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Sample records for acetochlor alachlor butachlor

  1. [The transferability of acetochlor and butachlor in soil].

    PubMed

    Zheng, H; Ye, C

    2001-09-01

    The transferability of acetochlor and butachlor in soil was studied by soil thin layer chromatography. Acetochlor and butachlor were dropped on the glass plate and spreaded soil on the glass plate was collected per 2 cm, then acetochlor and butachlor were analyzed quantitatively by HPlC. When river water was as the spread solution, Rf(relative flow) of acetochlor and butachlor in the Haidian loam were 0.116 and 0.031 respectively, Rf of acetochlor and butachlor in the Baiyangdian sandy loam were 0.147 and 0.032 respectively. When 30 mg.L-1 dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid sodium salt solution was as the spread solution, Rf of acetochlor and butachlor in the Haidian loam were 0.159 and 0.034 respectively. Acetochlor's transferability was weak and the gradation of its transferability was II grade, while butachlor's was more weak and the gradation was I grade. Anionic surfactant solution can promote pesticides to transfer. Cationic surfactant solution can impede pesticides to transfer.

  2. Biodegradation of acetanilide herbicides acetochlor and butachlor in soil.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chang-ming; Wang, Xing-jun; Zheng, He-hui

    2002-10-01

    The biodegradation of two acetanilide herbicides, acetochlor and butachlor in soil after other environmental organic matter addition were measured during 35 days laboratory incubations. The herbicides were applied to soil alone, soil-SDBS (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate) mixtures and soil-HA (humic acid) mixtures. Herbicide biodegradation kinetics were compared in the different treatment. Biodegradation products of herbicides in soil alone samples were identified by GC/MS at the end of incubation. Addition of SDBS and HA to soil decreased acetochlor biodegradation, but increased butachlor biodegradation. The biodegradation half-life of acetochlor and butachlor in soil alone, soil-SDBS mixtures and soil-HA mixtures were 4.6 d, 6.1 d and 5.4 d and 5.3 d, 4.9 d and 5.3 d respectively. The biodegradation products were hydroxyacetochlor and 2-methyl-6-ethylaniline for acetochlor, and hydroxybutachlor and 2,6-diethylaniline for butachlor.

  3. Erythema multiforme major due to occupational exposure to the herbicides alachlor and butachlor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoon; Min, JinHong; Park, JungSoo; Lee, SukWoo; Lee, JiYeonn

    2011-02-01

    Alachlor and butachlor are commonly used chloroacetanilide herbicides. They are cytotoxic, but there have been rare reported cases of alachlor or butachlor induced erythema multiforme major. We report the case of a 38-year-old farmer with erythema multiforme major due to the occupational exposure to alachlor/butachlor. The patient presented to the ED because of itching. Confluent erythematous to violaceous maculopatches with bullae and erosions were seen on the trunk, both upper extremities and both lower extremities. He had no relevant past or family history of a similar skin disease. He had used alachlor/butachlor for 3 days before he developed the itch. We performed a skin incisional biopsy and found diffuse hydropic degeneration with many necrotic keratinocytes in the epidermis and mild to moderate superficial perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate admixed with neutrophils and eosinophils in the upper dermis. These results confirmed the diagnosis of erythema multiforme major. The patient was admitted and received systemic and topical steroids. After 18 days, most lesions had healed, and he was discharged.

  4. Derived Reference Doses (RfDs) for the environmental degradates of the herbicides alachlor and acetochlor: results of an independent expert panel deliberation.

    PubMed

    Gadagbui, Bernard; Maier, Andrew; Dourson, Michael; Parker, Ann; Willis, Alison; Christopher, John P; Hicks, Lebelle; Ramasamy, Santhini; Roberts, Stephen M

    2010-01-01

    An independent peer expert panel was convened under the auspices of the Alliance for Risk Assessment (ARA) to review toxicology data and derive oral Reference Doses (RfDs) for four environmental degradates of the acetanilide herbicides, alachlor and acetochlor. The degradates included in this evaluation were (1) alachlor tertiary-ethanesulfonic acid (ESA), (2) alachlor tertiary-oxanilic acid (OXA), (3) acetochlor ESA, and (4) acetochlor OXA. Each degradate was judged to have sufficient data for developing low to medium confidence RfD, with use of an additional uncertainty factor (UF) to cover data gaps. Body weight decreases were identified as the most sensitive treatment-related adverse effect for RfD development. A composite UF of 1000 (10 for human variability in sensitivity, 10 for interspecies differences in sensitivity, and 10 for subchronic to chronic and database deficiency combined; i.e., 10(A)x10(H)x10(S&D)) for each degradate was considered reasonable, while noting that an argument could be made for an UF of 3000 (10(A)x10(H)x30(S&D)). Based on the available data, an oral RfD of 0.2 mg/kg-day is recommended for both acetochlor ESA and acetochlor OXA and an oral RfD of 0.8 mg/kg-day is recommended for both alachlor ESA and alachlor OXA. PMID:20206657

  5. Accurate mass analysis of ethanesulfonic acid degradates of acetochlor and alachlor using high-performance liquid chromatography and time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Ferrer, I.; Parry, R.

    2002-01-01

    Degradates of acetochlor and alachlor (ethanesulfonic acids, ESAs) were analyzed in both standards and in a groundwater sample using high-performance liquid chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization. The negative pseudomolecular ion of the secondary amide of acetochlor ESA and alachlor ESA gave average masses of 256.0750??0.0049 amu and 270.0786??0.0064 amu respectively. Acetochlor and alachlor ESA gave similar masses of 314.1098??0.0061 amu and 314.1153??0.0048 amu; however, they could not be distinguished by accurate mass because they have the same empirical formula. On the other hand, they may be distinguished using positive-ion electrospray because of different fragmentation spectra, which did not occur using negative-ion electrospray.

  6. Acetochlor

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetochlor ; CASRN 34256 - 82 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effe

  7. Alachlor

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Alachlor ; CASRN 15972 - 60 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  8. Characterization of a Novel Butachlor Biodegradation Pathway and Cloning of the Debutoxylase (Dbo) Gene Responsible for Debutoxylation of Butachlor in Bacillus sp. hys-1.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Jin, Lei; Shi, Hui; Chu, Zhangjie

    2015-09-30

    Bacillus sp. strain hys-1, which was isolated from active sludge, could degrade >90% butachlor at a concentration of 100 mg/L within 7 days. The present work revealed that strain hys-1 could mineralize butachlor via the following pathway: butachlor was initially metabolized to 2-chloro-N-(2,6-diethylphenyl)-N-methylacetamide by debutoxylation and then transformed to form 2-chloro-N-(2,6-diethylphenyl)acetamide by N-demethylation. Subsequently, it was converted to 2,6-diethylaniline and further mineralized into CO2 and H2O. In addition, the catalytic efficiency of crude cell extracts descended as follows: alachlor > acetochlor > butachlor. Furthermore, a novel 744 bp gene responsible for transforming butachlor into 2-chloro-N-(2,6-diethylphenyl)-N-methylacetamide was cloned from strain hys-1 and the encoding debutoxylase was designated Dbo. Then Dbo was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified using Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. Dbo displayed the highest activity against butachlor at pH 6.5 and 30 °C. Metal ions played an important role in Dbo activity. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report that strain hys-1 can mineralize butachlor by a novel metabolic mechanism and the first identification of a gene encoding butachlor debutoxylase.

  9. Occurrence of alachlor and its sulfonated metabolite in rivers and reservoirs of the midwestern United States: The importance of sulfonation in the transport of chloroacetanilide herbicides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Goolsby, D.A.; Aga, D.S.; Pomes, M.L.; Meyer, M.T.

    1996-01-01

    Alachlor and its metabolite, 2-[(2',6'-diethylphenyl)- (methoxymethyl)amino]-2-oxoethanesulfonate (ESA), were identified in 76 reservoirs in the midwestern United States using immunoassay, liquid chromatography, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The median concentration of ESA (0.48 ??g/L) exceeded the median concentration of alachlor (<0.05 ??g/L), with highest values in the upper Midwest. ESA also was detected in the Mississippi River from the mouth to the headwaters at concentrations of 0.2-1.5 ??g/L, exceeding the concentration of alachlor. In a field runoff study, alachlor rapidly formed ESA. It is hypothesized that a glutathione conjugate forms, which later oxidizes in soil to ESA. The removal of the chlorine atom lessens the toxicity of the parent compound and increases runoff potential. It is hypothesized further that sulfonic acid metabolites of other chloroacetanilides, including acetochlor, butachlor, metolachlor, and propachlor, also occur in surface water.

  10. Consensus diagnoses and mode of action for the formation of gastric tumors in rats treated with the chloroacetanilide herbicides alachlor and butachlor.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Satoshi; Harada, Takanori; Thake, Daryl; Iatropoulos, Michael J; Sherman, James H

    2014-01-01

    A panel of pathologists (Panel) was formed to evaluate the pathogenesis and human relevance of tumors that developed in the fundic region of rat stomachs in carcinogenicity and mechanistic studies with alachlor and butachlor. The Panel evaluated stomach sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin, neuron-specific enolase, and chromogranin A to determine the presence and relative proportion of enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cells in the tumors and concluded all tumors were derived from ECL cells. Biochemical and pathological data demonstrated the tumor formation involved a nongenotoxic threshold mode of action (MOA) initially characterized by profound atrophy of the glandular fundic mucosa that affected gastric glands, but not surface epithelium. This resulted in a substantial loss of parietal cells and a compensatory mucosal cell proliferation. The loss of parietal cells caused a marked increase in gastric pH (hypochlorhydria), leading to sustained and profound hypergastrinemia. The mucosal atrophy, together with the increased gastrin, stimulated cell growth in one or more ECL cell populations, resulting in neoplasia. ECL cell autocrine and paracrine effects led to dedifferentiation of ECL cell tumors. The Panel concluded the tumors develop via a threshold-dependent nongenotoxic MOA, under conditions not relevant to humans.

  11. Biodegradation of butachlor by Rhodococcus sp. strain B1 and purification of its hydrolase (ChlH) responsible for N-dealkylation of chloroacetamide herbicides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Ming; Cao, Li; Lu, Peng; Ni, Haiyan; Li, Yun-Xiang; Yan, Xin; Hong, Qing; Li, Shun-Peng

    2012-12-19

    Rhodococcus sp. strain B1 could degrade 100 mg/L butachlor within 5 days. Butachlor was first hydrolyzed by strain B1 through N-dealkylation, which resulted in the production of butoxymethanol and 2-chloro-N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)acetamide. Butoxymethanol could be further degraded and utilized as the carbon source for the growth of strain B1, whereas 2-chloro-N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)acetamide could not be degraded further. The hydrolase designated ChlH, responsible for the N-dealkylation of the side chain of butachlor, was purified 185.1-fold to homogeneity with 16.1% recovery. The optimal pH and temperature of ChlH were observed to be 7.0-7.5 and 30 °C, respectively. This enzyme was also able to catalyze the N-dealkylation of other chloroacetamide herbicides; the catalytic efficiency followed the order alachlor > acetochlor >butachlor > pretilachlor, which indicated that the alkyl chain length influenced the N-dealkylation of the chloroacetamide herbicides. This is the first report on the biodegradation of chloroacetamide herbicides at the enzyme level.

  12. METHOD DEVELOPMENT FOR ALACHLOR ESA AND OTHER ACENTANILIDE HERBICIDE DEGRADATION PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Acetanilide herbicides are frequently applied in the U.S. on crops (corn, soybeans, popcorn, etc.) to control broadleaf and annual weeds. The acetanilide and acetamide herbicides currently registered for use in the U.S. are alachlor, acetochlor, metolachlor, propa...

  13. Metolachlor and alachlor breakdown product formation patterns in aquatic field mesocosms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, W.H.; Graham, D.W.; DeNoyelles, F.; Smith, V.H.; Larive, C.K.; Thurman, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    The transformation of metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)- N-(2-methoxy-1-methyl)ethyl)acetamide] and alachlor [2-chloro-N-(2,6- diethylphenyl)-N-methoxymethyl)acetamide] in aquatic systems was investigated using outdoor tank mesocosms. Metolachlor and alachlor levels and their ethane sulfonic acid (ESA) and oxanillic acid breakdown products were monitored over time under five experimental treatments (each in quadruplicate). Background water conditions were identical in all treatments with each treatment differing based on the level and type(s) of herbicide present. Treatments included a noherbicide control, 10 ??g/L metolachlor, 25 ??g/L metolachlor, 25 ??g/L alachlor, and 25 ??g/L alachlor plus 25 ??g/L metolachlor in combination. The experiment was initiated by adding herbicide(s) to the units to the target concentrations; herbicide and breakdown product levels and other chemical parameters were then monitored for 85 days. In general, metolachlor half-lives were longer than alachlor half-lives under all treatments, although the differences were not statistically significant. Metolachlor half-lives (??95% confidence limits) ranged from 33.0 d (??14.1 d) to 46.2 d (??40.0 d), whereas alachlor half- lives ranged from 18.7 d (??3.5 d) to 21.0 d (??6.5 d) for different treatments. Formation patterns of ESA were similar in all treatments, whereas oxanillic acid formation differed for the two herbicides. Alachlor oxanillic acid was produced in larger quantities than metolachlor oxanillic acid and either ESA under equivalent conditions. Our results suggest that the transformation pathways for alachlor and metolachlor in aquatic systems are similar and resemble the acetochlor pathway in soils proposed by Feng (Pestic. Biochem. Physiol. 1991, 34, 136); however, the oxanillic acid branch of the pathway is favored for alachlor as compared with metolachlor.The transformation of metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N- (2-methoxy-1-methylethy

  14. Volatilization of alachlor from polymeric formulations.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Oliver D

    2004-11-01

    Pesticides may be dispersed throughout the environment by several means, including groundwater contamination, surface water contamination, and volatilization with subsequent atmospheric transport and deposition. In earlier research primarily directed at reducing the potential for groundwater contamination, a number of herbicides were microencapsulated within several different polymers. These polymeric formulations were evaluated for efficacy in the greenhouse. In the studies described in this paper, three polymeric alachlor formulations that were the most effective in the greenhouse were evaluated in laboratory volatility studies using pure alachlor and a commercial formulation (Lasso 4EC) for comparison purposes. In a given experiment, technical alachlor, Lasso 4EC, and two polymeric formulations were applied to soil and evaluated in a contained system under 53% humidity with a fixed flow rate. Evolved alachlor was collected in ethylene glycol, recovered with C18 solid phase extraction cartridges, and analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance thin-layer chromatography with densitometry. Duration of the studies ranged from 32 to 39 days. In studies in which all formulations were uniformly incorporated in the soil, total alachlor volatilization from the polymeric microcapsules was consistently lower than that from the alachlor and Lasso 4EC formulations. In studies in which the polymeric formulations were sprinkled on the surface of the soil, microcapsules prepared with the polymer cellulose acetate butyrate released the smallest quantity of volatilized alachlor.

  15. Biodegradation and mineralization of metolachlor and alachlor by Candida xestobii.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Ana; Koskinen, William C; Cox, Lucía; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2011-01-26

    Metolachlor (2-chloro-6'-ethyl-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl)aceto-o-toluidide) is a pre-emergent chloroacetanilide herbicide used to control broadleaf and annual grassy weeds in a variety of crops. The S enantiomer, S-metolachlor, is the most effective form for weed control. Although the degradation of metolachlor in soils is thought to occur primarily by microbial activity, little is known about the microorganisms that carry out this process and the mechanisms by which this occurs. This study examined a silty-clay soil (a Luvisol) from Spain, with 10 and 2 year histories of metolachlor and S-metolachlor applications, respectively, for microorganisms that had the ability to degrade this herbicide. Tis paper reports the isolation and characterization of pure cultures of Candida xestobii and Bacillus simplex that have the ability to use metolachlor as a sole source of carbon for growth. Species assignment was confirmed by morphological and biochemical criteria and by sequence analysis of 18S and 16S rRNA, respectively. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analyses indicated that C. xestobii degraded 60% of the added metolachlor after 4 days of growth and converted up to 25% of the compound into CO(2) after 10 days. In contrast, B. simplex biodegraded 30% of metolachlor following 5 days of growth in minimal medium. In contrast, moreover, the yeast degraded other acetanilide compounds and 80% of acetochlor (2-chloro-N-ethoxymethyl-6'-ethylaceto-o-toluidide) and alachlor (2-chloro-2',6'-diethyl-N-methoxymethylacetanilide) were degraded after 15 and 41 h of growth, respectively. The results of these studies indicate that microorganisms comprising two main branches of the tree of life have acquired the ability to degrade the same novel chlorinated herbicide that has been recently added to the biosphere. PMID:21190381

  16. DNA adduct formation by alachlor metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.; Kimmel, E.C.; Casida, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The extent of DNA adduct formation by alachlor (ArN(CH/sub 2/OCH/sub 3/)C(O)CH/sub 2/Cl wherein Ar is 2,6-diethylphenyl) and its metabolites is used as a guide to deduce the causal agent(s) in the carcinogenicity of this major herbicide. (/sup 14/C-phenyl)Alachlor is compared to its two metabolic cleavage products, (/sup 14/C-phenyl) 2-chloro-N-(2,6-diethylphenyl)acetamide (CDEPA) (ArNHC(O)CH/sub 2/Cl) and (/sup 14/C-phenyl)2,6-diethylaniline (DEA) (ArNH/sub 2/), and to (/sup 14/C-methoxy)alachlor in various in vitro and in vivo systems. Horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide activate DEA, but not CEDPA or alachlor, for formation of adducts with calf thymus DNA, which probably involves 2,6-diethylnitrosobenzene (ArNO) as an intermediate. Mouse liver microsomes and NADPH are both required to enhance the binding from each labeled preparation to calf thymus DNA; 4-fold higher labeling is observed from (/sup 14/C-methoxy)- than from (/sup 14/C-phenyl)alachlor. This 4-fold preferential DNA labeling from the /sup 14/C-methoxy compound is likewise found in the liver of mice treated intraperitoneally. Mouse liver protein and hemoglobin are also labeled, in vivo, with (/sup 14/C-phenyl)alachlor, -CDEPA and -DEA, and, as with the DNA, the labeling of these proteins is 1.5- to 2-fold higher with (/sup 14/C-methoxy)alachlor.

  17. Biodegradation of acetochlor by a newly isolated Pseudomonas strain.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Gu, Qiuya; Chen, Wenting; Zhu, Xiangcheng; Duan, Zhibing; Yu, Xiaobin

    2015-05-01

    A novel microbial strain JD115 capable of degrading acetochlor was isolated from the sludge of acetochlor manufacture and was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa species. This strain was able to grow on acetochlor as the sole source of both carbon and nitrogen. The biodegradation of acetochlor by strain JD115 could be described either by the pseudo-first-order or by the second-order kinetics models, while the latter gave a better performance. The strain optimally degraded acetochlor at a pH value of 7.0 and a temperature of 37 °C. Additional nutriments could greatly enhance the degradation rate of acetochlor up to 95.4% in the presence of 50 mg acetochlor l(-1). The metabolite analyses by GC-MS presumed that catechol was an intermediate product of acetochlor, which was finally degraded for 5 days of incubation. This study highlights the potential use of this strain for the bioremediation of an acetochlor-polluted environment.

  18. Development of controlled release formulations of alachlor in ethylcellulose.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Urrusuno, R; Gines, J M; Morillo, E

    2000-01-01

    The herbicide alachlor (2-chloro-N-(2,6-diethylphenyl)-N-(methoxymethyl)-acetamide) is frequently implicated in groundwater contamination. Microencapsulated alachlor should have reduced potential for leaching in the soil while maintaining effective biological activity. Microspheres of alachlor were prepared using ethylcellulose, according to the solvent evaporation method. The influence of formulation variables affecting the release rate of pesticide, such as the molecular weight of ethylcellulose, the amount of emulsifying agent, the pesticide/polymer ratio and the particle size, were investigated. The results showed that microspheres retarded the release of alachlor in different degrees. Pesticide/polymer ratio and particle size were the more important factors determining the alachlor release. Ethylcellulose microspheres may prove useful for the prolonged release of alachlor.

  19. Mutagenicity study of butachlor and its metabolites using Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Kuei-Yao; Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Lin, Jen-Kun; Kuo, Wein-Shung; Ou, Yueh-Hsing

    2005-12-01

    Butachlor is the most commonly used herbicide in Taiwan and many other countries. It has been reported to be an indirect mutagen and carcinogen in various in vitro assay systems. Previous investigation has also demonstrated that butachlor stimulates cell proliferation, transforms normal embryonic cells, and induces stomach tumors in Spraque-Dawley rats. However, the mechanism of butachlor carcinogenicity is still not clear. In order to clarify the toxicologic and carcinogenic properties of butachlor, we proposed a metabolic pathway, and synthesized the authentic metabolites by chemical methods. In addition, we tested the mutagenicity of butachlor and these metabolites on Salmonella typhimurium. The results indicate that butachlor might manifest its carcinogenicity via the mutagenicity of its metabolic products. Although the molecular mechanism of butachlor-induced cellular toxicity is still not clear, it is likely that the cellular transformation ability of butachlor is partly associated with its mutagenicity.

  20. Butachlor-induced acute toxic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Daryani, Nasser Ebrahimi; Hosseini, Parviz; Bashashati, Mohammad; Haidarali, Mona; Sayyah, Alireza

    2007-01-01

    Butachlor is a highly effective herbicidal substance widely used by farmers. We report a 60-year-old man with exfoliative dermatitis, jaundice, increase in liver enzymes and eosinophilia one day after accidental dermal exposure to butachlor toxin. The diagnostic workup showed no other cause and liver histology was consistent with substance-induced toxic hepatitis. Within two weeks of conservative therapy, his liver function tests returned to normal.

  1. Genotoxicity of the herbicide butachlor in cultured human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sinha, S; Panneerselvam, N; Shanmugam, G

    1995-08-01

    Butachlor, a pre-emergence herbicide was investigated for its ability to induce sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) and chromosome aberrations (CA) in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes were treated with three different concentrations (5, 10 and 20 micrograms/ml) of butachlor for 24, 48 and 72 h. Our results indicate a dose-dependent increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations at 24, 48 and 72 h of treatment with butachlor. No SCE was promoted by butachlor.

  2. 40 CFR 180.470 - Acetochlor; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... stoichiometric equivalents of acetochlor, in or on the following commodities: Commodity Parts per million Beet, sugar, dried pulp 0.50 Beet, sugar, molasses 0.80 Beet, sugar, roots 0.30 Beet, sugar, tops 0.70...

  3. Progression of alachlor-induced olfactory mucosal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Genter, Mary Beth; Burman, Dawn M; Bolon, Brad

    2002-01-01

    Alachlor is an herbicide used primarily in the production of corn (maize), peanuts, and soybeans and is associated with cancer of the nasal cavity, thyroid, and stomach in rats. Previous work from our laboratory demonstrated that the nasal cavity tumours originate from the olfactory mucosa, and that neoplasms were present following 6 months of exposure (126 mg/kg/day in the diet). The studies presented herein were conducted to determine more precisely the earliest time point at which alachlor-induced tumours were present, and to describe the histological changes that occur en route to tumour formation. We determined that dramatic histological changes, including respiratory metaplasia of the olfactory mucosa, were present following 3 months of exposure, and the earliest alachlor-induced olfactory mucosal tumours were detected following 5 months of treatment. Because alachlor is positive in short-term mutagenicity assays with olfactory mucosal activation, and because of the relatively short time-to-tumour formation observed with alachlor, we also conducted a ‘stop’ study in which rats were treated with alachlor for 1 month and then held without further treatment for an additional 5 months. This study demonstrated that abbreviated alachlor exposure did not result in subsequent tumour formation within the 6-month observation period. PMID:12657139

  4. Effects of butachlor on microbial enzyme activities in paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Min, Hang; Ye, Yang-Fang; Chen, Zhong-Yun; Wu, Wei-Xiang; Du, Yu-Feng

    2002-07-01

    This paper reports the influences of the herbicide butachlor (n-butoxymethl-chloro-2', 6'-diethylacetnilide) on microbial respiration, nitrogen fixation and nitrification, and on the activities of dehydrogenase and hydrogen peroxidase in paddy soil. The results showed that after application of butachlor with concentrations of 5.5 micrograms/g dried soil, 11.0 micrograms/g dried soil and 22.0 micrograms/g dried soil, the application of butachlor enhanced the activity of dehydrogenase at increasing concentrations. The soil dehydrogenase showed the highest activity on the 16th day after application of 22.0 micrograms/g dried soil of butachlor. The hydrogen peroxidase could be stimulated by butachlor. The soil respiration was depressed within a period from several days to more than 20 days, depending on concentrations of butachlor applied. Both the nitrogen fixation and nitrification were stimulated in the beginning but reduced greatly afterwards in paddy soil.

  5. Isolation and characterization of a pseudomonas oleovorans degrading the chloroacetamide herbicide acetochlor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Qiu, Xinghui; Dai, Jiayin; Cao, Hong; Yang, Min; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Muqi

    2006-06-01

    To date, no pure bacterial cultures that could degrade acetochlor have been described. In this study, one strain of microorganism capable of degrading acetochlor, designated as LCa2, was isolated from acetochlor-contaminated soil. The strain LCa2 is Pseudomonas oleovorans according to the criteria of Bergey's manual of determinative bacteriology and sequence analysis of the partial 16S rRNA gene. Optimum growth temperature and pH were 35 degrees C and 8.0, respectively. The strain could degrade 98.03% of acetochlor treated at a concentration of 7.6 mg l(-1) after 7 days of incubation and could tolerate 200 mg l(-1) of acetochlor. When the acetochlor concentration became higher, the degradation cycle became longer. The acetochlor biodegradation products were identified by GC-MS based on mass spectral data and fragmentation patterns. The main plausible degradative pathways involved dechlorination, hydroxylation, N-dealkylation, C-dealkylation and dehydrogenation. PMID:16715401

  6. Acetochlor in the hydrologic system in the midwestern United States, 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, D.W.; Nations, B.K.; Goolsby, D.A.; Thurman, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    The herbicide acetochlor [2-chloro-N-(ethoxymethyl)-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)acetamide] was given conditional registration in the United States by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in March 1994. This registration provided a rare opportunity to investigate the occurrence of a pesticide during its first season of extensive use in the midwestern United States. Water samples collected and analyzed by the U.S. Geological Survey during 1994 documented the distribution of acetochlor in the hydrologic system; it was detected in 29% of the rain samples from four sites in Iowa, 17% of the stream samples from 51 sites across nine states, and 0% of the groundwater samples from 38 wells across eight states. Acetochlor exhibited concentration increases in rain and streams following its application to corn in the midwestern United States, with 75% of the rainwater and 35% of the stream samples having acetochlor detected during this time period. Acetochlor concentrations in rain decreased as the growing season progressed. Based on the limited data collected for this study, it is anticipated that acetochlor concentrations will have a seasonal pattern in rain and streams similar to those of other acetanilide herbicides examined. Possible explanations for the absence of acetochlor in groundwater for this study include the rapid degradation of acetochlor in the soil zone, insufficient time for this first extensive use of acetochlor to have reached the aquifers sampled, and the possible lack of acetochlor use in the recharge areas for the wells examined.

  7. Comparative proteome analysis of butachlor-degrading bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinhua; Lu, Yitong; Chen, Yingying

    2008-01-01

    A Pseudomonas putida strain, named ER1, was isolated from an agricultural soil and found to actively degrade the herbicide butachlor. The enzyme extracted from ER1 could degrade butachlor. Furthermore, incubation of ER1 in a medium containing 50 mg/kg of butachlor after 3 days resulted in the high butachlor-degrading enzyme activity of ER1. Response of ER1 to butachlor might be related to changes in protein composition at both quantitative and qualitative levels. Total proteins were extracted from control strain (incubated in the medium without butachlor) and the treated strain (incubated in the medium with butachlor). The proteins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Of the total number of ER1 protein, 11 spots were significantly changed under butachlor stress. Analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry coupled with database searching allowed the function of some proteins which were similar to the hydrolases activity or oxidoreductase activity.

  8. Environmental fate of alachlor and metolachlor.

    PubMed

    Chesters, G; Simsiman, G V; Levy, J; Alhajjar, B J; Fathulla, R N; Harkin, J M

    1989-01-01

    Decision-makers, scientists, and the interested public should be informed what future research and education is needed if a strong pesticide regulatory program is imposed. Recommendations are intended to highlight research gaps. Some may be of general concern and apply to many pesticides. A situation that calls into question the value of many of our management decisions, is the lack of good field-scale experimentation and of logical mechanisms for translating and extrapolating laboratory data to field-scale dimensions. Many experiments were not designed to allow application of basic statistical criteria. High costs often preclude sufficient replication in field-scale experiments so that researchers must make the "no-win" choice between doing one investigation well or doing two or three poorly. The following observations about alachlor and metolachlor are provided: Pysicochemical properties are accurately determined. The herbicides' modes of action and plant selectivity have received a great deal of attention, but gaps remain in defining which of three modes of action are most important. Geographic distribution and extent of residue contamination of surface waters is documented, but groundwater contamination is poorly defined. Any groundwater monitoring protocol should limit the investigation based on sound scientific judgment since a nationwide monitoring network cannot be economically justified. Enough data are needed, however, to allow mathematical model development, verification and validation for a diversity of soil, geographic, climatic, and agricultural management conditions. In view of the importance of adsorption in determining the fate of pesticides, improved methods of determining adsorption coefficients (KD) are needed particularly for very low concentrations. The impact of soil aggregation on adsorption/desorption needs to be examined. The role of temperature and water content in adsorption/desorption processes needs clearer definition. Although

  9. Use of acetochlor and cancer incidence in the Agricultural Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Lerro, Catherine C.; Koutros, Stella; Andreotti, Gabriella; Hines, Cynthia J.; Blair, Aaron; Lubin, Jay; Ma, Xiaomei; Zhang, Yawei; Freeman, Laura E. Beane

    2015-01-01

    Since its registration in 1994 acetochlor has become a commonly used herbicide in the US, yet no epidemiologic study has evaluated its carcinogenicity in humans. We evaluated use of acetochlor and cancer incidence among licensed pesticide applicators in the Agricultural Health Study. In telephone interviews administered 1999-2005, participants provided information on acetochlor use, use of other pesticides, and additional potential confounders. We used Poisson regression to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for cancers that occurred from the time of interview through 2011 in Iowa and 2010 in North Carolina. Among 33,484 men, there were 4,026 applicators who used acetochlor and 3,234 incident cancers, with 304 acetochlor-exposed cases. Increased risk of lung cancer was observed among acetochlor users (RR = 1.74; 95% CI: 1.07-2.84) compared to nonusers, and among individuals who reported using acetochlor/atrazine product mixtures (RR = 2.33; 95% CI: 1.30-4.17), compared to nonusers of acetochlor. Colorectal cancer risk was significantly elevated among the highest category of acetochlor users (RR = 1.75; 95% CI: 1.08-2.83) compared to never users. Additionally, borderline significantly increased risk of melanoma (RR = 1.61; 95% CI: 0.98-2.66) and pancreatic cancer (RR = 2.36; 95% CI: 0.98-5.65) were observed among acetochlor users. The associations between acetochlor use and lung cancer, colorectal cancer, melanoma, and pancreatic cancer are suggestive, however the lack of exposure-response trends, small number of exposed cases, and relatively short time between acetochlor use and cancer development, prohibit definitive conclusions. PMID:25559664

  10. Use of acetochlor and cancer incidence in the Agricultural Health Study.

    PubMed

    Lerro, Catherine C; Koutros, Stella; Andreotti, Gabriella; Hines, Cynthia J; Blair, Aaron; Lubin, Jay; Ma, Xiaomei; Zhang, Yawei; Beane Freeman, Laura E

    2015-09-01

    Since its registration in 1994 acetochlor has become a commonly used herbicide in the US, yet no epidemiologic study has evaluated its carcinogenicity in humans. We evaluated the use of acetochlor and cancer incidence among licensed pesticide applicators in the Agricultural Health Study. In telephone interviews administered during 1999-2005, participants provided information on acetochlor use, use of other pesticides and additional potential confounders. We used Poisson regression to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for cancers that occurred from the time of interview through 2011 in Iowa and 2010 in North Carolina. Among 33,484 men, there were 4,026 applicators who used acetochlor and 3,234 incident cancers, with 304 acetochlor-exposed cases. Increased risk of lung cancer was observed among acetochlor users (RR = 1.74; 95% CI: 1.07-2.84) compared to nonusers, and among individuals who reported using acetochlor/atrazine product mixtures (RR = 2.33; 95% CI: 1.30-4.17), compared to nonusers of acetochlor. Colorectal cancer risk was significantly elevated among the highest category of acetochlor users (RR = 1.75; 95% CI: 1.08-2.83) compared to never users. Additionally, borderline significantly increased risk of melanoma (RR = 1.61; 95% CI: 0.98-2.66) and pancreatic cancer (RR = 2.36; 95% CI: 0.98-5.65) were observed among acetochlor users. The associations between acetochlor use and lung cancer, colorectal cancer, melanoma and pancreatic cancer are suggestive, however the lack of exposure-response trends, small number of exposed cases and relatively short time between acetochlor use and cancer development prohibit definitive conclusions.

  11. Soil Pseudomonas community structure and its antagonism towards Rhizoctonia solani under the stress of acetochlor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Minna; Zhang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Huiwen; Zhang, Yan; Li, Xinyu; Zhou, Qixing; Zhang, Chenggang

    2009-09-01

    In a microcosm experiment, the amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis was adopted to investigate the Pseudomonas community structure in soils applied with different concentrations (0, 50, 150, and 250 mg/kg) of acetochlor, and an in vitro assay was made to examine the antagonistic activity of isolated Pseudomonas strains acting on soil-borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. The results showed that acetochlor application changed the community structure of Pseudomonas in aquic brown soil. The diversity of Pseudomonas and the amount of isolated Pseudomonas strains with antagonistic activity decreased with an increasing acetochlor concentration, and the toxic effect of acetochlor reached to a steady level at 150-250 mg/kg.

  12. Evaluation of mortality and cancer incidence among alachlor manufacturing workers.

    PubMed Central

    Acquavella, J F; Riordan, S G; Anne, M; Lynch, C F; Collins, J J; Ireland, B K; Heydens, W F

    1996-01-01

    Alachlor is the active ingredient in a family of preemergence herbicides. We assessed mortality rates from 1968 to 1993 and cancer incidence rates from 1969 to 1993 for manufacturing workers with potential alachlor exposure. For workers judged to have high alachlor exposure, mortality from all causes combined was lower than expected [23 observed, standardized mortality ratio (SMR) = 0.7, 95% CI, 0.4-1.0], cancer mortality was similar to expected (6 observed, SMR = 0.7, 95% CI, 0.3-1.6), and there were no cancer deaths among workers with 5 or more years high exposure and 15 or more years since first exposure (2.3 expected, SMR = 0, 95% CI, 0-1.6). Cancer incidence for workers with high exposure potential was similar to the state rate [18 observed, standardized incidence ratio (SIR) = 1.2, 95% CI, 0.7-2.0], especially for workers exposed for 5 or more years and with at least 15 years since first exposure (4 observed, SIR = 1.0, 95% CI, 0.3-2.7). The most common cancer for these latter workers was colorectal cancer (2 observed, SIR 3.9, 95% CI, 0.5-14.2 among workers). Despite the limitations of this study with respect to small size and exposure estimating, the findings are useful for evaluating potential alachlor-related health risks because past manufacturing exposures greatly exceeded those characteristic of agricultural operations. These findings suggest no appreciable effect of alachlor exposure on worker mortality or cancer incidence rates during the study period. PMID:8841758

  13. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Identification of New Sulfonic Acid Metabolites of Chloroacetanilide Herbicides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, M.D.; Walters, F.H.; Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.; Larive, C.K.

    1997-01-01

    The detection of the sulfonic acid metabolites of the chloroacetanilide herbicides acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, propachlor, and, more recently, metolachlor in surface and ground water suggests that a common mechanism for dechlorination exists via the glutathione conjugation pathway. The identification of these herbicides and their metabolites is important due to growing public awareness and concern about pesticide levels in drinking water. Although these herbicides are regulated, little is known about the fate of their metabolites in soil. The sulfonic acid metabolites were synthesized by reaction of the parent compounds with an excess of sodium sulfite. Acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, metolachlor, and propachlor and their sulfonic acid metabolites were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. This paper provides a direct method for the preparation and characterization of these compounds that will be useful in the analysis and study of chloracetanilide herbicides and their metabolites.

  14. Organo-clay formulation of acetochlor for reduced movement in soil.

    PubMed

    El-Nahhal, Y; Nir, S; Serban, C; Rabinovitz, O; Rubin, B

    2001-11-01

    This study aimed to design ecologically acceptable formulations of acetochlor by adsorbing it on montmorillonite exchanged by a small organic cation, phenyltrimethylammonium (PTMA). Adsorption of acetochlor on the clay mineral exchanged with different organic cations and its release from these complexes were determined by GC and modeled by Langmuir equation. Interactions between acetochlor molecules and the exchanged organic cation on the clay surface were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Leaching of acetochlor in soil was determined by a bioassay using a column technique and Setaria viridis as a test plant. The adsorbed amounts of acetochlor on montmorillonite exchanged by PTMA at a loading of 0.5 mmol/g of clay were higher than at a loading up to the cation-exchange capacity, i.e., 0.8 mmol/g, and were higher than obtained by using a clay mineral exchanged by other organic cations. Preloading montmorillonite by PTMA at 0.5 mmol/g yielded maximal shifts of the infrared peaks of the herbicide. The above formulation of acetochlor yielded slow release in water and showed improved weed control in field and greenhouse experiments in comparison with the commercial formulation. The PTMA-clay formulation of acetochlor maintained herbicidal activity in the topsoil and yielded the most significant reduction in herbicide leaching and persistence under field conditions. The application of this formulation can minimize the risk to groundwater and can reduce the applied rates.

  15. An evaluation of the feasibility of using cytogenetic damage as a biomarker for alachlor exposure.

    PubMed

    Kligerman, A D; Erexson, G L

    1999-04-26

    Alachlor is a widely used herbicide for which there is significant human exposure, principally through groundwater contamination and inhalation. Because alachlor is purported to be carcinogenic and mutagenic, we initiated studies to determine if induced cytogenetic damage could be used as a biomarker for exposure to this herbicide. Both isolated and whole blood human lymphocytes were exposed to alachlor using several protocols. The lymphocytes were cultured for analysis of sister chromatid exchange (SCE), chromosome aberrations (CAs), micronuclei (MN) in cytochalasin B-induced binucleated cells, and proliferation kinetics using the replicative index (RI). In addition, CD rats were injected with either 10 or 50 mg kg-1 of alachlor, 2-chloro-N-(2,6-diethylphenyl) acetamide (CDEPA) or 2, 6-diethylanaline (DEA). After 24 h, the peripheral blood lymphocytes were removed and cultured for SCE and RI analysis. Alachlor did induce a concentration-related increase in SCE in vitro, but neither it nor its metabolites (CDEPA or DEA) induced a significant increase in SCEs or an alteration of RI in vivo. At the highest in vitro concentration tested, alachlor induced a statistically-significant increase in MN, but no concomitant increase in CAs was seen. From analyses of our data and the literature on alachlor clastogenicity and exposure levels, we concluded that cytogenetic damage may not be an adequately sensitive marker for evaluating human exposure to alachlor.

  16. KINETICS OF ALACHLOR TRANSFORMATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF METABOLITES UNDER ANAEROBIC CONDITIONS. (R825549C037)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alachlor is one of the two most commonly used herbicides in the United States. In the environment, little mineralization of this compound has been found to occur, and metabolites of alachlor may be formed and could accumulate. The objectives of this study were to determine the...

  17. Rapid degradation of butachlor in wheat rhizosphere soil.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y L; Chen, Y X; Luo, Y M; Pan, X D; He, Y F; Wong, M H

    2003-02-01

    The degradative characteristics of butachlor in non-rhizosphere, wheat rhizosphere, and inoculated rhizosphere soils were measured. The rate constants for the degradation of butachlor in non-rhizosphere, rhizosphere, and inoculated rhizosphere soils were measured to be 0.0385, 0.0902, 0.1091 at 1 mg/kg, 0.0348, 0.0629, 0.2355 at 10 mg/kg, and 0.0299, 0.0386, 0.0642 at 100 mg/kg, respectively. The corresponding half-lives for butachlor in the soils were calculated to be 18.0, 7.7, 6.3 days at 1 mg/kg, 19.9, 11.0, 2.9 days at 10 mg/kg, and 23.2, 18.0, 10.8 days at 100 mg/kg, respectively. The experimental results show that the degradation of butachlor can be enhanced greatly in wheat rhizosphere, and especially in the rhizosphere inoculated with the bacterial community designated HD which is capable of degrading butachlor. It could be concluded that rhizosphere soil inoculated with microorganisms-degrading target herbicides is a useful pathway to achieve rapid degradation of the herbicides in soil.

  18. [Residual levels of acetochlor in source water and drinking water of China's major cities].

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Yong; Jin, Fen; Li, Hong-Yan; An, Wei; Yang, Min

    2014-05-01

    The concentration levels of acetochlor were investigated in source water and drinking water from 36 major cities in China by solid phase extraction (SPE) combined with gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Acetochlor detection rate was 66.9% in all the 145 source water samples collected with an average concentration of 33.9 ng L-1. The average removal rate of acetochlor was limited through the drinking water treatment process. The detection concentration of the northeast region was the highest. The concentrations of acetochlor detected in lake were higher than those in river and groundwater as source water. The detection rate and concentration of Liaohe river watershed and the coastal watershed were the highest.

  19. [Quantitative analysis of butachlor, oxadiazon and simetryn by gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Mu, W; Wang, J

    1999-03-01

    The quantitative analysis of the ingredients in 26% B-O-S (butachlor, oxadiazon and simetryn) emulsion by gas chromatographic method was carried out with a 5% SE-30 on Chromosorb AW DMCS, 2 m x 3 mm i.d., glass column at column temperature of 210 degrees C and detector temperature of 230 degrees C. The internal standard is di-n-butyl sebacate. The retentions of simetryn, internal standard, butachlor and oxadiazon were 6.5, 8.3, 9.9 and 11.9 min respectively. This method has a recovery of 98.62%-100.77% and the coefficients of variation of this analysis of butachlor, oxadiazon and simetryn were 0.46%, 0.32% and 0.57% respectively. All coefficients of linear correlation were higher than 0.999.

  20. Comparative metabolism of chloroacetamide herbicides and selected metabolites in human and rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, S; Linderman, R; Hodgson, E; Rose, R L

    2000-01-01

    Acetochlor [2-chloro-N-(ethoxymethyl)-N-(2-ethyl-6-methyl-phenyl)-acetamide], alachlor [N-(methoxymethyl)-2-chloro-N-(2, 6-diethyl-phenyl)acetamide], butachlor [N-(butoxymethyl)-2-chloro-N-(2,6-diethyl-phenyl)acetamide], and metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl) acetamide] are pre-emergent herbicides used in the production of agricultural crops. These herbicides are carcinogenic in rats: acetochlor and alachlor cause tumors in the nasal turbinates, butachlor causes stomach tumors, and metolachlor causes liver tumors. It has been suggested that the carcinogenicity of these compounds involves a complex metabolic activation pathway leading to a DNA-reactive dialkylbenzoquinone imine. Important intermediates in this pathway are 2-chloro-N-(2,6-diethylphenyl)acetamide (CDEPA) produced from alachlor and butachlor and 2-chloro-N-(2-methyl-6-ethylphenyl)acetamide (CMEPA) produced from acetochlor and metolachlor. Subsequent metabolism of CDEPA and CMEPA produces 2,6-diethylaniline (DEA) and 2-methyl-6-ethylaniline (MEA), which are bioactivated through para-hydroxylation and subsequent oxidation to the proposed carcinogenic product dialkylbenzoquinone imine. The current study extends our earlier studies with alachlor and demonstrates that rat liver microsomes metabolize acetochlor and metolachlor to CMEPA (0.065 nmol/min/mg and 0.0133 nmol/min/mg, respectively), whereas human liver microsomes can metabolize only acetochlor to CMEPA (0.023 nmol/min/mg). Butachlor is metabolized to CDEPA to a much greater extent by rat liver microsomes (0.045 nmol/min/mg) than by human liver microsomes (< 0.001 nmol/min/mg). We have determined that both rat and human livers metabolize both CMEPA to MEA (0.308 nmol/min/mg and 0.541 nmol/min/mg, respectively) and CDEPA to DEA (0.350 nmol/min/mg and 0.841 nmol/min/mg, respectively). We have shown that both rat and human liver microsomes metabolize MEA (0.035 nmol/min/mg and 0.069 nmol/min/mg, respectively

  1. Embryonic exposure to butachlor in zebrafish (Danio rerio): endocrine disruption, developmental toxicity and immunotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenqing; Niu, Lili; Liu, Weiping; Xu, Chao

    2013-03-01

    Butachlor is a chloroacetanilide herbicide widely employed in weeding important crops. Recently, the study of the possible toxic effects of butachlor in non-target organisms has increased substantially. However, the endocrine disruption, developmental toxicity and immunotoxicity effects of butachlor in fish have not been fully investigated in previous studies. In the present study, zebrafish embryos were exposed to a range of butachlor concentrations from 4 to 20 μM to evaluate the embryonic toxicity of butachlor until 84 hours postfertilization (hpf). The results demonstrated that butachlor was highly toxic to zebrafish embryos, hindering the hatching process, resulting in a series of malformations and followed by mortality. The malformations observed included pericardial edema (PE) and yolk sac edema (YSE), which showed concentration-dependent responses. The analysis of endocrine gene transcription indicated that butachlor significantly induced the expression of the estrogen-responsive gene Vtg1 but had no effect on the expression of the ERα gene. The innate immune system appeared to be another possible target of butachlor. At 72 hpf, butachlor significantly up-regulated the innate immune system-related genes, including IL-1β, CC-chem, CXCL-C1c and IL-8. These data suggest that butachlor causes developmental toxicity, endocrine disruption and immune toxicity in the zebrafish embryo. Bidirectional interactions between the endocrine system and the immune system might be present, and further studies are needed to determine these possible pathways.

  2. Embryonic exposure to butachlor in zebrafish (Danio rerio): endocrine disruption, developmental toxicity and immunotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenqing; Niu, Lili; Liu, Weiping; Xu, Chao

    2013-03-01

    Butachlor is a chloroacetanilide herbicide widely employed in weeding important crops. Recently, the study of the possible toxic effects of butachlor in non-target organisms has increased substantially. However, the endocrine disruption, developmental toxicity and immunotoxicity effects of butachlor in fish have not been fully investigated in previous studies. In the present study, zebrafish embryos were exposed to a range of butachlor concentrations from 4 to 20 μM to evaluate the embryonic toxicity of butachlor until 84 hours postfertilization (hpf). The results demonstrated that butachlor was highly toxic to zebrafish embryos, hindering the hatching process, resulting in a series of malformations and followed by mortality. The malformations observed included pericardial edema (PE) and yolk sac edema (YSE), which showed concentration-dependent responses. The analysis of endocrine gene transcription indicated that butachlor significantly induced the expression of the estrogen-responsive gene Vtg1 but had no effect on the expression of the ERα gene. The innate immune system appeared to be another possible target of butachlor. At 72 hpf, butachlor significantly up-regulated the innate immune system-related genes, including IL-1β, CC-chem, CXCL-C1c and IL-8. These data suggest that butachlor causes developmental toxicity, endocrine disruption and immune toxicity in the zebrafish embryo. Bidirectional interactions between the endocrine system and the immune system might be present, and further studies are needed to determine these possible pathways. PMID:23294635

  3. Effects of butachlor on microbial populations and enzyme activities in paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Min, H; Ye, Y F; Chen, Z Y; Wu, W X; Yufeng, D

    2001-09-01

    This paper reports the influences of the herbicide butachlor (n-butoxymethlchloro -2', 6'-diethylacetnilide) on microbial populations, respiration, nitrogen fixation and nitrification, and on the activities of dehydrogenase and hydrogen peroxidase in paddy soil. The results showed that the number of actinomycetes declined significantly after the application of butachlor at different concentrations ranging from 5.5 microg g(-1) to 22.0 microg g(-1) dried soil, while that of bacteria and fungi increased. Fungi were easily affected by butachlor compared to the bacteria. The growth of fungi was retarded by butachlor at higher concentrations. Butachlor however, stimulated the growth of anaerobic hydrolytic fermentative bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and denitrifying bacteria. The increased concentration of butachlor applied resulted in the higher number of SRB. Butachlor inhibited the growth of hydrogen-producing acetogenic bacteria. The effect of butachlor varied on methane-producing bacteria (MPB) at different concentrations. Butachlor at the concentration of 1.0 microg g(-1) dried soil or less than this concentration accelerated the growth of MPB, while at 22.0 microg g(-1) dried soil showed an inhibition. Butachlor enhanced the activity of dehydrogenase at increasing concentrations. The soil dehydrogenase showed the highest activity on the 16th day after application of 22.0 microg g(-1) dried soil of butachlor. The hydrogen peroxidase could be stimulated by butachlor. The soil respiration was depressed during the period from several days to more than 20 days, depending on concentrations of butachlor applied. Both the nitrogen fixation and nitrification were stimulated in the beginning but reduced greatly afterwards in paddy soil.

  4. Mechanism study of alachlor biodegradation by Paecilomyces marquandii with proteomic and metabolomic methods.

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, Rafał; Soboń, Adrian; Słaba, Mirosława; Długoński, Jerzy

    2015-06-30

    Alachlor is an herbicide that is widely used worldwide to protect plant crops against broadleaf weeds and annual grasses. However, due to its endocrine-disrupting activity, its application had been banned in the European Union. As described in our earlier work, Paecilomyces marquandii is a microscopic fungus capable of alachlor removal by N-acetyl oxidation. Our current work uses proteomics and metabolomics to gain a better understanding of alachlor biodegradation by the microscopic fungus P. marquandii. The data revealed that the addition of alachlor reduced the culture growth and glucose consumption rates. Moreover, the rates of glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acids (TCA) cycle increased during the initial stage of growth, and there was a shift toward the formation of supplementary materials (UDP-glucose/galactose) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers (ascorbate). Proteomic analysis revealed that the presence of xenobiotics resulted in a strong upregulation of enzymes related to energy, sugar metabolism and ROS production. However, the unique overexpression of cyanide hydratase in alachlor-containing cultures may implicate this enzyme as the key protein involved in the alachlor biodegradation pathway. The characterization of P. marquandii-mediated alachlor removal in terms of cell structure and function provides a deeper insight into the strategies of microorganisms toward xenobiotic biodegradation. PMID:25765177

  5. Mechanism study of alachlor biodegradation by Paecilomyces marquandii with proteomic and metabolomic methods.

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, Rafał; Soboń, Adrian; Słaba, Mirosława; Długoński, Jerzy

    2015-06-30

    Alachlor is an herbicide that is widely used worldwide to protect plant crops against broadleaf weeds and annual grasses. However, due to its endocrine-disrupting activity, its application had been banned in the European Union. As described in our earlier work, Paecilomyces marquandii is a microscopic fungus capable of alachlor removal by N-acetyl oxidation. Our current work uses proteomics and metabolomics to gain a better understanding of alachlor biodegradation by the microscopic fungus P. marquandii. The data revealed that the addition of alachlor reduced the culture growth and glucose consumption rates. Moreover, the rates of glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acids (TCA) cycle increased during the initial stage of growth, and there was a shift toward the formation of supplementary materials (UDP-glucose/galactose) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers (ascorbate). Proteomic analysis revealed that the presence of xenobiotics resulted in a strong upregulation of enzymes related to energy, sugar metabolism and ROS production. However, the unique overexpression of cyanide hydratase in alachlor-containing cultures may implicate this enzyme as the key protein involved in the alachlor biodegradation pathway. The characterization of P. marquandii-mediated alachlor removal in terms of cell structure and function provides a deeper insight into the strategies of microorganisms toward xenobiotic biodegradation.

  6. The influence of alachlor, trifluralin, and diazinon on the development of endogenous mycorrhizae in soybeans.

    PubMed

    Burpee, L L; Cole, H

    1978-02-01

    Preplant incorporated treatments of 2 and 4 kg/ha of trifluralin and diazinon had no significant effect on growth, P accumulation or root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi in soybeans planted in an Andover clay loam. At 4 kg/ha, alachlor and trifluralin inhibited root development of 25 day-old plants. The 4 kg/ha alachlor treatment reduced shoot weight of 25 day old plants significantly and suppressed mycorrhizal development of 25 to 60 day old plants. At currently used commercial rates neither alachlor, trifluralin, nor diazinon affected mycorrhizal development under the conditions of the experiment.

  7. Butachlor, a suspected carcinogen, alters growth and transformation characteristics of mouse liver cells.

    PubMed

    Ou, Y H; Chung, P C; Chang, Y C; Ngo, F Q; Hsu, K Y; Chen, F D

    2000-12-01

    Butachlor is a widely used herbicide in Asia and South America. Previous investigations have indicated that it is a suspected carcinogen. To understand more about the biological effects of butachlor on cultured cells and the mechanism(s) of its carcinogenicity, we studied the alteration of the growth characteristics that was induced by butachlor in normal mouse liver cells (BNL CL2). This study demonstrates that butachlor decreases the population-doubling time of BNL CL2 cells, suggesting that it stimulates cell proliferation. To support this finding, a thymidine incorporation assay was conducted and a similar result that butachlor stimulates cell proliferation was elucidated. In addition, we show that butachlor increases the saturation density of the BNL CL2 cells. When combined with the tumor initiator N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), butachlor transforms cells efficiently, as demonstrated by loss of contact inhibition. These findings indicate that butachlor alters the growth characteristics of BNL CL2 cells and suggest that butachlor may induce malignant transformation through stimulation of cell proliferation, alteration of cell cycle regulation, and suppression of cell density-dependent inhibition of proliferation.

  8. [Effect of butachlor on CH4 emission and anaerobes in paddy soil].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Mei, Q; Chen, M; Min, H

    1997-12-01

    Effects of butachlor on CH4 emission and the count of anaerobes in paddy soil or in the media were studied. The results obtained showed that CH4 emission and growth of methanogens would be greatly affected at field rates of butachlor within 2 weeks, but this adverse effects would disappear as time went on. CH4 emission and methanogenic activities would be retarded by butachlor in media for longer time. The amount of butachlor available to act upon anaerobes depended on application rate and method of application.

  9. ANALYTICAL METHOD DEVELOPMENT FOR ALACHLOR ESA AND OTHER ACETANILIDE HERBICIDE DEGRADATION PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1998, USEPA published a Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List (CCL) of 50 chemicals and 10 microorganisms. "Alachlor ESA and other acetanilide herbicide degradation products" is listed on the the 1998 CCL. Acetanilide degradation products are generally more water soluble...

  10. Formation and transport of the sulfonic acid metabolites of alachlor and metolachlor in soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.

    2001-01-01

    Alachlor and metolachlor are dechlorinated and transformed into their corresponding ethane sulfonic acid (ESA) metabolites in soil. In a field-disappearance study, it was shown that alachlor ESA was formed at a faster rate and at concentrations 2-4 times higher than metolachlor ESA, conforming with the observed longer disappearance half-life of metolachlor (15.5 d) in the field as compared to alachlor (8 d). Runoff data also showed higher concentrations of alachlor ESA as compared to metolachlor ESA, even though they were applied at the same levels. Data from soil cores showed transport of the ESA compounds in soil to as far down as 75-90 cm below the surface, at concentrations ranging from less than 0.5 ??g/L to about 50 ??g/L. In contrast, no parent herbicide was detected at these depths. This observation correlates with the higher log KOC values for alachlor (3.33) and metolachlor (3.01) relative to their corresponding ESA metabolites, alachlor ESA (2.26), and metolachlor ESA (2.29).

  11. Degradation of alachlor using an enhanced sono-Fenton process with efficient Fenton's reagent dosages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chikang; Liu, Zonghan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an enhanced sono-Fenton process for the degradation of alachlor is presented. At high ultrasonic power, low pH, and in the presence of adequate Fenton's reagent dosages, alachlor degradation can reach nearly 100%. The toxicity of treated alachlor wastewater, which was measured by changes in cell viability, slightly decreased after the Fenton or ultrasound/H2O2 process and significantly decreased after the enhanced sono-Fenton process. A satisfactory relationship was observed between the total organic carbon removal and cell viability increment, indicating that alachlor mineralization is a key step in reducing the toxicity of the solution. The formation of alachlor degradation byproducts was observed during the oxidation process, in which the first step was the substitution of a chloride by a hydroxyl group. In conclusion, the enhanced sono-Fenton process was effective in the degradation and detoxification of alachlor within a short reaction time. Thus, the treated wastewater can then be passed through a biological treatment unit for further treatment.

  12. Ethylcellulose formulations for controlled release of the herbicide alachlor in a sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Sopeña, Fátima; Cabrera, Alegría; Maqueda, Celia; Morillo, Esmeralda

    2007-10-01

    The development of controlled-release formulations of alachlor to diminish its leaching in sandy soils, avoiding groundwater contamination and maintaining its efficacy, was studied. For this purpose, ethylcellulose (EC) microencapsulated formulations (MEFs) of alachlor were prepared under different conditions and applied to soil columns to study their mobility. The results show that in all cases the release into water of alachlor from MEFs was retarded when compared with commercial formulation. Total leaching losses in soil columns were reduced to 59% from 98%. The mobility of alachlor from EC microspheres into soil columns has been greatly diminished in comparison with its current commercial formulation (CF), above all with increasing EC/herbicide ratios. Distribution of alachlor applied as MEFs at different depths in the soil was higher in the soil surface (66.3-81.3% of herbicide applied at the first 12 cm). In contrast, the residues from CF along the complete soil column were only 20.4%. From the results of bioassays, MEFs showed a higher efficacy than CF at 30 days after the treatment. The use of ME formulations could provide an advantage in minimizing the risk of groundwater contamination by alachlor and reducing the application rates, as a result of maintaining the desired concentration of the herbicide in the top soil layer, obtaining longer periods of weed control.

  13. Effects of butachlor on reproduction and hormone levels in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Chang, Juhua; Liu, Shaoying; Zhou, Shengli; Wang, Minghua; Zhu, Guonian

    2013-01-01

    Butachlor, a chloracetamide herbicide, is widely used in China. In the present study, paired adult male and female zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to various concentrations of butachlor (0, 25, 50 and 100 μg/L) for 30 days, and the effects on reproduction and endocrine disruption were evaluated using fecundity, condition factor (CF), gonadosomatic index (GSI), liver somatic index (LSI), plasma vitellogenin (VTG), sex steroids and thyroid hormone levels as endpoints. Our results showed that the mean fecundity rates were significantly decreased at 50 and 100 μg/L butachlor during the 30-day exposure period. At the end of the exposure period, no significant changes were observed in CF and LSI in both females and males, while GSI was significantly reduced in males at 50 and 100 μg/L butachlor. At 100 μg/L butachlor, plasma testosterone (T) and 17β-estradiol (E2) levels were significantly decreased in females, while plasma VTG level was significantly increased in males. Plasma thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels were significantly increased at 50 and 100 μg/L butachlor in males, and at 100 μg/L in females. This work demonstrated that butachlor adversely affected the normal reproductive success of zebrafish, and disrupted the thyroid and sex steroid endocrine systems, which provides the basis for the estimated ecological risk during butachlor exposure.

  14. Atrazine, alachlor, and cyanazine in a large agricultural river system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schottler, S.P.; Eisenreich, Steven J.; Capel, P.D.

    1994-01-01

    Atrazine, alachlor, and cyanazine exhibited maximum concentrations of about 1000-6000 ng/L in the Minnesota River in 1990 and 1991, resulting from precipitation and runoff following the application period. Transport of these herbicides to the river occurs via overland flow or by infiltration to tile drainage networks. Suspended sediment, SO42-, and Cl- concentrations were used as indicators of transport mechanisms. The atrazine metabolite, DEA, was present in the river throughout the year. The ratio of DEA to atrazine concentration was used to calculate an apparent first-order soil conversion rate of atrazine to DEA. Half lives of 21-58 d were calculated for 1990 and 1991, respectively. The longer conversion rate in 1991 results from rapid flushing from the soil and minimum exposure to soil microorganisms. Total flux of herbicide to the river was 1-6.5 t, with over 60% of this loading occurring during the month of June. Loading to the river accounts for less than 1.5% of applied herbicide. ?? 1994 American Chemical Society.

  15. Bioavailability of butachlor and myclobutanil residues in soil to earthworms.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y L; Wu, X M; Li, S N; Fang, H; Tan, Y J; Yu, J Q

    2005-05-01

    To establish chemical extraction procedures for predicting bioavailability of butachlor and myclobutanil in soil, several solvent systems, including methanol, methanol-water (9:1), methanol-water (1:1), acetone-water (5:3), petroleum ether and water, were assessed for their feasibility in determining extractability of the target compounds from soil samples. Experimental data showed that the extractability of butachlor and myclobutanil by the solvents was well linearly correlated with their bioavailability to Eisenia foetida and Allolobophora caliginosa, indicating that these extraction procedures may be efficient for predicting bioavailability of the two pesticides. The concentrations of the pesticides accumulated in E. foetida and A. caliginosa varied with species, suggesting that the availability of the soil-sequestered pesticide is a species-dependent process.

  16. Rapid polyelectrolyte-based membrane immunoassay for the herbicide butachlor.

    PubMed

    Dzantiev, B B; Byzova, N A; Zherdev, A V; Hennion, M C

    2005-01-01

    Oppositely charged water-soluble polyelectrolytes were used in the developed membrane immunoenzyme assay for the herbicide butachlor. High-affinity and rapid binding between polyanion polymethacrylate and polycation poly(N-ethyl-4-vinylpyridinium) was applied to separate reacted and free immunoreactants. Competitive immunoassay format with peroxidase-labeled antigen was realized. The insoluble colored product of the peroxidase reaction was formed by bound labeled immune complexes and was reflectometrically detected. The assay combines short duration (15 min), high sensitivity (0.03 g/mL) and availability for out-of-laboratory testing. Different image processing algorithms were used to determine the herbicide content. Low variation coefficients of the measurements in the proposed quantitative assay, namely 4.8-9.0% for the range of antigen concentrations from 0.1 to 3.0 ng/mL, are evidence of the assay effectiveness. Possibility to control the butachlor content in mineral, artesian, and drinking water was demonstrated.

  17. Field-scale mobility and persistence of commercial and stargh-encapusulated atrazine and alachlor

    SciTech Connect

    Gish, T.J.; Shirmohammadi, A.; Wienhold, B.J.

    1994-03-01

    Recent laboratory studies have shown that starch-encapsulation (SE) may reduce leachate losses of certain pesticides. This study compares field-scale mobility and persistence of SE-atrazine [2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine] and alachlor [2-chloro-N(2,6 diethylphenyl)-N-(methoxymethyl)acetamide] to that of a commerciall formulation (CF) of atrazine and alachlor. The research site consisted of four (0.25 ha) fields. Two fields were under no-tillage management (NT) and two were under conventional tillage (CT). One field in each tillage system received SE-formulated atritzine and alachlor, while the others received CF-atrazine and alachlor. Chemical movement and persistence was determined by analysis of surface samples ({approximately}3 cm) taken immediately after application and 1.1-m soil cores collected seven times over 2 yr. No significant difference in herbicide residue levels was observed between NT and CT, but there was a herbicide formulation effect. Soil residue analysis suggests that SE-atrazine was more persistent and less mobile than CF-atrazine. Starch- encapsulated-alachlor was slightly more persistent than CF-alachlor, but no differences in mobility between formulations was observed. The differential field behavior between SE-herbicides is attributed to the faster release of alachlor from the starch granules. Increased atrazine persistence was attributed to the reduction of leachate losses. The reduction in atrazine leaching is likely due to the slow release from the starch granules and subsequent diffusion into the son matrix where it is less subject to preferential flow processes. 20 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Butachlor is cytotoxic and clastogenic and induces apoptosis in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Panneerselvam, N; Sinha, S; Shanmugam, G

    1999-09-01

    The ability of butachlor to induce cytotoxicity, clastogenicity and DNA damage was assessed using Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO), Swiss mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF) and human peripheral blood lymphocytes. A dose and time dependent loss of viability was evident upon treatment of CHO cells with butachlor. Cell killing to an extent of 50% was observed when cells were treated with 16.2 micrograms/ml of butachlor for 24 hr or with 11.5 micrograms/ml for 48 hr. The herbicide induced micronuclei significantly in cultured lymphocytes at 24 and 48 hr of treatment suggesting that it is clastogenic. To understand the mechanism of cell death caused by butachlor, its effect on DNA strand breaks was studied in MEF. A concomitant decrease in cell viability was observed with increase in DNA strand breaks. Agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA from herbicide treated CHO cells and cytochemical staining indicate the induction of apoptosis by butachlor.

  19. Inclusion complex of butachlor with beta-cyclodextrin: characterization, solubility, and speciation-dependent adsorption.

    PubMed

    Bian, Haitao; Chen, Jingwen; Cai, Xiyun; Liu, Ping; Liu, Huihui; Qiao, Xianliang; Huang, Liping

    2009-08-26

    Due to soil adsorption, higher amounts of the herbicide butachlor are necessary to achieve its herbicidal activity, hence increasing its environmental risks. In this study, the effects of beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) on solubility and soil adsorption of butachlor were investigated. Formation of a 1:1 stoichiometric inclusion complex between them with an apparent stability constant of 443 L mol(-1) was confirmed in the solution. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the (N-CO) amide bond and alkyl ether moiety of butachlor molecule could enter into the cavity of beta-CD, but the double-substituted aromatic ring was excluded because it was larger size than the cavity. Significant enhancing dissolution of butachlor in the inclusion complex occurred in comparison to the free herbicide. The adsorption of butachlor on soil was reduced with an increase of beta-CD concentration because of the formation of the inclusion complex with low adsorption potency. Although the sorption distribution coefficient of complexed butachlor (i.e., butachlor/beta-cyclodextrin inclusion complex) (K(d,c) = 6.14) was about 14% of that of the free herbicide (K(d,f) = 44.54), the proportion of the adsorbed amount of complexed butachlor to the total adsorbed amount rose with the increase of beta-CD concentration. Thus, the adsorption of inclusion complex cannot be neglected in the presence of high concentrations cyclodextrins, although its water solubility was much higher than that of the free herbicide. These results indicate that beta-CD may be used as a formation additive to improve the solubility of butachlor, reduce its adsorption on soil, and increase the availability of butachlor for weeds.

  20. Trends in acetochlor concentrations in surface waters of the White River Basin, Indiana, 1994-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crawford, Charles G.

    1997-01-01

    Corn herbicides are used extensively in the White River Basin and account for about 70 percent of the total agricultural pesticide use in the basin. Acetochlor, a corn herbicide registered for use in 1994, is expected to reduce the total amount of corn herbicides used because of its broad-spectrum weed control and low use rates. Acetochlor is considered to be a probable human carcinogen, and its continued registration is contingent on concentrations in surface and ground water not exceeding target levels. During 1994, acetochlor was detected in only trace concentrations near the mouth of the White River and not at all in a small stream (93-square-mile drainage) in the northern part of the basin. By 1996, peak concentrations were about 2 and 3 micrograms per liter near the mouth of the White River and in the small stream, respectively. The estimated annual average concentration of acetochlor near the mouth of the White River in 1996 was 0.15 micrograms per liter, well below the 2 micrograms per liter criterion for surface-water supplied community-water systems.

  1. Henry's law constants measurements of alachlor and dichlorvos between 283 and 298 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Céline; Le Calvé, Stéphane; Mirabel, Philippe

    In this work, a dynamic system based on the water/air equilibrium at the interface within the length of a microporous tube was used to determine experimentally the Henry's law constants (HLC) of two pesticides: alachlor and dichlorvos. The measurements were conducted over the range 283-298 K. At 298 K, HLC were found to be equal to HLC=(14±2)×10 3 and HLC=(4.0±0.6)×10 3 (in units of M atm -1) for alachlor and dichlorvos, respectively. The obtained data were use to derive the following Arrhenius expressions: HLC=(8.0±3.4)×10 -10 exp((9200±1600)/ T) for alachlor and HLC=(2.8±0.4)×10 -13 exp((11 100±1500)/ T) for dichlorvos. At a cumulus temperature of 283 K, the fraction of alachlor and dichlorvos in the atmospheric aqueous phase is about 45% and 22%, respectively. Assuming that annual rainfall rate is 1 m/year, the wet deposition lifetimes were then estimated to be of the order of 2.8 days for alachlor and 5.6 days for dichlorvos. These latter are used to compare the relative importance of wet removal towards the lifetime in the gas phase.

  2. Removal of alachlor from water by catalyzed ozonation on Cu/Al2O3 honeycomb

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The herbicide alachlor (2-chloro-2′6′-diethyl-N-methoxymethylacetanilide) has been known as a probable human carcinogen, and the MCL (minimum contamination level) for drinking water has been set at 2 μg L-1. Therefore, the advanced methods for effectively removing it from water are a matter of interest. Catalyzed ozonation is a promising method for refractory organics degradation. Cu/Al2O3 catalyzed ozonation for degrading an endocrine disruptor (alachlor) in water was investigated. Results Experimental results showed that the ozonation of alachlor can be effectively catalyzed and enhanced by Cu/Al2O3-honeycomb. The main intermediate products formed (aliphatic carboxylic acids) were mineralized to a large extent in the catalytic process. Conclusions This study has shown that Cu/Al2O3-honeycomb is a feasible and efficient catalyst in the ozonation of alachlor in water. Less intermediate oxidation product was produced in the catalytic process than in the uncatalytic one. Furthermore, the mineralization of alachlor could be enhanced by increasing the pH of the reaction solution. PMID:23977841

  3. Infiltration of acetochlor and two of its metabolites in two contrasting soils.

    PubMed

    Baran, Nicole; Mouvet, Christophe; Dagnac, Thierry; Jeannot, Roger

    2004-01-01

    To obtain data concerning the risk of leaching of acetochlor (2-chloro-2'-methyl-6'-ethyl-N-ethoxymethyl-acetanilide) and its major metabolites, ethanesulfonic acid (ESA) and oxanilic acid (OA), to ground water, we studied the fate of these products in two different soil types (luvisol and calcisol) under the same weather conditions. The metabolites were detected in the soils as early as 7 d after application, indicating a rapid onset of acetochlor degradation. Ethanesulfonic acid was predominant over OA in the calcisol, regardless of time or depth, whereas the ESA to OA ratio varied with both time and depth in the luvisol. The maximum depths at which they were detected were 60 to 70 and 10 to 20 cm for ESA and OA, respectively, in the luvisol, and 60 to 70 cm (maximum depth sampled) and 30 to 40 cm for ESA and OA, respectively, in the calcisol. Acetochlor was still detected in the surface layer of the two soils 344 d after its application, although the molecule was partially leached. The maximum depths at which acetochlor was detected (60-70 cm in the luvisol and 50-60 cm [maximum depth sampled] in the calcisol) were recorded during the first sampling 7 d after application. Acetochlor was not detected on later dates below the 30- to 40-cm layer in the calcisol or the 5- to 10-cm layer in the luvisol. The greater preferential flow in the luvisol, which would have favored leaching, might partially explain why the mass balances done 7 d after application were lower in the luvisol (approximately 26%) than in the calcisol (approximately 45%).

  4. Alachlor transformation patterns in aquatic field mesocosms under variable oxygen and nutrient conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, D.W.; Miley, M.K.; Denoyelles, F.; Smith, V.H.; Thurman, E.M.; Carter, R.

    2000-01-01

    Alachlor is one of the most commonly used herbicides in both Europe and North America. Because of its toxic properties, its fate and attenuation in natural waters is practically important. This paper assesses factors that affect alachlor decay rate in aquatic systems using field-scale experimental units. In particular, we used field mesocosms (11.3 m3 outdoor fiberglass tanks) to examine the affect of oxygen level and other factors on decay rate in water columns. This is one of the first studies ever performed where diverse water column conditions have been successfully simulated using common mesocosm-scale facilities. Four treatments were assessed, including aerobic systems (aerobic); low nutrient, oxygen-stratified systems (stratified-LN); moderate nutrient, oxygen-stratified systems (stratified-HN); and anaerobic systems (anaerobic). The lowest half-lives were observed in the anaerobic units (9.7 days) followed by the aerobic (21 days), stratified-HN (22 days), and stratified-LN (46 days) units. Our results indicate that alachlor is transformed most rapidly under anaerobic conditions, although the ambient phosphorus level also appears to influence decay rate. In this study, two common alachlor breakdown products, ethane sulfonic acid (ESA) and oxanilic acid, were also monitored. Oxanilic acid was produced in greater quantities than ESA under all treatments with the highest levels being produced in the stratified-HN units. In general, our results suggest that previous laboratory data, which indicated that high rates of alachlor decay can occur under oxygen-free methanogenic conditions, is translatable to field-scale applications. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd.Alachlor is one of the most commonly used herbicides in both Europe and North America. Because of its toxic properties, its fate and attenuation in natural waters is practically important. This paper assesses factors that affect alachlor decay rate in aquatic systems using field-scale experimental

  5. Cytogenetic effects of alachlor and/or atrazine in vivo and in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Meisner, L.F.; Roloff, B.D. ); Belluck, D.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the cytogenetic effects of two commonly used herbicides, alachlor and atrazine, which are often found together in groundwater. Chromosome damage was examined in bone marrow cells of mice drinking water containing 20 ppm alachlor and/or 20 ppm atrazine, with an immunosuppressive dose of cyclophosphamide used as a positive control. Chromosome damage was also quantified in human lymphocytes. The in vitro study demonstrated dose related cytogenetic damage not associated with mitotic inhibition or cell death, with damage due to the alachlor-atrazine combination suggesting an additive model. The fact that the elevated mitotic index was associated with immune suppresion in the cyclophosphamide group suggests that death of cells with accumulated chromosomal aberrations resulted in increased bone marrow proliferation, so a higher fraction of cells examined were newer with less damage.

  6. Comprehensive spectroscopic probing the interaction and conformation impairment of bovine serum albumin (BSA) by herbicide butachlor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyi; Ling, Zhaoxing; Zhou, Xing; Ahmad, Farooq; Zhou, Ying

    2016-09-01

    Butachlor is an effective herbicide to deal with undesired weeds selectively and is used at high levels in Asian countries. However, its interaction and impairment effect on BSA was still not clear. In this study, we investigated the interaction between butachlor and bovine serum albumin (BSA) by multi-spectroscopic methods including UV absorption, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra and fluorescence spectra under physiological conditions (pH=7.4). The results revealed that there was a static quenching of BSA induced by butachlor stemmed from the formation of complex. Based on thermodynamic data, the interaction of butachlor with BSA was due to happen, and van der Waals force as well as hydrogen bond were the major forces contributed to the interaction. The binding constant Kb and number of binding site of butachlor with BSA were 5.158×10(5) and 1.372 at 303K, respectively. The distance r between donor (BSA) and acceptor (butachlor) was 0.113nm, obtained according to the Förster theory. The results revealed that butachlor induced conformational changes in BSA but the secondary structure of BSA was still retained. In addition, the microenvironment around chromophore residues of BSA, for example, tryptophan, changed as well, resulting from the formation of more hydrogen bonds. PMID:27419617

  7. Comprehensive spectroscopic probing the interaction and conformation impairment of bovine serum albumin (BSA) by herbicide butachlor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyi; Ling, Zhaoxing; Zhou, Xing; Ahmad, Farooq; Zhou, Ying

    2016-09-01

    Butachlor is an effective herbicide to deal with undesired weeds selectively and is used at high levels in Asian countries. However, its interaction and impairment effect on BSA was still not clear. In this study, we investigated the interaction between butachlor and bovine serum albumin (BSA) by multi-spectroscopic methods including UV absorption, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra and fluorescence spectra under physiological conditions (pH=7.4). The results revealed that there was a static quenching of BSA induced by butachlor stemmed from the formation of complex. Based on thermodynamic data, the interaction of butachlor with BSA was due to happen, and van der Waals force as well as hydrogen bond were the major forces contributed to the interaction. The binding constant Kb and number of binding site of butachlor with BSA were 5.158×10(5) and 1.372 at 303K, respectively. The distance r between donor (BSA) and acceptor (butachlor) was 0.113nm, obtained according to the Förster theory. The results revealed that butachlor induced conformational changes in BSA but the secondary structure of BSA was still retained. In addition, the microenvironment around chromophore residues of BSA, for example, tryptophan, changed as well, resulting from the formation of more hydrogen bonds.

  8. The toxic mechanism of high lethality of herbicide butachlor in marine flatfish flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Huarong; Yin, Licheng; Zhang, Shicui; Feng, Wenrong

    2010-09-01

    The toxic mechanism of herbicide butachlor to induce extremely high lethality in marine flatfish flounder, Paralichthys Olivaceus, was analyzed by histopathological examination, antioxidant enzymes activities and ATP content assay. Histopathological examination of gill, liver and kidney of exposed fishes showed that gill was a target organ of butachlor. The butachlor seriously impaired the respiration of gills by a series of lesions such as edema, lifting and detachment of lamellar epithelium, breakdown of pillar cells, and blood congestion. The dysfunction of gill respiration caused suffocation to the exposed flounder with extremely high acute lethality. Antioxidant enzyme activity assay of the in vitro cultured flounder gill (FG) cells exposed to butachlor indicated that butachlor markedly inhibited the antioxidant enzyme activities of Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX). Furthermore, along with the decline of antioxidant enzyme activities, ATP content in the exposed FG cells decreased, too. This infers that the oxidative stress induced by butachlor can inhibit the production of cellular ATP. Similar decrease of ATP content was also observed in the exposed flounder gill tissues. Taken together, as in FG cells, butachlor possibly induced a short supply of ATP in pillar cells by inhibiting the antioxidant enzyme activities and then affecting the contractibility of the pillar cells, which in turn resulted in the blood congestion and suffocation of exposed flounder.

  9. Exposure to butachlor causes thyroid endocrine disruption and promotion of metamorphosis in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuying; Li, Meng; Wang, Qiangwei; Gui, Wenjun; Zhu, Guonian

    2016-06-01

    Butachlor is extensively applied in rice paddy ecosystem in china, and has been widespread contaminant in the aquatic environment. Here, Xenopus laevis was used for the evaluation of teratogenesis developmental toxicity, and disruption of thyroid system when exposure to different concentrations of butachlor by window phase exposure. Acute toxicity investigation shown that 96 h-LC50 value of butachlor was 1.424 mg L(-1) and 0.962 mg L(-1) for tadpoles (starting from stages 46/47) and embryos (starting from stages 8/9), respectively. Exposure to butachlor caused malformation, including abnormal eye, pericardial edema, enlarged proctodaeum and bent tail. Window phase exposure test indicated that butachlor significantly promote the contents of whole-body thyroid hormones (THs, T3 and T4) at higher levels, indicating thyroid endocrine disruption. At 7 days, exposure to butachlor up-regulated the mRNA expression of genes involved in THs synthesis and metabolism (tshα, tg, tpo and dio1) and THs receptors (trα and trβ). At 14 days, up-regulation of the mRNA expression of genes related to THs synthesis and metabolism (tshα, tshβ, tg, tpo, dio1, dio2 and ttr) and THs receptors (trβ) were also observed after the exposure to butachlor. At 21 days, butachlor up-regulated the mRNA expression of tshα, tg, tpo genes and down-regulated the mRNA expression of tshβ, tg, dio1, ttr and trα genes. These results showed that butachlor could change the mRNA expression of genes involved in the HPT axis and increase whole-body thyroid hormones levels of X. laevis tadpoles in a dose- and time-dependent manner, causing thyroid endocrine disruption and developmental toxicity.

  10. Degradation of alachlor and pyrimethanil by combined photo-Fenton and biological oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros Martín, M M; Sánchez Pérez, J A; García Sánchez, J L; Montes de Oca, L; Casas López, J L; Oller, I; Malato Rodríguez, S

    2008-06-30

    Biodegradability of aqueous solutions of the herbicide alachlor and the fungicide pyrimethanil, partly treated by photo-Fenton, and the effect of photoreaction intermediates on growth and DOC removal kinetics of the bacteria Pseudomonas putida CECT 324 are demonstrated. Toxicity of 30-120 mg L(-1) alachlor and pyrimethanil has been assayed in P. putida. The biodegradability of photocatalytic intermediates found at different photo-treatment times was evaluated for each pesticide. At a selected time during batch-mode phototreatment, larger-scale biodegradation kinetics were analysed in a 12 L bubble column bioreactor. Both alachlor and pyrimethanil are non-toxic for P. putida CECT 324 at the test concentrations, but they are not biodegradable. A approximately 100 min photo-Fenton pre-treatment was enough to enhance biodegradability, the biological oxidation response being dependent on the pesticide tested. The different alachlor and pyrimethanil respiration and carbon uptake rates in pre-treated solutions are related to change in the growth kinetics of P. putida. Reproducible results have shown that P. putida could be a suitable microorganism for determining photo-Fenton pre-treatment time. PMID:18162295

  11. Environmentally friendly formulations of alachlor and atrazine: preparation, characterization, and reduced leaching.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Verdejo, Trinidad; Undabeytia, Tomás; Nir, Shlomo; Villaverde, Jaime; Maqueda, Celia; Morillo, Esmeralda

    2008-11-12

    Atrazine and alachlor formulations were designed by encapsulating the herbicide molecules into phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles, which subsequently were adsorbed on montmorillonite. PC and montmorillonite are classified as substances of minimal toxicological risk by the U.S. EPA. PC enhanced alachlor and atrazine solubilities by 15- and 18-fold, respectively. A 6 mM PC:5 g/L clay ratio was found as optimal for PC adsorption on the clay. Active ingredient contents of the PC-clay formulations ranged up to 8.6% for atrazine and 39.5% for alachlor. Infrared spectroscopy showed hydrophobic interactions of herbicide molecules with the alkyl chains of PC, in addition to hydrophilic interactions with the PC headgroup. Release experiments in a sandy soil showed a slower rate from the PC-clay formulations than the commercial ones. Soil column experiments under moderate irrigation and bioactivity experiments indicate that a reduction in the recommended dose of alachlor and atrazine can be accomplished by using PC-clay formulations.

  12. Haplo-diploid gene expression and pollen selection for tolerance to acetochlor in maize.

    PubMed

    Frascaroli, E; Galletti, S; Landi, P

    1994-08-01

    The objectives of this research were to determine if genes controlling the reaction to the herbicide acetochlor in maize (Zea mays L.) are active during both the haploid and the diploid phases of the life cycle and if pollen selection can be utilized for improving sporophytic resistance. Pollen of eight inbred lines, previously characterized through sporophytic analysis for the level of tolerance to acetochlor, showed a differential reaction to the herbicide forin vitro tube length; moreover, such pollen reactions proved to be significantly correlated (r =0.786(*),df=6) with those of the sporophytes producing the pollen. Pollen analysis of two inbred lines (i.e. Mo17, tolerant, and B79, susceptible) and their single cross showed that thein vitro pollen-tube length reaction of the hybrid was intermediate between those of two parents. An experiment on pollen selection was then performed by growing tassels of Mo17xB79 in the presence of the herbicide. Pollen obtained from treated tassels showed a greater tolerance to acetochlor, assessed asin vitro tube length reaction, than pollen obtained from control tassels. Moreover, the backcross [B79 (Mo17xB79)] sporophytic population obtained using pollen from the treated tassels was more tolerant (as indicated by the fresh weight of plants grown in the presence of the herbicide) than was the control backcross population. The two populations did not differ when grown without the herbicide. These findings indicate that genes controlling the reaction to acetochlor in maize have haplodiploid expression; consequently, pollen selection can be applied for improving plant tolerance. PMID:24186178

  13. Butachlor degradation in tropical soils: effect of application rate, biotic-abiotic interactions and soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Pal, R; Das, P; Chakrabarti, K; Chakraborty, A; Chowdhury, A

    2006-01-01

    The degradative characteristics of butachlor (N-Butoxymethyl-2-chloro-2',6'-diethyla- cetanilide) were studied under controlled laboratory conditions in clay loam alluvial (AL) soil (Typic udifluvent) and coastal saline (CS) soil (Typic endoaquept) from rice cultivated fields. The application rates included field rate (FR), 2-times FR (2FR) and 10-times FR (10FR). The incubation study was carried out at 30 degrees C with and without decomposed cow manure (DCM) at 60% of maximum water holding capacity (WHC) and waterlogged soil condition. The half-life values depended on the soil types and initial concentrations of butachlor. Butachlor degraded faster in AL soil and in soil amended with DCM under waterlogged condition. Microbial degradation is the major avenue of butachlor degradation from soils.

  14. Action of the herbicide butachlor on cholinesterases in the freshwater snail Pila globosa (Swainson).

    PubMed

    Rajyalakshmi, T; Srinivas, T; Swamy, K V; Prasad, N S; Mohan, P M

    1996-11-01

    Butachlor action on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) activates in central nervous tissue of the snail Pila globosa was assayed following the method of ELLMAN et al1, in vitro by adding butachlor directly (10-100 mu moles), to tissue homogenates and in in vivo by exposing the snails to sub-lethal concentration (26.6 ppm) and taking out the tissue for experimentation at different intervals (3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h) of exposure. The enzyme activities decreased in a dose-dependent manner in vitro, and up to 12-24 h in vivo after which they showed recovery towards the control. The inhibition of cholinesterases by butachlor in vitro indicates a direct action of the herbicide on these enzymes. Presumably butachlor exercises its neurotoxic effects through cholinergic impairment in a way similar to that of organophosphates and carbamates.

  15. Influence of degradation and sorption processes on the persistence and movement of alachlor and dicamba in soils

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, P.Y.

    1992-01-01

    The impact of herbicide usage in agriculture on ground water quality is controlled by the interaction of herbicide degradation, sorption, and transport processes as the herbicide moves through the soil to ground water. The objectives of this thesis were to determine the influence of degradation and sorption processes on the fate of a non-ionic (alachlor) and a weak acid (dicamba) herbicide in four soils (Kim loam, Port Byron silt loam, Webster silty clay loam, and Estherville sandy loam) as a function of soil depth. Alachlor dissipated rapidly under field conditions in Kim soil. Although laboratory studied underestimated the rate of alachlor degradation compared to field conditions, they showed that microbial degradation rather than leaching below sampling depth was the major dissipation pathway of alachlor in soil. Laboratory studies are showed that soils obtained from lower depths had capacities to degrade alachlor, however, at slower rates than surface soils. Sorption of alachlor to soils was moderate (Freundlich sorption coefficient, K[sub f] = 0.7 to 7.3). Movement of alachlor in Kim soil under field conditions was overestimated by leachability indices calculated based on laboratory degradation and sorption studies. Leachability indices would classify alachlor as a [open quotes]leacher[close quotes] in Kim, Port Byron and Estherville soils. In the case of Webster soil, alachlor would be classified as transitional between a [open quotes]leacher[close quotes] and [open quotes]nonleacher[close quotes]. Field dissipation experiments are currently being conducted to evaluate potential leachability of dicamba in the three Minnesota soils. Laboratory studies showed that degradation of dicamba in the four soils was slow (50% dissipation time, DT[sub 50] > 70 days) due to a long lag phase. Soils below 15 cm depth demonstrated slower dicamba degradation capacities than the surface soils. Sorption of dicamba to these soils was minimal (K[sub f] = 0.004 to 0.50).

  16. Construction and analysis of an intergeneric fusant able to degrade bensulfuron-methyl and butachlor.

    PubMed

    Feng, Liping; Xiong, Minghua; Cheng, Xiaosong; Hou, Ning; Li, Chunyan

    2013-02-01

    Rhodococcus sp. BX2 degrades bensulfuron-methyl but not butachlor, and Acinetobacter sp. LYC-1 degrades butachlor but not bensulfuron-methyl. Functional strains were constructed through protoplast fusion of Rhodococcus sp. BX2 and Acinetobacter sp. LYC-1 to generate fusants with an improved ability to simultaneously degrade bensulfuron-methyl and butachlor. Initial identification and stability tests of the fusants were performed. Three fusants with eighth transfer on plates containing two antibiotics and two herbicides were obtained. F1 also grew well in an inorganic salt solution containing bensulfuron-methyl and butachlor. F1 was characterized by its parents' morphological and physio-biochemical features. F1 not only had bands in common with BX2 and LYC-1, but also had its own specific bands analyzed by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA. The genetic similarity indices between F1 and BX2 and F1 and LYC-1 were 0.507 and 0.470, respectively. The percentages bensulfuron-methyl and butachlor degradation by F1 in an inorganic salt solution supplemented with 100 mg/L bensulfuron-methyl and 100 mg/L butachlor were 65.35 and 62.41 %, respectively, and the percentages in soil contaminated with 10 mg/kg bensulfuron-methyl and 10 mg/kg butachlor with an inoculum size of 5 % at 34 °C and at a pH of 7.5 after 35 days were 63.74 and 61.53 %, respectively. It was demonstrated that F1 could simultaneously degrade bensulfuron-methyl and butachlor.

  17. Combined effects of cadmium and butachlor on soil enzyme activities and microbial community structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinhua; Lu, Yitong; Shen, Guoqing

    2007-02-01

    The combined effects of cadmium (Cd, 10 mg/kg of soil) and butachlor (5, 10 and 50 mg/kg of soil) on enzyme activities and microbial community structure were assessed in phaeozem soil. The result showed that phosphatase activities were decreased in soils with Cd (10 mg/kg of soil) alone whereas urease acitivities were unaffected by Cd. Urease and phosphatase activities were significantly reduced by high butachlor concentration (50 mg/kg of soil). When Cd and butachlor concentrations in soils were added at milligram ratio of 2:1 or 1:2, urease and phosphatase activities were decreased, while enzyme activities were greatly improved at the ratio of 1:5. This study indicates that the combined effects of Cd and butachlor on soil urease and phosphatase activities depend largely on the addition concentration ratios to soils. The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis showed that the changes occurring in RAPD profiles of different treated samples included variation in loss of normal bands and appearance of new bands compared with the control soil. The RAPD fingerprints showed substantial differences between the control and treated soil samples, with apparent changes in the number and size of amplified DNA fragments. The results showed that the addition of high concentration butachlor and the combined applied Cd and butachlor significantly affected the diversity of microbial community. The present results suggest that RAPD analysis in conjunction with other biomarkers such as soil enzyme parameter etc. would prove a powerful ecotoxicological tool.

  18. Butachlor inhibits production and oxidation of methane in tropical rice soils under flooded condition.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, S R; Nayak, D R; Babu, Y J; Adhya, T K

    2004-01-01

    In laboratory incubation experiments, application of a commercial formulation of the herbicide butachlor (N-butoxymethyl-2-chloro-2',6'-diethyl acetanilide) to three tropical rice soils, widely differing in their physicochemical characteristics, under flooded condition inhibited methane (CH4) production. The inhibitory effect was concentration dependent and most remarkable in the alluvial soil. Thus, following application of butachlor at 5, 10, 50 and 100 microg g(-1) soil, respectively, cumulative CH4 production in the alluvial soil was inhibited by 15%, 31%, 91% and 98% over unamended control. Since CH4 production was less pronounced in the sandy loam and acid sulfate soil, the impact of amendment with butchalor, albeit inhibitory, was less extensive than the alluvial soil. Inhibition of CH4 production in butachlor-amended alluvial soil was related to the prevention in the drop in redox potential as well as low methanogenic bacterial population especially at high concentrations of butachlor. CH4 oxidation was also inhibited in butachlor-amended alluvial soil with the inhibitory effect being more prevalent under flooded condition. Inhibition in CH4 oxidation was related to a reduction in the population of soluble methane monooxygenase producing methanotrophs. Results demonstrate that butachlor, a commonly used herbicide in rice cultivation, even at very low concentrations can affect CH4 production and its oxidation, thereby influencing the biogeochemical cycle of CH4 in flooded rice soils.

  19. Phylogenetic changes in soil microbial and diazotrophic diversity with application of butachlor.

    PubMed

    Yen, Jui-Hung; Wang, Yei-Shung; Hsu, Wey-Shin; Chen, Wen-Ching

    2013-01-01

    We investigated changes in population and taxonomic distribution of cultivable bacteria and diazotrophs with butachlor application in rice paddy soils. Population changes were measured by the traditional plate-count method, and taxonomic distribution was studied by 16S rDNA sequencing, then maximum parsimony phylogenic analysis with bootstrapping (1,000 replications). The bacterial population was higher after 39 than 7 days of rice cultivation, which indicated the augmentation of soil microbes by rice root exudates. The application of butachlor increased the diazotrophic population in both upper (0-3 cm) and lower (3-15 cm) layers of soils. Especially at day 39, the population of diazotrophs was 1.8 and 1.6 times that of the control in upper and lower layer soils, respectively. We found several bacterial strains only with butachlor application; examples are strains closest to Bacillus arsenicus, B. marisflavi, B. luciferensis, B. pumilus, and Pseudomonas alvei. Among diazotrophs, three strains closely related to Streptomyces sp. or Rhrizobium sp. were found only with butachlor application. The population of cultivable bacteria and the species composition were both changed with butachlor application, which explains in part the contribution of butachlor to augmenting soil nitrogen-fixing ability.

  20. Biotransformation of butachlor through mercapturic acid pathway in rat tissue homogenates.

    PubMed

    Ou, Y H; Lin, J K

    1992-01-01

    The metabolism of butachlor was studied in rat liver and kidney homogenates. In vitro incubation of butachlor with liver fractions (S9, microsome, and cytosolic fractions) formed a considerable amount of butachlor glutathione conjugate (BGSC), while the conjugating activity was not efficient for the kidney S9 fraction. There is a sex difference in the distribution of glutathione S-transferase in the liver. It seems that more enzyme activity is detected in the female liver microsome, while this is not the case in its cytosolic fraction. Further biotransformation of BGSC to mercapturate was not observed in the liver S9 fraction. This metabolite was further transformed to butachlor acetyl cysteine conjugate (BACC) in the presence of acetyl CoA, but to butachlor cysteine conjugate (BCC) in the absence of acetyl CoA. These findings demonstrated that butachlor is initially conjugated with GSH to form BGSC by the enzyme glutathione S-transferase in the liver. This metabolite is apparently transported to the kidneys, where it is transformed to the mercapturate.

  1. Effect of cadmium alone and in combination with butachlor on soil enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinhua; Lu, Yitong; Ding, Hui; Shen, Guoqing

    2007-10-01

    The ecological toxicity of cadmium (Cd, 10 mg kg(-1 )of dry weight soil) and butachlor (10, 50 and100 mg kg(-1 )of dry weight soil) in both their single and combined effects on soil urease and phosphatase was studied after 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days exposure under controlled conditions in paddy and phaeozem soils. The results showed that Cd reduced the activities of urease and phosphatase at early incubation time (1-7 days), while the reduction almost disappeared at the end of the incubation. The effect of Cd on phosphatase was more pronounced than that on urease. The activities of urease and phosphatase were reduced by butachlor, while urease activity was significantly (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01) improved when the concentrations of butachlor were 10 and 50 mg kg(-1) at the end of the incubation. When Cd (10 mg kg(-1)) was combined with butachlor (50 and 100 mg kg(-1)), the activities of urease and phosphatase became lower than without combination at early incubation time, which indicated that the toxicity of Cd significantly increased (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). However, when Cd (10 mg kg(-1)) was combined with butachlor (10 mg kg(-1)), the activities of urease and phosphatase became higher than those without combination at the end of the incubation, which indicated that the toxicity of Cd decreased. It was indicated that the combined effects depended largely on the incubation time and the concentration ratio of Cd and butachlor. In addition, it was showed that the combined effects of butachlor and Cd appeared different in paddy from phaeozem, which may be related to the different properties of these soils.

  2. (1)H NMR based metabolomics approach to study the toxic effects of herbicide butachlor on goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Xu, Hua-Dong; Wang, Jun-Song; Li, Ming-Hui; Liu, Yan; Chen, Ting; Jia, Ai-Qun

    2015-02-01

    Butachlor, one of the most widely used herbicides in agriculture, has been reported with high ecotoxicity to aquatic plants and animals. In this study, a (1)H NMR based metabolomics approach combined with histopathological examination and biochemical assays was applied to comprehensively investigate the toxic effects of butachlor on four important organs (gill, brain, liver and kidney) of goldfish (Carassius auratus) for the first time. After 10 days' butachlor exposure at two dosages of 3.2 and 0.64 μmol/L, fish tissues (gill, brain, liver and kidney) and serum were collected. Histopathological inspection revealed severe impairment of gill filaments and obvious cellular edema in livers and kidneys. The increase of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity in gill and methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) level in four tissues reflected the disturbance of antioxidative system in the intoxicated goldfish. Serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and creatinine (CRE) level were increased in butachlor exposure groups, suggesting liver and kidney injuries induced by butachlor. Orthogonal signal correction partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OSC-PLS-DA) of NMR profiles disclosed metabolic changes that were related to the toxic effects of butachlor including oxidative stress, disorder of energy metabolism and amino acids metabolism, and disturbance of neurotransmitter balance in butachlor exposed goldfish. This integrated metabolomics approach provided a molecular basis underlying the toxicity of butachlor and demonstrated that metabolomics was a powerful and highly effective approach to elucidate the toxicity and underlying mechanisms of herbicides and pesticides, applicable for their risk assessment. PMID:25528421

  3. (1)H NMR based metabolomics approach to study the toxic effects of herbicide butachlor on goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Xu, Hua-Dong; Wang, Jun-Song; Li, Ming-Hui; Liu, Yan; Chen, Ting; Jia, Ai-Qun

    2015-02-01

    Butachlor, one of the most widely used herbicides in agriculture, has been reported with high ecotoxicity to aquatic plants and animals. In this study, a (1)H NMR based metabolomics approach combined with histopathological examination and biochemical assays was applied to comprehensively investigate the toxic effects of butachlor on four important organs (gill, brain, liver and kidney) of goldfish (Carassius auratus) for the first time. After 10 days' butachlor exposure at two dosages of 3.2 and 0.64 μmol/L, fish tissues (gill, brain, liver and kidney) and serum were collected. Histopathological inspection revealed severe impairment of gill filaments and obvious cellular edema in livers and kidneys. The increase of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity in gill and methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) level in four tissues reflected the disturbance of antioxidative system in the intoxicated goldfish. Serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and creatinine (CRE) level were increased in butachlor exposure groups, suggesting liver and kidney injuries induced by butachlor. Orthogonal signal correction partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OSC-PLS-DA) of NMR profiles disclosed metabolic changes that were related to the toxic effects of butachlor including oxidative stress, disorder of energy metabolism and amino acids metabolism, and disturbance of neurotransmitter balance in butachlor exposed goldfish. This integrated metabolomics approach provided a molecular basis underlying the toxicity of butachlor and demonstrated that metabolomics was a powerful and highly effective approach to elucidate the toxicity and underlying mechanisms of herbicides and pesticides, applicable for their risk assessment.

  4. Mortality and cancer incidence among alachlor manufacturing workers 1968–99

    PubMed Central

    Acquavella, J; Delzell, E; Cheng, H; Lynch, C; Johnson, G

    2004-01-01

    Background: Alachlor is the active ingredient in pre-emergent herbicide formulations that have been used widely on corn, soybeans, and other crops. It has been found to cause nasal, stomach, and thyroid tumours in rodent feeding studies at levels that are much higher than likely human exposures. Aims: To evaluate mortality rates from 1968 to 1999 and cancer incidence rates from 1969 to 1999 for alachlor manufacturing workers at a plant in Muscatine, Iowa. Methods: Worker mortality and cancer incidence rates were compared to corresponding rates for the Iowa state general population. Analyses addressed potential intensity and duration of exposure. Results: For workers with any period of high alachlor exposure, mortality from all causes combined was lower than expected (42 observed deaths, SMR 64, 95% CI 46 to 86) and cancer mortality was slightly lower than expected (13 observed deaths, SMR 79, 95% CI 42 to 136). Cancer incidence for workers with potential high exposure was similar to that for Iowa residents, both overall (29 observed cases, SIR 123, 95% CI 82 to 177) and for workers exposed for five or more years and with at least 15 years since first exposure (eight observed cases, SIR 113, 95% CI 49 to 224). There were no cases of nasal, stomach, or thyroid cancer. Conclusions: There were no cancers of the types found in toxicology studies and no discernible relation between cancer incidence for any site and years of alachlor exposure or time since first exposure. Despite the small size of this population, the findings are important because these workers had chronic exposure potential during extended manufacturing campaigns, while use in agriculture is typically limited to a few days or weeks each year. PMID:15258274

  5. Cometabolism of low concentrations of propachlor, alachlor, and cycloate in sewage and lake water.

    PubMed Central

    Novick, N J; Alexander, M

    1985-01-01

    Low concentrations of propachlor (2-chloro-N-isopropylacetanilide) and alachlor [2-chloro-2',6'-diethyl-N-(methoxymethyl)acetanilide] were not mineralized, cycloate (S-ethyl-N-ethylthiocyclohexanecarbamate) was slowly or not mineralized, and aniline and cyclohexylamine were readily mineralized in sewage and lake water. Propachlor, alachlor, and cycloate were extensively metabolized, but the products were organic. Little conversion of propachlor and alachlor was evident in sterilized sewage or lake water. The cometabolism of propachlor was essentially linear with time in lake water and was well fit by zero-order kinetics in short periods and by first-order kinetics in longer periods in sewage. The rate of cometabolism in sewage was directly proportional to propachlor concentration at levels from 63 pg/ml to more than 100 ng/ml. Glucose but not aniline increased the yield of products formed during propachlor cometabolism in sewage. No microorganism able to use propachlor as a sole source of carbon and energy was isolated, but bacteria isolated from sewage and lake water metabolized this chemical. During the metabolism of this herbicide by two of the bacteria, none of the carbon was assimilated. Our data indicate that cometabolism of these pesticides takes place at concentrations of synthetic compounds that commonly occur in natural waters. PMID:4004208

  6. Responses of butachlor degradation and microbial properties in a riparian soil to the cultivation of three different plants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Changming; Wang, Mengmeng; Chen, Haiyan; Li, Jianhua

    2011-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the biodegradation dynamics and related microbial ecophysiological responses to butachlor addition in a riparian soil planted with different plants such as Phragmites australis, Zizania aquatica, and Acorus calamus. The results showed that there were significant differences in microbial degradation dynamics of butachlor in the rhizosphere soils among the three riparian plants. A. calamus displays a significantly higher degradation efficiency of butachlor in the rhizosphere soils, as compared with Z. aquatica and P. australis. Half-life time of butachlor degradation in the rhizospheric soils of P. australis, Z. aquatica, and A. calamus were 7.5, 9.8 and 5.4 days, respectively. Residual butachlor concentration in A. calamus rhizosphere soil was 35.2% and 21.7% lower than that in Z. aquatica and P. australis rhizosphere soils, respectively, indicating that A. calamus showed a greater improvement effect on biodegradation of butachlor in rhizosphere soils than the other two riparian plant. In general, microbial biomass and biochemical activities in rhizosphere soils were depressed by butachlor addition, despite the riparian plant types. However, rhizospheric soil microbial ecophysiological responses to butachlor addition significantly (P < 0.05) differed between riparian plant species. Compared to Z. aquatica and P. australis, A. calamus showed significantly larger microbial number, higher enzyme activities and soil respiration rates in the rhizosphere soils. The results indicated that A. calamus have a better alleviative effect on inhibition of microbial growth due to butachlor addition and can be used as a suitable riparian plant for detoxifying and remediating butachlor contamination from agricultural nonpoint pollution.

  7. Absorption and metabolism of 2-chloro-2,6-diethyl-N-(butoxymethyl)acetanilide (butachlor) in human skin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ademola, J I; Wester, R C; Maibach, H I

    1993-07-01

    Studies have demonstrated that several chemicals are absorbed and metabolized during skin permeation. We investigated the absorption and metabolism of the pesticide butachlor. Radiolabeled butachlor was measured in human (n = 5) skin and the unchanged compound and metabolites were quantified by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Following a 24-hr exposure, an average butachlor quantity of approximately 5.00% of the applied dose (1.01 micrograms) was absorbed by the skin. The mean peak penetration rate was 0.7% of the applied dose per hour. The skin retained 1.40 to 8.10% of the applied butachlor. The retention of 1.4 to 8.1% of the pesticide by the skin suggests the importance of monitoring human skin following topical exposure. Of the dose recovered in the skin, 0.9% was metabolized to 4-hydroxybutachlor, while 1.8% of the dose in the receptor fluid was recovered as polar conjugates (cysteine, 0.29% dose; glutathione, 0.1% dose; unidentified metabolites, 1.4% dose); 2.8 and 6.8% of the dose absorbed by the skin (approximately 5.0%) were recovered as metabolites in the receptor fluids and skin homogenates, respectively. Similar to metabolism during percutaneous absorption, butachlor was metabolized to its conjugated and hydroxyl derivatives by skin fractions. The rate of butachlor glutathione and butachlor cysteine formation using skin cytosolic fractions were 12.0 +/- 1.5 and 48.0 +/- 3.6 pmol/min/mg protein +/- SD, respectively. When human skin microsomes were incubated with butachlor, 4-hydroxybutachlor was formed at the rate of 55.0 +/- 15.0 pmol/min/mg protein +/- SD. 4-Hydroxybutachlor formation was totally dependent on the presence of NADPH. The biotransformation of butachlor using skin fractions indicates the metabolic capacity of the tissue. The biological significance of these metabolites in the disposition of butachlor requires further investigation.

  8. Clastogenicity of pentachlorophenol, 2,4-D and butachlor evaluated by Allium root tip test.

    PubMed

    Ateeq, Bushra; Abul Farah, M; Niamat Ali, M; Ahmad, Waseem

    2002-02-15

    The meristematic mitotic cells of Allium cepa is an efficient cytogenetic material for chromosome aberration assay on environmental pollutants. For assessing genotoxicity of pentachlorophenol (PCP), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2-chloro-2,6-diethyl-N-(butoxymethyl) acetanilide (butachlor), 50% effective concentration (EC(50)), c-mitosis, stickiness, chromosome breaks and mitotic index (MI) were used as endpoints of genotoxicity. EC(50) values for PCP and butachlor are 0.73 and 5.13 ppm, respectively. 2,4-D evidently induced morphological changes at higher concentrations. Some changes like crochet hooks, c-tumours and broken roots were unique to 2,4-D at 5-20 ppm. No such abnormalities were found in PCP and butachlor treated groups, however, root deteriorated and degenerated at higher concentrations (<3 ppm) in PCP. MI in 2,4-D showed a low average of 14.32% followed by PCP (19.53%), while in butachlor it was recorded 71.6%, which is near to the control value. All chemicals induced chromosome aberrations at statistically significant level. The highest chromosome aberration frequency (11.90%) was recorded in PCP at 3 ppm. Large number of c-mitotic anaphases indicated that butachlor acts as potent spindle inhibitor, whereas, breaks, bridges, stickiness and laggards were most frequently found in PCP showing that it is a potent clastogen. PMID:11815249

  9. Acute toxicity of butachlor and atrazine to freshwater green alga Scenedesmus obliquus and cladoceran Daphnia carinata.

    PubMed

    He, Hongzhi; Yu, Jing; Chen, Guikui; Li, Wenyang; He, Jinbo; Li, Huashou

    2012-06-01

    Both single and joint toxicity of atrazine and butachlor to freshwater green alga Scenedesmus obliquus and cladoceran Daphnia carinata isolated from South China were investigated in the present study. The 96 h-EC(50) values of atrazine and butachlor to S. obliquus were 0.0147 and 2.31 mg L(-1), while the 48 h-LC(50) values to D. carinata were 60.6 and 3.40 mg L(-1), respectively. These results suggest that atrazine could be highly toxic to S. obliquus and slightly toxic to D. carinata, while butachlor exhibits moderate toxicity to both organisms. The additive indexes of atrazine and butachlor mixtures were -2.68 (-3.02 to -2.32) to S. obliquus and 0.054 (-0.025 to 0.238) to D. carinata, respectively. Therefore, the joint action of two herbicides was significant antagonism to S. obliquus, while significant synergism was not shown to D. carinata. Moreover, significant linear correlation between the natural logarithm of herbicide concentrations and growth rates of alga S. obliquus was observed. Taken together, it is the first study reporting the toxicity endpoints for mixture of atrazine and butachlor against S. obliquus and D. carinata isolated from south China. The present results would be helpful to provide data to assess the ecological risk of both herbicides to aquatic organisms.

  10. Identification of UV photoproducts and hydrolysis products of butachlor by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, H H; Ye, C M

    2001-07-15

    The photoproducts and hydrolysis products of butachlor in water were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. When exposed to UV light, butachlor in aqueous solution was rapidly degraded, giving at least 11 photoproducts as a result of dechlorination with subsequent hydroxylation or cyclization processes. The chemical structures of nine degradation compounds were identified on the basis of mass spectrum interpretation and literature data. Major photoproducts are identified as 8-ethyl-1-butoxymethyl-4-methyl-2-oxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-quinoline, 2-hydroxy-2',6'-diethyl-N-(butoxymethyl) acetanilide, and a compound related to butachlor. Minor photoproducts are identified as 2,6-diethylaniline; 1-acetyl-7-ethylindole; N-(2,6-diethylphenyl)-N-(butoxymethyl)acetamide; 2-oxo-N-(2,6-diethyl-phenyl)-N-(butoxymethyl)acetamide; 1-hydroxyacetyl-2-butoxyl-3-methyl-7-ethylindole; 1-acetyl-2-butoxyl-3-methyl-7-ethylindole; and two compounds with the chemical structure unknown. The half-lives of butachlor UV photolysis were 7.54, 10.56, and 12.22 min in deionized water, river water, and paddy water, respectively. The half-lives of butachlor hydrolysis at pH 4, 7, and 10 were 630, 1155, and 1155 days at 25 +/- 1 degrees C, respectively. A hydrolysis product at pH 4 was identified by GC/MS to be 2-hydroxy-2',6'-diethyl-N-(butoxymethyl) acetanilide.

  11. Clastogenicity of pentachlorophenol, 2,4-D and butachlor evaluated by Allium root tip test.

    PubMed

    Ateeq, Bushra; Abul Farah, M; Niamat Ali, M; Ahmad, Waseem

    2002-02-15

    The meristematic mitotic cells of Allium cepa is an efficient cytogenetic material for chromosome aberration assay on environmental pollutants. For assessing genotoxicity of pentachlorophenol (PCP), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2-chloro-2,6-diethyl-N-(butoxymethyl) acetanilide (butachlor), 50% effective concentration (EC(50)), c-mitosis, stickiness, chromosome breaks and mitotic index (MI) were used as endpoints of genotoxicity. EC(50) values for PCP and butachlor are 0.73 and 5.13 ppm, respectively. 2,4-D evidently induced morphological changes at higher concentrations. Some changes like crochet hooks, c-tumours and broken roots were unique to 2,4-D at 5-20 ppm. No such abnormalities were found in PCP and butachlor treated groups, however, root deteriorated and degenerated at higher concentrations (<3 ppm) in PCP. MI in 2,4-D showed a low average of 14.32% followed by PCP (19.53%), while in butachlor it was recorded 71.6%, which is near to the control value. All chemicals induced chromosome aberrations at statistically significant level. The highest chromosome aberration frequency (11.90%) was recorded in PCP at 3 ppm. Large number of c-mitotic anaphases indicated that butachlor acts as potent spindle inhibitor, whereas, breaks, bridges, stickiness and laggards were most frequently found in PCP showing that it is a potent clastogen.

  12. Degradation mechanism of alachlor during direct ozonation and O(3)/H(2)O(2) advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Zhimin; Liu, Chao; Dong, Bingzhi; Zhang, Yalei

    2010-01-01

    The degradation of alachlor by direct ozonation and advanced oxidation process O(3)/H(2)O(2) was investigated in this study with focus on identification of degradation byproducts. The second-order reaction rate constant between ozone and alachlor was determined to be 2.5+/-0.1M(-1)s(-1) at pH 7.0 and 20 degrees C. Twelve and eight high-molecular-weight byproducts (with the benzene ring intact) from alachlor degradation were identified during direct ozonation and O(3)/H(2)O(2), respectively. The common degradation byproducts included N-(2,6-diethylphenyl)-methyleneamine, 8-ethyl-3,4-dihydro-quinoline, 8-ethyl-quinoline, 1-chloroacetyl-2-hydro-3-ketone-7-acetyl-indole, 2-chloro-2',6'-diacetyl-N-(methoxymethyl)acetanilide, 2-chloro-2'-acetyl-6'-ethyl-N-(methoxymethyl)-acetanilide, and two hydroxylated alachlor isomers. In direct ozonation, four more byproducts were also identified including 1-chloroacetyl-2,3-dihydro-7-ethyl-indole, 2-chloro-2',6'-ethyl-acetanilide, 2-chloro-2',6'-acetyl-acetanilide and 2-chloro-2'-ethyl-6'-acetyl-N-(methoxymethyl)-acetanilide. Degradation of alachlor by O(3) and O(3)/H(2)O(2) also led to the formation of low-molecular-weight byproducts including formic, acetic, propionic, monochloroacetic and oxalic acids as well as chloride ion (only detected in O(3)/H(2)O(2)). Nitrite and nitrate formation was negligible. Alachlor degradation occurred via oxidation of the arylethyl group, N-dealkylation, cyclization and cleavage of benzene ring. After O(3) or O(3)/H(2)O(2) treatment, the toxicity of alachlor solution examined by the Daphnia magna bioassay was slightly reduced. PMID:20022076

  13. Effects of herbicide butachlor on soil microorganisms and on nitrogen-fixing abilities in paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ching; Yen, Jui-Hung; Chang, Ching-Shu; Wang, Yei-Shung

    2009-01-01

    The composition of culture-independent microbial communities and the change of nitrogenase activities under the application of butachlor in paddy soil were investigated. Nitrogen-fixation ability was expressed by the amount of acetylene reduction, and changes of microbial communities were studied by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) technique; afterward, minimum distance (MD, in brief) statistics was applied to determine the cluster numbers in UPGMA dendrograms. The results showed that the reduction of acetylene was suppressed shortly after butachlor application but was augmented after 37 days in both upper and lower layer soils. From UPGMA dendrograms, the diazotrophic divergences ranged from 33% to 64% throughout rice growth stages. For general bacterial communities, the diversities ranged from 28% to 52%. The divergences became higher with the cultivation period, and the application of butachlor imposed a significant variation on microbial community shift, which may be a reason for the boosting nitrogen-fixation ability in paddy soils.

  14. Experimental design approach to the optimization of ultrasonic degradation of alachlor and enhancement of treated water biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Torres, Ricardo A; Mosteo, Rosa; Pétrier, Christian; Pulgarin, Cesar

    2009-03-01

    This work presents the application of experimental design for the ultrasonic degradation of alachlor which is pesticide classified as priority substance by the European Commission within the scope of the Water Framework Directive. The effect of electrical power (20-80W), pH (3-10) and substrate concentration (10-50mgL(-1)) was evaluated. For a confidential level of 90%, pH showed a low effect on the initial degradation rate of alachlor; whereas electrical power, pollutant concentration and the interaction of these two parameters were significant. A reduced model taking into account the significant variables and interactions between variables has shown a good correlation with the experimental results. Additional experiments conducted in natural and deionised water indicated that the alachlor degradation by ultrasound is practically unaffected by the presence of potential *OH radical scavengers: bicarbonate, sulphate, chloride and oxalic acid. In both cases, alachlor was readily eliminated ( approximately 75min). However, after 4h of treatment only 20% of the initial TOC was removed, showing that alachlor by-products are recalcitrant to the ultrasonic action. Biodegradability test (BOD5/COD) carried out during the course of the treatment indicated that the ultrasonic system noticeably increases the biodegradability of the initial solution. PMID:18930694

  15. Impacts of the herbicide butachlor on the larvae of a paddy field breeding frog (Fejervarya limnocharis) in subtropical Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wan-Yi; Wang, Ching-Yuh; Wang, Tsu-Shing; Fellers, Gary M; Lai, Bo-Chi; Kam, Yeong-Choy

    2011-03-01

    Butachlor is the most commonly used herbicide on paddy fields in Taiwan and throughout Southeast Asia. Since paddy fields provide habitat for pond breeding amphibians, we examined growth, development, time to metamorphosis, and survival of alpine cricket frog tadpoles (Fejervarya limnocharis) exposed to environmentally realistic concentrations of butachlor. We documented negative impacts of butachlor on survival, development, and time to metamorphosis, but not on tadpole growth. The 96 h LC(50) for tadpoles was 0.87 mg/l, much lower than the 4.8 mg/l recommended dosage for application to paddy fields. Even given the rapid breakdown of butachlor, tadpoles would be exposed to concentrations in excess of their 96 h LC(50) for an estimated 126 h. We also documented DNA damage (genotoxicity) in tadpoles exposed to butachlor at concentrations an order of magnitude less than the 4.8 mg/l recommended application rate. We did not find that butachlor depressed cholinesterase activity of tadpoles, unlike most organophosphorus insecticides. We conclude that butachlor is likely to have widespread negative impacts on amphibians occupying paddy fields with traditional herbicide application.

  16. Impacts of the herbicide butachlor on the larvae of a paddy field breeding frog (Fejervarya limnocharis) in subtropical Taiwan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Wan-Yi; Wang, Ching-Yuh; Wang, Tsu-Shing; Fellers, Gary M.; Lai, Bo-Chi; Kam, Yeong-Choy

    2011-01-01

    Butachlor is the most commonly used herbicide on paddy fields in Taiwan and throughout Southeast Asia. Since paddy fields provide habitat for pond breeding amphibians, we examined growth, development, time to metamorphosis, and survival of alpine cricket frog tadpoles (Fejervarya limnocharis) exposed to environmentally realistic concentrations of butachlor. We documented negative impacts of butachlor on survival, development, and time to metamorphosis, but not on tadpole growth. The 96 h LC50 for tadpoles was 0.87 mg/l, much lower than the 4.8 mg/l recommended dosage for application to paddy fields. Even given the rapid breakdown of butachlor, tadpoles would be exposed to concentrations in excess of their 96 h LC50 for an estimated 126 h. We also documented DNA damage (genotoxicity) in tadpoles exposed to butachlor at concentrations an order of magnitude less than the 4.8 mg/l recommended application rate. We did not find that butachlor depressed cholinesterase activity of tadpoles, unlike most organophosphorus insecticides. We conclude that butachlor is likely to have widespread negative impacts on amphibians occupying paddy fields with traditional herbicide application.

  17. Butachlor induced dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, oxidative DNA damage and necrosis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed

    2012-12-01

    Butachlor is a systemic herbicide widely applied on rice, tea, wheat, beans and other crops; however, it concurrently exerts toxic effects on beneficial organisms like earthworms, aquatic invertebrates and other non-target animals including humans. Owing to the associated risk to humans, this chloroacetanilide class of herbicide was investigated with the aim to assess its potential for the (i) interaction with DNA, (ii) mitochondria membrane damage and DNA strand breaks and (iii) cell cycle arrest and necrosis in butachlor treated human peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMN) cells. Fluorescence quenching data revealed the binding constant (Ka=1.2×10(4)M(-1)) and binding capacity (n=1.02) of butachlor with ctDNA. The oxidative potential of butachlor was ascertained based on its capacity of inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and substantial amounts of promutagenic 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) adducts in DNA. Also, the discernible butachlor dose-dependent reduction in fluorescence intensity of a cationic dye rhodamine (Rh-123) and increased fluorescence intensity of 2',7'-dichlorodihydro fluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) in treated cells signifies decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) due to intracellular ROS generation. The comet data revealed significantly greater Olive tail moment (OTM) values in butachlor treated PBMN cells vs untreated and DMSO controls. Treatment of cultured PBMN cells for 24h resulted in significantly increased number of binucleated micronucleated (BNMN) cells with a dose dependent reduction in the nuclear division index (NDI). The flow cytometry analysis of annexin V(-)/7-AAD(+) stained cells demonstrated substantial reduction in live population due to complete loss of cell membrane integrity. Overall the data suggested the formation of butachlor-DNA complex, as an initiating event in butachlor-induced DNA damage. The results elucidated the oxidative role of butachlor in intracellular ROS production, and

  18. Effects of the organic matter from swine wastewater on the adsorption and desorption of alachlor in soil.

    PubMed

    Dal Bosco, Tatiane C; Sampaio, Silvio C; Coelho, Silvia R M; Cosmann, Natássia J; Smanhotto, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    The application of swine wastewater to the soil for agricultural purposes results in the addition of total and dissolved organic matter to the soil, which may interfere with the dynamics of pesticides in the soil. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the application of total and dissolved organic matter from a biodigester and a treatment lagoon of swine wastewater in the adsorption and desorption of alachlor [2-chloro-2,6-diethyl-N(methoxymethyl acetamide)]. The assay was performed by the batch equilibrium method, and the results were fitted to the Freundlich model. The curve comparison test revealed a greater adsorption of alachlor in the soil treated with swine wastewater from the biodigester. The adsorption and desorption of alachlor increased in the soils where swine wastewater was added, and hysteresis was observed in all of the treatments. PMID:22494371

  19. Effects of the organic matter from swine wastewater on the adsorption and desorption of alachlor in soil.

    PubMed

    Dal Bosco, Tatiane C; Sampaio, Silvio C; Coelho, Silvia R M; Cosmann, Natássia J; Smanhotto, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    The application of swine wastewater to the soil for agricultural purposes results in the addition of total and dissolved organic matter to the soil, which may interfere with the dynamics of pesticides in the soil. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the application of total and dissolved organic matter from a biodigester and a treatment lagoon of swine wastewater in the adsorption and desorption of alachlor [2-chloro-2,6-diethyl-N(methoxymethyl acetamide)]. The assay was performed by the batch equilibrium method, and the results were fitted to the Freundlich model. The curve comparison test revealed a greater adsorption of alachlor in the soil treated with swine wastewater from the biodigester. The adsorption and desorption of alachlor increased in the soils where swine wastewater was added, and hysteresis was observed in all of the treatments.

  20. Transport of Alachlor, Atrazine, Dicamba, and Bromide through Silt and Loam Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tindall, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    The herbicides alachlor, atrazine, and dicamba, as well as bromide were applied to soils overlying the High Plains aquifer in Nebraska, to both macropore and non-macropore sites. Three of 6 study areas (exhibiting a high percentage of macropores) were used for analysis of chemical transport. Twelve intact soil cores (30 cm diameter; 40 cm height), were excavated (two each from 0-40 cm and 40-80 cm depths). The first three study areas and soil cores were used to study preferential flow characteristics using dye staining and to determine hydraulic properties; the remaining cores were treated the same as field macropore sites. Two undisturbed experimental field plots, each with a 1 m2 surface area, were established in each of the three macropore study areas. Each preferential plot was instrumented with suction lysimeters, tensiometers, and neutron access tubes - 10 cm increments to 80 cm - and planted in corn. Three study areas that did not exhibit macropores had alachlor, atrazine, and dicamba and bromide disked into the top 15 cm of soil; concentrations were tracked for 120 days - samples were collected on a grid, distributed within 3 plots measuring 50 m x 50 m each. Core samples were collected prior to and immediately after application, and then at 30, 60, and 120 days after application. Each lab core sample was in 15-cm lengths from 0-15 cm, 15-30 cm, 45-60 cm, and 75-90 cm. For areas exhibiting macropores, herbicides had begun to move between 10-15 days after application with concentrations peaking at various depths after heavy rainfall events. Field lysimeter samples showed increases in concentrations of herbicides at depths where laboratory data indicated greater percentages of preferential flowpaths. Concentrations of atrazine, alachlor and dicamba exceeding 0.30, 0.30, and 0.05 μg m1-1 respectively were observed with depth (10-30 cm and 50-70 cm) after two months following heavy rainfall events indicating that preferential flowpaths were a significant

  1. An analytical method for the simultaneous determination of butachlor and benoxacor in wheat and soil.

    PubMed

    Del Buono, Daniele; Scarponi, Luciano; D'Amato, Roberto

    2005-06-01

    Butachlor is a chloroacetanilide herbicide successfully employed in weeding some important crops, and benoxacor is a safening compound able to induce the enzymatic mechanism of chloroacetanilide detoxification in plants. A practical method for a simultaneous detection of butachlor and benoxacor residues in wheat and in soil is described. The procedure can be performed by GC and HPLC. They were extracted with methanol and cleaned up by solid phase extraction (SPE). The analytes were satisfactorily separated via both GC and HPLC techniques, and no interferences were observed coming from plant or soil matrixes or reagents. The limit of quantitation was found to be 5.0 ng by GC and 20.0 ng by HPLC for butachlor and 2.5 ng by GC and 15.0 ng by HPLC for benoxacor. Butachlor recovery tests ranged from 85.4% to 91.7% in wheat shoots and 84.0% to 93.2% in soil; benoxacor recovery tests ranged from 86.5% to 90.8% in wheat shoots and 85.7% to 90.7% in soil. The reproducibility and the accuracy make this method a selective and sensitive tool for routine analyses.

  2. Understanding butachlor toxicity in Aulosira fertilissima using physiological, biochemical and proteomic approaches.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Nidhi; Narayan, Om Prakash; Rai, Lal Chand

    2009-12-01

    The present study examines butachlor-induced inhibition of growth, photosynthetic pigments such as chlorophyll a, phycocyanin, allophycocyanin, phycoerythrin, photosystems I and II, whole chain electron transport, oxygen evolution, carbon fixation, ATP content, total thiol and glutathione contents of Aulosira fertilissima. For ascertaining if above mentioned changes are due to disturbance in plasma membrane integrity or proteins, fatty acid profiling and proteomics were done. Gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) depicted a decrease in alpha-linolenic acid (C18:3) which appears responsible for plasma membrane instability. Enhanced lipid peroxidation and electrolyte leakage further attested the butachlor-induced cell damage. Butachlor-treated Aulosira exhibited significant and reproducible alternations in eight proteins as assessed by 2DE and LC-MS analysis of which phycocyanin alpha-chain, allophycocyanin beta-chain, C-phycocyanin alpha-subunit, ATP synthase beta-chain and FBP aldolase were associated with photosynthesis and respiration, peroxiredoxin with antioxidative defense system and GroES and NusB with protein folding and transcription termination respectively. However, a prolonged (15 d) butachlor treatment of Aulosira downregulated all the proteins except NusB. Reverse transcription PCR of the protein genes affirmed that aforesaid proteins were the gene products not artifacts. Downregulated GroES and over expressed NusB are critical proteins for cell death.

  3. Joint acute toxicity of the herbicide butachlor and three insecticides to the terrestrial earthworm, Eisenia fetida.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; Cang, Tao; Yu, Ruixian; Wu, Shenggan; Liu, Xinju; Chen, Chen; Wang, Qiang; Cai, Leiming

    2016-06-01

    The herbicide butachlor and three insecticides phoxim, chlorpyrifos, and lambda-cyhalotrhin are widely used pesticides with different modes of action. As most previous laboratory bioassays for these pesticides have been conducted solely based on acute tests with a single compound, only limited information is available on the possible combined toxicity of these common chemicals to soil organisms. In this study, we evaluated their mixture toxicity on the terrestrial earthworm, Eisenia fetida, with binary, ternary, and quaternary mixtures. Two different types of bioassays were employed in our work, including a contact filter paper toxicity test and a soil toxicity test. Mixture toxicity effects were assessed using the additive index method. For all of the tested binary mixtures (butachlor-phoxim, butachlor-chlorpyrifos, and butachlor-lambda-cyhalothrin), significant synergistic interactions were observed after 14 days in the soil toxicity assay. However, greater additive toxicity was found after 48 h in the contact toxicity bioassay. Most of the ternary and quaternary mixtures exhibited significant synergistic effects on the worms in both bioassay systems. Our findings would be helpful in assessing the ecological risk of these pesticide mixtures to soil invertebrates. The observed synergistic interactions underline the necessity to review soil quality guidelines, which are likely underestimating the adverse combined effects of these compounds.

  4. Effect of butachlor on growth and nitrogen fixation by Anabaena sphaerica.

    PubMed

    Suseela, M R

    2001-07-01

    Present study was carried out to examine the effect of Butachlor on growth and nitrogen fixation by Anabaena sphaerica. The increased concentration of the pesticide did not have any adverse effect on the alga. Rather it accelerated the algal contribution in terms of biomass and nitrogen fixation.

  5. The decreasing of corn root biomembrane penetration for acetochlor with vermicompost amendment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sytnyk, Svitlana; Wiche, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    One of the topical environmental security issues is management and control of anthropogenic (artificially synthesized) chemical agents usage and utilization. Protection systems development against toxic effects of herbicides should be based on studies of biological indication mechanisms for identification of stressors effect in organisms. Lipid degradation is non-specific reaction to exogenous chemical agents effects. Therefore it is important to study responses of lipid components depending on the stressor type. We studied physiological and biochemical characteristics of lipid metabolism under action of herbicides of chloracetamide group. Corn at different stages of ontogenesis was used as testing object during model laboratory and microfield experiments. Cattle manure treated with earth worms Essenia Foetida was used as compost fertilizer to add to chain: chernozem (black soil) -corn system. It was found several acetochlor actions as following: -decreasing of sterols, phospholipids, phosphatidylcholines and phosphatidylethanolamines content; -increasing pool of available fatty acids and phosphatidic acids associated with intensification of hydrolysis processes; -lypase activity stimulation under effect of stressor in low concentrations; -lypase activity inhibition under effect of high stressor level; -decreasing of polyenoic free fatty acids indicating biomembrane degradation; -accumulation of phospholipids degradation products (phosphatidic acids); -decreasing of high-molecular compounds (phosphatidylcholin and phosphatidylinositol) concentrations; -change in the index of unsaturated and saturated free fatty acids ratio in biomembranes structure; It was established that incorporation of vermicompost in dose 0.4 kg/m2 in black soil lead to corn roots biomembrane restoration. It was fixed the decreasing roots biomembrane penetration for acetochlor in trial with vermicompost. Second compost substances antidote effect is the soil microorganism's activation

  6. Potential Use of Rice Field Cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum in the Evaluation of Butachlor Induced Toxicity and their Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Anees, Sumaiya; Suhail, Shazia; Pathak, Neelam; Zeeshan, Mohd

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, butachlor (5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 ppm) induced toxicity in Nostoc muscorum and their degradation was evaluated. The dose of butachlor dependent decreased in the cell survival and growth of N. muscorum was noticed. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the adverse impact on the cell size and shapes. Low concentrations of butachlor (10 and 20 ppm) induced the over expression of a polypeptides of 31.0 K Da and 42.7 K Da, respectively which could be responsible for developing resistance in the organism up to certain level. Further, the degradation product of butachlor as a result of metabolic activities of N. muscorum, identified by GC-MS analysis includes phenols and benzene dicarboxylic acid indicating the utilization of herbicide during active growth. PMID:25097380

  7. Potential Use of Rice Field Cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum in the Evaluation of Butachlor Induced Toxicity and their Degradation.

    PubMed

    Anees, Sumaiya; Suhail, Shazia; Pathak, Neelam; Zeeshan, Mohd

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, butachlor (5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 ppm) induced toxicity in Nostoc muscorum and their degradation was evaluated. The dose of butachlor dependent decreased in the cell survival and growth of N. muscorum was noticed. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the adverse impact on the cell size and shapes. Low concentrations of butachlor (10 and 20 ppm) induced the over expression of a polypeptides of 31.0 K Da and 42.7 K Da, respectively which could be responsible for developing resistance in the organism up to certain level. Further, the degradation product of butachlor as a result of metabolic activities of N. muscorum, identified by GC-MS analysis includes phenols and benzene dicarboxylic acid indicating the utilization of herbicide during active growth.

  8. Syntrophic biodegradation of butachlor by Mycobacterium sp. J7A and Sphingobium sp. J7B isolated from rice paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Hyun; Kim, Dong-Uk; Kim, Ijung; Ka, Jong-Ok

    2013-07-01

    Two bacterial strains involved in syntrophic degradation of chloroacetamide herbicide butachlor were isolated from a rice paddy soil. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the two isolates were related to members of the genera Mycobacterium and Sphingobium, respectively. Thus, a pair consisted of Mycobacterium sp. J7A and Sphingobium sp. J7B could rapidly degrade butachlor (100 mg L(-1)) at 28 °C within 24 h, while each isolate alone was not able to completely degrade butachlor. The isolate Mycobacterium sp. J7A was observed to grow slightly on butachlor, possibly utilizing the alkyl side chain of butachlor as its carbon and energy source, but the isolate Sphingobium sp. J7B alone could not grow on butachlor at all. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry on catabolic intermediates revealed that the strain J7A produced and accumulated 2-chloro-N-(2,6-diethylphenyl) acetamide (CDEPA) during growth on butachlor. This intermediate was not further degraded by strain J7A, but strain J7B was observed to be able to completely degrade and grow on it through 2,6-diethylaniline (DEA). The results showed that butachlor was completely degraded by the two isolates by syntrophic metabolism, in which strain Mycobacterium sp. J7A degraded butachlor to CDEPA, which was subsequently degraded by strain Sphingobium sp. J7B through DEA.

  9. Butachlor causes disruption of HPG and HPT axes in adult female rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lifei; Li, Wei; Zha, Jinmiao; Wang, Miao; Yuan, Lilai; Wang, Zijian

    2014-09-25

    Butachlor is a chloroacetamide herbicide widely used in Asia, and may enter the aquatic environment through agricultural application. In this study, plasma VTG and hormone levels (E2, 11-KT, T3 and T4) were determined after the female rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus) was exposed to butachlor at environmental relevant concentrations (0, 0.1, 1, and 10μg/L) for 40days. The mRNA levels of the HPG axis-related genes (gnrh, erα, vtg, star, lhr, 3β-hsd, cyp11a, cyp17, cyp19a and cyp19b), and the HPT axis-related genes (trα, dio1, dio2, and dio3) were quantified after 20 and 40days exposure to butachlor. For the HPG axis, the plasma 11-KT was increased at exposure concentration of 10μg/L, and VTG was significantly decreased at 1μg/L. Functional genes like gnrh and cyp19b in the brains, star, lhr, cyp11a, 3β-hsd, and cyp19a in the ovaries, and erα and vtg in livers were up-regulated. For the HPT axis, the results showed that plasma T4 levels were significantly increased, the gene expression of dio1 was up-regulated, dio2 showed no significant variation, and dio3 was down-regulated in the livers. These results indicated that butachlor may promote the accumulation of T4 in fish through inactive deiodinase type 3. The transcription of HPG axis-related genes could serve as an auto-regulation of hormone levels after exposure to butachlor. Furthermore, the activation of gnrh may play an important role as a feed-back mechanism in the regulation of hormone levels and crosstalk of endocrine axes.

  10. Persistence of the herbicide butachlor in soil after repeated applications and its effects on soil microbial functional diversity.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hua; Yu, Yun L; Wang, Xiu G; Chu, Xiao Q; Yang, Xiao E

    2009-02-01

    Effects of repeated applications of the herbicide butachlor (N-(butoxymethyl)-2-chloro -N-2',6'-dimethyl acetanilide) in soil on its persistence and soil microbial functional diversity were investigated under laboratory conditions. The degradation half-lives of butachlor at the recommended dosage in soil were calculated to be 12.5, 4.5, and 3.2 days for the first, second, and third applications, respectively. Throughout this study, no significant inhibition of the Shannon-Wiener index H' was observed. However, the Simpson index 1/D and McIntosh index U were significantly reduced (P < or = 0.05) during the initial 3 days after the first application of butachlor, and thereafter gradually recovered to a similar level to that of the control soil. A similar variation but faster recovery in 1/D and U was observed after the second and third Butachlor applications. Therefore, repeated applications of butachlor led to more rapid degradation of the herbicide, and more rapid recovery of soil microorganisms. It is concluded that repeated butachlor applications in soil had a temporary or short-term inhibitory effect on soil microbial communities.

  11. Effects of butachlor on estrogen receptor, vitellogenin and P450 aromatase gene expression in the early life stage of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Chang, Juhua; Gui, Wenjun; Wang, Minghua; Zhu, Guonian

    2012-01-01

    Butachlor has adverse effects on fecundity and disrupts sex hormone homeostasis in adult zebrafish, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are still unclear. In the present study, zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were exposed to various concentrations of butachlor from 2 h post-fertilization (hpf) to 30 days post-fertilization (dpf). The transcription of genes involved estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ1 and ERβ2), vitellogenins (VTG I and II), and cytochrome P450 aromatase (CYP19a) was analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR. The results showed that there was no significant alteration in the expression of VTGI, ERα, ERβ1, ERβ2 and CYP19a after 30 days of butachlor exposure, whereas the transcription of VTG II gene was significantly up-regulated in zebrafish exposed to 100 μg/L butachlor. It is suggested that butachlor may be a weak estrogen, and more endpoints need to be investigated to assess the effects of butachlor on the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis of zebrafish.

  12. RESPONSES OF MOLECULAR INDICATORS OF EXPOSURE IN MESOCOSMS: COMMON CARP (CYPRINUS CARPIO) EXPOSED TO THE HERBICIDES ALACHLOR AND ATRAZINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Common carp (Cyprinus carpio) were treated in aquatic mesocosms with a single pulse of the herbicides atrazine or alachlor to study the bioavailability and biological activity of these herbicides using molecular indicators: Liver vitellogenin gene expression in male fish for estr...

  13. Determination of alachlor and its sulfonic acid metabolite in water by solid-phase extraction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.; Pomes, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were combined for the trace analysis of the herbicide alachlor and its major soil metabolite, ethanesulfonic acid (ESA). The anti-alachlor antibody cross-reacted with ESA, which produced false-positive detections of alachlor in water samples by immunoassay screens. Alachlor and ESA were isolated from water by SPE on a C18 resin and eluted sequentially with ethyl acetate and methanol. Alachlor is soluble in ethyl acetate while the anionic ESA is not. Thus ESA remained adsorbed on the C18 resin and was eluted later with methanol. The combination of SPE with ELISA effectivety separated and quantified both alachlor and ESA using the same antibody for two ELISA methods. The general method may have applicability for the separation of other herbicides and their ionic metabolites. The SPE-ELISA method has a, detection limit of 0.01 ??g/L for alachlor and 0.05 ??g/L for ESA, with a precision of ?? 10%. Analyses of surface and ground water samples were confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode-array detection. Results showed widespread occurrence of ESA in surface and ground water of the midwestern United States, with concentrations ranging from 10 ??g/L.

  14. Exposure to the herbicide acetochlor alters thyroid hormone-dependent gene expression and metamorphosis in Xenopus Laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Crump, Doug; Werry, Kate; Veldhoen, Nik; Van Aggelen, Graham; Helbing, Caren C

    2002-01-01

    A growing number of substances released into the environment disrupt normal endocrine mechanisms in a wide range of vertebrates. Little is known about the effects and identities of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that target thyroid hormone (TH) action, particularly at the cellular level. Frog tadpole metamorphosis depends completely on TH, which has led to the suggestion of a metamorphosis-based assay for screening potential EDCs. A major mechanism of TH action is the alteration of gene expression via hormone-bound nuclear receptors. To assess the gene expression profiles in the frog model, we designed a novel multispecies frog cDNA microarray. Recently, the preemergent herbicide acetochlor was shown to accelerate 3,5,3 -triiodothyronine (T3)-induced forelimb emergence and increase mRNA expression of thyroid hormone ss receptors in ranid tadpoles. Here we show that T3-induced metamorphosis of Xenopus laevis, a species commonly used in the laboratory, is accelerated upon acute exposure to an environmentally relevant level of acetochlor. The morphologic changes observed are preceded by alterations in gene expression profiles detected in the tadpole tail, and the nature of these profiles suggest a novel mechanism of action for acetochlor. PMID:12460798

  15. Involvement of the Cytochrome P450 System EthBAD in the N-Deethoxymethylation of Acetochlor by Rhodococcus sp. Strain T3-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Zhou, Jie; Li, Zhoukun; Dong, Weiliang; Hou, Ying; Huang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Acetochlor [2-chloro-N-(ethoxymethyl)-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-acetamide] is a widely applied herbicide with potential carcinogenic properties. N-Deethoxymethylation is the key step in acetochlor biodegradation. N-Deethoxymethylase is a multicomponent enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of acetochlor to 2′-methyl-6′-ethyl-2-chloroacetanilide (CMEPA). Fast detection of CMEPA by a two-enzyme (N-deethoxymethylase–amide hydrolase) system was established in this research. Based on the fast detection method, a three-component enzyme was purified from Rhodococcus sp. strain T3-1 using ammonium sulfate precipitation and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The molecular masses of the components of the purified enzyme were estimated to be 45, 43, and 11 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Based on the results of peptide mass fingerprint analysis, acetochlor N-deethoxymethylase was identified as a cytochrome P450 system, composed of a cytochrome P450 oxygenase (43-kDa component; EthB), a ferredoxin (45 kDa; EthA), and a reductase (11 kDa; EthD), that is involved in the degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether. The gene cluster ethABCD was cloned by PCR amplification and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). Resting cells of a recombinant E. coli strain showed deethoxymethylation activity against acetochlor. Subcloning of ethABCD showed that ethABD expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3) has the activity of acetochlor N-deethoxymethylase and is capable of converting acetochlor to CMEPA. PMID:25595756

  16. Boule gene expression underpins the meiotic arrest in spermatogenesis in male rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to DEHP and butachlor.

    PubMed

    Ahmadivand, Sohrab; Farahmand, Hamid; Teimoori-Toolabi, Ladan; Mirvaghefi, Alireza; Eagderi, Soheil; Geerinckx, Tom; Shokrpoor, Sara; Rahmati-Holasoo, Hooman

    2016-01-01

    Boule, the ancestor of the DAZ (Deleted in AZoospermia) gene family, in most organisms is mainly involved in male meiosis. The present study investigates the effects of the plasticizer DEHP (50mg/kg body weight) and herbicide butachlor (0.39mg/L) on male rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for a 10-day period in two independent experiments. The results showed that plasma testosterone (T) concentrations were significantly lower in fish exposed to either DEHP or butachlor compared to the control fish (P<0.05). Fish showed a significantly elevated hepatosomatic index (HSI) in the butachlor treatment (P<0.05). However, no significant difference was observed in HSI values in the DEHP treatment (P>0.05). In addition, no significant differences were found in the gonadosomatic index (GSI) in both DEHP and butachlor treatments (P>0.05). Histologically, testes of male trout in the control groups were well differentiated and filled with large numbers of cystic structures containing spermatozoa. In contrast, the testes of male trout contained mostly spermatocytes with few spermatozoa in both treated group, suggesting that DEHP and butachlor may inhibit the progression of meiosis. Also, boule gene expression was significantly lower in the testes of male trout affected by DEHP and butachlor in comparison with their control groups (P<0.05), which confirmed the meiotic arrest in affected trout. Based on the results, the present study demonstrated that DEHP and butachlor can inhibit the progression of spermatogenesis in male trout, potentially by causing an arrest of meiosis, maybe due to down-regulation of boule gene expression through T and/or IGF1 via ERK1/2 signaling in T-independent pathways. In addition, these results confirmed that boule can be considered as a predictive marker to assess meiotic efficiency.

  17. Boule gene expression underpins the meiotic arrest in spermatogenesis in male rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to DEHP and butachlor.

    PubMed

    Ahmadivand, Sohrab; Farahmand, Hamid; Teimoori-Toolabi, Ladan; Mirvaghefi, Alireza; Eagderi, Soheil; Geerinckx, Tom; Shokrpoor, Sara; Rahmati-Holasoo, Hooman

    2016-01-01

    Boule, the ancestor of the DAZ (Deleted in AZoospermia) gene family, in most organisms is mainly involved in male meiosis. The present study investigates the effects of the plasticizer DEHP (50mg/kg body weight) and herbicide butachlor (0.39mg/L) on male rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for a 10-day period in two independent experiments. The results showed that plasma testosterone (T) concentrations were significantly lower in fish exposed to either DEHP or butachlor compared to the control fish (P<0.05). Fish showed a significantly elevated hepatosomatic index (HSI) in the butachlor treatment (P<0.05). However, no significant difference was observed in HSI values in the DEHP treatment (P>0.05). In addition, no significant differences were found in the gonadosomatic index (GSI) in both DEHP and butachlor treatments (P>0.05). Histologically, testes of male trout in the control groups were well differentiated and filled with large numbers of cystic structures containing spermatozoa. In contrast, the testes of male trout contained mostly spermatocytes with few spermatozoa in both treated group, suggesting that DEHP and butachlor may inhibit the progression of meiosis. Also, boule gene expression was significantly lower in the testes of male trout affected by DEHP and butachlor in comparison with their control groups (P<0.05), which confirmed the meiotic arrest in affected trout. Based on the results, the present study demonstrated that DEHP and butachlor can inhibit the progression of spermatogenesis in male trout, potentially by causing an arrest of meiosis, maybe due to down-regulation of boule gene expression through T and/or IGF1 via ERK1/2 signaling in T-independent pathways. In addition, these results confirmed that boule can be considered as a predictive marker to assess meiotic efficiency. PMID:26027538

  18. Effect of acetochlor on transcription of genes associated with oxidative stress, apoptosis, immunotoxicity and endocrine disruption in the early life stage of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jinhua; Wu, Shenggan; Liu, Xinju; Wang, Yanhua; An, Xuehua; Cai, Leiming; Zhao, Xueping

    2015-09-01

    The study presented here aimed to characterize the effects of acetochlor on expression of genes related to endocrine disruption, oxidative stress, apoptosis and immune system in zebrafish during its embryo development. Different trends in gene expression were observed after exposure to 50, 100, 200μg/L acetochlor for 96h. Results demonstrated that the transcription patterns of many key genes involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal/thyroid (HPG/HPT) axis (e.g., VTG1, ERβ1, CYP19a and TRα), cell apoptosis pathway (e.g., Bcl2, Bax, P53 and Cas8), as well as innate immunity (e.g., CXCL-C1C, IL-1β and TNFα) were affected in newly hatched zebrafish after exposure to acetochlor. In addition, the up-regulation of CAT, GPX, GPX1a, Cu/Zn-SOD and Ogg1 suggested acetochlor might trigger oxidative stress in zebrafish. These finding indicated that acetochlor could simultaneously induce multiple responses during zebrafish embryonic development, and bidirectional interactions among oxidative stress, apoptosis pathway, immune and endocrine systems might be present.

  19. Effect of acetochlor on transcription of genes associated with oxidative stress, apoptosis, immunotoxicity and endocrine disruption in the early life stage of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jinhua; Wu, Shenggan; Liu, Xinju; Wang, Yanhua; An, Xuehua; Cai, Leiming; Zhao, Xueping

    2015-09-01

    The study presented here aimed to characterize the effects of acetochlor on expression of genes related to endocrine disruption, oxidative stress, apoptosis and immune system in zebrafish during its embryo development. Different trends in gene expression were observed after exposure to 50, 100, 200μg/L acetochlor for 96h. Results demonstrated that the transcription patterns of many key genes involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal/thyroid (HPG/HPT) axis (e.g., VTG1, ERβ1, CYP19a and TRα), cell apoptosis pathway (e.g., Bcl2, Bax, P53 and Cas8), as well as innate immunity (e.g., CXCL-C1C, IL-1β and TNFα) were affected in newly hatched zebrafish after exposure to acetochlor. In addition, the up-regulation of CAT, GPX, GPX1a, Cu/Zn-SOD and Ogg1 suggested acetochlor might trigger oxidative stress in zebrafish. These finding indicated that acetochlor could simultaneously induce multiple responses during zebrafish embryonic development, and bidirectional interactions among oxidative stress, apoptosis pathway, immune and endocrine systems might be present. PMID:26318563

  20. The ratio of clay content to total organic carbon content is a useful parameter to predict adsorption of the herbicide butachlor in soils.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongzhen; He, Yan; Xu, Jianming; Huang, Panming; Jilani, Ghulam

    2008-03-01

    Thirteen soils collected from 11 provinces in eastern China were used to investigate the butachlor adsorption. The results indicated that the total organic carbon (TOC) content, clay content, amorphous Fe2O3 content, silt content, CEC, and pH had a combined effect on the butachlor sorption on soil. Combination of the data obtained from the 13 soils in the present study with other 23 soil samples reported by other researchers in the literature showed that Koc would be a poor predictive parameter for butachlor adsorption on soils with TOC content higher than 4.0% and lower than 0.2%. The soils with the ratio of clay content to TOC content (RCO) values less than 60 adsorbed butachlor mainly by the partition into soil organic matter matrix. The soils with RCO values higher than 60 apparently adsorbed butachlor by the combination of the partition into soil organic matter matrix and adsorption on clay surface.

  1. Can assessing for potential contribution of soil organic and inorganic components for butachlor sorption be improved?

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Liu, Zhongzhen; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Haizhen; Shi, Jiachun; Xu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    Sorption of butachlor to various types of common soil components was investigated. Six pure minerals (montmorillonite [Mont], kaolinite [Kaol], Ca homoionic montmorillonite [Ca-Mont] and kaolinite [Ca-Kaol], amorphous hydrated Al and Fe oxides [AHOs-Al, AHOs-Fe]), four soil alkali-extractable pure humic acids (HAs), and the four corresponding HAs originated real unmodified and HO-treated soils were selected as the representative sorbents. Results showed that the HAs played a crucial role, and clay minerals (especially Mont) also showed an important effect in butachlor sorption. The AHOs may likely influence only in a mediator way by enhancing the availability of sorption domains of HAs. By removing 78% (on average) of the total organic carbon (TOC) from the soils with HO, the content ratio of clay to TOC (RCO) increased by an average of 367% and became >60. This change simultaneously decreased the sorption capacity of soils (40%, on average). Considering that the surface sorption domain on clay minerals may be highly exposed and more competitive after the partial removal of soil organic matter (SOM), this reaffirmed the potential contribution from clay minerals. It can thus be inferred that in the real soil where SOM and clay minerals are associated, the coating of clay minerals may have weakened the partition function of SOM or blocked some sorption domain within SOM, resulting in a decreased sorption of butachlor. Therefore, clay minerals, especially 2:1 type expanding minerals, may play a dual function vs. SOM content for the sorption of butachlor in soil.

  2. Fatal poisoning by butachlor and chlornitrofen ingested from a bottle marked as nitrofen.

    PubMed

    Lin, T J; Li, H P; Wong, S S; Hung, D Z; Yang, D Y

    2001-08-01

    Nitrofen has been banned in Taiwan since January 1, 1983 due to its tetrogenicity. A 78-y-o female consumed about 500 ml of herbicide, labeled as nitrofen, in a suicide attempt. Consciousness disturbance occurred immediately. After 9 h, bloody-tarry stool was noted. Hematemesis occurred 19 h later. Hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity also developed. Twitching of head and both upper extremities lasting 20-30 sec and up to 5 min developed on day 3. Sometimes an upward gaze with the face turned to the right or a convulsion of the right upper extremity was observed. EEG showed alpha coma, generalized slow spike-and-wave complexes, and isolated generalized sharp waves mainly in the left occipital area. On day 7, endotracheal intubation was performed due to apnea; she expired on day 9. The pesticide was found to contain butachlor and chlornitrofen. The Agricultural Committee prohibited the marketing of chlornitrofen due to its generation of tumors in animals. The combination of butachlor and chlornitrofen can result in consciousness disturbance, leucocytosis, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, rhabdomyolysis, hypocalcemia, hypoalbuminemia, elevated amylase, nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, seizures and death. The cytotoxicity of butachlor may be related to the patient's death. Active components of pesticides should be checked if the clinical course of a poisoned patient is unusual to allow appropriate interventions.

  3. Comparative and combined acute toxicity of butachlor, imidacloprid and chlorpyrifos on earthworm, Eisenia fetida.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Wang, Yanhua; Zhao, Xueping; Wang, Qiang; Qian, Yongzhong

    2014-04-01

    Various pesticides have become widespread contaminants of soils due to their large applications in agriculture and homes. An earthworm assay was used to assess the acute toxicity of butachlor, imidacloprid and chlorpyrifos with different modes of action. Ecotoxicities of these pesticides were compared for earthworm Eisenia fetida separately and in combination in artificial soil and contact filter paper tests. Imidacloprid was the most toxic for E. fetida with LC₅₀ (lethal concentration 50) values three orders magnitude lower than that of butachlor and chlorpyrifos in both tests. The toxicity of the mixtures was compared to that predicted by the concentration addition (CA) model. According to the CA model, the observed toxicities of all binary mixtures were less than additive. However, for all the mixtures in 14 d artificial soil test, and mixtures of butachlor plus chlorpyrifos and imidacloprid plus chlorpyrifos in 48 h contact filter paper test, the difference in toxicity was less than 30%, hence it was concluded that the mixtures conformed to CA. The combined effects of the pesticides in contact filter paper tests were not consistent with the results in artificial soil toxicity tests, which may be associated with the interaction of soil salts with the pesticides. The CA model provides estimates of mixture toxicity that did not markedly underestimate the measured toxicity, and therefore the CA model is the most suitable to use in ecological risk assessments of the pesticides.

  4. Clinico-hematological and tissue changes induced by butachlor in male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica).

    PubMed

    Hussain, Riaz; Khan, Ahrar; Mahmood, Fazal; Rehan, Sarmad; Ali, Farah

    2014-02-01

    The present experiment was executed to determine the pathological effects induced by concurrent feeding of butachlor (chloroacetanilide herbicide) in male Japanese quail. For this purpose mature male quail about 4-5weeks of age were procured from the local market and randomly divided into six equal groups (A-F). Butachlor was mixed in corn oil and administered orally for 30days using crop tube. Four birds from each group were killed at day 10, 20 and 30 of the experiment and blood was collected with and without anticoagulant. The birds in groups (A-D) did not reveal any clinical and behavioral alterations. Clinical signs like watery droppings, dullness, ruffled feather, depression, decrease frequency of crowing, mounting with pen mates and foam production were observed. Maximum intensity of these clinical signs and behavioral alterations were observed in group F throughout the experiment. Significant lower values of erythrocytes, hematocrit percent and hemoglobin were recorded. Significantly increased numbers of erythrocytes with micronuclei, lobed and notched nuclei were observed. Histopathologically, enlarged intertubular space, fewer numbers of round spermatids, necrotic spermatids and admixture of dead spermatids were observed in testes. The results revealed significant increase in serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT) and urea concentrations. The results of present experimental study indicated that butachlor induces hematobiochemical and testicular changes in birds.

  5. Effect of butachlor on antioxidant enzyme status and lipid peroxidation in fresh water African catfish, (Clarias gariepinus).

    PubMed

    Farombi, E O; Ajimoko, Y R; Adelowo, O A

    2008-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of butachlor, a widely used herbicide, on antioxidant enzyme system and lipid peroxidation formation in African cat fish (Clarias gariepinus). Fish were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of butachlor 1, 2, 2.5 ppm and sacrificed 24hrs after treatment. A significant increase in malondialdehyde formation was observed in the liver, kidney, gills and heart of the fish following exposure to different concentrations of butachlor. Superoxide dismutase and catalase activities increased in the liver and kidney but decreased in the gills and heart in a concentration-dependent pattern. Glutathione level and glutathione-Stransferase activities increased (P<0.05) in the liver but decreased in the kidneys, gills and heart when fishes were exposed to the three concentrations of butachlor. The results suggest that butachlor induced oxidative stress in the various tissues of the fish particularly in the kidney and as such the organ may be subjected to severe oxidative toxicity due to depressed glutathione detoxification system.

  6. Effect of Butachlor on Antioxidant Enzyme Status and Lipid Peroxidation in Fresh Water African Catfish, (Clarias gariepinus)

    PubMed Central

    Farombi, E. O.; Ajimoko, Y. R.; Adelowo, O. A.

    2008-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of butachlor, a widely used herbicide, on antioxidant enzyme system and lipid peroxidation formation in African cat fish (Clarias gariepinus). Fish were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of butachlor 1, 2, 2.5 ppm and sacrificed 24hrs after treatment. A significant increase in malondialdehyde formation was observed in the liver, kidney, gills and heart of the fish following exposure to different concentrations of butachlor. Superoxide dismutase and catalase activities increased in the liver and kidney but decreased in the gills and heart in a concentration-dependent pattern. Glutathione level and glutathione-S-transferase activities increased (P<0.05) in the liver but decreased in the kidneys, gills and heart when fishes were exposed to the three concentrations of butachlor. The results suggest that butachlor induced oxidative stress in the various tissues of the fish particularly in the kidney and as such the organ may be subjected to severe oxidative toxicity due to depressed glutathione detoxification system. PMID:19151438

  7. Responses of molecular indicators of exposure in mesocosms: common carp (Cyprinus carpio) exposed to the herbicides alachlor and atrazine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Lina W; Toth, Gregory P; Gordon, Denise A; Graham, David W; Meier, John R; Knapp, Charles W; deNoyelles, F Jerry; Campbell, Scott; Lattier, David L

    2005-01-01

    Common carp (Cyprinus carpio) were treated in aquatic mesocosms with a single pulse of the herbicides atrazine or alachlor to study the bioavailability and biological activity of these herbicides using molecular indicators: Liver vitellogenin gene expression in male fish for estrogenic activity, liver cytochrome P4501A1 gene expression, and DNA damage in blood cells using the single-cell gel electrophoresis method. Both alachlor and atrazine showed dose-related increases in DNA strand breaks at environmentally relevant concentrations (<100 ppb). Gene expression indicators showed that neither herbicide had estrogenic activity in the carp, whereas atrazine at concentrations as low as 7 ppb induced cytochrome P4501A1. These results support the study of molecular indicators for exposure in surrogate ecosystems to gauge relevant environmental changes following herbicide treatments.

  8. Simultaneous determination of alachlor, metolachlor, atrazine, and simazine in water and soil by isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.Q.

    1989-03-01

    A multiresidue method was developed for the simultaneous determination of low parts per billion (ppb) concentrations of the herbicides alachlor, metolachlor, atrazine, and simazine in water and soil using isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Known amounts of /sup 15/N,/sup 13/C-alachlor and /sup 2/H/sub 5/-atrazine were added to each sample as internal standards. The samples were then prepared by a solid phase extraction with no further cleanup. A high resolution GC/low resolution MS system with data acquisition in selected ion monitoring mode was used to quantitate herbicides in the extract. The limit of detection was 0.05 ppb for water and 0.5 ppb for soil. Accuracy greater than 80% and precision better than 4% was demonstrated with spiked samples.

  9. A urinary metabonomics analysis of long-term effect of acetochlor exposure on rats by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Longxue; Wang, Maoqing; Chen, Shuhong; Zhao, Wei; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Yang

    2016-03-01

    The study was to assess the long-term toxic effects of acetochlor on rats. Two different doses (42.96 and 107.4 mg/kg body weight/day) of acetochlor were administered to Wistar rats through their food for over 24 weeks. Rat urine samples were collected at two time-points for the measurements of the metabonomics profiles with ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MSMS). The results of clinical chemistry and histopathology suggested that long-term use of acetochlor in rats caused liver and kidney damage, and dysfunction of antioxidant system. The urinary metabonomics analysis indicated that the high and low-dose exposure of acetochlor could cause alterations of these metabonomics in urine in the rat. Significant changes of the levels of hippuric acid (0.403-fold decrease), citric acid (0.430-fold decrease), pantothenic acid (0.486-fold decrease), uracil (0.419-fold decrease), β-Alanine (0.325-fold decrease), nonanedioic acid (0.445-fold decrease), L-tyrosine (0.410-fold decrease), D-glucuronic acid (8.389-fold increase) and 2-ethyl-6-methyl-N-methyl-2-chloro-acetanilide in urine were observed. In addition, it may interfere with the fatty acid synthesis, the pyrimidine degradation and pantothenate biosynthesis. The level of 2-ethyl-6-methyl-N-methyl-2-chloro-acetanilide is detected in all treated groups which is not found in the control groups, indicating which can be used as an early, sensitive marker of acetochlor exposure in rat. This study illustrates the important utility of metabonomics approaches to understand the toxicity of long-term exposure of acetochlor.

  10. A urinary metabonomics analysis of long-term effect of acetochlor exposure on rats by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Longxue; Wang, Maoqing; Chen, Shuhong; Zhao, Wei; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Yang

    2016-03-01

    The study was to assess the long-term toxic effects of acetochlor on rats. Two different doses (42.96 and 107.4 mg/kg body weight/day) of acetochlor were administered to Wistar rats through their food for over 24 weeks. Rat urine samples were collected at two time-points for the measurements of the metabonomics profiles with ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MSMS). The results of clinical chemistry and histopathology suggested that long-term use of acetochlor in rats caused liver and kidney damage, and dysfunction of antioxidant system. The urinary metabonomics analysis indicated that the high and low-dose exposure of acetochlor could cause alterations of these metabonomics in urine in the rat. Significant changes of the levels of hippuric acid (0.403-fold decrease), citric acid (0.430-fold decrease), pantothenic acid (0.486-fold decrease), uracil (0.419-fold decrease), β-Alanine (0.325-fold decrease), nonanedioic acid (0.445-fold decrease), L-tyrosine (0.410-fold decrease), D-glucuronic acid (8.389-fold increase) and 2-ethyl-6-methyl-N-methyl-2-chloro-acetanilide in urine were observed. In addition, it may interfere with the fatty acid synthesis, the pyrimidine degradation and pantothenate biosynthesis. The level of 2-ethyl-6-methyl-N-methyl-2-chloro-acetanilide is detected in all treated groups which is not found in the control groups, indicating which can be used as an early, sensitive marker of acetochlor exposure in rat. This study illustrates the important utility of metabonomics approaches to understand the toxicity of long-term exposure of acetochlor. PMID:26969444

  11. Comparative study of photocatalytic and photoelectrocatalytic properties of alachlor using different morphology TiO2/Ti photoelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yanjun; Liu, Huiling; Han, Lei; Zhou, Yabin

    2011-09-15

    Wormhole-shaped TiO(2)/Ti (WT) and nanotube-shaped TiO(2)/Ti (TNT) photoelectrodes were prepared by anodic oxidation method. The morphology and structure were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that both crystal types of WT and TNT photoelectrodes were composed of anatase and rutile TiO(2) phases; however TNT photoelectrodes had highly ordered nanostructure. The photoelectrochemical (PECH) and photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) properties of WT and TNT photoelectrodes were investigated by photocurrent transient, open-circuit potential and degradation rate of alachlor under the artificial solar light illumination. All results showed that TNT photoelectrodes prepared in NaF-Na(2)SO(4) solution have more excellent photoelectron properties than WT photoelectrodes prepared in H(2)SO(4) solution. The photocatalytic (PC) and PEC experiments of alachlor showed that PC and PEC activities of TNT photoelectrodes were superior to WT photoelectrodes. At applied bias potentials the degradation rate of alachlor at TNT photoelectrodes increased significantly to 94.5%. The higher PC and PEC performance of TNT photoelectrodes were ascribed to the long-range ordered structure and short-orientation diffusion distance of photogenerated carries.

  12. Comparative sensitivity of five species of macrophytes and six species of algae to atrazine, metribuzin, alachlor, and metolachlor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairchild, James F.; Ruessler, Shane; Carlson, A. Ron

    1998-01-01

    This study determined the relative sensitivity of five species of aquatic macrophytes and six species of algae to four commonly used herbicides (atrazine, metribuzin, alachlor, and metolachlor). Toxicity tests consisted of 96-h (duckweed and algae) or 14-d (submerged macrophytes) static exposures. The triazine herbicides (atrazine and metribuzin) were significantly more toxic to aquatic plants than were the acetanilide herbicides (alachlor and metolachlor). Toxicity studies ranked metribuzin > atrazine > alachlor > metolachlor in decreasing order of overall toxicity to aquatic plants. Relative sensitivities of macrophytes to these herbicides decreased in the order of Ceratophyllum > Najas > Elodea > Lemna > Myriophyllum. Relative sensitivities of algae to herbicides decreased in the order of Selenastrum > Chlorella > Chlamydomonas > Microcystis > Scenedesmus > Anabaena. Algae and macrophytes were of similar overall sensitivities to herbicides. Data indicated that Selenastrum, a commonly tested green alga, was generally more sensitive compared to other plant species. Lemna minor, a commonly tested floating vascular plant, was of intermediate sensitivity, and was fivefold less sensitive than Ceratophyllum, which was the most sensitive species tested. The results indicated that no species was consistently most sensitive, and that a suite of aquatic plant test species may be needed to perform accurate risk assessments of herbicides.

  13. Adsorption behavior of herbicide butachlor on typical soils in China and humic acids from the soil samples.

    PubMed

    Xu, Duanping; Xu, Zhonghou; Zhu, Shuquan; Cao, Yunzhe; Wang, Yu; Du, Xiaoming; Gu, Qingbao; Li, Fasheng

    2005-05-01

    Three kinds of soils in China, krasnozem, fluvo-aquic soil, and phaeozem, as well as the humic acids (HAs) isolated from them, were used to adsorb the herbicide butachlor from water. Under the experimental conditions, the adsorption amount of butachlor on soils was positively correlated with the content of soil organic matter. HAs extracted from different kinds of soils had different adsorption capacity for the tested herbicide, which was positively correlated with their content of carbonyls. The adsorption mechanism was studied using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and cross-polarization with magic angle spinning 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (CP-MAS 13C NMR) techniques. It was showed that the adsorption mainly took place on the C=O, phenolic and alcoholic O-H groups of HAs. It was also confirmed that the adsorption mechanism was hydrogen bonds formation between the above groups of HAs and butachlor molecules.

  14. Development and validation of an alternative to conventional pretreatment methods for residue analysis of butachlor in water, soil, and rice.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jiaying; Jiang, Wenqing; Liu, Fengmao; Zhao, Huiyu; Wang, Suli; Peng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    A rapid and effective alternative analytical method for residues of butachlor in water, soil, and rice was established. The operating variables affecting performance of this method, including different extraction conditions and cleanup adsorbents, were evaluated. The determination of butachlor residues in soil, straw, rice hull, and husked rice was performed using GC/MS after extraction with n-hexane and cleanup with graphite carbon black. The average recoveries ranged from 81.5 to 102.7%, with RSDs of 0.6-7.7% for all of the matrixes investigated. The limits of quantitation were 0.05 mg/kg in water and rice plant, and 0.01 mg/kg in soil, straw, rice hull, and husked rice. A comparison among this proposed method, the conventional liquid-liquid extraction, the Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe method, and Soxhlet extraction indicated that this method was more suitable for analyzing butachlor in rice samples. The further validation of the proposed method was carried out by Soxhlet extraction for the determination of butachlor residues in the husked rice samples, and the residue results showed there was no obvious difference obtained from these two methods. Samples from a rice field were found to contain butachlor residues below the maximum residue limits set by China (0.5 mg/kg) and Japan (0.1 mg/kg). The proposed method has a strong potential for application in routine screening and processing of large numbers of samples. This study developed a more effective alternative to the conventional analytical methods for analyzing butachlor residues in various matrixes.

  15. Single-step uncalcined N-TiO2 synthesis, characterizations and its applications on alachlor photocatalytic degradations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwannaruang, Totsaporn; Wantala, Kitirote

    2016-09-01

    The aims of this research were to synthesize nitrogen doped TiO2 (N-TiO2) photocatalysts produced by hydrothermal technique and to test the degradation performance of alachlor by photocatalytic process under UV irradiations in the effect of aging temperature and time in the preparation process. The characterizations of synthesized TiO2 such as specific surface area, particle size, phase structure and elements were analyzed by using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) technique, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray Diffractometer (XRD) and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX), respectively. The Central Composite Design (CCD) was used to design the experiment to determine the optimal condition, main effects and their interactions by using specific surface area, percent alachlor removal and observed first-order rate constant as responses. The kinetic reactions of alachlor degradation were explained by using Langmuir-Hinshelwood expression to confirm the reaction took place on the surface of photocatalyst. The results showed that the effect of aging temperatures was significant on surface area, whereas aging time was insignificant. Additionally, the square term of aging temperature and interaction term were shown significant on the specific surface area as well. The highest specific surface area from response surface at aging temperature between 150-175 °C and aging time between 6-13 h was found in a range of 100-106 m2/g. The average particle size of TiO2 was similar to crystallite size. Therefore, it can be concluded that one particle has only one crystal. The element analysis has shown 10% of nitrogen in TiO2 structure that the energy band-gap about 2.95 eV was found. Although, the effects of aging temperature and time on percent alachlor removal and observed first-order rate constants were insignificant, both terms were significant in term of the square for alachlor photocatalytic degradation. The optimal condition of both responses was achieved at an

  16. Cyanobacterial diversity shifts induced by butachlor in selected Indian rice fields in Eastern Uttar Pradesh and Western Bihar analyzed with PCR and DGGE.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Nidhi; Narayan, Om Prakash; Rai, Lal Chand

    2012-01-01

    The present study examines the effects of 30 mg/kg butachlor on the cyanobacterial diversity of rice fields in Eastern Uttar Pradesh and Western Bihar in India. A total of 40 samples were grouped into three classes [(i) acidic, (ii) neutral, and (iii) alkaline soils], based on physicochemical and principle component analyses. Acidic soils mainly harbored Westillopsis, Trichormus, Anabaenopsis, and unicellular cyanobacteria; whereas Nostoc, Anabaena, Calothrix, Tolypothrix, and Aulosira were found in neutral and alkaline soils. Molecular characterization using 16S rRNA PCR and DGGE revealed the presence of 13 different phylotypes of cyanobacteria in these samples. Butachlor treatment of the soil samples led to the disappearance of 5 and the emergence of 2 additional phylotypes. A total of 40 DGGE bands showed significant reproducible changes upon treatment with butachlor. Phylogenetic analyses divided the phylotypes into five major clusters exhibiting interesting links with soil pH. Aulosira, Anabaena, Trichormus, and Anabaenopsis were sensitive to butachlor treatment, whereas uncultured cyanobacteria, a chroococcalean member, Westillopsis, Nostoc, Calothrix, Tolypothrix, Rivularia, Gloeotrichia, Fischerella, Leptolyngbya, and Cylindrospermum, appeared to be tolerant against butachlor at their native soil pH. Butachlor-induced inhibition of nitrogen fixation was found to be 65% (maximum) and 33% (minimum) in the soil samples of pH 9.23 and 5.20, respectively. In conclusion, low butachlor doses may prove beneficial in paddy fields having a neutral to alkaline soil pH.

  17. Environmentally friendly slow release formulations of alachlor based on clay-phosphatidylcholine.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Verdejo, Trinidad; Undabeytia, Tomas; Nir, Shlomo; Maqueda, Celia; Morillo, Esmeralda

    2008-08-01

    A new clay-liposome complex was developed for reducing leaching of herbicides and contamination of groundwater. The liposomes were composed of the neutral and Environmental Protection Agency approved phospholipid phosphatidylcholine (PC). Adsorption of PC liposomes on the clay mineral montmorillonite could exceed the cation exchange capacity of the clay, and was well simulated by the Langmuir equation. X-ray diffraction results for 6 mM PC and 1.6 g/L clay (3 day incubation) yielded a basal spacing of 7.49 nm, which was interpreted as the formation of a supported planar bilayer on montmorillonite platelets. Fluorescence methods demonstrated structural changes which reflected adsorption of PC followed by loss of vesicle integrity as measured by the penetration of dithionite into the internal monolayer of fluorescently labeled liposomes, resulting in a decrease in fluorescence intensity to 18% of initial after 4 h. Energy transfer was demonstrated after 1 h from labeled liposomes to montmorillonite labeled by an acceptor. The neutral herbicide alachlor adsorbed on the liposome-clay complex, yielding a formulation of up to 40% active ingredient, and 1.6-fold reduction in herbicide release in comparison to the commercial formulation. Hence, the PC-montmorillonite complex can form a basis for environmentally friendly formulations of herbicides, which would yield reduced leaching.

  18. Toxicity studies of butachlor to the freshwater fish Channa punctata (Bloch).

    PubMed

    Tilak, K S; Veeraiah, K; Bhaskara Thathaji, P; Butchiram, M S

    2007-04-01

    The toxicity studies were conducted on the fish Channa punctata (Bloch) by employing static and continuous flow through systems, for the toxicant butachlor (technical grade+) and its commercial formulation+ (machete 50% EC). The LC50 values are 297.89 ppb and 247.46 ppb for 24 hr and 48 hr in static for technical and 636.45 and 546.09 for machete. In continuous flow through the values are 270.05, 233.52 to the technical and 567.85 and 481.49 respectively for machete. The tissues show qualitative accumulation and were quantitatively analysed by gas liquid chromatography (GLC).

  19. Effect of crop competition and herbicides on yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus L. ) and root absorption, translocation, and metabolism of alachlor and metolachlor by yellow nutsedge

    SciTech Connect

    Chamblee, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Field studies were conducted in 1980, 1981, and 1982 to compare management programs involving different cultural practices, at-planting herbicides, and postemergence herbicides to reduce yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus L.) populations, in a soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr. Ransom)-corn (Zea mays L. Pioneer 3161 and Pioneer 3358) rotation. In laboratory studies, alachlor and metolachlor toxicity, absorption, translocation, and metabolism were investigated in different sized yellow nutsedge plants. Exposure to herbicides was restricted to plant roots. Plant sizes evaluated were 4 to 6, 10 to 15, and 18 to 22-cm tall at experiment initiation. Concentrations of greater than 0.1 ppm of both alachlor and metolachlor reduced small yellow nutsedge plant size by more than 50%. At concentrations greater than 0.2 ppm increased growth reduction was seen from metolachlor but not from alachlor. Ten to 15-cm plants exposed to 1.6 ppm of alachlor and metolachlor had plant size reductions of 48 and 62%, respectively, after 12 days. There was no difference in root absorption of /sup 14/C alachlor or /sup 14/C metolachlor from nutrient solutions. After 8 days, greater than 40, 58, and 76% of available /sup 14/C was absorbed by small, medium and large plants, respectively. After 4 and 8 days of exposure, small yellow nutsedge plants had translocated 2.6 times as much /sup 14/C metolachlor to plant shoots than /sup 14/C alachlor. Larger plants translocated the herbicides equally. Small sized plants treated with /sup 14/C metolachlor retained greater than 23% of the parent material.

  20. Hydrothermal Synthesis of FeS2 as a High-Efficiency Fenton Reagent to Degrade Alachlor via Superoxide-Mediated Fe(II)/Fe(III) Cycle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Yueyao; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2015-12-30

    In this study, we demonstrate that hydrothermally synthesized FeS2 (syn-FeS2) is highly efficient at catalyzing the H2O2 decomposition for alachlor degradation at a wide range of initial pH (3.2-9.2). The alachlor degradation rate of syn-FeS2 heterogeneous Fenton system was almost 55 times that of its commercial pyrite (com-FeS2) counterpart at an initial pH of 6.2. Experimental results revealed that the alachlor oxidation enhancement in the syn-FeS2 Fenton system was attributed to the molecular oxygen activation induced by more surface-bound ferrous ions on syn-FeS2. The molecular oxygen activation process could generate superoxide anions to accelerate the Fe(II)/Fe(III) cycle on the syn-FeS2 surface, which favored the H2O2 decomposition to generate more hydroxyl radicals for the alachlor oxidation. It was found that the hydroxyl radicals generation rate constant of syn-FeS2 Fenton system was 71 times that of its com-FeS2 counterpart, and even 1-3 orders of magnitude larger than those of commonly used Fe-bearing heterogeneous catalysts. We detected the alachlor degradation intermediates with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to propose tentatively a possible alachlor degradation pathway. These interesting findings could provide some new insights on the molecular oxygen activation induced by FeS2 minerals and the subsequent heterogeneous Fenton degradation of organic pollutants in the environment. PMID:26646468

  1. Influence of rhizosphere microbial ecophysiological parameters from different plant species on butachlor degradation in a riparian soil.

    PubMed

    Yang, Changming; Wang, Mengmeng; Li, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    Biogeochemical processes in riparian zones regulate contaminant movement to receiving waters and often mitigate the impact of upland sources of contaminants on water quality. However, little research has been reported on the microbial process and degradation potential of herbicide in a riparian soil. Field sampling and incubation experiments were conducted to investigate differences in microbial parameters and butachlor degradation in the riparian soil from four plant communities in Chongming Island, China. The results suggested that the rhizosphere soil had significantly higher total organic C and water-soluble organic C relative to the nonrhizosphere soil. Differences in rhizosphere microbial community size and physiological parameters among vegetation types were significant. The rhizosphere soil from the mixed community of Phragmites australis and Acorus calamus had the highest microbial biomass and biochemical activity, followed by A. calamus, P. australis and Zizania aquatica. Microbial ATP, dehydrogenase activity (DHA), and basal soil respiration (BSR) in the rhizosphere of the mixed community of P. australis and A. calamus were 58, 72, and 62% higher, respectively, than in the pure P. australis community. Compared with the rhizosphere soil of the pure plant communities, the mixed community of P. australis and A. calamus displayed a significantly greater degradation rate of butachlor in the rhizosphere soil. Residual butachlor concentrations in rhizosphere soil of the mixed community of P. australis and A. calamus and were 48, 63, and 68% lower than three pure plant communities, respectively. Butachlor degradation rates were positively correlated to microbial ATP, DHA, and BSR, indicating that these microbial parameters may be useful in assessing butachlor degradation potential in the riparian soil.

  2. Relation of Landscape Position and Irrigation to Concentrations of Alachlor, Atrazine, and Selected Degradates in Regolith in Northeastern Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verstraeten, Ingrid M.; Lewis, D.T.; McCallister, D.L.; Parkhurst, A.; Thurman, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    Concentrations of alachlor, its ethanesulfonic acid degradate, atrazine and its degradates, deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine, in the upper regolith and associated shallow aquifers were determined in relation to landscape position (floodplains, terraces, and uplands) and irrigation (nonirrigated and irrigated corn cropland) in 1992. Irrigated and nonirrigated sites were located on each landscape position. Samples were collected from three depths. Canonical discriminant and multivariate analyses were used to interpret data. Herbicides and their degradation products tended to be present in soils with high percent organic matter, low pH, and low sand content. Atrazine was present more frequently on the floodplain at all depths than the other compounds. Atrazine (maximum 17.5 ??g/kg) and ethanesulfonic acid (maximum 10 ??g/kg) were associated with landscape position, but not with irrigation. Alachlor (maximum 24 ??g/kg), deethylatrazine (maximum 1.5 ??g/kg), and deisopropylatrazine (maximum 3.5 ??g/kg) were not significantly associated with either landscape position or irrigation. Ground-water analytical results suggested that concentrations of these herbicides and degradates in ground water did not differ among landscape position or between irrigated and nonirrigated corn cropland.

  3. Determination of alachlor and its metabolite 2,6-diethylaniline in microbial culture medium using online microdialysis enriched-sampling coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Zen; Yan, Cheing-Tong; Kumar, Ponnusamy Vinoth; Huang, Jenn-Wen; Jen, Jen-Fon

    2011-08-10

    In this study, a simple and novel microdialysis sampling technique incorporating hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME) coupled online to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for the one-step sample pretreatment and direct determination of alachlor (2-chloro-2',6'-diethyl-N -(methoxymethyl)acetanilide) and its metabolite 2,6-diethylaniline (2,6-DEA) in microbial culture medium has been developed. A reversed-phase C-18 column was utilized to separate alachlor and 2,6-DEA from other species using an acetonitrile/water mixture (1:1) containing 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution at pH 7.0 as the mobile phase. Detection was carried out with a UV detector operated at 210 nm. Parameters that influenced the enrichment efficiency of online HF-LPME sampling, including the length of the hollow fiber, the perfusion solvent and its flow rate, the pH, and the salt added in sample solution, as well as chromatographic conditions were thoroughly optimized. Under optimal conditions, excellent enrichment efficiency was achieved by the microdialysis of a sample solution (pH 7.0) using hexane as perfusate at the flow rate of 4 μL/min. Detection limits were 72 and 14 ng/mL for alachlor and 2,6-DEA, respectively. The enrichment factors were 403 and 386 (RSD < 5%) for alachlor and 2,6-DEA, respectively, when extraction was performed by using a 40 cm regenerated cellulose hollow fiber and hexane as perfusion solvent at the flow rate of 0.1 μL/min. The proposed method provides a sensitive, flexible, fast, and eco-friendly procedure to enrich and determine alachlor and its metabolite (2,6-DEA) in microbial culture medium. PMID:21707080

  4. GC-MS(n) and LC-MS/MS couplings for the identification of degradation products resulting from the ozonation treatment of Acetochlor.

    PubMed

    Bouchonnet, Stéphane; Bourcier, Sophie; Souissi, Yasmine; Genty, Christophe; Sablier, Michel; Roche, Pascal; Boireau, Véronique; Ingrand, Valérie

    2012-04-01

    The degradation of the chloracetamide herbicide acetochlor has been studied under simulated ozonation treatment plant conditions. The degradation of acetochlor included the formation of several degradation products that were identified using GC/ion-trap mass spectrometry with EI and CI and HPLC/electrospray-QqTOF mass spectrometry. Thirteen ozonation products of acetochlor have been identified. Ozonation of the deuterated herbicide combined to MS(n) and high-resolution mass measurement allowed effective characterization of the degradation products. At the exception of one of them, the product B (2-chloro-2', ethyl-6', methyl-acetanilide), none of the identified degradation products has been already reported in the literature. Post-ozonation kinetics studies revealed that the concentrations of most degradation products evolved noticeably with time, particularly during the first hours following the ozonation treatment. This raises concerns about the fate of degradation products in the effluents of treatment plants and suggests the need for a better control on these products if their toxicity was demonstrated. PMID:22689619

  5. Novel Three-Component Rieske Non-Heme Iron Oxygenase System Catalyzing the N-Dealkylation of Chloroacetanilide Herbicides in Sphingomonads DC-6 and DC-2

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qing; Wang, Cheng-Hong; Deng, Shi-Kai; Wu, Ya-Dong; Li, Yi; Yao, Li; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Yan, Xin; Li, Shun-Peng

    2014-01-01

    Sphingomonads DC-6 and DC-2 degrade the chloroacetanilide herbicides alachlor, acetochlor, and butachlor via N-dealkylation. In this study, we report a three-component Rieske non-heme iron oxygenase (RHO) system catalyzing the N-dealkylation of these herbicides. The oxygenase component gene cndA is located in a transposable element that is highly conserved in the two strains. CndA shares 24 to 42% amino acid sequence identities with the oxygenase components of some RHOs that catalyze N- or O-demethylation. Two putative [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin genes and one glutathione reductase (GR)-type reductase gene were retrieved from the genome of each strain. These genes were not located in the immediate vicinity of cndA. The four ferredoxins share 64 to 72% amino acid sequence identities to the ferredoxin component of dicamba O-demethylase (DMO), and the two reductases share 62 to 65% amino acid sequence identities to the reductase component of DMO. cndA, the four ferredoxin genes, and the two reductases genes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant proteins were purified using Ni-affinity chromatography. The individual components or the components in pairs displayed no activity; the enzyme mixture showed N-dealkylase activities toward alachlor, acetochlor, and butachlor only when CndA-His6 was combined with one of the four ferredoxins and one of the two reductases, suggesting that the enzyme consists of three components, a homo-oligomer oxygenase, a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin, and a GR-type reductase, and CndA has a low specificity for the electron transport component (ETC). The N-dealkylase utilizes NADH, but not NADPH, as the electron donor. PMID:24928877

  6. Effects of the agrochemicals butachlor, pretilachlor and isoprothiolane on rat liver xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, M; Iwata, H; Kazusaka, A; Hatakeyama, S; Fujita, S

    1998-11-01

    1. The herbicides butachlor (2-chloro-2',6',diethyl-N-[buthoxymethyl] acetanilide) and pretilachlor (2-chloro-2',6'-diethyl-N-[2-propoxyethyl] acetanilide) are widely used in Asia, South America, Europe and Africa. Isoprothiolane (diisopropyl-1,3-dithiolan-2-ylidenemalonate) is used as a fungicide and an insecticide in rice paddies. We administered these agrochemicals to the male rat and examined their effects on cytochrome P450 (P450), glutathione S-transferase (GST), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UDPGT), and NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1)-related metabolism in the liver. 2. Administration of isoprothiolane, butachlor or pretilachlor to rat induced hepatic P4502B subfamily-dependent enzyme activities (pentoxyresorufin O-depentylation and testosterone 16 beta-hydroxylation) up to 271-413% of control, which coincided with the increase in expression levels of the P4502B apoprotein. 3. Activities of GST toward 1-chloro-2,4-nitrobenzene and 3,4-dichloronitrobenzene were slightly induced (127-133% of control) in the liver of the rat treated with these pesticides. On the other hand, marked elevations of UDPGT activities toward p-nitrophenol (164-281% of control) were observed. NQO1-related metabolism (menadione reductase activity) was also induced (123-176% of control) in the liver of rat treated with these agrochemicals. 4. These results indicate that some of the agrochemicals currently in use are capable of inducing phase I and II xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme activities in an isozyme selective manner. The induction of these activities may disrupt normal physiologic functions related to these enzymes in exposed animals.

  7. Effects of (Anti) Androgenic Endocrine Disruptors (DEHP and Butachlor) on Immunoglobulin M (IgM) and Leukocytes Counts of Male Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Ahmadivand, Sohrab; Farahmand, Hamid; Mirvaghefi, Alireza; Eagderi, Soheil; Zargar, Ashkan

    2015-06-01

    The effect of two anti-androgenic endocrine disrupting compounds, i.e. the plasticizer di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and herbicide butachlor, were evaluated for their effects on immunoglobulin M (IgM) and leukocytes in male rainbow trout. Also, plasma testosterone (T) concentration was measured to confirm their anti-androgenic effects. In the first experiment, trout were treated with 50 mg/kg (body weight) DEHP intraperitoneally, and in the second one, fish were exposed to 0.39 mg/L butachlor for 10 days. The results showed that T concentrations and white blood cells were significantly lower in fish exposed to either DEHP or butachlor compared to control fish (p < 0.05). Fish showed significantly elevated neutrophil levels and decreased lymphocyte levels in the butachlor (p < 0.05); however, no significant difference was observed in lymphocyte and neutrophils values in the DEHP treatment (p > 0.05). In addition, no significant differences were found in IgM, eosinophil and monocyte parameters in either DEHP or butachlor treatments (p > 0.05). These results confirmed that leukocytes counts can be considered as a novel marker of immunotoxicity triggered by (anti) androgenic endocrine disruptors.

  8. Effects of (Anti) Androgenic Endocrine Disruptors (DEHP and Butachlor) on Immunoglobulin M (IgM) and Leukocytes Counts of Male Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Ahmadivand, Sohrab; Farahmand, Hamid; Mirvaghefi, Alireza; Eagderi, Soheil; Zargar, Ashkan

    2015-06-01

    The effect of two anti-androgenic endocrine disrupting compounds, i.e. the plasticizer di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and herbicide butachlor, were evaluated for their effects on immunoglobulin M (IgM) and leukocytes in male rainbow trout. Also, plasma testosterone (T) concentration was measured to confirm their anti-androgenic effects. In the first experiment, trout were treated with 50 mg/kg (body weight) DEHP intraperitoneally, and in the second one, fish were exposed to 0.39 mg/L butachlor for 10 days. The results showed that T concentrations and white blood cells were significantly lower in fish exposed to either DEHP or butachlor compared to control fish (p < 0.05). Fish showed significantly elevated neutrophil levels and decreased lymphocyte levels in the butachlor (p < 0.05); however, no significant difference was observed in lymphocyte and neutrophils values in the DEHP treatment (p > 0.05). In addition, no significant differences were found in IgM, eosinophil and monocyte parameters in either DEHP or butachlor treatments (p > 0.05). These results confirmed that leukocytes counts can be considered as a novel marker of immunotoxicity triggered by (anti) androgenic endocrine disruptors. PMID:25708297

  9. Behavior of butachlor and pyrazosulfuron-ethyl in paddy water using micro paddy lysimeters under different temperature conditions in spring and summer.

    PubMed

    Ok, Junghun; Doan, Nguyen Hai; Watanabe, Hirozumi; Thuyet, Dang Quoc; Boulange, Julien

    2012-08-01

    The behavior of butachlor and pyrazosulfuron-ethyl in paddy water was investigated using micro paddy lysimeters with prescribed hydrological conditions under ambient temperature in spring and summer for simulating two rice crop seasons. Although they were not significantly different, the dissipation of both herbicides in paddy water in the summer experiment was faster than in the spring experiment. The half-lives (DT(50)) in paddy water for spring and summer experiments were 3.2 and 2.5 days for butachlor, and 3.1 and 1.6 days for pyrazosulfuron-ethyl, respectively.

  10. Behavior of butachlor and pyrazosulfuron-ethyl in paddy water using micro paddy lysimeters under different temperature conditions in spring and summer.

    PubMed

    Ok, Junghun; Doan, Nguyen Hai; Watanabe, Hirozumi; Thuyet, Dang Quoc; Boulange, Julien

    2012-08-01

    The behavior of butachlor and pyrazosulfuron-ethyl in paddy water was investigated using micro paddy lysimeters with prescribed hydrological conditions under ambient temperature in spring and summer for simulating two rice crop seasons. Although they were not significantly different, the dissipation of both herbicides in paddy water in the summer experiment was faster than in the spring experiment. The half-lives (DT(50)) in paddy water for spring and summer experiments were 3.2 and 2.5 days for butachlor, and 3.1 and 1.6 days for pyrazosulfuron-ethyl, respectively. PMID:22696099

  11. Runoff and leaching of atrazine and alachlor on a sandy soil as affected by application in sprinkler irrigation.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, A R; Wauchope, R D; Truman, C C; Dowler, C C

    1999-05-01

    Rainfall simulation was used with small packed boxes of soil to compare runoff of herbicides applied by conventional spray and injection into sprinkler-irrigation (chemigation), under severe rainfall conditions. It was hypothesized that the larger water volumes used in chemigation would leach some of the chemicals out of the soil surface rainfall interaction zone, and thus reduce the amounts of herbicides available for runoff. A 47-mm rain falling in a 2-hour event 24 hours after application of alachlor (2-chloro-N-(2,6-diethylphenyl)-N-(methoxymethyl)-acetamide) and atrazine (6-chloro-N-ethyl-N'-(1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2, 4-diamine) was simulated. The design of the boxes allowed a measurement of pesticide concentrations in splash water throughout the rainfall event. Initial atrazine concentrations exceeding its' solubility were observed. When the herbicides were applied in 64,000 L/ha of water (simulating chemigation in 6.4 mm irrigation water) to the surface of a Tifton loamy sand, subsequent herbicide losses in runoff water were decreased by 90% for atrazine and 91% for alachlor, as compared to losses from applications in typical carrier water volumes of 187 L/ha. However, this difference was not due to an herbicide leaching effect but to a 96% decrease in the amount of runoff from the chemigated plots. Only 0.3 mm of runoff occurred from the chemigated boxes while 7.4 mm runoff occurred from the conventionally-treated boxes, even though antecedent moisture was higher in the former. Two possible explanations for this unexpected result are (a) increased aggregate stability in the more moist condition, leading to less surface sealing during subsequent rainfall, or (b) a hydrophobic effect in the drier boxes. In the majority of these pans herbicide loss was much less in runoff than in leachate water. Thus, in this soil, application of these herbicides by chemigation would decrease their potential for pollution only in situations where runoff is a greater

  12. Runoff and leaching of atrazine and alachlor on a sandy soil as affected by application in sprinkler irrigation.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, A R; Wauchope, R D; Truman, C C; Dowler, C C

    1999-05-01

    Rainfall simulation was used with small packed boxes of soil to compare runoff of herbicides applied by conventional spray and injection into sprinkler-irrigation (chemigation), under severe rainfall conditions. It was hypothesized that the larger water volumes used in chemigation would leach some of the chemicals out of the soil surface rainfall interaction zone, and thus reduce the amounts of herbicides available for runoff. A 47-mm rain falling in a 2-hour event 24 hours after application of alachlor (2-chloro-N-(2,6-diethylphenyl)-N-(methoxymethyl)-acetamide) and atrazine (6-chloro-N-ethyl-N'-(1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2, 4-diamine) was simulated. The design of the boxes allowed a measurement of pesticide concentrations in splash water throughout the rainfall event. Initial atrazine concentrations exceeding its' solubility were observed. When the herbicides were applied in 64,000 L/ha of water (simulating chemigation in 6.4 mm irrigation water) to the surface of a Tifton loamy sand, subsequent herbicide losses in runoff water were decreased by 90% for atrazine and 91% for alachlor, as compared to losses from applications in typical carrier water volumes of 187 L/ha. However, this difference was not due to an herbicide leaching effect but to a 96% decrease in the amount of runoff from the chemigated plots. Only 0.3 mm of runoff occurred from the chemigated boxes while 7.4 mm runoff occurred from the conventionally-treated boxes, even though antecedent moisture was higher in the former. Two possible explanations for this unexpected result are (a) increased aggregate stability in the more moist condition, leading to less surface sealing during subsequent rainfall, or (b) a hydrophobic effect in the drier boxes. In the majority of these pans herbicide loss was much less in runoff than in leachate water. Thus, in this soil, application of these herbicides by chemigation would decrease their potential for pollution only in situations where runoff is a greater

  13. Whole Genome Sequence Analysis of an Alachlor and Endosulfan Degrading Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 Isolated from Ochlockonee River, Florida.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Ashish; Chauhan, Ashvini; Ewida, Ayman Y I; Stothard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We recently isolated Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 from Ochlockonee River, Florida and demonstrated potent biodegradative activity against two commonly used pesticides- alachlor [(2-chloro-2`,6`-diethylphenyl-N (methoxymethyl)acetanilide)] and endosulfan [(6,7,8,9,10,10-hexachloro-1,5,5a,6,9,9a-hexahydro-6,9methano-2,3,4-benzo(e)di-oxathiepin-3-oxide], respectively. To further identify the repertoire of metabolic functions possessed by strain 2385, a draft genome sequence was obtained, assembled, annotated and analyzed. The genome sequence of Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 consisted of 1,460,461,440 bases which assembled into 175 contigs with an N50 contig length of 50,109 bases and a coverage of 600x. The genome size of this strain was estimated at 2,431,226 base pairs with a G+C content of 72.8 and a total number of 2,268 putative genes. RAST annotated a total of 340 subsystems in the genome of strain 2385 along with the presence of 2,177 coding sequences. A genome wide survey indicated that that strain 2385 harbors a plethora of genes to degrade other pollutants including caprolactam, PAHs (such as naphthalene), styrene, toluene and several chloroaromatic compounds.

  14. Whole Genome Sequence Analysis of an Alachlor and Endosulfan Degrading Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 Isolated from Ochlockonee River, Florida.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Ashish; Chauhan, Ashvini; Ewida, Ayman Y I; Stothard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We recently isolated Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 from Ochlockonee River, Florida and demonstrated potent biodegradative activity against two commonly used pesticides- alachlor [(2-chloro-2`,6`-diethylphenyl-N (methoxymethyl)acetanilide)] and endosulfan [(6,7,8,9,10,10-hexachloro-1,5,5a,6,9,9a-hexahydro-6,9methano-2,3,4-benzo(e)di-oxathiepin-3-oxide], respectively. To further identify the repertoire of metabolic functions possessed by strain 2385, a draft genome sequence was obtained, assembled, annotated and analyzed. The genome sequence of Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 consisted of 1,460,461,440 bases which assembled into 175 contigs with an N50 contig length of 50,109 bases and a coverage of 600x. The genome size of this strain was estimated at 2,431,226 base pairs with a G+C content of 72.8 and a total number of 2,268 putative genes. RAST annotated a total of 340 subsystems in the genome of strain 2385 along with the presence of 2,177 coding sequences. A genome wide survey indicated that that strain 2385 harbors a plethora of genes to degrade other pollutants including caprolactam, PAHs (such as naphthalene), styrene, toluene and several chloroaromatic compounds. PMID:27672405

  15. Whole Genome Sequence Analysis of an Alachlor and Endosulfan Degrading Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 Isolated from Ochlockonee River, Florida

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Ashish; Chauhan, Ashvini; Ewida, Ayman Y.I.; Stothard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We recently isolated Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 from Ochlockonee River, Florida and demonstrated potent biodegradative activity against two commonly used pesticides- alachlor [(2-chloro-2`,6`-diethylphenyl-N (methoxymethyl)acetanilide)] and endosulfan [(6,7,8,9,10,10-hexachloro-1,5,5a,6,9,9a-hexahydro-6,9methano-2,3,4-benzo(e)di-oxathiepin-3-oxide], respectively. To further identify the repertoire of metabolic functions possessed by strain 2385, a draft genome sequence was obtained, assembled, annotated and analyzed. The genome sequence of Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 consisted of 1,460,461,440 bases which assembled into 175 contigs with an N50 contig length of 50,109 bases and a coverage of 600x. The genome size of this strain was estimated at 2,431,226 base pairs with a G+C content of 72.8 and a total number of 2,268 putative genes. RAST annotated a total of 340 subsystems in the genome of strain 2385 along with the presence of 2,177 coding sequences. A genome wide survey indicated that that strain 2385 harbors a plethora of genes to degrade other pollutants including caprolactam, PAHs (such as naphthalene), styrene, toluene and several chloroaromatic compounds.

  16. Whole Genome Sequence Analysis of an Alachlor and Endosulfan Degrading Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 Isolated from Ochlockonee River, Florida

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Ashish; Chauhan, Ashvini; Ewida, Ayman Y.I.; Stothard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We recently isolated Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 from Ochlockonee River, Florida and demonstrated potent biodegradative activity against two commonly used pesticides- alachlor [(2-chloro-2`,6`-diethylphenyl-N (methoxymethyl)acetanilide)] and endosulfan [(6,7,8,9,10,10-hexachloro-1,5,5a,6,9,9a-hexahydro-6,9methano-2,3,4-benzo(e)di-oxathiepin-3-oxide], respectively. To further identify the repertoire of metabolic functions possessed by strain 2385, a draft genome sequence was obtained, assembled, annotated and analyzed. The genome sequence of Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 consisted of 1,460,461,440 bases which assembled into 175 contigs with an N50 contig length of 50,109 bases and a coverage of 600x. The genome size of this strain was estimated at 2,431,226 base pairs with a G+C content of 72.8 and a total number of 2,268 putative genes. RAST annotated a total of 340 subsystems in the genome of strain 2385 along with the presence of 2,177 coding sequences. A genome wide survey indicated that that strain 2385 harbors a plethora of genes to degrade other pollutants including caprolactam, PAHs (such as naphthalene), styrene, toluene and several chloroaromatic compounds. PMID:27672405

  17. Tea bag filter paper as a novel protective membrane for micro-solid phase extraction of butachlor in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Pelden, Tshering; Thammaknet, Chongdee; Thavarungkul, Panote; Kanatharana, Proespichaya

    2014-01-01

    An innovative, cost-effective, simple, and environmental friendly tea bag filter paper protected micro-solid phase extraction (μ-SPE) technique was developed for the first time with the aim to miniaturize and minimize the use of organic solvents for the extraction and determination of butachlor in aqueous samples. The μ-SPE device was produced by packing 3.0 mg of an easily synthesized new sorbent, hydroxyl-functionalized polypyrrole (OH-PPY), inside a small tea bag filter paper sachet (1.0 cm × 0.5 cm) that served as a protective envelope. Both the extraction and desorption procedures were facilitated by sonication. Due to the high porosity and the fast water absorption of the tea bag filter paper, the analyte could easily diffuse through and enhance the interaction with the sorbent. Under the optimized conditions for the GC-ECD and the μ-SPE, the limit of detection (S/N ≥ 3) was 2.0 μg L(-1) while the limit of quantitation (S/N ≥ 10) was 10.0 μg L(-1). The recoveries of the butachlor spiked at 0.050, 0.10, and 0.50 μg mL(-1) ranged from 77.9 ± 3.0 to 112.5 ± 2.9%. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of butachlor in water samples from paddy cultivation sites. The levels found were from non-detectable to 24.71 ± 0.37 μg L(-1).

  18. Identity and pathogenesis of stomach tumors in Sprague-Dawley rats associated with the dietary administration of butachlor.

    PubMed

    Hard, G C; Iatropoulos, M J; Thake, D C; Wheeler, D; Tatematsu, M; Hagiwara, A; Williams, G M; Wilson, A G

    1995-05-01

    Macroscopic stomach tumors induced in Sprague-Dawley rats during two chronic bioassays with the acetanilide herbicide butachlor at a dietary concentration of 3000 ppm, were evaluated histologically and immunohistochemically in order to determine their identity and pathogenesis. The tumors, which occurred primarily in female rats, were a heterogeneous series, including a few consisting wholly or partly of classic solid or anaplastic epithelium, but with the majority containing diffusely distributed primitive neoplastic cells. The latter had either the general appearance of undifferentiated epithelium or presented a more "mesenchyme-like" pattern where the cells were epithelioid, blastema-like, neuroendocrine-like or sarcoma-like with fascicular disposition. Gastric glandular profiles were also present, usually located near the periphery of the tumors, but in some cases extending into the diffuse tumor tissue. Most of the tumors displayed variable immunohistochemical reactivity for cytokeratin, vimentin and neuron-specific enolase but were negative for muscle-specific actin or desmin except in the stromal tracts. Detailed examination of all available gastric tissue revealed the presence of additional microscopic neoplasms and precursor hyperplastic lesions. All of these were typical gastric neuroendocrine cell lesions (gastric carcinoids) originating in the fundic mucosa but occasionally invading submucosally, and consisting of epithelial cells in organized clusters, rosettes or primitive tubules. The enterochromaffin-like (ECL) nature of these microscopic neoplasms and precursor lesions was substantiated by strong immunohistochemical reactivity for cytokeratin, neuron-specific enolase and chromogranin A, and a negative reaction for vimentin. One microscopic tumor showed a transition from differentiated neuroendocrine type in the fundic mucosa to a dispersed "mesenchyme-like" pattern in the submucosal extension. An additional finding in the butachlor-treated male and

  19. Induction of micronuclei and erythrocyte alterations in the catfish Clarias batrachus by 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and butachlor.

    PubMed

    Ateeq, Bushra; Abul farah, M; Niamat Ali, M; Ahmad, Waseem

    2002-07-25

    The micronucleus test (MNT) in fish erythrocytes has increasingly been used to detect the genotoxic effects of environmental mutagens and its frequency is considered to reflect the genotoxic damage to cells, mainly the chromosomes. Besides, morphologically altered erythrocyte is taken as an index of cytotoxicity. Both parameters were used in the present study by two herbicides, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D, in 25, 50 and 75ppm concentrations) and 2-chloro-2,6-diethyl-N-(butoxymethyl) acetanilide (butachlor, in 1, 2 and 2.5ppm concentrations) for genotoxic and cytotoxic endpoints. The study was carried out by an in vivo method on peripheral erythrocytes of catfish Clarias batrachus using multiple sampling times (48, 72 and 96h). Cytogenetic preparations were made by haematoxylin-eosin staining technique. Pycnotic and granular micronuclei (MN) were consistently observed irrespective of chemical tested. A wide range of altered cells was also observed. Echinocytes accompanied by altered nuclei and vacuoles were prominent feature of 2,4-D, whereas, anisochromasia and anisocytosis of erythrocytes were characteristic of butachlor. Increase in MN as well as altered cells frequencies were significant. A positive dose-response relationship in all exposures and sampling times was observed. Herbicides used were found to be genotoxic as well as cytotoxic in this fish. The suitability of the adopted parameters for the screening of the aquatic genotoxicants is discussed.

  20. Cytogenotoxicity assessment of monocrotophos and butachlor at single and combined chronic exposures in the fish Catla catla (Hamilton).

    PubMed

    Anbumani, S; Mohankumar, Mary N

    2015-04-01

    Cytogenotoxic effects in the form of micronuclei and deformed nucleus, nuclear buds, binucleated cells, vacuolated nucleus, vacuolated cytoplasm, echinocytes, and enucleus induced by two compounds belonging to two different chemical classes of agrochemicals (monocrotophos and butachlor) at sublethal concentrations (0.625, 1.3, and 2.3 ppm and 0.016, 0.032, and 0.064 ppm) in single and combined chronic exposures were studied under laboratory conditions for a period of 35 days in the economically important Indian fish Catla catla. Statistically significant duration-dependent increases in the frequencies of micronucleus (MN) and other cytological anomalies were observed. Compared to single exposures, a twofold increase in micronuclei frequency was noted at combined exposures indicating the synergistic phenomenon. Binucleated and enucleated cells appeared only in fishes exposed to sublethal concentrations of butachlor. The present study is the first of its kind in exploring a significant positive correlation between micronuclei and other nuclear anomalies suggesting them as new possible biomarkers of genotoxicity after agrochemical exposures. The study highlights the sensitivity of the assay in exploring various predictive biomarkers of genotoxic and cytotoxic events and also elicits the synergistic effects of agrochemicals in apparently healthy fishes. C. catla can be considered as a suitable aquatic biomonitoring sentinel species of contaminated water bodies.

  1. Leaching of Br-, metolachlor, alachlor, atrazine, deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine in clayey vadoze zone: a field scale experiment in north-east Greece.

    PubMed

    Vryzas, Zisis; Papadakis, Emmanuel Nikolaos; Papadopoulou-Mourkidou, E

    2012-04-15

    An extensive four-year research program has been carried out to explore and acquire knowledge about the fundamental agricultural practices and processes affecting the mobility and bioavailability of pesticides in soils under semi-arid Mediterranean conditions. Pesticide leaching was studied under field conditions at five different depths using suction cups. Monitoring of metolachlor, alachlor, atrazine, deethylatrazine (DEA), deisopropylatrazine (DIA), and bromide ions in soil water, as well as dye patterns made apparent the significant role of preferential flow to the mobility of the studied compounds. Irrespective to their adsorption capacities and degradation rates, atrazine, metolachlor and bromide ions were simultaneously detected to 160 cm depth. Following 40 mm irrigation, just after their application, both alachlor and atrazine were leached to 160 cm depth within 18 h, giving maximum concentrations of 211 and 199 μg L(-1), respectively. Metolachlor was also detected in all depth when its application was followed by a rainfall event (50 mm) two weeks after its application. The greatest concentrations of atrazine, alachlor and metolachlor in soil water were 1795, 1166 and 845 μg L(-1), respectively. The greatest concentrations of atrazine's degradation products (both DEA and DIA) appeared later in the season compared to the parent compound. Metolachlor exhibited the greatest persistence with concentrations up to 10 μg L(-1) appearing in soil water 18 months after its application. Brilliant blue application followed by 40 mm irrigation clearly depict multi-branching network of preferential flow paths allowing the fast flow of the dye down to 150 cm within 24 h. This network was created by soil cracks caused by shrinking of dry soils, earthworms and plant roots. Chromatographic flow of the stained soil solution was evident only in the upper 10-15 cm of soil. PMID:22325931

  2. Determination of Low Concentrations of Acetochlor in Water by Automated Solid-Phase Extraction and Gas Chromatography with Mass-Selective Detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindley, C.E.; Stewart, J.T.; Sandstrom, M.W.

    1996-01-01

    A sensitive and reliable gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) method for determining acetochlor in environmental water samples was developed. The method involves automated extraction of the herbicide from a filtered 1 L water sample through a C18 solid-phase extraction column, elution from the column with hexane-isopropyl alcohol (3 + 1), and concentration of the extract with nitrogen gas. The herbicide is quantitated by capillary/column GC/MS with selected-ion monitoring of 3 characteristic ions. The single-operator method detection limit for reagent water samples is 0.0015 ??g/L. Mean recoveries ranged from about 92 to 115% for 3 water matrixes fortified at 0.05 and 0.5 ??g/L. Average single-operator precision, over the course of 1 week, was better than 5%.

  3. A study of the mechanism of butachlor-associated gastric neoplasms in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Thake, D C; Iatropoulos, M J; Hard, G C; Hotz, K J; Wang, C X; Williams, G M; Wilson, A G

    1995-05-01

    Long term administration of butachlor to Sprague-Dawley rats in a previous bioassay, resulted in the induction of gastric neoplasms which occurred only in the highest dose group (3000 ppm in the diet), primarily in females and specifically in the fundic region. The tumors were a composite of highly undifferentiated enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cells and mucus producing cells with morphologic characteristics unlike those previously described in the rat stomach. Mucosal atrophy of marked intensity was a consistent feature of the gastric mucosa in animals from the highest dose group. An additional long term study was conducted in female Sprague-Dawley rats at dietary levels of 0, 100, 1000 and 3000 ppm to explore the mechanism(s) involved in the formation of these neoplasms. Cell proliferation was evaluated in both fundic and pyloric regions of the stomachs of rats at multiple time periods from 14 days to 26 months. Mucosal thickness was determined in the fundic region at the same time intervals as were used for cell proliferation studies. Gastric pH and gastric acid production were measured after approximately 21 months of exposure. Serum gastrin levels were analyzed at 14, 60, and 120 days and at 6, 18 and 20 months. Cholecystokinin (CCK)/gastrin receptor binding studies were conducted on samples of four tumors and pooled fundic mucosa from five animals in the control group. Cell proliferation was increased in both the neck and base regions of the fundic mucosa at nearly all time points measured from 14 days to 26 months. The magnitude of the changes in the base region were substantially greater than those in the neck region. Fundic mucosal thickness was decreased beginning at the 30-day time point and continued at all intervals, being less than one half that of controls at 20 and 26 months. Gastric pH in rats from the highest dose was elevated to nearly twice control levels at 21 months. Gastric acid secretion was dramatically decreased in animals from the 3000 ppm

  4. Combined toxicity of butachlor, atrazine and λ-cyhalothrin on the earthworm Eisenia fetida by combination index (CI)-isobologram method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Wang, Yanhua; Zhao, Xueping; Qian, Yongzhong; Wang, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    Pesticides in the environment do not appear singly and usually occur as complex mixtures and their combined effect may exhibit toxicity to organisms. The individual and combined toxicities of two herbicides, atrazine and butachlor and an insecticide λ-cyhalothrin have been examined to the earthworm Eisenia fetida, as a non-target terrestrial organism, in artificial soil and filter paper tests. The order of toxicity for the individual pesticides was ranked as atrazine>λ-cyhalothrin>butachlor in both tests. We applied the combination index (CI)-isobologram method which is widely used to study chemical interactions to determine the nature of toxicological interactions of the pesticides and it allows computerized quantitation of synergism, additive effect and antagonism. For most cases in artificial soil test, synergism was observed in majority of the mixtures except for the combination of butachlor plus λ-cyhalothrin. This particular combination displayed opposite interaction in filter paper test. The CI method was compared with the classical models of Concentration Addition (CA) and Independent Action (IA) and we found that CI method could accurately predict the combined toxicity and can serve as a useful tool in ecotoxicological risk assessment.

  5. Detection of DNA damage by alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis in 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic-acid- and butachlor-exposed erythrocytes of Clarias batrachus.

    PubMed

    Ateeq, Bushra; Abul Farah, M; Ahmad, Waseem

    2005-11-01

    The alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis, also known as comet assay, is a rapid, simple and sensitive technique for measuring DNA strand breaks in individual cells. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the genotoxic potential of two widely used herbicides; 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2-chloro-2,6-diethyl-N-(butoxymethyl) acetanilide (butachlor) in erythrocytes of freshwater catfish, Clarias batrachus. Fish were exposed by medium treatment with three sub-lethal concentrations of 2,4-D (25, 50, and 75ppm) and butachlor (1, 2, and 2.5ppm) and alkaline comet assay was performed on nucleated erythrocytes after 48, 72, and 96h. The amount of DNA damage in cells was estimated from comet tail length as the extent of migration of the genetic material. A significant increase in comet tail length indicating DNA damage was observed at all concentrations of both the herbicides compared with control (P<0.05). The mean comet tail length showed a concentration-related and time-dependent increase as the maximum tail length recorded at highest concentration and longer duration of 2,4-D (9.59microm) and butachlor (9.28microm). This study confirmed that the comet assay applied on the fish erythrocyte is a useful tool in determining potential genotoxicity of water pollutants and might be appropriate as a part of a monitoring program.

  6. A High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Based Screening Method for the Analysis of Atrazine, Alachlor, and Ten of Their Transformation Products

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroyer, B.R.; Capel, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    A high-performance liquid Chromatography (HPLC) method is presented for the for the fast, quantitative analysis of the target analytes in water and in low organic-carbon, sandy soils that are known to be contaminated with the parent herbicides. Speed and ease of sample preparation was prioritized above minimizing detection limits. Soil samples were extracted using 80:20 methanol:water (volume:volume). Water samples (50 ??L) were injected directly into the HPLC without prior preparation. Method quantification limits for soil samples (10 g dry weight) and water samples ranged from 20 to 110 ng/g and from 20 to 110 ??g/L for atrazine and its transformation products and from 80 to 320 ng/g and from 80 to 320 ??g/L for alachlor and its transformation products, respectively.

  7. Butachlor impact on protein, free amino acid and glutamine contents, and on activity levels of aminotransferases, glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase in the fresh water snail, Pila globosa (Swainson).

    PubMed

    Rajyalakshmi, T; Srinivas, T; Swamy, K V; Mohan, P M

    1996-08-01

    Biochemical changes followed in the freshwater snail Pila globosa (Swainson) during exposure to sublethal concentrations of the herbicide butachlor (26.6 ppm) in the ambient medium, at 3,6,12,24 and 48 h intervals, were marked by a significant decrease in total and soluble proteins, and an increase in free amino acids in foot and hepatopancreas up to 12 h before gradually recovering. Aminotransferase activities and glutamine content decreased during the early periods of exposure, while glutamate dehydrogenase activity increased. After an initial elevation, glutamate synthetase activity decreased at later intervals. Maximum effect of butachlor on the enzymes was seen after 12 h exposure. The extent of increase or decrease in different parameters examined varied between the two tissues studied. These changes are discussed in relation to the toxic stress of butachlor.

  8. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway play distinct role in acetochlor-mediated toxicity and intrinsic apoptosis in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Zerin, Tamanna; Song, Ho-Yeon; Kim, Yong-Sik

    2015-02-01

    Acetochlor (ACETO), a member of the chloroacetanilide family of herbicides, is widely used globally and is very frequently detected in watersheds of agricultural lands and fresh water streams. The human health consequences of environmental exposure to ACETO are unknown. This study was designed to elucidate the effect and molecular mechanisms of ACETO on human alveolar A549 cells. Established assays of cell viability and cytotoxicity were performed to detect the potential effects of ACETO on A549 cells. ACETO generated reactive oxygen species, which may have been crucial to apoptosis-mediated cytotoxicity. ACETO-treatment showed a concentration dependent up-regulation of pro-apoptotic proteins including Bax, Bak, BID and Bad, but a differential level of expression of anti-apoptotic proteins were observed, leading to the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to the cytoplasm as well as activation of caspase-3, and cleavage of caspase-9 and PARP. ACETO also induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Inhibition of the expression of ERK by PD98059 partially reversed ACETO-induced cytotoxicity, apoptosis and the expression of caspase-3, -9 and PARP in A549 cells. Comparative evaluation of the results indicates that the principal mechanism underlying ACETO-mediated cytotoxicity is likely to be through ERK-mediated intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. PMID:25291404

  9. in-silico analysis suggests alterations in the function of XisA protein as a possible mechanism of butachlor toxicity in the nitrogen fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shilpi; Singh, Prem Pal

    2013-01-01

    Butachlor, a commonly used herbicide adversely affects the nitrogen fixing capability of Anabaena, an acclaimed nitrogen fixer in the Indian paddy fields. The nitrogen fixation in Anabaena is triggered by the excision of nifD element by xisA gene leading to rearrangement of nifD forming nifHDK operon in the heterocyst of Anabaena sp. PCC7120. Functional elucidation adjudged through in-silico analysis revealed that xisA belongs to integrase family of tyrosine recombinase. The predicted functional partners with XisA protein that have shown cooccurence with this protein in a network are mainly hypothetical proteins with unknown functions except psaK1 whose exact function in photosystem I is not yet known. The focus of this study was to find out the relation between XisA and butachlor using in-silico approaches. The XisA protein was modeled and its active sites were identified. Docking studies revealed that butachlor binds at the active site of XisA protein hampering its excision ability vis-à-vis nif genes in Anabaena sp. PCC7120. This study reveals that butachlor is not directly involved in hampering the nitrogen fixing ability of Anabaena sp. PCC7120 but by arresting the excision ability of XisA protein necessary for the functioning of nif gene and nitrogen fixation. PMID:23930023

  10. in-silico analysis suggests alterations in the function of XisA protein as a possible mechanism of butachlor toxicity in the nitrogen fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shilpi; Singh, Prem Pal

    2013-01-01

    Butachlor, a commonly used herbicide adversely affects the nitrogen fixing capability of Anabaena, an acclaimed nitrogen fixer in the Indian paddy fields. The nitrogen fixation in Anabaena is triggered by the excision of nifD element by xisA gene leading to rearrangement of nifD forming nifHDK operon in the heterocyst of Anabaena sp. PCC7120. Functional elucidation adjudged through in-silico analysis revealed that xisA belongs to integrase family of tyrosine recombinase. The predicted functional partners with XisA protein that have shown cooccurence with this protein in a network are mainly hypothetical proteins with unknown functions except psaK1 whose exact function in photosystem I is not yet known. The focus of this study was to find out the relation between XisA and butachlor using in-silico approaches. The XisA protein was modeled and its active sites were identified. Docking studies revealed that butachlor binds at the active site of XisA protein hampering its excision ability vis-à-vis nif genes in Anabaena sp. PCC7120. This study reveals that butachlor is not directly involved in hampering the nitrogen fixing ability of Anabaena sp. PCC7120 but by arresting the excision ability of XisA protein necessary for the functioning of nif gene and nitrogen fixation.

  11. in-silico analysis suggests alterations in the function of XisA protein as a possible mechanism of butachlor toxicity in the nitrogen fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shilpi; Singh, Prem Pal

    2013-01-01

    Butachlor, a commonly used herbicide adversely affects the nitrogen fixing capability of Anabaena, an acclaimed nitrogen fixer in the Indian paddy fields. The nitrogen fixation in Anabaena is triggered by the excision of nifD element by xisA gene leading to rearrangement of nifD forming nifHDK operon in the heterocyst of Anabaena sp. PCC7120. Functional elucidation adjudged through in-silico analysis revealed that xisA belongs to integrase family of tyrosine recombinase. The predicted functional partners with XisA protein that have shown cooccurence with this protein in a network are mainly hypothetical proteins with unknown functions except psaK1 whose exact function in photosystem I is not yet known. The focus of this study was to find out the relation between XisA and butachlor using in-silico approaches. The XisA protein was modeled and its active sites were identified. Docking studies revealed that butachlor binds at the active site of XisA protein hampering its excision ability vis-à-vis nif genes in Anabaena sp. PCC7120. This study reveals that butachlor is not directly involved in hampering the nitrogen fixing ability of Anabaena sp. PCC7120 but by arresting the excision ability of XisA protein necessary for the functioning of nif gene and nitrogen fixation. PMID:23930023

  12. Comparison of rat olfactory mucosal responses to carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic chloracetanilides

    PubMed Central

    Genter, M.B.; Warner, B.M.; Medvedovic, M.; Sartor, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Alachlor and butachlor are chloracetanilide herbicides that induce olfactory tumors in rats, whereas propachlor does not. The mechanism by which alachlor induces tumors is distinct from many other nasal carcinogens, in that alachlor induces a gradual de-differentiation of the olfactory mucosa (OM) to a more respiratory-like epithelium, in contrast to other agents that induce cytotoxicity, followed by an aberrant regenerative response. We studied biochemical and genomic effects of these compounds to identify processes that occur in common between alachlor- and butachlor-treated rats. Because we have previously shown that matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) is activated in OM by alachlor, in the present studies we evaluated both MMP2 activation and changes in OM gene expression in response to carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic chloracetanilide treatments. All three chloracetanilides activated MMP2, and > 300 genes were significantly up- or downregulated between control and alachlor-treated rats. The most significantly regulated gene was vomeromodulin, which was dramatically upregulated by alachlor and butachlor treatment (>60-fold), but not by propachlor treatment. Except for similar gene responses in alachlor- and butachlor-treated rats, we did not identify clear-cut differences that would predict OM carcinogenicity in this study. PMID:19425180

  13. Whole genome sequence analysis of an Alachlor and Endosulfan degrading Pseudomonas strain W15Feb9B isolated from Ochlockonee River, Florida.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Ashvini; Pathak, Ashish; Ewida, Ayman Y I; Griffiths, Zabrenna; Stothard, Paul

    2016-06-01

    We recently isolated a Pseudomonas sp. strain W15Feb9B from Ochlockonee River, Florida and demonstrated potent biodegradative activity against two commonly used pesticides - Alachlor [(2-chloro-2',6'-diethylphenyl-N (methoxymethyl)acetanilide)] and Endosulfan [(6,7,8,9,10,10-hexachloro-1,5,5a,6,9,9a-hexahydro-6,9methano-2,3,4-benzo(e)di-oxathiepin-3-oxide], respectively. To further identify the repertoire of metabolic functions possessed by strain W15Feb9B, a draft genome sequence was obtained, assembled, annotated and analyzed. The genome sequence of strain 2385 has been deposited in GenBank under accession number JTKF00000000; BioSample number SAMN03151543. The sequences obtained from strain 2385 assembled into 192 contigs with a genome size of 6,031,588, G + C content of 60.34, and 5512 total number of putative genes. RAST annotated a total of 542 subsystems in the genome of strain W15Feb9B along with the presence of 5360 coding sequences. A genome wide survey of strain W15Feb9B indicated that it has the potential to degrade several other pollutants including atrazine, caprolactam, dioxin, PAHs (such as naphthalene) and several chloroaromatic compounds.

  14. Whole genome sequence analysis of an Alachlor and Endosulfan degrading Pseudomonas strain W15Feb9B isolated from Ochlockonee River, Florida.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Ashvini; Pathak, Ashish; Ewida, Ayman Y I; Griffiths, Zabrenna; Stothard, Paul

    2016-06-01

    We recently isolated a Pseudomonas sp. strain W15Feb9B from Ochlockonee River, Florida and demonstrated potent biodegradative activity against two commonly used pesticides - Alachlor [(2-chloro-2',6'-diethylphenyl-N (methoxymethyl)acetanilide)] and Endosulfan [(6,7,8,9,10,10-hexachloro-1,5,5a,6,9,9a-hexahydro-6,9methano-2,3,4-benzo(e)di-oxathiepin-3-oxide], respectively. To further identify the repertoire of metabolic functions possessed by strain W15Feb9B, a draft genome sequence was obtained, assembled, annotated and analyzed. The genome sequence of strain 2385 has been deposited in GenBank under accession number JTKF00000000; BioSample number SAMN03151543. The sequences obtained from strain 2385 assembled into 192 contigs with a genome size of 6,031,588, G + C content of 60.34, and 5512 total number of putative genes. RAST annotated a total of 542 subsystems in the genome of strain W15Feb9B along with the presence of 5360 coding sequences. A genome wide survey of strain W15Feb9B indicated that it has the potential to degrade several other pollutants including atrazine, caprolactam, dioxin, PAHs (such as naphthalene) and several chloroaromatic compounds. PMID:27330991

  15. Alterations in juvenile diploid and triploid African catfish skin gelatin yield and amino acid composition: Effects of chlorpyrifos and butachlor exposures.

    PubMed

    Karami, Ali; Karbalaei, Samaneh; Zad Bagher, Fariba; Ismail, Amin; Simpson, Stuart L; Courtenay, Simon C

    2016-08-01

    Skin is a major by-product of the fisheries and aquaculture industries and is a valuable source of gelatin. This study examined the effect of triploidization on gelatin yield and proximate composition of the skin of African catfish (Clarias gariepinus). We further investigated the effects of two commonly used pesticides, chlorpyrifos (CPF) and butachlor (BUC), on the skin gelatin yield and amino acid composition in juvenile full-sibling diploid and triploid African catfish. In two separate experiments, diploid and triploid C. gariepinus were exposed for 21 days to graded CPF [mean measured: 10, 16, or 31 μg/L] or BUC concentrations [Mean measured: 22, 44, or 60 μg/L]. No differences in skin gelatin yield, amino acid or proximate compositions were observed between diploid and triploid control groups. None of the pesticide treatments affected the measured parameters in diploid fish. In triploids, however, gelatin yield was affected by CPF treatments while amino acid composition remained unchanged. Butachlor treatments did not alter any of the measured variables in triploid fish. To our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate changes in the skin gelatin yield and amino acid composition in any animal as a response to polyploidization and/or contaminant exposure.

  16. A silica coated paper substrate: development and its application in paper spray mass spectrometry for rapid analysis of pesticides in milk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Zheng, Yajun; Zhang, Xiaoling; Han, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Teng; Zhang, Zhiping

    2015-12-01

    A novel silica coated paper substrate is developed through a facile vacuum filtration method by using the commercially available silica particles as the coating material and corn starch as the adhesive agent. Unlike the commercial silica coated paper (namely grade SG81 paper), the resulting paper substrate was covered by a layer of silica particles on the top side of the paper, and no cellulosic fibers were exposed at its surface. After loading a solution sample on its surface, the coated silica particles allowed the target analytes to remain at the top side rather than penetration through the substrate. Owing to this effect and the special interactions with analytes, the as-prepared silica coated paper demonstrated superior performance in the analysis of different pesticides in milk using paper spray mass spectrometry to the uncoated filter paper and grade SG81 paper. Compared to the other two papers, paper spray analysis using the as-prepared paper improved the estimated lower limit of quantitation of seven pesticides (alachlor, acetochlor, pretilachlor, butachlor, metolachlor, napropamid and benzeneacetamide) in milk by a factor of 2 to 19-fold depending on the pesticide. This study offers a novel paper substrate for paper spray in high sensitivity analysis of target analytes in a complex foodstuff matrix without any pretreatment.

  17. Evidence of apoptotic effects of 2,4-D and butachlor on walking catfish, Clarias batrachus, by transmission electron microscopy and DNA degradation studies.

    PubMed

    Ateeq, Bushra; Farah, M Abul; Ahmad, Waseem

    2006-01-25

    Apoptosis or programmed cell death is characterized morphologically by chromatin condensation, cell shrinkage, fragmentation of the nucleus and cytoplasm, and consequently formation of apoptotic bodies. It has also been best characterized by the cleavage of DNA into nucleosomal size fragments of 180-200 bp or multiples of the same. Contrary to this, under extreme conditions, the cells were found to show adaptive response to apoptosis and unable to regulate their own death; necrosis is therefore predominantly observed. In the present study, we showed induction of apoptosis in Clarias batrachus due to sublethal concentration of 2,4-D and butachlor at multiple exposure time. The first phase of the study involved light microscopy (LM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for ultrastructural abnormalities of the germinal tissues. While, in the second phase of the study, DNA degradation of blood and hepatic tissue was resolved on agarose gel electrophoresis. In histopathological studies, large numbers of stage II oocytes were noted for nuclear blebbing irrespective of the test chemical. Some of the butachlor-exposed oocytes showed vacuolation and electron dense cytoplasm along with thickened nuclear envelope, having close association with the lysosomes on the cytoplasmic side. Some oocytes undergo nuclear blebbing having inner dense core and translucent cytoplasm. Leydig cells were slightly hypertrophied and few appeared pycnotic, a process involving necrotic changes in which the cell nuclei were characterized by rounding up and condensation resulting in hyperchromatic staining or pycnosis. In testicular tissue, spermatogonial nuclei had irregular large clumps of heterochromatin adjoining the nuclear membrane indicating initial stage of apoptotic cell death. Electrophoretic separation resulted in a ladder pattern of blood DNA and smear like pattern of hepatic DNA. These results indicate that the above herbicides are able to induce apoptosis both at molecular as

  18. Induction of wheat and maize glutathione S-transferase by some herbicide safeners and their effect on enzyme activity against butachlor and terbuthylazine.

    PubMed

    Scarponi, Luciano; Quagliarini, Elisa; Del Buono, Daniele

    2006-10-01

    The expression of glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in wheat and maize shoots was investigated in response to treatments with the herbicide safeners benoxacor, cloquintocet-mexyl, fenchlorazole-ethyl, fenclorim, fluxofenim and oxabetrinil. These safeners significantly enhanced the GST activity towards 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as a 'standard' substrate, with the exception of oxabetrinil in maize. The enhancements of GST (CDNB) activity were found to be concomitant with increases in V(max) (the reaction rate when the enzyme is fully saturated by the substrate) in wheat following cloquintocet-mexyl and fenchlorazole-ethyl treatments, and in maize following fenchlorazole-ethyl treatment. Otherwise, decreases in V(max) were observed in wheat and maize following fenclorim and fluxofenim treatments. With the exception of oxabetrinil, all the safeners significantly reduced the apparent K(M) (the substrate concentration required for 50% of maximum GST activity) of both wheat and maize GST. The V(max) and K(M) variations following safener treatments are discussed in terms of an increased expression of GST enzymes and an increased affinity for the CDNB substrate. The activity of wheat and maize GST was also assayed towards butachlor and terbuthylazine respectively; the results indicate the ability of cloquintocet-mexyl, fenchlorazole-ethyl and fluxofenim to enhance the enzyme activity in wheat and of benoxacor and fenchlorazole-ethyl to do so in maize.

  19. A Novel Aldo-Keto Reductase (AKR17A1) of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 Degrades the Rice Field Herbicide Butachlor and Confers Tolerance to Abiotic Stresses in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Chhavi; Sen, Sonia; Yadav, Shivam; Rai, Shweta; Rai, Lal Chand

    2015-01-01

    Present study deals with the identification of a novel aldo/keto reductase, AKR17A1 from Anabaena sp. PCC7120 and adds on as 17th family of AKR superfamily drawn from a wide variety of organisms. AKR17A1 shares many characteristics of a typical AKR such as- (i) conferring tolerance to multiple stresses like heat, UV-B, and cadmium, (ii) excellent activity towards known AKR substrates (isatin and 2-nitrobenzaldehyde), and (iii) obligate dependence on NADPH as a cofactor for enzyme activity. The most novel attribute of AKR17A1, first reported in this study, is its capability to metabolize butachlor, a persistent rice field herbicide that adversely affects agro-ecosystem and non-target organisms. The AKR17A1 catalyzed- degradation of butachlor resulted into formation of 1,2-benzene dicarboxylic acid and 2,6 bis (1,1, dimethylethyl) 4,-methyl phenol as the major products confirmed by GC-MS analysis. PMID:26372161

  20. A Novel Aldo-Keto Reductase (AKR17A1) of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 Degrades the Rice Field Herbicide Butachlor and Confers Tolerance to Abiotic Stresses in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Chhavi; Sen, Sonia; Yadav, Shivam; Rai, Shweta; Rai, Lal Chand

    2015-01-01

    Present study deals with the identification of a novel aldo/keto reductase, AKR17A1 from Anabaena sp. PCC7120 and adds on as 17th family of AKR superfamily drawn from a wide variety of organisms. AKR17A1 shares many characteristics of a typical AKR such as— (i) conferring tolerance to multiple stresses like heat, UV-B, and cadmium, (ii) excellent activity towards known AKR substrates (isatin and 2-nitrobenzaldehyde), and (iii) obligate dependence on NADPH as a cofactor for enzyme activity. The most novel attribute of AKR17A1, first reported in this study, is its capability to metabolize butachlor, a persistent rice field herbicide that adversely affects agro-ecosystem and non-target organisms. The AKR17A1 catalyzed- degradation of butachlor resulted into formation of 1,2-benzene dicarboxylic acid and 2,6 bis (1,1, dimethylethyl) 4,-methyl phenol as the major products confirmed by GC-MS analysis. PMID:26372161

  1. A Novel Aldo-Keto Reductase (AKR17A1) of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 Degrades the Rice Field Herbicide Butachlor and Confers Tolerance to Abiotic Stresses in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Chhavi; Sen, Sonia; Yadav, Shivam; Rai, Shweta; Rai, Lal Chand

    2015-01-01

    Present study deals with the identification of a novel aldo/keto reductase, AKR17A1 from Anabaena sp. PCC7120 and adds on as 17th family of AKR superfamily drawn from a wide variety of organisms. AKR17A1 shares many characteristics of a typical AKR such as- (i) conferring tolerance to multiple stresses like heat, UV-B, and cadmium, (ii) excellent activity towards known AKR substrates (isatin and 2-nitrobenzaldehyde), and (iii) obligate dependence on NADPH as a cofactor for enzyme activity. The most novel attribute of AKR17A1, first reported in this study, is its capability to metabolize butachlor, a persistent rice field herbicide that adversely affects agro-ecosystem and non-target organisms. The AKR17A1 catalyzed- degradation of butachlor resulted into formation of 1,2-benzene dicarboxylic acid and 2,6 bis (1,1, dimethylethyl) 4,-methyl phenol as the major products confirmed by GC-MS analysis.

  2. ACETANILIDE HERBICIDE DEGRADATION PRODUCTS BY LC/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acetanilide herbicides are frequently applied in the U.S. on crops (corn, soybeans, popcorn, etc.) to control broadleaf and annual weeds. The acetanilide and acetamide herbicides currently registered for use in the U.S. are alachlor, acetochlor, metolachlor, propachlor, flufen...

  3. Implications of sampling frequency to herbicide conservation effects assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicide losses from row crop agriculture represent potential human health hazards. In particular, atrazine concentrations in drinking water must not exceed its maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 3 'g/L. Atrazine, simazine, alachlor, acetochlor, metolachlor, and glyphosate were monitored along ti...

  4. Herbicide Losses in the Saint Joseph River Watershed: Impacts of Hydrology and Land Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicide losses from row crop agriculture represent potential human health hazards, and are a major focus of the Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP). Atrazine, simazine, alachlor, acetochlor, metolachlor, and glyphosate were monitored in tile-fed drainage ditches draining to a drinking ...

  5. Structure-toxicity relationship of chloroacetanilide herbicides: relative impact on soil microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Saha, Supradip; Dutta, Debashis; Karmakar, Rajib; Ray, Deb Prasad

    2012-09-01

    The research was carried out to ascertain the effect of three chloroacetanilide herbicides, alachlor, butachlor and pretilachlor on soil microbial biomass growth and activity. Laboratory experiments were performed in a silty clay loam soil to relate changes of soil enzymatic activity to the herbicide persistence under laboratory condition up to 42 days at three application rates. The results showed that all the three herbicides caused enhancement of dehydrogenase activity. Higher concentrations of herbicide resulted in enhancement of the enzymatic activity. In addition, a similar trend was observed in β-glucosidase and acid phosphatase activity, although urease activity decreased upon incubation for 42 days as compared with initial soil incubation values. Based on the extent of impact for dehydrogenase activity in soil, the order was pretilachlor>alachlor>butachlor; whereas in case of urease activity, the order changed to pretilachlor>butachlor>alachlor. The soil half-lives of alachlor, butachlor and pretilachlor respectively, were 9.3, 12.7 and 7.3 days, which could be accounted for in terms of their respective chemical structures, as well as variable adsorption, degradation, differential effects of the agents on soil microbes. Soil management practices and the differing physicochemical properties of the herbicides may contribute to their rates of decay in soil.

  6. 78 FR 13264 - Acetochlor; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... July 25, 2012 (77 FR 43562) (FRL-9353- 6), EPA issued a document pursuant to FFDCA section 408(d)(3... FR 47445) (FRL-8434-1). C. Exposure Assessment 1. Dietary exposure from food and feed uses. In... Review'' (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993). Because this final rule has been exempted from review...

  7. Occurrence and distribution of pesticides in streams of the Eastern Iowa Basins, 1996-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schnoebelen, Douglas J.; Kalkhoff, Stephen J.; Becher, Kent D.

    2001-01-01

    Occurrence of pesticide compounds varied by landform region. The triazine herbicides, atrazine and cyanazine and their degradates were present in significantly greater concentrations in the Southern Iowa Drift Plain (predominantly loess soils) than either the Des Moines Lobe or the Iowan Surface (predominantly till soils). Less atrazine and cyanazine are applied to till soils because of pH and organic carbon content. Alachlor, metolachlor, and acetochlor have often been used to offset triazine pesticide reductions in area with till soils.

  8. Using compound-specific isotope analysis to assess the degradation of chloroacetanilide herbicides in lab-scale wetlands.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, O F; Maillard, E; Vuilleumier, S; Nijenhuis, I; Richnow, H H; Imfeld, G

    2014-03-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) is a promising tool to study the environmental fate of a wide range of contaminants including pesticides. In this study, a novel CSIA method was developed to analyse the stable carbon isotope signatures of widely used chloroacetanilide herbicides. The developed method was applied in combination with herbicide concentration and hydrochemical analyses to investigate in situ biodegradation of metolachlor, acetochlor and alachlor during their transport in lab-scale wetlands. Two distinct redox zones were identified in the wetlands. Oxic conditions prevailed close to the inlet of the four wetlands (oxygen concentration of 212±24μM), and anoxic conditions (oxygen concentrations of 28±41μM) prevailed towards the outlet, where dissipation of herbicides mainly occurred. Removal of acetochlor and alachlor from inlet to outlet of wetlands was 56% and 51%, whereas metolachlor was more persistent (23% of load dissipation). CSIA of chloroacetanilides at the inlet and outlet of the wetlands revealed carbon isotope fractionation of alachlor (εbulk=-2.0±0.3‰) and acetochlor (εbulk=-3.4±0.5‰), indicating that biodegradation contributes to the dissipation of both herbicides. This study is a first step towards the application of CSIA to evaluate the transport and degradation of chloroacetanilide herbicides in the environment.

  9. Novosphingobium chloroacetimidivorans sp. nov., a chloroacetamide herbicide-degrading bacterium isolated from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Cheng-Hong; Jiang, Jin; Kwon, Soon-Wo; Sun, Li-Na; Shen, Wen-Biao; He, Jian

    2014-08-01

    Strain BUT-14(T), a Gram-reaction-negative, non-spore-forming, ellipse-shaped bacterium, was isolated from activated sludge of a chloroacetamide-herbicides-manufacturing wastewater treatment facility. The strain was able to degrade more than 90% of butachlor, acetochlor and alachlor (100 mg l(-1)) within 5 days of incubation. The taxonomic position was investigated using a polyphasic approach. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain BUT-14(T) was a member of the genus Novosphingobium and showed the highest sequence similarities to Novosphingobium soli DSM 22821(T) (97.9%), N. naphthalenivorans KACC 15258(T) (97.4%), N. pentaromativorans JCM 12182(T) (97.4%) and N. barchaimii DSM 25411(T) (97.1%) and lower (<97%) sequence similarities to all other species of the genus Novosphingobium. Chemotaxonomic analysis revealed that strain BUT-14(T) possessed Q-10 as the predominant ubiquinone, spermidine as the major polyamine and C(18 : 1)ω7c (46.9%), C(17 : 1)ω6c (17.9%), summed feature 3, C(14 : 0) 2-OH (4.4%), C(15 : 0) 2-OH (3.1%) and C(16 : 0) (5.51%) as the major fatty acids. The polar lipids included lipid, glycolipid, phosphatidylglycerol, phospholipid, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, sphingoglycolipid and phospatidyldimethylethanolamine. Strain BUT-14(T) showed low DNA-DNA relatedness with N. soli DSM 22821(T) (41.5±2.9%), N. naphthalenivorans JCM 12182(T) (49.2±4.2%), N. pentaromativorans KACC 12295(T) (53.2±1.9%) and N. barchaimii DSM 25411 (51.2±4.5%). The DNA G+C content was 66±0.3 mol%. The combination of phylogenetic analysis, phenotypic characteristics, chemotaxonomic data and DNA-DNA hybridization supports the suggestion that strain BUT-14(T) represents a novel species of the genus Novosphingobium, for which the name Novosphingobium chloroacetimidivorans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BUT-14(T) ( = CCTCC AB 2013086(T) = KACC 17147(T) = JCM 19923(T)).

  10. Occurrence and load of selected herbicides and metabolites in the lower Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, G.M.; Goolsby, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    Analyses of water samples collected from the Mississippi River at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, during 1991-1997 indicate that hundreds of metric tons of herbicides and herbicide metabolites are being discharged annually to the Gulf of Mexico. Atrazine, metolachlor, and the ethane-sulfonic acid metabolite of alachlor (alachlor ESA) were the most frequently detected herbicides and, in general, were present in the largest concentrations. Almost 80% of the annual herbicide load to the Gulf of Mexico occurred during the growing season from May to August. The concentrations and loads of alachlor in the Mississippi River decreased dramatically after 1993 in response to decreased use in the basin. In contrast, the concentrations and loads of acetochlor increased after 1994, reflecting its role as a replacement for alachlor. The peak annual herbicide load occurred in 1993, when approximately 640 metric tons (t) of atrazine, 320 t of cyanazine, 215 t of metolachlor, 53 t of simazine, and 50 t of alachlor were discharged to the Gulf of Mexico. The annual loads of atrazine and cyanazine were generally 1-2% of the amount annually applied in the Mississippi River drainage basin; the annual loads of acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor were generally less than 1%. Despite a reduction in atrazine use, historical data do not indicate a long-term downward trend in the atrazine load to the Gulf of Mexico. Although a relation (r2=0.62) exists between the atrazine load and stream discharge during May to August, variations in herbicide use and rainfall patterns within subbasins can have a large effect on herbicide loads in the Mississippi River Basin and probably explain a large part of the annual variation in atrazine load to the Gulf of Mexico. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  11. 40 CFR 180.470 - Acetochlor; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., stover 2.5 Corn, sweet, forage 1.5 Corn, sweet, kernels plus cob with husks removed 0.05 Corn, sweet..., rice, and wheat, grain 0.05 Pea and bean, dried shelled, except soybean, subgroup 6C 0.05 Potato...

  12. 40 CFR 180.470 - Acetochlor; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., stover 2.5 Corn, sweet, forage 1.5 Corn, sweet, kernels plus cob with husks removed 0.05 Corn, sweet..., rice, and wheat, grain 0.05 Pea and bean, dried shelled, except soybean, subgroup 6C 0.05 Potato...

  13. 40 CFR 180.470 - Acetochlor; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., stover 2.5 Corn, sweet, forage 1.5 Corn, sweet, kernels plus cob with husks removed 0.05 Corn, sweet... wheat, grain 0.05 Pea and bean, dried shelled, except soybean, subgroup 6C 0.05 Potato 0.05...

  14. 40 CFR 180.470 - Acetochlor; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., stover 1.0 Cotton, gin byproducts 4.0 Cotton, undelinted seed 0.6 Sorghum, grain, forage 1.6 Sorghum, grain, grain 0.05 Sorghum, grain, stover 1.7 Soybean, meal 1.2 Soybean, seed 1.0 (b) Section 18... corn, grain sorghum, rice and wheat, forage 0.5 Grain, cereal, forage, fodder and straw, group...

  15. Dechlorinating chloroacetanilide herbicides by dithionite-treated aquifer sediment and surface soil.

    PubMed

    Boparai, Hardiljeet K; Shea, Patrick J; Comfort, Steve D; Snow, Daniel D

    2006-05-01

    The prevalent use of chloroacetanilide herbicides has resulted in nonpoint contamination of some groundwater and surface water. We determined the efficacy of dithionite-treated sediment and soils to transform chloroacetanilides. When used alone, dithionite rapidly dechlorinates chloroacetanilides in water, with the following order of reactivity: propachlor > alachlor > acetochlor > metolachlor. Stoichiometric release of chloride occurs during reaction with dithionite, and thiosulfate herbicide derivatives are produced. Treating aquifer sediment with dithionite reduces native Fe(lII), creating a redox barrier of Fe(ll)-bearing minerals and surface-bound Fe(ll). Washing the reduced sediment (buffered with citrate-bicarbonate) with oxygen-free water removed Fe(ll) and excess dithionite and no alachlor transformation was observed. In contrast, a dithionite-treated surface soil, rich in clay and iron, effectively dechlorinated alachlor after washing. Exposing alachlor to aquifer sediment treated with dithionite in potassium carbonate buffer (pH 8.5-9.0) produced dechlorinated alachlor as the major degradation product. Our results provide proof-of-concept that dechlorination of chloroacetanilide herbicides by dithionite and dithionite-treated aquifer sediment and soil is a remediation option in natural environments where iron-bearing minerals are abundant.

  16. 40 CFR 180.249 - Alachlor; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., meat 0.02 Hog, fat 0.02 Hog meat byproducts 0.02 Hog, meat 0.02 Horse, fat 0.02 Horse, meat byproducts 0.02 Horse, meat 0.02 Milk 0.02 Peanut 0.5 Poultry, fat 0.02 Poultry, meat byproducts 0.02 Poultry..., dry 0.1 Beans, succulent lima 0.1 Cattle, fat 0.02 Cattle, meat byproducts 0.02 Cattle, meat 0.02...

  17. 40 CFR 180.249 - Alachlor; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., meat 0.02 Hog, fat 0.02 Hog meat byproducts 0.02 Hog, meat 0.02 Horse, fat 0.02 Horse, meat byproducts 0.02 Horse, meat 0.02 Milk 0.02 Peanut 0.5 Poultry, fat 0.02 Poultry, meat byproducts 0.02 Poultry..., dry 0.1 Beans, succulent lima 0.1 Cattle, fat 0.02 Cattle, meat byproducts 0.02 Cattle, meat 0.02...

  18. 40 CFR 180.249 - Alachlor; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., meat 0.02 Hog, fat 0.02 Hog meat byproducts 0.02 Hog, meat 0.02 Horse, fat 0.02 Horse, meat byproducts 0.02 Horse, meat 0.02 Milk 0.02 Peanut 0.5 Poultry, fat 0.02 Poultry, meat byproducts 0.02 Poultry..., dry 0.1 Beans, succulent lima 0.1 Cattle, fat 0.02 Cattle, meat byproducts 0.02 Cattle, meat 0.02...

  19. 40 CFR 180.249 - Alachlor; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., meat 0.02 Hog, fat 0.02 Hog meat byproducts 0.02 Hog, meat 0.02 Horse, fat 0.02 Horse, meat byproducts 0.02 Horse, meat 0.02 Milk 0.02 Peanut 0.5 Poultry, fat 0.02 Poultry, meat byproducts 0.02 Poultry..., dry 0.1 Beans, succulent lima 0.1 Cattle, fat 0.02 Cattle, meat byproducts 0.02 Cattle, meat 0.02...

  20. 40 CFR 180.249 - Alachlor; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., meat 0.02 Hog, fat 0.02 Hog meat byproducts 0.02 Hog, meat 0.02 Horse, fat 0.02 Horse, meat byproducts 0.02 Horse, meat 0.02 Milk 0.02 Peanut 0.5 Poultry, fat 0.02 Poultry, meat byproducts 0.02 Poultry..., dry 0.1 Beans, succulent lima 0.1 Cattle, fat 0.02 Cattle, meat byproducts 0.02 Cattle, meat 0.02...

  1. Biodegradation and mineralization of metolachlor and alachlor by Candida xestobii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metolachlor (2-chloro-6’-ethyl-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl) aceto-o-toluidide) is a pre-emergent chloroacetanilide herbicide used to control broadleaf and annual grassy weeds in a variety of crops. The S enantiomer of metolachlor, S-metolachlor, is the most effective form for weed control. While the ...

  2. Changes in herbicide concentrations in Midwestern streams in relation to changes in use, 1989-1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scribner, E.A.; Battaglin, W.A.; Goolsby, D.A.; Thurman, E.M.

    2000-01-01

    Water samples were collected from Midwestern streams in 1994-1995 and 1998 as part of a study to help determine if changes in herbicide use resulted in changes in herbicide concentrations since a previous reconnaissance study in 1989-1990. Sites were sampled during the first significant runoff period after the application of pre-emergent herbicides in 1989-1990, 1994-1995, and 1998. Samples were analyzed for selected herbicides, two atrazine metabolites, three cyanazine metabolites, and one alachlor metabolite. In the Midwestern USA, alachlor use was much greater in 1989 than in 1995, whereas acetochlor was not used in 1989 but was commonly used in 1995. The use of atrazine, cyanazine, and metolachlor was approximately the same in 1989 and 1995. The median concentrations of atrazine, alachlor, cyanazine, and metolachlor were substantially higher in 1989-1990 than in 1994-1995 or 1998. The median acetochlor concentration was higher in 1998 than in 1994 or 1995. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  3. Herbicide concentrations in the Mississippi River Basin - The importance of chloroacetanilide herbicide degradates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rebich, R.A.; Coupe, R.H.; Thurman, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    The proportion of chloroacetanilide herbicide degradates, specifically the ethane sulfonic (ESA) and oxanilic (OA) acids, averaged 70% of the total herbicide concentration in samples from the Upper Mississippi River. In samples from the Missouri River and the Ohio River, the proportion of chloroacetanilide degradates in the total herbicide concentration was much less, 24% and 41%, respectively. The amount of tile drainage throughout the Mississippi River Basin appeared to be related to the occurrence and distribution of chloroacetanilide degradates in water samples. Pesticide concentrations in streams of the Mississippi River Basin have been well characterized. However, recent research demonstrates that in order to more fully understand the fate and transport of pesticides, the major pesticide degradates need to be included in the analysis. From March 1999 through May 2001, water samples from four major junctures of the Mississippi River Basin were collected and analyzed for a suite of herbicides and their degradate compounds. Each sampling site was selected to represent a major part of the Mississippi River: upper and lower Mississippi, Missouri and Ohio Rivers. Each basin has unique landscape variables, geology, hydrology, precipitation, and land use, which is reflected in the pesticide content at the most downstream sample site near the mouth of the Mississippi River. Atrazine was the most frequently detected herbicide (detected in 97% of the samples), followed by metolachlor (60%), and acetochlor (31%). The most frequently detected degradates were metolachlor ESA (69%), followed by deethylatrazine (62%), metolachlor OA (37%), and alachlor ESA (37%). Metolachlor ESA was detected more frequently than its parent compound (69 vs. 60%), as was alachlor ESA (37 vs. 9%). After an improvement was made in the analytical method, metolachlor ESA was detected in every sample, metolachlor OA in 89% of the samples, alachlor ESA in 84%, acetochlor ESA in 71%, and acetochlor

  4. Eleven-year trend in acetanilide pesticide degradates in the Iowa River, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkhoff, Stephen J.; Vecchia, Aldo V.; Capel, Paul D.; Meyer, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Trends in concentration and loads of acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor and their ethanasulfonic (ESA) and oxanilic (OXA) acid degradates were studied from 1996 through 2006 in the main stem of the Iowa River, Iowa and in the South Fork Iowa River, a small tributary near the headwaters of the Iowa River. Concentration trends were determined using the parametric regression model SEAWAVE-Q, which accounts for seasonal and flow-related variability. Daily estimated concentrations generated from the model were used with daily streamflow to calculate daily and yearly loads. Acetochlor, alachlor, metolachlor, and their ESA and OXA degradates were generally present in >50% of the samples collected from both sites throughout the study. Their concentrations generally decreased from 1996 through 2006, although the rate of decrease was slower after 2001. Concentrations of the ESA and OXA degradates decreased from 3 to about 23% yr-1. The concentration trend was related to the decreasing use of these compounds during the study period. Decreasing concentrations and constant runoff resulted in an average reduction of 10 to >3000 kg per year of alachlor and metolachlor ESA and OXA degradates being transported out of the Iowa River watershed. Transport of acetochlor and metolachlor parent compounds and their degradates from the Iowa River watershed ranged from <1% to about 6% of the annual application. These trends were related to the decreasing use of these compounds during the study period, but the year-to-year variability cannot explain changes in loads based on herbicide use alone. The trends were also affected by the timing and amount of precipitation. As expected, increased amounts of water moving through the watershed moved a greater percentage of the applied herbicides, especially the relatively soluble degradates, from the soils into the rivers through surface runoff, shallow groundwater inflow, and subsurface drainage.

  5. Eleven-year trend in acetanilide pesticide degradates in the Iowa River, Iowa.

    PubMed

    Kalkhoff, Stephen J; Vecchia, Aldo V; Capel, Paul D; Meyer, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    Trends in concentration and loads of acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor and their ethanasulfonic (ESA) and oxanilic (OXA) acid degradates were studied from 1996 through 2006 in the main stem of the Iowa River, Iowa and in the South Fork Iowa River, a small tributary near the headwaters of the Iowa River. Concentration trends were determined using the parametric regression model SEAWAVE-Q, which accounts for seasonal and flow-related variability. Daily estimated concentrations generated from the model were used with daily streamflow to calculate daily and yearly loads. Acetochlor, alachlor, metolachlor, and their ESA and OXA degradates were generally present in >50% of the samples collected from both sites throughout the study. Their concentrations generally decreased from 1996 through 2006, although the rate of decrease was slower after 2001. Concentrations of the ESA and OXA degradates decreased from 3 to about 23% yr. The concentration trend was related to the decreasing use of these compounds during the study period. Decreasing concentrations and constant runoff resulted in an average reduction of 10 to >3000 kg per year of alachlor and metolachlor ESA and OXA degradates being transported out of the Iowa River watershed. Transport of acetochlor and metolachlor parent compounds and their degradates from the Iowa River watershed ranged from <1% to about 6% of the annual application. These trends were related to the decreasing use of these compounds during the study period, but the year-to-year variability cannot explain changes in loads based on herbicide use alone. The trends were also affected by the timing and amount of precipitation. As expected, increased amounts of water moving through the watershed moved a greater percentage of the applied herbicides, especially the relatively soluble degradates, from the soils into the rivers through surface runoff, shallow groundwater inflow, and subsurface drainage. PMID:23099949

  6. Determination of chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites in water using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hostetler, K.A.; Thurman, E.M.

    2000-01-01

    Analytical methods using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) were developed for the analysis of the following chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites in water: alachlor ethanesulfonic acid (ESA); alachlor oxanilic acid; acetochlor ESA; acetochlor oxanilic acid; metolachlor ESA; and metolachlor oxanilic acid. Good precision and accuracy were demonstrated for both the HPLC-DAD and HPLC/MS methods in reagent water, surface water, and ground water. The average HPLC-DAD recoveries of the chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites from water samples spiked at 0.25, 0.5 and 2.0 ??g/l ranged from 84 to 112%, with relative standard deviations of 18% or less. The average HPLC/MS recoveries of the metabolites from water samples spiked at 0.05, 0.2 and 2.0 ??g/l ranged from 81 to 118%, with relative standard deviations of 20% or less. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) for all metabolites using the HPLC-DAD method was 0.20 ??g/l, whereas the LOQ using the HPLC/MS method was at 0.05 ??g/l. These metabolite-determination methods are valuable for acquiring information about water quality and the fate and transport of the parent chloroacetanilide herbicides in water. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  7. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Group; determination of chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites in water using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmerman, L.R.; Hostetler, K.A.; Thurman, E.M.

    2000-01-01

    Analytical methods using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) were developed for the analysis of the following chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites in water: acetochlor ethanesulfonic acid (ESA), acetochlor oxanilic acid (OXA), alachlor ESA, alachlor OXA, metolachlor ESA, and metolachlor OXA. Good precision and accuracy were demonstrated for both the HPLC-DAD and HPLC/MS methods in reagent water, surface water, and ground water. The mean HPLC-DAD recoveries of the chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites from water samples spiked at 0.25, 0.50, and 2.0 mg/L (micrograms per liter) ranged from 84 to 112 percent, with relative standard deviations of 18 percent or less. The mean HPLC/MS recoveries of the metabolites from water samples spiked at 0.05, 0.20, and 2.0 mg/L ranged from 81 to 125 percent, with relative standard deviations of 20 percent or less. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) for all metabolites using the HPLC-DAD method was 0.20 mg/L, whereas the LOQ using the HPLC/MS method was 0.05 mg/L. These metabolite-determination methods are valuable for acquiring information about water quality and the fate and transport of the parent chloroacetanilide herbicides in water.

  8. Degradation of chloroacetanilide herbicides: The prevalence of sulfonic and oxanilic acid metabolites in Iowa groundwaters and surface waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkhoff, S.J.; Kolpin, D.W.; Thurman, E.M.; Ferrer, I.; Barcelo, D.

    1998-01-01

    Water samples were collected from 88 municipal wells throughout Iowa during the summer and were collected monthly at 12 stream sites in eastern Iowa from March to December 1996 to study the occurrence of the sulfonic and oxanilic metabolites of acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor. The sulfonic and oxanilic metabolites were present in almost 75% of the groundwater samples and were generally present from 3 to 45 times more frequently than their parent compounds. In groundwater, the median value of the summed concentrations of acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor was less than 0.05 μg/L, and the median value of the summed concentrations of the six metabolites was 1.2 μg/L. All surface water samples contained at least one detectable metabolite compound. Individual metabolites were detected from 2 to over 100 times more frequently than the parent compounds. In surface water, the median value of the summed concentrations of the three parent compounds was 0.13 μg/L, and the median value of the summed concentrations of the six metabolites was 6.4 μg/L. These data demonstrate the importance of analyzing both parent compounds and metabolites to more fully understand the environmental fate and transport of herbicides in the hydrologic system.

  9. Degradation of chloroacetanilide herbicides and bacterial community composition in lab-scale wetlands.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Omniea Fawzy; Maillard, Elodie; Vuilleumier, Stéphane; Millet, Maurice; Imfeld, Gwenaël

    2015-07-01

    Degradation of chloroacetanilide herbicides rac-metolachlor, acetochlor, and alachlor, as well as associated bacterial populations, were evaluated in vertical upflow wetland columns using a combination of hydrochemical and herbicide analyses, and DNA-based approaches. Mass dissipation of chloroacetanilides, continuously supplied at 1.8-1.9 μM for 112 days, mainly occurred in the rhizosphere zone under nitrate and sulphate-reducing conditions, and averaged 61±14%, 52±12% and 29±19% for acetochlor, alachlor and rac-metolachlor, respectively. Metolachlor enantiomer fractions of 0.494±0.009 in the oxic zone and 0.480±0.005 in the rhizosphere zone indicated preferential biodegradation of the S-enantiomer. Chloroacetanilide ethane sulfonic acid and oxanilic acid degradates were detected at low concentrations only (0.5 nM), suggesting extensive degradation and the operation of yet unknown pathways for chloroacetanilide degradation. Hydrochemical parameters and oxygen concentration were major drivers of bacterial composition, whereas exposure to chloroacetanilides had no detectable impact. Taken together, the results underline the importance of anaerobic degradation of chloroacetanilides in wetlands, and highlight the potential of complementary chemical and biological approaches to characterise processes involved in the environmental dissipation of chloroacetanilides.

  10. Acute Oral Poisoning Due to Chloracetanilide Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Su-Jin; Choi, Sang-Cheon; Yang, Jong-Oh; Lee, Eun-Young; Song, Ho-Yeon; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2012-01-01

    Chloracetanilide herbicides (alachlor, butachlor, metachlor) are used widely. Although there are much data about chronic low dose exposure to chloracetanilide in humans and animals, there are few data about acute chloracetanilide poisoning in humans. This study investigated the clinical feature of patients following acute oral exposure to chloracetanilide. We retrospectively reviewed the data on the patients who were admitted to two university hospitals from January 2006 to December 2010. Thirty-five patients were enrolled. Among them, 28, 5, and 2 cases of acute alachlor, metachlor, butachlor poisoning were included. The mean age was 49.8 ± 15.4 yr. The poison severity score (PSS) was 17 (48.6%), 10 (28.6%), 5 (14.3%), 2 (5.7%), and 1 (2.9%) patients with a PSS of 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. The age was higher for the symptomatic patients (1-4 PSS) than that for the asymptomatic patients (0 PSS) (43.6 ± 15.2 vs 55.7 ± 13.5). The arterial blood HCO3 ¯ was lower in the symptomatic patients (1-4 PSS) than that in the asymptomatic patients (0 PSS). Three patients were a comatous. One patient died 24 hr after the exposure. In conclusion, although chloracetanilide poisoning is usually of low toxicity, elder patients with central nervous system symptoms should be closely monitored and cared after oral exposure. PMID:22323855

  11. Acute oral poisoning due to chloracetanilide herbicides.

    PubMed

    Seok, Su-Jin; Choi, Sang-Cheon; Gil, Hyo-Wook; Yang, Jong-Oh; Lee, Eun-Young; Song, Ho-Yeon; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2012-02-01

    Chloracetanilide herbicides (alachlor, butachlor, metachlor) are used widely. Although there are much data about chronic low dose exposure to chloracetanilide in humans and animals, there are few data about acute chloracetanilide poisoning in humans. This study investigated the clinical feature of patients following acute oral exposure to chloracetanilide. We retrospectively reviewed the data on the patients who were admitted to two university hospitals from January 2006 to December 2010. Thirty-five patients were enrolled. Among them, 28, 5, and 2 cases of acute alachlor, metachlor, butachlor poisoning were included. The mean age was 49.8 ± 15.4 yr. The poison severity score (PSS) was 17 (48.6%), 10 (28.6%), 5 (14.3%), 2 (5.7%), and 1 (2.9%) patients with a PSS of 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. The age was higher for the symptomatic patients (1-4 PSS) than that for the asymptomatic patients (0 PSS) (43.6 ± 15.2 vs 55.7 ± 13.5). The arterial blood HCO₃⁻ was lower in the symptomatic patients (1-4 PSS) than that in the asymptomatic patients (0 PSS). Three patients were a comatous. One patient died 24 hr after the exposure. In conclusion, although chloracetanilide poisoning is usually of low toxicity, elder patients with central nervous system symptoms should be closely monitored and cared after oral exposure.

  12. Are shifts in herbicide use reflected in concentration changes in Midwestern rivers?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.A.; Goolsby, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    In many Midwestern rivers, elevated concentrations of herbicides occur during runoff events for 1-3 months following application. The highest or 'peak' herbicide concentration often occurs during one of these runoff events. Herbicide concentrations in rivers are affected by a number of factors, including herbicide use patterns within the associated basin. Changing agricultural practices, reductions in recommended and permitted herbicide applications, shifts to new herbicides, and greater environmental awareness in the agricultural community have resulted in changes to herbicide use patterns. In the Midwestern United States, alachlor use was much larger in 1989 than in 1995, while acetochlor was not used in 1989, and commonly used in 1995. Use of atrazine, cyanazine, and metolachlor was about the same in 1989 and 1995. Herbicide concentrations were measured in samples from 53 Midwestern rivers during the first major runoff event that occurred after herbicide application (postapplication) in 1989, 1990, 1994, and 1995. The median concentrations of atrazine, alachlor, cyanazine, metribuzin, metolachlor, propazine, and simazine all were significantly higher in 1989/90 than in 1994/95. The median acetochlor concentration was higher in 1995 than in 1994. Estimated daily yields for all herbicides and degradation products measured, with the exception of acetochlor, were higher in 1989/90 than in 1994/95. The differences in concentration and yield do not always parallel changes in herbicide use, suggesting that other changes in herbicide or crop management are affecting concentrations in Midwestern rivers during runoff events.In many Midwestern rivers, elevated concentrations of herbicides occur during runoff events for 1-3 months following application. The highest or `peak' herbicide concentration often occurs during one of these runoff events. Herbicide concentrations in rivers are affected by a number of factors, including herbicide use patterns within the associated

  13. HPLC-NMR INVESTIGATION OF THE ISOMERIZATION OF ALACHLOR-ETHANE SULFONIC ACID. (R829008)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  14. Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Group-Update and Additions to the Determination of Chloroacetanilide Herbicide Degradation Compounds in Water Using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, E.A.; Kish, J.L.; Zimmerman, L.R.; Thurman, E.

    2001-01-01

    An analytical method using high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1999 for the analysis of selected chloroacetanilide herbicide degradation compounds in water. These compounds were acetochlor ethane sulfonic acid (ESA), acetochlor oxanilic acid (OXA), alachlor ESA, alachlor OXA, metolachlor ESA, and metolachlor OXA. The HPLC/MS method was updated in 2000, and the method detection limits were modified accordingly. Four other degradation compounds also were added to the list of compounds that can be analyzed using HPLC/MS; these compounds were dimethenamid ESA, dimethenamid OXA, flufenacet ESA, and flufenacet OXA. Except for flufenacet OXA, good precision and accuracy were demonstrated for the updated HPLC/MS method in buffered reagent water, surface water, and ground water. The mean HPLC/MS recoveries of the degradation compounds from water samples spiked at 0.20 and 1.0 ?g/L (microgram per liter) ranged from 75 to 114 percent, with relative standard deviations of 15.8 percent or less for all compounds except flufenacet OXA, which had relative standard deviations ranging from 11.3 to 48.9 percent. Method detection levels (MDL's) using the updated HPLC/MS method varied from 0.009 to 0.045 ?g/L, with the flufenacet OXA MDL at 0.072 ?g/L. The updated HPLC/MS method is valuable for acquiring information about the fate and transport of the parent chloroacetanilide herbicides in water.

  15. Pesticide and transformation product detections and age-dating relations from till and sand deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, K.L.; Morrow, W.S.

    2007-01-01

    Pesticide and transformation product concentrations and frequencies in ground water from areas of similar crop and pesticide applications may vary substantially with differing lithologies. Pesticide analysis data for atrazine, metolachlor, alachlor, acetochlor, and cyanazine and their pesticide transformation products were collected at 69 monitoring wells in Illinois and northern Indiana to document occurrence of pesticides and their transformation products in two agricultural areas of differing lithologies, till, and sand. The till is primarily tile drained and has preferential fractured flow, whereas the sand primarily has surface water drainage and primary porosity flow. Transformation products represent most of the agricultural pesticides in ground water regardless of aquifer material - till or sand. Transformation products were detected more frequently than parent pesticides in both the till and sand, with metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid being most frequently detected. Estimated ground-water recharge dates for the sand were based on chlorofluorocarbon analyses. These age-dating data indicate that ground water recharged prior to 1990 is more likely to have a detection of a pesticide or pesticide transformation product. Detections were twice as frequent in ground water recharged prior to 1990 (82%) than in ground water recharged on or after 1990 (33%). The highest concentrations of atrazine, alachlor, metolachlor, and their transformation products, also were detected in samples from ground water recharged prior to 1990. These age/pesticide detection relations are opposite of what would normally be expected, and may be the result of preferential flow and/or ground-water mixing between aquifers and aquitards as evident by the detection of acetochlor transformation products in samples with estimated ground-water ages predating initial pesticide application. ?? 2007 American Water Resources Association.

  16. Trends in concentrations and use of agricultural herbicides for Corn Belt rivers, 1996-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vecchia, A.V.; Gilliom, R.J.; Sullivan, D.J.; Lorenz, D.L.; Martin, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Trends in the concentrations and agricultural use of four herbicides (atrazine, acetochlor, metolachlor, and alachlor) were evaluated for major rivers of the Corn Belt for two partially overlapping time periods: 1996-2002 and 2000-2006. Trends were analyzed for 11 sites on the mainstems and selected tributaries in the Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Missouri River Basins. Concentration trends were determined using a parametric regression model designed for analyzing seasonal variability, flow-related variability, and trends in pesticide concentrations(SEAWAVE-Q).TheSEAWAVE-Qmodel accounts for the effect of changing flow conditions in order to separate changes caused by hydrologic conditions from changes caused by other factors, such as pesticide use. Most of the trends in atrazine and acetochlor concentrations for both time periods were relatively small and nonsignificant, but metolachlor and alachlor were dominated by varying magnitudes of concentration downtrends. Overall, with trends expressed as a percent change per year, trends in herbicide concentrations were consistent with trends in agricultural use; 84 of 88 comparisons for different sites, herbicides, and time periods showed no significant difference between concentration trends and agricultural use trends. Results indicate that decreasing use appears to have been the primary cause for the concentration downtrends during 1996-2006 and that, while there is some evidence that nonuse management factors may have reduced concentrations in some rivers, reliably evaluating the influence of these factors on pesticides in large streams and rivers will require improved, basin-specific information on both management practices and use over time. ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  17. Reconnaissance data for glyphosate, other selected herbicides, their degradation products, and antibiotics in 51 streams in nine midwestern states, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scribner, Elisabeth A.; Battaglin, William A.; Dietze, Julie E.; Thurman, E.M.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1989, the U.S. Geological Survey has conducted periodic reconnaissance studies of streams in the Midwestern United States to determine the geographic and seasonal distribution of herbicide compounds. These studies have documented that large amounts of acetochlor, alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, metolachlor, and their degradation products are flushed into streams during post-application runoff. Additional studies show that peak herbicide concentrations tend to occur during the first runoff after herbicide application and that herbicide flushes can occur during runoff for several weeks to months following application. Since the first stream study conducted in 1989, several significant changes in herbicide use have occurred. The most substantial change is the tripling in the use of glyphosate during the past 5 years. Over this same time period (1997-2001), usage of acetochlor and atrazine increased slightly, whereas alachlor, cyanazine, and metolachlor usage decreased. During 2002, 154 samples were collected from 51 streams in nine Midwestern States during three periods of runoff. This report provides a compilation of the analytical results of five laboratory methods. Results show that glyphosate was detected in 55 (36 percent) of the samples, and aminomethylphosphonic acid (a degradation product of glyphosate) was detected in 107 (69 percent) of the samples. Atrazine, the most frequently detected herbicide, was found in 93 percent of the samples, followed by metolachlor, found in 73 percent of the samples; metolachlor ethanesulfonic acid (ESA) and oxanilic acid (OXA) were the most frequently detected herbicide degradation products, both being found in more than 95 percent of the samples. The data presented here are valuable for comparison with results from the earlier reconnaissance studies.

  18. Determination of low-level agricultural residues in soft drinks and sports drinks by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry: single-laboratory validation.

    PubMed

    Paske, Nathan; Berry, Bryan; Schmitz, John; Sullivan, Darryl

    2007-01-01

    In this study, sponsored by PepsiCo Inc., a method was validated for measurement of 11 pesticide residues in soft drinks and sports drinks. The pesticide residues determined in this validation were alachlor, atrazine, butachlor, isoproturon, malaoxon, monocrotophos, paraoxon-methyl, phorate, phorate sulfone, phorate sulfoxide, and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) when spiked at 0.100 microg/L (1.00 microg/L for phorate). Samples were filtered (if particulate matter was present), degassed (if carbonated), and analyzed using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Quantitation was performed with matrix-matched external standard calibration solutions. The standard curve range for this assay was 0.0750 to 10.0 microg/L. The calibration curves for all agricultural residues had coefficient of determination (r2) values greater than or equal to 0.9900 with the exception of 2 values that were 0.9285 and 0.8514. Fortification spikes at 0.100 microg/L (1.00 microg/L for phorate) over the course of 2 days (n=8 each day) for 3 matrixes (7UP, Gatorade, and Diet Pepsi) yielded average percent recoveries (and percent relative standard deviations) as follows (n=48): 94.4 (15.2) for alachlor, 98.2 (13.5) for atrazine, 83.1 (41.6) for butachlor, 89.6 (24.5) for isoproturon, 87.9 (24.4) for malaoxon, 96.1 (9.26) for monocrotophos, 101 (25.7) for paraoxon-methyl, 86.6 (20.4) for phorate, 101 (16.5) for phorate sulfone, 93.6 (25.5) for phorate sulfoxide, and 98.2 (6.02) for 2,4-D. PMID:17474522

  19. Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Group?Determination of acetamide herbicides and their degradation products in water using online solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, E.A.; Strahan, A.P.

    2003-01-01

    An analytical method for the determination of 6 acetamide herbicides (acetochlor, alachlor, dimethenamid, flufenacet, metolachlor, and propachlor) and 16 of their degradation products in natural water samples using solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry is described in this report. Special consideration was given during the development of the method to prevent the formation of degradation products during the analysis. Filtered water samples were analyzed using octadecylsilane as the solid-phase extraction media on online automated equipment followed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The method uses only 10 milliliters of sample per injection. Three different water-sample matrices, a reagent-water, a ground-water, and a surface-water sample spiked at 0.10 and 1.0 microgram per liter, were analyzed to determine method performance. Method detection limits ranged from 0.004 to 0.051 microgram per liter for the parent acetamide herbicides and their degradation products. Mean recoveries for the acetamide compounds in the ground- and surface-water samples ranged from 62.3 to 117.4 percent. The secondary amide of acetochlor/metolachlor ethanesulfonic acid (ESA) was recovered at an average rate of 43.5 percent. The mean recoveries for propachlor and propachlor oxanilic acid (OXA) were next lowest, ranging from 62.3 to 95.5 percent. Mean recoveries from reagent-water samples ranged from 90.3 to 118.3 percent for all compounds. Overall the mean of the mean recoveries of all compounds in the three matrices spiked at 0.10 and 1.0 microgram per liter ranged from 89.9 to 100.7 percent, including the secondary amide of acetochlor/metolachlor ESA and the propachlor compounds. The acetamide herbicides and their degradation products are reported in concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 2.0 micrograms per liter. The upper concentration limit is 2.0 micrograms per liter for all compounds without dilution. With the exception of the secondary amide of

  20. Herbicide-induced anthocyanin accumulation in transgenic rice by expression of rice OSB2 under the control of rice CYP72A21 promoter.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Sakiko; Kawahigashi, Hiroyuki; Tagiri, Akemi; Ohkawa, Yasunobu

    2008-02-27

    CYP72A21, a rice cytochrome P450 gene, is induced by chloroacetamide herbicides. OSB2, a rice myc-type transcription factor, induces anthocyanin accumulation in rice leaves. To produce plants for biomonitoring by color change, we combined the CYP72A21 promoter and the OSB2 gene and introduced them into the rice isogenic line Taichung-65 CB A (T65), which contains loci CB and A from the rice cultivar Murasakiine. Leaves of the transgenic plants turned red upon treatment with the chloroacetamide herbicides acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor. Seedling shoots reddened upon treatment with alachlor or metolachlor at 10 microM, a concentration slightly higher than that used in the field. Anthocyanin content was increased approximately 200% by the treatment. The color changes were consistent with increased shoot expression of OSB2 and the anthocyanidin synthase gene (ANS). This system promises easy detection of rice plant gene expression. Transgenic plants could be used in the future to biomonitor accumulated herbicides.

  1. Simulated ground-water flow and water quality of the Mississippi River alluvium near Burlington, Iowa, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Water samples collected from the alluvium indicated ground water can be classified as a calcium-magnesium-bicarbonate type. Reducing conditions likely occur in some localized areas of the alluvium, as suggested by relatively large concentrations of dissolved iron (4,390 micrograms per liter) and manganese (2, 430 micrograms per liter) in some ground-water samples. Nitrite plus nitrate was detected at concentrations greater than or equal to 8 milligrams per liter in three samples collected from observation wells completed in close proximity to cropland; the nitrite plus nitrate concentration in one groundwater sample exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Maximum Contaminant Level for nitrate in drinking water (10 milligrams per liter as N). Triazine herbicides (atrazine, cyanazine, propazine, simazine, and selected degradation products) and chloroacetanilide herbicides (acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor) were detected in some water samples. A greater number of herbicide compounds were detected in surface-water samples than in ground-water samples. Herbicide concentrations typically were at least an order of magnitude greater in surfacewater samples than in ground-water samples. The Maximum Contaminant Level for alachlor (2 micrograms per liter) was exceeded in a sample from Dry Branch Creek at Tama Road and for atrazine (3 micrograms per liter) was exceeded in samples collected from Dry Branch Creek at Tama Road and the county drainage ditch at Tama Road.

  2. Major herbicides in ground water: Results from the National Water-Quality Assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barbash, J.E.; Thelin, G.P.; Kolpin, D.W.; Gilliom, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    To improve understanding of the factors affecting pesticide occurrence in ground water, patterns of detection were examined for selected herbicides, based primarily on results from the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program. The NAWQA data were derived from 2227 sites (wells and springs) sampled in 20 major hydrologic basins across the USA from 1993 to 1995. Results are presented for six high-use herbicides - atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-iso-propylamino-s-triazine), cyanazine (2-[4-chloro-6-ethylamino-l,3,5-triazin-2-yl]amino]-2-methylpropionitrile), simazine (2-chloro-4,6-bis[ethylamino]-s-triazine), alachlor (2-chloro-N-[2,6-diethylphenyl]-N-[methoxymethyl]acetamide), acetochlor (2-chloro-N-[ethoxymethyl]. N-[2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl]acetamide), and metolachlor (2-chloro-N-[2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl]-N-[2-methoxy-l- methylethyl]acetamide) - as well as for prometon (2,4-bis[isopropylamino]-6-methoxy-s-triazine), a nonagricultural herbicide detected frequently during the study. Concentrations were <1 ??g L-1 at 98% of the sites with detections, but exceeded drinking-water criteria (for atrazine) at two sites. In urban areas, frequencies of detection (at or above 0.01 ??g L-1) of atrazine, cyanazine, simazine, alachlor, and metolachlor in shallow ground water were positively correlated with their nonagricultural use nationwide (P < 0.05). Among different agricultural areas, frequencies of detection were positively correlated with nearby agricultural use for atrazine, cyanazine, alachlor, and metolachlor, but not simazine. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that for these five herbicides, frequencies of detection beneath agricultural areas were positively correlated with their agricultural use and persistence in aerobic soil. Acetochlor, an agricultural herbicide first registered in 1994 for use in the USA, was detected in shallow ground water by 1995, consistent with previous field-scale studies indicating that some pesticides may be detected in ground

  3. Trends in Pesticide Concentrations in Corn-Belt Streams, 1996-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Daniel J.; Vecchia, Aldo V.; Lorenz, David L.; Gilliom, Robert J.; Martin, Jeffrey D.

    2009-01-01

    Trends in the concentrations of commonly occurring pesticides in the Corn Belt of the United States were assessed, and the performance and application of several statistical methods for trend analysis were evaluated. Trends in the concentrations of 11 pesticides with sufficient data for trend assessment were assessed at up to 31 stream sites for two time periods: 1996-2002 and 2000-2006. Pesticides included in the trend analyses were atrazine, acetochlor, metolachlor, alachlor, cyanazine, EPTC, simazine, metribuzin, prometon, chlorpyrifos, and diazinon. The statistical methods applied and compared were (1) a modified version of the nonparametric seasonal Kendall test (SEAKEN), (2) a modified version of the Regional Kendall test, (3) a parametric regression model with seasonal wave (SEAWAVE), and (4) a version of SEAWAVE with adjustment for streamflow (SEAWAVE-Q). The SEAKEN test is a statistical hypothesis test for detecting monotonic trends in seasonal time-series data such as pesticide concentrations at a particular site. Trends across a region, represented by multiple sites, were evaluated using the regional seasonal Kendall test, which computes a test for an overall trend within a region by computing a score for each season at each site and adding the scores to compute the total for the region. The SEAWAVE model is a parametric regression model specifically designed for analyzing seasonal variability and trends in pesticide concentrations. The SEAWAVE-Q model accounts for the effect of changing flow conditions in order to separate changes caused by hydrologic trends from changes caused by other factors, such as pesticide use. There was broad, general agreement between unadjusted trends (no adjustment for streamflow effects) identified by the SEAKEN and SEAWAVE methods, including the regional seasonal Kendall test. Only about 10 percent of the paired comparisons between SEAKEN and SEAWAVE indicated a difference in the direction of trend, and none of these had

  4. Semen quality in relation to biomarkers of pesticide exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Shanna H; Kruse, Robin L; Liu, Fan; Barr, Dana B; Drobnis, Erma Z; Redmon, J Bruce; Wang, Christina; Brazil, Charlene; Overstreet, James W

    2003-01-01

    We previously reported reduced sperm concentration and motility in fertile men in a U.S. agrarian area (Columbia, MO) relative to men from U.S. urban centers (Minneapolis, MN; Los Angeles, CA; New York, NY). In the present study we address the hypothesis that pesticides currently used in agriculture in the Midwest contributed to these differences in semen quality. We selected men in whom all semen parameters (concentration, percentage sperm with normal morphology, and percentage motile sperm) were low (cases) and men in whom all semen parameters were within normal limits (controls) within Missouri and Minnesota (sample sizes of 50 and 36, respectively) and measured metabolites of eight current-use pesticides in urine samples provided at the time of semen collection. All pesticide analyses were conducted blind with respect to center and case-control status. Pesticide metabolite levels were elevated in Missouri cases, compared with controls, for the herbicides alachlor and atrazine and for the insecticide diazinon [2-isopropoxy-4-methyl-pyrimidinol (IMPY)]; for Wilcoxon rank test, p = 0.0007, 0.012, and 0.0004 for alachlor, atrazine, and IMPY, respectively. Men from Missouri with high levels of alachlor or IMPY were significantly more likely to be cases than were men with low levels [odds ratios (ORs) = 30.0 and 16.7 for alachlor and IMPY, respectively], as were men with atrazine levels higher than the limit of detection (OR = 11.3). The herbicides 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) and metolachlor were also associated with poor semen quality in some analyses, whereas acetochlor levels were lower in cases than in controls (p = 0.04). No significant associations were seen for any pesticides within Minnesota, where levels of agricultural pesticides were low, or for the insect repellent DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide) or the malathion metabolite malathion dicarboxylic acid. These associations between current-use pesticides and reduced semen quality suggest that

  5. Surface water-ground water interaction: Herbicide transport into municipal collector wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verstraeten, Ingrid M.; Carr, J.D.; Steele, G.V.; Thurman, E.M.; Bastian, K.C.; Dormedy, D.F.

    1999-01-01

    During spring runoff events, herbicides in the Platte River are transported through an alluvial aquifer into collector wells located on an island in the river in 6 to 7 d. During two spring runoff events in 1995 and 1996, atrazine [2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine] concentrations in water from these wells reached approximately 7 ??g/L, 70 times more than the background concentration in ground water. Concentrations of herbicides and metabolites in the collector wells generally were one-half to one-fifth the concentrations of herbicides in the river for atrazine, alachlor [2-chloro-2'-6'-diethyl-N-(methoxymethyl)-acetanilide], alachlor ethane-sulfonic acid (ESA) [2-((2,6-diethylphenyl) (methoxymethyl)amino)-2- oxoethane-sulfonic acid], metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N- (2-methoxy-1-methylethyl)acetamide], cyanazine [2-((4-chloro-6-(ethyl-amino)- 1,3,5 triazin-2-yl)-amino)-2-methylpropionitrile], and acetochlor [2-chloro- N-(ethoxymethyl)-N-(2-ethyl-6methyl-phenyl) acetamide], suggesting that 20 to 50% river water could be present in the water from the collector wells, assuming no degradation. The effect of the river on the quality of water from the collector wells can be reduced through selective management of horizontal laterals of the collector wells. The quality of the water from the collector wells is dependent on the (i) selection of the collector well used, (ii) number and selection of laterals used, (iii) chemical characteristics of the contaminant, and (iv) relative mixing of the Platte River and a major upstream tributary.

  6. Development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for determination of pretilachlor in water and soil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen-Jiang; Yu, Peng-Min; Fang, Song; Fan, Jia-Qin; Wang, Ming-Hua

    2011-09-01

    An indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ic-ELISA) has been developed for detection of pretilachlor in water and soil. An immunogen was prepared from haptens of pretilachlor conjugated to bovine serum albumin(BSA). The specific polyclonal antibodies were obtained by immunizing New Zealand white rabbits. The influence of parameters including concentrations of methanol, ionic strength and pH values were optimized to improve the sensitivity of the assay. The optimized ELISA was shown to have a high sensitivity and specificity for pretilachlor. Under optimal conditions, the ELISA has demonstrated an 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) value of 0.0359 mg/L with a limit of detection (LOD, IC(10)) of 6.9 ng/L. The cross-reactivities to some analogs of pretilachlor (acetochlor, butachlor, metazachlor and metalaxyl) were below 1.5%. The average recoveries of pretilachlor from distilled water, tap water, paddy water and soil were in the range of 77.0-115.2% between 0.005 and 5.0mg/L. The results of ELISA for spiked samples were confirmed by GC-ECD with a high correlation coefficient of 0.9950(n=11). Thus, the ELISA proven to be a sensitive, specific, inexpensive and quantitative tool for detection of pretilachlor from four kinds of spiked samples.

  7. Identification of ionic chloroacetanilide-herbicide metabolites in surface water and groundwater by HPLC/MS using negative ion spray

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferrer, I.; Thurman, E.M.; Barcelo, D.

    1997-01-01

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) was combined with high-performance liquid chromatography/high-flow pneumatically assisted electrospray mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESP/MS) for the trace analysis of oxanilic and sulfonic acids of acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor. The isolation procedure separated the chloroacetanilide metabolites from the parent herbicides during the elution from C18 cartridges using ethyl acetate for parent compounds, followed by methanol for the anionic metabolites. The metabolites were separated chromatographically using reversed-phase HPLC and analyzed by negative-ion MS using electrospray ionization in selected ion mode. Quantitation limits were 0.01 ??g/L for both the oxanilic and sulfonic acids based on a 100-mL water sample. This combination of methods represents an important advance in environmental analysis of chloroacetanilide-herbicide metabolites in surface water and groundwater for two reasons. First, anionic chloroacetanilide metabolites are a major class of degradation products that are readily leached to groundwater in agricultural areas. Second, anionic metabolites, which are not able to be analyzed by conventional methods such as liquid extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, are effectively analyzed by SPE and high-flow pneumatically assisted electrospray mass spectrometry. This paper reports the first HPLC/MS identification of these metabolites in surface water and groundwater.

  8. Acetamide herbicides and their degradation products in ground water and surface water of the United States, 1993-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scribner, Elisabeth A.; Dietze, Julie E.; Thurman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    During 1993 through 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a number of studies to investigate and document the occurrence, fate, and transport of acetamide herbicides and their degradation products in ground and surface water. As part of these studies, approximately 5,100 water samples were collected and analyzed for the acetamide parent herbicides acetochlor, alachlor, dimethenamid, flufenacet, and metolachlor and their degradation products ethanesulfonic acid, oxanilic acid, and sulfinyl acetic acid. During this period, various analytical methods were developed to detect and measure concentrations of acetamide herbicides and their degradation products in ground water and surface water. Results showed that the degradation products of acetamide herbicides in ground water were detected more frequently and occurred at higher concentrations than their parent compounds. Further study showed that the acetamide herbicides and their degradation products were detected more frequently in surface water than in ground water. In general, the parent compounds were detected at similar or greater frequencies than the degradation products in surface water. The developed methods and data were valuable for acquiring information about the occurrence, fate, and transport of the herbicides and their degradation products and the importance of analyzing for both parent compounds and their degradate products in water-quality studies.

  9. Herbicide and degradate flux in the Yazoo River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coupe, R.H.; Welch, H.L.; Pell, A.B.; Thurman, E.M.

    2005-01-01

    During 1996-1997, water samples were collected from five sites in the Yazoo River Basin and analysed for 14 herbicides and nine degradates. These included acetochlor, alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, fluometuron, metolachlor, metribuzin, molinate, norflurazon, prometryn, propanil, propazine, simazine, trifluralin, three degradates of fluometuron, two degradates of atrazine, one degradate of cyanazine, norflurazon, prometryn, and propanil. Fluxes generally were higher in 1997 than in 1996 due to a greater rainfall in 1997 than 1996. Fluxes were much larger from streams in the alluvial plain (an area of very productive farmland) than from the Skuna River in the bluff hills (an area of small farms, pasture, and forest). Adding the flux of the atrazine degradates to the atrazine flux increased the total atrazine flux by an average of 14.5%. The fluometuron degradates added about 10% to the total fluometuron flux, and adding the norflurazon degradate flux to the norflurazon flux increased the flux by 82% in 1996 and by 171% in 1997. ?? 2005 Taylor & Francis.

  10. Pesticide monitoring in surface water and groundwater using passive samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodes, V.; Grabic, R.

    2009-04-01

    Passive samplers as screening devices have been used within a czech national water quality monitoring network since 2002 (SPMD and DGT samplers for non polar substances and metals). The passive sampler monitoring of surface water was extended to polar substances, in 2005. Pesticide and pharmaceutical POCIS samplers have been exposed in surface water at 21 locations and analysed for polar pesticides, perfluorinated compounds, personal care products and pharmaceuticals. Pesticide POCIS samplers in groundwater were exposed at 5 locations and analysed for polar pesticides. The following active substances of plant protection products were analyzed in surface water and groundwater using LC/MS/MS: 2,4,5-T, 2,4-D, Acetochlor, Alachlor, Atrazine, Atrazine_desethyl, Azoxystrobin, Bentazone, Bromacil, Bromoxynil, Carbofuran, Clopyralid, Cyanazin, Desmetryn, Diazinon, Dicamba, Dichlobenil, Dichlorprop, Dimethoat, Diuron, Ethofumesate, Fenarimol, Fenhexamid, Fipronil, Fluazifop-p-butyl, Hexazinone, Chlorbromuron, Chlorotoluron, Imazethapyr, Isoproturon, Kresoxim-methyl, Linuron, MCPA, MCPP, Metalaxyl, Metamitron, Methabenzthiazuron, Methamidophos, Methidathion, Metobromuron, Metolachlor, Metoxuron, Metribuzin, Monolinuron, Nicosulfuron, Phorate, Phosalone, Phosphamidon, Prometryn, Propiconazole, Propyzamide, Pyridate, Rimsulfuron, Simazine, Tebuconazole, Terbuthylazine, Terbutryn, Thifensulfuron-methyl, Thiophanate-methyl and Tri-allate. The POCIS samplers performed very well being able to provide better picture than grab samples. The results show that polar pesticides and also perfluorinated compounds, personal care products and pharmaceuticals as well occur in hydrosphere of the Czech republic. Acknowledgment: Authors acknowledge the financial support of grant No. 2B06095 by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports.

  11. Application of herbicides is likely to reduce greenhouse gas (N2O and CH4) emissions from rice-wheat cropping systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jingyan; Chen, Linmei; Sun, Qing; Sang, Mengmeng; Huang, Yao

    2015-04-01

    Herbicides have been widely used to control weeds in croplands; however, their effects on greenhouse gas emissions remain unclear. The effects of three wheat herbicides (acetochlor, AC; tribenuron-methyl, TBM; fenoxaprop-p-ethyl, FE) and two rice herbicides (butachlor, BC; bensulfuron-methyl, BSM) on N2O and CH4 emissions were investigated in this study. In the wheat growing season, applications of AC and FE + TBM significantly reduced N2O emissions by 31% compared with no herbicide use (p = 0.001). In the rice growing season, the application of BC significantly reduced CH4 emissions by 58% (p = 0.022), and BSM significantly reduced N2O emissions by 27% (p = 0.040); however, no significant difference among treatments with regard to the aggregate emissions of N2O and CH4 in the CO2 equivalent for the 100-year horizon was observed (p > 0.05). Relative to control plots, which were not treated with herbicides, the combined application of the herbicides FE and TBM in the wheat season led to a significant decrease in greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) by ∼41% (p = 0.002), and the application of BC together with BSM reduced GHGI by 22% in the rice season, although this reduction was not statistically significant (p = 0.158). Further investigation suggested that the inhibitory effect of herbicides on N2O emissions in the wheat field could be ascribed to low soil ammonium nitrogen and less abundance of denitrifying bacteria. The inhibitory effects of separate applications of BC on CH4 emissions in rice fields, in contrast, were linked to high soil nitrate nitrogen and urease activity.

  12. Pesticide fate and transport throughout unsaturated zones in five agricultural settings, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hancock, T.C.; Sandstrom, M.W.; Vogel, J.R.; Webb, R.M.T.; Bayless, E.R.; Barbash, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Pesticide transport through the unsaturated zone is a function of chemical and soil characteristics, application, and water recharge rate. The fate and transport of 82 pesticides and degradates were investigated at five different agricultural sites. Atrazine and metolachlor, as well as several of the degradates of atrazine, metolachlor, acetochlor, and alachlor, were frequently detected in soil water during the 2004 growing season, and degradates were generally more abundant than parent compounds. Metolachlor and atrazine were applied at a Nebraska site the same year as sampling, and focused recharge coupled with the short time since application resulted in their movement in the unsaturated zone 9 m below the surface. At other sites where the herbicides were applied 1 to 2 yr before sampling, only degradates were found in soil water. Transformations of herbicides were evident with depth and during the 4-mo sampling time and reflected the faster degradation of metolachlor oxanilic acid and persistence of metolachor ethanesulfonic acid. The fraction of metolachlor ethanesulfonic acid relative to metolachlor and metolachlor oxanilic acid increased from 0.3 to > 0.9 at a site in Maryland where the unsaturated zone was 5 m deep and from 0.3 to 0.5 at the shallowest depth. The flux of pesticide degradates from the deepest sites to the shallow ground water was greatest (3.0–4.9 μmol m−2 yr−1) where upland recharge or focused flow moved the most water through the unsaturated zone. Flux estimates based on estimated recharge rates and measured concentrations were in agreement with fluxes estimated using an unsaturated-zone computer model (LEACHM).

  13. Atmospheric Transport and Deposition of Agricultural Chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, M. S.; Vogel, J. R.; Capel, P. D.

    2006-05-01

    Concentrations of more than 80 pesticides and select transformation products were measured in atmospheric deposition during two growing seasons in five agricultural areas across the United States. Rainfall samples were collected at study areas in California, Indiana, Maryland, and Nebraska. In the arid Yakima Valley of Washington, dry deposition for the same compounds was estimated using air concentration measurements and depositional models. In the predominantly corn, soybean, and alfalfa growing region of Nebraska, Indiana, and Maryland, the herbicides acetochlor, alachlor, atrazine, and metolachlor where the predominant pesticides detected, and the highest concentrations ranged from 0.64 microgram per liter (ug/L) for metolachlor in a small, predominantly dairy use dominated watershed in Maryland to 6.6 ug/L and 19 ug/L for atrazine in Indiana and Nebraska, respectively. California showed a different seasonal occurrence pattern and suite of detected pesticides because the rainy season occurs during the winter months and a wide variety of crops are grown throughout the year. With the exception of metolachlor (0.23 ug/L, max.), the corn and soybean herbicides were not used to any great extent in the California study area and were not detected. The insecticides diazinon (1.21 ug/L, max.) and chlorpyrifos (0.12 ug/L, max.) were detected in nearly every sample taken in California. The Washington study area was similar to California in terms of the variety of crops grown and the pesticides use, but it receives very little rainfall. Dry deposition was estimated at this site from air concentrations and particle settling velocities. The results of these studies show the importance of the atmosphere as an additional source of pesticide loading to agricultural watersheds.

  14. Pesticides in rain in four agricultural watersheds in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vogel, J.R.; Majewski, M.S.; Capel, P.D.

    2008-01-01

    Rainfall samples were collected during the 2003 and 2004 growing seasons at four agricultural locales across the USA in Maryland, Indiana, Nebraska, and California. The samples were analyzed for 21 insecticides, 18 herbicides, three fungicides, and 40 pesticide degradates. Data from all sites combined show that 7 of the 10 most frequently detected pesticides were herbicides, with atrazine (70%) and metolachlor (83%) detected at every site. Dacthal, acetochlor, simazine, alachlor, and pendimethalin were detected in more than 50% of the samples. Chlorpyrifos, carbaryl, and diazinon were the only insecticides among the 10 most frequently detected compounds. Of the remaining pesticide parent compounds, 18 were detected in fewer than 30% of the samples, and 13 were not detected. The most frequently detected degradates were deethylatrazine; the oxygen analogs (OAs) of the organophosphorus insecticides chlorpyrifos, diazinon, and malathion; and 1-napthol (degradate of carbaryl). Deethylatrazine was detected in nearly 70% of the samples collected in Maryland, Indiana, and Nebraska but was detected only once in California. The OAs of chlorpyrifos and diazinon were detected primarily in California. Degradates of the acetanilide herbicides were rarely detected in rain, indicating that they are not formed in the atmosphere or readily volatilized from soils. Herbicides accounted for 91 to 98% of the total pesticide mass deposited by rain except in California, where insecticides accounted for 61% in 2004. The mass of pesticides deposited by rainfall was estimated to be less than 2% of the total applied in these agricultural areas. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  15. Occurrence of sulfonylurea, sulfonamide, imidazolinone, and other herbicides in rivers, reservoirs and ground water in the Midwestern United States, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.A.; Furlong, E.T.; Burkhardt, M.R.; Peter, C.J.

    2000-01-01

    Sulfonylurea (SU), sulfonamide (SA), and imidazolinone (IMI) herbicides are relatively new classes of chemical compounds that function by inhibiting the action of a plant enzyme, stopping plant growth, and eventually killing the plant. These compounds generally have low mammalian toxicity, but plants demonstrate a wide range in sensitivity to SUs, SAs, and IMIs with over a 10000-fold difference in observed toxicity levels for some compounds. SUs, SAs, and IMIs are applied either pre- or post-emergence to crops commonly at 1/50th or less of the rate of other herbicides. Little is known about their occurrence, fate, or transport in surface water or ground water in the USA. To obtain information on the occurrence of SU, SA, and IMI herbicides in the Midwestern United States, 212 water samples were collected from 75 surface-water and 25 ground-water sites in 1998. These samples were analyzed for 16 SU, SA and IMI herbicides by USGS Methods Research and Development Program staff using high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Samples were also analyzed for 47 pesticides or pesticide degradation products. At least one of the 16 SUs, SAs or IMIs was detected above the method reporting limit (MRL) of 0.01 ??g/l in 83% of 130 stream samples. Imazethapyr was detected most frequently (71% of samples) followed by flumetsulam (63% of samples) and nicosulfuron (52% of samples). The sum of SU, SA and IMI concentrations exceeded 0.5 ??g/l in less than 10% of stream samples. Acetochlor, alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine and metolachlor were all detected in 90% or more of 129 stream samples. The sum of the concentration of these five herbicides exceeded 50 ??g/l in approximately 10% of stream samples. At least one SU, SA, or IMI herbicide was detected above the MRL in 24% of 25 ground-water samples and 86% of seven reservoir samples. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  16. Ground-water quality in northeastern St. Joseph County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenelon, J.M.; Bayless, E. Randall; Watson, Lee R.

    1995-01-01

    No industrial organic compounds were detected in the water samples. Four pesticides - alachlor, carbofuran, metolachlor, and triazines - were detected in water samples; the highest pesticide concentration in a water sample was 1.0 microgram per liter of alachlor.

  17. Pesticides in ground water in selected agricultural land-use areas and hydrogeologic settings in Pennsylvania, 2003-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loper, Connie A.; Breen, Kevin J.; Zimmerman, Tammy M.; Clune, John W.

    2009-01-01

    absence of bacteria only for the 10 wells representing the Blue Ridge crystalline and Triassic Lowland siliciclastic setting. Results of Spearman’s rank test showed strong positive correlations in the Devonian-Silurian carbonate setting between 1) the number of pesticides above the MRLs and nitrate concentration, and 2) concentrations of atrazine and nitrate. Atrazine concentration and nitrate concentration also showed a statistically significant positive correlation in the Great Valley siliciclastic setting. An additional component of baseline monitoring was to evaluate changes in pesticide concentration in water from wells representing hydrogeologic settings most vulnerable to contamination from pesticides. In 2003, 16 wells originally sampled in the 1990s were resampled—4 each in the Appalachian Mountain carbonate, Triassic Lowland siliciclastic, Great Valley carbonate, and Piedmont carbonate settings. Nine of these wells, where pesticide concentrations from 1993 and 2003 were analyzed at the NWQL, were chosen for a paired-sample analysis using concentrations of atrazine and metolachlor. A statistically significant decrease in atrazine concentration was identified using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test (p = 0.004); significant temporal changes in metolachlor concentrations were not observed (p = 0.625). Monitoring in three areas of special ground-water protection, where selected pesticide concentrations in well water were at or above the PPGWS action levels, was done at wells BE 1370 (Berks County, Oley Township), BA 437 (Blair County, North Woodbury Township), and LN 1842 (Lancaster County, Earl Township). Co-occurrence of pesticide-degradation products with parent compounds was documented for the first time in ground-water samples collected from these three wells. Degradation products of atrazine, cyanazine, acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor were commonly at larger concentrations than the parent compound in the same water sample. Pesticide occurrence in water

  18. Removal of Pesticides and Inorganic Contaminants in Anaerobic and Aerobic Biological Contactors

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation contains data on the removal of pesticides (acetochlor, clethodim, dicrotophos), ammonia, nitrate, bromate and perchlorate through aerobic and anaerobic biological treatment processes.

  19. Pesticides and pesticide degradates in the East Fork Little Miami River and William H. Harsha Lake, southwestern Ohio, 1999-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Funk, Jason M.; Reutter, David C.; Rowe, Gary L.

    2003-01-01

    In 1999 and 2000, the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program conducted a national pilot study of pesticides and degradates in drinking-water supplies, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). William H. Harsha Lake, which provides drinking water for several thousand people in southwestern Ohio, was selected as one of the drinking-water supplies for this study. East Fork Little Miami River is the main source of water to Harsha Lake and drains a predominantly agricultural basin. Samples were collected from the East Fork Little Miami River upstream from Harsha Lake, at the drinking-water intake at Harsha Lake, at the outfall just below Harsha Lake, and from treated water at the Bob McEwen Treatment Plant. These samples were analyzed using standardized methods developed for the NAWQA Program. In all, 42 pesticide compounds (24 herbicides, 4 insecticides, 1 fungicide, and 13 degradates) were detected at least once in samples collected during this study. No compound in the treated water samples exceeded any drinking-water standard, although atrazine concentrations in untreated water exceeded the USEPA Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for drinking water (3 ?g/L) on four occasions. At least eight compounds were detected with greater than 60 percent frequency at each sampling location. Herbicides, such as atrazine, alachlor, acetochlor, cyanazine, metolachlor, and simazine, were detected most frequently. Rainfall affected the pesticide concentrations in surface waters of the East Fork Little Miami River Basin. Drought conditions from May through November 1999 led to lower streamflow and pesticide concentrations throughout southwestern Ohio. More normal climate conditions during 2000 resulted in higher streamflows and seasonally higher concentrations in the East Fork Little Miami River and Harsha Lake for some pesticides Comparison of pesticide concentrations in untreated lake water and treated drinking water

  20. Risk assessment of herbicides and booster biocides along estuarine continuums in the Bay of Vilaine area (Brittany, France).

    PubMed

    Caquet, Th; Roucaute, M; Mazzella, N; Delmas, F; Madigou, C; Farcy, E; Burgeot, Th; Allenou, J-P; Gabellec, R

    2013-02-01

    A 2-year study was implemented to characterize the contamination of estuarine continuums in the Bay of Vilaine area (NW Atlantic Coast, Southern Brittany, France) by 30 pesticide and biocide active substances and metabolites. Among these, 11 triazines (ametryn, atrazine, desethylatrazine, desethylterbuthylazine, desisopropyl atrazine, Irgarol 1051, prometryn, propazine, simazine, terbuthylazine, and terbutryn), 10 phenylureas (chlortoluron, diuron, 1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-methylurea, fenuron, isoproturon, 1-(4-isopropylphenyl)-3-methylurea, 1-(4-isopropylphenyl)-urea, linuron, metoxuron, and monuron), and 4 chloroacetanilides (acetochlor, alachlor, metolachlor, and metazachlor) were detected at least once. The objectives were to assess the corresponding risk for aquatic primary producers and to provide exposure information for connected studies on the responses of biological parameters in invertebrate sentinel species. The risk associated with contaminants was assessed using risk quotients based on the comparison of measured concentrations with original species sensitivity distribution-derived hazardous concentration values. For EU Water Framework Directive priority substances, results of monitoring were also compared with regulatory Environmental Quality Standards. The highest residue concentrations and risks for primary producers were recorded for diuron and Irgarol 1051 in Arzal reservoir, close to a marina. Diuron was present during almost the all survey periods, whereas Irgarol 1051 exhibited a clear seasonal pattern, with highest concentrations recorded in June and July. These results suggest that the use of antifouling biocides is responsible for a major part of the contamination of the lower part of the Vilaine River course for Irgarol 1051. For diuron, agricultural sources may also be involved. The presence of isoproturon and chloroacetanilide herbicides on some dates indicated a significant contribution of the use of plant protection products in

  1. Herbicide Transport and Transformations in the Unsaturated Zone of Three Small Agricultural Basins with Corn and Soybean Row Crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, T. C.; Vogel, J. R.; Sandstrom, M. W.; Capel, P. D.; Bayless, R. E.; Webb, R. M.

    2006-05-01

    locations this fraction increased over time. At the Maple Creek sites, atrazine, metalochlor, acetochlor, and alachlor were detected, typically at concentrations higher than their metabolites. The Maple Creek site is influenced by focused recharge, macropore flow, and variable soil-moisture retention properties in soils that transition from loess to sand.

  2. Cloud point extraction with surfactant derivatization as an enrichment step prior to gas chromatographic or gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Takagai, Yoshitaka; Hinze, Willie L

    2009-08-15

    Cloud point extraction (CPE) using Triton X-114 was successfully applied as an extractive preconcentration step prior to gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis. No liquid chromatographic or back-extraction steps were required to remove the target analyte(s) from the surfactant-rich extractant phase. Instead a post-extraction derivatization step is employed in which the surfactant of the surfactant-rich phase is reacted with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) prior to injection into the gas chromatograph. Such derivatization of the Triton X-114 surfactant following CPE was found to provide improved chromatographic performance yielding a reasonable elution time window that is free of derivatized surfactant signals, reproducible analyte retention times, and quantitative results. Mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), herbicides, and profens were utilized to demonstrate the feasibility and performance of this approach. The retention times of six PAHs (acenaphthene, acenaphthylene, anthracene, biphenyl, dibenzofuran, and fluorene) were found to be very reproducible with relative standard deviations (RSDs) in the range of 0.5-0.8%. Quantitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of a herbicide test mixture (composed of alachlor, atrazine, butachlor, hexachlorocyclopentadiene, metolachlor, and simazine) following their CPE from spiked water samples yielded detection limits in the range of 6.6-97 ng/L (except for that of hexachlorocyclopentadiene which was 482 ng/L). The enrichment factors achieved for these herbicides ranged from 17 to 33. The recovery of the herbicides from spiked water samples ranged from 90 to 100% except for simazine and atrazine which were 50% and 74%, respectively. The BSFTA derivatization step can serve not only to derivatize the surfactant but also appropriate nonvolatile (or less volatile) analytes. An ibuprofen and flurbiprofen test mix was utilized to demonstrate this feature. The

  3. Characterization of Ground-Water Quality, Upper Republican Natural Resources District, Nebraska, 1998-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankforter, Jill D.; Chafin, Daniele T.

    2004-01-01

    south-central Dundy, and south-central Perkins Counties. Generally, these concentrations were detected in samples from wells located in upland areas with permeable soils and a high percentage of cropland. In 1999, 31 of the ground-water samples collected from irrigation wells were analyzed for pesticides, and 14 samples (45 percent) had detectable concentrations of at least one pesticide compound. In 2000, all of the 23 irrigation-well samples analyzed had one or more pesticides present at detectable concentrations. In 2001, 12 of 26 domestic-well samples (46 percent) had detectable concentrations. Although the analytical method used during the study was changed to increase the number of pesticides included in the analyses, the pesticides detected in the ground-water samples from domestic and irrigation wells were limited to the commonly used herbicide compounds acetochlor, alachlor, atrazine, metolachlor, prometon, propachlor, propazine, trifluralin, and the atrazine degradation product deethylatrazine. Of the compounds detected, only atrazine (3.0 micrograms per liter) and alachlor (2.0 micrograms per liter) have MCLs established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. None of the ground-water samples from the URNRD study area had concentrations that exceeded either MCL. Tritium age-dating analyses indicate water from about one-third of the sites entered the ground-water system prior to 1952. Because the increase in agricultural practices occurred during the 1950s and 1960s, it can be assumed that this water was not influenced by agricultural practices. Nitrogen-isotope speciation analyses for samples from three irrigation wells indicated that the source of nitrates in the ground water probably is synthetic fertilizer; however, the source at most irrigation wells probably is either naturally occurring or a mixture of water from various anthropogenic sources (such as synthetic fertilizer and animal waste).

  4. Evaluating the Influence of Drainage, Application, and Tillage Practices on the Dissipation of Chloroacetanilide Herbicides in Minnesota Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acetochlor and metolachlor are herbicides used in Minnesota and the United States for the control of broadleaf and annual weeds in corn, soybean and other crops. Water monitoring studies have reported the occurrences of acetochlor, metolachlor and their breakdown products in both ground and surface ...

  5. IMPROVING STRUCTURE-LINKED ACCESS TO PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CHEMICAL TOXICITY INFORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatotoxicity of the Herbicide Alachlor Associated with Glutathione Depletion, Oxidative Damage and Protein S-Cysteinyl Adduction.

    Toxicity of the herbicide alachlor (2-chloro-2',6'-diethtl-N-[methoxtmethtl]-acetanilide) has been attributed to cytochrome P450-dependent me...

  6. Effects of urbanization on water quality in the Kansas River, Shunganunga Creek Basin, and Soldier Creek, Topeka, Kansas, October 1993 through September 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pope, L.M.; Putnam, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    , respectively, before treatment-plant discharge to a calculated 4,900 and 4,700 colonies per 100 milliliters of water, respectively, after discharge. Median concentrations of dissolved solids were not significantly different between three sampling sites in the Shunganunga Creek Basin. Median concentrations of dissolved nitrate as nitrogen, total phosphorus, and dissolved orthophosphate were significantly larger in water from the upstream- most Shunganunga Creek sampling site than in water from either of the other sampling sites in the Shunganunga Creek Basin probably because of the site's proximity to a wastewater-treatment plant.Median concentrations of dissolved nitrate as nitrogen and total phosphorus during 1993-95 at upstream sampling sites were either significantlylarger than during 1979-81 in response to increase of wastewater-treatment plant discharge or smaller because of the elimination of wastewater-treatment plant discharge. Median concentrations of dissolved ammonia as nitrogen were significantly less during 1993-95 than during 1979-81. Median concentrations of total aluminum, iron, maganese, and molybdenum were significantly larger in water from the downstream-mostShunganunga Creek sampling site than in water from the upstream-most sampling site. This probably reflects their widespread use in the urbanenvironment between the upstream and downstream Shunganunga Creek sampling sites. Little water-quality effect from the urbanization was indicated by results from the Soldier Creek sampling site. Median concentrations of most water-quality constituents in water from this sampling site were the smallest in water from any sampling site in the study area. Herbicides were detected in water from all sampling sites. Some of the more frequently detected herbicides included acetochlor, alachlor,atrazine, cyanazine, EPTC, metolachlor, prometon, simazine, and tebuthiuron. Detected insecticides including chlordane,

  7. Pesticides in surface water in the lower Illinois River basin, 1996-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Robin B.

    2003-01-01

    the Sangamon River at Monticello. The maximum atrazine concentration in the lower Illinois River was 20 mg/L, measured at Valley City, although most of the relatively elevated concentrations in the Illinois River sites were in the range from 5 to 8 mg/L. The concentrations of the herbicide cyanazine exceeded the health advisory guideline of 1 mg/L in about 19 percent (15 of 80) of the May to June samples. The pesticides chlorpyrifos, diazinon, metolachlor, and 2,4-D exceeded aquatic health guidelines at various times from May to August. Three dominant factors that affect the presence of pesticides in streams are identified: the pesticide usage, the time-of-year (or season), and the flow condition. The pesticides with the highest usage--atrazine, metolachlor, cyanazine, and acetochlor--generally were the pesticides detected most frequently and at the highest concentrations. Notable exceptions to this general observation are alachlor and simazine, which did not have high usage but were detected frequently. The elevated pesticide concentrations were most affected by seasonality--most of these elevated concentrations were observed across all flow conditions during May to June. Flow conditions also affect pesticide concentrations, but not as much as seasonality. The maximum pesticide loads were observed between March and July on the Illinois River. The net contribution of pesticides applied in the study area to net increases in load indicates that only about 1-2 percent of the pesticides applied exit the basin through the Illinois River at Valley City. The chloroacetanilide-class transformation products observed in samples collected in summer 1998 persistently contained elevated concentrations relative to the associated parent pesticide compound at all locations and for all streamflow conditions. The concentration of the transformation product metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid (ESA) usually was about 10 times higher than the parent compound in the mainstem of the lower

  8. Anthropogenic Organic Compounds in Source Water of Selected Community Water Systems that Use Groundwater, 2002-05

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hopple, Jessica A.; Delzer, Gregory C.; Kingsbury, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Source water, defined as groundwater collected from a community water system well prior to water treatment, was sampled from 221 wells during October 2002 to July 2005 and analyzed for 258 anthropogenic organic compounds. Most of these compounds are unregulated in drinking water and include pesticides and pesticide degradates, gasoline hydrocarbons, personal-care and domestic-use products, and solvents. The laboratory analytical methods used in the study have detection levels that commonly are 100 to 1,000 times lower than State and Federal standards and guidelines for protecting water quality. Detections of anthropogenic organic compounds do not necessarily indicate a concern to human health but rather help to identify emerging issues and track changes in occurrence and concentrations over time. Less than one-half (120) of the 258 compounds were detected in at least one source-water sample. Chloroform, in 36 percent of samples, was the most commonly detected of the 12 compounds that were in about 10 percent or more of source-water samples. The herbicides atrazine, metolachlor, prometon, and simazine also were among the commonly detected compounds. The commonly detected degradates of atrazine - deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine - as well as degradates of acetochlor and alachlor, generally were detected at concentrations similar to or greater than concentrations of the parent herbicide. The compounds perchloroethene, trichloroethene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, methyl tert-butyl ether, and cis-1,2-dichloroethene also were detected commonly. The most commonly detected compounds in source-water samples generally were among those detected commonly across the country and reported in previous studies by the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Relatively few compounds were detected at concentrations greater than human-health benchmarks, and 84 percent of the concentrations were two or more orders of magnitude less than benchmarks. Five

  9. Hydrogeology, Chemical Characteristics, and Transport Processes in the Zone of Contribution of a Public-Supply Well in York, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landon, Matthew K.; Clark, Brian R.; McMahon, Peter B.; McGuire, Virginia L.; Turco, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    aquifers (hereinafter, confined unmixed wells). Delta 18O and delta D values for a minority of wells in the confined aquifers were intermediate between those for the unconfined shallow wells and those for the confined unmixed wells. These intermediate values were consistent with mixing of water from unconfined and confined aquifers (hereinafter, confined mixed wells). Oxidation-reduction conditions were primarily oxic in the unconfined aquifer and variably reducing in the confined aquifers. Trace amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOC), particularly tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were widely detected in unconfined shallow urban wells and indicated the presence of young urban recharge waters in most confined mixed wells. The presence of degradation products of agricultural pesticides (acetochlor and alachlor) in some confined mixed wells suggests that some fraction of the water in these wells also was the result of recharge in agricultural areas. In the unconfined aquifer, age-tracer data (chlorofluorocarbon and sulfur hexafluoride data, and tritium to helium-3 ratios) fit a piston-flow model, with apparent recharge ages ranging from 7 to 48 years and generally increasing with depth. Age-tracer data for the confined aquifers were consistent with mixing of 'old' water, not containing modern tracers recharged in the last 60 years, and exponentially-mixed 'young' water with modern tracers. Confined unmixed wells contained less than (=) 97% of old water. Confined mixed wells contained >30% young water and mean ages ranged from 12 to 14 years. Median concentrations of nitrate (as nitrogen, hereinafter, nitrate-N) were 17.3 and 16.0 mg/L (milligram per liter) in unconfined shallow urban and agricultural wells, respectively, indicating a range of likely nitrate sources. Septic systems are most numerous near the edge of the urban area and appear to be

  10. Environmental and human risk hierarchy of pesticides: A prioritization method, based on monitoring, hazard assessment and environmental fate.

    PubMed

    Tsaboula, Aggeliki; Papadakis, Emmanouil-Nikolaos; Vryzas, Zisis; Kotopoulou, Athina; Kintzikoglou, Katerina; Papadopoulou-Mourkidou, Euphemia

    2016-05-01

    A pesticide prioritization approach was developed and implemented in the Pinios River Basin of Central Greece. It takes under consideration the Level of Environmental Risk containing information on the frequency of occurrence of pesticides above environmental thresholds, the intensity of this occurrence and the spatial distribution as well as information about the fate and behavior of pesticides in the environment and the potential to have adverse impact on humans' health. Original 3-year monitoring data from 102 Stationary Sampling Sites located on rivers and their tributaries, reservoirs, streams and irrigation/drainage canals giving rise to a collection of 2382 water samples resulting in 7088 data sets, were included in this integrated prioritization study. Among 302 monitored active ingredients, 119 were detected at least once and the concentrations found in the aquatic systems for 41% of compounds were higher than the respective lowest Predicted Non-Effect Concentration (PNEC) values. Sixteen and 5 pesticides were found with risk ratios (MECmax/PNEC) above 10 (high concern) and 100 (very high concern), respectively. However, pesticides with maximum Measured Environmental Concentration (MECmax) values exceeding by 1000 times the respective lowest PNEC values were also found which were considered of extremely high concern; in the latter group were included prometryn, chlorpyrifos, diazinon, λ-cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, α-cypermethrin deltamethrin, ethalfluralin and phosmet. The sensitivity of the analytical methods used in the monitoring study was considered inadequate to meet the toxicological endpoints for 32 pesticides. The widest distribution of occurrence in the Stationary Sampling Sites of the monitoring program was found for the pesticides, prometryn, fluometuron, terbuthylazine, S-metolachlor, chlorpyrifos, diphenylamine, acetochlor, alachlor, 2,4-D, etridiazole, imidacloprid and lindane (γ-ΗCH). Among the 27 priority pesticides included in the

  11. Occurrence of Agricultural Chemicals in Shallow Ground Water and the Unsaturated Zone, Northeast Nebraska Glacial Till, 2002-04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanton, Jennifer S.; Steele, Gregory V.; Vogel, Jason R.

    2007-01-01

    included parent or degradate compounds of acetochlor, alachlor, atrazine, and metolachlor. Overall, pesticide concentrations in ground-water samples collected in 2003 and 2004 were small and did not exceed public drinking-water standards where established. On average, more pesticides were detected in the flow-path wells than in the glacial-till network wells. The presence of a perennial stream within 1,640 feet of a well was correlated to smaller nitrate-N concentrations in the well water, and the presence of a road ditch within 164 feet of the well was correlated to the presence of detectable pesticides in the well water. All other variables tested showed no significant correlations to nitrate-N concentrations or pesticide detections. Unsaturated zone soil cores collected in 2002 from well boreholes indicated that nitrogen in the forms of nitrate-N and ammonia as nitrogen (ammonia-N) was available in the unsaturated zone for transport to ground water. Concentrations of nitrate-N and ammonia-N in these soil cores were inversely correlated to depth, and nitrate-N concentrations were correlated to chloride concentrations.

  12. Environmental and human risk hierarchy of pesticides: A prioritization method, based on monitoring, hazard assessment and environmental fate.

    PubMed

    Tsaboula, Aggeliki; Papadakis, Emmanouil-Nikolaos; Vryzas, Zisis; Kotopoulou, Athina; Kintzikoglou, Katerina; Papadopoulou-Mourkidou, Euphemia

    2016-05-01

    A pesticide prioritization approach was developed and implemented in the Pinios River Basin of Central Greece. It takes under consideration the Level of Environmental Risk containing information on the frequency of occurrence of pesticides above environmental thresholds, the intensity of this occurrence and the spatial distribution as well as information about the fate and behavior of pesticides in the environment and the potential to have adverse impact on humans' health. Original 3-year monitoring data from 102 Stationary Sampling Sites located on rivers and their tributaries, reservoirs, streams and irrigation/drainage canals giving rise to a collection of 2382 water samples resulting in 7088 data sets, were included in this integrated prioritization study. Among 302 monitored active ingredients, 119 were detected at least once and the concentrations found in the aquatic systems for 41% of compounds were higher than the respective lowest Predicted Non-Effect Concentration (PNEC) values. Sixteen and 5 pesticides were found with risk ratios (MECmax/PNEC) above 10 (high concern) and 100 (very high concern), respectively. However, pesticides with maximum Measured Environmental Concentration (MECmax) values exceeding by 1000 times the respective lowest PNEC values were also found which were considered of extremely high concern; in the latter group were included prometryn, chlorpyrifos, diazinon, λ-cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, α-cypermethrin deltamethrin, ethalfluralin and phosmet. The sensitivity of the analytical methods used in the monitoring study was considered inadequate to meet the toxicological endpoints for 32 pesticides. The widest distribution of occurrence in the Stationary Sampling Sites of the monitoring program was found for the pesticides, prometryn, fluometuron, terbuthylazine, S-metolachlor, chlorpyrifos, diphenylamine, acetochlor, alachlor, 2,4-D, etridiazole, imidacloprid and lindane (γ-ΗCH). Among the 27 priority pesticides included in the

  13. Monitoring of herbicide effect in maize based on electrical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cseresnyés, I.; Fekete, G.; Végh, K.; Székács, A.; Mörtl, M.; Rajkai, K.

    2012-07-01

    The effect of the herbicide acetochlor on root growth was studied by a non-destructive electrical impedance and capacitance method in pot experiments on maize. Acetochlor was applied both as single active ingredient and mixed with safener AD-67 in two dosages. Without safener addition, acetochlor had a permanent inhibiting effect on plant root expansion. The safener AD-67 was capable of providing protective effect against herbicide application. High correlations between root electrical impedance or capacitance and the root dry mass or surface area under our laboratory conditions were confirmed by plant harvest method. Root electrical impedance and capacitance measurements proved to be valid for monitoring the effect of the herbicide influencing root development and for distinguishing plant groups subjected to different stress conditions.

  14. Effect of rice husk gasification residue application on herbicide behavior in micro paddy lysimeter.

    PubMed

    Ok, Junghun; Pisith, Sok; Watanabe, Hirozumi; Thuyet, Dang Quoc; Boulange, Julien; Takagi, Kazuhiro

    2015-06-01

    Effects of rice husk gasification residues (RHGR) application on the fate of herbicides, butachlor and pyrazosulfuron-ethyl, in paddy water were investigated using micro paddy lysimeters (MPLs). The dissipation of both herbicides in paddy water was faster in the RHGR treated MPL than in the control MPL. The average concentrations of butachlor and pyrazosulfuron-ethyl in paddy water in the lysimeter treated with RHGR during 21 days were significantly reduced by 51% and 48%, respectively, as compared to those in the lysimeter without RHGR application. The half-lives (DT50) of butachlor in paddy water for control and treatment were 3.1 and 2.3 days respectively, and these values of pyrazosulfuron-ethyl were 3.0 and 2.2 days, respectively. Based on this study, RHGR application in rice paddy environment is an alternative method to reduce the concentration of herbicide in paddy field water and consequently to reduce potential pollution to aquatic environment.

  15. Influence of surfactants on the sorption of two chloroacetanilide in an Romanian chernozem soil.

    PubMed

    Coroi, I G; De Wilde, T; Cara, M S; Jitareanu, G; Steurbaut, W

    2011-01-01

    Pesticides have been extensively used in modern agriculture. Due to the prevalent use, there have been serious problems generated by pesticides wastes which could eventually endanger water resources and human health. The development of technologies for the decontamination of soils and waters polluted by hydrophobic organic compounds has encouraged research into the use of non-ionic surfactants as potential agents for the enhanced solubilization and removal of contaminants from soils and sediments. Sorption of two chloroacetanilide herbicides, acetochlor and metolachlor was studied on a representative chernozem soil of the Main Agricultural Research Station Ezareni belonging to the "Ion Ionescu de la Brad" University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine lasi, Romania, in the presence and absence of surfactants. Three different non-ionic surfactants were selected: Tween-20, Synperonic 91/5 and Silwet L-77, to verify the influence of their presence on herbicide sorption at different concentrations. Our results showed that the sorption of the studied herbicides within the soil-water-non-ionic surfactant system was influenced by the presence of non-ionic surfactants. The n values obtained were lower than 1 for all pesticide-surfactant combinations, which indicates that the amount of acetochor and metolachlor sorbed decreased with an increase in pesticide concentration. The sorption of acetochlor increased in the following order: Acetochlor+Synperonic 91/5 < Acetochlor < Acetochlor+Tween-20 < Acetochlor+Silwet L-77. In the case of metolachlor+Synperonic and metolachlor+Silwet L-77, the Kf values were significantly higher than the Kf value of metolachlor+Tween-20 on soil, where a lower Kf value could be observed with however a higher n value which indicate a higher sorption capacity at higher concentrations.

  16. Agricultural chemicals in groundwater of the midwestern United States: Relations to land use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    To determine the relations between land use and concentrations of selected agricultural chemicals (nitrate, atrazine residue [atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) + deethylatrazinc (2-amino-4-chloro-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) + deisopropylatrazine (2-amino-4-chloro-6-ethylamino-s-triazine)], and alachlor residue [alachlor, [2-chloro-2′,6′-diethyl-N-(methoxymethyl) acetanilide] + alachlor ethanesulfonic acid (alachlor-ESA; 2-[(2,6-diethylphenyl)(methoxymethyl)amino]-2-oxoethanesulfonic acid)] in groundwater, detailed land use information based on accurate measurements from aerial photographs for the 1991 growing season was obtained within a 2-km radius surrounding 100 wells completed in near-surface unconsolidated aquifers in the midwestern USA. The most significant land use factors to the agricultural chemicals examined were: nitrate (amount of irrigated crop production, positive relation), atrazine residue (amount of irrigated crop production, positive relation), and alachlor residue (amount of highly erodible land, inverse relation). The investigation of smaller buffer sizes (size of circular area around sampled wells) proved insightful for this study. Additional land use factors having significant relations to all three agricultural chemicals were identified using these smaller buffer radii. The most significant correlations (correlation maxima) generally occurred at ≤500-m for nitrate and ≥1000-m for atrazine residue and alachlor residue. An attempt to improve the statistical relations to land use by taking hydrologic considerations into account (removing land outside the estimated most probable recharge area from the statistical analysis) was not as successful as anticipated. Only 45% of the nitrate, 32% of the atrazine residue, and 20% of the alachlor residue correlations were improved by a consideration of the estimated most probable recharge area.

  17. Changes in tolerance to herbicide toxicity throughout development stages of phototrophic biofilms.

    PubMed

    Paule, A; Roubeix, V; Lauga, B; Duran, R; Delmas, F; Paul, E; Rols, J L

    2013-11-15

    Ecotoxicological experiments have been performed in laboratory-scale microcosms to investigate the sensitivity of phototrophic biofilm communities to the alachlor herbicide, in relation to the stages of phototrophic biofilm maturation (age of the phototrophic biofilms) and physical structure (intact biofilm versus recolonization). The phototrophic biofilms were initially cultivated on artificial supports in a prototype rotating annular bioreactor (RAB) with Taylor-Couette type flow under constant operating conditions. Biofilms were collected after 1.6 and 4.4 weeks of culture providing biofilms with different maturation levels, and then exposed to nominal initial alachlor concentration of 10 μg L(-1) in either intact or recolonized biofilms for 15 days in microcosms (mean time-weighted average concentration - TWAC of 5.52 ± 0.74 μg L(-1)). At the end of the exposure period, alachlor effects were monitored by a combination of biomass descriptors (ash-free dry mass - AFDM, chlorophyll a), structural molecular fingerprinting (T-RFLP), carbon utilization spectra (Biolog) and diatom species composition. We found significant effects that in terms of AFDM, alachlor inhibited growth of the intact phototrophic biofilms. No effect of alachlor was observed on diatom composition or functional and structural properties of the bacterial community regardless of whether they were intact or recolonized. The intact three-dimensional structure of the biofilm did not appear to confer protection from the effects of alachlor. Bacterial community structure and biomass level of 4.4 weeks - intact phototrophic biofilms were significantly influenced by the biofilm maturation processes rather than alachlor exposure. The diatom communities which were largely composed of mobile and colonizer life-form populations were not affected by alachlor. This study showed that the effect of alachlor (at initial concentration of 10 μg L(-1) or mean TWAC of 5.52 ± 0.74 μg L(-1)) is mainly limited to

  18. Changes in tolerance to herbicide toxicity throughout development stages of phototrophic biofilms.

    PubMed

    Paule, A; Roubeix, V; Lauga, B; Duran, R; Delmas, F; Paul, E; Rols, J L

    2013-11-15

    Ecotoxicological experiments have been performed in laboratory-scale microcosms to investigate the sensitivity of phototrophic biofilm communities to the alachlor herbicide, in relation to the stages of phototrophic biofilm maturation (age of the phototrophic biofilms) and physical structure (intact biofilm versus recolonization). The phototrophic biofilms were initially cultivated on artificial supports in a prototype rotating annular bioreactor (RAB) with Taylor-Couette type flow under constant operating conditions. Biofilms were collected after 1.6 and 4.4 weeks of culture providing biofilms with different maturation levels, and then exposed to nominal initial alachlor concentration of 10 μg L(-1) in either intact or recolonized biofilms for 15 days in microcosms (mean time-weighted average concentration - TWAC of 5.52 ± 0.74 μg L(-1)). At the end of the exposure period, alachlor effects were monitored by a combination of biomass descriptors (ash-free dry mass - AFDM, chlorophyll a), structural molecular fingerprinting (T-RFLP), carbon utilization spectra (Biolog) and diatom species composition. We found significant effects that in terms of AFDM, alachlor inhibited growth of the intact phototrophic biofilms. No effect of alachlor was observed on diatom composition or functional and structural properties of the bacterial community regardless of whether they were intact or recolonized. The intact three-dimensional structure of the biofilm did not appear to confer protection from the effects of alachlor. Bacterial community structure and biomass level of 4.4 weeks - intact phototrophic biofilms were significantly influenced by the biofilm maturation processes rather than alachlor exposure. The diatom communities which were largely composed of mobile and colonizer life-form populations were not affected by alachlor. This study showed that the effect of alachlor (at initial concentration of 10 μg L(-1) or mean TWAC of 5.52 ± 0.74 μg L(-1)) is mainly limited to

  19. Herbicides and their metabolites in rainfall: Origin, transport, and deposition patterns across the midwestern and northeastern United States, 1990-1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goolsby, D.A.; Thurman, E.M.; Pomes, M.L.; Meyer, M.T.; Battaglin, W.A.

    1997-01-01

    Herbicides were detected in rainfall throughout the midwestern and northeastern United States during late spring and summer of 1990 and 1991. Herbicide concentrations exhibited distinct geographic and seasonal patterns. The highest concentrations occurred in midwestern cornbelt states following herbicide application to cropland. Volume-weighted concentrations of 0.2- 0.4??g/L for atrazine and alachlor were typical in this area during mid- April through mid-July, and weighted concentrations as large as 0.6-0.9 ??g/L occurred at several sites. Concentrations of 1-3 ??g/L were measured in a few individual samples. Atrazine was detected most often followed by alachlor, deethylatrazine, metolachlor, cyanazine, and deisopropyl-atrazine. The high ratio (~0.5) of deethylatrazine to atrazine in rainfall suggests atmospheric degradation of atrazine. Mass deposition of herbicides was greatest in areas where herbicide use was high and decreased with distance from the cornbelt. Estimated deposition rates for both atrazine and alachlor ranged from more than 240 ??g m-2 yr-1 for some areas in the midwestern states to less than 10 ??g m-2 yr-1 for the New England states. The estimated annual deposition of atrazine on the Great Lakes ranged from about 12 to 63 ??g m-2 yr-1. The total amounts of atrazine and alachlor deposited annually in rainfall in the study area represent about 0.6% of the atrazine and 0.4% of the alachlor applied annually to crops in the study area.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF METHOD 535 FOR THE DETERMINATION OF CHLOROACETANILIDE AND OTHER ACETAMIDE HERBICIDE DEGRADATES IN DRINKING WATER BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION AND LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY/TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Method 535 has been developed in order to provide a method for the analysis of "Alachlor ESA and other acetanilide degradation products" which are listed on U.S. EPA's 1998 Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List. Method 535 uses solid phase extraction with a nonporous gr...

  1. Herbicide interchange between a stream and the adjacent alluvial aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, W.; Squillace, P.

    1994-01-01

    Herbicide interchange between a stream and the adjacent alluvial aquifer and quantification of herbicide bank storage during high streamflow were investigated at a research site on the Cedar River flood plain, 10 km southeast of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. During high streamflow in March 1990, alachlor, atrazine, and metolachlor were detected at concentrations above background in water from wells as distant as 20, 50, and 10 m from the river's edge, respectively. During high streamflow in May 1990, alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and metolachlor were detected at concentrations above background as distant as 20, 50, 10, and 20 m from the river's edge, respectively. Herbicide bank storage took place during high streamflow when hydraulic gradients were from the river to the alluvial aquifer and the laterally infiltrating river water contained herbicide concentrations larger than background concentrations in the aquifer. The herbicide bank storage can be quantified by multiplying herbicide concentration by the "effective area" that a well represented and an assumed porosity of 0.25. During March 1990, herbicide bank storage values were calculated to be 1.7,79, and 4.0 mg/m for alachlor, atrazine, and metolachlor, respectively. During May 1990, values were 7.1, 54, 11, and 19 mg/m for alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and metolachlor, respectively. ?? 1994 American Chemical Society.

  2. EVALUATION OF GENETIC DAMAGE IN FISH EXPOSED TO PESTICIDES IN FIELD AQUATIC MICROCOSMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Single cell gel electrophoresis (SCG) and micronucleus (MN) assays were used to measure DNA strand breaks and chromosomal damage in fish blood erythrocytes as biological indicators of exposure to alachlor and atrazine in a surrogate aquatic ecosystem. Caged common carp (Cyprinus...

  3. NOVEL CHROMATOGRAPHIC SEPARATION AND CARBON SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION OF ACETANILIDE HERBICIDE DEGRADATION PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Six acetanilide herbicides are currently registered for use in the U.S. Over the past several years, ethanesufonic acid (ESA) and oxanilic acid (OA) degradatoin products of these acetanilide herbicides have been found in U.S. ground waters and surface waters. "Alachlor ESA and ...

  4. Tillage management to mitigate herbicide loss in runoff under simulated rainfall conditions.

    PubMed

    Locke, Martin A; Zablotowicz, Robert M; Reddy, Krishna N; Steinriede, R Wade

    2008-02-01

    Conservation tillage mitigates soil loss in cropland because plant residues help protect the soil, but effects on pesticide movement in surface runoff are not as straightforward. Effects of soil disturbance on surface runoff loss of chlorimuron and alachlor were evaluated utilizing runoff trays. Soil in the trays was either disturbed (tilled) and kept bare or was not tilled, and existing decomposed plant residue was left on the surface. Rainfall (25mm, 20min) was simulated 1d after alachlor (2.8kg ha(-1)) or chlorimuron (54g ha(-1)) application, and runoff was collected. Runoff fractions were analyzed for herbicide and sediment. Total alachlor loss from bare plots was greater than that in no-tillage plots (4.5% vs. 2.3%, respectively). More than one-third of total alachlor lost from bare plots occurred in the first l of runoff, while no-tillage plots had less runoff volume with a more even distribution of alachlor concentration in the runoff during the rainfall simulation and subsequent runoff period. In contrast, more chlorimuron was lost from no-tillage plots than bare plots (12% vs. 1.5%) even though total runoff volume was lower in the no-tillage plots (10.6mm vs. 13.6mm). This was attributed to dense coverage with partially decomposed plant residue in no-tillage plots (1652kg ha(-1)) that intercepted chlorimuron. It was likely that chlorimuron, a polar compound, was more easily washed off surface plant residues and transported in runoff.

  5. Herbicides and degradates in shallow aquifers of Illinois: Spatial and temporal trends

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mills, P.C.; Kolpin, D.W.; Scribner, E.A.; Thurman, E.M.

    2005-01-01

    During the fall of 2000, the occurrence was examined of 16 herbicides and 13 herbicide degradates in samples from 55 wells in shallow aquifers underlying grain producing regions of Illinois. Herbicide compounds with concentrations above 0.05 ??g/L were detected in 56 percent of the samples. No concentrations exceeded regulatory drinking water standards. The six most frequently detected compounds were degradates. Water age was an important factor in determining vulnerability of ground water to transport of herbicide compounds. Unconsolidated aquifers, which were indicated to generally contain younger ground water than bedrock aquifers, had a higher occurrence of herbicides (73 percent of samples) than bedrock aquifers (22 percent). Temporal analysis to determine if changes in concentrations of selected herbicides and degradates could be observed over a near decadal period indicated a decrease in detection frequency (25 to 18 percent) between samplings in 1991 and 2000. Over this period, significant differences in concentrations were observed for atrazine (decrease) and total acetochlor (increase). The increase in acetochlor compound concentrations corresponds to an increase in acetochlor use during the study period, while the decrease in atrazine concentrations corresponds to relatively consistent use of atrazine. Changes in frequency of herbicide detection and concentration do not appear related to changes in land use near sampled wells.

  6. Arsenic and cadmium are inhibitors of cyanobacterial dinitrogenase reductase (nifH1) gene.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shilpi; Shrivastava, A K; Singh, V K

    2014-09-01

    The enzyme nitrogenase complex is a key component conferring nitrogen fixation in all known diazotrophs. This study for the first time examines the impact of As, Na, Cd, Cu and butachlor on component II (dinitrogenase reductase, nifH1) of nitrogenase from diazotrophic cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120 using in silico and wet lab approaches. The nifH1 of Anabaena is a glycine-rich stable protein having DNA-binding properties and shows close similarity with free living compared with symbiotic diazotrophs. Phylogenetic tree revealed an adverse effect of the selected stresses on close homologs across the diazotroph community. The protein interaction network demonstrated the presence of nirA, glnA, glnB, alr4255 and alr2485 proteins besides nif proteins, suggesting their involvement in nitrogen fixation along with nifH1. Homology modelling and docking under As, Na, Cd, Cu and butachlor revealed an interaction between stressors and nifH1 protein which was further validated by a transcript of the gene through quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Presence of binding sites for As, Na, Cd and Cu on oxyR promoter attested their adverse affects on nifH1. Maximum down-regulation of nifH1 in Cd and As followed by salt, copper and butachlor revealed that arsenic and cadmium were most potential inhibitors of nitrogenase of diazotrophic community, which might negatively affect crop yield.

  7. Effect of rice husk gasification residue application on herbicide behavior in micro paddy lysimeter.

    PubMed

    Ok, Junghun; Pisith, Sok; Watanabe, Hirozumi; Thuyet, Dang Quoc; Boulange, Julien; Takagi, Kazuhiro

    2015-06-01

    Effects of rice husk gasification residues (RHGR) application on the fate of herbicides, butachlor and pyrazosulfuron-ethyl, in paddy water were investigated using micro paddy lysimeters (MPLs). The dissipation of both herbicides in paddy water was faster in the RHGR treated MPL than in the control MPL. The average concentrations of butachlor and pyrazosulfuron-ethyl in paddy water in the lysimeter treated with RHGR during 21 days were significantly reduced by 51% and 48%, respectively, as compared to those in the lysimeter without RHGR application. The half-lives (DT50) of butachlor in paddy water for control and treatment were 3.1 and 2.3 days respectively, and these values of pyrazosulfuron-ethyl were 3.0 and 2.2 days, respectively. Based on this study, RHGR application in rice paddy environment is an alternative method to reduce the concentration of herbicide in paddy field water and consequently to reduce potential pollution to aquatic environment. PMID:25763539

  8. Transport and attenuation of chloroacetanilides in an agricultural headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefrancq, Marie; Imfeld, Gwenaël; Millet, Maurice; Payraudeau, Sylvain

    2015-04-01

    Chloroacetanilides (e.g., S-metolachlor and acetochlor) are pre-emergent herbicides used on corn and sugar beet and are applied to bare soil, which is prone to runoff and erosion. Some of these herbicides are chiral and the commercial products can be isomerically enriched in the enantiomer-S compared to the enantiomer-R as an example S-metolachlor 80/20% S to R . Determination of the transport of these herbicides in the dissolved and particulate phases of runoff water and degradation in agricultural catchments is currently lacking. The objectives of this study were i) to quantify over an corn growing season the export of chloroacetanilides and their main degradation products (ethane sulfonic (ESA) and oxanilic acid (OXA) degradates of metolachlor (MESA and MOXA) and acetochlor (AcESA and AcOXA)) in an 47 ha agricultural head-catchment in the dissolved and particulate phases, and ii) to evaluate S-metolachlor biodegradation from its application on the field to its export from the catchment using enantiomer analysis. Runoff, erosion, hydrochemistry and chloroacetanilide transport were evaluated at both the plot and catchment scales. Our results showed that an important amount of the pesticide load is missed when only the dissolved concentration of the parent compound is analysed. The total export coefficients for S-metolachlor and acetochlor and their degradation products were 11.4 and 11.8%, respectively, which includes both the dissolved and particulate loads. The partitioning of S-metolachlor and acetochlor between the dissolved and particulate phases varied widely over time and was linked to the suspended solid concentrations. Detection of S-metolachlor degradation products in runoff water was more frequent compared to that of acetochlor degradation products. Enrichment up to 37% of R-metolachlor was observed during the corn growing season, supporting enantioselective degradation of S-metolachlor. Our field study indicates the potential of enantiomer analyses for

  9. Detection of Pesticides and Pesticide Metabolites Using the Cross Reactivity of Enzyme Immunoassays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Aga, D.S.

    2001-01-01

    Enzyme immunoassay is an important environmental analysis method that may be used to identify many pesticide analytes in water samples. Because of similarities in chemical structure between various members of a pesticide class, there often may be an unwanted response that is characterized by a percentage of cross reactivity. Also, there may be cross reactivity caused by degradation products of the target analyte that may be present in the sample. In this paper, the concept of cross reactivity caused by degradation products or by nontarget analytes is explored as a tool for identification of metabolites or structurally similar compounds not previously known to be present in water samples. Two examples are examined in this paper from various water quality studies. They are alachlor and its metabolite, alachlor ethane sulfonic acid, and atrazine and its class members, prometryn and propazine. A method for using cross reactivity for the detection of these compounds is explained in this paper.

  10. Evaluating Microtox as a tool for biodegradability assessment of partially treated solutions of pesticides using Fe3+ and TiO2 solar photo-assisted processes.

    PubMed

    Lapertot, Milena; Ebrahimi, Sirous; Oller, Isabel; Maldonado, Manuel I; Gernjak, Wolfgang; Malato, Sixto; Pulgarín, César

    2008-03-01

    To shorten phototreatment time is of major concern for the cost and energy benefits of the xenobiotics degradation performed by photocatalytic processes. Using photo-Fenton and TiO(2) phototreatments, partially photodegraded solutions of 6 separate pesticides (alachlor, atrazine, chlorfenvinphos, diuron, isoproturon and pentachlorophenol) were tested for biocompatibility, which was evaluated according to the Zahn-Wellens procedure. This study investigated if Microtox could be considered as a suitable global indicator capable of giving information on the evolution of biocompatibility of the water solution contaminated with organic pollutants during the phototreatment in order to promote biotreatment. The obtained results demonstrated that biodegradability increased significantly after short photo-Fenton treatment times for alachlor, diuron and pentachlorophenol. Uncertain results were obtained with atrazine and isoproturon. Microtox acute toxicity testing was shown to correctly represent dynamics and efficiency of phototreatment.

  11. Stability and recovery of triazine and chloroacetamide herbicides from pH adjusted water samples by using empore solid-phase extraction disks and gas chromatography with ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mueller, T C; Senseman, S A; Carson, K H; Sciumbato, A S

    2001-01-01

    Empore disks were used to successfully extract herbicide residues from a difficult-to-analyze surface water source and deionized water. Herbicide recoveries were lower in surface water at 7,14, or 21 days after fortification and storage at 4 degrees C, presumably due to chemical sorption onto precipitated organic particulates. The addition of acid to the samples, as recommended in EPA Method 525.2, did not affect recoveries of alachlor and metolachlor, but reduced recoveries of atrazine, simazine, and cyanazine. Treatment of water samples with sodium hypochlorite did not affect alachlor or metolachlor recoveries, but greatly reduced the recovery of all triazine herbicides. This indicates that addition of acid or sodium hypochlorite to water samples may be detrimental to triazine analysis.

  12. Evaluating Microtox as a tool for biodegradability assessment of partially treated solutions of pesticides using Fe3+ and TiO2 solar photo-assisted processes.

    PubMed

    Lapertot, Milena; Ebrahimi, Sirous; Oller, Isabel; Maldonado, Manuel I; Gernjak, Wolfgang; Malato, Sixto; Pulgarín, César

    2008-03-01

    To shorten phototreatment time is of major concern for the cost and energy benefits of the xenobiotics degradation performed by photocatalytic processes. Using photo-Fenton and TiO(2) phototreatments, partially photodegraded solutions of 6 separate pesticides (alachlor, atrazine, chlorfenvinphos, diuron, isoproturon and pentachlorophenol) were tested for biocompatibility, which was evaluated according to the Zahn-Wellens procedure. This study investigated if Microtox could be considered as a suitable global indicator capable of giving information on the evolution of biocompatibility of the water solution contaminated with organic pollutants during the phototreatment in order to promote biotreatment. The obtained results demonstrated that biodegradability increased significantly after short photo-Fenton treatment times for alachlor, diuron and pentachlorophenol. Uncertain results were obtained with atrazine and isoproturon. Microtox acute toxicity testing was shown to correctly represent dynamics and efficiency of phototreatment. PMID:18155146

  13. Organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticide residues in raw buffalo milk from agroindustrial areas in Assiut, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Eman M; Elsharkawy, Eman E

    2015-01-01

    Raw buffalo milk samples from the agroindustrial zone in upper Egypt were analyzed for the presence of organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Five organochlorine pesticides namely, alachlor, dieldrin, hexachlorobenzene, lindane and methoxychlor and three organophosphorus pesticides chlorpyrifos, malathion, and parathion-methyl were detected in the milk samples. In 44% of the samples, the concentrations of lindane and malathion residues exceeded tolerance levels set by the European Commission (EC) in 2008. In addition, the concentrations of chlorpyrifos, methoxychlor, and hexachlorobenzene residues exceeded the 2008 EC maximum residual limits (MRLs) by 33, 66, and 88% of the examined samples, respectively. However, the levels of alachlor, dieldrin, and parathion-methyl residues were below EC MRLs. The results of this study confirm the risks of pesticide residues exposure that threaten consumer health in Egypt. Thus, we recommend that pesticide residue monitoring programs be instituted in all the developing countries.

  14. A reconnaissance study of herbicides and their metabolites in surface water of the midwestern united states using immunoassay and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michael, Thurman E.; Goolsby, D.A.; Meyer, M.T.; Mills, M.S.; Pomes, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    Preemergent herbicides and their metabolites, particularly atrazine, deethylatrazine, and metolachlor, persisted from 1989 to 1990 in the majority of rivers and streams in the midwestern United States. In spring, after the application of herbicides, the concentrations of atrazine, alachlor, and simazine were frequently 3-10 times greater than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level (MCL). The concentration of herbicides exceeded the MCLs both singly and in combination. Two major degradation products of atrazine (deisopropylatrazine and deethylatrazine) also were found in many of the streams. The order of persistence of the herbicides and their metabolites in surface water was atrazine > deethylatrazine > metolachlor > alachlor > deisopropylatrazine > cyanazine. Storm runoff collected at several sites exceeded the MCL multiple times during the summer months as a function of stream discharge, with increased concentrations during times of increased streamflow. It is proposed that metabolites of atrazine may be used as indicators of surface-water movement into adjacent alluvial aquifers.

  15. Selection and analysis of sites highly vulnerable to groundwater contamination in southwestern Michigan. Final technical report, 1 April 1991-31 March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ervin, J.L.; Lusch, D.P.

    1992-04-01

    An ongoing study in central Cass County has demonstrated extensive nitrate contamination of the glacial drift aquifer in the Donnell Lake watershed. In addition, about 20% of 121 wells sampled showed detectable herbicides (atrazine, alachlor/metolachlor, and/or alachlor soil metabolite). Monthly monitoring of these wells in 1991 demonstrated stable water quality in the deeper wells, with some shallow wells showing from 30 to 300% increases in nitrate concentration over the summer. One well showed an 80% decrease in nitrate concentration. Herbicide concentrations were quite stable and consistent with previous findings. Generally the deeper wells (over 50 feet) demonstrated less contamination, but one 80 foot deep well demonstrated substantial nitrate and herbicide concentrations.

  16. Assessing the transfer of pesticides to the atmosphere during and after application. Development of a multiresidue method using adsorption on Tenax and thermal desorption-GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Briand, Olivier; Millet, Maurice; Bertrand, Florence; Clément, Michel; Seux, René

    2002-11-01

    An air sampling and analytical method based on adsorption on porous polymer (Tenax TA) followed by automatic thermal desorption (ATD) and GC/MS analysis was developed for ten pesticides commonly used on major crops in Britanny and some of their metabolites in air (from spray drift and volatilisation transfer processes): alachlor, atrazine (and two major degradation products: deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine), carbofuran, cyprodinil, epoxyconazole, iprodione (and 3,5-dichloroaniline), lindane (and -HCH, its isomer), metolachlor, terbuconazole and trifluralin. This method was established with special consideration for optimal thermal desorption conditions, linear ranges, limits of detection and quantification. Moreover, collection efficiencies of Tenax TA at room temperature were examined. This method was then applied to the determination of ambient pesticide levels during the spraying season at a rural area. The method was also applied to determine the vertical gradient of alachlor concentrations on a treated maize parcel to evaluate volatilisation fluxes.

  17. Herbicides and nitrates in the Iowa River alluvial aquifer prior to changing land use, Iowa County, Iowa, 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savoca, Mark E.; Tobias, Jennifer L.; Sadorf, Eric M.; Birkenholtz, Trevor L.

    1997-01-01

    Four herbicides (alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and metolachlor) and one nutrient (nitrate) were selected for study on the basis of frequent usage in Iowa and high detection rates in ground water (Detroy and Kuzniar, 1988). Alachlor was not detected at concentrations greater than the method detection limit (MDL). Atrazine was detected at concentrations greater than the MDL in samples from 48 percent of the 23 wells, cyanazine from 13 percent, metolachlor from 26 percent, and nitrate from 91 percent. None of the four herbicides were detected at concentrations greater than the respective U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for drinking water. Thirteen percent of the samples had nitrate concentrations above the USEPA's MCL of 10 mg/L (milligrams per liter). Relations between constituent concentration and well depth were observed for specific constituents at individual well nests.

  18. Controlled release of water-soluble herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Riggle, B.D.

    1985-01-01

    Pine kraft lignin was used to control the release of metribuzin (4-amino-6-tert-butyl-3-(methylthio)-as-triazin-5(4H)-one) and alachlor (2-chloro-2',6'-diethyl-N-methoxy-methyl acetanalide). Soil thin layer chromatography (TLC) analysis using /sup 14/C-metribuzin and /sup 14/C-alachlor demonstrated that NB-5203-58 series and PC940 series kraft lignins could retard the mobility of both herbicides after multiple soil TLC plate developments with water. Soil column chromatography analysis demonstrated that PC940C could retard the mobility of both herbicides after soil column water leaching by positioning the herbicides in the top portion of the soil column where the PC940C-herbicide mixture had been applied. There was a concentration effect where, as more PC940C was used, more /sup 14/C-labelled herbicide was retained in the top portion of the soil columns. Soil column chromatography and soil TLC plate analysis demonstrated that /sup 3/H-PC940C was immobile. Finally, PC940C significantly reduced metribuzin related phytotoxicity to field and greenhouse grown soybeans (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) which had been treated with PC940C rates of 0.77 and 1.15 L/ha and metribuzin rates of 0.42 and 0.84 kg/ha. The results for /sup 14/C-metribuzin and /sup 14/C-alachlor as well as the reduction in metribuzin related phytotoxicity to soybeans suggests that PC940C can effectively control the release of metribuzin and alachlor.

  19. Herbicide and nitrate variation in alluvium underlying a cornfield at a site in Iowa County, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkhoff, S.J.; Detroy, M.G.; Cherryholmes, K.; Kuzniar, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    A hydrologic investigation to determine vertical and seasonal variation of atrazine, alachlor, cyanazine, and nitrate at one location and to relate the variation to ground-water movement in the Iowa River alluvium was conducted in Iowa County, Iowa, from March 1986 to December 1987. Water samples were collected at discrete intervals through the alluvial sequence from the soil zone to the base of the aquifer. Alachlor, atrazine, and cyanazine were detected most frequently in the soil zone but also were present in the upper part of the alluvial aquifer. Alachlor was detected sporadically, whereas, atrazine, cyanazine, and nitrate were present throughout the year. In the alluvial aquifer, the herbicides generally were not detected during 1986 and were present in detectable concentrations for only a short period of time in the upper 1.6 meters of the aquifer during 1987. Nitrate was present throughout the alluvium and was stratified in the alluvial aquifer. The largest nitrate concentrations were detected in the middle part of the aquifer. Nitrate concentrations were variable only in the upper 2 meters of the aquifer. Vertical movement of herbicides and nitrate in the soil correlated with precipitation and degree of saturation. A clay layer retarded vertical movement of atrazine but not nitrate from the soil layer to the aquifer. Vertical movement could not account for the chemical variation in the alluvial aquifer.

  20. Use of enzyme immunoassay for large water-quality surveys of major herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman, E.M.; Aga, D.S.; Zimmerman, L.R.; Goolsby, D.A.

    1996-10-01

    Commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used for the determination of major herbicides in several large water-quality surveys of surface water, rainwater, and ground water throughout the United States. The ELISA results were compared with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for accuracy and cross reactivity. In total, five compounds were analyzed: alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, metolachlor, and (2,4-dichlorophenoxy) acetic acid (2,4-D). Results indicated that the ELISA and GC/MS results were comparable for cyanazine and metolachlor. The atrazine ELISA correlated well with GC/MS for surface- and ground-water samples from the central United States but did not correlate with samples from Texas where the cotton triazine, prometryn, is used. Results using the alachlor ELISA were poor because of cross reactivity with the metabolite, alachlor ethane-sulfonic acid. The ELISA for (2,4-dichlorophenoxy) acetic acid was insensitive at concentrations that occur in most surface water.

  1. Human skin binding and absorption of contaminants from ground and surface water during swimming and bathing

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, R.C.; Maibach, H.I. )

    1989-10-01

    Contaminants exist in ground and surface water. Human skin has the capacity to bind and then absorb these contaminants into the body during swimming and bathing. Powdered human stratum corneum will bind both lipid-soluble (alachlor, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), benzene) and water-soluble (nitroaniline) chemicals. In vitro (Human skin) and in vivo (Rhesus monkey) studies show that these chemicals readily distribute into skin, and then some of the chemical is absorbed into the body. Linearity in binding and absorption exists for nitroaniline over a 10-fold concentration range. Multiple exposure to benzene is at least cumulative. Binding and adsorption can be significant for exposures as short as 30 minutes, and will increase with time. Adsorption with water dilution increased for alachlor, but not for dinoseb. Soap reversed the partitioning of alachlor between human stratum corneum and water. The PCBs could be removed from skin by soap and water for up to 3 hours and the decontamination potential decreased, due to continuing skin absorption. The model that in vitro and in vivo systems used should permit easy estimation of this area of extensive human exposure effect on risk assessment. 5 refs., 9 tabs.

  2. [Study on usage of pesticides in various countries].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Miyako; Toda, Miou; Tanaka, Keiko; Sugita, Takiko; Sasaki, Shiho; Uneyama, Chikako; Morikawa, Kaoru

    2007-01-01

    Usage of pesticides in food items in export countries was studied, focusing items which Japan imports in large quantity. Japan has imported field crops such as wheat, corn and soy bean, and also grapefruit in large quantity on a weight base, mainly from United States, Australia and Canada. While, Japan has imported various kinds of vegetables in which China had the largest share. We collected usage data of pesticides for 44 food items of 17 countries of 2004. Pesticides which were used frequently (usage rank within top ten in each item/country) were dichlorvos, carbofuran, chlorpyrifos, dimethoate (insecticides), mancozeb, carbendazim, thiophanate-methyl, chlorthalonil (fungicides), glyphosate, 2,4-D, paraquat, acetochlor (herbicides). Carbendazim, thiophanate-methyl, acetochlor and dichlorvos were mainly used in China. Dithiocarbamates are used frequently in various food items in various countries, and also frequently detected in monitoring in foreign countries. Some pesticides such as bisultap, monosultap, etaboxam and triazmate were used only in certain countries, and available information on toxicity or analytical method was very limited. Some of pesticides described above have not been analyzed in the pesticide residue monitoring in Japan before 2005,however, many of them are subjects of analysis for import food after 2006 with the enforcement of positivelist system for residues of pesticide and veterinary medicines in food in Japan. PMID:18220053

  3. [Study on usage of pesticides in various countries].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Miyako; Toda, Miou; Tanaka, Keiko; Sugita, Takiko; Sasaki, Shiho; Uneyama, Chikako; Morikawa, Kaoru

    2007-01-01

    Usage of pesticides in food items in export countries was studied, focusing items which Japan imports in large quantity. Japan has imported field crops such as wheat, corn and soy bean, and also grapefruit in large quantity on a weight base, mainly from United States, Australia and Canada. While, Japan has imported various kinds of vegetables in which China had the largest share. We collected usage data of pesticides for 44 food items of 17 countries of 2004. Pesticides which were used frequently (usage rank within top ten in each item/country) were dichlorvos, carbofuran, chlorpyrifos, dimethoate (insecticides), mancozeb, carbendazim, thiophanate-methyl, chlorthalonil (fungicides), glyphosate, 2,4-D, paraquat, acetochlor (herbicides). Carbendazim, thiophanate-methyl, acetochlor and dichlorvos were mainly used in China. Dithiocarbamates are used frequently in various food items in various countries, and also frequently detected in monitoring in foreign countries. Some pesticides such as bisultap, monosultap, etaboxam and triazmate were used only in certain countries, and available information on toxicity or analytical method was very limited. Some of pesticides described above have not been analyzed in the pesticide residue monitoring in Japan before 2005,however, many of them are subjects of analysis for import food after 2006 with the enforcement of positivelist system for residues of pesticide and veterinary medicines in food in Japan.

  4. Estimates of pesticide concentrations and fluxes in two rivers of an extensive French multi-agricultural watershed: application of the passive sampling strategy.

    PubMed

    Poulier, Gaëlle; Lissalde, Sophie; Charriau, Adeline; Buzier, Rémy; Cleries, Karine; Delmas, François; Mazzella, Nicolas; Guibaud, Gilles

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the passive sampling strategy was evaluated for its ability to improve water quality monitoring in terms of concentrations and frequencies of quantification of pesticides, with a focus on flux calculation. Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samplers (POCIS) were successively exposed and renewed at three sampling sites of an extensive French multi-agricultural watershed from January to September 2012. Grab water samples were recovered every 14 days during the same period and an automated sampler collected composite water samples from April to July 2012. Thirty-nine compounds (pesticides and metabolites) were analysed. DEA, diuron and atrazine (banned in France for many years) likely arrived via groundwater whereas dimethanamid, imidacloprid and acetochlor (all still in use) were probably transported via leaching. The comparison of the three sampling strategies showed that the POCIS offers lower detection limits, resulting in the quantification of trace levels of compounds (acetochlor, diuron and desethylatrazine (DEA)) that could not be measured in grab and composite water samples. As a consequence, the frequencies of occurrence were dramatically enhanced with the POCIS compared to spot sample data. Moreover, the integration of flood events led to a better temporal representation of the fluxes when calculated with the POCIS compared to the bimonthly grab sampling strategy. We conclude that the POCIS could be an advantageous alternative to spot sampling, offering better performance in terms of quantification limits and more representative data.

  5. New insights into the interactions between cork chemical components and pesticides. The contribution of π-π interactions, hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic effect.

    PubMed

    Olivella, M À; Bazzicalupi, C; Bianchi, A; Fiol, N; Villaescusa, I

    2015-01-01

    The role of chemical components of cork in the sorption of several pesticides has been investigated. For this purpose raw cork and three cork extracted fractions (i.e. cork free of aliphatic extractives, cork free of all extractives and cork free of all extractives and suberin) were used as sorbent of three ionic pesticides (propazine, 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) and alachlor) and five non-ionic pesticides (chlorpyrifos, isoproturon, metamitron, methomyl and oxamyl) with a logKow within the range -0.47 to 4.92. The effect of cations on the ionic pesticides, propazine and 2,4-D sorption was also analyzed. Results indicated that the highest yields were obtained for chlorpyrifos and alachlor sorption onto raw cork (>55%). After removal of aliphatic extractives sorption of all pesticides increased that ranged from 3% for propazine to 31% for alachlor. In contrast, removal of phenolic extractives caused a sorption decrease. Low sorption yields were obtained for hydrophobic pesticides such as metamitron, oxamyl and methomyl (<11%) by using all cork fractions and extremely low when using raw cork (<1%). FTIR analysis was useful to indicate that lignin moieties were the main components involved on the sorption process. Modelling calculations evidenced that π-stacking interactions with the aromatic groups of lignin play a major role in determining the adsorption properties of cork toward aromatic pesticides. Results presented in this paper gain insights into the cork affinities for pesticides and the interactions involved in the sorption process and also enables to envisage sorption affinity of cork for other organic pollutants.

  6. New insights into the interactions between cork chemical components and pesticides. The contribution of π-π interactions, hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic effect.

    PubMed

    Olivella, M À; Bazzicalupi, C; Bianchi, A; Fiol, N; Villaescusa, I

    2015-01-01

    The role of chemical components of cork in the sorption of several pesticides has been investigated. For this purpose raw cork and three cork extracted fractions (i.e. cork free of aliphatic extractives, cork free of all extractives and cork free of all extractives and suberin) were used as sorbent of three ionic pesticides (propazine, 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) and alachlor) and five non-ionic pesticides (chlorpyrifos, isoproturon, metamitron, methomyl and oxamyl) with a logKow within the range -0.47 to 4.92. The effect of cations on the ionic pesticides, propazine and 2,4-D sorption was also analyzed. Results indicated that the highest yields were obtained for chlorpyrifos and alachlor sorption onto raw cork (>55%). After removal of aliphatic extractives sorption of all pesticides increased that ranged from 3% for propazine to 31% for alachlor. In contrast, removal of phenolic extractives caused a sorption decrease. Low sorption yields were obtained for hydrophobic pesticides such as metamitron, oxamyl and methomyl (<11%) by using all cork fractions and extremely low when using raw cork (<1%). FTIR analysis was useful to indicate that lignin moieties were the main components involved on the sorption process. Modelling calculations evidenced that π-stacking interactions with the aromatic groups of lignin play a major role in determining the adsorption properties of cork toward aromatic pesticides. Results presented in this paper gain insights into the cork affinities for pesticides and the interactions involved in the sorption process and also enables to envisage sorption affinity of cork for other organic pollutants. PMID:25240950

  7. Nitrate and herbicide loading in two groundwater basins of Illinois' sinkhole plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panno, S.V.; Kelly, W.R.

    2004-01-01

    This investigation was designed to estimate the mass loading of nitrate (NO3-) and herbicides in spring water discharging from groundwater basins in an agriculturally dominated, mantled karst terrain. The loading was normalized to land use and NO3- and herbicide losses were compared to estimated losses in other agricultural areas of the Midwestern USA. Our study area consisted of two large karst springs that drain two adjoining groundwater basins (total area of 37.7 km2) in southwestern Illinois' sinkhole plain, USA. The springs and stream that they form were monitored for almost 2 years. Nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) concentrations at three monitoring sites were almost always above the background concentration (1.9 mg/l). NO3-N concentrations at the two springs ranged from 1.08 to 6.08 with a median concentration of 3.61 mg/l. Atrazine and alachlor concentrations ranged from <0.01 to 34 ??g/l and <0.01 to 0.98 ??g/l, respectively, with median concentrations of 0.48 and 0.12 ??g/l, respectively. Approximately 100,000 kg/yr of NO3-N, 39 kg/yr of atrazine, and 2.8 kg/yr of alachlor were discharged from the two springs. Slightly more than half of the discharged NO3- came from background sources and most of the remainder probably came from fertilizer. This represents a 21-31% loss of fertilizer N from the groundwater basins. The pesticide losses were 3.8-5.8% of the applied atrazine, and 0.05-0.08% of the applied alachlor. The loss of atrazine adsorbed to the suspended solid fraction was about 2 kg/yr, only about 5% of the total mass of atrazine discharged from the springs. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Pesticide sorption and leaching potential on three Hawaiian soils.

    PubMed

    Hall, Kathleen E; Ray, Chittaranjan; Ki, Seo Jin; Spokas, Kurt A; Koskinen, William C

    2015-08-15

    On the Hawaiian Islands, groundwater is the principal source of potable water and contamination of this key resource by pesticides is of great concern. To evaluate the leaching potential of four weak acid herbicides [aminocyclopyrachlor, picloram, metsulfuron-methyl, biologically active diketonitrile degradate of isoxaflutole (DKN)] and two neutral non-ionizable herbicides [oxyfluorfen, alachlor], their sorption coefficients were determined on three prevalent soils from the island of Oahu. Metsulfuron-methyl, aminocylcopyrachlor, picloram, and DKN were relatively low sorbing herbicides (K(oc) = 3-53 mL g(-1)), alachlor was intermediate (K(oc) = 120-150 mL g(-1)), and oxyfluorfen sorbed very strongly to the three soils (K(oc) > 12,000 mL g(-1)). Following determination of K(oc) values, the groundwater ubiquity score (GUS) indices for these compounds were calculated to predicted their behavior with the Comprehensive Leaching Risk Assessment System (CLEARS; Tier-1 methodology for Hawaii). Metsulfuron-methyl, aminocyclopyrachlor, picloram, and DKN would be categorized as likely leachers in all three Hawaiian soils, indicating a high risk of groundwater contamination across the island of Oahu. In contrast, oxyfluorfen, regardless of the degradation rate, would possess a low and acceptable leaching risk due to its high sorption on all three soils. The leaching potential of alachlor was more difficult to classify, with a GUS value between 1.8 and 2.8. In addition, four different biochar amendments to these soils did not significantly alter their sorption capacities for aminocyclopyrachlor, indicating a relatively low impact of black carbon additions from geologic volcanic inputs of black carbon. Due to the fact that pesticide environmental risks are chiefly dependent on local soil characteristics, this work has demonstrated that once soil specific sorption parameters are known one can assess the potential pesticide leaching risks.

  9. Pesticides in streams in the Tar-Pamlico drainage basin, North Carolina, 1992-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodside, Michael D.; Ruhl, Kelly E.

    2001-01-01

    From 1992 to 1994, 147 water samples were collected at 5 sites in the Tar-Pamlico drainage basin in North Carolina and analyzed for 46 herbicides, insecticides, and pesticide metabolites as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Based on a common adjusted detection limit of 0.01 microgram per liter, the most frequently detected herbicides were metolachlor (84 percent), atrazine (78 percent), alachlor (72 percent), and prometon (57 percent). The insecticides detected most frequently were carbaryl (12 percent), carbofuran (7 percent), and diazinon (4 percent). Although the pesticides with the highest estimated uses generally were the compounds detected most frequently, there was not a strong correlation between estimated use and detection frequency. The development of statistical correlations between pesticide use and detection frequency was limited by the lack of information on pesticides commonly applied in urban and agricultural areas, such as prometon, chlorpyrifos, and diazinon, and the small number of basins included in this study. For example, prometon had the fourth highest detection frequency, but use information was not available. Nevertheless, the high detection frequency of prometon indicates that nonagricultural uses also contribute to pesticide levels in streams in the Tar-Pamlico drainage basin. Concentrations of the herbicides atrazine, alachlor, and trifluralin varied seasonally, with elevated concentrations generally occurring in the spring, during and immediately following application periods, and in the summer. Seasonal concentration patterns were less evident for prometon, diazinon, and chlorpyrifos. Alachlor is the only pesticide detected in concentrations that exceeded current (2000) drinking-water standards.

  10. Nitrate and herbicide loading in two groundwater basins of Illinois' sinkhole plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panno, S. V.; Kelly, W. R.

    2004-05-01

    This investigation was designed to estimate the mass loading of nitrate (NO 3-) and herbicides in spring water discharging from groundwater basins in an agriculturally dominated, mantled karst terrain. The loading was normalized to land use and NO 3- and herbicide losses were compared to estimated losses in other agricultural areas of the Midwestern USA. Our study area consisted of two large karst springs that drain two adjoining groundwater basins (total area of 37.7 km 2) in southwestern Illinois' sinkhole plain, USA. The springs and stream that they form were monitored for almost 2 years. Nitrate-nitrogen (NO 3-N) concentrations at three monitoring sites were almost always above the background concentration (1.9 mg/l). NO 3-N concentrations at the two springs ranged from 1.08 to 6.08 with a median concentration of 3.61 mg/l. Atrazine and alachlor concentrations ranged from <0.01 to 34 μg/l and <0.01 to 0.98 μg/l, respectively, with median concentrations of 0.48 and 0.12 μg/l, respectively. Approximately 100,000 kg/yr of NO 3-N, 39 kg/yr of atrazine, and 2.8 kg/yr of alachlor were discharged from the two springs. Slightly more than half of the discharged NO 3- came from background sources and most of the remainder probably came from fertilizer. This represents a 21-31% loss of fertilizer N from the groundwater basins. The pesticide losses were 3.8-5.8% of the applied atrazine, and 0.05-0.08% of the applied alachlor. The loss of atrazine adsorbed to the suspended solid fraction was about 2 kg/yr, only about 5% of the total mass of atrazine discharged from the springs.

  11. Pesticide fate in tropical wetlands of Brazil: an aquatic microcosm study under semi-field conditions.

    PubMed

    Laabs, V; Wehrhan, A; Pinto, A; Dores, E; Amelung, W

    2007-03-01

    A contamination of off-site aquatic environments with pesticides has been observed in the tropics, yet only sparse information exists about pesticide fate in such ecosystems. The objective of our semi-field study was to elucidate the fate of alachlor, atrazine, chlorpyrifos, endosulfan, metolachlor, profenofos, simazine, and trifluralin in the aqueous environment of the Pantanal wetland (MT, Brazil). To this aim, water and water/sediment microcosms of two sizes (0.78 and 202 l) were installed in the outskirts of this freshwater lagoon environment and pesticide dissipation was monitored for up to 50 d after application. The physical-chemical water conditions that developed in the microcosms were reproducible among field replicates for both system sizes. Pesticide dissipation was substantially enhanced for most pesticides in small microcosms relative to the large ones (reduced DT(50) by a factor of up to 5.3). The presence of sediment in microcosms led to increased persistence of chlorpyrifos, endosulfan, and trifluralin in the test systems, while for polar pesticides (alachlor, atrazine, metolachlor, profenofos, and simazine) a lesser persistence was observed. Atrazine, simazine, metolachlor, and alachlor were identified as the most persistent pesticides in large water microcosms (DT(50) > or = 47 d); in large water/sediment systems endosulfan beta, atrazine, metolachlor, and simazine showed the slowest dissipation (DT(50) > or = 44 d). A medium-term accumulation in the sediment of tropical ecosystems can be expected for chlorpyrifos and endosulfan isomers (11-35% of applied amount still extractable at 50 d after application). We conclude that the persistence of the studied pesticides in aquatic ecosystems of the tropics is not substantially lower than during summer in temperate regions. PMID:17166548

  12. The occurrence and transport of agricultural pesticides in the Tuttle Creek lake-stream system, Kansas and Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bevans, Hugh E.; Fromm, Carla Hyde; Watkins, Sharon A.

    1995-01-01

    Median monthly atrazine concentrations detected in surface-water samples from the Big Blue River basin (1977-86) exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency health-advisory level (3.0 micrograms per liter) during May through September. Herbicide loads transported from the basin in 1986, expressed in tons and in percentage of amount applied, were alachlor (1.2 tons, 0.23 percent), atrazine (19 tons, 2.2 percent), and metolachlor (2.2 tons, 2.7 percent).

  13. Quality of ground water used for selected municipal water supplies in Iowa, 1982-96 water years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaap, B.D.; Linhart, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    Maps show the general location of wells that have been sampled in the various aquifers. Other maps show the location of wells where sulfate and nitrite plus nitrate concentrations exceed the respective Maximum Contaminant Levels and wells where concentrations of the pesticides alachlor, atrazine, or cyanazine exceeded the respective minimum reporting levels. The compact disc included with this report has information about water-quality properties and concentrations of dissolved solids, major ions, nutrients, trace elements, radionuclides, total organic carbon, pesticides, and synthetic organic compounds for water years 1982 through 1996.

  14. Synthetic organic agrochemicals in the lower Mississippi River and its major tributaries: Distribution, transport and fate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pereira, W.E.; Rostad, C.E.; Leiker, T.J.; ,

    1992-01-01

    The Mississippi River and its major tributaries transport herbicides and their degradation products from agricultural areas in the mid-western U.S.A. These compounds include atrazine and its degradation products (desethyl- and desisopropylatrazine), simazine, cyanazine, metolachlor, and alachlor and its degradation products (2-chloro-2',6'-diethylacetanilide, 2-hydroxy-2',6'-diethylacetanilide and 2,6-diethylaniline). These compounds were identified and confirmed by gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry. Loads of these compounds were determined during five sampling trips in 1987-1989. Stream loads of these compounds indicated that atrazine and metolachlor were relatively conservative in downstream transport. Alachlor and its degradation products were generated from point and non-point sources. Seasonal variations and hydrologic conditions controlled the loads of these compounds in the Mississippi River. Cross-channel mixing was slow downstream from major river confluences, possibly requiring several hundred kilometers of downriver transit for completion. The annual transport of these compounds into the Gulf of Mexico was estimated to be < 2% of the annual application of each herbicide in the Midwest.The Mississippi River and its major tributaries transport herbicides and their degradation products from agricultural areas in the mid-western U.S.A. These compounds include atrazine and its degradation products (desethyl- and desisopropylatrazine), simazine, cyanazine, metolachlor, and alachlor and its degradation products (2-chloro-2???,6???-diethylacetanilide, 2-hydroxy-2???,6???-diethylacetanilide and 2,6-diethylaniline). These compounds were identified and confirmed by gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry. Loads of these compounds were determined during five sampling trips in 1987-1989. Stream loads of these compounds indicated that atrazine and metolachlor were relatively conservative in downstream transport. Alachlor and its degradation products

  15. A summary of pesticides in ground-water data collected by government agencies in Indiana, December 1985 to April 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risch, M.R.

    1994-01-01

    More than 1 pesticide was present in 16 of the 51 samples that had detections, for a total of 90 individual pesticide detections. Concentrations of the detected pesticides ranged from 0.04 to 49 micrograms per liter, and two-thirds of the detected concentrations were less than 1 microgram per liter. In about 29 percent of all detections, the concentration of 9 pesticides alachlor, aldrin, atrazine, dieldrin, EDB, heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, simazine, and terbufos exceeded either the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Maximum Contaminant Level or adult lifetime Health Advisory.

  16. Laboratory and quality assurance protocols for the analysis of herbicides in ground water from the Management Systems Evaluation Area, Princeton, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, S.J.; Capel, P.D.; VanderLoop, A.G.

    1996-01-01

    Laboratory and quality assurance procedures for the analysis of ground-water samples for herbicides at the Management Systems Evaluation Area near Princeton, Minnesota are described. The target herbicides include atrazine, de-ethylatrazine, de-isopropylatrazine, metribuzin, alachlor, 2,6-diethylaniline, and metolachlor. The analytical techniques used are solid-phase extraction, and analysis by gas chromatography with mass-selective detection. Descriptions of cleaning procedures, preparation of standard solutions, isolation of analytes from water, sample transfer methods, instrumental analysis, and data analysis are included.

  17. Natural attenuation of chloroacetinilide herbicides in aquatic systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, D.W.; Graham, W.H.; DeNoyelles, F.; Smith, V.H.; ,

    1999-01-01

    A 4-yr research program that studied the transformation of alachlor and metolachlor in aquatic systems using field microcosms is presented. The field microcosms provided an accurate simulation of natural ecosystems while also permitting the controlled creation of numerous contamination scenarios and sufficient replication to allow statistical evaluation of the results. Different treatments were assessed including conditions as diverse as anaerobic, eutrophic waters typical of nutrient-rich wetland to aerobic, oligotrophic waters typical of the epilimnion of Canadian glacial lake. Herbicide transformation rate was most strongly affected by water temperature, oxygen conditions, nutrient levels within the system, and the specific herbicide assessed.

  18. Relations of water-quality constituent concentrations to surrogate measurements in the lower Platte River corridor, Nebraska, 2007 through 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaepe, Nathaniel J.; Soenksen, Philip J.; Rus, David L.

    2014-01-01

    The lower Platte River, Nebraska, provides drinking water, irrigation water, and in-stream flows for recreation, wildlife habitat, and vital habitats for several threatened and endangered species. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Lower Platte River Corridor Alliance (LPRCA) developed site-specific regression models for water-quality constituents at four sites (Shell Creek near Columbus, Nebraska [USGS site 06795500]; Elkhorn River at Waterloo, Nebr. [USGS site 06800500]; Salt Creek near Ashland, Nebr. [USGS site 06805000]; and Platte River at Louisville, Nebr. [USGS site 06805500]) in the lower Platte River corridor. The models were developed by relating continuously monitored water-quality properties (surrogate measurements) to discrete water-quality samples. These models enable existing web-based software to provide near-real-time estimates of stream-specific constituent concentrations to support natural resources management decisions. Since 2007, USGS, in cooperation with the LPRCA, has continuously monitored four water-quality properties seasonally within the lower Platte River corridor: specific conductance, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, and turbidity. During 2007 through 2011, the USGS and the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality collected and analyzed discrete water-quality samples for nutrients, major ions, pesticides, suspended sediment, and bacteria. These datasets were used to develop the regression models. This report documents the collection of these various water-quality datasets and the development of the site-specific regression models. Regression models were developed for all four monitored sites. Constituent models for Shell Creek included nitrate plus nitrite, total phosphorus, orthophosphate, atrazine, acetochlor, suspended sediment, and Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria. Regression models that were developed for the Elkhorn River included nitrate plus nitrite, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, total phosphorus

  19. Source, extent, and degradation of herbicides in a shallow aquifer near Hesston, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    Atrazine, alachlor, cyanazine, metolachlor, and metribuzin were detected in water from a domestic well completed in a shallow aquifer underlying the Harvey County Experiment Field near Hesston, Kansas. The study described in this report investigated the source, extent, and degradation of these five herbicides. Hydrogeologic analysis of the site enabled estimation of the degradation half-lives of the herbicides in the saturated zone. The most probable source of the contamination was back- siphonage or spillage of herbicides from a sprayer tank into a trench backfilled with sand. The herbicides moved downgradient to the domestic well and then moved into the aquifer via the annular space in the well. Once in the aquifer, the contaminants remained nearly stationary with very little lateral movement away from the point of injection. Decreases in herbicide concentrations were caused mainly by degradation of the parent compounds and to a lesser degree, by extensive pumping of the well. Estimated herbicide degradation half-lives in the saturated environment were 1,000 days for atrazine, 400 days for alachlor, 250 days for cyanazine, 350 days for metolachlor, and 350 days for metribuzin. The herbicides will likely be eliminated from the soil and groundwater at the experiment field by continued natural degradation at the land surface and by degradation in and continued pumping of water from the aquifer. Pumping will remove any degradation products as well as the remaining parent compounds. (USGS)

  20. Batch vs continuous-feeding operational mode for the removal of pesticides from agricultural run-off by microalgae systems: A laboratory scale study.

    PubMed

    Matamoros, Víctor; Rodríguez, Yolanda

    2016-05-15

    Microalgae-based water treatment technologies have been used in recent years to treat different water effluents, but their effectiveness for removing pesticides from agricultural run-off has not yet been addressed. This paper assesses the effect of microalgae in pesticide removal, as well as the influence of different operation strategies (continuous vs batch feeding). The following pesticides were studied: mecoprop, atrazine, simazine, diazinone, alachlor, chlorfenvinphos, lindane, malathion, pentachlorobenzene, chlorpyrifos, endosulfan and clofibric acid (tracer). 2L batch reactors and 5L continuous reactors were spiked to 10 μg L(-1) of each pesticide. Additionally, three different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) were assessed (2, 4 and 8 days) in the continuous feeding reactors. The batch-feeding experiments demonstrated that the presence of microalgae increased the efficiency of lindane, alachlor and chlorpyrifos by 50%. The continuous feeding reactors had higher removal efficiencies than the batch reactors for pentachlorobenzene, chlorpyrifos and lindane. Whilst longer HRTs increased the technology's effectiveness, a low HRT of 2 days was capable of removing malathion, pentachlorobenzene, chlorpyrifos, and endosulfan by up to 70%. This study suggests that microalgae-based treatment technologies can be an effective alternative for removing pesticides from agricultural run-off.

  1. Occurrence of Atrazine and Related Compounds in Sediments of Upper Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiehong; Li, Zhuona; Ranasinghe, Prabha; Bonina, Solidea; Hosseini, Soheil; Corcoran, Margaret B; Smalley, Colin; Kaliappan, Rajashankar; Wu, Yan; Chen, Da; Sandy, Andy L; Wang, Yawei; Rockne, Karl J; Sturchio, Neil C; Giesy, John P; Li, An

    2016-07-19

    Surface grab and core sediment samples were collected from Lakes Michigan, Superior, and Huron from 2010 to 2012, and concentrations of herbicides atrazine, simazine, and alachlor, as well as desethylatrazine (DEA), were determined. Concentrations of atrazine in surface grabs ranged from 0.01 to 1.7 ng/g dry weight and are significantly higher in the southern basin of Lake Michigan (latitude <44°) than other parts of the three lakes. The highest concentration of alachlor was found in sediments of Saginaw Bay in Lake Huron. The inventory and net fluxes of these herbicides were found to decline exponentially from the south to the north. The concentration ratio of DEA to atrazine (DEA/ATZ) increased with latitude, suggesting degradation of atrazine to DEA during atmospheric transport. DEA/ATZ also increased with sediment depth in the sediment cores. Diffusion of deposited herbicides from the upper sediment into deeper sediments has occurred, on the basis of the observed patterns of concentrations in dated sediment cores. Concentrations of atrazine in pore water were estimated and were higher than those reported for the bulk waters, suggesting the occurrence of solid-phase deposition of atrazine through the water column and that contaminated sediments act as a source releasing atrazine to the overlying water.

  2. Water supply implications of herbicide sampling: Hydrologic conditions may affect concentrations of organonitrogen herbicides and may be important considerations in complying with drinking water regulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamer, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    The temporal distribution of the herbicides alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and metolachlor was documented from September 1991 through August 1992 in the Platte River at Louisville, Neb., the drainage of the Central Nebraska Basins. Lincoln, Ornaha, and other municipalities withdraw groundwater for public supplies from the adjacent alluvium, which is hydraulically connected to the Platte River. Data were collected, in part, to provide information to managers, planners, and public utilities on the likelihood of water supplies being adversely affected by these herbicides. Three computational procedures - monthly means, monthly subsampling, and quarterly subsampling - were used to calculate annual mean herbicide concentrations. When the sampling was conducted quarterly rather than monthly, alachlor and atrazine concentrations were more likely to exceed their respective maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) of 2.0 ??g/L and 3.0 ??g/L, and cyanazine concentrations were more likely to exceed the health advisory level of 1.0 ??g/L. The US Environmental Protection Agency has established a tentative MCL of 1.0 ??g/L for cyanazine; data indicate that cyanazine is likely to exceed this level under most hydrologic conditions.

  3. Degradates provide insight to spatial and temporal trends of herbicides in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, D.W.; Schnoebelen, D.J.; Thurman, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    During 2001, 86 municipal wells in Iowa were sampled and analyzed for 21 herbicide parent compounds and 24 herbicide degradates. The frequency of detection increased from 17% when only herbicide parent compounds were considered to 53% when both herbicide parents and degradates were considered. Thus, the transport of herbicide compounds to ground water is substantially underestimated when herbicide degradates are not considered. A significant difference in the results among the major aquifer types was apparent only when both herbicide parent compounds and their degradates were considered. In addition, including herbicide degradates greatly improved the statistical relation to the age of the water being sampled. When herbicide parent compounds are considered, only 40% of the wells lacking a herbicide detection could be explained by the age of the water predating herbicide use. However, when herbicide degradates were also considered, 80% of the ground water samples lacking a detection could be explained by the age of the water predating herbicide use. Finally, a temporal pattern in alachlor concentrations in ground water could only be identified when alachlor degradates were considered.

  4. Nonpoint source contamination of the Mississippi river and its tributaries by herbicides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pereira, W.E.; Hostettler, F.D.

    1993-01-01

    A study of the Mississippi River and its tributaries during July-August 1991, October-November 1991, and April-May 1992 has indicated that the entire navigable reach of the river is contaminated with a complex mixture of agrochemicals and their transformation products derived from nonpoint sources. Twenty-three compounds were identified, including triazine, chloroacetanilide, thiocarbamate, phenylurea, pyridazine, and organophosphorus pesticides. The upper and middle Mississippi River Basin farm lands are major sources of herbicides applied to corn, soybeans, and sorghum. Farm lands in the lower Mississippi River Basin are a major source of rice and cotton herbicides. Inputs of the five major herbicides atrazine, cyanazine, metolachlor, alachlor, and simazine to the Mississippi River are mainly from the Minnesota, Des Moines, Missouri, and Ohio Rivers. Ratios of desethylatrazine/atrazine potentially are useful indicators of groundwater and surface water interactions in the Mississippi River. These ratios suggested that during baseflow conditions, there is a significant groundwater contribution to the river. The Mississippi River thus serves as a drainage channel for pesticide-contaminated surface and groundwater from the midwestern United States. Conservative estimates of annual mass transport indicated that about 160 t of atrazine, 71 t of cyanazine, 56 t of metolachlor, and 18 t of alachlor were discharged into the Gulf of Mexico in 1991.

  5. Agricultural chemicals in ground and surface water in a small watershed in Clayton County, Iowa, 1988-91

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkhoff, S.J.; Schaap, B.D.

    1995-01-01

    Nitrogen was present in all water samples from Deer Creek. Nitrate concentrations ranged from 0.70 to 17 mg/L. Alachlor was detected in 11 percent of the samples, atrazine in 69 percent, cyanazine in 19 percent, and metolachlor in 33 percent. Alachlor concentrations ranged from less than 0.10 to 0.53 ug/L, atrazine ranged from less than 0.10 to 55 ug/L, cyanazine ranged from less than 0.10 to 12 ug/L, and metolachlor ranged from less than 0.10 to 69 ug/L. Herbicide detections occurred most frequently in late spring and early summer during or just following chemical application. Overland flow is an important source of nitrogen and herbicides to Deer Creek. Substantial amounts of agricultural chemicals are transported from the watershed. As much as 4,700 pounds, or 6.7 pounds per acre, of nitrogen were estimated to be transported from the watershed in 1 year. Nitrogen loads transported from the Deer Creek watershed were less during dry years than during years with average or greater than average rainfall.

  6. Organo/layered double hydroxide nanohybrids used to remove non ionic pesticides.

    PubMed

    Chaara, D; Bruna, F; Ulibarri, M A; Draoui, K; Barriga, C; Pavlovic, I

    2011-11-30

    The preparation and characterization of organo/layered double hydroxide nanohybrids with dodecylsulfate and sebacate as interlayer anion were studied in detail. The aim of the modification of the layered double hydroxides (LDHs) was to change the hydrophilic character of the interlayer to hydrophobic to improve the ability of the nanohybrids to adsorb non-ionic pesticides such as alachlor and metolachlor from water. Adsorption tests were conducted on organo/LDHs using variable pH values, contact times and initial pesticide concentrations (adsorption isotherms) in order to identify the optimum conditions for the intended purpose. Adsorbents and adsorption products were characterized several physicochemical techniques. The adsorption test showed that a noticeable increase of the adsorption of the non-ionic herbicides was produced. Based on the results, the organo/LDHs could be good adsorbents to remove alachlor and metolachlor from water. Different organo/LDHs complexes were prepared by a mechanical mixture and by adsorption. The results show that HTSEB-based complex displays controlled release properties that reduce metolachlor leaching in soil columns compared to a technical product and the other formulations. The release was dependent on the nature of the adsorbent used to prepare the complexes. Thus, it can be concluded that organo/LDHs might act as suitable supports for the design of pesticide slow release formulations with the aim of reducing the adverse effects derived from rapid transport losses of the chemical once applied to soils. PMID:21978582

  7. Occurrence of herbicides, nitrite plus nitrate, and selected trace elements in ground water from northwestern and northeastern Missouri, July 1991 and 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkison, Donald H.; Maley, Randall D.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the Missouri Department of Health collected water samples for analysis of nitrite plus nitrate and herbicides from rural domestic wells in northwestern and northeastern Missouri in 1991 and 1992. In July 1991, samples were collected from 130 wells in Caldwell, Clinton, Daviess, Gentry, and Nodaway Counties in northwestern Missouri. Nitrite plus nitrate concentrations as nitrogen ranged from less than 0.05 to 63 milligrams per liter. Nitrite plus nitrate concentrations exceeded the State drinking-water standard of 10 milligrams per liter in water samples from 28 wells. One or more of the herbicides--alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine; metribuzin, metolachlor, and trifluralin--were detected at concentrations greater than or equal to 0.05 micrograms per liter in 19 samples. Atrazine was detected in water samples from 16 wells. In July 1992, water samples were collected from 147 wells in Audrain, Clark, Lewis, Monroe, Scotland, and Shelby Counties in northeastern Missouri. Nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen concentrations in samples ranged from less than 0.05 to 60 milligrams per liter and exceeded 10 milligrams per liter in samples from 28 wells. One or more of the herbicides-alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, metribuzin, and metolachlor-were detected at concentrations greater than 0.10 microgram per liter in water samples from 19 of the wells sampled. Atrazine was detected in water from 18 wells.

  8. Sorption and predicted mobility of herbicides in Baltic soils.

    PubMed

    Sakaliene, Ona; Papiernik, Sharon K; Koskinen, William C; Spokas, Kurt A

    2007-08-01

    This study was undertaken to determine sorption coefficients of eight herbicides (alachlor, amitrole, atrazine, simazine, dicamba, imazamox, imazethapyr, and pendimethalin) to seven agricultural soils from sites throughout Lithuania. The measured sorption coefficients were used to predict the susceptibility of these herbicides to leach to groundwater. Soil-water partitioning coefficients were measured in batch equilibrium studies using radiolabeled herbicides. In most soils, sorption followed the general trend pendimethalin > alachlor > atrazine approximately amitrole approximately simazine > imazethapyr > imazamox > dicamba, consistent with the trends in hydrophobicity (log K(ow)) except in the case of amitrole. For several herbicides, sorption coefficients and calculated retardation factors were lowest (predicted to be most susceptible to leaching) in a soil of intermediate organic carbon content and sand content. Calculated herbicide retardation factors were high for soils with high organic carbon contents. Estimated leaching times under saturated conditions, assuming no herbicide degradation and no preferential water flow, were more strongly affected by soil textural effects on predicted water flow than by herbicide sorption effects. All herbicides were predicted to be slowest to leach in soils with high clay and low sand contents, and fastest to leach in soils with high sand content and low organic matter content. Herbicide management is important to the continued increase in agricultural production and profitability in the Baltic region, and these results will be useful in identifying critical areas requiring improved management practices to reduce water contamination by pesticides.

  9. Ecotoxicological hazards of herbicides on biological attributes of Zygogramma bicolorata Pallister (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Hasan, Fazil; Ansari, M Shafiq

    2016-07-01

    Ecotoxic effects of commonly used herbicides i.e. glyphosate, atrazine, metribuzin, alachlor and 2, 4-D were evaluated on the biological and demographic parameters of Zygogramma bicolorata Pallister on parthenium in laboratory. The herbicides used in the bioassay were within a minimum range of their recommended field dose. In direct toxicity experiment, 2,4-D and alachlor caused the highest mortality of 3rd instars and prolonged the development time. Fecundity and eggs viability were also significantly reduced in all treatments. Indirect toxicity (carryover effect) was evaluated through life table analysis of F1 progenies developed from surviving 3rd instars treated for direct toxicity experiment. Incubation period and overall development time was considerably prolonged in all treatments especially in 2, 4-D treated group. Daily fecundity and population growth parameters were significantly lowest in 2, 4-D treated groups compared to other tested herbicides. A significantly greater number of females were produced in glyphosate treatment than other treatments. Based on the present study, none of the tested herbicide can be classified as safe to Zygogramma bicolorata, while glyphosate was found to be least toxic. Therefore, it can be concluded that application of field recommended dose of glyphosate might be used in integration with Z. bicolorata for effective management of parthenium, however this needs to be conducted under natural field conditions. PMID:27077536

  10. Organo/layered double hydroxide nanohybrids used to remove non ionic pesticides.

    PubMed

    Chaara, D; Bruna, F; Ulibarri, M A; Draoui, K; Barriga, C; Pavlovic, I

    2011-11-30

    The preparation and characterization of organo/layered double hydroxide nanohybrids with dodecylsulfate and sebacate as interlayer anion were studied in detail. The aim of the modification of the layered double hydroxides (LDHs) was to change the hydrophilic character of the interlayer to hydrophobic to improve the ability of the nanohybrids to adsorb non-ionic pesticides such as alachlor and metolachlor from water. Adsorption tests were conducted on organo/LDHs using variable pH values, contact times and initial pesticide concentrations (adsorption isotherms) in order to identify the optimum conditions for the intended purpose. Adsorbents and adsorption products were characterized several physicochemical techniques. The adsorption test showed that a noticeable increase of the adsorption of the non-ionic herbicides was produced. Based on the results, the organo/LDHs could be good adsorbents to remove alachlor and metolachlor from water. Different organo/LDHs complexes were prepared by a mechanical mixture and by adsorption. The results show that HTSEB-based complex displays controlled release properties that reduce metolachlor leaching in soil columns compared to a technical product and the other formulations. The release was dependent on the nature of the adsorbent used to prepare the complexes. Thus, it can be concluded that organo/LDHs might act as suitable supports for the design of pesticide slow release formulations with the aim of reducing the adverse effects derived from rapid transport losses of the chemical once applied to soils.

  11. Estimating contributions of nitrate and herbicides from groundwater to headwater streams, northern Atlantic Coastal Plain, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ator, Scott; Denver, Judith M.

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater transport often complicates understanding of surface-water contamination. We estimated the regional flux of nitrate and selected herbicides from groundwater to nontidal headwater streams of the Atlantic Coastal Plain (New Jersey through North Carolina) based on late-winter or spring base-flow samples from 174 streams. Sampled streams were selected randomly, and flux estimates are based on resulting population estimates rather than on empirical models, which have been used previously for similar estimates. Base-flow flux in the estimated 8,834 headwater streams of the study area are an estimated 21,200 kg/day of nitrate (as N) and 5.83, 0.565, and 20.7 kg/day of alachlor, atrazine, and metolachlor (and selected degradates), respectively. Base-flow flux of alachlor and metolachlor is <3% of the total base-flow flux of those compounds plus degradates. Base-flow flux of nitrate and herbicides as a percentage of applications is typically highest in well-drained areas and lowest in areas with abundant poor drainage and anoxic conditions. In Coastal Plain watersheds of Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, <2% of applied nitrogen reaches headwater streams as base flow. On the Delmarva Peninsula part of the Chesapeake Bay watershed, however, more than 10% of such applications are transported through groundwater to streams, and base-flow nitrate flux represents 70% of total nitrogen flux in headwater streams.

  12. Modulated expression and enzymatic activity of the monogonont rotifer Brachionus koreanus Cu/Zn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) in response to environmental biocides.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo-Mi; Lee, Jin Wuk; Seo, Jung Soo; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-02-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are important antioxidant enzymes whose expression levels are often used as biomarkers for oxidative stress. To investigate the biomarker potential of the monogonont rotifer Brachionus koreanus SOD genes, the full-length Cu/Zn-SOD (Bk-Cu/Zn-SOD) and Mn-SOD (Bk-Mn-SOD) genes were cloned from genomic DNA and characterized. All amino acid residues involved in the formation of tertiary structure and metal binding in Bk-Cu/Zn-SOD and Bk-Mn-SOD were highly conserved across species. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Bk-Mn-SOD, in particular, was closely clustered with mitochondrial Mn-SOD. Transcript analysis after exposure to six different biocides (alachlor, chlorpyrifos, dimethoate, endosulfan, lindane, and molinate) revealed that the transcriptional level of Bk-Cu/Zn-SOD was significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, the level of Bk-Mn-SOD transcript was significantly increased compared with control cells in response to chlorpyrifos, endosulfan, and molinate at their no observed effect concentrations (NOECs). However, exposure to alachlor, chlorpyrifos, and molinate significantly reduced the enzymatic activity of total SOD protein, while a decreased pattern was observed in all biocide treatments. Taken together, these results indicate that exposure to waterborne environmental biocides induces the transcription of Bk-Cu/Zn-SOD and Bk-Mn-SOD, but inhibits the enzymatic activity of Bk-SODs. These results contribute to our understanding of the modes of action of oxidative stress-mediating biocides on rotifer.

  13. Occurrence of Atrazine and Related Compounds in Sediments of Upper Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiehong; Li, Zhuona; Ranasinghe, Prabha; Bonina, Solidea; Hosseini, Soheil; Corcoran, Margaret B; Smalley, Colin; Kaliappan, Rajashankar; Wu, Yan; Chen, Da; Sandy, Andy L; Wang, Yawei; Rockne, Karl J; Sturchio, Neil C; Giesy, John P; Li, An

    2016-07-19

    Surface grab and core sediment samples were collected from Lakes Michigan, Superior, and Huron from 2010 to 2012, and concentrations of herbicides atrazine, simazine, and alachlor, as well as desethylatrazine (DEA), were determined. Concentrations of atrazine in surface grabs ranged from 0.01 to 1.7 ng/g dry weight and are significantly higher in the southern basin of Lake Michigan (latitude <44°) than other parts of the three lakes. The highest concentration of alachlor was found in sediments of Saginaw Bay in Lake Huron. The inventory and net fluxes of these herbicides were found to decline exponentially from the south to the north. The concentration ratio of DEA to atrazine (DEA/ATZ) increased with latitude, suggesting degradation of atrazine to DEA during atmospheric transport. DEA/ATZ also increased with sediment depth in the sediment cores. Diffusion of deposited herbicides from the upper sediment into deeper sediments has occurred, on the basis of the observed patterns of concentrations in dated sediment cores. Concentrations of atrazine in pore water were estimated and were higher than those reported for the bulk waters, suggesting the occurrence of solid-phase deposition of atrazine through the water column and that contaminated sediments act as a source releasing atrazine to the overlying water. PMID:27322944

  14. HYPOTHYROIDISM AND PESTICIDE USE AMONG MALE PRIVATE PESTICIDE APPLICATORS IN THE AGRICULTURAL HEALTH STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Goldner, Whitney S.; Sandler, Dale P.; Yu, Fang; Shostrom, Valerie; Hoppin, Jane A.; Kamel, Freya; LeVan, Tricia D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the association between thyroid disease and use of insecticides, herbicides, fumigants/fungicides in male applicators in the Agricultural Health Study. Methods We examined the association between use of 50 specific pesticides and self-reported hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and ‘other’ thyroid disease among 22,246 male pesticide applicators. Results There was increased odds of hypothyroidism with ever-use of the herbicides 2,4-D, 2,4,5-T, 2,4,5-TP, alachlor, dicamba, and petroleum oil. Hypothyroidism was also associated with ever-use of eight insecticides: organochlorines chlordane, DDT, heptachlor, lindane, and toxaphene; organophosphates diazinon and malathion; and the carbamate carbofuran. Exposure-response analysis showed increasing odds with increasing level of exposure for the herbicides alachlor and 2,4-D, and the insecticides aldrin, chlordane, DDT, lindane, and parathion. Conclusions There is an association between hypothyroidism and specific herbicides and insecticides in male applicators, similar to previous results for spouses. PMID:24064777

  15. Particle size distributions of currently used pesticides in a rural atmosphere of France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coscollà, Clara; Yahyaoui, Abderrazak; Colin, Patrice; Robin, Corine; Martinon, Laurent; Val, Stéphanie; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle; Mellouki, Abdelwahid; Yusà, Vicent

    2013-12-01

    This work presents first data on the particle size distributions of current-used pesticides in the atmosphere. Ambient air samples were collected using a cascade impactor distributed into four size fractions in a rural site of Centre Region (France). Most pesticides were accumulated in the fine (0.1-1 μm) particle size fraction such as cyprodinil, pendimethalin, fenpropidin, fenpropimorph and spiroxamine. Other pesticides such as acetochlor and metolachlor presented a bimodal distribution with maximum concentrations in the ultrafine (0.03-0.1 μm)-coarse (1-10 μm) and in the ultrafine-fine size ranges, respectively. No pesticides were detected in the size fraction >10 μm.

  16. [The Study on the Characteristics of Organic Pollution in Typical Herbicide Plant Wastewater].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-hui; Xi, Hong-bo; Yu, Dong; Zhou, Yue-xi; Chen, Xue-min; Fu, Xiao-yong

    2015-12-01

    Herbicide wastewater is one of tne industrial wastewater, it has high salt content, poor biodegradability, biodegradable characteristics. Nitrogen-containing organic compounds are dominated in dissolved organic matter and dissolved organic matter of wastewater, BOD: COD = 0.045, C:N:P = 692:426:1. Applying static headspace, purg and trap, solid-phase extraction, solid-phase microextraction and liquid-liquid extraction as pretreatment methods combined with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), which qualitatively analyzed the organic components of the Atrazine, acetochlor herbicide production wastewater and researched the UV spectrum, three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy of the wastewater and its major pollutants. The study of GC/MS indicated that Wastewater contained chlorinated hydrocarbons, BTEX and triazines, amides herbicides etc. 38 kinds of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds, atrazine and acetochlor herbicides accounted for 87. 99%. Affected monocyclic or heterocyclic substances, the ultraviolet absorption spectrum of the wastewater in 210-230 and 250-270 nm in that the amino group lead to the UV absorption red shift 20 nm. Wastewater generated 5 fluorescence peak in λ(ex)/λ(em) = 200-280/300-400 nm, such as a(225/305 nm), b(265/365 nm), c(275/305 nm), d(285/390 nm), e(320/375 nm). Based on three-dimensional fluorescence results of the different functional groups of the characteristics organic, fluorescent area of unsaturated bond is in λ(ex)/λ(em) = 215-230/290-340 nm, the main contribution of the fluorescent substance in the region were olefins, benzene, heterocyclic in the wastewater; fluorescent area of Phenolic hydroxyl and carbonyl is in λ(ex)/λ(em) = 270/300 nm, the main contribution of the fluorescent substance in the region were phenols, ketones. PMID:26964227

  17. Sulphur flux through the sulphate assimilation pathway is differently controlled by adenosine 5'-phosphosulphate reductase under stress and in transgenic poplar plants overexpressing gamma-ECS, SO, or APR.

    PubMed

    Scheerer, Ursula; Haensch, Robert; Mendel, Ralf R; Kopriva, Stanislav; Rennenberg, Heinz; Herschbach, Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    Sulphate assimilation provides reduced sulphur for the synthesis of cysteine, methionine, and numerous other essential metabolites and secondary compounds. The key step in the pathway is the reduction of activated sulphate, adenosine 5'-phosphosulphate (APS), to sulphite catalysed by APS reductase (APR). In the present study, [(35)S]sulphur flux from external sulphate into glutathione (GSH) and proteins was analysed to check whether APR controls the flux through the sulphate assimilation pathway in poplar roots under some stress conditions and in transgenic poplars. (i) O-Acetylserine (OAS) induced APR activity and the sulphur flux into GSH. (ii) The herbicide Acetochlor induced APR activity and results in a decline of GSH. Thereby the sulphur flux into GSH or protein remained unaffected. (iii) Cd treatment increased APR activity without any changes in sulphur flux but lowered sulphate uptake. Several transgenic poplar plants that were manipulated in sulphur metabolism were also analysed. (i) Transgenic poplar plants that overexpressed the gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-ECS) gene, the enzyme catalysing the key step in GSH formation, showed an increase in sulphur flux into GSH and sulphate uptake when gamma-ECS was targeted to the cytosol, while no changes in sulphur flux were observed when gamma-ECS was targeted to plastids. (ii) No effect on sulphur flux was observed when the sulphite oxidase (SO) gene from Arabidopsis thaliana, which catalyses the back reaction of APR, that is the reaction from sulphite to sulphate, was overexpressed. (iii) When Lemna minor APR was overexpressed in poplar, APR activity increased as expected, but no changes in sulphur flux were observed. For all of these experiments the flux control coefficient for APR was calculated. APR as a controlling step in sulphate assimilation seems obvious under OAS treatment, in gamma-ECS and SO overexpressing poplars. A possible loss of control under certain conditions, that is Cd treatment

  18. Distribution and risk assessment of 82 pesticides in Jiulong River and estuary in South China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Senllin; Chen, Bin; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Meng; Ma, Zhiyuan; Yu, Xingguang

    2016-02-01

    To discover the distribution and risk of pesticides in Jiulong River and estuary, the residues of 102 pesticides were analyzed in water, sediment and clam samples collected from 35 sites in different seasons. A total number of 82 pesticides were detected and the occurrence and the risk to human and fish were assessed. Most of pesticides with high frequency were medium or low toxic except for DDTs. DDTs were the significant contaminant and the widely used dicofol was the new source of DDTs. The spatial and seasonal variation of pesticide distribution was linked with the distribution of orchards and farmlands. Health risk from river water consumption was low (RQ < 0.1) while that from clam consumption was medium (RQ = 0.84). Pesticides in water posed great risk to fish and among the 76 water samples analyzed, 65 of them showed high risk (RQ > 1) and 6 showed medium risk (0.1 ≤ QR < 1). The single chemical posed high risk to fish included DDTs, triazophos, fenvalerate, bifenthrin and cyfluthrin, and those showed medium risk included dicofol, butachlor, isocarbophos, terbufos and cyhalothrin. There were 14 single pesticides detected with concentration above 100 ng L(-1) in this study and the pesticide with the highest concentration was procymidone (3904 ng L(-1)). Further experiments illustrated that procymidone could disrupt the expression of vitellogenin in the estuarine fish even at environmental concentrations. DDTs, dicofol, triazophos, isocarbophos, terbufos, cyfluthrin, bifenthrin, fenvalerate, cyhalothrin, butachlor and procymidone have become the significant pesticides and should be considered in aquatic ecosystem risk management.

  19. Pesticides and their metabolites in wells of Suffolk County, New York, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, Patrick J.; Eckhardt, D.A.; Terracciano, S.A.; Rosenmann, Larry

    1999-01-01

    Five insecticide residues and 20 herbicide residues were detected in water samples collected from 50 shallow wells screened in the surficial sand and gravel aquifer in Suffolk County, Long Island in areas with known or suspected residues. Laboratory analytical methods with extremely low detection limits - from 0.001 to 0.2 ?g/L (micrograms per liter) - were used to analyze the samples for 60 pesticide residues. Forty-four of the samples contained at least one pesticide residue, and some samples contained as many as 11 different pesticides or pesticide metabolites. Only four water- quality standards were exceeded in the samples collected in this study. Dieldrin exceeded the New York State Class GA standard (0.004 ?g/L) in samples from eight wells. The Federal and New York State Maximum Contaminant Level for simazine (4 ?g/L) was exceeded in samples from two wells, and the State Class GA standard for simazine (0.5 ?g/L) was exceeded in samples from six wells. Federal water-quality standards have not been established for many of the compounds detected in this study, including herbicide metabolites. Maximum concentrations of four herbicide metabolites -metolachlor ESA (ethanesulfonic acid), metolachlor OA (oxanilic acid), and the alachlor metabolites alachlor ESA and alachlor OA -exceeded 20 ?g/L. The maximum concentration of one herbicide (tebuthiuron) exceeded 10 ?g/L, and the maximum concentration of three herbicides (simazine, metolachlor, and atrazine) and one herbicide metabolite (deisopropylatrazine) ranged from 1 to 10 ?g/L. The herbicide metolachlor, which is used on potato fields in Suffolk County, and its metabolites (metolachlor ESA and metolachlor OA) were most frequently detected in samples from agricultural areas. The herbicides simazine and tebuthiuron, which were used in utility rights-of-way, and the simazine metabolite deisopropylatrazine were detected at concentrations greater than 0.05 ?g/L most frequently in samples from residential and mixed land

  20. Method development for the determination of selected pesticides on tobacco by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Helm, Bernhard; Hofbauer, Ludwig; Müller, Jutta

    2008-02-15

    A method was developed for the quantitative determination of alachlor, benalaxyl, clomazone, diflubenzuron, dimethomorph, diphenamid, ethofumesate, metalaxyl, methoprene, metobromuron and piperonyl butoxide on tobacco. The pesticides were extracted with water and methanol from five different types of tobacco. The extracts were purified by partition on an extraction cartridge containing diatomaceous earth. The purified extracts were analysed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography connected to an atmospheric pressure ionisation-electrospray-triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in the positive ion mode. Two different transitions and their relative intensities were monitored for unambiguous identification. All pesticides presented overall recovery rates between 35% and 110%. The trueness is near 100% and the interday precision is below 15%. The limits of quantifications are equal or below the guidance residue levels proposed by the Agrochemical Advisory Committee of CORESTA, an association of organisations having scientific research relative to tobacco.

  1. Cross sectional concentration data for selected organic contaminants in river waters near the confluence of the Mississippi River and the Illinois, Missouri, and Ohio Rivers, June 1989 and May-June 1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, Colleen E.; Bishop, LaDonna M.; Pereira, Wilfred E.; Leiker, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Water samples were collected upstream and downstream from the confluence of the Ohio River and Mississippi River to study mixing of the river waters. Samples collected in June 1989 on the Mississippi River were analyzed for alachlor, atrazine, 2-chloro-2',6'-diethylacetanilide, cyanazine, desethyl-atrazine, desisopropylatrazine, 2,6-diethylaniline, 2-hydroxy-2',6'-diethylacetanilide, metolachlor, simazine, trimethyltriazinetrione, tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate, and tris(chloroisopropyl) phosphate. Samples collected upstream and downstream from the confluence of the Ohio River and Mississippi River in May-June 1990 were analyzed for trimethyltriazinetrione, tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate, and tris(chloroisopropyl) phosphate. Concentration data for six to fifteen locations across the rivers are presented in tabular form for two sites in 1989 and six sites in 1990.

  2. Organomineral Interactions and Herbicide Sorption in Brazilian Tropical and Subtropical Oxisols under No-Tillage.

    PubMed

    Bonfleur, Eloana J; Kookana, Rai S; Tornisielo, Valdemar L; Regitano, Jussara B

    2016-05-25

    We evaluated the effects of the soil organic matter (SOM) composition, distribution between soil aggregates size, and their interactions with the mineral phase on herbicide sorption (alachlor, bentazon, and imazethapyr) in tropical and subtropical Oxisols under no-till systems (NT). Using soil physical fractionation approach, sorption experiments were performed on whole soils and their aggregates. SOM chemistry was assessed by CP/MAS (13)C NMR. The lower sorption observed in tropical soils was attributed to the greater blockage of SOM sorption sites than in subtropical soils. When these sites were exposed upon physical fractionation, sorption of the three herbicides in tropical soils increased, especially for imazethapyr. High amounts of poorly crystallized sesquioxides in these soils may have contributed to masking of sorption sites, indicating that organomineral interactions may lead to blockage of sorption sites on SOM in tropical soils.

  3. Trends in pesticide concentrations and use for major rivers of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryberg, Karen R.; Gilliom, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Pesticides strongly dominated by agricultural use (cyanazine, alachlor, atrazine and its degradate deethylatrazine, metolachlor, and carbofuran) had widespread agreement between concentration trends and use trends. Pesticides with substantial use in both agricultural and nonagricultural applications (simazine, chlorpyrifos, malathion, diazinon, and carbaryl) had concentration trends that were mostly explained by a combination of agricultural-use trends, regulatory changes, and urban use changes inferred from concentration trends in urban streams. When there were differences, concentration trends usually were greater than use trends (increased more or decreased less). These differences may occur because of such factors as unaccounted pesticide uses, delayed transport to the river through groundwater, greater uncertainty in the use data, or unquantified land use and management practice changes.

  4. Study of the effects of environmental parameters on the gas/particle partitioning of current-use pesticides in urban air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauret, Nathalie; Wortham, Henri; Putaud, Jean-Philippe; Mirabel, Philippe

    A filter-XAD-2 resin plug high-volume air sampler was used to collect particulate (P) and gaseous (G) phases of seven pesticides (atrazine, terbuthylazine, alachlor, metolachlor, cymoxanil, diflufenicanil, and fenoxaprop- p-ethyl) and two metabolites (de-ethylatrazine (DEA) and de-ethylterbuthylazine (DET)) in downtown Strasbourg (France). Most of the molecules listed above were found to be associated only with particulate aerosols and only four of them were detected regularly in both atmospheric phases (particulate and gaseous). The results presented in this work showed that models developed previously to describe the gas/particle (G/P) partitioning did not work for currently used pesticides. A new partition equation ( Korg, m 3 ng -1) was defined for the pesticides under study using environmental parameters such as temperature, relative humidity, and organic carbon content of atmospheric aerosols.

  5. Effects of sampling strategies on estimates of annual mean herbicide concentrations in midwestern rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.A.; Hay, L.E.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of 10 sampling strategies on estimates of annual mean concentrations of the herbicides atrazine, alachlor, and cyanazine in selected midwestern rivers were tested. The accuracy of the strategies was computed by comparing time-weighted annual mean herbicide concentrations calculated from water samples collected from 17 locations on midwestern rivers, with simulated annual mean concentrations calculated for each sampling strategy, using Monte Carlo simulations. Monthly sampling was the most accurate strategy tested. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency requires quarterly sampling for municipalities using surface water as a source of drinking water. Due to the seasonality of herbicide occurrence and transport, quarterly sampling underestimates annual mean herbicide concentrations in over 40% of the simulations. Three of the strategies tested showed that, relative to quarterly sampling, a more accurate representation of annual mean concentrations could be obtained by sampling more frequently during spring and early summer runoff and assuming zero herbicide concentration during late summer and winter months.

  6. Distribution of major herbicides in ground water of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barbash, Jack E.; Thelin, Gail P.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Gilliom, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    Frequencies of detection at or above 0.01 microgram per liter in shallow ground water beneath agricultural areas during the NAWQA study were significantly correlated with agricultural use in those areas for atrazine, cyanazine, alachlor, and metolachlor (P<0.05; Spearman rank correlations), but not for simazine (P>0.05). In urban areas, overall frequencies of detection of these five herbicides in shallow ground water were positively correlated with their total nonagricultural use nationwide (P=0.026; simple linear correlation). Multivariate statistical analysis indicated that frequencies of detection in shallow ground water beneath agricultural areas were positively correlated with half-lives for transformation in aerobic soil and agricultural use of the comp

  7. Occurrence of pesticides in ground water in the White River Basin, Indiana, 1994-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenelon, Joseph M.; Moore, Rhett C.

    1996-01-01

    Pesticides (herbicides and insecticides) are used extensively in the White River Basin. Application of herbicides to corn and soybeans accounts for most of the use. The U.S. Geological Survey collected samples from four networks of monitoring wells in the White River Basin during 1994-95. The most frequently detected compounds in ground water were desethyl atrazine (a breakdown product of atrazine) and the commonly used herbicides, atrazine and metolachlor. Insecticides commonly used in urban and agricultural areas were not found. The highest concentration of any pesticide detected was alachlor at 0.19 micrograms per liter. Most detections of atrazine and desethyl atrazine were in agricultural areas overlying fluvial deposits, which are vulnerable to pesticide contamination, but the concentrations were small (less than 0.1 microgram per liter).

  8. Field calibration of surface: a model of agricultural chemicals in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, D I

    1990-10-01

    Agricultural chemicals sporadically occur at detectable levels in the surface waters of intensively farmed watersheds. HSPF, a previously released model of agricultural chemicals in surface water, had been used to predict concentrations which were much higher (10 X) than those actually observed during monitoring studies. A new model, SURFACE, is described here which is much simpler than HSPF and gives better predictions of surface water concentrations. SURFACE uses PRZM, an EPA model, to calculate edge-of-field runoff losses and simple hydraulic routing algorithms to determine concentrations at the bottom of large river basins. In water systems sampled during 1985 and 1986, SURFACE predictions of annualized mean concentrations for alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine and metolachlor were within 0.09 ppb half of the time.

  9. Organomineral Interactions and Herbicide Sorption in Brazilian Tropical and Subtropical Oxisols under No-Tillage.

    PubMed

    Bonfleur, Eloana J; Kookana, Rai S; Tornisielo, Valdemar L; Regitano, Jussara B

    2016-05-25

    We evaluated the effects of the soil organic matter (SOM) composition, distribution between soil aggregates size, and their interactions with the mineral phase on herbicide sorption (alachlor, bentazon, and imazethapyr) in tropical and subtropical Oxisols under no-till systems (NT). Using soil physical fractionation approach, sorption experiments were performed on whole soils and their aggregates. SOM chemistry was assessed by CP/MAS (13)C NMR. The lower sorption observed in tropical soils was attributed to the greater blockage of SOM sorption sites than in subtropical soils. When these sites were exposed upon physical fractionation, sorption of the three herbicides in tropical soils increased, especially for imazethapyr. High amounts of poorly crystallized sesquioxides in these soils may have contributed to masking of sorption sites, indicating that organomineral interactions may lead to blockage of sorption sites on SOM in tropical soils. PMID:26666375

  10. Research on agrichemicals in water resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkart, Michael R.; Onstad, Charles A.; Bubenzer, Gary D.

    A plan to study the effects of agricultural systems on the occurrence of agricultural chemicals in ground and surface waters is being formulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Geological Survey. Initial research will focus on the herbicides atrazine and alachlor, the insecticide carbofuran, and plant nutrient, nitrate, in the midwest cornbelt. The cornbelt has uniquely similar agriculture over a large area. Many hydrologic and agronomic scientific disciplines from several federal and state agencies are being integrated to conduct research at several scales. The integration of information from this research is intended to lead to the identification of major processes affecting agrichemical fate and ultimately to development of farming systems that protect, improve, or remediate water quality.

  11. Treating Soil Solution Samplers To Prevent Microbial Removal of Analytes

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, David L.; Simons, Alex P.; Moore, W. Bruce; Gattie, David K.

    1992-01-01

    Soil microorganisms colonizing soil water sampling devices (lysimeters) reduced concentrations of biodegradable organic chemicals, including 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid methyl ester, alachlor, methyl m-chlorobenzoate, and metolachlor as water entered through porous ceramic cups. In some cases, losses exceeded 99%. Additions of either a biocide (sodium hypochlorite) or a bacteriostat (copper salt) prevented microbial activity so that concentrations of test chemicals inside lysimeters equaled those outside. Field studies further indicated that treating lysimeters with a copper salt effectively prevented microbial activity. Thus, chemically treating soil water samplers could improve the accuracy of soil water data for a wide variety of analytes, including environmentally important organics, such as pesticides and industrial wastes, and inorganics, such as ammonia and nitrate. Images PMID:16348616

  12. Photocatalytic oxidation of pesticides by solar-irradiated TiO[sub 2] systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.M.; Grinstead, J.H. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Research at the Tennessee Valley Authority's National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center has been directed toward the development of passive basin type solar evaporators as a simple means of reducing the volume of fertilizer and pesticide contaminated rinsewater generated at fertilizer and agrichemical dealerships. In conjunction with this work, investigations are also devoted to TiO[sub 2] catalyzed solar photooxidation as a potential procedure for destroying pesticides in dilute aqueous systems. Initial tests in which dilute samples of the herbicides; Bicep (atrazine and metolachlor), Lasso (alachlor), and Sencor (metribuzin); were recirculated continuously over TiO[sub 2] impregnated fiberglass gauze, under solar irradiation, gave promising results. In the case of metribuzin, solar irradiation induced oxidation appeared effective at concentrations as high as 600 ppM. Catalytic efficiency did not appear greatly affected by using tap water rather than distilled water to dilute the pesticides. Two solar reactor designs will be discussed.

  13. Movement of pesticides and nutrients into tile drainage water. Final report, 22 September 1985-22 September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Van Scoyoc, G.E.; Kladivko, E.J.

    1989-01-01

    Concern about contamination of surface and ground water by agricultural chemicals has increased in the last five years. The objectives of this study were to determine field-scale pesticide and nutrient losses to tile drains over a 3-year period on a low-organic-matter, poorly structured silt loam soil under typical agricultural management practices. A tile-drainage spacing study was instrumented to measure water outflow rates and to continuously collect tile outflow samples on a flow-proportional basis. Two replicates of 3 tile spacings (5, 10, and 20 m) were included in the study. Water samples were analyzed for all applied pesticides (atrazine, cyanazine, alachlor, carbofuran, terbufos, and chlorpyrifos) as well as major nutrients (N,P,K) and sediment.

  14. Photocatalytic oxidation of pesticides by solar-irradiated TiO{sub 2} systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.M.; Grinstead, J.H. Jr.

    1992-12-01

    Research at the Tennessee Valley Authority`s National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center has been directed toward the development of passive basin type solar evaporators as a simple means of reducing the volume of fertilizer and pesticide contaminated rinsewater generated at fertilizer and agrichemical dealerships. In conjunction with this work, investigations are also devoted to TiO{sub 2} catalyzed solar photooxidation as a potential procedure for destroying pesticides in dilute aqueous systems. Initial tests in which dilute samples of the herbicides; Bicep (atrazine and metolachlor), Lasso (alachlor), and Sencor (metribuzin); were recirculated continuously over TiO{sub 2} impregnated fiberglass gauze, under solar irradiation, gave promising results. In the case of metribuzin, solar irradiation induced oxidation appeared effective at concentrations as high as 600 ppM. Catalytic efficiency did not appear greatly affected by using tap water rather than distilled water to dilute the pesticides. Two solar reactor designs will be discussed.

  15. Are Streams in Agricultural and Urban Areas Contaminated by Pesticides?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimbrough, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    To answer this question, a study of pesticides in streams in a small agricultural area and a small urban area in Colorado was conducted in 1993 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program. The results indicate that pesticides are present in streams, and both agricultural and urban areas are probable sources of the contamination. In the agricultural area, 30 pesticides were detected and in the urban area, 26 pesticides were detected at least once during the thirteen month study. In the agricultural area, the herbicides alachlor (two samples) and cyanazine (four samples) and the insecticide diazinon (one sample) were the only pesticides that exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) or health advisory levels (HALs) for drinking water. No pesticides exceeded MCLs or HALs in the urban area.

  16. 40 CFR Table 2 to Part 455 - Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient Effluent Limitations Best Available Technology Economically...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... not exceed Notes 2,4-D 1.97×10−3 6.40×10−4 2,4-D Salts and Esters (1) (1) 2,4-DB Salts and Esters (1) (1) Acephate 6.39×10−4 1.97×10−4 Acifluorfen 2.45 9.3×10−1 Alachlor 5.19×10−3 1.54×10−3 Aldicarb 7.23×10−4 3.12×10−4 Ametryn 7.72×10−3 2.53×10−3 Atrazine 5.12×10−3 1.72×10−3 Azinphos......

  17. 40 CFR Table 2 to Part 455 - Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient Effluent Limitations Best Available Technology Economically...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... not exceed Notes 2,4-D 1.97×10−3 6.40×10−4 2,4-D Salts and Esters (1) (1) 2,4-DB Salts and Esters (1) (1) Acephate 6.39×10−4 1.97×10−4 Acifluorfen 2.45 9.3×10−1 Alachlor 5.19×10−3 1.54×10−3 Aldicarb 7.23×10−4 3.12×10−4 Ametryn 7.72×10−3 2.53×10−3 Atrazine 5.12×10−3 1.72×10−3 Azinphos......

  18. 40 CFR Table 2 to Part 455 - Organic Pesticide Active Ingredient Effluent Limitations Best Available Technology Economically...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... not exceed Notes 2,4-D 1.97×10−3 6.40×10−4 2,4-D Salts and Esters (1) (1) 2,4-DB Salts and Esters (1) (1) Acephate 6.39×10−4 1.97×10−4 Acifluorfen 2.45 9.3×10−1 Alachlor 5.19×10−3 1.54×10−3 Aldicarb 7.23×10−4 3.12×10−4 Ametryn 7.72×10−3 2.53×10−3 Atrazine 5.12×10−3 1.72×10−3 Azinphos......

  19. Pesticide distributions in surface water: The distribution of pesticide concentrations at two study sites points to herbicides that may affect management of public water supplies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamer, J.K.; Wieczorek, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    Distributions of concentrations of 46 pesticides were documented from May 1992 through March 1994 for Maple Creek near Nickerson, Neb., and Platte River at Louisville, Neb. As their source of public water supplies, Lincoln and the western part of Omaha withdraw groundwater from the adjacent alluvium near the Platte River site, which is hydraulically connected to the Platte River. Organonitrogen herbicides dominated the pesticide distributions at each site. Variations in the distributions of pesticides at the two sites partly reflect differences in land use and land management practices. Diazinon, an insecticide used in urban areas, was commonly detected at the Platte River site but not at the Maple Creek site. Of the 46 pesticides analyzed at the Platte River site, the herbicides atrazine and alachlor were more likely to exceed their respective maximum contaminant levels of 3.0 and 2.0 pg/L; cyanazine was more likely to exceed the health advisory level of 1.0 ??g/L.

  20. Occurrence of active and inactive herbicide ingredients at selected sites in Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, W.; Liszewski, M.; Buchmiller, R.; Cherryholmes, K.

    1995-01-01

    Herbicides were detected in 50% of water samples, ranging from 78% of water samples from the Ames site to 25% from the Walnut Creek site. Among herbicides detected, listed in decreasing order of frequency, were atrazine > alachlor > cyanazine > metolachlor > metribuzin. Volatile organic compounds were detected in 11% of water samples. Among the compounds detected, listed in decreasing order of frequency, were xylene > toluene > acetone. One sample contained a detectable amount of aliphatic compound(s), with the empirical formula of C8H18. Results from the Deer Creek site showed that herbicides were detected primarily in the top layer (1.2 m), whereas xylene and other alkylbenzenes were detected at 2.1 m or deeper. Apparently, physico-chemical and other factors are separating herbicides and volatile organic compounds in the shallow unsaturated zone.

  1. Predicted impact of transgenic, herbicidetolerant corn on drinking water quality in vulnerable watersheds of the mid-western USA.

    PubMed

    Wauchope, R Don; Estes, Tammara L; Allen, Richard; Baker, James L; Hornsby, Arthur G; Jones, Russell L; Richards, R Peter; Gustafson, David I

    2002-02-01

    In the intensely farmed corn-growing regions of the mid-western USA, surface waters have often been contaminated by herbicides, principally as a result of rainfall runoff occurring shortly after application of these to corn and other crops. In some vulnerable watersheds, water quality criteria for chronic human exposure through drinking water are occasionally exceeded. We selected three settings representative of vulnerable corn-region watersheds, and used the PRZM-EXAMS model with the Index Reservoir scenario to predict corn herbicide concentrations in the reservoirs as a function of herbicide properties and use pattern, site characteristics and weather in the watersheds. We compared herbicide application scenarios, including broadcast surface pre-plant atrazine and alachlor applications with a glyphosate pre-plant application, scenarios in which losses of herbicides were mitigated by incorporation or banding, and scenarios in which only glyphosate or glufosinate post-emergent herbicides were used with corn genetically modified to be resistant to them. In the absence of drift, in almost all years a single runoff event dominates the input into the reservoir. As a result, annual average pesticide concentrations are highly correlated with annual maximum daily values. The modeled concentrations were generally higher than those derived from monitoring data, even for no-drift model scenarios. Because of their lower post-emergent application rates and greater soil sorptivity, glyphosate and glufosinate loads in runoff were generally one-fifth to one-tenth those of atrazine and alachlor. These model results indicate that the replacement of pre-emergent corn herbicides with the post-emergent herbicides allowed by genetic modification of crops would dramatically reduce herbicide concentrations in vulnerable watersheds. Given the significantly lower chronic mammalian toxicity of these compounds, and their vulnerability to breakdown in the drinking water treatment process

  2. Linking ground-water age and chemistry data along flow paths: Implications for trends and transformations of nitrate and pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tesoriero, A.J.; Saad, D.A.; Burow, K.R.; Frick, E.A.; Puckett, L.J.; Barbash, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Tracer-based ground-water ages, along with the concentrations of pesticides, nitrogen species, and other redox-active constituents, were used to evaluate the trends and transformations of agricultural chemicals along flow paths in diverse hydrogeologic settings. A range of conditions affecting the transformation of nitrate and pesticides (e.g., thickness of unsaturated zone, redox conditions) was examined at study sites in Georgia, North Carolina, Wisconsin, and California. Deethylatrazine (DEA), a transformation product of atrazine, was typically present at concentrations higher than those of atrazine at study sites with thick unsaturated zones but not at sites with thin unsaturated zones. Furthermore, the fraction of atrazine plus DEA that was present as DEA did not increase as a function of ground-water age. These findings suggest that atrazine degradation occurs primarily in the unsaturated zone with little or no degradation in the saturated zone. Similar observations were also made for metolachlor and alachlor. The fraction of the initial nitrate concentration found as excess N2 (N2 derived from denitrification) increased with ground-water age only at the North Carolina site, where oxic conditions were generally limited to the top 5??m of saturated thickness. Historical trends in fluxes to ground water were evaluated by relating the times of recharge of ground-water samples, estimated using chlorofluorocarbon concentrations, with concentrations of the parent compound at the time of recharge, estimated by summing the molar concentrations of the parent compound and its transformation products in the age-dated sample. Using this approach, nitrate concentrations were estimated to have increased markedly from 1960 to the present at all study sites. Trends in concentrations of atrazine, metolachlor, alachlor, and their degradates were related to the timing of introduction and use of these compounds. Degradates, and to a lesser extent parent compounds, were detected

  3. A Review of Pesticide Exposure and Cancer Incidence in the Agricultural Health Study Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Weichenthal, Scott; Moase, Connie; Chan, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Objective We reviewed epidemiologic evidence related to occupational pesticide exposures and cancer incidence in the Agricultural Health Study (AHS) cohort. Data sources Studies were identified from the AHS publication list available at http://aghealth.nci.nih.gov as well as through a Medline/PubMed database search in March 2009. We also examined citation lists. Findings related to lifetime-days and/or intensity-weighted lifetime-days of pesticide use are the primary focus of this review, because these measures allow for the evaluation of potential exposure–response relationships. Data synthesis We reviewed 28 studies; most of the 32 pesticides examined were not strongly associated with cancer incidence in pesticide applicators. Increased rate ratios (or odds ratios) and positive exposure–response patterns were reported for 12 pesticides currently registered in Canada and/or the United States (alachlor, aldicarb, carbaryl, chlorpyrifos, diazinon, dicamba, S-ethyl-N,N-dipropylthiocarbamate, imazethapyr, metolachlor, pendimethalin, permethrin, trifluralin). However, estimates of association for specific cancers were often imprecise because of small numbers of exposed cases, and clear monotonic exposure–response patterns were not always apparent. Exposure misclassification is also a concern in the AHS and may limit the analysis of exposure–response patterns. Epidemiologic evidence outside the AHS remains limited with respect to most of the observed associations, but animal toxicity data support the biological plausibility of relationships observed for alachlor, carbaryl, metolachlor, pendimethalin, permethrin, and trifluralin. Conclusions Continued follow-up is needed to clarify associations reported to date. In particular, further evaluation of registered pesticides is warranted. PMID:20444670

  4. Comparative sensitivity of Selenastrum capricornutum and Lemna minor to sixteen herbicides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairchild, J.F.; Ruessler, D.S.; Haverland, P.S.; Carlson, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    Aquatic plant toxicity tests are frequently conducted in environmental risk assessments to determine the potential impacts of contaminants on primary producers. An examination of published plant toxicity data demonstrates that wide differences in sensitivity can occur across phylogenetic groups of plants. Yet relatively few studies have been conducted with the specific intent to compare the relative sensitivity of various aquatic plant species to contaminants. We compared the relative sensitivity of the algae Selenestrum capricornutum and the floating vascular plant Lemna minor to 16 herbicides (atrazine, metribuzin, simazine, cyanazine, alachlor, metolachlor, chlorsulfuron, metsulfuron, triallate, EPTC, trifluralin, diquat, paraquat, dicamba, bromoxynil, and 2,4-D). The herbicides studied represented nine chemical classes and several modes of action and were chosen to represent major current uses in the United States. Both plant species were generally sensitive to the triazines (atrazine, metribuzin, simazine, and cyanazine), sulfonureas (metsulfuron and chlorsulfuron), pyridines (diquat and paraquat), dinitroaniline (trifluralin), and acetanilide (alachlor and metolachlor) herbicides. Neither plant species was uniformly more sensitive than the other across the broad range of herbicides tested. Lemna was more sensitive to the sulfonureas (metsulfuron and chlorsulfuron) and the pyridines (diquat and parequat) than Selenastrum. However Selenastrum was more sensitive than Lemna to one of two thiocarbamates (triallate) and one of the triazines (cyanazine). Neither species was sensitive to selective broadleaf herbicides including bromoxynil, EPTC, dicamba, or 2,4-D. Results were not always predictable in spite of obvious differences in herbicide modes of action and plant phylogeny. Major departures in sensitivity of Selenastrum occurred between chemicals within individual classes of the triazine, acetanilide, and thiocarbamate herbicides. Results indicate that neither

  5. Pesticide Use and Relative Leukocyte Telomere Length in the Agricultural Health Study.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Gabriella; Hoppin, Jane A; Hou, Lifang; Koutros, Stella; Gadalla, Shahinaz M; Savage, Sharon A; Lubin, Jay; Blair, Aaron; Hoxha, Mirjam; Baccarelli, Andrea; Sandler, Dale; Alavanja, Michael; Beane Freeman, Laura E

    2015-01-01

    Some studies suggest that telomere length (TL) may be influenced by environmental exposures, including pesticides. We examined associations between occupational pesticide use reported at three time points and relative telomere length (RTL) in the Agricultural Health Study (AHS), a prospective cohort study of pesticide applicators in Iowa and North Carolina. RTL was measured by qPCR using leukocyte DNA from 568 cancer-free male AHS participants aged 31-94 years with blood samples collected between 2006 and 2008. Self-reported information, including pesticide use, was collected at three time points: enrollment (1993-1997) and two follow-up questionnaires (1998-2003, 2005-2008). For each pesticide, we evaluated cumulative use (using data from all three questionnaires), and more recent use (using data from the last follow-up questionnaire). Multivariable linear regression was used to examine the associations between pesticide use (ever, lifetime days, intensity-weighted lifetime days (lifetime days*intensity score)) and RTL, adjusting for age at blood draw and use of other pesticides. Of the 57 pesticides evaluated with cumulative use, increasing lifetime days of 2,4-D (p-trend=0.001), diazinon (p-trend=0.002), and butylate (p-trend=0.01) were significantly associated with shorter RTL, while increasing lifetime days of alachlor was significantly associated with longer RTL (p-trend=0.03). Only the association with 2,4-D was significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons. Of the 40 pesticides evaluated for recent use, malathion was associated with shorter RTL (p=0.03), and alachlor with longer RTL (p=0.03). Our findings suggest that leukocyte TL may be impacted by cumulative use and recent use of certain pesticides.

  6. Pesticide Use and Relative Leukocyte Telomere Length in the Agricultural Health Study.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Gabriella; Hoppin, Jane A; Hou, Lifang; Koutros, Stella; Gadalla, Shahinaz M; Savage, Sharon A; Lubin, Jay; Blair, Aaron; Hoxha, Mirjam; Baccarelli, Andrea; Sandler, Dale; Alavanja, Michael; Beane Freeman, Laura E

    2015-01-01

    Some studies suggest that telomere length (TL) may be influenced by environmental exposures, including pesticides. We examined associations between occupational pesticide use reported at three time points and relative telomere length (RTL) in the Agricultural Health Study (AHS), a prospective cohort study of pesticide applicators in Iowa and North Carolina. RTL was measured by qPCR using leukocyte DNA from 568 cancer-free male AHS participants aged 31-94 years with blood samples collected between 2006 and 2008. Self-reported information, including pesticide use, was collected at three time points: enrollment (1993-1997) and two follow-up questionnaires (1998-2003, 2005-2008). For each pesticide, we evaluated cumulative use (using data from all three questionnaires), and more recent use (using data from the last follow-up questionnaire). Multivariable linear regression was used to examine the associations between pesticide use (ever, lifetime days, intensity-weighted lifetime days (lifetime days*intensity score)) and RTL, adjusting for age at blood draw and use of other pesticides. Of the 57 pesticides evaluated with cumulative use, increasing lifetime days of 2,4-D (p-trend=0.001), diazinon (p-trend=0.002), and butylate (p-trend=0.01) were significantly associated with shorter RTL, while increasing lifetime days of alachlor was significantly associated with longer RTL (p-trend=0.03). Only the association with 2,4-D was significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons. Of the 40 pesticides evaluated for recent use, malathion was associated with shorter RTL (p=0.03), and alachlor with longer RTL (p=0.03). Our findings suggest that leukocyte TL may be impacted by cumulative use and recent use of certain pesticides. PMID:26196902

  7. Pesticides in streams of the western Lake Michigan drainages, Wisconsin and Michigan, 1993-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Daniel J.; Richards, Kevin D.

    1996-01-01

    During 1993-95, water samples were collected at nine sites on eight streams in the Western Lake Michigan Drainages to attempt to determine pesticide concentrations. The sampling effort was part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water- Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Pesticides analyzed for were 58 herbicides and 30 insecticides. Pesticides are used extensively in the study area; application of herbicides to corn and soybeans accounts for most of the use. Herbicides were detected more frequently and generally at higher concentrations than insecticides. The herbicide atrazine is applied to more acreage in Wisconsin than all other pesticides and was detected in 142 of 143 samples. The herbicides simazine, metolachlor, cyanazine, prometon, and alachlor were detected in more than half of the samples. The presence of these compounds in the sampled streams, is related to agricultural use. Two streams in forested basins in the northern part of the study area were sampled and found to contain low concentrations of atrazine. Atmospheric deposition is the likely source; atrazine has been detected in rain fall in northeastern Wisconsin. Herbicide concentrations in agricultural basins were highest in samples collected during storm runoff following application. Concentrations decreased over the growing season as herbicides broke down and increased ground cover reduced runoff. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) drinking-water standard for atrazine was exceeded in eight samples, and the standard for alachlor was exceeded in two samples. All exceedances occurred during brief periods of high streamflow in June and July at two streams that drain primarily agricultural basins. Herbicide data for the Western Lake Drainages and other NAWQA study units indicate that concentrations in streams are as much as two orders of magnitude higher in areas where agricultural land contains a high percentage of row crops especially corn and soybeans than in areas where

  8. Compilation of atrazine and selected herbicide data from previous surface-water-quality investigations within the Big Blue River basin, Nebraska, 1983-92

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankforter, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Atrazine has been detected in the surface water of the Big Blue River Basin during every month of the year. Recent data (1983-92) documenting the occurrence of atrazine and related herbicides in the surface water of the basin are compiled in this report. In samples analyzed during these studies, atrazine was the herbicide detected most frequently within the basin. Of the 385 samples analyzed, 369 contained atrazine in detectable concentrations with detection levels varying from 0 to 0.1 micrograms per liter. The concentrations of atrazine within the samples varied from 0.5 to 166 micrograms per liter, with a median concentration of 2.7 micrograms per liter. Other herbicides frequently detected in the Big Blue River Basin were alachlor, cyanazine, metolachlor, and simazine, and two metabolites of atrazine, desethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine. In the 226 samples which alachlor was detected, the concentrations of the herbicide ranged from 0.05 to 56 micrograms per liter, and the median concen- tration was 1.1 micrograms per liter. Cyanazine was detected in 210 of 365 samples collected with con- centrations that ranged from 0.05 to 8.6 micrograms per liter with a median concentration of 0.4 microgram per liter. The maximum concentrations of metolachlor and simazine were 26 and 35 micrograms per liter, respectively. The median concentrations of these herbicides were 1.0 and 0.1 micrograms per liter, respectively. The maximum concentration of desethylatrazine, was 3.7 micrograms per liter, with a median concentration of 1.0 microgram per liter. Deisopropylatrazine, was detected in 152 samples with maximum and median concentrations of 2.6 and 0.6 micrograms per liter, respectively.

  9. Estimating the Regional Flux of Nitrate and Agricultural Herbicide Compounds from Groundwater to Headwater Streams of the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ator, S.; Denver, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Agriculture is common in the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain (NACP, including New Jersey through North Carolina), and groundwater discharge provides nitrogen (primarily in the form of nitrate) and herbicide compounds from agricultural sources along with the majority of flow to NACP streams. Poor water quality has contributed to ecological degradation of tidal streams and estuaries along much of the adjacent mid-Atlantic coast. Although statistical models have provided estimates of total instream nutrient flux in the Coastal Plain, the regional flux of nitrogen and herbicides during base flow is less well understood. We estimated the regional flux of nitrate and selected commonly used herbicide compounds from groundwater to non-tidal headwater streams of the NACP on the basis of late-winter or spring base-flow samples from 174 such streams. Sampled streams were selected using an unequal-probability random approach, and flux estimates are based on resulting population estimates rather than empirical models, which are commonly used for such estimates. Base-flow flux in the estimated 8,834 NACP non-tidal headwater streams are an estimated 21,200 kilograms per day of nitrate (as N) and 5.83, 0.565, and 20.7 kilograms per day of alachlor, atrazine, and metolachlor (including selected degradates), respectively. Base-flow flux of alachlor and metolachlor is dominated by degradates; flux of parent compounds is less than 3 percent of the total flux of parent plus degradates. Base-flow flux of nitrate and herbicides as a percentage of applications generally varies predictably with regional variations in hydrogeology. Abundant nonpoint (primarily agricultural) sources and hydrogeologic conditions, for example, contribute to particularly large base-flow flux from the Delmarva Peninsula to Chesapeake Bay. In the Delmarva Peninsula part of the Chesapeake Watershed, more than 10 percent of total nonpoint nitrogen applications is transported through groundwater to stream base flow

  10. Amidase activity in soils. IV. Effects of trace elements and pesticides

    SciTech Connect

    Frankenberger, W.T., Jr.; Tabatabai, M.A.

    1981-11-01

    Amidase was recently detected in soils, and this study was carried out to assess the effects of 21 trace elements, 12 herbicides, 2 fungicides, and 2 insecticides on the activity of this enzyme. Results showed that most of the trace elements and pesticides studied inhibited amidase activity in soils. The degree of inhibition varied among the soils used. When the trace elements were compared by using 5 ..mu..mol/g of soil, the average inhibition of amidase in three soils showed that Ag(I), Hg(I), As(III), and Se(IV) were the most effective inhibitors, but only Ag(I) and As(III) showed average inhibition > 50%. The least effective inhibitors (average inhibition < 3%) included Cu(I), Ba(II), Cu(II), Fe(II), Ni(II), Al(III), Fe(III), Ti(IV), V(IV), As(V), Mo(VI), and W(VI). Other elements that inhibited amidase activity in soils were Cd(II), Co(II), Mn(II), Pb(II), Sn(II), Zn(II), B(III), and Cr(III). Enzyme kinetic studies showed that As(III) was a competitive inhibitor of amidase, whereas Ag(I), Hg(II), and Se(IV) were noncompetitive inhibitors. When the pesticides studied were compared by using 10 ..mu..g of active ingredient per gram of soil, the average inhibition of amidase in three soils ranged from 2% with dinitroamine, EPTC plus R-25788, and captan to 10% with butylate. Other pesticides that inhibited amidase activity in soils were atrazine, naptalam, chloramben, dicamba, cyanazine, 2,4-D, alachlor, paraquat, trifluralin, maneb, diazinon, and malathion. The inhibition of amidase by diazinon, alachlor, and butylate followed noncompetitive kinetics.

  11. Comparison of solvents for removing pesticides from skin using an in vitro porcine model.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J L; Smith, M A; Eiteman, M A; Williams, P L; Boeniger, M F

    2000-01-01

    This study compared four solvents (1-propanol, polyethylene glycol [avg. MW 400], 10% Ivory Liquid and water, and D-TAM) for their ability to remove selected pesticides from an in vitro porcine skin model using a solvent-moistened wipe. Wipes were performed 90 min after pesticide was applied to the skin. The four pesticides selected (glyphosate, alachlor, methyl parathion, and trifluralin) were chosen because of their differences in water solubility. This study also determined whether pretreatment of skin with a solvent prior to pesticide application would either increase or decrease recovery of the pesticide. Recovery efficiencies for all solvents and pesticides were affected by the amount of contaminant on the skin. Although pesticide recoveries from all four solvents were similar (range: 45-57%), on average 1-propanol had significantly higher recoveries, followed by soap and water. There was no significant difference between polyethylene glycol, and D-TAM. When skin was pretreated with any of the four solvents before pesticide application, the recoveries of the more water soluble compounds, glyphosate and alachlor, decreased. When pretreatment with solvent preceded application of trifluralin, the pesticide with the lowest water solubility, recoveries increased. 1-Propanol or soap and water were more effective in removing pesticides from skin than polyethylene glycol or D-TAM, but the amount of pesticide recovered from skin was affected by the chemical characteristics of the pesticide (such as water solubility) and the amount of pesticide originally on the skin. This study provides information useful to the interpretation of skin wipe sample results collected in field studies.

  12. Agricultural chemicals in alluvial aquifers in Missouri after the 1993 flood

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heimann, D.C.; Richards, J.M.; Wilkison, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    Intense rains produced flooding during the spring and summer of 1993 over much of the midwestern USA including many agricultural areas of Missouri. Because of potential contamination from floodwater, an investigation was conducted to determine the changes in concentrations of agricultural chemicals in water samples from alluvial wells in Missouri after the flood. Water samples from 80 alluvial wells with historical data were collected in March, July, and November 1994, and analyzed for dissolved herbicides, herbicide metabolites, and nitrate (NO3). There were no statistically significant differences in the distribution of alachlor ((2,chloro-2'-6'-diethyl-N-[methoxymethyl]acetanilide), atrazine (2-chloro- 4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1, 3, 5 triazine), and nitrate concentrations between pre- and postflood samples (?? = 0.05). The detection frequency of alachlor and atrazine in postflood samples was generally lower than the frequency in preflood samples. Analyses of agricultural chemicals in water samples from an intensely sampled well field indicate significant differences between the distribution of dissolved P concentrations in pre- and postflood samples (?? = 0.05). However, no significant differences were detected between the pre- and postflood distributions of NO3 or ammonia concentrations. Because of the numerous sources of temporal variability and the relatively short record of water-quality data for the study wells, a cause-and-effect relation between changes in agricultural chemical concentrations and a single factor of the 1993 flood is difficult to determine. Based on the results of this study, the 1993 flood did not cause widespread or long-term significant changes in concentrations of agricultural chemicals in water from alluvial aquifers in Missouri.

  13. Linking ground-water age and chemistry data along flow paths: Implications for trends and transformations of nitrate and pesticides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesoriero, Anthony J.; Saad, David A.; Burow, Karen R.; Frick, Elizabeth A.; Puckett, Larry J.; Barbash, Jack E.

    2007-10-01

    Tracer-based ground-water ages, along with the concentrations of pesticides, nitrogen species, and other redox-active constituents, were used to evaluate the trends and transformations of agricultural chemicals along flow paths in diverse hydrogeologic settings. A range of conditions affecting the transformation of nitrate and pesticides (e.g., thickness of unsaturated zone, redox conditions) was examined at study sites in Georgia, North Carolina, Wisconsin, and California. Deethylatrazine (DEA), a transformation product of atrazine, was typically present at concentrations higher than those of atrazine at study sites with thick unsaturated zones but not at sites with thin unsaturated zones. Furthermore, the fraction of atrazine plus DEA that was present as DEA did not increase as a function of ground-water age. These findings suggest that atrazine degradation occurs primarily in the unsaturated zone with little or no degradation in the saturated zone. Similar observations were also made for metolachlor and alachlor. The fraction of the initial nitrate concentration found as excess N 2 (N 2 derived from denitrification) increased with ground-water age only at the North Carolina site, where oxic conditions were generally limited to the top 5 m of saturated thickness. Historical trends in fluxes to ground water were evaluated by relating the times of recharge of ground-water samples, estimated using chlorofluorocarbon concentrations, with concentrations of the parent compound at the time of recharge, estimated by summing the molar concentrations of the parent compound and its transformation products in the age-dated sample. Using this approach, nitrate concentrations were estimated to have increased markedly from 1960 to the present at all study sites. Trends in concentrations of atrazine, metolachlor, alachlor, and their degradates were related to the timing of introduction and use of these compounds. Degradates, and to a lesser extent parent compounds, were detected

  14. Hydrologic data for the Big Spring basin, Clayton County, Iowa, water year 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkhoff, S.J.; Kuzniar, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    Stream discharge, specific conductance, pH, and water temperature were monitored continuously, and monthly water-quality samples were collected at a site on Roberts Creek and at Big Spring. Nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen concentrations in 27 samples from Roberts Creek at the point where it leaves the study area ranged from 1.8 to 22 mg/L. Herbicide concentrations in 26 samples from the Roberts Creek site ranged from less than 0.10 μg/L (micrograms per liter) to 43 μg/L. Alachlor was detected in 42 percent of the samples; atrazine in 92 percent; and cyanazine and metolachlor in 35 percent of the samples. The total suspended-sediment load discharged in Roberts Creek was about 160,000 tons. At Big Spring, the ground-water discharge point, the daily mean specific conductance ranged from 414 to 788 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius, the daily median pH ranged from 6.7 to 7.1, and the daily mean water temperature ranged from 8.5 to 13.0 degrees Celsius. Concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen in 23 samples ranged from 4.2 to 17 mg/L. The total measured suspended-sediment discharged from Big Spring was about 17,000 tons. Alachlor was detected in 26 percent; atrazine in 100 percent; cyanazine in 26 percent, and metolachlor in 9 percent of the samples. The maximum atrazine concentration was 16 μg/L.

  15. Water-quality characteristics and contaminants in the rural karst-dominated Spring Mill Lake watershed, southern Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hasenmueller, N.R.; Buehler, M.A.; Krothe, N.C.; Comer, J.B.; Branam, T.D.; Ennis, M.V.; Smith, R.T.; Zamani, D.D.; Hahn, L.; Rybarczyk, J.P.

    2006-01-01

    , acetochlor, and simazine were detected during the spring of 2001. Atrazine, metolachlor, acetochlor, and simazine are used to suppress weeds during corn and soybean production. Additional sources of atrazine and simazine may result from application to right-of-ways, orchards, and managed forest areas. ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

  16. Sources and transport of contaminants of emerging concern: A two-year study of occurrence and spatiotemporal variation in a mixed land use watershed.

    PubMed

    Fairbairn, David J; Karpuzcu, M Ekrem; Arnold, William A; Barber, Brian L; Kaufenberg, Elizabeth F; Koskinen, William C; Novak, Paige J; Rice, Pamela J; Swackhamer, Deborah L

    2016-05-01

    The occurrence and spatiotemporal variation of 26 contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) were evaluated in 68 water samples in 2011-2012 in the Zumbro River watershed, Minnesota, U.S.A. Samples were collected across a range of seasonal/hydrological conditions from four stream sites that varied in associated land use and presence of an upstream wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Selected CECs included human/veterinary pharmaceuticals, personal care products, pesticides, phytoestrogens, and commercial/industrial compounds. Detection frequencies and concentrations varied, with atrazine, metolachlor, acetaminophen, caffeine, DEET, and trimethoprim detected in more than 70% of samples, acetochlor, mecoprop, carbamazepine, and daidzein detected in 30%-50% of samples, and 4-nonylphenol, cotinine, sulfamethoxazole, erythromycin, tylosin, and carbaryl detected in 10%-30% of samples. The remaining target CECs were not detected in water samples. Three land use-associated trends were observed for the detected CECs. Carbamazepine, 4-nonylphenol, erythromycin, sulfamethoxazole, tylosin, and carbaryl profiles were WWTP-dominated, as demonstrated by more consistent loading and significantly greater concentrations downstream of the WWTP and during low-flow seasons. In contrast, acetaminophen, trimethoprim, DEET, caffeine, cotinine, and mecoprop patterns demonstrated both seasonally-variable non-WWTP-associated and continual WWTP-associated influences. Surface water studies of CECs often target areas near WWTPs. This study suggests that several CECs often characterized as effluent-associated have additional important sources such as septic systems or land-applied biosolids. Finally, agricultural herbicide (atrazine, acetochlor, and metolachlor) profiles were strongly influenced by agricultural land use and seasonal application-runoff, evident by significantly greater concentrations and loadings at upstream sites and in early summer when application and precipitation rates are

  17. Synthesis and herbicidal activity of novel 1-(Diethoxy-phosphoryl)-3-(4-one-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)-propan-2-yl carboxylic esters.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yan; Zhao, Hanqing; Lu, Huizhe; Kuemmel, Colleen M; Zhang, Jianjun; Wang, Daoquan

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel compounds, namely 1-(diethoxyphosphoryl)-3-(4-ones-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)propan-2-yl carboxylic esters, were designed on the basis of the diazafulvene intermediate of imidazole glycerol phosphate dehydratase (IGPD) and high-activity inhibitors of IGPD, and synthesized as inhibitors targeting IGPD in plants. Their structures were confirmed by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, 31P-NMR and HR-MS. The herbicidal evaluation performed by a Petri dish culture method showed that most compounds possessed moderate to good herbicidal activities. Six compounds were chosen for further herbicidal evaluation on barnyard grass by pot experiments. 1-(Diethoxyphosphoryl)-3-(4-phenyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)propan-2-yl 2-(naphthalen-1-yl)acetate (5-A3) and ethyl 1-(2-acetoxy-3-(diethoxyphosphoryl)propyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazole-4-carboxylate (5-B4) showed good herbicidal activities. Compared with the compounds with the best herbicidal activity ever reported, both compounds 5-A3 and 5-B4, which can inhibit the growth of barnyard grass at the concentration of 250g/hm2, efficiently gave rise to a nearly 4-fold increase of the herbicidal potency. However, their herbicidal activities were lower than that of acetochlor (62.5 g/hm2) in the pot experiments.

  18. Sorption of four hydrophobic organic contaminants by biochars derived from maize straw, wood dust and swine manure at different pyrolytic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziying; Han, Lanfang; Sun, Ke; Jin, Jie; Ro, Kyoung S; Libra, Judy A; Liu, Xitao; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-02-01

    Sorption behavior of acetochlor (ACE), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), 17α-Ethynyl estradiol (EE2) and phenanthrene (PHE) with biochars produced from three feedstocks (maize straw (MABs), pine wood dust (WDBs) and swine manure (SWBs)) at seven heat treatment temperatures (HTTs) was evaluated. The bulk polarity of these biochars declined with increasing HTT while the aromaticity and CO2-surface area (CO2-SA) rose. The surface OC contents of biochars were generally higher than bulk OC contents. The organic carbon (OC)-normalized CO2-SA (CO2-SA/OC) of biochars significantly correlated with the sorption coefficients (n and logK(oc)), suggesting that pore filling could dominate the sorption of tested sorbates. SWBs had higher logK(oc) values compared to MABs and WDBs, due to their higher ash contents. Additionally, the logK(oc) values for MABs was relatively greater than that for WDBs at low HTTs (≤400 °C), probably resulting from the higher CO2-SA/OC, ash contents and aromaticity of MABs. Surface polarity and the aliphatic C may dominate the sorption of WDBs obtained at relatively low HTTs (≤400 °C), while aromatic C affects the sorption of biochars at high HTTs. Results of this work aid to deepen our understanding of the sorption mechanisms, which is pivotal to wise utilization of biochars as sorbents for hazardous organic compounds.

  19. Agricultural herbicide transport in a first-order intermittent stream, Nebraska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vogel, J.R.; Linard, J.I.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of herbicides in surface waters is a function of many variables, including scale of the watershed, physical and chemical properties of the herbicide, physical and chemical properties of the soil, rainfall intensity, and time of year. In this study, the transport of 6 herbicides and 12 herbicide degradates was examined during the 2004 growing season in an intermediate-scale agricultural watershed (146 ha) that is drained by a first-order intermittent stream, and the mass load for each herbicide in the stream was estimated. The herbicide load during the first week of storm events after application ranged from 17% of annual load for trifluralin to 84% of annual load for acetochlor. The maximum weekly herbicide load in the stream was generally within the first 3 weeks after application for those compounds that were applied within the watershed during 2004, and later for herbicides not applied within the watershed during 2004 but still detected in the stream. The apparent dominant mode of herbicide transport in the stream-determined by analysis amongst herbicide and conservative ion concentrations at different points in the hydrograph and in base flow samples-was either overland runoff or shallow subsurface flow, depending on the elapsed time after application and type of herbicide. The load as a percentage of use (LAPU) for the parent compounds in this study was similar to literature values for those compounds applied by the farmer within the watershed, but smaller for those herbicides that had rainfall as their only source within the watershed.

  20. In Vitro Effects of Herbicides and Insecticides on Human Breast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Jessica D.; Gabriel, Seth M.; Schultz-Norton, Jennifer R.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have indicated that the pesticides and herbicides used in agricultural processes in the United States and Europe may have detrimental effects upon human health. Many of these compounds have been indicated as potential endocrine and reproductive disruptors, although the studies have examined supraphysiological levels well above the US EPA safe levels for drinking water and have often examined these effects in “model” cell lines such as Chinese hamster ovary cells. We have now examined the cytotoxicity of more environmentally relevant concentrations of four herbicides, acetochlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and simazine, and two insecticides, chlorpyrifos and resmethrin, in three human breast cell lines. Interestingly, cytotoxicity was not observed in the estrogen-dependent MCF-7 mammary epithelial carcinoma cells; rather increases in cell viability were seen for some of the compounds at select concentrations. These results vary greatly from what was observed in the estrogen independent MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and the non-cancerous MCF-10A breast cells. This gives insight into how different tumors may respond to pesticide exposure and allows us to make more accurate conclusions about the potential cytotoxicity or, at times, stimulatory actions of these pesticides. PMID:23762632

  1. Nitrate-induced photolysis in natural waters: Controls on concentrations of hydroxyl radical photo-intermediates by natural scavenging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Brezonik, P.L.; Fulkerson-Brekken, J.

    1998-10-01

    The importance of the principal natural scavenging agents for hydroxyl radicals ({sup {sm_bullet}}OH) was evaluated, and a general framework was developed to predict the significance of nitrate-induced, {sup {sm_bullet}}OH-mediated degradation of aquatic contaminants. Rate constants for *OH scavenging by dissolved organic matter (DOM) from five surface water sources were in a narrow range which is similar to previously reported values and suggests that the importance of DOM as a {sup {sm_bullet}}OH sink can be estimated simply from the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration of a water. Scavenging of {sup {sm_bullet}}*OH by carbonate and bicarbonate is generally less important, but these ions can be the major cause of *OH scavenging in low DOC, high alkalinity waters. Use of the framework is illustrated by predicting levels of {sup {sm_bullet}}OH and half-lives of the corn herbicide acetochlor in waters ranging from pristine to highly influenced by agricultural activities.

  2. Occurrence of currently used pesticides in ambient air of Centre Region (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coscollà, Clara; Colin, Patrice; Yahyaoui, Abderrazak; Petrique, Olivier; Yusà, Vicent; Mellouki, Abdelwahid; Pastor, Agustin

    2010-10-01

    Ambient air samples were collected, from 2006 to 2008 at three rural and two urban sites in Centre Region (France) and analyzed for 56 currently used pesticides (CUPs), of which 41 were detected. The four CUPs most frequently detected were the herbicides trifluralin, acetochlor and pendimethalin and the fungicide chlorothalonil, which were found with frequencies ranging between 52 and 78%, and with average concentrations of 1.93, 1.32, 1.84 and 12.15 ng m -3, respectively. Among the detected pesticides, concentrations of eight fungicides (spiroxamine, fenpropimorph, cyprodinil, tolyfluanid, epoxiconazole, vinchlozolin, fluazinam, fludioxinil), two insecticides (propargite, ethoprophos), and one herbicide (oxyfluorfen) are, to our knowledge, reported for the first time in the literature. The majority of the CUPs showed a seasonal trend, with most of the detections and the highest concentrations occurring during the spring and early summer. The most important pesticides detected were related to arable crops and fruit orchards, the main cultures in this region, highlighting the fact that the main sources come from local applications. Minor differences were found in the profiles of pesticides within rural areas and between rural and urban areas.

  3. Assessment of the effects of farming and conservation programs on pesticide deposition in high plains wetlands.

    PubMed

    Belden, Jason B; Hanson, Brittany Rae; McMurry, Scott T; Smith, Loren M; Haukos, David A

    2012-03-20

    We examined pesticide contamination in sediments from depressional playa wetlands embedded in the three dominant land-use types in the western High Plains and Rainwater Basin of the United States including cropland, perennial grassland enrolled in conservation programs (e.g., Conservation Reserve Program [CRP]), and native grassland or reference condition. Two hundred and sixty four playas, selected from the three land-use types, were sampled from Nebraska and Colorado in the north to Texas and New Mexico in the south. Sediments were examined for most of the commonly used agricultural pesticides. Atrazine, acetochlor, metolachlor, and trifluralin were the most commonly detected pesticides in the northern High Plains and Rainwater Basin. Atrazine, metolachlor, trifluralin, and pendimethalin were the most commonly detected pesticides in the southern High Plains. The top 5-10% of playas contained herbicide concentrations that are high enough to pose a hazard for plants. However, insecticides and fungicides were rarely detected. Pesticide occurrence and concentrations were higher in wetlands surrounded by cropland as compared to native grassland and CRP perennial grasses. The CRP, which is the largest conservation program in the U.S., was protective and had lower pesticide concentrations compared to cropland.

  4. Synthesis and herbicidal activity of novel 1-(Diethoxy-phosphoryl)-3-(4-one-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)-propan-2-yl carboxylic esters.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yan; Zhao, Hanqing; Lu, Huizhe; Kuemmel, Colleen M; Zhang, Jianjun; Wang, Daoquan

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel compounds, namely 1-(diethoxyphosphoryl)-3-(4-ones-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)propan-2-yl carboxylic esters, were designed on the basis of the diazafulvene intermediate of imidazole glycerol phosphate dehydratase (IGPD) and high-activity inhibitors of IGPD, and synthesized as inhibitors targeting IGPD in plants. Their structures were confirmed by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, 31P-NMR and HR-MS. The herbicidal evaluation performed by a Petri dish culture method showed that most compounds possessed moderate to good herbicidal activities. Six compounds were chosen for further herbicidal evaluation on barnyard grass by pot experiments. 1-(Diethoxyphosphoryl)-3-(4-phenyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)propan-2-yl 2-(naphthalen-1-yl)acetate (5-A3) and ethyl 1-(2-acetoxy-3-(diethoxyphosphoryl)propyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazole-4-carboxylate (5-B4) showed good herbicidal activities. Compared with the compounds with the best herbicidal activity ever reported, both compounds 5-A3 and 5-B4, which can inhibit the growth of barnyard grass at the concentration of 250g/hm2, efficiently gave rise to a nearly 4-fold increase of the herbicidal potency. However, their herbicidal activities were lower than that of acetochlor (62.5 g/hm2) in the pot experiments. PMID:25587785

  5. Considerations necessary in gathering occurrence data for selected unstable compounds in the USEPA Unregulated Contaminant Candidate List in USEPA Method 526.

    PubMed

    Winslow, S D; Prakash, B; Domino, M M; Pepich, B V; Munch, D J

    2001-05-01

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 526 was developed for the analysis of target analytes that are subject to degradation by hydrolysis. Two technical hurdles that had to be overcome were preservation of the target analytes and selection of a suitable solid-phase extraction material. The target analytes were diazinon, disulfoton, fonofos, terbufos, prometon, 1,2-diphenylhydrazine, nitrobenzene, acetochlor, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, and cyanazine. Diazolidinyl urea was used for the first time as a microbial inhibitor in an EPA drinking water method. Experiment confirmed antimicrobial agents containing copper or mercury salts increased hydrolysis degradation rates. Trisodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid salt was added to chelate metal ions that may increase hydrolysis rates. A pH 7 buffer of tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) and Tris hydrochloride was used to minimize rates of hydrolysis. The use of ascorbic acid prevented degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenol, terbufos, fonofos, diazinon, and disulfoton due to residual chlorine. Samples were extracted using a styrene divinylbenzene solid-phase material and analyzed by capillary column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. A 21-day storage stability study, together with precision and accuracy studies, showed that this method has suitable sensitivity, accuracy, precision, and ruggedness for use in the EPA's Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule drinking water occurrence survey.

  6. Sorption of four hydrophobic organic contaminants by biochars derived from maize straw, wood dust and swine manure at different pyrolytic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziying; Han, Lanfang; Sun, Ke; Jin, Jie; Ro, Kyoung S; Libra, Judy A; Liu, Xitao; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-02-01

    Sorption behavior of acetochlor (ACE), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), 17α-Ethynyl estradiol (EE2) and phenanthrene (PHE) with biochars produced from three feedstocks (maize straw (MABs), pine wood dust (WDBs) and swine manure (SWBs)) at seven heat treatment temperatures (HTTs) was evaluated. The bulk polarity of these biochars declined with increasing HTT while the aromaticity and CO2-surface area (CO2-SA) rose. The surface OC contents of biochars were generally higher than bulk OC contents. The organic carbon (OC)-normalized CO2-SA (CO2-SA/OC) of biochars significantly correlated with the sorption coefficients (n and logK(oc)), suggesting that pore filling could dominate the sorption of tested sorbates. SWBs had higher logK(oc) values compared to MABs and WDBs, due to their higher ash contents. Additionally, the logK(oc) values for MABs was relatively greater than that for WDBs at low HTTs (≤400 °C), probably resulting from the higher CO2-SA/OC, ash contents and aromaticity of MABs. Surface polarity and the aliphatic C may dominate the sorption of WDBs obtained at relatively low HTTs (≤400 °C), while aromatic C affects the sorption of biochars at high HTTs. Results of this work aid to deepen our understanding of the sorption mechanisms, which is pivotal to wise utilization of biochars as sorbents for hazardous organic compounds. PMID:26364218

  7. In vitro effects of herbicides and insecticides on human breast cells.

    PubMed

    Rich, Jessica D; Gabriel, Seth M; Schultz-Norton, Jennifer R

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have indicated that the pesticides and herbicides used in agricultural processes in the United States and Europe may have detrimental effects upon human health. Many of these compounds have been indicated as potential endocrine and reproductive disruptors, although the studies have examined supraphysiological levels well above the US EPA safe levels for drinking water and have often examined these effects in "model" cell lines such as Chinese hamster ovary cells. We have now examined the cytotoxicity of more environmentally relevant concentrations of four herbicides, acetochlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and simazine, and two insecticides, chlorpyrifos and resmethrin, in three human breast cell lines. Interestingly, cytotoxicity was not observed in the estrogen-dependent MCF-7 mammary epithelial carcinoma cells; rather increases in cell viability were seen for some of the compounds at select concentrations. These results vary greatly from what was observed in the estrogen independent MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and the non-cancerous MCF-10A breast cells. This gives insight into how different tumors may respond to pesticide exposure and allows us to make more accurate conclusions about the potential cytotoxicity or, at times, stimulatory actions of these pesticides.

  8. Utilizing toxicogenomic data to understand chemical mechanism of action in risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Vickie S.; Keshava, Nagalakshmi; Hester, Susan; Segal, Deborah; Chiu, Weihsueh; Thompson, Chad M.; Euling, Susan Y.

    2013-09-15

    The predominant role of toxicogenomic data in risk assessment, thus far, has been one of augmentation of more traditional in vitro and in vivo toxicology data. This article focuses on the current available examples of instances where toxicogenomic data has been evaluated in human health risk assessment (e.g., acetochlor and arsenicals) which have been limited to the application of toxicogenomic data to inform mechanism of action. This article reviews the regulatory policy backdrop and highlights important efforts to ultimately achieve regulatory acceptance. A number of research efforts on specific chemicals that were designed for risk assessment purposes have employed mechanism or mode of action hypothesis testing and generating strategies. The strides made by large scale efforts to utilize toxicogenomic data in screening, testing, and risk assessment are also discussed. These efforts include both the refinement of methodologies for performing toxicogenomics studies and analysis of the resultant data sets. The current issues limiting the application of toxicogenomics to define mode or mechanism of action in risk assessment are discussed together with interrelated research needs. In summary, as chemical risk assessment moves away from a single mechanism of action approach toward a toxicity pathway-based paradigm, we envision that toxicogenomic data from multiple technologies (e.g., proteomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics, supportive RT-PCR studies) can be used in conjunction with one another to understand the complexities of multiple, and possibly interacting, pathways affected by chemicals which will impact human health risk assessment.

  9. Impact of some herbicides on the biomass activity in biological treatment plants and biodegradability enhancement by a photo-Fenton process.

    PubMed

    Benzaquén, T B; Benzzo, M T; Isla, M A; Alfano, O M

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the use of agrochemicals has increased because they are essential for profitable agricultural production. Herbicides are heavily demanded compounds and among these, the most marketed are 2,4-D, atrazine and acetochlor. They have characteristics that can cause problems to humans and the environment. Therefore, it is necessary to design systems that can reduce these compounds to harmless molecules. This work aims at evaluating the possibility of incorporating these herbicides into degradable effluents in a biological treatment system, without reducing its efficiency. For this purpose, studies of organic matter degradability in the presence of these agrochemicals were performed. A synthetic effluent based on glucose and mineral salts was inoculated with microorganisms. Glucose consumption and biomass concentration were assessed. Subsequently, preliminary studies were performed to test the viability of degradation of the most harmful compound with an advanced oxidation process (AOP). The results showed that the incorporation of these herbicides into degradable effluents in a biological treatment system has a negative impact on microorganisms. Therefore, the application of an AOP, such as the Fenton or photo-Fenton processes, prior to a biological treatment was found to degrade these substances to simpler and less toxic molecules.

  10. Protective headgear for midwestern agriculture: a limited wear study.

    PubMed

    Stone, J F; Hanna, M; Guo, C; Imerman, P

    2001-03-01

    Baseball caps are popular with farm workers, but have been criticized because they do not sufficiently shade the face, neck, and ears. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards require workers to wear chemical-resistant hoods or chemical-resistant hats with wide brims during the application of pesticides whose labels call for head protection. In this study, four farm workers wore baseball caps and two alternative types of headgear with wide brims for 20 to 36 hours during planting of corn and soybeans to compare performance features and practicality. Afterwards, researchers analyzed the headgear fabrics by gas chromatography or high-performance liquid chromatography to determine the levels at which five herbicides were deposited on the headgear: 2,4-D, metolachlor, acetochlor, ethalfluralin, and glyphosate. Chemical analysis revealed that 12 percent of specimens had detectable residue: levels of glyphosate in the nanograms-per-square-centimeter (ng/cm2) range and levels of 2,4-D in the micrograms-per-square-centimeter (microgram/cm2) range. Workers, however, preferred the baseball caps because of problems with the wind and feelings of embarrassment about wearing other types of headgear. An acceptable, protective substitute for the baseball cap has yet to be designed.

  11. Chemical and toxicologic assessment of organic contaminants in surface water using passive samplers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alvarez, D.A.; Cranor, W.L.; Perkins, S.D.; Clark, R.C.; Smith, S.B.

    2008-01-01

    Passive sampling methodologies were used to conduct a chemical and toxicologic assessment of organic contaminants in the surface waters of three geographically distinct agricultural watersheds. A selection of current-use agrochemicals and persistent organic pollutants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and organochlorine pesticides, were targeted using the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) and the semipermeable membrane device passive samplers. In addition to the chemical analysis, the Microtox assay for acute toxicity and the yeast estrogen screen (YES) were conducted as potential assessment tools in combination with the passive samplers. During the spring of 2004, the passive samplers were deployed for 29 to 65 d at Leary Weber Ditch, IN; Morgan Creek, MD; and DR2 Drain, WA. Chemical analysis of the sampler extracts identified the agrochemicals predominantly used in those areas, including atrazine, simazine, acetochlor, and metolachlor. Other chemicals identified included deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine, trifluralin, fluoranthene, pyrene, cis- and trans-nonachlor, and pentachloroanisole. Screening using Microtox resulted in no acutely toxic samples. POCIS samples screened by the YES assay failed to elicit a positive estrogenic response. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  12. Enantiomeric resolution of chiral pesticides by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Jiang, Shuren; Liu, Donghui; Zhang, Hongjun; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2006-03-01

    Successful enantiomeric separation of 10 chiral pesticides by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using cellulose-tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) (CDMPC) chiral stationary phase (CSP) was performed. The mobile phase was n-hexane modified by ethanol, propanol, 2-propanol (IPA), butanol, or isobutanol. The effects of mobile phase composition and column temperature on the separation were investigated. Baseline separation was obtained with ethofumesate, fluroxypyr-meptyl, malathion, benalaxyl, diclofop-methyl, methamidophos, vinclozolin, and lactofen, whereas near baseline separation was obtained with profenofos and acetochlor. Butanol was the best modifier for benalaxyl; isobutanol was the best modifier for lactofen, malathion, diclofop-methyl, and ethofumesate; and IPA was the best modifier for the other five. Better separations were not always at low temperature. The elution orders of the eluting enantiomers were determined by a circular dichroism (CD) detector. The quantitative analysis methods for the enantiomers of ethofumesate, benalaxyl, and diclofop-methyl were established. Validation parameters include linearity, precision, and limit of detection (LOD). The enantiomeric residual analysis procedures in soil and water samples were also developed using acetone extraction and C(18) solid phase extraction. The methods were reliable for residual analysis of the enantiomers. PMID:16506803

  13. Assessment of the effects of farming and conservation programs on pesticide deposition in high plains wetlands.

    PubMed

    Belden, Jason B; Hanson, Brittany Rae; McMurry, Scott T; Smith, Loren M; Haukos, David A

    2012-03-20

    We examined pesticide contamination in sediments from depressional playa wetlands embedded in the three dominant land-use types in the western High Plains and Rainwater Basin of the United States including cropland, perennial grassland enrolled in conservation programs (e.g., Conservation Reserve Program [CRP]), and native grassland or reference condition. Two hundred and sixty four playas, selected from the three land-use types, were sampled from Nebraska and Colorado in the north to Texas and New Mexico in the south. Sediments were examined for most of the commonly used agricultural pesticides. Atrazine, acetochlor, metolachlor, and trifluralin were the most commonly detected pesticides in the northern High Plains and Rainwater Basin. Atrazine, metolachlor, trifluralin, and pendimethalin were the most commonly detected pesticides in the southern High Plains. The top 5-10% of playas contained herbicide concentrations that are high enough to pose a hazard for plants. However, insecticides and fungicides were rarely detected. Pesticide occurrence and concentrations were higher in wetlands surrounded by cropland as compared to native grassland and CRP perennial grasses. The CRP, which is the largest conservation program in the U.S., was protective and had lower pesticide concentrations compared to cropland. PMID:22356096

  14. Pesticides water decontamination in oxygen-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Suciu, Nicoleta Alina; Ferrari, Federico; Vasileiadis, Sotirios; Merli, Annalisa; Capri, Ettore; Trevisan, Marco

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to develop a laboratory bioreactor, with a functioning principle similar with that of biobed systems but working in oxygen-limited conditions, suitable for decontaminating wastewater mixtures with pesticides. The system is composed by two cylindrical plastic containers. The first one, where the pesticides solution is collected, is open, whereas the second one, where the biomass is disposed, is closed. The pesticides solution was pumped at the biomass surface and subsequently recollected and disposed in the first container. Four pesticides with different physical-chemical characteristics were tested. The results obtained showed a relatively good capacity of the developed prototype to decontaminate waste water containing the mixture of pesticides. The time of the experiment, the number of cycles that the solution made in the system and the environmental temperature have a significantly influence for the decontamination of acetochlor and chlorpyrifos whereas for the decontamination of terbuthylazine and metalaxyl no significant influence was observed. Even if the present prototype could represent a valid solution to manage the water pesticides residues in a farm and to increase the confidence of bystanders and residents, the practical difficulties when replacing the biomass could represent a limit of the system.

  15. Assessment of pesticide pollution in suburban soil in south Shenyang, China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rongguang; Lv, Jungang; Feng, Jimin

    2011-11-01

    In this study, 35 representative farmland soil samples from suburban areas in south Shenyang, the capital city in Liaoning province, China, were collected to evaluate the pollution of 114 pesticides. Surface soil samples were air-dried and sieved. Ultrasonic extraction was used for pesticides preparation prior to analysis with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The total concentrations of tested pesticides in the area ranged in 0-51.32 ng/g and the average of concentrations was 6.86 ng/g. Six pesticides, including butachlor(with detect frequency 71.4%), p,p'-DDE (88.6%), p,p'-DDT (77.1%), o,p'-DDD (82.9%), hexachlorobenzene (88.6%) and δ-HCB (77.1%), were detected most frequently. It indicated that DDTs (N.D.-40.25 ng/g) and HCHs (N.D.-42.79 ng/g) were the predominant pesticide pollutants in soil because of their long term persistence. On the contrary, most of organophosphorus pesticides, pyrethroids and carbamates were not detected. Spatial variation of six pesticides with high detection frequency (>70%) in soil was illustrated. Pollution levels, characteristics and the possible sources were also discussed. The data were helpful to figure out the pollution of the pesticides and could be further used to evaluate the health risk associated with food safety.

  16. Identification of pesticide varieties by testing microalgae using Visible/Near Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yongni; Jiang, Linjun; Zhou, Hong; Pan, Jian; He, Yong

    2016-04-01

    In our study, the feasibility of using visible/near infrared hyperspectral imaging technology to detect the changes of the internal components of Chlorella pyrenoidosa so as to determine the varieties of pesticides (such as butachlor, atrazine and glyphosate) at three concentrations (0.6 mg/L, 3 mg/L, 15 mg/L) was investigated. Three models (partial least squares discriminant analysis combined with full wavelengths, FW-PLSDA; partial least squares discriminant analysis combined with competitive adaptive reweighted sampling algorithm, CARS-PLSDA; linear discrimination analysis combined with regression coefficients, RC-LDA) were built by the hyperspectral data of Chlorella pyrenoidosa to find which model can produce the most optimal result. The RC-LDA model, which achieved an average correct classification rate of 97.0% was more superior than FW-PLSDA (72.2%) and CARS-PLSDA (84.0%), and it proved that visible/near infrared hyperspectral imaging could be a rapid and reliable technique to identify pesticide varieties. It also proved that microalgae can be a very promising medium to indicate characteristics of pesticides.

  17. Phytotoxicity of four herbicides on Ceratophyllum demersum, Vallisneria natans and Elodea nuttallii.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huiyun; Li, Xiaolu; Xu, Xiaohua; Gao, Shixiang

    2009-01-01

    The physiological effects of 4 herbicides (butachlor, quinclorac, bensulfuron-methyl and atrazine) on 3 submerged macrophytes (Ceratophyllum demersum, Vallisneria natans and Elodea nuttallii) were tested in laboratory. The variables of the relative growth rate and the photosynthetic pigment content showed that all of the tested herbicides affected the growth of the plants obviously, even at the lowest concentration (0.0001 mg/L). Except for the C. demersum treated with quinclorac at 0.005 and 0.01 mg/L, the relative growth rates of the plants were inhibited significantly (p < 0.01). Statistical analysis of chlorophyll a (Chl-a) contents was carried out with both the t-test and one-way ANOVA to determine the difference between the treatment and control. The results showed that Chl-a contents of the plants in all treatment groups were affected by herbicides significantly, except for the C. demersum treated with bensulfuron-methyl at 0.0005 mg/L. The decrease in Chl-a content was positively correlated to the dosage of the herbicides in most treatment groups. It was suggested that herbicides in water bodies might potentially affect the growth of aquatic macrophytes. Since the Chl-a content of submerged macrophytes responded to the stress of herbicides sensitively and directly, it could be used as a biomaker in environmental monitoring or in the ecological risk assessment of herbicide contamination. PMID:19634441

  18. Ternary toxicological interactions of insecticides, herbicides, and a heavy metal on the earthworm Eisenia fetida.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; Chen, Chen; Qian, Yongzhong; Zhao, Xueping; Wang, Qiang

    2015-03-01

    The combined toxicities of five insecticides (chlorpyrifos, avermectin, imidacloprid, λ-cyhalothrin, and phoxim), two herbicides (atrazine and butachlor), and a heavy metal (cadmium) have been examined using the acute toxicity test on the earthworm. With a concentration of 2.75 mg/kg being lethal for 50% of the organisms, imidacloprid exhibited the highest acute toxicity toward the earthworm Eisenia fetida. Toxicological interactions of these chemicals in ternary mixtures were studied using the combination-index (CI) equation method. Twenty-one ternary mixtures exhibited various interactive effects, in which 11 combinations showed synergistic effects, four led to dual synergistic/additive behaviors, one exhibited an additive effect, and five showed increasing antagonism within the entire range of effects. The CI method was compared with the classical models of concentration addition and independent action, and it was found that the CI method could accurately predict combined toxicity of the chemicals studied. The predicted synergism in the majority of the mixtures, especially at low-effect levels, might have implications in the real terrestrial environment.

  19. The synergistic toxicity of the multiple chemical mixtures: implications for risk assessment in the terrestrial environment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Wang, Yanhua; Qian, Yongzhong; Zhao, Xueping; Wang, Qiang

    2015-04-01

    The combined toxicity of five insecticides (chlorpyrifos, avermectin, imidacloprid, λ-cyhalothrin, and phoxim), two herbicides (atrazine and butachlor) and a heavy metal (cadmium) has been examined with the earthworm acute toxicity test. Toxicological interactions of these chemicals in four, five, six, seven, and eight-component mixtures were studied using the combination-index (CI) equation method. In four-component and five-component mixtures, the synergistic effects predominated at lower effect levels, while the patterns of interactions found in six, seven, and eight-component mixtures displayed synergism. The λ-CY+IMI+BUT+ATR+CPF+PHO combination displayed the most strongly synergistic interaction, with CI values ranging from 0.09 to 0.15. The nature of the interaction changes with the effect level and the relevance of synergistic effects increase with the complexity of the mixture. The CI method was compared with the classical models of concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA) and we found that the CI method could accurately predict the combined toxicity. The predicted synergism resulted from co-existence of the pesticides and the heavy metal especially at low effect levels may have important implications in risk assessment for the real terrestrial environment.

  20. Identification of pesticide varieties by testing microalgae using Visible/Near Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging technology

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yongni; Jiang, Linjun; Zhou, Hong; Pan, Jian; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    In our study, the feasibility of using visible/near infrared hyperspectral imaging technology to detect the changes of the internal components of Chlorella pyrenoidosa so as to determine the varieties of pesticides (such as butachlor, atrazine and glyphosate) at three concentrations (0.6 mg/L, 3 mg/L, 15 mg/L) was investigated. Three models (partial least squares discriminant analysis combined with full wavelengths, FW-PLSDA; partial least squares discriminant analysis combined with competitive adaptive reweighted sampling algorithm, CARS-PLSDA; linear discrimination analysis combined with regression coefficients, RC-LDA) were built by the hyperspectral data of Chlorella pyrenoidosa to find which model can produce the most optimal result. The RC-LDA model, which achieved an average correct classification rate of 97.0% was more superior than FW-PLSDA (72.2%) and CARS-PLSDA (84.0%), and it proved that visible/near infrared hyperspectral imaging could be a rapid and reliable technique to identify pesticide varieties. It also proved that microalgae can be a very promising medium to indicate characteristics of pesticides. PMID:27071456

  1. Ecological risk assessment of herbicides in Japan: Integrating spatiotemporal variation in exposure and effects using a multimedia model and algal density dynamics models.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takehiko I; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Yokomizo, Hiroyuki; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Suzuki, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Application of herbicides to paddy fields in Japan has strong seasonality, and their environmental concentrations exhibit clear spatiotemporal variation. The authors developed an approach that combines a multimedia environmental exposure model (Grid-Catchment Integrated Modeling System) and density dynamics models for algae. This approach enabled assessment of ecological risk when the exposure concentration shows spatiotemporal variation. First, risk maps of 5 herbicides (pretilachlor, butachlor, simetryn, mefenacet, and esprocarb) were created from the spatial predictions of environmental concentrations and 50% inhibitory concentrations of the herbicides. Simulations of algal density dynamics at high-risk sites were then conducted by incorporating the predicted temporal dynamics of the environmental concentration of each herbicide at the sites. The results suggested that the risk of pretilachlor was clearly the highest of the 5 herbicides, in terms of both the spatial distributions and the temporal durations. The present study highlights the importance of integrating exposure models and effect models to clarify spatial and temporal risk and to develop management plans for chemical exposure that shows high spatiotemporal variation. PMID:26183805

  2. Ecological risk assessment of herbicides in Japan: Integrating spatiotemporal variation in exposure and effects using a multimedia model and algal density dynamics models.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takehiko I; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Yokomizo, Hiroyuki; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Suzuki, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Application of herbicides to paddy fields in Japan has strong seasonality, and their environmental concentrations exhibit clear spatiotemporal variation. The authors developed an approach that combines a multimedia environmental exposure model (Grid-Catchment Integrated Modeling System) and density dynamics models for algae. This approach enabled assessment of ecological risk when the exposure concentration shows spatiotemporal variation. First, risk maps of 5 herbicides (pretilachlor, butachlor, simetryn, mefenacet, and esprocarb) were created from the spatial predictions of environmental concentrations and 50% inhibitory concentrations of the herbicides. Simulations of algal density dynamics at high-risk sites were then conducted by incorporating the predicted temporal dynamics of the environmental concentration of each herbicide at the sites. The results suggested that the risk of pretilachlor was clearly the highest of the 5 herbicides, in terms of both the spatial distributions and the temporal durations. The present study highlights the importance of integrating exposure models and effect models to clarify spatial and temporal risk and to develop management plans for chemical exposure that shows high spatiotemporal variation.

  3. Pesticides analysed in rainwater in Alsace region (Eastern France): Comparison between urban and rural sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheyer, Anne; Morville, Stéphane; Mirabel, Philippe; Millet, Maurice

    Current-used pesticides commonly applied in Alsace region (Eastern France) on diverse crops (maize, vineyard, vegetables, etc.) were analysed, together with Lindane, in rainwater between January 2002 and June 2003 simultaneously on two sites situated in a typical rural (Erstein, France) and urban area (Strasbourg, France). Rainwater samples were collected on a weekly basis by using two automatic wet only collectors associated with an open collector for the measurement of rainwater height. Pesticides were analysed by GC-MSMS and extracted from rainwater by SPME. Two runs were performed. The first one was performed by using a PDMS (100 μm) fibre for pesticides where direct injection into GC is possible (alachlor, atrazine, azinphos-ethyl, azinphos-methyl, captan, chlorfenvinphos, dichlorvos, diflufenican, α- and β-endosulfan, iprodione, lindane, metolachlor, mevinphos, parathion-methyl, phosalone, phosmet, tebuconazole, triadimefon and trifluralin). The second run was performed by using PDMS/DVB fibre and this run concerns pesticides where a preliminary derivatisation step with pentafluorobenzylbromide (PFBBr) is required for very low volatiles (bromoxynil,2,4-MCPA, MCPP and 2,4-D) or thermo labiles (chlorotoluron, diuron and isoproturon) pesticides. Results showed that the more concentrated pesticides detected were those used as herbicides in large quantities in Alsace region for maize crops (alachlor, metolachlor and atrazine). Maximum concentrations for these herbicides have been measured during intensive applications periods on maize crops following by rapid decrease immediately after use. For Alachlor, most important peaks have been observed between 21 and 28 April 2003 (3327 ng L -1 at Erstein and 5590 ng L -1 at Strasbourg). This is also the case for Metolachlor where most important peak was observed during the same week. Concentrations of pesticides measured out of application periods were very low for many pesticides and some others where never detected

  4. Acute toxicity of selected herbicides and surfactants to larvae of the midge Chironomus riparius

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buhl, Kevin J.; Faerber, Neil L.

    1989-01-01

    The acute toxicities of eight commercial herbicides and two surfactants to early fourth instar larvae of the midgeChironomus riparius were determined under static conditions. The formulated herbicides tested were Eradicane® (EPTC), Fargo® (triallate), Lasso® (alachlor), ME4 Brominal® (bromoxynil), Ramrod® (propachlor), Rodeo® (glyphosate), Sencor®(metribuzin), and Sutan (+)® (butylate); the two surfactants were Activator N.F.® and Ortho X-77®. In addition, technical grade alachlor, metribuzin, propachlor, and triallate were tested for comparison with the formulated herbicides. The relative toxicity of the commercial formulations, based on percent active ingredient, varied considerably. The EC50 values ranged from 1.23 mg/L for Fargo® to 5,600 mg/L for Rodeo®. Fargo®, ME4 Brominal®, and Ramrod®were moderately toxic to midge larvae; Lasso®, Sutan (+)®, and Eradicane® were slightly toxic; and Sencor® and Rodeo® were practically non-toxic. The 48-hr EC50 values of the two surfactants were nearly identical and were considered moderately toxic to midges. For two of the herbicides in which the technical grade material was tested, the inert ingredients in the formulations had a significant effect on the toxicity of the active ingredients. Fargo® was twice as toxic as technical grade triallate, whereas Sencor® was considerably less toxic than technical grade metribuzin. A comparison of the slope function values indicated that the toxic action of all the compounds occurred within a relatively narrow range. Published acute toxicity data on these compounds for other freshwater biota were tabulated and compared with our results. In general, the relative order of toxicity toC. riparius was similar to those for other freshwater invertebrates and fish. Maximum concentrations of each herbicide in bulk runoff during a projected “critical” runoff event were calculated as a percentage of the application rate lost in a given volume of runoff. A comparison

  5. Effects of herbicides on Lemna gibba and recovery from damage after prolonged exposure.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, M; Itoh, K; Suyama, K

    2010-04-01

    To determine the potential impact of contaminants on the aquatic vascular plants Lemna sp., toxicity tests are usually conducted for a 4- to 14-day exposure, and the toxicity is usually expressed as EC50. However, the effects of longer exposure and the recovery potential after exposure to chemicals are other important factors which should be considered. We present the relative risks of a variety of exposure scenarios and recovery potentials from damage, using herbicides with different modes of action. Toxicity was assessed on the basis of both EC50 and relative growth rate (RGR) compared with untreated controls in exposure and recovery. The EC50 of atrazine was found to be 89 ppb, and its phytostatic concentrations were 1600 and 800 ppb for exposure periods of 14 and 28 days, respectively, and no phytocidal effects were observed up to 3200 ppb for a 28-day exposure. The RGR in recovery was not affected by the RGR in exposure, and regrowth was possible even after complete inhibition of growth for 28 days at the highest concentration tested. Alachlor, with an EC50 of 31 ppb, was phytostatic at 400 ppb for a 14-day exposure and phytocidal at 200 ppb for 21- and 28-day exposures. Paraquat, with an EC50 of 31 ppb, showed phytocidal rather than phytostatic effects. All phytostatic fronds could not grow in the recovery period, and the phytocidal concentration decreased with exposure period, from 80 ppb for a 7-day exposure to 20 ppb for 21- and 28-day exposures. The RGR of alachlor and paraquat in recovery was dependent on the RGR in exposure. In the case of cyclosulfamuron, phytostatic concentrations were 100 and 50 ppb for 7- and 14-day exposures, respectively. In the case of exposures longer than 21 days, however, it exhibited phytocidal activity at 10 ppb. The results of this study suggest that it is important to examine the effects of chemicals over a longer exposure period as well as the recovery potential from damage for reliable ecological risk assessment. PMID

  6. Herbicide concentrations in and loads transported by the Conestoga River and Pequea Creek, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, 1992-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, Lloyd A.; Koerkle, Edward H.; Takita, Charles S.

    1997-01-01

    Water samples were collected from four streams in Lancaster County from 1992 through 1995 and analyzed for selected herbicides. Samples were collected from the Little Conestoga Creek near Churchtown, Mill Creek (a tributary to the Conestoga River) at Elshelman Mill Road near Lyndon, the Conestoga River at Conestoga, and Pequea Creek at Martic Forge. Most samples were collected from stormflow that occurred during the growing season. Samples were analyzed for alachlor, aldrin, atrazine, chlordane, cyanazine, dieldrin, malathion, metolachlor, propazine, simazine, and toxaphene. Most samples had detectable concentrations of alachlor, atrazine, metolachlor, and simazine, and the loads of these constituents that were transported during each of the 4 years were computed. Of the samples collected from each of the streams?Little Conestoga Creek, Mill Creek, Conestoga River, and Pequea Creek?10, 12, 15, and 18 percent, respectively, had atrazine concentrations greater than 3.0 micrograms per liter, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level. Loads of atrazine, metolochlor, and simazine were greater than loads of any other herbicides. The largest loads were transported during 1994. Loads of atrazine transported by the four streams during periods of storm- flow from May to September 1994 totaled 3.46, 28.3, 263, and 46.8 pounds, respectively. The total loads of atrazine transported by the four streams?Little Conestoga Creek, Mill Creek, Conestoga River, and Pequea Creek?during calendar year 1994 were 6.48, 54.1, 498, and 102 pounds, respectively. A little less than half the atrazine load transported by each stream?45, 39, 42, and 42 percent, respectively?was transported during storms that occurred from May through September. Average annual yields of atrazine for the period 1992-95 were 0.59, 0.64, 0.68, and 0.51 pounds per square mile from the Little Conestoga Creek, Mill Creek, Conestoga River, and Pequea Creek, respectively. Average annual yields of

  7. Factors affecting herbicide yields in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, June 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hainly, R.A.; Kahn, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Median concentrations and instantaneous yields of alachlor, metolachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and simazine were generally highest at sites in the Lower Susquehanna River Basin and in agricultural subbasins. Instantaneous herbicide yields are related to land use, hydrogeologic setting, streamflow yield, and agricultural row cropping practices. The significance of these relations may be affected by the interdependence of the factors. The percentage of basin area planted in corn is the most influential factor in the prediction of herbicide yield. Instantaneous yields of all five herbicides measured in June 1994 related poorly to averaged 199094 herbicide use. Annually averaged herbicide-use data are too general to use as a predictor for short-term herbicide yields. An evaluation of factors affecting herbicide yields could be refined with more-current land use and land cover information and a more accurate estimate of the percentage of basin area planted in corn. Factors related to herbicide yields can be used to predict herbicide yields in other basins within the Chesapeake Bay watershed and to develop an estimate of herbicide loads to Chesapeake Bay.Median concentrations and instantaneous yields of alachlor, metolachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and simazine were generally highest at sites in the Lower Susquehanna River Basin and in agricultural subbasins. Instantaneous herbicide yields are related to land use, hydrogeologic setting, streamflow yield, and agricultural row cropping practices. The significance of these relations may be affected by the interdependence of the factors. The percentage of basin area planted in corn is the most influential factor in the prediction of herbicide yield. Instantaneous yields of all five herbicides measured in June 1994 related poorly to averaged 1990-94 herbicide use. Annually averaged herbicide-use data are too general to use as a predictor for short-term herbicide yields. An evaluation of factors affecting herbicide yields could

  8. Airborne pesticide residues along the Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majewski, M.S.; Foreman, W.T.; Goolsbys, D.A.; Nakagaki, N.

    1998-01-01

    The occurrence, concentration, and geographical distribution of agricultural pesticides were determined in air over the Mississippi River from New Orleans, LA, to St. Paul, MN, during the first 10 days of June 1994. Air samples were collected from a research vessel by pulling air through polyurethane foam plugs at about 100 L/min for up to 24 h. Each sample was analyzed for 42 pesticides and 3 pesticide transformation products. Twenty- five compounds-15 herbicides, 7 insecticides, and 3 pesticide transformation products-were detected in one or more samples with concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 80 ng/m3. Alachlor, chlorpyrifos, diazinon, fonofos, malathion, methyl parathion, metolachlor, metribuzin, pendimethalin, and trifluralin were detected in 80% or more of the samples. The highest concentrations for chlorpyrifos (1.6 ng/m3), diazinon (0.36 ng/m3), and malathion (4.6 ng/m3) all occurred near major metropolitan areas. These samples represent a 'snapshot in time', a spatial and temporal integration of which pesticides were present in the air during each sampling period. The occurrence and atmospheric concentrations of the observed pesticides were most closely related to their use on cropland within 40 km of the river.The occurrence, concentration, and geographical distribution of agricultural pesticides were determined in air over the Mississippi River from New Orleans, LA, to St. Paul, MN, during the first 10 days of June 1994. Air samples were collected from a research vessel by pulling air through polyurethane foam plugs at about 100 L/min for up to 24 h. Each sample was analyzed for 42 pesticides and 3 pesticide transformation products. Twenty-five compounds-15 herbicides, 7 insecticides, and 3 pesticide transformation products-were detected in one or more samples with concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 80 ng/m3. Alachlor, chlorpyrifos, diazinon, fonofos, malathion, methyl parathion, metolachlor, metribuzin, pendimethalin, and trifluralin were detected in

  9. A pesticide monitoring survey in rivers and lakes of northern Greece and its human and ecotoxicological risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Emmaluel N; Vryzas, Zisis; Kotopoulou, Athena; Kintzikoglou, Katerina; Makris, Konstantinos C; Papadopoulou-Mourkidou, Euphemia

    2015-06-01

    A pesticide monitoring study covering the main rivers and lakes of Northern Greece (Macedonia, Thrace and Thessaly) was undertaken. A total of 416 samples were collected over a 1.5-year sampling period (September 1999- February 2001) from six rivers and ten lakes. The water samples were analyzed with an off-line solid phase extraction technique coupled with a gas chromatography ion trap mass spectrometer using an analytical method for 147 pesticides and their metabolites, including organochlorines, organophosphates, triazines, chloroacetanilides, pyrethroids, carbamates, phthalimides and other pesticides (herbicides, insecticides and fungicides). Based on the pesticide survey results, a human health carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risk assessment was conducted for adults and children. Ecotoxicological risk assessment was also conducted using default endpoint values and the risk quotient method. Results showed that the herbicides metolachlor, prometryn, alachlor and molinate, were the most frequently detected pesticides (29%, 12.5%, 12.5% and 10%, respectively). They also exhibited the highest concentration values, often exceeding 1 μg/L. Chlorpyrifos ethyl was the most frequently detected insecticide (7%). Seasonal variations in measured pesticide concentrations were observed in all rivers and lakes. The highest concentrations were recorded during May-June period, right after pesticide application. Concentrations of six pesticides were above the maximum allowable limit of 0.1 μg/L set for drinking water. Alachlor, atrazine and a-HCH showed unacceptable carcinogenic risk estimates (4.5E-06, 4.6E-06 and 1.3E-04, respectively). Annual average concentrations of chlorpyriphos ethyl (0.031 μg L), dicofol (0.01 μg/L), dieldrin (0.02 μg/L) and endosulfan a (0.065 μg/L) exceeded the EU environmental quality standards. The risk quotient estimates for the insecticides chorpyrifos ethyl, diazinon and parathion methyl and herbicide prometryn were above acceptable risk

  10. Phosphatidylcholine Specific PLC-Induced Dysregulation of Gap Junctions, a Robust Cellular Response to Environmental Toxicants, and Prevention by Resveratrol in a Rat Liver Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Sovadinova, Iva; Babica, Pavel; Böke, Hatice; Kumar, Esha; Wilke, Andrew; Park, Joon-Suk; Trosko, James E.; Upham, Brad L.

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) has been associated with different pathologies, including cancer; however, molecular mechanisms regulating GJIC are not fully understood. Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK)-dependent mechanisms of GJIC-dysregulation have been well-established, however recent discoveries have implicated phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) in the regulation of GJIC. What is not known is how prevalent these two signaling mechanisms are in toxicant/toxin-induced dysregulation of GJIC, and do toxicants/toxins work through either signaling mechanisms or both, or through alternative signaling mechanisms. Different chemical toxicants were used to assess whether they dysregulate GJIC via MEK or PC-PLC, or both Mek and PC-PLC, or through other signaling pathways, using a pluripotent rat liver epithelial oval-cell line, WB-F344. Epidermal growth factor, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, thrombin receptor activating peptide-6 and lindane regulated GJIC through a MEK1/2-dependent mechanism that was independent of PC-PLC; whereas PAHs, DDT, PCB 153, dicumylperoxide and perfluorodecanoic acid inhibited GJIC through PC-PLC independent of Mek. Dysregulation of GJIC by perfluorooctanoic acid and R59022 required both MEK1/2 and PC-PLC; while benzoylperoxide, arachidonic acid, 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid, perfluorooctane sulfonic acid, 1-monolaurin, pentachlorophenol and alachlor required neither MEK1/2 nor PC-PLC. Resveratrol prevented dysregulation of GJIC by toxicants that acted either through MEK1/2 or PC-PLC. Except for alachlor, resveratrol did not prevent dysregulation of GJIC by toxicants that worked through PC-PLC-independent and MEK1/2-independent pathways, which indicated at least two other, yet unidentified, pathways that are involved in the regulation of GJIC. In conclusion: the dysregulation of GJIC is a contributing factor to the cancer process; however the underlying mechanisms by which gap

  11. A pesticide monitoring survey in rivers and lakes of northern Greece and its human and ecotoxicological risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Emmaluel N; Vryzas, Zisis; Kotopoulou, Athena; Kintzikoglou, Katerina; Makris, Konstantinos C; Papadopoulou-Mourkidou, Euphemia

    2015-06-01

    A pesticide monitoring study covering the main rivers and lakes of Northern Greece (Macedonia, Thrace and Thessaly) was undertaken. A total of 416 samples were collected over a 1.5-year sampling period (September 1999- February 2001) from six rivers and ten lakes. The water samples were analyzed with an off-line solid phase extraction technique coupled with a gas chromatography ion trap mass spectrometer using an analytical method for 147 pesticides and their metabolites, including organochlorines, organophosphates, triazines, chloroacetanilides, pyrethroids, carbamates, phthalimides and other pesticides (herbicides, insecticides and fungicides). Based on the pesticide survey results, a human health carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risk assessment was conducted for adults and children. Ecotoxicological risk assessment was also conducted using default endpoint values and the risk quotient method. Results showed that the herbicides metolachlor, prometryn, alachlor and molinate, were the most frequently detected pesticides (29%, 12.5%, 12.5% and 10%, respectively). They also exhibited the highest concentration values, often exceeding 1 μg/L. Chlorpyrifos ethyl was the most frequently detected insecticide (7%). Seasonal variations in measured pesticide concentrations were observed in all rivers and lakes. The highest concentrations were recorded during May-June period, right after pesticide application. Concentrations of six pesticides were above the maximum allowable limit of 0.1 μg/L set for drinking water. Alachlor, atrazine and a-HCH showed unacceptable carcinogenic risk estimates (4.5E-06, 4.6E-06 and 1.3E-04, respectively). Annual average concentrations of chlorpyriphos ethyl (0.031 μg L), dicofol (0.01 μg/L), dieldrin (0.02 μg/L) and endosulfan a (0.065 μg/L) exceeded the EU environmental quality standards. The risk quotient estimates for the insecticides chorpyrifos ethyl, diazinon and parathion methyl and herbicide prometryn were above acceptable risk

  12. Effects of Eight Herbicides on In Vitro Hatching of Heterodera glycines

    PubMed Central

    Wong, A. T. S.; Tylka, G. L.; Hartzler, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to evaluate effects of selected herbicides on hatching of free eggs of the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines. The herbicides used were Atrazine (atrazine), Basagran (bentazon), Bladex (cyanazine), Blazer (acifluorfen), Command (clomazone), Lasso (alachlor), Sonalan (ethalfluralin), and Treflan (trifluralin). Treatments comprised two concentrations of commercial herbicide formulations and deionized water and 3.14 mM zinc sulfate as negative and positive controls, respectively. Eggs were extracted from females and cysts, surface disinfested, and incubated in herbicide or control solutions at 25 ± 2 C in darkness. Hatched second-stage juveniles were counted every other day for 24 days. Hatching of H. glycines eggs in 50 and 500 μg/ml Blazer was 42 to 67% less than that in deionized water and 6l to 78% less than that in zinc sulfate solution. Zinc sulfate significantly increased hatching activity in 50 μg/ml but not 500 μg/ml Blazer. The other herbicides tested at various concentrations had no significant effect on egg hatching. The specific component of Blazer inhibiting egg hatching is unknown. Suppression of hatching by Blazer indicates that this postemergence soybean herbicide may have a potential role in managing H. glycines. PMID:19279812

  13. Simultaneous determination of herbicide residues in tobacco using ultraperformance convergence chromatography coupled with solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weiyun; Bian, Zhaoyang; Zhang, Daohong; Tang, Gangling; Liu, Wei; Wang, Jianlong; Li, Zhonghao; Yang, Fei

    2015-03-01

    A time-saving and organic solvent efficient method to simultaneously determine six kinds of herbicide residues in tobacco using solid-phase extraction for sample clean-up and preconcentration and the highly sensitive ultraperformance convergence chromatography method was developed. Parameters for ultraperformance convergence chromatography, including the choice of stationary phase and modifiers, autobackpressure regulator pressure, column temperature, and the flow rate of mobile solvents, were optimized. The herbicide residues of napropamide, alachlor, quizalofop-ethyl, diphenamid, metolachlor, and clomazone in tobacco samples were successfully separated and detected at levels as low as 0.0043-0.0086 mg/kg within 5 min using a nonpolar high strength silica C18 selectivity for bases column and methanol as the cosolvent of the mobile phase of carbon dioxide (75-99.9%, v/v). Analysis of tobacco samples had recoveries of 69.8-95.0%, limit of quantitation of 0.0127-0.0245 mg/kg, limit of detection of 0.0043-0.0086 mg/kg, and correlation coefficient of >0.9990. Results support this method as an efficient alternative to current methodologies for the determination of herbicide residues in tobacco.

  14. Effects of Eight Herbicides on In Vitro Hatching of Heterodera glycines.

    PubMed

    Wong, A T; Tylka, G L; Hartzler, R G

    1993-12-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to evaluate effects of selected herbicides on hatching of free eggs of the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines. The herbicides used were Atrazine (atrazine), Basagran (bentazon), Bladex (cyanazine), Blazer (acifluorfen), Command (clomazone), Lasso (alachlor), Sonalan (ethalfluralin), and Treflan (trifluralin). Treatments comprised two concentrations of commercial herbicide formulations and deionized water and 3.14 mM zinc sulfate as negative and positive controls, respectively. Eggs were extracted from females and cysts, surface disinfested, and incubated in herbicide or control solutions at 25 +/- 2 C in darkness. Hatched second-stage juveniles were counted every other day for 24 days. Hatching of H. glycines eggs in 50 and 500 mug/ml Blazer was 42 to 67% less than that in deionized water and 6l to 78% less than that in zinc sulfate solution. Zinc sulfate significantly increased hatching activity in 50 mug/ml but not 500 mug/ml Blazer. The other herbicides tested at various concentrations had no significant effect on egg hatching. The specific component of Blazer inhibiting egg hatching is unknown. Suppression of hatching by Blazer indicates that this postemergence soybean herbicide may have a potential role in managing H. glycines.

  15. Comparison of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with electron ionization and negative-ion chemical ionization for analyses of pesticides at trace levels in atmospheric samples.

    PubMed

    Raina, Renata; Hall, Patricia

    2008-09-09

    A comparison of detection limits of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in selected ion monitoring (SIM) with gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode with both electron ionization (EI) and negative-ion chemical ionization (NCI) are presented for over 50 pesticides ranging from organochlorines (OCs), organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) and pre-emergent herbicides used in the Canadian prairies (triallate, trifluralin, ethalfluralin). The developed GC-EI/SIM, GC-NCI/SIM, and GC-NCI/SRM are suitable for the determination of pesticides in air sample extracts at concentrations <100 pg microL(-1) (<100 pg m(-3) in air). No one method could be used to analyze the range of pre-emergent herbicides, OPs, and OCs investigated. In general GC-NCI/SIM provided the lowest method detection limits (MDLs commonly 2.5-10 pg microL(-1)) along with best confirmation (<25% RSD of ion ratio), while GC-NCI/SRM is recommended for use where added selectivity or confirmation is required (such as parathion-ethyl, tokuthion, carbofenothion). GC-EI/SRM at concentration <100 pg microL(-1) was not suitable for most pesticides. GC-EI/SIM was more prone to interference issues than NCI methods, but gave good sensitivity (MDLs 1-10 pg microL(-1)) for pesticides with poor NCI response (OPs: sulfotep, phorate, aspon, ethion, and OCs: alachlor, aldrin, perthane, and DDE, DDD, DDT).

  16. Enhancing biodegradability of priority substances (pesticides) by solar photo-Fenton.

    PubMed

    Lapertot, Milena; Pulgarín, César; Fernández-Ibáñez, Pilar; Maldonado, Manuel I; Pérez-Estrada, Leonidas; Oller, Isabel; Gernjak, Wolfgang; Malato, Sixto

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, we present the photo-Fenton treatment in a solar pilot-plant scale of several EU priority hazardous substances (Alachlor, Atrazine, Chlorfenvinphos, Diuron and Isoproturon) dissolved in water. The results have been evaluated not only from the point of view of contaminant disappearance and mineralisation, but also of toxicity reduction and enhancement of biodegradability. Degradation was monitored by total organic carbon, pesticide concentration by HPLC-UV, inorganics released by ion chromatography, and biodegradability by the Zahn-Wellens (Z-W) test. The total volume of the solar photoreactor, composed of compound parabolic collectors with a total area of 4.16m2, was between 70 and 82 L. The treatment was shown to be effective, mineralising all of the pesticides tested, both alone and in mixtures. In order to find out the conditions for biocompatibility using the photo-Fenton reaction as a pre-treatment step, wastewater inoculated with unacclimated municipal sludge containing pesticides after certain degradation time was evaluated by the Z-W test. Biodegradability was enhanced (70% considered biodegradable) by the photo-Fenton treatment after 12-25min. It may be concluded that the photo-Fenton treatment consistently enhances biodegradability of wastewater containing pesticides.

  17. Net photosynthesis and respiration of sago pondweed (Potamogeton pectinatus) exposed to herbicides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.; Ailstock, M.S.; Momot, J.J.; Hughes, Jane S.; Biddinger, Gregory R.; Mones, Eugene

    1995-01-01

    We determined net photosynthesis and respiration rates for sago pondweed (potamogeton pectinatus) exposed to various concentrations of 11 herbicides widely used in Maryland during the past decade. Net photosynthesis and respiration were determined by measuring changes in the. oxygen content of solutions containing dilutions of technical grade herbicides. At 20-22? C and 58 umol/m2/sec of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), oxygen production of undosed plants averaged 0.72-2.03 mg/g fresh wt/h. Respiration rates of undosed plants averaged 0.46-0.60 mg O2/g fresh wt/h. Nominal herbicide concentrations (ng/L) that reduced net photosynthesis by 5O percent (IC5O) were: metribuzin, 8; atrazine, 29; cyanazine, 32; linuron, 70; simazine, 164; and paraquat, 240. IC5O values for 2,4-D, acifluorfen, glyphosate and metolachlor exceeded the maximum test concentration of 10,000 ng/L. The IC5O value for alachlor was estimated to be between 1,000 and 10,000 ng/L. None of the herbicides tested had a significant effect on dark respiration.

  18. Response of sago pondweed, a submerged aquatic macrophyte, to herbicides in three laboratory culture systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.; Ailstock, M.S.; Momot, J.J.; Norman, C.M.; Gorsuch, Joseph W.; Lower, William R.; Wang, Wun-cheng; Lewis, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    The phytotoxicity of atrazine, paraquat, glyphosate, and alachlor to sago pondweed (Potamogeton pectinatus), a submerged aquatic macrophyte, was tested under three types of laboratory culture conditions. In each case, tests were conducted in static systems, the test period was four weeks, and herbicide exposure was chronic, resulting from a single addition of herbicide to the test vessels at the beginning of the test period. The three sets of test conditions employed were(1) axenic cultures in 125-mL flasks containing a nutrient media and sucrose; (2) a microcosm system employing 18.9-L buckets containing a sand, shell, and peat substrate; and (3) an algae-free system employing O.95-L jars containing reconstituted freshwater and a nutrient agar substrate. The primary variable measured was biomass production. Plants grew well in all three test systems, with biomass of untreated plants increasing by a factor of about 5 to 6.5 during the four-week test period. Biomass production in response to herbicide exposure differed significantly among culture systems, which demonstrates the need for a standardized testing protocol for evaluating the effects of toxics on submerged aquatic plants.

  19. Integrated use of biomarkers and bioaccumulation data in Zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) for site-specific quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Binelli, A; Ricciardi, F; Riva, C; Provini, A

    2006-01-01

    One of the useful biological tools for environmental management is the measurement of biomarkers whose changes are related to the exposure to chemicals or environmental stress. Since these responses might vary with different contaminants or depending on the pollutant concentration reached in the organism, the support of bioaccumulation data is needed to prevent false conclusions. In this study, several persistent organic pollutants -- 23 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, 11 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), six dichlorodiphenyltricholroethane (DDT) relatives, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), chlorpyrifos and its oxidized metabolite -- and some herbicides (lindane and the isomers alpha, beta, delta; terbutilazine; alachlor; metolachlor) were measured in the soft tissues of the freshwater mollusc Zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) from 25 sampling sites in the Italian portions of the sub-alpine great lakes along with the measure of ethoxyresorufin dealkylation (EROD) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The linkage between bioaccumulation and biomarker data allowed us to create site-specific environmental quality indexes towards man-made chemicals. This classification highlighted three different degrees of xenobiotic contamination of the Italian sub-alpine great lakes: a high water quality in Lake Lugano with negligible pollutant levels and no effects on enzyme activities, an homogeneous poor quality for Lakes Garda, Iseo and Como, and the presence of some xenobiotic point-sources in Lake Maggiore, whose ecological status could be jeopardized, also due to the heavy DDT contamination revealed since 1996.

  20. BOREAS TGB-7 Dry Deposition Herbicide and Organochlorine Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, Don; Conrad, Sara K. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-7 team measured the concentration and flux of several agricultural pesticides in air, rainwater, and dry deposition samples in order to determine the associated yearly deposition rates. This data set contains information on the dry deposition flux of seven herbicides [2,4- dichlorophenoxyacidic_acid (2,4-D), bromoxynil, dicamb, 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), triallate, trifluralin, and diclop-methyl] known to appear in the atmosphere of the Canadian prairies. Also, the concentration of three herbicides (atrazine, alachlor, and metolachlor), two groups of insecticides (lindane and breakdown products and dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) and breakdown products), and several polychlorinated biphenyls commonly used in the central United States was measured. All of these chemicals are reported, in the literature, to be transported in the atmosphere. Many have been reported to occur in boreal and arctic food chains. The sampling was carried out from 16-Jun to 13-Aug-1993 and 04-May to 20-Jul-1994 at the BOREAS site in the Prince Albert National Park (Waskesiu). The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  1. BOREAS TGB-7 Rainwater Herbicide and Organochlorine Concentration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, Don; Conrad, Sara K. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-7 team measured the concentration and flux of several agricultural pesticides in air and rainwater samples in order to determine the associated yearly deposition rates. This data set contains information on the rainwater concentration of seven herbicides [2,4- dichlorophenoxyacidic_acid (2,4-D), bromoxynil, dicamb, 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), triallate, trifluralin, and diclop-methyl] known to appear in the atmosphere of the Canadian prairies. Also, the concentration of three herbicides (atrazine, alachlor, and metolachlor), two groups of insecticides (lindane and breakdown products and dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) and breakdown products), and several polychlorinated biphenyls commonly used in the central United States was measured. All of these chemicals are reported, in the literature, to be transported in the atmosphere. Many have been reported to occur in boreal and arctic food chains. The sampling was carried out from 16-Jun to 13-Aug-1993 and 04-May to 20-Jul-1994 at the BOREAS site in the Prince Albert National Park (Waskesiu). The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  2. Aquatic risk assessment of priority and other river basin specific pesticides in surface waters of Mediterranean river basins.

    PubMed

    Silva, Emília; Daam, Michiel A; Cerejeira, Maria José

    2015-09-01

    To meet good chemical and ecological status, Member States are required to monitor priority substances and chemicals identified as substances of concern at European Union and local/river-basin/national level, respectively, in surface water bodies, and to report exceedances of the environmental quality standards (EQSs). Therefore, standards have to be set at national level for river basin specific pollutants. Pesticides used in dominant crops of several agricultural areas within the catchment of Mediterranean river basins ('Mondego', 'Sado' and 'Tejo', Portugal) were selected for monitoring, in addition to the pesticides included in priority lists defined in Europe. From the 29 pesticides and metabolites selected for the study, 20 were detected in surface waters of the river basins, seven of which were priority substances: alachlor, atrazine, chlorfenvinphos, chlorpyrifos, endosulfan, simazine and terbutryn, all of which exceeded their respective EQS values. QSs for other specific pollutants were calculated using different extrapolation techniques (i.e. deterministic or probabilistic) largely based on the method described in view of the Water Framework Directive. Non-acceptable aquatic risks were revealed for molinate, oxadiazon, pendimethalin, propanil, terbuthylazine, and the metabolite desethylatrazine. Implications of these findings for the classification of the ecological status of surface water bodies in Portugal and at the European level are discussed.

  3. BOREAS TGB-7 Ambient Air Herbicide and Organochlorine Concentration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, Don; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Trace Gas Biogeochemistry (BOREAS TGB)-7 team measured the concentration and flux of several agricultural pesticides in air, rainwater, and dry deposition samples in order to determine the associated yearly deposition rates. This data set contains information on the ambient air concentration of seven herbicides [2,4- dichlorophenoxyacidic_acid (2,4-D), bromoxynil, dicamb, 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), triallate, trifluralin, and diclop-methyl] known to appear in the atmosphere of the Canadian prairies. Also, the concentration of three herbicides (atrazine, alachlor, and metolachlor), two groups of insecticides (lindane and breakdown products and dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) and breakdown products), and several polychlorinated biphenyls commonly used in the central United States was measured. All of these chemicals are reported, in the literature, to be transported in the atmosphere. Many have been reported to occur in boreal and arctic food chains. The sampling was carried out from 16-Jun to 13-Aug-1993 and 04-May to 20-Jul-1994 at the BOREAS site in the Prince Albert National Park (Waskesiu). The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  4. Quality of water in alluvial aquifers in eastern Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savoca, Mark E.; Sadorf, Eric M.; Linhart, S. Michael; Barnes, Kimberlee K.

    2001-01-01

    Pesticides were detected in 84 percent of samples from agricultural areas and 70 percent from urban areas. Atrazine and metolachlor were the most frequently detected pesticides in samples from agricultural areas; atrazine and prometon were the most frequently detected pesticides in samples from urban areas. None of the pesticide concentrations exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant levels or lifetime health advisories for drinking water. Pesticide degradates were detected in 94 percent of samples from agricultural areas and 53 percent from urban areas. Metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid and deethylatrazine were the most frequently detected metabolites in samples from agricultural areas; metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid and alachlor ethane sulfonic acid were the most frequently detected degradates in samples from urban areas. Total degradate concentrations were significantly higher in samples from agricultural areas than in samples from urban areas. Total pesticide concentrations (parent compounds) tended to be higher in samples from agricultural areas; however, this difference was not statistically significant. Degradates constituted the major portion of the total residue concentration

  5. Analysis of selected herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scribner, E.A.; Thurman, E.M.; Zimmerman, L.R.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary goals of the US Geological Survey (USGS) Laboratory in Lawrence, Kansas, is to develop analytical methods for the analysis of herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water that are vital to the study of herbicide fate and degradation pathways in the environment. Methods to measure metabolite concentrations from three major classes of herbicides - triazine, chloroacetanilide and phenyl-urea - have been developed. Methods for triazine metabolite detection cover nine compounds: six compounds are detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry; one is detected by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection; and eight are detected by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Two metabolites of the chloroacetanilide herbicides - ethane sulfonic acid and oxanilic acid - are detected by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Alachlor ethane sulfonic acid also has been detected by solid-phase extraction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Six phenylurea metabolites are all detected by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry; four of the six metabolites also are detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Additionally, surveys of herbicides and their metabolites in surface water, ground water, lakes, reservoirs, and rainfall have been conducted through the USGS laboratory in Lawrence. These surveys have been useful in determining herbicide and metabolite occurrence and temporal distribution and have shown that metabolites may be useful in evaluation of non-point-source contamination. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  6. Factors affecting leaching in agricultural areas and an assessment of agricultural chemicals in the ground water of Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, C.A.; Robbins, F.V.; Barnes, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    As assessment of hydrologic factors and agricultural practices that may affect the leaching of agricultural chemicals to groundwater was conducted to evaluate the extent and severity of chemical contamination of groundwater resources in Kansas. The climate of a particular area determines the length of the growing season and the availability of water, at the surface and in the ground, for the growth of plants. Climate, together with surficial geology, soil, and principal aquifers, determines the types of crops to be planted,types of tillage, conservation and irrigation practices, and affects the quantity and method of application of agricultural chemicals. Examination of groundwater nitrate-nitrogen data collected from 766 wells throughout Kansas during 1976-81 indicated that 13 of 14 geohydrologic regions had wells producing samples that exceeded the 10-mg/L drinking water standard determined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. One or more herbicides were detected in water samples from 11 of 56 wells during 1985-86 located in areas susceptible to agricultural leaching. Atrazine was the most common herbicide that was detected; it was detected in water at 9 of 11 wells. Cyanazine was detected in water at three wells; metolachlor at two wells; and metribuzin, alachlor, simazine, and propazine were detected at one well each. (USGS)

  7. Determination of trace levels of herbicides and their degradation products in surface and ground waters by gas chromatography/ion-trap mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pereira, W.E.; Rostad, C.E.; Leiker, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    A rapid, specific and highly sensitive method is described for the determination of several commonly used herbicides and their degradation products in surface and ground waters by using gas chromatography/ion-trap mass spectrometry. The compounds included atrazine, and its degradation products desethylatrazine and desisopropylatrazine; Simazine; Cyanazine; Metolachlor; and alachlor and its degradation products, 2-chloro-2', 6'-diethylacetanilide, 2-hydroxy-2', 6'-diethylacetanilide and 2,6-diethylaniline. The method was applied to surface-water samples collected from 16 different stations along the lower Mississippi River and its major tributaries, and ground-water samples beneath a cornfield in central Nebraska. Average recovery of a surrogate herbicide, terbuthylazine, was greater than 99%. Recoveries of the compounds of interest from river water spiked at environmental levels are also presented. Full-scan mass spectra of these compounds were obtained on 1 ng or less of analyte. Data were collected in the full-scan acquisition mode. Quantitation was based on a single characteristic ion for each compound. The detection limit was 60 pg with a signal-to-noise ratio of greater than 10:1.

  8. Plan of study to determine the effect of changes in herbicide use on herbicide concentrations in Midwestern streams, 1989-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goolsby, Donald A.; Boyer, Laurie L.; Battaglin, William A.

    1994-01-01

    An approach was developed to determine if recent changes in the use of herbicides has affected herbicide concentrations in Midwestern streams. This approach also provides a plan to determine if the abnormally high rainfall and flooding in 1993 has an effect on nitrate concentrations in 1994 in streams that flooded in 1993. The approach involves sampling 53 stream sites, 50 of which were sampled in 1989 and 1990 as part of a reconnaissance to determine the geographic and seasonal distribution of herbicides in 10 Midwestern States. Sites will be sampled twice, once prior to application of herbicides, in March or early April, and once during the first runoff event after application of herbicides. Samples will be analyzed for 11 herbicide and 2 atrazine metabolites by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Samples will also be analyzed for ESA (an alachlor metabolite), two cyanazine metabolites, and nutrients. Changes to the manufacturers' label have decreased the maximum recommended application rate for atrazine on com and sorghum by about 50 percent since the 1989-90 study. Conversely, the use of other herbicides, such as cyanazine, has increased by more than 25 percent since 1989. Statistical procedures such as Wilcoxon signed rank tests for paired samples will be used to determine if the distributions of herbicide and nitrate concentrations in 1994 are different from those measured in 1989 and 1990.

  9. Extraction of pesticides from contaminated soil using supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, G.B.

    1991-12-31

    The demand for processes to clean up contaminated soils without generating additional contaminants, such as hazardous solvents, is increasing. One approach to minimizing this problem is to use supercritical fluids like light hydrocarbons and CO{sub 2} to extract contaminants from soils. Gases exhibit unique properties under supercritical conditions. They retain the ability to diffuse through the interstitial spaces of solid materials, plus they have the solvating power of liquids. Some examples of extractions using SCFs are caffeine from coffee, cholesterol from eggs, drugs from plants, and nicotine from tobacco. Supercritical CO{sub 2} is an attractive, alternative extraction medium for removal of pesticides from soils. Carbon dioxide is readily available, relatively inexpensive, and if recycled, nonpolluting. Contaminants may be easily recovered by evaporating the CO{sub 2} into an expansion vessel. Supercritical fluid extraction technology is discussed and results are given for the extraction of atrazine, bentazon, alachlor, and permethrin from contaminated soil prepared in the laboratory. Initial studies show >95% removal for these pesticides.

  10. Extraction of pesticides from contaminated soil using supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, G.B.

    1991-01-01

    The demand for processes to clean up contaminated soils without generating additional contaminants, such as hazardous solvents, is increasing. One approach to minimizing this problem is to use supercritical fluids like light hydrocarbons and CO[sub 2] to extract contaminants from soils. Gases exhibit unique properties under supercritical conditions. They retain the ability to diffuse through the interstitial spaces of solid materials, plus they have the solvating power of liquids. Some examples of extractions using SCFs are caffeine from coffee, cholesterol from eggs, drugs from plants, and nicotine from tobacco. Supercritical CO[sub 2] is an attractive, alternative extraction medium for removal of pesticides from soils. Carbon dioxide is readily available, relatively inexpensive, and if recycled, nonpolluting. Contaminants may be easily recovered by evaporating the CO[sub 2] into an expansion vessel. Supercritical fluid extraction technology is discussed and results are given for the extraction of atrazine, bentazon, alachlor, and permethrin from contaminated soil prepared in the laboratory. Initial studies show >95% removal for these pesticides.

  11. Reconnaissance of ground-water quality in the North Platte Natural Resources District, western Nebraska, June-July 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verstraeten, Ingrid M.; Sibray, S.S.; Cannia, J.C.; Tanner, D.Q.

    1995-01-01

    One-hundred twenty wells completed in unconfined Quaternary alluvial, Ogallala, Arikaree, Brule fractured, sand and confined Chadron and undifferentiated Cretaceous water-bearing units were sampled in June and July 1991 to characterize the quality of ground water in the study area. More than 75 percent of the water samples had nitrate and nitrite as nitrogen concentrations equal to or less than 6.0 milligrams per liter. Samples from six wells completed in Quaternary alluvial and Brule fractured water-bearing units exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Maximum Contaminant Level of 10 milligrams per liter nitrate and nitrite as nitrogen. Water from several wells completed in Quaternary alluvial and the Brule water-bearing units had detectable concentrations of alachlor, atrazine, deethylatrazine, or prometon. Major element concentrations in water from 44 wells indicated that the water-bearing units had distinct chemistry. Water from unconfined water- bearing units generally was a calcium bicarbonate type and water from the confined water-bearing units generally was a sodium bicarbonate type. Measurements of pH and concentrations of dissolved solids, sulfate, chloride, fluoride, arsenic, beryllium, manganese, adjusted gross alpha activities, radon, and uranium in ground water exceeded final or proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Maximum Contaminant Levels or Secondary Maximum Contaminant Levels.

  12. Trends in pesticide concentrations and use for major rivers of the United States.

    PubMed

    Ryberg, Karen R; Gilliom, Robert J

    2015-12-15

    Trends in pesticide concentrations in 38 major rivers of the United States were evaluated in relation to use trends for 11 commonly occurring pesticide compounds. Pesticides monitored in water were analyzed for trends in concentration in three overlapping periods, 1992-2001, 1997-2006, and 2001-2010 to facilitate comparisons among sites with variable sample distributions over time and among pesticides with changes in use during different periods and durations. Concentration trends were analyzed using the SEAWAVE-Q model, which incorporates intra-annual variability in concentration and measures of long-term, mid-term, and short-term streamflow variability. Trends in agricultural use within each of the river basins were determined using interval-censored regression with high and low estimates of use. Pesticides strongly dominated by agricultural use (cyanazine, alachlor, atrazine and its degradate deethylatrazine, metolachlor, and carbofuran) had widespread agreement between concentration trends and use trends. Pesticides with substantial use in both agricultural and nonagricultural applications (simazine, chlorpyrifos, malathion, diazinon, and carbaryl) had concentration trends that were mostly explained by a combination of agricultural-use trends, regulatory changes, and urban use changes inferred from concentration trends in urban streams. When there were differences, concentration trends usually were greater than use trends (increased more or decreased less). These differences may occur because of such factors as unaccounted pesticide uses, delayed transport to the river through groundwater, greater uncertainty in the use data, or unquantified land use and management practice changes.

  13. Thyroid disruption in the lizard Podarcis bocagei exposed to a mixture of herbicides: a field study.

    PubMed

    Bicho, Rita C; Amaral, Maria José; Faustino, Augusto M R; Power, Deborah M; Rêma, Alexandra; Carretero, Miguel A; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Mann, Reinier M

    2013-01-01

    Pesticide exposure has been related with thyroid disrupting effects in different vertebrate species. However, very little is known about the effects of these compounds in reptiles. In the Mediterranean area, lacertid lizards are the most abundant vertebrate group in agroecosystems, and have been identified as potential model species for reptile ecotoxicology. The aim of this study was to understand if the herbicides applied in corn fields have thyroid disruptive effects in the lizard Podarcis bocagei. Adult male lizards were captured in north-western Portugal in corn fields treated with herbicides (exposed sites), and in organic agricultural fields (reference sites). Thyroid and male gonad morphology and functionality, and testosterone levels were investigated through histological, immunohistochemical and biochemical techniques. Lizards from exposed locations displayed thyroid follicular lumens with more reabsorption vacuoles and significantly larger follicular area than those from reference fields. Furthermore, testes of lizards from exposed locations had significantly larger seminiferous tubule diameters, significantly higher number of spermatogenic layers and displayed an up-regulation of thyroid hormone receptors when compared with lizards from reference areas. These findings strongly suggest that the complex mixture of herbicides that lizards are exposed to in agricultural areas have thyroid disrupting effects which ultimately affect the male reproductive system. Alachlor, which has demonstrated thyroid effects in mammals, may be largely responsible for the observed effects.

  14. Water-quality reconnaissance of selected water-supply lakes in eastern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pope, L.M.; Arruda, J.A.; Vahsholtz, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    Data collected for 19 public water-supply lakes in eastern Kansas during spring-fall 1983 were statistically analyzed to describe relationships between water-quality constituents and lake and watershed physical characteristics. A large range was observed in mean concentrations of total nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen, total ammonia nitrogen, total phosphorus, total organic carbon, and chlorophyll a and in lake and watershed physical characteristics, such as age, surface area, watershed area, watershed-to-lake surface-area ratio, and average maximum depth. Pesticides were detected in 8 of the 19 lakes. Atrazine and Alachlor were the most commonly detected pesticides. Spearman rank-order correlation analyses showed possible relationships between mean concentrations of total nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen, total ammonia nitrogen, total phosphorus, total organic carbon, and chlorophyll a, and certain lake and watershed physical characteristics. Multiple-regression analysis produced significant relations between mean concentrations of total nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen and percentage of watershed in protected cropland and age of lake (0.62 coefficient of determination), and between mean concentrations of total organic carbon and lake average maximum depth, lake-surface area, age of lake, and watershed-to-lake surface-area ratio (0.76 coefficient of determination). (USGS)

  15. Multiresidue method for the quantitation of 20 pesticides in aquatic products.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ha Ra; Park, Jun Seo; Kim, Junghyun; Han, Sang Beom; Choi, Yong Seok

    2015-12-01

    As the consumption of aquatic products increased, the need for regulation of pesticide residues in aquatic products also emerged. Thus, in this study, a scheduled multiple reaction monitoring (sMRM) method employing a novel extraction and purification step based on QuEChERS with EDTA was developed for the simultaneous quantitation of 20 pesticides (alachlor, aldicarb, carbofuran, diazinon, dimethoate, dimethomorph, ethoprophos, ferimzone, fluridone, hexaconazole, iprobenfos, malathion, methidathion, methiocarb, phenthoate, phosalone, phosmet, phosphamidon, pirimicarb, and simazine) in aquatic products. Additionally, the present method was validated in the aspects of specificity, linearity (r ≥ 0.980), sensitivity (the limit of quantitation (LOQ) ≤ 5 ng/g), relative standard deviation, RSD (1.0% ≤ RSD ≤ 19.4%), and recovery (60.1% ≤ recovery ≤ 117.9%). Finally, the validated method was applied for the determination of the 20 pesticide residues in eel and shrimp purchased from local food markets. In the present study, QuEChERS with EDTA was successfully expanded to residual pesticide analysis for the first time. The present method could contribute to the rapid and successful establishment of the positive list system in South Korea. PMID:26466578

  16. Regression models for estimating herbicide concentrations in U.S. streams from watershed characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, S.J.; Gilliom, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Regression models were developed for estimating stream concentrations of the herbicides alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, metolachlor, and trifluralin from use-intensity data and watershed characteristics. Concentrations were determined from samples collected from 45 streams throughout the United States during 1993 to 1995 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA). Separate regression models were developed for each of six percentiles (10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, 95th) of the annual distribution of stream concentrations and for the annual time-weighted mean concentration. Estimates for the individual percentiles can be combined to provide an estimate of the annual distribution of concentrations for a given stream. Agricultural use of the herbicide in the watershed was a significant predictor in nearly all of the models. Several hydrologic and soil parameters also were useful in explaining the variability in concentrations of herbicides among the streams. Most of the regression models developed for estimation of concentration percentiles and annual mean concentrations accounted for 50 percent to 90 percent of the variability among streams. Predicted concentrations were nearly always within an order of magnitude of the measured concentrations for the model-development streams, and predicted concentration distributions reasonably matched the actual distributions in most cases. Results from application of the models to streams not included in the model development data set are encouraging, but further validation of the regression approach described in this paper is needed.

  17. Evaluation of herbicides for use in transplanting leucaena leucocephala and prosopis alba on semi-arid lands without irrigation

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, P.; Smith, D.; Smith, M.; Bingham, R.L.; Reyes, I.

    1984-01-01

    Five herbicides were applied to plots at 2 rates in April 1982, and 3-month old seedlings planted 2 days later. Basal diameter was measured after 110 days and converted to dry weight using published equations. Percent weed cover was recorded 45, 75, and 105 days after planting. All herbicides increased survival over untreated controls. The greatest biomass production of both species was obtained with oryzalin treatment at 2.8 kg/ha active ingredient, which increased production 4-5X compared with control plots. Oryzalin was second to napropamide (2.24 kg/ha active ingredient) in grass control and equal to oxyfluorfen (1.12 kg/ha active ingredient) in forb control, oxyfluorfen at this rate also gave the second best biomass production. Oryzalin increased survival from 71 to 87% for Leucaena and from 81-94% for Prosopis, and is considered to be the best herbicide tested, followed by oxyfluorfen and metolachlor. Alachlor was considered to be too short-lived and napropamide too expensive.

  18. A multi-residue method for determination of 70 organic micropollutants in surface waters by solid-phase extraction followed by gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Terzopoulou, Evangelia; Voutsa, Dimitra; Kaklamanos, George

    2015-01-01

    A multi-residue method, based on gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS), has been developed for the determination of 70 organic micropollutants from various chemical classes (organochlorinated, organophosphorous, triazines, carbamate and urea, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pharmaceuticals, phenols, etc.) in surface waters. A single-step SPE extraction using OASIS HLB cartridges was employed for the recovery of target micropollutants. The method has been validated according to monitoring performance criteria of the Water Framework Directive, taking into account the approved guidelines on quality assurance and quality control. The recoveries ranged from 60 to 110 %, the coefficient of variation from 0.84 to 27.4 %, and the uncertainty from 6 to 37 %. The LOD varied from 6.0 to 40 ng/L. The limits of quantification for the priority pollutants anthracene, alachlor, atrazine, benzo(a)pyrene, chlorfenvinphos, diuron, isoproturon, nonylphenol, simazine, and terbutryn fulfill the criterion of <30 % of the relevant environmental standards. The method was employed to investigate the water quality in the basin of a transboundary river, Strymonas, in NE Greece during three sampling campaigns conducted in the year 2013. Thirty-nine compounds were detected in the river water. Metolachlor, diuron, isoproturon, salicylic acid, chlorfenvinphos, 1,2-benzanthracene, pyrene, diflubenzuron, and carbaryl exhibited the highest detection frequencies.

  19. Groundwater pesticide levels and the association with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    James, Katherine A; Hall, Deborah A

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear whether exposure to environmentally relevant levels of pesticides in groundwater is associated with an increased risk of Parkinson disease (PD). The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between PD and pesticide levels in groundwater. This cross-sectional study included 332 971 Medicare beneficiaries, including 4207 prevalent cases of PD from the 2007 Colorado Medicare Beneficiary Database. Residential pesticide levels were estimated from a spatial model based on 286 well water samples with atrazine, simazine, alachlor, and metolachlor measurements. A logistic regression model with known PD risk factors was used to assess the association between residential groundwater pesticide levels and prevalent PD. We found that for every 1.0 µg/L of pesticide in groundwater, the risk of PD increases by 3% (odds ratio = 1.03; 95% confidence interval: 1.02-1.04) while adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and gender suggesting that higher age-standardized PD prevalence ratios are associated with increasing levels of pesticides in groundwater. PMID:25939349

  20. Pesticides in Iowa precipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nations, B.K.; Hallberg, G.R.

    1992-01-01

    Rainfall was sampled for pesticides to assess their occurrence in precipitation and potential impacts on water resources. Three areas in Iowa were sampled; two localities were in rural settings, and a third in an urban area. Fourteen pesticides, including ten herbicides and four insecticides, were detected from October 1987 through September 1990. Atrazine, alachlor, cyanazine, and metolachlor were the most commonly detected, with one or more of these four herbicides found in almost every rainfall sample during the growing season. Concentrations of individual pesticides ranged from 0.1 ??g L-1 to 40.0 ??g L-1, with most detections under 1.0 ??g L-1. Pesticide detections in rainfall began in April and ended in July or August, probably related to the timing of chemical application and greater volatilization rates during warmer weather. Samples from the urban site had detections of the same agricultural chemicals found at the rural sites, but in lesser quantities. In addition to the commonly detected herbicides, three of the four insecticides detected in rainfall were only found in urban samples. Two of these have urban as well as agricultural uses. Some variation of pesticide detections were seen at the three sampling localities, related to regional and local use patterns. Concentrations were greater at sampling sites near fields where pesticides are applied, suggesting that local volatilization and distance of transport affect the concentrations in rainfall. Pesticide concentrations were highest at the beginning of a rainfall event with concentrations becoming lower in samples taken later in the event.

  1. Herbicide transport in rivers: Importance of hydrology and geochemistry in nonpoint-source contamination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Squillace, P.J.; Thurman, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    Alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, metolachlor, and metribuzin were measured at six sites during 1984 and 1985 in large subbasins within the Cedar River, IA. A computer model separated the Cedar River discharge hydrograph into groundwater and overland-flow components. The concentration of herbicides in the river when groundwater was the major flow component was less than 1.0 μg/L and averaged 0.2 μg/L. The maximum concentrations of herbicides occurred when overland flow was the major component of river discharge, exceeding 50 pg/L for total herbicides. About 6% of the annual river load of atrazine was transported with the groundwater component, while 94% was transported with overland flow. From 1.5 to 5% of the atrazine applied during the year was transported from the basin. Atrazine concentrations in the river in- creased according to the discharge divided by the drainage area. This correlation indicates that rivers with large normalized 2-year peak flows have the potential to transport large concentrations of herbicides. A diagrammatic model of nonpoint-source transport of herbicides was developed that suggests that sorbed transport from fields occurs during episodes of overland flow with rapid dissolution of herbicides downstream. 

  2. Assessing the quality of freshwaters in a protected area within the Tagus River basin district (central Portugal).

    PubMed

    Silva, Emília; Pereira, Ana Carina; Estalagem, Soraia Patrícia; Moreira-Santos, Matilde; Ribeiro, Rui; Cerejeira, Maria José

    2012-01-01

    Water-sediment quality was assessed in an agricultural zone of a protected area within the Tagus River basin district (central Portugal) combining chemical analysis to 12 pesticide compounds and whole toxicity testing using the bacterium , the algae , the crustacean , and the midge . The herbicides alachlor, atrazine ethofumesate, metolachlor, terbuthylazine, the insecticides chlorfenvinphos and chlorpyrifos, and the metabolite 3,4-dichloroaniline were detected in surface water samples at four sites and in groundwater samples from six wells, during four sampling occasions. Measured concentrations were compared with parametric values for human consumption, groundwater quality standards, and environmental quality standards applicable to surface water established in European Union legislation. Most severe adverse effects were noted on the growth of and lethality of in nondiluted water samples. Taking into account the values calculated by the method of toxic unit summation for pesticide mixtures, it was not possible to link the pesticides found to the toxicity detected in the water samples. Conducting this study with chemical analyses and biotests provided a more comprehensive quality assessment and realistic picture of the environmental samples analyzed, although additional studies are needed to evaluate the performance of mixture models for predicting mixture toxicity. This study underlines the importance of chemical analysis and whole toxicity testing as tools for assessing the impact of human activity on the status of water, mainly in protected zones. PMID:23099932

  3. Simultaneous determination of herbicide residues in tobacco using ultraperformance convergence chromatography coupled with solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weiyun; Bian, Zhaoyang; Zhang, Daohong; Tang, Gangling; Liu, Wei; Wang, Jianlong; Li, Zhonghao; Yang, Fei

    2015-03-01

    A time-saving and organic solvent efficient method to simultaneously determine six kinds of herbicide residues in tobacco using solid-phase extraction for sample clean-up and preconcentration and the highly sensitive ultraperformance convergence chromatography method was developed. Parameters for ultraperformance convergence chromatography, including the choice of stationary phase and modifiers, autobackpressure regulator pressure, column temperature, and the flow rate of mobile solvents, were optimized. The herbicide residues of napropamide, alachlor, quizalofop-ethyl, diphenamid, metolachlor, and clomazone in tobacco samples were successfully separated and detected at levels as low as 0.0043-0.0086 mg/kg within 5 min using a nonpolar high strength silica C18 selectivity for bases column and methanol as the cosolvent of the mobile phase of carbon dioxide (75-99.9%, v/v). Analysis of tobacco samples had recoveries of 69.8-95.0%, limit of quantitation of 0.0127-0.0245 mg/kg, limit of detection of 0.0043-0.0086 mg/kg, and correlation coefficient of >0.9990. Results support this method as an efficient alternative to current methodologies for the determination of herbicide residues in tobacco. PMID:25546570

  4. Quality of surface water before implementation of a flood-control project in Chaska, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tornes, L.H.

    1981-01-01

    Samples were collected for 1 year from East Creek, Chaska Creek, and Courthouse Lake in Chaska, Minnesota, to determine the water quality before implementation of a flood-control project proposed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The creeks had similar water-quality characteristics. Data indicate that ground water may be the primary source of dissolved solids, sulfate, chloride, and chromium in the creeks. The pesticides alachlor, atrazine, simazine, and 2,4-D were found in water samples from both creeks but were well below the lethal concentrations for fish. Courthouse Lake, a 57-foot-deep stream-trout lake, had a mean summer trophic-state index of 35. Phytoplankton populations varied seasonally, and blue-green algae were predominant only in late summer. The algal-pollution index was highest in late summer, but did not provide evidence of high organic pollution. The apparently successful recovery of Courthouse Lake from past inundations by Minnesota River floodwaters having total phosphorus concentrations as high as 0.66 milligram per liter suggests that the lake, in time, will also recover from the added runoff expected as a result of implementing the flood-control project. The runoff could temporarily raise the total phosphorus concentration in the lake from 0.03 to 0.12 milligram per liter and raise the spring trophic-state index from 49 to 69.

  5. Solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous determination of several pesticides in water.

    PubMed

    Penetra, A; Vale Cardoso, V; Ferreira, E; Benoliel, M J

    2010-01-01

    Contamination of surface and groundwater sources with pesticide residues has been of great concern for a long time and it is a major challenge for the preservation and sustainability of the environment. In order to accomplish the requirements of the European Directive 98/83/EC, we developed and validated an analytical method based on the combination of gas chromatography and tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) using solid-phase extraction as sample preparation. In this work nine pesticides were studied: molinate, simazine, atrazine, terbuthylazine, diazinon, alachlor, metalaxyl, metolachlor and pendimethalin. In order to get the best sensitivity and selectivity for each pesticide, several parameters of the tandem mass spectrometry were optimized using the MRM mode. Good linearity of the detector response was found for all pesticides at concentrations within the tested working range, with linear determination coefficients higher than 0.9988. Recoveries studies in several matrices with different fortification levels were performed, with recoveries between 77 and 115% with RSD lower than 9.5%. The MQLs obtained for these compounds were between 0.013 microg L(-1) and 0.022 microg L(-1), which were much lower than the maximum level established by the European legislation.

  6. The potential of pesticides to contaminate the groundwater resources of the Axios river basin. Part II. Monitoring study in the south part of the basin.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou-Mourkidou, E; Karpouzas, D G; Patsias, J; Kotopoulou, A; Milothridou, A; Kintzikoglou, K; Vlachou, P

    2004-04-01

    A monitoring study was conducted during 1992-1994 in the south part of the Axios river basin, which constitutes one of the main rice-cultivated basins of Greece. The potential of pesticides to contaminate groundwater resources was assessed under realistic agricultural conditions using suction lysimeters. Pesticide residues were also measured in local drainage canals, the phreatic horizon and Axios river. Carbofuran, atrazine, alachlor, prometryne and propanil were regularly detected at concentrations exceeding 1 microg/l in the soil water of deeper soil layers and in the phreatic horizon of the fields. Residues of those pesticides were measured in the soil water and the phreatic horizon of all the studied fields even though they had only been applied in certain fields. This almost uniform distribution of pesticide residues across the whole of the studied area was attributed to rice cultivation. Soil water and its pesticidal content was horizontally transported from saturated soil conditions beneath rice paddies to adjacent corn or cotton-cultivated fields with lower soil moisture contents. The presence of high pesticide concentrations in the water of the Axios river, which was used for the irrigation of the studied area, had probably contributed to the generalized pesticide contamination of the soil water in the studied area. These results suggest that there is a high risk for groundwater contamination in the basin.

  7. A multi-residue method for determination of 70 organic micropollutants in surface waters by solid-phase extraction followed by gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Terzopoulou, Evangelia; Voutsa, Dimitra; Kaklamanos, George

    2015-01-01

    A multi-residue method, based on gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS), has been developed for the determination of 70 organic micropollutants from various chemical classes (organochlorinated, organophosphorous, triazines, carbamate and urea, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pharmaceuticals, phenols, etc.) in surface waters. A single-step SPE extraction using OASIS HLB cartridges was employed for the recovery of target micropollutants. The method has been validated according to monitoring performance criteria of the Water Framework Directive, taking into account the approved guidelines on quality assurance and quality control. The recoveries ranged from 60 to 110 %, the coefficient of variation from 0.84 to 27.4 %, and the uncertainty from 6 to 37 %. The LOD varied from 6.0 to 40 ng/L. The limits of quantification for the priority pollutants anthracene, alachlor, atrazine, benzo(a)pyrene, chlorfenvinphos, diuron, isoproturon, nonylphenol, simazine, and terbutryn fulfill the criterion of <30 % of the relevant environmental standards. The method was employed to investigate the water quality in the basin of a transboundary river, Strymonas, in NE Greece during three sampling campaigns conducted in the year 2013. Thirty-nine compounds were detected in the river water. Metolachlor, diuron, isoproturon, salicylic acid, chlorfenvinphos, 1,2-benzanthracene, pyrene, diflubenzuron, and carbaryl exhibited the highest detection frequencies. PMID:25109470

  8. Chemical stress sensitive luminescent human cells: Molecular biology approach using inducible Drosophila melanogaster hsp22 promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Mandon, C.A.; Diaz, C.; Arrigo, A.-P.; Blum, L.J. . E-mail: Loic.Blum@univ-lyon1.fr

    2005-09-23

    A whole-cell bioassay has been developed for the total toxicity testing of liquid samples. The method is based on the induction of the bioluminescent activity of genetically manipulated mammalian cells. For that purpose, transfection was used to introduce, in HeLa cells, a DNA sensing element that responds to chemical stress agents (heavy metals, genotoxic agents, and endocrine-disrupting chemicals). Such element was designed to direct the expression of a reporting gene (firefly luciferase) through the activation of Drosophila melanogaster hsp22 promoter. A molecular approach was conducted to optimize hsp22 promoter element in order to decrease the background expression level of the reporting gene and to increase the sensitivity of the bioassay for testing endocrine disruptors. As a result, in the presence of 20-100 {mu}M cadmium chloride, a 6-fold increase in luciferase expression was obtained using a specially designed truncated hsp22 promoter construction. The following chemicals known to be found in the polluted samples were tested: CdCl{sub 2}, Cd(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, NaAsO{sub 2}, alachlore, fentine acetate, thiram, and maneb. The stressing effect of each of them was sensitively detected by the present bioassay in the 0.05-50 {mu}M concentration range.

  9. Development of California Public Health Goals (PHGs) for chemicals in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Howd, R A; Brown, J P; Morry, D W; Wang, Y Y; Bankowska, J; Budroe, J D; Campbell, M; DiBartolomeis, M J; Faust, J; Jowa, L; Lewis, D; Parker, T; Polakoff, J; Rice, D W; Salmon, A G; Tomar, R S; Fan, A M

    2000-01-01

    As part of a program for evaluation of environmental contaminants in drinking water, risk assessments are being conducted to develop Public Health Goals (PHGs) for chemicals in drinking water, based solely on public health considerations. California's Safe Drinking Water Act of 1996 mandated the development of PHGs for over 80 chemicals by 31 December 1999. The law allowed these levels to be set higher or lower than federal maximum contaminant levels (MCLs), including a level of zero if data are insufficient to determine a specific level. The estimated safe levels and toxicological rationale for the first 26 of these chemicals are described here. The chemicals include alachlor, antimony, benzo[a]pyrene, chlordane, copper, cyanide, dalapon, 1,2-dichlorobenzene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, 2,4-D, diethylhexylphthalate, dinoseb, endothall, ethylbenzene, fluoride, glyphosate, lead, nitrate, nitrite, oxamyl, pentachlorophenol, picloram, trichlorofluoromethane, trichlorotrifluoroethane, uranium and xylene(s). These risk assessments are to be considered by the State of California in revising and developing state MCLs for chemicals in drinking water (which must not exceed federal MCLs). The estimates are also notable for incorporation or consideration of newer guidelines and principles for risk assessment extrapolations. PMID:11139167

  10. Light-sensitized decontamination of ground-water hazardous chemicals. Technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, R.A.; Schlauch, M.B.; Ellis, D.D.; Marley, K.A.; Ju, H.L.

    1988-01-01

    The use of sunlight, oxygen, and dissolved organic compounds active as 'photosensitizers' (substances capable of absorbing sunlight and transforming it into chemically useful forms) is a promising treatment for contaminated waters. Light is absorbed by the sensitizing substance, raising it to a higher energy excited state. Reaction with the excited state substance converts molecular oxygen to a form much more reactive with dissolved compounds. Riboflavin (Vitamin B2), a naturally occurring compound and a known photosensitizer, was investigated for use in this process. A series of kinetic experiments explored its ability to photodegrade several aromatic compounds, phenols and anilines, that are related to some herbicides (such as carbaryl, 2, 4-D, alachlor, atrazine, and trifluralin) commonly found in polluted waters. It was found that riboflavin when added to solutions of phenols or anilines greatly accelerated the rate of their loss in the presence of light. The sensitized photolysis rates increased in the absence of oxygen, suggesting a mechanism involving direct energy or electron transfer between flavin excited states and acceptor molecules. In addition, it was found that some iron salts were very significant promoters of photodestruction of the triazine herbicide, atrazine.

  11. Contribution of subsoil and aquifer microorganisms to ground-water quality. Technical report, 1 July 1988-30 June 1989. (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Turco, R.F.; Konopka, A.E.

    1989-06-01

    Little information about the microbiology of the subsurface environment is available. The study was conducted to better understand the microbiology and microbial processes that occur in the subsurface under a typical midwestern agricultural soil. A 26-meter bore was installed in November of 1988. Sterile collections of soils were made at 17 different depths. A physical as well as biological investigation of the subsurface materials was conducted. Among the measured parameters were particle-size analysis, carbon, carbonates, nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, and water-holding capacity. The level of three pesticides, atrazine, metolachlor, and alachlor, was determined. Microbial biomass was assessed using direct counts, phospholipid content, and plate counts. The ability of microbial populations resident in the strata to use glucose, phenol, aniline, (14)C-ring labeled 2-methyl-6-ethyl-aniline, (14)C-ring labeled metolachlor, (14)C-carbonyl labeled metolachlor, and atrazine was assessed. Physical analysis indicated that the site contained up to 17 different strata. The site materials were primarily glacial tills with high carbonate content. Microbial numbers and activity in the tills was much lower than either in the surface materials or the aquifer located at 25 m.

  12. Water: pesticides in ground water beneath irrigated farmland in Nebraska, August 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, R.F.; Junk, G.A.; Richard, J.J.

    1980-09-01

    During the 1978 irrigation season, 14 ground water samples were collected in the Central Platte region of Nebraska, an area known to have high nitrate-nitrogen (NO-N) levels, and analyzed for the presence of 13 pesticide residues. Atrazine levels ranged from 0.06 ..mu..g/liter to 3.12 ..mu..g/liter and were correlated to NO/sub 3/-N concentrations with a coefficient of r = +0.55. Nitrate-nitrogen concentrations were measured as indicators of deep percolation from irrigated lands and ranged from 17.1 mg/liter to 34.3 mg/liter. Alachlor levels ranged from <0.01 ..mu..g/liter to 0.71 ..mu..g/liter. The amounts of 2,4-D were indeterminate because of experimental problems. Levels of the herbicides silvex and EPTC were below the limits of detectability. Levels of the oragnochlorine insecticides endrin, ..gamma..-BHC (lindane), dieldrin, DDT and its primary metabolite DDE, heptachlor and its primary derivative heptachlor epoxide, and methoxychlor were all below the detectable limits of 0.005 and 0.010 ..mu..g/liter.

  13. Investigation of factors affecting terrestrial passive sampling device performance and uptake rates in laboratory chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.A.; Weisskopf, C.P.

    1995-12-31

    A rapid sampling method using passive sampling devices (PSDS) for soil contaminant characterization shows extreme promise. The use of PSDs increases ease and speed of analysis, decreases solvent usage and cost, and minimizes the transport of contaminated soils. Time and cost savings allow a high sampling frequency, providing a more thorough site characterization than traditional methods. The authors have conducted both laboratory and field studies with terrestrial PSDS. Laboratory studies demonstrated the concentration and moisture dependence of sampler uptake and provided an estimate of the optimal field sampling time for soils contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). These PSDs were also used to accurately estimate PCB concentrations at hazardous waste site where concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 200 ug PCB/g soil. However, PSDs in the field had sampling rates approximately three times greater than in the laboratory. As a result several factors affecting PSD sampling rates and/or performance in laboratory chambers were evaluated. The parameters investigated were soil bulk density or compactness, chamber size and air flow. The chemicals used in these studies included two PCB congeners (52 and 153), three organochlorine pesticides (DDT, dieldrin and methoxychlor), three organophosphate pesticides (chlorpyrifos, diazinon and terbufos) and three herbicides (alachlor, atrazine and metolachlor).

  14. Pesticides in ground water beneath irrigated farmland in Nebraska, August 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, R.F.; Junk, G.A.; Richard, J.J.

    1980-09-01

    During the 1978 irrigation season, 14 ground water samples were collected in the Central Platte region of Nebraska, an area known to have high nitrate-nitrogen (NO/sub 3/--N) levels, and analyzed for the presence of 13 pesticide residues. Atrazine levels ranged from 0.06 microgram/liter to 3.12 microgram/liter and were correlated to NO/sub 3/--N concentrations with a coefficient of r . +0.55. Nitrate-nitrogen concentrations were measured as indicators of deep percolation from irrigated lands and ranged from 17.1 mg/liter to 34.3 mg/liter. Alachlor levels ranged from less than 0.01 microgram/liter to 0.71 microgram/liter. The amounts of 2,4-D were indeterminate because of experimental problems. Levels of the herbicides silvex and EPTC were below the limits of detectability. Levels of the organochlorine insecticides endrin, gamma-BHC (lindane), dieldrin, DDT and its primary metabolite DDE, heptachlor and its primary derivative heptachlor epoxide, and methoxychlor were all below the detectable limits of 0.005-0.010 microgram/liter.

  15. Catalytic transformation of persistent contaminants using a new composite material based on nanosized zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Dror, Ishai; Jacov, Osnat Merom; Cortis, Andrea; Berkowitz, Brian

    2012-07-25

    A new composite material based on deposition of nanosized zerovalent iron (nZVI) particles and cyanocobalamine (vitamin B12) on a diatomite matrix is presented, for catalytic transformation of organic contaminants in water. Cyanocobalamine is known to be an effective electron mediator, having strong synergistic effects with nZVI for reductive dehalogenation reactions. This composite material also improves the reducing capacity of nZVI by preventing agglomeration of iron nanoparticles, thus increasing their active surface area. The porous structure of the diatomite matrix allows high hydraulic conductivity, which favors channeling of contaminated water to the reactive surface of the composite material resulting in faster rates of remediation. The composite material rapidly degrades or transforms completely a large spectrum of water contaminants, including halogenated solvents like TCE, PCE, and cis-DCE, pesticides like alachlor, atrazine and bromacyl, and common ions like nitrate, within minutes to hours. A field experiment where contaminated groundwater containing a mixture of industrial and agricultural persistent pollutants was conducted together with a set of laboratory experiments using individual contaminant solutions to analyze chemical transformations under controlled conditions.

  16. Groundwater pesticide levels and the association with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    James, Katherine A; Hall, Deborah A

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear whether exposure to environmentally relevant levels of pesticides in groundwater is associated with an increased risk of Parkinson disease (PD). The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between PD and pesticide levels in groundwater. This cross-sectional study included 332 971 Medicare beneficiaries, including 4207 prevalent cases of PD from the 2007 Colorado Medicare Beneficiary Database. Residential pesticide levels were estimated from a spatial model based on 286 well water samples with atrazine, simazine, alachlor, and metolachlor measurements. A logistic regression model with known PD risk factors was used to assess the association between residential groundwater pesticide levels and prevalent PD. We found that for every 1.0 µg/L of pesticide in groundwater, the risk of PD increases by 3% (odds ratio = 1.03; 95% confidence interval: 1.02-1.04) while adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and gender suggesting that higher age-standardized PD prevalence ratios are associated with increasing levels of pesticides in groundwater.

  17. Assessing the quality of freshwaters in a protected area within the Tagus River basin district (central Portugal).

    PubMed

    Silva, Emília; Pereira, Ana Carina; Estalagem, Soraia Patrícia; Moreira-Santos, Matilde; Ribeiro, Rui; Cerejeira, Maria José

    2012-01-01

    Water-sediment quality was assessed in an agricultural zone of a protected area within the Tagus River basin district (central Portugal) combining chemical analysis to 12 pesticide compounds and whole toxicity testing using the bacterium , the algae , the crustacean , and the midge . The herbicides alachlor, atrazine ethofumesate, metolachlor, terbuthylazine, the insecticides chlorfenvinphos and chlorpyrifos, and the metabolite 3,4-dichloroaniline were detected in surface water samples at four sites and in groundwater samples from six wells, during four sampling occasions. Measured concentrations were compared with parametric values for human consumption, groundwater quality standards, and environmental quality standards applicable to surface water established in European Union legislation. Most severe adverse effects were noted on the growth of and lethality of in nondiluted water samples. Taking into account the values calculated by the method of toxic unit summation for pesticide mixtures, it was not possible to link the pesticides found to the toxicity detected in the water samples. Conducting this study with chemical analyses and biotests provided a more comprehensive quality assessment and realistic picture of the environmental samples analyzed, although additional studies are needed to evaluate the performance of mixture models for predicting mixture toxicity. This study underlines the importance of chemical analysis and whole toxicity testing as tools for assessing the impact of human activity on the status of water, mainly in protected zones.

  18. Mineralization of the s-triazine ring of atrazine by stable bacterial mixed cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Mandelbaum, R T; Wackett, L P; Allan, D L

    1993-01-01

    Enrichment cultures containing atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine) at a concentration of 100 ppm (0.46 mM) as a sole nitrogen source were obtained from soils exposed to repeated spills of atrazine, alachlor, and metolachlor. Bacterial growth occurred concomitantly with formation of metabolites from atrazine and subsequent biosynthesis of protein. When ring-labeled [14C]atrazine was used, 80% or more of the s-triazine ring carbon atoms were liberated as 14CO2. Hydroxyatrazine may be an intermediate in the atrazine mineralization pathway. More than 200 pure cultures isolated from the enrichment cultures failed to utilize atrazine as a nitrogen source. Mixing pure cultures restored atrazine-mineralizing activity. Repeated transfer of the mixed cultures led to increased rates of atrazine metabolism. The rate of atrazine degradation, even at the elevated concentrations used, far exceeded the rates previously reported in soils, waters, and mixed and pure cultures of bacteria. PMID:8328795

  19. The impact of agricultural practices on shallow groundwater in the Bluegrass Region of Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Hampson, S.K.; Sendlein, L.V.A. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    To study the effects of agricultural practices on the groundwater quality of the Inner Bluegrass Region of Kentucky, a large representative row crop and livestock production operation was chosen. Located in southeastern Bourbon County, the study area encompasses a 1,400 acre watershed underlain by limestones and shales of the Ordovician age Lexington Limestone Formation. Sampling and testing of surface water, ephemeral, and perennial spring waters began in the area in October, 1989. At crop and pasture micro-sites within the study area, nests containing porous-cup lysimeters and monitoring wells were installed prior to the 1992 growing season. Samples from the nest locations were analyzed for Nitrate-N, triazines, metolochlor, carbofuran, alachlor, and 2,4-D. While only ten per cent of the total samples from the study area showed triazine or Nitrate-N concentrations in excess of EPA limits, greater than 80 per cent of the samples showed concentrations of triazines above detection limits, and greater than 70 per cent of the samples contained concentrations of Nitrate-N above detection limits. Occurrences of detectable concentrations of triazines and Nitrate-N were more frequent at crop-site nests, than at pasture-site nests. Nests at both the crop and pasture sites indicated dilution of Nitrate-N and triazine concentrations with depth.

  20. Occurrence, distributions, and transport of herbicides and their degradation products in the lower Mississippi river and its tributaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pereira, W.E.

    1990-01-01

    The Mississippi River and its tributaries drain extensive agricultural regions of the midcontinental United States, where large amounts of herbicides are applied as weed control agents on crops such as corn and soybeans. Studies being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey along the lower Mississippi River and its major tributaries, representing a 1930-km river reach, have confirmed that several triazine and chloroacetanilide herbicides and their degradation products are present in this riverine system. These herbicides include atrazine, and its degradation products, desethyl- and desisopropylatrazine; cyanazine; simazine; metolachlor; and alachlor and its degradation products, 2-chloro-2???,6???-diethylacetanilide, and 2-hydroxy-2???,6???-diethylacetanilide. Loads of these compounds were determined at 17 different sampling stations under various seasonal and hydrologic conditions, during five sampling trips from July 1987 to June 1989. Stream loads of herbicides were relatively small during the drought of 1987 and 1988. Stream loads were much greater during the relatively wet year of 1989. Trace levels of atrazine, cyanazine, and metolachlor also were associated with suspended sediments. Distribution coefficients (Koc) of these compounds varied considerably between sites and were much larger than Koc values reported in the literature. The annual transport of atrazine into the Gulf of Mexico was estimated to be less than 2% of the amount of atrazine applied each year in the midwest.

  1. Regional patterns of pesticide concentrations in surface waters of New York in 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, P.J.; Eckhardt, D.A.; Freehafer, D.A.; Wall, G.R.; Ingleston, H.H.

    2002-01-01

    The predominant mixtures of pesticides found in New York surface waters consist of five principal components. First, herbicides commonly used on corn (atrazine, metolachlor, alachlor, cyanazine) and a herbicide degradate (deethylatrazine) were positively correlated to a corn-herbicide component, and watersheds with the highest corn-herbicide component scores were those in which large amounts of row crops are grown. Second, two insecticides (diazinon and carbaryl) and one herbicide (prometon) widely used in urban and residential settings were positively correlated to an urban/residential component. Watersheds with the highest urban/residential component scores were those with large amounts of urban and residential land use. A third component was related to two herbicides (EPTC and cyanazine) used on dry beans and corn, the fourth to an herbicide (simazine) and an insecticide (carbaryl) commonly used in orchards and vineyards, and the fifth to an herbicide (DCPA). Results of this study indicate that this approach can be used to: (1) identify common mixtures of pesticides in surface waters, (2) relate these mixtures to land use and pesticide applications, and (3) indicate regions where these mixtures of pesticides are commonly found.

  2. Direct surface analysis of pesticides on soil, leaves, grass, and stainless steel by static secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, J.C.; Groenewold, G.S.; Appelhans, A.D.; Delmore, J.E.; Olson, J.E.; Miller, D.L.

    1997-02-01

    Direct surface analyses by static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) were performed for the following pesticides adsorbed on dandelion leaves, grass, soil, and stainless steel samples: alachlor, atrazine, captan, carbofuran, chlorpyrifos, chlorosulfuron, chlorthal-dimethyl, cypermethrin, 2,4-D, diuron, glyphosate, malathion, methomyl, methyl arsonic acid, mocap, norflurazon, oxyfluorfen, paraquat, temik, and trifluralin. The purpose of this study was to evaluate static SIMS as a tool for pesticide analysis, principally for use in screening samples for pesticides. The advantage of direct surface analysis compared with conventional pesticide analysis methods is the elimination of sample pretreatment including extraction, which streamlines the analysis substantially; total analysis time for SIMS analysis was ca. 10 min/sample. Detection of 16 of the 20 pesticides on all four substrates was achieved. Of the remaining four pesticides, only one (trifluralin) was not detected on any of the samples. The minimum detectable quantity was determined for paraquat on soil in order to evaluate the efficacy of using SIMS as a screening tool. Paraquat was detected at 3 pg/mm{sup 2} (c.a. 0.005 monolayers). The results of these studies suggest that SIMS is capable of direct surface detection of a range of pesticides, with low volatility, polar pesticides being the most easily detected. 25 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Distribution of major herbicides in ground water of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barbash, Jack E.; Thelin, Gail P.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Gilliom, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    Frequencies of detection at or above 0.01 microgram per liter in shallow ground water beneath agricultural areas during the NAWQA study were significantly correlated with agricultural use in those areas for atrazine, cyanazine, alachlor, and metolachlor (P<0.05; Spearman rank correlations), but not for simazine (P>0.05). In urban areas, overall frequencies of detection of these five herbicides in shallow ground water were positively correlated with their total nonagricultural use nationwide (P=0.026; simple linear correlation). Multivariate statistical analysis indicated that frequencies of detection in shallow ground water beneath agricultural areas were positively correlated with half-lives for transformation in aerobic soil and agricultural use of the compounds (P≤0.0001 for both parameters). Although frequencies of detection were not significantly correlated with their subsurface mobility (Koc; P=0.19) or the median well depths of the sampled networks (P=0.72), the range of Koc values among the five herbicides and the range of well depths were limited.

  4. A field study to compare performance of stainless steel research monitoring wells with existing on-farm drinking water wells in measuring pesticide and nitrate concentrations.

    PubMed

    Smith, C N; Payne, W R; Pope, J D; Winkie, J H; Parrish, R S

    1999-02-01

    Existing drinking water wells are widely used for the collection of ground water samples to evaluate chemical contamination. A well comparison study was conducted to compare pesticide and nitrate-N data from specially designed stainless steel research monitoring wells with data from nearby existing on-farm drinking water wells. Results could help to determine whether adequate information concerning ground water contamination can be obtained from existing drinking water wells for use in making pollutant control decisions. The study was conducted during 1993-1994 in the Little Coharie Watershed, a 158 square mile area located in the coastal plain of eastern North Carolina. Statistical analysis indicated that research monitoring wells provided a greater probability of detecting pesticides in ground water than existing on-farm wells. Atrazine was the most frequently detected pesticide found in all wells, followed in order by fluometuron, carbofuran, metolachlor, alachlor, carbaryl, butylate, chlorothalonil, linuron and simazine. Ninety-seven percent of all wells had observed concentrations of nitrate-N, ranging from 0.1 to 30.1 mg/L. There was not a significant difference between research wells and existing wells for monitoring nitrate-N. Based on results of this study, existing drinking water wells can be used for monitoring nitrate; however, specialized stainless steel monitoring wells should be used for monitoring pesticides in ground water.

  5. Trends in pesticide concentrations and use for major rivers of the United States.

    PubMed

    Ryberg, Karen R; Gilliom, Robert J

    2015-12-15

    Trends in pesticide concentrations in 38 major rivers of the United States were evaluated in relation to use trends for 11 commonly occurring pesticide compounds. Pesticides monitored in water were analyzed for trends in concentration in three overlapping periods, 1992-2001, 1997-2006, and 2001-2010 to facilitate comparisons among sites with variable sample distributions over time and among pesticides with changes in use during different periods and durations. Concentration trends were analyzed using the SEAWAVE-Q model, which incorporates intra-annual variability in concentration and measures of long-term, mid-term, and short-term streamflow variability. Trends in agricultural use within each of the river basins were determined using interval-censored regression with high and low estimates of use. Pesticides strongly dominated by agricultural use (cyanazine, alachlor, atrazine and its degradate deethylatrazine, metolachlor, and carbofuran) had widespread agreement between concentration trends and use trends. Pesticides with substantial use in both agricultural and nonagricultural applications (simazine, chlorpyrifos, malathion, diazinon, and carbaryl) had concentration trends that were mostly explained by a combination of agricultural-use trends, regulatory changes, and urban use changes inferred from concentration trends in urban streams. When there were differences, concentration trends usually were greater than use trends (increased more or decreased less). These differences may occur because of such factors as unaccounted pesticide uses, delayed transport to the river through groundwater, greater uncertainty in the use data, or unquantified land use and management practice changes. PMID:26318227

  6. Coupling solid-phase extraction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for ultratrace determination of herbicides in pristine water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were coupled for automated trace analysis of pristine water samples containing 2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamine-s-triazine (atrazine) and 2-chloro-2???,6???-diethyl-N-(methoxymethyl)acetanilide (alachlor). The isolation of the two herbicides on a C18-resin involved the selection of an elution solvent that both removes interfering substances and is compatible with ELISA. Ethyl acetate was selected as the elution solvent followed by a solvent exchange with methanol/water (20/80, % v/v). The SPE-ELISA method has a detection limit of 5.0 ng/L (5 ppt), >90% recovery, and a relative standard deviation of ??10%. The performance of a microtiter plate-based ELISA and a magnetic particle-based ELISA coupled to SPE was also evaluated. Although the sensitivity of the two ELISA methods was comparable, the precision using magnetic particles was improved considerably (??10% versus ??20%) because of the faster reaction kinetics provided by the magnetic particles. Finally, SPE-ELISA and isotope dilution gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry correlated well (correlation coefficient of 0.96) for lake-water samples. The SPE-ELISA method is simple and may have broader applications for the inexpensive automated analysis of other contaminants in water at trace levels.

  7. Water quality survey of Mississippi's Upper Pearl River.

    PubMed

    Tagert, Mary Love M; Massey, Joseph H; Shaw, David R

    2014-05-15

    Surface water samples were collected from May 2002 through May 2003 at seven locations within the Upper Pearl River Basin (UPRB) in east-central Mississippi to assess levels of pesticide impairment in the watershed. Depth-integrated samples were collected at three sites from September 2001 through January 2003 for total dissolved solid (TDS) analysis. Samples were extracted via Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) and analyzed for fifteen pesticides: triclopyr, 2,4-D, tebuthiuron, simazine, atrazine, metribuzin, alachlor, metolachlor, cyanazine, norflurazon, hexazinone, pendimethalin, diuron, fluometuron, and the dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) degradation product p,p'-DDE. Of the analyzed compounds, hexazinone was detected in 94% of the samples, followed by metolachlor (76%), tebuthiuron (48%), and atrazine (47%). Metribuzin was detected in 6% of the samples and was the least detected compound of those analyzed. Sediment concentrations ranged from 20.64 mg/L at Burnside to 42.20mg/L at Carthage, which also had the highest cumulative total sediment concentration at 4,009 mg/L.

  8. Drinking water treatment of priority pesticides using low pressure UV photolysis and advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Sanches, Sandra; Barreto Crespo, Maria T; Pereira, Vanessa J

    2010-03-01

    This study reports the efficiency of low pressure UV photolysis for the degradation of pesticides identified as priority pollutants by the European Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC. Direct low pressure UV photolysis and advanced oxidation processes (using hydrogen peroxide and titanium dioxide) experiments were conducted in laboratory grade water, surface water, and groundwater. LP direct photolysis using a high UV fluence (1500 mJ/cm(2)) was found to be extremely efficient to accomplish the degradation of all pesticides except isoproturon, whereas photolysis using hydrogen peroxide and titanium dioxide did not significantly enhance their removal. In all matrices tested the experimental photolysis of the pesticides followed the same trend: isoproturon degradation was negligible, alachlor, pentachlorophenol, and atrazine showed similar degradation rate constants, whereas diuron and chlorfenvinphos were highly removed. The degradation trend observed for the selected compounds followed the decadic molar absorption coefficients order with exception of isoproturon probably due to its extremely low quantum yield. Similar direct photolysis rate constants were obtained for each pesticide in the different matrices tested, showing that the water components did not significantly impact degradation. Extremely similar photolysis rate constants were also obtained in surface water for individual compounds when compared to mixtures. The model fluence and time-based rate constants reported were very similar to the direct photolysis experimental results obtained, while overestimating the advanced oxidation results. This model was used to predict how degradation of isoproturon, the most resilient compound, could be improved.

  9. Fate and transport of pesticides in the ground water systems of southwest Georgia, 1993-2005.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Melinda S; Frick, Elizabeth A

    2008-01-01

    Modern agricultural practices in the United States have resulted in nearly unrivaled efficiency and productivity. Unfortunately, there is also the potential for release of these compounds to the environment and consequent adverse affects on wildlife and human populations. Since 1993, the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program of the U.S. Geological Survey has evaluated water quality in agricultural areas to address these concerns. The objective of this study is to evaluate trends in pesticide concentrations from 1993-2005 in the surficial and Upper Floridan aquifers of southwest Georgia using pesticide and pesticide degradate data collected for the NAWQA program. There were six compounds-five herbicides and one degradate-that were detected in more than 20% of samples: atrazine, deethylatrazine (DEA), metolachlor, alachlor, floumeturon, and tebuthiuron. Of the 128 wells sampled during the study, only eight wells had pesticide concentrations that either increased (7) or decreased (1) on a decadal time scale. Most of the significant trends were increasing concentrations of pesticides in older water; median pesticide concentrations did not differ between the surficial and Upper Floridan aquifers from 1993 and 2005. Deethylatrazine, in the Upper Floridan aquifer, was the only compound that had a significant change (increase) in concentration during the study. The limited number of wells with increases in pesticide concentrations suggest that ground-water sources of these compounds are not increasing in concentration over the time scale represented in this study.

  10. Pesticide concentrations in wetlands on the Lake Traverse Indian Reservation, South and North Dakota, July 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, Janet M.; Thompson, Ryan F.

    2016-05-04

    During July 2015, water samples were collected from 18 wetlands on the Lake Traverse Indian Reservation in northeastern South Dakota and southeastern North Dakota and analyzed for physical properties and 54 pesticides. This study by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate was designed to provide an update on pesticide concentrations of the same 18 wetlands that were sampled for a reconnaissance-level assessment during July 2006. The purpose of this report is to present the results of the assessment of pesticide concentrations in selected Lake Traverse Indian Reservation wetlands during July 2015 and provide a comparison of pesticide concentrations between 2006 and 2015.Of the 54 pesticides that were analyzed for in the samples collected during July 2015, 47 pesticides were not detected in any samples. Seven pesticides—2-chloro-4-isopropylamino-6-amino-s-triazine (CIAT); 2,4–D; acetachlor; atrazine; glyphosate; metolachlor; and prometon—were detected in the 2015 samples with estimated concentrations or concentrations greater than the laboratory reporting level, and most pesticides were detected at low concentrations in only a few samples. Samples from all wetlands contained at least one detected pesticide. The maximum number of pesticides detected in a wetland sample was six, and the median number of pesticides detected was three.The most commonly detected pesticides in the 2015 samples were atrazine and the atrazine degradate CIAT (also known as deethylatrazine), which were detected in 14 and 13 of the wetlands sampled, respectively. Glyphosate was detected in samples from 11 wetlands, and metolachlor was detected in samples from 10 wetlands. The other detected pesticides were 2,4–D (4 wetlands), acetochlor (3 wetlands), and prometon (1 wetland).The same pesticides that were detected in the 2006 samples were detected in the 2015 samples, with the exception of simazine, which was detected only in one sample in 2006

  11. Concentrations of nutrients, pesticides, and suspended sediment in the karst terrane of the Sinking Creek basin, Kentucky, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crain, Angela S.

    2006-01-01

    Water samples were collected in streams and springs in the karst terrane of the Sinking Creek Basin in 2004 as part of study in cooperation with the Kentucky Department of Agriculture. A total of 48 water samples were collected at 7 sites (4 springs, 2 streams, and 1 karst window) from April through November 2004. The karst terrane of the Sinking Creek Basin (also known as Boiling Spring Basin) encompasses about 125 square miles in Breckinridge County and portions of Meade and Hardin Counties in Kentucky. Fourteen pesticides were detected of the 52 pesticides analyzed in the stream and spring samples. Of the 14 detected pesticides, 12 were herbicides and 2 were insecticides. The most commonly detected pesticides?atrazine, simazine, metolachlor, and acetochlor?were those most heavily used on crops during the study. Atrazine was detected in 100 percent of all samples; simazine, metolachlor, and acetochlor were detected in more than 35 percent of all samples. The pesticide-transformation compound, deethylatrazine, was detected in 98 percent of the samples. Only one nonagricultural herbicide, prometon, was detected in more than 30 percent of the samples. Malathion, the most commonly detected insecticide, was found in 4 percent of the samples, which was followed by carbofuran (2 percent). Most of the pesticides were present in low concentrations; however, atrazine was found in springs exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s (USEPA) standards for drinking water. Atrazine exceeded the USEPA?s maximum contaminant level 2 times in 48 detections. Concentrations of nitrate greater than 10 milligrams per liter (mg/L) were not found in water samples from any of the sites. Concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate ranged from 0.21 to 3.9 mg/L at the seven sites. The median concentration of nitrite plus nitrate for all sites sampled was 1.5 mg/L. Concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate generally were higher in the springs than in the main stem of Sinking Creek. Forty

  12. A cocktail of contaminants: how mixtures of pesticides at low concentrations affect aquatic communities.

    PubMed

    Relyea, Rick A

    2009-03-01

    The ubiquity of anthropogenic chemicals in nature poses a challenge to understanding how ecological communities are impacted by them. While we are rapidly gaining an understanding of how individual contaminants affect communities, communities are exposed to suites of contaminants yet investigations of the effects of diverse contaminant mixtures in aquatic communities are rare. I examined how a single application of five insecticides (malathion, carbaryl, chlorpyrifos, diazinon, and endosulfan) and five herbicides (glyphosate, atrazine, acetochlor, metolachlor, and 2,4-D) at low concentrations (2-16 p.p.b.) affected aquatic communities composed of zooplankton, phytoplankton, periphyton, and larval amphibians (gray tree frogs, Hyla versicolor, and leopard frogs, Rana pipiens). Using outdoor mesocosms, I examined each pesticide alone, a mix of insecticides, a mix of herbicides, and a mix of all ten pesticides. Individual pesticides had a wide range of direct and indirect effects on all trophic groups. For some taxa (i.e., zooplankton and algae), the impact of pesticide mixtures could largely be predicted from the impacts of individual pesticides; for other taxa (i.e., amphibians) it could not. For amphibians, there was an apparent direct toxic effect of endosulfan that caused 84% mortality of leopard frogs and an indirect effect induced by diazinon that caused 24% mortality of leopard frogs. When pesticides were combined, the mix of herbicides had no negative effects on the survival and metamorphosis of amphibians, but the mix of insecticides and the mix of all ten pesticides eliminated 99% of leopard frogs. Interestingly, these mixtures did not cause mortality in the gray tree frogs and, as a result, the gray tree frogs grew nearly twice as large due to reduced competition with leopard frogs. In short, wetland communities can be dramatically impacted by low concentrations of pesticides (both separate and combined) and these results offer important insights for the

  13. Influence of the organic complex concentration on adsorption of herbicide in organic modified montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaludjerovic, Lazar; Tomic, Zorica; Djurovic, Rada; Milosevic, Maja

    2016-04-01

    Pesticides are recognized as an important source of potential pollution to soil and water due to their mobility and degradation in soils. Results presented in this paper show impact of the organic complex concentration on the adsorption of herbicides (acetochlor) at the surface of the organic modified montmorillonite. In this work, natural montmorillonite from Bogovina, located near Boljevac municipality, was used for organic modification. Cation-exchange capacity of this montmorillonite was determined by extraction with ammonium acetate (86 mmol/100g of clay). Montmorillonite have been modified first with NaCl and than with two organic complexes, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTMA) and phenyltrimethylammonium chloride (PTMA). For both organic complexes, three saturation concentrations were selected for monitoring of the herbicide adsorption (43 mmol/100g of clay (0.5 CEC), 86 mmol/100g of clay (1 CEC) and 129 mmol/100g of clay (1.5 CEC)). Changes in the properties of the inorganic and organic bentonite have been examined using the X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and batch equilibrium method. Increase in basal spacing (d) of montmorillonites saturated with 1.5 CEC of organic cation indicate that sorption of PTMA and HDTMA can exceed the saturation of 1 CEC. Both organic montmorillonites have shown higher uptake of the herbicide, compared to the inorganic montmorillonite. Comparing the values Freundlich coefficients in batch equilibrium method, (presented in the form of log Kf and 1/n), it can be seen that the sorption decreases in the series: 0.5CEC> 1CEC> 1.5CEC> NaM, for both organic montmorillonites.

  14. Nongenotoxic (epigenetic) carcinogens: pesticides as an example. A critical review.

    PubMed

    Rakitsky, V N; Koblyakov, V A; Turusov, V S

    2000-01-01

    The following groups of pesticides are considered in this review by supposed mechanisms of their carcinogenicity: hepatocarcinogenic pesticides, pesticides - peroxisome proliferators, pesticides as endocrine disruptors, goitrogenic pesticides, pesticides producing sustained cell proliferation and some others. With very rare exceptions, pesticides do not react with DNA directly and the mechanisms of their carcinogenicity are, in general, similar to those of other nongenotoxic (epigenetic) carcinogens, namely: promotion of spontaneous initiation, cytotoxicity with sustained cell proliferation, oxidative stress, formation of activated receptors and some others. Genotoxicity of pesticides varies from its complete absence (propiconazol as an example) to a very pronounced one (captafol) with remaining compounds in between. These two compounds demonstrate full correlation between genotoxicity and carcinogenicity (or their absence). Many pesticides give positive results in some tests for genotoxicity but these results are frequently controversial, not readily reproducible, or obtained only at toxic dose levels. The weak genotoxicity of the majority of pesticides is easily explainable by their rather severe testing before their introduction into practical use. The above mechanisms are threshold-based and therefore pesticides are regulated through NOEL/safety factor. There exist examples of lack of correlation between genotoxicity and carcinogenicity: some pesticides are genotoxic (although not strongly) but noncarcinogenic, others are considered as nongenotoxic but are strongly carcinogenic (chlorothalonil, acetochlor). The general scheme of the promoters' effect is presented in which an important role is attributed to the cytochrome P-450 induction (some pesticides are the cytochrome P-450 inducers), formation of reactive oxygen species and peroxitome proliferation. Teratogenesis Carcinog. Mutagen. 20:229-240, 2000. PMID:10910473

  15. A Rapid, Physiologic Protocol for Testing Transcriptional Effects of Thyroid-Disrupting Agents in Premetamorphic Xenopus Tadpoles

    PubMed Central

    Turque, Nathalie; Palmier, Karima; Le Mével, Sébastien; Alliot, Caroline; Demeneix, Barbara A.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing numbers of substances present in the environment are postulated to have endocrine-disrupting effects on vertebrate populations. However, data on disruption of thyroid signaling are fragmentary, particularly at the molecular level. Thyroid hormone (TH; triiodothyronine, T3) acts principally by modulating transcription from target genes; thus, thyroid signaling is particularly amenable to analysis with a transcriptional assay. Also, T3 orchestrates amphibian metamorphosis, thereby providing an exceptional model for identifying thyroid-disrupting chemicals. We combined these two advantages to develop a method for following and quantifying the transcriptional action of T3 in Xenopus laevis tadpoles. This technology provides a means of assessing thyroid activity at the molecular level in a physiologically relevant situation. Moreover, translucent tadpoles are amenable to “on-line” imaging with fluorescent reporter constructs that facilitate in vivo measurement of transcriptional activity. We adapted transgenesis with TH-responsive elements coupled to either luciferase or green fluorescent protein to follow T3-dependent transcription in vivo. To reduce time of exposure and to synchronize responses, we optimized a physiologic pre-treatment protocol that induced competence to respond to T3 and thus to assess T3 effects and T3 disruption within 48 hr. This pretreatment protocol was based on a short (24 hr), weak (10−12 M) pulse of T3 that induced TH receptors, facilitating and synchronizing the transcriptional responses. This protocol was successfully applied to somatic and germinal transgenesis with both reporter systems. Finally, we show that the transcriptional assay allows detection of the thyroid-disrupting activity of environmentally relevant concentrations (10−8 M) of acetochlor, a persistent herbicide. PMID:16263516

  16. Assessment of heavy metal and pesticide levels in soil and plant products from agricultural area of Belgrade, Serbia.

    PubMed

    Marković, Mirjana; Cupać, Svjetlana; Durović, Rada; Milinović, Jelena; Kljajić, Petar

    2010-02-01

    This study was aimed to assess the levels of selected heavy metals and pesticides in soil and plant products from an agricultural area of Belgrade, Serbia and to indicate possible sources and risks of contamination. Soil, vegetable, and fruit samples from the most important agricultural city areas were collected from July to November of 2006. Metal contents were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry, whereas pesticide residues were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after extraction performed using solid-phase microextraction technique. Soil characterization based on the determination of selected physical and chemical properties revealed heterogeneous soils belonging to different soil groups. The concentrations of lead, cadmium, copper, and zinc in soil samples do not exceed the limits established by national and international regulations. Residues of the herbicide atrazine were detected in three soil samples, with levels lower than the relevant limit. The presence of other herbicides, namely prometryn, chloridazon, acetochlor, flurochloridone, and napropamide, was registered in some soil samples as well. Among the insecticides investigated in the soil, fenitrothion and chlorpyrifos were the only ones detected. In most of the investigated vegetable samples from the Obrenovac area, Pb and Cd contents are higher in comparison with the maximum levels, indicating the emission of coal combustion products from local thermal power plants as a possible source of contamination. Residue levels of some herbicides and insecticides (metribuzin, trifluralin, pendimethalin, bifenthrin, chlorpyrifos, and cypermethrin) determined in tomato, pepper, potato, and onion samples from Slanci, Ovca, and Obrenovac areas are even several times higher than the maximum residue levels. Inappropriate use of these plant protection products is considered to be the most probable reason of contamination. Because increased levels of heavy metals and pesticide residues found in

  17. Pesticide Urinary Metabolite Levels of Children in Eastern North Carolina Farmworker Households

    PubMed Central

    Arcury, Thomas A.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Barr, Dana B.; Tapia, Janeth; Chen, Haiying; Quandt, Sara A.

    2007-01-01

    Background In this investigation we documented the pesticide urinary metabolite levels of farmworker children in North Carolina, determined the number of different metabolites detected for each child, and delineated risk factors associated with the number of metabolites. Methods Urine samples were collected from 60 Latino farmworker children 1–6 years of age (34 female, 26 male). Interviews were completed by their mothers in Spanish. We analyzed urine samples for 14 pesticide metabolites, including the organophosphate pesticides chlorpyrifos, coumaphos, diazinon, isazaphos, malathion, pirimiphos, and parathion and its methyl counterpart; a common metabolite of at least 18 pyrethroid insecticides; the repellent DEET; and the herbicides 2,4,5-trichlorphenoxyacetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, acetochlor, atrazine, and metolachlor. Predictors included measures of paraoccupational, residential, and environmental exposure, child characteristics, and mother characteristics. Results Thirteen metabolites were present in the urine samples. Organophosphate pesticide metabolites were detected in a substantial proportion of children, particularly metabolites of parathion/methyl parathion (90.0%; geometric mean 1.00 μg/L), chlorpyrifos/chlorpyrifos methyl (83.3%; geometric mean 1.92 μg/L), and diazinon (55.0%; geometric mean 10.56 μg/L). The number of metabolites detected ranged from 0 to 7, with a mode of 4 detected (28.3%). Boys, children living in rented housing, and children with mothers working part-time had more metabolites detected. Conclusions Children in farmworker homes experience multiple sources of pesticide exposure. Pesticides may remain in their environments for long periods. Environmental and occupational health changes are needed to address these exposures. Research is needed with more precise measures of exposure and on the health effects of concurrent exposure to multiple pesticides. PMID:17687456

  18. Metabolic pathway involved in 2-methyl-6-ethylaniline degradation by Sphingobium sp. strain MEA3-1 and cloning of the novel flavin-dependent monooxygenase system meaBA.

    PubMed

    Dong, Weiliang; Chen, Qiongzhen; Hou, Ying; Li, Shuhuan; Zhuang, Kai; Huang, Fei; Zhou, Jie; Li, Zhoukun; Wang, Jue; Fu, Lei; Zhang, Zhengguang; Huang, Yan; Wang, Fei; Cui, Zhongli

    2015-12-01

    2-Methyl-6-ethylaniline (MEA) is the main microbial degradation intermediate of the chloroacetanilide herbicides acetochlor and metolachlor. Sphingobium sp. strain MEA3-1 can utilize MEA and various alkyl-substituted aniline and phenol compounds as sole carbon and energy sources for growth. We isolated the mutant strain MEA3-1Mut, which converts MEA only to 2-methyl-6-ethyl-hydroquinone (MEHQ) and 2-methyl-6-ethyl-benzoquinone (MEBQ). MEA may be oxidized by the P450 monooxygenase system to 4-hydroxy-2-methyl-6-ethylaniline (4-OH-MEA), which can be hydrolytically spontaneously deaminated to MEBQ or MEHQ. The MEA microbial metabolic pathway was reconstituted based on the substrate spectra and identification of the intermediate metabolites in both the wild-type and mutant strains. Plasmidome sequencing indicated that both strains harbored 7 plasmids with sizes ranging from 6,108 bp to 287,745 bp. Among the 7 plasmids, 6 were identical, and pMEA02' in strain MEA3-1Mut lost a 37,000-bp fragment compared to pMEA02 in strain MEA3-1. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and protein mass fingerprinting (PMF) showed that MEA3-1Mut lost the two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase (TC-FDM) MeaBA, which was encoded by a gene in the lost fragment of pMEA02. MeaA shared 22% to 25% amino acid sequence identity with oxygenase components of some TC-FDMs, whereas MeaB showed no sequence identity with the reductase components of those TC-FDMs. Complementation with meaBA in MEA3-1Mut and heterologous expression in Pseudomonas putida strain KT2440 resulted in the production of an active MEHQ monooxygenase.

  19. Effect of herbicide combinations on Bt-maize rhizobacterial diversity.

    PubMed

    Valverde, José R; Marín, Silvia; Mellado, Rafael P

    2014-11-28

    Reports of herbicide resistance events are proliferating worldwide, leading to new cultivation strategies using combinations of pre-emergence and post-emergence herbicides. We analyzed the impact during a one-year cultivation cycle of several herbicide combinations on the rhizobacterial community of glyphosate-tolerant Bt-maize and compared them to those of the untreated or glyphosate-treated soils. Samples were analyzed using pyrosequencing of the V6 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene. The sequences obtained were subjected to taxonomic, taxonomy-independent, and phylogeny-based diversity studies, followed by a statistical analysis using principal components analysis and hierarchical clustering with jackknife statistical validation. The resilience of the microbial communities was analyzed by comparing their relative composition at the end of the cultivation cycle. The bacterial communites from soil subjected to a combined treatment with mesotrione plus s-metolachlor followed by glyphosate were not statistically different from those treated with glyphosate or the untreated ones. The use of acetochlor plus terbuthylazine followed by glyphosate, and the use of aclonifen plus isoxaflutole followed by mesotrione clearly affected the resilience of their corresponding bacterial communities. The treatment with pethoxamid followed by glyphosate resulted in an intermediate effect. The use of glyphosate alone seems to be the less aggressive one for bacterial communities. Should a combined treatment be needed, the combination of mesotrione and s-metolachlor shows the next best final resilience. Our results show the relevance of comparative rhizobacterial community studies when novel combined herbicide treatments are deemed necessary to control weed growth.. PMID:25394507

  20. Effects of Pesticide Mixtures on Host-Pathogen Dynamics of the Amphibian Chytrid Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Julia C.; Hua, Jessica; Brogan, William R.; Dang, Trang D.; Urbina, Jenny; Bendis, Randall J.; Stoler, Aaron B.; Blaustein, Andrew R.; Relyea, Rick A.

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic and natural stressors often interact to affect organisms. Amphibian populations are undergoing unprecedented declines and extinctions with pesticides and emerging infectious diseases implicated as causal factors. Although these factors often co-occur, their effects on amphibians are usually examined in isolation. We hypothesized that exposure of larval and metamorphic amphibians to ecologically relevant concentrations of pesticide mixtures would increase their post-metamorphic susceptibility to the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), a pathogen that has contributed to amphibian population declines worldwide. We exposed five anuran species (Pacific treefrog, Pseudacris regilla; spring peeper, Pseudacris crucifer; Cascades frog, Rana cascadae; northern leopard frog, Lithobates pipiens; and western toad, Anaxyrus boreas) from three families to mixtures of four common insecticides (chlorpyrifos, carbaryl, permethrin, and endosulfan) or herbicides (glyphosate, acetochlor, atrazine, and 2,4-D) or a control treatment, either as tadpoles or as newly metamorphic individuals (metamorphs). Subsequently, we exposed animals to Bd or a control inoculate after metamorphosis and compared survival and Bd load. Bd exposure significantly increased mortality in Pacific treefrogs, spring peepers, and western toads, but not in Cascades frogs or northern leopard frogs. However, the effects of pesticide exposure on mortality were negligible, regardless of the timing of exposure. Bd load varied considerably across species; Pacific treefrogs, spring peepers, and western toads had the highest loads, whereas Cascades frogs and northern leopard frogs had the lowest loads. The influence of pesticide exposure on Bd load depended on the amphibian species, timing of pesticide exposure, and the particular pesticide treatment. Our results suggest that exposure to realistic pesticide concentrations has minimal effects on Bd-induced mortality, but can alter Bd load. This result

  1. Effects of Pesticide Mixtures on Host-Pathogen Dynamics of the Amphibian Chytrid Fungus.

    PubMed

    Buck, Julia C; Hua, Jessica; Brogan, William R; Dang, Trang D; Urbina, Jenny; Bendis, Randall J; Stoler, Aaron B; Blaustein, Andrew R; Relyea, Rick A

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic and natural stressors often interact to affect organisms. Amphibian populations are undergoing unprecedented declines and extinctions with pesticides and emerging infectious diseases implicated as causal factors. Although these factors often co-occur, their effects on amphibians are usually examined in isolation. We hypothesized that exposure of larval and metamorphic amphibians to ecologically relevant concentrations of pesticide mixtures would increase their post-metamorphic susceptibility to the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), a pathogen that has contributed to amphibian population declines worldwide. We exposed five anuran species (Pacific treefrog, Pseudacris regilla; spring peeper, Pseudacris crucifer; Cascades frog, Rana cascadae; northern leopard frog, Lithobates pipiens; and western toad, Anaxyrus boreas) from three families to mixtures of four common insecticides (chlorpyrifos, carbaryl, permethrin, and endosulfan) or herbicides (glyphosate, acetochlor, atrazine, and 2,4-D) or a control treatment, either as tadpoles or as newly metamorphic individuals (metamorphs). Subsequently, we exposed animals to Bd or a control inoculate after metamorphosis and compared survival and Bd load. Bd exposure significantly increased mortality in Pacific treefrogs, spring peepers, and western toads, but not in Cascades frogs or northern leopard frogs. However, the effects of pesticide exposure on mortality were negligible, regardless of the timing of exposure. Bd load varied considerably across species; Pacific treefrogs, spring peepers, and western toads had the highest loads, whereas Cascades frogs and northern leopard frogs had the lowest loads. The influence of pesticide exposure on Bd load depended on the amphibian species, timing of pesticide exposure, and the particular pesticide treatment. Our results suggest that exposure to realistic pesticide concentrations has minimal effects on Bd-induced mortality, but can alter Bd load. This result

  2. Effects of Pesticide Mixtures on Host-Pathogen Dynamics of the Amphibian Chytrid Fungus.

    PubMed

    Buck, Julia C; Hua, Jessica; Brogan, William R; Dang, Trang D; Urbina, Jenny; Bendis, Randall J; Stoler, Aaron B; Blaustein, Andrew R; Relyea, Rick A

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic and natural stressors often interact to affect organisms. Amphibian populations are undergoing unprecedented declines and extinctions with pesticides and emerging infectious diseases implicated as causal factors. Although these factors often co-occur, their effects on amphibians are usually examined in isolation. We hypothesized that exposure of larval and metamorphic amphibians to ecologically relevant concentrations of pesticide mixtures would increase their post-metamorphic susceptibility to the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), a pathogen that has contributed to amphibian population declines worldwide. We exposed five anuran species (Pacific treefrog, Pseudacris regilla; spring peeper, Pseudacris crucifer; Cascades frog, Rana cascadae; northern leopard frog, Lithobates pipiens; and western toad, Anaxyrus boreas) from three families to mixtures of four common insecticides (chlorpyrifos, carbaryl, permethrin, and endosulfan) or herbicides (glyphosate, acetochlor, atrazine, and 2,4-D) or a control treatment, either as tadpoles or as newly metamorphic individuals (metamorphs). Subsequently, we exposed animals to Bd or a control inoculate after metamorphosis and compared survival and Bd load. Bd exposure significantly increased mortality in Pacific treefrogs, spring peepers, and western toads, but not in Cascades frogs or northern leopard frogs. However, the effects of pesticide exposure on mortality were negligible, regardless of the timing of exposure. Bd load varied considerably across species; Pacific treefrogs, spring peepers, and western toads had the highest loads, whereas Cascades frogs and northern leopard frogs had the lowest loads. The influence of pesticide exposure on Bd load depended on the amphibian species, timing of pesticide exposure, and the particular pesticide treatment. Our results suggest that exposure to realistic pesticide concentrations has minimal effects on Bd-induced mortality, but can alter Bd load. This result

  3. Concentration of Selected Sulfonylurea, Sulfonamide, and Imidazolinone Herbicides, Other Pesticides, and Nutrients in 71 Streams, 5 Reservoir Outflows, and 25 Wells in the Midwestern United States, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, William A.; Furlong, Edward T.; Burkhardt, Mark R.

    2001-01-01

    Sulfonylurea (SU), sulfonamide (SA), and imidazolinone (IMI) herbicides are recently developed herbicides that function by inhibiting the action of a key plant enzyme, stopping plant growth, and eventually killing the plant. These compounds generally have low mammalian toxicity, but crop and non-crop plants demonstrate a wide range in sensitivity to SUs, SAs, and IMIs, with over a 10,000-fold difference in observed toxicity levels for some compounds. SUs, SAs, and IMIs are applied either pre- or post-emergence to crops commonly at 1/50th or less of the rate of other herbicides. Little is known about their occurrence, fate, or transport in surface water or ground water in the United States. To obtain information on the occurrence of SU, SA, and IMI herbicides in the Midwestern United States, 214 water samples were collected from 76 surface-water and 25 ground-water sites in 1998. These samples were analyzed for 16 SU, SA, and IMI herbicides by using highperformance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Samples also were analyzed for 46 pesticides and pesticide degradation products and 13 herbicides and 10 herbicide degradates. At least 1 of the 16 SUs, SAs, or IMIs was detected at or above the method reporting limit of 0.010 microgram per liter (ug/L) in 83 percent of 133 stream samples. Imazethapyr was detected most frequently (69 percent of samples), followed by flumetsulam (65 percent of samples) and nicosulfuron (53 percent of samples). At least one SU, SA, or IMI herbicide was detected at or above the method reporting limit in 6 of 8 reservoir samples and 5 of 25 ground-water samples. SU, SA, and IMI herbicides occurred less frequently and at a fraction (often 1/50th or less) of the concentrations of other herbicides such as atrazine. Acetochlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and metolachlor were all detected in 95 percent or more of 136 stream samples.

  4. Assessment of heavy metal and pesticide levels in soil and plant products from agricultural area of Belgrade, Serbia.

    PubMed

    Marković, Mirjana; Cupać, Svjetlana; Durović, Rada; Milinović, Jelena; Kljajić, Petar

    2010-02-01

    This study was aimed to assess the levels of selected heavy metals and pesticides in soil and plant products from an agricultural area of Belgrade, Serbia and to indicate possible sources and risks of contamination. Soil, vegetable, and fruit samples from the most important agricultural city areas were collected from July to November of 2006. Metal contents were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry, whereas pesticide residues were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after extraction performed using solid-phase microextraction technique. Soil characterization based on the determination of selected physical and chemical properties revealed heterogeneous soils belonging to different soil groups. The concentrations of lead, cadmium, copper, and zinc in soil samples do not exceed the limits established by national and international regulations. Residues of the herbicide atrazine were detected in three soil samples, with levels lower than the relevant limit. The presence of other herbicides, namely prometryn, chloridazon, acetochlor, flurochloridone, and napropamide, was registered in some soil samples as well. Among the insecticides investigated in the soil, fenitrothion and chlorpyrifos were the only ones detected. In most of the investigated vegetable samples from the Obrenovac area, Pb and Cd contents are higher in comparison with the maximum levels, indicating the emission of coal combustion products from local thermal power plants as a possible source of contamination. Residue levels of some herbicides and insecticides (metribuzin, trifluralin, pendimethalin, bifenthrin, chlorpyrifos, and cypermethrin) determined in tomato, pepper, potato, and onion samples from Slanci, Ovca, and Obrenovac areas are even several times higher than the maximum residue levels. Inappropriate use of these plant protection products is considered to be the most probable reason of contamination. Because increased levels of heavy metals and pesticide residues found in

  5. A rapid, physiologic protocol for testing transcriptional effects of thyroid-disrupting agents in premetamorphic Xenopus tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Turque, Nathalie; Palmier, Karima; Le Mével, Sébastien; Alliot, Caroline; Demeneix, Barbara A

    2005-11-01

    Increasing numbers of substances present in the environment are postulated to have endocrine-disrupting effects on vertebrate populations. However, data on disruption of thyroid signaling are fragmentary, particularly at the molecular level. Thyroid hormone (TH; triiodothyronine, T3) acts principally by modulating transcription from target genes; thus, thyroid signaling is particularly amenable to analysis with a transcriptional assay. Also, T3 orchestrates amphibian metamorphosis, thereby providing an exceptional model for identifying thyroid-disrupting chemicals. We combined these two advantages to develop a method for following and quantifying the transcriptional action of T3 in Xenopus laevis tadpoles. This technology provides a means of assessing thyroid activity at the molecular level in a physiologically relevant situation. Moreover, translucent tadpoles are amenable to "on-line" imaging with fluorescent reporter constructs that facilitate in vivo measurement of transcriptional activity. We adapted transgenesis with TH-responsive elements coupled to either luciferase or green fluorescent protein to follow T3-dependent transcription in vivo. To reduce time of exposure and to synchronize responses, we optimized a physiologic pretreatment protocol that induced competence to respond to T3 and thus to assess T3 effects and T3 disruption within 48 hr. This pretreatment protocol was based on a short (24 hr), weak (10(-12) M) pulse of T3 that induced TH receptors, facilitating and synchronizing the transcriptional responses. This protocol was successfully applied to somatic and germinal transgenesis with both reporter systems. Finally, we show that the transcriptional assay allows detection of the thyroid-disrupting activity of environmentally relevant concentrations (10(-8) M) of acetochlor, a persistent herbicide. PMID:16263516

  6. Impacts of woodchip biochar additions on greenhouse gas production and sorption/degradation of two herbicides in a Minnesota soil.

    PubMed

    Spokas, K A; Koskinen, W C; Baker, J M; Reicosky, D C

    2009-10-01

    A potential abatement to increasing levels of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) in the atmosphere is the use of pyrolysis to convert vegetative biomass into a more stable form of carbon (biochar) that could then be applied to the soil. However, the impacts of pyrolysis biochar on the soil system need to be assessed before initiating large scale biochar applications to agricultural fields. We compared CO(2) respiration, nitrous oxide (N(2)O) production, methane (CH(4)) oxidation and herbicide retention and transformation through laboratory incubations at field capacity in a Minnesota soil (Waukegan silt loam) with and without added biochar. CO(2) originating from the biochar needs to be subtracted from the soil-biochar combination in order to elucidate the impact of biochar on soil respiration. After this correction, biochar amendments reduced CO(2) production for all amendment levels tested (2, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 60% w/w; corresponding to 24-720 tha(-1) field application rates). In addition, biochar additions suppressed N(2)O production at all levels. However, these reductions were only significant at biochar amendment levels >20% w/w. Biochar additions also significantly suppressed ambient CH(4) oxidation at all levels compared to unamended soil. The addition of biochar (5% w/w) to soil increased the sorption of atrazine and acetochlor compared to non-amended soils, resulting in decreased dissipation rates of these herbicides. The recalcitrance of the biochar suggests that it could be a viable carbon sequestration strategy, and might provide substantial net greenhouse gas benefits if the reductions in N(2)O production are lasting.

  7. Metabolic Pathway Involved in 2-Methyl-6-Ethylaniline Degradation by Sphingobium sp. Strain MEA3-1 and Cloning of the Novel Flavin-Dependent Monooxygenase System meaBA

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Weiliang; Chen, Qiongzhen; Hou, Ying; Li, Shuhuan; Zhuang, Kai; Huang, Fei; Zhou, Jie; Li, Zhoukun; Wang, Jue; Fu, Lei; Zhang, Zhengguang; Huang, Yan; Wang, Fei

    2015-01-01

    2-Methyl-6-ethylaniline (MEA) is the main microbial degradation intermediate of the chloroacetanilide herbicides acetochlor and metolachlor. Sphingobium sp. strain MEA3-1 can utilize MEA and various alkyl-substituted aniline and phenol compounds as sole carbon and energy sources for growth. We isolated the mutant strain MEA3-1Mut, which converts MEA only to 2-methyl-6-ethyl-hydroquinone (MEHQ) and 2-methyl-6-ethyl-benzoquinone (MEBQ). MEA may be oxidized by the P450 monooxygenase system to 4-hydroxy-2-methyl-6-ethylaniline (4-OH-MEA), which can be hydrolytically spontaneously deaminated to MEBQ or MEHQ. The MEA microbial metabolic pathway was reconstituted based on the substrate spectra and identification of the intermediate metabolites in both the wild-type and mutant strains. Plasmidome sequencing indicated that both strains harbored 7 plasmids with sizes ranging from 6,108 bp to 287,745 bp. Among the 7 plasmids, 6 were identical, and pMEA02′ in strain MEA3-1Mut lost a 37,000-bp fragment compared to pMEA02 in strain MEA3-1. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and protein mass fingerprinting (PMF) showed that MEA3-1Mut lost the two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase (TC-FDM) MeaBA, which was encoded by a gene in the lost fragment of pMEA02. MeaA shared 22% to 25% amino acid sequence identity with oxygenase components of some TC-FDMs, whereas MeaB showed no sequence identity with the reductase components of those TC-FDMs. Complementation with meaBA in MEA3-1Mut and heterologous expression in Pseudomonas putida strain KT2440 resulted in the production of an active MEHQ monooxygenase. PMID:26386060

  8. Identifying sources of emerging organic contaminants in a mixed use watershed using principal components analysis.

    PubMed

    Karpuzcu, M Ekrem; Fairbairn, David; Arnold, William A; Barber, Brian L; Kaufenberg, Elizabeth; Koskinen, William C; Novak, Paige J; Rice, Pamela J; Swackhamer, Deborah L

    2014-01-01

    Principal components analysis (PCA) was used to identify sources of emerging organic contaminants in the Zumbro River watershed in Southeastern Minnesota. Two main principal components (PCs) were identified, which together explained more than 50% of the variance in the data. Principal Component 1 (PC1) was attributed to urban wastewater-derived sources, including municipal wastewater and residential septic tank effluents, while Principal Component 2 (PC2) was attributed to agricultural sources. The variances of the concentrations of cotinine, DEET and the prescription drugs carbamazepine, erythromycin and sulfamethoxazole were best explained by PC1, while the variances of the concentrations of the agricultural pesticides atrazine, metolachlor and acetochlor were best explained by PC2. Mixed use compounds carbaryl, iprodione and daidzein did not specifically group with either PC1 or PC2. Furthermore, despite the fact that caffeine and acetaminophen have been historically associated with human use, they could not be attributed to a single dominant land use category (e.g., urban/residential or agricultural). Contributions from septic systems did not clarify the source for these two compounds, suggesting that additional sources, such as runoff from biosolid-amended soils, may exist. Based on these results, PCA may be a useful way to broadly categorize the sources of new and previously uncharacterized emerging contaminants or may help to clarify transport pathways in a given area. Acetaminophen and caffeine were not ideal markers for urban/residential contamination sources in the study area and may need to be reconsidered as such in other areas as well. PMID:25135154

  9. Coupling passive sampling and time of flight mass spectrometry for a better estimation of polar pesticide freshwater contamination: Simultaneous target quantification and screening analysis.

    PubMed

    Guibal, Robin; Lissalde, Sophie; Charriau, Adeline; Poulier, Gaëlle; Mazzella, Nicolas; Guibaud, Gilles

    2015-03-27

    The aim of this study was first to develop and validate an analytical method for the quantification of 35 polar pesticides and 9 metabolites by ultra-high-performance-liquid chromatography combined with a high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer detector (UHPLC-(Q)-TOF). Various analytical conditions were investigated (eluent composition and mass parameters) to optimize analyte responses. Analytical performance (linearity, limit of quantification, and accuracy) was then evaluated and interference in the extract of a passive sampler exposed in freshwater (POCIS: Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler) was studied. The proposed quantification method was validated for 43 compounds with variation of calibration slopes below 10% in environmental matrix. For the unvalidated compound DIA (atrazine-desisopropyl: an atrazine metabolite), interference increased the error of concentration determination (50%). The limits of quantification obtained by combining POCIS and UHPLC-(Q)-TOF for 43 target compounds were between 0.1 (terbuthylazine) and 10.7 ng/L (acetochlor). Secondly, the method was successfully applied during a 14-day POCIS river exposure, and gave concentration values similar to a more commonly used triple quadrupole detector regarding concentration, but allowed for the detection of more compounds. Additionally with the targeted compound quantification, the (Q)-TOF mass spectrometer was also used for screening non-target compounds (other pesticides and pharmaceuticals) in POCIS extracts. Moreover, the acquisition of full scan MS data allowed the identification of the polyethylene glycol (PEG) compounds which gave unresolvable interference to DIA, and thus questions the ability of DIA to be used as performance reference compound (PRC) to determine sampling rates in situ. This study therefore illustrates the potential, and proposes a pathway, of UHPLC-(Q)-TOF combined with POCIS in situ pre-concentration for both quantitative and screening analyses of

  10. Herbicides and herbicide degradates in shallow groundwater and the Cedar River near a municipal well field, Cedar Rapids, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Water samples were collected near a Cedar Rapids, Iowa municipal well field from June 1998 to August 1998 and analyzed for selected triazine and acetanilide herbicides and degradates. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the occurrence of herbicides and herbicide degradates in the well field during a period following springtime application of herbicides to upstream cropland. The well field is in an alluvial aquifer adjacent to the Cedar River. Parent herbicide concentrations generally were greatest in June, and decreased in July and August. Atrazine was most frequently detected and occurred at the greatest concentrations; acetochlor, cyanazine and metolachlor also were detected, but at lesser concentrations than atrazine. Triazine degradate concentrations were relatively small (<0.50 ??g/l) and generally decreased from June to August. Although the rate of groundwater movement is relatively fast (approx. 1 m per day) in the alluvial aquifer near the Cedar River, deethylatrazine (DEA) to atrazine ratios in groundwater samples collected near the Cedar River indicate that atrazine and DEA probably are gradually transported into the alluvial aquifer from the Cedar River. Deisopropylatrazine (DIA) to DEA ratios in water samples indicate most DIA in the Cedar River and alluvial aquifer is produced by atrazine degradation, although some could be from cyanazine degradation. Acetanilide degradates were detected more frequently and at greater concentrations than their corresponding parent herbicides. Ethanesulfonic-acid (ESA) degradates comprised at least 80% of the total acetanilide-degradate concentrations in samples collected from the Cedar River and alluvial aquifer in June, July and August; oxanilic acid degradates comprised less than 20% of the total concentrations. ESA-degradate concentrations generally were smallest in June and greater in July and August. Acetanilide degradate concentrations in groundwater adjacent to the Cedar River indicate acetanilide

  11. Gene Expression and Microscopic Analysis of Arabidopsis Exposed to Chloroacetanilide Herbicides and Explosive Compounds. A Phytoremediation Approach1

    PubMed Central

    Mezzari, Melissa P.; Walters, Katherine; Jelínkova, Marcela; Shih, Ming-Che; Just, Craig L.; Schnoor, Jerald L.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the function of detoxifying enzymes in plants toward xenobiotics is of major importance for phytoremediation applications. In this work, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; ecotype Columbia) seedlings were exposed to 0.6 mm acetochlor (AOC), 2 mm metolachlor (MOC), 0.6 mm 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), and 0.3 mm hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). In vivo glutathione (GSH) conjugation reactions of AOC, MOC, RDX, and TNT were studied in root cells using a multiphoton microscope. In situ labeling with monochlorobimane, used as a competitive compound for conjugation reactions with GSH, confirmed that AOC and MOC are conjugated in Arabidopsis cells. Reverse transcription-PCR established the expression profile of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and nitroreductases enzymes. Genes selected for this study were AtGSTF2, AtGSTU1, AtGSTU24, and two isoforms of 12-oxophytodienoate reductase (OPR1 and OPR2). The five transcripts tested were induced by all treatments, but RDX resulted in low induction. The mRNA level of AtGSTU24 showed substantial increase for all chemicals (23-fold induction for AOC, 18-fold for MOC, 5-fold for RDX, and 40-fold for TNT). It appears that GSTs are also involved in the conjugation reactions with metabolites of TNT, and to a lesser extent with RDX. Results indicate that OPR2 is involved in plant metabolism of TNT (11-fold induction), and in oxidative stress when exposed to AOC (7-fold), MOC (9-fold), and RDX (2-fold). This study comprises gene expression analysis of Arabidopsis exposed to RDX and AOC, which are considered significant environmental contaminants, and demonstrates the importance of microscopy methods for phytoremediation investigations. PMID:15923336

  12. Multiple-herbicide resistance in Echinochloa crus-galli var. formosensis, an allohexaploid weed species, in dry-seeded rice.

    PubMed

    Iwakami, Satoshi; Hashimoto, Masato; Matsushima, Ken-ichi; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Hamamura, Kenshiro; Uchino, Akira

    2015-03-01

    Biotypes of Echinochloa crus-galli var. formosensis with resistance to cyhalofop-butyl, an acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitor, have been found in dry-seeded rice fields in Okayama, Japan. We collected two lines with suspected resistance (Ecf27 and Ecf108) from dry-seeded rice fields and investigated their sensitivity to cyhalofop-butyl and other herbicides. Both lines exhibited approximately 7-fold higher resistance to cyhalofop-butyl than a susceptible line. Ecf108 was susceptible to penoxsulam, an acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitor. On the other hand, Ecf27 showed resistance to penoxsulam and two other ALS inhibitors: propyrisulfuron and pyriminobac-methyl. The alternative herbicides butachlor, thiobencarb, and bispyribac-sodium effectively controlled both lines. To examine the molecular mechanisms of resistance, we amplified and sequenced the target-site encoding genes in Ecf27, Ecf108, and susceptible lines. Partial sequences of six ACCase genes and full-length sequences of three ALS genes were examined. One of the ACCase gene sequences encodes a truncated aberrant protein due to a frameshift mutation in both lines. Comparisons of the genes among Ecf27, Ecf108, and the susceptible lines revealed that none of the ACCases and ALSs in Ecf27 and Ecf108 have amino acid substitutions that are known to confer herbicide resistance, although a single amino acid substitution was found in each of three ACCases in Ecf108. Our study reveals the existence of a multiple-herbicide resistant biotype of E. crus-galli var. formosensis at Okayama, Japan that shows resistance to cyhalofop-butyl and several ALS inhibitors. We also found a biotype that is resistant only to cyhalofop-butyl among the tested herbicides. The resistance mechanisms are likely to be non-target-site based, at least in the multiple-herbicide resistant biotype.

  13. Pesticide management and their residues in sediments and surface and drinking water in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Toan, Pham Van; Sebesvari, Zita; Bläsing, Melanie; Rosendahl, Ingrid; Renaud, Fabrice G

    2013-05-01

    Public concern in Vietnam is increasing with respect to pesticide pollution of the environment and of drinking water resources. While established monitoring programs in the Mekong Delta (MD) focus on the analysis of organochlorines and some organophosphates, the environmental concentrations of more recently used pesticides such as carbamates, pyrethroides, and triazoles are not monitored. In the present study, household level pesticide use and management was therefore surveyed and combined with a one year environmental monitoring program of thirteen relevant pesticides (buprofezin, butachlor, cypermethrin, α-endosulfan, β-endosulfan, endosulfan-sulfate, fenobucarb, fipronil, isoprothiolane, pretilachlor, profenofos, propanil, and propiconazole) in surface water, soil, and sediment samples. The surveys showed that household level pesticide management remains suboptimal in the Mekong Delta. As a consequence, a wide range of pesticide residues were present in water, soil, and sediments throughout the monitoring period. Maximum concentrations recorded were up to 11.24 μg l(-1) in water for isoprothiolane and up to 521 μg kg(-1) dm in sediment for buprofezin. Annual average concentrations ranged up to 3.34 μg l(-1) in water and up to 135 μg kg(-1) dm in sediment, both for isoprothiolane. Occurrence of pesticides in the environment throughout the year and co-occurrence of several pesticides in the samples indicate a considerable chronic exposure of biota and humans to pesticides. This has a high relevance in the delta as water for drinking is often extracted from canals and rivers by rural households (GSO, 2005, and own surveys). The treatment used by the households for preparing surface water prior to consumption (flocculation followed by boiling) is insufficient for the removal of the studied pesticides and boiling can actually increase the concentration of non-volatile pollutants.

  14. Pesticide management and their residues in sediments and surface and drinking water in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Toan, Pham Van; Sebesvari, Zita; Bläsing, Melanie; Rosendahl, Ingrid; Renaud, Fabrice G

    2013-05-01

    Public concern in Vietnam is increasing with respect to pesticide pollution of the environment and of drinking water resources. While established monitoring programs in the Mekong Delta (MD) focus on the analysis of organochlorines and some organophosphates, the environmental concentrations of more recently used pesticides such as carbamates, pyrethroides, and triazoles are not monitored. In the present study, household level pesticide use and management was therefore surveyed and combined with a one year environmental monitoring program of thirteen relevant pesticides (buprofezin, butachlor, cypermethrin, α-endosulfan, β-endosulfan, endosulfan-sulfate, fenobucarb, fipronil, isoprothiolane, pretilachlor, profenofos, propanil, and propiconazole) in surface water, soil, and sediment samples. The surveys showed that household level pesticide management remains suboptimal in the Mekong Delta. As a consequence, a wide range of pesticide residues were present in water, soil, and sediments throughout the monitoring period. Maximum concentrations recorded were up to 11.24 μg l(-1) in water for isoprothiolane and up to 521 μg kg(-1) dm in sediment for buprofezin. Annual average concentrations ranged up to 3.34 μg l(-1) in water and up to 135 μg kg(-1) dm in sediment, both for isoprothiolane. Occurrence of pesticides in the environment throughout the year and co-occurrence of several pesticides in the samples indicate a considerable chronic exposure of biota and humans to pesticides. This has a high relevance in the delta as water for drinking is often extracted from canals and rivers by rural households (GSO, 2005, and own surveys). The treatment used by the households for preparing surface water prior to consumption (flocculation followed by boiling) is insufficient for the removal of the studied pesticides and boiling can actually increase the concentration of non-volatile pollutants. PMID:23500396

  15. Vertical gradients in water chemistry in the central High Plains aquifer, southwestern Kansas and Oklahoma panhandle, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, Peter B.

    2001-01-01

    in sediments of Permian age by ground water was the likely source of calcium, sulfate, sodium, and chloride in those waters. Calcium-sodium-sulfate waters dominated, and concentrations of dissolved solids were as large as 4,916 mg/L near the water table in the area of downward leakage. Dissolution of minerals in sedimentary deposits of marine origin in upstream areas of the Arkansas River drainage were the likely sources of calcium, sodium, and sulfate in those waters. Nitrate was detected throughout the aquifer and the background concentration was estimated to be 2.45 mg/L as N. The largest nitrate concentrations (8.28, 22, and 54.4 mg/L as N) occurred in recently recharged water collected adjacent to irrigated fields. Three pesticides (atrazine, metolachlor, simazine) and five pesticide degradation products (alachlor ethanesulfonic acid, alachlor oxanilic acid, deethylatrazine, metolachlor ethanesulfonic acid, metolachlor oxanilic acid) were detected in recently recharged water from six water-table wells. Five of the six wells were adjacent to irrigated fields. These data indicate that concentrations of nitrate and pesticides increased over time in some areas of the aquifer as a result of agricultural activities. Results from this study indicate that vertical gradients in water chemistry existed in the central High Plains aquifer. The chemical gradients resulted from chemical inputs to the aquifer from underlying sediments of Permian age, from the Arkansas River, and from agricultural activities. In areas where those chemical inputs occurred, water quality in the aquifer was impaired and may not have been suitable for some intended uses.

  16. Quality-assurance design applied to an assessment of agricultural pesticides in ground water from carbonate bedrock aquifers in the Great Valley of eastern Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breen, Kevin J.

    2000-01-01

    Assessments to determine whether agricultural pesticides are present in ground water are performed by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania under the aquifer monitoring provisions of the State Pesticides and Ground Water Strategy. Pennsylvania?s Department of Agriculture conducts the monitoring and collects samples; the Department of Environmental Protection (PaDEP) Laboratory analyzes the samples to measure pesticide concentration. To evaluate the quality of the measurements of pesticide concentration for a groundwater assessment, a quality-assurance design was developed and applied to a selected assessment area in Pennsylvania. This report describes the quality-assurance design, describes how and where the design was applied, describes procedures used to collect and analyze samples and to evaluate the results, and summarizes the quality assurance results along with the assessment results. The design was applied in an agricultural area of the Delaware River Basin in Berks, Lebanon, Lehigh, and Northampton Counties to evaluate the bias and variability in laboratory results for pesticides. The design?with random spatial and temporal components?included four data-quality objectives for bias and variability. The spatial design was primary and represented an area comprising 30 sampling cells. A quality-assurance sampling frequency of 20 percent of cells was selected to ensure a sample number of five or more for analysis. Quality-control samples included blanks, spikes, and replicates of laboratory water and spikes, replicates, and 2-lab splits of groundwater. Two analytical laboratories, the PaDEP Laboratory and a U.S. Geological Survey Laboratory, were part of the design. Bias and variability were evaluated by use of data collected from October 1997 through January 1998 for alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, metolachlor, simazine, pendimethalin, metribuzin, and chlorpyrifos. Results of analyses of field blanks indicate that collection, processing, transport, and laboratory

  17. Ground-water monitoring plan, water quality, and variability of agricultural chemicals in the Missouri River alluvial aquifer near the City of Independence, Missouri, well field, 1998-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, Brian P.

    2002-01-01

    wells. The highest total BTEX concentration was less than the MCL of toluene, ethyl benzene, or xylene but greater than the MCL for benzene. Total BTEX was not detected in samples from any well more than once. Atrazine was detected in samples from nine wells, and exceeded the MCL once in a sample from one well. Alachlor was detected in samples from 22 wells but the MCL was never exceeded in any sample. Samples from five wells analyzed for a large number of organic compounds indicate concentrations of volatile organic compounds did not exceed the MCL for drinking water. No semi-volatile organic compounds were detected; dieldrin was detected in one well sample, and no other pesticides, herbicides, polychlorinated biphenyls, or polychlorinated napthalenes were detected. Dissolved ammonia, dissolved nitrite plus nitrate, dissolved orthophosphorus, alachlor, and atrazine analyses were used to determine the spatial and temporal variability of agricultural chemicals in ground water. Detection frequencies for dissolved ammonia increased with well depth, decreased with depth for dissolved nitrite plus nitrate, and remained relatively constant with depth for dissolved orthophosphorus. Maximum concentrations of dissolved ammonia, dissolved nitrite plus nitrate, and dissolved orthophosphorus were largest in the shallowest wells and decreased with depth, which may indicate the land surface as the source. However, median concentrations increased with depth for dissolved ammonia, were less than the detection limit for dissolved nitrite plus nitrate, and decreased with depth for dissolved orthophosphorus. This pattern does not indicate a well-defined single source for these constituents. Dissolved orthophosphorus median concentrations were similar, but decreased slightly with depth, and may indicate the land surface as the source. Seasonal variability of dissolved ammonia, dissolved nitrite plus nitrate, a

  18. Contributing recharge areas, groundwater travel time, and groundwater water quality of the Missouri River alluvial aquifer near the City of Independence, Missouri, well field, 1997-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    recharge area (CRA) of the Independence well field. Statistical summaries and the spatial and temporal variability of water quality in the Missouri River alluvial aquifer near the Independence well field were characterized from analyses of 598 water samples. Water-quality constituent groups include dissolved oxygen and physical properties, nutrients, major ions and trace elements, wastewater indicator compounds, fuel compounds, and total benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX), alachlor, and atrazine. The Missouri Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level (SMCL) for iron was exceeded in almost all monitoring wells. The Missouri Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for arsenic was exceeded 32 times in samples from monitoring wells. The MCL for barium was exceeded five times in samples from one monitoring well. The SMCL for manganese was exceeded 160 times in samples from all monitoring wells and the combined well-field sample. The most frequently detected wastewater indicator compounds were N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET), phenol, caffeine, and metolachlor. The most frequently detected fuel compounds were toluene and benzene. Alachlor was detected in 22 samples and atrazine was detected in 37 samples and the combined well-field sample. The MCL for atrazine was exceeded in one sample from one monitoring well. Samples from monitoring wells with median concentrations of total inorganic nitrogen larger than 1 milligram per liter (mg/L) are located near agricultural land and may indicate that agricultural land practices are the source of nitrogen to groundwater. Largest median values of specific conductance; total inorganic nitrogen; dissolved calcium, magnesium, sodium, iron, arsenic, manganese, bicarbonate, and sulfate and detections of wastewater indicator compounds generally were in water samples from monitoring wells with CRAs that intersect the south bank of the Missouri River. Zones of higher specific conductance were located just upstream from the Independen

  19. Relation of pesticide concentrations to season, streamflow, and land use in seven New Jersey streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reiser, Robert G.

    1999-01-01

    The presence and variability of pesticides in seven New Jersey streams was documented by analyzing 146 samples collected from the streams from April 1996 through June 1998. The samples were analyzed for 85 pesticides, including 50 herbicides, 28 insecticides, and 7 degradation products, at method detection limits that ranged from 0.001 to 0.018 μg/L (micrograms per liter). Pesticides were frequently detected; however, concentrations were generally low. The pesticides most frequently detected were atrazine, in 97 percent of the samples; prometon, 96 percent; metolachlor, 95 percent; desethyl-atrazine, 91 percent; simazine, 88 percent; diazinon, 58 percent; alachlor, 56 percent; and carbaryl, 54 percent. Detection frequencies were highest during the growing season (April-September). At least one pesticide was detected in all but one of these samples, and 49 percent of the samples contained 9 or more pesticides. The numbers of pesticides detected at a given site ranged from 13 to 29. Ten pesticides were detected at concentrations that exceeded established water-quality criteria. Thirty-one of these detections were in samples collected during the growing season and one during the nongrowing season. The pesticides that exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) maximum contaminant level for drinking water were atrazine, which exceeded 3 μg/L in four samples, and alachlor, 2 μg/L in two samples. Cyanazine exceeded the USEPA liftime health advisory level (HAL) of 1 μg/L in two samples. These eight detections occurred during runoff shortly after spring pesticide applications and represent a potential threat to municipal water supplies in the Raritan River basin. Concentrations of chlorpyrifos, chlorthalonil, diazinon, ethyl-parathion, and methyl-azinphos exceeded the chronic life criteria for the protection of aquatic life (ACQR) in 20 samples at four sites during the growing season. Dieldrin was detected in four samples and DDE in two samples at

  20. Water-Quality Trends in the Neuse River Basin, North Carolina, 1974-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harned, D. A.

    2003-12-01

    detected for pH, hardness, and alkalinity. A pattern of increase until 1990 followed by little change or decline was observed for specific conductance, dissolved solids, hardness, and sulfate in the Neuse River and for potassium in Contentnea Creek. No significant recent (1997-2003) trends were detected for dissolved oxygen, pH, specific conductance, hardness, dissolved solids, or major ions. The Neuse River data indicated a recent declining trend in sediment concentration. Nitrogen concentrations in the form of ammonia, total ammonia and organic nitrogen, and nitrite plus nitrate have declined in both the Neuse River and Contentnea Creek. Total nitrogen concentrations increased in the Neuse River until about 1990 and then declined, primarily because of declines in nitrate. Recent declines are evident in nitrite plus nitrate in the Neuse River and in ammonia concentrations in Contentnea Creek. The data also show a reduction in variation of extreme values after 1990 in Contentnea Creek. Both observations suggest that the 1997 Neuse River management rules have had a detectable effect on nitrogen concentrations. Concentrations of dissolved and total phosphorus and orthophosphate reduced in a step trend in 1988 at both locations. This reflects the 1988 phosphate detergent ban in North Carolina. Orthophosphate concentrations have continued a recent decline in Contentnea Creek. Contentnea Creek has sufficient period of record (1994-2003) of concentrations of atrazine, deethyl atrazine, alachlor, carbaryl, diazinon, and prometon to test for trends. Both alachlor and prometon concentrations showed significant declines. Recent changes in agricultural practices coupled with a 5-year drought probably have affected pesticide use and transport to surface waters.

  1. Occurrence of pesticides in transboundary aquifers of North-eastern Greece.

    PubMed

    Vryzas, Zisis; Papadakis, Emmanuel N; Vassiliou, George; Papadopoulou-Mourkidou, Euphemia

    2012-12-15

    A five-year groundwater monitoring program undertaken in Evros (north-east Greece), showed a diversification in the levels of pesticide residues detected in adjacent transboundary aquifers. During the first two years 37 wells, including irrigation, drinking water and artesian wells were monitored while the next three years the survey was focused on the 11 most contaminated wells. The presence of pesticide residues was also monitored in the phreatic horizon (shallow groundwater) of four experimental boreholes drilled in the respective margins of four fields. Among the compounds found alachlor, metolachlor, atrazine, desethylatrazine (DEA), desisopropylatrazine (DIA) and caffeine were constantly detected. Pesticide concentrations were much lower (up to 1.54 μg/L) in the water of the monitored drinking water wells (deep groundwater aquifers) compared to those found in the phreatic horizon (experimental boreholes) of the respective areas (up to 5.20 μg/L). DEA to atrazine concentration ratios (DAR) determined for the phreatic horizon of the three boreholes and respective wells were lower than 1, indicating that preferential flow was the cause of the fast downward movement of atrazine to the phreatic horizon. In contrast the DAR for the fourth borehole and the adjacent well were greater than 1 indicating the absence of preferential flow of atrazine. Catabolic processes of the soil converted atrazine to DEA which is more mobile than atrazine itself through chromatographic (darcian) flow. This differential behavior of pesticides in adjacent aquifers (3 km) was further investigated by determining the apparent age of water in the two wells. The apparent age of the water present in the first aquifer was 21.7 years whereas the apparent age of that in the second aquifer was approximately 1.2 years. The faster replenishing rate of the latter is an indication that this aquifer is very vulnerable to contamination with pollutants present in the infiltrated soil water. PMID

  2. Pesticides in Streams in Central Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamer, J.K.; Wieczorek, Michael E.

    1995-01-01

    Contamination of surface and ground water from non-point sources is a national issue. Examples of nonpoint-source contaminants from agricultural activities are pesticides, which include fungicides, herbicides, and insecticides; sediment; nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus); and fecal bacteria. Of these contaminants, pesticides receive the most attention because of the potential toxicity to aquatic life and to humans. Most farmers use pesticides to increase crop yields and values. Herbicides prevent or inhibit the growth of weeds that compete for nutrients and moisture needed by the crops. Herbicides are applied before, during, or following planting. In addition to agricultural use, herbicides are used in urban areas, often in larger rates of application, for weed control such as among rights-of-way. Alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and metolachlor, which are referred to as organonitrogen herbicides, were the four most commonly applied herbicides (1991) in the Central Nebraska Basins (CNB). These herbicides are used for corn, sorghum, and soybean production. Atrazine was the most extensively applied pesticide (1991) in central Nebraska. Insecticides are used to protect the crop seeds in storage prior to planting and also to protect the plants from destruction once the seeds have germinated. Like herbicides, insecticides are also used in urban areas to protect lawns, trees, and ornamentals. Many of the 46 pesticides shown in the table have either a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of Health Advisory Level (HAL) established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) for public water supplies. The purposes of this Fact Sheet are to (1) to provide water-utility managers, water-resources planners and managers, and State regulators an improved understanding of the distributions of concentrations of pesticides in streams and their relation to respective drinking-water regulations or criteria, and (2) to describe concentrations of pesticides in streams draining a

  3. Estrogenic endocrine-disrupting chemicals modulate the production of inflammatory mediators and cell viability of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Gyung; Yeon, Seung-min; Kim, Kyong Hoon; Kim, Heejoong; Park, Jong-Il; Kang, Hyun-Jin; Cha, Eun Ji; Park, Hee-Deung; Kang, Hyo Jung; Park, Tae Won; Jeon, Young-Ho; Park, Young In; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Jung, Yong Woo

    2015-04-01

    Estrogenic endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are exogenous substances that act as competitive inhibitors of estrogen in the endocrine system. By disrupting the endocrine system, EDCs can cause severe disabilities and diseases, including cancers and altered sexual development. Although the influence of these molecules in the endocrine system is evident, the effects of EDCs on the immune system as well as their cytotoxicity have been poorly examined. Therefore, we selected 21 EDCs that are commonly found in Korean ecosystems, such as surface waters and effluents, and studied their immunologic effects by comparing nitric oxide (NO) production and cytotoxicity in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells (RAW cells), a macrophage cell line. Among the EDCs tested, fenitrothion (FTH) inhibited the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), resulting in reduced NO production, while treatment with andostenedione (AD), diethyl phthalate, di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), estriol, or molinate decreased production of NO in an iNOS-independent fashion. In contrast, benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) increased the production of NO in RAW cells. In addition, AD, DBP, or FTH inhibited the mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha or interleukin-1 beta. Treatment with 17-α-ethynylestradiol, 17-β-estradiol, 4-n-butyl phenol, or alachlor induced apoptosis of RAW cells, while dicyclohexyl phthalate and B(a)P caused cell death in an apoptosis-independent manner. These data suggest that EDCs can influence the immune response to pathogens by modulating the functions of macrophages.

  4. Relationships between land uses and rainwater quality in a southcentral Pennsylvania watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shertzer, R.H.; Hall, D.W.; Steffy, S.A.; Kime, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variability in rainfall concentrations of nutrients, major ions, and herbicides was monitored at 7 locations in or near the Conodoguinet Creek watershed in southcentral Pennsylvania from 1991-1993. Results were used to (1) compare precipitation quality in forested, agricultural and urban areas, and (2) assess the practicality of using volunteer citizen monitoring in such a study. As indicated in previous studies, sulfate and nitrogen concentrations in precipitation were linked to sample pH. Concentrations of major ions in precipitation appeared to relate more to regional influences rather than local influences. However, concentrations of herbicides in precipitation may have been influenced by both regional and local use which caused compounds like atrazine, deethylatrazine, propazine, simazine, metolachlor, alachlor, ametryn, and prometon to be present in detectable concentrations in rainfall. Seasonality was evident in nitrogen, sulfate, pH, and herbicide data and was suggested in calcium, iron, manganese, magnesium, orthophosphate, and chloride data. Agricultural weed control activities were probably responsible for the seasonal pattern in pesticide data which peaked in May and June. Tropical storm Danielle may have caused the apparent seasonal patterns for the other nine parameters. This storm did not follow the typical west to east movement pattern and consequently produced rainfall of relative high quality. A variety of quality assurance checks indicated that trained volunteer citizen monitors were successful participants in this intensive and extensive scientific study, collecting good quality samples in a timely manner. Without this kind of volunteer help, it is extremely difficult to complete studies that require sampling in response to natural events such as rainfall.

  5. Pesticides in shallow groundwater in the Delmarva Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koterba, M.T.; Banks, W.S.L.; Shedlock, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    A regional study of the areal and depth distribution of pesticides in shallow groundwater in the Delmarva Peninsula of Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia was done to (i) relate the pesticides detected to landscape and shallow subsurface features, and (ii) evaluate aquifer vulnerability and the potential contamination of drinking-water supplies. Water samples collected at 100 wells from 1988 to 1990 were analyzed for concentrations of 36 pesticides, four metabolites, and other constituents. The most commonly detected residues were atrazine, cyanazine, simazine, alachlor, metolachlor, and dicamba. Concentrations were low; few exceeded 3 ??g L-1. Most detections correlate with the intensive use of these herbicides in three widely distributed and commonly rotated crops-corn (Zea mays L.), soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], and small grain-particularly if grown in well- drained soils. Most detections occurred in samples collected from shallow wells screened within 10 m of the overlying water table. The shallow depth distribution of most residues is consistent with their suspected history of use (ca. 20 yr), and patterns in shallow groundwater flow in the surficial aquifer in the study area. The areal and depth distributions of detectable residues in groundwater did not correlate with a vulnerability index, nor any of the component scores developed to estimate that index using the DRASTIC method. The shallow depth of most detections also indicates why few samples from water-supply wells in this study had measurable concentrations of pesticides; most supply wells are deeper than 10 m below the water table. The low number of contaminated samples from supply wells implies that deep groundwater currently (1992) used for drinking generally does not contain detectable pesticide residues.

  6. Water-quality assessment of the Kentucky River basin, Kentucky; nutrients, sediments, and pesticides in streams, 1987-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haag, K.H.; Porter, S.D.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey investigated the water quality of the Kentucky River Basin in Kentucky as part of the National Water Quality Assessment program. Data collected during 1987-90 were used to describe the spatial and temporal variability of nutrients, suspended sediment, and pesticides in streams. Concentrations of phosphorus were signifi- cantly correlated with urban and agricultural land use. The high phosphorus content of Bluegrass Region soils was an important source of phosphorus in streams. At many sites in urban areas, all of the stream nitrogen load was attributable to wastewater- treatment-plant effluent. Tributary streams affected by agricultural sources of nutrients contained higher densities of phytoplankton than streams that drained forested areas. Data indicate that a consid- erable percentage of total nitrogen was transported as algal biomass during periods of low discharge. Average suspended-sediment concentrations for the study period were positively correlated with dis- charge. There was a downward trend in suspended- sediment concentrations downstream in the Kentucky River main stem during the study. Although a large amount of suspended sediment originates in the Eastern Coal Field Region, contributions of suspended sediment from the Red River and other tributary streams of the Knobs Region also are important. The most frequently detected herbicides in water samples were atrazine, 2,4-D, alachlor, metolachlor, and dicamba. Diazinon, malathion, and parathion were the most frequently detected organo- phosphate insecticides in water samples. Detectable concentrations of aldrin, chlordane, DDT, DDE, dieldrin, endrin, endosulfan, heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, and lindane were found in streambed- sediment samples.

  7. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of pesticides in water by C-18 solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Smith, Steven G.; Fehlberg, Kevin M.

    1995-01-01

    A method for the isolation of 41 pesticides and pesticide metabolites in natural-water samples using C-18 solid-phase extraction and determination by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring is described. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then are pumped through disposable solid-phase extraction columns containing octadecyl-bonded porous silica to extract the pesticides. The columns are dried using carbon dioxide or nitrogen gas, and adsorbed pesticides are removed from the columns by elution with 3.0 milliliters of hexane-isopropanol (3:1). Extracted pesticides are determined by capillary- column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring of three characteristic ions. The upper concentration limit is 4 micrograms per liter (g/L) for most pesticides, with the exception of widely used corn herbicides--atrazine, alachlor, cyanazine, and metolachlor--which have upper concentration limits of 20 g/L. Single- operator method detection limits in reagent-water samples range from 0.001 to 0.018 g/L. Average short-term single-operator precision in reagent- water samples is 7 percent at the 0.1- and 1.0-g/L levels and 8 percent at the 0.01-g/L level. Mean recoveries in reagent-water samples are 73 percent at the 0.1- and 1.0-g/L levels and 83 percent at the 0.01-g/L level. The estimated holding time for pesticides after extraction on the solid-phase extraction columns was 7 days. An optional on-site extraction procedure allows for samples to be collected and processed at remote sites where it is difficult to ship samples to the laboratory within the recommended pre-extraction holding time.

  8. Data on selected herbicides and two triazine metabolites in precipitation of the Midwestern and Northeastern United States, 1990-91

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goolsby, D.A.; Scribner, E.A.; Thurman, E.M.; Pomes, M.L.; Meyer, M.T.

    1995-01-01

    Weekly precipitation (rain and snow) samples were collected from 81 National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network sites in the Midwestern and Northeastern United States for the analysis of herbicides. In addition, five high- elevation background sites along the Rocky Mountains and in Alaska were sampled to provide data on herbicides in precipitation at sites far from the study area. The study began in March 1990 and continued through September 1991. The precipitation samples were shipped to the Central Analytical Laboratory operated by the Illinois State Water Survey for analyses of inorganic compounds. Subsamples of the precipitation were shipped to the U.S. Geological Survey laboratory in Lawrence, Kansas, for the analysis of 11 herbicides and 2 triazines metabolites. This report provides descriptions of the study area, sample-collection methods, laboratory methods, and quality assurance. The report also includes a compilation of herbicide concentration data from both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry methods. Laboratory analyses consisted of 6,230 samples that were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using alachlor and atrazine microtiter plates and 2,341 samples that were confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. Graphical and statistical comparisons of the two analytical methods are given in this report. Data from this study have been useful in determining the spatial and temporal distribution of herbicide concentrations and deposition in precipitation of over a 26-State area of the Midwestern and Northeastern United States. The data also provide evidence of long-range atmospheric transport of herbicides and triazine metabolites.

  9. Ground-water quality in the Lake Champlain basin, New York, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nystrom, Elizabeth A.

    2006-01-01

    Water samples were collected from 11 public-supply wells and 11 private domestic wells in the Lake Champlain basin in New York during the fall of 2004 to characterize the chemical quality of ground water. Wells were selected for sampling based on location and focused on areas of greatest ground-water use. Samples were analyzed for 219 physical properties and constituents, including inorganic compounds, nutrients, metals, radionuclides, pesticides and pesticide degradates, volatile organic compounds, and bacteria. Sixty-eight constituents were detected at concentrations above laboratory reporting levels. The cation and anion with the highest median concentration were calcium (34.8 mg/L) bicarbonate (134 mg/L), respectively. The predominant nutrient was nitrate, which was detected in 14 (64 percent) of the 22 samples. The two metals with the highest median concentrations were iron (175 ?g/L) and strontium (124 ?g/L); concentrations of iron, manganese, aluminum, and zinc exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency secondary drinking-water standards in one or more samples. Radon concentrations were less than 1,000 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) in most samples, but concentrations as high as 6,900 pCi/L were detected and, in eight samples, exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed maximum contaminant level (300 pCi/L) for radon. The most frequently detected pesticides were degradates of the broadleaf herbicides metolachlor, alachlor, and atrazine. Volatile organic compounds were detected in only three samples; those that were detected typically were fuel oxygenates, such as methyl tert-butyl ether. Coliform bacteria were detected in four samples, two of which also tested positive for E. coli.

  10. Atmospheric pressure glow discharge desorption mass spectrometry for rapid screening of pesticides in food.

    PubMed

    Jecklin, Matthias Conradin; Gamez, Gerardo; Touboul, David; Zenobi, Renato

    2008-09-01

    Flowing afterglow atmospheric pressure glow discharge tandem mass spectrometry (APGD-MS/MS) is used for the analysis of trace amounts of pesticides in fruit juices and on fruit peel. The APGD source was rebuilt after Andrade et al. (Andrade et al., Anal. Chem. 2008; 80: 2646-2653; 2654-2663) and mounted onto a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Apple, cranberry, grape and orange juices as well as fruit peel and salad leaves were spiked with aqueous solutions containing trace amounts of the pesticides alac