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Sample records for acetic propionic butyric

  1. Isolation of acetic, propionic and butyric acid-forming bacteria from biogas plants.

    PubMed

    Cibis, Katharina Gabriela; Gneipel, Armin; König, Helmut

    2016-02-20

    In this study, acetic, propionic and butyric acid-forming bacteria were isolated from thermophilic and mesophilic biogas plants (BGP) located in Germany. The fermenters were fed with maize silage and cattle or swine manure. Furthermore, pressurized laboratory fermenters digesting maize silage were sampled. Enrichment cultures for the isolation of acid-forming bacteria were grown in minimal medium supplemented with one of the following carbon sources: Na(+)-dl-lactate, succinate, ethanol, glycerol, glucose or a mixture of amino acids. These substrates could be converted by the isolates to acetic, propionic or butyric acid. In total, 49 isolates were obtained, which belonged to the phyla Firmicutes, Tenericutes or Thermotogae. According to 16S rRNA gene sequences, most isolates were related to Clostridium sporosphaeroides, Defluviitoga tunisiensis and Dendrosporobacter quercicolus. Acetic, propionic or butyric acid were produced in cultures of isolates affiliated to Bacillus thermoamylovorans, Clostridium aminovalericum, Clostridium cochlearium/Clostridium tetani, C. sporosphaeroides, D. quercicolus, Proteiniborus ethanoligenes, Selenomonas bovis and Tepidanaerobacter sp. Isolates related to Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum produced acetic, butyric and lactic acid, and isolates related to D. tunisiensis formed acetic acid. Specific primer sets targeting 16S rRNA gene sequences were designed and used for real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The isolates were physiologically characterized and their role in BGP discussed. PMID:26779817

  2. Homogeneous preparation of cellulose acetate propionate (CAP) and cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) from sugarcane bagasse cellulose in ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kelin; Wang, Ben; Cao, Yan; Li, Huiquan; Wang, Jinshu; Lin, Weijiang; Mu, Chaoshi; Liao, Dankui

    2011-05-25

    Cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and cellulose acetate propionate (CAP) were prepared homogeneously in a 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (AmimCl) ionic liquid system from sugarcane bagasse (SB). The reaction temperature, reaction time, and molar ratio of butyric (propionic) anhydride/anhydroglucose units in the cellulose affect the butyryl (B) or propionyl (P) content of CAB or CAP samples. The (13)C NMR data revealed the distribution of the substituents of CAB and CAP. The thermal stability of sugar cane bagasse cellulose was found by thermogravimetric analysis to have decreased after chemical modification. After reaction, the ionic liquid was effectively recycled and reused. This study provides a new way for high-value-added utilization of SB and realizing the objective of turning waste into wealth. PMID:21452895

  3. The effect of short-chain fatty acids butyrate, propionate, and acetate on urothelial cell kinetics in vitro: potential therapy in augmentation cystoplasty.

    PubMed

    Dyer, J P; Featherstone, J M; Solomon, L Z; Crook, T J; Cooper, A J; Malone, P S

    2005-07-01

    The intestinal element of enterocystoplasty is affected by chronic inflammatory changes, which lead to excess mucus production, urinary tract infections, and stone formation. There is also an increased risk of malignancy. These inflammatory changes may be due to diversion colitis, which affects colonic segments excluded from the faecal stream and likewise may respond to intraluminal short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) therapy. The SCFAs have interesting antiproliferative, differentiating, and pro-apoptotic effects, which are protective against colorectal cancer and may influence the risk of malignancy in enterocystoplasty. Before intravesical therapy can be considered, the effect on normal urothelium must be investigated. Primary urothelial cells cultured from biopsy specimens and transformed urothelial (RT112 and MGH-U1) and intestinal cell lines (HT29 and CaCo-2) were incubated with SCFAs. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to measure the residual viable biomass to assess cell proliferation. Proliferation of primary and transformed urothelial cells in culture was inhibited by all SCFAs in a similar time- and dose-dependent manner. The concentration of SCFA required to inhibit growth of primary cells by 50% (IC50) was 20 mM of butyrate, 120 mM of propionate, and 240 mM of acetate after incubation for 1 h. After 72 h the IC50 was 2 mM of butyrate, 4 mM of propionate, and 20 mM of acetate. Transformed urothelial and colon cancer cell lines demonstrated similar growth inhibition. Butyrate was the most potent inhibitor of cell proliferation, followed by propionate and then acetate. Growth inhibition is not an immediate cytotoxic effect, and urothelial cells show a degree of adaptation to butyrate and growth recovery after incubation with butyrate. In conclusion, butyrate- and propionate-induced growth inhibition is potentially clinically significant and may have therapeutically beneficial implications in vivo. PMID:15864601

  4. Reductive Carboxylation of Propionate to Butyrate in Methanogenic Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Tholozan, J. L.; Samain, E.; Grivet, J. P.; Moletta, R.; Dubourguier, H. C.; Albagnac, G.

    1988-01-01

    During the batch degradation of sodium propionate by the anaerobic sludge from an industrial digestor, we observed a significant amount of butyrate formation. Varying the initial propionate concentrations did not alter the ratio of maximal butyrate accumulation to initial propionate concentration within a large range. By measuring the decrease in the radioactivity of [1-14C]butyrate during propionate degradation, we estimated that about 20% of the propionate was converted to butyrate. Labeled butyrate was formed from [1-14C]propionate with the same specific radioactivity, suggesting a possible direct pathway from propionate to butyrate. We confirmed this hypothesis by nuclear magnetic resonance studies with [13C]propionate. The results showed that [1-13C]-, [2-13C]-, and [3-13C]propionate were converted to [2-13C]-, [3-13C]-, and [4-13C]butyrate, respectively, demonstrating the direct carboxylation on the carboxyl group of propionate without randomization of the other two carbons. In addition, we observed an exchange reaction between C-2 and C-3 of the propionate, indicating that acetogensis may proceed through a randomizing pathway. The physiological significance and importance of various metabolic pathways involved in propionate degradation are discussed, and an unusual pathway of butyrate synthesis is proposed. PMID:16347557

  5. Metabolic Activity of Fatty Acid-Oxidizing Bacteria and the Contribution of Acetate, Propionate, Butyrate, and CO2 to Methanogenesis in Cattle Waste at 40 and 60°C

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, Roderick I.; Bryant, Marvin P.

    1981-01-01

    The quantitative contribution of fatty acids and CO2 to methanogenesis was studied by using stirred, 3-liter bench-top digestors fed on a semicontinuous basis with cattle waste. The fermentations were carried out at 40 and 60°C under identical loading conditions (6 g of volatile solids per liter of reactor volume per day, 10-day retention time). In the thermophilic digestor, acetate turnover increased from a prefeeding level of 16 μM/min to a peak (49 μM/min) 1 h after feeding and then gradually decreased. Acetate turnover in the mesophilic digestor increased from 15 to 40 μM/min. Propionate turnover ranged from 2 to 5.2 and 1.5 to 4.5 μM/min in the thermophilic and mesophilic digestors, respectively. Butyrate turnover (0.7 to 1.2 μM/min) was similar in both digestors. The proportion of CH4 produced via the methyl group of acetate varied with time after feeding and ranged from 72 to 75% in the mesophilic digestor and 75 to 86% in the thermophilic digestor. The contribution from CO2 reduction was 24 to 29% and 19 to 27%, respectively. Propionate and butyrate turnover accounted for 20% of the total CH4 produced. Acetate synthesis from CO2 was greatest shortly after feeding and was higher in the thermophilic digestor (0.5 to 2.4 μM/min) than the mesophilic digestor (0.3 to 0.5 μM/min). Counts of fatty acid-degrading bacteria were related to their turnover activity. PMID:16345789

  6. Inhibition of the Fermentation of Propionate to Methane by Hydrogen, Acetate, and Propionate

    PubMed Central

    Fukuzaki, Satoshi; Nishio, Naomichi; Shobayashi, Manabu; Nagai, Shiro

    1990-01-01

    Inhibition of the fermentation of propionate to methane and carbon dioxide by hydrogen, acetate, and propionate was analyzed with a mesophilic propionate-acclimatized sludge that consisted of numerous flocs (size, 150 to 300 μm). The acclimatized sludge could convert propionate to methane and carbon dioxide stoichiometrically without accumulating hydrogen and acetate in a propionate-minimal medium. Inhibition of propionate utilization by propionate could be analyzed by a second-order substrate inhibition model (shown below) given that the substrate saturation constant, Ks, was 15.9 μM; the substrate inhibition constant, Ki, was 0.79 mM; and the maximum specific rate of propionate utilization, qm, was 2.15 mmol/g of mixed-liquor volatile suspended solids (MLVSS) per day: qs = qmS/[Ks + S + (S2/Ki)], where qs is the specific rate of propionate utilization and S is the initial concentration of undissociated propionic acid. For inhibition by hydrogen and acetate to propionate utilization, a noncompetitive product inhibition model was used: qs = qm/[1 + (P/Kp)n], where P is the initial concentration of hydrogen or undissociated acetic acid and Kp is the inhibition constant. Kinetic analysis gave, for hydrogen inhibition, Kp(H2) = 0.11 atm (= 11.1 kPa, 71.5 μM), qm = 2.40 mmol/g of MLVSS per day, and n = 1.51 and, for acetate inhibition, Kp(HAc) = 48.6 μM, qm = 1.85 mmol/g of MLVSS per day, and n = 0.96. It could be concluded that the increase in undissociated propionic acid concentration was a key factor in inhibition of propionate utilization and that hydrogen and acetate cooperatively inhibited propionate degradation, suggesting that hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogens might play an important role in enhancing propionate degradation to methane and carbon dioxide. PMID:16348146

  7. [Pharmacological study on hydrocortisone 17-butyrate 21-propionate (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Otomo, S; Higuchi, S; Nakaike, S; Takeshita, K; Tanaka, M; Gotoh, Y; Osada, Y; Tsuchida, K; Inoue, K; Kyogoku, K; Tarumoto, Y; Sasajima, M; Ohzeki, M

    1981-12-01

    The topical and systemic anti-inflammatory activities of hydrocortisone 17-butyrate 21-propionate (HBP) were studied. The systemic anti-inflammatory activities of HBP and reference steroids were examined for their effects on dinitrochlorobenzene dermatitis, carrageenin edema, cotton pellet granuloma and adjuvant arthritis in rats and by the delayed allergic edema test in mice. The topical anti-inflammatory activities of these steroids were examined for their effects on croton oil dermatitis, croton oil ear edema, carrageenin edema and cotton pellet granuloma in rats. Furthermore, effects of these steroids on liver glycogen deposition in mice, thymolysis, and decrease of serum corticosterone level in rats were examined. Systemically administered HBP was less potent than betamethasone 17-valerate (BV), but was almost equal to hydrocortisone 17-butyrate (HB) in anti-inflammatory activity, and its effects on liver glycogen deposition, thymolysis, and the decrease of serum corticosterone level. However, the topical anti-inflammatory activity of HBP was more potent than that of BV and HB, although in the same experiment, thymolytic activity of HBP was less potent than that of BV, but was almost equal to HB. The inhibitory effect of HBP on hypotonic induced hemolysis was weaker than that of BV, but was stronger than that of HB in vitro. The affinity of HBP was higher than that of BV and HB to polymorphonuclear leucocytes used as the inflammatory cells in vitro. On the other hand no marked difference was observed in the affinity to erythrocytes used as the non-inflammatory cells in vitro. These results suggest that HBP is a useful drug which has superior topical anti-inflammatory activity, but has a weak systemic effect. PMID:7333567

  8. Potential enhancement of direct interspecies electron transfer for syntrophic metabolism of propionate and butyrate with biochar in up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Yaobin; Holmes, Dawn E; Dang, Yan; Woodard, Trevor L; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R

    2016-06-01

    Promoting direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) to enhance syntrophic metabolism may be a strategy for accelerating the conversion of organic wastes to methane, but microorganisms capable of metabolizing propionate and butyrate via DIET under methanogenic conditions have yet to be identified. In an attempt to establish methanogenic communities metabolizing propionate or butyrate with DIET, enrichments were initiated with up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), similar to those that were previously reported to support communities that metabolized ethanol with DIET that relied on direct biological electrical connections. In the absence of any amendments, microbial communities enriched were dominated by microorganisms closely related to pure cultures that are known to metabolize propionate or butyrate to acetate with production of H2. When biochar was added to the reactors there was a substantial enrichment on the biochar surface of 16S rRNA gene sequences closely related to Geobacter and Methanosaeta species known to participate in DIET. PMID:26967338

  9. Communities stimulated with ethanol to perform direct interspecies electron transfer for syntrophic metabolism of propionate and butyrate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Yaobin; Yu, Qilin; Dang, Yan; Li, Yang; Quan, Xie

    2016-10-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) has been considered as an alternative to interspecies H2 transfer (IHT) for syntrophic metabolism, but the microorganisms capable of metabolizing the key intermediates, such as propionate and butyrate, via DIET have yet to be described. A strategy of culturing the enrichments with ethanol as a DIET substrate to stimulate the communities for the syntrophic metabolism of propionate and/or butyrate was proposed in this study. The results showed that the syntrophic propionate and/or butyrate degradation was significantly improved in the ethanol-stimulated reactor when propionate/butyrate was the sole carbon source. The conductivity of the ethanol-stimulated enrichments was as 5 folds (for propionate)/76 folds (for butyrate) as that of the traditional enrichments (never ethanol fed). Microbial community analysis revealed that Geobacter species known to proceed DIET were only detected in the ethanol-stimulated enrichments. Together with the significant increase of Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina species in these enrichments, the potential DIET between Geobacter and Methanosaeta or Methanosarcina species might be established to improve the syntrophic propionate and/or butyrate degradation. Further experiments demonstrated that granular activated carbon (GAC) could improve the syntrophic metabolism of propionate and/or butyrate of the ethanol-stimulated enrichments, while almost no effects on the traditional enrichments. Also, the high H2 partial pressure could inhibit the syntrophic propionate and/or butyrate degradation of the traditional enrichments, but its effect on that of the ethanol-stimulated enrichments was negligible. PMID:27403870

  10. Allergic contact dermatitis to topical corticosteroids: clobetasol propionate and clobetasone butyrate.

    PubMed

    Dooms-Goossens, A; Vanhee, J; Vanderheyden, D; Gevers, D; Willems, L; Degreef, H

    1983-11-01

    2 case reports are given of patients with positive patch test reactions to clobetasol propionate. One of the patients also reacted to clobetasone butyrate. 30 other steroids that were chemically very closely related to these two 21-chloro-9-alpha-fluoro-corticosteroids, were patch test negative. The literature on contact dermatitis reactions to corticosteroids is reviewed. PMID:6653104

  11. Anti-inflammatory properties of the short-chain fatty acids acetate and propionate: A study with relevance to inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Tedelind, Sofia; Westberg, Fredrik; Kjerrulf, Martin; Vidal, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To compare the anti-inflammatory properties of butyrate with two other SCFAs, namely acetate and propionate, which have less well-documented effects on inflammation. METHODS: The effect of SCFAs on cytokine release from human neutrophils was studied with ELISA. SCFA-dependent modulation of NF-κB reporter activity was assessed in the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line, Colo320DM. Finally, the effect of SCFAs on gene expression and cytokine release, measured with RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively, was studied in mouse colon organ cultures established from colitic mice. RESULTS: Acetate, propionate and butyrate at 30 mmol/L decreased LPS-stimulated TNFα release from neutrophils, without affecting IL-8 protein release. All SCFAs dose dependently inhibited NF-κB reporter activity in Colo320DM cells. Propionate dose-dependently suppressed IL-6 mRNA and protein release from colon organ cultures and comparative studies revealed that propionate and butyrate at 30 mmol/L caused a strong inhibition of immune-related gene expression, whereas acetate was less effective. A similar inhibition was achieved with the proteasome inhibitor MG-132, but not the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580. All SCFAs decreased IL-6 protein release from organ cultures. CONCLUSION: In the present study propionate and butyrate were equipotent, whereas acetate was less effective, at suppressing NF-κB reporter activity, immune-related gene expression and cytokine release in vitro. Our findings suggest that propionate and acetate, in addition to butyrate, could be useful in the treatment of inflammatory disorders, including IBD. PMID:17569118

  12. Propionate stimulates pyruvate oxidation in the presence of acetate

    PubMed Central

    Purmal, Colin; Kucejova, Blanka; Sherry, A. Dean; Burgess, Shawn C.; Malloy, Craig. R.

    2014-01-01

    Flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) in the heart may be reduced by various forms of injury to the myocardium, or by oxidation of alternative substrates in normal heart tissue. It is important to distinguish these two mechanisms because imaging of flux through PDH based on the appearance of hyperpolarized (HP) [13C]bicarbonate derived from HP [1-13C]pyruvate has been proposed as a method for identifying viable myocardium. The efficacy of propionate for increasing PDH flux in the setting of PDH inhibition by an alternative substrate was studied using isotopomer analysis paired with exams using HP [1-13C]pyruvate. Hearts from C57/bl6 mice were supplied with acetate (2 mM) and glucose (8.25 mM). 13C NMR spectra were acquired in a cryogenically cooled probe at 14.1 Tesla. After addition of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate, 13C NMR signals from lactate, alanine, malate, and aspartate were easily detected, in addition to small signals from bicarbonate and CO2. The addition of propionate (2 mM) increased appearance of HP [13C]bicarbonate >30-fold without change in O2 consumption. Isotopomer analysis of extracts from the freeze-clamped hearts indicated that acetate was the preferred substrate for energy production, glucose contribution to energy production was minimal, and anaplerosis was stimulated in the presence of propionate. Under conditions where production of acetyl-CoA is dominated by the availability of an alternative substrate, acetate, propionate markedly stimulated PDH flux as detected by the appearance of hyperpolarized [13C]bicarbonate from metabolism of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate. PMID:25320331

  13. Transcriptome characterization by deep-RNA-sequencing underlies the mechanisms of butyrate-induced epigenomic regulation in bovine cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs, acetate, propionate, and butyrate), especially butyrate, alter cell differentiation, proliferation, motility, and in particular, induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through its histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition activity. Butyrate is a great inducer of ...

  14. Comparative toxicity study of hydrocortisone 17-butyrate 21-propionate (HBP) ointment and other topical corticosteroids in rats.

    PubMed

    Kimura, M; Tarumoto, Y; Nakane, S; Otomo, S

    1986-01-01

    Comparative systemic and topical toxicity in male rats treated on the dorsal skin for 14 consecutive days with a volume of 0.15 g/100 g (body weight) of 0.1% hydrocortisone 17-butyrate 21-propionate (HBP) ointment, 0.05% clobetasol propionate (CP) ointment, 0.1% predonisolone 17-valerate 21-acetate (PVA) ointment and 0.1% diflucortolone valerate (DV) ointment was studied. In all the treated groups body weight gain was suppressed, serum concentration of total cholesterol and triglycerides increased and the lymphatic tissues and skin were atrophic. The DV and CP groups had adrenal atrophy and renal lesions, and the DV group also had gastric and hepatic lesions. The systemic effect of HBP ointment was weaker than that of the other drugs (DV greater than CP much greater than PVA greater than HBP). All the drugs significantly reduced the skin fold thickness in treated areas throughout the application period. The dermal atrophic effect of HBP ointment was also relatively weaker than that of the other drugs. From the above evidence, it was concluded that HBP ointment was less toxic than the other topical corticosteroids. PMID:3757761

  15. Conductive iron oxides accelerate thermophilic methanogenesis from acetate and propionate.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Chihaya; Kato, Souichiro; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2015-06-01

    Anaerobic digester is one of the attractive technologies for treatment of organic wastes and wastewater, while continuous development and improvements on their stable operation with efficient organic removal are required. Particles of conductive iron oxides (e.g., magnetite) are known to facilitate microbial interspecies electron transfer (termed as electric syntrophy). Electric syntrophy has been reported to enhance methanogenic degradation of organic acids by mesophilic communities in soil and anaerobic digester. Here we investigated the effects of supplementation of conductive iron oxides (magnetite) on thermophilic methanogenic microbial communities derived from a thermophilic anaerobic digester. Supplementation of magnetite accelerated methanogenesis from acetate and propionate under thermophilic conditions, while supplementation of ferrihydrite also accelerated methanogenesis from propionate. Microbial community analysis revealed that supplementation of magnetite drastically changed bacterial populations in the methanogenic acetate-degrading cultures, in which Tepidoanaerobacter sp. and Coprothermobacter sp. dominated. These results suggest that supplementation of magnetite induce electric syntrophy between organic acid-oxidizing bacteria and methanogenic archaea and accelerate methanogenesis even under thermophilic conditions. Findings from this study would provide a possibility for the achievement of stably operating thermophilic anaerobic digestion systems with high efficiency for removal of organics and generation of CH4. PMID:25488041

  16. Li-Ion Cells Employing Electrolytes With Methyl Propionate and Ethyl Butyrate Co-Solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2011-01-01

    Future NASA missions aimed at exploring Mars and the outer planets require rechargeable batteries that can operate at low temperatures to satisfy the requirements of such applications as landers, rovers, and penetrators. A number of terrestrial applications, such as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and electric vehicles (EVs) also require energy storage devices that can operate over a wide temperature range (i.e., -40 to +70 C), while still providing high power capability and long life. Currently, the state-of-the-art lithium-ion system has been demonstrated to operate over a wide range of temperatures (-30 to +40 C); however, the rate capability at the lower temperatures is very poor. These limitations at very low temperatures are due to poor electrolyte conductivity, poor lithium intercalation kinetics over the electrode surface layers, and poor ionic diffusion in the electrode bulk. Two wide-operating-temperature-range electrolytes have been developed based on advances involving lithium hexafluorophosphate-based solutions in carbonate and carbonate + ester solvent blends, which have been further optimized in the context of the technology and targeted applications. The approaches employed include further optimization of electrolytes containing methyl propionate (MP) and ethyl butyrate (EB), which are effective co-solvents, to widen the operating temperature range beyond the baseline systems. Attention was focused on further optimizing ester-based electrolyte formulations that have exhibited the best performance at temperatures ranging from -60 to +60 C, with an emphasis upon improving the rate capability at -20 to -40 C. This was accomplished by increasing electrolyte salt concentration to 1.20M and increasing the ester content to 60 percent by volume to increase the ionic conductivity at low temperatures. Two JPL-developed electrolytes 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MP (20:20:60 v/v %) and 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+EB (20:20:60 v/v %) operate effectively over a wide

  17. Intraperitoneal administration of butyrate prevents the severity of acetic acid colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Malago, Joshua J.; Sangu, Catherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Intrarectal infusion of butyrate improves colorectal disorders including ulcerative colitis (UC). However, it is not established whether systemically administered butyrate benefits such patients. The current study aimed at exploring and comparing the potential of intraperitoneally, intrarectally, and orally administered butyrate against acetic acid (AA)-induced UC in rats. Intrarectal administration of 2 ml of 50% AA was done after or without prior treatment of rats for 7 consecutive days with 100 mg/kg sodium butyrate (SB) intraperitoneally, intrarectally, or orally. Rats were sacrificed after 48 h of AA-treatment. Subsequently, colon sections were processed routinely for histopathological examination. We clinically observed diarrhea, loose stools, and hemoccult-positive stools, and histologically, epithelial loss and ulceration, crypt damage, goblet cell depletion, hemorrhage, and mucosal infiltration of inflammatory cells. The changes were significantly reduced by intraperitoneal, intrarectal, or oral butyrate, with intraperitoneal butyrate exhibiting the highest potency. It is concluded that intraperitoneal administration of butyrate abrogates the lesions of AA-induced UC and its potency surpasses that of intrarectal or oral butyrate. PMID:25743124

  18. The interaction of propionic and butyric acids with ice and HNO₃-doped ice surfaces at 195-212 K.

    PubMed

    Romanias, Manolis N; Papadimitriou, Vassileios C; Papagiannakopoulos, Panos

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of propionic and butyric acids on ice and HNO3-doped ice were studied between 195 and 212 K and low concentrations, using a Knudsen flow reactor coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The initial uptake coefficients (γ0) of propionic and butyric acids on ice as a function of temperature are given by the expressions: γ0(T) = (7.30 ± 1.0) × 10(-10) exp[(3216 ± 478)/T] and γ0(T) = (6.36 ± 0.76) × 10(-11) exp[(3810 ± 434)/T], respectively; the quoted error limits are at 95% level of confidence. Similarly, γ0 of propionic acid on 1.96 wt % (A) and 7.69 wt % (B) HNO3-doped ice with temperature are given as γ(0,A)(T) = (2.89 ± 0.26) × 10(-8) exp[(2517 ± 266)/T] and γ(0,B)(T) = (2.77 ± 0.29) × 10(-7) exp[(2126 ± 206)/T], respectively. The results show that γ0 of C1 to C4 n-carboxylic acids on ice increase with the alkyl-group length, due to lateral interactions between alkyl-groups that favor a more perpendicular orientation and well packing of H-bonded monomers on ice. The high uptakes (>10(15) molecules cm(-2)) and long recovery signals indicate efficient growth of random multilayers above the first monolayer driven by significant van der Waals interactions. The heterogeneous loss of both acids on ice and HNO3-doped ice particles in dense cirrus clouds is estimated to take a few minutes, signifying rapid local heterogeneous removal by dense cirrus clouds. PMID:25384192

  19. Temperature effect on acetate and propionate consumption by sulfate-reducing bacteria in saline wastewater.

    PubMed

    van den Brand, T P H; Roest, K; Brdjanovic, D; Chen, G H; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2014-05-01

    Seawater toilet flushing, seawater intrusion in the sewerage, and discharge of sulfate-rich industrial effluents elevates sulfate content in wastewater. The application of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in wastewater treatment is very beneficial; as for example, it improves the pathogen removal and reduces the volume of waste sludge, energy requirement and costs. This paper evaluates the potential to apply biological sulfate reduction using acetate and propionate to saline sewage treatment in moderate climates. Long-term biological sulfate reduction experiments at 10 and 20 °C were conducted in a sequencing batch reactor with synthetic saline domestic wastewater. Subsequently, acetate and propionate (soluble organic carbon) conversion rate were determined in both reactors, in the presence of either or both fatty acids. Both acetate and propionate consumption rates by SRB were 1.9 times lower at 10 °C than at 20 °C. At 10 °C, propionate was incompletely oxidized to acetate. At 10 °C, complete removal of soluble organic carbon requires a significantly increased hydraulic retention time as compared to 20 °C. The results of the study showed that biological sulfate reduction can be a feasible and promising process for saline wastewater treatment in moderate climate. PMID:24463759

  20. [Long-term and short-term effects of propionic/acetic acid ratios on metabolism of glycogen-accumulating organisms].

    PubMed

    Yao, Ying; Chen, Yin-guang; Ma, Min; Gu, Guo-wei

    2007-09-01

    Three activated sludges enriched with glycogen accumulating organisms (GAO) were acclimatized respectively with different ratios of propionic to acetic acid (i.e. biomass SBR-A, C and E) . The effect of different ratios of propionic/acetic acid on the metabolism of long-term cultivated GAO was investigated. Cultivated with high propionic/acetic acid ratio, GAO consumed less glycogen and synthesized less poly-beta-hydroxyalkanoates (PHA) in the anaerobic phase, and in the aerobic phase accumulated less glycogen and degraded less PHA, and at the same time the microbial growth was lower. When the carbon mole of acetic acid equaled that of propionic acid in the influent, GAO utilized acetic acid faster than propionic acid. Batch tests were carried out with biomass SBR-A and SBR-E to study the transient response of long-term cultivated GAO to short-term change of propionic/acetic acid ratio. The GAO cultivated with a high propionic/acetic acid ratio was able to utilize acetic acid immediately when the concentration of acetic acid in the feed suddenly increased. But when the biomass cultivated with a low propionic/acetic acid ratio was feed with high ratio propionic/acetic acid wastewater, the propionic acid uptake rate was only 41.1% of the rate of the GAO long-term cultivated with high propionic/acetic acid. The sudden increase of propionic/acetic acid ratio could effectively inhibit the metabolism of GAO. PMID:17990541

  1. Morphological development of polypropylene in immiscible blends with cellulose acetate butyrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isotactic polypropylenes (iPP) with different melt flow indexes were melt blended with cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and then prepared into microspheres or nanofibers following a novel process of producing well dispersed CAB/iPP immiscible blends and subsequent removal of the CAB matrix. The morp...

  2. Intermediary Metabolism in Clostridium acetobutylicum: Levels of Enzymes Involved in the Formation of Acetate and Butyrate

    PubMed Central

    Hartmanis, Maris G. N.; Gatenbeck, Sten

    1984-01-01

    The levels of seven intermediary enzymes involved in acetate and butyrate formation from acetyl coenzyme A in the saccharolytic anaerobe Clostridium acetobutylicum were investigated as a function of time in solvent-producing batch fermentations. Phosphate acetyltransferase and acetate kinase, which are known to form acetate from acetyl coenzyme A, both showed a decrease in specific activity when the organism reached the solvent formation stage. The three consecutive enzymes thiolase, β-hydroxybutyrylcoenzyme A dehydrogenase, and crotonase exhibited a coordinate expression and a maximal activity after growth had ceased. Only low levels of butyryl coenzyme A dehydrogenase activity were found. Phosphate butyryltransferase activity rapidly decreased after 20 h from 5 to 11 U/mg of protein to below the detection limit (1 mU/mg). Butyrate no longer can be formed, and the metabolic flux may be diverted to butanol. Butyrate kinase showed a 2.5- to 10-fold increase in specific activity after phosphate butyryltransferase activity no longer could be detected. These results suggest that the uptake of acetate and butyrate during solvent formation can not proceed via a complete reversal of the phosphate transferase and kinase reactions. The activities of all enzymes investigated as a function of time in vitro are much higher than the metabolic fluxes through them in vivo. This indicates that none of the maximal activities of the enzymes assayed is rate limiting in C. acetobutylicum. PMID:16346566

  3. DNA microarray analyses of the long-term adaptive response of Escherichia coli to acetate and propionate.

    PubMed

    Polen, T; Rittmann, D; Wendisch, V F; Sahm, H

    2003-03-01

    In its natural environment, Escherichia coli is exposed to short-chain fatty acids, such as acetic acid or propionic acid, which can be utilized as carbon sources but which inhibit growth at higher concentrations. DNA microarray experiments revealed expression changes during exponential growth on complex medium due to the presence of sodium acetate or sodium propionate at a neutral external pH. The adaptive responses to acetate and propionate were similar and involved genes in three categories. First, the RNA levels for chemotaxis and flagellum genes increased. Accordingly, the expression of chromosomal fliC'-'lacZ and flhDC'-'lacZ fusions and swimming motility increased after adaptation to acetate or propionate. Second, the expression of many genes that are involved in the uptake and utilization of carbon sources decreased, indicating some kind of catabolite repression by acetate and propionate. Third, the expression of some genes of the general stress response increased, but the increases were more pronounced after short-term exposure for this response than for the adaptive response. Adaptation to propionate but not to acetate involved increased expression of threonine and isoleucine biosynthetic genes. The gene expression changes after adaptation to acetate or propionate were not caused solely by uncoupling or osmotic effects but represented specific characteristics of the long-term response of E. coli to either compound. PMID:12620868

  4. Butyric acid production from softwood hydrolysate by acetate-consuming Clostridium sp. S1 with high butyric acid yield and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsun; Kim, Ki-Yeon; Lee, Kyung Min; Youn, Sung Hun; Lee, Sun-Mi; Woo, Han Min; Oh, Min-Kyu; Um, Youngsoon

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study the butyric acid production from softwood hydrolysate by acetate-consuming Clostridium sp. S1. Results showed that Clostridium sp. S1 produced butyric acid by simultaneously utilizing glucose and mannose in softwood hydrolysate and, more remarkably, it consumed acetic acid in hydrolysate. Clostridium sp. S1 utilized each of glucose, mannose, and xylose as well as mixed sugars simultaneously with partially repressed xylose utilization. When softwood (Japanese larch) hydrolysate containing glucose and mannose as the main sugars was used, Clostridium sp. S1 produced 21.17g/L butyric acid with the yield of 0.47g/g sugar and the selectivity of 1 (g butyric acid/g total acids) owing to the consumption of acetic acid in hydrolysate. The results demonstrate potential of Clostridium sp. S1 to produce butyric acid selectively and effectively from hydrolysate not only by utilizing mixed sugars simultaneously but also by converting acetic acid to butyric acid. PMID:27474955

  5. Carboxymethyl Cellulose Acetate Butyrate: A Review of the Preparations, Properties, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Samir; Salama, Ahmed; Sarhan, Hebat-Allah

    2014-01-01

    Carboxymethyl cellulose acetate butyrate (CMCAB) has gained increasing importance in several fields, particularly in coating technologies and pharmaceutical research. CMCAB is synthesized by esterification of CMC sodium salt with acetic and butyric anhydrides. CMCAB mixed esters are relatively high molecular weight (MW) thermoplastic polymers with high glass transition temperatures (Tg). CMCAB ester is dispersible in water and soluble in a wide range of organic solvents, allowing varied opportunity to the solvent choice. It makes application of coatings more consistent and defect-free. Its ability to slow down the release rate of highly water-soluble compounds and to increase the dissolution of poorly soluble compounds makes CMCAB a unique and potentially valuable tool in pharmaceutical and amorphous solid dispersions (ASD) formulations. PMID:25548679

  6. Performance of cellulose acetate butyrate membranes in hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea feed solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T.; Leban, M.

    1973-01-01

    Cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) membranes are shown to give high salt and urea rejection with water flux of about 3 gallons/sq ft per day at 600 psig. Membranes prepared from a formulation containing glyoxal show a significant increase in flux and decrease in salt and urea rejection with drying time. Zero drying time gives maximum urea and salt rejection and is therefore most suitable for hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea feed solution.

  7. Analysis of the key enzymes of butyric and acetic acid fermentation in biogas reactors

    PubMed Central

    Gabris, Christina; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Dürre, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of the mechanisms of acidogenesis, which is a key process during anaerobic digestion. To expose possible bottlenecks, specific activities of the key enzymes of acidification, such as acetate kinase (Ack, 0.23–0.99 U mg−1 protein), butyrate kinase (Buk, < 0.03 U mg−1 protein) and butyryl-CoA:acetate-CoA transferase (But, 3.24–7.64 U mg−1 protein), were determined in cell free extracts of biogas reactor content from three different biogas reactors. Furthermore, the detection of Ack was successful via Western blot analysis. Quantification of corresponding functional genes encoding Buk (buk) and But (but) was not feasible, although an amplification was possible. Thus, phylogenetic trees were constructed based on respective gene fragments. Four new clades of possible butyrate-producing bacteria were postulated, as well as bacteria of the genera Roseburia or Clostridium identified. The low Buk activity was in contrast to the high specific But activity in the analysed samples. Butyrate formation via Buk activity does barely occur in the investigated biogas reactor. Specific enzyme activities (Ack, Buk and But) in samples drawn from three different biogas reactors correlated with ammonia and ammonium concentrations (NH3 and NH4+-N), and a negative dependency can be postulated. Thus, high concentrations of NH3 and NH4+-N may lead to a bottleneck in acidogenesis due to decreased specific acidogenic enzyme activities. PMID:26086956

  8. Analysis of the key enzymes of butyric and acetic acid fermentation in biogas reactors.

    PubMed

    Gabris, Christina; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Dürre, Peter

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of the mechanisms of acidogenesis, which is a key process during anaerobic digestion. To expose possible bottlenecks, specific activities of the key enzymes of acidification, such as acetate kinase (Ack, 0.23-0.99 U mg(-1) protein), butyrate kinase (Buk, < 0.03 U mg(-1) protein) and butyryl-CoA:acetate-CoA transferase (But, 3.24-7.64 U mg(-1) protein), were determined in cell free extracts of biogas reactor content from three different biogas reactors. Furthermore, the detection of Ack was successful via Western blot analysis. Quantification of corresponding functional genes encoding Buk (buk) and But (but) was not feasible, although an amplification was possible. Thus, phylogenetic trees were constructed based on respective gene fragments. Four new clades of possible butyrate-producing bacteria were postulated, as well as bacteria of the genera Roseburia or Clostridium identified. The low Buk activity was in contrast to the high specific But activity in the analysed samples. Butyrate formation via Buk activity does barely occur in the investigated biogas reactor. Specific enzyme activities (Ack, Buk and But) in samples drawn from three different biogas reactors correlated with ammonia and ammonium concentrations (NH₃ and NH₄(+)-N), and a negative dependency can be postulated. Thus, high concentrations of NH₃ and NH₄(+)-N may lead to a bottleneck in acidogenesis due to decreased specific acidogenic enzyme activities. PMID:26086956

  9. Characterization of a bioflocculant produced by Citrobacter sp. TKF04 from acetic and propionic acids.

    PubMed

    Fujita, M; Ike, M; Tachibana, S; Kitada, G; Kim, S M; Inoue, Z

    2000-01-01

    A bacterial strain, TKF04, capable of producing a bioflocculant from acetic and/or propionic acids was isolated from a biofilm formed in inside a kitchen drain. It was identified as a Citrobacter based on its morphological and physiological characteristics and the partial sequences of its 16S rRNA. TKF04 produced the bioflocculant during the logarithmic phase of growth, and the optimum temperature and pH for the bioflocculant production were 30 degrees C and 7.2-10.0, respectively. It could utilize some organic acids and sugars for its growth as the sole carbon sources when yeast extract was supplemented; however, only acetate and propionate were found to be good substrates for the bioflocculant production. The crude bioflocculant could be recovered from the supernatant of the culture broth by ethanol precipitation and dialysis against deionized water. It was found to be effective for flocculation of a kaolin suspension, when added at a final concentration of 1-10 mg/l, over a wide range of pHs (2-8) and temperatures (approximately 3-95 degrees C), while the co-presence of cations (Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Fe2+, Al3+ or Fe3+) did not enhance the flocculating activity. It could efficiently flocculate a variety of inorganic and organic suspended particles, including kaolin, diatomite, bentonite, activated carbon, soil and activated sludge. It contained glucosamine as the major component, and the molecular weight was estimated to be between 232 and 440 kDa by gel filtration. The observation that the flocculating activity was completely lost following chitinase treatment and its analysis with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer suggested that the bioflocculant is a biopolymer structurally-similar to chitin or chitosan. PMID:16232696

  10. Polyethylene-supported polyvinylidene fluoride-cellulose acetate butyrate blended polymer electrolyte for lithium ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Weishan; Zuo, Xiaoxi; Liu, Shengqi; Li, Zhao

    2013-03-01

    The polyethylene (PE)-supported polymer membranes based on the blended polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) are prepared for gel polymer electrolyte (GPE) of lithium ion battery. The performances of the prepared membranes and the resulting GPEs are investigated by scanning electron microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, linear potential sweep, and charge-discharge test. The effect of the ratio of PVDF to CAB on the performance of the prepared membranes is considered. It is found that the GPE based on the blended polymer with PVDF:CAB = 2:1 (in weight) has the largest ionic conductivity (2.48 × 10-3 S cm-1) and shows good compatibility with anode and cathode of lithium ion battery. The LiCoO2/graphite battery using this GPE exhibits superior cyclic stability at room temperature, storage performance at elevated temperature, and rate performance.

  11. Extent of propionate metabolism during absorption from the bovine ruminoreticulum

    PubMed Central

    Weigand, Edgar; Young, Jerry W.; McGilliard, A. Dare

    1972-01-01

    1. Solutions containing acetate, [2-14C]propionate and butyrate were placed into the ruminoreticulum of calves to measure the extent to which propionate is metabolized by ruminoreticulum epithelium. In response to five different combinations of pH and total volatile fatty acid concentrations, propionate absorption rates ranged from 89 to 341mmol/h. 2. The extent of propionate conversion into lactate, calculated from both concentration and specific radioactivity in portal and arterial blood, averaged 4.9 (range 2.5–9.1)%. 3. Circulating glucose synthesized from propionate had a higher specific radioactivity than arterial lactate and was converted into lactate by gastrointestinal tissues. Thus conversion of propionate into lactate was overestimated but was corrected to average 2.3 (1.0–4.6)%. 4. The estimates of propionate conversion into lactate were negatively correlated with its rate of absorption. PMID:5075230

  12. Fabrication of Tunable Submicro- or Nano-structured Polyethylene Materials form Immiscible Blends with Cellulose Acetate Butyrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low density polyethylene (LDPE) was prepared into micro- or submicro-spheres or nanofibers via melt blending or extrusion of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB)/LDPE immiscible blends and subsequent removal of the CAB matrix. The sizes of the PE spheres or fibers can be successfully controlled by varyi...

  13. Structure and Rotational Dynamics of Isoamyl Acetate and Methyl Propionate Studied by Microwave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, W.; Nguyen, H. V. L.; Sutikdja, L. W.; Jelisavac, D.; Mouhib, H.; Kleiner, I.

    2012-06-01

    The microwave spectra of a number of organic aliphatic esters have been recorded for the first time in the 3-26.5 GHz frequency range, using the molecular beam Fourier-transform microwave (MB-FTMW) spectrometer in Aachen, with an instrumental uncertainty of a few kHz for unblended lines. The combined use of ab initio quantum chemical calculations and spectral analysis allowed us to determine the spectroscopic parameters and potential barriers to internal rotation of the methyl groups for the lowest energy conformers. We will compare here the results from ab initio calculations and from two different hamiltonian methods (the XIAM and BELGI codes) for isoamyl acetate H3C-COO-(CH2)2-CH(CH3)2, an one-top internal rotor molecule with a C1 symmetry and for methyl propionate CH3CH2COOCH3 containing two inequivalent methyl tops (C3v), with different barrier heights. This study is part of a larger project which aims at determining the structures of the lowest energy conformers for a serie of organic esters and ketones which are of interest for flavour or perfume applications.

  14. Quantifying Effect of Lactic, Acetic, and Propionic Acids on Growth of Molds Isolated from Spoiled Bakery Products.

    PubMed

    Dagnas, Stéphane; Gauvry, Emilie; Onno, Bernard; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2015-09-01

    The combined effect of undissociated lactic acid (0 to 180 mmol/liter), acetic acid (0 to 60 mmol/liter), and propionic acid (0 to 12 mmol/liter) on growth of the molds Aspergillus niger, Penicillium corylophilum, and Eurotium repens was quantified at pH 3.8 and 25°C on malt extract agar acid medium. The impact of these acids on lag time for growth (λ) was quantified through a gamma model based on the MIC. The impact of these acids on radial growth rate (μ) was analyzed statistically through polynomial regression. Concerning λ, propionic acid exhibited a stronger inhibitory effect (MIC of 8 to 20 mmol/liter depending on the mold species) than did acetic acid (MIC of 23 to 72 mmol/liter). The lactic acid effect was null on E. repens and inhibitory on A. niger and P. corylophilum. These results were validated using independent sets of data for the three acids at pH 3.8 but for only acetic and propionic acids at pH 4.5. Concerning μ, the effect of acetic and propionic acids was slightly inhibitory for A. niger and P. corylophilum but was not significant for E. repens. In contrast, lactic acid promoted radial growth of all three molds. The gamma terms developed here for these acids will be incorporated in a predictive model for temperature, water activity, and acid. More generally, results for μ and λ will be used to identify and evaluate solutions for controlling bakery product spoilage. PMID:26319723

  15. Preparation and characterization of nanoparticles of carboxymethyl cellulose acetate butyrate containing acyclovir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Venkata Bharadwaz; Chopra, Maulick; Joseph, Emil; Mazumder, Sonal

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles of carboxymethyl cellulose acetate butyrate complexed with the poorly soluble antiviral drug acyclovir (ACV) were produced by precipitation process and the formulation process and properties of nanoparticles were investigated. Two different particle synthesis methods were explored—a conventional precipitation method and a rapid precipitation in a multi-inlet vortex mixer. The particles were processed by rotavap followed by freeze-drying. Particle diameters as measured by dynamic light scattering were dependent on the synthesis method used. The conventional precipitation method did not show desired particle size distribution, whereas particles prepared by the mixer showed well-defined particle size ~125-450 nm before and after freeze-drying, respectively, with narrow polydispersity indices. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed chemical stability and intactness of entrapped drug in the nanoparticles. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that the drug was in amorphous state in the polymer matrix. ACV drug loading was around 10 wt%. The release studies showed increase in solution concentration of drug from the nanoparticles compared to the as-received crystalline drug.

  16. Formate, acetate, and propionate as substrates for sulfate reduction in sub-arctic sediments of Southwest Greenland.

    PubMed

    Glombitza, Clemens; Jaussi, Marion; Røy, Hans; Seidenkrantz, Marit-Solveig; Lomstein, Bente A; Jørgensen, Bo B

    2015-01-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) are key intermediates in the anaerobic mineralization of organic matter in marine sediments. We studied the role of VFAs in the carbon and energy turnover in the sulfate reduction zone of sediments from the sub-arctic Godthåbsfjord (SW Greenland) and the adjacent continental shelf in the NE Labrador Sea. VFA porewater concentrations were measured by a new two-dimensional ion chromatography-mass spectrometry method that enabled the direct analysis of VFAs without sample pretreatment. VFA concentrations were low and surprisingly constant (4-6 μmol L(-1) for formate and acetate, and 0.5 μmol L(-1) for propionate) throughout the sulfate reduction zone. Hence, VFAs are turned over while maintaining a stable concentration that is suggested to be under a strong microbial control. Estimated mean diffusion times of acetate between neighboring cells were <1 s, whereas VFA turnover times increased from several hours at the sediment surface to several years at the bottom of the sulfate reduction zone. Thus, diffusion was not limiting the VFA turnover. Despite constant VFA concentrations, the Gibbs energies (ΔGr) of VFA-dependent sulfate reduction decreased downcore, from -28 to -16 kJ (mol formate)(-1), -68 to -31 kJ (mol acetate)(-1), and -124 to -65 kJ (mol propionate)(-1). Thus, ΔGr is apparently not determining the in-situ VFA concentrations directly. However, at the bottom of the sulfate zone of the shelf station, acetoclastic sulfate reduction might operate at its energetic limit at ~ -30 kJ (mol acetate)(-1). It is not clear what controls VFA concentrations in the porewater but cell physiological constraints such as energetic costs of VFA activation or uptake could be important. We suggest that such constraints control the substrate turnover and result in a minimum ΔGr that depends on cell physiology and is different for individual substrates. PMID:26379631

  17. Topical hydrocortisone 17-butyrate 21-propionate in the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases: pharmacological data, clinical efficacy, safety and calculation of the therapeutic index.

    PubMed

    Fölster-Holst, R; Abeck, D; Torrelo, A

    2016-03-01

    Hydrocortisone 17-butyrate 21-propionate (hydrocortisone buteprate, HBP) is a medium potent, non-halogenated double-ester of hydrocortisone with a favorable benefit/risk ratio for the treatment of inflammatory skin disorders. HBP is available as a 0.1% cream or ointment formulation. Good results were obtained with a once-daily topical treatment. HBP is characterized by a strong topical anti-inflammatory activity and weak systemic action. It is considered to have potency comparable to that of betamethasone 17-valerate (BV), but its systemic effects are less pronounced. HBP was shown to have a good efficacy in the treatment of various oozing and lichenified eczematous skin diseases including atopic dermatitis (AD) and in the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris. Even in very young children, HBP proved successful as an effective and safe drug. A therapeutic index of 2.0 can be attributed to this glucocorticoid. In this respect, there is no difference between topical HBP and other topical glucocorticoids with increased benefit/risk ratio, e.g. prednicarbate (PC), methylprednisolone aceponate (MPA) and mometasone furoate (MM). PMID:27183704

  18. Genome-wide ChIP-seq mapping and analysis of butyrate-induced H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation and epigenomic landscapes alteration in bovine cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile short-chain fatty acids (VFAs, acetate, propionate, and butyrate) are nutrients especially critical to ruminants. Beyond their nutritional impact, clear evidence is beginning to link modifications in chromatin structure induced by butyrate to cell cycle progression, DNA replication and over...

  19. Impact of mash feeding versus pellets on propionic/butyric acid levels and on total load in the gastrointestinal tract of growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Longpré, J; Fairbrother, J M; Fravalo, P; Arsenault, J; LeBel, P; Laplante, B; Surprenant, C; Massé, D; Letellier, A

    2016-03-01

    Feed characteristics may influence the bacterial community composition and metabolic activities in the pig gastrointestinal tract, known to be associated with positive effects on the gut. Use of mash feed is associated with reduced excretion, but little is known of its effect on the population or of the mechanism of action. Our objectives were to assess the effect of feed texture combined with feed particle size on VFA profiles and levels, total count, and the presence of genes encoding virulence factors of pathogenic strains in the digestive tract along with their impact on pig performance of fattening pigs. Pigs ( = 840) on a commercial farm received mash or pellet diets of different particle sizes during the fattening period. Caecal and colon contents from 164 pigs were sampled at the slaughterhouse for enumeration of by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and for VFA quantification by capillary gas chromatography. The gene was used to enumerate total . Improved pig performances associated with pellet texture and a 500-μm size were observed. Caecal ( = 0.02) and colon ( < 0.01) propionic acid concentrations were lower for pigs receiving pellet rather than mash feed. Similarly, caecal ( = 0.01) and colon ( < 0.001) butyric acid concentrations were also lower for pigs receiving pellet rather than mash feed, as determined by capillary gas chromatography. Moreover, caecal ( = 0.03) and colon ( < 0.001) butyric acid concentrations were higher for pigs receiving a feed with a 1,250-μm particle size rather than a 500-μm particle size. On the other hand, total caecal and colon levels were higher for pigs receiving pellet feed than for those receiving mash feed. For total enumeration, caecal ( < 0.01) and colon ( < 0.01) gene copies were higher for pigs receiving pellet rather than mash feed. No effect of particle size on fatty acid concentrations or on numbers was observed. Virulence gene quantification revealed no trend. Taken together, results showed that mash feed is

  20. Butyrate: A dietary inhibitor of histone deacetylases and an epigenetic regulator

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) acetate, propionate and butyrate, also known as volatile fatty acids (VFA), are produced in the gastrointestinal tract by microbial fermentation. Consumption of dietary fibers has been shown to have positive metabolic health effects, such as increasing satiety, an...

  1. Enteric Bacterial Metabolites Propionic and Butyric Acid Modulate Gene Expression, Including CREB-Dependent Catecholaminergic Neurotransmission, in PC12 Cells - Possible Relevance to Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nankova, Bistra B.; Agarwal, Raj; MacFabe, Derrick F.; La Gamma, Edmund F.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in gut microbiome composition have an emerging role in health and disease including brain function and behavior. Short chain fatty acids (SCFA) like propionic (PPA), and butyric acid (BA), which are present in diet and are fermentation products of many gastrointestinal bacteria, are showing increasing importance in host health, but also may be environmental contributors in neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Further to this we have shown SCFA administration to rodents over a variety of routes (intracerebroventricular, subcutaneous, intraperitoneal) or developmental time periods can elicit behavioral, electrophysiological, neuropathological and biochemical effects consistent with findings in ASD patients. SCFA are capable of altering host gene expression, partly due to their histone deacetylase inhibitor activity. We have previously shown BA can regulate tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA levels in a PC12 cell model. Since monoamine concentration is known to be elevated in the brain and blood of ASD patients and in many ASD animal models, we hypothesized that SCFA may directly influence brain monoaminergic pathways. When PC12 cells were transiently transfected with plasmids having a luciferase reporter gene under the control of the TH promoter, PPA was found to induce reporter gene activity over a wide concentration range. CREB transcription factor(s) was necessary for the transcriptional activation of TH gene by PPA. At lower concentrations PPA also caused accumulation of TH mRNA and protein, indicative of increased cell capacity to produce catecholamines. PPA and BA induced broad alterations in gene expression including neurotransmitter systems, neuronal cell adhesion molecules, inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid metabolism and mitochondrial function, all of which have been implicated in ASD. In conclusion, our data are consistent with a molecular mechanism through which gut related environmental signals such as

  2. Formate, acetate, and propionate as substrates for sulfate reduction in sub-arctic sediments of Southwest Greenland

    PubMed Central

    Glombitza, Clemens; Jaussi, Marion; Røy, Hans; Seidenkrantz, Marit-Solveig; Lomstein, Bente A.; Jørgensen, Bo B.

    2015-01-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) are key intermediates in the anaerobic mineralization of organic matter in marine sediments. We studied the role of VFAs in the carbon and energy turnover in the sulfate reduction zone of sediments from the sub-arctic Godthåbsfjord (SW Greenland) and the adjacent continental shelf in the NE Labrador Sea. VFA porewater concentrations were measured by a new two-dimensional ion chromatography-mass spectrometry method that enabled the direct analysis of VFAs without sample pretreatment. VFA concentrations were low and surprisingly constant (4–6 μmol L−1 for formate and acetate, and 0.5 μmol L−1 for propionate) throughout the sulfate reduction zone. Hence, VFAs are turned over while maintaining a stable concentration that is suggested to be under a strong microbial control. Estimated mean diffusion times of acetate between neighboring cells were <1 s, whereas VFA turnover times increased from several hours at the sediment surface to several years at the bottom of the sulfate reduction zone. Thus, diffusion was not limiting the VFA turnover. Despite constant VFA concentrations, the Gibbs energies (ΔGr) of VFA-dependent sulfate reduction decreased downcore, from −28 to −16 kJ (mol formate)−1, −68 to −31 kJ (mol acetate)−1, and −124 to −65 kJ (mol propionate)−1. Thus, ΔGr is apparently not determining the in-situ VFA concentrations directly. However, at the bottom of the sulfate zone of the shelf station, acetoclastic sulfate reduction might operate at its energetic limit at ~ −30 kJ (mol acetate)−1. It is not clear what controls VFA concentrations in the porewater but cell physiological constraints such as energetic costs of VFA activation or uptake could be important. We suggest that such constraints control the substrate turnover and result in a minimum ΔGr that depends on cell physiology and is different for individual substrates. PMID:26379631

  3. Identification and Characterization of a Bacterial Transport System for the Uptake of Pyruvate, Propionate, and Acetate in Corynebacterium glutamicum▿

    PubMed Central

    Jolkver, Elena; Emer, Denise; Ballan, Stefan; Krämer, Reinhard; Eikmanns, Bernhard J.; Marin, Kay

    2009-01-01

    The metabolism of monocarboxylic acids is of central importance for bacteria in their natural habitat as well as during biotechnological production. Although biosynthesis and degradation are well understood, the transport of such compounds is still a matter of discussion. Here we present the identification and characterization of a new transport system in Corynebacterium glutamicum with high affinity for acetate and propionate and with lower affinity for pyruvate. Biochemical analysis of this monocarboxylic acid transporter (MctC) revealed for the first time a quantitative discrimination of passive diffusion and active transport of acetate by bacterial cells. MctC is a secondary transporter and belongs to the class of sodium solute symporters, but it is driven by the electrochemical proton potential. The mctC gene is preceded by and cotranscribed with cg0952, a locus encoding a small membrane protein, and the transcription of the cg0952-mctC operon is under the control of the transcriptional regulators RamA and RamB. Both of these proteins directly bind to the promoter region of the operon; RamA is essential for expression and RamB exerts a slightly negative control on expression of the cg0952-mctC operon. mctC expression is induced in the presence of pyruvate and beneficial under substrate-limiting conditions for C. glutamicum. PMID:19028892

  4. A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR INTRAVENOUS AND INHALATION-ROUTE PHARMACOKINETICS OF BUTYL ACETATE AND METABOLITES N-BUTANOL AND N-BUTYRIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk assessment for n-butyl acetate and metabolites n-butanol and n-butyric acid (the butyl series) can be accomplished with limited toxicity data and pharmacokinetic data for each compound through application of the "family approach" (Barton et al., 2000). The necessary quantita...

  5. First European Report of Social Wasps Trapped in Response to Acetic acid, Isobutanol, 2-Methyl-2-propanol, and Heptyl butyrate in Tests Conducted in Hungary

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five species of social wasps were captured in trapping tests in Hungary that evaluated the attractiveness of acetic acid, isobutanol, 2-methyl-2-propanol, and heptyl butyrate to social wasps. Both Vespula vulgaris (L.) and Vespula germanica (Fabr.), were captured in traps baited with isobutanol, t...

  6. Inhibition of acetate and propionate assimilation by itaconate via propionyl-CoA carboxylase in isocitrate lyase-negative purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed

    Berg, Ivan A; Filatova, Ludmila V; Ivanovsky, Ruslan N

    2002-10-29

    Itaconate is known as a potent inhibitor of isocitrate lyase. Unexpectedly, itaconate was a strong inhibitor of acetate and propionate assimilation in isocitrate lyase-negative purple non-sulfur bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum. It was shown that in cell extracts of R. rubrum itaconate inhibited propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC) activity. The participation of PCC in propionate assimilation in R. rubrum is well-documented, but the inhibition of acetate assimilation suggests that PCC is also involved in acetate metabolism. PCC is one of the enzymes of the citramalate cycle, the anaplerotic pathway proposed for R. rubrum as a substitute for the glyoxylate cycle. These results provide further support for the hypothesis of the occurrence of the citramalate cycle in R. rubrum. PCC from other isocitrate lyase-negative phototrophs, Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Phaeospirillum fulvum, was not inhibited by itaconate. PMID:12423751

  7. Pathways analysis identifies perturbation of genetic networks induced by butyrate in a bovine kidney epithelial cell line

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ruminant species have evolved to metabolize the short-chain volatile fatty acids (VFA), acetate, propionate, and butyrate to fulfill up to 70% of their nutrient energy requirements. The inherent VFA dependence of ruminant cells was exploited in order to add a level of increased sensitivity to the s...

  8. Acetate favors more phosphorus accumulation into aerobic granular sludge than propionate during the treatment of synthetic fermentation liquor.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wei; Huang, Wenli; Li, Huifang; Sun, Beina; Xiao, Huasheng; Zhang, Zhenya; Lei, Zhongfang

    2016-08-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is an efficient biotechnology widely applied for energy and resource recovery from organic waste and wastewater treatment. The effluent from AD or fermentation liquor containing organic substances like volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and mineral nutrients (such as N and P), however, will trigger serious environmental issues if not properly dealt with. In this study two identical sequencing batch reactors (SBRs), namely Ra and Rp were used to cultivate aerobic granules for P recovery from synthetic fermentation liquor, respectively using acetate and propionate as additional carbon source. Larger and more stable granules were achieved in Ra with higher P removal capability (9.4mgP/g-VSS·d) and higher anaerobic P release (6.9mgP/g-VSS·h). In addition to much higher P content (78mgP/g-SS), bioavailable P in Ra-granules increased to 45mgP/g-SS, approximately 2-times those of seed sludge and Rp-granules. Microbial community analysis indicated that more GAOs were accumulated in Rp-granules. PMID:27183235

  9. Driving carbon flux through exogenous butyryl-CoA: Acetate CoA-transferase to produce butyric acid at high titer in Thermobifida fusca.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yu; Mao, Yin; Zhang, Xiaojuan

    2015-12-20

    Butyric acid, a 4-carbon short chain fatty acid, is widely used in chemical, food, and pharmaceutical industries. The low activity of butyryl-CoA: acetate CoA-transferase in Thermobifida fusca muS, a thermophilic actinobacterium whose optimal temperature was 55°C, was found to hinder the accumulation of high yield of butyric acid. In order to solve this problem, an exogenous butyryl-CoA: acetate CoA-transferase gene (actA) from Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum DSM571 was integrated into the chromosome of T. fusca muS by replacing celR gene, forming T. fusca muS-1. We demonstrated that on 5g/L cellulose, the yield of butyric acid by the engineered muS-1 strain was increased by 42.9 % compared to the muS strain. On 100g/L of cellulose, the muS-1 strain could consume 90.5% of total cellulose in 144h, with 33.2g/L butyric acid produced. Furthermore, on the mix substrates including the major components of biomass: cellulose, xylose, mannose and galactose, 70.4g/L butyric acid was produced in 168h by fed-batch fermentation. To validate the ability of fermenting biomass, the muS-1 strain was grown on the milled corn stover ranging from 200 to 250μm. The muS-1 strain had the highest butyrate titer 17.1g/L on 90g/L corn stover. PMID:26535965

  10. Peat: home to novel syntrophic species that feed acetate- and hydrogen-scavenging methanogens.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Oliver; Hink, Linda; Horn, Marcus A; Drake, Harold L

    2016-08-01

    Syntrophic bacteria drive the anaerobic degradation of certain fermentation products (e.g., butyrate, ethanol, propionate) to intermediary substrates (e.g., H2, formate, acetate) that yield methane at the ecosystem level. However, little is known about the in situ activities and identities of these syntrophs in peatlands, ecosystems that produce significant quantities of methane. The consumption of butyrate, ethanol or propionate by anoxic peat slurries at 5 and 15 °C yielded methane and CO2 as the sole accumulating products, indicating that the intermediates H2, formate and acetate were scavenged effectively by syntrophic methanogenic consortia. 16S rRNA stable isotope probing identified novel species/strains of Pelobacter and Syntrophomonas that syntrophically oxidized ethanol and butyrate, respectively. Propionate was syntrophically oxidized by novel species of Syntrophobacter and Smithella, genera that use different propionate-oxidizing pathways. Taxa not known for a syntrophic metabolism may have been involved in the oxidation of butyrate (Telmatospirillum-related) and propionate (unclassified Bacteroidetes and unclassified Fibrobacteres). Gibbs free energies (ΔGs) for syntrophic oxidations of ethanol and butyrate were more favorable than ΔGs for syntrophic oxidation of propionate. As a result of the thermodynamic constraints, acetate transiently accumulated in ethanol and butyrate treatments but not in propionate treatments. Aceticlastic methanogens (Methanosarcina, Methanosaeta) appeared to outnumber hydrogenotrophic methanogens (Methanocella, Methanoregula), reinforcing the likely importance of aceticlastic methanogenesis to the overall production of methane. ΔGs for acetogenesis from H2 to CO2 approximated to -20 kJ mol(-1) when acetate concentrations were low, indicating that acetogens may have contributed to the flow of carbon and reductant towards methane. PMID:26771931

  11. Transport of the two natural auxins, indole-3-butyric acid and indole-3-acetic acid, in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashotte, Aaron M.; Poupart, Julie; Waddell, Candace S.; Muday, Gloria K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Polar transport of the natural auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is important in a number of plant developmental processes. However, few studies have investigated the polar transport of other endogenous auxins, such as indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), in Arabidopsis. This study details the similarities and differences between IBA and IAA transport in several tissues of Arabidopsis. In the inflorescence axis, no significant IBA movement was detected, whereas IAA is transported in a basipetal direction from the meristem tip. In young seedlings, both IBA and IAA were transported only in a basipetal direction in the hypocotyl. In roots, both auxins moved in two distinct polarities and in specific tissues. The kinetics of IBA and IAA transport appear similar, with transport rates of 8 to 10 mm per hour. In addition, IBA transport, like IAA transport, is saturable at high concentrations of auxin, suggesting that IBA transport is protein mediated. Interestingly, IAA efflux inhibitors and mutations in genes encoding putative IAA transport proteins reduce IAA transport but do not alter IBA movement, suggesting that different auxin transport protein complexes are likely to mediate IBA and IAA transport. Finally, the physiological effects of IBA and IAA on hypocotyl elongation under several light conditions were examined and analyzed in the context of the differences in IBA and IAA transport. Together, these results present a detailed picture of IBA transport and provide the basis for a better understanding of the transport of these two endogenous auxins.

  12. Simultaneous extraction and HPLC determination of 3-indole butyric acid and 3-indole acetic acid in pea plant by using ionic liquid-modified silica as sorbent.

    PubMed

    Sheikhian, Leila; Bina, Sedigheh

    2016-01-15

    In this study, ionic liquid-modified silica was used as sorbent for simultaneous extraction and preconcentration of 3-indole butyric acid and 3-indole acetic acid in pea plants. The effect of some parameters such as pH and ionic strength of sample solution, amount of sorbent, flow rate of aqueous sample solution and eluent solution, concentration of eluent solution, and temperature were studied for each hormone solution. Percent extraction of 3-indole butyric acid and 3-indole acetic acid was strongly affected by pH of aqueous sample solution. Ionic strength of aqueous phase and temperature showed no serious effects on extraction efficiency of studied plant hormones. Obtained breakthrough volume was 200mL for each of studied hormones. Preconcentration factor for spectroscopic and chromatographic determination of studied hormones was 100 and 4.0×10(3) respectively. Each solid sorbent phase was reusable for almost 10 times of extraction/stripping procedure. Relative standard deviations of extraction/stripping processes of 3-indole butyric acid and 3-indole acetic acid were 2.79% and 3.66% respectively. The calculated limit of detections for IBA and IAA were 9.1×10(-2)mgL(-1) and 1.6×10(-1)mgL(-1) respectively. PMID:26701202

  13. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of undissociated lactic, acetic, citric and propionic acid for Listeria monocytogenes under conditions relevant to cheese.

    PubMed

    Wemmenhove, Ellen; van Valenberg, Hein J F; Zwietering, Marcel H; van Hooijdonk, Toon C M; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H J

    2016-09-01

    Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of undissociated lactic acid were determined for six different Listeria monocytogenes strains at 30 °C and in a pH range of 4.2-5.8. Small increments in pH and acid concentrations were used to accurately establish the growth/no growth limits of L. monocytogenes for these acids. The MICs of undissociated lactic acid in the pH range of 5.2-5.8 were generally higher than at pH 4.6 for the different L. monocytogenes strains. The average MIC of undissociated lactic acid was 5.0 (SD 1.5) mM in the pH range 5.2-5.6, which is relevant to Gouda cheese. Significant differences in MICs of undissociated lactic acid were found between strains of L. monocytogenes at a given pH, with a maximum observed level of 9.0 mM. Variations in MICs were mostly due to strain variation. In the pH range 5.2-5.6, the MICs of undissociated lactic acid were not significantly different at 12 °C and 30 °C. The average MICs of undissociated acetic acid, citric acid, and propionic acid were 19.0 (SD 6.5) mM, 3.8 (SD 0.9) mM, and 11.0 (SD 6.3) mM, respectively, for the six L. monocytogenes strains tested in the pH range 5.2-5.6. Variations in MICs of these organic acids for L. monocytogenes were also mostly due to strain variation. The generated data contribute to improved predictions of growth/no growth of L. monocytogenes in cheese and other foods containing these organic acids. PMID:27217360

  14. Effects of injection of acetic acid and propionic acid for total phosphorus removal at high temperature in enhanced biological phosphorus removal process.

    PubMed

    Ki, C Y; Kwon, K H; Kim, S W; Min, K S; Lee, T U; Park, D J

    2014-01-01

    In summer, wastewater treatment plant total phosphorus (TP) removal efficiency is low in South Korea. The reason is because of high temperatures or significant fluctuation of inflow characteristics caused by frequent rainfall. Hence, this study tried to raise TP removal efficiency by injecting fixed external carbon sources in real sewage. Polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) compete to occupy microorganisms at high temperature. Propionate is known to restrain GAOs. Thus, acetate and propionate were chosen as the external carbon source in this study to find out the suitable volume and ratio of carbon source which ensured the dominance of PAOs. An external carbon source was supplied in the anaerobic reactor of the biological phosphorus removal process at high temperature (above 25 °C). TP removal efficiency was improved by injecting an external carbon source compared to that without an external carbon source. Also, it remained relatively stable when injecting an external carbon source, despite the variation in temperature. TP removal efficiency was the highest when injecting acetate and propionate in the proportion of 2:1 (total concentration as chemical oxygen demand (COD) is 12 mg/L in influent). PMID:24845316

  15. Development of theophylline floating microballoons using cellulose acetate butyrate and/or Eudragit RL 100 polymers with different permeability characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Jelvehgari, M.; Maghsoodi, M.; Nemati, H.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to design a sustained release floating microcapsules of theophylline using two polymers of different permeability characteristics; Eudragit RL 100 (Eu RL) and cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) using the oil-in-oil emulsion solvent evaporation method. Polymers were used separately and in combination to prepare different microcapsules. The effect of drug-polymer interaction was studied for each of the polymers and for their combination. Encapsulation efficiency, the yield, particle size, floating capability, morphology of microspheres, powder X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were evaluated. The in vitro release studies were performed in PH 1.2 and 7.4. The optimized drug to polymer ratios was found to be 4:1 (F2) and 0.75:1 (F'2) with Eu RL and CAB, respectively. The best drug to polymer ratio in mix formulation was 4:1:1 (theophylline: Eu RL: CAB ratio). Production yield, loading efficiencies, and particle size of F2 and F’2 were found to be 59.14% and 45.39%, 73.93% and 95.87%, 372 and 273 micron, respectively. Microsphere prepared with CAB showed the best floating ability (80.3 ± 4.02% buoyancy) in 0.1 M HCl for over 12 h. The XRD and DSC showed that theophylline in the drug loaded microspheres was stable and in crystaline form. Microparticles prepared using blend of Eu RL and CAB polymers indicated more sustained pattern than the commercial tablet (P<0.05). Drug loaded floating microballoons prepared of combination of Eu RL and CAB with 1:1 ratio were found to be a suitable delivery system for sustained release delivery of theophylline which contained lower amount of polymer contents in the microspheres. PMID:21589766

  16. Plasmonic-based colorimetric and spectroscopic discrimination of acetic and butyric acids produced by different types of Escherichia coli through the different assembly structures formation of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    La, Ju A; Lim, Sora; Park, Hyo Jeong; Heo, Min-Ji; Sang, Byoung-In; Oh, Min-Kyu; Cho, Eun Chul

    2016-08-24

    We present a plasmonic-based strategy for the colourimetric and spectroscopic differentiation of various organic acids produced by bacteria. The strategy is based on our discovery that particular concentrations of dl-lactic, acetic, and butyric acids induce different assembly structures, colours, and optical spectra of gold nanoparticles. We selected wild-type (K-12 W3110) and genetically-engineered (JHL61) Escherichia coli (E. coli) that are known to primarily produce acetic and butyric acid, respectively. Different assembly structures and optical properties of gold nanoparticles were observed when different organic acids, obtained after the removal of acid-producing bacteria, were mixed with gold nanoparticles. Moreover, at moderate cell concentrations of K-12 W3110 E. coli, which produce sufficient amounts of acetic acid to induce the assembly of gold nanoparticles, a direct estimate of the number of bacteria was possible based on time-course colour change observations of gold nanoparticle aqueous suspensions. The plasmonic-based colourimetric and spectroscopic methods described here may enable onsite testing for the identification of organic acids produced by bacteria and the estimation of bacterial numbers, which have applications in health and environmental sciences. PMID:27497013

  17. Cellular Metabolism and Dose Reveal Carnitine-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms of Butyrate Oxidation in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Anna; Bennett, Natalie; MacDonald, Amber; Johnstone, Megan; Whelan, Jay; Donohoe, Dallas R

    2016-08-01

    Dietary fiber has been suggested to suppress colorectal cancer development, although the mechanisms contributing to this beneficial effect remain elusive. Butyrate, a fermentation product of fiber, has been shown to have anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on colorectal cancer cells. The metabolic fate of butyrate in the cell is important in determining whether, it acts as an HDAC inhibitor or is consumed as a short-chain fatty acid. Non-cancerous colonocytes utilize butyrate as the primary energy source whereas cancerous colonocytes increase glucose utilization through the Warburg effect. In this study, we show that butyrate oxidation is decreased in cancerous colonocytes compared to non-cancerous colonocytes. We demonstrate that colorectal cancer cells utilize both a carnitine-dependent and carnitine-independent mechanism that contributes to butyrate oxidation. The carnitine-dependent mechanism is contingent on butyrate concentration. Knockdown of CPT1A in colorectal cancer cells abolishes butyrate oxidation. In terms of selectivity, the carnitine-dependent mechanism only regulated butyrate oxidation, as acetate and propionate oxidation were carnitine-independent. Carnitine decreased the action of butyrate as an HDAC inhibitor and suppressed induction of H3 acetylation by butyrate in colorectal cancer cells. Thus, diminished oxidation of butyrate is associated with decreased HDAC inhibition and histone acetylation. In relation to the mechanism, we find that dichloroacetate, which decreases phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase, increased butyrate oxidation and that this effect was carnitine-dependent. In conclusion, these data suggest that colorectal cancer cells decrease butyrate oxidation through inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase, which is carnitine-dependent, and provide insight into why butyrate shows selective effects toward colorectal cancer cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1804-1813, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26661480

  18. Cloning and expression of clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 acetoacetyl-coenzyme A:acetate/butyrate:coenzyme A-transferase in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, J.W.; Petersen, D.J.; Bennett, G.N. ); Papoutsakis, E.T. )

    1990-06-01

    Coenzyme A (CoA)-transferase (acetoacetyl-CoA:acetate/butyrate:CoA-transferase (butyrate-acetoacetate CoA-transferase) (EC 2.8.3.9)) of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 is an important enzyme in the metabolic shift between the acid-producing and solvent-forming states of this organism. The genes encoding the two subunits of this enzyme have been cloned and subsequent subcloning experiments established the position of the structural genes for CoA-transferase. Complementation of Escherichia coli ato mutants with the recombinant plasmid pCoAT4 (pUC19 carrying a 1.8-kilobase insert of C. acetobutylicum DNA encoding CoA-transferase activity) enabled the transformants to grow on butyrate as a sole carbon source. Despite the ability of CoA-transferase to complement the ato defect in E. coli mutants, Southern blot and Western blot (immunoblot) analyses showed showed that neither the C. acetobutylicum genes encoding CoA-transferase nor the enzyme itself shared any apparent homology with its E. coli counterpart. Polypeptides of M{sub r} of the purified CoA-transferase subunits were observed by Western blot and maxicell analysis of whole-cell extracts of E.coli harboring pCoAT4. The proximity and orientation of the genes suggest that the genes encoding the two subunits of CoA-transferase may form an operon similar to that found in E. coli. In the plasmid, however, transcription appears to be primarily from the lac promoter of the vector.

  19. Characterization of butyrate transport across the luminal membranes of equine large intestine.

    PubMed

    Nedjadi, Taoufik; Moran, Andrew W; Al-Rammahi, Miran A; Shirazi-Beechey, Soraya P

    2014-10-01

    The diet of the horse, pasture forage (grass), is fermented by the equine colonic microbiota to short-chain fatty acids, notably acetate, propionate and butyrate. Short-chain fatty acids provide a major source of energy for the horse and contribute to many vital physiological processes. We aimed to determine both the mechanism of butyrate uptake across the luminal membrane of equine colon and the nature of the protein involved. To this end, we isolated equine colonic luminal membrane vesicles. The abundance and activity of cysteine-sensitive alkaline phosphatase and villin, intestinal luminal membrane markers, were significantly enriched in membrane vesicles compared with the original homogenates. In contrast, the abundance of GLUT2 protein and the activity of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, known markers of the intestinal basolateral membrane, were hardly detectable. We demonstrated, by immunohistochemistry, that monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) protein is expressed on the luminal membrane of equine colonocytes. We showed that butyrate transport into luminal membrane vesicles is energized by a pH gradient (out < in) and is not Na(+) dependent. Moreover, butyrate uptake is time and concentration dependent, with a Michaelis-Menten constant of 5.6 ± 0.45 mm and maximal velocity of 614 ± 55 pmol s(-1) (mg protein)(-1). Butyrate transport is significantly inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate, phloretin and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, all potent inhibitors of MCT1. Moreover, acetate and propionate, as well as the monocarboxylates pyruvate and lactate, also inhibit butyrate uptake. Data presented here support the conclusion that transport of butyrate across the equine colonic luminal membrane is predominantly accomplished by MCT1. PMID:25172888

  20. Amavadin and other vanadium complexes as remarkably efficient catalysts for one-pot conversion of ethane to propionic and acetic acids.

    PubMed

    Kirillova, Marina V; Kuznetsov, Maxim L; da Silva, José A L; Guedes da Silva, Maria Fátima C; Fraústo da Silva, João J R; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic amavadin Ca[V{ON[CH(CH(3))COO](2)}(2)] and its models Ca[V{ON(CH(2)COO)(2)}(2)] and [VO{N(CH(2)CH(2)O)(3)}], in the presence of K(2)S(2)O(8) in trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), exhibit remarkable catalytic activity for the one-pot carboxylation of ethane to propionic and acetic acids with the former as the main product (overall yields up to 93 %, catalyst turnover numbers (TONs) up to 2.0 x 10(4)). The simpler V complexes [VO(CF(3)SO(3))(2)], [VO(acac)(2)] and VOSO(4) are less active. The effects of various factors, namely, C(2)H(6) and CO pressures, time, temperature, and amounts of catalyst, TFA and K(2)S(2)O(8), have been investigated, and this allowed optimisation of the process and control of selectivity. (13)C-labelling experiments indicated that the formation of acetic acid follows two pathways, the dominant one via oxidation of ethane with preservation of the C--C bond, and the other via rupture of this bond and carbonylation of the methyl group by CO; the C--C bond is retained in the formation of propionic acid upon carbonylation of ethane. The reactions proceed via both C- and O-centred radicals, as shown by experiments with radical traps. On the basis of detailed DFT calculations, plausible reaction mechanisms are discussed. The carboxylation of ethane in the presence of CO follows the sequential formation of C(2)H(5) (*), C(2)H(5)CO(*), C(2)H(5)COO(*) and C(2)H(5)COOH. The C(2)H(5)COO(*) radical is easily formed on reaction of C(2)H(5)CO(*) with a peroxo V catalyst via a V{eta(1)-OOC(O)C(2)H(5)} intermediate. In the absence of CO, carboxylation proceeds by reaction of C(2)H(5) (*) with TFA. For the oxidation of ethane to acetic acid, either with preservation or cleavage of the C-C bond, metal-assisted and purely organic pathways are also proposed and discussed. PMID:18058882

  1. Protective activity of butyrate on hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in isolated human colonocytes and HT29 tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Rosignoli, P; Fabiani, R; De Bartolomeo, A; Spinozzi, F; Agea, E; Pelli, M A; Morozzi, G

    2001-10-01

    Epidemiological studies support the involvement of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) in colon physiology and the protective role of butyrate on colon carcinogenesis. Among the possible mechanisms by which butyrate may exert its anti-carcinogenicity an antioxidant activity has been recently suggested. We investigated the effects of butyrate and mixtures of SCFA (butyrate, propionate and acetate) on DNA damage induced by H(2)O(2) in isolated human colonocytes and in two human colon tumour cell lines (HT29 and HT29 19A). Human colonocytes were isolated from endoscopically obtained samples and the DNA damage was assessed by the comet assay. H(2)O(2) induced DNA damage in normal colonocytes in a dose-dependent manner which was statistically significant at concentrations over 10 microM. At 15 microM H(2)O(2) DNA damage in HT29 and HT29 19A cells was significantly lower than that observed in normal colonocytes (P < 0.01). Pre-incubation of the cells with physiological concentrations of butyrate (6.25 and 12.5 mM) reduced H(2)O(2) (15 microM) induced damage by 33 and 51% in human colonocytes, 45 and 75% in HT29 and 30 and 80% in HT29 19A, respectively. Treatment of cells with a mixture of 25 mM acetate + 10.4 mM propionate + 6.25 mM butyrate did not induce DNA damage, while a mixture of 50 mM acetate + 20.8 mM propionate + 12.5 mM butyrate was weakly genotoxic only towards normal colonocytes. However, both mixtures were able to reduce the H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage by about 50% in all cell types. The reported protective effect of butyrate might be important in pathogenetic mechanisms mediated by reactive oxygen species, and aids understanding of the apparent protection toward colorectal cancer exerted by dietary fibres, which enhance the butyrate bioavailability in the colonic mucosa. PMID:11577008

  2. Propionic acid secreted from propionibacteria induces NKG2D ligand expression on human-activated T lymphocytes and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Lars; Hansen, Karen Aagaard; Jensen, Helle; Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Stougaard, Peter; Hansen, Helle Rüsz; Jurlander, Jesper; Skov, Søren

    2009-07-15

    We found that propionic acid secreted from propionibacteria induces expression of the NKG2D ligands MICA/B on activated T lymphocytes and different cancer cells, without affecting MICA/B expression on resting peripheral blood cells. Growth supernatant from propionibacteria or propionate alone could directly stimulate functional MICA/B surface expression and MICA promoter activity by a mechanism dependent on intracellular calcium. Deletion and point mutations further demonstrated that a GC-box motif around -110 from the MICA transcription start site is essential for propionate-mediated MICA promoter activity. Other short-chain fatty acids such as lactate, acetate, and butyrate could also induce MICA/B expression. We observed a striking difference in the molecular signaling pathways that regulate MICA/B. A functional glycolytic pathway was essential for MICA/B expression after exposure to propionate and CMV. In contrast, compounds with histone deacetylase-inhibitory activity such as butyrate and FR901228 stimulated MICA/B expression through a pathway that was not affected by inhibition of glycolysis, clearly suggesting that MICA/B is regulated through different molecular mechanisms. We propose that propionate, produced either by bacteria or during cellular metabolism, has significant immunoregulatory function and may be cancer prophylactic. PMID:19553547

  3. Effect of cellulose acetate butyrate microencapsulated ammonium polyphosphate on the flame retardancy, mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties of intumescent flame-retardant ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer/microencapsulated ammonium polyphosphate/polyamide-6 blends.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bibo; Tang, Qinbo; Hong, Ningning; Song, Lei; Wang, Lei; Shi, Yongqian; Hu, Yuan

    2011-09-01

    Ammonium polyphosphate (APP), a widely used intumescent flame retardant, has been microencapsulated by cellulose acetate butyrate with the aim of enhancing the water resistance of APP and the compatibility between the ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) matrix and APP. The structure of microencapsulated ammonium polyphosphate (MCAPP) was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and water contact angle (WCA). The flame retadancy and thermal stability were investigated by a limiting oxygen index (LOI) test, UL-94 test, cone calorimeter, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The WCA results indicated that MCAPP has excellent water resistance and hydrophobicity. The results demonstrated that MCAPP enhanced interfacial adhesion, mechanical, electrical, and thermal stability of the EVA/MCAPP/polyamide-6 (PA-6) system. The microencapsulation not only imparted EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 with a higher LOI value and UL-94 rating but also could significantly improve the fire safety. Furthermore, the microencapsulated EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 composites can still pass the UL-94 V-0 rating after treatment with water for 3 days at 70 °C, indicating excellent water resistance. This investigation provides a promising formulation for the intumescent flame retardant EVA with excellent properties. PMID:21859130

  4. Simultaneous detection and quantification of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) produced by rhizobacteria from l-tryptophan (Trp) using HPTLC.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Dweipayan; Thakker, Janki N; Dhandhukia, Pinakin C

    2015-03-01

    A simple, quick and reliable method is proposed for the detection and quantitation of indole-3-acetate (IAA) and indole-3-butyrate (IBA), an auxin phytohormone produced by rhizobacteria from l-tryptophan (Trp) metabolism using high performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC). Microbial auxin biosynthesis routes involve Trp as a precursor where other than IAA and IBA, products such as indole-3-pyruvate (IPA), indole-3-acetamide (IAM), tryptamine, indole-3-acetonitrile (IAN), indole-3-lactic acid (ILA) and indole-3-acetaldehyde (IAAld) are also produced. In traditional spectrophotometric method, Salkowski reagent develops color by reacting with indolic compounds. The color development is non-specific contributed by several Trp derivatives produced by rhizobacteria rather than IAA only. To overcome this limitation, HPTLC based protocol is developed to precisely detect and quantify IAA and IBA in the range of 100 to 1000ng per spot. This protocol is applicable to detect and quantify IAA and IBA from microbial samples ignoring other Trp derivatives. For microbial samples, the spectrophotometric method gives larger values as compared to HPTLC derived values which may be attributed by total indolic compounds reacting with Salkowski reagent rather than only IAA and/or IBA. PMID:25573587

  5. Relationship between Indole-3-Acetic Acid Levels in Apple (Malus pumila Mill) Rootstocks Cultured in Vitro and Adventitious Root Formation in the Presence of Indole-3-Butyric Acid.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, R; Nissen, S J; Sutter, E G

    1989-02-01

    In vitro rooting response and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels were examined in two genetically related dwarfing apple (Malus pumila Mill) rootstocks. M.26 and M.9 were cultured in vitro using Linsmaier-Skoog medium supplemented with benzyladenine (BA), indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), and 1,3,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid (PG). Rooting response was tested in Lepoivre medium supplemented with IBA and PG. IBA concentrations of 12.0 and 4.0 micromolar induced the maximum rooting percentages for M.9 and M.26, respectively. At these concentrations rooting response was 100% for M.26 and 80% for M.9. Free and conjugated IAA levels were determined in M.26 and M.9 shoots prior to root inducing treatment by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and validated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using (13)[C(6)]IAA as internal standard. Basal sections of M.26 shoots contained 2.8 times more free IAA than similar tissue in M.9 (477.1 +/- 6.5 versus 166.6 +/- 6.7 nanograms per gram fresh weight), while free IAA levels in apical sections of M.26 and M.9 shoots were comparable (298.0 +/- 4.4 versus 263.7 +/- 9.3 nanograms per gram fresh weight). Conjugated IAA levels were significantly higher in M.9 than in M.26 indicating that a greater proportion of total IAA was present as a conjugate in M.9. These data suggest that differences between M.26 and M.9 rooting responses may be related to differences in free IAA levels in the shoot base. PMID:16666562

  6. Butyrate production in phylogenetically diverse Firmicutes isolated from the chicken caecum

    PubMed Central

    Eeckhaut, Venessa; Van Immerseel, Filip; Croubels, Siska; De Baere, Siegrid; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Louis, Petra; Vandamme, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Summary Sixteen butyrate‐producing bacteria were isolated from the caecal content of chickens and analysed phylogenetically. They did not represent a coherent phylogenetic group, but were allied to four different lineages in the Firmicutes phylum. Fourteen strains appeared to represent novel species, based on a level of ≤ 98.5% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity towards their nearest validly named neighbours. The highest butyrate concentrations were produced by the strains belonging to clostridial clusters IV and XIVa, clusters which are predominant in the chicken caecal microbiota. In only one of the 16 strains tested, the butyrate kinase operon could be amplified, while the butyryl‐CoA : acetate CoA‐transferase gene was detected in eight strains belonging to clostridial clusters IV, XIVa and XIVb. None of the clostridial cluster XVI isolates carried this gene based on degenerate PCR analyses. However, another CoA‐transferase gene more similar to propionate CoA‐transferase was detected in the majority of the clostridial cluster XVI isolates. Since this gene is located directly downstream of the remaining butyrate pathway genes in several human cluster XVI bacteria, it may be involved in butyrate formation in these bacteria. The present study indicates that butyrate producers related to cluster XVI may play a more important role in the chicken gut than in the human gut. PMID:21375722

  7. Enhanced production of IL-18 in butyrate-treated intestinal epithelium by stimulation of the proximal promoter region.

    PubMed

    Kalina, Uwe; Koyama, Noriko; Hosoda, Tomoko; Nuernberger, Heike; Sato, Kazuto; Hoelzer, Dieter; Herweck, Frank; Manigold, Tobias; Singer, Manfred V; Rossol, Siegbert; Böcker, Ulrich

    2002-09-01

    Expression of IL-18 in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) has been implicated in Th1 cell-mediated chronic intestinal inflammation and anti-tumor immunity. However, physiological regulatory factors have not been identified. Besides their effects on proliferation and restitution, immunomodulatory functions have been attributed to short chain fatty acids (SCFA). We investigated the effect of SCFA (butyrate, propionate, acetate) on expression of IL-18 in IEC in vitro and in vivo. Expression of IL-18 mRNA and protein in human carcinoma-derived HT-29 and Caco-2 cells was analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot. Transcriptional regulation of IL-18 gene expression was determined by transient transfection of wild-type and mutated IL-18 promoter. Further, in vivo expression of IL-18 in the intestine from butyrate-treated and untreated mice was assessed by immunohistochemistry. IL-18 mRNA and the IL-18 protein were expressed in IEC, while IL-18 secretion was not observed. Butyrate and acetate increased intracellular IL-18 content in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. In contrast to proinflammatory stimuli butyrate potently activated the IL-18 promoter, indicating that IL-18 is regulated at the transcriptional level by SCFA. Furthermore, a 108-bp sequence in the proximal region was identified to be essential for IL-18 promoter activation by butyrate. As proof of principle butyrate effects were confirmed in vivo by demonstration of increased IL-18 protein expression in IEC from butyrate-treated mice. In conclusion, SCFA up-regulate IL-18 protein expression in IEC, suggesting a potential regulatory contribution of these luminal constituents to T cell mediated inflammatory and neoplastic intestinal conditions. PMID:12207348

  8. Fragrance material review on 2-(p-tolyloxy)ethyl acetate.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of 2-(p-tolyloxy)ethyl acetate when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. 2-(p-tolyloxy)ethyl acetate is a member of the fragrance structural group aryl alkyl alcohol simple acid esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for 2-(p-tolyloxy)ethyl acetate were evaluated, then summarized, and includes physical properties data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document. Please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances. PMID:22414652

  9. Restricted Distribution of the Butyrate Kinase Pathway among Butyrate-Producing Bacteria from the Human Colon

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Petra; Duncan, Sylvia H.; McCrae, Sheila I.; Millar, Jacqueline; Jackson, Michelle S.; Flint, Harry J.

    2004-01-01

    The final steps in butyrate synthesis by anaerobic bacteria can occur via butyrate kinase and phosphotransbutyrylase or via butyryl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase. Degenerate PCR and enzymatic assays were used to assess the presence of butyrate kinase among 38 anaerobic butyrate-producing bacterial isolates from human feces that represent three different clostridial clusters (IV, XIVa, and XVI). Only four strains were found to possess detectable butyrate kinase activity. These were also the only strains to give PCR products (verifiable by sequencing) with degenerate primer pairs designed within the butyrate kinase gene or between the linked butyrate kinase/phosphotransbutyrylase genes. Further analysis of the butyrate kinase/phosphotransbutyrylase genes of one isolate, L2-50, revealed similar organization to that described previously from different groups of clostridia, along with differences in flanking sequences and phylogenetic relationships. Butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase activity was detected in all 38 strains examined, suggesting that it, rather than butyrate kinase, provides the dominant route for butyrate formation in the human colonic ecosystem that contains a constantly high concentration of acetate. PMID:15028695

  10. Derivation of a human equivalent concentration for n-butanol using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for n-butyl acetate and metabolites n-butanol and n-butyric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Deisinger, P. J.; Poet, Torka S.; English, J C.; Faber, W D.; Barton, H. A.; Corley, Rick A.; Clewell, III, H. J.

    2005-05-01

    The metabolic series (family) approach for risk assessment uses a dosimetry-based analysis to develop toxicity information for a group of metabolically linked compounds using pharmacokinetic (PK) data for each compound and toxicity data for the parent compound. An initial physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to support the implementation of the metabolic series approach for n-butyl acetate and its subsequent metabolites, n-butanol, and n-butyric acid (the butyl series) (Barton et al. 2000). In conjunction with pilot pharmacokinetic studies, the model was used to design the definitive intravenous (i.v.) PK studies. Rats were implanted with dual indwelling cannulae and administered test compounds by i.v. bolus dose, i.v. infusion, or by inhalation in a recirculating closed chamber. Hepatic, vascular and extravascular metabolic constants for metabolism were estimated by fitting the model to the blood time course data from these experiments. The respiratory bioavailability of n-butyl acetate and n-butanol was estimated from closed chamber inhalation studies and measured ventilation rates. The resulting butyl series PBPK model successfully reproduces the blood time course of these compounds following i.v. administration, and inhalation exposure to n-butyl acetate and n-butanol. A fully scaled human version of the model successfully reproduces arterial blood n-butanol kinetics following inhalation exposure to n-butanol. These validated i.v (rat) and inhalation route models (rat, butyl acetate, n-butanol; human, butanol only) can be used to support species and dose-route extrapolations required for risk assessment of butyl series family of compounds. Further, this work demonstrates the usefulness of i.v. kinetic data for parameterization of systemic metabolism and the value of collaboration between experimentalists and kineticists in the development of PBPK models. The product of this effort, validated rat and human PBPK models for the butyl

  11. Fragrance material review on phenethyl acetate.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Vitale, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of phenethyl acetate when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. Phenethyl acetate is a member of the fragrance structural group aryl alkyl alcohol simple acid esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for phenethyl acetate were evaluated, then summarized, and includes: physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, mucous membrane (eye) irritation, skin sensitization, elicitation, toxicokinetics, repeated dose, genotoxicity, and carcinogenicity data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document. Please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances. PMID:22414644

  12. An evaluation of the bioconversion of woody biomass to calcium acetate deicing salt

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, D.L.; Augenstein, D. )

    1988-01-01

    A competitive process is described using local woody biomass residues, which may also include associated pulp and paper wastes, or municipal solid waste, as potential feedstocks for bioconversion to calcium acetate, an alternative deicing salt. The process first involves suppressed methane fermentation of these woody biomass residues in a packed bed fermentor for the production of acetic acid. In earlier experimental work, operation of conventional anaerobic digestion systems in this suppressed methane mode has yielded a product of over 85% acetic acid, the remainder primarily being other organic acids such as propionic and butyric acids; operation at thermophilic conditions (60{degree}C) yielded essentially all acetic acid. In the process described, recovery of the dilute organic acids (=3.5% acetic acid) will be by liquid ion exchange extraction. Production calcium acetate is formed by back extraction of liquid ion exchange with calcium hydroxide. After spray drying, this calcium acetate is ready for use as an organic deicing salt. Pretreatment of woody biomass may be by steam explosion or by mild alkali treatment to breakdown the lignin fraction for fermentation to acetic acid; however, if cellulosic wastes are used, no pretreatment step will be needed. Essentially, only technology transfer is involved in commercialization of this process, rather than the development of new technology. Their cost analysis, the objective of this present work, projects calcium acetate costs of 0.258 $US/kg ($0.117/lb) for a full-scale plant of 454 metric tons/day (500 US tons/day).

  13. Effect of Exogenous Indole-3-Acetic Acid and Indole-3-Butyric Acid on Internal Levels of the Respective Auxins and Their Conjugation with Aspartic Acid during Adventitious Root Formation in Pea Cuttings.

    PubMed

    Nordström, A C; Jacobs, F A; Eliasson, L

    1991-07-01

    The influence of exogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) on the internal levels of these auxins was studied during the first 4 days of adventitious root formation in cuttings of Pisum sativum L. The quantitations were done by high performance liquid chromatography with spectrofluorometric detection. IBA, identified by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), was found to naturally occur in this plant material. The root inducing ability of exogenous IBA was superior to that of IAA. The IAA level in the tissue increased considerably on the first day after application of IAA, but rapidly decreased again, returning to a level twice the control by day 3. The predominant metabolic route was conjugation with aspartic acid, as reflected by the increase in the level of indole-3-acetylaspartic acid. The IBA treatment resulted in increases in the levels of IBA, IAA, and indole-3-acetylaspartic acid. The IAA content rapidly returned to control levels, whereas the IBA level remained high throughout the experimental period. High amounts of indole-3-butyrylaspartic acid were found in the tissue after feeding with IBA. The identity of the conjugate was confirmed by (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance and GC-MS. IBA was much more stable in solution than IAA. No IAA was detected after 48 hours, whereas 70% IBA was still recovered after this time. The relatively higher root inducing ability of IBA is ascribed to the fact that its level remained elevated longer than that of IAA, even though IBA was metabolized in the tissue. Adventitious root formation is discussed on the basis of these findings. PMID:16668265

  14. Effects of volatile fatty acids on propionate metabolism and gluconeogenesis in caprine hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, R.J.; Armentano, L.E.

    1987-12-01

    Isolated caprine hepatocytes were incubated with fatty acids of various chain lengths. Short-chain fatty acids effects on rates of gluconeogenesis and oxidation from (2-/sup 14/C) propionate were determined. Additions of glucose (2.5 mM) had no effect on hepatic (2-/sup 14/C)-propionate metabolism in the presence and absence of amino acids. A complete mixture of amino acids increased label incorporation from (2-/sup 14/C) propionate into (/sup 14/C) glucose by 22%. Butyrate inhibited (2-/sup 14/C) propionate metabolism and increased the apparent Michaelis constant for (2-/sup 14/C) propionate incorporation into (/sup 14/C) glucose from 2.4 +/- 1.5 to 5.6 +/- .9 mM. Butyrate's effects on propionate were similar in the presence and absence of L-carnitine (1 mM). Isobutyrate, 2-methylbutyrate, and valerate (1.25 mM) had no effect on (/sup 14/C) glucose production but decreased /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production to 57, 61, and 54% of the control (2-/sup 14/C) propionate (1.25 mM). This inhibition on /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ was not competitive. Isovalerate had no effect on either (2-/sup 14/C) propionate incorporation into glucose of CO/sub 2/. An increase in ratio of (/sup 14/C) glucose to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from (2-/sup 14/C)-propionate demonstrated that short-chain fatty acids other than butyrate do not inhibit gluconeogenesis from propionate. In addition, fatty acids that generate a net synthesis of intracellular oxaloacetate may partition propionate carbons toward gluconeogenic rather than oxidative pathways in goat hepatocytes.

  15. High-Fat Diet Reduces the Formation of Butyrate, but Increases Succinate, Inflammation, Liver Fat and Cholesterol in Rats, while Dietary Fibre Counteracts These Effects

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsdottir, Greta; Xu, Jie; Molin, Göran; Ahrné, Siv; Nyman, Margareta

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is linked to type 2 diabetes and risk factors associated to the metabolic syndrome. Consumption of dietary fibres has been shown to have positive metabolic health effects, such as by increasing satiety, lowering blood glucose and cholesterol levels. These effects may be associated with short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), particularly propionic and butyric acids, formed by microbial degradation of dietary fibres in colon, and by their capacity to reduce low-grade inflammation. Objective To investigate whether dietary fibres, giving rise to different SCFAs, would affect metabolic risk markers in low-fat and high-fat diets using a model with conventional rats for 2, 4 and 6 weeks. Material and Methods Conventional rats were administered low-fat or high-fat diets, for 2, 4 or 6 weeks, supplemented with fermentable dietary fibres, giving rise to different SCFA patterns (pectin – acetic acid; guar gum – propionic acid; or a mixture – butyric acid). At the end of each experimental period, liver fat, cholesterol and triglycerides, serum and caecal SCFAs, plasma cholesterol, and inflammatory cytokines were analysed. The caecal microbiota was analysed after 6 weeks. Results and Discussion Fermentable dietary fibre decreased weight gain, liver fat, cholesterol and triglyceride content, and changed the formation of SCFAs. The high-fat diet primarily reduced formation of SCFAs but, after a longer experimental period, the formation of propionic and acetic acids recovered. The concentration of succinic acid in the rats increased in high-fat diets with time, indicating harmful effect of high-fat consumption. The dietary fibre partly counteracted these harmful effects and reduced inflammation. Furthermore, the number of Bacteroides was higher with guar gum, while noticeably that of Akkermansia was highest with the fibre-free diet. PMID:24236183

  16. In vitro evaluation of cashew nut shell liquid as a methane-inhibiting and propionate-enhancing agent for ruminants.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Y; Suzuki, R; Koike, S; Nagashima, K; Mochizuki, M; Forster, R J; Kobayashi, Y

    2010-11-01

    Cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) containing antibacterial phenolic compounds was evaluated for its potency as a feed additive for ruminants. In experiment 1, ruminal responses to CNSL supplementation were assessed using a batch culture system. Rumen fluid from cattle was diluted with artificial saliva and incubated for 18h in a batch culture with a mixed diet containing a 30:70 hay:concentrate diet to which raw or heated CNSL was added at a final concentration of 500 μg/mL. In experiment 2, a Rusitec, using rumen fluid from the same cattle, was operated over a period of 7 d during which only raw CNSL was tested at concentrations of 0, 50, 100, or 200 μg/mL, and variations in fermentation and bacterial population were assessed. In experiment 3, a pure culture study was conducted using selected bacteria to determine their susceptibility to CNSL. In experiment 1, methane production was inhibited by raw CNSL (56.9% inhibition) but not by heated CNSL. Total volatile fatty acid concentration was not affected, whereas increased concentrations of propionate and decreased concentrations of acetate and butyrate were observed using either raw or heated CNSL. These changes were more obvious when raw CNSL was tested. In experiment 2, raw CNSL inhibited methanogenesis and increased propionate production in a dose-dependent manner, showing maximum methane inhibition (70.1%) and propionate enhancement (44.4%) at 200 μg/mL supplementation. Raw CNSL increased total volatile fatty acid concentration and dry matter digestibility. Raw CNSL also appeared to induce a dramatic shift in the population of rumen microbiota, based on decreased protozoa numbers and changes in quantitative PCR assay values for representative bacterial species. In experiment 3, using pure cultures, raw CNSL prevented the growth of hydrogen-, formate-, and butyrate-producing rumen bacteria, but not the growth of bacteria involved in propionate production. Based on these data, raw CNSL, rich in the antibacterial

  17. Liquid chromatographic determination of clobetasone-17-butyrate in ointments.

    PubMed

    Patel, A G; Patel, R B; Patel, M R

    1990-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic (LC) method has been developed for determination of clobetasone-17-butyrate in ointment using clobetasone propionate as an internal standard. Separation was carried out on a C18 reverse-phase column using water-methanol as a mobile phase. Methylparaben and propylparaben (both sodium salt) used as preservatives did not interfere with separation. Compounds are detected photometrically at 235 nm. Mean assay results for 0.05% commercial ointments were 100.36% (n = 5). Mean recovery of clobetasone-17-butyrate added to commercial ointment was 99.89%. PMID:2289922

  18. Effect of abomasal butyrate infusion on net nutrient flux across the portal-drained viscera and liver of growing lambs.

    PubMed

    Foote, A P; Freetly, H C

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to determine if supplying butyrate to the postruminal gastrointestinal tract of growing lambs alters blood flow and nutrient flux across the portal-drained viscera (PDV) and hepatic tissues. Polled Dorset wether lambs ( = 10; initial BW = 55 ± 3.3 kg) had catheters surgically implanted into the portal vein, a branch of the hepatic vein, a mesenteric vein, and the abdominal aorta. A cannula was placed in the abomasum to deliver the treatment. Lambs were fed a pelleted ration once daily consisting of 69.7% dehydrated alfalfa, 30.0% ground corn, and 0.3% salt at 1.3 × NE requirement. The experimental design was a crossover balanced in time, so that each lamb received both treatments. Treatments consisted of either a pulse dose infusion of butyrate (buffered solution) to supply butyrate (10 mg/kg BW) or a buffered saline solution (1 mL/kg BW) once daily at the time of feeding. On d 14 of the treatment period, nutrient fluxes were measured using para-aminohippuric acid as a blood flow marker. Blood samples were collected from the aorta, portal vein, and hepatic vein every hour for 9 h beginning at 30 min prior to treatment/feeding. There was a tendency for a treatment × time interaction ( = 0.05) for portal vein blood flow, indicating that blood flow began to decrease earlier postprandial in lambs receiving butyrate. The butyrate treatment tended to increase the uptake of O ( = 0.07) and increased the uptake of glucose ( = 0.002), glutamate ( = 0.04), and glutamine ( = 0.02) by the PDV. There was a treatment × time interaction ( < 0.01) for flux of acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate, and valerate across the PDV. The interaction was mainly due to an earlier postprandial peak and associated decrease in the flux rate of the VFA. The alteration in timing of the postprandial peak of VFA flux was also observed in hepatic fluxes of VFA. It appears that supplying butyrate to the postruminal tissues through an abomasal cannula

  19. Crystal Structure of Butyrate Kinase 2 from Thermotoga maritima, a Member of the ASKHA Superfamily of Phosphotransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Diao, Jiasheng; Hasson, Miriam S.

    2009-04-01

    The enzymatic transfer of phosphoryl groups is central to the control of many cellular processes. One of the phosphoryl transfer mechanisms, that of acetate kinase, is not completely understood. Besides better understanding of the mechanism of acetate kinase, knowledge of the structure of butyrate kinase 2 (Buk2) will aid in the interpretation of active-site structure and provide information on the structural basis of substrate specificity. The gene buk2 from Thermotoga maritima encodes a member of the ASKHA (acetate and sugar kinases/heat shock cognate/actin) superfamily of phosphotransferases. The encoded protein Buk2 catalyzes the phosphorylation of butyrate and isobutyrate. We have determined the 2.5-{angstrom} crystal structure of Buk2 complexed with ({beta},{gamma}-methylene) adenosine 5'-triphosphate. Buk2 folds like an open-shelled clam, with each of the two domains representing one of the two shells. In the open active-site cleft between the N- and C-terminal domains, the active-site residues consist of two histidines, two arginines, and a cluster of hydrophobic residues. The ATP binding region of Buk2 in the C-terminal domain consists of abundant glycines for nucleotide binding, and the ATP binding motif is similar to those of other members of the ASKHA superfamily. The enzyme exists as an octamer, in which four disulfide bonds form between intermolecular cysteines. Sequence alignment and structure superposition identify the simplicity of the monomeric Buk2 structure, a probable substrate binding site, the key residues in catalyzing phosphoryl transfer, and the substrate specificity differences among Buk2, acetate, and propionate kinases. The possible enzyme mechanisms are discussed.

  20. Fragrance material review on p-anisyl acetate.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of p-anisyl acetate when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. p-Anisyl acetate is a member of the fragrance structural group aryl alkyl alcohol simple acid esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for p-anisyl acetate were evaluated, then summarized, and includes: physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, mucous membrane (eye) irritation, skin sensitization, and genotoxicity data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document. Please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances. PMID:22417777

  1. Fragrance material review on ethyl phenyl carbinyl acetate.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of ethyl phenyl carbinyl acetate when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. Ethyl phenyl carbinyl acetate is a member of the fragrance structural group Aryl Alkyl Alcohol Simple Acid Esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for ethyl phenyl carbinyl acetate were evaluated, then summarized, and includes: physical properties; acute toxicity; skin irritation; and skin sensitization data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances. PMID:22433983

  2. Hydrogen bonding and molecular association in 2-(quinuclidinium)-butyric acid bromide hydrate studied by X-ray diffraction, DFT calculations, FTIR and NMR spectroscopy, and potentiometric titration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dega-Szafran, Z.; Katrusiak, A.; Szafran, M.; Barczyński, P.

    2010-06-01

    The structure of 2-(quinuclidinium)-butyric acid bromide hydrate (QNBu·H 2O·HBr, 3) has been determined by X-ray diffraction, DFT calculations and characterized by FTIR and NMR spectroscopy. Crystals of 3 are monoclinic, space group P2 1. The water molecule interacts with the carboxylic group of 2-(quinuclidinium)-butyric acid and with the bromide anion by the COOH⋯OH 2 and HOH⋯Br hydrogen bonds of 2.575(3) and 3.293(2) Å, respectively. The structures of monomer ( 4) and dimeric cation ( 5) of the title complex have been optimized by the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) approach, yielding conformations consistent with this in the crystal. The solid-state FTIR spectra of 3 and its deuterated analogue have been measured and compared with the theoretical spectrum of 4. The assignments of the observed and predicted bands have been proposed. The molecule of 3 has a chiral center at the C(9) atom, which is responsible for the non-magnetically equivalence of the α-ring and C(11)H 2 methylene protons in 1H NMR spectrum. The values of p Ka of quinuclidinium-acetate (quinuclidine betaine), 2-(quinuclidinium)-propionate and 2-(quinuclidinium)-butyrate have been determined by the potentiometric titration of their hydrohalides.

  3. Propionic acid production by immobilized cells of a propionate-tolerant strain of Propionibacterium acidipropionici.

    PubMed

    Paik, H D; Glatz, B A

    1994-10-01

    Cells of the propionate-tolerant strain Propionibacterium acidipropionici P200910, immobilized in calcium alginate beads, were tested for propionic and acetic acid production both in a semidefined laboratory medium and in corn steep liquor in batch, fed-batch, and continuous fermentation. Cell density was about 9.8 x 10(9) cells/g (wet weight) of beads, and beads were added to the medium at 0.1 g (wet weight) beads/ml. Beads could be reused for several consecutive batch fermentations; propionic acid production in the tenth cycle was about 50%-70% of that in the first cycle. In batch culture complete substrate consumption (glucose in semidefined medium, lactate in corn steep liquor) and maximum acid production were seen within 36 h, and acid yields from the substrate were higher than in free-cell fermentations. Fed-batch fermentations were incubated up to 250 h. Maximum propionic acid concentrations obtained were 45.6 g/l in corn steep liquor and 57 g/l in semidefined medium; this is the highest concentration achieved to date in our laboratory. Maximum acetic acid concentrations were 17 g/l and 12 g/l, respectively. In continuous fermentation of semide-fined medium, dilution rates up to 0.31 h-1 could be used, which gave higher volumetric productivities (0.96 g l-1 h-1 for propionic acid and 0.26 g l-1 h-1 for acetic acid) than we have obtained with free cells. Corn steep liquor shows promise as an inexpensive medium for production of both acids by immobilized cells of propionibacteria. PMID:7765817

  4. The Common Gut Microbe Eubacterium hallii also Contributes to Intestinal Propionate Formation

    PubMed Central

    Engels, Christina; Ruscheweyh, Hans-Joachim; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Lacroix, Christophe; Schwab, Clarissa

    2016-01-01

    Eubacterium hallii is considered an important microbe in regard to intestinal metabolic balance due to its ability to utilize glucose and the fermentation intermediates acetate and lactate, to form butyrate and hydrogen. Recently, we observed that E. hallii is capable of metabolizing glycerol to 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA, reuterin) with reported antimicrobial properties. The key enzyme for glycerol to 3-HPA conversion is the cobalamin-dependent glycerol/diol dehydratase PduCDE which also utilizes 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD) to form propionate. Therefore our primary goal was to investigate glycerol to 3-HPA metabolism and 1,2-PD utilization by E. hallii along with its ability to produce cobalamin. We also investigated the relative abundance of E. hallii in stool of adults using 16S rRNA and pduCDE based gene screening to determine the contribution of E. hallii to intestinal propionate formation. We found that E. hallii utilizes glycerol to produce up to 9 mM 3-HPA but did not further metabolize 3-HPA to 1,3-propanediol. Utilization of 1,2-PD in the presence and absence of glucose led to the formation of propanal, propanol and propionate. E. hallii formed cobalamin and was detected in stool of 74% of adults using 16S rRNA gene as marker gene (n = 325). Relative abundance of the E. hallii 16S rRNA gene ranged from 0 to 0.59% with a mean relative abundance of 0.044%. E. hallii PduCDE was detected in 63 to 81% of the metagenomes depending on which subunit was investigated beside other taxons such as Ruminococcus obeum, R. gnavus, Flavonifractor plautii, Intestinimonas butyriciproducens, and Veillonella spp. In conclusion, we identified E. hallii as a common gut microbe with the ability to convert glycerol to 3-HPA, a step that requires the production of cobalamin, and to utilize 1,2-PD to form propionate. Our results along with its ability to use a broad range of substrates point at E. hallii as a key species within the intestinal trophic chain with the potential to

  5. High propionic acid fermentations and mineral accumulation in the cecum of rats adapted to different levels of inulin.

    PubMed

    Levrat, M A; Rémésy, C; Demigné, C

    1991-11-01

    The digestive and metabolic effects of inulin (from chicory) were studied in rats adapted to semipurified diets containing 0, 5, 10 or 20% inulin (wt/wt). Moderate levels of inulin (5-10%) did not significantly affect food intake or body weight gain. Dietary inulin resulted in considerably greater cecal fermentation and a significantly greater intraluminal concentration of propionate (peaking at 58.4 mmol/L). A lower concentration of acetate (42.6 mmol/L) was observed in rats fed 20% inulin. Lactic fermentations were observed in rats fed the 10 or 20% inulin diets. The cecal pool of volatile fatty acids tended to reach a plateau in rats fed diets containing more than 10% inulin (up to 600-700 mumol), but volatile fatty acid absorption was a slightly hyperbolic function of the dietary inulin level. Butyrate absorption was proportionally lower than that of propionate. Inulin-containing diets induced an enlargement of the cecal pool of calcium, phosphate and (to a lesser extent) magnesium. There was also an enhanced absorption of these divalent cations. The cecal pool of bile acids was greater in rats fed inulin, and this oligosaccharide displayed a slight hypocholesterolemic effect, even in rats fed the 5% inulin diet. However, plasma triglycerides were depressed only in rats fed the 20% inulin diet. In conclusion, inulin seems very effective in promoting propionic fermentation and in enhancing the calcium content of the large intestine. However, high levels of inulin (greater than 10%) may affect growth in rats and lead to acidic (pH 5.65) cecal fermentation. PMID:1941180

  6. Expression and specificity profile of the major acetate transporter AcpA in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Sá-Pessoa, Joana; Amillis, Sotiris; Casal, Margarida; Diallinas, George

    2015-03-01

    AcpA has been previously characterized as a high-affinity transporter essential for the uptake and use of acetate as sole carbon source in Aspergillus nidulans. Here, we follow the expression profile of AcpA and define its substrate specificity. AcpA-mediated acetate transport is detected from the onset of conidiospore germination, peaks at the time of germ tube emergence, and drops to low basal levels in germlings and young mycelia, where a second acetate transporter is also becoming apparent. AcpA activity also responds to acetate presence in the growth medium, but is not subject to either carbon or nitrogen catabolite repression. Short-chain monocarboxylates (benzoate, formate, butyrate and propionate) inhibit AcpA-mediated acetate transport with apparent inhibition constants (Ki) of 16.89±2.12, 9.25±1.01, 12.06±3.29 and 1.44±0.13mM, respectively. AcpA is also shown not to be directly involved in ammonia export, as proposed for its Saccharomyces cerevisiae homologue Ady2p. In the second part of this work, we search for the unknown acetate transporter expressed in mycelia, and for other transporters that might contribute to acetate uptake. In silico analysis, genetic construction of relevant null mutants, and uptake assays, reveal that the closest AcpA homologue (AN1839), named AcpB, is the 'missing' secondary acetate transporter in mycelia. We also identify two major short-chain carboxylate (lactate, succinate, pyruvate and malate) transporters, named JenA (AN6095) and JenB (AN6703), which however are not involved in acetate uptake. This work establishes a framework for further exploiting acetate and carboxylate transport in filamentous ascomycetes. PMID:25708319

  7. Vitamin B12-dependent propionate production by the ruminal bacterium Prevotella ruminicola 23.

    PubMed

    Strobel, H J

    1992-07-01

    When Prevotella ruminicola 23 was grown in a defined medium containing a vitamin mixture, significant amounts of propionate were formed. Succinate and acetate were the major fermentation acids produced when vitamins were omitted, and further experiments demonstrated that propionate formation was dependent on vitamin B12. When the organism was grown in continuous culture at dilution rates of less than 0.20 h-1, propionate and acetate were the predominant fermentation products and little succinate was formed when vitamin B12 was present. However, at higher dilution rates, propionate formation declined and succinate accumulated. Since cell protein yields were reduced 15 to 25% in the absence of vitamin B12, the pathway for propionate formation may contain an energy-conserving step. PMID:1637169

  8. [Propionic acidemia: one case report].

    PubMed

    Yuan, L

    1991-04-01

    A case of propionic acidemia is reported. The main features of this patient were recurrent vomiting, ketosis and occasional episodes of seizure. Serum concentrations of propionic acid and glycine were within the normal range. Blood ammonia was slightly elevated. Characteristic organic acids were present in the patient's urine. they were: 3-hydroxypropionic acid, propionylglycine, methyl-citric acid, tiglyglycine, 3-hydroxyvaleric acid, etc. The etiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of propionic acidemia are briefly discussed. PMID:1831712

  9. Pharmaceutical availability of clobetasol-17-propionate from cream and ointment.

    PubMed

    Dyderski, S; Grześkowiak, E; Szałek, E; Mrzygłód, A

    2001-01-01

    Kinetics of drug release from both compared preparations available as a cream and an ointment, was in vitro studied. A reversed-phase HPLC method was developed for the determination of clobetasol-17-propionate in lipophylic bases using clobetasol-17-butyrate as an internal standard. Analyses were performed using a C18 reversed-phase column with a mobile phase of methanol-water and ultraviolet detection at lambda=254 nm. The calibration curve was constructed for the concentration range 0.5-40.0 microg/ml. The method is simple, accurate and precise. PMID:12197615

  10. Synthesis of β–Heteroaryl Propionates via Trapping of Carbocations with π-Nucleophiles

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Tsung-hao; Bonaparte, Amy; Martin, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    A variety of heterocyclic alcohols and acetates were coupled with silyl ketene acetals and other π-nucleophiles in the presence of trimethylsilyl trifluoromethanesulfonate to provide an array of substituted β-heteroaryl propionates, including those with contiguous quaternary centers, as well as vinylogs thereof. This reaction also proceeds with high diastereoselectivity when the π-nucleophile bears a chiral auxiliary. PMID:20161309

  11. Preparation of chitin butyrate by using phosphoryl mixed anhydride system.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Lok Ranjan; Kim, Bo Mi; Hyun, Kim; Kang, Kyung Hee; Lu, Chichong; Chai, Kyu Yun

    2011-04-01

    Acylation of chitin with butyric acid was performed in the presence of trifluoroacetic anhydride/phosphoric acid mediated system. The products were characterized by (1)H NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy and their solubility was tested in different organic solvents. Inclusion of butyric acid moieties into the parent molecule was confirmed from the (1)H NMR and FT-IR spectra. FT-IR analysis revealed that the degree of acid substitution (DS) of the products was in a range of 1.9-2.38, which increased with increasing the amounts of butyric acid added to the reaction system. Degree of N-deacetylation (DD) of the products, as determined by (1)H NMR was between 54.2% and 65.6%. The products with DS >2.0 were soluble in dimethyl sulfoxide, N,N-dimethylformamide, tetrahydrofuran, methanol, acetone, chloroform, and acetic acid. PMID:21353204

  12. Interspecies distances between propionic acid degraders and methanogens in syntrophic consortia for optimal hydrogen transfer.

    PubMed

    Felchner-Zwirello, Monika; Winter, Josef; Gallert, Claudia

    2013-10-01

    A mixed culture from an anaerobic biowaste digester was enriched on propionate and used to investigate interspecies hydrogen transfer in dependence of spatial distances between propionate degraders and methanogens. From 20.3 mM propionate, 20.8 mM acetate and 15.5 mM methane were formed. Maximum specific propionate oxidation and methane formation rates were 49 and 23 mmol mg(-1) day(-1), respectively. Propionate oxidation was inhibited by only 20 mM acetate by about 50 %. Intermediate formate formation during inhibited methanogensis was observed. The spatial distribution and the biovolume fraction of propionate degraders and of methanogens in relation to the total population during aggregate formation were determined. Measurements of interbacterial distances were conducted with fluorescence in situ hybridization by application of group-specific 16S rRNA-targeted probes and 3D image analyses. With increasing incubation time, floc formation and growth up to 54 μm were observed. Propionate degraders and methanogens were distributed randomly in the flocs. The methanogenic biovolume fraction was high at the beginning and remained constant over 42 days, whereas the fraction of propionate degraders increased with time during propionate feeding. Interbacterial distances between propionate degraders and methanogens decreased with time from 5.30 to 0.29 μm, causing an increase of the maximum possible hydrogen flux from 1.1 to 10.3 nmol ml(-1) min(-1). The maximum possible hydrogen flux was always higher than the hydrogen formation and consumption rate, indicating that reducing the interspecies distance by aggregation is advantageous in complex ecosystems. PMID:23233207

  13. Propionate Ameliorates Dextran Sodium Sulfate-Induced Colitis by Improving Intestinal Barrier Function and Reducing Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Ling-chang; Wang, Yue; Wang, Zhi-bin; Liu, Wei-ye; Sun, Sheng; Li, Ling; Su, Ding-feng; Zhang, Li-chao

    2016-01-01

    Propionate is a short chain fatty acid that is abundant as butyrate in the gut and blood. However, propionate has not been studied as extensively as butyrate in the treatment of colitis. The present study was to investigate the effects of sodium propionate on intestinal barrier function, inflammation and oxidative stress in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis mice. Animals in DSS group received drinking water from 1 to 6 days and DSS [3% (w/v) dissolved in double distilled water] instead of drinking water from 7 to 14 days. Animals in DSS+propionate (DSS+Prop) group were given 1% sodium propionate for 14 consecutive days and supplemented with 3% DSS solution on day 7–14. Intestinal barrier function, proinflammatory factors, oxidative stress, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway in the colon were determined. It was found that sodium propionate ameliorated body weight loss, colon-length shortening and colonic damage in colitis mice. Sodium propionate significantly inhibited the increase of FITC-dextran in serum and the decrease of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), occludin, and E-cadherin expression in the colonic tissue. It also inhibited the expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) mRNA and phosphorylation of STAT3 in colitis mice markedly, reduced the myeloperoxidase (MPO) level, and increased the superoxide dismutase and catalase level in colon and serum compared with DSS group. Sodium propionate inhibited macrophages with CD68 marker infiltration into the colonic mucosa of colitis mice. These results suggest that oral administration of sodium propionate could ameliorate DSS-induced colitis mainly by improving intestinal barrier function and reducing inflammation and oxidative stress via the STAT3 signaling pathway. PMID:27574508

  14. Propionate Ameliorates Dextran Sodium Sulfate-Induced Colitis by Improving Intestinal Barrier Function and Reducing Inflammation and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Tong, Ling-Chang; Wang, Yue; Wang, Zhi-Bin; Liu, Wei-Ye; Sun, Sheng; Li, Ling; Su, Ding-Feng; Zhang, Li-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Propionate is a short chain fatty acid that is abundant as butyrate in the gut and blood. However, propionate has not been studied as extensively as butyrate in the treatment of colitis. The present study was to investigate the effects of sodium propionate on intestinal barrier function, inflammation and oxidative stress in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis mice. Animals in DSS group received drinking water from 1 to 6 days and DSS [3% (w/v) dissolved in double distilled water] instead of drinking water from 7 to 14 days. Animals in DSS+propionate (DSS+Prop) group were given 1% sodium propionate for 14 consecutive days and supplemented with 3% DSS solution on day 7-14. Intestinal barrier function, proinflammatory factors, oxidative stress, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway in the colon were determined. It was found that sodium propionate ameliorated body weight loss, colon-length shortening and colonic damage in colitis mice. Sodium propionate significantly inhibited the increase of FITC-dextran in serum and the decrease of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), occludin, and E-cadherin expression in the colonic tissue. It also inhibited the expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) mRNA and phosphorylation of STAT3 in colitis mice markedly, reduced the myeloperoxidase (MPO) level, and increased the superoxide dismutase and catalase level in colon and serum compared with DSS group. Sodium propionate inhibited macrophages with CD68 marker infiltration into the colonic mucosa of colitis mice. These results suggest that oral administration of sodium propionate could ameliorate DSS-induced colitis mainly by improving intestinal barrier function and reducing inflammation and oxidative stress via the STAT3 signaling pathway. PMID:27574508

  15. INDUCTION OF APOPTOSIS BY BUTYRATE CORRELATES WITH INCREASING LEVEL OF PROTEIN UBIQUITINATION IN BOVINE KIDNEY EPITHELIAL CELLS (MDBK)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While butyrate (BT) is largely regarded as the minor short-chain fatty acid ([butyrate]< [acetate] or [proiponate]) formed during microbial fermatation in ruminants, an increasing body of evidence has clearly shown effects beyond those attributable to its function in nutrition. BT modulates cell d...

  16. Microbial production of propionic acid and vitamin B12 using molasses or sugar.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Chanto, A; Afschar, A S; Wagner, F

    1994-06-01

    With a cell concentration of 125 g dry biomass l-1 and a dilution rate of 0.1 h-1, Propionibacterium acidipropionici produces 30 g propionic acid l-1 from sugar with a productivity of 3 g l-1 h-1. The yield of propionic acid is approx. 0.36-0.45 g propionic acid g-1 sucrose and is independent of the dilution rate and cell concentration. Acetic acid is an unwanted by-product in the production of propionic acid. The concentration of acetic acid only increases slightly when the cell concentration is increased. A two-stage fermentation process was developed for the conversion of sugar or molasses of various types to propionic acid and vitamin B12. By fermentation of blackstrap molasses (from sugar beet and sugar cane) in the first fermentation stage 17.7 g propionic acid l-1 with a yield of 0.5 g propionic acid g-1 carbohydrate was produced with a dilution rate of 0.25 h-1. In the second stage 49 mg vitamin B12 1-1 was produced at a dilution rate of 0.03 h-1. PMID:7765100

  17. Structures of microbial communities found in anaerobic batch runs that produce methane from propionic acid--Seeded from full-scale anaerobic digesters above a certain threshold.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woong; Shin, Seung Gu; Han, Gyuseong; Cho, Kyungjin; Hwang, Seokhwan

    2015-11-20

    The volatile fatty acid propionate inhibits anaerobic digestion during organic waste treatments. To examine potential microbial interactions that accelerate propionate oxidation, anaerobic digestion systems seeded with various types of anaerobic sludge were analyzed. Seed samples were collected from 10 different full-scale anaerobic reactors in South Korea. Propionate oxidation was estimated as the methane production rate per gram of propionate used per day. Two domestic sewage sludge showed the highest methane production rate values, 109.1 ± 4.2 and 74.5 ± 8.6 mL CH4/(g propionate ∙ d). A food waste recycling wastewater source exhibited the lowest methane production rate, 33.2 ± 2.6 mL CH4/(g propionate ∙ d). To investigate how the microbial community structure affected propionate oxidation, qualitative molecular analyses were carried out using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Methanosaeta concilii, an aceticlastic methanogen, was detected in most batch runs. Smithella propionica, a unique propionate oxidizer and simultaneous producer of acetate, was found in domestic sewage sludge sources showing the highest methane production rate; in contrast, Desulfobulbus rhabdoformis, a sulfate reducer coupled with the consumption of acetate to be used as a precursor of methane, was observed in food waste recycling wastewater sludge source showing the lowest methane production rate. Thus, we propose that S. propionica, a syntrophic acetate producer using propionate, might cooperate with aceticlastic methanogens for high methane production during anaerobic digestion that included propionate. PMID:26450560

  18. Geobacter sulfurreducens sp. nov., a hydrogen- and acetate-oxidizing dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganism.

    PubMed Central

    Caccavo, F; Lonergan, D J; Lovley, D R; Davis, M; Stolz, J F; McInerney, M J

    1994-01-01

    A dissimilatory metal- and sulfur-reducing microorganism was isolated from surface sediments of a hydrocarbon-contaminated ditch in Norman, Okla. The isolate, which was designated strain PCA, was an obligately anaerobic, nonfermentative nonmotile, gram-negative rod. PCA grew in a defined medium with acetate as an electron donor and ferric PPi, ferric oxyhydroxide, ferric citrate, elemental sulfur, Co(III)-EDTA, fumarate, or malate as the sole electron acceptor. PCA also coupled the oxidation of hydrogen to the reduction of Fe(III) but did not reduce Fe(III) with sulfur, glucose, lactate, fumarate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate, isovalerate, succinate, yeast extract, phenol, benzoate, ethanol, propanol, or butanol as an electron donor. PCA did not reduce oxygen, Mn(IV), U(VI), nitrate, sulfate, sulfite, or thiosulfate with acetate as the electron donor. Cell suspensions of PCA exhibited dithionite-reduced minus air-oxidized difference spectra which were characteristic of c-type cytochromes. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA sequence placed PCA in the delta subgroup of the proteobacteria. Its closest known relative is Geobacter metallireducens. The ability to utilize either hydrogen or acetate as the sole electron donor for Fe(III) reduction makes strain PCA a unique addition to the relatively small group of respiratory metal-reducing microorganisms available in pure culture. A new species name, Geobacter sulfurreducens, is proposed. Images PMID:7527204

  19. Evidence that the production of acetate in rat hepatocytes is a predominantly cytoplasmic process.

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, B; Souter, M J; Anderson, S E

    1989-01-01

    By using [1-14C]butyrate, the fluxes of butyrate to acetate and fatty acids were measured in rat hepatocytes. Both fluxes were inhibited to a similar extent by (-)-hydroxycitrate, with no significant effect on butyrate uptake. These results indicate that acetate formation takes place in the cytoplasm, presumably via ATP-stimulated acetyl-CoA hydrolase. Since acetate formation occurred despite a net uptake of acetate, the results are also consistent with the operation of a substrate cycle between acetate and acetyl-CoA, recently proposed by other workers, and suggest that this cycle is cytoplasmic. PMID:2564776

  20. Phosphorus limitation strategy to increase propionic acid flux towards 3-hydroxyvaleric acid monomers in Cupriavidus necator.

    PubMed

    Grousseau, Estelle; Blanchet, Elise; Déléris, Stéphane; Albuquerque, Maria G E; Paul, Etienne; Uribelarrea, Jean-Louis

    2014-02-01

    Properties of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (P(3HB-co-3HV)) depend on their 3HV content. 3HV can be produced by Cupriavidus necator from propionic acid. Few studies explored carbon distribution and dynamics of 3HV and 3HB monomers production, and none of them have been done with phosphorus as limiting nutrient. In this study, fed-batch cultures of C. necator with propionic acid, as sole carbon source or mixed with butyric acid, were performed. Phosphorus deficiency allowed sustaining 3HV production rate and decreasing 3HB production rate, leading to an instant production of up to 100% of 3HV. When a residual growth is sustained by a phosphorus feeding, the maximum 3HV percentage produced from propionic acid is limited to 33% (Mole.Mole(-1)). The association of a second carbon source like butyric acid lead to higher conversion of propionic acid into 3HV. This study showed the importance of the limiting nutrient and of the culture strategy to get the appropriate product. PMID:24365742

  1. Multiple paths of electron flow to current in microbial electrolysis cells fed with low and high concentrations of propionate.

    PubMed

    Hari, Ananda Rao; Katuri, Krishna P; Gorron, Eduardo; Logan, Bruce E; Saikaly, Pascal E

    2016-07-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) provide a viable approach for bioenergy generation from fermentable substrates such as propionate. However, the paths of electron flow during propionate oxidation in the anode of MECs are unknown. Here, the paths of electron flow involved in propionate oxidation in the anode of two-chambered MECs were examined at low (4.5 mM) and high (36 mM) propionate concentrations. Electron mass balances and microbial community analysis revealed that multiple paths of electron flow (via acetate/H2 or acetate/formate) to current could occur simultaneously during propionate oxidation regardless of the concentration tested. Current (57-96 %) was the largest electron sink and methane (0-2.3 %) production was relatively unimportant at both concentrations based on electron balances. At a low propionate concentration, reactors supplemented with 2-bromoethanesulfonate had slightly higher coulombic efficiencies than reactors lacking this methanogenesis inhibitor. However, an opposite trend was observed at high propionate concentration, where reactors supplemented with 2-bromoethanesulfonate had a lower coulombic efficiency and there was a greater percentage of electron loss (23.5 %) to undefined sinks compared to reactors without 2-bromoethanesulfonate (11.2 %). Propionate removal efficiencies were 98 % (low propionate concentration) and 78 % (high propionate concentration). Analysis of 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing revealed the dominance of sequences most similar to Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and G. sulfurreducens subsp. ethanolicus. Collectively, these results provide new insights on the paths of electron flow during propionate oxidation in the anode of MECs fed with low and high propionate concentrations. PMID:26936773

  2. Propionic acidemia--biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Barash, V; Elpeleg, O; Amit, R; Gottfried, S; Yatziv, S; Gutman, A

    1989-02-01

    The first documented case of propionic acidemia in Israel is described. Diagnosis was based on three independent methods: analysis of urinary organic acids by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, assay of propionyl CoA carboxylase activity and oxidation of 1-14C-propionate by cultured skin fibroblasts. The use of more than one method for confirmation of the diagnosis is considered to be of importance in providing an additional margin of safety in cases where genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis in future pregnancies are indicated. PMID:2495260

  3. Butyrate production from dietary fibre and protection against large bowel cancer in a rat model.

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, A; Gibson, P R; Young, G P

    1993-01-01

    Butyrate slows the growth of cancer cells cultured in vitro. To determine the relevance of the fermentative production of butyrate in vivo, colonic butyrate concentrations were manipulated by feeding different dietary fibres and were related to tumour development in the rat dimethylhydrazine model of large bowel cancer. It has previously been shown that guar gum and oat bran, while highly fermentable, are associated with low butyrate levels in the distal colon, while wheat bran causes significantly higher concentrations. Diets containing these fibres (nominally 10% w:w) were administered for 3 weeks before, for 10 weeks during, and for 20 weeks after dimethylhydrazine administration, after which animals were killed and examined for tumours. Significantly fewer tumours were seen in the rats fed wheat bran compared with those fed guar or oat bran, and the total tumour mass was lowest in rats fed wheat bran. Rats on a 'no added fibre diet' had an intermediate tumour mass. Regression analysis, performed regardless of dietary group, showed that the concentration in stools of butyrate but not of acetate or stool volume, correlated significantly (and negatively) with tumour mass. These findings indicate that fibre which is associated with high butyrate concentrations in the distal large bowel is protective against large bowel cancer, while soluble fibres that do not raise distal butyrate concentrations, are not protective. Thus, butyrate production in vivo does bear a significant relationship to suppression of tumour formation. PMID:8386131

  4. High-purity propionate production from glycerol in mixed culture fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Wang, Ting; Shen, Nan; Zhang, Fang; Zeng, Raymond J

    2016-11-01

    High-purity propionate production from glycerol in mixed culture fermentation (MCF) induced by high ammonium concentration was investigated. Fed-batch experiments revealed that higher ammonium concentration (>2.9g/L) had simultaneous negative effects on acetate and propionate degradation. Propionate production and yield was up to 22.6g/L and 0.45g COD/g COD glycerol, respectively, with a purity of 96%. Sequential batch experiments demonstrated that the yields of propionate were 0.3±0.05, 0.32±0.01, and 0.34±0.03g COD/g COD at a glycerol concentration of 2.78, 4.38, and 5.56g/L, respectively, and the purity of propionate was 91-100%. Microbial community analysis showed that the phylum Firmicutes dominated the bacterial community at different glycerol concentrations. However, the Methanosaeta population decreased from 46% to 6% when glycerol concentration increased from 2.78 to 5.56g/L, resulting in lower acetate degradation rate. Thus, the present study might provide an alternative option for the production of propionate from glycerol via MCF. PMID:27544916

  5. 21 CFR 184.1221 - Calcium propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium propionate. 184.1221 Section 184.1221 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1221 Calcium propionate. (a) Calcium propionate (C6H10CaO4, CAS Reg. No. 4075-81-4) is the calcium salt of propionic acid. It occurs as white crystals or...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1784 - Sodium propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium propionate. 184.1784 Section 184.1784 Food... GRAS § 184.1784 Sodium propionate. (a) Sodium propionate (C3H5NaO2, CAS Reg. No. 137-40-6) is the sodium salt of propionic acid. It occurs as colorless, transparent crystals or a granular...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1784 - Sodium propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium propionate. 184.1784 Section 184.1784 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1784 Sodium propionate. (a) Sodium propionate (C3H5NaO2, CAS Reg. No. 137-40-6) is the sodium salt of propionic acid. It occurs as colorless, transparent crystals or...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1784 - Sodium propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium propionate. 184.1784 Section 184.1784 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1784 Sodium propionate. (a) Sodium propionate (C3H5NaO2, CAS Reg. No. 137-40-6) is the sodium salt of propionic acid. It occurs as colorless, transparent crystals or...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1784 - Sodium propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium propionate. 184.1784 Section 184.1784 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1784 Sodium propionate. (a) Sodium propionate (C3H5NaO2, CAS Reg. No. 137-40-6) is the sodium salt of propionic acid. It occurs as colorless, transparent crystals or...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1784 - Sodium propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium propionate. 184.1784 Section 184.1784 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1784 Sodium propionate. (a) Sodium propionate (C3H5NaO2, CAS Reg. No. 137-40-6) is the sodium salt of propionic acid. It occurs as colorless, transparent crystals or...

  11. Wheat flour based propionic acid fermentation: an economic approach.

    PubMed

    Kagliwal, Lalit D; Survase, Shrikant A; Singhal, Rekha S; Granström, Tom

    2013-02-01

    A process for the fermentative production of propionic acid from whole wheat flour using starch and gluten as nutrients is presented. Hydrolysis of wheat flour starch using amylases was optimized. A batch fermentation of hydrolysate supplemented with various nitrogen sources using Propionibacterium acidipropionici NRRL B 3569 was performed. The maximum production of 48.61, 9.40, and 11.06 g of propionic acid, acetic acid and succinic acid, respectively, was found with wheat flour hydrolysate equivalent to 90 g/l glucose and supplemented with 15 g/l yeast extract. Further, replacement of yeast extract with wheat gluten hydrolysate showed utilization of gluten hydrolysate without compromising the yields and also improving the economics of the process. The process so developed could be useful for production of animal feed from whole wheat with in situ production of preservatives, and also suggest utilization of sprouted or germinated wheat for the production of organic acids. PMID:23357590

  12. 21 CFR 184.1221 - Calcium propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Reg. No. 4075-81-4) is the calcium salt of propionic acid. It occurs as white crystals or a crystalline solid, possessing not more than a faint odor of propionic acid. It is prepared by neutralizing propionic acid with calcium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food...

  13. 21 CFR 556.710 - Testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Testosterone propionate. 556.710 Section 556.710... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.710 Testosterone propionate. No residues of testosterone, resulting from the use of testosterone propionate, are permitted in excess of the following increments...

  14. 21 CFR 556.710 - Testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Testosterone propionate. 556.710 Section 556.710... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.710 Testosterone propionate. No residues of testosterone, resulting from the use of testosterone propionate, are permitted in excess of the following increments...

  15. 21 CFR 556.710 - Testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Testosterone propionate. 556.710 Section 556.710... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.710 Testosterone propionate. No residues of testosterone, resulting from the use of testosterone propionate, are permitted in excess of the following increments...

  16. 21 CFR 556.710 - Testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testosterone propionate. 556.710 Section 556.710... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.710 Testosterone propionate. No residues of testosterone, resulting from the use of testosterone propionate, are permitted in excess of the following increments...

  17. 21 CFR 556.710 - Testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Testosterone propionate. 556.710 Section 556.710... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.710 Testosterone propionate. No residues of testosterone, resulting from the use of testosterone propionate, are permitted in excess of the following increments...

  18. 21 CFR 582.3221 - Calcium propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium propionate. 582.3221 Section 582.3221 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3221 Calcium propionate. (a) Product. Calcium propionate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1081 - Propionic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Propionic acid. 184.1081 Section 184.1081 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1081 Propionic acid. (a) Propionic acid (C3H6O2, CAS Reg. No. 79-09-4) is an oily liquid having...

  20. 21 CFR 582.3081 - Propionic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Propionic acid. 582.3081 Section 582.3081 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Propionic acid. (a) Product. Propionic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  1. 21 CFR 582.3081 - Propionic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Propionic acid. 582.3081 Section 582.3081 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Propionic acid. (a) Product. Propionic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  2. 21 CFR 582.3081 - Propionic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Propionic acid. 582.3081 Section 582.3081 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Propionic acid. (a) Product. Propionic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  3. 21 CFR 582.3081 - Propionic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Propionic acid. 582.3081 Section 582.3081 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Propionic acid. (a) Product. Propionic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  4. 21 CFR 582.3081 - Propionic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Propionic acid. 582.3081 Section 582.3081 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Propionic acid. (a) Product. Propionic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  5. 21 CFR 582.3784 - Sodium propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium propionate. 582.3784 Section 582.3784 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3784 Sodium propionate. (a) Product. Sodium propionate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  6. 21 CFR 582.3784 - Sodium propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium propionate. 582.3784 Section 582.3784 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3784 Sodium propionate. (a) Product. Sodium propionate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  7. 21 CFR 582.3784 - Sodium propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium propionate. 582.3784 Section 582.3784 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3784 Sodium propionate. (a) Product. Sodium propionate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  8. 21 CFR 582.3784 - Sodium propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium propionate. 582.3784 Section 582.3784 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3784 Sodium propionate. (a) Product. Sodium propionate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  9. 21 CFR 582.3784 - Sodium propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium propionate. 582.3784 Section 582.3784 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3784 Sodium propionate. (a) Product. Sodium propionate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  10. A propionate CoA-transferase of Ralstonia eutropha H16 with broad substrate specificity catalyzing the CoA thioester formation of various carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Lindenkamp, Nicole; Schürmann, Marc; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we have investigated a propionate CoA-transferase (Pct) homologue encoded in the genome of Ralstonia eutropha H16. The corresponding gene has been cloned into the vector pET-19b to yield a histidine-tagged enzyme which was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). After purification, high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) analyses revealed that the enzyme exhibits a broad substrate specificity for carboxylic acids. The formation of the corresponding CoA-thioesters of acetate using propionyl-CoA as CoA donor, and of propionate, butyrate, 3-hydroxybutyrate, 3-hydroxypropionate, crotonate, acrylate, lactate, succinate and 4-hydroxybutyrate using acetyl-CoA as CoA donor could be shown. According to the substrate specificity, the enzyme can be allocated in the family I of CoA-transferases. The apparent molecular masses as determined by gel filtration and detected by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were 228 and 64 kDa, respectively, and point to a quaternary structure of the native enzyme (α4). The enzyme exhibited similarities in sequence and structure to the well investigated Pct of Clostridium propionicum. It does not contain the typical conserved (S)ENG motif, but the derived motif sequence EXG with glutamate 342 to be, most likely, the catalytic residue. Due to the homo-oligomeric structure and the sequence differences with the subclasses IA-C of family I CoA-transferases, a fourth subclass of family I is proposed, comprising - amongst others - the Pcts of R. eutropha H16 and C. propionicum. A markerless precise-deletion mutant R. eutropha H16∆pct was generated. The growth and accumulation behaviour of this mutant on gluconate, gluconate plus 3,3'-dithiodipropionic acid (DTDP), acetate and propionate was investigated but resulted in no observable phenotype. Both, the wild type and the mutant showed the same growth and storage behaviour with these carbon sources. It is probable that R. eutropha H16 is upregulating

  11. Microbial electrosynthesis of butyrate from carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ganigué, R; Puig, S; Batlle-Vilanova, P; Balaguer, M D; Colprim, J

    2015-02-21

    This work proves for the first time the bioelectrochemical production of butyrate from CO2 as a sole carbon source. The highest concentration of butyrate achieved was 20.2 mMC, with a maximum butyrate production rate of 1.82 mMC d(-1). The electrochemical characterisation demonstrated that the CO2 reduction to butyrate was hydrogen driven. Production of ethanol and butanol was also observed opening up the potential for biofuel production. PMID:25608945

  12. Acute Management of Propionic Acidemia

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Kimberly A; Gropman, Andrea; MacLeod, Erin; Stagni, Kathy; Summar, Marshall L.; Ueda, Keiko; Mew, Nicholas Ah; Franks, Jill; Island, Eddie; Matern, Dietrich; Pena, Loren; Smith, Brittany; Sutton, V. Reid; Urv, Tiina; Venditti, Charles; Chakrapani, Anupam

    2014-01-01

    Propionic Acidemia or aciduria is an intoxication-type disorder of organic metabolism. Patients deteriorate in times of increased metabolic demand and subsequent catabolism. Metabolic decompensation can manifest with lethargy, vomiting, coma and death if not appropriately treated. On January 28-30, 2011 in Washington, D.C., Children's National Medical Center hosted a group of clinicians, scientists and parental group representatives to design recommendations for acute management of individuals with Propionic Acidemia. Although many of the recommendations are geared towards the previously undiagnosed neonate, the recommendations for a severely metabolically decompensated individual are applicable to any known patient as well. Initial management is critical for prevention of morbidity and mortality. The following manuscript provides recommendations for initial treatment and evaluation, a discussion of issues concerning transport to a metabolic center (if patient presents to a non-metabolic center), acceleration of management and preparation for discharge. PMID:22000903

  13. Clinical Spectrum of Propionic Acidaemia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the clinical features, physical findings, diagnosis, and laboratory parameters of the patients with propionic acidaemia (PA). Methods. The records of diagnosed cases of propionic acidaemia were reviewed, retrospectively. Results. Twenty-six patients with PA had 133 admissions. The majority (85%) of the patients exhibited clinical manifestations in the 1st week of life. Regarding clinical features, lethargy, fever, poor feeding, vomiting, dehydration, muscular hypotonia, respiratory symptoms, encephalopathy, disturbance of tone and reflexes, and malnutrition were observed in 51–92% admissions. Metabolic crises, respiratory diseases, hyperammonaemia, metabolic acidosis, hypoalbuminaemia, and hypocalcaemia were observed in 30–96% admissions. Pancytopenia, ketonuria, hypoproteinemia, hypoglycaemia, and mildly disturbed liver enzymes were found in 12–41% admissions. Generalised brain oedema was detected in 17% and cerebral atrophy in 25% admissions. Gender-wise odd ratio analysis showed value of 1.9 for lethargy, 1.99 for respiratory diseases, 0.55 for anaemia, and 1.82 for hypocalcaemia. Conclusion. Propionic acidaemia usually presents with wide spectrum of clinical features and disturbances of laboratory parameters in early neonatal age. It is associated with significant complications which deteriorate the patients' quality of life. Perhaps with early diagnosis of the disease and in time intervention, these may be preventable. PMID:24288598

  14. Clinical spectrum of propionic acidaemia.

    PubMed

    Rafique, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the clinical features, physical findings, diagnosis, and laboratory parameters of the patients with propionic acidaemia (PA). Methods. The records of diagnosed cases of propionic acidaemia were reviewed, retrospectively. Results. Twenty-six patients with PA had 133 admissions. The majority (85%) of the patients exhibited clinical manifestations in the 1st week of life. Regarding clinical features, lethargy, fever, poor feeding, vomiting, dehydration, muscular hypotonia, respiratory symptoms, encephalopathy, disturbance of tone and reflexes, and malnutrition were observed in 51-92% admissions. Metabolic crises, respiratory diseases, hyperammonaemia, metabolic acidosis, hypoalbuminaemia, and hypocalcaemia were observed in 30-96% admissions. Pancytopenia, ketonuria, hypoproteinemia, hypoglycaemia, and mildly disturbed liver enzymes were found in 12-41% admissions. Generalised brain oedema was detected in 17% and cerebral atrophy in 25% admissions. Gender-wise odd ratio analysis showed value of 1.9 for lethargy, 1.99 for respiratory diseases, 0.55 for anaemia, and 1.82 for hypocalcaemia. Conclusion. Propionic acidaemia usually presents with wide spectrum of clinical features and disturbances of laboratory parameters in early neonatal age. It is associated with significant complications which deteriorate the patients' quality of life. Perhaps with early diagnosis of the disease and in time intervention, these may be preventable. PMID:24288598

  15. Efficient production of butyric acid from Jerusalem artichoke by immobilized Clostridium tyrobutyricum in a fibrous-bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Cai, Jin; Wang, Jin; Zhu, Xiangcheng; Huang, Lei; Yang, Shang-Tian; Xu, Zhinan

    2011-02-01

    Butyric acid is an important specialty chemical with wide industrial applications. The feasible large-scale fermentation for the economical production of butyric acid requires low-cost substrate and efficient process. In the present study, butyric acid production by immobilized Clostridium tyrobutyricum was successfully performed in a fibrous-bed bioreactor using Jerusalem artichoke as the substrate. Repeated-batch fermentation was carried out to produce butyric acid with a high butyrate yield (0.44 g/g), high productivity (2.75 g/L/h) and a butyrate concentration of 27.5 g/L. Furthermore, fed-batch fermentation using sulfuric acid pretreated Jerusalem artichoke hydrolysate resulted in a high butyric acid concentration of 60.4 g/L, with the yield of 0.38 g/g and the selectivity of ∼ 85.1 (85.1g butyric acid/g acetic acid). Thus, the production of butyric acid from Jerusalem artichoke on a commercial scale could be achieved based on the system developed in this work. PMID:21169015

  16. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  17. Propionate Oxidation by and Methanol Inhibition of Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Güven, Didem; Dapena, Ana; Kartal, Boran; Schmid, Markus C.; Maas, Bart; van de Pas-Schoonen, Katinka; Sozen, Seval; Mendez, Ramon; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Strous, Marc; Schmidt, Ingo

    2005-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is a recently discovered microbial pathway and a cost-effective way to remove ammonium from wastewater. Anammox bacteria have been described as obligate chemolithoautotrophs. However, many chemolithoautotrophs (i.e., nitrifiers) can use organic compounds as a supplementary carbon source. In this study, the effect of organic compounds on anammox bacteria was investigated. It was shown that alcohols inhibited anammox bacteria, while organic acids were converted by them. Methanol was the most potent inhibitor, leading to complete and irreversible loss of activity at concentrations as low as 0.5 mM. Of the organic acids acetate and propionate, propionate was consumed at a higher rate (0.8 nmol min−1 mg of protein−1) by Percoll-purified anammox cells. Glucose, formate, and alanine had no effect on the anammox process. It was shown that propionate was oxidized mainly to CO2, with nitrate and/or nitrite as the electron acceptor. The anammox bacteria carried out propionate oxidation simultaneously with anaerobic ammonium oxidation. In an anammox enrichment culture fed with propionate for 150 days, the relative amounts of anammox cells and denitrifiers did not change significantly over time, indicating that anammox bacteria could compete successfully with heterotrophic denitrifiers for propionate. In conclusion, this study shows that anammox bacteria have a more versatile metabolism than previously assumed. PMID:15691967

  18. Sodium butyrate mitigates in vitro ammonia generation in cecal content of laying hens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anping; Wang, Yan; Di Liao, Xin; Wu, Yinbao; Liang, Juan Boo; Laudadio, Vito; Tufarelli, Vincenzo

    2016-08-01

    One of the environmental challenges that modern poultry industry faced is odor pollution caused by ammonia emission. The objectives of the study were to determine the effect of sodium butyrate on the production of ammonia in the cecal contents of laying hens using in vitro gas production study and to elucidate the mechanism behind it. The study consisted of a control (without sodium butyrate), and three experimental groups added with 10, 15, and 20 mg of sodium butyrate, respectively. Results showed that ammonia production in headspace of the syringe decreased by 8.2, 23, and 23 %, respectively, while ammonium production from the fermentation broth decreased by 6.3, 14.4, and 13.7 %, respectively. Sodium butyrate had no significant effect on the contents of uric acid and urea, nitrate-N, or total N in all treatments. However, sodium butyrate decreased the urease and uricase activities (P < 0.05) in the fermentation broth. Sodium butyrate also altered volatile fatty acids profile of the fermentation broth by decreasing the production of isovalerate (P < 0.05) and increasing those of acetate, butyrate, and isobutyrate (P < 0.05). The MiSeq System Sequencing results showed that sodium butyrate increased the relative abundance of Bacteroides and Faecalibacterium (P < 0.05) and decreased the relative abundance of Desulfovibrio, Helicobacter, and Campylobacter (P < 0.05).Our results concluded that sodium butyrate changes the diversity and relative abundance of the microbes which altered the fermentation characteristics leading to reduction in ammonia production. PMID:27154844

  19. 21 CFR 184.1081 - Propionic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Propionic acid. 184.1081 Section 184.1081 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1081 Propionic acid. (a) Propionic acid (C3H6O2, CAS Reg. No. 79-09-4)...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1081 - Propionic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Propionic acid. 184.1081 Section 184.1081 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1081 Propionic acid. (a) Propionic acid (C3H6O2, CAS Reg. No. 79-09-4)...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1081 - Propionic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Propionic acid. 184.1081 Section 184.1081 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1081 Propionic acid. (a) Propionic acid (C3H6O2, CAS Reg. No. 79-09-4)...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1081 - Propionic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Propionic acid. 184.1081 Section 184.1081 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1081 Propionic acid. (a) Propionic acid (C3H6O2, CAS Reg. No. 79-09-4)...

  3. Dynamics of Microbial Community Structure of and Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal by Aerobic Granules Cultivated on Propionate or Acetate▿

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Holliger, Christof

    2011-01-01

    Aerobic granules are dense microbial aggregates with the potential to replace floccular sludge for the treatment of wastewaters. In bubble-column sequencing batch reactors, distinct microbial populations dominated propionate- and acetate-cultivated aerobic granules after 50 days of reactor operation when only carbon removal was detected. Propionate granules were dominated by Zoogloea (40%), Acidovorax, and Thiothrix, whereas acetate granules were mainly dominated by Thiothrix (60%). Thereafter, an exponential increase in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) activity was observed in the propionate granules, but a linear and erratic increase was detected in the acetate ones. Besides Accumulibacter and Competibacter, other bacterial populations found in both granules were associated with Chloroflexus and Acidovorax. The EBPR activity in the propionate granules was high and stable, whereas EBPR in the acetate granules was erratic throughout the study and suffered from a deterioration period that could be readily reversed by inducing hydrolysis of polyphosphate in presumably saturated Accumulibacter cells. Using a new ppk1 gene-based dual terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) approach revealed that Accumulibacter diversity was highest in the floccular sludge inoculum but that when granules were formed, propionate readily favored the dominance of Accumulibacter type IIA. In contrast, acetate granules exhibited transient shifts between type I and type II before the granules were dominated by Accumulibacter type IIA. However, ppk1 gene sequences from acetate granules clustered separately from those of propionate granules. Our data indicate that the mere presence of Accumulibacter is not enough to have consistently high EBPR but that the type of Accumulibacter determines the robustness of the phosphate removal process. PMID:21926195

  4. Butyrate produced by commensal bacteria potentiates phorbol esters induced AP-1 response in human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nepelska, Malgorzata; Cultrone, Antonietta; Béguet-Crespel, Fabienne; Le Roux, Karine; Doré, Joël; Arulampalam, Vermulugesan; Blottière, Hervé M

    2012-01-01

    The human intestine is a balanced ecosystem well suited for bacterial survival, colonization and growth, which has evolved to be beneficial both for the host and the commensal bacteria. Here, we investigated the effect of bacterial metabolites produced by commensal bacteria on AP-1 signaling pathway, which has a plethora of effects on host physiology. Using intestinal epithelial cell lines, HT-29 and Caco-2, stably transfected with AP-1-dependent luciferase reporter gene, we tested the effect of culture supernatant from 49 commensal strains. We observed that several bacteria were able to activate the AP-1 pathway and this was correlated to the amount of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) produced. Besides being a major source of energy for epithelial cells, SCFAs have been shown to regulate several signaling pathways in these cells. We show that propionate and butyrate are potent activators of the AP-1 pathway, butyrate being the more efficient of the two. We also observed a strong synergistic activation of AP-1 pathway when using butyrate with PMA, a PKC activator. Moreover, butyrate enhanced the PMA-induced expression of c-fos and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but not p38 and JNK. In conclusion, we showed that SCFAs especially butyrate regulate the AP-1 signaling pathway, a feature that may contribute to the physiological impact of the gut microbiota on the host. Our results provide support for the involvement of butyrate in modulating the action of PKC in colon cancer cells. PMID:23300800

  5. [Juvenile glaucoma in propionic acidemia].

    PubMed

    Rosentreter, A; Gaki, S; Dinslage, S; Dietlein, T S

    2012-12-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from deficiency of the biotin-dependent enzyme propionyl-CoA carboxylase, which is necessary for the catabolism of branched chain amino acids and odd-chain fatty acids. Although optic atrophy was documented in four cases, no glaucomatous optic atrophy has yet been described. This article describes the first case of a 12-year-old boy with PA showing bilateral glaucomatous optic disc atrophy due to dysgenetic changes of the angle of the anterior chamber. PMID:22733289

  6. Production of Butyrate from Lactate by a Newly Isolated Clostridium sp. BPY5.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yong; Hu, Xiaohong; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Jin, Hong; Xu, Zhancheng; Tang, Qinglan; Li, Xiangzhen

    2016-06-01

    Lactate-utilizing bacteria play important roles in the production of Chinese strong-flavored liquor (CSFL). However, the identity of these bacteria and their lactate-utilizing properties are largely unknown. Here, a lactate-utilizing, butyrate-producing bacterium BPY5 was isolated from an old fermentation pit for CSFL production. The isolate represented a novel species belonging to Clostridium cluster XIVa of family Lachnospiraceae based on phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequences. Strain BPY5 could ferment lactate into butyrate as the major metabolic product. Butyrate was significantly formed at initial lactate concentration from 66 to 104 mM, but substantially declined when initial lactate exceeded 133 mM. At initial lactate concentration of 66 mM, lactate conversion was independent on initial pH from 5.5 to 7.0, but the conversion was completely inhibited when pH dropped below 4.8. Nevertheless, the inhibition on lactate conversion was largely relieved by the addition of acetate, suggesting that exogenous acetate could enhance lactate conversion at low pH condition. Additionally, lactate in CSFL-brewing wastewater was dramatically removed when inoculated with strain BPY5. These results implicate that the isolate may be applied for the industrial production of butyrate or the recovery of butyrate from lactate-containing wastewater. PMID:26842597

  7. A sensitive high-throughput HPLC assay for simultaneous determination of everolimus and clobetasol propionate.

    PubMed

    Kamberi, Marika; Fu, Katherine; Lu, Jianmin; Chemaly, G Mike; Feder, Debra

    2008-01-01

    A novel sensitive high-throughput high-performance liquid chromatography assay is developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of everolimus and clobetasol propionate in pharmaceutical formulations. The chromatographic separation is achieved on a Zorbax Eclipse XDB-C18 reversed-phase column using a gradient elution, with solvent A: ammonium acetate (pH 6.8; 0.01 M) and solvent B: acetonitrile. The mean recovery ranges from 95.1% to 100.0% for clobetasol propionate and from 97.9% to 103.7% for everolimus. The limit of quantitation for each analyte is 0.02 microg/mL. The percent relative standard deviations are less than 3% for intra- and inter-day analyses. The proposed method can be used for the routine quality control of everolimus and clobetasol propionate in complex pharmaceutical formulations, especially the drug-delivery systems with a low total drug-load. PMID:18218184

  8. Enhanced butyrate formation by cross-feeding between Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Bifidobacterium adolescentis.

    PubMed

    Rios-Covian, David; Gueimonde, Miguel; Duncan, Sylvia H; Flint, Harry J; de los Reyes-Gavilan, Clara G

    2015-11-01

    Cross-feeding is an important metabolic interaction mechanism of bacterial groups inhabiting the human colon and includes features such as the utilization of acetate by butyrate-producing bacteria as may occur between Bifidobacterium and Faecalibacterium genera. In this study, we assessed the utilization of different carbon sources (glucose, starch, inulin and fructooligosaccharides) by strains of both genera and selected the best suited combinations for evidencing this cross-feeding phenomenon. Co-cultures of Bifidobacterium adolescentis L2-32 with Faecalibacterium prausnitzii S3/L3 with fructooligosaccharides as carbon source, as well as with F. prausnitzii A2-165 in starch, were carried out and the production of short-chain fatty acids was determined. In both co-cultures, acetate levels decreased between 8 and 24 h of incubation and were lower than in the corresponding B. adolescentis monocultures. In contrast, butyrate concentrations were higher in co-cultures as compared to the respective F. prausnitzii monocultures, indicating enhanced formation of butyrate by F. prausnitzii in the presence of the bifidobacteria. Variations in the levels of acetate and butyrate were more pronounced in the co-culture with fructooligosaccharides than with starch. Our results provide a clear demonstration of cross-feeding between B. adolescentis and F. prausnitzii. PMID:26420851

  9. Propionate supplementation improves nitrogen use by reducing urea flux in sheep.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, U; Hu, Q; Bequette, B J

    2015-10-01

    Feeding and postruminal infusion of propionate is known to increase N retention in ruminants. Our aim was to determine the role of rumen propionate on urea N recycling and gluconeogenesis in growing sheep. In Exp. 1, wether sheep ( = 6; 32.5 ± 3.57 kg BW) fitted with a rumen cannula were fed to 1.8 × ME requirement a concentrate-type ration (172 g CP/kg DM and 10.4 MJ ME/kg DM) and continuously infused into the rumen with isoenergetic (10% of dietary ME intake) solutions of either sodium acetate (control) or sodium propionate for 9-d periods in a crossover design. In Exp. 2, a different group of wether sheep ( = 5; 33.6 ± 3.70 kg BW) fitted with a rumen cannula were fed, on an isonitrogenous basis, either a control (151 g CP/kg DM and 8.4 MJ ME/kg DM) or sodium propionate-supplemented (139 g CP/kg DM and 8.9 MJ ME/kg DM) diet at 2-h intervals. [N] urea was continuously infused intravenously for the last 5 d of each period, and total urine was collected by vacuum and feces were collected by a harness bag. Over the last 12 h, [C]glucose was continuously infused intravenously and hourly blood samples were collected during the last 5 h. Propionate treatments increased ( < 0.001) the proportion of rumen propionate in both experiments. In Exp. 1, N retention was not affected by propionate infusion as compared with isoenergetic acetate. There was no effect on urea entry (synthesis) rate (UER) in Exp. 1; however, sodium propionate infusion tended ( < 0.1) to increase urinary urea elimination (UUE). In Exp. 2, feeding propionate increased ( < 0.01) N retention by 0.8 g N/d. In addition, UER was reduced by approximately 2 g urea N/d, leading to a reduction ( < 0.05) in UUE (7.0 vs. 6.2 g urea N/d). Between the 2 experiments, the proportion of UER recycled to the gut was greater with the forage-type diet in Exp. 2 (approximately 60%) compared with the concentrate-type diet in Exp. 1 (approximately 40%), although urea N fluxes across the gut remained unchanged in both

  10. Butyric acid in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Załęski, Andrzej; Banaszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Walkowiak, Jarosław

    2013-01-01

    Butyric acid (butanoic acid) belongs to a group of short-chain fatty acids and is thought to play several beneficial roles in the gastrointestinal tract. Butyric anion is easily absorbed by enteric cells and used as a main source of energy. Moreover, butyric acid is an important regulator of colonocyte proliferation and apoptosis, gastrointestinal tract motility and bacterial microflora composition in addition to its involvement in many other processes including immunoregulation and anti-inflammatory activity. The pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), the most commonly diagnosed functional gastrointestinal condition, is complex, and its precise mechanisms are still unclear. This article describes the potential benefits of butyric acid in IBS. PMID:24868283

  11. Butyric acid in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Załęski, Andrzej; Walkowiak, Jarosław

    2013-01-01

    Butyric acid (butanoic acid) belongs to a group of short-chain fatty acids and is thought to play several beneficial roles in the gastrointestinal tract. Butyric anion is easily absorbed by enteric cells and used as a main source of energy. Moreover, butyric acid is an important regulator of colonocyte proliferation and apoptosis, gastrointestinal tract motility and bacterial microflora composition in addition to its involvement in many other processes including immunoregulation and anti-inflammatory activity. The pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), the most commonly diagnosed functional gastrointestinal condition, is complex, and its precise mechanisms are still unclear. This article describes the potential benefits of butyric acid in IBS. PMID:24868283

  12. Direct hydrogenation of biomass-derived butyric acid to n-butanol over a ruthenium-tin bimetallic catalyst.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Min; Upare, Pravin P; Chang, Jong-San; Hwang, Young Kyu; Lee, Jeong Ho; Hwang, Dong Won; Hong, Do-Young; Lee, Seung Hwan; Jeong, Myung-Geun; Kim, Young Dok; Kwon, Young-Uk

    2014-11-01

    Catalytic hydrogenation of organic carboxylic acids and their esters, for example, cellulosic ethanol from fermentation of acetic acid and hydrogenation of ethyl acetate is a promising possibility for future biorefinery concepts. A hybrid conversion process based on selective hydrogenation of butyric acid combined with fermentation of glucose has been developed for producing biobutanol. ZnO-supported Ru-Sn bimetallic catalysts exhibits unprecedentedly superior performance in the vapor-phase hydrogenation of biomass-derived butyric acid to n-butanol (>98% yield) for 3500 h without deactivation. PMID:25123894

  13. The Future of Butyric Acid in Industry

    PubMed Central

    Dwidar, Mohammed; Park, Jae-Yeon; Mitchell, Robert J.; Sang, Byoung-In

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the different applications of butyric acid and its current and future production status are highlighted, with a particular emphasis on the biofuels industry. As such, this paper discusses different issues regarding butyric acid fermentations and provides suggestions for future improvements and their approaches. PMID:22593687

  14. [Blood propionic acid with hyperammonemic coma].

    PubMed

    Stöckler, S; Kastner, U; Pokits, B; Müller, W; Roscher, A

    1987-01-01

    We report on a mature male newborn who presented clinically on the 2nd day of live with poor feeding and acidotic breathing. Laboratory findings like severe metabolic acidosis, hyperammonemia, hyperglycinemia, ketonuria and elevated urinary excretion of lactate and propionate suggested the presence of organoacidopathia. Propionic acidemia, however could be diagnosed definitively only when the characteristic urinary and blood metabolites were found during the state of a hyperammonemic coma provoked by a fully oral protein regimen. The diagnosis was affirmed by reduced propionate fixation and by reduced propionyl-CoA-carboxylase shown in the patient's skin fibroblasts. PMID:3682709

  15. Vibrational spectroscopic study of fluticasone propionate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, H. R. H.; Edwards, H. G. M.; Kendrick, J.; Scowen, I. J.

    2009-03-01

    Fluticasone propionate is a synthetic glucocorticoid with potent anti-inflammatory activity that has been used effectively in the treatment of chronic asthma. The present work reports a vibrational spectroscopic study of fluticasone propionate and gives proposed molecular assignments on the basis of ab initio calculations using BLYP density functional theory with a 6-31G* basis set and vibrational frequencies predicted within the quasi-harmonic approximation. Several spectral features and band intensities are explained. This study generated a library of information that can be employed to aid the process monitoring of fluticasone propionate.

  16. Effect of propionate on mRNA expression of key genes for gluconeogenesis in liver of dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Koser, Stephanie L; Bequette, Brian J; Donkin, Shawn S

    2015-12-01

    Elevated needs for glucose in lactating dairy cows are met through a combination of increased capacity for gluconeogenesis and increased supply of gluconeogenic precursors, primarily propionate. This study evaluated the effects of propionate on mRNA expression of cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1), mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK2), pyruvate carboxylase (PC), and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC), key gluconeogenic enzymes, and capacity for glucose synthesis in liver of dairy cattle. In experiment 1, six multiparous mid-lactation Holstein cows were used in a replicated 3×3 Latin square design consisting of a 6-d acclimation or washout phase followed by 8h of postruminal infusion of either propionate (1.68mol), glucose (0.84mol), or an equal volume (10mL/min) of water. In experiment 2, twelve male Holstein calves [39±4 kg initial body weight (BW)] were blocked by birth date and assigned to receive, at 7d of age, either propionate [2mmol·h(-1)·(BW(0.75))(-1)], acetate [3.5mmol·h(-1)·(BW(.75))(-1)], or an equal volume (4mL/min) of saline. In both experiments, blood samples were collected at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8h relative to the start of infusion and liver biopsy samples were collected at the end of the infusion for mRNA analysis. Liver explants from experiment 1 were used to measure tricarboxylic acid cycle flux and gluconeogenesis using (13)C mass isotopomer distribution analysis from (13)C3 propionate. Dry matter intake and milk yield were not altered by infusions in cows. Serum insulin concentration in cows receiving propionate was elevated than cows receiving water, but was not different from cows receiving glucose. Hepatic expression of PCK1 and G6PC mRNA and glucose production in cows receiving propionate were not different from cows receiving water, but tended to be higher compared with cows receiving glucose. Hepatic expression of PCK2 and PC mRNA was not altered by propionate infusion in cows. Blood glucose, insulin, and

  17. Effect of intraruminal propionic acid infusion on metabolism of mesenteric- and portal-drained viscera in growing steers fed a forage diet: I. Volatile fatty acids, glucose, and lactate.

    PubMed

    Seal, C J; Parker, D S

    1994-05-01

    This experiment investigated the effect of intraruminal infusion of propionic acid on ruminal VFA metabolism and the absorption of nutrients by the mesenteric- and portal-drained viscera of seven Friesian steers, average BW 127 kg, fed a dried grass-pellet diet. Each received by random allocation 0 (control), .5, or 1.0 mol of propionic acid/d for 7 d. Ruminal acetate and propionate irreversible loss rates and carbon exchange between VFA and CO2 were measured during continuous intraruminal infusions of 2-14C-acetic acid and 2-14C-propionic acid. Ruminal acetate irreversible loss rate was not affected by propionic acid infusion (overall mean 8.09, error mean square [EMS] 2.68 mol/d), whereas propionate irreversible loss increased incrementally with PA supply (3.22 vs 4.16, EMS .61 mol/d, for control and 1.0 mol of propionic acid/d, respectively, P = .09). Glucose irreversible loss rate was increased at the highest level of PA infusion (2.84, 2.83, and 3.22, EMS .06 mol/d, for control, .5, and 1.0 mol of propionic acid/d, respectively; P = .02 for control vs .5 + 1.0), although the proportion of glucose irreversible loss derived from propionate remained constant (.6). Net absorption into venous blood showed that propionate was extensively metabolized in the rumen wall and that the tissues of the small intestine utilized acetate. Utilization of glucose was reduced in portal tissues as a result of intraruminal infusion, and the data were used to derive a model of glucose and lactate interrelationships in gut tissues. PMID:8056681

  18. Unusual presentations of propionic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Ozand, P T; Rashed, M; Gascon, G G; Youssef, N G; Harfi, H; Rahbeeni, Z; al Garawi, S; al Aqeel, A

    1994-11-01

    The files of 25 patients with propionic acidemia (PA), followed by the Inborn Errors of Metabolism Service (IEMS) at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre (KFSH & RC) from 1990 to 1993, were studied retrospectively. In 14 patients PA presented acutely with acidosis, hyperammonemia and thrombocytopenia, while in 11 patients the presentation of the disease was unusual. In the latter group, two neonates with PA initially appeared as a primarily hyperammonemic metabolic disease. In two other neonates the vomiting was so severe that they were diagnosed as intestinal obstruction in referral hospitals. The presentation in three infants was primarily as an immune disorder. In four infants, PA appeared as an acute or chronic encephalopathy, i.e. as a silent organic acidemia, with few other findings of the disease. The clinical picture of PA includes facial and nipple dysmorphia, severe hypotonia and vomiting. Severe thrombocytopenia is the hallmark of the metabolic crisis. In one patient it was noticed late and caused intracranial hemorrhage, while in three others intracranial bleeding caused death. The prognosis in PA remained grave despite rigorous treatment. Only seven of the 25 PA patients remained to have a normal life-style, while eight patients expired. The diagnosis is readily achieved by urine gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), or by enzyme analysis of fibroblasts. While there may be both examiner- and patient-related reasons for the variations in the presentation of PA, one other reason may be the heterogeneity of the molecular defect in propionyl-CoA carboxylase. PMID:7726381

  19. Co-culturing a novel Bacillus strain with Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755 to produce butyric acid from sucrose

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently, the most promising microorganism used for the bio-production of butyric acid is Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755T; however, it is unable to use sucrose as a sole carbon source. Consequently, a newly isolated strain, Bacillus sp. SGP1, that was found to produce a levansucrase enzyme, which hydrolyzes sucrose into fructose and glucose, was used in a co-culture with this strain, permitting C. tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755T to ferment sucrose to butyric acid. Results B. sp. SGP1 alone did not show any butyric acid production and the main metabolite produced was lactic acid. This allowed C. tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755T to utilize the monosaccharides resulting from the activity of levansucrase together with the lactic acid produced by B. sp. SGP1 to generate butyric acid, which was the main fermentative product within the co-culture. Furthermore, the final acetic acid concentration in the co-culture was significantly lower when compared with pure C. tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755T cultures grown on glucose. In fed-batch fermentations, the optimum conditions for the production of butyric acid were around pH 5.50 and a temperature of 37°C. Under these conditions, the final butyrate concentration was 34.2±1.8 g/L with yields of 0.35±0.03 g butyrate/g sucrose and maximum productivity of 0.3±0.04 g/L/h. Conclusions Using this co-culture, sucrose can be utilized as a carbon source for butyric acid production at a relatively high yield. In addition, this co-culture offers also the benefit of a greater selectivity, with butyric acid constituting 92.8% of the acids when the fermentation was terminated. PMID:23452443

  20. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric assay for clobetasol propionate in human serum from patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Sparidans, Rolf W; van Velsen, Sara G A; de Roos, Marlise P; Schellens, Jan H M; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A F M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2010-08-01

    A bioanalytical assay for the topical corticosteroid clobetasol propionate was developed and validated. For the quantitative assay 0.5 ml human serum samples, supplemented with clobetasone butyrate as internal standard, were extracted with hexane-ether. Evaporated and reconstituted extracts were injected on a polar embedded octadecyl silica column with isocratic elution using formic acid in water-methanol as mobile phase. The eluate was led into the electrospray interface with positive ionization and the analyte was detected and quantified using the selective reaction monitoring mode of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The assay was validated in the range 0.04-10 ng/ml, the lowest level of this range being the lower limit of quantification. Precisions were 5-10% and accuracies were between 102 and 109%. The drug was stable under all relevant conditions. Finally, the assay was successfully applied on patients suffering from severe atopic dermatitis treated topically with clobetasol propionate. PMID:20605116

  1. The effect of propionic acid and valeric acid on the cell cycle in root meristems of Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Tramontano, W.A.; Yang, Shauyu; Delillo, A.R. )

    1990-01-01

    Propionic acid and valeric acid at 1mM reduced the mitotic index of root meristem cells of Pisum sativum to < 1% after 12 hr in aerated White's medium. This effect varied with different acid concentrations. After a 12 hr exposure to either acid, seedlings transferred to fresh medium without either acid, resumed their normal mitotic index after 12 hr, with a burst of mitosis 8 hr post-transfer. Exposure of root meristem cells to either acid also inhibited ({sup 3}H)-TdR incorporation. Neither acid significantly altered the distribution of meristematic cells in G1 and G2 after 12 hr. The incorporation of ({sup 3}H) - uridine was also unaltered by the addition of either acid. This information suggests that propionic acid and valeric acid, limit progression through the cell cycle by inhibiting DNA synthesis and arresting cells in G1 and G2. These results were consistent with previous data which utilized butyric acid.

  2. Indole-3-acetic acid UDP-glucosyltransferase from immature seeds of pea is involved in modification of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Hetmann, Anna; Jakubowska, Anna

    2015-09-01

    The glycosylation of auxin is one of mechanisms contributing to hormonal homeostasis. The enzyme UDPG: indole-3-ylacetyl-β-D-glucosyltransferase (IAA glucosyltransferase, IAGlc synthase) catalyzes the reversible reaction: IAA+UDPG↔1-O-IA-glucose+UDP, which is the first step in the biosynthesis of IAA-ester conjugates in monocotyledonous plants. In this study, we report IAA-glucosyltransferase isolated using a biochemical approach from immature seed of pea (Pisum sativum). The enzyme was purified by PEG fractionation, DEAE-Sephacel anion-exchange chromatography and preparative PAGE. LC-MS/MS analysis of tryptic peptides of the enzyme revealed the high identity with maize IAGlc synthase, but lack of homology with other IAA-glucosyltransferases from dicots. Biochemical characterization showed that of several acyl acceptors tested, the enzyme had the highest activity on IAA as the glucosyl acceptor (Km=0.52 mM, Vmax=161 nmol min(-1), kcat/Km=4.36 mM s(-1)) and lower activity on indole-3-propionic acid and 1-naphthalene acetic acid. Whereas indole-3-butyric acid and indole-3-propionic acid were competitive inhibitors of IAGlc synthase, D-gluconic acid lactone, an inhibitor of β-glucosidase activity, potentiated the enzyme activity at the optimal concentration of 0.3mM. Moreover, we demonstrated that the 1-O-IA-glucose synthesized by IAGlc synthase is the substrate for IAA labeling of glycoproteins from pea seeds indicating a possible role of this enzyme in the covalent modification of a class of proteins by a plant hormone. PMID:26057226

  3. Metabolism of propionate by sheep liver

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R. M.; Osborne-White, W. S.; Russell, G. R.

    1967-01-01

    Experiments were conducted with aged nuclear-free homogenate of sheep liver and aged mitochondria in an attempt to measure both the extent of oxidation of propionate and the distribution of label from [2-14C]propionate in the products. With nuclear-free homogenate, propionate was 44% oxidized with the accumulation of succinate, fumarate, malate and some citrate. Recovery of 14C in these intermediates and respiratory carbon dioxide was only 33%, but additional label was detected in endogenous glutamate and aspartate. With washed mitochondria 30% oxidation of metabolized propionate occurred, and proportionately more citrate and malate accumulated. Recovery of 14C in dicarboxylic acids, citrate, α-oxoglutarate, glutamate, aspartate and respiratory carbon dioxide was 91%. The specific activities of the products and the distribution of label in the carbon atoms of the dicarboxylic acids were consistent with the operation solely of the methylmalonate pathway together with limited oxidation of the succinate formed by the tricarboxylic acid cycle via pyruvate. In a final experiment with mitochondria the label consumed from [2-14C]propionate was entirely recovered in the intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, glutamate, aspartate, methylmalonate and respiratory carbon dioxide. PMID:6048786

  4. Metabolism of propionate by sheep liver. Oxidation of propionate by homogenates

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R. M.; Osborne-White, W. S.

    1965-01-01

    1. The rate and stability to aging of the metabolism of propionate by sheep-liver slices and sucrose homogenates were examined. Aging for up to 20min. at 37° in the absence of added substrate had little effect with slices, whole homogenates or homogenates without the nuclear fraction. 2. Metabolism of propionate by sucrose homogenates was confined to the mitochondrial fraction, but the mitochondrial supernatant (microsomes plus cell sap) stimulated propionate removal. 3. The rate of propionate metabolism by liver slices was higher in a high potassium phosphate–bicarbonate medium [0·88(±s.e.m. 0·16)μmole/mg. of N/hr.] than in Krebs–Ringer bicarbonate medium [0·44(±s.e.m. 0·13)μmole/mg. of N/hr.]. 4. Metabolism of propionate by sucrose homogenates freed from nuclei was dependent on the presence of oxygen, carbon dioxide and ATP. Propionate removal was stimulated 250% by Mg2+ ions and 670% by cytochrome c. 5. In the complete medium 2·39(±s.e.m. 0·15)μmoles of propionate were consumed/mg. of N/hr. 6. The ratio of oxygen consumption to propionate utilization was sufficient to account for the complete oxidation of half the propionate consumed. 7. The only products detected under these conditions were succinate, fumarate and malate. Propionate had no effect on the production of lactate from endogenous sources and did not itself give rise to lactate. 8. Methylmalonate did not accumulate when propionate was metabolized and was not oxidized. It was detected as an intermediate in the conversion of propionyl-CoA into succinate. The rate of this reaction sequence was adequate to account for the rate of propionate metabolism by sucrose homogenates or slices, provided that the rate of formation of propionyl-CoA was not limiting. 9. The methylmalonate pathway was predominantly a mitochondrial function. 10. The metabolism of propionate appeared to be dependent on active oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:14340092

  5. Enhancement of propionic acid fraction in volatile fatty acids produced from sludge fermentation by the use of food waste and Propionibacterium acidipropionici.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinguang; Li, Xiang; Zheng, Xiong; Wang, Dongbo

    2013-02-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFA) can be used as the additional carbon source of biological nutrient removal (BNR), and the increase of propionic acid percentage in VFA has been reported to facilitate the performance of BNR. In this study a new method for significantly improving the propionic acid fraction in VFA derived from waste activated sludge was reported, which included (1) mixing food waste with sludge and pre-fermenting the mixture (first stage), and (2) separating the mixture, sterilizing the pre-fermentation liquid and fermenting it after inoculating Propionibacterium acidipropionici (second stage). By optimizing the first stage with response surface methodology, a propionic acid content of 68.4% with propionic acid concentration of 7.13 g COD/L could be reached in the second stage, which was much higher than that reported previously. Lactic acid was found to be the most abundant product of the first stage and it served as the substrate for propionic acid production in the second stage. Further investigation showed that during the first stage the addition of food waste to the pre-fermentation system of sludge significantly increased the generation of lactic acid due to the synergistic effect, which resulted in the improvement of propionic acid production in the second stage. Finally, the use of propionic acid-enriched VFA as a superior carbon source of BNR was tested, and its performance was observed to be much better than using acetic acid-enriched VFA derived from sludge by the previously documented method. PMID:23219005

  6. 40 CFR 721.8660 - Propionic acid methyl ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Propionic acid methyl ester (generic... Substances § 721.8660 Propionic acid methyl ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a propionic acid methyl...

  7. 40 CFR 721.8660 - Propionic acid methyl ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Propionic acid methyl ester (generic... Substances § 721.8660 Propionic acid methyl ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a propionic acid methyl...

  8. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.842 Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. (a) Sponsors. See sponsors in... testosterone propionate (one implant consisting of 8 pellets, each pellet containing 2.5 mg estradiol...

  9. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.842 Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. (a) Sponsors. See sponsors in... testosterone propionate (one implant consisting of 8 pellets, each pellet containing 2.5 mg estradiol...

  10. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.842 Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. (a) Sponsors. See sponsors in... testosterone propionate (one implant consisting of 8 pellets, each pellet containing 2.5 mg estradiol...

  11. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.842 Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. (a) Sponsors. See sponsors in... testosterone propionate (one implant consisting of 8 pellets, each pellet containing 2.5 mg estradiol...

  12. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.842 Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. (a) Sponsors. See sponsors in... testosterone propionate (one implant consisting of 8 pellets, each pellet containing 2.5 mg estradiol...

  13. Production of butyrate from lysine and the Amadori product fructoselysine by a human gut commensal

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Thi Phuong Nam; Ritari, Jarmo; Boeren, Sjef; de Waard, Pieter; Plugge, Caroline M.; de Vos, Willem M.

    2015-01-01

    Human intestinal bacteria produce butyrate, which has signalling properties and can be used as energy source by enterocytes thus influencing colonic health. However, the pathways and the identity of bacteria involved in this process remain unclear. Here we describe the isolation from the human intestine of Intestinimonas strain AF211, a bacterium that can convert lysine stoichiometrically into butyrate and acetate when grown in a synthetic medium. Intestinimonas AF211 also converts the Amadori product fructoselysine, which is abundantly formed in heated foods via the Maillard reaction, into butyrate. The butyrogenic pathway includes a specific CoA transferase that is overproduced during growth on lysine. Bacteria related to Intestinimonas AF211 as well as the genetic coding capacity for fructoselysine conversion are abundantly present in colonic samples from some healthy human subjects. Our results indicate that protein can serve as a source of butyrate in the human colon, and its conversion by Intestinimonas AF211 and related butyrogens may protect the host from the undesired side effects of Amadori reaction products. PMID:26620920

  14. Ammonium acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ammonium acetate ; CASRN 631 - 61 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  15. Vinyl acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Vinyl acetate ; CASRN 108 - 05 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  16. Ethyl acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl acetate ; CASRN 141 - 78 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  17. Phenylmercuric acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Phenylmercuric acetate ; CASRN 62 - 38 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinog

  18. Thallium acetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 30 , 2009 , the assessment summary for Thallium acetate is included in t

  19. Converting Carbon Dioxide to Butyrate with an Engineered Strain of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    PubMed Central

    Nevin, Kelly P.; Woodard, Trevor L.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microbial conversion of carbon dioxide to organic commodities via syngas metabolism or microbial electrosynthesis is an attractive option for production of renewable biocommodities. The recent development of an initial genetic toolbox for the acetogen Clostridium ljungdahlii has suggested that C. ljungdahlii may be an effective chassis for such conversions. This possibility was evaluated by engineering a strain to produce butyrate, a valuable commodity that is not a natural product of C. ljungdahlii metabolism. Heterologous genes required for butyrate production from acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) were identified and introduced initially on plasmids and in subsequent strain designs integrated into the C. ljungdahlii chromosome. Iterative strain designs involved increasing translation of a key enzyme by modifying a ribosome binding site, inactivating the gene encoding the first step in the conversion of acetyl-CoA to acetate, disrupting the gene which encodes the primary bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase for ethanol production, and interrupting the gene for a CoA transferase that potentially represented an alternative route for the production of acetate. These modifications yielded a strain in which ca. 50 or 70% of the carbon and electron flow was diverted to the production of butyrate with H2 or CO as the electron donor, respectively. These results demonstrate the possibility of producing high-value commodities from carbon dioxide with C. ljungdahlii as the catalyst. PMID:25336453

  20. Kinetics of metabolism of glucose, propionate and CO2 in steers as affected by injecting phlorizin and feeding propionate

    SciTech Connect

    Veenhuizen, J.J.; Russell, R.W.; Young, J.W.

    1988-11-01

    Effects of injecting phlorizin subcutaneously and/or feeding propionate on metabolism of glucose, propionate and CO2 were determined for four steers used in a 4 x 4 Latin square design. Isotope dilution techniques were used to determine a four-pool kinetic solution for the flux of carbon among plasma glucose, rumen propionate, blood CO2 and rumen CO2. Injecting 1 g of phlorizin twice daily for 19 d resulted in 7.1 mol glucose C/d being excreted in urine. The basal glucose production of 13.4 mol C/d was increased to 17.9 mol C/d with phlorizin. There was no change in glucose oxidation or propionate production. The percentage of plasma glucose derived from propionate was unaffected by phlorizin, but 54 +/- 0.4% of total propionate was converted to plasma glucose during phlorizin treatment versus 40 +/- 0.6% during the basal treatment. When propionate was fed (18.3 mol C/d) glucose production increased to 21.2 mol C/d from the basal value of 13.4 mol C/d, and propionate oxidation to CO2 increased to 14.9 mol C/d from the basal value of 4.1 mol C/d. Glucose derived from propionate was 43 +/- 5% for the basal treatment and 67 +/- 3% during propionate feeding. The percentage of propionate converted to plasma glucose and blood and rumen CO2 was not affected by feeding propionate. An increased need for glucose, because of glucose excretion during phlorizin treatment, caused an increased utilization of propionate for gluconeogenesis, but an increased availability of propionate caused an increase in glucose production without affecting the relative distribution of carbon from propionate.

  1. Catalytic upgrading of butyric acid towards fine chemicals and biofuels

    PubMed Central

    Sjöblom, Magnus; Matsakas, Leonidas; Christakopoulos, Paul; Rova, Ulrika

    2016-01-01

    Fermentation-based production of butyric acid is robust and efficient. Modern catalytic technologies make it possible to convert butyric acid to important fine chemicals and biofuels. Here, current chemocatalytic and biocatalytic conversion methods are reviewed with a focus on upgrading butyric acid to 1-butanol or butyl-butyrate. Supported Ruthenium- and Platinum-based catalyst and lipase exhibit important activities which can pave the way for more sustainable process concepts for the production of green fuels and chemicals. PMID:26994015

  2. Photosynthetic mixed culture polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production from individual and mixed volatile fatty acids (VFAs): substrate preferences and co-substrate uptake.

    PubMed

    Fradinho, J C; Oehmen, A; Reis, M A M

    2014-09-20

    This work studied the effect of the substrate feeding composition on the polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) accumulation capacity of an acetate enriched photosynthetic mixed culture (PMC). From the six tested organic acids - malate, citrate, lactate, acetate, propionate and butyrate - only the three volatile fatty acids (VFAs) enabled PHA production, with acetate and butyrate leading to polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) formation and propionate leading to a HB:HV copolymer with a 51% fraction of hydroxyvalerate (HV). Also, results showed an acceleration of butyrate and propionate consumption when fed in the presence of acetate, suggesting that the latter can act as a co-substrate for butyrate and propionate uptake. Furthermore, results suggest that some PMC bacterial groups present a substrate preference for butyrate in relation to acetate and propionate. These findings indicate the possibility of feeding the PMC with cheap VFA rich fermented wastes, leading to a more cost-effective and environmentally sustainable PHA production system. PMID:24915131

  3. Searching for Synbiotics to increase Colonic Butyrate Concentration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate is produced by microbial fermentation of plant fiber in the gut and a preferred substrate for gut epithelial cells. In ruminants, butyrate contributes to 70% of energy metabolism. In monogastric species, butyrate also plays an important role in energy metabolism in the hindgut. Moreover, bu...

  4. Diet is a major factor governing the fecal butyrate-producing community structure across Mammalia, Aves and Reptilia

    PubMed Central

    Vital, Marius; Gao, Jiarong; Rizzo, Mike; Harrison, Tara; Tiedje, James M

    2015-01-01

    Butyrate-producing bacteria have an important role in maintaining host health. They are well studied in human and medically associated animal models; however, much less is known for other Vertebrata. We investigated the butyrate-producing community in hindgut-fermenting Mammalia (n=38), Aves (n=8) and Reptilia (n=8) using a gene-targeted pyrosequencing approach of the terminal genes of the main butyrate-synthesis pathways, namely butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase (but) and butyrate kinase (buk). Most animals exhibit high gene abundances, and clear diet-specific signatures were detected with but genes significantly enriched in omnivores and herbivores compared with carnivores. But dominated the butyrate-producing community in these two groups, whereas buk was more abundant in many carnivorous animals. Clustering of protein sequences (5% cutoff) of the combined communities (but and buk) placed carnivores apart from other diet groups, except for noncarnivorous Carnivora, which clustered together with carnivores. The majority of clusters (but: 5141 and buk: 2924) did not show close relation to any reference sequences from public databases (identity <90%) demonstrating a large ‘unknown diversity'. Each diet group had abundant signature taxa, where buk genes linked to Clostridium perfringens dominated in carnivores and but genes associated with Ruminococcaceae bacterium D16 were specific for herbivores and omnivores. Whereas 16S rRNA gene analysis showed similar overall patterns, it was unable to reveal communities at the same depth and resolution as the functional gene-targeted approach. This study demonstrates that butyrate producers are abundant across vertebrates exhibiting great functional redundancy and that diet is the primary determinant governing the composition of the butyrate-producing guild. PMID:25343515

  5. Diet is a major factor governing the fecal butyrate-producing community structure across Mammalia, Aves and Reptilia.

    PubMed

    Vital, Marius; Gao, Jiarong; Rizzo, Mike; Harrison, Tara; Tiedje, James M

    2015-04-01

    Butyrate-producing bacteria have an important role in maintaining host health. They are well studied in human and medically associated animal models; however, much less is known for other Vertebrata. We investigated the butyrate-producing community in hindgut-fermenting Mammalia (n = 38), Aves (n = 8) and Reptilia (n = 8) using a gene-targeted pyrosequencing approach of the terminal genes of the main butyrate-synthesis pathways, namely butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase (but) and butyrate kinase (buk). Most animals exhibit high gene abundances, and clear diet-specific signatures were detected with but genes significantly enriched in omnivores and herbivores compared with carnivores. But dominated the butyrate-producing community in these two groups, whereas buk was more abundant in many carnivorous animals. Clustering of protein sequences (5% cutoff) of the combined communities (but and buk) placed carnivores apart from other diet groups, except for noncarnivorous Carnivora, which clustered together with carnivores. The majority of clusters (but: 5141 and buk: 2924) did not show close relation to any reference sequences from public databases (identity <90%) demonstrating a large 'unknown diversity'. Each diet group had abundant signature taxa, where buk genes linked to Clostridium perfringens dominated in carnivores and but genes associated with Ruminococcaceae bacterium D16 were specific for herbivores and omnivores. Whereas 16S rRNA gene analysis showed similar overall patterns, it was unable to reveal communities at the same depth and resolution as the functional gene-targeted approach. This study demonstrates that butyrate producers are abundant across vertebrates exhibiting great functional redundancy and that diet is the primary determinant governing the composition of the butyrate-producing guild. PMID:25343515

  6. Use of Additives to Improve Performance of Methyl Butyrate-Based Lithium-Ion Electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2011-01-01

    This work addresses the need for robust rechargeable batteries that can operate well over a wide temperature range. To this end, a number of electrolyte formulations have been developed that incorporate the use of electrolyte additives to improve the high-temperature resilience, low-temperature power capability, and life characteristics of methyl butyrate-based electrolyte solutions. These electrolyte additives include mono-fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC), lithium oxalate, vinylene carbonate (VC), and lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB), which have been shown to result in improved high-temperature resilience of all carbonate-based electrolytes. Improved performance has been demonstrated of Li-ion cells with methyl butyrate-based electrolytes, including 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %); 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %) + 2% FEC; 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %) + 4% FEC; 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %) + lithium oxalate; 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %) + 2% VC; and 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %) + 0.10M LiBOB. These electrolytes have been shown to improve performance in MCMB-LiNiCoO2 and graphite-LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 experimental Li-ion cells. A number of LiPF6-based mixed carbonate electrolyte formulations have been developed that contain ester co-solvents, which have been optimized for operation at low temperature, while still providing reasonable performance at high temperature. For example, a number of ester co-solvents were investigated, including methyl propionate (MP), ethyl propionate (EP), methyl butyrate (MB), ethyl butyrate (EB), propyl butyrate (PB), and butyl butyrate (BB) in multi-component electrolytes of the following composition: 1.0M LiPF6 in ethylene carbonate (EC) + ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) + X (20:60:20 v/v %) [where X = ester co-solvent]. ["Optimized Car bon ate and Ester-Based Li-Ion Electrolytes", NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 4 (April 2008), p. 56.] Focusing upon improved rate

  7. Rapid presumptive identification of anaerobes in blood cultures by gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Sondag, J E; Ali, M; Murray, P R

    1980-01-01

    Production of volatile and nonvolatile metabolic acids in blood culture broths by aerobic, facultative anaerobic, and obligate anaerobic bacteria was analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. Anaerobic blood culture isolates were presumptively identified by the qualitative analysis of volatile fatty acids. Isolates, with a characteristic Gram stain reaction and cellular morphology, were identified by the following acid patterns: Bacteriodes fragilis group with acetic and propionic acids; Fusobacterium with acetic, butyric, and usually propionic acids; Veillonella with acetic and propionic acids; gram-positive cocci with acetic and butyric acids; and Clostridium with acetic and butyric acids. PMID:7381002

  8. Biogas Production on Demand Regulated by Butyric Acid Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, K.; Schiffels, J.; Krafft, S.; Kuperjans, I.; Elbers, G.; Selmer, T.

    2016-03-01

    Investigating effects of volatile fatty acids on the biogas process it was observed that butyric acid can be used for transient stimulation of the methane production in biogas plants operating with low energy substrates like cattle manure. Upon addition of butyrate the methane output of the reactors doubled within 24 h and reached almost 3-times higher methane yields within 3-4 days. Butyrate was quantitatively eliminated and the reactors returned to the original productivity state within 3 days when application of butyrate was stopped. The opportunity to use butyrate feeding for increased biogas production on demand is discussed.

  9. Propionic acid production in a plant fibrous-bed bioreactor with immobilized Propionibacterium freudenreichii CCTCC M207015.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Feng, Xiaohai; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Dan; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2012-12-15

    A plant fibrous-bed bioreactor (PFB) was constructed for propionic acid production. Sugar cane bagasse was applied to the PFB as immobilizing material. Starting at a concentration of 80g/L of glucose, Propionibacterium freudenreichii CCTCC M207015 produced 41.20±2.03g/L of propionic acid at 108h in the PFB. The value was 21.07% higher than that produced by free cell fermentation. Intermittent and constant fed-batch fermentations were performed in the PFB to optimize the fermentation results. The highest propionic acid concentration obtained from constant fed-batch fermentation was 136.23±6.77g/L, which is 1.40 times higher than the highest concentration (97.00g/L) previously reported. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that cells exhibited striking changes in morphology after PFB domestication. Compared with free cell fermentation, the fluxes of propionic acid synthesis and the pentose phosphate pathway in PFB fermentation increased by 84.65% and 227.62%, respectively. On the other hand, a decrease in succinic and acetic acid fluxes was also observed. The metabolic flux distributions of the two PFB fed-batch fermentation strategies also demonstrated that constant fed-batch fermentation is a more beneficial method for the immobilized production of propionic acid. The relevant key enzyme activities and metabolic flux variations of the batch cultures showed good consistency. These results suggest that the PFB was effective in high-concentration propionic acid production. PMID:22982366

  10. Stable carbon isotope discrimination in rice field soil during acetate turnover by syntrophic acetate oxidation or acetoclastic methanogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Ralf; Klose, Melanie

    2011-03-01

    Rice fields are an important source for the greenhouse gas methane. In Italian rice field soil CH 4 is produced either by hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis, or by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and syntrophic acetate oxidation when temperatures are below and above about 40-45 °C, respectively. In order to see whether these acetate consumption pathways differently discriminate the stable carbon isotopes of acetate, we measured the δ 13C of total acetate and acetate-methyl as well as the δ 13C of CO 2 and CH 4 in rice field soil that had been pre-incubated at 45 °C and then shifted to different temperatures between 25 and 50 °C. Acetate transiently accumulated to about 6 mM, which is about one-third of the amount of CH 4 produced, irrespective of the incubation temperature and the CH 4 production pathway involved. However, the patterns of δ 13C of the CH 4 and CO 2 produced were different at low (25, 30, 35 °C) versus high (40, 45, 50 °C) temperatures. These patterns were consistent with CH 4 being exclusively formed by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis at high temperatures, and by a combination of acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis at low temperatures. The patterns of δ 13C of total acetate and acetate-methyl were also different at high versus low temperatures, indicating the involvement of different pathways of production and consumption of acetate at the two temperature regimes. Isotope fractionation during consumption of the methyl group of acetate was more pronounced at low ( α = 1.010-1.025) than at high ( α = 1.0-1.01) temperatures indicating that acetoclastic methanogenesis exhibits a stronger isotope effect than syntrophic acetate oxidation. Small amounts of propionate also transiently accumulated and were analyzed for δ 13C. The δ 13C values slightly increased (by about 10‰) during production and consumption of propionate, but were not affected by incubation temperature. Collectively, our results showed distinct

  11. Engineering Escherichia coli for high-level production of propionate.

    PubMed

    Akawi, Lamees; Srirangan, Kajan; Liu, Xuejia; Moo-Young, Murray; Perry Chou, C

    2015-07-01

    Mounting environmental concerns associated with the use of petroleum-based chemical manufacturing practices has generated significant interest in the development of biological alternatives for the production of propionate. However, biological platforms for propionate production have been limited to strict anaerobes, such as Propionibacteria and select Clostridia. In this work, we demonstrated high-level heterologous production of propionate under microaerobic conditions in engineered Escherichia coli. Activation of the native Sleeping beauty mutase (Sbm) operon not only transformed E. coli to be propionogenic (i.e., propionate-producing) but also introduced an intracellular "flux competition" between the traditional C2-fermentative pathway and the novel C3-fermentative pathway. Dissimilation of the major carbon source of glycerol was identified to critically affect such "flux competition" and, therefore, propionate synthesis. As a result, the propionogenic E. coli was further engineered by inactivation or overexpression of various genes involved in the glycerol dissimilation pathways and their individual genetic effects on propionate production were investigated. Generally, knocking out genes involved in glycerol dissimilation (except glpA) can minimize levels of solventogenesis and shift more dissimilated carbon flux toward the C3-fermentative pathway. For optimal propionate production with high C3:C2-fermentative product ratios, glycerol dissimilation should be channeled through the respiratory pathway and, upon suppressed solventogenesis with minimal production of highly reduced alcohols, the alternative NADH-consuming route associated with propionate synthesis can be critical for more flexible redox balancing. With the implementation of various biochemical and genetic strategies, high propionate titers of more than 11 g/L with high yields up to 0.4 g-propionate/g-glycerol (accounting for ~50 % of dissimilated glycerol) were achieved, demonstrating the

  12. Concentration of clobetasone butyrate in aqueous humour.

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, S C; Richards, A B

    1983-01-01

    The concentrations of clobetasone butyrate and betamethasone were measured in aqueous humour of patients undergoing cataract extraction 12.5 to 18.5 hours after application into the lower conjunctival sac of an ointment containing 0.1% of the steroid. Samples were assayed from 10 patients receiving clobetasone butyrate and 13 patients receiving betamethasone phosphate. There were measurable concentrations in only 2 samples in the former group, and both were 0.1 ng/ml. In the betamethasone group measurable concentrations were found in 11 samples, and the concentrations ranged from 0.5 to 20.3 ng/ml, with the highest concentrations between 12.5 and 13.5 hours after application. The concentration of betamethasone in the aqueous humour decreased by about 90% in the 6 hours from 12.5 to 18.5 hours after application. It is speculative as to whether it is these differences in pharmacokinetic behaviour, or other differences in biological or physicochemical properties, which are responsible for the minimal effect on intraocular pressure induced by clobetasone butyrate compared with betamethasone. PMID:6824626

  13. Contribution of propionate to glucose synthesis in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Leng, R. A.; Steel, J. W.; Luick, J. R.

    1967-01-01

    1. The production rate of propionate in the rumen and the entry rate of glucose into the body pool of glucose in sheep were measured by isotope-dilution methods. Propionate production rates were measured by using a continuous infusion of specifically labelled [14C]propionate. Glucose entry rates were estimated by using either a primed infusion or a continuous infusion of [U-14C]glucose. 2. The specific radioactivity of plasma glucose was constant between 4 and 9hr. after the commencement of intravenous infusion of [U-14C]glucose and between 1 and 3hr. when a primed infusion was used. 3. Infusion of [14C]propionate intraruminally resulted in a fairly constant specific radioactivity of rumen propionate between about 4 and 9hr. and of plasma glucose between 6 and 9hr. after the commencement of the infusion. Comparison of the mean specific radioactivities of glucose and propionate during these periods allowed estimates to be made of the contribution of propionate to glucose synthesis. 4. Comparisons of the specific radioactivities of plasma glucose and rumen propionate during intraruminal infusions of one of [1-14C]-, [2-14C]-, [3-14C]- and [U-14C]-propionate indicated considerable exchange of C-1 of propionate on conversion into glucose. The incorporation of C-2 and C-3 of propionate into glucose and lactate indicated that 54% of both the glucose and lactate synthesized arose from propionate carbon. 5. No differences were found for glucose entry rates measured either by a primed infusion or by a continuous infusion. The mean entry rate (±s.e.m.) of glucose estimated by using a continuous infusion into sheep was 0·33±0·03 (4) m-mole/min. and by using a primed infusion was 0·32±0·01 (4) m-mole/min. The mean propionate production rate was 1·24±0·03 (8) m-moles/min. The conversion of propionate into glucose was 0·36 m-mole/min., indicating that 32% of the propionate produced in the rumen is used for glucose synthesis. 6. It was indicated that a considerable

  14. Batch fermentation model of propionic acid production by Propionibacterium acidipropionici in different carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Coral, Jefferson; Karp, Susan Grace; Porto de Souza Vandenberghe, Luciana; Parada, José Luis; Pandey, Ashok; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2008-12-01

    Propionic acid (PA) is widely used as additive in animal feed and also in the manufacturing of cellulose-based plastics, herbicides, and perfumes. Salts of propionic acid are used as preservative in food. PA is mainly produced by chemical synthesis. Nowadays, PA production by fermentation of low-cost industrial wastes or renewable sources has been an interesting alternative. In the present investigation, PA production by Propionibacterium acidipropionici ATCC 4965 was studied using a basal medium with sugarcane molasses (BMSM), glycerol or lactate (BML) in small batch fermentation at 30 and 36 degrees C. Bacterial growth was carried out under low dissolved oxygen concentration and without pH control. Results indicated that P. acidipropionici produced more biomass in BMSM than in other media at 30 degrees C (7.55 g l(-1)) as well as at 36 degrees C (3.71 g l(-1)). PA and biomass production were higher at 30 degrees C than at 36 degrees C in all cases studied. The best productivity was obtained by using BML (0.113 g l(-1) h(-1)), although the yielding of this metabolite was higher when using glycerol as carbon source (0.724 g g(-1)) because there was no detection of acetic acid. By the way, when using the other two carbon sources, acetic acid emerged as an undesirable by-product for further PA purification. PMID:18386184

  15. Radiation induces acid tolerance of Clostridium tyrobutyricum and enhances bioproduction of butyric acid through a metabolic switch

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Butyric acid as a renewable resource has become an increasingly attractive alternative to petroleum-based fuels. Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755T is well documented as a fermentation strain for the production of acids. However, it has been reported that butyrate inhibits its growth, and the accumulation of acetate also inhibits biomass synthesis, making production of butyric acid from conventional fermentation processes economically challenging. The present study aimed to identify whether irradiation of C. tyrobutyricum cells makes them more tolerant to butyric acid inhibition and increases the production of butyrate compared with wild type. Results In this work, the fermentation kinetics of C. tyrobutyricum cultures after being classically adapted for growth at 3.6, 7.2 and 10.8 g·L-1 equivalents were studied. The results showed that, regardless of the irradiation used, there was a gradual inhibition of cell growth at butyric acid concentrations above 10.8 g·L-1, with no growth observed at butyric acid concentrations above 3.6 g·L-1 for the wild-type strain during the first 54 h of fermentation. The sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis also showed significantly different expression levels of proteins with molecular mass around the wild-type and irradiated strains. The results showed that the proportion of proteins with molecular weights of 85 and 106 kDa was much higher for the irradiated strains. The specific growth rate decreased by 50% (from 0.42 to 0.21 h-1) and the final concentration of butyrate increased by 68% (from 22.7 to 33.4 g·L-1) for the strain irradiated at 114 AMeV and 40 Gy compared with the wild-type strains. Conclusions This study demonstrates that butyric acid production from glucose can be significantly improved and enhanced by using 12C6+ heavy ion-irradiated C. tyrobutyricum. The approach is economical, making it competitive compared with similar fermentation processes. It may prove useful as

  16. Metabolism of propionate by sheep-liver mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R. M.; Russell, G. R.

    1967-01-01

    1. Metabolism of propionate by sheep-liver mitochondria was stimulated catalytically by α-oxoglutarate, pyruvate, citrate and isocitrate. Succinate was stimulatory at higher concentrations, but fumarate and malate were inert. These effects were all independent of the presence of ATP, succinate being less effective when ATP was present. 2. Compared with the metabolism of added succinate, propionate metabolism was resistant to malonate inhibition, but only in the presence of added ATP. In the absence of ATP propionate metabolism was more sensitive to malonate inhibition than was the metabolism of succinate. 3. In the absence of malonate, and at malonate concentrations in the range 5–100mm, α-oxoglutarate increased the rate of fixation of [2-14C]propionate by about 50% without altering the nature of the fixation products. 4. Metabolism of [1-14C]-propionate in the presence of 50mm-malonate was accompanied by accumulation of about half the propionate consumed as succinate. When α-oxoglutarate was present in addition part of the α-oxoglutarate was metabolized and the rate of propionate consumption was increased. The total succinate that accumulated corresponded to the α-oxoglutarate consumed plus about half the propionate metabolized. 5. When [1-14C]propionate was metabolized in the absence of malonate about 70% of the generated succinate was oxidized to fumarate or beyond. The addition of malonate decreased the rate of propionate metabolism, and decreased to about half the fraction of generated succinate oxidized. 6. When propionate and 10mm-succinate were metabolized together, the total oxidation of succinate was greater than that with 10mm-succinate alone. The increment in succinate oxidation corresponded to about half the propionate metabolized in the presence or absence of malonate or ATP. 7. It is suggested that the metabolism of propionate is specifically limited by the rate of oxidation of the generated succinate, and that the succinate oxidase concerned

  17. 40 CFR 721.8657 - Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate complexes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8657 Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate complexes. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  18. 40 CFR 721.8657 - Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate complexes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8657 Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate complexes. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  19. 40 CFR 721.8657 - Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate complexes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8657 Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate complexes. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  20. 40 CFR 721.8657 - Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate complexes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8657 Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate complexes. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  1. 40 CFR 721.8657 - Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate complexes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8657 Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate complexes. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  2. Converting carbon dioxide to butyrate with an engineered strain of Clostridium ljungdahlii.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Nevin, Kelly P; Woodard, Trevor L; Lovley, Derek R

    2014-01-01

    Microbial conversion of carbon dioxide to organic commodities via syngas metabolism or microbial electrosynthesis is an attractive option for production of renewable biocommodities. The recent development of an initial genetic toolbox for the acetogen Clostridium ljungdahlii has suggested that C. ljungdahlii may be an effective chassis for such conversions. This possibility was evaluated by engineering a strain to produce butyrate, a valuable commodity that is not a natural product of C. ljungdahlii metabolism. Heterologous genes required for butyrate production from acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) were identified and introduced initially on plasmids and in subsequent strain designs integrated into the C. ljungdahlii chromosome. Iterative strain designs involved increasing translation of a key enzyme by modifying a ribosome binding site, inactivating the gene encoding the first step in the conversion of acetyl-CoA to acetate, disrupting the gene which encodes the primary bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase for ethanol production, and interrupting the gene for a CoA transferase that potentially represented an alternative route for the production of acetate. These modifications yielded a strain in which ca. 50 or 70% of the carbon and electron flow was diverted to the production of butyrate with H2 or CO as the electron donor, respectively. These results demonstrate the possibility of producing high-value commodities from carbon dioxide with C. ljungdahlii as the catalyst. Importance: The development of a microbial chassis for efficient conversion of carbon dioxide directly to desired organic products would greatly advance the environmentally sustainable production of biofuels and other commodities. Clostridium ljungdahlii is an effective catalyst for microbial electrosynthesis, a technology in which electricity generated with renewable technologies, such as solar or wind, powers the conversion of carbon dioxide and water to organic products. Other electron donors

  3. Converting Carbon Dioxide to Butyrate with an Engineered Strain of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    SciTech Connect

    Ueki, T; Nevin, KP; Woodard, TL; Lovley, DR

    2014-08-26

    Microbial conversion of carbon dioxide to organic commodities via syngas metabolism or microbial electrosynthesis is an attractive option for production of renewable biocommodities. The recent development of an initial genetic toolbox for the acetogen Clostridium ljungdahlii has suggested that C. ljungdahlii may be an effective chassis for such conversions. This possibility was evaluated by engineering a strain to produce butyrate, a valuable commodity that is not a natural product of C. ljungdahlii metabolism. Heterologous genes required for butyrate production from acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) were identified and introduced initially on plasmids and in subsequent strain designs integrated into the C. ljungdahlii chromosome. Iterative strain designs involved increasing translation of a key enzyme by modifying a ribosome binding site, inactivating the gene encoding the first step in the conversion of acetyl-CoA to acetate, disrupting the gene which encodes the primary bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase for ethanol production, and interrupting the gene for a CoA transferase that potentially represented an alternative route for the production of acetate. These modifications yielded a strain in which ca. 50 or 70% of the carbon and electron flow was diverted to the production of butyrate with H-2 or CO as the electron donor, respectively. These results demonstrate the possibility of producing high-value commodities from carbon dioxide with C. ljungdahlii as the catalyst. IMPORTANCE The development of a microbial chassis for efficient conversion of carbon dioxide directly to desired organic products would greatly advance the environmentally sustainable production of biofuels and other commodities. Clostridium ljungdahlii is an effective catalyst for microbial electrosynthesis, a technology in which electricity generated with renewable technologies, such as solar or wind, powers the conversion of carbon dioxide and water to organic products. Other electron donors

  4. Propionic acidemia in the Arab World.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Hatem

    2015-06-15

    The autosomal recessive disease propionic acidemia (PA) is an inborn error of metabolism with highly variable clinical manifestations, caused by a deficiency of propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC) enzyme, due to mutations in either PCCA or PCCB genes, which encode the alpha and beta subunits of the PCC enzyme, respectively. The classical clinical presentation consists of poor feeding, vomiting, metabolic acidosis, hyperammonemia, lethargy, neurological problems, and developmental delay. PA seems to be a prevalent disease in the Arab World. Arab patients with PA seem to have the same classical clinical picture for PA with distinctive associated complications and other diseases. Most of the mutations found in Arab patients seem to be specific to the Arab population, and not observed in other ethnic groups. In this review, I will discuss in details the clinical and molecular profile of Arab patients with PA. PMID:25865301

  5. STUDIES OF METHANOGENIC BACTERIA IN SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methanogenic bacteria were isolated from mesophilic anaerobic digesters. The isolates were able to utilize H2 and CO2 acetate, formate and methanol, but were not able to metabolize propionate and butyrate. It was shown the propionate and butyrate are not substrates for methanogen...

  6. Metabolic changes associated with hyperammonemia in patients with propionic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Filipowicz, Heather R; Ernst, Sharon L; Ashurst, Carrie L; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2006-06-01

    Propionic acidemia is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of propionyl CoA carboxylase. Affected patients can develop severe hyperammonemia, whose causative mechanism is unknown. In this study, we monitored changes in metabolic parameters associated with hyperammonemia in patients with propionic acidemia. Levels of ammonia were correlated with plasma levels of individual amino acids and carnitine and with urinary organic acids. Significance of correlations was determined with analysis of variance. Hyperammonemia positively correlated with an increase in branched-chain amino acids (leucine and isoleucine) and a decrease in glutamine/glutamate and esterified carnitine. The urinary excretion of methylcitric acid, formed by the combination of propionic acid with oxaloacetate from the Krebs cycle, increased while that of citric acid decreased with hyperammonemia. These results suggest that in propionic acidemia, hyperammonemia is triggered by catabolism with the accumulation of propionic acid derivatives. The decrease of the plasma levels of glutamine/glutamate with hyperammonemia in patients with propionic acidemia indicates that the mechanism producing hyperammonemia differs from that in urea cycle defects. The increase in methylcitric acid and decline in citric acid urinary excretion suggest that hyperammonemia in propionic acidemia might be related to inability to maintain adequate levels of glutamine precursors through a dysfunctional Krebs cycle. PMID:16406646

  7. Specific cell cycle synchronization with butyrate and cell cycle analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable for many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDBK cells. To explore the possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells, we investigated the property of the cell cyc...

  8. Isolation of unique butyrate-producing bacteria from swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate-producing bacteria in humans contribute to a healthy gastrointestinal tract and are known to be species from clostridial clusters IV, IX, XIVa, and XVI - with the community dominated by clusters XIVa and IV. However, the composition of the butyrate-producing bacterial community in swine is...

  9. Propionic acidemia in a parturient presenting for induction of labor.

    PubMed

    Schmeck, Alison; Beilin, Yaakov

    2014-11-01

    Propionic acidemia is a congenital disorder of metabolism where the enzyme propionyl-CoA carboxylase is nonfunctional, resulting in an accumulation of propionic acid in the blood. It is important to avoid excess protein intake and a catabolic state to prevent acidemia. Additionally, it may be wise to avoid anesthetic drugs metabolized by propionyl-CoA carboxylase because use of these drugs may lead to acidosis. We present a case of a parturient with propionic acidemia who presented for induction of labor. PMID:25611862

  10. Reversible diffusion weighted imaging changes in propionic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Amit; Amatya, Sirisa Kandel; Yeh, E Ann

    2013-01-01

    Propionic acidemia is an inborn error of metabolism with neurologic manifestations. We describe a 3-year-old boy with propionic acidemia presenting with a metabolic crisis including headache, vomiting, and altered mental status with metabolic acidosis. Electroencephalography showed focal slowing in right temporal region. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed restricted diffusion with apparent diffusion coefficient correlate in the right parietooccipital region. Correction of metabolic acidosis led to clinical improvement and normalization of MRI diffusion weighted imaging/apparent diffusion coefficient changes. This article suggests that restricted diffusion resulting from metabolic crises in propionic acidemia may be reversible in some cases. PMID:22532545

  11. Gamma amino butyric acid accumulation in medicinal plants without stress

    PubMed Central

    Anju, P.; Moothedath, Ismail; Rema Shree, Azhimala Bhaskaranpillai

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) is an important ubiquitous four carbon nonprotein amino acid with an amino group attached to gamma carbon instead of beta carbon. It exists in different organisms including bacteria, plants, and animals and plays a crucial role in humans by regulating neuronal excitability throughout the nervous system. It is directly responsible for the regulation of muscle tone and also effective in lowering stress, blood pressure, and hypertension. Aim and Objective: The aim of the study was to develop the fingerprint profile of selected medicinally and economically important plants having central nervous system (CNS) activity and to determine the quantity of GABA in the selected plants grown under natural conditions without any added stress. Materials and Methods: The high-performance thin layer chromatography analysis was performed on precoated silica gel plate 60F–254 plate (20 cm × 10 cm) in the form of bands with width 8 mm using Hamilton syringe (100 μl) using n-butanol, acetic acid, and water in the proportion 5:2:2 as mobile phase in a CAMAG chamber which was previously saturated for 30 min. CAMAG TLC scanner 3 was used for the densitometric scanning at 550 nm. Specific marker compounds were used for the quantification. Results and Conclusion: Among the screened medicinal plants, Zingiber officinale and Solanum torvum were found to have GABA. The percentage of GABA present in Z. officinale and S. torvum were found to be 0.0114% and 0.0119%, respectively. The present work confirmed that among the selected CNS active medicinal plants, only two plants contain GABA. We found a negative correlation with plant having CNS activity and accumulation of GABA. The GABA shunt is a conserved pathway in eukaryotes and prokaryotes but, although the role of GABA as a neurotransmitter in mammals is clearly established, its role in plants is still vague. PMID:25861139

  12. Neonatal onset propionic acidemia without acidosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Akman, Ipek; Imamoğlu, Sebahat; Demirkol, Mübeccel; Alpay, Harika; Ozek, Eren

    2002-01-01

    Propionic acidemia is an inherited disorder of organic acid metabolism characterized by a spectrum of clinical and biochemical findings. The usual presentation is life-threatening ketoacidosis and hyperammonemia. In this report we present a neonate with propionic acidemia presenting with prominent neurologic problems without ketoacidosis. The patient had a serum ammonia level of 3,500 microg/dl which was effectively lowered to normal values in 48 hours by peritoneal dialysis, with remarkable improvement in neurologic status. However, she developed Candida albicans peritonitis, and sepsis and died of cardiorespiratory failure. Infants who have an early onset propionic acidemia have a high mortality and morbidity rate. In conclusion, propionic acidemia should be in the differential diagnosis of patients with neurologic symptoms and hyperammonemia with or without acidosis. PMID:12458812

  13. Chronic kidney disease in an adult with propionic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Vernon, H J; Bagnasco, S; Hamosh, A; Sperati, C J

    2014-01-01

    We report an adult male with classic propionic acidemia (PA) who developed chronic kidney disease in the third decade of his life. This diagnosis was recognized by an increasing serum creatinine and confirmed by reduced glomerular filtration on a (99m)Tc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA) scan. Histopathology of the kidney showed moderate glomerulo- and tubulointerstitial fibrosis with very segmental mesangial IgA deposits. This is the second reported case of kidney disease in an individual with propionic acidemia possibly indicating that chronic kidney disease may be a late-stage complication of propionic acidemia. Additionally, this is the first description of the histopathology of kidney disease in an individual with propionic acidemia. As more cases emerge, the clinical course and spectrum of renal pathology in this disorder will be better defined. PMID:23756992

  14. Effect of propionic acid on fatty acid oxidation and ureagenesis.

    PubMed

    Glasgow, A M; Chase, H P

    1976-07-01

    Propionic acid significantly inhibited 14CO2 production from [1-14C] palmitate at a concentration of 10 muM in control fibroblasts and 100 muM in methylmalonic fibroblasts. This inhibition was similar to that produced by 4-pentenoic acid. Methylmalonic acid also inhibited 14CO2 production from [1-14C] palmitate, but only at a concentration of 1 mM in control cells and 5 mM in methylmalonic cells. Propionic acid (5 mM) also inhibited ureagenesis in rat liver slices when ammonia was the substrate but not with aspartate and citrulline as substrates. Propionic acid had no direct effect on either carbamyl phosphate synthetase or ornithine transcarbamylase. These findings may explain the fatty degeneration of the liver and the hyperammonemia in propionic and methylmalonic acidemia. PMID:934734

  15. Blend miscibility of cellulose propionate with poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone-co-methyl methacrylate).

    PubMed

    Sugimura, Kazuki; Teramoto, Yoshikuni; Nishio, Yoshiyuki

    2013-10-15

    The blend miscibility of cellulose propionate (CP) with poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone-co-methyl methacrylate) (P(VP-co-MMA)) was investigated. The degree of substitution (DS) of CP used ranged from 1.6 to >2.9, and samples for the vinyl polymer component were prepared in a full range of VP:MMA compositions. Through DSC analysis and solid-state (13)C NMR and FT-IR measurements, we revealed that CPs of DS<2.7 were miscible with P(VP-co-MMA)s of VP≥~10mol% on a scale within a few nanometers, in virtue of hydrogen-bonding interactions between CP-hydroxyls and VP-carbonyls. When the DS of CP exceeded 2.7, the miscibility was restricted to the polymer pairs using P(VP-co-MMA)s of VP=ca. 10-40 mol%; the scale of mixing in the blends concerned was somewhat larger (ca. 5-20 nm), however. The appearance of such a "miscibility window" was interpretable as an effect of intramolecular repulsion in the copolymer component. Results of DMA and birefringence measurements indicated that the miscible blending of CP with the vinyl polymer invited synergistic improvements in thermomechanical and optical properties of the respective constituent polymers. Additionally, it was found that the VP:MMA composition range corresponding to the miscibility window was expanded by modification of the CP component into cellulose acetate propionate. PMID:23987378

  16. Absence of acidosis in the initial presentation of propionic acidaemia.

    PubMed

    Walter, J H; Wraith, J E; Cleary, M A

    1995-05-01

    The clinical presentation and results of the initial biochemical and haematological investigations in 11 newborn term infants with propionic acidaemia are described. All patients had neurological symptoms. Only four had clinically important acidosis, but all had a raised blood ammonia. A diagnosis of propionic acidaemia should be considered in all newborn infants with unexplained neurological deterioration even in the absence of a metabolic acidosis. PMID:7796239

  17. Sources of propionate for the biogenesis of ethyl-braced insect juvenile hormones: role of isoleucine and valine

    SciTech Connect

    Brindle, P.A.; Baker, F.C.; Tsai, L.W.; Reuter, C.C.; Schooley, D.A.

    1987-11-01

    Corpora allata from adult female Manduca sexta biosynthesis the sesquiterpenoid juvenile hormone (JH) III and the unusual ethyl-branched homologue JH II in vitro. The authors maintained corpora allata in medium 199 using (methyl-/sup 3/H)methionine as the source of the JH methyl ester moiety and as a mass marker. This allowed measurement of the relative contributions of /sup 14/C-labeled precursors to the biogenesis of JH II and III carbon skeletons. They showed efficient incorporation of a propionate equivalent, from isoleucine or valine catabolism, into the ethyl-branched portion of JH II, using double-label liquid scintillation counting of isolated JHs and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected ion monitoring of JH deuteromethoxyhydrin derivatives. Methionine was a poor source of propionate for JH II biosynthesis, while glucose, succinate, threonine, and ..beta..-alanine did not contribute propionate at all. Leucine, isoleucine, and glucose incorporated into JH III and the acetate-derivative portion of JH II.

  18. Butyrivibrio hungatei sp. nov. and Pseudobutyrivibrio xylanivorans sp. nov., butyrate-producing bacteria from the rumen.

    PubMed

    Kopecný, Jan; Zorec, Masa; Mrázek, Jakub; Kobayashi, Yasuo; Marinsek-Logar, Romana

    2003-01-01

    Two novel Gram-negative, anaerobic, non-spore-forming, butyrate-producing bacterial species, strains Mz 5T and JK 615T, were isolated from the rumen fluid of cow and sheep. Both strains were curved rods that were motile by means of single polar or subpolar flagellum and common in the rumen microbial ecosystem. Strain Mz 5T produced high xylanase, proteinase, pectin hydrolase and DNase activities; 1,4-beta-endoglucanase was also detected in the culture medium. The bacterium utilized a wide range of carbohydrates. Glucose was fermented to formate, butyrate, lactate, succinate and ethanol. The DNA G + C content was 42.1 mol%. The complete 16S rDNA sequence was obtained and phylogenetic relationships were determined. Strain Mz 5T and related isolates were located in clostridial cluster XIVa and were closely related to Pseudobutyrivibrio ruminis, Butyrivibrio crossotus, Roseburia cecicola and Eubacterium rectale. The name proposed for this novel bacterium is Pseudobutyrivibrio xylanivorans; the type strain is Mz 5T (=DSM 14809T =ATCC BAA-455T). Strain JK 615T produced no fibrolytic activity, but utilized a wide range of carbohydrates. Glucose was fermented to formate, acetate, butyrate and ethanol. The DNA G + C content was 44-8 mol%. The complete 16S rDNA sequence was obtained and phylogenetic relationships were determined. Strain JK 615T was located in clostridial cluster XIVa and was closely related to Clostridium proteoclasticum, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens and Eubacterium halii. The name proposed for this novel bacterium is Butyrivibrio hungatei; the type strain is JK 615T (=DSM 14810T =ATCC BAA-456T). PMID:12656174

  19. Direct interspecies electron transfer accelerates syntrophic oxidation of butyrate in paddy soil enrichments.

    PubMed

    Li, Huijuan; Chang, Jiali; Liu, Pengfei; Fu, Li; Ding, Dewen; Lu, Yahai

    2015-05-01

    Syntrophic interaction occurs during anaerobic fermentation of organic substances forming methane as the final product. H2 and formate are known to serve as the electron carriers in this process. Recently, it has been shown that direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) occurs for syntrophic CH4 production from ethanol and acetate. Here, we constructed paddy soil enrichments to determine the involvement of DIET in syntrophic butyrate oxidation and CH4 production. The results showed that CH4 production was significantly accelerated in the presence of nanoFe3 O4 in all continuous transfers. This acceleration increased with the increase of nanoFe3 O4 concentration but was dismissed when Fe3 O4 was coated with silica that insulated the mineral from electrical conduction. NanoFe3 O4 particles were found closely attached to the cell surfaces of different morphology, thus bridging cell connections. Molecular approaches, including DNA-based stable isotope probing, revealed that the bacterial Syntrophomonadaceae and Geobacteraceae, and the archaeal Methanosarcinaceae, Methanocellales and Methanobacteriales, were involved in the syntrophic butyrate oxidation and CH4 production. Among them, the growth of Geobacteraceae strictly relied on the presence of nanoFe3 O4 and its electrical conductivity in particular. Other organisms, except Methanobacteriales, were present in enrichments regardless of nanoFe3 O4 amendment. Collectively, our study demonstrated that the nanoFe3 O4 -facilitated DIET occurred in syntrophic CH4 production from butyrate, and Geobacter species played the key role in this process in the paddy soil enrichments. PMID:25059331

  20. Propionate induces the bovine cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Koser, Stephanie L; Donkin, Shawn S

    2016-08-01

    Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) is a critical enzyme within the metabolic networks for gluconeogenesis, hepatic energy metabolism, and tricarboxylic acid cycle function, and is controlled by several transcription factors including hepatic nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α). The primary objective of the present study was to determine whether propionate regulates bovine PCK1 transcription. The second objective was to determine the action of cyclic AMP (cAMP), glucocorticoids, and insulin, hormonal cues known to modulate glucose metabolism, on bovine PCK1 transcriptional activity. The proximal promoter of the bovine PCK1 gene was ligated to a Firefly luciferase reporter and transfected into H4IIE hepatoma cells. Cells were exposed to treatments for 23 h and luciferase activity was determined in cell lysates. Activity of the PCK1 promoter was linearly induced by propionate, and maximally increased 7-fold with 2.5 mM propionate, which was not muted by 100 nM insulin. Activity of the PCK1 promoter was increased 1-fold by either 1.0 mM cAMP or 5.0µM dexamethasone, and 2.2-fold by their combination. Induction by cAMP and dexamethasone was repressed 50% by 100 nM insulin. Propionate, cAMP, and dexamethasone acted synergistically to induce the PCK1 promoter activity. Propionate-responsive regions, identified by 5' deletion analysis, were located between -1,238 and -409 bp and between -85 and +221 bp. Deletions of the core sequences of the 2 putative HNF4α sites decreased the responsiveness to propionate by approximately 40%. These data indicate that propionate regulates its own metabolism through transcriptional stimulation of the bovine PCK1 gene. This induction is mediated, in part, by the 2 putative HNF4α binding sites in the bovine PCK1 promoter. PMID:27289145

  1. Rationale for the luminal provision of butyrate in intestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Wächtershäuser, A; Stein, J

    2000-08-01

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFA), especially butyrate, play central metabolic roles in maintaining the mucosal barrier in the gut. A lack of SCFA, leading to endogenous starvation of enterocytes, may be the cause of ulcerative colitis and other inflammatory conditions. The main source of SCFA is dietary fibre, but they can also be derived from structured lipids, e. g. tributyrin. Once absorbed by non-ionic diffusion or carrier-mediated anion exchanges, SCFA are either used locally as fuel for the enterocytes or enter the portal bloodstream. Butyrate has been shown to increase wound healing and to reduce inflammation in the small intestine. In the colon, butyrate is the dominant energy source for epithelial cells and affects cellular proliferation and differentiation by yet unknown mechanisms. Recent data suggest that the luminal provision of butyrate may be an appropriate means to improve wound healing in intestinal surgery and to ameliorate symptoms of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:11079736

  2. Impact of butyric acid on butanol formation by Clostridium pasteurianum.

    PubMed

    Regestein, Lars; Doerr, Eric Will; Staaden, Antje; Rehmann, Lars

    2015-11-01

    The butanol yield of the classic fermentative acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) process has been enhanced in the past decades through the development of better strains and advanced process design. Nevertheless, by-product formation and the incomplete conversion of intermediates still decrease the butanol yield. This study demonstrates the potential of increasing the butanol yield from glycerol though the addition of small amounts of butyric acid. The impact of butyric acid was investigated in a 7L stirred tank reactor. The results of this study show the positive impact of butyric acid on butanol yield under pH controlled conditions and the metabolic stages were monitored via online measurement of carbon dioxide formation, pH value and redox potential. Butyric acid could significantly increase the butanol yield at low pH values if sufficient quantities of primary carbon source (glycerol) were present. PMID:26233327

  3. Production and characterization of poly(3-hydroxy butyrate-co-3 hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) by a novel halotolerant mangrove isolate.

    PubMed

    Moorkoth, Dhanya; Nampoothiri, Kesavan Madhavan

    2016-02-01

    A halophilic mangrove isolate identified by 16S rRNA sequence as a Bacillus spp. was found to be capable of using a broad range of carbon sources including monosaccharides (glucose and fructose), disaccharides (sucrose), pentoses (xylose and arabinose), various organic acids (acetic acid, propionic acid and octanoic acid) and even the acid pre-treated liquor (APL) of sugarcane trash, a lignocellulosic biomass, for growth and the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) such as poly(3-hydroxybutyrate, P3HB), poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate, PHBV), and 4-hydroxyhexanoate, 4HHX). The study describes the innate ability of a wild-type culture for PHBV production by both propionate dependent and propionate independent pathways. The biopolymer was extracted and characterized physico-chemically. The PHBV yield from glucose was estimated to be 73% of biomass weight with a high 3-hydroxyvalerate fraction of 48mol%. Thereafter, spherical homogenous PHBV nanoparticles of ∼164nm size were prepared for future applications. PMID:26684174

  4. [Dark metabolism of acetate in Rhodospirillum rubrum cells, grown under photoheterotropic conditions].

    PubMed

    Berg, I A; Krasil'nikova, E N; Ivanovskiĭ, R N

    2000-01-01

    The mechanism of the dark assimilation of acetate in the photoheterotrophically grown nonsulfur bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum was studied. Both in the light and in the dark, acetate assimilation in Rsp. rubrum cells, which lack the glyoxylate pathway, was accompanied by the excretion of glyoxylate into the growth medium. The assimilation of propionate was accompanied by the excretion of pyruvate. Acetate assimilation was found to be stimulated by bicarbonate, pyruvate, the C4-dicarboxylic acids of the Krebs cycle, and glyoxylate, but not by propionate. These data implied that the citramalate (CM) cycle in Rsp. rubrum cells grown aerobically in the dark can function as an anaplerotic pathway. This supposition was confirmed by respiration measurements. The respiration of cells oxidizing acetate depended on the presence of CO2 in the medium. The fact that the intermediates of the CM cycle (citramalate and mesaconate) markedly inhibited acetate assimilation but had almost no effect on cell respiration indicative that citramalate and mesaconate are intermediates of the acetate assimilation pathway. The inhibition of acetate assimilation and cell respiration by itaconate was due to its inhibitory effect on propionyl-CoA carboxylase, an enzyme of the CM cycle. The addition of 5 mM itaconate to extracts of Rsp. rubrum cells inhibited the activity of this enzyme by 85%. The data obtained suggest that the CM cycle continues to function in Rsp. rubrum cells that have been grown anaerobically in the light and then transferred to the dark and incubated aerobically. PMID:10808482

  5. Clinical evaluation of clobetasone butyrate eye drops in episcleritis.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd-Jones, D; Tokarewicz, A; Watson, P G

    1981-01-01

    Thirty-nine patients took part in a double-blind, between-patient clinical trial to compare clobetasone butyrate, betamethasone phosphate, and placebo eye drops in the treatment of episcleritis. Although from the symptom scores the patients given placebo appeared to do as well as the other patients in the first week of treatment, they did significantly less well after this time. Clobetasone butyrate and betamethasone phosphate eye drops seemed to be equally effective in the treatment of this disease. PMID:7028088

  6. Comparison of desoximetasone and hydrocortisone butyrate in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Zachariae, H

    1976-01-01

    Thirty psoriatics were treated for 2 weeks on a double-blind controlled basis with desoximetasone (0.25%) and with hydrocortisone butyrate (0.1%). It was a randomised left-right comparative trial. Thirteen out of 27 patients preferred desoximetasone, 3 patients preferred hydrocortisone butyrate. There was also a significantly better effect of desoximetasone as judged by the observer after the second week of treatment. PMID:60029

  7. Colonic mucin synthesis is increased by sodium butyrate.

    PubMed

    Finnie, I A; Dwarakanath, A D; Taylor, B A; Rhodes, J M

    1995-01-01

    The effects of sodium butyrate and sodium bromo-octanoate (an inhibitor of beta oxidation) on colonic mucus glycoprotein (mucin) synthesis have been assessed using tissue from colonic resection samples. Epithelial biopsy specimens were incubated for 16 hours in RPMI 1640 with glutamine, supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and N-acetyl-[3H]-glucosamine ([3H]-Glc NAc), and differing concentrations of sodium butyrate. Incorporation of [3H] Glc NAc into mucin by normal epithelium at least 10 cm distant from colonic cancer was increased in the presence of sodium butyrate in a dose dependent manner, with maximum effect (476%) at a concentration of 0.1 mM (number of specimens = 24 from six patients, p < 0.001). The increase in response to butyrate was not seen when specimens were incubated in the presence of the beta oxidation inhibitor sodium bromo-octanoate 0.05 M. The striking increase in mucin synthesis that results when butyrate is added to standard nutrient medium suggests that this may be an important mechanism affecting the rate of mucin synthesis in vivo and may also explain the therapeutic effect of butyrate in colitis. PMID:7890244

  8. Microbial metabolite butyrate facilitates M2 macrophage polarization and function

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jian; Shu, Dingming; Zheng, Mingzhu; Wang, Jie; Luo, Chenglong; Wang, Yan; Guo, Fuyou; Zou, Xian; Lv, Xiaohui; Li, Ying; Liu, Tianfei; Qu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites from intestinal microbes modulate the mucosal immune system by regulating the polarization and expansion of T cells. Whether the microbial metabolites influence macrophage polarization, however, is poorly understood. Here, we show that the large bowel microbial fermentation product, butyrate, facilitates M2 macrophage polarization, in vitro and in vivo. The supernatant from butyrate-treated M2 macrophage increased the migration and enhanced the wound closure rate of MLE-12 cells. Butyrate attenuated intestinal inflammation in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, with a significant increase in colonic expression of the M2 macrophage-associated protein, Arg1. M2 macrophage treated with butyrate, had increased activation of the H3K9/STAT6 signaling pathway, suggesting a mechanism for butyrate facilitated M2 macrophage polarization. Collectively, our study indicated that commensal microbe-derived butyrate is a novel activator of STAT6-mediated transcription through H3K9 acetylation driving M2 macrophage polarization, and delineated new insights into the immune interplay underlying inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27094081

  9. Microbial metabolite butyrate facilitates M2 macrophage polarization and function.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jian; Shu, Dingming; Zheng, Mingzhu; Wang, Jie; Luo, Chenglong; Wang, Yan; Guo, Fuyou; Zou, Xian; Lv, Xiaohui; Li, Ying; Liu, Tianfei; Qu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites from intestinal microbes modulate the mucosal immune system by regulating the polarization and expansion of T cells. Whether the microbial metabolites influence macrophage polarization, however, is poorly understood. Here, we show that the large bowel microbial fermentation product, butyrate, facilitates M2 macrophage polarization, in vitro and in vivo. The supernatant from butyrate-treated M2 macrophage increased the migration and enhanced the wound closure rate of MLE-12 cells. Butyrate attenuated intestinal inflammation in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, with a significant increase in colonic expression of the M2 macrophage-associated protein, Arg1. M2 macrophage treated with butyrate, had increased activation of the H3K9/STAT6 signaling pathway, suggesting a mechanism for butyrate facilitated M2 macrophage polarization. Collectively, our study indicated that commensal microbe-derived butyrate is a novel activator of STAT6-mediated transcription through H3K9 acetylation driving M2 macrophage polarization, and delineated new insights into the immune interplay underlying inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27094081

  10. STIMULATION OF REDUCTIVE DECHLORINATION OF TETRA- CHLOROETHENE (PCE) IN ANAEROBIC AQUIFER MICROCOSMS BY ADDITION OF SHORT-CHAIN ORGANIC ACIDS OR ALCOHOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of the addition of common fermentation products on the dehalogenation of tetrachloroethene was studied in methanogenic slurries made with aquifer solids. Lactate, propionate, crotonate, butyrate, and ethanol stimulated dehalogenation activity, while acetate, methanol, ...

  11. ION-EXCLUSION CHROMATOGRAPHIC DETERMINATION OF CARBOXYLIC ACIDS USED TO SUPPORT THE MICROBIALLY MEDIATED REDUCTIVE DECHLORINATION OF TETRACHLOROETHENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical method was developed for the determination of lactic acid, formic acid, acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid in environmental microcosm samples using ion-exclusion chromatography. The chromatographic behavior of various eluents was studied to determine the ...

  12. Metagenomics detects functional shifts in the bovine rumen microbiota in response to propionate intake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimizing rumen microbial ecosystem output is essential towards improved ruminant agriculture. Ruminal infusion or intake of propionate, one of the predominant volatile fatty acids, has important implications for host physiology. However, how the rumen microbiota responds to propionate administrat...

  13. The treatment of balanitis xerotica obliterans with testosterone propionate ointment.

    PubMed

    Pasieczny, T A

    1977-01-01

    Balanitis xerotica obliterans (BXO) and kraurosis penis are thought to be synonymous. Clinically and histopathologically they probably represent the same disease process as lichen sclerosus et atrophicus (LSA) but also involve the urethral mucosa. The treatment of choice is considered to be 2 1/2% testosterone propionate ointment which gives better results than strong corticosteroid applications, yet without their side effects. PMID:71837

  14. 2-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy)propionic acid (MCPP)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    2 - ( 2 - Methyl - 4 - chlorophenoxy ) propionic acid ( MCPP ) ; CASRN 93 - 65 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( H

  15. Biochemical basis of heterogeneity in acute presentations of propionic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Sindgikar, Seema Pavaman; Rao, Suchetha; Shenoy, Rathika D; Kamath, Nutan

    2013-01-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA), an uncommon organic acidemia has varied clinical and metabolic presentation causing difficulty and delay in the diagnosis. We report a case of PA in an infant who presented with failure to thrive, acute encephalopathy due to severe hyperammonemia without acidosis and fungal sepsis. The biochemical basis of severe hyperammonemia is discussed. PMID:24381430

  16. 40 CFR 180.325 - 2-(m-Chlorophenoxy) propionic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 2-(m-Chlorophenoxy) propionic acid... Tolerances § 180.325 2-(m-Chlorophenoxy) propionic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance is established for negligible residues of the plant regulator 2-(m-chlorophenoxy) propionic acid from...

  17. N-Butyrate alters chromatin accessibility to DNA repair enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.J.

    1986-03-01

    Current evidence suggests that the complex nature of mammalian chromatin can result in the concealment of DNA damage from repair enzymes and their co-factors. Recently it has been proposed that the acetylation of histone proteins in chromatin may provide a surveillance system whereby damaged regions of DNA become exposed due to changes in chromatin accessibility. This hypothesis has been tested by: (i) using n-butyrate to induce hyperacetylation in human adenocarcinoma (HT29) cells; (ii) monitoring the enzymatic accessibility of chromatin in permeabilised cells; (iii) measuring u.v. repair-associated nicking of DNA in intact cells and (iv) determining the effects of n-butyrate on cellular sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. The results indicate that the accessibility of chromatin to Micrococcus luteus u.v. endonuclease is enhanced by greater than 2-fold in n-butyrate-treated cells and that there is a corresponding increase in u.v. repair incision rates in intact cells exposed to the drug. Non-toxic levels of n-butyrate induce a block to G1 phase transit and there is a significant growth delay on removal of the drug. Resistance of HT29 cells to u.v.-radiation and adriamycin is enhanced in n-butyrate-treated cells whereas X-ray sensitivity is increased. Although changes in the responses of cells to DNA damaging agents must be considered in relation to the effects of n-butyrate on growth rate and cell-cycle distribution, the results are not inconsistent with the proposal that increased enzymatic-accessibility/repair is biologically favourable for the resistance of cells to u.v.-radiation damage. Overall the results support the suggested operation of a histone acetylation-based chromatin surveillance system in human cells.

  18. Failure of the normal ureagenic response to amino acids in organic acid-loaded rats. Proposed mechanism for the hyperammonemia of propionic and methylmalonic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Stewart, P M; Walser, M

    1980-09-01

    Propionic and methylmalonic acidemia are both known to be associated with hyperammonemia. Rats injected with 10 or 20 mmol/kg of propionate or 20 mmol/kg of methylmalonate, along with 1.5 g/kg of a mixture of amino acids, developed severe hyperammonemia, whereas rats administered the same dosages of acetate did not. In vitro, neither propionyl nor methylmalonyl CoA affected the activity of carbamyl phosphate synthetase I, ornithine transcarbamylase, nor the activation constant (K(A)) of carbamyl phosphate synthetase I for N-acetyl glutamate. Furthermore, rats injected with propionate showed no alteration of liver amino acid concentrations, which could explain impaired ureagenesis. Animals injected with methylmalonate showed an increase in both citrulline and aspartate, suggesting that argininosuccinic acid synthetase may also have been inhibited. Liver ATP levels were unchanged. Citrullinogenesis, measured in intact mitochondria from livers of injected animals, was reduced 20-25% by 20 mmol/kg of propionate or methylmalonate (compared with acetate). This effect was attributable to an impairment in the normal rise of liver N-acetyl glutamate content after amino acid injection. Thus, carbamyl phosphate synthetase I activation was reduced. Liver levels of acetyl CoA and free CoA were reduced. Levels of unidentified acyl CoA derivatives rose, presumably reflecting the accumulation of propionyl and methylmalonyl CoA. Thus, the principal mechanism for hyperammonemia induced by these acids is depletion of liver N-acetyl glutamate, which is in turn attributable to depletion of acetyl CoA and/or competitive inhibition by propionyl and methylmalonyl CoA of N-acetyl glutamate synthetase. Injection of methylmalonate may also have an additional inhibitory effect on argininosuccinic acid synthetase. PMID:7400325

  19. Biological carbon monoxide conversion to acetate production by mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Nam, Chul Woo; Jung, Kyung A; Park, Jong Moon

    2016-07-01

    To utilize waste CO for mixed culture gas fermentation, carbon sources (CO, CO2) and pH were optimized in the batch system to find out the center point and boundary of response surface method (RSM) for higher acetate (HAc) production (center points: 25% CO, 40% CO2, and pH 8). The concentrations of CO and CO2, and pH had significant effects on acetate production, but the pH was the most significant on the HAc production. The optimum condition for HAc production in the gas fermentation was 20.81% CO, 41.38% CO2, 37.81% N2, and pH 7.18. The continuous gas fermentation under the optimum condition obtained 1.66g/L of cell DW, 23.6g/L HAc, 3.11g/L propionate, and 3.42g/L ethanol. PMID:27035481

  20. Preparation of vinyl acetate

    DOEpatents

    Tustin, Gerald Charles; Zoeller, Joseph Robert; Depew, Leslie Sharon

    1998-01-01

    This invention pertains to the preparation of vinyl acetate by contacting a mixture of hydrogen and ketene with a heterogeneous catalyst containing a transition metal to produce acetaldehyde, which is then reacted with ketene in the presence of an acid catalyst to produce vinyl acetate.

  1. Preparation of vinyl acetate

    DOEpatents

    Tustin, G.C.; Zoeller, J.R.; Depew, L.S.

    1998-03-24

    This invention pertains to the preparation of vinyl acetate by contacting a mixture of hydrogen and ketene with a heterogeneous catalyst containing a transition metal to produce acetaldehyde, which is then reacted with ketene in the presence of an acid catalyst to produce vinyl acetate.

  2. Production of Butyric Acid and Butanol from Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    David E. Ramey; Shang-Tian Yang

    2005-08-25

    Environmental Energy Inc has shown that BUTANOL REPLACES GASOLINE - 100 pct and has no pollution problems, and further proved it is possible to produce 2.5 gallons of butanol per bushel corn at a production cost of less than $1.00 per gallon. There are 25 pct more Btu-s available and an additional 17 pct more from hydrogen given off, from the same corn when making butanol instead of ethanol that is 42 pct more Btu-s more energy out than it takes to make - that is the plow to tire equation is positive for butanol. Butanol is far safer to handle than gasoline or ethanol. Butanol when substituted for gasoline gives better gas mileage and does not pollute as attested to in 10 states. Butanol should now receive the same recognition as a fuel alcohol in U.S. legislation as ethanol. There are many benefits to this technology in that Butanol replaces gasoline gallon for gallon as demonstrated in a 10,000 miles trip across the United States July-August 2005. No modifications at all were made to a 1992 Buick Park Avenue; essentially your family car can go down the road on Butanol today with no modifications, Butanol replaces gasoline. It is that simple. Since Butanol replaces gasoline more Butanol needs to be made. There are many small farms across America which can grow energy crops and they can easily apply this technology. There is also an abundance of plant biomass present as low-value agricultural commodities or processing wastes requiring proper disposal to avoid pollution problems. One example is in the corn refinery industry with 10 million metric tons of corn byproducts that pose significant environmental problems. Whey lactose presents another waste management problem, 123,000 metric tons US, which can now be turned into automobile fuel. The fibrous bed bioreactor - FBB - with cells immobilized in the fibrous matrix packed in the reactor has been successfully used for several organic acid fermentations, including butyric and propionic acids with greatly increased

  3. Alternate splicing regulated by butyrate in the bovine epithelial cell

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a signaling molecule and a potent inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HADCs), butyrate exerts its impacts on a broad range of biological processes, such as apoptosis and cell proliferation, in addition to its critical role in energy metabolism in ruminants. In this study, we examined the effect of...

  4. 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid (MCPB)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    4 - ( 2 - Methyl - 4 - chlorophenoxy ) butyric acid ( MCPB ) ; CASRN 94 - 81 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Hea

  5. Development of a specific radioimmunoassay for cortisol 17-butyrate

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.N.; Lee, Y.F.; Bu'Lock, D.E.; August, P.; Anderson, D.C.

    1983-07-01

    We describe the development and validation of an assay for cortisol 17-butyrate in blood in which there is no significant cross reaction with endogenous corticosteroids at levels encountered normally in man. Preliminary data on blood levels of the drug in absorption studies are presented.

  6. EFFECT OF LEAD ON GAMMA AMINO BUTYRIC ACID SYNTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project studies the inhibitory effect of lead on the enzymatic activity of brain glutamic amino acid decarboxylase (GADC). The enzyme is responsible for the catalytic formation of gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) inhibitory neurons which is believed to be involved with the tra...

  7. BUTYRATE DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATES CYTOKINES AND PROLIFERATION IN PORCINE PERIPHERAL BLOOD MONONUCLEAR CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although butyrate modulates proliferation and cytokine production by PBMC in some species, the role of butyrate as a regulator of immunocyte function in the pig has not been studied. Therefore, the primary objective of this study was to determine whether butyrate influences peripheral blood mononuc...

  8. Swine Intestinal Tract Harbors a High Diversity of Butyrate-Producing Bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate is a preferred energy source of human colonic epithelial cells, and changes in the communities of butyrate-producing bacteria have been associated with adverse health. We hypothesize that in swine, like in humans, butyrate-producing bacteria contribute to a healthy intestinal ecosystem. T...

  9. Quantification of transcriptome responses of the rumen epithelium to butyrate infusion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as butyrate, produced by gut microorganisms play an important role in energy metabolism and physiology in ruminants as well as in human health. Butyrate is a preferred substrate in the rumen epithelium where approximately 90% of butyrate is metabolized. Additi...

  10. Role of rumen butyrate in regulation of nitrogen utilization and urea nitrogen kinetics in growing sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate, a major rumen VFA, has been indirectly linked to enhancement of urea recycling based on increased expression of urea transporter (UT-B) in the rumen epithelia of steers fed a rumen butyrate-enhancing diet. Two studies were conducted to quantify the effect of elevated rumen butyrate concent...

  11. Induction of peroxisomes by butyrate-producing probiotics.

    PubMed

    Weng, Huachun; Endo, Kosuke; Li, Jiawei; Kito, Naoko; Iwai, Naoharu

    2015-01-01

    We previously found that peroxisomal biogenesis factor 11a (Pex11a) deficiency is associated with a reduction in peroxisome abundance and impaired fatty acid metabolism in hepatocytes, and results in steatosis. In the present study, we investigated whether butyrate induces Pex11a expression and peroxisome proliferation, and studied its effect on lipid metabolism. C57BL/6 mice fed standard chow or a high-fat diet (HFD) were treated with tributyrin, 4-phelybutyrate acid (4-PBA), or the butyrate-producing probiotics (Clostridium butyricum MIYAIRI 588 [CBM]) plus inulin (dietary fiber), and the body weight, white adipose tissue, serum triglycerides, mRNA expression, and peroxisome abundance were evaluated. Tributyrin or 4-PBA treatment significantly decreased body weight and increased hepatic mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) and Pex11a. In addition, 4-PBA treatment increased peroxisome abundance and the expression of genes involved in peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation (acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 and hydroxysteroid [17-beta] dehydrogenase 4). CBM and inulin administration reduced adipose tissue mass and serum triglycerides, induced Pex11a, acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1, and hydroxysteroid (17-beta) dehydrogenase 4 genes, and increased peroxisome abundance in mice fed standard chow or an HFD. In conclusion, elevation of butyrate availability (directly through administration of butyrate or indirectly via administration of butyrate-producing probiotics plus fiber) induces PPARα and Pex11a and the genes involved in peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation, increases peroxisome abundance, and improves lipid metabolism. These results may provide a new therapeutic strategy against hyperlipidemia and obesity. PMID:25659146

  12. Acute psychosis in propionic acidemia: 2 case reports.

    PubMed

    Dejean de la Bâtie, C; Barbier, V; Valayannopoulos, V; Touati, G; Maltret, A; Brassier, A; Arnoux, J B; Grévent, D; Chadefaux, B; Ottolenghi, C; Canouï, P; de Lonlay, P

    2014-02-01

    Propionic acidemia is an inborn deficiency of propionyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase activity, which leads to mitochondrial accumulation of propionyl-CoA and its by-products. Neurologic complications are frequent, but only a few cases presenting with psychiatric symptoms have been reported so far. We report 2 cases of children with chronic psychiatric symptoms who presented with an acute psychotic episode as teenagers. Both patients had hallucinations, panic and grossly disorganized behavior, for several weeks to several months. They had signs of moderate metabolic decompensation at the beginning of the episode, although the psychiatric symptoms lasted longer than the metabolic imbalance. We propose that these episodes were at least partially imputable to propionic acidemia. Such episodes require psychiatric examination and antipsychotic treatment, which may have to be adapted in case of cardiomyopathy or long QT syndrome. PMID:24334345

  13. Regulation and Evolution of Malonate and Propionate Catabolism in Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Suvorova, I. A.; Ravcheev, D. A.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria catabolize malonate via two pathways, encoded by the mdc and mat genes. In various bacteria, transcription of these genes is controlled by the GntR family transcription factors (TFs) MatR/MdcY and/or the LysR family transcription factor MdcR. Propionate is metabolized via the methylcitrate pathway, comprising enzymes encoded by the prp and acn genes. PrpR, the Fis family sigma 54-dependent transcription factor, is known to be a transcriptional activator of the prp genes. Here, we report a detailed comparative genomic analysis of malonate and propionate metabolism and its regulation in proteobacteria. We characterize genomic loci and gene regulation and identify binding motifs for four new TFs and also new regulon members, in particular, tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP) transporters. We describe restructuring of the genomic loci and regulatory interactions during the evolution of proteobacteria. PMID:22505679

  14. Identification of a novel acetate-utilizing bacterium belonging to Synergistes group 4 in anaerobic digester sludge

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tsukasa; Yoshiguchi, Kazumi; Ariesyady, Herto Dwi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    Major acetate-utilizing bacterial and archaeal populations in methanogenic anaerobic digester sludge were identified and quantified by radioisotope- and stable-isotope-based functional analyses, microautoradiography-fluorescence in situ hybridization (MAR-FISH) and stable-isotope probing of 16S rRNA (RNA-SIP) that can directly link 16S rRNA phylogeny with in situ metabolic function. First, MAR-FISH with 14C-acetate indicated the significant utilization of acetate by only two major groups, unidentified bacterial cells and Methanosaeta-like filamentous archaeal cells, in the digester sludge. To identify the acetate-utilizing unidentified bacteria, RNA-SIP was conducted with 13C6-glucose and 13C3-propionate as sole carbon source, which were followed by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA. We found that bacteria belonging to Synergistes group 4 were commonly detected in both 16S rRNA clone libraries derived from the sludge incubated with 13C-glucose and 13C-propionate. To confirm that this bacterial group can utilize acetate, specific FISH probe targeting for Synergistes group 4 was newly designed and applied to the sludge incubated with 14C-acetate for MAR-FISH. The MAR-FISH result showed that bacteria belonging to Synergistes group 4 significantly took up acetate and their active population size was comparable to that of Methanosaeta in this sludge. In addition, as bacteria belonging to Synergistes group 4 had high Km for acetate and maximum utilization rate, they are more competitive for acetate over Methanosaeta at high acetate concentrations (2.5–10 m). To our knowledge, it is the first time to report the acetate-utilizing activity of uncultured bacteria belonging to Synergistes group 4 and its competitive significance to acetoclastic methanogen, Methanosaeta. PMID:21562600

  15. Propionate alters ion transport by rabbit distal colon

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, P.J.; Weiser, M.M.; Duffey, M.E.

    1986-03-01

    The primary anions of the colon are short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) produced by intestinal microorganisms from endogenous secretions and dietary fiber. The effects of the SCFA propionate on ion transport by the epithelium of rabbit distal colon were studied on tissues stripped of underlying musculature and mounted in Ussing chambers. When tissues were bathed with NaCl Ringer's solutions at 37/sup 0/C (5% CO/sub 2/-21mM HCO/sub 3/, pH 7.4) replacement of 33mM Cl/sup -/ in both tissue baths by propionate reduced short-circuit current (Isc) from 86 to 35 ..mu..A/cm/sup 2/ and increased transepithelial conductance (G/sub t/) from 3.6 to 5.6mS/cm/sup 2/. Unidirectional /sup 14/C-propionate flux measurements revealed that this ion was secreted at a rate of 0.5..mu..Eq/cm/sup 2/hr. Intracellular measurements with potential and pH sensitive microelectrodes showed that propionate reduced intracellular pH (PH/sub i/) from 6.84 to 6.68 (P < 0.02), depolarized the apical membrane potential (phi/sub a/) by 4mV (P < 0.02) and decreased the membrane fractional resistance (f/sub R/) from .78 to .71 (P < 0.001). Addition of 0.1mM amiloride to the mucosal bath reversed Isc to -18..mu..A/cm/sup 2/, decreased G/sub t/ to 5.3mS/cm/sup 2/, hyperpolarized phi/sub a/ by 5mV (P < 0.05) and increased f/sub R/ to 0.85 (P < 0.001). Amiloride had no effect on pH/sub i/. These results show that propionate can be secreted by rabbit distal colon and that exposure to this SCFA causes cell acidification and electrophysiological changes consistent with H/sup +/ secretion.

  16. Understanding of how Propionibacterium acidipropionici respond to propionic acid stress at the level of proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Ningzi; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R.; Li, Jianghua; Liu, Long; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Propionic acid (PA) is an important platform chemical in the food, agriculture, and pharmaceutical industries and is mainly biosynthesized by propionibacteria. Acid tolerance in PA-producing strains is crucial. In previous work, we investigated the acid tolerance mechanism of Propionibacterium acidipropionici at microenvironmental levels by analyzing physiological changes in the parental strain and three PA-tolerant mutants obtained by genome shuffling. However, the molecular mechanism of PA tolerance in P. acidipropionici remained unclear. Here, we performed a comparative proteomics study of P. acidipropionici CGMCC 1.2230 and the acid-tolerant mutant P. acidipropionici WSH1105; MALDI-TOF/MS identified 24 proteins that significantly differed between the parental and shuffled strains. The differentially expressed proteins were mainly categorized as key components of crucial biological processes and the acid stress response. Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was used to confirm differential expression of nine key proteins. Overexpression of the secretory protein glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and ATP synthase subunit α in Escherichia coli BL21 improved PA and acetic acid tolerance; overexpression of NADH dehydrogenase and methylmalonyl-CoA epimerase improved PA tolerance. These results provide new insights into the acid tolerance of P. acidipropionici and will facilitate the development of PA production through fermentation by propionibacteria. PMID:25377721

  17. Improved biological phosphorus removal performance driven by the aerobic/extended-idle regime with propionate as the sole carbon source.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongbo; Li, Xiaoming; Yang, Qi; Zheng, Wei; Wu, Yan; Zeng, Tianjing; Zeng, Guangming

    2012-08-01

    Our previous studies proved that biological phosphorus removal (BPR) could be achieved in an aerobic/extended-idle (AEI) process employing two typical substrates of glucose and acetate as the carbon sources. This paper further evaluated the feasibility of another important substrate, propionate, serving as the carbon source for BPR in the AEI process, and compared the BPR performance between the AEI and anaerobic/oxic (A/O) processes. Two sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) were operated, respectively, as the AEI and A/O regimes for BPR using propionate as the sole substrate. The results showed that the AEI-reactor removed 2.98 ± 0.04-4.06 ± 0.06 mg of phosphorus per g of total suspended solids during the course of the steady operational trial, and the phosphorus content of the dried sludge was reached 8.0 ± 0.4% after 56-day operation, demonstrating the good performance of phosphorus removal. Then, the efficiencies of BPR and the transformations of the intracellular storages were compared between two SBRs. It was observed that the phosphorus removal efficiency was maintained around 95% in the AEI-reactor, and about 83% in the A/O-reactor, although the latter showed much greater transformations of both polyhydroxyalkanoates and glycogen. The facts clearly showed that BPR could be enhanced by the AEI regime using propionate as the carbon source. Finally, the mechanisms for the propionate fed AEI-reactor improving BPR were investigated. It was found that the sludge cultured by the AEI regime had more polyphosphate containing cells than that by the A/O regime. Further investigation revealed that the residual nitrate generated in the last aerobic period was readily deteriorated BPR in the A/O-SBR, but a slight deterioration was observed in the AEI-SBR. Moreover, the lower glycogen transformation measured in the AEI-SBR indicated that the biomass cultured by the AEI regime contained less glycogen accumulating organisms activities than that by the A/O regime. PMID

  18. Tcf3 and cell cycle factors contribute to butyrate resistance in colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chiaro, Christopher; Lazarova, Darina L.; Bordonaro, Michael

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate mechanisms responsible for butyrate resistance in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulates butyrate's effects on Wnt activity and cell growth in resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulation of butyrate's effects differ by cell context. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell cycle factors are overexpressed in the resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reversal of altered gene expression can enhance the anti-cancer effects of butyrate. -- Abstract: Butyrate, a fermentation product of dietary fiber, inhibits clonal growth in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells dependent upon the fold induction of Wnt activity. We have developed a CRC cell line (HCT-R) that, unlike its parental cell line, HCT-116, does not respond to butyrate exposure with hyperactivation of Wnt signaling and suppressed clonal growth. PCR array analyses revealed Wnt pathway-related genes, the expression of which differs between butyrate-sensitive HCT-116 CRC cells and their butyrate-resistant HCT-R cell counterparts. We identified overexpression of Tcf3 as being partially responsible for the butyrate-resistant phenotype, as this DNA-binding protein suppresses the hyperinduction of Wnt activity by butyrate. Consequently, Tcf3 knockdown in HCT-R cells restores their sensitivity to the effects of butyrate on Wnt activity and clonal cell growth. Interestingly, the effects of overexpressed Tcf3 differ between HCT-116 and HCT-R cells; thus, in HCT-116 cells Tcf3 suppresses proliferation without rendering the cells resistant to butyrate. In HCT-R cells, however, the overexpression of Tcf3 inhibits Wnt activity, and the cells are still able to proliferate due to the higher expression levels of cell cycle factors, particularly those driving the G{sub 1} to S transition. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms determining the variable sensitivity of CRC cells to butyrate may assist in developing approaches that prevent or

  19. Mass isotopomer study of anaplerosis from propionate in the perfused rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Kasumov, Takhar; Cendrowski, Andrea V.; David, France; Jobbins, Kathryn A.; Anderson, Vernon E.; Brunengraber, Henri

    2007-01-01

    Anaplerosis from propionate was investigated in rat hearts perfused with 0–2 mM [13C3]propionate and physiological concentrations of glucose, lactate and pyruvate. The data show that when the concentration of [13C3]propionate was raised from 0 to 2 mM, total anaplerosis increases from 5 to 16% of the turnover of citric acid cycle intermediates. Then, [13C3]propionate abolished anaplerosis from endogenous substrates, glucose, lactate and pyruvate. Also, while the contents of propionyl-CoA and methylmalonyl-CoA increased with [13C3]propionate concentration, the content of succinyl-CoA decreased, presumably via activation of succinyl-CoA hydrolysis by a decrease in free CoA. Under our conditions, [13C3]propionate was a purely anaplerotic substrate since there was no labeling of mitochondrial acetyl-CoA, reflected by the labeling of the acetyl moiety of citrate. PMID:17418801

  20. Reversal of cardiomyopathy in propionic acidemia after liver transplantation: a 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Arrizza, Chiara; De Gottardi, Andrea; Foglia, Ezio; Baumgartner, Matthias; Gautschi, Matthias; Nuoffer, Jean-Marc

    2015-12-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a frequent complication in propionic acidemia. It is mostly rapidly fatal and independent of the metabolic control or medical intervention. Here, we present the reversal of a severe cardiomyopathy after liver transplantation in a patient with propionic acidemia and the long-term stability after ten years. Liver transplantation in patients with propionic acidemia may be considered a valid and long-lasting treatment when cardiomyopathy is progressive and unresponsive to medical therapy. PMID:26358860

  1. Fermentative degradation of nonionic surfactants and polyethylene glycol by enrichment cultures and by pure cultures of homoacetogenic and propionate-forming bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Wagener, S; Schink, B

    1988-01-01

    Linear alkyl ethoxylates (polyethylene glycol alkyl ethers) were fermented completely to methane and CO2 in enrichment cultures inoculated with anoxic sewage sludge. Long-chain fatty acids were released as intermediates. No degradation was found with polypropylene glycol and polypropylene glycol-containing surfactants. Two types of primary ethoxylate-degrading bacteria were isolated and characterized. Both degraded polyethylene glycols with molecular weights of 1,000 completely. Strain KoB35 fermented polyethylene glycol, ethoxyethanol, and lactate to acetate and propionate and was assigned to the described species Pelobacter propionicus. Strain KoB58 converted polyethylene glycol and many other substrates to acetate only and was assigned to the genus Acetobacterium. The pathways of anaerobic degradation of nonionic surfactants are discussed with respect to their limitations and the various groups of bacteria involved. Images PMID:3355141

  2. Exploring De Novo metabolic pathways from pyruvate to propionic acid.

    PubMed

    Stine, Andrew; Zhang, Miaomin; Ro, Soo; Clendennen, Stephanie; Shelton, Michael C; Tyo, Keith E J; Broadbelt, Linda J

    2016-03-01

    Industrial biotechnology provides an efficient, sustainable solution for chemical production. However, designing biochemical pathways based solely on known reactions does not exploit its full potential. Enzymes are known to accept non-native substrates, which may allow novel, advantageous reactions. We have previously developed a computational program named Biological Network Integrated Computational Explorer (BNICE) to predict promiscuous enzyme activities and design synthetic pathways, using generalized reaction rules curated from biochemical reaction databases. Here, we use BNICE to design pathways synthesizing propionic acid from pyruvate. The currently known natural pathways produce undesirable by-products lactic acid and succinic acid, reducing their economic viability. BNICE predicted seven pathways containing four reaction steps or less, five of which avoid these by-products. Among the 16 biochemical reactions comprising these pathways, 44% were validated by literature references. More than 28% of these known reactions were not in the BNICE training dataset, showing that BNICE was able to predict novel enzyme substrates. Most of the pathways included the intermediate acrylic acid. As acrylic acid bioproduction has been well advanced, we focused on the critical step of reducing acrylic acid to propionic acid. We experimentally validated that Oye2p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae can catalyze this reaction at a slow turnover rate (10(-3) s(-1) ), which was unknown to occur with this enzyme, and is an important finding for further propionic acid metabolic engineering. These results validate BNICE as a pathway-searching tool that can predict previously unknown promiscuous enzyme activities and show that computational methods can elucidate novel biochemical pathways for industrial applications. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:303-311, 2016. PMID:26821575

  3. Chemical modification of the haem propionate of cytochrome c.

    PubMed Central

    Timkovich, R

    1980-01-01

    The significance of the exposed haem edge in cytochrome c was directly probed by chemically modifying the partially exposed haem propionate in the crevice region around residues threonine-78 and threonine-49. Reaction of tuna heart cytochrome c with a water-soluble carbodi-imide at pH 3.7 in the absence of any added nucleophilic base leads to the covalent addition of substituted N-acylureas to the protein at two sites. One site has been shown to be a haem propionate by isotope-tracer and i.r.-spectral analysis of haem purified from the apoprotein. The other site is aspartial acid-62 on the back of the molecule. The modified cytochrome c demonstrates abnormal properties, including auto-oxidizability, a reduction potential of + 105mV, a reversible transition to a high-spin species below pH 5.3, no 695 nm charge-transfer band in the ferric state and abnormal binding to mitochondrial membranes. The derivative does react with cytochrome oxidase in deoxycholate-treated submitochondrial particles or in purified preparations with a specific activity of 43-65% compared with that obtained with native cytochrome c. The results are consistent with the view that an intact haem crevice is essential for normal values for physiochemical characteristics, but the significant residual enzymic activity suggests that the electron-transfer interface and/or the cytochrome oxidase-binding site cannot be localized solely in the region of the exposed haem propionate. PMID:6246879

  4. Strategies for production of butanol and butyl-butyrate through lipase-catalyzed esterification.

    PubMed

    Xin, Fengxue; Basu, Anindya; Yang, Kun-Lin; He, Jianzhong

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a fermentation process for production of butanol and butyl-butyrate by using Clostridium sp. strain BOH3 is developed. This strain is able to produce butyric acid and butanol when it ferments 60 g/L xylose. Meanwhile, it also excreted indigenous lipases (induced by olive oil) which naturally convert butyric acid and butanol into 1.2 g/L of butyl-butyrate. When Bio-OSR was used as both an inducer for lipase and extractant for butyl-butyrate, the butyl-butyrate concentration can reach 6.3 g/L. To further increase the yield, additional lipases and butyric acid are added to the fermentation system. Moreover, kerosene was used as an extractant to remove butyl-butyrate in situ. When all strategies are combined, 22.4 g/L butyl-butyrate can be produced in a fed-batch reactor spiked with 70 g/L xylose and 7.9 g/L butyric acid, which is 4.5-fold of that in a similar system (5 g/L) with hexadecane as the extractant. PMID:26710347

  5. The behavior of chickens following embryonic treatment with testosterone propionate.

    PubMed

    Mauldin, J M; Wolfe, J L; Glick, B

    1975-11-01

    This study was designed to investigate an initial response and the flocking behavior of chicks treated embryonically with testosterone propionate (TP). The high (1.28 gm. %) and low (0.32 gm. %) levels of TP interfered with the response of these chicks to a specific stimulus. However, only the high level TP depressed the flocking response. TP administered prior to day 13 of embryonic development will depress sexual behavior in the chicken. These data suggest that TP influences a variety of behavioral patterns in the chicken. PMID:1228736

  6. Microwave Spectra of Fluorinated Propionic Acids and Their Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obenchain, Daniel A.; Grubbs, G. S. Grubbs, Ii; Novick, Stewart E.; Cooke, Stephen A.; Serrato, Agapito Serrato, Iii; Lin, Wei

    2013-06-01

    The microwave spectra of three fluorinated propionic acids, namely pentafluoropropionic acid, 2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropionic acid, and 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropionic acid have been observed and assigned. The spectra of pentafluoropropionic acid and its monohydrate were reported in this meeting last year. The conformational analysis of 2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropionic acid and 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropionic acid will be compared to that of pentafluoropropionic acid. The structures of the three monohydrates will be discussed in terms of hydrogen bonding.

  7. Growth and characterization of organic NLO material: clobetasol propionate.

    PubMed

    Purusothaman, R; Rajesh, P; Ramasamy, P

    2015-06-15

    Single crystals of clobetasol propionate (CP) have been grown by slow evaporation solution technique using mixed solvent of methanol-acetone. The grown crystals were subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis to confirm their lattice parameter and space group. The powder X-ray diffraction pattern of the grown CP has been indexed. Thermal analysis was performed to study the thermal stability of the grown crystals. Photoluminescence spectrum shows broad emission peak observed at 421 nm. Nonlinear optical studies were carried out for the grown crystal and second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency was found in the crystal. PMID:25791879

  8. Growth and characterization of organic NLO material: Clobetasol propionate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purusothaman, R.; Rajesh, P.; Ramasamy, P.

    2015-06-01

    Single crystals of clobetasol propionate (CP) have been grown by slow evaporation solution technique using mixed solvent of methanol-acetone. The grown crystals were subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis to confirm their lattice parameter and space group. The powder X-ray diffraction pattern of the grown CP has been indexed. Thermal analysis was performed to study the thermal stability of the grown crystals. Photoluminescence spectrum shows broad emission peak observed at 421 nm. Nonlinear optical studies were carried out for the grown crystal and second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency was found in the crystal.

  9. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the products classified under SIC 28213 thermoplastic resins including those resins and resin groups... Butyrates Cellulose Acetate Resin *Cellulose Acetates *Cellulose Acetates Propionates Cellulose Nitrate... Polymers Nylon 11 Resin *Nylon 6-66 Copolymers *Nylon 6—Nylon 11 Blends Nylon 6 Resin Nylon 612 Resin...

  10. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the products classified under SIC 28213 thermoplastic resins including those resins and resin groups... Butyrates Cellulose Acetate Resin *Cellulose Acetates *Cellulose Acetates Propionates Cellulose Nitrate... Polymers Nylon 11 Resin *Nylon 6-66 Copolymers *Nylon 6—Nylon 11 Blends Nylon 6 Resin Nylon 612 Resin...

  11. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the products classified under SIC 28213 thermoplastic resins including those resins and resin groups... Butyrates Cellulose Acetate Resin *Cellulose Acetates *Cellulose Acetates Propionates Cellulose Nitrate... Polymers Nylon 11 Resin *Nylon 6-66 Copolymers *Nylon 6—Nylon 11 Blends Nylon 6 Resin Nylon 612 Resin...

  12. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the products classified under SIC 28213 thermoplastic resins including those resins and resin groups... Butyrates Cellulose Acetate Resin *Cellulose Acetates *Cellulose Acetates Propionates Cellulose Nitrate... Polymers Nylon 11 Resin *Nylon 6-66 Copolymers *Nylon 6—Nylon 11 Blends Nylon 6 Resin Nylon 612 Resin...

  13. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the products classified under SIC 28213 thermoplastic resins including those resins and resin groups... Butyrates Cellulose Acetate Resin *Cellulose Acetates *Cellulose Acetates Propionates Cellulose Nitrate... Polymers Nylon 11 Resin *Nylon 6-66 Copolymers *Nylon 6—Nylon 11 Blends Nylon 6 Resin Nylon 612 Resin...

  14. Formulation and nebulization of fluticasone propionate-loaded lipid nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Umerska, Anita; Mouzouvi, Celia R A; Bigot, André; Saulnier, Patrick

    2015-09-30

    Inhaled fluticasone propionate (FP) is often prescribed as a first-line therapy for the effective management of pulmonary diseases such as asthma. As nanocarriers offer many advantages over other drug delivery systems, this study investigated the suitability of lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) as a carrier for fluticasone propionate, examining the drug-related factors that should be considered in the formulation design and the behaviour of LNCs with different compositions and properties suspended within aerosol droplets under the relatively hostile conditions of nebulization. By adjusting the formulation conditions, particularly the nanocarrier composition, FP was efficiently encapsulated within the LNCs with a yield of up to 97%, and a concentration comparable to commercially available preparations was achieved. Moreover, testing the solubility of the drug in oil and water and determining the oil/water partition coefficient proved to be useful when assessing the encapsulation of the FP in the LNC formulation. Nebulization did not cause the FP to leak from the formulation, and no phase separation was observed after nebulization. LNCs with a diameter of 100 nm containing a smaller amount of surfactant and a larger amount of oil provided a better FP-loading capacity and better stability during nebulization than 30 or 60 nm LNCs. PMID:26183331

  15. A pilot study of fluticasone propionate in untreated coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchison, H C; al Mardini, H; Gillespie, S; Laker, M; Zaitoun, A; Record, C O

    1991-01-01

    Although gluten withdrawal is likely to remain the mainstay of treatment for adult coeliac disease, many patients find the diet inconvenient and unpalatable and compliance among asymptomatic patients is often poor. Oral corticosteroids have been used for patients who seem to be resistant to gluten withdrawal but preparations with low systemic bioavailability might be preferable. We have given a new glucocorticoid (fluticasone propionate) to 12 adults with untreated coeliac disease for six weeks while they were on a normal diet. One patient defaulted and one suffered a relapse in a pre-existing neoplasm. Excluding these, there was an improvement of symptoms, a mean weight gain of 2 kg, and a rise in albumin of 5.4 g/l. There was a significant improvement in the lactulose/mannitol excretion ratio (p less than 0.05) and in all histological variables examined in paired biopsy specimens (surface and crypt intraepithelial lymphocyte/enterocyte and goblet cell/enterocyte ratios and enterocyte height, p less than 0.01 or better). In six paired specimens sucrase and alkaline phosphatase activity increased in all (p less than 0.05) and lactase in five of six. No appreciable side effects were observed, but two patients had suppressed cortisol values and synacthen responses at six weeks. A further three, with normal pretrial results, had a blunted tetracosactrin response at six weeks. Fluticasone propionate seems worthy of further assessment in the treatment of coeliac disease as an adjunct to gluten withdrawal. PMID:1901562

  16. Choline acetate enhanced the catalytic performance of Candida rogusa lipase in AOT reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Xue, Luyan; Zhao, Yin; Yu, Lijie; Sun, Yanwen; Yan, Keqian; Li, Ying; Huang, Xirong; Qu, Yinbo

    2013-05-01

    Choline acetate is an ionic liquid composed of a kosmotropic anion and a chaotropic cation. According to Hofmeister series, a kosmotropic anion and/or a chaotropic cation could stabilize an enzyme, thereby facilitating the retention of the catalytic activity of the enzyme. In this work, we first report the influence of choline acetate on the activity and stability of lipase in AOT/water/isooctane reverse micelles. The indicator reaction is the lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl butyrate. The results show that a low level of choline acetate does not affect the microstructure of the AOT reverse micelles, but the ionic liquid can improve the catalytic efficiency of lipase. Fluorescence spectra show that a high level of choline acetate has an impact on the conformation of lipase, so the activation is mainly due to the influence of choline acetate on the nucleophilicity of water. Infrared spectra demonstrate that choline acetate can form stronger hydrogen bonds with water surrounding lipase, and therefore enhance the nucleophilicity of the water, which makes it easier to attack the acyl enzyme intermediate, thereby increasing the activity of the lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of the ester. A study on the stability of lipase in AOT reverse micelles indicates that the ionic liquid is able to maintain the activity of lipase to a certain extent. The effect of choline acetate is consistent with that predicted based on Hofmeister series. PMID:23352950

  17. Induction of the acetamidase of Aspergillus nidulans by acetate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hynes, M J

    1977-09-01

    Growth tests and enzyme determinations strongly suggest that the acetamidase of Aspergillus nidulans is induced by a product of acetate metabolism rather than the substrate, acetamide. The cis-dominant mutation, amdI9, which is closely linked to amdS, the structural gene for the acetamidase, results in greatly increased sensitivity to induction by acetate metabolism. Propionate, L-threonine, and ethanol also result in acetamidase induction. Mutations in the facA, facB, and facC genes, which lead to low levels of acetyl-coenzyme A synthase, are epistatic to the amdI9 mutation for strong growth on acetamide medium and abolish acetamide and propionamide induction of the acetamidase and isocitrate lyase enzymes. Acetate, L-threonine, and ethanol, however, can induce these enzymes in strains containing facA and facC lesions but not in strains containing a facB lesion. The evidence suggests that acetamidase and isocitrate lyase may be induced by a similar mechanism. PMID:19418

  18. Use of poly-beta-hydroxy-butyrate as a slow-release electron donor for the microbial reductive dechlorination of TCE.

    PubMed

    Aulenta, F; Fuoco, M; Canosa, A; Petrangeli Papini, M; Majone, M

    2008-01-01

    In situ anaerobic reductive dechlorination, using slow-release electron donors, is emerging as an effective and sustainable (low-cost and low-maintenance) technology to remediate aquifers contaminated by chloroethenes. In the present study, we investigated the use of poly-beta-hydroxy-butyrate (PHB), a fully biodegradable polymer, as a slow-release source of hydrogen and acetate for the reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE). Results of this study indicated that TCE dechlorination in PHB-amended microcosms was 2.3-times higher than in non-amended controls. This higher activity was explained by a higher H(2) level in PHB-amended microcosms. As usual, acetate was the major sink (approximately 90%) of reducing equivalents available from PHB degradation, whereas no acetotrophic dechlorination was observed. PMID:18413954

  19. [Double-blind-study on treatment with clobetasol-17-propionate and other topical corticoids (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Beck, M; Berger, C; Filipp, N; Hundertmark, U; Loewel, R

    1981-08-15

    90 patients suffering from chronic skin diseases-mainly psoriasis vulgaris-were treated in a double-blind-study for two weeks with topical Clobetasol-17-propionate compared with other topical corticoids. In 81% was seen a better therapeutical effect on the Clobetasol-17-propionate treated skin area. PMID:7027655

  20. Propionate induces cell swelling and K+ accumulation in shark rectal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, G.M.; Ziyadeh, F.N.; Mills, J.W.; Booz, G.W.; Kleinzeller, A. )

    1989-08-01

    Small organic anions have been reported to induce cell solute accumulation and swelling. To investigate the mechanism of swelling, we utilized preparations of rectal gland cells from Squalus acanthias incubated in medium containing propionate. Propionate causes cells to swell by diffusing across membranes in its nonionic form, acidifying cell contents, and activating the Na+-H+ antiporter. The Na+-H+ exchange process tends to correct intracellular pH (pHi), and thus it maintains a favorable gradient for propionic acid diffusion and allows propionate to accumulate. Activation of the Na+-H+ antiport also facilitates Na+ entry into the cell and Nai accumulation. At the same time Na+-K+-ATPase activity, unaffected by propionate, replaces Nai with Ki, whereas the K+ leak rate, decreased by propionate, allows Ki to accumulate. As judged by {sup 86}Rb+ efflux, the reduction in K+ leak was not due to propionate-induced cell acidification or reduction in Cli concentration. Despite inducing cell swelling, propionate did not disrupt cell structural elements and F actin distribution along cell membranes.

  1. Measures of de novo synthesis of milk components from propionate in lactating goats

    SciTech Connect

    Emmanuel, B.; Kennelly, J.J.

    1985-02-01

    Possible direct contributions of propionate to de novo synthesis of milk components by the mammary gland of lactating goats fed a concentrate-roughage diet have been studied in vivo by primed constant infusion of (1-carbon-14)propionate into the right mammary artery. Specific radioactivities of milk galactose, fatty acids, and protein were higher in the infused than in the uninfused half of the mammary gland, suggesting de novo synthesis of these compounds in the udder. Specific radioactivities of milk glucose in both udder halves were identical, ruling out any possibility of mammary gland-derived glucose from propionate of blood plasma under the experimental conditions. Of milk galactose, .8% was derived from propionate of blood plasma, and of milk glucose, 98% was derived from glucose of blood plasma. After intraruminal infusion of unlabeled propionic acid at 11 g/h, concentration of propionate in blood plasma was doubled, its contribution to milk galactose was increased to 1.5%, and proportions of milk odd-numbered fatty acids were increased. Propionate was incorporated largely into milk odd-numbered fatty acids. The authors conclude that small amounts of propionate can be incorporated into principal components of milk in the mammary gland of lactating goats.

  2. Transcriptomic Sequencing Reveals a Set of Unique Genes Activated by Butyrate-Induced Histone Modification.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong-Jun; Li, Robert W; Baldwin, Ransom L; Blomberg, Le Ann; Wu, Sitao; Li, Weizhong

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes in the bovine epithelial cells using RNA sequencing technology, a set of unique genes that are activated only after butyrate treatment were revealed. A complementary bioinformatics analysis of the functional category, pathway, and integrated network, using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, indicated that these genes activated by butyrate treatment are related to major cellular functions, including cell morphological changes, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Our results offered insight into the butyrate-induced transcriptomic changes and will accelerate our discerning of the molecular fundamentals of epigenomic regulation. PMID:26819550

  3. Transcriptomic Sequencing Reveals a Set of Unique Genes Activated by Butyrate-Induced Histone Modification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cong-Jun; Li, Robert W.; Baldwin, Ransom L.; Blomberg, Le Ann; Wu, Sitao; Li, Weizhong

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes in the bovine epithelial cells using RNA sequencing technology, a set of unique genes that are activated only after butyrate treatment were revealed. A complementary bioinformatics analysis of the functional category, pathway, and integrated network, using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, indicated that these genes activated by butyrate treatment are related to major cellular functions, including cell morphological changes, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Our results offered insight into the butyrate-induced transcriptomic changes and will accelerate our discerning of the molecular fundamentals of epigenomic regulation. PMID:26819550

  4. Biosynthesis of heparin. Effects of n-butyrate on cultured mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsson, K.G.; Riesenfeld, J.; Lindahl, U.

    1985-10-05

    Murine mastocytoma cells were incubated in vitro with inorganic (TVS)sulfate, in the absence or presence of 2.5 mM n-butyrate, and labeled heparin was isolated. The polysaccharide produced in the presence of butyrate showed a lower charge density on anion exchange chromatography than did the control material and a 3-fold increased proportion of components with high affinity for antithrombin. Structural analysis of heparin labeled with (TH) glucosamine in the presence of butyrate showed that approximately 35% of the glucosamine units were N-acetylated, as compared to approximately 10% in the control material; the nonacetylated glucosamine residues were N-sulfated. The presence of butyrate thus leads to an inhibition of the N-deacetylation/N-sulfation process in heparin biosynthesis, along with an augmented formation of molecules with high affinity for antithrombin. Preincubation of the mastocytoma cells with butyrate was required for manifestation of either effect; when the preincubation period was reduced from 24 to 10 h the effects of butyrate were no longer observed. A polysaccharide formed on incubating mastocytoma microsomal fraction with UDP-(TH)glucuronic acid, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, and 3'-phosphoadenylylsulfate in the presence of 5 mM butyrate showed the same N-acetyl/N-sulfate ratio as did the corresponding control polysaccharide, produced in the absence of butyrate. These findings suggest that the effect of butyrate on heparin biosynthesis depends on the integrity of the cell.

  5. Butyrate-induced changes in nuclease sensitivity of chromatin cannot be correlated with transcriptional activation

    SciTech Connect

    Birren, B.W.; Taplitz, S.J.; Herschman, H.R.

    1987-11-01

    The authors examined in the H4IIE rat heptoma cell line the relationship between butyrate-induced changes in the nuclease sensitivity of chromatin and changes in transcriptional activity of specific genes. The butyrate-inducible metallothionein I (MT-I) gene underwent a dramatic increase in DNase I sensitivity after 3 h of butyrate treatment. However, genes not transcribed in H4IIE cells underwent the same changes in DNase I sensitivity. Thus, butyrate-induced increases in DNase I sensitivity are not sufficient for the transcriptional activation of a gene. Butyrate treatment has also been reported to alter the sensitivity of sequence to micrococcal nuclease (MNase) in a manner reflecting their tissue-specific expression. Butyrate exposure caused increased digestion of the MT-I gene by MNase. However, butyrate-induced MNase sensitivity also occurred for genes which are neither transcribed in untreated cells nor butyrate inducible. Moreover, cadmium, a potent transcriptional activator of the MT-I gene, does not alter the sensitivity of the MT-I gene to MNase. Thus, the butyrate-induced alterations in MNase sensitivity are neither sufficient for, necessary for, nor indicative of transcriptional activation.

  6. Acetate Dependence of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Comerford, Sarah A.; Huang, Zhiguang; Du, Xinlin; Wang, Yun; Cai, Ling; Witkiewicz, Agnes; Walters, Holly; Tantawy, Mohammed N.; Fu, Allie; Manning, H. Charles; Horton, Jay D.; Hammer, Robert E.; McKnight, Steven L.; Tu, Benjamin P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Acetyl-CoA represents a central node of carbon metabolism that plays a key role in bioenergetics, cell proliferation and the regulation of gene expression. How highly glycolytic or hypoxic tumors are able to produce sufficient quantities of this metabolite to support cell growth and survival under nutrient-limiting conditions remains poorly understood. Here we show that the nucleocytosolic acetyl-CoA synthetase enzyme, ACSS2, supplies a key source of acetyl-CoA for tumors by capturing acetate as a carbon source. Despite exhibiting no gross deficits in growth or development, adult mice lacking ACSS2 exhibit a significant reduction in tumor burden in two different models of hepatocellular carcinoma. ACSS2 is expressed in a large proportion of human tumors and its activity is responsible for the majority of cellular acetate uptake into both lipids and histones. These observations may qualify ACSS2 as a targetable metabolic vulnerability of a wide spectrum of tumors. PMID:25525877

  7. Metabolic network rewiring of propionate flux compensates vitamin B12 deficiency in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Watson, Emma; Olin-Sandoval, Viridiana; Hoy, Michael J; Li, Chi-Hua; Louisse, Timo; Yao, Victoria; Mori, Akihiro; Holdorf, Amy D; Troyanskaya, Olga G; Ralser, Markus; Walhout, Albertha Jm

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic network rewiring is the rerouting of metabolism through the use of alternate enzymes to adjust pathway flux and accomplish specific anabolic or catabolic objectives. Here, we report the first characterization of two parallel pathways for the breakdown of the short chain fatty acid propionate in Caenorhabditis elegans. Using genetic interaction mapping, gene co-expression analysis, pathway intermediate quantification and carbon tracing, we uncover a vitamin B12-independent propionate breakdown shunt that is transcriptionally activated on vitamin B12 deficient diets, or under genetic conditions mimicking the human diseases propionic- and methylmalonic acidemia, in which the canonical B12-dependent propionate breakdown pathway is blocked. Our study presents the first example of transcriptional vitamin-directed metabolic network rewiring to promote survival under vitamin deficiency. The ability to reroute propionate breakdown according to B12 availability may provide C. elegans with metabolic plasticity and thus a selective advantage on different diets in the wild. PMID:27383050

  8. Effects of butyrate, avilamycin, and a plant extract combination on the intestinal equilibrium of early-weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Manzanilla, E G; Nofrarías, M; Anguita, M; Castillo, M; Perez, J F; Martín-Orúe, S M; Kamel, C; Gasa, J

    2006-10-01

    We evaluated the effects of 3 additives, sodium butyrate (AC), avilamycin (AB), and a combination of plant extracts (XT), on the productive performance and the intestinal environment of the early-weaned pig. The XT was a standardized mixture with 5% (wt/wt) carvacrol (from Origanum spp.), 3% cinnamaldehyde (from Cinnamonum spp.), and 2% capsicum oleoresin (from Capsicum annum). Pigs (n = 32) weaned at 18 to 22 d of age with an initial BW of 6.0 +/- 0.10 kg were allocated to 8 pens that, in turn, were allocated to 4 treatments. The treatments included a basal diet (CT) or the basal diet supplemented with 0.3% of AC, 0.04% of AB, or 0.03% of XT. Productive performance was determined during the initial 14 d postweaning. On d 19 and 21 of the experiment, the pigs were killed to allow collection of digesta and intestinal tissue to evaluate variables indicative of aspects of the gastrointestinal environment. Treatments AB and AC improved G:F (P = 0.012 and 0.003, respectively) compared with the CT. Butyrate included in the diet was only detected in the stomach but not in cranial jejunum. When compared with CT, AC produced a lower ileal starch digestibility (P = 0.002) and a lower whole-tract OM and starch digestibility (P = 0.001 and 0.003, respectively), related to a lower VFA concentration in the cranial colon (P = 0.082) and a numerically reduced branched VFA percentage in the rectum. The AB treatment diminished propionate production in caudal colon (P = 0.002) and rectum (P = 0.012) compared with CT. The AC group exhibited deeper crypt depth in the jejunum without variations in villus height compared with CT (P = 0.042). The AC and AB groups also increased goblet cell presence in the colon (P = 0.001 and 0.032, respectively). On the other hand, AB and XT diminished intraepithelial lymphocytes in the jejunum (P = 0.003 and 0.034, respectively). The XT increased lymphocyte presence in the colon (P = 0.003). These results show the important influence of AB and AC on

  9. Pathway engineering of Propionibacterium jensenii for improved production of propionic acid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Long; Guan, Ningzi; Zhu, Gexin; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Propionic acid (PA) is an important chemical building block widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, and chemical industries. In our previous study, a shuttle vector was developed as a useful tool for engineering Propionibacterium jensenii, and two key enzymes-glycerol dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase-were overexpressed to improve PA titer. Here, we aimed to improve PA production further via the pathway engineering of P. jensenii. First, the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene (ppc) from Klebsiella pneumoniae was overexpressed to access the one-step synthesis of oxaloacetate directly from phosphoenolpyruvate without pyruvate as intermediate. Next, genes encoding lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) and pyruvate oxidase (poxB) were deleted to block the synthesis of the by-products lactic acid and acetic acid, respectively. Overexpression of ppc and deleting ldh improved PA titer from 26.95 ± 1.21 g·L(-1) to 33.21 ± 1.92 g·L(-1) and 30.50 ± 1.63 g·L(-1), whereas poxB deletion decreased it. The influence of this pathway engineering on gene transcription, enzyme expression, NADH/NAD(+) ratio, and metabolite concentration was also investigated. Finally, PA production in P. jensenii with ppc overexpression as well as ldh deletion was investigated, which resulted in further increases in PA titer to 34.93 ± 2.99 g·L(-1) in a fed-batch culture. PMID:26814976

  10. Pathway engineering of Propionibacterium jensenii for improved production of propionic acid

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Long; Guan, Ningzi; Zhu, Gexin; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-dong; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Propionic acid (PA) is an important chemical building block widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, and chemical industries. In our previous study, a shuttle vector was developed as a useful tool for engineering Propionibacterium jensenii, and two key enzymes—glycerol dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase—were overexpressed to improve PA titer. Here, we aimed to improve PA production further via the pathway engineering of P. jensenii. First, the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene (ppc) from Klebsiella pneumoniae was overexpressed to access the one-step synthesis of oxaloacetate directly from phosphoenolpyruvate without pyruvate as intermediate. Next, genes encoding lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) and pyruvate oxidase (poxB) were deleted to block the synthesis of the by-products lactic acid and acetic acid, respectively. Overexpression of ppc and deleting ldh improved PA titer from 26.95 ± 1.21 g·L−1 to 33.21 ± 1.92 g·L−1 and 30.50 ± 1.63 g·L−1, whereas poxB deletion decreased it. The influence of this pathway engineering on gene transcription, enzyme expression, NADH/NAD+ ratio, and metabolite concentration was also investigated. Finally, PA production in P. jensenii with ppc overexpression as well as ldh deletion was investigated, which resulted in further increases in PA titer to 34.93 ± 2.99 g·L−1 in a fed-batch culture. PMID:26814976

  11. Effect of butyric acid on the performance and carcass yield of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Leeson, S; Namkung, H; Antongiovanni, M; Lee, E H

    2005-09-01

    Short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate are considered potential alternatives to antibiotic growth promoters. The efficacy of butyric acid on performance and carcass characteristics of broiler chickens was tested in two studies. The effect of dietary butyrate on the ability to withstand coccidial oocyte challenge also was investigated. In experiment 1, male broiler chickens were fed diets supplemented with 0 or 11 ppm virginiamycin or 0.2 or 0.4% butyric acid (as mono-, di-, and triglyceride). In experiment 2, broilers were fed bacitracin methylene disalicylate or 0.1 or 0.2% butyric acid. In another trial, birds vaccinated against coccidiosis were challenged with oocytes at 21 d and examined 6 d later. In experiment 1, diet treatments had no effect on body weight gain. Feed intake of the birds fed 0.4% butyric acid was decreased (P < 0.01) compared with birds fed the nonmedicated diet during the starter period, whereas birds fed 0.2% butyric acid had similar feed intake to the control birds. In experiment 2, diet treatments did not affect the performance of broiler chicks while carcass weight and breast meat yield increased (P < 0.01) in birds fed 0.2% butyric acid. With oocyte challenge, birds that had received butyric acid before challenge showed higher growth rate following the challenge compared with birds that received nonmedicated feed. Bacitracin decreased (P < 0.05%) duodenal villi crypt depth, whereas villus length was similar in birds fed butyric acid or the nonmedicated control diet. These results show that 0.2% butyric acid can help to maintain the performance and carcass quality of broilers, especially in vaccinated birds challenged with coccidiosis. PMID:16206563

  12. Butyrate-rich colonic microenvironment is a relevant selection factor for metabolically adapted tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Serpa, Jacinta; Caiado, Francisco; Carvalho, Tânia; Torre, Cheila; Gonçalves, Luís G; Casalou, Cristina; Lamosa, Pedro; Rodrigues, Margarida; Zhu, Zhenping; Lam, Eric W F; Dias, Sérgio

    2010-12-10

    The short chain fatty acid (SCFA) butyrate is a product of colonic fermentation of dietary fibers. It is the main source of energy for normal colonocytes, but cannot be metabolized by most tumor cells. Butyrate also functions as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor to control cell proliferation and apoptosis. In consequence, butyrate and its derived drugs are used in cancer therapy. Here we show that aggressive tumor cells that retain the capacity of metabolizing butyrate are positively selected in their microenvironment. In the mouse xenograft model, butyrate-preselected human colon cancer cells gave rise to subcutaneous tumors that grew faster and were more angiogenic than those derived from untreated cells. Similarly, butyrate-preselected cells demonstrated a significant increase in rates of homing to the lung after intravenous injection. Our data showed that butyrate regulates the expression of VEGF and its receptor KDR at the transcriptional level potentially through FoxM1, resulting in the generation of a functional VEGF:KDR autocrine growth loop. Cells selected by chronic exposure to butyrate express higher levels of MMP2, MMP9, α2 and α3 integrins, and lower levels of E-cadherin, a marker for epithelial to mesenchymal transition. The orthotopic model of colon cancer showed that cells preselected by butyrate are able to colonize the animals locally and at distant organs, whereas control cells can only generate a local tumor in the cecum. Together our data shows that a butyrate-rich microenvironment may select for tumor cells that are able to metabolize butyrate, which are also phenotypically more aggressive. PMID:20926374

  13. Acetylcarnitine potentiates the anticarcinogenic effects of butyrate on SW480 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Elimrani, Ihsan; Dionne, Serge; Saragosti, Dan; Qureshi, Ijaz; Levy, Emile; Delvin, Edgar; Seidman, Ernest G

    2015-08-01

    Butyrate is a potent anticarcinogenic compound against colon cancer cells in vitro. However, its rapid metabolism is hypothesized to limit its anticancer benefits in colonic epithelial cells. Carnitine, a potent antioxidant, is essential to fatty acid oxidation. The aims of this study were to identify a colon cancer cell line capable of transporting carnitine. We evaluated the effect of carnitine and acetylcarnitine (ALCAR) on the response of colon carcinoma cells to butyrate. We explored the mechanisms underlying the anticarcinogenic benefit. SW480 cells were incubated with butyrate ± carnitine or ALCAR. Carnitine uptake was assessed using [3H]-carnitine. Apoptosis and cell viability were assessed using an ELISA kit and flow cytometry, respectively. Modulation of proteins implicated in carnitine transport, cell death and proliferation were assessed by western blotting. SW480 cells were found to transport carnitine primarily via the OCTN2 transporter. Butyrate induced SW480 cell death occurred at concentrations of 2 mM and higher. Cells treated with the combination of butyrate (3 mM) with ALCAR exhibited increased mortality. The addition of carnitine or ALCAR also increased butyrate-induced apoptosis. Butyrate increased levels of cyclin D1, p21 and PARP p86, but decreased Bcl-XL and survivin levels. Butyrate also downregulated dephospho-β-catenin and increased acetylated histone H4 levels. Butyrate and carnitine decreased survivin levels by ≥25%. ALCAR independently induced a 20% decrease in p21. These results demonstrate that butyrate and ALCAR are potentially beneficial anticarcinogenic nutrients that inhibit colon cancer cell survival in vitro. The combination of both agents may have superior anticarcinogenic properties than butyrate alone. PMID:26043725

  14. Butyrate enhances antibacterial effects while suppressing other features of alternative activation in IL-4-induced macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Maria R; Saxena, Alpana; Reyes, José-Luis; McKay, Derek M

    2016-05-15

    The short-chain fatty acid butyrate is produced by fermentation of dietary fiber by the intestinal microbiota; butyrate is the primary energy source of colonocytes and has immunomodulatory effects. Having shown that macrophages differentiated with IL-4 [M(IL-4)s] can suppress colitis, we hypothesized that butyrate would reinforce an M(IL-4) phenotype. Here, we show that in the presence of butyrate M(IL-4)s display reduced expression of their hallmark markers Arg1 and Ym1 and significantly suppressed LPS-induced nitric oxide, IL-12p40, and IL-10 production. Butyrate treatment likely altered the M(IL-4) phenotype via inhibition of histone deacetylation. Functionally, M(IL-4)s treated with butyrate showed increased phagocytosis and killing of bacteria, compared with M(IL-4) and this was not accompanied by enhanced proinflammatory cytokine production. Culture of regulatory T cells with M(IL-4)s and M(IL-4 + butyrate)s revealed that both macrophage subsets suppressed expression of the regulatory T-cell marker Foxp3. However, Tregs cocultured with M(IL-4 + butyrate) produced less IL-17A than Tregs cocultured with M(IL-4). These data illustrate the importance of butyrate, a microbial-derived metabolite, in the regulation of gut immunity: the demonstration that butyrate promotes phagocytosis in M(IL-4)s that can limit T-cell production of IL-17A reveals novel aspects of bacterial-host interaction in the regulation of intestinal homeostasis. PMID:27012776

  15. Butyrate inhibits inflammatory responses through NFκB inhibition: implications for Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Segain, J; de la Bletiere, D R.; Bourreille, A; Leray, V; Gervois, N; Rosales, C; Ferrier, L; Bonnet, C; Blottiere, H; Galmiche, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM—Proinflammatory cytokines are key factors in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD). Activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB), which is involved in their gene transcription, is increased in the intestinal mucosa of CD patients. As butyrate enemas may be beneficial in treating colonic inflammation, we investigated if butyrate promotes this effect by acting on proinflammatory cytokine expression.
METHODS—Intestinal biopsy specimens, isolated lamina propria cells (LPMC), and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were cultured with or without butyrate for assessment of secretion of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and mRNA levels. NFκB p65 activation was determined by immunofluorescence and gene reporter experiments. Levels of NFκB inhibitory protein (IκBα) were analysed by western blotting. The in vivo efficacy of butyrate was assessed in rats with trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS) induced colitis.
RESULTS—Butyrate decreased TNF production and proinflammatory cytokine mRNA expression by intestinal biopsies and LPMC from CD patients. Butyrate abolished lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced expression of cytokines by PBMC and transmigration of NFκB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. LPS induced NFκB transcriptional activity was decreased by butyrate while IκBα levels were stable. Butyrate treatment also improved TNBS induced colitis.
CONCLUSIONS—Butyrate decreases proinflammatory cytokine expression via inhibition of NFκB activation and IκBα degradation. These anti-inflammatory properties provide a rationale for assessing butyrate in the treatment of CD.


Keywords: inflammation; butyrate; Crohn's disease; nuclear factor kappa B; cytokines PMID:10940278

  16. Genetics of propionic acidemia in a Mennonite-Amish kindred.

    PubMed

    Kidd, J R; Wolf, B; Hsia, E; Kidd, K K

    1980-03-01

    A large Mennonite kindred was found to have propionic acidemia (complementation group pcc C) in at least four different sibships. Even within this kindred and this complementation group (where etiology may be assumed to be identical), there is a wide range of symptoms exhibited by homozygous pcc C-deficient individuals. The inbreeding coefficients (f) for the affected sibships ranged from 4.776 X 10(3) to 2.003 X 10(-2). Data from this study strongly support the single-locus autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Three couples were found to be common in the ancestry (9--11 generations ago) of all eight parents of the four affected sibships. Relative likelihoods for a member of each of those couples to have been the early carrier of the defective allele were calculated at 1539, 278, and 1. Thus, one couple was designated the most likely earliest-known transmitter of the pcc-deficient allele. PMID:7386459

  17. Anaesthetic considerations for liver transplantation in propionic acidemia

    PubMed Central

    Rajakumar, Akila; Kaliamoorthy, Ilankumaran; Reddy, Mettu Srinivas; Rela, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is an autosomal recessive disorder of metabolism due to deficiency of the enzyme propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC) that converts propionyl-CoA to methylmalonyl-CoA with the help of the cofactor biotin inside the mitochondria. The resultant accumulation of propionyl-CoA causes severe hyperammonaemia and life-threatening metabolic acidosis. Based on the positive outcomes, liver transplantation is now recommended for individuals with recurrent episodes of hyperammonaemia or acidosis that is not adequately controlled with appropriate medical therapies. We report anaesthetic management of two children with PA for liver transplantation at our institution. It is essential for the anaesthesiologist, caring for these individuals to be familiar with the manifestations of the disease, the triggers for decompensation and management of an acute episode. PMID:26962256

  18. Autism spectrum disorder in a child with propionic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Al-Owain, M; Kaya, N; Al-Shamrani, H; Al-Bakheet, A; Qari, A; Al-Muaigl, S; Ghaziuddin, M

    2013-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a combination of reciprocal social deficits, communication impairment, and rigid ritualistic interests. While autism does not have an identifying cause in most of the cases, it is associated with known medical conditions in at least 10% of cases. Although uncommon, cases of autism have also been reported in association with metabolic disorders. In this brief report, we describe the occurrence of autism in a 7-year-old girl with propionic acidemia (PA), a common form of organic aciduria resulting from the deficiency of propionyl-CoA carboxylase and characterized by frequent and potentially lethal episodes of metabolic acidosis often accompanied by hyperammonemia. It is particularly common in countries with high rates of consanguinity. Early diagnosis of autism in patients with metabolic disorders is important since autistic features are sometimes the most disruptive of all the child's problems. This facilitates providing the needed behavioral services not otherwise available for children with metabolic disorders. PMID:23430497

  19. Anaesthetic considerations for liver transplantation in propionic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Rajakumar, Akila; Kaliamoorthy, Ilankumaran; Reddy, Mettu Srinivas; Rela, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is an autosomal recessive disorder of metabolism due to deficiency of the enzyme propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC) that converts propionyl-CoA to methylmalonyl-CoA with the help of the cofactor biotin inside the mitochondria. The resultant accumulation of propionyl-CoA causes severe hyperammonaemia and life-threatening metabolic acidosis. Based on the positive outcomes, liver transplantation is now recommended for individuals with recurrent episodes of hyperammonaemia or acidosis that is not adequately controlled with appropriate medical therapies. We report anaesthetic management of two children with PA for liver transplantation at our institution. It is essential for the anaesthesiologist, caring for these individuals to be familiar with the manifestations of the disease, the triggers for decompensation and management of an acute episode. PMID:26962256

  20. The rib1 Mutant Is Resistant to Indole-3-Butyric Acid, an Endogenous Auxin in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Poupart, Julie; Waddell, Candace S.

    2000-01-01

    The presence of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) as an endogenous auxin in Arabidopsis has been recently demonstrated. However, the in vivo role of IBA remains to be elucidated. We present the characterization of a semi-dominant mutant that is affected in its response to IBA, but shows a wild-type response to indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), the predominant and most studied form of auxin. We have named this mutant rib1 for resistant to IBA. Root elongation assays show that rib1 is specifically resistant to IBA, to the synthetic auxin 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and to auxin transport inhibitors. rib1 does not display increased resistance to IAA, to the synthetic auxin naphthalene acetic acid, or to other classes of plant hormones. rib1 individuals also have other root specific phenotypes including a shortened primary root, an increased number of lateral roots, and a more variable response than wild type to a change in gravitational vector. Adult rib1 plants are morphologically indistinguishable from wild-type plants. These phenotypes suggest that rib1 alters IBA activity in the root, thereby affecting root development and response to environmental stimuli. We propose models in which RIB1 has a function in either IBA transport or response. Our experiments also suggest that IBA does not use the same mechanism to exit cells as does IAA and we propose a model for IBA transport. PMID:11115890

  1. N-carbamylglutamate for neonatal hyperammonaemia in propionic acidaemia.

    PubMed

    Jones, S; Reed, C A B; Vijay, S; Walter, J H; Morris, A A M

    2008-12-01

    Hyperammonaemia is common in neonates with branched-chain organic acidaemias, primarily due to the inhibition of N-acetylglutamate (NAG) synthetase; NAG is an activator for carbamylphosphate synthetase I, the first enzyme of the urea cycle. N-Carbamylglutamate, a NAG analogue, has been reported to correct hyperammonaemia in neonates with organic acidaemias. It is, however, uncertain how the ammonia concentrations in these neonates would have progressed without the drug. We report a neonate with propionic acidaemia, whose plasma ammonia concentration responded dramatically to N-carbamylglutamate, having previously been over 950 μmol/L for 33 h. Our patient presented with poor feeding, hypoglycaemia, acidosis and hyperammonaemia (1044 μmol/L at 65 h of age). The patient was treated with intravenous glucose (12 mg/kg per min), insulin, sodium benzoate, sodium phenylbutyrate, carnitine and continuous veno-venous haemofiltration (CVVH). In spite of these measures, the plasma ammonia concentration remained above 950 μmol/L. After 30 h of CVVH, N-carbamylglutamate (250 mg/kg) was given through a nasogastric tube. Over the following 4 h, the plasma ammonia fell from 1410 μmol/L to 267 μmol/L. Despite stopping CVVH, the ammonia level dropped to 137 μmol/L over the next 2 h and it continued to fall while the intravenous drug doses were reduced. The patient was readmitted, aged 4 weeks, with hyperammonaemia (347 μmol/L) and again this responded to N-carbamylglutamate. In contrast, we report a previous patient with propionic acidaemia who showed no response to a lower dose of N-carbamylglutamate (25 mg/kg). PMID:18338235

  2. Competition between acetate and oleate for the formation of malonyl-CoA and mitochondrial acetyl-CoA in the perfused rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Fang; Kasumov, Takhar; Jobbins, Kathryn A.; Minkler, Paul E.; Anderson, Vernon E.; Kerner, Janos; Hoppel, Charles L.; Brunengraber, Henri

    2007-01-01

    We previously showed that in the perfused rat heart, the capacity of n-fatty acids to generate mitochondrial acetyl-CoA decreases as their chain length increases. In the present study, we investigated whether the oxidation of a long-chain fatty acid, oleate, is inhibited by short-chain fatty acids, acetate or propionate (which do and do not generate mitochondrial acetyl-CoA, respectively). We perfused rat hearts with buffer containing 4 mM glucose, 0.2 mM pyruvate, 1 mM lactate, and various concentrations of either (i) [U-13C]acetate, (ii) [U-13C]acetate plus [1-13C]oleate, or (iii) unlabeled propionate plus [1-13C]oleate. Using mass isotopomer analysis, we determined the contributions of the labeled substrates to the acetyl moiety of citrate (a probe of mitochondrial acetyl-CoA) and to malonyl-CoA. We found that acetate, even at low concentration, markedly inhibits the oxidation of [1-13C]oleate in the heart, without change in malonyl-CoA concentration. We also found that propionate, at a concentration higher than 1 mM, decreases (i) the contribution of [1-13C]oleate to mitochondrial acetyl-CoA, and (ii) malonyl-CoA concentration. The inhibition by acetate or propionate of acetyl-CoA production from oleate probably results from a competition for mitochondrial CoA between the CoA-utilizing enzymes. PMID:17020764

  3. TRAPPING YELLOWJACKETS (HYMENOPTERA: VESPIDAE) WITH HEPTYL BUTYRATE EMITTED FROM CONTROLLED-RELEASE DISPENSERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numbers of workers of Vespula pensylvanica (Saussure) (western yellowjacket) and V. atropilosa (Sladen) trapped with heptyl butyrate in Washington increased with increased release of the attractant from vial dispensers, up to an estimated 2.3 milligrams heptyl butyrate per hour. Vespula germanica F...

  4. Butyrate enema therapy stimulates mucosal repair in experimental colitis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Butzner, J D; Parmar, R; Bell, C J; Dalal, V

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The short chain fatty acid (SCFA) butyrate provides energy for colonocytes, stimulates colonic fluid and electrolyte absorption and is recognised as an effective treatment for multiple types of colitis. AIM--To examine the impact of butyrate enema therapy on the clinical course, severity of inflammation, and SCFA stimulated Na+ absorption in a chronic experimental colitis. METHODS--Distal colitis was induced in rats with a trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS) enema. Five days after induction, rats were divided into groups to receive: no treatment, saline enemas, or 100 mM Na-butyrate enemas daily. On day 24, colonic damage score and tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were evaluated. Colon was mounted in Ussing chambers and Na+ transport and electrical activities were measured during a basal period and after stimulation with 25 mM butyrate. RESULTS--In the untreated and the saline enema treated TNBS groups, diarrhoea and extensive colonic damage were seen, associated with increased tissue MPO activities and absent butyrate stimulated Na+ absorption. In contrast, in the butyrate enema treated TNBS group, diarrhoea ceased, colonic damage score improved, and tissue MPO activity as well as butyrate stimulated Na+ absorption recovered to control values. CONCLUSION--Butyrate enema therapy stimulated colonic repair, as evidenced by clinical recovery, decreased inflammation, and restoration of SCFA stimulated electrolyte absorption. PMID:8707089

  5. Butyric acid from anaerobic fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates by Clostridium sp. strain RPT-4213

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel Clostridium sp. strain RPT-4213 was found producing butyrate under strict anaerobic conditions. This strain produced 9.47 g L-1 butyric acid from MRS media (0.48 g/g glucose). RPT-4213 was also used to ferment dilute acid pretreated hydrolysates including wheat straw (WSH), corn fiber (CFH...

  6. Effect of butyrate on immune response of a chicken macrophage cell line

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyric acid is a major short chain fatty acid (SCFA) produced in the gastrointestinal tract by anaerobic bacterial fermentation which has been demonstrated to have beneficial health effects in many species including poultry. To understand the immunomodulating effects of butyrate on chicken macropha...

  7. Butyric acid stimulates bovine neutrophil functions and potentiates the effect of platelet activating factor.

    PubMed

    Carretta, M D; Hidalgo, A I; Burgos, J; Opazo, L; Castro, L; Hidalgo, M A; Figueroa, C D; Taubert, A; Hermosilla, C; Burgos, R A

    2016-08-01

    Increased short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production is associated with subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) and activation of inflammatory processes. In humans and rodents, SCFAs modulate inflammatory responses in the gut via free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2). In bovines, butyric acid is one of the most potent FFA2 agonists. Its expression in bovine neutrophils has recently been demonstrated, suggesting a role in innate immune response in cattle. This study aimed to evaluate if butyric acid modulates oxidative and non-oxidative functions or if it can potentiate other inflammatory mediators in bovine neutrophils. Our results showed that butyric acid can activate bovine neutrophils, inducing calcium (Ca(2+)) influx and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, two second messengers involved in FFA2 activation. Ca(2+) influx induced by butyric acid was dependent on the extracellular and intracellular Ca(2+) source and phospholipase C (PLC) activation. Butyric acid alone had no significant effect on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and chemotaxis; however, a priming effect on platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent inflammatory mediator, was observed. Butyric acid increased CD63 expression and induced the release of neutrophil granule markers matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and lactoferrin. Finally, we observed that butyric acid induced neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation without affecting cellular viability. These findings suggest that butyric acid, a component of the ruminal fermentative process, can modulate the innate immune response of ruminants. PMID:27288853

  8. Bioinformatic dissecting of TP53 regulation pathway underlying butyrate-induced histone modification in epigenetic regulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate affects cell proliferation, differentiation and motility. Butyrate inhibits histone deacetylase (HDAC) activities and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. TP53 is one of the most active upstream regulators discovered by IPA in our RNA sequencing data set. The TP53 signaling pathway pl...

  9. FLOW CYTOMETRIC EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF SODIUM BUTYRATE ON APOPTOSIS OF BOVINE NEUTROPHILS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine blood neutrophils(PMN) from four clinically healthy cows were suspended in Dulbecco's minimal essential medium and incubated at 37C for 0, 2 or 6 hours in medium alone, with 100ng/ml bacterial endotoxin, 160nM sodium butyrate, 16uM actinomycin D, mixture of sodium butyrate and bacterial endot...

  10. Conversion of N-butyrate to N-butanol with Continuous Fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of our study is to optimize n-butanol production from n-butyrate, using pure cultures of solventogenic Clostridia. In addition to butyrate as a substrate, glucose was used as a source of energy and to provide reducing equivalents to facilitate the conversion. To prevent product inhibition...

  11. Butyric acid from anaerobic fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates by Clostridium tyrobutyricum strain RPT-4213

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newly isolated Clostridium sp. strain RPT-4213 was found to produce butyrate under anaerobic conditions. Fermentations using Lactobacilli MRS Broth produced 9.47 g L-1 butyric acid from glucose (0.48 g/g glucose). However, the strain was not capable of utilizing five carbon sugars. To assess the a...

  12. Transcriptomic sequencing reveals a set of unique genes activated by butyrate-induced histone modification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes induced by butyrate in the bovine epithelial cell using deep RNA-sequencing technology (RNA-seq), a set of unique gen...

  13. Effect of Sodium Butyrate on Growth Performance and Response to Lipopolysaccharide in Weanling Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of dietary sodium butyrate on growth performance and response to E. coli. lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in weanling pigs. In the first 28 d experiment, 180 pigs (initial BW 6.3 kg) were fed 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4% sodium butyrate, or 110 mg/kg d...

  14. Isolation and characterization of bacterium producing lipid from short-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Yoshiko; Nakai, Shota; Ohkawachi, Masahiko; Suemitsu, Masahiro; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Aki, Tsunehiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Matsumoto, Mitsufumi

    2016-02-01

    Anaerobic fermentation generates propionic acid, which inhibits microbial growth and accumulates in wastewater containing increased amounts of organic matter. We therefore isolated a propionic acid-assimilating bacterium that could produce triacylglycerol, for use in wastewater treatment. Nitratireductor sp. strain OM-1 can proliferate in medium containing propionic, acetic, butyric, and valeric acids as well as glycerol, and produces triacylglycerol when both propionic and acetic acids or glycerol are present. In composite model wastewater containing acetic acid, propionic acid and glycerol, this strain shows an even higher conversion rate, suggesting that it is suitable for wastewater treatment. Further, nitrogen depletion in medium containing an acetic-propionic acid mixture resulted in the production of the light oil 2-butenoic acid 1-methylethyl ester, but not triacylglycerol. Collectively, our data indicate that strain OM-1 has the potential to reduce accumulation of activated sludge in wastewater treatment and may contribute to the production of biodiesel. PMID:26649900

  15. Effect of different concentrations of acetic, citric, and propionic acid dipping solutions on bacterial contamination of raw chicken skin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial contamination of raw, processed poultry may include spoilage bacteria and foodborne pathogens. We evaluated different combinations of organic acid (OA) wash solutions for their ability to reduce bacterial contamination of raw chicken skin and to inhibit growth of spoilage bacteria and path...

  16. Effect of fluticasone propionate on neutrophil chemotaxis, superoxide generation, and extracellular proteolytic activity in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Llewellyn-Jones, C. G.; Hill, S. L.; Stockley, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Corticosteroids are widely used in the treatment of many inflammatory conditions but the exact mode of action on neutrophil function is uncertain. Fluticasone propionate is a new topically active synthetic steroid which can be measured in body fluids and which undergoes first pass metabolism. METHODS--The effects of fluticasone propionate on the function of neutrophils isolated from normal, healthy control subjects and on the chemotactic activity of sputum sol phase were assessed. RESULTS--Preincubation of neutrophils with fluticasone propionate reduced the chemotactic response to 10(-8) mol/l F-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP) and to a 1:5 dilution of sputum sol phase in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, when fluticasone propionate was added to sputum from eight patients with stable chronic obstructive bronchitis the chemotactic activity of a 1:5 dilution of the sol phase fell from a mean (SE) value of 22.2 (1.21) cells/field to 19.6 (0.89), 17.1 (0.74), and 11.9 (0.6) cells field at 1 mumol/l, 10 mumol/l, and 100 mumol/l, respectively. In further experiments fluticasone propionate preincubated with neutrophils inhibited fibronectin degradation by resting cells and by cells stimulated by FMLP (15.2% inhibition of resting cells, 5.1% inhibition of stimulated cells with 1 mumol/l fluticasone propionate, 24% and 18.7% inhibition respectively at 100 mumol/l fluticasone propionate. Fluticasone propionate had no effect on generation of superoxide anion by resting or stimulated cells. CONCLUSIONS--These results indicate that fluticasone propionate has a direct suppressive effect on several aspects of neutrophil function and may suggest a role for this agent in the modulation of neutrophil mediated damage to connective tissue. PMID:8202875

  17. Impact of volatile fatty acids on microbial electrolysis cell performance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nan; Hafez, Hisham; Nakhla, George

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the performance of microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) fed with three common fermentation products: acetate, butyrate, and propionate. Each substrate was fed to the reactor for three consecutive-batch cycles. The results showed high current densities for acetate, but low current densities for butyrate and propionate (maximum values were 6.0 ± 0.28, 2.5 ± 0.06, 1.6 ± 0.14 A/m(2), respectively). Acetate also showed a higher coulombic efficiency of 87 ± 5.7% compared to 72 ± 2.0 and 51 ± 6.4% for butyrate and propionate, respectively. This paper also revealed that acetate could be easily oxidized by anode respiring bacteria in MEC, while butyrate and propionate could not be oxidized to the same degree. The utilization rate of the substrates in MEC followed the order: acetate > butyrate > propionate. The ratio of suspended biomass to attached biomass was approximately 1:4 for all the three substrates. PMID:26159302

  18. Vimentin, colon cancer progression and resistance to butyrate and other HDACis.

    PubMed

    Lazarova, Darina L; Bordonaro, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Dietary fibre protects against colorectal cancer (CRC) most likely through the activity of its fermentation product, butyrate. Butyrate functions as a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) that hyperactivates Wnt signalling and induces apoptosis of CRC cells. However, individuals who consume a high-fibre diet may still develop CRC; therefore, butyrate resistance may develop over time. Furthermore, CRC cells that are resistant to butyrate are cross-resistant to clinically relevant therapeutic HDACis, suggesting that the development of butyrate resistance in vivo can result in HDACi-resistant CRCs. Butyrate/HDACi-resistant CRC cells differ from their butyrate/HDACi-sensitive counterparts in the expression of many genes, including the gene encoding vimentin (VIM) that is usually expressed in normal mesenchymal cells and is involved in cancer metastasis. Interestingly, vimentin is overexpressed in butyrate/HDACi-resistant CRC cells although Wnt signalling is suppressed in such cells and that VIM is a Wnt activity-targeted gene. The expression of vimentin in colonic neoplastic cells could be correlated with the stage of neoplastic progression. For example, comparative analyses of LT97 microadenoma cells and SW620 colon carcinoma cells revealed that although vimentin is not detectable in LT97 cells, it is highly expressed in SW620 cells. Based upon these observations, we propose that the differential expression of vimentin contributes to the phenotypic differences between butyrate-resistant and butyrate-sensitive CRC cells, as well as to the differences between early-stage and metastatic colorectal neoplastic cells. We discuss the hypothesis that vimentin is a key factor integrating epithelial to mesenchymal transition, colonic neoplastic progression and resistance to HDACis. PMID:27072512

  19. Butyrate regulates the expression of inflammatory and chemotactic cytokines in human acute leukemic cells during apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Pulliam, Stephanie R; Pellom, Samuel T; Shanker, Anil; Adunyah, Samuel E

    2016-08-01

    Butyrate is a histone deacetylase inhibitor implicated in many studies as a potential therapy for various forms of cancer. High concentrations of butyrate (>1.5mM) have been shown to activate apoptosis in several cancer cell lines including prostate, breast, and leukemia. Butyrate is also known to influence multiple signaling pathways that are mediators of cytokine production. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of high concentrations of butyrate on the cancer microenvironment vis-à-vis apoptosis, cellular migration, and capacity to modulate cytokine expression in cancer cells. The results indicate that high concentrations of butyrate induced a 2-fold activation of caspase-3 and reduced cell viability by 60% in U937 leukemia cells. Within 24h, butyrate significantly decreased the levels of chemokines CCL2 and CCL5 in HL-60 and U937 cells, and decreased CCL5 in THP-1 leukemia cells. Differential effects were observed in treatments with valproic acid for CCL2 and CCL5 indicating butyrate-specificity. Many of the biological effects examined in this study are linked to activation of the AKT and MAPK signaling pathways; therefore, we investigated whether butyrate alters the levels of phosphorylated forms of these signaling proteins and how it correlated with the expression of chemokines. The results show that butyrate may partially regulate CCL5 production via p38 MAPK. The decrease in p-ERK1/2 and p-AKT levels correlated with the decrease in CCL2 production. These data suggest that while promoting apoptosis, butyrate has the potential to influence the cancer microenvironment by inducing differential expression of cytokines. PMID:27253488

  20. SKW 6.4 cell differentiation induced by interleukin 6 is stimulated by butyrate.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, T; Gohda, E; Iji, H; Fujiwara, M; Yamamoto, I

    1998-08-01

    We investigated if sodium butyrate (NaBu), an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, and its analogs modulate cytokine-induced differentiation of the human B cell line SKW 6.4 transformed by the Epstein-Barr virus. NaBu markedly enhanced interleukin (IL)-6-induced IgM production with an accompanying increase in the level of histone H4 acetylation and augmented IgM production induced by IL-4 and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. From both the enhancing effect of cell differentiation and the effect of inducing histone hyperacetylation in SKW 6.4 cells, other histone deacetylase inhibitors and NaBu analogs were divided into three groups: those that increased both IL-6-induced antibody production and histone acetylation, those that caused histone hyperacetylation, but failed to induce the differentiation, and those that were ineffective at inducing either activity. No agent that enhanced IgM production without inducing histone hyperacetylation was found among the inhibitors and analogs we tested. These results suggest that the increase in the histone acetylation is necessary, but it is insufficient to augment differentiation of SKW 6.4 cells. Thus another activity of NaBu in addition to the inhibition of histone deacetylase may be involved in promoting IL-6-induced differentiation. Our results also suggest that fatty acids that have a straight chain of four carbon atoms or are branched with four and five carbon atoms, which contain no hydrophilic substituents, or those with similar structures, show this other activity. PMID:9826026

  1. Butyrate plays differential roles in cellular signaling in cancerous HCT116 and noncancerous NCM460 colon cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, exhibits chemoprevention effects in colon. However, the mechanistic action of butyrate at the cellular level remains to be determined. We hypothesize that butyrate plays differential roles in cancerous and non-cancerous cells through si...

  2. In vitro dissolution and in vivo absorption of calcium [1-14C]butyrate in free or protected forms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate is a by-product of microbial carbohydrate fermentation that occurs primarily in the large intestine. When added to feed, butyrate quickly disappears in the upper digestive tract. Because butyrate is important for the epithelial cell development and for mucosal integrity, and for animal grow...

  3. Chromium propionate in broilers: effect on insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Brooks, M A; Grimes, J L; Lloyd, K E; Krafka, K; Lamptey, A; Spears, J W

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of dietary chromium (Cr), as chromium propionate, on measures of insulin sensitivity. Liver and muscle glycogen, and plasma glucose and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations were used as indicators of insulin sensitivity. In total, 288 newly hatched male Ross broilers were divided into 4 dietary treatments consisting of 0 (control diet analyzed 0.43 to 0.45 mg Cr/kg), 0.2, 0.4, or 0.6 mg supplemental Cr/kg diet, resulting in 4 treatments with 9 replicate pens per treatment containing eight birds per pen. At d 21, 2 birds per cage were removed based on the greatest deviation from pen mean BW, resulting in each pen containing 6 birds for the final analyses. Final BW were taken on d 40, and on d 42 two birds from each pen were sampled for plasma NEFA, glucose, and muscle and liver glycogen determination at the initiation and termination of a 22 h fast. The remaining 2 fasted birds were sampled after a 30 min refeeding period. No differences were observed in feed intake, BW gain, or feed efficiency on d 21 or d 40. Liver glycogen tended (P=0.10) to be greater in Cr-supplemented chicks in the fed state, and muscle glycogen concentrations tended (P=0.07) to be greater in Cr-supplemented chicks compared with controls following fasting and refeeding. Plasma glucose concentrations were not affected by dietary Cr in the fed, fasted, or refed state. Plasma NEFA levels were not affected by treatment in fed or fasted birds. However, plasma NEFA concentrations were lower (P<0.01) in chicks supplemented with Cr than in controls following fasting and refeeding, suggesting that Cr increased insulin sensitivity. No differences were detected among birds supplemented with 0.2 or 0.4 mg Cr/kg, and among those receiving 0.4 or 0.6 mg Cr/kg. Results of this study indicate that Cr propionate supplementation of a control diet containing 0.43 to 0.45 mg Cr/kg enhanced insulin sensitivity. PMID:26933236

  4. [Nomegestrol acetate: clinical pharmacology].

    PubMed

    Lello, S

    2009-10-01

    Progestogens are used in clinical practice in some conditions. Their effects depend on their chemical structure, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, with important differences among various progestogens. Generally, progestins are classified according to their parent molecule, of which often they keep some features. Derivatives of 19-nor-progesterone are characterized by high selectivity of action on progestin receptor. In particular, nomegestrol acetate (NomAc) shows an important progestational potency, neutral gluco-lipid profile, and antigonadotropic activity. It is used for treating menstrual cycle disorders and for hormone replacement therapy in menopause in association with an estrogen. In future, thanks to its antigonadotropic activity, NomAc will be used in estroprogestin combinations in fertile women, thus taking advantage of its tolerability profile and obtaining numerous non-contraceptive benefits as well. PMID:19749678

  5. Complete Oxidation of Propionate, Valerate, Succinate, and Other Organic Compounds by Newly Isolated Types of Marine, Anaerobic, Mesophilic, Gram-Negative, Sulfur-Reducing Eubacteria

    PubMed Central

    Finster, Kai; Bak, Friedhelm

    1993-01-01

    Anaerobic enrichment cultures with either propionate, succinate, lactate, or valerate and elemental sulfur and inocula from shallow marine or deep-sea sediments were dominated by rod-shaped motile bacteria after three transfers. By application of deep-agar dilutions, five eubacterial strains were obtained in pure culture and designated Kyprop, Gyprop, Kysw2, Gylac, and Kyval. All strains were gram negative and grew by complete oxidation of the electron donors and concomitant stoichiometric reduction of elemental sulfur to hydrogen sulfide. The isolates used acetate, propionate, succinate, lactate, pyruvate, oxaloacetate, maleate, glutamate, alanine, aspartate, and yeast extract. All isolates, except strain Gylac, used citrate as an electron donor but valerate was oxidized only by strain Kyval. Fumarate and malate were degraded by all strains without an additional electron donor or acceptor. Kyprop, Gyprop, and Gylac utilized elemental sulfur as the sole inorganic electron acceptor, while Kysw2 and Kyval also utilized nitrate, dimethyl sulfoxide, or Fe(III)-citrate as an electron acceptor. Images PMID:16348934

  6. The role of propionates in substrate binding to heme oxygenase from Neisseria meningitidis; A NMR study†

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Dungeng; Ma, Li-Hua; Smith, Kevin M.; Zhang, Xuhong; Sato, Michihiko; La Mar, Gerd N.

    2012-01-01

    Heme oxygenase, HO, cleaves hemin into biliverdin, iron and CO. For mammalian HOs, both native hemin propionates are required for substrate binding and activity. The HO from the pathogenic bacterium Neisseria meningitidis, NmHO, possesses a crystallographically undetected C-terminal fragment that by solution 1H NMR is found to fold and interact with the active site. One of the substrate propionates has been proposed to form a salt bridge to the C-terminus rather than to the conventional buried cationic side chain in other HOs. Moreover, the C-terminal dipeptide Arg208His209 cleaves spontaneously over ~24 hours at a rate dependent on substituent size. 2D 1H NMR of NmHO azide complexes with hemins with selectively deleted or rearranged propionates all bind to NmHO with a structurally conserved active site as reflected in optical spectra and NMR NOESY cross peak and hyperfine shift patterns. In contrast to mammalian HOs, NmHO requires only a single propionate interacting with the buried terminus of Lys16 to exhibit full activity and tolerates the existence of a propionate at the exposed 8-position. The structure of the C-terminus is qualitatively retained upon deletion of the 7-propionate but a dramatic change in the 7-propionate carboxylate 13C chemical shift upon C-terminal cleavage confirms its role in the interaction with the C-terminus. The stronger hydrophobic contacts between pyrroles A and B with NmHO contribute more substantially to the substrate binding free energy than in mammalian HOs, “liberating” one propionate to stabilize the C-terminus. The functional implications of the C-terminus in product release are discussed. PMID:22913621

  7. Butyrate upregulates endogenous host defense peptides to enhance disease resistance in piglets via histone deacetylase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Haitao; Guo, Bingxiu; Gan, Zhenshun; Song, Deguang; Lu, Zeqing; Yi, Hongbo; Wu, Yueming; Wang, Yizhen; Du, Huahua

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate has been used to treat different inflammatory disease with positive outcomes, the mechanisms by which butyrate exerts its anti-inflammatory effects remain largely undefined. Here we proposed a new mechanism that butyrate manipulate endogenous host defense peptides (HDPs) which contributes to the elimination of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and thus affects the alleviation of inflammation. An experiment in piglets treated with butyrate (0.2% of diets) 2 days before E. coli O157:H7 challenge was designed to investigate porcine HDP expression, inflammation and E. coli O157:H7 load in feces. The mechanisms underlying butyrate-induced HDP gene expression and the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of macrophage 3D4/2 cells in vitro were examined. Butyrate treatment (i) alleviated the clinical symptoms of E. coli O157:H7-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and the severity of intestinal inflammation; (ii) reduced the E. coli O157:H7 load in feces; (iii) significantly upregulated multiple, but not all, HDPs in vitro and in vivo via histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition; and (iv) enhanced the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of 3D4/2 cells. Our findings indicate that butyrate enhances disease resistance, promotes the clearance of E. coli O157:H7, and alleviates the clinical symptoms of HUS and inflammation, partially, by affecting HDP expression via HDAC inhibition. PMID:27230284

  8. Butyrate upregulates endogenous host defense peptides to enhance disease resistance in piglets via histone deacetylase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Haitao; Guo, Bingxiu; Gan, Zhenshun; Song, Deguang; Lu, Zeqing; Yi, Hongbo; Wu, Yueming; Wang, Yizhen; Du, Huahua

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate has been used to treat different inflammatory disease with positive outcomes, the mechanisms by which butyrate exerts its anti-inflammatory effects remain largely undefined. Here we proposed a new mechanism that butyrate manipulate endogenous host defense peptides (HDPs) which contributes to the elimination of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and thus affects the alleviation of inflammation. An experiment in piglets treated with butyrate (0.2% of diets) 2 days before E. coli O157:H7 challenge was designed to investigate porcine HDP expression, inflammation and E. coli O157:H7 load in feces. The mechanisms underlying butyrate-induced HDP gene expression and the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of macrophage 3D4/2 cells in vitro were examined. Butyrate treatment (i) alleviated the clinical symptoms of E. coli O157:H7-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and the severity of intestinal inflammation; (ii) reduced the E. coli O157:H7 load in feces; (iii) significantly upregulated multiple, but not all, HDPs in vitro and in vivo via histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition; and (iv) enhanced the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of 3D4/2 cells. Our findings indicate that butyrate enhances disease resistance, promotes the clearance of E. coli O157:H7, and alleviates the clinical symptoms of HUS and inflammation, partially, by affecting HDP expression via HDAC inhibition. PMID:27230284

  9. Genotype-dependency of butyrate efficacy in children with congenital chloride diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital chloride diarrhea (CLD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by life-long, severe diarrhea with intestinal Cl- malabsorption. It results from a reduced activity of the down regulated in adenoma exchanger (DRA), due to mutations in the solute carrier family 26, member 3 (SLC26A3) gene. Currently available therapies are not able to limit the severity of diarrhea in CLD. Conflicting results have been reported on the therapeutic efficacy of oral butyrate. Methods We investigated the effect of oral butyrate (100 mg/kg/day) in seven CLD children with different SLC26A3 genotypes. Nasal epithelial cells were obtained to assess the effect of butyrate on the expression of the two main Cl- transporters: DRA and putative anion transporter-1 (PAT-1). Results A variable clinical response to butyrate was observed regarding the stool pattern and fecal ion loss. The best response was observed in subjects with missense and deletion mutations. Variable response to butyrate was also observed on SLC26A3 (DRA) and SLC26A6 (PAT1) gene expression in nasal epithelial cells of CLD patients. Conclusions We demonstrate a genotype-dependency for butyrate therapeutic efficacy in CLD. The effect of butyrate is related in part on a different modulation of the expression of the two main apical membrane Cl- exchangers of epithelial cells, members of the SLC26 anion family. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical trial Registry ACTRN12613000450718. PMID:24350656

  10. Butyrate protects rat liver against total hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury with bowel congestion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Qian, Jianmin; Wang, Qingbao; Wang, Fangrui; Ma, Zhenyu; Qiao, Yingli

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is an unavoidable consequence of major liver surgery, especially in liver transplantation with bowel congestion, during which endotoxemia is often evident. The inflammatory response aggravated by endotoxin after I/R contributes to liver dysfunction and failure. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of butyrate, a naturally occurring four-carbon fatty acid in the body and a dietary component of foods such as cheese and butter, on hepatic injury complicated by enterogenous endotoxin, as well as to examine the underlying mechanisms involved. SD rats were subjected to a total hepatic ischemia for 30 min after pretreatment with either vehicle or butyrate, followed by 6 h and 24 h of reperfusion. Butyrate preconditioning markedly improved hepatic function and histology, as indicated by reduced transaminase levels and ameliorated tissue pathological changes. The inflammatory factors levels, macrophages activation, TLR4 expression, and neutrophil infiltration in live were attenuated by butyrate. Butyrate also maintained the intestinal barrier structures, reversed the aberrant expression of ZO-1, and decreased the endotoxin translocation. We conclude that butyrate inhibition of endotoxin translocation, macrophages activation, inflammatory factors production, and neutrophil infiltration is involved in the alleviation of total hepatic I/R liver injury in rats. This suggests that butyrate should potentially be utilized in liver transplantation. PMID:25171217

  11. Destructive effects of butyrate on the cell envelope of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Hideo; Osaki, Takako; Hanawa, Tomoko; Kurata, Satoshi; Zaman, Cynthia; Woo, Timothy Derk Hoong; Takahashi, Motomichi; Matsubara, Sachie; Kawakami, Hayato; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2012-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori can be found in the oral cavity and is mostly detected by the use of PCR techniques. Growth of H. pylori is influenced by various factors in the mouth, such as the oral microflora, saliva and other antimicrobial substances, all of which make colonization of the oral cavity by H. pylori difficult. In the present study, we analysed the effect of the cell supernatant of a representative periodontal bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis on H. pylori and found that the cell supernatant destroyed the H. pylori cell envelope. As P. gingivalis produces butyric acid, we focused our research on the effects of butyrate and found that it significantly inhibited the growth of H. pylori. H. pylori cytoplasmic proteins and DNA were detected in the extracellular environment after treatment with butyrate, suggesting that the integrity of the cell envelope was compromised and indicating that butyrate has a bactericidal effect on H. pylori. In addition, levels of extracellular H. pylori DNA increased following treatment with the cell supernatant of butyric acid-producing bacteria, indicating that the cell supernatant also has a bactericidal effect and that this may be due to its butyric acid content. In conclusion, butyric acid-producing bacteria may play a role in affecting H. pylori colonization of the oral cavity. PMID:22194341

  12. In vivo measurement of colonic butyrate metabolism in patients with quiescent ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, E; Chapman, M; Dawson, J; Berry, D; Macdonald, I; Cole, A

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Butyrate, a short chain fatty acid produced by bacterial fermentation, is a major fuel source for the colonocyte. In vitro work has shown that ulcerative colitis may be characterised by a metabolic defect in colonocyte butyrate oxidation.
AIMS—To investigate the rate of metabolism of rectally administered butyrate in patients with quiescent colitis.
METHODS—[1-13C]-butyrate enemas were administered to 11 patients with long standing quiescent ulcerative colitis and to 10 control patients. The rate of production of 13CO2 in exhaled breath over four hours was measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry combined with indirect calorimetry in order to measure CO2 production. This allowed calculation of the patients' resting energy expenditure and respiratory quotient.
RESULTS—Over a four hour period, 325 (SEM 21) µmol 13CO2 was recovered in breath samples from the colitis group compared with 322 (17) µmol from the control group (NS). The respiratory quotient of the colitic group was significantly lower than that of the control group.
CONCLUSION—There was no difference in the rate of metabolism of butyrate between the two groups. It is unlikely that there is a primary metabolic defect of butyrate metabolism in patients with quiescent ulcerative colitis.


Keywords: ulcerative colitis; in vivo butyrate metabolism PMID:10601058

  13. Butyrate enemas upregulate Muc genes expression but decrease adherent mucus thickness in mice colon.

    PubMed

    Gaudier, E; Rival, M; Buisine, M-P; Robineau, I; Hoebler, C

    2009-01-01

    Colonic mucosal protection is provided by the mucus gel, mainly composed of mucins. Several factors can modulate the formation and the secretion of mucins, and among them butyrate, an end-product of carbohydrate fermentation. However, the specific effect of butyrate on the various colonic mucins, and the consequences in terms of the mucus layer thickness are not known. Our aim was to determine whether butyrate modulates colonic MUC genes expression in vivo and whether this results in changes in mucus synthesis and mucus layer thickness. Mice received daily for 7 days rectal enemas of butyrate (100 mM) versus saline. We demonstrated that butyrate stimulated the gene expression of both secreted (Muc2) and membrane-linked (Muc1, Muc3, Muc4) mucins. Butyrate especially induced a 6-fold increase in Muc2 gene expression in proximal colon. However, butyrate enemas did not modify the number of epithelial cells containing the protein Muc2, and caused a 2-fold decrease in the thickness of adherent mucus layer. Further studies should help understanding whether this last phenomenon, i.e. the decrease in adherent mucus gel thickness, results in a diminished protective function or not. PMID:18198997

  14. Amino acid metabolism in patients with propionic acidaemia.

    PubMed

    Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Zschocke, Johannes; Karall, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Propionic acidaemia (PA) is an inborn error of intermediary metabolism caused by deficiency of propionyl-CoA carboxylase. The metabolic block leads to a profound failure of central metabolic pathways, including the urea and the citric acid cycles. This review will focus on changes in amino acid metabolism in this inborn disorder of metabolism. The first noted disturbance of amino acid metabolism was hyperglycinaemia, which is detectable in nearly all PA patients. Additionally, hyperlysinaemia is a common observation. In contrast, concentrations of branched chain amino acids, especially of isoleucine, are frequently reported as decreased. These non-proportional changes of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) compared with aromatic amino acids are also reflected by the Fischer's ratio (concentration ratio of BCAAs to aromatic amino acids), which is decreased in PA patients. As restricted dietary intake of valine and isoleucine as precursors of propionyl-CoA is part of the standard treatment in PA, decreased plasma concentrations of BCAAs may be a side effect of treatment. The concentration changes of the nitrogen scavenger glutamine have to be interpreted in the light of ammonia levels. In contrast to other hyperammonaemic syndromes, in PA plasma glutamine concentrations do not increase in hyperammonaemia, whereas CSF glutamine concentrations are elevated. Despite lactic acidaemia in PA patients, hyperalaninaemia is only rarely reported. The mechanisms underlying the observed changes in amino acid metabolism have not yet been elucidated, but most of the changes can be at least partly interpreted as consequence of disturbance of anaplerosis. PMID:21113738

  15. Antioxidants successfully reduce ROS production in propionic acidemia fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Villar, Lorena; Pérez, Belén; Ugarte, Magdalena; Desviat, Lourdes R; Richard, Eva

    2014-09-26

    Propionic acidemia (PA), caused by a deficiency of the mitochondrial biotin dependent enzyme propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC) is one of the most frequent organic acidurias in humans. Most PA patients present in the neonatal period with metabolic acidosis and hyperammonemia, developing different neurological symptoms, movement disorders and cardiac complications. There is strong evidence indicating that oxidative damage could be a pathogenic factor in neurodegenerative, mitochondrial and metabolic diseases. Recently, we identified an increase in ROS levels in PA patients-derived fibroblasts. Here, we analyze the capability of seven antioxidants to scavenge ROS production in PA patients' cells. Tiron, trolox, resveratrol and MitoQ significantly reduced ROS content in patients and controls' fibroblasts. In addition, changes in the expression of two antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, were observed in PA patients-derived fibroblasts after tiron and resveratrol treatment. Our results in PA cellular models establish the proof of concept of the potential of antioxidants as an adjuvant therapy for PA and pave the way for future assessment of antioxidant strategies in the murine model of PA. PMID:25159844

  16. Impact of Propionic Acid on Liver Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Al- Daihan, Sooad; Shafi Bhat, Ramesa

    2015-01-01

    Propionic acid (PA) is a short chain fatty acid, a common food preservative and metabolic end product of enteric bacteria in the gut. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of PA on liver injury in male rats. Male western albino rats were divided into two groups. The first group served as normal control, the second was treated with PA. The activities of serum hepatospecific markers such as aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, and alkaline phosphatase were estimated. Antioxidant status in liver tissues was estimated by determining the level of lipid peroxidation and activities of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. Sodium and potassium levels were also measured in liver tissue. PA treatment caused significant changes in all hepatospecific markers. Biochemical analysis of liver homogenates from PA-treated rats showed an increase in oxidative stress markers like lipid peroxidation and lactate dehydrogenase, coupled with a decrease in glutathione, vitamin C and glutathione S- transferase. However, PA exposure caused no change in sodium and potassium levels in liver tissue. Our study demonstrated that PA persuade hepatic damage in rats. PMID:26629488

  17. Effect of salinity on methanogenic propionate degradation by acclimated marine sediment-derived culture.

    PubMed

    Miura, Toyokazu; Kita, Akihisa; Okamura, Yoshiko; Aki, Tsunehiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2015-12-01

    Degradation of propionate under high salinity is needed for biomethane production from salt-containing feedstocks. In this study, marine sediment-derived culture was evaluated to determine the effect of salinity on methanogenic propionate degradation. Microbes in marine sediments were subjected to fed-batch cultivation on propionate for developing acclimatized cultures. The rate of propionate degradation increased eightfold during 10 rounds of cultivation. Microbial community composition was determined through pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons after 10 rounds of cultivation. Taxa analysis was conducted for the reads obtained by pyrosequencing. Known propionate degraders were undetectable in the acclimated culture. Comparison of bacterial taxa in the original sediment with those in the acclimated culture revealed that the populations of four bacterial taxa were significantly increased during acclimation. Methanolobus was the predominant archaea genus in the acclimated culture. The propionate degradation rate of the acclimated culture was not affected by salinity of up to equivalent of 1.9 % NaCl. The rate decreased at higher salinity levels and was more than 50 % of the maximum rate even at equivalent of 4.3 % NaCl. PMID:26364311

  18. Responses of Blood Glucose, Insulin, Glucagon, and Fatty Acids to Intraruminal Infusion of Propionate in Hanwoo

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Y. K.; Eun, J. S.; Lee, S. C.; Chu, G. M.; Lee, Sung S.; Moon, Y. H.

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the effects of intraruminal infusion of propionate on ruminal fermentation characteristics and blood hormones and metabolites in Hanwoo (Korean cattle) steers. Four Hanwoo steers (average body wt. 270 kg, 13 month of age) equipped with rumen cannula were infused into rumens with 0.0 M (Water, C), 0.5 M (37 g/L, T1), 1.0 M (74 g/L, T2) and 1.5 M (111 g/L, T3) of propionate for 1 hour per day and allotted by 4×4 Latin square design. On the 5th day of infusion, samples of rumen and blood were collected at 0, 60, 120, 180, and 300 min after intraruminal infusion of propionate. The concentrations of serum glucose and plasma glucagon were not affected (p>0.05) by intraruminal infusion of propionate. The serum insulin concentration at 60 min after infusion was significantly (p<0.05) higher in T3 than in C, while the concentration of non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) at 60 and 180 min after infusion was significantly (p<0.05) lower in the propionate treatments than in C. Hence, intraruminal infusion of propionate stimulates the secretion of insulin, and decreases serum NEFA concentration rather than the change of serum glucose concentration. PMID:25557815

  19. Fe° enhanced acetification of propionate and granulation of sludge in acidogenic reactor.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Yaobin; Meng, Xusheng; Yu, Zhonghan; Quan, Xie

    2015-07-01

    Acidogenic reactors commonly operated at short hydraulic retention times (HRT) are liable to cause low chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal and acidogenic efficiency especially under fluctuating feed. Granular sludge as an efficient form for anaerobic microbial community to resist shocks in methanogenic reactors has been widely investigated, which however was less focused in acidogenic reactors. Adding Fe(0) in an acidogenic reactor with propionate as the substrate operated at HRT of 2 h was found to enhance the propionate decomposition and sludge granulation in this study. When increasing the organic load and decreasing pH in the feed, the propionate conversion and COD removal in the reactor with Fe(0) were higher than those in the control reactor. The sludge granulation was well developed in this reactor. Fe(0) advanced the growth of homoacetogenic bacteria that consumed the hydrogen produced in acetification of propionate. The propionate-oxidizing bacteria and homoacetogenic bacteria grew together in the sludge to accelerate hydrogen transfer, which was an important reason for the enhanced propionate decomposition and sludge granulation in the acidogenesis. PMID:25728443

  20. Short-chain fatty acids and colon cancer cells: the vitamin D receptor--butyrate connection.

    PubMed

    Gaschott, Tanja; Stein, Jürgen

    2003-01-01

    Butyrate and its prodrug tributyrin, as well as 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3), have important physiological effects on proliferation and differentiation in a variety of malignant cells. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in butyrate-induced cell differentiation and cell cycle arrest in Caco-2 cells, a human colon cancer cell line. Cell differentiation was evaluated by analyzing the activity of alkaline phosphatase (AP). Protein of VDR, cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) and of cdk inhibitors was quantified by Western blot analysis, VDR-mRNA by PCR. Pre- and postconfluent cells were assessed for VDR binding activity. Cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. Tributyrin significantly increased VDR-mRNA level (250% vs. control) and VDR binding activity. Butyrate also enhanced VDR protein content in the nucleus in a time- and dose-dependent manner and more potently than other short-chain fatty acids of a related structure. Both butyrate (640% vs. control) and 1,25-(OH)2D3 (350% vs. control) significantly stimulated differentiation, whereas combined treatment with butyrate and 1,25-(OH)2D3 resulted in a synergistic amplification of AP activity (1400% vs. control). In the presence of the VDR antagonist ZK 191732, butyrate-induced differentiation was completely abolished (150% vs. control). While butyrate alone increased p21Waf1/Cip1 expression and down-regulated cdk 6 and cyclin A, and combined exposure with 1,25-(OH)2D3 resulted in a synergistic enhancement of butyrate-induced changes, expressions did not change from control level after treatment with butyrate and ZK 191732. G1 cell cycle arrest induced by butyrate was also abolished after combined treatment with butyrate and ZK 191732. In conclusion, differentiation and cell cycle arrest of Caco-2 cells induced by butyrate are mediated by up-regulation of VDR, followed by a stimulation of the negative cell cycle regulator p21Waf1/Cip1 and by a down

  1. Sodium Butyrate Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagy in Colorectal Cells: Implications for Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jintao; Yi, Man; Zha, Longying; Chen, Siqiang; Li, Zhijia; Li, Cheng; Gong, Mingxing; Deng, Hong; Chu, Xinwei; Chen, Jiehua; Zhang, Zheqing; Mao, Limei; Sun, Suxia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid derived from dietary fiber, inhibits proliferation and induces cell death in colorectal cancer cells. However, clinical trials have shown mixed results regarding the anti-tumor activities of butyrate. We have previously shown that sodium butyrate increases endoplasmic reticulum stress by altering intracellular calcium levels, a well-known autophagy trigger. Here, we investigated whether sodium butyrate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated autophagy, and whether there was crosstalk between autophagy and the sodium butyrate-induced apoptotic response in human colorectal cancer cells. Methods Human colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT-116 and HT-29) were treated with sodium butyrate at concentrations ranging from 0.5–5mM. Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT tetrazolium salt formation. Autophagy induction was confirmed through a combination of Western blotting for associated proteins, acridine orange staining for acidic vesicles, detection of autolysosomes (MDC staining), and electron microscopy. Apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry using standard annexinV/propidium iodide staining and by assessing PARP-1 cleavage by Western blot. Results Sodium butyrate suppressed colorectal cancer cell proliferation, induced autophagy, and resulted in apoptotic cell death. The induction of autophagy was supported by the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles and autolysosomes, and the expression of autophagy-associated proteins, including microtubule-associated protein II light chain 3 (LC3-II), beclin-1, and autophagocytosis-associated protein (Atg)3. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine inhibited sodium butyrate induced autophagy. Furthermore, sodium butyrate treatment markedly enhanced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated proteins, including BIP, CHOP, PDI, and IRE-1a. When endoplasmic reticulum stress was inhibited by pharmacological (cycloheximide and mithramycin

  2. Use of Dialysis and Liquid-Liquid Extraction for the Determination of Propionic Acid by Gas Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Takahiro; Tahara, Shoichi; Yamajima, Yukiko; Miyakawa, Hiroyuki; Uematsu, Yoko; Monma, Kimio

    2016-01-01

    A simple and efficient method for the determination of propionic acid (PA) in foods was developed. The sample was cleaned up by dialysis, and PA in the resulting solution was extracted into ethyl acetate for GC analysis. Sodium sulfate was used as a salting-out agent in the extraction process, and GC-FID and GC-MS were successfully applied to the determination and confirmation of PA, respectively. The recoveries were in the range of 98.9-104.4% at the addition level of 0.2 g/kg from 6 foods, bread, cake, cheese, worcester sauce, vinegar-pickles and yogurt. To evaluate the performance of the developed method, recoveries from bread, cake and cheese were compared with those of the notified method at the maximal allowable addition level of PA as a preservative for each food. Recoveries of 98.2-99.5% for the developed method and 91.2-92.0% for the notified method were obtained. The analytical limit was 0.1 g/kg in samples for both determination and confirmation. PMID:27440751

  3. A note concerning acetate activation of peroxidative activity of catalases using 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid as a substrate.

    PubMed

    Baker, Warren L; Key, Christopher; Lonergan, Greg T

    2005-01-01

    Beef liver catalases showed peroxidative activity using 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid as the electron donor and hydrogen peroxide as the acceptor at a pH of 5. This activity was not observed at pH 7. The reaction depended on acetate concentration, although succinate and propionate could partly replace the acetate as a catalyst. Other haem proteins also catalyzed a peroxidative effect. The reaction using syringaldazine or the coupling between dimethylaminobenzoic acid and 3-methyl-2-benzothiazolinone hydrazone was less effective and less sensitive. Evidence is presented that the reaction is associated with a conformational change of the catalase. PMID:15932252

  4. Development of an industrializable fermentation process for propionic acid production.

    PubMed

    Stowers, Chris C; Cox, Brad M; Rodriguez, Brandon A

    2014-05-01

    Propionic acid (PA) is a short-chain fatty acid with wide industrial application including uses in pharmaceuticals, herbicides, cosmetics, and food preservatives. As a three-carbon building block, PA also has potential as a precursor for high-volume commodity chemicals such as propylene. Currently, most PA is manufactured through petrochemical routes, which can be tied to increasing prices and volatility due to difficulty in demand forecasting and feedstock availability. Herein described are research advancements to develop an industrially feasible, renewable route to PA. Seventeen Propionibacterium strains were screened using glucose and sucrose as the carbon source to identify the best platform strain. Propionibacterium acidipropionici ATCC 4875 was selected as the platform strain and subsequent fermentation optimization studies were performed to maximize productivity and yield. Fermentation productivity was improved three-fold to exceed 2 g/l/h by densifying the inoculum source. Byproduct levels, particularly lactic and succinic acid, were reduced by optimizing fermentor headspace pressure and shear. Following achievement of commercially viable productivities, the lab-grade medium components were replaced with industrial counterparts to further reduce fermentation costs. A pure enzymatically treated corn mash (ECM) medium improved the apparent PA yield to 0.6 g/g (PA produced/glucose consumed), but it came at the cost of reduced productivity. Supplementation of ECM with cyanocobalamin restored productivity to near lab-grade media levels. The optimized ECM recipe achieved a productivity of 0.5 g/l/h with an apparent PA yield of 0.60 g/g corresponding to a media cost <1 USD/kg of PA. These improvements significantly narrow the gap between the fermentation and incumbent petrochemical processes, which is estimated to have a manufacturing cost of 0.82 USD/kg in 2017. PMID:24627047

  5. Lactational effect of propionic acid and duodenal glucose in cows.

    PubMed

    Rigout, S; Hurtaud, C; Lemosquet, S; Bach, A; Rulquin, H

    2003-01-01

    Five dairy cows were arranged in a 5 x 5 Latin square design to compare the effects of two amounts of either duodenal glucose or ruminal propionic acid (C3) on milk yield and composition. Treatments consisted of a grass silage-based diet supplemented with glucogenic nutrients either infused in the rumen as a mixture of volatile fatty acids (control) or pure C3 (1.72 and 3.45 Mcal/d) or in the duodenum as glucose (1.72 and 3.45 Mcal/d). Treatments were isoenergetic and isonitrogenous and contained 100 and 115% of energy and protein requirements according to INRA (1989), respectively. Only C3 treatments significantly modified ruminal volatile fatty acid composition and linearly increased C3 percentage (up to 25.5%). Both treatments substantially decreased milk fat yield and content, and linearly increased milk and protein yields. Although no significant differences between glucose and C3 were highlighted for milk yield and composition, it seems that mechanisms involved in milk fat decrease are different. Indeed, whereas C3 treatments decreased fatty acid production in an homogeneous way, short- and long-chain fatty acids decreased and medium-chain fatty acid production increased with glucose treatments. A bibliographical study confirmed that increasing glucogenic precursors (GP) supply curvilinearly increase milk yield, linearly increase milk protein content (+ 0.04% per Mcal of GP) and curvilinearly decrease milk fat content (- 0.14% per Mcal of GP). Thus, it appears important to account for the nature of energy supplied by the ration in formulation. PMID:12613868

  6. n-Butyrate inhibits Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase activation and cytokine transcription in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Diakos, Christos; Prieschl, Eva E.; Saeemann, Marcus D.; Boehmig, Georg A.; Csonga, Robert; Sobanov, Yury; Baumruker, Thomas; Zlabinger, Gerhard J. . E-mail: gerhard.zlabinger@meduniwien.ac.at

    2006-10-20

    Mast cells are well known to contribute to type I allergic conditions but only recently have been brought in association with chronic relapsing/remitting autoimmune diseases such as celiac disease and ulcerative colitis. Since the bacterial metabolite n-butyrate is considered to counteract intestinal inflammation we investigated the effects of this short chain fatty acid on mast cell activation. Using RNAse protection assays and reporter gene technology we show that n-butyrate downregulates TNF-{alpha} transcription. This correlates with an impaired activation of the Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) but not other MAP kinases such as ERK and p38 that are largely unaffected by n-butyrate. As a consequence, we observed a decreased nuclear activity of AP-1 and NF-AT transcription factors. These results indicate that n-butyrate inhibits critical inflammatory mediators in mast cells by relatively selectively targeting the JNK signalling.

  7. Sodium butyrate protects the intestinal barrier function in peritonitic mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaofeng; Song, Huimin; Wang, Yunlei; Sheng, Yingmo; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Peritonitis is a commonly seen disease with high morbidity and mortality. It is prevalently considered that the impaired intestinal barrier during peritonitis is the access point of gut microbes into the blood system, and acts as the engine of the following systemic infection. In our previous study, we found that Sodium Butyrate (NaB) was protective on intestinal barrier function. In this study, we aim to evaluate the effects of NaB on overwhelming infection animal models of peritonitis. Methods: Mouse cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model was used to study the effects of NaB on the intestinal barrier. Experimental animals were fed of NaB by gavage. Post-CLP mortality, gut permeability and intestinal histological alterations were studied. Results: Gastrointestinal NaB pharmacodynamics profiles after medication were studied. Measurements of NaB concentration in chyme showed significantly higher intestinal concentration of NaB in the NaB treated group than that of the control group. CLP-induced mortality was significantly decreased by oral NaB treatments. Gut permeability was largely increased after CLP, which was partially prevented by NaB feeding. Histological study showed that intestinal, especially ileal injury following peritonitis was substantially alleviated by NaB treatments. Moreover, tissue regeneration was also prompted by NaB. Conclusion: NaB has a potential protective effect on intestinal barrier function in peritonitis. PMID:26064302

  8. ALA-Butyrate prodrugs for Photo-Dynamic Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovitch, G.; Nudelman, A.; Ehenberg, B.; Rephaeli, A.; Malik, Z.

    2010-05-01

    The use of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) administration has led to many applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in cancer. However, the hydrophilic nature of ALA limits its ability to penetrate the cells and tissues, and therefore the need for ALA derivatives became an urgent research target. In this study we investigated the activity of novel multifunctional acyloxyalkyl ester prodrugs of ALA that upon metabolic hydrolysis release active components such as, formaldehyde, and the histone deacetylase inhibitory moiety, butyric acid. Evaluation of these prodrugs under photo-irradiation conditions showed that butyryloxyethyl 5-amino-4-oxopentanoate (ALA-BAC) generated the most efficient photodynamic destruction compared to ALA. ALA-BAC stimulated a rapid biosynthesis of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in human glioblastoma U-251 cells which resulted in generation of intracellular ROS, reduction of mitochondrial activity, leading to apoptotic and necrotic death of the cells. The apoptotic cell death induced by ALA / ALA-BAC followed by PDT equally activate intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signals and both pathways may occur simultaneously. The main advantage of ALA-BAC over ALA stems from its ability to induce photo-damage at a significantly lower dose than ALA.

  9. Sodium butyrate alleviates adipocyte inflammation by inhibiting NLRP3 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xukai; He, Gang; Peng, Yan; Zhong, Weitian; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a common feature of Type II diabetes, metabolic disorders, hypertension and other vascular diseases. Recent studies showed that obesity-induced inflammation may be critical for IR. To investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of sodium butyrate (NaB) on obesity-induced inflammation, the db/db mice were intraperitoneally injected with NaB for 6 weeks. Glucose control was evaluated by glucose tolerance test (GTT) and insulin tolerance test (ITT). Adipose tissue was harvested for gene expression analysis. 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with Tnf-α to mimic the inflammatory state and gene expression was detected by realtime PCR and Western blotting. Our results showed that NaB treatment improved glucose control in db/db mice as determined by GTT and ITT tests. Gene expression analysis showed that NaB inhibited cytokines and immunological markers including CD68, Interferon-γ and Mcp in adipose tissues in db/db mice. Moreover, NaB inhibited cytokine releasing in 3T3-L1 adipocytes treated with TNF-α. Further analysis of inflammation pathway showed that NLRP3 was activated in db/db mice, which was efficiently inhibited by NaB treatment. Our data suggest that inhibition of obesity-induced inflammation alleviates IR, and NaB might be a potential anti-inflammatory agent for obesity. PMID:26234821

  10. Sodium butyrate alleviates adipocyte inflammation by inhibiting NLRP3 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xukai; He, Gang; Peng, Yan; Zhong, Weitian; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a common feature of Type II diabetes, metabolic disorders, hypertension and other vascular diseases. Recent studies showed that obesity-induced inflammation may be critical for IR. To investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of sodium butyrate (NaB) on obesity-induced inflammation, the db/db mice were intraperitoneally injected with NaB for 6 weeks. Glucose control was evaluated by glucose tolerance test (GTT) and insulin tolerance test (ITT). Adipose tissue was harvested for gene expression analysis. 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with Tnf-α to mimic the inflammatory state and gene expression was detected by realtime PCR and Western blotting. Our results showed that NaB treatment improved glucose control in db/db mice as determined by GTT and ITT tests. Gene expression analysis showed that NaB inhibited cytokines and immunological markers including CD68, Interferon-γ and Mcp in adipose tissues in db/db mice. Moreover, NaB inhibited cytokine releasing in 3T3-L1 adipocytes treated with TNF-α. Further analysis of inflammation pathway showed that NLRP3 was activated in db/db mice, which was efficiently inhibited by NaB treatment. Our data suggest that inhibition of obesity-induced inflammation alleviates IR, and NaB might be a potential anti-inflammatory agent for obesity. PMID:26234821

  11. Ultrasound assisted synthesis of methyl butyrate using heterogeneous catalyst.

    PubMed

    Dange, P N; Kulkarni, A V; Rathod, V K

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasound assisted esterification of butyric acid with methanol was investigated in an ultrasound irradiated isothermal batch reactor using acid ion-exchange resin (amberlyst-15) as a catalyst. Effect of parameters such as temperature (323-353 K), catalyst loading (0-8.5%w/w), alcohol to acid ratio, M (2-6), ultrasound power (0-145 W), duty cycle (0-85%) and amount of molecular sieves added (0-11%w/w) on the rate of reaction was studied. At optimized parameters, a maximum conversion of 91.64% was obtained in 120 min in presence of ultrasound. Experimental kinetic data were correlated by using Eley-Rideal (ER) and Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson (LHH W) models taking into account reverse reaction. Studies showed that single site LHHW with reactants and products both adsorbing on catalyst surface was most suited for the obtained experimental data. Activation energy determined based on heterogeneous kinetics was in the range 49.31-57.54 kJ/mol while it was 18.29 kJ/mol using homogeneous model. PMID:25825149

  12. Comparative pharmaceutical evaluation of brand and generic clobetasone butyrate ointments.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshihisa; Fukami, Toshiro; Koide, Tatsuo; Onuki, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Toyofumi; Metori, Koichi; Katori, Noriko; Hiyama, Yukio; Tomono, Kazuo

    2014-03-10

    In the present study, we performed comprehensive pharmaceutical evaluation among an original clobetasone butyrate (CLB) ointment product and three generic products. Although spherocrystal images were observed under a polarizing microscope for only Kindavate®, the original product, distribution of active and inactive ingredients was chemically equivalent between the original and generic medicine by the attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy. These results suggest that the spherocrystals observed in Kindavate® are composed of hydrocarbon. On GC/MS, it was revealed that linear alkanes having 25-27 carbon atoms are densely present in Sun White®, the base used in Kindavate®. On the other hand, linear alkanes having 22-31 carbon atoms were broadly distributed in most other white petrolatums. In the CLB ointment products, the distribution equivalent of linear alkane to Sun White® was observed only in Kindavate®. Thus, the GC/MS method is extremely useful for identification of white petrolatum used in the ointment. A similar amount of CLB among the pharmaceutical products was detected in the skin tissue by skin accumulation test, although there were the differences in rheological properties and the quality of white petrolatum. The present results will be very useful for pharmacists in selecting medicine products that match the needs of the patient. Such pharmaceutical information will help spread objective knowledge about products in the future, and will contribute to the appropriate selection of medication. PMID:24406671

  13. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It may be produced by the calcium hydroxide neutralization of acetic acid. (b) The ingredient meets...

  14. Butyrate and glucose metabolism by colonocytes in experimental colitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, M; Krishnan, S; Ramakrishna, B; Mathan, M; Pulimood, A; Murthy, S

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Impaired colonocyte metabolism of butyrate has been implicated in the aetiopathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Colonocyte butyrate metabolism was investigated in experimental colitis in mice.
METHODS—Colitis was induced in Swiss outbred white mice by oral administration of 4% dextran sulphate sodium (DSS). Colonocytes isolated from colitic and normal control mice were incubated with [14C]butyrate or glucose, and production of 14CO2, as well as of intermediate metabolites (acetoacetate, β-hydroxybutyrate and lactate), was measured. The effect of different substrate concentrations on oxidation was also examined.
RESULTS—Butyrate oxidation (µmol/h per mg protein; mean (SEM)) was significantly reduced in DSS colitis, values on day 7 of DSS administration being 0.177 (0.007) compared with 0.406 (0.035) for control animals (p<0.001). Glucose oxidation (µmol/h per mg protein; mean (SEM)) on day 7 of DSS administration was significantly higher than in controls (0.06 (0.006) v 0.027 (0.004), p<0.001). Production of β-hydroxybutyrate was decreased and production of lactate increased in DSS colitis compared with controls. Increasing butyrate concentration from 10 to 80 mM enhanced oxidation in DSS colitis (0.036 (0.002) to 0.285 (0.040), p<0.001), although it continued to remain lower than in controls. Surface and crypt epithelial cells showed similar ratios of butyrate to glucose oxidation. When 1 mM DSS was added to normal colonocytes in vitro, it did not alter butyrate oxidation. The initial histological lesion of DSS administration was very patchy and involved crypt cells. Abnormal butyrate oxidation became apparent only after six days of DSS administration, at which time histological abnormalities were more widespread.
CONCLUSIONS—Colonocyte metabolism of butyrate, but not of glucose, is impaired in DSS colitis, and may be important in pathophysiology. Histological abnormalities preceded measurable defects in butyrate

  15. Butyrate-mediated acquisition of chemoresistance by human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyang Ri; Choi, Hyeon Gyeom; Jeon, Chae Kyung; Lim, Soo-Jeong; Kim, So Hee

    2016-08-01

    Butyrate is a short-chain fatty acid produced by the intestinal microflora and it not only induces apoptosis but also inhibits the proliferation of cancer cells. Recently, it has been reported that butyrate may cause resistance in colon cancer cells. Therefore, we investigated the effects of increased resistance to butyrate in HCT116 colon cancer cells. We established HCT116 cells resistant to butyrate (HCT116/BR) by treating HCT116 parental cells (HCT116/PT) with increasing concentrations of butyrate to a maximum of 1.6 mM for 3 months. The butyrate concentrations that inhibited cell growth by 50% (IC50) were 0.508 and 5.50 mM in HCT116/PT and HCT116/BR cells. The values after treatment with paclitaxel, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), doxorubicin and trichostatin A (TSA) were 2.42, 2.36, 4.31 and 11.3-fold higher, respectively, in HCT116/BR cells compared with HCT116/PT cells. The protein expression of drug efflux pumps, such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer-resistant protein (BCRP) and the multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1), did not differ between HCT116/PT and HCT116/BR cells. The expression level of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL protein was increased while those of pro-apoptotic Bax and Bim proteins were reduced in HCT116/BR cells. There were no significant differences in cell motility and invasion. This study suggests that exposure of colon cancer cells to butyrate results in development of resistance to butyrate, which may play a role in the acquisition of chemoresistance in colon cancer. PMID:27277338

  16. Activation of PPAR{gamma} is not involved in butyrate-induced epithelial cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, S.; Waechtershaeuser, A.; Loitsch, S.; Knethen, A. von; Bruene, B.; Stein, J. . E-mail: j.stein@em.uni-frankfurt.de

    2005-10-15

    Histone deacetylase-inhibitors affect growth and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells by inducing expression of several transcription factors, e.g. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) or vitamin D receptor (VDR). While activation of VDR by butyrate mainly seems to be responsible for cellular differentiation, the activation of PPAR{gamma} in intestinal cells remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine the role of PPAR{gamma} in butyrate-induced cell growth inhibition and differentiation induction in Caco-2 cells. Treatment with PPAR{gamma} ligands ciglitazone and BADGE (bisphenol A diglycidyl) enhanced butyrate-induced cell growth inhibition in a dose- and time-dependent manner, whereas cell differentiation was unaffected after treatment with PPAR{gamma} ligands rosiglitazone and MCC-555. Experiments were further performed in dominant-negative PPAR{gamma} mutant cells leading to an increase in cell growth whereas butyrate-induced cell differentiation was again unaffected. The present study clearly demonstrated that PPAR{gamma} is involved in butyrate-induced inhibition of cell growth, but seems not to play an essential role in butyrate-induced cell differentiation.

  17. Response of Syntrophic Propionate Degradation to pH Decrease and Microbial Community Shifts in an UASB Reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liguo; Ban, Qiaoying; Li, Jianzheng; Jha, Ajay Kumar

    2016-08-28

    The effect of pH on propionate degradation in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor containing propionate as a sole carbon source was studied. Under influent propionate of 2,000 mg/l and 35ºC, propionate removal at pH 7.5-6.8 was above 93.6%. Propionate conversion was significantly inhibited with stepwise pH decrease from pH 6.8 to 6.5, 6.0, 5.5, 5.0, 4.5, and then to 4.0. After long-term operation, the propionate removal at pH 6.5-4.5 maintained an efficiency of 88.5%-70.1%, whereas propionate was hardly decomposed at pH 4.0. Microbial composition analysis showed that propionate-oxidizing bacteria from the genera Pelotomaculum and Smithella likely existed in this system. They were significantly reduced at pH ≤5.5. The methanogens in this UASB reactor belonged to four genera: Methanobacterium, Methanospirillum, Methanofollis, and Methanosaeta. Most detectable hydrogenotrophic methanogens were able to grow at low pH conditions (pH 6.0-4.0), but the acetotrophic methanogens were reduced as pH decreased. These results indicated that propionate-oxidizing bacteria and acetotrophic methanogens were more sensitive to low pH (5.5-4.0) than hydrogenotrophic methanogens. PMID:27160579

  18. Antibiofilm Properties of Acetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, Morten; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Nielsen, Anne K.; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Homøe, Preben; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are known to be extremely tolerant toward antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents. These biofilms cause the persistence of chronic infections. Since antibiotics rarely resolve these infections, the only effective treatment of chronic infections is surgical removal of the infected implant, tissue, or organ and thereby the biofilm. Acetic acid is known for its antimicrobial effect on bacteria in general, but has never been thoroughly tested for its efficacy against bacterial biofilms. In this article, we describe complete eradication of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative biofilms using acetic acid both as a liquid and as a dry salt. In addition, we present our clinical experience of acetic acid treatment of chronic wounds. In conclusion, we here present the first comprehensive in vitro and in vivo testing of acetic acid against bacterial biofilms. PMID:26155378

  19. Quantification of in Vivo Colonic Short Chain Fatty Acid Production from Inulin

    PubMed Central

    Boets, Eef; Deroover, Lise; Houben, Els; Vermeulen, Karen; Gomand, Sara V.; Delcour, Jan A.; Verbeke, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFA), including acetate, propionate, and butyrate, are produced during bacterial fermentation of undigested carbohydrates in the human colon. In this study, we applied a stable-isotope dilution method to quantify the in vivo colonic production of SCFA in healthy humans after consumption of inulin. Twelve healthy subjects performed a test day during which a primed continuous intravenous infusion with [1-13C]acetate, [1-13C]propionate and [1-13C]butyrate (12, 1.2 and 0.6 μmol·kg−1·min−1, respectively) was applied. They consumed 15 g of inulin with a standard breakfast. Breath and blood samples were collected at regular times during the day over a 12 h period. The endogenous rate of appearance of acetate, propionate, and butyrate was 13.3 ± 4.8, 0.27 ± 0.09, and 0.28 ± 0.12 μmol·kg−1·min−1, respectively. Colonic inulin fermentation was estimated to be 137 ± 75 mmol acetate, 11 ± 9 mmol propionate, and 20 ± 17 mmol butyrate over 12 h, assuming that 40%, 10%, and 5% of colonic derived acetate, propionate, and butyrate enter the systemic circulation. In conclusion, inulin is mainly fermented into acetate and, to lesser extents, into butyrate and propionate. Stable isotope technology allows quantifying the production of the three main SCFA in vivo and proved to be a practical tool to investigate the extent and pattern of SCFA production. PMID:26516911

  20. Tyrosine B10 triggers a heme propionate hydrogen bonding network loop with glutamine E7 moiety

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos-Santana, Brenda J.; Lopez-Garriga, Juan

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H-bonding network loop by PheB10Tyr mutation is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The propionate group H-bonding network restricted the flexibility of the heme. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hydrogen bonding interaction modulates the electron density of the iron. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Propionate H-bonding network loop explains the heme-ligand stabilization. -- Abstract: Propionates, as peripheral groups of the heme active center in hemeproteins have been described to contribute in the modulation of heme reactivity and ligand selection. These electronic characteristics prompted the question of whether the presence of hydrogen bonding networks between propionates and distal amino acids present in the heme ligand moiety can modulate physiological relevant events, like ligand binding association and dissociation activities. Here, the role of these networks was evaluated by NMR spectroscopy using the hemoglobin I PheB10Tyr mutant from Lucina pectinata as model for TyrB10 and GlnE7 hemeproteins. {sup 1}H-NMR results for the rHbICN PheB10Tyr derivative showed chemical shifts of TyrB10 OH{eta} at 31.00 ppm, GlnE7 N{sub {epsilon}1}H/N{sub {epsilon}2}H at 10.66 ppm/-3.27 ppm, and PheE11 C{sub {delta}}H at 11.75 ppm, indicating the presence of a crowded, collapsed, and constrained distal pocket. Strong dipolar contacts and inter-residues crosspeaks between GlnE7/6-propionate group, GlnE7/TyrB10 and TyrB10/CN suggest that this hydrogen bonding network loop between GlnE7, TyrB10, 6-propionate group, and the heme ligand contribute significantly to the modulation of the heme iron electron density as well as the ligand stabilization mechanism. Therefore, the network loop presented here support the fact that the electron withdrawing character of the hydrogen bonding is controlled by the interaction of the propionates and the nearby electronic environments contributing to the modulation of the heme electron density state. Thus

  1. Multiple Facets of Arabidopsis Seedling Development Require 
Indole-3-Butyric Acid–Derived Auxin[W

    PubMed Central

    Strader, Lucia C.; Wheeler, Dorthea L.; Christensen, Sarah E.; Berens, John C.; Cohen, Jerry D.; Rampey, Rebekah A.; Bartel, Bonnie

    2011-01-01

    Levels of auxin, which regulates both cell division and cell elongation in plant development, are controlled by synthesis, inactivation, transport, and the use of storage forms. However, the specific contributions of various inputs to the active auxin pool are not well understood. One auxin precursor is indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), which undergoes peroxisomal β-oxidation to release free indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). We identified ENOYL-COA HYDRATASE2 (ECH2) as an enzyme required for IBA response. Combining the ech2 mutant with previously identified iba response mutants resulted in enhanced IBA resistance, diverse auxin-related developmental defects, decreased auxin-responsive reporter activity in both untreated and auxin-treated seedlings, and decreased free IAA levels. The decreased auxin levels and responsiveness, along with the associated developmental defects, uncover previously unappreciated roles for IBA-derived IAA during seedling development, establish IBA as an important auxin precursor, and suggest that IBA-to-IAA conversion contributes to the positive feedback that maintains root auxin levels. PMID:21406624

  2. Evaluating the potential impact of proton carriers on syntrophic propionate oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juste-Poinapen, Natacha M. S.; Turner, Mark S.; Rabaey, Korneel; Virdis, Bernardino; Batstone, Damien J.

    2015-12-01

    Anaerobic propionic acid degradation relies on interspecies electron transfer (IET) between propionate oxidisers and electron acceptor microorganisms, via either molecular hydrogen, formate or direct transfers. We evaluated the possibility of stimulating direct IET, hence enhancing propionate oxidation, by increasing availability of proton carriers to decrease solution resistance and reduce pH gradients. Phosphate was used as a proton carrying anion, and chloride as control ion together with potassium as counter ion. Propionic acid consumption in anaerobic granules was assessed in a square factorial design with ratios (1:0, 2:1, 1:1, 1:2 and 0:1) of total phosphate (TP) to Cl-, at 1X, 10X, and 30X native conductivity (1.5 mS.cm-1). Maximum specific uptake rate, half saturation, and time delay were estimated using model-based analysis. Community profiles were analysed by fluorescent in situ hybridisation and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. The strongest performance was at balanced (1:1) ratios at 10X conductivity where presumptive propionate oxidisers namely Syntrophobacter and Candidatus Cloacamonas were more abundant. There was a shift from Methanobacteriales at high phosphate, to Methanosaeta at low TP:Cl ratios and low conductivity. A lack of response to TP, and low percentage of presumptive electroactive organisms suggested that DIET was not favoured under the current experimental conditions.

  3. Comparison of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Photodynamic Therapy and Clobetasol Propionate in Treatment of Vulvar Lichen Sclerosus.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Miao, Fei; Zhang, Ling-Lin; Zhang, Guo-Long; Wang, Pei-Ru; Ji, Jie; Wang, Xiao-Jie; Huang, Zheng; Wang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Xiu-Li

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) for the treatment of vulvar lichen sclerosus (VLS) and compare its effectiveness with that of clobetasol propionate. Four sessions of topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) were administered at 2-week intervals (n = 20). Clobetasol propionate (0.05%) was used daily for 8 weeks (n = 20). The rate of complete response in the PDT group (14/20) was double that of the clobetasol propionate group (7/20) (p < 0.05, 2 = 4.912). Horizontal visual analogue scores indicated that PDT was more effective than clobetasol propionate. Pain intensity numeric rating scale values for PDT were between 3.05 and 4.45. One month after the final session of PDT, only one patient relapsed and all 7 patients in clobetasol propionate group relapsed. ALA-PDT is a well-tolerated and effective option for the treatment of VLS. PMID:26775671

  4. Metabolic network rewiring of propionate flux compensates vitamin B12 deficiency in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Emma; Olin-Sandoval, Viridiana; Hoy, Michael J; Li, Chi-Hua; Louisse, Timo; Yao, Victoria; Mori, Akihiro; Holdorf, Amy D; Troyanskaya, Olga G; Ralser, Markus; Walhout, Albertha JM

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic network rewiring is the rerouting of metabolism through the use of alternate enzymes to adjust pathway flux and accomplish specific anabolic or catabolic objectives. Here, we report the first characterization of two parallel pathways for the breakdown of the short chain fatty acid propionate in Caenorhabditis elegans. Using genetic interaction mapping, gene co-expression analysis, pathway intermediate quantification and carbon tracing, we uncover a vitamin B12-independent propionate breakdown shunt that is transcriptionally activated on vitamin B12 deficient diets, or under genetic conditions mimicking the human diseases propionic- and methylmalonic acidemia, in which the canonical B12-dependent propionate breakdown pathway is blocked. Our study presents the first example of transcriptional vitamin-directed metabolic network rewiring to promote survival under vitamin deficiency. The ability to reroute propionate breakdown according to B12 availability may provide C. elegans with metabolic plasticity and thus a selective advantage on different diets in the wild. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17670.001 PMID:27383050

  5. Evaluating the potential impact of proton carriers on syntrophic propionate oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Juste-Poinapen, Natacha M. S.; Turner, Mark S.; Rabaey, Korneel; Virdis, Bernardino; Batstone, Damien J.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic propionic acid degradation relies on interspecies electron transfer (IET) between propionate oxidisers and electron acceptor microorganisms, via either molecular hydrogen, formate or direct transfers. We evaluated the possibility of stimulating direct IET, hence enhancing propionate oxidation, by increasing availability of proton carriers to decrease solution resistance and reduce pH gradients. Phosphate was used as a proton carrying anion, and chloride as control ion together with potassium as counter ion. Propionic acid consumption in anaerobic granules was assessed in a square factorial design with ratios (1:0, 2:1, 1:1, 1:2 and 0:1) of total phosphate (TP) to Cl−, at 1X, 10X, and 30X native conductivity (1.5 mS.cm−1). Maximum specific uptake rate, half saturation, and time delay were estimated using model-based analysis. Community profiles were analysed by fluorescent in situ hybridisation and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. The strongest performance was at balanced (1:1) ratios at 10X conductivity where presumptive propionate oxidisers namely Syntrophobacter and Candidatus Cloacamonas were more abundant. There was a shift from Methanobacteriales at high phosphate, to Methanosaeta at low TP:Cl ratios and low conductivity. A lack of response to TP, and low percentage of presumptive electroactive organisms suggested that DIET was not favoured under the current experimental conditions. PMID:26670292

  6. Mutations participating in interallelic complementation in propionic acidemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gravel, R.A.; Akerman, B.R.; Lamhonwah, A.M.; Loyer, M.; Leon-del-Rio, A.; Italiano, I. )

    1994-07-01

    Deficiency of propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC; [alpha][sub 4][beta][sub 4]) results in the rare, autosomal recessive disease propionic acidemia. Cell fusion experiments have revealed two complementation groups, pccA and pccB, corresponding to defects of the PCCA ([alpha]-subunit) and PCCB ([beta]-subunit) genes, respectively. The pccBCC group includes subgroups, pccB and pccC, which are thought to reflect interallelic complementation between certain mutations of the PCCB gene. In this study, the authors have identified the mutations in two pccB, one pccC, and two pccBC cell lines and have deduced those alleles participating in interallelic complementation. One pccB line was a compound hetrozygote of Pro228Leu and Asn536Asp. The latter mutation was also detected in a noncomplementing pccBC line. This leaves Pro228Leu responsible for complementation in the pccB cells. The second pccB line contained an insertional duplication, dupKICK140-143, and a splice mutation IVS+1 G[yields]T, located after Lys466. The authors suggest that the dupKICK mutation is the complementing allele, since the second allele is incompatible with normal splicing. The pccC line studied was homozygous for Arg410Trp, which is necessarily the complementing allele in that line. For a second pccC line, they previously had proposed that [Delta]Ile408 was the complementing allele. They now show that its second allele, [open quotes]Ins[center dot]Del[close quotes], a 14-bp deletion replaced by a 12-bp insertion beginning at codon 407, fails to complement in homozygous form. The authors conclude that the interallelic complementation results from mutations in domains that can interact between [beta]-subunits in the PCC heteromer to restore enzymatic function. On the basis of sequence homology with the Propionibacterium shermanii transcarboxylase 12S subunit, they suggest that the pccC domain, defined by Ile408 and Arg410, may involve the propionyl-CoA binding site. 37 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. AB164. Methylmalonic acidemia/propionic acidemia in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Tzu-Hung; Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Lin, Hsiang-Yu; Liao, Hsuan-Chieh; Ho, Huey-Jane; Liu, Chin-Su; Lai, Chih-Jou; Chiang, Chuan-Chi; Yang, Chia-Feng; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Lin, Shuan-Pei; Niu, Dau-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background Methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) comprises a heterogeneous group of disorders, which are characterized by accumulation of methylmalonate in the body due to deficiency of methylmalonyl/proprionic coenzyme A mutase or defects in the uptake, transport or synthesis of 5'-deoxyadenosylcobalamin. Propionic acidemia (PA) refers to propionyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency. Most these patients might have very-early onset signs and symptoms that occur even before the results of newborn screening (NBS) are available, and die immediately or survive with significant neurodevelopmental disability. The associative outcome of MMA/PA was scarcely reported in Asia. Methods From January 2000 to December 2014, elevated C3 and elevated C3/C2 ratio cases were collected from Taipei Institute of Pathology (TIP), Chinese Foundation of Health (CFH) and National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH). Demographic data, initial presentation, whether or not undergoing liver transplantation (LT) and postoperative prognosis including survival rate, DQ/IQ performance, admission length, tube feeding time and were analyzed. Results During this period, 2,735,122 newborns were screened. Overall incidence rate of MMA was 1/109,405; PA, 1/683,781. Referral time was 323 days before the era of NBS vs. 8.8/7.5 days after the introduction for MMA/PA (P<0.05). MMA mutase type generally possesses higher AST, ALT, NH3 value and lower pH value compared to cobalamin type (P<0.05). Seventeen out of 25 MMA mutase type patients received LT; two out of 4 PA patients did LT. Mean admission length shortened from 90.6 days/year (pre-LT) to 9.1 days/year (post-LT) for MMA patients (P<0.0005). Tube feeding ratio decreased from 74.56% to 0.56% (P<0.00005). The anxiety level from the caregiver also down-escalated from 33.4 to 27.2 (P=0.001). DQ/IQ performance ameliorated after LT as well from 50 to 60.1, even though not statistically significant. Conclusions There is still room for improved regarding to management of MMA

  8. Cellulose esters synthesized using a tetrabutylammonium acetate and dimethylsulfoxide solvent system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yongqi; Miao, Jiaojiao; Jiang, Zeming; Sun, Haibo; Zhang, Liping

    2016-07-01

    Cellulose acetate (CA) and cellulose acetate propionate (CAP) were homogeneously synthesized in a novel tetrabutylammonium acetate/dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent system, without any catalyst, at temperatures below 70 °C. The molecular structures of the cellulose esters (CEs) and distributions of the substituents in the anhydroglucose repeating units were determined using 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and the degree of substitution (DS) values were determined using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The structures of the CEs, regenerated cellulose (RC), and pulp were determined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The thermal properties of the products were determined using thermogravimetric analysis. The temperatures of initial decomposition of the CEs were up to 40 °C higher than those of the RC and pulp. All the CEs were highly soluble in DMSO, but were insoluble in acetone. CAs with DS values less than 2.6 swelled or were poorly dissolved in CHCl3, but those with DS values above 2.9 dissolved rapidly. CAPs with DS values above 2.6 had good solubilities in ethyl acetate.

  9. Effects of Sodium Butyrate on Methamphetamine-Sensitized Locomotor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Harkness, John H.; Hitzemann, Robert J.; Edmunds, Stephanie; Phillips, Tamara J.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroadaptations associated with behavioral sensitization induced by repeated exposure to methamphetamine (MA) appear to be involved in compulsive drug pursuit and use. Increased histone acetylation, an epigenetic effect resulting in altered gene expression, may promote sensitized responses to psychostimulants. The role of histone acetylation in the expression and acquisition of MA-induced locomotor sensitization was examined by measuring the effect of histone deacetylase inhibition by sodium butyrate (NaB). For the effect on expression, vehicle or NaB (630 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) was administered 30 min prior to MA challenge in mice treated repeatedly with MA (10 days of 2 mg/kg MA) or saline (10 days), and then locomotor response to MA challenge was measured. NaB treatment increased the locomotor response to MA in both acutely MA treated and sensitized animals. For acquisition, NaB was administered 30 min prior to each MA exposure (10 days of 1 or 2 mg/kg), but not prior to the MA challenge test. Treatment with NaB during the sensitization acquisition period significantly increased locomotor activation by MA in sensitized mice only. NaB alone did not significantly alter locomotor activity. Acute NaB or MA, but not the combination, appeared to increase striatal acetylation at histone H4. Repeated treatment with MA, but not NaB or MA plus NaB, increased striatal acetylation at histone H3. Although increased histone acetylation may alter the expression of genes involved in acute locomotor response to MA and in the acquisition of MA-induced sensitization, results for acetylation at H3 and H4 showed little correspondence with behavior. PMID:23137698

  10. Effect of short-chain fatty acids on triacylglycerol accumulation, lipid droplet formation and lipogenic gene expression in goat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuting; Luo, Jun; Zhu, Jiangjiang; Shi, Hengbo; Li, Jun; Qiu, Siyuan; Wang, Ping; Loor, Juan J

    2016-02-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are the major energy sources for ruminants and are known to regulate various physiological functions in other species. However, their roles in ruminant milk fat metabolism are still unclear. In this study, goat mammary gland epithelial cells (GMECs) were treated with 3 mmol/L acetate, propionate or butyrate for 24 h to assess their effects on lipogenesis. Data revealed that the content of triacylglycerol (TAG) and lipid droplet formation were significantly stimulated by propionate and butyrate. The expression of FABP3, SCD1, PPARG, SREBP1, DGAT1, AGPAT6 and ADRP were upregulated by propionate and butyrate treatment. In contrast, the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of FASN and LXRα was not affected by propionate, but reduced by butyrate. Acetate had no obvious effect on the content of TAG and lipid droplets but increased the mRNA expression of SCD1 and FABP3 in GMECs. Additionally, it was observed that propionate significantly increased the relative content of mono-unsaturated fatty acids (C18:1 and C16:1) at the expense of decreased saturated fatty acids (C16:0 and C18:0). Butyrate and acetate had no significant effect on fatty acid composition. Overall, the results from this work help enhance our understanding of the regulatory role of SCFAs on goat mammary cell lipid metabolism. PMID:26304676

  11. Expanding the Diet for DIET: Electron Donors Supporting Direct Interspecies Electron Transfer (DIET) in Defined Co-Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Ying; Nevin, Kelly P.; Woodard, Trevor L.; Mu, Bo-Zhong; Lovley, Derek R.

    2016-01-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) has been recognized as an alternative to interspecies H2 transfer as a mechanism for syntrophic growth, but previous studies on DIET with defined co-cultures have only documented DIET with ethanol as the electron donor in the absence of conductive materials. Co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens and Geobacter sulfurreducens metabolized propanol, butanol, propionate, and butyrate with the reduction of fumarate to succinate. G. metallireducens utilized each of these substrates whereas only electrons available from DIET supported G. sulfurreducens respiration. A co-culture of G. metallireducens and a strain of G. sulfurreducens that could not metabolize acetate oxidized acetate with fumarate as the electron acceptor, demonstrating that acetate can also be syntrophically metabolized via DIET. A co-culture of G. metallireducens and Methanosaeta harundinacea previously shown to syntrophically convert ethanol to methane via DIET metabolized propanol or butanol as the sole electron donor, but not propionate or butyrate. The stoichiometric accumulation of propionate or butyrate in the propanol- or butanol-fed cultures demonstrated that M. harundinaceae could conserve energy to support growth solely from electrons derived from DIET. Co-cultures of G. metallireducens and Methanosarcina barkeri could also incompletely metabolize propanol and butanol and did not metabolize propionate or butyrate as sole electron donors. These results expand the range of substrates that are known to be syntrophically metabolized through DIET, but suggest that claims of propionate and butyrate metabolism via DIET in mixed microbial communities warrant further validation. PMID:26973614

  12. Efficient production of propionic acid through high density culture with recycling cells of Propionibacterium acidipropionici.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Ge, Yongsheng; Xu, Jing; Gao, Chao; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore propionic acid production via high density culture of Propionibacterium acidipropionici and recycling of cells. Results showed that final cells of P. acidipropionici from high density culture still had high metabolic activity for reuse. Using our process, 75.9gl(-1) propionic acid was produced, which was 1.84-fold of that in fed-batch fermentation with low cell density (41.2gl(-1)); the corresponding productivity was 100.0% higher than that in fed-batch fermentation with low cell density (0.16gl(-1)h(-1)). This bioprocess may have potential for the industrial production of propionic acid. PMID:27318164

  13. Butyrate delivered by butyrylated starch increases distal colonic epithelial apoptosis in carcinogen-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Julie M; Young, Graeme P; Topping, David L; Bird, Anthony R; Cobiac, Lynne; Scherer, Benjamin L; Winkler, Jessica G; Lockett, Trevor J

    2012-01-01

    Animal studies show that increasing large bowel butyrate concentration through ingestion of butyrylated or resistant starches opposes carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis, which is consistent with population data linking greater fiber consumption with lowered colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Butyrate has been shown to regulate the apoptotic response to DNA damage. This study examined the impact of increasing large bowel butyrate concentration by dietary butyrylated starch on the colonic epithelium of rats treated with the genotoxic carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM). Four groups of 10 male rats were fed AIN-93G based-diets containing either low amylose maize starch (LAMS), LAMS with 3% tributyrin, 10% high amylose maize starch (HAMS) or 10% butyrylated HAMS (HAMSB). HAMS and HAMSB starches were cooked by heating in water. After 4 weeks, rats were injected once with AOM and killed 6 h later. Rates of apoptosis and proliferation were measured in colonic epithelium. Short-chain fatty acid concentrations in large bowel digesta and hepatic portal venous plasma were higher in HAMSB than all other groups. Apoptotic rates in the distal colon were increased by HAMSB and correlated with luminal butyrate concentrations but cellular proliferation rates were unaffected by diet. The increase in apoptosis was most marked in the base and proliferative zone of the crypt. Regulation of luminal butyrate using HAMSB increases the rates of apoptotic deletion of DNA-damaged colonocytes. We propose this pro-apoptotic function of butyrate plays a major role reducing tumour formation in the AOM-treated rat and that these data support a potential protective role of butyrate in CRC. PMID:22080572

  14. Butyrate modulates antioxidant enzyme expression in malignant and non-malignant human colon tissues.

    PubMed

    Jahns, Franziska; Wilhelm, Anne; Jablonowski, Nadja; Mothes, Henning; Greulich, Karl Otto; Glei, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The induction of antioxidant enzymes is an important mechanism in colon cancer chemoprevention, but the response of human colon tissue to butyrate, a gut fermentation product derived from dietary fiber, remains largely unknown. Therefore, our study investigated the effect of a butyrate treatment on catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in matched human colon tissues of different transformation stages (n = 3-15 in each group) ex vivo. By performing quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot, and spectrophotometric measurements, we found an increase in SOD2 at expression and activity level in colonic adenocarcinomas (mRNA: 1.96-fold; protein: 1.41-fold, activity: 1.8-fold; P < 0.05). No difference was detectable for CAT between normal, adenoma, and carcinoma colon tissues. Treatment of normal colon epithelium (12 h) with a physiologically relevant concentration of butyrate (10 mM) resulted in a significant increase (P < 0.05) in CAT mRNA (1.24-fold) and protein (1.39-fold), without affecting the enzymatic activity. Consequently, preliminary experiments failed to show any protective effect of butyrate against H2 O2 -mediated DNA damage. Despite a significantly lowered SOD2 transcript (0.51-fold, P < 0.01) and, to a lesser extent, protein level (0.86-fold) after butyrate exposure of normal colon cells, the catalytic activity was significantly enhanced (1.19-fold, P < 0.05), suggesting an increased protection against tissue superoxide radicals. In malignant tissues, greater variations in response to butyrate were observed. Furthermore, both enzymes showed an age-dependent decrease in activity in normal colon epithelium (CAT: r = -0.49, P = 0.09; SOD2: r = -0.58, P = 0.049). In conclusion, butyrate exhibited potential antioxidant features ex vivo but cellular consequences need to be investigated more in depth. PMID:24677319

  15. Anti-inflammatory effect of sodium butyrate preconditioning during myocardial ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    HU, XIAORONG; ZHANG, KAI; XU, CHANGWU; CHEN, ZHIQAING; JIANG, HONG

    2014-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) has an important role in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Sodium butyrate, an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, has been shown to inhibit HMGB1 expression. In the present study, the effect of sodium butyrate on myocardial I/R injury in rats was investigated. Anesthetized male rats were intraperitoneally administered sodium butyrate (100 or 300 mg/kg) 30 min prior to the induction of ischemia. The rats were then subjected to ischemia for 30 min followed by reperfusion for 4 h. Infarct size, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase (CK) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were then measured. The expression of HMGB1 was assessed using western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that pretreatment with sodium butyrate (300 mg/kg) significantly reduced the infarct size, as well as the levels of LDH and CK (P<0.05). In addition, sodium butyrate (300 mg/kg) was shown to significantly inhibit the I/R-induced increase in the level of MDA and reduction in the level of SOD (P<0.05). Furthermore, treatment with sodium butyrate (300 mg/kg) was found to significantly inhibit the expression of TNF-α, IL-6 and HMGB1 induced by I/R injury (P<0.05). In conclusion, the results from the present study suggest that preconditioning with sodium butyrate may attenuate myocardial I/R injury by inhibition of the expression of inflammatory mediators during myocardial I/R. PMID:24944626

  16. Secondary mitochondrial dysfunction in propionic aciduria: a pathogenic role for endogenous mitochondrial toxins

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Marina A.; Sauer, Sven W.; Okun, Jürgen G.; Nijtmans, Leo G. J.; Rodenburg, Richard J. T.; van den Heuvel, Lambert P.; Dröse, Stefan; Brandt, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Georg F.; Ter Laak, Henk; Kölker, Stefan; Smeitink, Jan A. M.

    2006-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction during acute metabolic crises is considered an important pathomechanism in inherited disorders of propionate metabolism, i.e. propionic and methylmalonic acidurias. Biochemically, these disorders are characterized by accumulation of propionyl-CoA and metabolites of alternative propionate oxidation. In the present study, we demonstrate uncompetitive inhibition of PDHc (pyruvate dehydrogenase complex) by propionyl-CoA in purified porcine enzyme and in submitochondrial particles from bovine heart being in the same range as the inhibition induced by acetyl-CoA, the physiological product and known inhibitor of PDHc. Evaluation of similar monocarboxylic CoA esters showed a chain-length specificity for PDHc inhibition. In contrast with CoA esters, non-esterified fatty acids did not inhibit PDHc activity. In addition to PDHc inhibition, analysis of respiratory chain and tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes also revealed an inhibition by propionyl-CoA on respiratory chain complex III and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. To test whether impairment of mitochondrial energy metabolism is involved in the pathogenesis of propionic aciduria, we performed a thorough bioenergetic analysis in muscle biopsy specimens of two patients. In line with the in vitro results, oxidative phosphorylation was severely compromised in both patients. Furthermore, expression of respiratory chain complexes I–IV and the amount of mitochondrial DNA were strongly decreased, and ultrastructural mitochondrial abnormalities were found, highlighting severe mitochondrial dysfunction. In conclusion, our results favour the hypothesis that toxic metabolites, in particular propionyl-CoA, are involved in the pathogenesis of inherited disorders of propionate metabolism, sharing mechanistic similarities with propionate toxicity in micro-organisms. PMID:16686602

  17. Isomerization and dissociation in competition: The two-component dissociation rates of methyl propionate ions

    SciTech Connect

    Mazyar, O.A.; Baer, T.

    1999-03-04

    Threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence (TPEPICO) spectroscopy has been used to investigate the unimolecular chemistry of gas-phase methyl propionate ions. This ion undergoes isomerization to a lower energy enol structure, CH{sub 3}CHC(OH)OCH{sub 3}{sup {sm_bullet}+}, via two different pathways involving two distonic isomers, {sup {sm_bullet}}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}C{sup +}(OH)OCH{sub 3} and CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}C{sup +}(OH)OCH{sub 2}{sup {sm_bullet}}. This isomerization reaction is in competition with the direct CH{sub 3}O{sup {sm_bullet}} loss reaction, which leads to two-component dissociation rates of the methyl propionate ions. Detailed modeling of this complex reaction permitted the extraction of the dissociative photoionization threshold for methyl propionate, which at 0 K is 10.83 {+-} 0.01 eV, as well as the isomerization barrier between the distonic CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}C{sup +}(OH)OCH{sub 2}{sup {sm_bullet}} and enol CH{sub 3}CHC(OH)OCH{sub 3}{sup {sm_bullet}+} ions of 8.5 kcal/mol (relative to the methyl propionate ion). By combining this with the 0 K heats of formation of methyl propionate and the methoxy radical, the authors derive a 0 K heat of formation of the product propanoyl ion of 147 kcal/mol. Also measured was the adiabatic ionization energy of methyl propionate, 10.03 {+-} 0.05 eV.

  18. Associations between hepatic metabolism of propionate and palmitate in liver slices from transition dairy cows.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, M M; Piepenbrink, M S; Overton, T R

    2015-10-01

    Multiparous Holstein cows (n=95) were used to evaluate changes in hepatic propionate and palmitate metabolism and liver composition over time during the transition period, along with the relationships of these variables with cumulative increases in nonesterified fatty acids and β-hydroxybutyrate during the periparturient period. Data from 3 previous experiments were used to address the study objectives, accounting for a total of 95 multiparous Holstein cows. Liver slices from biopsies on d -21, 1, and 21 relative to parturition were used to determine conversion of [1-(14)C]palmitate to CO2 and esterified products (EP) and the conversion of [1-(14)C]propionate to CO2 and glucose. Hepatic glycogen content was highest on d -21 and was 26.9 and 36.5% of prepartum values on d 1 and 21, respectively. Liver triglyceride content was lowest at d -21 and was 271 and 446% of prepartum values on d 1 and 21, respectively. We detected no difference in the capacity for the liver to oxidize [1-(14)C]palmitate to CO2 between d -21 and d 1; however, on d 21, oxidation was 84% of prepartum values. The capacity of the liver to convert [1-(14)C]palmitate to EP was 148 and 139% of prepartum values on d 1 and 21, respectively. The capacity of liver to convert [1-(14)C]propionate to CO2 was 127 and 83% of prepartum values on d 1 and 21, and the capacity of liver to convert [1-(14)C]propionate to glucose was 126 and 85% of prepartum values on d 1 and 21, respectively. Correlation relationships suggest that overall, cows with elevated prepartum liver triglyceride content had elevated triglycerides throughout the transition period along with increased [1-(14)C]palmitate oxidation and conversion to EP and a decreased propensity to convert [1-(14)C]propionate to glucose. Cows with increased [1-(14)C]propionate oxidation had increased conversion of [1-(14)C]propionate to glucose throughout the transition period. Overall, conditions that lead to impairments in fatty acid metabolism during the

  19. Propionic acid and its esterified derivative suppress the growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Dai, A; Huang, S; Kuo, S; Shu, M; Tapia, C P; Yu, J; Two, A; Zhang, H; Gallo, R L; Huang, C-M

    2014-06-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that Propionibacterium acnes, a human skin commensal bacterium, ferments glycerol into short-chain fatty acids, including propionic acid. Propionic acid suppressed the growth of Staphylococcus aureus USA300, a community-acquired methicillin-resistant bacterium, in vitro and in vivo. In this study, it is demonstrated that the anti-USA300 activity of propionic acid persisted after buffering the acid with 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1- piperazineethanesulfonic acid. This suggests that the growth suppression of USA300 mainly resulted from the antimicrobial activity of propionic acid per se and not from the acidity of the medium. In addition, proprionic acid significantly reduced the intracellular pH of USA300 and exhibited broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Candida albicans. P. acnes showed a higher tolerance to propionic acid. Next, an esterified derivative of propionic acid was synthesised. Propionic acid and the esterified derivative were equivalent in their efficacy to suppress the growth of USA300 in vitro. The esterified derivative thus provides an alternative to propionic acid as an antimicrobial agent against S. aureus. PMID:24686580

  20. Enhanced propionic acid production from Jerusalem artichoke hydrolysate by immobilized Propionibacterium acidipropionici in a fibrous-bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ze-Xin; Li, Lin; Li, Shuang; Cai, You-Hua; Yang, Shang-Tian; Wang, Ju-Fang

    2012-08-01

    Propionic acid is an important chemical that is widely used in the food and chemical industries. To enhance propionic acid production, a fibrous-bed bioreactor (FBB) was constructed and Jerusalem artichoke hydrolysate was used as a low-cost renewable feedstock for immobilized fermentation. Comparison of the kinetics of immobilized-cell fermentation using the FBB with those of fed-batch free-cell fermentation showed that immobilized-cell fermentation gave a much higher propionic acid concentration (68.5 vs. 40.6 g/L), propionic acid yield (0.434 vs. 0.379 g/g) and propionic acid productivity (1.55 vs. 0.190 g/L/h) at pH 6.5. Furthermore, repeated batch fermentation, carried out to evaluate the stability of the FBB system, showed that long-term operation with a high average propionic acid yield of 0.483 g/g, high productivity of 3.69 g/L/h and propionic acid concentration of 26.2 g/L were achieved in all eight repeated batches during fermentation for more than 200 h. It is thus concluded that the FBB culture system can be utilized to realize the economical production of propionic acid from Jerusalem artichoke hydrolysate during long-term operation. PMID:22228298

  1. Influence of propionic acid on growth and aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus in liquid submerged and solid substrate conditions.

    PubMed

    al-Hilli, A L; Smith, J E

    1992-01-01

    The present experiments demonstrate that sublethal concentrations of propionic acid stimulated aflatoxin production considerably in submerged shaken culture and solid substrate culture of Aspergillus flavus. In liquid conditions aflatoxin formation was significantly influenced by the time of addition of propionic acid. The spores initially swelled into large spherical cells, and the resultant hyphae developed into a swollen, stunted, and excessively branched mycelium. PMID:1573566

  2. Oncogenic ras alters sensitivity of mouse colonocytes to butyrate and fatty acid mediated growth arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nancy D; Zhang, Jianhu; Davidson, Laurie A; Lupton, Joanne R; Chapkin, Robert S

    2002-12-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and butyrate favorably modulate colonocyte proliferation and apoptosis. In order to elucidate how oncogenic Ras modulates responses to these chemopreventive nutrients, we incubated isogenic non-transformed and Ras malignant transformed mouse colon cells with butyrate and DHA or linoleic acid (LA). Combining DHA with 1mM butyrate decreased proliferation relative to LA or no PUFA treatment in both cell lines. At a higher butyrate dose (5mM), caspase 3 activity was elevated to a greater extent in Ras transformed cells. Only non-transformed cells were sensitive to the apoptogenic effects of DHA, indicating that Ras transformation alters sensitivity to dietary chemopreventive agents. PMID:12183072

  3. Mechanism of Butyrate Stimulation of Triglyceride Storage and Adipokine Expression during Adipogenic Differentiation of Porcine Stromovascular Cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Ajuwon, Kolapo M

    2015-01-01

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFA), products of microbial fermentation of dietary fiber, exert multiple metabolic effects in cells. Previously, we had demonstrated that soluble fiber influenced fat mass accumulation, gut microbial community structure and SCFA production in pigs. The current study was designed to identify effects of SCFA treatment during adipogenic differentiation of porcine stromovascular cells on lipid metabolism and adipokine expression. Differentiating cells were treated with varying concentrations of butyrate. Results show that butyrate treatment enhanced adipogenesis and lipid accumulation, perhaps through upregulation of glucose uptake and de novo lipogenesis and other mechanisms that include induction of SREBP-1c, C/EBPα/β, GLUT4, LPL, PPARγ, GPAT4, DGAT1 and DGAT2 expression. In addition, butyrate induced adiponectin expression, resulting in activation of downstream target genes, such as AMPK and AKT. Activation of AMPK by butyrate led to phosphorylation of ACC. Although increased ACO gene expression was seen with butyrate treatment, experiments with the peroxisomal fatty acid inhibitor, thioridazine, suggest that butyrate may have an inhibitory effect on peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation. Our studies also provide evidence that butyrate may inhibit lipolysis, perhaps in an FFAR3-dependent manner. Therefore, this study presents a novel paradigm for butyrate action in adipocytes and shows that adipocytes are capable of utilizing butyrate, leading to increased expression of adiponectin for enhanced glucose uptake and improved insulin sensitivity. PMID:26713737

  4. Acidity and complex formation studies of 3-(adenine-9-yl)-propionic and 3-(thymine-1-yl)-propionic acids in ethanol-water media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammud, Hassan H.; El Shazly, Shawky; Sonji, Ghassan; Sonji, Nada; Bouhadir, Kamal H.

    2015-05-01

    The ligands 3-(adenine-9-yl)propionic acid (AA) and 3-(thymine-1-yl)propionic acid (TA) were prepared by N9-alkylation of adenine and N1-alkylation of thymine with ethylacrylate in presence of a base catalyst, followed by acid hydrolysis of the formed ethyl esters to give the corresponding propionic acid derivatives. The products were characterized by spectral methods (FTIR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR), which confirm their structures. The dissociation constants of ligands, were potentiometrically determined in 0.3 M KCl at 20-50 °C temperature range. The work was extended to study complexation behavior of AA and TA with various biologically important divalent metal ions (Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Mn2+ and Pb2+) in 50% v/v water-ethanol medium at four different temperatures, keeping ionic strength constant (0.3 M KCl). The order of the stability constants of the formed complexes decreases in the sequence Cu2+ > Pb2+ > Zn2+ > Ni2+ > Co2+ > Mn2+ > Cd2+ for both ligands. The effect of temperature was also studied and the corresponding thermodynamic functions (ΔG, ΔH, ΔS) were derived and discussed. The formation of metal complexes has been found to be spontaneous, and the stability constants were dependant markedly on the basicity of the ligands.

  5. Methylmalonic and propionic acidemias: lipid profiles of normal and affected human skin fibroblasts incubated with (1-/sup 14/C)propionate

    SciTech Connect

    Giudici, T.A.; Chen, R.G.; Oizumi, J.; Shaw, K.N.; Ng, W.G.; Donnell, G.N.

    1986-06-01

    Normal human skin fibroblasts and those from methylmalonic acidemia and propionic acidemia patients were grown in culture. Following incubation with (1-/sup 14/C)propionate, the major lipid classes in the cells were separated by thin layer chromatography and isolated fractions analyzed by radio gas chromatography for the presence of odd-numbered long-chain fatty acids; the pattern of even-numbered long-chain fatty acids was obtained also. Normal fibroblasts incorporated a small percentage of propionate into odd-numbered fatty acids which were present in all lipids studied. The abnormal cells incorporated a larger amount while maintaining the characteristic ratios of odd-numbered fatty acids found in the normal line. Most of the radioactivity was associated with phospholipids which are the predominant constituents of cell membranes. A characteristic C15/C17 ratio was found for different phospholipids and the triglyceride fraction; pentadecanoic acid was the principal odd-numbered fatty acid utilized in the assembly of complex lipids. Compared to even-numbered long-chain fatty acids the absolute amount of odd-numbered fatty acids was low (1-2%), even in affected cells. An unusual polar lipid fraction was isolated in the course of the study. In the normal cell it contained several unlabeled eicosanoids which were missing from the same fraction of both affected cell lines.

  6. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium acetate. 184.1185 Section 184.1185 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1185 Calcium acetate. (a) Calcium acetate (Ca (C2H3O2)2, CAS Reg. No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It may...

  7. Growth of geobacter sulfurreducens with acetate in syntrophic cooperation with hydrogen-oxidizing anaerobic partners

    PubMed

    Cord-Ruwisch; Lovley; Schink

    1998-06-01

    Pure cultures of Geobacter sulfurreducens and other Fe(III)-reducing bacteria accumulated hydrogen to partial pressures of 5 to 70 Pa with acetate, butyrate, benzoate, ethanol, lactate, or glucose as the electron donor if electron release to an acceptor was limiting. G. sulfurreducens coupled acetate oxidation with electron transfer to an anaerobic partner bacterium in the absence of ferric iron or other electron acceptors. Cocultures of G. sulfurreducens and Wolinella succinogenes with nitrate as the electron acceptor degraded acetate efficiently and grew with doubling times of 6 to 8 h. The hydrogen partial pressures in these acetate-degrading cocultures were considerably lower, in the range of 0.02 to 0.04 Pa. From these values and the concentrations of the other reactants, it was calculated that in this cooperation the free energy change available to G. sulfurreducens should be about -53 kJ per mol of acetate oxidized, assuming complete conversion of acetate to CO2 and H2. However, growth yields (18.5 g of dry mass per mol of acetate for the coculture, about 14 g for G. sulfurreducens) indicated considerably higher energy gains. These yield data, measurement of hydrogen production rates, and calculation of the diffusive hydrogen flux indicated that electron transfer in these cocultures may not proceed exclusively via interspecies hydrogen transfer but may also proceed through an alternative carrier system with higher redox potential, e.g., a c-type cytochrome that was found to be excreted by G. sulfurreducens into the culture fluid. Syntrophic acetate degradation was also possible with G. sulfurreducens and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans CSN but only with nitrate as electron acceptor. These cultures produced cell yields of 4.5 g of dry mass per mol of acetate, to which both partners contributed at about equal rates. These results demonstrate that some Fe(III)-reducing bacteria can oxidize organic compounds under Fe(III) limitation with the production of hydrogen

  8. Butyric acid fermentation in a fibrous bed bioreactor with immobilized Clostridium tyrobutyricum from cane molasses.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ling; Wang, Jufang; Liang, Shizhong; Wang, Xiaoning; Cen, Peilin; Xu, Zhinan

    2009-07-01

    Butyrate fermentation by immobilized Clostridium tyrobutyricum was successfully carried out in a fibrous bed bioreactor using cane molasses. Batch fermentations were conducted to investigate the influence of pH on the metabolism of the strain, and the results showed that the fermentation gave a highest butyrate production of 26.2 g l(-1) with yield of 0.47 g g(-1) and reactor productivity up to 4.13 g l(-1)h(-1) at pH 6.0. When repeated-batch fermentation was carried out, long-term operation with high butyrate yield, volumetric productivity was achieved. Several cane molasses pretreatment techniques were investigated, and it was found that sulfuric acid treatment gave better results regarding butyrate concentration (34.6+/-0.8 g l(-1)), yield (0.58+/-0.01 g g(-1)), and sugar utilization (90.8+/-0.9%). Also, fed-batch fermentation from cane molasses pretreated with sulfuric acid was performed to further increase the concentration of butyrate up to 55.2 g l(-1). PMID:19297150

  9. New holographic polymeric composition based on plexiglass, polyvinyl butyral, and phenanthrenquinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusevich, Vladislav; Tolstik, Elen; Kowarschik, Richard; Egorova, Elena; Matusevich, Yuri I.; Krul, Leonid

    2013-05-01

    The newly developed Plexiglas films containing polyvinyl butyral resins and phenanthrenequinone molecules as photosensitive dopant, which are proposed for the practical application as interlayer of laminated safety glass, are shown for the first time. The injection of the phenanthrenequinone-poly(methyl methacrylate) into the polyvinyl butyral protective interlayer provides a homogenous distribution of the recording holographic medium in the layer and allows fixing the entire surface grating in the laminated glass. In addition, the original properties of polyvinyl butyral as a connecting material were preserved during manufacturing of the laminated glass. This allows a recording of holographic structures directly after baking of the laminated glass, thus reducing the destruction of the gratings due to the elevated temperatures. The diffractive structures in phenanthrenequinone-poly(methyl methacrylate)-polyvinyl butyral polymeric layers with thicknesses of hundreds of microns are sealed between two panels of glass (so-called laminated glass) and are generated by illumination with an Argon-laser of 514 nm. Efficiently fixed and long-term stable holographic gratings recorded in the phenanthrenequinone-poly(methyl methacrylate)-polyvinyl butyral layer enable to produce transparent laminated glass with inserted diffractive elements, which can be used e.g. for Head-up Displays in automobile windshields or as holographic light concentrators for solar cells.

  10. Butyric acid fermentation from pretreated and hydrolysed wheat straw by an adapted Clostridium tyrobutyricum strain

    PubMed Central

    Baroi, G N; Baumann, I; Westermann, P; Gavala, H N

    2015-01-01

    Butyric acid is a valuable building-block for the production of chemicals and materials and nowadays it is produced exclusively from petroleum. The aim of this study was to develop a suitable and robust strain of Clostridium tyrobutyricum that produces butyric acid at a high yield and selectivity from lignocellulosic biomasses. Pretreated (by wet explosion) and enzymatically hydrolysed wheat straw (PHWS), rich in C6 and C5 sugars (71.6 and 55.4 g l−1 of glucose and xylose respectively), was used as substrate. After one year of serial selections, an adapted strain of C. tyrobutyricum was developed. The adapted strain was able to grow in 80% (v v−1) PHWS without addition of yeast extract compared with an initial tolerance to less than 10% PHWS and was able to ferment both glucose and xylose. It is noticeable that the adapted C. tyrobutyricum strain was characterized by a high yield and selectivity to butyric acid. Specifically, the butyric acid yield at 60–80% PHWS lie between 0.37 and 0.46 g g−1 of sugar, while the selectivity for butyric acid was as high as 0.9–1.0 g g−1 of acid. Moreover, the strain exhibited a robust response in regards to growth and product profile at pH 6 and 7. PMID:26230610

  11. AB041. Effectiveness and cost impact evaluation of fluticasone propionate/formoterol compared to fluticasone propionate/salmeterol

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Simon Wan Yau; Small, Iain; Wolfe, Stephanie; Hamil, John; Gruffydd-Jones, Kevin; Daly, Cathal; Soriano, Joan B.; Gardner, Liz; Skinner, Derek; Price, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment of asthmatics with an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) and long-acting beta agonist (LABA) is recommended for maintenance treatment according to Step 3 in the GINA guidelines. Fixed-dose combination (FDC) inhalers simplify the dosing regimen and may improve adherence over their separate components. However, the effectiveness and cost impact of FDC devices containing fluticasone propionate/formoterol (FP/FOR) compared to fluticasone/salmeterol (FP/SAL) in asthma patients who initiate or switch to FDC ICS/LABA inhalers have not been studied in real-life patients in the United Kingdom. To determine whether FP/FOR is non-inferior to FP/SAL in patients who initiate or switch to a FDC ICS/LABA therapy with respect to decreasing the occurrence of asthma exacerbations and overall cost impact. Methods This study used a matched, historical cohort design to compare the two FDC ICS/LABA treatments using the Optimal Patient Care Database. Based on a 1-year exploratory analysis of baseline variables such as comorbidities, current treatment, demographics and clinical measurements, cohorts were matched to ensure similar patients were compared over a 1-year outcome. Two cohorts of patients were studied: one of patients initiated on combination therapy (either FP/FOR or FP/SAL) and one of patients either switched from FP/SAL to FP/FOR or who remained on FP/SAL. The primary outcome studied non-inferiority in terms of percentage of patients who were free from severe asthma exacerbations (defined by ATS/ERS position statements) for patients prescribed FP/FORversusFP/SAL in the outcome year. Secondary outcomes included the rate of asthma exacerbations, clinical exacerbations, asthma control, treatment stability, and lower respiratory tract hospitalisations. Cost impact outcomes included a comparison of resource costs, drug costs and combined drug and resource costs. Results The study included 2,472 patients (618 patients in FP/FOR and 1,854 patients in FP/SAL cohorts

  12. Direct block of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl(-) channel by butyrate and phenylbutyrate.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, P

    2001-01-12

    Chloride permeation through the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is inhibited by a broad range of intracellular organic anions. Here it is shown, using patch clamp recording from CFTR-transfected mammalian cell lines, that the fatty acids butyrate and 4-phenylbutyrate cause a voltage-dependent block of CFTR Cl(-) currents when applied to the cytoplasmic face of membrane patches, with apparent K(d)s (at 0 mV) of 29.6 mM for butyrate and 6.6 mM for 4-phenylbutyrate. At the single channel level, both these fatty acids caused an apparent reduction in CFTR current amplitude, suggesting a kinetically fast blocking mechanism. The concentration-dependence of block suggests that CFTR-mediated Cl(-) currents in vivo may be affected by both 4-phenylbutyrate used in the treatment of various diseases, including cystic fibrosis, and by butyrate produced endogenously within the colonic lumen. PMID:11164382

  13. Butyrate production from high-fiber diet protects against lymphoma tumor.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Sun, Wei; Yu, Shanshan; Yang, Yu; Ai, Limei

    2016-10-01

    Gut microbiota and dietary fiber are critical for protecting body from obesity, diabetes and cancer. Butyrate, produced in the gut by bacterial fermentation of dietary fibers, is demonstrated to be protective against the development of colorectal cancer as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. We report that high-fiber diet and butyrate significantly inhibited the growth lymphoma tumors. Butyrate induced apoptosis of lymphoma tumor cells and significantly up-regulated histone 3 acetylation (H3ac) level and target genes such as Fas, P21, P27. Our results unravel an instrumental role of fiber diet and their metabolites on lymphoma tumor and demonstrate an intervention potential on the prevention and therapy of lymphoma. PMID:26885564

  14. Enrichment of 3-nitro-1-propionic acid-metabolizing bacteria in avian feces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Denitrobacterium detoxificans is a Gram-positive anaerobe that conserves energy for growth exclusively via anaerobic respiration, oxidizing H2, formate or lactate for the reduction of nitrate, trimethylamine oxide, dimethyl sulfoxide or nitroalkanes such as 3-nitro-1-propionic acid (NPA). At presen...

  15. ANTIANDROGENIC EFFECTS OF VINCLOZOLIN ON MALE RATS ARE PARTIALLY ATTENUATED BY TESTOSTERONE PROPIONATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ANTIANDROGENIC EFFECTS OF VINCLOZOLIN ON MALE RATS ARE PARTIALLY ATTENUATED BY TESTOSTERONE PROPIONATE

    Cynthia Wolf1,2 , Joe Ostby1, Jonathan Furr 1, Gerald A. LeBlanc2, and L. Earl Gray, Jr.1
    1 US Environmental Protection Agency, NHEERL, RTD, RTP, NC 27711, 2 Departmen...

  16. Enhanced Propionate Formation by Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. freudenreichii in a Three-Electrode Amperometric Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Emde, Rainer; Schink, Bernhard

    1990-01-01

    In order to influence the fermentation pattern of Propionibacterium freudenreichii towards enhanced propionate formation, growth and product formation with glucose and lactate as energy sources were studied in a three-electrode poised-potential amperometric culture system. With anthraquinone 2,6-disulfonic acid (E0′ = −184 mV; poised electron potential = −224 mV) or cobalt sepulchrate (E0′ = −350 mV; −390 mV) as mediator and an activated platinum working electrode, reduction of bacterially oxidized mediator occurred fast enough to keep more than 50% of the respective mediator (in minimum 0.4 mM) in the reduced state, up to a current of 2 mA. With glucose as substrate, 90.0 or 97.3% propionate was formed during exponential growth in the presence of 0.5 mM anthraquinone 2,6-disulfonic acid or 0.4 mM cobalt sepulchrate, respectively. Growth yields of 56.3 or 53.8 g of cell material per mol of substrate degraded were calculated, respectively, and the electrons were transferred quantitatively from the working electrode to the bacterial cells. With l-lactate, only 68.6 or 72.9% propionate was formed with the same mediators. The results are discussed with respect to energetics, electron transfer potentials, and potential application of the new technique in technical propionate production. PMID:16348285

  17. Enhanced Propionate Formation by Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. freudenreichii in a Three-Electrode Amperometric Culture System.

    PubMed

    Emde, R; Schink, B

    1990-09-01

    In order to influence the fermentation pattern of Propionibacterium freudenreichii towards enhanced propionate formation, growth and product formation with glucose and lactate as energy sources were studied in a three-electrode poised-potential amperometric culture system. With anthraquinone 2,6-disulfonic acid (E(0)' = -184 mV; poised electron potential = -224 mV) or cobalt sepulchrate (E(0)' = -350 mV; -390 mV) as mediator and an activated platinum working electrode, reduction of bacterially oxidized mediator occurred fast enough to keep more than 50% of the respective mediator (in minimum 0.4 mM) in the reduced state, up to a current of 2 mA. With glucose as substrate, 90.0 or 97.3% propionate was formed during exponential growth in the presence of 0.5 mM anthraquinone 2,6-disulfonic acid or 0.4 mM cobalt sepulchrate, respectively. Growth yields of 56.3 or 53.8 g of cell material per mol of substrate degraded were calculated, respectively, and the electrons were transferred quantitatively from the working electrode to the bacterial cells. With l-lactate, only 68.6 or 72.9% propionate was formed with the same mediators. The results are discussed with respect to energetics, electron transfer potentials, and potential application of the new technique in technical propionate production. PMID:16348285

  18. 2(2,4,5-Trichlorophenoxy) propionic acid (2,4,5-TP)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    2 ( 2,4,5 - Trichlorophenoxy ) propionic acid ( 2,4,5 - TP ) ; CASRN 93 - 72 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Hea

  19. 78 FR 55263 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Bioequivalence Recommendations for Fluticasone Propionate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-10

    ... Federal Register of June 11, 2010 (75 FR 33311), FDA announced the availability of a guidance for industry... Propionate; Salmeterol Xinafoate.'' The recommendations provide specific guidance on the design of....115). The draft guidance, when finalized, will represent the Agency's current thinking on the...

  20. Propionic acidemia: a Turkish case report of a successful pregnancy, labor and lactation.

    PubMed

    Mungan, Neslihan Önenli; Kör, Deniz; Büyükkurt, Selim; Atmış, Anıl; Güleç, Ümran; Satar, Mehmet

    2016-07-01

    Although propionic acidemia (PA) is a devastating inherited metabolic disease, with early diagnosis and advanced treatment strategies prognosis gets better and girls can survive to child-bearing ages. We share the detailed follow-up data of the pregnancy, successful labor with cesarean section and a healthy baby of a Turkish patient with PA. PMID:27089410

  1. Masquerading acidosis after cardiopulmonary bypass: a case of propionic acidemia and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Robert A; Monge, Michael C; Charrow, Joel; Costello, John M; Epting, Conrad L

    2015-04-01

    We report the case of a child with both propionic acidemia and cyanotic congenital heart disease. The presence of an underlying inborn error of metabolism confounded the management of this patient in the postoperative period, resulting in therapeutic misdirection until the true etiology of hyperlactemia was recognized. PMID:25870350

  2. Propionic acidemia: clinical course and outcome in 55 pediatric and adolescent patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Propionic acidemia is an inherited disorder caused by deficiency of propionyl-CoA carboxylase. Although it is one of the most frequent organic acidurias, information on the outcome of affected individuals is still limited. Study design/methods Clinical and outcome data of 55 patients with propionic acidemia from 16 European metabolic centers were evaluated retrospectively. 35 patients were diagnosed by selective metabolic screening while 20 patients were identified by newborn screening. Endocrine parameters and bone age were evaluated. In addition, IQ testing was performed and the patients’ and their families’ quality of life was assessed. Results The vast majority of patients (>85%) presented with metabolic decompensation in the neonatal period. Asymptomatic individuals were the exception. About three quarters of the study population was mentally retarded, median IQ was 55. Apart from neurologic symptoms, complications comprised hematologic abnormalities, cardiac diseases, feeding problems and impaired growth. Most patients considered their quality of life high. However, according to the parents’ point of view psychic problems were four times more common in propionic acidemia patients than in healthy controls. Conclusion Our data show that the outcome of propionic acidemia is still unfavourable, in spite of improved clinical management. Many patients develop long-term complications affecting different organ systems. Impairment of neurocognitive development is of special concern. Nevertheless, self-assessment of quality of life of the patients and their parents yielded rather positive results. PMID:23305374

  3. Electrocatalytic oxidation of n-propanol to produce propionic acid using an electrocatalytic membrane reactor.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiao; Li, Jianxin; Wang, Hong; Cheng, Bowen; He, Benqiao; Yan, Feng; Yang, Yang; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Huu Hao

    2013-05-18

    An electrocatalytic membrane reactor assembled using a nano-MnO2 loading microporous Ti membrane as an anode and a tubular stainless steel as a cathode was used to oxidize n-propanol to produce propionic acid. The high efficiency and selectivity obtained is related to the synergistic effect between the reaction and separation in the reactor. PMID:23572114

  4. Monitoring Amyelois transitella Males and Females with Phenyl Propionate Traps in Almonds and Pistachios

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Attractants that lure both sexes and both mated and unmated females have been used to monitor the effect of mating disruption on the mating status and relative abundance of lepidopteran females. For the navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), phenyl propionate attra...

  5. Degradation of Fructans and Production of Propionic Acid by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron are Enhanced by the Shortage of Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Adamberg, Signe; Tomson, Katrin; Vija, Heiki; Puurand, Marju; Kabanova, Natalja; Visnapuu, Triinu; Jõgi, Eerik; Alamäe, Tiina; Adamberg, Kaarel

    2014-01-01

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is commonly found in the human colon and stabilizes its ecosystem by catabolism of various polysaccharides. A model of cross-talk between the metabolism of amino acids and fructans in B. thetaiotaomicron was proposed. The growth of B. thetaiotaomicron DSM 2079 in two defined media containing mineral salts and vitamins, and supplemented with either 20 or 2 amino acids, was studied in an isothermal microcalorimeter. The polyfructans inulin (from chicory) and levan (synthesized using levansucrase from Pseudomonas syringae), two fructooligosaccharide preparations with different composition, sucrose and fructose were tested as substrates. The calorimetric power-time curves were substrate specific and typically multiauxic. A surplus of amino acids reduced the consumption of longer oligosaccharides (degree of polymerization > 3). Bacterial growth was not detected either in the carbohydrate free medium containing amino acids or in the medium with inulin as a sole carbohydrate. In amino acid-restricted medium, fermentation leading to acetic acid formation was dominant at the beginning of growth (up to 24 h), followed by increased lactic acid production, and mainly propionic and succinic acids were produced at the end of fermentation. In the medium supplemented with 20 amino acids, the highest production of d-lactate (82 ± 33 mmol/gDW) occurred in parallel with extensive consumption (up to 17 mmol/gDW) of amino acids, especially Ser, Thr, and Asp. The production of Ala and Glu was observed at growth on all substrates, and the production was enhanced under amino acid deficiency. The study revealed the influence of amino acids on fructan metabolism in B. thetaiotaomicron and showed that defined growth media are invaluable in elucidating quantitative metabolic profiles of the bacteria. Levan was shown to act as an easily degradable substrate for B. thetaiotaomicron. The effect of levan on balancing or modifying colon microbiota will

  6. Degradation of Fructans and Production of Propionic Acid by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron are Enhanced by the Shortage of Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Adamberg, Signe; Tomson, Katrin; Vija, Heiki; Puurand, Marju; Kabanova, Natalja; Visnapuu, Triinu; Jõgi, Eerik; Alamäe, Tiina; Adamberg, Kaarel

    2014-01-01

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is commonly found in the human colon and stabilizes its ecosystem by catabolism of various polysaccharides. A model of cross-talk between the metabolism of amino acids and fructans in B. thetaiotaomicron was proposed. The growth of B. thetaiotaomicron DSM 2079 in two defined media containing mineral salts and vitamins, and supplemented with either 20 or 2 amino acids, was studied in an isothermal microcalorimeter. The polyfructans inulin (from chicory) and levan (synthesized using levansucrase from Pseudomonas syringae), two fructooligosaccharide preparations with different composition, sucrose and fructose were tested as substrates. The calorimetric power-time curves were substrate specific and typically multiauxic. A surplus of amino acids reduced the consumption of longer oligosaccharides (degree of polymerization > 3). Bacterial growth was not detected either in the carbohydrate free medium containing amino acids or in the medium with inulin as a sole carbohydrate. In amino acid-restricted medium, fermentation leading to acetic acid formation was dominant at the beginning of growth (up to 24 h), followed by increased lactic acid production, and mainly propionic and succinic acids were produced at the end of fermentation. In the medium supplemented with 20 amino acids, the highest production of d-lactate (82 ± 33 mmol/gDW) occurred in parallel with extensive consumption (up to 17 mmol/gDW) of amino acids, especially Ser, Thr, and Asp. The production of Ala and Glu was observed at growth on all substrates, and the production was enhanced under amino acid deficiency. The study revealed the influence of amino acids on fructan metabolism in B. thetaiotaomicron and showed that defined growth media are invaluable in elucidating quantitative metabolic profiles of the bacteria. Levan was shown to act as an easily degradable substrate for B. thetaiotaomicron. The effect of levan on balancing or modifying colon microbiota will

  7. The SCFA butyrate stimulates the epithelial production of retinoic acid via inhibition of epithelial HDAC.

    PubMed

    Schilderink, Ronald; Verseijden, Caroline; Seppen, Jurgen; Muncan, Vanesa; van den Brink, Gijs R; Lambers, Tim T; van Tol, Eric A; de Jonge, Wouter J

    2016-06-01

    In the intestinal mucosa, retinoic acid (RA) is a critical signaling molecule. RA is derived from dietary vitamin A (retinol) through conversion by aldehyde dehydrogenases (aldh). Reduced levels of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are associated with pathological microbial dysbiosis, inflammatory disease, and allergy. We hypothesized that SCFAs contribute to mucosal homeostasis by enhancing RA production in intestinal epithelia. With the use of human and mouse epithelial cell lines and primary enteroids, we studied the effect of SCFAs on the production of RA. Functional RA conversion was analyzed by Adlefluor activity assays. Butyrate (0-20 mM), in contrast to other SCFAs, dose dependently induced aldh1a1 or aldh1a3 transcript expression and increased RA conversion in human and mouse epithelial cells. Epithelial cell line data were replicated in intestinal organoids. In these organoids, butyrate (2-5 mM) upregulated aldh1a3 expression (36-fold over control), whereas aldh1a1 was not significantly affected. Butyrate enhanced maturation markers (Mucin-2 and villin) but did not consistently affect stemness markers or other Wnt target genes (lgr5, olfm4, ascl2, cdkn1). In enteroids, the stimulation of RA production by SCFA was mimicked by inhibitors of histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) but not by HDAC1/2 inhibitors nor by agonists of butyrate receptors G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR)43 or GPR109A, indicating that butyrate stimulates RA production via HDAC3 inhibition. We conclude that the SCFA butyrate inhibits HDAC3 and thereby supports epithelial RA production. PMID:27151945

  8. Desmopressin Acetate in Intracranial Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kapapa, Thomas; Röhrer, Stefan; Struve, Sabine; Petscher, Matthias; König, Ralph; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Woischneck, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The secondary increase in the size of intracranial haematomas as a result of spontaneous haemorrhage or trauma is of particular relevance in the event of prior intake of platelet aggregation inhibitors. We describe the effect of desmopressin acetate as a means of temporarily stabilising the platelet function. Patients and Methods. The platelet function was analysed in 10 patients who had received single (N = 4) or multiple (N = 6) doses of acetylsalicylic acid and 3 patients (control group) who had not taken acetylsalicylic acid. All subjects had suffered intracranial haemorrhage. Analysis was performed before, half an hour and three hours after administration of desmopressin acetate. Statistical analysis was performed by applying a level of significance of P ≤ 0.05. Results. (1) Platelet function returned to normal 30 minutes after administration of desmopressin acetate. (2) The platelet function worsened again after three hours. (3) There were no complications related to electrolytes or fluid balance. Conclusion. Desmopressin acetate can stabilise the platelet function in neurosurgical patients who have received acetylsalicylic acid prior to surgery without causing transfusion-related side effects or a loss of time. The effect is, however, limited and influenced by the frequency of drug intake. Further controls are needed in neurosurgical patients. PMID:25610644

  9. Reductive opening of carbohydrate phenylsulfonylethylidene (PSE) acetals.

    PubMed

    Chéry, Florence; Cabianca, Elena; Tatibouët, Arnaud; De Lucchi, Ottorino; Lindhorst, Thisbe K; Rollin, Patrick

    2015-11-19

    The phenylsulfonylethylidene (PSE) acetal is a relatively new protecting group in carbohydrate chemistry. However, carbohydrate-derived phenylsulfonylethylidene (PSE) acetals show a different behavior in reductive desulfonylation than simple symmetrical acetals. Here we have investigated various SET-type reaction conditions in order to open PSE acetals regioselectively and to produce chiral ω-hydroxyethenyl ethers. Whereas sodium amalgam leads to a mixture of regioisomeric vinyl ethers besides the ethylidene acetal, samarium iodide is suited for regioselective ring opening. This is shown with seven different carbohydrate PSE acetals, both of the 1,3-dioxane and the 1,3-dioxolane type. PMID:26469209

  10. Fermentative Conversion of Cellulose to Acetic Acid and Cellulolytic Enzyme Production by a Bacterial Mixed Culture Obtained from Sewage Sludge †

    PubMed Central

    Khan, A. W.; Wall, Duncan; van den Berg, L.

    1981-01-01

    A simple procedure that uses a cellulose-enriched culture started from sewage sludge was developed for producing cellulolytic enzymes and converting cellulose to acetic acid rather than CH4 and CO2. In this procedure, the culture which converts cellulose to CH4 and CO2 was mixed with a synthetic medium and cellulose and heated to 80°C for 15 min before incubation. The end products formed were acetic acid, propionic acid, CO2, and traces of ethanol and H2. Supernatants from 6- to 10-day-old cultures contained 16 to 36 mM acetic acid. Cellulolytic enzymes in the supernatant were stable at 2°C under aerobic conditions for up to 4 weeks and had the ability to hydrolyze carboxymethyl cellulose, a microcystalline cellulose, cellobiose, xylan, and filter paper to reducing sugars. PMID:16345772

  11. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is regulated by butyrate induced epigenetic modulation of gene expression in bovine cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present evidence that butyrate induced histone acetylation regulates miRNA expression. MicroRNA expression microarray profiling revealed that 35 miRNA transcripts are significantly (p <0.05) differentially expressed after cells were treated with 10 mM butyrate. Among them, 11 transcripts are dif...

  12. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of propionate kinase (TdcD) from Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Simanshu, Dhirendra K.; Murthy, M. R. N.

    2005-01-01

    Propionate kinase (TdcD) from S. typhimurium has been expressed, purified and crystallized. A diffraction data set has been collected to 2.2 Å resolution. In the cell, propionate is mainly formed during β-oxidation of odd-numbered carbon-chain fatty acids, fermentation of carbohydrates and degradation of the amino acids threonine, valine, isoleucine and methionine. Recently, it has been shown that l-threonine is non-oxidatively cleaved to propionate via 2-ketobutyrate. The last step in this process, conversion of propionyl phosphate and ADP to propionate and ATP, is catalysed by propionate kinase (EC 2.7.1.–). Here, the cloning of propionate kinase (molecular weight 44 kDa) from Salmonella typhimurium with an N-terminal hexahistidine affinity tag and its overexpression in Escherichia coli are reported. Purified propionate kinase was found to cocrystallize with ADP in the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion and microbatch methods. Crystals belong to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 111.47, c = 66.52 Å. A complete data set to 2.2 Å resolution has been collected using an image-plate detector system mounted on a rotating-anode X-ray generator.

  13. Comparative study on the effect of electron beam irradiation on the physical properties of ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bibo; Hong, Ningning; Shi, Yongqian; Wang, Biao; Sheng, Haibo; Song, Lei; Tang, Qinbo; Hu, Yuan

    2014-04-01

    Ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) flame retarded by a combination of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) microencapsulated ammonium polyphosphate (MCAPP) and polyamide-6 (PA-6) have been crosslinked by high energy electron beam irradiation. The effect of high energy electron beam irradiation on the crosslinking degree, mechanical, electrical and thermal properties of EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 cable material was studied by gel content, heat extention test, mechanical test, dynamic mechanical analysis, high-insulation resistance meter and thermogravimetric analysis. The gel content and heat extention test results showed that the EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 composites can be easily crosslinked by electron beam irradiation. The tensile strength of EVA composites was drastically increased from 16.2 to maximum 26.2 MPa as the electron beam irradiation dose increases from 0 to 160 kGy. The volatilized products of EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 composites were analyzed and compared by thermogravimetric analysis/infrared spectrometry (TG-FTIR).

  14. Barley malt increases hindgut and portal butyric acid, modulates gene expression of gut tight junction proteins and Toll-like receptors in rats fed high-fat diets, but high advanced glycation end-products partially attenuate the effects.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yadong; Teixeira, Cristina; Marungruang, Nittaya; Sae-Lim, Watina; Tareke, Eden; Andersson, Roger; Fåk, Frida; Nyman, Margareta

    2015-09-01

    Barley malt, a product of controlled germination, has been shown to produce high levels of butyric acid in the cecum and portal serum of rats and may therefore have anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of the study was to investigate how four barley malts, caramelized and colored malts, 50-malt and 350-malt, differing in functional characteristics concerning beta-glucan content and color, affect short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), barrier function and inflammation in the hindgut of rats fed high-fat diets. Male Wistar rats were given malt-supplemented high-fat diets for four weeks. Low and high-fat diets containing microcrystalline cellulose were incorporated as controls. All diets contained 70 g kg(-1) dietary fiber. The malt-fed groups were found to have had induced higher amounts of butyric and propionic acids in the hindgut and portal serum compared with controls, while cecal succinic acid only increased to a small extent. Fat increased the mRNA expression of tight junction proteins and Toll-like receptors (TLR) in the small intestine and distal colon of the rats, as well as the concentration of some amino acids in the portal plasma, but malt seemed to counteract these adverse effects to some extent. However, the high content of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) in caramelized malt tended to prohibit the positive effects on occludin in the small intestine and plasma amino acids seen with the other malt products. In conclusion, malting seems to be an interesting process for producing foods with positive health effects, but part of these effects may be destroyed if the malt contains a high content of AGE. PMID:26227569

  15. 21 CFR 522.533 - Deslorelin acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Deslorelin acetate. (a) Specifications. Each implant contains 2.1 milligrams deslorelin acetate. (b) Sponsor.... One implant per mare. (ii) Indications for use. For inducing ovulation within 48 hours in...

  16. Carbon-isotopic analysis of dissolved acetate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelwicks, J. T.; Hayes, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Heating of dried, acetate-containing solids together with oxalic acid dihydrate conveniently releases acetic acid for purification by gas chromatography. For determination of the carbon-isotopic composition of total acetate, the acetate-containing zone of the chromatographic effluent can be routed directly to a combustion furnace coupled to a vacuum system allowing recovery, purification, and packaging of CO2 for mass-spectrometric analysis. For analysis of methyl carbon, acetic acid can be cryogenically trapped from the chromatographic effluent, then transferred to a tube containing excess NaOH. The tube is evacuated, sealed, and heated to 500 degrees C to produce methane by pyrolysis of sodium acetate. Subsequent combustion of the methane allows determination of the 13C content at the methyl position in the parent acetate. With typical blanks, the standard deviation of single analyses is less than 0.4% for acetate samples larger than 5 micromoles. A full treatment of uncertainties is outlined.

  17. Ozone decomposition in aqueous acetate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sehested, K.; Holcman, J.; Bjergbakke, E.; Hart, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    The acetate radical ion reacts with ozone with a rate constant of k = (1.5 +/- 0.5) x 10Z dmT mol s . The products from this reaction are CO2, HCHO, and O2 . By subsequent reaction of the peroxy radical with ozone the acetate radical ion is regenerated through the OH radical. A chain decomposition of ozone takes place. It terminates when the acetate radical ion reacts with oxygen forming the unreactive peroxy acetate radical. The chain is rather short as oxygen is developed, as a result of the ozone consumption. The inhibiting effect of acetate on the ozone decay is rationalized by OH scavenging by acetate and successive reaction of the acetate radical ion with oxygen. Some products from the bimolecular disappearance of the peroxy acetate radicals, however, react further with ozone, reducing the effectiveness of the stabilization.

  18. Butyrate modulates bacterial adherence on LS174T human colorectal cells by stimulating mucin secretion and MAPK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Tae-Hwan; Park, Jeong Hyeon; Han, Kyoung-Sik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Fermentation of dietary fiber results in production of various short chain fatty acids in the colon. In particular, butyrate is reported to regulate the physical and functional integrity of the normal colonic mucosa by altering mucin gene expression or the number of goblet cells. The objective of this study was to investigate whether butyrate modulates mucin secretion in LS174T human colorectal cells, thereby influencing the adhesion of probiotics such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains and subsequently inhibiting pathogenic bacteria such as E. coli. In addition, possible signaling pathways involved in mucin gene regulation induced by butyrate treatment were also investigated. MATERIALS/METHODS Mucin protein content assay and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining were performed in LS174T cells treated with butyrate at various concentrations. Effects of butyrate on the ability of probiotics to adhere to LS174T cells and their competition with E. coli strains were examined. Real time polymerase chain reaction for mucin gene expression and Taqman array 96-well fast plate-based pathway analysis were performed on butyrate-treated LS174T cells. RESULTS Treatment with butyrate resulted in a dose-dependent increase in mucin protein contents in LS174T cells with peak effects at 6 or 9 mM, which was further confirmed by PAS staining. Increase in mucin protein contents resulted in elevated adherence of probiotics, which subsequently reduced the adherent ability of E. coli. Treatment with butyrate also increased transcriptional levels of MUC3, MUC4, and MUC12, which was accompanied by higher gene expressions of signaling kinases and transcription factors involved in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. CONCLUSIONS Based on our results, butyrate is an effective regulator of modulation of mucin protein production at the transcriptional and translational levels, resulting in changes in the adherence of gut microflora. Butyrate

  19. The rib1 Mutant of Arabidopsis Has Alterations in Indole-3-Butyric Acid Transport, Hypocotyl Elongation, and Root Architecture1

    PubMed Central

    Poupart, Julie; Rashotte, Aaron M.; Muday, Gloria K.; Waddell, Candace S.

    2005-01-01

    Polar transport of the auxin indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) has recently been shown to occur in Arabidopsis (Arabidopis thaliana) seedlings, yet the physiological importance of this process has yet to be fully resolved. Here we describe the first demonstration of altered IBA transport in an Arabidopsis mutant, and show that the resistant to IBA (rib1) mutation results in alterations in growth, development, and response to exogenous auxin consistent with an important physiological role for IBA transport. Both hypocotyl and root IBA basipetal transport are decreased in rib1 and root acropetal IBA transport is increased. While indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) transport levels are not different in rib1 compared to wild type, root acropetal IAA transport is insensitive to the IAA efflux inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid in rib1, as is the dependent physiological process of lateral root formation. These observed changes in IBA transport are accompanied by altered rib1 phenotypes. Previously, rib1 roots were shown to be less sensitive to growth inhibition by IBA, but to have a wild-type response to IAA in root elongation. rib1 is also less sensitive to IBA in stimulation of lateral root formation and in hypocotyl elongation under most, but not all, light and sucrose conditions. rib1 has wild-type responses to IAA, except under one set of conditions, low light and 1.5% sucrose, in which both hypocotyl elongation and lateral root formation show altered IAA response. Taken together, our results support a model in which endogenous IBA influences wild-type seedling morphology. Modifications in IBA distribution in seedlings affect hypocotyl and root elongation, as well as lateral root formation. PMID:16258013

  20. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3 or C2H3O2Na·3H2O, CAS Reg. No. 6131-90-4) is the sodium salt of acetic acid and occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues....

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of the Butyric Acid Producer Clostridium tyrobutyricum Strain CIP I-776 (IFP923)

    PubMed Central

    Clément, Benjamin; Lopes Ferreira, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Clostridium tyrobutyricum CIP I-776 (IFP923), an efficient producer of butyric acid. The genome consists of a single chromosome of 3.19 Mb and provides useful data concerning the metabolic capacities of the strain. PMID:26941139

  2. Simultaneous Clostridial fermentation, lipase-catalyzed esterification, and ester extraction to enrich diesel with butyl butyrate.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Corjan; Heeres, Arjan S; van der Wielen, Luuk A M; Straathof, Adrie J J

    2013-01-01

    The recovery of 1-butanol from fermentation broth is energy-intensive since typical concentrations in fermentation broth are below 20 g L(-1). To prevent butanol inhibition and high downstream processing costs, we aimed at producing butyl esters instead of 1-butanol. It is shown that it is possible to perform simultaneously clostridial fermentation, esterification of the formed butanol to butyl butyrate, and extraction of this ester by hexadecane. The very high partition coefficient of butyl butyrate pulls the esterification towards the product side even at fermentation pH and relatively low butanol concentrations. The hexadecane extractant is a model diesel compound and is nontoxic to the cells. If butyl butyrate enriched diesel can directly be used as car fuel, no product recovery is required. A proof-of-principle experiment for the one-pot bio-ester production from glucose led to 5 g L(-1) butyl butyrate in the hexadecane phase. The principle may be extended to a wide range of esters, especially to longer chain ones. PMID:22833369

  3. Perturbation dynamics of the rumen microbiota in response to exogenous butyrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The capacity of the rumen microbiota to produce volatile fatty acids (VFA) has important implications in animal well-being and production. We investigated temporal changes of the rumen microbiota in response to butyrate infusion using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Phyla were identified in ...

  4. 4-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy)butyric acid (2,4-DB)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    4 - ( 2,4 - Dichlorophenoxy ) butyric acid ( 2,4 - DB ) ; CASRN 94 - 82 - 6 Health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in IRIS only after a comprehensive review of chronic toxicity data by U.S . EPA health scientists from several Program Offices and the Office of Research and

  5. Exploring the Genome of a Butyric Acid Producer, Clostridium butyricum INCQS635

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Fernanda Gomes; Tschoeke, Diogo Antonio; Miranda, Milene; Pereira, Nei; Valle, Rogério; Thompson, Cristiane C.

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of Clostridium butyricum INCQS635 was obtained by means of ion sequencing. The genome provides further insight into the genetic repertoire involved with metabolic pathways related to the fermentation of different compounds and organic solvents synthesis (i.e., butyric acid) with biofuel applications. PMID:25414496

  6. Exploring the Genome of a Butyric Acid Producer, Clostridium butyricum INCQS635.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Thiago; Leite, Fernanda Gomes; Tschoeke, Diogo Antonio; Miranda, Milene; Pereira, Nei; Valle, Rogério; Thompson, Cristiane C; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of Clostridium butyricum INCQS635 was obtained by means of ion sequencing. The genome provides further insight into the genetic repertoire involved with metabolic pathways related to the fermentation of different compounds and organic solvents synthesis (i.e., butyric acid) with biofuel applications. PMID:25414496

  7. Butyrate and deoxycholic acid play common and distinct roles in HCT116 human colon cell proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of a high fat diet causes an increase in bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) in colon lumen and colon cancer risk while butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, has been shown to exhibit colon cancer preventive effects. To distinguish these opposing effects of DCA and...

  8. Butyrate and deoxycholic acid play common and distinct roles in HCT116 human colon cell proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of a high fat diet causes an increase in bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) in colon lumen and colon cancer risk while butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, has been shown to exhibit colon cancer preventive effects. To distinguish these opposing effects of D...

  9. Kinetics of the Methanogenic Fermentation of Acetate

    PubMed Central

    Fukuzaki, Satoshi; Nishio, Naomichi; Nagai, Shiro

    1990-01-01

    Inhibition of the fermentation of acetate to methane and carbon dioxide by acetate was analyzed with an acetate-acclimatized sludge and with Methanosarcina barkeri Fusaro under mesophilic conditions. A second-order substrate inhibition model, qch4 = qmS/[Ks + S + (S2/Ki)], where S was the concentration of undissociated acetic acid, not ionized acetic acid, could be applicable in both cases. The analysis resulted in substrate saturation constants, Ks, of 4.0 μM for the acclimatized sludge and 104 μM for M. barkeri. The threshold concentrations of undissociated acetic acid when no further acetate utilization was observed were 0.078 μM (pH 7.50) for the acclimatized sludge and 4.43 μM (pH 7.45) for M. barkeri. These kinetic results suggested that the concentration of undissociated acetic acid became a key factor governing the actual threshold acetate concentration for acetate utilization and that the acclimatized sludge in which Methanothrix spp. appeared dominant could utilize acetate better and survive at a lower concentration of undissociated acetic acid than could M. barkeri. Images PMID:16348323

  10. 21 CFR 522.2476 - Trenbolone acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... days. (A) 140 milligrams (mg) trenbolone acetate (one implant consisting of 7 pellets, each pellet containing 20 mg trenbolone acetate) per implant dose. (B) 140 mg trenbolone acetate (one implant consisting... 29 mg tylosin tartrate) per implant dose. (ii) Indications for use. For improved feed...

  11. 21 CFR 522.2476 - Trenbolone acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... days. (A) 140 milligrams (mg) trenbolone acetate (one implant consisting of 7 pellets, each pellet containing 20 mg trenbolone acetate) per implant dose. (B) 140 mg trenbolone acetate (one implant consisting... 29 mg tylosin tartrate) per implant dose. (ii) Indications for use. For improved feed...

  12. 21 CFR 522.2476 - Trenbolone acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... days. (A) 140 milligrams (mg) trenbolone acetate (one implant consisting of 7 pellets, each pellet containing 20 mg trenbolone acetate) per implant dose. (B) 140 mg trenbolone acetate (one implant consisting... 29 mg tylosin tartrate) per implant dose. (ii) Indications for use. For improved feed...

  13. 21 CFR 522.2476 - Trenbolone acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... days. (A) 140 milligrams (mg) trenbolone acetate (one implant consisting of 7 pellets, each pellet containing 20 mg trenbolone acetate) per implant dose. (B) 140 mg trenbolone acetate (one implant consisting... 29 mg tylosin tartrate) per implant dose. (ii) Indications for use. For improved feed...

  14. 21 CFR 582.6185 - Calcium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 582.6185 Section 582.6185 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium acetate. (a) Product. Calcium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  15. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acetic acid. 184.1005 Section 184.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Acetic acid (C2H4O2, CAS Reg. No. 64-19-7) is known as ethanoic acid. It...

  17. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  18. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  19. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  20. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  1. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  2. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  3. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 582.1721 Section 582.1721 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Product. Sodium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  6. Acet-oxy-γ-valerolactone.

    PubMed

    Tristram, Cameron; Gainsford, Graeme J; Hinkley, Simon

    2013-06-01

    Levulinyl cellulose esters have been produced as an effective renewable binder for architectural coatings. The title compound, C7H10O4 (systematic name: 2-methyl-5-oxo-tetra-hydro-furan-2-yl acetate), assigned as the esterifying species, was isolated and crystallized to confirm the structure. In the crystal, the mol-ecules pack in layers parallel to (102) utilizing weak C-H⋯O inter-actions. PMID:23795112

  7. Effects of 5-azacytidine and butyrate on differentiation and apoptosis of hepatic cancer cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X M; Wang, X; Li, J; Evers, B M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the cellular effects of 5-azacytidine (5-azaC) and sodium butyrate on two human liver cancers, HepG2 and Hep3B. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Primary liver cancer is a significant health problem; treatment options are limited and prognosis is poor. Recent studies have focused on the role that programmed cell death (i.e., apoptosis) plays in both normal and neoplastic growth: certain genes can either suppress (e.g., Bcl-2, Bcl-xL) or promote (e.g., Bik, Bax, Bak) apoptosis. The identification of novel agents targeted to specific molecular pathways may be beneficial in the treatment of this disease. METHODS: Human liver cancer cell lines HepG2 and Hep3B were treated with 5-azaC alone, butyrate alone, or 5-azaC and butyrate. Morphologic and proliferative changes were assessed by light microscopy and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine staining; flow cytometry was used to determine cell cycle characteristics. Apoptosis was assessed by DNA laddering and the in situ apoptosis detection assay using the TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling method. In addition, total RNA and protein were analyzed by ribonuclease protection and Western blot, respectively, to assess changes in the expression of apoptosis-related genes. RESULTS: Treatment with either 5-azaC or butyrate inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in both HepG2 and Hep3B cells; the combination of 5-azaC and butyrate was not more effective than either agent alone. 5-azaC alone resulted in a more differentiated-appearing morphology and G2 cell cycle arrest in both cell lines. Treatment with 5-azaC or butyrate affected the expression levels of proteins of the Bcl-2 family. CONCLUSIONS: Both 5-azaC and butyrate induced apoptosis in the HepG2 and Hep3B liver cancer cells; 5-azaC treatment alone produced G2 arrest in both cell lines. Proteins of the Bcl-2 family may play a role in the cellular changes that occur with treatment, but further studies are required to define this potential role. Products of the

  8. Eumovate (clobetasone butyrate 0.05%) cream: a review of clinical efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Goustas, P; Cork, M J; Higson, D

    2003-06-01

    Topical steroid creams and ointments have been available as over-the-counter (OTC) medications for the self treatment of acute dermatitis and other steroid responsive skin disorders for more than ten years. Despite earlier fears, widespread availability and use of these creams is not associated with clinically significant adverse effects. In dermatological practice, hydrocortisone 1% remains the mainstay of treatment for facial eczema, but it is often not effective in eczema affecting other body areas. Eumovate(TM) (clobetasone butyrate 0.05%) cream has recently been made available as a pharmacy medication for the short-term management of acute eczema and allergic dermatitis by adults and children aged 10 or older, based on evidence derived from clinical trials involving over 3500 patients. This review summarises the key efficacy and safety data derived from 29 clinical trials and the post-licensing pharmacovigilance safety information, which supported the reclassification of this product for OTC use. These data show clobetasone butyrate 0.05% is more effective than 1.0% hydrocortisone in the treatment of eczema and more effective than flurandrenolone 0.0125% (p=0.01%) and a potent topical steroid hydrocortisone butyrate (p<0.05), in the treatment of psoriasis. A review of the effect of topical steroids on skin thickness concluded that, following short term application, there was no clinically significant difference between hydrocortisone 1.0% and clobetasone butyrate 0.05% in terms of potential for skin thinning. Similarly, even under extreme conditions, clobetasone butyrate 0.05% has negligible systemic absorption and has almost no effect on HPA axis function. PMID:12775314

  9. Performance of feedlot steers fed diets containing laidlomycin propionate or monensin plus tylosin, and effects of laidlomycin propionate concentration on intake patterns and ruminal fermentation in beef steers during adaptation to a high-concentrate diet.

    PubMed

    Galyean, M L; Malcolm, K J; Duff, G C

    1992-10-01

    Two hundred eighty-eight beef steers (British x Continental x Brahman) were fed a 90% concentrate diet containing either no ionophore (control), laidlomycin propionate at either 6 or 12 mg/kg of dietary DM, or monensin plus tylosin (31 and 12 mg/kg of DM, respectively). Neither of the two levels of laidlomycin propionate nor monensin plus tylosin affected (P greater than .10) ADG or feed:gain ratio. Monensin plus tylosin reduced (P less than .01) daily DMI for the 161-d trial period compared with the other three treatments. Laidlomycin propionate at 6 mg/kg increased (P less than .05) DMI relative to the control, laidlomycin propionate at 12 mg/kg, and monensin plus tylosin diets during the 2nd wk of the trial and from d 57 to 84. Treatments did not affect carcass measurements. In a second experiment, 12 ruminally cannulated steers were fed diets containing no ionophore or laidlomycin propionate at either 6 or 12 mg/kg of DM. Samples were obtained for two consecutive days while the dietary concentrate level was 75%, after which the diet was switched abruptly to 90% concentrate, and samples were collected on several days during a 21-d period. The rate at which steers consumed their daily allotment of feed was not altered markedly by laidlomycin propionate. Likewise, laidlomycin propionate did not affect total ruminal VFA concentrations or proportions. Ruminal concentrations of D-lactate were reduced (P less than .10) by 6 but not by 12 mg/kg of laidlomycin propionate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1429270

  10. Millimeterwave rotational spectrum and theoretical calculations of cis-propionic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaman, A. I.; Chakraborty, Shamik; Chakraborty, Rangana

    2015-01-01

    The millimeterwave rotational spectra of the cis conformer of propionic acid (C3H6O2) have been investigated in the ground vibrational state in the frequency range of 80.0-100.0 GHz. Many high J and K-1 (Jmax = 50, K-1 = 12) rotational lines have been assigned. A least-squares analysis of the measured and previously reported rotational transition frequencies resulted in the determination of an improved set of rotational and centrifugal distortion (CD) constants of the molecule. Detailed MP2 and DFT calculations were also carried out with various functional and basis sets to evaluate the spectroscopic constants, dipole moment, and various structural parameters of cis-propionic acid and compared with the corresponding experimental values. Potential energy surface has been calculated to identify other probable conformers in this molecule.

  11. N-carbamylglutamate in emergency management of hyperammonemia in neonatal acute onset propionic and methylmalonic aciduria.

    PubMed

    Filippi, Luca; Gozzini, Elena; Fiorini, Patrizio; Malvagia, Sabrina; la Marca, Giancarlo; Donati, Maria Alice

    2010-01-01

    In propionic aciduria and methylmalonic aciduria, hyperammonemia as a symptom of metabolic decompensation is one of the major clinical problems. Hyperammonemia is a true neonatal emergency with high mortality and neurological complications in most survivors. It requires a rapid and vigorous treatment in order to normalize the ammonia concentration as fast as possible. We report on two full-term neonates, one with propionic aciduria and the other with methylmalonic aciduria, whose plasma ammonia concentrations responded dramatically to oral N-carbamylglutamate. N-carbamylglutamate, added to the classic treatment, quickly normalized plasma ammonia levels in both patients and avoided the need of hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. A particularly sudden fall of ammonia was obtained in one patient through beginning N-carbamylglutamate treatment precociously. PMID:19887858

  12. Comparison of official methods for 'readily oxidizable substances' in propionic acid as a food additive.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, H; Takeda, Y; Kawasaki, Y; Kubota, H; Yamada, T

    1996-01-01

    The official methods for 'readily oxidizable substances (ROS)' in propionic acid as a food additive were compared. The methods examined were those adopted in the Compendium of Food Additive Specifications (CFAS) by the Joint FAO-WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives, FAO, The Japanese Standards for Food Additives (JSFA) by the Ministry of Health and Welfare, Japan, and the Food Chemicals Codex (FCC) by the National Research Council, USA. The methods given in CFAS and JSFA are the same (potassium permanganate consumption). However, by this method, manganese (VII) in potassium permanganate was readily reduced to colourless manganese(II) with some substances contained in the propionic acid before reacting with aldehydes, which are generally considered as 'readily oxidizable substances', to form brown manganese (IV) oxide. The FCC method (bromine consumption) for 'ROS' could be recommended because it was able to obtain quantitative results of 'ROS', including aldehydes. PMID:8647299

  13. Death of a Neonate With a Negative Autopsy and Ketoacidosis: A Case Report of Propionic Acidemia.

    PubMed

    Krizova, Adriana; Herath, Jayantha C

    2015-09-01

    Facing a sudden neonatal death in the forensic setting brings to mind enormous differential diagnostic possibilities. This case report demonstrates that at times, when no anatomical cause of death is apparent after a postmortem examination, ancillary testing can lead to diagnosis. In this case, ancillary testing showed ketosis and further workup showed presence of propionic acidemia in a 3-day-old neonate. PMID:26017692

  14. Three cases of opportunistic infection caused by propionic acid producing Corynebacterium minutissimum.

    PubMed

    Van Bosterhaut, B; Cuvelier, R; Serruys, E; Pouthier, F; Wauters, G

    1992-07-01

    Propionic acid producing strains of Corynebacterium minutissimum were isolated from three patients with opportunistic infections. One neutropenic patient was undergoing chemotherapy for prolymphocytic leukemia; the other two patients were undergoing hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis respectively. An unusual feature of these three strains was their resistance to several antibiotics, which is seldom seen in diphtheroids other than Corynebacterium jeikeium and CDC group D2. PMID:1396773

  15. Involvement of the Antioxidant Effect and Anti-inflammatory Response in Butyrate-Inhibited Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Omana P.; Ranganna, Kasturi; Milton, Shirlette G.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms by altering the expression and, in turn, functions of target genes have potential to modify cellular processes that are characteristics of atherosclerosis, including inflammation, proliferation, migration and apoptosis/cell death. Butyrate, a natural epigenetic modifier and a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi), is an inhibitor of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, a critical event in atherogenesis. Here, we examined whether glutathione peroxidases (GPxs), a family of antioxidant enzymes, are modulated by butyrate, contributing to its antiproliferation action on VSMC through the regulation of the inflammatory response by using western blotting, immunostaining methods and activity assay. Treatment of VSMC with butyrate not only upregulates glutathione peroxidase (GPx) 3 and GPx4, but also increases the overall catalytic activity of GPx supporting involvement of antioxidant effect in butyrate arrested VSMC proliferation. Moreover, analysis of the redox-sensitive NF-κB transcription factor system, the target of GPx, reveals that butyrate causes downregulation of IKKα, IKKβ, IkBα and NF-κBp65 expression and prevents NF-κBp65 phosphorylation at serine536 causing inhibition of the expression NF-κB target inflammatory genes, including inducible nitric oxide synthase, VCAM-1 and cyclooxygenase-2. Overall, these observations suggest a link between the antioxidant effect and anti-inflammatory response in butyrate-arrested VSMC proliferation, accentuating the atheroprotective and therapeutic potential of natural products, like butyrate, in vascular proliferative diseases. PMID:25390157

  16. Butyrate downregulates α2β1 integrin: a possible role in the induction of apoptosis in colorectal cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Buda, A; Qualtrough, D; Jepson, M A; Martines, D; Paraskeva, C; Pignatelli, M

    2003-01-01

    Background: Integrins mediate cell matrix adhesion and regulate cell growth and survival. In colonic epithelial cells, α2β1 integrin controls glandular differentiation and proliferation. Butyrate stimulates differentiation and induces apoptosis in vitro. Aims: We investigated whether butyrate induction of apoptosis was associated with perturbation of integrin mediated cell matrix adhesion. Methods: Three colonic cancer cell lines (SW1222, SW620, LS174T) were studied. Adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins, expression of α2β1 integrin, and apoptosis were studied in adherent cells after treatment with 4 mM butyrate. Results: Butyrate decreased the attachment to type I collagen in SW620 cells and type I and IV collagen in LS174T cells. The decreased cell attachment was associated with downregulation of α2β1 integrin and increased apoptosis in adherent cells. No changes in α2β1 expression or matrix adhesion were seen in SW1222 cells, which were also found to be less sensitive to butyrate induction of apoptosis. Downregulation of α2β1 integrin preceded the detection of apoptosis. Conclusion: Apoptosis induced by butyrate is associated with downregulation of expression and functional activity of α2β1 integrin. Perturbation of cell matrix adhesion may be a novel mechanism by which butyrate induces apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells. PMID:12692060

  17. Comparison of the butyrate effects on neurotransmitter receptors in neurohybrids NG108-15 and NCB-20 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X.Z.; Chuang, D.M.

    1987-08-31

    The authors previous study demonstrated that long term treatment of NCB-20 cells with sodium butyrate resulted in a marked increase in the density of delta-opioid receptors with a much lesser effect on muscarinic cholinergic and no effect on alpha/sub 2/-adrenergic receptors. In the present study the authors investigated the effect of sodium butyrate on these three types of receptors in NG108-15 cells whose neuroblastoma parent is the same as that of NCB-20 cells. Long term treatment of NG108-15 cells with sodium butyrate (0.5 mM) induced a 2-fold increase in the density of the specific binding of /sup 3/H-clonidine. A comparable increase in the number of binding sites was detected when /sup 3/H-yohimbine was used as the receptor ligand. The butyrate-induced increase in the alpha/sub 2/-adrenergic receptor binding could be totally abolished by treatment with a protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, suggesting that synthesis of receptor protein is involved. The same butyrate treatment had no significant effect on opioid and muscarinic cholinergic receptor bindings. Thus, butyrate effects on the expression of these three types of receptors in NG108-15 and NCB-20 cells are dramatically different. These data suggest that induction by butyrate of neurotransmitter receptors requires concerted action of genetic factors of both parents of the neurohybrids. 22 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  18. Increased colonic propionate reduces anticipatory reward responses in the human striatum to high-energy foods123

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Claire S; Chambers, Edward S; Alhabeeb, Habeeb; Chhina, Navpreet; Preston, Tom; Tedford, Catriona; Fitzpatrick, Julie; Irani, Cherag; Busza, Albert; Garcia-Perez, Isabel; Fountana, Sofia; Holmes, Elaine; Goldstone, Anthony P; Frost, Gary S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), metabolites produced through the microbial fermentation of nondigestible dietary components, have key roles in energy homeostasis. Animal research suggests that colon-derived SCFAs modulate feeding behavior via central mechanisms. In humans, increased colonic production of the SCFA propionate acutely reduces energy intake. However, evidence of an effect of colonic propionate on the human brain or reward-based eating behavior is currently unavailable. Objectives: We investigated the effect of increased colonic propionate production on brain anticipatory reward responses during food picture evaluation. We hypothesized that elevated colonic propionate would reduce both reward responses and ad libitum energy intake via stimulation of anorexigenic gut hormone secretion. Design: In a randomized crossover design, 20 healthy nonobese men completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) food picture evaluation task after consumption of control inulin or inulin-propionate ester, a unique dietary compound that selectively augments colonic propionate production. The blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) signal was measured in a priori brain regions involved in reward processing, including the caudate, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, anterior insula, and orbitofrontal cortex (n = 18 had analyzable fMRI data). Results: Increasing colonic propionate production reduced BOLD signal during food picture evaluation in the caudate and nucleus accumbens. In the caudate, the reduction in BOLD signal was driven specifically by a lowering of the response to high-energy food. These central effects were partnered with a decrease in subjective appeal of high-energy food pictures and reduced energy intake during an ad libitum meal. These observations were not related to changes in blood peptide YY (PYY), glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), glucose, or insulin concentrations. Conclusion: Our results suggest that colonic propionate production may

  19. Metabolism of propionic acid to a novel acyl-coenzyme A thioester by mammalian cell lines and platelets[S

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Nathaniel W.; Basu, Sankha S.; Worth, Andrew J.; Mesaros, Clementina; Blair, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolism of propionate involves the activated acyl-thioester propionyl-CoA intermediate. We employed LC-MS/MS, LC-selected reaction monitoring/MS, and LC-high-resolution MS to investigate metabolism of propionate to acyl-CoA intermediates. We discovered that propionyl-CoA can serve as a precursor to the direct formation of a new six-carbon mono-unsaturated acyl-CoA. Time course and dose-response studies in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells demonstrated that the six-carbon mono-unsaturated acyl-CoA was propionate-dependent and underwent further metabolism over time. Studies utilizing [13C1]propionate and [13C3]propionate suggested a mechanism of fatty acid synthesis, which maintained all six-carbon atoms from two propionate molecules. Metabolism of 2,2-[2H2]propionate to the new six-carbon mono-unsaturated acyl-CoA resulted in the complete loss of two deuterium atoms, indicating modification at C2 of the propionyl moiety. Coelution experiments and isotopic tracer studies confirmed that the new acyl-CoA was trans-2-methyl-2-pentenoyl-CoA. Acyl-CoA profiles following treatment of HepG2 cells with mono-unsaturated six-carbon fatty acids also supported this conclusion. Similar results were obtained with human platelets, mouse hepatocellular carcinoma Hepa1c1c7 cells, human bronchoalveolar carcinoma H358 cells, and human colon adenocarcinoma LoVo cells. Interestingly, trans-2-methyl-2-pentenoyl-CoA corresponds to a previously described acylcarnitine tentatively described in patients with propionic and methylmalonic acidemia. We have proposed a mechanism for this metabolic route consistent with all of the above findings. PMID:25424005

  20. Metabolism of propionic acid to a novel acyl-coenzyme A thioester by mammalian cell lines and platelets.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Nathaniel W; Basu, Sankha S; Worth, Andrew J; Mesaros, Clementina; Blair, Ian A

    2015-01-01

    Metabolism of propionate involves the activated acyl-thioester propionyl-CoA intermediate. We employed LC-MS/MS, LC-selected reaction monitoring/MS, and LC-high-resolution MS to investigate metabolism of propionate to acyl-CoA intermediates. We discovered that propionyl-CoA can serve as a precursor to the direct formation of a new six-carbon mono-unsaturated acyl-CoA. Time course and dose-response studies in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells demonstrated that the six-carbon mono-unsaturated acyl-CoA was propionate-dependent and underwent further metabolism over time. Studies utilizing [(13)C1]propionate and [(13)C3]propionate suggested a mechanism of fatty acid synthesis, which maintained all six-carbon atoms from two propionate molecules. Metabolism of 2,2-[(2)H2]propionate to the new six-carbon mono-unsaturated acyl-CoA resulted in the complete loss of two deuterium atoms, indicating modification at C2 of the propionyl moiety. Coelution experiments and isotopic tracer studies confirmed that the new acyl-CoA was trans-2-methyl-2-pentenoyl-CoA. Acyl-CoA profiles following treatment of HepG2 cells with mono-unsaturated six-carbon fatty acids also supported this conclusion. Similar results were obtained with human platelets, mouse hepatocellular carcinoma Hepa1c1c7 cells, human bronchoalveolar carcinoma H358 cells, and human colon adenocarcinoma LoVo cells. Interestingly, trans-2-methyl-2-pentenoyl-CoA corresponds to a previously described acylcarnitine tentatively described in patients with propionic and methylmalonic acidemia. We have proposed a mechanism for this metabolic route consistent with all of the above findings. PMID:25424005

  1. Salmeterol combined with fluticasone propionate improved COPD in patients during stable stage

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Dongmei; Ma, Junpeng; Yang, Xiaohong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical effect of inhaled Salmeterol with Fluticasone propionate (50:500 μg) in patients with moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) during the stable stage of the disease. Methods: Sixty patients with moderate to severe COPD were randomly divided into trial and control groups (N=30 each). In the trial group, patients inhaled Salmeterol with Fluticasone (50:500 μg) propionate twice daily via turbuhaler for 3 months. In the control group, patients used slow- released theophylline, 200 mg, twice daily for 3 months; patients took an expectorant (Ambroxol Hydrochloride, 10 ml, three times daily) if necessary. Clinical symptoms and physical signs were graded using St. George’s respiratory disease questionnaire (SGRQ). Changes in lung function were assessed. Results: Indicators of lung function including the values of FEV1, FEV1/FVC, and FEV1/predicted values were significantly higher after treatment in the trial group than in the control group (P<0.05). SGRQ values in the trial group decreased significantly after treatment (P<0.05). Conclusion: Inhaled Salmeterol 50 μg and Fluticasone propionate 500 μg can significantly improve the lung function and clinical symptoms of patients with stable moderate to severe COPD. PMID:25356157

  2. Characterisation of the aggregation behaviour in a salmeterol and fluticasone propionate inhalation aerosol system.

    PubMed

    Michael, Y; Snowden, M J; Chowdhry, B Z; Ashurst, I C; Davies-Cutting, C J; Riley, T

    2001-06-19

    The nature of the drug-drug aggregation phenomena between salmeterol xinafoate and fluticasone propionate used in a metered-dose inhaler system has been examined. Interactions between the drugs in the solvents 1,1,2-trichlorotrifloroethane (CFC-113) and 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFA-134a) have been characterised using a focused beam reflectance measurement probe by measuring the average floc size of the drug particles individually and in combination as a function of stirrer rate. The floc composition in the CFC-113 system, where the drug particles cream, was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. The aggregation behaviour of the individual drugs was shown to depend on the physical and chemical properties of both the drug substance and the media. Larger flocs were observed for salmeterol xinafoate compared with fluticasone propionate, while both drugs formed larger aggregates in HFA-134a compared with in CFC-113. The floc composition studies demonstrated that, in the combined formulation in CFC-113, salmeterol xinafoate and fluticasone propionate aggregate together to form hetero-flocs. The interaction between the two drugs was such that they did not separate on creaming, despite having different densities. The average floc size of the combined drug suspension was also found to depend on the dispersion medium. PMID:11397578

  3. Two frequent mutations associated with the classic form of propionic acidemia in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yen-Hui; Liu, Yu-Ning; Liao, Wei-Ling; Chang, Ying-Chen; Lin, Shuan-Pei; Hsu, Chia-Chi; Chiu, Pao-Chin; Niu, Dau-Ming; Wang, Chung-Hsing; Ke, Yu-Yuan; Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Hsiao, Kwang-Jen; Liu, Tze-Tze

    2014-10-01

    Propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC) is involved in the catabolism of branched chain amino acids, odd-numbered fatty acids, cholesterol, and other metabolites. PCC consists of two subunits, α and β, encoded by the PCCA and PCCB genes, respectively. Mutations in the PCCA or PCCB subunit gene may lead to propionic acidemia. In this study, we performed mutation analysis on ten propionic acidemia patients from eight unrelated and nonconsanguineous families in Taiwan. Two PCCA mutations, c.229C→T (p.R77W) and c.1262A→C (p.Q421P), were identified in a PCCA-deficient patient. Six mutations in the PCCB gene, including c.-4156_183+3713del, c.580T→C (p.S194P), c.838dup (p.L280Pfs 11), c.1301C→T (p.A434V), c.1316A→G (P.Y439C), and c.1534C→T (p.R512C), were identified in seven PCCB-deficient families. The c.-4156_183+3713del mutation is the first known large deletion that affects the PCCB gene functions. Furthermore, the c.1301C→T and c.-4156_183+3713del mutations in the PCCB gene have not been reported previously. Clinical features demonstrated that these two frequent mutations are associated with low enzyme activity and a classic propionic acidemia phenotype. PMID:24863100

  4. A case of methylmalonic and propionic acidemia due to methulmalonyl-CoA carbonylmutase apoenzyme deficiency.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, H; Boelkens, M T; Hommes, F A

    1976-01-01

    A patient presenting with a deep metabolic acidosis after birth is described. Gas chromatographic analysis of short chain fatty acid and non volatile organic acids revealed the presence of both propionic and methylmalonic acid. In plasma obtained immediately after death the propionic- and methylmalonic acid concentrations were measured after separation of both acids by thin layer chromatography. The propionic acid concentration was about 5 mM while the methylmalonic acid concentration was 2.6 mM. The methylmalonic acid concentration in urine was 6.8 mM. Propionyl-CoA carboxylase activity measured in leucocytes and liver-mitochondria revealed normal values (53 pmoles/min/mg protein and 6.5 nmoles/min/mg protein respectively). 2-14C-Methyl-malonate oxydation in intact fibroblasts was totally blocked in the patient's cells. The methylmalonyl-CoA carbonyl mutase activity was found to be absent in the patient's fibroblasts. Addition of vit. B12 coenzyme to the incubation mixture stimulated 14C-succinate formation in the control cells but not in the patient's cells. PMID:3087

  5. Acetic acid recovery from a hybrid biological-hydrothermal treatment process of sewage sludge - a pilot plant study.

    PubMed

    Andrews, J; Dare, P; Estcourt, G; Gapes, D; Lei, R; McDonald, B; Wijaya, N

    2015-01-01

    A two-stage process consisting of anaerobic fermentation followed by sub-critical wet oxidation was used to generate acetic acid from sewage sludge at pilot scale. Volatile fatty acids, dominated by propionic acid, were produced over 4-6 days in the 2,000 L fermentation reactor, which also achieved 31% solids reduction. Approximately 96% of the carbon was retained in solution over the fermentation stage. Using a 200 L wet oxidation reactor operating in batch mode, the second stage achieved 98% volatile suspended solids (VSS) destruction and 67% total chemical oxygen demand (tCOD) destruction. Acetic acid produced in this stage was recalcitrant to further degradation and was retained in solution. The gross yield from VSS was 16% for acetic acid and 21% for volatile fatty acids across the process, higher than reported yields for wet oxidation alone. The pilot plant results showed that 72% of the incoming phosphorus was retained in the solids, 94% of the nitrogen became concentrated in solution and 41% of the carbon was converted to a soluble state, in a more degradable form. Acetic acid produced from the process has the potential to be used to offset ethanol requirements in biological nutrient removal plants. PMID:25768220

  6. Relationship of Enhanced Butyrate Production by Colonic Butyrate-Producing Bacteria to Immunomodulatory Effects in Normal Mice Fed an Insoluble Fraction of Brassica rapa L.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Sachi; Yamamoto, Kana; Yamada, Kazuki; Furuya, Kanon; Uyeno, Yutaka

    2016-05-01

    This study was performed to determine the effects of feeding a fiber-rich fraction of Brassica vegetables on the immune response through changes in enteric bacteria and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production in normal mice. The boiled-water-insoluble fraction of Brassica rapa L. (nozawana), which consists mainly of dietary fiber, was chosen as a test material. A total of 31 male C57BL/6J mice were divided into two groups and housed in a specific-pathogen-free facility. The animals were fed either a control diet or the control diet plus the insoluble B. rapa L. fraction for 2 weeks and sacrificed to determine microbiological and SCFA profiles in lower-gut samples and immunological molecules. rRNA-based quantification indicated that the relative population of Bacteroidetes was markedly lower in the colon samples of the insoluble B. rapa L. fraction-fed group than that in the controls. Populations of the Eubacterium rectale group and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, both of which are representative butyrate-producing bacteria, doubled after 2 weeks of fraction intake, accompanying a marginal increase in the proportion of colonic butyrate. In addition, feeding with the fraction significantly increased levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) and tended to increase splenic regulatory T cell numbers but significantly reduced the population of cells expressing activation markers. We demonstrated that inclusion of the boiled-water-insoluble fraction of B. rapa L. can alter the composition of the gut microbiota to decrease the numbers of Bacteroidetes and to increase the numbers of butyrate-producing bacteria, either of which may be involved in the observed shift in the production of splenic IL-10. PMID:26921420

  7. Efficacy of sodium butyrate adjunct therapy in shigellosis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Treatment of shigellosis in rabbits with butyrate reduces clinical severity and counteracts the downregulation of cathelicidin (CAP-18) in the large intestinal epithelia. Here, we aimed to evaluate whether butyrate can be used as an adjunct to antibiotics in the treatment of shigellosis in patients. Methods A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group designed clinical trial was conducted. Eighty adult patients with shigellosis were randomized to either the Intervention group (butyrate, n = 40) or the Placebo group (normal saline, n = 40). The Intervention group was given an enema containing sodium butyrate (80 mM), twice daily for 3 days, while the Placebo group received the same dose of normal saline. The primary endpoint of the trial was to assess the efficacy of butyrate in improving clinical, endoscopic and histological features of shigellosis. The secondary endpoint was to study the effect of butyrate on the induction of antimicrobial peptides in the rectum. Clinical outcomes were assessed and concentrations of antimicrobial peptides (LL-37, human beta defensin1 [HBD-1] and human beta defensin 3 [HBD-3]) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β [IL-1β] and interleukin-8 [IL-8]) were measured in the stool. Sigmoidoscopic and histopathological analyses, and immunostaining of LL-37 in the rectal mucosa were performed in a subgroup of patients. Results Compared with placebo, butyrate therapy led to the early reduction of macrophages, pus cells, IL-8 and IL-1β in the stool and improvement in rectal histopathology. Butyrate treatment induced LL-37 expression in the rectal epithelia. Stool concentration of LL-37 remained significantly higher in the Intervention group on days 4 and 7. Conclusion Adjunct therapy with butyrate during shigellosis led to early reduction of inflammation and enhanced LL-37 expression in the rectal epithelia with prolonged release of LL-37 in the stool. Trial Registration Clinical

  8. The hypophagic response to heat stress is not mediated by GPR109A or peripheral β-OH butyrate.

    PubMed

    Hepler, Chelsea; Foy, Caroline E; Higgins, Mark R; Renquist, Benjamin J

    2016-05-15

    Rising temperatures resulting from climate change will increase the incidence of heat stress, negatively impacting the labor force and food animal production. Heat stress elevates circulating β-OH butyrate, which induces vasodilation through GPR109a. Interestingly, both heat stress and intraperitoneal β-OH butyrate administration induce hypophagia. Thus, we aimed to investigate the role of β-OH butyrate in heat stress hypophagia in mice. We found that niacin, a β-OH butyrate mimetic that cannot be oxidized to generate ATP, also reduces food intake. Interestingly, the depression in food intake as a result of 8-h intraperitoneal niacin or 48-h heat exposure did not result from changes in hypothalamic expression of orexigenic or anorexigenic signals (AgRP, NPY, or POMC). Genetically eliminating GPR109a expression did not prevent the hypophagic response to heat exposure, intraperitoneal β-OH butyrate (5.7 mmol/kg), or niacin (0.8 mmol/kg). Hepatic vagotomy eliminated the hypophagic response to β-OH butyrate and niacin but did not affect the hypophagic response to heat exposure. We subsequently hypothesized that the hypophagic response to heat stress may depend on direct effects of β-OH butyrate at the central nervous system: β-OH butyrate induced hormonal changes (hyperinsulinemia, hypercorticosteronemia, and hyperleptinemia), or gene expression changes. To test these possibilities, we blocked expression of hepatic hydroxyl methyl glutaryl CoA synthase II (HMGCS2) to prevent hepatic β-OH butyrate synthesis. Mice that lack HMGCS2 maintain a hypophagic response to heat stress. Herein, we establish that the hypophagia of heat stress is independent of GPR109a, the hepatic vagus afferent nerve, and hepatic ketone body synthesis. PMID:26936786

  9. Novel fermentation process strengthening strategy for production of propionic acid and vitamin B12 by Propionibacterium freudenreichii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Jiao, Youjing; Liu, Shouxin

    2014-12-01

    An efficient fermentation-strengthening approach was developed to improve the anaerobic production of propionic acid and vitamin B12 by co-fermentation with Propionibacterium freudenreichii. Vitamin B12 production from glucose resulted in relatively high productivity (0.35 mg/L h) but a low propionic acid yield (0.55 g/g). By contrast, glycerol gave a high propionic acid yield (0.63 g/g) but low productivity (0.16 g/L h). Co-fermentation of glycerol and glucose with a gradual addition strategy gave high yields (propionic acid: 0.71 g/g; vitamin B12: 0.72 mg/g) and productivities (propionic acid: 0.36 g/L h; vitamin B12: 0.36 mg/L h). Finally, the integrated feedstock and fermentation system strengthening strategy was demonstrated as an efficient method for the economic production of bio-based propionic acid and vitamin B12. PMID:25261985

  10. Biliverdin amides reveal roles for propionate side chains in bilin reductase recognition and in holophytochrome assembly and photoconversion†

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Lixia; Rockwell, Nathan C.; Martin, Shelley S.; Lagarias, J. Clark

    2010-01-01

    Linear tetrapyrroles (bilins) perform important antioxidant and light harvesting functions in cells from bacteria to humans. To explore the role of the propionate moieties in bilin metabolism, we report the semisynthesis of mono- and di-amides of biliverdin IXα and those of its non-natural XIIIα isomer. Initially, these were examined as substrates of two types of NADPH-dependent biliverdin reductase, BVR and BvdR, and of the representative ferredoxin-dependent bilin reductase, phycocyanobilin:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PcyA). Our studies indicate that the NADPH-dependent biliverdin reductases are less accommodating to amidation of the propionic acid sidechains of biliverdin IXα than PcyA, which does not require free carboxylic acid sidechains to yield its phytobilin product, phycocyanobilin. Bilin amides were also assembled with BV-type and phytobilin-type apophytochromes, demonstrating a role for the 8-propionate in formation of the spectroscopically native Pr dark states of these biliprotein photosensors. Neither ionizable propionate sidechain proved essential to primary photoisomerization for both classes of phytochromes, but an unsubstituted 12-propionate was required for full photointerconversion of phytobilin-type phytochrome Cph1. Taken together, these studies provide insight into the roles of the ionizable propionate sidechains in substrate discrimination by two bilin reductase families while further underscoring the mechanistic differences between the photoconversions of BV-type and phytobilin-type phytochromes. PMID:20565135

  11. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of propionate kinase (TdcD) from Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Simanshu, Dhirendra K; Murthy, M R N

    2005-01-01

    In the cell, propionate is mainly formed during beta-oxidation of odd-numbered carbon-chain fatty acids, fermentation of carbohydrates and degradation of the amino acids threonine, valine, isoleucine and methionine. Recently, it has been shown that L-threonine is non-oxidatively cleaved to propionate via 2-ketobutyrate. The last step in this process, conversion of propionyl phosphate and ADP to propionate and ATP, is catalysed by propionate kinase (EC 2.7.1.-). Here, the cloning of propionate kinase (molecular weight 44 kDa) from Salmonella typhimurium with an N-terminal hexahistidine affinity tag and its overexpression in Escherichia coli are reported. Purified propionate kinase was found to cocrystallize with ADP in the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion and microbatch methods. Crystals belong to space group P3(1)21 or P3(2)21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 111.47, c = 66.52 A. A complete data set to 2.2 A resolution has been collected using an image-plate detector system mounted on a rotating-anode X-ray generator. PMID:16508089

  12. A large genomic island allows Neisseria meningitidis to utilize propionic acid, with implications for colonization of the human nasopharynx

    PubMed Central

    Catenazzi, Maria Chiara E; Jones, Helen; Wallace, Iain; Clifton, Jacqueline; Chong, James P J; Jackson, Matthew A; Macdonald, Sandy; Edwards, James; Moir, James W B

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is an important human pathogen that is capable of killing within hours of infection. Its normal habitat is the nasopharynx of adult humans. Here we identify a genomic island (the prp gene cluster) in N. meningitidis that enables this species to utilize propionic acid as a supplementary carbon source during growth, particularly under nutrient poor growth conditions. The prp gene cluster encodes enzymes for a methylcitrate cycle. Novel aspects of the methylcitrate cycle in N. meningitidis include a propionate kinase which was purified and characterized, and a putative propionate transporter. This genomic island is absent from the close relative of N. meningitidis, the commensal Neisseria lactamica, which chiefly colonizes infants not adults. We reason that the possession of the prp genes provides a metabolic advantage to N. meningitidis in the adult oral cavity, which is rich in propionic acid-generating bacteria. Data from classical microbiological and sequence-based microbiome studies provide several lines of supporting evidence that N. meningitidis colonization is correlated with propionic acid generating bacteria, with a strong correlation between prp-containing Neisseria and propionic acid generating bacteria from the genus Porphyromonas, and that this may explain adolescent/adult colonization by N. meningitidis. PMID:24910087

  13. Characterization of cucumber fermentation spoilage bacteria by enrichment culture and 16S rDNA cloning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercial cucumber fermentations are typically carried out in 40000 L fermentation tanks. A secondary fermentation can occur after sugars are consumed that results in the formation of acetic, propionic, and butyric acids, concomitantly with the loss of lactic acid and an increase in pH. Spoilage fe...

  14. RUMINAL FERMENTATION OF PROPYLENE GLYCOL AND GLYCEROL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine rumen fluid was fermented anaerobically with 25 mM R-propylene glycol, S-propylene glycol, or glycerol added. After 24 h all of the propylene glycol enantiomers and approximately 80% of the glycerol were metabolized. Acetate, propionate, butyrate, valerate, and caproate concentrations, in dec...

  15. Lithium-Ion Electrolytes with Fluoroester Co-Solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); Prakash, G. K. Surya (Inventor); Smith, Kiah (Inventor); Bhalla, Pooja (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An embodiment lithium-ion battery comprising a lithium-ion electrolyte of ethylene carbonate; ethyl methyl carbonate; and at least one solvent selected from the group consisting of trifluoroethyl butyrate, ethyl trifluoroacetate, trifluoroethyl acetate, methyl pentafluoropropionate, and 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl propionate. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  16. Quantitative analysis of growth and volatile fatty acid production by the anaerobic ruminal bacterium Megasphaera elsdenii T81

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Megaspheara elsdenii T81 grew on either DL-lactate or D-glucose at similar rates (0.85 per h), but displayed major differences in the fermentation of these substrates. Lactate was fermented at up to 210-mM concentration to yield acetic, propionic, butyric, and valeric acids. The bacterium was able t...

  17. Clinical evaluation of clobetasone butyrate eye drops in the treatment of anterior uveitis and its effects on intraocular pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Eilon, L A; Walker, S R

    1981-01-01

    Clobetasone butyrate has been formulated as a new steroid preparation of use in ophthalmology and has been compared with prednisolone phosphate and betamethasone phosphate in the treatment of anterior uveitis. The results from 4 double-blind, between-patient studies have shown that all 3 treatments are effective in reducing the signs and symptoms of this intraocular disease. 87% of those patients receiving clobetasone butyrate had a good or satisfactory response, but no differences in therapeutic efficacy were observed between these 3 steroid treatments. Clobetasone butyrate had little effect on intraocular pressure when compared with dexamethasone or hydrocortisone, both of which cause a significant rise in intraocular pressure. PMID:7028089

  18. Biokinetics and bacterial communities of propionate oxidizing bacteria in phased anaerobic sludge digestion systems.

    PubMed

    Zamanzadeh, Mirzaman; Parker, Wayne J; Verastegui, Yris; Neufeld, Josh D

    2013-03-15

    Phased anaerobic digestion is a promising technology and may be a potential source of bio-energy production. Anaerobic digesters are widely used for sewage sludge stabilization and thus a better understanding of the microbial process and kinetics may allow increased volatile solids reduction and methane production through robust process operation. In this study, we analyzed the impact of phase separation and operational conditions on the bio-kinetic characteristics and communities of bacteria associated with four phased anaerobic digestion systems. In addition to significant differences between bacterial communities associated with different digester operating temperatures, our results also revealed that bacterial communities in the phased anaerobic digestion systems differed between the 1st and 2nd phase digesters and we identified strong community composition correlations with several measured physicochemical parameters. The maximum specific growth rates of propionate oxidizing bacteria (POB) in the mesophilic and thermophilic 1st phases were 11 and 23.7 mgCOD mgCOD(-1) d(-1), respectively, while those of the mesophilic and thermophilic 2nd-phase digesters were 6.7 and 18.6 mgCOD mgCOD(-1) d(-1), respectively. Hence, the biokinetic characteristics of the POB population were dependent on the digester loading. In addition, we observed that the temperature dependency factor (θ) values were higher for the less heavily loaded digesters as compared to the values obtained for the 1st-phase digesters. Our results suggested the appropriate application of two sets of POB bio-kinetic that reflect the differing growth responses as a function of propionate concentration (and/or organic loading rates). Also, modeling acetogenesis in phased anaerobic sludge digestion systems will be improved considering a population shift in separate phases. On the basis of the bio-kinetic values estimated in various digesters, high levels of propionate in the thermophilic digesters may be

  19. The Nitrification Inhibitor Methyl 3-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)Propionate Modulates Root Development by Interfering with Auxin Signaling via the NO/ROS Pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangyang; Wang, Ruling; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Qi; Luo, Qiong; Zhu, Yiyong; Xu, Jin

    2016-07-01

    Methyl 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)propionate (MHPP) is a root exudate that functions as a nitrification inhibitor and as a modulator of the root system architecture (RSA) by inhibiting primary root (PR) elongation and promoting lateral root formation. However, the mechanism underlying MHPP-mediated modulation of the RSA remains unclear. Here, we report that MHPP inhibits PR elongation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) by elevating the levels of auxin expression and signaling. MHPP induces an increase in auxin levels by up-regulating auxin biosynthesis, altering the expression of auxin carriers, and promoting the degradation of the auxin/indole-3-acetic acid family of transcriptional repressors. We found that MHPP-induced nitric oxide (NO) production promoted reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in root tips. Suppressing the accumulation of NO or ROS alleviated the inhibitory effect of MHPP on PR elongation by weakening auxin responses and perception and by affecting meristematic cell division potential. Genetic analysis supported the phenotype described above. Taken together, our results indicate that MHPP modulates RSA remodeling via the NO/ROS-mediated auxin response pathway in Arabidopsis. Our study also revealed that MHPP significantly induced the accumulation of glucosinolates in roots, suggesting the diverse functions of MHPP in modulating plant growth, development, and stress tolerance in plants. PMID:27217493

  20. Intracerebroventricular injection of propionic acid, an enteric bacterial metabolic end-product, impairs social behavior in the rat: implications for an animal model of autism.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Sandy R; MacFabe, Derrick F; Ossenkopp, Klaus-Peter; Scratch, Shannon; Whelan, Jennifer; Taylor, Roy; Cain, Donald P

    2008-05-01

    Environmental, dietary, and gastrointestinal factors may contribute to autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Propionic acid (PPA) is a short chain fatty acid, a metabolic end-product of enteric bacteria in the gut, and a common food preservative. Recent evidence indicates that PPA can cause behavioral abnormalities and a neuroinflammatory response in rats. Social behavior was examined in similarly-treated pairs of adult male Long-Evans rats placed in an open field following intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of PPA (4 microl of 0.26 M solution) or control compounds. Behavior was analyzed using both the EthoVision behavior tracking system and by blind scoring of videotapes of social behaviors. Compared to controls, rats treated with PPA displayed social behavior impairments as indicated by significantly greater mean distance apart, reduced time spent in close proximity, reduced playful interaction, and altered responses to playful initiations. Treatment with another short chain fatty acid, sodium acetate, produced similar impairments, but treatment with the alcohol analog of PPA, 1-propanol, did not produce impairments. Immunohistochemical analysis of brain tissue taken from rats treated with PPA revealed reactive astrogliosis, indicating a neuroinflammatory response. These findings suggest that PPA can change both brain and behavior in the laboratory rat in a manner that is consistent with symptoms of human ASD. PMID:18395759

  1. Resorufin butyrate as a soluble and monomeric high-throughput substrate for a triglyceride lipase.

    PubMed

    Lam, Vincent; Henault, Martin; Khougaz, Karine; Fortin, Louis-Jacques; Ouellet, Marc; Melnyk, Roman; Partridge, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    Triglyceride lipases such as lipoprotein lipase, endothelial lipase, and hepatic lipase play key roles in controlling the levels of plasma lipoprotein. Accordingly, small-molecule modulation of these species could alter patient lipid profiles with corresponding health effects. Screening of these enzymes for small-molecule therapeutics has historically involved the use of lipid-based particles to mimic native substrates. However, particle-based artifacts can complicate the discovery of therapeutic molecules. As a simplifying solution, the authors sought to develop an approach involving a soluble and monomeric lipase substrate. Using purified bovine lipoprotein lipase as a model system, they show that the hydrolysis of resorufin butyrate can be fluorescently monitored to give a robust assay (Z' > 0.8). Critically, using parallel approaches, they show that resorufin butyrate is soluble and monomeric under assay conditions. The presented assay should be useful as a simple and inexpensive primary or secondary screen for the discovery of therapeutic lipase modulators. PMID:21956174

  2. Butyrate Infusions in the Ovine Fetus Delay the Biologic Clock for Globin Gene Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrine, Susan P.; Rudolph, Abraham; Faller, Douglas V.; Roman, Christine; Cohen, Ruth A.; Chen, Shao-Jing; Kan, Yuet Wai

    1988-11-01

    The switch from fetal to adult hemoglobin expression is regulated in many mammalian species by a developmental clock-like mechanism and determined by the gestational age of the fetus. Prolonging fetal globin gene expression is of considerable interest for therapeutic potential in diseases caused by abnormal β -globin genes. Butyric acid, which is found in increased plasma concentrations in infants of diabetic mothers who have delayed globin gene switching, was infused into catheterized fetal lambs in utero during the time of the normal globin gene switch period. The globin gene switch was significantly delayed in three of four butyrate-treated fetuses compared with controls and was entirely prevented in one fetus in whom the infusion was begun before the globin switch was under way. These data provide a model for investigating and arresting the biologic clock of hemoglobin switching.

  3. Structural Analysis and Quantitative Determination of Clevidipine Butyrate Impurities Using an Advanced RP-HPLC Method.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuxia; Zhou, Fan; Yan, Fei; Yang, Feng; Yao, Yuxian; Zou, Qiaogen

    2016-03-01

    Eleven potential impurities, including process-related compounds and degradation products, have been analyzed by comprehensive studies on the manufacturing process of clevidipine butyrate. Possible formation mechanisms could also be devised. MS and NMR techniques have been used for the structural characterization of three previously unreported impurities (Imp-3, Imp-5 and Imp-11). To separate and quantify the potential impurities in a simultaneous fashion, an efficient and advanced RP-HPLC method has been developed. In doing so, four major degradation products (Imp-2, Imp-4, Imp-8 and Imp-10) can be observed under varying stress conditions. This analytical method has been validated according to ICH guidelines with respect to specificity, accuracy, linearity, robustness and stability. The method described has been demonstrated to be applicable in routine quality control processes and stability evaluation studies of clevidipine butyrate. PMID:26489435

  4. Isolation of lipase producer and its performance in enantioselective hydrolysis of glycidyl butyrate.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shi-Ying; Xu, Jian-He; Li, Qing Shan; Yu, Jun Tang

    2003-01-01

    A racemic glycidyl butyrate resolving strain, preliminarily identified as a Rhizopus sp., had been isolated from soil. Its extracellular lipase was found to enantioselectively hydrolyze the (S)-enantiomer of the chiral ester, with optimal activities at pH 5.3 and 42 degrees C. Higher enantioselectivity of the enzyme was observed at lower temperatures, while the best enantioselectivity was obtained at pH 5.5-6.0, with an E value (enantiomeric ratio) of 57. PMID:12495206

  5. An Acute Butyr-Fentanyl Fatality: A Case Report with Postmortem Concentrations.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Iain M; Trochta, Amber; Gary, Ray D; Wright, Jennifer; Mena, Othon

    2016-03-01

    In this case report, we present an evaluation of the distribution of postmortem concentrations of butyr-fentanyl in a fatality attributed principally to the drug. A man who had a history of intravenous drug abuse was found unresponsive on the bathroom floor of his home. Drug paraphernalia was located on the bathroom counter. Toxicology testing, which initially screened positive for fentanyl by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, subsequently confirmed butyr-fentanyl, which was then quantitated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-specific ion monitoring (GC-MS SIM) analysis following liquid-liquid extraction. The butyr-fentanyl peripheral blood concentration was quantitated at 58 ng/mL compared with the central blood concentration of 97 ng/mL. The liver concentration was 320 ng/g, the vitreous was 40 ng/mL, the urine was 670 ng/mL and the gastric contained 170 mg. Acetyl-fentanyl was also detected in all biological specimens tested. Peripheral blood concentration was quantitated at 38 ng/mL compared with the central blood concentration of 32 ng/mL. The liver concentration was 110 ng/g, the vitreous was 38 ng/mL, the urine was 540 ng/mL and the gastric contained <70 mg. The only other drug detected was a relatively low concentration of benzoylecgonine. The cause of death was certified as acute butyr-fentanyl, acetyl-fentanyl and cocaine intoxication, and the manner of death was certified as accident. PMID:26683128

  6. Understanding Palladium Acetate from a User Perspective.

    PubMed

    Carole, William A; Colacot, Thomas J

    2016-06-01

    The behavior of palladium acetate is reviewed with respect to its synthesis, characterization, structure (in both solution and solid state), and activation pathways. In addition, comparisons of catalytic activities between pure palladium acetate and two common byproducts, Pd3 (OAc)5 (NO2 ) and polymeric [Pd(OAc)2 ]n , typically present in commercially available material are reviewed. Hence, this minireview serves as a concise guide for the users of palladium acetate from both academia and industry. PMID:27125630

  7. 21 CFR 184.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acetic acid. 184.1005 Section 184.1005 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1005 Acetic acid. (a) Acetic acid (C2H4O2, CAS Reg. No. 64-19-7) is known as ethanoic acid. It occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues. It is produced by fermentation...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acetic acid. 184.1005 Section 184.1005 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1005 Acetic acid. (a) Acetic acid (C2H4O2, CAS Reg. No. 64-19-7) is known as ethanoic acid. It occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues. It is produced by fermentation...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... sodium sulfate and sodium bicarbonate. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... sodium sulfate and sodium bicarbonate. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1721 - Sodium acetate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... sodium sulfate and sodium bicarbonate. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium acetate. 184.1721 Section 184.1721 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1721 Sodium acetate. (a) Sodium acetate (C2H3O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 127-09-3...

  12. Impact of butyrate on microbial selection in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems.

    PubMed

    Begum, Shamim A; Batista, Jacimaria R

    2014-01-01

    Microbial selection in an enhanced biological phosphorus removal system was investigated in a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor fed exclusively with butyrate as a carbon source. As reported in the few previous studies, butyrate uptake was slow and phosphorus (P) release occurred during the entire anaerobic period. Polyphosphate-accumulating organism (PAO), i.e. Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (named as Accumulibacter), glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs), i.e. Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis (named as Competibacter) and Defluviicoccus-related, tetrad-forming alphaproteobacteria (named as Defluviicoccus) were identified using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The results show that Accumulibacter and Defluviicoccus were selected in the butyrate-fed reactor, whereas Competibacter was not selected. P removal was efficient at the beginning of the experiment with an increasing percentage relative abundance (% RA) of PAOs. The % RA of Accumulibacter and Defluviicoccus increased from 13% to 50% and 8% to 16%, respectively, and the % RA of Competibacter decreased from 8% to 2% during the experiment. After 6 weeks, P removal deteriorated with the poor correlation between the percentage of P removal and % RA of GAOs. PMID:25189844

  13. Severity of atopic disease inversely correlates with intestinal microbiota diversity and butyrate-producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nylund, L; Nermes, M; Isolauri, E; Salminen, S; de Vos, W M; Satokari, R

    2015-02-01

    The reports on atopic diseases and microbiota in early childhood remain contradictory, and both decreased and increased microbiota diversity have been associated with atopic eczema. In this study, the intestinal microbiota signatures associated with the severity of eczema in 6-month-old infants were characterized. Further, the changes in intestinal microbiota composition related to the improvement of this disease 3 months later were assessed. The severity of eczema correlated inversely with microbiota diversity (r = -0.54, P = 0.002) and with the abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria (r = -0.52, P = 0.005). During the 3-month follow-up, microbiota diversity increased (P < 0.001) and scoring atopic dermatitis values decreased (P < 0.001) in all infants. This decrease coincided with the increase in bacteria related to butyrate-producing Coprococcus eutactus (r = -0.59, P = 0.02). In conclusion, the high diversity of microbiota and high abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria were associated with milder eczema, thus suggesting they have a role in alleviating symptoms of atopic eczema. PMID:25413686

  14. The microbial metabolite butyrate regulates intestinal macrophage function via histone deacetylase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pamela V; Hao, Liming; Offermanns, Stefan; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2014-02-11

    Given the trillions of microbes that inhabit the mammalian intestines, the host immune system must constantly maintain a balance between tolerance to commensals and immunity against pathogens to avoid unnecessary immune responses against otherwise harmless bacteria. Misregulated responses can lead to inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. The mechanisms by which the immune system maintains this critical balance remain largely undefined. Here, we demonstrate that the short-chain fatty acid n-butyrate, which is secreted in high amounts by commensal bacteria, can modulate the function of intestinal macrophages, the most abundant immune cell type in the lamina propria. Treatment of macrophages with n-butyrate led to the down-regulation of lipopolysaccharide-induced proinflammatory mediators, including nitric oxide, IL-6, and IL-12, but did not affect levels of TNF-α or MCP-1. These effects were independent of toll-like receptor signaling and activation of G-protein-coupled receptors, two pathways that could be affected by short-chain fatty acids. In this study, we provide several lines of evidence that suggest that these effects are due to the inhibition of histone deacetylases by n-butyrate. These findings elucidate a pathway in which the host may maintain tolerance to intestinal microbiota by rendering lamina propria macrophages hyporesponsive to commensal bacteria through the down-regulation of proinflammatory effectors. PMID:24390544

  15. Feed-drug interaction of orally applied butyrate and phenobarbital on hepatic cytochrome P450 activity in chickens.

    PubMed

    Mátis, G; Kulcsár, A; Petrilla, J; Hermándy-Berencz, K; Neogrády, Zs

    2016-08-01

    The expression of hepatic drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes may be affected by several nutrition-derived compounds, such as by the commonly applied feed additive butyrate, possibly leading to feed-drug interactions. The aim of this study was to provide some evidence if butyrate can alter the activity of hepatic CYPs in chickens exposed to CYP-inducing xenobiotics, monitoring for the first time the possibility of such interaction. Ross 308 chickens in the grower phase were treated with daily intracoelomal phenobarbital (PB) injection (80 mg/kg BW), applied as a non-specific CYP-inducer, simultaneously with two different doses of intra-ingluvial sodium butyrate boluses (0.25 and 1.25 g/kg BW) for 5 days. Activity of CYP2H and CYP3A subfamilies was assessed by specific enzyme assays from isolated liver microsomes. According to our results, the lower dose of orally administered butyrate significantly attenuated the PB-triggered elevation of both hepatic CYP2H and CYP3A activities, which might be in association with the partly common signalling pathways of butyrate and CYP-inducing drugs, such as that of PB. Based on these data, butyrate may take part in pharmacoepigenetic interactions with simultaneously applied drugs or other CYP-inducing xenobiotics, with possible consequences for food safety and pharmacotherapy. Butyrate was found to be capable to maintain physiological CYP activity by attenuating CYP induction, underlining the safety of butyrate application in poultry nutrition. PMID:26614344

  16. Effects of Dietary Linseed Oil and Propionate Precursors on Ruminal Microbial Community, Composition, and Diversity in Yanbian Yellow Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jong S.; Choi, Seong H.; Smith, Stephen B.; Yan, Chang G.

    2015-01-01

    The rumen microbial ecosystem is a complex system where rumen fermentation processes involve interactions among microorganisms. There are important relationships between diet and the ruminal bacterial composition. Thus, we investigated the ruminal fermentation characteristics and compared ruminal bacterial communities using tag amplicon pyrosequencing analysis in Yanbian yellow steers, which were fed linseed oil (LO) and propionate precursors. We used eight ruminally cannulated Yanbian yellow steers (510 ± 5.8 kg) in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design with four dietary treatments. Steers were fed a basal diet that comprised 80% concentrate and 20% rice straw (DM basis, CON). The CON diet was supplemented with LO at 4%. The LO diet was also supplemented with 2% dl-malate or 2% fumarate as ruminal precursors of propionate. Dietary supplementation with LO and propionate precursors increased ruminal pH, total volatile fatty acid concentrations, and the molar proportion of propionate. The most abundant bacterial operational taxonomic units in the rumen were related to dietary treatments. Bacteroidetes dominated the ruminal bacterial community and the genus Prevotella was highly represented when steers were fed LO plus propionate precursors. However, with the CON and LO diet plus malate or fumarate, Firmicutes was the most abundant phylum and the genus Ruminococcus was predominant. In summary, supplementing the diets of ruminants with a moderate level of LO plus propionate precursors modified the ruminal fermentation pattern. The most positive responses to LO and propionate precursors supplementation were in the phyla Bacteriodetes and Firmicutes, and in the genus Ruminococcus and Prevotella. Thus, diets containing LO plus malate or fumarate have significant effects on the composition of the rumen microbial community. PMID:26024491

  17. Molecular pathways: gene-environment interactions regulating dietary fiber induction of proliferation and apoptosis via butyrate for cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Bultman, Scott J

    2014-02-15

    Gene-environment interactions are so numerous and biologically complicated that it can be challenging to understand their role in cancer. However, dietary fiber and colorectal cancer prevention may represent a tractable model system. Fiber is fermented by colonic bacteria into short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate. One molecular pathway that has emerged involves butyrate having differential effects depending on its concentration and the metabolic state of the cell. Low-moderate concentrations, which are present near the base of colonic crypts, are readily metabolized in the mitochondria to stimulate cell proliferation via energetics. Higher concentrations, which are present near the lumen, exceed the metabolic capacity of the colonocyte. Unmetabolized butyrate enters the nucleus and functions as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor that epigenetically regulates gene expression to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis as the colonocytes exfoliate into the lumen. Butyrate may therefore play a role in normal homeostasis by promoting turnover of the colonic epithelium. Because cancerous colonocytes undergo the Warburg effect, their preferred energy source is glucose instead of butyrate. Consequently, even moderate concentrations of butyrate accumulate in cancerous colonocytes and function as HDAC inhibitors to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. These findings implicate a bacterial metabolite with metaboloepigenetic properties in tumor suppression. PMID:24270685

  18. Increased growth of Bifidobacterium and Eubacterium by germinated barley foodstuff, accompanied by enhanced butyrate production in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kanauchi, O; Fujiyama, Y; Mitsuyama, K; Araki, Y; Ishii, T; Nakamura, T; Hitomi, Y; Agata, K; Saiki, T; Andoh, A; Toyonaga, A; Bamba, T

    1999-02-01

    Germinated barley foodstuff (GBF) derived from the aleurone and scutellum fractions of germinated barley mainly consists of low-lignified hemicellulose and glutamine-rich protein. GBF improves the proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells and defecation, through the bacterial production of short chain fatty acids (SCFA), especially butyrate. In this study we investigated the mechanism of production of butyrate by microflora in humans and in vitro. Daily administration of 9 g GBF for 14 successive days significantly increased fecal butyrate content. Fecal Bifidobacterium and Eubacterium were also significantly increased by GBF administration in healthy volunteers. Ten anaerobic micro-organisms selected from intestinal microflora were cultured in vitro in the medium containing GBF as a sole carbon source (GBF medium). After a 3-day incubation, 7 strains (Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei, Bacteroides ovatus, Clostridium butyricum, and Eubacterium limosum) lowered the medium pH producing SCFA. Eubacterium grown together with Bifidobacterium in GBF medium efficiently produced butyrate. On the other hand, GBF changed the intestinal microflora and increased probiotics such as Bifidobacterium in the intestinal tract. As a result, butyrate was produced by the mutual action of Eubacterium and Bifidobacterium. This butyrate is considered to enhance the proliferation of colonic epithelial cells. PMID:9917526

  19. Proboscis conditioning experiments with honeybees, Apis mellifera caucasica, with butyric acid and DEET mixture as conditioned and unconditioned stimuli.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Charles I; Giray, Tugrul; Mixson, T Andrew; Nolf, Sondra L; Wells, Harrington; Kence, Aykut; Kence, Meral

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments are described investigating whether olfactory repellents DEET and butyric acid can support the classical conditioning of proboscis extension in the honeybee, Apis mellifera caucasica (Hymenoptera: Apidae). In the first experiment DEET and butyric acid readily led to standard acquisition and extinction effects, which are comparable to the use of cinnamon as a conditioned stimulus. These results demonstrate that the odor of DEET or butyric acid is not intrinsically repellent to honey bees. In a second experiment, with DEET and butyric acid mixed with sucrose as an unconditioned stimulus, proboscis conditioning was not established. After several trials, few animals responded to the unconditioned stimulus. These results demonstrate that these chemicals are gustatory repellents when in direct contact. In the last experiment a conditioned suppression paradigm was used. Exposing animals to butyric acid or DEET when the proboscis was extended by direct sucrose stimulation or by learning revealed that retraction of the proboscis was similar to another novel odor, lavender, and in all cases greatest when the animal was not permitted to feed. These results again demonstrate that DEET or butyric acid are not olfactory repellents, and in addition, conditioned suppression is influenced by feeding state of the bee. PMID:20879917

  20. Positron scattering from vinyl acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, L.; Zecca, A.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Brunger, M. J.

    2014-09-01

    Using a Beer-Lambert attenuation approach, we report measured total cross sections (TCSs) for positron scattering from vinyl acetate (C4H6O2) in the incident positron energy range 0.15-50 eV. In addition, we also report an independent atom model with screening corrected additivity rule computation results for the TCSs, differential and integral elastic cross sections, the positronium formation cross section and inelastic integral cross sections. The energy range of these calculations is 1-1000 eV. While there is a reasonable qualitative correspondence between measurement and calculation for the TCSs, in terms of the energy dependence of those cross sections, the theory was found to be a factor of ˜2 larger in magnitude at the lower energies, even after the measured data were corrected for the forward angle scattering effect.