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Sample records for acetogenic bacterium acetobacterium

  1. CO Metabolism in the Acetogen Acetobacterium woodii

    PubMed Central

    Bertsch, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The Wood-Ljungdahl pathway allows acetogenic bacteria to grow on a number of one-carbon substrates, such as carbon dioxide, formate, methyl groups, or even carbon monoxide. Since carbon monoxide alone or in combination with hydrogen and carbon dioxide (synthesis gas) is an increasingly important feedstock for third-generation biotechnology, we studied CO metabolism in the model acetogen Acetobacterium woodii. When cells grew on H2-CO2, addition of 5 to 15% CO led to higher final optical densities, indicating the utilization of CO as a cosubstrate. However, the growth rate was decreased by the presence of small amounts of CO, which correlated with an inhibition of H2 consumption. Experiments with resting cells revealed that the degree of inhibition of H2 consumption was a function of the CO concentration. Since the hydrogen-dependent CO2 reductase (HDCR) of A. woodii is known to be very sensitive to CO, we speculated that cells may be more tolerant toward CO when growing on formate, the product of the HDCR reaction. Indeed, addition of up to 25% CO did not influence growth rates on formate, while the final optical densities and the production of acetate increased. Higher concentrations (75 and 100%) led to a slight inhibition of growth and to decreasing rates of formate and CO consumption. Experiments with resting cells revealed that the HDCR is a site of CO inhibition. In contrast, A. woodii was not able to grow on CO as a sole carbon and energy source, and growth on fructose-CO or methanol-CO was not observed. PMID:26092462

  2. Stoichiometry and deletion analyses of subunits in the heterotrimeric F-ATP synthase c ring from the acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Karsten; Müller, Daniel B; Hoffmann, Jan; Langer, Julian D; Brutschy, Bernd; Morgner, Nina; Müller, Volker

    2016-02-01

    The ion-translocating c ring of the Na(+) F1 Fo ATP synthase of the anaerobic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii is the first heteromeric c ring found in nature that contains one V- (c1 ) and two F-type-like c subunits (c2 /c3 ), the latter of identical amino acid sequence. To address whether they are of equal or different importance for function, they were deleted in combination or individually. Deletion of c1 was compensated by incorporation of two c2 /c3 subunits but the enzyme was unstable and largely impaired in Na(+) transport. Deletion of c2 was compensated by incorporation of c3 but also led to a reduction of Na(+) transport. Deletion of c3 had no effect. In contrast, deletion of both c2 and c3 led to a complete loss of ATPase activity at the cytoplasmic membrane. Mass spectrometric analysis of c2 +1 Ala and c2 +2 Ala variants revealed a copy number of 8 : 1 for c2 /c3 which is consistent with the biochemical characteristics of the variants. These data indicate a role of c1 in assembly and a function of c2 as the predominant c ring constituent.

  3. Characterization of the psychrotolerant acetogen strain SyrA5 and the emended description of the species Acetobacterium carbinolicum.

    PubMed

    Paarup, Maiken; Friedrich, Michael W; Tindall, Brian J; Finster, Kai

    2006-01-01

    A psychrotolerant, obligate anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium designated strain SyrA5 was isolated from black anoxic sediment of a brackish fjord. Cells were Gram-positive, non-sporeforming rods. The isolate utilized H(2)/CO(2), CO, fructose, glucose, ethanol, ethylene glycol, glycerol, pyruvate, lactate, betaine and the methyl-groups of several methoxylated benzoic derivatives such as syringate, trimethoxybenzoate and vallinate. The optimum temperature for growth was 29 degrees C, whilst slow growth occurred at 2 degrees C. The strain grew optimally with NaCl concentrations below 2.7% (w/v), but growth occurred up to 4.3% (w/v) NaCl. Growth was observed in the range from pH 5.9 to 8.5, optimum at pH 8. The G+C content was 44.1 mol%. Based upon 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and DNA-DNA reassociation studies, the organism was classified in the genus Acetobacterium. Strain SyrA5 shared a 16S rRNA sequence similarity with A. carbinolicum of 100%, a fthfs gene (which codes for the N5,N10 tetrahydrofolate synthetase) sequence identity of 98.5-98.7% (amino acid sequence similarities were 99.4-100%) and a RNA-DNA hybridization homology of 64-68%. Despite a number of phenotypic differences between strain SyrA5 and A. carbinolicum we propose including strain SyrA5 as a subspecies of A. carbinolicum for which we propose the name Acetobacterium carbinolicum subspecies kysingense. The type strain is SyrA5 (=DSM 16427(T), ATCC BAA-990).

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of the Type Strain of the Acetogenic Bacterium Moorella thermoacetica DSM 521T

    PubMed Central

    Poehlein, Anja; Bengelsdorf, Frank R.; Esser, Carola; Schiel-Bengelsdorf, Bettina; Daniel, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the closed genome sequence of the type strain Moorella thermoacetica DSM 521T, an acetogenic bacterium, which is able to grow autotrophically on H2 + CO2 and/or CO, using the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. The genome consists of a circular chromosome (2.53 Mb). PMID:26450731

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of the Acetogenic Bacterium Moorella thermoacetica DSM 2955T

    PubMed Central

    Bengelsdorf, Frank R.; Poehlein, Anja; Esser, Carola; Schiel-Bengelsdorf, Bettina; Daniel, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Moorella thermoacetica DSM 2955T, an acetogenic bacterium, which uses the Wood–Ljungdahl pathway for reduction of H2 + CO2 or CO. The genome consists of a single circular chromosome (2.62 Mb). PMID:26450730

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium scatologenes ATCC 25775, a Chemolithoautotrophic Acetogenic Bacterium Producing 3-Methylindole and 4-Methylphenol

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yoseb; Jeong, Yujin; Shin, Hyeon Seok

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium scatologenes ATCC 25775 is a strictly anaerobic and chemolithoautotrophic acetogenic bacterium that converts syngas into multi-carbon compounds such as acetate, indole, 3-methylindole, and 4-methylphenol. Here we report the draft genome sequence of C. scatologenes ATCC 25775 (7.3 Mbp) to elucidate its metabolic pathway for syngas fermentation. PMID:24831152

  7. Transformation of tetrachloromethane to dichloromethane and carbon dioxide by Acetobacterium woodii

    SciTech Connect

    Egli, C.; Tschan, T.; Scholtz, R.; Cook, A.M.; Leisinger, T. )

    1988-11-01

    Five anaerobic bacteria were tested for their abilities to transform tetrachloromethane so that information about enzymes involved in reductive dehalogenations of polychloromethanes could be obtained. Cultures of the sulfate reducer Desulfobacterium autotrophicum transformed some 80 {mu}M tetrachloromethane to trichloromethane and a small amount of dichloromethane in 18 days under conditions of heterotrophic growth. The acetogens Acetobacterium woodii and Clostridium thermoaceticum in fructose-salts and glucose-salts media, respectively, degraded some 80 {mu}M tetrachloromethane completely within 3 days. Trichloromethane accumulated as a transient intermediate, but the only chlorinated methanes recovered at the end of the incubation were 8 {mu}M dichloromethane and traces of chloromethane. Desulfobacter hydrogenophilus and an autotrophic, nitrate-reducing bacterium were unable to transform tetrachloromethane. Reduction of chlorinated methanes was thus observed only in the organisms with the acetyl-coenzyme A pathway. Experiments with ({sup 14}C)tetrachloromethane were done to determine the fate of this compound in the acetogen A. woodii. Radioactivity in an 11-day heterotrophic culture was largely (67%) recovered in CO{sub 2}, acetate, pyruvate, and cell material. In experiments with cell suspensions to which ({sup 14}C)tetrachloromethane was added, {sup 14}CO{sub 2} appeared within 20 s as the major transformation product. A. woodii thus catalyzes reductive dechlorinations and transforms tetrachloromethane to CO{sub 2} by a series of unknown reactions.

  8. (Per)chlorate reduction by an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa sp., isolated from an underground gas storage

    PubMed Central

    Mehboob, Farrakh; van Gelder, Antonie H.; Rijpstra, W. Irene C.; Damsté, Jaap S. Sinninghe; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2010-01-01

    A mesophilic bacterium, strain An4, was isolated from an underground gas storage reservoir with methanol as substrate and perchlorate as electron acceptor. Cells were Gram-negative, spore-forming, straight to curved rods, 0.5–0.8 μm in diameter, and 2–8 μm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. The cells grew optimally at 37°C, and the pH optimum was around 7. Strain An4 converted various alcohols, organic acids, fructose, acetoin, and H2/CO2 to acetate, usually as the only product. Succinate was decarboxylated to propionate. The isolate was able to respire with (per)chlorate, nitrate, and CO2. The G+C content of the DNA was 42.6 mol%. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain An4 was most closely related to Sporomusa ovata (98% similarity). The bacterium reduced perchlorate and chlorate completely to chloride. Key enzymes, perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase, were detected in cell-free extracts. PMID:20680263

  9. Acetone production with metabolically engineered strains of Acetobacterium woodii.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeister, Sabrina; Gerdom, Marzena; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Linder, Sonja; Flüchter, Sebastian; Öztürk, Hatice; Blümke, Wilfried; May, Antje; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg; Bahl, Hubert; Dürre, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Expected depletion of oil and fossil resources urges the development of new alternative routes for the production of bulk chemicals and fuels beyond petroleum resources. In this study, the clostridial acetone pathway was used for the formation of acetone in the acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The acetone production operon (APO) containing the genes thlA (encoding thiolase A), ctfA/ctfB (encoding CoA transferase), and adc (encoding acetoacetate decarboxylase) from Clostridium acetobutylicum were cloned under the control of the thlA promoter into four vectors having different replicons for Gram-positives (pIP404, pBP1, pCB102, and pCD6). Stable replication was observed for all constructs. A. woodii [pJIR_actthlA] achieved the maximal acetone concentration under autotrophic conditions (15.2±3.4mM). Promoter sequences of the genes ackA from A. woodii and pta-ack from C. ljungdahlii were determined by primer extension (PEX) and cloned upstream of the APO. The highest acetone production in recombinant A. woodii cells was achieved using the promoters PthlA and Ppta-ack. Batch fermentations using A. woodii [pMTL84151_actthlA] in a bioreactor revealed that acetate concentration had an effect on the acetone production, due to the high Km value of the CoA transferase. In order to establish consistent acetate concentration within the bioreactor and to increase biomass, a continuous fermentation process for A. woodii was developed. Thus, acetone productivity of the strain A. woodii [pMTL84151_actthlA] was increased from 1.2mgL(-1)h(-1) in bottle fermentation to 26.4mgL(-1)h(-1) in continuous gas fermentation. PMID:26971669

  10. Acetone production with metabolically engineered strains of Acetobacterium woodii.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeister, Sabrina; Gerdom, Marzena; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Linder, Sonja; Flüchter, Sebastian; Öztürk, Hatice; Blümke, Wilfried; May, Antje; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg; Bahl, Hubert; Dürre, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Expected depletion of oil and fossil resources urges the development of new alternative routes for the production of bulk chemicals and fuels beyond petroleum resources. In this study, the clostridial acetone pathway was used for the formation of acetone in the acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The acetone production operon (APO) containing the genes thlA (encoding thiolase A), ctfA/ctfB (encoding CoA transferase), and adc (encoding acetoacetate decarboxylase) from Clostridium acetobutylicum were cloned under the control of the thlA promoter into four vectors having different replicons for Gram-positives (pIP404, pBP1, pCB102, and pCD6). Stable replication was observed for all constructs. A. woodii [pJIR_actthlA] achieved the maximal acetone concentration under autotrophic conditions (15.2±3.4mM). Promoter sequences of the genes ackA from A. woodii and pta-ack from C. ljungdahlii were determined by primer extension (PEX) and cloned upstream of the APO. The highest acetone production in recombinant A. woodii cells was achieved using the promoters PthlA and Ppta-ack. Batch fermentations using A. woodii [pMTL84151_actthlA] in a bioreactor revealed that acetate concentration had an effect on the acetone production, due to the high Km value of the CoA transferase. In order to establish consistent acetate concentration within the bioreactor and to increase biomass, a continuous fermentation process for A. woodii was developed. Thus, acetone productivity of the strain A. woodii [pMTL84151_actthlA] was increased from 1.2mgL(-1)h(-1) in bottle fermentation to 26.4mgL(-1)h(-1) in continuous gas fermentation.

  11. Energetics and Application of Heterotrophy in Acetogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Schuchmann, Kai; Müller, Volker

    2016-07-15

    Acetogenic bacteria are a diverse group of strictly anaerobic bacteria that utilize the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for CO2 fixation and energy conservation. These microorganisms play an important part in the global carbon cycle and are a key component of the anaerobic food web. Their most prominent metabolic feature is autotrophic growth with molecular hydrogen and carbon dioxide as the substrates. However, most members also show an outstanding metabolic flexibility for utilizing a vast variety of different substrates. In contrast to autotrophic growth, which is hardly competitive, metabolic flexibility is seen as a key ability of acetogens to compete in ecosystems and might explain the almost-ubiquitous distribution of acetogenic bacteria in anoxic environments. This review covers the latest findings with respect to the heterotrophic metabolism of acetogenic bacteria, including utilization of carbohydrates, lactate, and different alcohols, especially in the model acetogen Acetobacterium woodii Modularity of metabolism, a key concept of pathway design in synthetic biology, together with electron bifurcation, to overcome energetic barriers, appears to be the basis for the amazing substrate spectrum. At the same time, acetogens depend on only a relatively small number of enzymes to expand the substrate spectrum. We will discuss the energetic advantages of coupling CO2 reduction to fermentations that exploit otherwise-inaccessible substrates and the ecological advantages, as well as the biotechnological applications of the heterotrophic metabolism of acetogens.

  12. Energetics and Application of Heterotrophy in Acetogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Schuchmann, Kai; Müller, Volker

    2016-07-15

    Acetogenic bacteria are a diverse group of strictly anaerobic bacteria that utilize the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for CO2 fixation and energy conservation. These microorganisms play an important part in the global carbon cycle and are a key component of the anaerobic food web. Their most prominent metabolic feature is autotrophic growth with molecular hydrogen and carbon dioxide as the substrates. However, most members also show an outstanding metabolic flexibility for utilizing a vast variety of different substrates. In contrast to autotrophic growth, which is hardly competitive, metabolic flexibility is seen as a key ability of acetogens to compete in ecosystems and might explain the almost-ubiquitous distribution of acetogenic bacteria in anoxic environments. This review covers the latest findings with respect to the heterotrophic metabolism of acetogenic bacteria, including utilization of carbohydrates, lactate, and different alcohols, especially in the model acetogen Acetobacterium woodii Modularity of metabolism, a key concept of pathway design in synthetic biology, together with electron bifurcation, to overcome energetic barriers, appears to be the basis for the amazing substrate spectrum. At the same time, acetogens depend on only a relatively small number of enzymes to expand the substrate spectrum. We will discuss the energetic advantages of coupling CO2 reduction to fermentations that exploit otherwise-inaccessible substrates and the ecological advantages, as well as the biotechnological applications of the heterotrophic metabolism of acetogens. PMID:27208103

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Acetobacterium bakii DSM 8239, a Potential Psychrophilic Chemical Producer through Syngas Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Soonkyu; Song, Yoseb

    2015-01-01

    Acetobacterium bakii DSM 8239 is an anaerobic, psychrophilic, and chemolithoautotrophic bacterium that is a potential platform for producing commodity chemicals from syngas fermentation. We report here the draft genome sequence of A. bakii DSM 8239 (4.14 Mb) to elucidate its physiological and metabolic properties related to syngas fermentation. PMID:26404601

  14. Carbon Isotope Fractionation of 11 Acetogenic Strains Grown on H2 and CO2

    PubMed Central

    Dreisbach, Lisa K.; Conrad, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Acetogenic bacteria are able to grow autotrophically on hydrogen and carbon dioxide by using the acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) pathway. Acetate is the end product of this reaction. In contrast to the fermentative route of acetate production, which shows almost no fractionation of carbon isotopes, the acetyl-CoA pathway has been reported to exhibit a preference for light carbon. In Acetobacterium woodii the isotope fractionation factor (ε) for 13C and 12C has previously been reported to be ε = −58.6‰. To investigate whether such a strong fractionation is a general feature of acetogenic bacteria, we measured the stable carbon isotope fractionation factor of 10 acetogenic strains grown on H2 and CO2. The average fractionation factor was εTIC = −57.2‰ for utilization of total inorganic carbon and εacetate = −54.6‰ for the production of acetate. The strongest fractionation was found for Sporomusa sphaeroides (εTIC = −68.3‰), the lowest fractionation for Morella thermoacetica (εTIC = −38.2‰). To investigate the reproducibility of our measurements, we determined the fractionation factor of 21 biological replicates of Thermoanaerobacter kivui. In general, our study confirmed the strong fractionation of stable carbon during chemolithotrophic acetate formation in acetogenic bacteria. However, the specific characteristics of the bacterial strain, as well as the cultural conditions, may have a moderate influence on the overall fractionation. PMID:23275504

  15. Isolation of acetogenic bacteria that induce biocorrosion by utilizing metallic iron as the sole electron donor.

    PubMed

    Kato, Souichiro; Yumoto, Isao; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion of iron occurring under anoxic conditions, which is termed microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) or biocorrosion, is mostly caused by microbial activities. Microbial activity that enhances corrosion via uptake of electrons from metallic iron [Fe(0)] has been regarded as one of the major causative factors. In addition to sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea in marine environments, acetogenic bacteria in freshwater environments have recently been suggested to cause MIC under anoxic conditions. However, no microorganisms that perform acetogenesis-dependent MIC have been isolated or had their MIC-inducing mechanisms characterized. Here, we enriched and isolated acetogenic bacteria that induce iron corrosion by utilizing Fe(0) as the sole electron donor under freshwater, sulfate-free, and anoxic conditions. The enriched communities produced significantly larger amounts of Fe(II) than the abiotic controls and produced acetate coupled with Fe(0) oxidation prior to CH4 production. Microbial community analysis revealed that Sporomusa sp. and Desulfovibrio sp. dominated in the enrichments. Strain GT1, which is closely related to the acetogen Sporomusa sphaeroides, was eventually isolated from the enrichment. Strain GT1 grew acetogenetically with Fe(0) as the sole electron donor and enhanced iron corrosion, which is the first demonstration of MIC mediated by a pure culture of an acetogen. Other well-known acetogenic bacteria, including Sporomusa ovata and Acetobacterium spp., did not grow well on Fe(0). These results indicate that very few species of acetogens have specific mechanisms to efficiently utilize cathodic electrons derived from Fe(0) oxidation and induce iron corrosion.

  16. Electrosynthesis of Organic Compounds from Carbon Dioxide Is Catalyzed by a Diversity of Acetogenic Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nevin, KP; Hensley, SA; Franks, AE; Summers, ZM; Ou, JH; Woodard, TL; Snoeyenbos-West, OL; Lovley, DR

    2011-04-20

    Microbial electrosynthesis, a process in which microorganisms use electrons derived from electrodes to reduce carbon dioxide to multicarbon, extracellular organic compounds, is a potential strategy for capturing electrical energy in carbon-carbon bonds of readily stored and easily distributed products, such as transportation fuels. To date, only one organism, the acetogen Sporomusa ovata, has been shown to be capable of electrosynthesis. The purpose of this study was to determine if a wider range of microorganisms is capable of this process. Several other acetogenic bacteria, including two other Sporomusa species, Clostridium ljungdahlii, Clostridium aceticum, and Moorella thermoacetica, consumed current with the production of organic acids. In general acetate was the primary product, but 2-oxobutyrate and formate also were formed, with 2-oxobutyrate being the predominant identified product of electrosynthesis by C. aceticum. S. sphaeroides, C. ljungdahlii, and M. thermoacetica had high (> 80%) efficiencies of electrons consumed and recovered in identified products. The acetogen Acetobacterium woodii was unable to consume current. These results expand the known range of microorganisms capable of electrosynthesis, providing multiple options for the further optimization of this process.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of a Carbon Monoxide-Utilizing Acetogen, Eubacterium limosum KIST612 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Hanseong; Ko, Hyeok-Jin; Kim, Daehee; Choi, Dong Geon; Park, Shinyoung; Kim, Sujin; Chang, In Seop; Choi, In-Geol

    2011-01-01

    Eubacterium limosum KIST612 is an anaerobic acetogenic bacterium that uses CO as the sole carbon/energy source and produces acetate, butyrate, and ethanol. To evaluate its potential as a syngas microbial catalyst, we have sequenced the complete 4.3-Mb genome of E. limosum KIST612. PMID:21036996

  18. The Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium aceticum: a Missing Link between Rnf- and Cytochrome-Containing Autotrophic Acetogens

    PubMed Central

    Poehlein, Anja; Cebulla, Martin; Ilg, Marcus M.; Bengelsdorf, Frank R.; Schiel-Bengelsdorf, Bettina; Whited, Gregg; Andreesen, Jan R.; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Daniel, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium aceticum was the first isolated autotrophic acetogen, converting CO2 plus H2 or syngas to acetate. Its genome has now been completely sequenced and consists of a 4.2-Mbp chromosome and a small circular plasmid of 5.7 kbp. Sequence analysis revealed major differences from other autotrophic acetogens. C. aceticum contains an Rnf complex for energy conservation (via pumping protons or sodium ions). Such systems have also been found in C. ljungdahlii and Acetobacterium woodii. However, C. aceticum also contains a cytochrome, as does Moorella thermoacetica, which has been proposed to be involved in the generation of a proton gradient. Thus, C. aceticum seems to represent a link between Rnf- and cytochrome-containing autotrophic acetogens. In C. aceticum, however, the cytochrome is probably not involved in an electron transport chain that leads to proton translocation, as no genes for quinone biosynthesis are present in the genome. PMID:26350967

  19. The Ether-Cleaving Methyltransferase System of the Strict Anaerobe Acetobacterium dehalogenans: Analysis and Expression of the Encoding Genes▿

    PubMed Central

    Schilhabel, Anke; Studenik, Sandra; Vödisch, Martin; Kreher, Sandra; Schlott, Bernhard; Pierik, Antonio Y.; Diekert, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    Anaerobic O-demethylases are inducible multicomponent enzymes which mediate the cleavage of the ether bond of phenyl methyl ethers and the transfer of the methyl group to tetrahydrofolate. The genes of all components (methyltransferases I and II, CP, and activating enzyme [AE]) of the vanillate- and veratrol-O-demethylases of Acetobacterium dehalogenans were sequenced and analyzed. In A. dehalogenans, the genes for methyltransferase I, CP, and methyltransferase II of both O-demethylases are clustered. The single-copy gene for AE is not included in the O-demethylase gene clusters. It was found that AE grouped with COG3894 proteins, the function of which was unknown so far. Genes encoding COG3894 proteins with 20 to 41% amino acid sequence identity with AE are present in numerous genomes of anaerobic microorganisms. Inspection of the domain structure and genetic context of these orthologs predicts that these are also reductive activases for corrinoid enzymes (RACEs), such as carbon monoxide dehydrogenase/acetyl coenzyme A synthases or anaerobic methyltransferases. The genes encoding the O-demethylase components were heterologously expressed with a C-terminal Strep-tag in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant proteins methyltransferase I, CP, and AE were characterized. Gel shift experiments showed that the AE comigrated with the CP. The formation of other protein complexes with the O-demethylase components was not observed under the conditions used. The results point to a strong interaction of the AE with the CP. This is the first report on the functional heterologous expression of acetogenic phenyl methyl ether-cleaving O-demethylases. PMID:19011025

  20. Mechanism of anaerobic ether cleavage: conversion of 2-phenoxyethanol to phenol and acetaldehyde by Acetobacterium sp.

    PubMed

    Speranza, Giovanna; Mueller, Britta; Orlandi, Maximilian; Morelli, Carlo F; Manitto, Paolo; Schink, Bernhard

    2002-04-01

    2-Phenoxyethanol is converted into phenol and acetate by a strictly anaerobic Gram-positive bacterium, Acetobacterium strain LuPhet1. Acetate results from oxidation of acetaldehyde that is the early product of the biodegradation process (Frings, J., and Schink, B. (1994) Arch. Microbiol. 162, 199-204). Feeding experiments with resting cell suspensions and 2-phenoxyethanol bearing two deuterium atoms at either carbon of the glycolic moiety as substrate demonstrated that the carbonyl group of the acetate derives from the alcoholic function and the methyl group derives from the adjacent carbon. A concomitant migration of a deuterium atom from C-1 to C-2 was observed. These findings were confirmed by NMR analysis of the acetate obtained by fermentation of 2-phenoxy-[2-(13)C,1-(2)H(2)]ethanol, 2-phenoxy-[1-(13)C,1-(2)H(2)]ethanol, and 2-phenoxy-[1,2-(13)C(2),1-(2)H(2)]ethanol. During the course of the biotransformation process, the molecular integrity of the glycolic unit was completely retained, no loss of the migrating deuterium occurred by exchange with the medium, and the 1,2-deuterium shift was intramolecular. A diol dehydratase-like mechanism could explain the enzymatic cleavage of the ether bond of 2-phenoxyethanol, provided that an intramolecular H/OC(6)H(5) exchange is assumed, giving rise to the hemiacetal precursor of acetaldehyde. However, an alternative mechanism is proposed that is supported by the well recognized propensity of alpha-hydroxyradical and of its conjugate base (ketyl anion) to eliminate a beta-positioned leaving group.

  1. Anaerobic CO2 fixation by the acetogenic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, P; Rismani-Yazdi, H; Stephanopoulos, G

    2013-05-16

    Anaerobic bacteria such as Moorella thermoacetica have the capacity of fixing carbon dioxide with carbon monoxide and hydrogen for the production of ethanol, acetic acid, and other useful chemicals. In this study, we evaluated the fixation of CO2 for the production of acetic acid, as a product in its own right but also as precursor for lipid synthesis by oleaginous organisms. We achieved maximum cell optical density of 11.3, acetic acid titer of 31 g/L, and productivity of 0.55 g/L-h at CO mass-transfer rate of 83 mM/h. We also showed electron availability by CO mass transfer limited the process at CO mass transfer rates lower than 30 mM/h. Further enhancement of mass-transfer rate removed such limitations in favor of biological kinetics as main limitation. This work underlines the potential of microbial processes for converting syngas to fuel and chemical products in processes suitable for distributed feedstock utilization. (c) 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers AIChE J, 59: 3176-3183, 2013

  2. Rumen fermentation and acetogen population changes in response to an exogenous acetogen TWA4 strain and Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun-lei; Guan, Le-luo; Liu, Jian-xin; Wang, Jia-kun

    2015-08-01

    The presence of yeast cells could stimulate hydrogen utilization of acetogens and enhance acetogenesis. To understand the roles of acetogens in rumen fermentation, an in vitro rumen fermentation experiment was conducted with addition of acetogen strain (TWA4) and/or Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product (XP). A 2×2 factorial design with two levels of TWA4 (0 or 2×10(7) cells/ml) and XP (0 or 2 g/L) was performed. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were increased (P<0.05) in XP and TWA4XP, while methane was increased only in TWA4XP (P<0.05). The increase rate of microorganisms with formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase, especially acetogens, was higher than that of methanogens under all treatments. Lachnospiraceae was predominant in all acetogen communities, but without close acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) amino acid sequences from cultured isolates. Low-Acetitomaculum ruminis-like ACS was predominant in all acetogen communities, while four unique phylotypes in XP treatment were all amino acid identified low-Eubacterium limosum-like acetogens. It differs to XP treatment that more low-A. ruminis-like and less low-E. limosum-like sequences were identified in TWA4 and TWA4XP treatments. Enhancing acetogenesis by supplementation with an acetogen strain and/or yeast cells may be an approach to mitigate methane, by targeting proper acetogens such as uncultured low-E. limosum-like acetogens.

  3. Rumen fermentation and acetogen population changes in response to an exogenous acetogen TWA4 strain and Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-lei; Guan, Le-luo; Liu, Jian-xin; Wang, Jia-kun

    2015-01-01

    The presence of yeast cells could stimulate hydrogen utilization of acetogens and enhance acetogenesis. To understand the roles of acetogens in rumen fermentation, an in vitro rumen fermentation experiment was conducted with addition of acetogen strain (TWA4) and/or Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product (XP). A 2×2 factorial design with two levels of TWA4 (0 or 2×107 cells/ml) and XP (0 or 2 g/L) was performed. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were increased (P<0.05) in XP and TWA4XP, while methane was increased only in TWA4XP (P<0.05). The increase rate of microorganisms with formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase, especially acetogens, was higher than that of methanogens under all treatments. Lachnospiraceae was predominant in all acetogen communities, but without close acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) amino acid sequences from cultured isolates. Low-Acetitomaculum ruminis-like ACS was predominant in all acetogen communities, while four unique phylotypes in XP treatment were all amino acid identified low-Eubacterium limosum-like acetogens. It differs to XP treatment that more low-A. ruminis-like and less low-E. limosum-like sequences were identified in TWA4 and TWA4XP treatments. Enhancing acetogenesis by supplementation with an acetogen strain and/or yeast cells may be an approach to mitigate methane, by targeting proper acetogens such as uncultured low-E. limosum-like acetogens. PMID:26238546

  4. Rumen fermentation and acetogen population changes in response to an exogenous acetogen TWA4 strain and Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun-lei; Guan, Le-luo; Liu, Jian-xin; Wang, Jia-kun

    2015-08-01

    The presence of yeast cells could stimulate hydrogen utilization of acetogens and enhance acetogenesis. To understand the roles of acetogens in rumen fermentation, an in vitro rumen fermentation experiment was conducted with addition of acetogen strain (TWA4) and/or Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product (XP). A 2×2 factorial design with two levels of TWA4 (0 or 2×10(7) cells/ml) and XP (0 or 2 g/L) was performed. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were increased (P<0.05) in XP and TWA4XP, while methane was increased only in TWA4XP (P<0.05). The increase rate of microorganisms with formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase, especially acetogens, was higher than that of methanogens under all treatments. Lachnospiraceae was predominant in all acetogen communities, but without close acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) amino acid sequences from cultured isolates. Low-Acetitomaculum ruminis-like ACS was predominant in all acetogen communities, while four unique phylotypes in XP treatment were all amino acid identified low-Eubacterium limosum-like acetogens. It differs to XP treatment that more low-A. ruminis-like and less low-E. limosum-like sequences were identified in TWA4 and TWA4XP treatments. Enhancing acetogenesis by supplementation with an acetogen strain and/or yeast cells may be an approach to mitigate methane, by targeting proper acetogens such as uncultured low-E. limosum-like acetogens. PMID:26238546

  5. Catabolite pathway for the production of skatole and indole acetic acid by the acetogen Clostridium drakei, Clostridium scatologenes, and swine manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Skatole (3-methyl-indole) is a malodorous chemical in stored swine manure and is implicated as a component of foul tasting pork. Definitive evidence for the skatole pathway is lacking. Deuterium-labeled substrates were employed to resolve this pathway in the acetogenic bacterium Clostridium drakei...

  6. CO Metabolism in the Thermophilic Acetogen Thermoanaerobacter kivui

    PubMed Central

    Weghoff, Marie Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    The thermophilic acetogenic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter kivui, previously described not to use carbon monoxide as a carbon and energy source, was adapted to grow on CO. This was achieved by using a preculture grown on H2 plus CO2 and by increasing the CO concentration in small, 10% increments. T. kivui was finally able to grow within a 100% CO atmosphere. Growth on CO was found in complex and mineral media, and vitamins were not required. Carbon monoxide consumption was accompanied by acetate and hydrogen production. Cells also grew on synthesis gas (syngas) with the simultaneous use of CO and H2 coupled to acetate production. CO oxidation in resting cells was coupled to hydrogen and acetate production and accompanied by the synthesis of ATP. A protonophore abolished ATP synthesis but stimulated H2 production, which is consistent with a chemiosmotic mechanism of ATP synthesis. Hydrogenase activity was highest in crude extracts of CO-grown cells, and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH) activity was highest in H2-plus-CO2- or CO-grown cells. The genome of T. kivui harbors two CODH gene clusters, and both CODH proteins were present in crude extracts, but one CODH was more prevalent in crude extracts from CO-grown cells. PMID:26850300

  7. Mechanism of anaerobic degradation of triethanolamine by a homoacetogenic bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Speranza, Giovanna . E-mail: giovanna.speranza@unimi.it; Morelli, Carlo F.; Cairoli, Paola; Mueller, Britta; Schink, Bernhard

    2006-10-20

    Triethanolamine (TEA) is converted into acetate and ammonia by a strictly anaerobic, gram-positive Acetobacterium strain LuTria3. Fermentation experiments with resting cell suspensions and specifically deuterated substrates indicate that in the acetate molecule the carboxylate and the methyl groups correspond to the alcoholic function and to its adjacent methylene group, respectively, of the 2-hydroxyethyl unit of TEA. A 1,2 shift of a hydrogen (deuterium) atom from -CH{sub 2} -O- to =N-CH{sub 2} - without exchange with the medium was observed. This fact gives evidence that a radical mechanism occurs involving the enzyme and/or coenzyme molecule as a hydrogen carrier. Such a biodegradation appears analogous to the conversion of 2-phenoxyethanol into acetate mediated by another strain of the anaerobic homoacetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium.

  8. Mechanism of anaerobic degradation of triethanolamine by a homoacetogenic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Speranza, Giovanna; Morelli, Carlo F; Cairoli, Paola; Müller, Britta; Schink, Bernhard

    2006-10-20

    Triethanolamine (TEA) is converted into acetate and ammonia by a strictly anaerobic, gram-positive Acetobacterium strain LuTria3. Fermentation experiments with resting cell suspensions and specifically deuterated substrates indicate that in the acetate molecule the carboxylate and the methyl groups correspond to the alcoholic function and to its adjacent methylene group, respectively, of the 2-hydroxyethyl unit of TEA. A 1,2 shift of a hydrogen (deuterium) atom from -CH2-O- to =N-CH2- without exchange with the medium was observed. This fact gives evidence that a radical mechanism occurs involving the enzyme and/or coenzyme molecule as a hydrogen carrier. Such a biodegradation appears analogous to the conversion of 2-phenoxyethanol into acetate mediated by another strain of the anaerobic homoacetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium.

  9. Limitation of syntrophic coculture growth by the acetogen.

    PubMed

    Junicke, Helena; Feldman, Hannah; Van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Kleerebezem, Robbert

    2016-03-01

    The syntrophic cooperation between hydrogen-producing acetogens and hydrogenotrophic methanogens relies on a critical balance between both partners. A recent study, provided several indications for the dependence of the biomass-specific growth rate of a methanogenic coculture on the acetogen. Nevertheless, final experimental proof was lacking since biomass-specific rates were obtained from a descriptive model, and not from direct measurement of individual biomass concentrations. In this study, a recently developed quantitative PCR approach was used to measure the individual biomass concentrations in the coculture of Desulfovibrio sp. G11 and Methanospirillum hungatei JF1 on lactate, formate or both. The model-derived growth yields and biomass-specific rates were successfully validated. Experimental findings identified the acetogen as the growth-limiting partner in the coculture on lactate. While the acetogen was operating at its maximum biomass-specific lactate consumption rate, the hydrogenotrophic methanogen showed a significant overcapacity. Furthermore, this study provides experimental evidence for different growth strategies followed by the syntrophic partners in order to maintain a common biomass-specific growth rate. During syntrophic lactate conversion, the biomass-specific electron transfer rate of Methanospirillum hungatei JF1 was three-fold higher compared to Desulfovibrio sp. G11. This is to compensate for the lower methanogenic biomass yield per electron-mole of substrate, which is dictated by the thermodynamics of the underlying reaction. PMID:26301789

  10. Effect of CO2 on the fermentation capacities of the acetogen Peptostreptococcus productus U-1.

    PubMed

    Misoph, M; Drake, H L

    1996-06-01

    The fermentative capacities of the acetogenic bacterium Peptostreptococcus productus U-1 (ATCC 35244) were examined. Although acetate was formed from all the substrates tested, additional products were produced in response to CO2 limitation. Under CO2-limited conditions, fructose-dependent growth yielded high levels of lactate as a reduced end product; lactate was also produced under CO2-enriched conditions when fructose concentrations were elevated. In the absence of supplemental CO2, xylose-dependent growth yielded lactate and succinate as major reduced end products. Although supplemental CO2 and acetogenesis stimulated cell yields on fructose, xylose-dependent cell yields were decreased in response to CO2 and acetogenesis. In contrast, glycerol-dependent growth yielded high levels of ethanol in the absence of supplemental CO2, and pyruvate was subject to only acetogenic utilization independent of CO2. CO2 pulsing during the growth of CO2-limited fructose cultures stopped lactate synthesis immediately, indicating that CO2-limited cells were nonetheless metabolically poised to respond quickly to exogenous CO2. Resting cells that were cultivated at the expense of fructose without supplemental CO2 readily consumed fructose in the absence of exogenous CO2 and formed only lactate. Although the specific activity of lactate dehydrogenase was not appreciably influenced by supplemental C02 during cultivation, cells cultivated on fructose under CO2-enriched conditions displayed minimal capacities to consume fructose in the absence of exogenous CO2. These results demonstrate that the utilization of alternative fermentations for the conservation of energy and growth of P. productus U-1 is augmented by the relative availability of CO2 and growth substrate.

  11. O-demethylase from Acetobacterium dehalogenans--substrate specificity and function of the participating proteins.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, F; Wohlfarth, G; Diekert, G

    1998-05-01

    The ether-cleaving O-demethylase isolated from syringate-grown cells of Acetobacterium dehalogenans (formerly named strain MC) consists of four proteins, components A, B, C and D. The enzyme system converts only phenyl methyl ethers with a hydroxyl group in the ortho position to the methoxyl moiety. The presence of a carboxyl group in the aromatic compound was not required for O-demethylase reaction. Component B mediated the conversion of vanillate to 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate in the presence of the Ti(III)-reduced corrinoid-containing component A. After addition of component D and tetrahydrofolate, methyl tetrahydrofolate was formed from vanillate in stoichiometric amounts. Titanium(III) citrate as a reductant could be replaced by H2, methyl viologen or ferredoxin, partially purified hydrogenase, purified component C obtained from A. dehalogenans, and ATP. From these findings, it was deduced that component B serves as vanillate:corrinoid protein methyltransferase (methyltransferase I) mediating the methyl transfer from vanillate to the reduced corrinoid protein component A. Component D functions as methylcorrinoid protein:tetrahydrofolate transferase (methyltransferase II). The role of component C is probably that of an activating protein reversing accidental oxidation of the protein-bound cob(I)alamin to cob(II)alamin in the presence of ATP and reducing equivalents supplied by the enzymatic oxidation of hydrogen.

  12. The role of acetogens in microbially influenced corrosion of steel

    PubMed Central

    Mand, Jaspreet; Park, Hyung Soo; Jack, Thomas R.; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of iron (Fe0) by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) has been studied extensively. Through a mechanism, that is still poorly understood, electrons or hydrogen (H2) molecules are removed from the metal surface and used as electron donor for sulfate reduction. The resulting ferrous ions precipitate in part with the sulfide produced, forming characteristic black iron sulfide. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens can also contribute to MIC. Incubation of pipeline water samples, containing bicarbonate and some sulfate, in serum bottles with steel coupons and a headspace of 10% (vol/vol) CO2 and 90% N2, indicated formation of acetate and methane. Incubation of these samples in serum bottles, containing medium with coupons and bicarbonate but no sulfate, also indicated that formation of acetate preceded the formation of methane. Microbial community analyses of these enrichments indicated the presence of Acetobacterium, as well as of hydrogenotrophic and acetotrophic methanogens. The formation of acetate by homoacetogens, such as Acetobacterium woodii from H2 (or Fe0) and CO2, is potentially important, because acetate is a required carbon source for many SRB growing with H2 and sulfate. A consortium of the SRB Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and A. woodii was able to grow in defined medium with H2, CO2, and sulfate, because A. woodii provides the acetate, needed by D. vulgaris under these conditions. Likewise, general corrosion rates of metal coupons incubated with D. vulgaris in the presence of acetate or in the presence of A. woodii were higher than in the absence of acetate or A. woodii, respectively. An extended MIC model capturing these results is presented. PMID:24917861

  13. Enhanced biotransformation of carbon tetrachloride by Acetobacterium woodii upon addition of hydroxocobalamin and fructose

    SciTech Connect

    Hashsham, S.A.; Freedman, D.L.

    1999-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydroxocobalamin (OH-Cbl) on transformation of high concentrations of carbon tetrachloride (CT) by Acetobacterium woodii. Complete transformation of 470 {micro}M CT was achieved by A. woodii within 2.5 days, when 10 {micro}M OH-Cbl was added along with 25.2 mM fructose. This was approximately 30 times faster than A. woodii cultures and medium that did not receive OH-Cbl and 5 times faster than those controls that did receive OH-Cbl, but either live A. woodii or fructose was missing. CT transformation in treatments with only OH-Cbl was indicative of the important contribution of nonenzymatic reactions. Besides increasing the rate of CT transformation, addition of fructose and OH-Cbl to live cultures increased the percentage of [{sup 14}C]CT transformed to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and {sup 14}C-labeled soluble materials, while decreasing the percentage of CT reduced to chloroform and abiotically transformed to carbon disulfide. {sup 14}CS{sub 2} represented more than 35% of the [{sup 14}C]CT in the presence of reduced medium and OH-Cbl. Conversion of CT to CO was a predominant pathway in formation of CO{sub 2} in the presence of live cells and added fructose and OH-Cbl. These results indicate that the rate and distribution of products during cometabolic transformation of CT by A. woodii can be improved by the addition of fructose and OH-Cbl.

  14. Dissecting the in Vivo Metabolic Potential of Two Human Gut Acetogens*

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Federico E.; Faith, Jeremiah J.; Bain, James; Muehlbauer, Michael J.; Stevens, Robert D.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2010-01-01

    Fermenting microbial communities generate hydrogen; its removal through the production of acetate, methane, or hydrogen sulfide modulates the efficiency of energy extraction from available nutrients in many ecosystems. We noted that pathway components for acetogenesis are more abundantly and consistently represented in the gut microbiomes of monozygotic twins and their mothers than components for methanogenesis or sulfate reduction and subsequently analyzed the metabolic potential of two sequenced human gut acetogens, Blautia hydrogenotrophica and Marvinbryantia formatexigens in vitro and in the intestines of gnotobiotic mice harboring a prominent saccharolytic bacterium. To do so, we developed a generally applicable method for multiplex sequencing of expressed microbial mRNAs (microbial RNA-Seq) and, together with mass spectrometry of metabolites, showed that these organisms have distinct patterns of substrate utilization. B. hydrogenotrophica targets aliphatic and aromatic amino acids. It increases the efficiency of fermentation by consuming reducing equivalents, thereby maintaining a high NAD+/NADH ratio and boosting acetate production. In contrast, M. formatexigens consumes oligosaccharides, does not impact the redox state of the gut, and boosts the yield of succinate. These findings have strategic implications for those who wish to manipulate the hydrogen economy of gut microbial communities in ways that modulate energy harvest. PMID:20444704

  15. Dissecting the in vivo metabolic potential of two human gut acetogens.

    PubMed

    Rey, Federico E; Faith, Jeremiah J; Bain, James; Muehlbauer, Michael J; Stevens, Robert D; Newgard, Christopher B; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2010-07-16

    Fermenting microbial communities generate hydrogen; its removal through the production of acetate, methane, or hydrogen sulfide modulates the efficiency of energy extraction from available nutrients in many ecosystems. We noted that pathway components for acetogenesis are more abundantly and consistently represented in the gut microbiomes of monozygotic twins and their mothers than components for methanogenesis or sulfate reduction and subsequently analyzed the metabolic potential of two sequenced human gut acetogens, Blautia hydrogenotrophica and Marvinbryantia formatexigens in vitro and in the intestines of gnotobiotic mice harboring a prominent saccharolytic bacterium. To do so, we developed a generally applicable method for multiplex sequencing of expressed microbial mRNAs (microbial RNA-Seq) and, together with mass spectrometry of metabolites, showed that these organisms have distinct patterns of substrate utilization. B. hydrogenotrophica targets aliphatic and aromatic amino acids. It increases the efficiency of fermentation by consuming reducing equivalents, thereby maintaining a high NAD(+)/NADH ratio and boosting acetate production. In contrast, M. formatexigens consumes oligosaccharides, does not impact the redox state of the gut, and boosts the yield of succinate. These findings have strategic implications for those who wish to manipulate the hydrogen economy of gut microbial communities in ways that modulate energy harvest.

  16. Investigation into Host Selection of the Cecal Acetogen Population in Rabbits after Weaning

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunlei; Mi, Lan; Hu, Xialu; Liu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Homoacetogenic bacteria have received attention as a hydrogenotrophic population that offers a significant energetic advantage to the host animal. Reductive acetogenesis is likely an important hydrogen disposal mechanism in the cecum of rabbits. However, molecular ecology information about cecal acetogen candidates has rarely been reported. To better understand the effect of host selection in the rabbit cecal acetogen community with respect to growth, rabbits at four different age stages (30, 60, 120 and 180 days) with the same diet were studied. Although the abundance of potential acetogens and methanogens was high in the cecum of rabbits undergoing growth, many novel potential acetogen populations were observed in the cecum of rabbits across all age groups. Young and adult rabbits had their own distinct acetogen community although they received the same diet, which suggests that as the rabbit ages, acetogens in the cecum undergo developmental changes because of host selection that are independent of diet, and perhaps the different acetogen communities result in different hydrogenotrophic characteristics. The within-group similarity increased with age, indicating that the acetogen community converges to a more homogeneous and stable arrangement with aging. PMID:27379387

  17. Interaction of acetogens and methanogens in anaerobic freshwater sediments.

    PubMed

    Jones, J G; Simon, B M

    1985-04-01

    Anaerobic decomposition processes in the profundal sediments of Blelham Tarn (English Lake District) are often limited during late summer by the input of organic carbon. The concentration of acetate in the interstitial water fell from about 100 microM (immediately after sedimentation of the spring diatom bloom) to a relatively constant value of about 20 microM in late summer, during which acetate utilization appeared to be balanced by production. Addition of chloroform and molybdate caused an accumulation of cold acetate in large sediment cores and of [14C]acetate in small cores to which [14C]bicarbonate had been added. In both cases chloroform caused the greater accumulation, implying that acetoclastic methanogens were the more active consumers. The conversion of 14CO2 to [14C]acetate was inversely related, with depth, to its conversion to 14CH4. Methanogenesis from CO2 decreased during late summer, whereas acetogenesis and acetoclastic methanogenesis increased over the same time period. The production of acetate from CO2 was generally equivalent to less than 10% of the acetate carbon utilized but could be as high as 25% of that value. Hydrogen consumption by acetogens could be as high as 50% of that utilized in methanogenesis. The role of acetogenic bacteria in anaerobic processes may therefore be of greater significance in lakes such as Blelham Tarn than in more eutrophic systems. PMID:4004224

  18. Analysis of the Core Genome and Pan-Genome of Autotrophic Acetogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jongoh; Song, Yoseb; Jeong, Yujin; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Acetogens are obligate anaerobic bacteria capable of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) to multicarbon compounds coupled to the oxidation of inorganic substrates, such as hydrogen (H2) or carbon monoxide (CO), via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. Owing to the metabolic capability of CO2 fixation, much attention has been focused on understanding the unique pathways associated with acetogens, particularly their metabolic coupling of CO2 fixation to energy conservation. Most known acetogens are phylogenetically and metabolically diverse bacteria present in 23 different bacterial genera. With the increased volume of available genome information, acetogenic bacterial genomes can be analyzed by comparative genome analysis. Even with the genetic diversity that exists among acetogens, the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, a central metabolic pathway, and cofactor biosynthetic pathways are highly conserved for autotrophic growth. Additionally, comparative genome analysis revealed that most genes in the acetogen-specific core genome were associated with the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. The conserved enzymes and those predicted as missing can provide insight into biological differences between acetogens and allow for the discovery of promising candidates for industrial applications. PMID:27733845

  19. Autotrophy at the thermodynamic limit of life: a model for energy conservation in acetogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Schuchmann, Kai; Müller, Volker

    2014-12-01

    Life on earth evolved in the absence of oxygen with inorganic gases as potential sources of carbon and energy. Among the alternative mechanisms for carbon dioxide (CO₂) fixation in the living world, only the reduction of CO₂ by the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, which is used by acetogenic bacteria, complies with the two requirements to sustain life: conservation of energy and production of biomass. However, how energy is conserved in acetogenic bacteria has been an enigma since their discovery. In this Review, we discuss the latest progress on the biochemistry and genetics of the energy metabolism of model acetogens, elucidating how these bacteria couple CO₂ fixation to energy conservation.

  20. Alkalibaculum bacchi gen. nov., sp. nov., a CO-oxidizing, ethanol-producing acetogen isolated from livestock-impacted soil.

    PubMed

    Allen, Toby D; Caldwell, Matthew E; Lawson, Paul A; Huhnke, Raymond L; Tanner, Ralph S

    2010-10-01

    Phenotypic and phylogenetic studies were performed on three strains of an acetogenic bacterium isolated from livestock-impacted soil. The bacterium stained Gram-negative and was a non-spore-forming rod that was motile by peritrichous flagella. The novel strains had an optimum pH for growth of 8.0-8.5 and utilized H₂ : CO₂, CO : CO₂, glucose, fructose, mannose, turanose, ribose, trimethylamine, pyruvate, methanol, ethanol, n-propanol and n-butanol as growth substrates. Acetate was produced from glucose. Acetate, CO₂ and ethanol were produced from CO : CO₂. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the novel strains formed a new subline in the family Eubacteriaceae (rRNA cluster XV) of the low G+C-containing Gram-positive bacteria of the class Clostridia. The DNA G+C base composition was 34 mol%. Cell wall analysis revealed the existence of a novel B-type peptidoglycan similar to the B2α-type (B4) configuration with a variation containing aspartic acid. Based on phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence, it is proposed that the new isolates represent a novel genus and species, for which the name Alkalibaculum bacchi gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is CP11(T) (=ATCC BAA-1772(T)=DSM 22112(T)).

  1. Industrial Acetogenic Biocatalysts: A Comparative Metabolic and Genomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Poehlein, Anja; Linder, Sonja; Erz, Catarina; Hummel, Tim; Hoffmeister, Sabrina; Daniel, Rolf; Dürre, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis gas (syngas) fermentation by anaerobic acetogenic bacteria employing the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway is a bioprocess for production of biofuels and biocommodities. The major fermentation products of the most relevant biocatalytic strains (Clostridium ljungdahlii, C. autoethanogenum, C. ragsdalei, and C. coskatii) are acetic acid and ethanol. A comparative metabolic and genomic analysis using the mentioned biocatalysts might offer targets for metabolic engineering and thus improve the production of compounds apart from ethanol. Autotrophic growth and product formation of the four wild type (WT) strains were compared in uncontrolled batch experiments. The genomes of C. ragsdalei and C. coskatii were sequenced and the genome sequences of all four biocatalytic strains analyzed in comparative manner. Growth and product spectra (acetate, ethanol, 2,3-butanediol) of C. autoethanogenum, C. ljungdahlii, and C. ragsdalei were rather similar. In contrast, C. coskatii produced significantly less ethanol and its genome sequence lacks two genes encoding aldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductases (AOR). Comparative genome sequence analysis of the four WT strains revealed high average nucleotide identity (ANI) of C. ljungdahlii and C. autoethanogenum (99.3%) and C. coskatii (98.3%). In contrast, C. ljungdahlii WT and C. ragsdalei WT showed an ANI-based similarity of only 95.8%. Additionally, recombinant C. ljungdahlii strains were constructed that harbor an artificial acetone synthesis operon (ASO) consisting of the following genes: adc, ctfA, ctfB, and thlA (encoding acetoacetate decarboxylase, acetoacetyl-CoA:acetate/butyrate:CoA-transferase subunits A and B, and thiolase) under the control of thlA promoter (P thlA ) from C. acetobutylicum or native pta-ack promoter (P pta-ack ) from C. ljungdahlii. Respective recombinant strains produced 2-propanol rather than acetone, due to the presence of a NADPH-dependent primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase that converts acetone to 2

  2. Industrial Acetogenic Biocatalysts: A Comparative Metabolic and Genomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bengelsdorf, Frank R.; Poehlein, Anja; Linder, Sonja; Erz, Catarina; Hummel, Tim; Hoffmeister, Sabrina; Daniel, Rolf; Dürre, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis gas (syngas) fermentation by anaerobic acetogenic bacteria employing the Wood–Ljungdahl pathway is a bioprocess for production of biofuels and biocommodities. The major fermentation products of the most relevant biocatalytic strains (Clostridium ljungdahlii, C. autoethanogenum, C. ragsdalei, and C. coskatii) are acetic acid and ethanol. A comparative metabolic and genomic analysis using the mentioned biocatalysts might offer targets for metabolic engineering and thus improve the production of compounds apart from ethanol. Autotrophic growth and product formation of the four wild type (WT) strains were compared in uncontrolled batch experiments. The genomes of C. ragsdalei and C. coskatii were sequenced and the genome sequences of all four biocatalytic strains analyzed in comparative manner. Growth and product spectra (acetate, ethanol, 2,3-butanediol) of C. autoethanogenum, C. ljungdahlii, and C. ragsdalei were rather similar. In contrast, C. coskatii produced significantly less ethanol and its genome sequence lacks two genes encoding aldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductases (AOR). Comparative genome sequence analysis of the four WT strains revealed high average nucleotide identity (ANI) of C. ljungdahlii and C. autoethanogenum (99.3%) and C. coskatii (98.3%). In contrast, C. ljungdahlii WT and C. ragsdalei WT showed an ANI-based similarity of only 95.8%. Additionally, recombinant C. ljungdahlii strains were constructed that harbor an artificial acetone synthesis operon (ASO) consisting of the following genes: adc, ctfA, ctfB, and thlA (encoding acetoacetate decarboxylase, acetoacetyl-CoA:acetate/butyrate:CoA-transferase subunits A and B, and thiolase) under the control of thlA promoter (PthlA) from C. acetobutylicum or native pta-ack promoter (Ppta-ack) from C. ljungdahlii. Respective recombinant strains produced 2-propanol rather than acetone, due to the presence of a NADPH-dependent primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase that converts acetone to 2

  3. Industrial Acetogenic Biocatalysts: A Comparative Metabolic and Genomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Poehlein, Anja; Linder, Sonja; Erz, Catarina; Hummel, Tim; Hoffmeister, Sabrina; Daniel, Rolf; Dürre, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis gas (syngas) fermentation by anaerobic acetogenic bacteria employing the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway is a bioprocess for production of biofuels and biocommodities. The major fermentation products of the most relevant biocatalytic strains (Clostridium ljungdahlii, C. autoethanogenum, C. ragsdalei, and C. coskatii) are acetic acid and ethanol. A comparative metabolic and genomic analysis using the mentioned biocatalysts might offer targets for metabolic engineering and thus improve the production of compounds apart from ethanol. Autotrophic growth and product formation of the four wild type (WT) strains were compared in uncontrolled batch experiments. The genomes of C. ragsdalei and C. coskatii were sequenced and the genome sequences of all four biocatalytic strains analyzed in comparative manner. Growth and product spectra (acetate, ethanol, 2,3-butanediol) of C. autoethanogenum, C. ljungdahlii, and C. ragsdalei were rather similar. In contrast, C. coskatii produced significantly less ethanol and its genome sequence lacks two genes encoding aldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductases (AOR). Comparative genome sequence analysis of the four WT strains revealed high average nucleotide identity (ANI) of C. ljungdahlii and C. autoethanogenum (99.3%) and C. coskatii (98.3%). In contrast, C. ljungdahlii WT and C. ragsdalei WT showed an ANI-based similarity of only 95.8%. Additionally, recombinant C. ljungdahlii strains were constructed that harbor an artificial acetone synthesis operon (ASO) consisting of the following genes: adc, ctfA, ctfB, and thlA (encoding acetoacetate decarboxylase, acetoacetyl-CoA:acetate/butyrate:CoA-transferase subunits A and B, and thiolase) under the control of thlA promoter (P thlA ) from C. acetobutylicum or native pta-ack promoter (P pta-ack ) from C. ljungdahlii. Respective recombinant strains produced 2-propanol rather than acetone, due to the presence of a NADPH-dependent primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase that converts acetone to 2

  4. Enrichment of acetogenic bacteria in high rate anaerobic reactors under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ryan, P; Forbes, C; McHugh, S; O'Reilly, C; Fleming, G T A; Colleran, E

    2010-07-01

    The objective of the current study was to expand the knowledge of the role of acetogenic Bacteria in high rate anaerobic digesters. To this end, acetogens were enriched by supplying a variety of acetogenic growth supportive substrates to two laboratory scale high rate upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors operated at 37 degrees C (R1) and 55 degrees C (R2). The reactors were initially fed a glucose/acetate influent. Having achieved high operational performance and granular sludge development and activity, both reactors were changed to homoacetogenic bacterial substrates on day 373 of the trial. The reactors were initially fed with sodium vanillate as a sole substrate. Although % COD removal indicated that the 55 degrees C reactor out performed the 37 degrees C reactor, effluent acetate levels from R2 were generally higher than from R1, reaching values as high as 5023 mg l(-1). Homoacetogenic activity in both reactors was confirmed on day 419 by specific acetogenic activity (SAA) measurement, with higher values obtained for R2 than R1. Sodium formate was introduced as sole substrate to both reactors on day 464. It was found that formate supported acetogenic activity at both temperatures. By the end of the trial, no specific methanogenic activity (SMA) was observed against acetate and propionate indicating that the methane produced was solely by hydrogenotrophic Archaea. Higher SMA and SAA values against H(2)/CO(2) suggested development of a formate utilising acetogenic population growing in syntrophy with hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Throughout the formate trial, the mesophilic reactor performed better overall than the thermophilic reactor.

  5. [Quantitative use of fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect syntrophic acetogenic bacteria in anaerobic environmental samples].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Na; Xu, Ke-Wei; Du, Guo-Cheng; Chen, Jian; Liu, He

    2007-12-01

    Syntrophic acetogenic bacteria, an important functional one in anaerobic habitats, were detected and counted by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technology by using 16S rRNA-based oligonucleotide probes. For enumeration and quantification of the targeted bacteria, an attempt was made to optimize the hybridization conditions. The optimum conditions are as follows: a fixation time of 19h, a dehydrated time of 5 min, and a formamide concentration of 55% in hybridized solution. The abundance of syntrophic acetogenic bacteria of different environmental samples were quantified by FISH and the results showed that Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Reactor (UASB) treating STHZ high-concentration organic wastewater and the digestive tract of some animals were the main habitats of syntrophic acetogenic bacteria. The numbers of syntrophic acetogenic bacteria in UASB and cattle manure were 1.70 x 10(9) cells/mL sample and 6.50 x 10(8) cells/mL sample, respectively. Meanwhile, the sediments of rivers and lakes existed less of the bacteria and the contents of them were just about 1.20 x 10(8) cells/mL sample in Taihu lake.

  6. ENUMERATION, ISOLATION, AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ACETOGENIC BACTERIA ASSOCIATED WITH SEAGRASS ROOTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seagrasses are rooted in anoxic, sulfate-reducing sediments. However, the seagrass root is oxygenated during the daytime, becoming anoxic at night. Root thin sections hydridized with 33P-labeled probes revealed the presence of acetogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria in the rhizo...

  7. ENUMERATION, ISOLATION, AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ACETOGENIC BACTERIA ASSOCIATED WITH SEAGRASS ROOTS (POSTER SESSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seagrasses are rooted in anoxic, sulfate-reducing sediments. However, the seagrass root is oxygenated during the daytime, becoming anoxic at night. Root thin sections hydridized with 33P-labeled probes revealed the presence of acetogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria in the rhizo...

  8. O-demethylase from Acetobacterium dehalogenans--cloning, sequencing, and active expression of the gene encoding the corrinoid protein.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, F; Wohlfarth, G; Diekert, G

    1998-10-15

    The ether-cleaving O-demethylase from the strictly anaerobic homoacetogen Acetobacterium dehalogenans catalyses the methyltransfer from 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-benzoate (vanillate) to tetrahydrofolate. In the first step a vanillate :corrinoid protein methyltransferase (methyltransferase I) mediates the methylation of a 25-kDa corrinoid protein with the cofactor reduced to cob(I)alamin. The methyl group is then transferred to tetrahydrofolate by the action of a methylcorrinoid protein:tetrahydrofolate methyltransferase (methyltransferase II). Using primers derived from the amino-terminal sequences of the corrinoid protein and the vanillate:corrinoid protein methyltransferase (methyltransferase I), a 723-bp fragment was amplified by PCR, which contained the gene odmA encoding the corrinoid protein of O-demethylase. Downstream of odmA, part of the odmB gene encoding methyltransferase I was identified. The amino acid sequence deduced from odmA showed about 60% similarity to the cobalamin-binding domain of methionine synthase from Escherichia coli (MetH) and to corrinoid proteins of methyltransferase systems involved in methanogenesis from methanol and methylamines. The sequence contained the DXHXXG consensus sequence typical for displacement of the dimethylbenzimidazole base of the corrinoid cofactor by a histidine from the protein. Heterologous expression of odmA in E. coli yielded a colourless, oxygen-insensitive apoprotein, which was able to bind one mol cobalamin or methylcobalamin/mol protein. Both of these reconstituted forms of the protein were active in the overall O-demethylation reaction. OdmA reconstituted with hydroxocobalamin and reduced by titanium(III) citrate to the cob(I)alamin form was methylated with vanillate by methyltransferase I in an irreversible reaction. Methylcobalamin carrying OdmA served as methyl group donor for the methylation of tetrahydrofolate by methyltransferase II. This reaction was found to be reversible, since methyltranSferase II

  9. Functional gene analysis suggests different acetogen populations in the bovine rumen and tammar wallaby forestomach.

    PubMed

    Gagen, Emma J; Denman, Stuart E; Padmanabha, Jagadish; Zadbuke, Someshwar; Al Jassim, Rafat; Morrison, Mark; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2010-12-01

    Reductive acetogenesis via the acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) pathway is an alternative hydrogen sink to methanogenesis in the rumen. Functional gene-based analysis is the ideal approach for investigating organisms capable of this metabolism (acetogens). However, existing tools targeting the formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase gene (fhs) are compromised by lack of specificity due to the involvement of formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase (FTHFS) in other pathways. Acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) is unique to the acetyl-CoA pathway and, in the present study, acetyl-CoA synthase genes (acsB) were recovered from a range of acetogens to facilitate the design of acsB-specific PCR primers. fhs and acsB libraries were used to examine acetogen diversity in the bovine rumen and forestomach of the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii), a native Australian marsupial demonstrating foregut fermentation analogous to rumen fermentation but resulting in lower methane emissions. Novel, deduced amino acid sequences of acsB and fhs affiliated with the Lachnospiraceae in both ecosystems and the Ruminococcaeae/Blautia group in the rumen. FTHFS sequences that probably originated from nonacetogens were identified by low "homoacetogen similarity" scores based on analysis of FTHFS residues, and comprised a large proportion of FTHFS sequences from the tammar wallaby forestomach. A diversity of FTHFS and ACS sequences in both ecosystems clustered between the Lachnospiraceae and Clostridiaceae acetogens but without close sequences from cultured isolates. These sequences probably originated from novel acetogens. The community structures of the acsB and fhs libraries from the rumen and the tammar wallaby forestomach were different (LIBSHUFF, P < 0.001), and these differences may have significance for overall hydrogenotrophy in both ecosystems.

  10. Tindallia californiensis sp. nov., a new anaerobic, haloalkaliphilic, spore-forming acetogen isolated from Mono Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, E. V.; Hoover, R. B.; Bej, A. K.; Marsic, D.; Detkova, E. N.; Whitman, W. B.; Krader, P.

    2003-01-01

    A novel extremely haloalkaliphilic, strictly anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium strain APO was isolated from sediments of the athalassic, meromictic, alkaline Mono Lake in California. The Gram-positive, spore-forming, slightly curved rods with sizes 0.55- 0.7x1.7-3.0 microns were motile by a single laterally attached flagellum. Strain APO was mesophilic (range 10-48 C, optimum of 37 C); halophilic (NaCl range 1-20% (w/v) with optimum of 3-5% (w/v), and alkaliphilic (pH range 8.0-10.5, optimum 9.5). The novel isolate required sodium ions in the medium. Strain APO was an organotroph with a fermentative type of metabolism and used the substrates peptone, bacto-tryptone, casamino acid, yeast extract, L-serine, L-lysine, L-histidine, L-arginine, and pyruvate. The new isolate performed the Stickland reaction with the following amino acid pairs: proline + alanine, glycine + alanine, and tryptophan + valine. The main end product of growth was acetate. High activity of CO dehydrogenase and hydrogenase indicated the presence of a homoacetogenic, non-cycling acetyl-coA pathway. Strain APO was resistant to kanamycin but sensitive to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and gentamycin. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 44.4 mol% (by HPLC method). The sequence of the 16s rRNA gene of strain APO possessed 98.2% similarity with the sequence from Tindullia magadiensis Z-7934, but the DNA-DNA hybridization value between these organisms was only 55%. On the basis of these physiological and molecular properties, strain APO is proposed to be a novel species of the genus Tindallia with the name Tindallia californiensis sp. nov., (type strain APO = ATCC BAA-393 - DSM 14871).

  11. Design and testing of a functional group-specific DNA probe for the study of natural populations of acetogenic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Lovell, C R; Hui, Y

    1991-01-01

    The acetogens, although phylogenetically diverse, can be characterized by their possession of the acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) pathway for autotrophic CO2 fixation. The gene encoding formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase, a key enzyme of the acetyl-CoA pathway, was previously cloned from the thermophilic acetogen Clostridium thermoaceticum and has now been tested as a group-specific probe for acetogens. Stable hybrids were formed between the probe and single DNA fragments from eight known acetogens representing six genera. A hybrid was also formed between the probe and a DNA fragment from one sulfate reducer known to be capable of both autotrophic CO2 fixation and acetate catabolism. No such hybrid was formed between the probe and DNA from a homoacetate fermenter not known to use the acetyl-CoA pathway, with two known formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase-producing purine fermenters, or with DNA from 27 other species representing 16 genera of organisms that do not use the acetyl-CoA pathway. DNA purified from cells extracted from horse manure was also screened with the acetogen probe. Six hybrids, indicating at least six detectable acetogen "strains," were observed. Images PMID:1768134

  12. Hydrogenotrophic culture enrichment reveals rumen Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae acetogens and hydrogen-responsive Bacteroidetes from pasture-fed cattle.

    PubMed

    Gagen, Emma J; Padmanabha, Jagadish; Denman, Stuart E; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2015-07-01

    Molecular information suggests that there is a broad diversity of acetogens in the rumen, distinct from any currently isolated acetogens. We combined molecular analysis with enrichment culture techniques to investigate this diversity further. Methane-inhibited, hydrogenotrophic enrichment cultures produced acetate as the dominant end product. Acetyl-CoA synthase gene analysis revealed putative acetogens in the cultures affiliated with the Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae as has been found in other rumen studies. No formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase genes affiliating with acetogens or with 'homoacetogen similarity' scores >90% were identified. To further investigate the hydrogenotrophic populations in these cultures and link functional gene information with 16S rRNA gene identity, cultures were subcultured quickly, twice, through medium without exogenous hydrogen, followed by incubation without exogenous hydrogen. Comparison of cultures lacking hydrogen and their parent cultures revealed novel Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae that diminished in the absence of hydrogen, supporting the hypothesis that they were likely the predominant acetogens in the enrichments. Interestingly, a range of Bacteroidetes rrs sequences that demonstrated <86% identity to any named isolate also diminished in cultures lacking hydrogen. Acetogens or sulphate reducers from the Bacteroidetes have not been reported previously; therefore this observation requires further investigation.

  13. Hydrogenotrophic culture enrichment reveals rumen Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae acetogens and hydrogen-responsive Bacteroidetes from pasture-fed cattle.

    PubMed

    Gagen, Emma J; Padmanabha, Jagadish; Denman, Stuart E; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2015-07-01

    Molecular information suggests that there is a broad diversity of acetogens in the rumen, distinct from any currently isolated acetogens. We combined molecular analysis with enrichment culture techniques to investigate this diversity further. Methane-inhibited, hydrogenotrophic enrichment cultures produced acetate as the dominant end product. Acetyl-CoA synthase gene analysis revealed putative acetogens in the cultures affiliated with the Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae as has been found in other rumen studies. No formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase genes affiliating with acetogens or with 'homoacetogen similarity' scores >90% were identified. To further investigate the hydrogenotrophic populations in these cultures and link functional gene information with 16S rRNA gene identity, cultures were subcultured quickly, twice, through medium without exogenous hydrogen, followed by incubation without exogenous hydrogen. Comparison of cultures lacking hydrogen and their parent cultures revealed novel Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae that diminished in the absence of hydrogen, supporting the hypothesis that they were likely the predominant acetogens in the enrichments. Interestingly, a range of Bacteroidetes rrs sequences that demonstrated <86% identity to any named isolate also diminished in cultures lacking hydrogen. Acetogens or sulphate reducers from the Bacteroidetes have not been reported previously; therefore this observation requires further investigation. PMID:26109360

  14. Characterizing acetogenic metabolism using a genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The metabolic capabilities of acetogens to ferment a wide range of sugars, to grow autotrophically on H2/CO2, and more importantly on synthesis gas (H2/CO/CO2) make them very attractive candidates as production hosts for biofuels and biocommodities. Acetogenic metabolism is considered one of the earliest modes of bacterial metabolism. A thorough understanding of various factors governing the metabolism, in particular energy conservation mechanisms, is critical for metabolic engineering of acetogens for targeted production of desired chemicals. Results Here, we present the genome-scale metabolic network of Clostridium ljungdahlii, the first such model for an acetogen. This genome-scale model (iHN637) consisting of 637 genes, 785 reactions, and 698 metabolites captures all the major central metabolic and biosynthetic pathways, in particular pathways involved in carbon fixation and energy conservation. A combination of metabolic modeling, with physiological and transcriptomic data provided insights into autotrophic metabolism as well as aided the characterization of a nitrate reduction pathway in C. ljungdahlii. Analysis of the iHN637 metabolic model revealed that flavin based electron bifurcation played a key role in energy conservation during autotrophic growth and helped identify genes for some of the critical steps in this mechanism. Conclusions iHN637 represents a predictive model that recapitulates experimental data, and provides valuable insights into the metabolic response of C. ljungdahlii to genetic perturbations under various growth conditions. Thus, the model will be instrumental in guiding metabolic engineering of C. ljungdahlii for the industrial production of biocommodities and biofuels. PMID:24274140

  15. Complete genome sequence of a malodorant-producing acetogen, Clostridium scatologenes ATCC 25775(T).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhengang; Guo, Ting; Zheng, Huajun; Song, Tianshun; Ouyang, Pingkai; Xie, Jingjing

    2015-10-20

    Clostridium scatologenes ATCC 25775(T) is an acetogenic anaerobic bacteria known to be capable of synthesizing volatile fatty acids and solvents from CO2 or CO on its autotrophic mode and producing 3-methylindole and 4-methylphenol on its heterotrophic mode. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of this strain, which might provide a lot of valuable information for developing metabolic engineering strategies to produce biofuels or chemicals from greenhouse gases. PMID:26210291

  16. Characterizing acetogenic metabolism using a genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    SciTech Connect

    Nagarajan, H; Sahin, M; Nogales, J; Latif, H; Lovley, DR; Ebrahim, A; Zengler, K

    2013-11-25

    Background: The metabolic capabilities of acetogens to ferment a wide range of sugars, to grow autotrophically on H-2/CO2, and more importantly on synthesis gas (H-2/CO/CO2) make them very attractive candidates as production hosts for biofuels and biocommodities. Acetogenic metabolism is considered one of the earliest modes of bacterial metabolism. A thorough understanding of various factors governing the metabolism, in particular energy conservation mechanisms, is critical for metabolic engineering of acetogens for targeted production of desired chemicals. Results: Here, we present the genome-scale metabolic network of Clostridium ljungdahlii, the first such model for an acetogen. This genome-scale model (iHN637) consisting of 637 genes, 785 reactions, and 698 metabolites captures all the major central metabolic and biosynthetic pathways, in particular pathways involved in carbon fixation and energy conservation. A combination of metabolic modeling, with physiological and transcriptomic data provided insights into autotrophic metabolism as well as aided the characterization of a nitrate reduction pathway in C. ljungdahlii. Analysis of the iHN637 metabolic model revealed that flavin based electron bifurcation played a key role in energy conservation during autotrophic growth and helped identify genes for some of the critical steps in this mechanism. Conclusions: iHN637 represents a predictive model that recapitulates experimental data, and provides valuable insights into the metabolic response of C. ljungdahlii to genetic perturbations under various growth conditions. Thus, the model will be instrumental in guiding metabolic engineering of C. ljungdahlii for the industrial production of biocommodities and biofuels.

  17. THERMICANUS AEGYPTIUS GEN. NOV., SP. NOV., ISOLATED FROM OXIC SOIL, A FERMENTATIVE MICROAEROPHILE THAT GROWS COMMENSALLY WITH THE THERMOPHILIC ACETOGEN MOORELLA THERMOACETICA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A thermophilic, fermentative microaerophile (ET-5b) and a thermophilic acetogen (ET-5a) were coisolated from oxic soil obtained from Egypt. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of ET-5a was 99.8% identical to that of the classic acetogen Moorella thermoacetica. Further analyses confirmed t...

  18. A Deeply Branching Thermophilic Bacterium with an Ancient Acetyl-CoA Pathway Dominates a Subsurface Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Takami, Hideto; Noguchi, Hideki; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Toyoda, Atsushi; Nishi, Shinro; Chee, Gab-Joo; Arai, Wataru; Nunoura, Takuro; Itoh, Takehiko; Hattori, Masahira; Takai, Ken

    2012-01-01

    A nearly complete genome sequence of Candidatus ‘Acetothermum autotrophicum’, a presently uncultivated bacterium in candidate division OP1, was revealed by metagenomic analysis of a subsurface thermophilic microbial mat community. Phylogenetic analysis based on the concatenated sequences of proteins common among 367 prokaryotes suggests that Ca. ‘A. autotrophicum’ is one of the earliest diverging bacterial lineages. It possesses a folate-dependent Wood-Ljungdahl (acetyl-CoA) pathway of CO2 fixation, is predicted to have an acetogenic lifestyle, and possesses the newly discovered archaeal-autotrophic type of bifunctional fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase/phosphatase. A phylogenetic analysis of the core gene cluster of the acethyl-CoA pathway, shared by acetogens, methanogens, some sulfur- and iron-reducers and dechlorinators, supports the hypothesis that the core gene cluster of Ca. ‘A. autotrophicum’ is a particularly ancient bacterial pathway. The habitat, physiology and phylogenetic position of Ca. ‘A. autotrophicum’ support the view that the first bacterial and archaeal lineages were H2-dependent acetogens and methanogenes living in hydrothermal environments. PMID:22303444

  19. Acetogenic mixotrophy: novel options for yield improvement in biofuels and biochemicals production.

    PubMed

    Fast, Alan G; Schmidt, Ellinor D; Jones, Shawn W; Tracy, Bryan P

    2015-06-01

    Mass yields of biofuels and chemicals from sugar fermentations are limited by the decarboxylation reactions involved in Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) glycolysis. This paper reviews one route to recapture evolved CO2 using the Wood-Ljungdahl carbon fixation pathway (WLP) in a process called anaerobic, non-photosynthetic (ANP) mixotrophic fermentation. In ANP mixotrophic fermentation, the two molecules of CO2 and eight electrons produced from glycolysis are used by the WLP to generate three molecules of acetyl-CoA from glucose, rather than the two molecules that are produced by typical fermentation processes. In this review, we define the bounds of ANP mixotrophy, calculate the potential metabolic advantages, and discuss the viability in a number of host organisms. Additionally, we highlight recent accomplishments in the field, including the recent discovery of electron bifurcation in acetogens, and close with recommendations to realize mixotrophic biofuel and biochemical production.

  20. Chemolithotrophic acetogenic H2/CO2 utilization in Italian rice field soil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fanghua; Conrad, Ralf

    2011-09-01

    Acetate oxidation in Italian rice field at 50 °C is achieved by uncultured syntrophic acetate oxidizers. As these bacteria are closely related to acetogens, they may potentially also be able to synthesize acetate chemolithoautotrophically. Labeling studies using exogenous H(2) (80%) and (13)CO(2) (20%), indeed demonstrated production of acetate as almost exclusive primary product not only at 50 °C but also at 15 °C. Small amounts of formate, propionate and butyrate were also produced from (13)CO(2). At 50 °C, acetate was first produced but later on consumed with formation of CH(4). Acetate was also produced in the absence of exogenous H(2) albeit to lower concentrations. The acetogenic bacteria and methanogenic archaea were targeted by stable isotope probing of ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Using quantitative PCR, (13)C-labeled bacterial rRNA was detected after 20 days of incubation with (13)CO(2). In the heavy fractions at 15 °C, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA showed that Clostridium cluster I and uncultured Peptococcaceae assimilated (13)CO(2) in the presence and absence of exogenous H(2), respectively. A similar experiment showed that Thermoanaerobacteriaceae and Acidobacteriaceae were dominant in the (13)C treatment at 50 °C. Assimilation of (13)CO(2) into archaeal rRNA was detected at 15 °C and 50 °C, mostly into Methanocellales, Methanobacteriales and rice cluster III. Acetoclastic methanogenic archaea were not detected. The above results showed the potential for acetogenesis in the presence and absence of exogenous H(2) at both 15 °C and 50 °C. However, syntrophic acetate oxidizers seemed to be only active at 50 °C, while other bacterial groups were active at 15 °C.

  1. Mevalonate production by engineered acetogen biocatalyst during continuous fermentation of syngas or CO₂/H₂ blend.

    PubMed

    Kiriukhin, Michael; Tyurin, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Naturally mevalonate-resistant acetogen Clostridium sp. MT1243 produced only 425 mM acetate during syngas fermentation. Using Clostridium sp. MT1243 we engineered biocatalyst selectively producing mevalonate from synthesis gas or CO₂/H₂ blend. Acetate production and spore formation were eliminated from Clostridium sp. MT1243 using Cre-lox66/lox71-system. Cell energy released via elimination of phosphotransacetylase, acetate kinase and early stage sporulation genes powered mevalonate accumulation in fermentation broth due to expression of synthetic thiolase, HMG-synthase, and HMG-reductase, three copies of each, integrated using Tn7-approach. Recombinants produced 145 mM mevalonate in five independent single-step fermentation runs 25 days each in five repeats using syngas blend 60% CO and 40% H₂ (v/v) (p < 0.005). Mevalonate production was 97 mM if only CO₂/H₂ blend was fed instead of syngas (p < 0.005). Mevalonate from CO₂/H₂ blend might serve as a commercial route to mitigate global warming in proportion to CO₂ fermentation scale worldwide.

  2. The roles of methanogens and acetogens in dechlorination of trichloroethene using different electron donors.

    PubMed

    Wen, Li-Lian; Zhang, Yin; Pan, Ya-Wei; Wu, Wen-Qi; Meng, Shao-Hua; Zhou, Chen; Tang, Youneng; Zheng, Ping; Zhao, He-Ping

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the effects of methanogens and acetogens on the function and structure of microbial communities doing reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) by adding four distinct electron donors: lactate, a fermentable organic; acetate, a non-fermentable organic; methanol, a fermentable 1-C (carbon) organic; and hydrogen gas (H2), the direct electron donor for reductive dechlorination by Dehalococcoides. The fermentable electron donors had faster dechlorination rates, more complete dechlorination, and higher bacterial abundances than the non-fermentable electron donors during short-term tests. Phylotypes of Dehalococcoides were relatively abundant (≥9%) for the cultures fed with fermentable electron donors but accounted for only ~1-2% of the reads for the cultures fed by the non-fermentable electron donors. Routing electrons to methanogenesis and a low ratio of Dehalococcoides/methanogenesis (Dhc/mcrA) were associated with slow and incomplete reductive dechlorination with methanol and H2. When fermentable substrates were applied as electron donors, a Dhc/mcrA ratio ≥6.4 was essential to achieve fast and complete dechlorination of TCE to ethene. When methanogenesis was suppressed using 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES), achieving complete dechlorination of TCE to ethane required a minimum abundance of the mcrA gene. Methanobacterium appeared to be important for maintaining a high dechlorination rate, probably by providing Dehalococcoides with cofactors other than vitamin B12. Furthermore, the presence of homoacetogens also was important to maintain a high dechlorination rate, because they provided acetate as Dehalococcoides's obligatory carbon source and possibly cofactors.

  3. Carbon Isotope Fractionation during Catabolism and Anabolism in Acetogenic Bacteria Growing on Different Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Freude, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Homoacetogenic bacteria are versatile microbes that use the acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) pathway to synthesize acetate from CO2 and hydrogen. Likewise, the acetyl-CoA pathway may be used to incorporate other 1-carbon substrates (e.g., methanol or formate) into acetate or to homoferment monosaccharides completely to acetate. In this study, we analyzed the fractionation of pure acetogenic cultures grown on different carbon substrates. While the fractionation of Sporomusa sphaeroides grown on C1 compounds was strong (εC1, −49‰ to −64‰), the fractionation of Moorella thermoacetica and Thermoanaerobacter kivui using glucose (εGlu = −14.1‰) was roughly one-third as strong, suggesting a contribution of less-depleted acetate from fermentative processes. For M. thermoacetica, this could indeed be validated by the addition of nitrate, which inhibited the acetyl-CoA pathway, resulting in fractionation during fermentation (εferm = −0.4‰). In addition, we determined the fractionation into microbial biomass of T. kivui grown on H2/CO2 (εanabol. = −28.6‰) as well as on glucose (εanabol. = +2.9‰). PMID:26921422

  4. Acetogens and Acetoclastic Methanosarcinales Govern Methane Formation in Abandoned Coal Mines▿

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, Sabrina; Lueders, Tillmann; Krüger, Martin; von Netzer, Frederick; Engelen, Bert; Cypionka, Heribert

    2011-01-01

    In abandoned coal mines, methanogenic archaea are responsible for the production of substantial amounts of methane. The present study aimed to directly unravel the active methanogens mediating methane release as well as active bacteria potentially involved in the trophic network. Therefore, the stable-isotope-labeled precursors of methane, [13C]acetate and H2-13CO2, were fed to liquid cultures from hard coal and mine timber from a coal mine in Germany. Guided by methane production rates, samples for DNA stable-isotope probing (SIP) with subsequent quantitative PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoretic (DGGE) analyses were taken over 6 months. Surprisingly, the formation of [13C]methane was linked to acetoclastic methanogenesis in both the [13C]acetate- and the H2-13CO2-amended cultures of coal and timber. H2-13CO2 was used mainly by acetogens related to Pelobacter acetylenicus and Clostridium species. Active methanogens, closely affiliated with Methanosarcina barkeri, utilized the readily available acetate rather than the thermodynamically more favorable hydrogen. Thus, the methanogenic microbial community appears to be highly adapted to the low-H2 conditions found in coal mines. PMID:21460109

  5. Effect of trace metals on ethanol production from synthesis gas by the ethanologenic acetogen, Clostridium ragsdalei.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Jyotisna; Tanner, Ralph S

    2011-04-01

    The effect of trace metal ions (Co²+, Cu²+, Fe²+, Mn²+, Mo⁶+, Ni²+, Zn²+, SeO₄⁻ and WO₄⁻) on growth and ethanol production by an ethanologenic acetogen, Clostridium ragsdalei was investigated in CO:CO₂-grown cells. A standard acetogen medium (ATCC medium no. 1754) was manipulated by varying the concentrations of trace metals in the media. Increasing the individual concentrations of Ni²+, Zn²+, SeO₄⁻ and WO₄⁻ from 0.84, 6.96, 1.06, and 0.68 μM in the standard trace metals solution to 8.4, 34.8, 5.3, and 6.8 μM, respectively, increased ethanol production from 35.73 mM under standard metals concentration to 176.5, 187.8, 54.4, and 72.3 mM, respectively. Nickel was necessary for growth of C. ragsdalei. Growth rate (μ) of C. ragsdalei improved from 0.34 to 0.49 (day⁻¹), and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH) and hydrogenase (H₂ase)-specific activities improved from 38.45 and 0.35 to 48.5 and 1.66 U/mg protein, respectively, at optimum concentration of Ni²+. At optimum concentrations of WO₄⁻ and SeO₄⁻, formate dehydrogenase (FDH) activity improved from 32.3 to 42.6 and 45.4 U/mg protein, respectively. Ethanol production and the activity of FDH reduced from 35 mM and 32.3 U/mg protein to 1.14 mM and 8.79 U/mg protein, respectively, upon elimination of WO₄⁻ from the medium. Although increased concentration of Zn²+ enhanced growth and ethanol production, the activities of CODH, FDH, H₂ase and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) were not affected by varying the Zn²+ concentration. Omitting Fe²+ from the medium decreased ethanol production from 35.7 to 6.30 mM and decreased activities of CODH, FDH, H₂ase and ADH from 38.5, 32.3, 0.35, and 0.68 U/mg protein to 9.07, 7.01, 0.10, and 0.24 U/mg protein, respectively. Ethanol production improved from 35 to 54 mM when Cu²+ was removed from the medium. The optimization of trace metals concentration in the fermentation medium improved enzyme activities (CODH, FDH, and H

  6. PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY OF CLOSTRIDIUM GLYCOLICUM RD-1, AN AEROTOLERANT ACETOGEN ISOLATED FROM SEA GRASS ROOTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An anaerobic, H2-utilizing bacterium, strain RD-1, was isolated from the highest growth-positive dilution series of a root homogenate prepared from the sea grass Halodule wrightii. Cells of RD-1 were gram-positive, spore-forming, motile rods that were linked by connecting filamen...

  7. Fermentation of phenoxyethanol to phenol and acetate by a homoacetogenic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Frings, J; Schink, B

    1994-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic gram-positive, rod-shaped bacterium, strain LuPhet1, was isolated from sewage sludge with phenoxyethanol as sole carbon and energy source, and was assigned to the genus Acetobacterium. The new isolate fermented the alkylaryl ether compound phenoxyethanol stoichiometrically to phenol and acetate, whereas phenoxyacetic acid was not degraded. In cell-free extracts of strain LuPhet1, cleavage of the ether linkage was shown, and acetaldehyde was detected as reaction product. Coenzyme A-dependent acetaldehyde: acceptor oxidoreductase, phosphate acetyltransferase, acetate kinase, and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase were measured in cell-free extracts of this strain. Our results indicate that the ether linkage of phenoxyethanol is cleaved by a shift of the hydroxyl group to the subterminal carbon atom, analogous to a corrinoid-dependent diol dehydratase reaction, to form an unstable hemiacetal that releases phenol and acetaldehyde. Obviously, phenoxyethanol is degraded by the same strategy as in anaerobic degradation of the alkyl ether polyethylene glycol.

  8. Adaptation of the autotrophic acetogen Sporomusa ovata to methanol accelerates the conversion of CO2 to organic products

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Höglund, Daniel; Koza, Anna; Bonde, Ida; Zhang, Tian

    2015-01-01

    Acetogens are efficient microbial catalysts for bioprocesses converting C1 compounds into organic products. Here, an adaptive laboratory evolution approach was implemented to adapt Sporomusa ovata for faster autotrophic metabolism and CO2 conversion to organic chemicals. S. ovata was first adapted to grow quicker autotrophically with methanol, a toxic C1 compound, as the sole substrate. Better growth on different concentrations of methanol and with H2-CO2 indicated the adapted strain had a more efficient autotrophic metabolism and a higher tolerance to solvent. The growth rate on methanol was increased 5-fold. Furthermore, acetate production rate from CO2 with an electrode serving as the electron donor was increased 6.5-fold confirming that the acceleration of the autotrophic metabolism of the adapted strain is independent of the electron donor provided. Whole-genome sequencing, transcriptomic, and biochemical studies revealed that the molecular mechanisms responsible for the novel characteristics of the adapted strain were associated with the methanol oxidation pathway and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway of acetogens along with biosynthetic pathways, cell wall components, and protein chaperones. The results demonstrate that an efficient strategy to increase rates of CO2 conversion in bioprocesses like microbial electrosynthesis is to evolve the microbial catalyst by adaptive laboratory evolution to optimize its autotrophic metabolism. PMID:26530351

  9. Adaptation of the autotrophic acetogen Sporomusa ovata to methanol accelerates the conversion of CO2 to organic products.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Höglund, Daniel; Koza, Anna; Bonde, Ida; Zhang, Tian

    2015-11-04

    Acetogens are efficient microbial catalysts for bioprocesses converting C1 compounds into organic products. Here, an adaptive laboratory evolution approach was implemented to adapt Sporomusa ovata for faster autotrophic metabolism and CO2 conversion to organic chemicals. S. ovata was first adapted to grow quicker autotrophically with methanol, a toxic C1 compound, as the sole substrate. Better growth on different concentrations of methanol and with H2-CO2 indicated the adapted strain had a more efficient autotrophic metabolism and a higher tolerance to solvent. The growth rate on methanol was increased 5-fold. Furthermore, acetate production rate from CO2 with an electrode serving as the electron donor was increased 6.5-fold confirming that the acceleration of the autotrophic metabolism of the adapted strain is independent of the electron donor provided. Whole-genome sequencing, transcriptomic, and biochemical studies revealed that the molecular mechanisms responsible for the novel characteristics of the adapted strain were associated with the methanol oxidation pathway and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway of acetogens along with biosynthetic pathways, cell wall components, and protein chaperones. The results demonstrate that an efficient strategy to increase rates of CO2 conversion in bioprocesses like microbial electrosynthesis is to evolve the microbial catalyst by adaptive laboratory evolution to optimize its autotrophic metabolism.

  10. Genome tailoring powered production of isobutanol in continuous CO2/H2 blend fermentation using engineered acetogen biocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Gak, Eugene; Tyurin, Michael; Kiriukhin, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The cell energy fraction that powered maintenance and expression of genes encoding pro-phage elements, pta-ack cluster, early sporulation, sugar ABC transporter periplasmic proteins, 6-phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and fructose-1,6-disphosphatase in acetogen Clostridium sp. MT871 was re-directed to power synthetic operon encoding isobutanol biosynthesis at the expense of these genes achieved via their elimination. Genome tailoring decreased cell duplication time by 7.0 ± 0.1 min (p < 0.05) compared to the parental strain, with intact genome and cell duplication time of 68 ± 1 min (p < 0.05). Clostridium sp. MT871 with tailored genome was UVC-mutated to withstand 6.1 % isobutanol in fermentation broth to prevent product inhibition in an engineered commercial biocatalyst producing 5 % (674.5 mM) isobutanol during two-step continuous fermentation of CO2/H2 gas blend. Biocatalyst Clostridium sp. MT871RG- 11IBR6 was engineered to express six copies of synthetic operon comprising optimized synthetic format dehydrogenase, pyruvate formate lyase, acetolactate synthase, acetohydroxyacid reductoisomerase, 2,3-dihydroxy-isovalerate dehydratase, branched-chain alpha-ketoacid decarboxylase gene, aldehyde dehydrogenase, and alcohol dehydrogenase, regaining cell duplication time of 68 ± 1 min (p < 0.05) for the parental strain. This is the first report on isobutanol production by an engineered acetogen biocatalyst suitable for commercial manufacturing of this chemical/fuel using continuous fermentation of CO2/H2 blend thus contributing to the reversal of global warming.

  11. Reconstruction of an Acetogenic 2,3-Butanediol Pathway Involving a Novel NADPH-Dependent Primary-Secondary Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Köpke, Michael; Gerth, Monica L.; Maddock, Danielle J.; Mueller, Alexander P.; Liew, FungMin

    2014-01-01

    Acetogenic bacteria use CO and/or CO2 plus H2 as their sole carbon and energy sources. Fermentation processes with these organisms hold promise for producing chemicals and biofuels from abundant waste gas feedstocks while simultaneously reducing industrial greenhouse gas emissions. The acetogen Clostridium autoethanogenum is known to synthesize the pyruvate-derived metabolites lactate and 2,3-butanediol during gas fermentation. Industrially, 2,3-butanediol is valuable for chemical production. Here we identify and characterize the C. autoethanogenum enzymes for lactate and 2,3-butanediol biosynthesis. The putative C. autoethanogenum lactate dehydrogenase was active when expressed in Escherichia coli. The 2,3-butanediol pathway was reconstituted in E. coli by cloning and expressing the candidate genes for acetolactate synthase, acetolactate decarboxylase, and 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase. Under anaerobic conditions, the resulting E. coli strain produced 1.1 ± 0.2 mM 2R,3R-butanediol (23 μM h−1 optical density unit−1), which is comparable to the level produced by C. autoethanogenum during growth on CO-containing waste gases. In addition to the 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase, we identified a strictly NADPH-dependent primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (CaADH) that could reduce acetoin to 2,3-butanediol. Detailed kinetic analysis revealed that CaADH accepts a range of 2-, 3-, and 4-carbon substrates, including the nonphysiological ketones acetone and butanone. The high activity of CaADH toward acetone led us to predict, and confirm experimentally, that C. autoethanogenum can act as a whole-cell biocatalyst for converting exogenous acetone to isopropanol. Together, our results functionally validate the 2,3-butanediol pathway from C. autoethanogenum, identify CaADH as a target for further engineering, and demonstrate the potential of C. autoethanogenum as a platform for sustainable chemical production. PMID:24657865

  12. Bacterial Community Profiling of H2/CO2 or Formate-Utilizing Acetogens Enriched from Diverse Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, R.; Zhang, L.; Fu, B.; Liu, H.

    2014-12-01

    Synthetic gases are usually generated from either cellulosic agricultural waste combustion or industrial release and could be subsequently transformed into acetate, ethanol, and/or butyrate by homoacetogenic bacteria, which commonly possess reductive acetyl-CoA synthesis pathway. Homoacetogen-based syngas fermentation technology provides an alternative solution to link greenhouse gas emission control and cellulosic solid waste treatment with biofuels production. The objective of our current project is to hunt for homoacetogens with capabilities of highly efficiently converting syngases to chemical solvents. In this study, we evaluated homoacetogens population dynamics during enrichments and pinpointed dominant homoacetogens representing diverse ecosystems enriched by different substrates. We enriched homoacetogens from four different samples including waste activate sludge, freshwater sediment, anaerobic methanogenic sludge, and cow manure using H2/CO2 (4:1) or formate as substrate for homoacetogen enrichment. Along with the formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase (FTHFS) gene (fhs gene)-specific real time qPCR assay and Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis, 16S rRNA based 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing was applied to reveal the population dynamic and community structure during enrichment from different origins. Enrichment of homoacetogenic populations coincided with accumulations of short chain fatty acids such as acetate and butyrate. 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing revealed Firmicutes and Spirochaetes populations became dominant while the overall microbial diversity decreased after enrichment. The most abundant sequences among the four origins belonged to the following phyla: Firmicutes, Spirochaetes, Proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes, accounting for 62.1%-99.1% of the total reads. The major putative homoacetogenic species enriched on H2/CO2 or formate belonged to Clostridium spp., Acetobacterium spp., Acetoanaerobium spp

  13. Competition and coexistence of sulfate-reducing bacteria, acetogens and methanogens in a lab-scale anaerobic bioreactor as affected by changing substrate to sulfate ratio.

    PubMed

    Dar, Shabir A; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Stams, Alfons J M; Kuenen, J Gijs; Muyzer, Gerard

    2008-04-01

    The microbial population structure and function of natural anaerobic communities maintained in lab-scale continuously stirred tank reactors at different lactate to sulfate ratios and in the absence of sulfate were analyzed using an integrated approach of molecular techniques and chemical analysis. The population structure, determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and by the use of oligonucleotide probes, was linked to the functional changes in the reactors. At the influent lactate to sulfate molar ratio of 0.35 mol mol(-1), i.e., electron donor limitation, lactate oxidation was mainly carried out by incompletely oxidizing sulfate-reducing bacteria, which formed 80-85% of the total bacterial population. Desulfomicrobium- and Desulfovibrio-like species were the most abundant sulfate-reducing bacteria. Acetogens and methanogenic Archaea were mostly outcompeted, although less than 2% of an acetogenic population could still be observed at this limiting concentration of lactate. In the near absence of sulfate (i.e., at very high lactate/sulfate ratio), acetogens and methanogenic Archaea were the dominant microbial communities. Acetogenic bacteria represented by Dendrosporobacter quercicolus-like species formed more than 70% of the population, while methanogenic bacteria related to uncultured Archaea comprising about 10-15% of the microbial community. At an influent lactate to sulfate molar ratio of 2 mol mol(-1), i.e., under sulfate-limiting conditions, a different metabolic route was followed by the mixed anaerobic community. Apparently, lactate was fermented to acetate and propionate, while the majority of sulfidogenesis and methanogenesis were dependent on these fermentation products. This was consistent with the presence of significant levels (40-45% of total bacteria) of D. quercicolus-like heteroacetogens and a corresponding increase of propionate-oxidizing Desulfobulbus-like sulfate-reducing bacteria (20% of the total bacteria). Methanogenic Archaea

  14. Thermicanus aegyptius gen. nov., sp. nov., Isolated from Oxic Soil, a Fermentative Microaerophile That Grows Commensally with the Thermophilic Acetogen Moorella thermoacetica

    PubMed Central

    Gößner, Anita S.; Devereux, Richard; Ohnemüller, Nadja; Acker, Georg; Stackebrandt, Erko; Drake, Harold L.

    1999-01-01

    A thermophilic, fermentative microaerophile (ET-5b) and a thermophilic acetogen (ET-5a) were coisolated from oxic soil obtained from Egypt. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of ET-5a was 99.8% similar to that of the classic acetogen Moorella thermoacetica. Further analyses confirmed that ET-5a was a new strain of M. thermoacetica. For ET-5b, the nearest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity value to known genera was approximately 88%. ET-5b was found to be a motile rod with a genomic G+C content of 50.3 mol%. Cells were weakly gram positive and lacked spores. Growth was optimal at 55 to 60°C and pH 6.5 to 7.0. ET-5b grew under both oxic and anoxic conditions, but growth was erratic under atmospheric concentrations of O2. Utilizable substrates included oligosaccharides and monosaccharides. Acetate, formate, and succinate supported growth only under oxic conditions. Saccharides yielded succinate, lactate, ethanol, acetate, formate, and H2 under anoxic conditions; fermentation products were also formed under oxic conditions. A new genus is proposed, the type strain being Thermicanus aegyptius ET-5b gen. nov., sp. nov. (DSMZ 12793). M. thermoacetica ET-5a (DSMZ 12797) grew commensally with T. aegyptius ET-5b on oligosaccharides via the interspecies transfer of H2 formate, and lactate. In support of this interaction, uptake hydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase specific activities were fundamentally greater in M. thermoacetica ET-5a than in T. aegyptius ET-5b. These results demonstrate that (i) soils subject to high temperatures harbor uncharacterized thermophilic microaerophiles, (ii) the classic acetogen M. thermoacetica resides in such soils, and (iii) trophic links between such soil bacteria might contribute to their in situ activities. PMID:10543831

  15. Single Bacterium Detection Using Sers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Baikova, T. V.; Alushin, M. V.; Svistunova, T. S.; Minaeva, S. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Saraeva, I. N.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    This work is devoted to the study of a single Staphylococcus aureus bacterium detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and resonant Raman spectroscopy (RS). It was shown that SERS allows increasing sensitivity of predominantly low frequency lines connected with the vibrations of Amide, Proteins and DNA. At the same time the lines of carotenoids inherent to this kind of bacterium are well-detected due to the resonance Raman scattering mechanism. The reproducibility and stability of Raman spectra strongly depend on the characteristics of nanostructured substrate, and molecular structure and size of the tested biological object.

  16. Characterization of the H2- and CO-dependent chemolithotrophic potentials of the acetogens Clostridium thermoaceticum and Acetogenium kivui.

    PubMed

    Daniel, S L; Hsu, T; Dean, S I; Drake, H L

    1990-08-01

    Strains of Clostridium thermoaceticum were tested for H2- and CO-dependent growth in a defined medium containing metals, minerals, vitamins, cysteine-sulfide, CO2-bicarbonate, and H2 or CO. Ten of the thirteen strains tested grew at the expense of H2 and CO, and C. thermoaceticum ATCC 39073 was chosen for further study. The doubling times for H2- and CO-dependent growth under chemolithotrophic conditions (the defined medium with nicotinic acid as sole essential vitamin and sulfide as sole reducer) were 25 and 10 h, respectively. Product stiochiometries for chemolithotrophic cultures approximated: 4.1H2 + 2.4CO2----CH3COOH + 0.1 cell C + 0.3 unrecovered C and 6.8CO----CH3COOH + 3.5CO2 + 0.4 cell C + 0.9 unrecovered C. H2-dependent growth produced significantly higher acetate concentrations per unit of biomass synthesized than did CO- or glucose-dependent growth. In contrast, the doubling time for H2-dependent growth under chemolithotrophic conditions (the defined medium without vitamins and sulfide as sole reducer) by Acetogenium kivui ATCC 33488 was 2.7 h; as a sole energy source, CO was not growth supportive for A. kivui. The YH2 values for A. kivui and C. thermoaceticum were 0.91 and 0.46 g of cell dry weight per mol of H2 consumed, respectively; the YCO value for C. thermoaceticum was 1.28 g of cell dry weight per mol of CO consumed. The specific activities of hydrogenase and CO dehydrogenase in both acetogens were influenced by the energy source utilized for growth and were significantly lower in C. thermoaceticum than in A. kivui. With extracts of H2-cultivated cells and benzyl viologen as electron acceptor, the Vmax values for hydrogenase from C. thermoaceticum and A. kivui were 155.7 and 1,670 micromoles of H2 oxidized per min mg of protein, respectively; the Vmax values for CO dehydrogenase from C. thermoaceticum and A. kivui were 90.6 and 2,973 micromoles of CO oxidized per min per mg of protein, respectively.

  17. Selective methanol or formate production during continuous CO₂ fermentation by the acetogen biocatalysts engineered via integration of synthetic pathways using Tn7-tool.

    PubMed

    Tyurin, Michael; Kiriukhin, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Methanol-resistant mutant acetogen Clostridium sp. MT1424 originally producing only 365 mM acetate from CO₂/CO was engineered to eliminate acetate production and spore formation using Cre-lox66/lox71-system to power subsequent methanol production via expressing synthetic methanol dehydrogenase, formaldehyde dehydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase, three copies of each, assembled in cluster and integrated to chromosome using Tn7-based approach. Production of 2.2 M methanol was steady (p < 0.005) in single step fermentations of 20 % CO₂ + 80 % H₂ blend (v/v) 25 day runs each in five independent repeats. If the integrated cluster comprised only three copies of formate dehydrogenase the respective recombinants produced 95 mM formate (p < 0.005) under the same conditions. For commercialization, the suggested source of inorganic carbon would be CO₂ waste of IGCC power plant. Hydrogen may be produced in situ via powered by solar panels electrolysis.

  18. Selective methanol or formate production during continuous CO₂ fermentation by the acetogen biocatalysts engineered via integration of synthetic pathways using Tn7-tool.

    PubMed

    Tyurin, Michael; Kiriukhin, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Methanol-resistant mutant acetogen Clostridium sp. MT1424 originally producing only 365 mM acetate from CO₂/CO was engineered to eliminate acetate production and spore formation using Cre-lox66/lox71-system to power subsequent methanol production via expressing synthetic methanol dehydrogenase, formaldehyde dehydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase, three copies of each, assembled in cluster and integrated to chromosome using Tn7-based approach. Production of 2.2 M methanol was steady (p < 0.005) in single step fermentations of 20 % CO₂ + 80 % H₂ blend (v/v) 25 day runs each in five independent repeats. If the integrated cluster comprised only three copies of formate dehydrogenase the respective recombinants produced 95 mM formate (p < 0.005) under the same conditions. For commercialization, the suggested source of inorganic carbon would be CO₂ waste of IGCC power plant. Hydrogen may be produced in situ via powered by solar panels electrolysis. PMID:23519429

  19. Occurrence of ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity and its ion specificity in several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Verena; Gallegos, Rene; Jones, J Andrew; Barquera, Blanca; Malamy, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    A ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase was recently discovered as a redox-driven ion pump in the anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The enzyme is assumed to be encoded by the rnf genes. Since these genes are present in the genomes of many bacteria, we tested for ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity in cytoplasmic membranes from several different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that have annotated rnf genes. We found this activity in Clostridium tetanomorphum, Clostridium ljungdahlii, Bacteroides fragilis, and Vibrio cholerae but not in Escherichia coli and Rhodobacter capsulatus. As in A. woodii, the activity was Na+-dependent in C. tetanomorphum and B. fragilis but Na+-independent in C. ljungdahlii and V. cholerae. We deleted the rnf genes from B. fragilis and demonstrated that the mutant has greatly reduced ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity. This is the first genetic proof that the rnf genes indeed encode the reduced ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity. PMID:26793417

  20. An Ancient Pathway Combining Carbon Dioxide Fixation with the Generation and Utilization of a Sodium Ion Gradient for ATP Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Poehlein, Anja; Schmidt, Silke; Kaster, Anne-Kristin; Goenrich, Meike; Vollmers, John; Thürmer, Andrea; Bertsch, Johannes; Schuchmann, Kai; Voigt, Birgit; Hecker, Michael; Daniel, Rolf; Thauer, Rudolf K.; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Müller, Volker

    2012-01-01

    Synthesis of acetate from carbon dioxide and molecular hydrogen is considered to be the first carbon assimilation pathway on earth. It combines carbon dioxide fixation into acetyl-CoA with the production of ATP via an energized cell membrane. How the pathway is coupled with the net synthesis of ATP has been an enigma. The anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii uses an ancient version of this pathway without cytochromes and quinones. It generates a sodium ion potential across the cell membrane by the sodium-motive ferredoxin:NAD oxidoreductase (Rnf). The genome sequence of A. woodii solves the enigma: it uncovers Rnf as the only ion-motive enzyme coupled to the pathway and unravels a metabolism designed to produce reduced ferredoxin and overcome energetic barriers by virtue of electron-bifurcating, soluble enzymes. PMID:22479398

  1. Genome analysis of Desulfotomaculum gibsoniae strain GrollT a highly versatile Gram-positive sulfate-reducing bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Kuever, Jan; Visser, Michael; Loeffler, Claudia; Boll, Matthias; Worm, Petra; Sousa, Diana Z.; Plugge, Caroline M.; Schaap, Peter J.; Muyzer, Gerard; Pereira, Ines A.C.; Parshina, Sofiya N.; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Detter, Janine; Woyke, Tanja; Chain, Patrick; Davenport, Karen W.; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Stams, Alfons J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Desulfotomaculum gibsoniae is a mesophilic member of the polyphyletic spore-forming genus Desulfotomaculum within the family Peptococcaceae. This bacterium was isolated from a freshwater ditch and is of interest because it can grow with a large variety of organic substrates, in particular several aromatic compounds, short-chain and medium-chain fatty acids, which are degraded completely to carbon dioxide coupled to the reduction of sulfate. It can grow autotrophically with H2 + CO2 and sulfate and slowly acetogenically with H2 + CO2, formate or methoxylated aromatic compounds in the absence of sulfate. It does not require any vitamins for growth. Here, we describe the features of D. gibsoniae strain GrollT together with the genome sequence and annotation. The chromosome has 4,855,529 bp organized in one circular contig and is the largest genome of all sequenced Desulfotomaculum spp. to date. A total of 4,666 candidate protein-encoding genes and 96 RNA genes were identified. Genes of the acetyl-CoA pathway, possibly involved in heterotrophic growth and in CO2 fixation during autotrophic growth, are present. The genome contains a large set of genes for the anaerobic transformation and degradation of aromatic compounds, which are lacking in the other sequenced Desulfotomaculum genomes. PMID:25197466

  2. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Affects Acetic Acid Production during Anaerobic Fermentation of Waste Activated Sludge by Altering Activity and Viability of Acetogen.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jingyang; Chen, Yinguang; Feng, Leiyu

    2016-07-01

    Till now, almost all the studies on anaerobic fermentation of waste activated sludge (WAS) for bioproducts generation focused on the influences of operating conditions, pretreatment methods and sludge characteristics, and few considered those of widespread persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in sludge, for example, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Herein, phenanthrene, which was a typical PAH and widespread in WAS, was selected as a model compound to investigate its effect on WAS anaerobic fermentation for short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) accumulation. Experimental results showed that the concentration of SCFAs derived from WAS was increased in the presence of phenanthrene during anaerobic fermentation. The yield of acetic acid which was the predominant SCFA in the fermentation reactor with the concentration of 100 mg/kg dry sludge was 1.8 fold of that in the control. Mechanism exploration revealed that the present phenanthrene mainly affected the acidification process of anaerobic fermentation and caused the shift of the microbial community to benefit the accumulation of acetic acid. Further investigation showed that both the activities of key enzymes (phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase) involved in acetic acid production and the quantities of their corresponding encoding genes were enhanced in the presence of phenanthrene. Viability tests by determining the adenosine 5'-triphosphate content and membrane potential confirmed that the acetogens were more viable in anaerobic fermentation systems with phenanthrene, which resulted in the increased production of acetic acid. PMID:27267805

  3. Energy Conservation Model Based on Genomic and Experimental Analyses of a Carbon Monoxide-Utilizing, Butyrate-Forming Acetogen, Eubacterium limosum KIST612.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jiyeong; Bertsch, Johannes; Hess, Verena; Choi, Sunju; Choi, In-Geol; Chang, In Seop; Müller, Volker

    2015-07-01

    Eubacterium limosum KIST612 is one of the few acetogens that can produce butyrate from carbon monoxide. We have used a genome-guided analysis to delineate the path of butyrate formation, the enzymes involved, and the potential coupling to ATP synthesis. Oxidation of CO is catalyzed by the acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthase/CO dehydrogenase and coupled to the reduction of ferredoxin. Oxidation of reduced ferredoxin is catalyzed by the Rnf complex and Na(+) dependent. Consistent with the finding of a Na(+)-dependent Rnf complex is the presence of a conserved Na(+)-binding motif in the c subunit of the ATP synthase. Butyrate formation is from acetyl-CoA via acetoacetyl-CoA, hydroxybutyryl-CoA, crotonyl-CoA, and butyryl-CoA and is consistent with the finding of a gene cluster that encodes the enzymes for this pathway. The activity of the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase was demonstrated. Reduction of crotonyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA with NADH as the reductant was coupled to reduction of ferredoxin. We postulate that the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase uses flavin-based electron bifurcation to reduce ferredoxin, which is consistent with the finding of etfA and etfB genes next to it. The overall ATP yield was calculated and is significantly higher than the one obtained with H2 + CO2. The energetic benefit may be one reason that butyrate is formed only from CO but not from H2 + CO2.

  4. Energy Conservation Model Based on Genomic and Experimental Analyses of a Carbon Monoxide-Utilizing, Butyrate-Forming Acetogen, Eubacterium limosum KIST612

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jiyeong; Bertsch, Johannes; Hess, Verena; Choi, Sunju; Choi, In-Geol

    2015-01-01

    Eubacterium limosum KIST612 is one of the few acetogens that can produce butyrate from carbon monoxide. We have used a genome-guided analysis to delineate the path of butyrate formation, the enzymes involved, and the potential coupling to ATP synthesis. Oxidation of CO is catalyzed by the acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthase/CO dehydrogenase and coupled to the reduction of ferredoxin. Oxidation of reduced ferredoxin is catalyzed by the Rnf complex and Na+ dependent. Consistent with the finding of a Na+-dependent Rnf complex is the presence of a conserved Na+-binding motif in the c subunit of the ATP synthase. Butyrate formation is from acetyl-CoA via acetoacetyl-CoA, hydroxybutyryl-CoA, crotonyl-CoA, and butyryl-CoA and is consistent with the finding of a gene cluster that encodes the enzymes for this pathway. The activity of the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase was demonstrated. Reduction of crotonyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA with NADH as the reductant was coupled to reduction of ferredoxin. We postulate that the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase uses flavin-based electron bifurcation to reduce ferredoxin, which is consistent with the finding of etfA and etfB genes next to it. The overall ATP yield was calculated and is significantly higher than the one obtained with H2 + CO2. The energetic benefit may be one reason that butyrate is formed only from CO but not from H2 + CO2. PMID:25956767

  5. Reductive biodegradation of 1,2-dichloroethane by methanogenic granular sludge: perspectives for in situ remediation.

    PubMed

    De Wildeman, S; Nollet, H; Van Langenhove, H; Diekert, G; Verstraete, W

    2002-01-01

    Granular methanogenic sludge was able to dechlorinate 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) to ethene in UASB reactors. Ethanol served as the sole carbon and energy source. The average dechlorination rate measured on the basis of ethene production varied between 1.7 and 2.1 micromol 1,2-DCA/(h.gVSS) (46.7 and 57.4 mg/L.d). In order to elucidate the microbial origin of this bioconversion, enrichment cultures of the methanogenic sludge were prepared with different carbon and electron sources: pyruvate, lactate, H2/CO2, ethanol and formate. Dithiothreitol (DTT) was the strong reductant in order to increase the negative redox potential in the media. A homo-acetogenic gram-positive strain could be isolated in the presence of formate. 16S rRNA of the isolated strain showed that the bacterium was closely related (99.7%) to Acetobacterium wieringae. The strain also grew on pyruvate, lactate, H2/CO2 and ethanol, although dechlorination rates of 1,2-DCA were at least 5 times higher when formate was the (only) electron source. Average conversion rates reached 3 micromol/(h.g(dry cells)) and appeared t relate to cometabolic biocatalysis on the corrinoid centers of the homo-acetogenic strain. Some perspectives of anaerobic in situ bioremediation of groundwater polluted with chloroethanes are presented.

  6. Novel Waddlia Intracellular Bacterium in Artibeus intermedius Fruit Bats, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Morales, Cirani Obregón; Martínez, Leonardo Perea; Ceballos, Nidia Aréchiga; Rivero, Juan José Pérez; Díaz, Osvaldo López; Brayton, Kelly A.

    2015-01-01

    An intracellular bacterium was isolated from fruit bats (Artibeus intermedius) in Cocoyoc, Mexico. The bacterium caused severe lesions in the lungs and spleens of bats and intracytoplasmic vacuoles in cell cultures. Sequence analyses showed it is related to Waddlia spp. (order Chlamydiales). We propose to call this bacterium Waddlia cocoyoc. PMID:26583968

  7. Novel Waddlia Intracellular Bacterium in Artibeus intermedius Fruit Bats, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Morales, Cirani Obregón; Martínez, Leonardo Perea; Ceballos, Nidia Aréchiga; Rivero, Juan José Pérez; Díaz, Osvaldo López; Brayton, Kelly A; Setién, Alvaro Aguilar

    2015-12-01

    An intracellular bacterium was isolated from fruit bats (Artibeus intermedius) in Cocoyoc, Mexico. The bacterium caused severe lesions in the lungs and spleens of bats and intracytoplasmic vacuoles in cell cultures. Sequence analyses showed it is related to Waddlia spp. (order Chlamydiales). We propose to call this bacterium Waddlia cocoyoc.

  8. Characterization of a novel extremely alkalophilic bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Souza, K. A.; Deal, P. H.

    1977-01-01

    A new alkalophilic bacterium, isolated from a natural spring of high pH is characterized. It is a Gram-positive, non-sporulating, motile rod requiring aerobic and alkaline conditions for growth. The characteristics of this organism resemble those of the coryneform group of bacteria; however, there are no accepted genera within this group with which this organism can be closely matched. Therefore, a new genus may be warranted.

  9. Detection of Salmonella bacterium in drinking water using microring resonator.

    PubMed

    Bahadoran, Mahdi; Noorden, Ahmad Fakhrurrazi Ahmad; Mohajer, Faeze Sadat; Abd Mubin, Mohamad Helmi; Chaudhary, Kashif; Jalil, Muhammad Arif; Ali, Jalil; Yupapin, Preecha

    2016-01-01

    A new microring resonator system is proposed for the detection of the Salmonella bacterium in drinking water, which is made up of SiO2-TiO2 waveguide embedded inside thin film layer of the flagellin. The change in refractive index due to the binding of the Salmonella bacterium with flagellin layer causes a shift in the output signal wavelength and the variation in through and drop port's intensities, which leads to the detection of Salmonella bacterium in drinking water. The sensitivity of proposed sensor for detecting of Salmonella bacterium in water solution is 149 nm/RIU and the limit of detection is 7 × 10(-4)RIU.

  10. Halotolerant and Resistant to High pH Hydrogenase from Haloalkaliphilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detkova, Ekaterina N.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogenase is the key enzyme of energetic metabolism in cells, it catalyzing the converse reaction of hydrogen oxidation and responsible for consumption and excretion of hydrogen in bacteria. Hydrogenases are proteins containing either Nickel and Iron, or the only Iron in theirs active center. Hydrogenases have been found in many microorganisms, such as Methanogenic, acetogenic, nitrogen-fixing, photosynthetic and sulfate-reducing bacteria that could utilize the hydrogen as energy source or use it as electron sink. Hydrogenases are subject for wide physiological, biochemical, physicochemical and genetic studies due to theirs abilities produce the molecular hydrogen as alternative source of pure energy. Notwithstanding on enough large quantity of works that deal with intracellular and extrasellular enzymes of halophilic bacteria, the data about hydrogenases and theirs functions of salts practically are absent. The study of hydrogenase in cell-free extracts of extremely halophilic eubacterium Acetohalobium mabaticum showed dramatic increasing activity of the enzyme at high concentrations of NaCl and KCI (close to saturated solution). Here we present the data of free-cells extracted hydrogenase from new haloalkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans, which grow on highly miniralized carbonate-bicarbonate medium in salinity range 1 to 7 % and at pH 7.8 - 10.5. Studied enzyme was active in Concentration range from 0 to 4.3 M NaCl with optimum at 1.0 M NaCl. At 1.0 M NaCl the enzyme activity was increased on 20 %, but with changing concentration from 2.1 M to 3.4 M the activity decreased and was kept on constant level. NaHCO3 inhibited hydrogenase activity on more then 30 %. The maximum of enzyme activity was observed at pH 9.5 with limits 7.5 and 11.5 that practically equal to pH optimum of bacterial growth. Therefore the hydrogenase of Desulfanatronum thiodismutans is tolerant to high concentrations of sodium salts and it also resistant to

  11. Salt-tolerant and high-pH-resistant hydrogenase from the haloalkaliphilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detkova, Ekaterina N.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-11-01

    Hydrogenase is the key enzyme of energetic metabolism in cells, catalyzing the converse reaction of hydrogen oxidation and responsible for the consumption and excretion of hydrogen in bacteria. Hydrogenases are proteins, most of which contain either nickel and iron or iron alone in their active center. Hydrogenases have been found in many microorganisms, such as methanogenic, acetogenic, nitrogen-fixing, sulfate-reducing, photosynthetic bacteria, and algae that use the hydrogen as an energy source or as an electron sink. Hydrogenases are the subject of wide physiological, biochemical, physico-chemical and genetic studies due to their abilities to produce molecular hydrogen as an alternative source of energy. Despite the large quantity of work dealing with the intracellular and extracellular enzymes of halophilic bacteria, the data about the response of hydrogenases to salts are practically absent. The study of hydrogenase in cell-free extracts of the extremely halophilic eubacterium Acetohalobium arabaticum showed a dramatic increase in the activity of the enzyme at high concentrations of NaCl and KCl (near saturated solutions). Here we present data about hydrogenase in a free-cell extract from the new halo-alkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans, which grows on a highly mineralized carbonate-bicarbonate medium in the salinity range from 1 to 7 % NaCl and at pH 8.0-10.0. The studied enzyme was active in concentration range from 0.0 to 4.3 M NaCl with the optimum at 1.0 M NaCl. At 1.0 M NaCl the enzyme expressed 20 % additional activity, with NaCl concentration changing from 2.1 M to 3.4 M, and then the activity decreased and reached a constant level. Although sodium bicarbonate decreases the hydrogenase activity, the enzyme still showed activity at 60 % of the maximum level at concentration in a near saturated solution (1.2 M NaHCO3). The maximum enzyme activity was observed at pH 9.5 with limits of 7.5 and 11.5, which is practically

  12. Agrobacterium tumefaciens Is a Diazotrophic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Kanvinde, Lalita; Sastry, G. R. K.

    1990-01-01

    This is the first report that Agrobacterium tumefaciens can fix nitrogen in a free-living condition as shown by its abilities to grow on nitrogen-free medium, reduce acetylene to ethylene, and incorporate 15N supplied as 15N2. As with most other well-characterized diazotrophic bacteria, the presence of NH4+ in the medium and aerobic conditions repress nitrogen fixation by A. tumefaciens. The system requires molybdenum. No evidence for nodulation was found with pea, peanut, or soybean plants. Further understanding of the nitrogen-fixing ability of this bacterium, which has always been considered a pathogen, should cast new light on the evolution of a pathogenic versus symbiotic relationship. Images PMID:16348237

  13. Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a diazotrophic bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Kanvinde, L.; Sastry, G.R.K. )

    1990-07-01

    This is the first report that Agrobacterium tumefaciens can fix nitrogen in a free-living condition as shown by its abilities to grown on nitrogen-free medium, reduce acetylene to ethylene, and incorporate {sup 15}N supplied as {sup 15}N{sub 2}. As with most other well-characterized diazotrophic bacteria, the presence of NH{sub 4}{sup +} in the medium and aerobic conditions repress nitrogen fixation by A. tumefaciens. The system requires molybdenum. No evidence for nodulation was found with pea, peanut, or soybean plants. Further understanding of the nitrogen-fixing ability of this bacterium, which has always been considered a pathogen, should cast new light on the evolution of a pathogenic versus symbiotic relationship.

  14. Immobilization of the Methanogenic bacterium methanosarcina barkeri

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, P.; Kluge, M.; Klein, J.; Sahm, H.

    1981-05-01

    Whole cells of the methanogen Methanosarcina barkeri were immobilized in an alginate network which was crosslinked with Ca/sup 2+/ calcium ions. The rates of methanol conversion to methane of entrapped cells were found to be in the same range as the corresponding rates of free cells. Furthermore, immobilized cells were active for a longer period than free cells. The particle size of the spherical alginate beads and thus diffusion has no obvious influence on the turnover of methanol. The half-value period for methanol conversion activity determined in a buffer medium was approximately 4 days at 37/degree/C for entrapped cells. The high rates of methanol degradation indicated that the immobilization technique preserved the cellular functions of this methanogenic bacterium. 24 refs.

  15. The chemical formula of a magnetotactic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Naresh, Mohit; Das, Sayoni; Mishra, Prashant; Mittal, Aditya

    2012-05-01

    Elucidation of the chemical logic of life is one of the grand challenges in biology, and essential to the progress of the upcoming field of synthetic biology. Treatment of microbial cells explicitly as a "chemical" species in controlled reaction (growth) environments has allowed fascinating discoveries of elemental formulae of a few species that have guided the modern views on compositions of a living cell. Application of mass and energy balances on living cells has proved to be useful in modeling of bioengineering systems, particularly in deriving optimized media compositions for growing microorganisms to maximize yields of desired bio-derived products by regulating intra-cellular metabolic networks. In this work, application of elemental mass balance during growth of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense in bioreactors has resulted in the discovery of the chemical formula of the magnetotactic bacterium. By developing a stoichiometric equation characterizing the formation of a magnetotactic bacterial cell, coupled with rigorous experimental measurements and robust calculations, we report the elemental formula of M. gryphiswaldense cell as CH(2.06)O(0.13)N(0.28)Fe(1.74×10(-3)). Remarkably, we find that iron metabolism during growth of this magnetotactic bacterium is much more correlated individually with carbon and nitrogen, compared to carbon and nitrogen with each other, indicating that iron serves more as a nutrient during bacterial growth rather than just a mineral. Magnetotactic bacteria have not only invoked some interest in the field of astrobiology for the last two decades, but are also prokaryotes having the unique ability of synthesizing membrane bound intracellular organelles. Our findings on these unique prokaryotes are a strong addition to the limited repertoire, of elemental compositions of living cells, aimed at exploring the chemical logic of life.

  16. Assessment of reductive acetogenesis with indigenous ruminal bacterium populations and Acetitomaculum ruminis.

    PubMed

    Le Van, T D; Robinson, J A; Ralph, J; Greening, R C; Smolenski, W J; Leedle, J A; Schaefer, D M

    1998-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of reductive acetogenesis as an alternative H2 disposal mechanism in the rumen. H2/CO2-supported acetogenic ruminal bacteria were enumerated by using a selective inhibitor of methanogenesis, 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid (BES). Acetogenic bacteria ranged in density from 2.5 x 10(5) cells/ml in beef cows fed a high-forage diet to 75 cells/ml in finishing steers fed a high-grain diet. Negligible endogenous acetogenic activity was demonstrated in incubations containing ruminal contents, NaH13CO3, and 100% H2 gas phase since [U-13C]acetate, as measured by mass spectroscopy, did not accumulate. Enhancement of acetogenesis was observed in these incubations when methanogenesis was inhibited by BES and/or by the addition of an axenic culture of the rumen acetogen Acetitomaculum ruminis 190A4 (10(7) CFU/ml). To assess the relative importance of population density and/or H2 concentration for reductive acetogenesis in ruminal contents, incubations as described above were performed under a 100% N2 gas phase. Both selective inhibition of methanogenesis and A. ruminis 190A4 fortification (>10(5) CFU/ml) were necessary for the detection of reductive acetogenesis under H2-limiting conditions. Under these conditions, H2 accumulated to 4, 800 ppm. In contrast, H2 accumulated to 400 ppm in incubations with active methanogenesis (without BES). These H2 concentrations correlated well with the pure culture H2 threshold concentrations determined for A. ruminis 190A4 (3,830 ppm) and the ruminal methanogen 10-16B (126 ppm). The data demonstrate that ruminal methanogenic bacteria limited reductive acetogenesis by lowering the H2 partial pressure below the level necessary for H2 utilization by A. ruminis 190A4. PMID:9726893

  17. Chitoporin from the Marine Bacterium Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Chumjan, Watcharin; Winterhalter, Mathias; Schulte, Albert; Benz, Roland; Suginta, Wipa

    2015-01-01

    VhChiP is a sugar-specific porin present in the outer membrane of the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi. VhChiP is responsible for the uptake of chitin oligosaccharides, with particular selectivity for chitohexaose. In this study, we employed electrophysiological and biochemical approaches to demonstrate that Trp136, located at the mouth of the VhChiP pore, plays an essential role in controlling the channel's ion conductivity, chitin affinity, and permeability. Kinetic analysis of sugar translocation obtained from single channel recordings indicated that the Trp136 mutations W136A, W136D, W136R, and W136F considerably reduce the binding affinity of the protein channel for its best substrate, chitohexaose. Liposome swelling assays confirmed that the Trp136 mutations decreased the rate of bulk chitohexaose permeation through the VhChiP channel. Notably, all of the mutants show increases in the off-rate for chitohexaose of up to 20-fold compared with that of the native channel. Furthermore, the cation/anion permeability ratio Pc/Pa is decreased in the W136R mutant and increased in the W136D mutant. This demonstrates that the negatively charged surface at the interior of the protein lumen preferentially attracts cationic species, leading to the cation selectivity of this trimeric channel. PMID:26082491

  18. Characterizations of intracellular arsenic in a bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe-Simon, F.; Yannone, S. M.; Tainer, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Life requires a key set of chemical elements to sustain growth. Yet, a growing body of literature suggests that microbes can alter their nutritional requirements based on the availability of these chemical elements. Under limiting conditions for one element microbes have been shown to utilize a variety of other elements to serve similar functions often (but not always) in similar molecular structures. Well-characterized elemental exchanges include manganese for iron, tungsten for molybdenum and sulfur for phosphorus or oxygen. These exchanges can be found in a wide variety of biomolecules ranging from protein to lipids and DNA. Recent evidence suggested that arsenic, as arsenate or As(V), was taken up and incorporated into the cellular material of the bacterium GFAJ-1. The evidence was interpreted to support As(V) acting in an analogous role to phosphate. We will therefore discuss our ongoing efforts to characterize intracellular arsenate and how it may partition among the cellular fractions of the microbial isolate GFAJ-1 when exposed to As(V) in the presence of various levels of phosphate. Under high As(V) conditions, cells express a dramatically different proteome than when grown given only phosphate. Ongoing studies on the diversity and potential role of proteins and metabolites produced in the presence of As(V) will be reported. These investigations promise to inform the role and additional metabolic potential for As in biology. Arsenic assimilation into biomolecules contributes to the expanding set of chemical elements utilized by microbes in unusual environmental niches.

  19. Taxonomic characterization of the cellulose-degrading bacterium NCIB 10462

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, C.; Ringleberg, D.; Scott, T.C.; Phelps, T.

    1994-06-01

    The gram negative cellulase-producing bacterium NCIB 10462 has been previously named Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. or var. cellulosa. Since there is renewed interest in cellulose-degrading bacteria for use in bioconversion of cellulose to chemical feed stocks and fuels, we re-examined the characteristics of this microorganism to determine its proper taxonomic characterization and to further define it`s true metabolic potential. Metabolic and physical characterization of NCIB 10462 revealed that this was an alkalophilic, non-fermentative, gram negative, oxidase positive, motile, cellulose-degrading bacterium. The aerobic substrate utilization profile of this bacterium was found to have few characteristics consistent with a classification of P. fluorescens with a very low probability match with the genus Sphingomonas. Total lipid analysis did not reveal that any sphingolipid bases are produced by this bacterium. NCIB 10462 was found to grow best aerobically but also grows well in complex media under reducing conditions. NCIB 10462 grew slowly under full anaerobic conditions on complex media but growth on cellulosic media was found only under aerobic conditions. Total fatty acid analysis (MIDI) of NCIB 10462 failed to group this bacterium with a known pseudomonas species. However, fatty acid analysis of the bacteria when grown at temperatures below 37{degrees}C suggest that the organism is a pseudomonad. Since a predominant characteristic of this bacterium is it`s ability to degrade cellulose, we suggest it be called Pseudomonas cellulosa.

  20. Pangenome Evolution in the Marine Bacterium Alteromonas

    PubMed Central

    López-Pérez, Mario; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    We have examined a collection of the free-living marine bacterium Alteromonas genomes with cores diverging in average nucleotide identities ranging from 99.98% to 73.35%, i.e., from microbes that can be considered members of a natural clone (like in a clinical epidemiological outbreak) to borderline genus level. The genomes were largely syntenic allowing a precise delimitation of the core and flexible regions in each. The core was 1.4 Mb (ca. 30% of the typical strain genome size). Recombination rates along the core were high among strains belonging to the same species (37.7–83.7% of all nucleotide polymorphisms) but they decreased sharply between species (18.9–5.1%). Regarding the flexible genome, its main expansion occurred within the boundaries of the species, i.e., strains of the same species already have a large and diverse flexible genome. Flexible regions occupy mostly fixed genomic locations. Four large genomic islands are involved in the synthesis of strain-specific glycosydic receptors that we have called glycotypes. These genomic regions are exchanged by homologous recombination within and between species and there is evidence for their import from distant taxonomic units (other genera within the family). In addition, several hotspots for integration of gene cassettes by illegitimate recombination are distributed throughout the genome. They code for features that give each clone specific properties to interact with their ecological niche and must flow fast throughout the whole genus as they are found, with nearly identical sequences, in different species. Models for the generation of this genomic diversity involving phage predation are discussed. PMID:27189983

  1. Pangenome Evolution in the Marine Bacterium Alteromonas.

    PubMed

    López-Pérez, Mario; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    We have examined a collection of the free-living marine bacterium Alteromonas genomes with cores diverging in average nucleotide identities ranging from 99.98% to 73.35%, i.e., from microbes that can be considered members of a natural clone (like in a clinical epidemiological outbreak) to borderline genus level. The genomes were largely syntenic allowing a precise delimitation of the core and flexible regions in each. The core was 1.4 Mb (ca. 30% of the typical strain genome size). Recombination rates along the core were high among strains belonging to the same species (37.7-83.7% of all nucleotide polymorphisms) but they decreased sharply between species (18.9-5.1%). Regarding the flexible genome, its main expansion occurred within the boundaries of the species, i.e., strains of the same species already have a large and diverse flexible genome. Flexible regions occupy mostly fixed genomic locations. Four large genomic islands are involved in the synthesis of strain-specific glycosydic receptors that we have called glycotypes. These genomic regions are exchanged by homologous recombination within and between species and there is evidence for their import from distant taxonomic units (other genera within the family). In addition, several hotspots for integration of gene cassettes by illegitimate recombination are distributed throughout the genome. They code for features that give each clone specific properties to interact with their ecological niche and must flow fast throughout the whole genus as they are found, with nearly identical sequences, in different species. Models for the generation of this genomic diversity involving phage predation are discussed. PMID:27189983

  2. A novel mode of lactate metabolism in strictly anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Weghoff, Marie Charlotte; Bertsch, Johannes; Müller, Volker

    2015-03-01

    Lactate is a common substrate for major groups of strictly anaerobic bacteria, but the biochemistry and bioenergetics of lactate oxidation is obscure. The high redox potential of the pyruvate/lactate pair of E0 ' = -190 mV excludes direct NAD(+) reduction (E0 ' = -320 mV). To identify the hitherto unknown electron acceptor, we have purified the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from the strictly anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The LDH forms a stable complex with an electron-transferring flavoprotein (Etf) that exhibited NAD(+) reduction only when reduced ferredoxin (Fd(2-) ) was present. Biochemical analyses revealed that the LDH/Etf complex of A. woodii uses flavin-based electron confurcation to drive endergonic lactate oxidation with NAD(+) as oxidant at the expense of simultaneous exergonic electron flow from reduced ferredoxin (E0 ' ≈ -500 mV) to NAD(+) according to: lactate + Fd(2-)  + 2 NAD(+)  → pyruvate + Fd + 2 NADH. The reduced Fd(2-) is regenerated from NADH by a sequence of events that involves conversion of chemical (ATP) to electrochemical ( Δ μ ˜ Na + ) and finally redox energy (Fd(2-) from NADH) via reversed electron transport catalysed by the Rnf complex. Inspection of genomes revealed that this metabolic scenario for lactate oxidation may also apply to many other anaerobes.

  3. Coiled to diffuse: Brownian motion of a helical bacterium.

    PubMed

    Butenko, Alexander V; Mogilko, Emma; Amitai, Lee; Pokroy, Boaz; Sloutskin, Eli

    2012-09-11

    We employ real-time three-dimensional confocal microscopy to follow the Brownian motion of a fixed helically shaped Leptospira interrogans (LI) bacterium. We extract from our measurements the translational and the rotational diffusion coefficients of this bacterium. A simple theoretical model is suggested, perfectly reproducing the experimental diffusion coefficients, with no tunable parameters. An older theoretical model, where edge effects are neglected, dramatically underestimates the observed rates of translation. Interestingly, the coiling of LI increases its rotational diffusion coefficient by a factor of 5, compared to a (hypothetical) rectified bacterium of the same contour length. Moreover, the translational diffusion coefficients would have decreased by a factor of ~1.5, if LI were rectified. This suggests that the spiral shape of the spirochaete bacteria, in addition to being employed for their active twisting motion, may also increase the ability of these bacteria to explore the surrounding fluid by passive Brownian diffusion.

  4. Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Nirakar; Dipasquale, Laura; d’Ippolito, Giuliana; Panico, Antonio; Lens, Piet N. L.; Esposito, Giovanni; Fontana, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    As the only fuel that is not chemically bound to carbon, hydrogen has gained interest as an energy carrier to face the current environmental issues of greenhouse gas emissions and to substitute the depleting non-renewable reserves. In the last years, there has been a significant increase in the number of publications about the bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana that is responsible for production yields of H2 that are among the highest achievements reported in the literature. Here we present an extensive overview of the most recent studies on this hyperthermophilic bacterium together with a critical discussion of the potential of fermentative production by this bacterium. The review article is organized into sections focused on biochemical, microbiological and technical issues, including the effect of substrate, reactor type, gas sparging, temperature, pH, hydraulic retention time and organic loading parameters on rate and yield of gas production. PMID:26053393

  5. Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Nirakar; Dipasquale, Laura; d'Ippolito, Giuliana; Panico, Antonio; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni; Fontana, Angelo

    2015-06-04

    As the only fuel that is not chemically bound to carbon, hydrogen has gained interest as an energy carrier to face the current environmental issues of greenhouse gas emissions and to substitute the depleting non-renewable reserves. In the last years, there has been a significant increase in the number of publications about the bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana that is responsible for production yields of H2 that are among the highest achievements reported in the literature. Here we present an extensive overview of the most recent studies on this hyperthermophilic bacterium together with a critical discussion of the potential of fermentative production by this bacterium. The review article is organized into sections focused on biochemical, microbiological and technical issues, including the effect of substrate, reactor type, gas sparging, temperature, pH, hydraulic retention time and organic loading parameters on rate and yield of gas production.

  6. Understanding the detailed motion of a model bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thawani, Akanksha; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh

    2014-11-01

    Inspired by the motion of flagellated bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, we have built a macroscopic model bacterium, in order to investigate the intricate aspects of their motion which cannot be visualized under a microscope. The flagellated rod shaped cells were approximated with a spherical head attached to a rigid metal helix, via a plastic hook. The motion of model bacterium was observed in a high viscosity silicone oil to replicate the low Reynolds number flow conditions. A significant wobble was observed even in the absence of an off-axis flagellum. We suspect that the flexibility in the hook connecting the head and flagellum is the cause for wobble, since wobble was observed to increase significantly with hook-flexibility. The motion of the model bacterium was predicted using the Slender Body theory of Lighthill, and was compared with the measured trajectories.

  7. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2012-01-01

    potential for transfer, and subsequent proliferation, on another solar body such as Mars and Europa. These organisms are more likely to escape planetary protection assays, which only take into account presence of spores. Hence, presences of extreme radiation-resistant Deinococcus in the cleanroom facility where spacecraft are assembled pose a serious risk for integrity of life-detection missions. The microorganism described herein was isolated from the surfaces of the cleanroom facility in which the Phoenix Lander was assembled. The isolated bacterial strain was subjected to a comprehensive polyphasic analysis to characterize its taxonomic position. This bacterium exhibits very low 16SrRNA similarity with any other environmental isolate reported to date. Both phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses clearly indicate that this isolate belongs to the genus Deinococcus and represents a novel species. The name Deinococcus phoenicis was proposed after the Phoenix spacecraft, which was undergoing assembly, testing, and launch operations in the spacecraft assembly facility at the time of isolation. D. phoenicis cells exhibited higher resistance to ionizing radiation (cobalt-60; 14 kGy) than the cells of the D. radiodurans (5 kGy). Thus, it is in the best interest of NASA to thoroughly characterize this organism, which will further assess in determining the potential for forward contamination. Upon the completion of genetic and physiological characteristics of D. phoenicis, it will be added to a planetary protection database to be able to further model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  8. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2013-01-01

    potential for transfer, and subsequent proliferation, on another solar body such as Mars and Europa. These organisms are more likely to escape planetary protection assays, which only take into account presence of spores. Hence, presences of extreme radiation-resistant Deinococcus in the cleanroom facility where spacecraft are assembled pose a serious risk for integrity of life-detection missions. The microorganism described herein was isolated from the surfaces of the cleanroom facility in which the Phoenix Lander was assembled. The isolated bacterial strain was subjected to a comprehensive polyphasic analysis to characterize its taxonomic position. This bacterium exhibits very low 16SrRNA similarity with any other environmental isolate reported to date. Both phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses clearly indicate that this isolate belongs to the genus Deinococcus and represents a novel species. The name Deinococcus phoenicis was proposed after the Phoenix spacecraft, which was undergoing assembly, testing, and launch operations in the spacecraft assembly facility at the time of isolation. D. phoenicis cells exhibited higher resistance to ionizing radiation (cobalt-60; 14 kGy) than the cells of the D. radiodurans (5 kGy). Thus, it is in the best interest of NASA to thoroughly characterize this organism, which will further assess in determining the potential for forward contamination. Upon the completion of genetic and physiological characteristics of D. phoenicis, it will be added to a planetary protection database to be able to further model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  9. Microcalorimetric Measurements of Glucose Metabolism by Marine Bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Andrew S.; Millero, Frank J.; Gerchakov, Sol M.

    1982-01-01

    Microcalorimetric measurements of heat production from glucose by Vibrio alginolyticus were made to assess the viability of calorimetry as a technique for studying the metabolism of marine bacteria at organic nutrient concentrations found in marine waters. The results show that the metabolism of glucose by this bacterium can be measured by calorimetry at submicromolar concentrations. A linear correlation between glucose concentration and total heat production was observed over a concentration range of 8 mM to 0.35 μM. It is suggested that these data indicate a constant efficiency of metabolism for this bacterium over the wide range of glucose concentrations studied. PMID:16346131

  10. Gut bacterium of Dendrobaena veneta (Annelida: Oligochaeta) possesses antimycobacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Fiołka, Marta J; Zagaja, Mirosław P; Piersiak, Tomasz D; Wróbel, Marek; Pawelec, Jarosław

    2010-09-01

    The new bacterial strain with antimycobacterial activity has been isolated from the midgut of Dendrobaena veneta (Annelida). Biochemical and molecular characterization of isolates from 18 individuals identified all as Raoultella ornithinolytica genus with 99% similarity. The bacterium is a possible symbiont of the earthworm D. veneta. The isolated microorganism has shown the activity against four strains of fast-growing mycobacteria: Mycobacterium butiricum, Mycobacterium jucho, Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium phlei. The multiplication of the gut bacterium on plates with Sauton medium containing mycobacteria has caused a lytic effect. After the incubation of the cell free extract prepared from the gut bacterium with four strains of mycobacteria in liquid Sauton medium, the cells of all tested strains were deformed and divided to small oval forms and sometimes created long filaments. The effect was observed by the use of light, transmission and scanning microscopy. Viability of all examined species of mycobacteria was significantly decreased. The antimycobacterial effect was probably the result of the antibiotic action produced by the gut bacterium of the earthworm. The application of ultrafiltration procedure allowed to demonstrate that antimicrobial substance with strong antimycobacterial activity from bacterial culture supernatant, is a protein with the molecular mass above 100 kDa.

  11. Complete Genome of the Cellulolytic Ruminal Bacterium Ruminococcus albus 7

    SciTech Connect

    Suen, Garret; Stevenson, David M; Bruce, David; Chertkov, Olga; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Detter, J. Chris; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Hauser, Loren John; Ivanova, N; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Land, Miriam L; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pitluck, Sam; Tapia, Roxanne; Woyke, Tanja; Boyum, Julie; Mead, David; Weimer, Paul J

    2011-01-01

    Ruminococcus albus 7 is a highly cellulolytic ruminal bacterium that is a member of the phylum Firmicutes. Here, we describe the complete genome of this microbe. This genome will be useful for rumen microbiology and cellulosome biology and in biofuel production, as one of its major fermentation products is ethanol.

  12. Revised Genome Sequence of the Purple Photosynthetic Bacterium Blastochloris viridis

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, Matthew; Liu, Xuan; Huang, Fang; Darby, Alistair C.; Hall, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Blastochloris viridis is a unique anaerobic, phototrophic purple bacterium that produces bacteriochlorophyll b. Here we report an improved genome sequence of Blastochloris viridis DSM133, which is instrumental to the studies of photosynthesis, metabolic versatility, and genetic engineering of this microorganism. PMID:26798090

  13. ACETOGENIC BACTERIA ASSOCIATED WITH SEAGRASS ROOTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seagrasses are adapted to being rooted in reduced, anoxic sediments with high rates of sulfate reduction. During the day, an oxygen gradient is generated around the roots, becoming anoxic at night. Thus, obligate anaerobic bacteria in the rhizosphere have to tolerate elevated oxy...

  14. Acetogenic microbial degradation of vinyl chloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2000-01-01

    Under methanogenic conditions, microbial degradation of [1,2-14C]vinyl chloride (VC) resulted in significant (14 ?? 3% maximum recovery) but transient recovery of radioactivity as 14C-acetate. Subsequently, 14C- acetate was degraded to 14CH4 and 14CO2 (18 ?? 2% and 54 ?? 3% final recoveries, respectively). In contrast, under 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid (BES) amended conditions, 14C-acetate recovery remained high (27 ?? 1% maximum recovery) throughout the study, no 14CH4 was produced, and the final recovery of 14CO2 was only 35 ?? 4%. These results demonstrate that oxidative acetogenesis may be an important mechanism for anaerobic VC biodegradation. Moreover, these results (1) demonstrate that microbial degradation of VC to CH4 and CO2 may involve oxidative acetogenesis followed by acetotrophic methanogenesis and (2) suggest that oxidative acetogenesis may be the initial step in the net oxidation of VC to CO2 reported previously under Fe(III)-reducing, SO4-reducing, and humic acids- reducing conditions.Under methanogenic conditions, microbial degradation of [1,2-14C]vinyl chloride (VC) resulted in significant (14 ?? 3% maximum recovery) but transient recovery of radioactivity as 14C-acetate. Subsequently, 14C-acetate was degraded to 14CH4 and 14CO2 (18 ?? 2% and 54 ?? 3% final recoveries respectively). In contrast, under 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid (BES) amended conditions, 14C-acetate recovery remained high (27 ?? 1% maximum recovery) throughout the study, no 14CH4 was produced, and the final recovery of 14CO2 was only 35 ?? 4%. These results demonstrate that oxidative acetogenesis may be an important mechanism for anaerobic VC biodegradation. Moreover, these results (1) demonstrate that microbial degradation of VC to CH4 and CO2 may involve oxidative acetogenesis followed by acetotrophic methanogenesis and (2) suggest that oxidative acetogenesis may be the initial step in the net oxidation of VC to CO2 reported previously under Fe(III)-reducing, SO4-reducing, and humic acids-reducing conditions.

  15. Isolation of a Bacterium Capable of Degrading Peanut Hull Lignin

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Thomas J.; Kerr, Robert D.; Benner, Ronald

    1983-01-01

    Thirty-seven bacterial strains capable of degrading peanut hull lignin were isolated by using four types of lignin preparations and hot-water-extracted peanut hulls. One of the isolates, tentatively identified as Arthrobacter sp., was capable of utilizing all four lignin preparations as well as extracted peanut hulls as a sole source of carbon. The bacterium was also capable of degrading specifically labeled [14C]lignin-labeled lignocellulose and [14C]cellulose-labeled lignocellulose from the cordgrass Spartina alterniflora and could also degrade [14C]Kraft lignin from slash pine. After 10 days of incubation with [14C]cellulose-labeled lignocellulose or [14C]lignin-labeled lignocellulose from S. alterniflora, the bacterium mineralized 6.5% of the polysaccharide component and 2.9% of the lignin component. Images PMID:16346424

  16. A Streamlined Strategy for Biohydrogen Production with an Alkaliphilic Bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne A; Wall, Judy D.; Mormile, Dr. Melanie R.; Begemann, Matthew B

    2012-01-01

    Biofuels are anticipated to enable a shift from fossil fuels for renewable transportation and manufacturing fuels, with biohydrogen considered attractive since it could offer the largest reduction of global carbon budgets. Currently, biohydrogen production remains inefficient and heavily fossil fuel-dependent. However, bacteria using alkali-treated biomass could streamline biofuel production while reducing costs and fossil fuel needs. An alkaliphilic bacterium, Halanaerobium strain sapolanicus, is described that is capable of biohydrogen production at levels rivaling neutrophilic strains, but at pH 11 and hypersaline conditions. H. sapolanicus ferments a variety of 5- and 6- carbon sugars derived from hemicellulose and cellulose including cellobiose, and forms the end products hydrogen and acetate. Further, it can also produce biohydrogen from switchgrass and straw pretreated at temperatures far lower than any previously reported and in solutions compatible with growth. Hence, this bacterium can potentially increase the efficiency and efficacy of biohydrogen production from renewable biomass resources.

  17. Isolation of the Legionnaires' disease bacterium from environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Morris, G K; Patton, C M; Feeley, J C; Johnson, S E; Gorman, G; Martin, W T; Skaliy, P; Mallison, G F; Politi, B D; Mackel, D C

    1979-04-01

    We analyzed 24 environmental samples collected in or near the Indiana Memorial Union, where an epidemic of Legionnaires' disease occurred in early 1978. We conducted fluorescent antibody analyses and culture on F-G and charcoal yeast extract agars of each sample directly; splenic tissue of guinea pigs inoculated with the sample; and yolk sacs from embryonated eggs inoculated with splenic tissue of guinea pigs injected with the sample. Legionnaires' disease (LD) bacterium was isolated from seven of the 24 samples: one water sample from the air-conditioner cooling tower of the Union; three water samples from a stream near the Union; and three mud samples from the same stream. The LD bacterium strains were of three different serotypes. These findings indicate that LD bacteria may be widespread in nature. PMID:373549

  18. Isolation of a bacterium capable of degrading peanut hull lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, T.A.; Kerr, R.D.; Benner, R.

    1983-11-01

    Thirty-seven bacterial strains capable of degrading peanut hull lignin were isolated by using four types of lignin preparations and hot-water-extracted peanut hulls. One of the isolates, tentatively identified as Arthrobacter species, was capable of utilizing all four lignin preparations as well as extracted peanut hulls as a sole source of carbon. The bacterium was also capable of degrading specifically labeled (/sup 14/C) lignin-labeled lignocellulose and (/sup 14/C)cellulose-labeled lignocellulose from the cordgrass Spartina alterniflora and could also degrade (/sup 14/C) Kraft lignin from slash pine. After 10 days of incubation with (/sup 14/C) cellulose-labeled lignocellulose or (/sup 14/C) lignin-labeled lignocellulose from S. alterniflora, the bacterium mineralized 6.5% of the polysaccharide component and 2.9% of the lignin component. (Refs. 24).

  19. Trichloroethylene Biodegradation by a Methane-Oxidizing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Little, C. Deane; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Herbes, Stephen E.; Lidstrom, Mary E.; Tyndall, Richard L.; Gilmer, Penny J.

    1988-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), a common groundwater contaminant, is a suspected carcinogen that is highly resistant to aerobic biodegradation. An aerobic, methane-oxidizing bacterium was isolated that degrades TCE in pure culture at concentrations commonly observed in contaminated groundwater. Strain 46-1, a type I methanotrophic bacterium, degraded TCE if grown on methane or methanol, producing CO2 and water-soluble products. Gas chromatography and 14C radiotracer techniques were used to determine the rate, methane dependence, and mechanism of TCE biodegradation. TCE biodegradation by strain 46-1 appears to be a cometabolic process that occurs when the organism is actively metabolizing a suitable growth substrate such as methane or methanol. It is proposed that TCE biodegradation by methanotrophs occurs by formation of TCE epoxide, which breaks down spontaneously in water to form dichloroacetic and glyoxylic acids and one-carbon products. Images PMID:16347616

  20. Thermostable purified endoglucanase from thermophilic bacterium acidothermus cellulolyticus

    DOEpatents

    Tucker, Melvin P.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Mohagheghi, Ali

    1992-01-01

    A substantially purified high molecular weight cellulase enzyme having a molecular weight of between about 156,000 to about 203,400 daltons isolated from the bacterium Acidothermus cellulolyticus (ATCC 43068) and a method of producing it are disclosed. The enzyme is water soluble, possesses both C.sub.1 and C.sub.x types of enzymatic activity, has a high degree of stability toward heat and exhibits both a high optimum temperature activity and high inactivation characteristics.

  1. An on-bacterium flow cytometric immunoassay for protein quantification.

    PubMed

    Lan, Wen-Jun; Lan, Wei; Wang, Hai-Yan; Yan, Lei; Wang, Zhe-Li

    2013-09-01

    The polystyrene bead-based flow cytometric immunoassay has been widely reported. However, the preparation of functional polystyrene bead is still inconvenient. This study describes a simple and easy on-bacterium flow cytometric immunoassay for protein quantification, in which Staphylococcus aureus (SAC) is used as an antibody-antigen carrier to replace the polystyrene bead. The SAC beads were prepared by carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) labeling, paraformaldehyde fixation and antibody binding. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cytokeratin-19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1) proteins were used as models in the test system. Using prepared SAC beads, biotinylated proteins, and streptavidin-phycoerythrin (SA-PE), the on-bacterium flow cytometric immunoassay was validated by quantifying CEA and CYFRA 21-1 in sample. Obtained data demonstrated a concordant result between the logarithm of the protein concentration and the logarithm of the PE mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). The limit of detection (LOD) in this immunoassay was at least 0.25 ng/ml. Precision and accuracy assessments appeared that either the relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) or the relative error (R.E.) was <10%. The comparison between this immunoassay and a polystyrene bead-based flow cytometric immunoassay showed a correlation coefficient of 0.998 for serum CEA or 0.996 for serum CYFRA 21-1. In conclusion, the on-bacterium flow cytometric immunoassay may be of use in the quantification of serum protein. PMID:23739299

  2. Fast Neutron Irradiation of the Highly Radioresistant Bacterium Deinococcus Radiodurans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Diane Louise

    Fast neutron dose survival curves were generated for the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, which is renowned for its unusually high resistance to gamma, x-ray, and ultraviolet radiation, but for which fast neutron response was unknown. The fast neutrons were produced by the University of Massachusetts Lowell 5.5-MV, type CN Van de Graaff accelerator through the ^7Li(p,n)^7 Be reaction by bombarding a thick metallic lithium target with a 4-MeV proton beam. The bacteria were uniformly distributed on 150-mm agar plates and were exposed to the fast neutron beam under conditions of charged particle equilibrium. The plates were subdivided into concentric rings of increasing diameter from the center to the periphery of the plate, within which the average neutron dose was calculated as the product of the precisely known neutron fluence at the average radius of the ring and the neutron energy dependent kerma factor. The neutron fluence and dose ranged from approximately 3 times 1013 n cm^ {-2} to 1 times 1012 n cm^ {-2}, and 200 kilorad to 5 kilorad, respectively, from the center to the periphery of the plate. Percent survival for Deinococcus radiodurans as a function of fast neutron dose was derived from the ability of the irradiated cells to produce visible colonies within each ring compared to that of a nonirradiated control population. The bacterium Escherichia coli B/r (CSH) was irradiated under identical conditions for comparative purposes. The survival response of Deinococcus radiodurans as a result of cumulative fast neutron exposures was also investigated. The quantification of the ability of Deinococcus radiodurans to survive cellular insult from secondary charged particles, which are produced by fast neutron interactions in biological materials, will provide valuable information about damage and repair mechanisms under extreme cellular stress, and may provide new insight into the origin of this bacterium's unprecedented radiation resistance.

  3. Factors Affecting Zebra Mussel Kill by the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2004-02-24

    The specific purpose of this research project was to identify factors that affect zebra mussel kill by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Test results obtained during this three-year project identified the following key variables as affecting mussel kill: treatment concentration, treatment duration, mussel siphoning activity, dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperature, and naturally suspended particle load. Using this latter information, the project culminated in a series of pipe tests which achieved high mussel kill inside power plants under once-through conditions using service water in artificial pipes.

  4. Triazine herbicide resistance in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.E.; Gilbert, C.W.; Guy, R.; Arntzen, C.J.

    1984-10-01

    The photoaffinity herbicide azidoatrazine (2-azido-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) selectively labels the L subunit of the reaction center of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. Herbicide-resistant mutants retain the L subunit and have altered binding properties for methylthio- and chloro-substituted triazines as well as altered equilibrium constants for electron transfer between primary and secondary electron acceptors. We suggest that a subtle alteration in the L subunit is responsible for herbicide resistance and that the L subunit is the functional analog of the 32-kDa Q/sub B/ protein of chloroplast membranes. 42 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  5. CORNEAL REACTIONS TO BACTERIUM GRANULOSIS AND OTHER MICROORGANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Olitsky, Peter K.; Knutti, Ralph E.; Tyler, Joseph R.

    1932-01-01

    The conclusions which may be drawn from the results of the experiments here presented are: 1. The cornea of the rabbit is highly sensitive to the action of various injected bacteria. The lesions vary from insignificant, transient changes to severe, destructive panophthalmitis, with fine gradations from the mildest to the violent form of inflammation. Moreover, animals that receive the same organisms show like changes. 2. The varying degree of inflammatory reaction is related to the pathogenicity of the special culture employed; as, for example, is shown by the reactions to Type I pneumococci and to Bacterium granulosis. It is evident that when a microorganism having a certain degree of virulence is used, a lesion of localized vasculonebulous keratitis resembling pannus tenuis or vasculosus of human trachoma can be induced. Thus Bacterium granulosis, Bacillus xerosis, Hemophilus influenzae, Pneumococcus Type II, Streptococcus viridans, and gonococcus can cause the pannus-like corneal changes in the rabbit. Of these organisms, however, only Bacterium granulosis induces early, uncomplicated and enduring keratitic lesions; the others cause first, diffuse keratitis with suppurative lesions; then, as a residual effect, transient, localized, vasculonebulous changes in the cornea. These changes, in contradistinction to the granulosis lesions, are, therefore delayed, complicated, and transient. When, on the other hand, the invasiveness and infecting power of the organisms are low, as is the case with the filtrable, Gram-negative bacillus and the small, Gram-negative bacilli ultimately derived from cases of folliculosis, no marked effect is produced by their intracorneal inoculation. If the pathogenicity of bacteria is high (as shown by Pneumococcus Type I, hemolytic streptococcus, and the remaining bacteria), intracorneal inoculation of the microorganisms leads to serious suppurative or destructive changes. 3. The results of experiments with monkeys indicate that while

  6. Magnetic guidance of the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense.

    PubMed

    Loehr, Johannes; Pfeiffer, Daniel; Schüler, Dirk; Fischer, Thomas M

    2016-04-21

    Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense is a magnetotactic bacterium with a permanent magnetic moment capable of swimming using two bipolarly located flagella. In their natural environment these bacteria swim along the field lines of the homogeneous geomagnetic field in a typical run and reversal pattern and thereby create non-differentiable trajectories with sharp edges. In the current work we nevertheless achieve stable guidance along curved lines of mechanical instability by using a heterogeneous magnetic field of a garnet film. The successful guidance of the bacteria depends on the right balance between motility and the magnetic moment of the magnetosome chain. PMID:26972517

  7. Vector potential of houseflies for the bacterium Aeromonas caviae.

    PubMed

    Nayduch, D; Noblet, G Pittman; Stutzenberger, F J

    2002-06-01

    Houseflies, Musca domestica Linnaeus (Diptera: Muscidae), have been implicated as vectors or transporters of numerous gastrointestinal pathogens encountered during feeding and ovipositing on faeces. The putative enteropathogen Aeromonas caviae (Proteobacteria: Aeromonadaceae) may be present in faeces of humans and livestock. Recently A. caviae was detected in houseflies by PCR and isolated by culture methods. In this study, we assessed the vector potential of houseflies for A. caviae relative to multiplication and persistence of the bacterium in the fly and to contamination of other flies and food materials. In experimentally fed houseflies, the number of bacteria increased up to 2 days post-ingestion (d PI) and then decreased significantly 3 d PI. A large number of bacteria was detected in the vomitus and faeces of infected flies at 2-3 d PI. The bacteria persisted in flies for up to 8 d PI, but numbers were low. Experimentally infected flies transmitted A. caviae to chicken meat, and transmissibility was directly correlated with exposure time. Flies contaminated the meat for up to 7 d PI; however, a significant decrease in contamination was observed 2-3 d PI. In the fly-to-fly transmission experiments, the transmission of A. caviae was observed and was apparently mediated by flies sharing food. These results support houseflies as potential vectors for A. caviae because the bacterium multiplied, persisted in flies for up to 8 d PI, and could be transmitted to human food items.

  8. Polysaccharide degradation systems of the saprophytic bacterium Cellvibrio japonicus

    DOE PAGES

    Gardner, Jeffrey G.

    2016-06-04

    Study of recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation by bacterial systems is critical for understanding biological processes such as global carbon cycling, nutritional contributions of the human gut microbiome, and the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. One bacterium that has a robust ability to degrade polysaccharides is the Gram-negative saprophyte Cellvibrio japonicus. A bacterium with a circuitous history, C. japonicus underwent several taxonomy changes from an initially described Pseudomonas sp. Most of the enzymes described in the pre-genomics era have also been renamed. Furthermore, this review aims to consolidate the biochemical, structural, and genetic data published on C. japonicus and its remarkablemore » ability to degrade cellulose, xylan, and pectin substrates. Initially, C. japonicus carbohydrate-active enzymes were studied biochemically and structurally for their novel polysaccharide binding and degradation characteristics, while more recent systems biology approaches have begun to unravel the complex regulation required for lignocellulose degradation in an environmental context. Also included is a discussion for the future of C. japonicus as a model system, with emphasis on current areas unexplored in terms of polysaccharide degradation and emerging directions for C. japonicus in both environmental and biotechnological applications.« less

  9. Molybdate Reduction to Molybdenum Blue by an Antarctic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, S. A.; Shukor, M. Y.; Shamaan, N. A.; Mac Cormack, W. P.; Syed, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    A molybdenum-reducing bacterium from Antarctica has been isolated. The bacterium converts sodium molybdate or Mo6+ to molybdenum blue (Mo-blue). Electron donors such as glucose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose supported molybdate reduction. Ammonium sulphate was the best nitrogen source for molybdate reduction. Optimal conditions for molybdate reduction were between 30 and 50 mM molybdate, between 15 and 20°C, and initial pH between 6.5 and 7.5. The Mo-blue produced had a unique absorption spectrum with a peak maximum at 865 nm and a shoulder at 710 nm. Respiratory inhibitors such as antimycin A, sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and rotenone failed to inhibit the reducing activity. The Mo-reducing enzyme was partially purified using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The partially purified enzyme showed optimal pH and temperature for activity at 6.0 and 20°C, respectively. Metal ions such as cadmium, chromium, copper, silver, lead, and mercury caused more than 95% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity at 0.1 mM. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY1 based on partial 16s rDNA molecular phylogenetic assessment and the Biolog microbial identification system. The characteristics of this strain would make it very useful in bioremediation works in the polar and temperate countries. PMID:24381945

  10. Molybdate reduction to molybdenum blue by an Antarctic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, S A; Shukor, M Y; Shamaan, N A; Mac Cormack, W P; Syed, M A

    2013-01-01

    A molybdenum-reducing bacterium from Antarctica has been isolated. The bacterium converts sodium molybdate or Mo⁶⁺ to molybdenum blue (Mo-blue). Electron donors such as glucose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose supported molybdate reduction. Ammonium sulphate was the best nitrogen source for molybdate reduction. Optimal conditions for molybdate reduction were between 30 and 50 mM molybdate, between 15 and 20°C, and initial pH between 6.5 and 7.5. The Mo-blue produced had a unique absorption spectrum with a peak maximum at 865 nm and a shoulder at 710 nm. Respiratory inhibitors such as antimycin A, sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and rotenone failed to inhibit the reducing activity. The Mo-reducing enzyme was partially purified using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The partially purified enzyme showed optimal pH and temperature for activity at 6.0 and 20°C, respectively. Metal ions such as cadmium, chromium, copper, silver, lead, and mercury caused more than 95% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity at 0.1 mM. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY1 based on partial 16s rDNA molecular phylogenetic assessment and the Biolog microbial identification system. The characteristics of this strain would make it very useful in bioremediation works in the polar and temperate countries. PMID:24381945

  11. Structure and morphology of magnetite anaerobically-produced by a marine magnetotactic bacterium and a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, N. H. C.; Mann, S.; Bazylinski, D. A.; Lovley, D. R.; Jannasch, H. W.; Frankel, R. B.

    1990-04-01

    Intracellular crystals of magnetite synthesized by cells of the magnetotactic vibroid organism, MV-1, and extracellular crystals of magnetite produced by the non-magnetotactic dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium strain GS-15, were examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and 57Fe Mo¨ssbauer spectroscopy. The magnetotactic bacterium contained a single chain of approximately 10 crystals aligned along the long axis of the cell. The crystals were essentially pure stoichiometric magnetite. When viewed along the crystal long axis the particles had a hexagonal cross-section whereas side-on they appeared as rectangules or truncated rectangles of average dimension, 53 × 35 nm. These findings are explained in terms of a three-dimensional morphology comprising a hexagonal prism of 110 faces which are capped and truncated by 111 end faces. Electron diffraction and lattice imaging studies indicated that the particles were structurally well-defined single crystals. In contrast, magnetite particles produced by the strain, GS-15 were irregular in shape and had smaller mean dimensions (14 nm). Single crystals were imaged but these were not of high structural perfection. These results highlight the influence of intracellular control on the crystallochemical specificity of bacterial magnetites. The characterization of these crystals is important in aiding the identification of biogenic magnetic materials in paleomagnetism and in studies of sediment magnetization.

  12. Structure and morphology of magnetite anaerobically-produced by a marine magnetotactic bacterium and a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparks, N.H.C.; Mann, S.; Bazylinski, D.A.; Lovley, D.R.; Jannasch, H.W.; Frankel, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    Intracellular crystals of magnetite synthesized by cells of the magnetotactic vibroid organism, MV-1, and extracellular crystals of magnetite produced by the non-magnetotactic dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium strain GS-15, were examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and 57Fe Mo??ssbauer spectroscopy. The magnetotactic bacterium contained a single chain of approximately 10 crystals aligned along the long axis of the cell. The crystals were essentially pure stoichiometric magnetite. When viewed along the crystal long axis the particles had a hexagonal cross-section whereas side-on they appeared as rectangules or truncated rectangles of average dimension, 53 ?? 35 nm. These findings are explained in terms of a three-dimensional morphology comprising a hexagonal prism of {110} faces which are capped and truncated by {111} end faces. Electron diffraction and lattice imaging studies indicated that the particles were structurally well-defined single crystals. In contrast, magnetite particles produced by the strain, GS-15 were irregular in shape and had smaller mean dimensions (14 nm). Single crystals were imaged but these were not of high structural perfection. These results highlight the influence of intracellular control on the crystallochemical specificity of bacterial magnetites. The characterization of these crystals is important in aiding the identification of biogenic magnetic materials in paleomagnetism and in studies of sediment magnetization. ?? 1990.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Ensifer adhaerens M78, a Mineral-Weathering Bacterium Isolated from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanli; Chen, Wei; He, Linyan; Wang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Ensifer adhaerens M78, a bacterium isolated from soil, can weather potash feldspar and release Fe, Si, and Al from rock under nutrient-poor conditions. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain M78, which may facilitate a better understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in mineral weathering by the bacterium. PMID:27609930

  14. Genome Sequence of the Mycorrhizal Helper Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8

    PubMed Central

    Gross, H.; Morin, E.; Karpinets, T.; Utturkar, S.; Mehnaz, S.; Martin, F.; Frey-Klett, P.; Labbé, J.

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of the mycorrhizal helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain BBc6R8. This is the first genome of a mycorrhizal helper bacterium. The draft genome contains 6,952,353 bp and is predicted to encode 6,317 open reading frames. Comparative genomic analyses will help to identify helper traits. PMID:24407649

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Ensifer adhaerens M78, a Mineral-Weathering Bacterium Isolated from Soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanli; Chen, Wei; He, Linyan; Wang, Qi; Sheng, Xia-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Ensifer adhaerens M78, a bacterium isolated from soil, can weather potash feldspar and release Fe, Si, and Al from rock under nutrient-poor conditions. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain M78, which may facilitate a better understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in mineral weathering by the bacterium. PMID:27609930

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain RB, a Bacterium Capable of Synthesizing Cadmium Selenide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ayano, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Masashi; Soda, Satoshi; Ike, Michihiko

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RB is a bacterium capable of synthesizing cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles and was isolated from a soil sample. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa strain RB. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a draft genome of a CdSe-synthesizing bacterium.

  17. Kinetic study of trichloroethylene and toluene degradation by a bioluminescent reporter bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C.J.; Sanseverino, J.; Bienkowski, P.R.; Sayler, G.S.

    1995-12-31

    A constructed bioluminescent reporter bacterium, Pseudomonas putida B2, is very briefly described in this paper. The bacterium degrades toluene and trichloroethylene (TCE), and produces light in the presence of toluene. The light response is an indication of cellular viability and expression of the genes encoding toluene and TCE degrading enzymes.

  18. Near-complete genome sequence of the cellulolytic Bacterium Bacteroides (Pseudobacteroides) cellulosolvens ATCC 35603

    DOE PAGES

    Dassa, Bareket; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Hurt, Richard A.; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Keller, Martin; Xu, Jian; Reddy, Harish Kumar; Borovok, Ilya; Grinberg, Inna Rozman; Lamed, Raphael; et al

    2015-09-24

    We report the single-contig genome sequence of the anaerobic, mesophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, Bacteroides cellulosolvens. The bacterium produces a particularly elaborate cellulosome system, whereas the types of cohesin-dockerin interactions are opposite of other known cellulosome systems: cell-surface attachment is thus mediated via type-I interactions whereas enzymes are integrated via type-II interactions.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Ensifer adhaerens M78, a Mineral-Weathering Bacterium Isolated from Soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanli; Chen, Wei; He, Linyan; Wang, Qi; Sheng, Xia-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Ensifer adhaerens M78, a bacterium isolated from soil, can weather potash feldspar and release Fe, Si, and Al from rock under nutrient-poor conditions. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain M78, which may facilitate a better understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in mineral weathering by the bacterium.

  20. Genome Sequence of the Antarctic Psychrophile Bacterium Planococcus antarcticus DSM 14505

    PubMed Central

    Margolles, Abelardo; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Planococcus antarcticus DSM 14505 is a psychrophile bacterium that was isolated from cyanobacterial mat samples, originally collected from ponds in McMurdo, Antarctica. This orange-pigmented bacterium grows at 4°C and may possess interesting enzymatic activities at low temperatures. Here we report the first genomic sequence of P. antarcticus DSM 14505. PMID:22843594

  1. Characterisation of an unusual bacterium isolated from genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Ursi, J P; van Dyck, E; Ballard, R C; Jacob, W; Piot, P; Meheus, A Z

    1982-02-01

    The preliminary characterisation of an unusual gram-negative bacillus isolated from genital ulcers in Swaziland is reported. Like Haemophilus ducreyi, it is an oxidase positive, nitrate-reductase-positive gram-negative rod that forms streptobacillary chains in some circumstances; it was therefore called the "ducreyi-like bacterium" (DLB). Distinguishing features of DLB are production of alpha-haemolysis on horse-blood agar, stimulation of growth by a microaerophilic atmosphere and by a factor produced by Staphylococcus aureus, a strongly positive porphyrin test, and a remarkable ability to undergo autolysis. DLB had a guanine + cytosine value of c. 50 mole% but it cannot be classified, even at the genus level, until more taxonomic data are obtained.

  2. Genome analysis of the Anerobic Thermohalophilic bacterium Halothermothrix orenii

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Anderson, Iain; Lykidis, Athanasios; Hooper, Sean D.; Sun, Hui; Kunin, Victor; Lapidus, Alla; Hugenholtz, Philip; Patel, Bharat; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2008-11-03

    Halothermothirx orenii is a strictly anaerobic thermohalophilic bacterium isolated from sediment of a Tunisian salt lake. It belongs to the order Halanaerobiales in the phylum Firmicutes. The complete sequence revealed that the genome consists of one circular chromosome of 2578146 bps encoding 2451 predicted genes. This is the first genome sequence of an organism belonging to the Haloanaerobiales. Features of both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were identified with the presence of both a sporulating mechanism typical of Firmicutes and a characteristic Gram negative lipopolysaccharide being the most prominent. Protein sequence analyses and metabolic reconstruction reveal a unique combination of strategies for thermophilic and halophilic adaptation. H. orenii can serve as a model organism for the study of the evolution of the Gram negative phenotype as well as the adaptation under thermohalophilic conditions and the development of biotechnological applications under conditions that require high temperatures and high salt concentrations.

  3. A bacterium that degrades and assimilates poly(ethylene terephthalate).

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shosuke; Hiraga, Kazumi; Takehana, Toshihiko; Taniguchi, Ikuo; Yamaji, Hironao; Maeda, Yasuhito; Toyohara, Kiyotsuna; Miyamoto, Kenji; Kimura, Yoshiharu; Oda, Kohei

    2016-03-11

    Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) is used extensively worldwide in plastic products, and its accumulation in the environment has become a global concern. Because the ability to enzymatically degrade PET has been thought to be limited to a few fungal species, biodegradation is not yet a viable remediation or recycling strategy. By screening natural microbial communities exposed to PET in the environment, we isolated a novel bacterium, Ideonella sakaiensis 201-F6, that is able to use PET as its major energy and carbon source. When grown on PET, this strain produces two enzymes capable of hydrolyzing PET and the reaction intermediate, mono(2-hydroxyethyl) terephthalic acid. Both enzymes are required to enzymatically convert PET efficiently into its two environmentally benign monomers, terephthalic acid and ethylene glycol. PMID:26965627

  4. A bacterium that degrades and assimilates poly(ethylene terephthalate).

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shosuke; Hiraga, Kazumi; Takehana, Toshihiko; Taniguchi, Ikuo; Yamaji, Hironao; Maeda, Yasuhito; Toyohara, Kiyotsuna; Miyamoto, Kenji; Kimura, Yoshiharu; Oda, Kohei

    2016-03-11

    Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) is used extensively worldwide in plastic products, and its accumulation in the environment has become a global concern. Because the ability to enzymatically degrade PET has been thought to be limited to a few fungal species, biodegradation is not yet a viable remediation or recycling strategy. By screening natural microbial communities exposed to PET in the environment, we isolated a novel bacterium, Ideonella sakaiensis 201-F6, that is able to use PET as its major energy and carbon source. When grown on PET, this strain produces two enzymes capable of hydrolyzing PET and the reaction intermediate, mono(2-hydroxyethyl) terephthalic acid. Both enzymes are required to enzymatically convert PET efficiently into its two environmentally benign monomers, terephthalic acid and ethylene glycol.

  5. Genome Sequence of the Haloalkaliphilic Methanotrophic Bacterium Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z

    PubMed Central

    Vuilleumier, Stéphane; Khmelenina, Valentina N.; Bringel, Françoise; Reshetnikov, Alexandr S.; Lajus, Aurélie; Mangenot, Sophie; Rouy, Zoé; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Dispirito, Alan A.; Dunfield, Peter; Klotz, Martin G.; Semrau, Jeremy D.; Stein, Lisa Y.; Barbe, Valérie; Médigue, Claudine; Trotsenko, Yuri A.

    2012-01-01

    Methylomicrobium strains are widespread in saline environments. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z, a haloalkaliphilic methanotrophic bacterium, which will provide the basis for detailed characterization of the core pathways of both single-carbon metabolism and responses to osmotic and high-pH stresses. Final assembly of the genome sequence revealed that this bacterium contains a 128-kb plasmid, making M. alcaliphilum 20Z the first methanotrophic bacterium of known genome sequence for which a plasmid has been reported. PMID:22207753

  6. Ecology and metabolism of the beneficial intestinal commensal bacterium Faecalibacterium prausnitzii

    PubMed Central

    Miquel, Sylvie; Martín, Rebeca; Bridonneau, Chantal; Robert, Véronique; Sokol, Harry; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; Thomas, Muriel; Langella, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is a major commensal bacterium, and its prevalence is often decreased in conditions of intestinal dysbiosis. The phylogenic identity of this bacterium was described only recently. It is still poorly characterized, and its specific growth requirements in the human gastrointestinal tract are not known. In this review, we consider F. prausnitzii metabolism, its ecophysiology in both humans and animals, and the effects of drugs and nutrition on its population. We list important questions about this beneficial and ubiquitous commensal bacterium that it would be valuable to answer. PMID:24637606

  7. Ecology and metabolism of the beneficial intestinal commensal bacterium Faecalibacterium prausnitzii.

    PubMed

    Miquel, Sylvie; Martín, Rebeca; Bridonneau, Chantal; Robert, Véronique; Sokol, Harry; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; Thomas, Muriel; Langella, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is a major commensal bacterium, and its prevalence is often decreased in conditions of intestinal dysbiosis. The phylogenic identity of this bacterium was described only recently. It is still poorly characterized, and its specific growth requirements in the human gastrointestinal tract are not known. In this review, we consider F. prausnitzii metabolism, its ecophysiology in both humans and animals, and the effects of drugs and nutrition on its population. We list important questions about this beneficial and ubiquitous commensal bacterium that it would be valuable to answer.

  8. Anaerobic degradation of toluene by a denitrifying bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, P J; Mang, D T; Kim, K S; Young, L Y

    1991-01-01

    A denitrifying bacterium, designated strain T1, that grew with toluene as the sole source of carbon under anaerobic conditions was isolated. The type of agar used in solid media and the toxicity of toluene were determinative factors in the successful isolation of strain T1. Greater than 50% of the toluene carbon was oxidized to CO2, and 29% was assimilated into biomass. The oxidation of toluene to CO2 was stoichiometrically coupled to nitrate reduction and denitrification. Strain T1 was tolerant of and grew on 3 mM toluene after a lag phase. The rate of toluene degradation was 1.8 mumol min-1 liter-1 (56 nmol min-1 mg of protein-1) in a cell suspension. Strain T1 was distinct from other bacteria that oxidize toluene anaerobically, but it may utilize a similar biochemical pathway of oxidation. In addition, o-xylene was transformed to a metabolite in the presence of toluene but did not serve as the sole source of carbon for growth of strain T1. This transformation was dependent on the degradation of toluene. Images PMID:2059037

  9. Tracing the run-flip motion of an individual bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Morse, Michael; Tang, Jay; Powers, Thomas; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2012-11-01

    We have developed a digital 3D tracking microscope in which the microscope stage follows the motion of an individual motile microorganism so that the target remains focused at the center of the view-field. The tracking mechanism is achieved by a high-speed feedback control through real-time image analysis and the trace of the microorganism is recorded with submicron accuracy. We apply this tracking microscope to a study of the motion of an individual Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium that moves up to 100 microns (or 50 body lengths) per second and reverses its direction of motion occasionally by switching the rotation direction of its single helical flagellum. By tracking the motion of a single cell over many seconds, we show how a flip event occurs with submicron resolution and how the speed of a single cell varies over time and with the rotational rate of the flagellum. We also present statistics for the run-reverse dynamics of an ensemble of cells.

  10. Presence of an Unusual Methanogenic Bacterium in Coal Gasification Waste

    PubMed Central

    Tomei, Francisco A.; Rouse, Dwight; Maki, James S.; Mitchell, Ralph

    1988-01-01

    Methanogenic bacteria growing on a pilot-scale, anaerobic filter processing coal gasification waste were enriched in a mineral salts medium containing hydrogen and acetate as potential energy sources. Transfer of the enrichments to methanol medium resulted in the initial growth of a strain of Methanosarcina barkeri, but eventually small cocci became dominant. The cocci growing on methanol produced methane and exhibited the typical fluorescence of methanogenic bacteria. They grew in the presence of the cell wall synthesis-inhibiting antibiotics d-cycloserine, fosfomycin, penicillin G, and vancomycin as well as in the presence of kanamycin, an inhibitor of protein synthesis in eubacteria. The optimal growth temperature was 37°C, and the doubling time was 7.5 h. The strain lysed after reaching stationary phase. The bacterium grew poorly with hydrogen as the energy source and failed to grow on acetate. Morphologically, the coccus shared similarities with Methanosarcina sp. Cells were 1 μm wide, exhibited the typical thick cell wall and cross-wall formation, and formed tetrads. Packets and cysts were not formed. Images PMID:16347791

  11. Heavy Metal Induced Antibiotic Resistance in Bacterium LSJC7

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Songcan; Li, Xiaomin; Sun, Guoxin; Zhang, Yingjiao; Su, Jianqiang; Ye, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Co-contamination of antibiotics and heavy metals prevails in the environment, and may play an important role in disseminating bacterial antibiotic resistance, but the selective effects of heavy metals on bacterial antibiotic resistance is largely unclear. To investigate this, the effects of heavy metals on antibiotic resistance were studied in a genome-sequenced bacterium, LSJC7. The results showed that the presence of arsenate, copper, and zinc were implicated in fortifying the resistance of LSJC7 towards tetracycline. The concentrations of heavy metals required to induce antibiotic resistance, i.e., the minimum heavy metal concentrations (MHCs), were far below (up to 64-fold) the minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC) of LSJC7. This finding indicates that the relatively low heavy metal levels in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficient to induce bacterial antibiotic resistance. In addition, heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance was also observed for a combination of arsenate and chloramphenicol in LSJC7, and copper/zinc and tetracycline in antibiotic susceptible strain Escherichia coli DH5α. Overall, this study implies that heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance might be ubiquitous among various microbial species and suggests that it might play a role in the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in metal and antibiotic co-contaminated environments. PMID:26426011

  12. Biophysical basis for cooperation among the bacterium Thiovulum majus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, A.; Libchaber, A.

    2013-12-01

    The organization of microorganisms into communities plays a vital role in determining how nutrients flow through an ecosystem. Here we investigate the basis of a mathematically simple form of community formation displayed by the bacterium Thiovulum majus. T. majus cells attach to surfaces using a tether. As a tethered cell beats its flagella, it creates a flow that pulls nutrients to the cell. At high cell densities, variations in the density of cells drive large-scale convective flows that stir the environment. Here we use a combination of experimental observations and mathematical analysis to investigate how the macroscopic dynamics of a community arise from the behavior of individual cells. We begin by considering the flow of water around a single tethered cell and the resulting cell motion. We then show how the behavior of cells responding to the flow of nutrients through the community gives rise to soliton-like collective modes that efficiently stir the environment. Finally, we present new techniques for visualizing the flow of nutrients through these communities and the resulting collective phenomena. Because these dynamics arise from hydrodynamic coupling between cells and their environment, this system can be understood using classical techniques of fluid mechanics. In this way, T. majus communities provide a tractable example of the general phenomenon of community formation in response to nutrient flow.

  13. Gracilibacillus kimchii sp. nov., a halophilic bacterium isolated from kimchi.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Joon; Lee, Hae-Won; Lim, Seul Ki; Kwon, Min-Sung; Lee, Jieun; Jang, Ja-Young; Park, Hae Woong; Nam, Young-Do; Seo, Myung-Ji; Choi, Hak-Jong

    2016-09-01

    A novel halophilic bacterium, strain K7(T), was isolated from kimchi, a traditional Korean fermented food. The strain is Gram-positive, motile, and produces terminal endospores. The isolate is facultative aerobic and grows at salinities of 0.0-25.0% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 10-15% NaCl), pH 5.5-8.5 (optimum pH 7.0-7.5), and 15-42°C (optimum 37°C). The predominant isoprenoid quinone in the strain is menaquinone-7 and the peptidoglycan of the strain is meso-diaminopimelic acid. The major fatty acids of the strain are anteisio-C15:0, iso-C15:0, and, C16:0 (other components were < 10.0%), while the major polar lipids are diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, and three unidentified lipids. A phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity showed that the isolated strain was a cluster of the genus Gracilibacillus. High levels of gene sequence similarity were observed between strain K7(T) and Gracilibacillus orientalis XH-63(T) (96.5%), and between the present strain and Gracilibacillus xinjiangensis (96.5%). The DNA G+C content of this strain is 37.7 mol%. Based on these findings, strain K7(T) is proposed as a novel species: Gracilibacillus kimchii sp. nov. The type strain is K7(T) (KACC 18669(T); JCM 31344(T)).

  14. Bioconversion of methane to lactate by an obligate methanotrophic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Henard, Calvin A.; Smith, Holly; Dowe, Nancy; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Pienkos, Philip T.; Guarnieri, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Methane is the second most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG), with nearly 60% of emissions derived from anthropogenic sources. Microbial conversion of methane to fuels and value-added chemicals offers a means to reduce GHG emissions, while also valorizing this otherwise squandered high-volume, high-energy gas. However, to date, advances in methane biocatalysis have been constrained by the low-productivity and limited genetic tractability of natural methane-consuming microbes. Here, leveraging recent identification of a novel, tractable methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomicrobium buryatense, we demonstrate microbial biocatalysis of methane to lactate, an industrial platform chemical. Heterologous overexpression of a Lactobacillus helveticus L-lactate dehydrogenase in M. buryatense resulted in an initial titer of 0.06 g lactate/L from methane. Cultivation in a 5 L continuously stirred tank bioreactor enabled production of 0.8 g lactate/L, representing a 13-fold improvement compared to the initial titer. The yields (0.05 g lactate/g methane) and productivity (0.008 g lactate/L/h) indicate the need and opportunity for future strain improvement. Additionally, real-time analysis of methane utilization implicated gas-to-liquid transfer and/or microbial methane consumption as process limitations. This work opens the door to develop an array of methanotrophic bacterial strain-engineering strategies currently employed for biocatalytic sugar upgrading to “green” chemicals and fuels. PMID:26902345

  15. New Type of Bacterium Expands Possibilities of Life, Scientists Indicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-12-01

    Leading up to NASA's 2 December news briefing about a new astrobiology finding, segments of the blogosphere had run wild with speculation that the agency would announce that it has found life elsewhere. Although some bloggers and readers may have been disappointed in the actual announcement, scientists at the briefing at NASA headquarters in Washington, D. C., said the finding of a bacterium that can grow by using arsenic instead of phosphorus is “phenomenal,” with broad implications for searching for life on Earth and elsewhere and for other areas of research on Earth. Felisa Wolfe-Simon, a NASA Astrobiology Research Fellow in residence at the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park, Calif., led a team that discovered and experimented on the microbe, known as strain GFAJ-1 of the common bacteria group Gammaproteobacteria. Noting that life is mostly composed of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and phosphorus, she said, “If there is an organism on Earth doing something different, we've cracked open the door to what is possible for life elsewhere.”

  16. Heavy Metal Induced Antibiotic Resistance in Bacterium LSJC7.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songcan; Li, Xiaomin; Sun, Guoxin; Zhang, Yingjiao; Su, Jianqiang; Ye, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Co-contamination of antibiotics and heavy metals prevails in the environment, and may play an important role in disseminating bacterial antibiotic resistance, but the selective effects of heavy metals on bacterial antibiotic resistance is largely unclear. To investigate this, the effects of heavy metals on antibiotic resistance were studied in a genome-sequenced bacterium, LSJC7. The results showed that the presence of arsenate, copper, and zinc were implicated in fortifying the resistance of LSJC7 towards tetracycline. The concentrations of heavy metals required to induce antibiotic resistance, i.e., the minimum heavy metal concentrations (MHCs), were far below (up to 64-fold) the minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC) of LSJC7. This finding indicates that the relatively low heavy metal levels in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficient to induce bacterial antibiotic resistance. In addition, heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance was also observed for a combination of arsenate and chloramphenicol in LSJC7, and copper/zinc and tetracycline in antibiotic susceptible strain Escherichia coli DH5α. Overall, this study implies that heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance might be ubiquitous among various microbial species and suggests that it might play a role in the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in metal and antibiotic co-contaminated environments. PMID:26426011

  17. Aerobic biodegradation of 4-methylquinoline by a soil bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, S D; Pfaller, S L; Shann, J R; Warshawsky, D; Kinkle, B K; Vestal, J R

    1996-01-01

    Methylquinolines and related N-heterocyclic aromatic compounds are common contaminants associated with the use of hydrocarbons in both coal gasification and wood treatment processes. These compounds have been found in groundwater, and many are known mutagens. A stable, five-member bacterial consortium able to degrade 4-methylquinoline was established by selective enrichment using soil collected from an abandoned coal gasification site. The consortium was maintained for 5 years by serial transfer in a medium containing 4-methylquinoline. A gram-negative soil bacterium, strain Lep1, was isolated from the consortium and shown to utilize 4-methylquinoline as a source of carbon and energy during growth in liquid medium. A time course experiment demonstrated that both the isolate Lep1 and the consortium containing Lep1 were able to degrade 4-methylquinoline under aerobic conditions. Complete degradation of 4-methylquinoline by either strain Lep1 alone or the consortium was characterized by the production and eventual disappearance of 2-hydroxy-4-methylquinoline, followed by the appearance and persistence of a second metabolite tentatively identified as a hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin. Currently, there is no indication that 4-methylquinoline degradation proceeds differently in the consortium culture compared with Lep1 alone. This is the first report of 4-methylquinoline biodegradation under aerobic conditions. PMID:8702284

  18. Yersinia ruckeri sp. nov., the redmouth (RM) bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ewing, W.H.; Ross, A.J.; Brenner, Don J.; Fanning, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    Cultures of the redmouth (RM) bacterium, one of the etiological agents of redmouth disease in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) and certain other fishes, were characterized by means of their biochemical reactions, by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) hybridization, and by determination of guanine-plus-cytosine (G+C) ratios in DNA. The DNA relatedness studies confirmed the fact that the RM bacteria are members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and that they comprise a single species that is not closely related to any other species of Enterobacteriaceae. They are about 30% related to species of both Serratia and Yersinia. A comparison of the biochemical reactions of RM bacteria and serratiae indicated that there are many differences between these organisms and that biochemically the RM bacteria are most closely related to yersiniae. The G+C ratios of RM bacteria were approximated to be between 47.5 and 48.5% These values are similar to those of yersiniae but markedly different from those of serratiae. On the basis of their biochemical reactions and their G+C ratios, the RM bacteria are considered to be a new species of Yersinia, for which the name Yersinia ruckeri is proposed. Strain 2396-61 (= ATCC 29473) is designated the type strain of the species.

  19. Bioconversion of methane to lactate by an obligate methanotrophic bacterium

    DOE PAGES

    Henard, Calvin A.; Smith, Holly; Dowe, Nancy; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Pienkos, Philip T.; Guarnieri, Michael T.

    2016-02-23

    Methane is the second most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG), with nearly 60% of emissions derived from anthropogenic sources. Microbial conversion of methane to fuels and value-added chemicals offers a means to reduce GHG emissions, while also valorizing this otherwise squandered high-volume, high-energy gas. However, to date, advances in methane biocatalysis have been constrained by the low-productivity and limited genetic tractability of natural methane-consuming microbes. Here, leveraging recent identification of a novel, tractable methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomicrobium buryatense, we demonstrate microbial biocatalysis of methane to lactate, an industrial platform chemical. Heterologous overexpression of a Lactobacillus helveticus L-lactate dehydrogenase in M. buryatense resultedmore » in an initial titer of 0.06 g lactate/L from methane. Cultivation in a 5 L continuously stirred tank bioreactor enabled production of 0.8 g lactate/L, representing a 13-fold improvement compared to the initial titer. The yields (0.05 g lactate/g methane) and productivity (0.008 g lactate/L/h) indicate the need and opportunity for future strain improvement. Additionally, real-time analysis of methane utilization implicated gas-to-liquid transfer and/or microbial methane consumption as process limitations. This work opens the door to develop an array of methanotrophic bacterial strain-engineering strategies currently employed for biocatalytic sugar upgrading to “green” chemicals and fuels.« less

  20. Perchlorate reduction by a novel chemolithoautotrophic, hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Husen; Bruns, Mary Ann; Logan, Bruce E

    2002-10-01

    Water treatment technologies are needed that can remove perchlorate from drinking water without introducing organic chemicals that stimulate bacterial growth in water distribution systems. Hydrogen is an ideal energy source for bacterial degradation of perchlorate as it leaves no organic residue and is sparingly soluble. We describe here the isolation of a perchlorate-respiring, hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium (Dechloromonas sp. strain HZ) that grows with carbon dioxide as sole carbon source. Strain HZ is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped facultative anaerobe that was isolated from a gas-phase anaerobic packed-bed biofilm reactor treating perchlorate-contaminated groundwater. The ability of strain HZ to grow autotrophically with carbon dioxide as the sole carbon source was confirmed by demonstrating that biomass carbon (100.9%) was derived from CO2. Chemolithotrophic growth with hydrogen was coupled with complete reduction of perchlorate (10 mM) to chloride with a maximum doubling time of 8.9 h. Strain HZ also grew using acetate as the electron donor and chlorate, nitrate, or oxygen (but not sulphate) as an electron acceptor. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA sequence placed strain HZ in the genus Dechloromonas within the beta subgroup of the Proteobacteria. The study of this and other novel perchlorate-reducing bacteria may lead to new, safe technologies for removing perchlorate and other chemical pollutants from drinking water.

  1. Biodegradation of nicosulfuron by the bacterium Serratia marcescens N80.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Mu, Wenhui; Hou, Zhiguang; Wu, Xian; Zhao, Weiwei; Zhang, Xianghui; Pan, Hongyu; Zhang, Shihong

    2012-01-01

    By enrichment culturing of the sludge collected from the industrial wastewater treatment pond, we isolated a highly efficient nicosulfuron degrading bacterium Serratia marcescens N80. In liquid medium, Serratia marcescens N80 grows using nicosulfuron as the sole nitrogen source, and the optimal temperature, pH values, and inoculation for degradation are 30-35°C, 6.0-7.0, and 3.0% (v/v), respectively. With the initial concentration of 10 mg L⁻¹, the degradation rate is 93.6% in 96 hours; as the initial concentrations are higher than 10 mg L⁻¹, the biodegradation rates decrease as the nicosulfuron concentrations increase; when the concentration is 400 mg L⁻¹, the degradation rate is only 53.1%. Degradation follows the pesticide degradation kinetic equation at concentrations between 5 mg L⁻¹ and 50 mg L⁻¹. Identification of the metabolites by the liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) indicates that the degradation of nicosulfuron is achieved by breaking the sulfonylurea bridge. The strain N80 also degraded some other sulfonylurea herbicides, including ethametsulfuron, tribenuron-methyl, metsulfuron-methyl, chlorimuron-ethyl,and rimsulfuron.

  2. A serine sensor for multicellularity in a bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Arvind R; DeLoughery, Aaron; Bradshaw, Niels; Chen, Yun; O’Shea, Erin; Losick, Richard; Chai, Yunrong

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of a simple environmental sensing mechanism for biofilm formation in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis that operates without the involvement of a dedicated RNA or protein. Certain serine codons, the four TCN codons, in the gene for the biofilm repressor SinR caused a lowering of SinR levels under biofilm-inducing conditions. Synonymous substitutions of these TCN codons with AGC or AGT impaired biofilm formation and gene expression. Conversely, switching AGC or AGT to TCN codons upregulated biofilm formation. Genome-wide ribosome profiling showed that ribosome density was higher at UCN codons than at AGC or AGU during biofilm formation. Serine starvation recapitulated the effect of biofilm-inducing conditions on ribosome occupancy and SinR production. As serine is one of the first amino acids to be exhausted at the end of exponential phase growth, reduced translation speed at serine codons may be exploited by other microbes in adapting to stationary phase. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01501.001 PMID:24347549

  3. Gracilibacillus kimchii sp. nov., a halophilic bacterium isolated from kimchi.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Joon; Lee, Hae-Won; Lim, Seul Ki; Kwon, Min-Sung; Lee, Jieun; Jang, Ja-Young; Park, Hae Woong; Nam, Young-Do; Seo, Myung-Ji; Choi, Hak-Jong

    2016-09-01

    A novel halophilic bacterium, strain K7(T), was isolated from kimchi, a traditional Korean fermented food. The strain is Gram-positive, motile, and produces terminal endospores. The isolate is facultative aerobic and grows at salinities of 0.0-25.0% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 10-15% NaCl), pH 5.5-8.5 (optimum pH 7.0-7.5), and 15-42°C (optimum 37°C). The predominant isoprenoid quinone in the strain is menaquinone-7 and the peptidoglycan of the strain is meso-diaminopimelic acid. The major fatty acids of the strain are anteisio-C15:0, iso-C15:0, and, C16:0 (other components were < 10.0%), while the major polar lipids are diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, and three unidentified lipids. A phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity showed that the isolated strain was a cluster of the genus Gracilibacillus. High levels of gene sequence similarity were observed between strain K7(T) and Gracilibacillus orientalis XH-63(T) (96.5%), and between the present strain and Gracilibacillus xinjiangensis (96.5%). The DNA G+C content of this strain is 37.7 mol%. Based on these findings, strain K7(T) is proposed as a novel species: Gracilibacillus kimchii sp. nov. The type strain is K7(T) (KACC 18669(T); JCM 31344(T)). PMID:27572507

  4. Acquisition of polyamines by the obligate intracytoplasmic bacterium Rickettsia prowazekii.

    PubMed Central

    Speed, R R; Winkler, H H

    1990-01-01

    Both the polyamine content and the route of acquisition of polyamines by Rickettsia prowazekii, an obligate intracellular parasitic bacterium, were determined. The rickettsiae grew normally in an ornithine decarboxylase mutant of the Chinese hamster ovary (C55.7) cell line whether or not putrescine, which this host cell required in order to grow, was present. The rickettsiae contained approximately 6 mM putrescine, 5 mM spermidine, and 3 mM spermine when cultured in the presence or absence of putrescine. Neither the transport of putrescine and spermidine by the rickettsiae nor a measurable rickettsial ornithine decarboxylase activity could be demonstrated. However, we demonstrated the de novo synthesis of polyamines from arginine by the rickettsiae. Arginine decarboxylase activity (29 pmol of 14CO2 released per h per 10(8) rickettsiae) was measured in the rickettsiae growing within their host cell. A markedly lower level of this enzymatic activity was observed in cell extracts of R. prowazekii and could be completely inhibited with 1 mM difluoromethylarginine, an irreversible inhibitor of the enzyme. R. prowazekii failed to grow in C55.7 cells that had been cultured in the presence of 1 mM difluoromethylarginine. After rickettsiae were grown in C55.7 in the presence of labeled arginine, the specific activities of arginine in the host cell cytoplasm and polyamines in the rickettsiae were measured; these measurements indicated that 100% of the total polyamine content of R. prowazekii was derived from arginine. PMID:2120188

  5. Hydrodynamics and collective behavior of the tethered bacterium Thiovulum majus

    PubMed Central

    Petroff, Alexander; Libchaber, Albert

    2014-01-01

    The ecology and dynamics of many microbial systems, particularly in mats and soils, are shaped by how bacteria respond to evolving nutrient gradients and microenvironments. Here we show how the response of the sulfur-oxidizing bacterium Thiovulum majus to changing oxygen gradients causes cells to organize into large-scale fronts. To study this phenomenon, we develop a technique to isolate and enrich these bacteria from the environment. Using this enrichment culture, we observe the formation and dynamics of T. majus fronts in oxygen gradients. We show that these dynamics can be understood as occurring in two steps. First, chemotactic cells moving up the oxygen gradient form a front that propagates with constant velocity. We then show, through observation and mathematical analysis, that this front becomes unstable to changes in cell density. Random perturbations in cell density create oxygen gradients. The response of cells magnifies these gradients and leads to the formation of millimeter-scale fluid flows that actively pull oxygenated water through the front. We argue that this flow results from a nonlinear instability excited by stochastic fluctuations in the density of cells. Finally, we show that the dynamics by which these modes interact can be understood from the chemotactic response of cells. These results provide a mathematically tractable example of how collective phenomena in ecological systems can arise from the individual response of cells to a shared resource. PMID:24459183

  6. Novel Trypanosomatid-Bacterium Association: Evolution of Endosymbiosis in Action

    PubMed Central

    Kostygov, Alexei Y.; Dobáková, Eva; Grybchuk-Ieremenko, Anastasiia; Váhala, Dalibor; Maslov, Dmitri A.; Votýpka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We describe a novel symbiotic association between a kinetoplastid protist, Novymonas esmeraldas gen. nov., sp. nov., and an intracytoplasmic bacterium, “Candidatus Pandoraea novymonadis” sp. nov., discovered as a result of a broad-scale survey of insect trypanosomatid biodiversity in Ecuador. We characterize this association by describing the morphology of both organisms, as well as their interactions, and by establishing their phylogenetic affinities. Importantly, neither partner is closely related to other known organisms previously implicated in eukaryote-bacterial symbiosis. This symbiotic association seems to be relatively recent, as the host does not exert a stringent control over the number of bacteria harbored in its cytoplasm. We argue that this unique relationship may represent a suitable model for studying the initial stages of establishment of endosymbiosis between a single-cellular eukaryote and a prokaryote. Based on phylogenetic analyses, Novymonas could be considered a proxy for the insect-only ancestor of the dixenous genus Leishmania and shed light on the origin of the two-host life cycle within the subfamily Leishmaniinae. PMID:26980834

  7. Heavy Metal Induced Antibiotic Resistance in Bacterium LSJC7.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songcan; Li, Xiaomin; Sun, Guoxin; Zhang, Yingjiao; Su, Jianqiang; Ye, Jun

    2015-09-29

    Co-contamination of antibiotics and heavy metals prevails in the environment, and may play an important role in disseminating bacterial antibiotic resistance, but the selective effects of heavy metals on bacterial antibiotic resistance is largely unclear. To investigate this, the effects of heavy metals on antibiotic resistance were studied in a genome-sequenced bacterium, LSJC7. The results showed that the presence of arsenate, copper, and zinc were implicated in fortifying the resistance of LSJC7 towards tetracycline. The concentrations of heavy metals required to induce antibiotic resistance, i.e., the minimum heavy metal concentrations (MHCs), were far below (up to 64-fold) the minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC) of LSJC7. This finding indicates that the relatively low heavy metal levels in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficient to induce bacterial antibiotic resistance. In addition, heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance was also observed for a combination of arsenate and chloramphenicol in LSJC7, and copper/zinc and tetracycline in antibiotic susceptible strain Escherichia coli DH5α. Overall, this study implies that heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance might be ubiquitous among various microbial species and suggests that it might play a role in the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in metal and antibiotic co-contaminated environments.

  8. IN SITU RT-PCR WITH A SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIUM ISOLATED FROM SEAGRASS ROOTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacteria considered to be obligate anaerobes internally colonize roots of the submerged macrophyte Halodule wrightii. A sulfate reducing bacterium, Summer lac 1, was isolated on lactate from H. wrightii roots. The isolate has physiological characteristics typical of Desulfovibri...

  9. O-allyl decoration on alpha-glucan isolated from the haloalkaliphilic Halomonas pantelleriensis bacterium.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Maria Michela; Gambacorta, Agata; Lanzetta, Rosa; Nicolaus, Barbara; Pieretti, Giuseppina; Romano, Ida; Parrilli, Michelangelo

    2007-07-01

    An alpha-glucan containing the unprecedented peculiar O-allyl substituent was isolated from the haloalkaliphilic Gram-negative Halomonas pantelleriensis bacterium. Its dextran-like structure was deduced from chemical degradative and spectroscopic methods.

  10. Characterization of a Neochlamydia-like bacterium associated with epitheliocystis in cultured Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infections of branchial epithelium by intracellular gram-negative bacteria, termed epitheliocystis, have limited culture of Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus). To characterize a bacterium associated with epitheliocystis in cultured char, gills were sampled for histopathologic examination, conventiona...

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of the Versatile Alkane-Degrading Bacterium Aquabacterium sp. Strain NJ1

    PubMed Central

    Shiwa, Yuh; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Zylstra, Gerben J.

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of a soil bacterium, Aquabacterium sp. strain NJ1, capable of utilizing both liquid and solid alkanes, was deciphered. This is the first report of an Aquabacterium genome sequence. PMID:25477416

  12. Characterization of a Neochlamydia-like Bacterium Associated with Epitheliocystis in Cultured Artic Char Salvelinus alpinus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infections of branchial epithelium by intracellular gram-negative bacteria, termed epitheliocystis, have limited culture of Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus). To characterize a bacterium associated with epitheliocystis in cultured char, gills were sampled for histopathologic examination, conventional...

  13. Enhancement of xylose utilization from corn stover by a recombinant bacterium for ethanol production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant ethanologenic Escherichia coli ferments glucose, xylose and arabinose to ethanol. However, the bacterium preferentially utilizes glucose first, then arabinose and finally xylose (sequential utilization of sugars) during fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolyzates to ethanol making the p...

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of the p-Nitrophenol-Degrading Bacterium Pseudomonas putida DLL-E4

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaojun; Wang, Jue; Wang, Fei; Chen, Qiongzhen; Huang, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The first complete genome sequence of a p-nitrophenol (PNP)-degrading bacterium is reported here. Pseudomonas putida DLL-E4, a Gram-negative bacterium isolated from methyl-parathion-polluted soil, can utilize PNP as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. P. putida DLL-E4 has a 6,484,062 bp circular chromosome that contains 5,894 genes, with a G+C content of 62.46%. PMID:24948765

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of a Dyella-Like Bacterium from the Planthopper Hyalesthes obsoletus.

    PubMed

    Lahav, Tamar; Zchori-Fein, Einat; Naor, Vered; Freilich, Shiri; Iasur-Kruh, Lilach

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of a Dyella-like bacterium (DLB) isolated from Hyalesthes obsoletus, the insect vector of the uncultivable mollicute bacterium "Candidatus Phytoplasma." This isolate inhibits Spiroplasma melliferum, a cultivable mollicute. The draft genome of DLB consists of 4,196,214 bp, with a 68.6% G+C content, and 3,757 genes were predicted. PMID:27445378

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of DLB, a Dyella-Like Bacterium from the Planthopper Hyalesthes obsoletus

    PubMed Central

    Lahav, Tamar; Zchori-Fein, Einat; Naor, Vered; Freilich, Shiri

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of a Dyella-like bacterium (DLB) isolated from Hyalesthes obsoletus, the insect vector of the uncultivable mollicute bacterium “Candidatus Phytoplasma.” This isolate inhibits Spiroplasma melliferum, a cultivable mollicute. The draft genome of DLB consists of 4,196,214 bp, with a 68.6% G+C content, and 3,757 genes were predicted. PMID:27445378

  17. Effect of alginic acid decomposing bacterium on the growth of Laminaria japonica (Phaeophyceae).

    PubMed

    Wang, You; Tang, Xue-Xi; Yang, Zhen; Yu, Zhi-Ming

    2006-01-01

    We collected the diseased blades of Laminaria japonica from Yantai Sea Farm from October to December 2002, and the alginic acid decomposing bacterium on the diseased blade was isolated and purified, and was identified as Alteromonas espejiana. This bacterium was applied as the causative pathogen to infect the blades of L. japonica under laboratory conditions. The aim of the present study was to identify the effects of the bacterium on the growth of L. japonica, and to find the possibly effective mechanism. Results showed that: (1) The blades of L. japonica exhibited symptoms of lesion, bleaching and deterioration when infected by the bacterium, and their growth and photosynthesis were dramatically suppressed. At the same time, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation enhanced obviously, and the relative membrane permeability increased significantly. The contents of malonaldehyde (MDA) and free fatty acid in the microsomol membrane greatly elevated, but the phospholipid content decreased. Result suggested an obvious peroxidation and deesterrification in the blades of L. japonica when infected by the bacterium. (2) The simultaneous assay on the antioxidant enzyme activities demonstrated that superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) increased greatly when infected by the bacterium, but glutathione peroxidase (Gpx) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) did not exhibit active responses to the bacterium throughout the experiment. (3) The histomorphological observations gave a distinctive evidence of the severity of the lesions as well as the relative abundance in the bacterial population on the blades after infection. The bacterium firstly invaded into the endodermis of L. japonica and gathered around there, and then resulted in the membrane damage, cells corruption and ultimately, the death of L. japonica.

  18. Fermentative degradation of polyethylene glycol by a strictly anaerobic, gram-negative, nonsporeforming bacterium, Pelobacter venetianus sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Schink, B; Stieb, M

    1983-01-01

    The synthetic polyether polyethylene glycol (PEG) with a molecular weight of 20,000 was anaerobically degraded in enrichment cultures inoculated with mud of limnic and marine origins. Three strains (Gra PEG 1, Gra PEG 2, and Ko PEG 2) of rod-shaped, gram-negative, nonsporeforming, strictly anaerobic bacteria were isolated in mineral medium with PEG as the sole source of carbon and energy. All strains degraded dimers, oligomers, and polymers of PEG up to a molecular weight of 20,000 completely by fermentation to nearly equal amounts of acetate and ethanol. The monomer ethylene glycol was not degraded. An ethylene glycol-fermenting anaerobe (strain Gra EG 12) isolated from the same enrichments was identified as Acetobacterium woodii. The PEG-fermenting strains did not excrete extracellular depolymerizing enzymes and were inhibited by ethylene glycol, probably owing to a blocking of the cellular uptake system. PEG, some PEG-containing nonionic detergents, 1,2-propanediol, 1,2-butanediol, glycerol, and acetoin were the only growth substrates utilized of a broad variety of sugars, organic acids, and alcohols. The isolates did not reduce sulfate, sulfur, thiosulfate, or nitrate and were independent of growth factors. In coculture with A. woodii or Methanospirillum hungatei, PEGs and ethanol were completely fermented to acetate (and methane). A marine isolate is described as the type strain of a new species, Pelobacter venetianus sp. nov. Its physiology and ecological significance, as well as the importance and possible mechanism of anaerobic polyether degradation, are discussed. Images PMID:6881964

  19. Metabolomics evaluation of the impact of smokeless tobacco exposure on the oral bacterium Capnocytophaga sputigena.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jinchun; Jin, Jinshan; Beger, Richard D; Cerniglia, Carl E; Yang, Maocheng; Chen, Huizhong

    2016-10-01

    The association between exposure to smokeless tobacco products (STP) and oral diseases is partially due to the physiological and pathological changes in the composition of the oral microbiome and its metabolic profile. However, it is not clear how STPs affect the physiology and ecology of oral microbiota. A UPLC/QTof-MS-based metabolomics study was employed to analyze metabolic alterations in oral bacterium, Capnocytophaga sputigena as a result of smokeless tobacco exposure and to assess the capability of the bacterium to metabolize nicotine. Pathway analysis of the metabolome profiles indicated that smokeless tobacco extracts caused oxidative stress in the bacterium. The metabolomics data also showed that the arginine-nitric oxide pathway was perturbed by the smokeless tobacco treatment. Results also showed that LC/MS was useful in identifying STP constituents and additives, including caffeine and many flavoring compounds. No significant changes in levels of nicotine and its major metabolites were found when C. sputigena was cultured in a nutrient rich medium, although hydroxylnicotine and cotinine N-oxide were detected in the bacterial metabolites suggesting that nicotine metabolism might be present as a minor degradation pathway in the bacterium. Study results provide new insights regarding the physiological and toxicological effects of smokeless tobacco on oral bacterium C. sputigena and associated oral health as well as measuring the ability of the oral bacterium to metabolize nicotine.

  20. Metabolomics evaluation of the impact of smokeless tobacco exposure on the oral bacterium Capnocytophaga sputigena.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jinchun; Jin, Jinshan; Beger, Richard D; Cerniglia, Carl E; Yang, Maocheng; Chen, Huizhong

    2016-10-01

    The association between exposure to smokeless tobacco products (STP) and oral diseases is partially due to the physiological and pathological changes in the composition of the oral microbiome and its metabolic profile. However, it is not clear how STPs affect the physiology and ecology of oral microbiota. A UPLC/QTof-MS-based metabolomics study was employed to analyze metabolic alterations in oral bacterium, Capnocytophaga sputigena as a result of smokeless tobacco exposure and to assess the capability of the bacterium to metabolize nicotine. Pathway analysis of the metabolome profiles indicated that smokeless tobacco extracts caused oxidative stress in the bacterium. The metabolomics data also showed that the arginine-nitric oxide pathway was perturbed by the smokeless tobacco treatment. Results also showed that LC/MS was useful in identifying STP constituents and additives, including caffeine and many flavoring compounds. No significant changes in levels of nicotine and its major metabolites were found when C. sputigena was cultured in a nutrient rich medium, although hydroxylnicotine and cotinine N-oxide were detected in the bacterial metabolites suggesting that nicotine metabolism might be present as a minor degradation pathway in the bacterium. Study results provide new insights regarding the physiological and toxicological effects of smokeless tobacco on oral bacterium C. sputigena and associated oral health as well as measuring the ability of the oral bacterium to metabolize nicotine. PMID:27480511

  1. Respiratory-driven Na+ electrical potential in the bacterium Vitreoscilla.

    PubMed

    Efiok, B J; Webster, D A

    1990-05-15

    Vitreoscilla is a Gram-negative bacterium with unique respiratory physiology in which Na+ was implicated as a coupling cation for the generation of a transmembrane electrical gradient (delta psi). Thus, cells respiring in the presence of 110 mM Na+ generated a delta psi of -142 mV compared to only -42 and -56 mV for Li+ and choline, respectively, and even the -42 and -56 mV were insensitive to the protonophore 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (DTHB). The kinetics of delta psi formation and collapse correlated well with the kinetics of Na+ fluxes but not with those of H+ fluxes. Cyanide inhibited respiration, Na+ extrusion, and delta psi formation 81% or more, indicating that delta psi formation and Na+ extrusion were coupled to respiration. Experiments were performed to distinguish among three possible transport systems for this coupling: (1) a Na(+)-transporting ATPase; (2) an electrogenic Na+/H+ antiport system; (3) a primary Na+ pump directly driven by the free energy of electron transport. DCCD and arsenate decreased cellular ATP up to 86% but had no effect on delta psi, evidence against a Na(+)-transporting ATPase. Low concentrations of DTHB had no effect on delta psi; high concentrations transiently collapsed delta psi, but led to a stimulation of Na+ extrusion, the opposite of that expected for a Na+/H+ antiport system. Potassium ion, which collapses delta psi, also stimulated Na+ extrusion. The experimental evidence is against Na+ extrusion by mechanisms 1 and 2 and supports the existence of a respiratory-driven primary Na+ pump for generating delta psi in Vitreoscilla. PMID:2372555

  2. Sulfobacillus thermotolerans sp. nov., a thermotolerant, chemolithotrophic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, Tat'yana I; Tsaplina, Iraida A; Kondrat'eva, Tamara F; Duda, Vitalii I; Suzina, Natalya E; Melamud, Vitalii S; Tourova, Tat'yana P; Karavaiko, Grigorii I

    2006-05-01

    A thermotolerant, Gram-positive, aerobic, endospore-forming, acidophilic bacterium (strain Kr1T) was isolated from the pulp of a gold-containing sulfide concentrate processed at 40 degrees C in a gold-recovery plant (Siberia). Cells of strain Kr1(T) were straight to slightly curved rods, 0.8-1.2 microm in diameter and 1.5-4.5 microm in length. Strain Kr1T formed spherical and oval, refractile, subterminally located endospores. The temperature range for growth was 20-60 degrees C, with an optimum at 40 degrees C. The pH range for growth on medium containing ferrous iron was 1.2-2.4, with an optimum at pH 2.0; the pH range for growth on medium containing S0 was 2.0-5.0, with an optimum at pH 2.5. Strain Kr1T was mixotrophic, oxidizing ferrous iron, S0, tetrathionate or sulfide minerals as energy sources in the presence of 0.02 % yeast extract or other organic substrates. The G+C content of the DNA of strain Kr1T was 48.2+/-0.5 mol%. Strain Kr1T showed a low level of DNA-DNA reassociation with the known Sulfobacillus species (11-44 %). 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that Kr1T formed a separate phylogenetic group with a high degree of similarity between the nucleotide sequences (98.3-99.6 %) and 100 % bootstrap support within the phylogenetic Sulfobacillus cluster. On the basis of its physiological properties and the results of phylogenetic analyses, strain Kr1T can be affiliated to a novel species of the genus Sulfobacillus, for which the name Sulfobacillus thermotolerans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Kr1T (=VKM B-2339T=DSM 17362T).

  3. Energy coupling to K+ transport in a marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    Sedgwick, E G; MacLeod, R A

    1980-10-01

    Cells of the marine bacterium Alteromonas haloplanktis 214 ATCC 19855 (previously referred to as marine pseudomonad B-16) were depleted of K+ by washing with 0.1 M MgSO4. Washing with 0.05 M MgSO4 lowered the Vmax for K+ transport compared with washing with 0.1 M with 0.05 but did not change the Km, while washing with lower concentrations of MgSO4 caused loss of ultraviolet-absorbing material from the cells. K+ uptake was a strictly aerobic process and was accompanied by proton release. When an anaerobic suspension of cells was added to incubation mixtures containing increasing amounts of O2, intracellular ATP concentrations increased as the O2 concentration increased and reached near maximum values before K+ transport began. The O2 concentration initiating K+ transport caused transport to proceed at its maximum rate. For these experiments A. haloplanktis was depleted of ATP by incubating under anaerobic conditions. Incubating with either N,N'-dicyclohexyl carbodiimide (DCCD) or arsenate failed to deplete intact cells of ATP or prevent K+ transport. The inhibitory activity of DCCD for ATPase in membrane preparations was higher at 5 mM than at other MgSO4 concentrations and increased with time. Cyanide and the uncoupling agents tetrachloro-salicylanide (TCS) and carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) prevented K+ uptake while TSC and FCCP though not cyanide caused K+ to be released from K+-containing cells. It is concluded that the driving force for K+ transport in these cells is likely to be the membrane potential and that K+ transport may be gated.

  4. Metabolic Evolution of a Deep-Branching Hyperthermophilic Chemoautotrophic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Braakman, Rogier; Smith, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Aquifex aeolicus is a deep-branching hyperthermophilic chemoautotrophic bacterium restricted to hydrothermal vents and hot springs. These characteristics make it an excellent model system for studying the early evolution of metabolism. Here we present the whole-genome metabolic network of this organism and examine in detail the driving forces that have shaped it. We make extensive use of phylometabolic analysis, a method we recently introduced that generates trees of metabolic phenotypes by integrating phylogenetic and metabolic constraints. We reconstruct the evolution of a range of metabolic sub-systems, including the reductive citric acid (rTCA) cycle, as well as the biosynthesis and functional roles of several amino acids and cofactors. We show that A. aeolicus uses the reconstructed ancestral pathways within many of these sub-systems, and highlight how the evolutionary interconnections between sub-systems facilitated several key innovations. Our analyses further highlight three general classes of driving forces in metabolic evolution. One is the duplication and divergence of genes for enzymes as these progress from lower to higher substrate specificity, improving the kinetics of certain sub-systems. A second is the kinetic optimization of established pathways through fusion of enzymes, or their organization into larger complexes. The third is the minimization of the ATP unit cost to synthesize biomass, improving thermodynamic efficiency. Quantifying the distribution of these classes of innovations across metabolic sub-systems and across the tree of life will allow us to assess how a tradeoff between maximizing growth rate and growth efficiency has shaped the long-term metabolic evolution of the biosphere. PMID:24516572

  5. Trace Metal Sequestration by the Manganese Oxidizing Bacterium Pseudomonas putida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, B.; Manceau, A.; Marcus, M. A.; Sposito, G.

    2002-12-01

    Bacterial cells are an important source of chemically reactive surfaces in freshwater and soil environments. Pseudomonas putida strain MnB1 cells, like many gram negative bacteria, present an outer membrane studded with phosphate groups and carbohydrates as well as a billowing biofilm of extracellular polysaccharides to the surrounding microenvironment. The cell outer membrane and the biofilm possess functional groups that complex trace metals. During certain growth phases P. putida is also a manganese oxidizing bacterium, causing the cells to coat themselves in Mn(IV) oxide. Therefore, in addition to the cell outer membrane and associated biofilm, trace metals may sorb to the biogenic Mn oxide. To explore the relative contributions to trace metal sorption by the bacterial cells and biogenic Mn oxide, zinc and nickel were added to suspensions of bacterial cells with three different conditions: cells in the absence of Mn, cells in the process of Mn oxidation and cells with preformed biogenic Mn oxide. Adsorption isotherms were measured to quantify Zn and Ni sorption to P. putida in the presence and absence of biogenic Mn oxide. Zinc and Ni K-edge EXAFS spectra were measured to determine how and where the metals were binding to the bacterial cells and biogenic Mn oxide. The Zn and Ni adsorption isotherms exhibited two plateaus. The metal complexation was dependent on concentration with Zn having a higher affinity for phosphate and Ni for carboxyl functional groups. The preformed biogenic Mn oxide has high affinity for Zn and Ni and the bacterial surface contributed little to metal removal from solution under these conditions. However, if the metal is present in solution while Mn oxidation is occurring the bacterial cell surface influences greatly the overall removal of metal. Manganese oxidizing bacteria such as P. putida contribute to environmental metal sequestration by catalyzing the production of Mn oxide minerals, and the bacterial cells are themselves reactive

  6. Interaction of Cadmium With the Aerobic Bacterium Pseudomonas Mendocina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, P. J.; Haack, E. A.; Maurice, P. A.

    2006-05-01

    The fate of toxic metals in the environment can be heavily influenced by interaction with bacteria in the vadose zone. This research focuses on the interactions of cadmium with the strict aerobe Pseudomonas mendocina. P. mendocina is a gram-negative bacterium that has shown potential in the bioremediation of recalcitrant organic compounds. Cadmium is a common environmental contaminant of wide-spread ecological consequence. In batch experiments P. mendocina shows typical bacterial growth curves, with an initial lag phase followed by an exponential phase and a stationary to death phase; concomitant with growth was an increase in pH from initial values of 7 to final values at 96 hours of 8.8. Cd both delays the onset of the exponential phase and decreases the maximum population size, as quantified by optical density and microscopic cell counts (DAPI). The total amount of Cd removed from solution increases over time, as does the amount of Cd removed from solution normalized per bacterial cell. Images obtained with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the production of a cadmium, phosphorus, and iron containing precipitate that was similar in form and composition to precipitates formed abiotically at elevated pH. However, by late stationary phase, the precipitate had been re-dissolved, perhaps by biotic processes in order to obtain Fe. Stressed conditions are suggested by TEM images showing the formation of pili, or nanowires, when 20ppm Cd was present and a marked decrease in exopolysaccharide and biofilm material in comparison to control cells (no cadmium added).

  7. Phenotypic Variation in the Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Acidovorax citrulli

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Ram Kumar; Rosenberg, Tally; Makarovsky, Daria; Eckshtain-Levi, Noam; Zelinger, Einat; Kopelowitz, June; Sikorski, Johannes; Burdman, Saul

    2013-01-01

    Acidovorax citrulli causes bacterial fruit blotch (BFB) of cucurbits, a disease that threatens the cucurbit industry worldwide. Despite the economic importance of BFB, little is known about pathogenicity and fitness strategies of the bacterium. We have observed the phenomenon of phenotypic variation in A. citrulli. Here we report the characterization of phenotypic variants (PVs) of two strains, M6 and 7a1, isolated from melon and watermelon, respectively. Phenotypic variation was observed following growth in rich medium, as well as upon isolation of bacteria from inoculated plants or exposure to several stresses, including heat, salt and acidic conditions. When grown on nutrient agar, all PV colonies possessed a translucent appearance, in contrast to parental strain colonies that were opaque. After 72 h, PV colonies were bigger than parental colonies, and had a fuzzy appearance relative to parental strain colonies that are relatively smooth. A. citrulli colonies are generally surrounded by haloes detectable by the naked eye. These haloes are formed by type IV pilus (T4P)-mediated twitching motility that occurs at the edge of the colony. No twitching haloes could be detected around colonies of both M6 and 7a1 PVs, and microscopy observations confirmed that indeed the PVs did not perform twitching motility. In agreement with these results, transmission electron microscopy revealed that M6 and 7a1 PVs do not produce T4P under tested conditions. PVs also differed from their parental strain in swimming motility and biofilm formation, and interestingly, all assessed variants were less virulent than their corresponding parental strains in seed transmission assays. Slight alterations could be detected in some DNA fingerprinting profiles of 7a1 variants relative to the parental strain, while no differences at all could be seen among M6 variants and parental strain, suggesting that, at least in the latter, phenotypic variation is mediated by slight genetic and/or epigenetic

  8. Idiomarina maris sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from sediment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Jiao; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Zhao, Hui-Lin; Zhou, Ming-Yang; Li, Hui-Juan; Gao, Zhao-Ming; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Dang, Hong-Yue; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2012-02-01

    A protease-producing marine bacterium, designated CF12-14(T), was isolated from sediment of the South China Sea. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain CF12-14(T) formed a separate lineage within the genus Idiomarina (Gammaproteobacteria). The isolate showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Idiomarina salinarum ISL-52(T) (94.7 %), Idiomarina seosinensis CL-SP19(T) (94.6 %) and other members of the genus Idiomarina (91.9-94.6 %). Cells were gram-negative, aerobic, flagellated, straight or slightly curved, and often formed buds and prosthecae. Strain CF12-14(T) grew at 4-42 °C (optimum 30-35 °C) and with 0.1-15 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 2-3 %). The isolate reduced nitrate to nitrite and hydrolysed DNA, but did not produce acids from sugars. The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0) (27.4 %), iso-C(17 : 0) (16.0 %) and iso-C(17 : 1)ω9c (15.8 %). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol. The major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone 8. The DNA G+C content was 50.4 mol%. The phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic data supported the conclusion that CF12-14(T) represents a novel species of the genus Idiomarina, for which the name Idiomarina maris sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CF12-14(T) ( = CCTCC AB 208166(T) = KACC 13974(T)).

  9. Sodium-coupled ATP synthesis in the bacterium Vitreoscilla.

    PubMed

    Efiok, B J; Webster, D A

    1992-01-01

    The bacterium Vitreoscilla generates an electrical potential gradient due to sodium ion (delta psi Na+) across its membrane via respiratory-driven primary Na+ pump(s). The role of the delta psi Na+ as a driving force for ATP synthesis was, therefore, investigated. In respiring starved cells pulsed with 100 mM external Na+ [( Na+]o) there was a 167% net increase in cellular ATP concentration over basal levels compared with 0, 56, 78, and 78% for no addition, choline, Li+, and K+ controls, respectively. Doubling the [Na+]o to 200 mM boosted the net increase to 244% but a similar doubling of the choline caused only an increase to 78%. When the initial condition was intracellular Na+ ([Na+]i) = [Na+]o = 100 mM, there was a 94% net increase in cellular ATP compared with only 18 and 11% for Li+ and K+ controls, respectively, indicating that Nai+ may be the only cation tested that the cells extruded to generate the electrochemical gradient required to drive ATP synthesis. The Na(+)-dependent ATP synthesis was inhibited completely by monensin (12 microM), but only transiently by the protonophore 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (100 microM), further evidence that the Na+ gradient and not a H+ gradient was driving the ATP synthesis. ATP synthesis in response to an artificially imposed H+ gradient (delta pH approximately 3) in the absence of an added cation, or in the presence of Li+, K+, or choline, yielded similar delta ATP/delta pH ratios of 0.98-1.22. In the presence of Na+, however, this ratio dropped to 0.23, indicating that Na+ inhibited H(+)-coupling to ATP synthesis and possibly that H+ and Na+ coupling to ATP synthesis share a common catalyst. The above evidence adds to previous findings that under normal growth conditions Na+ is probably the main coupling cation for ATP synthesis in Vitreoscilla. PMID:1309288

  10. A plant growth-promoting bacterium that decreases nickel toxicity in seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Burd, G.I.; Dixon, D.G.; Glick, B.R.

    1998-10-01

    A plant growth-promoting bacterium, Kluyvera ascorbata SUD165, that contained high levels of heavy metals was isolated from soil collected near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. The bacterium was resistant to the toxic effects of Ni{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and CrO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, produced a siderophore(s), and displayed 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase activity. Canola seeds inoculated with this bacterium and then grown under gnotobiotic conditions in the presence of high concentrations of nickel chloride were partially protected against nickel toxicity. In addition, protection by the bacterium against nickel toxicity was evident in pot experiments with canola and tomato seeds. The presence of K. ascorbata SUD165 had no measurable influence on the amount of nickel accumulated per milligram (dry weight) of either roots or shoots of canola plants. Therefore, the bacterial plant growth-promoting effect in the presence of nickel was probably not attributable to the reduction of nickel uptake by seedlings. Rather, it may reflect the ability of the bacterium to lower the level of stress ethylene induced by the nickel.

  11. Veratrol-O-demethylase of Acetobacterium dehalogenans: ATP-dependent reduction of the corrinoid protein.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Anke; Schubert, Torsten; Engelmann, Tina; Studenik, Sandra; Diekert, Gabriele

    2005-09-01

    The anaerobic veratrol O-demethylase mediates the transfer of the methyl group of the phenyl methyl ether veratrol to tetrahydrofolate. The primary methyl group acceptor is the cobalt of a corrinoid protein, which has to be in the +1 oxidation state to bind the methyl group. Due to the negative redox potential of the cob(II)/cob(I)alamin couple, autoxidation of the cobalt may accidentally occur. In this study, the reduction of the corrinoid to the superreduced [Co(I)] state was investigated. The ATP-dependent reduction of the corrinoid protein of the veratrol O-demethylase was shown to be dependent on titanium(III) citrate as electron donor and on an activating enzyme. In the presence of ATP, activating enzyme, and Ti(III), the redox potential versus the standard hydrogen electrode (E (SHE)) of the cob(II)alamin/cob(I)alamin couple in the corrinoid protein was determined to be -290 mV (pH 7.5), whereas E (SHE) at pH 7.5 was lower than -450 mV in the absence of either activating enzyme or ATP. ADP, AMP, or GTP could not replace ATP in the activation reaction. The ATP analogue adenosine-5'-(beta,gamma-imido)triphosphate (AMP-PNP, 2-4 mM) completely inhibited the corrinoid reduction in the presence of ATP (2 mM). PMID:15968525

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Gary; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Chertkov, Olga; Land, Miriam L

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer-ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi-cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome squence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, Mun Su; Moritz, Brelan E.; Xie, Gary; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Thomas S; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Pitluck, Sam; Land, Miriam L; Patel, Milind; Ou, Mark; Harbrucker, Roberta; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, Keelnathan T.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer- ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this spo- rogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attrac- tive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi- cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome se- quence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Mun Su; Moritz, Brélan E.; Xie, Gary; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, E.; Tice, H.; Bruce, D.; Goodwin, L.; Chertkov, O.; Brettin, T.; Han, C.; Detter, C.; Pitluck, S.; Land, Miriam L.; Patel, Milind; Ou, Mark; Harbrucker, Roberta; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, K. T.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 and ferments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemicellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome sequence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed. PMID:22675583

  15. Investigations of Iron Minerals Formed by Dissimilatory Alkaliphilic Bacterium with 57Fe Mössbauer Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistyakova, N. I.; Rusakov, V. S.; Shapkin, A. A.; Zhilina, T. N.; Zavarzina, D. G.; Lančok, A.; Kohout, J.

    2010-07-01

    Anaerobic alkaliphilic bacterium of Geoalkalibacter ferrihydriticus type (strain Z-0531), isolated from a bottom sediment sample from the weakly mineralized soda Lake Khadyn, have been analyzed. The strain uses the amorphous Fe(III)-hydroxide (AFH) as an electron acceptor and acetate CH3COO- as an electron donor. Mössbauer investigations of solid phase samples obtained during the process of the bacterium growth were carried out at room temperature, 77.8 K, 4.2 K without and with the presence of an external magnetic field (6 T) applied perpendicular to the γ-bebam.

  16. Investigations of Iron Minerals Formed by Dissimilatory Alkaliphilic Bacterium with {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chistyakova, N. I.; Rusakov, V. S.; Shapkin, A. A.; Zhilina, T. N.; Zavarzina, D. G.; Kohout, J.

    2010-07-13

    Anaerobic alkaliphilic bacterium of Geoalkalibacter ferrihydriticus type (strain Z-0531), isolated from a bottom sediment sample from the weakly mineralized soda Lake Khadyn, have been analyzed. The strain uses the amorphous Fe(III)-hydroxide (AFH) as an electron acceptor and acetate CH{sub 3}COO{sup -} as an electron donor. Moessbauer investigations of solid phase samples obtained during the process of the bacterium growth were carried out at room temperature, 77.8 K, 4.2 K without and with the presence of an external magnetic field (6 T) applied perpendicular to the {gamma}-bebam.

  17. Description of a bacterium associated with redmouth disease of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1966-01-01

    A description was given of a gram-negative, peritrichously flagellated, fermentative bacterium that was isolated on numerous occasions from kidney tissues of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) afflicted with redmouth disease. Although the bacteria apparently were members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, it was impossible to determine their taxonomic position within the family with certainty. Hence it was recommended that their taxonomic position remain sub judice for the present. As a temporary designation RM bacterium was used. Redmouth disease was transmitted from infected to normal fish through the medium of water.

  18. Isolation from the Sorghum bicolor Mycorrhizosphere of a Bacterium Compatible with Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Development and Antagonistic towards Soilborne Fungal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Budi, S. W.; van Tuinen, D.; Martinotti, G.; Gianinazzi, S.

    1999-01-01

    A gram-positive bacterium with antagonistic activity towards soilborne fungal pathogens has been isolated from the mycorrhizosphere of Sorghum bicolor inoculated with Glomus mosseae. It has been identified as Paenibacillus sp. strain B2 based on its analytical profile index and on 16S ribosomal DNA analysis. Besides having antagonistic activity, this bacterium stimulates mycorrhization. PMID:10543835

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of an Anaerobic and Extremophilic Bacterium, Caldanaerobacter yonseiensis, Isolated from a Geothermal Hot Stream

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Yong-Jik; Park, Gun-Seok; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Lee, Sang Jun; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Caldanaerobacter yonseiensis is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, spore-forming bacterium, which was isolated from a geothermal hot stream in Indonesia. This bacterium utilizes xylose and produces a variety of proteases. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of C. yonseiensis, which reveals insights into the pentose phosphate pathway and protein degradation metabolism in thermophilic microorganisms. PMID:24201201

  20. Cadherin Domains in the Polysaccharide-Degrading Marine Bacterium Saccharophagus degradans 2-40 Are Carbohydrate-Binding Modules▿

    PubMed Central

    Fraiberg, Milana; Borovok, Ilya; Bayer, Edward A.; Weiner, Ronald M.; Lamed, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    The complex polysaccharide-degrading marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans strain 2-40 produces putative proteins that contain numerous cadherin and cadherin-like domains involved in intercellular contact interactions. The current study reveals that both domain types exhibit reversible calcium-dependent binding to different complex polysaccharides which serve as growth substrates for the bacterium. PMID:21036994

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Arthrobacter sp. Strain SPG23, a Hydrocarbon-Degrading and Plant Growth-Promoting Soil Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Bottos, Eric M.; Van Hamme, Jonathan D.; Thijs, Sofie; Rineau, Francois; Balseiro-Romero, Maria; Weyens, Nele

    2015-01-01

    We report here the 4.7-Mb draft genome of Arthrobacter sp. SPG23, a hydrocarbonoclastic Gram-positive bacterium belonging to the Actinobacteria, isolated from diesel-contaminated soil at the Ford Motor Company site in Genk, Belgium. Strain SPG23 is a potent plant growth promoter useful for diesel fuel remediation applications based on plant-bacterium associations. PMID:26701084

  2. Classification of the Legionnaires' disease bacterium: Legionella pneumophila, genus novum, species nova, of the family Legionellaceae, familia nova.

    PubMed

    Brenner, D J; Steigerwalt, A G; McDade, J E

    1979-04-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) relatedness was used to classify strains of the Legionnaires' disease (LD) bacterium. These DNA comparisons showed that all strains of the LD bacterium were members of the same species. Included were strains isolated from the environment and strains with three different O-antigens. The DNA from the LD bacterium was not significantly related to DNA from any other group of bacteria that was tested. Biochemical data, growth characteristics, and guanine-plus-cytosine ratios were used to rule out the possibility that the LD bacterium was significantly related to members of genera whose DNA was not tested. In view of these data we propose that the LD bacterium be named Legionella pneumophila species nova, the type species of Legionella, genus novum. The type strain of L. pneumophila is Philadelphia 1.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of the Moderately Thermophilic Bacterium Schleiferia thermophila Strain Yellowstone (Bacteroidetes).

    PubMed

    Thiel, Vera; Hamilton, Trinity L; Tomsho, Lynn P; Burhans, Richard; Gay, Scott E; Ramaley, Robert F; Schuster, Stephan C; Steinke, Laurey; Bryant, Donald A

    2014-08-28

    The draft genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic bacterium Schleiferia thermophila strain Yellowstone (Bacteroidetes), isolated from Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA) was sequenced and comprises 2,617,694 bp in 35 contigs. The draft genome is predicted to encode 2,457 protein coding genes and 37 tRNA encoding genes and two rRNA operons.

  4. Aerobic mineralization of vinyl chlorides by a bacterium of the order Actinomycetales

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, T.J.; Malachowsky, K.; Schram, R.M. ); White, D.C. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1991-04-01

    A gram-positive branched bacterium isolated from a trichloroethylene-degrading consortium mineralized vinyl chloride in growing cultures and cell suspensions. Greater than 67% of the (1,2-{sup 14}C)vinyl chloride was mineralized to carbon dioxide, with approximately 10% of the radioactivity appearing in {sup 14}C-aqueous-phase products.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Phytoplasma pruni” Strain CX, a Plant-Pathogenic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Shao, J.; Bottner-Parker, K. D.; Gundersen-Rindal, D. E.; Zhao, Y.; Davis, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    “Candidatus Phytoplasma pruni” strain CX, belonging to subgroup 16SrIII-A, is a plant-pathogenic bacterium causing economically important diseases in many fruit crops. Here, we report the draft genome sequence, which consists of 598,508 bases, with a G+C content of 27.21 mol%. PMID:26472824

  6. Complete genome sequence of the bioleaching bacterium Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Alonso; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Valdés, Natalia; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter; Orellana, Omar; Levicán, Gloria

    2016-03-20

    We describe the complete genome sequence of Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1, an acidophilic bioleaching bacterium isolated from an acid mine drainage (AMD). This work provides data to gain insights about adaptive response of Leptospirillum spp. to the extreme conditions of bioleaching environments. PMID:26853478

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of the Algicidal Bacterium Mangrovimonas yunxiaonensis Strain LY01

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Zhu, Hong; Li, Chongping; Zhang, Huajun; Chen, Zhangran; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Mangrovimonas yunxiaonensis LY01, a novel bacterium isolated from mangrove sediment, showed high algicidal effects on harmful algal blooms of Alexandrium tamarense. Here, we present the first draft genome sequence of this strain to further understanding of the functional genes related to algicidal activity. PMID:25428978

  8. Response to comments on "A bacterium that can grow using arsenic instead of phosphorus"

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe-Simon, Felisa; Blum, Jodi Switzer; Kulp, Thomas R.; Gordon, Gwyneth W.; Hoeft, Shelley E.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Stolz, John F.; Webb, Samuel M.; Weber, Peter K.; Davies, Paul C.W.; Anbar, Ariel D.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2011-01-01

    Concerns have been raised about our recent study suggesting that arsenic (As) substitutes for phosphorus in major biomolecules of a bacterium that tolerates extreme As concentrations. We welcome the opportunity to better explain our methods and results and to consider alternative interpretations. We maintain that our interpretation of As substitution, based on multiple congruent lines of evidence, is viable.

  9. Robinsoniella peoriensis: A model anaerobic commensal bacterium for acquisition of antibiotic resistance?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: R. peoriensis was characterized in our laboratories from swine manure and feces as a Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium. Since then strains of this species have been identified from a variety of mammalian and other gastrointestinal (GI) tracts, suggesting it is a member of the commensal ...

  10. Draft Genome Sequence and Gene Annotation of the Uropathogenic Bacterium Proteus mirabilis Pr2921

    PubMed Central

    Giorello, F. M.; Romero, V.; Farias, J.; Scavone, P.; Umpiérrez, A.; Zunino, P.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the genome sequence of Proteus mirabilis Pr2921, a uropathogenic bacterium that can cause severe complicated urinary tract infections. After gene annotation, we identified two additional copies of ucaA, one of the most studied fimbrial protein genes, and other fimbriae related-proteins that are not present in P. mirabilis HI4320. PMID:27340058

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia cenocepacia Strain 869T2, a Plant-Beneficial Endophytic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ying-Ning

    2015-01-01

    An endophytic bacterium, Burkholderia cenocepacia 869T2, isolated from vetiver grass, has shown its abilities for both in planta biocontrol and plant growth promotion. Its draft genome sequence was determined to provide insights into those metabolic pathways involved in plant-beneficial activity. This is the first genome report for endophytic B. cenocepacia. PMID:26564046

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Sphingomonas sp. Strain NIC1, an Efficient Nicotine-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiongyu; Wang, Weiwei; Xu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomonas sp. strain NIC1, an efficient nicotine-degrading bacterium, was isolated from tobacco leaves. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of strain NIC1, which contains one circular chromosome and two circular plasmids. The genomic information will provide insights into its molecular mechanism for nicotine degradation. PMID:27417841

  13. Complete genome sequence of the cellulase-producing bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis PF008.

    PubMed

    Bae, Chungyun; Oh, Eom-Ji; Lee, Han-Beoyl; Kim, Byung-Yong; Oh, Chang-Sik

    2015-11-20

    The Gram-positive Actinobacterium Clavibacter michiganensis strain PF008 produces a cellulase of biotechnological interest, which is used for degradation of cellulose, a major component of plant cell walls. Here we report the complete genome sequence of this bacterium for better understanding of cellulase production and its virulence mechanism.

  14. Complete genome sequence of the bioleaching bacterium Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Alonso; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Valdés, Natalia; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter; Orellana, Omar; Levicán, Gloria

    2016-03-20

    We describe the complete genome sequence of Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1, an acidophilic bioleaching bacterium isolated from an acid mine drainage (AMD). This work provides data to gain insights about adaptive response of Leptospirillum spp. to the extreme conditions of bioleaching environments.

  15. Effect of tannic acid on the transcriptome of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tannins are plant-produced organic compounds that are found in soils, are able to sequester iron, and have antimicrobial properties. We studied the effect of tannic acid on the molecular physiology of the soil-inhabiting biocontrol bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (formerly Pseudomonas fluoresce...

  16. Comment on "A bacterium that degrades and assimilates poly(ethylene terephthalate)".

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Yang, Jun; Jiang, Lei

    2016-08-19

    Yoshida et al (Report, 11 March 2016, p. 1196) reported that the bacterium Ideonella sakaiensis 201-F6 can degrade and assimilate poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). However, the authors exaggerated degradation efficiency using a low-crystallinity PET and presented no straightforward experiments to verify depolymerization and assimilation of PET. Thus, the authors' conclusions are rather misleading. PMID:27540159

  17. The construction of an engineered bacterium to remove cadmium from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chang, S; Shu, H

    2014-01-01

    The removal of cadmium (Cd) from wastewater before it is released from factories is important for protecting human health. Although some researchers have developed engineered bacteria, the resistance of these engineered bacteria to Cd have not been improved. In this study, two key genes involved in glutathione synthesis (gshA and gshB), a serine acetyltransferase gene (cysE), a Thlaspi caerulescens phytochelatin synthase gene (TcPCS1), and a heavy metal ATPase gene (TcHMA3) were transformed into Escherichia coli BL21. The resistance of the engineered bacterium to Cd was significantly greater than that of the initial bacterium and the Cd accumulation in the engineered bacterium was much higher than in the initial bacterium. In addition, the Cd resistance of the bacteria harboring gshB, gshA, cysE, and TcPCS1 was higher than that of the bacteria harboring gshA, cysE, and TcPCS1. This finding demonstrated that gshB played an important role in glutathione synthesis and that the reaction catalyzed by glutathione synthase was the limiting step for producing phytochelatins. Furthermore, TcPCS1 had a greater specificity and a higher capacity for removing Cd than SpPCS1, and TcHMA3 not only played a role in T. caerulescens but also functioned in E. coli. PMID:25521138

  18. Genome sequence of the mycorrhizal helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8

    SciTech Connect

    Deveau, Aurelie; Grob, Harald; Morin, Emmanuelle; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Utturkar, Sagar M; Mehnaz, Samina; Kurz, Sven; Martin, Francis; Frey-Klett, Pascale; Labbe, Jessy L

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of the mycorrhiza helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain BBc6R8 . Several traits which could be involved in the mycorrhiza helper ability of the bacterial strain such as multiple secretion systems, auxin metabolism and phosphate mobilization were evidenced in the genome.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus Bacterium Meiothermus ruber Strain A

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, Vera; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Burhans, Richard; Gay, Scott E.; Schuster, Stephan C.; Ward, David M.; Bryant, Donald A.

    2015-03-26

    The draft genome sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus group bacterium Meiothermus ruber strain A, isolated from a cyanobacterial enrichment culture obtained from Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY), comprises 2,968,099 bp in 170 contigs. It is predicted to contain 2,895 protein-coding genes, 44 tRNA-coding genes, and 2 rRNA operons.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of the Novel Agar-Digesting Marine Bacterium HQM9▿

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zongjun; Zhang, Zhewen; Miao, Tingting; Wu, Jiayan; Lü, Guoqiang; Yu, Jun; Xiao, Jingfa; Chen, Guanjun

    2011-01-01

    Strain HQM9, an aerobic, rod-shaped marine bacterium from red algae, can produce agarases and liquefy solid plating media efficiently when agar is used as a coagulant. Here we report the draft genome sequence and the initial findings from a preliminary analysis of strain HQM9, which should be a novel species of Flavobacteriaceae. PMID:21725015

  1. Bacterium induces cryptic meroterpenoid pathway in the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    König, Claudia C; Scherlach, Kirstin; Schroeckh, Volker; Horn, Fabian; Nietzsche, Sandor; Brakhage, Axel A; Hertweck, Christian

    2013-05-27

    Stimulating encounter: The intimate, physical interaction between the soil-derived bacterium Streptomyces rapamycinicus and the human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus led to the activation of an otherwise silent polyketide synthase (PKS) gene cluster coding for an unusual prenylated polyphenol (fumicycline A). The meroterpenoid pathway is regulated by a pathway-specific activator gene as well as by epigenetic factors.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of the Moderately Halophilic Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas ruthenica Strain CP76.

    PubMed

    de la Haba, Rafael R; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; León, María José; Papke, R Thane; Ventosa, Antonio

    2013-05-23

    Pseudoalteromonas ruthenica strain CP76, isolated from a saltern in Spain, is a moderately halophilic bacterium belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria. Here we report the draft genome sequence, which consists of a 4.0-Mb chromosome, of this strain, which is able to produce the extracellular enzyme haloprotease CPI.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88, an Entomopathogenic Bacterium Isolated from Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Ghazal, Shimaa; Oshone, Rediet; Simpson, Stephen; Morris, Krystalynne; Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Thomas, W. Kelley; Khalil, Kamal M.

    2016-01-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88 is an entomopathogenic bacterium that forms a symbiotic association with Heterorhabditis nematodes. We report here a 5.27-Mbp draft genome sequence for P. luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88, with a G+C content of 42.4% and containing 4,243 candidate protein-coding genes. PMID:26988056

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88, an Entomopathogenic Bacterium Isolated from Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Ghazal, Shimaa; Oshone, Rediet; Simpson, Stephen; Morris, Krystalynne; Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Thomas, W Kelley; Khalil, Kamal M; Tisa, Louis S

    2016-01-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88 is an entomopathogenic bacterium that forms a symbiotic association with Heterorhabditis nematodes. We report here a 5.27-Mbp draft genome sequence for P. luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88, with a G+C content of 42.4% and containing 4,243 candidate protein-coding genes. PMID:26988056

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of an Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing Bacterium, “Candidatus Brocadia sinica”

    PubMed Central

    Oshiki, Mamoru; Shinyako-Hata, Kaori; Satoh, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    A draft genome sequence of an anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacterium, “Candidatus Brocadia sinica,” was determined by pyrosequencing and by screening a fosmid library. A 4.07-Mb genome sequence comprising 3 contigs was assembled, in which 3,912 gene-coding regions, 47 tRNAs, and a single rrn operon were annotated. PMID:25883286

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of a Bacillus Bacterium from the Atacama Desert Wetlands Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Vilo, Claudia; Galetovic, Alexandra; Araya, Jorge E.; Dong, Qunfeng

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of a Bacillus bacterium isolated from the microflora of Nostoc colonies grown at the Andean wetlands in northern Chile. We consider this genome sequence to be a molecular tool for exploring microbial relationships and adaptation strategies to the prevailing extreme conditions at the Atacama Desert. PMID:26294639

  7. Transcriptome analysis of the rhizosphere bacterium Azospirillum brasilense reveals an extensive auxin response.

    PubMed

    Van Puyvelde, Sandra; Cloots, Lore; Engelen, Kristof; Das, Frederik; Marchal, Kathleen; Vanderleyden, Jos; Spaepen, Stijn

    2011-05-01

    The rhizosphere bacterium Azospirillum brasilense produces the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) through the indole-3-pyruvate pathway. As we previously demonstrated that transcription of the indole-3-pyruvate decarboxylase (ipdC) gene is positively regulated by IAA, produced by A. brasilense itself or added exogenously, we performed a microarray analysis to study the overall effects of IAA on the transcriptome of A. brasilense. The transcriptomes of A. brasilense wild-type and the ipdC knockout mutant, both cultured in the absence and presence of exogenously added IAA, were compared.Interfering with the IAA biosynthesis/homeostasis in A. brasilense through inactivation of the ipdC gene or IAA addition results in much broader transcriptional changes than anticipated. Based on the multitude of changes observed by comparing the different transcriptomes, we can conclude that IAA is a signaling molecule in A. brasilense. It appears that the bacterium, when exposed to IAA, adapts itself to the plant rhizosphere, by changing its arsenal of transport proteins and cell surface proteins. A striking example of adaptation to IAA exposure, as happens in the rhizosphere, is the upregulation of a type VI secretion system (T6SS) in the presence of IAA. The T6SS is described as specifically involved in bacterium-eukaryotic host interactions. Additionally, many transcription factors show an altered regulation as well, indicating that the regulatory machinery of the bacterium is changing.

  8. The construction of an engineered bacterium to remove cadmium from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chang, S; Shu, H

    2014-01-01

    The removal of cadmium (Cd) from wastewater before it is released from factories is important for protecting human health. Although some researchers have developed engineered bacteria, the resistance of these engineered bacteria to Cd have not been improved. In this study, two key genes involved in glutathione synthesis (gshA and gshB), a serine acetyltransferase gene (cysE), a Thlaspi caerulescens phytochelatin synthase gene (TcPCS1), and a heavy metal ATPase gene (TcHMA3) were transformed into Escherichia coli BL21. The resistance of the engineered bacterium to Cd was significantly greater than that of the initial bacterium and the Cd accumulation in the engineered bacterium was much higher than in the initial bacterium. In addition, the Cd resistance of the bacteria harboring gshB, gshA, cysE, and TcPCS1 was higher than that of the bacteria harboring gshA, cysE, and TcPCS1. This finding demonstrated that gshB played an important role in glutathione synthesis and that the reaction catalyzed by glutathione synthase was the limiting step for producing phytochelatins. Furthermore, TcPCS1 had a greater specificity and a higher capacity for removing Cd than SpPCS1, and TcHMA3 not only played a role in T. caerulescens but also functioned in E. coli.

  9. Mechanisms of Stress Resistance and Gene Regulation in the Radioresistant Bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Agapov, A A; Kulbachinskiy, A V

    2015-10-01

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans reveals extraordinary resistance to ionizing radiation, oxidative stress, desiccation, and other damaging conditions. In this review, we consider the main molecular mechanisms underlying such resistance, including the action of specific DNA repair and antioxidation systems, and transcription regulation during the anti-stress response.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Jeotgalibacillus soli DSM 23228, a Bacterium Isolated from Alkaline Sandy Soil

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Yaakop, Amira Suriaty; Chan, Chia Sing; Ee, Robson; Tan, Wen-Si; Gan, Han Ming

    2015-01-01

    Jeotgalibacillus soli, a bacterium capable of degrading N-acyl homoserine lactone, was isolated from a soil sample in Portugal. J. soli constitutes the only Jeotgalibacillus species isolated from a non-marine source. Here, the draft genome, several interesting glycosyl hydrolases, and its putative N-acyl homoserine lactonases are presented. PMID:25999554

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Sphingobium yanoikuyae TJ, a Halotolerant Di-n-Butyl-Phthalate-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Decai; Zhu, Ying; Wang, Xinxin; Kong, Xiao; Liu, Huijun; Wang, Yafeng

    2016-01-01

    Sphingobium yanoikuyae TJ is a halotolerant di-n-butyl-phthalate-degrading bacterium, isolated from the Haihe estuary in Bohai Bay, Tianjin, China. Here, we report the 5.1-Mb draft genome sequence of this strain, which will provide insights into the diversity of Sphingobium spp. and the mechanism of phthalate ester degradation in the estuary. PMID:27313307

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of a Thermophilic Desulfurization Bacterium, Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius Strain W-2

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; Li, Mingchang; Guo, Shuyi

    2016-01-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius strain W-2 is a thermophilic bacterium isolated from a deep-subsurface oil reservoir in northern China, which is capable of degrading organosulfur compounds. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of G. thermoglucosidasius strain W-2, which may help to elucidate the genetic basis of biodegradation of organosulfur pollutants under heated conditions. PMID:27491977

  13. Complete genome sequence of Pandoraea thiooxydans DSM 25325(T), a thiosulfate-oxidizing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Yong, Delicia; Ee, Robson; Lim, Yan-Lue; Yu, Choo-Yee; Ang, Geik-Yong; How, Kah-Yan; Tee, Kok-Keng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2016-01-10

    Pandoraea thiooxydans DSM 25325(T) is a thiosulfate-oxidizing bacterium isolated from rhizosphere soils of a sesame plant. Here, we present the first complete genome of P. thiooxydans DSM 25325(T). Several genes involved in thiosulfate oxidation and biodegradation of aromatic compounds were identified.

  14. Isolation of Laribacter hongkongensis, a novel bacterium associated with gastroenteritis, from Chinese tiger frog.

    PubMed

    Lau, Susanna K P; Lee, Leo C K; Fan, Rachel Y Y; Teng, Jade L L; Tse, Cindy W S; Woo, Patrick C Y; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2009-01-31

    Laribacter hongkongensis is a recently discovered novel bacterium associated with community-acquired gastroenteritis. Although the bacterium has been isolated from freshwater fish and natural freshwater environments, it is not known if other freshwater animals could also be a source of L. hongkongensis. In a surveillance study on freshwater food animals (other than fish) in Hong Kong, L. hongkongensis was isolated from eight of 10 Chinese tiger frogs (Hoplobatrachus chinensis), a widespread frog species commonly consumed in China and southeast Asia. The large intestine was the site with the highest recovery rate, followed by the small intestine and stomach. None of the 30 Malaysian prawns, 20 pieces of sand shrimp, 20 Chinese mystery snails or 10 Chinese soft-shelled turtles was found to harbor the bacterium. Among the eight positive frogs, a total of 26 isolates of L. hongkongensis, confirmed by phenotypic tests and PCR, were obtained. As with human, freshwater fish and natural water isolates, a heterogeneous population of L. hongkongensis in frogs was identified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, with 6 different patterns among the 26 isolates and a single frog often carrying different strains. The present report represents the first to describe the isolation of L. hongkongensis from amphibians. The high isolation rate and genetic heterogeneity of L. hongkongensis among the Chinese tiger frogs suggested that these animals are also natural reservoir for the bacterium. Caution should be exercised in handling and cooking these frogs. PMID:19033083

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Enterobacter cloacae B2-DHA, a Chromium-Resistant Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Aminur; Nahar, Noor; Olsson, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we reported a chromium-resistant bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae B2-DHA, isolated from the landfills of tannery industries in Bangladesh. Here, we investigated its genetic composition using massively parallel sequencing and comparative analysis with other known Enterobacter genomes. Assembly of the sequencing reads revealed a genome of ~4.21 Mb in size. PMID:27257201

  16. Distribution, abundance and diversity of the extremely halophilic bacterium Salinibacter ruber

    PubMed Central

    Antón, Josefa; Peña, Arantxa; Santos, Fernando; Martínez-García, Manuel; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Rosselló-Mora, Ramon

    2008-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1998, representatives of the extremely halophilic bacterium Salinibacter ruber have been found in many hypersaline environments across the world, including coastal and solar salterns and solar lakes. Here, we review the available information about the distribution, abundance and diversity of this member of the Bacteroidetes. PMID:18957079

  17. Genome sequence of Citrobacter sp. strain A1, a dye-degrading bacterium.

    PubMed

    Chan, Giek Far; Gan, Han Ming; Rashid, Noor Aini Abdul

    2012-10-01

    Citrobacter sp. strain A1, isolated from a sewage oxidation pond, is a facultative aerobe and mesophilic dye-degrading bacterium. This organism degrades azo dyes efficiently via azo reduction and desulfonation, followed by the successive biotransformation of dye intermediates under an aerobic environment. Here we report the draft genome sequence of Citrobacter sp. A1.

  18. Genome sequence of Pedobacter arcticus sp. nov., a sea ice bacterium isolated from tundra soil.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ye; Yue, Guidong; Gao, Qiang; Wang, Zhiyong; Peng, Fang; Fang, Chengxiang; Yang, Xu; Pan, Li

    2012-12-01

    Pedobacter arcticus sp. nov. was originally isolated from tundra soil collected from Ny-Ålesund, in the Arctic region of Norway. It is a Gram-negative bacterium which shows bleb-shaped appendages on the cell surface. Here, we report the draft annotated genome sequence of Pedobacter arcticus sp. nov., which belongs to the genus Pedobacter.

  19. Melanin from the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azotobacter chroococcum: a spectroscopic characterization.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Aulie; Supakar, Subhrangshu; Banerjee, Raja

    2014-01-01

    Melanins, the ubiquitous hetero-polymer pigments found widely dispersed among various life forms, are usually dark brown/black in colour. Although melanins have variety of biological functions, including protection against ultraviolet radiation of sunlight and are used in medicine, cosmetics, extraction of melanin from the animal and plant kingdoms is not an easy task. Using complementary physicochemical techniques (i.e. MALDI-TOF, FTIR absorption and cross-polarization magic angle spinning solid-state (13)C NMR), we report here the characterization of melanins extracted from the nitrogen-fixing non-virulent bacterium Azotobacter chroococcum, a safe viable source. Moreover, considering dihydroxyindole moiety as the main constituent, an effort is made to propose the putative molecular structure of the melanin hetero-polymer extracted from the bacterium. Characterization of the melanin obtained from Azotobacter chroococcum would provide an inspiration in extending research activities on these hetero-polymers and their use as protective agent against UV radiation.

  20. Economic Game Theory to Model the Attenuation of Virulence of an Obligate Intracellular Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Tago, Damian; Meyer, Damien F

    2016-01-01

    Diseases induced by obligate intracellular pathogens have a large burden on global human and animal health. Understanding the factors involved in the virulence and fitness of these pathogens contributes to the development of control strategies against these diseases. Based on biological observations, a theoretical model using game theory is proposed to explain how obligate intracellular bacteria interact with their host. The equilibrium in such a game shows that the virulence and fitness of the bacterium is host-triggered and by changing the host's defense system to which the bacterium is confronted, an evolutionary process leads to an attenuated strain. Although, the attenuation procedure has already been conducted in practice in order to develop an attenuated vaccine (e.g., with Ehrlichia ruminantium), there was a lack of understanding of the theoretical basis behind this process. Our work provides a model to better comprehend the existence of different phenotypes and some underlying evolutionary mechanisms for the virulence of obligate intracellular bacteria. PMID:27610355

  1. Helicobacter hepaticus sp. nov., a microaerophilic bacterium isolated from livers and intestinal mucosal scrapings from mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, J G; Dewhirst, F E; Tully, J G; Paster, B J; Yan, L; Taylor, N S; Collins, M J; Gorelick, P L; Ward, J M

    1994-01-01

    A bacterium with a spiral shape and bipolar, single, sheathed flagella was isolated from the livers of mice with active, chronic hepatitis. The bacteria also colonized the cecal and colonic mucosae of mice. The bacterium grew at 37 degrees C under microaerophilic and anaerobic conditions, rapidly hydrolyzed urea, was catalase and oxidase positive, reduced nitrate to nitrite, and was resistant to cephalothin metronidazole. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the organism was classified as a novel helicobacter, Helicobacter hepaticus. This new helicobacter, like two other murine Helicobacter species, H. muridarum and "H. rappini," is an efficient colonizer of the gastrointestinal tract, but in addition, it has the pathogenic potential to elicit persistent hepatitis in mice. Images PMID:8051250

  2. Single-bacterium nanomechanics in biomedicine: unravelling the dynamics of bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Aguayo, S; Donos, N; Spratt, D; Bozec, L

    2015-02-13

    The use of the atomic force microscope (AFM) in microbiology has progressed significantly throughout the years since its first application as a high-resolution imaging instrument. Modern AFM setups are capable of characterizing the nanomechanical behaviour of bacterial cells at both the cellular and molecular levels, where elastic properties and adhesion forces of single bacterium cells can be examined under different experimental conditions. Considering that bacterial and biofilm-mediated infections continue to challenge the biomedical field, it is important to understand the biophysical events leading towards bacterial adhesion and colonization on both biological and non-biological substrates. The purpose of this review is to present the latest findings concerning the field of single-bacterium nanomechanics, and discuss future trends and applications of nanoindentation and single-cell force spectroscopy techniques in biomedicine.

  3. Economic Game Theory to Model the Attenuation of Virulence of an Obligate Intracellular Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Tago, Damian; Meyer, Damien F

    2016-01-01

    Diseases induced by obligate intracellular pathogens have a large burden on global human and animal health. Understanding the factors involved in the virulence and fitness of these pathogens contributes to the development of control strategies against these diseases. Based on biological observations, a theoretical model using game theory is proposed to explain how obligate intracellular bacteria interact with their host. The equilibrium in such a game shows that the virulence and fitness of the bacterium is host-triggered and by changing the host's defense system to which the bacterium is confronted, an evolutionary process leads to an attenuated strain. Although, the attenuation procedure has already been conducted in practice in order to develop an attenuated vaccine (e.g., with Ehrlichia ruminantium), there was a lack of understanding of the theoretical basis behind this process. Our work provides a model to better comprehend the existence of different phenotypes and some underlying evolutionary mechanisms for the virulence of obligate intracellular bacteria.

  4. The bacterium Xenorhabdus nematophila inhibits phospholipases A2 from insect, prokaryote, and vertebrate sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Youngjin; Kim, Yonggyun; Stanley, David

    The bacterium, Xenorhabdus nematophila, is a virulent insect pathogen. Part of its pathogenicity is due to impairing cellular immunity by blocking biosynthesis of eicosanoids, the major recognized signal transduction system in insect cellular immunity. X. nematophila inhibits the first step in eicosanoid biosynthesis, phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Here we report that the bacterium inhibits PLA2 from two insect immune tissues, hemocytes and fat body, as well as PLA2s selected to represent a wide range of organisms, including prokaryotes, insects, reptiles, and mammals. Our finding on a bacterial inhibitor of PLA2 activity contributes new insight into the chemical ecology of microbe-host interactions, which usually involve actions rather than inhibitors of PLA2s.

  5. Economic Game Theory to Model the Attenuation of Virulence of an Obligate Intracellular Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Tago, Damian; Meyer, Damien F.

    2016-01-01

    Diseases induced by obligate intracellular pathogens have a large burden on global human and animal health. Understanding the factors involved in the virulence and fitness of these pathogens contributes to the development of control strategies against these diseases. Based on biological observations, a theoretical model using game theory is proposed to explain how obligate intracellular bacteria interact with their host. The equilibrium in such a game shows that the virulence and fitness of the bacterium is host-triggered and by changing the host's defense system to which the bacterium is confronted, an evolutionary process leads to an attenuated strain. Although, the attenuation procedure has already been conducted in practice in order to develop an attenuated vaccine (e.g., with Ehrlichia ruminantium), there was a lack of understanding of the theoretical basis behind this process. Our work provides a model to better comprehend the existence of different phenotypes and some underlying evolutionary mechanisms for the virulence of obligate intracellular bacteria. PMID:27610355

  6. Isolation and biological characteristics of aerobic marine magnetotactic bacterium YSC-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jun; Pan, Hongmiao; Yue, Haidong; Song, Tao; Zhao, Yong; Chen, Guanjun; Wu, Longfei; Xiao, Tian

    2006-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria have become a hot spot of research in microbiology attracting intensive interest of researchers in multiple disciplinary fields. However, the studies were limited in few fastidious bacteria. The objective of this study aims at isolating new marine magnetic bacteria and better comprehension of magnetotactic bacteria. In this study, an aerobic magnetotactic bacterium YSC-1 was isolated from sediments in the Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass (YSCWM). In TEM, magnetic cells have one or several circular magnetosomes in diameter of 100nm, and consist of Fe and Co shown on energy dispersive X-ray spectrum. The biological and physiological characteristics of this bacterium were also described. The colour of YSC-1 colony is white in small rod. The gram stain is negative. Results showed that Strain YSC-1 differs from microaerophile magnetotactic bacteria MS-1 and WD-1 in biology.

  7. A Streamlined Strategy for Biohydrogen Production with Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans, an Alkaliphilic Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Begemann, Matthew B; Mormile, Melanie R; Sitton, Oliver C; Wall, Judy D; Elias, Dwayne A

    2012-01-01

    Biofuels are anticipated to enable a shift from fossil fuels for renewable transportation and manufacturing fuels, with biohydrogen considered attractive since it could offer the largest reduction of global carbon budgets. Currently, lignocellulosic biohydrogen production remains inefficient with pretreatments that are heavily fossil fuel-dependent. However, bacteria using alkali-treated biomass could streamline biofuel production while reducing costs and fossil fuel needs. An alkaliphilic bacterium, Halanaerobiumhydrogeniformans, is described that is capable of biohydrogen production at levels rivaling neutrophilic strains, but at pH 11 and hypersaline conditions. H. hydrogeniformans ferments a variety of 5- and 6-carbon sugars derived from hemicellulose and cellulose including cellobiose, and forms the end products hydrogen, acetate, and formate. Further, it can also produce biohydrogen from switchgrass and straw pretreated at temperatures far lower than any previously reported and in solutions compatible with growth. Hence, this bacterium can potentially increase the efficiency and efficacy of biohydrogen production from renewable biomass resources.

  8. A Streamlined Strategy for Biohydrogen Production with Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans, an Alkaliphilic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Begemann, Matthew B.; Mormile, Melanie R.; Sitton, Oliver C.; Wall, Judy D.; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2012-01-01

    Biofuels are anticipated to enable a shift from fossil fuels for renewable transportation and manufacturing fuels, with biohydrogen considered attractive since it could offer the largest reduction of global carbon budgets. Currently, lignocellulosic biohydrogen production remains inefficient with pretreatments that are heavily fossil fuel-dependent. However, bacteria using alkali-treated biomass could streamline biofuel production while reducing costs and fossil fuel needs. An alkaliphilic bacterium, Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans, is described that is capable of biohydrogen production at levels rivaling neutrophilic strains, but at pH 11 and hypersaline conditions. H. hydrogeniformans ferments a variety of 5- and 6-carbon sugars derived from hemicellulose and cellulose including cellobiose, and forms the end products hydrogen, acetate, and formate. Further, it can also produce biohydrogen from switchgrass and straw pretreated at temperatures far lower than any previously reported and in solutions compatible with growth. Hence, this bacterium can potentially increase the efficiency and efficacy of biohydrogen production from renewable biomass resources. PMID:22509174

  9. Crystal structure of ribosomal protein L1 from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonova, E. Yu.; Tishchenko, S. V.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Shklyaeva, A. A.; Garber, M. B.; Nikonov, S. V.; Nevskaya, N. A.

    2011-07-01

    The crystal structure of ribosomal protein L1 from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus was solved by the molecular-replacement method and refined to R cryst = 19.4% and R free = 25.1% at 2.1 Å protein consists of two domains linked together by a flexible hinge region. In the structure under consideration, the domains are in close proximity and adopt a closed conformation. Earlier, this conformation has been found in the structure of protein L1 from the bacterium Thermus thermophilus, whereas the structures of archaeal L1 proteins and the structures of all L1 proteins in the RNA-bound form have an open conformation. The fact that a closed conformation was found in the structures of two L1 proteins which crystallize in different space groups and belong to different bacteria suggests that this conformation is a characteristic feature of L1 bacterial proteins in the free form.

  10. A partial proteome reference map of the wine lactic acid bacterium Oenococcus oeni ATCC BAA-1163.

    PubMed

    Mohedano, María de la Luz; Russo, Pasquale; de Los Ríos, Vivian; Capozzi, Vittorio; Fernández de Palencia, Pilar; Spano, Giuseppe; López, Paloma

    2014-02-26

    Oenococcus oeni is the main lactic acid bacterium that carries out the malolactic fermentation in virtually all red wines and in some white and sparkling wines. Oenococcus oeni possesses an array of metabolic activities that can modify the taste and aromatic properties of wine. There is, therefore, industrial interest in the proteins involved in these metabolic pathways and related transport systems of this bacterium. In this work, we report the characterization of the O. oeni ATCC BAA-1163 proteome. Total and membrane protein preparations from O. oeni were standardized and analysed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Using tandem mass spectrometry, we identified 224 different spots corresponding to 152 unique proteins, which have been classified by their putative function and subjected to bioinformatics analysis.

  11. Economic Game Theory to Model the Attenuation of Virulence of an Obligate Intracellular Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Tago, Damian; Meyer, Damien F.

    2016-01-01

    Diseases induced by obligate intracellular pathogens have a large burden on global human and animal health. Understanding the factors involved in the virulence and fitness of these pathogens contributes to the development of control strategies against these diseases. Based on biological observations, a theoretical model using game theory is proposed to explain how obligate intracellular bacteria interact with their host. The equilibrium in such a game shows that the virulence and fitness of the bacterium is host-triggered and by changing the host's defense system to which the bacterium is confronted, an evolutionary process leads to an attenuated strain. Although, the attenuation procedure has already been conducted in practice in order to develop an attenuated vaccine (e.g., with Ehrlichia ruminantium), there was a lack of understanding of the theoretical basis behind this process. Our work provides a model to better comprehend the existence of different phenotypes and some underlying evolutionary mechanisms for the virulence of obligate intracellular bacteria.

  12. INTRACELLULAR COLONIZATION OF SEAGRASS ROOTS BY ACETOGENIC AND SULFIDOGENIC BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The contribution of seagrasses to the stability and fertility of estuarine ecosystems is well established. Loss of seagrasses in recent years to disease and coastal development underscores the importance of understanding the microbial ecology of seagrasses, and the possible roles...

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Uncultured SAR324 Bacterium lautmerah10, Binned from a Red Sea Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Luke R.

    2016-01-01

    A draft genome of SAR324 bacterium lautmerah10 was assembled from a metagenome of a surface water sample from the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia. The genome is more complete and has a higher G+C content than that of previously sequenced SAR324 representatives. Its genomic information shows a versatile metabolism that confers an advantage to SAR324, which is reflected in its distribution throughout different depths of the marine water column. PMID:26868398

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of the Moderately Thermophilic Bacterium Schleiferia thermophila Strain Yellowstone (Bacteroidetes)

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Vera; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Burhans, Richard; Gay, Scott E.; Ramaley, Robert F.; Schuster, Stephan C.; Steinke, Laurey

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic bacterium Schleiferia thermophila strain Yellowstone (Bacteroidetes), isolated from Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA) was sequenced and comprises 2,617,694 bp in 35 contigs. The draft genome is predicted to encode 2,457 protein coding genes and 37 tRNA encoding genes and two rRNA operons. PMID:25169864

  15. Cadmium resistance and uptake by bacterium, Salmonella enterica 43C, isolated from industrial effluent.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zaman; Rehman, Abdul; Hussain, Syed Z; Nisar, Muhammad A; Zulfiqar, Soumble; Shakoori, Abdul R

    2016-12-01

    Cadmium resistant bacterium, isolated from industrial wastewater, was characterized as Salmonella enterica 43C on the basis of biochemical and 16S rRNA ribotyping. It is first ever reported S. enterica 43C bared extreme resistance against heavy metal consortia in order of Pb(2+)>Cd(2+)>As(3+)>Zn(2+)>Cr(6+)>Cu(2+)>Hg(2+). Cd(2+) stress altered growth pattern of the bacterium in time dependent manner. It could remove nearly 57 % Cd(2+) from the medium over a period of 8 days. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies based on various adsorption isotherm models (Langmuir and Freundlich) depicted the Cd(2+) biosorption as spontaneous, feasible and endothermic in nature. Interestingly, the bacterium followed pseudo first order kinetics, making it a good biosorbent for heavy metal ions. The S. enterica 43C Cd(2+) processivity was significantly influenced by temperature, pH, initial Cd(2+) concentration, biomass dosage and co-metal ions. FTIR analysis of the bacterium revealed the active participation of amide and carbonyl moieties in Cd(2+) adsorption confirmed by EDX analysis. Electron micrographs beckoned further surface adsorption and increased bacterial size due to intracellular Cd(2+) accumulation. An overwhelming increase in glutathione and other non-protein thiols levels played a significant role in thriving oxidative stress generated by metal cations. Presence of metallothionein clearly depicted the role of such proteins in bacterial metal resistance mechanism. The present study results clearly declare S. enterica 43C a suitable candidate for green chemistry to bioremediate environmental Cd(2+).

  16. Effect of tannic acid on the transcriptome of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chee Kent; Penesyan, Anahit; Hassan, Karl A; Loper, Joyce E; Paulsen, Ian T

    2013-05-01

    Tannins are a diverse group of plant-produced, polyphenolic compounds with metal-chelating and antimicrobial properties that are prevalent in many soils. Using transcriptomics, we determined that tannic acid, a form of hydrolysable tannin, broadly affects the expression of genes involved in iron and zinc homeostases, sulfur metabolism, biofilm formation, motility, and secondary metabolite biosynthesis in the soil- and rhizosphere-inhabiting bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5.

  17. Insights in Nanoparticle-Bacterium Interactions: New Frontiers to Bypass Bacterial Resistance to Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Diab, Roudayna; Khameneh, Bahman; Joubert, Olivier; Duval, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been revealed as a fundamental approach for antibiotics delivery. In this paper, recent findings demonstrating the superiority of nanocarried-antibiotics over "naked" ones and the ways by which nanoparticles can help to overwhelm bacterial drug resistance are reviewed. The second part of this paper sheds light on nanoparticle-bacterium interaction patterns. Finally, key factors affecting the effectiveness of nanoparticles interactions with bacteria are discussed.

  18. Permanent draft genome of acetaldehyde degradation bacterium, Shewanella sp. YQH10.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Shang, Xiexie; Zeng, Runying

    2015-02-01

    Shewanella sp. YQH10 isolated from mangrove sediment, was a novel species of Shewanella, which has the ability to degrade acetaldehyde. Here, we present an annotated draft genome sequence of Shewanella sp. YQH10, which contains 4,215,794 bp with a G + C content of 48.1%. This information regarding the genetic basis of this bacterium can greatly advance our understanding of the physiology of this species.

  19. Effect of Tannic Acid on the Transcriptome of the Soil Bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chee Kent; Penesyan, Anahit; Hassan, Karl A.

    2013-01-01

    Tannins are a diverse group of plant-produced, polyphenolic compounds with metal-chelating and antimicrobial properties that are prevalent in many soils. Using transcriptomics, we determined that tannic acid, a form of hydrolysable tannin, broadly affects the expression of genes involved in iron and zinc homeostases, sulfur metabolism, biofilm formation, motility, and secondary metabolite biosynthesis in the soil- and rhizosphere-inhabiting bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5. PMID:23435890

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Gordonia sihwensis Strain 9, a Branched Alkane-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lisa M.; Gunasekera, Thusitha S.; Striebich, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Gordonia sihwensis strain 9 is a Gram-positive bacterium capable of efficient aerobic degradation of branched and normal alkanes. The draft genome of G. sihwensis S9 is 4.16 Mb in size, with 3,686 coding sequences and 68.1% G+C content. Alkane monooxygenase and P-450 cytochrome genes required for alkane degradation are predicted in G. sihwensis S9. PMID:27340079

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas frederiksbergensis SI8, a Psychrotrophic Aromatic-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lisa M.; Striebich, Richard C.; Mueller, Susan S.; Gunasekera, Thusitha S.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas frederiksbergensis strain SI8 is a psychrotrophic bacterium capable of efficient aerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons. The draft genome of P. frederiksbergensis SI8 is 6.57 Mb in size, with 5,904 coding sequences and 60.5% G+C content. The isopropylbenzene (cumene) degradation pathway is predicted to be present in P. frederiksbergensis SI8. PMID:26184950

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of a Strictly Anaerobic Dichloromethane-Degrading Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Kleindienst, Sara; Higgins, Steven A; Tsementzi, Despina; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T; Mack, E Erin; Löffler, Frank E

    2016-01-01

    An anaerobic, dichloromethane-degrading bacterium affiliated with novel Peptococcaceae was maintained in a microbial consortium. The organism originated from pristine freshwater sediment collected from Rio Mameyes in Luquillo, Puerto Rico, in October 2009 (latitude 18°21'43.9″, longitude -65°46'8.4″). The draft genome sequence is 2.1 Mb and has a G+C content of 43.5%. PMID:26941136

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of the Extremely Halophilic Phototrophic Purple Sulfur Bacterium Halorhodospira halochloris.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kumar Saurabh; Kirksey, Jared; Hoff, Wouter D; Deole, Ratnakar

    2014-01-01

    Halorhodospira halochloris is an extremely halophilic bacterium isolated from hypersaline Wadi Nantrun lakes in Egypt. Here we report the draft genome sequence of this gammaproteobacteria (GI number: 589289709, GenBank Accession number: CP007268). The 3.5-Mb genome encodes for photosynthesis and biosynthesis of organic osmoprotectants. Comparison with the genome of H.halophila promises to yield insights into the evolution of halophilic adaptations. PMID:25057327

  4. Cadmium resistance and uptake by bacterium, Salmonella enterica 43C, isolated from industrial effluent.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zaman; Rehman, Abdul; Hussain, Syed Z; Nisar, Muhammad A; Zulfiqar, Soumble; Shakoori, Abdul R

    2016-12-01

    Cadmium resistant bacterium, isolated from industrial wastewater, was characterized as Salmonella enterica 43C on the basis of biochemical and 16S rRNA ribotyping. It is first ever reported S. enterica 43C bared extreme resistance against heavy metal consortia in order of Pb(2+)>Cd(2+)>As(3+)>Zn(2+)>Cr(6+)>Cu(2+)>Hg(2+). Cd(2+) stress altered growth pattern of the bacterium in time dependent manner. It could remove nearly 57 % Cd(2+) from the medium over a period of 8 days. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies based on various adsorption isotherm models (Langmuir and Freundlich) depicted the Cd(2+) biosorption as spontaneous, feasible and endothermic in nature. Interestingly, the bacterium followed pseudo first order kinetics, making it a good biosorbent for heavy metal ions. The S. enterica 43C Cd(2+) processivity was significantly influenced by temperature, pH, initial Cd(2+) concentration, biomass dosage and co-metal ions. FTIR analysis of the bacterium revealed the active participation of amide and carbonyl moieties in Cd(2+) adsorption confirmed by EDX analysis. Electron micrographs beckoned further surface adsorption and increased bacterial size due to intracellular Cd(2+) accumulation. An overwhelming increase in glutathione and other non-protein thiols levels played a significant role in thriving oxidative stress generated by metal cations. Presence of metallothionein clearly depicted the role of such proteins in bacterial metal resistance mechanism. The present study results clearly declare S. enterica 43C a suitable candidate for green chemistry to bioremediate environmental Cd(2+). PMID:27491862

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of the Thermophilic, Piezophilic, Heterotrophic Bacterium Marinitoga piezophila KA3

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Peters, Lin; Mikhailova, Natalia; Teshima, Hazuki; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N; Pagani, Ioanna; Vannier, Pauline; Oger, Phil; Bartlett, Douglas; Noll, Kenneth M; Woyke, Tanja; Jebbar, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Marinitoga piezophila KA3 is a thermophilic, anaerobic, chemoorganotrophic, sulfur-reducing bacterium isolated from the Grandbonum deep-sea hydrothermal vent site at the East Pacific Rise (13 degrees N, 2,630-m depth). The genome of M. piezophila KA3 comprises a 2,231,407-bp circular chromosome and a 13,386-bp circular plasmid. This genome was sequenced within Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute CSP 2010.

  6. Degradation of p-nitrophenol by the phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Roldán, M D; Blasco, R; Caballero, F J; Castillo, F

    1998-01-01

    The phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus detoxified p-nitrophenol and 4-nitrocatechol. The bacterium tolerated moderate concentrations of p-nitrophenol (up to 0.5 mM) and degraded it under light at an optimal O2 pressure of 20 kPa. The bacterium did not metabolize the xenobiotic in the dark or under strictly anoxic conditions or high O2 pressure. Bacterial growth with acetate in the presence of p-nitrophenol took place with the simultaneous release of nonstoichiometric amounts of 4-nitrocatechol, which can also be degraded by the bacterium. Crude extracts from R. capsulatus produced 4-nitrocatechol from p-nitrophenol upon the addition of NAD(P)H, although at a very low rate. A constitutive catechol 1, 2-dioxygenase activity yielding cis,cis-muconate was also detected in crude extracts of R. capsulatus. Further degradation of 4-nitrocatechol included both nitrite- and CO2-releasing steps since: (1) a strain of R. capsulatus (B10) unable to assimilate nitrate and nitrite released nitrite into the medium when grown with p-nitrophenol or 4-nitrocatechol, and the nitrite concentration was stoichiometric with the 4-nitrocatechol degraded, and (2) cultures of R. capsulatus growing microaerobically produced low amounts of 14CO2 from radiolabeled p-nitrophenol. The radioactivity was also incorporated into cellular compounds from cells grown with uniformly labeled 14C-p-nitrophenol. From these results we concluded that the xenobiotic is used as a carbon source by R. capsulatus, but that only the strain able to assimilate nitrite (E1F1) can use p-nitrophenol as a nitrogen source.

  7. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic study of intact cells of the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azospirillum brasilense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamnev, A. A.; Ristić, M.; Antonyuk, L. P.; Chernyshev, A. V.; Ignatov, V. V.

    1997-06-01

    The data of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic measurements performed on intact cells of the soil nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azospirillum brasilense grown in a standard medium and under the conditions of an increased metal uptake are compared and discussed. The structural FTIR information obtained is considered together with atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) data on the content of metal cations in the bacterial cells. Some methodological aspects concerning preparation of bacterial cell samples for FTIR measurements are also discussed.

  8. PSEUDOMONAS NATRIEGENS, A MARINE BACTERIUM WITH A GENERATION TIME OF LESS THAN 10 MINUTES

    PubMed Central

    Eagon, R. G.

    1962-01-01

    Eagon, R. G. (University of Georgia, Athens). Pseudomonas natriegens, a marine bacterium with a generation time of less than 10 minutes. J. Bacteriol. 83:736–737. 1962.—Pseudomonas natriegens, a marine microorganism, was demonstrated to have a generation time of 9.8 min. This is the shortest generation time reported to date. Optimal growth occurred at 37 C in brain heart infusion broth supplemented with 1.5% sea salt. PMID:13888946

  9. Permanent draft genome of the malachite-green-tolerant bacterium Rhizobium sp. MGL06.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Runping; Zeng, Runying

    2014-12-01

    Rhizobium sp. MGL06, the first Rhizobium isolate from a marine environment, is a malachite-green-tolerant bacterium with a broader salinity tolerance (range: 0.5% to 9%) than other rhizobia. This study sequences and annotates the draft genome sequence of this strain. Genome sequence information provides a basis for analyzing the malachite green tolerance, broad salinity adaptation, nitrogen fixation properties, and taxonomic classification of the isolate.

  10. Catalytic Biomineralization of Fluorescent Calcite by the Thermophilic Bacterium Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius▿

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Naoto; Higashimura, Eiji; Saeki, Yuichi

    2010-01-01

    The thermophilic Geobacillus bacterium catalyzed the formation of 100-μm hexagonal crystals at 60°C in a hydrogel containing sodium acetate, calcium chloride, and magnesium sulfate. Under fluorescence microscopy, crystals fluoresced upon excitation at 365 ± 5, 480 ± 20, or 545 ± 15 nm. X-ray diffraction indicated that the crystals were magnesium-calcite in calcite-type calcium carbonate. PMID:20851984

  11. Sexual Transmission of a Plant Pathogenic Bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, between Conspecific Insect Vectors during Mating

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Rajinder S.; Pelz-Stelinski, Kirsten; Hermann, Sara L.; Tiwari, Siddharth; Stelinski, Lukasz L.

    2011-01-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus is a fastidious, phloem-inhabiting, gram-negative bacterium transmitted by Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). The bacterium is the presumed causal agent of huanglongbing (HLB), one of the most destructive and economically important diseases of citrus. We investigated whether Las is transmitted between infected and uninfected D. citri adults during courtship. Our results indicate that Las was sexually transmitted from Las-infected male D. citri to uninfected females at a low rate (<4%) during mating. Sexual transmission was not observed following mating of infected females and uninfected males or among adult pairs of the same sex. Las was detected in genitalia of both sexes and also in eggs of infected females. A latent period of 7 days or more was required to detect the bacterium in recipient females. Rod shaped as well as spherical structures resembling Las were observed in ovaries of Las-infected females with transmission electron microscopy, but were absent in ovaries from uninfected D. citri females. The size of the rod shaped structures varied from 0.39 to 0.67 µm in length and 0.19 to 0.39 µm in width. The spherical structures measured from 0.61 to 0.80 µm in diameter. This investigation provides convincing evidence that a plant pathogenic bacterium is sexually transmitted from male to female insects during courtship and established evidence that bacteria persist in reproductive organs. Moreover, these findings provide an alternative sexually horizontal mechanism for the spread of Las within populations of D. citri, even in the absence of infected host trees. PMID:22216209

  12. Halobacterium saccharovorum sp. nov., a carbohydrate-metabolizing, extremely halophilic bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlinson, G. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1976-01-01

    The previously described extremely halophilic bacterium, strain M6, metabolizes a variety of carbohydrates with the production of acid. In addition, the organism produces nitrite (but no gas) from nitrate, is motile, and grows most rapidly at about 50 C. These characteristics distinguish it from all previously described halophilic bacteria in the genus Halobacterium. It is suggested that it be designated as a new species, Halobacterium saccharovorum.

  13. Identification of insertion sequence from a gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane degrading bacterium, Sphingomonas paucimobilis UT26.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, Keisuke; Fukuda, Masao; Tsuda, Masataka; Takagi, Masamichi; Nagata, Yuji

    2005-01-01

    Tn5-derived mutants of the gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane-degrading bacterium Sphingomonas paucimobilis UT26 were genetically characterized, and an endogenous insertion sequence (IS) which belongs to the IS1380 family was identified. The IS, named ISsp1, existed as multi copies in UT26, and its transposition appeared to be activated during the process of Tn5-mutagenesis. It was found that transposon mutagenesis can cause endogenous mutations.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus Bacterium Meiothermus ruber Strain A

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Vera; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Burhans, Richard; Gay, Scott E.; Schuster, Stephan C.; Ward, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus group bacterium Meiothermus ruber strain A, isolated from a cyanobacterial enrichment culture obtained from Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY), comprises 2,968,099 bp in 170 contigs. It is predicted to contain 2,895 protein-coding genes, 44 tRNA-coding genes, and 2 rRNA operons. PMID:25814606

  15. Draft genome sequence of a strictly anaerobic dichloromethane-degrading bacterium

    DOE PAGES

    Kleindienst, Sara; Higgins, Steven A.; Tsementzi, Despina; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.; Mack, E. Erin; Loffler, Frank E.

    2016-03-03

    Here, an anaerobic, dichloromethane-degrading bacterium affiliated with novel Peptococcaceae was maintained in a microbial consortium. The organism originated from pristine freshwater sediment collected from Rio Mameyes in Luquillo, Puerto Rico, in October 2009 (latitude 18°21'43.9", longitude –65°46'8.4"). The draft genome sequence is 2.1 Mb and has a G+C content of 43.5%.

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of a Strictly Anaerobic Dichloromethane-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Steven A.; Tsementzi, Despina; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.; Mack, E. Erin

    2016-01-01

    An anaerobic, dichloromethane-degrading bacterium affiliated with novel Peptococcaceae was maintained in a microbial consortium. The organism originated from pristine freshwater sediment collected from Rio Mameyes in Luquillo, Puerto Rico, in October 2009 (latitude 18°21′43.9″, longitude −65°46′8.4″). The draft genome sequence is 2.1 Mb and has a G+C content of 43.5%. PMID:26941136

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus succinus Strain CSM-77, a Moderately Halophilic Bacterium Isolated from a Triassic Salt Mine

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Staphylococcus succinus strain CSM-77. This moderately halophilic bacterium was isolated from the surface of a halite sample obtained from a Triassic salt mine. PMID:27284152

  18. Hydrolysis of fenamiphos and its oxidation products by a soil bacterium in pure culture, soil and water.

    PubMed

    Megharaj, M; Singh, N; Kookana, R S; Naidu, R; Sethunathan, N

    2003-05-01

    A bacterium, identified as Brevibacterium sp. MM1, readily hydrolysed fenamiphos, a widely used organophosphorus insecticide and its toxic oxides (fenamiphos sulfoxide, fenamiphos sulfone), which all contain a common P-O-C bond, in a mineral salts medium. The bacterium also hydrolysed fenamiphos and its oxides in soil and groundwater. Interestingly, fenamiphos phenol, fenamiphos sulfoxide phenol and fenamiphos sulfone phenol, formed during bacterial hydrolysis of fenamiphos and its oxides, persisted in the mineral salts medium, but were transitory in soil and groundwater due to their further metabolism by indigenous micro-organisms. The cell-free preparation (crude enzyme) of this bacterium was very effective in hydrolysing fenamiphos. This is the first report on exceptionally rapid hydrolysis of fenamiphos by a bacterium in pure cultures, soil and groundwater.

  19. Microbial metabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: isolation and characterization of a pyrene-degrading bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Heitkamp, M A; Franklin, W; Cerniglia, C E

    1988-01-01

    Microbiological analyses of sediments located near a point source for petrogenic chemicals resulted in the isolation of a pyrene-mineralizing bacterium. This isolate was identified as a Mycobacterium sp. on the basis of its cellular and colony morphology, gram-positive and strong acid-fast reactions, diagnostic biochemical tests, 66.6% G + C content of the DNA, and high-molecular-weight mycolic acids (C58 to C64). The mycobacterium mineralized pyrene when grown in a mineral salts medium supplemented with nutrients but was unable to utilize pyrene as a sole source of carbon and energy. The mycobacterium grew well at 24 and 30 degrees C and minimally at 35 degrees C. No growth was observed at 5 or 42 degrees C. The mycobacterium grew well at salt concentrations up to 4%. Pyrene-induced Mycobacterium cultures mineralized 5% of the pyrene after 6 h and reached a maximum of 48% mineralization within 72 h. Treatment of induced and noninduced cultures with chloramphenicol showed that pyrene-degrading enzymes were inducible in this Mycobacterium sp. This bacterium could also mineralize other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and alkyl- and nitro-substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons including naphthalene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, 3-methylcholanthrene, 1-nitropyrene, and 6-nitrochrysene. This is the first report of a bacterium able to extensively mineralize pyrene and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons containing four aromatic rings. Images PMID:3202633

  20. Multiple cellobiohydrolases and cellobiose phosphorylases cooperate in the ruminal bacterium Ruminococcus albus 8 to degrade cellooligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Devendran, Saravanan; Abdel-Hamid, Ahmed M.; Evans, Anton F.; Iakiviak, Michael; Kwon, In Hyuk; Mackie, Roderick I.; Cann, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Digestion of plant cell wall polysaccharides is important in energy capture in the gastrointestinal tract of many herbivorous and omnivorous mammals, including humans and ruminants. The members of the genus Ruminococcus are found in both the ruminant and human gastrointestinal tract, where they show versatility in degrading both hemicellulose and cellulose. The available genome sequence of Ruminococcus albus 8, a common inhabitant of the cow rumen, alludes to a bacterium well-endowed with genes that target degradation of various plant cell wall components. The mechanisms by which R. albus 8 employs to degrade these recalcitrant materials are, however, not clearly understood. In this report, we demonstrate that R. albus 8 elaborates multiple cellobiohydrolases with multi-modular architectures that overall enhance the catalytic activity and versatility of the enzymes. Furthermore, our analyses show that two cellobiose phosphorylases encoded by R. albus 8 can function synergistically with a cognate cellobiohydrolase and endoglucanase to completely release, from a cellulosic substrate, glucose which can then be fermented by the bacterium for production of energy and cellular building blocks. We further use transcriptomic analysis to confirm the over-expression of the biochemically characterized enzymes during growth of the bacterium on cellulosic substrates compared to cellobiose. PMID:27748409

  1. Purification and Characterization of Haloalkaline, Organic Solvent Stable Xylanase from Newly Isolated Halophilic Bacterium-OKH

    PubMed Central

    Sanghvi, Gaurav; Jivrajani, Mehul; Patel, Nirav; Jivrajani, Heta; Bhaskara, Govinal Badiger; Patel, Shivani

    2014-01-01

    A novel, alkali-tolerant halophilic bacterium-OKH with an ability to produce extracellular halophilic, alkali-tolerant, organic solvent stable, and moderately thermostable xylanase was isolated from salt salterns of Mithapur region, Gujarat, India. Identification of the bacterium was done based upon biochemical tests and 16S rRNA sequence. Maximum xylanase production was achieved at pH 9.0 and 37°C temperature in the medium containing 15% NaCl and 1% (w/v) corn cobs. Sugarcane bagasse and wheat straw also induce xylanase production when used as carbon source. The enzyme was active over a range of 0–25% sodium chloride examined in culture broth. The optimum xylanase activity was observed at 5% sodium chloride. Xylanase was purified with 25.81%-fold purification and 17.1% yield. Kinetic properties such as Km and Vmax were 4.2 mg/mL and 0.31 μmol/min/mL, respectively. The enzyme was stable at pH 6.0 and 50°C with 60% activity after 8 hours of incubation. Enzyme activity was enhanced by Ca2+, Mn2+, and Mg2+ but strongly inhibited by heavy metals such as Hg2+, Fe3+, Ni2+, and Zn2+. Xylanase was found to be stable in organic solvents like glutaraldehyde and isopropanol. The purified enzyme hydrolysed lignocellulosic substrates. Xylanase, purified from the halophilic bacterium-OKH, has potential biotechnological applications. PMID:27350996

  2. Bioremediation of hexavalent chromium (VI) by a soil-borne bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae B2-DHA.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Aminur; Nahar, Noor; Nawani, Neelu N; Jass, Jana; Hossain, Khaled; Saud, Zahangir Alam; Saha, Ananda K; Ghosh, Sibdas; Olsson, Björn; Mandal, Abul

    2015-01-01

    Chromium and chromium containing compounds are discharged into the nature as waste from anthropogenic activities, such as industries, agriculture, forest farming, mining and metallurgy. Continued disposal of these compounds to the environment leads to development of various lethal diseases in both humans and animals. In this paper, we report a soil borne bacterium, B2-DHA that can be used as a vehicle to effectively remove chromium from the contaminated sources. B2-DHA is resistant to chromium with a MIC value of 1000 µg mL(-1) potassium chromate. The bacterium has been identified as a Gram negative, Enterobacter cloacae based on biochemical characteristics and 16S rRNA gene analysis. TOF-SIMS and ICP-MS analyses confirmed intracellular accumulation of chromium and thus its removal from the contaminated liquid medium. Chromium accumulation in cells was 320 µg/g of cells dry biomass after 120-h exposure, and thus it reduced the chromium concentration in the liquid medium by as much as 81%. Environmental scanning electron micrograph revealed the effect of metals on cellular morphology of the isolates. Altogether, our results indicate that B2-DHA has the potential to reduce chromium significantly to safe levels from the contaminated environments and suggest the potential use of this bacterium in reducing human exposure to chromium, hence avoiding poisoning.

  3. Multiple cellobiohydrolases and cellobiose phosphorylases cooperate in the ruminal bacterium Ruminococcus albus 8 to degrade cellooligosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devendran, Saravanan; Abdel-Hamid, Ahmed M.; Evans, Anton F.; Iakiviak, Michael; Kwon, In Hyuk; Mackie, Roderick I.; Cann, Isaac

    2016-10-01

    Digestion of plant cell wall polysaccharides is important in energy capture in the gastrointestinal tract of many herbivorous and omnivorous mammals, including humans and ruminants. The members of the genus Ruminococcus are found in both the ruminant and human gastrointestinal tract, where they show versatility in degrading both hemicellulose and cellulose. The available genome sequence of Ruminococcus albus 8, a common inhabitant of the cow rumen, alludes to a bacterium well-endowed with genes that target degradation of various plant cell wall components. The mechanisms by which R. albus 8 employs to degrade these recalcitrant materials are, however, not clearly understood. In this report, we demonstrate that R. albus 8 elaborates multiple cellobiohydrolases with multi-modular architectures that overall enhance the catalytic activity and versatility of the enzymes. Furthermore, our analyses show that two cellobiose phosphorylases encoded by R. albus 8 can function synergistically with a cognate cellobiohydrolase and endoglucanase to completely release, from a cellulosic substrate, glucose which can then be fermented by the bacterium for production of energy and cellular building blocks. We further use transcriptomic analysis to confirm the over-expression of the biochemically characterized enzymes during growth of the bacterium on cellulosic substrates compared to cellobiose.

  4. [Mechanisms of Forespore Formation during Polysporogenesis of an Anaerobic Bacterium Anaerobacter polyendosporus PST(T)].

    PubMed

    Duda, V I; Suzina, N E

    2015-01-01

    Forespore formation in the anaerobic bacterium Anaerobacterpolyendosporus PS-1(T) was studied by phase contrast, fluorescence, and electron microscopy. It is concluded that in this bacterium the formation of all forespores in multispore sporangia occurs via the same mechanism as that operating in all known bacilli and clostridia during the single-spore variant of endogenous sporogenesis. Its cytological indicators are as follows: (1) formation of the forespore septum, (2) engulfment of the smaller prespore cell by the larger mother cell, (3) cortex synthesis, (4) assembly of the spore coats, (5) exosporium formation, and (6) lysis of the mother cell. Polysporogenesis in strain PS-1(T) is characterized by synchronous formation of all spores (siblings) in a given sporangium and by the absence of any indication of forespore division within the mother cell. These data suggest that multiple spores within a single PS-1(T) cell result not from division of the first forespores developing at one or two cell poles, as it was reported for another polysporogenic bacterium, "Metabacterium polyspora", but rather from simultaneous independent formation of several prespores in a single mother cell in the course of modified cell division. PMID:27169242

  5. In Search of an Uncultured Human-Associated TM7 Bacterium in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Dinis, Jorge M.; Barton, David E.; Ghadiri, Jamsheed; Surendar, Deepa; Reddy, Kavitha; Velasquez, Fernando; Chaffee, Carol L.; Lee, Mei-Chong Wendy; Gavrilova, Helen; Ozuna, Hazel; Smits, Samuel A.; Ouverney, Cleber C.

    2011-01-01

    We have identified an environmental bacterium in the Candidate Division TM7 with ≥98.5% 16S rDNA gene homology to a group of TM7 bacteria associated with the human oral cavity and skin. The environmental TM7 bacterium (referred to as TM7a-like) was readily detectable in wastewater with molecular techniques over two years of sampling. We present the first images of TM7a-like cells through FISH technique and the first images of any TM7 as viable cells through the STARFISH technique. In situ quantification showed TM7 concentration in wastewater up to five times greater than in human oral sites. We speculate that upon further characterization of the physiology and genetics of the TM7a-like bacterium from environmental sources and confirmation of its genomic identity to human-associated counterparts it will serve as model organisms to better understand its role in human health. The approach proposed circumvents difficulties imposed by sampling humans, provides an alternative strategy to characterizing some diseases of unknown etiology, and renders a much needed understanding of the ecophysiological role hundreds of unique Bacteria and Archaea strains play in mixed microbial communities. PMID:21701585

  6. Phosphate enhances levan production in the endophytic bacterium Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Pal5

    PubMed Central

    Idogawa, Nao; Amamoto, Ryuta; Murata, Kousaku; Kawai, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a gram-negative and endophytic nitrogen-fixing bacterium that has several beneficial effects in host plants; thus, utilization of this bacterium as a biofertilizer in agriculture may be possible. G. diazotrophicus synthesizes levan, a D-fructofuranosyl polymer with β-(2→6) linkages, as an exopolysaccharide and the synthesized levan improves the stress tolerance of the bacterium. In this study, we found that phosphate enhances levan production by G. diazotrophicus Pal5, a wild type strain that showed a stronger mucous phenotype on solid medium containing 28 mM phosphate than on solid medium containing 7 mM phosphate. A G. diazotrophicus Pal5 levansucrase disruptant showed only a weak mucous phenotype regardless of the phosphate concentration, indicating that the mucous phenotype observed on 28 mM phosphate medium was caused by levan. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the effect of a high concentration of phosphate on exopolysaccharide production. PMID:24717418

  7. Genetic Engineering of a Radiation-Resistant Bacterium for Biodegradation of Mixed Wastes--Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mary E. Lidstrom

    2003-12-26

    Aqueous mixed low level wastes (MLLW) containing radionuclides, solvents, and/or heavy metals represent a serious current and future problem for DOE environmental management and cleanup. In order to provide low-cost treatment alternatives under mild conditions for such contained wastes, we have proposed to use the radiation-resistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans. This project has focused on developing D. radiodurans strains for dual purpose processes: cometabolic treatment of haloorganics and other solvents and removal of heavy metals from waste streams in an above-ground reactor system. The characteristics of effective treatment strains that must be attained are: (a) high biodegradative and metal binding activity; (b) stable treatment characteristics in the absence of selection and in the presence of physiological stress; (c) survival and activity under harsh chemical conditions, including radiation. The result of this project has been a suite of strains with high biodegradative capabilities that are candidates for pilot stage treatment systems. In addition, we have determined how to create conditions to precipitate heavy metals on the surface of the bacterium, as the first step towards creating dual-use treatment strains for contained mixed wastes of importance to the DOE. Finally, we have analyzed stress response in this bacterium, to create the foundation for developing treatment processes that maximize degradation while optimizing survival under high stress conditions.

  8. Anomalous Magnetic Orientations of Magnetosome Chains in a Magnetotactic Bacterium: Magnetovibrio blakemorei Strain MV-1

    PubMed Central

    Kalirai, Samanbir S.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Hitchcock, Adam P.

    2013-01-01

    There is a good deal of published evidence that indicates that all magnetosomes within a single cell of a magnetotactic bacterium are magnetically oriented in the same direction so that they form a single magnetic dipole believed to assist navigation of the cell to optimal environments for their growth and survival. Some cells of the cultured magnetotactic bacterium Magnetovibrio blakemorei strain MV-1 are known to have relatively wide gaps between groups of magnetosomes that do not seem to interfere with the larger, overall linear arrangement of the magnetosomes along the long axis of the cell. We determined the magnetic orientation of the magnetosomes in individual cells of this bacterium using Fe 2p X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectra measured with scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). We observed a significant number of cases in which there are sub-chains in a single cell, with spatial gaps between them, in which one or more sub-chains are magnetically polarized opposite to other sub-chains in the same cell. These occur with an estimated frequency of 4.0±0.2%, based on a sample size of 150 cells. We propose possible explanations for these anomalous cases which shed insight into the mechanisms of chain formation and magnetic alignment. PMID:23308202

  9. Alcanivorax dieselolei, an alkane-degrading bacterium associated with the mucus of the zoanthid Palythoa caribaeorum (Cnidaria, Anthozoa).

    PubMed

    Campos, F F; Garcia, J E; Luna-Finkler, C L; Davolos, C C; Lemos, M V F; Pérez, C D

    2015-05-01

    Analyses of 16S rDNA genes were used to identify the microbiota isolated from the mucus of the zoanthid Palythoa caribaeorum at Porto de Galinhas on the coast of Pernambuco State, Brazil. This study is important as the first report of this association, because of the potential biotechnological applications of the bacterium Alcanivorax dieselolei, and as evidence for the presence of a hydrocarbon degrading bacterium in a reef ecosystem such as Porto de Galinhas.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus licheniformis Strain GB2, a Hydrocarbon-Degrading and Plant Growth-Promoting Soil Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Van Hamme, Jonathan; Bottos, Eric; Thijs, Sofie; Balseiro-Romero, Maria; Monterroso, Carmela; Kidd, Petra Suzan; Rineau, Francois; Weyens, Nele; Sillen, Wouter

    2016-01-01

    We report the 4.39 Mb draft genome of Bacillus licheniformis GB2, a hydrocarbonoclastic Gram-positive bacterium of the family Bacillaceae, isolated from diesel-contaminated soil at the Ford Motor Company site in Genk, Belgium. Strain GB2 is an effective plant-growth promoter useful for diesel fuel remediation applications based on plant-bacterium associations. PMID:27340073

  11. Anaerobic, Nitrate-Dependent Oxidation of U(IV) Oxide Minerals by the Chemolithoautotrophic Bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, H R

    2004-06-25

    Under anaerobic conditions and at circumneutral pH, cells of the widely-distributed, obligate chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans oxidatively dissolved synthetic and biogenic U(IV) oxides (uraninite) in nitrate-dependent fashion: U(IV) oxidation required the presence of nitrate and was strongly correlated to nitrate consumption. This is the first report of anaerobic U(IV) oxidation by an autotrophic bacterium.

  12. Effect of arsenite-oxidizing bacterium B. laterosporus on arsenite toxicity and arsenic translocation in rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gui-Di; Xie, Wan-Ying; Zhu, Xi; Huang, Yi; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Qiu, Zong-Qing; Lv, Zhen-Mao; Wang, Wen-Na; Lin, Wen-Xiong

    2015-10-01

    Arsenite [As (III)] oxidation can be accelerated by bacterial catalysis, but the effects of the accelerated oxidation on arsenic toxicity and translocation in rice plants are poorly understood. Herein we investigated how an arsenite-oxidizing bacterium, namely Brevibacillus laterosporus, influences As (III) toxicity and translocation in rice plants. Rice seedlings of four cultivars, namely Guangyou Ming 118 (GM), Teyou Hang II (TH), Shanyou 63 (SY) and Minghui 63 (MH), inoculated with or without the bacterium were grown hydroponically with As (III) to investigate its effects on arsenic toxicity and translocation in the plants. Percentages of As (III) oxidation in the solutions with the bacterium (100%) were all significantly higher than those without (30-72%). The addition of the bacterium significantly decreased As (III) concentrations in SY root, GM root and shoot, while increased the As (III) concentrations in the shoot of SY, MH and TH and in the root of MH. Furthermore, the As (III) concentrations in the root and shoot of SY were both the lowest among the treatments with the bacterium. On the other hand, its addition significantly alleviated the As (III) toxicity on four rice cultivars. Among the treatments amended with B. laterosporus, the bacterium showed the best remediation on SY seedlings, with respect to the subdued As (III) toxicity and decreased As (III) concentration in its roots. These results indicated that As (III) oxidation accelerated by B. laterosporus could be an effective method to alleviate As (III) toxicity on rice seedlings. PMID:26024808

  13. [Diversity analysis of desulfuration bacterium from the oxidation ditch of city sewage treatment plant with SO2 gas].

    PubMed

    Huang, Bing; Zhang, Shi-Ling; Zhang, Jiang-Hong; Ao, Yong; Shi, Zhe

    2011-07-01

    A group of removing SO2 bacterium was obtained from the oxidation ditch of city sewage treatment plant by inductive domestication over 6 d with low concentration SO2 gas, and they have an ability with biodegradation rate of 888 mg x (L x h)(-1) and a degradation efficiency of 85% during 1.5 h for SO2 dissolved in water with their synergy. The clone library and two phylogenetic trees of the removing SO2 bacterium communities were obtained based on 16S rRNA DNA comparison by DNA extraction of the sample and in situ polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The phylogenetic analysis showed that 8 dominant desulfuration bacterium occupy about 69% of all removing SO2 bacterium, and some of them have a kindred with discovered desulfuration bacterium but not homogeneity, and there are four belong to alpha-Proteobacteria, another four belong to beta-Proteobacteria in them. The gene information about 16S rRNA sequence of the dominant desulfuration bacteria and domestication method provide a basic of looking for or domesticating removing SO2 bacterium for development microbial desulfurization technology of contained SO2 tail gas.

  14. Effect of arsenite-oxidizing bacterium B. laterosporus on arsenite toxicity and arsenic translocation in rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gui-Di; Xie, Wan-Ying; Zhu, Xi; Huang, Yi; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Qiu, Zong-Qing; Lv, Zhen-Mao; Wang, Wen-Na; Lin, Wen-Xiong

    2015-10-01

    Arsenite [As (III)] oxidation can be accelerated by bacterial catalysis, but the effects of the accelerated oxidation on arsenic toxicity and translocation in rice plants are poorly understood. Herein we investigated how an arsenite-oxidizing bacterium, namely Brevibacillus laterosporus, influences As (III) toxicity and translocation in rice plants. Rice seedlings of four cultivars, namely Guangyou Ming 118 (GM), Teyou Hang II (TH), Shanyou 63 (SY) and Minghui 63 (MH), inoculated with or without the bacterium were grown hydroponically with As (III) to investigate its effects on arsenic toxicity and translocation in the plants. Percentages of As (III) oxidation in the solutions with the bacterium (100%) were all significantly higher than those without (30-72%). The addition of the bacterium significantly decreased As (III) concentrations in SY root, GM root and shoot, while increased the As (III) concentrations in the shoot of SY, MH and TH and in the root of MH. Furthermore, the As (III) concentrations in the root and shoot of SY were both the lowest among the treatments with the bacterium. On the other hand, its addition significantly alleviated the As (III) toxicity on four rice cultivars. Among the treatments amended with B. laterosporus, the bacterium showed the best remediation on SY seedlings, with respect to the subdued As (III) toxicity and decreased As (III) concentration in its roots. These results indicated that As (III) oxidation accelerated by B. laterosporus could be an effective method to alleviate As (III) toxicity on rice seedlings.

  15. Akkermansia muciniphila gen. nov., sp. nov., a human intestinal mucin-degrading bacterium.

    PubMed

    Derrien, Muriel; Vaughan, Elaine E; Plugge, Caroline M; de Vos, Willem M

    2004-09-01

    The diversity of mucin-degrading bacteria in the human intestine was investigated by combining culture and 16S rRNA-dependent approaches. A dominant bacterium, strain MucT, was isolated by dilution to extinction of faeces in anaerobic medium containing gastric mucin as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. A pure culture was obtained using the anaerobic soft agar technique. Strain MucT was a Gram-negative, strictly anaerobic, non-motile, non-spore-forming, oval-shaped bacterium that could grow singly and in pairs. When grown on mucin medium, cells produced a capsule and were found to aggregate. Strain MucT could grow on a limited number of sugars, including N-acetylglucosamine, N-acetylgalactosamine and glucose, but only when a protein source was provided and with a lower growth rate and final density than on mucin. The G + C content of DNA from strain MucT was 47.6 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the isolate was part of the division Verrucomicrobia. The closest described relative of strain MucT was Verrucomicrobium spinosum (92 % sequence similarity). Remarkably, the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain MucT showed 99 % similarity to three uncultured colonic bacteria. According to the data obtained in this work, strain MucT represents a novel bacterium belonging to a new genus in subdivision 1 of the Verrucomicrobia; the name Akkermansia muciniphila gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is MucT (= ATCC BAA-835T = CIP 107961T).

  16. An Oleaginous Bacterium That Intrinsically Accumulates Long-Chain Free Fatty Acids in its Cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Taiki; Kanno, Manabu; Morita, Naoki; Hori, Tomoyuki; Narihiro, Takashi; Mitani, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    Medium- and long-chain fatty acids are present in organisms in esterified forms that serve as cell membrane constituents and storage compounds. A large number of organisms are known to accumulate lipophilic materials as a source of energy and carbon. We found a bacterium, designated GK12, that intrinsically accumulates free fatty acids (FFAs) as intracellular droplets without exhibiting cytotoxicity. GK12 is an obligatory anaerobic, mesophilic lactic acid bacterium that was isolated from a methanogenic reactor. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that GK12 is affiliated with the family Erysipelotrichaceae in the phylum Firmicutes but is distantly related to type species in this family (less than 92% similarity in 16S rRNA gene sequence). Saturated fatty acids with carbon chain lengths of 14, 16, 18, and 20 were produced from glucose under stress conditions, including higher-than-optimum temperatures and the presence of organic solvents that affect cell membrane integrity. FFAs were produced at levels corresponding to up to 25% (wt/wt) of the dry cell mass. Our data suggest that FFA accumulation is a result of an imbalance between excess membrane fatty acid biosynthesis due to homeoviscous adaptation and limited β-oxidation activity due to anaerobic growth involving lactic acid fermentation. FFA droplets were not further utilized as an energy and carbon source, even under conditions of starvation. A naturally occurring bacterium that accumulates significant amounts of long-chain FFAs with noncytotoxicity would provide useful strategies for microbial biodiesel production. PMID:24296497

  17. Measurement of soil bacterial colony temperatures and isolation of a high heat-producing bacterium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The cellular temperatures of microorganisms are considered to be the same as those of their surroundings because the cellular volume is too small to maintain a cellular temperature that is different from the ambient temperature. However, by forming a colony or a biofilm, microorganisms may be able to maintain a cellular temperature that is different from the ambient temperature. In this study, we measured the temperatures of bacterial colonies isolated from soils using an infrared imager and investigated the thermogenesis by a bacterium that increases its colony temperature. Results The temperatures of some colonies were higher or lower than that of the surrounding medium. A bacterial isolate with the highest colony temperature was identified as Pseudomonas putida. This bacterial isolate had an increased colony temperature when it grew at a temperature suboptimal for its growth. Measurements of heat production using a microcalorimeter showed that the temperature of this extraordinary, microcalorimetrically determined thermogenesis corresponded with the thermographically observed increase in bacterial colony temperature. When investigating the effects of the energy source on this thermal behavior, we found that heat production by this bacterium increased without additional biomass production at a temperature suboptimal for its growth. Conclusions We found that heat production by bacteria affected the bacterial colony temperature and that a bacterium identified as Pseudomonas putida could maintain a cellular temperature different from the ambient temperature, particularly at a sub-optimal growth temperature. The bacterial isolate P. putida KT1401 increased its colony temperature by an energy-spilling reaction when the incubation temperature limited its growth. PMID:23497132

  18. Haloanaerobium salsugo sp. nov., a moderately halophilic, anaerobic bacterium from a subterranean brine

    SciTech Connect

    Bhupathiraju, V.K.; Sharma, P.K.; Tanner, R.S.; McInerney, M.J.; Oren, A.; Woese, C.R.

    1994-07-01

    A strictly anaerobic, moderately halophilic, gram-negative bacterium was isolated from a highly saline oil field brine. The bacterium was a non-spore-forming, nonmotile rod, appearing singly, in pairs, or occasionally as long chains, and measured 0.3 to 0.4 by 2.6 to 4 {micro}m. The bacterium had a specific requirement for NaCl and grew at NaCl concentrations of between 6 and 24%, with optimal growth at 9% NaCl. The isolate grew at temperatures of between 22 and 51 C and pH values of between 5.6 and 8.0. The doubling time in a complex medium containing 10% NaCl was 9 h. Growth was inhibited by chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and penicillin but not by cycloheximide or azide. Fermentable substrates were predominantly carbohydrates. The end products of glucose fermentation were acetate, ethanol, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}. The major components of the cellular fatty acids were C{sub 14:0}, C{sub 16:0}, C{sub 16:1}, and C{sub 17:0 cyc} acids. The DNA base composition of the isolate was 34 mol% G+C. Oligonucleotide catalog and sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA showed that strain VS-752{sup T} was most closely related to Haloanaerobium praevalens GSL{sup T} (ATCC 33744), the sole member of the genus Haloanaerobium. The authors propose that strain VS-752 (ATCC 51327) by established as the type strain of a new species, Haloanaerobium salsugo, in the genus Haloanaerobium. 40 refs., 3 figs, 5 tabs.

  19. Cloning and characterization of nif structural and regulatory genes in the purple sulfur bacterium, Halorhodospira halophila.

    PubMed

    Tsuihiji, Hisayoshi; Yamazaki, Yoichi; Kamikubo, Hironari; Imamoto, Yasushi; Kataoka, Mikio

    2006-03-01

    Halorhodospira halophila is a halophilic photosynthetic bacterium classified as a purple sulfur bacterium. We found that H. halophila generates hydrogen gas during photoautotrophic growth as a byproduct of a nitrogenase reaction. In order to consider the applied possibilities of this photobiological hydrogen generation, we cloned and characterized the structural and regulatory genes encoding the nitrogenase, nifH, nifD and nifA, from H. halophila. This is the first description of the nif genes for a purple sulfur bacterium. The amino-acid sequences of NifH and NifD indicated that these proteins are an Fe protein and a part of a MoFe protein, respectively. The important residues are conserved completely. The sequence upstream from the nifH region and sequence similarities of nifH and nifD with those of the other organisms suggest that the regulatory system might be a NifL-NifA system; however, H. halophila lacks nifL. The amino-acid sequence of H. halophila NifA is closer to that of the NifA of the NifL-NifA system than to that of NifA without NifL. H. halophila NifA does not conserve either the residue that interacts with NifL or the important residues involved in NifL-independent regulation. These results suggest the existence of yet another regulatory system, and that the development of functional systems and their molecular counterparts are not necessarily correlated throughout evolution. All of these Nif proteins of H. halophila possess an excess of acidic residues, which acts as a salt-resistant mechanism.

  20. Influence of Mn Ion on the Iron Biomineralization by an Iron-reducing Bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Roh, Y.; Lee, I.; Phelps, T. J.

    2003-12-01

    Manganese ion is known to be easily sorbed to iron oxide surface or co-precipitated into iron oxides structure, but the effect of manganese ion on iron biomineralization is not sufficiently understood. The objectives of this study were to examine the influence of Mn substitution and sorption on iron biomineralization and to identify biogeochemical factors determining phase distribution of Mn ion during iron biomineralization. The reductive biomineralization of Mn-substituted (Fe1-xMnxOOH) or Mn-sorbed (FeOOH plus MnCl2) akaganeite by an iron-reducing bacterium (Shewanella alga, PV-4) was investigated under ananerobic conditions at circumneutral pH (pH = 7 - 8) and at 25 deg.C. The influence of Mn ion on the iron biomineralization was explored along with effects of bicarbonate (30 - 210 mM) on biomineralization using lactate (10 mM) as an electron donor. No exogenous electron carrier substance (i.e., anthraquinone disulfonate) or reducing agent (i.e., cysteine) was added to the anaerobic medium. Solid phases and aqueous chemistry were characterized after incubations with both of the iron-reducing bacterium and Mn-substituted or Mn-sorbed akaganeite for 30 days. The iron reducing bacterium, S. alga, mainly formed siderite (FeCO3), green rust [Fe2+Fe3+(OH)16CO3 4H2O], and magnetite (Fe3O4) using Mn-substituted akaganeite, while rhodochrosite (MnCO3), siderite, and magnetite were dominant phases using Mn-sorbed akaganeite in the bicarbonate buffered medium. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis of iron minerals formed by S. alga showed that Mn was preferentially concentrated in the siderite and green rust. This research indicates that microorganisms may affect the cyclings of Fe, Mn and C and the fate of metal contaminants in subsurface environments.

  1. High Prevalence of Antibodies against the Bacterium Treponema pallidum in Senegalese Guinea Baboons (Papio papio).

    PubMed

    Knauf, Sascha; Barnett, Ulrike; Maciej, Peter; Klapproth, Matthias; Ndao, Ibrahima; Frischmann, Sieghard; Fischer, Julia; Zinner, Dietmar; Liu, Hsi

    2015-01-01

    The bacterium Treponema pallidum is known to cause syphilis (ssp. pallidum), yaws (ssp. pertenue), and endemic syphilis (ssp. endemicum) in humans. Nonhuman primates have also been reported to be infected with the bacterium with equally versatile clinical manifestations, from severe skin ulcerations to asymptomatic. At present all simian strains are closely related to human yaws-causing strains, an important consideration for yaws eradication. We tested clinically healthy Guinea baboons (Papio papio) at Parc National Niokolo Koba in south eastern Senegal for the presence of anti-T. pallidum antibodies. Since T. pallidum infection in this species was identified 50 years ago, and there has been no attempt to treat non-human primates for infection, it was hypothesized that a large number of West African baboons are still infected with simian strains of the yaws-bacterium. All animals were without clinical signs of treponematoses, but 18 of 20 (90%) baboons tested positive for antibodies against T. pallidum based on treponemal tests. Yet, Guinea baboons seem to develop no clinical symptoms, though it must be assumed that infection is chronic or comparable to the latent stage in human yaws infection. The non-active character is supported by the low anti-T. pallidum serum titers in Guinea baboons (median = 1:2,560) versus serum titers that are found in genital-ulcerated olive baboons with active infection in Tanzania (range of medians among the groups of initial, moderate, and severe infected animals = 1:15,360 to 1:2.097e+7). Our findings provide evidence for simian infection with T. pallidum in wild Senegalese baboons. Potentially, Guinea baboons in West Africa serve as a natural reservoir for human infection, as the West African simian strain has been shown to cause sustainable yaws infection when inoculated into humans. The present study pinpoints an area where further research is needed to support the currently on-going second WHO led yaws eradication campaign with

  2. Pontibacter diazotrophicus sp. nov., a Novel Nitrogen-Fixing Bacterium of the Family Cytophagaceae

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Linghua; Zeng, Xian-Chun; Nie, Yao; Luo, Xuesong; Zhou, Enmin; Zhou, Lingli; Pan, Yunfan; Li, Wenjun

    2014-01-01

    Few diazotrophs have been found to belong to the family Cytophagaceae so far. In the present study, a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium that forms red colonies, was isolated from sands of the Takalamakan desert. It was designated H4XT. Phylogenetic and biochemical analysis indicated that the isolate is a new species of the genus Pontibacter. The 16S rRNA gene of H4XT displays 94.2–96.8% sequence similarities to those of other strains in Pontibacter. The major respiratory quinone is menaquinone-7 (MK-7). The DNA G+C content is 46.6 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids are iso-C15∶0, C16∶1ω5c, summed feature 3 (containing C16∶1ω6c and/or C16∶1ω7c) and summed feature 4 (comprising anteiso-C17∶1B and/or iso-C17∶1I). The major polar lipids are phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), one aminophospholipid (APL) and some unknown phospholipids (PLs). It is interesting to see that this bacterium can grow very well in a nitrogen-free medium. PCR amplification suggested that the bacterium possesses at least one type of nitrogenase gene. Acetylene reduction assay showed that H4XT actually possesses nitrogen-fixing activity. Therefore, it can be concluded that H4XT is a new diazotroph. We thus referred it to as Pontibacter diazotrophicus sp. nov. The type strain is H4XT ( = CCTCC AB 2013049T = NRRL B-59974T). PMID:24647674

  3. Studies of the Extracellular Glycocalyx of the Anaerobic Cellulolytic Bacterium Ruminococcus albus 7▿

    PubMed Central

    Weimer, Paul J.; Price, Neil P. J.; Kroukamp, Otini; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Wolfaardt, Gideon M.; Van Zyl, Willem H.

    2006-01-01

    Anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria are thought to adhere to cellulose via several mechanisms, including production of a glycocalyx containing extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). As the compositions and structures of these glycocalyces have not been elucidated, variable-pressure scanning electron microscopy (VP-SEM) and chemical analysis were used to characterize the glycocalyx of the ruminal bacterium Ruminococcus albus strain 7. VP-SEM revealed that growth of this strain was accompanied by the formation of thin cellular extensions that allowed the bacterium to adhere to cellulose, followed by formation of a ramifying network that interconnected individual cells to one another and to the unraveling cellulose microfibrils. Extraction of 48-h-old whole-culture pellets (bacterial cells plus glycocalyx [G] plus residual cellulose [C]) with 0.1 N NaOH released carbohydrate and protein in a ratio of 1:5. Boiling of the cellulose fermentation residue in a neutral detergent solution removed almost all of the adherent cells and protein while retaining a residual network of adhering noncellular material. Trifluoroacetic acid hydrolysis of this residue (G plus C) released primarily glucose, along with substantial amounts of xylose and mannose, but only traces of galactose, the most abundant sugar in most characterized bacterial exopolysaccharides. Linkage analysis and characterization by nuclear magnetic resonance suggested that most of the glucosyl units were not present as partially degraded cellulose. Calculations suggested that the energy demand for synthesis of the nonprotein fraction of EPS by this organism represents only a small fraction (<4%) of the anabolic ATP expenditure of the bacterium. PMID:17028224

  4. Adhesive properties of a symbolic bacterium from a wood-boreing marine shipworm

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, S.H.; Greene, R.V.; Griffin, H.L. )

    1990-05-01

    Adhesive properties of cellulolytic, nitrogen-fixing bacterium isolated from a marine shipworm are described. {sup 35}S-labeled cells of the shipworm bacterium bound preferentially Whatman no.1 cellulose filter paper, compared with its binding to other cellulose substrata or substrata lacking cellulose. The ability of the bacteria to bind to Whatman no. 1 filter paper was significantly reduced by glutaraldehyde or heat treatment of cells. Pretreatment of cells with azide, valinomycin, gramicidin-D, bis-hexafluoroacetylacetone (1799), or carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone inhibited adhesion activity. Cells pretreated with pronase or trypsin also exhibited reduced binding activity, but chymotrypsin and peptidase had no effect on adhesion activity. Cellodextrins and methyl cellulose 15 inhibited the adhesion of the shipworm bacteria to filter paper, whereas glucose, cellobiose, and soluble carboxymethyl cellulose had no significant effect. The divalent cation chelators EDTA and EGTA (ethylene hlycol-bis({beta}-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N{prime}N{prime}-tetraacetic acid) had little or no effect on adhesive properties of shipworm bacteria. Also, preabsorbing the substratum with extracellular endoglucanase isolated from the ship worm bacterium or 1% bovine serum albumin had no apparent effect on bacterial binding. Low concentration (0.01%) of sodium dodecyl sulfate solubilized a fraction from whole cells, which appeared to be involved in cellular binding activity. After removal of sodium dodecyl, sulfate, several proteins in this fraction associated with intact cells. These cells exhibited up to 50% enhanced binding to filter paper in comparison to cells which had not been exposed to the sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized fraction.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of the Endophytic Strain Rhodococcus kyotonensis KB10, a Potential Biodegrading and Antibacterial Bacterium Isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chi Eun; Jo, Sung Hee

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus kyotonensis KB10 is an endophytic bacterium isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana. The organism showed mild antibacterial activity against the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. This study reports the genome sequence of R. kyotonensis KB10. This bacterium contains an ectoine biosynthesis gene cluster and has the potential to degrade nitroaromatic compounds. The identified bacterium may be a suitable biocontrol agent and degrader of environmental pollutants. PMID:27389269

  6. A bacterium that can grow by using arsenic instead of phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Wolfe-Simon, Felisa; Switzer Blum, Jodi; Kulp, Thomas R; Gordon, Gwyneth W; Hoeft, Shelley E; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Stolz, John F; Webb, Samuel M; Weber, Peter K; Davies, Paul C W; Anbar, Ariel D; Oremland, Ronald S

    2011-06-01

    Life is mostly composed of the elements carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and phosphorus. Although these six elements make up nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids and thus the bulk of living matter, it is theoretically possible that some other elements in the periodic table could serve the same functions. Here, we describe a bacterium, strain GFAJ-1 of the Halomonadaceae, isolated from Mono Lake, California, that is able to substitute arsenic for phosphorus to sustain its growth. Our data show evidence for arsenate in macromolecules that normally contain phosphate, most notably nucleic acids and proteins. Exchange of one of the major bio-elements may have profound evolutionary and geochemical importance.

  7. Genome sequence of Xanthomonas sacchari R1, a biocontrol bacterium isolated from the rice seed.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yunxia; Lin, Haiyan; Wu, Liwen; Ren, Deyong; Ye, Weijun; Dong, Guojun; Zhu, Li; Guo, Longbiao

    2015-07-20

    Xanthomonas sacchari, was first identified as a pathogenic bacterium isolated from diseased sugarcane in Guadeloupe. In this study, R1 was first isolated from rice seed samples from Philippines in 2002. The antagonistic ability against several rice pathogens raises our attention. The genomic feature of this strain was described in this paper. The total genome size of X. sacchari R1 is 5,000,479 bp with 4315 coding sequences (CDS), 59 tRNAs, 2rRNAs and one plasmid. PMID:25931193

  8. Complete genome sequence of Enterobacter cloacae GGT036: a furfural tolerant soil bacterium.

    PubMed

    Gong, Gyeongtaek; Um, Youngsoon; Park, Tai Hyun; Woo, Han Min

    2015-01-10

    Enterobacter cloacae is a facultative anaerobic bacterium to be an important cause of nosocomial infection. However, the isolated E. cloacae GGT036 showed higher furfural-tolerant cellular growth, compared to industrial relevant strains such as Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of E. cloacae GGT036 isolated from Mt. Gwanak, Seoul, Republic of Korea. The genomic DNA sequence of E. cloacae GGT036 will provide valuable genetic resources for engineering of industrially relevant strains being tolerant to cellular inhibitors present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. PMID:25444880

  9. Genome Sequence of the Boron-Tolerant and -Requiring Bacterium Bacillus boroniphilus

    PubMed Central

    Çöl, Bekir; Özkeserli, Zeynep; Kumar, Dibyendu; Özdağ, Hilal

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus boroniphilus is a highly boron-tolerant bacterium that also requires this element for its growth. The complete genome sequence of B. boroniphilus was determined by a combination of shotgun sequencing and paired-end sequencing using 454 pyrosequencing technology. A total of 84,872,624 reads from shotgun sequencing and a total of 194,092,510 reads from paired-end sequencing were assembled using Newbler 2.3. The estimated size of the draft genome is 5.2 Mb. PMID:24385571

  10. Coarse grained simulation reveals antifreeze properties of hyperactive antifreeze protein from Antarctic bacterium Colwellia sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hung; Van, Thanh Dac; Le, Ly

    2015-10-01

    The novel hyperactive antifreeze protein (AFP) of Antarctic sea ice bacterium Colwellia sp. provides a target for studying the protection of psychrophilic microgoranisms against freezing environment. Interestingly, the Colwellia sp. hyperactive antifreeze protein (ColAFP) was crystallized without the structural dynamic characteristics. Here, the result indicated, through coarse grained simulation of ColAFP under various subfreezing temperature, that ColAFP remains active at temperature of equal and greater than 275 K (∼2 °C). Extensive simulation analyses also revealed the adaptive mechanism of ColAFP in subfreezing environment. Our result provides a structural dynamic understanding of the ColAFP.

  11. Complete genome of a coastal marine bacterium Muricauda lutaonensis KCTC 22339(T).

    PubMed

    Oh, Jeongsu; Choe, Hanna; Kim, Byung Kwon; Kim, Kyung Mo

    2015-10-01

    Muricauda lutaonensis KCTC 22339(T) is a yellow-pigmented, gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium that was isolated from a coastal hot spring of a volcanic island in the Pacific Ocean, off the eastern coast of Taiwan. We here report the complete genome of M. lutaonensis KCTC 22339(T), which consists of 3,274,259bp with the G+C content of 44.97%. The completion of the M. lutaonensis genome sequence is expected to provide a valuable resource for understanding the secondary metabolic pathways related to bacterial pigmentation.

  12. Aerobic Reduction of Arsenate by a Bacterium Isolated From Activated Sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozai, N.; Ohnuki, T.; Hanada, S.; Nakamura, K.; Francis, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    Microlunatus phosphovorus strain NM-1 is a polyphosphate-accumulating bacterium isolated from activated sludge. This bacterium takes up a large amount of polyphosphate under aerobic conditions and release phosphate ions by hydrolysis of polyphosphate to orthophosphate under anaerobic conditions to derive energy for taking up substrates. To understand the nature of this strain, especially, influence of potential contaminants in sewage and wastewater on growth, we have been investigating behavior of this bacterium in media containing arsenic. The present paper mainly reports reduction of arsenate by this bacterium under aerobic conditions. The strain NM-1 (JCM 9379) was aerobically cultured at 30 °C in a nutrient medium containing 2.5 g/l peptone, 0.5 g/l glucose, 1.5 g/l yeast extract, and arsenic [Na2HAsO4 (As(V)) or Na3AsO3 (As(III))] at concentrations between 0 and 50 mM. The cells collected from arsenic-free media were dispersed in buffer solutions containing 2mM HEPES, 10mM NaCl, prescribed concentrations of As(V), and 0-0.2 percent glucose. Then, this cell suspension was kept at 20 °C under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. The speciation of arsenic was carried out by ion chromatography and ICP-MS. The growth of the strain under aerobic conditions was enhanced by the addition of As(V) at the concentration between 1 and 10 mM. The maximum optical density of the culture in the medium containing 5mM As(V) was 1.4 times greater than that of the control culture. Below the As(V) concentration of 10mM, most of the As(V) was reduced to As(III). The growth of the strain under anaerobic conditions has not been observed so far. The cells in the buffer solutions reduced As(V) under aerobic condition. The reduction was enhanced by the addition of glucose. However, the cell did not reduce As(V) under anaerobic conditions. The strain NM-1 showed high resistance to As(V) and As(III). The maximum optical density of the culture grown in a medium containing 50 mM As(V) was only

  13. [Isolation and characterization of a facultative anaerobic aniline-degrading bacterium].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guo-Qu; Ren, Sui-Zhou; Cao, Wei; Hu, Jin-Cai; Lin, Lu-Jing; Sun, Guo-Ping

    2006-08-01

    An aniline-degrading bacterium (designated strain AN29) was isolated from dyeing wastewater process (anaerobic baffled reactor, ABR) with the capability of utilizing aniline as sole carbon source and nitrogen source. It was identified as Pseudomonas sp. based upon the phenotypic properties and a partial analysis of the 16S rDNA. The strain could degrade aniline under the aerobic and anaerobic conditions, the optimal initial pH 6.5 - 8.0, a temperature of 37 degrees C, and initial aniline concentrations of 500 - 2 000 mg/L with maximum concentration of 4 000 mg/L respectively.

  14. A bacterium that can grow by using arsenic instead of phosphorus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe-Simon, Felisa; Blum, J.S.; Kulp, T.R.; Gordon, G.W.; Hoeft, S.E.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Stolz, J.F.; Webb, S.M.; Weber, P.K.; Davies, P.C.W.; Anbar, A.D.; Oremland, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    Life is mostly composed of the elements carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and phosphorus. Although these six elements make up nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids and thus the bulk of living matter, it is theoretically possible that some other elements in the periodic table could serve the same functions. Here, we describe a bacterium, strain GFAJ-1 of the Halomonadaceae, isolated from Mono Lake, California, that is able to substitute arsenic for phosphorus to sustain its growth. Our data show evidence for arsenate in macromolecules that normally contain phosphate, most notably nucleic acids and proteins. Exchange of one of the major bio-elements may have profound evolutionary and geochemical importance.

  15. Dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides by an Aerobic Bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Maurice, P.

    2004-12-13

    This project investigated the effects of an aerobic Pseudomonas mendocina bacterium on the dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides. The research is important because metals and radionuclides that adsorb to Fe(III)(hydr)oxides could potentially be remobilized by dissolving bacteria. We showed that P. mendocina is capable of dissolving Fe-bearing minerals by a variety of mechanisms, including production of siderophores, pH changes, and formation of reductants. The production of siderophores by P. mendocina was quantified under a variety of growth conditions. Finally, we demonstrated that microbial siderophores may adsorb to and enhance dissolution of clay minerals.

  16. News & notes: paper digestion by the cellulolytic ruminal bacterium Fibrobacter succinogenes.

    PubMed

    Martin, S A; Martin, J A

    1998-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of the predominant cellulolytic ruminal bacterium Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 to digest filter paper, office paper, newspaper, and magazine paper. When F. succinogenes S85 was incubated with all four paper sources, little digestion of any paper occurred between 0 and 48 h. However, digestion of filter paper increased from 12% at 48 h to 80% at 120 h. No significant digestion of office paper, newspaper, or magazine paper occurred between 48 and 120 h. These results suggest that F. succinogenes S85 is unable to digest office paper, newspaper, or magazine paper.

  17. Aggregation of the rhizospheric bacterium Azospirillum brasilense in response to oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdoun, Hamid; McMillan, Mary; Pereg, Lily

    2016-04-01

    Azospirillum brasilense spp. have ecological, scientific and agricultural importance. As model plant growth promoting rhizobacteria they interact with a large variety of plants, including important food and cash crops. Azospirillum strains are known for their production of plant growth hormones that enhance root systems and for their ability to fix nitrogen. Azospirillum cells transform in response to environmental cues. The production of exopolysaccharides and cell aggregation during cellular transformation are important steps in the attachment of Azospirillum to roots. We investigate signals that induce cellular transformation and aggregation in the Azospirillum and report on the importance of oxygen to the process of aggregation in this rhizospheric bacterium.

  18. Partial genome sequence of the haloalkaliphilic soda lake bacterium Thioalkalivibrio thiocyanoxidans ARh 2T

    DOE PAGES

    Berben, Tom; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Kyrpides, Nikos; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Woyke, Tanja; Muyzer, Gerard

    2015-10-26

    Thioalkalivibrio thiocyanoxidans strain ARh 2T is a sulfur-oxidizing bacterium isolated from haloalkaline soda lakes. It is a motile, Gram-negative member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Remarkable properties include the ability to grow on thiocyanate as the sole energy, sulfur and nitrogen source, and the capability of growth at salinities of up to 4.3 M total Na+. This draft genome sequence consists of 61 scaffolds comprising 2,765,337 bp, and contains 2616 protein-coding and 61 RNA-coding genes. In conclusion, this organism was sequenced as part of the Community Science Program of the DOE Joint Genome Institute.

  19. An Updated genome annotation for the model marine bacterium Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    When the genome of Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3 was published in 2004, it represented the first sequence from a heterotrophic marine bacterium. Over the last ten years, the strain has become a valuable model for understanding the cycling of sulfur and carbon in the ocean. To ensure that this genome remains useful, we have updated 69 genes to incorporate functional annotations based on new experimental data, and improved the identification of 120 protein-coding regions based on proteomic and transcriptomic data. We review the progress made in understanding the biology of R. pomeroyi DSS-3 and list the changes made to the genome. PMID:25780504

  20. Complete genome sequence of the cyanide-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344.

    PubMed

    Wibberg, Daniel; Luque-Almagro, Víctor M; Igeño, Ma Isabel; Bremges, Andreas; Roldán, Ma Dolores; Merchán, Faustino; Sáez, Lara P; Guijo, Ma Isabel; Manso, Ma Isabel; Macías, Daniel; Cabello, Purificación; Becerra, Gracia; Ibáñez, Ma Isabel; Carmona, Ma Isabel; Escribano, Ma María Paz; Castillo, Francisco; Sczyrba, Alexander; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado; Blasco, Rafael; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas

    2014-04-10

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344, a Gram-negative bacterium isolated from the Guadalquir River (Córdoba, Spain), is able to utilize different cyano-derivatives. Here, the complete genome sequence of P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 harboring a 4,686,340bp circular chromosome encoding 4513 genes and featuring a GC-content of 62.34% is reported. Necessarily, remaining gaps in the genome had to be closed by assembly of few long reads obtained from PacBio single molecule real-time sequencing. Here, the first complete genome sequence for the species P. pseudoalcaligenes is presented. PMID:24553071

  1. Cadmium-nickel toxicity interactions towards a bacterium, filamentous fungi, and a cultured mammalian cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, H.; Shopsis, C.; Borenfreund, E.

    1986-10-01

    The response of the biota to exposure to individual metals may differ from its response to multiple metals, as mixtures of metals may interact antagonistically or synergistically in their resultant toxicity. The present study evaluated the effects of a combination of Cd and Ni on the freshwater bacterium, Aeromonas hydrophila, the terrestrial fungi, Trichodema viride and Aspergillus niger, and the mammalian cell line, BALB/c mouse 3T3 fibroblasts. This particular spectrum of target cells was selected because studies in the literature show a wide variety of possible interactions between Cd and Ni in their combined toxicities towards bacteria cyanobacteria, slime molds, isolated rat hepatocytes, and rats.

  2. An Updated genome annotation for the model marine bacterium Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3.

    PubMed

    Rivers, Adam R; Smith, Christa B; Moran, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    When the genome of Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3 was published in 2004, it represented the first sequence from a heterotrophic marine bacterium. Over the last ten years, the strain has become a valuable model for understanding the cycling of sulfur and carbon in the ocean. To ensure that this genome remains useful, we have updated 69 genes to incorporate functional annotations based on new experimental data, and improved the identification of 120 protein-coding regions based on proteomic and transcriptomic data. We review the progress made in understanding the biology of R. pomeroyi DSS-3 and list the changes made to the genome.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Enterobacter cloacae GGT036: a furfural tolerant soil bacterium.

    PubMed

    Gong, Gyeongtaek; Um, Youngsoon; Park, Tai Hyun; Woo, Han Min

    2015-01-10

    Enterobacter cloacae is a facultative anaerobic bacterium to be an important cause of nosocomial infection. However, the isolated E. cloacae GGT036 showed higher furfural-tolerant cellular growth, compared to industrial relevant strains such as Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of E. cloacae GGT036 isolated from Mt. Gwanak, Seoul, Republic of Korea. The genomic DNA sequence of E. cloacae GGT036 will provide valuable genetic resources for engineering of industrially relevant strains being tolerant to cellular inhibitors present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates.

  4. Partial genome sequence of the haloalkaliphilic soda lake bacterium Thioalkalivibrio thiocyanoxidans ARh 2(T).

    PubMed

    Berben, Tom; Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Kyrpides, Nikos; Goodwin, Lynne A; Woyke, Tanja; Muyzer, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Thioalkalivibrio thiocyanoxidans strain ARh 2(T) is a sulfur-oxidizing bacterium isolated from haloalkaline soda lakes. It is a motile, Gram-negative member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Remarkable properties include the ability to grow on thiocyanate as the sole energy, sulfur and nitrogen source, and the capability of growth at salinities of up to 4.3 M total Na(+). This draft genome sequence consists of 61 scaffolds comprising 2,765,337 bp, and contains 2616 protein-coding and 61 RNA-coding genes. This organism was sequenced as part of the Community Science Program of the DOE Joint Genome Institute.

  5. Whole genome shotgun sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens TF28, a biocontrol entophytic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shumei; Jiang, Wei; Li, Jing; Meng, Liqiang; Cao, Xu; Hu, Jihua; Liu, Yushuai; Chen, Jingyu; Sha, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens TF28 is a biocontrol endophytic bacterium that is capable of inhibition of a broad range of plant pathogenic fungi. The strain has the potential to be developed into a biocontrol agent for use in agriculture. Here we report the whole-genome shotgun sequence of the strain. The genome size of B. amyloliquefaciens TF28 is 3,987,635 bp which consists of 3754 protein-coding genes, 65 tandem repeat sequences, 47 minisatellite DNA, 2 microsatellite DNA, 63 tRNA, 7rRNA, 6 sRNA, 3 prophage and CRISPR domains. PMID:27688836

  6. Complete genome of a coastal marine bacterium Muricauda lutaonensis KCTC 22339(T).

    PubMed

    Oh, Jeongsu; Choe, Hanna; Kim, Byung Kwon; Kim, Kyung Mo

    2015-10-01

    Muricauda lutaonensis KCTC 22339(T) is a yellow-pigmented, gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium that was isolated from a coastal hot spring of a volcanic island in the Pacific Ocean, off the eastern coast of Taiwan. We here report the complete genome of M. lutaonensis KCTC 22339(T), which consists of 3,274,259bp with the G+C content of 44.97%. The completion of the M. lutaonensis genome sequence is expected to provide a valuable resource for understanding the secondary metabolic pathways related to bacterial pigmentation. PMID:25986927

  7. FACTORS LIMITING BACTERIAL GROWTH : III. CELL SIZE AND "PHYSIOLOGIC YOUTH" IN BACTERIUM COLI CULTURES.

    PubMed

    Hershey, A D; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1938-07-20

    1. Measurements of the rate of oxygen uptake per cell in transplants of Bacterium coli from cultures of this organism in different phases of growth have given results in essential agreement with the observations of others. 2. Correlations of viable count, centrifugable nitrogen, and turbidity, with oxygen consumption, indicate that the increased metabolism during the early portion of the growth period is quantitatively referable to increased average size of cells. 3. Indirect evidence has suggested that the initial rate of growth of transplants is not related to the phase of growth of the parent culture.

  8. Response to Comments on "A Bacterium That Can Grow Using Arsenic Instead of Phosphorus"

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe-Simon, F; Blum, J S; Kulp, T R; Gordon, G W; Hoeft, S E; Pett-Ridge, J; Stolz, J F; Webb, S M; Weber, P K; Davies, P W; Anbar, A D; Oremland, R S

    2011-03-07

    Concerns have been raised about our recent study describing a bacterium that can grow using arsenic (As) instead of phosphorus (P). Our data suggested that As could act as a substitute for P in major biomolecules in this organism. Although the issues raised are of investigative interest, we contend that they do not invalidate our conclusions. We argue that while no single line of evidence we presented was sufficient to support our interpretation of the data, taken as an entire dataset we find no plausible alternative to our conclusions. Here we reply to the critiques and provide additional arguments supporting the assessment of the data we reported.

  9. A bacterium that can grow by using arsenic instead of phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe-Simon, F; Blum, J S; Kulp, T R; Gordon, G W; Hoeft, S E; Pett-Ridge, J; Stolz, J F; Webb, S M; Weber, P K; Davies, P W; Anbar, A D; Oremland, R S

    2010-11-01

    Life is mostly composed of the elements carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur and phosphorus. Although these six elements make up nucleic acids, proteins and lipids and thus the bulk of living matter, it is theoretically possible that some other elements in the periodic table could serve the same functions. Here we describe a bacterium, strain GFAJ-1 of the Halomonadaceae, isolated from Mono Lake, CA, which substitutes arsenic for phosphorus to sustain its growth. Our data show evidence for arsenate in macromolecules that normally contain phosphate, most notably nucleic acids and proteins. Exchange of one of the major bio-elements may have profound evolutionary and geochemical significance.

  10. Exoelectrogenic bacterium phylogenetically related to Citrobacter freundii, isolated from anodic biofilm of a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianjian; Zhu, Nengwu; Cao, Yanlan; Peng, Yue; Wu, Pingxiao; Dong, Wenhao

    2015-02-01

    An electrogenic bacterium, named Citrobacter freundii Z7, was isolated from the anodic biofilm of microbial fuel cell (MFC) inoculated with aerobic sewage sludge. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) analysis exhibited that the strain Z7 had relatively high electrochemical activity. When the strain Z7 was inoculated into MFC, the maximum power density can reach 204.5 mW/m(2) using citrate as electron donor. Series of substrates including glucose, glycerol, lactose, sucrose, and rhammose could be utilized to generate power. CV tests and the addition of anode solution as well as AQDS experiments indicated that the strain Z7 might transfer electrons indirectly via secreted mediators.

  11. Draft genome sequence of algal polysaccharides degradation bacterium, Flammeovirga sp. OC4.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Yi, Zhiwei; Cai, Yaping; Zeng, Runying

    2015-06-01

    Flammeovirga sp. OC4 was isolated from seawater sample of the South China Sea using the method of in-situ-enrichment, which has the ability to degrade algal polysaccharides. Colonies are reddish orange in the exponential growth phase and turn white in the late stationary growth phase, which is the indicator of the bacterial death. Here, we present an annotated draft genome sequence of Flammeovirga sp. OC4, which contains 8,069,312bp with a G+C content of 34.8%. This information regarding the genetic basis of this bacterium can greatly advance our understanding of algal polysaccharides-degrading mechanism and the physiology of this species.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of the Filamentous Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Barry, Kerrie; Chertkov, Olga; Dalin, Eileen; Han, Cliff; Hauser, Loren John; Honchak, Barbara M; Karbach, Lauren E; Land, Miriam L; Lapidus, Alla L.; Larimer, Frank W; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pitluck, Sam; Pierson, Beverly K

    2011-01-01

    Chloroflexus aurantiacus is a thermophilic filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic (FAP) bacterium, and can grow phototrophically under anaerobic conditions or chemotrophically under aerobic and dark conditions. According to 16S rRNA analysis, Chloroflexi species are the earliest branching bacteria capable of photosynthesis, and Cfl. aurantiacus has been long regarded as a key organism to resolve the obscurity of the origin and early evolution of photosynthesis. Cfl. aurantiacus contains a chimeric photosystem that comprises some characters of green sulfur bacteria and purple photosynthetic bacteria, and also has some unique electron transport proteins compared to other photosynthetic bacteria.

  13. Clostridium perfringens: a flesh-eating bacterium living in your garden.

    PubMed

    Rothwell, Ann

    2010-10-01

    Gas gangrene is a painful, rapidly developing and potentially fatal infection despite antibiotic treatment. During the First World War thousands of soldiers died from this disease. Dr Alexis Carrel pioneered a controversial method of irrigating wounds with Dakin's solution to destroy Clostridium perfringens, a bacterium found in heavily fertilised soils that causes gas gangrene. Although this method is no longer used due to the discovery of antibiotics, many of his other ideas, such as scientifically determining the type and number of bacteria and delaying the closure of a wound until the bacteria had been eradicated, are still used today. PMID:21049805

  14. Complete genome sequence of Hymenobacter swuensis, an ionizing-radiation resistant bacterium isolated from mountain soil.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jong-Hyun; Yang, Ho-Yeon; Jeong, Sunwook; Joe, Min-Ho; Cho, Yong-Joon; Kim, Myung-Kyum; Lim, Sangyong

    2014-05-20

    Hymenobacter swuensis is a gamma-radiation resistant bacterium isolated from mountain soil in South Korea (N 35°51'38″, E 127°44'47″; altitude 1500m). The complete genome of H. swuensis consists of one chromosome (4,904,241bp) with three plasmids. The genomic sequence indicated that H. swuensis includes a series of genes involved in 2'-hydroxy-carotenoid biosynthesis. This is the first report describing the Hymenobacter genome and key enzymes in the 2'-hydroxy-carotenoid biosynthesis pathway. These data may provide opportunities for genetic engineering and antioxidant 2'-hydroxy-carotenoid production. PMID:24637374

  15. Francisella Inflammasomes: Integrated Responses to a Cytosolic Stealth Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Wallet, Pierre; Lagrange, Brice; Henry, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium causing tularemia, a zoonotic disease. Francisella replicates in the macrophage cytosol and eventually triggers cytosolic immune responses. In murine macrophages, Francisella novicida and Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain lyse in the host cytosol and activate the cytosolic DNA receptor Aim2. Here, we review the mechanisms leading or contributing to Aim2 inflammasome activation, including the role of TLRs and of IFN signaling and the implication of the guanylate-binding proteins 2 and 5 in triggering cytosolic bacteriolysis. Furthermore, we present how this cytosolic Gram-negative bacterium escapes recognition by caspase-11 but can trigger a non-canonical caspase-8 inflammasome. In addition, we highlight the differences in inflammasome activation in murine and human cells with pyrin, NLRP3, and AIM2 involved in sensing Francisella in human phagocytes. From a bacterial prospective, we describe the hiding strategy of Francisella to escape recognition by innate sensors and to resist to bacteriolysis in the host cytosol. Finally, we discuss the inability of the inflammasome sensors to detect F. tularensis subspecies tularensis strains, making them highly pathogenic stealth microbes.

  16. Development of a gene cloning system for the hydrogen-producing marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, T.; Matsunaga, N.; Tsubaki, K.; Tanaka, T.

    1986-10-01

    Seventy-six strains of marine photosynthetic bacteria were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis for plasmid DNA content. Among these strains, 12 carried two to four different plasmids with sizes ranging from 3.1 to 11.0 megadaltons. The marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106 had two plasmids, pRD06S and pRD06L. The smaller plasmid, pRD06S, had a molecular weight of 3.8 megadaltons and was cut at a single site by restriction endonucleases SalI, SmaI, PstI, XhoI, and BglII. Moreover, the marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106 containing plasmid pRD06 had a satisfactory growth rate (doubling time, 7.5 h), a hydrogen-producing rate of 0.96 ..mu..mol/mg (dry weight) of cells per h, and nitrogen fixation capability. Plasmid pRD06S, however, had neither drug resistance nor heavy-metal resistance, and its copy number was less than 10. Therefore, a recombinant plasmid consisting of pRD06S and Escherichia coli cloning vector pUC13 was constructed and cloned in E. coli. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106. As a result, Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106 developed ampicillin resistance. Thus, a shuttle vector for gene transfer was constructed for marine photosynthetic bacteria.

  17. Detection of a novel bacterium associated with spores of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Gigaspora margarita.

    PubMed

    Long, Liangkun; Yao, Qing; Ai, Yuncan; Deng, Mingrong; Zhu, Honghui

    2009-06-01

    With PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis, two bacterial 16S rRNA gene V3 region sequences, 7A and 7B, were detected in association with the crushed spores of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Gigaspora margarita W.N. Becker & I.R. Hall 1976 MAFF520054. DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis revealed that 7B was mostly related to the documented cytoplasm endosymbiotic bacterium Candidatus Glomeribacter gigasporarum of G. margarita, but 7A could not be confidently assigned to a known taxon. Further characterization of 7A was conducted by obtaining its almost complete 16S rRNA gene sequence via PCR amplification and sequencing. BLAST search indicates that the 16S rRNA gene sequence did not match any identified species sequences in the GenBank database. Further detection revealed that 7A was also associated with the clean G. margarita MAFF520054 spores that were obtained by the surface-sterilized method or dual culture with Ri T-DNA transformed carrot roots. Many ellipse-shaped or egg-shaped bacterium-like organisms were clustered in layer 3 of the fungal spore wall by transmission electron microscopy observation. Our results indicate that 7A represents a novel bacterial population associated with G. margarita MAFF520054 spores, and its doubtless location (wall or cytoplasm) remains unclear based on the present data.

  18. Expression and surface display of Cellulomonas endoglucanase in the ethanologenic bacterium Zymobacter palmae.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Motoki; Akahoshi, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Kenji; Yanase, Hideshi

    2012-11-01

    In order to reduce the cost of bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass, we developed a tool for cell surface display of cellulolytic enzymes on the ethanologenic bacterium Zymobacter palmae. Z. palmae is a novel ethanol-fermenting bacterium capable of utilizing a broad range of sugar substrates, but not cellulose. Therefore, to express and display heterologous cellulolytic enzymes on the Z. palmae cell surface, we utilized the cell-surface display motif of the Pseudomonas ice nucleation protein Ina. The gene encoding Ina from Pseudomonas syringae IFO3310 was cloned, and its product was comprised of three functional domains: an N-terminal domain, a central domain with repeated amino acid residues, and a C-terminal domain. The N-terminal domain of Ina was shown to function as the anchoring motif for a green fluorescence protein fusion protein in Escherichia coli. To express a heterologous cellulolytic enzyme extracellularly in Z. palmae, we fused the N-terminal coding sequence of Ina to the coding sequence of an N-terminal-truncated Cellulomonas endoglucanase. Z. palmae cells carrying the fusion endoglucanase gene were shown to degrade carboxymethyl cellulose. Although a portion of the expressed fusion endoglucanase was released from Z. palmae cells into the culture broth, we confirmed the display of the protein on the cell surface by immunofluorescence microscopy. The results indicate that the N-terminal anchoring motif of Ina from P. syringae enabled the translocation and display of the heterologous cellulase on the cell surface of Z. palmae.

  19. The fate of a nitrobenzene-degrading bacterium in pharmaceutical wastewater treatment sludge.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yuan; Yang, Juan; Chen, Shaoyi

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the fate of a nitrobenzene-degrading bacterium, Klebsiella oxytoca NBA-1, which was isolated from a pharmaceutical wastewater treatment facility. The 90-day survivability of strain NBA-1 after exposure to sludge under anaerobic and aerobic conditions was investigated. The bacterium was inoculated into sludge amended with glucose and p-chloronitrobenzene (p-CNB) to compare the bacterial community variations between the modified sludge and nitrobenzene amendment. The results showed that glucose had no obvious effect on nitrobenzene biodegradation in the co-metabolism process, regardless of the presence/absence of oxygen. When p-CNB was added under anaerobic conditions, the biodegradation rate of nitrobenzene remained unchanged although p-CNB inhibited the production of aniline. The diversity of the microbial community increased and NBA-1 continued to be one of the dominant strains. Under aerobic conditions, the degradation rate of both nitrobenzene and p-CNB was only 20% of that under anaerobic conditions. p-CNB had a toxic effect on the microorganisms in the sludge so that most of the DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) bands, including that of NBA-1, began to disappear under aerobic conditions after 90days of exposure. These data show that the bacterial community was stable under anaerobic conditions and the microorganisms, including NBA-1, were more resistant to the adverse environment. PMID:26086561

  20. Marine bacterium strain screening and pyrethroid insecticide-degrading efficiency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Aili; Liu, Jinghua; Shi, Xizhi; Li, Dexiang; Chen, Jiong; Tang, Daojun

    2014-09-01

    A pyrethroid insecticide-degrading bacterium, strain HS-24, was isolated from an offshore seawater environment. The strain, which can degrade cypermethrin (CYP) and deltamethrin (DEL), was identified as Methylophaga sp. The optimal culture and degradation conditions for CYP and DEL by strain HS-24 is pH 7 at 28°C. Under optimum culture conditions, strain HS-24 exhibited a broad degradation concentration range of 100, 200, 400, 600, and 800 mg/L for CYP and DEL. The metabolic intermediates were analyzed by NMR, which provided strong evidence that CYP and DEL removal occurred mainly because of a biological process. The toxicity of the degradation products of strain HS-24 was studied simultaneously by measuring the light output of the luminescence bacterium. This demonstrated that the biodegradation ability of strain HS-24 significantly decreased the toxicity of CYP- and DEL-contaminated aquaculture seawater. Finally, the findings of this paper indicate that strain HS-24 is thus revealed as a biological agent for the remediation of marine aquatic environments.

  1. Psychromonas ingrahamii sp. nov., a novel gas vacuolate, psychrophilic bacterium isolated from Arctic polar sea ice.

    PubMed

    Auman, Ann J; Breezee, Jennifer L; Gosink, John J; Kämpfer, Peter; Staley, James T

    2006-05-01

    A gas vacuolate bacterium, designated strain 37T, was isolated from a sea ice core collected from Point Barrow, Alaska, USA. Cells of strain 37T were large (6-14 microm in length), rod-shaped, contained gas vacuoles of two distinct morphologies, and grew well at NaCl concentrations of 1-10 % and at temperatures of -12 to 10 degrees C. The DNA G+C content was 40 mol%. Whole-cell fatty acid analysis showed that 16 : 1omega7c comprised 67 % of the total fatty acid content. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that this bacterium was closely related to members of the genus Psychromonas, with highest sequence similarity (96.8 %) to Psychromonas antarctica. Phenotypic analysis differentiated strain 37T from P. antarctica on the basis of several characteristics, including cell morphology, growth temperature range and the ability to hydrolyse polymers. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments revealed a level of relatedness of 37 % between strain 37T and P. antarctica, providing further support that it represents a distinct species. The name Psychromonas ingrahamii sp. nov. is proposed for this novel species. The type strain is 37T (=CCUG 51855T=CIP 108865T).

  2. Melanin from the Nitrogen-Fixing Bacterium Azotobacter chroococcum: A Spectroscopic Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Raja

    2014-01-01

    Melanins, the ubiquitous hetero-polymer pigments found widely dispersed among various life forms, are usually dark brown/black in colour. Although melanins have variety of biological functions, including protection against ultraviolet radiation of sunlight and are used in medicine, cosmetics, extraction of melanin from the animal and plant kingdoms is not an easy task. Using complementary physicochemical techniques (i.e. MALDI-TOF, FTIR absorption and cross-polarization magic angle spinning solid-state 13C NMR), we report here the characterization of melanins extracted from the nitrogen-fixing non-virulent bacterium Azotobacter chroococcum, a safe viable source. Moreover, considering dihydroxyindole moiety as the main constituent, an effort is made to propose the putative molecular structure of the melanin hetero-polymer extracted from the bacterium. Characterization of the melanin obtained from Azotobacter chroococcum would provide an inspiration in extending research activities on these hetero-polymers and their use as protective agent against UV radiation. PMID:24416247

  3. Application of DNA adductomics to soil bacterium Sphingobium sp. strain KK22.

    PubMed

    Kanaly, Robert A; Micheletto, Ruggero; Matsuda, Tomonari; Utsuno, Youko; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Hamamura, Natsuko

    2015-10-01

    Toward the development of ecotoxicology methods to investigate microbial markers of impacts of hydrocarbon processing activities, DNA adductomic analyses were conducted on a sphingomonad soil bacterium. From growing cells that were exposed or unexposed to acrolein, a commonly used biocide in hydraulic fracturing processes, DNA was extracted, digested to 2'-deoxynucleosides and analyzed by liquid chromatography-positive ionization electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry in selected reaction monitoring mode transmitting the [M + H](+) > [M + H - 116](+) transition over 100 transitions. Overall data shown as DNA adductome maps revealed numerous putative DNA adducts under both conditions with some occurring specifically for each condition. Adductomic analyses of triplicate samples indicated that elevated levels of some targeted putative adducts occurred in exposed cells. Two exposure-specific adducts were identified in exposed cells as 3-(2'-deoxyribosyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-6-hydroxy-(and 8-hydroxy-)pyrimido[1,2-a]- purine-(3H)-one (6- and 8-hydroxy-PdG) following synthesis of authentic standards of these compounds and subsequent analyses. A time course experiment showed that 6- and 8-hydroxy-PdG were detected in bacterial DNA within 30 min of acrolein exposure but were not detected in unexposed cells. This work demonstrated the first application of DNA adductomics to examine DNA damage in a bacterium and sets a foundation for future work. PMID:26305056

  4. Extreme furfural tolerance of a soil bacterium Enterobacter cloacae GGT036.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun Young; Gong, Gyeongtaek; Park, Hong-Sil; Um, Youngsoon; Sim, Sang Jun; Woo, Han Min

    2015-01-10

    Detoxification process of cellular inhibitors including furfural is essential for production of bio-based chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. Here we isolated an extreme furfural-tolerant bacterium Enterobacter cloacae GGT036 from soil sample collected in Mt. Gwanak, Republic of Korea. Among isolated bacteria, only E. cloacae GGT036 showed cell growth with 35 mM furfural under aerobic culture. Compared to the maximal half inhibitory concentration (IC50) of well-known industrial strains Escherichia coli (24.9 mM furfural) and Corynebacterium glutamicum (10 mM furfural) based on the cell density, IC50 of E. cloacae GGT036 (47.7 mM) was significantly higher after 24 h, compared to E. coli and C. glutamicum. Since bacterial cell growth was exponentially inhibited depending on linearly increased furfural concentrations in the medium, we concluded that E. cloacae GGT036 is an extreme furfural-tolerant bacterium. Recently, the complete genome sequence of E. cloacae GGT036 was announced and this could provide an insight for engineering of E. cloacae GGT036 itself or other industrially relevant bacteria.

  5. Functional diversity of carbohydrate-active enzymes enabling a bacterium to ferment plant biomass.

    PubMed

    Boutard, Magali; Cerisy, Tristan; Nogue, Pierre-Yves; Alberti, Adriana; Weissenbach, Jean; Salanoubat, Marcel; Tolonen, Andrew C

    2014-11-01

    Microbial metabolism of plant polysaccharides is an important part of environmental carbon cycling, human nutrition, and industrial processes based on cellulosic bioconversion. Here we demonstrate a broadly applicable method to analyze how microbes catabolize plant polysaccharides that integrates carbohydrate-active enzyme (CAZyme) assays, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), and anaerobic growth screening. We apply this method to study how the bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans ferments plant biomass components including glucans, mannans, xylans, galactans, pectins, and arabinans. These polysaccharides are fermented with variable efficiencies, and diauxies prioritize metabolism of preferred substrates. Strand-specific RNA-seq reveals how this bacterium responds to polysaccharides by up-regulating specific groups of CAZymes, transporters, and enzymes to metabolize the constituent sugars. Fifty-six up-regulated CAZymes were purified, and their activities show most polysaccharides are degraded by multiple enzymes, often from the same family, but with divergent rates, specificities, and cellular localizations. CAZymes were then tested in combination to identify synergies between enzymes acting on the same substrate with different catalytic mechanisms. We discuss how these results advance our understanding of how microbes degrade and metabolize plant biomass.

  6. Characterization of outer membrane vesicles released by the psychrotolerant bacterium Pseudoalteromonas antarctica NF3

    PubMed Central

    Nevot, Maria; Deroncelé, Víctor; Messner, Paul; Guinea, Jesús; Mercadé, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pseudoalteromonas antarctica NF3 is an Antarctic psychrotolerant Gram-negative bacterium that accumulates large amounts of an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) with high protein content. Transmission electron microscopy analysis after high-pressure freezing and freeze substitution (HPF-FS) shows that the EPS is composed of a capsular polymer and large numbers of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). These vesicles are bilayered structures and predominantly spherical in shape, with an average diameter of 25–70 nm, which is similar to what has been observed in OMVs from other Gram-negative bacteria. Analyses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), phospholipids and protein profiles of OMVs are consistent with the bacterial outer membrane origin of these vesicles. In an initial attempt to elucidate the functions of OMVs proteins, we conducted a proteomic analysis on 1D SDS-PAGE bands. Those proteins putatively identified match with outer membrane proteins and proteins related to nutrient processing and transport in Gram-negative bacteria. This approach suggests that OMVs present in the EPS from P. antarctica NF3, might function to deliver proteins to the external media, and therefore play an important role in the survival of the bacterium in the extreme Antarctic environment. PMID:16913913

  7. A highly infective plant-associated bacterium influences reproductive rates in pea aphids

    PubMed Central

    Hendry, Tory A.; Clark, Kelley J.; Baltrus, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Pea aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum, have the potential to increase reproduction as a defence against pathogens, though how frequently this occurs or how infection with live pathogens influences this response is not well understood. Here we determine the minimum infective dose of an environmentally common bacterium and possible aphid pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, to determine the likelihood of pathogenic effects to pea aphids. Additionally, we used P. syringae infection to investigate how live pathogens may alter reproductive rates. We found that oral bacterial exposure decreased subsequent survival of aphids in a dose-dependent manner and we estimate that ingestion of less than 10 bacterial cells is sufficient to increase aphid mortality. Pathogen dose was positively related to aphid reproduction. Aphids exposed to low bacterial doses showed decreased, although statistically indistinguishable, fecundity compared to controls. Aphids exposed to high doses reproduced significantly more than low dose treatments and also more, but not significantly so, than controls. These results are consistent with previous studies suggesting that pea aphids may use fecundity compensation as a response to pathogens. Consequently, even low levels of exposure to a common plant-associated bacterium may therefore have significant effects on pea aphid survival and reproduction. PMID:26998321

  8. Isolation and Characterization of an Anaerobic, Cellulolytic Bacterium, Clostridium cellulovorans sp. nov

    PubMed Central

    Sleat, Robert; Mah, Robert A.; Robinson, Ralph

    1984-01-01

    A new anaerobic, mesophilic, spore-forming cellulolytic bacterium is described. Cellulose is cleared within 24 to 48 h around colonies formed in cellulose agar roll tubes. Cells stain gram negative and are nonmotile rods which form oblong spores either centrally or subterminally in a clostridial swelling. Colonies are irregular with an opaque edge and a center devoid of both vegetative cells and spores. Cellulose, xylan, pectin, cellobiose, glucose, maltose, galactose, sucrose, lactose, and mannose serve as substrates for growth. H2, CO2, acetate, butyrate, formate, and lactate are produced during fermentation of cellulose or cellobiose. The temperature and pH for optimum growth are 37°C and 7.0, respectively. The DNA composition is 26 to 27 mol% guanine plus cytosine. This bacterium resembles “Clostridium lochheadii” in morphological and some biochemical characteristics but is not identical to it. The name Clostridium cellulovorans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 743B (ATCC 35296). Images PMID:16346602

  9. Polaribacter butkevichii sp. nov., a novel marine mesophilic bacterium of the family Flavobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Nedashkovskaya, Olga I; Kim, Seung Bum; Lysenko, Anatoly M; Kalinovskaya, Nataliya I; Mikhailov, Valery V; Kim, In Seop; Bae, Kyung Sook

    2005-12-01

    A novel heterotrophic, yellow pigmented, aerobic, Gram-negative, nonmotile, oxidase- and catalase-positive bacterium KMM 3,938(T) was isolated from sea water collected in the Sea of Japan, Russia. The strain grew at mesophilic temperature range, and required the presence of NaCl for growth. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain KMM 3,938(T) is a member of the family Flavobacteriaceae. The predominant fatty acids were C13:0 iso, C14:0 iso, C15:0 iso, C15:0, C15:1Delta6, 3OH-C15:0:3 iso, and 3OH-C15:0. The G + C content of the DNA of KMM 3938(T) was 32.4 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, genotypic, and phylogenetic characteristics, the novel bacterium was assigned to the genus Polaribacter as Polaribacter butkevichii sp. nov. The type strain is KMM 3938(T )(= KCTC 12100(T) = CCUG 48005(T)).

  10. Genome Analysis of Thermosulfurimonas dismutans, the First Thermophilic Sulfur-Disproportionating Bacterium of the Phylum Thermodesulfobacteria.

    PubMed

    Mardanov, Andrey V; Beletsky, Alexey V; Kadnikov, Vitaly V; Slobodkin, Alexander I; Ravin, Nikolai V

    2016-01-01

    Thermosulfurimonas dismutans S95(T), isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent is the first bacterium of the phylum Thermodesulfobacteria reported to grow by the disproportionation of elemental sulfur, sulfite, or thiosulfate with carbon dioxide as the sole carbon source. In contrast to its phylogenetically close relatives, which are dissimilatory sulfate-reducers, T. dismutans is unable to grow by sulfate respiration. The features of this organism and its 2,1 Mb draft genome sequence are described in this report. Genome analysis revealed that the T. dismutans genome contains the set of genes for dissimilatory sulfate reduction including ATP sulfurylase, the AprA and B subunits of adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate reductase, and dissimilatory sulfite reductase. The oxidation of elemental sulfur to sulfite could be enabled by APS reductase-associated electron transfer complex QmoABC and heterodisulfide reductase. The genome also contains several membrane-linked molybdopterin oxidoreductases that are thought to be involved in sulfur metabolism as subunits of thiosulfate, polysulfide, or tetrathionate reductases. Nitrate could be used as an electron acceptor and reduced to ammonium, as indicated by the presence of periplasmic nitrate and nitrite reductases. Autotrophic carbon fixation is enabled by the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, and the complete set of genes that is required for nitrogen fixation is also present in T. dismutans. Overall, our results provide genomic insights into energy and carbon metabolism of chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-disproportionating bacterium that could be important primary producer in microbial communities of deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

  11. Nematode-Bacterium Symbioses - Cooperation and Conflict Revealed in the 'Omics' Age

    PubMed Central

    Murfin, Kristen E.; Dillman, Adler R.; Foster, Jeremy M.; Bulgheresi, Silvia; Slatko, Barton E.; Sternberg, Paul W.; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    Nematodes are ubiquitous organisms that have a significant global impact on ecosystems, economies, agriculture, and human health. The applied importance of nematodes and the experimental tractability of many species have promoted their use as models in various research areas, including developmental biology, evolutionary biology, ecology, and animal-bacterium interactions. Nematodes are particularly well suited for investigating host associations with bacteria because all nematodes have interacted with bacteria during their evolutionary history and engage in a diversity of association types. Interactions between nematodes and bacteria can be positive (mutualistic) or negative (pathogenic/parasitic) and may be transient or stably maintained (symbiotic). Furthermore, since many mechanistic aspects of nematode-bacterium interactions are conserved their study can provide broader insights into other types of associations, including those relevant to human diseases. Recently, genome-scale studies have been applied to diverse nematode-bacterial interactions, and have helped reveal mechanisms of communication and exchange between the associated partners. In addition to providing specific information about the system under investigation, these studies also have helped inform our understanding of genome evolution, mutualism, and innate immunity. In this review we will discuss the importance and diversity of nematodes, 'omics' studies in nematode-bacterial systems, and the wider implications of the findings. PMID:22983035

  12. Evaluation of nitrate removal by continuous culturing of an aerobic denitrifying bacterium, Paracoccus pantotrophus.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa-Kurisu, K; Otani, Y; Hanaki, K

    2006-01-01

    Nitrate removal under aerobic conditions was investigated using pure cultures of Paracoccus pantotrophus, which is a well-known aerobic-denitrifying (AD) bacterium. When a high concentration of cultures with a high carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio was preserved at the beginning of batch experiments, subsequently added nitrate was completely removed. When continuous culturing was perpetuated, a high nitrate removal rate (66.5%) was observed on day 4 post-culture, although gradual decreases in AD ability with time were observed. The attenuation in AD ability was probably caused by carbon limitation, because when carbon concentration of inflow water was doubled, nitrate removal efficiency improved from 18.1% to 59.6%. Bacterial community analysis using the polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) method showed that P. pantotrophus disappeared in the suspended medium on day 8 post-culture, whereas other bacterial communities dominated by Acidovorax sp. appeared. Interestingly, this replaced bacterial community also showed AD ability. As P. pantotrophus was detected as attached colonies around the membrane and bottom of the reactor, this bacterium can therefore be introduced in a fixed form for treatment of wastewater containing nitrate with a high C/N ratio. PMID:17163031

  13. Structural characterization of the lipid A from the LPS of the haloalkaliphilic bacterium Halomonas pantelleriensis.

    PubMed

    Carillo, Sara; Pieretti, Giuseppina; Casillo, Angela; Lindner, Buko; Romano, Ida; Nicolaus, Barbara; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Giuliano, Mariateresa; Cammarota, Marcella; Lanzetta, Rosa; Corsaro, Maria Michela

    2016-09-01

    Halomonas pantelleriensis DSM9661(Τ) is a Gram-negative haloalkaliphilic bacterium isolated from the sand of the volcanic Venus mirror lake, closed to seashore in the Pantelleria Island in the south of Italy. It is able to optimally grow in media containing 3-15 % (w/v) total salt and at pH between 9 and 10. To survive in these harsh conditions, the bacterium has developed several strategies that probably concern the bacteria outer membrane, a barrier regulating the exchange with the environment. In such a context, the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), which are among the major constituent of the Gram-negative outer membrane, are thought to contribute to the restrictive membrane permeability properties. The structure of the lipid A family derived from the LPS of Halomonas pantelleriensis DSM 9661(T) is reported herein. The lipid A was obtained from the purified LPS by mild acid hydrolysis. The lipid A, which contains different numbers of fatty acids residues, and its partially deacylated derivatives were completely characterized by means of ESI FT-ICR mass spectrometry and chemical analysis. Preliminary immunological assays were performed, and a comparison with the lipid A structure of the phylogenetic proximal Halomonas magadiensis is also reported.

  14. Development of a gene cloning system for the hydrogen-producing marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp.

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, T; Matsunaga, N; Tsubaki, K; Tanaka, T

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-six strains of marine photosynthetic bacteria were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis for plasmid DNA content. Among these strains, 12 carried two to four different plasmids with sizes ranging from 3.1 to 11.0 megadaltons. The marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106 had two plasmids, pRD06S and pRD06L. The smaller plasmid, pRD06S, had a molecular weight of 3.8 megadaltons and was cut at a single site by restriction endonucleases SalI, SmaI, PstI, XhoI, and BglII. Moreover, the marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106 containing plasmid pRD06 had a satisfactory growth rate (doubling time, 7.5 h), a hydrogen-producing rate of 0.96 mumol/mg (dry weight) of cells per h, and nitrogen fixation capability. Plasmid pRD06S, however, had neither drug resistance nor heavy-metal resistance, and its copy number was less than 10. Therefore, a recombinant plasmid consisting of pRD06S and Escherichia coli cloning vector pUC13 was constructed and cloned in E. coli. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106. As a result, Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106 developed ampicillin resistance. Thus, a shuttle vector for gene transfer was constructed for marine photosynthetic bacteria. PMID:3020006

  15. Biogenesis of antibacterial silver nanoparticles using the endophytic bacterium Bacillus cereus isolated from Garcinia xanthochymus

    PubMed Central

    Sunkar, Swetha; Nachiyar, C Valli

    2012-01-01

    Objective To synthesize the ecofriendly nanoparticles, which is viewed as an alternative to the chemical method which initiated the use of microbes like bacteria and fungi in their synthesis. Methods The current study uses the endophytic bacterium Bacillus cereus isolated from the Garcinia xanthochymus to synthesize the silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The AgNPs were synthesized by reduction of silver nitrate solution by the endophytic bacterium after incubation for 3-5 d at room temperature. The synthesis was initially observed by colour change from pale white to brown which was confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The AgNPs were further characterized using FTIR, SEM-EDX and TEM analyses. Results The synthesized nanoparticles were found to be spherical with the size in the range of 20-40 nm which showed a slight aggregation. The energy-dispersive spectra of the nanoparticle dispersion confirmed the presence of elemental silver. The AgNPs were found to have antibacterial activity against a few pathogenic bacteria like Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Conclusions The endophytic bacteria identified as Bacillus cereus was able to synthesize silver nanoparticles with potential antibacterial activity. PMID:23593575

  16. Pseudomonas sp. strain 273, and aerobic {alpha},{omega}-dichloroalkane-degrading bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Wischnak, C.; Mueller, R.; Loeffler, F.E. |; Li, J.; Urbance, J.W.

    1998-09-01

    A gram-negative, aerobic bacterium was isolated from soil; this bacterium grew in 50% (vol/vol) suspensions of 1,10-dichlorodecane (1,10-DCD) as the sole source of carbon and energy. Phenotypic and small-subunit ribosomal RNA characterizations identified the organism, designated strain 273, as a member of the genus Pseudomonas. After induction with 1,10-DCD, Pseudomonas sp. strain 273 released stoichiometric amounts of chloride from C{sub 5} to C{sub 12} {alpha},{omega}-dichloroalkanes in the presence of oxygen. No dehalogenation occurred under anaerobic conditions. The best substrates for dehalogenation and growth were C{sub 9} to C{sub 12} chloroalkanes. The isolate also grew with nonhalogenated aliphatic compounds, and decane-grown cells dechlorinated 1,10-DCD without a lag phase. In addition, cells grown on decane dechlorinated 1,10-DCD in the presence of chloramphenicol, indicating that the 1,10-DCD-dechlorinating enzyme system was also induced by decane. Other known alkane-degrading Pseudomonas species did not grow with 1,10-DCD as a carbon source. Dechlorination of 1,10-DCD was demonstrated in cell extracts of Pseudomonas sp. strain 273. Cell-free activity was strictly oxygen dependent, and NADH stimulated dechlorination, whereas EDTA had an inhibitory effect.

  17. Non-specific immune response of bullfrog Rana catesbeiana to intraperitoneal injection of bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junjie; Zou, Wenzheng; Yan, Qingpi

    2008-08-01

    Non-specific immune response of bullfrog Rana catesbeiana to pathogenic Aeromonas hydrophila was studied to 60 individuals in two groups. Each bullfrog in bacterium-injected group was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 0.2 ml bacterial suspension at a density of 5.2 × 106 CFU/ml, while each one in control group injected i.p. with 0.2 ml sterile saline solution (0.85%, w/v). Three bullfrogs in both groups were sampled at 0, 1, 3, 7, 11, 15 and 20 days post-injection (dpi) for the evaluation of non-specific immune parameters. It was observed that intraperitoneal injection of A. hydrophila significantly increased the number of leucocytes and that of NBT-positive cells in peripheral blood. Significant increases in serum bactericidal activity and serum acid phosphatase activity were also observed in the bacterium-injected frogs when compared with those in the control group. However, a significant reduction was detected in vitro in phagocytosis activity of peripheral blood phagocytes. No significant difference in changes in the number of peripheral erythrocytes, serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and lysozyme activity was detected between the two groups. It is suggested that bullfrogs may produce a series of non-specific immune reactions in response to the A. hydrophila infection.

  18. Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae, a bacterium pathogenic for marine animals and humans

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Amable J.; Lemos, Manuel L.; Osorio, Carlos R.

    2013-01-01

    Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae (formerly Vibrio damsela) is a pathogen of a variety of marine animals including fish, crustaceans, molluscs, and cetaceans. In humans, it can cause opportunistic infections that may evolve into necrotizing fasciitis with fatal outcome. Although the genetic basis of virulence in this bacterium is not completely elucidated, recent findings demonstrate that the phospholipase-D Dly (damselysin) and the pore-forming toxins HlyApl and HlyAch play a main role in virulence for homeotherms and poikilotherms. The acquisition of the virulence plasmid pPHDD1 that encodes Dly and HlyApl has likely constituted a main driving force in the evolution of a highly hemolytic lineage within the subspecies. Interestingly, strains that naturally lack pPHDD1 show a strong pathogenic potential for a variety of fish species, indicating the existence of yet uncharacterized virulence factors. Future and deep analysis of the complete genome sequence of Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae will surely provide a clearer picture of the virulence factors employed by this bacterium to cause disease in such a varied range of hosts. PMID:24093021

  19. Optimization of liquid media and biosafety assessment for algae-lysing bacterium NP23.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chunli; Liu, Xiaobo; Shan, Linna

    2014-09-01

    To control algal bloom caused by nutrient pollution, a wild-type algae-lysing bacterium was isolated from the Baiguishan reservoir in Henan province of China and identified as Enterobacter sp. strain NP23. Algal culture medium was optimized by applying a Placket-Burman design to obtain a high cell concentration of NP23. Three minerals (i.e., 0.6% KNO3, 0.001% MnSO4·H2O, and 0.3% K2HPO4) were found to be independent factors critical for obtaining the highest cell concentration of 10(13) CFU/mL, which was 10(4) times that of the control. In the algae-lysing experiment, the strain exhibited a high lysis rate for the 4 algae test species, namely, Chlorella vulgari, Scenedesmus, Microcystis wesenbergii, and Chlorella pyrenoidosa. Acute toxicity and mutagenicity tests showed that the bacterium NP23 had no toxic and mutagenic effects on fish, even in large doses such as 10(7) or 10(9) CFU/mL. Thus, Enterobacter sp. strain NP23 has strong potential application in the microbial algae-lysing project. PMID:25188453

  20. Quorum sensing activity of Citrobacter amalonaticus L8A, a bacterium isolated from dental plaque

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Share-Yuan; Khan, Saad Ahmed; Tee, Kok Keng; Abu Kasim, Noor Hayaty; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell communication is also known as quorum sensing (QS) that happens in the bacterial cells with the aim to regulate their genes expression in response to increased cell density. In this study, a bacterium (L8A) isolated from dental plaque biofilm was identified as Citrobacter amalonaticus by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). Its N-acylhomoserine-lactone (AHL) production was screened by using two types of AHL biosensors namely Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Escherichia coli [pSB401]. Citrobacter amalonaticus strain L8A was identified and confirmed producing numerous types of AHL namely N-butyryl-L-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL), N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL), N-octanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C8-HSL) and N-hexadecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C16-HSL). We performed the whole genome sequence analysis of this oral isolate where its genome sequence reveals the presence of QS signal synthase gene and our work will pave the ways to study the function of the related QS genes in this bacterium. PMID:26860259

  1. Proteomic analysis of membrane proteins from a radioresistant and moderate thermophilic bacterium Deinococcus geothermalis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bing; Wang, Hu; Ma, Xiaoqiong; Hu, Yaping; Sun, Zongtao; Shen, Shaochuan; Wang, Fei; Hua, Yuejin

    2010-10-01

    Deinococcus geothermalis is a radioresistant and moderate thermophilic bacterium. Little was known about the membrane or membrane associated proteins of this bacterium. This study established the membrane subproteome profile of D. geothermalis, using 1-D PAGE and LC-MS/MS analysis following Triton X-114 detergent extraction. A total of 552 proteins from the membrane preparations were identified from two independent trials. In the total identified proteins, 117 were membrane subproteomic proteins, and 89 of them were described for the first time in D. geothermalis including fimbrial pilin (Dgeo_2038), cytochrome bd ubiquinol oxidase (Dgeo_2705) and multi-sensor (Dgeo_2096). The major membrane subproteomic proteins were distributed into 18 functional groups including nutrient transport and metabolism, energy production and conversion, cell wall/membrane biogenesis and a poorly characterized subclass. The identifications of Deinococcus-specific proteins, such as cell surface receptor IPT/TIG (Dgeo_1119) and four hypothetical proteins, demonstrated the special protein composition and functions in the cell membrane of Deinococcus. The results provide a basis for quantitative proteomic analysis, which will facilitate the understanding of the adaptation of this organism to different environmental stresses and the development of strategies for bioremediation of environmental waste.

  2. Geovibrio ferrireducens, a phylogenetically distinct dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caccavo, F.; Coates, J.D.; Rossello-Mora, R. A.; Ludwig, W.; Schleifer, K.H.; Lovley, D.R.; McInerney, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    A new, phylogenetically distinct, dissimilatory, Fe(III)-reducing bacterium was isolated from surface sediment of a hydrocarbon-contaminated ditch. The isolate, designated strain PAL-1, was an obligately anaerobic, non-fermentative, motile, gram-negative vibrio. PAL-1 grew in a defined medium with acetate as electron donor and ferric pyrophosphate, ferric oxyhydroxide, ferric citrate, Co(III)-EDTA, or elemental sulfur as sole electron acceptor. PAL-1 also used proline, hydrogen, lactate, propionate, succinate, fumarate, pyruvate, or yeast extract as electron donors for Fe(III) reduction. It is the first bacterium known to couple the oxidation of an amino acid to Fe(III) reduction. PAI-1 did not reduce oxygen, Mn(IV), U(VI), Cr(VI), nitrate, sulfate, sulfite, or thiosulfate with acetate as the electron donor. Cell suspensions of PAL-1 exhibited dithionite-reduced minus air-oxidized difference spectra that were characteristic of c-type cytochromes. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of PAL-1 showed that the strain is not related to any of the described metal-reducing bacteria in the Proteobacteria and, together with Flexistipes sinusarabici, forms a separate line of descent within the Bacteria. Phenotypically and phylogenetically, strain PAI-1 differs from all other described bacteria, and represents the type strain of a new genus and species. Geovibrio ferrireducens.

  3. Biochemical and Structural Insights into Xylan Utilization by the Thermophilic Bacterium Caldanaerobius polysaccharolyticus*

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yejun; Agarwal, Vinayak; Dodd, Dylan; Kim, Jason; Bae, Brian; Mackie, Roderick I.; Nair, Satish K.; Cann, Isaac K. O.

    2012-01-01

    Hemicellulose is the next most abundant plant cell wall component after cellulose. The abundance of hemicellulose such as xylan suggests that their hydrolysis and conversion to biofuels can improve the economics of bioenergy production. In an effort to understand xylan hydrolysis at high temperatures, we sequenced the genome of the thermophilic bacterium Caldanaerobius polysaccharolyticus. Analysis of the partial genome sequence revealed a gene cluster that contained both hydrolytic enzymes and also enzymes key to the pentose-phosphate pathway. The hydrolytic enzymes in the gene cluster were demonstrated to convert products from a large endoxylanase (Xyn10A) predicted to anchor to the surface of the bacterium. We further use structural and calorimetric studies to demonstrate that the end products of Xyn10A hydrolysis of xylan are recognized and bound by XBP1, a putative solute-binding protein, likely for transport into the cell. The XBP1 protein showed preference for xylo-oligosaccharides as follows: xylotriose > xylobiose > xylotetraose. To elucidate the structural basis for the oligosaccharide preference, we solved the co-crystal structure of XBP1 complexed with xylotriose to a 1.8-Å resolution. Analysis of the biochemical data in the context of the co-crystal structure reveals the molecular underpinnings of oligosaccharide length specificity. PMID:22918832

  4. Conversion of Daidzein and Genistein by an Anaerobic Bacterium Newly Isolated from the Mouse Intestine▿

    PubMed Central

    Matthies, Anastasia; Clavel, Thomas; Gütschow, Michael; Engst, Wolfram; Haller, Dirk; Blaut, Michael; Braune, Annett

    2008-01-01

    The metabolism of isoflavones by gut bacteria plays a key role in the availability and bioactivation of these compounds in the intestine. Daidzein and genistein are the most common dietary soy isoflavones. While daidzein conversion yielding equol has been known for some time, the corresponding formation of 5-hydroxy-equol from genistein has not been reported previously. We isolated a strictly anaerobic bacterium (Mt1B8) from the mouse intestine which converted daidzein via dihydrodaidzein to equol as well as genistein via dihydrogenistein to 5-hydroxy-equol. Strain Mt1B8 was a gram-positive, rod-shaped bacterium identified as a member of the Coriobacteriaceae. Strain Mt1B8 also transformed dihydrodaidzein and dihydrogenistein to equol and 5-hydroxy-equol, respectively. The conversion of daidzein, genistein, dihydrodaidzein, and dihydrogenistein in the stationary growth phase depended on preincubation with the corresponding isoflavonoid, indicating enzyme induction. Moreover, dihydrogenistein was transformed even more rapidly in the stationary phase when strain Mt1B8 was grown on either genistein or daidzein. Growing the cells on daidzein also enabled conversion of genistein. This suggests that the same enzymes are involved in the conversion of the two isoflavones. PMID:18539813

  5. Genome Analysis of Thermosulfurimonas dismutans, the First Thermophilic Sulfur-Disproportionating Bacterium of the Phylum Thermodesulfobacteria.

    PubMed

    Mardanov, Andrey V; Beletsky, Alexey V; Kadnikov, Vitaly V; Slobodkin, Alexander I; Ravin, Nikolai V

    2016-01-01

    Thermosulfurimonas dismutans S95(T), isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent is the first bacterium of the phylum Thermodesulfobacteria reported to grow by the disproportionation of elemental sulfur, sulfite, or thiosulfate with carbon dioxide as the sole carbon source. In contrast to its phylogenetically close relatives, which are dissimilatory sulfate-reducers, T. dismutans is unable to grow by sulfate respiration. The features of this organism and its 2,1 Mb draft genome sequence are described in this report. Genome analysis revealed that the T. dismutans genome contains the set of genes for dissimilatory sulfate reduction including ATP sulfurylase, the AprA and B subunits of adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate reductase, and dissimilatory sulfite reductase. The oxidation of elemental sulfur to sulfite could be enabled by APS reductase-associated electron transfer complex QmoABC and heterodisulfide reductase. The genome also contains several membrane-linked molybdopterin oxidoreductases that are thought to be involved in sulfur metabolism as subunits of thiosulfate, polysulfide, or tetrathionate reductases. Nitrate could be used as an electron acceptor and reduced to ammonium, as indicated by the presence of periplasmic nitrate and nitrite reductases. Autotrophic carbon fixation is enabled by the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, and the complete set of genes that is required for nitrogen fixation is also present in T. dismutans. Overall, our results provide genomic insights into energy and carbon metabolism of chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-disproportionating bacterium that could be important primary producer in microbial communities of deep-sea hydrothermal vents. PMID:27379079

  6. An O2-sensing stressosome from a Gram-negative bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xin; Wang, Jian-bo; Rivera, Shannon; Duong, Duc; Weinert, Emily E.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved numerous pathways to sense and respond to changing environmental conditions, including, within Gram-positive bacteria, the stressosome complex that regulates transcription of general stress response genes. However, the signalling molecules recognized by Gram-positive stressosomes have yet to be identified, hindering our understanding of the signal transduction mechanism within the complex. Furthermore, an analogous pathway has yet to be described in Gram-negative bacteria. Here we characterize a putative stressosome from the Gram-negative bacterium Vibrio brasiliensis. The sensor protein RsbR binds haem and exhibits ligand-dependent control of the stressosome complex activity. Oxygen binding to the haem decreases activity, while ferrous RsbR results in increased activity, suggesting that the V. brasiliensis stressosome may be activated when the bacterium enters anaerobic growth conditions. The findings provide a model system for investigating ligand-dependent signalling within stressosome complexes, as well as insights into potential pathways controlled by oxygen-dependent signalling within Vibrio species. PMID:27488264

  7. Chemical compounds effective against the citrus Huanglongbing bacterium 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' in planta.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Muqing; Powell, Charles A; Zhou, Lijuan; He, Zhenli; Stover, Ed; Duan, Yongping

    2011-09-01

    Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB) is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus worldwide and is threatening the survival of the Floridian citrus industry. Currently, there is no established cure for this century-old and emerging disease. As a possible control strategy for citrus HLB, therapeutic compounds were screened using a propagation test system with 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus'-infected periwinkle and citrus plants. The results demonstrated that the combination of penicillin and streptomycin (PS) was effective in eliminating or suppressing the 'Ca. L. asiaticus' bacterium and provided a therapeutically effective level of control for a much longer period of time than when administering either antibiotic separately. When treated with the PS, 'Ca. L. asiaticus'-infected periwinkle cuttings achieved 70% of regeneration rates versus <50% by other treatments. The 'Ca. L. asiaticus' bacterial titers in the infected periwinkle plants, as measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, decreased significantly following root soaking or foliar spraying with PS. Application of the PS via trunk injection or root soaking also eliminated or suppressed the 'Ca. L. asiaticus' bacterium in the HLB-affected citrus plants. This may provide a useful tool for the management of citrus HLB and other Liberibacter-associated diseases.

  8. Structural characterization of the lipid A from the LPS of the haloalkaliphilic bacterium Halomonas pantelleriensis.

    PubMed

    Carillo, Sara; Pieretti, Giuseppina; Casillo, Angela; Lindner, Buko; Romano, Ida; Nicolaus, Barbara; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Giuliano, Mariateresa; Cammarota, Marcella; Lanzetta, Rosa; Corsaro, Maria Michela

    2016-09-01

    Halomonas pantelleriensis DSM9661(Τ) is a Gram-negative haloalkaliphilic bacterium isolated from the sand of the volcanic Venus mirror lake, closed to seashore in the Pantelleria Island in the south of Italy. It is able to optimally grow in media containing 3-15 % (w/v) total salt and at pH between 9 and 10. To survive in these harsh conditions, the bacterium has developed several strategies that probably concern the bacteria outer membrane, a barrier regulating the exchange with the environment. In such a context, the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), which are among the major constituent of the Gram-negative outer membrane, are thought to contribute to the restrictive membrane permeability properties. The structure of the lipid A family derived from the LPS of Halomonas pantelleriensis DSM 9661(T) is reported herein. The lipid A was obtained from the purified LPS by mild acid hydrolysis. The lipid A, which contains different numbers of fatty acids residues, and its partially deacylated derivatives were completely characterized by means of ESI FT-ICR mass spectrometry and chemical analysis. Preliminary immunological assays were performed, and a comparison with the lipid A structure of the phylogenetic proximal Halomonas magadiensis is also reported. PMID:27329160

  9. Accurate Cell Division in Bacteria: How Does a Bacterium Know Where its Middle Is?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Martin; Rutenberg, Andrew

    2004-03-01

    I will discuss the physical principles lying behind the acquisition of accurate positional information in bacteria. A good application of these ideas is to the rod-shaped bacterium E. coli which divides precisely at its cellular midplane. This positioning is controlled by the Min system of proteins. These proteins coherently oscillate from end to end of the bacterium. I will present a reaction-diffusion model that describes the diffusion of the Min proteins, and their binding/unbinding from the cell membrane. The system possesses an instability that spontaneously generates the Min oscillations, which control accurate placement of the midcell division site. I will then discuss the role of fluctuations in protein dynamics, and investigate whether fluctuations set optimal protein concentration levels. Finally I will examine cell division in a different bacteria, B. subtilis. where different physical principles are used to regulate accurate cell division. See: Howard, Rutenberg, de Vet: Dynamic compartmentalization of bacteria: accurate division in E. coli. Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 278102 (2001). Howard, Rutenberg: Pattern formation inside bacteria: fluctuations due to the low copy number of proteins. Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 128102 (2003). Howard: A mechanism for polar protein localization in bacteria. J. Mol. Biol. 335 655-663 (2004).

  10. A Commensal Bacterium Promotes Virulence of an Opportunistic Pathogen via Cross-Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Stacy, Apollo; Fleming, Derek; Lamont, Richard J.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria rarely inhabit infection sites alone, instead residing in diverse, multispecies communities. Despite this fact, bacterial pathogenesis studies primarily focus on monoculture infections, overlooking how community interactions influence the course of disease. In this study, we used global mutant fitness profiling (transposon sequencing [Tn-seq]) to determine the genetic requirements for the pathogenic bacterium Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans to cause disease when coinfecting with the commensal bacterium Streptococcus gordonii. Our results show that S. gordonii extensively alters A. actinomycetemcomitans requirements for virulence factors and biosynthetic pathways during infection. In addition, we discovered that the presence of S. gordonii enhances the bioavailability of oxygen during infection, allowing A. actinomycetemcomitans to shift from a primarily fermentative to a respiratory metabolism that enhances its growth yields and persistence. Mechanistically, respiratory metabolism enhances the fitness of A. actinomycetemcomitans in vivo by increasing ATP yields via central metabolism and creating a proton motive force. Our results reveal that, similar to cross-feeding, where one species provides another species with a nutrient, commensal bacteria can also provide electron acceptors that promote the respiratory growth and fitness of pathogens in vivo, an interaction that we term cross-respiration. PMID:27353758

  11. Biomass yield efficiency of the marine anammox bacterium, "Candidatus Scalindua sp.," is affected by salinity.

    PubMed

    Awata, Takanori; Kindaichi, Tomonori; Ozaki, Noriatsu; Ohashi, Akiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    The growth rate and biomass yield efficiency of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria are markedly lower than those of most other autotrophic bacteria. Among the anammox bacterial genera, the growth rate and biomass yield of the marine anammox bacterium "Candidatus Scalindua sp." is still lower than those of other anammox bacteria enriched from freshwater environments. The activity and growth of marine anammox bacteria are generally considered to be affected by the presence of salinity and organic compounds. Therefore, in the present study, the effects of salinity and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) on the anammox activity, inorganic carbon uptake, and biomass yield efficiency of "Ca. Scalindua sp." enriched from the marine sediments of Hiroshima Bay, Japan, were investigated in batch experiments. Differences in VFA concentrations (0-10 mM) were observed under varying salinities (0.5%-4%). Anammox activity was high at 0.5%-3.5% salinity, but was 30% lower at 4% salinity. In addition, carbon uptake was higher at 1.5%-3.5% salinity. The results of the present study clearly demonstrated that the biomass yield efficiency of the marine anammox bacterium "Ca. Scalindua sp." was significantly affected by salinity. On the other hand, the presence of VFAs up to 10 mM did not affect anammox activity, carbon uptake, or biomass yield efficiency.

  12. A symbiotic bacterium differentially influences arsenate absorption and transformation in Dunaliella salina under different phosphate regimes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya; Zhang, Chun Hua; Lin, Man Man; Ge, Ying

    2016-11-15

    In this study, we investigated the effects of a symbiotic bacterium and phosphate (PO4(3-)) nutrition on the toxicity and metabolism of arsenate (As(V)) in Dunaliella salina. The bacterium was identified as Alteromonas macleodii based on analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence. When no As(V) was added, A. macleodii significantly enhanced the growth of D. salina, irrespective of PO4(3-) nutrition levels, but this effect was reversed after As(V)+PO4(3-) treatment (1.12mgL(-1)) for 3 days. Arsenic (As) absorption by the non-axenic D. salina was significantly higher than that by its axenic counterpart during incubation with 1.12mgL(-1) PO4(3-). However, when the culture was treated with 0.112mgL(-1) PO4(3-), As(V) reduction and its subsequent arsenite (As(III)) excretion by non-axenic D. salina were remarkably enhanced, which, in turn, contributed to lower As absorption in non-axenic algal cells from days 7 to 9. Moreover, dimethylarsinic acid was synthesized by D. salina alone, and the rates of its production and excretion were accelerated when the PO4(3-) concentration was 0.112mgL(-1). Our data demonstrate that A. macleodii strongly affected As toxicity, uptake, and speciation in D. salina, and these impacts were mediated by PO4(3-) in the cultures.

  13. Enzymatic properties of chitinase-producing antagonistic bacterium Paenibacillus chitinolyticus with various substrates.

    PubMed

    Song, Yong-Su; Seo, Dong-Jun; Ju, Wan-Taek; Lee, Yong-Seong; Jung, Woo-Jin

    2015-12-01

    Various chitin substrates were used to investigate the properties of enzymes produced from the chitinase-producing bacterium Paenibacillus chitinolyticus MP-306 against phytopathogens. The MP-306 bacterium was incubated in nine culture media [crab shell powder chitin (CRS), chitin-protein complex powder (CPC), carboxymethyl-chitin powder (CMC), yeast extract only (YE), LB (Trypton, NaCl, and yeast extract), GT (Trypton, NaCl, and glucose), crab shell colloidal chitin (CSC), squid pen powder chitin (SPC), and cicada slough powder chitin (CSP)] at 30 °C for 3 days. Chitinase isozymes in CPC medium were expressed strongly as CN1, CN2, CN3, CN4, CN5, and CN6 bands on native-PAGE gels. Chitinase isozymes in CPC and CMC medium were expressed as 13 bands (CS1-CS13) on SDS-PAGE gels. Chitinase isozymes were expressed strongly on SDS-PAGE gels as two bands (CS6 and CS8) on YE and LB medium and 13 bands (CS1-CS13) on SPC medium. In crude enzyme, chitinase isozymes at pH 7 and pH 9 in chitin media appeared strongly on SDS-PAGE gels. Partial purified enzyme indicated high stability of enzyme activity at various temperatures and pHs in chitin medium, while these enzymes indicated low activity staining of enzyme on electrophoresis gels at various temperatures and pHs condition of chitin medium.

  14. Data supporting functional diversity of the marine bacterium Cobetia amphilecti KMM 296.

    PubMed

    Balabanova, Larissa; Nedashkovskaya, Olga; Podvolotskaya, Anna; Slepchenko, Lubov; Golotin, Vasily; Belik, Alexey; Shevchenko, Ludmila; Son, Oksana; Rasskazov, Valery

    2016-09-01

    Data is presented in support of functionality of hyper-diverse protein families encoded by the Cobetia amphilecti KMM 296 (formerly Cobetia marina KMM 296) genome ("The genome of the marine bacterium Cobetia marina KMM 296 isolated from the mussel Crenomytilus grayanus (Dunker, 1853)" [1]) providing its nutritional versatility, adaptability and biocontrol that could be the basis of the marine bacterium evolutionary and application potential. Presented data include the information of growth and biofilm-forming properties of the food-associated isolates of Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Listeria, Salmonella and Staphylococcus under the conditions of their co-culturing with C. amphilecti KMM 296 to confirm its high inter-species communication and anti-microbial activity. Also included are the experiments on the crude petroleum consumption by C. amphilecti KMM 296 as the sole source of carbon in the presence of sulfate or nitrate to ensure its bioremediation capacity. The multifunctional C. amphilecti KMM 296 genome is a promising source for the beneficial psychrophilic enzymes and essential secondary metabolites. PMID:27508225

  15. Root-to-Root Travel of the Beneficial Bacterium Azospirillum brasilense†

    PubMed Central

    Bashan, Yoav; Holguin, Gina

    1994-01-01

    The root-to-root travel of the beneficial bacterium Azospirillum brasilense on wheat and soybean roots in agar, sand, and light-textured soil was monitored. We used a motile wild-type (Mot+) strain and a motility-deficient (Mot-) strain which was derived from the wild-type strain. The colonization levels of inoculated roots were similar for the two strains. Mot+ cells moved from inoculated roots (either natural or artificial roots in agar, sand, or light-textured soil) to noninoculated roots, where they formed a band-type colonization composed of bacterial aggregates encircling a limited part of the root, regardless of the plant species. The Mot- strain did not move toward noninoculated roots of either plant species and usually stayed at the inoculation site and root tips. The effect of attractants and repellents was the primary factor governing the motility of Mot+ cells in the presence of adequate water. We propose that interroot travel of A. brasilense is an essential preliminary step in the root-bacterium recognition mechanism. Bacterial motility might have a general role in getting Azospirillum cells to the site where firmer attachment favors colonization of the root system. Azospirillum travel toward plants is a nonspecific active process which is not directly dependent on nutrient deficiency but is a consequence of a nonspecific bacterial chemotaxis, influenced by the balance between attractants and possibly repellents leaked by the root. PMID:16349297

  16. Nitrite-Oxidizing Bacterium Nitrobacter winogradskyi Produces N-Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Autoinducers

    PubMed Central

    Bottomley, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrobacter winogradskyi is a chemolithotrophic bacterium that plays a role in the nitrogen cycle by oxidizing nitrite to nitrate. Here, we demonstrate a functional N-acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) synthase in this bacterium. The N. winogradskyi genome contains genes encoding a putative acyl-HSL autoinducer synthase (nwi0626, nwiI) and a putative acyl-HSL autoinducer receptor (nwi0627, nwiR) with amino acid sequences 38 to 78% identical to those in Rhodopseudomonas palustris and other Rhizobiales. Expression of nwiI and nwiR correlated with acyl-HSL production during culture. N. winogradskyi produces two distinct acyl-HSLs, N-decanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL) and a monounsaturated acyl-HSL (C10:1-HSL), in a cell-density- and growth phase-dependent manner, during batch and chemostat culture. The acyl-HSLs were detected by bioassay and identified by ultraperformance liquid chromatography with information-dependent acquisition mass spectrometry (UPLC-IDA-MS). The C=C bond in C10:1-HSL was confirmed by conversion into bromohydrin and detection by UPLC-IDA-MS. PMID:26092466

  17. Isolation, identification and characteristics of an endophytic quinclorac degrading bacterium Bacillus megaterium Q3.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Luo, Kun; Wang, Yunsheng; Zeng, Aiping; Zhou, Xiaomao; Luo, Feng; Bai, Lianyang

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we isolated an endophytic quinclorac-degrading bacterium strain Q3 from the root of tobacco grown in quinclorac contaminated soil. Based on morphological characteristics, Biolog identification, and 16S rDNA sequence analysis, we identified strain Q3 as Bacillus megaterium. We investigated the effects of temperature, pH, inoculation size, and initial quinclorac concentration on growth and degrading efficiency of Q3. Under the optimal degrading condition, Q3 could degrade 93% of quinclorac from the initial concentration of 20 mg/L in seven days. We analyzed the degradation products of quinclorac using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The major degradation products by Q3 were different from those of previously identified quinclorac degrading strains, which suggests that Q3 may employ new pathways for quinclorac degradation. Our indoor pot experiments demonstrated that Q3 can effectively alleviate the quinclorac phytotoxicity in tobacco. As the first endophytic microbial that is capable of degrading quinclorac, Q3 can be a good bioremediation bacterium for quinclorac phytotoxicity.

  18. A model of insect—pathogen dynamics in which a pathogenic bacterium can also reproduce saprophytically

    PubMed Central

    Godfray, H. C. J.; Briggs, C. J.; Barlow, N. D.; O'Callaghan, M.; Glare, T. R.; Jackson, T. A.

    1999-01-01

    We developed a model of the population dynamic interaction between an insect and a pathogenic bacterium motivated by study of Serratia entomophila, a commercially exploited pathogen of the New Zealand grass grub (Costelytra zealandica). The bacterium is able to reproduce saprophytically, though it competes for saprophytic substrates with non-pathogenic strains, which appear to be superior competitors, probably because they lack a plasmid that carries genes required for pathogenicity. The effect of saprophytism and competition on the invasion criterion (R0), short-term dynamics and long-term dynamics are described. Saprophytism can reduce (possibly to zero) the host threshold at which the pathogen can invade, though this reduction is less when there is competition with non-pathogenic strains. In a model of short-term population dynamics designed to mimic the application of bacteria to a host epizootic, saprophytism enhances the reduction in host density, though again this is tempered by competition with non-pathogens. In the long term, a pathogen that can develop saprophytically can drive its host to extinction in the absence of competition with non-pathogens. When the latter are present, host extinction is prevented. The addition of saprophytic reproduction can stabilize an otherwise unstable host–pathogen model, but we were unable to find a stable equilibrium given the further addition of a wholly saprophytic bacterial strain. The model suggests that enhancing or selecting for saprophytic ability could be a way of improving biological control.

  19. Engineering of a psychrophilic bacterium for the bioremediation of aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Parrilli, Ermengilda; Papa, Rosanna; Tutino, Maria Luisa; Sannia, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Microbial degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons has been studied with the aim of developing applications for the removal of toxic compounds. Efforts have been directed toward the genetic manipulation of mesophilic bacteria to improve their ability to degrade pollutants, even though many pollution problems occur in sea waters and in effluents of industrial processes which are characterized by low temperatures. From these considerations the idea of engineering a psychrophilic microorganism for the oxidation of aromatic compounds was developed.In a previous paper it was demonstrated that the recombinant Antarctic Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125 (PhTAC/tou) expressing a toluene-o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) is able to convert several aromatic compounds into corresponding catechols. In our work we improved the metabolic capability of PhTAC/tou cells by combining action of recombinant ToMO enzyme with that of the endogenous P. haloplanktis TAC125 laccase-like protein. This strategy allowed conferring new and specific degradative capabilities to a bacterium isolated from an unpolluted environment; indeed engineered PhTAC/tou cells are able to grow on aromatic compounds as sole carbon and energy sources. Our approach demonstrates the possibility to use the engineered psychrophilic bacterium for the bioremediation of chemically contaminated marine environments and/or cold effluents.

  20. Characterization of a Marine Bacterium Associated with Crassostrea virginica (the Eastern Oyster)

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Ronald M.; Segall, Anca M.; Colwell, Rita R.

    1985-01-01

    A gram-negative bacterium found to be closely associated with oysters has been isolated and characterized. The organism, designated LST, has a generation time of 106 min in Marine broth under optimal growth conditions at 25°C. During the decline phase of growth, it exhibits a morphological transition from a motile rod (ca. 1 μm in length) to an elongated, 3- to 40-μm, nonmotile, tightly coiled helix. LST synthesizes and releases a pigment in the stationary and decline phases of growth. Identified as melanin on the basis of chemical properties and UV absorbance maxima, the pigment comprises polymers of heterogeneous molecular weights, ranging from 12,000 to 120,000. The guanosine-plus-cytosine content of the LST DNA is 46%, and results of phenetic analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization indicate that this bacterium represents a new species. LST adheres to a variety of surfaces, including glass, plastics, and oyster shell, and has been shown to promote the settlement of oyster larvae. Images PMID:16346712

  1. Nitrite-Oxidizing Bacterium Nitrobacter winogradskyi Produces N-Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Autoinducers.

    PubMed

    Mellbye, Brett L; Bottomley, Peter J; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A

    2015-09-01

    Nitrobacter winogradskyi is a chemolithotrophic bacterium that plays a role in the nitrogen cycle by oxidizing nitrite to nitrate. Here, we demonstrate a functional N-acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) synthase in this bacterium. The N. winogradskyi genome contains genes encoding a putative acyl-HSL autoinducer synthase (nwi0626, nwiI) and a putative acyl-HSL autoinducer receptor (nwi0627, nwiR) with amino acid sequences 38 to 78% identical to those in Rhodopseudomonas palustris and other Rhizobiales. Expression of nwiI and nwiR correlated with acyl-HSL production during culture. N. winogradskyi produces two distinct acyl-HSLs, N-decanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL) and a monounsaturated acyl-HSL (C10:1-HSL), in a cell-density- and growth phase-dependent manner, during batch and chemostat culture. The acyl-HSLs were detected by bioassay and identified by ultraperformance liquid chromatography with information-dependent acquisition mass spectrometry (UPLC-IDA-MS). The C=C bond in C10:1-HSL was confirmed by conversion into bromohydrin and detection by UPLC-IDA-MS.

  2. Application of DNA adductomics to soil bacterium Sphingobium sp. strain KK22

    PubMed Central

    Kanaly, Robert A; Micheletto, Ruggero; Matsuda, Tomonari; Utsuno, Youko; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Hamamura, Natsuko

    2015-01-01

    Toward the development of ecotoxicology methods to investigate microbial markers of impacts of hydrocarbon processing activities, DNA adductomic analyses were conducted on a sphingomonad soil bacterium. From growing cells that were exposed or unexposed to acrolein, a commonly used biocide in hydraulic fracturing processes, DNA was extracted, digested to 2′-deoxynucleosides and analyzed by liquid chromatography-positive ionization electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry in selected reaction monitoring mode transmitting the [M + H]+ > [M + H − 116]+ transition over 100 transitions. Overall data shown as DNA adductome maps revealed numerous putative DNA adducts under both conditions with some occurring specifically for each condition. Adductomic analyses of triplicate samples indicated that elevated levels of some targeted putative adducts occurred in exposed cells. Two exposure-specific adducts were identified in exposed cells as 3-(2′-deoxyribosyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-6-hydroxy-(and 8-hydroxy-)pyrimido[1,2-a]- purine-(3H)-one (6- and 8-hydroxy-PdG) following synthesis of authentic standards of these compounds and subsequent analyses. A time course experiment showed that 6- and 8-hydroxy-PdG were detected in bacterial DNA within 30 min of acrolein exposure but were not detected in unexposed cells. This work demonstrated the first application of DNA adductomics to examine DNA damage in a bacterium and sets a foundation for future work. PMID:26305056

  3. Cold adaptation in the marine bacterium, Sphingopyxis alaskensis, assessed using quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ting, Lily; Williams, Timothy J; Cowley, Mark J; Lauro, Federico M; Guilhaus, Michael; Raftery, Mark J; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2010-10-01

    The cold marine environment constitutes a large proportion of the Earth's biosphere. Sphingopyxis alaskensis was isolated as a numerically abundant bacterium from several cold marine locations, and has been extensively studied as a model marine bacterium. Recently, a metabolic labelling platform was developed to comprehensively identify and quantify proteins from S. alaskensis. The approach incorporated data normalization and statistical validation for the purpose of generating highly confident quantitative proteomics data. Using this approach, we determined quantitative differences between cells grown at 10°C (low temperature) and 30°C (high temperature). Cold adaptation was linked to specific aspects of gene expression: a dedicated protein-folding system using GroESL, DnaK, DnaJ, GrpE, SecB, ClpB and PPIase; polyhydroxyalkanoate-associated storage materials; a link between enzymes in fatty acid metabolism and energy generation; de novo synthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the membrane and cell wall; inorganic phosphate ion transport by a phosphate import PstB homologue; TonB-dependent receptor and bacterioferritin in iron homeostasis; histidine, tryptophan and proline amino acid metabolism; and a large number of proteins without annotated functions. This study provides a new level of understanding on how important marine bacteria can adapt to compete effectively in cold marine environments. This study is also a benchmark for comparative proteomic analyses with other important marine bacteria and other cold-adapted organisms. PMID:20482592

  4. Isolation, identification and characteristics of an endophytic quinclorac degrading bacterium Bacillus megaterium Q3.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Luo, Kun; Wang, Yunsheng; Zeng, Aiping; Zhou, Xiaomao; Luo, Feng; Bai, Lianyang

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we isolated an endophytic quinclorac-degrading bacterium strain Q3 from the root of tobacco grown in quinclorac contaminated soil. Based on morphological characteristics, Biolog identification, and 16S rDNA sequence analysis, we identified strain Q3 as Bacillus megaterium. We investigated the effects of temperature, pH, inoculation size, and initial quinclorac concentration on growth and degrading efficiency of Q3. Under the optimal degrading condition, Q3 could degrade 93% of quinclorac from the initial concentration of 20 mg/L in seven days. We analyzed the degradation products of quinclorac using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The major degradation products by Q3 were different from those of previously identified quinclorac degrading strains, which suggests that Q3 may employ new pathways for quinclorac degradation. Our indoor pot experiments demonstrated that Q3 can effectively alleviate the quinclorac phytotoxicity in tobacco. As the first endophytic microbial that is capable of degrading quinclorac, Q3 can be a good bioremediation bacterium for quinclorac phytotoxicity. PMID:25244184

  5. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis IL1403

    PubMed Central

    Bolotin, Alexander; Wincker, Patrick; Mauger, Stéphane; Jaillon, Olivier; Malarme, Karine; Weissenbach, Jean; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Sorokin, Alexei

    2001-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a nonpathogenic AT-rich gram-positive bacterium closely related to the genus Streptococcus and is the most commonly used cheese starter. It is also the best-characterized lactic acid bacterium. We sequenced the genome of the laboratory strain IL1403, using a novel two-step strategy that comprises diagnostic sequencing of the entire genome and a shotgun polishing step. The genome contains 2,365,589 base pairs and encodes 2310 proteins, including 293 protein-coding genes belonging to six prophages and 43 insertion sequence (IS) elements. Nonrandom distribution of IS elements indicates that the chromosome of the sequenced strain may be a product of recent recombination between two closely related genomes. A complete set of late competence genes is present, indicating the ability of L. lactis to undergo DNA transformation. Genomic sequence revealed new possibilities for fermentation pathways and for aerobic respiration. It also indicated a horizontal transfer of genetic information from Lactococcus to gram-negative enteric bacteria of Salmonella-Escherichia group. [The sequence data described in this paper has been submitted to the GenBank data library under accession no. AE005176.] PMID:11337471

  6. Removal of arsenic from groundwater by using a native isolated arsenite-oxidizing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Kao, An-Chieh; Chu, Yu-Ju; Hsu, Fu-Lan; Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination of groundwater is a significant public health concern. In this study, the removal of arsenic from groundwater using biological processes was investigated. The efficiency of arsenite (As(III)) bacterial oxidation and subsequent arsenate (As(V)) removal from contaminated groundwater using bacterial biomass was examined. A novel As(III)-oxidizing bacterium (As7325) was isolated from the aquifer in the blackfoot disease (BFD) endemic area in Taiwan. As7325 oxidized 2300μg/l As(III) using in situ As(III)-contaminated groundwater under aerobic conditions within 1d. After the oxidation of As(III) to As(V), As(V) removal was further examined using As7325 cell pellets. The results showed that As(V) could be adsorbed efficiently by lyophilized As7325 cell pellets, the efficiency of which was related to lyophilized cell pellet concentration. Our study conducted the examination of an alternative technology for the removal of As(III) and As(V) from groundwater, indicating that the oxidation of As(III)-contaminated groundwater by native isolated bacterium, followed by As(V) removal using bacterial biomass is a potentially effective technology for the treatment of As(III)-contaminated groundwater.

  7. Isolation, Identification and Characteristics of an Endophytic Quinclorac Degrading Bacterium Bacillus megaterium Q3

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunsheng; Zeng, Aiping; Zhou, Xiaomao; Luo, Feng; Bai, Lianyang

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we isolated an endophytic quinclorac-degrading bacterium strain Q3 from the root of tobacco grown in quinclorac contaminated soil. Based on morphological characteristics, Biolog identification, and 16S rDNA sequence analysis, we identified strain Q3 as Bacillus megaterium. We investigated the effects of temperature, pH, inoculation size, and initial quinclorac concentration on growth and degrading efficiency of Q3. Under the optimal degrading condition, Q3 could degrade 93% of quinclorac from the initial concentration of 20 mg/L in seven days. We analyzed the degradation products of quinclorac using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The major degradation products by Q3 were different from those of previously identified quinclorac degrading strains, which suggests that Q3 may employ new pathways for quinclorac degradation. Our indoor pot experiments demonstrated that Q3 can effectively alleviate the quinclorac phytotoxicity in tobacco. As the first endophytic microbial that is capable of degrading quinclorac, Q3 can be a good bioremediation bacterium for quinclorac phytotoxicity. PMID:25244184

  8. INDISIM-Paracoccus, an individual-based and thermodynamic model for a denitrifying bacterium.

    PubMed

    Araujo Granda, Pablo; Gras, Anna; Ginovart, Marta; Moulton, Vincent

    2016-08-21

    We have developed an individual-based model for denitrifying bacteria. The model, called INDISIM-Paracoccus, embeds a thermodynamic model for bacterial yield prediction inside the individual-based model INDISIM, and is designed to simulate the bacterial cell population behavior and the product dynamics within the culture. The INDISIM-Paracoccus model assumes a culture medium containing succinate as a carbon source, ammonium as a nitrogen source and various electron acceptors such as oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, nitric oxide and nitrous oxide to simulate in continuous or batch culture the different nutrient-dependent cell growth kinetics of the bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans. The individuals in the model represent microbes and the individual-based model INDISIM gives the behavior-rules that they use for their nutrient uptake and reproduction cycle. Three previously described metabolic pathways for P. denitrificans were selected and translated into balanced chemical equations using a thermodynamic model. These stoichiometric reactions are an intracellular model for the individual behavior-rules for metabolic maintenance and biomass synthesis and result in the release of different nitrogen oxides to the medium. The model was implemented using the NetLogo platform and it provides an interactive tool to investigate the different steps of denitrification carried out by a denitrifying bacterium. The simulator can be obtained from the authors on request. PMID:27179457

  9. A highly infective plant-associated bacterium influences reproductive rates in pea aphids.

    PubMed

    Hendry, Tory A; Clark, Kelley J; Baltrus, David A

    2016-02-01

    Pea aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum, have the potential to increase reproduction as a defence against pathogens, though how frequently this occurs or how infection with live pathogens influences this response is not well understood. Here we determine the minimum infective dose of an environmentally common bacterium and possible aphid pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, to determine the likelihood of pathogenic effects to pea aphids. Additionally, we used P. syringae infection to investigate how live pathogens may alter reproductive rates. We found that oral bacterial exposure decreased subsequent survival of aphids in a dose-dependent manner and we estimate that ingestion of less than 10 bacterial cells is sufficient to increase aphid mortality. Pathogen dose was positively related to aphid reproduction. Aphids exposed to low bacterial doses showed decreased, although statistically indistinguishable, fecundity compared to controls. Aphids exposed to high doses reproduced significantly more than low dose treatments and also more, but not significantly so, than controls. These results are consistent with previous studies suggesting that pea aphids may use fecundity compensation as a response to pathogens. Consequently, even low levels of exposure to a common plant-associated bacterium may therefore have significant effects on pea aphid survival and reproduction.

  10. "Candidatus Paraholospora nucleivisitans", an intracellular bacterium in Paramecium sexaurelia shuttles between the cytoplasm and the nucleus of its host.

    PubMed

    Eschbach, Erik; Pfannkuchen, Martin; Schweikert, Michael; Drutschmann, Denja; Brümmer, Franz; Fokin, Sergei; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Görtz, Hans-Dieter

    2009-10-01

    An intracellular bacterium was discovered in two isolates of Paramecium sexaurelia from an aquarium with tropical fish in Münster (Germany) and from a pond in the Wilhelma zoological-botanical garden, Stuttgart (Germany). The bacteria were regularly observed in the cytoplasm of the host, but on some occasions they were found in the macronucleus of the host cell. In these cases, only a few, if any, bacteria were observed remaining in the cytoplasm. The bacterium was not infectious to P. sexaurelia or other species of Paramecium and appeared to be an obligate intracellular bacterium, while bacteria-free host cells were completely viable. The fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and comparative 16SrDNA sequence analyses showed that the bacterium belonged to a new genus, and was most closely, yet quite distantly, related to Holospora obtusa. In spite of this relationship, the new bacteria differed from Holospora by at least two biological features. Whereas all Holospora species reside exclusively in the nuclei of various species of Paramecium and show a life cycle with a morphologically distinct infectious form, for the new bacterium no infectious form and no life cycle have been observed. For the new bacterium, the name Candidatus Paraholospora nucleivisitans is suggested. The host P. sexaurelia is usually known from tropical and subtropical areas and is not a species typically found in Germany and central Europe. Possibly, it had been taken to Germany with fish or plants from tropical or subtropical waters. Candidatus Paraholospora nucleivisitans may therefore be regarded as an intracellular neobacterium for Germany.

  11. Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura: long-term results of bacterium eradication and association with bacterium virulence profiles.

    PubMed

    Emilia, Giovanni; Luppi, Mario; Zucchini, Patrizia; Morselli, Monica; Potenza, Leonardo; Forghieri, Fabio; Volzone, Francesco; Jovic, Gordana; Leonardi, Giovanna; Donelli, Amedea; Torelli, Giuseppe

    2007-12-01

    Eradication of Helicobacter pylori may lead to improvement of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), although its efficacy over time is uncertain. We report the results of H pylori screening and eradication in 75 consecutive adult patients with ITP. We also used molecular methods to investigate lymphocyte clonality and H pylori genotypes in the gastric biopsies from 10 H pylori-positive patients with ITP and 19 H pylori-positive patients without ITP with chronic gastritis. Active H pylori infection was documented in 38 (51%) patients and successfully eradicated in 34 (89%) patients. After a median follow-up of 60 months, a persistent platelet response in 23 (68%) of patients with eradicated infection was observed; 1 relapse occurred. No differences in mucosal B- or T-cell clonalities were observed between patients with ITP and control participants. Of note, the frequency of the H pylori cagA gene (P = .02) and the frequency of concomitant H pylori cagA, vacAs1, and iceA genes (triple-positive strains; P = .015) resulted statistically higher in patients with ITP than in control participants. All asymptomatic H pylori-positive patients with ITP were suffering from chronic gastritis. Our data suggest a sustained platelet recovery in a proportion of patients with ITP by H pylori eradication alone. Overrepresentation of specific H pylori genotypes in ITP suggests a possible role for bacterium-related factors in the disease pathogenesis. PMID:17652264

  12. Genome Assembly of Chryseobacterium polytrichastri ERMR1:04, a Psychrotolerant Bacterium with Cold Active Proteases, Isolated from East Rathong Glacier in India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dharam; Swarnkar, Mohit Kumar; Singh, Anil Kumar; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    We report here the genome assembly of a psychrotolerant bacterium, Chryseobacterium polytrichastri ERMR1:04, which secretes cold-active proteases. The bacterium was isolated from a pristine location, the East Rathong Glacier in the Sikkim Himalaya. The 5.53-Mb genome provides insight into the cold-active industrial enzyme and adaptation in the cold environment. PMID:26543128

  13. Cloacibacillus porcorum sp. nov., a mucin-degrading bacterium from the swine intestinal tract and emended description of the genus Cloacibacillus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel anaerobic, mesophilic, amino-acid-fermenting bacterium, designated strain CL-84T, was isolated from the swine intestinal tract on mucin-based media. The bacterium had curved-rod cells (0.8-1.2 µm x 3.5-5.0 µm), stained Gram negative, and was non-motile with no evidence of spores. CL-84T pro...

  14. Near-complete genome sequence of the cellulolytic Bacterium Bacteroides (Pseudobacteroides) cellulosolvens ATCC 35603

    SciTech Connect

    Dassa, Bareket; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Hurt, Richard A.; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Keller, Martin; Xu, Jian; Reddy, Harish Kumar; Borovok, Ilya; Grinberg, Inna Rozman; Lamed, Raphael; Zhivin, Olga; Bayer, Edward A.; Brown, Steven D.

    2015-09-24

    We report the single-contig genome sequence of the anaerobic, mesophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, Bacteroides cellulosolvens. The bacterium produces a particularly elaborate cellulosome system, whereas the types of cohesin-dockerin interactions are opposite of other known cellulosome systems: cell-surface attachment is thus mediated via type-I interactions whereas enzymes are integrated via type-II interactions.

  15. Whole-Genome Sequence of Filimonas lacunae, a Bacterium of the Family Chitinophagaceae Characterized by Marked Colony Growth under a High-CO2 Atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Shiratori-Takano, Hatsumi; Takano, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    We report here the genome sequence of Filimonas lacunae, a bacterium of the family Chitinophagaceae characterized by high-CO2-dependent growth. The 7.81-Mb circular genome harbors many genes involved in carbohydrate degradation and related genetic regulation, suggesting the role of the bacterium as a carbohydrate degrader in diverse environments. PMID:27417842

  16. A Pathway Closely Related to the d-Tagatose Pathway of Gram-Negative Enterobacteria Identified in the Gram-Positive Bacterium Bacillus licheniformis

    PubMed Central

    Van der Heiden, Edwige; Lebrun, Sarah; Freichels, Régine; Brans, Alain; Vastenavond, Christian M.; Galleni, Moreno; Joris, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    We report the first identification of a gene cluster involved in d-tagatose catabolism in Bacillus licheniformis. The pathway is closely related to the d-tagatose pathway of the Gram-negative bacterium Klebsiella oxytoca, in contrast to the d-tagatose 6-phosphate pathway described in the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:23524682

  17. Localization of propionibacterium acnes in granulomas supports a possible etiologic link between sarcoidosis and the bacterium.

    PubMed

    Negi, Mariko; Takemura, Tamiko; Guzman, Josune; Uchida, Keisuke; Furukawa, Asuka; Suzuki, Yoshimi; Iida, Tadatsune; Ishige, Ikuo; Minami, Junko; Yamada, Tetsuo; Kawachi, Hiroshi; Costabel, Ulrich; Eishi, Yoshinobu

    2012-09-01

    Sarcoidosis likely results from the exposure of a genetically susceptible subject to an environmental agent, possibly an infectious one. Mycobacterial and propionibacterial organisms are the most commonly implicated potential etiologic agents. Propionibacterium acnes is the only microorganism, however, found in sarcoid lesions by bacterial culture. To evaluate the pathogenic role of this indigenous bacterium, we screened for the bacterium in sarcoid and non-sarcoid tissues using immunohistochemical methods with novel P. acnes-specific monoclonal antibodies that react with cell-membrane-bound lipoteichoic acid (PAB antibody) and ribosome-bound trigger-factor protein (TIG antibody). We examined formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples of lungs and lymph nodes from 196 patients with sarcoidosis, and corresponding control samples from 275 patients with non-sarcoidosis diseases. The samples were mostly from Japanese patients, with 64 lymph node samples from German patients. Immunohistochemistry with PAB antibody revealed small round bodies within sarcoid granulomas in 20/27 (74%) video-assisted thoracic surgery lung samples, 24/50 (48%) transbronchial lung biopsy samples, 71/81 (88%) Japanese lymph node samples, and 34/38 (89%) German lymph node samples. PAB antibody did not react with non-sarcoid granulomas in any of the 45 tuberculosis samples or the 34 samples with sarcoid reaction. In nongranulomatous areas, small round bodies detected by PAB antibody were found in alveolar macrophages of lungs and paracortical macrophages of lymph nodes from many sarcoid and some non-sarcoid patients. Large-spheroidal acid-fast bodies, Hamazaki-Wesenberg bodies, which were found in 50% of sarcoid and 15% of non-sarcoid lymph node samples, reacted with both PAB and TIG antibodies. Electron microscopy revealed that these Hamazaki-Wesenberg bodies had a single bacterial structure and lacked a cell wall with occasional protrusions from the body. The high frequency and specificity

  18. Metabolism of 4-chloro-2-nitrophenol in a Gram-positive bacterium, Exiguobacterium sp. PMA

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chloronitrophenols (CNPs) are widely used in the synthesis of dyes, drugs and pesticides, and constitute a major group of environmental pollutants. 4-Chloro-2-nitrophenol (4C2NP) is an isomer of CNPs that has been detected in various industrial effluents. A number of physicochemical methods have been used for treatment of wastewater containing 4C2NP. These methods are not as effective as microbial degradation, however. Results A 4C2NP-degrading bacterium, Exiguobacterium sp. PMA, which uses 4C2NP as the sole carbon and energy source was isolated from a chemically-contaminated site in India. Exiguobacterium sp. PMA degraded 4C2NP with the release of stoichiometeric amounts of chloride and ammonium ions. The effects of different substrate concentrations and various inoculum sizes on degradation of 4C2NP were investigated. Exiguobacterium sp. PMA degraded 4C2NP up to a concentration of 0.6 mM. High performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry identified 4-chloro-2-aminophenol (4C2AP) and 2-aminophenol (2AP) as possible metabolites of the 4C2NP degradation pathway. The crude extract of 4C2NP-induced PMA cells contained enzymatic activity for 4C2NP reductase and 4C2AP dehalogenase, suggesting the involvement of these enzymes in the degradation of 4C2NP. Microcosm studies using sterile and non-sterile soils spiked with 4C2NP were carried out to monitor the bioremediation potential of Exiguobacterium sp. PMA. The bioremediation of 4C2NP by Exiguobacterium sp. PMA was faster in non-sterilized soil than sterilized soil. Conclusions Our studies indicate that Exiguobacterium sp. PMA may be useful for the bioremediation of 4C2NP-contaminated sites. This is the first report of (i) the formation of 2AP in the 4C2NP degradation pathway by any bacterium and (iii) the bioremediation of 4C2NP by any bacterium. PMID:23171039

  19. The impact of a pathogenic bacterium on a social carnivore population.

    PubMed

    Höner, Oliver P; Wachter, Bettina; Goller, Katja V; Hofer, Heribert; Runyoro, Victor; Thierer, Dagmar; Fyumagwa, Robert D; Müller, Thomas; East, Marion L

    2012-01-01

    1. The long-term ecological impact of pathogens on group-living, large mammal populations is largely unknown. We evaluated the impact of a pathogenic bacterium, Streptococcus equi ruminatorum, and other key ecological factors on the dynamics of the spotted hyena Crocuta crocuta population in the Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania. 2. We compared key demographic parameters during two years when external signs of bacterial infection were prevalent ('outbreak') and periods of five years before and after the outbreak when such signs were absent or rare. We also tested for density dependence and calculated the basic reproductive rate R(0) of the bacterium. 3. During the five pre-outbreak years, the mean annual hyena mortality rate was 0.088, and annual population growth was relatively high (13.6%). During the outbreak, mortality increased by 78% to a rate of 0.156, resulting in an annual population decline of 4.3%. After the outbreak, population size increased moderately (5.1%) during the first three post-outbreak years before resuming a growth similar to pre-outbreak levels (13.9%). We found no evidence that these demographic changes were driven by density dependence or other ecological factors. 4. Most hyenas showed signs of infection when prey abundance in their territory was low. During the outbreak, mortality increased among adult males and yearlings, but not among adult females - the socially dominant group members. These results suggest that infection and mortality were modulated by factors linked to low social status and poor nutrition. During the outbreak, we estimated R(0) for the bacterium to be 2.7, indicating relatively fast transmission. 5. Our results suggest that the short-term 'top-down' impact of S. equi ruminatorum during the outbreak was driven by 'bottom-up' effects on nutritionally disadvantaged age-sex classes, whereas the longer-term post-outbreak reduction in population growth was caused by poor survival of juveniles during the outbreak and subsequent

  20. The impact of a pathogenic bacterium on a social carnivore population.

    PubMed

    Höner, Oliver P; Wachter, Bettina; Goller, Katja V; Hofer, Heribert; Runyoro, Victor; Thierer, Dagmar; Fyumagwa, Robert D; Müller, Thomas; East, Marion L

    2012-01-01

    1. The long-term ecological impact of pathogens on group-living, large mammal populations is largely unknown. We evaluated the impact of a pathogenic bacterium, Streptococcus equi ruminatorum, and other key ecological factors on the dynamics of the spotted hyena Crocuta crocuta population in the Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania. 2. We compared key demographic parameters during two years when external signs of bacterial infection were prevalent ('outbreak') and periods of five years before and after the outbreak when such signs were absent or rare. We also tested for density dependence and calculated the basic reproductive rate R(0) of the bacterium. 3. During the five pre-outbreak years, the mean annual hyena mortality rate was 0.088, and annual population growth was relatively high (13.6%). During the outbreak, mortality increased by 78% to a rate of 0.156, resulting in an annual population decline of 4.3%. After the outbreak, population size increased moderately (5.1%) during the first three post-outbreak years before resuming a growth similar to pre-outbreak levels (13.9%). We found no evidence that these demographic changes were driven by density dependence or other ecological factors. 4. Most hyenas showed signs of infection when prey abundance in their territory was low. During the outbreak, mortality increased among adult males and yearlings, but not among adult females - the socially dominant group members. These results suggest that infection and mortality were modulated by factors linked to low social status and poor nutrition. During the outbreak, we estimated R(0) for the bacterium to be 2.7, indicating relatively fast transmission. 5. Our results suggest that the short-term 'top-down' impact of S. equi ruminatorum during the outbreak was driven by 'bottom-up' effects on nutritionally disadvantaged age-sex classes, whereas the longer-term post-outbreak reduction in population growth was caused by poor survival of juveniles during the outbreak and subsequent

  1. High Prevalence of Antibodies against the Bacterium Treponema pallidum in Senegalese Guinea Baboons (Papio papio)

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, Sascha; Barnett, Ulrike; Maciej, Peter; Klapproth, Matthias; Ndao, Ibrahima; Frischmann, Sieghard; Fischer, Julia; Zinner, Dietmar; Liu, Hsi

    2015-01-01

    The bacterium Treponema pallidum is known to cause syphilis (ssp. pallidum), yaws (ssp. pertenue), and endemic syphilis (ssp. endemicum) in humans. Nonhuman primates have also been reported to be infected with the bacterium with equally versatile clinical manifestations, from severe skin ulcerations to asymptomatic. At present all simian strains are closely related to human yaws-causing strains, an important consideration for yaws eradication. We tested clinically healthy Guinea baboons (Papio papio) at Parc National Niokolo Koba in south eastern Senegal for the presence of anti-T. pallidum antibodies. Since T. pallidum infection in this species was identified 50 years ago, and there has been no attempt to treat non-human primates for infection, it was hypothesized that a large number of West African baboons are still infected with simian strains of the yaws-bacterium. All animals were without clinical signs of treponematoses, but 18 of 20 (90%) baboons tested positive for antibodies against T. pallidum based on treponemal tests. Yet, Guinea baboons seem to develop no clinical symptoms, though it must be assumed that infection is chronic or comparable to the latent stage in human yaws infection. The non-active character is supported by the low anti-T. pallidum serum titers in Guinea baboons (median = 1:2,560) versus serum titers that are found in genital-ulcerated olive baboons with active infection in Tanzania (range of medians among the groups of initial, moderate, and severe infected animals = 1:15,360 to 1:2.097e+7). Our findings provide evidence for simian infection with T. pallidum in wild Senegalese baboons. Potentially, Guinea baboons in West Africa serve as a natural reservoir for human infection, as the West African simian strain has been shown to cause sustainable yaws infection when inoculated into humans. The present study pinpoints an area where further research is needed to support the currently on-going second WHO led yaws eradication campaign with

  2. Enhanced bactericidal potency of nanoliposomes by modification of the fusion activity between liposomes and bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yufan; Wang, Zhao; Zhao, Wen; Lu, Tingli; Wang, Rutao; Mei, Qibing; Chen, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a good model of antibiotic resistance. These organisms have an outer membrane with a low level of permeability to drugs that is often combined with multidrug efflux pumps, enzymatic inactivation of the drug, or alteration of its molecular target. The acute and growing problem of antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas to conventional antibiotics made it imperative to develop new liposome formulations to overcome these mechanisms, and investigate the fusion between liposome and bacterium. Methods The rigidity, stability and charge properties of phospholipid vesicles were modified by varying the cholesterol, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), and negatively charged lipids 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol sodium salt (DMPG), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phopho-L-serine sodium salt (DMPS), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate monosodium salt (DMPA), nature phosphatidylserine sodium salt from brain and nature phosphatidylinositol sodium salt from soybean concentrations in liposomes. Liposomal fusion with intact bacteria was monitored using a lipid-mixing assay. Results It was discovered that the fluid liposomes-bacterium fusion is not dependent on liposomal size and lamellarity. A similar degree of fusion was observed for liposomes with a particle size from 100 to 800 nm. The fluidity of liposomes is an essential pre-request for liposomes fusion with bacteria. Fusion was almost completely inhibited by incorporation of cholesterol into fluid liposomes. The increase in the amount of negative charges in fluid liposomes reduces fluid liposomes-bacteria fusion when tested without calcium cations due to electric repulsion, but addition of calcium cations brings the fusion level of fluid liposomes to similar or higher levels. Among the negative phospholipids examined, DMPA gave the highest degree of fusion, DMPS and DMPG had intermediate fusion levels, and PI resulted in the lowest degree of fusion

  3. Genome sequence of the bioplastic-producing "Knallgas" bacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16.

    PubMed

    Pohlmann, Anne; Fricke, Wolfgang Florian; Reinecke, Frank; Kusian, Bernhard; Liesegang, Heiko; Cramm, Rainer; Eitinger, Thomas; Ewering, Christian; Pötter, Markus; Schwartz, Edward; Strittmatter, Axel; Voss, Ingo; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Steinbüchel, Alexander; Friedrich, Bärbel; Bowien, Botho

    2006-10-01

    The H(2)-oxidizing lithoautotrophic bacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16 is a metabolically versatile organism capable of subsisting, in the absence of organic growth substrates, on H(2) and CO(2) as its sole sources of energy and carbon. R. eutropha H16 first attracted biotechnological interest nearly 50 years ago with the realization that the organism's ability to produce and store large amounts of poly[R-(-)-3-hydroxybutyrate] and other polyesters could be harnessed to make biodegradable plastics. Here we report the complete genome sequence of the two chromosomes of R. eutropha H16. Together, chromosome 1 (4,052,032 base pairs (bp)) and chromosome 2 (2,912,490 bp) encode 6,116 putative genes. Analysis of the genome sequence offers the genetic basis for exploiting the biotechnological potential of this organism and provides insights into its remarkable metabolic versatility.

  4. Sulfonamide inhibition studies of the γ-carbonic anhydrase from the Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis.

    PubMed

    Vullo, Daniela; De Luca, Viviana; Del Prete, Sonia; Carginale, Vincenzo; Scozzafava, Andrea; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-09-01

    The Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis encodes for a γ-class carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1), which was cloned, purified and characterized. The enzyme (PhaCAγ) has a good catalytic activity for the physiologic reaction of CO2 hydration to bicarbonate and protons, with a k(cat) of 1.4×10(5) s(-1) and a k(cat)/K(m) of 1.9×10(6) M(-1)×s(-1). A series of sulfonamides and a sulfamate were investigated as inhibitors of the new enzyme. Methazolamide and indisulam showed the best inhibitory properties (K(I)s of 86.7-94.7 nM). This contribution shed new light on γ-CAs inhibition profiles with a relevant class of pharmacologic agents.

  5. Indole-based alkaloids from deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans with antitumor activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Tang, Xixiang; Shao, Zhongzhe; Ren, Jinwei; Liu, Dong; Proksch, Peter; Lin, Wenhan

    2014-05-01

    Chromatographic separation of a crude extract obtained from a fermentation broth of a chemically unknown bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 collected in deep-sea yielded three new indole alkaloids namely shewanellines A (1a), B (1b) and C (2), together with 12 known indole alkaloids. The structures were unambiguously elucidated on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR ((1)H, (13)C, COSY, HMBC, HSQC and NOESY) in association with MS and CD data. Compounds 1-4, 7, 9 and 11-14 were selected for the evaluation of their cytotoxic activities against human tumor cell lines HL-60 and BEL-7402, whereas compounds 2, 4 and 9 exhibited significant inhibition toward HL-60.

  6. New crystal forms of NTPDase1 from the bacterium Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Zebisch, Matthias; Schäfer, Petra; Lauble, Peter; Sträter, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (NTPDases) are a large class of nucleotidases that hydrolyze the (γ/β)- and (β/α)-anhydride bonds of nucleoside triphosphates and diphosphates, respectively. NTPDases are found throughout the eukaryotic domain. In addition, a very small number of members can be found in bacteria, most of which live as parasites of eukaryotic hosts. NTPDases of intracellular and extracellular parasites are emerging as important regulators for the survival of the parasite. To deepen the knowledge of the structure and function of this enzyme class, recombinant production of the NTPDase1 from the bacterium Legionella pneumophila has been established. The protein could be crystallized in six crystal forms, of which one has been described previously. The crystals diffracted to resolutions of between 1.4 and 2.5 Å. Experimental phases determined by a sulfur SAD experiment using an orthorhombic crystal form produced an interpretable electron-density map. PMID:23519799

  7. Anaerobic metabolism of phthalate and other aromatic compounds by a denitrifying bacterium. [Pseudomonas sp

    SciTech Connect

    Nozawa, T.; Maruyama, Y. )

    1988-12-01

    The anaerobic metabolism of phthalate and other aromatic compounds by the denitrifying bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain P136 was studied. Benzoate, cyclohex-1-ene-carboxylate, 2-hydroxycyclohexanecarboxylate, and pimelate were detected as predominant metabolic intermediates during the metabolism of three isomers of phthalate, m-hydroxybenzoate, p-hydroxybenzoate, and cyclohex-3-ene-carboxylate. Inducible acyl-coeznyme A synthetase activities for phthalates, benzoate, cyclohex-1-ene-carboxylate, and cyclohex-3-ene-carboxylate were detected in the cells grown on aromatic compounds. Simultaneous adaptation to these aromatic compounds also occurred. A similar phenomenon was observed in the aerobic metabolism of aromatic compounds by this strain. A new pathway for the anaerobic metabolism of phthalate and a series of other aromatic compounds by this strain was proposed. Some properties of the regulation of this pathway were also discussed.

  8. Nanomechanical properties of the sea-water bacterium Paracoccus seriniphilus--a scanning force microscopy approach.

    PubMed

    Davoudi, Neda; Müller-Renno, Christine; Ziegler, Christiane; Raid, Indek; Seewig, Jörg; Schlegel, Christin; Muffler, Kai; Ulber, Roland

    2015-03-02

    The measurement of force-distance curves on a single bacterium provides a unique opportunity to detect properties such as the turgor pressure under various environmental conditions. Marine bacteria are very interesting candidates for the production of pharmaceuticals, but are only little studied so far. Therefore, the elastic behavior of Paracoccus seriniphilus, an enzyme producing marine organism, is presented in this study. After a careful evaluation of the optimal measurement conditions, the spring constant and the turgor pressure are determined as a function of ionic strength and pH. Whereas the ionic strength changes the turgor pressure passively, the results give a hint that the change to acidic pH increases the turgor pressure by an active mechanism. Furthermore, it could be shown, that P. seriniphilus has adhesive protrusions outside its cell wall.

  9. Cellulomonas xylanilytica sp. nov., a cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacterium isolated from a decayed elm tree.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Raúl; Trujillo, Martha E; Mateos, P F; Martínez-Molina, E; Velázquez, Encarna

    2004-03-01

    A Gram-positive, aerobic, non-motile bacterium was isolated from a decayed elm tree. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequences revealed 99.0 % similarity to Cellulomonas humilata. Chemotaxonomic data that were determined for this isolate included cell-wall composition, fatty acid profiles and polar lipids; the results supported the placement of strain XIL11(T) in the genus Cellulomonas. The DNA G+C content was 73 mol%. The results of DNA-DNA hybridization with C. humilata ATCC 25174(T), in combination with chemotaxonomic and physiological data, demonstrated that isolate XIL11(T) should be classified as a novel Cellulomonas species. The name Cellulomonas xylanilytica sp. nov. is proposed, with strain XIL11(T) (=LMG 21723(T)=CECT 5729(T)) as the type strain.

  10. [Expression of phosphofructokinase gene from Escherichia coli K-12 in obligately autotrophic bacterium Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans].

    PubMed

    Tian, Keli; Lin, Jianqun; Liu, Xiangmei; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Changkai

    2003-10-01

    A plasmid pSDK-1 containing the Escherichia coli phosphofructokinase-1 (EC 2.7.1. 11) gene (pfkA) was constructed and transferred into Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans Tt-Z2 by conjugation. The transfer frequency of plasmid from E. coli to Tt-Z2 was 2.6 x 10(-6). More than 68% of Tt-Z2 cells carried the recombinant plasmids after being cultured for 50 generations without selective pressure, which showed that pSDK-1 was maintained consistently in Tt-Z2. The pfkA gene from E. coli could be expressed in this obligately autotrophic bacterium but the enzyme activity (14 U/g was lower than that in E. coli (K-12: 86 U/g; DF1010 carrying plasmid pSDK-1: 97 U/g). In th presence of glucose, the Tt-Z2 transconjugant consumed glucose leading to a better growth yield.

  11. Bioethanol production from mannitol by a newly isolated bacterium, Enterobacter sp. JMP3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Kim, Young Mi; Rhee, Hong Soon; Lee, Min Woo; Park, Jong Moon

    2013-05-01

    In this study a new bacterium capable of growing on brown seaweed Laminaria japonica, Enterobacter sp. JMP3 was isolated from the gut of turban shell, Batillus cornutus. In anaerobic condition, it produced high yields of ethanol (1.15 mol-EtOH mol-mannitol(-1)) as well as organic acids from mannitol, the major carbohydrate component of L. japonica. Based on carbon distribution and metabolic flux analysis, it was revealed that mannitol was more favorable than glucose for ethanol production due to their different redox states. This indicates that L. japonica is one of the promising feedstock for bioethanol production. Additionally, the mannitol dehydrogenation pathway in Enterobacter sp. JMP3 was examined and verified. Finally, an attempt was made to explore the possibility of controlling ethanol production by altering the redox potential via addition of external NADH in mannitol fermentation. PMID:23186687

  12. Triplet excited state spectra and dynamics of carotenoids from the thermophilic purple photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum

    SciTech Connect

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Blankenship, R. E.

    2011-01-13

    Light-harvesting complex 2 from the anoxygenic phototrophic purple bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum was purified and studied by steady-state absorption, fluorescence and flash photolysis spectroscopy. Steady-state absorption and fluorescence measurements show that carotenoids play a negligible role as supportive energy donors and transfer excitation to bacteriochlorophyll-a with low energy transfer efficiency of ~30%. HPLC analysis determined that the dominant carotenoids in the complex are rhodopin and spirilloxanthin. Carotenoid excited triplet state formation upon direct (carotenoid) or indirect (bacteriochlorophyll-a Q{sub x} band) excitation shows that carotenoid triplets are mostly localized on spirilloxanthin. In addition, no triplet excitation transfer between carotenoids was observed. Such specific carotenoid composition and spectroscopic results strongly suggest that this organism optimized carotenoid composition in the light-harvesting complex 2 in order to maximize photoprotective capabilities of carotenoids but subsequently drastically suppressed their supporting role in light-harvesting process.

  13. Molecular Mechanisms of Adaptation of the Moderately Halophilic Bacterium Halobacillis halophilus to Its Environment

    PubMed Central

    Hänelt, Inga; Müller, Volker

    2013-01-01

    The capability of osmoadaptation is a prerequisite of organisms that live in an environment with changing salinities. Halobacillus halophilus is a moderately halophilic bacterium that grows between 0.4 and 3 M NaCl by accumulating both chloride and compatible solutes as osmolytes. Chloride is absolutely essential for growth and, moreover, was shown to modulate gene expression and activity of enzymes involved in osmoadaptation. The synthesis of different compatible solutes is strictly salinity- and growth phase-dependent. This unique hybrid strategy of H. halophilus will be reviewed here taking into account the recently published genome sequence. Based on identified genes we will speculate about possible scenarios of the synthesis of compatible solutes and the uptake of potassium ion which would complete our knowledge of the fine-tuned osmoregulation and intracellular osmolyte balance in H. halophilus. PMID:25371341

  14. Clostridium amazonense sp. nov. an obliqately anaerobic bacterium isolated from a remote Amazonian community in Peru

    PubMed Central

    O’Neal, Lindsey; Obregón-Tito, Alexandra J.; Tito, Raul Y.; Ozga, Andrew T.; Polo, Susan I.; Lewis, Cecil M.; Lawson, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic Gram-stain positive, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium designated NE08VT, was isolated from a fecal sample of an individual residing in a remote Amazonian community in Peru. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed the organism belonged to the genus Clostridium and is most closely related to Clostridium vulturis (97.4% sequence similarity) and was further characterized using biochemical and chemotaxonomic methods. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso C13:0 and C16:0 with a genomic DNA G + C content of 31.6 mol%. Fermentation products during growth on glucose were acetate and butyrate. Based on phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic information, strain NE08V was identified as representing a novel species of the genus Clostridium, for which the name Clostridium amazonense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NE08VT (DSM 23598T = CCUG 59712T). PMID:26123611

  15. Characterization and a point mutational approach of a psychrophilic lipase from an arctic bacterium, Bacillus pumilus.

    PubMed

    Wi, Ah Ram; Jeon, Sung-Jong; Kim, Sunghui; Park, Ha Ju; Kim, Dockyu; Han, Se Jong; Yim, Joung Han; Kim, Han-Woo

    2014-06-01

    A bacterium with lipolytic activity was isolated from the Chukchi Sea within the Arctic Ocean. The lipase BpL5 from the isolate, Bacillus pumilus ArcL5, belongs to subfamily 4 of lipase family I. The optimum pH and temperature of the recombinant enzyme BpL5, as expressed in Escherichia coli, were 9.0 and 20 °C, respectively. The enzyme retained 85 % of its activity at 5 °C. There was a significant difference between temperatures for maximal activity (20 °C) and for protein denaturation (approx. 45 °C). The enzyme preferred middle-chain (C8) p-nitrophenyl substrates. Two mutants, S139A and S139Y, were rationally designed based on the 3D-structure model, and their activities were compared with that of the wild type. The both mutants showed significantly improved activity against tricaprylin.

  16. A cultured greigite-producing magnetotactic bacterium in a novel group of sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Christopher T; Menguy, Nicolas; Abreu, Fernanda; Lins, Ulysses; Pósfai, Mihály; Prozorov, Tanya; Pignol, David; Frankel, Richard B; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2011-12-23

    Magnetotactic bacteria contain magnetosomes--intracellular, membrane-bounded, magnetic nanocrystals of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) or greigite (Fe(3)S(4))--that cause the bacteria to swim along geomagnetic field lines. We isolated a greigite-producing magnetotactic bacterium from a brackish spring in Death Valley National Park, California, USA, strain BW-1, that is able to biomineralize greigite and magnetite depending on culture conditions. A phylogenetic comparison of BW-1 and similar uncultured greigite- and/or magnetite-producing magnetotactic bacteria from freshwater to hypersaline habitats shows that these organisms represent a previously unknown group of sulfate-reducing bacteria in the Deltaproteobacteria. Genomic analysis of BW-1 reveals the presence of two different magnetosome gene clusters, suggesting that one may be responsible for greigite biomineralization and the other for magnetite.

  17. Bioluminescent reporter bacterium for toxicity monitoring in biological wastewater treatment systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C.J.; Lajoie, C.A.; Layton, A.C.; Sayler, G.S.

    1999-01-01

    Toxic shock due to certain chemical loads in biological wastewater treatment systems can result in death of microorganisms and loss of floc structure. To overcome the limitations of existing approaches to toxicity monitoring, genes encoding enzymes for light production were inserted to a bacterium (Shk 1) isolated from activated sludge. The Shk 1 bioreporter indicated a toxic response to concentrations of cadmium, 2,4-dinitrophenol, and hydroquinone by reductions in initial levels of bioluminescence on exposure to the toxicant. The decrease in bioluminescence was more severe with increasing toxicant concentration. Bioluminescence did not decrease in response to ethanol concentrations up to 1,000 mg/L or to pH conditions between 6.1 and 7.9. A continuous toxicity monitoring system using this bioreporter was developed for influent wastewater and tested with hydroquinone. The reporter exhibited a rapid and proportional decrease in bioluminescence in response to increasing hydroquinone concentrations.

  18. The nucleotide sequence of Beneckea harveyi 5S rRNA. [bioluminescent marine bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luehrsen, K. R.; Fox, G. E.

    1981-01-01

    The primary sequence of the 5S ribosomal RNA isolated from the free-living bioluminescent marine bacterium Beneckea harveyi is reported and discussed in regard to indications of phylogenetic relationships with the bacteria Escherichia coli and Photobacterium phosphoreum. Sequences were determined for oligonucleotide products generated by digestion with ribonuclease T1, pancreatic ribonuclease and ribonuclease T2. The presence of heterogeneity is indicated for two sites. The B. harveyi sequence can be arranged into the same four helix secondary structures as E. coli and other prokaryotic 5S rRNAs. Examination of the 5S-RNS sequences of the three bacteria indicates that B. harveyi and P. phosphoreum are specifically related and share a common ancestor which diverged from an ancestor of E. coli at a somewhat earlier time, consistent with previous studies.

  19. Biotransformation of luteoloside by a newly isolated human intestinal bacterium using UHPLC-Q-TOF/MS.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jin-hua; Wang, Dong-geng; Yang, Chi; Huang, Jin-hua; Qiu, Wen-qian; Zhao, Xi

    2015-06-01

    To explore the metabolic pathways and metabolites of luteoloside yielded by the isolated human intestinal bacteria from healthy human feces and characterize the β-d-glucosidase activity of the specific strain which catalyzed the breakdown of luteoloside, a preculture bacterial GAM broth and luteoloside were mixed incubated together for 48h. UHPLC-Q-TOF/MS was used for analysis of the metabolites of luteoloside in the corresponding supernatant fractions from fermentation. Aliquots of the reactive solutions were collected at different times and were measured with a microplate reader at 405nm to evaluate the enzymatic activity. Three metabolites (acetylated luteoloside, luteolin and deoxygenated luteolin) were detected in the fractions isolated from the bacterial samples. The variation of β-d-glucosidase activity inside the bacterium was in coincidence with the changes in luteolin generation or luteoloside degradation in different time periods.

  20. Cytochrome P450 enzymes from the metabolically diverse bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Stephen G. . E-mail: stephen.bell@chem.ox.ac.uk; Hoskins, Nicola; Xu Feng; Caprotti, Domenico; Rao Zihe; Wong, L.-L. . E-mail: luet.wong@chem.ox.ac.uk

    2006-03-31

    Four (CYP195A2, CYP199A2, CYP203A1, and CYP153A5) of the seven P450 enzymes, and palustrisredoxin A, a ferredoxin associated with CYP199A2, from the metabolically diverse bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris have been expressed and purified. A range of substituted benzenes, phenols, benzaldehydes, and benzoic acids was shown to bind to the four P450 enzymes. Monooxygenase activity of CYP199A2 was reconstituted with palustrisredoxin A and putidaredoxin reductase of the P450cam system from Pseudomonas putida. We found that 4-ethylbenzoate and 4-methoxybenzoate were oxidized to single products, and 4-methoxybenzoate was demethylated to form 4-hydroxybenzoate. Crystals of substrate-free CYP199A2 which diffracted to {approx}2.0 A have been obtained.

  1. Columnaris disease in fish: a review with emphasis on bacterium-host interactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Flavobacterium columnare (F. columnare) is the causative agent of columnaris disease. This bacterium affects both cultured and wild freshwater fish including many susceptible commercially important fish species. F. columnare infections may result in skin lesions, fin erosion and gill necrosis, with a high degree of mortality, leading to severe economic losses. Especially in the last decade, various research groups have performed studies aimed at elucidating the pathogenesis of columnaris disease, leading to significant progress in defining the complex interactions between the organism and its host. Despite these efforts, the pathogenesis of columnaris disease hitherto largely remains unclear, compromising the further development of efficient curative and preventive measures to combat this disease. Besides elaborating on the agent and the disease it causes, this review aims to summarize these pathogenesis data emphasizing the areas meriting further investigation. PMID:23617544

  2. Proteomic Profiling of the Dioxin-Degrading Bacterium Sphingomonas wittichii RW1

    PubMed Central

    Colquhoun, David R.; Hartmann, Erica M.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2012-01-01

    Sphingomonas wittichii RW1 is a bacterium of interest due to its ability to degrade polychlorinated dioxins, which represent priority pollutants in the USA and worldwide. Although its genome has been fully sequenced, many questions exist regarding changes in protein expression of S. wittichii RW1 in response to dioxin metabolism. We used difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) to identify proteomic changes induced by growth on dibenzofuran, a surrogate for dioxin, as compared to acetate. Approximately 10% of the entire putative proteome of RW1 could be observed. Several components of the dioxin and dibenzofuran degradation pathway were shown to be upregulated, thereby highlighting the utility of using proteomic analyses for studying bioremediation agents. This is the first global protein analysis of a microorganism capable of utilizing the carbon backbone of both polychlorinated dioxins and dibenzofurans as the sole source for carbon and energy. PMID:23091346

  3. Plague bacterium as a transformer species in prairie dogs and the grasslands of western North America.

    PubMed

    Eads, David A; Biggins, Dean E

    2015-08-01

    Invasive transformer species change the character, condition, form, or nature of ecosystems and deserve considerable attention from conservation scientists. We applied the transformer species concept to the plague bacterium Yersinia pestis in western North America, where the pathogen was introduced around 1900. Y. pestis transforms grassland ecosystems by severely depleting the abundance of prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) and thereby causing declines in native species abundance and diversity, including threatened and endangered species; altering food web connections; altering the import and export of nutrients; causing a loss of ecosystem resilience to encroaching invasive plants; and modifying prairie dog burrows. Y. pestis poses an important challenge to conservation biologists because it causes trophic-level perturbations that affect the stability of ecosystems. Unfortunately, understanding of the effects of Y. pestis on ecosystems is rudimentary, highlighting an acute need for continued research. PMID:25817984

  4. Draft whole genome sequence of the cyanide-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344.

    PubMed

    Luque-Almagro, Víctor M; Acera, Felipe; Igeño, Ma Isabel; Wibberg, Daniel; Roldán, Ma Dolores; Sáez, Lara P; Hennig, Magdalena; Quesada, Alberto; Huertas, Ma José; Blom, Jochen; Merchán, Faustino; Escribano, Ma Paz; Jaenicke, Sebastian; Estepa, Jessica; Guijo, Ma Isabel; Martínez-Luque, Manuel; Macías, Daniel; Szczepanowski, Rafael; Becerra, Gracia; Ramirez, Silvia; Carmona, Ma Isabel; Gutiérrez, Oscar; Manso, Isabel; Pühler, Alfred; Castillo, Francisco; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado; Schlüter, Andreas; Blasco, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 is a Gram-negative bacterium able to tolerate cyanide and to use it as the sole nitrogen source. We report here the first draft of the whole genome sequence of a P. pseudoalcaligenes strain that assimilates cyanide. Three aspects are specially emphasized in this manuscript. First, some generalities of the genome are shown and discussed in the context of other Pseudomonadaceae genomes, including genome size, G + C content, core genome and singletons among other features. Second, the genome is analysed in the context of cyanide metabolism, describing genes probably involved in cyanide assimilation, like those encoding nitrilases, and genes related to cyanide resistance, like the cio genes encoding the cyanide insensitive oxidases. Finally, the presence of genes probably involved in other processes with a great biotechnological potential like production of bioplastics and biodegradation of pollutants also is discussed. PMID:22998548

  5. Phylogeny of the filamentous bacterium 'Nostocoida limicola' III from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Liu, J R; McKenzie, C A; Seviour, E M; Webb, R I; Blackall, L L; Saint, C P; Seviour, R J

    2001-01-01

    Five strains of the filamentous bacterium 'Nostocoida limicola' III were successfully isolated into pure culture from samples of activated sludge biomass from five plants in Australia. 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses showed that all isolates were members of the Planctomycetales, most closely related to Isosphaera pallida, but they differed phenotypically from this species in that they did not glide and were not thermotolerant. The ultrastructure of these 'N. limicola' III isolates was also consistent with them being Planctomycetales, in that they possessed complex intracellular membrane systems compartmentalizing the cells. However, the arrangements of these intracellular membranes differed between isolates. These data confirm that 'N. limicola' III is phylogenetically unrelated to both 'N. limicola' I and 'N. limicola' II, activated sludge filamentous bacteria which share morphological features in common with 'N. limicola' III and which have been presumed historically to be the same or very similar bacteria. PMID:11211260

  6. [Electrooptical properties of soil nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azospirillum brasilense: effect of copper ions].

    PubMed

    Ignatov, O V; Kamnev, A A; Markina, L N; Antoniuk, L P; Kolina, M; Ignatov, V V

    2001-01-01

    The effects of copper ions on the uptake of some essential metals in the biomass and the electrooptical properties of cell suspensions of the nitrogen-fixing soil bacterium Azospirillum brasilense sp. 245 were studied. Copper cations were shown to be effectively taken up by the cell biomass from the culture medium. The addition of copper ions increased the rate of uptake of some other metals present in the culture medium. This was accompanied by changes in the electrooptical characteristics of cell suspension as measured within the orienting electric field frequency range of 10 to 10,000 kHz. The effects observed during short-term incubation of A. brasilense in the presence of copper cations were less significant than during long-term incubation. These results can be used for rapid screening of microbial cultures for enhanced efficiency of sorption and uptake of metals.

  7. Isolation of pigmentation mutants of the green filamentous photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus.

    PubMed

    Pierson, B K; Keith, L M; Leovy, J G

    1984-07-01

    Mutants deficient in the production of bacteriochlorophyll c (Bchl c) and one mutant lacking colored carotenoids were isolated from the filamentous gliding bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. Mutagenesis was achieved by using UV radiation or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Several clones were isolated that were deficient in Bchl c synthesis. All reverted. One double mutant deficient both in Bchl c synthesis and in the synthesis of colored carotenoids under anaerobic conditions was isolated. Isolation of a revertant in Bchl c synthesis from this double mutant produced a mutant strain of Chloroflexus that grew photosynthetically under anaerobic conditions and lacked colored carotenoids. Analysis of pigment contents and growth rates of the mutants revealed a positive association between growth rate and content of Bchl c under light-limiting conditions.

  8. Identification of bisphosphatidic acid and its plasmalogen analogues in the phospholipids of a marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    McAllister, D J; De Siervo, A J

    1975-07-01

    A relatively nonpolar unidentified phospholipid (phospholipid X) , isolated from the gram-negative marine bacterium MB 45, was characterized both chromatographically and by chemical analysis. Phospholipid X was shown to be an acidic phospholipid without vicinal hydroxyl, free-amino, or amide groups. The presence of O-alkenyl groups was indicated by a positive reaction for plasmalogen. Mild alkaline methanolysis of phospholipid X yielded only glycerophosphoryglycerol as the derivative. Acetolysis produced only diacyl-glycerol monoacetate. Clevage of O-alkenyl chains by methanolic hydrochloride resulted in the formation of three lyso derivatives. It was estimated that 18.2% of phospholipid X was plasmalogen. From these data, together with chromatographic comparisons with standards, infrared spectra, a molecular weight estimation, and the determination of the glycerol-phosphate-acyl ester ratio, it was concluded that phospholipid X was bisphosphatidic acid mixed with its plasmalogen analogues. PMID:1141198

  9. Complete genome of Nitrosospira briensis C-128, an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium from agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Rice, Marlen C; Norton, Jeanette M; Valois, Frederica; Bollmann, Annette; Bottomley, Peter J; Klotz, Martin G; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J; Suwa, Yuichi; Stein, Lisa Y; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis; Woyke, Tanja; Shapiro, Nicole; Goodwin, Lynne A; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Kyrpides, Nikos; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Nitrosospira briensis C-128 is an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium isolated from an acid agricultural soil. N. briensis C-128 was sequenced with PacBio RS technologies at the DOE-Joint Genome Institute through their Community Science Program (2010). The high-quality finished genome contains one chromosome of 3.21 Mb and no plasmids. We identified 3073 gene models, 3018 of which are protein coding. The two-way average nucleotide identity between the chromosomes of Nitrosospira multiformis ATCC 25196 and Nitrosospira briensis C-128 was found to be 77.2 %. Multiple copies of modules encoding chemolithotrophic metabolism were identified in their genomic context. The gene inventory supports chemolithotrophic metabolism with implications for function in soil environments. PMID:27471578

  10. Purification and characterization of the alternative nitrogenase from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, R; Lehman, L; Petrovich, R; Shah, V K; Roberts, G P; Ludden, P W

    1996-01-01

    The alternative nitrogenase from a nifH mutant of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum has been purified and characterized. The dinitrogenase protein (ANF1) contains three subunits in an apparent alpha2beta2gamma2 structure and contains Fe but no Mo or V. A factor capable of activating apo-dinitrogenase (lacking the FeMo cofactor) from Azotobacter vinelandii was extracted from the alternative dinitrogenase protein with N-methylformamide. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal of the dinitrogenase protein is not characteristic of the EPR signals of molybdenum- or vanadium-containing dinitrogenases. The alternative dinitrogenase reductase (ANF2) was purified as an alpha2 dimer containing an Fe4S4 cluster and exhibited an EPR spectrum characteristic of dinitrogenase reductases. The enzyme complex reduces protons to H2 very well but reduces N2 to ammonium poorly. Acetylene is reduced to a mixture of ethylene and ethane. PMID:8631723

  11. Biodegradation of nitrobenzene in a lysogeny broth medium by a novel halophilic bacterium Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian; Deng, Xinping; Wang, Jinjun; Chen, Yucheng; He, Lin; Sun, Yuchuan; Song, Caixia; Zhou, Zhifeng

    2014-12-15

    The Bacillus licheniformis strain YX2, a novel nitrobenzene-degrading halophilic bacterium, was isolated from active sludge obtained from a pesticide factory. Strain YX2 can withstand highly acidic and alkaline conditions and high temperatures. Degradation of nitrobenzene (200mgL(-1)) by YX2 exceeded 70% after 72h in lysogeny broth medium (pH 4-9). Under optimal degradation conditions (33°C, pH 7 in LB medium) YX2 degraded 50, 100, 200, and 600mgL(-1) nitrobenzene within 36, 36, 72, and 156h, respectively. Even in the presence of benzene, phenol or aniline, strain YX2 efficiently degraded nitrobenzene. Furthermore, strain YX2 completely degraded 600mgL(-1) nitrobenzene in 7% NaCl (w/w). Thus, our data show that strain YX2 may have promise for removing nitrobenzene from complex wastewaters with high salinity and variable pH.

  12. Plague bacterium as a transformer species in prairie dogs and the grasslands of western North America.

    PubMed

    Eads, David A; Biggins, Dean E

    2015-08-01

    Invasive transformer species change the character, condition, form, or nature of ecosystems and deserve considerable attention from conservation scientists. We applied the transformer species concept to the plague bacterium Yersinia pestis in western North America, where the pathogen was introduced around 1900. Y. pestis transforms grassland ecosystems by severely depleting the abundance of prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) and thereby causing declines in native species abundance and diversity, including threatened and endangered species; altering food web connections; altering the import and export of nutrients; causing a loss of ecosystem resilience to encroaching invasive plants; and modifying prairie dog burrows. Y. pestis poses an important challenge to conservation biologists because it causes trophic-level perturbations that affect the stability of ecosystems. Unfortunately, understanding of the effects of Y. pestis on ecosystems is rudimentary, highlighting an acute need for continued research.

  13. Microbial metabolism of haloaromatics: isolation and properties of a chlorobenzene-degrading bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Reineke, W.; Knackmuss, H.J.

    1984-02-01

    A chlorobenzene-degrading bacterium was isolated by continuous enrichment from a mixture of soil and sewage samples. This organism, strain WR1306, was grown in a chemostat on a mineral medium with chlorobenzene being supplied through the vapor phase with a critical D/sub c/ value at a dilution rate of 0.55 h/sup -1/. Maximum growth rates in batch culture were accomplished at substrate concentrations of less than or equal to 0.5 mM in the culture medium. During growth on chlorobenzene, stoichiometric amounts of chloride were released. Respiration data and enzyme activities in cell extracts as well as the isolation of 3-chlorocatechol from the culture fluid are consistent with the degradation of chlorobenzene via 3-chloro-cis-1,2-dihydroxycyclohexa-3,5-diene, 3-chlorocatechol, 2-chloro-cis, cis-muconate, trans-4-carboxymethylenebut-2-en-4-olide, maleylacetate, and 3-oxoadipate. 55 references.

  14. Capnocytophaga ochracea-related Bacterium Bacteremia in a Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Patient without Neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shimpei; Hagiya, Hideharu; Kimura, Keigo; Nishi, Isao; Yoshida, Hisao; Kioka, Hidetaka; Ohtani, Tomohito; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Tanabe, Kazuaki; Tomono, Kazunori; Sakata, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Gram-negative fusiform rods were detected in a blood culture obtained from a 63-year-old man who had been hospitalized for a long duration for severe heart failure. Although the organism could not be identified using a conventional method, it was finally identified as a bacterium of the Capnocytophaga ochracea group based on the results of biochemical testing, 16S rRNA sequencing and a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis. Although neutropenic patients with poor oral hygiene are exclusively vulnerable to Capnocytophaga bacteremia, this case was unique because such predisposing conditions were not noted. A multi-centered investigation is warranted for a better understanding of this clinically rare, but potentially pathogenic organism. PMID:27629977

  15. The structure of ferricytochrome c552 from the psychrophilic marine bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H

    PubMed Central

    Harvilla, Paul B.; Wolcott, Holly N.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 40% of all proteins are metalloproteins, and approximately 80% of Earth’s ecosystems are at temperatures ≤ 5 °C, including 90% of the global ocean. Thus, an essential aspect of marine metallobiochemistry is an understanding of the structure, dynamics, and mechanisms of cold adaptation of metalloproteins from marine microorganisms. Here, the molecular structure of the electron-transfer protein cytochrome c552 from the psychrophilic marine bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H has been determined by X-ray crystallography (PDB: 4O1W). The structure is highly superimposable with that of the homologous cytochrome from the mesophile Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus. Based on structural analysis and comparison of psychrophilic, psychrotolerant, and mesophilic sequences, a methionine-based ligand-substitution mechanism for psychrophilic protein stabilization is proposed. PMID:24727932

  16. Decoherence dynamics of coherent electronic excited states in the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xian-Ting; Zhang, Wei-Min; Zhuo, Yi-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a theoretical description to the quantum coherence and decoherence phenomena of energy transfer in photosynthesis observed in a recent experiment [Science 316, 1462 (2007)]. As a successive two-color laser pulses with selected frequencies cast on a sample of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rb. sphaeroides two resonant excitations of electrons in chromophores can be generated. However, this effective two-level subsystem will interact with its protein environment and decoherence is inevitable. We describe this subsystem coupled with its environment as a dynamical spin-boson model. The non-Markovian decoherence dynamics is described using a quasiadiabatic propagator path integral (QUAPI) approach. With the photon-induced effective time-dependent level splitting energy and level flip coupling coefficient between the two excited states and the environment-induced non-Markovian decoherence dynamics, our theoretical result is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  17. Strain IMB-1, a novel bacterium for the removal of methyl bromide in fumigated agricultural soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Connell, Hancock T.L.; Costello, A.M.; Lidstrom, M.E.; Oremland, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    A facultatively methylotrophic bacterium, strain IMB-1, that has been isolated from agricultural soil grows on methyl bromide (MeBr), methyl iodide, methyl chloride, and methylated amines, as well as on glucose, pyruvate, or acetate. Phylogenetic analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence indicates that strain IMB-1 classes in the alpha subgroup of the class Proteobacteria and is closely related to members of the genus Rhizobium. The ability of strain IMB-1 to oxidize MeBr to CO2 is constitutive in cells regardless of the growth substrate. Addition of cell suspensions of strain IMB-1 to soils greatly accelerates the oxidation of MeBr, as does pretreatment of soils with low concentrations of methyl iodide. These results suggest that soil treatment strategies can be devised whereby bacteria can effectively consume MeBr during field fumigations, which would diminish or eliminate the outward flux of MeBr to the atmosphere.

  18. Identification of an anaerobic bacterium which reduces perchlorate and chlorate as Wolinella succinogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W.; Attaway, H. |

    1995-12-31

    Perchlorate and chlorate salts are widely used by the chemical, aerospace and defense industries as oxidizers in propellant, explosives and pyrotechnics. The authors have isolated a anaerobic bacterium which is capable of the dissimilatory reduction of both perchlorate and chlorate for energy and growth. Strain HAP-1 is a gram negative, thin rod, non-sporeforming, highly motile strict anaerobe. Antibiotic resistance profiles, utilization of carbon substrates and electron acceptors demonstrated similar physiological characteristics to Wolinella succinogenes. Pairwise comparisons of 16S RNA sequences showed only a 0.75% divergence between strain HAP-1 and W. succinogenes. Physiological, morphological and 16S RRNA sequence data indicate strain HAP-1 is a subspecies of W. succinogenes that can utilize perchlorate and chlorate as terminal electron acceptors.

  19. Bioethanol production from mannitol by a newly isolated bacterium, Enterobacter sp. JMP3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Kim, Young Mi; Rhee, Hong Soon; Lee, Min Woo; Park, Jong Moon

    2013-05-01

    In this study a new bacterium capable of growing on brown seaweed Laminaria japonica, Enterobacter sp. JMP3 was isolated from the gut of turban shell, Batillus cornutus. In anaerobic condition, it produced high yields of ethanol (1.15 mol-EtOH mol-mannitol(-1)) as well as organic acids from mannitol, the major carbohydrate component of L. japonica. Based on carbon distribution and metabolic flux analysis, it was revealed that mannitol was more favorable than glucose for ethanol production due to their different redox states. This indicates that L. japonica is one of the promising feedstock for bioethanol production. Additionally, the mannitol dehydrogenation pathway in Enterobacter sp. JMP3 was examined and verified. Finally, an attempt was made to explore the possibility of controlling ethanol production by altering the redox potential via addition of external NADH in mannitol fermentation.

  20. Complete genome sequencing and analysis of Saprospira grandis str. Lewin, a predatory marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    Saw, Jimmy H W; Yuryev, Anton; Kanbe, Masaomi; Hou, Shaobin; Young, Aaron G; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi; Alam, Maqsudul

    2012-03-19

    Saprospira grandis is a coastal marine bacterium that can capture and prey upon other marine bacteria using a mechanism known as 'ixotrophy'. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of Saprospira grandis str. Lewin isolated from La Jolla beach in San Diego, California. The complete genome sequence comprises a chromosome of 4.35 Mbp and a plasmid of 54.9 Kbp. Genome analysis revealed incomplete pathways for the biosynthesis of nine essential amino acids but presence of a large number of peptidases. The genome encodes multiple copies of sensor globin-coupled rsbR genes thought to be essential for stress response and the presence of such sensor globins in Bacteroidetes is unprecedented. A total of 429 spacer sequences within the three CRISPR repeat regions were identified in the genome and this number is the largest among all the Bacteroidetes sequenced to date.

  1. [Isolation and characteristic of a moderately halophilic bacterium accumulated ectoine as main compatible solute].

    PubMed

    He, Jian; Wang, Ting; Sun, Ji-Quan; Gu, Li-Feng; Li, Shun-Peng

    2005-12-01

    A moderately halophilic bacterium(designated strain I15) was isolated from lawn soil. Based on the analysis of 16S rDNA (GenBank accession number DQ010162), morphology, physiological and biochemical characteristics, strain I15 was identified as Virgibacillus marismortuii. This strain was capable of growing under 0% approximately 25% NaCl, and exhibited an optimum NaCl concentration of 10% and an optimum temperature of 30 degrees C and an optimum pH of 7.5 - 8.0 for its growth, respectively. Under hyperosmotic stress, strain 115 accumulated ectoine as the main compatible solute. Under 15% NaCl conditions the intracellar ectoine can reach to 1.608 mmol/(g x cdw), accounted for 89.6% of the total compatible solutes. The biosynthesis of ectoine was under the control of osmotic, and the accumulated ectoine synthesized intraceilularly can released under hypoosmotic shocks and resynthesis under hyperosmotic shock rapidly. PMID:16496700

  2. New evidence for 250 Ma age of halotolerant bacterium from a Permian salt crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satterfield, Cindy L.; Lowenstein, Tim K.; Vreeland, Russell H.; Rosenzweig, William D.; Powers, Dennis W.

    2005-04-01

    The purported oldest living organism, the spore-forming bacterium Virgibacillus sp. Permian strain 2 9-3, was recently cultured from a brine inclusion in halite of the 250 Ma Permian Salado Formation. However, the antiquity of Virgibacillus sp. 2 9-3 has been challenged; it has been argued that the halite crystal and the fluid inclusion from which the bacterial spores were extracted may be younger than the Permian Salado salts. Here we report that brine inclusions from the same layer of salt that housed Virgibacillus sp. 2 9-3 are composed of evaporated Late Permian seawater that was trapped in halite cement crystals precipitated syndepositionally from shallow groundwater brines at temperatures of 17 37 °C. These results support the 250 Ma age of the fluid inclusions, and by inference, the long-term survivability of microorganisms such as Virgibacillus sp. 2 9-3.

  3. Sulfonamide inhibition studies of the γ-carbonic anhydrase from the Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis.

    PubMed

    Vullo, Daniela; De Luca, Viviana; Del Prete, Sonia; Carginale, Vincenzo; Scozzafava, Andrea; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-09-01

    The Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis encodes for a γ-class carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1), which was cloned, purified and characterized. The enzyme (PhaCAγ) has a good catalytic activity for the physiologic reaction of CO2 hydration to bicarbonate and protons, with a k(cat) of 1.4×10(5) s(-1) and a k(cat)/K(m) of 1.9×10(6) M(-1)×s(-1). A series of sulfonamides and a sulfamate were investigated as inhibitors of the new enzyme. Methazolamide and indisulam showed the best inhibitory properties (K(I)s of 86.7-94.7 nM). This contribution shed new light on γ-CAs inhibition profiles with a relevant class of pharmacologic agents. PMID:26174556

  4. The glucose transport system of the hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana

    SciTech Connect

    Galperin, M.Y.; Noll, K.M.; Romano, A.H.

    1996-08-01

    The glucose transport system of the extremely thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana was studied with the nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DOG). T. neapolitana accumulated 2-DOG against a concentration gradient in an intracellular free sugar pool that was exchangeable with external D-glucose. This active transport of 2-DOG was dependent upon the presence of sodium ion and an external source of energy, such as pyruvate, and was inhibited by arsenate and gramicidin D. There was no phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphorylation of glucose, 2-DOG, or fructose by cell extracts or toluene-treated cells, indicating the absence of a phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system. These data indicate that D-glucose is taken up by T.neapolitana via an active transport system that is energized by an ion gradient generated by ATP, derived from substrate-level phosphorylation. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Proteolysin, a Novel Highly Thermostable and Cosolvent-Compatible Protease from the Thermophilic Bacterium Coprothermobacter proteolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Toplak, Ana; Wu, Bian; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Quaedflieg, Peter J. L. M.

    2013-01-01

    Through genome mining, we identified a gene encoding a putative serine protease of the thermitase subgroup of subtilases (EC 3.4.21.66) in the thermophilic bacterium Coprothermobacter proteolyticus. The gene was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli, and the enzyme, which we called proteolysin, was purified to near homogeneity from crude cell lysate by a single heat treatment step. Proteolysin has a broad pH tolerance and is active at temperatures of up to 80°C. In addition, the enzyme shows good activity and stability in the presence of organic solvents, detergents, and dithiothreitol, and it remains active in 6 M guanidinium hydrochloride. Based on its stability and activity profile, proteolysin can be an excellent candidate for applications where resistance to harsh process conditions is required. PMID:23851086

  6. New features of the cell wall of the radio-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Farci, Domenica; Bowler, Matthew W; Kirkpatrick, Joanna; McSweeney, Sean; Tramontano, Enzo; Piano, Dario

    2014-07-01

    We have analyzed the cell wall of the radio-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. Unexpectedly, the bacterial envelope appears to be organized in different complexes of high molecular weight. Each complex is composed of several proteins, most of which are coded by genes of unknown function and the majority are constituents of the inner/outer membrane system. One of the most abundant complexes is constituted by the gene DR_0774. This protein is a type of secretin which is a known subunit of the homo-oligomeric channel that represents the main bulk of the type IV piliation family. Finally, a minor component of the pink envelope consists of several inner-membrane proteins. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  7. Complete genome of Pandoraea pnomenusa RB-38, an oxalotrophic bacterium isolated from municipal solid waste landfill site.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yan-Lue; Ee, Robson; Yong, Delicia; Tee, Kok-Keng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2015-11-20

    Pandoraea pnomenusa RB-38 is a bacterium isolated from a former sanitary landfill site. Here, we present the complete genome of P. pnomenusa RB38 in which an oxalate utilization pathway was identified. The genome analysis suggested the potential of this strain as an effective biocontrol agent against oxalate-producing phytopathogens.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus pseudalcaliphilus PN-137T (DSM 8725), an Alkaliphilic Halotolerant Bacterium Isolated from Garden Soils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie-Ping; Liu, Bo; Liu, Guo-Hong; Xiao, Rong-Feng; Zheng, Xue-Fang; Shi, Huai; Ge, Ci-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus pseudalcaliphilus PN-137(T) (DSM 8725) is a Gram-positive, spore-forming, alkaliphilic, and halotolerant bacterium. Here, we report the 4.49-Mb genome sequence of B. pseudalcaliphilus PN-137(T), which will accelerate the application of this alkaliphile and provide useful information for genomic taxonomy and phylogenomics of Bacillus-like bacteria.

  9. Multiple, stochastic factors can determine acquisition success of the foregut-borne bacterium, Xylella fastidiosa, by a sharpshooter vector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xylella fastidiosa is a phytopathogenic foregut-borne bacterium whose vectors are sharpshooter leafhoppers. Despite several decades of study, the mechanisms of transmission (acquisition and inoculation) of X. fastidiosa still are not fully understood. Studies of the inoculation mechanism depend upon...

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CFL1, a Lactic Acid Bacterium Isolated from French Handcrafted Fermented Milk

    PubMed Central

    Meneghel, Julie; Irlinger, Françoise; Loux, Valentin; Vidal, Marie; Passot, Stéphanie; Béal, Catherine; Layec, Séverine

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus) is a lactic acid bacterium widely used for the production of yogurt and cheeses. Here, we report the genome sequence of L. bulgaricus CFL1 to improve our knowledge on its stress-induced damages following production and end-use processes. PMID:26941141

  11. Whole-Genome Sequence of Marine Bacterium Phaeodactylibacter xiamenensis Strain KD52, Isolated from the Phycosphere of Microalga Phacodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhangran; Lei, Xueqian; Li, Yi; Zhang, Jingyan; Zhang, Huajun; Yang, Luxi; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Phaeodactylibacter xiamenensis KD52 is a novel bacterium isolated from a culture of the alga Phaeodactylum tricornutum in Xiamen, Fujian Province, China. Here, we present the first draft genome sequence of this strain, which will provide an opportunity to further understand the functional genes related to signing for nutrition from the host algae and the molecular mechanisms underlying its beneficial properties. PMID:25502677

  12. Complete genome of Pandoraea pnomenusa RB-38, an oxalotrophic bacterium isolated from municipal solid waste landfill site.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yan-Lue; Ee, Robson; Yong, Delicia; Tee, Kok-Keng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2015-11-20

    Pandoraea pnomenusa RB-38 is a bacterium isolated from a former sanitary landfill site. Here, we present the complete genome of P. pnomenusa RB38 in which an oxalate utilization pathway was identified. The genome analysis suggested the potential of this strain as an effective biocontrol agent against oxalate-producing phytopathogens. PMID:26393955

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CFL1, a Lactic Acid Bacterium Isolated from French Handcrafted Fermented Milk.

    PubMed

    Meneghel, Julie; Dugat-Bony, Eric; Irlinger, Françoise; Loux, Valentin; Vidal, Marie; Passot, Stéphanie; Béal, Catherine; Layec, Séverine; Fonseca, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus) is a lactic acid bacterium widely used for the production of yogurt and cheeses. Here, we report the genome sequence of L. bulgaricus CFL1 to improve our knowledge on its stress-induced damages following production and end-use processes. PMID:26941141

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Raoultella ornithinolytica Strain S12, a Lignin-Degrading Bacterium Isolated from Forest Soil.

    PubMed

    Bao, Wenying; Zhou, Yun; Jiang, Jingwei; Xu, Zhihui; Hou, Liyuan; Leung, Frederick Chi-Ching

    2015-03-19

    We report the complete genome sequence of Raoultella ornithinolytica strain S12, isolated from a soil sample collected from areas bordering rotten wood and wet soil on Mt. Zijin, Nanjing. The complete genome of this bacterium may contribute toward the discovery of efficient lignin-degrading pathways.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Spiroplasma turonicum Tab4cT, a Bacterium Isolated from Horse Flies (Haematopota sp.).

    PubMed

    Lo, Wen-Sui; Gasparich, Gail E; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2016-09-22

    Spiroplasma turonicum Tab4c(T) was isolated from a horse fly (Haematopota sp.; probably Haematopota pluvialis) collected at Champchevrier, Indre-et-Loire, Touraine, France, in 1991. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of this bacterium to facilitate the investigation of its biology and the comparative genomics among Spiroplasma spp.

  16. Whole-Genome Shotgun Sequence of the Keratinolytic Bacterium Lysobacter sp. A03, Isolated from the Antarctic Environment

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jamile Queiroz; Ambrosini, Adriana; Sant’Anna, Fernando Hayashi; Tadra-Sfeir, Michele; Faoro, Helisson; Pedrosa, Fábio Oliveira; Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Brandelli, Adriano

    2015-01-01

    Lysobacter sp. strain A03 is a protease-producing bacterium isolated from decomposing-penguin feathers collected in the Antarctic environment. This strain has the ability to degrade keratin at low temperatures. The A03 genome sequence provides the possibility of finding new genes with biotechnological potential to better understand its cold-adaptation mechanism and survival in cold environments. PMID:25838495

  17. Draft Genome of Shewanella frigidimarina Ag06-30, a Marine Bacterium Isolated from Potter Peninsula, King George Island, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Parmeciano Di Noto, Gisela; Vázquez, Susana C.; MacCormack, Walter P.; Iriarte, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We present the draft genome of Shewanella frigidimarina Ag06-30, a marine bacterium from King George Island, Antarctica, which encodes the carbapenemase SFP-1. The assembly contains 4,799,218 bp (G+C content 41.24%). This strain harbors several mobile genetic elements that provide insight into lateral gene transfer and bacterial plasticity and evolution. PMID:27151790

  18. Draft Genome of Shewanella frigidimarina Ag06-30, a Marine Bacterium Isolated from Potter Peninsula, King George Island, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Parmeciano Di Noto, Gisela; Vázquez, Susana C; MacCormack, Walter P; Iriarte, Andrés; Quiroga, Cecilia

    2016-05-05

    We present the draft genome of Shewanella frigidimarina Ag06-30, a marine bacterium from King George Island, Antarctica, which encodes the carbapenemase SFP-1. The assembly contains 4,799,218 bp (G+C content 41.24%). This strain harbors several mobile genetic elements that provide insight into lateral gene transfer and bacterial plasticity and evolution.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of the Boron-Tolerant and Moderately Halotolerant Bacterium Gracilibacillus boraciitolerans JCM 21714T

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Kenshiro; Suda, Wataru; Kitamura, Keiko; Iida, Toshiya; Ohmori, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Toru; Hattori, Masahira

    2014-01-01

    Gracilibacillus boraciitolerans JCM 21714T has been characterized as a highly boron-tolerant and moderately halotolerant bacterium. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this strain. The genome sequence facilitates an understanding of the biochemical functions of boron and provides a base to identify the gene(s) involved in the boron tolerance mechanism of the strain. PMID:24558242

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of the Bacterium Aalborg_AAW-1, Representing a Novel Family within the Candidate Phylum SR1.

    PubMed

    Dueholm, Morten Simonsen; Albertsen, Mads; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; McIlroy, Simon J; Karst, Søren M; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the complete genome sequence of the candidate phylum SR1 bacterium Aalborg_AAW-1. Its 16S rRNA gene is only 85.5% similar to that of the closest relative, RAAC1_SR1, and the genome of Aalborg_AAW-1 consequently represents the first of a novel family within the candidate phylum SR1.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Strain PSR-1, an Arsenate-Respiring Bacterium Isolated from Arsenic-Contaminated Soil.

    PubMed

    Tonomura, Mimori; Ehara, Ayaka; Suzuki, Haruo; Amachi, Seigo

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a draft genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. strain PSR-1, an arsenate-respiring bacterium isolated from arsenic-contaminated soil. It contained three distinct arsenic resistance gene clusters (ars operons), while no respiratory arsenate reductase gene (arr) was identified. PMID:25977440

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Strain PSR-1, an Arsenate-Respiring Bacterium Isolated from Arsenic-Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Tonomura, Mimori; Ehara, Ayaka; Suzuki, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a draft genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. strain PSR-1, an arsenate-respiring bacterium isolated from arsenic-contaminated soil. It contained three distinct arsenic resistance gene clusters (ars operons), while no respiratory arsenate reductase gene (arr) was identified. PMID:25977440

  3. Draft Genome Sequence and Description of Janthinobacterium sp. Strain CG3, a Psychrotolerant Antarctic Supraglacial Stream Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heidi; Akiyama, Tatsuya; Franklin, Michael; Woyke, Tanja; Teshima, Hazuki; Davenport, Karen; Daligault, Hajnalka; Erkkila, Tracy; Goodwin, Lynne; Gu, Wei; Xu, Yan; Chain, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Here we present the draft genome sequence of Janthinobacterium sp. strain CG3, a psychrotolerant non-violacein-producing bacterium that was isolated from the Cotton Glacier supraglacial stream. The genome sequence of this organism will provide insight as to the mechanisms necessary for bacteria to survive in UV-stressed icy environments. PMID:24265494

  4. Growth and survival of the fish pathogenic bacterium, Flavobacterium columnare, in tilapia mucus and porcine gastric mucin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavobacterium columnare is an economically important gram negative bacterium that infects most freshwater farmed fish worldwide. Flavobacterium columnare colonizes the skin and gills of fish in the initial steps of pathogenesis. The fish’s surface is coated with mucus made up of high molecular we...

  5. Draft Genome Sequence for Microbacterium laevaniformans Strain OR221, a Bacterium Tolerant to Metals, Nitrate, and Low pH

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Panikov, Nikolai; Ariyawansa, Thilini; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Johnson, Courtney M; Land, Miriam L; Utturkar, Sagar M; Epstein, Slava

    2012-01-01

    Microbacterium laevaniformans strain OR221 was isolated from subsurface sediments obtained from the Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. It was characterized as a bacterium tolerant to heavy metals such as uranium, nickel, cobalt, cadmium, as well as nitrate and low pH. We present its draft genome sequence.

  6. Boron nitride nanotube-based biosensing of various bacterium/viruses: continuum modelling-based simulation approach.

    PubMed

    Panchal, Mitesh B; Upadhyay, Sanjay H

    2014-09-01

    In this study, the feasibility of single walled boron nitride nanotube (SWBNNT)-based biosensors has been ensured considering the continuum modelling-based simulation approach, for mass-based detection of various bacterium/viruses. Various types of bacterium or viruses have been taken into consideration at the free-end of the cantilevered configuration of the SWBNNT, as a biosensor. Resonant frequency shift-based analysis has been performed with the adsorption of various bacterium/viruses considered as additional mass to the SWBNNT-based sensor system. The continuum mechanics-based analytical approach, considering effective wall thickness has been considered to validate the finite element method (FEM)-based simulation results, based on continuum volume-based modelling of the SWBNNT. As a systematic analysis approach, the FEM-based simulation results are found in excellent agreement with the analytical results, to analyse the SWBNNTs for their wide range of applications such as nanoresonators, biosensors, gas-sensors, transducers and so on. The obtained results suggest that by using the SWBNNT of smaller size the sensitivity of the sensor system can be enhanced and detection of the bacterium/virus having mass of 4.28 × 10⁻²⁴ kg can be effectively performed. PMID:25082222

  7. Role of RpoS in stress tolerance and environmental fitness of the phyllosphere bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain 122.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Virginia O; Hockett, Kevin; Loper, Joyce E

    2009-06-01

    Bacteria living epiphytically on aerial plant surfaces encounter severe and rapidly fluctuating environmental conditions, and their capacity to withstand environmental stress contributes to epiphytic fitness. The stationary phase sigma factor RpoS is a key determinant in stress response of gram-negative bacteria, including Pseudomonas spp. This study focused on the role of RpoS in stress response and epiphytic fitness of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain 122 on aerial plant surfaces. RpoS had a significant role in the response of the phyllosphere bacterium P. fluorescens 122 to stresses imposed by desiccation, UV irradiation, starvation, and an oxidative environment. While significant, the difference in stress response between an rpoS mutant and the parental strain was less for strain 122 than for the rhizosphere bacterium P. fluorescens Pf-5. No consistent influence of RpoS on epiphytic population size of strain 122 on pear or apple flowers or leaves was observed in field trials. These data may indicate that P. fluorescens occupies protected microsites on aerial plant surfaces where the bacteria escape exposure to environmental stress, or that redundant stress-response mechanisms are operating in this bacterium, thereby obscuring the role of RpoS in epiphytic fitness of the bacterium.

  8. Draft genome sequence of Enterobacter cloacae subsp. cloacae strain 08XA1, a fecal bacterium of giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yue; Zhao, Chuan-Wu; Zhang, Yi-Zheng; Zhang, Zhi-He; Pan, Guang-Lin; Liu, Wen-Wang; Ma, Qing-Yi; Hou, Rong; Tan, Xue-Mei

    2012-12-01

    Enterobacter cloacae, a common pathogenic bacterium, is a Gram-negative bacillus. We analyzed the draft genome of Enterobacter cloacae subsp. cloacae strain 08XA1 from the feces of a giant panda in China. Genes encoding a β-lactamase and efflux pumps, as well as other factors, have been found in the genome. PMID:23209197

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Klebsiella variicola Strain HKUOPLA, a Cellulose-Degrading Bacterium Isolated from Giant Panda Feces.

    PubMed

    Lu, Matthew Guan-Xi; Jiang, Jingwei; Liu, Lirui; Ma, Angel Po-Yee; Leung, Frederick Chi-Ching

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Klebsiella variicola strain HKUOPLA, isolated from a giant panda feces sample collected from Ocean Park, Hong Kong. The complete genome of this bacterium may contribute toward the discovery of efficient cellulose-degrading pathways.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae Strain HKUOPLC, a Cellulose-Degrading Bacterium Isolated from Giant Panda Feces.

    PubMed

    Lu, Matthew Guan-Xi; Jiang, Jingwei; Liu, Lirui; Ma, Angel Po-Yee; Leung, Frederick Chi-Ching

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae strain HKUOPLC, isolated from a giant panda fecal sample collected from Ocean Park, Hong Kong. The complete genome of this bacterium may contribute to the discovery of efficient cellulose-degrading pathways.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of the Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Sphingobium sp. Strain Ant17, Isolated from Antarctic Soil

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Leandro D.; Makhalanyane, Thulani P.; Aislabie, Jackie M.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Sphingobium sp. strain Ant17, an aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium that was isolated from Antarctic oil-contaminated soil. An analysis of this genome can lead to insights into the mechanisms of xenobiotic degradation processes at low temperatures and potentially aid in bioremediation applications. PMID:24723703

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Pannonibacter phragmitetus Strain CGMCC9175, a Halotolerant Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Decai; Zhou, Lisha; Zhang, Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    Pannonibacter phragmitetus CGMCC9175 is a halotolerant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacterium isolated from PAH-contaminated intertidal zone sediment. Here, we report the 5.7-Mb draft genome sequence of this strain, which will provide insights into the diversity of Pannonibacter and the mechanism of PAH degradation in sediments. PMID:26823598

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Chryseobacterium sp. Strain GSE06, a Biocontrol Endophytic Bacterium Isolated from Cucumber (Cucumis sativus).

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin-Ju; Park, Byeong Hyeok; Park, Hongjae; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Ki Deok

    2016-06-16

    Chryseobacterium sp. strain GSE06 is a biocontrol endophytic bacterium against the destructive soilborne oomycete Phytophthora capsici, which causes Phytophthora blight of pepper. Here, we present its draft genome sequence, which contains genes related to biocontrol traits, such as colonization, antimicrobial activity, plant growth promotion, and abiotic or biotic stress adaptation.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae Strain HKUOPLC, a Cellulose-Degrading Bacterium Isolated from Giant Panda Feces.

    PubMed

    Lu, Matthew Guan-Xi; Jiang, Jingwei; Liu, Lirui; Ma, Angel Po-Yee; Leung, Frederick Chi-Ching

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae strain HKUOPLC, isolated from a giant panda fecal sample collected from Ocean Park, Hong Kong. The complete genome of this bacterium may contribute to the discovery of efficient cellulose-degrading pathways. PMID:26564041

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Klebsiella variicola Strain HKUOPLA, a Cellulose-Degrading Bacterium Isolated from Giant Panda Feces.

    PubMed

    Lu, Matthew Guan-Xi; Jiang, Jingwei; Liu, Lirui; Ma, Angel Po-Yee; Leung, Frederick Chi-Ching

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Klebsiella variicola strain HKUOPLA, isolated from a giant panda feces sample collected from Ocean Park, Hong Kong. The complete genome of this bacterium may contribute toward the discovery of efficient cellulose-degrading pathways. PMID:26472841

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Photorhabdus luminescens Strain BA1, an Entomopathogenic Bacterium Isolated from Nematodes Found in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Ghazal, Shimaa; Hurst, Sheldon G; Morris, Krystalynne; Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Thomas, W Kelley; Badr, Usama M; Hussein, Mona A; Abouzaied, Mohamed A; Khalil, Kamal M; Tisa, Louis S

    2014-01-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens strain BA1 is an entomopathogenic bacterium that forms a symbiotic association with Heterorhabditis nematodes. We report here a 5.0-Mbp draft genome sequence for P. luminscens strain BA1, with a G+C content of 42.46% and 4,250 candidate protein-coding genes. PMID:24786955

  17. Friend and foe: factors influencing the movement of the bacterium Helicobacter pylori along the parasitism–mutualism continuum

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Derek; Koskella, Britt

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the transition of bacterial species from commensal to pathogen, or vice versa, is a key application of evolutionary theory to preventative medicine. This requires working knowledge of the molecular interaction between hosts and bacteria, ecological interactions among microbes, spatial variation in bacterial prevalence or host life history, and evolution in response to these factors. However, there are very few systems for which such broad datasets are available. One exception is the gram-negative bacterium, Helicobacter pylori, which infects upwards of 50% of the global human population. This bacterium is associated with a wide breadth of human gastrointestinal disease, including numerous cancers, inflammatory disorders, and pathogenic infections, but is also known to confer fitness benefits to its host both indirectly, through interactions with other pathogens, and directly. Outstanding questions are therefore why, when, and how this bacterium transitions along the parasitism–mutualism continuum. We examine known virulence factors, genetic predispositions of the host, and environmental contributors that impact progression of clinical disease and help define geographical trends in disease incidence. We also highlight the complexity of the interaction and discuss future therapeutic strategies for disease management and public health in light of the longstanding evolutionary history between the bacterium and its human host. PMID:25667600

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Limnobacter sp. Strain CACIAM 66H1, a Heterotrophic Bacterium Associated with Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Fábio Daniel Florêncio; Lima, Alex Ranieri Jerônimo; Moraes, Pablo Henrique Gonçalves; Siqueira, Andrei Santos; Dall’Agnol, Leonardo Teixeira; Baraúna, Anna Rafaella Ferreira; Martins, Luisa Carício; Oliveira, Karol Guimarães; de Lima, Clayton Pereira Silva; Nunes, Márcio Roberto Teixeira; Vianez-Júnior, João Lídio Silva Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    Ecological interactions between cyanobacteria and heterotrophic prokaryotes are poorly known. To improve the genomic studies of heterotrophic bacterium-cyanobacterium associations, the draft genome sequence (3.2 Mbp) of Limnobacter sp. strain CACIAM 66H1, found in a nonaxenic culture of Synechococcus sp. (cyanobacteria), is presented here. PMID:27198027

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Chryseobacterium sp. Strain GSE06, a Biocontrol Endophytic Bacterium Isolated from Cucumber (Cucumis sativus).

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin-Ju; Park, Byeong Hyeok; Park, Hongjae; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Ki Deok

    2016-01-01

    Chryseobacterium sp. strain GSE06 is a biocontrol endophytic bacterium against the destructive soilborne oomycete Phytophthora capsici, which causes Phytophthora blight of pepper. Here, we present its draft genome sequence, which contains genes related to biocontrol traits, such as colonization, antimicrobial activity, plant growth promotion, and abiotic or biotic stress adaptation. PMID:27313310

  20. Genome Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae YZUSK-4, a Bacterium Proposed as a Starter Culture for Fermented Meat Products.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai; Yin, Yongqi; Xu, Lin; Yan, Ming; Fang, Weiming; Ge, Qingfeng

    2015-07-23

    Klebsiella pneumoniae strain YZUSK-4, isolated from Chinese RuGao ham, is an efficient branched-chain aminotransferase-producing bacterium that can be used widely in fermented meat products to enhance flavor. The draft genome sequence of strain YZUSK-4 may provide useful genetic information on branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase production and branched-chain amino acid metabolism.

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus salivarius HSISS4, a Human Commensal Bacterium Highly Prevalent in the Digestive Tract.

    PubMed

    Mignolet, Johann; Fontaine, Laetitia; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Hols, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The human commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius plays a major role in the equilibrium of microbial communities of the digestive tract. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of a Streptococcus salivarius strain isolated from the small intestine, namely, HSISS4. Its circular chromosome comprises 1,903 coding sequences and 2,100,988 nucleotides. PMID:26847886

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus salivarius HSISS4, a Human Commensal Bacterium Highly Prevalent in the Digestive Tract

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Laetitia; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2016-01-01

    The human commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius plays a major role in the equilibrium of microbial communities of the digestive tract. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of a Streptococcus salivarius strain isolated from the small intestine, namely, HSISS4. Its circular chromosome comprises 1,903 coding sequences and 2,100,988 nucleotides. PMID:26847886

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CFL1, a Lactic Acid Bacterium Isolated from French Handcrafted Fermented Milk.

    PubMed

    Meneghel, Julie; Dugat-Bony, Eric; Irlinger, Françoise; Loux, Valentin; Vidal, Marie; Passot, Stéphanie; Béal, Catherine; Layec, Séverine; Fonseca, Fernanda

    2016-03-03

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus) is a lactic acid bacterium widely used for the production of yogurt and cheeses. Here, we report the genome sequence of L. bulgaricus CFL1 to improve our knowledge on its stress-induced damages following production and end-use processes.

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Spiroplasma helicoides TABS-2T (DSM 22551), a Bacterium Isolated from a Horsefly (Tabanus abactor)

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wei-Yi; Lo, Wen-Sui; Lai, Yi-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Spiroplasma helicoides TABS-2T (DSM 22551) was isolated from the gut of a horsefly (Tabanus abactor) collected near Ardmore, Oklahoma, USA, in 1987. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of this bacterium to facilitate the investigation of its biology and the comparative genomics among Spiroplasma species. PMID:27795290

  5. A Comparative biochemical study on two marine endophytes, Bacterium SRCnm and Bacillus sp. JS, Isolated from red sea algae.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Eman Fadl; Hassan, Hossam Mokhtar; Rateb, Mostafa Ezzat; Abdel-Wahab, Noha; Sameer, Somayah; Aly Taie, Hanan Anwar; Abdel-Hameed, Mohammed Sayed; Hammouda, Ola

    2016-01-01

    Two marine endophytic bacteria were isolated from the Red Sea algae; a red alga; Acanthophora dendroides and the brown alga Sargassum sabrepandum. The isolates were identified based on their 16SrRNA sequences as Bacterium SRCnm and Bacillus sp. JS. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential anti-microbial and antioxidant activities of the extracts of the isolated bacteria grown in different nutrient conditions. Compared to amoxicillin (25μg/disk) and erythromycin (15μg/disk), the extracts of Bacterium SRCn min media II, III, IV and V were potent inhibitors of the gram-positive bacterium Sarcina maxima even at low concentrations. Also, the multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) was more sensitive to the metabolites produced in medium (II) of the same endophyte than erythromycin (15μg/disk). A moderate activity of the Bacillus sp. JS extracts of media I and II was obtained against the same pathogen. The total compounds (500ug/ml) of both isolated endophytes showed moderate antioxidant activities (48.9% and 46.1%, respectively). LC/MS analysis of the bacterial extracts was carried out to investigate the likely natural products produced. Cyclo(D-cis-Hyp-L-Leu), dihydrosphingosine and 2-Amino-1,3-hexadecanediol were identified in the fermentation medium of Bacterium SRCnm, whereas cyclo (D-Pro-L-Tyr) and cyclo (L-Leu-L-Pro) were the suggested compounds of Bacillus sp. JS. PMID:26826831

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudoalteromonas tetraodonis Strain MQS005, a Bacterium with Potential Quorum-Sensing Regulation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yonglong; Wang, Yanbo; Yan, Xiaoqing; Mazumder, Asit; Liang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    We present here the draft genome sequence of Pseudoalteromonas tetraodonis strain MQS005, a bacterium possessing potential quorum-sensing regulatory activity. This strain was isolated from water from the South China Sea, People's Republic of China. The assembly consists of 4,252,538 bp and contains 144 contigs, with a G+C content of 41.85%. PMID:27491986

  7. Boron nitride nanotube-based biosensing of various bacterium/viruses: continuum modelling-based simulation approach.

    PubMed

    Panchal, Mitesh B; Upadhyay, Sanjay H

    2014-09-01

    In this study, the feasibility of single walled boron nitride nanotube (SWBNNT)-based biosensors has been ensured considering the continuum modelling-based simulation approach, for mass-based detection of various bacterium/viruses. Various types of bacterium or viruses have been taken into consideration at the free-end of the cantilevered configuration of the SWBNNT, as a biosensor. Resonant frequency shift-based analysis has been performed with the adsorption of various bacterium/viruses considered as additional mass to the SWBNNT-based sensor system. The continuum mechanics-based analytical approach, considering effective wall thickness has been considered to validate the finite element method (FEM)-based simulation results, based on continuum volume-based modelling of the SWBNNT. As a systematic analysis approach, the FEM-based simulation results are found in excellent agreement with the analytical results, to analyse the SWBNNTs for their wide range of applications such as nanoresonators, biosensors, gas-sensors, transducers and so on. The obtained results suggest that by using the SWBNNT of smaller size the sensitivity of the sensor system can be enhanced and detection of the bacterium/virus having mass of 4.28 × 10⁻²⁴ kg can be effectively performed.

  8. Genome Sequence of Virgibacillus pantothenticus DSM 26T (ATCC 14576), a Mesophilic and Halotolerant Bacterium Isolated from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie-ping; Liu, Guo-hong; Chen, De-ju; Zhu, Yu-jing; Chen, Zheng; Che, Jian-mei

    2015-01-01

    Virgibacillus pantothenticus DSM 26T is a Gram-positive, spore-forming, aerobic, mesophilic, and halotolerant bacterium. Here, we report its 4.76-Mb draft genome sequence, which is the first genome information of V. pantothenticus and will promote biological research and biotechnological application for the species. PMID:26383648

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Spiroplasma turonicum Tab4cT, a Bacterium Isolated from Horse Flies (Haematopota sp.).

    PubMed

    Lo, Wen-Sui; Gasparich, Gail E; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2016-01-01

    Spiroplasma turonicum Tab4c(T) was isolated from a horse fly (Haematopota sp.; probably Haematopota pluvialis) collected at Champchevrier, Indre-et-Loire, Touraine, France, in 1991. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of this bacterium to facilitate the investigation of its biology and the comparative genomics among Spiroplasma spp. PMID:27660788

  10. Biological control of postharvest spoilage caused by Penicillium expansum and Botrytis cinerea in apple by using the bacterium Rahnella aquatilis.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Juan; Calvente, Viviana; de Orellano, María Edith; Benuzzi, Delia; Sanz de Tosetti, Maria Isabel

    2007-02-15

    The epiphytic bacterium Rahnella aquatilis, isolated from fruit and leaves of apples, was tested for antagonistic properties against Penicillium expansum and Botrytis cinerea on Red Delicious apple fruit. In "in vitro" assays, this bacterium inhibited completely the germination of P. expansum and B. cinerea spores, but it needed direct contact with the spores to do it. However the putative mechanism seemed be different for the two pathogens. The bacterium did not produce extracellular antibiotic substances and when the acute toxicity test was performed no mortality, toxicity symptoms or organ alterations of the test animals (Wistar rats) were observed. Assays of biological control of P. expansum and B. cinerea on apple fruit were carried out at different temperatures. At 15 degrees C and 90% RH, the incidence of disease caused by P. expansum on apples stored for 20 days, was reduced by nearly 100% by R. aquatilis (10(6) cells/ml), while in the case of B. cinerea, the reduction of decay severity was nearly 64% but there was no reduction in the incidence of disease. At 4 degrees C and 90% RH the treatment with the bacterium significantly inhibited the development of B. cinerea on apples stored for 40 days and the incidence of disease was reduced by nearly 100%, while the incidence of disease caused by P. expansum at 4 degrees C was 60%. The results obtained show that R. aquatilis would be an interesting microorganism to be used as a biocontrol agent.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas putida JLR11, a Facultative Anaerobic 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene Biotransforming Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Javier; Udaondo, Zulema; Molina, Lazaro; Segura, Ana; Esteve-Núñez, Abraham; Caballero, Antonio; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan Luis; van Dillewijn, Pieter

    2015-09-03

    We report the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas putida JLR11, a facultative anaerobic bacterium that has been studied in detail for its capacity to use the explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) as a nitrogen source. The sequence confirms the mechanisms used by this versatile strain to reduce and assimilate nitrogen from TNT.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas putida JLR11, a Facultative Anaerobic 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene Biotransforming Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Javier; Udaondo, Zulema; Molina, Lazaro; Segura, Ana; Esteve-Núñez, Abraham; Caballero, Antonio; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas putida JLR11, a facultative anaerobic bacterium that has been studied in detail for its capacity to use the explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) as a nitrogen source. The sequence confirms the mechanisms used by this versatile strain to reduce and assimilate nitrogen from TNT. PMID:26337875

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Chryseobacterium sp. Strain GSE06, a Biocontrol Endophytic Bacterium Isolated from Cucumber (Cucumis sativus)

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jin-Ju; Park, Byeong Hyeok; Park, Hongjae

    2016-01-01

    Chryseobacterium sp. strain GSE06 is a biocontrol endophytic bacterium against the destructive soilborne oomycete Phytophthora capsici, which causes Phytophthora blight of pepper. Here, we present its draft genome sequence, which contains genes related to biocontrol traits, such as colonization, antimicrobial activity, plant growth promotion, and abiotic or biotic stress adaptation. PMID:27313310

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Strain P23, a Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium of Duckweed.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Masayuki; Hosoyama, Akira; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Morikawa, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain P23 is a plant growth-promoting bacterium, which was isolated from the surface of duckweed. We report here the draft genome sequence of strain P23. The genome data will serve as a valuable reference for understanding the molecular mechanism of plant growth promotion in aquatic plants.

  15. Quantitative analysis of growth and volatile fatty acid production by the anaerobic ruminal bacterium Megasphaera elsdenii T81

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Megaspheara elsdenii T81 grew on either DL-lactate or D-glucose at similar rates (0.85 per h), but displayed major differences in the fermentation of these substrates. Lactate was fermented at up to 210-mM concentration to yield acetic, propionic, butyric, and valeric acids. The bacterium was able t...

  16. Genome Sequence of Virgibacillus pantothenticus DSM 26T (ATCC 14576), a Mesophilic and Halotolerant Bacterium Isolated from Soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie-Ping; Liu, Bo; Liu, Guo-Hong; Chen, De-Ju; Zhu, Yu-Jing; Chen, Zheng; Che, Jian-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Virgibacillus pantothenticus DSM 26(T) is a Gram-positive, spore-forming, aerobic, mesophilic, and halotolerant bacterium. Here, we report its 4.76-Mb draft genome sequence, which is the first genome information of V. pantothenticus and will promote biological research and biotechnological application for the species. PMID:26383648

  17. Draft genome sequence of Enterobacter cloacae subsp. cloacae strain 08XA1, a fecal bacterium of giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yue; Zhao, Chuan-Wu; Zhang, Yi-Zheng; Zhang, Zhi-He; Pan, Guang-Lin; Liu, Wen-Wang; Ma, Qing-Yi; Hou, Rong; Tan, Xue-Mei

    2012-12-01

    Enterobacter cloacae, a common pathogenic bacterium, is a Gram-negative bacillus. We analyzed the draft genome of Enterobacter cloacae subsp. cloacae strain 08XA1 from the feces of a giant panda in China. Genes encoding a β-lactamase and efflux pumps, as well as other factors, have been found in the genome.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Enterococcus hirae R17, a Daptomycin-Resistant Bacterium Isolated from Retail Pork in China

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zixin; Wang, Wei; Hu, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    Daptomycin-resistant Enterococcus hirae R17 was isolated from retail pork sold at a free-trade market in Beijing, China. The complete genome sequence of R17 contains a circular 2,886,481-bp chromosome and a circular 73,574-bp plasmid. Genes involved in cell envelope homeostasis of this bacterium were identified by whole-genome analysis. PMID:27340071

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudoalteromonas tetraodonis Strain MQS005, a Bacterium with Potential Quorum-Sensing Regulation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yonglong; Wang, Yanbo; Yan, Xiaoqing; Mazumder, Asit; Liang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    We present here the draft genome sequence of Pseudoalteromonas tetraodonis strain MQS005, a bacterium possessing potential quorum-sensing regulatory activity. This strain was isolated from water from the South China Sea, People's Republic of China. The assembly consists of 4,252,538 bp and contains 144 contigs, with a G+C content of 41.85%.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Spiroplasma turonicum Tab4cT, a Bacterium Isolated from Horse Flies (Haematopota sp.)

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Wen-Sui; Gasparich, Gail E.

    2016-01-01

    Spiroplasma turonicum Tab4cT was isolated from a horse fly (Haematopota sp.; probably Haematopota pluvialis) collected at Champchevrier, Indre-et-Loire, Touraine, France, in 1991. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of this bacterium to facilitate the investigation of its biology and the comparative genomics among Spiroplasma spp. PMID:27660788