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Sample records for acetone laser-induced fluorescence

  1. Composition measurement of bicomponent droplets using laser-induced fluorescence of acetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqua, C.; Depredurand, V.; Castanet, G.; Wolff, M.; Lemoine, F.

    2007-12-01

    Commercial fuels are complex mixtures, the evaporation of which remains particularly difficult to model. Experimental characterization of the differential vaporization of the components is a problem that is seldom addressed. In this paper, the evaporation of binary droplets made of ethyl-alcohol and acetone is investigated using a technique of measurement of the droplet composition developed in purpose. This technique exploits the laser induced fluorescence of acetone which acts as a fluorescent tracer as well as the more volatile component of the fuel associated with an accurate measurement of the droplet diameter by forward scattering interferometry. A model of the fluorescence intensity of the binary mixture, taking into account the absorption of the acetone molecules, is proposed and validated. The sensitivity of the technique is discussed. Finally, the reliability of the technique is demonstrated on binary combusting droplets in linear stream.

  2. Quantitative Temperature Imaging in Gas-Phase Turbulent Thermal Convection by Laser-Induced Fluorescence of Acetone

    SciTech Connect

    KEARNEY,SEAN P.; REYES,FELIPE V.

    2000-12-13

    In this paper, an acetone planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique for nonintrusive, temperature imaging is demonstrated in gas-phase (Pr = 0.72) turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection at Rayleigh number, Ra = 1.3 x 10{sup 5}. The PLIF technique provides quantitative, spatially correlated temperature data without the flow intrusion or time lag associated with physical probes and without the significant path averaging that plagues most optical heat-transfer diagnostic tools, such as the Mach-Zehnder interferometer, thus making PLIF an attractive choice for quantitative thermal imaging in easily perturbed, complex three-dimensional flow fields. The instantaneous (20-ns integration time) thermal images presented have a spatial resolution of 176 x 176 x 500 {micro}m and a single-pulse temperature measurement precision of {+-}5.5 K, or 5.4 % of the total temperature difference. These images represent a 2-D slice through a complex, 3-D flow allowing for the thermal structure of the turbulence to be quantified. Statistics such as the horizontally averaged temperature profile, rms temperature fluctuation, two-point spatial correlations, and conditionally averaged plume structures are computed from an ensemble of 100 temperature images. The profiles of the mean temperature and rms temperature fluctuation are in good agreement with previously published data, and the results obtained from the two-point spatial correlations and conditionally averaged temperature fields show the importance of large-scale coherent structures in this turbulent flow.

  3. Investigation of the chemical stability of the laser-induced fluorescence tracers acetone, diethylketone, and toluene under IC engine conditions using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Trost, Johannes; Zigan, Lars; Eichmann, Simone C; Seeger, Thomas; Leipertz, Alfred

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of the chemical stability of the common laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) tracers acetone, diethylketone, and toluene. Stability is analyzed using linear Raman spectroscopy inside a heated pressure cell with optical access, which is used for the LIF calibration of these tracers. The measurements examine the influence of temperature, pressure, and residence time on tracer oxidation, which occurs without a rise in temperature or pressure inside the cell, highlighting the need for optical detection. A comparison between the three different tracers shows large differences, with diethylketone having the lowest and toluene by far the highest stability. An analysis of the sensitivity of the measurement shows that the detection limit of the oxidized tracer is well below 3% molar fraction, which is typical for LIF applications in combustion devices such as internal combustion (IC) engines. Furthermore, the effect on the LIF signal intensity is examined in an isothermal turbulent mixing study. PMID:24085091

  4. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Peter J.

    1998-12-01

    This paper outlines a method for optically detecting bacteria on various backgrounds, such as meat, by imaging their laser induced auto-fluorescence response. This method can potentially operate in real-time, which is many times faster than current bacterial detection methods, which require culturing of bacterial samples. This paper describes the imaging technique employed whereby a laser spot is scanned across an object while capturing, filtering, and digitizing the returned light. Preliminary results of the bacterial auto-fluorescence are reported and plans for future research are discussed. The results to date are encouraging with six of the eight bacterial strains investigated exhibiting auto-fluorescence when excited at 488 nm. Discrimination of these bacterial strains against red meat is shown and techniques for reducing background fluorescence discussed.

  5. Confocal Laser Induced Fluorescence of Argon Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scime, Earl; Soderholm, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) provides measurements of flow speed, temperature and when absolutely calibrated, density of ions or neutrals in a plasma. Traditionally, laser induced fluorescence requires two ports on a plasma device. One port is used for laser injection and the other is used for fluorescence emission collection. Traditional LIF is tedious and time consuming to align. These difficulties motivate the development of an optical configuration that requires a single port and remains fully aligned at all times; confocal LIF. Our confocal optical design employs a single two inch diameter lens to both inject the laser light and collect the stimulated emission from an argon plasma. A pair of axicon lenses create an annular beam path for the emission collection and the pump laser light is confined inside the annulus of the collection beam. The measurement location is scanned radially by manually adjusting the final focusing lens position. Here we present optical modeling of and initial results from the axicon based confocal optical system. The confocal measurements are compared to traditional, two-port, LIF measurements over the same radial range. This work is supported by US National Science Foundation grant number PHY-1360278.

  6. Laser induced fluorescence of dental caries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, S.; Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Significant differences between the optical spectra taken from sound regions of teeth and carious regions have been observed. These differences appear both in absorption and in laser induced fluorescence spectra. Excitation by the 488 nm line of an argon ion laser beam showed a peak in the emission intensity around 553 nm for the sound dental material while the emission peak from the carious region was red-shifted by approximately 40 nm. The relative absorption of carious region was significantly higher at 488 nm; however its fluorescence intensity peak was lower by an order of magnitude compared to the sound tooth. Implications of these results for a safe, reliable and early detection of dental caries are discussed.

  7. Laser-induced fluorescence in medical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Johansson, Jonas; Svanberg, Katarina; Svanberg, Sune

    1990-07-01

    We have performed extensive investigations using laser-induced fluorescence in animal as well as human tissue in order to localize diseased tissue and thus discriminate such tissue from normal surrounding areas. In characterizing different tissue types the endogenous fluorescence (autofluorescence) as well as specific fluorescence from different photosensitising substances was utilized. We have investigated different experimental and human malignant tumors in vivo and in vitro as well as atherosclerotic lesions in vitro. A fiber-optic fluorosensor was constructed and used in the experiments and in the clinical examination of patients. Dimensionless spectroscopic functions were formed to ensure that the signals were independent of clinically uncontrollable variables such as distance variations, tissue topography, light source fluctuations and variations in detection efficiency. A multi-color two-dimensional imaging system was constructed for real-time imaging. The system was tested peroperatively and during standard examination patient procedures. Besides utilizing the time-integrated fluorescence signal we have also investigated the possibility of incorporating time-resolved fluorescence characterization.

  8. Laser Induced Fluorescence on Molecular Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulders, Hjalmar; Rijke, Arij; Girault, Vincent; Stoffels, Winfred

    2008-10-01

    In the last half century, mercury has been used widely as the radiating species in many low pressure fluorescent lamps. Mercury primarily radiates at 254 nm and 185 nm. These photons excite a phosphor that fluoresces back to the ground state producing visible photons. This process reduces the efficiency because much of the energy of the UV photons has to be discarded. Using a species that emits light closer to or even in the visible range reduces these losses. Ideally the species (or a mixture of several species) should build up the whole visible spectrum, much like in HID lamps. InBr seems to be a good candidate for such a lamp, because it is an efficient radiator that emits most of its light around 370 nm; much closer to the visible part of the spectrum. In order to get insight in the energy transfer processes going on in these molecules we have conducted a laser induced fluorescence (LIF) experiment on InBr vapour and on a plasma. We have measured the decay times of different rovibrational levels of the InBr-molecule as well as the spectral distribution of the fluorescence from these levels. From the former we calculated the rotational temperature of the plasma and from the latter we calculated the Franck-Condon factors for the A-state as well as the vibrational temperature.

  9. Laser Induced Fluorescence of the Iodine Ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargus, William

    2014-10-01

    Iodine (I2) has been considered as a potential electrostatic spacecraft thruster propellant for approximately 2 decades, but has only recently been demonstrated. Energy conversion efficiency appears to be on par with xenon without thruster modification. Intriguingly, performance appears to exceed xenon at high acceleration potentials. As part of a continuing program for the development of non-intrusive plasma diagnostics for advanced plasma spacecraft propulsion, we have identified the I II 5d5D4 o state as metastable, and therefore containing a reservoir of excited state ions suitable for laser probing. The 5d5D4 o - 6p5P3 transition at 695.878 nm is convenient for diode laser excitation with the 5s5S2 o - 6p5P3 transition at 516.12 nm as an ideal candidate for non-resonant fluorescence collection. We have constructed a Penning type iodine microwave discharge lamp optimized for I II production for table-top measurements. This work demonstrates I II laser-induced fluorescence in a representative iodine discharge and will validate our previous theoretical work based on the limited available historical I II spectral data.

  10. Vacuum ultraviolet laser induced fluorescence on a Si atomic beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brian, T. R.; Lawler, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    A broadly applicable vacuum ultraviolet experiment is described for measuring radiative lifetimes of neutral and singly-ionized atoms in a beam environment to 5-percent accuracy using laser induced fluorescence. First results for neutral Si are reported.

  11. Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Miller, S.M.

    1983-10-31

    Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

  12. Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven M.

    1988-01-01

    Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

  13. Laser-Induced-Fluorescence Photogrammetry and Videogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul; Jones, Tom; Connell, John; Belvin, Keith; Watson, Kent

    2004-01-01

    surface of the target. The improved method is denoted laser-induced-fluorescence photogrammetry.

  14. Laser-induced fluorescence-cued, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy biological-agent detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hybl, John D.; Tysk, Shane M.; Berry, Shaun R.; Jordan, Michael P

    2006-12-01

    Methods for accurately characterizing aerosols are required for detecting biological warfare agents. Currently, fluorescence-based biological agent sensors provide adequate detection sensitivity but suffer from high false-alarm rates. Combining single-particle fluorescence analysis with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides additional discrimination and potentially reduces false-alarm rates. A transportable UV laser-induced fluorescence-cued LIBS test bed has been developed and used to evaluate the utility of LIBS for biological-agent detection. Analysis of these data indicates that LIBS adds discrimination capability to fluorescence-based biological-agent detectors.However, the data also show that LIBS signatures of biological agent simulants are affected by washing. This may limit the specificity of LIBS and narrow the scope of its applicability in biological-agent detection.

  15. Laser-induced fluorescence of space-exposed polyurethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Ralph H., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The object of this work was to utilize laser-induced fluorescence technique to characterize several samples of space-exposed polyurethane. These samples were flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), which was in a shuttle-like orbit for nearly 6 years. Because of our present work to develop laser-induced-fluorescence inspection techniques for polymers, space-exposed samples and controls were lent to us for evaluation. These samples had been attached to the outer surface of LDEF; therefore, they were subjected to thermal cycling, solar ultraviolet radiation, vacuum, and atomic oxygen. It is well documented that atomic oxygen and ultraviolet exposure have detrimental effects on many polymers. This was a unique opportunity to make measurements on material that had been naturally degraded by an unusual environment. During our past work, data have come from artificially degraded samples and generally have demonstrated a correlation between laser-induced fluorescence and tensile strength or elasticity.

  16. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Panjehpour, M.; Overholt, B.F.

    1996-12-03

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample. 5 figs.

  17. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Panjehpour, Masoud; Overholt, Bergein F.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample.

  18. Plasma erosion rate diagnostics using laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaeta, C. J.; Turley, R. S.; Matossian, J. N.; Beattie, J. R.; Williamson, W. S.

    1992-01-01

    An optical technique for measuring the sputtering rate of a molybdenum surface immersed in a xenon plasma has been developed and demonstrated. This approach, which may be useful in real-time wear diagnostics for ion thrusters, relies on laser-induced fluorescence to determine the density of sputtered molybdenum atoms.

  19. Photodiagnostics of turbulent flows using laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bershader, D.; Gross, K. P.

    1983-01-01

    An optical probe technique that will allow remote measurements of temperature (and density), along with their time dependent fluctuations, to be made in a supersonic turbulent wind tunnel flow was developed. Laser-induced fluorescence from nitric oxide which was seeded into the flowing gas medium (nitrogen) at low concentrations was used. The fluorescence emission intensity following laser excitation of the nitric oxide (NO) ground state rotational levels is then related to thermodynamic quantities of the bulk fluid.

  20. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of the secondary cataract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, N. A.; Larionov, P. M.; Rozhin, I. A.; Druzhinin, I. B.; Chernykh, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    Excitation-emission matrices of laser-induced fluorescence of lens capsule epithelium, the lens nucleus, and the lens capsule are investigated. A solid-state laser in combination with an optical parametric generator tunable in the range from 210 to 350 nm was used for excitation of fluorescence. The spectra of fluorescence of all three types of tissues exhibit typical features that are specific to them and drastically differ from one another. This effect can be used for intrasurgical control of presence of residual lens capsule epithelium cells in the capsular bag after surgical treatment of a cataract.

  1. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Helps Diagnose Plasma Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, J. R.; Mattosian, J. N.; Gaeta, C. J.; Turley, R. S.; Williams, J. D.; Williamson, W. S.

    1994-01-01

    Technique developed to provide in situ monitoring of rates of ion sputter erosion of accelerator electrodes in ion thrusters also used for ground-based applications to monitor, calibrate, and otherwise diagnose plasma processes in fabrication of electronic and optical devices. Involves use of laser-induced-fluorescence measurements, which provide information on rates of ion etching, inferred rates of sputter deposition, and concentrations of contaminants.

  2. Radioiodine detector based on laser induced fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, Jimmie R.; Baronavski, Andrew P.

    1980-01-01

    The invention involves the measurement of the concentration of the radioisotope .sup.129 I.sub.2 in the presence of a gas. The invention uses a laser to excite a sample of the .sup.129 I.sub.2 in a sample gas chamber and a reference sample of a known concentration of .sup.129 I.sub.2 in a reference gas chamber. The .sup.129 I.sub.2 in the sample and reference gas chamber each gives off fluorescence emissions which are received by photomultipliers which provide signals to a detector. The detector uses a ratioing technique to determine the concentration of .sup.129 I.sub.2 in the sample gas chamber.

  3. Laser induced fluorescence applied to turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daily, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    The saturated fluorescence method makes use of the great simplifications which occur when under conditions of intense radiation the excitation process becomes saturated. A description is presented of the saturated fluorescence method, taking into account rate equations and saturation, radiative transfer, the two-level system, a multilevel system, and measurements under saturation conditions. The detectability limits of the method are investigated. Fluorescence trapping is found to place an upper limit on the number density of the fluorescing species that can be measured without signal loss. Turbulence places time and spatial constraints on the measurements, but otherwise poses no difficulties. Saturated laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy appears to be a most promising method for measuring species concentrations in flames.

  4. Remote sensing of phytoplankton using laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Babichenko, S.; Poryvkina, L.; Arikese, V. ); Kaitala, S. ); Kuosa, H. )

    1993-06-01

    The results of remote laser sensing of brackish-water phytoplankton on board a research vessel are presented. Field data of laser-induced fluorescence of phytoplankton obtained during the several cruises in the mouth of tile Gulf of Finland are compared with the results of standard chlorophyll a analysis of water samples and phytoplankton species determination by microscopy. The approach of fluorescence excitation by tunable laser radiation is applied to study the spatial distribution of a natural phytoplankton community. The remote analysis of the pigment composition of a phytoplankton community using the method of selective pigment excitation is described. The possibility of elaborating methods of quantitative laser remote biomonitoring is discussed.

  5. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in tissue local necrosis detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cip, Ondrej; Buchta, Zdenek; Lesundak, Adam; Randula, Antonin; Mikel, Bretislav; Lazar, Josef; Veverkova, Lenka

    2014-03-01

    The recent effort leads to reliable imaging techniques which can help to a surgeon during operations. The fluorescence spectroscopy was selected as very useful online in vivo imaging method to organics and biological materials analysis. The presented work scopes to a laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique to detect tissue local necrosis in small intestine surgery. In first experiments, we tested tissue auto-fluorescence technique but a signal-to-noise ratio didn't express significant results. Then we applied a contrast dye - IndoCyanine Green (ICG) which absorbs and emits wavelengths in the near IR. We arranged the pilot experimental setup based on highly coherent extended cavity diode laser (ECDL) used for stimulating of some critical areas of the small intestine tissue with injected ICG dye. We demonstrated the distribution of the ICG exciter with the first file of shots of small intestine tissue of a rabbit that was captured by high sensitivity fluorescent cam.

  6. Kr II laser-induced fluorescence for measuring plasma acceleration.

    PubMed

    Hargus, W A; Azarnia, G M; Nakles, M R

    2012-10-01

    We present the application of laser-induced fluorescence of singly ionized krypton as a diagnostic technique for quantifying the electrostatic acceleration within the discharge of a laboratory cross-field plasma accelerator also known as a Hall effect thruster, which has heritage as spacecraft propulsion. The 728.98 nm Kr II transition from the metastable 5d(4)D(7/2) to the 5p(4)P(5/2)(∘) state was used for the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence within the plasma discharge. From these measurements, it is possible to measure velocity as krypton ions are accelerated from near rest to approximately 21 km/s (190 eV). Ion temperature and the ion velocity distributions may also be extracted from the fluorescence data since available hyperfine splitting data allow for the Kr II 5d(4)D(7/2)-5p(4)P(5/2)(∘) transition lineshape to be modeled. From the analysis, the fluorescence lineshape appears to be a reasonable estimate for the relatively broad ion velocity distributions. However, due to an apparent overlap of the ion creation and acceleration regions within the discharge, the distributed velocity distributions increase ion temperature determination uncertainty significantly. Using the most probable ion velocity as a representative, or characteristic, measure of the ion acceleration, overall propellant energy deposition, and effective electric fields may be calculated. With this diagnostic technique, it is possible to nonintrusively characterize the ion acceleration both within the discharge and in the plume. PMID:23126755

  7. Direct probing of chromatography columns by laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    McGuffin, V.L.

    1992-12-07

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments of this research project from September 1, 1989 to February 28, 1993. During this period, we have accomplished all of the primary scientific objectives of the research proposal: (1) constructed and evaluated a laser-induced fluorescence detection system that allows direct examination of the chromatographic column, (2) examined nonequilibrium processes that occur upon solute injection and elution, (3) examined solute retention in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, (4) examined solute zone dispersion in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, and (5) developed appropriate theoretical models to describe these phenomena. In each of these studies, substantial knowledge has been gained of the fundamental processes that are responsible for chromatographic separations. In addition to these primary research objectives, we have made significant progress in three related areas: (1) examined pyrene as a fluorescent polarity probe insupercritical fluids and liquids as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) developed methods for the class-selective identification of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal-derived fluids by microcolumn liquid chromatography with fluorescence quenching detection, and (3) developed methods for the determination of saturated and unsaturated (including omega-3) fatty acids in fish oil extracts by microcolumn liquid chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection. In these studies, the advanced separation and detection techniques developed in our laboratory are applied to practical problems of environmental and biomedical significance.

  8. Direct probing of chromatography columns by laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuffin, V. L.

    1992-12-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments of this research project from 1 Sep. 1989 to 28 Feb. 1993. During this period, we have accomplished all of the primary scientific objectives of the research proposal: (1) constructed and evaluated a laser-induced fluorescence detection system that allows direct examination of the chromatographic column, (2) examined nonequilibrium processes that occur upon solute injection and elution, (3) examined solute retention in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, (4) examined solute zone dispersion in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, and (5) developed appropriate theoretical models to describe these phenomena. In each of these studies, substantial knowledge has been gained of the fundamental processes that are responsible for chromatographic separations. In addition to these primary research objectives, we have made significant progress in three related areas: (1) examined pyrene as a fluorescent polarity probe in supercritical fluids and liquids as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) developed methods for the class-selective identification of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal-derived fluids by microcolumn liquid chromatography with fluorescence quenching detection, and (3) developed methods for the determination of saturated and unsaturated (including omega-3) fatty acids in fish oil extracts by microcolumn liquid chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection. In these studies, the advanced separation and detection techniques developed in our laboratory are applied to practical problems of environmental and biomedical significance.

  9. Radioactive contamination screening with laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Sheely, R.; Di Benedetto, J.

    1994-06-01

    The ability to induce, detect and discriminate fluorescence of uranium oxides makes available new capabilities for screening the surface of large complex facilities for uranium. This paper will present the results of field tests evaluate laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) as a contamination screening tool and report on the progress to produce a field portable instrument for uranium surveys on exposed surfaces. The principal effect is to illuminate the surface of an object or an area with a remotely-located light source, and to evaluate the re-radiated emission energy. A gated intensified CCD camera was used with ultraviolet (UV) laser excitation to discriminate the phosphorescent (persistent) green uranium emission from the prompt background fluorescence which results from excitation of plants, concrete, soils, and other background materials.

  10. Application of the method of laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateeva, Natalia L.; Matvienko, Gennadii G.

    2004-02-01

    Great attention is now paid to ecology of the environment, in whic plants are of great importance. However the present methods of biophysical analysis of plant states are very labor-intensive and require a lot of time. The structure of protein-pigment complexes is known to break in different dissolvents that results in the shift of maxima of chlorophyll absorption and fluorescence bands. That is why development of methods for remote diagnostics of plants is of great scientific and practical interest. They would make it possible to determine species and state of plants rather quickly and accurately. We have developed a setup and methods for optical diagnostics of the physiological state of plants to investigate the dynamics of the fastest part of fluorescence of plants in vivo. The method of laser-induced fluorescence makes it possible to observe the level of vegetative development of living plants, as well as their state under the impact of some stress factors.

  11. Combined Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography and Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Jennifer K.; Tumlinson, Alexandre R.; Utzinger, Urs

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) are promising modalities for tissue characterization in human patients and animal models. OCT detects coherently backscattered light, whereas LIF detects fluorescence emission of endogenous biochemicals, such as reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), collagen, and fluorescent proteins, or exogenous substances such as cyanine dyes. Given the complementary mechanisms of contrast for OCT and LIF, the combination of the two modalities could potentially provide more sensitive and specific detection of disease than either modality alone. Sample probes for both OCT and LIF can be implemented using small diameter optical fibers, suggesting a particular synergy for endoscopic applications. In this chapter, the mechanisms of contrast and diagnostic capability for both OCT and LIF are briefly examined. Evidence of complementary capability is described. Example published combined OCT-LIF systems are reviewed, one successful commercial instrument is discussed, and example applications are provided.

  12. Development of Isotope Analysis Based on Laser Induced Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, T.; Watanabe, K.; Uritani, A.; Tomita, H.; Iguchi, T.

    2009-03-17

    We have proposed Laser Induced Fluorescence analysis using Doppler Shift of laser ablated atoms for Isotope Analysis (LIF-DS-IA). This isotope analysis is expected to have a small mass discrimination effect because the detection target is fluorescence photons instead of ions, which distort the measured isotope ratio by the space charge effect. We demonstrate this technique to be feasible through the model calculations. We experimentally confirmed the fundamental behavior in LIF-DS-IA that the shift in the irradiating laser frequency corresponds to that of peak position in the time domain LIF spectra. The reason of poor mass resolution in the present system was considered to be inadequate definition in the field of view of the fluorescence detector.

  13. Laser-induced fluorescence measurement of combustion chemistry intermediates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosley, David R.

    1986-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) can measure the trace (often free radical) species encountered as intermediates in combustion chemistry; OH, CS, NH, NS, and NCO are typical of the species detected in flames by LIF. Attention is given to illustrative experiments designed to accumulate a quantitative data base for LIF detection in low pressure flow systems and flames, as well as to flame measurements conducted with a view to the detection of new chemical intermediaries that may deepen insight into the chemistry of combustion.

  14. [Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectrum Characteristics of Paddy under Nitrogen Stress].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Shi, Shuo; Gong, Wei; Du, Lin; Zhu, Bo; Ma, Ying-ying; Sun, Jia

    2016-02-01

    Order to guide fertilizing andreduce waste of resources as well as enviro nmental pollution, especially eutrophication, which are caused by excessive fertilization, a system of laser-induced fluorescence(LIF) was built. The system aimed to investigate the correlation between nitrogen(N) content of paddy leaf and the fluorescence intensity. We measuredNcontent and SPAD of paddy leaf (the samples came from the second upper leaves of paddy in tillering stage and the study area was located in Jianghan plain of China) by utilizing the Plant Nutrient (Tester TYS-3N). The fluorescence spectrum was also obtained by using the systembuilt based on theLIFtechnology. Fluorescence spectra of leaf with different N-content were collected and then a fluorescence spectra database wasestablished. It is analyzed that the relationship between the parameters of fluorescence (F₇₄₀/F₆₈₅ is the ratio of fluorescence intensity of 740 nm. dividing that of 685 nm) and the N level of paddy. It is found that the effect of different N-content on the fluorescence spectrum characteristics is significant. The experiment demonstrated the positive correlation between fluorescence parameters and paddy leaf N-content. Results showed a positive linear correlation between the ratio of peak fluorescence (F₇₄₀/F₆₈₅) and N-content The correlation coefficient (r) reached 0.871 8 and the root mean square error (RMSE) was 0.076 82. The experiment demonstrated that LIF spectroscopy detection technology has the advantages of rapidand non-destructive measurement, and it also has the potential to measure plant content of nutrient elements. It will provide a more accurate remote sensing method to rapidly detect the crop nitrogen levels. PMID:27209764

  15. Uncertainty analysis of planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavoularis, Stavros; Vanderwel, Christina

    2014-11-01

    We present a thorough analysis of the uncertainty of the planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) method. We consider the measurement of concentration maps in cross-sections parallel to and normal to the axis of a slender plume containing Rhodamine 6G as a passive scalar tracer and transported by a turbulent shear flow. In particular, we identify two previously unexplored sources of error contributed by non-uniformity of the concentration across the laser sheet and by secondary fluorescence. We propose new methods to evaluate and correct for these sources of error and demonstrate that the corrected concentration measurements accurately determined the injected dye mass flow rate of the plume in the far field. Supported by NSERC.

  16. Kr II laser-induced fluorescence for measuring plasma acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hargus, W. A. Jr.

    2012-10-15

    We present the application of laser-induced fluorescence of singly ionized krypton as a diagnostic technique for quantifying the electrostatic acceleration within the discharge of a laboratory cross-field plasma accelerator also known as a Hall effect thruster, which has heritage as spacecraft propulsion. The 728.98 nm Kr II transition from the metastable 5d{sup 4}D{sub 7/2} to the 5p{sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup Ring-Operator} state was used for the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence within the plasma discharge. From these measurements, it is possible to measure velocity as krypton ions are accelerated from near rest to approximately 21 km/s (190 eV). Ion temperature and the ion velocity distributions may also be extracted from the fluorescence data since available hyperfine splitting data allow for the Kr II 5d{sup 4}D{sub 7/2}-5p{sup 4}P{sub 5/2}{sup Ring-Operator} transition lineshape to be modeled. From the analysis, the fluorescence lineshape appears to be a reasonable estimate for the relatively broad ion velocity distributions. However, due to an apparent overlap of the ion creation and acceleration regions within the discharge, the distributed velocity distributions increase ion temperature determination uncertainty significantly. Using the most probable ion velocity as a representative, or characteristic, measure of the ion acceleration, overall propellant energy deposition, and effective electric fields may be calculated. With this diagnostic technique, it is possible to nonintrusively characterize the ion acceleration both within the discharge and in the plume.

  17. Laser-induced fluorescence in diagnosis of dental caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drakaki, Eleni A.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan; Serafetinides, Alexandros A.

    2003-09-01

    laser induces better discrimination in deep caries diagnosis.

  18. Laser-Induced Fluorescence in Gaseous [I[subscript]2] Excited with a Green Laser Pointer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2007-01-01

    A green laser pointer could be used in a flashy demonstration of laser-induced fluorescence in the gas phase by directing the beam of the laser through a cell containing [I[subscript]2] at its room temperature vapor pressure. The experiment could be used to provide valuable insight into the requirements for laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and the…

  19. OH Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence from Microgravity Droplet Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Michael; Wegge, Jason; Kang, Kyung-Tae

    1997-01-01

    Droplet combustion under microgravity conditions has been extensively studied, but laser diagnostics have just begun to be employed in microgravity droplet experiments. This is due in part to the level of difficulty associated with laser system size, power and economic availability. Hydroxyl radical (OH) is an important product of combustion, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has proved to be an adequate and sensitive tool to measure OH. In this study, a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser and a doubled dye laser, compact and reliable enough to perform OH PLIF experiments aboard a parabolic flight-path aircraft, has been developed and successfully demonstrated in a methanol droplet flame experiment. Application to microgravity conditions is planned aboard parabolic flight-path aircraft.

  20. APPLICATIONS OF CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS/LASER-INDUCED FLUORESCENCE DETECTION TO GROUND WATER MIGRATION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been applied to the determination of groundwater migration based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection and traditional spectrofluorimetry. The detection limits of injected dye-fluorescent whitening agent (tinopal) in the low parts per tr...

  1. Characterisation of estuarine intertidal macroalgae by laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gameiro, Carla; Utkin, Andrei B.; Cartaxana, Paulo

    2015-12-01

    The article reports the application of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for the assessment of macroalgae communities of estuarine intertidal areas. The method was applied for the characterisation of fifteen intertidal macroalgae species of the Tagus estuary, Portugal, and adjacent coastal area. Three bands characterised the LIF spectra of red macroalgae with emission maxima in the ranges 577-583 nm, 621-642 nm and 705-731 nm. Green and brown macroalgae showed one emission maximum in the red region (687-690 nm) and/or one in the far-red region (726-732 nm). Characteristics of LIF emission spectra were determined by differences in the main fluorescing pigments: phycoerythrin, phycocyanin and chlorophyll a (Chl a). In the green and brown macroalgae groups, the relative significance of the two emission maxima seems to be related to the thickness of the photosynthetic layer. In thick macroalgae, like Codium tomentosum or Fucus vesiculosus, the contribution of the far-red emission fluorescence peak was more significant, most probably due to re-absorption of the emitted red Chl a fluorescence within the dense photosynthetic layer. Similarly, an increase in the number of layers of the thin-blade green macroalgae Ulva rigida caused a shift to longer wavelengths of the red emission maximum and the development of a fluorescence peak at the far-red region. Water loss from Ulva's algal tissue also led to a decrease in the red/far-red Chl fluorescence ratio (F685/F735), indicating an increase in the density of chloroplasts in the shrinking macroalgal tissue during low tide exposure.

  2. Mixing and stabilization study of a partially premixed swirling flame using laser induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Galley, D.; Ducruix, S.; Lacas, F.; Veynante, D.

    2011-01-15

    A laboratory-scale swirling burner, presenting many similarities with gas turbines combustors, has been studied experimentally using planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) on OH radical and acetone vapor in order to characterize the flame stabilization process. These diagnostics show that the stabilization point rotates in the combustion chamber and that air and fuel mixing is not complete at the end of the mixing tube. Fuel mass fraction decays exponentially along the mixing tube axis and transverse profiles show a gaussian shape. However, radial pressure gradients tend to trap the fuel in the core of the vortex that propagates axially in the mixing tube. As the mixing tube vortex enters the combustion chamber, vortex breakdown occurs through a precessing vortex core (PVC). The axially propagating vortex shows a helicoidal trajectory in the combustion chamber which trace is observed with transverse acetone PLIF. As a consequence, the stabilizing point of the flame in the combustion chamber rotates with the PVC structure. This phenomenon has been observed in the present study with a high speed camera recording spontaneous emission of the flame. The stabilization point rotation frequency tends to increase with mass flow rates. It was also shown that the coupling between the PVC and the flame stabilization occurs via mixing, explaining one possible coupling mechanism between acoustic waves in the flow and the reaction rate. This path may also be envisaged for flashback, an issue that will be more completely treated in a near future. (author)

  3. Laser-induced fluorescence for discrimination of crops and weeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Peter J.

    2000-11-01

    This paper reports the use of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) of plants to discriminate between crops and weeds for potential use in an intelligent crop spraying system. Past and current work in intelligent crop spraying has concentrated on using multi-spectral reflectance data in particular using near infrared (NIR) and color. Texture and shape image processing has also been used with limited success and is usually computationally expensive. Also, most of these approaches are error prone since they rely on ambient solar illumination and so are susceptible to errors caused by cloud variations, shadows and other non-uniformities. There are several commercial spraying systems available that detect presence or absence of plants using the NIR 'red-edge' effect without discrimination between species. 'Weedseeker' and 'Detectspray' are two examples of such systems, the 'Weedseeker' system being one of the few active systems, incorporating its own light source. However, both systems suffer from poor spatial resolution. The use of plant or chlorophyll fluorescence for discrimination between species is a relatively under researched area. This paper shows that LIF of several crops and weeds can be used to discriminate between species. Spectra are presented for two crop and two weed species over a range of discrete laser excitation wavelengths. The technique can be directly implemented with a laser imaging system for real-time detection and discrimination of crops and weeds.

  4. Visualization of plasma turbulence with laser-induced fluorescence (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Levinton, Fred M.; Trintchouk, Fedor

    2001-01-01

    Turbulence is a key factor limiting the performance of fusion devices. Plasma edge turbulence determines the boundary values of the plasma density and temperature, which in turn determine the internal gradients and controls global plasma transport. In recent years, significant progress has been made in modeling turbulence behavior in plasmas and its effect on transport. Progress has also been made in diagnostics for turbulence measurement; however, there is still a large gap in our understanding of it. An approach to improve this situation is to experimentally visualize the turbulence, that is, a high resolution 2-D image of the plasma density. Visualization of turbulence can improve the connection to theory and help validate theoretical models. One method that has been successfully developed to visualize turbulence in gases and fluids is planar laser-induced fluorescence. We have recently applied this technique to visualize turbulence and structures in a plasma. This was accomplished using an Alexandrite laser that is tunable between 700 and 800 nm, and from 350 to 400 nm with second harmonic generation. The fluorescence light from an argon ion transition has been imaged onto an intensified charged coupled device camera that is gated in synchronization with the laser. Images from the plasma show a rotating structure at 30 kHz in addition to small scale turbulence.

  5. Laser-induced fluorescence detection strategies for sodium atoms and compounds in high-pressure combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiland, Karen J. R.; Wise, Michael L.; Smith, Gregory P.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of laser-induced fluorescence schemes were examined experimentally in atmospheric pressure flames to determine their use for sodium atom and salt detection in high-pressure, optically thick environments. Collisional energy transfer plays a large role in fluorescence detection. Optimum sensitivity, at the parts in 10 exp 9 level for a single laser pulse, was obtained with the excitation of the 4p-3s transition at 330 nm and the detection of the 3d-3p fluorescence at 818 nm. Fluorescence loss processes, such as ionization and amplified spontaneous emission, were examined. A new laser-induced atomization/laser-induced fluorescence detection technique was demonstrated for NaOH and NaCl. A 248-nm excimer laser photodissociates the salt molecules present in the seeded flames prior to atom detection by laser-induced fluorescence.

  6. Airborne laser induced fluorescence imaging. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) was demonstration as part of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) Plant 1 Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project (LSDDP) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology, Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area located at the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. The demonstration took place on November 19, 1996. In order to allow the contaminated buildings undergoing deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) to be opened to the atmosphere, radiological surveys of floors, walls and ceilings must take place. After successful completion of the radiological clearance survey, demolition of the building can continue. Currently, this process is performed by collecting and analyzing swipe samples for radiological analysis. Two methods are used to analyze the swipe samples: hand-held frisker and laboratory analysis. For the purpose of this demonstration, the least expensive method, swipe samples analyzed by hand-held frisker, is the baseline technology. The objective of the technology demonstration was to determine if the baseline technology could be replaced using LIF.

  7. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of the cylindrical Hall thruster plume

    SciTech Connect

    Spektor, R.; Diamant, K. D.; Beiting, E. J.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2010-09-15

    An investigation of a fully cylindrical Hall thruster was performed using laser induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure ion velocity profiles in the plume. The measurements confirm a previously reported 9% increase in the exhaust energy when the cathode keeper draws an excess current (overrun mode). Furthermore, the velocity directions in the plume remain relatively unchanged for the cusped and direct magnetic field configuration in both overrun and nonoverrun modes. Previously reported plume narrowing in the overrun mode was confirmed and found to be due to the shift of the acceleration and ionization regions toward the anode. The electric field inferred from the LIF measurements allowed calculation of the electron ExB drift. Close to the centerline of the thruster, electrons drift azimuthally with velocity decreasing away from the centerline, thus creating shear. This shear can be a source of plasma instabilities and influence electron transport. Further away from the centerline, electrons drift in the opposite direction with their velocity increasing with increasing radius. In that region, electrons rotate without shear.

  8. Laser-Induced Fluorescence in plasmas at UC Irvine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, R.

    2003-10-01

    For about 25 years laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has been performed at UC Irvine with many people contributing over that time period. A central contributor to the work has been Raul Stern, whether directly involved with the experiments at hand or via physics advice obtained wherever he could be found worldwide spreading the joys of LIF. At Irvine LIF has been developed (1,2) and used for ion tagging (3), spatial diffusion (4,5), velocity-space diffusion (6), optical tomography (7), and plasma processing (8) among many other fascinating experimental results. This talk will review the LIF work at Irvine with special note of Stern's contributions and influence. 1.) D. Hill, S. Fornaca, M. Wickham, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 54, 309 (1983) 2.) G.D. Severn, D.A. Edrich, and R. McWilliams, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 69, 10 (1998). 3.) R. Stern, D. Hill, N. Rynn, Phys. Lett. A93, 127 (1983) 4.) M. Okubo, R. McWilliams, Phys. Fluids 30, 2849 (1987). 5.) R. McWilliams, M. K. Okubo and N. S. Wolf, Phys. Fluids B 2(3), 523 (1990). 6.) J. Bowles, R. McWilliams, N. Rynn, Phys. Plasmas 1, 3814 (1994). 7.) R. McWilliams, R. Koslover), Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 37 (1987). 8.) R. McWilliams, D. Edrich, Thin Solid Films 435, 1 (2003).

  9. Laser induced fluorescence of argon ion in plasma presheaths

    SciTech Connect

    Atta Khedr, M.; Hala, A.M.; Oksuz, L.; Hershkowitz, N.

    1999-07-01

    A turnable diode laser system has been used to measure ion velocity distribution functions of ArII in plasma presheaths using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The diode laser system can examine the velocity distribution function with marginally greater resolution than the dye laser owing to their smaller line width (0.001 nm). LIF of ArII requires excitation at 668.61 nm. the diode laser is centered at that wavelength with a tuning range of 0.15 nm and the optical amplifier (MOPA) is at 10 nm. LIF measurements of presheaths as a function of pressure (0.5--3 mTorr) were made in a DC hot-filament produced multidipole plasma discharge near a negatively biased plate. The ion velocity has range of 10{sup 3}cm/s--10{sup 5} cm/s for presheaths thickness 0.5 cm--5cm. These measurements are compared with results obtained by using a double sided Langmuir probe (Mach probe) and an emissive probe.

  10. Laser Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic for the ASTRAL Plasma Source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Robert; Kamar, Ola; Munoz, Jorge

    2006-10-01

    A Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) diagnostic is presented in this poster. The ion temperature measurements are made in the ASTRAL (Auburn Steady sTate Research fAciLity) helicon plasma source using a diode laser based LIF diagnostic. ASTRAL produces Ar plasmas with the following parameters: ne = 10^10 to 10^13 cm-3, Te = 2 to 10 eV and Ti = 0.03 to 0.5 eV. A series of 7 large coils produce an axial magnetic field up to 1.3 kGauss. Operating pressure varies from 0.1 to 100 mTorr and any gas can be used for the discharge. A fractional helix antenna is used to introduce rf power up to 2 kWatt. A number of diagnostics are presently installed on the plasma device (Langmuir Probe, Spectrometer, LIF system). The LIF diagnostic makes use of a diode laser with the following characteristics: 1.5 MHz bandwidth, Littrow external cavity, mode-hop free tuning range up to 16 GHz, total power output of about 15 mW. The wavelength is measured by a precision wavemeter and frequent monitoring prevents wavelength drift. For Ar plasma, a new LIF scheme has been developed. The laser tuned at 686.354 nm, is used to pump the 3d^4F5/2 Ar II metastable level to the 4p^4D5/2 state. The fluorescence radiation between the 4p^4D5/2 and the 4s^4P3/2 terms (442.6 nm) is monitored by a PMT.

  11. Spectrally resolved laser-induced fluorescence for bioaerosols standoff detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buteau, Sylvie; Stadnyk, Laurie; Rowsell, Susan; Simard, Jean-Robert; Ho, Jim; Déry, Bernard; McFee, John

    2007-09-01

    An efficient standoff biological warfare detection capability could become an important asset for both defence and security communities based on the increasing biological threat and the limits of the presently existing protection systems. Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) has developed, by the end of the 90s, a standoff bioaerosol sensor prototype based on intensified range-gated spectrometric detection of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). This LIDAR system named SINBAHD monitors the spectrally resolved LIF originating from inelastic interactions with bioaerosols present in atmospheric cells customizable in size and in range. SINBAHD has demonstrated the capability of near real-time detection and classification of bioaerosolized threats at multi-kilometre ranges. In spring 2005, DRDC has initiated the BioSense demonstration project, which combines the SINBAHD technology with a geo-referenced Near InfraRed (NIR) LIDAR cloud mapper. SINBAHD is now being used to acquire more signatures to add in the spectral library and also to optimize and test the new BioSense algorithm strategy. In September 2006, SINBAHD has participated in a two-week trial held at DRDC-Suffield where different open-air wet releases of live and killed bioagent simulants, growth media and obscurants were performed. An autoclave killing procedure was performed on two biological materials (Bacillus subtilis var globigii or BG, and Bacillus thuringiensis or Bt) before being aerosolized, disseminated and spectrally characterized with SINBAHD. The obtained results showed no significant impact of this killing process on their normalised spectral signature in comparison with their live counterparts. Correlation between the detection signals from SINBAHD, an array of slit samplers and a FLuorescent Aerosol Particle Sensor (C-FLAPS) was obtained and SINBAHD's sensitivity could then be estimated. At the 2006 trial, a detection limit of a few tens of Agent Containing Particles per Liter of Air (ACPLA) was obtained

  12. Determination of phosphorus in steel by the combined technique of laser induced breakdown spectrometry with laser induced fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Naoya; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2009-09-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) combined with laser induced fluorescence spectrometry (LIFS) has been applied for detection of trace-level phosphorus in steel. The plasma induced by irradiation of Nd:YAG laser pulse for ablation was illuminated by the 3rd harmonic of Ti:Sapphire laser tuned to one of the resonant lines for phosphorus in the wavelength region of 253-256 nm. An excitation line for phosphorus was selected to give the highest signal-to-noise ratio. Fluorescence signals, P213.62 and P214.91 nm, were observed with high selectivity at the contents as low as several tens µg g - 1 . Fluorescence intensities were in a good linear correlation with the contents. Fluorescence intensity ratio of a collisionally assisted line (213.62 nm) to a direct transition line (214.91 nm) was discussed in terms of the analytical conditions and experimental results were compared with a calculation based on rate equations. Since the fluorescence signal light in the wavelength range longer than 200 nm can be transmitted relatively easily, even through fiber optics of moderate length, LIBS/LIFS would be a versatile technique in on-site applications for the monitoring of phosphorus contents in steel.

  13. Reflectance, scattering, and laser induced fluorescence for the detection of dental caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drakaki, Eleni; Makropoulou, Myrsini; Khabbaz, Maruan; Serafetinides, Alexandros A.

    2003-10-01

    Directional dependence of reflected laser light and of the laser induced fluorescence signals performed both on the intact hard dental tissues, such as enamel, dentine, cementum and on the tissues pathologically affected by caries (superficial, intermediate, and deep). The laser induced fluorescence spectra were collected at different angles of observation and were correlated with the different scattering and reflectance properties of the hard dental samples

  14. Simultaneous measurement of Raman scattering and laser-induced OH fluorescence in nonpremixed turbulent jet flames.

    PubMed

    Barlow, R S; Dibble, R W; Lucht, R P

    1989-03-01

    Spontaneous Raman scattering and laser-induced fluorescence are combined to perform simultaneous point measurements of major species concentrations, temperature, and hydroxyl radical concentration in turbulent nonpremixed flames. The Raman-scattering data for major species concentrations and temperature characterize the instantaneous, local, collisional quenching environment of the OH molecule. Collisional quenching corrections are applied for each laser shot so that absolute hydroxyl concentrations are obtained in turbulent flames using linear laser-induced fluorescence. PMID:19749889

  15. Determination of cobalt in low-alloy steels using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy combined with laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiaming; Guo, Lianbo; Zhao, Nan; Yang, Xinyan; Yi, Rongxing; Li, Kuohu; Zeng, Qingdong; Li, Xiangyou; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Lu, Yongfeng

    2016-05-01

    Cobalt element plays an important role for the properties of magnetism and thermology in steels. In this work, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy combined with laser-induced fluorescence (LIBS-LIF) was studied to selectively enhance the intensities of Co lines. Two states of Co atoms were resonantly excited by a wavelength-tunable laser. LIBS-LIF with ground-state atom excitation (LIBS-LIFG) and LIBS-LIF with excited-state atom excitation (LIBS-LIFE) were compared. The results show that LIBS-LIFG has analytical performance with LoD of 0.82μg/g, R(2) of 0.982, RMSECV of 86μg/g, and RE of 9.27%, which are much better than conventional LIBS and LIBS-LIFE. This work provided LIBS-LIFG as a capable approach for determining trace Co element in the steel industry. PMID:26946032

  16. A handheld laser-induced fluorescence detector for multiple applications.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiao-Xia; Li, Han-Yang; Fang, Pan; Pan, Jian-Zhang; Fang, Qun

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a compact handheld laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detector based on a 450 nm laser diode and quasi-confocal optical configuration with a total size of 9.1 × 6.2 × 4.1 cm(3). Since there are few reports on the use of 450 nm laser diode in LIF detection, especially in miniaturized LIF detector, we systematically investigated various optical arrangements suitable for the requirements of 450 nm laser diode and system miniaturization, including focusing lens, filter combination, and pinhole, as well as Raman effect of water at 450 nm excitation wavelength. As the result, the handheld LIF detector integrates the light source (450 nm laser diode), optical circuit module (including a 450 nm band-pass filter, a dichroic mirror, a collimating lens, a 525 nm band-pass filter, and a 1.0mm aperture), optical detector (miniaturized photomultiplier tube), as well as electronic module (including signal recording, processing and displaying units). This detector is capable of working independently with a cost of ca. $2000 for the whole instrument. The detection limit of the instrument for sodium fluorescein solution is 0.42 nM (S/N=3). The broad applicability of the present system was demonstrated in capillary electrophoresis separation of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled amino acids and in flow cytometry of tumor cells as an on-line LIF detector, as well as in droplet array chip analysis as a LIF scanner. We expect such a compact LIF detector could be applied in flow analysis systems as an on-line detector, and in field analysis and biosensor analysis as a portable universal LIF detector. PMID:26838391

  17. Characterisation of CFRP surface contamination by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, Pawel H.; Sawczak, Miroslaw; Wandowski, Tomasz; Ostachowicz, Wieslaw M.; Cenian, Adam

    2014-03-01

    The application of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) in aeronautics has been increasing. The CFRP elements are joint using rivets and adhesive bonding. The reliability of the bonding limits the use of adhesive bonding for primary aircraft structures, therefore it is important to assess the bond quality. The performance of adhesive bonds depends on the physico-chemical properties of the adhered surfaces. This research is focused on characterization of surfaces before bonding. In-situ examination of large surface materials, determine the group of methods that are preferred. The analytical methods should be non-destructive, enabling large surface analysis in relatively short time. In this work a spectroscopic method was tested that can be potentially applied for surface analysis. Four cases of surface condition were investigated that can be encountered either in the manufacturing process or during aircraft service. The first case is related to contamination of CFRP surface with hydraulic fluid. This fluid reacts with water forming a phosphoric acid that can etch the CFRP. Second considered case was related to silicone-based release agent contamination. These agents are used during the moulding process of composite panels. Third case involved moisture content in CFRP. Moisture content lowers the adhesion quality and leads to reduced performance of CFRP resulting in reduced performance of the adhesive bond. The last case concentrated on heat damage of CFRP. It was shown that laser induced fluorescence method can be useful for non-destructive evaluation of CFRP surface and some of the investigated contaminants can be easily detected.

  18. Single-shot, volumetrically illuminated, three-dimensional, tomographic laser-induced-fluorescence imaging in a gaseous free jet.

    PubMed

    Halls, Benjamin R; Thul, Daniel J; Michaelis, Dirk; Roy, Sukesh; Meyer, Terrence R; Gord, James R

    2016-05-01

    Single-shot, tomographic imaging of the three-dimensional concentration field is demonstrated in a turbulent gaseous free jet in co-flow using volumetrically illuminated laser-induced fluorescence. The fourth-harmonic output of an Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm is formed into a collimated 15 × 20 mm2 beam to excite the ground singlet state of acetone seeded into the central jet. Subsequent fluorescence is collected along eight lines of sight for tomographic reconstruction using a combination of stereoscopes optically coupled to four two-stage intensified CMOS cameras. The performance of the imaging system is evaluated and shown to be sufficient for recording instantaneous three-dimensional features with high signal-to-noise (130:1) and nominal spatial resolution of 0.6-1.5 mm at x/D = 7-15.5. PMID:27137614

  19. Characterization of the COBRA triple-nozzle gas-puff valve using planar laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grouchy, P. W. L.; Rosenberg, E.; Qi, N.; Kusse, B. R.; Kroupp, E.; Fisher, A.; Maron, Y.; Hammer, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    We present neutral density measurements of argon (Ar) injected into the 70 mm outer diameter, 24 mm axial length, outflow region of the triple-nozzle gas-puff valve fielded for gas-puff z-pinch experiments on the (1 MA, 100-200 ns) COBRA generator at Cornell University. Measurements are obtained by planar laser induced fluorescence of (λ = 266 nm, E = 80 mJ, Δt = 3 ns) frequency-quadrupled Nd:YAG laser light, absorbed by acetone dopant introduced into the Ar at 7% by pressure. Results are acquired 500μs after valve opening, the time of current initiation during z-pinch experiments. Number density plots are obtained across the Outer (O), Inner (I) and Center (C) puffs, with nozzle backing pressures {O:I:C} = {1:3:8}psia and {4:0:10}psia, delivering `uniform' and `hollow' profiles respectively. The total mass per unit length in these puffs is 22±0.4 μgcm-1 and 47±1 μgcm-1. Density measurement precision is ±5×1015 cm-3.

  20. Photophysics of Laser Dye-Doped Polymer Membranes for Laser-Induced Fluorescence Photogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorrington, Adrian A.; Jones, Thomas W.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2004-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence target generation in dye-doped polymer films has recently been introduced as a promising alternative to more traditional photogrammetric targeting techniques for surface profiling of highly transparent or reflective membrane structures. We investigate the photophysics of these dye-doped polymers to help determine their long-term durability and suitability for laser-induced fluorescence photogrammetric targeting. These investigations included experimental analysis of the fluorescence emission pattern, spectral content, temporal lifetime, linearity, and half-life. Results are presented that reveal an emission pattern wider than normal Lambertian diffuse surface scatter, a fluorescence time constant of 6.6 ns, a pump saturation level of approximately 20 micro J/mm(exp 2), and a useful lifetime of more than 300,000 measurements. Furthermore, two demonstrations of photogrammetric measurements by laser-induced fluorescence targeting are presented, showing agreement between photogrammetric and physically measured dimensions within the measurement scatter of 100 micron.

  1. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of coronary arteries for open-heart surgery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Roderick S.; Gladysz, D.; Brown, Derek W.; Higginson, Lyall A. J.

    1991-07-01

    A technique utilizing laser induced fluorescence has been developed to obtain direct real-time imaging of the coronary artery network for open heart surgery applications. Both excimer pumped dye and cw argon-ion laser radiation transmitted through a fused silica fiber were used as laser sources to irradiate swine, bovine, and human cadaver hearts whose coronary arteries had been injected with strongly fluorescent dyes. The laser induces fluorescence originating from within the coronary arteries and detected by the surgeon's eye, allows the entire coronary network to be directly viewed. A comparison between laser induced fluorescence and the use of direct visual inspection of arteries following injection of the dye Cardio-Green(R) as well as conventional thermal imaging is presented. The limitations imposed on each technique by layers of fat on top of the coronary arteries are also described. The possibility of using these techniques to detect mechanical or laser beam perforations during laser endarterectomy procedures is discussed.

  2. Acetone

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetone ; CASRN 67 - 64 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  3. Detection of trace phosphorus in steel using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy combined with laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Shen, X K; Wang, H; Xie, Z Q; Gao, Y; Ling, H; Lu, Y F

    2009-05-01

    Monitoring of light-element concentration in steel is very important for quality assurance in the steel industry. In this work, detection in open air of trace phosphorus (P) in steel using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) combined with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has been investigated. An optical parametric oscillator wavelength-tunable laser was used to resonantly excite the P atoms within plasma plumes generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. A set of steel samples with P concentrations from 3.9 to 720 parts in 10(6) (ppm) were analyzed using LIBS-LIF at wavelengths of 253.40 and 253.56 nm for resonant excitation of P atoms and fluorescence lines at wavelengths of 213.55 and 213.62 nm. The calibration curves were measured to determine the limit of detection for P in steel, which is estimated to be around 0.7 ppm. The results demonstrate the potential of LIBS-LIF to meet the requirements for on-line analyses in open air in the steel industry. PMID:19412215

  4. Means and method for capillary zone electrophoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edwards; Kuhr, Werner G.

    1991-04-09

    A means and method for capillary zone electrphoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection. A detector is positioned on the capillary tube of a capillary zone electrophoresis system. The detector includes a laser which generates a laser beam which is imposed upon a small portion of the capillary tube. Fluorescence of the elutant electromigrating through the capillary tube is indirectly detected and recorded.

  5. Recognition of edible oil by using BP neural network and laser induced fluorescence spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Tao-tao; Chen, Si-ying; Zhang, Yin-chao; Guo, Pan; Chen, He; Zhang, Hong-yan; Liu, Xiao-hua; Wang, Yuan; Bu, Zhi-chao

    2013-09-01

    In order to accomplish recognition of the different edible oil we set up a laser induced fluorescence spectrum system in the laboratory based on Laser induced fluorescence spectrum technology, and then collect the fluorescence spectrum of different edible oil by using that system. Based on this, we set up a fluorescence spectrum database of different cooking oil. It is clear that there are three main peak position of different edible oil from fluorescence spectrum chart. Although the peak positions of all cooking oil were almost the same, the relative intensity of different edible oils was totally different. So it could easily accomplish that oil recognition could take advantage of the difference of relative intensity. Feature invariants were extracted from the spectrum data, which were chosen from the fluorescence spectrum database randomly, before distinguishing different cooking oil. Then back propagation (BP) neural network was established and trained by the chosen data from the spectrum database. On that basis real experiment data was identified by BP neural network. It was found that the overall recognition rate could reach as high as 83.2%. Experiments showed that the laser induced fluorescence spectrum of different cooking oil was very different from each other, which could be used to accomplish the oil recognition. Laser induced fluorescence spectrum technology, combined BP neural network,was fast, high sensitivity, non-contact, and high recognition rate. It could become a new technique to accomplish the edible oil recognition and quality detection.

  6. Means and method for capillary zone electrophoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Kuhr, Werner G.

    1996-02-20

    A means and method for capillary zone electrphoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection. A detector is positioned on the capillary tube of a capillary zone electrophoresis system. The detector includes a laser which generates a laser beam which is imposed upon a small portion of the capillary tube. Fluorescence of the elutant electromigrating through the capillary tube is indirectly detected and recorded.

  7. MULTISPECTRAL LASER-INDUCED FLUORESCENCE IMAGING SYSTEM FOR LARGE BIOLOGICAL SAMPLES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Presented is a detailed description of a common aperture, multispectral laser-induced fluorescence imaging system developed to allow detection of fecal matter on agricultural products. With an expanded, 355 nm, Nd:YAG laser beam as the excitation source, fluorescence emission images in the blue, gr...

  8. Detection of fecal residue on poultry carcasses by laser induced fluorescence imaging techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential use of laser-induced fluorescence imaging techniques was investigated for the detection of diluted fecal matters from various parts of the digestive tract, including colon, ceca, small intestine, and duodenum, on poultry carcasses. One of the challenges for using fluorescence imaging f...

  9. Measurement of Fluorescence Spectra from Ambient Aerosol Particles Using Laser-induced Fluorescence Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketani, F.; Kanaya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Moteki, N.; Takegawa, N.

    2011-12-01

    To obtain the information of composition of organic aerosol particles in atmosphere, we developed an instrument using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. To measure the fluorescence from a particle, we employed two lasers. Scattering light signal derived from a single particle upon crossing the 635nm-CW laser triggers the 266nm-pulsed laser to excite the particle. Fluorescence from the particle in the wavelength range 300-600nm is spectrally dispersed by a grating spectrometer and then detected by a 32-Ch photo-multiplier tube(PMT). The aerosol stream is surrounded by a coaxial sheath air flow and delivered to the optical chamber at atmospheric pressure. Using PSL particles with known sizes, we made a calibration curve to estimate particle size from scattering light intensity. With the current setup of the instrument we are able to detect both scattering and fluorescence from particles whose diameters are larger than 0.5um. Our system was able to differentiate particles composed of mono-aromatic species (e.g. Tryptophan) from those of Riboflavin, by their different fluorescence wavelengths. Also, measurements of fluorescence spectra of ambient particles were demonstrated in our campus in Yokosuka city, facing Tokyo bay in Japan. We obtained several types of florescence spectra in the 8 hours. Classification of the measured fluorescence spectra will be discussed in the presentation.

  10. Laser-induced fluorescence of fused silica irradiated by ArF excimer laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Haibo; Yuan Zhijun; Zhou Jun; Dong Jingxing; Wei Yunrong; Lou Qihong

    2011-07-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of high-purity fused silica irradiated by ArF excimer laser is studied experimentally. LIF bands of the fused silica centered at 281 nm, 478 nm, and 650 nm are observed simultaneously. Furthermore, the angular distribution of the three fluorescence peaks is examined. Microscopic image of the laser modified fused silica indicates that scattering of the generated fluorescence by laser-induced damage sites is the main reason for the angular distribution of LIF signals. Finally, the dependence of LIF signals intensities of the fused silica on laser power densities is presented. LIF signals show a squared power density dependence, which indicates that laser-induced defects are formed mainly via two-photon absorption processes.

  11. Standoff Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds In Air Using Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Jerry; Alexander, Alonzo; Wiggins, Delonia; Williams, Sydney; Akpovo, Charlemagne; Mezonlin, Ephrem; Johnson, Joseph, III; CenterPlasma Science; Technology (CePaST) Team

    2011-10-01

    The use of laser-induced fluorescence has proven to be an excellent method of detecting important intermediates in turbulent systems. However, Acetylene detection in air at ambient temperatures has proven more challenging. Molecular spectra were collected in laser induced acetylene plasmas using a 250 mJ Nd:YAG laser and an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to achieve the 260 nm wavelength and greater than 3 mJ energy necessary to excite acetylene molecules. The acetylene laser-induced fluorescence excitation was observed at the 228 nm wavelength. Using various concentration ratios, acetylene was mixed with air to specifically determine the capabilities of standoff acetylene detection at atmospheric pressure. These results will lead to further research and development of turbulence based battlefield ready detection devices. Research supported in part by NSF grants to FAMU.

  12. Quantitative imaging of equivalence ratios in a natural gas SI engine flow bench using acetone fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben, L.; Charnay, G.; Bazile, R.; Ferret, B.

    2007-07-01

    Although compressed natural gas (CNG) is a gaseous fuel, the mixing process is quite different from air-liquid fuel mixing. The aim of this work is to understand the effect of the fuel feeding system on mixture homogeneity. Planar laser-induced fluorescence has been used to produce quantitative equivalence ratio maps in the intake manifold. Fluorescence results from excitation of doped acetone in natural gas. Its emission is proportional to the fuel mass. Collected images were post processed to obtain the equivalence ratio. This work shows the difference between continuous injection at low speed and sequential injection. In the first part, we present the behaviour of the injection jet in the intake manifold. The second part displays a smaller section of the duct upstream of the intake valve. The study shows clearly the stratification effect obtained with continuous injection at low speed. A very homogenous mixture is observed for sequential injection with fuel trapped for a cycle and aspirated in the next cycle.

  13. Laser-induced fluorescence of metal-atom impurities in a neutral beam

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, C.F.; Pyle, R.V.; Sabetimani, Z.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1984-10-01

    The need to limit impurities in fusion devices to low levels is well known. We have investigated, by the technique of laser-induced fluorescence, the concentration of heavy-metal atoms in a neutral beam caused by their evaporation from the hot filaments in a conventional high-current multifilament hydrogen-ion source.

  14. Raman and Fluorescence Study of Erbium-Doped Laser-Induced Crystals-in-Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Brian; Veenhuizen, Keith; Stone, Adam; Jain, Himanshu; Dierolf, Volkmar

    Laser induced crystallization of glasses is a spatially selective process which has the potential to produce photonic integrated circuits in a glass matrix. Low temperature Combined Excitation Emission Spectroscopy in Er:LaBGeO5 show that erbium incorporates at predominantly one majority site in both glass-ceramics and laser-induced crystals-in-glass, but that other minority sites also exist. The energy levels of the majority site were quantified. The fluorescence characteristics of the erbium ions in any site in the laser-induced crystals were found to be only weakly influenced by the irradiation conditions during growth. On the other hand, a hidden parameter, potentially boron deficiency-related defects, resulted in a significant change in the incorporation behavior of the erbium ions. Simultaneous scanning confocal Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the energies of the Raman modes are shifted, and the erbium fluorescence intensity varies, in a non-uniform manner, despite the host glass being homogeneously doped, across the cross-sections of laser-induced crystals in glass. These fluctuations within the Raman and fluorescence are spatially correlated, implying that different erbium sites form preferentially at different locations in the crystal cross-section.

  15. Laser-induced blood serum fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy for cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Wang, Qiuyu; Lin, Junxiu

    1999-09-01

    Laser induced auto-fluorescence and Raman spectra of serum from cancerous and normal people are measured and analyzed. The content of (beta) -carotene in the serum from normal man is higher than that from the cancerous one, this result agrees with other reports.

  16. Application of laser-induced fluorescence to neoplasm diagnosis using bis-1[alanylo-N]ethylodeuteroporphyrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwasny, Miroslaw; Mierczyk, Zygmunt; Graczyk, Alfreda; Chwirot, S.; Chwirot, B. W.; Pirozynska, E.; Zuchewicz, K.

    1996-03-01

    This study presents possibilities of neoplasm localization applying the laser-induced fluorescence method using new porphyrin derivatives -- complexes of protoporphyrin and amino acids. These compounds show a strong retention in diseased tissues. Their spectral characteristics and photosensitizing properties are similar to hematoporphyrin derivatives, so they can be used both in the photodynamic therapy method and neoplasm diagnosis.

  17. Laser-induced fluorescence measurement of the dynamics of a pulsed planar sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Goeckner, M.J.; Malik, S.M. ); Conrad, J.R. ); Breun, R.A. )

    1994-04-01

    Using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) the ion density near the edge of an expanding plasma sheath has been measured. These measurements utilized a transition of N[sup +][sub 2] [the P12 component of the [ital X] [sup 2][Sigma][sup +][sub [ital g

  18. Time-synchronized continuous wave laser-induced fluorescence on an oscillatory xenon discharge

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, N. A.; Cappelli, M. A.; Hargus, W. A. Jr.

    2012-11-15

    A novel approach to time-synchronizing laser-induced fluorescence measurements to an oscillating current in a 60 Hz xenon discharge lamp using a continuous wave laser is presented. A sample-hold circuit is implemented to separate out signals at different phases along a current cycle, and is followed by a lock-in amplifier to pull out the resulting time-synchronized fluorescence trace from the large background signal. The time evolution of lower state population is derived from the changes in intensity of the fluorescence excitation line shape resulting from laser-induced fluorescence measurements of the 6s{sup Prime }[1/2]{sub 1}{sup 0}-6p{sup Prime }[3/2]{sub 2} xenon atomic transition at {lambda}= 834.68 nm. Results show that the lower state population oscillates at twice the frequency of the discharge current, 120 Hz.

  19. Time-synchronized continuous wave laser-induced fluorescence on an oscillatory xenon discharge.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, N A; Cappelli, M A; Hargus, W A

    2012-11-01

    A novel approach to time-synchronizing laser-induced fluorescence measurements to an oscillating current in a 60 Hz xenon discharge lamp using a continuous wave laser is presented. A sample-hold circuit is implemented to separate out signals at different phases along a current cycle, and is followed by a lock-in amplifier to pull out the resulting time-synchronized fluorescence trace from the large background signal. The time evolution of lower state population is derived from the changes in intensity of the fluorescence excitation line shape resulting from laser-induced fluorescence measurements of the 6s(')[1/2](1)(0)-6p(')[3/2](2) xenon atomic transition at λ = 834.68 nm. Results show that the lower state population oscillates at twice the frequency of the discharge current, 120 Hz. PMID:23206061

  20. Transient Fluorescence Spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence lifetimes of terbium doped dipicolinic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makoui, Anali

    We have investigated the use of deep UV laser induced fluorescence for the sensitive detection and spectroscopic lifetime studies of terbium doped dipicolinic acid (DPA-Tb) and used this to study the optical characteristics of DPA which is a chemical surrounding most bacterial spores. Background absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra, and Excitation Emission Matrix (EEM) spectra were made of the DPA-Tb complex, using both fixed 266 nm wavelength and tunable (220 nm--280 nm) UV laser excitations. Of importance, the fluorescence lifetimes of the four main fluorescence peaks (488 nm, 543 nm, 581 nm, and 618 nm) of the DPA-Tb complex have been measured for the first time to our knowledge. The lifetimes of all the fluorescing lines have been measured as a function of DPA-Tb concentration, solvent pH, and solvent composition, including that for the weakest fluorescing line of DPA-Tb at 618 nm. In addition, a new spectroscopic lifetime measurement technique, which we call "Transient Fluorescence Spectroscopy", was developed. In this technique, a weak, quasi-CW, amplitude modulated UV laser (8.5 kHz) was used to measure the lifetimes of the fluorescence lines, and yields insight into energy transfer and excitation lifetimes within the system. This technique is especially useful when a high power laser is not either available or not suitable. In the latter case, this would be when a high power pulsed deep-UV laser could produce bleaching or destruction of the biological specimen. In addition, this technique simulated the excitation and fluorescence emission of the DPA-Tb using a 4-level energy model, and solved the dynamic transient rate equations to predict the temporal behavior of the DPA-Tb emitted fluorescence. Excellent agreement between the experiments and the simulation were found. This technique has the potential to provide a more accurate value for the fluorescence lifetime values. In addition, with the use of asymmetric excitation waveforms, the dynamic

  1. Performance Characteristics of Compact Mobile LIFS (Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectrum) Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomida, Takayuki; Nishizawa, Naoto; Sakurai, Kosuke; Suganumata, Hikaru; Tsukada, Shodai; Song, Sung-Moo; Park, Ho-Dong; Saito, Yasunori

    2016-06-01

    We developed a compact but versatile laser-induced fluorescence spectrum (LIFS) lidar that has potential use for material or aerosol identification outside experimental rooms. The compactness and mobility of the LIFS lidar means observations can be more freely conducted at any place and any time. Its performance characteristics were validated by threedimensional fluorescence imaging of targets and remote detection of quasi bio/organic aerosols.

  2. Analysis of laser-induced fluorescence spectra of in vitro plant tissue cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Muñoz, Ana Celia; Gutiérrez-Pulido, Humberto; Rodríguez-Domínguez, José Manuel; Gutiérrez-Mora, Antonia; Rodríguez-Garay, Benjamín; Cervantes-Martínez, Jesús

    2007-04-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for monitoring the development and stress detection of in vitro tissue cultures in a nondestructive and noninvasive way. The changes in LIF spectra caused by the induction of organogenesis, the increase of the F690/F740 ratio as a result of the stress originated in the organogenic explants due to shoot emergence, and the relationship between fluorescence spectra and shoot development were detected by LIF through closed containers of Saintpaulia ionantha.

  3. Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) from plant foliage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, Emmett W.; Williams, Darrel L.

    1987-01-01

    The fluorescence spectra and fluorescence induction kinetics of green plants excited at 337 nm by a laser were studied. They correlate with plant type, as well as with changes in the physiology of the plant as the result of stress. The plant types studied include herbaceous dicots, monocots, hardwoods, conifers, and algae. These plant types could be identified on the basis of differences in either the number of fluorescent bands or the relative intensity of the bands. Differences in fluorescent spectra which could be related to vigor status are observed in conifers located in an area of high atmospheric deposition. Changes in the fluorescence spectra and induction kinetics are also seen in plants grown under conditions of nutrient deficiency and drought stress.

  4. Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) from plant foliage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Williams, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    The fluorescence spectra and fluorescence induction kinetics of green plants excited at 337 nm by a laser were studied. They correlate with plant type, as well as with changes in the physiology of the plant as the result of stress. The plant types studied include herbaceous dicots, monocots, hardwoods, conifers, and algae. These plant types could be identified on the basis of differences in either the number of fluorescent bands or the relative intensity of the bands. Differences in fluorescent spectra which could be related to vigor status are observed in conifers located in an area of high atmospheric deposition. Changes in the fluorescence spectra and induction kinetics are also seen in plants grown under conditions of nutrient deficiency and drought stress.

  5. Laser-induced fluorescence and dispersed fluorescence spectroscopy of jet-cooled 1-phenylpropargyl radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Neil J.; Nakajima, Masakazu; Gibson, Bligh A.; Schmidt, Timothy W.; Kable, Scott H.

    2009-04-01

    The D1(A2″)-D0(A2″) electronic transition of the resonance-stabilized 1-phenylpropargyl radicalooled discharge of 3-phenyl-1-propyne, has been investigated in detail by laser-induced fluorescence excitation and dispersed single vibronic level fluorescence (SVLF) spectroscopy. The transition is dominated by the origin band at 21 007 cm-1, with weaker Franck-Condon activity observed in a' fundamentals and even overtones and combinations of a″ symmetry. Ab initio and density functional theory calculations of the D0 and D1 geometries and frequencies were performed to support and guide the experimental assignments throughout. Analysis of SVLF spectra from 16 D1 vibronic levels has led to the assignment of 15 fundamental frequencies in the excited state and 19 fundamental frequencies in the ground state; assignments for many more normal modes not probed directly by fluorescence spectroscopy are also suggested. Duschinsky mixing, in which the excited state normal modes are rotated with respect to the ground state modes, is prevalent throughout, in vibrations of both a' and a″ symmetry.

  6. Spatial variability of oceanic phycoerythrin spectral types derived from airborne laser-induced fluorescence emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Wright, C. Wayne; Kana, Todd M.; Swift, Robert N.; Yungel, James K.

    1998-07-01

    We report spatial variability of oceanic phycoerythrin spectral types detected by means of a blue spectral shift in airborne laser-induced fluorescence emission. The blue shift of the phycoerythrobilin fluorescence is known from laboratory studies to be induced by phycourobilin chromophore substitution at phycoerythrobilin chromophore sites in some strains of phycoerythrin-containing marine cyanobacteria. The airborne 532-nm laser-induced phycoerythrin fluorescence of the upper oceanic volume showed distinct segregation of cyanobacterial chromophore types in a flight transect from coastal water to the Sargasso Sea in the western North Atlantic. High phycourobilin levels were restricted to the oceanic (oligotrophic) end of the flight transect, in agreement with historical ship findings. These remotely observed phycoerythrin spectral fluorescence shifts have the potential to permit rapid, wide-area studies of the spatial variability of spectrally distinct cyanobacteria, especially across interfacial regions of coastal and oceanic water masses. Airborne laser-induced phytoplankton spectral fluorescence observations also further the development of satellite algorithms for passive detection of phytoplankton pigments. Optical modifications to the NASA Airborne Oceanographic Lidar are briefly described that permitted observation of the fluorescence spectral shifts.

  7. Using a Diode Laser for Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Yang; Whitten, J. E.

    2001-08-01

    The construction and use of a laser fluorimeter from a 635-nm red diode laser and an amplified photodiode detector are described. The low cost and monochromatic nature of diode lasers make them attractive as excitation sources for educational fluorescence experiments. Use of this type of fluorimeter is demonstrated by measuring fluorescence signals for various concentrations of Nile blue A dissolved in methanol; concentrations as low as 1 ppb are easily detected. The use of this instrument for monitoring the decomposition of a dye by an oxidizing agent is demonstrated by measuring the decay of fluorescence as a function of time for a 1 ppm Nile blue A solution after the addition of sodium hypochlorite.

  8. Early diagnosis of gastric cancer with laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joffe, Alexander Y.; Sayenko, Valeriy F.; Denisov, Nikolay A.; Dets, Sergiy M.; Buryi, Alexander N.

    1999-02-01

    Optical biopsy of stomach mucosa was performed afterwards oral administration of encapsulated hyperflav (single dose was chosen to provide 0.1 - 0.15 mg/kg b.w.) A sufficient fluorescence contrast of suspicions versus normal tissue was obtained after incubation time from 4 to 10 hours. Fluorescence was induced by He - Cd laser coupled to fiber optic probe inserted into a biopsy channel of the endoscope. Fluorescent spectra were recorded in the range from 500 nm up to 700 nm with 2 nm resolution. We took two groups of patients with benign and malignant ulcer of the stomach and erosive gastritis. The first group consisted of 59 patients (male/female 36/23) was carried out with optical biopsy of stomach mucosa. The second group consisted of 60 patients (male/female 39/21) was carried out by routine method: gastroscopy and biopsy from 5 - 7 places of macroscopically changed mucosa.

  9. Laser-Induced Molecular Fluorescence: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    1981-01-01

    Describes a companion experiment to the experimental study of the di-iodide visible absorption spectrum. Experimental details, interpretation, and data analysis are provided for an analysis of the di-iodide fluorescence excited by a visible laser, using a Raman instrument. (CS)

  10. Development of bio-photonic sensor based on laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chan Kyu

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has been shown to be potentially useful for identifying microorganisms in real time. It is a selective and sensitive technique because the excitation is performed at one wavelength while the emission is monitored at longer wavelengths so that background from the excitation source can be eliminated. This specialized optical property of LIF can be applied to development of an optical sensor capable of quickly, non-invasively, and quantitatively probing complex biochemical transformations in microorganisms. Various bio-photonic optical fiber sensors based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy were developed as diagnostic tools for microorganisms. In the first phase, the enhancement of the sensitivity and selectivity of the optical sensor system focused on diagnosis of human breast cancer cell lines and Azotobacter vinelandii (an aerobic soil-dwelling organism). Auto-fluorescence spectra from human breast cancer cell lines and Azotobacter vinelandii corresponding to different growth environments were investigated. Then, the study has expanded to include the use of gold nanoparticles for specific DNA detection. The use of gold nanoparticles opens a door into construction of a compact, highly specific, inexpensive and user-friendly optical fiber senor for specific DNA detection. An optical fiber laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) sensor based has been developed to detect single-strand (ss) DNA hybridization at the femtomolar level. Effects of various experimental parameters and configuration were investigated in order to optimize sensor performance and miniaturize sensor size. Key words. Laser induced fluorescence, human breast cancer cell lines, Azotobacter vinelandii, DNA, gold nanoparticles.

  11. Quantitative analysis of essential oils of Thymus daenensis using laser-induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Khoshroo, H; Khadem, H; Bahreini, M; Tavassoli, S H; Hadian, J

    2015-11-10

    Laser-induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy are used for the investigation of different genotypes of Thymus daenensis native to the Ilam province of Iran. Different genotypes of T. daenensis essential oils, labeled T1 through T7, possess slight differences with regard to the composition of the thymol. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method is performed to determine the concentration of each constituent as a reference method. The Raman spectra of different concentrations of pure thymol dissolved in hexane as standard samples are obtained via a laboratory prototype Raman spectroscopy setup for the calculation of the calibration curve. The regression coefficient and limit of detection are calculated. The possibility of the differentiation of different genotypes of T. daenensis is also examined by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, although we do not know the exact amounts of their components. All the fluorescence spectral information is used jointly by cluster analysis to differentiate between 7 genotypes. Our results demonstrate the acceptable precision of Raman spectroscopy with GC-MS and corroborate the capacity of Raman spectroscopy in applications in the quantitative analysis field. Furthermore, the cluster analysis results show that laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy is an acceptable technique for the rapid classification of different genotypes of T. daenensis without having any previous information of their exact amount of constituents. So, the ability to rapidly and nondestructively differentiate between genotypes makes it possible to efficiently select high-quality herbs from many samples. PMID:26560783

  12. Droplet temperature measurement based on 2-color laser-induced exciplex fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuyin; Zhang, Gaoming; Xu, Min; Wang, Jianxin

    2013-08-01

    Measurements of liquid phase temperature distributions in liquid-vapor co-existing conditions (such as in evaporating sprays) are important to understand the physics of droplet evaporation. The techniques based on laser-induced fluorescence are not suitable for evaporating case since both liquid and vapor phases emit fluorescence with the same wavelength. In this study, the fluorescence from liquid and vapor phases was separated by use of laser-induced exciplex fluorescence (LIEF) technique. Two fluorescence bands from the liquid phase fluorescence spectra were detected simultaneously, and their intensity ratio was correlated to the liquid phase temperature. For the LIEF imaging system, FB-DEMA- n-hexane was selected as it was a typical LIEF system for the vapor concentration diagnostic, and thus easily to be extended to a simultaneous diagnostic on the vapor concentration and the droplet temperature. The fluorescence spectra were obtained in the temperature range from 303 to 423 K. The effects of liquid temperature, liquid pressure, dopant concentration and laser energy on the temperature measurement were investigated. The results show a good linear relationship between the fluorescence ratio and the temperature function. Increasing the dopant concentration can raise the signal-to-noise ratio but deteriorate temperature sensitivity. The optimal range of the dopant concentration was found between 0.1 % and 0.5 %. After calibration, the technique was applied to a monosized droplet stream, and the measurement results demonstrated excellent measurement accuracy with error below 1 % in the range of 303-423 K.

  13. Using the laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in the differentiation between normal and neoplastichuman breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Hage, R; Galhanone, P R; Zângaro, R A; Rodrigues, K C; Pacheco, M T T; Martin, A A; Netto, M M; Soares, F A; da Cunha, I W

    2003-01-01

    This article reports results of the in vitro study for potential evaluation of the laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in the differentiation between normal and neoplastic human breast tissue. A coumarine dye laser pumped by nitrogen laser generated an excitation light centered at 458 nm. In order to collect the fluorescence signal was used an optical fiber catheter coupled to a spectrometer and CCD detector. Fluorescence spectra were recorded from normal and neoplastic (benign and malignant) human breast tissue, adding up 94 different areas. The discrimination between normal and neoplasm groups reach a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. PMID:14505202

  14. Comparisons of laser-saturated, laser-induced, and planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of nitric oxide in a lean direct-injection spray flame.

    PubMed

    Cooper, C S; Ravikrishna, R V; Laurendeau, N M

    1998-07-20

    We report quantitative, spatially resolved laser-saturated fluorescence (LSF), linear laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements of nitric oxide (NO) concentration in a preheated, lean direct-injection spray flame at atmospheric pressure. The spray is produced by a hollow-cone, pressure-atomized nozzle supplied with liquid heptane, and the overall equivalence ratio is unity. NO is excited by means of the Q(2)(26.5) transition of the gamma(0, 0) band. LSF and LIF detection are performed in a 2-nm region centered on the gamma(0, 1) band. PLIF detection is performed in a broad ~70-nm region with a peak transmission at 270 nm. Quantitative radial NO profiles obtained by LSF are presented and analyzed so as to correct similar LIF and PLIF profiles. Excellent agreement is achieved among the three fluorescence methodologies. PMID:18285943

  15. Laser-induced fluorescence of phosphors for remote cryogenic thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beshears, D. L.; Capps, G. J.; Cates, M. R.; Simmons, C. M.; Schwenterly, S. W.

    1990-01-01

    Remote cryogenic temperature measurements can be made by inducing fluorescence in phosphors with temperature-dependent emissions and measuring the emission lifetimes. The thermographic phosphor technique can be used for making precision, noncontact, cryogenic-temperature measurements in electrically hostile environments, such as high dc electric or magnetic fields. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is interested in using these thermographic phosphors for mapping hot spots on cryogenic tank walls. Europium-doped lanthanum oxysulfide (La2O2S:Eu) and magnesium fluorogermanate doped with manganese (Mg4FGeO6:Mn) are suitable for low-temperature surface thermometry. Several emission lines, excited by a 337-nm ultraviolet laser, provide fluorescence lifetimes having logarithmic dependence with temperature from 4 to above 125 K. A calibration curve for both La2O2S:Eu and Mg4FGeO6:Mn is presented, as well as emission spectra taken at room temperature and 11 K.

  16. DNA fragment sizing and sorting by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Mark L.; Jett, James H.; Keller, Richard A.; Marrone, Babetta L.; Martin, John C.

    1996-01-01

    A method is provided for sizing DNA fragments using high speed detection systems, such as flow cytometry to determine unique characteristics of DNA pieces from a sample. In one characterization the DNA piece is fragmented at preselected sites to produce a plurality of DNA fragments. The DNA piece or the resulting DNA fragments are treated with a dye effective to stain stoichiometrically the DNA piece or the DNA fragments. The fluorescence from the dye in the stained fragments is then examined to generate an output functionally related to the number of nucleotides in each one of the DNA fragments. In one embodiment, the intensity of the fluorescence emissions from each fragment is linearly related to the fragment length. The distribution of DNA fragment sizes forms a characterization of the DNA piece for use in forensic and research applications.

  17. Laser-induced fluorescence studies of caries model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Ekaterina G.; Uzunov, Tzonko T.; Avramov, Lachezar A.

    2004-06-01

    The goal of this study is fluorescence investigations in the process of caries growth in presence of bacteria metabolism products. Spectra of teeth, illuminated with 337 nm nitrogen laser were measured during in vitro caries formation. Spectra, obtained from sound tooth consist of one intensive peak at 480-500 nm and one secondary peak at 430-450 nm. In the process of the caries formation of the teeth we observed increase in intensity at 430-450 nm and appearance of two peaks in the red spectral region at 590-650 nm. A general decrease in the intensity of the fluorescence signal is observed, but changes in spectral shape are more significant. We observe that the peak increase at 430-450 nm is related to the tooth demineralization. Bacteria presence and their metabolism products induce fluorescence signal in the red region. These results allow consideration of caries in terms of two different processes, which lead to its formation: demineralization and metabolism products increase, which are caused by bacteria activities, and could be used to obtain a more complete picture of caries formation.

  18. Planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of high-enthalpy free jet flow with nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Jennifer L.; Mcmillin, Brian K.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    1992-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements of property fields in a high-enthalpy, supersonic, underexpanded free jet generated in a reflection-type shock tunnel are reported. PLIF images showing velocity and temperature sensitivity are presented. The inferred radial velocity and relative rotational temperature fields are found to be in agreement with those predicted by a numerical simulation of the flowfield using the method of characteristics.

  19. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Analysis of Protein-Based Binding Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevin, A.; Cather, S.; Anglos, D.; Fotakis, Costas

    Laser-induced fluorescence of intrinsic fluorophores of organic media found in paintings (casein, animal glue and egg proteins) provides a means of characterising general classes of media depending on the amino acid composition and presence of degradation cross-linkages. Wavelength dependence of spectra is investigated for non-destructive and non-invasive analyses of thin films of protein-based binding media.

  20. Radiative lifetimes in B I using ultraviolet and vacuum-ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brian, T. R.; Lawler, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes of the eight lowest even parity levels in the doublet system of B I are measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence in the UV and VUV on an atomic beam of boron. The accurate lifetimes provide a base for improved determination of absolute transition probabilities in B I. The techniques described are broadly applicable to measurement of lifetimes of levels with transitions in the visible, UV, and VUV in almost any element.

  1. Multi-target PCR analysis by capillary electrophoresis and laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei; Han, Dai-Shu; Yuan, Ju; Andrieu, Jean-Marie

    1994-03-01

    Quantitative analysis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified HIV-1 DNA or cDNA fragments is attained using an automated system that combines capillary-gel electrophoresis (CGE) for high-efficiency separation and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for high-sensitivity detection. This system enables the detection of PCR-amplified multiple target DNA or cDNA in the same tube by a single injection with high precision.

  2. Simultaneous laser-induced fluorescence and Raman imaging inside a hydrogen engine.

    PubMed

    Engel, Sascha Ronald; Koch, Peter; Braeuer, Andreas; Leipertz, Alfred

    2009-12-10

    We report on the simultaneous and two-dimensional measurement of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and Raman scattering (Ramanography) applied inside a hydrogen internal combustion (IC) engine. Two different LIF tracer molecules, triethylamine (TEA) and trimethylamine (TMA), were used for the LIF experiments. The LIF and Raman results were found to be in very good agreement. The simultaneous application of Ramanography and LIF imaging indicated that TMA is the more suitable LIF tracer molecule, compared to TEA. PMID:20011004

  3. Laser-induced fluorescence of phosphors for remote cryogenic thermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Beshears, D.L.; Capps, G.J.; Cates, M.R.; Simmons, C.M.; Schwenterly, S.W.

    1990-01-01

    Remote cryogenic temperature measurements can be made by inducing fluorescence in phosphors with temperature-dependent emissions and measuring the emission lifetimes. The thermographic phosphor technique can be used for making precision, non-contact, cryogenic temperature measurements in electrically hostile environments, such as high DC electric or magnetic fields. NASA is interested in utilizing these thermographic phosphors for mapping hot spots on cryogenic tank walls. Europium-doped lanthanum oxysulfide (La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Eu) and magnesium fluorogermanate doped with manganese (Mg{sub 4}(F)GeO{sub 6}:Mn) are suitable for low-temperature surface thermometry. Several emission lines, excited by a 337 nm UV laser, provide fluorescence lifetimes having logarithmic dependence with temperatures from 4 to 125 Kelvin. A calibration curve for both La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Eu and Mg{sub 4}(F)GeO{sub 6}:Mn are presented as well as emission spectra taken at room temperature and 7 Kelvin.

  4. DNA fragment sizing and sorting by laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.H.; Hammond, M.L.; Keller, R.A.; Marrone, B.L.; Martin, J.C.

    1992-12-31

    A method is provided for obtaining DNA fingerprints using high speed detection systems, such as flow cytometry to determine unique characteristics of DNA pieces from a selected sample. In one characterization the DNA piece is fragmented at preselected sites to produce a plurality of DNA fragments. The DNA piece or the resulting DNA fragments are treated with a dye effective to stain stoichiometrically the DNA fragments. The fluorescence from the dye in the stained fragments is then examined to generate an output functionally related to the number of nucleotides in each one of the DNA fragments. In one embodiment, the intensity of the fluorescence emissions from each fragment is directly proportional to the fragment length. Additional dyes can be bound to the DNA piece and DNA fragments to provide information additional to length information. Oligonucleotide specific dyes and/or hybridization probes can be bound to the DNA fragments to provide information on oligonucleotide distribution or probe hybridization to DNA fragments of different sizes.

  5. Naphthalene laser-induced fluorescence measurements at low temperature and pressure.

    PubMed

    Combs, Christopher S; Clemens, Noel T

    2016-05-01

    Few studies on naphthalene vapor fluorescence have been conducted at low temperature and pressure conditions. The current study focuses on conducting measurements of naphthalene quenching and absorption cross section in a temperature- and pressure-regulated test cell with 266 nm laser excitation. The test-cell measurements were of the naphthalene-fluorescence lifetime and integrated fluorescence signal over the temperature range of 100 to 525 K and pressure range of 1 to 40 kPa in air. These data enabled the calculation of naphthalene-fluorescence quantum yield and absorption cross section over the range of temperatures and pressures tested, which were then fit to simple functional forms for future use in the calibration of naphthalene laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements. Furthermore, the variation of naphthalene-fluorescence signal with respect to temperature was investigated for four different excitation wavelengths, demonstrating that a two-line naphthalene LIF thermometry technique may be feasible. PMID:27140385

  6. Optofluidic jet waveguide for laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Persichetti, Gianluca; Testa, Genni; Bernini, Romeo

    2012-12-15

    An optofluidic water-jet waveguide on chip for fluorescence analysis is presented. A high-speed water stream produced by means of a microchannel acts at the same time as the solution to analyze and as the collecting optical waveguide. The absence of solid walls and the very optically smooth surface of the liquid stream permits a strong increase of the signal-to-noise ratio. The device layout allows a self-alignment direct coupling of a water-jet waveguide with a multimode optical fiber connected to the detector. The performances of the integrated system are tested on Cy5 water solutions. For a 4.5 mm long water-jet waveguide, the measured limit of detection (LOD) is 2.56 nM and filter-free detection is possible with an LOD of 6.11 nM. PMID:23258023

  7. Standoff detection: distinction of bacteria by hyperspectral laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Arne; Duschek, Frank; Fellner, Lea; Grünewald, Karin M.; Hausmann, Anita; Julich, Sandra; Pargmann, Carsten; Tomaso, Herbert; Handke, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Sensitive detection and rapid identification of hazardous bioorganic material with high sensitivity and specificity are essential topics for defense and security. A single method can hardly cover these requirements. While point sensors allow a highly specific identification, they only provide localized information and are comparatively slow. Laser based standoff systems allow almost real-time detection and classification of potentially hazardous material in a wide area and can provide information on how the aerosol may spread. The coupling of both methods may be a promising solution to optimize the acquisition and identification of hazardous substances. The capability of the outdoor LIF system at DLR Lampoldshausen test facility as an online classification tool has already been demonstrated. Here, we present promising data for further differentiation among bacteria. Bacteria species can express unique fluorescence spectra after excitation at 280 nm and 355 nm. Upon deactivation, the spectral features change depending on the deactivation method.

  8. DETERMINATION OF ALIPHATIC AMINES IN WATER USING DERIVATIZATION WITH FLUORESCEIN ISOTHIOCYANATE AND CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS/LASER-INDUCED FLUORESCENCE DETECTION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detection-oriented derivatization of aliphatic amines and amine functional groups in coumpounds of environmental interest was studied using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) with separation/determination by capillary electrophoresis/laser-induced fluorescence. Determinative level...

  9. Simultaneous visualization of water and hydrogen peroxide vapor using two-photon laser-induced fluorescence and photofragmentation laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Kajsa; Johansson, Olof; Aldén, Marcus; Bood, Joakim

    2014-01-01

    A concept based on a combination of photofragmentation laser-induced fluorescence (PF-LIF) and two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) is for the first time demonstrated for simultaneous detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and water (H2O) vapor. Water detection is based on two-photon excitation by an injection-locked krypton fluoride (KrF) excimer laser (248.28 nm), which induces broadband fluorescence (400-500 nm) from water. The same laser simultaneously photodissociates H2O2, whereupon the generated OH fragments are probed by LIF after a time delay of typically 50 ns, by a frequency-doubled dye laser (281.91 nm). Experiments in six different H2O2/H2O mixtures of known compositions show that both signals are linearly dependent on respective species concentration. For the H2O2 detection there is a minor interfering signal contribution from OH fragments created by two-photon photodissociation of H2O. Since the PF-LIF signal yield from H2O2 is found to be at least ∼24,000 times higher than the PF-LIF signal yield from H2O at room temperature, this interference is negligible for most H2O/H2O2 mixtures of practical interest. Simultaneous single-shot imaging of both species was demonstrated in a slightly turbulent flow. For single-shot imaging the minimum detectable H2O2 and H2O concentration is 10 ppm and 0.5%, respectively. The proposed measurement concept could be a valuable asset in several areas, for example, in atmospheric and combustion science and research on vapor-phase H2O2 sterilization in the pharmaceutical and aseptic food-packaging industries. PMID:25358016

  10. Spectroscopic properties and laser induced fluorescence determination of some endocrine disrupting compounds.

    PubMed

    Benmansour, Badr; Stephan, Ludovic; Cabon, Jean-Yves; Deschamps, Laure; Giamarchi, Philippe

    2011-05-01

    This work presents spectroscopic properties of some Endocrine Disrupting Compounds (EDCs), frequently found in food and in natural water. Studied molecules belong to the groups of phenolic and phthalate EDCs. In a first part, we have examined their absorption and fluorescence properties. Fluorescence emission wavelengths are about 300 nm for phenolic compounds and 360 nm for phtalate compounds; main excitation wavelengths being comprised between 210 nm and 230 nm. Fluorescence lifetimes measured are short (about 4 ns) and the fluorescence quantum yield has been determined. In a second part, to avoid the time consuming solvent extraction step, an analytical application to evaluate the performance of a direct analysis by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of ECDs traces in tap water and in raw water is presented. Good detection limits have been obtained, i.e.: 0.35 µg.L(-1) of chlorophenol in tap water, which are always lower than the reported Predictive Non Efficient Concentration (PNEC). PMID:20084436

  11. Laser-induced fluorescence in malignant and normal tissue in mice injected with two different carotenoporphyrins.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, H.; Johansson, J.; Svanberg, K.; Svanberg, S.; Jori, G.; Reddi, E.; Segalla, A.; Gust, D.; Moore, A. L.; Moore, T. A.

    1994-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) was used to characterise the localisation of an intravenously administered trimethylated carotenoporphyrin [CP(Me)3] and a trimethoxylated carotenoporphyrin [CP(OMe)3] in an intramuscularly transplanted malignant tumour (MS-2 fibrosarcoma) and healthy muscle in female Balb/c mice, 3, 24, 48 and 96 h post injection. The fluorescence was induced with a dye laser pumped by a nitrogen laser, emitting light at 425 nm. The fluorescence spectra were recorded in the region 455-760 nm using a polychromator equipped with an image-intensified CCD camera. The tumour/peritumoral muscle ratio was about 5:1 for CP(Me)3 and about 6:1 for CP(OMe)3 in terms of the background-free fluorescence intensity, which peaked at about 655 nm. By including the endogenous tissue fluorescence, the contrast was further enhanced by a factor of approximately 2. PMID:7947092

  12. Planar temperature measurement in compressible flows using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1991-01-01

    A laser-induced iodine fluorescence technique that is suitable for the planar measurement of temperature in cold nonreacting compressible air flows is investigated analytically and demonstrated in a known flow field. The technique is based on the temperature dependence of the broadband fluorescence from iodine excited by the 514-nm line of an argon-ion laser. Temperatures ranging from 165 to 245 K were measured in the calibration flow field. This technique makes complete, spatially resolved surveys of temperature practical in highly three-dimensional, low-temperature compressible flows.

  13. LIFES: Laser Induced Fluorescence and Environmental Sensing. [remote sensing technique for marine environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, W. R.; Stephenson, D. G.; Measures, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    A laboratory investigation has been conducted to evaluate the detection and identification capabilities of laser induced fluorescence as a remote sensing technique for the marine environment. The relative merits of fluorescence parameters including emission and excitation profiles, intensity and lifetime measurements are discussed in relation to the identification of specific targets of the marine environment including crude oils, refined petroleum products, fish oils and algae. Temporal profiles displaying the variation of lifetime with emission wavelength have proven to add a new dimension of specificity and simplicity to the technique.

  14. Analysis of laser-induced fluorescence spectra of in vitro plant tissue cultures.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Muñoz, Ana Celia; Gutiérrez-Pulido, Humberto; Rodríguez-Domínguez, José Manuel; Gutiérrez-Mora, Antonia; Rodríguez-Garay, Benjamín; Cervantes-Martínez, Jesús

    2007-04-10

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for monitoring the development and stress detection of in vitro tissue cultures in a nondestructive and noninvasive way. The changes in LIF spectra caused by the induction of organogenesis, the increase of the F690/F740 ratio as a result of the stress originated in the organogenic explants due to shoot emergence, and the relationship between fluorescence spectra and shoot development were detected by LIF through closed containers of Saintpaulia ionantha. PMID:17384731

  15. (2+1) laser-induced fluorescence of spin-polarized hydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Everest, Michael A; Alexander, Andrew J; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2010-11-01

    We report the measurement of the spin polarization of hydrogen (SPH) atoms by (2+1) laser-induced fluorescence, produced via the photodissociation of thermal HBr molecules with circularly polarized 193 nm light. This scheme, which involves two-photon laser excitation at 205 nm and fluorescence at 656 nm, offers an experimentally simpler polarization-detection method than the previously reported vacuum ultraviolet detection scheme, allowing the detection of SPH atoms to be performed more straightforwardly, from the photodissociation of a wide range of molecules and from a variety of collision experiments. PMID:21054033

  16. Analysis of biological samples by capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Szöko, Eva; Tábi, Tamás

    2010-12-15

    In this paper an overview is provided on practical difficulties as well as applications of capillary electrophoresis coupled to laser induced fluorescence detection methods in the field of analysis of biological samples. Various methodological approaches elaborated for determination of small molecules, peptides and proteins are outlined. Besides giving an overview on detection based on native fluorescence, immune and enzyme assays, the main focus is the problematics of sample derivatization and achievable detection sensitivities in the analysis of real biological samples. The characteristics and applicability of the most commonly used labeling reagents are discussed in details. PMID:20719451

  17. A comparison of planar, laser-induced fluorescence, and high-sensitivity interferometry techniques for gas-puff nozzle density measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, S. L.; Weber, B. V.; Mosher, D.; Phipps, D. G.; Stephanakis, S. J.; Commisso, R. J.; Qi, N.; Failor, B. H.; Coleman, P. L.

    2008-10-15

    The distribution of argon gas injected by a 12-cm-diameter triple-shell nozzle was characterized using both planar, laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and high-sensitivity interferometry. PLIF is used to measure the density distribution at a given time by detecting fluorescence from an acetone tracer added to the gas. Interferometry involves making time-dependent, line-integrated gas density measurements at a series of chordal locations that are then Abel inverted to obtain the gas density distribution. Measurements were made on nominally identical nozzles later used for gas-puff Z-pinch experiments on the Saturn pulsed-power generator. Significant differences in the mass distributions obtained by the two techniques are presented and discussed, along with the strengths and weaknesses of each method.

  18. Laser-induced fluorescence of formaldehyde in combustion using third harmonic Nd:YAG laser excitation.

    PubMed

    Brackmann, Christian; Nygren, Jenny; Bai, Xiao; Li, Zhongshan; Bladh, Henrik; Axelsson, Boman; Denbratt, Ingemar; Koopmans, Lucien; Bengtsson, Per-Erik; Aldén, Marcus

    2003-12-01

    Formaldehyde (CH2O) is an important intermediate species in combustion processes and it can through laser-induced fluorescence measurements be used for instantaneous flame front detection. The present study has focussed on the use of the third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm as excitation wavelength for formaldehyde, and different dimethyl ether (C2H6O) flames were used as sources of formaldehyde in the experiments. The investigations included studies of the overlap between the laser profile and the absorption lines of formaldehyde, saturation effects and the potential occurrence of laser-induced photochemistry. The technique was applied for detection of formaldehyde in an internal combustion engine operated both as a spark ignition engine and as a homogenous charge compression ignition engine. PMID:14607232

  19. Laser-induced fluorescence of ketones at elevated temperatures for pressures up to 20 bars by using a 248 nm excitation laser wavelength: experiments and model improvements.

    PubMed

    Braeuer, Andreas; Beyrau, Frank; Leipertz, Alfred

    2006-07-10

    Laser-induced fluorescence of acetone and 3-pentanone for a 248 nm excitation wavelength was investigated for conditions relevant for internal combustion engines regarding temperature, pressure, and gas composition. An optically accessible calibration chamber with continuous gas flow was operated by using CO2 and air as a bath gas. According to the varying pressure and temperature conditions during the compression stroke of a spark ignition engine, fluorescence experiments were performed under isothermal pressure variations from 1 to 20 bars for different temperatures between 293 and 700 K. The ketone fluorescence behavior predictions, based on a model previously developed by Thurber et al. [Appl. Opt. 37, 4963 (1998)], were found to overestimate the pressure-related fluorescence increase for high temperature and small wavelength excitation at 248 nm. The parameters influencing the model only in the large vibrational energy regime were newly adjusted, which resulted in an improved model with a better agreement with the experiment. The model's validity for excitation at larger wavelengths was not influenced. For the air bath gas an additional collision and vibrational energy sensitive quenching rate was implemented in the model for both tracers, acetone and 3-pentanone. PMID:16807609

  20. Laser-induced fluorescence of ketones at elevated temperatures for pressures up to 20 bars by using a 248 nm excitation laser wavelength: experiments and model improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braeuer, Andreas; Beyrau, Frank; Leipertz, Alfred

    2006-07-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence of acetone and 3-pentanone for a 248 nm excitation wavelength was investigated for conditions relevant for internal combustion engines regarding temperature, pressure, and gas composition. An optically accessible calibration chamber with continuous gas flow was operated by using CO2 and air as a bath gas. According to the varying pressure and temperature conditions during the compression stroke of a spark ignition engine, fluorescence experiments were performed under isothermal pressure variations from 1 to 20 bars for different temperatures between 293 and 700 K. The ketone fluorescence behavior predictions, based on a model previously developed by Thurber et al. [Appl. Opt. 37, 4963 (1998)], were found to overestimate the pressure-related fluorescence increase for high temperature and small wavelength excitation at 248 nm. The parameters influencing the model only in the large vibrational energy regime were newly adjusted, which resulted in an improved model with a better agreement with the experiment. The model's validity for excitation at larger wavelengths was not influenced. For the air bath gas an additional collision and vibrational energy sensitive quenching rate was implemented in the model for both tracers, acetone and 3-pentanone.

  1. Laser-induced tissue fluorescence in radiofrequency tissue-fusion characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Lei; Fonseca, Martina B.; Arya, Shobhit; Kudo, Hiromi; Goldin, Robert; Hanna, George B.; Elson, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    Heat-induced tissue fusion is an important procedure in modern surgery and can greatly reduce trauma, complications, and mortality during minimally invasive surgical blood vessel anastomosis, but it may also have further benefits if applied to other tissue types such as small and large intestine anastomoses. We present a tissue-fusion characterization technology using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, which provides further insight into tissue constituent variations at the molecular level. In particular, an increase of fluorescence intensity in 450- to 550-nm range for 375- and 405-nm excitation suggests that the collagen cross-linking in fused tissues increased. Our experimental and statistical analyses showed that, by using fluorescence spectral data, good fusion could be differentiated from other cases with an accuracy of more than 95%. This suggests that the fluorescence spectroscopy could be potentially used as a feedback control method in online tissue-fusion monitoring.

  2. Multispectral laser-induced fluorescence imaging system for large biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moon S.; Lefcourt, Alan M.; Chen, Yud-Ren

    2003-07-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence imaging system developed to capture multispectral fluorescence emission images simultaneously from a relatively large target object is described. With an expanded, 355-nm Nd:YAG laser as the excitation source, the system captures fluorescence emission images in the blue, green, red, and far-red regions of the spectrum centered at 450, 550, 678, and 730 nm, respectively, from a 30-cm-diameter target area in ambient light. Images of apples and of pork meat artificially contaminated with diluted animal feces have demonstrated the versatility of fluorescence imaging techniques for potential applications in food safety inspection. Regions of contamination, including sites that were not readily visible to the human eye, could easily be identified from the images.

  3. A unified planar measurement technique for compressible flows using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1992-01-01

    A unified laser-induced fluorescence technique for conducting planar measurements of temperature, pressure and velocity in nonreacting, highly compressible flows has been developed, validated and demonstrated. Planar fluorescence from iodine, seeded into air, was induced by an argon-ion laser and collected using a liquid-nitrogen cooled CCD camera. In the measurement technique, temperature is determined from the fluorescence induced with the laser operated broad band. Pressure and velocity are determined from the shape and position of the fluorescence excitation spectrum which is measured with the laser operated narrow band. The measurement approach described herein provides a means of obtaining accurate, spatially-complete maps of the primary flow field parameters in a wide variety of cold supersonic and transonic flows.

  4. Analysis of laser-induced-fluorescence carbon monoxide measurements in turbulent nonpremixed flames.

    PubMed

    Mokhov, A V; Levinsky, H B; van der Meij, C E; Jacobs, R A

    1995-10-20

    The influence of fluctuating concentrations and temperature on the laser-induced-fluorescence (LIF) measurement of CO in turbulent flames is described, under conditions in which the fluorescence and the temperature are measured independently. The analysis shows that correlations between CO concentration and temperature can bias the averaged mole fraction extracted from LIF measurements. The magnitude of the bias can exceed the order of the average CO mole fraction. Further, LIF measurements of CO concentrations in a turbulent, nonpremixed, natural gas flame are described. The averaged CO mole fractions are derived from the fluorescence measurements by the use of flame temperatures independently measured by coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. Analysis of the fluctuations in measured temperature and fluorescence indicates that temperature and CO concentrations in flame regions with intensive mixing are indeed correlated. In the flame regions where burnout of CO has ceased, the LIF measurements of the CO mole fraction correspond to the probe measurements in exhaust. PMID:21060569

  5. Blood perfusion and pH monitoring in organs by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vari, Sandor G.; Papazoglou, Theodore G.; Pergadia, Vani R.; Stavridi, Marigo; Snyder, Wendy J.; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Duffy, J. T.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Thomas, Reem; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1994-01-01

    Sensitivity of laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) in detecting a change in tissue pH, and blood perfusion was determined. Rabbits were anesthetized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated. The arterial and venous blood supplies of the kidney were isolated and ligated to alter the perfusion. The femoral artery was cannulated to extract samples for blood gas analysis. A 308-nm XeCl was used as an excitation source. A 600 micrometers core diameter fiber was used for fluorescence acquisition, and the spectra analyzed by an optical multichannel analyzer (EG & G, OMA III). the corresponding intensity ratio R equals INADH / ICOLL was used as an index for respiratory acidosis. Blood perfusion was assessed using the following algorithm: (IELAS minus ICOLL) divided by (INADH minus ICOLL). The intensity ratio linearly decreased with the reduction of blood perfusion. When we totally occluded the artery the ratio decreased tenfold when compared to the ratio of a fully perfused kidney. Results of monitoring blood acidosis by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy shows a significant trend between pH and intensity ratio. Since all the slopes were negative, there is an obvious significant correlation between the pH and NADH.COLLAGEN RATIO. Blue-light-induced fluorescence measurements and ratio fluorometry is a sensitive method for monitoring blood perfusion and acidity or alkalinity of an organ.

  6. Beam power-dependent laser-induced fluorescence radiation quenching of silver-ion-exchanged glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahal, Arashmid; Khalesifard, Hamid Reza M.

    2007-04-01

    In this article, results of an investigation about the modification of silver ions embedded in a glass matrix under the action of a CW high-power Ar + laser beam, by means of laser-induced fluorescence, is reported. It is known [A. Nahal, H.R.M. Khalesifard, J. Mostafavi-Amjad, Appl. Phys. B 79 (2004) 513-518] that, as a result of the interaction of the laser beam with the sample, the embedded silver ions reduce to neutral ones and silver clusters are formed. We observed that the fluorescence radiation of the central part of the interaction area, on the sample, diminishes simultaneously with the formation of the neutral clusters. Further increase in the exposure time or the power of the beam results in reappearance of the fluorescence radiation, in the central part of the interaction area. We found that, during and after the interaction the spectrum of the fluorescence radiation changes. This makes it possible to study the laser-induced changes in the embedded silver ions and clusters, in real-time.

  7. Quasi-resonance enhancement of laser-induced-fluorescence diagnosis of endometriosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Ralph H., Jr.; Vancaillie, Thierry G.

    1990-05-01

    Endometriosis, a common disease in women in the reproductive age group, is defined pathologically by the presence of endometrial tissue (inner lining of the uterus) outside the uterus. The displaced tissue is histologically identical to endometrium. In addition to being a highly prevalent disease, this disease is associated with many distressing and debilitating symptoms. Motivated by the need to improve diagnosis by endoscopic imaging instrumentation, we have previously used several drugs to cause selective laser-induced fluorescence of active surgically induced endometriosis in the rabbit model in vivo using ultraviolet-wavelength (351.1 and 363.8 nm) excitation from an argon-ion laser. In the present study we have investigated methods of enhancing differentiation between normal and abnormal tissue by using other excitation wavelengths. In addition to an enhanced capability for detecting abnormal tissue, there are several other advantages associated with using visible-wavelength excitation, such as deeper penetration into the tissue, as well as increased equipment performance, reliability, versatility, and availability. The disadvantage is that because only wavelengths longer than the excitation wavelength can be used for detection, some of the spectral information is lost. Because human endomeiriosis samples were somewhat limited in quantity, as well as specimen size, we used normal ovarian tissue for the laser-induced-fluorescence differentiation-enhancement studies. Positive enhancement of the laser-induced- fluorescence differentiation was found in human ovarian tissue in vitro utilizing 514.5-nm excitation from an argonion laser. Additionally, preliminary verification of this concept was accomplished in active surgically induced endometriosis in the rabbit model in vivo with visible argon-ion laser excitation of two tetracycline-based drugs. Future experiments with other drug treatments and excitation/detection parameters are planned.

  8. Numerical analysis of quantitative measurement of hydroxyl radical concentration using laser-induced fluorescence in flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuang, Chen; Tie, Su; Yao-Bang, Zheng; Li, Chen; Ting-Xu, Liu; Ren-Bing, Li; Fu-Rong, Yang

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present work is to quantitatively measure the hydroxyl radical concentration by using LIF (laser-induced fluorescence) in flame. The detailed physical models of spectral absorption lineshape broadening, collisional transition and quenching at elevated pressure are built. The fine energy level structure of the OH molecule is illustrated to understand the process with laser-induced fluorescence emission and others in the case without radiation, which include collisional quenching, rotational energy transfer (RET), and vibrational energy transfer (VET). Based on these, some numerical results are achieved by simulations in order to evaluate the fluorescence yield at elevated pressure. These results are useful for understanding the real physical processes in OH-LIF technique and finding a way to calibrate the signal for quantitative measurement of OH concentration in a practical combustor. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11272338) and the Fund from the Science and Technology on Scramjet Key Laboratory, China (Grant No. STSKFKT2013004).

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence from N2(+) ions generated by a corona discharge in ambient air.

    PubMed

    Konthasinghe, Kumarasiri; Fitzmorris, Kristin; Peiris, Manoj; Hopkins, Adam J; Petrak, Benjamin; Killinger, Dennis K; Muller, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we present the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence from N2(+) ions via the B(2)Σu(+)-X(2)Σg(+) band system in the near-ultraviolet. The ions were generated continuously by a plasma glow discharge in low pressure N2 and by a corona discharge in ambient air. The fluorescence decay time was found to rapidly decrease with increasing pressure leading to an extrapolated decay rate of ≍10(10) s(-1) at atmospheric pressure. In spite of this quenching, we were able to observe laser induced fluorescence in ambient air by means of a time-gated spectral measurement. In the process of comparing the emission signal with that of N2 spontaneous Raman scattering, ion concentrations in ambient air of order 10(8-)10(10) cm(-3) were determined. With moderate increases in laser power and collection efficiency, ion concentrations of less than 10(6) cm(-3) may be measurable, potentially enabling applications in atmospheric standoff detection of ionizing radiation from hazardous radioactive sources. PMID:26414524

  10. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of chemo-drugs as biocompatible fluorophores: irinotecan, gemcitabine and navelbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motlagh, N. S. Hosseini; Parvin, P.; Ghasemi, F.; Atyabi, F.; Jelvani, S.; Abolhosseini, S.

    2016-07-01

    The fluorescence nature of chemo-drugs is useful for simultaneous cancer diagnosis and therapy. Here, the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) properties of irinotecan, gemcitabine and navelbine are extensively investigated. The UV photons provoke the desired transitions of the several chemo-drugs by virtue of the XeCl laser at 308 nm. It is shown that LIF spectra are strongly dependent on the fluorophore concentration, while no spectral shift is measured for irinotecan, gemcitabine and navelbine because of a large Stokes shift. On the other hand, doxorubicin is characterized by a large overlapping between absorption and emission spectra giving rise to a sensible red shift. The fluorescence extinction α and self-quenching k coefficients as well as the quantum yield η f of those chemo-drugs are determined accordingly. In fact, irinotecan shows the highest quantum efficiency among the chemo-drugs of interest.

  11. Laser-induced fluorescence determination of temperatures in low pressure flames.

    PubMed

    Rensberger, K J; Jeffries, J B; Copeland, R A; Kohse-Höinghaus, K; Wise, M L; Crosley, D R

    1989-09-01

    Spatially resolved temperatures in a variety of low pressure flames of hydrogen and hydrocarbons burning with oxygen and nitrous oxide are determined from OH, NH, CH, and CN laser-induced fluorescence rotational excitation spectra. Systematic errors arising from spectral bias, time delay, and temporal sampling gate of the fluorescence detector are considered. In addition, we evaluate the errors arising from the influences of the optical depth and the rotational level dependence of the fluorescence quantum yield for each radical. These systematic errors cannot be determined through goodness-of-fit criteria and they are much larger than the statistical precision of the measurement. The severity of these problems is different for each radical; careful attention to the experimental design details for each species is necessary to obtain accurate LIF temperature measurements. PMID:20555739

  12. Advanced double-pulse UV source for laser-induced fluorescence of bioaerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feugnet, Gilles; Grisard, Arnaud; Lallier, Eric; McIntosh, Lee; Hellström, Jonas

    2008-10-01

    To enhance discrimination of UV-laser-induced-fluorescence based bio-aerosol-detection-system, a UV-laser is described that allows multiple wavelength excitation of bio-aerosols and both fluorescence spectral and time-decay analysis. The latter requiring sub-ns pulse duration, a two-stage-amplifier boosts a 20-µJ-1064-nm-500-ps-actively-Q-Switch microchip-oscillator output energy up to 2.5 mJ. After frequency doubling and beam splitting, 20-µJ-293-and-337-nm pulses are generated by two different periodically-poled-KTP (parametric generation) and BBO (frequency doubling) crystal arrangements. In order to get distinct fluorescence signals for each wavelength, the beams are then time-delayed with two optical fibers of different lengths and launched into a chamber for bio-aerosol excitation connected to a fast detection system.

  13. Confocal, two-photon laser-induced fluorescence technique for the detection of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Reeves, M; Musculus, M; Farrell, P

    1998-10-01

    We describe a confocal two-photon laser-induced fluorescence scheme for the detection of gaseous NO. Excitation from a simple YAG-pumped Coumarin 450 dye system near 452.6 nm was used to promote the two-photon NO(A (2)?(+), nu? = 0 ? X (2)?, nu? = 0) transition in the gamma(0, 0) band. Subsequent fluorescence detection in the range 200-300 nm permitted almost total rejection of elastic and geometric scatter of laser radiation for excellent signal/noise ratio characteristics. The goal of the research was to apply NO fluorescence to a relatively realistic limited optical access combustion environment. A confocal optical arrangement was demonstrated for single-point measurements of NO concentration in gas samples and in atmospheric-pressure flames. The technique is suitable for applications that offer only a single direction for optical access and when significant elastic scatter is present. PMID:18301470

  14. Applications of capillary electrophoresis/laser-induced fluorescence detection to groundwater migration studies.

    PubMed

    Brumley, W C; Ferguson, P L; Grange, A H; Donnelly, J L; Farley, J W

    1996-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis has been applied to the determination of groundwater migration based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection and traditional spectrofluorimetry. Detection limits of injected dye-fluorescent whitening agent (tinopal) in the low ppt ranges have been accomplished with both a spectrofluorometer and with CE/LIF based on the HeCd laser. The real-world problem was the determination of groundwater migration between adjacent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Superfund sites. Fluorescent dyes were injected into wells and were discovered in monitoring wells by extracting pads that adsorbed the dye. The methodology based on CE/LIF exhibits increased specificity over existing methodology due to the separation and unique migration time of the dye. Additional studies were aimed at achieving sub-ppt levels in the water directly using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and field-amplified injection techniques. PMID:9384723

  15. Oh Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements in Nanosecond Pulse Discharge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Inchul; Adamovich, Igor V.; Lempert, Walter R.

    2010-06-01

    We present recent results of laser-induced fluorescence measurements of hydroxyl radical density in repetitively pulsed nanosecond plasmas, created using 10-20 nsec duration, high (up to 20 kV) voltage pulsers, capable of operation at repetition rates as high as 40-50 kHz. OH mole fraction as a function of time with respect to discharge creation is determined, with absolute calibration performed using a Hencken flat flame burner. This paper will focus on a series of low temperature, non-equilibrium kinetics measurements in hydrogen and hydrocarbon-air mixtures, with results compared to predictions of a recently developed plasma chemical oxidation model.

  16. Fungus covered insulator materials studied with laser-induced fluorescence and principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, M; Wallström, S; Sjöholm, M; Grönlund, R; Anderson, B; Larsson, A; Karlsson, S; Kröll, S; Svanberg, S

    2005-08-01

    A method combining laser-induced fluorescence and principal component analysis to detect and discriminate between algal and fungal growth on insulator materials has been studied. Eight fungal cultures and four insulator materials have been analyzed. Multivariate classifications were utilized to characterize the insulator material, and fungal growth could readily be distinguished from a clean surface. The results of the principal component analyses make it possible to distinguish between algae infected, fungi infected, and clean silicone rubber materials. The experiments were performed in the laboratory using a fiber-optic fluorosensor that consisted of a nitrogen laser and an optical multi-channel analyzer system. PMID:16105213

  17. Temperature measurements in hypersonic air flows using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation is reported of the use of laser-induced fluorescence on oxygen for the measurement of air temperature and its fluctuations owing to turbulence in hypersonic wind tunnel flows. The results show that for temperatures higher than 60 K and densities higher than 0.01 amagat, the uncertainty in the temperature measurement can be less than 2 percent if it is limited by photon-statistical noise. The measurement is unaffected by collisional quenching and, if the laser fluence is kept below 1.5 J/sq cm, it is also unaffected by nonlinear effects which are associated with depletion of the absorbing states.

  18. Quantitative characterization of a nonreacting, supersonic combustor flowfield using unified, laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, D. G.; Mcdaniel, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    A calibrated, nonintrusive optical technique, laser-induced iodine fluorescence (LIIF) was used to quantify the steady, compressible flowfield of a nonreacting, supersonic combustor. The combustor was configured with single and staged, transverse-air injection into a supersonic-air freestream behind a rearward-facing step. Pressure, temperature, two-velocity components, and injectant mole fraction were measured with high spatial resolution in the three-dimensional flowfields. These experimental results provide a benchmark set of data for validation of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes being developed to model supersonic combustor flowfields.

  19. Demonstration of the feasibility of laser induced fluorescence for arc jet flow diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    1989-01-01

    Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) studies are carried out on nitric oxide and oxygen molecules in the arc jet flows at the NASA Johnson Space Center Reentry Testing Facility. Measurements are taken in the free stream and from a blunt body shock layer. Tests are performed under different flow conditions to determine the feasibility and sensitivity of the LIF technique for various species. This is developed as a part of high enthalpy flow diagnostics and will be useful to elucidate the rotational and vibrational temperatures. Adequate sensitivity for the detection of O(2) and NO is demonstrated. Proposed improvements of the existing system are presented.

  20. Two-color planar laser-induced fluorescence thermometry in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, G. Andrew; Lucht, Robert P.; Laurendeau, Normand M

    2008-05-20

    We demonstrate a two-color planar laser-induced fluorescence technique for obtaining two-dimensional temperature images in water. For this method, a pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm excites a solution of temperature-sensitive rhodamine 560 and temperature-insensitive sulforhodamine 640. The resulting emissions are optically separated through filters and detected via a charged-couple device (CCD) camera system. A ratio of the two images yields temperature images independent of incident irradiance. An uncertainty in temperature of {+-}1.4 deg. C is established at the 95% confidence interval.

  1. Attogram detection limit for aqueous dye samples by laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Dovichi, N.J.; Martin, J.C.; Keller, R.A.

    1983-02-18

    A modified flow cytometer has been used to detect attogram quantities of aqueous rhodamine 6G by laser-induced fluorescence analysis. A detection limit of 28 attograms (35,000 molecules) was obtained, nearly two orders of magnitude better than earlier measurements. The detection limit in concentration units was 1.4 x 10/sup -13/ mole per liter. During the 1-second measurement period, the total volume sampled was 0.42 microliter. On average, only half a rhodamine 6G molecule was present in the 6-picoliter probed volume.

  2. Approach to single-molecule detection by laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Dovichi, N.J.; Martin, J.C.; Jett, J.H.; Trkula, M.; Keller, R.A.

    1983-08-01

    A sheath flow cuvette was evaluated in laser-induced fluorescence determination of aqueous rhodamine 6G. A detection limit of 18 attograms was obtained within a one-second signal integration time. The concentration detection limit was 8.9 x 10/sup -14/ mole per liter. An average of one-half rhodamine 6G molecule was present within the 11 pL excitation volume. However, during the signal integration time a total of 22,000 analyte molecules passed through the excitation in a 0.42 microliter volume.

  3. Laser Induced Fluorescence Measurements of Ion Velocity in Magnetic Cusped Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Natalia; Cappelli, Mark; Hargus, William, Jr.

    2012-10-01

    Cusped Field Thrusters (CFTs) are magnetized plasma accelerators that use strong cusps to shape the magnetic field and hence the electrostatic potential. The cusped magnetic field lines meter the electron transport to the anode and reduce the energetic ion flux towards the dielectric channel walls, thereby reducing the effects of erosion. This work presents time averaged laser induced fluorescence velocity measurements of the ions in the plumes of three CFT variants. These include the Cylindrical Hall Thruster (CHT), Cylindrical Cusped Field Thruster (CCFT), and Diverging Cusped Field Thruster (DCFT). Results indicate that magnetic cusps form equipotential surfaces, and that the majority of ion acceleration occurs outside of the thruster channels.

  4. Application of planar laser-induced fluorescence measurement techniques to study the heat transfer characteristics of parallel-plate heat exchangers in thermoacoustic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Mao, Xiaoan; Jaworski, Artur J.

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes the development of an experimental arrangement and the application of acetone-based planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurement techniques to study the unsteady characteristics of heat transfer processes in the parallel-plate heat exchangers of thermoacoustic devices. The experimental rig is a quarter-wavelength acoustic resonator where a standing wave imposes oscillatory flow conditions. Two mock-up heat exchangers, 'hot' and 'cold', have their fins kept at constant temperatures by electrical heating and water cooling, respectively. A purpose-designed acetone tracer seeding mechanism is used for PLIF temperature measurement. Acetone concentration is optimized from the viewpoint of PLIF signal intensity. Two-dimensional temperature distributions in the gas surrounding the heat exchanger plates, as a function of phase angle in the acoustic cycle, are obtained. Local and global (instantaneous and cycle-averaged) heat flux values on the fin surface are estimated and used to obtain the dependence of the space-cycle averaged Nusselt versus Reynolds number. Measurement uncertainties are discussed.

  5. [Characterization of Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence from Crude Oil Samples].

    PubMed

    Liu, De-qing; Luan, Xiao-ning; Han, Xiao-shuang; Guo, Jin-jia; An, Ju-bai; Zheng, Rong-er

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of laser induced time-resolved fluorescence technique for in-situ detection of underwater suspended oil spill, extensive investigations have been carried out with different densities of crude oil samples from six different wells of Shengli Oilfield in this work. It was found that the fluorescence emission durations of these crude oil samples were almost the same, the Gate Pulse Delay of DDG (Digital Delay Generator) in the ICCD started at 52ns and ended at 82ns with a width (FWHM) of 10 ns. It appears that the peak location and lifetime of fluorescence for different crude oil samples varied with their densities, and those with similar densities shared a similar lifespan with the closer peak locations of fluorescence. It is also observed that the peak of fluorescence remained the same location before reaching the maximum intensity, subsequently shift to longer wavelength as fluorescence attenuated from maximum intensity with a red shift among 17-30 nm varied with samples. This demonstrated that the decay rate of fluorescent components in the crude oils was different, and energy transfer between these components might exist. It is hoped that those obtained results and characteristics could be the useful information for identification of suspended spilled-oil underwater. PMID:26601371

  6. Parametric investigation of laser-induced fluorescence of solid-state uranyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangjun; Su, Yi; Monts, David L

    2008-10-23

    The combination of remote/standoff sensing and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy shows potential for detection of uranyl (UO2(2+)) compounds. Uranyl compounds exhibit characteristic emission in the 450-600 nm (22,200 to 16,700 cm(-1)) spectral region when excited by wavelengths in the ultraviolet or in the short-wavelength portion of the visible spectrum. We report a parametric study of the effects of excitation wavelength [including 532 nm (18,797 cm(-1)), 355 nm (28,169 cm(-1)), and 266 nm (37,594 cm(-1))] and excitation laser power on solid-state uranium compounds. The uranium compounds investigated include uranyl nitrate, uranyl sulfate, uranyl oxalate, uranium dioxide, triuranium octaoxide, uranyl acetate, uranyl formate, zinc uranyl acetate, and uranyl phosphate. We observed the characteristic uranyl fluorescence spectrum from the uranium compounds except for uranium oxide compounds (which do not contain the uranyl moiety) and for uranyl formate, which has a low fluorescence quantum yield. Relative uranyl fluorescence intensity is greatest for 355 nm excitation, and the order of decreasing fluorescence intensity with excitation wavelength (relative intensity/laser output) is 355 nm > 266 nm > 532 nm. For 532 nm excitation, the emission spectrum is produced by two-photon excitation. Uranyl fluorescence intensity increases linearly with increasing laser power, but the rate of fluorescence intensity increase is different for different emission bands. PMID:18823105

  7. UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and laser Doppler flowmetry in the diagnostics of alopecia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomorokha, Diana P.; Pigoreva, Yulia N.; Salmin, Vladimir V.

    2016-04-01

    Development of optical biopsy methods has a great interest for medical diagnostics. In clinical and experimental studies it is very important to analyze blood circulation quickly and accurately, thereby laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is widely used. UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (UV LIFS) is express highly sensitive and widely-spread method with no destructive impact, high excitation selectivity and the possibility to use in highly scattering media. The goal of this work was to assess a correlation of UV laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and laser Doppler flowmetry parameters, and a possibility to identify or to differentiate various types of pathological changes in tissues according to their autofluorescence spectra. Three groups of patients with diffuse (symptomatic) alopecia, androgenic alopecia, and focal alopecia have been tested. Each groups consisted of not less than 20 persons. The measurements have been done in the parietal and occipital regions of the sculls. We used the original automated spectrofluorimeter to record autofluorescence spectra, and standard laser Doppler flowmeter BLF-21 (Transonic Systems, Inc., USA) to analyze the basal levels of blood circulation. Our results show that UV LIFS accurately distinguishes the zones with different types of alopecia. We found high correlation of the basal levels of blood circulation and the integrated intensity of autofluorescence in the affected tissue.

  8. Erosion rate diagnostics in ion thrusters using laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaeta, C. J.; Matossian, J. N.; Turley, R. S.; Beattie, J. R.; Williams, J. D.; Williamson, W. S.

    1993-01-01

    We have used laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to monitor the charge-exchange ion erosion of the molybdenum accelerator electrode in ion thrusters. This real-time, nonintrusive method was implemented by operating a 30cm-diam ring-cusp thruster using xenon propellant. With the thruster operating at a total power of 5 kW, laser radiation at a wavelength of 390 nm (corresponding to a ground state atomic transition of molybdenum) was directed through the extracted ion beam adjacent to the downstream surface of the molybdenum accelerator electrode. Molybdenum atoms, sputtered from this surface as a result of charge-exchange ion erosion, were excited by the laser radiation. The intensity of the laser-induced fluorescence radiation, which is proportional to the sputter rate of the molybdenum atoms, was measured and correlated with variations in thruster operating conditions such as accelerator electrode voltage, accelerator electrode current, and test facility background pressure. We also demonstrated that the LIF technique has sufficient sensitivity and spatial resolution to evaluate accelerator electrode lifetime in ground-based test facilities.

  9. Two-photon Laser Induced Fluorescence on Xenon for Neutral Density and Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Drew; Galante, Matthew; Scime, Earl; Soderholm, Mark; Vandervort, Rober

    2013-10-01

    Many noble gasses are ideal species for plasma generation because of their relatively low ionization energies, very low electron affinities, and because the neutral and ion electronic configurations are easily probed spectroscopically. Laser induced fluorescence of a ground state neutral atom is particularly useful because it enables absolute signal calibration. We have identified a new two-photon-absorption laser-induced-fluorescence (TALIF) scheme for neutral xenon. The initial 5p6 ground state is pumped to the 5p5 7f state (ΔJ = 2) by two photons of wavelength approximately 209 nm, which then decays to the 5p5 6s state through single photon emission at 543 nm. Since the excitation is from the ground state, measurements of the fill gas provide absolute calibration. The pulsed TALIF laser (approx. 1 MWatt) with a very narrow line width (approx. 1 cm-1) enables the Doppler broadened line shape (superimposed on the isotopic splitting) to be measured. These measurements are obtained with confocal optics necessitating only a single lens and a single view port. We present spatially and temporally resolved neutral density and neutral temperature profiles in a xenon helicon plasma. Now at Wisconsin-Madison.

  10. Laser Induced Fluorescence For Measurement Of Lignin Concentrations In Pulping Liquors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, J. J.; Semerjian, H. G.; Biasca, K. L.; Attala, R.

    1988-11-01

    Laser excited fluorescence of pulping liquors was investigated for use in the pulp and paper industry for process measurement and control applications. Liquors from both mill and laboratory cooks were studied. A Nd-YAG pumped dye laser was used to generate the excitation wavelength of 280 nm; measurements were also performed using a commercially available fluorometer. Measurements on mill pulping liquors gave strong signals and showed changes in the fluorescence intensity during the cook. Absorption spectra of diluted mill liquor samples showed large changes during the cook. Samples from well controlled and characterized laboratory cooks showed fluorescence to be linear with concentration over two decades with an upper limit of approximately 1000 ppm dissolved lignin. At the end of these cooks a possible chemical change was indicated by an increase in the observed fluorescence intensity. Results indicate that lignin concentrations in pulping liquors can be accurately determined with fluorescence in the linear optical region over a greater dynamic range than absorption spectroscopy. Laser induced fluorescence may also provide an indication of chemical changes occurring in the lignin structure during a cook.

  11. Quenching-independent measurement of species concentrations in flames by laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, J.T.; Carter, C.D.; Laurendeau, N.M.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes work accomplished in the last two years on measurement of species concentrations in flames via laser-induced fluorescence. During this period, we have published absolute number densities of atomic hydrogen in subatmospheric, premixed C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/O{sub 2}/Ar flames at equivalence ratios of 1.0 and 1.7 via two-photon excited fluorescence. This work has led to the development of a new single-laser, two-step fluorescence method for the detection of atomic hydrogen in flames. Using photoionization controlled-loss spectroscopy (PICLS), we have verified the T{sup {minus}1/2} dependence of quenching on temperature for atomic hydrogen, in agreement with kinetic theory. Previous work on pyrometry using laser-saturated fluorescence (LSF) and the anomalous fluorescence from pyrene has evolved into publication of a major review paper on temperature measurements by light-scattering methods. Finally, we have demonstrated the feasibility of quantitative LSF measurements of NO concentration by obtaining relative saturation curves and NO fluorescence profiles. 25 refs.

  12. Bioaerosol detection and classification using dual excitation wavelength laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Per; Wästerby, Pär.; Gradmark, Per-Åke; Hedborg, Julia; Larsson, Anders; Landström, Lars

    2015-05-01

    We present results obtained by a detection system designed to measure laser-induced fluorescence from individual aerosol particles using dual excitation wavelengths. The aerosol is sampled from ambient air and via a 1 mm diameter nozzle, surrounded by a sheath air flow, confined into a particle beam. A continuous wave blue laser at 404 nm is focused on the aerosol beam and two photomultiplier tubes monitor the presence of individual particles by simultaneous measuring the scattered light and any induced fluorescence. When a particle is present in the detection volume, a laser pulse is triggered from an ultraviolet laser at 263 nm and the corresponding fluorescence spectrum is acquired with a spectrometer based on a diffraction grating and a 32 channel photomultiplier tube array with single-photon sensitivity. The spectrometer measures the fluorescence spectra in the wavelength region from 250 to 800 nm. In the present report, data were measured on different monodisperse reference aerosols, simulants of biological warfare agents, and different interference aerosol particles, e.g. pollen. In the analysis of the experimental data, i.e., the time-resolved scattered and fluorescence signals from 404 nm c.w. light excitation and the fluorescence spectra obtained by a pulsed 263 nm laser source, we use multivariate data analysis methods to classify each individual aerosol particle.

  13. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of colonic dysplasia: prospects for optical histological analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, Ramasamy; Zonios, George I.; Cothren, Robert M., Jr.; Arendt, Joseph; Van Dam, Jacques; Feld, Michael S.

    1995-05-01

    Several groups have shown that laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy can detect dysplastic changes in human colon tissues. We present an approach based on analysis of the underlying tissue microstructure for extracting histological information from such spectral signals. The method employs fluorescence microscopy and tissue optics to model the `bulk' fluorescence collected with an optical fiber probe in a clinical setting. For both colonic normal and adenoma, we measured the intrinsic fluorescence lineshapes, the spatial distributions of the fluorophores, and optical parameters of tissue. Numerical and analytical solutions to the radiative transfer equation were then used to compute fluorescence spectra. The results of the model were in excellent agreement with clinical spectra collected during colonoscopy, using 370 nm excitation. Four factors were found to be responsible for the spectral differences between normal tissue and adenoma: fluorescence of mucosal collagen, dysplastic cell, and submucosa, and hemoglobin attenuation. Preliminary results indicate that these parameters can be extracted from individual clinical spectra by reversing the modeling procedure.

  14. Chemometric treatment of multimode laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) data of fuel-spiked soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Benthem, Mark H.; Mitchell, Ben C.; Gillispie, Gregory D.; St. Germain, Randy W.

    1996-11-01

    Field screening of fuel-contaminated soils using laser- induced fluorescence is a cost effective and timely method of characterizing contaminated sites. Data collected with laser-based screening tools are often extensive and difficult to interpret. Pattern recognition algorithms can be utilized to enable less highly trained personnel to identify contaminants. In this work, fluorescence intensity of various hydrocarbon fuels deposited on various soil types was measured as a function of emission wavelength and decay time, generating wavelength-time matrices. The data were arranged into a three mode array and subjected to trilinear decomposition (TLD). The results of the TLD were then utilized in pattern recognition schemes, specifically, linear discrimination and classification and hierarchical cluster analysis. Classification rates and clustering results indicate that these techniques can be very valuable tools in site characterization.

  15. Chemometric treatment of multimode laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) data of fuel-spiked soils

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, M.H.; Mitchell, B.C.; Gillispie, G.D.; St. Germain, R.W.

    1996-12-31

    Field screening of fuel-contaminated soils using laser-induced fluorescence is a cost effective and timely method of characterizing contaminated sites. Data collected with laser-based screening tools are often extensive and difficult to interpret. Pattern recognition algorithms can be utilized to enable less highly trained personnel to identify contaminants. In this work, fluorescence intensity of various hydrocarbon fuels deposited on various soil types was measured as a function of emission wavelength and decay time, generating wavelength-time matrices (WTMs). The data were arranged into a three mode array and subjected to trilinear decomposition (TLD). The results of the TLD were then utilized in pattern recognition schemes, specifically, linear discrimination and classification and hierarchical cluster analysis. Classification rates and clustering results indicate that these techniques can be very valuable tools in site characterization.

  16. Investigation of laser-induced iodine fluorescence for the measurement of density in compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdaniel, J. C., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence is an attractive nonintrusive approach for measuring molecular number density in compressible flows although this technique does not produce a signal that is directly related to the number density. Saturation and frequency detuned excitation are explored as means for minimizing the quenching effect using iodine as the molecular system because of its convenient absorption spectrum. Saturation experiments indicate that with available continuous wave laser sources of Gaussian transverse intensity distribution only partial saturation could be achieved in iodine at the pressures of interest in gas dynamics. Using a fluorescence lineshape theory, it is shown that for sufficiently large detuning of a narrow bandwidth laser from a molecular transition, the quenching can be cancelled by collisional broadening over a large range of pressures and temperatures. Experimental data obtained in a Mach 4.3 underexpanded jet of nitrogen seeded with iodine for various single mode argon laser detunings from a strong iodine transition at 5145 A are discussed.

  17. Measurements of temperature, density, pressure, and their fluctuations in supersonic turbulence using laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, K. P.; Mckenzie, R. L.; Logan, P.

    1987-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence method has been developed that provides simultaneous measurements of temperature, density, and their fluctuations owing to turbulence in unheated compressible flows. Pressure and its fluctuations are also deduced using the equation of state. Fluorescence is induced in nitric oxide that has been seeded into a nitrogen flow in concentrations of 100 ppm. Measurements are obtained from each laser pulse, with a spatial resolution of 1 mm and a temporal resolution of 125 ns. The method was applied to a supersonic, turbulent, boundary-layer flow with a free-stream Mach number of 2. For stream conditions in the range from 150-300 K and 0.3-1 atm, temperature is measured with an uncertainty of approximately 1 percent rms, while density and pressure uncertainties are approximately 2 percent rms.

  18. Compact low-cost detector for in vivo assessment of microphytobenthos using laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utkin, A. B.; Vieira, S.; Marques da Silva, J.; Lavrov, A.; Leite, E.; Cartaxana, P.

    2013-03-01

    The development of a compact low-cost detector for non-destructive assessment of microphytobenthos using laser induced fluorescence was described. The detector was built from a specially modified commercial miniature fiber optic spectrometer (Ocean Optics USB4000). Its usefulness is experimentally verified by the study of diatom-dominated biofilms inhabiting the upper layers of intertidal sediments of the Tagus Estuary, Portugal. It is demonstrated that, operating with a laser emitter producing 30 mJ pulses at the wavelength of 532 nm, the detector is capable to record fluorescence signals with sufficient intensity for the quantitative biomass characterization of the motile epipelic microphytobenthic communities and to monitor their migratory activity. This paves the way for building an entire emitter-detector LIF system for microphytobenthos monitoring, which will enable microalgae communities occupying hardly accessible intertidal flats to be monitored in vivo at affordable cost.

  19. Shot noise limited detection of OH using the technique of laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakalyar, D. M.; Davis, L. I., Jr.; Guo, C.; James, J. V.; Kakos, S.; Morris, P. T.; Wang, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Nearly shot-noise limited detection of OH using the technique of laser-induced fluorescence is reported. A LIDAR configuration is used to excite fluorescence in a large volume and a narrow-bandwidth interference filter provides spectral discrimination. This arrangement alleviates the effect of ozone interference and facilitates image processing at relatively close distances. The detection limit is determined mainly by the shot-noise of the solar background. Ground-based measurements in Dearborn indicate a detection limit of better than 1 x 10 to the 6th power OH/cubic cm over a forty-minute acquisition period. Under favorable conditions, a comparable detection limit was also observed for airborne measurements.

  20. Two-photon digital imaging of CO in combustion flows using planar laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Haumann, J.; Seitzman, J.M.; Hanson, R.K.

    1986-12-01

    Two-dimensional imaging of CO distributions in combustion gases is demonstrated using planar laser-induced fluorescence. The illumination technique is based on the combination of a nonlinear absorption scheme, in which two photons at 230.1 nm excite several rotational transitions of the B/sup 1/..sigma../sup +/reverse arrowX/sup 1/..sigma../sup +/ system, and the use of an ultraviolet multipass cell for producing the laser sheet. The subsequent visible fluorescence (B/sup 1/..sigma../sup +/..-->..A/sup 1/..pi..) is imaged onto an intensified two-dimensional photodiode array. Experimental results are presented for carbon monoxide-air and methane-air flames.

  1. Development of the megahertz planar laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic for plasma turbulence visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Kuritsyn, Aleksey; Levinton, Fred M.

    2004-10-01

    A megahertz laser-induced fluorescence-based diagnostic system for measuring ion density fluctuations in two spatial dimensions is described. Well resolved spatial and temporal two-dimensional (2D) images of turbulent structures will be useful in understanding ion turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas which is a key factor in the performance of fusion experimental devices. A sheet beam of a megahertz repetition rate tunable Alexandrite laser is used to excite ion emission from argon plasma. The fluorescence emitted from the plane of the laser beam is detected with a narrow band interference filter and intensified ultrafast charge coupled device camera providing 2D images of relative ion density fluctuations every microsecond. It is expected that the edge plasma on fusion devices will be accessible to this technique.

  2. Absolute OH density determination by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in an atmospheric pressure RF plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Q.; Nikiforov, A. Yu.; Li, L.; Vanraes, P.; Britun, N.; Snyders, R.; Lu, X. P.; Leys, C.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, the ground state OH density is measured in high pressure plasma by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy. The OH density determination is based on the simulation of the intensity fraction of fluorescence from the laser-excited level of OH (A) in the total detected LIF signal. The validity of this approach is verified in an atmospheric pressure Ar + H2O plasma jet sustained by a 13.56 MHz power supply. The transition line P1 (4) from OH (A, v' = 1, J' = 3) → OH (X, v'' = 0, J'' = 4) is used for the LIF excitation. The absolute OH density is determined to be 2.5 × 1019 m-3 at 1 mm away from the jet nozzle. It corresponds to a dissociation of 0.06% of the water vapor in the working gas. Different mechanisms of OH (X) production in the core of the plasma jet are discussed and analyzed.

  3. Detection of biological warfare agents using ultra violet-laser induced fluorescence LIDAR.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Deepti; Kumar, Deepak; Maini, Anil K; Sharma, Ramesh C

    2013-08-01

    This review has been written to highlight the threat of biological warfare agents, their types and detection. Bacterial biological agent Bacillus anthracis (bacteria causing the disease anthrax) which is most likely to be employed in biological warfare is being discussed in detail. Standoff detection of biological warfare agents in aerosol form using Ultra violet-Laser Induced Fluorescence (UV-LIF) spectroscopy method has been studied. Range-resolved detection and identification of biological aerosols by both nano-second and non-linear femto-second LIDAR is also discussed. Calculated received fluorescence signal for a cloud of typical biological agent Bacillus globigii (Simulants of B. anthracis) at a location of ~5.0 km at different concentrations in presence of solar background radiation has been described. Overview of current research efforts in internationally available working UV-LIF LIDAR systems are also mentioned briefly. PMID:23719340

  4. Detection of biological warfare agents using ultra violet-laser induced fluorescence LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Deepti; Kumar, Deepak; Maini, Anil K.; Sharma, Ramesh C.

    This review has been written to highlight the threat of biological warfare agents, their types and detection. Bacterial biological agent Bacillus anthracis (bacteria causing the disease anthrax) which is most likely to be employed in biological warfare is being discussed in detail. Standoff detection of biological warfare agents in aerosol form using Ultra violet-Laser Induced Fluorescence (UV-LIF) spectroscopy method has been studied. Range-resolved detection and identification of biological aerosols by both nano-second and non-linear femto-second LIDAR is also discussed. Calculated received fluorescence signal for a cloud of typical biological agent Bacillus globigii (Simulants of B. anthracis) at a location of ˜5.0 km at different concentrations in presence of solar background radiation has been described. Overview of current research efforts in internationally available working UV-LIF LIDAR systems are also mentioned briefly.

  5. Oil film thickness using airborne laser-induced oil fluorescence backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.

    1983-01-01

    Remote airborne measurement of oil film thickness on ocean surface using laser-induced water Raman backscatter is discussed. It is pointed out that the theoretical model of oil fluorescence by Horvath et al. (1971) contains the necessary constituents to provide for the natural background fluorescence that is also induced by the laser during the course of an oil thickness experiment. How the various parameters of the model are obtained from typical airborne profile data is discussed, and it is shown that the water Raman backscatter may be used to assist further in the application of the data. The regions or water types over which the technique might be most useful or applicable are discussed.

  6. Monitoring refolding of tailspike endorhamnosidase using capillary electrophoresis-laser induced tryptophan fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, P.K.; Lee, Cheng S.; King, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    The use of capillary electrophoresis equipped with laser-induced tryptophan fluorescence detection is presented for monitoring the refolding pathway of phage P22 tailspike endorhamnosidase. Upon initiation of refolding, tailspike polypeptides rapidly fold into structured monomeric intermediates with a high content of secondary structure. These monomeric species associate to form the triple-chain defined folding intermediates, the protrimers. Conversion of the protrimer into the native, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) resistant tailspike protein is the rate-limiting step in the refolding pathway. Refolding kinetics and yield measured by capillary electrophoresis are in good agreement with those obtained via native gel electrophoresis, SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and fluorescence spectrophotometry. To enhance separation resolution between protrimer and native protein in capillary electrophoresis, the use of poly(ethylene oxide) is investigated for the introduction of a sieving separation mechanism. The increased viscosity of the electrophoresis buffer may also play a role in resolution enhancement.

  7. Simulation of ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence LIDAR for detecting bioaerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yinchao; Chen, Siying; Lan, Tian; Wang, Yuzhao; Qiu, Zongjia; Kong, Weiguo; Ni, Guoqiang

    2009-11-01

    The biological warfare agent (BWA) is a kind of terrible threat during the war or raid from the terrorist. Last decade, the interest in utilizing ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence (UV-LIF) LIDAR to detect the bioaerosol cloud has risen in order to measure the distribution of the bioaerosol particle. The UV-LIF LIDAR system can remotely detect and classify the bioaerosol agents and it is an active detecting system. As the infrared absorbing in the atmosphere is less, the range of infrared remote sensing is very far. The infrared laser at 1064 nm wavelength firstly begins to work in the UV-LIF LIDAR system and the aerosol cloud can be detected at very long range through the elastic backscattering signal from aerosol irradiated by infrared laser. But the category of aerosol can't be identified yet. If the infrared elastic backscattering level exceeds a threshold, UV laser at 355 nm wavelength will be triggered and induce the fluorescence. The excitated spectra of fluorescence can be used for discrimination of different aerosol species and particle concentration. This paper put forward for a UV-LIF LIDAR system model and the principle of the model is described summarily. Then the system parameters are presented and the simulation and analysis of the infrared elastic backscattering and laser-induced fluorescence are made, which is based on these parameters. Raman backscattering signal of Nitrogen gas in the atmosphere generally is taken to reduce measuring error, so the article also simulates this Raman backscatter signal at 387 nm wavelength. The studies above may provide some valuable instructions to the design of a real UV-LIF LIDAR system.

  8. Laser-induced fluorescence as a method of early caries diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielczarek, Agnieszka; Wiewior, Piotr

    2001-07-01

    Use of lasers in dentistry dates back 20 years but is still not fully exploited, especially when concerning the hard dental tissues. Over the past many efforts and actions have been involved in testing and developing new methods for caries diagnosis. The implementation of these methods in general dental practice is unfortunately still limited because too little scientific evidence exists to support them. One of the age-old concerns for dentists is that decay is often discovered too late. Dentists commonly use x-ray imaging for early caries detection, but this method cannot reveal decay at a sufficiently early stage to avoid restorative methods. Generally, if a caries lesion si detected by x-ray, the mineral loss within the tooth is normally very high and will need invasive treatment. Several laser based techniques, as also other optical methods of detecting caries lesions at an early stage seem to be very promising. Fluorescence of tooth structure is observed when hard tissues are illuminated using laser light. Decayed areas appear dark and provide a contrast against the healthy background surrounding them, so discriminating sound and carious tissues. The aim of this study was to present the possibilities of using laser induced fluorescence in the diagnosis of early caries lesions. The current state-of-the-art is presented, as well as results of our investigations. In our studies an argon ion laser was used to illuminate the teeth and the fluorescence pictures were captured with a CCD camera and then analyzed. Results confirmed that laser induced fluorescence can be used as a sensitive method of caries diagnosis.

  9. [Discrimination of Crude Oil Samples Using Laser-Induced Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao-shuang; Liu, De-qing; Luan, Xiao-ning; Guo, Jin-jia; Liu, Yong-xin; Zheng, Rong-er

    2016-02-01

    The Laser-induced fluorescence spectra combined with pattern recognition method has been widely applied in discrimination of different spilled oil, such as diesel, gasoline, and crude oil. However, traditional three-dimension fluorescence analysis method, which is not adapted to requirement of field detection, is limited to laboratory investigatio ns. The development of oil identification method for field detection is significant to quick response and operation of oil spill. In this paper, a new method based on laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence combined with support vector machine (SVM) model was introduced to discriminate crude oil samples. In this method, time-resolved spectra data was descended into two dimensions with selecting appropriate range in time and wavelength domains respectively to form a SVM data base. It is found that the classification accurate rate increased with an appropriate selection. With a selected range from 54 to 74 ns in time domain, the classification accurate rate has been increased from 83.3% (without selection) to 88.1%. With a selected wavelength range of 387.00~608.87 nm, the classification accurate rate of suspect oil was improved from 84% (without selection) to 100%. Since the detection delay of fluorescence lidar fluctuates due to wave and platform swing, the identification method with optimizing in both time and wavelength domains could offer a better flexibility for field applications. It is hoped that the developed method could provide some useful reference with data reduction for classification of suspect crude oil in the future development. PMID:27209747

  10. Investigation of potential interferences in the detection of atmospheric ROx radicals by laser-induced fluorescence under dark conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H.; Tan, Z.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Broch, S.; Dorn, H.-P.; Holland, F.; Künstler, C.; Gomm, S.; Rohrer, F.; Schrade, S.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.

    2015-11-01

    Direct detection of highly reactive, atmospheric hydroxyl radicals (OH) is widely accomplished by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instruments. The technique is also suitable for the indirect measurement of HO2 and RO2 peroxy radicals by chemical conversion to OH. It requires sampling of ambient air into a low pressure cell, where OH fluorescence is detected after excitation by 308 nm laser radiation. Although the residence time of air inside the fluorescence cell is typically only on the order of milliseconds, there is potential that additional OH is internally produced, which would artificially increase the measured OH concentration. Here, we present experimental studies investigating potential interferences in the detection of OH and peroxy radicals for the LIF instruments of Forschungszentrum Jülich for nighttime conditions. For laboratory experiments, the inlet of the instrument was overflown by excess synthetic air containing one or more reactants. In order to distinguish between OH produced by reactions upstream of the inlet and artificial signals produced inside the instrument, a chemical titration for OH was applied. Additional experiments were performed in the simulation chamber SAPHIR where simultaneous measurements by an open-path differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) served as reference for OH to quantify potential artifacts in the LIF instrument. Experiments included the investigation of potential interferences related to the nitrate radical (NO3, N2O5), related to the ozonolysis of alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene, 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene, α-pinene, limonene, isoprene), and the laser photolysis of acetone. Experiments studying the laser photolysis of acetone yield OH signals in the fluorescence cell, which are equivalent to 0.05 × 106 cm-3 OH for a mixing ratio of 5 ppbv acetone. Under most atmospheric conditions, this interference is negligible. No significant interferences were found for atmospheric concentrations of reactants

  11. Investigation of potential interferences in the detection of atmospheric ROx radicals by laser-induced fluorescence under dark conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Hendrik; Tan, Zhaofeng; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Broch, Sebastian; Dorn, Hans-Peter; Holland, Frank; Künstler, Christopher; Gomm, Sebastian; Rohrer, Franz; Schrade, Stephanie; Tillmann, Ralf; Wahner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Direct detection of highly reactive, atmospheric hydroxyl radicals (OH) is widely accomplished by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instruments. The technique is also suitable for the indirect measurement of HO2 and RO2 peroxy radicals by chemical conversion to OH. It requires sampling of ambient air into a low-pressure cell, where OH fluorescence is detected after excitation by 308 nm laser radiation. Although the residence time of air inside the fluorescence cell is typically only on the order of milliseconds, there is potential that additional OH is internally produced, which would artificially increase the measured OH concentration. Here, we present experimental studies investigating potential interferences in the detection of OH and peroxy radicals for the LIF instruments of Forschungszentrum Jülich for nighttime conditions. For laboratory experiments, the inlet of the instrument was over flowed by excess synthetic air containing one or more reactants. In order to distinguish between OH produced by reactions upstream of the inlet and artificial signals produced inside the instrument, a chemical titration for OH was applied. Additional experiments were performed in the simulation chamber SAPHIR where simultaneous measurements by an open-path differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) served as reference for OH to quantify potential artifacts in the LIF instrument. Experiments included the investigation of potential interferences related to the nitrate radical (NO3, N2O5), related to the ozonolysis of alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene, 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene, α-pinene, limonene, isoprene), and the laser photolysis of acetone. Experiments studying the laser photolysis of acetone yield OH signals in the fluorescence cell, which are equivalent to 0.05 × 106 cm-3 OH for a mixing ratio of 5 ppbv acetone. Under most atmospheric conditions, this interference is negligible. No significant interferences were found for atmospheric concentrations of reactants

  12. Laser-induced fluorescence, dispersed fluorescence and lifetime measurements of jet-cooled chloro-substituted benzyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamatani, Satoshi; Tsuji, Kazuhide; Kawai, Akio; Shibuya, Kazuhiko

    2002-07-01

    We measured the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and dispersed fluorescence (DF) spectra of jet-cooled α-, o- and m-chlorobenzyl radicals after they were generated by the 193 nm photolysis of the corresponding parent molecules. The vibronically resolved spectra were obtained to analyze their D1-D0 transitions. The fluorescence lifetimes of α-, o-, m- and p-chlorobenzyls in the zeroth vibrational levels of the D1 states were measured to estimate the oscillator strengths of a series of benzyl derivatives. It was found that the α-substitution is inefficient to break the `accidental forbiddenness' of the D1-D0 transition of benzyl, while the ring-substitution enhances the oscillator strength by 50%.

  13. Detection of bacterial infection of agave plants by laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-Martinez, Jesus; Flores-Hernandez, Ricardo; Rodriguez-Garay, Benjamin; Santacruz-Ruvalcaba, Fernando

    2002-05-01

    Greenhouse-grown plants of Agave tequilana Weber var. azul were inoculated with Erwinia carotovora, the causal agent of stem soft rot. We investigated the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of agave plants to determine whether LIF can be used as a noninvasive sensing tool for pathological studies. The LIF technique was also investigated as a means of detecting the effect of the polyamine biosynthesis inhibitor beta-hydroxyethylhydrazine as a bactericide against the pathogenic bacterium Erwinia carotovora. A He-Ne laser at 632.8 nm was used as the excitation source, and in vivo fluorescence emission spectra were recorded in the 660-790-range. Fluorescence maxima were at 690 and 740 nm. The infected plants that were untreated with the bactericide showed a definite increase in fluorescence intensity at both maxima within the first three days after infection. Beginning on the fifth day, a steady decrease in fluorescence intensity was observed, with a greater effect at 740 than at 690 nm. After 30 days there was no fluorescence. The infected plants that had been treated with the bactericide showed no significant change in fluorescence compared with that of the uninfected plants. The ratio of fluorescence intensities was determined to be F 690 nm/F 740 nm for all treatments. These studies indicate that LIF measurements of agave plants may be used for the early detection of certain types of disease and for determining the effect of a bactericide on bacteria. The results also showed that fluorescence intensity ratios can be used as a reliable indicator of the progress of disease.

  14. Objective assessment of endogenous collagen in vivo during tissue repair by laser induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Satish B S; Fernandes, Edward Mark; Rao, Anuradha C K; Prasad, Keerthana; Mahato, Krishna K

    2014-01-01

    Collagen, a triple helical protein with the primary role of mechanical function, provides tensile strength to the skin, and plays a pivotal task in tissue repair. During tissue regeneration, collagen level increases gradually and therefore, monitoring of such changes in vivo by laser induced fluorescence was the main objective behind the present study. In order to accomplish this, 15 mm diameter excisional wounds were created on six to eight week old Swiss albino mice. The collagen deposition accelerated upon irradiation of single exposure of 2 J/cm2 He-Ne laser dose immediately after wounding was recorded by laser induced autofluorescence in vivo along with un-illuminated and un-wounded controls. Autofluorescence spectra were recorded for each animal of the experimental groups on 0, 5, 10, 30, 45 and 60 days post-wounding, by exciting the granulation tissue/skin with 325 nm He-Cd laser. The variations in the average collagen intensities from the granulation tissue/skin of mice were inspected as a function of age and gender. Further, the spectral findings of the collagen synthesis in wound granulation tissue/un-wounded skin tissues were validated by Picro-Sirius red- polarized light microscopy in a blinded manner through image analysis of the respective collagen birefringence. The in vivo autofluorescence studies have shown a significant increase in collagen synthesis in laser treated animals as compared to the un-illuminated controls. Image analysis of the collagen birefringence further authenticated the ability of autofluorescence in the objective monitoring of collagen in vivo. Our results clearly demonstrate the potential of laser induced autofluorescence in the monitoring of collegen synthesis during tissue regeneration, which may have clinical implications. PMID:24874229

  15. Uranium and nitrate remote sensing in the nuclear fuel cycle by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulin, Christophe; Couston, Laurent; Decambox, Pierre; Mauchien, Patrick; Pouyat, Dominique

    1994-12-01

    Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence has been used for uranium and nitrate remote sensing in the nuclear fuel cycle. Advantages of this technique are aside sensitivity and selectivity, its ability to perform remote measurements via fiber optics and optode. Uranium is usually determined by the standard addition method but by applying a fluorescence model taking into account complexation and absorption phenomena, it is possible to directly determine uranium concentration. Nitrate concentration is determined after spectral deconvolution of the uranium fluorescence spectrum.

  16. Characterization of the respiration of 3T3 cells by laser-induced fluorescence during a cyclic heating process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuthan, J.; Dressler, C.; Zabarylo, U.; Minet, O.

    2010-04-01

    The use of lasers in the near infrared spectral range for laser-induced tumor therapy (LITT) demands a new understanding of the thermal responses to repetitive heat stress. The analysis of laser-induced fluorescence during vital monitoring offers an excellent opportunity to solve many of the related issues in this field. The laser-induced fluorescence of the cellular coenzyme NADH was investigated for its time and intensity behavior under heat stress conditions. Heat was applied to vital 3T3 cells (from 22°C to 50°C) according to a typical therapeutical time regime. A sharp increase in temperature resulted in non-linear time behavior when the concentration of this vital coenzyme changed. There are indications that biological systems have a delayed reaction on a cellular level. These results are therefore important for further dosimetric investigations.

  17. Laser-induced fluorescence reader with a turbidimetric system for sandwich-type immunoassay using nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y H; Lim, H B

    2015-07-01

    A unique laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) reader equipped with a turbidimetric system was developed for a sandwich-type immunoassay using nanoparticles. The system was specifically designed to reduce experimental error caused by particle loss, aggregation and sinking, and to improve analytical performance through ratiometric measurement of the fluorescence with respect to the turbidimetric absorbance. For application to determine the concentration of salinomycin, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and FITC-doped silica nanoparticles (colored balls) immobilized with antibody were synthesized for magnetic extraction and for tagging as a fluorescence probe, respectively. The detection limit of about 39 pg mL(-1) was obtained, which was an improvement of about 2-fold compared to that obtained without employment of the turbidimetric system. Calibration linearity and sensitivity were also improved, with increase from 0.8601 to 0.9905 in the R(2)-coefficient and by 1.92-fold for the curve slope, respectively. The developed LIF reader has the potential to be used for fluorescence measurements using various nanomaterials, such as quantum dots. PMID:26088773

  18. Laser induced fluorescence as a diagnostic tool integrated into a scanning fiber endoscope for mouse imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Christopher M.; Maggio-Price, Lillian; Seibel, Eric J.

    2007-02-01

    Scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) technology has shown promise as a minimally invasive optical imaging tool. To date, it is capable of capturing full-color 500-line images, at 15 Hz frame rate in vivo, as a 1.6 mm diameter endoscope. The SFE uses a singlemode optical fiber actuated at mechanical resonance to scan a light spot over tissue while backscattered or fluorescent light at each pixel is detected in time series using several multimode optical fibers. We are extending the capability of the SFE from a RGB reflectance imaging device to a diagnostic tool by imaging laser induced fluorescence (LIF) in tissue, allowing for correlation of endogenous fluorescence to tissue state. Design of the SFE for diagnostic imaging is guided by a comparison of single point spectra acquired from an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) model to tissue histology evaluated by a pathologist. LIF spectra were acquired by illuminating tissue with a 405 nm light source and detecting intrinsic fluorescence with a multimode optical fiber. The IBD model used in this study was mdr1a-/- mice, where IBD was modulated by infection with Helicobacter bilis. IBD lesions in the mouse model ranged from mild to marked hyperplasia and dysplasia, from the distal colon to the cecum. A principle components analysis (PCA) was conducted on single point spectra of control and IBD tissue. PCA allowed for differentiation between healthy and dysplastic tissue, indicating that emission wavelengths from 620 - 650 nm were best able to differentiate diseased tissue and inflammation from normal healthy tissue.

  19. Characterization of ammonia two-photon laser-induced fluorescence for gas-phase diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackmann, Christian; Hole, Odd; Zhou, Bo; Li, Zhongshan S.; Aldén, Marcus

    2014-04-01

    Two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of ammonia (NH3) with excitation of the C'- X transition at 304.8 nm and fluorescence detection in the 565 nm C'- A band has been investigated, targeting combustion diagnostics. The impact of laser irradiance, temperature, and pressure has been studied, and simulation of NH3-spectra, fitted to experimental data, facilitated interpretation of the results. The LIF-signal showed quadratic dependence on laser irradiance up to 2 GW/cm2. Stimulated emission, resulting in loss of excited molecules, is induced above 10 GW/cm2, i.e., above irradiances attainable for LIF imaging. Maximum LIF-signal was obtained for excitation at the 304.8 nm bandhead; however, lower temperature sensitivity over the range 400-700 K can be obtained probing lines around 304.9 nm. A decrease in fluorescence signal was observed with pressure up to 5 bar absolute and attributed to collisional quenching. A detection limit of 800 ppm, at signal-to-noise ratio 1.5, was identified for single-shot LIF imaging over an area of centimeter scale, whereas for single-point measurements, the technique shows potential for sub-ppm detection. Moreover, high-quality NH3-imaging has been achieved in laminar and turbulent premixed flames. Altogether, two-photon fluorescence provides a useful tool for imaging NH3-detection in combustion diagnostics.

  20. In vivo Diagnosis of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Using 337-nm- Excited Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanujam, N.; Mitchell, M. F.; Mahadevan, A.; Warren, S.; Thomsen, S.; Silva, E.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1994-10-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence at 337-nm excitation was used in vivo to differentiate neoplastic [cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)], nonneoplastic abnormal (inflammation and human papilloma viral infection), and normal cervical tissues. A colposcope (low-magnification microscope used to view the cervix with reflected light) was used to identify 66 normal and 49 abnormal (5 inflammation, 21 human papilloma virus infection, and 23 CIN) sites on the cervix in 28 patients. These sites were then interrogated spectroscopically. A two-stage algorithm was developed to diagnose CIN. The first stage differentiated histologically abnormal tissues from colposcopically normal tissues with a sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of 92%, 90%, and 88%, respectively. The second stage differentiated preneoplastic and neoplastic tissues from nonneoplastic abnormal tissues with a sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of 87%, 73%, and 74%, respectively. Spectroscopic differences were consistent with a decrease in the absolute contribution of collagen fluorescence, an increase in the absolute contribution of oxyhemoglobin attenuation, and an increase in the relative contribution of reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate [NAD(P)H] fluorescence as tissue progresses from normal to abnormal in the same patient. These results suggest that in vivo fluorescence spectroscopy of the cervix can be used to diagnose CIN at colposcopy.

  1. Laser induced fluorescence measurements and modeling of nitric oxide in high-pressure premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisel, John R.; Laurendeau, Normand M.

    1994-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has been applied to the quantitative measurement of nitric oxide (NO) in premixed, laminar, high-pressure flames. Their chemistry was also studied using three current kinetics schemes to determine the predictive capabilities of each mechanism with respect to NO concentrations. The flames studied were low-temperature (1600 less than T less than 1850K) C2H6/O2/N2 and C2H6/O2/N2 flames, and high temperature (2100 less than T less than 2300K) C2H6/O2/N2 flames. Laser-saturated fluorescence (LSF) was initially used to measure the NO concentrations. However, while the excitation transition was well saturated at atmospheric pressure, the fluorescence behavior was basically linear with respect to laser power at pressures above 6 atm. Measurements and calculations demonstrated that the fluorescence quenching rate variation is negligible for LIF measurements of NO at a given pressure. Therefore, linear LIF was used to perform quantitative measurements of NO concentration in these high-pressure flames. The transportability of a calibration factor from one set of flame conditions to another also was investigated by considering changes in the absorption and quenching environment for different flame conditions. The feasibility of performing LIF measurements of (NO) in turbulent flames was studied; the single-shot detection limit was determined to be 2 ppm.

  2. Label-free bacterial imaging with deep-UV-laser-induced native fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Bhartia, Rohit; Salas, Everett C; Hug, William F; Reid, Ray D; Lane, Arthur L; Edwards, Katrina J; Nealson, Kenneth H

    2010-11-01

    We introduce a near-real-time optical imaging method that works via the detection of the intrinsic fluorescence of life forms upon excitation by deep-UV (DUV) illumination. A DUV (<250-nm) source enables the detection of microbes in their native state on natural materials, avoiding background autofluorescence and without the need for fluorescent dyes or tags. We demonstrate that DUV-laser-induced native fluorescence can detect bacteria on opaque surfaces at spatial scales ranging from tens of centimeters to micrometers and from communities to single cells. Given exposure times of 100 μs and low excitation intensities, this technique enables rapid imaging of bacterial communities and cells without irreversible sample alteration or destruction. We also demonstrate the first noninvasive detection of bacteria on in situ-incubated environmental experimental samples from the deep ocean (Lo'ihi Seamount), showing the use of DUV native fluorescence for in situ detection in the deep biosphere and other nutrient-limited environments. PMID:20817797

  3. Airborne Laser-Induced Oceanic Chlorophyll Fluorescence: Solar-Induced Quenching Corrections by use of Concurrent Downwelling Irradiance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Wright, C. Wayne; Swift, Robert N.; Yungel, James K.

    1998-05-01

    Airborne laser-induced (and water Raman-normalized) spectral fluorescence emissions from oceanic chlorophyll were obtained during variable downwelling irradiance conditions induced by diurnal variability and patchy clouds. Chlorophyll fluorescence profiles along geographically repeated inbound and outbound flight track lines, separated in time by 3 6 h and subject to overlying cloud movement, were found to be identical after corrections made with concurrent downwelling irradiance measurements. The corrections were accomplished by a mathematical model containing an exponential of the ratio of the instantaneous-to-average downwelling irradiance. Concurrent laser-induced phycoerythrin fluorescence and chromophoric dissolved organic matter fluorescence were found to be invariant to downwelling irradiance and thus, along with sea-surface temperature, established the near constancy of the oceanic surface layer during the experiment and validated the need for chlorophyll fluorescence quenching corrections over wide areas of the ocean.

  4. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of benign and malignant cutaneous lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Ekaterina G.; Troyanova, P. P.; Stoyanova, V. P.; Avramov, Lachezar A.

    2005-04-01

    The goals of this work were investigation of pigmented skin lesions by the method of laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence spectra were obtained from malignant and benign skin lesions after excitation with nitrogen laser at 337 nm, namely: benign nevi, dysplastic nevi, malignant melanoma (MM), keratopapilloma, base-cell papilloma and base-cell carcinoma, as well as from healthy skin areas near to the lesion that were used posteriori to reveal changes between healthy and lesion skin spectra. Initially lesions were classified by ABCD-dermatscopic method. All suspicious lesions were excised and were investigated histologically. Spectrum of healthy skin consists of one main maximum at 470-500 nm spectral region and secondary maxima at in the regions round 400 and 440 nm. In the cases of nevi and melanoma significant decrease of fluorescence intensity, which correlated with the type of pigment lesion was observed. This reduction of the signal is related to the accumulation of melanin in the lesions that re-absorb strongly the fluorescence from native skin fluorophores in whole visible spectral region. In cases of papilloma and base-cell carcinoma an intensity decrease was also observed, related to accumulation of pigments in these cutaneous lesions. An relative increase of the fluorescence peak at 440 nm were registered in the case of base-cell carcinoma, and appearance of green fluorescence, related to increase of keratin content in benign papilloma lesions were detected. The results, obtained in this investigation of the different pigment lesions could be used for better comprehension of the skin optical properties. The fluorescence spectroscopy of the human skin are very prominent for early diagnosis and differentiation of cutaneous diseases and gives a wide range of possibilities related to real-time determination of existing pathological condition.

  5. Laser-induced fluorescence identification of intimal hyperplasia after intravascular stent implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Alexandra; Perk, Masis; Wen, Yue; Tio, Fermin O.; Schneider, Wolfgang

    1992-08-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy has been developed as a guidance system for laser angioplasty. We have investigated fluorescence spectroscopic detection of neo-intimal formation from the endoluminal surface of stent implanted arteries. Nine White Leghorn roosters had Palmaz-Schatz intra-abdominal aortic stent implantation, nine had aortic balloon angioplasty. Five roosters with stent implantation and four roosters with balloon angioplasty were on a high cholesterol diet and the remainder were on a normal diet. Roosters were sacrificed at intervals of 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after intervention. Fluorescence emission spectra were recorded from aortic segments during excimer laser excitation at 308 nm (XeCl, 1.5 - 2.0 mJ/pulse, 5 Hertz). Spectra were then correlated with histology. Fluorescence emission intensity recorded from abdominal aortic segments with stent implantation was higher than that of adjacent segments (p < 0.002 at 440 - 460 nm). Abdominal aortic segments of roosters on normal diets with stent implantation and balloon angioplasty were similar (p equals NS). With cholesterol feeding, aortic spectra from roosters with stent implant had higher intensity at 440 - 460 nm than spectra from aortic segments with balloon angioplasty (p < 0.004). Morphometric analysis demonstrated a twofold increase in intimal thickness in stent segments from cholesterol fed roosters when compared to similar segments of roosters on normal diets (p < 0.005). Our conclusion is: (1) Fluorescence emission spectra can be used to detect native artery fluorescence in stent implant areas. (2) Neo-intimal thickening at the stet implant site can be distinguished from adjacent areas by fluorescence emission spectra. (3) Cholesterol feeding increased neo-intimal thickening.

  6. Losses in the fluorescent tracer used in hydrodynamic modeling of constructed wetlands studied by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plazas, Lucero; Rosero, Edison; Solarte, Efraín; Sandoval, Jhon; Peña, Miguel

    2009-08-01

    Fluorescent tracer trials are performed to obtain useful information for hydrodynamic modeling. Particularly they have been used in constructed wetlands, aimed for residual water treatment, in order to find residence time distribution for particles entering the system and, in general, to know the flux pattern. Nevertheless, it has been reported that some tracers, as Rhodamine WT, exhibit adsorption phenomena over the substrate. This situation has to be considered in the analysis of residence time distribution curves, taking into account advection-dispersion processes which are given by the diffusion modified equation. Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) with a Nd:YAG laser (532 nm; 35mW), was used to determine Rhodamine WT accumulated concentration. Through adsorption coefficients obtained experimentally, an advection - dispersion model for solute transport in a subsurface flow constructed wetland was evaluated. Including this phenomenon allows to optimize the model, and another important condition is added in the behavior prediction of these complex ecosystems.

  7. Arc Jet Flow Properties Determined from Laser-Induced Fluorescence of Atomic Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Douglas; Wercinski, Paul F. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    An laser-spectroscopic investigation of the thermocheMical state of arcjet flows is currently being conducted in the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) Circlet at NASA Ames Research Center. Downstream of the nozzle exit, but upstream of the test article, Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) of atomic nitrogen is used to assess the nonequilibriuM distribution of flow enthalpy in the free stream. The two-photon LIF technique provides simultaneous measurements of free stream velocity, translational temperature, and nitrogen number density on the flow centerline. Along with information from facility instrumentation, these measurements allow a determination of the free stream total enthalpy, and its apportionment in to thermal, kinetic, and chemical mode contributions. Experimental results are presented and discussed for two different niti-ogen/argon test gas flow runs during which the current is varied while the pressure remains constant .

  8. Dynamic model of thermal reaction of biological tissues to laser-induced fluorescence and photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Seteikin, Alexey Yu; Krasnikov, Ilya V; Drakaki, Eleni; Makropoulou, Mersini

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the temperature fields and the dynamics of heat conduction into the skin tissue under several laser irradiation conditions with both a pulsed ultraviolet (UV) laser (λ=337  nm) and a continuous-wave (cw) visible laser beam (λ=632.8  nm) using Monte Carlo modeling. Finite-element methodology was used for heat transfer simulation. The analysis of the results showed that heat is not localized on the surface, but is collected inside the tissue in lower skin layers. The simulation was made with the pulsed UV laser beam (used as excitation source in laser-induced fluorescence) and the cw visible laser (used in photodynamic therapy treatments), in order to study the possible thermal effects. PMID:23839531

  9. Investigation of Heat Transfer in Mini Channels using Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bøgild, M. R.; Poulsen, J. L.; Rath, E. Z.; Sørensen, H.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper an experimental investigation of the heat transfer in mini channels with a hydraulic diameter of 889 μm is conducted. The method used is planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF), which uses the principle of laser excitation of rhodamine B in water. The goal of this study is to validate the applicability of PLIF to determine the convective heat transfer coefficient in mini channels against conventional correlations of the convective heat transfer coefficient. The applicability of the conventional theory in micro and mini channels has been discussed by several researchers, but to the authors knowledge the applicability of PLIF to validate this has not yet been investigated thoroughly. The experiment shows good agreement to the conventional correlation, and the resolution of the temperature gradient at the wall is found sufficiently accurate in certain areas. However, PLIF is not found satisfactory over the whole domain, and the limitations and errors are analysed.

  10. High repetition rate laser induced fluorescence applied to Surfatron Induced Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.; Palomares, J. M.; Carbone, E. A. D.; Graef, W.; Hübner, S.

    2012-05-01

    The reaction kinetics in the excitation space of Ar and the conversion space of Ar-molecule mixtures are explored using a combination of high rep-rate YAG-Dye laser systems with a well defined and easily controllable Surfatron Induced Plasma set-up. Applying the method of Saturation Time Resolved Laser Induced Fluorescence (SaTiRe-LIF), we could trace excitation and conversion channels and determine rates of electron and heavy particle excitation kinetics. The time resolved density disturbances observed in the Ar excitation space, which are initiated by the laser, reveal the excitation channels and corresponding rates; responses of the molecular radiation in Ar-molecule mixtures corresponds to the presence of conversion processes induced by heavy particle excitation kinetics.

  11. Characterization and Discrimination of Plastic Materials Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Spizzichino, Valeria; Caneve, Luisa; Colao, Francesco; Ruggiero, Ludovica

    2016-06-01

    The most meaningful spectral components in laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra for several different commercial plastics have been individuated and used to automatically discriminate among different plastic materials and between plastics and complex organic materials, such as woods. Starting from LIF measurements on known samples, a number of significant wavelengths have been identified by principal component analysis (PCA). These have been used to produce intensity ratios functional to the discrimination. Threshold values for such ratios have been individuated in order to obtain an automatic recognition of plastics. The work done has been preparatory to the design and development of a multispectral imaging LIF system for fast detection of plastic debris in a post-blast scene. PMID:27076514

  12. Velocity and electronic state distributions of sputtered Fe atoms by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.E.; Calaway, W.F.; Pellin, M.J.; Gruen, D.M.

    1983-01-01

    Velocity distributions and relative populations in the fine-structure levels of the a/sup 5/D/sub J/ ground state of Fe atoms, produced by sputtering with 3 keV argon ions, have been investigated by Doppler shifted laser induced fluorescence. The laser system employs a single-mode, scanning ring dye laser, amplified by a sequence of three excimer-pumped flowing-dye cells. Frequency doubling in a KD*P crystal was used to produce high energy (> .5 mJ) pulses of narrowband tunable UV output near 300 nm. Laser power influence on effective velocity bandwidth was investigated. Favorable light-collection geometry minimized distortion of the velocity spectra from apparatus-averaging effects. In impurity flux diagnostic applications in fusion devices, substantial spatial averaging may occur. In the latter case, the narrow velocity bandwidth (70 m/s, transform limit) of the present laser system is particularly useful.

  13. Experimental investigation of a supersonic swept ramp injector using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1990-01-01

    Planar measurements of injectant mole fraction and temperature have been conducted in a nonreacting supersonic combustor configured with underexpanded injection in the base of a swept ramp. The temperature measurements were conducted with a Mach 2 test section inlet in streamwise planes perpendicular to the test section wall on which the ramp was mounted. Injection concentration measurements, conducted in cross flow planes with both Mach 2 and Mach 2.9 free stream conditions, dramatically illustrate the domination of the mixing process by streamwise vorticity generated by the ramp. These measurements, conducted using a nonintrusive optical technique (laser-induced iodine fluorescence), provide an accurate and extensive experimental data base for the validation of computation fluid dynamic codes for the calculation of highly three-dimensional supersonic combustor flow fields.

  14. Pyrene measurements in sooting low pressure methane flames by jet-cooled laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Wartel, M; Pauwels, J-F; Desgroux, P; Mercier, X

    2011-12-15

    This paper presents in detail the study we carried out concerning the pyrene measurement by jet-cooled laser-induced fluorescence (JCLIF) in different sooting low pressure methane flames. The aim of this paper is both to demonstrate the potentialities of this technique for the measurement of such moderately sized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons under sooting flame conditions and to provide new experimental data for the understanding and the development of chemical models of the soot formation processes. Several concentration profiles of pyrene measured in different sooting flame (various pressure and equivalence ratio) are presented. The validation of the JCLIF method for pyrene measurements is explained in detail as well as the calibration procedure, based on the standard addition method, which has been implemented for the quantification of the concentration profiles. Sensitivity lower than 1 ppb was obtained for the measurement of this species under sooting flame conditions. PMID:22029528

  15. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements on plasma science experiments at PPPL

    SciTech Connect

    Koepke, Mark

    2011-12-20

    Collaborative research between WVU and PPPL was carried out at WVU for the purpose of incorporating the sophisticated diagnostic technique known as laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) in the Paul-Trap Simulation Experiment (PTSX) at PPPL. WVU assembled a LIF system at WVU, transported it to PPPL, helped make LIF experiments on the PTSX device, participated in PTSX science, and trained PPPL staff in LIF techniques. In summary, WVU refurbished a non-operational LIF system being loaned from University of Maryland to PPPL and, by doing so, provided PPPL with additional diagnostic capability for its PTSX device and other General Plasma Science experiments. WVU students, staff, and faculty will visit PPPL to collaborate on PTSX experiments in the future.

  16. [Analysis of amines in water samples by high performance liquid chromatography-laser induced fluorescence detection].

    PubMed

    Liu, Fan; Gao, Fangyuan; Tang, Tao; Sun, Yuanshe; Li, Tong; Zhang, Weibing

    2013-11-01

    A sensitive high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-laser induced fluorescence detection (LIFD) method was developed for the determination of amines. The derivatization and separation conditions were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, spermidine, putrescine and histamine were analyzed. The limits of detection (LODs) of the three biogenic amines (S/N = 3) were as low as 10(-10) mol/L. This method showed excellent stability. The RSDs of retention times and peak areas of the three biogenic amines were lower than 0.3% and 3%, respectively. This method was applied in biogenic amine analysis in water samples, and the average recoveries were in the range of 94.99%-104.7%. Furthermore, the amines in seven tea samples were analyzed by this method, and satisfactory results were achieved. The developed assay is of excellent sensitivity and good reproducibility, which can be used in the analysis of the amines in water samples. PMID:24558849

  17. Indirect determination of the electric field in plasma discharges using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vaudolon, J. Mazouffre, S.

    2014-09-15

    The evaluation of electric fields is of prime interest for the description of plasma characteristics. In this work, different methods for determining the electric field profile in low-pressure discharges using one- and two-dimensional Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) measurements are presented and discussed. The energy conservation, fluid, and kinetic approaches appear to be well-suited for the electric field evaluation in this region of the plasma flow. However, the numerical complexity of a two-dimensional kinetic model is penalizing due to the limited signal-to-noise ratio that can be achieved, making the computation of the electric field subject to large error bars. The ionization contribution which appears in the fluid model makes it unattractive on an experimental viewpoint. The energy conservation and 1D1V kinetic approaches should therefore be preferred for the determination of the electric field when LIF data are used.

  18. Laser induced fluorescence spectra of fluorophenol cations in a Ne matrix

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bondybey, V.E.; English, J.H.; Miller, T.A.; Shiley, R.H.

    1983-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence and/or absorption spectra of the cations of 2,3,5,6‐tetrafluorophenol, 2,3,5,6‐tetrafluorothiophenol, and 3,5‐difluorophenol have been obtained in a Ne matrix. The spectra of C6HF4OH+ are much better resolved than in the gas phase. The gas phase congestion is likely caused by the near degeneracy of the and electronic states whose separation is now measured at 207 cm−1. The spectrum of C6H3F2OH+ represents a deperturbed example of the Jahn–Teller distorted sym‐C6F3H3+ ion. C6H3F2SH+ shows only a broad featureless absorption.

  19. Tunable ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence detection of trace plastics and dissolved organic compounds in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaprakasam, Vasanthi; Killinger, Dennis K.

    2003-11-01

    We developed a tunable (220-285-nm) UV and fixed 266-nm laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system using a spectrometer and a cooled CCD imaging detector to measure the excitation-emission matrix spectra of various compounds in water, including quinine sulfate and plastic compound bisphenol-A. The LIF instrument was used for the fast, nonspecific determination of trace amounts of dissolved organic compounds present in natural water supplies and various brand name bottled distilled water and bottled drinking water. Plastic-related compounds that leached out of plastic utensils and containers were also detected with this instrument. The sensitivity of the system was approximately 1-2 orders of magnitude better than that for a commercial system.

  20. Tunable ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence detection of trace plastics and dissolved organic compounds in water.

    PubMed

    Sivaprakasam, Vasanthi; Killinger, Dennis K

    2003-11-20

    We developed a tunable (220-285-nm) UV and fixed 266-nm laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system using a spectrometer and a cooled CCD imaging detector to measure the excitation-emission matrix spectra of various compounds in water, including quinine sulfate and plastic compound bisphenol-A. The LIF instrument was used for the fast, nonspecific determination of trace amounts of dissolved organic compounds present in natural water supplies and various brand name bottled distilled water and bottled drinking water. Plastic-related compounds that leached out of plastic utensils and containers were also detected with this instrument. The sensitivity of the system was approximately 1-2 orders of magnitude better than that for a commercial system. PMID:14658478

  1. Spatial uniformity in chamber-cleaning plasmas measured using planar laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Steffens, Kristen L.; Sobolewski, Mark A.

    1998-11-24

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements were made to determine 2-D spatial maps of CF{sub 2} density as an indicator of chemical uniformity in 92%CF{sub 4}/O{sub 2} and 50%C{sub 2}F{sub 6}/O{sub 2} chamber-cleaning plasmas. Measurements were also made of broadband optical emission and of discharge current and voltage. All measurements were made in the Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) reference cell, a capacitively-coupled, parallel-plate platform designed to facilitate comparison of results among laboratories. The PLIF and emission results were found to correlate with discharge current and voltage measurements. Together, these optical and electrical measurements provide insight into the optimization of chamber-cleaning processes and reactors and suggest new methods of monitoring plasma uniformity.

  2. Laser-induced fluorescence detection of hot molecular oxygen in flames using an alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Johannes; Zhou, Bo; Zetterberg, Johan; Li, Zhongshan; Alden, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    The use of an alexandrite laser for laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy and imaging of molecular oxygen in thermally excited vibrational states is demonstrated. The laser radiation after the third harmonic generation was used to excite the B-X (0-7) band at 257 nm in the Schumann-Runge system of oxygen. LIF emission was detected between 270 and 380 nm, revealing distinct bands of the transitions from B(0) to highly excited vibrational states in the electronic ground state, X (v > 7). At higher spectral resolution, these bands reveal the common P- and R-branch line splitting. Eventually, the proposed LIF approach was used for single-shot imaging of the two-dimensional distribution of hot oxygen molecules in flames. PMID:25279538

  3. Fiber-optic laser-induced fluorescence probe for the detection of environmental pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bublitz, J.; Dickenhausen, M.; Grätz, M.; Todt, S.; Schade, W.

    1995-06-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy in combination with fiber optics is shown to be a powerful tool for qualitative and quantitative diagnostics of environmental pollutants in water and soil. Time-integrated data accumulation of the LIF signals in early and late time windows with respect to the excitation pulse simplifies the method so that it becomes attractive for practical applications. Results from field measurements are reported, as oil contaminations under a gas station and in an industrial sewer system are investigated. A KrF-excimer laser and a hydrogen Raman shifter can be applied for multiwavelength excitation. This allows a discrimination between benzene, toluene, xylene, and ethylbenzene aromatics and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules in the samples under investigation. For a rough theoretical approach, a computer simulation is developed to describe the experimental results.

  4. Validation of Laser-Induced Fluorescent Photogrammetric Targets on Membrane Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Thomas W.; Dorrington, Adrian A.; Shortis, Mark R.; Hendricks, Aron R.

    2004-01-01

    The need for static and dynamic characterization of a new generation of inflatable space structures requires the advancement of classical metrology techniques. A new photogrammetric-based method for non-contact ranging and surface profiling has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to support modal analyses and structural validation of this class of space structures. This full field measurement method, known as Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) photogrammetry, has previously yielded promising experimental results. However, data indicating the achievable measurement precision had not been published. This paper provides experimental results that indicate the LIF-photogrammetry measurement precision for three different target types used on a reflective membrane structure. The target types were: (1) non-contact targets generated using LIF, (2) surface attached retro-reflective targets, and (3) surface attached diffuse targets. Results from both static and dynamic investigations are included.

  5. Measuring OH and HO2 in the Troposphere by Laser-Induced Fluorescence at Low Pressure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, William H.; Stevens, Philip S.; Mather, James H.

    1995-10-01

    The hydroxyl radical OH oxidizes many lime gases in the atmosphere. It initiates and then participates in chemical reactions that lead to such phenomena as photochemical smog, acid rain, and stratospheric ozone depletion. Because OH is so reactive, its volume mixing ratio is less than 1 part per trillion volume (pptv) throughout the troposphere. Its close chemical cousin, the hydroperoxyl radical HO2, participates in many reactions as well. The authors have developed an instrument capable of measuring OH and HO2 by laser-induced fluorescence in a detection chamber at low pressure. This prototype instrument is able to detect about 1.4 × 105 molecules cm3 (0.005 pptv) of OH at the ground in a signal integration time of 30 s with negligible interferences. The absolute uncertainty is a factor of 1.5. This instrument is now being adapted to aircraft use for measurements throughout the troposphere.

  6. Absolute Density Calibration Cell for Laser Induced Fluorescence Erosion Rate Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domonkos, Matthew T.; Stevens, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    Flight qualification of ion thrusters typically requires testing on the order of 10,000 hours. Extensive knowledge of wear mechanisms and rates is necessary to establish design confidence prior to long duration tests. Consequently, real-time erosion rate measurements offer the potential both to reduce development costs and to enhance knowledge of the dependency of component wear on operating conditions. Several previous studies have used laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure real-time, in situ erosion rates of ion thruster accelerator grids. Those studies provided only relative measurements of the erosion rate. In the present investigation, a molybdenum tube was resistively heated such that the evaporation rate yielded densities within the tube on the order of those expected from accelerator grid erosion. This work examines the suitability of the density cell as an absolute calibration source for LIF measurements, and the intrinsic error was evaluated.

  7. A novel laser-induced fluorescence scheme for Ar-I in a plasma.

    PubMed

    Short, Zachary D; Siddiqui, M Umair; Henriquez, Miguel F; McKee, John S; Scime, Earl E

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe a novel infrared laser-induced fluorescence scheme for the 1s2 state of Ar-I using an 841.052 nm (vacuum) Sacher tunable diode laser oscillator and compare it to an established 667.913 nm (vacuum) 1s4-pumping Ar-I LIF scheme using a master oscillator power amplifier laser [A. M. Keesee et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 4091 (2004)]. The novel scheme exhibits a significantly greater signal-to-noise ratio for a given injected laser power than the established scheme. We argue that this is caused by less intense spontaneous Ar-I radiation near the LIF emission wavelength for the 1s2 scheme as compared to the 1s4 scheme. In addition we present an updated iodine cell spectrum around the 1s4 LIF scheme pump wavelength. PMID:26827319

  8. Oxygen plasma flow properties deduced from laser-induced fluorescence and probe measurements.

    PubMed

    Löhle, Stefan; Eichhorn, Christoph; Steinbeck, Andreas; Lein, Sebastian; Herdrich, Georg; Röser, Hans-Peter; Auweter-Kurtz, Monika

    2008-04-10

    Estimation of the local dissociation degree and the local mass-specific enthalpy of a pure oxygen plasma flow determined mainly from laser-induced fluorescence measurements are reported. Measurements have been conducted for several generator parameters in an inductively heated plasma wind tunnel. Additional probe measurements of total pressure together with the deduced translational temperature are used to estimate the local mass-specific enthalpy. For a reference condition, full dissociation has been measured. The measured translational temperature of atomic oxygen for this condition is T = 3500 K. Subsequently, the local mass-specific enthalpy has been derived using these local density and temperature measurements. For the reference condition the estimated value of h = 27 MJ/kg is in good agreement with the probe measurements and results from diode laser absorption spectroscopy. PMID:18404183

  9. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Photogrammetry for Dynamic Characterization of Transparent and Aluminized Membrane Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorrington, Adrian A.; Jones, Thomas W.; Danehy, Paul M.; Pappa, Richard S.

    2003-01-01

    Photogrammetry has proven to be a valuable tool for static and dynamic profiling of membrane based inflatable and ultra-lightweight space structures. However, the traditional photogrammetric targeting techniques used for solid structures, such as attached retro-reflective targets and white-light dot projection, have some disadvantages and are not ideally suited for measuring highly transparent or reflective membrane structures. In this paper, we describe a new laser-induced fluorescence based target generation technique that is more suitable for these types of structures. We also present several examples of non-contact non-invasive photogrammetric measurements of laser-dye doped polymers, including the dynamic measurement and modal analysis of a 1m-by-1m aluminized solar sail style membrane.

  10. Spatially and temporally resolved gas distributions around heterogeneous catalysts using infrared planar laser-induced fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Zetterberg, Johan; Blomberg, Sara; Gustafson, Johan; Evertsson, Jonas; Zhou, Jianfeng; Adams, Emma C.; Carlsson, Per-Anders; Aldén, Marcus; Lundgren, Edvin

    2015-01-01

    Visualizing and measuring the gas distribution in close proximity to a working catalyst is crucial for understanding how the catalytic activity depends on the structure of the catalyst. However, existing methods are not able to fully determine the gas distribution during a catalytic process. Here we report on how the distribution of a gas during a catalytic reaction can be imaged in situ with high spatial (400 μm) and temporal (15 μs) resolution using infrared planar laser-induced fluorescence. The technique is demonstrated by monitoring, in real-time, the distribution of carbon dioxide during catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide above powder catalysts. Furthermore, we demonstrate the versatility and potential of the technique in catalysis research by providing a proof-of-principle demonstration of how the activity of several catalysts can be measured simultaneously, either in the same reactor chamber, or in parallel, in different reactor tubes. PMID:25953006

  11. Detection and mapping of oil-contaminated soils by remote sensing of laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luedeker, Wilhelm; Guenther, Kurt P.; Dahn, Hans-Guenter

    1995-10-01

    The contamination of soil by aromatic mineral hydrocarbons (MHC) (e.g., gasoline, oil, etc.) has become a severe environmental problem because not only men, animals, and plants are threatened but also the water and air. With the unification of Germany a great number of suspected contaminated sites in the new countries were registered. An estimation of the German Federal Ministry of Environment (BMU) counts 180,000 areas contaminated with different pollutants, 55,000 are situated in the former GDR. On military settlements for example more than fifty percent of the chemicals are MHCs. Hence one can get an idea of the importance of soil pollution by hydrocarbons. Other zones contaminated due to carelessness or accidents are civil petrolstations, airports, refineries, pipelines, and traffic disasters. At the present time for most of these areas the contamination is assumed due to recent use. Due to the large extension of the problem an estimation and evaluation of the potential hazard for the environment is difficult and expensive to perform. In the case of an actual endangering the total area must be mapped in detail resulting in increasing costs for the owner. Nevertheless it is necessary to find reliable timesaving areal mapping and monitoring methods. One opportunity presented in this paper is the application of remote sensing by laser induced fluorescence from an airborne platform. It promises to fulfill these requirements in a sufficiently fast manner with very high spatial resolution. The access to the pollutant detection is the specific laser induced fluorescence emitted by the MHC (finger print). The present work shows the requirements for a helicopterborne lidar system for MHC mapping and how the detected signals are to be evaluated and interpreted.

  12. [Study on the deteriorating course of fresh milk by laser-induced fluorescence spectra].

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Yu, C Q; Li, J Z; Yan, J X

    2001-12-01

    Along with the development of living standard, people's demand for food quality and food hygiene also rises. People demand food not only with rich nutrition, inexpensive price, but also with safety. So food hygiene test is paid common attention of society. Milk is a nourishing food and is loved by people. Sour milk goods from milk is also in great demand. But nourishing foods are good for growing many microbes. Fresh milk and sour milk are easy contaminated by microbes and go bad. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technology is an important part of modern optics. It is broadly applied in biomedicine, diagnostics, test of food hygiene, environment protecting, owing to its high sensitivity, high speed, automation, untouched testing. In this paper, we attempted to LIF technology to test milk food quality. We used the third harmonics pulsed Nd:YAG laser (355 nm) as the exciting source, and a multi-track spectrometer as the detector and measured the intensities of apply LIF of fresh milk and sour milk during their deteriorating course. Test system and test method are introduced, fluorescence spectra of deteriorating course are also attached. The test result makes clear that there are close connection between deteriorating course and fluorescence spectra. PMID:12958890

  13. Use of a laser-induced fluorescence thermal imaging system for film cooling heat transfer measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Chyu, M.K.

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes a novel approach based on fluorescence imaging of thermographic phosphor that enables the simultaneous determination of both local film effectiveness and local heat transfer on a film-cooled surface. The film cooling model demonstrated consists of a single row of three discrete holes on a flat plate. The transient temperature measurement relies on the temperature-sensitive fluorescent properties of europium-doped lanthanum oxysulfide (La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Eu{sup +3}) thermographic phosphor. A series of full-field surface temperatures, mainstream temperatures, and coolant film temperatures were acquired during the heating of a test surface. These temperatures are used to calculate the heat transfer coefficients and the film effectiveness simultaneously. Because of the superior spatial resolution capability for the heat transfer data reduced from these temperature frames, the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging system, the present study observes the detailed heat transfer characteristics over a film-protected surface. The trend of the results agrees with those obtained using other conventional thermal methods, as well as the liquid crystal imaging technique. One major advantage of this technique is the capability to record a large number of temperature frames over a given testing period. This offers multiple-sample consistency.

  14. Laser induced singlet-oxygen-sensitised delayed fluorescence of dyes in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnovskii, A A; Bashtanov, M E; Drozdova, N N; Yuzhakova, O A; Luk'yanets, Evgenii A

    2002-01-31

    It is shown that water-soluble derivatives of phthalocyanines - poly(diethoxyphosphinylmethyl)substituted aluminium phthalocyanines - emit intense singlet-oxygen-sensitised delayed fluorescence upon laser-induced formation of singlet oxygen in air-saturated aqueous (D{sub 2}O) solutions. The delayed fluorescence is emitted by the dye molecules which accepted energy from two molecules of singlet oxygen. The quantum efficiency of delayed fluorescence in aerated D{sub 2}O of the chloroaluminium complex of octa(diethoxyphosphinylmethyl) phthalocyanine corresponds to the rate constant of population of excited dye molecules which is equal to (5.5 {+-} 3) x 10{sup 12} mole{sup -2} L{sup 2} s{sup -1}. This value is only an order of magnitude smaller than that for tetra(4-tert.-butyl)phthalocyanine earlier studied in aerated organic solvents. It is shown that these phthalocyanine derivatives can be used as highly sensitive luminescence indicators of singlet oxygen produced in aqueous solutions of different compounds upon laser excitation. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  15. Single laser detection of CO and OH via laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosburger, M.; Sick, V.

    2010-04-01

    Two-photon laser-induced fluorescence detection of carbon monoxide with excitation in the Fourth Positive System near 280 nm is demonstrated in carbon monoxide/nitrogen mixtures at ambient conditions and in a methane/air Bunsen flame. Fully resolved rotational spectra are presented for the A-X (5,0) and (4,0) bands near 279 and 284 nm, respectively. Energy transfer from excited molecular nitrogen to carbon monoxide with subsequent fluorescence from carbon monoxide that was reported for low pressure conditions in the literature has also been observed at atmospheric conditions. It was further demonstrated that overlaps of some CO A-X (4,0) rotational lines with OH A-X (1,0) rotational lines allow simultaneous excitation of both species with a single laser. The fluorescence bands are completely separated, enabling detection without crosstalk. Detection limits are adequate to detect CO in nascent state in a flame and it is expected that for application in high-pressure, low-temperature combustion environments, where high quantities of CO are present, this approach can provide advantages compared to the excitation of CO at shorter wavelengths due to decreased laser beam attenuation.

  16. Use of a laser-induced fluorescence thermal imaging system for film cooling heat transfer measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Chyu, M.K.

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes a novel approach based on fluorescence imaging of thermographic phosphor that enables the simultaneous determination of both local film effectiveness and local heat transfer on a film-cooled surface. The film cooling model demonstrated consists of a single row of three discrete holes on a flat plate. The transient temperature measurement relies on the temperature-sensitive fluorescent properties of europium-doped lanthanum oxysulfide (La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:EU{sup 3+}) thermographic phosphor. A series of full-field surface temperatures, mainstream temperatures, and coolant film temperatures were acquired during the heating of a test surface. These temperatures are used to calculate the heat transfer coefficients and the film effectiveness simultaneously. Because of the superior spatial resolution capability for the heat transfer data reduced from these temperature frames, the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging system, the present study observes the detailed heat transfer characteristics over a film-protected surface. The trend of the results agrees with those obtained using other conventional thermal methods, as well as the liquid crystal imaging technique. One major advantage of this technique is the capability to record a large number of temperature frames over a given testing period. This offers multiple-sample consistency.

  17. Laser Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence Spectra of Cajanus Cajan L Plant Growing Under Cadmium Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Ram; Pandey, J. K.

    2010-06-01

    Laser-induced Chlorophyll fluorescence (LICF) spectra of Cajanus cajan L leaves treated with different concentrations of Cd (0.05, 0.5 and 1 mM) are recorded at 10 and 20 days after first treatment of cadmium. LICF spectra are recorded in the region of 650-780 nm using violet diode laser (405 nm). LICF spectra of plant leaves show two maxima near 685 and 730nm. Fluorescence induction kinetics (FIK) curve are recorded at 685 and 730 nm with red diode laser (635 nm) for excitation. The fluorescence intensity ratios (FIR) F685/F730 are calculated from LICF spectra and vitality index (Rfd) are determined from FIK curve. FIR and Rfd value are good stress indicator of plant health. These parameters along with chlorophyll content are used to analyze the effect of Cd on wheat plants. The result indicates that higher concentrations of Cd hazardous for photosynthetic activity and health of Arhar plants. The lower concentration of 0.05 mM shows stimulatory response up to 10 days while after 20 days this concentration also shows inhibitory response. R. Gopal, K. B. Mishra, M. Zeeshan, S. M. Prasad, and M. M. Joshi Curr. Sci., 83, 880, 2002 K. B. Mishra and R. Gopal Int. J. Rem. Sen., 29, 157, 2008 R. Maurya, S. M. Prasad, and R. Gopal J. Photochem. Photobio. C: Photochem. Rev., 9, 29, 2008

  18. Tissue characterization in some clinical specialities utilizing laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svanberg, Katarina; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Baert, Luc; Bak-Jensen, Elisabeth; Berg, Roger; Brun, Arne; Colleen, Stig; Idvall, Ingrid; D'Hallewin, Marie-Ange; Ingvar, Christian; Johansson, Jonas; Karlsson, Sven-Erik; Lundgren, Rolf; Salford, Leif G.; Stenram, Unne; Stromblad, Lars-Goran; Svanberg, Sune; Wang-Nordman, Ingrid

    1994-05-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) can be used for noninvasive spectroscopic identification of biological tissue and is of special interest in early tumor detection. The basis for this optical biopsy method is the interaction of the laser light with tissue chromophores, such as tryptophan, collagen, elastin, NADH, beta-carotene and hemoglobin. The UV-excited fluorescence that arises from the native chromophores, the autofluorescence, has a broad distribution, peaking at about 490 nm with a lower intensity in tumor compared to normal tissue. The tumor detection potential is enhanced with exogenously administrated tumor- marking agents, such as hematoporphyrin (HPD, commercial name Photofrin), with two fluorescence peaks at about 630 and 690 nm. We have developed clinical instrumentation both for tissue point monitoring and for full real-time image processing. Seventy-one patients were investigated in vivo and surgical samples from additional 20 patients. In 46 patients the autofluorescence only was monitored. In 45 patients low-dose Photofrin injection was used. The in vivo investigations included different kinds of lung tumors, urinary bladder tumors, and malignant gliomas. The in vitro measurements were performed in breast tumors and prostatic tumors. Invasive and early tumors and also precancerous lesions can be revealed utilizing LIF in low-dose Photofrin injected patients.

  19. Toluene-based planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of temperature in hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estruch-Samper, D.; Vanstone, L.; Hillier, R.; Ganapathisubramani, B.

    2015-06-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging is carried out in a hypersonic gun tunnel at a freestream Mach number of 8.9 and Reynolds number of ( is the test gas). The fluorescence of toluene is correlated with the red shift of the emission spectra with increasing temperature. A two-colour approach is used where, following an excitation at 266 nm, emission spectra at two different bands are captured in separate runs using two different filters. Two different flow fields are investigated using this method: (i) hypersonic flow past a blunt nose, which is characterised by a bow shock with strong entropy effects, and (ii) an attached shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction induced by a flare located further downstream on the same blunt cylinder body. Measurements from as low as the freestream temperature of K all the way up to K are obtained. The uncertainty at the higher temperature level is approximately %, while at the low end of the temperature, an additional % uncertainty is expected. Application of the technique is further challenged at high temperatures due to the exponentially reduced fluorescence quantum yields and the occurrence of toluene pyrolysis near the stagnation region ( K). Overall, results are found to be within % agreement with the expected distributions, thus demonstrating suitability of the technique for hypersonic flow thermometry applications in low-enthalpy facilities.

  20. Laser ablation laser induced fluorescence for sensitive detection of heavy metals in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godwal, Yogesh

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy LIBS is a fast non-contact technique for the analysis of the elemental composition using spectral information of the emission from a laser-induced plasma. For the LIBS studies in this thesis the focus has been in using very low energy, microjoule pulses in order to give high spatial resolution and minimize the laser system requirements. This is a regime that we refer to as microLIBS. Under such conditions it is important to maximize the signal detected to give the lowest limit of detection LOD possible. One technique to improve the signal to noise ratios is by coupling LIBS with Laser Induced Fluorescence. This is a technique where the first pulse creates a vapor plume and the second pulse tuned to a resonant absorption line of the species of interest re-excites the plume. We term this technique as Laser ablation Laser Induced Fluorescence LA-LIF. We have been investigating the performance of LA-LIF at low pulse energies (≤ 1 mJ for both pulses) for the detection of elemental contaminants in water. This technique allows reasonable performance compared to high energy single-pulse LIBS, but at a much reduced total energy expenditure. This allows LODs in the parts per billion range ppb range which typically cannot be obtained with low energy single pulse probing of the systems. This approach or exceeds the sensitivities which can be obtained with many shots using much larger energy systems. In this thesis we investigated the performance of LIBS at low pulse energies for the detection of Pb as a contaminant in water. An LOD of 70 ppb was obtained for an accumulation of 100 shots with the ablation laser pulse energy of 250 muJ and an excitation laser pulse energy of 8 muJ. A systematic study of the detector conditions was made for the system for the detection of Pb. Scaling laws for the LOD in terms of the pump and probe energies were measured and also the effect of detector gain, the gate delay and the gate width were studied. In

  1. Bioaerosols laser-induced fluorescence provides specific robust signatures for standoff detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buteau, Sylvie; Simard, Jean-Robert; Déry, Bernard; Roy, Gilles; Lahaie, Pierre; Mathieu, Pierre; Ho, Jim; McFee, John

    2006-10-01

    One of today's primary security challenges is the emerging biological threat due to the increased accessibility to biological warfare technology and the limited efficiency of detection against such menace. At the end of the 90s, Defence R&D Canada developed a standoff bioaerosol sensor, SINBAHD, based on intensified range-gated spectrometric detection of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) with an excitation at 351 nm. This LIDAR system generates specific spectrally wide fluorescence signals originating from inelastic interactions with complex molecules forming the building blocks of most bioaerosols. This LIF signal is spectrally collected by a combination of a dispersive element and a range-gated ICCD that limits the spectral information within a selected atmospheric cell. The system can detect and classify bioaerosols in real-time, with the help of a data exploitation process based on a least-square fit of the acquired fluorescence signal by a linear combination of normalized spectral signatures. The detection and classification processes are hence directly dependant on the accuracy of these signatures to represent the intrinsic fluorescence of bioaerosols and their discrepancy. Comparisons of spectral signatures acquired at Suffield in 2001 and at Dugway in 2005 of bioaerosol simulants, Bacillius subtilis var globiggi (BG) and Erwinia herbicola (EH), having different origin, preparation protocol and/or dissemination modes, has been made and demonstrates the robustness of the obtained spectral signatures in these particular cases. Specific spectral signatures and their minimum detectable concentrations for different simulants/interferents obtained at the Joint Biological Standoff Detection System (JBSDS) increment II field demonstration trial, Dugway Proving Ground (DPG) in June 2005, are also presented.

  2. Fast analysis of amino acids in wine by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Mandrioli, Roberto; Morganti, Emanuele; Mercolini, Laura; Kenndler, Ernst; Raggi, Maria A

    2011-10-01

    A fast analytical method has been developed for the determination of nine amino acids, together with serotonin, in wine samples of different origin and vintage. The method is based on capillary electrophoresis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence detection. Separation was obtained by using a fused-silica capillary (75 μm id, 74.0 cm total length, 60.0 cm length to detector) and a background electrolyte composed of carbonate buffer (20 mM, pH 9.2), applying a 20 kV voltage. Direct hydrodynamic injection of wine samples was made after an original microwave-assisted derivatisation step with 5-(4,6-dichlorotriazinyl)aminofluorescein. Fluorescence was induced by an Ar-Ion laser, exciting at 488 nm. Good linearity (r(2) >0.9990) was obtained for all considered analytes and sensitivity was also good, with limits of detection in the 7-50 ng/mL range. The method was successfully applied for the analysis of commercial Italian wines and thus seems to be suitable for the determination of the relevant amino acids and serotonin, providing good results in terms of accuracy and precision, together with the advantage of a very fast, microwave-assisted derivatisation procedure. Future applications of the method are planned to check for wine adulterations and commercial frauds. PMID:21922500

  3. Standoff detection and classification procedure for bioorganic compounds by hyperspectral laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischbach, Thomas; Duschek, Frank; Hausmann, Anita; Pargmann, Carsten; Aleksejev, Valeri; Poryvkina, Larisa; Sobolev, Innokenti; Babichenko, Sergey; Handke, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    The high and still increasing number of attacks by hazardous bioorganic materials makes enormous demands on their detection. A very high detection sensitivity and differentiability are essential, as well as a rapid identification with low false alarm rates. One single technology can hardly achieve this. Point sensors can collect and identify materials, but finding an appropriate position is time consuming and involves several risks. Laser based standoff detection, however, can immediately provide information on propagation and compound type of a released hazardous material. The coupling of both methods may illustrate a solution to optimize the acquisition and detection of hazardous substances. At DLR Lampoldshausen, bioorganic substances are measured, based on laser induced fluorescence (LIF), and subsequently classified. In this work, a procedure is presented, which utilizes lots of information (time-dependent spectral data, local information) and predicts the presence of hazardous substances by statistical data analysis. For that purpose, studies are carried out on a free transmission range at a distance of 22m at two different excitation wavelengths alternating between 280nm and 355 nm. Time-dependent fluorescence spectra are recorded by a gated intensified CCD camera (iCCD). An automated signal processing allows fast and deterministic data collection and a direct subsequent classification of the detected substances. The variation of the substance parameters (physical state, concentration) is included within this method.

  4. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Jet-Cooled t-Butoxy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinjun; Reilly, Neil J; Mason, Amy; Miller, Terry A

    2015-12-10

    The vibrational structures of the Ã(2)A1 and X̃(2)E states of t-butoxy were obtained in jet-cooled laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and dispersed fluorescence (DF) spectroscopic measurements. The observed transitions are assigned based on vibrational frequencies calculated using the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method and the predicted Franck-Condon factors. The spin-orbit splitting was measured to be 36(5) cm(-1) for the lowest vibrational level of the ground (X̃(2)E) state, which is significantly smaller than that of methoxy, and increases with increasing vibrational quantum number of the CO stretch mode. Vibronic analysis of the DF spectra suggests that Jahn-Teller active modes of the ground-state t-butoxy radical are similar to those of methoxy and would be the same if methyl groups were replaced by hydrogen atoms. The rotational and fine structure of the LIF transition to the first CO stretch overtone level of the Ã(2)A1 state has been simulated using a spectroscopic model first proposed for methoxy, yielding an accurate determination of the rotational constants of both à and X̃ states. PMID:26524342

  5. DNA sequencing by capillary electrophoresis with replaceable linear polyacrylamide and laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Martinez, M C; Berka, J; Belenkii, A; Foret, F; Miller, A W; Karger, B L

    1993-10-15

    Replaceable linear polyacrylamide (LPA) has been utilized as a sieving matrix for DNA sequencing by capillary electrophoresis (CE). Difficulties associated with cross-linked polyacrylamide gel stability have been overcome for the routine application of CE to DNA sequencing. A simple laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection system based on a single laser and two photomultipliers (PMT) has been adopted for this work. Sequencing information for four bases has been obtained from two fluorescent dyes and two peak height ratios, detected in two optical channels. FAM- and JOE-labeled M13 (-21) primers have been chosen because both dyes are efficiently excited with a low-power argon ion laser, can be optically separated, and exhibit minimal dye-based shifts in DNA fragment mobilities. Addition of denaturants to the electrophoresis running buffer (1 x TBE, 3.5 M urea, 30% formamide) and column operation at 32 degrees C permitted the resolution of difficult compressed sites in the sequence of phage M13mp18. Careful examination of the polymerization reaction of LPA has led to methodology that has proven to be reproducible for obtaining DNA sequencing information of M13mp18 phage for 350 nucleotides in close to 30 min. PMID:8250265

  6. A new post-column reactor-laser induced fluorescence detector for capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Liling

    1996-01-02

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE), a powerful separation method based on the differential migration of charged species under the influence of an electric field, has been widely used for separations covering from small ions to big biomolecules. Chapter 1 describes the method, then discusses detection of the separated analytes by laser induced fluorescence and by chemical derivatization, and the use of O-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) as a post-column reagent. Chapter 2 describes a post-column reactor which uses two narrow bore capillaries connected coaxially. This reactor differs from other coaxial reactors in terms of capillary dimensions, reagent flow control, ease of construction and most importantly, better limits of detection. The derivatization reagent is electroosmotically driven into the reaction capillary and the reagent flow rate is independently controlled by a high voltage power supply. Amino acids, amines and proteins, derivatized by OPA/2-mercaptoethanol using this post-column reactor coupled with LIF detection, show low attomole mass limits of detection, and for the first time, the authors demonstrate single cell capability with a post-column derivatization scheme. The single cell capability shows that this reactor could find applications in assaying non-fluorescent or electrochemically inactive components in individual biological cells in the future.

  7. Laser induced fluorescence imaging of thermal damage in polymer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, W.G.; Meyer, K.E.; Wachter, E.A.; Perl, D.R.; Kulowitch, P.J.

    1997-06-01

    A simple, fluorescence based imaging system has been developed that is capable of identifying regions of thermal damage in polymer matrix composites (PMCs). These materials are playing an increasingly important role in the production of high performance vehicles and aircraft, where their low weight and high mechanical strength, combined with advancements in manufacturing technology, ensure increased use for a variety of applications. Of particular concern in the aerospace industry is the tendency of some PMC materials to become irreversibly damaged when exposed to elevated temperatures. Traditional nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques are capable of detecting physical anomalies such as cracks and delaminations but cannot detect initial heat damage, which occurs on a molecular scale. Spectroscopic techniques such as laser induced fluorescence provide an attractive means for detecting this type of damage and are amenable to imaging large, irregularly shaped surfaces. In this report the authors describe instrumentation capable of rapidly detecting thermal damage in graphite epoxy components and suggest improvements which will enable this technology to make quantitative judgments concerning the mechanical strength properties of heat damaged specimens.

  8. Clinical trial for detection of dental caries using laser-induced fluorescence ratio reference standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Shiny Sara; Mohanty, Soumyakant; Jayanthi, J. L.; Varughese, Jolly Mary; Balan, Anitha; Subhash, Narayanan

    2010-03-01

    We present the clinical applicability of fluorescence ratio reference standard (FRRS) to discriminate different stages of dental caries. Toward this, laser-induced autofluorescence emission spectra are recorded in vivo in the 400- to 800-nm spectral range on a miniature fiber optic spectrometer from 65 patients, with a 404-nm diode laser as the excitation source. Autofluorescence spectra of sound teeth consist of a broad emission at 500 nm that is typical of natural enamel, whereas in caries teeth additional peaks are seen at 635 and 680 nm due to emission from porphyrin compounds in oral bacteria. Scatter plots are developed to differentiate sound teeth from enamel caries, sound teeth from dentinal caries, and enamel caries from dentinal caries using the mean fluorescence intensity (FI) and ratios F500/F635 and F500/F680 measured from 25 sites of sound teeth and 65 sites of carious teeth. The sensitivity and specificity of both the FI and FRRS are determined. It is observed that a diagnostic algorithm based on FRRS scatter plots is able to discriminate enamel caries from sound teeth, dentinal caries from sound teeth, and enamel from dentinal caries with overall sensitivities of 85, 100, and 88% and specificities of 90, 100, and 77%, respectively.

  9. Stark broadening corrections to laser-induced fluorescence temperature measurements in a hydrogen arcjet plume.

    PubMed

    Storm, P V; Cappelli, M A

    1996-08-20

    Laser-induced fluorescence of the H(α) transition of atomic hydrogen has previously been performed in the plume of a hydrogen arcjet thruster. Measurements of plasma velocity and temperature, based on the Doppler shift and broadening of the H(α) line shape, were previously published [Appl. Opt. 32, 6117 (1993)]. In that paper the Stark broadening of the H(α) transition was estimated from static-ion calculations performed in the early 1970's and found to be negligible in comparison with the Doppler broadening. However, more recent dynamic-ion calculations have shown the Stark broadening to be considerably larger than was previously assumed, resulting in inaccurate temperature measurements. We present a reanalysis of the fluorescence data, taking into account the improved Stark broadening calculations. The correct atomic hydrogen translation temperature and electron number density are obtained from the Doppler and Stark broadening components of the measured line shape. The results indicate a substantial drop in temperature from those previously reported. PMID:21102917

  10. Laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic for the LEM turbulent hydrodynamics experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B.; Dimonte, G.

    1994-12-01

    The authors are developing a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) diagnostic for the LEM experiment to measure the evolution of a Rayleigh-Taylor unstable fluid interface into the highly nonlinear regime. The interface will be between two fluids of different density in a 7 x 7 x 14 cm cell that will be accelerated downwards over a distance of {approximately}100 cm, achieving maximum velocities of order 50 m/s. One of the two fluids will be doped with laser dye and pumped to fluoresce with a 100 Hz pulsed, frequency doubled YAG laser beam spread into a sheet and entering the cell from the bottom. The short pulse duration of the laser (<10 ns) eliminates motional blurring, and the images are recorded from the side with a series of 35 mm static cameras. Aligning the laser sheet to the center of the cell localizes the region of the cell probed and eliminates edge effects in the data. This LIF diagnostic will be described.

  11. Ablation plume structure and dynamics in ambient gas observed by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyabe, M.; Oba, M.; Iimura, H.; Akaoka, K.; Khumaeni, A.; Kato, M.; Wakaida, I.

    2015-08-01

    The dynamic behavior of an ablation plume in ambient gas has been investigated by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy. The second harmonic beam from an Nd:YAG laser (0.5-6 J/cm2) was focused on a sintered oxide pellet or a metal chip of gadolinium. The produced plume was subsequently intersected with a sheet-shaped UV beam from a dye laser so that time-resolved fluorescence images were acquired with an intensified CCD camera at various delay times. The obtained cross-sectional images of the plume indicate that the ablated ground state atoms and ions of gadolinium accumulate in a hemispherical contact layer between the plume and the ambient gas, and a cavity containing a smaller density of ablated species is formed near the center of the plume. At earlier expansion stage, another luminous component also expands in the cavity so that it coalesces into the hemispherical layer. The splitting and coalescence for atomic plume occur later than those for ionic plume. Furthermore, the hemispherical layer of neutral atoms appears later than that of ions; however, the locations of the layers are nearly identical. This coincidence of the appearance locations of the layers strongly suggests that the neutral atoms in the hemispherical layer are produced as a consequence of three-body recombination of ions through collisions with gas atoms. The obtained knowledge regarding plume expansion dynamics and detailed plume structure is useful for optimizing the experimental conditions for ablation-based spectroscopic analysis.

  12. Portable detection system of vegetable oils based on laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Li; Zhang, Yinchao; Chen, Siying; Chen, He; Guo, Pan; Mu, Taotao

    2015-11-01

    Food safety, especially edible oils, has attracted more and more attention recently. Many methods and instruments have emerged to detect the edible oils, which include oils classification and adulteration. It is well known than the adulteration is based on classification. Then, in this paper, a portable detection system, based on laser induced fluorescence, is proposed and designed to classify the various edible oils, including (olive, rapeseed, walnut, peanut, linseed, sunflower, corn oils). 532 nm laser modules are used in this equipment. Then, all the components are assembled into a module (100*100*25mm). A total of 700 sets of fluorescence data (100 sets of each type oil) are collected. In order to classify different edible oils, principle components analysis and support vector machine have been employed in the data analysis. The training set consisted of 560 sets of data (80 sets of each oil) and the test set consisted of 140 sets of data (20 sets of each oil). The recognition rate is up to 99%, which demonstrates the reliability of this potable system. With nonintrusive and no sample preparation characteristic, the potable system can be effectively applied for food detection.

  13. Two-Beam multiplexed laser-induced fluorescence measurements of an argon arcjet plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruyten, Wilhelmus M.; Keefer, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    We describe a multiplexed, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique with which radial and axial profiles of vector velocities of excited propellant species were obtained in the exhaust plume from a 300-W argon arcjet. Although the arcjet is a prototype, and although argon is not an interesting propellant from a propulsion perspective, the technique clearly demonstrates how a narrowband, frequency-stabilized ring-dye laser can be used to obtain simultaneous measurements of two velocity components in an arcjet plume and how a third signal from an optogalvanic cell can be used as a frequency reference. We also show that much information on the flow can be obtained by analyzing the Doppler widths and fluorescence intensities of the LIF data. Specifically, the data identify a boundary layer in the radial direction of the plume and a shock in the downstream region of the flow. Also, some flow anisotropy is observed, consistent with the assumption that the magnitude of the mean flow velocity fluctuates. The peak velocity on centerline remains roughly constant at 3 km/s throughout the expansion.

  14. Refractive Index Matching for Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence Imaging of Fluid Mixing in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, E. J.; Tigera, R. G.; Crimaldi, J. P.; Mays, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    Research in porous media is often hampered by the difficulty in making pore-scale observations. By selecting porous media that is refractive index matched (RIM) to the pore fluid, the media becomes transparent. This allows optical imaging techniques such as static light scattering (SLS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), confocal microscopy, and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) to be employed. RIM is particularly useful for research concerning contaminant remediation in the subsurface, permitting visual observation of plume dynamics at the pore scale. The goal of this research is to explore and assess candidate combinations of porous media, fluid, and fluorescent dye. The strengths and weaknesses of each combination will then be evaluated in terms of safety, cost, and optical quality in order to select the best combination for use with PLIF. Within this framework, top-ranked RIM combinations include Pyrex glass beads, water beads, or granular Nafion saturated in vegetable glycerin, deionized water, and an aqueous solution of 48% isopropanol, respectively. This research lays the groundwork for future efforts to build a flow chamber in which the selected RIM porous media, solution, and dye will be used in evaluating subsurface pumping strategies designed to impose chaotic plume spreading in porous media. Though the RIM porous media explored in this research are selected based on the specifications of a particular experiment, the methods developed for working with and evaluating RIM porous media should be of utility to a wide variety of research interests.

  15. A simple dental caries detection system using full spectrum of laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha-Cabral, Renata Maciel; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros; Maldonado, Edison Puig; Zezell, Denise Maria

    2015-06-01

    Objectives: to develop an apparatus for the detection of early caries lesions in enamel using the full extent of the tooth fluorescence spectrum, through the integration of a laser diode, fiber optics, filters and one portable spectrometer connected to a computer, all commercially available; to evaluate the developed device in clinical and laboratory tests, and compare its performance with commercial equipment. Methods: clinical examinations were performed in patients with indication for exodontics of premolars. After examinations, the patients underwent surgery and the teeth were stored individually. The optical measurements were repeated approximately two months after extraction, on the same sites previously examined, then histological analysis was carried out. Results: the spectral detector has presented high specificity and moderate sensitivity when applied to differentiate between healthy and damaged tissues, with no significant differences from the performance of the commercial equipment. The developed device is able to detect initial damages in enamel, with depth of approximately 300 μm. Conclusions: we successfully demonstrated the development of a simple and portable system based in laser-induced fluorescence for caries detection, assembled from common commercial parts. As the spectral detector acquires a complete recording of the spectrum from each tissue, it is possible to use it for monitoring developments of caries lesions.

  16. Capillary electrophoresis/laser-induced fluorescence detection of fluorescein as a groundwater migration tracer.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, P L; Grange, A H; Brumley, W C; Donnelly, J R; Farley, J W

    1998-09-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been applied to the determination of the groundwater migration tracer dye fluorescein based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection and compared to determinations obtained with traditional spectrofluorimetry. Detection limits of injected dye in the low parts per trillion (ppt) ranges have been accomplished with both CE/LIF based on the Ar ion laser and with a spectrofluorimeter. This approach was used for a real-world problem in determining groundwater migration between adjacent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Superfund sites by the Environmental Sciences Division in response to regional needs and as application of new analytical tools under development. Fluorescent dye was injected into source wells and then was determined in monitoring wells by extracting pads that adsorbed the dye or by directly determining the dye in the water using solid-phase extraction (SPE), a preconcentration technique. The approaches based on CE/LIF exhibits increased specificity over existing approaches due to the separation and unique migration time of the dye. Additional studies were aimed at achieving sub-ppt levels in the water using solid-phase extraction and field-amplified injection techniques. PMID:9761212

  17. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Su

    2001-05-25

    Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, the author introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, they demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm{sup 2} for 40-{micro}m wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection. In the second part of this dissertation, the author used laser-induced native fluorescence coupled with capillary electrophoresis (LINF-CE) and microscope imaging to study the single cell degranulation. On the basis of good temporal correlation with events observed through an optical microscope, they have identified individual peaks in the fluorescence electropherograms as serotonin released from the granular core on contact with the surrounding fluid.

  18. Standoff detection of natural bioaerosol by range-gated laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buteau, Sylvie; Simard, Jean-Robert; Roy, Gilles

    2005-11-01

    The biological threat has emerged as one of today's primary security challenges due to the increased accessibility to biological warfare technology and the limited efficiency of detection and protection measures against such menace. Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) has investigated various methods, including the improvement of atmospheric bioaerosol monitoring, to increase the readiness against such threat. By the end of the 90s, DRDC developed a standoff bioaerosol sensor based on intensified range-gated spectrometric detection of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). This work has showed an important potential of detecting and discriminating in real-time several bioaerosols. The LIDAR system that monitors atmosphere cells from a standoff position induces specific spectrally wide fluorescence signals originating from inelastic interactions with complex molecules forming the building blocks of the bioaerosols. This LIF signal is spectrally collected by a combination of a dispersive element and a range-gated ICCD that records the spectral information within a range-selected atmospheric volume. To assess further the potential of discrimination of such technique, this innovative sensor was used to obtain spectral data of various natural bioaerosols. In order to evaluate the discrimination of biological agent simulants from naturally occurring background fluorescing materials, the obtained results were compared with the ones of bioaerosol simulants (Bacillius subtilis var globiggi (BG) and Erwinia herbicola (EH)) acquired in 2001. The robustness of the spectral data with time was also investigated. From our results, most of the studied natural materials showed a spectral shift of various degrees, and up to 10 nm, to the longer wavelength one year later.

  19. Study of Sugar Cane Management Systems in Brazil Using Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Jader; Villas-Boas, Paulino; Carvalho, Camila; Corá, José Eduardo; Milori, Débora

    2014-05-01

    Brazil is the largest producer of cane sugar, consequently, is a leader in the production of bio-ethanol, a clean and renewable energy that fits the model of sustainable economy as discussed and pursued by our society. Our state of São Paulo concentrates 60% of national production, representing a sizeable share in the range of world production. All this economic potential is closely monitored by the scientific community, which develops numerous studies seeking an improvement in production efficiency and reduced environmental impacts caused by the planting. However, the study of soil samples, in plantation areas, demands results about the content and structural forms of organic matter (OM). Also, the soil carbon stocks depend on the type of management. Our goal is to study OM of soil samples from four sugar cane management systems: (i) unburned cane harvest, (ii) preharvest burned, (iii) addition of sugarcane bagasse ash and (iv) addition of residue from the extraction of sucrose, using Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of solid state. All the emission spectra were acquired using the system called LIFS-405, which consists of a diode laser Coherent, model cube with excitation at 405 nm, maximum output power of 50mJ and a mini-spectrometer, Ocean Optics USB2000-high sensitivity, with range of 194-894 nm and a fiber-optic bundle design (six excitation fibers in a circular path and one central fiber the collect the fluorescence). In this work, we will present the preliminary results evolving the humification index (HLIFS) of soil OM and total carbon amount (TC) for the different types of management. HLIFS shows a close correlation with the humification index of humic acid in solution obtained by means 2D conventional fluorescence spectroscopy.

  20. Stereoscopic Imaging in Hypersonics Boundary Layers using Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett; Inman, Jennifer A.; Alderfer, David W.; Jones, Stephen B.

    2008-01-01

    Stereoscopic time-resolved visualization of three-dimensional structures in a hypersonic flow has been performed for the first time. Nitric Oxide (NO) was seeded into hypersonic boundary layer flows that were designed to transition from laminar to turbulent. A thick laser sheet illuminated and excited the NO, causing spatially-varying fluorescence. Two cameras in a stereoscopic configuration were used to image the fluorescence. The images were processed in a computer visualization environment to provide stereoscopic image pairs. Two methods were used to display these image pairs: a cross-eyed viewing method which can be viewed by naked eyes, and red/blue anaglyphs, which require viewing through red/blue glasses. The images visualized three-dimensional information that would be lost if conventional planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging had been used. Two model configurations were studied in NASA Langley Research Center's 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Wind tunnel. One model was a 10 degree half-angle wedge containing a small protuberance to force the flow to transition. The other model was a 1/3-scale, truncated Hyper-X forebody model with blowing through a series of holes to force the boundary layer flow to transition to turbulence. In the former case, low flowrates of pure NO seeded and marked the boundary layer fluid. In the latter, a trace concentration of NO was seeded into the injected N2 gas. The three-dimensional visualizations have an effective time resolution of about 500 ns, which is fast enough to freeze this hypersonic flow. The 512x512 resolution of the resulting images is much higher than high-speed laser-sheet scanning systems with similar time response, which typically measure 10-20 planes.

  1. Stereoscopic Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence Imaging at 500 kHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medford, Taylor L.; Danehy, Paul M.; Jones, Stephen B.; Jiang, N.; Webster, M.; Lempert, Walter; Miller, J.; Meyer, T.

    2011-01-01

    A new measurement technique for obtaining time- and spatially-resolved image sequences in hypersonic flows is developed. Nitric-oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) has previously been used to investigate transition from laminar to turbulent flow in hypersonic boundary layers using both planar and volumetric imaging capabilities. Low flow rates of NO were typically seeded into the flow, minimally perturbing the flow. The volumetric imaging was performed at a measurement rate of 10 Hz using a thick planar laser sheet that excited NO fluorescence. The fluorescence was captured by a pair of cameras having slightly different views of the flow. Subsequent stereoscopic reconstruction of these images allowed the three-dimensional flow structures to be viewed. In the current paper, this approach has been extended to 50,000 times higher repetition rates. A laser operating at 500 kHz excites the seeded NO molecules, and a camera, synchronized with the laser and fitted with a beam-splitting assembly, acquires two separate images of the flow. The resulting stereoscopic images provide three-dimensional flow visualizations at 500 kHz for the first time. The 200 ns exposure time in each frame is fast enough to freeze the flow while the 500 kHz repetition rate is fast enough to time-resolve changes in the flow being studied. This method is applied to visualize the evolving hypersonic flow structures that propagate downstream of a discrete protuberance attached to a flat plate. The technique was demonstrated in the NASA Langley Research Center s 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel facility. Different tunnel Reynolds number conditions, NO flow rates and two different cylindrical protuberance heights were investigated. The location of the onset of flow unsteadiness, an indicator of transition, was observed to move downstream during the tunnel runs, coinciding with an increase in the model temperature.

  2. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Su

    2001-05-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, we introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, we demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm{sub 2} for 40-{micro}m wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection.

  3. Study of Organic Matter in Soils of the Amazon Region Employing Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadini, Amanda Maria; Nicolodelli, Gustavo; Mounier, Stéphane; Montes, Célia Regina; Marcondes Bastos Pereira Milori, Débora

    2014-05-01

    In the face of climate change and increasing CO2 levels in the atmosphere, the global carbon cycle, soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration, and the role of different world biomes as potential sources and sinks of carbon are receiving increasing attention. Carbon quantification is an important environmental indicator, but the structure of organic matter is also important because is related to carbon stability. The synthesis of soil organic matter (SOM), as presented in soils of forest vegetation, can be originated from condensation polymeric polyphenols and quinones that are responsible for controlling the main physical-chemical properties of soils. These systems are present in humic substances, representing the major fluorophore of SOM[1-3]. Abiotic factors, such as soil texture, use and occupation of soil, can influence on the process of SOM formation, molecular structure and in its humification index[4]. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (LIFS) have become a promising technique for assessing humification index of SOM (HLIFS). In this context, the aim of this study was to analyze the humification index of the SOM in the region of Barcelos (Amazon) employing LIFS. The study area was the region of Barcelos, close the river Demeni. The whose vegetation distribution in this area, is two biomes the Dense Ombrophylous Forest (DPQD) and Campinarana (DPQT), with areas of edaphic contacts between these two phytophysiognomies, which ranged from Open field (FDE) to closed Depression (DPQ). Preliminary results showed that the area closed Depression (DPQ) there was a continuous gradient of humification with increasing soil depth. A similar behavior was verified for area Forest (DPQD), where the highest values of HLIFS were obtained between the four points analyzed, indicating the magnitude of the molecular recalcitrance this organic matter in this area. The results obtained for area Campinarana (DPQT) and Open field (FDE) showed an opposite behavior. These points there

  4. Laser-induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy for applications in chemical sensing and optical refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumi Barimah, Eric

    limit of detection for ClO4, was determined to be 14.7 +/- 0.5 wt%/wt for the given experimental conditions. In the second part of this research, the temperature-dependent absorption and emission properties of Tm doped KPb2Cl5 (KPC) and KPb2Br5 (KPB) were evaluated for applications in laser cooling. A Tm doped Y3Al5O12 (YAG) crystal was also included for comparative studies. Under laser pumping, all crystals exhibited broad IR fluorescence at room temperature with a mean fluorescence wavelength of ˜1.82 mum and bandwidth of 0.14 mum (FWHM) for Tm:KPC/KPB and ˜1.79 mum for Tm:YAG. Initial experiments on laser-induced heating/cooling were performed using a combined IR imaging and fluorescence thermometry setup. Employing a continuous-wave laser operating at 1.907 mum, Tm: KPC and Tm: KPB crystals revealed a very small heat load resulting in temperature increase of ˜ 0.3 ( +/- 0.1)°C. The heat loading in Tm:YAG was signicantly larger and resulted in a temperature increase of ˜0.9 (+/-0.1)°C. The results derived from IR imaging were also conrmed by the fluorescence thermometry experiments, which showed only minimal changes in the FIR intensity ratio of the green Er3+ fluorescence lines from Er:KPC.

  5. Comparison of beetroot extracts originating from several sites using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabasović, M. S.; Šević, D.; Terzić, M.; Marinković, B. P.

    2012-05-01

    Beetroot (Beta vulgaris) juice contains a large number of fluorophores which can fluoresce. There is a growing interest in beetroot extracts analysis. In contrast, there is only limited information about beetroot obtained without sample preparation and/or extraction of components from the sample. In this work, we continue our previous study (Rabasović et al 2009 Acta Phys. Pol. A 116 570-2), analyzing and comparing beetroot extracts from several sites, using the time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique to measure the fluorescence of samples at different excitation wavelengths (340-470 nm) and for different sample dilutions.

  6. Subwavenumber charge-coupled device spectrometer calibration using molecular iodine laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Joseph G.; Hernandez-Diaz, Carlos; Williamson, J. Charles

    2010-01-15

    Spectrometers configured with charge-coupled devices (CCD) or other array-based detectors require calibration to convert from the pixel coordinate to a spectral coordinate. A CCD calibration method well suited for Raman spectroscopy has been developed based on the 514.5 nm Ar{sup +} laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrum of room-temperature molecular iodine vapor. Over 360 primary and secondary I{sub 2} LIF calibration lines spanning 510-645 nm were identified as calibrant peaks using an instrumental resolution of 1 cm{sup -1}. Two instrument calibration functions were evaluated with these peaks: a second-order polynomial and a function derived from simple optomechanical considerations. The latter function provided better fitting characteristics. Calibration using I{sub 2} LIF was tested with measurements of both laser light scattering and Raman spectra. The I{sub 2} LIF reference spectra and the signal spectra were recorded simultaneously, with no cross talk, by separating the two signals spatially along the vertical axis of the CCD imager. In this way, every CCD image could be independently calibrated. An accuracy and a precision of {+-}0.05 cm{sup -1} were achieved with this calibration technique.

  7. Characterization of laser induced fluorescence from background aerosols in a maritime environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buteau, Sylvie; Simard, Jean-Robert; Nadeau, Denis

    2011-05-01

    Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) has developed, by the end of the 90s, a standoff bioaerosol sensor based on intensified range-gated spectrometric detection of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). This sensor called SINBAHD demonstrated the capability to detect and characterize bioaerosols from a stand-off position. The sensor sensitivity and false alarm rate directly depend on the background characteristics since these later will dictate the threshold levels to be used. SINBAHD was used to characterize the background aerosols in a maritime environment close to Halifax, Canada in May 2008. The characterization of the LIF signal from the background aerosols included spectral, temporal and spatial aspects over 8 nights of continuous data collection. The local environmental conditions in addition to the aerosol concentration and particle size distribution were recorded during the entire trial period. From the 64 LIF trials, only five showed specific spectral features. The spectral variability was encountered either at short range, thus closer to the shore, or during a night having a specific prevalent wind direction. Indeed, the detected anomalies were in most cases directly related to the climatic conditions. The integrated LIF signal was also processed to assess the use of LIF intensity to identify aerosol anomalies in a maritime environment.

  8. Thermal distribution in biological tissue at laser induced fluorescence and photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnikov, I. V.; Seteikin, A. Yu.; Drakaki, E.; Makropoulou, M.

    2012-03-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy and photodynamic therapy (PDT) are techniques currently introduced in clinical applications for visualization and local destruction of malignant tumours as well as premalignant lesions. During the laser irradiation of tissues for the diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, the absorbed optical energy generates heat, although the power density of the treatment light for surface illumination is normally low enough not to cause any significantly increased tissue temperature. In this work we tried to evaluate the utility of Monte Carlo modeling for simulating the temperature fields and the dynamics of heat conduction into the skin tissue under several laser irradiation conditions with both a pulsed UV laser and a continuous wave visible laser beam. The analysis of the results showed that heat is not localized on the surface, but it is collected inside the tissue. By varying the boundary conditions on the surface and the type of the laser radiation (continuous or pulsed) we can reach higher than normal temperature inside the tissue without simultaneous formation of thermally damaged tissue (e.g. coagulation or necrosis zone).

  9. Thermal distribution in biological tissue at laser induced fluorescence and photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnikov, I. V.; Seteikin, A. Yu.; Drakaki, E.; Makropoulou, M.

    2011-10-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy and photodynamic therapy (PDT) are techniques currently introduced in clinical applications for visualization and local destruction of malignant tumours as well as premalignant lesions. During the laser irradiation of tissues for the diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, the absorbed optical energy generates heat, although the power density of the treatment light for surface illumination is normally low enough not to cause any significantly increased tissue temperature. In this work we tried to evaluate the utility of Monte Carlo modeling for simulating the temperature fields and the dynamics of heat conduction into the skin tissue under several laser irradiation conditions with both a pulsed UV laser and a continuous wave visible laser beam. The analysis of the results showed that heat is not localized on the surface, but it is collected inside the tissue. By varying the boundary conditions on the surface and the type of the laser radiation (continuous or pulsed) we can reach higher than normal temperature inside the tissue without simultaneous formation of thermally damaged tissue (e.g. coagulation or necrosis zone).

  10. Ion dynamics in a DC magnetron microdischarge measured with laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Christopher; Gascon, Nicolas; Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Ito, Tsuyohito; Cappelli, Mark

    2015-11-01

    We present evidence of coherent rotating azimuthal wave structures in a planar DC magnetron microdischarge operated with argon and xenon. The dominant stable mode structure varies with discharge voltage, and high frame rate camera imaging of plasma emission reveals propagating azimuthal waves in the negative E-> × B-> direction. This negative drift direction is attributed to a local field reversal arising from strong density gradients that drive excess ions towards the anode. Observed mode transitions are shown to be consistent with models of gradient drift-wave dispersion in such a field reversal when the fluid representation includes ambipolar diffusion parallel to the magnetic field direction. Time-averaged and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence measurements interrogate xenon ion dynamics under the action of the field reversal. Time resolution is obtained by synchronizing with the coherent azimuthal wave frequency at fixed mode number. This work is sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research with Dr. Mitat Birkan as program manager. C.Y. acknowledges support from the DOE NNSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship under Contract DE-FC52-08NA28752.

  11. Multi-Site N-glycan mapping study 1: Capillary electrophoresis – laser induced fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Szekrényes, Ákos; Park, SungAe Suhr; Santos, Marcia; Lew, Clarence; Jones, Aled; Haxo, Ted; Kimzey, Michael; Pourkaveh, Shiva; Szabó, Zoltán; Sosic, Zoran; Feng, Peng; Váradi, Csaba; de l'Escaille, François; Falmagne, Jean-Bernard; Sejwal, Preeti; Niedringhaus, Thomas; Michels, David; Freckleton, Gordon; Hamm, Melissa; Manuilov, Anastasiya; Schwartz, Melissa; Luo, Jiann-Kae; van Dyck, Jonathan; Leung, Pui-King; Olajos, Marcell; Gu, Yingmei; Gao, Kai; Wang, Wenbo; Wegstein, Jo; Tep, Samnang; Guttman, András

    2016-01-01

    An international team that included 20 independent laboratories from biopharmaceutical companies, universities, analytical contract laboratories and national authorities in the United States, Europe and Asia was formed to evaluate the reproducibility of sample preparation and analysis of N-glycans using capillary electrophoresis of 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (APTS)-labeled glycans with laser induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) detection (16 sites) and ultra high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC, 12 sites; results to be reported in a subsequent publication). All participants used the same lot of chemicals, samples, reagents, and columns/capillaries to run their assays. Migration time, peak area and peak area percent values were determined for all peaks with >0.1% peak area. Our results demonstrated low variability and high reproducibility, both, within any given site as well across all sites, which indicates that a standard N-glycan analysis platform appropriate for general use (clone selection, process development, lot release, etc.) within the industry can be established. PMID:26466659

  12. Measurements of population densities of metastable and resonant levels of argon using laser induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolić, M.; Newton, J.; Sukenik, C. I.; Vušković, L.; Popović, S.

    2015-01-14

    We present a new approach to measure population densities of Ar I metastable and resonant excited states in low temperature Ar plasmas at pressures higher than 1 Torr. This approach combines the time resolved laser induced fluorescence technique with the kinetic model of Ar. The kinetic model of Ar is based on calculating the population rates of metastable and resonant levels by including contributions from the processes that affect population densities of Ar I excited states. In particular, we included collisional quenching processes between atoms in the ground state and excited states, since we are investigating plasma at higher pressures. We also determined time resolved population densities of Ar I 2 p excited states by employing optical emission spectroscopy technique. Time resolved Ar I excited state populations are presented for the case of the post-discharge of the supersonic flowing microwave discharge at pressures of 1.7 and 2.3 Torr. The experimental set-up consists of a pulsed tunable dye laser operating in the near infrared region and a cylindrical resonance cavity operating in TE{sub 111} mode at 2.45 GHz. Results show that time resolved population densities of Ar I metastable and resonant states oscillate with twice the frequency of the discharge.

  13. Hot-wire accuracy in supersonic turbulence from comparisons with laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Pamela; Bershader, Daniel; Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    A hot-wire anemometer and a new, nonintrusive, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique are used to survey a turbulent boundary layer in a supersonic channel flow at Mach no. 2.06. The purpose is to test the accuracy of using the hot wire to measure the fluctuation amplitudes of static temperature and density in a compressible turbulent flow by comparing the results with independent and direct LIF measurements. Several methods of hot-wire calibration and analysis are applied. With each method, the hot-wire response can be related primarily to fluctuations of mass flux and total temperature, from which fluctuations of static temperature and density are calculated. However, these calculations are shown to be valid only if the fluctuations in static pressure are negligible. The acquisition and the analysis of the hot-wire data are often simplified further by neglecting the effects of fluctuations in total temperature. Comparisons of the fluctuation amplitudes of temperature and density obtained by hot-wire and LIF measurements demonstrate that such assumptions might not always be warranted, even in apparently simple flows.

  14. Consolidated Laser-Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic Systems for the NASA Ames Arc Jet Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Porter, Barry J.; Brown, Jeffrey D.; Yeung, Dickson; Battazzo, Stephen J.; Brubaker, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic species for non-intrusive arc jet flow property measurement was first implemented at NASA Ames in the mid-1990s. Use of TALIF expanded at NASA Ames and to NASA Johnson's arc jet facility in the late 2000s. In 2013-2014, NASA combined the agency's large-scale arc jet test capabilities at NASA Ames. Concurrent with that effort, the agency also sponsored a project to establish two comprehensive LIF diagnostic systems for the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) and Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jets. The scope of the project enabled further engineering development of the existing IHF LIF system as well as the complete reconstruction of the original AHF LIF system. The updated LIF systems are identical in design and capability. They represent the culmination of over 20 years of development experience in transitioning a specialized laboratory research tool into a measurement system for large-scale, high-demand test facilities. This paper documents the overall system design from measurement requirements to implementation. Representative data from the redeveloped AHF and IHF LIF systems are also presented.

  15. Genomic DNA detection using cycling probe technology and capillary gel electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Dickinson Laing, Terrina; Mah, David C W; Poirier, Robert T; Bekkaoui, Faouzi; Lee, William E; Bader, Douglas E

    2004-10-01

    Cycling probe technology (CPT) is an isothermal DNA analysis method that has been shown to be useful for identifying genetic markers of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in clinical settings. CPT assays have previously employed several assay methods that include polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and magnetic beads for separations and radioisotopic and colorimetric detection for detection. Capillary gel electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence (CGE-LIF) is an alternative separation and detection method that offers attributes such as low sample consumption, short analysis times, no radiation hazards and potential for high throughput. We report on the development of a CGE-LIF CPT assay for genomic DNA from Erwinia herbicola and the comparison of this assay with a conventional 32p radioisotopic PAGE CPT assay. Separation and detection of intact and cleaved fluorescein-labeled CPT probe molecules by CGE-LIF was achieved in under 4 min through a gel-filled capillary (7 cm separation length to detector). Total time, from setup to detection, was about 1 h for the complete assay versus several hours (3-12 h) for the radioisotopic PAGE CPT assay. Similar detection limits of 10(5)-10(6) copies of genomic target DNA were observed with each assay method. This study demonstrated that CGE-LIF CPT is a suitable analysis method for the detection of genomic DNA sequences. PMID:15356906

  16. Computation of two-dimensional electric field from the ion laser induced fluorescence measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Spektor, Rostislav

    2010-09-15

    This paper presents a method of computing two-dimensional electric field from ion laser induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements in a plasma flow. The expression for the field is derived by taking velocity moments of the Boltzmann equation for ions. It was found that the pressure tensor, related to the width of the ion velocity distribution, plays a critical role in the computation of the electric field. Even with the assumption of cold ion flow, the pressure tensor contribution may be significant when velocity spread is caused by other forces. Such a situation occurs in the flow of a Hall thruster, where velocity spread is caused by the ions born at different potentials. LIF measurements of the cylindrical hall thruster plume were used to demonstrate practical application of the derived method. Whenever the pressure tensor components are small as compared to the mean ion drift velocity, the electric field calculations reduce to a simple expression given in terms of mean ion drift velocity and its divergence.

  17. Planar Laser-Induced Iodine Fluorescence Measurements in Rarefied Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Eric; McDaniel, James C.

    2005-01-01

    A planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique is discussed and applied to measurement of time-averaged values of velocity and temperature in an I(sub 2)-seeded N(sub 2) hypersonic free jet facility. Using this technique, a low temperature, non-reacting, hypersonic flow over a simplified model of a reaction control system (RCS) was investigated. Data are presented of rarefied Mach 12 flow over a sharp leading edge flat plate at zero incidence, both with and without an interacting jet issuing from a nozzle built into the plate. The velocity profile in the boundary layer on the plate was resolved. The slip velocity along the plate, extrapolated from the velocity profile data, varied from nearly 100% down to 10% of the freestream value. These measurements are compared with results of a DSMC solution. The velocity variation along the centerline of a jet issuing from the plate was measured and found to match closely with the correlation of Ashkenas and Sherman. The velocity variation in the oblique shock terminating the jet was resolved sufficiently to measure the shock wave thickness.

  18. Fractal analysis of turbulent mixing in fractal-generated turbulence by planar laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiroki; Nagata, Kouji; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Hasegawa, Yutaka

    2013-07-01

    The fractal geometry of turbulent mixing of high-Schmidt-number scalars in multiscale, fractal-generated turbulence (FGT) is experimentally investigated. The difference between the fractal geometry in FGT and that in classical grid turbulence (CGT) generated by a biplane, single-scale grid is also investigated. Nondimensional concentration fields are measured by a planar laser-induced fluorescence technique whose accuracy has recently been improved by our research group, and the fractal dimensions are calculated by using the box-counting method. The mesh Reynolds number is 2500 for both CGT and FGT. The Schmidt number is about 2100. It is found that the threshold width ΔCth, when applying the box-counting method, does not affect the evaluation of the fractal dimension at large scales; therefore, the fractal dimensions at large scales have been investigated in this study. The results show that the fractal dimension in FGT is larger than that in CGT. In addition, the fractal dimension in FGT monotonically increases with the onset of time (or with the downstream direction), whereas that in CGT is almost constant with time. The investigation of the number of counted boxes in a unit area, together with the above results, suggests that turbulent mixing is more enhanced in FGT from the viewpoints of fractal geometry and expansion of the mixing interface.

  19. HCHO Measurements Using an Ultra-Compact Fiber Laser-Induced Fluorescence Instrument During BEARPEX 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digangi, J. P.; Paul, J.; Henry, S. B.; Kammrath, A.; Keutsch, F.

    2009-12-01

    The oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is central to the production of tropospheric ozone smog and the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The oxidation of biogenic VOCs (BVOCs), such as isoprene and terpenes emitted from forests, can result in elevated ozone and aerosol concentrations in rural areas away from urban pollution. Formaldehyde (HCHO) is one of the most ubiquitous VOC oxidation products and thus an important tracer of VOC oxidation. Measurements of HCHO gradients and fluxes in forests can provide valuable insight into rapid BVOC oxidation inside the forest canopy. We present field measurements of formaldehyde concentrations and gradients taken with the first deployment of the Madison FIber Laser-Induced Fluorescence (FILIF) Instrument during the Biosphere Effects on AeRosols and Photochemistry EXperiment (BEARPEX) 2009 at a rural forest in the Sierra Nevada mountains. The instrument utilizes a novel fiber laser from NovaWave Technologies which is < 1ft3 and requires < 100 W power. The detection limit (3σ) during BEARPEX 2009 was ~ 1 ppbv/s, but modifications will improve the detection limit to < 40 pptv/s, or < 6 pptv/min. Large nighttime gradients through the canopy were observed with larger HCHO concentrations above the canopy, whereas smaller reverse gradients were observed during the day. These results will be discussed in the context of rapid in-canopy BVOC oxidation and the uncertainties in the HOx budget inside forest canopies. We will also discuss the capability of the instrument to measure HCHO fluxes via eddy correlation.

  20. A 3-level Model for Schumann-Runge O2 Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Glenn S.; Lempert, Walter R.; Miles, Richard B.

    1996-01-01

    A three level model has been developed for the analysis of Schumann-Runge band (B(sup 3)Sigma(sup -)(sub u ) <- X(sup 3)Sigma(sup -)(sub g)) laser-induced fluorescence of molecular oxygen, O2. Such a model is required due to the severe lower state depletion which can occur when transitions having relatively large absorption cross-sections are excited. Such transitions are often utilized via ArF* or KrF* excimer or dye-laser excitation in high temperature environments. The rapid predissociation of the upper state prevents substantial repopulation of the lower state by collisional processes, and the lower state may be largely depleted, even at laser fluences as low as 10-100 mJ/sq cm. The resulting LIF signal in such cases no longer varies linearly with laser pulse energy, and the extent of the sublinear behavior varies with the particular rovibrational transition of interest. Relating the measured signal to the lower state population, then, necessitates the use of exceedingly low laser fluences. These low fluences in turn lead to the need to compromise spatial resolution in order to generate sufficient signal.

  1. Intercomparison of Hantzsch and fiber-laser-induced-fluorescence formaldehyde measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, J.; Li, X.; Tillmann, R.; Acir, I.; Holland, F.; Rohrer, F.; Wegener, R.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2014-06-01

    Two gas-phase formaldehyde (HCHO) measurement techniques, a modified commercial wet-chemical instrument based on Hantzsch fluorimetry and a custom-built instrument based on fiber laser-induced fluorescence (FILIF), were deployed at the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction Chamber) to compare the instruments' performances under a range of conditions. Thermolysis of para-HCHO and ozonolysis of 1-butene were used as HCHO sources, allowing for calculations of theoretical HCHO mixing ratios. Calculated HCHO mixing ratios are compared to measurements, and the two measurements are also compared. Experiments were repeated under dry and humid conditions (RH < 2% and RH > 60%) to investigate the possibility of a water artifact in the FILIF measurements. The ozonolysis of 1-butene also allowed for the investigation of an ozone artifact seen in some Hantzsch measurements in previous intercomparisons. Results show that under all conditions the two techniques are well correlated (R2 ≥ 0.997), and linear regression statistics show measurements agree with within stated uncertainty (15% FILIF + 5% Hantzsch). No water or ozone artifacts are identified. While a slight curvature is observed in some Hantzsch vs. FILIF regressions, the potential for variable instrument sensitivity cannot be attributed to a single instrument at this time. Measurements at low concentrations highlight the need for a secondary method for testing the purity of air used in instrument zeroing and the need for further FILIF White cell outgassing experiments.

  2. Intercomparison of Hantzsch and fiber-laser-induced-fluorescence formaldehyde measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, J.; Li, X.; Tillmann, R.; Acir, I.; Rohrer, F.; Wegener, R.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2014-01-01

    Two gas-phase formaldehyde (HCHO) measurement techniques, a modified commercial wet-chemical instrument based on Hantzsch Fluorimetry and a custom-built instrument based on Fiber-Laser Induced Fluorescence (FILIF), were deployed at the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR to compare the instruments' performances under a range of conditions. Thermolysis of para-HCHO and ozonolysis of 1-butene were used as HCHO sources, allowing for calculations of theoretical HCHO mixing ratios. Calculated HCHO mixing ratios are compared to measurements, and the two measurements are also compared. Experiments were repeated under dry and humid conditions (RH < 2% and RH > 60%) to investigate the possibility of a water artifact in the FILIF measurements. The ozonolysis of 1-butene also allowed for the investigation of an ozone artifact seen in some Hantzsch measurements in previous intercomparisons. Results show that under all conditions the two techniques are well correlated (R2 ≥ 0.997), and linear regression statistics show measurements agree with within stated uncertainty (15% FILIF + 5% Hantzsch). No water or ozone artifacts are identified.

  3. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence of Shock Initiated Combustion of a Spherical Density Inhomogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haehn, Nicholas; Weber, Chris; Oakley, Jason; Anderson, Mark; Rothamer, Dave; Bonazza, Riccardo

    2009-11-01

    A spherical density inhomogeneity with a stoichiometric mixture of H2, O2, and a diluent such as Xe is ignited with a planar shock wave. When a heavy bubble, such as Xe, is shock accelerated in a lighter ambient gas, such as Ar, the shock wave at the exterior periphery of the bubble travels faster than the interior transmitted wave, resulting in shock-focusing at the downstream pole of the bubble. The shock wave convergence results in a temperature much higher than the one behind the transmitted shock and auto ignition may occur at this location. For non-point source ignition experiments, the temperature is raised by a second shock acceleration from the planar shock that reflects from the shock tube's end-wall. These experiments shed light on the combustion characteristics under both turbulent and non-turbulent conditions. In addition, results are used for validating hydrodynamic codes with chemical reactions. The experiments are performed at the Wisconsin Shock Tube Laboratory in a 6 m vertical shock tube with a 25.4x25.4 cm^2 square cross-section. Diagnostics are performed using planar laser induced fluorescence of the OH^- molecule present during the combustion process. A Nd:Yag pumped dye laser at a wavelength of 283 nm excites the (1,0) band of the OH^- molecule.

  4. Multi-Site N-glycan mapping study 1: Capillary electrophoresis - laser induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Szekrényes, Ákos; Park, SungAe Suhr; Santos, Marcia; Lew, Clarence; Jones, Aled; Haxo, Ted; Kimzey, Michael; Pourkaveh, Shiva; Szabó, Zoltán; Sosic, Zoran; Feng, Peng; Váradi, Csaba; de l'Escaille, François; Falmagne, Jean-Bernard; Sejwal, Preeti; Niedringhaus, Thomas; Michels, David; Freckleton, Gordon; Hamm, Melissa; Manuilov, Anastasiya; Schwartz, Melissa; Luo, Jiann-Kae; van Dyck, Jonathan; Leung, Pui-King; Olajos, Marcell; Gu, Yingmei; Gao, Kai; Wang, Wenbo; Wegstein, Jo; Tep, Samnang; Guttman, András

    2016-01-01

    An international team that included 20 independent laboratories from biopharmaceutical companies, universities, analytical contract laboratories and national authorities in the United States, Europe and Asia was formed to evaluate the reproducibility of sample preparation and analysis of N-glycans using capillary electrophoresis of 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (APTS)-labeled glycans with laser induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) detection (16 sites) and ultra high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC, 12 sites; results to be reported in a subsequent publication). All participants used the same lot of chemicals, samples, reagents, and columns/capillaries to run their assays. Migration time, peak area and peak area percent values were determined for all peaks with >0.1% peak area. Our results demonstrated low variability and high reproducibility, both, within any given site as well across all sites, which indicates that a standard N-glycan analysis platform appropriate for general use (clone selection, process development, lot release, etc.) within the industry can be established. PMID:26466659

  5. Chiral separation of benzoporphyrin derivative mono- and diacids by laser induced fluorescence-capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xuejun; Sternberg, Ethan; Dolphin, David

    2002-01-01

    A method for the separation of benzoporphyrin derivative mono- and diacid (BPDMA, BPDDA) enantiomers by laser induced fluorescence-capillary electrophoresis (LIF-CE) has been developed. By using 300 mM borate buffer, pH 9.2, 25 mM sodium cholate and 10% acetronitrile as electrolyte, +10 kV electrokinetic sampling injection of 2 s and an applied +20 kV voltage across the ends of a 37 cm capillary (30 cm to the detector, 50 microm ID), all six BPD stereoisomers were baseline-separated within 20 min. Formation constants, free electrophoretic and complexation mobilities with borate and cholate were determined based on dynamic complexation capillary electrophoresis theory. The BPD enantiomers can be quantitatively determined in the range of 10(-2)-10(-5) mg mL(-1). The correlation coefficients (r2) of the least-squares linear regression analysis of the BPD enantiomers are in the range of 0.9914-0.9997. Their limits of detection are 2.18-3.5 x 10(-3) mg mL(-1). The relative standard deviations for the separation were 2.90-4.64% (n = 10). In comparison with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), CE has better resolution and efficiency. This separation method was successfully applied to the BPD enantiomers obtained from a matrix of bovine serum and from liposomally formulated material as well as from studies with rat, dog and human microsomes. PMID:11824627

  6. Flow Property Measurement Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay Henderson; Porter, Barry J.; Carballo, Julio Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic species has been applied to single-point measurements of velocity and static temperature in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jet. Excitation spectra of atomic oxygen and nitrogen were recorded while scanning a tunable dye laser over the absorption feature. Thirty excitation spectra were acquired during 8 arc jet runs at two facility operating conditions; the number of scans per run varied between 2 and 6. Curve fits to the spectra were analyzed to recover their Doppler shifts and widths, from which the flow velocities and static temperatures, respectively, were determined. An increase in the number of independent flow property pairs from each as-measured scan was obtained by extracting multiple lower-resolution scans. The larger population sample size enabled the mean property values and their uncertainties for each run to be characterized with greater confidence. The average plus or minus 2 sigma uncertainties in the mean velocities and temperatures for all 8 runs were plus or minus 1.4% and plus or minus 11%, respectively.

  7. Adsorption of Uranyl on Gibbsite: A Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Hyun-shik; Korshin, Gregory V.; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.

    2006-02-15

    Uranyl adsorbed on gibbsite at pH 4.0-8.0 and ionic strengths (ISs) 0.001-0.4 M (NaClO4) in the absence of carbonate was studied using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLIFS) under cryogenic conditions. TRLIFS data showed the presence of several distinct emission components. Their contributions were determined using the evolving factor analysis approach. Four components denoted as species A, B, C, and D were discerned. Each of them was characterized by a characteristic response to pH and IS changes and also by a unique combination of the values of the fundamental transition energy E0,0, vibronic spacing E, and half-width of the vibronic lines W. Species A and B were major contributors to the overall emission. They were mainly affected by the pH and predominated below and above pH 5.0, respectively. In contrast with that, the contribution of species C was noticeable only at IS = 0.001 M, while it was suppressed or absent at high IS values. It was concluded that species A and B are likely to correspond to inner-sphere surface aluminol complexes AlO-(UO2)+ and AlO-(UO2)OH, while species C was hypothesized to correspond to electrostatically bound uranyl complexes (predominantly [UO2(OH)3]-).

  8. Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of OH distribution in lean premixed swirling flames

    SciTech Connect

    Birouk, M.; Gupta, A.K.; Lewis, M.J.

    1998-07-01

    The spatial distribution of OH specie in lean premixed methane-air swirling flames at atmospheric pressure conditions has been investigated using a Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) technique. Tests were conducted in a burner with a central nozzle surrounded by two concentric annuli, through which the methane-air mixture could be injected with variable equivalence ratio, swirl and momentum. The geometry was chosen to simulate a single burner in a typical gas turbine combustor. Experiments were carried out across a range of three independently-varied parameters: the swirl distribution in the outer annulus, the axial momentum in the inner annulus, and the premixed equivalence ratio ({phi} = 0.75, 0.68, and 0.61). Instantaneous and ensemble-averaged OH images were obtained at vertical cross-sections of the flame (referenced through the centerline) under different flame conditions. These images provide information on the flame reaction zone which is of interest for understanding the complex structure and dynamics of a swirling premixed combustion system. These images also assist in understanding why lean premixed gas turbine combustion systems may experience combustion instability, particularly under leaner conditions.

  9. Validation and evaluation of a novel time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durot, C. J.; Gallimore, A. D.; Smith, T. B.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel technique to measure time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence signals in plasma sources that have a relatively constant Fourier spectrum of oscillations in steady-state operation, but are not periodically pulsed, e.g., Hall thrusters. The technique uses laser modulation of the order of MHz and recovers signal via a combination of band-pass filtering, phase-sensitive detection, and averaging over estimated transfer functions calculated for many different cycles of the oscillation. Periodic discharge current oscillations were imposed on a hollow cathode. Measurements were validated by comparison with independent measurements from a lock-in amplifier and by comparing the results of the transfer function average to an independent analysis technique triggering averaging over many oscillation cycles in the time domain. The performance of the new technique is analyzed and compared to prior techniques, and it is shown that this new technique has a niche in measurements where the analog photomultiplier signal has a nonwhite noise spectral density and cycles of oscillation are not sufficiently repeatable to allow for reliable triggering or a meaningful average waveform in the time domain.

  10. Validation and evaluation of a novel time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique.

    PubMed

    Durot, C J; Gallimore, A D; Smith, T B

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel technique to measure time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence signals in plasma sources that have a relatively constant Fourier spectrum of oscillations in steady-state operation, but are not periodically pulsed, e.g., Hall thrusters. The technique uses laser modulation of the order of MHz and recovers signal via a combination of band-pass filtering, phase-sensitive detection, and averaging over estimated transfer functions calculated for many different cycles of the oscillation. Periodic discharge current oscillations were imposed on a hollow cathode. Measurements were validated by comparison with independent measurements from a lock-in amplifier and by comparing the results of the transfer function average to an independent analysis technique triggering averaging over many oscillation cycles in the time domain. The performance of the new technique is analyzed and compared to prior techniques, and it is shown that this new technique has a niche in measurements where the analog photomultiplier signal has a nonwhite noise spectral density and cycles of oscillation are not sufficiently repeatable to allow for reliable triggering or a meaningful average waveform in the time domain. PMID:24517766

  11. Measurement of pre-sheath flow velocities by laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, S. L.; Stansfield, B. L.; Abou-Assaleh, Z.; Boucher, C.; Matte, J. P.; Johnston, T. W.; Marchand, R.

    1990-12-01

    For the first time, the pre-sheath ion flow velocity has been measured using the Doppler shift of laser-induced fluorescence in singly-ionized argon ions. The velocity shows a monotonic increase, from a value of about 0.15 of the sound speed VS far from the target to 0.5 of Vs at a distance of 5 mm from the surface. The temperature, the floating potential and the density are calculated from cylindrical probe measurements taken in the same region under identical conditions. These experimental results are compared with those from a 1D isothermal single-ion fluid model of the pre-sheath and a kinetic electron/fluid ion model. Both models agree well with the density profile, but underestimate the potential change and overestimate the velocity. In addition, the bulk flow velocity has been independently determined from "Mach probe" measurements, using various candidate theories to relate the Mach number to the ratio of the upstream to downstream saturation currents. Comparison with the optical measurements indicate that the probe models which include viscosity provide reasonable agreement with our Mach probe data.

  12. [Capillary electrophoresis analysis for glyphosate, glufosinate and aminomethylphosphonic acid with laser-induced fluorescence detection].

    PubMed

    Cao, Liwei; Liang, Siliu; Tan, Xiaofang; Meng, Jianxin

    2012-12-01

    A sensitive analytical method was developed for the simultaneous determination of glyphosate, glufosinate and aminomethylphosphonic acid by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF). 5-(4,6-Dichlorotriazinyl) amino fluorescein (DTAF) was successfully applied to label the herbicides. The optimal derivatization reaction was carried out in boric acid buffer of pH 9.5 at 30 degrees C for 40 min. The baseline separation of the three derivatives could be accomplished using 30 mmol/L boric acid, 15 mmol/L Brij-35 (pH 9.5) as the running buffer. The detection limits (S/N = 3) for the glyphosate, glufosinate and aminomethylphosphonic acid were 3.21, 6.14, 1.99 ng/kg, respectively. Finally, the method was successfully applied to the analysis of environmental samples, and the three compounds were measured without any interference from real samples. The recoveries of the compounds in these samples were 91.3% - 106.0%. The method has the advantages of easiness and sensitivity, and can meet the requirement of the determination of the herbicide and metabolite residues in the environmental samples. PMID:23593890

  13. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) investigation of hypersonic flowfields in a Mach 10 wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Wilkes, Jennifer A.; Aderfer, David W.; Jones, Stephen B.; Robbins, Anthony W.; Pantry, Danny P.; Schwartz, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of nitric oxide (NO) was used to visualize four different hypersonic flowfields in the NASA Langley Research Center 31-Inch Mach 10 Air wind tunnel. The four configurations were: (1) the wake flowfield of a fuselage-only X-33 lifting body, (2) flow over a flat plate containing a rectangular cavity, (3) flow over a 70deg blunted cone with a cylindrical afterbody, formerly studied by an AGARD working group, and (4) an Apollo-geometry entry capsule - relevant to the Crew Exploration Vehicle currently being developed by NASA. In all cases, NO was seeded into the flowfield through tubes inside or attached to the model sting and strut. PLIF was used to visualize the NO in the flowfield. In some cases pure NO was seeded into the flow while in other cases a 5% NO, 95% N2 mix was injected. Several parameters were varied including seeding method and location, seeding mass flow rate, model angle of attack and tunnel stagnation pressure, which varies the unit Reynolds number. The location of the laser sheet was as also varied to provide three dimensional flow information. Virtual Diagnostics Interface (ViDI) technology developed at NASA Langley was used to visualize the data sets in post processing. The measurements demonstrate some of the capabilities of the PLIF method for studying hypersonic flows.

  14. Method for measuring temperatures and densities in hypersonic wind tunnel air flows using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Mckenzie, Robert L.; Fletcher, Douglas G.

    1990-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence in oxygen, in combination with Raman scattering, is shown to be an accurate means by which temperature, density, and their fluctuations owing to turbulence can be measured in air flows associated with high-speed wind tunnels. For temperatures above 60 K and densities above 0.01 amagat, the uncertainties in the temperature and density measurements can be less than 2 percent, if the signal uncertainties are dominated by photon statistical noise. The measurements are unaffected by collisional quenching and can be achieved with laser fluences for which nonlinear effects are insignificant. Temperature measurements using laser-induced fluorescence alone have been demonstrated at known densities in the range of low temperatures and densities which are expected in a hypersonic wind tunnel.

  15. A method for measuring temperatures and densities in hypersonic wind tunnel air flows using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Fletcher, Douglas G.; Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence in oxygen, in combination with Raman scattering, is shown to be an accurate means by which temperature, density, and their fluctuations due to turbulence can be measured in air flows associated with high-speed wind tunnels. For temperatures above 60 K and densities above 0.01 amagat, the uncertainty in the temperature and density measurements can be less than 2 and 3 percent, respectively, if the signal uncertainties are dominated by photon-statistical noise. The measurements are unaffected by collisional quenching and can be achieved with laser fluences for which nonlinear effects are insignificant. Temperature measurements using laser-induced fluorescence alone have been demonstrated at known densities in the range of low temperatures and densities which are expected in a hypersonic wind tunnel.

  16. Remote measurement of photosynthetic efficiency using laser induced fluorescence transient (LIFT) technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieruschka, R.; Rascher, U.; Klimov, D.; Kolber, Z. S.; Berry, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    An understanding of spatial and temporal diversity of photosynthetic processes, water and energy exchange of complex plant canopies is essential for carbon and climate models. Remote sensing from space or aircraft platforms provides the only practical way to characterize the vast extent of plant canopies around the globe, but the basis for relating physiological processes to remote sensing is still largely theoretical. Experiments that bridge this gap are needed. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements have been widely applied to quantify photosynthetic efficiency and non- photochemical energy dissipation non-destructively in photosynthetically active organisms. The most commonly used Pulse Amplitude Modulated (PAM) technique provides a saturating light pulse and is not practical at the canopy scale. We report here on a recently developed technique, Laser Induced Fluorescence Transient (LIFT), capable of remote measurement of photosynthetic efficiency of selected leaves at a distance of up to 50 m and we present here continuous studies on plans growing under natural conditions during the beginning of the winter season and the onset of summer drought in this Mediterranean climate. i) Lichens showed a strong diurnal variation in photosynthetic efficiency which correlated with relative humidity; ii) Photosynthetic efficiency of annual grass decreased with progressing drought stress; iii) An oak canopy showed very little variation of quantum yield from leaf out in spring to summer; iv) The combined effect of low temperature and high light intensity during an early winter strongly reduced the photosynthetic efficiency of four different species in response to chilling stress. These measures with the LIFT correlated well with (more limited) sampling by PAM fluoromentry and gas exchange. The ability to make continuous, automatic and remote measurements of photosynthetic efficiency of leaves with the LIFT provides a new approach for studying the heterogeneity of

  17. Jet-Cooled Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of T-Butoxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Neil J.; Cheng, Lan; Stanton, John F.; Miller, Terry A.; Liu, Jinjun

    2015-06-01

    The vibrational structures of the tilde A ^2A_1 and tilde X ^2E states of t-butoxy were obtained in jet-cooled laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and dispersed fluorescence (DF) spectroscopic measurements. The observed transitions are assigned based on vibrational frequencies calculated using Complete Active Space Self-Consistent Field (CASSCF) method and the predicted Franck-Condon factors. The spin-orbit (SO) splitting was measured to be 35(5) cm-1 for the lowest vibrational level of the ground (tilde X ^2E) state and increases with increasing vibrational quantum number of the CO stretch mode. Vibronic analysis of the DF spectra suggests that Jahn-Teller (JT)-active modes of the ground-state t-butoxy radical are similar to those of methoxy and would be the same if methyl groups were replaced by hydrogen atoms. Coupled-cluster calculations show that electron delocalization, introduced by the substitution of hydrogens with methyl groups, reduces the electronic contribution of the SO splittings by only around ten percent, and a calculation on the vibronic levels based on quasidiabatic model Hamiltonian clearly attributes the relatively small SO splitting of the tilde X ^2E state of t-butoxy mainly to stronger reduction of orbital angular momentum by the JT-active modes when compared to methoxy. The rotational and fine structure of the LIF transition to the first CO stretch overtone level of the tilde A^2A_1 state has been simulated using a spectroscopic model first proposed for methoxy, yielding an accurate determination of the rotational constants of both tilde A and tilde X states.

  18. Laser-induced fluorescence and phosphoresence of C{sub 60} isolated in solid Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, W.C.; Ho, C.D.; Liu, C.P.; Lee, Y.P.

    1996-03-07

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectrum of C{sub 60} isolated in solid Ne with resolved vibronic lines was recorded with laser excitation at 355 nm or in the 585-645 nm region. The spectrum consists of progressions with spacings nearly 260 cm{sup -1}, each separated by varied intervals from the origin at 15648 cm{sup -1}. The intervals 272, 412, 971, 1452, 1587, 2883, 2924, and 3023 cm{sup -1} correspond to various vibrational levels of g{sub u} and h{sub u} symmetry, or their combination with the a{sub g}(1) level, of the ground electronic state; the nearly 260 cm{sup -1} progression (with 272 cm{sup -1} as the first spacing) corresponds to the Jahn-Teller active h{sub g}(8) mode. When the Ne matrix was doped with Xe (1.2%), phosphorescence of C{sub 60} was greatly enhanced. The spectrum exhibited a single progression with origin at 12773 cm{sup -1} and spacings near 260 cm{sup -1}; its lifetime at 5 K was approximately 90 {mu}s. The fluorescence excitation spectrum revealed progressions of spacings either nearly 180 or nearly 260 cm{sup -1}, corresponding to excitation to two different singlet excited states, respectively. The first excited singlet and triplet states observed in this work are proposed to be A {sup 1}T{sub 2g} and a {sup 3}T{sub 2g}, respectively. The second excited singlet state, proposed to be B {sup 1}T{sub 1g}, lies approximately 200 cm{sup -1} above the A {sup 1}T{sub 2g} state. 48 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Highly sensitive detection of S-nitrosylated proteins by capillary gel electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Siyang; Circu, Magdalena L; Zhou, Hu; Figeys, Daniel; Aw, Tak Y; Feng, June

    2011-09-23

    S-nitrosylated proteins are biomarkers of oxidative damage in aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we report a new method for detecting and quantifying nitrosylated proteins by capillary gel electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence detection (CGE-LIF). Dylight 488 maleimide was used to specifically label thiol group (SH) after switching the S-nitrosothiol (S-NO) to SH in cysteine using the "fluorescence switch" assay. In vitro nitrosylation model-BSA subjected to S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) optimized the labeling reactions and characterized the response of the LIF detector. The method proves to be highly sensitive, detecting 1.3 picomolar (pM) concentration of nitrosothiols in nanograms of proteins, which is the lowest limit of detection of nitrosothiols reported to date. We further demonstrated the direct application of this method in monitoring protein nitrosylation damage in MQ mediated human colon adenocarcinoma cells. The nitrosothiol amounts in MQ treated and untreated cells are 14.8±0.2 and 10.4±0.5 pmol/mg of proteins, respectively. We also depicted nitrosylated protein electrophoretic profiles of brain cerebrum of 5-month-old AD transgenic (Tg) mice model. In Tg mice brain, 15.5±0.4 pmol of nitrosothiols/mg of proteins was quantified while wild type contained 11.7±0.3 pmol/mg proteins. The methodology is validated to quantify low levels of S-nitrosylated protein in complex protein mixtures from both physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:21820121

  20. Optical measurements of fluctuating temperatures in a supersonic turbulent flow using one- and two-photon, laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, K. P.; Mckenzie, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence technique was developed that provides a practical means of nonintrusively measuring the instantaneous temperatures in low-temperature turbulent flows. The capabilities of the method are reviewed, and its application to a simple, two-dimensional, turbulent boundary-layer flow at Mach 2 is reported. Measurements of the average temperature distribution through the boundary layer and the magnitudes of temperature fluctuations about their average values are presented.

  1. Real-time measurement of dual-wavelength laser-induced fluorescence spectra of individual aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hermes C; Pan, Yong-Le; Hill, Steven C; Pinnick, Ronald G; Chang, Richard K

    2008-10-13

    We report the development of an in-situ aerosol detection system capable of rapidly measuring dual-wavelength laser-induced fluorescence spectra of single particles on the fly using a single spectrometer and a single 32-anode photomultiplier array. We demonstrate the capability of this system with both reference samples and outdoor air. We present spectra from separate excitation wavelengths from the same particle that demonstrate improved discrimination capability compared with only using one excitation wavelength. PMID:18852760

  2. Plant abiotic stress diagnostic by laser induced chlorophyll fluorescence spectral analysis of in vivo leaf tissue of biofuel species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouveia-Neto, Artur S.; Silva, Elias A., Jr.; Costa, Ernande B.; Bueno, Luciano A.; Silva, Luciana M. H.; Granja, Manuela M. C.; Medeiros, Maria J. L.; Câmara, Terezinha J. R.; Willadino, Lilia G.

    2010-02-01

    Laser induced fluorescence is exploited to evaluate the effect of abiotic stresses upon the evolution and characteristics of in vivo chlorophyll emission spectra of leaves tissues of brazilian biofuel plants species(Saccharum officinarum and Jatropha curcas). The chlorophyll fluorescence spectra of 20 min predarkened intact leaves were studied employing several excitation wavelengths in the UV-VIS spectral region. Red(Fr) and far-red (FFr) chlorophyll fluorescence emission signals around 685 nm and 735 nm, respectively, were analyzed as a function of the stress intensity and the time of illumination(Kautsky effect). The Chl fluorescence ratio Fr/FFr which is a valuable nondestructive indicator of the chlorophyll content of leaves was investigated during a period of time of 30 days. The dependence of the Chl fluorescence ratio Fr/FFr upon the intensity of the abiotic stress(salinity) was examined. The results indicated that the salinity plays a major hole in the chlorophyll concentration of leaves in both plants spieces, with a significant reduction in the chlorophyll content for NaCl concentrations in the 25 - 200 mM range. The laser induced chlorophyll fluorescence analysis allowed detection of damage caused by salinity in the early stages of the plants growing process, and can be used as an early-warning indicator of salinity stress

  3. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Neutral and Ionized Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in a Cosmic Simulation Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejaoui, Salma; Salama, Farid

    2015-08-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are considered the best carriers to account for the ubiquitous infrared emission bands. PAHs have also been proposed as candidates to explain the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), a series of absorption features seen on the interstellar extinction curve and are plausible carriers for the extended red emission (ERE), a photoluminescent process associated with a wide variety of interstellar environments. Extensive efforts have been devoted over the past two decades to characterize the physical and chemical properties of PAH molecules and ions in space. Absorption spectra of PAH molecules and ions trapped in solid matrices have been compared to the DIBs [1, 2]. Absorption spectra of several cold, isolated gas-phase PAHs have also been measured under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions [see 3 for a review]. The purpose of this study is to provide a new dimension to the existing spectroscopic database of neutral and single ionized PAHs that is largely based on absorption spectra by adding emission spectroscopy data. The measurements are based on the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique [4] and are performed with the Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) of the COSmIC laboratory facility at NASA Ames laboratory. The PDN generates plasma in a free supersonic jet expansion to simulate the physical and the chemical conditions in interstellar environments. We focus, here, on the fluorescence spectra of large neutral PAHs and their cations where there is a lack of fluorescence spectroscopy data. The astronomical implications of the data (e.g., ERE) are examinedReferences[1] F. Salama, E. Bakes, L.J. Allamandola, A.G.G.M. Tielens, Astrophys. J., 458 (1996) p.621[2] F. Salama, The ISO Revolution, EDP Sciences, Les Ulis, France (1999) p.65[3] Salama F., In Organic Matter in Space, IAU Symposium 251, Kwok & Sandford Eds.Cambridge University Press,4, S251,(2008), p. 357 (2008) and references therein.[4

  4. Measurements of hydroxyl concentrations and lifetimes in laminar flames using picosecond time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, T A; Klassen, M S; King, G B; Laurendeau, N M

    1996-04-20

    Picosecond time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (PITLIF) can potentially be used to obtain measurements of minor species concentrations in rapidly fluctuating flames. Previous studies demonstrated this potential for atomic sodium by monitoring the temporal fluorescence signal with both an equivalent-time and a real-time sampling method. In this developmental study, PITLIF is used to determine hydroxyl concentrations in laminar CH(4)-O(2)-N(2) flames by the measurement of both the integrated fluorescence signal and the fluorescence lifetime. The quenching environment can be monitored with real-time sampling, and thus the necessary quenching rate coefficient is obtained in 348 us, which is fast enough for use in many turbulent flows. Fluorescence lifetimes of OH are also measured at different equivalence ratios in laminar flames by the use of the equivalent-time sampling technique. These results compare favorably with predicted lifetimes based on relevant quenching cross sections and calculated species concentrations. PMID:21085341

  5. Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) of Hg2 and Hg3 via dissociation of HgBr2 at 157 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skordoulis, C.; Sarantopoulou, E.; Spyrou, S. M.; Kosmidis, C.; Cefalas, A. C.

    1991-06-01

    Laser induced fluorescence of the mercury clusters Hg2 and Hg3 in the spectral range between 300 nm to 510 nm has been obtained from the dissociation of HgBr2 at 7.88 eV (157.5 nm) with an F2 molecular laser, together with fluorescence from mercury atomic transitions from highly excited states. The excitation process involves two photon absorption which dissociates the molecule at 15.76 eV total photon energy with the subsequent formation of the metallic clusters.

  6. Arc Jet Flow Properties Determined from Laser- Induced Fluorescence of Atomic Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Douglas G.

    1997-01-01

    Flow property measurements that were recently acquired in the Ames Research Center Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) arc jet using two-photon Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) of atomic nitrogen and oxygen are reported. The measured properties, which include velocity, translational temperature, and species concentration, cover a wide range of facility operation for the 30 cm nozzle. During the tests, the arc jet pressure and input stream composition were maintained at fixed values and the arc current was varied to vary the flow enthalpy. As part of this ongoing effort, a measurement of the two-photon absorption coefficient for the 3p4D(left arrow)2p4S transition of atomic nitrogen was performed, and the measured value is used to convert the relative concentration measurements to absolute values. A flow reactor is used to provide a known temperature line shape profile to deconvolve the laser line width contribution to the translational temperature measurements. Results from the current experiments are compared with previous results obtained using NO-beta line profiles at room temperature and the problem of multimode laser oscillation and its impact on the two-photon excitation line shape are discussed. One figure is attached, and this figure show relative N atom concentration measurements as a function of the arc power. Other measurements have already been acquired and analyzed. The arc jet flow facilities are heavily used in thermal protection material development and evaluation. All hypersonic flight and planetary atmospheric entry vehicles will use materials tested in these arc jet facilities. This poster represents an application of laser-spectroscopic measurements in an important test facility.

  7. Arcjet Flow Properties Determined from Laser-Induced Fluorescence of Atomic Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Douglas G.

    1997-01-01

    Flow property measurements that were recently acquired in the Ames Research Center Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) arc jet using two-photon Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) of atomic nitrogen and oxygen are reported. The measured properties, which include velocity, translational temperature, and species concentration, cover a wide range of facility operation for the 30 cm nozzle. During the tests, the arc jet pressure and input stream composition were maintained at fixed values and the arc current was varied to vary the flow enthalpy. As part of this ongoing effort, a measurement of the two-photon absorption coefficient for the 3p4D<-2p4S transition of atomic nitrogen was performed, and the measured value is used to convert the relative concentration measurements to absolute values. A flow reactor is used to provide a known temperature line shape profile to deconvolve the laser line width contribution to the translational temperature measurements. Results from the current experiments are compared with previous results obtained using NO-Beta line profiles at room temperature and the problem of multimode laser oscillation and its impact on the two-photon excitation line shape are discussed. One figure is attached, and this figure shows relative N atom concentration measurements as a function of the arc power. Other measurements have already been acquired and analyzed. This poster represents an application of laser-spectroscopic measurements in an important test facility. The arc jet flow facilities are heavily used in thermal protection material development and evaluation. All hypersonic flight and planetary atmospheric entry vehicles will use materials tested in these arc jet facilities.

  8. Velocity Field Measurements in Rarefied, Hypersonic Flows of Nitrogen Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence of Iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecil, Eric

    Velocity fields are measured in the shock layer and boundary layer on a plate with a cylindrical fin immersed in a hypersonic, free jet of nitrogen, using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of iodine. A sheet beam from a single-mode argon laser at 514 nm is used to excite hyperfine components of the P(13), R(15) and P(48), P(103) blended rotational-vibrational lines in the B-X electronic transition for iodine seeded in the flow. The Doppler broadening and shift of these lines, and the relative rotational line strengths are determined for excitation spectra recorded in a planar grid. Using this measurement technique, estimates for iodine of the mass velocity component and kinetic temperature of translation in the direction of laser propagation, rotational temperature, and relative number density are determined at each point. Sectional planes of the flow over the body are investigated at a spatial resolution on the scale of the molecular mean-free-path in the free jet near the plate leading edge. Two directions within each plane are examined, to determine the velocity vector and to investigate translational non-equilibrium. Predictions from two direct simulation Monte Carlo computations of the flow are compared with the measurements. Large values of slip velocity and temperature jump at the plate surface are observed for iodine. Measurements and DSMC predictions indicate strong translational non-equilibrium effects for the iodine in the shock wave and the thick boundary layer on the plate, and are qualitatively consistent with a bimodal velocity distribution function. As a consequence of the ratio of molecular masses, the translational non-equilibrium of iodine is much greater than for nitrogen.

  9. On-line wall-free cell for laser-induced fluorescence detection in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chang-Zhu; He, You-Zhao; Xie, Hai-Yang; Gao, Yong; Gan, Wu-Er; Li, Jun

    2009-05-15

    A wall-free detection method based on liquid junction in a capillary gap was proposed for laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of capillary electrophoresis (CE). The capillary gap of the wall-free cell was fabricated by etching a 10-mm x 50-microm I.D. fused-silica capillary to obtain a polyimide coating sleeve, decoating about 6mm at one end of both 50 microm I.D. separation and liquid junction capillary, inserting the treated capillary ends into the coating sleeve oppositely, fixing the capillaries with a gap distance of 140 microm by epoxy glue and removing the coating sleeve by burning. The theoretical model, experimental results and wall-free cell images indicated that the gap distance and applied voltage were main influence factors on the wall-free detection. Since the wall-free cell increased the absorption light path and avoided the stray light from the capillary wall, it improved the ratio of signal to noise and limit of detection (LOD) of CE-LIF. Three flavin compounds of riboflavin (RF), flavin mononucleotide sodium (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide disodium (FAD) were used to evaluate the wall-free detection method. Compared with on-column cell, the LODs of the wall-free cell were improved 15-, 6- and 9-fold for RF, FMN and FAD, respectively. The linear calibration concentrations of the flavins ranged from 0.005 to 5.0 micromol/L. The column efficiency was in the range from 1.0 x 10(5) to 2.5 x 10(5) plates. The wall-free detection of CE-LIF was applied to the analysis of the flavins in spinach and lettuce leaves. PMID:19329123

  10. Ex vivo optical coherence tomography and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy imaging of murine gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri, Lida; Tumlinson, Alexandre R.; Wade, Norman; Besselsen, David; Utzinger, Urs; Gerner, Eugene; Barton, Jennifer

    2005-04-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (LIF) have separately been found to have clinical potential in identifying human gastrointestinal (GI) pathologies, yet their diagnostic capability in mouse models of human disease is unknown. We combine the two modalities to survey the GI tract of a variety of mouse strains and sample dysplasias and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) of the small and large intestine. Segments of duodenum and lower colon 2.5 cm in length and the entire esophagus from 10 mice each of two colon cancer models (ApcMin and AOM treated A/J) and two IBD models (Il-2 and Il-10) and 5 mice each of their respective controls were excised. OCT images and LIF spectra were obtained simultaneously from each tissue sample within 1 hour of extraction. Histology was used to classify tissue regions as normal, Peyer"s patch, dysplasia, adenoma, or IBD. Features in corresponding regions of OCT images were analyzed. Spectra from each of these categories were averaged and compared via the student's t-test. Features in OCT images correlated to histology in both normal and diseased tissue samples. In the diseased samples, OCT was able to identify early stages of mild colitis and dysplasia. In the sample of IBD, the LIF spectra displayed unique peaks at 635nm and 670nm, which were attributed to increased porphyrin production in the proliferating bacteria of the disease. These peaks have the potential to act as a diagnostic for IBD. OCT and LIF appear to be useful and complementary modalities for imaging mouse models.

  11. Two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurements of neutral density in a helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Galante, M. E.; Magee, R. M.; Scime, E. E.

    2014-05-15

    We have developed a new diagnostic based on two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). We use a high intensity (5 MW/cm{sup 2}), narrow bandwidth (0.1 cm{sup −1}) laser to probe the ground state of neutral hydrogen, deuterium and krypton with spatial resolution better than 0.2 cm, a time resolution of 10 ns, and a measurement cadence of 20 Hz. Here, we describe proof-of-principle measurements in a helicon plasma source that demonstrate the TALIF diagnostic is capable of measuring neutral densities spanning four orders of magnitude; comparable to the edge neutral gradients predicted in the DIII-D tokamak pedestal. The measurements are performed in hydrogen and deuterium plasmas and absolute calibration is accomplished through TALIF measurements in neutral krypton. The optical configuration employed is confocal, i.e., both light injection and collection are accomplished with a single lens through a single optical port in the vacuum vessel. The wavelength resolution of the diagnostic is sufficient to separate hydrogen and deuterium spectra and we present measurements from mixed hydrogen and deuterium plasmas that demonstrate isotopic abundance measurements are feasible. Time resolved measurements also allow us to explore the evolution of the neutral hydrogen density and temperature and effects of wall recycling. We find that the atomic neutral density grows rapidly at the initiation of the discharge, reaching the steady-state value within 1 ms. Additionally, we find that neutral hydrogen atoms are born with 0.08 eV temperatures, not 2 eV as is typically assumed.

  12. Simultaneous optical coherence tomography and laser induced fluorescence imaging in rat model of ovarian carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hariri, Lida P; Liebmann, Erica R; Marion, Samuel L; Hoyer, Patricia B; Davis, John R; Brewer, Molly A

    2010-01-01

    Determining if an ovarian mass is benign or malignant is an ongoing clinical challenge. The development of reliable animal models provides means to evaluate new diagnostic tools to more accurately determine if an ovary has benign or malignant features. Although sex cord-stromal tumors (SCST) account for 0.1–0.5% of ovarian malignancies, they have similar appearances to more aggressive epithelial cancers and can serve as a prototype for developing better diagnostic methods for ovarian cancer. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy are non-destructive optical imaging modalities. OCT provides architectural cross-sectional images at near histological resolutions and LIF provides biochemical information. We utilize combined OCT-LIF to image ovaries in post-menopausal ovarian carcinogenesis rat models, evaluating normal cyclic, acyclic and neoplastic ovaries. Eighty-three female Fisher rats were exposed to combinations of control sesame oil, 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) to induce ovarian failure, and/or 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) to induce carcinogenesis. Three or five months post-treatment, 162 ovaries were harvested and imaged with OCT-LIF: 40 cyclic, 105 acyclic and 17 SCST. OCT identified various follicle stages, corpora lutea (CL), CL remnants, epithelial invaginations/inclusions and allowed for characterization of both cystic and solid SCST. Signal attenuation comparisons between CL and solid SCST revealed statistically significant increases in attenuation among CL. LIF characterized spectral differences in cyclic, acyclic and neoplastic ovaries attributed to collagen, NADH/FAD and hemoglobin absorption. We present combined OCT-LIF imaging in a rat ovarian carcinogenesis model, providing preliminary criteria for normal cyclic, acyclic and SCST ovaries which support the potential of OCT-LIF for ovarian imaging. PMID:21108515

  13. Measurement of OH reactivity by laser flash photolysis coupled with laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Daniel; Whalley, Lisa K.; Ingham, Trevor; Edwards, Peter M.; Cryer, Danny R.; Brumby, Charlotte A.; Seakins, Paul W.; Heard, Dwayne E.

    2016-07-01

    OH reactivity (k'OH) is the total pseudo-first-order loss rate coefficient describing the removal of OH radicals to all sinks in the atmosphere, and is the inverse of the chemical lifetime of OH. Measurements of ambient OH reactivity can be used to discover the extent to which measured OH sinks contribute to the total OH loss rate. Thus, OH reactivity measurements enable determination of the comprehensiveness of measurements used in models to predict air quality and ozone production, and, in conjunction with measurements of OH radical concentrations, to assess our understanding of OH production rates. In this work, we describe the design and characterisation of an instrument to measure OH reactivity using laser flash photolysis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence (LFP-LIF) spectroscopy. The LFP-LIF technique produces OH radicals in isolation, and thus minimises potential interferences in OH reactivity measurements owing to the reaction of HO2 with NO which can occur if HO2 is co-produced with OH in the instrument. Capabilities of the instrument for ambient OH reactivity measurements are illustrated by data collected during field campaigns in London, UK, and York, UK. The instrumental limit of detection for k'OH was determined to be 1.0 s-1 for the campaign in London and 0.4 s-1 for the campaign in York. The precision, determined by laboratory experiment, is typically < 1 s-1 for most ambient measurements of OH reactivity. Total uncertainty in ambient measurements of OH reactivity is ˜ 6 %. We also present the coupling and characterisation of the LFP-LIF instrument to an atmospheric chamber for measurements of OH reactivity during simulated experiments, and provide suggestions for future improvements to OH reactivity LFP-LIF instruments.

  14. Laser-induced fluorescence and Optical/Stark spectroscopy of PtC

    SciTech Connect

    Beaton, S. A.; Steimle, T. C.

    1999-12-22

    Optical/Stark measurements have been performed on the (0,0) bands of both the A{sup ''} {sup 1}{sigma}{sup +}-X {sup 1}{sigma}{sup +} system ({nu}{sub 0}{approx_equal}12 643 cm{sup -1}) and the A{sup '} {sup 1}{pi}-X {sigma}{sup +} system ({nu}{sub 0}{approx_equal}13 196 cm{sup -1}) of platinum monocarbide. The PtC molecules were produced in a pulsed supersonic molecular beam source following the reaction of laser ablated platinum vapor with a mixture of a few percent of methane in argon. The newly determined permanent electric dipole moments obtained are 1.94(2)D (A{sup ''} {sup 1}{sigma}{sup +}) and 1.919(9)D (A{sup '} {sup 1}{pi}). These results are discussed in terms of a proposed molecular orbital correlation diagram for platinum containing diatomics. The laser-induced fluorescence spectrum of the (0,0)A{sup ''} {sup 1}{sigma}{sup +}-X {sup 1}{sigma}{sup +} transition of PtC has been re-recorded at high resolution (full width of half-maximum {approx}40 MHz) and analyzed to yield rotational constants for the four most abundant isotopomers of PtC, extending the previous analysis [Appelblad, Nilsson, and Scullman, Phys. Scr. 7, 65 (1973)]. The anomalously large value ({approx}15 MHz) for the newly derived nuclear-spin rotation parameter, C{sub I}({sup 195}Pt), for the A{sup ''} {sup 1}{sigma}{sup +} state is discussed. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Formaldehyde preparation methods for pressure and temperature dependent laser-induced fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, A.; Müller, D.; Rieger, S.; Schmidl, G.; Triebel, W.; Paa, W.

    2015-12-01

    Formaldehyde is an excellent tracer for the early phase of ignition of hydrocarbon fuels and can be used, e.g., for characterization of single droplet ignition. However, due to its fast thermal decomposition at elevated temperatures and pressures, the determination of concentration fields from laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements is difficult. In this paper, we address LIF measurements of this important combustion intermediate using a calibration cell. Here, formaldehyde is created from evaporation of paraformaldehyde. We discuss three setups for preparation of formaldehyde/air mixtures with respect to their usability for well-defined heating of formaldehyde/air mixtures. The "basic setup" uses a resist heater around the measurement cell for investigation of formaldehyde near vacuum conditions or formaldehyde/air samples after sequential admixing of air. The second setup, described for the first time in detail here, takes advantage of a constant flow formaldehyde/air regime which uses preheated air to reduce the necessary time for gas heating. We used the constant flow system to measure new pressure dependent LIF excitation spectra in the 343 nm spectral region (414 absorption band of formaldehyde). The third setup, based on a novel concept for fast gas heating via excitation of SF6 (chemically inert gas) using a TEA (transverse excitation at atmospheric pressure) CO2 laser, allows to further minimize both gas heating time and thermal decomposition. Here, an admixture of CO2 is served for real time temperature measurement based on Raman scattering. The applicability of the fast laser heating system has been demonstrated with gas mixtures of SF6 + air, SF6 + N2, as well as SF6 + N2 + CO2 at 1 bar total pressure.

  16. Formaldehyde preparation methods for pressure and temperature dependent laser-induced fluorescence measurements.

    PubMed

    Burkert, A; Müller, D; Rieger, S; Schmidl, G; Triebel, W; Paa, W

    2015-12-01

    Formaldehyde is an excellent tracer for the early phase of ignition of hydrocarbon fuels and can be used, e.g., for characterization of single droplet ignition. However, due to its fast thermal decomposition at elevated temperatures and pressures, the determination of concentration fields from laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements is difficult. In this paper, we address LIF measurements of this important combustion intermediate using a calibration cell. Here, formaldehyde is created from evaporation of paraformaldehyde. We discuss three setups for preparation of formaldehyde/air mixtures with respect to their usability for well-defined heating of formaldehyde/air mixtures. The "basic setup" uses a resist heater around the measurement cell for investigation of formaldehyde near vacuum conditions or formaldehyde/air samples after sequential admixing of air. The second setup, described for the first time in detail here, takes advantage of a constant flow formaldehyde/air regime which uses preheated air to reduce the necessary time for gas heating. We used the constant flow system to measure new pressure dependent LIF excitation spectra in the 343 nm spectral region (41 (4) absorption band of formaldehyde). The third setup, based on a novel concept for fast gas heating via excitation of SF6 (chemically inert gas) using a TEA (transverse excitation at atmospheric pressure) CO2 laser, allows to further minimize both gas heating time and thermal decomposition. Here, an admixture of CO2 is served for real time temperature measurement based on Raman scattering. The applicability of the fast laser heating system has been demonstrated with gas mixtures of SF6 + air, SF6 + N2, as well as SF6 + N2 + CO2 at 1 bar total pressure. PMID:26724008

  17. Quarry identification of historical building materials by means of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence and chemometric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colao, F.; Fantoni, R.; Ortiz, P.; Vazquez, M. A.; Martin, J. M.; Ortiz, R.; Idris, N.

    2010-08-01

    To characterize historical building materials according to the geographic origin of the quarries from which they have been mined, the relative content of major and trace elements were determined by means of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) techniques. 48 different specimens were studied and the entire samples' set was divided in two different groups: the first, used as reference set, was composed by samples mined from eight different quarries located in Seville province; the second group was composed by specimens of unknown provenance collected in several historical buildings and churches in the city of Seville. Data reduction and analysis on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence measurements was performed using multivariate statistical approach, namely the Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogy (SIMCA). A clear separation among reference sample materials mined from different quarries was observed in Principal Components (PC) score plots, then a supervised soft independent modeling of class analogy classification was trained and run, aiming to assess the provenance of unknown samples according to their elemental content. The obtained results were compared with the provenance assignments made on the basis of petrographical description. This work gives experimental evidence that laser induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements on a relatively small set of elements is a fast and effective method for the purpose of origin identification.

  18. Time-resolved experimental and computational study of two-photon laser-induced fluorescence in a hydrogen plasma

    PubMed

    van Der Heijden HW; Boogaarts; Mazouffre; van Der Mullen JA; Schram

    2000-04-01

    The time profile of the fluorescence light emission of atomic hydrogen in an expanding plasma beam after pulsed excitation with a nanosecond laser is studied, both experimentally and computationally. Ground state H atoms in an expanding Ar-H cascaded arc plasma are excited to the p=3 level using two-photon laser excitation at 205 nm. The resulting fluorescence is resolved in time with a fast photomultiplier tube to investigate the occurrence of quenching. A fluorescence decay time of (10+/-0.5) ns is measured under all circumstances, indicating that there is a complete l mixing of the p=3 sublevels. A time-resolved collisional radiative model is developed to model pulsed laser induced fluorescence for a large range of plasma parameters. The model calculations agree well with the experimental results over the entire range of conditions and indicate that two-photon LIF can strongly influence the local electron and ion densities, resulting in a "self-quenching" of the laser-induced H fluorescence. PMID:11088238

  19. Measurements of IO in the Tropical Marine Boundary Layer using Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, H.; Ingham, T.; Heard, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    Halogenated short-lived substances (VSLS) are emitted from the oceans by marine species such as macroalgae and phytoplankton and contribute to halogen loading in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. Transport of halogenated VSLS into the stratosphere occurs mainly in the tropics, where ascending warm air carries them aloft, and leads to catalytic depletion of stratospheric ozone on a global scale and formation of the Antarctic ozone hole. The tropical marine environment is therefore an important region in which to study the effects of these short-lived halogen species on ozone depletion. The SHIVA (Stratospheric Ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere) project combines ship-borne, aircraft-based and ground-based measurements in and over the South China Sea and the Sulu Sea, and around the coast of Malaysian Borneo, to reduce uncertainties in the amount of halogenated VSLS reaching the stratosphere, the associated ozone depletion, and the effects of a changing climate on these processes. In this work we present measurements of IO radicals made onboard the German research vessel Sonne during SHIVA, between Singapore and Manila. IO is formed via photolysis of iodine-containing source gases (e.g. I2, CH3I) to produce I atoms, which react with ozone. It is therefore an important species to consider when assessing the impacts of halogen chemistry on ozone depletion. Measurements of IO were made over a two-week period by the University of Leeds Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) instrument, which excites IO radicals at λ ~ 445 nm and detects the resultant fluorescence at λ ~ 512 nm. A suite of supporting gas- and aqueous-phase measurements were also made, including concentrations of halocarbons (e.g. CHBr3, CH3I), trace pollutant gases (e.g. CO, O3, NOx), and biological parameters (e.g. abundance and speciation of phytoplankton). Preliminary data analysis indicates that IO was detected above the instrumental limit of detection (0.3 pptv for a 30 minute averaging

  20. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements and Modeling of Nitric Oxide in Counterflow Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravikrishna, Rayavarapu V.

    2000-01-01

    The feasibility of making quantitative nonintrusive NO concentration ([NO]) measurements in nonpremixed flames has been assessed by obtaining laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of [NO] in counterflow diffusion flames at atmospheric and higher pressures. Comparisons at atmospheric pressure between laser-saturated fluorescence (LSF) and linear LIF measurements in four diluted ethane-air counterflow diffusion flames with strain rates from 5 to 48/s yielded excellent agreement from fuel-lean to moderately fuel-rich conditions, thus indicating the utility of a model-based quenching correction technique, which was then extended to higher pressures. Quantitative LIF measurements of [NO] in three diluted methane-air counterflow diffusion flames with strain rates from 5 to 35/s were compared with OPPDIF model predictions using the GRI (version 2.11) chemical kinetic mechanism. The comparisons revealed that the GRI mechanism underpredicts prompt-NO by 30-50% at atmospheric pressure. Based on these measurements, a modified reaction rate coefficient for the prompt-NO initiation reaction was proposed which causes the predictions to match experimental data. Temperature measurements using thin filament pyrometry (TFP) in conjunction with a new calibration method utilizing a near-adiabatic H2-air Hencken burner gave very good comparisons with model predictions in these counterflow diffusion flames. Quantitative LIF measurements of [NO] were also obtained in four methane-air counterflow partially-premixed flames with fuel-side equivalence ratios (phi(sub B)) of 1.45, 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0. The measurements were in excellent agreement with model predictions when accounting for radiative heat loss. Spatial separation between regions dominated by the prompt and thermal NO mechanisms was observed in the phi(sub B) = 1.45 flame. The modified rate coefficient proposed earlier for the prompt-NO initiation reaction improved agreement between code predictions and measurements in the

  1. Development of a UV laser-induced fluorescence lidar for monitoring blue-green algae in Lake Suwa.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yasunori; Takano, Kengo; Kobayashi, Fumitoshi; Kobayashi, Kazuki; Park, Ho-Dong

    2014-10-20

    We developed a UV (355 nm) laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) lidar for monitoring the real-time status of blue-green algae. Since the fluorescence spectrum of blue-green algae excited by 355 nm showed the specific fluorescence at 650 nm, the lidar was designed to be able to detect the 650 nm fluorescence as a surveillance method for the algae. The usefulness was confirmed by observation at Lake Suwa over four years (2005-2008). The detection limit of the LIF lidar was 16.65 mg/L for the blue-green algae, which is the range of concentrations in the safe level set by the World Health Organization. PMID:25402791

  2. Direct probing of chromatography columns by laser-induced fluorescence. Technical progress report, September 1, 1989--February 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    McGuffin, V.L.

    1992-12-07

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments of this research project from September 1, 1989 to February 28, 1993. During this period, we have accomplished all of the primary scientific objectives of the research proposal: (1) constructed and evaluated a laser-induced fluorescence detection system that allows direct examination of the chromatographic column, (2) examined nonequilibrium processes that occur upon solute injection and elution, (3) examined solute retention in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, (4) examined solute zone dispersion in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, and (5) developed appropriate theoretical models to describe these phenomena. In each of these studies, substantial knowledge has been gained of the fundamental processes that are responsible for chromatographic separations. In addition to these primary research objectives, we have made significant progress in three related areas: (1) examined pyrene as a fluorescent polarity probe insupercritical fluids and liquids as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) developed methods for the class-selective identification of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal-derived fluids by microcolumn liquid chromatography with fluorescence quenching detection, and (3) developed methods for the determination of saturated and unsaturated (including omega-3) fatty acids in fish oil extracts by microcolumn liquid chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection. In these studies, the advanced separation and detection techniques developed in our laboratory are applied to practical problems of environmental and biomedical significance.

  3. Laser induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy in capillary electrophoresis as an possible instrument for extraterrestrial life signs detection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhail, Gorlenko; Cheptcov, Vladimir; Anton, Maydykovskiy; Eugeniy, Vasilev

    The one of a significant aims in extraterrestrial exploration is a seeking for a life traces in a open space and planetary objects. Complex composition and unknown origin of suspected signs of life required у new analytical approaches and technical solutions. The promising assai here can be Laser induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy methods. The combined instrument developed by our team reveal the advantage of capillary electrophoresis assays in a junction with laser induced fluorescence detection technology. We optimized excitation configuration of fluorescence in capillary electrophoresis to reduce pumping laser power up to 1 mW and decrease background scattering. The improvement of the device sensitivity at poor sample concentration we achieved by incorporating fluorescence flow-through cuvette into spectrometer. That allows to simplify setup, to minimize weight and increase reproducibility of measurements. The device has been tasted in complex organic chemical mixes and microbial strains differentiation tasks. 3d multinational spectra allow us to increase the spectra information loads in comparison with ordinary capillary electrophoresis approaches. Possible updating the device with Raman approach can even furthermore multiple the differentiation power of the instrument. The analytical module developed using this approach can be potentially effectively used in extraterrestrial researches as a payload of the future spacecraft.

  4. In Situ Airborne Measurement of Formaldehyde with a New Laser Induced Fluorescence Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkinson, H.; Hanisco, T. F.; Cazorla, M.; Fried, A.; Walega, J.

    2012-12-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is a highly reactive and ubiquitous compound in the atmosphere that originates from primary emissions and secondary formation by photochemical oxidation of volatile organic compounds. HCHO is an important precursor to the formation of ozone and an ideal tracer for the transport of boundary layer pollutants to higher altitudes. In situ measurements of HCHO are needed to improve understanding of convective transport mechanisms and the effects of lofted pollutants on ozone production and cloud microphysics in the upper troposphere. The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Project (DC3) field campaign addressed the effects of deep, midlatitude continental convective clouds on the upper troposphere by examining vertical transport of fresh emissions and water aloft and by characterizing subsequent changes in composition and chemistry. Observations targeting convective storms were conducted over Colorado, Alabama, and Texas and Oklahoma. We present measurements of the In Situ Airborne Formaldehyde instrument (ISAF), which uses laser induced fluorescence to achieve the high sensitivity and fast time response required to detect low concentrations in the upper troposphere and capture the fine structure characteristic of convective storm outflow. Preliminary results from DC3 indicate that the ISAF is able to resolve concentrations ranging from under 35 ppt to over 35 ppb, spanning three orders of magnitude, in less than a few minutes. Frequent, abrupt changes in HCHO captured by the ISAF are corroborated by similar patterns observed by simultaneous trace gas and aerosol measurements. Primary HCHO emissions are apparent in cases when the DC-8 flew over combustion sources or biomass burning, and secondary HCHO formation is suggested by observations of enhanced HCHO concurrent with other elevated hydrocarbons. Vertical transport of HCHO is indicated by measurements of over 6 ppb from outflow in the upper troposphere. The DC-8 payload also included the

  5. Human neutrophil elastase inhibition studied by capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence detection and microscale thermophoresis.

    PubMed

    Syntia, Fayad; Nehmé, Reine; Claude, Bérengère; Morin, Philippe

    2016-01-29

    Capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence (CZE-LIF) and microscale thermophoresis (MST) were used for the first time to study the inhibition of human neutrophil elastase (HNE). We recently studied HNE kinetics (Km and Vmax) by developing an in-capillary CZE-LIF assay based on transverse diffusion of laminar flow profiles (TDLFP) for reactant mixing. In this work, the former assay was adapted to monitor HNE inhibition. Two natural well known HNE inhibitors from the triterpene family, ursolic acid and oleanolic acid, were tested to validate the developed assay. Since the solubility of pentacyclic triterpenes in aqueous media where the enzymatic reaction will take place is limited, the effect of DMSO and ethanol on HNE was studied using microscale thermophoresis (MST). An agglomeration of the enzyme was revealed when preparing the inhibitor in 5% (v/v) DMSO. This phenomenon did not occur in the presence of ethanol. Therefore, ethanol was used as inhibitor solvent, at a limited percentage of 20% (v/v). In these conditions and after optimization of the TDLFP approach, the repeatability (RSD on migration times and peak-areas inferior to 2.2%) of the CZE-LIF assay and the sensitivity (LOQ of few nM) were found to be satisfactory for conducting inhibition assays. IC50 values for ursolic and oleanolic acid were successfully determined. They were respectively equal to 5.62±0.10μM (r(2)=0.9807; n=3) and to 8.21±0.23μM (r(2)=0.9887; n=3). Excellent agreement was found between the results obtained by CE and those reported in literature which validates the developed method. Particularly, the CE-based assay is able to rank HNE inhibitors relative to each other. Furthermore, MST technique was used for evaluating HNE interaction with the ursolic acid. Up to 16 capillaries were automatically processed to obtain in one titration experiment the dissociation constant for the HNE-ursolic acid complex. Ki was found to be 2.72±0.66μM (n=3) which is in excellent agreement

  6. Multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging of feces-contaminated apples by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence imaging system with tunable excitation wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moon S.; Cho, Byoung-Kwan; Lefcourt, Alan M.; Chen, Yud-Ren; Kang, Sukwon

    2008-04-01

    We recently developed a time-resolved multispectral laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging system capable of tunable wavelengths in the visible region for sample excitation and nanosecond-scale characterizations of fluorescence responses (lifetime imaging). Time-dependent fluorescence decay characteristics and fluorescence lifetime imaging of apples artificially contaminated with a range of diluted cow feces were investigated at 670 and 685 nm emission bands obtained by 418, 530, and 630 nm excitations. The results demonstrated that a 670 nm emission with a 418 nm excitation provided the greatest difference in time-dependent fluorescence responses between the apples and feces-treated spots. The versatilities of the time-resolved LIF imaging system, including fluorescence lifetime imaging of a relatively large biological object in a multispectral excitation-emission wavelength domain, were demonstrated.

  7. Prospects for single-molecule detection in liquids by laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Trkula, M.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Jett, J.H.; Dovichi, N.J.

    1983-01-01

    A laser-induced fluoresence determination of aqueous solutions of rhodamine 6G resulted in a detection limit of 18 attograms, or 22,000 molecules, of rhodamine 6G. These results allow the projection to single-molecule detection with reasonable improvements in the experimental apparatus.

  8. Laser-induced fluorescence of green plants. I - A technique for the remote detection of plant stress and species differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Wood, F. M., Jr.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III; Newcomb, W. W.

    1984-01-01

    The laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of green plants was evaluated as a means of remotely detecting plant stress and determining plant type. Corn and soybeans were used as representatives of monocots and dicots, respectively, in these studies. The fluorescence spectra of several plant pigments was excited with a nitrogen laser emitting at 337 nm. Intact leaves from corn and soybeans also fluoresced using the nitrogen laser. The two plant species exhibited fluorescence spectra which had three maxima in common at 440, 690, and 740 nm. However, the relative intensities of these maxima were distinctly different for the two species. Soybeans had an additional slight maxima at 525 nm. Potassium deficiency in corn caused an increase in fluorescence at 690 and 740 nm. Simulated water stress in soybeans resulted in increased fluorescence at 440, 525, 690, and 740 nm. The inhibition of photosynthesis in soybeans by 3-(3-4-dichlorophenyl)-1-1-dimethyl urea (DCMU) gave incresed fluorescence primarily at 690 and 740 nm. Chlorosis as occurring in senescent soybean leaves caused a decrease in fluorescence at 690 and 740 nm. These studies indicate that LIF measurements of plants offer the potential for remotely detecting certain types of stress condition and also for differentiating plant species.

  9. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of various carbon nanostructures (GO, G and nanodiamond) in Rd6G solution

    PubMed Central

    Bavali, A.; Parvin, P.; Mortazavi, S. Z.; Nourazar, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of carbon nanostructures such as graphene (G), graphene oxide (GO) and nanodiamond (ND) on the spectral properties of Rhodamine 6G (Rd6G) emission due to the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) was investigated. It is shown that the addition of carbon nano- structures lead to sensible Red/Blue shifts which depend on the optical properties and surface functionality of nanoparticles. The current theories such as resonance energy transfer (RET), fluorescence quenching and photon propagation in scattering media support the experimental findings. Stern-Volmer curves for dynamic and static quenching of Rd6G molecules embedded with G, GO and nanodiamond are correlated with spectral shifts. Furthermore, time evolution of the spectral shift contributes to determine loading/release rates of fluorescent species with large S-parameter on the given nano-carriers. PMID:26137372

  10. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of various carbon nanostructures (GO, G and nanodiamond) in Rd6G solution.

    PubMed

    Bavali, A; Parvin, P; Mortazavi, S Z; Nourazar, S S

    2015-05-01

    The effect of carbon nanostructures such as graphene (G), graphene oxide (GO) and nanodiamond (ND) on the spectral properties of Rhodamine 6G (Rd6G) emission due to the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) was investigated. It is shown that the addition of carbon nano- structures lead to sensible Red/Blue shifts which depend on the optical properties and surface functionality of nanoparticles. The current theories such as resonance energy transfer (RET), fluorescence quenching and photon propagation in scattering media support the experimental findings. Stern-Volmer curves for dynamic and static quenching of Rd6G molecules embedded with G, GO and nanodiamond are correlated with spectral shifts. Furthermore, time evolution of the spectral shift contributes to determine loading/release rates of fluorescent species with large S-parameter on the given nano-carriers. PMID:26137372

  11. Direct visualization of secretion from single bovine adrenal chromaffin cells by laser-induced native fluorescence imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, W.; Yeung, E.S.

    1998-03-01

    Direct visualization of the secretion process of individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was achieved with laser-induced native fluorescence imaging microscopy. By monitoring the native fluorescence of catecholamines excited by the 275 nm laser line with an intensified charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera, we obtained good temporal and spatial resolution simultaneously without using additional fluorescent probes. Large variations were found among individual cells in terms of the amounts of catecholamines secreted and the rates of secretion. Different regions of a cell also behave differently during the secretion process. However, the degree of this local heterogeneity is smaller than in neurons and neuralgia. The influence of deep-ultraviolet (UV) laser excitation on cells is also discussed. This quantitative imaging technique provides a useful noninvasive approach for the study of dynamic cellular changes and the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of secretory processes. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  12. Remote monitoring of 129I and 127I isotopes in the atmosphere using the laser-induced fluorescence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kireev, S. V.; Shnyrev, S. L.; Suganeev, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports the experimental and calculation research of the development of the remote laser-induced fluorescence method for the detection of 129I and 127I molecular iodine isotopologues in atmospheric air in real time. As an excitation source we used a frequency-doubled neodymium laser (~532 nm). We estimated the sensitivity of 127I129I and 129I2 detection in the atmosphere. Detection sensitivity of molecular iodine is 4 · 1013 cm‑3 for a sensing distance of 6 km.

  13. Planar measurement of flow field parameters in a nonreacting supersonic combustor using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1990-01-01

    A nonintrusive optical technique, laser-induced iodine fluorescence, has been used to obtain planar measurements of flow field parameters in the supersonic mixing flow field of a nonreacting supersonic combustor. The combustor design used in this work was configured with staged transverse sonic injection behind a rearward-facing step into a Mach 2.07 free stream. A set of spatially resolved measurements of temperature and injectant mole fraction has been generated. These measurements provide an extensive and accurate experimental data set required for the validation of computational fluid dynamic codes developed for the calculation of highly three-dimensional combustor flow fields.

  14. Enthalpy Distributions of Arc Jet Flow Based on Measured Laser Induced Fluorescence, Heat Flux and Stagnation Pressure Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Leonard E.; Milhoan, James D.; Oelke, Lance; Godfrey, Dennis; Larin, Maksim Y.; Scott, Carl D.; Grinstead, Jay H.; DelPapa, Steven

    2011-01-01

    The centerline total enthalpy of arc jet flow is determined using laser induced fluorescence of oxygen and nitrogen atoms. Each component of the energy, kinetic, thermal, and chemical can be determined from LIF measurements. Additionally, enthalpy distributions are inferred from heat flux and pressure probe distribution measurements using an engineering formula. Average enthalpies are determined by integration over the radius of the jet flow, assuming constant mass flux and a mass flux distribution estimated from computational fluid dynamics calculations at similar arc jet conditions. The trends show favorable agreement, but there is an uncertainty that relates to the multiple individual measurements and assumptions inherent in LIF measurements.

  15. Protein profile study of Pap smear and tissue of cervix by high performance liquid chromatography: laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujatha, N.; Rai, Lavanya; Kumar, Pratap; Krishnanand, B. R.; Mahato, K. K.; George, Sajan D.; Kartha, V. B.; C, Santhosh

    2007-02-01

    HPLC combined with laser induced fluorescence provides a very sensitive method for the separation and identification of the many proteins present in clinical samples. Protein profiles of clinical samples like Pap smear and tissue samples, from subjects with cervical cancer and normal volunteers, were recorded using HPLC-LIF. The protein profiles were analyzed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The profiles were characterized by parameters like scores of the factors, sum of squared residuals, and Mahalanobis Distance, derived from PCA. Parameters of each sample were compared with those of a standard set and Match/ No Match results were generated. Good discrimination between normal and malignant samples was achieved with high sensitivity and specificity.

  16. High-speed laser-induced fluorescence and spark plug absorption sensor diagnostics for mixing and combustion studies in engines.

    PubMed

    Cundy, Michael; Schucht, Torsten; Thiele, Olaf; Sick, Volker

    2009-02-01

    Simultaneous high-speed in-cylinder measurements of laser-induced fluorescence of biacetyl as a fuel tracer and mid-infrared broadband absorption of fuel and combustion products (water and carbon dioxide) using a spark plug probe are compared in an optical engine. The study addresses uncertainties and the applicability of absorption measurements at a location slightly offset to the spark plug when information about mixing at the spark plug is desired. Absorbance profiles reflect important engine operation events, such as valve opening and closing, mixing, combustion, and outgassing from crevices. PMID:19183588

  17. Does ozone enhance the remineralizing potential of nanohydroxyapatite on artificially demineralized enamel? A laser induced fluorescence study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Samuelraj; Prabhu, Vijendra; Chandra, Subhash; Koshy, Shalini; Acharya, Shashidhar; Mahato, Krishna K.

    2014-02-01

    The present era of minimal invasive dentistry emphasizes the early detection and remineralization of initial enamel caries. Ozone has been shown to reverse the initial demineralization before the integrity of the enamel surface is lost. Nano-hydroxyapatite is a proven remineralizing agent for early enamel caries. In the present study, the effect of ozone in enhancing the remineralizing potential of nano-hydroxyapatite on artificially demineralized enamel was investigated using laser induced fluorescence. Thirty five sound human premolars were collected from healthy subjects undergoing orthodontic treatment. Fluorescence was recorded by exciting the mesial surfaces using 325 nm He-Cd laser with 2 mW power. Tooth specimens were subjected to demineralization to create initial enamel caries. Following which the specimens were divided into three groups, i.e ozone (ozonated water for 2 min), without ozone and artificial saliva. Remineralization regimen was followed for 3 weeks. The fluorescence spectra of the specimens were recorded from all the three experimental groups at baseline, after demineralization and remineralization. The average spectrum for each experimental group was used for statistical analysis. Fluorescence intensities of Ozone treated specimens following remineralization were higher than that of artificial saliva, and this difference was found to be statistically significant (P<0.0001). In a nutshell, ozone enhanced the remineralizing potential of nanohydroxyapatite, and laser induced fluorescence was found to be effective in assessing the surface mineral changes in enamel. Ozone can be considered an effective agent in reversing the initial enamel caries there by preventing the tooth from entering into the repetitive restorative cycle.

  18. Laser-induced fluorescence studies of meso-tetra(hydroxyphenyl)chlorin in malignant and normal tissues in rats.

    PubMed

    Alian, W; Andersson-Engels, S; Svanberg, K; Svanberg, S

    1994-11-01

    meso-Tetra(hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (mTHPC) is an attractive second-generation dihydroporphyrin photosensitiser for use in photodynamic therapy. In this study, 1.3 mg kg-1 body weight mTHPC was administered intravenously, and laser-induced fluorescence was used to characterise and compare its localisation and retention in different rat tissues, including an induced experimental adenocarcinoma, 24 h and 48 h post injection. These studies were performed in an attempt to predict the anatomical locations where mTHPC PDT might be most effective and suggest suitable injection--irradiation intervals in each case. Of particular interest were the intra-abdominal and intrathoracic tissues. The fluorescence was induced at 405 nm and the fluorescence spectrum in the region 450-750 nm was analysed. All collected spectra were dominated by the fluorescence signature of mTHPC with its peak at 652 nm, and all values in this study are in terms of background-free drug-specific fluorescence intensity at that wavelength. The photosensitiser accumulated in high concentrations in the tumour and the reticuloendothelial system. Muscular organs, such as the heart and the abdominal wall, were characterised by a low drug fluorescence signature. PMID:7947093

  19. Simultaneous high-speed measurement of temperature and lifetime-corrected OH laser-induced fluorescence in unsteady flames.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Terrence R; King, Galen B; Gluesenkamp, Matthew; Gord, James R

    2007-08-01

    A means of performing simultaneous, high-speed measurements of temperature and OH lifetime-corrected laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for tracking unsteady flames has been developed and demonstrated. The system uses the frequency-doubled and frequency-tripled output beams of an 80 MHz mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser to achieve ultrashort laser pulses (order 2 ps) for Rayleigh-scattering thermometry at 460 nm and lifetime-corrected OH LIF at 306.5 nm, respectively. Simultaneous, high-speed measurements of temperature and OH number density enable studies of flame chemistry, heat release, and flame extinction in unsteady, strained flames where the local fluorescence-quenching environment is unknown. PMID:17671590

  20. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence measurement of ion and neutral dynamics in a Hall thruster during ionization oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Young, Christopher V.; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents spatially and temporally resolved laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of the xenon ion and neutral velocity distribution functions in a 400 W Hall thruster during natural ionization oscillations at 23 kHz, the so-called "breathing mode." Strong fluctuations in measured axial ion velocity throughout the discharge current cycle are observed at five spatial locations and the velocity maxima appear in the low current interval. The spatio-temporal evolution of the ion velocity distribution function suggests a propagating acceleration front undergoing periodic motion between the thruster exit plane and ˜1 cm downstream into the plume. The ion LIF signal intensity oscillates almost in phase with the discharge current, while the neutral fluorescence signal appears out of phase, indicating alternating intervals of strong and weak ionization.

  1. Periodic Evolution of a Xe I Population in an Oscillatory Discharge Captured Through Time-Synchronized Laser Induced Fluorescence Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Young, Christopher; Cappelli, Mark

    2014-10-01

    We track the evolution of the Xe I 6 s '[ 1 / 2 ] 1 - 6 p '[ 3 / 2 ] 2 (834.68 nm air) transition lineshape in a plasma discharge oscillating at 60 Hz. Two time-synchronized laser induced fluorescence techniques based on phase sensitive detection of the fluorescence signal are demonstrated, yielding consistent results. One approach used previously involves a sample-and-hold procedure that collects fluorescence signal at a particular phase in the oscillation period and holds the average value until the following sample. The second method is based on fast switching of the fluorescence signal; only the signal collected inside the acquisition gate is sent to a lock-in amplifier for processing. Both methods rely on modulating the exciting laser beam and the latter permits operation at a much higher frequency range with reduced spectral noise density. The maximum observed peak fluorescence intensity occurs at low discharge currents, although the peak intensity drops to zero at zero discharge current. The peak intensity also decreases at the discharge current maximum. Time-varying properties of the xenon neutrals are extracted from a lineshape analysis. This work is sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research with Dr. Mitat Birkan as program manager. CVY acknowledges support from the DOE NNSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship under Contract DE-FC52-08NA28752.

  2. Time-resolved detection of aromatic compounds on planetary surfaces by ultraviolet laser induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshelman, E.; Daly, M. G.; Slater, G.; Cloutis, E.

    2015-12-01

    Raman spectroscopic instruments are highly capable in the search for organics on Mars due to the potential to perform rapid and nondestructive measurements on unprepared samples. Upcoming and future Raman instruments are likely to also incorporate laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) capabilities, which can be added for modest cost and complexity. We demonstrate that it is possible to obtain sub-ns fluorescence lifetime measurements of Mars-relevant organics and minerals if a fast time-gating capability is used with an intensified detector and a short ultraviolet laser pulse. This serves a primary purpose of discriminating mineral from short-lived (less than 10 ns) organic fluorescence, considered a potential biosignature. Additionally, lifetime measurements may assist in determining if more than one fluorescing species is present and provide information concerning the molecular structure as well as the local environment. Fast time-gating is also useful at longer visible or near-IR wavelengths, as this approach increases the sensitivity of the instrument to organic material by removing the majority of the fluorescence background from the Raman signal and reducing the effect of ambient light.

  3. Changes in laser-induced fluorescence responses of 3T3 fibroblasts to repetitive thermal stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuthan, J.; Dressler, C.; Zabarylo, U.; Minet, O.

    2009-04-01

    The combined experimental use of laser-induced autofluorescence of cellular metabolites and methodological fundamentals of systems biology will provide access to biological thermal stress analysis on a sub cellular level. A test setup incorporating a pulsed nitrogen laser was realized with which autofluorescence of the coenzyme NADH could be measured in living 3T3 cells. The cells were subjected to different temperature stress at repetitive time intervals. When subjected to a simple mathematical analysis, the NADH concentration change measured through autofluorescence in biological cells exhibited approximate concentration-equivalent balance curves. These results add up to the fundamental know-how about the dosimetry of thermally therapeutic methods.

  4. Detection of immunoglobulins in a laser induced fluorescence system utilizing polydimethysiloxane microchips with advanced surface and optical properties.

    PubMed

    Schrott, Walter; Nebyla, Marek; Přibyl, Michal; Snita, Dalimil

    2011-01-01

    We developed an automated laser induced fluorescence system utilizing microfluidic chips for detection and quantification of immunoglobulins. Microchips were fabricated from polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) using the so-called "prepolymerization technique." The microchip structure helped minimize the effects of PDMS autofluorescence and light scattering. Furthermore, a thin and uniform PDMS layer forming the top of the microchip enabled proper focusing and collection of the excitation beam and the emitted fluorescence, respectively. The developed system was tested for the detection of mouse immunoglobulins. The capturing antibodies were immobilized on internal microchannel walls in the form of a polyelectrolyte. We clearly show that this immobilization technique, if correctly realized, gives results with high reproducibility. After sample incubation and washing, secondary antibodies labeled by fluorescein isothiocyanate were introduced into microchannels to build a detectable complex. We show that mouse antibodies can be quantified in a wide concentration range, 0.01-100 μg ml(-1). The lower detection limit was below 0.001 μg ml(-1) (6.7 pM). The developed laser induced fluorescence (LIF) apparatus is relatively cheap and easy to construct. The total cost of the developed LIF detector is lower than a typical price of plate readers. If compared to classical ELISA (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay) plate systems, the detection of immunoglobulins or other proteins in the developed PDMS microfluidic device brings other important benefits such as reduced time demands (10 min incubation) and low reagent consumption (less than 1 μl). The cost of the developed PDMS chips is comparable with the price of commercial ELISA plates. The main troubleshooting related to the apparatus development is also discussed in order to help potential constructors. PMID:21359027

  5. A Study of Aberrant Glycosylation in Simulated Microgravity Using Laser Induced AutoFluorescence and Flow Cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, B. DeSales

    1999-01-01

    A number of pathologies and cellular dysfunctions including neoplasms have been correlated with autofluorescence. The complications of aging and diabetes have been associated with the accumulation of non-enzymatic glycosylations of tissue macromolecules. These products are known as the Advanced Glycosylated End Products (AGEs). A physical property associated with AGEs is the emission of 570 mn or 630 nm light energy (autofluorescence) following the absorption of 448 mm energy associated with the argon laser. This investigation sought to assess the induction of argon-laser induced autofluorescence in a variety of in vitro culture systems. Different fluorescence intensities distinguished tumor lines from normal cell populations. Laser-stimulated autofluorescence discriminated primary cultures of lymphocytes grown in the presence of excess glucose as opposed to normal glucose concentrations. The effects of deglycosylating agents upon laser-induced autofluorescence were also assessed. The studies included studies of cell cycle analysis using Propidium Iodide stained DNA of cells grown in simulated microgravity using NASA Bioreactor Vessels in media of normal and elevated glucose concentrations.

  6. Advanced optical diagnostics of multiphase combustion flow field using OH planar laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kevin Young-jin

    High-repetition-rate (5 kHz, 10 kHz) OH planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) was used to investigate the combustion of liquid, gelled, and solid propellants. For the liquid monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) droplet combustion experiment in N2O/N2 using 5 kHz OH PLIF and visible imaging system, the OH profile and the droplet diameter were measured. The N2O partial pressure was varied by 20% and 40%, and the total pressure was varied by 103, 172, 276, 414, 552 kPa. The OH location indicated that the oxidation flame front is between the visible dual flame fronts. The results showed thicker flame sheet and higher burning rate for increased N2O concentration for a given pressure. The burning rate increased with increased pressure at 20% partial pressure N2O, and the burning rate decreased with increased pressure at 40% partial pressure N2O. This work provides experimental data for validating chemical kinetics models. For the gelled droplet combustion experiment using a 5 kHz OH PLIF system, speeds and locations of fuel jets emanating from the burning gelled droplets were quantified for the first time. MMH was gelled with organic gellant HPC at 3 wt.% and 6 wt.%, and burned in air at 35, 103, 172, 276, and 414 kPa. Different types of interaction of vapor jets and flame front were distinguished for the first time. For high jet speed, local extinction of the flame was observed. By analyzing the jet speed statistics, it was concluded that pressure and jet speed had an inverse relationship and gellant concentration and jet speed had a direct relationship. This work provides more fundamental insight into the physics of gelled fuel droplet combustion. A 3D OH PLIF system was assembled and demonstrated using a 10 kHz OH PLIF system and a galvanometric scanning mirror. This is the first time that a reacting flow field was imaged with a 3D optical technique using OH PLIF. A 3D scan time of 1 ms was achieved, with ten slices generated per sweep with 1000 Hz scan rate. Alternatively

  7. Amine Analysis Using AlexaFluor 488 Succinimidyl Ester and Capillary Electrophoresis with Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Christian G.; Stockton, Amanda M.; Leicht, Stephen; McCaig, Heather; Chung, Shirley; Scott, Valerie; Zhong, Fang; Lin, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent probes enable detection of otherwise nonfluorescent species via highly sensitive laser-induced fluorescence. Organic amines are predominantly nonfluorescent and are of analytical interest in agricultural and food science, biomedical applications, and biowarfare detection. Alexa Fluor 488 N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester (AF488 NHS-ester) is an amine-specific fluorescent probe. Here, we demonstrate low limit of detection of long-chain (C9 to C18) primary amines and optimize AF488 derivatization of long-chain primary amines. The reaction was found to be equally efficient in all solvents studied (dimethylsulfoxide, ethanol, and N,N-dimethylformamide). While an organic base (N,N-diisopropylethylamine) is required to achieve efficient reaction between AF488 NHS-ester and organic amines with longer hydrophobic chains, high concentrations (>5 mM) result in increased levels of ethylamine and propylamine in the blank. Optimal incubation times were found to be >12 hrs at room temperature. We present an initial capillary electrophoresis separation for analysis using a simple micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) buffer consisting of 12 mM sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) and 5 mM carbonate, pH 10. Limits of detection using the optimized labeling conditions and these separation conditions were 5–17 nM. The method presented here represents a novel addition to the arsenal of fluorescent probes available for highly sensitive analysis of small organic molecules. PMID:26090268

  8. Laser-induced fluorescence monitoring of the gas phase in a glow discharge during reactive sputtering of vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvostikov, V. A.; Grazhulene, S. S.; Burmii, Zh. P.; Marchenko, V. A.

    2011-11-01

    Processes in the gas phase of a glow discharge during diode and magnetron reactive sputtering of vanadium in an Ar-O2 atmosphere have been investigated by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) as a function of the parameters of the glow discharge and the composition of the atmosphere. The intensity of the fluorescence spectra increased by 1.5-2.0 orders of magnitude in the magnetron sputtering process compared with that of diode sputtering. Under continuous sputtering conditions, the dependences of the intensities and relative compositions of the fluorescence spectra on the discharge parameters (discharge voltage and current) have been investigated. In pulsed mode of the glow discharge, the dynamics of changes in the spectra have been studied versus variations in the discharge duration and the lag time for recording the fluorescence signal. The dependence of the spectral line intensities on the partial pressure of oxygen has been found for vanadium and its oxide. The cathode surface at pressures of 0.03-0.04 Pa was shown to convert to the oxidized state.

  9. Using violet laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra for crop yield assessment of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp) varieties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Benjamin; Buah-Bassuah, Paul K.; Tetteh, Jonathan P.

    2004-07-01

    The use of violet laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (LICF) emission spectra to monitor the growth of five varieties of cowpea in the University of Cape Coast Botanical Garden is presented. Radiation from a continuous-wave violet laser diode emitting at 396 nm through a fibre is closely incident on in vivo leaves of cowpea to excite chlorophyll fluorescence, which is detected by an integrated spectrometer with CCD readout. The chlorophyll fluorescence spectra with peaks at 683 and 731 nm were used for growth monitoring of the cowpea plants over three weeks and analysed using Gaussian spectral functions with curve fitted parameters to determine the peak positions, area under the spectral curve and the intensity ratio F683/F731. The variation in the intensity ratio of the chlorophyll bands showed sensitive changes indicating the photosynthetic activity of the cowpea varieties. A discussion of the fluorescence result as compared to conventional assessment is presented with regard to discrimination between the cowpea varieties in terms of crop yield performance.

  10. An aircraft instrument design for in situ tropospheric OH measurements by laser induced fluorescence at low pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, William H.; Stevens, Philip S.; Mather, James H.

    1993-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) is important for many processes involved in tropospheric chemistry. For instance, it initiates the photochemical degradation of gases that cause global climate change, such as methane and the chlorofluorocarbon substitutes (HCFCs). Because of its reactivity, its abundances are less than 0.1 pptv. Thus, OH has been very difficult to measure accurately, despite its importance. Techniques have evolved, however, so that good measurements of tropospheric OH abundances are now possible. One of these techniques that is adaptable to aircraft measurements is the laser induced fluorescence detection of the OH radical in a detection chamber at low pressures. The current ground-based instrument, which can be readily adapted to aircraft, can detect OH abundances of 1.4 x 10 exp 5 OH molecules/cu cm with S/N = 2 in 30 sec, and 5 x 10 exp 4/cu cm in 5 min.

  11. Comparison of 2D and 3D flame topography measured by planar laser-induced fluorescence and tomographic chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lin; Wu, Yue; Xu, Wenjiang; Hammack, Stephen D; Lee, Tonghun; Carter, Campbell D

    2016-07-10

    The goal of this work was to contrast and compare the 2D and 3D flame topography of a turbulent flame. The 2D measurements were obtained using CH-based (methylidyne radical-based) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), and the 3D measurements were obtained through a tomographic chemiluminescence (TC) technique. Both PLIF and TC were performed simultaneously on a turbulent premixed Bunsen flame. The PLIF measurements were then compared to a cross section of the 3D TC measurements, both to provide a validation to the 3D measurements and also to illustrate the differences in flame structures inferred from the 2D and 3D measurements. PMID:27409304

  12. Measurements with magnetic field in the National Spherical Torus Experiment using the motional Stark effect with laser induced fluorescence diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, E. L.; Levinton, F. M.

    2013-04-15

    The motional Stark effect with laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic (MSE-LIF) has been installed and tested on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. The MSE-LIF diagnostic will be capable of measuring radially resolved profiles of magnetic field magnitude or pitch angle in NSTX plasmas. The system includes a diagnostic neutral hydrogen beam and a laser which excites the n = 2 to n = 3 transition. A viewing system has been implemented which will support up to 38 channels from the plasma edge to past the magnetic axis. First measurements of MSE-LIF signals in the presence of small applied magnetic fields in neutral gas are reported.

  13. MHz-rate nitric oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging in a Mach 10 hypersonic wind tunnel.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Naibo; Webster, Matthew; Lempert, Walter R; Miller, Joseph D; Meyer, Terrence R; Ivey, Christopher B; Danehy, Paul M

    2011-02-01

    Nitric oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) imaging at repetition rates as high as 1 MHz is demonstrated in the NASA Langley 31 in. Mach 10 hypersonic wind tunnel. Approximately 200 time-correlated image sequences of between 10 and 20 individual frames were obtained over eight days of wind tunnel testing spanning two entries in March and September of 2009. The image sequences presented were obtained from the boundary layer of a 20° flat plate model, in which transition was induced using a variety of different shaped protuberances, including a cylinder and a triangle. The high-speed image sequences captured a variety of laminar and transitional flow phenomena, ranging from mostly laminar flow, typically at a lower Reynolds number and/or in the near wall region of the model, to highly transitional flow in which the temporal evolution and progression of characteristic streak instabilities and/or corkscrew-shaped vortices could be clearly identified. PMID:21283217

  14. Detection of glutathione within single mice hepatocytes using microfluidic chips coupled with a laser-induced fluorescence system.

    PubMed

    Hao, Minglu; Liu, Rutao; Zhang, Hao; Li, Yating; Jing, Mingyang

    2014-05-01

    A rapid and accurate detection of glutathione (GSH) content in single cells is important to the early diagnosis and prevention of diseases. A microfluidic system allows the manipulation of trace amounts of reagents and single cells in a simple and cheap glass chip coupled with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection. 2,3-Naphthalenedicarboxaldehyde (NDA) was used as the derivatization reagent to label GSH in cells. Microchannel surface derivatization and optimization of injection and separation were investigated in detail, and then the GSH in single mice hepatocyte was separated and detected under optimum conditions with a linear range of 5×10(-4) M~5×10(-3) M and a detection limit of 4.47×10(-5) M. This study provides a simple and effective method for rapid GSH detection in single cells using few reagents. PMID:24534424

  15. Studies of Landé gJ-factors of singly ionized lanthanum by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werbowy, S.; Güney, C.; Windholz, L.

    2016-08-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, using a cooled hollow cathode discharge lamp as source of ions, was used to observe the Zeeman splitting of 18 lines of La II in the wavelength range 629.6-680.9 nm, in external intermediate magnetic fields up to 800 G. The recorded hyperfine-Zeeman patterns were analyzed in detail using already known accurate hyperfine structure A- and B-constants. From the recordings the Landé gJ-factors for some levels belonging to the 5d2, 5d6s, 5d6p, 4f5d, 4f6s and 4f6p configurations of La II were determined. The obtained experimental gJ-factors are compared with earlier measurements and theoretical calculations.

  16. Computer-controlled multi-parameter mapping of 3D compressible flowfields using planar laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, James M.; Victor, Kenneth G.; Mcdaniel, James C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A computer-controlled technique, using planar laser-induced iodine fluorescence, for measuring complex compressible flowfields is presented. A new laser permits the use of a planar two-line temperature technique so that all parameters can be measured with the laser operated narrowband. Pressure and temperature measurements in a step flowfield show agreement within 10 percent of a CFD model except in regions close to walls. Deviation of near wall temperature measurements from the model was decreased from 21 percent to 12 percent compared to broadband planar temperature measurements. Computer-control of the experiment has been implemented, except for the frequency tuning of the laser. Image data storage and processing has been improved by integrating a workstation into the experimental setup reducing the data reduction time by a factor of 50.

  17. Line Raman, Rayleigh, and laser-induced predissociation fluorescence technique for combustion with a tunable KrF excimer laser.

    PubMed

    Mansour, M S; Chen, Y C

    1996-07-20

    We have applied a line UV Raman, Rayleigh, and laser-induced predissociation fluorescence technique for measurement of turbulent hydrocarbon flames. The species concentration of CO(2), O(2), CO, N(2), CH(4), H(2)O, OH, and H(2) and the temperature are measured instantaneously and simultaneously along a line of 11.4 mm, from which the gradients with respect to mixture fraction and spatial direction are obtained. The technique has been successfully tested in a laminar premixed stoichiometric methane flame and a laminar hydrogen diffusion flame. In addition the technique has been tested in a highly turbulent rich premixed methane flame. The data show that the technique can be used to provide instantaneous measurements of local profiles that describe the local flame structure in highly turbulent flames. PMID:21102834

  18. Oxygen-atom concentrations measured in flames: a method to improve the accuracy of laser-induced fluorescence diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Myhr, F H; Driscoll, J F

    2001-10-20

    A procedure is proposed, denoted as the corrected laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) method, that reduces the error associated with the unavoidable photodissociation of O(2) molecules that has limited the measurement of oxygen-atom concentrations in the past. Two different laser intensities are employed, and the two signals that are obtained with two-photon LIF diagnostics are used to correct for the photolysis error. We measured oxygen-atom concentrations using this method at 33 locations in lean and rich flames. Results are compared with values determined by use of two independent techniques: the partial equilibrium method and equilibrium calculations. The measurements also quantify the shot noise, the photolysis errors, and the critical laser intensity required to avoid photolysis errors. PMID:18364818

  19. Dynamics of Laser-Ablation Plume and Ambient Gas Visualized by Laser-Induced Fluorescence Imaging Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Koichi; Watarai, Hiroshi

    2006-04-01

    The dynamics of both a laser-ablation plume and ambient gas were studied by visualizing their density distributions by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy. A deep dip was formed in the density distribution of the ambient gas. The depth of the dip was almost 100% immediately after irradiation of the ablation laser pulse. The size of the dip expanded with time. At a long delay time after the irradiation of the ablation laser pulse, the ambient gas returned to the dip and slowly filled it. The location of the dip corresponded to that of the plume ejected from the target. This means that the high pressure of the plume removed the ambient gas, and the plume and the ambient gas located exclusively. In addition, we observed the formation and propagation of a compressed layer around the dip.

  20. Development of fiber-laser-based laser-induced fluorescence for detection of SO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Dahv A. V. Kliner; Roger L. Farrow; Jeffrey P. Koplow; Lew Goldberg

    1998-12-01

    Gaining a quantitative understanding of many aspects of the earth's climate system requires development of new detection methods for key atmospheric species and their incorporation into chemical sensors with high sensitivity, specificity, and time response. The authors have initiated a research program to develop these new chemical-sensing capabilities. The species they have targeted initially are oxides of nitrogen and sulfur, specifically NO and S0{sub 2} These molecules play a central role in the earth's climate, and anthropogenic activities (primarily fossil-fuel combustion) are the dominant source of both species. They are exploring the use of single-mode fiber lasers and amplifiers as compact, lightweight sources of tunable, narrow-bandwidth, deep-UV radiation. They have also begun spectroscopic studies to optimize UV laser-induced fluorescence for detection of S0{sub 2} with high sensitivity and specificity.

  1. Method for detecting the isomeric state I =(3/2 ) + in 229Th with laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dembczyński, J.; Elantkowska, M.; Ruczkowski, J.

    2015-07-01

    There are different predictions regarding the position of the isomeric state of Thm229. There is some question as to whether it even exists. We propose simple experiments to provide the evidence of the existence of this isomeric state. If the metastable isomeric state exists, we should be able to observe the effects of mixing of the nuclear wave functions of the ground state I =5 /2 and the isomeric I =3 /2 state via electronic shells. It will be shown as the differences between the hyperfine A and B constants, which will be measured by means of the laser-induced fluorescence methods and those predicted by semiempirical calculations. The wave function for the atomic state |conf . S L J I F > contains contributions from both nuclear states I =5 /2 and 3 /2 , thus its effects on the hyperfine-structure patterns of spectral lines should be observed, confirming the existence of this isomeric state.

  2. Detection of glutathione within single mice hepatocytes using microfluidic chips coupled with a laser-induced fluorescence system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Minglu; Liu, Rutao; Zhang, Hao; Li, Yating; Jing, Mingyang

    A rapid and accurate detection of glutathione (GSH) content in single cells is important to the early diagnosis and prevention of diseases. A microfluidic system allows the manipulation of trace amounts of reagents and single cells in a simple and cheap glass chip coupled with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection. 2,3-Naphthalenedicarboxaldehyde (NDA) was used as the derivatization reagent to label GSH in cells. Microchannel surface derivatization and optimization of injection and separation were investigated in detail, and then the GSH in single mice hepatocyte was separated and detected under optimum conditions with a linear range of 5 × 10-4 M ˜ 5 × 10-3 M and a detection limit of 4.47 × 10-5 M. This study provides a simple and effective method for rapid GSH detection in single cells using few reagents.

  3. Laser-induced fluorescence of flowing samples as an approach to single-molecule detection in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Dovichi, N.J.; Martin, J.C.; Jett, J.H.; Trkula, M.; Keller, R.A.

    1984-03-01

    A flow cytometer system was used to detect aqueous rhodamine 6G by laser-induced fluorescence. Best results were obtained with careful spectral and spatial filtering. At the detection limit, the probability of a rhodamine 6G molecule being present in the detector's probed volume of 11 pL is about 0.6 . With a flow rate of 0.42 ..mu..L/s, a detection limit of 8.9 x 10/sup -14/ M was obtained for a 1-s time constant. At the detection limit, 18 ag or 22,000 molecules of rhodamine 6G flowed through the probed volume during the signal integration period. Signal linearity extends over greater than 5 orders of magnitude limited only by saturation of the detection electronics at high concentration. The results presented here allow a projection to single-molecule detection with reasonable improvements to the apparatus. 25 references, 5 figures, 7 tables.

  4. Measurements with magnetic field in the National Spherical Torus Experiment using the motional Stark effect with laser induced fluorescence diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, E. L.; Levinton, F. M.

    2013-04-01

    The motional Stark effect with laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic (MSE-LIF) has been installed and tested on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. The MSE-LIF diagnostic will be capable of measuring radially resolved profiles of magnetic field magnitude or pitch angle in NSTX plasmas. The system includes a diagnostic neutral hydrogen beam and a laser which excites the n = 2 to n = 3 transition. A viewing system has been implemented which will support up to 38 channels from the plasma edge to past the magnetic axis. First measurements of MSE-LIF signals in the presence of small applied magnetic fields in neutral gas are reported.

  5. Selective enzymatic cleavage and labeling for sensitive capillary electrophoresis laser-induced fluorescence analysis of oxidized DNA bases.

    PubMed

    Li, Cuiping; Wang, Hailin

    2015-08-01

    Oxidatively generated DNA damage is considered to be a significant contributing factor to cancer, aging, and age-related human diseases. It is important to detect oxidatively generated DNA damage to understand and clinically diagnosis diseases caused by oxidative damage. In this study, using selective enzymatic cleavage and quantum dot (QD) labeling, we developed a novel capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence method for the sensitive detection of oxidized DNA bases. First, oxidized DNA bases are recognized and removed by one DNA base excision repair glycosylase, leaving apurinic and apyrimidinic sites (AP sites) at the oxidized positions. The AP sites are further excised by the AP nicking activity of the chosen glycosylase, generating a nucleotide gap with 5'- and 3'- phosphate groups. After dephosphorylation with one alkaline phosphatase, a biotinylated ddNTP is introduced into the nucleotide space within the DNA strand by DNA polymerase I. The biotin-tagged DNA is further labeled with a QD-streptavidin conjugate via non-covalent interactions. The DNA-bound QD is well-separated from excess DNA-unbound QD by highly efficient capillary electrophoresis and is sensitively detected by online coupled laser-induced fluorescence analysis. Using this method, we can assess the trace levels of oxidized DNA bases induced by the Fenton reaction and UV irradiation. Interestingly, the use of the formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG) protein and endonuclease VIII enables the detection of oxidized purine and pyrimidine bases, respectively. Using the synthesized standard DNA, the approach has low limits of detection of 1.1×10(-19)mol in mass and 2.9pM in concentration. PMID:26105778

  6. Mechanism for laser-induced fluorescence signal generation in a nanoparticle-seeded flow for planar flame thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, D. H.; Sun, Z. W.; Medwell, P. R.; Alwahabi, Z. T.; Dally, B. B.; Nathan, G. J.

    2015-02-01

    The mechanism of atomic indium generation for laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of indium from laser ablation seeding was investigated in a hydrogen/nitrogen non-premixed flame. The morphology and particle size distributions of the ablation products were examined with scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. These investigations show that the ablation products comprise complex agglomerates of nano-sized primary particles of indium compounds and micron-sized spherical indium beads. Images of the atomic indium LIF, Mie scattering of ablation products and natural fluorescence emission of indium in the flame were recorded to investigate the mechanism of fluorescence signal generation. The relative contribution of natural fluorescence emission of indium towards the total indium fluorescence signal was assessed by comparing these images. These images also reveal the evolution of ablation products through the flame structure and the correlation between LIF signal and ablation products. It is found that the LIF signal generation is associated with the vapourisation of indium nanoparticles into the gas phase by thermal decomposition in the flame. A further mechanism for thermal decomposition of the nanoparticles was also identified, that of heating the ablation products by in situ laser ablation. This was assessed by means of a second laser, introduced prior to the excitation laser, to reveal that the LIF signal can be enhanced by in situ laser ablation, particularly in the upstream regions of the flame. These findings supersede the mechanism deduced previously by the authors that neutral atomic indium can survive a convection time of the order of tens of seconds and be directly seeded into reacting or non-reacting flows. The possible influences of laser ablation seeding on the nonlinear two-line atomic fluorescence thermometry technique were also assessed.

  7. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements of nitric oxide in laminar C2H6/O2/N2 flames at high pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisel, John R.; Carter, Campbell D.; Laurendeau, Normand M.

    1993-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of nitric oxide in C2H6/O2/N2 flames at 1-9 atm were successfully carried out using laser-induced fluorescence. The location of maximum NO concentration is found to shift towards leaner equivalence ratios with increasing pressure. Details of the experimental apparatus and measurement procedure are described.

  8. Applicability of UV laser-induced solid-state fluorescence spectroscopy for characterization of solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Woltmann, Eva; Meyer, Hans; Weigel, Diana; Pritzke, Heinz; Posch, Tjorben N; Kler, Pablo A; Schürmann, Klaus; Roscher, Jörg; Huhn, Carolin

    2014-10-01

    High production output of solid pharmaceutical formulations requires fast methods to ensure their quality. Likewise, fast analytical procedures are required in forensic sciences, for example at customs, to substantiate an initial suspicion. We here present the design and the optimization of an instrumental setup for rapid and non-invasive characterization of tablets by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (with a UV-laser (λ ex = 266 nm) as excitation source) in reflection geometry. The setup was first validated with regard to repeatability, bleaching phenomena, and sensitivity. The effect on the spectra by the physical and chemical properties of the samples, e.g. their hardness, homogeneity, chemical composition, and granule grain size of the uncompressed material, using a series of tablets, manufactured in accordance with design of experiments, was investigated. Investigation of tablets with regard to homogeneity, especially, is extremely important in pharmaceutical production processes. We demonstrate that multiplicative scatter correction is an appropriate tool for data preprocessing of fluorescence spectra. Tablets with different physical and chemical characteristics can be discriminated well from their fluorescence spectra by subjecting the results to principal component analysis. PMID:25106544

  9. Design of a novel laser-induced fluorescence spectrophotometer for water quality monitor based on virtual instrument and linear CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhong; Huang, Shuanggen; Liu, Guodong; Huang, Zhen; Zeng, Lvming

    2011-06-01

    Since the water resource is being seriously polluted with the development of the human society, the monitoring of the available water resource is an impending task. The concentration of the dissolved organic matter, oxygen and inorganic salt in water can be checked by means of some methods, e.g. electrolysis, electrochemical method, colorimetry. But because some drawbacks are existed in these methods, the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrophotometry method is adopted into this paper. And a novel LIF spectrophotometer for water quality monitor (WQM) is designed. In this WQM, the 3rd harmonic of the Q switched Nd:YAG laser is used as the induced fluorescence light-source. And for the splitting-light system of the spectrophotometer for WQM, in order to improve the resolution and light-passing efficiency, a novel volume holography transmissive(VHT) grating is used as the diffraction grating instead of the plane or holography grating. Meanwhile, the linear CCD with combined data acquisition (DAQ) card is used as the fluorescence spectral detection system and virtual instrument (VI) technology based on LabVIEW is used to control the spectral acquisition and analysis. Experimental results show that the spatial resolution of the novel spectrophotometer for WQM is improved, its resolution can reach 2nm. And the checking accuracy of this WQM is higher than others. Therefore, the novel LIF spectrophotometer for WQM has the potential value in the water quality monitoring and biochemical application.

  10. Thermally induced irreversible conformational changes in collagen probed by optical second harmonic generation and laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Theodossiou, T; Rapti, G S; Hovhannisyan, V; Georgiou, E; Politopoulos, K; Yova, D

    2002-01-01

    Irreversible thermal conformational changes induced to collagen have been studied by optical methods. More specifically, second harmonic generation (SHG) from incident nanosecond Ng:YAG 1064 nm radiation and laser-induced fluorescence by 337 nm, pulsed nanosecond nitrogen laser excitation, at 405, 410 and 415 nm emission wavelengths were registered at eight temperatures (40 degrees, 50 degrees, 55 degrees, 60 degrees, 65 degrees, 70 degrees, 75 degrees and 80 degrees C) and normalised with respect to the corresponding values at the ambient temperature of 30 degrees C. The heating protocol used in this work, was selected to monitor only permanent changes reflecting in the optical properties of the samples under investigation. In this context, the SHG, directly related to the collagen fibril population in triple helix conformation, indicated on irreversible phase transition around 64 degrees C. On the other hand fluorescence related to the destruction of cross-linked chromophores in collagen, some of which are related to the triple helix tertiary structure, also indicated a permanent phase transition around 63 degrees C. These results are in agreement with previous results from studies with differential scanning calorimetry. However SHG and fluorescence, being non-invasive optical methods are expected to have a significant impact in the fields of laser ablative surgery and laser tissue welding. PMID:11845366

  11. 20 kHz toluene planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of a jet in nearly sonic crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, V. A.; Troutman, V. A.; Mungal, M. G.; Hanson, R. K.

    2014-10-01

    This manuscript describes continuous, high-repetition-rate (20 kHz) toluene planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging in an expansion tube impulse flow facility. Cinematographic image sequences are acquired that visualize an underexpanded jet of hydrogen in Mach 0.9 crossflow, a practical flow configuration relevant to aerospace propulsion systems. The freestream gas is nitrogen seeded with toluene; toluene broadly absorbs and fluoresces in the ultraviolet, and the relatively high quantum yield of toluene produces large signals and high signal-to-noise ratios. Toluene is excited using a commercially available, frequency-quadrupled (266 nm), high-repetition-rate (20 kHz), pulsed (0.8-0.9 mJ per pulse), diode-pumped solid-state Nd:YAG laser, and fluorescence is imaged with a high-repetition-rate intensifier and CMOS camera. The resulting PLIF movie and image sequences are presented, visualizing the jet start-up process and the dynamics of the jet in crossflow; the freestream duration and a measure of freestream momentum flux steadiness are also inferred. This work demonstrates progress toward continuous PLIF imaging of practical flow systems in impulse facilities at kHz acquisition rates using practical, turn-key, high-speed laser and imaging systems.

  12. Hydrogen bond-induced vibronic mode mixing in benzoic acid dimer: a laser-induced fluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Chayan K; Chakraborty, Tapas

    2004-05-01

    Laser-induced dispersed fluorescence spectra of benzoic acid dimer in the cold environment of supersonic jet expansion have been reinvestigated with improved spectral resolution of measurements. The spectra are analyzed with the aid of the normal mode vibrations of the dimer calculated by the ab initio quantum chemistry method at the DFT/B3LYP/6-311+G(*) (*) level of theory. The analysis reveals that the low-frequency intermolecular hydrogen bond modes are mixed extensively with the carboxyl as well as aromatic ring vibrations upon electronic excitation. The mode mixing is manifested as the complete loss of mirror symmetry relation between the fluorescence excitation and dispersed fluorescence spectra of the S(1) origin, and appearance of large number of cross-sequence transitions when the DF spectra are measured by exciting the low-energy vibrations near the S(1) origin. The cross-sequence bands are found in all the cases to be the combinations of two nontotally symmetric fundamentals consisting of one of the intermolecular hydrogen bond modes and the other from the aromatic ring and carboxyl group vibrations. The implications of this mode mixing on the excited state dynamics of the dimer are discussed. PMID:15267778

  13. Background corrections for laser-induced-fluorescence measurements of nitric oxide in lean, high-pressure, premixed methane flames.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, D D; Kuligowski, F F; Laurendeau, N M

    1997-05-20

    An experimental technique is presented that both minimizes and accounts for the interference background when laser-induced-fluorescence (LIF) measurements are made of NO in lean, high-pressure, premixed, CH(4)/O(2)/N(2) flames. Measurement interferences such as fluorescence and Raman scattering from secondary species become increasingly important for high-pressure LIF studies. O(2) fluorescence interferences are particularly troublesome in lean premixed flames. An excitation-detection scheme that minimizes the effects of these interferences is identified. A procedure that corrects the resulting LIF signal so as to account for any remaining interference signal is then developed. This correction is found to vary from less than 10% of the overall NO signal at atmospheric pressure to over 40% of the overall signal at 14.6 atm for LIF measurements of NO in a series of worst-case flames (phi = 0.6, dilution ratio 2.2). The correction technique is further demonstrated to be portable over a useful range of flame conditions at each pressure. PMID:18253332

  14. Ultrasensitive detection of closely related angiotensin I peptides using capillary electrophoresis with near-infrared laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Baars, M J; Patonay, G

    1999-02-01

    A novel near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye (NN382, LICOR, Inc.) was evaluated as an ultrasensitive peptide-labeling reagent for use with capillary electrophoresis (CE). Six angiotensin I (Ang-I) variants were selected as model peptides for the derivatization and separation studies. The closely related decapeptides were labeled with the NIR dye, separated using CE, and detected by NIR laser-induced fluorescence. Derivatization of the peptides was achieved under aqueous conditions using 2.5-500 pmol of Ang-I in a 50-microL sample (5 x 10(-8)-1 x 10(-5)M), and between 1.3 and 254 amol of the labeled peptides were injected on column. The fluorescence response was linear over a 200-fold range (correlation r > or = 0.9986). The limit of detection (SNR = 3, signal/RMS noise) ranged from 100 to 300 zmol, for the six Ang-I variants. Four of six peptides were resolved from each other and excess dye using capillary zone electrophoresis with a simple 50 mM phosphate run buffer, pH 7.2. Two pairs of coeluting peptides were successfully resolved using micellar electrokinetic chromatography with a nonionic surfactant, Triton X-100. The NIR amine-labeling reagent NN382 is a viable alternative to using visible fluorophores for CE methods requiring high sensitivity. PMID:9989384

  15. Simultaneous Laser-induced Fluorescence of Nitric Oxide and Atomic Oxygen in the Hypersonic Materials Environment Test System Arcjet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansen, Craig; Lincoln, Daniel; Bathel, Brett; Inman, Jennifer; Danehy, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous nitric oxide (NO) and atomic oxygen (O) laser induced fluorescence (LIF) experiments were performed in the Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System (HYMETS) facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. The data serves as an experimental database for validation for chemical and thermal nonequilibrium models used in hypersonic flows. Measurements were taken over a wide range of stagnation enthalpies (6.7 - 18.5 MJ/kg) using an Earth atmosphere simulant with a composition of 75% N2, 20% O2, and 5% Ar (by volume). These are the first simultaneous measurements of NO and O LIF to be reported in literature for the HYMETS facility. The maximum O LIF mean signal intensity was observed at a stagnation enthalpy of approximately 12 MJ/kg while the maximum NO LIF mean signal intensity was observed at a stagnation enthalpy of 6.7 MJ/kg. Experimental results were compared to simple fluorescence model that assumes equilibrium conditions in the plenum and frozen chemistry in the isentropic nozzle expansion (Mach 5). The equilibrium calculations were performed using CANTERA v2.1.1 with 16 species. The fluorescence model captured the correlation in mean O and NO LIF signal intensities over the entire range of stagnation enthalpies tested. Very weak correlations between single-shot O and NO LIF intensities were observed in the experiments at all of the stagnation enthalpy conditions.

  16. Experimental Assessment and Enhancement of Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements of Nitric Oxide in an Inverse Diffusion Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, William P.; Laurendeau, Normand M.

    1997-01-01

    We have experimentally assessed the quantitative nature of planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements of NO concentration in a unique atmospheric pressure, laminar, axial inverse diffusion flame (IDF). The PLIF measurements were assessed relative to a two-dimensional array of separate laser saturated fluorescence (LSF) measurements. We demonstrated and evaluated several experimentally-based procedures for enhancing the quantitative nature of PLIF concentration images. Because these experimentally-based PLIF correction schemes require only the ability to make PLIF and LSF measurements, they produce a more broadly applicable PLIF diagnostic compared to numerically-based correction schemes. We experimentally assessed the influence of interferences on both narrow-band and broad-band fluorescence measurements at atmospheric and high pressures. Optimum excitation and detection schemes were determined for the LSF and PLIF measurements. Single-input and multiple-input, experimentally-based PLIF enhancement procedures were developed for application in test environments with both negligible and significant quench-dependent error gradients. Each experimentally-based procedure provides an enhancement of approximately 50% in the quantitative nature of the PLIF measurements, and results in concentration images nominally as quantitative as LSF point measurements. These correction procedures can be applied to other species, including radicals, for which no experimental data are available from which to implement numerically-based PLIF enhancement procedures.

  17. A hyphenated optical trap capillary electrophoresis laser induced native fluorescence system for single-cell chemical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cecala, Christine; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Mitchell, Jennifer W.; Gillette, Martha U.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2013-01-01

    Single-cell measurements allow a unique glimpse into cell-to-cell heterogeneity; even small changes in selected cells can have a profound impact on an organism’s physiology. Here an integrated approach to single-cell chemical sampling and assay are described. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) with laser-induced native fluorescence (LINF) has the sensitivity to characterize natively-fluorescent indoles and catechols within individual cells. While the separation and detection approaches are well established, the sampling and injection of individually selected cells requires new approaches. We describe an optimized system that interfaces a single-beam optical trap with CE and multichannel LINF detection. A cell is localized within the trap and then the capillary inlet is positioned near the cell using a computer-controlled micromanipulator. Hydrodynamic injection allows cell lysis to occur within the capillary inlet, followed by the CE separation and LINF detection. The use of multiple emission wavelengths allows improved analyte identification based on differences in analyte fluorescence emission profiles and migration time. The system enables injections of individual rat pinealocytes and quantification of their endogenous indoles, including serotonin, N-acetyl-serotonin, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid, tryptophol and others. The amounts detected in individual cells incubated in 5-hydroxytryptophan ranged from 10−14 mol to 10−16 mol, an order of magnitude higher than observed in untreated pinealocytes. PMID:22543409

  18. Endoscopic detection of early malignancies in the upper gastrointestinal tract using laser-induced fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukowski, Uwe; Ebert, Bernd; Ortner, Marianne; Zumbusch, Katharina; Mueller, Karsten; Fleige, Barbara; Lochs, Herbert; Rinneberg, Herbert H.

    2001-01-01

    Fluorescence images were recorded simultaneously with white light images to detect dyspasia or early malignancies during regular endoscopy of the upper gastrointestinal tract, after topical administration of 5-aminolaevulinic acid. Biopsies were taken at locations where fluorescence intensity were high compared with the mean fluorescence intensity of the image. Prompt and delayed fluorescence spectra of biopsies were subsequently recorded ex vivo, and normalized fluorescence intensities of Protoporphyrin IX derived from these spectra were compared with routine histology. In contrast to routine endoscopy, one early carcinoma and one signet-ring carcinoma were found in the stomach, and malignancies in a duodenal polyp. In addition, intestinal metaplasia could be visualized in the stomach of two patients, which had not been detected in biopsies taken prior to fluorescence endoscopy.

  19. A Laser Induced Fluorescence Immunoassay System For The Detection Of Salmonella And E. Coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wygant, R. W.; Almeida, S. P.; Pierson, M. D.; Hedrick, J. C.; Churchill, G. B.; Groger, H. P.

    1989-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescent immunoassay techniques provide a powerful method of detecting biological antigens. A laser system has been developed to record the evanescent wave excited fluorescence emitted from the dye labeled polyclonal antibodies developed for Salmonella spp. and E. Coli 0157:H7. A cw argon laser tuned at 488 nm was used to induce the emitted fluorescence at about 520 nm. Measurement of the fluorescence was performed via an optical multichannel analyzer, on-line to a microcomputer. Antigen samples of varying concentrations were analyzed to test the operation of the system. A description of the laser detector is presented in this paper.

  20. INTEGRATION OF HYPERSPECTRAL REFLECTANCE AND LASER-INDUCED FLUORESCENCE IMAGING FOR ASSESSING APPLE MATURITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fluorescence and reflectance are two different forms of light interaction with matter, and they can be complementary in measuring fruit quality and condition. The objective of this research was to develop an integrated hyperspectral reflectance and fluorescence imaging system for measuring apple mat...

  1. Detection of fecal residue on poultry carcasses by laser induced fluorescence imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feasibility of fluorescence imaging technique for the detection of diluted fecal matters from various parts of the digestive tract, including colon, ceca, small intestine, and duodenum, on chicken carcasses was investigated. One of the challenges for using fluorescence imaging for inspection of agri...

  2. Studies of the laser-induced fluorescence of explosives and explosive compositions.

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, Philip Joseph, Jr.; Thorne, Lawrence R.; Phifer, Carol Celeste; Parmeter, John Ethan; Schmitt, Randal L.

    2006-10-01

    Continuing use of explosives by terrorists throughout the world has led to great interest in explosives detection technology, especially in technologies that have potential for standoff detection. This LDRD was undertaken in order to investigate the possible detection of explosive particulates at safe standoff distances in an attempt to identify vehicles that might contain large vehicle bombs (LVBs). The explosives investigated have included the common homogeneous or molecular explosives, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclonite or hexogen (RDX), octogen (HMX), and the heterogeneous explosive, ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO), and its components. We have investigated standard excited/dispersed fluorescence, laser-excited prompt and delayed dispersed fluorescence using excitation wavelengths of 266 and 355 nm, the effects of polarization of the laser excitation light, and fluorescence imaging microscopy using 365- and 470-nm excitation. The four nitro-based, homogeneous explosives (TNT, PETN, RDX, and HMX) exhibit virtually no native fluorescence, but do exhibit quenching effects of varying magnitude when adsorbed on fluorescing surfaces. Ammonium nitrate and fuel oil mixtures fluoresce primarily due to the fuel oil, and, in some cases, due to the presence of hydrophobic coatings on ammonium nitrate prill or impurities in the ammonium nitrate itself. Pure ammonium nitrate shows no detectable fluorescence. These results are of scientific interest, but they provide little hope for the use of UV-excited fluorescence as a technique to perform safe standoff detection of adsorbed explosive particulates under real-world conditions with a useful degree of reliability.

  3. Monitoring the uptake of glycosphingolipids in Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes using both fluorescence microscopy and capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection

    PubMed Central

    Essaka, David C.; White, John; Rathod, Pradip; Whitmore, Colin D.; Hindsgaul, Ole; Palcic, Monica M.

    2010-01-01

    The metabolism of glycosphingolipids by the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium falciparum plays an important role in the progression of the disease. We report a new and highly sensitive method to monitor the uptake of glycosphingolipids in infected red blood cells (iRBCs). A tetramethylrhodamine-labeled glycosphingolipid (GM1-TMR) was used as a substrate. Uptake was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy. The iRBCs were lysed with a 15% solution of saponin and washed with phosphate buffered saline to release intact parasites. The parasites were further lysed and the resulting homogenates were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection. The lysate from erythrocytes infected at 1% parasitemia generated a signal twenty standard deviations larger than uninfected erythrocytes, which suggests that relatively low infection levels can be studied with this technique. PMID:21043509

  4. Multiwavelength laser induced fluorescence of algae in-vivo - A new remote sensing technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumola, P. B.; Jarrett, O., Jr.; Brown, C. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    In order to accurately determine the quantity of chlorophyll a in living algae by fluorescence spectrometry, either remotely or in the laboratory, the fluorescence excitation cross section must be known. Laboratory fluorescence studies of a number of different algae species representative of the various color groups were performed. These measurements indicate distinct maximum spectral excitation regions which differ from one color group to another. Within each color group, however, the fluorescent properties were nearly identical, regardless of species. These two key features - namely, the similarity of fluorescent properties within a color group, and the distinct spectral differences between color groups - make possible the simultaneous determination of chlorophyll a content of an unknown mixture of phytoplankton and the distribution of chlorophyll a among the various color groups.

  5. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence study on dyes used in DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Kaisyang; Force, R.K. )

    1993-01-01

    Research on the time-resolved fluorescence of fluorescein isothiocyanate, NBD, tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate, and Texas Red - the dyes used for fluorescence-based DNA sequencing - is described. Mean fluorescence lifetiems in both aqueous buffer solution and 5.3%T, 4.8%C polyacrylamide gel were determined as a function of excitation wave-lengths at 337, 470, and 550 nm and were found to be 3.5, 1.1, 2.5, and 4.3 ns; the detection limits are 10, 200, 200 and 200 amol for FITC, NBD, TEMR, and T. Red, respectively. Comparisons of fluorescence parameters between the conjugated dyes and the free dyes are also reported. Results on the optimization of the excitation source wavelengths to improve sensitivity and reduce background scattering in polyacrylamide gel are also reported. Time-resolved fluorescence was successfully applied to resolve spectral overlapping of emissions in both solution and in polyacrylamide gel. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Atomic Emission, Absorption and Fluorescence in the Laser-induced Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Winefordner, J. D.

    2009-01-22

    The main result of our efforts is the development and successful application of the theoretical model of laser induced plasma (LIP) that allows a back-calculation of the composition of the plasma (and the condensed phase) based on the observable plasma spectrum. The model has an immediate experimental input in the form of LIP spectra and a few other experimentally determined parameters. The model is also sufficiently simple and, therefore, practical. It is conveniently interfaced in a graphical user-friendly form for using by students and any laboratory personnel with only minimal training. In our view, the model opens up the possibility for absolute analysis, i.e. the analysis which requires no standards and tedious calibration. The other parts of this proposal (including plasma diagnostics) were somewhat subordinate to this main goal. Plasma diagnostics provided the model with the necessary experimental input and led to better understanding of plasma processes. Another fruitful direction we pursued was the use of the correlation analysis for material identification and plasma diagnostics. Through a number of computer simulations we achieved a clear understanding of how, where and why this approach works being applied to emission spectra from a laser plasma. This understanding will certainly improve the quality of forensic and industrial analyses where fast and reliable material identification and sorting are required.

  7. Intercomparison of OH Radical Measurements by Long-Path Absorption and Laser Induced Fluorescence in the Atmosphere Simulation Chamber SAPHIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, H.-P.; Brauers, T.; Greif, J.; Häseler, R.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Rupp, L.

    2003-04-01

    A striking advantage of the SAPHIR chamber is the availability of two spectroscopic detection instruments for OH radicals: Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (LIF) and Long-Path Differential Optical Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). Both instruments have already been compared in 1994 during the field measurement campaign POPCORN. They agreed well with a correlation coefficient of r=0.90 and a weighted linear fit with a slope of 1.09 +- 0.12. However, OH measurements in the simulation chamber differ significantly from measurements in ambient air. While DOAS measures OH as an integral value along the central longitudinal axis of SAPHIR, LIF samples the air locally and close (2 cm) to the floor of the chamber. Thus, the LIF measurements might be possibly affected by local concentration gradients caused by insufficient mixing of the chamber air or by deposition to the wall. On the other hand, if turbulent mixing of the chamber air is weak and high concentrations of ozone are used in experiments, the DOAS instrument might be subject to artificial formation of OH radicals in the air volume which is illuminated by the detection laser. This interference results from laser induced photolysis of ozone and the subsequent reaction of water vapor with the excited oxygen atoms formed. Thus it is of decisive importance to compare OH measurements from both instruments in order to investigate potential disturbing effects due to the specific sampling properties of both instruments within SAPHIR. We report on OH measurements accomplished simultaneously with both instruments using different trace gas compositions and experimental conditions.

  8. Selective detection of uranium by laser-induced fluorescence: a potential remote-sensing technique. 1: Optical characteristics of uranyl geologic targets.

    PubMed

    Deneufville, J P; Kasdan, A; Chimenti, R J

    1981-04-15

    The remote sensing of laser-induced uranyl ion fluorescence is examined as a potential indicator of uranium occurring in geologic materials at the earth's surface. The lifetime and brightness of the fluorescence from a wide variety of rocks, minerals, and soils are reported. The distinctive characteristics of uranyl ion absorption and fluorescence were observed in diverse geologic materials such as chalcedonies and opals containing 15-3000 ppm of uranium and in surface coatings of uranyl minerals such as metaautunite, liebigite, and an-dersonite. The conditions which permit the excitation and selective detection of uranyl ion fluorescence from such targets are described. PMID:20309303

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence studies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) vapors at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chi, Z; Cullum, B M; Stokes, D L; Mobley, J; Miller, G H; Hajaligol, M R; Vo-Dinh, T

    2001-06-01

    In this work, we present the fluorescence spectra of anthracene and pyrene vapors at different elevated temperatures (from 150 to 650 degrees C) excited with the 337 nm line of a nitrogen laser. We describe the high temperature effects on the resulting spectral properties including spectral intensity, spectral bandwidth and spectral shift. We found that the PAH fluorescence spectral bandwidths become very broad as the temperature increases. The broadening is mainly due to thermal vibrational sequence congestion. We also have found that the fluorescence intensity of pyrene vapor increases with increasing temperature, which results from the increase of the pyrene vapor absorption cross section at 337 nm. PMID:11446693

  10. Two dimensional laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy: A powerful technique for elucidating rovibronic structure in electronic transitions of polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascooke, Jason R.; Alexander, Ula N.; Lawrance, Warren D.

    2011-05-01

    We demonstrate the power of high resolution, two dimensional laser induced fluorescence (2D-LIF) spectroscopy for observing rovibronic transitions of polyatomic molecules. The technique involves scanning a tunable laser over absorption features in the electronic spectrum while monitoring a segment, in our case 100 cm-1 wide, of the dispersed fluorescence spectrum. 2D-LIF images separate features that overlap in the usual laser induced fluorescence spectrum. The technique is illustrated by application to the S1-S0 transition in fluorobenzene. Images of room temperature samples show that overlap of rotational contours by sequence band structure is minimized with 2D-LIF allowing a much larger range of rotational transitions to be observed and high precision rotational constants to be extracted. A significant advantage of 2D-LIF imaging is that the rotational contours separate into their constituent branches and these can be targeted to determine the three rotational constants individually. The rotational constants determined are an order of magnitude more precise than those extracted from the analysis of the rotational contour and we find the previously determined values to be in error by as much as 5% [G. H. Kirby, Mol. Phys. 19, 289 (1970), 10.1080/00268977000101291]. Comparison with earlier ab initio calculations of the S0 and S1 geometries [I. Pugliesi, N. M. Tonge, and M. C. R. Cockett, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 104303 (2008), 10.1063/1.2970092] reveals that the CCSD/6-311G** and RI-CC2/def2-TZVPP levels of theory predict the rotational constants, and hence geometries, with comparable accuracy. Two ground state Fermi resonances were identified by the distinctive patterns that such resonances produce in the images. 2D-LIF imaging is demonstrated to be a sensitive method capable of detecting weak spectral features, particularly those that are otherwise hidden beneath stronger bands. The sensitivity is demonstrated by observation of the three isotopomers of fluorobenzene

  11. Exciplex liquid-phase thermometer using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Parigger, C; Plemmons, D H; Litchford, R J; Jeng, S M

    1998-01-01

    Pulsed photoexcitation of hydrocarbon fuels doped with organic molecules exhibits a temperature-dependent fluorescence spectrum that is used as the basis for a weakly intrusive optical thermometer. By use of pulsed excitation from a 308-nm 8-ns XeCl excimer laser with gated detection of the fluorescence emissions from doped n -heptane, we demonstrate that time-resolved measurement of the excited monomer and the redshifted excited-state complex (exciplex) fluorescence emissions can yield sub-1 degrees accuracy for temperatures ranging from 440 K to the vicinity of the critical temperature (540 K). The experiments also show that the exciplex fluorescence spectrum is pressure independent below and above supercritical pressure. PMID:18084417

  12. Injectant mole-fraction imaging in compressible mixing flows using planar laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Abbitt, John D., III; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1989-01-01

    A technique is described for imaging the injectant mole-fraction distribution in nonreacting compressible mixing flow fields. Planar fluorescence from iodine, seeded into air, is induced by a broadband argon-ion laser and collected using an intensified charge-injection-device array camera. The technique eliminates the thermodynamic dependence of the iodine fluorescence in the compressible flow field by taking the ratio of two images collected with identical thermodynamic flow conditions but different iodine seeding conditions.

  13. Photolytic-interference-free, femtosecond, two-photon laser-induced fluorescence imaging of atomic oxygen in flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Roy, Sukesh; Jiang, Naibo; Gord, James R.

    2016-02-01

    Ultrashort-pulse lasers are well suited for nonlinear diagnostic techniques such as two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (TPLIF) because the signals generated scale as the laser intensity squared. Furthermore, the broad spectral bandwidths associated with nearly Fourier-transform-limited ultrashort pulses effectively contribute to efficient nonlinear excitation by coupling through a large number of in-phase photon pairs, thereby producing strong fluorescence signals. Additionally, femtosecond (fs)-duration amplified laser systems typically operate at 1-10 kHz repetition rates, enabling high-repetition-rate imaging in dynamic environments. In previous experiments, we have demonstrated utilization of fs pulses for kilohertz (kHz)-rate, interference-free imaging of atomic hydrogen (H) in flames. In the present study, we investigate the utilization of fs-duration pulses to photolytic-interference-free TPLIF imaging of atomic oxygen (O). In TPLIF of O, photodissociation of vibrationally excited carbon dioxide (CO2) is known to be the prominent interference that produces additional O atoms in the medium. We have found that through the use of fs excitation, such interferences can be virtually eliminated in premixed laminar methane flames, which paves the way for two-dimensional imaging of O at kHz data rates. Such measurements can provide critical data for validating complex, multidimensional turbulent-combustion models as well as for investigating flame dynamics in practical combustion devices.

  14. Femtosecond, two-photon laser-induced-fluorescence imaging of atomic oxygen in an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Jacob B.; Sands, Brian L.; Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Roy, Sukesh; Scofield, James; Gord, James R.

    2015-06-01

    Femtosecond, two-photon-absorption laser-induced-fluorescence (fs-TALIF) spectroscopy is employed to measure space- and time-resolved atomic-oxygen distributions in a nanosecond, repetitively pulsed, externally grounded, atmospheric-pressure plasma jet flowing helium with a variable oxygen admixture. The high-peak-intensity, low-average-energy femtosecond pulses result in increased TALIF signal with reduced photolytic inferences. This allows 2D imaging of absolute atomic-oxygen number densities ranging from 5.8   ×   1015 to 2.0   ×   1012cm-3 using a cooled CCD with an external intensifier. Xenon is used for signal and imaging-system calibrations to quantify the atomic-oxygen fluorescence signal. Initial results highlight a transition in discharge morphology from annular to filamentary, corresponding with a change in plasma chemistry from ozone to atomic oxygen production, as the concentration of oxygen in the feed gas is changed at a fixed voltage-pulse-repetition rate. In this configuration, significant concentrations of reactive oxygen species may be remotely generated by sustaining an active discharge beyond the confines of the dielectric capillary, which may benefit applications that require large concentrations of reactive oxygen species such as material processing or biomedical devices.

  15. Photochemical effect in two-photon laser-induced fluorescence detection of carbon monoxide in hydrocarbon flames.

    PubMed

    Nefedov, A P; Sinel'shchikov, V A; Usachev, A D; Zobnin, A V

    1998-11-20

    The CO formation as a result of the CO(2) photodissociation at 230.08 nm was observed by using the two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) method. The measurements were performed in a propane-air combustion product flow and in mixtures of CO(2) and O(2). The temperature dependence of the fluorescence signal caused by CO molecules, produced in the photodissociation of CO(2) molecules under the action of laser radiation at a wavelength of 230.08 nm, was measured at temperatures ranging from 1300 to 2000 K. It is shown that consideration of CO(2) photodissociation under the action of the probing radiation is necessary when one applies the two-photon LIF method for the measurement of small CO concentrations in high-temperature gas mixtures containing CO(2). As an example, a correction is given of the CO concentration profiles measured by the LIF method in the combustion product flow around a cooled metallic plate. PMID:18301610

  16. Laser induced fluorescence monitoring of the transport of small organic molecules in an organic vapor phase deposition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolin, Cedric; Vartanian, Garen; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2012-12-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is employed for the accurate and real-time in-situ monitoring of the concentration of organic molecules in an organic vapor phase deposition (OVPD) chamber. We investigate the transport dynamics of organic species in a hot N2 carrier gas from the evaporation source to the substrate. Based on the time-dependent concentration of organic molecules obtained from their fluorescence intensity near the substrate, we find that carrier gas transport is accurately described by Poiseuille flow. The interplay between convective and diffusive forces gives rise to dispersion of organic molecules in the carrier gas, resulting in the development of plug flow as described by Taylor-Aris theory. Retention of molecules in chamber dead volumes delays transport and introduces tailing of the concentration transients. Our study indicates how OVPD system design and operating conditions can be optimized to limit the duration of transport transients, ultimately leading to precise control over the growth of complex multilayer thin film structures.

  17. Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of OH in the exhaust of a bi-propellant thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Phillip H.; Clemens, N. T.; Makel, D. B.

    1992-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of the hydroxyl radical has been performed on the flow produced by the exhaust of a subscale H2/O2 fueled bi-propellant rocket engine. Measurements were made to test the feasibility of OH (0,0) and (3,0) excitation strategies by using injection seeded XeCl and KrF excimer lasers, respectively. The flow is produced with hydrogen and oxygen reacting at a combustor chamber pressure of 5 atm which then exhausts to the ambient. The hydroxyl concentration in the exhaust flow is approximately 8 percent. Fluorescence images obtained by pumping the Q1(3) transition in the (0,0) band exhibited very high signals but also showed the effect of laser beam absorption. To obtain images when pumping the P1(8) transition in the (3,0) band it was necessary to use exceptionally fast imaging optics and unacceptably high intensifier gains. The result was single-shot images which displayed a signal-to-noise ratio of order unity or less when measured on a per pixel basis.

  18. Characterisation of an inexpensive sonic spray ionisation source using laser-induced fluorescence imaging and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stindt, Arne; Warschat, Carsten; Bierstedt, Andreas; Panne, Ulrich; Riedel, Jens

    2014-01-01

    A commercially available airbrush gun as a new source for spray ionisation is presented. It is best operated employing moderate stagnation pressures, resulting in a sonic gas flow. A mass spectrometric investigation on the amino acid Lysine and several peptides reveals that this inexpensive approach results in reproducible mass spectra. The ion patterns strongly resemble the results from other studies obtained with custom-made sonic spray vaporisers. The patterns also resemble the mass spectra recorded with electrospray devices. For a better understanding of the vaporisation process, the mass spectrometry experiments are accompanied by laser-induced fluorescence experiments. Inverse Abel Transform of the obtained fluorescence maps allows the determination of the full three-dimensional distribution of the spray cone. Furthermore, via exploitation of the solvatochromism of the used dye the solvation-state distribution can be visualised. In addition, expansion parameters, such as droplet size and velocity, are obtained by laser stroboscopy. The experiments demonstrate that the analyte hardly desolvates throughout the expansion. This indicates a subsequent vaporisation of the residual solvent in the intermediate pressure region of the mass spectrometer. PMID:24881452

  19. Insitu measurements of laser-induced-fluorescence spectra of single atmospheric organic carbon aerosol particles for their partial classification. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnick, R. G.; Pan, Y.; Hill, S.; Rosen, J. M.; Chang, R. K.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosols are ubiquitous in the earth’s atmosphere. Within the last two decades, the importance of organic carbon aerosols (OCAs) has been widely recognized. OCAs have both natural and anthropogenic sources and have effects ranging from atmospheric radiative forcing to human health. Improved methods for measuring and classifying OCAs are needed for better understanding their sources, transformation, and fate. In this talk we focus on the use of a relatively new technique for characterization of single OCA particles in atmospheric aerosol: ultraviolet laser-induced-fluorescence (UV-LIF). UV-LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosols measured at multiple sites with different regional climate (Adelphi, MD, New Haven, CT, and Las Cruces, NM) are reported. A hierarchical clustering method was used to cluster (approximately 90%) of the single-particle UV-LIF spectra into 8-10 groups (clusters). Some of these clusters have spectra that are similar to spectra of some important classes of atmospheric aerosol, such as humic/fulvic acids and humic-like substances, bacteria, cellulose, marine aerosol, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The most highly populated clusters, and some of the less populated ones, appear at all sites. On average, spectra characteristic of humic/fulvic acids and humic-like-substances (HULIS) comprise 28-43% of fluorescent particles at all three sites; whereas cellulose-like spectra contribute only 1-3%.

  20. Determination of flue gas alkali concentrations in fluidized-bed coal combustion by excimer-laser-induced fragmentation fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Hartinger, K.T.; Monkhouse, P.B.; Wolfrum, J.; Baumann, H.; Bonn, B.

    1994-12-31

    Gas-phase sodium concentrations were measured for the first time in situ in the flue gas of a fluidized-bed reactor by the excimer-laser-induced fragmentation fluorescence (ELIF) technique. This method involves using ArF-excimer laser light at 193 nm to simultaneously photodissociate the alkali compounds of interest and excite electronically the alkali atoms formed. The resulting fluorescence from Na (3{sup 2}P) atoms can he readily detected at 589 nm. Measured signals were converted to absolute concentrations using a calibration system that monitors alkali compounds under known conditions of temperature, pressure, and composition and rising the same optical setup as at the reactor. Several different coals were investigated under a specific set of reactor conditions at total pressures close to 1 bar. Sodium concentrations ranging from the sub-ppb region to 20 ppb were obtained, and a detection limit for sodium of 0.1 ppb under the present conditions was estimated. Over the course of the reactor program, contrasting concentration histories were observed for the two lignites and the hard coal investigated. In particular, significantly higher sodium concentrations were found for the hard coal, consistent with both the higher chlorine and sodium contents determined in the corresponding coal analysis.

  1. Analysis of picosecond laser induced fluorescence phenomena in photosynthetic membranes utilizing a master equation approach.

    PubMed Central

    Paillotin, G; Swenberg, C E; Breton, J; Geacintov, N E

    1979-01-01

    A Pauli master equation is formulated and solved to describe the fluorescence quantum yield, phi, and the fluorescence temporal decay curves. F(t), obtained in picosecond laser excitation experiments of photosynthetic systems. It is assumed that the lowering of phi with increasing pulse intensity is due to bimolecular singlet exciton annihilation processes which compete with the monomolecular exciton decay processes; Poisson statistics are taken into account. Calculated curves of phi as a function of the number of photon hits per domain are compared with experimental data, and it is concluded that these domains contain at least two to four connected photosynthetic units (depending on the temperature), where each photosynthetic unit is assumed to contain approximately 300 pigment molecules. It is shown that under conditions of high excitation intensities, the fluorescence decays approximately according to the (time)1/2 law. PMID:262402

  2. Simultaneous Raman scattering and laser-induced fluorescence for multispecies imaging in turbulent flames.

    PubMed

    Schefer, R W; Namazian, M; Kelly, J

    1991-06-01

    A multispecies imaging technique for single-shot, simultaneous measurement of the OH, CH, and CH(4) concentrations in turbulent nonpremixed flames is described. A unique aspect of the system is the use of a two-wavelength multipass cell to form both a visible and a UV laser sheet. The UV beam is used to excite fluorescence in the OH molecule, while Raman scattering from CH(4) molecules and fluorescence induced in CH is achieved by using the visible beam. The visible and UV lasers are operated simultaneously, and the resulting signals are recorded by two vidicon cameras. The sheet intensity provided by the multipass cell is sufficient to saturate the OH transition, which makes single-shot, laser-saturated fluorescence imaging measurements possible. PMID:19776809

  3. Simultaneous Raman scattering and laser-induced fluorescence for multispecies imaging in turbulent flames

    SciTech Connect

    Schefer, R.W.; Namazian, M.; Kelly, J. )

    1991-06-01

    A multispecies imaging technique for single-shot, simultaneous measurement of the OH, CH, and CH{sub 4} concentrations in turbulent nonpremixed flames is described. A unique aspect of the system is the use of a two-wavelength multipass cell to form both a visible and a UV laser sheet. The UV beam is used to excite fluorescence in the OH molecule, while Raman scattering from CH{sub 4} molecules and fluorescence induced in CH is achieved by using the visible beam. The visible and UV lasers are operated simultaneously, and the resulting signals are recorded by two vidicon cameras. The sheet intensity provided by the multipass cell is sufficient to saturate the OH transition, which makes single-shot, laser-saturated fluorescence imaging measurements possible.

  4. In situ monitoring of ocean chlorophyll via laser-induced fluorescence backscattering through an optical fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Cowles, T.J.; Moum, J.N.; Desiderio, R.A.; Angel, S.M.

    1989-02-01

    The first seagoing test of a prototype laser/fiber-optic system for in situ detection of ocean chlorophyll fluorescence is described. Radiation at 488 nm originating from a shipboard argon laser was transmitted through 20 of 200-..mu..m core optical fiber to the distal tip mounted on the microstructure profiler, the Rapid Sampling Vertical Profiler. The backscattered fluorescence emission signal was collected through the same fiber and processed on board ship. A series of measurements indicated that (1) successful isolation of ship-induced vibrations could be achieved using our optical bench framework to maintain optical alignments; (2) ambient chlorophyll concentrations could be detected in situ; (3) a Raman scattering signal from water could also be detected and should provide an internal standard against which chlorophyll fluorescence may be calibrated.

  5. Laser induced fluorescence in algae: A new technique for remote detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, E. J.; Hickman, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of the absorption and fluorescence spectra were obtained for four various types of marine and fresh water algae using a pulsed N2/Ne dye laser as the source of excitation. The absorption maxima for the algae ranged from 420 to 675 nm, while their fluorescent spectra ranged from 580 to 685 nm. It appears feasible that various algal species can be identified by detection of their fluorescent signatures using a tunable laser as the excitation source. However, if one is concerned only with detection of chlorophyll a, the optimum excitation is approximately 600 + 50 nm while detection is at 685 nm. An analysis of both calculations and laboratory results indicates that it should be feasible to measure chlorophyll a in concentrations as low as 1.0 mg/m3 using a 100 kW peak pulsed laser from an altitude of 500 meters.

  6. Analysis of picosecond laser induced fluorescence phenomena in photosynthetic membranes utilizing a master equation approach.

    PubMed

    Paillotin, G; Swenberg, C E; Breton, J; Geacintov, N E

    1979-03-01

    A Pauli master equation is formulated and solved to describe the fluorescence quantum yield, phi, and the fluorescence temporal decay curves. F(t), obtained in picosecond laser excitation experiments of photosynthetic systems. It is assumed that the lowering of phi with increasing pulse intensity is due to bimolecular singlet exciton annihilation processes which compete with the monomolecular exciton decay processes; Poisson statistics are taken into account. Calculated curves of phi as a function of the number of photon hits per domain are compared with experimental data, and it is concluded that these domains contain at least two to four connected photosynthetic units (depending on the temperature), where each photosynthetic unit is assumed to contain approximately 300 pigment molecules. It is shown that under conditions of high excitation intensities, the fluorescence decays approximately according to the (time)1/2 law. PMID:262402

  7. Studies on the effect of mobile phone radiation on DNA using laser induced fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnu, K.; Nithyaja, B.; Pradeep, C.; Sujith, R.; Mohanan, P.; Nampoori, V. P. N.

    2011-11-01

    In the present study we have investigated the effect of mobile phone radiation on deoxyribonucleic acid by using fluorescence technique. Absorption spectra shows increase in absorption of DNA after exposure to radiation from mobile phone with different SAR values and microwave frequency which give information about unwinding of the DNA double strand. Fluorescence intensity of dye doped DNA solution is getting reduced suggesting that the absorbed energy is used for unwinding of double strand of DNA after irradiating with microwave radiation. Unwinding of the DNA is very sensitive to power of the microwave radiation.

  8. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of the Ca dimer deposited on helium and mixed helium/xenon clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Gaveau, Marc-André; Pothier, Christophe; Briant, Marc; Mestdagh, Jean-Michel

    2014-12-09

    We study how the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of the calcium dimer deposited on pure helium clusters is modified by the addition of xenon atoms. In the wavelength range between 365 and 385 nm, the Ca dimer is excited from its ground state up to two excited electronic states leading to its photodissociation in Ca({sup 1}P)+Ca({sup 1}S): this process is monitored by recording the Ca({sup 1}P) fluorescence at 422.7nm. One of these electronic states of Ca{sub 2} is a diexcited one correlating to the Ca(4s4p{sup 3}P(+Ca(4s3d{sup 3}D), the other one is a repulsive state correlating to the Ca(4s4p1P)+Ca(4s21S) asymptote, accounting for the dissociation of Ca{sub 2} and the observation of the subsequent Ca({sup 1}P) emission. On pure helium clusters, the fluorescence exhibits the calcium atomic resonance line Ca({sup 1}S←{sup 1}P) at 422.7 nm (23652 cm{sup −1}) assigned to ejected calcium, and a narrow red sided band corresponding to calcium that remains solvated on the helium cluster. When adding xenon atoms to the helium clusters, the intensity of these two features decreases and a new spectral band appears on the red side of calcium resonance line; the intensity and the red shift of this component increase along with the xenon quantity deposited on the helium cluster: it is assigned to the emission of Ca({sup 1}P) associated with the small xenon aggregate embedded inside the helium cluster.

  9. Characterisation of an inlet pre-injector laser induced fluorescence instrument for the measurement of ambient hydroxyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novelli, A.; Hens, K.; Tatum Ernest, C.; Kubistin, D.; Regelin, E.; Elste, T.; Plass-Dülmer, C.; Martinez, M.; Lelieveld, J.; Harder, H.

    2014-01-01

    Ambient measurements of hydroxyl radicals (OH) are challenging due to a high reactivity and consequently low concentration. The importance of OH as an atmospheric oxidant has resulted in a sustained effort leading to the development of a number of analytical techniques. Recent work has indicated that the laser-induced fluorescence of the OH molecules method based on the fluorescence assay by gas expansion technique (LIF-FAGE) for the measurement of atmospheric OH in some environments may be influenced by artificial OH generated within the instrument, and a chemical method to remove this interference was implemented in a LIF-FAGE system by Mao et al. (2012). We have applied this method to our LIF-FAGE HORUS (HydrOxyl Radical Measurement Unit based on fluorescence Spectroscopy) system, and developed and deployed an inlet pre-injector (IPI) to determine the chemical zero level in the instrument via scavenging the ambient OH radical. We describe and characterise this technique in addition to its application at field sites in forested locations in Finland, Spain, and Germany. Ambient measurements show that OH generated within the HORUS instrument is a non-negligible fraction of the total OH signal, which can comprise 30% to 80% during the day and 60% to 100% during the night. The contribution of the background OH varied greatly between measurement sites and was likely related to the type and concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present at each particular location. Two inter-comparisons in contrasting environments between the HORUS instrument and two different chemical ionisation mass spectrometers (CIMS) are described to demonstrate the efficacy of the inlet-pre-injector and the necessity of the chemical zeroing method in such environments.

  10. Characterisation of an inlet pre-injector laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the measurement of atmospheric hydroxyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novelli, A.; Hens, K.; Tatum Ernest, C.; Kubistin, D.; Regelin, E.; Elste, T.; Plass-Dülmer, C.; Martinez, M.; Lelieveld, J.; Harder, H.

    2014-10-01

    Atmospheric measurements of hydroxyl radicals (OH) are challenging due to a high reactivity and consequently low concentration. The importance of OH as an atmospheric oxidant has motivated a sustained effort leading to the development of a number of highly sensitive analytical techniques. Recent work has indicated that the laser-induced fluorescence of the OH molecules method based on the fluorescence assay by gas expansion technique (LIF-FAGE) for the measurement of atmospheric OH in some environments may be influenced by artificial OH generated within the instrument, and a chemical method to remove this interference was implemented in a LIF-FAGE system by Mao et al. (2012). While it is not clear whether other LIF-FAGE instruments suffer from the same interference, we have applied this method to our LIF-FAGE HORUS (Hydroxyl Radical Measurement Unit based on fluorescence Spectroscopy) system, and developed and deployed an inlet pre-injector (IPI) to determine the chemical zero level in the instrument via scavenging the ambient OH radical. We describe and characterise this technique in addition to its application at field sites in forested locations in Finland, Spain and Germany. Ambient measurements show that OH generated within the HORUS instrument is a non-negligible fraction of the total OH signal, which can comprise 30 to 80% during daytime and 60 to 100% during the night. The contribution of the background OH varied greatly between measurement sites and was likely related to the type and concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present at each particular location. Two inter-comparisons in contrasting environments between the HORUS instrument and two different chemical ionisation mass spectrometers (CIMS) are described to demonstrate the efficacy of IPI and the necessity of the chemical zeroing method for our LIF-FAGE instrument in such environments.

  11. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of the Ca Dimer Deposited on Helium and Mixed Helium/Argon Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Masson, A.; Briant, M.; Mestdagh, J. M.; Gaveau, M. A.

    2011-05-20

    We study the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of the calcium dimer deposited on helium and mixed helium/argon clusters. In the wavelength range between 365 and 385 nm, the Ca dimer is excited from its ground state up to two excited electronic states leading to its photodissociation in Ca({sup 1}P)+Ca({sup 1}S): this process is monitored by recording the Ca({sup 1}P) fluorescence about 422.7 nm. These electronic excited states of Ca{sub 2} are respectively a diexcited one correlating to the Ca(4s 4p {sup 3}P)+Ca(4s 3d {sup 3}D) and a repulsive one correlating diabatically to the Ca(4s 4p {sup 1}P)+Ca(4s{sup 2} {sup 1}S) asymptote, accounting for the dissociation of Ca{sub 2} and the observation of the subsequent Ca({sup 1}P) emission. On pure helium clusters, the fluorescence consists of the calcium atomic resonance line Ca({sup 1}S(leftarrow){sup 1}P) at 422.7 nm (23652 cm{sup -1}) assigned to ejected calcium, and a narrow red sided band corresponding to calcium that remains solvated on the helium cluster. Interestingly, the branching ratio to the ejection of Ca({sup 1}P) increases along with the wavelength of the excitation photon, i.e. when its energy decreases. This is contrary to what is intuitively expected and to what is really found on pure argon clusters. On mixed helium/argon clusters, a new spectral band appears on the red side of the calcium resonance line; the intensity and the red shift of this component increase along with the argon quantity deposited on the helium cluster: it is assigned to the emission of Ca({sup 1}P) associated with the small argon aggregate embedded inside the helium cluster.

  12. Effect of polarization and geometric factors on quantitative laser-induced fluorescence- to-Raman intensity ratios of water samples and a new calibration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaprakasam, Vasanthi; Killinger, Dennis K.

    2003-09-01

    A 266-nm laser-induced fluorescence system was used to study the effect of polarization of the excitation source and geometry of the collection optics on the ratio of the signal from a fluorescence standard, quinine sulfate, and the Raman scatter from water. Although the ratio is sometimes considered to be a constant and is used for intersystem comparisons, our studies showed that the Raman signal and, thus, the ratio can vary by a factor of up to 3.6. These experimental values agree with previous studies by others involving gas and flame Raman spectroscopy and suggest a new calibration method for intersystem comparison of different fluorescence systems.

  13. Imaging magnetic scalar potentials by laser-induced fluorescence from bright and dark atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fescenko, I.; Weis, A.

    2014-06-01

    We present a spectroscopic method for mapping two-dimensional distributions of magnetic field strengths (magnetic scalar potential lines) using charge-coupled device (CCD) recordings of the fluorescence patterns emitted by spin-polarized Cs vapour in a buffer gas exposed to inhomogeneous magnetic fields. The method relies on the position-selective destruction of spin polarization by magnetic resonances induced by multi-component oscillating magnetic fields, such that magnetic potential lines can be directly detected by the CCD camera. We also present a generic algebraic model allowing for the calculation of the fluorescence patterns and find excellent agreement with the experimental observations for three distinct inhomogeneous field topologies. The spatial resolution obtained with these proof-of-principle experiments is of the order of 1 mm. A substantial increase of spatial and magnetic field resolution is expected by deploying the method in a magnetically shielded environment.

  14. Environmental effects on laser-induced fluorescence spectra of natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vodacek, Anthony; Philpot, William D.

    1987-01-01

    Laser fluorosensing can be used to monitor dissolved organic carbon (DOC), but analysis of the data can be hindered by several environmental phenomena. These phenomena include attenuation of the laser beam and differential attenuation of the fluorescence by the water column, variability in the molecular weight composition of the DOC, and temperature, pH, and metal ion effects on DOC fluorescence. These factors are discussed in terms of their effect on laboratory and remote field data analysis. Experimental results are provided. Analysis of fluorosensor data of DOC may be improved by compensating for the environmental factors. An improved methodology is discussed, and a suggestion is made for indirect monitoring of pH and metal ion concentration.

  15. Early detection of the carious conditions by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Ekaterina G.; Uzunov, Tzonko T.; Gisbreht, Alexander I.; Avramov, Lachezar A.

    2003-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the natural intrinsic fluorescence in sound and diseased human teeth and the correspondence of such autofluorescence to the stages of the dental lesions. Direct visual examination was used for comparison. Different stages of caries lesions are detected, by using a nitrogen laser (337 nm), light-emitting diode (LED) (440 nm) and argon laser (488 nm). Besides caries, there were investigated samples of the fluorosa dentis and odontolithiasis, for better determination of the influence of other teeth pathologies over the teeth autofluorescence spectra. There was observed a significant decrease in the intensity of the autofluorescence signal in the case of caries. The carious lesions revealed characteristic emission of endogenous fluorophores with fluorescence band in the red spectral region. Healthy hard dental tissue exhibited no emission bands in the red. An algorithm for early diagnosis is created on the basis of collected significant statistical material.

  16. Laser-induced fluorescence technique for velocity field measurements in subsonic gas flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiller, B.; Mcdaniel, J. C.; Rea, E. C., Jr.; Hanson, R. K.

    1983-01-01

    A nonintrusive optical technique is reported for multiple-point velocity measurements in subsonic flows. The technique is based on the detection of fluorescence from a Doppler-shifted absorption line of seeded iodine molecules excited at a laser frequency fixed in the wing of the line. Counterpropagating laser sheets are used to illuminate the flow, in the present case a nitrogen round jet, thereby eliminating the need for an unshifted reference signal. The fluorescence is detected simultaneously at 10,000 points in a plane of the flow using a 100 x 100 element photodiode-array camera. The velocity at each point is computed from four successive camera frames, each recorded with a different beam direction. The measured mean velocities between 5 and 50 m/sec agree well with data from the literature.

  17. Laser-induced fluorescence in doped metal oxide planar waveguides deposited from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, N.J.; Exarhos, G.J. ); Wood, S.M. . Shock Dynamics Lab.)

    1991-12-01

    An aqueous route to the deposition of complex metal oxide films is based upton the complexation of the corresponding metal nitrate salts by glycine, followed by spin-casting the concentrated solution onto silica substrates. The presence of glycine serves to frustrate precipitation and leads to the formation of a glassy matrix through which metal cations are homogeneously dispersed. Subsequent heating of coated substrates initiates an oxidation-reduction reaction which removes the organic matrix and residual nitrate leaving behind a film of the desired oxide composition. Using this method, ruby (Cr:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and Sm:YAG (Sm:Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}) films on the order of 150 nm thick have been deposited. The respective phase have been confirmed by XRD data and from the measured fluorescence spectra. The red fluorescence exhibited by these materials under 488 nm excitation is dependent upon the ambient temperature and pressure. A marked shift in wavelength is observed as a function of increasing pressure. Ruby also exhibits a temperature dependent wavelength shift in contrast to Sm:YAG where a negligible shift is seen to temperatures near 1200 K. Fluorescence lifetimes of both materials exhibit a temperature dependence which varies with dopant concentration. This work suggests the possible application of these films as pressure-temperature sensors in a planar waveguide configuration or as a coating material for optical fibers. Details of the deposition process will be reviewed and the fluorescence response of both types of films will be summarized. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Miscible and immiscible experiments on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability using planar laser induced fluorescence visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokler, Matthew; Roberts, Michael; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2013-11-01

    Incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments are presented in which two stratified liquids having Atwood number of 0.2 are accelerated in a vertical linear induction motor driven drop tower. A test sled having only vertical freedom of motion contains the experiment tank and visualization equipment. The sled is positioned at the top of the tower within the linear induction motors and accelerated downward causing the initially stable interface to be unstable and allowing the Rayleigh-Taylor instability to develop. Forced and unforced experiments are conducted using both immiscible and miscible liquid combinations. Forced initial perturbations are produced by vertically oscillating the test sled prior to the start of acceleration. The interface is visualized using a 445 nm laser light source that illuminates a fluorescent dye mixed in one of the fluids. The resulting fluorescent images are recorded using a monochromatic high speed video camera. The laser beam is synchronously swept across the fluorescent fluid, at the frame rate of the camera, exposing a single plane of the interface allowing for the measurement of spike and bubble growth. Comparisons between miscible and immiscible mixing layer distributions are made from the resulting interface concentration profiles.

  19. Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) as a Remote Sensing Tool: A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Kim, M. S.; Mulchi, C. L.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; McMurtrey, J.; Corp, L.

    1998-01-01

    Vegetational changes are primary indicators of the present and future ecological status of the globe. These are changes which not only impact upon the primary productivity, but the total of the biogeochemical processes occurring on the planet. The impacts of global climatic and other environmental changes on vegetation must be monitored by some means in order to develop models which will allow us to predict long term effects. Large scale monitoring is now possible only with remote sensing systems, primarily passive reflectance, obtained by the use of satellite and aircraft platforms. However, passive reflectance techniques at this time are limited in their ability to detect subtle changes in the concentration and oxidation states of the many compounds involved in the light reactions of photosynthesis. Knowledge of these changes we consider to be fundamental in the remote assessment of both the rate and efficiency of photosynthesis and also the early detection of stress damage. The above factors pointed to the desirability of a sensing technique with the sensitivity and specificity necessary for detecting and quantifying those biological entities involved in photosynthesis. Another optical technique for vegetation monitoring is fluorescence. Previously, the lack of adequate excitation light sources and detector technologies have limited the use of fluorescence on intact plant leaves in the field. It is only recently with the advent of lasers with short pulse duration and advanced detector technologies that fluorescence measurements in the remote mode have become possible in the presence of ambient light.

  20. Concentration Measurements in a Cold Flow Model Annular Combustor Using Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Douglas C.

    1996-01-01

    A nonintrusive concentration measurement method is developed for determining the concentration distribution in a complex flow field. The measurement method consists of marking a liquid flow with a water soluble fluorescent dye. The dye is excited by a two dimensional sheet of laser light. The fluorescent intensity is shown to be proportional to the relative concentration level. The fluorescent field is recorded on a video cassette recorder through a video camera. The recorded images are analyzed with image processing hardware and software to obtain intensity levels. Mean and root mean square (rms) values are calculated from these intensity levels. The method is tested on a single round turbulent jet because previous concentration measurements have been made on this configuration by other investigators. The previous results were used to comparison to qualify the current method. These comparisons showed that this method provides satisfactory results. 'Me concentration measurement system was used to measure the concentrations in the complex flow field of a model gas turbine annular combustor. The model annular combustor consists of opposing primary jets and an annular jet which discharges perpendicular to the primary jets. The mixing between the different jet flows can be visualized from the calculated mean and rms profiles. Concentration field visualization images obtained from the processing provide further qualitative information about the flow field.

  1. Observation of nanosecond laser induced fluorescence of in vitro seawater phytoplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Bensky, Thomas J.; Clemo, Lisa; Gilbert, Chris; Neff, Bryan; Moline, Mark A.; Rohan, Dov

    2008-08-01

    Seawater has been irradiated using a train of 70 ns flashes from a 440 nm laser source. This wavelength is on resonance with the blue absorption peak of Chlorophyll pigment associated with the photosystem of in vitro phytoplankton. The resulting fluorescence at 685 nm is instantaneously recorded during each laser pulse using a streak camera. Delayed fluorescence is observed, yielding clues about initiation of the photosynthetic process on a nanosecond time scale. Further data processing allows for determination of the functional absorption cross section, found to be 0.0095 ?{sup 2}, which is the first reporting of this number for in vitro phytoplankton. Unlike other flash-pump studies of Chlorophyll, using a LED or flashlamp-based sources, the short laser pulse used here does not reveal any pulse-to-pulse hysteresis (i.e., variable fluorescence), indicating that the laser pulses used here are not able to drive the photosynthetic process to completion. This is attributed to competition from a back reaction between the photoexcited photosystem II and the intermediate electron acceptor. The significance of this work as a new type of deployable ocean fluorimeter is discussed, and it is believed the apparatus will have applications in thin-layer phytoplankton research.

  2. Planar Rayleigh scattering and laser-induced fluorescence for visualization of a hot, Mach 2 annular air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balla, R. Jeffrey

    1994-10-01

    Planar Rayleigh scattering (PRS) and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) were used to investigate the vitiated air component of a coaxial hydrogen/vitiated air nonpremixed turbulent jet flame that is ejected at a Mach number of 2. All experiments were performed with a xenon chloride tunable excimer laser. Planar information for both techniques was obtained using laser sheets 6 cm high, 5 cm wide, and 300 micron thick. In this flow field, the effective Rayleigh cross section of the components in the vitiated air was assumed to be independent of composition. Therefore, the PRS technique produced signals which were proportional to total density. When the flow field was assumed to be at a known and uniform pressure, the PRS signal data for the vitiated air could be converted to temperature information. Also, PLIF images were generated by probing the OH molecule. These images contain striation patterns attributed to small localized instantaneous temperature nonuniformities. The results from the PLIF and PRS techniques were used to show that this flow field contains a nongaseous component, most likely liquid water that can be reduced by increasing the settling chamber wall temperature.

  3. Simultaneous measurements of velocity, temperature, and pressure using rapid CW wavelength-modulation laser-induced fluorescence of OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. Y.; Battles, B. E.; Hanson, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    In high speed flows, laser induced fluorescence (LIF) on Doppler shifted transitions is an attractive technique for velocity measurement. LIF velocimetry was applied to combined single-point measurements of velocity, temperature, and pressure and 2-D imaging of velocity and pressure. Prior to recent research using NO, LIF velocimetry in combustion related flows relied largely on the use of seed molecules. Simultaneous, single-point LIF measurements is reported of velocity, temperature, and pressure using the naturally occurring combustion species OH. This experiment is an extension of earlier research in which a modified ring dye laser was used to make time resolved temperature measurements behind reflected shock waves by using OH absorption an in postflame gases by using OH LIF. A pair of fused-silica rhombs mounted on a single galvanonmeter in an intracavity-doubled Spectra-Physics 380 ring laser permit the UV output to be swept continuously over a few wave numbers at an effective frequency of 3kHz.

  4. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Atomic Oxygen Measurements in Short Pulse Discharges by Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempert, Walter; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Mintusov, Eugene; Jiang, Naibo; Adamovich, Igor

    2007-10-01

    Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) is used to measure time-dependent absolute oxygen atom concentrations in O2/He, O2/N2, and CH4/air plasmas produced with a 20 nanosecond duration, 20 kV pulsed discharge at 10 Hz repetition rate. Xenon calibrated spectra show that a single discharge pulse creates initial oxygen dissociation fraction of ˜0.0005 for air like mixtures at 40-60 torr total pressure. Peak O atom concentration is a factor of approximately two lower in fuel lean (φ=0.5) methane/air mixtures. In helium buffer, the initially formed atomic oxygen decays monotonically, with decay time consistent with formation of ozone. In all nitrogen containing mixtures, atomic oxygen concentrations are found to initially increase, for time scales on the order of 10-100 microseconds, due presumably to additional O2 dissociation caused by collisions with electronically excited nitrogen. Further evidence of the role of metastable N2 is demonstrated from time-dependent N2 2^nd Positive and NO Gamma band emission spectroscopy. Comparisons with modeling predictions show qualitative, but not quantitative, agreement with the experimental data.

  5. Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements of the Ion Velocity Distribution in the H6 Hall Thruster Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durot, Christopher; Gallimore, Alec

    2013-10-01

    We developed a technique to recover time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence signals from strong background emission in plasma sources that have a relatively constant spectrum of oscillations in steady-state operation but are not periodically pulsed, such as Hall thrusters. The system was previously validated using a hollow cathode plasma source with forced discharge current oscillations. We present the first results using the new technique to capture oscillations in a Hall thruster. The ion velocity distribution function in the plume of the H6 Hall thruster is interrogated during breathing mode oscillations, which are characterized by an oscillating depletion and replenishment of neutrals at a frequency of 10-25 kHz. We use laser modulation on the order of megahertz, well above the time scale of interest (about 0.1 ms). A combination of band-pass filtering, phase-sensitive detection (with a time constant on the order of microseconds), and averaging over transfer functions is used to recover the signal. This technique has advantages such as a shorter dwell time than other techniques and the lack of a need for triggering averaging in the time domain. The ultimate bandwidth of the system that we implemented is approximately 1 MHz, limited by the speed of the AOM and signal photon rate collected. This work was supported by AFOSR and AFRL through the MACEEP center of excellence grant number FA9550-09-1-0695.

  6. Aircraft-borne, laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the in situ detection of hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wennberg, P. O.; Cohen, R. C.; Hazen, N. L.; Lapson, L. B.; Allen, N. T.; Hanisco, T. F.; Oliver, J. F.; Lanham, N. W.; Demusz, J. N.; Anderson, J. G.

    1994-01-01

    The odd-hydrogen radicals OH and HO2 are central to most of the gas-phase chemical transformations that occur in the atmosphere. Of particular interest is the role that these species play in controlling the concentration of stratospheric ozone. This paper describes an instrument that measures both of these species at volume mixing ratios below one part in 10(exp 14) in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The hydroxyl radical (OH) is measured by laser induced fluorescence at 309 nm. Tunable UV light is used to pump OH to the first electric state near 282 nm. the laser light is produced by a high-repetition rate pulsed dye-laser powered with all solid-state pump lasers. HO2 is measured as OH after gas-phase titration with nitric oxide. Measurements aboard a NASA ER-2 aircraft demonstrate the capability of this instrument to perform reliably with very high signal-to-noise ratios (greater than 30) achieved in short integration times (less than 20 sec).

  7. Planar Rayleigh scattering and laser-induced fluorescence for visualization of a hot, Mach 2 annular air jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balla, R. Jeffrey

    1994-01-01

    Planar Rayleigh scattering (PRS) and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) were used to investigate the vitiated air component of a coaxial hydrogen/vitiated air nonpremixed turbulent jet flame that is ejected at a Mach number of 2. All experiments were performed with a xenon chloride tunable excimer laser. Planar information for both techniques was obtained using laser sheets 6 cm high, 5 cm wide, and 300 micron thick. In this flow field, the effective Rayleigh cross section of the components in the vitiated air was assumed to be independent of composition. Therefore, the PRS technique produced signals which were proportional to total density. When the flow field was assumed to be at a known and uniform pressure, the PRS signal data for the vitiated air could be converted to temperature information. Also, PLIF images were generated by probing the OH molecule. These images contain striation patterns attributed to small localized instantaneous temperature nonuniformities. The results from the PLIF and PRS techniques were used to show that this flow field contains a nongaseous component, most likely liquid water that can be reduced by increasing the settling chamber wall temperature.

  8. Investigation of optical fibers for gas-phase, ultraviolet laser-induced-fluorescence (UV-LIF) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Paul S; Kulatilaka, Waruna D; Jiang, Naibo; Gord, James R; Roy, Sukesh

    2012-06-20

    We investigate the feasibility of transmitting high-power, ultraviolet (UV) laser pulses through long optical fibers for laser-induced-fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy of the hydroxyl radical (OH) and nitric oxide (NO) in reacting and non-reacting flows. The fundamental transmission characteristics of nanosecond (ns)-duration laser pulses are studied at wavelengths of 283 nm (OH excitation) and 226 nm (NO excitation) for state-of-the-art, commercial UV-grade fibers. It is verified experimentally that selected fibers are capable of transmitting sufficient UV pulse energy for single-laser-shot LIF measurements. The homogeneous output-beam profile resulting from propagation through a long multimode fiber is ideal for two-dimensional planar-LIF (PLIF) imaging. A fiber-coupled UV-LIF system employing a 6 m long launch fiber is developed for probing OH and NO. Single-laser-shot OH- and NO-PLIF images are obtained in a premixed flame and in a room-temperature NO-seeded N(2) jet, respectively. Effects on LIF excitation lineshapes resulting from delivering intense UV laser pulses through long fibers are also investigated. Proof-of-concept measurements demonstrated in the current work show significant promise for fiber-coupled UV-LIF spectroscopy in harsh diagnostic environments such as gas-turbine test beds. PMID:22722279

  9. A two-photon laser-induced fluorescence field instrument for ground-based and airborne measurements of atmospheric NO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, J. D.; Rodgers, M. O.; Sandholm, S. T.; Kesheng, S.; Davis, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reports on a new two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (TP-LIF) sensor capable of making routine measurements at the few parts per trillion volume level. This direct spectroscopic detection method has been demonstrated to be a reliable instrument while performing both on the ground and in the air. As currently designed it is unique in being 'signal' rather than 'signal-to-noise' limited. The latter characteristic enables the TP-LIF sensor to make atmospheric measurements of NO under environmental conditions that might normally be considered unsuitable for a laser technique. These include clouds, rain, and, in general, high-atmospheric-aerosol loading conditions. Of special interest is the insensitivity of the TP-LIF NO instrument to changes in pressure while operating in the troposphere. This characteristic has enabled this sensor to be used to record real-time altitude profiles of NO. Future improvements should make possible two measurement opportunities: (1) NO flux measurements via the airborne eddy-correlation method and (2) nitrogen isotopic distribution measurements (e.g., (N-15)(0-16) versus (N-14)(0-16) as a means of identifying specific NO(x) sources.

  10. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements of argon and xenon ion velocities near the sheath boundary in 3 ion species plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, Chi-Shung; Hershkowitz, Noah; Severn, Greg; Baalrud, Scott D.

    2016-05-01

    The Bohm sheath criterion is studied with laser-induced fluorescence in three ion species plasmas using two tunable diode lasers. Krypton is added to a low pressure unmagnetized DC hot filament discharge in a mixture of argon and xenon gas confined by surface multi-dipole magnetic fields. The argon and xenon ion velocity distribution functions are measured at the sheath-presheath boundary near a negatively biased boundary plate. The potential structures of the plasma sheath and presheath are measured by an emissive probe. Results are compared with previous experiments with Ar-Xe plasmas, where the two ion species were observed to reach the sheath edge at nearly the same speed. This speed was the ion sound speed of the system, which is consistent with the generalized Bohm criterion. In such two ion species plasmas, instability enhanced collisional friction was demonstrated [Hershkowitz et al., Phys. Plasmas 18(5), 057102 (2011).] to exist which accounted for the observed results. When three ion species are present, it is demonstrated under most circumstances the ions do not fall out of the plasma at their individual Bohm velocities. It is also shown that under most circumstances the ions do not fall out of the plasma at the system sound speed. These observations are also consistent with the presence of the instabilities.

  11. Two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurement of atomic oxygen density in an atmospheric pressure air plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, J.; Gogna, G. S.; Gaman, C.; Turner, M. M.; Daniels, S.

    2016-08-01

    Atomic oxygen number density [O] is measured in an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) using two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). Gas flow is fixed at 8 slpm, the RF power coupled into the plasma jet varied between 5 W and 20 W, and the resulting changes in atomic oxygen density measured. Photolysis of molecular oxygen is employed to allow in situ calibration of the TALIF system. During calibration, O2 photo-dissociation and two-photon excitation of the resulting oxygen atoms are achieved within the same laser pulse. The atomic oxygen density produced by photolysis is time varying and spatially non-uniform which needs to be corrected for to calibrate the TALIF system for measurement of atomic oxygen density in plasma. Knowledge of the laser pulse intensity I 0(t), wavelength, and focal spot size allows correction factors to be determined using a rate equation model. Atomic oxygen is used for calibration and measurement, so the laser intensity can be increased outside the TALIF quadratic laser power dependence region without affecting the calibration reliability as the laser power dependence will still be the same for both. The atomic O density results obtained are not directly benchmarked against other known density measurement techniques. The results show that the plasma jet atomic oxygen content increases as the RF power coupled into the plasma increases.

  12. A comparison of ion beam measurements by retarding field energy analyzer and laser induced fluorescence in helicon plasma devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gulbrandsen, N. Fredriksen, Å.; Carr, J.; Scime, E.

    2015-03-15

    Both Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) and Retarding Field Energy Analyzers (RFEA) have been applied to the investigation of beams formed in inductively coupled helicon plasmas. While the LIF technique provides a direct measurement of the velocity distribution in the plasma, the RFEA measures ion flux as a function of a retarding potential. In this paper, we present a method to compare the two techniques, by converting the LIF velocity distribution to an equivalent of a RFEA measurement. We applied this method to compare new LIF and RFEA measurements in two different experiments; the Hot Helicon Experiment (HELIX) - Large Experiment on Instabilities and Anisotropies (LEIA) at West Virginia University and Njord at University of Tromsø. We find good agreement between beam energies of the two methods. In agreement with earlier observations, the RFEA is found to measure ion beams with densities too low for the LIF to resolve. In addition, we present measurements of the axial development of the ion beam in both experiments. Beam densities drop exponentially with distance from the source, both in LIF and RFEA measurements. The effective quenching cross section from LIF in LEIA is found to be σ{sub b,*}=4×10{sup −19} m{sup 2}, and the effective beam collisional cross sections by RFEA in Njord to be σ{sub b}=1.7×10{sup −18} m{sup 2}.

  13. Photodissociation dynamics of 2-chloro-6-nitrotoluene and nitrocyclopentane in gas phase: Laser-induced fluorescence detection of OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawade, Monali N.; Saha, Ankur; Upadhyaya, Hari P.; Kumar, Awadhesh; Naik, Prakash D.

    2014-10-01

    Photodissociation of 2-chloro-6-nitrotoluene (ClNT) at 193, 248 and 266 nm and nitrocyclopentane (NCP) at 193 nm leads to the formation of OH, as detected by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The nascent OH produced from the photolysis of ClNT at all the wavelengths is vibrationally cold, with the Boltzmann type rotational state distributions. However, the nascent OH product from NCP is in the ground and vibrationally excited states with the measured average relative population in ν″ = 1 to that in ν″ = 0 of 0.12 ± 0.03, and these levels are characterized by rotational temperatures of 650 ± 180 K and 1570 ± 90 K, respectively. The translational energy partitioned in the OH fragment has been measured for photodissociation of both ClNT and NCP. On the basis of both the experimental results and the ground state molecular orbital (MO) calculations, a plausible mechanism for the OH formation has been proposed.

  14. Determination of Gabapentin in Human Plasma and Urine by Capillary Electrophoresis with Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xia; Cai, Yuanli; Yan, Jin; Zhang, Lili; Wu, Di; Li, Hui

    2015-07-01

    A simple and reliable method based on capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection was developed for the analysis of the antiepileptic drug Gabapentin in human plasma and urine. 4-Chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan was used for precolumn derivatization of the drug. With an uncoated fused silica capillary (40.0 cm effective length, 50.2 cm total length and 75 μm internal diameter), optimal separation was achieved with 30 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate, 40 mM sodium borate (pH 10.25) and acetonitrile 10% (v/v) as running buffer. The applied voltage was 20 kV and the samples were injected by pressure (3.45 kPa × 3 s). The method was fully validated with regard to linear range, sensitivity, precision, limit of detection and limit of quantification in human plasma and urine samples. Linear ranges were 0.1-15 μg mL(-1) for plasma and urine. The intra- and interday precisions were ≤9.02 and 13.90%, respectively. The recoveries were 96.0-109.3% for plasma and 94.3-98.0% for urine. The method was successfully applied for the determination of Gabapentin in human plasma and urine. PMID:25352536

  15. Measuring OH and HO{sub 2} in the troposphere by laser-induced fluorescence at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.H.; Stevens, P.S.; Mather, J.H.

    1995-10-01

    The hydroxyl radical OH oxidizes many trace gases in the atmosphere. It initiates and then participates in chemical reactions that lead to such phenomena as photochemical smog, acid rain, and stratospheric ozone depletion. Because OH is so reactive, its volume mixing ratio is less than 1 part per trillion volume (pptv) throughout the troposphere. Its close chemical cousin, the hydroperoxyl radical HO{sub 2}, participates in many reactions as well. The authors have developed an instrument capable of measuring OH and HO{sub 2} by laser-induced fluorescence in a detection chamber at low pressure. This prototype instrument is able to detect about 1.4 X 10{sup 5} molecules cm{sup {minus}3} (0.005 pptv) of OH at the ground in a signal integration time of 30 s with negligible interferences. The absolute uncertainty is a factor of 1.5. This instrument is now being adapted to aircraft use for measurements throughout the troposphere. 25 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Heterogeneous processes in CF4/O2 plasmas probed using laser-induced fluorescence of CF2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, S. G.; Luckman, G.; Nieman, George C.; Colson, Steven D.

    1990-09-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence of CF2 is used to monitor heterogeneous processes in ≊300 mTorr CF4/O2 plasmas. CF2 is rapidly removed at fluorinated copper and silver surfaces in 13.56-MHz rf discharges as judged by a distinct dip in its spatial distribution. These metals, when employed as etch masks, are known to accelerate plasma etching of silicon, and the present results suggest catalytic dehalogenation of CF2 is involved in this process. In contrast, aluminum and silicon dioxide exhibit negligible reactivity with CF2, which suggests that aluminum masks will not appreciably accelerate silicon etching and that ground state CF2 does not efficiently etch silicon dioxide. Measurement of CF2 decay in a pulsed discharge coupled with direct laser sputtering of metal into the gas phase indicates the interaction between CF2 and the active metals is purely heterogeneous. Aluminum does, however, exhibit homogeneous reactivity with CF2. Redistribution of active metal by plasma sputtering readily occurs; silicon etch rates may also be enhanced by the metal's presence on the silicon surface. Polymers contribute CF2 to the plasma as they etch. The observation of an induction period suggests fluorination of the polymer surface is the first step in its degradation. Polymeric etch masks can therefore depress the silicon etch rate by removal of F atoms, the primary etchants.

  17. The measurement of tropospheric OH radicals by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy during the POPCORN Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofzumahaus, A.; Aschmutat, U.; Heßling, M.; Holland, F.; Ehhalt, D. H.

    A highly sensitive OH measurement instrument has been developed. It is based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection of OH using the A²Σ+v‧ = 0-X²Π v″ = 0 transition at 308.15 nm at low pressure. The LIF instrument detects OH directly and with high specificity, a fact that was demonstrated by recording laser excitation spectra (Q1(3), Q21(3) and P1(1) lines) of ambient OH. For high time resolution (typ. 60-100 s), the laser wavelength was modulated on-/off- resonance with the P1(1) line. Here, we report some of the OH measurements obtained by this technique during its first application in a tropospheric field campaign (“POPCORN”), which was conducted in August 1994 in a rural environment in the North-East of Germany. These include diurnal OH concentration profiles with maximum OH concentrations up to 1.4×107cm-3at noon. Minimum OH concentrations were measured in the morning and evening down to the detection limit of (3-6) × 105cm-3(SNR=2, measurement time 1 min.). During the day, OH fluctuations were observed on a time scale of minutes and hours. These were highly correlated to the flux of the solar UV radiation which is responsible for the primary OH production by photolysis.

  18. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements and kinetic analysis of Si atom formation in a rotating disk chemical vapor deposition reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, P.; Coltrin, M.E.; Breiland, W.G. )

    1994-10-06

    An extensive set of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of Si atoms during the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon from silane and disilane in a research rotating disk reactor are presented. The experimental results are compared in detail with predictions from a numerical model of CVD from silane and disilane that treats the fluid flow coupled to gas-phase and gas-surface chemistry. The comparisons showed that the unimolecular decomposition of SiH[sub 2] could not account for the observed gas-phase Si atom density profiles. The H[sub 3]SiSiH [leftrightarrow] Si + SiH[sub 4] and H[sub 3]SiSiH + SiH[sub 2] [leftrightarrow] Si + Si[sub 2]H[sub 6] reactions are proposed as the primary Si atom production routes. The model is in good agreement with the measured shapes of the Si atom profiles and the trends in Si atom density with susceptor temperature, pressure, and reactant gas mixture. 33 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Systematic Effects in Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurments of Ion Density and Temperature Caused by Optical Pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langin, Thomas; Strickler, Trevor; McQuillen, Patrick; Killian, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Ultracold neutral plasmas of strontium are generated by photoionizing laser-cooled atoms. The plasma evolution is probed by laser induced fluorescence (LIF) via the 5s2S1/2-5p2P1/2 ion transition. Spectra are obtained by recording LIF intensity at varying laser detunings. The ion temperature, T, is then measured by fitting a Voigt profile to obtain the Doppler width. However, for linearly (circularly) polarized light, 5p2P1/2 ions have a 7% (33%) chance of decaying to the dark metastable 5d 2D3/2 state (dark opposite spin state). Near resonance, where ions are more likely to scatter multiple photons during the LIF process, the observed signal will be depressed due to optical pumping. This causes an artificial broadening in the spectra and thus artificially high T measurements. Moreover, the loss of ions throughout the excitation process, if not corrected for, will result in artificially low density measurements. We have developed, and experimentally verified, a method for simulating the LIF process in order to determine the LIF-probe durations and intensities for which these effects becomes significant. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy (PHY-0714603), the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA9550-12-1-0267), the Department of Defense (NDSEG Fellowship), and Shell

  20. Simultaneous determination of amino acids in tea leaves by micellar electrokinetic chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jin; Cai, Yuanli; Wang, Yufei; Lin, Xia; Li, Hui

    2014-01-15

    A rapid and effective method of micellar electrokinetic chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection was developed for the simultaneous determination of amino acids in tea leaves. Pre-column derivatization of the analytes used 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan (NDB-Cl). Optimal separation was achieved at +20kV using an uncoated fused silica capillary (40.0cm effective length, 50.2cm total length, 75μm internal diameter), as well as 20mM sodium borate (pH 8.5), 20mM Brij 35, and acetonitrile 10% (v/v) as running buffers. Within 11min, 15 amino acids were separated completely. The optimized method demonstrated good linearity (r(2)⩾0.9990), precision (⩽6.65%), accuracy (85.50-112.74%), and sensitivity (0.1ng/mL-100ng/mL). The method successfully determined the quantity of amino acids in five different tea leaves; furthermore, theanine was identified as the most abundant amino acid in teas. The proposed method showed great potential in further investigations on the biofunctions of different tea samples. PMID:24054216

  1. Laser-induced fluorescence monitoring of higher alkanes production from pure methane using non-oxidative processes.

    PubMed

    Gondal, M A; Dastgeer, A; Yamani, Zain H; Arfaj, A; Ali, M A

    2003-02-01

    A novel method for the study of non-oxidative methane conversion process into higher value hydrocarbon and hydrogen has been invented. The method involves the multiphoton dissociation of methane under the influence of the high power pulsed ultraviolet laser radiation at 355 nm wavelength at room temperature (293 K) and standard pressure (1 atm). The products generated as a result of methane conversion like ethane, ethylene, propane, propylene and isobutane are analyzed using an online gas chromatograph while the other species such as CH, CH(2) and C(2)H(2), atomic and molecular hydrogen are characterized by real-time laser-induced fluorescence technique for the first time. A typical 7% conversion of methane into ethane has been achieved using 80 mJ of laser irradiation at 355 nm. The important features of this method are that it is non-oxidative, does not require any catalyst, high temperatures or pressures, which is normally the case in conventional techniques for methane conversion. PMID:18968911

  2. Determining eosin as a groundwater migration tracer by capillary electrophoresis/laser-induced fluorescence using a multiwavelength laser.

    PubMed

    Brumley, William C; Farley, John W

    2003-07-01

    Measurements for determining of the path of groundwater migration remain an important tool in the overall assessment of environmental processes and transport of pollutants. This paper examines a multiwavelength laser for the determination of eosin, a groundwater tracer, using capillary electrophoresis/laser-induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) at excitation wavelength 514.5 nm. Eosin was one of four dyes used in a study of adjacent resource conservation and recovery act (RCRA) and Superfund sites (created by the comprehensive environmental response, compensation, and liability act) that routinely relied on spectrofluorimetry for determination as we have previously reported. However, the improved specificity of CE-LIF is further illustrated in this work applied to the analysis of adsorbent pads placed in monitoring wells after dye injection and flushing from injection wells. The multiwavelength laser provided the capability to analyze for several dyes with one laser. The advantages/disadvantages of CE-LIF versus spectrofluorimetry are discussed. Spectrofluorimetry is fast and sensitive and will likely continue to be the primary workhorse technique. CE-LIF could provide confirmation when greater specificity is needed in a regulatory context. PMID:12874868

  3. In-capillary derivatization and laser-induced fluorescence detection for the analysis of organophosphorus pesticides by micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Luo, Zhi; Wang, Shumin; Hui, Yang; Hu, Zhide; Chen, Xingguo

    2007-05-18

    We developed a rapid and sensitive method using in-capillary derivatization and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection for the fully automated analysis of organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs), including glufosinate, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and glyphosate by micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC). The potential of 4-fluoro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-F) as in-capillary derivatization reagent is described for the first time. The unique feature of this MEKC method is the capillary being used as a small reaction chamber. In in-capillary derivatization, the sample and reagent solutions were injected directly into the capillary by tandem mode, followed by an electrokinetic step to enhance the mixing efficiency of analytes and reagent plugs in accordance with their different electrophoretic mobilities. Standing a specified time for reaction, the derivatives were then immediately separated and determined. Careful optimization of the derivatization and separation conditions allowed the determination of glufosinate, AMPA and glyphosate with detection limits of 2.8, 3.6 and 32.2 ng/mL, respectively. These detection limits were comparable to those of 1.4, 1.9 and 23.8 ng/mL obtained from conventional pre-capillary derivatization. Furthermore, repeatability better than 0.40% for migration time and 3.4% for peak area, as well as shorter migration time, was obtained. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of spiked river water sample with satisfactory results. PMID:17412355

  4. Imaging of the expansion of femtosecond-laser-produced silicon plasma atoms by off-resonant planar laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Samek, Ota; Leis, Franz; Margetic, Vanja; Malina, Radomir; Niemax, Kay; Hergenröder, Roland

    2003-10-20

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements were used to investigate the expansion dynamics of a femtosecond laser-induced plasma. Temporally and spatially resolved measurements were performed to monitor the atoms that were ablated from a silicon target. A dye laser (lambda = 288.16 nm) was used to excite fluorescence signals. The radiation of an off-resonant transition (Si 390.55 nm) was observed at different distances from the target surface. This allowed easy detection of the ablated Si atoms without problems caused by scattered laser light. Abel inversion was applied to obtain the radial distribution of the Si atoms. The atom distribution in the plasma shows some peculiarities, depending on the crater depth. PMID:14594057

  5. Airborne simultaneous spectroscopic detection of laser-induced water Raman backscatter and fluorescence from chlorophyll a and other naturally occurring pigments.

    PubMed

    Hoge, F E; Swift, R N

    1981-09-15

    The airborne laser-induced spectral emission bands obtained simultaneously from water Raman backscatter and the fluorescence of chlorophyll and other naturally occurring waterborne pigments are reported here for the first time. The importance of this type data lies not only in its single-shot multispectral character but also in the application of the Raman line for correction or calibration of the spatial variation of the laser penetration depth without the need for in situ water attenuation measurements. The entire laser-induced fluorescence and Raman scatter emissions resulting from each separate 532-nm 10-nsec laser pulse are collected and spectrally dispersed in a diffraction grating spectrometer having forty photomultiplier tube detectors. Results from field experiments conducted in the North Sea and the Chesapeake Bay/Potomac River are presented. Difficulties involving the multispectral resolution of the induced emissions are addressed, and feasible solutions are suggested together with new instrument configurations and future research directions. PMID:20333121

  6. Airborne simultaneous spectroscopic detection of laser-induced water Raman backscatter and fluorescence from chlorophyll a and other naturally occurring pigments

    SciTech Connect

    Hoge, F.E.; Swift, R.N.

    1981-09-15

    The airborne laser-induced spectral emission bands obtained simultaneously from water Raman backscatter and the fluorescence of chlorophyll and other naturally occuring waterborne pigments are reported here for the first time. The importance of this type data lies not only in its single-shot multispectral character but also in the application of the Raman line for correction or calibration of the spatial variation of the laser penetration depth without the need for in situ water attenuation measurements. The entire laser-induced fluorescence and Raman scatter emissions resulting from each separate 532-nm 10-nsec laser pulse are collected and spectrally dispersed in a diffraction grating spectrometer having forty photomultiplier tube detectors. Results from field experiments conducted in the North Sea and the Chesapeake Bay/Potomac River are presented. Difficulties involving the multispectral resolution of the induced emissions are addressed, and feasible solutions are suggested together with new instrument configurations and future research directions.

  7. Airborne simultaneous spectroscopic detection of laser-induced water Raman backscatter and fluorescence from chlorophyll a and other naturally occurring pigments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    The airborne laser-induced spectral emission bands obtained simultaneously from water Raman backscatter and the fluorescence of chlorophyll and other naturally occurring waterborne pigments are reported here for the first time. The importance of this type data lies not only in its single-shot multispectral character but also in the application of the Raman line for correction or calibration of the spatial variation of the laser penetration depth without the need for in situ water attenuation measurements. The entire laser-induced fluorescence and Raman scatter emissions resulting from each separate 532-nm 10-nsec laser pulse are collected and spectrally dispersed in a diffraction grating spectrometer having forty photomultiplier tube detectors. Results from field experiments conducted in the North Sea and the Chesapeake Bay/Potomac River are presented. Difficulties involving the multispectral resolution of the induced emissions are addressed, and feasible solutions are suggested together with new instrument configurations and future research directions.

  8. Feasibility of measuring temperature and density fluctuations in air using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, G. A.; Lemon, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    A tunable line-narrowed ArF laser can selectively excite several rotation al lines of the Schumann-Runge band system of O2 in air. The resulting ultraviolet fluorescence can be monitored at 90 deg to the laser beam axis, permitting space and time resolved observation of density and temperature fluctuations in turbulence. Experiments and calculations show that + or - 1 K, + or - 1 percent density, 1 cu mm spatial, and 1 microsecond temporal resolution can be achieved simultaneously under some conditions.

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence of cyclohexadienyl (c-C{sub 6}H{sub 7}) radical in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, Takashi; Zhang Weijun; Horiuchi, Hiroaki; Hiratsuka, Hiroshi; Kudo, Takako; Obi, Kinichi

    2004-10-08

    A laser-induced fluorescence spectrum was observed in the 500-560 nm region when a mixture of 1,4-cyclohexadiene and oxalyl chloride was photolyzed at 193 nm. The observed excitation spectrum was assigned to the A-tilde {sup 2}A{sub 2}<-X-tilde {sup 2}B{sub 1} transition of the cyclohexadienyl radical c-C{sub 6}H{sub 7}, produced by abstraction of a hydrogen atom from 1,4-cyclohexadiene by Cl atoms. The origin of the A-tilde<-X-tilde transition of c-C{sub 6}H{sub 7} was at 18 207 cm-1. From measurements of the dispersed fluorescence spectra and ab initio calculations, the frequencies of several vibrational modes in both the ground and excited states of c-C{sub 6}H{sub 7} were determined: {nu}{sub 5}(C-H in-plane bend)=1571, {nu}{sub 8}(C-Hin-plane bend)=1174, {nu}{sub 10}(C-C-C in-plane bend)=981, {nu}{sub 12}(C-C-C in-plane bend)=559, {nu}{sub 16}(C-C-C out-of-plane bend)=375, and {nu}{sub 33}(C-C-C in-plane bend)=600 cm{sup -1} for the ground state and {nu}{sub 8}=1118, {nu}{sub 10}=967, {nu}{sub 12}=502, {nu}{sub 16}=172, and {nu}{sub 33}=536 cm{sup -1} for the excited states.

  10. Development of a Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system on the Plasma Material Interaction System (PLAMIS-II) device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, I. J.; Lee, K. Y.; Lee, K. I.; Choi, Y.-S.; Cho, S. G.; Bae, M. K.; Lee, D.-H.; Hong, S. H.; Lho, T.; Chung, K.-S.

    2015-12-01

    A laser induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been developed for the plasma material interaction system (PLAMIS-II) device, which is equipped with a unique plasma gun composed of a LaB6 cathode and two anodes with electromagnets to generate a focused dense plasma. PLAMIS-II simulates the interactions of plasma with different materials and is to be used for the test of plasma facing components of fusion devices. The LIF system is composed of a seed laser with Littmann/Metcalf cavity and a master oscillator power amplifier to pump 3d4F7/2 metastable argon ion to 4p4D5/2 level at the wavelength of 668.61 nm, which has the following input parameters: laser power = 20 mW, line width < 100 kHz, and a mode-hop free tuning range > 70 GHz. For in-situ measurement of laser wavelength, the wavelength spectrum of an iodine cell was measured by a photo-transistor during LIF measurement. To measure argon ion temperature (Ti) and drift velocity (vd) in PLAMIS-II, the fluorescence light with the wavelength of 442.72 nm, emitted from 4p4D5/2 level to 4s4P3/2 level and passing through 1 nm band-width filter, was collected by the photomultiplier tube combined with a lock-in amplifier and a chopper with frequency of 3 kHz. Initial data of Ti and vd were analysed in terms of gas flow rate and applied power.

  11. Final Technical Report - Development of a tunable diode laser induced fluorescence diagnostic for the Princeton magnetic nozzle experiment: West Virginia University and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Earl Scime

    2006-11-07

    This project involves the construction of a compact, portable, laser induced fluorescence (LIF) diagnostic for measurements of neutral helium, neutral argon, and argon ion velocity space distributions in a high density, steady state, helicon source. The project is collaborative effort between the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and the West Virginia University (WVU) helicon source group. A key feature of the diagnostic system will be the use of tunable diode lasers instead of the tunable dye lasers typically used in LIF experiments.

  12. Electrothermal atomization-laser induced fluorescence determination of iridium, rhodium, palladium, platinum and gold at the ng/l level in pure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masera, Eric; Mauchien, Patrick; Lerat, Yannick

    1996-04-01

    Trace determination of Au, Rh, Ir, Pd and Pt in pure water solution has been performed by electrothermal atomization-laser induced fluorescence (ETA-LIF). Limits of detection obtained are in the ng/l -1 range, improving previously published absolute limits of detection by one or two orders of magnitude. The day to day reproducibility for iridium is around 8%. Thus, the ETA-LIF technique can be used routinely for the determination of precious metals at ultratrace concentrations.

  13. Influence of the gaseous mixture composition on accuracy of molecular iodine on-line detection by laser-induced fluorescence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kireev, S. V.; Shnyrev, S. L.

    2016-07-01

    This paper informs on research into the influence of the composition of gaseous mixtures analyzed on the accuracy of on-line molecular iodine detection by laser-induced fluorescence in various gaseous media—in atmospheric air and in technological mixtures formed during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The paper shows that by considering the composition of buffer media and parts of its components, the accuracy of iodine content measurement may be increased in several times.

  14. Tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence measurement technique for quantitative fuel/air-ratio measurements in a hydrogen internal combustion engine.

    PubMed

    Blotevogel, Thomas; Hartmann, Matthias; Rottengruber, Hermann; Leipertz, Alfred

    2008-12-10

    A measurement technique for the quantitative investigation of mixture formation processes in hydrogen internal combustion engines (ICEs) has been developed using tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence (TLIF). This technique can be employed to fired and motored engine operation. The quantitative TLIF fuel/air-ratio results have been verified by means of linear Raman scattering measurements. Exemplary results of the simultaneous investigation of mixture formation and combustion obtained at an optical accessible hydrogen ICE are shown. PMID:19079454

  15. A capillary holder for scanning detection of capillary isoelectric focusing with laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Katsuyoshi; Maruo, Yuji; Kitamori, Takehiko; Shimura, Kiyohito

    2009-02-01

    A holder for a 12 cm long capillary was designed for scanning LIF detection of CIEF. The polyimide coat of a fused-silica capillary has been removed, and 1.5 mm diameter flanges have been attached near both ends. The holder is fixed on the stage of a fluorescence microscope via a translational stage, and a capillary guide is directly fixed on the microscope stage. The guide has a groove and a pressure plate for the capillary to slide in. The holder has two pulling plates with slits of 1 mm to accept the capillary just inside the flanges. The slits and the groove of the guide have been aligned. The motion of the translational stage brings the pulling plate into contact with the flange at the pulled side, and slides the capillary through the guide. The other end of the capillary is free and produces no strain on the capillary. When the motion of the stage is reversed, an unstrained contact is achieved at the other end. The baseline noise from scanning was only 50% larger than that without scanning. The fluorescence-signal variation during scanning was about 4% of the total signal, which was about twice that without scanning. PMID:19142915

  16. Postcolumn derivatization of proteins in capillary sieving electrophoresis/laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Kaneta, Takashi; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Imasaka, Totaro

    2009-11-01

    The separation methods for proteins with high resolution and sensitivity are absolutely important in the field of biological sciences. Capillary sieving electrophoresis (CSE) is an excellent separation technique for DNA and proteins with high resolution, while LIF permits the most sensitive detection in CSE. Therefore, proteins have to be labeled with fluorescent or fluorogenic reagent to produce fluorescent derivatives. Both precolumn and oncolumn derivatization have been employed for the labeling of proteins in CSE. However, there is no report on the postcolumn derivatization due to the limitation in the use of a standard migration buffer, despite it being a promising method for sensitive detection of proteins. Here, we show a novel postcolumn derivatization method for protein separation by CSE, using a tertiary amine as a buffer component in the running buffer. Tris, which is commonly used as a base in CSE separation buffers, was substituted by tertiary amines, 2-(diethylamino)ethanol and triethanolamine. A buffer solution containing 2-(diethylamino)ethanol or triethanolamine can be used for the CSE separation followed by the postcolumn derivatization of proteins, since both reagents are unreactive toward a fluorogenic labeling reagent, naphthalene-2,3-dicarbaldehyde. Thus, LIF detection using the postcolumn derivatization permits significant reduction in the LOD (by a factor of 2.4-28) of proteins, compared with conventional absorbance detection. PMID:19862753

  17. Plant-Stress Measurements Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence Excitation: Poland Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gene Capelle; Steve Jones

    1999-05-01

    Bechtel Nevada's Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) has been involved in remote sensing for many years, and in April 1995 STL began to study the use of active remote sensing for detecting plant stress. This work was motivated by the need to detect subsurface contamination, with the supposition that this could be accomplished by remote measurement of optical signatures from the overgrowing vegetation. The project has been a cooperative DOE/Disney effort, in which basic optical signature measurements (primarily fluorescence) were done at the Disney greenhouse facilities at Epcot Center in Florida, using instrumentation developed by STL on DOE funding. The primary instrument is a LIFI system, which had originally been developed for detection of surface uranium contamination at DOE sites. To deal specifically with the plant stress measurements, a LIFS system was built that utilizes the same laser, but captures the complete fluorescence spectrum from blue to red wavelengths. This system had continued to evolve, and the version in existence in September 1997 was sent to Poland, accompanied by two people from STL, for the purpose of making the measurements described in this report.

  18. Laser-induced fluorescence of Ba+ ions trapped and mass-selected in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Li, G Z; Vining, B A; Guan, S; Marshall, A G

    1996-01-01

    We present the design and preliminary results from a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) mass spectrometer developed for the direct detection of UV/visible laser-induced fluorescence of trapped, mass-selected, gas-phase ions. A 3 T superconducting magnet and an open-ended multi-section cylindrical Penning trap capture and confine ions created by electron impact or laser desorption. Azimuthal quadrupolar excitation in the presence of ion/neutral collisions cools, axializes and mass selects ions as they fill the trap. A pulsed dye laser pumped by an Nd:YAG laser provides electronic energy excitation. A Brewster window and baffles on each side of the vacuum chamber reduce the scattered light from the excitation laser. Laser-induced fluorescence is collected from mirrors and lenses and directed through a quartz window and fiber-optic bundle to a photomultiplier. The ICR and optical events are controlled by a modular ICR data station and GPIB and RS-232 interfaces. An excitation spectrum is demonstrated for atomic Ba+ ions, and should extend to laser-induced fluorescence of virtually any stable positive or negative gas-phase ions of arbitrary molecular weight: molecular or quasimolecular ions, fragment ions, adduct ions, and ions formed from ion/molecule reactions. PMID:8953788

  19. Identification Of Natural Dyes On Archaeological Textile Objects Using Laser Induced Fluorescent Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Eltokhy, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-22

    This study aims to evaluate the use of Laser Fluorescent as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. In this study wool textile samples were dyed with 10 natural dyes such as cochineal, cutch, henna, indigo, Lac, madder, safflower, saffron, sumac and turmeric. These dyes common present on archaeological textile objects to be used as standard dyed textile samples. These selected natural dyes will be used as known references that can be used a guide to identify unknown archaeological dyes. The dyed textile samples were investigated with laser radiation in different wavelengths to detect the best wavelengths for identification each dye. This study confirms that Laser Florescent is very useful and a rapid technique can be used as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. The results obtained with this study can be a guide for all conservators in identification of natural organic dyes on archaeological textile objects.

  20. Development of the Megahertz Planar Laser-induced Fluorescence Diagnostic for Plasma Turbulence Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksey Kuritsyn; Fred M. Levinton

    2004-04-27

    A megahertz LIF-based diagnostic system for measuring ion density fluctuations in two spatial dimensions is described. Well resolved spatial and temporal 2D images of turbulent structures will be useful in understanding ion turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas which is a key factor in the performance of fusion experimental devices. A sheet beam of a megahertz repetition rate tunable Alexandrite laser is used to excite ion emission from argon plasma. The fluorescence emitted from the plane of the laser beam is detected with a narrow band interference filter and intensified ultra-fast CCD camera providing 2D images of relative ion density fluctuations every microsecond. It is expected that the edge plasma on fusion devices will be accessible to this technique.

  1. Identification Of Natural Dyes On Archaeological Textile Objects Using Laser Induced Fluorescent Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Eltokhy, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the use of Laser Fluorescent as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. In this study wool textile samples were dyed with 10 natural dyes such as cochineal, cutch, henna, indigo, Lac, madder, safflower, saffron, sumac and turmeric. These dyes common present on archaeological textile objects to be used as standard dyed textile samples. These selected natural dyes will be used as known references that can be used a guide to identify unknown archaeological dyes. The dyed textile samples were investigated with laser radiation in different wavelengths to detect the best wavelengths for identification each dye. This study confirms that Laser Florescent is very useful and a rapid technique can be used as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. The results obtained with this study can be a guide for all conservators in identification of natural organic dyes on archaeological textile objects.

  2. The use of vitamins as tracer dyes for laser-induced fluorescence in liquid flow applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zähringer, Katharina

    2014-04-01

    Tracers commonly used in experimental flow studies are mostly nocuous to the environment and human health. Particularly, in large flow installations, this can become a problem. In this study, a solution of this problem is presented, based on using water-soluble vitamins. Five of them are examined here for their applicability in flow studies. Vitamins B2 and B6 turned out to be the most promising candidates, and the dependency of their fluorescence intensity on parameters like concentration, laser energy, temperature, and pH are determined for two commonly used laser excitation wavelengths (532, 355 nm). Two examples of application in a static mixer and a spray flow are shown and demonstrate the applicability of the vitamin tracers.

  3. Biochemical Detection and Identification False Alarm Rate Dependence on Wavelength Using Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, R.; Hug, W. F.; Sala, E. C.; Sijapati, K.; Lane, A. L.; Reid, R. D.; Conrad, P. G.

    2006-01-01

    Most organic and many inorganic materials absorb strongly in specific wavelength ranges in the deep UV between about 220nm and 300nm. Excitation within these absorption bands results in native fluorescence emission. Each compound or composite material, such as a bacterial spore, has a unique excitation-emission fingerprint that can be used to provide information about the material. The sensitivity and specificity with which these materials can be detected and identified depends on the excitation wavelength and the number and location of observation wavelengths.We will present data on our deep ultraviolet Targeted Ultraviolet Chemical Sensors that demonstrate the sensitivity and specificity of the sensors. In particular, we will demonstrate the ability to quantitatively differentiate a wide range of biochemical agent targets against a wide range of background materials. We will describe the relationship between spectral resolution and specificity in target identification, as well as simple, fast, algorithms to identify materials.Hand-held, battery operated instruments using a deep UV laser and multi-band detection have been developed and deployed on missions to the Antarctic, the Arctic, and the deep ocean with the capability of detecting a single bacterial spore and to differentiate a wide range of organic and biological compounds.

  4. Standoff detection: classification of biological aerosols using laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, Anita; Duschek, Frank; Fischbach, Thomas; Pargmann, Carsten; Aleksejev, Valeri; Poryvkina, Larisa; Sobolev, Innokenti; Babichenko, Sergey; Handke, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    The challenges of detecting hazardous biological materials are manifold: Such material has to be discriminated from other substances in various natural surroundings. The detection sensitivity should be extremely high. As living material may reproduce itself, already one single bacterium may represent a high risk. Of course, identification should be quite fast with a low false alarm rate. Up to now, there is no single technique to solve this problem. Point sensors may collect material and identify it, but the problems of fast identification and especially of appropriate positioning of local collectors are sophisticated. On the other hand, laser based standoff detection may instantaneously provide the information of some accidental spillage of material by detecting the generated thin cloud. LIF technique may classify but hardly identify the substance. A solution can be the use of LIF technique in a first step to collect primary data and - if necessary- followed by utilizing these data for an optimized positioning of point sensors. We perform studies on an open air laser test range at distances between 20 and 135 m applying LIF technique to detect and classify aerosols. In order to employ LIF capability, we use a laser source emitting two wavelengths alternatively, 280 and 355 nm, respectively. Moreover, the time dependence of fluorescence spectra is recorded by a gated intensified CCD camera. Signal processing is performed by dedicated software for spectral pattern recognition. The direct comparison of all results leads to a basic classification of the various compounds.

  5. Temperature measurements in flames using thermally assisted laser-induced fluorescence of Ga.

    PubMed

    Joklik, R G; Horvath, J J; Semerjian, H G

    1991-04-20

    The use of thermally assisted fluorescence (THAF) for temperature measurements has been investigated in a laminar, premixed C(2)H(2)/O(2)/Ar flame seeded with Ga atoms. Average temperature measurements were made with an uncertainty of less than +/-100 K in flames >2150 K and were found to be in agreement with sodium line reversal temperature measurements and equilibrium calculations. In both fuel rich and lean flames spanning equivalence ratios from 0.75 to 2.0, it was found that composition influenced the measured temperatures, resulting in an accuracy of +/-100 K over this range of flame conditions. Dilution of the flame with N(2) rather than Ar resulted in measured temperatures that were substantially higher than the calculated adiabatic flame temperature, indicating that, in this case, a partial Boltzmann equilibrium is not established among the collisionally populated levels of Ga used for the measurement. These results indicate that THAF with gallium as the thermometric species is limited to cases in which an inefficient quencher, such as a rare gas, is the primary diluent. PMID:20700311

  6. Laser-induced fluorescence line narrowing in Sm2+-doped fluoride glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masanori; Kushida, Takashi

    1994-02-01

    Fluorescence line-narrowing experiments have been made for the Sm2+ ion in fluoride glass at 77 K under cw dye-laser excitation at various energies within the inhomogeneously broadened 7F50-D0 and 7F50-D1 absorption lines. The energies of the three Stark levels of the 7F1 and 5D1 manifolds have been obtained as a function of the 5D70-F0 energy separation. From the analysis of this result, it has been found that the site-to-site variations of the energies of these Stark levels can be explained well only by taking into account the J-mixing effect. The low-energy levels of the 4f55d configuration lie in the vicinity of the 5DJ states in this material. However, no effect of the crystal-field mixing of the 4f55d states on the inhomogeneous distribution of the energies of the 7F1 and 5D1 states has been observed. The origin of the unusually intense 5D70-F0 transition in Sm2+ is also discussed.

  7. The saturation of the fluorescence and its consequences for laser-induced fluorescence thermometry in liquid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaze, William; Caballina, Ophélie; Castanet, Guillaume; Lemoine, Fabrice

    2016-04-01

    The temperature dependence of the fluorescence emission of certain organic dyes such as rhodamine B has been widely utilized for measuring the temperature in liquid flows. Measurements are generally based on two assumptions: The fluorescence signal is proportional to the intensity of the laser excitation, and the temperature sensitivity of the dye is not affected by the laser irradiance. In the ratiometric methods, these assumptions allow justifying that the influence of the laser intensity can be totally eliminated in the intensity ratio of two spectral bands of the fluorescence emission and thus that measurements can be taken with no biases under experimental conditions, where the laser propagation is disturbed by the flow. However, when pulsed lasers are used (mainly in planar LIF measurements), the peak irradiance usually compares or exceeds the saturation intensity of the dyes. The present study assesses the consequences of a saturation of the dye emission on temperature measurements. Tests among fluoresceins and rhodamines reveal that the saturation can be accompanied by a significant loss of temperature sensitivity. The dyes, for which this loss of sensitivity is observed, mainly owe their temperature dependence to the fluorescence quantum yield and have a fluorescence signal decreasing with the temperature. The couple fluorescein/sulforhodamine 640 is finally proposed for an implementation of the ratiometric method, since its relatively high temperature dependence (+3 %/° {C}) is not altered at high laser irradiances. The possibility of measuring instantaneous temperature fields with this pair of dyes using a single laser shot is finally demonstrated on a turbulent heated jet injected into quiescent water.

  8. Infrared planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging and applications to imaging of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Brian James

    This dissertation introduces infrared planar laser- induced fluorescence (IR PLIF) techniques for visualization of species that lack convenient electronic transitions and are therefore unsuitable for more traditional electronic PLIF measurements. IR PLIF measurements can generate high signal levels that scale linearly with both laser energy and species concentration, thereby demonstrating advantages over Raman and multiphoton PLIF techniques. IR PLIF is shown to be a straightforward and effective tool for visualization of CO and CO2 in reactive flows. The slow characteristic times of vibrational relaxation and the large mole fractions of CO and CO2 in typical flows lead to high IR PLIF signal levels, despite the low emission rates typical of vibrational transitions. Analyses of rotational energy transfer (RET) and vibrational energy transfer (VET) show that excitation schemes in either linear (weak) or saturated (strong) limits may be developed, with the fluorescence collected directly from the laser-excited species or indirectly from bath gases in vibrational resonance with the laser-excited species. Use of short (~1 μs) exposures (for CO) or short exposures combined with long-pulse, high-pulse-energy excitation (for CO2) minimizes unwanted signal variation due to spatially-dependent VET rates. Results are presented for flows ranging from room- temperature mixing to a benchmark CH4 laminar diffusion flame. Linear excitation is appropriate for CO due to its slow vibrational relaxation. However, linear excitation is not well-suited for CO2 imaging due to fast H 2O-enhanced VET processes and the attendant difficulty in interpreting the resulting signal. Saturated excitation using a CO2 laser (or combined CO2 laser-OPO) technique is most appropriate for CO 2, as it generates high signal and minimizes spatial variations in fluorescence quantum yield. Since IR PLIF is applicable to most IR-active species, it has a high potential for expanding the diagnostic

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence method for on-line molecular isotopologues of iodine-127, iodine-129, iodine-131 detected in gaseous media using a tunable diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kireev, S. V.; Shnyrev, S. L.; Sobolevsky, I. V.

    2016-06-01

    The letter reports on the development of a laser-induced fluorescence method for on-line selective measurement of 127I2, 129I2, 131I2, 129I127I, 127I131I, 129I131I isotopologue concentrations in gaseous media. The method is based on the excitation of molecular iodine isotopologues’ fluorescence by tunable diode laser (632–637 nm) radiation at three or four wavelengths corresponding to the 127I2, 131I2, 129I127I, 129I131I absorption line centers. Boundary relations for concentrations of simultaneously measured iodine isotopologues is about 10‑5–10‑6.

  10. On-line molecular iodine isotopologue detection in gaseous media during spent nuclear fuel reprocessing using a laser-induced fluorescence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kireev, S. V.; Shnyrev, S. L.

    2015-06-01

    The paper reports on on-line measurement of the {}129{{\\text{I}}2}, 127I129I, and {}127{{\\text{I}}2} concentrations during spent nuclear fuel (SNF) reprocessing using a laser-induced fluorescence method. A He-Ne laser (632.8 nm) was used as a fluorescence excitation source. The detection limits obtained for molecular iodine isotopologue concentrations demonstrate the possibility of using this method for iodine control both in gaseous technological media generated during SNF reprocessing and after passing through the gas purification system (in atmosphere emission).

  11. Applications of capillary electrophoresis and laser-induced fluorescence detection to the analysis of trace species: From single cells to single molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Qifeng, X.

    1995-11-01

    This Ph.D. Thesis describes several separation and detection schemes for the analysis of small volume and amount of samples, such as intracellular components and single enzymes developed during research. Indirect Laser-induced fluorescence detection and capillary electrophoresis were used to quantify lactate and pyruvate in single red blood cells. The assay of specific enzyme activities was achieved by monitoring the highly fluorescent enzymatic reaction product, NADH. LDH activity was found not to be a unique marker for diagnosis of leukemia. Reactions of single LDH-1 molecules were investigated by monitoring the reaction product with LIF detection.

  12. Local OH concentration measurement in atmospheric pressure flames by a laser-saturated fluorescence method: two-optical path laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Desgroux, P; Cottereau, M J

    1991-01-01

    The first (to our knowledge) measurements of number density of OH in flames at atmospheric pressure by TOPLIF are reported. TOPLIF (acronym for two optical paths laser-induced fluorescence) improves the accuracy of LIF measurements by taking into account both the spatial profile of the exciting laser intensity and the collisional transfer rate. The method is based on simultaneously recording the LIF signals from focal volumes of two different shapes. The ratio of the signals is a measure of the saturation parameter (which depends on the laser intensity and the quenching) using which accurate determination of the species number density can be deduced from the fluorescence signals. The method is valid as far as at least partial saturation is reached. First, experimental verification of the theoretical basis of the method is reported. The population of a single rovibronic level is measured as it is in most of the spectroscopic methods. TOPLIF measures this population relative to this level's population in a chosen reference flame. Absolute value can therefore be obtained if the value in the reference flame is known or measured. Absolute [OH] profiles obtained in flat flames burning at 60 and 1000 mb are presented and compared to laser absorption measurements. PMID:20581952

  13. Variability of spectra of laser-induced fluorescence of colonic mucosa: its significance for fluorescence detection of colonic neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Chwirot, Barbara W; Kowalska, Małgorzata; Płóciennik, Natalia; Piwiński, Mariusz; Michniewicz, Zbigniew; Chwirot, Stanisław

    2003-05-01

    To determine the extent of a natural variability of the spectra of the autofluorescence and its significance for a reproducibility of different approaches typically used in studies on fluorescence detection of colonic lesions. Two independent series of experiments have been conducted during three years in the same laboratory. Macroscopic tissue specimens obtained during operations of patients with colonic cancers were studied in vitro. The tissues were excited using UV lines of c.w. He-Cd laser and pulsed nitrogen laser and the autofluorescence spectra were recorded for areas visually diagnosed as normal or pathologically changed mucosa. Natural variability of the autofluorescence spectra of colonic tissues seems to be most important factor limiting sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic algorithms. The mean fluorescence spectra obtained for normal mucosa and its neoplastic lesions differ significantly but the differences are difficult to observe because of the high natural variability among the individual spectra. Further studies of biological basis of the colonic autofluorescence are necessary for a progress in the field of fluorescence detection of colonic neoplastic lesions. PMID:15244272

  14. Silica nanoparticles for separation of biologically active amines by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced native fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Kuo, I-Ting; Huang, Yu-Fen; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2005-06-01

    This paper describes the analysis of biologically active amines by capillary electrophoresis (CE) in conjunction with laser-induced native fluorescence detection. In order to simultaneously analyze amines and acids as well as to achieve high sensitivity, 10 mM formic acid solutions (pH < 4.0) containing silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) were chosen as the background electrolytes. With increasing SiNP concentration, the migration times for seven analytes decrease as a result of increase in electroosmotic flow (EOF) and decrease in their electrophoretic mobilities against EOF. A small EOF generated at pH 3.0 reveals adsorption of SiNPs on the deactivated capillary wall. The decreases in electrophoretic mobilities with increasing SiNP concentration up to 0.3x indicate the interactions between the analytes and the SiNPs. Having a great sensitivity (the limits of detection at a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) = 3 of 0.09 nM for tryptamine (TA)), high efficiency, and excellent reproducibility (less than 2.4% of the migration times), this developed method has been applied to the analysis of urinal samples with the concentrations of 0.50 +/- 0.02 microM, 0.49 +/- 0.04 microM, and 74 +/- 2 microM for TA, 5-hydroxytryptamine, and tryptophan, respectively. The successful examples demonstrated in this study open up a possibility of using functional nanoparticles for the separation of different analytes by CE. PMID:15937981

  15. Developments in laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy for quantitative in situ measurements of free radicals in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, Dwayne

    2015-04-01

    Photo-oxidation in the troposphere is highly complex, being initiated by short lived free radical species, in the daytime dominated by the hydroxyl radical, OH. Chemical oxidation cycles, which also involve peroxy radicals (HO2 and RO2), remove natural or anthropogenic emissions (for example methane) and generate a range of secondary products, for example ozone, nitrogen dioxide, acidic and multifunctional organic species, and secondary organic aerosol, which impact on human health and climate. Owing to their short lifetime in the atmosphere, the abundance of radicals is determined solely by their rate of chemical production and loss, and not by transport. Field measurements of the concentrations of radicals and comparison with calculations using a numerical model therefore constitutes one of the very best ways to test whether the chemistry in each of these locations is understood and accurately represented in the model. Validation of the chemistry is important, as the predictions of climate and air quality models containing this chemistry are used to drive the formulation of policy and legislation. However, in situ measurements of radical species, owing to their very low abundance (often sub part per trillion) and short lifetimes (< 1 second for OH), remain extremely challenging. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIF) has enjoyed considerable success worldwide for the quantitative detection of radicals in a range of environments. The radicals are either excited directly by the laser (e.g. OH, IO) or are first chemically converted to OH prior to detection (e.g. HO2, RO2). Recent developments in the LIF technique for radical detection, which uses a supersonic expansion with detection at low pressure and multi kHz pulse repetition rate tunable laser systems, will be discussed, together with calibration methods to make signals absolute, and identification of potential interferences. LIF instruments have been operated on ground, ship and aircraft platforms at a

  16. Indirect detection of superoxide in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells using microchip electrophoresis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    de Campos, Richard P S; Siegel, Joseph M; Fresta, Claudia G; Caruso, Giuseppe; da Silva, José A F; Lunte, Susan M

    2015-09-01

    Superoxide, a naturally produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the human body, is involved in many pathological and physiological signaling processes. However, if superoxide formation is left unregulated, overproduction can lead to oxidative damage to important biomolecules, such as DNA, lipids, and proteins. Superoxide can also lead to the formation of peroxynitrite, an extremely hazardous substance, through its reaction with endogenously produced nitric oxide. Despite its importance, quantitative information regarding superoxide production is difficult to obtain due to its high reactivity and low concentrations in vivo. MitoHE, a fluorescent probe that specifically reacts with superoxide, was used in conjunction with microchip electrophoresis (ME) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection to investigate changes in superoxide production by RAW 264.7 macrophage cells following stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Stimulation was performed in the presence and absence of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibitors, diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) and 2-metoxyestradiol (2-ME). The addition of these inhibitors resulted in an increase in the amount of superoxide specific product (2-OH-MitoE(+)) from 0.08 ± 0.01 fmol (0.17 ± 0.03 mM) in native cells to 1.26 ± 0.06 fmol (2.5 ± 0.1 mM) after PMA treatment. This corresponds to an approximately 15-fold increase in intracellular concentration per cell. Furthermore, the addition of 3-morpholino-sydnonimine (SIN-1) to the cells during incubation resulted in the production of 0.061 ± 0.006 fmol (0.12 ± 0.01 mM) of 2-OH-MitoE(+) per cell on average. These results demonstrate that indirect superoxide detection coupled with the use of SOD inhibitors and a separation method is a viable method to discriminate the 2-OH-MitoE(+) signal from possible interferences. PMID:26159570

  17. Spatially-Resolved Velocity Measurements in Steady, High-Speed Reacting Flows Using Laser-Induced OH Fluorescence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavuhn, Kurt G.

    The theoretical development and calibration of a nonintrusive, high-resolution, optical flowfield-diagnostic technique utilizing OH laser-induced fluorescence (OH LIF) for the measurement of velocity in steady, high-speed, reacting flows is reported. The particular high-speed, reacting flows of interest are those occurring in supersonic combustors for proposed hypersonic flight vehicles. The theory of the OH LIF strategy employed in this work is described, with emphasis on the optimization of the strategy for quantitative velocity measurements. A simplified model is derived for the calculation of expected signal levels from pulsed, narrow-linewidth, (1,0) band excitation of OH in flames when collecting filtered (1,1) and (0,0) band fluorescence with a gated detector. Several illumination techniques are presented for measuring the Doppler shift of the OH LIF while eliminating systematic errors. A unique reacting underexpanded jet was constructed for the calibration of the OH LIF velocity measurement technique over a wide range of flow conditions. A complete analysis of the distribution of flow properties in the jet flowfield is presented, including results from a full Navier-Stokes calculation with finite -rate chemistry. Comparisons of results from pointwise OH LIF velocity measurements along the centerline and planar OH LIF velocity measurements along the central plane of the reacting underexpanded jet with the numerical solution demonstrate the resolution, range, and accuracy of the technique. Measured and calculated velocities in the supersonic jet core agree on average to within +/-1.3% for the pointwise measurements and +/-2.2% for the planar measurements. The uncertainty (2 sigma) in the pointwise velocity measurements in the jet core was on average +/-6.0% for a single measurement and +/-3.5% for the average value of three scans. For the planar velocity measurements in the jet core, the uncertainty (2 sigma) was on average +/-4.9% for a single measurement

  18. Spatially-resolved velocity measurements in steady, high-speed, reacting flows using laser-induced OH fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavuhn, Kurt G.

    The theoretical development and calibration of a nonintrusive, high-resolution, optical flowfield-diagnostic technique utilizing OH laser-induced fluorescence (OH LIF) for the measurement of velocity in steady, high-speed, reacting flows is reported. The particular high-speed, reacting flows of interest are those occurring in supersonic combustors for proposed hypersonic flight vehicles. The theory of the OH LIF strategy employed is described, with emphasis on the optimization of the strategy for quantitative velocity measurements. A simplified model is derived for the calculation of expected signal levels from pulsed, narrow-linewidth, (1,0) band excitation of OH in flames when collecting filtered (1,1) and (0,0) band fluorescence with a gated detector. Several illumination techniques are presented for measuring the Doppler shift of the OH LIF while eliminating systematic errors. A unique reacting underexpanded jet was constructed for the calibration of the OH LIF velocity measurement technique over a wide range of flow conditions. A complete analysis of the distribution of flow properties in the jet flowfield is presented, including results from a full Navier-Stokes calculation with finite-rate chemistry. Comparisons of results from pointwise OH LIF velocity measurements along the centerline and planar OH LIF velocity measurements along the central plane of the reacting underexpanded jet with the numerical solution demonstrate the resolution, range, and accuracy of the technique. Measured and calculated velocities in the supersonic jet core agree on average to within +/- 1.3 percent for the pointwise measurements and +/- 2.2 percent for the planar measurements. The uncertainty (2 sigma) in the pointwise velocity measurements in the jet core was on average +/- 6.0 percent for a single measurement and +/- 3.5 percent for the average value of three scans. For the planar velocity measurements in the jet core, the uncertainty (2 sigma) was on average +/- 4.9 percent

  19. Native fluorescence detection of flavin derivatives by microchip capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence intensified charge-coupled device detection.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jianhua; Fung, Yingsing; Zhu, Derong; Lin, Bingcheng

    2004-02-20

    To widen the scope of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for detection in microchip capillary electrophoresis (CE), a microchip CE LIF-ICCD (intensified charge-coupled device) system based on a tunable wavelength dye laser pumped by a pico-second pulse nitrogen laser for excitation and a spectrograph with ICCD for detection had developed to demonstrate the enhancement in detection sensitivity by the following three approaches: direct detection of native fluorescence, improvement of signal-to-noise ratio by pulse laser excitation and time delay detection, and selective spectral acquisition by multi-channel detection. Riboflavin, flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin-adenine dinucleotide (FAD) have been selected as they are dietetically important and microchip CE provides a promising onsite detection method. The results indicate a strong effect of wavelength on detection sensitivity and the need to tune wavelength for direct detection. Under optimized conditions (excitation 450 nm, emission 520 nm, gate delay time 45 ns, 20 mM phosphate buffer at pH 7.1), the following results were obtained under static condition: Working ranges (0.6-350 microg/l, r > 0.99), detection limits (0.15-1.0 microg/l) and peak height repeatability (1.8-2.2% R.S.D.), all within the applicability range for body fluids or beverages such as human urine and cow milk. Baseline separation of three flavins was obtained under dynamic condition and the fluorescence spectra acquired assist the identification of alkaline-degraded products of riboflavin. Thus, the capability to check peak purity and identify unknown peaks has been demonstrated. PMID:14971506

  20. Nitric oxide density measurements in air and air/fuel nanosecond pulse discharges by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddi, M.; Jiang, N.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2009-04-01

    Laser induced fluorescence is used to measure absolute nitric oxide concentrations in air, methane-air and ethylene-air non-equilibrium plasmas, as a function of time after initiation of a single pulse, 20 kV peak voltage, 25 ns pulse duration discharge. A mixture of NO and nitrogen with known composition (4.18 ppm NO) is used for calibration. Peak NO density in air at 60 Torr, after a single pulse, is ~8 × 1012 cm-3 (~4.14 ppm) occurring at ~250 µs after the pulse, with decay time of ~16.5 ms. Peak NO atom mole fraction in a methane-air mixture with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5 is found to be approximately equal to that in air, with approximately the same rise and decay rate. In an ethylene-air mixture (also with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5), the rise and decay times are comparable to air and methane-air, but the peak NO concentration is reduced by a factor of approximately 2.5. Spontaneous emission measurements show that excited electronic states N2(C 3Π) and NO(A 2Σ) in air at P = 60 Torr decay within ~20 ns and ~1 µs, respectively. Kinetic modelling calculations incorporating air plasma kinetics complemented with the GRI Mech 3.0 hydrocarbon oxidation mechanism are compared with the experimental data using three different NO production mechanisms. It is found that NO concentration rise after the discharge pulse is much faster than predicted by Zel'dovich mechanism reactions, by two orders of magnitude, but much slower compared with reactions of electronically excited nitrogen atoms and molecules, also by two orders of magnitude. It is concluded that processes involving long lifetime (~100 µs) metastable states, such as N2(X 1Σ,v) and O2(b 1Σ), formed by quenching of the metastable N2(A 3Σ) state by ground electronic state O2, may play a dominant role in NO formation. NO decay, in all cases, is found to be dominated by the reverse Zel'dovich reaction, NO + O → N + O2, as well as by conversion into NO2 in a reaction of NO with ozone.

  1. High-repetition-rate three-dimensional OH imaging using scanned planar laser-induced fluorescence system for multiphase combustion.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kevin Y; Satija, Aman; Pourpoint, Timothée L; Son, Steven F; Lucht, Robert P

    2014-01-20

    Imaging dynamic multiphase combusting events is challenging. Conventional techniques can image only a single plane of an event, capturing limited details. Here, we report on a three-dimensional, time-resolved, OH planar laser-induced fluorescence (3D OH PLIF) technique that was developed to measure the relative OH concentration in multiphase combustion flow fields. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time a 3D OH PLIF technique has been reported in the open literature. The technique involves rapidly scanning a laser sheet across a flow field of interest. The overall experimental system consists of a 5 kHz OH PLIF system, a high-speed detection system (image intensifier and CMOS camera), and a galvanometric scanning mirror. The scanning mirror was synchronized with a 500 Hz triangular sweep pattern generated using Labview. Images were acquired at 5 kHz corresponding to six images per mirror scan, and 1000 scans per second. The six images obtained in a scan were reconstructed into a volumetric representation. The resulting spatial resolution was 500×500×6 voxels mapped to a field of interest covering 30  mm×30  mm×8  mm. The novel 3D OH PLIF system was applied toward imaging droplet combustion of methanol gelled with hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) (3 wt. %, 6 wt. %), as well as solid propellant combustion, and impinging jet spray combustion. The resulting 3D dataset shows a comprehensive view of jetting events in gelled droplet combustion that was not observed with high-speed imaging or 2D OH PLIF. Although the scan is noninstantaneous, the temporal and spatial resolution was sufficient to view the dynamic events in the multiphase combustion flow fields of interest. The system is limited by the repetition rate of the pulsed laser and the step response time of the galvanometric mirror; however, the repetition rates are sufficient to resolve events in the order of 100 Hz. Future upgrade includes 40 kHz pulsed UV laser system, which can reduce

  2. A single-label fluorescent derivatization method for quantitative determination of neurotoxin in vivo by capillary electrophoresis coupled with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cuiwei; Hu, Yiqin; Shi, Xiaowei; Tao, Chenghao; Zheng, Hongyue; Fei, Weidong; Han, Shunping; Zhu, Jiazhen; Wei, Yinghui; Li, Fanzhu

    2016-07-21

    Neurotoxin (NT), a short-chain α-neurotoxin, is the main neurotoxic protein identified from the venom of Naja naja atra. As an effective drug for the analgesis of advanced cancer patients, NT lasts longer than morphine and does not cause addiction. However, achieving a sensitive and high-resolution measurement of NT is difficult because of the extra-low content of NT in vivo. Therefore, developing a novel method to quantify NT is essential to study its pharmacokinetics in vivo. Although NT contains four primary amine groups that could react with the thiourea in fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), we developed a simple and reproducible single-label fluorescent derivatization method for NT which is related to the reaction of N-terminal α-amino of NT alone under optimized derivatization conditions. Furthermore, neurotoxin labelled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (NT-FITC) was prepared by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a purity value higher than 99.29% and identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. Finally, NT-FITC could be detected at 0.8 nmol L(-1) in rat plasma using capillary electrophoresis coupled with laser induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF). In this paper, the established method robustly and reliably quantified NT labelled with FITC via intravenous and intramuscular administrations in vivo. In addition, this work fully demonstrated the pharmacokinetic characteristics of NT in vivo, which could reduce the risk of drug accumulation, optimize therapies, and provide sufficient evidence for the rational use of NT in clinical and research laboratories. PMID:27175860

  3. Laser-induced fluorescence for the non-intrusive diagnostics of a fuel droplet burning under microgravity in a drop shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Fujii, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Katsumasa; Segawa, Daisuke; Kadota, Toshikazu

    1999-10-01

    The laser-induced-fluorescence method has been employed for remote, non-intrusive and instantaneous measurements of a fuel droplet burning under microgravity. A fuel droplet was doped with naphthalene and TMPD. The fluorescence emission spectra from a droplet subjected to the incident nitrogen laser beam were measured with an image-intensifying optical multichannel analyser. The microgravity was generated in a capsule of a 100 m drop shaft. The results showed that the newly developed diagnostic system could be applied successfully for the simultaneous measurements of droplet temperature and diameters of the droplet, flame and soot shell under microgravity. The droplet temperature was determined from the measured ratio of fluorescence emission intensities at two different wavelengths. The soot shell was located in the vicinity of the droplet surface deep inside the flame during the early stage of the burning and moved away from the droplet with the elapse of time.

  4. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements of Translational Temperature and Relative Cycle Number by use of Optically Pumped Trace-Sodium Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Chris C.

    1999-01-01

    Sodium fluorescence induced by a narrow-bandwidth tunable laser has been used to measure temperature, pressure, axial velocity, and species concentrations in wind tunnels, rocket engine exhausts, and the upper atmosphere. Optical pumping of the ground states of the sodium, however, can radically alter the shape of the laser-induced fluorescence excitation spectrum, complicating such measurements. Here a straightforward extension of rate equations originally proposed to account for the features of the pumped spectrum is used to make temperature measurements from spectra taken in pumped vapor. Also determined from the spectrum is the relative fluorescence cycle number, which has application to measurement of diffusion rate and transverse flow velocity, The accuracy of both the temperature and the cycle-number measurements is comparable with that of temperature measurements made in the absence of pumping.

  5. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements of Translational Temperature and Relative Cycle Number by use of Optically Pumped Trace-Sodium Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Chris C.

    1998-01-01

    Sodium fluorescence induced by a narrow bandwidth tunable laser has been used to measure temperature, pressure, axial velocity and species concentrations in wind tunnels, rocket engine exhausts and the upper atmosphere. Optical pumping of the ground states of the sodium, however, can radically alter the shape of the laser induced fluorescence excitation spectrum, complicating such measurements. Here a straightforward extension of rate equations originally proposed to account for the features of the pumped spectrum is to make temperature measurements from spectra taken in pumped vapor. Also determined from the spectrum is the relative fluorescence cycle number, which has application to measurement of diffusion rate and transverse flow velocity. The accuracy of both the temperature and cycle-number measurements is comparable with that of temperature measurements made in the absence of pumping.

  6. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements of translational temperature and relative cycle number by use of optically pumped trace-sodium vapor.

    PubMed

    Dobson, C C

    1999-06-20

    Sodium fluorescence induced by a narrow-bandwidth tunable laser has been used to measure temperature, pressure, axial velocity, and species concentrations in wind tunnels, rocket engine exhausts, and the upper atmosphere. Optical pumping of the ground states of the sodium, however, can radically alter the shape of the laser-induced fluorescence excitation spectrum, complicating such measurements. Here a straightforward extension of rate equations originally proposed to account for the features of the pumped spectrum is used to make temperature measurements from spectra taken in pumped vapor. Also determined from the spectrum is the relative fluorescence cycle number, which has application to measurement of diffusion rate and transverse flow velocity. The accuracy of both the temperature and the cycle-number measurements is comparable with that of temperature measurements made in the absence of pumping. PMID:18320000

  7. L.I.F.E.: laser induced fluorescence emission, a non-invasive tool to detect photosynthetic pigments in glacial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilg, Markus; Storrie-Lombardi, Michael; Kohstall, Christoph; Trenkwalder, Andreas; Psenner, Roland; Sattler, Birgit

    2011-10-01

    The cryosphere harbours diverse microbial communities which are contributing to the global carbon budget. Various ice ecosystems like ice covers of freshwater lakes, sea ice and supraglacial areas are highly sensitive to temperate rise due to resulting enhanced availability of liquid water which is the prerequisite for life. To assess the overall importance of these communities we require a non-invasive tool which provides high resolution measurements of photosynthetic pigments such as phycoerythrin. Here we present the preliminary calibration processes for L.I.F.E. (laser induced fluorescence emission).

  8. Jet-cooled laser-induced dispersed fluorescence spectroscopy of TaN: Observation of a3Δ and A1Δ states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukund, Sheo; Bhattacharyya, Soumen; Nakhate, S. G.

    2016-07-01

    Laser-induced dispersed fluorescence spectra of TaN molecules, produced in a free-jet apparatus, have been studied. Two spin components of the lowest-lying a3Δ state along with their vibrational structure have been observed. The A1Δ state, which was predicted earlier by ab initio calculation has also been observed. The X1Σ+ ground state vibrational progression up to v = 9 has been recorded. The experimentally determined term energies and vibrational constants at equilibrium for the ground and a3Δ states are in fairly good agreement with the ab initio values reported earlier.

  9. A theoretical assessment of the O3/H2O interference problem in the detection of natural levels of OH via laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. D.; Rodgers, M. O.; Fischer, S. D.; Heaps, W. S.

    1981-01-01

    Theoretical calculations are presented which estimate the possible magnitude of the O3/H2O derived OH interference signal resulting from the use of the laser-induced fluorescence technique in measuring natural levels of tropospheric OH. Critical to this new assessment has been the measurement of the nascent OH quantum state distribution resulting from the reaction O(1D) + H2O yields 2OH, and an assessment of the subsequent rotational relaxation of the OH species when formed in high k levels.

  10. The Use of Laser-Induced Fluorescence to Characterize Discharge Cathode Erosion in a 30 cm Ring-Cusp Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S. (Technical Monitor); Williams, George J., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Relative erosion rates and impingement ion production mechanisms have been identified for the discharge cathode of a 30 cm ion engine using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). Mo and W erosion products as well as neutral and singly ionized xenon were interrogated. The erosion increased with both discharge current and voltage and spatially resolved measurements agreed with observed erosion patters. Ion velocity mapping identified back-flowing ions near the regions of erosion with energies potentially sufficient to generate the level of observed erosion. Ion production regions downstream of the cathode were indicated and were suggested as possible sources of the erosion causing ions.

  11. Two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence on O and O{sub 3} in a dc plasma for oxidation of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Knechten, K.; Kniknie, B.J.; Engeln, R.; Swagten, H.J.M.; Koopmans, B.; Sanden, M.C.M. van de; Jonge, W.J.M. de

    2004-11-01

    It has been conjectured that atomic oxygen and ozone can have a great influence on the plasma oxidation of ultrathin aluminum for magnetic tunnel junctions. In order to measure the density of O and ozone, two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurements are performed in the dc glow plasma that is used for the oxidation process. It was found that ozone is much more abundantly present compared to atomic oxygen. Using in situ, real-time ellipsometry measurements, we prove that ozone is not directly involved in the oxidation process.

  12. OH and HO2 in Urban Environments. Measurements by Laser-Induced Fluorescence and Comparison With Model Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. D.; Heard, D. E.; Carslaw, N.; Pilling, M. J.; Creasey, D. J.; Carpenter, L. J.

    2001-12-01

    In contrast to remote, unpolluted regions, measurements of OH and HO2 in urban environments are rare. Our understanding of the complex chemical mechanisms in polluted air has not yet been fully evaluated through a comparison of measured HOx and model predictions. We have made measurements of OH and HO2 in the polluted boundary layer at two locations in the UK, in both summer and winter. OH is detected directly by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) at reduced pressure, and HO2 by titration with NO followed by LIF detection of OH, with noon detection limits of less than 1e5 molecule cm-3 (OH) and 1e6 molecule cm-3 (HO2). The instrument is equipped with two fluorescence cells and thus is capable of making simultaneous measurements of OH and HO2. The URGENT PUMA campaigns were located around 2 miles west of Birmingham city centre during June 1999 and January 2000, enabling a seasonal comparison of OH and HO2 radicals. During the summer campaign, OH and HO2 displayed distinct diurnal cycles, with maxima occurring at noon in the range (3-8)e6 (OH) and (1-8)e6 (HO2) molecule cm-3. Unexpectedly high concentrations of both OH and HO2 were measured during the winter campaign, with OH concentrations on average only a factor of 2-3 lower compared to summer, much less than the corresponding factor for J(O1D). The results suggest that the oxidising capacity of the urban boundary layer in winter may be underestimated. The PRIME campaign was located around 15 miles west of central London in July - August 1999. On four days the site was downwind of the polluted London plume, and very high concentrations of ozone were generated. In the plume OH, HO2 and O3 concentrations were highly correlated, and were found to peak several hours after local solar noon. On August 11, 1999, OH measurements were made during the nearly total solar eclipse, displaying a rapid and dramatic modulation with light intensity. For both locations, comparisons of the measured radical concentrations and the

  13. In-situ measurements of iodine monoxide at coastal and open-ocean locations using laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commane, R.; Whalley, L. K.; Furneaux, K. L.; Ingham, T.; Bloss, W. J.; Heard, D. E.

    2008-12-01

    The halogen oxides, IO and BrO, have traditionally been measured using the Long Path-Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) technique. Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF), however, provides a sensitive and selective alternative method to detect IO. LIF provides a point-source measurement of IO; comparison of IO data taken using LIF and LP-DOAS can help determine local sources of iodine at coastal sites. In-situ techniques, such as LIF, also allow a direct comparison with other co-located in-situ instruments, improving the understanding of the chemical interactions that occur. Furthermore the size, weight and flexibility of such instruments mean that they are readily deployable on ship and aircraft platforms, as well as at ground-based sites. The University of Leeds LIF-IO instruments have been operational since 2006; data taken at three contrasting locations will be presented. IO measurements were made at the Mace Head Observatory on the west coast of Ireland in 2007. The site is predominantly impacted by background air-masses from the north Atlantic. An anti-correlation between IO concentration and tidal height during the day was observable; a maximum of 33 pptV was observed during the lowest tides. A comparison with concurrent LP-DOAS measurements demonstrates local hot-spots of IO production. The release of I2 from a narrow strip of macro-algae, specifically laminaria, along this coastline acts as the major iodine source. In-situ IO measurements were also made at a second coastal site, in Roscoff, France as part of the Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe) project. This stretch of coastline is also impacted by macro-algae and high concentrations of IO were again observable at low-tide. In contrast to Mace Head, the Roscoff site was influenced by local pollution. A negative correlation between IO and NO2 was observed during low-tide periods; a positive correlation between IO and new particle bursts was also recorded. This work

  14. The Development and Deployment of a Ground-Based, Laser-Induced Fluorescence Instrument for the In Situ Detection of Iodine Monoxide Radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurlow, M. E.; Co, D. T.; O'Brien, A. S.; Hannun, R. A.; Lapson, L. B.; Hanisco, T. F.; Anderson, J. G.

    2014-01-01

    High abundances of iodine monoxide (IO) are known to exist and to participate in local photochemistry of the marine boundary layer. Of particular interest are the roles IO plays in the formation of new particles in coastal marine environments and in depletion episodes of ozone and mercury in the Arctic polar spring. This paper describes a ground-based instrument that measures IO at mixing ratios less than one part in 1012. The IO radical is measured by detecting laser-induced fluorescence at wavelengths longer that 500 nm. Tunable visible light is used to pump the A23/2 (v = 2) ? X23/2 (v = 0) transition of IO near 445 nm. The laser light is produced by a solid-state, Nd:YAG-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser at 5 kHz repetition rate. The laser-induced fluorescence instrument performs reliably with very high signal-to-noise ratios (>10) achieved in short integration times (<1 min). The observations from a validation deployment to the Shoals Marine Lab on Appledore Island, ME are presented and are broadly consistent with in situ observations from European Coastal Sites. Mixing ratios ranged from the instrumental detection limit (<1 pptv) to 10 pptv. These data represent the first in situ point measurements of IO in North America.

  15. Radial analysis of a C{sub 2}F{sub 6} inductively coupled plasma using optical emission spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, S.; Holloway, J.P.; Brake, M.L.; Hebner, G.

    1998-12-31

    A C{sub 2}F{sub 6} Discharge in a GEC rf Reference cell equipped with an inductively coupled source has been analyzed using laser induced fluorescence and spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy. Experiments were conducted approximately 1 cm above the lower electrode for C{sub 2}F{sub 6} and C{sub 2}F{sub 6}/Ar discharges at pressures ranging from 5 mTorr to 20 mTorr and inductive electrode power ranging from 100 W to 300 W. A 30 W bias was placed on the bottom electrode for all experiments. A 6 inch bare silicon wafer was used to represent processing conditions. A quartz ring was clamped to the top electrode to provide discharge stability. Radial profiles of optical emission were obtained using a novel glow discharge tomography sensor and regularized inversion solver. The 488 nm SiF line and the 703 nm F line were profiled, as well as the 750.4 nm Ar line in the C2F6/Ar runs in order to conduct spatially resolved actinometry of fluorine. Spatially resolved ground state radical density profiles were measured by laser induced fluorescence. Results of the OES and LIF experiments are presented and compared.

  16. The development and deployment of a ground-based, laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the in situ detection of iodine monoxide radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Thurlow, M. E. Hannun, R. A.; Lapson, L. B.; Anderson, J. G.; Co, D. T.; O'Brien, A. S.; Hanisco, T. F.

    2014-04-15

    High abundances of iodine monoxide (IO) are known to exist and to participate in local photochemistry of the marine boundary layer. Of particular interest are the roles IO plays in the formation of new particles in coastal marine environments and in depletion episodes of ozone and mercury in the Arctic polar spring. This paper describes a ground-based instrument that measures IO at mixing ratios less than one part in 10{sup 12}. The IO radical is measured by detecting laser-induced fluorescence at wavelengths longer that 500 nm. Tunable visible light is used to pump the A{sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} (v{sup ′} = 2) ← X{sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} (v{sup ″} = 0) transition of IO near 445 nm. The laser light is produced by a solid-state, Nd:YAG-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser at 5 kHz repetition rate. The laser-induced fluorescence instrument performs reliably with very high signal-to-noise ratios (>10) achieved in short integration times (<1 min). The observations from a validation deployment to the Shoals Marine Lab on Appledore Island, ME are presented and are broadly consistent with in situ observations from European Coastal Sites. Mixing ratios ranged from the instrumental detection limit (<1 pptv) to 10 pptv. These data represent the first in situ point measurements of IO in North America.

  17. Study the effect of insecticide dimethoate on photosynthetic pigments and photosynthetic activity of pigeon pea: Laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Jitendra Kumar; Dubey, Gunjan; Gopal, R

    2015-10-01

    Pigeon pea is one of the most important legume crops in India and dimethoate is a widely used insecticide in various crop plants. We studied the effect of dimethoate on growth and photosynthetic activity of pigeon pea plants over a short and long term exposure. Plant growth parameters, photosynthetic pigment content and chlorophyll fluorescence response of pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan L.) plants treated with various concentrations of the insecticide dimethoate (10, 20, 40 and 80 ppm) have been compared for 30 days at regular intervals of 10 days each. Laser induced chlorophyll fluorescence spectra and fluorescence-induction kinetics (FIK) curve of dimethoate treated pigeon pea plants were recorded after 10, 20 and 30 days of treatment. Fluorescence intensity ratio at the two fluorescence maxima (F685/F730) was calculated by evaluating curve-fitted parameters. The variable chlorophyll fluorescence decrease ratio (Rfd) was determined from the FIK curves. Our study revealed that after 10 days of treatment, 10 ppm of dimethoate showed stimulatory response whereas 20, 40 and 80 ppm of dimethoate showed inhibitory response for growth and photosynthetic activity of pigeon pea plants, but after 20 and 30 days of treatment all the tested concentrations of dimethoate became inhibitory. This study clearly shows that dimethoate is highly toxic to the pigeon pea plant, even at very low concentration (10 ppm), if used for a prolonged duration. Our study may thus be helpful in determining the optimal dose of dimethoate in agricultural practices. PMID:25228224

  18. Two-Photon Laser-Induced Fluorescence O and N Atoms for the Study of Heterogeneous Catalysis in a Diffusion Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pallix, Joan B.; Copeland, Richard A.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Advanced laser-based diagnostics have been developed to examine catalytic effects and atom/surface interactions on thermal protection materials. This study establishes the feasibility of using laser-induced fluorescence for detection of O and N atom loss in a diffusion tube to measure surface catalytic activity. The experimental apparatus is versatile in that it allows fluorescence detection to be used for measuring species selective recombination coefficients as well as diffusion tube and microwave discharge diagnostics. Many of the potential sources of error in measuring atom recombination coefficients by this method have been identified and taken into account. These include scattered light, detector saturation, sample surface cleanliness, reactor design, gas pressure and composition, and selectivity of the laser probe. Recombination coefficients and their associated errors are reported for N and O atoms on a quartz surface at room temperature.

  19. Quantitative two-dimensional measurement of oil-film thickness by laser-induced fluorescence in a piston-ring model experiment.

    PubMed

    Wigger, Stefan; Füßer, Hans-Jürgen; Fuhrmann, Daniel; Schulz, Christof; Kaiser, Sebastian A

    2016-01-10

    This paper describes advances in using laser-induced fluorescence of dyes for imaging the thickness of oil films in a rotating ring tribometer with optical access, an experiment representing a sliding piston ring in an internal combustion engine. A method for quantitative imaging of the oil-film thickness is developed that overcomes the main challenge, the accurate calibration of the detected fluorescence signal for film thicknesses in the micrometer range. The influence of the background material and its surface roughness is examined, and a method for flat-field correction is introduced. Experiments in the tribometer show that the method yields quantitative, physically plausible results, visualizing features with submicrometer thickness. PMID:26835762

  20. High-Throughput Analysis With 96-Capillary Array Electrophoresis and Integrated Sample Preparation for DNA Sequencing Based on Laser Induced Fluorescence Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gang Xue

    2001-12-31

    The purpose of this research was to improve the fluorescence detection for the multiplexed capillary array electrophoresis, extend its use beyond the genomic analysis, and to develop an integrated micro-sample preparation system for high-throughput DNA sequencing. The authors first demonstrated multiplexed capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) separations in a 96-capillary array system with laser-induced fluorescence detection. Migration times of four kinds of fluoresceins and six polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are normalized to one of the capillaries using two internal standards. The relative standard deviations (RSD) after normalization are 0.6-1.4% for the fluoresceins and 0.1-1.5% for the PAHs. Quantitative calibration of the separations based on peak areas is also performed, again with substantial improvement over the raw data. This opens up the possibility of performing massively parallel separations for high-throughput chemical analysis for process monitoring, combinatorial synthesis, and clinical diagnosis. The authors further improved the fluorescence detection by step laser scanning. A computer-controlled galvanometer scanner is adapted for scanning a focused laser beam across a 96-capillary array for laser-induced fluorescence detection. The signal at a single photomultiplier tube is temporally sorted to distinguish among the capillaries. The limit of detection for fluorescein is 3 x 10{sup -11} M (S/N = 3) for 5-mW of total laser power scanned at 4 Hz. The observed cross-talk among capillaries is 0.2%. Advantages include the efficient utilization of light due to the high duty-cycle of step scan, good detection performance due to the reduction of stray light, ruggedness due to the small mass of the galvanometer mirror, low cost due to the simplicity of components, and flexibility due to the independent paths for excitation and emission.

  1. Observation of Aqueous Cm(III)/Eu(III) and UO22+ Nanoparticulates at Concentrations Approaching Solubility Limit by Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Felmy, Andrew R.; Xia, Yuanxian; Buck, Edgar C.

    2006-07-20

    Eu(III), Cm(III) and the uranyl ion display intense fluorescence spectra in the visible range and the spectroscopic characteristics are dependent on the composition and structure of the individual metal complexes. In this work, we demonstrate the application of laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy in identification of nanoparticles of (1) Eu(III) and Cm(III) in basic solutions (pH > 10) in the presence of organic chelates including EDTA, HEDTA, NTA and oxalate and (2) sodium uranyl phosphate after equilibration with synthetic sodium uranyl phosphate suspensions. Fluorescence spectral and SEM results indicate that Eu(III) and Cm(III) can exist as colloidal nanoparticles in filtered 0.1 M NaOH solutions. Such nanoparticles, which display largely red-shifted fluorescence spectra as compared with the aqueous complexes and unusually short fluorescence lifetimes, contribute to the measured concentrations of Eu(III)/Cm(III) in the aqueous solutions. Similarly, uranyl spectroscopic signatures indicate that the determination of the solubility of uranium phosphate minerals is prone to the presence of uranyl phosphate nanoparticles. Due to the presence of such nanoparticles, the common solubility measurements may only indicate an upper limit of the ''true'' solubility.

  2. Interpretation of In-Situ Measurements of Iodine Monoxide in Coastal Regions Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furneaux, K. L.; Whalley, L. K.; Heard, D. E.

    2009-04-01

    Iodine species are present in coastal and open ocean regions due to the release of I2 and iodocarbons from macro and micro algae. The photolysis of these molecules yields iodine atoms, which react with ozone to produce iodine monoxide (IO). IO is involved in ozone depletion cycles, the partitioning of HOx and NOx, and the formation and growth of new particles. A novel point source Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) instrument was deployed to measure IO in September 2006 at Roscoff, France as part of the Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe) programme (1 instrument uncertainty = 23%)1. The maximum IO mixing ratio was 30 ± 7.1 pptV (10 s integration period, limit of detection = 1.4 pptV) at this semi-polluted coastal site (NOx levels = 1 - 5 ppbV). The closest macroalgae beds known to strongly emit I2 (laminaria) were ~ 300 m from the LIF instrument. IO displayed a strong anti-correlation with tidal height which is consistent with previous studies. IO was also dependent on solar irradiation and meteorological conditions. The dominant source of IO at this site was the photolysis of I2. The measurements provided by this instrument aim to address the main uncertainties associated with iodine chemistry. Co-ordinated measurement of IO by point source (LIF) and spatially averaged (Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) instruments confirm the presence of IO hotspots due to non-uniform macroalgae distribution at this location (resulting in a spatially variable I2 source). The ratio of point source/spatially averaged IO is determined by meteorological conditions and distance of the instrument from macroalgae beds. Co-located point source I2 (Broadband Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy) and IO (LIF) measurements correlated on some days but cannot be explained by our current knowledge of iodine chemistry. The influence of NOx on IO has been investigated. The detection of IO by LIF at the Roscoff site shows that IO can survive in a high NOx

  3. Tandem laser-induced fluorescence and mass spectrometry detection for high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the In Vitro metabolism of doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Katzenmeyer, Joseph B.; Eddy, Christopher V.; Arriaga, Edgar A.

    2010-01-01

    Structural characterization, identification and quantification of xenobiotics and their metabolic products commonly require the use of at least two different techniques. This has been the case in the analysis of metabolic products of doxorubicin, a widely-used fluorescent anthracycline for the treatment of tumors and leukemia. In this work, we combine HPLC with a tandem laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and mass spectrometry (MS) detection scheme for the characterization of doxorubicin and its metabolites produced in the post-mitochondrial fraction prepared from Fisher 344 rat liver. LIF detection allowed quantification of the metabolic compounds while MS detection aided in the identification of the metabolites. Using this HPLC-LIF-MS methodology, the disapperance of doxorubicin and the appearance of 7-deoxydoxorubicinone and 7-deoxydoxorubicinolone were monitored over the course of 40 minutes. This application demonstrates the potential of the tandem LIF-MS detection scheme in quantification and characterization of biotransformations of fluorescent xenobiotics of biomedical and environmental relevance. Furthermore, this detection scheme would be particularly relevant in the analysis of fluorescent analytes in complex samples and in validation of methods for the analysis of such samples that typically rely only on LIF detectors. PMID:20825163

  4. Design and daytime performance of laser-induced fluorescence spectrum lidar for simultaneous detection of multiple components, dissolved organic matter, phycocyanin, and chlorophyll in river water.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yasunori; Kakuda, Kei; Yokoyama, Mizuho; Kubota, Tomoki; Tomida, Takayuki; Park, Ho-Dong

    2016-08-20

    In this work, we developed mobile laser-induced fluorescence spectrum (LIFS) lidar based on preliminary experiments on the excitation emission matrix of a water sample and a method for reducing solar background light using the synchronous detection technique. The combination of a UV short-pulse laser (355 nm, 6 ns) for fluorescence excitation with a 10-100 ns short-time synchronous detection using a gated image-intensified multi-channel CCD of the fluorescence made the LIFS lidar operation possible even in daytime. The LIFS lidar with this construction demonstrated the potential of natural river/lake water quality monitoring at the Tenryu River/Lake Suwa. Three main components in the fluorescence data of the water, dissolved organic matter, phycocyanin, and chlorophyll, were extracted by spectral analysis using the standard spectral functions of these components. Their concentrations were estimated by adapting experimentally calibrated data. Results of long-term field observations using our LIFS lidar from 2010 to 2012 show the necessity of simultaneous multi-component detection to understand the natural water environment. PMID:27556995

  5. Delineation of estuarine fronts in the German Bight using airborne laser-induced water Raman backscatter and fluorescence of water column constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    The acquisition and application of airborne laser induced emission spectra from German Bight water during the 1979 MARSEN experiment is detailed for the synoptic location of estuarine fronts. The NASA Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) was operated in the fluorosensing mode. A nitrogen laser transmitter at 337.1 nm was used to stimulate the water column to obtain Gelbstoff or organic material fluorescence spectra together with water Raman backscatter. Maps showing the location and relative strength of estuarine fronts are presented. The distribution of the fronts indicates that mixing within the German Bight takes place across a relatively large area. Reasonable agreement between the patterns observed by the AOL and published results are obtained. The limitations and constraints of this technique are indicated and improvements to the AOL fluorosensor are discussed with respect to future ocean mapping applications.

  6. In situ detection of tropospheric OH, HO2, NO2, and NO by laser-induced fluorescence in detection chambers at reduced pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, William H.

    1992-01-01

    This report is a brief summary of the status of work on the grant entitled 'In situ detection of tropospheric OH, HO2, NO2, and NO by laser induced fluorescence in detection chambers at low pressures'. The first version of the instrument is essentially complete and operational for about six months, and we continue to make improvements on the instrument sensitivity and reliability. We are focusing our efforts on improving our understanding of the operating characteristics of the instrument - particularly the inlet transmission for OH and HO2, the exact character of the air flow around and within the instrument, and the efficiency of the chemical conversion of HO2 to OH. We are also in the process of converting this laboratory instrument into a field worthy instrument that we can take to remote sites for measurements.

  7. NO2 flux evaluation using laser induced fluorescence measurements and eddy covariance technique, in the Borneo forest during OP3 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dari Salisburgo, Cesare; di Carlo, Piero; Aruffo, E.; Langford, Ben; Dorsey, James; Giammaria, F.

    2010-05-01

    Emissions (both anthropogenic and biogenic) are extremely important to reduce the uncertainty of most models used to predict the atmospheric chemical species evolution. Measurements of emission of compounds such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are very rare because they require measures with high sensitivity and frequencies (above 5 Hz). Direct measurements of NO2 using laser-induced fluorescence (at 10Hz) combined with those of three components of wind are used to quantify directly the NO2 flux applying the eddy covariance technique. In this presentation will be described the technique of measurements and results of the observations made in the forests of Borneo (Malaysia) during the OP3 campaign in summer 2008.

  8. Jet-cooled laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of ScH: Observation of an Ω‧=2-Ω″=1 transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukund, Sheo; Bhattacharyya, Soumen; Nakhate, S. G.

    2014-11-01

    New bands of scandium monohydride at origins 17,914.5 and 17,942.3 cm-1 have been observed in a jet-cooled beam with laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Mass-selected resonant photoionization spectroscopy also confirmed the carrier of the band as ScH. The rotational analysis indicated that both transitions at 17,914.5 and 17,942.3 cm-1 are of Ω‧=2-Ω″=1 type with vibrational assignments (0,0) and (1,1) respectively. The assigned g3Φ2-a3Δ1 excitation is the first observed triplet-triplet transition in ScH.

  9. Real-Time Gas-Phase Imaging over a Pd(110) Catalyst during CO Oxidation by Means of Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The gas composition surrounding a catalytic sample has direct impact on its surface structure, which is essential when in situ investigations of model catalysts are performed. Herein a study of the gas phase close to a Pd(110) surface during CO oxidation under semirealistic conditions is presented. Images of the gas phase, provided by planar laser-induced fluorescence, clearly visualize the formation of a boundary layer with a significantly lower CO partial pressure close to the catalytically active surface, in comparison to the overall concentration as detected by mass spectrometry. The CO partial pressure variation within the boundary layer will have a profound effect on the catalysts’ surface structure and function and needs to be taken into consideration for in situ model catalysis studies. PMID:25893136

  10. Direct methods for dynamic monitoring of secretions from single cells by capillary electrophoresis and microscopy with laser-induced native fluorescence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, W.

    1997-10-08

    Microscale separation and detection methods for real-time monitoring of dynamic cellular processes (e.g., secretion) by capillary electrophoresis (CE) and microscopic imaging were developed. Ultraviolet laser-induced native fluorescence (LINF) provides simple, sensitive and direct detection of neurotransmitters and proteins without any derivatization. An on-column CE-LINF protocol for quantification of the release from single cell was demonstrated. Quantitative measurements of both the amount of insulin released from and the amount remaining in the cell ({beta}TC3) were achieved simultaneously. Secretion of catecholamines (norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E)) from individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was determined using the on-column CE-LINF. Direct visualization of the secretion process of individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was achieved by LINF imaging microscopy with high temporal and spatial resolution. The secretion of serotonin from individual leech Retzius neurons was directly characterized by LINF microscopy with high spatial resolution.

  11. According theory and experiment in CaH: Laser-induced fluorescence study of new B/B‧-X bands in the UV region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Kyohei; Yoneyama, Naoya; Uchida, Kanako; Kobayashi, Kaori; Matsushima, Fusakazu; Moriwaki, Yoshiki; Ross, Stephen C.

    2016-07-01

    Despite the astrophysical importance of calcium monohydride (CaH), a long-standing discrepancy exists between the experimental and theoretical analysis of its first two excited 2Σ+ states. In a bid to resolve this discrepancy, we observed the rotationally-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectrum of CaH in the 23,300-27,800 cm-1 region. We assigned all newly observed vibrational levels, and five levels previously assigned to the D state, to the B/B‧ state. The level properties alternate strongly with vibrational excitation and this new assignment brings the experimental vibronic structure into remarkably good agreement with the predictions of Carlsund-Levin et al. (2002).

  12. Comparison of ELISA and capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection in the analysis of Ochratoxin A in low volumes of human blood serum.

    PubMed

    Köller, Gábor; Wichmann, Gunnar; Rolle-Kampczyk, Ulrike; Popp, Peter; Herbarth, Olf

    2006-08-18

    In this paper the determination of Ochratoxin A (OTA) in low volumes of human blood serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is compared with an appropriate capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF) method. In order to use ELISA for high-throughput analysis in epidemiological studies no sample cleanup was performed. Both methods showed a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.5 ng/mL. Comparing the precisions of both methods, the data show that the quantified concentrations in ELISA are higher than the corresponding concentrations in the CE-LIF method. Using a matrix calibration curve instead of a standard calibration curve the reproducibilities of both methods are comparable. No additional matrix effect could be observed by adding phenylalanine as probable matrix compound to the serum. PMID:16731055

  13. Laser-induced (endo)vascular photothermal effects studied by combined brightfield and fluorescence microscopy in hamster dorsal skin fold venules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezemer, R.; Heger, M.; van den Wijngaard, J. P. H.; Mordon, S. R.; van Gemert, M. J. C.; Beek, J. F.

    2007-07-01

    The putative features of the (endo)vascular photothermal response, characterized by laser-induced thermal denaturation of blood and vessel wall constituents, have been elucidated individually, but not simultaneously in dynamic, isolated in vivo systems. A hamster dorsal skin fold model in combination with brightfield/fluorescence intravital microscopy was used to examine the effect of laser pulse duration and blood flow velocity on the size of the thermal coagulum, its attachment behavior, and laser-mediated vasomotion. The size of the coagulum and the extent of vasoconstriction and latent vasodilation were proportional to the laser pulse duration, but pulse duration had no effect on coagulum attachment/dislodgement. Blood flow velocity exhibited no significant effect on the studied parameters. The (endo)vascular photothermal response is governed predominantly by laser energy deposition and to a marginal extent by blood flow velocity.

  14. In situ detection of tropospheric OH, HO2, NO2, and NO by laser-induced fluorescence in detection chambers at reduced pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, William H.

    1993-01-01

    This report is a brief summary of the status of work on the grant entitled 'In situ detection of tropospheric OH, HO2, NO2, and NO by laser induced fluorescence in detection chambers at low pressures.' The basic instrument characteristics have been established, and have been reported in a manuscript, included as an appendix to this report, that has been accepted by the Journal of Geophysical Research. Currently, two efforts are under way. First, instrument tests and calibrations are continuing. These efforts include field measurements and an informal inter comparison in Colorado last August and September. Second, new technologies in lasers and detectors are being implemented to make the instrument smaller, lighter, and more energy efficient. Such instrument modifications are essential for measurements from aircraft, high scaffolding in forests, and ships.

  15. Development of a flow injection analysis (FIA) system for the measurement of heavy metals using a fiber optic chemical sensor based on laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Prestel, Harald; Gahr, Achim; Niessner, Reinhard

    2000-05-01

    The development of a fiber optic sensor system is described, for the on-line detection of heavy metal ions in water. This is based on laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of suitable metal-ligand complexes. The sensor system is designed to measure heavy metal ions in the field. Flow injection analysis (FIA) is coupled with the sensor system, to overcome problems of a slow diffusion rate of heavy metals through the membrane of an in situ sensor head. Preliminary experiments show the new FIA system has good reproducibility, a high sample analysis rate and it can measure heavy metal ions (Cu(II), Ni(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II)) at the ppb level, when using the appropriate ligands.

  16. Nitric-oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence applied to low-pressure hypersonic flow fields for the imaging of mixture fraction.

    PubMed

    Rossmann, Tobias; Mungal, M Godfrey; Hanson, Ronald K

    2003-11-20

    The scalar-field imaging of a hypersonic mixing flow is performed in a mixing facility that is shock tunnel driven. The instantaneous mixture-fraction field of a hypersonic two-dimensional mixing layer (M1 = 5.1, M2 = 0.3) is determined with a temperature-insensitive planar laser-induced fluorescence technique with nitric oxide (NO) as the tracer species. Single-shot images are obtained with the broadband excitation of a reduced temperature-sensitivity transition in the A2 sigma+ <-- X2 II(1/2) (0, 0) band of NO near 226 nm. The instantaneous mixture-fraction field at a convective Mach number of 2.64 is shown to be nearly identical to a typical diffusive process, supporting the notion of gradient-transport mixing models for highly compressible mixing layers. PMID:14658473

  17. Laser-induced fluorescence and reflectance spectroscopy for the discrimination of basal cell carcinoma from the surrounding normal skin tissue.

    PubMed

    Drakaki, E; Kaselouris, E; Makropoulou, M; Serafetinides, A A; Tsenga, A; Stratigos, A J; Katsambas, A D; Antoniou, C

    2009-01-01

    The object of this study was to investigate whether laser-induced skin autofluorescence (LIF) and/or light reflectance spectra could provide a useful contrast between basal cell carcinoma (BCC) tissues and the surrounding healthy skin. Unstained human skin samples, excised from humans undergoing biopsy examination, were irradiated with a nitrogen laser (lambda = 337 nm) for excitation of autofluorescence and a tungsten halogen lamp for the reflectance measurements. The ex vivo spectroscopic results were correlated with the histopathology images to distinguish the areas of BCC from those of the surrounding health skin. A simple spectral analysis technique was also applied for better skin diagnosis. In conclusion, it seems that LIF and reflectance spectra could be used to differentiate neoplastic from normal skin tissue using an appropriate classification model analysis. PMID:19365155

  18. On-line and in-situ detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) on aerosols via thermodesorption and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Panne, U; Knöller, A; Kotzick, R; Niessner, R

    2000-02-01

    A fiber optical sensor system for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) on aerosols by laser-induced, time-resolved fluorescence is combined with a thermodesorption device. The sensor system is based on an aerosol flow cell, which is fibre-optically coupled to a pulsed nitrogen laser for excitation and the detection system. Time-resolved fluorescence emission spectra are detected by a monochromator equipped with a photomultiplier and a fast digital storage oscilloscope. The analytical figures of merit of the thermodenuder are reported for benzo[a]pyrene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, and benzo[ghi]-perylene on ultrafine soot and NaCl aerosols. By thermodesorption of the PAH, problems due to quenching of the PAH fluorescence by the bulk aerosol material or excimer formation on the aerosol surface were avoided. For the PAH under study, the sensitivity was improved considerably and detection limits between 110 and 850 ng m(-3) were attained, while a response time of 2-3 min was achieved with the thermodenuder. A calibration for PAH on ultrafine soot and NaCl aerosols was established independent of the aerosol substrate. PMID:11220329

  19. Periodic Evolution of a Xe I Population in an Oscillatory Discharge: Comparison between Time-Synchronized Laser-Induced-Fluorescence Measurements and A Dynamic Collisional-Radiative Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Young, Chris V.; Cappelli, Mark A.; Plasma Physics Laboratory Team

    2014-10-01

    We study the evolution of the Xe I 6 s '[ 1 / 2 ] 1 - 6 p '[ 3 / 2 ] 2 (834.68 nm air) transition lineshape in a plasma discharge oscillating at 60 Hz using time-synchronized laser induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements and a collisional-radiative model. Two different time-synchronized LIF techniques based on phase sensitive detection of the fluorescence signal are applied, yielding consistent results. The maximum observed peak fluorescence intensity occurs at low values of the discharge current, although the peak intensity drops to zero at zero discharge current. The peak intensity also decreases at the discharge current maximum. A dynamic collisional-radiative model of the weakly ionized xenon discharge is also implemented, based on a set of rate equations. The proper electron impact cross-sections and radiative decay rates are identified from the literature and used to compute accurate rate coefficients with the Boltzmann solver Bolsig+, including the time-varying electric field. The time evolution of the probed excited state density predicted by the model shows good agreement with the experimental measurements. This work is sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research with Dr. Mitat Birkan as program manager. CVY acknowledges support from the DOE NNSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship under Contract DE-FC52-08NA28752.

  20. Simultaneous imaging of fuel vapor mass fraction and gas-phase temperature inside gasoline sprays using two-line excitation tracer planar laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Zigan, Lars; Trost, Johannes; Leipertz, Alfred

    2016-02-20

    This paper reports for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, on the simultaneous imaging of the gas-phase temperature and fuel vapor mass fraction distribution in a direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) spray under engine-relevant conditions using tracer planar laser-induced fluorescence (TPLIF). For measurements in the spray, the fluorescence tracer 3-pentanone is added to the nonfluorescent surrogate fuel iso-octane, which is excited quasi-simultaneously by two different excimer lasers for two-line excitation LIF. The gas-phase temperature of the mixture of fuel vapor and surrounding gas and the fuel vapor mass fraction can be calculated from the two LIF signals. The measurements are conducted in a high-temperature, high-pressure injection chamber. The fluorescence calibration of the tracer was executed in a flow cell and extended significantly compared to the existing database. A detailed error analysis for both calibration and measurement is provided. Simultaneous single-shot gas-phase temperature and fuel vapor mass fraction fields are processed for the assessment of cyclic spray fluctuations. PMID:26906600