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Sample records for acetate pma-stimulated neutrophils

  1. Roles of phospholipase D in phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated neutrophil respiratory burst.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tianhui; Liu, Zhaoxia; Shen, Xun

    2011-03-01

    The phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulated nutrophil respiratory burst has been considered to simply involve the activation of protein kinase C (PKC). However, the PLD activity was also increased by 10-fold in human neutrophils stimulated with 100 nM PMA. Unexpectedly, U73122, an inhibitor of phospholipase C, was found to significantly inhibit PMA-stimulated respiratory burst in human neutrophils. U73122 at the concentrations, which were sufficient to inhibit the respiratory burst completely, caused partial inhibition of the PLD activity but no inhibition on PKC translocation and activation, suggesting that PLD activity is also required in PMA-stimulated respiratory burst. Using 1-butanol, a PLD substrate, to block phosphatidic acid (PA) generation, the PMA-stimulated neutrophil respiratory burst was also partially inhibited, further indicating that PLD activation, possibly its hydrolytic product PA and diacylglycerol (DAG), is involved in PMA-stimulated respiratory burst. Since GF109203X, an inhibitor of PKC that could completely inhibit the respiratory burst in PMA-stimulated neutrophils, also caused certain suppression of PLD activation, it may suggest that PLD activation in PMA-stimulated neutrophils might be, to some extent, PKC dependent. To further study whether PLD contributes to the PMA stimulated respiratory burst through itself or its hydrolytic product, 1,2-dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol, an analogue of DAG , was used to prime cells at low concentration, and it reversed the inhibition of PMA-stimulated respiratory burst by U73122. The results indicate that U73122 may act as an inhibitor of PLD, and PLD activation is required in PMA-stimulated respiratory burst.

  2. Evaluation of Antiradical and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Ethyl Acetate and Butanolic Subfractions of Agelanthus dodoneifolius (DC.) Polhill & Wiens (Loranthaceae) Using Equine Myeloperoxidase and Both PMA-Activated Neutrophils and HL-60 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boly, Rainatou; Franck, Thierry; Kohnen, Stephan; Lompo, Marius; Guissou, Innocent Pierre; Dubois, Jacques; Serteyn, Didier; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange

    2015-01-01

    The ethyl acetate and n-butanolic subfractions of Agelanthus dodoneifolius were investigated for their antioxidant and antimyeloperoxidase (MPO) activities. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was assessed by lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) and dichlorofluorescein- (DCF-) induced fluorescence techniques from phorbol myristate acetate- (PMA-) stimulated equine neutrophils and human myeloid cell line HL-60, respectively. In parallel, the effects of the tested subfractions were evaluated on the total MPO release by stimulated neutrophils and on the specific MPO activity by means of immunological assays. The results showed the potent activity of the butanolic subfraction, at least in respect of the chemiluminescence test (IC50 = 0.3 ± 0.1 µg/mL) and the ELISA and SIEFED assays (IC50 = 2.8 ± 1.2 µg/mL and 1.3 ± 1.0 µg/mL), respectively. However, the ethyl acetate subfraction was found to be the most potent in the DCF assay as at the highest concentration, DCF fluorescence intensity decreases of about 50%. Moreover, we demonstrated that the ethyl acetate subfraction was rich in catechin (16.51%) while it was not easy to identify the main compounds in the butanolic subfraction using the UPLC-MS/MS technique. Nevertheless, taken together, our results provide evidence that Agelanthus dodoneifolius subfractions may represent potential sources of natural antioxidants and of antimyeloperoxidase compounds. PMID:25821497

  3. Phorbol myristate acetate receptors in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Nishihira, J.; O'Flaherty, J.T.

    1985-11-01

    Resting or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-pretreated neutrophils were disrupted by nitrogen cavitation and were fractionated on Percoll density gradients to identify the subcellular location of PMA receptors. Receptors were found in the cytoplasm of resting cells; neither primary nor secondary granules bound (/sup 3/H)PMA, and the few binding sites located in non-granule membrane fractions appeared to reflect cytosolic contamination. Contrastingly, PMA-pretreated cells lost cytosolic receptors; > 80% of PMA-binding sites were associated with non-granule membranes. Protein kinase C activity similarly shifted from cytosol to membranes after PMA treatment. Indeed, protein kinase C and PMA receptors co-sedimented on Percoll gradients, co-eluted from Ultragel AcA 44 columns loaded with neutrophil cytoplasm, and were identically influenced by various phospholipids. Finally, PMA, mezerein, diacylglycerol, and dialkylglycerol activated protein kinase C with potencies that paralleled their respective abilities to stimulate neutrophil aggregation responses and inhibit (/sup 3/H)PMA binding to whole cells or cytosol. These results fit a model of stimulus-response coupling wherein exogenous PMA or endogenous diacylglycerol solvate in cellular membranes. Cytosolic protein kinase C binds to the intramembranous ligand, forming an active, membrane-associated complex that phosphorylates nearby elements involved in triggering aggregation and other responses.

  4. Enhancement of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte adherence to plastic and endothelium by phorbol myristate acetate. Comparison with human C5a.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, R. O.; Wysolmerski, R. B.; Lagunoff, D.

    1986-01-01

    The adherence of circulating neutrophils to vascular endothelium represents a necessary step in the chemotactic emigration of neutrophils to extravascular inflammatory sites. Studies of neutrophil adherence induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) were undertaken to determine the ability of a nonchemotactic neutrophil stimulus to provoke increased adherence. The authors found that the adherence of human neutrophils to plastic surfaces or confluent monolayers of endothelial cells is enhanced in a concentration-dependent fashion by exposure of neutrophils to PMA. The effect of PMA concentration (0.1-5.0 ng/ml) on increased neutrophil adherence parallels that observed for superoxide anion generation and release of lysosomal enzymes from specific granules. Whereas complement C5a-treated neutrophils exhibited a fourfold to fivefold increase in adherence to endothelial cells, PMA-treated neutrophils showed a 10-fold to 20-fold increase. The ability of PMA to cause increased neutrophil adherence to endothelium appeared to be directed primarily at the neutrophil. Pretreatment of neutrophils with PMA was as effective as coincubation in causing increased adherence to plastic surfaces or confluent cultured endothelial cells, but pretreatment of endothelial cells with PMA failed to promote neutrophil adherence. Alteration of neutrophil cytoskeletal structures by cytochalasin B treatment did not prevent subsequent PMA-stimulated neutrophil adherence. These results demonstrate that increased neutrophil adherence to surfaces can be induced by a nonchemotactic stimulus and that neutrophil adherence is independent of organized microfilaments. Images Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:3789092

  5. Stimulus specific effect of ibuprofen on chemiluminescence of sheep neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Tahamont, M.V.; Margiotta, M.; Gee, M.H.

    1986-03-05

    The authors have shown that pretreatment with ibuprofen inhibits free radical release from complement stimulated neutrophils. To further examine the effect of ibuprofen on neutrophil free radical release, they stimulated neutrophils with the synthetic peptide, FMLP, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), or zymosan-activated plasma (ZAP). Pure (>95%), viable (>95%) sheep neutrophils (2 x 10/sup 6/) were placed in HEPES buffer, luminol, drug or vehicle and stimulated in the luminometer with one of the stimuli. The chemiluminescence (CL) response was recorded and the drug treated samples were compared to vehicle treated controls. Ibuprofen had a dose dependent effect on CL in ZAP stimulated neutrophils. At the highest dose (10/sup -2/M) these cells produced only 37 +/- 7% of the CL response observed in the control cells. In contrast, at the same dose, ibuprofen did not significantly attenuate CL seen in FMLP stimulated cells, with these cells producing 79 +/- 7% of the control cells; nor did ibuprofen effect PMA stimulated CL, as these cells produced a CL response that was 85 +/- 8% of the control cells. Ibuprofen appears to have a stimulus specific effect on free radical release in activated neutrophils. It is also apparent that ibuprofen inhibits complement stimulated free radical release by some mechanism independent of its cyclooxygenase inhibitory effect.

  6. 12-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (PMA) produces injury to isolated rat lungs in the presence and absence of perfused neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, L.J.; Roth, R.A.

    1986-03-01

    PMA produced injury to isolated, perfused rat lungs when eutrophils were added to or omitted from the buffer/albumin perfusion medium. When a high dose of PMA (57 ng/ml) was added to medium devoid of added neutrophils, perfusion pressure and lung weight increased. Together, superoxide dismutase (500 U/ml) and catalase (400 U/ml) had no effect on the increases in lung weight or perfusion pressure. However, papaverine (0.5 mM) prevented both the increase in perfusion pressure and fluid accumulation. When a concentration of PMA (14 ng/ml) that did not by itself cause lungs to accumulate fluid was added to perfusion medium containing neutrophils (1 x 10/sup 8/), perfusion pressures increased and lungs accumulated fluid. This concentration of PMA stimulated neutrophils (1 x 10/sup 8/) to release superoxide. Addition of superoxide dismutase (500 U/ml) and catalase (400 U/ml) to this medium prevented the increase in lung weight, but not the increase in perfusion pressure. Papaverine (0.5 mM) attenuated the increase in perfusion pressure and prevented fluid accumulation in these lungs. In summary, high concentrations of PMA produce lung injury which is independent of oxygen radicals; at lower concentrations it produces injury which is neutrophil-dependent and mediated by oxygen radicals.

  7. Differential Use of Human Neutrophil Fcγ Receptors for Inducing Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation

    PubMed Central

    Alemán, Omar Rafael; Mora, Nancy; Cortes-Vieyra, Ricarda; Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils (PMN) are the most abundant leukocytes in the blood. PMN migrate from the circulation to sites of infection, where they are responsible for antimicrobial functions. PMN use phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to kill microbes. NETs are fibers composed of chromatin and neutrophil-granule proteins. Several pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and parasites, and also some pharmacological stimuli such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) are efficient inducers of NETs. Antigen-antibody complexes are also capable of inducing NET formation. However the particular Fcγ receptor involved in triggering this function is a matter of controversy. In order to provide some insight into what Fcγ receptor is responsible for NET formation, each of the two human Fcγ receptors was stimulated individually by specific monoclonal antibodies and NET formation was evaluated. FcγRIIa cross-linking did not promote NET formation. Cross-linking other receptors such as integrins also did not promote NET formation. In contrast FcγRIIIb cross-linking induced NET formation similarly to PMA stimulation. NET formation was dependent on NADPH-oxidase, PKC, and ERK activation. These data show that cross-linking FcγRIIIb is responsible for NET formation by the human neutrophil. PMID:27034964

  8. Achyrocline satureioides (Lam.) D.C. Hydroalcoholic Extract Inhibits Neutrophil Functions Related to Innate Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Barioni, Eric Diego; Machado, Isabel Daufenback; Rodrigues, Stephen Fernandes de Paula; Ferraz-de-Paula, Viviane; Wagner, Theodoro Marcel; Cogliati, Bruno; Corrêa dos Santos, Matheus; Machado, Marina da Silva; de Andrade, Sérgio Faloni; Niero, Rivaldo; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli

    2013-01-01

    Achyrocline satureioides (Lam.) D.C. is a herb native to South America, and its inflorescences are popularly employed to treat inflammatory diseases. Here, the effects of the in vivo actions of the hydroalcoholic extract obtained from inflorescences of A. satureioides on neutrophil trafficking into inflamed tissue were investigated. Male Wistar rats were orally treated with A. satureioides extract, and inflammation was induced one hour later by lipopolysaccharide injection into the subcutaneous tissue. The number of leukocytes and the amount of chemotactic mediators were quantified in the inflammatory exudate, and adhesion molecule and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) expressions and phorbol-myristate-acetate- (PMA-) stimulated oxidative burst were quantified in circulating neutrophils. Leukocyte-endothelial interactions were quantified in the mesentery tissue. Enzymes and tissue morphology of the liver and kidney were evaluated. Treatment with A. satureioides extract reduced neutrophil influx and secretion of leukotriene B4 and CINC-1 in the exudates, the number of rolling and adhered leukocytes in the mesentery postcapillary venules, neutrophil L-selectin, β2-integrin and TLR-4 expression, and oxidative burst, but did not cause an alteration in the morphology and activities of liver and kidney. Together, the data show that A. satureioides extract inhibits neutrophil functions related to the innate response and does not cause systemic toxicity. PMID:23476704

  9. Achyrocline satureioides (Lam.) D.C. Hydroalcoholic Extract Inhibits Neutrophil Functions Related to Innate Host Defense.

    PubMed

    Barioni, Eric Diego; Santin, José Roberto; Machado, Isabel Daufenback; Rodrigues, Stephen Fernandes de Paula; Ferraz-de-Paula, Viviane; Wagner, Theodoro Marcel; Cogliati, Bruno; Corrêa Dos Santos, Matheus; Machado, Marina da Silva; de Andrade, Sérgio Faloni; Niero, Rivaldo; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli

    2013-01-01

    Achyrocline satureioides (Lam.) D.C. is a herb native to South America, and its inflorescences are popularly employed to treat inflammatory diseases. Here, the effects of the in vivo actions of the hydroalcoholic extract obtained from inflorescences of A. satureioides on neutrophil trafficking into inflamed tissue were investigated. Male Wistar rats were orally treated with A. satureioides extract, and inflammation was induced one hour later by lipopolysaccharide injection into the subcutaneous tissue. The number of leukocytes and the amount of chemotactic mediators were quantified in the inflammatory exudate, and adhesion molecule and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) expressions and phorbol-myristate-acetate- (PMA-) stimulated oxidative burst were quantified in circulating neutrophils. Leukocyte-endothelial interactions were quantified in the mesentery tissue. Enzymes and tissue morphology of the liver and kidney were evaluated. Treatment with A. satureioides extract reduced neutrophil influx and secretion of leukotriene B4 and CINC-1 in the exudates, the number of rolling and adhered leukocytes in the mesentery postcapillary venules, neutrophil L-selectin, β 2-integrin and TLR-4 expression, and oxidative burst, but did not cause an alteration in the morphology and activities of liver and kidney. Together, the data show that A. satureioides extract inhibits neutrophil functions related to the innate response and does not cause systemic toxicity.

  10. An aqueous pomegranate peel extract inhibits neutrophil myeloperoxidase in vitro and attenuates lung inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Bachoual, Rafik; Talmoudi, Wifak; Boussetta, Tarek; Braut, Françoise; El-Benna, Jamel

    2011-06-01

    Punica granatum peel aqueous extract (PGE) is widely used to treat disorders such as inflammation, ulcers and infections, but its pharmacological target is not known. In this study we investigated the effect of PGE on human neutrophil reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in vitro and on LPS-induced lung inflammation in vivo in mice. Neutrophils were isolated and ROS generation was measured by luminol-amplified chemiluminescence. Superoxide anion generation was detected by the cytochrome c reduction assay. H(2)O(2) was detected by DCFH fluorescence assay. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was measured by the tetramethyl benzidine oxidation method. Lung inflammation was induced in mice by LPS instillation. PGE inhibited luminol-amplified chemiluminescence of resting neutrophils and N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLF)- or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated neutrophils, in a concentration-dependent manner. PGE had no effect on superoxide anion generation, suggesting that it does not directly inhibit NADPH oxidase activity or activation pathways, or scavenge superoxide anions. PGE did not scavenge H(2)O(2) but directly inhibited myeloperoxidase activity in vitro. In vivo studies showed that PGE also attenuated LPS-induced lung inflammation in mice. So this study reveals that PGE inhibits neutrophil MPO activity and attenuates LPS-induced lung inflammation in mice. Inhibition of MPO activity by PGE could explain its anti-inflammatory action. PMID:21376769

  11. An aqueous pomegranate peel extract inhibits neutrophil myeloperoxidase in vitro and attenuates lung inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Bachoual, Rafik; Talmoudi, Wifak; Boussetta, Tarek; Braut, Françoise; El-Benna, Jamel

    2011-06-01

    Punica granatum peel aqueous extract (PGE) is widely used to treat disorders such as inflammation, ulcers and infections, but its pharmacological target is not known. In this study we investigated the effect of PGE on human neutrophil reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in vitro and on LPS-induced lung inflammation in vivo in mice. Neutrophils were isolated and ROS generation was measured by luminol-amplified chemiluminescence. Superoxide anion generation was detected by the cytochrome c reduction assay. H(2)O(2) was detected by DCFH fluorescence assay. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was measured by the tetramethyl benzidine oxidation method. Lung inflammation was induced in mice by LPS instillation. PGE inhibited luminol-amplified chemiluminescence of resting neutrophils and N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLF)- or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated neutrophils, in a concentration-dependent manner. PGE had no effect on superoxide anion generation, suggesting that it does not directly inhibit NADPH oxidase activity or activation pathways, or scavenge superoxide anions. PGE did not scavenge H(2)O(2) but directly inhibited myeloperoxidase activity in vitro. In vivo studies showed that PGE also attenuated LPS-induced lung inflammation in mice. So this study reveals that PGE inhibits neutrophil MPO activity and attenuates LPS-induced lung inflammation in mice. Inhibition of MPO activity by PGE could explain its anti-inflammatory action.

  12. The effect of electromagnetic field on reactive oxygen species production in human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Poniedzialek, Barbara; Rzymski, Piotr; Nawrocka-Bogusz, Honorata; Jaroszyk, Feliks; Wiktorowicz, Krzysztof

    2013-09-01

    The present study was undertaken in order to determine the effect of low frequency electromagnetic field (EMF) on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human neutrophils in peripheral blood in vitro. We investigated how differently generated EMF and several levels of magnetic induction affect ROS production. To evaluate the level of ROS production, two fluorescent dyes were used: 2'7'-dichlorofluorscein-diacetate and dihydrorhodamine. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), known as strong stimulator of the respiratory burst, was also used. Alternating magnetic field was generated by means of Viofor JPS apparatus. Three different levels of magnetic induction have been analyzed (10, 40 and 60 μT). Fluorescence of dichlorofluorescein and 123 rhodamine was measured by flow cytometry. The experiments demonstrated that only EMF tuned to the calcium ion cyclotron resonance frequency was able to affect ROS production in neutrophils. Statistical analysis showed that this effect depended on magnetic induction value of applied EMF. Incubation in EMF inhibited cell activity slightly in unstimulated neutrophils, whereas the activity of PMA-stimulated neutrophils has increased after incubation in EMF.

  13. [Perfluorocarbon emulsions and other corpuscular systems influence on neutrophil activity].

    PubMed

    Shekhtman, D G; Safronova, V G; Sklifas, A N; Alovskaia, A A; Gapeev, A B; Obraztsov, V V; Chemeris, N K

    1997-01-01

    Influence of perfluorodecalin, perfluoromethilcyclohexylpiperidine, perfluorotributylamine emulsions on active oxygen form (AOF) generation by neutrophils has been studied. All investigated emulsions stabilized both proxanol 268 and egg yolk phospholipids inhibited PMA-stimulated neutrophil activity. Castor oil emulsion also inhibited the neutrophil activity. Neutrophil response for chemotactic peptide, was unchanged in the presence of all tested emulsions. We suppose that fast hydrophobic attachment of inert submicrone emulsion particles to cell surface provokes alteration of neutrophil plasma membrane function resulting in a decrease of AOF generation. PMID:9490112

  14. Effect of post-exercise protein-leucine feeding on neutrophil function, immunomodulatory plasma metabolites and cortisol during a 6-day block of intense cycling.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Andre R; Jackson, Lara; Clarke, Jim; Stellingwerff, Trent; Broadbent, Suzanne; Rowlands, David S

    2013-09-01

    Whey protein and leucine ingestion following exercise increases muscle protein synthesis and could influence neutrophil function during recovery from prolonged intense exercise. We examined the effects of whey protein and leucine ingestion post-exercise on neutrophil function and immunomodulators during a period of intense cycling. In a randomized double-blind crossover, 12 male cyclists ingested protein/leucine/carbohydrate/fat (LEUPRO 20/7.5/89/22 g h(-1), respectively) or isocaloric carbohydrate/fat control (CON 119/22 g h(-1)) beverages for 1-3 h post-exercise during 6 days of high-intensity training. Blood was taken pre- and post-exercise on days 1, 2, 4 and 6 for phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated neutrophil superoxide (O2 (-)) production, immune cell counts, amino acid and lipid metabolism via metabolomics, hormones (cortisol, testosterone) and cytokines (interleukin-6, interleukin-10). During recovery on day 1, LEUPRO ingestion increased mean concentrations of plasma amino acids (glycine, arginine, glutamine, leucine) and myristic acid metabolites (acylcarnitines C14, myristoylcarnitine; and C14:1-OH, hydroxymyristoleylcarnitine) with neutrophil priming capacity, and reduced neutrophil O2 production (15-17 mmol O2 (-) cell(-1) ± 90 % confidence limits 20 mmol O2 (-) cell(-1)). On day 2, LEUPRO increased pre-exercise plasma volume (6.6 ± 3.8 %) but haematological effects were trivial. LEUPRO supplementation did not substantially alter neutrophil elastase, testosterone, or cytokine concentrations. By day 6, however, LEUPRO reduced pre-exercise cortisol 21 % (±15 %) and acylcarnitine C16 (palmitoylcarnitine) during exercise, and increased post-exercise neutrophil O2 (-) (33 ± 20 mmol O2 (-) cell(-1)), relative to control. Altered plasma amino acid and acylcarnitine concentrations with protein-leucine feeding might partly explain the acute post-exercise reduction in neutrophil function and increased exercise-stimulated neutrophil oxidative burst on

  15. Effect of post-exercise protein-leucine feeding on neutrophil function, immunomodulatory plasma metabolites and cortisol during a 6-day block of intense cycling.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Andre R; Jackson, Lara; Clarke, Jim; Stellingwerff, Trent; Broadbent, Suzanne; Rowlands, David S

    2013-09-01

    Whey protein and leucine ingestion following exercise increases muscle protein synthesis and could influence neutrophil function during recovery from prolonged intense exercise. We examined the effects of whey protein and leucine ingestion post-exercise on neutrophil function and immunomodulators during a period of intense cycling. In a randomized double-blind crossover, 12 male cyclists ingested protein/leucine/carbohydrate/fat (LEUPRO 20/7.5/89/22 g h(-1), respectively) or isocaloric carbohydrate/fat control (CON 119/22 g h(-1)) beverages for 1-3 h post-exercise during 6 days of high-intensity training. Blood was taken pre- and post-exercise on days 1, 2, 4 and 6 for phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated neutrophil superoxide (O2 (-)) production, immune cell counts, amino acid and lipid metabolism via metabolomics, hormones (cortisol, testosterone) and cytokines (interleukin-6, interleukin-10). During recovery on day 1, LEUPRO ingestion increased mean concentrations of plasma amino acids (glycine, arginine, glutamine, leucine) and myristic acid metabolites (acylcarnitines C14, myristoylcarnitine; and C14:1-OH, hydroxymyristoleylcarnitine) with neutrophil priming capacity, and reduced neutrophil O2 production (15-17 mmol O2 (-) cell(-1) ± 90 % confidence limits 20 mmol O2 (-) cell(-1)). On day 2, LEUPRO increased pre-exercise plasma volume (6.6 ± 3.8 %) but haematological effects were trivial. LEUPRO supplementation did not substantially alter neutrophil elastase, testosterone, or cytokine concentrations. By day 6, however, LEUPRO reduced pre-exercise cortisol 21 % (±15 %) and acylcarnitine C16 (palmitoylcarnitine) during exercise, and increased post-exercise neutrophil O2 (-) (33 ± 20 mmol O2 (-) cell(-1)), relative to control. Altered plasma amino acid and acylcarnitine concentrations with protein-leucine feeding might partly explain the acute post-exercise reduction in neutrophil function and increased exercise-stimulated neutrophil oxidative burst on

  16. Effective NET formation in neutrophils from individuals with G6PD Taiwan-Hakka is associated with enhanced NADP(+) biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, M L; Ho, H Y; Lin, H Y; Lai, Y C; Chiu, D T Y

    2013-09-01

    In response to infection, neutrophils employ various strategies to defend against the invading microbes. One of such defense mechanisms is the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Recent studies suggest that reactive oxygen species is a signal critical to NET formation. This prompts us to examine whether neutrophils from individuals with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) Taiwan-Hakka variant, which are prone to oxidative stress generation, have altered ability to form NET. We adopted an image-based method to study the NET formation potential in neutrophils from G6PD-deficient patients. Neutrophils from either normal or G6PD-deficient individuals underwent NETosis in response to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). The extent of NETosis in the former did not significantly differ from that of the latter. Diphenyleneiodonium sulfate (DPI) and 3-methyladenine (MA) inhibited PMA-stimulated NET formation in these cells, suggesting the involvement of NADPH oxidase and autophagy in the process. Glucose oxidase (GO) and xanthine oxidase/xanthine (XO/X) could induce a similar extent of NET formation in normal and G6PD-deficient neutrophils. GO- or XO-induced NETosis was not inhibitable by MA, implying that reactive oxygen species (ROS) can act as an independent signal for activation of NETosis. Mechanistically, enhanced superoxide production in neutrophils was associated with increases in levels of NAD(+) and NADP(+), as well as activation of NAD(+) kinase. Taken together, these findings suggest that G6PD-deficient neutrophils are as equally efficient as normal cells in NET formation, and their deficiency in G6PD-associated NADPH regeneration capacity is largely compensated for by nicotinamide nucleotide biosynthesis.

  17. Modulation of human neutrophil oxidative metabolism and degranulation by extract of Tamarindus indica L. fruit pulp.

    PubMed

    Paula, Fabiana S; Kabeya, Luciana M; Kanashiro, Alexandre; de Figueiredo, Andréa S G; Azzolini, Ana Elisa C S; Uyemura, Sérgio A; Lucisano-Valim, Yara Maria

    2009-01-01

    The tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) is indigenous to Asian countries and widely cultivated in the American continents. The tamarind fruit pulp extract (ExT), traditionally used in spices, food components and juices, is rich in polyphenols that have demonstrated anti-atherosclerotic, antioxidant and immunomodulatory activities. This study evaluated the modulator effect of a crude hydroalcoholic ExT on some peripheral human neutrophil functions. The neutrophil reactive oxygen species generation, triggered by opsonized zymosan (OZ), n-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), and assessed by luminol- and lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (LumCL and LucCL, respectively), was inhibited by ExT in a concentration-dependent manner. ExT was a more effective inhibitor of the PMA-stimulated neutrophil function [IC50 (in microg/10(6)cells)=115.7+/-9.7 (LumCL) and 174.5+/-25.9 (LucCL)], than the OZ- [IC50=248.5+/-23.1 (LumCL) and 324.1+/-34.6 (LucCL)] or fMLP-stimulated cells [IC50=178.5+/-12.2 (LumCL)]. The ExT also inhibited neutrophil NADPH oxidase activity (evaluated by O2 consumption), degranulation and elastase activity (evaluated by spectrophotometric methods) at concentrations higher than 200 microg/10(6)cells, without being toxic to the cells, under the conditions assessed. Together, these results indicate the potential of ExT as a source of compounds that can modulate the neutrophil-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  18. Modulation of human neutrophil oxidative metabolism and degranulation by extract of Tamarindus indica L. fruit pulp.

    PubMed

    Paula, Fabiana S; Kabeya, Luciana M; Kanashiro, Alexandre; de Figueiredo, Andréa S G; Azzolini, Ana Elisa C S; Uyemura, Sérgio A; Lucisano-Valim, Yara Maria

    2009-01-01

    The tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) is indigenous to Asian countries and widely cultivated in the American continents. The tamarind fruit pulp extract (ExT), traditionally used in spices, food components and juices, is rich in polyphenols that have demonstrated anti-atherosclerotic, antioxidant and immunomodulatory activities. This study evaluated the modulator effect of a crude hydroalcoholic ExT on some peripheral human neutrophil functions. The neutrophil reactive oxygen species generation, triggered by opsonized zymosan (OZ), n-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), and assessed by luminol- and lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (LumCL and LucCL, respectively), was inhibited by ExT in a concentration-dependent manner. ExT was a more effective inhibitor of the PMA-stimulated neutrophil function [IC50 (in microg/10(6)cells)=115.7+/-9.7 (LumCL) and 174.5+/-25.9 (LucCL)], than the OZ- [IC50=248.5+/-23.1 (LumCL) and 324.1+/-34.6 (LucCL)] or fMLP-stimulated cells [IC50=178.5+/-12.2 (LumCL)]. The ExT also inhibited neutrophil NADPH oxidase activity (evaluated by O2 consumption), degranulation and elastase activity (evaluated by spectrophotometric methods) at concentrations higher than 200 microg/10(6)cells, without being toxic to the cells, under the conditions assessed. Together, these results indicate the potential of ExT as a source of compounds that can modulate the neutrophil-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:19022329

  19. Monoclonal antibodies to a particulate superoxide-forming system stimulate a respiratory burst in intact guinea pig neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Berton, G; Rosen, H; Ezekowitz, R A; Bellavite, P; Serra, M C; Rossi, F; Gordon, S

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal rat antibodies were produced against a subcellular preparation of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated guinea pig neutrophils that retains NADPH-oxidase activity. Two antibodies, 1A10.4 and IG4, were isolated that bind to a surface antigen restricted to guinea pig neutrophils from bone marrow and peritoneal exudate and to macrophages and that trigger a respiratory burst in neutrophils in the presence of cytochalasin B. Intact antibody 1A10.4, subclass IgG2c, can trigger superoxide anion release directly; F(ab')2 fragments of 1A10.4 and intact IG4 require further cross-linking by F(ab')2 fragments of anti-rat immunoglobulin antibody. Both antibodies recognize the same antigen, a proteolipid of apparent molecular mass 10 kDa. Immunoprecipitation of solubilized oxidase activity with 1A10.4 brings down this activity as part of a macromolecular complex. Surface expression of the antigen is increased on treatment of cells with both PMA and cytochalasin B. 1A10.4 also triggers release of the granule enzyme beta-glucuronidase. Triggering of a respiratory burst by the antibodies appears distinct from the PMA and fMet-Leu-Phe signalling systems. These studies indicate that the antigen defined by antibodies 1A10.4 and IG4 becomes associated with the superoxide anion-generating system of neutrophils but may play a more general role in signal transduction in phagocytic cells. Images PMID:3012541

  20. A Metabolic Shift toward Pentose Phosphate Pathway Is Necessary for Amyloid Fibril- and Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate-induced Neutrophil Extracellular Trap (NET) Formation.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Estefania P; Rochael, Natalia C; Guimarães-Costa, Anderson B; de Souza-Vieira, Thiago S; Ganilho, Juliana; Saraiva, Elvira M; Palhano, Fernando L; Foguel, Debora

    2015-09-01

    Neutrophils are the main defense cells of the innate immune system. Upon stimulation, neutrophils release their chromosomal DNA to trap and kill microorganisms and inhibit their dissemination. These chromatin traps are termed neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and are decorated with granular and cytoplasm proteins. NET release can be induced by several microorganism membrane components, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate as well as by amyloid fibrils, insoluble proteinaceous molecules associated with more than 40 different pathologies among other stimuli. The intracellular signaling involved in NET formation is complex and remains unclear for most tested stimuli. Herein we demonstrate that a metabolic shift toward the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is necessary for NET release because glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), an important enzyme from PPP, fuels NADPH oxidase with NADPH to produce superoxide and thus induce NETs. In addition, we observed that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, which are NADPH-independent, are not effective in producing NETs. These data shed new light on how the PPP and glucose metabolism contributes to NET formation.

  1. A Metabolic Shift toward Pentose Phosphate Pathway Is Necessary for Amyloid Fibril- and Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate-induced Neutrophil Extracellular Trap (NET) Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Estefania P.; Rochael, Natalia C.; Guimarães-Costa, Anderson B.; de Souza-Vieira, Thiago S.; Ganilho, Juliana; Saraiva, Elvira M.; Palhano, Fernando L.; Foguel, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are the main defense cells of the innate immune system. Upon stimulation, neutrophils release their chromosomal DNA to trap and kill microorganisms and inhibit their dissemination. These chromatin traps are termed neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and are decorated with granular and cytoplasm proteins. NET release can be induced by several microorganism membrane components, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate as well as by amyloid fibrils, insoluble proteinaceous molecules associated with more than 40 different pathologies among other stimuli. The intracellular signaling involved in NET formation is complex and remains unclear for most tested stimuli. Herein we demonstrate that a metabolic shift toward the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is necessary for NET release because glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), an important enzyme from PPP, fuels NADPH oxidase with NADPH to produce superoxide and thus induce NETs. In addition, we observed that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, which are NADPH-independent, are not effective in producing NETs. These data shed new light on how the PPP and glucose metabolism contributes to NET formation. PMID:26198639

  2. Mitochondrial DNA released by trauma induces neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Itagaki, Kiyoshi; Kaczmarek, Elzbieta; Lee, Yen Ting; Tang, I Tien; Isal, Burak; Adibnia, Yashar; Sandler, Nicola; Grimm, Melissa J; Segal, Brahm H; Otterbein, Leo E; Hauser, Carl J

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are critical for anti-bacterial activity of the innate immune system. We have previously shown that mitochondrial damage-associated molecular patterns (mtDAMPs), including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), are released into the circulation after injury. We therefore questioned whether mtDNA is involved in trauma-induced NET formation. Treatment of human polymorphoneutrophils (PMN) with mtDNA induced robust NET formation, though in contrast to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation, no NADPH-oxidase involvement was required. Moreover, formation of mtDNA-induced NETs was completely blocked by TLR9 antagonist, ODN-TTAGGG. Knowing that infective outcomes of trauma in elderly people are more severe than in young people, we measured plasma mtDNA and NET formation in elderly and young trauma patients and control subjects. MtDNA levels were significantly higher in the plasma of elderly trauma patients than young patients, despite lower injury severity scores in the elderly group. NETs were not visible in circulating PMN isolated from either young or old control subjects. NETs were however, detected in PMN isolated from young trauma patients and to a lesser extent from elderly patients. Stimulation by PMA induced widespread NET formation in PMN from both young volunteers and young trauma patients. NET response to PMA was much less pronounced in both elderly volunteers' PMN and in trauma patients' PMN. We conclude that mtDNA is a potent inducer of NETs that activates PMN via TLR9 without NADPH-oxidase involvement. We suggest that decreased NET formation in the elderly regardless of higher mtDNA levels in their plasma may result from decreased levels of TLR9 and/or other molecules, such as neutrophil elastase and myeloperoxidase that are involved in NET generation. Further study of the links between circulating mtDNA and NET formation may elucidate the mechanisms of trauma-related organ failure as well as the greater susceptibility to

  3. Metabolic requirements for neutrophil extracellular traps formation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Espinosa, Oscar; Rojas-Espinosa, Oscar; Moreno-Altamirano, María Maximina Bertha; López-Villegas, Edgar Oliver; Sánchez-García, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    As part of the innate immune response, neutrophils are at the forefront of defence against infection, resolution of inflammation and wound healing. They are the most abundant leucocytes in the peripheral blood, have a short lifespan and an estimated turnover of 1010 to 1011 cells per day. Neutrophils efficiently clear microbial infections by phagocytosis and by oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent mechanisms. In 2004, a new neutrophil anti-microbial mechanism was described, the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) composed of DNA, histones and anti-microbial peptides. Several microorganisms, bacterial products, as well as pharmacological stimuli such as PMA, were shown to induce NETs. Neutrophils contain relatively few mitochondria, and derive most of their energy from glycolysis. In this scenario we aimed to analyse some of the metabolic requirements for NET formation. Here it is shown that NETs formation is strictly dependent on glucose and to a lesser extent on glutamine, that Glut-1, glucose uptake, and glycolysis rate increase upon PMA stimulation, and that NET formation is inhibited by the glycolysis inhibitor, 2-deoxy-glucose, and to a lesser extent by the ATP synthase inhibitor oligomycin. Moreover, when neutrophils were exposed to PMA in glucose-free medium for 3 hr, they lost their characteristic polymorphic nuclei but did not release NETs. However, if glucose (but not pyruvate) was added at this time, NET release took place within minutes, suggesting that NET formation could be metabolically divided into two phases; the first, independent from exogenous glucose (chromatin decondensation) and, the second (NET release), strictly dependent on exogenous glucose and glycolysis. PMID:25545227

  4. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in WIL2-NS cells: a sensitive system to detect chromosomal damage induced by reactive oxygen species and activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Umegaki, K; Fenech, M

    2000-05-01

    We have developed a method that can detect the DNA-damaging and cytotoxic effects of physiological levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activated human neutrophils. This was achieved using WIL2-NS cells, a human B lymphoblastoid cell line, as target cells and the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay. With this method, we observed a 4- and a 30-fold increase in the frequency of micronucleated binucleated cells (MNed BNC) when cells were exposed to 10 and 30 microM hydrogen peroxide, for 1 h, respectively. A dose-dependent increase in the frequency of MNed BNC was also detected when cells were exposed to hypoxanthine (HX)/xanthine oxidase (XO), a superoxide generating system: a 50-fold increase in the frequency of MNed BNC was observed at the highest XO dose (12.5 mU/ml). In this CBMN assay, nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) in BNC and necrotic cells were also readily detected, especially at the higher exposure doses of hydrogen peroxide or HX/XO. When WIL2-NS cells were exposed to neutrophils stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate acetate (PMA) for 1 h, the frequencies of MNed BNC in WIL2-NS cells increased in a dose-dependent manner (30-fold increase at 100 nM PMA) and with an increasing neutrophil:WIL2-NS co-culture ratio. The frequencies of MNed BNC were closely related to the production of ROS, especially hydrogen peroxide, by the neutrophils. Differentiated HL60 cells (DMSO-treated HL60) also produced ROS in response to PMA. In this case, we used a 'Transwell' system to expose WIL2-NS cells to DMSO-treated HL60 cells, because direct contact with DMSO-treated HL60 cells impaired cell division in WIL2-NS target cells. Exposure to PMA-stimulated DMSO-treated HL60 cells resulted in a PMA dose-dependent increase in the frequency of MNed BNC in WIL2-NS cells. MNed BNC frequencies were positively correlated with NPB (r = 0.61-0.93) and necrosis (r = 0.55-0.86) and negatively correlated with nuclear division index (r = -0.72 to -0. 91) in all of the above

  5. Peptidylarginine Deiminase Inhibitor Suppresses Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation and MPO-ANCA Production

    PubMed Central

    Kusunoki, Yoshihiro; Nakazawa, Daigo; Shida, Haruki; Hattanda, Fumihiko; Miyoshi, Arina; Masuda, Sakiko; Nishio, Saori; Tomaru, Utano; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Ishizu, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA)-associated vasculitis is a systemic small-vessel vasculitis, wherein, MPO-ANCA plays a critical role in the pathogenesis. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) released from activated neutrophils are composed of extracellular web-like DNA and antimicrobial proteins, including MPO. Diverse stimuli, such as phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and ligands of toll-like receptors (TLR), induce NETs. Although TLR-mediated NET formation can occur with preservation of living neutrophilic functions (called vital NETosis), PMA-stimulated neutrophils undergo cell death with NET formation (called suicidal NETosis). In the process of suicidal NETosis, histones are citrullinated by peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4). Since this step is necessary for decondensation of DNA, PAD4 plays a pivotal role in suicidal NETosis. Although NETs are essential for elimination of microorganisms, excessive formation of NETs has been suggested to be implicated in MPO-ANCA production. This study aimed to determine if pan-PAD inhibitors could suppress MPO-ANCA production in vivo. At first, NETs were induced in peripheral blood neutrophils derived from healthy donors (1 × 106/ml) by stimulation with 20 nM PMA with or without 20 μM propylthiouracil (PTU), an anti-thyroid drug. We then determined that the in vitro NET formation was inhibited completely by 200 μM Cl-amidine, a pan-PAD inhibitor. Next, we established mouse models with MPO-ANCA production. BALB/c mice were given intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of PMA (50 ng at days 0 and 7) and oral PTU (2.5 mg/day) for 2 weeks. These mice were divided into two groups; the first group was given daily i.p. injection of PBS (200 μl/day) (n = 13) and the other group with daily i.p. injection of Cl-amidine (0.3 mg/200 μl PBS/day) (n = 7). Two weeks later, citrullination as an indicator of NET formation in the peritoneum and serum MPO-ANCA titer was compared

  6. Demonstration of calcium-dependent phospholipase A2 activity in membrane preparation of rabbit neutrophils. Absence of activation by fMet-Leu-Phe, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and A-kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, T; Tao, W; Sha'afi, R I

    1988-01-01

    The presence of a phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity in rabbit neutrophil membrane preparation that is able to release [1-14C]oleic acid from labelled Escherichia coli has been demonstrated. The activity is critically dependent on the free calcium concentration and marginally stimulated by GTP gamma S. More than 80% of maximal activity is reached at 10 microM-Ca2+. The chemotactic factor, fMet-Leu-Phe, does not stimulate the PLA2 activity in this membrane preparation. Pretreatment of the membrane preparation, under various experimental conditions, or intact cells, before isolation of the membrane with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), does not affect PLA2 activity. Addition of the catalytic unit of cyclic AMP-dependent kinase to membrane preparation has no effect on PLA2 activity. Pretreatment of the intact neutrophil with dibutyryl-cAMP before isolation of the membrane produces a small but consistent increase in PLA2 activity. The activity of PLA2 in membrane isolated from cells treated with the protein kinase inhibitor 1-(5-isoquinolinesulphonyl)-2-methyl piperazine dihydrochloride (H-7) is significantly decreased. Furthermore, although the addition of PMA to intact rabbit neutrophils has no effect on the release of [3H]arachidonic acid from prelabelled cells, it potentiates significantly the release produced by the calcium ionophore A23187. This potentiation is not due to an inhibition of the acyltransferase activity. H-7 inhibits the basal release of arachidonic acid but does not inhibit the potentiation by PMA. These results suggest several points. (1) fMet-Leu-Phe does not stimulate PLA2 directly, and its ability to release arachidonic acid in intact neutrophils is mediated through its action on phospholipase C. (2) The potentiating effect of PMA on A23187-induced arachidonic acid release is most likely due to PMA affecting either the environment of PLA2 and/or altering the organization of membrane phospholipids in such a way as to increase their

  7. Selective loss of PMA-stimulated expression of matrix metalloproteinase 1 in HaCaT keratinocytes is correlated with the inability to induce mitogen-activated protein family kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Sudbeck, B D; Baumann, P; Ryan, G J; Breitkopf, K; Nischt, R; Krieg, T; Mauch, C

    1999-01-01

    Many cell types, including fibroblasts and primary keratinocytes, increase matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1) production in response to agonists such as growth factors and phorbol esters. However, the spontaneously transformed human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT, although it increases MMP-1 production in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF), does not respond similarly to stimulation with PMA. This phenomenon occurs even though HaCaT cells remain proliferatively responsive to both agonists, suggesting a HaCaT-specific defect in a PMA-mediated signal transduction pathway. Using an inside-out approach to elucidate the source of this defect, we found that EGF, but not PMA, stimulated MMP-1 promoter activity in transiently transfected HaCaT keratinocytes. In addition, an assessment of fibroblast and HaCaT c-fos and c-jun gene expression after exposure to EGF and PMA showed that although both agonists increased the expression of c-fos and c-jun mRNA in fibroblasts, only EGF did so in HaCaT keratinocytes. Finally, we looked at the activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) family kinases after stimulation with EGF or PMA and found that both agonists increased the phosphorylation and activation of fibroblast extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, but only EGF activated the same kinase activities in HaCaT cells. Further, the EGF-mediated increase in MMP-1 gene expression was inhibited by the MAP kinase/ERK kinase (MEK)-specific inhibitor PD98059 and the p38 kinase-specific inhibitor SB203580. Our evidence indicates that although HaCaT MAP kinases are functional, they are not properly regulated in response to the activation of protein kinase C, and that the defect that bars HaCaT MMP-1 expression in response to stimulation with PMA lies before MAP kinase activation. PMID:10085241

  8. Regulation of plasminogen activator in 3T3 cells: effect of phorbol myristate acetate on subcellular distribution and molecular weight

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The tumor promoter, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), stimulates plasminogen activator production and extracellular release in confluent Swiss 3T3 cells. Coordinated with the increased extracellular release is a redistribution of the activity into plasma membrane-enriched fractions and a shift in the predominant molecular weight species from 75,000 to 49,000 daltons. The evidence suggests that PMA induces the formation of the 49,000 dalton species which is preferentially located in plasma membrane-enriched fractions. PMID:7197280

  9. Transforming Growth Factor-β-Activated Kinase 1 Is Required for Human FcγRIIIb-Induced Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation.

    PubMed

    Alemán, Omar Rafael; Mora, Nancy; Cortes-Vieyra, Ricarda; Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils (PMNs) are the most abundant leukocytes in the blood. PMN migrates from the circulation to sites of infection where they are responsible for antimicrobial functions. PMN uses phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to kill microbes. Several stimuli, including bacteria, fungi, and parasites, and some pharmacological compounds, such as Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), are efficient inducers of NETs. Antigen-antibody complexes are also capable of inducing NET formation. Recently, it was reported that FcγRIIIb cross-linking induced NET formation similarly to PMA stimulation. Direct cross-linking of FcγRIIA or integrins did not promote NET formation. FcγRIIIb-induced NET formation presented different kinetics from PMA-induced NET formation, suggesting differences in signaling. Because FcγRIIIb also induces a strong activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor Elk-1, and the transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) has recently been implicated in ERK signaling, in the present report, we explored the role of TAK1 in the signaling pathway activated by FcγRIIIb leading to NET formation. FcγRIIIb was stimulated by specific monoclonal antibodies, and NET formation was evaluated in the presence or absence of pharmacological inhibitors. The antibiotic LL Z1640-2, a selective inhibitor of TAK1 prevented FcγRIIIb-induced, but not PMA-induced NET formation. Both PMA and FcγRIIIb cross-linking induced phosphorylation of ERK. But, LL Z1640-2 only inhibited the FcγRIIIb-mediated activation of ERK. Also, only FcγRIIIb, similarly to transforming growth factor-β-induced TAK1 phosphorylation. A MEK (ERK kinase)-specific inhibitor was able to prevent ERK phosphorylation induced by both PMA and FcγRIIIb. These data show for the first time that FcγRIIIb cross-linking activates TAK1, and that this kinase is required for triggering the MEK/ERK signaling pathway to NETosis

  10. Transforming Growth Factor-β-Activated Kinase 1 Is Required for Human FcγRIIIb-Induced Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation

    PubMed Central

    Alemán, Omar Rafael; Mora, Nancy; Cortes-Vieyra, Ricarda; Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils (PMNs) are the most abundant leukocytes in the blood. PMN migrates from the circulation to sites of infection where they are responsible for antimicrobial functions. PMN uses phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to kill microbes. Several stimuli, including bacteria, fungi, and parasites, and some pharmacological compounds, such as Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), are efficient inducers of NETs. Antigen–antibody complexes are also capable of inducing NET formation. Recently, it was reported that FcγRIIIb cross-linking induced NET formation similarly to PMA stimulation. Direct cross-linking of FcγRIIA or integrins did not promote NET formation. FcγRIIIb-induced NET formation presented different kinetics from PMA-induced NET formation, suggesting differences in signaling. Because FcγRIIIb also induces a strong activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor Elk-1, and the transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) has recently been implicated in ERK signaling, in the present report, we explored the role of TAK1 in the signaling pathway activated by FcγRIIIb leading to NET formation. FcγRIIIb was stimulated by specific monoclonal antibodies, and NET formation was evaluated in the presence or absence of pharmacological inhibitors. The antibiotic LL Z1640-2, a selective inhibitor of TAK1 prevented FcγRIIIb-induced, but not PMA-induced NET formation. Both PMA and FcγRIIIb cross-linking induced phosphorylation of ERK. But, LL Z1640-2 only inhibited the FcγRIIIb-mediated activation of ERK. Also, only FcγRIIIb, similarly to transforming growth factor-β-induced TAK1 phosphorylation. A MEK (ERK kinase)-specific inhibitor was able to prevent ERK phosphorylation induced by both PMA and FcγRIIIb. These data show for the first time that FcγRIIIb cross-linking activates TAK1, and that this kinase is required for triggering the MEK/ERK signaling pathway to

  11. Cytokines Induced Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Formation: Implication for the Inflammatory Disease Condition

    PubMed Central

    Keshari, Ravi S.; Jyoti, Anupam; Dubey, Megha; Kothari, Nikhil; Kohli, Monica; Bogra, Jaishri; Barthwal, Manoj K.; Dikshit, Madhu

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophils (PMNs) and cytokines have a critical role to play in host defense and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been shown to extracellularly kill pathogens, and inflammatory potential of NETs has been shown. Microbial killing inside the phagosomes or by NETs is mediated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). The present study was undertaken to assess circulating NETs contents and frequency of NETs generation by isolated PMNs from SIRS patients. These patients displayed significant augmentation in the circulating myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and DNA content, while PMA stimulated PMNs from these patients, generated more free radicals and NETs. Plasma obtained from SIRS patients, if added to the PMNs isolated from healthy subjects, enhanced NETs release and free radical formation. Expressions of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNFα and IL-8) in the PMNs as well as their circulating levels were significantly augmented in SIRS subjects. Treatment of neutrophils from healthy subjects with TNFα, IL-1β, or IL-8 enhanced free radicals generation and NETs formation, which was mediated through the activation of NADPH oxidase and MPO. Pre-incubation of plasma from SIRS with TNFα, IL-1β, or IL-8 antibodies reduced the NETs release. Role of IL-1β, TNFα and IL-8 thus seems to be involved in the enhanced release of NETs in SIRS subjects. PMID:23110185

  12. beta. -Endorphin and related peptides suppress phorbol myristate acetate-induced respiratory burst in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Diamant, M.; Henricks, P.A.J.; Nijkamp, F.P.; de Wied, D. )

    1989-01-01

    In the present study, the immunomodulatory effect of {beta}-endorphin ({beta}-E) and shorter pro-opiomelancortin (POMC) fragments was evaluated by assessing their influence on respiratory burst in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). The effect of the peptides on phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated production of reactive oxygen metabolites was measured in a lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) assay. Both POMC peptides with opiate-like activity and their non-opioid derivatives were tested. With the exception of {alpha}-E, PMA-stimulated respiratory burst was suppressed by all POMC fragments tested. A U-shaped dose-response relation was observed. Doses lower than 10{sup {minus}17}M and higher than 10{sup {minus}8}M were without effect. {beta}-E and dT{beta}E both suppressed PMA-induced oxidative burst in human PMN at physiological concentrations. {gamma}-E and dT{gamma}E proved to be less potent inhibitors, reaching maximal effect at higher concentrations. DE{gamma}E exerted an even less pronounced but still significant suppressive effect at the concentration of 10{sup {minus}10}M. None of the endorphins tested was shown to affect resting oxidative metabolism in the PMN. The modulatory effects of the opioid peptides could not be blocked by the opioid antagonist naloxone.

  13. Acetaminophen prevents oxidative burst and delays apoptosis in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Marisa; Costa, Vera M; Ribeiro, Daniela; Couto, Diana; Porto, Graça; Carvalho, Félix; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2013-05-23

    Acetaminophen is a frequently prescribed over-the-counter drug to reduce fever and pain in the event of inflammatory process. As neutrophils are relevant cells in inflammatory processes, the putative interaction of acetaminophen with these cells, if present, would be of paramount importance. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of acetaminophen in human neutrophils' oxidative burst and lifespan in vitro. The obtained results demonstrate that acetaminophen efficiently modulates neutrophils' oxidative burst in phorbol myristate acetate-activated neutrophils, in a concentration-dependent manner, at in vivo relevant concentrations. It was clearly demonstrated that acetaminophen is a strong scavenger of HOCl and H2O2, which probably contributed to the effect observed in neutrophils. Acetaminophen also induced the depletion of glutathione in stimulated neutrophils, suggesting its transformation into a reactive intermediate. Obtained results further revealed that acetaminophen affects programmed cell death of human neutrophils, resulting in a delay of previously stimulated neutrophils-mediated apoptosis. Overall, our data suggested that acetaminophen has considerable potential to be included in anti-inflammatory therapeutic strategies, by preventing biological damage induced by an excessive production of reactive species generated in activated neutrophils and by extending the lifespan of neutrophils, favoring the elimination of pathogens, thus contributing to tissue healing and resolution of inflammation. PMID:23518321

  14. How neutrophils kill fungi.

    PubMed

    Gazendam, Roel P; van de Geer, Annemarie; Roos, Dirk; van den Berg, Timo K; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils play a critical role in the prevention of invasive fungal infections. Whereas mouse studies have demonstrated the role of various neutrophil pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs), signal transduction pathways, and cytotoxicity in the murine antifungal immune response, much less is known about the killing of fungi by human neutrophils. Recently, novel primary immunodeficiencies have been identified in patients with a susceptibility to fungal infections. These human 'knock-out' neutrophils expand our knowledge to understand the role of PRRs and signaling in human fungal killing. From the studies with these patients it is becoming clear that neutrophils employ fundamentally distinct mechanisms to kill Candida albicans or Aspergillus fumigatus. PMID:27558342

  15. Dimethylfumarate Impairs Neutrophil Functions.

    PubMed

    Müller, Susen; Behnen, Martina; Bieber, Katja; Möller, Sonja; Hellberg, Lars; Witte, Mareike; Hänsel, Martin; Zillikens, Detlef; Solbach, Werner; Laskay, Tamás; Ludwig, Ralf J

    2016-01-01

    Host defense against pathogens relies on neutrophil activation. Inadequate neutrophil activation is often associated with chronic inflammatory diseases. Neutrophils also constitute a significant portion of infiltrating cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, for example, psoriasis and multiple sclerosis. Fumarates improve the latter diseases, which so far has been attributed to the effects on lymphocytes and dendritic cells. Here, we focused on the effects of dimethylfumarate (DMF) on neutrophils. In vitro, DMF inhibited neutrophil activation, including changes in surface marker expression, reactive oxygen species production, formation of neutrophil extracellular traps, and migration. Phagocytic ability and autoantibody-induced, neutrophil-dependent tissue injury ex vivo was also impaired by DMF. Regarding the mode of action, DMF modulates-in a stimulus-dependent manner-neutrophil activation using the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 pathways. For in vivo validation, mouse models of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, an organ-specific autoimmune disease caused by autoantibodies to type VII collagen, were employed. In the presence of DMF, blistering induced by injection of anti-type VII collagen antibodies into mice was significantly impaired. DMF treatment of mice with clinically already-manifested epidermolysis bullosa acquisita led to disease improvement. Collectively, we demonstrate a profound inhibitory activity of DMF on neutrophil functions. These findings encourage wider use of DMF in patients with neutrophil-mediated diseases. PMID:26763431

  16. ISOLATION OF MOUSE NEUTROPHILS

    PubMed Central

    Swamydas, Muthulekha; Luo, Yi; Dorf, Martin E.; Lionakis, Michail S.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils represent the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Indeed, patients with inherited and acquired qualitative and quantitative neutrophil defects are at high risk for developing bacterial and fungal infections and suffering adverse outcomes from these infections. Therefore, research aiming at defining the molecular factors that modulate neutrophil effector function under homeostatic conditions and during infection is essential for devising strategies to augment neutrophil function and improve the outcome of infected individuals. This unit describes a reproducible density gradient centrifugation-based protocol that can be applied in any laboratory to harvest large numbers of highly enriched and highly viable neutrophils from the bone marrow of mice both at the steady state and following infection with Candida albicans as described in UNIT 19.6. In another protocol, we also present a method that combines gentle enzymatic tissue digestion with a positive immunomagnetic selection technique or Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to harvest highly pure and highly viable preparations of neutrophils directly from mouse tissues such as the kidney, the liver or the spleen. Finally, methods for isolating neutrophils from mouse peritoneal fluid and peripheral blood are included. Mouse neutrophils isolated by these protocols can be used for examining several aspects of cellular function ex vivo including pathogen binding, phagocytosis and killing, neutrophil chemotaxis, oxidative burst, degranulation and cytokine production, and for performing neutrophil adoptive transfer experiments. PMID:26237011

  17. Stimulation of neutrophils by tumor necrosis factor

    SciTech Connect

    Klebanoff, S.J.; Vadas, M.A.; Harlan, J.M.; Sparks, L.H.; Gamble, J.R.; Agosti, J.M.; Waltersdorph, A.M.

    1986-06-01

    Human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was shown to be a weak direct stimulus of the neutrophil respiratory burst and degranulation. The stimulation, as measured by iodination, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production, and lysozyme release, was considerably increased by the presence of unopsonized zymosan in the reaction mixture, an effect which was associated with the increased ingestion of the zymosan. TNF does not act as an opsonin but, rather, reacts with the neutrophil to increase its phagocytic activity. TNF-dependent phagocytosis, as measured indirectly by iodination, is inhibited by monoclonal antibodies (Mab) 60.1 and 60.3, which recognize different epitopes on the C3bi receptor/adherence-promoting surface glycoprotein of neutrophils. Other neutrophil stimulants, namely N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, the Ca2+ ionophore A23187, and phorbol myristic acetate, also increase iodination in the presence of zymosan; as with TNF, the effect of these stimulants is inhibited by Mab 60.1 and 60.3, whereas, in contrast to that of TNF, their stimulation of iodination is unaffected by an Mab directed against TNF. TNF may be a natural stimulant of neutrophils which promotes adherence to endothelial cells and to particles, leading to increased phagocytosis, respiratory burst activity, and degranulation.

  18. Mesoxalaldehyde acetals

    SciTech Connect

    Gordeeva, G.N.; Kalashnikov, S.M.; Popov, Yu.N.; Kruglov, E.A.; Imashev, U.B.

    1987-11-10

    The treatment of methylglyoxal acetals by alkyl nitrites in the presence of the corresponding aliphatic alcohols and hydrochloric acid leads to the formation of linear mesoxalaldehyde acetals, whose structure was established by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The major pathways for the decomposition of these molecules upon electron impact were established.

  19. Neutrophils in cancer.

    PubMed

    Treffers, Louise W; Hiemstra, Ida H; Kuijpers, Taco W; van den Berg, Timo K; Matlung, Hanke L

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in cancer. This does not only relate to the well-established prognostic value of the presence of neutrophils, either in the blood or in tumor tissue, in the context of cancer progression or for the monitoring of therapy, but also to their active role in the progression of cancer. In the current review, we describe what is known in general about the role of neutrophils in cancer. What is emerging is a complex, rather heterogeneous picture with both pro- and anti-tumorigenic roles, which apparently differs with cancer type and disease stage. Furthermore, we will discuss the well-known role of neutrophils as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and also on the role of neutrophils as important effector cells during antibody therapy in cancer. It is clear that neutrophils contribute substantially to cancer progression in multiple ways, and this includes both direct effects on the cancer cells and indirect effect on the tumor microenvironment. While in many cases neutrophils have been shown to promote tumor progression, for instance by acting as MDSC, there are also protective effects, particularly when antibody immunotherapy is performed. A better understanding of the role of neutrophils is likely to provide opportunities for immunomodulation and for improving the treatment of cancer patients. PMID:27558343

  20. Myeloperoxidase Stimulates Neutrophil Degranulation.

    PubMed

    Grigorieva, D V; Gorudko, I V; Sokolov, A V; Kostevich, V A; Vasilyev, V B; Cherenkevich, S N; Panasenko, O M

    2016-08-01

    Myeloperoxidase, heme enzyme of azurophilic granules in neutrophils, is released into the extracellular space in the inflammation foci. In neutrophils, it stimulates a dose-dependent release of lactoferrin (a protein of specific granules), lysozyme (a protein of specific and azurophilic granules), and elastase (a protein of azurophilic granules). 4-Aminobenzoic acid hydrazide, a potent inhibitor of peroxidase activity of myeloperoxidase, produced no effect on neutrophil degranulation. Using signal transduction inhibitors (genistein, methoxyverapamil, wortmannin, and NiCl2), we demonstrated that myeloperoxidase-induced degranulation of neutrophils resulted from enzyme interaction with the plasma membrane and depends on activation of tyrosine kinases, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K), and calcium signaling. Myeloperoxidase modified by oxidative/halogenation stress (chlorinated and monomeric forms of the enzyme) lost the potency to activate neutrophil degranulation. PMID:27597056

  1. Expression and role of adhesion molecule CD18 on bovine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Nochi, H; Tamoto, K; Noda, H; Kociba, G J

    1995-01-01

    Expression of CD18 on bovine neutrophils in response to stimulation by zymosan activated serum (ZAS) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and the effects of monoclonal antibodies (MAB) recognizing CD18 or bovine neutrophil surface antigens (S2G8 and S5F8G10) on adherence, chemotactic responses and phagocytosis of bovine neutrophils were evaluated. CD18 expression of neutrophils was increased after ZAS and PMA treatment by 12.2 and 54.2% respectively, and were significantly (p < 0.05, p < 0.01) different from those of untreated neutrophils. CD18 expression by neutrophils from a Holstein-Friesian heifer affected with leukocyte adhesion deficiency was within negative controls when stimulated by ZAS and PMA. Adherence, chemotactic responses, and phagocytosis were significantly decreased (p < 0.01) in neutrophils continuously treated with anti-CD18 MAB (MHM 23). Adherence was also significantly decreased in anti-CD18 pretreated neutrophils. Significant (p < 0.01) differences of chemotactic responses and phagocytosis of neutrophils were found between neutrophils pretreated and continuously treated with anti-CD18 MAB (MHM 23). Monoclonal antibodies to other surface antigens did not significantly alter neutrophil adherence, chemotaxis or phagocytosis. This study demonstrated that CD18 expression on bovine neutrophils is increased significantly by stimulation with ZAS and PMA and that the adhesion molecule CD18 plays an important role in adhesion-related functions. PMID:7704836

  2. Effects of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate on triglyceride and cholesteryl ester synthesis in cultured coronary smooth muscle cells and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Moinat, M; Chevey, J M; Muzzin, P; Giacobino, J P; Kossovsky, M

    1990-02-01

    In cultured pig coronary smooth muscle cells phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulated the conversion of [4-14C]cholesterol into cholesteryl esters and the incorporation of [2-3H]glycerol into triglycerides 6.4- and 4.5-fold, respectively. The maximal effects occurred after 3 h of treatment and there was a return to basal values after 72 h. In the presence of 400 microM oleic acid, PMA stimulated the conversion of [4-14C]cholesterol into cholesteryl esters and that of [2-3H]glycerol into triglycerides 5.3- and 2.3-fold, respectively. The stimulatory effects were more sustained (still significant after 72 h) and their maxima were delayed (peaks after 24 h). PMA was also found to increase 2-fold the amount of triglyceride that accumulated in the cells in the presence of oleic acid after 24 h. In macrophages IC-21, the effects of PMA were observed only in the presence of oleic acid. They consisted of a 1.9-fold stimulation in the conversion of [4-14C]cholesterol into cholesteryl esters after 72 h and of a 1.7-fold stimulation in the incorporation of [2-3H]glycerol into triglycerides after 24 h. PMA also increased the amount of triglyceride that accumulated in the cells 1.9-fold after 72 h. It is concluded that PMA, and possibly growth factors, may promote lipid storage in smooth muscle cells and that fatty acids favor long lasting effects of PMA in smooth muscle cells and are necessary for any effect of PMA in macrophages. PMID:2324651

  3. The lymph node neutrophil.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Henry R; Chtanova, Tatyana

    2016-04-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs provide a specialized microenvironment tailored to foster communication between cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. These interactions allow immune cells to coordinate multilayered defense against pathogens. Until recently dendritic cells and macrophages were thought to comprise the main innate immune cell subsets responsible for delivering signals that drive the adaptive immune response, while the function of neutrophils was largely confined to the innate immune system. However, the discovery of neutrophils in lymph nodes has raised the question of whether neutrophils might play a more extensive role not only in innate immunity per se, but also in coordinating the interactions between innate and adaptive immune responses. In this review we discuss the mechanisms and consequences of neutrophil recruitment to lymph nodes and how this recruitment influences subsequent immune responses both in situ and at distant sites. PMID:27025975

  4. [Inhibition of neutrophil adhesion by pectic galacturonans].

    PubMed

    Popov, S V; Ovodova, R G; Popova, G Iu; Nikitina, I R; Ovodov, Iu S

    2007-01-01

    The inhibition of the adhesion of neutrophils to fibronectin by the fragments of the main galacturonan chain of the following pectins was demonstrated: comaruman from the marsh cinquefoil Comarum polustre, bergenan from the Siberian tea Bergenia crassifolia, lemnan from the duckweed Lemna minor, zosteran from the seagrass Zostera marina, and citrus pectin. The parent pectins, except for comaruman, did not affect the cell adhesion. Galacturonans prepared from the starting pectins by acidic hydrolysis were shown to reduce the neutrophil adhesion stimulated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (1.625 microM) and dithiothreitol (0.5 mM) at a concentration of 50-200 microg/ml. The presence of carbohydrate chains with molecular masses higher than 300, from 100 to 300, and from 50 to 100 kDa in the galacturonan fractions was proved by membrane ultrafiltration. PMID:17375675

  5. Constitutive apoptosis in equine peripheral blood neutrophils in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Brazil, Timothy J.; Dixon, Padraic M.; Haslett, Christopher; Murray, Joanna; McGorum, Bruce C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise constitutive apoptosis in equine peripheral blood neutrophils, including assessment of factors that potentially modulate neutrophil survival through alteration of the rate of constitutive apoptosis. Cells underwent spontaneous time-dependent constitutive apoptosis when aged in culture for up to 36 h, developing the structural and functional features of apoptosis observed in many cell types, including human neutrophils. Neutrophils undergoing apoptosis also had diminished zymosan activated serum (ZAS)-stimulated chemiluminescence, but maintained responsiveness to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). The constitutive rate of equine neutrophil apoptosis was promoted by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumour necrosis factor α and phagocytosis of opsonised ovine erythrocytes, while it was inhibited by dexamethasone and ZAS (a source of C5a). Formyl-Met-Leu-Phe, leukotriene B4, platelet activating factor and PMA had no demonstrable effect on equine neutrophil apoptosis. There was a difference between equine and human neutrophil apoptosis in response to LPS and the time-dependence of the response to dexamethasone. PMID:25239298

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis- induced neutrophil extracellular traps activate human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Braian, Clara; Hogea, Valentin; Stendahl, Olle

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils activated by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), containing DNA and several biologically active cytosolic and granular proteins. These NETs may assist in the innate immune defense against different pathogens. We investigated whether the NET-forming neutrophils mediate an activating signal to macrophages during the early multicellular inflammatory reaction and granuloma formation. Mtb-induced NETs were found to be reactive oxygen species dependent and phagocytosis dependent. A neutrophil elastase inhibitor also delayed NET formation. However, NET formation occurred independently of Mtb-induced apoptosis. We observed close interactions between macrophages and Mtb-activated neutrophils, where macrophages bound and phagocytosed NETs. Significant secretion of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β and IL-10 were detected from macrophages cocultured with NETs from Mtb-activated but not phorbol myristate acetate-activated neutrophils. NETs binding heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) or recombinant Hsp72 were able to trigger cytokine release from macrophages. Only Mtb-induced NETs contained Hsp72, suggesting that these NETs can transfer this danger signal to adjacent macrophages. We propose that Hsp72 sequestered in NETs plays an important role in the interaction between neutrophils and macrophages during the early innate immune phase of an Mtb infection. The immunomodulatory role of NETs and proteins derived from them may influence not only chronic inflammation during tuberculosis but also immune regulation and autoimmunity.

  7. Ethyl acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl acetate ; CASRN 141 - 78 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  8. Phenylmercuric acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Phenylmercuric acetate ; CASRN 62 - 38 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinog

  9. Vinyl acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Vinyl acetate ; CASRN 108 - 05 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  10. Ammonium acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ammonium acetate ; CASRN 631 - 61 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  11. Thallium acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 30 , 2009 , the assessment summary for Thallium acetate is included in t

  12. Neutrophil swarming: an essential process of the neutrophil tissue response.

    PubMed

    Kienle, Korbinian; Lämmermann, Tim

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophil infiltration into inflamed and infected tissues is a fundamental process of the innate immune response. While neutrophil interactions with the blood vessel wall have been intensely studied over the last decades, neutrophil dynamics beyond the vasculature have for a long time remained poorly investigated. Recent intravital microscopy studies of neutrophil populations directly at the site of tissue damage or microbial invasion have changed our perspective on neutrophil responses within tissues. Swarm-like migration patterns of neutrophils, referred to as 'neutrophil swarming', have been detected in diverse tissues under conditions of sterile inflammation and infection with various pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and parasites. Current work has begun to unravel the molecular pathways choreographing the sequential phases of highly coordinated chemotaxis followed by neutrophil accumulation and the formation of substantial neutrophil clusters. It is now clear that intercellular communication among neutrophils amplifies their recruitment in a feed-forward manner, which provides them with a level of self-organization during neutrophil swarming. This review will summarize recent developments and current concepts on neutrophil swarming, an important process of the neutrophil tissue response with a critical role in maintaining the balance between host protection and inflammation-driven tissue destruction. PMID:27558329

  13. Platelets enhance neutrophil transendothelial migration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Platelets are increasingly recognized as important mediators of inflammation in addition to thrombosis. While platelets have been shown to promote neutrophil (PMN) adhesion to endothelium in various inflammatory models, it is unclear whether platelets enhance neutrophil transmigration across inflame...

  14. Faropenem enhances superoxide anion production by human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Sato, N; Shimizu, H; Tsutiya, T; Takahashi, H; Kakizaki, S; Takayama, H; Takagi, H; Mori, M

    1999-09-01

    Neutrophils are important cellular components in the defence against infections and many studies in vitro have shown that some antibiotics affect neutrophil function. We examined the effect of faropenem, a new oral penem antibiotic on neutrophil killing function by determining the generation of superoxide anion in vitro. The production of superoxide anion was measured by chemiluminescence amplified by a Cypridina luciferin analogue in the presence of N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP). Faropenem significantly enhanced chemiluminescence in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of faropenem was maximal at 5 min of incubation time and continued for at least 30 min. The effect of faropenem was also observed when neutrophils were stimulated by a calcium ionophore (ionomycin), while the effect of faropenem did not change in the presence of 12-O-tetra-decanoylphorbolmyristate acetate. Cytosol Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) monitored with Fura-2 increased in response to fMLP, however, faropenem did not influence the response of [Ca2+]i to fMLP. Our results suggest that faropenem enhanced the generation of superoxide anion by neutrophils, probably at the site where cytosol Ca2+ regulates NADPH oxidase. Faropenem might be potentially advantageous in the treatment of infections because a synergic interaction of antibodies and cytocidal neutrophils is necessary for the early eradication of the pathogenic bacteria. PMID:10511400

  15. P-selectin promotes neutrophil extracellular trap formation in mice.

    PubMed

    Etulain, Julia; Martinod, Kimberly; Wong, Siu Ling; Cifuni, Stephen M; Schattner, Mirta; Wagner, Denisa D

    2015-07-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) can be released in the vasculature. In addition to trapping microbes, they promote inflammatory and thrombotic diseases. Considering that P-selectin induces prothrombotic and proinflammatory signaling, we studied the role of this selectin in NET formation. NET formation (NETosis) was induced by thrombin-activated platelets rosetting with neutrophils and was inhibited by anti-P-selectin aptamer or anti-P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) inhibitory antibody but was not induced by platelets from P-selectin(-/-) mice. Moreover, NETosis was also promoted by P-selectin-immunoglobulin fusion protein but not by control immunoglobulin. We isolated neutrophils from mice engineered to overproduce soluble P-selectin (P-selectin(ΔCT/ΔCT) mice). Although the levels of circulating DNA and nucleosomes (indicative of spontaneous NETosis) were normal in these mice, basal neutrophil histone citrullination and presence of P-selectin on circulating neutrophils were elevated. NET formation after stimulation with platelet activating factor, ionomycin, or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate was significantly enhanced, indicating that the P-selectin(ΔCT/ΔCT) neutrophils were primed for NETosis. In summary, P-selectin, cellular or soluble, through binding to PSGL-1, promotes NETosis, suggesting that this pathway is a potential therapeutic target for NET-related diseases.

  16. The Neutrophil Nucleus and Its Role in Neutrophilic Function.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Leonardo Olivieri; Aquino, Elaine Nascimento; Neves, Anne Caroline Dias; Fontes, Wagner

    2015-09-01

    The cell nucleus plays a key role in differentiation processes in eukaryotic cells. It is not the nucleus in particular, but the organization of the genes and their remodeling that provides the data for the adjustments to be made according to the medium. The neutrophil nucleus has a different morphology. It is a multi-lobed nucleus where some researchers argue no longer function. However, studies indicate that it is very probable the occurrence of chromatin remodeling during activation steps. It may be that the human neutrophil nucleus also contributes to the mobility of neutrophils through thin tissue spaces. Questions like these will be discussed in this small review. The topics include morphology of human neutrophil nucleus, maturation process and modifications of the neutrophil nucleus, neutrophil activation and chromatin modifications, causes and consequences of multi-lobulated segmented morphology, and importance of the nucleus in the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs).

  17. Interference with the oxidative response of neutrophils by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Perry, F E; Elson, C J; Greenham, L W; Catterall, J R

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Pneumococcal infections are still a major clinical problem. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes (neutrophils) are considered to have a key role in the host's defence against Streptococcus pneumoniae but the mechanisms by which they kill the pneumococcus remain unclear. As reactive oxygen species are regarded as a major antimicrobial defence of phagocytes an attempt has been made to establish their role in the response of neutrophils to S pneumoniae. METHODS--S pneumoniae isolated from patients with bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia were incubated with neutrophils in suspension and superoxide production was measured by reduction of ferricytochrome c. RESULTS--S pneumoniae did not stimulate superoxide production alone or in the presence of normal human serum. Spontaneous superoxide production by neutrophils was actually abrogated by S pneumoniae, as was the powerful respiratory burst stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate. This phenomenon depended on both the dose and the viability of the bacteria. With S pneumoniae in the logarithmic phase of growth inhibitory activity was confined to the organisms themselves but with organisms undergoing autolysis it was also present in filtered supernatants, suggesting that the inhibitory activity can be attributed to a factor released during autolysis. CONCLUSIONS--S pneumoniae can interfere with the respiratory burst of neutrophils. This property may help to explain the pathogenicity of the organism. PMID:8390109

  18. Neutrophil kinetics in the dog.

    PubMed Central

    Deubelbeiss, K A; Dancey, J T; Harker, L A; Finch, C A

    1975-01-01

    The production of neutrophils in dogs has been estimated from the number of postmitotic neutrophils in the marrow and the transit time of a [3H]-thymidine pulse. The number of postmitotic neutrophils was derived from the erythron iron turnover measurement of erythroid number and the neutrophil-erythroid ratio in bone marrow sections. The mean value for marrow postmitotic neutrophils in dogs was 5.61 plus or minus 0.56 times 10-9 cells/kg. The mean transit time of these neutrophils was calculated to be 82.1 h. A marrow production of 1.65 times 10-9 neutrophils/kg/day was calculated from these data. The turnover of circulating neutrophils was measured by [3H]thymidine and [32P]diisopropylphospho-fluoridate (DF32P) labeling of blood neutrophils. [3H]-Thymidine labeling gave a calculated recovery of 65 per cent, a t1/2 disappearance time of 6.7 h, and a calculated turnover of 1.66 times 10-9 cells/kg/day. Corresponding results with DF32P tagging were 51 per cent, 5.4 h, and 2.89 times 10-9 cells/kg/day. The discrepancy between these two tags persisted in doubly tagged cells and was considered to be due to elution of DF32P. PMID:1120785

  19. The beetroot component betanin modulates ROS production, DNA damage and apoptosis in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Zielińska-Przyjemska, Małgorzata; Olejnik, Anna; Kostrzewa, Artur; Łuczak, Michał; Jagodziński, Paweł P; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of betanin, one of the beetroot major components, on ROS production, DNA damage and apoptosis in human resting and stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate13-acetate polymorphonuclear neutrophils, one of the key elements of the inflammatory response. Incubation of neutrophils with betanin in the concentration range 2-500 µM resulted in significant inhibition of ROS production (by 15-46%, depending on the ROS detection assay). The antioxidant capacity of betanin was most prominently expressed in the chemiluminescence measurements. This compound decreased also the percentage of DNA in comet tails in stimulated neutrophils, but only at the 24 h time point. In resting neutrophils an increased level of DNA in comet tails was observed. Betanin did not affect the activity of caspase-3, in resting neutrophils, but significantly enhanced the enzyme activity in stimulated neutrophils. The western blot analysis showed, however, an increased level of caspase-3 cleavage products as a result of betanin treatment both in resting and stimulated neutrophils. The results indicate that betanin may be responsible for the effect of beetroot products on neutrophil oxidative metabolism and its consequences, DNA damage and apoptosis. The dose and time dependent effects on these processes require further studies.

  20. Regulation of catalase in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Effects of oxidant stress and exposure to human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Zheng, H Y; Hassett, D J; Bean, K; Cohen, M S

    1992-09-01

    We studied the effects of oxidant stress on the catalase activity and hydrogen peroxide sensitivity of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. N. gonorrhoeae is an obligate pathogen of man that evokes a remarkable but ineffective neutrophil response. Gonococci make no superoxide dismutase but express high catalase activity. Gonococcal catalase activity increased threefold when organisms were subjected to 1.0 mM hydrogen peroxide. This increase in catalase activity was marked by a parallel increase in protein concentration recognized by a rabbit polyclonal antibody raised against the purified gonococcal enzyme. Catalase was primarily localized to the gonococcal cytoplasm in the presence or absence of stress; only a single isoenzyme of catalase could be identified. Exposure of gonococci to neutrophil-derived oxidants was accomplished by stimulating neutrophils with phorbol myristate acetate or by using gonococcal Opa variants that interacted with neutrophils with different degrees of efficiency. Gonococci exposed to neutrophils demonstrated a twofold increase in catalase activity in spite of some reduction in viability. Exposure of gonococci to 1.0 mM hydrogen peroxide made the organisms significantly more resistant to higher concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and to neutrophils than control organisms. These results suggest that catalase is an important defense for N. gonorrhoeae during attack by human neutrophils. The rapid response of this enzyme to hydrogen peroxide should be taken into consideration in studies designed to evaluate the interaction between neutrophils and gonococci. PMID:1522209

  1. Analysis of the functional characteristics of L-selectin and its expression on normal and CD18-deficient bovine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Higuchi, H; Yamashiki, N; Yamaguchi, M

    2000-06-01

    In vivo responsiveness to epinephrine, expression of L-selectin on neutrophils, changes in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i), sulfatide-induced superoxide production and tyrosine phosphorylation in neutrophils were evaluated to elucidate the role of L-selectin-associated functions of normal and CD18-deficient bovine neutrophils. The number of neutrophils in peripheral blood was significantly increased (P < 0.05) in four normal calves at 5-20 min after in vivo administration of epinephrine; however, no significant increase of neutrophils was found in three calves with bovine leucocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD). Expression of L-selectin on neutrophils from three calves with BLAD was 61-77% of that of normal calves. Pretreatment of neutrophils with phorbol myristate acetate caused a marked decrease in the expression of L-selectin on neutrophils from both normal and BLAD calves. The sulfatide-induced sustained phase of [Ca2+]i concentration in neutrophils from calves with BLAD was significantly (P < 0.05) decreased. Following stimulation with aggregated IgG, the transient phase of [Ca2+]i in neutrophils from normal and BLAD calves was increased; however, the sustained phase of [Ca2+]i in BLAD neutrophils was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than that of controls. Sulfatide-induced O2- production and chemiluminescent response in neutrophils from calves with BLAD were 48-51% of those of normal calves and were inhibited by genistein and wortmannin, respectively, in a dose-dependent manner. The amount of tyrosine phosphorylated 100 kDa protein in neutrophils from BLAD calves stimulated with sulfatides was 57% of that of controls. The degree of L-selectin expression on neutrophils was correlated with the intracellular signalling events and the related superoxide production. PMID:10849115

  2. Increase in filtration coefficient from actions of melittin on neutrophils in isolated rabbit lungs.

    PubMed

    Littner, M R; Lott, F D

    1994-04-01

    Activation of neutrophils may contribute to lung injury in the adult respiratory distress syndrome. We added rabbit neutrophils to the pulmonary circulation of salt-perfused and ventilated isolated rabbit lungs. These neutrophils were activated by adding synthetically pure melittin to the perfusate. This led to lung injury as measured by filtration coefficient under no-flow conditions. We also activated neutrophils in vitro before addition to the pulmonary circulation. These preactivated neutrophils also produced lung injury, indicating a primary action of melittin on neutrophils rather than on lung. The injury was prevented by aristolochic acid, which is an inhibitor of phospholipase A2 (PLA2), and independently by catalase, which is scavenger of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Aristolochic acid also appeared to act primarily on neutrophils since addition to neutrophils in vitro prevented injury from in vitro activation by melittin. Aristolochic acid did not appear to act as a free radical scavenger since it did not prevent injury from neutrophils activated by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). PMA is a direct activator of protein kinase C in neutrophils and leads to formation of H2O2 with consequent lung injury. We conclude that activation of neutrophils by melittin leads to oxidant lung injury possibly from activation of PLA2. Since PLA2 does not directly produce a second messenger, such as diacylglycerol or inositol triphosphate, it is likely that other actions of PLA2 produce an intermediary mediator. We previously showed that an inhibitor of eicosanoid synthesis prevents lung injury from exogenous PLA2. This suggests that the formation of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), a 5-lipoxygenase product of arachidonic acid, may contribute to the oxidant lung injury from melittin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Altered intracellular pH regulation in neutrophils from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Coakley, R J; Taggart, C; Canny, G; Greally, P; O'Neill, S J; McElvaney, N G

    2000-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a condition characterized by neutrophil-mediated lung damage and bacterial colonization. The physiological basis for reported functional alterations in CF neutrophils, including increased release of neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase, and oxidants, is unknown. These processes are, however, regulated by intracellular pH (pH(i)). We demonstrate here that pH(i) regulation is altered in neutrophils from CF patients. Although resting pH(i) is similar, pH(i) after acid loading and activation (N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) is more acidic in CF cells than in normal cells. Furthermore, patients with non-CF-related bronchiectasis handle acid loading and activation in a fashion similar to subjects with normal neutrophils, suggesting that chronic pulmonary inflammation alone does not explain the difference in pH(i). This is further supported by data showing that normal neutrophils exposed to the CF pulmonary milieu respond by increasing pH(i) as opposed to decreasing pH(i) as seen in activated CF neutrophils. These pH(i) differences in activated or acid-loaded CF neutrophils are abrogated by ZnCl(2) but not by amiloride and bafilomycin A(1), suggesting that passive proton conductance is abnormal in CF. In addition, DIDS, which inhibits HCO(3)(-)/Cl(-) exchange, causes alkalinization of control but not of CF neutrophils, suggesting that anion transport is also abnormal in CF neutrophils. In summary, we have shown that pH(i) regulation in CF neutrophils is intrinsically abnormal, potentially contributing to the pulmonary manifestations of the condition.

  4. Neutrophil Functions in Periodontal Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Vieyra, Ricarda; Rosales, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Oral tissues are constantly exposed to damage from the mechanical effort of eating and to microorganisms, mostly bacteria. In healthy gingiva tissue remodeling and a balance between bacteria and innate immune cells are maintained. However, excess of bacteria biofilm (plaque) creates an inflammation state that recruits more immune cells, mainly neutrophils to the gingiva. Neutrophils create a barrier for bacteria to reach inside tissues. When neutrophils are insufficient, bacteria thrive causing more inflammation that has been associated with systemic effects on other conditions such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cancer. But paradoxically when neutrophils persist, they can also promote a chronic inflammatory state that leads to periodontitis, a condition that leads to damage of the bone-supporting tissues. In periodontitis, bone loss is a serious complication. How a neutrophil balance is needed for maintaining healthy oral tissues is the focus of this review. We present recent evidence on how alterations in neutrophil number and function can lead to inflammatory bone loss, and how some oral bacteria signal neutrophils to block their antimicrobial functions and promote an inflammatory state. Also, based on this new information, novel therapeutic approaches are discussed. PMID:27019855

  5. Pro-oxidative interactions of cobalt with human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ramafi, Grace J; Theron, Annette J; Anderson, Ronald

    2004-08-01

    The primary objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of cobalt(II) chloride (Co, 1.5-25 microM) on the reactivity of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 100 microM) or oxidants generated by activated human neutrophils. The prooxidative interactions of Co with H2O2 or cells were measured by luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (LECL), and according to the extent of oxidative inactivation of added alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (API). Cobalt dramatically potentiated the oxidation of luminol and API by both H2O2 and neutrophils activated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (5 ng/ml), without affecting the assembly of NADPH oxidase or the magnitude of oxygen consumption by the cells. Using 5,5-dimethyl-pyrolline 1-oxide-based electron spin resonance spectroscopy we were unable to detect hydroxyl radical formation by Co in the presence of either H2O2 or activated neutrophils, while the corresponding LECL responses were unaffected by the hydroxyl radical scavengers benzoate and mannitol (50 mM). These observations indicate that Co potentiates the reactivity of neutrophil-derived oxidants, primarily H2O2, which if operative in vivo during exposure to the heavy metal may pose the risk of oxidant- and protease-mediated tissue injury.

  6. Vanadium promotes hydroxyl radical formation by activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Fickl, Heidi; Theron, Annette J; Grimmer, Heidi; Oommen, Joyce; Ramafi, Grace J; Steel, Helen C; Visser, Susanna S; Anderson, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of vanadium in the +2, +3, +4, and +5 valence states on superoxide generation, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and hydroxyl radical formation by activated human neutrophils in vitro, using lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (LECL), autoiodination, and electron spin resonance with 5,5-dimethyl-l-pyrroline N-oxide as the spin trap, respectively. At concentrations of up to 25 microM, vanadium, in the four different valence states used, did not affect the LECL responses of neutrophils activated with either the chemoattractant, N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine (1 microM), or the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 12-acetate (25 ng/ml). However, exposure to vanadium in the +2, +3, and +4, but not the +5, valence states was accompanied by significant augmentation of hydroxyl radical formation by activated neutrophils and attenuation of MPO-mediated iodination. With respect to hydroxyl radical formation, similar effects were observed using cell-free systems containing either hydrogen peroxide (100 microM) or xanthine/xanthine oxidase together with vanadium (+2, +3, +4), while the activity of purified MPO was inhibited by the metal in these valence states. These results demonstrate that vanadium in the +2, +3, and +4 valence states interacts prooxidatively with human neutrophils, competing effectively with MPO for hydrogen peroxide to promote formation of the highly toxic hydroxyl radical.

  7. Singlet oxygen is essential for neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

    PubMed

    Nishinaka, Yoko; Arai, Toshiyuki; Adachi, Souichi; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Yamashita, Kouhei

    2011-09-16

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that bind invading microbes are pivotal for innate host defense. There is a growing body of evidence for the significance of NETs in the pathogenesis of infectious and inflammatory diseases, but the mechanism of NET formation remains unclear. Previous observation in neutrophils of chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients, which defect NADPH oxidase (Nox) and fail to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), revealed that ROS contributed to the formation of NETs. However, the active species were not identified. In this study, we discovered that singlet oxygen, one of the ROS, mediated Nox-dependent NET formation upon stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate. We also revealed that singlet oxygen itself could induce NET formation by a distinct system generating singlet oxygen with porfimer sodium (Photofrin) in CGD neutrophils, as well as healthy neutrophils. This was independent of Nox activation. These results show that singlet oxygen is essential for NET formation, and provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of infectious and inflammatory diseases.

  8. G Protein-Coupled Receptor 43 Modulates Neutrophil Recruitment during Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, Alyce J.; Oliveira, Ana Carolina; Mason, Linda J.; Binge, Lauren; Mackay, Charles R.; Wong, Connie H. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Fermentation of dietary fibre in the gut yields large amounts of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs). SCFAs can impart biological responses in cells through their engagement of ‘metabolite-sensing’ G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). One of the main SCFA receptors, GPR43, is highly expressed by neutrophils, which suggests that the actions of GPR43 and dietary fibre intake may affect neutrophil recruitment during inflammatory responses in vivo. Using intravital imaging of the small intestine, we found greater intravascular neutrophil rolling and adhesion in Gpr43−/−mice in response to LPS at 1 h. After 4 h of LPS challenge, the intravascular rolling velocity of GPR43-deficient neutrophils was reduced significantly and increased numbers of neutrophils were found in the lamina propria of Gpr43−/−mice. Additionally, GPR43-deficient leukocytes demonstrated exacerbated migration into the peritoneal cavity following fMLP challenge. The fMLP-induced neutrophil migration was significantly suppressed in wildtype mice that were treated with acetate, but not in Gpr43−/−mice, strongly suggesting a role for SCFAs in modulating neutrophil migration via GPR43. Indeed, neutrophils of no fibre-fed wildtype mice exhibited elevated migratory behaviour compared to normal chow-fed wildtype mice. Interestingly, this elevated migration could also be reproduced through simple transfer of a no fibre microbiota into germ-free mice, suggesting that the composition and function of microbiota stemming from a no fibre diet mediated the changes in neutrophil migration. Therefore, GPR43 and a microbiota composition that allows for SCFA production function to modulate neutrophil recruitment during inflammatory responses. PMID:27658303

  9. Neutrophil Elastase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Groutas, William C.; Dou, Dengfeng; Alliston, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) constitutes a worldwide health problem. There is currently an urgent and unmet need for the development of small molecule therapeutics capable of blocking and/or reversing the progression of the disorder. Recent studies have greatly illuminated our understanding of the multiple pathogenic processes associated with COPD. Of paramount importance is the key role played by proteases, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation. Insights gained from these studies have made possible the exploration of new therapeutic approaches. Areas covered An overview of major developments in COPD research with emphasis on low molecular weight neutrophil elastase inhibitors is described in this review. Expert opinion Great strides have been made toward our understanding of the biochemical and cellular events associated with COPD. However, our knowledge regarding the inter-relationships among the multiple pathogenic mechanisms and their mediators involved is till limited. The problem is further compounded by the unavailability of suitable validated biomarkers for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions. The complexity of COPD suggests that effective therapeutic interventions may require the administration of more than one agent such as, for instance, an HNE or MMP-12 inhibitor with an anti-inflammatory agent such as a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, or a dual function agent capable of disrupting the cycle of proteolysis, apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress PMID:21235378

  10. AUTOINFLAMMATORY PUSTULAR NEUTROPHILIC DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Haley B.; Cowen, Edward W.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The inflammatory pustular dermatoses constitute a spectrum of non-infectious conditions ranging from localized involvement to generalized disease with associated acute systemic inflammation and multi-organ involvement. Despite the variability in extent and severity of cutaneous presentation, each of these diseases is characterized by non-infectious neutrophilic intra-epidermal microabscesses. Many share systemic findings including fever, elevated inflammatory markers, inflammatory bowel disease and/or osteoarticular involvement, suggesting potential common pathogenic links (Figure 1). The recent discoveries of several genes responsible for heritable pustular diseases have revealed a distinct link between pustular skin disease and regulation of innate immunity. These genetic advances have led to a deeper exploration of common pathways in pustular skin disease and offer the potential for a new era of biologic therapy which targets these shared pathways. This chapter provides a new categorization of inflammatory pustular dermatoses in the context of recent genetic and biologic insights. We will discuss recently-described monogenic diseases with pustular phenotypes, including deficiency of IL-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA), deficiency of the IL-36 receptor antagonist (DITRA), CARD14-associated pustular psoriasis (CAMPS), and pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne (PAPA). We will then discuss how these new genetic advancements may inform how we view previously described pustular diseases, including pustular psoriasis and its clinical variants, with a focus on historical classification by clinical phenotype. PMID:23827244

  11. Luminol-dependent photoemission from single neutrophil stimulated by phorbol ester and calcium ionophore--role of degranulation and myeloperoxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Suematsu, M.; Oshio, C.; Miura, S.; Suzuki, M.; Houzawa, S.; Tsuchiya, M.

    1988-08-30

    Luminol-dependent photonic burst from phorbol ester-treated single neutrophil was visually investigated by using an ultrasensitive photonic image intensifier microscope. Neutrophils stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate (0.1 microgram/ml) alone produced a negligible level of photonic activities in the presence of luminol (10 micrograms/ml). The additional application of 0.1 microM Ca2+ ionophore A23187 induced explosive changes of photonic burst corresponding to the distribution of neutrophils, and these photonic activities were gradually spread to extracellular space. Sodium azide, which prevents myeloperoxidase activity, inhibited Ca2+ ionophore-induced photonic burst from phorbol ester-treated neutrophil. These findings suggest a prerequisite role of degranulation and myeloperoxidase release in luminol-dependent photoemission from stimulated neutrophils.

  12. Association of a bovine CXCR2 gene polymorphism with neutrophil survival and killing ability.

    PubMed

    Rambeaud, M; Clift, R; Pighetti, G M

    2006-06-15

    Recent research in our lab has demonstrated a significant association between the incidence of subclinical mastitis and specific polymorphisms of the CXCR2 gene in Holstein dairy cows. This gene encodes a receptor for interleukin-8 (IL-8), a key regulator of neutrophil migration, killing and survival. Because of the importance of this gene in neutrophil function, we hypothesized that differences in neutrophil killing and survival may exist among the CXCR2 genotypes and potentially contribute to the observed variation in intramammary infections. To test this hypothesis, neutrophils were isolated from cows representing each CXCR2 +777 genotype (GG, GC or CC) and tested for suppression of apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, glutathione levels, and bactericidal activity. A significant increase in survival was observed in neutrophils from cows with a CC genotype when compared to those with a GG genotype in response to IL-8, but not dexamethasone. In contrast, a significant reduction in neutrophil ROS generation in response to phorbol-13-myristate-12 acetate (PMA) was observed in cows with a CC genotype when compared to those with a GG genotype. However, no differences in bactericidal activity or glutathione levels were observed among genotypes. The functional activity of neutrophils from cows heterozygous for this polymorphism was intermediate between those with homozygous genotypes for those assays where differences were observed among homozygous genotypes. In summary, our results suggest that neutrophils from Holstein cows with different CXCR2 genotypes vary in their ability to suppress apoptosis and produce ROS. These differences have the potential to influence overall neutrophil function and may partially explain the variation observed with respect to mastitis in vivo. These results provide a foundation for future research aimed at better understanding the basic differences between dairy cows genetically more or less susceptible to mastitis and has

  13. Advanced oxidation protein products are generated by bovine neutrophils and inhibit free radical production in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bordignon, Milena; Da Dalt, Laura; Marinelli, Lieta; Gabai, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    Despite the recognised importance of oxidative stress in the health and immune function of dairy cows, protein oxidation markers have been poorly studied in this species. The current study aimed to characterise markers of protein oxidation generated by activated bovine neutrophils and investigate the biological effects of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) on bovine neutrophils. Markers of protein oxidation (AOPP, dityrosines and carbonyls) were measured in culture medium containing bovine serum albumin (BSA) exposed to neutrophils. The effect of AOPP-BSA on generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was assessed by chemiluminescence. Activation of caspases-3, -8 and -9 and the presence of DNA laddering were used as apoptosis markers. Greater amounts of AOPP were generated by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-activated than non-activated neutrophils (1.46 ± 0.13 vs. 0.75 ± 0.13 nmol/mg protein, respectively; P<0.05). Activated neutrophils and hypochlorous acid generated slightly different patterns of oxidized protein markers. Exposure to AOPP-BSA did not stimulate ROS production. Activated neutrophils generated a lesser amount of ROS when incubated with AOPP-BSA (P<0.001). Activation with PMA induced a loss of viable neutrophils after 3h, which was greater with AOPP-BSA incubation (P<0.05). Detectable amounts of active caspases-3, -8 and -9 were found in nearly all samples but differences in caspase activation or DNA laddering were not observed comparing treatment groups. Apoptosis was unlikely to be responsible for the greater loss of PMA-activated neutrophils cultured in AOPP-BSA and it is possible that primary necrosis occurred. The results suggest that accumulation of oxidized proteins at an inflammatory site might result in a progressive reduction of neutrophil viability.

  14. Volatile organic compounds discriminate between eosinophilic and neutrophilic inflammation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schleich, Florence N; Dallinga, Jan W; Henket, Monique; Wouters, Emiel F M; Louis, Renaud; Van Schooten, Frederik J

    2016-03-01

    Inflammation associated oxidative stress leads to peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids thereby generating volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The integrative analysis of the total amount of VOCs released by eosinophils and neutrophils in vitro enables the search for those compounds that discriminates between various inflammatory conditions. The approach comprises isolating eosinophils and neutrophils from 30 ml of blood of healthy non-smoking volunteers by gradient centrifugation, using lymphoprep. Eosinophils are separated from neutrophils by immunomagnetic cell separation using anti-CD16. Cells are activated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and VOCs from the headspace are collected at time 0', 30', 60' and 90' by introduction of ultra-pure nitrogen in the closed flasks at a flow rate of 200 ml min(-1) during 10 min. The gases are trapped onto a sorption tube and analyzed by gas chromatography-time-of-flight-mass spectometry (GC-TOF-MS) in order to identify VOCs released in the headspace by activated neutrophils and eosinophils. Eosinophils and neutrophils were isolated from 26 healthy non-smoking volunteers. The average absolute number of eosinophils and neutrophils upon isolation was 3.5  ×  10(6) and 19.4  ×  10(6), respectively. The volatome in headspace consisted of 2116 compounds and those compounds present in at least 8% of the samples (1123 compounds) were used for further discriminant analysis. Discriminant analysis showed that two VOCs were able to distinguish between eosinophilic and neutrophilic cultures in the unactivated state with 100% correct classification of the entire data set and upon cross validation while five VOCs were able to discriminate between activated eosinophils and neutrophils with 96% correct classification in the original set and upon cross-validation. Analysis of VOCs seems to be a very promising approach in identifying eosinophilic and neutrophilic inflammation but it needs further development

  15. Volatile organic compounds discriminate between eosinophilic and neutrophilic inflammation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schleich, Florence N; Dallinga, Jan W; Henket, Monique; Wouters, Emiel F M; Louis, Renaud; Van Schooten, Frederik J

    2016-02-01

    Inflammation associated oxidative stress leads to peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids thereby generating volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The integrative analysis of the total amount of VOCs released by eosinophils and neutrophils in vitro enables the search for those compounds that discriminates between various inflammatory conditions. The approach comprises isolating eosinophils and neutrophils from 30 ml of blood of healthy non-smoking volunteers by gradient centrifugation, using lymphoprep. Eosinophils are separated from neutrophils by immunomagnetic cell separation using anti-CD16. Cells are activated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and VOCs from the headspace are collected at time 0', 30', 60' and 90' by introduction of ultra-pure nitrogen in the closed flasks at a flow rate of 200 ml min(-1) during 10 min. The gases are trapped onto a sorption tube and analyzed by gas chromatography-time-of-flight-mass spectometry (GC-TOF-MS) in order to identify VOCs released in the headspace by activated neutrophils and eosinophils. Eosinophils and neutrophils were isolated from 26 healthy non-smoking volunteers. The average absolute number of eosinophils and neutrophils upon isolation was 3.5  ×  10(6) and 19.4  ×  10(6), respectively. The volatome in headspace consisted of 2116 compounds and those compounds present in at least 8% of the samples (1123 compounds) were used for further discriminant analysis. Discriminant analysis showed that two VOCs were able to distinguish between eosinophilic and neutrophilic cultures in the unactivated state with 100% correct classification of the entire data set and upon cross validation while five VOCs were able to discriminate between activated eosinophils and neutrophils with 96% correct classification in the original set and upon cross-validation. Analysis of VOCs seems to be a very promising approach in identifying eosinophilic and neutrophilic inflammation but it needs further development

  16. Neutrophil functional disorder in childhood.

    PubMed

    Mironska, K

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil functional disorders thought to be uncommon, yet important as a cause of morbidity and mortality in infants and children. During the first years of life, when the immune system is still not completely mature, when the viral infections are frequent and antibiotic overuse can damage and alter the immune response, the inadequate nutrition followed with iron deficient anemia and malnutrition can lead the child`s organism in state of immunodeficiency. Sometimes is difficult to distinguish at the beginning weather the cause of patient suffering from frequent infections is existing of primary immunodeficiency disorder or the cause of the immunodeficiency state is just from exogenous factors. Fortunately, primary immune deficiencies are rare diseases and only 6-7% of all of them, due to the neutrophilic functional disorders. Unfortunately, many exogenous and environmental factors have influence to the immune system, and the percentage of secondary caused neutrophilic functional disorders is much higher and should be considered when children are investigated for immunodeficiency. So, when to suspect neutrophil functional disorder? The hallmarks for diseases related to the neutrophilic functional disorders are discussed in this article.

  17. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Go Viral

    PubMed Central

    Schönrich, Günther; Raftery, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most numerous immune cells. Their importance as the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens is well described. In contrast, the role of neutrophils in controlling viral infections is less clear. Bacterial and fungal pathogens can stimulate neutrophils extracellular traps (NETs) in a process called NETosis. Although NETosis has previously been described as a special form of programmed cell death, there are forms of NET production that do not end with the demise of neutrophils. As an end result of NETosis, genomic DNA complexed with microbicidal proteins is expelled from neutrophils. These structures can kill pathogens or at least prevent their local spread within host tissue. On the other hand, disproportionate NET formation can cause local or systemic damage. Only recently, it was recognized that viruses can also induce NETosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which NETs are produced in the context of viral infection and how this may contribute to both antiviral immunity and immunopathology. Finally, we shed light on viral immune evasion mechanisms targeting NETs. PMID:27698656

  18. Neutrophils in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Juan; Xiao, Yang; Xu, Aimin; Zhou, Zhiguang

    2016-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that afflicts millions of people worldwide. It occurs as the consequence of destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells triggered by genetic and environmental factors. The initiation and progression of the disease involves a complicated interaction between β-cells and immune cells of both innate and adaptive systems. Immune cells, such as T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells, have been well documented to play crucial roles in type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. However, the particular actions of neutrophils, which are the most plentiful immune cell type and the first immune cells responding to inflammation, in the etiology of this disease might indeed be unfairly ignored. Progress over the past decades shows that neutrophils might have essential effects on the onset and perpetuation of type 1 diabetes. Neutrophil-derived cytotoxic substances, including degranulation products, cytokines, reactive oxygen species and extracellular traps that are released during the process of neutrophil maturation or activation, could cause destruction to islet cells. In addition, these cells can initiate diabetogenic T cell response and promote type 1 diabetes development through cell-cell interactions with other immune and non-immune cells. Furthermore, relevant antineutrophil therapies have been shown to delay and dampen the progression of insulitis and autoimmune diabetes. Here, we discuss the relationship between neutrophils and autoimmune type 1 diabetes from the aforementioned aspects to better understand the roles of these cells in the initiation and development of type 1 diabetes. PMID:27181374

  19. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Go Viral

    PubMed Central

    Schönrich, Günther; Raftery, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most numerous immune cells. Their importance as the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens is well described. In contrast, the role of neutrophils in controlling viral infections is less clear. Bacterial and fungal pathogens can stimulate neutrophils extracellular traps (NETs) in a process called NETosis. Although NETosis has previously been described as a special form of programmed cell death, there are forms of NET production that do not end with the demise of neutrophils. As an end result of NETosis, genomic DNA complexed with microbicidal proteins is expelled from neutrophils. These structures can kill pathogens or at least prevent their local spread within host tissue. On the other hand, disproportionate NET formation can cause local or systemic damage. Only recently, it was recognized that viruses can also induce NETosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which NETs are produced in the context of viral infection and how this may contribute to both antiviral immunity and immunopathology. Finally, we shed light on viral immune evasion mechanisms targeting NETs.

  20. Effects of Docosahexaenoic Supplementation and In Vitro Vitamin C on the Oxidative and Inflammatory Neutrophil Response to Activation

    PubMed Central

    Capó, Xavier; Martorell, Miquel; Sureda, Antoni; Tur, Josep Antoni; Pons, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effects of diet supplementation with docosahexaenoic (DHA) and in vitro vitamin C (VitC) at physiological concentrations on oxidative and inflammatory neutrophil response to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). Fifteen male footballers ingested a beverage enriched with DHA or a placebo for 8 weeks in a randomized double-blind study. Neutrophils were isolated from blood samples collected in basal conditions at the end of nutritional intervention. Neutrophils were cultured for 2 hours at 37°C in (a) control media, (b) media with PMA, and (c) media with PMA + VitC. PMA induces neutrophil degranulation with increased extracellular myeloperoxidase and catalase activities, nitric oxide production, expression of the inflammatory genes cyclooxygenase-2, nuclear factor κβ, interleukin 8 and tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin 6 production. DHA diet supplementation boosts the exit of CAT from neutrophils but moderates the degranulation of myeloperoxidase granules induced by PMA. VitC facilitates azurophilic degranulation of neutrophils and increases gene expression of myeloperoxidase induced by PMA. VitC and DHA diet supplementation prevent PMA effects on inflammatory gene expression, although together they do not produce additional effects. DHA diet supplementation enhances antioxidant defences and anti-inflammatory neutrophil response to in vitro PMA activation. VitC facilitates neutrophil degranulation but prevents an inflammatory response to PMA. PMID:25960826

  1. The Extracellular Matrix of Candida albicans Biofilms Impairs Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    PubMed Central

    Cabezas-Olcoz, Jonathan; Wang, Steven X.; Huttenlocher, Anna; Ansari, Hamayail; Nett, Jeniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils release extracellular traps (NETs) in response to planktonic C. albicans. These complexes composed of DNA, histones, and proteins inhibit Candida growth and dissemination. Considering the resilience of Candida biofilms to host defenses, we examined the neutrophil response to C. albicans during biofilm growth. In contrast to planktonic C. albicans, biofilms triggered negligible release of NETs. Time lapse imaging confirmed the impairment in NET release and revealed neutrophils adhering to hyphae and migrating on the biofilm. NET inhibition depended on an intact extracellular biofilm matrix as physical or genetic disruption of this component resulted in NET release. Biofilm inhibition of NETosis could not be overcome by protein kinase C activation via phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and was associated with suppression of neutrophil reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The degree of impaired NET release correlated with resistance to neutrophil attack. The clinical relevance of the role for extracellular matrix in diminishing NET production was corroborated in vivo using a rat catheter model. The C. albicans pmr1Δ/Δ, defective in production of matrix mannan, appeared to elicit a greater abundance of NETs by scanning electron microscopy imaging, which correlated with a decreased fungal burden. Together, these findings show that C. albicans biofilms impair neutrophil response through an inhibitory pathway induced by the extracellular matrix. PMID:27622514

  2. 7-Hydroxycoumarin modulates the oxidative metabolism, degranulation and microbial killing of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kabeya, Luciana M; Fuzissaki, Carolina N; Taleb-Contini, Silvia H; da C Ferreira, Ana Maria; Naal, Zeki; Santos, Everton O L; Figueiredo-Rinhel, Andréa S G; Azzolini, Ana Elisa C S; Vermelho, Roberta B; Malvezzi, Alberto; Amaral, Antonia T-do; Lopes, João Luis C; Lucisano-Valim, Yara Maria

    2013-10-25

    In the present study, we assessed whether 7-hydroxycoumarin (umbelliferone), 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin, and their acetylated analogs modulate some of the effector functions of human neutrophils and display antioxidant activity. These compounds decreased the ability of neutrophils to generate superoxide anion, release primary granule enzymes, and kill Candida albicans. Cytotoxicity did not mediate their inhibitory effect, at least under the assessed conditions. These coumarins scavenged hypochlorous acid and protected ascorbic acid from electrochemical oxidation in cell-free systems. On the other hand, the four coumarins increased the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence of human neutrophils stimulated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate and serum-opsonized zymosan. Oxidation of the hydroxylated coumarins by the neutrophil myeloperoxidase produced highly reactive coumarin radical intermediates, which mediated the prooxidant effect observed in the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence assay. These species also oxidized ascorbic acid and the spin traps α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone and 5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide. Therefore, 7-hydroxycoumarin and the derivatives investigated here were able to modulate the effector functions of human neutrophils and scavenge reactive oxidizing species; they also generated reactive coumarin derivatives in the presence of myeloperoxidase. Acetylation of the free hydroxyl group, but not addition of the 4-methyl group, suppressed the biological effects of 7-hydroxycoumarin. These findings help clarify how 7-hydroxycoumarin acts on neutrophils to produce relevant anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:23994743

  3. Preliminary study on overproduction of reactive oxygen species by neutrophils in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Ridzuan, Noridzzaida; John, Cini Mathew; Sandrasaigaran, Pratheep; Maqbool, Maryam; Liew, Lee Chuen; Lim, Jonathan; Ramasamy, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the amount and pattern of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in diabetic patient-derived neutrophils. METHODS: Blood samples from type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients and volunteers (controls) were subjected to neutrophil isolation and the assessment of neutrophil oxidative burst using chemiluminescence assay. Neutrophils were activated by using phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and neutrophils without activation were kept as a negative control. The chemiluminescence readings were obtained by transferring cell suspension into a 1.5 mL Eppendorf tube, with PMA and luminol. Reaction mixtures were gently vortexed and placed inside luminometer for a duration of 5 min. RESULTS: Our results showed that in the resting condition, the secretion of ROS in normal non-diabetic individuals was relatively low compared to diabetic patients. However, the time scale observation revealed that the secreted ROS declined accordingly with time in non-diabetic individuals, yet such a reduction was not detected in diabetic patients where at all the time points, the secretion of ROS was maintained at similar magnitudes. This preliminary study demonstrated that ROS production was significantly higher in patients with DM compared to non-diabetic subjects in both resting and activated conditions. CONCLUSION: The respiratory burst activity of neutrophils could be affected by DM and the elevation of ROS production might be an aggravating factor in diabetic-related complications. PMID:27433296

  4. The Extracellular Matrix of Candida albicans Biofilms Impairs Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Chad J; Cabezas-Olcoz, Jonathan; Kernien, John F; Wang, Steven X; Beebe, David J; Huttenlocher, Anna; Ansari, Hamayail; Nett, Jeniel E

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils release extracellular traps (NETs) in response to planktonic C. albicans. These complexes composed of DNA, histones, and proteins inhibit Candida growth and dissemination. Considering the resilience of Candida biofilms to host defenses, we examined the neutrophil response to C. albicans during biofilm growth. In contrast to planktonic C. albicans, biofilms triggered negligible release of NETs. Time lapse imaging confirmed the impairment in NET release and revealed neutrophils adhering to hyphae and migrating on the biofilm. NET inhibition depended on an intact extracellular biofilm matrix as physical or genetic disruption of this component resulted in NET release. Biofilm inhibition of NETosis could not be overcome by protein kinase C activation via phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and was associated with suppression of neutrophil reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The degree of impaired NET release correlated with resistance to neutrophil attack. The clinical relevance of the role for extracellular matrix in diminishing NET production was corroborated in vivo using a rat catheter model. The C. albicans pmr1Δ/Δ, defective in production of matrix mannan, appeared to elicit a greater abundance of NETs by scanning electron microscopy imaging, which correlated with a decreased fungal burden. Together, these findings show that C. albicans biofilms impair neutrophil response through an inhibitory pathway induced by the extracellular matrix. PMID:27622514

  5. 7-Hydroxycoumarin modulates the oxidative metabolism, degranulation and microbial killing of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kabeya, Luciana M; Fuzissaki, Carolina N; Taleb-Contini, Silvia H; da C Ferreira, Ana Maria; Naal, Zeki; Santos, Everton O L; Figueiredo-Rinhel, Andréa S G; Azzolini, Ana Elisa C S; Vermelho, Roberta B; Malvezzi, Alberto; Amaral, Antonia T-do; Lopes, João Luis C; Lucisano-Valim, Yara Maria

    2013-10-25

    In the present study, we assessed whether 7-hydroxycoumarin (umbelliferone), 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin, and their acetylated analogs modulate some of the effector functions of human neutrophils and display antioxidant activity. These compounds decreased the ability of neutrophils to generate superoxide anion, release primary granule enzymes, and kill Candida albicans. Cytotoxicity did not mediate their inhibitory effect, at least under the assessed conditions. These coumarins scavenged hypochlorous acid and protected ascorbic acid from electrochemical oxidation in cell-free systems. On the other hand, the four coumarins increased the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence of human neutrophils stimulated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate and serum-opsonized zymosan. Oxidation of the hydroxylated coumarins by the neutrophil myeloperoxidase produced highly reactive coumarin radical intermediates, which mediated the prooxidant effect observed in the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence assay. These species also oxidized ascorbic acid and the spin traps α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone and 5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide. Therefore, 7-hydroxycoumarin and the derivatives investigated here were able to modulate the effector functions of human neutrophils and scavenge reactive oxidizing species; they also generated reactive coumarin derivatives in the presence of myeloperoxidase. Acetylation of the free hydroxyl group, but not addition of the 4-methyl group, suppressed the biological effects of 7-hydroxycoumarin. These findings help clarify how 7-hydroxycoumarin acts on neutrophils to produce relevant anti-inflammatory effects.

  6. Complement component C3b and immunoglobulin Fc receptors on neutrophils from calves with leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Worku, M; Paape, M J; Di Carlo, A; Kehrli, M E; Marquardt, W W

    1995-04-01

    Receptors for opsonins, such as complement component C3b (CR1) and immunoglobulins, Fc receptors, interact with adhesion glycoproteins in mediating immune functions. Defects in expression of the adhesion glycoproteins CD11/CD18 results in severely hampered in vitro and in vivo adherence-related functions of leukocytes. Little is known regarding the effect of leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) on ligand binding and receptor expression. We investigated the binding and expression of CR1 and Fc receptors by bovine neutrophils isolated from dairy calves suffering from LAD, compared with clinically normal (hereafter referred to as normal) age-matched calves. Neutrophils were also assayed for endogenously bound IgG and IgM and for exogenous binding of C3b, IgG1, IgG2, IgM, and aggregated IgG (aIgG), using flow cytometry. Luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) production in response to IgG2 opsonized zymosan was studied, and specific inhibition of CL was used to determine the specificity of IgG2 binding. Activation of protein kinase C with phorbol myristate acetate was used to determine the effect of cellular activation on expression of CR1. A greater percentage of neutrophils from normal calves bound C3b than did neutrophils from LAD-affected calves. Receptor expression was similar. Activation with phorbol myristate acetate resulted in increased expression of CR1 on neutrophils from normal and LAD-affected calves, but expression was almost twofold greater on neutrophils from normal calves. There was no difference between LAD-affected and normal calves in percentage of neutrophils that bound endogenous IgG and IgM. A greater percentage of neutrophils from normal calves bound exogenous IgM than did neutrophils from LAD-affected calves.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7785817

  7. Neutral serine proteases of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kettritz, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs) exercise tissue-degrading and microbial-killing effects. The spectrum of NSP-mediated functions grows continuously, not least because of methodological progress. Sensitive and specific FRET substrates were developed to study the proteolytic activity of each NSP member. Advanced biochemical methods are beginning to characterize common and specific NSP substrates. The resulting novel information indicates that NSPs contribute not only to genuine inflammatory neutrophil functions but also to autoimmunity, metabolic conditions, and cancer. Tight regulatory mechanisms control the proteolytic potential of NSPs. However, not all NSP functions depend on their enzymatic activity. Proteinase-3 (PR3) is somewhat unique among the NSPs for PR3 functions as an autoantigen. Patients with small-vessel vasculitis develop autoantibodies to PR3 that bind their target antigens on the neutrophil surface and trigger neutrophil activation. These activated cells subsequently contribute to vascular necrosis with life-threatening multiorgan failure. This article discusses various aspects of NSP biology and highlights translational aspects with strong clinical implications. PMID:27558338

  8. Iron-chelating agent, deferasirox, inhibits neutrophil activation and extracellular trap formation.

    PubMed

    Kono, Mari; Saigo, Katsuyasu; Yamamoto, Shiori; Shirai, Kohei; Iwamoto, Shuta; Uematsu, Tomoko; Takahashi, Takayuki; Imoto, Shion; Hashimoto, Makoto; Minami, Yosuke; Wada, Atsushi; Takenokuchi, Mariko; Kawano, Seiji

    2016-10-01

    Iron-chelating agents, which are frequently prescribed to transfusion-dependent patients, have various useful biological effects in addition to chelation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by neutrophils can cause pulmonary endothelial cell damage, which can lead to acute lung injury (ALI). We previously reported that deferasirox (DFS), an iron-chelating agent, inhibits phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced ROS production in neutrophils, in vitro. Here, we investigate whether DFS inhibits vacuolization in neutrophils and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. Human neutrophils were incubated with DFS and stimulated with PMA or fMLP. Human neutrophils were separated from heparinized peripheral blood using density gradient centrifugation, and subsequently incubated with DFS. After 10 minutes, neutrophils were stimulated by PMA or fMLP. Vacuole formation was observed by electron microscopy. For observing NET formations using microscopes, immunohistological analyses using citrullinated histone H3 and myeloperoxidase antibodies, and SYTOX Green (an impermeable DNA detection dye) staining, were conducted. NET formation was measured as the quantity of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), using the AccuBlue Broad Range dsDNA Quantitation Kit. DFS (50 μmol/L) inhibited vacuole formation in the cytoplasm and NET formation. Additionally, 5-100 μmol/L concentration of DFS inhibited the release of dsDNA in a dose-independent manner. We demonstrate that DFS inhibits not only ROS production but also vacuolization and NET formation in neutrophils. These results suggest the possibility of protective effects of DFS against NET-related adverse effects, including ALI and thrombosis. PMID:27333499

  9. Effect of deuterium oxide on neutrophil oxidative metabolism, phagocytosis, and lysosomal enzyme release

    SciTech Connect

    Tsan, M.F.; Turkall, R.M.

    1982-12-01

    We have previously shown that deuterium oxide (D/sub 2/O) enhances the oxidation of methionine, a myeloperoxidase (MPO) -mediated reaction, by human neutrophils during phagocytosis. However, D/sub 2/O has no effect on the oxidation of methionine by the purified MPO-H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-Cl- system. To explain this observation, we studied the effect of D/sub 2/O on the oxidative metabolism, phagocytosis, and lysosomal enzyme release by human neutrophils. D/sub 2/O stimulated the hexose monophosphate shunt (HMS) activity of resting neutrophils in a dose-response fashion. In the presence of latex particles or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), D/sub 2/O brought about an exaggerated stimulation of the HMS activity. This enhancement of the HMS activity by D/sub 2/O was markedly reduced when neutrophils form two patients with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) were used, either in the presence or absence of latex particles or PMA. Superoxide and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production by neutrophils in the presence of latex particles or PMA were also stimulated by D/sub 2/O. In contrast, D/sub 2/O inhibited the ingestion of latex particles. D/sub 2/O enhanced the extracellular release of MPO, but not lactate dehydrogenase, by neutrophils only in the simultaneous presence of cytochalasin B and latex particles. The enhancement of HMS activity and MPO release by D/sub 2/O was partially inhibited by colchicine. Our results suggest that enhancement of neutrophil oxidative metabolism by D/sub 2/O may in part explain the stimulation of methionine oxidation by phagocytosing neutrophils.

  10. Preparation of vinyl acetate

    DOEpatents

    Tustin, Gerald Charles; Zoeller, Joseph Robert; Depew, Leslie Sharon

    1998-01-01

    This invention pertains to the preparation of vinyl acetate by contacting a mixture of hydrogen and ketene with a heterogeneous catalyst containing a transition metal to produce acetaldehyde, which is then reacted with ketene in the presence of an acid catalyst to produce vinyl acetate.

  11. Preparation of vinyl acetate

    DOEpatents

    Tustin, G.C.; Zoeller, J.R.; Depew, L.S.

    1998-03-24

    This invention pertains to the preparation of vinyl acetate by contacting a mixture of hydrogen and ketene with a heterogeneous catalyst containing a transition metal to produce acetaldehyde, which is then reacted with ketene in the presence of an acid catalyst to produce vinyl acetate.

  12. Peeking into the secret life of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Li, Jackson LiangYao; Ng, Lai Guan

    2012-09-01

    The migration of neutrophils between tissue compartments is an important aspect of innate immune surveillance. This process is regulated by a cascade of cellular and molecular signals to avoid unnecessary crowding of neutrophils at the periphery, to allow rapid mobilization of neutrophils in response to inflammatory stimuli, and to return to a state of homeostasis after the response. Intravital microscopy approaches have been fundamental in unraveling many aspects of neutrophil behavior, providing important mechanistic information on the processes involved in basal and disease states. Here, we provide a broad overview of the current state of research on neutrophil biology, describing the processes in the typical life cycle of neutrophils, from their first appearance in the bone marrow until their eventual destruction. We will focus on novel aspects of neutrophil behavior, which had previously been elusive until their recent elucidation by advanced intravital microscopy techniques. PMID:22407577

  13. Neutrophil extracellular traps - the dark side of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Ole E; Borregaard, Niels

    2016-05-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) were discovered as extracellular strands of decondensed DNA in complex with histones and granule proteins, which were expelled from dying neutrophils to ensnare and kill microbes. NETs are formed during infection in vivo by mechanisms different from those originally described in vitro. Citrullination of histones by peptidyl arginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) is central for NET formation in vivo. NETs may spur formation of autoantibodies and may also serve as scaffolds for thrombosis, thereby providing a link among infection, autoimmunity, and thrombosis. In this review, we present the mechanisms by which NETs are formed and discuss the physiological and pathophysiological consequences of NET formation. We conclude that NETs may be of more importance in autoimmunity and thrombosis than in innate immune defense.

  14. Biosynthesis of B2-integrin, intracellular calcium signalling and functional responses of normal and CD18-deficient bovine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Higuchi, H; Nochi, H; Tamoto, K; Araiso, T; Noda, H; Kociba, G J

    1996-09-01

    1Biosynthesis of CD11/CD18 in bovine leucocytes, intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) signalling, chemiluminescent responses and membrane fluidity of neutrophils and the effects of D-mannose on neutrophils from control heifers and a heifer with bovine leucocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) were measured. The synthesis of CD11/CD18 complex was clearly detected in leucocytes from a normal heifer, but not in a BLAD-affected heifer. The transient phase of increased [Ca2+]i was clearly detected in neutrophils from a heifer with BLAD stimulated with opsonised zymosan, aggregated bovine immunoglobulin G or concanavalin A, whereas the sustained phase was deficient or significantly decreased compared with control heifers. [Ca2+]i signalling of neutrophils from control heifers and a heifer with BLAD stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate via an 11b/CD18-independent pathway showed no transient phase, and the subsequent increase in [Ca2+]i was almost identical in neutrophils from affected and control heifers. [Ca2+]i concentration and chemiluminescent responses of neutrophils from a control heifer were clearly decreased by treatment with anti-CD18 and anti-IgG antibodies. No differences in membrane fluidity were detected between neutrophils derived from control and CD18-deficient cattle. D-mannose binds mainly to Fc rather than CD18 receptors, and decreased Agg-IgG induced [Ca2+]i and the chemiluminescent response of neutrophils. The [Ca2+]i responses and Agg-IgG induced chemiluminescent responses of neutrophils from control heifers and a BLAD-affected heifer were inhibited by D-mannose. The characteristic changes of [Ca2+]i signalling and functional responses of B2-integrin-deficient neutrophils were demonstrated. PMID:8880976

  15. Interferon-γ enhances phorbol myristate acetate-induced cell attachment and tumor necrosis factor production via the NF-κB pathway in THP-1 human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Yuichi; Furue, Masutaka

    2013-06-01

    During inflammation, activated macrophages express adhesion molecules and produce cytokines that interact with other hematopoietic and stromal cells. THP-1 non-adherent human monocytic cells differentiate into plastic-adherent macrophages via αVβ3 integrin, by ERK activation in the presence of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). This has proven to be a valuable model for investigating functional monocyte/macrophage diversity. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) is a Th1-cytokine that is crucial in macrophage activation. In this study, we investigated the effects of IFN-γ on adhesion and the secretion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) by PMA-stimulated THP-1 cells. IFN-γ is incapable of inducing cell attachment and TNF production; however, it cumulatively upregulated PMA-induced basal adhesion and TNF production. IFN-γ increased αV integrin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression and among these PMA-induced cell surface adhesion molecules, the blocking antibody for αV integrin suppressed adhesion and TNF production. Furthermore, IFN-γ enhanced PMA-induced NF-κB phosphorylation and not ERK phosphorylation. Accordingly, the NF-κB pathway inhibitor (BAY 11-7082) inhibited the enhancing effect of IFN-γ on adhesion and TNF production. By contrast, the MEK inhibitor (U0126) almost completely eliminated PMA-induced basal adhesion and TNF production. In conclusion, IFN-γ regulates macrophage activation by mediating the NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:23589028

  16. Interferon-γ enhances phorbol myristate acetate-induced cell attachment and tumor necrosis factor production via the NF-κB pathway in THP-1 human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Yuichi; Furue, Masutaka

    2013-06-01

    During inflammation, activated macrophages express adhesion molecules and produce cytokines that interact with other hematopoietic and stromal cells. THP-1 non-adherent human monocytic cells differentiate into plastic-adherent macrophages via αVβ3 integrin, by ERK activation in the presence of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). This has proven to be a valuable model for investigating functional monocyte/macrophage diversity. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) is a Th1-cytokine that is crucial in macrophage activation. In this study, we investigated the effects of IFN-γ on adhesion and the secretion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) by PMA-stimulated THP-1 cells. IFN-γ is incapable of inducing cell attachment and TNF production; however, it cumulatively upregulated PMA-induced basal adhesion and TNF production. IFN-γ increased αV integrin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression and among these PMA-induced cell surface adhesion molecules, the blocking antibody for αV integrin suppressed adhesion and TNF production. Furthermore, IFN-γ enhanced PMA-induced NF-κB phosphorylation and not ERK phosphorylation. Accordingly, the NF-κB pathway inhibitor (BAY 11-7082) inhibited the enhancing effect of IFN-γ on adhesion and TNF production. By contrast, the MEK inhibitor (U0126) almost completely eliminated PMA-induced basal adhesion and TNF production. In conclusion, IFN-γ regulates macrophage activation by mediating the NF-κB signaling pathway.

  17. Phorbol ester-induced activation of protein kinase C leads to increased formation of diacylglycerol in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Faellman, M.; Stendahl, O.; Andersson, T. )

    1989-03-01

    Human neutrophils stimulated with a phorbol ester (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate) responded with an increase in diacylglycerol, considered the natural activator of protein kinase C. The amounts of diacylglycerol formed were considerable, reaching 700-900% of basal after 20 minutes. In contrast, 4-{alpha}-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate did not induce any detectable formation of diacylglycerol. Simultaneously, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate exposure caused increased breakdown of both phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. These results suggest that once activated, protein kinase C can positively modulate its own activity by inducing additional formation of diacylglycerol from at least two different sources.

  18. Modulation of Human Neutrophil Responses by the Essential Oils from Ferula akitschkensis and Their Constituents.

    PubMed

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Kushnarenko, Svetlana V; Özek, Gulmira; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Sinharoy, Pritam; Utegenova, Gulzhakhan A; Abidkulova, Karime T; Özek, Temel; Başer, Kemal Hüsnü Can; Kovrizhina, Anastasia R; Khlebnikov, Andrei I; Damron, Derek S; Quinn, Mark T

    2016-09-28

    Essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation of the umbels+seeds and stems of Ferula akitschkensis (FAEOu/s and FAEOstm, respectively) and analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Fifty-two compounds were identified in FAEOu/s; the primary components were sabinene, α-pinene, β-pinene, terpinen-4-ol, eremophilene, and 2-himachalen-7-ol, whereas the primary components of FAEOstm were myristicin and geranylacetone. FAEOu/s, β-pinene, sabinene, γ-terpinene, geranylacetone, isobornyl acetate, and (E)-2-nonenal stimulated [Ca(2+)]i mobilization in human neutrophils, with the most potent being geranylacetone (EC50 = 7.6 ± 1.9 μM) and isobornyl acetate 6.4 ± 1.7 (EC50 = 7.6 ± 1.9 μM). In addition, treatment of neutrophils with β-pinene, sabinene, γ-terpinene, geranylacetone, and isobornyl acetate desensitized the cells to N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)- and interleukin-8 (IL-8)-induced [Ca(2+)]i flux and inhibited fMLF-induced chemotaxis. The effects of β-pinene, sabinene, γ-terpinene, geranylacetone, and isobornyl acetate on neutrophil [Ca(2+)]i flux were inhibited by transient receptor potential (TRP) channel blockers. Furthermore, the most potent compound, geranylacetone, activated Ca(2+) influx in TRPV1-transfected HEK293 cells. In contrast, myristicin inhibited neutrophil [Ca(2+)]i flux stimulated by fMLF and IL-8 and inhibited capsaicin-induced Ca(2+) influx in TRPV1-transfected HEK293 cells. These findings, as well as pharmacophore modeling of TRP agonists, suggest that geranylacetone is a TRPV1 agonist, whereas myristicin is a TRPV1 antagonist. Thus, at least part of the medicinal properties of Ferula essential oils may be due to modulatory effects on TRP channels. PMID:27586050

  19. Modulation of Human Neutrophil Responses by the Essential Oils from Ferula akitschkensis and Their Constituents.

    PubMed

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Kushnarenko, Svetlana V; Özek, Gulmira; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Sinharoy, Pritam; Utegenova, Gulzhakhan A; Abidkulova, Karime T; Özek, Temel; Başer, Kemal Hüsnü Can; Kovrizhina, Anastasia R; Khlebnikov, Andrei I; Damron, Derek S; Quinn, Mark T

    2016-09-28

    Essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation of the umbels+seeds and stems of Ferula akitschkensis (FAEOu/s and FAEOstm, respectively) and analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Fifty-two compounds were identified in FAEOu/s; the primary components were sabinene, α-pinene, β-pinene, terpinen-4-ol, eremophilene, and 2-himachalen-7-ol, whereas the primary components of FAEOstm were myristicin and geranylacetone. FAEOu/s, β-pinene, sabinene, γ-terpinene, geranylacetone, isobornyl acetate, and (E)-2-nonenal stimulated [Ca(2+)]i mobilization in human neutrophils, with the most potent being geranylacetone (EC50 = 7.6 ± 1.9 μM) and isobornyl acetate 6.4 ± 1.7 (EC50 = 7.6 ± 1.9 μM). In addition, treatment of neutrophils with β-pinene, sabinene, γ-terpinene, geranylacetone, and isobornyl acetate desensitized the cells to N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)- and interleukin-8 (IL-8)-induced [Ca(2+)]i flux and inhibited fMLF-induced chemotaxis. The effects of β-pinene, sabinene, γ-terpinene, geranylacetone, and isobornyl acetate on neutrophil [Ca(2+)]i flux were inhibited by transient receptor potential (TRP) channel blockers. Furthermore, the most potent compound, geranylacetone, activated Ca(2+) influx in TRPV1-transfected HEK293 cells. In contrast, myristicin inhibited neutrophil [Ca(2+)]i flux stimulated by fMLF and IL-8 and inhibited capsaicin-induced Ca(2+) influx in TRPV1-transfected HEK293 cells. These findings, as well as pharmacophore modeling of TRP agonists, suggest that geranylacetone is a TRPV1 agonist, whereas myristicin is a TRPV1 antagonist. Thus, at least part of the medicinal properties of Ferula essential oils may be due to modulatory effects on TRP channels.

  20. Neutrophil ageing is regulated by the microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dachuan; Chen, Grace; Manwani, Deepa; Mortha, Arthur; Xu, Chunliang; Faith, Jeremiah J.; Burk, Robert D.; Kunisaki, Yuya; Jang, Jung-Eun; Scheiermann, Christoph; Merad, Miriam; Frenette, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils provide immune protection against pathogens but also may promote tissue injury in inflammatory diseases1,2. Although neutrophils are generally considered as a relatively homogeneous population, evidence for heterogeneity is emerging3,4. Under steady-state conditions, neutrophil heterogeneity may arise from ageing and the replenishment by newly released neutrophils from the bone marrow5. Aged neutrophils up-regulate CXCR4, a receptor allowing their clearance in the bone marrow6,7, with feedback inhibition of neutrophil production via the IL17/G-CSF axis8, and rhythmic modulation of the haematopoietic stem cell niche5. The aged subset also expresses low levels of L-selectin (CD62L)5,9. Previous studies have suggested that in vitro-aged neutrophils exhibit impaired migration and reduced pro-inflammatory properties6,10. Here, we show using in vivo ageing analyses that the neutrophil pro-inflammatory activity correlates positively with their ageing in the circulation. Aged neutrophils represent an overly active subset exhibiting enhanced αMβ2 integrin (Mac-1) activation and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation under inflammatory conditions. Neutrophil ageing is driven by the microbiota via Toll-like receptors (TLRs)- and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (Myd88)-mediated signalling pathways. Depletion of the microbiota significantly reduces the number of circulating aged neutrophils and dramatically improves the pathogenesis and inflammation-related organ damage in models of sickle cell disease or endotoxin-induced septic shock. These results thus identify an unprecedented role for the microbiota in regulating a disease-promoting neutrophil subset. PMID:26374999

  1. Aberrant activation and regulation of the oxidative burst in neutrophils with Mo1 glycoprotein deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Nauseef, W.M.; de Alarcon, P.; Bale, J.F.; Clark, R.A.

    1986-07-15

    Patients whose cells are deficient in the glycoproteins LFA-1, Mo1, and p150,95 have recurrent infections and pronounced abnormalities in neutrophil adherence, aggregation, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis. Activation and regulation of oxidative metabolism of Mo1-deficient neutrophils have been characterized. These cells failed to depolarize or to produce O/sub 2//sup -/ or H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ normally when stimulated by opsonized zymosan. The chemotactic peptide formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine depolarized Mo1-deficient neutrophils normally but caused supernormal production of O/sub 2//sup -/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, a result of a prolonged burst in oxidative metabolism. Phorbol myristate acetate depolarized Mo1-deficient neutrophils at a nearly normal rate but evoked release of significantly less O/sub 2//sup -/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ than from normal PMN. The aberrant activation and regulation of the oxidative burst in Mo1-deficient neutrohpils are considered in light of recently neutrophils are considered in light of recently emerging concepts in the cell biology of this process, and the possibility that these abnormalities reflect a defect in the cytoskeleton-membrane interaction is discussed.

  2. Activation and regulation of arachidonic acid release in rabbit peritoneal neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, W.

    1988-01-01

    Arachidonic acid release in rabbit neutrophils can be enhanced by the addition of chemotactic fMet-Leu-Phe, platelet-activating factor, PAF, or the calcium ionophore A23187. Over 80% of the release ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid comes from phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol. The release is dose-dependent and increases with increasing concentration of the stimulus. The A23187-induced release increases with increasing time of the stimulation. ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid release, but not the rise in the concentration of intracellular calcium, is inhibited in pertussis toxin-treated neutrophils stimulated with PAF. The ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid released by A23187 is potentiated while that release by fMET-Leu-Phe or PAF is inhibited in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, PMA, treated rabbit neutrophils. The protein kinase C inhibitor 1-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine, H-7, has no effect on the potentiation by PMA of the A23187-induced release, it prevents the inhibition by PMA of the release produced by PAF or fMet-Leu-Phe. In addition, PMA increases arachidonic acid release in H-7-treated cells stimulated with fMet-Leu-Phe. The diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59022 increases the level of diacylglycerol in neutrophils stimulated with fMet-Leu-Phe. Furthermore, R59022 potentiates ({sup 3}H) arachidonic acid release produced by fMet-Leu-Phe. This potentiation is not inhibited by H-7, in fact, it is increased in H-7-treated neutrophils.

  3. Purification and characterization of an isoform of protein kinase C from bovine neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Dianoux, A.C.; Stasia, M.J.; Vignais, P.V. )

    1989-01-24

    Protein kinase C (PKC) from bovine neutrophils was purified 1,420-fold. Subcellular fractionation analysis of bovine neutrophil homogenate in the presence of EGTA indicated that more than 95% of the PKC activity was present in the soluble fraction. Whereas bovine brain PKC could be resolved into four isoenzymatic forms by chromatography on a hydroxylapatite column, bovine neutrophil PKC was eluted in a single peak, suggesting that it corresponded to a single isoform. The apparent molecular weight of bovine neutrophil PKC was 82,000, as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Bovine neutrophil PKC was autophosphorylated in the presence of ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP, provided that the medium was supplemented with Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, phosphatidylserine, and diacylglycerol; phorbol myristate acetate could substitute for diacylglycerol. Autophosphorylated PKC could be cleaved by trypsin to generate two radiolabeled peptides of M{sub r} 48,000 and 39,000. The labeled amino acids were serine and threonine. During the course of the purification procedure of bovine neutrophil PKC, a protein of M{sub r} 23,000 was found to exhibit a strong propensity to PKC-dependent phosphorylation in the presence of ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP, Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, phosphatidylserine, and diacylglycerol. This protein was recovered together with PKC in one of the two active peaks eluted from the Mono Q column at the second step of PKC purification. It is suggested that the M{sub r} 23,000 protein might be a natural substrate for bovine neutrophil PKC.

  4. Nicotine is Chemotactic for Neutrophils and Enhances Neutrophil Responsiveness to Chemotactic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totti, Noel; McCusker, Kevin T.; Campbell, Edward J.; Griffin, Gail L.; Senior, Robert M.

    1984-01-01

    Neutrophils contribute to chronic bronchitis and pulmonary emphysema associated with cigarette smoking. Nicotine was found to be chemotactic for human neutrophils but not monocytes, with a peak activity at ~ 31 micromolar. In lower concentrations (comparable to those in smokers' plasma), nicotine enhanced the response of neutrophils to two chemotactic peptides. In contrast to most other chemoattractants for neutrophils, however, nicotine did not affect degranulation or superoxide production. Nicotine thus may promote inflammation and consequent lung injury in smokers.

  5. Biomaterial surface-dependent neutrophil mobility.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yue; Doerschuk, Claire M; Anderson, James M; Marchant, Roger E

    2004-06-15

    Compromised neutrophil function in the presence of an implanted biomaterial may represent an important mechanism that allows for the development of implant-associated infections. Here, human neutrophil mobility has been investigated on a polyurethane (ChronoFlex AR), a hydrophobic surface consisting of an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) self-assembled monolayer, and a glass reference material. Neutrophil mobility was quantified, based on cell movement speed and persistence time obtained from time-lapse optical microscopy, while neutrophil cytoskeletal structures and morphology were visualized using confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Our results show that material surface properties affect neutrophil-surface interactions, as reflected by morphological changes, and the mobility of neutrophils stimulated by N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP). In the absence of adsorbed plasma proteins, the mobility of stimulated neutrophils increased with increasing material hydrophobicity from glass, to polyurethane, to OTS. The opposite trend was observed in the presence of adsorbed plasma proteins, such that neutrophil mobility increased with decreasing material hydrophobicity. Analysis of the results showed that the mobility of fMLP-stimulated neutrophils cells was inversely related to the extent of cell spreading on the materials. PMID:15162402

  6. Two neutrophilic dermatoses captured simultaneously on histology

    PubMed Central

    Wlodek, Christina; Bhatt, Nidhi; Kennedy, Cameron

    2016-01-01

    A number of neutrophilic dermatoses are associated with malignancies and their treatment. These rarely occur together in the same patient. A Caucasian 72-year-old male was treated for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with chemotherapy including daunorubicin and cytarabine. Within 48 hours of commencing treatment, he developed pyrexia and, two days later, disseminated non-tender pink plaques on the limbs and trunk. A skin biopsy showed a dermal interstitial infiltrate of lymphocytes, histiocytoid cells and predominantly neutrophils. This extended into the subcutis, where a neutrophilic lobular panniculitis was seen. These findings are consistent with Sweet’s syndrome. In addition, a neutrophilic and lymphocytic infiltrate was also present around eccrine coils and lower ducts. The eccrine epithelium showed squamous metaplasia with dyskeratosis and sloughing into the lumen. These latter findings are consistent with neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis (NEH). These two histologically distinct entities form part of the neutrophilic dermatoses that have been described in oncology patients with reports of concurrent or sequential occurrence of various neutrophilic dermatoses in the same patient. Ours, however, is only the second reported case of simultaneously captured Sweet’s and NEH in the setting of AML. The most likely explanation is that of an epiphenomenon, whereby the neutrophilic infiltrate extended around the sweat glands in the context of the neutrophilic dermatosis. PMID:27648385

  7. Two neutrophilic dermatoses captured simultaneously on histology.

    PubMed

    Wlodek, Christina; Bhatt, Nidhi; Kennedy, Cameron

    2016-07-01

    A number of neutrophilic dermatoses are associated with malignancies and their treatment. These rarely occur together in the same patient. A Caucasian 72-year-old male was treated for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with chemotherapy including daunorubicin and cytarabine. Within 48 hours of commencing treatment, he developed pyrexia and, two days later, disseminated non-tender pink plaques on the limbs and trunk. A skin biopsy showed a dermal interstitial infiltrate of lymphocytes, histiocytoid cells and predominantly neutrophils. This extended into the subcutis, where a neutrophilic lobular panniculitis was seen. These findings are consistent with Sweet's syndrome. In addition, a neutrophilic and lymphocytic infiltrate was also present around eccrine coils and lower ducts. The eccrine epithelium showed squamous metaplasia with dyskeratosis and sloughing into the lumen. These latter findings are consistent with neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis (NEH). These two histologically distinct entities form part of the neutrophilic dermatoses that have been described in oncology patients with reports of concurrent or sequential occurrence of various neutrophilic dermatoses in the same patient. Ours, however, is only the second reported case of simultaneously captured Sweet's and NEH in the setting of AML. The most likely explanation is that of an epiphenomenon, whereby the neutrophilic infiltrate extended around the sweat glands in the context of the neutrophilic dermatosis. PMID:27648385

  8. Transendothelial migration enhances integrin-dependent human neutrophil chemokinesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transendothelial migration of neutrophils induces phenotypic changes that influence the interactions of neutrophils with extravascular tissue components. To assess the influence of transmigration on neutrophil chemokinetic motility, we used polyethylene glycol hydrogels covalently modified with spec...

  9. Functional constituents of the active site of human neutrophil collagenase.

    PubMed

    Mookhtiar, K A; Wang, F; Van Wart, H E

    1986-05-01

    A series of chemical modification reactions has been carried out to identify functional constituents of the active site of human neutrophil collagenase. The enzyme is reversibly inhibited by the transition metal chelating agent 1,10-phenanthroline, and inhibition is fully reversed by zinc. Removal of weakly bound metal ions by gel filtration inactivates collagenase, and activity is fully restored on immediate readdition of calcium. The enzyme is unaffected by reagents that modify serine, cysteine, and arginine residues. However, reaction with the carboxyl reagents cyclohexylmorpholinocarbodiimide and Woodward's Reagent K lowers the activity of the enzyme substantially. Acetylimidazole inactivates the enzyme, but activity is completely restored on addition of hydroxylamine. The enzyme is also inactivated by tetranitromethane, indicating that it contains an essential tyrosine residue. Acylation of collagenase with diethyl pyrocarbonate, diketene, acetic anhydride, or trinitrobenzenesulfonate inactivates the enzyme, and activity is not restored on addition of hydroxylamine, indicating the presence of an essential lysine residue.

  10. Methane from acetate.

    PubMed

    Ferry, J G

    1992-09-01

    The general features are known for the pathway by which most methane is produced in nature. All acetate-utilizing methanogenic microorganisms contain CODH which catalyzes the cleavage of acetyl-CoA; however, the pathway differs from all other acetate-utilizing anaerobes in that the methyl group is reduced to methane with electrons derived from oxidation of the carbonyl group of acetyl-CoA to CO2. The current understanding of the methanogenic fermentation of acetate provides impressions of nature's novel solutions to problems of methyl transfer, electron transport, and energy conservation. The pathway is now at a level of understanding that will permit productive investigations of these and other interesting questions in the near future. PMID:1512186

  11. Effects of an aqueous extract from leaves of Ligustrum vulgare on mediators of inflammation in a human neutrophils model.

    PubMed

    Czerwińska, Monika E; Granica, Sebastian; Kiss, Anna K

    2013-07-01

    Leaves of Ligustrum vulgare (common privet) have been used for treatment of oropharyngeal inflammations or as antirheumatic, diuretic, and hypotensive agents in folk medicine in southern Europe. Taking into account that neutrophils are involved in the inflammation, the aim of the study was to determine the effect of an aqueous extract prepared from leaves of Ligustrum vulgare on neutrophil functions. The extract was characterized by the HPLC-DAD-MSn method. The inhibition of reactive oxygen species production by formyl-met-leu-phenylalanine- or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-stimulated neutrophils was determined using luminol- or lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence. The effect on myeloperoxidase, metalloproteinase 9, and interleukin 8 production by neutrophils was measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neutrophil elastase release was established spectrophotometrically. The expression of adhesion molecules on neutrophils was analyzed with flow cytometry. The main compounds detected were flavonoids, phenylpropanoids, hydroxycinnamates, and secoiridoids. The inhibition of oxidative burst by the extract was comparable in both stimuli models (formyl-met-leu-phenylalanine: IC50 = 18.2 ± 4.0 µg/mL; phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate: IC50 = 19.8 ± 3.0 µg/mL). The extract in the concentration range of 5-50 µg/mL inhibited neutrophil elastase release by 23.9-34.1 % and myeloperoxidase release by 24.2-37.4 %. The inhibitory effect on metalloproteinase 9 and interleukin 8 production was around 20 %. The extract in the highest concentration modulated the expression of L-selectin and β2 integrin. Our results partly support the traditional use of common privet leaves as an anti-inflammatory agent.

  12. Effects of an aqueous extract from leaves of Ligustrum vulgare on mediators of inflammation in a human neutrophils model.

    PubMed

    Czerwińska, Monika E; Granica, Sebastian; Kiss, Anna K

    2013-07-01

    Leaves of Ligustrum vulgare (common privet) have been used for treatment of oropharyngeal inflammations or as antirheumatic, diuretic, and hypotensive agents in folk medicine in southern Europe. Taking into account that neutrophils are involved in the inflammation, the aim of the study was to determine the effect of an aqueous extract prepared from leaves of Ligustrum vulgare on neutrophil functions. The extract was characterized by the HPLC-DAD-MSn method. The inhibition of reactive oxygen species production by formyl-met-leu-phenylalanine- or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-stimulated neutrophils was determined using luminol- or lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence. The effect on myeloperoxidase, metalloproteinase 9, and interleukin 8 production by neutrophils was measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neutrophil elastase release was established spectrophotometrically. The expression of adhesion molecules on neutrophils was analyzed with flow cytometry. The main compounds detected were flavonoids, phenylpropanoids, hydroxycinnamates, and secoiridoids. The inhibition of oxidative burst by the extract was comparable in both stimuli models (formyl-met-leu-phenylalanine: IC50 = 18.2 ± 4.0 µg/mL; phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate: IC50 = 19.8 ± 3.0 µg/mL). The extract in the concentration range of 5-50 µg/mL inhibited neutrophil elastase release by 23.9-34.1 % and myeloperoxidase release by 24.2-37.4 %. The inhibitory effect on metalloproteinase 9 and interleukin 8 production was around 20 %. The extract in the highest concentration modulated the expression of L-selectin and β2 integrin. Our results partly support the traditional use of common privet leaves as an anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:23824550

  13. Antioxidant, antimicrobial and neutrophil-modulating activities of herb extracts.

    PubMed

    Denev, Petko; Kratchanova, Maria; Ciz, Milan; Lojek, Antonin; Vasicek, Ondrej; Blazheva, Denitsa; Nedelcheva, Plamena; Vojtek, Libor; Hyrsl, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    The present study provides a comprehensive data on the antioxidant, antimicrobial and neutrophil-modulating activities of extracts from six medicinal plants--blackberry (Rubus fruticosus) leaves, chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) leaves, hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna) leaves, lady's mantle (Alchemilla glabra) aerial parts, meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria) aerial parts and raspberry (Rubus idaeus) leaves. In order to analyze the antioxidant activity of the herbs, several methods (ORAC, TRAP, HORAC and inhibition of lipid peroxidation) were used. Blackberry leaves and meadowsweet extracts revealed the highest antioxidant activities via all methods. All extracts studied blocked almost completely the opsonized zymosan particle-activated ROS production by neutrophils from human whole blood. On the other hand, the effect of extracts on phorbol myristate acetate-activated ROS production was much milder and even nonsignificant in the case of chokeberry leaves. This latter result suggests that extracts (apart from their antioxidative activity) interfere with the signaling cascade of phagocyte activation upstream of the protein kinase C activation. The antimicrobial activity of the investigated extracts against 11 human pathogens was investigated using three different methods. Meadowsweet and blackberry leaves extracts had the highest antimicrobial effect and the lowest minimal inhibiting concentrations (MICs) against the microorganisms tested.

  14. A Radical Break: Restraining Neutrophil Migration.

    PubMed

    Renkawitz, Jörg; Sixt, Michael

    2016-09-12

    When neutrophils infiltrate a site of inflammation, they have to stop at the right place to exert their effector function. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Wang et al. (2016) show that neutrophils sense reactive oxygen species via the TRPM2 channel to arrest migration at their target site. PMID:27623379

  15. Mechanotransduction in neutrophil activation and deactivation.

    PubMed

    Ekpenyong, Andrew E; Toepfner, Nicole; Chilvers, Edwin R; Guck, Jochen

    2015-11-01

    Mechanotransduction refers to the processes through which cells sense mechanical stimuli by converting them to biochemical signals and, thus, eliciting specific cellular responses. Cells sense mechanical stimuli from their 3D environment, including the extracellular matrix, neighboring cells and other mechanical forces. Incidentally, the emerging concept of mechanical homeostasis,long term or chronic regulation of mechanical properties, seems to apply to neutrophils in a peculiar manner, owing to neutrophils' ability to dynamically switch between the activated/primed and deactivated/deprimed states. While neutrophil activation has been known for over a century, its deactivation is a relatively recent discovery. Even more intriguing is the reversibility of neutrophil activation and deactivation. We review and critically evaluate recent findings that suggest physiological roles for neutrophil activation and deactivation and discuss possible mechanisms by which mechanical stimuli can drive the oscillation of neutrophils between the activated and resting states. We highlight several molecules that have been identified in neutrophil mechanotransduction, including cell adhesion and transmembrane receptors, cytoskeletal and ion channel molecules. The physiological and pathophysiological implications of such mechanically induced signal transduction in neutrophils are highlighted as a basis for future work. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology. PMID:26211453

  16. Neutrophil survival in the death zone.

    PubMed

    Croker, Ben A

    2014-01-16

    In this issue of Blood, Thompson et al reveal a key role for hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2a in the adaptation of neutrophils to hypoxia. Tissue hypoxia is a common feature of trauma and inflammation. Infiltrating neutrophils must adapt to this low-oxygen environment to satisfy the metabolic and functional demands of an immune response.

  17. Chronic neutrophilic leukaemia and plasma cell-related neutrophilic leukaemoid reactions.

    PubMed

    Bain, Barbara J; Ahmad, Shahzaib

    2015-11-01

    Many cases reported as 'chronic neutrophilic leukaemia' have had an associated plasma cell neoplasm. Recent evidence suggests that the great majority of such cases represent a neutrophilic leukaemoid reaction to the underlying multiple myeloma or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. We have analysed all accessible reported cases to clarify the likely diagnosis and to ascertain whether toxic granulation, Döhle bodies and an increased neutrophil alkaline phosphatase score were useful in making a distinction between chronic neutrophilic leukaemia and a neutrophilic leukaemoid reaction. We established that all these changes occur in both conditions. Toxic granulation and Döhle bodies are more consistently present in leukaemoid reactions but also occur quite frequently in chronic neutrophilic leukaemia. The neutrophil alkaline phosphatase score is increased in both conditions and is of no value in making a distinction.

  18. How Neutrophils Shape Adaptive Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Leliefeld, Pieter H. C.; Koenderman, Leo; Pillay, Janesh

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are classically considered as cells pivotal for the first line of defense against invading pathogens. In recent years, evidence has accumulated that they are also important in the orchestration of adaptive immunity. Neutrophils rapidly migrate in high numbers to sites of inflammation (e.g., infection, tissue damage, and cancer) and are subsequently able to migrate to draining lymph nodes (LNs). Both at the site of inflammation as well as in the LNs, neutrophils can engage with lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells. This crosstalk occurs either directly via cell–cell contact or via mediators, such as proteases, cytokines, and radical oxygen species. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge regarding locations and mechanisms of interaction between neutrophils and lymphocytes in the context of homeostasis and various pathological conditions. In addition, we will highlight the complexity of the microenvironment that is involved in the generation of suppressive or stimulatory neutrophil phenotypes. PMID:26441976

  19. How Neutrophils Shape Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Leliefeld, Pieter H C; Koenderman, Leo; Pillay, Janesh

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are classically considered as cells pivotal for the first line of defense against invading pathogens. In recent years, evidence has accumulated that they are also important in the orchestration of adaptive immunity. Neutrophils rapidly migrate in high numbers to sites of inflammation (e.g., infection, tissue damage, and cancer) and are subsequently able to migrate to draining lymph nodes (LNs). Both at the site of inflammation as well as in the LNs, neutrophils can engage with lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells. This crosstalk occurs either directly via cell-cell contact or via mediators, such as proteases, cytokines, and radical oxygen species. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge regarding locations and mechanisms of interaction between neutrophils and lymphocytes in the context of homeostasis and various pathological conditions. In addition, we will highlight the complexity of the microenvironment that is involved in the generation of suppressive or stimulatory neutrophil phenotypes. PMID:26441976

  20. Neutrophil uptake of vaccinia virus in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    West, B.C.; Eschete, M.L.; Cox, M.E.; King, J.W.

    1987-10-01

    We studied human neutrophils for uptake of vaccinia virus. Uptake was determined radiometrically and by electron microscopy. Vaccinia virus was labeled with /sup 14/C or /sup 3/H, incubated with neutrophils, and quantified in neutrophil pellets in a new radiometric phagocytosis assay. Better results were obtained from assays of (/sup 3/H)thymidine-labeled virus; uptake increased through 1 hr and then plateaued. Phagocytosis of 3H-labeled Staphylococcus aureus was normal. Uptake of virus was serum dependent. Hexose monophosphate shunt activity was measured by two methods. No /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from (/sup 14/C)1-glucose accompanied uptake of vaccinia virus, in contrast to the respiratory burst accompanying bacterial phagocytosis. Electron microscopy showed intact to slightly digested intraphagolysosomal vaccinia virus. Pock reduction assay showed a decrease in viral content due to neutrophils until 6 hr of incubation, when a modest but significant increase was observed. Thus, neutrophil uptake of vaccinia virus is distinguished from bacterial phagocytosis.

  1. Neutrophil function and apoptosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C treated with pegylated interferon α and ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Jabłonowska, Elżbieta; Wójcik, Kamila; Kur, Barbara; Lewkowicz, Przemysław; Nocuń, Marek

    2012-02-01

    The role of neutrophils in the pathogenesis of chronic hepatitis C as well as the effect of pegylated interferon α (PEG-IFN-α) and ribavirin treatment on neutrophil function is not precisely known. The study included 32 patients with CCH aged between 19 and 58 years (mean 33.5 years). Before and after 12 weeks of treatment with Peg-IFN-α and ribavirin, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, expression of adhesion molecules CD11b/MAC-1, CD16, CD18 and CD62L on neutrophils, as well as apoptosis and necrosis of these cells were analyzed with the use of flow cytometry. During antiviral therapy, a statistically significant decrease of mean fluorescence intensity for CD16 high and CD62 and increase for CD11b/MAC-1 along with the increased apoptosis and decreased necrosis of neutrophils were observed. After 12 weeks of treatment, intracellular ROS production by unstimulated neutrophils did not change, but after stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, statistically significant increase of ROS level was observed. During PEG-IFN-α and ribavirin treatment, activation of neutrophil function and increased ROS production were reported, which possibly resulted in accelerated apoptosis of these cells.

  2. Dynamic interactions of neutrophils and biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Hirschfeld, Josefine

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of microbial infections in humans are biofilm-associated and difficult to treat, as biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and protect themselves from external threats in various ways. Biofilms are tenaciously attached to surfaces and impede the ability of host defense molecules and cells to penetrate them. On the other hand, some biofilms are beneficial for the host and contain protective microorganisms. Microbes in biofilms express pathogen-associated molecular patterns and epitopes that can be recognized by innate immune cells and opsonins, leading to activation of neutrophils and other leukocytes. Neutrophils are part of the first line of defense and have multiple antimicrobial strategies allowing them to attack pathogenic biofilms. Objective/design In this paper, interaction modes of neutrophils with biofilms are reviewed. Antimicrobial strategies of neutrophils and the counteractions of the biofilm communities, with special attention to oral biofilms, are presented. Moreover, possible adverse effects of neutrophil activity and their biofilm-promoting side effects are discussed. Results/conclusion Biofilms are partially, but not entirely, protected against neutrophil assault, which include the processes of phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. However, virulence factors of microorganisms, microbial composition, and properties of the extracellular matrix determine whether a biofilm and subsequent microbial spread can be controlled by neutrophils and other host defense factors. Besides, neutrophils may inadvertently contribute to the physical and ecological stability of biofilms by promoting selection of more resistant strains. Moreover, neutrophil enzymes can degrade collagen and other proteins and, as a result, cause harm to the host tissues. These parameters could be crucial factors in the onset of periodontal inflammation and the subsequent tissue breakdown. PMID:25523872

  3. Human neutrophils in auto-immunity.

    PubMed

    Thieblemont, Nathalie; Wright, Helen L; Edwards, Steven W; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-04-01

    Human neutrophils have great capacity to cause tissue damage in inflammatory diseases via their inappropriate activation to release reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteases and other tissue-damaging molecules. Furthermore, activated neutrophils can release a wide variety of cytokines and chemokines that can regulate almost every element of the immune system. In addition to these important immuno-regulatory processes, activated neutrophils can also release, expose or generate neoepitopes that have the potential to break immune tolerance and result in the generation of autoantibodies, that characterise a number of human auto-immune diseases. For example, in vasculitis, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) that are directed against proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are neutrophil-derived autoantigens and activated neutrophils are the main effector cells of vascular damage. In other auto-immune diseases, these neutrophil-derived neoepitopes may arise from a number of processes that include release of granule enzymes and ROS, changes in the properties of components of their plasma membrane as a result of activation or apoptosis, and via the release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). NETs are extracellular structures that contain chromatin that is decorated with granule enzymes (including citrullinated proteins) that can act as neo-epitopes to generate auto-immunity. This review therefore describes the processes that can result in neutrophil-mediated auto-immunity, and the role of neutrophils in the molecular pathologies of auto-immune diseases such as vasculitis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We discuss the potential role of NETs in these processes and some of the debate in the literature regarding the role of this phenomenon in microbial killing, cell death and auto-immunity. PMID:27036091

  4. Micromanipulation of adhesion of phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate-stimulated T lymphocytes to planar membranes containing intercellular adhesion molecule-1.

    PubMed Central

    Tözeren, A; Mackie, L H; Lawrence, M B; Chan, P Y; Dustin, M L; Springer, T A

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical and experimental methodology to determine the physical strength of cell adhesion to a planar membrane containing one set of adhesion molecules. In particular, the T lymphocyte adhesion due to the interaction of the lymphocyte function associated molecule 1 on the surface of the cell, with its counter-receptor, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), on the planar membrane, was investigated. A micromanipulation method and mathematical analysis of cell deformation were used to determine (a) the area of conjugation between the cell and the substrate and (b) the energy that must be supplied to detach a unit area of the cell membrane from its substrate. T lymphocytes stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) conjugated strongly with the planar membrane containing purified ICAM-1. The T lymphocytes attached to the planar membrane deviated occasionally from their round configuration by extending pseudopods but without changing the size of the contact area. These adherent cells were dramatically deformed and then detached when pulled away from the planar membrane by a micropipette. Detachment occurred by a gradual decrease in the radius of the contact area. The physical strength of adhesion between a PMA-stimulated T lymphocyte and a planar membrane containing 1,000 ICAM-1 molecules/micron 2 was comparable to the strength of adhesion between a cytotoxic T cell and its target cell. The comparison of the adhesive energy density, measured at constant cell shape, with the model predictions suggests that the physical strength of cell adhesion may increase significantly when the adhesion bonds in the contact area are immobilized by the actin cytoskeleton. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 PMID:1358239

  5. Neutrophil elastase processing of Gelatinase A is mediated by extracellular matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, A.; Banda, M.J.

    1995-07-18

    Gelatinase A (72-kDa type IV collagenase) is a metalloproteinase that is expressed by many cells in culture and is overexpressed by some tumor cells. It has been suggested that the serine proteinase neutrophil elastase might play a role iii the posttranslational processing of gelatinase A and that noncatalytic interactions between gelatinase A and components of the extracellular matrix might alter potential processing pathways. These questions were addressed with the use of gelatin substrate zymography, gelatinolytic activity assays, and amino acid sequence analysis. We found that neutrophil elastase does proteolytically modify gelatinase A by cleaving at a number of sites within gelatinase A. Sequential treatment of gelatinase A with 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate (APMA) and neutrophil elastase yielded an active gelatinase with a 4-fold increase in gelatinolytic activity. The increased gelatinolytic activity correlated with that of a 40-kDa fragment of gelatinase A. Matrix components altered the proteolytic modifications in gelatinase A that were mediated by neutrophil elastase. In the absence of gelatin, neutrophil elastase destructively degraded gelatinase A by hydrolyzing at least two bonds within the fibronectin-like gelatin-binding domain of gelatinase A. In the presence of gelatin, these two inactivating cleavage sites were protected, and cleavage at a site within the hemopexin-like carboxyl-terminal domain resulted in a truncated yet active gelatinase. The results suggest a regulatory role for extracellular matrix molecules in stabilizing gelatinase A fragments and in altering the availability of sites susceptible to destructive proteolysis by neutrophil elastase. 32 refs., 10 figs.

  6. 4-Methylcoumarin Derivatives Inhibit Human Neutrophil Oxidative Metabolism and Elastase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fuzissaki, Carolina N.; Andrade, Micássio F.; Azzolini, Ana Elisa C.S.; Taleb-Contini, Silvia H.; Vermelho, Roberta B.; Lopes, João Luis C.; Lucisano-Valim, Yara Maria

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Increased neutrophil activation significantly contributes to the tissue damage in inflammatory illnesses; this phenomenon has motivated the search for new compounds to modulate their effector functions. Coumarins are natural products that are widely consumed in the human diet. We have evaluated the antioxidant and immunomodulator potential of five 4-methylcoumarin derivatives. We found that the 4-methylcoumarin derivatives inhibited the generation of reactive oxygen species by human neutrophils triggered by serum-opsonized zymosan or phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate; this inhibition occurred in a concentration-dependent manner, as revealed by lucigenin- and luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence assays. Cytotoxicity did not mediate this inhibitory effect. The 7,8-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin suppressed the neutrophil oxidative metabolism more effectively than the 6,7- and 5,7-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarins, but the 5,7- and 7,8-diacetoxy-4-methylcoumarins were less effective than their hydroxylated counterparts. An analysis of the biochemical pathways suggested that the 6,7- and 7,8-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarins inhibit the protein kinase C-mediated signaling pathway, but 5,7-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin, as well as 5,7- and 7,8-diacetoxy-4-methylcoumarins do not significantly interfere in this pathway of the activation of the human neutrophil oxidative metabolism. The 4-methylcoumarin derivatives bearing the catechol group suppressed the elastase and myeloperoxidase activity and reduced the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical the most strongly. Interestingly, the 5,7-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin scavenged hypochlorous acid more effectively than the o-dihydroxy-substituted 4-methylcoumarin derivatives, and the diacetoxylated 4-methylcoumarin derivatives scavenged hypochlorous acid as effectively as the 7,8-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin. The significant influence of small structural modifications in the inhibitory potential of 4-methylcoumarin derivatives on the

  7. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen in neutrophil fate.

    PubMed

    Witko-Sarsat, Véronique; Ohayon, Delphine

    2016-09-01

    The life span of a neutrophil is a tightly regulated process as extended survival is beneficial for pathogen elimination and cell death necessary to prevent cytotoxic content release from activated neutrophils at the inflammatory site. Therefore, the control between survival and death must be a dynamic process. We have previously described that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) which is known as a nuclear protein pivotal in DNA synthesis, is a key element in controlling neutrophil survival through its association with procaspases. Contrary to the dogma which asserted that PCNA has a strictly nuclear function, in mature neutrophils, PCNA is present exclusively within the cytosol due to its nuclear export at the end of the granulocytic differentiation. More recent studies are consistent with the notion that the cytosolic scaffold of PCNA is aimed at modulating neutrophil fate rather than simply preventing death. Ultimately, targeting neutrophil survival might have important applications not just in the field of immunology and inflammation, but also in hematology and transfusion. The neutrophil emerges as a unique and powerful cellular model to unravel the basic mechanisms governing the cell cycle-independent functions of PCNA and should be considered as a leader of the pack. PMID:27558345

  8. Candida albicans escapes from mouse neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ermert, David; Niemiec, Maria J; Röhm, Marc; Glenthøj, Andreas; Borregaard, Niels; Urban, Constantin F

    2013-08-01

    Candida albicans, the most commonly isolated human fungal pathogen, is able to grow as budding yeasts or filamentous forms, such as hyphae. The ability to switch morphology has been attributed a crucial role for the pathogenesis of C. albicans. To mimic disseminated candidiasis in humans, the mouse is the most widely used model organism. Neutrophils are essential immune cells to prevent opportunistic mycoses. To explore potential differences between the rodent infection model and the human host, we compared the interactions of C. albicans with neutrophil granulocytes from mice and humans. We revealed that murine neutrophils exhibited a significantly lower ability to kill C. albicans than their human counterparts. Strikingly, C. albicans yeast cells formed germ tubes upon internalization by murine neutrophils, eventually rupturing the neutrophil membrane and thereby, killing the phagocyte. On the contrary, growth and subsequent escape of C. albicans are blocked inside human neutrophils. According to our findings, this blockage in human neutrophils might be a result of higher levels of MPO activity and the presence of α-defensins. We therefore outline differences in antifungal immune defense between humans and mouse strains, which facilitates a more accurate interpretation of in vivo results.

  9. Acetate Production by Methanogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Westermann, Peter; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Mah, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    Methanosarcina barkeri MS and 227 and Methanosarcina mazei S-6 produced acetate when grown on H2-CO2, methanol, or trimethylamine. Marked differences in acetate production by the two bacterial species were found, even though methane and cell yields were nearly the same. M. barkeri produced 30 to 75 μmol of acetate per mmol of CH4 formed, but M. mazei produced only 8 to 9 μmol of acetate per mmol of CH4. PMID:16348006

  10. Platelet–neutrophil interactions under thromboinflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Kim, Kyungho; Barazia, Andrew; Tseng, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Platelets primarily mediate hemostasis and thrombosis, whereas leukocytes are responsible for immune responses. Since platelets interact with leukocytes at the site of vascular injury, thrombosis and vascular inflammation are closely intertwined and occur consecutively. Recent studies using real-time imaging technology demonstrated that platelet–neutrophil interactions on the activated endothelium are an important determinant of microvascular occlusion during thromboinflammatory disease in which inflammation is coupled to thrombosis. Although the major receptors and counter receptors have been identified, it remains poorly understood how heterotypic platelet–neutrophil interactions are regulated under disease conditions. This review discusses our current understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of platelet– neutrophil interactions in thromboinflammatory disease. PMID:25650236

  11. The effect of clindamycin and amoxicillin on neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) release.

    PubMed

    Bystrzycka, Weronika; Moskalik, Aneta; Sieczkowska, Sandra; Manda-Handzlik, Aneta; Demkow, Urszula; Ciepiela, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are threads of nuclear DNA complexed with antimicrobial proteins released by neutrophils to extracellular matrix to bind, immobilise, and kill different pathogens. NET formation is triggered by different physiological and non-physiological stimulants. It is also suggested that antibiotics could be non-physiological compounds that influence NET release. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of clindamycin and amoxicillin on NET release and the phagocyte function of neutrophils. Neutrophils isolated from healthy donors by density centrifugation method were incubated with amoxicillin or clindamycin for two hours, and then NET release was stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). After three hours of incubation with PMA NETs were quantified as amount of extracellular DNA by fluorometry and visualised by immunofluorescent microscopy. The percent of phagocyting cells was measured by flow cytometry. We showed that amoxicillin induces NET formation (increase of extracellular DNA fluorescence, p = 0.03), while clindamycin had no influence on NET release (p > 0.05), as confirmed by quantitative measurement and fluorescent microscopy. Regarding phagocyte function, both antibiotics increased bacterial uptake (43.3% and 61.6% median increase for amoxicillin and clindamycin, respectively). We concluded that the ability of antibiotics to modulate NET release depends on the antibiotic used and is not associated with their ability to influence phagocytosis.

  12. Alkalinizing the intralysosomal pH inhibits degranulation of human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Klempner, M S; Styrt, B

    1983-01-01

    Degranulation of lysosomes is one of the consequences of neutrophil activation. Regulatory mechanisms of lysosomal secretion are thought to be localized largely in the plasma membrane and cytosol, with the lysosome playing a passive role in secretion. Recent evidence indicates that the intralysosomal pH is highly acidic (pH congruent to 5.5) and is maintained by active transport of H+. We investigated whether changes in the intralysosomal pH altered the availability of lysosomes for exocytosis. Intralysosomal pH in intact neutrophils was monitored with the weakly basic fluorescent probe, 9-aminoacridine (9AA). The weak bases, methylamine, chloroquine, clindamycin, propanolol, and ammonium chloride (0.1-50 mM), caused an alkalinization of the intralysosomal pH as determined by reversal of quenching of 9AA fluorescence. Similarly, each of the weak bases, including ammonium chloride, methylamine, chloroquine, ethylamine, propylamine, propanolol, clindamycin, and dansylcadaverine, inhibited neutrophil degranulation in response to the calcium ionophore A23187, phorbol myristate acetate, or the chemotactic peptide, formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine plus cytochalasin B. These studies indicate that an acid intralysosomal pH is important to the neutrophil secretory response and suggest that the lysosome may play an active part in control of degranulation. PMID:6415117

  13. Acetate dependence of tumors.

    PubMed

    Comerford, Sarah A; Huang, Zhiguang; Du, Xinlin; Wang, Yun; Cai, Ling; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Walters, Holly; Tantawy, Mohammed N; Fu, Allie; Manning, H Charles; Horton, Jay D; Hammer, Robert E; McKnight, Steven L; Tu, Benjamin P

    2014-12-18

    Acetyl-CoA represents a central node of carbon metabolism that plays a key role in bioenergetics, cell proliferation, and the regulation of gene expression. Highly glycolytic or hypoxic tumors must produce sufficient quantities of this metabolite to support cell growth and survival under nutrient-limiting conditions. Here, we show that the nucleocytosolic acetyl-CoA synthetase enzyme, ACSS2, supplies a key source of acetyl-CoA for tumors by capturing acetate as a carbon source. Despite exhibiting no gross deficits in growth or development, adult mice lacking ACSS2 exhibit a significant reduction in tumor burden in two different models of hepatocellular carcinoma. ACSS2 is expressed in a large proportion of human tumors, and its activity is responsible for the majority of cellular acetate uptake into both lipids and histones. These observations may qualify ACSS2 as a targetable metabolic vulnerability of a wide spectrum of tumors.

  14. Neutrophils recruited to sites of infection protect from virus challenge by releasing neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Jenne, Craig N; Wong, Connie H Y; Zemp, Franz J; McDonald, Braedon; Rahman, Masmudur M; Forsyth, Peter A; McFadden, Grant; Kubes, Paul

    2013-02-13

    Neutrophils mediate bacterial clearance through various mechanisms, including the release of mesh-like DNA structures or neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that capture bacteria. Although neutrophils are also recruited to sites of viral infection, their role in antiviral innate immunity is less clear. We show that systemic administration of virus analogs or poxvirus infection induces neutrophil recruitment to the liver microvasculature and the release of NETs that protect host cells from virus infection. After systemic intravenous poxvirus challenge, mice exhibit thrombocytopenia and the recruitment of both neutrophils and platelets to the liver vasculature. Circulating platelets interact with, roll along, and adhere to the surface of adherent neutrophils, forming large, dynamic aggregates. These interactions facilitate the release of NETs within the liver vasculature that are able to protect host cells from poxvirus infection. These findings highlight the role of NETs and early tissue-wide responses in preventing viral infection.

  15. Store-operated calcium signaling in neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Regina A; Lowell, Clifford A

    2015-10-01

    Calcium signals in neutrophils are initiated by a variety of cell-surface receptors, including formyl peptide and other GPCRs, FcRs, and integrins. The predominant pathway by which calcium enters immune cells is termed SOCE, whereby plasma membrane CRAC channels allow influx of extracellular calcium into the cytoplasm when intracellular ER stores are depleted. The identification of 2 key families of SOCE regulators, STIM calcium "sensors" and ORAI calcium channels, has allowed for genetic manipulation of SOCE pathways and provided valuable insight into the molecular mechanism of calcium signaling in immune cells, including neutrophils. This review focuses on our current knowledge of the molecules involved in neutrophil SOCE and how study of these molecules has further informed our understanding of the role of calcium signaling in neutrophil activation.

  16. Major neutrophil functions subverted by Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Ingar; Hajishengallis, George

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) constitute an integrated component of the innate host defense in the gingival sulcus/periodontal pocket. However, the keystone periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis has in the course of evolution developed a number of capacities to subvert this defense to its own advantage. The present review describes the major mechanisms that P. gingivalis uses to subvert neutrophil homeostasis, such as impaired recruitment and chemotaxis, resistance to granule-derived antimicrobial agents and to the oxidative burst, inhibition of phagocytic killing while promoting a nutritionally favorable inflammatory response, and delay of neutrophil apoptosis. Studies in animal models have shown that at least some of these mechanisms promote the dysbiotic transformation of the periodontal polymicrobial community, thereby leading to inflammation and bone loss. It is apparent that neutrophil-P. gingivalis interactions and subversion of innate immunity are key contributing factors to the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. PMID:26993626

  17. [Effect of erythromycin on neutrophil adhesion molecules].

    PubMed

    Kusano, S; Mukae, H; Morikawa, T; Asai, T; Sawa, H; Morikawa, N; Oda, H; Sakito, O; Shukuwa, C; Senju, R

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms of erythromycin (EM) in chronic lower respiratory tract diseases including diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) has been reported. In this study we investigated the effect of EM on peripheral neutrophil adhesion molecules such as LFA-1 and Mac-1 obtained from six healthy subjects. Pretreatment of neutrophils with each concentration (10 ng/ml approximately 100 micrograms/ml) of EM resulted in no significant reduction in the expression of LFA-1 alpha, beta and Mac-1. Moreover, EM had no capability of reducing these expressions even when neutrophils were pretreated with 1 microgram/ml of EM at time from 0 to 60 min. These findings indicate that EM does not directly reduce the expression of LFA-1 alpha, beta and Mac-1 on peripheral neutrophil obtained from healthy subjects. PMID:8450276

  18. Neutrophils in asthma--a review.

    PubMed

    Ciepiela, Olga; Ostafin, Magdalena; Demkow, Urszula

    2015-04-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease, with an array of cells involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. The role of neutrophils in the development of bronchial asthma is found to be complex, as they may trigger activation of immunocompetent cells and are a potent source of free oxygen radicals and enzymes participating in airway remodeling. The review highlights the role of neutrophils in bronchial asthma.

  19. Differential expression of pentraxin 3 in neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Razvina, Olga; Jiang, Shuying; Matsubara, Koichi; Ohashi, Riuko; Hasegawa, Go; Aoyama, Takashi; Daigo, Kenji; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Hamakubo, Takao; Naito, Makoto

    2015-02-01

    Pentraxins belong to the superfamily of conserved proteins that are characterized by a cyclic multimeric structure. Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a long pentraxin which can be produced by different cell types upon exposure to various inflammatory signals. Inside the neutrophil PTX3 is stored in form of granules localized in the cytoplasm. Neutrophilic granules are divided into three types: azurophilic (primary) granules, specific (secondary) granules and gelatinase (tertiary) granules. PTX3 has been considered to be localized in specific (secondary) granules. Immunofluorescent analyses using confocal laser microscopic examination were performed to clarify the localization of all three groups of granules within the cytoplasm of the mature neutrophils and neutrophils stimulated with IL-8. Furthermore, PTX3 was localized in primary granules of promyelocyte cell line HL-60. As a result, we suggest that PTX3 is localized not only in specific granules, but is also partly expressed in primary and tertiary granules. After the stimulation with IL-8, irregular reticular structures called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) were formed, three types of granules were trapped by NETs and PTX3 showed partial colocalization with these granular components. PTX3 localized in all three types of granules in neutrophils may play important roles in host defense.

  20. Effects of Alchornea cordifolia on elastase and superoxide anion produced by human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kouakou-Siransy, Gisèle; Sahpaz, Sevser; Nguessan, G Irié; Datté, Jacques Yao; Brou, Jérome Kablan; Gressier, Bernard; Bailleul, François

    2010-02-01

    The ability of Alchornea cordifolia (Schum. and Thonn.) Müll. Arg. (Euphorbiaceae) leaves to inhibit human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and superoxide anion (O(2)(*-)) activities was evaluated on aqueous and ethyl acetate extracts as they allow for a targeted extraction of polyphenols. The direct effect of A. cordifolia extracts on HNE and O(2)(*-) was assessed in an acellular system. Results showed that extracts scavenge HNE and O(2)(*-) in a dose-dependent manner. Better activity was exhibited by the ethyl acetate extract with lower IC(50) (2.2 and 4. 1 mg/L for HNE and O(2)(*-), respectively) than for the aqueous extract. Cellular systems including isolated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) were investigated to assess the effect of extracts on PMN metabolism. PMN were stimulated with 4beta-phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), calcium ionophore (CaI), or N-formyl-methionyl-leucine-phenylalanine (fMLP), each stimulant having its own stimulation pathway. From the IC(50) obtained, it can be concluded that A. cordifolia reduces HNE and O(2)(*-) liberation. Furthermore it was demonstrated that A. cordifolia extracts have no cytotoxic activity on PMN by measuring release of the cytosolic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase. As the ethyl acetate extract offers a higher rate of total phenols than the aqueous extract as well as better scavenging activity, it can be supposed that polyphenols, which are well known for their potent antioxidant and antielastase activity, are implicated in the activity of the plant. Phenolic substances such as quercetin, myricetin-3-glucopyranoside, myricetin-3-rhamnopyranoside, and proanthocyanidin A2 were identified in the ethyl acetate extract. In conclusion, the study provides proof of ethnomedical claims and partly explains the mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory action of A. cordifolia leaves. PMID:20645828

  1. Effect of acute and chronic excesses of dietary nitrogen on blood neutrophil functions in cattle.

    PubMed

    Raboisson, D; Caubet, C; Tasca, C; De Marchi, L; Ferraton, J M; Gannac, S; Millet, A; Enjalbert, F; Schelcher, F; Foucras, G

    2014-12-01

    phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate was not modified, in contrast to OZ stimulation. Decreased ROS production during chronic EDN probably involves the early events leading to ROS production, as OZ acts through membrane receptors and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate directly activates protein kinase C. This is the first study to provide evidence that the modifications of neutrophil functions produced by excess nitrogen depend on the intensity and duration of the excess. Further studies, including epidemiological studies during risk periods, are needed to resolve the issues linked to EDN.

  2. Subcellular localization of the b-cytochrome component of the human neutrophil microbicidal oxidase: translocation during activation

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    We describe a new method for subcellular fractionation of human neutrophils. Neutrophils were disrupted by nitrogen cavitation and the nuclei removed by centrifugation. The postnuclear supernatant was applied on top of a discontinuous Percoll density gradient. Centrifugation for 15 min at 48,000 g resulted in complete separation of plasma membranes, azurophil granules, and specific granules. As determined by ultrastructure and the distribution of biochemical markers of these organelles, approximately 90% of the b-cytochrome in unstimulated cells was recovered from the band containing the specific granules and was shown to be in or tightly associated with the membrane. During stimulation of intact neutrophils with phorbol myristate acetate or the ionophore A23187, we observed translocation of 40-75% of the b-cytochrome to the plasma membrane. The extent of this translocation closely paralleled release of the specific granule marker, vitamin B12-binding protein. These data indicate that the b- cytochrome is in the membrane of the specific granules of unstimulated neutrophils and that stimulus-induced fusion of these granules with the plasma membrane results in a translocation of the cytochrome. Our observations provide a basis for the assembly of the microbicidal oxidase of the human neutrophil. PMID:6408102

  3. Phospholipase A{sub 2} is involved in the mechanism of activation of neutrophils by polychlorinated biphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Tithof, P.K.; Schiamberg, E.; Ganey, P.E.; Peters-Golden, M.

    1996-01-01

    Aroclor 1242, a mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), activates neutrophils to produce superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) by a mechanism that involves phospholipase C-dependent hydrolysis of membrane phosphoinositides; however, subsequent signal transduction mechanisms are unknown. This study determines whether phospholipase A{sub 2}-dependent release of arachidonic acid is involved in PCB-induced O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production. O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production was measured in vitro in glycogen-elicited, rat neutrophils in the presence and absence of the inhibitors of phospholipase A{sub 2}: quinacrine, 4-bromophenacyl bromide (BPB), and manoalide. All three agents significantly decreased the amount of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} detected during stimulation of neutrophils with Aroclor 1242. Similar inhibition occurred when neutrophils were activated with the classical stimuli, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) or phorbol myristate acetate. The effects of BPB and manoalide were not a result of cytotoxicity or other nonspecific effects. Significant release of {sup 3}H-arachidonic acid preceded O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production in neutrophils stimulated with Aroclor 1242 or fMLP. Manoalide, at a concentration that abolished O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production, also inhibited the release of {sup 3}H-arachidonate. Aspirin, zileuton, or WEB 2086 did not affect Aroclor 1242-induced O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production, suggesting that eicosanoids and platelet-activating factor are not needed for neutrophil activation by PCBs. Activation of phos-pholipase A{sub 2} and O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production do not appear to involve the Ah receptor. These data suggest that Aroclor 1242 stimulates neutrophils to produce O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} by a mechanism that involves phospholipase A{sub 2}-dependent release of arachiodonic acid. 49 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Potent inhibition of human neutrophil activations by bractelactone, a novel chalcone from Fissistigma bracteolatum

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yang-Chang; Sureshbabu, Munisamy; Fang, Yao-Ching; Wu, Yi-Hsiu; Lan, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Fang-Rong; Chang, Ya-Wen; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2013-02-01

    Fissistigma bracteolatum is widely used in traditional medicine to treat inflammatory diseases. However, its active components and mechanisms of action remain unclear. In this study, (3Z)-6,7-dihydroxy-4-methoxy-3-(phenylmethylidene)-5-(3-phenylpropanoyl) -1-benzofuran-2(3H) (bractelactone), a novel chalcone from F. bracteolatum, showed potent inhibitory effects against superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup ·−}) production, elastase release, and CD11b expression in formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP)-induced human neutrophils. However, bractelactone showed only weak inhibition of phorbol myristate acetate-caused O{sub 2}{sup ·−} production. The peak cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) was unaltered by bractelactone in FMLP-induced neutrophils, but the decay time of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was significantly shortened. In a calcium-free solution, changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} caused by the addition of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} were inhibited by bractelactone in FMLP-activated cells. In addition, bractelactone did not alter the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, JNK, or AKT or the concentration of cAMP. These results suggest that bractelactone selectively inhibits store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). In agreement with this concept, bractelactone suppressed sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} changes in thapsigargin-activated neutrophils. Furthermore, bractelactone did not alter FMLP-induced formation of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effects of bractelactone, an active ingredient of F. bracteolatum, in human neutrophils are through the selective inhibition of SOCE. Highlights: ► Bractelactone isolated from Fissistigma bracteolatum. ► Bractelactone inhibited FMLP-induced human neutrophil activations. ► Bractelactone had no effect on IP3 formation. ► Bractelactone did not alter MAPKs, AKT, and cAMP pathways. ► Bractelactone inhibited store-operated calcium entry.

  5. Superoxide Anion Production by Human Neutrophils Activated by Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun-Ouk

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cells found in vaginal discharges of patients infected with Trichomonas vaginalis. In this study, we examined superoxide anion (O2.-) production by neutrophils activated by T. vaginalis. Human neutrophils produced superoxide anions when stimulated with either a lysate of T. vaginalis, its membrane component (MC), or excretory-secretory product (ESP). To assess the role of trichomonad protease in production of superoxide anions by neutrophils, T. vaginalis lysate, ESP, and MC were each pretreated with a protease inhibitor cocktail before incubation with neutrophils. Superoxide anion production was significantly decreased by this treatment. Trichomonad growth was inhibited by preincubation with supernatants of neutrophils incubated for 3 hr with T. vaginalis lysate. Furthermore, myeloperoxidase (MPO) production by neutrophils was stimulated by live trichomonads. These results indicate that the production of superoxide anions and MPO by neutrophils stimulated with T. vaginalis may be a part of defense mechanisms of neutrophils in trichomoniasis. PMID:24039294

  6. Superoxide anion production by human neutrophils activated by Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Ouk; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2013-08-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cells found in vaginal discharges of patients infected with Trichomonas vaginalis. In this study, we examined superoxide anion (O2 (.-)) production by neutrophils activated by T. vaginalis. Human neutrophils produced superoxide anions when stimulated with either a lysate of T. vaginalis, its membrane component (MC), or excretory-secretory product (ESP). To assess the role of trichomonad protease in production of superoxide anions by neutrophils, T. vaginalis lysate, ESP, and MC were each pretreated with a protease inhibitor cocktail before incubation with neutrophils. Superoxide anion production was significantly decreased by this treatment. Trichomonad growth was inhibited by preincubation with supernatants of neutrophils incubated for 3 hr with T. vaginalis lysate. Furthermore, myeloperoxidase (MPO) production by neutrophils was stimulated by live trichomonads. These results indicate that the production of superoxide anions and MPO by neutrophils stimulated with T. vaginalis may be a part of defense mechanisms of neutrophils in trichomoniasis. PMID:24039294

  7. Superoxide anion production by human neutrophils activated by Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Ouk; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2013-08-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cells found in vaginal discharges of patients infected with Trichomonas vaginalis. In this study, we examined superoxide anion (O2 (.-)) production by neutrophils activated by T. vaginalis. Human neutrophils produced superoxide anions when stimulated with either a lysate of T. vaginalis, its membrane component (MC), or excretory-secretory product (ESP). To assess the role of trichomonad protease in production of superoxide anions by neutrophils, T. vaginalis lysate, ESP, and MC were each pretreated with a protease inhibitor cocktail before incubation with neutrophils. Superoxide anion production was significantly decreased by this treatment. Trichomonad growth was inhibited by preincubation with supernatants of neutrophils incubated for 3 hr with T. vaginalis lysate. Furthermore, myeloperoxidase (MPO) production by neutrophils was stimulated by live trichomonads. These results indicate that the production of superoxide anions and MPO by neutrophils stimulated with T. vaginalis may be a part of defense mechanisms of neutrophils in trichomoniasis.

  8. Neutrophils in Cancer: Two Sides of the Same Coin

    PubMed Central

    Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in blood and are considered to be the first line of defense during inflammation and infections. In addition, neutrophils are also found infiltrating many types of tumors. Tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) have relevant roles in malignant disease. Indeed neutrophils may be potent antitumor effector cells. However, increasing clinical evidence shows TANs correlate with poor prognosis. The tumor microenvironment controls neutrophil recruitment and in turn TANs help tumor progression. Hence, TANs can be beneficial or detrimental to the host. It is the purpose of this review to highlight these two sides of the neutrophil coin in cancer and to describe recent studies that provide some light on the mechanisms for neutrophil recruitment to the tumor, for neutrophils supporting tumor progression, and for neutrophil activation to enhance their antitumor functions. PMID:26819959

  9. Neutrophils and neutrophil extracellular traps orchestrate initiation and resolution of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Jonas; Knopf, Jasmin; Maueröder, Christian; Kienhöfer, Deborah; Leppkes, Moritz; Herrmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils, the most abundant leukocytes in the human body, are considered to be the first line of defense in the fight against microorganisms. In this fight neutrophils employ weaponry such as reactive oxygen species produced via the NADPH oxidase complex 2 together with the release of intracellular granules containing antimicrobial agents. The discovery that activated neutrophils release decondensed chromatin as DNase-sensitive neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) lead to a renewed interest in these leukocytes and the function of NETs in vivo. In this review, we will focus on desirable as well as detrimental features of NETs by the example of gout and pancreatitis. In our models we observed that neutrophils drive the initiation of inflammation and are required for the resolution of inflammation. PMID:27586795

  10. Bactericidal capacity of phorbol myristate acetate-treated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Wang-Iverson, P; Pryzwansky, K B; Spitznagel, J K; Cooney, M H

    1978-01-01

    Thus far, the functional capacity of phorbol myristate acetate- (PMA)-treated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes has been undefined. PMA induced exocytosis of lactoferrin, the specific granule marker, but not of myeloperoxidase, the azurophil granule marker. This phenomenon was demonstrated both biochemically and with fluorescent antibody conjugates. PMA-treated neutrophils contained virtually no specific granules when viewed by electron microscopy. Separation of the granule classes by linear sucrose density gradient centrifugation revealed the loss, from PMA-treated neutrophils, of lactoferrin and the specific granule (D20(20) = 1.89) band usually resolved from normal neutrophils. Cells treated with PMA appeared to retain those functions normally associated with intraleukocytic microbicidal action. The hexose monophosphate shunt activated by phagocytic challenge was present in PMA-treated neutrophils. As demonstrated by electron microscopy, the azurophil granules of these cells appeared intact, and they retained the capacity for degranulation with translocation of myeloperoxidase to the site of phagocytized Escherichia coli. The PMA-treated neutrophils also remained capable of degrading the ingested microorganisms. PMA-treated neutrophils exhibited a decrease in phagocytic ability at all levels of bacterial challenge. In the presence of a high multiplicity of bacteria they demonstrated an impairment in killing. These same cells were able to kill low multiplicities of E. coli as well as control cells. It thus appeared that the loss of the specific granules, plus other undefined PMA-induced alterations, impaired neither the viability of these neutrophils nor their killing ability in the presence of a modest phagocytic challenge. Images PMID:730386

  11. Cyclic AMP inhibits secretion from electroporated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Smolen, J E; Stoehr, S J; Kuczynski, B

    1991-02-01

    It has long been known that intracellular cAMP inhibits and cGMP enhances intact neutrophil function. However, these effects are modest and require relatively high concentrations of the cyclic nucleotides. We decided to re-examine the effects of cyclic nucleotides on Ca2(+)-induced secretion by electroporated cells. This system allowed us to bypass normal cell surface receptor-ligand interactions as well as to directly expose the intracellular space to native cyclic nucleotides. We found that concentrations of cAMP as low as 3 microM inhibited Ca2(+)-induced secretion; 30-300 microM cAMP was maximally inhibitory. cAMP was actually slightly more potent than dibutyryl cAMP, a membrane-permeant derivative. In contrast, cGMP was only slightly stimulatory at 3 microM and modestly inhibitory at 300 microM; dibutyryl cGMP was ineffective. A more detailed investigation of the effects of cAMP showed that inhibition was only obtained in the presence of Mg2+. Half-maximal inhibition by cAMP occurred at 10-30 microM. Inhibition by cAMP was achieved by shifting the Ca2+ dose-response curve for secretion to the right; this was observed for the release of both specific granules (vitamin B12 binding protein) and azurophil granules (B-glucuronidase). We previously showed that ATP could enhance Ca2(+)-induced secretion in the presence of Mg2+, apparently by interacting with a cell surface purine receptor. However, increasing concentrations of ATP could not overcome inhibition by cAMP; this suggested that cAMP acted at some site other than the purine receptor. Inhibition by cAMP was also less apparent in the presence of the protein kinase C agonist phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), suggesting that the cyclic nucleotide did not produce systemic desensitization of the neutrophils. In summary, these results demonstrate that low, physiologically relevant concentrations of cAMP can modulate neutrophil responsiveness. PMID:1846904

  12. Neutrophil Leukocyte: Combustive Microbicidal Action and Chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Allen, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil leukocytes protect against a varied and complex array of microbes by providing microbicidal action that is simple, potent, and focused. Neutrophils provide such action via redox reactions that change the frontier orbitals of oxygen (O2) facilitating combustion. The spin conservation rules define the symmetry barrier that prevents direct reaction of diradical O2 with nonradical molecules, explaining why combustion is not spontaneous. In burning, the spin barrier is overcome when energy causes homolytic bond cleavage producing radicals capable of reacting with diradical O2 to yield oxygenated radical products that further participate in reactive propagation. Neutrophil mediated combustion is by a different pathway. Changing the spin quantum state of O2 removes the symmetry restriction to reaction. Electronically excited singlet molecular oxygen ((1)O2(*)) is a potent electrophilic reactant with a finite lifetime that restricts its radius of reactivity and focuses combustive action on the target microbe. The resulting exergonic dioxygenation reactions produce electronically excited carbonyls that relax by light emission, that is, chemiluminescence. This overview of neutrophil combustive microbicidal action takes the perspectives of spin conservation and bosonic-fermionic frontier orbital considerations. The necessary principles of particle physics and quantum mechanics are developed and integrated into a fundamental explanation of neutrophil microbicidal metabolism.

  13. Exercise, training and neutrophil microbicidal activity.

    PubMed

    Smith, J A; Telford, R D; Mason, I B; Weidemann, M J

    1990-06-01

    The concentration in human plasma of putative neutrophil-"priming" cytokines like endogenous pyrogens is known to increase significantly in response to moderate exercise (11). This is characteristic of an acute-phase response. The ability of blood neutrophils isolated from both trained and untrained human subjects (n = 11, 9) to produce microbicidal reactive oxygen species was determined using luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence both before and after one hour of aerobic exercise at 60% VO2max. Irrespective of training and stimulus concentration, exercise nearly always caused significant "priming" of the capacity of neutrophils to produce H2O2 and HOCl upon stimulation with opsonized zymosan (P less than 0.01); however, compared to their untrained counterparts, the activity of cells isolated from trained individuals was depressed about 50% at unit stimulus concentration, both before and after exercise (P less than 0.075), whilst remaining unaltered at saturating concentrations. Although neutrophil oxygenation activity is only one parameter that contributes to immunological status, regular episodes of moderate exercise may increase resistance to infection by priming the "killing capacity" of neutrophils. In contrast, prolonged periods of intensive training may lead to increased susceptibility to common infections by diminishing this activity. PMID:2115507

  14. Methoxatin (PQQ) in guinea-pig neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Bishop, A; Paz, M A; Gallop, P M; Karnovsky, M L

    1994-10-01

    PQQ, also called methoxatin, has been isolated from guinea-pig neutrophils. The organic cations diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) and diphenyliodonium (BPI) and the aromatic o-diamine 4,5-dimethylphenylenediamine (DIMPDA) sequester synthetic PQQ and inhibit its redox-cycling activity in a model system. Standards were made of adducts of tritiated PQQ with unlabeled DIMPDA and of unlabeled PQQ with tritiated DPI or DIMPDA. PQQ adducts were isolated from guinea-pig neutrophils with each of the tritiated inhibitors. They were separated and defined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Tiron, a disodium benzene disulphonic acid, broke the DPI-PQQ adduct isolated from neutrophils and released free PQQ. Both DPI and DIMPDA, as well as BPI, blocked O2.- release by stimulated neutrophils. The blockade exerted by these inhibitors was released by the addition of PQQ to the cell suspensions. The data demonstrate the presence of PQQ in guinea-pig neutrophils and suggest that it has a possible role, direct or indirect, in the O2.(-)-producing respiratory burst.

  15. Blocking neutrophil diapedesis prevents hemorrhage during thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Hillgruber, Carina; Pöppelmann, Birgit; Weishaupt, Carsten; Steingräber, Annika Kathrin; Wessel, Florian; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Gessner, J. Engelbert; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous organ hemorrhage is the major complication in thrombocytopenia with a potential fatal outcome. However, the exact mechanisms regulating vascular integrity are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that neutrophils recruited to inflammatory sites are the cellular culprits inducing thrombocytopenic tissue hemorrhage. Exposure of thrombocytopenic mice to UVB light provokes cutaneous petechial bleeding. This phenomenon is also observed in immune-thrombocytopenic patients when tested for UVB tolerance. Mechanistically, we show, analyzing several inflammatory models, that it is neutrophil diapedesis through the endothelial barrier that is responsible for the bleeding defect. First, bleeding is triggered by neutrophil-mediated mechanisms, which act downstream of capturing, adhesion, and crawling on the blood vessel wall and require Gαi signaling in neutrophils. Second, mutating Y731 in the cytoplasmic tail of VE-cadherin, known to selectively affect leukocyte diapedesis, but not the induction of vascular permeability, attenuates bleeding. Third, and in line with this, simply destabilizing endothelial junctions by histamine did not trigger bleeding. We conclude that specifically targeting neutrophil diapedesis through the endothelial barrier may represent a new therapeutic avenue to prevent fatal bleeding in immune-thrombocytopenic patients. PMID:26169941

  16. Neutrophil Leukocyte: Combustive Microbicidal Action and Chemiluminescence

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil leukocytes protect against a varied and complex array of microbes by providing microbicidal action that is simple, potent, and focused. Neutrophils provide such action via redox reactions that change the frontier orbitals of oxygen (O2) facilitating combustion. The spin conservation rules define the symmetry barrier that prevents direct reaction of diradical O2 with nonradical molecules, explaining why combustion is not spontaneous. In burning, the spin barrier is overcome when energy causes homolytic bond cleavage producing radicals capable of reacting with diradical O2 to yield oxygenated radical products that further participate in reactive propagation. Neutrophil mediated combustion is by a different pathway. Changing the spin quantum state of O2 removes the symmetry restriction to reaction. Electronically excited singlet molecular oxygen (1O2*) is a potent electrophilic reactant with a finite lifetime that restricts its radius of reactivity and focuses combustive action on the target microbe. The resulting exergonic dioxygenation reactions produce electronically excited carbonyls that relax by light emission, that is, chemiluminescence. This overview of neutrophil combustive microbicidal action takes the perspectives of spin conservation and bosonic-fermionic frontier orbital considerations. The necessary principles of particle physics and quantum mechanics are developed and integrated into a fundamental explanation of neutrophil microbicidal metabolism. PMID:26783542

  17. Decreased apoptosis of beta 2- integrin-deficient bovine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, Hajime; Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Teraoka, Hiroki; Takahashi, Kenji; Takahashi, Kensi; Kuwabara, Mikinori; Inanami, Osamu; Kuwabara, Mikwori

    2004-02-01

    Stimulant-induced viability of neutrophils, nuclear-fragmentation, increase in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i), expression of annexin V on neutrophils and proteolysis of a fluorogenic peptide substrate Ac-DEVD-MCA (acetyl Asp-Glu-Val-Asp alpha-[4-methyl-coumaryl-7-amide]) by neutrophil lysates from five normal calves and three calves with leucocyte adhesion deficiency were determined to evaluate the apoptosis of normal and CD18-deficient neutrophils. Viability was markedly decreased in control neutrophils stimulated with opsonized zymosan (OPZ), compared to CD18-deficient neutrophils at 37 degrees C after incubation periods of 6 and 24 hours. The rate of apoptosis of control neutrophils stimulated with OPZ increased significantly depending on the incubation time, whereas no apparent increase in apoptosis was found in CD18-deficient neutrophils under the same conditions. Aggregated bovine (Agg) IgG-induced apoptosis of control neutrophils was not significantly different from that of CD18-deficient neutrophils. The expression of annexin V on OPZ-stimulated control neutrophils was greater than that of unstimulated ones 6 h after stimulation. No apparent increase in annexin V expression on CD18-deficient neutrophils was found with OPZ stimulation. A delay in apoptosis was demonstrated in CD18-deficient bovine neutrophils and this appeared to be closely associated with lowered signalling via [Ca2+]i, diminished annexin V expression on the cell surface, and decreased caspase 3 activity in lysates. PMID:14984592

  18. Clinical Microfluidics for Neutrophil Genomics and Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Kotz, Kenneth T.; Xiao, Wenzong; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Qian, Wei-Jun; Russom, Aman; Warner, Elizabeth A.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; De, Asit; Bankey, Paul E.; Petritis, Brianne O.; Camp, David G.; Rosenbach, Alan E.; Goverman, Jeremy; Fagan, Shawn P.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Irimia, Daniel; Xu, Weihong; Wilhelmy, Julie; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Smith, Richard D.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Toner, Mehmet

    2010-01-01

    Neutrophils play critical roles in modulating the immune response. We present a robust methodology for rapidly isolating neutrophils directly from whole blood and develop ‘on-chip’ processing for mRNA and protein isolation for genomics and proteomics. We validate this device with an ex vivo stimulation experiment and by comparison with standard bulk isolation methodologies. Lastly, we implement this tool as part of a near patient blood processing system within a multi-center clinical study of the immune response to severe trauma and burn injury. The preliminary results from a small cohort of patients in our study and healthy controls show a unique time-dependent gene expression pattern clearly demonstrating the ability of this tool to discriminate temporal transcriptional events of neutrophils within a clinical setting. PMID:20802500

  19. Clinical microfluidics for neutrophil genomics and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Kotz, Kenneth T; Xiao, Wenzong; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Qian, Wei-Jun; Russom, Aman; Warner, Elizabeth A; Moldawer, Lyle L; De, Asit; Bankey, Paul E; Petritis, Brianne O; Camp, David G; Rosenbach, Alan E; Goverman, Jeremy; Fagan, Shawn P; Brownstein, Bernard H; Irimia, Daniel; Xu, Weihong; Wilhelmy, Julie; Mindrinos, Michael N; Smith, Richard D; Davis, Ronald W; Tompkins, Ronald G; Toner, Mehmet

    2010-09-01

    Neutrophils have key roles in modulating the immune response. We present a robust methodology for rapidly isolating neutrophils directly from whole blood with 'on-chip' processing for mRNA and protein isolation for genomics and proteomics. We validate this device with an ex vivo stimulation experiment and by comparison with standard bulk isolation methodologies. Last, we implement this tool as part of a near-patient blood processing system within a multi-center clinical study of the immune response to severe trauma and burn injury. The preliminary results from a small cohort of subjects in our study and healthy controls show a unique time-dependent gene expression pattern clearly demonstrating the ability of this tool to discriminate temporal transcriptional events of neutrophils within a clinical setting.

  20. Granulopoiesis and granules of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Cowland, Jack B; Borregaard, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Granules are essential for the ability of neutrophils to fulfill their role in innate immunity. Granule membranes contain proteins that react to environmental cues directing neutrophils to sites of infection and initiate generation of bactericidal oxygen species. Granules are densely packed with proteins that contribute to microbial killing when liberated to the phagosome or extracellularly. Granules are, however, highly heterogeneous and are traditionally subdivided into azurophil granules, specific granules, and gelatinase granules in addition to secretory vesicles. This review will address issues pertinent to formation of granules, which is a process intimately connected to maturation of neutrophils from their precursors in the bone marrow. We further discuss possible mechanisms by which decisions are made regarding sorting of proteins to constitutive secretion or storage in granules and how degranulation of granule subsets is regulated. PMID:27558325

  1. Defective neutrophil chemotaxis in juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R A; Page, R C; Wilde, G

    1977-01-01

    Neutrophil chemotaxis was evaluated in nine patients with juvenile periodontitis, with normal subjects and patients with the adult form of periodontitis as controls. Defective chemotactic responses were observed in neutrophils from seven of nine juvenile patients, and a reduced level of complement-derived chemotactic activity was demonstrated in serum from four patients. These determinations were normal in all the patients with adult periodontitis. Serum from five of the juvenile patients contained a heat-stable, non-dialyzable factor that markedly inhibited the chemotaxis of normal neutrophils. Thus the characteristic tissue destruction seen in juvenile periodontitis may be, at least in part, a consequence of a failure of host defense mechanisms. PMID:591063

  2. Major neutrophil functions subverted by Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingar; Hajishengallis, George

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) constitute an integrated component of the innate host defense in the gingival sulcus/periodontal pocket. However, the keystone periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis has in the course of evolution developed a number of capacities to subvert this defense to its own advantage. The present review describes the major mechanisms that P. gingivalis uses to subvert neutrophil homeostasis, such as impaired recruitment and chemotaxis, resistance to granule-derived antimicrobial agents and to the oxidative burst, inhibition of phagocytic killing while promoting a nutritionally favorable inflammatory response, and delay of neutrophil apoptosis. Studies in animal models have shown that at least some of these mechanisms promote the dysbiotic transformation of the periodontal polymicrobial community, thereby leading to inflammation and bone loss. It is apparent that neutrophil–P. gingivalis interactions and subversion of innate immunity are key contributing factors to the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. PMID:26993626

  3. [Ultrastructural location of enzymes in peripheral blood neutrophils and in cerebrospinal fluid neutrophils in neuroinfections].

    PubMed

    Skotarczak, B

    1993-01-01

    Using cytochemical methods the location and activity were determined of alkaline phosphatase, ATP-ase and succinate dehydrogenase as representative enzymes for the metabolic processes in neutrophils isolated from blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with meningococcal meningoencephalitis as compared with peripheral blood neutrophils in a control group. The study showed presence of phosphatase on the membranes of many intracellular structures. The activity of the enzymes was higher than in the control group in the membranes of neutrophils in blood and CSF. This is explained as an effect of action of the chemotactic factor on the cell membrane and activation of the cell to movements and phagocytosis. ATP-ase activity in peripheral blood neutrophils in controls was found in all membranous structures in the cell. However, in peripheral blood neutrophils and CSF neutrophils in the acute stage of the disease the active enzyme was noted, in the first place, in cell membranes and digesting vacuoles, which reflected probably the direction of metabolic processes for phagocytosis and destroying of bacteria. The activity of succinate dehydrogenase was found in mitochondrial membranes. Peripheral blood and CSF neutrophils showed a high activity of the enzyme. In the CSF cells in acute phase atypical sites of succinate dehydrogenase activity were noted, which was explained as a sign of cell destruction.

  4. Mannheimia haemolytica and its leukotoxin cause neutrophil extracellular trap formation by bovine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Aulik, Nicole A; Hellenbrand, Katrina M; Klos, Heather; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2010-11-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is an important member of the bovine respiratory disease complex, which is characterized by abundant neutrophil infiltration into the alveoli and fibrin deposition. Recently several authors have reported that human neutrophils release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are protein-studded DNA matrices capable of trapping and killing pathogens. Here, we demonstrate that the leukotoxin (LKT) of M. haemolytica causes NET formation by bovine neutrophils in a CD18-dependent manner. Using an unacylated, noncytotoxic pro-LKT produced by an ΔlktC mutant of M. haemolytica, we show that binding of unacylated pro-LKT stimulates NET formation despite a lack of cytotoxicity. Inhibition of LKT binding to the CD18 chain of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) on bovine neutrophils reduced NET formation in response to LKT or M. haemolytica cells. Further investigation revealed that NETs formed in response to M. haemolytica are capable of trapping and killing a portion of the bacterial cells. NET formation was confirmed by confocal microscopy and by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Prior exposure of bovine neutrophils to LKT enhanced subsequent trapping and killing of M. haemolytica cells in bovine NETs. Understanding NET formation in response to M. haemolytica and its LKT provides a new perspective on how neutrophils contribute to the pathogenesis of bovine respiratory disease. PMID:20823211

  5. Neutrophil haptotaxis induced by the lectin KM+.

    PubMed

    Ganiko, L; Martins, A R; Espreáfico, E M; Roque-Barreira, M C

    1998-05-01

    KM+ is a D-mannose binding lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia that induces neutrophil migration in vitro and in vivo. This attractant activity was shown to be caused by haptotaxis rather than chemotaxis. The inhibition by D-mannose of the neutrophil attraction exerted by KM+, both in vitro and in vivo, supports the idea that haptotaxis is triggered in vivo by the sugar binding sites interacting with glycoconjugates located on the neutrophil surface and in the extracellular matrix. In the present study an in vivo haptotaxis assay was performed by intradermally (i.d.) injecting 125I-KM+ (200 ng), which led to a selective staining of loose connective tissue and vascular endothelium. The radiolabelled area exhibited a maximum increase (five-fold) in neutrophil infiltration 3 h after injection, relative to i.d. 200 ng 125I-BSA. We characterized the ex vivo binding of KM+ to tissue elements by immunohistochemistry, using paraformaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded, untreated rat skin. Bound KM+ was detected with an affinity-purified rabbit IgG anti-KM+ and visualized with an alkaline phosphatase based system. KM+ binding to connective tissue and vascular endothelium was inhibited by preincubating KM+ with 0.4 mM D-mannose and was potentiated by heparan sulfate (100 microg ml(-1)). An in vitro assay carried out in a Boyden microchamber showed that heparan sulfate potentiated the attractant effect of 10 microg KM+ by 34%. The present data suggest that KM+ induces neutrophil migration in vivo by haptotaxis and that the haptotactic gradient could be provided by the interaction of the KM+ carbohydrate recognition site(s) with mannose-containing glycoconjugate(s) in vascular endothelium and connective tissue. Heparan sulfate would act as an accessory molecule, enhancing the KM+ tissue binding and potentiating the induced neutrophil haptotaxis.

  6. Quantum magnetic deflagration in acetate.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Mínguez, A; Hernandez, J M; Macià, F; García-Santiago, A; Tejada, J; Santos, P V

    2005-11-18

    We report controlled ignition of magnetization reversal avalanches by surface acoustic waves in a single crystal of acetate. Our data show that the speed of the avalanche exhibits maxima on the magnetic field at the tunneling resonances of Mn(12). Combined with the evidence of magnetic deflagration in Mn(12) acetate, this suggests a novel physical phenomenon: deflagration assisted by quantum tunneling. PMID:16384178

  7. Quantum magnetic deflagration in acetate.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Mínguez, A; Hernandez, J M; Macià, F; García-Santiago, A; Tejada, J; Santos, P V

    2005-11-18

    We report controlled ignition of magnetization reversal avalanches by surface acoustic waves in a single crystal of acetate. Our data show that the speed of the avalanche exhibits maxima on the magnetic field at the tunneling resonances of Mn(12). Combined with the evidence of magnetic deflagration in Mn(12) acetate, this suggests a novel physical phenomenon: deflagration assisted by quantum tunneling.

  8. Dynamics of neutrophil migration in lymph nodes during infection

    PubMed Central

    Chtanova, Tatyana; Schaeffer, Marie; Han, Seong-Ji; van Dooren, Giel G.; Nollmann, Marcelo; Herzmark, Paul; Chan, Shiao Wei; Satija, Harshita; Camfield, Kristin; Aaron, Holly; Striepen, Boris; Robey, Ellen A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary While the signals that control neutrophil migration from the blood to sites of infection have been well characterized, little is known about their migration patterns within lymph nodes, or the strategies that neutrophils use to find their local sites of action. To address these questions, we used two-photon scanning laser microscopy (TPSLM) to examine neutrophil migration in intact lymph nodes during infection with an intracellular parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. We find that neutrophils form both small, transient or large, persistent swarms via a strikingly coordinated migration pattern. We provide evidence that cooperative action of neutrophils and parasite egress from host cells can trigger swarm formation. Neutrophil swarm formation coincides in space and time with the removal of macrophages that line the subcapsular sinus of the lymph node. Our data provide insights into the cellular mechanisms underlying neutrophil swarming and suggest new roles for neutrophils in shaping immune responses. PMID:18718768

  9. The inhibition of neutrophil granule enzyme secretion and chemotaxis by pertussis toxin

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Pertussis toxin treatment of rabbit peritoneal neutrophils causes a concentration-dependent inhibition of granule enzyme secretion induced by formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, C5a, and leukotriene B4. It also inhibits chemotaxis induced by formylmethionyl-leucyl- phenylalanine. The same toxin treatment, however, has no effect on granule enzyme secretion induced by the calcium ionophore A23187 or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Moreover, pertussis toxin treatment does not affect either the number or affinity of the formylpeptide receptors on the neutrophil nor does it have any effect on the unstimulated levels of cyclic AMP (cAMP) or the transient rise in cAMP induced by chemotactic factor stimulation in these cells. We hypothesize that pertussis toxin, as in other cells, interacts with a GTP binding regulatory protein identical with or analogous to either Ni or transducin which mediates the receptor-induced inhibition or activation of a target protein or proteins required in neutrophil activation. The nature of the target protein is unknown, but it is not the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase. The target protein acts after binding of chemotactic factor to its receptor in the sequence that leads to the receptor-induced rise in intracellular Ca2+. It does not affect the responses elicited by the direct introduction of calcium into the cells or the activity of protein kinase C. PMID:2859292

  10. Mechanism of interferon-gamma production by monocytes stimulated with myeloperoxidase and neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Kawata, Jin; Yamamoto, Toshitaka; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Sakamoto, Arisa; Ono, Tomomichi; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-08-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have an important role in antimicrobial innate immunity and release substances that may modulate the immune response. We investigated the effects of soluble factors from NETs and neutrophil granule proteins on human monocyte function by using the Transwell system to prevent cell-cell contact. NET formation was induced by exposing human neutrophils to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). When monocytes were incubated with PMA alone, expression of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha mRNA was upregulated, but IL-10, IL-12, and interferon (IFN)-gamma mRNA were not detected. Incubation of monocytes with NETs enhanced the expression of IL-10 and IFN-gamma mRNA, but not IL-12 mRNA. Myeloperoxidase stimulated IFN-gamma production by monocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Both a nuclear factor-kappaB inhibitor (PDTC) and an intracellular calcium antagonist (TMB-8) prevented upregulation of IFN-gamma production. Neither a combined p38alpha and p38beta inhibitor (SB203580) nor an extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibitor (PD98059) suppressed IFN-gamma production. Interestingly, a combined p38gamma and p38delta inhibitor (BIRB796) significantly decreased IFN-gamma production. These findings suggest that myeloperoxidase induces IFN-gamma production by monocytes via p38gamma/delta mitogen-activated protein kinase.

  11. Exposure to Leishmania braziliensis Triggers Neutrophil Activation and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Hurrell, Benjamin P.; Celes, Fabiana S.; Curvelo, Rebecca P.; Prates, Deboraci B.; Barral, Aldina; Borges, Valeria M.; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne; de Oliveira, Camila I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Neutrophils are the first line of defense against invading pathogens and are rapidly recruited to the sites of Leishmania inoculation. During Leishmania braziliensis infection, depletion of inflammatory cells significantly increases the parasite load whereas co-inoculation of neutrophils plus L. braziliensis had an opposite effect. Moreover, the co-culture of infected macrophages and neutrophils also induced parasite killing leading us to ask how neutrophils alone respond to an L. braziliensis exposure. Herein we focused on understanding the interaction between neutrophils and L. braziliensis, exploring cell activation and apoptotic fate. Methods and Findings Inoculation of serum-opsonized L. braziliensis promastigotes in mice induced neutrophil accumulation in vivo, peaking at 24 h. In vitro, exposure of thyoglycollate-elicited inflammatory or bone marrow neutrophils to L. braziliensis modulated the expression of surface molecules such as CD18 and CD62L, and induced the oxidative burst. Using mCherry-expressing L. braziliensis, we determined that such effects were mainly observed in infected and not in bystander cells. Neutrophil activation following contact with L. braziliensis was also confirmed by the release of TNF-α and neutrophil elastase. Lastly, neutrophils infected with L. braziliensis but not with L. major displayed markers of early apoptosis. Conclusions We show that L. braziliensis induces neutrophil recruitment in vivo and that neutrophils exposed to the parasite in vitro respond through activation and release of inflammatory mediators. This outcome may impact on parasite elimination, particularly at the early stages of infection. PMID:25756874

  12. Entamoeba histolytica Trophozoites and Lipopeptidophosphoglycan Trigger Human Neutrophil Extracellular Traps.

    PubMed

    Ávila, Eva E; Salaiza, Norma; Pulido, Julieta; Rodríguez, Mayra C; Díaz-Godínez, César; Laclette, Juan P; Becker, Ingeborg; Carrero, Julio C

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil defense mechanisms include phagocytosis, degranulation and the formation of extracellular traps (NET). These networks of DNA are triggered by several immune and microbial factors, representing a defense strategy to prevent microbial spread by trapping/killing pathogens. This may be important against Entamoeba histolytica, since its large size hinders its phagocytosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether E. histolytica and their lipopeptidophosphoglycan (EhLPPG) induce the formation of NETs and the outcome of their interaction with the parasite. Our data show that live amoebae and EhLPPG, but not fixed trophozoites, induced NET formation in a time and dose dependent manner, starting at 5 min of co-incubation. Although immunofluorescence studies showed that the NETs contain cathelicidin LL-37 in close proximity to amoebae, the trophozoite growth was only affected when ethylene glycol tetra-acetic acid (EGTA) was present during contact with NETs, suggesting that the activity of enzymes requiring calcium, such as DNases, may be important for amoeba survival. In conclusion, E. histolytica trophozoites and EhLPPG induce in vitro formation of human NETs, which did not affect the parasite growth unless a chelating agent was present. These results suggest that NETs may be an important factor of the innate immune response during infection with E. histolytica. PMID:27415627

  13. Entamoeba histolytica Trophozoites and Lipopeptidophosphoglycan Trigger Human Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    PubMed Central

    Ávila, Eva E.; Rodríguez, Mayra C.; Díaz-Godínez, César; Laclette, Juan P.; Becker, Ingeborg; Carrero, Julio C.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil defense mechanisms include phagocytosis, degranulation and the formation of extracellular traps (NET). These networks of DNA are triggered by several immune and microbial factors, representing a defense strategy to prevent microbial spread by trapping/killing pathogens. This may be important against Entamoeba histolytica, since its large size hinders its phagocytosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether E. histolytica and their lipopeptidophosphoglycan (EhLPPG) induce the formation of NETs and the outcome of their interaction with the parasite. Our data show that live amoebae and EhLPPG, but not fixed trophozoites, induced NET formation in a time and dose dependent manner, starting at 5 min of co-incubation. Although immunofluorescence studies showed that the NETs contain cathelicidin LL-37 in close proximity to amoebae, the trophozoite growth was only affected when ethylene glycol tetra-acetic acid (EGTA) was present during contact with NETs, suggesting that the activity of enzymes requiring calcium, such as DNases, may be important for amoeba survival. In conclusion, E. histolytica trophozoites and EhLPPG induce in vitro formation of human NETs, which did not affect the parasite growth unless a chelating agent was present. These results suggest that NETs may be an important factor of the innate immune response during infection with E. histolytica. PMID:27415627

  14. NETosing Neutrophils Activate Complement Both on Their Own NETs and Bacteria via Alternative and Non-alternative Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Joshua; Pluthero, Fred G.; Douda, David N.; Riedl, Magdalena; Cherry, Ahmed; Ulanova, Marina; Kahr, Walter H. A.; Palaniyar, Nades; Licht, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils deposit antimicrobial proteins, such as myeloperoxidase and proteases on chromatin, which they release as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Neutrophils also carry key components of the complement alternative pathway (AP) such as properdin or complement factor P (CFP), complement factor B (CFB), and C3. However, the contribution of these complement components and complement activation during NET formation in the presence and absence of bacteria is poorly understood. We studied complement activation on NETs and a Gram-negative opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA01, PAKwt, and PAKgfp). Here, we show that anaphylatoxin C5a, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), which activates NADPH oxidase, induce the release of CFP, CFB, and C3 from neutrophils. In response to PMA or P. aeruginosa, neutrophils secrete CFP, deposit it on NETs and bacteria, and induce the formation of terminal complement complexes (C5b–9). A blocking anti-CFP antibody inhibited AP-mediated but not non-AP-mediated complement activation on NETs and P. aeruginosa. Therefore, NET-mediated complement activation occurs via both AP- and non AP-based mechanisms, and AP-mediated complement activation during NETosis is dependent on CFP. These findings suggest that neutrophils could use their “AP tool kit” to readily activate complement on NETs and Gram-negative bacteria, such as P. aeruginosa, whereas additional components present in the serum help to fix non-AP-mediated complement both on NETs and bacteria. This unique mechanism may play important roles in host defense and help to explain specific roles of complement activation in NET-related diseases. PMID:27148258

  15. Comparison of antioxidant and nonantioxidant lipoxygenase inhibitors on neutrophil function. Implications for pathogenesis of myocardial reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Shappell, S B; Taylor, A A; Hughes, H; Mitchell, J R; Anderson, D C; Smith, C W

    1990-02-01

    The activation and accumulation of leukocytes during inflammatory processes such as that initiated by myocardial ischemia and reflow appear to be major determinants of irreversible tissue injury. Myocardial salvage by dual cyclooxygenase/lipoxygenase inhibitors and selective 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors has suggested a role for lipoxygenase (LOX) products, such as the potent chemotactic factor leukotriene B4, in ischemia-reflow injury. However, many LOX inhibitors are antioxidants and several have been shown to directly inhibit neutrophil function in vitro, thereby questioning the role of LOX products in reperfusion injury. To clarify further the protective mechanism of lipoxygenase inhibitors, we have examined the effects of two nonantioxidant inhibitors, SK&F 86002 and REV-5901, on human neutrophil activation and function in vitro. The antioxidant LOX inhibitor nordihydroguiaretic acid, which served as a positive control, exhibited a concentration-dependent inhibition of N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and recombinant C5a-induced neutrophil bipolarization, fMLP-induced upregulation of the adherence glycoprotein Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18), fMLP-induced aggregation and neutrophil adherence to and migration through interleukin-1-stimulated human endothelial monolayers. In contrast, neither SK&F 86002 nor REV-5901 (in concentrations up to 50 microM) had any effect on these functions, nor did they inhibit neutrophil oxidative metabolism (phorbol myristate acetate-induced chemiluminescence). Inasmuch as both of these agents have been observed to reduce myocardial ischemia-reflow injury in vivo, their failure to directly inhibit neutrophil function further supports an important role for chemotactic LOX products in the pathogenesis of reperfusion injury. PMID:2156049

  16. Pneumolysin activates neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

    PubMed

    G Nel, J; Theron, A J; Durandt, C; Tintinger, G R; Pool, R; Mitchell, T J; Feldman, C; Anderson, R

    2016-06-01

    The primary objective of the current study was to investigate the potential of the pneumococcal toxin, pneumolysin (Ply), to activate neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation in vitro. Isolated human blood neutrophils were exposed to recombinant Ply (5-20 ng ml(-1) ) for 30-90 min at 37°C and NET formation measured using the following procedures to detect extracellular DNA: (i) flow cytometry using Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Ruby; (ii) spectrofluorimetry using the fluorophore, Sytox(®) Orange (5 μM); and (iii) NanoDrop(®) technology. These procedures were complemented by fluorescence microscopy using 4', 6-diamino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) (nuclear stain) in combination with anti-citrullinated histone monoclonal antibodies to visualize nets. Exposure of neutrophils to Ply resulted in relatively rapid (detected within 30-60 min), statistically significant (P < 0·05) dose- and time-related increases in the release of cellular DNA impregnated with both citrullinated histone and myeloperoxidase. Microscopy revealed that NETosis appeared to be restricted to a subpopulation of neutrophils, the numbers of NET-forming cells in the control and Ply-treated systems (10 and 20 ng ml(-1) ) were 4·3 (4·2), 14.3 (9·9) and 16·5 (7·5), respectively (n = 4, P < 0·0001 for comparison of the control with both Ply-treated systems). Ply-induced NETosis occurred in the setting of retention of cell viability, and apparent lack of involvement of reactive oxygen species and Toll-like receptor 4. In conclusion, Ply induces vital NETosis in human neutrophils, a process which may either contribute to host defence or worsen disease severity, depending on the intensity of the inflammatory response during pneumococcal infection. PMID:26749379

  17. Changes in Neutrophil Functions in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaur, Indreshpal; Simons, Elizabeth R.; Castro, Victoria; Pierson, Duane L.

    2002-01-01

    Neutrophil functions (phagocytosis, oxidative burst, degranulation) and expression of surface markers involved in these functions were studied in 25 astronauts before and after 4 space shuttle missions. Space flight duration ranged from 5 to 11 days. Blood specimens were obtained 10 days before launch (preflight or L-10), immediately after landing (landing or R+0), and again at 3 days after landing (postflight or R+3). Blood samples were also collected from 9 healthy low-stressed subjects at 3 time points simulating a 10-day shuttle mission. The number of neutrophils increased at landing by 85 percent when compared to the preflight numbers. Neutrophil functions were studied in whole blood using flow cytometric methods. Phagocytosis of E.coli-FITC and oxidative burst capacity of the neutrophils following the 9 to 11 day missions were lower at all three sampling points than the mean values for control subjects. Phagocytosis and oxidative burst capacity of the astronauts was decreased even 10-days before space flight. Mission duration appears to be a factor in phagocytic and oxidative functions. In contrast, following the short-duration (5-days) mission, these functions were unchanged from control values. No consistent changes in degranulation were observed following either short or medium length space missions. The expression of CD16, CD32, CD11a, CD11b, CD11c, L-selectin and CD36 was measured and found to be variable. Specifically, CD16 and CD32 did not correlate with the changes in oxidative burst and phagocytosis. We can conclude from this study that the stresses associated with space flight can alter the important functions of neutrophils.

  18. The in vitro effects of Newcastle disease virus on the metabolic and antibacterial functions of human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Faden, H.; Humbert, J.; Lee, J.; Sutyla, P.; Ogra, P.L.

    1981-08-01

    Live Newcastle disease virus (NDV) was used to investigate the in vitro effects of a viral infection on phagocytosis, chemiluminescence generation, superoxide production, oxygen consumption, NADPH-oxidase activity, and intracellular killing of bacteria by Ficoll-Hypaque separated human neutrophils. Phagocytosis of oil red O particles by NDV-treated PMN was inhibited by 50%. Chemiluminescence by PMN was inhibited 79% after zymosan stimulation and 86% after tetradeconyl phorbol acetate stimulation. Superoxide generation was inhibited by 68%. Oxygen consumption was inhibited in the presence of NDV by 37% after stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate, while membrane-associated NADPH-enzyme activity was decreased by 19%. The percent of surviving intracellular S. aureus was significantly elevated in NDV-treated PMN after 60 and 120 min of incubation. Purified bacterial neuraminidase markedly suppressed chemiluminescence, while neuraminic acid blocked the effects of the virus. These observations suggest that infections with myxoviruses may suppress a number of vital neutrophil functions. It appears that the effects may be partly mediated by the interaction of viral neuraminidase with the external neutrophil membrane.

  19. Hyperbaric Oxygen Reduces Production of Reactive Oxygen Species in Neutrophils from Polytraumatized Patients Yielding in the Inhibition of p38 MAP Kinase and Downstream Pathways.

    PubMed

    Grimberg-Peters, Deborah; Büren, Carina; Windolf, Joachim; Wahlers, Thorsten; Paunel-Görgülü, Adnana

    2016-01-01

    Trauma represents the leading cause of death among young people in western countries. Among the beneficial role of neutrophils in host defence, excessive priming and activation of neutrophils after major trauma lead to an overwhelming inflammatory response and secondary host tissue injury due to the release of toxic metabolites and enzymes. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy has been proposed to possess antiinflammatory effects and might represent an appropriate therapeutic option to lower inflammation in a broad range of patients. Here, we studied the effects of HBO on the activity of neutrophils isolated from severely injured patients (days 1-2 after trauma), in fact on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). We found exposure to HBO therapy to significantly diminish phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced ROS production in neutrophils isolated from patients and healthy volunteers. At the same time, marked decrease in NETs release was found in control cells and a less pronounced reduction in patient neutrophils. Impaired ability to produce ROS following exposure to HBO was demonstrated to be linked to a strong downregulation of the activity of p38 MAPK. Only slight suppression of ERK activity could be found. In addition, HBO did not influence neutrophil chemotaxis or apoptosis, respectively. Collectively, this study shows for the first time that HBO therapy suppresses ROS production in inflammatory human neutrophils, and thus might impair ROS-dependent pathways, e.g. kinases activation and NETs release. Thus, HBO might represent a feasible therapy for patients suffering from systemic inflammation, including those with multiple trauma. PMID:27529549

  20. Hyperbaric Oxygen Reduces Production of Reactive Oxygen Species in Neutrophils from Polytraumatized Patients Yielding in the Inhibition of p38 MAP Kinase and Downstream Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Windolf, Joachim; Wahlers, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Trauma represents the leading cause of death among young people in western countries. Among the beneficial role of neutrophils in host defence, excessive priming and activation of neutrophils after major trauma lead to an overwhelming inflammatory response and secondary host tissue injury due to the release of toxic metabolites and enzymes. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy has been proposed to possess antiinflammatory effects and might represent an appropriate therapeutic option to lower inflammation in a broad range of patients. Here, we studied the effects of HBO on the activity of neutrophils isolated from severely injured patients (days 1–2 after trauma), in fact on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). We found exposure to HBO therapy to significantly diminish phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced ROS production in neutrophils isolated from patients and healthy volunteers. At the same time, marked decrease in NETs release was found in control cells and a less pronounced reduction in patient neutrophils. Impaired ability to produce ROS following exposure to HBO was demonstrated to be linked to a strong downregulation of the activity of p38 MAPK. Only slight suppression of ERK activity could be found. In addition, HBO did not influence neutrophil chemotaxis or apoptosis, respectively. Collectively, this study shows for the first time that HBO therapy suppresses ROS production in inflammatory human neutrophils, and thus might impair ROS-dependent pathways, e.g. kinases activation and NETs release. Thus, HBO might represent a feasible therapy for patients suffering from systemic inflammation, including those with multiple trauma. PMID:27529549

  1. Effect of Cellulose Acetate Beads on Interleukin-23 Release.

    PubMed

    Nishise, Shoichi; Abe, Yasuhiko; Nomura, Eiki; Sato, Takeshi; Sasaki, Yu; Iwano, Daisuke; Yoshizawa, Kazuya; Yagi, Makoto; Sakuta, Kazuhiro; Ueno, Yoshiyuki

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin (IL)-23, which is released by activated monocytes and neutrophils, promotes production of high levels of IL-17 by T-helper 17 cells. Cellulose acetate (CA) beads are used as carriers for granulocyte and monocyte (GM) adsorptive apheresis using Adacolumn. Contact between blood and CA beads induces cytokine release; however, their inflammatory effects on IL-23 release are unclear. We aimed to clarify the effect of CA beads on IL-23 release in vitro. We incubated peripheral blood with and without CA beads and measured IL-23. Compared to blood samples incubated without CA beads, blood samples incubated with CA beads had significantly decreased amounts of IL-23. In conclusion, CA beads inhibited IL-23 release from adsorbed GMs. The biological effects of this decrease in IL-23 release during GM adsorption to CA beads need further clarification.

  2. Inhibition of Human Neutrophil Responses by Essential Oil of Artemisia kotuchovii and Its Constituents

    PubMed Central

    Schepetkin, Igor A.; Kushnarenko, Svetlana V.; Özek, Gulmira; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Utegenova, Gulzhakhan A.; Kotukhov, Yuriy A.; Danilova, Alevtina N.; Özek, Temel; Başer, K. Hüsnü Can; Quinn, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    Essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation of the flowers+leaves and stems of Artemisia kotuchovii Kupr. (AKEOf+l and AKEOstm, respectively) and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The primary components of the oils were estragole, (E)- and (Z)-β-ocimenes, methyl eugenol, limonene, spathulenol, β-pinene, myrcene, and (E)-methyl cinnamate. Seventy four constituents were present at concentrations from 0.1 to 1.0%, and 34 compounds were identified in trace (<0.1%) amounts in one or both plant components. Screening of the essential oils for biological activity showed that AKEOstm, but not AKEOf+l, inhibited N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)-stimulated Ca2+ flux and chemotaxis and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human neutrophils. Selected pure constituents, representing >96% of the AKEOstm composition, were also tested in human neutrophils and HL-60 cells transfected with N-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1). We found that one component, 6-methyl-3,5-heptadien-2-one (MHDO), inhibited fMLF- and interleukin 8 (IL-8)-stimulated Ca2+ flux, fMLF-induced chemotaxis, and PMA-induced ROS production in human neutrophils. MHDO also inhibited fMLF-induced Ca2+ flux in FPR1-HL60 cells. These results suggest that MHDO may be effective in modulating some innate immune responses, possibly by an inhibition of neutrophil migration and ROS production. PMID:25959257

  3. Inhibition of Human Neutrophil Responses by the Essential Oil of Artemisia kotuchovii and Its Constituents.

    PubMed

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Kushnarenko, Svetlana V; Özek, Gulmira; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Utegenova, Gulzhakhan A; Kotukhov, Yuriy A; Danilova, Alevtina N; Özek, Temel; Başer, K Hüsnü Can; Quinn, Mark T

    2015-05-27

    Essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation of the flowers+leaves and stems of Artemisia kotuchovii Kupr. (AKEO(f+l) and AKEO(stm), respectively) and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The primary components of the oils were estragole, (E)- and (Z)-β-ocimenes, methyleugenol, limonene, spathulenol, β-pinene, myrcene, and (E)-methyl cinnamate. Seventy-four constituents were present at concentrations from 0.1 to 1.0%, and 34 compounds were identified in trace (<0.1%) amounts in one or both plant components. Screening of the essential oils for biological activity showed that AKEO(stm), but not AKEOf+l, inhibited N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)-stimulated Ca(2+) flux and chemotaxis and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human neutrophils. Selected pure constituents, representing >96% of the AKEO(stm) composition, were also tested in human neutrophils and HL-60 cells transfected with N-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1). One component, 6-methyl-3,5-heptadien-2-one (MHDO), inhibited fMLF- and interleukin 8 (IL-8)-stimulated Ca(2+) flux, fMLF-induced chemotaxis, and PMA-induced ROS production in human neutrophils. MHDO also inhibited fMLF-induced Ca(2+) flux in FPR1-HL60 cells. These results suggest that MHDO may be effective in modulating some innate immune responses, possibly by inhibition of neutrophil migration and ROS production. PMID:25959257

  4. Inhibition of Human Neutrophil Responses by the Essential Oil of Artemisia kotuchovii and Its Constituents.

    PubMed

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Kushnarenko, Svetlana V; Özek, Gulmira; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Utegenova, Gulzhakhan A; Kotukhov, Yuriy A; Danilova, Alevtina N; Özek, Temel; Başer, K Hüsnü Can; Quinn, Mark T

    2015-05-27

    Essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation of the flowers+leaves and stems of Artemisia kotuchovii Kupr. (AKEO(f+l) and AKEO(stm), respectively) and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The primary components of the oils were estragole, (E)- and (Z)-β-ocimenes, methyleugenol, limonene, spathulenol, β-pinene, myrcene, and (E)-methyl cinnamate. Seventy-four constituents were present at concentrations from 0.1 to 1.0%, and 34 compounds were identified in trace (<0.1%) amounts in one or both plant components. Screening of the essential oils for biological activity showed that AKEO(stm), but not AKEOf+l, inhibited N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)-stimulated Ca(2+) flux and chemotaxis and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human neutrophils. Selected pure constituents, representing >96% of the AKEO(stm) composition, were also tested in human neutrophils and HL-60 cells transfected with N-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1). One component, 6-methyl-3,5-heptadien-2-one (MHDO), inhibited fMLF- and interleukin 8 (IL-8)-stimulated Ca(2+) flux, fMLF-induced chemotaxis, and PMA-induced ROS production in human neutrophils. MHDO also inhibited fMLF-induced Ca(2+) flux in FPR1-HL60 cells. These results suggest that MHDO may be effective in modulating some innate immune responses, possibly by inhibition of neutrophil migration and ROS production.

  5. DNA, histones and neutrophil extracellular traps exert anti-fibrinolytic effects in a plasma environment.

    PubMed

    Varjú, Imre; Longstaff, Colin; Szabó, László; Farkas, Ádám Zoltán; Varga-Szabó, Veronika Judit; Tanka-Salamon, Anna; Machovich, Raymund; Kolev, Krasimir

    2015-06-01

    In response to various inflammatory stimuli, neutrophils secrete neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), web-like meshworks of DNA, histones and granular components forming supplementary scaffolds in venous and arterial thrombi. Isolated DNA and histones are known to promote thrombus formation and render fibrin clots more resistant to mechanical forces and tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA)-induced enzymatic digestion. The present study extends our earlier observations to a physiologically more relevant environment including plasma clots and NET-forming neutrophils. A range of techniques was employed including imaging (scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal laser microscopy, and photoscanning of macroscopic lysis fronts), clot permeability measurements, turbidimetric lysis and enzyme inactivation assays. Addition of DNA and histones increased the median fibre diameter of plasma clots formed with 16 nM thrombin from 108 to 121 and 119 nm, respectively, and decreased their permeability constant from 6.4 to 3.1 and 3.7×10(-9) cm(2). Histones effectively protected thrombin from antithrombin-induced inactivation, while DNA inhibited plasminogen activation on the surface of plasma clots and their plasmin-induced resolution by 20 and 40 %, respectively. DNA and histones, as well as NETs secreted by phorbol-myristate-acetate-activated neutrophils, slowed down the tPA-driven lysis of plasma clots and the latter effect could be reversed by the addition of DNase (streptodornase). SEM images taken after complete digestion of fibrin in NET-containing plasma clots evidenced retained NET scaffold that was absent in DNase-treated clots. Our results show that DNA and histones alter the fibrin architecture in plasma clots, while NETs contribute to a decreased lytic susceptibility that can be overcome by DNase.

  6. Inhibition of Neutrophil Exocytosis Ameliorates Acute Lung Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Uriarte, Silvia M.; Rane, Madhavi J.; Merchant, Michael L.; Jin, Shunying; Lentsch, Alex B.; Ward, Richard A.; McLeish, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    Exocytosis of neutrophil granules contributes to acute lung injury (ALI) induced by infection or inflammation, suggesting that inhibition of neutrophil exocytosis in vivo could be a viable therapeutic strategy. This study was conducted to determine the effect of a cell-permeable fusion protein that inhibits neutrophil exocytosis (TAT-SNAP-23) on ALI using an immune complex deposition model in rats. The effect of inhibition of neutrophil exocytosis by intravenous administration of TAT-SNAP-23 on ALI was assessed by albumin leakage, neutrophil infiltration, lung histology, and proteomic analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf). Administration of TAT-SNAP-23, but not TAT-Control, significantly reduced albumin leakage, total protein levels in the BALf, and intra-alveolar edema and hemorrhage. Evidence that TAT-SNAP-23 inhibits neutrophil exocytosis included a reduction in plasma membrane CD18 expression by BALf neutrophils and a decrease in neutrophil granule proteins in BALf. Similar degree of neutrophil accumulation in the lungs and/or BALf suggests that TAT-SNAP-23 did not alter vascular endothelial cell function. Proteomic analysis of BALf revealed that components of the complement and coagulation pathways were significantly reduced in BALf from TAT-SNAP-23-treated animals. Our results indicate that administration of a TAT-fusion protein that inhibits neutrophil exocytosis reduces in vivo ALI. Targeting neutrophil exocytosis is a potential therapeutic strategy to ameliorate ALI. PMID:23364427

  7. Endothelial cell phagocytosis of senescent neutrophils decreases procoagulant activity.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunyan; Xie, Rui; Li, Wen; Zhou, Jin; Liu, Shuchuan; Cao, Fenglin; Liu, Yue; Ma, Ruishuang; Si, Yu; Liu, Yan; Bi, Yayan; Gilbert, Gary E; Shi, Jialan

    2013-06-01

    Abundant senescent neutrophils traverse the vascular compartment and may contribute to pathologic conditions. For example, they become procoagulant when undergoing apoptosis and may contribute to thrombosis or inflammation. Our previous studies demonstrated a dominant clearance pathway in which the neutrophils can be phagocytosed by liver macrophages. The aim of this study was to explore an alternate pathway of neutrophil clearance by endothelial cells. Phagocytosis of the neutrophils by endothelial cells was performed using various experimental approaches includingflow cytometry, confocal microscopy and electron microscopy assays in vitro and in vivo. Procoagulant activity of cultured neutrophils was evaluated by coagulation time, factor Xase and prothrombinase assays. Lactadherin functioned as a novel probe for the detection of phosphatidylserine on apoptotic cells, an opsonin (bridge) between apoptotic cell and phagocyte for promoting phagocytosis, and an efficient anticoagulant for inhibition of factor Xase and thrombin formation. When cultured, purified human neutrophils spontaneously entered apoptosis and developed procoagulant activity that was directly related to the degree of phosphatidylserine exposure. Co-culture of aged neutrophils and endothelial cells resulted in phagocytosis of the neutrophils and prolonged coagulation time. Lactadherin diminished the procoagulant activity and increased the rate of neutrophil clearance. In vivo, neutrophils were sequestered by endothelial cells after blockade of Kupffer cells, a process that was dependent upon both phosphatidylserine exposure and P-selectin expression. Thus, the ability of endothelial cells to clear senescent neutrophils may limit the procoagulant and/or inflammatory impact of these cells.

  8. Neutrophil extracellular traps: Their role in periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Kolaparthy, Lakshmi Kanth; Sanivarapu, Sahitya; Swarna, Chakrapani; Devulapalli, Narasimha Swamy

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are the first line of innate immune defense against infectious diseases. Since their discovery, they have always been considered tissue-destructive cells responsible for inflammatory tissue damage occurring during infections. Extensive research in the field of neutrophil cell biology and their role skewing the immune response in various infections or inflammatory disorders revealed their importance in the regulation of immune response. Neutrophils also release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) for the containment of infection and inflammation along with other antimicrobial molecules. Activated neutrophils provide signals for the activation and maturation of macrophages as well as dendritic cells. Neutrophils are also involved in the regulation of T-cell immune response against various pathogens and tumor antigens. Thus, the present review is intended to highlight the emerging role of neutrophil extracellular trap production in the regulation of immune response and its role in periodontal disease. PMID:25624623

  9. Neutrophil extracellular traps: Their role in periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Kolaparthy, Lakshmi Kanth; Sanivarapu, Sahitya; Swarna, Chakrapani; Devulapalli, Narasimha Swamy

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are the first line of innate immune defense against infectious diseases. Since their discovery, they have always been considered tissue-destructive cells responsible for inflammatory tissue damage occurring during infections. Extensive research in the field of neutrophil cell biology and their role skewing the immune response in various infections or inflammatory disorders revealed their importance in the regulation of immune response. Neutrophils also release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) for the containment of infection and inflammation along with other antimicrobial molecules. Activated neutrophils provide signals for the activation and maturation of macrophages as well as dendritic cells. Neutrophils are also involved in the regulation of T-cell immune response against various pathogens and tumor antigens. Thus, the present review is intended to highlight the emerging role of neutrophil extracellular trap production in the regulation of immune response and its role in periodontal disease. PMID:25624623

  10. Distinct Oral Neutrophil Subsets Define Health and Periodontal Disease States.

    PubMed

    Fine, N; Hassanpour, S; Borenstein, A; Sima, C; Oveisi, M; Scholey, J; Cherney, D; Glogauer, M

    2016-07-01

    Neutrophils exit the vasculature and swarm to sites of inflammation and infection. However, these cells are abundant in the healthy, inflammation-free human oral environment, suggesting a unique immune surveillance role within the periodontium. We hypothesize that neutrophils in the healthy oral cavity occur in an intermediary parainflammatory state that allows them to interact with and contain the oral microflora without eliciting a marked inflammatory response. Based on a high-throughput screen of neutrophil CD (cluster of differentiation) marker expression and a thorough literature review, we developed multicolor flow cytometry panels to determine the surface marker signatures of oral neutrophil subsets in periodontal health and disease. We define here 3 distinct neutrophil subsets: resting/naive circulatory neutrophils, parainflammatory neutrophils found in the healthy oral cavity, and proinflammatory neutrophils found in the oral cavity during chronic periodontal disease. Furthermore, parainflammatory neutrophils manifest as 2 distinct subpopulations-based on size, granularity, and expression of specific CD markers-and exhibit intermediate levels of activation as compared with the proinflammatory oral neutrophils. These intermediately activated parainflammatory populations occur in equal proportions in the healthy oral cavity, with a shift to one highly activated proinflammatory neutrophil population in chronic periodontal disease. This work is the first to identify and characterize oral parainflammatory neutrophils that interact with commensal biofilms without inducing an inflammatory response, thereby demonstrating that not all neutrophils trafficking through periodontal tissues are fully activated. In addition to establishing possible diagnostic and treatment monitoring biomarkers, this oral neutrophil phenotype model builds on existing literature suggesting that the healthy periodontium may be in a parainflammatory state. PMID:27270666

  11. Isolation and Characterization of Neutrophils with Anti-Tumor Properties.

    PubMed

    Sionov, Ronit Vogt; Assi, Simaan; Gershkovitz, Maya; Sagiv, Jitka Y; Polyansky, Lola; Mishalian, Inbal; Fridlender, Zvi G; Granot, Zvi

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils, the most abundant of all white blood cells in the human circulation, play an important role in the host defense against invading microorganisms. In addition, neutrophils play a central role in the immune surveillance of tumor cells. They have the ability to recognize tumor cells and induce tumor cell death either through a cell contact-dependent mechanism involving hydrogen peroxide or through antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Neutrophils with anti-tumor activity can be isolated from peripheral blood of cancer patients and of tumor-bearing mice. These neutrophils are termed tumor-entrained neutrophils (TEN) to distinguish them from neutrophils of healthy subjects or naïve mice that show no significant tumor cytotoxic activity. Compared with other white blood cells, neutrophils show different buoyancy making it feasible to obtain a > 98% pure neutrophil population when subjected to a density gradient. However, in addition to the normal high-density neutrophil population (HDN), in cancer patients, in tumor-bearing mice, as well as under chronic inflammatory conditions, distinct low-density neutrophil populations (LDN) appear in the circulation. LDN co-purify with the mononuclear fraction and can be separated from mononuclear cells using either positive or negative selection strategies. Once the purity of the isolated neutrophils is determined by flow cytometry, they can be used for in vitro and in vivo functional assays. We describe techniques for monitoring the anti-tumor activity of neutrophils, their ability to migrate and to produce reactive oxygen species, as well as monitoring their phagocytic capacity ex vivo. We further describe techniques to label the neutrophils for in vivo tracking, and to determine their anti-metastatic capacity in vivo. All these techniques are essential for understanding how to obtain and characterize neutrophils with anti-tumor function. PMID:26132785

  12. Immunofluorescence and Confocal Microscopy of Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Lee-Ann H.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid recruitment of neutrophils to sites of infection and their ability to phagocytose and kill microbes is an important aspect of the innate immune response. Challenges associated with imaging of these cells include their short lifespan and small size and the fact that unstimulated cells are nonadherent. In addition, although cytoplasmic granules are plentiful, the abundance of many other organelles is diminished. Here we reprise methods for analysis of resting and activated cells using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, including kinetic analysis of phagosome maturation and degranulation, and detection of intraphagosomal superoxide accumulation. We describe approaches for rapid cell fixation and permeabilization that maximize antigen detection and discuss other variables that also affect data interpretation and image quality (such as cell spreading, degranulation, and phagocytosis). Finally, we show that these methods are also applicable to studies of neutrophil interactions with the extracellular matrix. PMID:24504957

  13. Network crosstalk dynamically changes during neutrophil polarization.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chin-Jen; Wang, Yanqin; Weiner, Orion D; Altschuler, Steven J; Wu, Lani F

    2012-05-25

    How complex signaling networks shape highly coordinated, multistep cellular responses is poorly understood. Here, we made use of a network-perturbation approach to investigate causal influences, or "crosstalk," among signaling modules involved in the cytoskeletal response of neutrophils to chemoattractant. We quantified the intensity and polarity of cytoskeletal marker proteins over time to characterize stereotyped cellular responses. Analyzing the effects of network disruptions revealed that, not only does crosstalk evolve rapidly during polarization, but also that intensity and polarity responses are influenced by different patterns of crosstalk. Interestingly, persistent crosstalk is arranged in a surprisingly simple circuit: a linear cascade from front to back to microtubules influences intensities, and a feed-forward network in the reverse direction influences polarity. Our approach provided a rational strategy for decomposing a complex, dynamically evolving signaling system and revealed evolving paths of causal influence that shape the neutrophil polarization response.

  14. Neutrophil myeloperoxidase destruction by ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanker, J.; Giammara, B.; Strauss, G.

    1988-01-01

    The peroxidase activity of enriched leukocyte preparations on coverslips was determined cytochemically with a newly developed method. The techniques utilizes diaminobenzidine medium and cupric nitrate intensification and is suitable for analysis with light microscopy, SEM, and TEM. Blood specimens from control individuals were studied with and without in vitro UV irradiation and compared with those from psoriasis patients exposed therapeutically to various types of UV in phototherapy. All UV irradiated samples showed diminished neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MP) activity although that of the principal eosinophil peroxidase was unaffected. The SEMs supported the contention that decreased neutrophil MP activity might be related to UV induced degranulation. It is believed to be possible, eventually, to equate the observed MP degranulation effect after UV irradiation with diminished ability to fight bacterial infections.

  15. Prognostic value of neutrophil distribution in cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Zhi-Yuan; Zhu, Guang-Qing; Xiong, Mei; Ren, Li; Bai, Li

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To explore the relationship of clinicopathological features and the distribution of neutrophils in the tumor microenvironment with the prognosis of cholangiocarcinoma. METHODS: Two hundred and fifty-four formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded tissue blocks were analyzed, including tissues from cholangiocarcinoma (n = 254), and tumor adjacent tissues (n = 238). Tissue sections were stained for CD15 using immunohistochemical staining. CD15 expression was detected to identify the distribution of neutrophils in the local tumor microenvironment. The neutrophil density of the tumor tissues and the adjacent tumor tissues was detected to reflect their inflammatory status. Clinical data and follow-up information of cholangiocarcinoma patients who underwent surgery from January 2004 to December 2010 were analyzed retrospectively. The relationship between clinicopathological features and the distribution of neutrophils with prognosis of the patients were analyzed. RESULTS: The positive expression level of CD15 was only significantly related to the TNM stage. CD15 expression was higher in tumor tissues than in adjacent tissues (73.6% vs 54.6%), with significant differences. Patients with high expression of CD15 had significantly shorter overall survival (OS) than those with low expression of CD15 (median overall survival time 39.77 mo vs 16.87 mo, P = 0.008). Patients with high CD15 expression had significantly shorter disease free survival time (DFS) than those with low expression of CD15 (median DFS 38.27 mo vs 16.83 mo, P = 0.029). COX multivariate analysis indicated that high CD15 expression in tumor tissues was an independent risk factor for predicting OS for patients with cholangiocarcinoma [P = 0.012, relative risk (RR) = 1.601], but it was not an independent risk factor for predicting DFS (P = 0.073, RR = 1.462). CONCLUSION: Patients with high CD15 expression in cancer tissues had shorter DFS and OS. High expression of CD15 is an independent risk factor for OS. PMID

  16. Characterization of prostanoid receptors on rat neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Wise, H; Jones, R L

    1994-01-01

    1. The effects of various prostanoid agonists have been compared on the increase in intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i) and the aggregation reaction of rat peritoneal neutrophils induced by N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP). 2. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and the specific IP-receptor agonist, cicaprost, both inhibited the FMLP-induced increase in [Ca2+]i (IC50 33 nM and 18 nM respectively) and the FMLP-induced aggregation reaction (IC50 5.6 nM and 7.9 nM respectively). PGD2, PGF2 alpha, and the TP-receptor agonist, U 46619, were inactive at the highest concentration tested (1 microM). 3. The EP1-receptor agonist, 17-phenyl-omega-trinor PGE2, and the EP3-receptor agonists, GR 63799X and sulprostone, had no inhibitory effect on FMLP-stimulated rat neutrophils. 4. PGE1 (EP/IP-receptor agonist) and iloprost (IP-receptor agonist) inhibited the FMLP-induced increase in [Ca2+]i with IC50 values of 34 nM and 38 nM respectively. The EP2-receptor agonists, butaprost and misoprostol (1 microM), inhibited both FMLP-stimulated [Ca2+]i and aggregation. However another EP2-receptor agonist, AH 13205, was inactive in both assays. 5. Prostanoid receptors present on rat neutrophils were further characterized by measuring [3H]-adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate ([3H]-cyclic AMP) accumulation. Only those agonists capable of stimulating [3H]-cyclic AMP accumulation were able to inhibit both FMLP-stimulated [Ca2+]i and aggregation. 6. These results indicate that rat neutrophils possess inhibitory IP and EP-receptors; the relative potencies of PGE2, misoprostol and butaprost are those expected for the EP2-receptor subtype. No evidence for DP, FP, TP or EP1 and EP3-receptors was obtained. PMID:7834211

  17. Capsular polysaccharides from Cryptococcus neoformans modulate production of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) by human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Juliana D B; Nascimento, Michelle T C; Decote-Ricardo, Debora; Côrte-Real, Suzana; Morrot, Alexandre; Heise, Norton; Nunes, Marise P; Previato, José Osvaldo; Mendonça-Previato, Lucia; DosReis, George A; Saraiva, Elvira M; Freire-de-Lima, Célio G

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we characterized the in vitro modulation of NETs (neutrophil extracellular traps) induced in human neutrophils by the opportunistic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, evaluating the participation of capsular polysaccharides glucuronoxylomanan (GXM) and glucuronoxylomannogalactan (GXMGal) in this phenomenon. The mutant acapsular strain CAP67 and the capsular polysaccharide GXMGal induced NET production. In contrast, the wild-type strain and the major polysaccharide GXM did not induce NET release. In addition, C. neoformans and the capsular polysaccharide GXM inhibited PMA-induced NET release. Additionally, we observed that the NET-enriched supernatants induced through CAP67 yeasts showed fungicidal activity on the capsular strain, and neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase, collagenase and histones were the key components for the induction of NET fungicidal activity. The signaling pathways associated with NET induction through the CAP67 strain were dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peptidylarginine deiminase-4 (PAD-4). Neither polysaccharide induced ROS production however both molecules blocked the production of ROS through PMA-activated neutrophils. Taken together, the results demonstrate that C. neoformans and the capsular component GXM inhibit the production of NETs in human neutrophils. This mechanism indicates a potentially new and important modulation factor for this fungal pathogen. PMID:25620354

  18. Delayed human neutrophil apoptosis by Trichomonas vaginalis lysate.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Ouk; Lim, Young-Su; Moon, Sun-Joo; Ahn, Myoung-Hee; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2010-03-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in the human immune system for protection against such microorganisms as a protozoan parasite, Trichomonas vaginalis; however, the precise role of neutrophils in the pathogenesis of trichomoniasis is still unknown. Moreover, it is thought that trichomonal lysates and excretory-secretory products (ESP), as well as live T. vaginalis, could possibly interact with neutrophils in local tissues, including areas of inflammation induced by T. vaginalis in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of T. vaginalis lysate on the fate of neutrophils. We found that T. vaginalis lysate inhibits apoptosis of human neutrophils as revealed by Giemsa stain. Less altered mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and surface CD16 receptor expression also supported the idea that neutrophil apoptosis is delayed after T. vaginalis lysate stimulation. In contrast, ESP stimulated-neutrophils were similar in apoptotic features of untreated neutrophils. Maintained caspase-3 and myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) in neutrophils co-cultured with trichomonad lysate suggest that an intrinsic mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis was involved in T. vaginalis lysate-induced delayed neutrophil apoptosis; this phenomenon may contribute to local inflammation in trichomoniasis. PMID:20333279

  19. Phagocytosis and killing of Staphylococcus aureus by human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thea; Porter, Adeline R; Kennedy, Adam D; Kobayashi, Scott D; DeLeo, Frank R

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are essential for host defense against Staphylococcus aureus infections. Although significant progress has been made, our understanding of neutrophil interactions with S. aureus remains incomplete. To provide a more comprehensive view of this process, we investigated phagocytosis and killing of S. aureus by human neutrophils using varied assay conditions in vitro. A greater percentage of bacteria were internalized by adherent neutrophils compared to those in suspension, and, unexpectedly, uptake of S. aureus by adherent neutrophils occurred efficiently in the absence of opsonins. An antibody specific for S. aureus promoted uptake of unopsonized bacteria in suspension, but had little or no capacity to enhance phagocytosis of S. aureus opsonized with normal human serum or by adherent neutrophils. Collectively, these results indicate that assay conditions can have a significant influence on the phagocytosis and killing of S. aureus by neutrophils. More importantly, the results suggest a vaccine approach directed to enhance opsonophagocytosis alone is not sufficient to promote increased killing of S. aureus by human neutrophils. With the emergence and reemergence of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms, establishing parameters that are optimal for studying neutrophil-S. aureus interactions will pave the way towards developing immune-directed strategies for anti-staphylococcal therapies.

  20. Prevention of vascular inflammation by nanoparticle targeting of adherent neutrophils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenjia; Li, Jing; Cho, Jaehyung; Malik, Asrar B.

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases such as acute lung injury and ischaemic tissue injury are caused by the adhesion of a type of white blood cell--polymorphonuclear neutrophils--to the lining of the circulatory system or vascular endothelium and unchecked neutrophil transmigration. Nanoparticle-mediated targeting of activated neutrophils on vascular endothelial cells at the site of injury may be a useful means of directly inactivating neutrophil transmigration and hence mitigating vascular inflammation. Here, we report a method employing drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles, which efficiently deliver drugs into neutrophils adherent to the surface of the inflamed endothelium. Using intravital microscopy of tumour necrosis factor-α-challenged mouse cremaster post-capillary venules, we demonstrate that fluorescently tagged albumin nanoparticles are largely internalized by neutrophils adherent to the activated endothelium via cell surface Fcɣ receptors. Administration of albumin nanoparticles loaded with the spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor, piceatannol, which blocks `outside-in' β2 integrin signalling in leukocytes, detached the adherent neutrophils and elicited their release into the circulation. Thus, internalization of drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles into neutrophils inactivates the pro-inflammatory function of activated neutrophils, thereby offering a promising approach for treating inflammatory diseases resulting from inappropriate neutrophil sequestration and activation.

  1. Anoxia and glucose supplementation preserve neutrophil viability and function.

    PubMed

    Monceaux, Valérie; Chiche-Lapierre, Clarisse; Chaput, Catherine; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Taylor, Cormac T; Ungeheuer, Marie-Noelle; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Marteyn, Benoit S

    2016-08-18

    Functional studies of human neutrophils and their transfusion for clinical purposes have been hampered by their short life span after isolation. Here, we demonstrate that neutrophil viability is maintained for 20 hours in culture media at 37°C under anoxic conditions with 3 mM glucose and 32 μg/mL dimethyloxalylglycine supplementation, as evidenced by stabilization of Mcl-1, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and pro-caspase-3. Notably, neutrophil morphology (nucleus shape and cell-surface markers) and functions (phagocytosis, degranulation, calcium release, chemotaxis, and reactive oxygen species production) were comparable to blood circulating neutrophils. The observed extension in neutrophil viability was reversed upon exposure to oxygen. Extending neutrophil life span allowed efficient transfection of plasmids (40% transfection efficiency) and short interfering RNA (interleukin-8, PCNA, and Bax), as a validation of effective and functional genetic manipulation of neutrophils both in vitro and in vivo. In vivo, transfusion of conditioned neutrophils in a neutropenic guinea pig model increased bacterial clearance of Shigella flexneri upon colonic infection, strongly suggesting that these conditioned neutrophils might be suitable for transfusion purposes. In summary, such conditioning of neutrophils in vitro should facilitate their study and offer new opportunities for genetic manipulation and therapeutic use. PMID:27402974

  2. Prevention of vascular inflammation by nanoparticle targeting of adherent neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenjia; Li, Jing; Cho, Jaehyung; Malik, Asrar B

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases such as acute lung injury and ischaemic tissue injury are caused by the adhesion of a type of white blood cell--polymorphonuclear neutrophils--to the lining of the circulatory system or vascular endothelium and unchecked neutrophil transmigration. Nanoparticle-mediated targeting of activated neutrophils on vascular endothelial cells at the site of injury may be a useful means of directly inactivating neutrophil transmigration and hence mitigating vascular inflammation. Here, we report a method employing drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles, which efficiently deliver drugs into neutrophils adherent to the surface of the inflamed endothelium. Using intravital microscopy of tumour necrosis factor-α-challenged mouse cremaster post-capillary venules, we demonstrate that fluorescently tagged albumin nanoparticles are largely internalized by neutrophils adherent to the activated endothelium via cell surface Fcɣ receptors. Administration of albumin nanoparticles loaded with the spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor, piceatannol, which blocks 'outside-in' β2 integrin signalling in leukocytes, detached the adherent neutrophils and elicited their release into the circulation. Thus, internalization of drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles into neutrophils inactivates the pro-inflammatory function of activated neutrophils, thereby offering a promising approach for treating inflammatory diseases resulting from inappropriate neutrophil sequestration and activation.

  3. Characterization of phorbol ester-stimulated serine phosphorylation of the human insulin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Feener, E P; Shiba, T; Hu, K Q; Wilden, P A; White, M F; King, G L

    1994-01-01

    Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated phosphorylation of the human insulin receptor (IR) was characterized and compared in two cell types of different lineage: normal rat kidney epithelial (NRK) cells and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) fibroblasts. PMA stimulation increased IR beta-subunit phosphorylation to 252 +/- 43 and 25- +/- 47% (+/- S.D.) of the unstimulated control in NRK and CHO cells respectively. Tryptic phosphopeptide analysis by Tricine/SDS/PAGE revealed significant differences in the PMA-stimulated phosphorylation of the IR in these two cell types. This phosphorylation of the IR was predominantly located in two tryptic phosphopeptides, and these phosphopeptides were absent in an IR mutant truncated by 43 C-terminal amino acids. The major PMA-stimulated tryptic phosphopeptide from in vivo-labelled CHO/IR was immunoprecipitated with an antibody against residues Ser1315 to Lys1329, and this precipitation was blocked with excess unlabelled peptide containing this sequence. Radiosequencing by manual Edman degradation revealed that this tryptic phosphopeptide was phosphorylated at Ser1315. This PMA-stimulated phosphorylation did not inhibit autophosphorylation of the IR in vivo. These results demonstrate that PMA-stimulated phosphorylation of the IR can exhibit significant differences when expressed in different cell types, and that Ser1315 is a major PMA-stimulated phosphorylation site on the human IR. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7945263

  4. 21 CFR 173.228 - Ethyl acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 1 (Ethyl Acetate; p. 372, 3d Ed., 1981), which are... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ethyl acetate. 173.228 Section 173.228 Food and..., Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.228 Ethyl acetate. Ethyl acetate (CAS Reg. No....

  5. 21 CFR 173.228 - Ethyl acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 1 (Ethyl Acetate; p. 372, 3d Ed., 1981), which are... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethyl acetate. 173.228 Section 173.228 Food and..., Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.228 Ethyl acetate. Ethyl acetate (CAS Reg. No....

  6. 21 CFR 73.2396 - Lead acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lead acetate. 73.2396 Section 73.2396 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2396 Lead acetate. (a) Identity. The color additive lead acetate is the trihydrate of lead (2+) salt of acetic acid. The color additive has the chemical formula...

  7. 21 CFR 73.2396 - Lead acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lead acetate. 73.2396 Section 73.2396 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2396 Lead acetate. (a) Identity. The color additive lead acetate is the trihydrate of lead (2+) salt of acetic acid. The color additive has the chemical formula...

  8. 21 CFR 73.2396 - Lead acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lead acetate. 73.2396 Section 73.2396 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2396 Lead acetate. (a) Identity. The color additive lead acetate is the trihydrate of lead (2+) salt of acetic acid. The color additive has the chemical formula...

  9. 21 CFR 73.2396 - Lead acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lead acetate. 73.2396 Section 73.2396 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2396 Lead acetate. (a) Identity. The color additive lead acetate is the trihydrate of lead (2+) salt of acetic acid. The color additive has the chemical formula...

  10. 21 CFR 73.2396 - Lead acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lead acetate. 73.2396 Section 73.2396 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2396 Lead acetate. (a) Identity. The color additive lead acetate is the trihydrate of lead (2+) salt of acetic acid. The color additive has the chemical formula...

  11. Neutrophil activator of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (NAM).

    PubMed

    Rollo, Ellen E; Hymowitz, Michelle; Schmidt, Cathleen E; Montana, Steve; Foda, Hussein; Zucker, Stanley

    2006-01-01

    We have isolated a novel soluble factor(s), neutrophil activator of matrix metalloproteinases (NAM), secreted by unstimulated normal human peripheral blood neutrophils that causes the activation of cell secreted promatrix metalloproteinase-2 (proMMP-2). Partially purified preparations of NAM have been isolated from the conditioned media of neutrophils employing gelatin-Sepharose chromatography and differential membrane filter centrifugation. NAM activity, as assessed by exposing primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) or HT1080 cells to NAM followed by gelatin zymography, was seen within one hour. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and hydroxamic acid derived inhibitors of MMPs (CT1746 and BB94) abrogated the activation of proMMP-2 by NAM, while inhibitors of serine and cysteine proteases showed no effect. NAM also produced an increase in TIMP-2 binding to HUVEC and HT1080 cell surfaces that was inhibited by TIMP-2, CT1746, and BB94. Time-dependent increases in MT1-MMP protein and mRNA were seen following the addition of NAM to cells. These data support a role for NAM in cancer dissemination.

  12. Differentiating neutrophils using the optical coulter counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonbrun, E.; Di Caprio, G.

    2015-03-01

    We present an opto-fluidic measurement system that quantifies cell volume, dry mass and nuclear morphology of neutrophils in high-throughput. While current clinical hematology analyzers can differentiate neutrophils from a blood sample, they do not give other quantitative information beyond their count. In order to better understand the distribution of neutrophil phenotypes in a blood sample, we perform two distinct multivariate measurements. In both measurements, white blood cells are driven through a microfluidic channel and imaged while in flow onto a color camera using a single exposure. In the first measurement, we quantify cell volume, scattering strength, and cell dry mass by combining quantitative phase imaging with dye exclusion cell volumetric imaging. In the second measurement, we quantify cell volume and nuclear morphology using a nucleic acid fluorescent stain. In this way, we can correlate cell volume to other cellular characteristics, which would not be possible using an electrical coulter counter. Unlike phase imaging or cell scattering analysis, the optical coulter counter is capable of quantifying cell volume virtually independent of the cell's refractive index and unlike optical tomography, measurements are possible on quickly flowing cells, enabling high-throughput.

  13. Differentiating neutrophils using the optical coulter counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonbrun, Ethan; Di Caprio, Giuseppe

    2015-11-01

    We present an optofluidic measurement system that quantifies cell volume, dry mass, and nuclear morphology of neutrophils in high-throughput. While current clinical hematology analyzers can differentiate neutrophils from a blood sample, they do not give other quantitative information beyond their count. In order to better understand the distribution of neutrophil phenotypes in a blood sample, we perform two distinct multivariate measurements. In both measurements, white blood cells are driven through a microfluidic channel and imaged while in flow onto a color camera using a single exposure. In the first measurement, we quantify cell volume, scattering strength, and cell dry mass by combining quantitative phase imaging with dye exclusion cell volumetric imaging. In the second measurement, we quantify cell volume and nuclear morphology using a nucleic acid fluorescent stain. In this way, we can correlate cell volume to other cellular characteristics, which would not be possible using an electrical coulter counter. Unlike phase imaging or cell scattering analysis, the optical coulter counter is capable of quantifying cell volume virtually independent of the cell's refractive index and unlike optical tomography, measurements are possible on quickly flowing cells, enabling high-throughput.

  14. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 184.1185 Section 184.1185 Food... GRAS § 184.1185 Calcium acetate. (a) Calcium acetate (Ca (C2H3O2)2, CAS Reg. No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It may be produced by...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium acetate. 184.1185 Section 184.1185 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1185 Calcium acetate. (a) Calcium acetate (Ca (C2H3O2)2, CAS Reg. No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It may...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 184.1185 Section 184.1185 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1185 Calcium acetate. (a) Calcium acetate (Ca (C2H3O2)2, CAS Reg. No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid....

  17. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 184.1185 Section 184.1185 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1185 Calcium acetate. (a) Calcium acetate (Ca (C2H3O2)2, CAS Reg. No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid....

  18. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 184.1185 Section 184.1185 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1185 Calcium acetate. (a) Calcium acetate (Ca (C2H3O2)2, CAS Reg. No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid....

  19. Pulmonary vascular sequestration of neutrophils in endotoxemia is initiated by an effect of endotoxin on the neutrophil in the rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Haslett, C.; Worthen, G.S.; Giclas, P.C.; Morrison, D.C.; Henson, J.E.; Henson, P.M.

    1987-07-01

    Endotoxemia causes neutrophil sequestration in the pulmonary vascular bed. Such sequestration may be a critical initiating event in the generation of microvascular injury, although the mechanisms that lead to this localization are not understood. To investigate these phenomena, the following study employed intravenous pulses of /sup 111/Indium-tropolonate-labeled neutrophils (/sup 111/In-neutrophils), which circulated in the rabbit with normal kinetics and responded in a manner indistinguishable from unlabeled, circulating neutrophils in response to an intravenous injection of purified endotoxic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or epinephrine. Pulmonary sequestration of /sup 111/In-neutrophils was assessed by quantitative external gamma camera scintigraphy of a lung suprahilar region of interest. Noninvasive assessment of radioactivity by this method accurately reflected total lung radioactivity, which was shown by autoradiography to be confined to the injected /sup 111/In-neutrophils. Intravenously administered LPS caused a marked, dose-dependent sequestration of /sup 111/In-neutrophils in the pulmonary vasculature, and exhaustive ultrastructural autoradiography showed discretely radiolabeled neutrophils located within pulmonary capillaries. A distinct effect was seen with an intravenous injection of as little as 100 ng per rabbit (i.e., 500 pg/ml blood). A 5-min ex vivo pretreatment of /sup 111/In-neutrophils with 10 ng to 10 micrograms/ml LPS in heat-inactivated plasma also caused dose-dependent pulmonary sequestration of the pretreated /sup 111/In-neutrophils but did not cause generalized neutropenia in recipient rabbits.

  20. Human neutrophil kinetics: modeling of stable isotope labeling data supports short blood neutrophil half-lives.

    PubMed

    Lahoz-Beneytez, Julio; Elemans, Marjet; Zhang, Yan; Ahmed, Raya; Salam, Arafa; Block, Michael; Niederalt, Christoph; Asquith, Becca; Macallan, Derek

    2016-06-30

    Human neutrophils have traditionally been thought to have a short half-life in blood; estimates vary from 4 to 18 hours. This dogma was recently challenged by stable isotope labeling studies with heavy water, which yielded estimates in excess of 3 days. To investigate this disparity, we generated new stable isotope labeling data in healthy adult subjects using both heavy water (n = 4) and deuterium-labeled glucose (n = 9), a compound with more rapid labeling kinetics. To interpret results, we developed a novel mechanistic model and applied it to previously published (n = 5) and newly generated data. We initially constrained the ratio of the blood neutrophil pool to the marrow precursor pool (ratio = 0.26; from published values). Analysis of heavy water data sets yielded turnover rates consistent with a short blood half-life, but parameters, particularly marrow transit time, were poorly defined. Analysis of glucose-labeling data yielded more precise estimates of half-life (0.79 ± 0.25 days; 19 hours) and marrow transit time (5.80 ± 0.42 days). Substitution of this marrow transit time in the heavy water analysis gave a better-defined blood half-life of 0.77 ± 0.14 days (18.5 hours), close to glucose-derived values. Allowing the ratio of blood neutrophils to mitotic neutrophil precursors (R) to vary yielded a best-fit value of 0.19. Reanalysis of the previously published model and data also revealed the origin of their long estimates for neutrophil half-life: an implicit assumption that R is very large, which is physiologically untenable. We conclude that stable isotope labeling in healthy humans is consistent with a blood neutrophil half-life of less than 1 day. PMID:27136946

  1. Human neutrophil kinetics: modeling of stable isotope labeling data supports short blood neutrophil half-lives

    PubMed Central

    Lahoz-Beneytez, Julio; Elemans, Marjet; Zhang, Yan; Ahmed, Raya; Salam, Arafa; Block, Michael; Niederalt, Christoph; Macallan, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Human neutrophils have traditionally been thought to have a short half-life in blood; estimates vary from 4 to 18 hours. This dogma was recently challenged by stable isotope labeling studies with heavy water, which yielded estimates in excess of 3 days. To investigate this disparity, we generated new stable isotope labeling data in healthy adult subjects using both heavy water (n = 4) and deuterium-labeled glucose (n = 9), a compound with more rapid labeling kinetics. To interpret results, we developed a novel mechanistic model and applied it to previously published (n = 5) and newly generated data. We initially constrained the ratio of the blood neutrophil pool to the marrow precursor pool (ratio = 0.26; from published values). Analysis of heavy water data sets yielded turnover rates consistent with a short blood half-life, but parameters, particularly marrow transit time, were poorly defined. Analysis of glucose-labeling data yielded more precise estimates of half-life (0.79 ± 0.25 days; 19 hours) and marrow transit time (5.80 ± 0.42 days). Substitution of this marrow transit time in the heavy water analysis gave a better-defined blood half-life of 0.77 ± 0.14 days (18.5 hours), close to glucose-derived values. Allowing the ratio of blood neutrophils to mitotic neutrophil precursors (R) to vary yielded a best-fit value of 0.19. Reanalysis of the previously published model and data also revealed the origin of their long estimates for neutrophil half-life: an implicit assumption that R is very large, which is physiologically untenable. We conclude that stable isotope labeling in healthy humans is consistent with a blood neutrophil half-life of less than 1 day. PMID:27136946

  2. 40 CFR 721.10001 - 2-Ethoxyethanol, 2-ethoxyethanol acetate, 2-methoxyethanol, and 2-methoxyethanol acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... acetate, 2-methoxyethanol, and 2-methoxyethanol acetate. 721.10001 Section 721.10001 Protection of...-ethoxyethanol acetate, 2-methoxyethanol, and 2-methoxyethanol acetate. (a) Chemical substances and significant...-80-5), 2-ethoxyethanol acetate (CAS No. 111-15-9), 2-methoxyethanol (CAS No. 109-86-4), and...

  3. Neutrophils from patients with SAPHO syndrome show no signs of aberrant NADPH oxidase-dependent production of intracellular reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Wekell, Per; Björnsdottir, Halla; Björkman, Lena; Sundqvist, Martina; Christenson, Karin; Osla, Veronica; Berg, Stefan; Fasth, Anders; Welin, Amanda; Bylund, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We aimed to investigate if aberrant intracellular production of NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) in neutrophils is a disease mechanism in the autoinflammatory disease SAPHO syndrome, characterized by synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis, as has previously been suggested based on a family with SAPHO syndrome-like disease. Methods. Neutrophil function was explored in a cohort of four patients with SAPHO syndrome, two of whom were sampled during both inflammatory and non-inflammatory phase. Intracellular neutrophil ROS production was determined by luminol-amplified chemiluminescence in response to phorbol myristate acetate. Results. Cells from all patients produced normal amounts of ROS, both intra- and extracellularly, when compared with internal controls as well as with a large collection of healthy controls assayed in the laboratory over time (showing an extensive inter-personal variability in a normal population). Further, intracellular production of ROS increased during the inflammatory phase. Neutrophil activation markers were comparable between patients and controls. Conclusion. Dysfunctional generation of intracellular ROS in neutrophils is not a generalizable feature in SAPHO syndrome. Secondly, serum amyloid A appears to be a more sensitive inflammatory marker than CRP during improvement and relapses in SAPHO syndrome. PMID:27121779

  4. Neutrophils in host defense: new insights from zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Harvie, Elizabeth A.; Huttenlocher, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are highly motile phagocytic cells that play a critical role in the immune response to infection. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are increasingly used to study neutrophil function and host-pathogen interactions. The generation of transgenic zebrafish lines with fluorescently labeled leukocytes has made it possible to visualize the neutrophil response to infection in real time by use of optically transparent zebrafish larvae. In addition, the genetic tractability of zebrafish has allowed for the generation of models of inherited neutrophil disorders. In this review, we discuss several zebrafish models of infectious disease, both in the context of immunocompetent, as well as neutrophil-deficient hosts and how these models have shed light on neutrophil behavior during infection. PMID:25717145

  5. The role of tissue resident cells in neutrophil recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nancy D.; Luster, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are first responders of the immune system, rapidly migrating into affected tissues in response to injury or infection. To effectively call in this first line of defense, strategically placed cells within the vasculature and tissue respond to noxious stimuli by sending out coordinated signals that recruit neutrophils. Regulation of organ-specific neutrophil entry occurs at two levels. First, the vasculature supplying the organ provides cues for neutrophil egress out of the bloodstream in a manner dependent upon its unique cellular composition and architectural features. Second, resident immune cells and stromal cells within the organ send coordinated signals that guide neutrophils to their final destination. Here, we review recent findings that highlight the importance of these tissue-specific responses in the regulation of neutrophil recruitment and the initiation and resolution of inflammation. PMID:26297103

  6. Perivascular macrophages mediate neutrophil recruitment during bacterial skin infection

    PubMed Central

    Abtin, Arby; Jain, Rohit; Mitchell, Andrew J.; Roediger, Ben; Brzoska, Anthony J.; Tikoo, Shweta; Cheng, Qiang; Ng, Lai Guan; Cavanagh, Lois L.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Hickey, Michael J.; Firth, Neville; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Transendothelial migration of neutrophils in post-capillary venules is a key event in the inflammatory response against pathogens and tissue damage. The precise regulation of this process is incompletely understood. We report that perivascular macrophages are critical for neutrophil migration into skin infected with the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Using multiphoton intravital microscopy we show that neutrophils extravasate from inflamed dermal venules in close proximity to perivascular macrophages, which are a major source of neutrophil chemoattractants. The virulence factor alpha-hemolysin lyses perivascular macrophages leading to decreased neutrophil transmigration. Our data illustrate a previously unrecognized role for perivascular macrophages in neutrophil recruitment to inflamed skin, and indicate that Staphylococcus aureus uses hemolysin-dependent killing of these cells as an immune evasion strategy. PMID:24270515

  7. Neutrophil depletion delays wound repair in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Naomi; Okawa, Yayoi; Sakurai, Hidetoshi

    2008-01-01

    One of the most important clinical problems in caring for elderly patients is treatment of pressure ulcers. One component of normal wound healing is the generation of an inflammatory reaction, which is characterized by the sequential infiltration of neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes. Neutrophils migrate early in the wound healing process. In aged C57BL/6 mice, wound healing is relatively inefficient. We examined the effects of neutrophil numbers on wound healing in both young and aged mice. We found that the depletion of neutrophils by anti-Gr-1 antibody dramatically delayed wound healing in aged mice. The depletion of neutrophils in young mice had less effect on the kinetics of wound healing. Intravenous G-CSF injection increased the migration of neutrophils to the wound site. While the rate of wound repair did not change significantly in young mice following G-CSF injection, it increased significantly in old mice. PMID:19424869

  8. Perivascular macrophages mediate neutrophil recruitment during bacterial skin infection.

    PubMed

    Abtin, Arby; Jain, Rohit; Mitchell, Andrew J; Roediger, Ben; Brzoska, Anthony J; Tikoo, Shweta; Cheng, Qiang; Ng, Lai Guan; Cavanagh, Lois L; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Hickey, Michael J; Firth, Neville; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Transendothelial migration of neutrophils in postcapillary venules is a key event in the inflammatory response against pathogens and tissue damage. The precise regulation of this process is incompletely understood. We report that perivascular macrophages are critical for neutrophil migration into skin infected with the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Using multiphoton intravital microscopy we showed that neutrophils extravasate from inflamed dermal venules in close proximity to perivascular macrophages, which are a major source of neutrophil chemoattractants. The virulence factor α-hemolysin produced by S. aureus lyses perivascular macrophages, which leads to decreased neutrophil transmigration. Our data illustrate a previously unrecognized role for perivascular macrophages in neutrophil recruitment to inflamed skin and indicate that S. aureus uses hemolysin-dependent killing of these cells as an immune evasion strategy. PMID:24270515

  9. Analysis of proteins responsive to acetic acid in Acetobacter: molecular mechanisms conferring acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Shigeru; Fukaya, Masahiro

    2008-06-30

    Acetic acid bacteria are used for industrial vinegar production because of their remarkable ability to oxidize ethanol and high resistance to acetic acid. Although several molecular machineries responsible for acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria have been reported, the entire mechanism that confers acetic acid resistance has not been completely understood. One of the promising methods to elucidate the entire mechanism is global analysis of proteins responsive to acetic acid by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Recently, two proteins whose production was greatly enhanced by acetic acid in Acetobacter aceti were identified to be aconitase and a putative ABC-transporter, respectively; furthermore, overexpression or disruption of the genes encoding these proteins affected acetic acid resistance in A. aceti, indicating that these proteins are involved in acetic acid resistance. Overexpression of each gene increased acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter, which resulted in an improvement in the productivity of acetic acid fermentation. Taken together, the results of the proteomic analysis and those of previous studies indicate that acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria is conferred by several mechanisms. These findings also provide a clue to breed a strain having high resistance to acetic acid for vinegar fermentation.

  10. Inhibition of human neutrophil activation by the allergic mediator release inhibitor, CI-922: differential inhibition of responses to a variety of stimuli.

    PubMed

    Wright, C D; Hoffman, M D; Thueson, D O; Conroy, M C

    1987-07-01

    The allergic mediator release inhibitor 3,7-dimethoxy-4-phenyl-N-1H-tetrazol-5-yl-4H-furo[3,2-b]indole-2- carboxamide, L-arginate (CI-922) is a potent inhibitor of human neutrophil functions in vitro. Over a concentration range from 1 to 100 mumol CI-922 inhibits the chemotactic response of neutrophils to the synthetic chemotaxin N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP). CI-922 also inhibits respiratory and secretory responses of neutrophils in response to agents that stimulate phospholipase C-dependent phosphoinositide hydrolysis to generate the second messengers inositol 1,4,5, trisphosphate and 1,2 diacylglycerol, including: the plasma membrane receptor-specific ligands FMLP and C5a; serum-opsonized zymosan; concanavalin A; and the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein-specific stimulus guanosine-5'-0-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S). CI-922 also inhibits neutrophil functions stimulated by the calcium ionophore A23187. In contrast, CI-922 does not inhibit neutrophil responses to protein kinase C-specific stimuli such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or L-alpha-1,2 dioctanoylglycerol (DiC8). CI-922 also fails to inhibit the synergistic activation of the respiratory burst by suboptimal concentrations of PMA and calcium ionophore A23187. The observation that CI-922 inhibits neutrophil responses to a variety of soluble and particulate stimuli, excluding protein kinase C-specific stimuli, allows us to postulate the site of action of the compound. We propose that CI-922 inhibits neutrophil activation at a site distal to signal transduction through the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein required for second messenger generation but proximal to phosphorylation reactions mediated by protein kinase C and calmodulin-dependent protein kinases.

  11. Mediators of neutrophil recruitment in human abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Houard, Xavier; Touat, Ziad; Ollivier, Véronique; Louedec, Liliane; Philippe, Monique; Sebbag, Uriel; Meilhac, Olivier; Rossignol, Patrick; Michel, Jean-Baptiste

    2009-01-01

    Aims Neutrophils/platelet interactions are involved in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The intraluminal thrombus (ILT) is a human model of platelet/neutrophil interactions. The present study focused on mediators involved in neutrophil recruitment in AAA. Methods and results Conditioned media from luminal, intermediate, and abluminal layers of 29 human ILTs were analysed for neutrophil markers [elastase/α1-antitrypsin and MMP9/NGAL complexes, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and α-defensin peptides], RANTES, platelet factor 4 (PF4), and interleukin-8 (IL-8). Their time-dependent release into serum from clots generated in vitro and their plasma concentrations in AAA patients and controls were determined. Immunohistochemistry for neutrophils, platelets, IL-8, PF4, and RANTES on AAA sections was performed; and molecules involved in ILT neutrophil chemotactic function were analysed in vitro. Neutrophils and platelets colocalized in the luminal layer of the thrombus. Consistently, neutrophil markers and platelet-derived RANTES and PF4 were released predominantly by the luminal thrombus pole, where their concentrations were significantly correlated. The luminal ILT layer was also the main source of IL-8, whose immunostaining colocalized with neutrophils. All were also released time dependently from clots and were increased in plasma of AAA patients. Luminal ILT layers displayed potent neutrophil chemotactic activity in vitro, which was inhibited by RANTES- and IL-8-blocking antibodies as well as by reparixin, an antagonist of the IL-8 receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2. Conclusion Taken together, these results suggest that platelet-derived RANTES and neutrophil-derived IL-8 are involved in attracting neutrophils to the luminal layer of AAA ILT. PMID:19201759

  12. Netting neutrophils in autoimmune small-vessel vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Kessenbrock, Kai; Krumbholz, Markus; Schönermarck, Ulf; Back, Walter; Gross, Wolfgang L; Werb, Zena; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Brinkmann, Volker; Jenne, Dieter E

    2009-06-01

    Small-vessel vasculitis (SVV) is a chronic autoinflammatory condition linked to antineutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCAs). Here we show that chromatin fibers, so-called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), are released by ANCA-stimulated neutrophils and contain the targeted autoantigens proteinase-3 (PR3) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). Deposition of NETs in inflamed kidneys and circulating MPO-DNA complexes suggest that NET formation triggers vasculitis and promotes the autoimmune response against neutrophil components in individuals with SVV.

  13. Human filarial Wolbachia lipopeptide directly activates human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tamarozzi, F; Wright, H L; Johnston, K L; Edwards, S W; Turner, J D; Taylor, M J

    2014-10-01

    The host inflammatory response to the Onchocerca volvulus endosymbiont, Wolbachia, is a major contributing factor in the development of chronic pathology in humans (onchocerciasis/river blindness). Recently, the toll-like pattern recognition receptor motif of the major inflammatory ligands of filarial Wolbachia, membrane-associated diacylated lipoproteins, was functionally defined in murine models of pathology, including mediation of neutrophil recruitment to the cornea. However, the extent to which human neutrophils can be activated in response to this Wolbachia pattern recognition motif is not known. Therefore, the responses of purified peripheral blood human neutrophils to a synthetic N-terminal diacylated lipopeptide (WoLP) of filarial Wolbachia peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (PAL) were characterized. WoLP exposure led to a dose-dependent activation of healthy, human neutrophils that included gross morphological alterations and modulation of surface expressed integrins involved in tethering, rolling and extravasation. WoLP exposure induced chemotaxis but not chemokinesis of neutrophils, and secretion of the major neutrophil chemokine, interleukin 8. WoLP also induced and primed the respiratory burst, and enhanced neutrophil survival by delay of apoptosis. These results indicate that the major inflammatory motif of filarial Wolbachia lipoproteins directly activates human neutrophils in vitro and promotes a molecular pathway by which human neutrophils are recruited to sites of Onchocerca parasitism. PMID:24909063

  14. Neutrophils: Between Host Defence, Immune Modulation, and Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Philipp; Saffarzadeh, Mona; Weber, Alexander N. R.; Rieber, Nikolaus; Radsak, Markus; von Bernuth, Horst; Benarafa, Charaf; Roos, Dirk; Skokowa, Julia; Hartl, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils, the most abundant human immune cells, are rapidly recruited to sites of infection, where they fulfill their life-saving antimicrobial functions. While traditionally regarded as short-lived phagocytes, recent findings on long-term survival, neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation, heterogeneity and plasticity, suppressive functions, and tissue injury have expanded our understanding of their diverse role in infection and inflammation. This review summarises our current understanding of neutrophils in host-pathogen interactions and disease involvement, illustrating the versatility and plasticity of the neutrophil, moving between host defence, immune modulation, and tissue damage. PMID:25764063

  15. Distinct Functions of Neutrophil in Cancer and Its Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Granot, Zvi; Jablonska, Jadwiga

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant of all white blood cells in the human circulation and are usually associated with inflammation and with fighting infections. In recent years the role immune cells play in cancer has been a matter of increasing interest. In this context the function of neutrophils is controversial as neutrophils were shown to possess both tumor promoting and tumor limiting properties. Here we provide an up-to-date review of the pro- and antitumor properties neutrophils possess as well as the environmental cues that regulate these distinct functions. PMID:26648665

  16. Neutrophilic Skin Lesions in Autoimmune Connective Tissue Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hau, Estelle; Vignon Pennamen, Marie-Dominique; Battistella, Maxime; Saussine, Anne; Bergis, Maud; Cavelier-Balloy, Benedicte; Janier, Michel; Cordoliani, Florence; Bagot, Martine; Rybojad, Michel; Bouaziz, Jean-David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The pathophysiology of neutrophilic dermatoses (NDs) and autoimmune connective tissue diseases (AICTDs) is incompletely understood. The association between NDs and AICTDs is rare; recently, however, a distinctive subset of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE, the prototypical AICTD) with neutrophilic histological features has been proposed to be included in the spectrum of lupus. The aim of our study was to test the validity of such a classification. We conducted a monocentric retrospective study of 7028 AICTDs patients. Among these 7028 patients, a skin biopsy was performed in 932 cases with mainly neutrophilic infiltrate on histology in 9 cases. Combining our 9 cases and an exhaustive literature review, pyoderma gangrenosum, Sweet syndrome (n = 49), Sweet-like ND (n = 13), neutrophilic urticarial dermatosis (n = 6), palisaded neutrophilic granulomatous dermatitis (n = 12), and histiocytoid neutrophilic dermatitis (n = 2) were likely to occur both in AICTDs and autoinflammatory diseases. Other NDs were specifically encountered in AICTDs: bullous LE (n = 71), amicrobial pustulosis of the folds (n = 28), autoimmunity-related ND (n = 24), ND resembling erythema gyratum repens (n = 1), and neutrophilic annular erythema (n = 1). The improvement of AICTDS neutrophilic lesions under neutrophil targeting therapy suggests possible common physiopathological pathways between NDs and AICTDs. PMID:25546688

  17. The Neutrophil Response Induced by an Agonist for Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 (GPR43) Is Primed by Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha and by Receptor Uncoupling from the Cytoskeleton but Attenuated by Tissue Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Björkman, Lena; Mårtensson, Jonas; Winther, Malene; Gabl, Michael; Holdfeldt, André; Uhrbom, Martin; Bylund, Johan; Højgaard Hansen, Anders; Pandey, Sunil K; Ulven, Trond; Forsman, Huamei; Dahlgren, Claes

    2016-10-15

    Ligands with improved potency and selectivity for free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2R) have become available, and we here characterize the neutrophil responses induced by one such agonist (Cmp1) and one antagonist (CATPB). Cmp1 triggered an increase in the cytosolic concentration of Ca(2+), and the neutrophils were then desensitized to Cmp1 and to acetate, a naturally occurring FFA2R agonist. The antagonist CATPB selectively inhibited responses induced by Cmp1 or acetate. The activated FFA2R induced superoxide anion secretion at a low level in naive blood neutrophils. This response was largely increased by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in a process associated with a recruitment of easily mobilizable granules, but neutrophils recruited to an aseptic inflammation in vivo were nonresponding. Superoxide production induced by Cmp1 was increased in latrunculin A-treated neutrophils, but no reactivation of desensitized FFA2R was induced by this drug, suggesting that the cytoskeleton is not directly involved in terminating the response. The functional and regulatory differences between the receptors that recognize short-chain fatty acids and formylated peptides, respectively, imply different roles of these receptors in the orchestration of inflammation and confirm the usefulness of a selective FFA2R agonist and antagonist as tools for the exploration of the precise role of the FFA2R. PMID:27503855

  18. Francisella tularensis alters human neutrophil gene expression: insights into the molecular basis of delayed neutrophil apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Justin T; Bandyopadhyay, Sarmistha; Kobayashi, Scott D; McCracken, Jenna; Whitney, Adeline R; Deleo, Frank R; Allen, Lee-Ann H

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrated recently that Francisella tularensis profoundly impairs human neutrophil apoptosis, but how this is achieved is largely unknown. Herein we used human oligonucleotide microarrays to test the hypothesis that changes in neutrophil gene expression contribute to this phenotype, and now demonstrate that F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) caused significant changes in neutrophil gene expression over a 24-hour time period relative to the uninfected controls. Of approximately 47,000 genes analyzed, 3,435 were significantly up- or downregulated by LVS, including 365 unique genes associated with apoptosis and cell survival. Specific targets in this category included genes asso-ciated with the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways (CFLAR, TNFAIP3, TNFRSF10D, SOD2, BCL2A1, BIRC4, PIM2, TNFSF10, TNFRSF10C, CASP2 and CASP8) and genes that act via the NFĸB pathway and other mechanisms to prolong cell viability (NFKB1, NFKB2 and RELA, IL1B, CAST, CDK2,GADD45B, BCL3, BIRC3, CDK2, IL1A, PBEF1, IL6, CXCL1, CCL4 and VEGF). The microarray data were confirmed by qPCR and pathway analysis. Moreover, we demonstrate that the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein remained abundant in polymorphonuclear leukocytes over 48 h of LVS infection, whereas BAX mRNA and protein were progressively downregulated. These data strongly suggest that antiapoptotic and prosurvival mechanisms collaborate to sustain the viability of F. tularensis--infected neutrophils. PMID:22986450

  19. Reductive opening of carbohydrate phenylsulfonylethylidene (PSE) acetals.

    PubMed

    Chéry, Florence; Cabianca, Elena; Tatibouët, Arnaud; De Lucchi, Ottorino; Lindhorst, Thisbe K; Rollin, Patrick

    2015-11-19

    The phenylsulfonylethylidene (PSE) acetal is a relatively new protecting group in carbohydrate chemistry. However, carbohydrate-derived phenylsulfonylethylidene (PSE) acetals show a different behavior in reductive desulfonylation than simple symmetrical acetals. Here we have investigated various SET-type reaction conditions in order to open PSE acetals regioselectively and to produce chiral ω-hydroxyethenyl ethers. Whereas sodium amalgam leads to a mixture of regioisomeric vinyl ethers besides the ethylidene acetal, samarium iodide is suited for regioselective ring opening. This is shown with seven different carbohydrate PSE acetals, both of the 1,3-dioxane and the 1,3-dioxolane type. PMID:26469209

  20. Characterization of C1 inhibitor binding to neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, N S; Boackle, R J; Leu, R W

    1991-01-01

    In a previous study we have isolated neutrophil membrane proteins that non-covalently bind to native C1-INH (105,000 MW) and a non-functional, degraded C1-INH (88,000 MW; C1-INH-88). To further characterize the binding nature, we have designed a novel kinetic C1 titration assay which enables not only a quantification of the removal of fluid-phase C1-INH by neutrophils, but also a concomitant measure of residual C1-INH function. Native C1-INH, when adsorbed to EDTA-pretreated neutrophils, lost its function in the inhibition of fluid-phase C1. The non-functional C1-INH-88, which is probably devoid of a reactive centre, was found to block the binding of native C1-INH to neutrophils. Pretreatment of neutrophils with serine esterase inhibitors did not abrogate binding capacity of the cells for C1-INH, whereas the binding affinity for C1-INH was lost when the cells were pretreated with trypsin. An array of human peripheral blood leucocytes and several lymphoid cell lines has surface binding sites for C1-INH, but not on human erythrocytes and U937 cells. Binding was further confirmed using (i) C1-INH-microsphere beads to neutrophils, in which the binding was blocked when pretreating neutrophils with excess C1-INH or with trypsin, and (ii) radiolabelled C1-INH to neutrophils, which was competitively blocked by unlabelled non-functional C1-INH-88. Desialylation of C1-INH significantly reduced its binding affinity for neutrophils, indicating that the membrane receptor sites on neutrophils could be specific for the binding of sialic acid residues on C1-INH. Overall, our studies indicate that neutrophils or other leucocytes possess specific surface binding sites for the sialic acid-containing portion of C1-INH. PMID:2045131

  1. Exogenous melatonin inhibits neutrophil migration through suppression of ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Da-Long; Sun, Ai-Ai; Li, Ya-Juan; Chen, Min; Ge, Shu-Chao; Hu, Bing

    2015-10-01

    Neutrophil migration to inflammatory sites is the fundamental process of innate immunity among organisms against pathogen invasion. As a major sleep adjusting hormone, melatonin has also been proved to be involved in various inflammatory events. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of exogenous melatonin on neutrophil migration to the injury site in live zebrafish and further investigate whether ERK signaling is involved in this process. Using the tail fin transection model, the fluorescently labeled neutrophil was in vivo visualized in transgenic Tg(lyz:EGFP), Tg(lyz:DsRed) zebrafish. We found that exogenous melatonin administration dramatically inhibited the injury-induced neutrophil migration in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. The inhibited effect of melatonin on neutrophil migration could be attenuated by melatonin receptor 1, 2, and 3 antagonists. The ERK phosphorylation level was significantly decreased post injury when treated with melatonin. The blocking of ERK activation with inhibitor PD0325901 suppressed the number of migrated neutrophils in response to injury. However, the activation of ERK with the epidermal growth factor could impair the inhibited effect of melatonin on neutrophil migration. We also detected that PD0325901 significantly suppressed the in vivo neutrophils transmigrating over the vessel endothelial cell using the transgenic Tg(flk:EGFP);(lyz:DsRed) line labeled as both vessel and neutrophil. Taking all of these data together, the results indicated that exogenous melatonin had an anti-migratory effect on neutrophils by blocking the ERK phosphorylation signal, and it led to the subsequent adhesion molecule expression. Thus, the crossing of the vessel endothelial cells of neutrophils became difficult.

  2. Differential stimulation of luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) and arachidonic acid metabolism in rat peritoneal neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, R.J.; Adams, L.M.; Cullinan, C.A.; Berkenkopf, J.W.; Weichman, B.M.

    1986-03-05

    Phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA) induced the production of radical oxygen species (ROS) from rat peritoneal neutrophils as assessed by CL. ROS generation occurred in a time- (maximum at 13.5 min) and dose- (concentration range of 1.7-498 nM) related fashion. However, 166 nM PMA did not induce either cyclooxygenase (CO) or lipoxygenase (LPO) product formation by 20 min post-stimulation. Conversely, A23187, at concentrations between 0.1 and 10 ..mu..M, stimulated both pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism, but had little or no effect upon ROS production. When suboptimal concentrations of PMA (5.5 nM) and A23187 (0.1-1 ..mu..M) were coincubated with the neutrophils, a synergistic ROS response was elicited. However, arachidonic acid metabolism in the presence of PMA was unchanged relative to A12187 alone. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) inhibited both PMA-induced CL (IC/sub 50/ = 0.9 ..mu..M) and A23187-induced arachidonic acid metabolism (IC/sub 50/ = 1.7 ..mu..M and 6.0 ..mu..M for LPO and CO, respectively). The mixed LPO-CO inhibitor, BW755C, behaved in a qualitatively similar manner to NDGA, whereas the CO inhibitors, indomethacin, piroxicam and naproxen had no inhibitory effect on ROS generation at concentrations as high as 100 ..mu..M. These results suggest that NDGA and BW755C may inhibit CL and arachidonic acid metabolism by distinct mechanisms in rat neutrophils.

  3. Neutrophil extracellular traps formation by bacteria causing endometritis in the mare.

    PubMed

    Rebordão, M R; Carneiro, C; Alexandre-Pires, G; Brito, P; Pereira, C; Nunes, T; Galvão, A; Leitão, A; Vilela, C; Ferreira-Dias, G

    2014-12-01

    Besides the classical functions, neutrophils (PMNs) are able to release DNA in response to infectious stimuli, forming neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and killing pathogens. The pathogenesis of endometritis in the mare is not completely understood. The aim was to evaluate the in vitro capacity of equine PMNs to secrete NETs by chemical activation, or stimulated with Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus (Szoo), Escherichia coli (Ecoli) or Staphylococcus capitis (Scap) strains obtained from mares with endometritis. Ex vivo endometrial mucus from mares with bacterial endometritis were evaluated for the presence of NETs. Equine blood PMNs were used either without or with stimulation by phorbol-myristate-acetate (PMA), a strong inducer of NETs, for 1-3h. To evaluate PMN ability to produce NETs when phagocytosis was impaired, the phagocytosis inhibitor cytochalasin (Cyt) was added after PMA. After the addition of bacteria, a subsequent 1-h incubation was carried out in seven groups. NETs were visualized by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and anti-histone. Ex vivo samples were immunostained for myeloperoxidase and neutrophil elastase. A 3-h incubation period of PMN + PMA increased NETs (p < 0.05). Bacteria + 25 nM PMA and bacteria + PMA + Cyt increased NETs (p<0.05). Szoo induced fewer NETs than Ecoli or Scap (p < 0.05). Ex vivo NETs were present in mares with endometritis. Scanning electron microscopy showed the spread of NETs formed by smooth fibers and globules that can be aggregated in thick bundles. Formation of NETs and the subsequent entanglement of bacteria suggest that equine NETs might be a complementary mechanism in fighting some of the bacteria causing endometritis in the mare. PMID:25218891

  4. Opposition between PKC isoforms regulates histone deimination and neutrophil extracellular chromatin release

    PubMed Central

    Neeli, Indira; Radic, Marko

    2013-01-01

    In response to inflammation, neutrophils deiminate histones and externalize chromatin. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are an innate immune defense mechanism, yet NETs also may aggravate chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. Activation of peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) is associated with NET release (NETosis) but the precise mechanisms of PAD4 regulation are unknown. We observed that, in human neutrophils, calcium ionophore induced histone deimination, whereas phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), an activator of protein kinase C (PKC), suppressed ionophore-induced deimination. Conversely, low doses of chelerythrine and sanguinarine, two inhibitors of PKC, reversed PMA inhibition and enhanced ionophore-stimulated deimination. In addition, a peptide inhibitor of PKCα superinduced ionophore activation of PAD4, thus identifying PKCα as the PMA-induced inhibitor of PAD4. At higher doses, chelerythrine, sanguinarine, and structurally unrelated PKC inhibitors blocked histone deimination, suggesting that a different PKC isoform activates histone deimination. We identify PKCζ as activator of PAD4 because a specific peptide inhibitor of this PKC isoform suppressed histone deimination. Confocal microscopy confirmed that, in the presence of PMA, NETosis proceeds without detectable histone deimination, and that ionophore cooperates with PMA to induce more extensive NET release. Broad inhibition of PKC by chelerythrine or specific inhibition of PKCζ suppressed NETosis. Our observations thus reveal an intricate antagonism between PKC isoforms in the regulation of histone deimination, identify a dominant role for PKCα in the repression of histone deimination, and assign essential functions to PKCζ in the activation of PAD4 and the execution of NETosis. The precise balance between opposing PKC isoforms in the regulation of NETosis affirms the idea that NET release underlies specific and vitally important evolutionary selection pressures. PMID:23430963

  5. Identification and characterization of a novel human neutrophil protein related to the S100 family.

    PubMed Central

    Guignard, F; Mauel, J; Markert, M

    1995-01-01

    A rabbit polyclonal antibody raised against myeloid-related protein 8 (MRP-8), a protein of the S100 family, recognized another S100 protein (MRP-14) as well as a protein of 6.5 kDa (p6) in the cytosol of resting neutrophils. p6 was found to be a novel member of the S100 family. It consisted of two isoforms with pI values of 6.2 (the minor form, p6a) and 6.3 (the major form, p6b) and constituted 5% of the total cytosolic proteins. Both isoforms were also demonstrated in the cytosol of monocytes, but not in lymphocytes, as previously shown for MRP-8 and MRP-14. Only the major isoform bound radioactive Ca2+, as also observed for MRP-8, whereas the different variants of MRP-14 were all labelled. On neutrophil activation with opsonized zymosan, a stimulant known to require extracellular Ca2+, 58% of p6a and 42% of p6b was translocated to the membrane. With phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, a Ca(2+)-independent stimulant, no translocation was detected. This translocation pattern was similar to that observed with MRP-8 and MRP-14. In addition, p6, MRP-8 and MRP-14 were specifically associated with the cytoskeletal fraction of the membrane. The Ca(2+)-dependent translocation of the novel S100 protein in parallel with MRP-8 and MRP-14 suggests a role for these proteins in regulating the Ca2+ signal to the membrane cytoskeleton and thus in regulating neutrophil activation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7626002

  6. Alteration of Neutrophil Reactive Oxygen Species Production by Extracts of Devil's Claw (Harpagophytum).

    PubMed

    Muzila, Mbaki; Rumpunen, Kimmo; Wright, Helen; Roberts, Helen; Grant, Melissa; Nybom, Hilde; Sehic, Jasna; Ekholm, Anders; Widén, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Harpagophytum, Devil's Claw, is a genus of tuberiferous xerophytic plants native to southern Africa. Some of the taxa are appreciated for their medicinal effects and have been traditionally used to relieve symptoms of inflammation. The objectives of this pilot study were to investigate the antioxidant capacity and the content of total phenols, verbascoside, isoverbascoside, and selected iridoids, as well as to investigate the capacity of various Harpagophytum taxa in suppressing respiratory burst in terms of reactive oxygen species produced by human neutrophils challenged with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), opsonised Staphylococcus aureus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Harpagophytum plants were classified into different taxa according to morphology, and DNA analysis was used to confirm the classification. A putative new variety of H. procumbens showed the highest degree of antioxidative capacity. Using PMA, three Harpagophytum taxa showed anti-inflammatory effects with regard to the PBS control. A putative hybrid between H. procumbens and H. zeyheri in contrast showed proinflammatory effect on the response of neutrophils to F. nucleatum in comparison with treatment with vehicle control. Harpagophytum taxa were biochemically very variable and the response in suppressing respiratory burst differed. Further studies with larger number of subjects are needed to corroborate anti-inflammatory effects of different taxa of Harpagophytum.

  7. Alteration of Neutrophil Reactive Oxygen Species Production by Extracts of Devil's Claw (Harpagophytum).

    PubMed

    Muzila, Mbaki; Rumpunen, Kimmo; Wright, Helen; Roberts, Helen; Grant, Melissa; Nybom, Hilde; Sehic, Jasna; Ekholm, Anders; Widén, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Harpagophytum, Devil's Claw, is a genus of tuberiferous xerophytic plants native to southern Africa. Some of the taxa are appreciated for their medicinal effects and have been traditionally used to relieve symptoms of inflammation. The objectives of this pilot study were to investigate the antioxidant capacity and the content of total phenols, verbascoside, isoverbascoside, and selected iridoids, as well as to investigate the capacity of various Harpagophytum taxa in suppressing respiratory burst in terms of reactive oxygen species produced by human neutrophils challenged with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), opsonised Staphylococcus aureus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Harpagophytum plants were classified into different taxa according to morphology, and DNA analysis was used to confirm the classification. A putative new variety of H. procumbens showed the highest degree of antioxidative capacity. Using PMA, three Harpagophytum taxa showed anti-inflammatory effects with regard to the PBS control. A putative hybrid between H. procumbens and H. zeyheri in contrast showed proinflammatory effect on the response of neutrophils to F. nucleatum in comparison with treatment with vehicle control. Harpagophytum taxa were biochemically very variable and the response in suppressing respiratory burst differed. Further studies with larger number of subjects are needed to corroborate anti-inflammatory effects of different taxa of Harpagophytum. PMID:27429708

  8. Arbutin and decrease of potentially toxic substances generated in human blood neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Pečivová, Jana; Nosál', Radomír; Sviteková, Klára; Mačičková, Tatiana

    2014-12-01

    Neutrophils, highly motile phagocytic cells, constitute the first line of host defense and simultaneously they are considered to be central cells of chronic inflammation. In combination with standard therapeutic procedures, natural substances are gaining interest as an option for enhancing the effectiveness of treatment of inflammatory diseases. We investigated the effect of arbutin and carvedilol and of their combination on 4β-phorbol-12β-myristate-13α-acetate- stimulated functions of human isolated neutrophils. Cells were preincubated with the drugs tested and subsequently stimulated. Superoxide (with or without blood platelets, in the rate close to physiological conditions [1:50]) and HOCl generation, elastase and myeloperoxidase release were determined spectrophotometrically and phospholipase D activation spectrofluorometrically. The combined effect of arbutin and carvedilol was found to be more effective than the effect of each compound alone. Our study provided evidence supporting the potential beneficial effect of arbutin alone or in combination with carvedilol in diminishing tissue damage by decreasing phospholipase D, myeloperoxidase and elastase activity and by attenuating the generation of superoxide and the subsequently derived reactive oxygen species. The presented data indicate the ability of arbutin to suppress the onset and progression of inflammation.

  9. Arbutin and decrease of potentially toxic substances generated in human blood neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Pečivová, Jana; Nosál', Radomír; Sviteková, Klára

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils, highly motile phagocytic cells, constitute the first line of host defense and simultaneously they are considered to be central cells of chronic inflammation. In combination with standard therapeutic procedures, natural substances are gaining interest as an option for enhancing the effectiveness of treatment of inflammatory diseases. We investigated the effect of arbutin and carvedilol and of their combination on 4β-phorbol-12β-myristate-13α-acetate- stimulated functions of human isolated neutrophils. Cells were preincubated with the drugs tested and subsequently stimulated. Superoxide (with or without blood platelets, in the rate close to physiological conditions [1:50]) and HOCl generation, elastase and myeloperoxidase release were determined spectrophotometrically and phospholipase D activation spectrofluorometrically. The combined effect of arbutin and carvedilol was found to be more effective than the effect of each compound alone. Our study provided evidence supporting the potential beneficial effect of arbutin alone or in combination with carvedilol in diminishing tissue damage by decreasing phospholipase D, myeloperoxidase and elastase activity and by attenuating the generation of superoxide and the subsequently derived reactive oxygen species. The presented data indicate the ability of arbutin to suppress the onset and progression of inflammation. PMID:26109900

  10. Neutrophil adherence to isolated adult canine myocytes. Evidence for a CD18-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Entman, M L; Youker, K; Shappell, S B; Siegel, C; Rothlein, R; Dreyer, W J; Schmalstieg, F C; Smith, C W

    1990-01-01

    Cardiac myocytes were isolated from adult dogs and incubated with isolated canine neutrophils (PMN). Intercellular adhesion was low and unchanged by stimulation of the PMN with zymosan activated serum or platelet activating factor (PAF) at concentrations that significantly enhance PMN adhesion to protein-coated glass and canine endothelial cell monolayers. Intercellular adhesion was significantly increased only when both myocytes and PMN were stimulated (e.g., myocytes incubated with IL-1, tumor necrosis factor, or phorbol myristate acetate, and PMN were chemotactically stimulated). Inhibitors of protein synthesis diminished the IL-1 beta-induced effect by greater than 80%. The IL-1 beta, PAF-stimulated PMN-myocyte adhesion was associated with substantial H2O2 production. Under conditions with low PMN-myocyte adhesion (i.e., IL-1 beta alone, PAF alone, or no stimulus) H2O2 production was generally less than 5% of that occurring with high adhesion. An anti-CD18 monoclonal antibody (R15.7) inhibited stimulated PMN-myocyte adhesion by greater than 95% and reduced H2O2 production by greater than 90%. Control isotype-matched, binding, and nonbinding antibodies were without effect on adherence or H2O2 production. The results indicate that cytokine stimulation of adult myocytes induces expression of a ligand involved in CD18-dependent adherence of canine neutrophils. Images PMID:1970581

  11. Alteration of Neutrophil Reactive Oxygen Species Production by Extracts of Devil's Claw (Harpagophytum)

    PubMed Central

    Muzila, Mbaki; Wright, Helen; Roberts, Helen; Grant, Melissa; Nybom, Hilde; Sehic, Jasna; Ekholm, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Harpagophytum, Devil's Claw, is a genus of tuberiferous xerophytic plants native to southern Africa. Some of the taxa are appreciated for their medicinal effects and have been traditionally used to relieve symptoms of inflammation. The objectives of this pilot study were to investigate the antioxidant capacity and the content of total phenols, verbascoside, isoverbascoside, and selected iridoids, as well as to investigate the capacity of various Harpagophytum taxa in suppressing respiratory burst in terms of reactive oxygen species produced by human neutrophils challenged with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), opsonised Staphylococcus aureus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Harpagophytum plants were classified into different taxa according to morphology, and DNA analysis was used to confirm the classification. A putative new variety of H. procumbens showed the highest degree of antioxidative capacity. Using PMA, three Harpagophytum taxa showed anti-inflammatory effects with regard to the PBS control. A putative hybrid between H. procumbens and H. zeyheri in contrast showed proinflammatory effect on the response of neutrophils to F. nucleatum in comparison with treatment with vehicle control. Harpagophytum taxa were biochemically very variable and the response in suppressing respiratory burst differed. Further studies with larger number of subjects are needed to corroborate anti-inflammatory effects of different taxa of Harpagophytum. PMID:27429708

  12. How Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Become Visible

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been identified as a fundamental innate immune defense mechanism against different pathogens. NETs are characterized as released nuclear DNA associated with histones and granule proteins, which form an extracellular web-like structure that is able to entrap and occasionally kill certain microbes. Furthermore, NETs have been shown to contribute to several noninfectious disease conditions when released by activated neutrophils during inflammation. The identification of NETs has mainly been succeeded by various microscopy techniques, for example, immunofluorescence microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Since the last years the development and improvement of new immunofluorescence-based techniques enabled optimized visualization and quantification of NETs. On the one hand in vitro live-cell imaging led to profound new ideas about the mechanisms involved in the formation and functionality of NETs. On the other hand different intravital, in vivo, and in situ microscopy techniques led to deeper insights into the role of NET formation during health and disease. This paper presents an overview of the main used microscopy techniques to visualize NETs and describes their advantages as well as disadvantages. PMID:27294157

  13. Pondering neutrophil extracellular traps with healthy skepticism.

    PubMed

    Nauseef, William M; Kubes, Paul

    2016-10-01

    The authors engage in a dialogue that evaluates critically the state of the study of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), a phenomenon currently the object of considerable interest, with the goal of identifying those aspects that merit clarification in order to assign the process its proper place in our current understanding of cell biology. Since the seminal observations in the Zychlinsky laboratory that described the extrusion of filaments of nuclear DNA associated with histones and granule proteins from neutrophils stimulated in vitro, many investigators have examined the phenomenon of NET formation in numerous and diverse settings. However, an overview of work in this rapidly growing field prompts several fundamental questions about NETs, including their precise composition, the mechanisms by which they arise, their clinical relevance, and the interrelationship of those observed in vitro and in vivo. In this discussion, the authors challenge interpretation of data from some experimental settings and provide recommendations for specific studies that would address the concerns raised, improve understanding of the biological relevance of NETs, and strengthen the field. PMID:27470975

  14. Pondering neutrophil extracellular traps with healthy skepticism.

    PubMed

    Nauseef, William M; Kubes, Paul

    2016-10-01

    The authors engage in a dialogue that evaluates critically the state of the study of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), a phenomenon currently the object of considerable interest, with the goal of identifying those aspects that merit clarification in order to assign the process its proper place in our current understanding of cell biology. Since the seminal observations in the Zychlinsky laboratory that described the extrusion of filaments of nuclear DNA associated with histones and granule proteins from neutrophils stimulated in vitro, many investigators have examined the phenomenon of NET formation in numerous and diverse settings. However, an overview of work in this rapidly growing field prompts several fundamental questions about NETs, including their precise composition, the mechanisms by which they arise, their clinical relevance, and the interrelationship of those observed in vitro and in vivo. In this discussion, the authors challenge interpretation of data from some experimental settings and provide recommendations for specific studies that would address the concerns raised, improve understanding of the biological relevance of NETs, and strengthen the field.

  15. Fluorescent Ly6G antibodies determine macrophage phagocytosis of neutrophils and alter the retrieval of neutrophils in mice.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Kirsten; Schmitt, Fee; Autenrieth, Stella E; Dillmann, Inken; Nürnberg, Bernd; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Beer-Hammer, Sandra

    2015-09-01

    Fluorescently labeled Ly6G antibodies enable the tracking of neutrophils in mice, whereas purified anti-Ly6G rapidly depletes neutrophils from the circulation. The mechanisms underlying neutrophil depletion are still under debate. Here, we examined how identical Ly6G antibodies coupled to different fluorochromes affect neutrophil fate in vivo. BM cells stained with Ly6G antibodies were injected into mice. The number of retrieved anti-Ly6G-FITC(+) cells was reduced significantly in comparison with anti-Ly6G-APC(+) or anti-Ly6G-PE(+) cells. Flow cytometry and multispectral imaging flow cytometry analyses revealed that anti-Ly6G-FITC(+) neutrophils were preferentially phagocytosed by BMMs in vitro and by splenic, hepatic, and BM macrophages in vivo. Direct antibody injection of anti-Ly6G-FITC but not anti-Ly6G-PE depleted neutrophils to the same degree as purified anti-Ly6G, indicating that the FITC-coupled antibody eliminates neutrophils by a similar mechanism as the uncoupled antibody. With the use of a protein G-binding assay, we demonstrated that APC and PE but not FITC coupling inhibited access to interaction sites on the anti-Ly6G antibody. We conclude the following: 1) that neutrophil phagocytosis by macrophages is a central mechanism in anti-Ly6G-induced neutrophil depletion and 2) that fluorochrome-coupling can affect functional properties of anti-Ly6G antibodies, thereby modifying macrophage uptake of Ly6G-labeled neutrophils and neutrophil retrieval following adoptive cell transfer or injection of fluorescent anti-Ly6G.

  16. Fluorescent Ly6G antibodies determine macrophage phagocytosis of neutrophils and alter the retrieval of neutrophils in mice.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Kirsten; Schmitt, Fee; Autenrieth, Stella E; Dillmann, Inken; Nürnberg, Bernd; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Beer-Hammer, Sandra

    2015-09-01

    Fluorescently labeled Ly6G antibodies enable the tracking of neutrophils in mice, whereas purified anti-Ly6G rapidly depletes neutrophils from the circulation. The mechanisms underlying neutrophil depletion are still under debate. Here, we examined how identical Ly6G antibodies coupled to different fluorochromes affect neutrophil fate in vivo. BM cells stained with Ly6G antibodies were injected into mice. The number of retrieved anti-Ly6G-FITC(+) cells was reduced significantly in comparison with anti-Ly6G-APC(+) or anti-Ly6G-PE(+) cells. Flow cytometry and multispectral imaging flow cytometry analyses revealed that anti-Ly6G-FITC(+) neutrophils were preferentially phagocytosed by BMMs in vitro and by splenic, hepatic, and BM macrophages in vivo. Direct antibody injection of anti-Ly6G-FITC but not anti-Ly6G-PE depleted neutrophils to the same degree as purified anti-Ly6G, indicating that the FITC-coupled antibody eliminates neutrophils by a similar mechanism as the uncoupled antibody. With the use of a protein G-binding assay, we demonstrated that APC and PE but not FITC coupling inhibited access to interaction sites on the anti-Ly6G antibody. We conclude the following: 1) that neutrophil phagocytosis by macrophages is a central mechanism in anti-Ly6G-induced neutrophil depletion and 2) that fluorochrome-coupling can affect functional properties of anti-Ly6G antibodies, thereby modifying macrophage uptake of Ly6G-labeled neutrophils and neutrophil retrieval following adoptive cell transfer or injection of fluorescent anti-Ly6G. PMID:26019296

  17. Diverse novel functions of neutrophils in immunity, inflammation, and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Mócsai, Attila

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils have long been considered simple suicide killers at the bottom of the hierarchy of the immune response. That view began to change 10–20 yr ago, when the sophisticated mechanisms behind how neutrophils locate and eliminate pathogens and regulate immunity and inflammation were discovered. The last few years witnessed a new wave of discoveries about additional novel and unexpected functions of these cells. Neutrophils have been proposed to participate in protection against intracellular pathogens such as viruses and mycobacteria. They have been shown to intimately shape the adaptive immune response at various levels, including marginal zone B cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells and T cell populations, and even to control NK cell homeostasis. Neutrophils have been shown to mediate an alternative pathway of systemic anaphylaxis and to participate in allergic skin reactions. Finally, neutrophils were found to be involved in physiological and pathological processes beyond the immune system, such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, and thrombus formation. Many of those functions appear to be related to their unique ability to release neutrophil extracellular traps even in the absence of pathogens. This review summarizes those novel findings on versatile functions of neutrophils and how they change our view of neutrophil biology in health and disease. PMID:23825232

  18. Human neutrophil leukocyte elastase activity is inhibited by Phenol Red

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) activity in urine, sputum and nasal mucous is used as an indicator of inflammation due to viral or bacterial infection. However, bovine nasal mucous neutrophils collected, lysed and stored in Dulbecco's minimal medium containing Phenol Red, showed no NE activity with methox...

  19. ATF3 is a novel regulator of mouse neutrophil migration

    PubMed Central

    Boespflug, Nicholas D.; Kumar, Sachin; McAlees, Jaclyn W.; Phelan, James D.; Grimes, H. Leighton; Hoebe, Kasper; Hai, Tsonwin; Karp, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Expression of the activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) gene is induced by Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling. In turn, ATF3 protein inhibits the expression of various TLR-driven proinflammatory genes. Given its counter-regulatory role in diverse innate immune responses, we defined the effects of ATF3 on neutrophilic airway inflammation in mice. ATF3 deletion was associated with increased lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-driven airway epithelia production of CXCL1, but not CXCL2, findings concordant with a consensus ATF3-binding site identified solely in the Cxcl1 promoter. Unexpectedly, ATF3-deficient mice did not exhibit increased airway neutrophilia after LPS challenge. Bone marrow chimeras revealed a specific reduction in ATF3−/− neutrophil recruitment to wild-type lungs. In vitro, ATF3−/− neutrophils exhibited a profound chemotaxis defect. Global gene expression analysis identified ablated Tiam2 expression in ATF3−/− neutrophils. TIAM2 regulates cellular motility by activating Rac1-mediated focal adhesion disassembly. Notably, ATF3−/− and ATF3-sufficient TIAM2 knockdown neutrophils, both lacking TIAM2, exhibited increased focal complex area, along with excessive CD11b-mediated F-actin polymerization. Together, our data describe a dichotomous role for ATF3-mediated regulation of neutrophilic responses: inhibition of neutrophil chemokine production but promotion of neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:24470589

  20. Intergrin-dependent neutrophil migration in the injured mouse cornea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As an early responder to an inflammatory stimulus, neutrophils must exit the vasculature and migrate through the extravascular tissue to the site of insult, which is often remote from the point of extravasation. Following a central epithelial corneal abrasion, neutrophils recruited from the peripher...

  1. Intracellular localization of VAMP-1 protein in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nabokina, S M

    2001-02-01

    We studied the intracellular localization of vesicle-associated membrane protein VAMP-1 in human neutrophils. VAMP-1 was associated with membranes of gelatinase and specific secretory granules rapidly mobilized during exocytosis. VAMP-1 probably acts as a component of the SNARE complex during exocytosis of gelatinase and specific granules in human neutrophils.

  2. Carbon-isotopic analysis of dissolved acetate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelwicks, J. T.; Hayes, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Heating of dried, acetate-containing solids together with oxalic acid dihydrate conveniently releases acetic acid for purification by gas chromatography. For determination of the carbon-isotopic composition of total acetate, the acetate-containing zone of the chromatographic effluent can be routed directly to a combustion furnace coupled to a vacuum system allowing recovery, purification, and packaging of CO2 for mass-spectrometric analysis. For analysis of methyl carbon, acetic acid can be cryogenically trapped from the chromatographic effluent, then transferred to a tube containing excess NaOH. The tube is evacuated, sealed, and heated to 500 degrees C to produce methane by pyrolysis of sodium acetate. Subsequent combustion of the methane allows determination of the 13C content at the methyl position in the parent acetate. With typical blanks, the standard deviation of single analyses is less than 0.4% for acetate samples larger than 5 micromoles. A full treatment of uncertainties is outlined.

  3. Ozone decomposition in aqueous acetate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sehested, K.; Holcman, J.; Bjergbakke, E.; Hart, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    The acetate radical ion reacts with ozone with a rate constant of k = (1.5 +/- 0.5) x 10Z dmT mol s . The products from this reaction are CO2, HCHO, and O2 . By subsequent reaction of the peroxy radical with ozone the acetate radical ion is regenerated through the OH radical. A chain decomposition of ozone takes place. It terminates when the acetate radical ion reacts with oxygen forming the unreactive peroxy acetate radical. The chain is rather short as oxygen is developed, as a result of the ozone consumption. The inhibiting effect of acetate on the ozone decay is rationalized by OH scavenging by acetate and successive reaction of the acetate radical ion with oxygen. Some products from the bimolecular disappearance of the peroxy acetate radicals, however, react further with ozone, reducing the effectiveness of the stabilization.

  4. Augmentation of oxidant injury to human pulmonary epithelial cells by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophore pyochelin.

    PubMed Central

    Britigan, B E; Rasmussen, G T; Cox, C D

    1997-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes acute and chronic infections of the human lung, with resultant tissue injury. We have previously shown that iron bound to pyochelin, a siderophore secreted by the organism to acquire iron, is an efficient catalyst for hydroxyl radical (HO.) formation and augments injury to pulmonary artery endothelial cells resulting from their exposure to superoxide (O2.) and/or H2O2. Sources for O2-. and H2O2 included phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated neutrophils and pyocyanin. Pyocyanin, another P. aeruginosa secretory product, undergoes cell-mediated redox, thereby forming O2-. and H2O2. In P. aeruginosa lung infections, damage to airway epithelial cells is probably more extensive than that to endothelial cells. Therefore, we examined whether ferripyochelin also augments oxidant-mediated damage to airway epithelial cells. A549 cells, a human type II alveolar epithelial cell line, was exposed to H2O2, PMA-stimulated neutrophils, or pyocyanin, and injury was determined by release of 51Cr from prelabeled cells. Ferripyochelin significantly increased (> 10-fold) oxidant-mediated cell injury regardless of whether H2O2, neutrophils, or pyocyanin was employed. Apo-pyochelin was not effective, and ferripyochelin was not toxic by itself at the concentrations employed. Spin trapping with alpha-(4-pyrridyl-1-oxide)-N-t-butyl-nitrone-ethanol confirmed the generation of HO., and injury was decreased by a variety of antioxidants, including superoxide dismutase, catalase, and dimethylthiourea. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the presence of ferripyochelin at sites of P. aeruginosa lung infection could contribute to tissue injury through its ability to promote HO.-mediated damage to airway epithelial cells. PMID:9038317

  5. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3 or C2H3O2Na·3H2O, CAS Reg. No. 6131-90-4) is the sodium salt of acetic acid and occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues....

  6. Swell activated chloride channel function in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, Michael D.; Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2009-04-17

    Non-excitable cells such as neutrophil granulocytes are the archetypal inflammatory immune cell involved in critical functions of the innate immune system. The electron current generated (I{sub e}) by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and rapidly depolarises the membrane potential. For continuous function of the NADPH oxidase, I{sub e} has to be balanced to preserve electroneutrality, if not; sufficient depolarisation would prevent electrons from leaving the cell and neutrophil function would be abrogated. Subsequently, the depolarisation generated by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase I{sub e} must be counteracted by ion transport. The finding that depolarisation required counter-ions to compensate electron transport was followed by the observation that chloride channels activated by swell can counteract the NADPH oxidase membrane depolarisation. In this mini review, we discuss the research findings that revealed the essential role of swell activated chloride channels in human neutrophil function.

  7. Effects of pentoxifylline on equine neutrophil function and flow properties.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, D J; Geor, R J; Burris, S M; Smith, C M

    1992-01-01

    Pentoxifylline has been reported to improve peripheral vascular circulation by altering the flow properties of blood. To determine if the hemorrheological effects of pentoxifylline were mediated by alterations in neutrophil function and/or flow properties, we evaluated the drug's effects on equine neutrophils in vitro. Pentoxifylline, at a concentration of 1 x 10(-1) M, but not at concentrations of 1 x 10(-6) M to 1 x 10(-2) M, markedly suppressed neutrophil superoxide production, zymosan phagocytosis and adherence to nylon wool. Pentoxifylline failed to improve neutrophil filterability through 3 mu polycarbonate filters at any concentration tested. We conclude that equine neutrophil function and flow properties are unlikely to be affected by pentoxifylline concentrations achievable in vivo. PMID:1335832

  8. Exosomes Mediate LTB4 Release during Neutrophil Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Ritankar; Tavakoli Tameh, Aidin; Parent, Carole A.

    2016-01-01

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is secreted by chemotactic neutrophils, forming a secondary gradient that amplifies the reach of primary chemoattractants. This strategy increases the recruitment range for neutrophils and is important during inflammation. Here, we show that LTB4 and its synthesizing enzymes localize to intracellular multivesicular bodies that, upon stimulation, release their content as exosomes. Purified exosomes can activate resting neutrophils and elicit chemotactic activity in a LTB4 receptor-dependent manner. Inhibition of exosome release leads to loss of directional motility with concomitant loss of LTB4 release. Our findings establish that the exosomal pool of LTB4 acts in an autocrine fashion to sensitize neutrophils towards the primary chemoattractant, and in a paracrine fashion to mediate the recruitment of neighboring neutrophils in trans. We envision that this mechanism is used by other signals to foster communication between cells in harsh extracellular environments. PMID:26741884

  9. Paradoxical Roles of the Neutrophil in Sepsis: Protective and Deleterious

    PubMed Central

    Sônego, Fabiane; Castanheira, Fernanda Vargas e Silva; Ferreira, Raphael Gomes; Kanashiro, Alexandre; Leite, Caio Abner Vitorino Gonçalves; Nascimento, Daniele Carvalho; Colón, David Fernando; Borges, Vanessa de Fátima; Alves-Filho, José Carlos; Cunha, Fernando Queiróz

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis, an overwhelming inflammatory response syndrome secondary to infection, is one of the costliest and deadliest medical conditions worldwide. Neutrophils are classically considered to be essential players in the host defense against invading pathogens. However, several investigations have shown that impairment of neutrophil migration to the site of infection, also referred to as neutrophil paralysis, occurs during severe sepsis, resulting in an inability of the host to contain and eliminate the infection. On the other hand, the neutrophil antibacterial arsenal contributes to tissue damage and the development of organ dysfunction during sepsis. In this review, we provide an overview of the main events in which neutrophils play a beneficial or deleterious role in the outcome of sepsis. PMID:27199981

  10. Spatial control of actin polymerization during neutrophil chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Orion D.; Servant, Guy; Welch, Matthew D.; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Sedat, John W.; Bourne, Henry R.

    2010-01-01

    Neutrophils respond to chemotactic stimuli by increasing the nucleation and polymerization of actin filaments, but the location and regulation of these processes are not well understood. Here, using a permeabilized-cell assay, we show that chemotactic stimuli cause neutrophils to organize many discrete sites of actin polymerization, the distribution of which is biased by external chemotactic gradients. Furthermore, the Arp2/3 complex, which can nucleate actin polymerization, dynamically redistributes to the region of living neutrophils that receives maximal chemotactic stimulation, and the least-extractable pool of the Arp2/3 complex co-localizes with sites of actin polymerization. Our observations indicate that chemoattractant-stimulated neutrophils may establish discrete foci of actin polymerization that are similar to those generated at the posterior surface of the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. We propose that asymmetrical establishment and/or maintenance of sites of actin polymerization produces directional migration of neutrophils in response to chemotactic gradients. PMID:10559877

  11. The role of neutrophils in the immune system: an overview.

    PubMed

    Malech, Harry L; Deleo, Frank R; Quinn, Mark T

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils, also known as polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), have long been considered as the short-lived, nonspecific white cells that form pus-and also happen to kill invading microbes. Indeed, neutrophils were often neglected (and largely not considered) as immune cells. This historic view of neutrophils has changed considerably over the past several decades, and we know now that, in addition to playing the predominant role in the clearance of bacteria and fungi, they play a major role in shaping the host response to infection and immune system homeostasis. The change in our view of the role of neutrophils in the immune system has been due in large part to the study of these cells in vitro. Such work has been made possible by new and/or improved methods and approaches used to investigate neutrophils. These methods are the focus of this volume.

  12. Clearance of apoptotic neutrophils and resolution of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Greenlee-Wacker, Mallary C

    2016-09-01

    The engulfment of apoptotic cells by phagocytes, a process referred to as efferocytosis, is essential for maintenance of normal tissue homeostasis and a prerequisite for the resolution of inflammation. Neutrophils are the predominant circulating white blood cell in humans, and contain an arsenal of toxic substances that kill and degrade microbes. Neutrophils are short-lived and spontaneously die by apoptosis. This review will highlight how the engulfment of apoptotic neutrophils by human phagocytes occurs, how heterogeneity of phagocyte populations influences efferocytosis signaling, and downstream consequences of efferocytosis. The efferocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils by macrophages promotes anti-inflammatory signaling, prevents neutrophil lysis, and dampens immune responses. Given the immunomodulatory properties of efferocytosis, understanding pathways that regulate and enhance efferocytosis could be harnessed to combat infection and chronic inflammatory conditions. PMID:27558346

  13. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  14. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  15. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  17. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  18. 21 CFR 556.380 - Melengestrol acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Melengestrol acetate. 556.380 Section 556.380 Food... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.380 Melengestrol acetate. A tolerance of 25 parts per billion is established for residues of the parent compound, melengestrol acetate, in fat of cattle....

  19. 21 CFR 582.6185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 582.6185 Section 582.6185 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium acetate. (a) Product. Calcium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  20. 21 CFR 582.6185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 582.6185 Section 582.6185 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium acetate. (a) Product. Calcium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  1. 21 CFR 582.6185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 582.6185 Section 582.6185 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium acetate. (a) Product. Calcium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  2. 21 CFR 582.6185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 582.6185 Section 582.6185 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium acetate. (a) Product. Calcium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  3. 21 CFR 582.6185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 582.6185 Section 582.6185 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium acetate. (a) Product. Calcium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  6. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  8. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  9. Effects of Montelukast on free radical production in whole blood and isolated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in asthmatic children

    PubMed Central

    Al Saadi, Muslim M.; Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Mustafa, Ali; Shafi, Ahmed; Tuwajri, Ali S. Al

    2011-01-01

    Montelukast is a highly selective leukotriene-receptor antagonist (LTRA). It is widely used in the treatment of bronchial asthma, primarily as an adjunct to corticosteroids. Reactive oxygen species (ROSs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma and oxidative stress contributing to the initiation and worsening of inflammatory respiratory disorders, such as asthma. Antioxidant drugs may have a role in minimizing or preventing damage in asthmatic children. The aim of this study was to assess the antioxidant effect of montelukast on the production of free radicals in the whole blood and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in asthmatic children. A group of 48 (38 males and 10 females), apparently healthy asthmatic children were recruited with ages ranging between 6 and 14 years. In asthmatic children, base line (premedication) and post medication free radicals activity in the whole blood and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) was determined by measuring chemiluminescence (CL) response through chemiluminescence luminometer. Free radical productions were significantly decreased in the whole blood, when stimulated with Phorbol Myristate Acetate (p < 0.04) and Opsonised Zymosan (p < 0.05). The free radicals were also significantly decreased in isolated polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) when stimulated with Opsonised Zymosan (p < 0.05) after the post medication treatment of montelukast in asthmatic children. Montelukast decreased the reactive oxygen species production, both in the whole blood as well as isolated PMNs in asthmatic children. PMID:23960762

  10. Sulfite-mediated oxidation of myeloperoxidase to a free radical: immuno-spin trapping detection in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ranguelova, Kalina; Rice, Annette B; Lardinois, Olivier M; Triquigneaux, Mathilde; Steinckwich, Natacha; Deterding, Leesa J; Garantziotis, Stavros; Mason, Ronald P

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies focused on catalyzed oxidation of (bi)sulfite, leading to the formation of the reactive sulfur trioxide ((•)SO3(-)), peroxymonosulfate ((-)O3SOO(•)), and sulfate (SO4(•-)) anion radicals, which can damage target proteins and oxidize them to protein radicals. It is known that these very reactive sulfur- and oxygen-centered radicals can be formed by oxidation of (bi)sulfite by peroxidases. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), an abundant heme protein secreted from activated neutrophils that play a central role in host defense mechanisms, allergic reactions, and asthma, is a likely candidate for initiating the respiratory damage caused by sulfur dioxide. The objective of this study was to examine the oxidative damage caused by (bi)sulfite-derived free radicals in human neutrophils through formation of protein radicals. We used immuno-spin trapping and confocal microscopy to study the protein oxidations driven by sulfite-derived radicals. We found that the presence of sulfite can cause MPO-catalyzed oxidation of MPO to a protein radical in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-activated human neutrophils. We trapped the MPO-derived radicals in situ using the nitrone spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide and detected them immunologically as nitrone adducts in cells. Our present study demonstrates that myeloperoxidase initiates (bi)sulfite oxidation leading to MPO radical damage, possibly leading to (bi)sulfite-exacerbated allergic reactions.

  11. Human plasma kallikrein releases neutrophil elastase during blood coagulation.

    PubMed Central

    Wachtfogel, Y T; Kucich, U; James, H L; Scott, C F; Schapira, M; Zimmerman, M; Cohen, A B; Colman, R W

    1983-01-01

    Elastase is released from human neutrophils during the early events of blood coagulation. Human plasma kallikrein has been shown to stimulate neutrophil chemotaxis, aggregation, and oxygen consumption. Therefore, the ability of kallikrein to release neutrophil elastase was investigated. Neutrophils were isolated by dextran sedimentation, and elastase release was measured by both an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and an enzymatic assay using t-butoxy-carbonyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-amino methyl coumarin as the substrate. Kallikrein, 0.1-1.0 U/ml, (0.045-0.45 microM), was incubated with neutrophils that were preincubated with cytochalasin B (5 micrograms/ml). The release of elastase was found to be proportional to the kallikrein concentration. Kallikrein released a maximum of 34% of the total elastase content, as measured by solubilizing the neutrophils in the nonionic detergent Triton X-100. A series of experiments was carried out to determine if kallikrein was a major enzyme involved in neutrophil elastase release during blood coagulation. When 10 million neutrophils were incubated in 1 ml of normal plasma in the presence of 30 mM CaCl2 for 90 min, 2.75 micrograms of elastase was released. In contrast, neutrophils incubated in prekallikrein-deficient or Factor XII-deficient plasma released less than half of the elastase, as compared with normal plasma. The addition of purified prekallikrein to prekallikrein-deficient plasma restored neutrophil elastase release to normal levels. Moreover, release of elastase was enhanced in plasma deficient in C1-inhibitor, the major plasma inhibitor of kallikrein. This release was not dependent upon further steps in the coagulation pathway, or on C5a, since levels of elastase, released in Factor XI- or C5-deficient plasma, were similar to that in normal plasma, and an antibody to C5 failed to inhibit elastase release. These data suggest that kallikrein may be a major enzyme responsible for the release of elastase during blood

  12. Human resistin promotes neutrophil proinflammatory activation and neutrophil extracellular trap formation and increases severity of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shaoning; Park, Dae Won; Tadie, Jean-Marc; Gregoire, Murielle; Deshane, Jessy; Pittet, Jean Francois; Abraham, Edward; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W

    2014-05-15

    Although resistin was recently found to modulate insulin resistance in preclinical models of type II diabetes and obesity, recent studies also suggested that resistin has proinflammatory properties. We examined whether the human-specific variant of resistin affects neutrophil activation and the severity of LPS-induced acute lung injury. Because human and mouse resistin have distinct patterns of tissue distribution, experiments were performed using humanized resistin mice that exclusively express human resistin (hRTN(+/-)(/-)) but are deficient in mouse resistin. Enhanced production of TNF-α or MIP-2 was found in LPS-treated hRtn(+/-/-) neutrophils compared with control Rtn(-/-/-) neutrophils. Expression of human resistin inhibited the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, a major sensor and regulator of cellular bioenergetics that also is implicated in inhibiting inflammatory activity of neutrophils and macrophages. In addition to the ability of resistin to sensitize neutrophils to LPS stimulation, human resistin enhanced neutrophil extracellular trap formation. In LPS-induced acute lung injury, humanized resistin mice demonstrated enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines, more severe pulmonary edema, increased neutrophil extracellular trap formation, and elevated concentration of the alarmins HMGB1 and histone 3 in the lungs. Our results suggest that human resistin may play an important contributory role in enhancing TLR4-induced inflammatory responses, and it may be a target for future therapies aimed at reducing the severity of acute lung injury and other inflammatory situations in which neutrophils play a major role.

  13. Photochemistry of 2-nitrobenzylidene acetals.

    PubMed

    Sebej, Peter; Solomek, Tomás; Hroudná, L'ubica; Brancová, Pavla; Klán, Petr

    2009-11-20

    Photolysis of dihydroxy compounds (diols) protected as 2-nitrobenzylidene acetals (ONBA) and subsequent acid- or base-catalyzed hydrolysis of the 2-nitrosobenzoic acid ester intermediates result in an efficient and high-yielding release of the substrates. We investigated the scope and limitations of ONBA photochemistry and expanded upon earlier described two-step procedures to show that the protected diols of many structural varieties can also be liberated in a one-pot procedure. In view of the fact that the acetals of nonsymmetrically substituted diols are converted into one of the corresponding 2-nitrosobenzoic acid ester isomers with moderate to high regioselectivity, the mechanism of their formation was studied using various experimental techniques. The experimental data were found to be in agreement with DFT-based quantum chemical calculations that showed the preferential cleavage occurs on the acetal C-O bond in the vicinity of more electron-withdrawing (or less electron-donating) groups. The study also revealed considerable complexity in the cleavage mechanism and that the structural variations in the substrate can significantly alter the reaction pathway. This deprotection strategy was found to be also applicable for 2-thioethanol when released from the corresponding monothioacetal in the presence of a reducing agent, such as ascorbic acid.

  14. Eosinophils versus Neutrophils in Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Bass, David A.; Szejda, Pamela

    1979-01-01

    Eosinophil leukocytes have been reported to have a major role in host defense against invasive, migratory phases of helminth infestations, yet the relative larvicidal abilities of eosinophils and neutrophils have not been thoroughly examined. This study examined the killing of newborn (migratory phase) larvae of Trichinella spiralis during incubation by human granulocytes in vitro. The assay employed cultue of larvae with cells, sera, and reagents in microtiter wells with direct counting of surviving larvae after incubation. Killed larvae appeared to be lysed. Verification of the microplate assay was obtained by demonstrating complete loss of infectivity of larvae incubated with leukocytes and immune serum. In the presence of optimal immune serum concentrations, purified neutrophils or eosinophils achieved ≥95% killing of larvae at cell:larva ratios of 2,000:1 or greater. Fresh normal serum prompted slight (19%) killing by leukocytes at a cell:larva ratio of 9,000:1. Cells plus heat-inactivated normal serum and all sera preparations in the absence of leukocytes killed <8% of the larvae. The activity of immune serum was opsonic. Cells adhered to larvae that had been preincubated in immune serum, and immunofluorescent studies indicated that such preopsonized larvae were coated with immunoglobulin (Ig)G. However, preopsonized larvae lost opsonic activity and surface IgG during incubation for 3 h in medium lacking immune serum. The rate of killing was dependent on the cell:larva ratio; at high leukocyte concentrations (4,200:1), 99% were killed within 7 h; at lower cell:larva ratios, killing increased steadily during a 20-h incubation period. Killing was inhibited by 20 μg catalase, 5 μg/ml cytochalasin B, or 5μM colchicine, but was unchanged by superoxide dismutase and was enhanced by azide or cyanide. Leukocytes from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease, lacking ability to mount a normal oxidative response, demonstrated a markedly suppressed larvicidal

  15. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil function in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Czirják, L; Dankó, K; Sipka, S; Zeher, M; Szegedi, G

    1987-01-01

    In vitro functions of polymorphonuclear (PMN) neutrophils were studied in 20 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS). An increase in the basal chemiluminescence (CL) activity of peripheral blood PMNs was found, suggesting that these cells had been preactivated in vivo. Patients with more extensive skin disease or signs of disease progression tended to have higher basal CL values. Active oxygen products during the respiratory burst may increase the extent of inflammatory and fibrotic processes and could be involved in the endothelial injury in PSS. The stimulatory capacity of CL response was normal in our study. No alterations were found in the opsonised yeast phagocytic activity of granulocytes when compared with control values. The binding of erythrocyte-antibody particles was found also to be normal. A depressed chemotactic activity of PMN cells against zymosan activated serum was also shown. The cause of the decreased chemotaxis of PMNs remains to be elucidated. PMID:3592786

  16. Biodegradation of cellulose acetate by Neisseria sicca.

    PubMed

    Sakai, K; Yamauchi, T; Nakasu, F; Ohe, T

    1996-10-01

    Bacteria capable of assimilating cellulose acetate, strains SB and SC, were isolated from soil on a medium containing cellulose acetate as a carbon source, and identified as Neisseria sicca. Both strains degraded cellulose acetate membrane filters (degree of substitution, DS, mixture of 2.8 and 2.0) and textiles (DS, 2.34) in a medium containing cellulose acetate (DS, 2.34) or its oligomer, but were not able to degrade these materials in a medium containing cellobiose octaacetate. Biodegradation of cellulose acetate (DS, 1.81 and 2.34) on the basis of biochemical oxygen demand reached 51 and 40% in the culture of N. sicca SB and 60 and 45% in the culture of N. sicca SC within 20 days. A decrease in the acetyl content of degraded cellulose acetate films and powder was confirmed by infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses. After 10-day cultivation of N. sicca SB and SC, the number-average molecular weight of residual cellulose acetate decreased by 9 and 5%, respectively. Activities of enzymes that released acetic acid and produced reducing sugars from cellulose acetate were mainly present in the culture supernatant. Reactivity of enzymes for cellulose acetate (DS, 1.81) was higher than that for cellulose acetate (DS, 2.34).

  17. Platelet-neutrophil interactions during hemodialysis: a proposed biocompatibility approach.

    PubMed

    Stuard, S; Bonomini, M; Settefrati, N; Albertazzi, A

    1998-02-01

    Platelet interaction with neutrophils may occur to a significant degree during hemodialysis (HD). We have recently shown that the enhanced neutrophil reactive oxygen species (ROS) production during the early phase of HD with cuprophan (CUP) is sustained by neutrophils which have bound platelets through P-selectin (CD62P). The evaluation of platelet-neutrophil interactions during dialysis offers the novel aspect of cell-cell interactions as a new parameter for studying the biocompatibility of dialyzer membranes. By the use of flow cytometry techniques, the present study was set up to analyze intradialytic platelet-neutrophil coaggregate formation and neutrophil ROS (hydrogen peroxide) production from 6 HD patients each dialysed with CUP, cellulose diacetate (CDA), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) in a cross-over clinical trial. Platelet-neutrophil coaggregate formation (percentage of neutrophil cells positive for CD62P) and ROS production by neutrophils (total population; CD62P+ cells; CD62P- cells) were determined before HD and after 10', 20'and 40'. CD62P+ neutrophils significantly increased during HD with CUP (10', 20', 40'), PMMA (20') and CDA (20), while no change was observed with PAN. The difference between CUP and the other membranes was significant at 10', 20' and 40'; at 20', PMMA vs PAN p<0.005. ROS production by total neutrophil population significantly increased with CUP (10', 20), PMMA (20) and CDA (20'). The increase with CUP was higher at 10' when compared to CDA (p<0.020) or PAN (p<0.005), and at 20' versus the other three membranes; at 20' PMMA vs PAN p<0.005. Only neutrophils gated in neutrophil-platelet coaggregate areas (CD26P+ neutrophils) produced hydrogen peroxide. ROS production by CD62P+ neutrophils significantly increased with CUP (10', 20), PMMA (20') and CDA (20'). The increase with CUP was significantly (p<0.0002) higher than the other three membranes at 10' and 20'; at 20', PMMA vs PAN p<0.02. With each

  18. Human intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) preparations degranulate human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Teeling, J L; De Groot, E R; Eerenberg, A J; Bleeker, W K; Van Mierlo, G; Aarden, L A; Hack, C E

    1998-11-01

    IVIG preparations have biological effects in vivo that are not fully understood. Possible effects include the property to stimulate Fc receptors on various cell types. To study whether IVIG may interact with neutrophils we developed an in vitro system, in which neutrophils, in whole blood or purified, were incubated with IVIG and assessed for degranulation by measuring the release of elastase and lactoferrin in culture medium. All commercially available IVIG preparations tested induced degranulation of neutrophils when incubated for 2 h at therapeutically relevant concentrations. In studies with blocking antibodies against Fc receptors (FcR), this degranulation was shown to be dependent on Fc gammaRII, whereas Fc gammaRIII had no effect. Experiments with purified neutrophils as well as binding experiments with labelled IVIG preparations indicated that neutrophil degranulation resulted from a direct interaction of IVIG with neutrophils. Using gel filtration fractions, it was found that polymeric and dimeric IgG present in IVIG was mainly responsible for the degranulation. We suggest that degranulation of neutrophils may contribute to the (side)effects of IVIG treatment in vivo.

  19. Quantitative assessment of neutrophil phagocytosis using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Nordenfelt, Pontus

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils have an incredible ability to find and eradicate intruders such as bacteria and fungi. They do this largely through the process of phagocytosis, where the target is internalized into a phagosome, and eventually destroyed by the hostile phagosomal environment. It is important to study phagocytosis in order to understand how neutrophils interact with various pathogens and how they respond to different stimuli. Here, I describe a method to study neutrophil phagocytosis of bacteria using flow cytometry. The bacteria are fluorescently labeled before being introduced to neutrophils. After phagocytosis, both any remaining extracellular bacteria and neutrophils are labeled using one-step staining before three-color analysis. To assess phagocytosis, first the average time it takes for the neutrophils to internalize all bound bacteria is determined. Experiments are then performed using that time point while varying the bacteria-to-neutrophil ratio for full control of the analysis. Due to the ease with which multiple samples can be analyzed, and the quantitative nature of flow cytometry, this approach is both reproducible and sensitive.

  20. Review of the neutrophil response to Bordetella pertussis infection.

    PubMed

    Eby, Joshua C; Hoffman, Casandra L; Gonyar, Laura A; Hewlett, Erik L

    2015-12-01

    The nature and timing of the neutrophil response to infection with Bordetella pertussis is influenced by multiple virulence factors expressed by the bacterium. After inoculation of the host airway, the recruitment of neutrophils signaled by B. pertussis lipooligosaccharide (LOS) is suppressed by pertussis toxin (PTX). Over the next week, the combined activities of PTX, LOS and adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) result in production of cytokines that generate an IL-17 response, promoting neutrophil recruitment which peaks at 10-14 days after inoculation in mice. Arriving at the site of infection, neutrophils encounter the powerful local inhibitory activity of ACT, in conjunction with filamentous hemagglutinin. With the help of antibodies, neutrophils contribute to clearance of B. pertussis, but only after 28-35 days in a naïve mouse. Studies of the lasting, antigen-specific IL-17 response to infection in mice and baboons has led to progress in vaccine development and understanding of pathogenesis. Questions remain about the mediators that coordinate neutrophil recruitment and the mechanisms by which neutrophils overcome B. pertussis virulence factors.

  1. Neutrophil function in an experimental model of hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vedanarayanan, V V; Kaplan, B S; Fong, J S

    1987-03-01

    To understand the role of neutrophil leukocytosis in hemolytic uremic syndrome, we studied the changes in neutrophil function in the modified generalized Shwartzman reaction in rabbits. This model resembles hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with endotoxemia. At the end of an endotoxin infusion, we observed leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and a decrease in hematocrit associated with schistocytosis. Plasma B-glucuronidase levels increased and this was associated with a decrease in neutrophil content of the enzyme. The chemotactic index and neutrophil aggregation to zymosan-activated serum were impaired compared to controls. The neutrophil procoagulant content increased after endotoxin infusion. The serum creatinine concentration and proteinuria increased in the endotoxin-treated animals. The changes returned to normal by 48 h. Renal cortical malondialdehyde, a reflection of lipid peroxidation, was higher in the endotoxin-treated animals than in the controls. We have shown enzyme release by neutrophils, impairment of chemotaxis and aggregation, increased procoagulant content in neutrophils, and evidence of lipid peroxidation in renal cortical tissue in this model. These observations raise the possibility that leukocytes may have a role in the pathogenesis of the hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:3550673

  2. Influence of gut microbiota-derived ellagitannins' metabolites urolithins on pro-inflammatory activities of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Piwowarski, Jakub P; Granica, Sebastian; Kiss, Anna K

    2014-07-01

    Ellagitannin-rich products exhibit beneficial influence in the case of inflammation-associated diseases. Urolithins, metabolites of ellagitannins produced by gut microbiota, in contrary to high molecular weight hydrophilic parental polyphenols, possess well established bioavailability. Because of the important role of neutrophils in progression of inflammation, the influence of urolithins on their pro-inflammatory functions was tested. Urolithin B at a concentration of 20 µM showed significant inhibition of interleukin 8 and extracellular matrix-degrading enzyme MMP-9 production. It was also significantly active in prevention of cytochalasin A/formyl-met-leu-phenylalanine-triggered selectin CD62L shedding. Urolithin C was the only active compound towards inhibition of elastase release from cytochalasin A/formyl-met-leu-phenylalanine-stimulated neutrophils with 39.0 ± 15.9% inhibition at a concentration of 5 µM. Myeloperoxidase release was inhibited by urolithins A and C (at 20 µM by 46.7 ± 16.1 and 63.8 ± 8.6%, respectively). Urolithin A was the most potent reactive oxygen species release inhibitor both in formyl-met-leu-phenylalanine and 4β-phorbol-12β-myristate-R13-acetate-stimulated neutrophils. At the concentration of 1 µM, it caused reactive oxygen species level decrease by 42.6 ± 26.6 and 53.7 ± 16.0%, respectively. Urolithins can specifically modulate inflammatory functions of neutrophils, and thus could contribute to the beneficial health effects of ellagitannin-rich medicinal plant materials and food products.

  3. Heterogeneity in Neutrophil Microparticles Reveals Distinct Proteome and Functional Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Dalli, Jesmond; Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; Norling, Lucy V; Yin, Xiaoke; Hinds, Charles; Haskard, Dorian; Mayr, Manuel; Perretti, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Altered plasma neutrophil microparticle levels have recently been implicated in a number of vascular and inflammatory diseases, yet our understanding of their actions is very limited. Herein, we investigate the proteome of neutrophil microparticles in order to shed light on their biological actions. Stimulation of human neutrophils, either in suspension or adherent to an endothelial monolayer, led to the production of microparticles containing >400 distinct proteins with only 223 being shared by the two subsets. For instance, postadherent microparticles were enriched in alpha-2 macroglobulin and ceruloplasmin, whereas microparticles produced by neutrophils in suspension were abundant in heat shock 70 kDa protein 1. Annexin A1 and lactotransferrin were expressed in both microparticle subsets. We next determined relative abundance of these proteins in three types of human microparticle samples: healthy volunteer plasma, plasma of septic patients and skin blister exudates finding that these proteins were differentially expressed on neutrophil microparticles from these samples reflecting in part the expression profiles we found in vitro. Functional assessment of the neutrophil microparticles subsets demonstrated that in response to direct stimulation neutrophil microparticles produced reactive oxygen species and leukotriene B4 as well as locomoted toward a chemotactic gradient. Finally, we investigated the actions of the two neutrophil microparticles subsets described herein on target cell responses. Microarray analysis with human primary endothelial cells incubated with either microparticle subset revealed a discrete modulation of endothelial cell gene expression profile. These findings demonstrate that neutrophil microparticles are heterogenous and can deliver packaged information propagating the activation status of the parent cell, potentially exerting novel and fundamental roles both under homeostatic and disease conditions. PMID:23660474

  4. Neutrophil adhesion and chemotaxis depend on substrate mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannat, Risat A.; Robbins, Gregory P.; Ricart, Brendon G.; Dembo, Micah; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2010-05-01

    Neutrophil adhesion to the vasculature and chemotaxis within tissues play critical roles in the inflammatory response to injury and pathogens. Unregulated neutrophil activity has been implicated in the progression of numerous chronic and acute diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, asthma and sepsis. Cell migration of anchorage-dependent cells is known to depend on both chemical and mechanical interactions. Although neutrophil responses to chemical cues have been well characterized, little is known about the effect of underlying tissue mechanics on neutrophil adhesion and migration. To address this question, we quantified neutrophil migration and traction stresses on compliant hydrogel substrates with varying elasticity in a micromachined gradient chamber in which we could apply either a uniform concentration or a precise gradient of the bacterial chemoattractant fMLP. Neutrophils spread more extensively on substrates of greater stiffness. In addition, increasing the stiffness of the substrate leads to a significant increase in the chemotactic index for each fMLP gradient tested. As the substrate becomes stiffer, neutrophils generate higher traction forces without significant changes in cell speed. These forces are often displayed in pairs and focused in the uropod. Increases in the mean fMLP concentration beyond the KD of the receptor lead to a decrease in chemotactic index on all surfaces. Blocking with an antibody against β2-integrins leads to a significant reduction, but not an elimination, of directed motility on stiff materials, but no change in motility on soft materials, suggesting neutrophils can display both integrin-dependent and integrin-independent motility. These findings are critical for understanding how neutrophil migration may change in different mechanical environments in vivo and can be used to guide the design of migration inhibitors that more efficiently target inflammation.

  5. Neutrophil adhesion and chemotaxis depend on substrate mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Jannat, Risat A.; Dembo, Micah; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophil adhesion to the vasculature and chemotaxis within tissues play critical roles in the inflammatory response to injury and pathogens. Unregulated neutrophil activity has been implicated in the progression of numerous chronic and acute diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, and sepsis. Cell migration of anchorage-dependent cells is known to depend on both chemical and mechanical interactions. Although neutrophil responses to chemical cues have been well characterized, little is known about the effect of underlying tissue mechanics on neutrophil adhesion and migration. To address this question, we quantified neutrophil migration and traction stresses on compliant hydrogel substrates with varying elasticity in a micro-machined gradient chamber in which we could apply either a uniform concentration or a precise gradient of the bacterial chemoattractant fMLP. Neutrophils spread more extensively on substrates of greater stiffness. In addition, increasing the stiffness of the substrate leads to a significant increase in the chemotactic index for each fMLP gradient tested. As the substrate becomes stiffer, neutrophils generate higher traction forces without significant changes in cell speed. These forces are often displayed in pairs and focused in the uropod. Increases in the mean fMLP concentration beyond the KD of the receptor lead to a decrease in chemotactic index on all surfaces. Blocking with an antibody against β2-integrins leads to a significant reduction but not an elimination of directed motility on stiff materials, but no change in motility on soft materials, suggesting neutrophils can display both integrin-dependent and integrin-independent motility. These findings are critical for understanding how neutrophil migration may change in different mechanical environments in vivo and can be used to guide the design of migration inhibitors that more efficiently target inflammation. PMID:20473350

  6. Neutrophil localization in acute and chronic experimental abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, D.M.; Bettin, K.M.; Gerding, D.N.

    1987-04-01

    Abdominal abscesses are associated with a high mortality, and usually require surgical drainage for cure. A potential mechanism explaining the inability of the host to clear this infection may be in part a result of the inability of the neutrophil to localize at the site of an established infection. To study this question, either acute (4 hours old) or chronic (2 weeks old) abscesses caused by Staphylococcus aureus were created in perforated capsules implanted in the peritoneal cavity of rabbits. Homologous neutrophils were obtained from donor rabbits 4 hours after peritoneal glycogen stimulation and labeled with indium 111 oxine. Only 0.71% of injected /sup 111/In-labeled neutrophils localized in the chronic abscesses, compared with 1.77% in acute abscesses (P less than or equal to 0.01). Animals with chronic infections had a lower intravascular recovery of injected neutrophils (P less than 0.002). Failure of neutrophil localization was not associated with less chemotactic activity within the abscess, as measured by a chemotaxis-under-agarose assay, or caused by a barrier surrounding the abscess as detected by radionuclide imaging. Only 0.07% of injected neutrophils localized into acute abdominal abscesses in animals with a concomitant chronic subcutaneous abscess. These chronically infected animals also demonstrated a low peak intravascular recovery of injected neutrophils when compared with animals with only an acute infection (P less than 0.002). These data reveal that neutrophils localize to abscesses poorly in animals with chronic infections. The mechanism is possibly related to a systemic factor(s) associated with a lower intravascular recovery of injected neutrophils in chronically infected animals.

  7. Neutrophil Integrins and Matrix Ligands and NET Release

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Xian M.; Reichner, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are motile and responsive to tissue injury and infection. As neutrophils emigrate from the bloodstream and migrate toward a site of affliction, they encounter the tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) and thereby engage integrins. Our laboratory studies the neutrophilic response to the fungal pathogen Candida albicans either in the filamentous state of the microbe or to the purified pathogen-associated molecular pattern, β-glucan. We have gained an appreciation for the role of integrins in regulating the neutrophil anti-Candida response and how the presence or absence of ECM can drive experimental outcome. The β2 integrin CR3 (complement receptor 3; αMβ2; Mac-1; CD11b/CD18) plays an important role in fungal recognition by its ability to bind β-glucan at a unique lectin-like domain. The presence of ECM differentially regulates essential neutrophil anti-fungal functions, including chemotaxis, respiratory burst, homotypic aggregation, and the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). We have shown that NET release to C. albicans hyphae or immobilized β-glucan occurs rapidly and without the requirement for respiratory burst on ECM. This is in contrast to the more frequently reported mechanisms of NETosis to other pathogens without the context of ECM, which occur after a prolonged lag period and require respiratory burst. As expected for an ECM-dependent phenotype, NETosis and other neutrophil functions are dependent on specific integrins. The focus of this review is the role of ECM ligation by neutrophil integrins as it pertains to host defense functions with an emphasis on lessons we have learned studying the anti-Candida response of human neutrophils.

  8. Neutrophil Integrins and Matrix Ligands and NET Release

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Xian M.; Reichner, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are motile and responsive to tissue injury and infection. As neutrophils emigrate from the bloodstream and migrate toward a site of affliction, they encounter the tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) and thereby engage integrins. Our laboratory studies the neutrophilic response to the fungal pathogen Candida albicans either in the filamentous state of the microbe or to the purified pathogen-associated molecular pattern, β-glucan. We have gained an appreciation for the role of integrins in regulating the neutrophil anti-Candida response and how the presence or absence of ECM can drive experimental outcome. The β2 integrin CR3 (complement receptor 3; αMβ2; Mac-1; CD11b/CD18) plays an important role in fungal recognition by its ability to bind β-glucan at a unique lectin-like domain. The presence of ECM differentially regulates essential neutrophil anti-fungal functions, including chemotaxis, respiratory burst, homotypic aggregation, and the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). We have shown that NET release to C. albicans hyphae or immobilized β-glucan occurs rapidly and without the requirement for respiratory burst on ECM. This is in contrast to the more frequently reported mechanisms of NETosis to other pathogens without the context of ECM, which occur after a prolonged lag period and require respiratory burst. As expected for an ECM-dependent phenotype, NETosis and other neutrophil functions are dependent on specific integrins. The focus of this review is the role of ECM ligation by neutrophil integrins as it pertains to host defense functions with an emphasis on lessons we have learned studying the anti-Candida response of human neutrophils. PMID:27698655

  9. Cytokine-induced neutrophil-derived interleukin-8.

    PubMed Central

    Strieter, R. M.; Kasahara, K.; Allen, R. M.; Standiford, T. J.; Rolfe, M. W.; Becker, F. S.; Chensue, S. W.; Kunkel, S. L.

    1992-01-01

    During acute inflammation, the first line of cellular response for host defense is the neutrophil. In addition to the historic role of the neutrophil as a phagocyte, recent studies have identified this cell as an important source of a number of cytokines. In this study, we provide evidence that the neutrophil is a significant source of interleukin-8 (IL-8). Neutrophils freshly isolated from whole blood were not found to constitutively express IL-8 mRNA. In contrast, when these leukocytes were cultured on plastic they were activated, leading to the significant expression of de novo steady-state levels of IL-8 mRNA. In addition, when neutrophils were treated with cycloheximide, there was evidence for "superinduction" of steady-state levels of IL-8 mRNA and inhibition of antigenic IL-8 production. Neutrophils were subsequently stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor-alpha, or interleukin-1-beta and were found to express IL-8 mRNA and antigen in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, neutrophils stimulated with traditional chemotactic/activating factors, such as the split product of the fifth component of complement (C5a), formylmethionyleucylphenylalanine (fMLP), and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) in a dose-dependent manner did not produce significant antigenic IL-8, as compared with unstimulated controls. In contrast, when neutrophils were exposed to either of these neutrophil agonists in the presence of LPS, the production of antigenic IL-8 was significantly elevated, as compared with either of the stimuli alone, suggesting a synergistic response. These data would suggest that the neutrophil can no longer be viewed as only a phagocyte or warehouse for proteolytic enzymes, but is a pivotal effector cell that is able to respond to mediators in its environment and generate cytokines. This latter neutrophil response may be important for either the elicitation of additional neutrophils or to orchestrate the conventional immune response at

  10. Ascorbate and α-tocopherol differentially modulate reactive oxygen species generation by neutrophils in response to FcγR and TLR agonists.

    PubMed

    Chapple, Iain Lc; Matthews, John B; Wright, Helen J; Scott, Ann E; Griffiths, Helen R; Grant, Melissa M

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis, a ubiquitous chronic inflammatory disease, is associated with reduced antioxidant defences and neutrophil hyperactivity in terms of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Its phenotype is thus characterized by oxidative stress. We have determined the effect of antioxidant micronutrients ascorbate and α-tocopherol on neutrophil ROS generation. Peripheral neutrophils from periodontally-healthy individuals (n = 20) were challenged with phorbol myristate acetate, IgG-opsonised Staphylococcus aureus, Fusobacterium nucleatum or PBS in the presence and absence of micronutrients (50 µM). Total and extracellular ROS were measured by luminol and isoluminol chemiluminescence respectively. Total and extracellular unstimulated, baseline ROS generation was unaffected by α-tocopherol, but inhibited by ascorbate and a combination of both micronutrients. Fcγ-receptor (Fcγ-R)-stimulated total or extracellular ROS generation was not affected by the presence of individual micronutrients. However, the combination significantly reduced extracellular FcγR-stimulated ROS release. Neither micronutrient inhibited TLR-stimulated total ROS, but the combination caused inhibition. Ascorbate and the micronutrient combination, but not α-tocopherol, inhibited extracellular ROS release by TLR-stimulated cells. Such micronutrient effects in vivo could be beneficial in reducing collateral tissue damage in chronic inflammatory diseases, such as periodontitis, while retaining immune-mediated neutrophil function. PMID:22914919

  11. Ectocytosis caused by sublytic autologous complement attack on human neutrophils. The sorting of endogenous plasma-membrane proteins and lipids into shed vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, J M; Luzio, J P

    1991-01-01

    During sublytic complement attack on human neutrophils, plasma-membrane vesicles are shed from the cell surface as a cell-protection mechanism. By using surface-iodinated neutrophils it was found that less than 2% of surface label was recovered in shed vesicles under conditions where 40% of complement component C9 was shed. SDS/PAGE of 125I-labelled shed vesicles and plasma membranes showed differences in iodination pattern, demonstrating the sorting of membrane proteins into the shed vesicles. Analysis of 32P-labelled phospholipids after labeling of neutrophils with [32P]Pi before sublytic complement attack showed the presence of phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidyl-ethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol and polyphosphoinositides in shed vesicles. Quantitative analysis using [3H]acetic anhydride-labelling method showed that the molar proportions of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine and sphingomyelin were the same in shed vesicles as in plasma membranes. In contrast, the molar proportions of cholesterol and diacylglycerol relative to sphingomyelin were almost twice those found in plasma membranes. The data demonstrate the existence of protein and lipid sorting mechanisms during the formation of shed vesicles when neutrophils are subject to sublytic complement attack. The term 'ectocytosis' is proposed to describe triggered shedding of right-side-out membrane vesicles from the surface of eukaryotic cells. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1848755

  12. Complement factor H modulates the activation of human neutrophil granulocytes and the generation of neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Andrea E; Sándor, Noémi; Kárpáti, Éva; Józsi, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Factor H (FH) is a major inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement activation in plasma and on certain host surfaces. In addition to being a complement regulator, FH can bind to various cells via specific receptors, including binding to neutrophil granulocytes through complement receptor type 3 (CR3; CD11b/CD18), and modulate their function. The cellular roles of FH are, however, poorly understood. Because neutrophils are important innate immune cells in inflammatory processes and the host defense against pathogens, we aimed at studying the effects of FH on various neutrophil functions, including the generation of extracellular traps. FH co-localized with CD11b on the surface of neutrophils isolated from peripheral blood of healthy individuals, and cell-bound FH retained its cofactor activity and enhanced C3b degradation. Soluble FH supported neutrophil migration and immobilized FH induced cell spreading. In addition, immobilized but not soluble FH enhanced IL-8 release from neutrophils. FH alone did not trigger the cells to produce neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), but NET formation induced by PMA and by fibronectin plus fungal β-glucan were inhibited by immobilized, but not by soluble, FH. Moreover, in parallel with NET formation, immobilized FH also inhibited the production of reactive oxygen species induced by PMA and by fibronectin plus β-glucan. Altogether, these data indicate that FH has multiple regulatory roles on neutrophil functions. While it can support the recruitment of neutrophils, FH may also exert anti-inflammatory effects and influence local inflammatory and antimicrobial reactions, and reduce tissue damage by modulating NET formation. PMID:26938503

  13. Medroxyprogesterone acetate exacerbates glutamate excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Jon; Morales, Alison; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2006-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that progesterone functions as a neuroprotective agent whereas medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA; Provera) does not. Moreover, MPA antagonized the neuroprotective and neurotrophic outcomes induced by 17beta-estradiol (E2). Towards developing effective hormone therapies for protection against neurodegeneration, we sought to determine whether formulation, chemical features or prevention versus treatment mode of exposure affected the outcome of MPA treatment in survival of primary hippocampal neurons. Results of these analyses indicated that both crystalline MPA and a pharmaceutical formulation (Depo-Provera) lacked neuroprotective efficacy, indicating that the effects were not dependent upon MPA formulation. Likewise, MPA in the prevention and treatment paradigms were equally ineffective at promoting neuronal survival, indicating that timing of MPA administration was not a factor. Further, the detrimental effects of MPA were not due to the presence of the acetate group, as medroxyprogesterone was as ineffective as MPA in promoting neuronal survival. Moreover, MPA pretreatment exacerbated neuron death induced by glutamate excitotoxicity as indicated by a 40% increase in neuron death determined by direct live/dead cell count and a commensurate increase in the number of positive cells by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end-labeling. Collectively these results predict that the progestin formulation of hormone therapy will affect the vulnerability of the central nervous system to degenerative insults.

  14. Oxidative burst of neutrophils against melanoma B16-F10.

    PubMed

    Zivkovic, Morana; Poljak-Blazi, Marija; Zarkovic, Kamelija; Mihaljevic, Danijela; Schaur, Rudolf Joerg; Zarkovic, Neven

    2007-02-01

    Intensive oxidative burst was determined by chemiluminescence of peripheral blood neutrophils of mice that were intramuscularly injected with melanoma B16-F10 and/or subcutaneously with Sephadex G-200. The neutrophils from papula developed at the site of Sephadex injection were cytotoxic for the B16-F10 cells in vitro. However, survival of Sephadex injected tumour-bearing mice was lower than of control animals bearing B16-F10, while their tumours grew faster and were less necrotic. Thus, it is likely that injection of Sephadex distracted the neutrophils from the tumour allowing faster progression of the tumour, indicating that neutrophils may have an important role in the host defence against malignant cells in the early stage of tumour development.

  15. Alterations of neutrophil functions in foundry and pottery workers.

    PubMed

    Başaran, N; Undeğer, U; Shubair, M

    2002-11-01

    To assess the immune competence of workers occupationally exposed to mainly silica, neutrophil functions such as the chemotactic and oxidative burst activity in foundry and pottery workers were evaluated. The chemotactic activity was examined in 22 foundry and 10 pottery workers and oxidative burst activity of neutrophils were determined in 22 foundry and 6 pottery workers. Healthy subjects of comparable age, sex, and smoking habits and with no history of silica exposure were used as the control groups. Chemotaxis was carried out in Boyden chambers using Zymosan activated serum as chemotactic stimulus. Oxidative burst activity was measured using nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) dye reduction test. Both neutrophil functions were significantly reduced in silica-exposed foundry and pottery workers (p < 0.001) compared to controls suggesting that human chronic exposure mainly to silica and other chemicals originated from foundry and pottery settings may diminish neutrophil functions in humans. PMID:12510795

  16. [The phagocytosis of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes in progressive periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Konopka, T; Zietek, M

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this paper was the evaluation of the phagocytic activity of neutrophils in blood and in gingival pocket fluid in patients suffering from rapidly progressive periodontitis (RPP) and postjuvenile periodontitis (PJP). Prior to periodontal treatment the authors evaluated the capacity to phagocytose latex particles of peripheral blood neutrophils from 21 patients with RPP, 51 with PJP and 59 healthy subjects (control group) as well as the phagocytic activity of neutrophils in pocket fluid from 21 patients with RPP, 14 with PJP and from 20 healthy subjects. This phagocytic activity was significantly lower in all examined groups in comparison with the control group. A similar evaluation executed 3 months after treatment revealed normal phagocytosis of blood neutrophils from patients with RPP. In patients receiving complementary pharmacotherapy (spiramycine combined with metronidazol), a better improvement of phagocytosis was noted, than that observed in patients treated only surgically. PMID:7481699

  17. Neutrophils scan for activated platelets to initiate inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sreeramkumar, Vinatha; Adrover, José M.; Ballesteros, Ivan; Cuartero, Maria Isabel; Rossaint, Jan; Bilbao, Izaskun; Nácher, Maria; Pitaval, Christophe; Radovanovic, Irena; Fukui, Yoshinori; McEver, Rodger P.; Filippi, Marie-Dominique; Lizasoain, Ignacio; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Zarbock, Alexander; Moro, María A.; Hidalgo, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Immune and inflammatory responses require leukocytes to migrate within and through the vasculature, a process that is facilitated by their capacity to switch to a polarized morphology with asymmetric distribution of receptors. We report that neutrophil polarization within activated venules served to organize a protruding domain that engaged activated platelets present in the bloodstream. The selectin ligand PSGL-1 transduced signals emanating from these interactions, resulting in redistribution of receptors that drive neutrophil migration. Consequently, neutrophils unable to polarize or to transduce signals through PSGL-1 displayed aberrant crawling, and blockade of this domain protected mice against thrombo-inflammatory injury. These results reveal that recruited neutrophils scan for activated platelets, and suggest that their bipolarity allows integration of signals present at both the endothelium and the circulation before inflammation proceeds. PMID:25477463

  18. Fatty acids as modulators of neutrophil recruitment, function and survival.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Hosana G; Takeo Sato, Fabio; Curi, Rui; Vinolo, Marco A R

    2016-08-15

    Neutrophils are well-known to act in the destruction of invading microorganisms. They have also been implicated in the activation of other immune cells including B- and T-lymphocytes and in the resolution of inflammation and tissue regeneration. Neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow and released into the circulation from where they migrate to tissues to perform their effector functions. Neutrophils are in constant contact with fatty acids that can modulate their function, activation and fate (survival or cell death) through different mechanisms. In this review, the effects of fatty acids pertaining to five classes, namely, long-chain saturated fatty acids (LCSFAs), short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), and omega-3 (n-3), omega-6 (n-6) and omega-9 (n-9) unsaturated fatty acids, on neutrophils and the relevance of these effects for disease development are discussed.

  19. Immunomodulatory activity of plant residues on ovine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Farinacci, Maura; Colitti, Monica; Sgorlon, Sandy; Stefanon, Bruno

    2008-11-15

    Neutrophils play an essential role in host defense and inflammation. Plants have long been used to improve the immune function, but for most of them specific investigations on animal health are lacking. In the present study, water and hydroethanolic extracts from 11 plant wastes have been screened on immune responses of ovine neutrophils. Eight sheep clinically healthy, not lactating, non-pregnant were selected and used for the experiment. Freshly isolated neutrophils were incubated with the extracts of the residues at increasing doses, and then they were tested for adhesion and superoxide production induced with PMA. The residues of Larix decidua, Thymus vulgaris, Salix alba, Sinupret, Helianthus annuus, Mangifera indica modulated the neutrophil immune functions, moreover, Larix decidua, Thymus vulgaris and Salix alba presented the highest anti-inflammatory activity.

  20. Alterations of neutrophil functions in foundry and pottery workers.

    PubMed

    Başaran, N; Undeğer, U; Shubair, M

    2002-11-01

    To assess the immune competence of workers occupationally exposed to mainly silica, neutrophil functions such as the chemotactic and oxidative burst activity in foundry and pottery workers were evaluated. The chemotactic activity was examined in 22 foundry and 10 pottery workers and oxidative burst activity of neutrophils were determined in 22 foundry and 6 pottery workers. Healthy subjects of comparable age, sex, and smoking habits and with no history of silica exposure were used as the control groups. Chemotaxis was carried out in Boyden chambers using Zymosan activated serum as chemotactic stimulus. Oxidative burst activity was measured using nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) dye reduction test. Both neutrophil functions were significantly reduced in silica-exposed foundry and pottery workers (p < 0.001) compared to controls suggesting that human chronic exposure mainly to silica and other chemicals originated from foundry and pottery settings may diminish neutrophil functions in humans.

  1. [The phagocytosis of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes in progressive periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Konopka, T; Zietek, M

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this paper was the evaluation of the phagocytic activity of neutrophils in blood and in gingival pocket fluid in patients suffering from rapidly progressive periodontitis (RPP) and postjuvenile periodontitis (PJP). Prior to periodontal treatment the authors evaluated the capacity to phagocytose latex particles of peripheral blood neutrophils from 21 patients with RPP, 51 with PJP and 59 healthy subjects (control group) as well as the phagocytic activity of neutrophils in pocket fluid from 21 patients with RPP, 14 with PJP and from 20 healthy subjects. This phagocytic activity was significantly lower in all examined groups in comparison with the control group. A similar evaluation executed 3 months after treatment revealed normal phagocytosis of blood neutrophils from patients with RPP. In patients receiving complementary pharmacotherapy (spiramycine combined with metronidazol), a better improvement of phagocytosis was noted, than that observed in patients treated only surgically.

  2. Relationships between lifestyle factors and neutrophil functions in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Kazumasa; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Machida, Kazuhiko; Saiki, Chinatsu; Murayama, Rumiko; Sugita, Minoru

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the relationships between neutrophil functions and lifestyle factors in the elderly. The subjects (84 males, 73.9+/-5.8 years old; and 63 females, 70.0+/-4.6 years old) belonged to a recreational seniors club in Japan. Investigations of the subjects' stress, exercise habits, smoking habits, and alcohol-drinking habits were performed. The phagocytosis and superoxide productivity of the neutrophils were measured with a nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction test. In addition, leukocyte counts and serum total protein (TP) levels were determined. The results revealed that aging, high serum levels, and stress-coping factors (e.g., having hobbies, keeping pets, and close links with friends or family) significantly correlated with preferable neutrophil functions. In addition, significant effects of lifestyle factors on the balance between phagocytosis and subsequent superoxide production were observed. Thus, the results of the present study suggest that there are correlations between neutrophil functions and lifestyle factors in the elderly. PMID:12357457

  3. On the maturation rate of the neutrophil.

    PubMed

    Zajicek, G; Shohat, M; Polliack, A

    1984-05-01

    Fifty-three maturing bone marrow cells of the granulocyte cell series stained with Giemsa stain and magnified 1,000 times were scanned by a "computerized microscope" consisting of a LSI-11/23 microprocessor and a black-and-white video camera attached to a "frame grabber ." Each sampled cell was digitized into 70 X 70 pixels, each pixel representing 0.04 micron of the real image. The pixel gray values ranged between 0 and 255. Zero stood for white, 255 represented black, while the numbers in between stood for the various shades of gray. The cells represented six different stages of granulocytic maturation: myeloblast, promyelocyte, myelocyte, metamyelocyte , band form, and polymorphonuclear granulocyte. A discriminant analysis program selected 19 features best distinguishing between the six different cell types and computed five canonical discriminant functions defining a Space in which maturation was studied. In the Space, distance between two cells serves as a measure of similarity. The closer two cells are, the more similar they are and vice versa. This measure was applied here to express the degree of similarity between the neutrophil maturation classes, and since they represent states in the neutrophil life history, it is applicable also as a yardstick for the quantitation of differentiation. In the Space, the life history of a cell is represented by a trajectory originating in the myeloblast and terminating in the granulocyte state. Displacement along the trajectory represents cell maturation that is expressed relatively to the least differentiated state of the myeloblast. The further a cell from this state the more mature it is. The same yardstick also serves for differentiation rate estimates represented in the Space by displacement velocities that are derived from the known "transit times" of a cell in each state. The methodology is also applied for cell production estimates. Unlike other "computerized microscopes" serving for cell classification, the

  4. Evaluation of Genome-Wide Expression Profiles of Blood and Sputum Neutrophils in Cystic Fibrosis Patients Before and After Antibiotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Conese, Massimo; Castellani, Stefano; Lepore, Silvia; Palumbo, Orazio; Manca, Antonio; Santostasi, Teresa; Polizzi, Angela Maria; Copetti, Massimiliano; Di Gioia, Sante; Casavola, Valeria; Guerra, Lorenzo; Diana, Anna; Montemurro, Pasqualina; Mariggiò, Maria Addolorata; Gallo, Crescenzio; Maffione, Angela Bruna; Carella, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    In seeking more specific biomarkers of the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung inflammatory disease that would be sensitive to antibiotic therapy, we sought to evaluate the gene expression profiles of neutrophils in CF patients before treatment in comparison with non-CF healthy individuals and after antibiotic treatment. Genes involved in neutrophil-mediated inflammation, i.e. chemotaxis, respiratory burst, apoptosis, and granule exocytosis, were the targets of this study. Microarray analysis was carried out in blood and airway neutrophils from CF patients and in control subjects. A fold change (log) threshold of 1.4 and a cut-off of p<0.05 were utilized to identify significant genes. Community networks and principal component analysis were used to distinguish the groups of controls, pre- and post-therapy patients. Control subjects and CF patients before therapy were readily separated, whereas a clear distinction between patients before and after antibiotic therapy was not possible. Blood neutrophils before therapy presented 269 genes down-regulated and 56 up-regulated as compared with control subjects. Comparison between the same patients before and after therapy showed instead 44 genes down-regulated and 72 up-regulated. Three genes appeared to be sensitive to therapy and returned to “healthy” condition: phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein 1 (PMAIP1), hydrogen voltage-gated channel 1 (HVCN1), and β-arrestin 1 (ARRB1). The up-regulation of these genes after therapy were confirmed by real time PCR. In airway neutrophils, 1029 genes were differentially expressed post- vs pre-therapy. Of these, 30 genes were up-regulated and 75 down-regulated following antibiotic treatment. However, biological plausibility determined that only down-regulated genes belonged to the gene classes studied for blood neutrophils. Finally, it was observed that commonly expressed genes showed a greater variability in airway neutrophils than that found in blood neutrophils, both before

  5. Disentangling the effects of tocilizumab on neutrophil survival and function.

    PubMed

    Gaber, Timo; Hahne, Martin; Strehl, Cindy; Hoff, Paula; Dörffel, Yvonne; Feist, Eugen; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Buttgereit, Frank

    2016-06-01

    The synovial tissue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) represents a hypoxic environment with up-regulated pro-inflammatory cytokines and cellular infiltrates including neutrophils. Although inhibition of the interleukin (IL)6 receptor pathway by tocilizumab is a potent treatment option for RA, it may also cause adverse effects such as an occasionally high-grade neutropenia. We analysed the impact of tocilizumab on survival, mediator secretion, oxidative burst, phagocytosis and energy availability of high-dose toll-like receptor (TLR)2/4-stimulated neutrophils (to mimic an arthritis flare) under normoxic versus hypoxic conditions. Human neutrophils were purified, pre-treated with varying doses of tocilizumab, dexamethasone or human IgG1 and high-dose-stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) alone-triggering TLR2/4-, LPS plus IL6, or left unstimulated. Cells were then incubated under normoxic (18 % O2) or hypoxic (1 % O2) conditions and subsequently analysed. Neutrophil survival and energy availability were significantly decreased by tocilizumab in a dose-dependent manner in high-dose TLR2/4-stimulated cells, but to a greater extent under normoxia as compared to hypoxia. We also found high-dose LPS-stimulated oxidative burst and phagocytosis of neutrophils to be higher under hypoxic versus normoxic conditions, but this difference was reduced by tocilizumab. Finally, we observed that tocilizumab affected neutrophil mediator secretion as a function of oxygen availability. Tocilizumab is known for both beneficial effects and a higher incidence of neutropenia when treating RA patients. Our results suggest that both effects can at least in part be explained by a reduction in neutrophil survival, a dose-dependent inhibition of hypoxia-induced NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative burst and phagocytosis of infiltrating hypoxic neutrophils and an alteration of mediator secretion.

  6. [MORPHOLOGICAL FEATURES OF NEUTROPHILS AND EOSINOPHILS GRANULES IN SAPPHIRE MINKS].

    PubMed

    Uzenbaeva, L B; Kizhina, A G; Ilyukha, V A

    2015-01-01

    It has been established that sapphire minks have abnormality of subcellular structure of blood and bone marrow neutrophils and eosinophils. The abnormality consists in forming of abnormal "giant" granules. The si- ze and the number of abnormal granules significantly change during maturation of leucocytes in bone marrow. We have found differences between abnormal granules forming in neutrophils and eosinophils that depend on the maturing stage and the cells life cycle duration as well as morphofunctional features of these granulocytes. PMID:26863773

  7. Understanding Palladium Acetate from a User Perspective.

    PubMed

    Carole, William A; Colacot, Thomas J

    2016-06-01

    The behavior of palladium acetate is reviewed with respect to its synthesis, characterization, structure (in both solution and solid state), and activation pathways. In addition, comparisons of catalytic activities between pure palladium acetate and two common byproducts, Pd3 (OAc)5 (NO2 ) and polymeric [Pd(OAc)2 ]n , typically present in commercially available material are reviewed. Hence, this minireview serves as a concise guide for the users of palladium acetate from both academia and industry. PMID:27125630

  8. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... sodium sulfate and sodium bicarbonate. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... sodium sulfate and sodium bicarbonate. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... sodium sulfate and sodium bicarbonate. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... sodium sulfate and sodium bicarbonate. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3...

  12. Dynamics of neutrophil rolling over stimulated endothelium in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, D J; el-Sabban, M E; Pauli, B U; Hammer, D A

    1994-01-01

    Prior to extravasation at sites of acute inflammation, neutrophils roll over activated endothelium. Neutrophil rolling is often characterized by the average rolling velocity. An additional dynamic feature of rolling that has been identified but not extensively studied is the fluctuation in the rolling velocity about the average. To analyze this characteristic further, we have measured the instantaneous velocity of bovine neutrophils interacting with lipopolysaccharide-stimulated bovine aortic endothelium at shear stresses of 1, 2, 3, and 4 dynes/cm2. The average velocities are quantitatively similar to those reported for human neutrophils rolling over reconstituted P-selectin at a surface density of 400 sites/microns 2. At all shear stresses tested, the population average variance in the instantaneous velocity is at least 2 orders of magnitude higher than the theoretical variance generated from experimental error, indicating that the neutrophils translate with a nonconstant velocity. Possible sources of the variance are discussed. These include "macroscopic" sources such as topological heterogeneity in the endothelium and microscopic sources, such as inherent stochastic formation and breakage of the receptor-ligand bonds that mediate the rolling. Regardless of the ultimate source of the variance, these results justify the use of mathematical models that incorporate stochastic processes to describe bond formation and breakage between the neutrophil and the endothelium and hence are able to generate variable velocity trajectories. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:7521229

  13. Formylpeptide receptors mediate rapid neutrophil mobilization to accelerate wound healing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingyong; Chen, Keqiang; Yoshimura, Teizo; Liu, Ying; Gong, Wanghua; Le, Yingying; Gao, Ji-Liang; Zhao, Jianhua; Wang, Ji Ming; Wang, Aimin

    2014-01-01

    Wound healing is a multi-phased pathophysiological process requiring chemoattractant receptor-dependent accumulation of myeloid cells in the lesion. Two G protein-coupled formylpeptide receptors Fpr1 and Fpr2 mediate rapid neutrophil infiltration in the liver of Listeria-infected mice by sensing pathogen-derived chemotactic ligands. These receptors also recognize host-derived chemotactic peptides in inflammation and injury. Here we report the capacity of Fprs to promote the healing of sterile skin wound in mice by initiating neutrophil infiltration. We found that in normal miceneutrophils rapidly infiltrated the dermis in the wound before the production of neutrophil-specific chemokines by the injured tissue. In contrast, rapid neutrophil infiltration was markedly reduced with delayed wound closure in mice deficient in both Fprs. In addition, we detected Fpr ligand activity that chemoattracted neutrophils into the wound tissue. Our study thus demonstrates that Fprs are critical for normal healing of the sterile skin wound by mediating the first wave of neutrophil infiltration.

  14. Neutrophil migration into the placenta: Good, bad or deadly?

    PubMed Central

    Giaglis, Stavros; Stoikou, Maria; Grimolizzi, Franco; Subramanian, Bibin Y.; van Breda, Shane V.; Hoesli, Irene; Lapaire, Olav; Hasler, Paul; Than, Nandor Gabor; Hahn, Sinuhe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Almost 2 decades have passed since the discovery that pregnancy is associated with a basal inflammatory state involving neutrophil activation, and that this is more overt in cases with preeclampsia, than in instances with sepsis. This pivotal observation paved the way for our report, made almost a decade ago, describing the first involvement of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in a non-infectious human pathology, namely preeclampsia, where an abundance of these structures were detected directly in the placental intervillous space. Despite these remarkable findings, there remains a paucity of interest among reproductive biologists in further exploring the role or involvement of neutrophils in pregnancy and related pathologies. In this review we attempt to redress this deficit by highlighting novel recent findings including the discovery of a novel neutrophil subset in the decidua, the interaction of placental protein 13 (PP13) and neutrophils in modulating spiral artery modification, as well as the use of animal model systems to elucidate neutrophil function in implantation, gestation and parturition. These model systems have been particularly useful in identifying key components implicated in recurrent fetal loss, preeclampsia or new signaling molecules such as sphingolipids. Finally, the recent discovery that anti-phospolipid antibodies can trigger NETosis, supports our hypothesis that these structures may contribute to placental dysfunction in pertinent cases with recurrent fetal loss. PMID:26933824

  15. Stimulus-dependent secretion of plasma proteins from human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Borregaard, N; Kjeldsen, L; Rygaard, K; Bastholm, L; Nielsen, M H; Sengeløv, H; Bjerrum, O W; Johnsen, A H

    1992-01-01

    In search for matrix proteins released from secretory vesicles of human neutrophils, a prominent 67-kD protein was identified in the extracellular medium of neutrophils stimulated by the chemotactic peptide, FMLP. The protein was purified to apparent homogeneity and partially sequenced. The sequence of the first 32 NH2-terminal amino acids was identical to the sequence of albumin. mRNA for human albumin could not be detected in bone marrow cells, nor could biosynthetic labeling of albumin be demonstrated in bone marrow cells during incubation with [14C]leucine. Immunofluorescence studies on single cells demonstrated the presence of intracellular albumin in fixed permeabilized neutrophils. Light microscopy of immunogold-silver-stained cryosections visualized albumin in cytoplasmic "granules." The morphology of these was determined by immunoelectron microscopy as vesicles of varying form and size. Subcellular fractionation studies on unstimulated neutrophils demonstrated the presence of albumin in the low density pre-gamma and gamma-regions that contain secretory vesicles, but are devoid of specific granules and azurophil granules. Albumin was readily released from these structures during activation of neutrophils with inflammatory mediators. Immunoblotting demonstrated the presence of immunoglobulin and transferrin along with albumin in exocytosed material from stimulated neutrophils. This indicates that secretory vesicles are unique endocytic vesicles that can be triggered to exocytose by inflammatory stimuli. Images PMID:1378856

  16. [Does temperature in extracorporeal circulation affect neutrophil-endothelium interactions?].

    PubMed

    Menasché, P; Peynet, J; Le Deist, F; Carreno, M P; Haeffner-Cavaillon, N; Dillisse, V; Larivière, J; Piwnica, A; Bloch, G; Tedgui, A

    1995-10-01

    The increasing interest in "warm" aerobic cardioplegia requires a critical reevaluation of the systemic effects of the associated normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). As activated neutrophils seem to be essential mediators of the inflammatory response to CPB via the cytotoxicity of the products that are released during their adhesion to endothelial cells, the authors undertook a study of the influence of temperature on the interaction between the neutrophils and the endothelium in 95 patients undergoing warm (31-33.5 degrees C, n = 49) and cold (26-27 degrees C, n = 46) CPB surgery. Blood sampling was performed before, during and after CPB. The following markers of neutrophil-endocardium interaction were analysed: complement activation (C3a), cytokine production (tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukines 1, 6 and 8, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist); endothelial expression of cytokine-dependent [intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)] and cytokine-independent (P-selectin) adhesion molecules (P-selectin); expression of cytokine molecules on the surface of polynuclear neutrophils (CD11a, CD11b, CD11c); and finally, endothelial adhesion and transendothelial migration of neutrophils (interleukin 8 and elastase). The results showed that, irrespective of temperature, CPB was associated with changes strongly suggestive of phenomena of transendothelial adhesion and migration. Moreover, normothermia increased the intensity of the inflammatory response as shown by increased cytokine production, earlier expression of neutrophil adhesion molecules and increased elastase production.

  17. Free p-Cresol Alters Neutrophil Function in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Anelise Maria; Pereira, Priscila Preve; Almeida, Breno Fernando Martins; Narciso, Luis Gustavo; Dos Santos, Diego Borba; Santos-Neto, Álvaro José Dos; Ferreira, Wagner Luis; Ciarlini, Paulo César

    2016-05-01

    To achieve a clearer understanding of the mechanisms responsible for neutrophil dysfunction recently described in dogs with chronic renal failure (CRF), the plasma concentrations of free p-cresol in healthy dogs (n = 20) and those with CRF (n = 20) were compared. The degree of correlation was determined between plasma levels of p-cresol and markers of oxidative stress and function of neutrophils in these dogs. The effect of this compound on oxidative metabolism and apoptosis was assessed in neutrophils isolated from 16 healthy dogs incubated in RPMI 1640 supplemented with p-cresol (0.405 mg/L) and compared with medium supplemented with uremic plasma (50%). To achieve this, the plasma concentration of p-cresol was quantified by liquid phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The neutrophil oxidative metabolism was determined using the probes hydroethidine and 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate and apoptosis was measured using Annexin V-PE by capillary flow cytometry. Compared with the healthy dogs, uremic dogs presented higher concentrations of free p-cresol, greater oxidative stress, and neutrophils primed for accelerated apoptosis. The free p-cresol induced in neutrophils from healthy dogs increased apoptosis and decreased reactive oxygen species production. We conclude that the health status presented during uremia concomitant with the increase in plasma free p-cresol can contribute to the presence of immunosuppression in dogs with CRF. PMID:26496142

  18. Wolbachia endosymbionts induce neutrophil extracellular trap formation in human onchocerciasis

    PubMed Central

    Tamarozzi, Francesca; Turner, Joseph D.; Pionnier, Nicolas; Midgley, Angela; Guimaraes, Ana F.; Johnston, Kelly L.; Edwards, Steven W.; Taylor, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    The endosymbiotic bacteria, Wolbachia, induce neutrophilic responses to the human helminth pathogen Onchocerca volvulus. The formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs), has been implicated in anti-microbial defence, but has not been identified in human helminth infection. Here, we demonstrate NETs formation in human onchocerciasis. Extracellular NETs and neutrophils were visualised around O. volvulus in nodules excised from untreated patients but not in nodules from patients treated with the anti-Wolbachia drug, doxycycline. Whole Wolbachia or microspheres coated with a synthetic Wolbachia lipopeptide (WoLP) of the major nematode Wolbachia TLR2/6 ligand, peptidoglycan associated lipoprotein, induced NETosis in human neutrophils in vitro. TLR6 dependency of Wolbachia and WoLP NETosis was demonstrated using purified neutrophils from TLR6 deficient mice. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that NETosis occurs during natural human helminth infection and demonstrate a mechanism of NETosis induction via Wolbachia endobacteria and direct ligation of Wolbachia lipoprotein by neutrophil TLR2/6. PMID:27752109

  19. Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV Is a Human and Murine Neutrophil Chemorepellent

    PubMed Central

    Herlihy, Sarah E.; Pilling, Darrell; Maharjan, Anu S.; Gomer, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    In Dictyostelium discoideum, AprA is a secreted protein that inhibits proliferation and causes chemorepulsion of Dictyostelium cells, yet AprA has little sequence similarity to any human proteins. We found that a predicted structure of AprA has similarity to human dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV). DPPIV is a serine protease present in extracellular fluids that cleaves peptides with a proline or alanine in the second position. In Insall chambers, DPPIV gradients below, similar to, and above the human serum DPPIV concentration cause movement of human neutrophils away from the higher concentration of DPPIV. A 1% DPPIV concentration difference between the front and back of the cell is sufficient to cause chemorepulsion. Neutrophil speed and viability are unaffected by DPPIV. DPPIV inhibitors block DPPIV-mediated chemorepulsion. In a murine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome, aspirated bleomycin induces a significant increase in the number of neutrophils in the lungs after 3 d. Oropharyngeal aspiration of DPPIV inhibits the bleomycin-induced accumulation of mouse neutrophils. These results indicate that DPPIV functions as a chemorepellent of human and mouse neutrophils, and they suggest new mechanisms to inhibit neutrophil accumulation in acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:23677473

  20. Pathophysiology of neutrophil-mediated extracellular redox reactions.

    PubMed

    Jaganjac, Morana; Cipak, Ana; Schaur, Rudolf Joerg; Zarkovic, Neven

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil granulocyte leukocytes (neutrophils) play fundamental role in the innate immune response. In the presence of adequate stimuli, neutrophils release excessive amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that may induce cell and tissue injury. Oxidative burst of neutrophils acts as a double-edged sword. It may contribute to the pathology of atherosclerosis and brain injury but is also necessary in resolving infections. Moreover, neutrophil-derived ROS may also have both a tumor promoting and tumor suppressing role. ROS have a specific activities and diffusion distance, which is related to their short lifetime. Therefore, the manner in which ROS will act depends on the cells targeted and the intra- and extracellular levels of individual ROS, which can further cause production of reactive aldehydes like 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) that act as a second messengers of ROS. In this review we discuss the influence of neutrophil mediated extracellular redox reactions in ischemia reperfusion injury, transplant rejection and chronic diseases (atherosclerosis, inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer). At the end a brief overview of cellular mechanisms to maintain ROS homeostasis is given.

  1. Genomic modulators of gene expression in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Naranbhai, Vivek; Fairfax, Benjamin P.; Makino, Seiko; Humburg, Peter; Wong, Daniel; Ng, Esther; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Knight, Julian C.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils form the most abundant leukocyte subset and are central to many disease processes. Technical challenges in transcriptomic profiling have prohibited genomic approaches to date. Here we map expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) in peripheral blood CD16+ neutrophils from 101 healthy European adults. We identify cis-eQTL for 3281 neutrophil-expressed genes including many implicated in neutrophil function, with 450 of these not previously observed in myeloid or lymphoid cells. Paired comparison with monocyte eQTL demonstrates nuanced conditioning of genetic regulation of gene expression by cellular context, which relates to cell-type-specific DNA methylation and histone modifications. Neutrophil eQTL are markedly enriched for trait-associated variants particularly autoimmune, allergy and infectious disease. We further demonstrate how eQTL in PADI4 and NOD2 delineate risk variant function in rheumatoid arthritis, leprosy and Crohn's disease. Taken together, these data help advance understanding of the genetics of gene expression, neutrophil biology and immune-related diseases. PMID:26151758

  2. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus inhibits the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Vong, Linda; Lorentz, Robert J; Assa, Amit; Glogauer, Michael; Sherman, Philip M

    2014-02-15

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are an essential component of the antimicrobial repertoire and represent an effective means by which neutrophils capture, contain, and kill microorganisms. However, the uncontrolled or excessive liberation of NETs also damages surrounding cells and can contribute to disease pathophysiology. Alterations in the gut microbiota, as well as the presence of local and systemic markers of inflammation, are strongly associated with the manifestation of a spectrum of intestinal disorders, including chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Although probiotics exert beneficial effects on gut homeostasis, their direct effect on neutrophils, which are abundant in the setting of intestinal inflammation, remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of nonpathogenic, enteropathogenic, and probiotic bacteria on the dynamics of NET formation. Using murine bone marrow-derived neutrophils and the neutrophil-differentiated human myeloid cell line d.HL-60, we demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG inhibits both PMA- and Staphylococcus aureus-induced formation of NETs. Moreover, probiotic L. rhamnosus strain GG had potent antioxidative activity: dampening reactive oxygen species production and phagocytic capacity of the neutrophils while protecting against cell cytotoxicity. Within the milieu of the gut, this represents a novel mechanism by which probiotics can locally dampen innate immune responses and confer desensitization toward luminal Ags.

  3. Influence of suspension on the oxidative burst by rat neutrophils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. S.; Koebel, D. A.; Davis, S. A.; Klein, J. B.; McLeish, K. R.; Goldwater, D.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of spaceflight on the oxidative burst of neutrophils is not known. The present study was designed to evaluate the influence of antiorthostatic suspension, a ground-based modeling system designed to simulate certain aspects of weightlessness that occur after spaceflight, on the capacity of rat neutrophils to express the oxidative burst, an important host defense mechanism against microbial pathogens. Rats were suspended in whole body harnesses in the antiorthostatic orientation for a 3- or 7-day period. Control rats were suspended orthostatically or allowed to remain in vivarium cages without the attachment of any suspension materials. After suspension, peripheral blood was harvested and neutrophils were isolated by density gradient centrifugation. The enriched neutrophil preparations were stimulated with N-formyl-methionyl-leucine-phenylalanine and phorbol myristic acid to induce the oxidative burst. It was found that neutrophils isolated from suspended animals released the same levels of superoxide anion as did vivarium control animals that were not suspended, indicating that whole body suspension did not alter this aspect of rat neutrophil function.

  4. Lectin KM+-induced neutrophil haptotaxis involves binding to laminin.

    PubMed

    Ganiko, Luciane; Martins, Antônio R; Freymüller, Edna; Mortara, Renato A; Roque-Barreira, Maria-Cristina

    2005-01-18

    The lectin KM+ from Artocarpus integrifolia, also known as artocarpin, induces neutrophil migration by haptotaxis. The interactions of KM+ with both the extracellular matrix (ECM) and neutrophils depend on the lectin ability to recognize mannose-containing glycans. Here, we report the binding of KM+ to laminin and demonstrate that this interaction potentiates the KM+-induced neutrophil migration. Labeling of lung tissue by KM+ located its ligands on the endothelial cells, in the basement membrane, in the alveolus, and in the interstitial connective tissue. Such labeling was inhibited by 400 mM D-mannose, 10 mM Manalpha1-3[Manalpha1-6]Man or 10 microM peroxidase (a glycoprotein-containing mannosyl heptasaccharide). Laminin is a tissue ligand for KM+, since both KM+ and anti-laminin antibodies not only reacted with the same high molecular mass components of a lung extract, but also determined colocalized labeling in basement membranes of the lung tissue. The relevance of the KM+-laminin interaction to the KM+ property of inducing neutrophil migration was evaluated. The inability of low concentrations of soluble KM+ to induce human neutrophil migration was reversed by coating the microchamber filter with laminin. So, the interaction of KM+ with laminin promotes the formation of a substrate-bound KM+ gradient that is able to induce neutrophil haptotaxis.

  5. Positron scattering from vinyl acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, L.; Zecca, A.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Brunger, M. J.

    2014-09-01

    Using a Beer-Lambert attenuation approach, we report measured total cross sections (TCSs) for positron scattering from vinyl acetate (C4H6O2) in the incident positron energy range 0.15-50 eV. In addition, we also report an independent atom model with screening corrected additivity rule computation results for the TCSs, differential and integral elastic cross sections, the positronium formation cross section and inelastic integral cross sections. The energy range of these calculations is 1-1000 eV. While there is a reasonable qualitative correspondence between measurement and calculation for the TCSs, in terms of the energy dependence of those cross sections, the theory was found to be a factor of ˜2 larger in magnitude at the lower energies, even after the measured data were corrected for the forward angle scattering effect.

  6. Abrogation of NF-κB signaling in human neutrophils induces neutrophil survival through sustained p38-MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Langereis, Jeroen D; Raaijmakers, Hanneke A J A; Ulfman, Laurien H; Koenderman, Leo

    2010-10-01

    NF-κB, an important transcription factor in the regulation of cellular inflammation, is one of the prime targets for novel anti-inflammatory therapeutics. Nowadays, anti-inflammatory therapies rely mostly on steroids, which among other effects, inhibit NF-κB activity. However, steroids have only limited efficacy in the treatment on neutrophil-driven diseases, such as COPD. Human neutrophils play an important role in the pathogenesis of COPD, and clearance of these cells by apoptosis is an effective pathway for resolution of inflammation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that modulation of the NF-κB pathway in human neutrophils affects survival. Importantly, the pharmacological NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082 inhibited NF-κB signaling in human neutrophils as expected. However, we found that complete inhibition of NF-κB activity with 10 μM Bay 11-7082 prolonged neutrophil survival significantly, which was not observed with inhibitors for other signaling pathways. Bay 11-7082-induced neutrophil survival was dependent on p38-MAPK kinase activity, as the p38 kinase activity inhibitor SB203580 abrogated this response completely. Bay 11-7082 induced rapid and sustained p38 activation that correlated with inhibited NF-κB signaling and prolonged neutrophil survival. The precise role of NF-κB in regulation of p38-MAPK activation remains to be established. Under these conditions of survival, the stability of Bcl-xL but not Mcl-1 was enhanced. Although inhibition of NF-κB leads to down-regulation of inflammatory genes in many cell types, our results illustrate that interference with basal NF-κB signaling in neutrophils as a drug target should be used with caution.

  7. Extractive fermentation of acetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Busche, R.M.

    1991-12-31

    In this technoeconomic evaluation of the manufacture of acetic acid by fermentation, the use of the bacterium: Acetobacter suboxydans from the old vinegar process was compared with expected performance of the newer Clostridium thermoaceticum bacterium. Both systems were projected to operate as immobilized cells in a continuous, fluidized bed bioreactor, using solvent extraction to recover the product. Acetobacter metabolizes ethanol aerobically to produce acid at 100 g/L in a low pH medium. This ensures that the product is in the form of a concentrated extractable free acid, rather than as an unextractable salt. Unfortunately, yields from glucose by way of the ethanol fermentation are poor, but near the biological limits of the organisms involved. Conversely, C. thermoaceticum is a thermophilic anaerobe that operates at high fermentation rates on glucose at neutral pH to produce acetate salts directly in substantially quantitative yields. However, it is severely inhibited by product, which restricts concentration to a dilute 20 g/L. An improved Acetobacter system operating with recycled cells at 50 g/L appears capable of producing acid at $0.38/lb, as compared with a $0.29/lb price for synthetic acid. However, this system has only a limited margin for process improvement. The present Clostridium system cannot compete, since the required selling price would be $0.42/lb. However, if the organism could be adapted to tolerate higher product concentrations at acid pH, selling price could be reduced to $0.22/lb, or about 80% of the price of synthetic acid.

  8. Passive mechanical behavior of human neutrophils: power-law fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, M A; Frank, R S; Waugh, R E

    1993-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of the neutrophil plays an important role in both the microcirculation and the immune system. Several laboratories in the past have developed mechanical models to describe different aspects of neutrophil deformability. In this study, the passive mechanical properties of normal human neutrophils have been further characterized. The cellular mechanical properties were assessed by single cell micropipette aspiration at fixed aspiration pressures. A numerical simulation was developed to interpret the experiments in terms of cell mechanical properties based on the Newtonian liquid drop model (Yeung and Evans, Biophys. J., 56: 139-149, 1989). The cytoplasmic viscosity was determined as a function of the ratio of the initial cell size to the pipette radius, the cortical tension, aspiration pressure, and the whole cell aspiration time. The cortical tension of passive neutrophils was measured to be about 2.7 x 10(-5) N/m. The apparent viscosity of neutrophil cytoplasm was found to depend on aspiration pressure, and ranged from approximately 500 Pa.s at an aspiration pressure of 98 Pa (1.0 cm H2O) to approximately 50 Pa.s at 882 Pa (9.0 cm H2O) when tested with a 4.0-micron pipette. These data provide the first documentation that the neutrophil cytoplasm exhibits non-Newtonian behavior. To further characterize the non-Newtonian behavior of human neutrophils, a mean shear rate gamma m was estimated based on the numerical simulation. The apparent cytoplasmic viscosity appears to decrease as the mean shear rate increases. The dependence of cytoplasmic viscosity on the mean shear rate can be approximated as a power-law relationship described by mu = mu c(gamma m/gamma c)-b, where mu is the cytoplasmic viscosity, gamma m is the mean shear rate, mu c is the characteristic viscosity at characteristic shear rate gamma c, and b is a material coefficient. When gamma c was set to 1 s-1, the material coefficients for passive neutrophils were determined to be mu c

  9. Metabolism of isoniazid by neutrophil myeloperoxidase leads to isoniazid-NAD(+) adduct formation: A comparison of the reactivity of isoniazid with its known human metabolites.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saifur R; Morgan, Andrew G M; Michail, Karim; Srivastava, Nutan; Whittal, Randy M; Aljuhani, Naif; Siraki, Arno G

    2016-04-15

    The formation of isonicotinyl-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (INH-NAD(+)) via the mycobacterial catalase-peroxidase enzyme, KatG, has been described as the major component of the mode of action of isoniazid (INH). However, there are numerous human peroxidases that may catalyze this reaction. The role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) in INH-NAD(+) adduct formation has never been explored; this is important, as neutrophils are recruited at the site of tuberculosis infection (granuloma) through infected macrophages' cell death signals. In our studies, we showed that neutrophil MPO is capable of INH metabolism using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping and UV-Vis spectroscopy. MPO or activated human neutrophils (by phorbol myristate acetate) catalyzed the oxidation of INH and formed several free radical intermediates; the inclusion of superoxide dismutase revealed a carbon-centered radical which is considered to be the reactive metabolite that binds with NAD(+). Other human metabolites, including N-acetyl-INH, N-acetylhydrazine, and hydrazine did not show formation of carbon-centered radicals, and either produced no detectable free radicals, N-centered free radicals, or superoxide, respectively. A comparison of these free radical products indicated that only the carbon-centered radical from INH is reducing in nature, based on UV-Vis measurement of nitroblue tetrazolium reduction. Furthermore, only INH oxidation by MPO led to a new product (λmax=326nm) in the presence of NAD(+). This adduct was confirmed to be isonicotinyl-NAD(+) using LC-MS analysis where the intact adduct was detected (m/z=769). The findings of this study suggest that neutrophil MPO may also play a role in INH pharmacological activity.

  10. Metabolism of isoniazid by neutrophil myeloperoxidase leads to isoniazid-NAD(+) adduct formation: A comparison of the reactivity of isoniazid with its known human metabolites.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saifur R; Morgan, Andrew G M; Michail, Karim; Srivastava, Nutan; Whittal, Randy M; Aljuhani, Naif; Siraki, Arno G

    2016-04-15

    The formation of isonicotinyl-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (INH-NAD(+)) via the mycobacterial catalase-peroxidase enzyme, KatG, has been described as the major component of the mode of action of isoniazid (INH). However, there are numerous human peroxidases that may catalyze this reaction. The role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) in INH-NAD(+) adduct formation has never been explored; this is important, as neutrophils are recruited at the site of tuberculosis infection (granuloma) through infected macrophages' cell death signals. In our studies, we showed that neutrophil MPO is capable of INH metabolism using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping and UV-Vis spectroscopy. MPO or activated human neutrophils (by phorbol myristate acetate) catalyzed the oxidation of INH and formed several free radical intermediates; the inclusion of superoxide dismutase revealed a carbon-centered radical which is considered to be the reactive metabolite that binds with NAD(+). Other human metabolites, including N-acetyl-INH, N-acetylhydrazine, and hydrazine did not show formation of carbon-centered radicals, and either produced no detectable free radicals, N-centered free radicals, or superoxide, respectively. A comparison of these free radical products indicated that only the carbon-centered radical from INH is reducing in nature, based on UV-Vis measurement of nitroblue tetrazolium reduction. Furthermore, only INH oxidation by MPO led to a new product (λmax=326nm) in the presence of NAD(+). This adduct was confirmed to be isonicotinyl-NAD(+) using LC-MS analysis where the intact adduct was detected (m/z=769). The findings of this study suggest that neutrophil MPO may also play a role in INH pharmacological activity. PMID:26867495

  11. Accelerated Apoptosis of Neutrophils in Familial Mediterranean Fever

    PubMed Central

    Manukyan, Gayane; Aminov, Rustam; Hakobyan, Gagik; Davtyan, Tigran

    2015-01-01

    The causative mutations for familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) are located in the MEFV gene, which encodes pyrin. Pyrin modulates the susceptibility to apoptosis via its PYD domain, but how the mutated versions of pyrin affect apoptotic processes are poorly understood. Spontaneous and induced rates of systemic neutrophil apoptosis as well as the levels of proteins involved in apoptosis were investigated ex vivo in patients with FMF using flow cytometry and RT-qPCR. The freshly collected neutrophils from the patients in FMF remission displayed a significantly larger number of cells spontaneously entering apoptosis compared to control (6.27 ± 2.14 vs. 1.69 ± 0.18%). This elevated ratio was retained after 24 h incubation of neutrophils in the growth medium (32.4 ± 7.41 vs. 7.65 ± 1.32%). Correspondingly, the mRNA level for caspase-3 was also significantly increased under these conditions. In response to the inducing agents, the neutrophils from FMF patients also displayed significantly elevated apoptotic rates compared to control. The elevated rates, however, can be largely explained by the higher basal ratio of apoptotic cells in the former group. Monitoring of several proteins involved in apoptosis has not revealed any conventional mechanisms contributing to the enhanced apoptotic rate of neutrophils in FMF. Although the exact molecular mechanisms of accelerated neutrophil apoptosis in FMF remain unknown, it may provide a protection against excessive inflammation and tissue damage due to a massive infiltration of neutrophils in the acute period of the disease. PMID:26042122

  12. Neutrophil extracellular traps: how to generate and visualize them.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Volker; Laube, Britta; Abu Abed, Ulrike; Goosmann, Christian; Zychlinsky, Arturo

    2010-02-24

    Neutrophil granulocytes are the most abundant group of leukocytes in the peripheral blood. As professional phagocytes, they engulf bacteria and kill them intracellularly when their antimicrobial granules fuse with the phagosome. We found that neutrophils have an additional way of killing microorganisms: upon activation, they release granule proteins and chromatin that together form extracellular fibers that bind pathogens. These novel structures, or Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs), degrade virulence factors and kill bacteria, fungi and parasites. The structural backbone of NETs is DNA, and they are quickly degraded in the presence of DNases. Thus, bacteria expressing DNases are more virulent. Using correlative microscopy combining TEM, SEM, immunofluorescence and live cell imaging techniques, we could show that upon stimulation, the nuclei of neutrophils lose their shape and the eu- and heterochromatin homogenize. Later, the nuclear envelope and the granule membranes disintegrate allowing the mixing of NET components. Finally, the NETs are released as the cell membrane breaks. This cell death program (NETosis) is distinct from apoptosis and necrosis and depends on the generation of Reactive Oxygen Species by NADPH oxidase. Neutrophil extracellular traps are abundant at sites of acute inflammation. NETs appear to be a form of innate immune response that bind microorganisms, prevent them from spreading, and ensure a high local concentration of antimicrobial agents to degrade virulence factors and kill pathogens thus allowing neutrophils to fulfill their antimicrobial function even beyond their life span. There is increasing evidence, however, that NETs are also involved in diseases that range from auto-immune syndromes to infertility. We describe methods to isolate Neutrophil Granulocytes from peripheral human blood and stimulate them to form NETs. Also we include protocols to visualize the NETs in light and electron microscopy.

  13. Manufacturing Ethyl Acetate From Fermentation Ethanol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, Naresh K.; Ingham, John D.

    1991-01-01

    Conceptual process uses dilute product of fermentation instead of concentrated ethanol. Low-concentration ethanol, extracted by vacuum from fermentation tank, and acetic acid constitutes feedstock for catalytic reaction. Product of reaction goes through steps that increases ethyl acetate content to 93 percent by weight. To conserve energy, heat exchangers recycle waste heat to preheat process streams at various points.

  14. Changes in diacylglycerol labeling, cell shape, and protein phosphorylation distinguish triggering from activation of human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Reibman, J.; Korchak, H.M.; Vosshall, L.B.; Haines, K.A.; Rich, A.M.; Weissmann, G.

    1988-05-05

    Upon activation neutrophils release reactive oxygen intermediates such as superoxide anion (O/sub 2//sup -/) which are potent mediators of inflammation. Various agents elicit different responses. In contrast, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA, 1.6 ..mu..M) acting directly via protein kinase C is a potent stimulus for O/sub 2//sup -/. The authors compared the kinetics of appearance of various second messengers with the capacity of these ligands to elicit O/sub 2//sup -/ generation. Kinetic analysis showed a two-phase response to membrane ligands; both an early (greater than or equal to 15 s) and a late (>15 s) increase in (/sup 3/H)- and (/sup 14/C)diacylglycerol (DG) was noted in response to fMLP. In contrast, LTB/sub 4/ elicited only a rapid early increase in DG. The rise in DG evoked by PMA was late. Moreover, comparison of increases in (/sup 3/H)DG versus those of (/sup 14/C)DG at early and late time points suggested that DG was not formed exclusively from the hydrolysis of polyphosphoinositides. Kinetic analysis of protein phosphorylation was compared to the early and late increments of DG labeling. A 47,000 M/sub r/ protein was phosphorylated with kinetics consistent with the production of O/sub 2//sup -/ and DG in response to fMLP and PMA. The temporal pattern of the formation of diacylglycerol and the phosphorylation of proteins describe a dual signal. The data suggest that neutrophils require not only triggering (the rapid generation of a signal) but also activation (the maintenance of a signal) to sustain responses.

  15. Venous levels of shear support neutrophil-platelet adhesion and neutrophil aggregation in blood via P-selectin and beta2-integrin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konstantopoulos, K.; Neelamegham, S.; Burns, A. R.; Hentzen, E.; Kansas, G. S.; Snapp, K. R.; Berg, E. L.; Hellums, J. D.; Smith, C. W.; McIntire, L. V.; Simon, S. I.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After activation, platelets adhere to neutrophils via P-selectin and beta2-integrin. The molecular mechanisms and adhesion events in whole blood exposed to venous levels of hydrodynamic shear in the absence of exogenous activation remain unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: Whole blood was sheared at approximately 100 s(-1). The kinetics of neutrophil-platelet adhesion and neutrophil aggregation were measured in real time by flow cytometry. P-selectin was upregulated to the platelet surface in response to shear and was the primary factor mediating neutrophil-platelet adhesion. The extent of neutrophil aggregation increased linearly with platelet adhesion to neutrophils. Blocking either P-selectin, its glycoprotein ligand PSGL-1, or both simultaneously by preincubation with a monoclonal antibody resulted in equivalent inhibition of neutrophil-platelet adhesion (approximately 30%) and neutrophil aggregation (approximately 70%). The residual amount of neutrophil adhesion was blocked with anti-CD11b/CD18. Treatment of blood with prostacyclin analogue ZK36374, which raises cAMP levels in platelets, blocked P-selectin upregulation and neutrophil aggregation to baseline. Complete abrogation of platelet-neutrophil adhesion required both ZK36374 and anti-CD18. Electron microscopic observations of fixed blood specimens revealed that platelets augmented neutrophil aggregation both by forming bridges between neutrophils and through contact-mediated activation. CONCLUSIONS: The results are consistent with a model in which venous levels of shear support platelet adherence to neutrophils via P-selectin binding PSGL-1. This interaction alone is sufficient to mediate neutrophil aggregation. Abrogation of platelet adhesion and aggregation requires blocking Mac-1 in addition to PSGL-1 or P-selectin. The described mechanisms are likely of key importance in the pathogenesis and progression of thrombotic disorders that are exacerbated by leukocyte-platelet aggregation.

  16. Attachment and ingestion of gonococci human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Dilworth, J A; Hendley, J O; Mandell, G L

    1975-03-01

    Previous studies have indirectly shown that type 1 gonococci are more resistant to phagocytosis by human neutrophils (PMN) than type 3 gonococci. Using phase contrast, fluorescent, and light microscopy, we directly quantitated PMN-gonococcal interaction, with emphasis on separating ingestion from attachment. PMN monolayers were incubated on slides with type 1 or type 3 gonococcal fluorescent antibody (FA). After methanol fixation, the FA-stained gonococci associated with PMN were cointed. Since the live PMN excludes FA, the FA-stained gonococci represent only extracellular gonococci. Methylene blue was then added to the smae slide to stain both ingested and surface attached gonococci. Using these methods, intracellular and extracellular cell-associated gonococci were quantitated under varying conditions. The numbers of methylene blue-stained cell-associated gonococci that were ingested were: with normal serum, 3.7 plus or minus 4.1 per cent for type 1 and 56.2 plus or minus 3.7 percent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001); with heat-inactivated serum, 1.0 plus or minus 3.0 per cent for type 1 and 52.6 plus or minus 3.7 per cent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001); with higher-titer anti-gonococcal antibody serum, 4.8 plus or minus 4.3 percent for type 1 and 64.0 plus or minus 1.6 per cent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001). Thus, most type 3 organisms were ingested, but most type 1 gonococci were bound on the PMN surface.

  17. Attachment and ingestion of gonococci human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Dilworth, J A; Hendley, J O; Mandell, G L

    1975-01-01

    Previous studies have indirectly shown that type 1 gonococci are more resistant to phagocytosis by human neutrophils (PMN) than type 3 gonococci. Using phase contrast, fluorescent, and light microscopy, we directly quantitated PMN-gonococcal interaction, with emphasis on separating ingestion from attachment. PMN monolayers were incubated on slides with type 1 or type 3 gonococcal fluorescent antibody (FA). After methanol fixation, the FA-stained gonococci associated with PMN were cointed. Since the live PMN excludes FA, the FA-stained gonococci represent only extracellular gonococci. Methylene blue was then added to the smae slide to stain both ingested and surface attached gonococci. Using these methods, intracellular and extracellular cell-associated gonococci were quantitated under varying conditions. The numbers of methylene blue-stained cell-associated gonococci that were ingested were: with normal serum, 3.7 plus or minus 4.1 per cent for type 1 and 56.2 plus or minus 3.7 percent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001); with heat-inactivated serum, 1.0 plus or minus 3.0 per cent for type 1 and 52.6 plus or minus 3.7 per cent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001); with higher-titer anti-gonococcal antibody serum, 4.8 plus or minus 4.3 percent for type 1 and 64.0 plus or minus 1.6 per cent for type 3 (P smaller than 0.001). Thus, most type 3 organisms were ingested, but most type 1 gonococci were bound on the PMN surface. Images PMID:46842

  18. CFTR RECRUITMENT TO PHAGOSOMES IN NEUTROPHILS

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yun; Song, Kejing; Painter, Richard G.; Aiken, Martha; Reiser, Jakob; Stanton, Bruce A.; Nauseef, William M.; Wang, Guoshun

    2013-01-01

    Optimal microbicidal activity of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) relies on generation of toxic agents such as hypochlorous acid (HOCl) in phagosomes. HOCl formation requires H2O2 produced by the NADPH oxidase, myeloperoxidase derived from azurophilic granules, and chloride ion. Chloride transport from cytoplasm into phagosomes requires chloride channels which include cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-activated chloride channel. However, the phagosomal targeting of CFTR in PMN has not been defined. Using human peripheral blood PMN, we determined that ~95–99% of LAMP-1 positive mature phagosomes were CFTR-positive, as judged by immunostaining and flow cytometric analysis. To establish a model cell system to evaluate CFTR phagosomal recruitment, we stably expressed EGFP alone, EGFP-wt-CFTR and EGFP-ΔF508-CFTR fusion proteins in promyelocytic PLB-985 cells, respectively. After differentiation into neutrophil-like cells, CFTR presentation to phagosomes was examined. EGFP-wt-CFTR was observed to associate with phagosomes and co-localize with LAMP-1. Flow cytometric analysis of the isolated phagosomes indicated that such a phagosomal targeting was determined by the CFTR portion of the fusion protein. In contrast, significantly less EGFP-ΔF508-CFTR was found in phagosomes, indicating a defective targeting of the molecule to the organelle. Importantly, CFTR corrector compound VRT-325 facilitated the recruitment of ΔF508-CFTR to phagosomes. These data demonstrate the possibility of pharmacologic correction of impaired recruitment of mutant CFTR, thereby providing a potential means to augment chloride supply to the phagosomes of PMN in patients with cystic fibrosis to enhance their microbicidal function. PMID:23486169

  19. Neutrophil function in children with kwashiorkor.

    PubMed

    Schopfer, K; Douglas, S D

    1976-09-01

    Peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) function has been investigated for 46 children with kwashiorkor (without overt infection) in the Ivory Coast, West Africa. In vitro chemotactic response, candidacidal activity, and kinetic studies of metabolism during phagocytosis have been performed. Postphagocytic morphological events were evaluated by electron microscopy. The reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT), measurement of enzyme activities, activity of glycolysis, and hexose monophosphate shunt (HMS) activity were assessed. The extent of iodide incorporation into trichloracetic acid (TCA)-precipitable protein by phagocytizing PMN'S and thyroid hormone degradation were measured. Chemotactic response was reduced at early time intervals (30, 60, and 120 minutes) and reached control values after 180 minutes. Whereas PMN's of controls killed 32.13 +/- 11.10 per cent of Candida albicans after 60 minutes, PMN's from kwashiorkor patients killed 18.55 +/- 7.74 per cent (p less than 0.01). HMS activity for resting PMN's of kwashiorkor children was higher than for controls, and during particle ingestion the extent of stimulation was comparable to controls. Electron microscopic assessment of phagocytic vacuole formation and degranulation showed no difference between PMN's from kwashiorkor and and control subjects. Incorporation of 131 I into TCA-precipitable proteins by phagocytizing PMN's from kwashiorkor children was reduced in compraison to controls, with either viable or heat-killed lactobacilli. No impairment in thyroxine (T4) degradation was observed for PMN's from kwashiorkor cases. PMS's from kwashiorkor patients show toxic granules, Dohle bodies, evidence of high baseline NBT reduction, and glucose decarboxylation. Functional studies indicate impaired kinetics of chemotaxis, diminished candidacidal activity, and reduced iodination. Enzymatic activities of resting cells are normal. Lactate production, HMS activity during phagocytosis, and morphological

  20. Isolation and Characterization of Low- vs. High-Density Neutrophils in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sagiv, Jitka Y; Voels, Sandra; Granot, Zvi

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant of all white blood cells in the human circulation and serve as the first line of defense against microbial infections. Traditionally, neutrophils were viewed as a homogeneous population of myeloid cells. However, in recent years accumulating evidence has suggested that neutrophils are heterogeneous and that distinct neutrophil subsets may play very different roles. Here, we describe the methodology for isolation of high- and low-density neutrophils from the murine and human circulation using a density gradient and antibody based enrichment. We further describe the methodology for functional characterization of these different neutrophil subsets in the context of cancer. PMID:27581022

  1. CXCL5 Drives Neutrophil Recruitment in TH17-Mediated GN

    PubMed Central

    Disteldorf, Erik M.; Krebs, Christian F.; Paust, Hans-Joachim; Turner, Jan-Eric; Nouailles, Geraldine; Tittel, André; Meyer-Schwesinger, Catherine; Stege, Gesa; Brix, Silke; Velden, Joachim; Wiech, Thorsten; Helmchen, Udo; Steinmetz, Oliver M.; Peters, Anett; Bennstein, Sabrina B.; Kaffke, Anna; Llanto, Chrystel; Lira, Sergio A.; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi; Stahl, Rolf A.K.; Kurts, Christian; Kaufmann, Stefan H.E.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil trafficking to sites of inflammation is essential for the defense against bacterial and fungal infections, but also contributes to tissue damage in TH17-mediated autoimmunity. This process is regulated by chemokines, which often show an overlapping expression pattern and function in pathogen- and autoimmune-induced inflammatory reactions. Using a murine model of crescentic GN, we show that the pathogenic TH17/IL-17 immune response induces chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 5 (CXCL5) expression in kidney tubular cells, which recruits destructive neutrophils that contribute to renal tissue injury. By contrast, CXCL5 was dispensable for neutrophil recruitment and effective bacterial clearance in a murine model of acute bacterial pyelonephritis. In line with these findings, CXCL5 expression was highly upregulated in the kidneys of patients with ANCA-associated crescentic GN as opposed to patients with acute bacterial pyelonephritis. Our data therefore identify CXCL5 as a potential therapeutic target for the restriction of pathogenic neutrophil infiltration in TH17-mediated autoimmune diseases while leaving intact the neutrophil function in protective immunity against invading pathogens. PMID:24904089

  2. Entamoeba histolytica induces human neutrophils to form NETs.

    PubMed

    Ventura-Juarez, J; Campos-Esparza, Mr; Pacheco-Yepez, J; López-Blanco, J A; Adabache-Ortíz, A; Silva-Briano, M; Campos-Rodríguez, R

    2016-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica invades the intestine and other organs during the pathogenesis of amoebiasis. In the early stages, the host organism responds with an inflammatory infiltrate composed mostly of neutrophils. It has been reported that these immune cells, activated by E. histolytica, exert a protective role by releasing proteolytic enzymes and generating reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) and antimicrobial peptides. It is now known that neutrophils also produce neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are able to damage and kill pathogens. Studies have shown that intracellular protozoan pathogens, including Toxoplasma gondi, Plasmodium falciparum and Leishmania spp, induce neutrophils to release NETs and are damaged by them. However, the action of this mechanism has not been explored in relation to E. histolytica trophozoites. Through scanning electron, epifluorescence microscopy and viability assays, we show for first time that during in vitro interaction with E. histolytica trophozoites, human neutrophils released NETs that covered amoebas and reduced amoebic viability. These NETs presented histones, myeloperoxidase and decondensed chromatin. The results suggest that NETs participate in the elimination of the parasite. PMID:27138813

  3. Marine Natural Product Inhibitors of Neutrophil-Associated Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Chang, Wen-Yi; Yang, Shun-Chin; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are widely recognized to play an important role in acute inflammatory responses, and recent evidence has expanded their role to modulating chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and microbicidal compounds released from neutrophils that are recruited to the site of inflammation contribute to the pathogenesis of multiple inflammation-associated diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, atherosclerosis, and hepatitis. Marine organisms are a valuable source of bioactive compounds with potential for industrial and pharmaceutical application. Marine natural products that inhibit neutrophil activation could be used as drugs for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Numerous studies investigating marine natural products have reported novel anti-inflammatory agents. Nevertheless, the detailed mechanisms underlying their actions, which could facilitate our understanding of the molecular events occurring in neutrophils, have not been reported in most of the associated research studies. Therefore, in this review, we will present marine products that inhibit neutrophil-associated inflammation. Furthermore, we will be limiting the detailed discussion to agents with well-investigated molecular targets. PMID:27472345

  4. Marine Natural Product Inhibitors of Neutrophil-Associated Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Chang, Wen-Yi; Yang, Shun-Chin; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are widely recognized to play an important role in acute inflammatory responses, and recent evidence has expanded their role to modulating chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and microbicidal compounds released from neutrophils that are recruited to the site of inflammation contribute to the pathogenesis of multiple inflammation-associated diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, atherosclerosis, and hepatitis. Marine organisms are a valuable source of bioactive compounds with potential for industrial and pharmaceutical application. Marine natural products that inhibit neutrophil activation could be used as drugs for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Numerous studies investigating marine natural products have reported novel anti-inflammatory agents. Nevertheless, the detailed mechanisms underlying their actions, which could facilitate our understanding of the molecular events occurring in neutrophils, have not been reported in most of the associated research studies. Therefore, in this review, we will present marine products that inhibit neutrophil-associated inflammation. Furthermore, we will be limiting the detailed discussion to agents with well-investigated molecular targets. PMID:27472345

  5. Neutrophils in the pathogenesis and manifestations of SLE.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Mariana J

    2011-09-27

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease of unclear etiology that affects mostly women of childbearing age. Profound abnormalities in both innate and adaptive immunity triggered by genetic and environmental factors are well documented to play an important part in the pathogenesis of SLE. Nonetheless, the role of neutrophils--the most abundant immune cell type--in the pathology of this disease has been unclear. Over the past decade, compelling evidence has emerged that implicates neutrophils in the initiation and perpetuation of SLE and also in the resultant organ damage frequently observed in patients with this disease. SLE-derived low-density granulocytes (LDGs) induce vascular damage and synthesize increased amounts of type I interferons and, as such, could play a prominent part in the pathogenesis of SLE. Furthermore, increased cell death and enhanced extracellular trap formation observed in SLE-derived neutrophils might have key roles in the induction of autoimmunity and the development of organ damage in patients with SLE. Together, these events could have significant deleterious effects and promote aberrant immune responses in this disease. This Review highlights the role of neutrophils in the pathogenesis of SLE, with a particular focus on the putative deleterious effects of LDGs and neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

  6. Peptide secreted by human alveolar macrophages releases neutrophil granule contents

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, C.K.; Miller, E.J.; Cohen, A.B.

    1987-11-15

    A monoclonal antibody was developed against an 8000-kDa enzyme-releasing peptide (ERP) released from human alveolar macrophages. ERP was isolated on an immunoaffinity column containing the antibody bound to staphylococcal protein A-Sepharose, and by autoradiography. Release of ERP from the macrophages is not changed by plastic adherence, phagocytosis, calcium ionophore, or phorbol esters. The peptide was not antigenically similar to interferon-..gamma.., tumor necrosis factor, or interleukin l..cap alpha.. or 1..beta... The release of constituents from azurophilic and specific granules was the main identified biologic function of ERP. ERP was a more effective secretagogue in the untreated neutrophils and f-met-leu-phe was more effective in the cytochalasin B-treated neutrophils. Absorption of ERP from macrophage-conditioned medium removed a small amount of the chemotactic activity; however, the immunopurified peptide was not chemotactic or chemokinetic for neutrophils, and at high concentrations, it suppressed base line chemokinesis. Treatment of washed macrophages with trypsin released active ERP of approximately the same m.w. of spontaneously secreted ERP. These studies showed that human alveolar macrophages release a peptide which is a secretagogue for human neutrophils under conditions which may be encountered in the lungs during certain disease states. Proteolytic enzymes which are free in the lungs may release the peptide and lead to the secretion of neutrophil enzymes.

  7. Absolute neutrophil values in malignant patients on cytotoxic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Madu, A J; Ibegbulam, O G; Ocheni, S; Madu, K A; Aguwa, E N

    2011-01-01

    A total of eighty patients with various malignancies seen between September 2008 and April 2009 at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH) Ituku Ozalla, Enugu, Nigeria, had their absolute neutrophil counts, done at Days 0 and 12 of the first cycle of their various chemotherapeutic regimens. They were adult patients who had been diagnosed of various malignancies, consisting of Breast cancer 36 (45%), Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma 8 (10%), Hodgkin's lymphoma 13 (16.25%), Colorectal carcinoma 6 (7.5%), Multiple myeloma 7 (8.75%), Cervical carcinoma 1 (1.25%) and other malignancies 9 (11.25%), Manual counting of absolute neutrophil count was done using Turks solution and improved Neubauer counting chamber and Galen 2000 Olympus microscope. The socio demographic data of the patients were assessed from a questionnaire. There were 27 males (33.75%) and 53 females (66.25%). Their ages ranged from 18 - 80 years with a median of 45 years. The mean absolute neutrophil count of the respondents pre-and post chemotherapy was 3.7 +/- 2.1 x 10(9)/L and 2.5 +/- 1.6 x 10(9)/L respectively. There were significant differences in both the absolute neutrophil count (p=0.00) compared to the pre-chemotherapy values. Chemotherapeutic combinations containing cyclophosphamide and Adriamycin were observed to cause significant reduction in absolute neutrophil.

  8. The Neutrophil Btk Signalosome Regulates Integrin Activation during Sterile Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Volmering, Stephanie; Block, Helena; Boras, Mark; Lowell, Clifford A.; Zarbock, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Neutrophils are recruited from the blood to sites of sterile inflammation, where they are involved in wound healing but can also cause tissue damage. During sterile inflammation, necrotic cells release pro-inflammatory molecules including formylated peptides. However, the signaling pathway triggered by formylated peptides to integrin activation and leukocyte recruitment is unknown. By using spinning-disk confocal intravital microscopy, we examined the molecular mechanisms of leukocyte recruitment to sites of focal hepatic necrosis in vivo. We demonstrated that the Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) was required for multiple Mac-1 activation events involved in neutrophil recruitment and functions during sterile inflammation triggered by fMLF. The Src family kinase Hck, Wiskott-Aldrich-syndrome protein, and phospholipase Cγ2 were also involved in this pathway required for fMLF-triggered Mac-1 activation and neutrophil recruitment. Thus, we have identified a neutrophil Btk signalosome that is involved in a signaling pathway triggered by formylated peptides leading to the selective activation of Mac-1 and neutrophil recruitment during sterile inflammation. PMID:26777396

  9. Leukocyte subsets and neutrophil function after short-term spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowe, R. P.; Sams, C. F.; Mehta, S. K.; Kaur, I.; Jones, M. L.; Feeback, D. L.; Pierson, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Changes in leukocyte subpopulations and function after spaceflight have been observed but the mechanisms underlying these changes are not well defined. This study investigated the effects of short-term spaceflight (8-15 days) on circulating leukocyte subsets, stress hormones, immunoglobulin levels, and neutrophil function. At landing, a 1.5-fold increase in neutrophils was observed compared with preflight values; lymphocytes were slightly decreased, whereas the results were variable for monocytes. No significant changes were observed in plasma levels of immunoglobulins, cortisol, or adrenocorticotropic hormone. In contrast, urinary epinephrine, norepinephrine, and cortisol were significantly elevated at landing. Band neutrophils were observed in 9 of 16 astronauts. Neutrophil chemotactic assays showed a 10-fold decrease in the optimal dose response after landing. Neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells was increased both before and after spaceflight. At landing, the expression of MAC-1 was significantly decreased while L-selectin was significantly increased. These functional alterations may be of clinical significance on long-duration space missions.

  10. The role of neutrophils in immune dysfunction during severe inflammation.

    PubMed

    Leliefeld, Pieter H C; Wessels, Catharina M; Leenen, Luke P H; Koenderman, Leo; Pillay, Janesh

    2016-01-01

    Critically ill post-surgical, post-trauma and/or septic patients are characterised by severe inflammation. This immune response consists of both a pro- and an anti-inflammatory component. The pro-inflammatory component contributes to (multiple) organ failure whereas occurrence of immune paralysis predisposes to infections. Strikingly, infectious complications arise in these patients despite the presence of a clear neutrophilia. We propose that dysfunction of neutrophils potentially increases the susceptibility to infections or can result in the inability to clear existing infections. Under homeostatic conditions these effector cells of the innate immune system circulate in a quiescent state and serve as the first line of defence against invading pathogens. In severe inflammation, however, neutrophils are rapidly activated, which affects their functional capacities, such as chemotaxis, phagocytosis, intra-cellular killing, NETosis, and their capacity to modulate adaptive immunity. This review provides an overview of the current understanding of neutrophil dysfunction in severe inflammation. We will discuss the possible mechanisms of downregulation of anti-microbial function, suppression of adaptive immunity by neutrophils and the contribution of neutrophil subsets to immune paralysis. PMID:27005275

  11. Niacin inhibits carrageenan-induced neutrophil migration in mice.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Raphael Gomes; Matsui, Tamires Cardoso; Gomides, Lindisley Ferreira; Godin, Adriana Martins; Menezes, Gustavo Batista; de Matos Coelho, Márcio; Klein, André

    2013-06-01

    Several emerging lines of evidence support an anti-inflammatory role for nicotinic acid (niacin); however, its role in the regulation of leukocyte migration in response to inflammatory stimuli has not been elucidated until now. Herein, we have examined the effect of nicotinic acid on neutrophil recruitment in experimentally induced inflammation. We demonstrated that nicotinic acid treatment inhibited interleukin (IL)-8-induced, leukotriene (LT)B4-induced, and carrageenan-induced neutrophil migration into the pleural cavity of BALB/c mice and reduced neutrophil rolling and adherence in a mouse cremaster muscle preparation. Surprisingly, nicotinic acid treatment increased the level of the neutrophil chemoattractant KC in response to carrageenan. These results suggest that nicotinic acid plays an important role in the regulation of inflammation due to its ability to inhibit the actions of the neutrophil chemoattractants IL-8 and LTB4. Further inhibition of chemoattractants leads to impairment of leukocyte rolling and adherence to the vascular endothelium in the microcirculation of inflamed tissues.

  12. Azithromycin Enhances Phagocytic Killing of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Y4 by Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Pin-Chuang; Schibler, Mark R.; Walters, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans resists killing by neutrophils and is inhibited by azithromycin (AZM) and amoxicillin (AMX). AZM actively concentrates inside host cells, whereas AMX enters by diffusion. The present study is conducted to determine whether AZM is more effective than AMX at enhancing phagocytic killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans by neutrophils. Methods Killing assays were conducted in the presence of either 2 μg/mL AZM or 16 μg/mL AMX (equipotent against A. actinomycetemcomitans). Neutrophils were loaded by incubation with the appropriate antibiotic. Opsonized A. actinomycetemcomitans strain Y4 was incubated with the indicated antibiotic alone, with loaded neutrophils and antibiotic, or with control neutrophils (without antibiotic) at multiplicities of infection (MOIs) of 30 and 90 bacteria per neutrophil. Results Neutrophil incubation with 2 μg/mL AZM yielded an intracellular concentration of 10 μg/mL. At an MOI of 30, neutrophils loaded with AZM failed to kill significantly more bacteria than control neutrophils during the 60- and 90-minute assay periods. At an MOI of 90, neutrophils loaded with AZM killed significantly more bacteria than either AZM alone or control neutrophils during 60- and 90-minute incubations (P <0.05), and killed significantly more bacteria after 90 minutes than the sum of the killing produced by AZM alone or neutrophils alone. Neutrophils incubated with AMX under identical conditions also killed significantly more bacteria than either AMX alone or control neutrophils, but there was no evidence of synergism between AMX and neutrophils. Conclusions Neutrophils possess a concentrative transport system for AZM that may enhance killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Its effects are most pronounced when neutrophils are greatly outnumbered by bacteria. PMID:25186779

  13. Neutrophil activation in ivermectin-treated onchocerciasis patients.

    PubMed

    Njoo, F L; Hack, C E; Oosting, J; Stilma, J S; Kijlstra, A

    1993-11-01

    Ivermectin is a safe and effective drug for onchocerciasis treatment. In certain individuals, however, therapy is accompanied by adverse reactions. The mechanisms underlying these reactions are not yet known. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether neutrophils are involved in the development of these adverse reactions. Elastase and lactoferrin, two markers for the release of neutrophil azurophilic and specific granule contents respectively, were measured by radioimmunoassays in plasma of onchocerciasis patients with varying degrees of side effects, as well as in control subjects before and 1 and 2 days after ivermectin treatment. A considerable increase of elastase levels after treatment was observed, whereas lactoferrin levels did not change. The percentage of patients with elevated elastase levels was significantly correlated with the degree of side effects. These findings suggest that neutrophil activation may be involved in the development of adverse reactions in these patients.

  14. Externalized decondensed neutrophil chromatin occludes pancreatic ducts and drives pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Leppkes, Moritz; Maueröder, Christian; Hirth, Sebastian; Nowecki, Stefanie; Günther, Claudia; Billmeier, Ulrike; Paulus, Susanne; Biermann, Mona; Munoz, Luis E; Hoffmann, Markus; Wildner, Dane; Croxford, Andrew L; Waisman, Ari; Mowen, Kerri; Jenne, Dieter E; Krenn, Veit; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M; Schett, Georg; Wirtz, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-03-11

    Ductal occlusion has been postulated to precipitate focal pancreatic inflammation, while the nature of the primary occluding agents has remained elusive. Neutrophils make use of histone citrullination by peptidyl arginine deiminase-4 (PADI4) in contact to particulate agents to extrude decondensed chromatin as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In high cellular density, NETs form macroscopically visible aggregates. Here we show that such aggregates form inside pancreatic ducts in humans and mice occluding pancreatic ducts and thereby driving pancreatic inflammation. Experimental models indicate that PADI4 is critical for intraductal aggregate formation and that PADI4-deficiency abrogates disease progression. Mechanistically, we identify the pancreatic juice as a strong instigator of neutrophil chromatin extrusion. Characteristic single components of pancreatic juice, such as bicarbonate ions and calcium carbonate crystals, induce aggregated NET formation. Ductal occlusion by aggregated NETs emerges as a pathomechanism with relevance in a plethora of inflammatory conditions involving secretory ducts.

  15. Externalized decondensed neutrophil chromatin occludes pancreatic ducts and drives pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Leppkes, Moritz; Maueröder, Christian; Hirth, Sebastian; Nowecki, Stefanie; Günther, Claudia; Billmeier, Ulrike; Paulus, Susanne; Biermann, Mona; Munoz, Luis E.; Hoffmann, Markus; Wildner, Dane; Croxford, Andrew L.; Waisman, Ari; Mowen, Kerri; Jenne, Dieter E.; Krenn, Veit; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M.; Schett, Georg; Wirtz, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F.; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Ductal occlusion has been postulated to precipitate focal pancreatic inflammation, while the nature of the primary occluding agents has remained elusive. Neutrophils make use of histone citrullination by peptidyl arginine deiminase-4 (PADI4) in contact to particulate agents to extrude decondensed chromatin as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In high cellular density, NETs form macroscopically visible aggregates. Here we show that such aggregates form inside pancreatic ducts in humans and mice occluding pancreatic ducts and thereby driving pancreatic inflammation. Experimental models indicate that PADI4 is critical for intraductal aggregate formation and that PADI4-deficiency abrogates disease progression. Mechanistically, we identify the pancreatic juice as a strong instigator of neutrophil chromatin extrusion. Characteristic single components of pancreatic juice, such as bicarbonate ions and calcium carbonate crystals, induce aggregated NET formation. Ductal occlusion by aggregated NETs emerges as a pathomechanism with relevance in a plethora of inflammatory conditions involving secretory ducts. PMID:26964500

  16. Interleukin-8: an expanding universe beyond neutrophil chemotaxis and activation.

    PubMed

    Mukaida, N

    2000-12-01

    Since the discovery 13 years ago of interleukin (IL)-8 as a potent neutrophil chemotactic factor, accumulating evidence has established it as a crucial mediator in neutrophil-dependent acute inflammation. Numerous observations have demonstrated that various types of cells can produce a large amount of IL-8, either in response to various stimuli or constitutively, after malignant transformation. Recent studies of IL-8-mediated signaling have revealed that IL-8 activates a wide range of signaling molecules in a coordinate manner. IL-8 has been proven to have diverse actions on various types of leukocytic and nonleukocytic cells besides neutrophils. The author reviews recent progress in IL-8 signal transduction and biological actions on nonneutrophilic leukocytes, including T lymphocytes, monocytes, and hematopoietic progenitor cells. Potential involvement of IL-8 in viral infections and tumor progression is also discussed.

  17. The effects of cloxacillin on staphylococci phagocytosed by bovine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Craven, N; Anderson, J C

    1980-07-01

    The effects of cloxacillin on staphylococci within neutrophils from the peripheral blood of cattle were examined. When cloxacillin was added to a preparation of intracellular staphylococci suspended in nutrient broth at 37 degrees C in the presence of lysostaphin, significantly more staphylococci were killed than in the controls without the antibiotic. Cloxacillin entered the neutrophils and made the intracellular staphylococci sensitive to lysis by lysostaphin when the neutrophils were disrupted. The intracellular action of cloxacillin was greater than when Hanks' balanced salt solution was the suspending fluid or when the broth was incubated at 4 degrees C. Failure to observe the effect in these circumstances was possibly due to a very low rate of metabolism in the staphylococci.

  18. An Elucidation of Neutrophil Functions against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Devin; Nguyen, Thien; Kim, John; Kassissa, Christine; Khurasany, Melissa; Luong, Jennifer; Kasko, Sarah; Pandya, Shalin; Chu, Michael; Chi, Po-Ting; Lagman, Minette; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2013-01-01

    We characterized the functions of neutrophils in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection, with particular reference to glutathione (GSH). We examined the effects of GSH in improving the ability of neutrophils to control intracellular M. tb infection. Our findings indicate that increasing the intracellular levels of GSH with a liposomal formulation of GSH (L-GSH) resulted in reduction in the levels of free radicals and increased acidification of M. tb containing phagosomes leading to the inhibition in the growth of M. tb. This inhibitory mechanism is dependent on the presence of TNF-α and IL-6. Our studies demonstrate a novel regulatory mechanism adapted by the neutrophils to control M. tb infection. PMID:24312131

  19. [Discovery of the neutrophil extracellular traps begins a new stage in the study of neutrophil morphogenesis and function].

    PubMed

    Perova, M D; Shubich, M G

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present review was to analyze the accumulating evidence regarding recently discovered novel defense mechanism of neutrophils - capacity to form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Contact with pathogenic microbes and/or exposure to proinflammatory cytokines trigger the respiratory burst in the neutrophils with a subsequent initiation of a cell death (NETosis) which differs from apoptosis and necrosis. NETs are formed by the fibrils of decondensed chromatin (DNA/ histones), released from the neutrophil, which is closely associated with the antimicrobial proteins of cytoplasmic granules. Due to its three-dimensional structure, NETs are capable of retaining the microorganisms (bacteria, fungi and protozoa), while high local concentration of the antimicrobial substances provides their killing. The review presents the evidence of a potential defensive role of NETs in infectious diseases, traumas and surgical operations, as well as during the early stage of a repair process. Considering the role played by neutrophils in the immune response orientation via pentraxin-3 (PTX3), including the switching to adaptive immunity, it is necessary to study the subsequent interaction of DNA/histone exrtacellular structures with the tissue microenvironment. PMID:21954717

  20. Influence of 4 weeks of bovine colostrum supplementation on neutrophil and mucosal immune responses to prolonged cycling.

    PubMed

    Jones, A W; Thatcher, R; March, D S; Davison, G

    2015-12-01

    Bovine colostrum (COL) has been advocated as a nutritional countermeasure to exercise-induced immune dysfunction. The aims of this study were to identify the effects of 4 weeks of COL supplementation on neutrophil responses and mucosal immunity following prolonged exercise. In a randomized double-blind, parallel group design, participants [age 28 ± 8 years; body mass 79 ± 7 kg; height 182 ± 6 cm; maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max) 55 ± 9 mL/kg/min] were assigned to 20 g per day of COL (n = 10) or an isoenergetic/isomacronutrient placebo (PLA; n = 10) for 4 weeks. Venous blood and unstimulated saliva samples were obtained before and after 2.5 h of cycling at 15% Δ (∼55-60% V̇O2max). A significantly greater formyl-methionyl-leucyl phenylalanine-stimulated oxidative burst was observed in the COL group compared with PLA group (P < 0.05) and a trend toward a time × group interaction (P = 0.06). However, there was no effect of COL on leukocyte trafficking, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-stimulated oxidative burst, bacterial-stimulated neutrophil degranulation, salivary secretory IgA, lactoferrin or lysozyme (P > 0.05). These findings provide further evidence of the beneficial effects of COL on receptor-mediated stimulation of neutrophil oxidative burst in a model of exercise-induced immune dysfunction. PMID:25727914

  1. Nitric Oxide Regulates Neutrophil Migration through Microparticle Formation

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Sarah; Dixon, Rachel; Norman, Keith; Hellewell, Paul; Ridger, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in regulating neutrophil migration has been investigated. Human neutrophil migration to interleukin (IL)-8 (1 nmol/L) was measured after a 1-hour incubation using a 96-well chemotaxis plate assay. The NO synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) significantly (P < 0.001) enhanced IL-8-induced migration by up to 45%. Anti-CD18 significantly (P < 0.001) inhibited both IL-8-induced and L-NAME enhanced migration. Antibodies to L-selectin or PSGL-1 had no effect on IL-8-induced migration but prevented the increased migration to IL-8 induced by L-NAME. L-NAME induced generation of neutrophil-derived microparticles that was significantly (P < 0.01) greater than untreated neutrophils or D-NAME. This microparticle formation was dependent on calpain activity and superoxide production. Only microparticles from L-NAME and not untreated or D-NAME-treated neutrophils induced a significant (P < 0.01) increase in IL-8-induced migration and transendothelial migration. Pretreatment of microparticles with antibodies to L-selectin (DREG-200) or PSGL-1 (PL-1) significantly (P < 0.001) inhibited this effect. The ability of L-NAME-induced microparticles to enhance migration was found to be dependent on the number of microparticles produced and not an increase in microparticle surface L-selectin or PSGL-1 expression. These data show that NO can modulate neutrophil migration by regulating microparticle formation. PMID:18079439

  2. Conversion to eslicarbazepine acetate monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    French, Jacqueline; Jacobson, Mercedes P.; Pazdera, Ladislav; Gough, Mallory; Cheng, Hailong; Grinnell, Todd; Blum, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) monotherapy. Methods: This post hoc pooled analysis of 2 randomized double-blind studies (093-045 and -046) included adults with partial-onset seizures medically uncontrolled by 1 or 2 antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Following the baseline period (8 weeks), eligible patients were randomized 2:1 to receive ESL 1,600 mg or 1,200 mg once daily for 18 weeks; the primary endpoint was study exit by meeting predefined exit criteria (signifying worsening seizure control). In each study, treatment was considered effective if the upper 95% confidence limit for exit rate was lower than the historical control threshold (65.3%). Results: Pooled exit rates were as follows: ESL 1,600 mg = 20.6% (95% confidence interval: 15.6%–26.8%); ESL 1,200 mg = 30.8% (23.0%–40.5%). Use of 2 baseline AEDs or rescue medication, US location, epilepsy duration ≥20 years, and higher maximum baseline seizure frequency were associated with higher exit risks. Median percent reductions in standardized seizure frequency between baseline and the 18-week double-blind period were as follows: ESL 1,600 mg = 43.2%; ESL 1,200 mg = 35.7%; baseline carbamazepine use was associated with smaller reductions. Safety profiles were similar between ESL doses. Conclusions: Exit rates for ESL monotherapy (1,600 mg and 1,200 mg once daily) were lower than the historical control threshold, irrespective of baseline AED use and region, with no additional safety concerns identified. Clinical factors and location clearly influence treatment responses in conversion-to-monotherapy trials. Classification of evidence: This pooled analysis provides Class IV evidence that for adults with medically uncontrolled partial-onset seizures, ESL monotherapy is well tolerated and effective. PMID:26911639

  3. Intravitreal injection of octreotide acetate.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J E; Westra, I; Woltering, E A; Winthrop, K L; Barrie, R; O'Dorisio, T M; Holmes, D

    1997-04-01

    This study was conducted to determine the feasibility of injecting the somatostatin analogue, octreotide acetate (OA), into the vitreous cavity. Previous work suggests that octreotide effectively inhibits angiogenesis in vitro, thus its use in vivo may slow the progression of proliferative eye disease. Fifty micrograms of aqueous OA in 50 microliters aqueous solution was injected into the mid-vitreous of kitten eyes (n = 6), and OA levels were monitored over 4 days. A long-acting release form of octreotide (OA-LAR) was also injected into the mid-vitreous of rabbit eyes at doses of 0.36 (n = 16), 1.1 (n = 1), 2.1 (n = 1), 4.05 (n = 1), 8.2 (n = 1), and 36 mg (n = 3) in solution; and octreotide concentrations were measured at various time points over 42 days. OA concentrations were determined by a highly specific radioimmunoassay. Aqueous octreotide was eliminated rapidly (t1/2 = 16 hours) from the vitreous of the kitten eye, with only negligible amounts recoverable 4 days post-injection. In the long-acting form, OA in the rabbit eye reached peak levels at 28 days. By 42 days, OA levels had declined to the 14-day level. Doses of OA-LAR of 1.1 mg or less produced no gross evidence of clinical toxicity and elicited no grossly visible ocular side effects. Doses greater than 1.1 mg produced significant toxicity, including cataracts and rubeosis. The 28-day peak release for long-acting OA implies that monthly intravitreal injections could provide continual high levels of OA. Intravitreal injection of long-acting OA provides sustained, high concentrations of drug, and deserves further study as a potential treatment of proliferative eye diseases.

  4. Analysis of the mechanisms involved in the stimulation of neutrophil apoptosis by tumour necrosis factor-α

    PubMed Central

    Salamone, Gabriela; Trevani, Analía; Martínez, Diego; Vermeulen, Mónica; Gamberale, Romina; Fernández-Calotti, Paula; Raiden, Silvina; Giordano, Mirta; Geffner, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    We have previously reported that human neutrophils pretreated with tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and then exposed to a variety of agents such as immune complexes, zymosan, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), C5a, fMLP, or granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), undergo a dramatic stimulation of apoptosis, suggesting that TNF-α is able to prime an apoptotic death programme which can be rapidly triggered by different stimuli. We report here that this response involves the participation of Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18), is dependent on caspases 3, 8 and 9, and is associated with both a loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and a down-regulation in expression of the anti-apoptotic protein, Mcl-1. Interestingly, we also found that the anti-apoptotic cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) improves the ability of TNF-α to promote apoptosis, supporting the notion than TNF-α, acting together with IL-1, may favour the depletion of neutrophils from the inflammatory areas during the course of acute inflammation. PMID:15500622

  5. Assessment of antioxidant activity of spray dried extracts of Psidium guajava leaves by DPPH and chemiluminescence inhibition in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, M R V; Azzolini, A E C S; Martinez, M L L; Souza, C R F; Lucisano-Valim, Y M; Oliveira, W P

    2014-01-01

    This work evaluated the physicochemical properties and antioxidant activity of spray dried extracts (SDE) from Psidium guajava L. leaves. Different drying carriers, namely, maltodextrin, colloidal silicon dioxide, Arabic gum, and β -cyclodextrin at concentrations of 40 and 80% relative to solids content, were added to drying composition. SDE were characterized through determination of the total phenolic, tannins, and flavonoid content. Antioxidant potential of the SDE was assessed by two assays: cellular test that measures the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (LumCL) produced by neutrophils stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and the DPPH radical scavenging (DPPH∗ method). In both assays the antioxidant activity of the SDE occurred in a concentration-dependent manner and showed no toxicity to the cells. Using the CLlum method, the IC50 ranged from 5.42 to 6.50 µg/mL. The IC50 of the SDE ranged from 7.96 to 8.11 µg/mL using the DPPH(•) method. Psidium guajava SDE presented significant antioxidant activity; thus they show high potential as an active phytopharmaceutical ingredient. Our findings in human neutrophils are pharmacologically relevant since they indicate that P. guajava SDE is a potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent in human cells. PMID:24822200

  6. Inhibition of neutrophil elastase and metalloprotease-9 of human adenocarcinoma gastric cells by chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) infusion.

    PubMed

    Bulgari, Michela; Sangiovanni, Enrico; Colombo, Elisa; Maschi, Omar; Caruso, Donatella; Bosisio, Enrica; Dell'Agli, Mario

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated whether the antiinflammatory effect of chamomile infusion at gastric level could be ascribed to the inhibition of metalloproteinase-9 and elastase. The infusions from capitula and sifted flowers (250-1500 µg/mL) and individual flavonoids (10 µM) were tested on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-stimulated AGS cells and human neutrophil elastase. The results indicate that the antiinflammatory activity associated with chamomile infusions from both the capitula and sifted flowers is most likely due to the inhibition of neutrophil elastase and gastric metalloproteinase-9 activity and secretion; the inhibition occurring in a concentration dependent manner. The promoter activity was inhibited as well and the decrease of metalloproteinase-9 expression was found to be associated with the inhibition of NF-kB driven transcription. The results further indicate that the flavonoid-7-glycosides, major constituents of chamomile flowers, may be responsible for the antiinflammatory action of the chamomile infusion observed here. PMID:22407864

  7. Assessment of Antioxidant Activity of Spray Dried Extracts of Psidium guajava Leaves by DPPH and Chemiluminescence Inhibition in Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, M. R. V.; Azzolini, A. E. C. S.; Martinez, M. L. L.; Souza, C. R. F.; Lucisano-Valim, Y. M.; Oliveira, W. P.

    2014-01-01

    This work evaluated the physicochemical properties and antioxidant activity of spray dried extracts (SDE) from Psidium guajava L. leaves. Different drying carriers, namely, maltodextrin, colloidal silicon dioxide, Arabic gum, and β-cyclodextrin at concentrations of 40 and 80% relative to solids content, were added to drying composition. SDE were characterized through determination of the total phenolic, tannins, and flavonoid content. Antioxidant potential of the SDE was assessed by two assays: cellular test that measures the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (LumCL) produced by neutrophils stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and the DPPH radical scavenging (DPPH∗ method). In both assays the antioxidant activity of the SDE occurred in a concentration-dependent manner and showed no toxicity to the cells. Using the CLlum method, the IC50 ranged from 5.42 to 6.50 µg/mL. The IC50 of the SDE ranged from 7.96 to 8.11 µg/mL using the DPPH• method. Psidium guajava SDE presented significant antioxidant activity; thus they show high potential as an active phytopharmaceutical ingredient. Our findings in human neutrophils are pharmacologically relevant since they indicate that P. guajava SDE is a potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent in human cells. PMID:24822200

  8. Local rheology of human neutrophils investigated using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong J; Patel, Dipika; Park, Soyeun

    2011-01-01

    During the immune response, neutrophils display localized mechanical events by interacting with their environment through the micro-vascular transit, trans-endothelial, and trans-epithelial migration. Nano-mechanical studies of human neutrophils on localized nano-domains could provide the essential information for understanding their immune responsive functions. Using the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)-based micro-rheology, we have investigated rheological properties of the adherent human neutrophils on local nano-domains. We have applied the modified Hertz model to obtain the viscoelastic moduli from the relatively thick body regions of the neutrophils. In addition, by using more advanced models to account for the substrate effects, we have successfully characterized the rheological properties of the thin leading and tail regions as well. We found a regional difference in the mechanical compliances of the adherent neutrophils. The central regions of neutrophils were significantly stiffer (1,548 ± 871 Pa) than the regions closer to the leading edge (686 ± 801 Pa), while the leading edge and the tail (494 ± 537 Pa) regions were mechanically indistinguishable. The frequency-dependent elastic and viscous moduli also display a similar regional difference. Over the studied frequency range (100 to 300 Hz), the complex viscoelastic moduli display the partial rubber plateau behavior where the elastic moduli are greater than the viscous moduli for a given frequency. The non-disparaging viscous modulus indicates that the neutrophils display a viscoelastic dynamic behavior rather than a perfect elastic behavior like polymer gels. In addition, we found no regional difference in the structural damping coefficient between the leading edge and the cell body. Thus, we conclude that despite the lower loss and storage moduli, the leading edges of the human neutrophils display partially elastic properties similar to the cell body. These results suggest that the lower elastic moduli

  9. Local rheology of human neutrophils investigated using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong J; Patel, Dipika; Park, Soyeun

    2011-01-01

    During the immune response, neutrophils display localized mechanical events by interacting with their environment through the micro-vascular transit, trans-endothelial, and trans-epithelial migration. Nano-mechanical studies of human neutrophils on localized nano-domains could provide the essential information for understanding their immune responsive functions. Using the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)-based micro-rheology, we have investigated rheological properties of the adherent human neutrophils on local nano-domains. We have applied the modified Hertz model to obtain the viscoelastic moduli from the relatively thick body regions of the neutrophils. In addition, by using more advanced models to account for the substrate effects, we have successfully characterized the rheological properties of the thin leading and tail regions as well. We found a regional difference in the mechanical compliances of the adherent neutrophils. The central regions of neutrophils were significantly stiffer (1,548 ± 871 Pa) than the regions closer to the leading edge (686 ± 801 Pa), while the leading edge and the tail (494 ± 537 Pa) regions were mechanically indistinguishable. The frequency-dependent elastic and viscous moduli also display a similar regional difference. Over the studied frequency range (100 to 300 Hz), the complex viscoelastic moduli display the partial rubber plateau behavior where the elastic moduli are greater than the viscous moduli for a given frequency. The non-disparaging viscous modulus indicates that the neutrophils display a viscoelastic dynamic behavior rather than a perfect elastic behavior like polymer gels. In addition, we found no regional difference in the structural damping coefficient between the leading edge and the cell body. Thus, we conclude that despite the lower loss and storage moduli, the leading edges of the human neutrophils display partially elastic properties similar to the cell body. These results suggest that the lower elastic moduli

  10. Fever and neutrophilic alveolitis caused by a vanadium based catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Vandenplas, O; Binard-Van, C; Gregoire, J; Brumagne, A; Larbanois, A

    2002-01-01

    Methods: The investigation included inhalation challenge with the suspected compound combined with monitoring of lung function tests and post-challenge bronchoalveolar lavage. Results: Exposure to the vanadium containing catalyst for 120 minutes resulted in a sustained decline in forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in one second, while the transfer factor for carbon monoxide did not change significantly. The subject developed fever and peripheral blood neutrophilia. Bronchoalveolar lavage performed 48 hours after the end of challenge exposure showed a marked increase in neutrophils (60% of total cell count). Conclusions: Exposure to vanadium can cause a metal fume fever-like syndrome associated with neutrophilic alveolitis. PMID:12409538

  11. Killing by neutrophil extracellular traps: fact or folklore?

    PubMed

    Menegazzi, Renzo; Decleva, Eva; Dri, Pietro

    2012-02-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are DNA structures released by dying neutrophils and claimed to constitute a new microbicidal mechanism. Killing by NET-forming cells is ascribed to these structures because it is prevented by preincubation with DNase, which has been shown to dismantle NETs, before addition of the target microorganisms. Curiously, the possibility that the microorganisms ensnared in NETs are alive has not been considered. Using Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans blastospores, we demonstrate that the microorganisms captured by NETs and thought to be killed are alive because they are released and recovered in cell medium by incubation with DNase. It is concluded that NETs entrap but do not kill microbes.

  12. Role of osteopontin in hepatic neutrophil infiltration during alcoholic steatohepatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, Udayan M.; Banerjee, Atrayee; McRee, Rachel; Wellberg, Elizabeth; Ramaiah, Shashi K. . E-mail: sramaiah@cvm.tamu.edu

    2005-08-22

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a major complication of heavy alcohol (EtOH) drinking and is characterized by three progressive stages of pathology: steatosis, steatohepatitis, and fibrosis/cirrhosis. Alcoholic steatosis (AS) is the initial stage of ALD and consists of fat accumulation in the liver accompanied by minimal liver injury. AS is known to render the hepatocytes increasingly sensitive to toxicants such as bacterial endotoxin (LPS). Alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH), the second and rate-limiting step in the progression of ALD, is characterized by hepatic fat accumulation, neutrophil infiltration, and neutrophil-mediated parenchymal injury. However, the pathogenesis of ASH is poorly defined. It has been theorized that the pathogenesis of ASH involves interaction of increased circulating levels of LPS with hepatocytes being rendered highly sensitive to LPS due to heavy EtOH consumption. We hypothesize that osteopontin (OPN), a matricellular protein (MCP), plays an important role in the hepatic neutrophil recruitment due to its enhanced expression during the early phase of ALD (AS and ASH). To study the role of OPN in the pathogenesis of ASH, we induced AS in male Sprague-Dawley rats by feeding EtOH-containing Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet for 6 weeks. AS rats experienced extensive fat accumulation and minimal liver injury. Moderate induction in OPN was observed in AS group. ASH was induced by feeding male Sprague-Dawley rats EtOH-containing Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet for 6 weeks followed by LPS injection. The ASH rats had substantial neutrophil infiltration, coagulative oncotic necrosis, and developed higher liver injury. Significant increases in the hepatic and circulating levels of OPN was observed in the ASH rats. Higher levels of the active, thrombin-cleaved form of OPN in the liver in ASH group correlated remarkably with hepatic neutrophil infiltration. Finally, correlative studies between OPN and hepatic neutrophil infiltration was corroborated in a simple

  13. [Murine peritoneal neutrophil activation upon tungsten nanoparticles exposure in vivo].

    PubMed

    Martinova, E A; Baranov, V I

    2014-01-01

    Two examples of tungsten carbide nanoparticles (d = 15 nm, 50 nm) and tungsten carbide nanoparticles with 8% cobalt (d = 50 nm) have been found to induce the neutrophil activation 3 h and 36 h after intraperitoneal administration in the doses 0.005; 0.025; 0.05; 0.25; 0.5; 1; 2.5 and 5 microgram per 1 gram body weight to FVB mice. Neutrophil activation was calculated based on the CD11b and S100 antigen expression. Effect of nanoparticles is bimodal for all tested examples.

  14. Microbe-dependent lymphatic migration of neutrophils modulates lymphocyte proliferation in lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, Henry R.; Bailey, Jacqueline; Tomura, Michio; Brink, Robert; Chtanova, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil recruitment to the site of injury is an essential first step of an anti-bacterial response. However, little is known about the basis for and relevance of neutrophil migration from inflamed tissue into lymphoid organs. We established a photoconversion-based system to monitor the fate of neutrophils recruited to inflamed skin. While neutrophils are efficiently recruited to sites of both microbial and sterile lesions, subsequent re-localization to draining lymph nodes happens only when bacteria are present in the primary lesion. Skin egress of neutrophils occurs via lymphatic vessels and is dependent on CD11b and CXCR4 but not CCR7. Neutrophils are the predominant immune cell to migrate from inflamed skin into lymph nodes where they augment lymphocyte proliferation. Furthermore, inhibition of neutrophil migration from skin reduces T-cell proliferation in draining lymph nodes. Thus neutrophils mediate rapid cellular communication between the initial injury site and secondary lymphoid organs and modulate immune responsiveness. PMID:25972253

  15. Contrasting effects of inflammatory stimuli on neutrophil and monocyte adherence to endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kamp, D W; Bauer, K D; Knap, A; Dunn, M M

    1989-08-01

    Leukocyte adherence to endothelial cells (EC) is an important early event in inflammatory responses, which are often characterized by a predominance of either neutrophils (PMN) or monocytes. However, there is little information concerning the molecular events important in leukocyte adherence to EC. Intracellular activation of protein kinase C and the calcium-second messenger system leads to the stimulation of a number of important functions in PMN and monocytes. We compared the effects of members of these pathways on human PMN and monocyte adherence to cultured bovine aortic EC. We observed that phorbol myristate acetate, phorbol, 12,13-dibutyrate, L-alpha-1-oleoyl-2-acetoyl-sn-3-glycerol, and ionomycin each induced significant dose-dependent increases in PMN adherence to EC monolayers. In contrast, similar concentrations of each of these agents induced significant decreases in EC adherence of monocytes enriched by countercurrent centrifugal elutriation. Separate experiments determined that the differences in PMN and monocyte adherence to EC were not related to differences in oxidant production because 1) phorbol myristate acetate and L-alpha-1-oleoyl-2-acetoyl-sn-3-glycerol caused similar marked increases in both PMN and monocyte superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide production and 2) ionomycin, which had opposing effects on PMN and monocyte adherence, had no effect on PMN and monocyte superoxide anion or hydrogen peroxide release. We conclude that activators of protein kinase C and the Ca-second messenger pathway have opposite effects on PMN and monocyte adherence to EC and that these effects are mediated by O2 radical-independent mechanisms.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Fragrance material review on 3-phenylpropyl acetate.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of 3-phenylpropyl acetate when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. 3-Phenylpropyl acetate is a member of the fragrance structural group Aryl Alkyl Alcohol Simple Acid Esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for 3-phenylpropyl acetate were evaluated, then summarized, and includes: physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, skin sensitization, and toxicokinetics data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document. Please refer to Belsito et al., 2012 for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances.

  17. Fragrance material review on anisyl acetate.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of anisyl acetate when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. Anisyl acetate is a member of the fragrance structural group Aryl Alkyl Alcohol Simple Acid Esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for anisyl acetate were evaluated, then summarized, and includes: physical properties, skin irritation, skin sensitization, elicitation, and phototoxicity data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document. Please refer to Belsito et al., 2012 for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances.

  18. Fragrance material review on piperonyl acetate.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of piperonyl acetate when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. Piperonyl acetate is a member of the fragrance structural group aryl alkyl alcohol simple acid esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for piperonyl acetate were evaluated, then summarized, and includes: physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, mucous membrane (eye) irritation, skin sensitization, toxicokinetics, and genotoxicity data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document. Please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances.

  19. Fragrance material review on 2-phenylpropyl acetate.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of 2-phenylpropyl acetate when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. 2-Phenylpropyl acetate is a member of the fragrance structural group Aryl Alkyl Alcohol Simple Acid Esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for 2-phenylpropyl acetate were evaluated, then summarized, and includes: physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, mucous membrane (eye) irritation, and skin sensitization data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document. Please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances.

  20. Fragrance material review on 4-methylbenzyl acetate.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of 4-methylbenzyl acetate when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. 4-Methylbenzyl acetate is a member of the fragrance structural group Aryl Alkyl Alcohol Simple Acid Esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for 4-methylbenzyl acetate were evaluated, then summarized, and includes: physical properties, skin irritation, skin sensitization, and elicitation data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document. Please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances.

  1. DNA damage and apoptosis in blood neutrophils of inflammatory bowel disease patients and in Caco-2 cells in vitro exposed to betanin.

    PubMed

    Zielińska-Przyjemska, Małgorzata; Olejnik, Anna; Dobrowolska-Zachwieja, Agnieszka; Łuczak, Michał; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic, relapsing, inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, and continuing colonic inflammation is considered an important risk factor in the development of colorectal cancer. Our previous studies showed that beetroot (Beta vulgaris var. rubra) products and their major component betanin modulate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and DNA damage in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) stimulated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils of healthy volunteers. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of betanin on the oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis in neutrophils isolated from blood of patients with inflammatory bowel disease--ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). The results were compared with those obtained in colon carcinoma-derived Caco-2 cells. Betanin treatment at the concentration of 100 μM for 24 h increased DNA damage assessed by comet assay in IBD patients' neutrophils. A similar effect although less pronounced was observed in Caco-2 cells. Treatment of Caco-2 cells with H2O2 caused a 4-fold increase of DNA strand breaks in comparison to untreated cells, but pre-treatment with betanin reduced DNA damage in these cells. Betanin also induced procaspase-3 cleavage and caspase-3 activity accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, indicating its pro-apoptotic activity. These results suggest that betanin may support mechanisms that lead to the release of ROS and apoptotic cell death. In this way betanin may exert anti-inflammatory and potentially cancer preventive activity. PMID:27117102

  2. DNA damage and apoptosis in blood neutrophils of inflammatory bowel disease patients and in Caco-2 cells in vitro exposed to betanin.

    PubMed

    Zielińska-Przyjemska, Małgorzata; Olejnik, Anna; Dobrowolska-Zachwieja, Agnieszka; Łuczak, Michał; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2016-04-06

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic, relapsing, inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, and continuing colonic inflammation is considered an important risk factor in the development of colorectal cancer. Our previous studies showed that beetroot (Beta vulgaris var. rubra) products and their major component betanin modulate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and DNA damage in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) stimulated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils of healthy volunteers. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of betanin on the oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis in neutrophils isolated from blood of patients with inflammatory bowel disease--ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). The results were compared with those obtained in colon carcinoma-derived Caco-2 cells. Betanin treatment at the concentration of 100 μM for 24 h increased DNA damage assessed by comet assay in IBD patients' neutrophils. A similar effect although less pronounced was observed in Caco-2 cells. Treatment of Caco-2 cells with H2O2 caused a 4-fold increase of DNA strand breaks in comparison to untreated cells, but pre-treatment with betanin reduced DNA damage in these cells. Betanin also induced procaspase-3 cleavage and caspase-3 activity accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, indicating its pro-apoptotic activity. These results suggest that betanin may support mechanisms that lead to the release of ROS and apoptotic cell death. In this way betanin may exert anti-inflammatory and potentially cancer preventive activity.

  3. Soluble CD40 ligand stimulates CD40-dependent activation of the β2 integrin Mac-1 and protein kinase C zeda (PKCζ) in neutrophils: implications for neutrophil-platelet interactions and neutrophil oxidative burst.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rong; Yu, Shiyong; Song, Zifang; Zhu, Xiaolei; Wang, Cuiping; Yan, Jinchuan; Wu, Fusheng; Nanda, Anil; Granger, D Neil; Li, Guohong

    2013-01-01

    Recent work has revealed an essential involvement of soluble CD40L (sCD40L) in inflammation and vascular disease. Activated platelets are the major source of sCD40L, which has been implicated in platelet and leukocyte activation, although its exact functional impact on leukocyte-platelet interactions and the underlying mechanisms remain undefined. We aimed to determine the impact and the mechanisms of sCD40L on neutrophils. We studied neutrophil interactions with activated, surface-adherent platelets as a model for leukocyte recruitment to the sites of injury. Our data show that CD40L contributes to neutrophil firm adhesion to and transmigration across activated surface-adherent platelets, possibly through two potential mechanisms. One involves the direct interaction of ligand-receptor (CD40L-CD40), i.e., platelet surface CD40L interaction with neutrophil CD40; another involves an indirect mechanism, i.e. soluble CD40L stimulates activation of the leukocyte-specific β2 integrin Mac-1 in neutrophils and thereby further promotes neutrophil adhesion and migration. Activation of the integrin Mac-1 is known to be critical for mediating neutrophil adhesion and migration. sCD40L activated Mac-1 in neutrophils and enhanced neutrophil-platelet interactions in wild-type neutrophils, but failed to elicit such responses in CD40-deficient neutrophils. Furthermore, our data show that the protein kinase C zeta (PKCζ) is critically required for sCD40L-induced Mac-1 activation and neutrophil adhesive function. sCD40L strongly stimulated the focal clustering of Mac-1 (CD11b) and the colocalization of Mac-1 with PKCζ in wild-type neutrophils, but had minimal effect in CD40-deficient neutrophils. Blocking PKCζ completely inhibited sCD40L-induced neutrophil firm adhesion. Moreover, sCD40L strongly stimulates neutrophil oxidative burst via CD40-dependent activation of PI3K/NF-KB, but independent of Mac-1 and PKCζ. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the

  4. NEUTROPHIL DEPLETION ATTENUATES INTERLEUKIN-8 PRODUCTION IN MILD-OVERSTRETCHED VENTILATED NORMAL RABBIT LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    OBJECTIVE: Acute lung injury induced by lung overstretch is associated with neutrophil influx, but the pathogenic role of neutrophils in overstretch-induced lung injury remains unclear. DESIGN: To assess the contribution of neutrophils, we compared the effects of noninjurious lar...

  5. Acetate limitation and nitrite accumulation during denitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, J.; Silverstein, J.

    1999-03-01

    Nitrite accumulated in denitrifying activated sludge mixed liquor when the carbon and electron source, acetate, was limited. If acetate was added to obtain a carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) ratio in the range of 2:1 to 3:1, nitrate was completely consumed at the same rate with no nitrite accumulation, indicating that nitrate concentration controlled the respiration rate as long as sufficient substrate was present. However, when acetate was reduced to a C:N ratio of 1:1, while nitrate continued to be consumed, > 50% of the initial nitrate-nitrogen accumulated as nitrite and 29% persisted as nitrite throughout an endogenous denitrification period of 8--9 h. While nitrite accumulated during acetate-limited denitrification, the specific nitrate reduction rate increased significantly compared with the rate when excess acetate was provided as follows: 0.034 mg-NO{sub 3}-N/mg-mixed liquid volatile suspended solids/h versus 0.023 mg-NO{sub 3}-N/mg-mixed liquid volatile suspended solids/h, respective. This may be explained by nitrate respiration out-competing nitrite respiration for limited acetate electrons. Complete restoration of balanced denitrification and elimination of nitrite accumulation during denitrification required several weeks after the C:N ratio was increased back to 2:1.

  6. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) stimulates the PAF-synthesizing enzyme acetyl-CoA:1-alkyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine O2-acetyltransferase and PAF synthesis in neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Doebber, T W; Wu, M S

    1987-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine; PAF) induced in isolated rat peritoneal and human peripheral neutrophils a rapid and potent activation of the PAF biosynthetic enzyme acetyl-CoA:1-alkyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine O2-acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.67). The PAF-induced activation of the neutrophil acetyltransferase (8-10 times basal neutrophil activity) was maximal within 30 sec after PAF addition, as was the PAF-stimulated degranulation. After 1 min of PAF stimulation, the elevated acetyltransferase activity steadily decreased. Within 2 min of stimulation of neutrophils with 10(-6) M PAF, the 7-fold increase in acetyltransferase activity was coincident with substantial PAF synthesis (as measured by [3H]acetate incorporation into PAF), which was 14% of the PAF synthesis induced by the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 at 10(-5) M. PAF activation of the acetyltransferase and PAF synthesis required intact neutrophils as they did not occur in cells broken by sonication. The neutrophil acetyltransferase was 10-30 times more sensitive to activation by PAF than was degranulation as the acetyltransferase activation was evident with 10(-9) M PAF and was about maximal with 3 x 10(-8) M PAF. The unstimulated and PAF-induced acetyltransferase exhibited the same Km for acetyl-CoA (67 microM), but the Vmax for the PAF-induced enzyme (1667 pmol/min per 10(7) cells) was 10 times that of the unstimulated enzyme (175 pmol/min per 10(7) cells). The PAF induction of the acetyltransferase was less sensitive to inhibition by the specific PAF receptor antagonist L-652,731 than was PAF-induced degranulation. This, along with the differing sensitivities to PAF, suggests that acetyltransferase activation and degranulation induced by PAF either involve two different PAF receptors or involve one receptor type with different receptor occupancy requirements. Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase, which greatly decreased the activity of the acetyltransferase in spleen

  7. Phosphorylation of CD18 in response to neutrophil stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jakes, S.; Schembri-King, J.; Wallace, R.W. )

    1991-03-11

    Leukocyte integrins containing the common {beta}-subunit (CD18) mediate the adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells. It has been shown that the CD18 is phosphorylated in response to the phorbol ester PMA and proposed that phosphorylation of CD18 triggers the enhanced avidity of leukocyte integrins. The purpose of this study was to determine if CD18 in human neutrophils is also phosphorylated in response to physiological stimuli, i.e. receptor mediated activation. After labeling freshly isolated human neutrophils with {sup 32}p it was found that CD18 was phosphorylated in response to PMA in a time dependent manner that corresponded to the rate of PMA induced homotypic aggregation. The receptor mediated stimuli fMLP, LTB{sub 4}, IL-8, and C5a were also effective at initiating rapid CD18 dependent homotypic aggregation of neutrophils. However, in none of the receptor mediated responses was the level of CD18 phosphorylation increased at any time from the addition of stimuli to the peak of homotypic aggregation. Though not conclusive, this study suggests that in human neutrophils, activation of the leukocyte integrins by PMA may involve signaling pathways distinct from those involved in activation through receptor mediated stimulation.

  8. TRPC6 regulates CXCR2-mediated chemotaxis of murine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Otto; Umlauf, Daniel; Frank, Svetlana; Schimmelpfennig, Sandra; Bertrand, Jessica; Pap, Thomas; Hanley, Peter J; Fabian, Anke; Dietrich, Alexander; Schwab, Albrecht

    2013-06-01

    Unraveling the mechanisms involved in chemotactic navigation of immune cells is of particular interest for the development of new immunoregulatory therapies. It is generally agreed upon that members of the classical transient receptor potential channel family (TRPC) are involved in chemotaxis. However, the regulatory role of TRPC channels in chemoattractant receptor-mediated signaling has not yet been clarified in detail. In this study, we demonstrate that the TRPC6 channels play a pronounced role in CXCR2-mediated intermediary chemotaxis, whereas N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine receptor-mediated end-target chemotaxis is TRPC6 independent. The knockout of TRPC6 channels in murine neutrophils led to a strongly impaired intermediary chemotaxis after CXCR2 activation which is not further reinforced by CXCR2, PI3K, or p38 MAPK inhibition. Furthermore, CXCR2-mediated Ca(2+) influx but not Ca(2+) store release was attenuated in TRPC6(-/-) neutrophils. We demonstrate that the TRPC6 deficiency affected phosphorylation of AKT and MAPK downstream of CXCR2 receptor activation and led to altered remodeling of actin. The relevance of this TRPC6-depending defect in neutrophil chemotaxis is underscored by our in vivo findings. A nonseptic peritoneal inflammation revealed an attenuated recruitment of neutrophils in the peritoneal cavity of TRPC6(-/-) mice. In summary, this paper defines a specific role of TRPC6 channels in CXCR2-induced intermediary chemotaxis. In particular, TRPC6-mediated supply of calcium appears to be critical for activation of downstream signaling components.

  9. Superoxide generation and cytotactic response of irradiated neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Eastlund, D.T.; Charbonneau, T.T.

    1988-07-01

    Irradiation of blood components has been used to prevent transfusion-related graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in immunocompromised patients. This study was designed to determine the effect of irradiation on neutrophil aggregation, chemotaxis, and superoxide generation. Purified neutrophils were irradiated with a Cesium source at four doses ranging from 0 to 17,500 rads. Formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and zymosan-treated serum (ZTS) cytotaxin-induced chemotaxis and migration were determined in the agarose assay. Neutrophil aggregation to FMLP was determined by aggregometry. Superoxide generation and random migration were not affected by irradiation at doses up to 17,500 rads. When compared to nonirradiated controls, the chemotactic response to ZTS remained normal, with an insignificant decline from 174 +/- 31.0 to 150 +/- 42.3 (mean +/- SD) units. The chemotactic response to FMLP declined insignificantly, from 228 +/- 31.3 at 0 rad to 207 +/- 26.4 at 17,500 rads. The aggregation response to FMLP remained within the normal range but declined from 0.78 +/- 0.11 to 0.61 +/- 0.18. At the radiation doses currently used to reduce the risk of transfusion-related GVHD, neutrophil superoxide generation and chemotactic response remain essentially normal.

  10. Cyanate-mediated inhibition of neutrophil myeloperoxidase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Qian, M; Eaton, J W; Wolff, S P

    1997-01-01

    Cyanate (CNO-) forms spontaneously in solutions containing urea, and is present in urine and the body fluids of uraemic patients. We have explored the possibility that CNO- might be one of the unknown substances responsible for the reported impairment, by urine and uraemic plasma, of neutrophil oxidative metabolism (especially as measured by luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence). Luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence generated by human neutrophils derives predominantly from the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) which produces hypochlorous acid from H2O2 and Cl-. We hypothesized that CNO- (which resembles the 'pseudohalide' thiocyanate, an alternative substrate for MPO) might somehow interfere with the activity of MPO. In support of this, we find: (i) CNO- inhibits both peroxidative and halogenating activities of MPO and also inhibits the enzyme within intact human neutrophils; (ii) the inhibition is H2O2-dependent, irreversible, accompanied by covalent addition of [14C]CNO- (or a carbon-containing fragment thereof) to the enzyme; (iii) CNO- also inhibits Cl-/H2O2/MPO-mediated bacterial killing. Impairment of this arm of neutrophil bactericidal activity by CNO- formed from urea may be one factor in the risk of urinary-tract infection associated with urinary stasis and perhaps in the generalized increase in susceptibility to infection in uraemic patients. PMID:9337863

  11. Modulation of human neutrophil apoptosis by immune complexes.

    PubMed

    Gamberale, R; Giordano, M; Trevani, A S; Andonegui, G; Geffner, J R

    1998-10-01

    In the present study we examined whether immune complexes (IC) are able to modulate human neutrophil apoptosis. We observed different effects depending on the type of IC employed. Precipitating IC (pIC) and Ab-coated erythrocytes (E-IgG) triggered a marked stimulation of apoptosis, while heat-aggregated IgG and soluble IC, significantly delayed spontaneous apoptosis. Blocking Abs directed to Fcgamma receptor type II (FcgammaRII), but not to FcgammaRIII, markedly diminished the acceleration of apoptosis triggered by either pIC or E-IgG, supporting a critical role for FcgammaRII in apoptosis stimulation. This phenomenon, on the other hand, does not appear to involve IC phagocytosis or the participation of CR3. Acceleration of neutrophil apoptosis triggered by either pIC or E-IgG seems to require the activation of the respiratory burst, as suggested by 1) the ability of catalase to prevent apoptosis stimulation; 2) the effect of azide, an heme enzyme inhibitor, which dramatically enhanced apoptosis induced by pIC or E-IgG; and 3) the inability of pIC or E-IgG to accelerate apoptosis of neutrophils isolated from CGD patients. It is well established that IC affect the course of inflammation by inducing the release of inflammatory cytokines, proteolytic enzymes, oxidative agents, and other toxic molecules. Our results suggest that IC may also affect the course of inflammation by virtue of their ability to modulate neutrophil apoptosis.

  12. Neutrophil adhesion in leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome type 2.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, M L; Schwartz, B R; Etzioni, A; Bayer, R; Ochs, H D; Paulson, J C; Harlan, J M

    1995-01-01

    We have previously reported a newly discovered congenital disorder of neutrophil adhesion, leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome type 2 (LAD II). The clinical manifestations of this syndrome are similar to those seen in the classic leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome, now designated type 1 (LAD I), but the two syndromes differ in the molecular basis of their adhesion defects. LAD I is caused by a deficiency in the CD18 integrin adhesion molecules while LAD II patients are deficient in expression of sialyl-Lewis X (SLeX), a carbohydrate ligand for selectins. In this report we demonstrate that neutrophils from a LAD II patient bind minimally or not at all to recombinant E-selectin, purified platelet P-selectin, or P-selectin expressed on histamine-activated human umbilical vein endothelial cells, but have normal levels of L-selectin and CD11b/CD18 integrin, and adhere to and migrate across endothelium when CD11b/CD18 is activated. We compare LAD I and LAD II patient neutrophil function in vitro, demonstrating that integrin and selectin adhesion molecules have distinct but interdependent roles in neutrophil adhesion during an inflammatory response. Images PMID:8675661

  13. Subcellular fractionation of human neutrophils and analysis of subcellular markers.

    PubMed

    Clemmensen, Stine Novrup; Udby, Lene; Borregaard, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The neutrophil has long been recognized for its impressive number of cytoplasmic granules that harbor proteins indispensable for innate immunity. Analysis of isolated granules has provided important information on how the neutrophil grades its response to match the challenges it meets on its passage from blood to tissues. Nitrogen cavitation was developed as a method for disruption of cells on the assumption that sudden reduction of the partial pressure of nitrogen would lead to aeration of nitrogen dissolved in the lipid bilayer of plasma membranes. We find that cells are broken by the shear stress that is associated with passage through the outlet valve under high pressure and that this results in disruption of the neutrophil cell membrane while granules remain intact. The unique properties of Percoll as a sedimentable density medium with no inherent tonicity or viscosity are used for creation of continuous density gradients with shoulders in the density profile created to optimize the physical separation of granule subsets and light membranes. Immunological methods (sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays) are used for quantitation of proteins that are characteristic constituents of the granule subsets of neutrophils. PMID:24504946

  14. Surface acoustic waves enhance neutrophil killing of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Loike, John D; Plitt, Anna; Kothari, Komal; Zumeris, Jona; Budhu, Sadna; Kavalus, Kaitlyn; Ray, Yonatan; Jacob, Harold

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are structured communities of bacteria that play a major role in the pathogenicity of bacteria and are the leading cause of antibiotic resistant bacterial infections on indwelling catheters and medical prosthetic devices. Failure to resolve these biofilm infections may necessitate the surgical removal of the prosthetic device which can be debilitating and costly. Recent studies have shown that application of surface acoustic waves to catheter surfaces can reduce the incidence of infections by a mechanism that has not yet been clarified. We report here the effects of surface acoustic waves (SAW) on the capacity of human neutrophils to eradicate S. epidermidis bacteria in a planktonic state and within biofilms. Utilizing a novel fibrin gel system that mimics a tissue-like environment, we show that SAW, at an intensity of 0.3 mW/cm(2), significantly enhances human neutrophil killing of S. epidermidis in a planktonic state and within biofilms by enhancing human neutrophil chemotaxis in response to chemoattractants. In addition, we show that the integrin CD18 plays a significant role in the killing enhancement observed in applying SAW. We propose from out data that this integrin may serve as mechanoreceptor for surface acoustic waves enhancing neutrophil chemotaxis and killing of bacteria.

  15. Chemokine CXCL1 mediated neutrophil recruitment: Role of glycosaminoglycan interactions.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Kirti V; Poluri, Krishna Mohan; Dutta, Amit K; Sepuru, Krishna Mohan; Troshkina, Anna; Garofalo, Roberto P; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL1/MGSA plays a pivotal role in the host immune response by recruiting and activating neutrophils for microbial killing at the tissue site. CXCL1 exists reversibly as monomers and dimers, and mediates its function by binding glycosaminoglycans (GAG) and CXCR2 receptor. We recently showed that both monomers and dimers are potent CXCR2 agonists, the dimer is the high-affinity GAG ligand, lysine and arginine residues located in two non-overlapping domains mediate GAG interactions, and there is extensive overlap between GAG and receptor-binding domains. To understand how these structural properties influence in vivo function, we characterized peritoneal neutrophil recruitment of a trapped monomer and trapped dimer and a panel of WT lysine/arginine to alanine mutants. Monomers and dimers were active, but WT was more active indicating synergistic interactions promote recruitment. Mutants from both domains showed reduced GAG heparin binding affinities and reduced neutrophil recruitment, providing compelling evidence that both GAG-binding domains mediate in vivo trafficking. Further, mutant of a residue that is involved in both GAG binding and receptor signaling showed the highest reduction in recruitment. We conclude that GAG interactions and receptor activity of CXCL1 monomers and dimers are fine-tuned to regulate neutrophil trafficking for successful resolution of tissue injury. PMID:27625115

  16. Chemokine CXCL1 mediated neutrophil recruitment: Role of glycosaminoglycan interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Kirti V.; Poluri, Krishna Mohan; Dutta, Amit K.; Sepuru, Krishna Mohan; Troshkina, Anna; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL1/MGSA plays a pivotal role in the host immune response by recruiting and activating neutrophils for microbial killing at the tissue site. CXCL1 exists reversibly as monomers and dimers, and mediates its function by binding glycosaminoglycans (GAG) and CXCR2 receptor. We recently showed that both monomers and dimers are potent CXCR2 agonists, the dimer is the high-affinity GAG ligand, lysine and arginine residues located in two non-overlapping domains mediate GAG interactions, and there is extensive overlap between GAG and receptor-binding domains. To understand how these structural properties influence in vivo function, we characterized peritoneal neutrophil recruitment of a trapped monomer and trapped dimer and a panel of WT lysine/arginine to alanine mutants. Monomers and dimers were active, but WT was more active indicating synergistic interactions promote recruitment. Mutants from both domains showed reduced GAG heparin binding affinities and reduced neutrophil recruitment, providing compelling evidence that both GAG-binding domains mediate in vivo trafficking. Further, mutant of a residue that is involved in both GAG binding and receptor signaling showed the highest reduction in recruitment. We conclude that GAG interactions and receptor activity of CXCL1 monomers and dimers are fine-tuned to regulate neutrophil trafficking for successful resolution of tissue injury. PMID:27625115

  17. ACTIVATED NEUTROPHILS INHIBIT PHAGOCYTOSIS BY HUMAN MONOCYTE CELLS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously reported the correlation of decreased phagocytosis of opsonized zymosan by sputum monocytic cells with the increase in sputum neutrophils in volunteers 6h after inhalation of endotoxin (20,000 EU) (Alexis, et al. JACI, 2003;112:353). To define whether an intrin...

  18. The Role of Neutrophils in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Cormac; Reeves, Emer P; McElvaney, Noel G

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is characterized by low levels of circulating alpha-1 antitrypsin and an increased risk for emphysema, liver disease, and panniculitis. The reduced levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin in AATD predispose the lung to unopposed proteolytic activity, predominantly from neutrophil-derived proteases, chiefly neutrophil elastase. This leads to emphysema. The mechanisms subtending the liver disease are less well understood, but are probably due to a "gain-of function" inflammatory process in the liver, stoked by intracellular retention of aberrantly folded alpha-1 antitrypsin. The panniculitis associated with AATD is most likely due to unopposed proteolytic activity in the skin. Although AATD has been traditionally viewed as a condition arising from a protease-antiprotease imbalance in the lung, it is increasingly recognized that AATD is an inflammatory disorder, both in the lung and in the extrapulmonary manifestations associated with the condition. This inflammation is predominantly neutrophil driven, and there are several alpha-1 antitrypsin-related mechanisms involved in potentiating this neutrophilic response. The rationale for AAT augmentation therapy in AATD is classically based on restoring the antiprotease balance in the lung, but its beneficial effects may also be exerted systemically, further exposing the pathogenesis of AATD-related disease and indicating a potential usage for alpha-1 antitrypsin in other inflammatory conditions. PMID:27564664

  19. Marked alterations of neutrophil functions during sepsis-induced immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Demaret, Julie; Venet, Fabienne; Friggeri, Arnaud; Cazalis, Marie-Angélique; Plassais, Jonathan; Jallades, Laurent; Malcus, Christophe; Poitevin-Later, Françoise; Textoris, Julien; Lepape, Alain; Monneret, Guillaume

    2015-12-01

    Severe septic syndromes deeply impair innate and adaptive immunity and are responsible for sepsis-induced immunosuppression. Although neutrophils represent the first line of defense against infection, little is known about their phenotype and functions a few days after sepsis, when the immunosuppressive phase is maximal (i.e., between d 3 and 8). The objective of the present study was to perform, for the first time, a global evaluation of neutrophil alterations in immunosuppressed septic patients (at d 3-4 and d 6-8) using phenotypic and functional studies. In addition, the potential association of these parameters and deleterious outcomes was assessed. Peripheral blood was collected from 43 septic shock patients and compared with that of 23 healthy controls. In the septic patients, our results highlight a markedly altered neutrophil chemotaxis (functional and chemokine receptor expressions), oxidative burst, and lactoferrin content and an increased number of circulating immature granulocytes (i.e., CD10(dim)CD16(dim)). These aspects were associated with an increased risk of death after septic shock. In contrast, phagocytosis and activation capacities were conserved. To conclude, circulating neutrophils present with phenotypic, functional, and morphologic alterations a few days after sepsis onset. These dysfunctions might participate in the deleterious role of sepsis-induced immunosuppression. The present results open new perspectives in the mechanisms favoring nosocomial infections after septic shock. They deserve to be further investigated in a larger clinical study and in animal models recapitulating these alterations. PMID:26224052

  20. Epithelial neutrophil activating peptide-78: a novel chemotactic cytokine for neutrophils in arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, A E; Kunkel, S L; Harlow, L A; Mazarakis, D D; Haines, G K; Burdick, M D; Pope, R M; Walz, A; Strieter, R M

    1994-01-01

    We and others have shown that cells obtained from inflamed joints of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients produce interleukin-8, a potent chemotactic cytokine for neutrophils (PMNs). However, IL-8 accounted for only 40% of the chemotactic activity for PMNs found in these synovial fluids. Currently, we have examined the production of the novel PMN chemotactic cytokine, epithelial neutrophil activating peptide-78 (ENA-78), using peripheral blood, synovial fluid, and synovial tissue from 70 arthritic patients. RA ENA-78 levels were greater in RA synovial fluid (239 +/- 63 ng/ml) compared with synovial fluid from other forms of arthritis (130 +/- 118 ng/ml) or osteoarthritis (2.6 +/- 1.8 ng/ml) (P < 0.05). RA peripheral blood ENA-78 levels (70 +/- 26 ng/ml) were greater than normal peripheral blood levels (0.12 +/- 0.04 ng/ml) (P < 0.05). Anti-ENA-78 antibodies neutralized 42 +/- 9% (mean +/- SE) of the chemotactic activity for PMNs found in RA synovial fluids. Isolated RA synovial tissue fibroblasts in vitro constitutively produced significant levels of ENA-78, and this production was further augmented when stimulated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). In addition RA and osteoarthritis synovial tissue fibroblasts as well as RA synovial tissue macrophages were found to constitutively produce ENA-78. RA synovial fluid mononuclear cells spontaneously produced ENA-78, which was augmented in the presence of lipopolysaccharide. Immunohistochemical localization of ENA-78 from the synovial tissue of patients with arthritis or normal subjects showed that the predominant cellular source of this chemokine was synovial lining cells, followed by macrophages, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. Synovial tissue macrophages and fibroblasts were more ENA-78 immunopositive in RA than in normal synovial tissue (P < 0.05). These results, which are the first demonstration of ENA-78 in a human disease state, suggest that ENA-78 may play an important role in the recruitment of PMNs

  1. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Söderberg, Daniel; Segelmark, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    A group of pauci-immune vasculitides, characterized by neutrophil-rich necrotizing inflammation of small vessels and the presence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs), is referred to as ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). ANCAs against proteinase 3 (PR3) (PR3-ANCA) or myeloperoxidase (MPO) (MPO-ANCA) are found in over 90% of patients with active disease, and these ANCAs are implicated in the pathogenesis of AAV. Dying neutrophils surrounding the walls of small vessels are a histological hallmark of AAV. Traditionally, it has been assumed that these neutrophils die by necrosis, but neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have recently been visualized at the sites of vasculitic lesions. AAV patients also possess elevated levels of NETs in the circulation. ANCAs are capable of inducing NETosis in neutrophils, and their potential to do so has been shown to be affinity dependent and to correlate with disease activity. Neutrophils from AAV patients are also more prone to release NETs spontaneously than neutrophils from healthy blood donors. NETs contain proinflammatory proteins and are thought to contribute to vessel inflammation directly by damaging endothelial cells and by activating the complement system and indirectly by acting as a link between the innate and adaptive immune system through the generation of PR3- and MPO-ANCA. Injection of NET-loaded myeloid dendritic cells into mice results in circulating PR3- and MPO-ANCA and the development of AAV-like disease. NETs have also been shown to be essential in a rodent model of drug-induced vasculitis. NETs induced by propylthiouracil could not be degraded by DNaseI, implying that disordered NETs might be important for the generation of ANCAs. NET degradation was also highlighted in another study showing that AAV patients have reduced DNaseI activity resulting in less NET degradation. With this in mind, it might be that prolonged exposure to proteins in the NETs due to the overproduction of NETs and/or reduced

  2. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Söderberg, Daniel; Segelmark, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    A group of pauci-immune vasculitides, characterized by neutrophil-rich necrotizing inflammation of small vessels and the presence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs), is referred to as ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). ANCAs against proteinase 3 (PR3) (PR3-ANCA) or myeloperoxidase (MPO) (MPO-ANCA) are found in over 90% of patients with active disease, and these ANCAs are implicated in the pathogenesis of AAV. Dying neutrophils surrounding the walls of small vessels are a histological hallmark of AAV. Traditionally, it has been assumed that these neutrophils die by necrosis, but neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have recently been visualized at the sites of vasculitic lesions. AAV patients also possess elevated levels of NETs in the circulation. ANCAs are capable of inducing NETosis in neutrophils, and their potential to do so has been shown to be affinity dependent and to correlate with disease activity. Neutrophils from AAV patients are also more prone to release NETs spontaneously than neutrophils from healthy blood donors. NETs contain proinflammatory proteins and are thought to contribute to vessel inflammation directly by damaging endothelial cells and by activating the complement system and indirectly by acting as a link between the innate and adaptive immune system through the generation of PR3- and MPO-ANCA. Injection of NET-loaded myeloid dendritic cells into mice results in circulating PR3- and MPO-ANCA and the development of AAV-like disease. NETs have also been shown to be essential in a rodent model of drug-induced vasculitis. NETs induced by propylthiouracil could not be degraded by DNaseI, implying that disordered NETs might be important for the generation of ANCAs. NET degradation was also highlighted in another study showing that AAV patients have reduced DNaseI activity resulting in less NET degradation. With this in mind, it might be that prolonged exposure to proteins in the NETs due to the overproduction of NETs and/or reduced

  3. Antimicrobial peptides and nitric oxide production by neutrophils from periodontitis subjects.

    PubMed

    Mariano, F S; Campanelli, A P; Nociti Jr, F H; Mattos-Graner, R O; Gonçalves, R B

    2012-11-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in periodontitis by producing nitric oxide (NO) and antimicrobial peptides, molecules with microbicidal activity via oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. It is unknown whether variation in the production of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, human neutrophil peptides (HNP) 1-3, and NO by neutrophils influences the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. We compared the production of these peptides and NO by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated neutrophils isolated from healthy subjects and from patients with periodontitis. Peripheral blood neutrophils were cultured with or without Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-LPS (Aa-LPS), Porphyromonas gingivalis-LPS (Pg-LPS) and Escherichia coli-LPS (Ec-LPS). qRT-PCR was used to determine quantities of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 mRNA in neutrophils. Amounts of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 proteins in the cell culture supernatants were also determined by ELISA. In addition, NO levels in neutrophil culture supernatants were quantitated by the Griess reaction. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured with Aa-LPS, Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS expressed higher HNP 1-3 mRNA than neutrophils from healthy subjects. LL-37 mRNA expression was higher in neutrophils from patients stimulated with Aa-LPS. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients produced significantly higher LL-37 protein levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects when stimulated with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS, but no difference was observed in HNP 1-3 production. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured or not with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS produced significantly lower NO levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects. The significant differences in the production of LL-37 and NO between neutrophils from healthy and periodontitis subjects indicate that production of these molecules might influence individual susceptibility to important periodontal pathogens.

  4. Pentoxifylline attenuates neutrophil activation in experimental endotoxemia in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    van Leenen, D; van der Poll, T; Levi, M; ten Cate, H; van Deventer, S J; Hack, C E; Aarden, L A; ten Cate, J W

    1993-08-15

    Costimulation of neutrophils and cytokines may play an important role in organ injury in sepsis. Pentoxifylline inhibits various neutrophil functions in vitro, and attenuates endotoxin-induced production of TNF in both in vitro and in vivo models. To assess the effect of pentoxifylline on neutrophil activation in endotoxemia, nine adult chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) were i.v. injected with saline (n = 2), Escherichia coli endotoxin (4 ng/kg; n = 4), or E. coli endotoxin (4 ng/kg) in combination with pentoxifylline (500 mg/3 h, starting 30 min before the endotoxin injection; n = 3). Serial blood samples were obtained for measurements of leukocyte counts and the granulocytic proteinases elastase complexed with alpha 1-antitrypsin and lactoferrin, and cytokines during the next 5 h. No changes were observed in the saline-treated chimpanzees. Endotoxin induced a marked leukocytosis and neutrophilia, which were slightly reduced by pentoxifylline. In contrast, pentoxifylline almost completely prevented endotoxin-induced neutrophil degranulation: peak elastase-alpha 1-antitrypsin was 164 +/- 21 ng/ml (mean +/- SE) after endotoxin alone, vs 71 +/- 7 ng/ml after endotoxin with pentoxifylline (t = 3 h; p < 0.05); peak lactoferrin was 329 +/- 15 and 182 +/- 5 ng/ml, respectively (t = 5 h; p < 0.05). Pentoxifylline also inhibited the endotoxin-induced release of TNF (271 +/- 26 vs 55 +/- 23 pg/ml at t = 1.5 h; p < 0.05) and IL-6 (225 +/- 42 vs 73 +/- 25 pg/ml at t = 2 h; p < 0.05). IL-8 release was not significantly inhibited by pentoxifylline. In none of the animals activation of the C system could be detected. We conclude that pentoxifylline attenuates neutrophil activation in endotoxemia in chimpanzees, probably in part by inhibiting the release of TNF.

  5. Protrusive and Contractile Forces of Spreading Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Henry, Steven J; Chen, Christopher S; Crocker, John C; Hammer, Daniel A

    2015-08-18

    Human neutrophils are mediators of innate immunity and undergo dramatic shape changes at all stages of their functional life cycle. In this work, we quantified the forces associated with a neutrophil's morphological transition from a nonadherent, quiescent sphere to its adherent and spread state. We did this by tracking, with high spatial and temporal resolution, the cell's mechanical behavior during spreading on microfabricated post-array detectors printed with the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. Two dominant mechanical regimes were observed: transient protrusion and steady-state contraction. During spreading, a wave of protrusive force (75 ± 8 pN/post) propagates radially outward from the cell center at a speed of 206 ± 28 nm/s. Once completed, the cells enter a sustained contractile state. Although post engagement during contraction was continuously varying, posts within the core of the contact zone were less contractile (-20 ± 10 pN/post) than those residing at the geometric perimeter (-106 ± 10 pN/post). The magnitude of the protrusive force was found to be unchanged in response to cytoskeletal inhibitors of lamellipodium formation and myosin II-mediated contractility. However, cytochalasin B, known to reduce cortical tension in neutrophils, slowed spreading velocity (61 ± 37 nm/s) without significantly reducing protrusive force. Relaxation of the actin cortical shell was a prerequisite for spreading on post arrays as demonstrated by stiffening in response to jasplakinolide and the abrogation of spreading. ROCK and myosin II inhibition reduced long-term contractility. Function blocking antibody studies revealed haptokinetic spreading was induced by β2 integrin ligation. Neutrophils were found to moderately invaginate the post arrays to a depth of ∼1 μm as measured from spinning disk confocal microscopy. Our work suggests a competition of adhesion energy, cortical tension, and the relaxation of cortical tension is at play at the onset of

  6. Conjunctival Neutrophils Predict Progressive Scarring in Ocular Mucous Membrane Pemphigoid

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Geraint P.; Nightingale, Peter; Southworth, Sue; Denniston, Alastair K. O.; Tomlins, Paul J.; Turner, Stephen; Hamburger, John; Bowman, Simon J.; Curnow, S. John; Rauz, Saaeha

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Ocular mucous membrane pemphigoid (OcMMP) is a rare autoimmune disorder resulting in progressive conjunctival fibrosis and ocular surface failure leading to sight loss in up to 50%. This study was designed to optimize an ocular surface sampling technique for identification of novel biomarkers associated with disease activity and/or progressive fibrosis. Methods Fifty-seven patients with OcMMP underwent detailed examination of conjunctival inflammation and fibrosis using fornix depth measurement. Ocular surface impression cytology (OSIC) to sample superior bulbar conjunctiva combined with flow cytometry (OSIC-flow) profiled infiltrating leukocytes. Profiles were compared with healthy controls (HC) and disease controls (primary Sjögren's syndrome, pSS). Thirty-five OcMMP patients were followed every 3 months for 12 months. Results Overall neutrophils were elevated in OcMMP eyes when compared to pSS or HC (109 [18%] neutrophils/impression [NPI]; 2 [0.2%]; 6 [0.8%], respectively [P < 0.0001]) and in OcMMP patients with no visible inflammation when compared with HC (44.3 [7.9%]; 5.8 [0.8%]; P < 0.05). At 12 months follow-up, 53% of OcMMP eyes progressed, and this was associated with baseline conjunctival neutrophilia (P = 0.004). As a potential biomarker, a value of 44 NPI had sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values of 75%, 70%, and 73%, respectively. Notably, eyes with no visible inflammation and raised conjunctival neutrophils were more likely to progress and have a greater degree of conjunctival shrinkage compared to those without raised neutrophils. Conclusions These data suggest that OSIC-flow cytometric analyses may facilitate repeated patient sampling. Neutrophils may act as a biomarker for monitoring disease activity, progressive fibrosis, and response to therapy in OcMMP even when the eye appears clinically uninflamed. PMID:27760272

  7. [Defects of neutrophil function in chronic gastroduodenitis in children].

    PubMed

    Agafonova, E V; Malanicheva, T G; Denisova, S N

    2013-01-01

    At present, chronic gastroduodenitis (CGD) occupies one ofthe leading places in the structure of diseases of the gastrointestinal tract in children. In the etiology of CGD, along with the leading pathogenic Helicobacterpylori (HP), the role of the fungal flora increased. The aim of the work was to evaluate the functional activity of neutrophils in children with the CGD, associated with HP and Candida albicans. Among 110 children in the age from 7 to 17 years with chronic gastroduodenitis, associated with Helicobacter pylory(HP), as well as the association of HP with Candida albicans and the markers of secondary immune insufficiency, a study of the phagocytic activity and immune phenotype of neutrophils by flow cytofluorimetry was conducted. Differentiated peculiarities of the phagocytic activity of neutrophils in association with bacterial pathogens (HP) and fungal flora were identified. The transformation of the immune phenotype was combined with a significant depression of the phagocytic and microbicidal functions, more pronounced with the association of HP and Candida albicans. Circulating mannano protein antigen of Candida albicans influenced on the surface of phenotype of neutrophils, increasing the expression of protopathic and HLADR-receptors, and decreasing the expression of adhesion receptors and cytolysis. Thus, in case of chronic gastroduodenitis in children, there was a considerable transformation of the phenotype of neutrophil with differentiated characteristics at the association with bacterial (HP) pathogens and fungal flora. The obtained data should be taken into account when carrying out medical activities, and the doctors should include in the composition of complex therapy of CGD, associated with Candida albicans, drugs, aimed at immunocorrection of the identified violations PMID:23951901

  8. Protrusive and Contractile Forces of Spreading Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Henry, Steven J; Chen, Christopher S; Crocker, John C; Hammer, Daniel A

    2015-08-18

    Human neutrophils are mediators of innate immunity and undergo dramatic shape changes at all stages of their functional life cycle. In this work, we quantified the forces associated with a neutrophil's morphological transition from a nonadherent, quiescent sphere to its adherent and spread state. We did this by tracking, with high spatial and temporal resolution, the cell's mechanical behavior during spreading on microfabricated post-array detectors printed with the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. Two dominant mechanical regimes were observed: transient protrusion and steady-state contraction. During spreading, a wave of protrusive force (75 ± 8 pN/post) propagates radially outward from the cell center at a speed of 206 ± 28 nm/s. Once completed, the cells enter a sustained contractile state. Although post engagement during contraction was continuously varying, posts within the core of the contact zone were less contractile (-20 ± 10 pN/post) than those residing at the geometric perimeter (-106 ± 10 pN/post). The magnitude of the protrusive force was found to be unchanged in response to cytoskeletal inhibitors of lamellipodium formation and myosin II-mediated contractility. However, cytochalasin B, known to reduce cortical tension in neutrophils, slowed spreading velocity (61 ± 37 nm/s) without significantly reducing protrusive force. Relaxation of the actin cortical shell was a prerequisite for spreading on post arrays as demonstrated by stiffening in response to jasplakinolide and the abrogation of spreading. ROCK and myosin II inhibition reduced long-term contractility. Function blocking antibody studies revealed haptokinetic spreading was induced by β2 integrin ligation. Neutrophils were found to moderately invaginate the post arrays to a depth of ∼1 μm as measured from spinning disk confocal microscopy. Our work suggests a competition of adhesion energy, cortical tension, and the relaxation of cortical tension is at play at the onset of

  9. Interaction between arsenic trioxide (ATO) and human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Chiasson, Sonia; Girard, Denis

    2011-05-01

    The cytotoxic effect of arsenic trioxide (ATO) is known to be mediated by its ability to induce cell apoptosis in a variety of cells, including neutrophils. More recently, we demonstrated that ATO induced several parameters involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced neutrophil apoptosis but that caspase-4 was not involved. The aim of this study was to better understand how neutrophils are activated by ATO and to further demonstrate that ATO is an ER stressor. Human neutrophils were isolated from healthy blood donors and incubated in vitro in the presence or absence of ATO and several parameters were investigated. We found that ATO induced the expression of the proapoptotic GADD153 protein, a key player involved in ER stress-induced apoptosis, activated nuclear nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) DNA binding activities, and increased prostaglandine E2 (PGE2) production. Using an antibody array approach, we found that ATO increased the production of several cytokines, with interleukin 8 (IL-8) being the predominant one. We confirmed that ATO increased the production of IL-8 by enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Treatment with a caspase-4 inhibitor did not inhibit IL-8 production. The results of the present study further support the notion that ATO is an ER stressor and that, although its toxic effect is mediated by induction of apoptosis, this chemical also induced, in parallel, NF-κB activation, the production of PGE2 and several cytokines probably involved in other cell functions. Also, we conclude that the production of IL-8 is not induced by a caspase-4-dependent mechanism, suggesting that ATO-induced caspase-4 activation is involved in other as yet unidentified functions in human neutrophils.

  10. Tilmicosin induces apoptosis in bovine peripheral neutrophils in the presence or in the absence of Pasteurella haemolytica and promotes neutrophil phagocytosis by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chin, A C; Lee, W D; Murrin, K A; Morck, D W; Merrill, J K; Dick, P; Buret, A G

    2000-09-01

    Pathogen virulence factors and inflammation are responsible for tissue injury associated with respiratory failure in bacterial pneumonia, as seen in the bovine lung infected with Pasteurella haemolytica. Tilmicosin is a macrolide antibiotic used for the treatment of bovine bacterial pneumonia. Recent evidence suggests that tilmicosin-induced neutrophil apoptosis may have anti-inflammatory effects. Using bovine leukocytes, we sought to define whether live P. haemolytica affected tilmicosin-induced neutrophil apoptosis, assessed the proapoptotic effects of tilmicosin in comparison with other drugs, and characterized its impact on phagocytic uptake of neutrophils by macrophages. Induction of apoptosis in the presence or absence of P. haemolytica was assessed by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for apoptotic nucleosomes. In addition, fluorescent annexin-V staining identified externalized phosphatidylserine in neutrophils treated with tilmicosin, penicillin, ceftiofur, oxytetracycline, or dexamethasone. Neutrophil membrane integrity was assessed by using propidium iodide and trypan blue exclusion. As phagocytic clearance of apoptotic neutrophils by macrophages contributes to the resolution of inflammation, phagocytosis of tilmicosin-treated neutrophils by esterase-positive cultured bovine macrophages was assessed with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Unlike bovine neutrophils treated with penicillin, ceftiofur, oxytetracycline, or dexamethasone, neutrophils exposed to tilmicosin became apoptotic, regardless of the presence or absence of P. haemolytica. Tilmicosin-treated apoptotic neutrophils were phagocytosed at a significantly greater rate by bovine macrophages than were control neutrophils. In conclusion, tilmicosin-induced neutrophil apoptosis occurs regardless of the presence or absence of live P. haemolytica, exhibits at least some degree of drug specificity, and promotes phagocytic clearance of the dying inflammatory cells.

  11. Effect of therapeutic plasma concentrations of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the production of reactive oxygen species by activated rat neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Paino, I M M; Ximenes, V F; Fonseca, L M da; Kanegae, M P P; Khalil, N M; Brunetti, I L

    2005-04-01

    The release of reactive oxygen specie (ROS) by activated neutrophil is involved in both the antimicrobial and deleterious effects in chronic inflammation. The objective of the present investigation was to determine the effect of therapeutic plasma concentrations of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on the production of ROS by stimulated rat neutrophils. Diclofenac (3.6 microM), indomethacin (12 microM), naproxen (160 microM), piroxicam (13 microM), and tenoxicam (30 microM) were incubated at 37 masculineC in PBS (10 mM), pH 7.4, for 30 min with rat neutrophils (1 x 10(6) cells/ml) stimulated by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (100 nM). The ROS production was measured by luminol and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence. Except for naproxen, NSAIDs reduced ROS production: 58 +/- 2% diclofenac, 90 +/- 2% indomethacin, 33 +/- 3% piroxicam, and 45 +/- 6% tenoxicam (N = 6). For the lucigenin assay, naproxen, piroxicam and tenoxicam were ineffective. For indomethacin the inhibition was 52 +/- 5% and diclofenac showed amplification in the light emission of 181 +/- 60% (N = 6). Using the myeloperoxidase (MPO)/H2O2/luminol system, the effects of NSAIDs on MPO activity were also screened. We found that NSAIDs inhibited both the peroxidation and chlorinating activity of MPO as follows: diclofenac (36 +/- 10, 45 +/- 3%), indomethacin (97 +/- 2, 100 +/- 1%), naproxen (56 +/- 8, 76 +/- 3%), piroxicam (77 +/- 5, 99 +/- 1%), and tenoxicam (90 +/- 2, 100 +/- 1%), respectively (N = 3). These results show that therapeutic levels of NSAIDs are able to suppress the oxygen-dependent antimicrobial or oxidative functions of neutrophils by inhibiting the generation of hypochlorous acid.

  12. Fluid Shear Stress Increases Neutrophil Activation via Platelet-Activating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Michael J.; Lin, Kimberly S.; King, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Leukocyte exposure to hemodynamic shear forces is critical for physiological functions including initial adhesion to the endothelium, the formation of pseudopods, and migration into tissues. G-protein coupled receptors on neutrophils, which bind to chemoattractants and play a role in neutrophil chemotaxis, have been implicated as fluid shear stress sensors that control neutrophil activation. Recently, exposure to physiological fluid shear stresses observed in the microvasculature was shown to reduce neutrophil activation in the presence of the chemoattractant formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. Here, however, human neutrophil preexposure to uniform shear stress (0.1–2.75 dyn/cm2) in a cone-and-plate viscometer for 1–120 min was shown to increase, rather than decrease, neutrophil activation in the presence of platelet activating factor (PAF). Fluid shear stress exposure increased PAF-induced neutrophil activation in terms of L-selectin shedding, αMβ2 integrin activation, and morphological changes. Neutrophil activation via PAF was found to correlate with fluid shear stress exposure, as neutrophil activation increased in a shear stress magnitude- and time-dependent manner. These results indicate that fluid shear stress exposure increases neutrophil activation by PAF, and, taken together with previous observations, differentially controls how neutrophils respond to chemoattractants. PMID:24853753

  13. Trichomonas vaginalis promotes apoptosis of human neutrophils by activating caspase-3 and reducing Mcl-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Kang, J H; Song, H O; Ryu, J S; Shin, M H; Kim, J M; Cho, Y S; Alderete, J F; Ahn, M H; Min, D Y

    2006-09-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cells found in the vaginal discharge of patients with Trichomonas vaginalis infection. However, it is not known whether neutrophil apoptosis is induced by live T. vaginalis. Therefore, we examined whether T. vaginalis can influence neutrophil apoptosis, and also whether caspase-3 and the Bcl-2 family members are involved in the apoptosis. Thus, human neutrophils were incubated with live T. vaginalis and neutrophil apoptosis was evaluated by Giemsa, annexin V-PI, and DiOC6 stainings. The neutrophil apoptosis was significantly higher in those incubated with T. vaginalis than in the control group. When trichomonads were pre-treated with mAb to AP65 (adhesin protein), or when trophozoites were separated from neutrophils using a Transwell chamber, neutrophil apoptosis was significantly reduced. The activation of caspase-3 was evident in neutrophils undergoing spontaneous apoptosis but was markedly enhanced during T. vaginalis-induced apoptosis. Moreover, the inhibition of caspase-3 effectively reduced T. vaginalis-induced apoptosis. Trichomonad-induced apoptosis was also associated with reduced expression of the neutrophil anti-apoptotic protein, Mcl-1. These results indicate that T. vaginalis alters Mcl-1 expression and caspase-3 activation, thereby inducing apoptosis of human neutrophils. PMID:16916367

  14. ICAM-1–expressing neutrophils exhibit enhanced effector functions in murine models of endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Woodfin, Abigail; Beyrau, Martina; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; Ma, Bin; Whiteford, James R.; Hordijk, Peter L.; Hogg, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on the cell surface of numerous cell types such as endothelial and epithelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and certain leukocyte subsets. With respect to the latter, ICAM-1 has been detected on neutrophils in several clinical and experimental settings, but little is known about the regulation of expression or function of neutrophil ICAM-1. In this study, we report on the de novo induction of ICAM-1 on the cell surface of murine neutrophils by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor, and zymosan particles in vitro. The induction of neutrophil ICAM-1 was associated with enhanced phagocytosis of zymosan particles and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Conversely, neutrophils from ICAM-1–deficient mice were defective in these effector functions. Mechanistically, ICAM-1–mediated intracellular signaling appeared to support neutrophil ROS generation and phagocytosis. In vivo, LPS-induced inflammation in the mouse cremaster muscle and peritoneal cavity led to ICAM-1 expression on intravascular and locally transmigrated neutrophils. The use of chimeric mice deficient in ICAM-1 on myeloid cells demonstrated that neutrophil ICAM-1 was not required for local neutrophil transmigration, but supported optimal intravascular and extravascular phagocytosis of zymosan particles. Collectively, the present results shed light on regulation of expression and function of ICAM-1 on neutrophils and identify it as an additional regulator of neutrophil effector responses in host defense. PMID:26647392

  15. Neutrophil recruitment to lymph nodes limits local humoral response to Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kamenyeva, Olena; Boularan, Cedric; Kabat, Juraj; Cheung, Gordon Y C; Cicala, Claudia; Yeh, Anthony J; Chan, June L; Periasamy, Saravanan; Otto, Michael; Kehrl, John H

    2015-04-01

    Neutrophils form the first line of host defense against bacterial pathogens. They are rapidly mobilized to sites of infection where they help marshal host defenses and remove bacteria by phagocytosis. While splenic neutrophils promote marginal zone B cell antibody production in response to administered T cell independent antigens, whether neutrophils shape humoral immunity in other lymphoid organs is controversial. Here we investigate the neutrophil influx following the local injection of Staphylococcus aureus adjacent to the inguinal lymph node and determine neutrophil impact on the lymph node humoral response. Using intravital microscopy we show that local immunization or infection recruits neutrophils from the blood to lymph nodes in waves. The second wave occurs temporally with neutrophils mobilized from the bone marrow. Within lymph nodes neutrophils infiltrate the medulla and interfollicular areas, but avoid crossing follicle borders. In vivo neutrophils form transient and long-lived interactions with B cells and plasma cells, and their depletion augments production of antigen-specific IgG and IgM in the lymph node. In vitro activated neutrophils establish synapse- and nanotube-like interactions with B cells and reduce B cell IgM production in a TGF-β1 dependent manner. Our data reveal that neutrophils mobilized from the bone marrow in response to a local bacterial challenge dampen the early humoral response in the lymph node. PMID:25884622

  16. Neutrophil secondary necrosis is induced by LL-37 derived from cathelicidin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhifang; Cherryholmes, Gregory; Shively, John E

    2008-09-01

    Neutrophils represent the most common granulocyte subtype present in blood. The short half-life of circulating neutrophils is regulated by spontaneous apoptosis, and tissue infiltrating neutrophils die by apoptosis and secondary necrosis. The mechanism of neutrophil apoptosis has been the subject of many studies; however, the mechanism of neutrophil secondary necrosis is less clear. Human cathelicidin cationic peptide 18, proteolytically processed to its active form, LL-37, is secreted by neutrophils and epithelial cells and shown to have effects in addition to bacterial lysis. We demonstrate here that LL-37 affects neutrophil lifespan by the pathway of secondary necrosis, rapidly converting annexin V-positive (AV(+)), propidium iodide-negative (PI(-); apoptotic) cells into PI(+) (necrotic) cells with the release of IL-8, IL-1R antagonist, ATP, and intact granules. The effects of LL-37 on apoptotic neutrophils are neither energy-dependent nor affected by pretreatment with G-CSF, GM-CSF, TNF-alpha, and LPS and are partially inhibited by human serum. Moreover, LL-37 decreases CXCR2 expression of AV(-)PI(-) (live) neutrophils, suggesting an effect on the neutrophil response to its chemotactic factors, including IL-8. Thus, the lifespan and inflammatory functions of neutrophils are directly affected by LL-37.

  17. Trichomonas vaginalis promotes apoptosis of human neutrophils by activating caspase-3 and reducing Mcl-1 expression

    PubMed Central

    KANG, J. H.; SONG, H. O.; RYU, J. S.; SHIN, M. H.; KIM, J. M.; CHO, Y. S.; ALDERETE, J. F.; AHN, M. H.; MIN, D. Y.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cells found in the vaginal discharge of patients with Trichomonas vaginalis infection. However, it is not known whether neutrophil apoptosis is induced by live T. vaginalis. Therefore, we examined whether T. vaginalis can influence neutrophil apoptosis, and also whether caspase-3 and the Bcl-2 family members are involved in the apoptosis. Thus, human neutrophils were incubated with live T. vaginalis and neutrophil apoptosis was evaluated by Giemsa, annexin V-PI, and DiOC6 stainings. The neutrophil apoptosis was significantly higher in those incubated with T. vaginalis than in the control group. When trichomonads were pre-treated with mAb to AP65 (adhesin protein), or when trophozoites were separated from neutrophils using a Transwell chamber, neutrophil apoptosis was significantly reduced. The activation of caspase-3 was evident in neutrophils undergoing spontaneous apoptosis but was markedly enhanced during T. vaginalis-induced apoptosis. Moreover, the inhibition of caspase-3 effectively reduced T. vaginalis-induced apoptosis. Trichomonad-induced apoptosis was also associated with reduced expression of the neutrophil anti-apoptotic protein, Mcl-1. These results indicate that T. vaginalis alters Mcl-1 expression and caspase-3 activation, thereby inducing apoptosis of human neutrophils. PMID:16916367

  18. ICAM-1-expressing neutrophils exhibit enhanced effector functions in murine models of endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Woodfin, Abigail; Beyrau, Martina; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; Ma, Bin; Whiteford, James R; Hordijk, Peter L; Hogg, Nancy; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2016-02-18

    Intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on the cell surface of numerous cell types such as endothelial and epithelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and certain leukocyte subsets. With respect to the latter, ICAM-1 has been detected on neutrophils in several clinical and experimental settings, but little is known about the regulation of expression or function of neutrophil ICAM-1. In this study, we report on the de novo induction of ICAM-1 on the cell surface of murine neutrophils by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor, and zymosan particles in vitro. The induction of neutrophil ICAM-1 was associated with enhanced phagocytosis of zymosan particles and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Conversely, neutrophils from ICAM-1-deficient mice were defective in these effector functions. Mechanistically, ICAM-1-mediated intracellular signaling appeared to support neutrophil ROS generation and phagocytosis. In vivo, LPS-induced inflammation in the mouse cremaster muscle and peritoneal cavity led to ICAM-1 expression on intravascular and locally transmigrated neutrophils. The use of chimeric mice deficient in ICAM-1 on myeloid cells demonstrated that neutrophil ICAM-1 was not required for local neutrophil transmigration, but supported optimal intravascular and extravascular phagocytosis of zymosan particles. Collectively, the present results shed light on regulation of expression and function of ICAM-1 on neutrophils and identify it as an additional regulator of neutrophil effector responses in host defense. PMID:26647392

  19. Neutrophils in the tumor microenvironment: trying to heal the wound that cannot heal.

    PubMed

    Singel, Kelly L; Segal, Brahm H

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils are the first responders to infection and injury and are critical for antimicrobial host defense. Through the generation of reactive oxidants, activation of granular constituents and neutrophil extracellular traps, neutrophils target microbes and prevent their dissemination. While these pathways are beneficial in the context of trauma and infection, their off-target effects in the context of tumor are variable. Tumor-derived factors have been shown to reprogram the marrow, skewing toward the expansion of myelopoiesis. This can result in stimulation of both neutrophilic leukocytosis and the release of immature granulocytic populations that accumulate in circulation and in the tumor microenvironment. While activated neutrophils have been shown to kill tumor cells, there is growing evidence for neutrophil activation driving tumor progression and metastasis through a number of pathways, including stimulation of thrombosis and angiogenesis, stromal remodeling, and impairment of T cell-dependent anti-tumor immunity. There is also growing appreciation of neutrophil heterogeneity in cancer, with distinct neutrophil populations promoting cancer control or progression. In addition to the effects of tumor on neutrophil responses, anti-neoplastic treatment, including surgery, chemotherapy, and growth factors, can influence neutrophil responses. Future directions for research are expected to result in more mechanistic knowledge of neutrophil biology in the tumor microenvironment that may be exploited as prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:27558344

  20. Rac1 signaling regulates neutrophil-dependent tissue damage in experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changhui; Zhang, Su; Song, Lei; Wang, Yusheng; Hwaiz, Rundk; Luo, Lingtao; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2014-10-15

    Excessive neutrophil recruitment in the colon is a major feature in acute colitis although the signaling mechanisms behind colonic recruitment of neutrophils remain elusive. Herein, we hypothesized that Rac1 activity might play an important role in neutrophil infiltration in the inflamed colon. Female Balb/c mice were treated with the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 (0.5 and 5mg/kg) before and daily after administration of 5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). Colonic tissue was collected for quantification of neutrophil recruitment, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and CXC chemokine formation as well as histological damage score five days after challenge with DSS. Rac1 activity was determined by western blot and Mac-1 expression by flow cytometry in neutrophils. Administration of NSC23766 decreased DSS-induced neutrophil recruitment and tissue damage in the colon. Rac1 inhibition decreased colonic formation of IL-6 and CXC chemokines in experimental colitis. Chemokine challenge increased Rac1 activity in neutrophils and NSC23766 markedly reduced this neutrophil activity of Rac1. Inhibition of Rac1 abolished CXC chemokine-induced neutrophil chemotaxis and up-regulation of Mac-1 in vitro. Taken together, Rac1 signaling plays a significant role in controlling accumulation of neutrophils and tissue injury in experimental colitis. Thus, our novel results suggest that targeting Rac1 signaling might be a useful way to protect against neutrophil-mediated tissue injury in acute colitis.

  1. Acetic acid production from food wastes using yeast and acetic acid bacteria micro-aerobic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; He, Dongwei; Niu, Dongjie; Zhao, Youcai

    2015-05-01

    In this study, yeast and acetic acid bacteria strains were adopted to enhance the ethanol-type fermentation resulting to a volatile fatty acids yield of 30.22 g/L, and improve acetic acid production to 25.88 g/L, with food wastes as substrate. In contrast, only 12.81 g/L acetic acid can be obtained in the absence of strains. The parameters such as pH, oxidation reduction potential and volatile fatty acids were tested and the microbial diversity of different strains and activity of hydrolytic ferment were investigated to reveal the mechanism. The optimum pH and oxidation reduction potential for the acetic acid production were determined to be at 3.0-3.5 and -500 mV, respectively. Yeast can convert organic matters into ethanol, which is used by acetic acid bacteria to convert the organic wastes into acetic acid. The acetic acid thus obtained from food wastes micro-aerobic fermentation liquid could be extracted by distillation to get high-pure acetic acid.

  2. Acetylation of Starch with Vinyl Acetate in Imidazolium Ionic Liquids and Characterization of Acetate Distribution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch was acetylated with vinyl acetate in different 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (BMIM) salts as solvent in effort to produce starches with different acetylation patterns. Overall degree of substitution was much higher for basic anions such as acetate and dicyanimide (dca) than for neutral anions ...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10001 - 2-Ethoxyethanol, 2-ethoxyethanol acetate, 2-methoxyethanol, and 2-methoxyethanol acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as 2-ethoxyethanol (CAS No. 110-80-5), 2-ethoxyethanol acetate (CAS No. 111-15-9), 2-methoxyethanol (CAS No. 109-86-4), and 2-methoxyethanol acetate (CAS No. 110-49-6) are subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10001 - 2-Ethoxyethanol, 2-ethoxyethanol acetate, 2-methoxyethanol, and 2-methoxyethanol acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as 2-ethoxyethanol (CAS No. 110-80-5), 2-ethoxyethanol acetate (CAS No. 111-15-9), 2-methoxyethanol (CAS No. 109-86-4), and 2-methoxyethanol acetate (CAS No. 110-49-6) are subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  5. Tested Demonstrations: Buffer Capacity of Various Acetic Acid-Sodium Acetate Systems: A Lecture Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Craig J.; Panek, Mary G.

    1985-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for a lecture experiment which uses indicators to illustrate the concept of differing buffer capacities by titrating acetic acid/sodium acetate buffers with 1.0 molar hydrochloric acid and 1.0 molar sodium hydroxide. A table with data used to plot the titration curve is included. (JN)

  6. Ultrastructural observation of human neutrophils during apoptotic cell death triggered by Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Sim, Seobo; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Yong, Tai-Soon; Park, Soon-Jung; Im, Kyung-il; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2004-12-01

    Neutrophils are important effector cells against protozoan extracellular parasite Entamoeba histolytica, which causes amoebic colitis and liver abscess in human beings. Apoptotic cell death of neutrophils is an important event in the resolution of inflammation and parasite's survival in vivo. This study was undertaken to investigate the ultrastructural aspects of apoptotic cells during neutrophil death triggered by Entamoeba histolytica. Isolated human neutrophils from the peripheral blood were incubated with or without live trophozoites of E. histolytica and examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Neutrophils incubated with E. histolytica were observed to show apoptotic characteristics, such as compaction of the nuclear chromatin and swelling of the nuclear envelop. In contrast, neutrophils incubated in the absence of the amoeba had many protrusions of irregular cell surfaces and heterogenous nuclear chromatin. Therefore, it is suggested that Entamoeba-induced neutrophil apoptosis contribute to prevent unwanted tissue inflammation and damage in the amoeba-invaded lesions in vivo.

  7. Cutting Edge: Developmental Regulation of IFN-γ Production by Mouse Neutrophil Precursor Cells.

    PubMed

    Sturge, Carolyn R; Burger, Elise; Raetz, Megan; Hooper, Lora V; Yarovinsky, Felix

    2015-07-01

    Neutrophils are an emerging cellular source of IFN-γ, a key cytokine that mediates host defense to intracellular pathogens. Production of IFN-γ by neutrophils, in contrast to lymphoid cells, is TLR- and IL-12-independent and the events associated with IFN-γ production by neutrophils are not understood. In this study, we show that mouse neutrophils express IFN-γ during their lineage development in the bone marrow niche at the promyelocyte stage independently of microbes. IFN-γ accumulates in primary neutrophilic granules and is released upon induction of degranulation. The developmental mechanism of IFN-γ production in neutrophils arms the innate immune cells prior to infection and assures the potential for rapid release of IFN-γ upon neutrophil activation, the first step during responses to many microbial infections. PMID:26026057

  8. Tamoxifen does not inhibit the swell activated chloride channel in human neutrophils during the respiratory burst

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2008-10-31

    Effective functioning of neutrophils relies upon electron translocation through the NADPH oxidase (NOX). The electron current generated (I{sub e}) by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and rapidly depolarises the membrane potential in activated human neutrophils. Swelling activated chloride channels have been demonstrated in part to counteract the depolarisation generated by the NADPH oxidase I{sub e}. In the present study, the effects of inhibitors of swell activated chloride channels on ROS production and on the swelling activated chloride conductance was investigated in activated human neutrophils. Tamoxifen (10 {mu}M), a specific inhibitor for swell activated chloride channels in neutrophils, completely inhibited both the PMA and FMLP stimulated respiratory burst. This inhibition of the neutrophil respiratory burst was not due to the blocking effect of tamoxifen on the swelling activated chloride conductance in these cells. These results demonstrate that a tamoxifen insensitive swell activated chloride channel has important significance during the neutrophil respiratory burst.

  9. Ultrastructural observation of human neutrophils during apoptotic cell death triggered by Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Sim, Seobo; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Yong, Tai-Soon; Park, Soon-Jung; Im, Kyung-il; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2004-12-01

    Neutrophils are important effector cells against protozoan extracellular parasite Entamoeba histolytica, which causes amoebic colitis and liver abscess in human beings. Apoptotic cell death of neutrophils is an important event in the resolution of inflammation and parasite's survival in vivo. This study was undertaken to investigate the ultrastructural aspects of apoptotic cells during neutrophil death triggered by Entamoeba histolytica. Isolated human neutrophils from the peripheral blood were incubated with or without live trophozoites of E. histolytica and examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Neutrophils incubated with E. histolytica were observed to show apoptotic characteristics, such as compaction of the nuclear chromatin and swelling of the nuclear envelop. In contrast, neutrophils incubated in the absence of the amoeba had many protrusions of irregular cell surfaces and heterogenous nuclear chromatin. Therefore, it is suggested that Entamoeba-induced neutrophil apoptosis contribute to prevent unwanted tissue inflammation and damage in the amoeba-invaded lesions in vivo. PMID:15591839

  10. Neutrophils Interact with Adenovirus Vectors via Fc Receptors and Complement Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Matthew J.; Zaiss, Anne K.; Muruve, Daniel A.

    2005-01-01

    Neutrophils are effectors of the innate immune response to adenovirus vectors. Following the systemic administration of Cy2-labeled AdLuc in mice, flow cytometry and PCR analysis of liver leukocytes revealed that 25% of recruited neutrophils interacted with adenovirus vectors. In vitro, flow cytometry of human neutrophils incubated with Cy2-labeled AdLuc also demonstrated a significant interaction with adenovirus vectors. Fluorescence and electron microscopy confirmed vector internalization by neutrophils. The AdLuc-neutrophil interaction reduced vector transduction efficiency by more than 50% in coincubation assays in epithelium-derived cells. Adenovirus vector uptake by neutrophils occurred independently of coxsackievirus adenovirus receptor (CAR) and capsid RGD motifs, since neutrophils do not express CAR and uptake of the RGD-deleted vector AdL.PB* was similar to that of AdLuc. Furthermore, both AdLuc and AdL.PB* activated neutrophils and induced similar degrees of L-selectin shedding. Neutrophil uptake of AdLuc was dependent on the presence of complement and antibodies, since the interaction between AdLuc and neutrophils was significantly reduced when they were incubated in immunoglobulin G-depleted or heat-inactivated human serum. Blocking of complement receptor 1 (CD35) but not complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18) significantly reduced neutrophil uptake of AdLuc. Blocking of FcγRI (CD64), FcγRII (CD32), and FcγRIII (CD16) individually or together also reduced neutrophil uptake of AdLuc, although less than blocking of CD35 alone. Combined CR1 and Fc receptor blockade synergistically inhibited neutrophil-AdLuc interactions close to baseline. These results demonstrate opsonin-dependent adenovirus vector interactions with neutrophils and their corresponding receptors. PMID:16282462

  11. Functional heterogeneity and differential priming of circulating neutrophils in human experimental endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Janesh; Ramakers, Bart P; Kamp, Vera M; Loi, Adele Lo Tam; Lam, Siu W; Hietbrink, Falco; Leenen, Luke P; Tool, Anton T; Pickkers, Peter; Koenderman, Leo

    2010-07-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in host defense. However, deregulation of neutrophils contributes to tissue damage in severe systemic inflammation. In contrast to complications mediated by an overactive neutrophil compartment, severe systemic inflammation is a risk factor for development of immune suppression and as a result, infectious complications. The role of neutrophils in this clinical paradox is poorly understood, and in this study, we tested whether this paradox could be explained by distinct neutrophil subsets and their functionality. We studied the circulating neutrophil compartment immediately after induction of systemic inflammation by administering 2 ng/kg Escherichia coli LPS i.v. to healthy volunteers. Neutrophils were phenotyped by expression of membrane receptors visualized by flow cytometry, capacity to interact with fluorescently labeled microbes, and activation of the NADPH-oxidase by oxidation of Amplex Red and dihydrorhodamine. After induction of systemic inflammation, expression of membrane receptors on neutrophils, such as CXCR1 and -2 (IL-8Rs), C5aR, FcgammaRII, and TLR4, was decreased. Neutrophils were also refractory to fMLF-induced up-regulation of membrane receptors, and suppression of antimicrobial function was shown by decreased interaction with Staphylococcus epidermis. Simultaneously, activation of circulating neutrophils was demonstrated by a threefold increase in release of ROS. The paradoxical phenotype can be explained by the selective priming of the respiratory burst. In contrast, newly released, CD16(dim) banded neutrophils display decreased antimicrobial function. We conclude that systemic inflammation leads to a functionally heterogeneous neutrophil compartment, in which newly released refractory neutrophils can cause susceptibility to infections, and activated, differentiated neutrophils can mediate tissue damage. PMID:20400675

  12. Neutrophil cell death, activation and bacterial infection in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Watt, A; Courtney, J; Moore, J; Ennis, M; Elborn, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterised by chronic endobronchial bacterial infection and neutrophil mediated inflammation. Neutrophil apoptosis is essential for the resolution of inflammation. This study assessed the relationship between levels of neutrophil apoptosis and sputum microbiology in matched clinically stable patients with CF. Methods: Sputum was induced from 34 patients (nine with no Gram negative infection, 10 colonised with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 with Burkholderia cenocepacia, and five with other infections). Apoptotic neutrophils measured by flow cytometric Annexin V/propidium iodide staining and morphology were similar in all groups. Results: Patients infected with P aeruginosa or B cenocepacia had a significantly lower percentage of viable neutrophils in the sputum than those with no Gram negative infection (Kruskal-Wallis p = 0.01, median (interquartile range (IQR)) 14.2% (9.4–21.6), 15.8% (12.3–19.5), and 48.4% (23.0–66.4); p = 0.003 and p = 0.002, respectively). They also had significantly higher levels of secondary necrotic granulocytes in sputum than patients with no Gram negative infection (Kruskal-Wallis p<0.0001, median (IQR) 55.5% (48.4–64.5), 50.4% (44.6–61.9), and 24.8% (14.4–30.5); p<0.0001 and p<0.0001, respectively). Neutrophils (x106/g sputum) in P aeruginosa infected patients (Kruskal-Wallis p = 0.05, median (IQR) 6.3 (3.5–12.7)) and B cenocepacia infected patients (5.7 (1.5–14.5)) were significantly higher than in the group with no Gram negative infection (0.5 (0.5–4.3), p = 0.03 and 0.04, respectively). Conclusion: These results suggest that cell death and clearance may be altered in patients with CF colonised with P aeruginosa and B cenocepacia compared with those with no Gram negative infection. PMID:16061707

  13. Passive mechanical behavior of human neutrophils: effect of cytochalasin B.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, M. A.; Frank, R. S.; Waugh, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Actin is a ubiquitous protein in eukaryotic cells. It plays a major role in cell motility and in the maintenance and control of cell shape. In this article, we intend to address the contribution of actin to the passive mechanical properties of human neutrophils. As a framework for assessing this contribution, the neutrophil is modeled as a simple viscous fluid drop with a constant cortical ("surface") tension. The reagent cytochalasin B (CTB) was used to disrupt the F-actin structure, and the neutrophil cortical tension and cytoplasmic viscosity were evaluated by single-cell micropipette aspiration. The cortical tension was calculated by simple force balance, and the viscosity was calculated according to a numerical analysis of the cell entry into the micropipette. CTB reduced the cell cortical tension in a dose-dependent fashion: by 19% at a concentration of 3 microM and by 49% at 30 microM. CTB also reduced the cytoplasmic viscosity by approximately -25% at a concentration of 3 microM and by approximately 65% at a concentration of 30 microM when compared at the same aspiration pressures. All three groups of neutrophils, normal cells, and cells treated with either 3 or 30 microM CTB, exhibited non-Newtonian behavior, in that the apparent viscosity decreased with increasing shear rate. The dependence of the cytoplasmic viscosity on deformation rate can be described empirically by mu = mu c(gamma m/gamma c)-b, where mu is cytoplasmic viscosity, gamma m is mean shear rate, mu c is the characteristic viscosity at the characteristic shear rate gamma c, and b is a material coefficient. The shear rate dependence of the cytoplasmic viscosity was reduced by CTB treatment. This is reflected by the changes in the material coefficients. When gamma c was set to 1 s-1, pc = 130 +/- 23 Pa.s and b = 0.52 +/- 0.09 for normal neutrophils and pc = 54 +/- 15 Pa.S and b = 0.26 +/- 0.05 for cells treated with 30 micro M CTB. These results provide the first quantitative assessment of

  14. Roscovitine ameliorates endotoxin-induced uveitis through neutrophil apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhao-Xin; Qiu, Suo; Lou, Bing-Sheng; Yang, Yao; Wang, Wen-Cong; Lin, Xiao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils have been recognized as critical response cells during the pathogenesis of endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU). Apoptosis of neutrophils induced by roscovitine has previously been demonstrated to ameliorate inflammation in several in vivo models. The present study aimed to assess whether roscovitine ameliorates EIU. EIU was induced in female C57BL/6 mice by a single intravitreal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 250 ng). The mice were divided into three groups as follows: LPS alone, LPS plus vehicle, LPS plus roscovitine (50 mg/kg). The mice were euthanized 12, 24, 48 and 72 h after LPS-induced uveitis. Accumulation of inflammatory cells in the vitreous body was confirmed by immunohistochemistry, and quantified following hematoxylin and eosin staining. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling was performed to detect of apoptotic cells. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines were analyzed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and the changes in protein levels were analyzed by western blotting. Inflammatory cells accumulated in the vitreous near the optic nerve head and the quantity peaked at 24 h after LPS injection. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the majority of the inflammatory cells were neutrophils. The number of infiltrating cells was similar in the LPS and LPS plus vehicle groups, while there were significantly less in the roscovitine group at 24 h. Apoptosis of neutrophils was observed between 12 and 48 h after roscovitine injection, while no apoptosis was observed in the other groups. The mRNA expression levels of GMCSF, CINC-1 and ICAM-1 peaked at 12 h after LPS injection, and decreased to normal levels at 72 h. This trend in mRNA expression was similar in the LPS and LPS plus vehicle groups; however, the expression levels decreased more quickly in the roscovitine group at 24 and 48 h. Following roscovitine administration, upregulated cleaved caspase 3 expression levels and downregulated Mcl-1

  15. Dynamic Protonation Equilibrium of Solvated Acetic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Wei; Frigato, Tomaso; Straatsma, TP; Helms, Volkhard H.

    2007-04-13

    For the first time, the dynamic protonation equilibrium between an amino acid side chain analogue and bulk water as well as the diffusion properties of the excess proton were successfully reproduced through unbiased computer simulations. During a 50 ns Q-HOP MD simulation, two different regimes of proton transfer were observed. Extended phases of frequent proton swapping between acetic acid and nearby water were separated by phases where the proton freely diffuses in the simulation box until it is captured again by acetic acid. The pKa of acetic acid was calculated around 3.0 based on the relative population of protonated and deprotonated states and the diffusion coefficient of excess proton was computed from the average mean squared displacement in the simulation. Both calculated values agree well with the experimental measurements.

  16. Leuprolide acetate-induced generalized papular eruption.

    PubMed

    Burris, Katy; Ding, Catherine Y; Lim, Geoffrey F S

    2014-06-01

    Leuprolide acetate, a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, is used in the treatment of prostate cancer. We report a unique case of a disseminated papular rash following leuprolide acetate injections in a 65-year-old man that shares clinical and histopathological features of papuloerythroderma of Ofuji. Leuprolide-induced papuloerythroderma, as well as a limited number of other disseminated cutaneous eruptions caused by this drug, is extremely rare, with only one case previously reported. Our case calls attention to this uncommon side effect in a commonly used hormonal therapy.

  17. Myeloperoxidase-dependent effect of amines on functions of isolated neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, E L; Grisham, M B; Jefferson, M M

    1983-01-01

    Isolated neutrophilic leukocytes were incubated with primary amines and related nitrogenous compounds. Stimulation of neutrophil oxygen (O2) metabolism with phorbol myristate acetate or opsonized zymosan resulted in production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), myeloperoxidase-catalyzed oxidation of chloride (C1-) to hypochlorous acid (HOC1), and the reaction of HOC1 with the added compounds to yield nitrogen-chlorine (N-C1) derivatives. Formation of N-C1 derivatives of low lipid solubility resulted in accumulation of the derivatives in the extracellular medium. These oxidizing agents were identified and measured on the basis of their absorption spectra and their ability to oxidize 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoic acid to the disulfide form. The yield of N-Cl derivatives was in the order: taurine greater than Tris greater than spermidine greater than spermine greater than glucosamine greater than putrescine greater than guanidinoacetate. Accumulation of N-C1 derivatives was also observed in the absence of added amines, owing to the reaction of HOC1 with endogenous taurine and other amines that were released from the cells into the medium. In the presence of compounds that yield lipophilic N-C1 derivatives, little or no accumulation of oxidizing agents was observed. Instead, these compounds inhibited the accumulation of N-C1 derivatives that was obtained with taurine, and their effect was competitive with taurine. Inhibition was in the order: methylamine greater than ethanolamine greater than phenylethylamine greater than p-toluenesulfonamide greater than ammonia greater than guanidine. Formation of lipophilic N-C1 derivatives also resulted in inhibition of O2 uptake and glucose metabolism. Inhibition was prevented by adding catalase to eliminate H2O2, dapsone to inhibit myeloperoxidase, taurine to compete for reaction with HOC1, or compounds that are rapidly oxidized by HOC1 or N-C1 derivatives, to reduce these oxidizing agents. The results indicate that: (a) formation of N-C1

  18. Neutrophils and Granulocytic MDSC: The Janus God of Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zilio, Serena; Serafini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant circulating blood cell type in humans, and are the first white blood cells recruited at the inflammation site where they orchestrate the initial immune response. Although their presence at the tumor site was recognized in the 1970s, until recently these cells have been neglected and considered to play just a neutral role in tumor progression. Indeed, in recent years neutrophils have been recognized to play a dual role in tumor development by either assisting the growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis or by exerting tumoricidal action directly via the secretion of antitumoral compounds, or indirectly via the orchestration of antitumor immunity. Understanding the biology of these cells and influencing their polarization in the tumor micro- and macro-environment may be the key for the development of new therapeutic strategies, which may finally hold the promise of an effective immunotherapy for cancer.

  19. Neutrophils and Granulocytic MDSC: The Janus God of Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zilio, Serena; Serafini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant circulating blood cell type in humans, and are the first white blood cells recruited at the inflammation site where they orchestrate the initial immune response. Although their presence at the tumor site was recognized in the 1970s, until recently these cells have been neglected and considered to play just a neutral role in tumor progression. Indeed, in recent years neutrophils have been recognized to play a dual role in tumor development by either assisting the growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis or by exerting tumoricidal action directly via the secretion of antitumoral compounds, or indirectly via the orchestration of antitumor immunity. Understanding the biology of these cells and influencing their polarization in the tumor micro- and macro-environment may be the key for the development of new therapeutic strategies, which may finally hold the promise of an effective immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:27618112

  20. Neutrophils and Granulocytic MDSC: The Janus God of Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zilio, Serena; Serafini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant circulating blood cell type in humans, and are the first white blood cells recruited at the inflammation site where they orchestrate the initial immune response. Although their presence at the tumor site was recognized in the 1970s, until recently these cells have been neglected and considered to play just a neutral role in tumor progression. Indeed, in recent years neutrophils have been recognized to play a dual role in tumor development by either assisting the growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis or by exerting tumoricidal action directly via the secretion of antitumoral compounds, or indirectly via the orchestration of antitumor immunity. Understanding the biology of these cells and influencing their polarization in the tumor micro- and macro-environment may be the key for the development of new therapeutic strategies, which may finally hold the promise of an effective immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:27618112

  1. Composition of partially purified NADPH oxidase from pig neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Bellavite, P; Jones, O T; Cross, A R; Papini, E; Rossi, F

    1984-01-01

    The superoxide (O2.-)-forming enzyme NADPH oxidase from pig neutrophils was solubilized and partially purified by gel-filtration chromatography. The purification procedure allowed the separation of NADPH oxidase activity from NADH-dependent cytochrome c reductase and 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol reductase activities. O2.-forming activity was co-purified with cytochrome b-245 and was associated with phospholipids. However, active fractions endowed with cytochrome b were devoid of ubiquinone and contained only little FAD. The cytochrome b/FAD ratio was 1.13:1 in the crude solubilized extract and increased to 18.95:1 in the partially purified preparations. Most of FAD was associated with fractions containing NADH-dependent oxidoreductases. These results are consistent with the postulated role of cytochrome b in O2.-formation by neutrophil NADPH oxidase, but raise doubts about the participation of flavoproteins in this enzyme activity. PMID:6439185

  2. The structural basis for neutrophil inactivation of C1 inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Pemberton, P A; Harrison, R A; Lachmann, P J; Carrell, R W

    1989-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) by neutrophil elastase, Pseudomonas elastase and snake venoms resulted in initial cleavage within the molecule's N-terminus followed by further cleavage within the molecule's C-terminally placed reactive centre. N-Terminal proteolysis occurred at peptide bonds 14-15, 36-37 and 40-41. This had no effect on either the inhibitory activity or the heat-stability of C1-INH. Proteolysis within the reactive centre occurred at peptide bonds 439-440, 440-441, 441-442 and 442-443. Cleavage at any one of these sites inactivated C1-INH and conferred enhanced heat-stability upon a previously heat-labile molecule. Released neutrophil proteinases also cleaved and inactivated C1-INH, suggesting that they may physiologically regulate C1-INH during inflammatory episodes. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2930506

  3. Neutrophil extracellular traps: double-edged swords of innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Mariana J; Radic, Marko

    2012-09-15

    Spectacular images of neutrophils ejecting nuclear chromatin and bactericidal proteins, in response to microbes, were first reported in 2004. As externalized chromatin could entangle bacteria, these structures were named neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Subsequent studies identified microorganisms and sterile conditions that stimulate NETs, as well as additional cell types that release extracellular chromatin. The release of NETs is the most dramatic stage in a cell death process called NETosis. Experimental evidence suggests that NETs participate in pathogenesis of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, with proposed involvement in glomerulonephritis, chronic lung disease, sepsis, and vascular disorders. Exaggerated NETosis or diminished NET clearance likely increases risk of autoreactivity to NET components. The biological significance of NETs is just beginning to be explored. A more complete integration of NETosis within immunology and pathophysiology will require better understanding of NET properties associated with specific disease states and microbial infections. This may lead to the identification of important therapeutic targets.

  4. LACTOFERRIN, AN IRON-BINBING PROTEIN NI NEUTROPHILIC LEUKOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Masson, P. L.; Heremans, J. F.; Schonne, E.

    1969-01-01

    Lactoferrin, an iron-binding protein previously shown to occur in many external secretions, is identified as one of the major proteins present in human and guinea pig neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The identification of this protein in leukocyte extracts was based upon a comparison of its electrophoretic, antigenic, and iron-combining properties with the corresponding properties of the same protein isolated from human and guinea pig milk. Immunochemical quantitations showed that lactoferrin occurs in human neutrophilic leukocytes at the concentration of 3 µg per 106 cells. Tissue cultures from guinea pig bone marrow and spleen actively synthesized the protein, as shown both by net production of lactoferrin and incorporation of labeled amino acids into the protein. Immunohistochemical data indicate that lactoferrin first appears in myeloid cells at the stage of the promyelocyte. PMID:4979954

  5. Trypanosomatidae produce acetate via a mitochondrial acetate:succinate CoA transferase.

    PubMed

    Van Hellemond, J J; Opperdoes, F R; Tielens, A G

    1998-03-17

    Hydrogenosome-containing anaerobic protists, such as the trichomonads, produce large amounts of acetate by an acetate:succinate CoA transferase (ASCT)/succinyl CoA synthetase cycle. The notion that mitochondria and hydrogenosomes may have originated from the same alpha-proteobacterial endosymbiont has led us to look for the presence of a similar metabolic pathway in trypanosomatids because these are the earliest-branching mitochondriate eukaryotes and because they also are known to produce acetate. The mechanism of acetate production in these organisms, however, has remained unknown. Four different members of the trypanosomatid family: promastigotes of Leishmania mexicana mexicana, L. infantum and Phytomonas sp., and procyclics of Trypanosoma brucei were analyzed as well as the parasitic helminth Fasciola hepatica. They all use a mitochondrial ASCT for the production of acetate from acetyl CoA. The succinyl CoA that is produced during acetate formation by ASCT is recycled presumably to succinate by a mitochondrial succinyl CoA synthetase, concomitantly producing ATP from ADP. The ASCT of L. mexicana mexicana promastigotes was further characterized after partial purification of the enzyme. It has a high affinity for acetyl CoA (Km 0.26 mM) and a low affinity for succinate (Km 6.9 mM), which shows that significant acetate production can occur only when high mitochondrial succinate concentrations prevail. This study identifies a metabolic pathway common to mitochondria and hydrogenosomes, which strongly supports a common origin for these two organelles.

  6. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in Periodontitis: A Web of Intrigue.

    PubMed

    White, P C; Chicca, I J; Cooper, P R; Milward, M R; Chapple, I L C

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) represent a novel paradigm in neutrophil-mediated immunity. NETs are believed to constitute a highly conserved antimicrobial strategy comprising decondensed nuclear DNA and associated histones that are extruded into the extracellular space. Associated with the web-like strands of DNA is an array of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which facilitate the extracellular destruction of microorganisms that become entrapped within the NETs. NETs can be released by cells that remain viable or following a unique form of programmed cell death known as NETosis, which is dependent on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the decondensing of the nuclear DNA catalyzed by peptidyl arginine deiminase-4. NETs are produced in response to a range of pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoa, as well as host-derived mediators. NET release is, however, not without cost, as the concomitant release of cytotoxic molecules can also cause host tissue damage. This is evidenced by a number of immune-mediated diseases, in which excess or dysfunctional NET production, bacterial NET evasion, and decreased NET removal are associated with disease pathogenesis. Periodontitis is the most prevalent infectious-inflammatory disease of humans, characterized by a dysregulated neutrophilic response to specific bacterial species within the subgingival plaque biofilm. Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cell involved in periodontitis and have previously been found to exhibit hyperactivity and hyperreactivity in terms of ROS production in chronic periodontitis patients. However, the contribution of ROS-dependent NET formation to periodontal health or disease remains unclear. In this focused review, we discuss the mechanisms, stimuli, and requirements for NET production; the ability of NET-DNA and NET-associated AMPs to entrap and kill pathogens; and the potential immunogenicity of NETs in disease. We also speculate on the potential

  7. Protrusive and Contractile Forces of Spreading Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Steven J.; Chen, Christopher S.; Crocker, John C.; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Human neutrophils are mediators of innate immunity and undergo dramatic shape changes at all stages of their functional life cycle. In this work, we quantified the forces associated with a neutrophil’s morphological transition from a nonadherent, quiescent sphere to its adherent and spread state. We did this by tracking, with high spatial and temporal resolution, the cell’s mechanical behavior during spreading on microfabricated post-array detectors printed with the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. Two dominant mechanical regimes were observed: transient protrusion and steady-state contraction. During spreading, a wave of protrusive force (75 ± 8 pN/post) propagates radially outward from the cell center at a speed of 206 ± 28 nm/s. Once completed, the cells enter a sustained contractile state. Although post engagement during contraction was continuously varying, posts within the core of the contact zone were less contractile (−20 ± 10 pN/post) than those residing at the geometric perimeter (−106 ± 10 pN/post). The magnitude of the protrusive force was found to be unchanged in response to cytoskeletal inhibitors of lamellipodium formation and myosin II-mediated contractility. However, cytochalasin B, known to reduce cortical tension in neutrophils, slowed spreading velocity (61 ± 37 nm/s) without significantly reducing protrusive force. Relaxation of the actin cortical shell was a prerequisite for spreading on post arrays as demonstrated by stiffening in response to jasplakinolide and the abrogation of spreading. ROCK and myosin II inhibition reduced long-term contractility. Function blocking antibody studies revealed haptokinetic spreading was induced by β2 integrin ligation. Neutrophils were found to moderately invaginate the post arrays to a depth of ∼1 μm as measured from spinning disk confocal microscopy. Our work suggests a competition of adhesion energy, cortical tension, and the relaxation of cortical tension is at play at the

  8. NADPH Oxidase Promotes Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation in Pulmonary Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Röhm, Marc; Grimm, Melissa J.; D'Auria, Anthony C.; Almyroudis, Nikolaos G.

    2014-01-01

    NADPH oxidase is a crucial enzyme in antimicrobial host defense and in regulating inflammation. Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited disorder of NADPH oxidase in which phagocytes are defective in generation of reactive oxidant intermediates. Aspergillus species are ubiquitous, filamentous fungi, which can cause invasive aspergillosis, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in CGD, reflecting the critical role for NADPH oxidase in antifungal host defense. Activation of NADPH oxidase in neutrophils can be coupled to the release of proteins and chromatin that comingle in neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which can augment extracellular antimicrobial host defense. NETosis can be driven by NADPH oxidase-dependent and -independent pathways. We therefore undertook an analysis of whether NADPH oxidase was required for NETosis in Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. Oropharyngeal instillation of live Aspergillus hyphae induced neutrophilic pneumonitis in both wild-type and NADPH oxidase-deficient (p47phox−/−) mice which had resolved in wild-type mice by day 5 but progressed in p47phox−/− mice. NETs, identified by immunostaining, were observed in lungs of wild-type mice but were absent in p47phox−/− mice. Using bona fide NETs and nuclear chromatin decondensation as an early NETosis marker, we found that NETosis required a functional NADPH oxidase in vivo and ex vivo. In addition, NADPH oxidase increased the proportion of apoptotic neutrophils. Together, our results show that NADPH oxidase is required for pulmonary clearance of Aspergillus hyphae and generation of NETs in vivo. We speculate that dual modulation of NETosis and apoptosis by NADPH oxidase enhances antifungal host defense and promotes resolution of inflammation upon infection clearance. PMID:24549323

  9. Association of microparticles and neutrophil activation with decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Thom, Stephen R; Bennett, Michael; Banham, Neil D; Chin, Walter; Blake, Denise F; Rosen, Anders; Pollock, Neal W; Madden, Dennis; Barak, Otto; Marroni, Alessandro; Balestra, Costantino; Germonpre, Peter; Pieri, Massimo; Cialoni, Danilo; Le, Phi-Nga Jeannie; Logue, Christopher; Lambert, David; Hardy, Kevin R; Sward, Douglas; Yang, Ming; Bhopale, Veena B; Dujic, Zeljko

    2015-09-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is a systemic disorder, assumed due to gas bubbles, but additional factors are likely to play a role. Circulating microparticles (MPs)--vesicular structures with diameters of 0.1-1.0 μm--have been implicated, but data in human divers have been lacking. We hypothesized that the number of blood-borne, Annexin V-positive MPs and neutrophil activation, assessed as surface MPO staining, would differ between self-contained underwater breathing-apparatus divers suffering from DCS vs. asymptomatic divers. Blood was analyzed from 280 divers who had been exposed to maximum depths from 7 to 105 meters; 185 were control/asymptomatic divers, and 90 were diagnosed with DCS. Elevations of MPs and neutrophil activation occurred in all divers but normalized within 24 h in those who were asymptomatic. MPs, bearing the following proteins: CD66b, CD41, CD31, CD142, CD235, and von Willebrand factor, were between 2.4- and 11.7-fold higher in blood from divers with DCS vs. asymptomatic divers, matched for time of sample acquisition, maximum diving depth, and breathing gas. Multiple logistic regression analysis documented significant associations (P < 0.001) between DCS and MPs and for neutrophil MPO staining. Effect estimates were not altered by gender, body mass index, use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, or emergency oxygen treatment and were modestly influenced by divers' age, choice of breathing gas during diving, maximum diving depth, and whether repetitive diving had been performed. There were no significant associations between DCS and number of MPs without surface proteins listed above. We conclude that MP production and neutrophil activation exhibit strong associations with DCS.

  10. Adipocytes and Neutrophils Give a Helping Hand to Pancreatic Cancers.

    PubMed

    Bronte, Vincenzo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2016-08-01

    Obesity-induced inflammation can build up a confined microenvironment in pancreatic adenocarcinoma that is associated with increased desmoplasia, neutrophil recruitment, reduced delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs, and immune evasion. Targeting molecular pathways empowering this circuit might represent a necessary measure to reach clinical efficacy for combination therapies in patients with excess body weight. Cancer Discov; 6(8); 821-3. ©2016 AACR.See related article by Incio et al., p. 852.

  11. Study of the phagocytic process in neutrophils from elite sportswomen.

    PubMed

    Ortega, E; Barriga, C; De la Fuente, M

    1993-01-01

    All the stages of the phagocytic process of blood neutrophils were compared in sedentary young women (no formal exercise during the previous 24 months) and elite sportswomen (basketball players from the "Siglo XXI Spain Selection", in the middle of their competitive season) at rest. The sportswomen had performed no exercise since the day before taking the blood samples. Adherence of neutrophils to nylon fibre, which is similar to endothelium adherence, was not different between the two groups [62 (SD 14) and 58 (SD 18) in control and sport groups respectively]. Chemotaxis (studied in a Boyden chamber using a filter with 3 microns pore diameter) was found to be stimulated (P < 0.001) in the sportswomen [105 (SD 30)] with respect to the controls [39 (SD 9)]. Attachment, ingestion and killing by neutrophils was measured by incubation of the neutrophils with serum and a suspension of Candida albicans. While no statistical differences were found in attachment of C. albicans after 15 min incubation [71 (SD 8) in the control group, and 74 (SD 20) in the sport group], the sportswomen showed a higher (P < 0.001) ingestion capacity for C. albicans at both 15 min [53 (SD 13) and 111 (SD 32) in control and sportswomen respectively] and 60 min [control 90 (SD 10), and sport group 224 (SD 21)] incubation. The greater phagocytic capacity in sportswomen was correlated with a higher plasma cortisol concentration (P < 0.05) and a lower plasma ACTH concentration (P < 0.001) in this group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. The Aminopeptidase CD13 Induces Homotypic Aggregation in Neutrophils and Impairs Collagen Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Fiddler, Christine A.; Parfrey, Helen; Cowburn, Andrew S.; Luo, Ding; Nash, Gerard B.; Murphy, Gillian; Chilvers, Edwin R.

    2016-01-01

    Aminopeptidase N (CD13) is a widely expressed cell surface metallopeptidase involved in the migration of cancer and endothelial cells. Apart from our demonstration that CD13 modulates the efficacy of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced apoptosis in neutrophils, no other function for CD13 has been ascribed in this cell. We hypothesized that CD13 may be involved in neutrophil migration and/or homotypic aggregation. Using purified human blood neutrophils we confirmed the expression of CD13 on neutrophils and its up-regulation by pro-inflammatory agonists. However, using the anti-CD13 monoclonal antibody WM-15 and the aminopeptidase enzymatic inhibitor bestatin we were unable to demonstrate any direct involvement of CD13 in neutrophil polarisation or chemotaxis. In contrast, IL-8-mediated neutrophil migration in type I collagen gels was significantly impaired by the anti-CD13 monoclonal antibodies WM-15 and MY7. Notably, these antibodies also induced significant homotypic aggregation of neutrophils, which was dependent on CD13 cross-linking and was attenuated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase and extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 inhibition. Live imaging demonstrated that in WM-15-treated neutrophils, where homotypic aggregation was evident, the number of cells entering IL-8 impregnated collagen I gels was significantly reduced. These data reveal a novel role for CD13 in inducing homotypic aggregation in neutrophils, which results in a transmigration deficiency; this mechanism may be relevant to neutrophil micro-aggregation in vivo. PMID:27467268

  13. Hypoxia-inducible factor 2α regulates key neutrophil functions in humans, mice, and zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, A. A. Roger; Elks, Philip M.; Marriott, Helen M.; Eamsamarng, Suttida; Higgins, Kathryn R.; Lewis, Amy; Williams, Lynne; Parmar, Selina; Shaw, Gary; McGrath, Emmet E.; Formenti, Federico; Van Eeden, Fredericus J.; Kinnula, Vuokko L.; Pugh, Christopher W.; Sabroe, Ian; Dockrell, David H.; Chilvers, Edwin R.; Robbins, Peter A.; Percy, Melanie J.; Simon, M. Celeste; Johnson, Randall S.; Renshaw, Stephen A.; Whyte, Moira K. B.

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophil lifespan and function are regulated by hypoxia via components of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)/von Hippel Lindau/hydroxylase pathway, including specific roles for HIF-1α and prolyl hydroxylase-3. HIF-2α has both distinct and overlapping biological roles with HIF-1α and has not previously been studied in the context of neutrophil biology. We investigated the role of HIF-2α in regulating key neutrophil functions. Human and murine peripheral blood neutrophils expressed HIF-2α, with expression up-regulated by acute and chronic inflammatory stimuli and in disease-associated inflammatory neutrophil. HIF2A gain-of-function mutations resulted in a reduction in neutrophil apoptosis both ex vivo, through the study of patient cells, and in vivo in a zebrafish tail injury model. In contrast, HIF-2α–deficient murine inflammatory neutrophils displayed increased sensitivity to nitrosative stress induced apoptosis ex vivo and increased neutrophil apoptosis in vivo, resulting in a reduction in neutrophilic inflammation and reduced tissue injury. Expression of HIF-2α was temporally dissociated from HIF-1α in vivo and predominated in the resolution phase of inflammation. These data support a critical and selective role for HIF-2α in persistence of neutrophilic inflammation and provide a platform to dissect the therapeutic utility of targeting HIF-2α in chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:24196071

  14. mTOR Mediates IL-23 Induction of Neutrophil IL-17 and IL-22 Production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feidi; Cao, Anthony; Yao, Suxia; Evans-Marin, Heather L; Liu, Han; Wu, Wei; Carlsen, Eric D; Dann, Sara M; Soong, Lynn; Sun, Jiaren; Zhao, Qihong; Cong, Yingzi

    2016-05-15

    It has been shown recently that neutrophils are able to produce IL-22 and IL-17, which differentially regulate the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. However, it is still largely unknown how the neutrophil production of IL-22 and IL-17 is regulated, and their role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. In this study, we found that IL-23 promoted neutrophil production of IL-17 and IL-22. IL-23 stimulated the neutrophil expression of IL-23R as well as rorc and ahr. Retinoid acid receptor-related orphan receptor γ t and aryl-hydrocarbon receptor differentially regulated IL-23 induction of neutrophil IL-17 and IL-22. In addition, IL-23 induced the activation of mTOR in neutrophils. Blockade of the mTOR pathway inhibited IL-23-induced expression of rorc and ahr, as well as IL-17 and IL-22 production. By using a microbiota Ag-specific T cell-mediated colitis model, we demonstrated that depletion of neutrophils, as well as blockade of IL-22, resulted in a significant increase in the severity of colitis, thereby indicating a protective role of neutrophils and IL-22 in chronic colitis. Collectively, our data revealed that neutrophils negatively regulate microbiota Ag-specific T cell induction of colitis, and IL-23 induces neutrophil production of IL-22 and IL-17 through induction of rorc and ahr, which is mediated by the mTOR pathway.

  15. Activated neutrophils disrupt endothelial monolayer integrity by an oxygen radical-independent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan, J.M.; Schwartz, B.R.; Reidy, M.A.; Schwartz, S.M.; Ochs, H.D.; Harker, L.A.

    1985-02-01

    The effect of activated neutrophils on endothelial monolayer integrity in vitro has been measured by assessing the capacity of endothelial monolayers on polycarbonate filters to exclude /sup 125/I-albumin. Although formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP)-activated neutrophils failed to induce /sup 51/Cr-release or detachment after 4 hours of incubation with endothelial monolayers cultured in polystyrene wells, FMLP-activated neutrophils produced a marked increase in the passage of /sup 125/I-albumin across bovine aortic or pulmonary artery endothelial monolayers on polycarbonate filters. This effect was evident as early as 30 minutes following the addition of FMLP-activated neutrophils to the monolayer and reached 180% over control values at 2 hours (p . 0.001). Light and transmission electron microscopic examination of the polycarbonate filters exposed to FMLP-activated neutrophils revealed focal disruption of the endothelial monolayers. Chronic granulomatous disease neutrophils produced similar disruption of the endothelial monolayer at 2 hours. Moreover, catalase and superoxide dismutase failed to reduce significantly the neutrophil-mediated increase in /sup 125/I-albumin passage at 2 hours. Cell-free postsecretory supernatants of FMLP-activated neutrophils, leukotriene C4, and platelet activating factor did not induce a significant increase in /sup 125/I-albumin passage across the endothelial monolayers. Of note, FMLP-activated neutrophils from a patient with a congenital abnormality of neutrophil adhesion and chemotaxis did not induce disruption of the monolayer or increase /sup 125/I-albumin passage.

  16. Neutrophils promote Alzheimer's disease-like pathology and cognitive decline via LFA-1 integrin.

    PubMed

    Zenaro, Elena; Pietronigro, Enrica; Della Bianca, Vittorina; Piacentino, Gennj; Marongiu, Laura; Budui, Simona; Turano, Ermanna; Rossi, Barbara; Angiari, Stefano; Dusi, Silvia; Montresor, Alessio; Carlucci, Tommaso; Nanì, Sara; Tosadori, Gabriele; Calciano, Lucia; Catalucci, Daniele; Berton, Giorgio; Bonetti, Bruno; Constantin, Gabriela

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, and innate immune cells have been shown to contribute to disease pathogenesis. In two transgenic models of Alzheimer's disease (5xFAD and 3xTg-AD mice), neutrophils extravasated and were present in areas with amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits, where they released neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and IL-17. Aβ42 peptide triggered the LFA-1 integrin high-affinity state and rapid neutrophil adhesion to integrin ligands. In vivo, LFA-1 integrin controlled neutrophil extravasation into the CNS and intraparenchymal motility. In transgenic Alzheimer's disease models, neutrophil depletion or inhibition of neutrophil trafficking via LFA-1 blockade reduced Alzheimer's disease-like neuropathology and improved memory in mice already showing cognitive dysfunction. Temporary depletion of neutrophils for 1 month at early stages of disease led to sustained improvements in memory. Transgenic Alzheimer's disease model mice lacking LFA-1 were protected from cognitive decline and had reduced gliosis. In humans with Alzheimer's disease, neutrophils adhered to and spread inside brain venules and were present in the parenchyma, along with NETs. Our results demonstrate that neutrophils contribute to Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis and cognitive impairment and suggest that the inhibition of neutrophil trafficking may be beneficial in Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Defensins Impair Phagocytic Killing by Neutrophils in Biomaterial-Related Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, S. S.; Heine, R. P.; Simmons, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    The implantation of foreign material carries a risk of infection which frequently is resistant to all treatment short of removing the implant. We have previously shown that these materials activate neutrophils by contact, leading to production of oxygen free radicals accompanied by release of granule products. Such activation further results in depletion of local host defenses, including the capacity of biomaterial-activated neutrophils to kill bacteria. Among the granule products released from neutrophils are small cationic antibacterial peptides (human neutrophil peptides [HNP]) known as defensins. Here we tested the hypothesis that defensins, released from activated neutrophils onto the surface of biomaterials, might play a role in the deactivation of subsequent neutrophil populations. Incubation of neutrophils with purified HNP resulted in a dose-related impairment of stimulus-induced oxygen radical production and of phagocytic killing. Furthermore, fresh neutrophils added to biomaterial-associated neutrophils exhibited impaired phagocytic killing. This impairment could be abrogated by antibody to HNP but not by an irrelevant antibody. Taken together, these observations support the idea that neutrophils activated at a material surface can create, by means of HNP release, an environment hostile to their microbicidal function and that of their infiltrating brethren. PMID:10084997

  18. The dynamics of neutrophils in zebrafish (Danio rerio) during infection with the parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis.

    PubMed

    von Gersdorff Jørgensen, Louise

    2016-08-01

    Ichthyophthirius multifiliis is a ciliated protozoan parasite infecting the skin and gills of freshwater fish. Neutrophils are attracted to the infection sites, as a part of the innate immune response. In this study a transgenic line of zebrafish (Tg(MPO:GFP)(i114)) with GFP-tagged neutrophils was infected with I. multifiliis and the neutrophil influx in the caudal fin was quantified. Twenty-four hours post infection (pi) the neutrophil count had gone up with an average of 3.4 fold. Forty-eight h pi the neutrophil count had dropped 12% and 72 h pi it had dropped to 21% compared to 24 h pi. At 72 h pi the neutrophil count was 2.7 times higher than prior to infection. A few dead parasites were observed, which were disintegrated and covered internally and externally with neutrophils. Live parasites, both surrounded by neutrophils and with no neutrophils in the near vicinity, were found during the infection. Neutrophils interacted directly with the parasites with pseudopod formation projecting towards the pathogen. These results indicate a strong innate immune response immediately following infection and/or a subsequent immune evasion by the parasite.

  19. Neutrophil elastase promotes myofibroblast differentiation in lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Alyssa D; Kliment, Corrine R; Metz, Heather E; Kim, Kyoung-Hee; Kargl, Julia; Agostini, Brittani A; Crum, Lauren T; Oczypok, Elizabeth A; Oury, Tim A; Houghton, A McGarry

    2015-08-01

    IPF is a progressive lung disorder characterized by fibroblast proliferation and myofibroblast differentiation. Although neutrophil accumulation within IPF lungs has been negatively correlated with outcomes, the role played by neutrophils in lung fibrosis remains poorly understood. We have demonstrated previously that NE promotes lung cancer cell proliferation and hypothesized that it may have a similar effect on fibroblasts. In the current study, we show that NE(-/-) mice are protected from asbestos-induced lung fibrosis. NE(-/-) mice displayed reduced fibroblast and myofibroblast content when compared with controls. NE directly both lung fibroblast proliferation and myofibroblast differentiation in vitro, as evidenced by proliferation assays, collagen gel contractility assays, and αSMA induction. Furthermore, αSMA induction occurs in a TGF-β-independent fashion. Treatment of asbestos-recipient mice with ONO-5046, a synthetic NE antagonist, reduced hydroxyproline content. Thus, the current study points to a key role for neutrophils and NE in the progression of lung fibrosis. Lastly, the study lends rationale to use of NE-inhibitory approaches as a novel therapeutic strategy for patients with lung fibrosis.

  20. Therapeutic exercise attenuates neutrophilic lung injury and skeletal muscle wasting

    PubMed Central

    Files, D. Clark; Liu, Chun; Pereyra, Andrea; Wang, Zhong-Min; Aggarwal, Neil R.; D’Alessio, Franco R.; Garibaldi, Brian T.; Mock, Jason R.; Singer, Benjamin D.; Feng, Xin; Yammani, Raghunatha R.; Zhang, Tan; Lee, Amy L.; Philpott, Sydney; Lussier, Stephanie; Purcell, Lina; Chou, Jeff; Seeds, Michael; King, Landon S.; Morris, Peter E.; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2016-01-01

    Early mobilization of critically ill patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has emerged as a therapeutic strategy that improves patient outcomes, such as the duration of mechanical ventilation and muscle strength. Despite the apparent efficacy of early mobility programs, their use in clinical practice is limited outside of specialized centers and clinical trials. To evaluate the mechanisms underlying mobility therapy, we exercised acute lung injury (ALI) mice for 2 days after the instillation of lipopolysaccharides into their lungs. We found that a short duration of moderate intensity exercise in ALI mice attenuated muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1)–mediated atrophy of the limb and respiratory muscles and improved limb muscle force generation. Exercise also limited the influx of neutrophils into the alveolar space through modulation of a coordinated systemic neutrophil chemokine response. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) concentrations were systemically reduced by exercise in ALI mice, and in vivo blockade of the G-CSF receptor recapitulated the lung exercise phenotype in ALI mice. Additionally, plasma G-CSF concentrations in humans with acute respiratory failure (ARF) undergoing early mobility therapy showed greater decrements over time compared to control ARF patients. Together, these data provide a mechanism whereby early mobility therapy attenuates muscle wasting and limits ongoing alveolar neutrophilia through modulation of systemic neutrophil chemokines in lung-injured mice and humans. PMID:25761888

  1. Therapeutic exercise attenuates neutrophilic lung injury and skeletal muscle wasting.

    PubMed

    Files, D Clark; Liu, Chun; Pereyra, Andrea; Wang, Zhong-Min; Aggarwal, Neil R; D'Alessio, Franco R; Garibaldi, Brian T; Mock, Jason R; Singer, Benjamin D; Feng, Xin; Yammani, Raghunatha R; Zhang, Tan; Lee, Amy L; Philpott, Sydney; Lussier, Stephanie; Purcell, Lina; Chou, Jeff; Seeds, Michael; King, Landon S; Morris, Peter E; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-03-11

    Early mobilization of critically ill patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has emerged as a therapeutic strategy that improves patient outcomes, such as the duration of mechanical ventilation and muscle strength. Despite the apparent efficacy of early mobility programs, their use in clinical practice is limited outside of specialized centers and clinical trials. To evaluate the mechanisms underlying mobility therapy, we exercised acute lung injury (ALI) mice for 2 days after the instillation of lipopolysaccharides into their lungs. We found that a short duration of moderate intensity exercise in ALI mice attenuated muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1)-mediated atrophy of the limb and respiratory muscles and improved limb muscle force generation. Exercise also limited the influx of neutrophils into the alveolar space through modulation of a coordinated systemic neutrophil chemokine response. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) concentrations were systemically reduced by exercise in ALI mice, and in vivo blockade of the G-CSF receptor recapitulated the lung exercise phenotype in ALI mice. Additionally, plasma G-CSF concentrations in humans with acute respiratory failure (ARF) undergoing early mobility therapy showed greater decrements over time compared to control ARF patients. Together, these data provide a mechanism whereby early mobility therapy attenuates muscle wasting and limits ongoing alveolar neutrophilia through modulation of systemic neutrophil chemokines in lung-injured mice and humans. PMID:25761888

  2. Effect of glutamine supplementation on neutrophil function in male judoists.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Eiji; Umeda, Takashi; Takahashi, Ippei; Arata, Kojima; Yamamoto, Yousuke; Tanabe, Masaru; Oyamada, Kazuyuki; Hashizume, Erika; Nakaji, Shigeyuki

    2013-01-01

    Glutamine is an important amino acid for immune function. Though high intensity and prolonged exercise decreases plasma glutamine concentration and causes immune suppression, the relationship between neutrophil functions and glutamine has not yet been found. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impacts of glutamine supplementation on neutrophil function. Twenty-six male university judoists were recruited. Subjects were classified into glutamine and control groups. The glutamine group ingested 3000 mg of glutamine per day and the control group ingested placebo for 2 weeks. Examinations were performed at the start of preunified loading exercise (pre-ULE), then 1 and 2 weeks after ULE (post-ULE). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, phagocytic activity, serum opsonic activity and serum myogenic enzymes were measured. Differences between the levels obtained in pre-ULE and post-ULE for the two groups were compared. In the glutamine group, ROS production activity increased 1 week after ULE, whereas it was not observed in the control group (P < 0.001). Though myogenic enzymes increased significantly after ULE (P < 0.001), the glutamine group remained unchanged by supplementation during ULE. Glutamine supplementation has prevented excessive muscle damage and suppression of neutrophil function, especially in ROS production activity, even during an intensive training period. PMID:23348981

  3. Effect of glutamine supplementation on neutrophil function in male judoists.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Eiji; Umeda, Takashi; Takahashi, Ippei; Arata, Kojima; Yamamoto, Yousuke; Tanabe, Masaru; Oyamada, Kazuyuki; Hashizume, Erika; Nakaji, Shigeyuki

    2013-01-01

    Glutamine is an important amino acid for immune function. Though high intensity and prolonged exercise decreases plasma glutamine concentration and causes immune suppression, the relationship between neutrophil functions and glutamine has not yet been found. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impacts of glutamine supplementation on neutrophil function. Twenty-six male university judoists were recruited. Subjects were classified into glutamine and control groups. The glutamine group ingested 3000 mg of glutamine per day and the control group ingested placebo for 2 weeks. Examinations were performed at the start of preunified loading exercise (pre-ULE), then 1 and 2 weeks after ULE (post-ULE). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, phagocytic activity, serum opsonic activity and serum myogenic enzymes were measured. Differences between the levels obtained in pre-ULE and post-ULE for the two groups were compared. In the glutamine group, ROS production activity increased 1 week after ULE, whereas it was not observed in the control group (P < 0.001). Though myogenic enzymes increased significantly after ULE (P < 0.001), the glutamine group remained unchanged by supplementation during ULE. Glutamine supplementation has prevented excessive muscle damage and suppression of neutrophil function, especially in ROS production activity, even during an intensive training period.

  4. Hypochlorous Acid Generated by Neutrophils Inactivates ADAMTS13

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Chen, Junmei; Ling, Minhua; López, José A.; Chung, Dominic W.; Fu, Xiaoyun

    2015-01-01

    ADAMTS13 is a plasma metalloproteinase that cleaves large multimeric forms of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to smaller, less adhesive forms. ADAMTS13 activity is reduced in systemic inflammatory syndromes, but the cause is unknown. Here, we examined whether neutrophil-derived oxidants can regulate ADAMTS13 activity. We exposed ADAMTS13 to hypochlorous acid (HOCl), produced by a myeloperoxidase-H2O2-Cl− system, and determined its residual proteolytic activity using both a VWF A2 peptide substrate and multimeric plasma VWF. Treatment with 25 nm myeloperoxidase plus 50 μm H2O2 reduced ADAMTS13 activity by >85%. Using mass spectrometry, we demonstrated that Met249, Met331, and Met496 in important functional domains of ADAMTS13 were oxidized to methionine sulfoxide in an HOCl concentration-dependent manner. The loss of enzyme activity correlated with the extent of oxidation of these residues. These Met residues were also oxidized in ADAMTS13 exposed to activated human neutrophils, accompanied by reduced enzyme activity. ADAMTS13 treated with either neutrophil elastase or plasmin was inhibited to a lesser extent, especially in the presence of plasma. These observations suggest that oxidation could be an important mechanism for ADAMTS13 inactivation during inflammation and contribute to the prothrombotic tendency associated with inflammation. PMID:25422322

  5. Inhibition of cytochalasin-primed neutrophils by hyperosmolarity.

    PubMed

    Giambelluca, Miriam S; Gende, Oscar A

    2008-10-01

    Experimental and clinical investigations using hyperosmotic solutions for resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock demonstrated modulation of the inflammatory response. Decreased postinjury hyperinflammation has been attributed to a reduction in neutrophil-mediated tissue damage. This study shows that cytoskeletal disruption with cytochalasinB did not reverse or prevent the inhibitory effect of an osmolarity increase on the neutrophil cytotoxic response to a formyl peptide. In cytochalasin-primed neutrophils, the hyperosmolarity-dependent inhibition promptly reversed after returning to iso-osmotic levels. Paradoxically, an increase in osmolarity after stimulation produced an increase in the release of reactive oxygen species to the extracellular medium. The inhibitory effect of hyperosmotic NaCl can be reproduced by solutions of similar osmolarity containing N-methyl glucamine or sucrose, but solutions containing mannitol allowed an almost complete response to N-formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine. The effects on the release of reactive oxygen species to the extracellular media found with the OxyBURST-bovine serum albumin assay correlated with the changes of the intracellular calcium signal, indicating that the inhibition by hyperosmolarity occurs near the receptor level. PMID:18277949

  6. Porphyromonas gingivalis infection of oral epithelium inhibits neutrophil transepithelial migration.

    PubMed Central

    Madianos, P N; Papapanou, P N; Sandros, J

    1997-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are inflammatory disorders caused by microorganisms of dental plaque that colonize the gingival sulcus and, subsequently, the periodontal pocket. As in other mucosal infections, the host response to plaque bacteria is characterized by an influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) to the gingival crevice. Neutrophil migration through the epithelial lining of the gingival pocket is thought to be the first line of defense against plaque bacteria. In order to model this phenomenon in vitro, we used the oral epithelial cell line KB and human PMNs in the Transwell system and examined the impact of Porphyr