Science.gov

Sample records for acetone methylene chloride

  1. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 84-419-1697, USGS Laboratory, Doraville, Georgia. [Benzene, methylene chloride, hexane, and acetone

    SciTech Connect

    Rondinelli, R.; Wilcox, T.; Roper, P.; Salisbury

    1986-05-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory, Doraville, Georgia requested an evaluation of physical complaints reported by employees to determine possible work related causes. Laboratory workers, in general, complained of physical symptoms which were irritative (rash, sore throat, nose or sinus irritation), neurological (numbness, muscle weakness) and nonspecific (dizziness, headache, emotional swings, insomnia, muscle aching, fatigue). Reported exposure to solvents such as benzene, methylene chloride, hexane and acetone were positively related with light headedness or dizziness, numbness, unexplained muscle weakness and muscle aching. Air sampling did not reveal any remarkable exposure to chemical contaminants. The authors conclude that no relationship could be established between chemical exposures and antinuclear antibody positivity. Exposure to chemicals measured by air sampling were below occupational health exposure limits.

  2. Fate and effects of methylene chloride in activated sludge.

    PubMed Central

    Klecka, G M

    1982-01-01

    Activated sludge obtained from a municipal wastewater treatment plant was acclimated to methylene chloride at concentrations between 1 and 100 mg/liter by continuous exposure to the compound for 9 to 11 days. Acclimated cultures were shown to mineralize methylene chloride to carbon dioxide and chloride. Rates of methylene chloride degradation were 0.14, 2.3, and 7.4 mg of CH2Cl2 consumed per h per g of mixed-liquor suspended solids for cultures incubated in the presence of 1, 10, and 100 mg/liter, respectively. Concentrations of methylene chloride between 10 and 1,000 mg/liter had no significant effect on O2 consumption or glucose metabolism by activated sludge. A hypothetical model was developed to examine the significance of volatilization and biodegradation for the removal of methylene chloride from an activated sludge reactor. Application of the model indicated that the rate of biodegradation was approximately 12 times greater than the rate of volatilization. Thus, biodegradation may be the predominant process determining the fate of methylene chloride in activated sludge systems continuously exposed to the compound. PMID:7138008

  3. Calix[4]arene coated QCM sensors for detection of VOC emissions: Methylene chloride sensing studies.

    PubMed

    Temel, Farabi; Tabakci, Mustafa

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the sensing studies of QCM sensors with coated some calixarene derivatives bearing different functional groups for some selected Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) such as acetone, acetonitrile, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, methylene chloride (MC), N,N-dimethylformamide, 1,4-dioxane, ethanol, ethyl acetate, xylene, methanol, n-hexane and toluene. The initial experiments have revealed that whole the calix[4]arene modified QCM sensors exhibited strongest sensing ability to MC emissions. Thus, the detailed studies were performed for only MC emissions after the determination of relatively more effective calix-coated QCM sensors for MC emissions in aqueous media. The results demonstrated that QCM sensor coated with calix-7 bearing both amino and imidazole groups was most useful sensor for MC emissions with 54.1ppm of detection limit. Moreover, it was understood that cyclic structures, H-bonding capabilities and also good preorganization properties of calixarene derivatives played an important role in VOC sensing processes. PMID:27130112

  4. Toxicology and metabolism of methylene chloride. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning methylene chloride, its effects on biological systems, and its metabolic fate. Both animal and human studies, and case reports are examined for methylene chloride toxicity. Exposure to the chemical through inhalation, ingestion, and contact is examined. Occupational exposure to methylene chloride is included, and risk factors are discussed. Long term carcinogenicity of methylene chloride is also considered. Toxicity of other chlorinated organic compounds is referenced in related bibliographies. (Contains a minimum of 78 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  5. 21 CFR 700.19 - Use of methylene chloride as an ingredient of cosmetic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... cosmetic products. 700.19 Section 700.19 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.19 Use of methylene chloride as an ingredient of cosmetic products. (a) Methylene chloride has been...

  6. 21 CFR 700.19 - Use of methylene chloride as an ingredient of cosmetic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... cosmetic products. 700.19 Section 700.19 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.19 Use of methylene chloride as an ingredient of cosmetic products. (a) Methylene chloride has been...

  7. 21 CFR 700.19 - Use of methylene chloride as an ingredient of cosmetic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... cosmetic products. 700.19 Section 700.19 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.19 Use of methylene chloride as an ingredient of cosmetic products. (a) Methylene chloride has been...

  8. 21 CFR 700.19 - Use of methylene chloride as an ingredient of cosmetic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... cosmetic products. 700.19 Section 700.19 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.19 Use of methylene chloride as an ingredient of cosmetic products. (a) Methylene chloride has been...

  9. 21 CFR 700.19 - Use of methylene chloride as an ingredient of cosmetic products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... cosmetic products. 700.19 Section 700.19 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.19 Use of methylene chloride as an ingredient of cosmetic products. (a) Methylene chloride has been...

  10. Assess health effects associated with dichloromethane (methylene chloride). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-09

    On August 13-14, 1987 the Halogenated Organics Subcommittee of the Science Advisory Board's Environmental Health Committee met in Washington, D.C. to review two documents prepared by EPA's Office of Research and Development that assess health effects associated with dichloromethane (methylene chloride). The documents included: a June 1987 Draft Technical Analysis of New Methods and Data Regarding Dichloromethane: Pharmacokinetics, Mechanism of Action and Epidemiology, a July 1987 Draft Addendum to the Health Assessment Document for Dichloromethane: Pharmacokinetics, Mechanism of Action and Epidemiology. The Subcommittees concluded that the Addendum was one of the best documents it has received in terms of its clarity, coverage of the data and analysis of scientific issues. The document clearly demonstrates the potential utility of pharmacokinetics data in risk assessment.

  11. Fatal exposure to methylene chloride among bathtub refinishers - United States, 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    2012-02-24

    In 2010, the Michigan Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation program conducted an investigation into the death of a bathtub refinisher who used a methylene chloride-based paint stripping product marketed for use in aircraft maintenance. The program identified two earlier, similar deaths in Michigan. Program staff members notified CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), which in turn notified the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). In addition to the three deaths, OSHA identified 10 other bathtub refinisher fatalities associated with methylene chloride stripping agents that had been investigated in nine states during 2000-2011. Each death occurred in a residential bathroom with inadequate ventilation. Protective equipment, including a respirator, either was not used or was inadequate to protect against methylene chloride vapor, which has been recognized as potentially fatal to furniture strippers and factory workers but has not been reported previously as a cause of death among bathtub refinishers. Worker safety agencies, public health agencies, methylene chloride-based stripper manufacturers, and trade organizations should communicate the extreme hazards of using methylene chloride-based stripping products in bathtub refinishing to employers, workers, and consumers. Employers should strongly consider alternative methods of bathtub stripping and always ensure worker safety protections that reduce the risk for health hazards to acceptable levels. Employers choosing to use methylene chloride-based stripping products must comply with OSHA's standard to limit methylene chloride exposures to safe levels. PMID:22357403

  12. DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF COPPER CHLORIDE, METHYLENE CHLORIDE,AND 6-AMINONICOTINAMIDE TO EMBRYOS OF THE GRASS SHRIMPPALAEMONETES PUGIO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Embryos of estuarine grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio have demonstrated sensitivity to various solvents and petroleum products, indicating utility for evaluating estuarine contamination. Testing was performed to establish concentration-response curves for methylene chloride, cop...

  13. Methylene chloride: a 2-year inhalation toxicity and oncogenicity study in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, K.D.; Burek, J.D.; Bell, T.J.; Kociba, R.J.; Rampy, L.W.; McKenna, M.J.

    1988-07-01

    Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 0, 50, 200, or 500 ppm methylene chloride for 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 2 years. Blood carboxyhemoglobin levels were elevated in a dose-dependent (less than linear) manner in rats exposed to 50-500 ppm methylene chloride. Histopathologic lesions related to methylene chloride exposure were confined to the liver and mammary tissue of rats. An increased incidence of hepatocellular vacuolization was observed in male and female rats exposed to 500 ppm methylene chloride. Female rats exposed to 500 ppm methylene chloride also had an increased incidence of multinucleated hepatocytes and number of spontaneous benign mammary tumors/tumor-bearing rat (adenomas, fibromas, and fibroadenomas with no progression toward malignancy); the incidence of benign mammary tumors in female rats exposed to 50 or 200 ppm methylene chloride was comparable to historical control values. No increase in the number of any malignant tumor type was observed in rats exposed to concentrations as high as 500 ppm methylene chloride. Additional groups of female rats were exposed to 500 ppm methylene chloride for the first 12 months or the last 12 months of the 24-month study. The response observed in female rats exposed to 500 ppm for the first 12 months was the same as that observed in female rats exposed to 500 ppm for 2 years. Conversely, the response observed in female rats exposed to 500 ppm during the last 12 months of the study was similar to that observed in control animals. Based upon the results of this study, the no-adverse-effect level for chronic inhalation exposure of Sprague-Dawley rats was judged to be 200 ppm methylene chloride.

  14. Acetone

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetone ; CASRN 67 - 64 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  15. Developmental toxicity of copper chloride, methylene chloride, and 6-aminonicotinamide to embryos of the grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio

    SciTech Connect

    Rayburn, J.R.; Fisher, W.S.

    1999-05-01

    Embryos of estuarine grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio have demonstrated sensitivity to various solvents and petroleum products, indicating utility for evaluating estuarine contamination. Testing was performed to establish concentration-response curves for methylene chloride, copper chloride, and 6-aminonicotinamide, three known teratogenic chemicals. Two exposure periods were used, 4 d and 12 d, and both periods extended through hatching. The average 4-d LC50 values for methylene chloride, copper chloride, and 6-aminonicotinamide were 0.071% v/v, 1.82 mg/L, and 0.21 mg/ml, respectively. The average 12-d LC50 values for methylene chloride, copper chloride, and 6-aminonicotinamide were 0.031% v/v, 1.44 mg/L, and 0.057 mg/ml, respectively. Eye malformations were observed with embryos exposed to concentrations greater than 3 mg/L copper chloride or greater than 0.07% v/v methylene chloride. Very few abnormalities were observed in embryos exposed to 6-aminonicotinamide. Abnormal larval development was found with exposure to copper chloride at concentrations greater than 1 mg/L. The sensitivity and low variability found here further supports the development of these relatively simple methods using grass shrimp embryos. Establishment of sublethal developmental endpoints warrants further investigation because of their potential correspondence to mechanisms of toxic action.

  16. A Study for Health Hazard Evaluation of Methylene Chloride Evaporated from the Tear Gas Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eun-Kyo; Yi, Gwang-Yong; Chung, Kwang-Jae; Shin, Jung-Ah; Lee, In-Seop

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the health hazard of those exposed to methylene chloride by assessing its atmospheric concentration when a tear gas mixture was aerially dispersed. The concentration of methylene chloride ranged from 311.1-980.3 ppm (geometric mean, 555.8 ppm), 30 seconds after the dispersion started. However, the concentration fell rapidly to below 10 ppm after dispersion was completed. The concentration during the dispersion did not surpass the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health 'immediately dangerous to life or health' value of 2,300 ppm, but did exceed the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists excursion limit of 250 ppm. Since methylene chloride is highly volatile (vapor pressure, 349 mmHg at 20℃), the postdispersion atmospheric concentration can rise instantaneously. Moreover, the o-chlorobenzylidenemalononitrile formulation of tear gas (CS gas) is an acute upper respiratory tract irritant. Therefore, tear gas mixtures should be handled with delicate care. PMID:22953168

  17. 76 FR 14432 - Methylene Chloride Standard; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3506 et seq.) and Secretary of Labor's Order No. 4-2010 (75 FR... requirements specified by the Methylene Chloride Standard (29 CFR 1910.1052). DATES: Comments must be submitted... entitled ``Methylene Chloride'' (MC) (29 CFR 1910.1052; the ``Standard'') protects workers from the...

  18. IRIS Toxicological Review of Dichloromethane (Methylene Chloride) (Interagency Science Consultation Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    On March 31, 2010, the draft IRIS Toxicological Review of Dichloromethane (Methylene Chloride) external review draft document and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for public review and comment. The draft document and the charge to external peer reviewers were r...

  19. SOURCE CHARACTERIZATION AND CONTROL TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT OF METHYLENE CHLORIDE EMISSIONS FROM EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY, ROCHESTER, NY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an assessment of potential control technologies for methylene chloride (also known as dichloromethane or DCM) emission sources at Eastman Kodak Company's Kodak Park facility in Rochester, NY. DCM is a solvent used by Kodak in the manufacture of cellulo...

  20. Mortality of workers exposed to methylene chloride employed at a plant producing cellulose triacetate film base.

    PubMed Central

    Tomenson, J A; Bonner, S M; Heijne, C G; Farrar, D G; Cummings, T F

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study mortality among 1785 employees of a factory that produced cellulose triacetate film base at Brantham in the United Kingdom. Also, to investigate patterns of mortality after exposure to methylene chloride; in particular, mortality from liver and biliary tract cancer, lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, and cardiovascular disease. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: All male employees with a record of employment at the film factory in 1946-88. A total of 1473 subjects worked in jobs that entailed exposure to methylene chloride. The mean duration of exposure was nine years at 19 ppm (eight hour time weighted average). RESULTS: In the cohort, 334 deaths were identified up to 31 December 1994. Mortalities for the cohort were compared with national and local rates and expressed as standardised mortality ratios (SMR). In the subcohort of workers exposed to methylene chloride, substantially reduced mortalities compared with national and local rates were found for all causes, all cancers, and the principal cancer sites of interest. The significantly reduced lung cancer mortalities in exposed workers (SMR 48) seemed to reflect the restrictions on smoking at the workplace. In contrast, mortality from ischaemic heart disease in exposed workers, although lower than national rates (SMR 92), was slightly increased compared with local rates. However, mortality from ischaemic heart disease was lower in active employees (SMR 83) where a direct effect of exposure to methylene chloride should be concentrated. No in service mortality due to ischaemic heart disease was found in workers with the highest cumulative exposure (> or = 800 ppm-years). CONCLUSIONS: The study provided no indication that employment at the plant, or exposure to methylene chloride, had adversely affected the mortalities of workers. PMID:9282122

  1. Methylene chloride exposure in furniture-stripping shops: ventilation and respirator use practices.

    PubMed

    Hall, A H; Rumack, B H

    1990-01-01

    Four cases of serious methylene chloride (dichloromethane) poisoning, including fatalities, in small-scale furniture-stripping shops were reported to the Rocky Mountain Poison and Drug Center between 1984 and 1988. Adequate ventilation systems and use of recommended respirators may seem impractical or overly expensive to the operators of such shops. Twenty-one shops in the metropolitan Denver, Colorado area were surveyed. A half-facepiece respirator with organic vapor cartridges was worn at least part-time in 14 of 21 shops; none was worn in 7. In 10 of 21 shops, workers had experienced dizziness, headache, or nausea when stripping furniture. Current safety practices in small-scale furniture-stripping shops may be inadequate to keep methylene chloride exposure levels in compliance with latest recommendations, and serious or fatal overexposure can occur.

  2. Source reduction for prevention of methylene chloride hazards: cases from four industrial sectors

    PubMed Central

    Roelofs, Cora R; Ellenbecker, Michael J

    2003-01-01

    Background Source reduction, defined as chemical, equipment and process changes that intervene in an industrial process to eliminate or reduce hazards, has not figured as a front-line strategy for the protection of workers' health. Such initiatives are popular for environmental protection, but their feasibility and effectiveness as an industrial hygiene approach have not been well described. Methods We investigated four cases of source reduction as a hazard prevention strategy in Massachusetts companies that had used methylene chloride, an occupational carcinogen, for cleaning and adhesive thinning. Three cases were retrospective and one was prospective, where the researchers assisted with the source reduction process change. Data were collected using qualitative research methods, including in-depth interviews and site visits. Results Motivated by environmental restrictions, a new worker health standard, and opportunity for productivity improvements, three companies eliminated their use of methylene chloride by utilizing available technologies and drop-in substitutes. Aided by technical assistance from the investigators, a fourth case dramatically reduced its use of methylene chloride via process and chemistry changes. While the companies' evaluations of potential work environment impacts of substitutes were not extensive, and in two cases new potential hazards were introduced, the overall impact of the source reduction strategy was deemed beneficial, both from a worker health and a production standpoint. Conclusion The findings from these four cases suggest that source reduction should be considered potentially feasible and effective for reducing or eliminating the potential hazards of methylene chloride exposure. Especially when faced with a hazard that is both an environmental and worker health concern, companies may chose to change their processes rather than rely on local exhaust ventilation equipment or personal protective equipment that might not be as

  3. POLLUTION PREVENTION DEMONSTRATION AND EVALUATION OF PAINT APPLICATION EQUIPMENT AND ALTERNATIVES TO METHYLENE CHLORIDE AND METHYL ETHYL KETONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of demonstrations of technologies to prevent or control emissions of hazardous air pollutant (HAPs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from processes with high solvent usage: (1) paint stripping using methylene chloride, (2) cleaning paint equipment wi...

  4. ANALYSIS OF VAPORS FROM METHYLENE CHLORIDE EXTRACTS OF NUCLEAR GRADE HEPA FILTER FIBERGLASS SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    FRYE JM; ANASTOS HL; GUTIERREZ FC

    2012-06-07

    While several organic compounds were detected in the vapor samples used in the reenactment of the preparation of mounts from the extracts of nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air filter fiberglass samples, the most significant species present in the samples were methylene chloride, phenol, phenol-d6, and 2-fluorophenol. These species were all known to be present in the extracts, but were expected to have evaporated during the preparation of the mounts, as the mounts appeared to be dry before any vapor was collected. These species were present at the following percentages of their respective occupational exposure limits: methylene chloride, 2%; phenol, 0.4%; and phenol-d6, 0.6%. However, there is no established limit for 2-fluorophenol. Several other compounds were detected at low levels for which, as in the case of 2-fluorophenol, there are no established permissible exposure limits. These compounds include 2-chlorophenol; N-nitroso-1-propanamine; 2-fluoro-1,1{prime}-biphenyl; 1,2-dihydroacenaphthylene; 2,5-cyclohexadiene-1,4-dione,2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl); trimethyl oxirane; n-propylpropanamine; 2-(Propylamino)ethanol; 4-methoxy-1-butene; 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one; and 3,4-dimethylpyridine. Some of these were among those added as surrogates or spike standards as part ofthe Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International, Inc. preparation ofthe extract of the HEPA filter media and are indicated as such in the data tables in Section 2, Results; other compounds found were not previously known to be present. The main inorganic species detected (sulfate, sodium, and sulfur) are also consistent with species added in the preparation of the methylene chloride extract of the high-efficiency particulate air sample.

  5. Headspace gas chromatographic determination of methylene chloride in decaffeinated tea and coffee, with electrolytic conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Page, B D; Charbonneau, C F

    1984-01-01

    A headspace gas chromatographic procedure is described for the determination of methylene chloride (MC) in decaffeinated tea and coffee. The tea or coffee sample, with added methylene bromide (MB) internal standard, is equilibrated for 1.5 h at 100 degrees C in aqueous sodium sulfate before manual headspace sampling. MC and MB are separated on a Porasil A column at 160 degrees C and detected by using a Coulson electrolytic conductivity detector. For coffee and tea samples spiked at 1.3 ppm MC, as well as commercially decaffeinated teas and coffees containing up to 8 ppm MC, coefficients of variation were 10% or less. For decaffeinated teas, problems involving sample homogeneity and loss of MC before sealing the headspace vial had to be overcome. Similar problems with decaffeinated instant and ground coffees were minimal. The headspace procedure was superior to a previously reported distillation technique. MC was readily detected at 0.05 ppm. Fourteen decaffeinated teas and 15 decaffeinated coffees were analyzed; MC was detected at levels that ranged up to 15.9 and 4.0 ppm, respectively. PMID:6469909

  6. Determination of Key Flavor Components in Methylene Chloride Extracts from Processed Grapefruit Juice.

    PubMed

    Jella; Rouseff; Goodner; Widmer

    1998-01-19

    The relative correlation of 52 aroma and 5 taste components in commercial not-from-concentrate grapefruit juices with flavor panel preference was determined. Methylene chloride extracts of juice were analyzed using GC/MS with a DB-5 column. Nonvolatiles determined included limonin and naringin by HPLC, degrees Brix, total acids, and degrees Brix/acid ratio. Juice samples were classified into low, medium, or high categories, based on average taste panel preference scores (nine-point hedonic scale). Principal component analysis demonstrated that highest quality juices were tightly clustered. Discriminant analysis indicated that 82% of the samples could be identified in the correct preference category using only myrcene, beta-caryophyllene, linalool, nootkatone, and degrees Brix. Nootkatone alone was not strongly associated with preference scores. The most preferred juices were strongly associated with low myrcene, low linalool, and intermediate levels of beta-caryophyllene. PMID:10554226

  7. DEMONSTRATION OF N-METHYL PYRROLIDONE (NMP) AS A POLLUTION PREVENTION ALTERNATIVE TO PAINT STRIPPING WITH METHYLENE CHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This objective of this paper is to demonstrate that NMP is a viable pollution prevention alternative to methylene chloride. Maine Corps Logistics Base (MCLB), Albany, GA, USA was the host site for the demonstration. MCLB's primary function is maintenance of military ground supp...

  8. Experimental exposure of rats to methylene chloride at varying controlled barometric altitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Lillquist, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    This study investigated combined effects of three methylene chloride (MC) volume/volume concentrations (0,50, and 500 ppm) at three controlled barometric altitudes (760, 640, and 560 torr). This provided a three by three study design. For each scenario, three altitude acclimated (6 days) adult male rats were studied for eight hours in a nose-only inhalation chamber. Blood (0.35 mL) was drawn from the cannulated left carotid artery of each rat at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 8 hours and hematocrit, pO[sub 2], pCO[sub 2], pH , total hemoglobin (Hb) and carboxyhemoglobin (CHb) were measured. Time, MC concentration and altitude had significant effects on CHb production. CHb increased with increasing MC concentration over time. Increased barometric altitude (reduced partial pressure of MC vapor at altitude for equal ppm concentrations) resulted in lower blood CHb levels. A statistical model was derived to explain variation in CHb levels for these three independent variables (r = 0.983). The data were applied to an equation assessing the impact of altitude, MC concentration and time on the potential oxygen carrying capacity (POCC) of blood. The POCC of HB in the blood was calculated using blood Hb, CHb levels, Hb oxygen saturation (based on the blood pO[sub 2] and the oxygen dissociation curve for rats), and oxygen binding potential of Hb. It was determined for the altitudes and MC concentrations used, polycythemia associated with increased altitude had a greater impact on POCC than decreased pO[sub 2]. A regression equation was derived modeling variation in POCC of blood for the three independent variables (r = 0.995). This study demonstrated that altitude affects airborne ppm MC concentrations. This ultimately impacts CHb levels and oxygen carrying capacity of the blood. These finding indicate that occupationally acceptable ppm MC exposure levels at altitude do need barometric pressure correction.

  9. Methylene chloride intoxication in a furniture refinisher. A comparison of exposure estimates utilizing workplace air sampling and blood carboxyhemoglobin measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Shusterman, D.; Quinlan, P.; Lowengart, R.; Cone, J. )

    1990-05-01

    A 35-year-old furniture refinisher came to the occupational medicine clinic with complaints of upper respiratory irritation, fatigue, and lightheadedness occurring on a daily basis after using a methylene chloride-containing paint stripper. Determinations of blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) on three occasions showed an apparently linear elevation of COHb as a function of hours worked on the day of sampling. COHb levels predicted from spot industrial hygiene measurements were in close concordance with those observed in the patient, indicating the potential usefulness of COHb monitoring in estimating airborne exposure levels. Methylene chloride (or dichloromethane) is an organic solvent that has found wide use as a degreaser, paint remover, aerosol propellant, and a blowing agent for polyurethane foams, and as a solvent in food processing, photographic film production, and plastics manufacturing. Discovery of its unusual metabolic fate--conversion to carbon monoxide in vivo--has earned the compound a special place in the solvent toxicology literature. Demonstration of oncogenicity in experimental animals has occasioned a reconsideration of exposure limits, with emphasis upon stricter controls. In some workplaces, conditions prevail in which controls are inadequate to prevent even acute toxicity, much less long-term exposure risks.

  10. Renal effects of Mammea africana Sabine (Guttiferae) stem bark methanol/methylene chloride extract on L-NAME hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Nguelefack-Mbuyo, Elvine Pami; Dimo, Théophile; Nguelefack, Télesphore Benoit; Dongmo, Alain Bertrand; Kamtchouing, Pierre; Kamanyi, Albert

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The present study aims at evaluating the effects of methanol/methylene chloride extract of the stem bark of Mammea africana on the renal function of L-NAME treated rats. Material and Methods: Normotensive male Wistar rats were divided into five groups respectively treated with distilled water, L-NAME (40 mg/kg/day), L-NAME + L-arginine (100 mg/kg/day), L-NAME + captopril (20 mg/kg/day) or L-NAME + M. africana extract (200 mg/kg/day) for 30 days. Systolic blood pressure was measured before and at the end of treatment. Body weight was measured at the end of each week. Urine was collected 6 and 24 h after the first administration and further on day 15 and 30 of treatment for creatinine, sodium and potassium quantification, while plasma was collected at the end of treatment for the creatinine assay. ANOVA two way followed by Bonferonni or one way followed by Tukey were used for statistical analysis. Results: M. africana successfully prevented the rise in blood pressure and the acute natriuresis and diuresis induced by L-NAME. When given chronically, the extract produced a sustained antinatriuretic effect, a non-significant increase in urine excretion and reduced the glomerular hyperfiltration induced by L-NAME. Conclusions: The above results suggest that the methanol/methylene chloride extract of the stem bark of M. africana may protect kidney against renal dysfunction and further demonstrate that its antihypertensive effect does not depend on a diuretic or natriuretic activity. PMID:20927244

  11. Antidiabetic and hypolipidaemic effects of a methanol/methylene-chloride extract of Laportea ovalifolia (Urticaceae), measured in rats with alloxan-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Momo, C E N; Oben, J E; Tazoo, D; Dongo, E

    2006-01-01

    A decoction of the leaves of Laportea ovalifolia is widely used in Cameroon for the treatment of several illnesses, including diabetes mellitus. The antidiabetic and hypolipidaemic effects of a methanol/methylene-chloride extract of the aerial parts of L. ovalifolia have now been investigated, in normal rats and rats with diabetes induced by the intraperitoneal injection of alloxan (at 150 mg/kg bodyweight). In the diabetic rats, 2 weeks of daily, intragastric treatment with the L. ovalifolia extract not only produced a significant reduction in the fasting serum glucose concentrations but also lowered the serum concentrations of total cholesterol, triglycerides, and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol, lowered the ratio of total cholesterol to high-density-lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and increased the serum concentration of HDL cholesterol. At least in rats with alloxan-induced diabetes, the methanol/methylene-chloride extract of L. ovalifolia therefore appears to possess antidiabetic and hypolipidaemic properties.

  12. Acetone poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Dimethyl formaldehyde poisoning; Dimethyl ketone poisoning; Nail polish remover poisoning ... Acetone can be found in: Nail polish remover Some cleaning solutions Some glues, including rubber cement Some lacquers Other products may also contain acetone.

  13. PBPK modeling/Monte Carlo simulation of methylene chloride kinetic changes in mice in relation to age and acute, subchronic, and chronic inhalation exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, R S; Yang, R S; Morgan, D G; Moorman, M P; Kermani, H R; Sloane, R A; O'Connor, R W; Adkins, B; Gargas, M L; Andersen, M E

    1996-01-01

    During a 2-year chronic inhalation study on methylene chloride (2000 or 0 ppm; 6 hr/day, 5 days/week), gas-uptake pharmacokinetic studies and tissue partition coefficient determinations were conducted on female B6C3F1, mice after 1 day, 1 month, 1 year, and 2 years of exposure. Using physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling coupled with Monte Carlo simulation and bootstrap resampling for data analyses, a significant induction in the mixed function oxidase (MFO) rate constant (Vmaxc) was observed at the 1-day and 1-month exposure points when compared to concurrent control mice while decreases in glutathione S-transferase (GST) rate constant (Kfc) were observed in the 1-day and 1-month exposed mice. Within exposure groups, the apparent Vmaxc maintained significant increases in the 1-month and 2-year control groups. Although the same initial increase exists in the exposed group, the 2-year Vmaxc is significantly smaller than the 1-month group (p < 0.001). Within group differences in median Kfc values show a significant decrease in both 1-month and 2-year groups among control and exposed mice (p < 0.001). Although no changes in methylene chloride solubility as a result of prior exposure were observed in blood, muscle, liver, or lung, a marginal decrease in the fat:air partition coefficient was found in the exposed mice at p = 0.053. Age related solubility differences were found in muscle:air, liver:air, lung:air, and fat:air partition coefficients at p < 0.001, while the solubility of methylene chloride in blood was not affected by age (p = 0.461). As a result of this study, we conclude that age and prior exposure to methylene chloride can produce notable changes in disposition and metabolism and may represent important factors in the interpretation for toxicologic data and its application to risk assessment. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. PMID:8875160

  14. Acetone-based cellulose solvent.

    PubMed

    Kostag, Marc; Liebert, Tim; Heinze, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Acetone containing tetraalkylammonium chloride is found to be an efficient solvent for cellulose. The addition of an amount of 10 mol% (based on acetone) of well-soluble salt triethyloctylammonium chloride (Et3 OctN Cl) adjusts the solvent's properties (increases the polarity) to promote cellulose dissolution. Cellulose solutions in acetone/Et3 OctN Cl have the lowest viscosity reported for comparable aprotic solutions making it a promising system for shaping processes and homogeneous chemical modification of the biopolymer. Recovery of the polymer and recycling of the solvent components can be easily achieved.

  15. Acetone and Ethyl Acetate in Commercial Nail Polish Removers: A Quantitative NMR Experiment Using an Internal Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, David W.

    1997-12-01

    The qualitative and quantitative analysis of commercial nail polish removers is performed on a 60 MHz NMR spectrometer. After taking NMR spectra of the polish removers, students can make peak assignments for the known components of acetone and ethyl acetate. Using these spectra, students are also able to identify the unknown alcohol present in the remover as ethanol. Quantitative analysis of either the acetone or ethyl acetate in the nail polish removers is accomplished by comparing the analyte peak intensities with that of an internal standard. The system in which deuterated acetone is used as a solvent and methylene chloride as an internal standard gave precise results for both commercial removers and for standards prepared from pure acetone or an ethyl acetate/ethanol mixture. As recovery from the standards was approximately 96 - 98% of what was anticipated, the analysis of the commercial products is also believed to be accurate.

  16. Gas chromatographic determination of residual methylene chloride and trichloroethylene in decaffeinated instant and ground coffee with electrolytic conductivity and electron capture detection.

    PubMed

    Page, B D; Charbonneau, C F

    1977-05-01

    A method is described for the quantitative determination of residual methylene chloride (MC) and trichloroethylene (TCE) in decaffeinated instant and ground roasted coffees. The residual solvents were isolated by a closed system vacuum distillation technique with toluene as a carrier solvent, chromatographed on Chromosorb 102, detected by both electron capture and electrolytic conductivity detectors, and quantitated by comparison with an internal standard. Average recoveries of MC from instant and ground coffees spiked at 1, 10, and 25 ppm were 100.0 (88-113), 93.2 (92-95), and 97.7% (94-102%); and for TCE, 97.2 (92-101), 96.2 (95-99), and 96.5% (92-100%), respectively. The results from both detectors are compared. At lower attenuations, levels less than 1 ppm can be readily measured. The procedure developed was applied to domestic and imported coffee samples. PMID:858707

  17. Treatment of methylene-induced carbon monoxide poisoning with hyperbaric oxygenation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rudge, F.W.

    1989-01-01

    Methylene chloride is an organic solvent with many industrial uses. Inhalation of methylene chloride fumes can result in toxicity, caused by hepatic biotransformation of methylene chloride to carbon monoxide. A case of acute methylene chloride poisoning is presented, including successful treatment of this patient with the use of hyperbaric oxygenation. The rationale for the use of hyperbaric oxygenation in the treatment of methylene chloride poisoning is discussed. (aw)

  18. Acute toxicity of cadmium, copper, zinc, ammonia, 3,3 prime -dichlorobenzidine, 2,6-dichloro-4-nitroaniline, methylene chloride, and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol to juvenile grass shrimp and killifish

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, D.T.; Fisher, D.J. )

    1990-05-01

    The acute toxicity of several compounds was investigated while performing a toxicity evaluation of a complex chemical effluent. The tests were conducted for one or more of the following reasons: (1) data were not available for the chemical; (2) data were not available for the species; or (3) data were not available for the juvenile life stage of the species. Forty-eight hour acute toxicity tests were run on juvenile grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) and juvenile killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) exposed to the following compounds: cadmium, copper, zinc, ammonia, 3,3{prime}-dichlorobenzidine, 2,6-dichloro-4-nitroaniline, methylene chloride (dichloromethane) and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol.

  19. Process for crosslinking methylene-containing aromatic polymers with ionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Vernon L. (Inventor); Havens, Stephen J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A process for crosslinking aromatic polymers containing radiation-sensitive methylene groups (-CH2-) by exposing the polymers to ionizing radiation thereby causing crosslinking of the polymers through the methylene groups is described. Crosslinked polymers are resistant to most organic solvents such as acetone, alcohols, hydrocarbons, methylene, chloride, chloroform, and other halogenated hydrocarbons, to common fuels and to hydraulic fluids in contrast to readily soluble uncrosslinked polymers. In addition, the degree of crosslinking of the polymers depends upon the percentage of the connecting groups which are methylene which ranges from 5 to 50 pct and preferably from 25 to 50 pct of the connecting groups, and is also controlled by the level of irradiation which ranges from 25 to 1000 Mrads and preferably from 25 to 250 Mrads. The temperature of the reaction conditions ranges from 25 to 200 C and preferably at or slightly above the glass transition temperature of the polymer. The crosslinked polymers are generally more resistant to degradation at elevated temperatures such as greater than 150 C, have a reduced tendency to creep under load, and show no significant embrittlement of parts fabricated from the polymers.

  20. 21 CFR 500.27 - Methylene blue-containing drugs for use in animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Methylene blue-containing drugs for use in animals... Decisions § 500.27 Methylene blue-containing drugs for use in animals. (a) New information requires a re- evaluation of the status of drugs containing methylene blue (tetramethylthionine chloride) for oral use...

  1. 21 CFR 500.27 - Methylene blue-containing drugs for use in animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Methylene blue-containing drugs for use in animals... Decisions § 500.27 Methylene blue-containing drugs for use in animals. (a) New information requires a re- evaluation of the status of drugs containing methylene blue (tetramethylthionine chloride) for oral use...

  2. Rubrene endoperoxide acetone monosolvate

    PubMed Central

    Shinashi, Kiyoaki; Uchida, Akira

    2012-01-01

    The title acetone solvate, C42H28O2·C3H6O [systematic name: 1,3,10,12-tetra­phenyl-19,20-dioxapenta­cyclo­[10.6.2.02,11.04,9.013,18]icosa-2(11),3,5,7,9,13,15,17-octa­ene acetone monosolvate], is a photooxygenation product of rubrene (systematic name: 5,6,11,12-tetra­phenyl­tetra­cene). The mol­ecule bends at the bridgehead atoms, which are linked by the O—O transannular bond, with a dihedral angle of 49.21 (6)° between the benzene ring and the naphthalene ring system of the tetra­cene unit. In the crystal, the rubrene mol­ecules are linked by C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a column along the c axis. The acetone solvent mol­ecules form a dimer around a crystallographic inversion centre through a carbon­yl–carbonyl dipolar inter­action. A C—H⋯O hydrogen bond between the rubrene and acetone mol­ecules is also observed. PMID:22590045

  3. Rubrene endoperoxide acetone monosolvate.

    PubMed

    Shinashi, Kiyoaki; Uchida, Akira

    2012-04-01

    The title acetone solvate, C(42)H(28)O(2)·C(3)H(6)O [systematic name: 1,3,10,12-tetra-phenyl-19,20-dioxapenta-cyclo-[10.6.2.0(2,11).0(4,9).0(13,18)]icosa-2(11),3,5,7,9,13,15,17-octa-ene acetone monosolvate], is a photooxygenation product of rubrene (systematic name: 5,6,11,12-tetra-phenyl-tetra-cene). The mol-ecule bends at the bridgehead atoms, which are linked by the O-O transannular bond, with a dihedral angle of 49.21 (6)° between the benzene ring and the naphthalene ring system of the tetra-cene unit. In the crystal, the rubrene mol-ecules are linked by C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a column along the c axis. The acetone solvent mol-ecules form a dimer around a crystallographic inversion centre through a carbon-yl-carbonyl dipolar inter-action. A C-H⋯O hydrogen bond between the rubrene and acetone mol-ecules is also observed. PMID:22590045

  4. 29 CFR 1915.1052 - Methylene chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Toxic and Hazardous Substances... section are identical to those set forth at 29 CFR 1910.1052....

  5. 21 CFR 173.255 - Methylene chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... section. (c) In coffee as a residue from its use as a solvent in the extraction of caffeine from green coffee beans, at a level not to exceed 10 parts per million (0.001 percent) in decaffeinated roasted coffee and in decaffeinated soluble coffee extract (instant coffee)....

  6. 29 CFR 1910.1052 - Methylene Chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... subject to the hazardous waste and emergency response provisions contained in 29 CFR 1910.120 (q).] (g... required by this section to use a respirator. (ii) Employers who provide employees with gas masks with... use and before the gas masks are returned to service. (3) Respirator selection. Employers must:...

  7. 29 CFR 1910.1052 - Methylene Chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... subject to the hazardous waste and emergency response provisions contained in 29 CFR 1910.120 (q).] (g... required by this section to use a respirator. (ii) Employers who provide employees with gas masks with... use and before the gas masks are returned to service. (3) Respirator selection. Employers must:...

  8. 29 CFR 1910.1052 - Methylene Chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... subject to the hazardous waste and emergency response provisions contained in 29 CFR 1910.120 (q).] (g... required by this section to use a respirator. (ii) Employers who provide employees with gas masks with... use and before the gas masks are returned to service. (3) Respirator selection. Employers must:...

  9. 29 CFR 1910.1052 - Methylene Chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... subject to the hazardous waste and emergency response provisions contained in 29 CFR 1910.120 (q).] (g... required by this section to use a respirator. (ii) Employers who provide employees with gas masks with... use and before the gas masks are returned to service. (3) Respirator selection. Employers must:...

  10. 29 CFR 1910.1052 - Methylene Chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... subject to the hazardous waste and emergency response provisions contained in 29 CFR 1910.120 (q).] (g... required by this section to use a respirator. (ii) Employers who provide employees with gas masks with... use and before the gas masks are returned to service. (3) Respirator selection. Employers must:...

  11. 21 CFR 173.255 - Methylene chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... section. (c) In coffee as a residue from its use as a solvent in the extraction of caffeine from green coffee beans, at a level not to exceed 10 parts per million (0.001 percent) in decaffeinated roasted coffee and in decaffeinated soluble coffee extract (instant coffee)....

  12. 21 CFR 173.255 - Methylene chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... section. (c) In coffee as a residue from its use as a solvent in the extraction of caffeine from green coffee beans, at a level not to exceed 10 parts per million (0.001 percent) in decaffeinated roasted coffee and in decaffeinated soluble coffee extract (instant coffee)....

  13. 21 CFR 173.255 - Methylene chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... section. (c) In coffee as a residue from its use as a solvent in the extraction of caffeine from green coffee beans, at a level not to exceed 10 parts per million (0.001 percent) in decaffeinated roasted coffee and in decaffeinated soluble coffee extract (instant coffee)....

  14. 21 CFR 173.255 - Methylene chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the hops extract only as prescribed by paragraph (b)(1) of this section. (c) In coffee as a residue from its use as a solvent in the extraction of caffeine from green coffee beans, at a level not to exceed 10 parts per million (0.001 percent) in decaffeinated roasted coffee and in decaffeinated...

  15. Fate of acetone in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Stephens, D.W.; Shultz, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    The physical, chemical, and biological processes that might affect the concentration of acetone in water were investigated in laboratory studies. Processes considered included volatilization, adsorption by sediments, photodecomposition, bacterial degradation, and absorption by algae and molds. It was concluded that volatilization and bacterial degradation were the dominant processes determining the fate of acetone in streams and rivers. ?? 1982.

  16. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 439 - Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Acetone 1 Ketones. 4-Methyl-2-pentanone (MIBK) Ammonia (aqueous) Miscellaneous. 2 Acetonitrile Methyl.... Chloroform 1 Methylene chloride 1 Chlorobenzene Ammonia (aqueous) Diethyl amine Triethyl amine Acetone 1...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 439 - Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Acetone 1 Ketones. 4-Methyl-2-pentanone (MIBK) Ammonia (aqueous) Miscellaneous. 2 Acetonitrile Methyl.... Chloroform 1 Methylene chloride 1 Chlorobenzene Ammonia (aqueous) Diethyl amine Triethyl amine Acetone 1...

  18. 21 CFR 173.210 - Acetone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acetone. 173.210 Section 173.210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD... Substances § 173.210 Acetone. A tolerance of 30 parts per million is established for acetone in...

  19. 21 CFR 173.210 - Acetone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acetone. 173.210 Section 173.210 Food and Drugs..., Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.210 Acetone. A tolerance of 30 parts per million is established for acetone in spice oleoresins when present therein as a residue from the extraction of spice....

  20. 21 CFR 173.210 - Acetone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acetone. 173.210 Section 173.210 Food and Drugs..., Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.210 Acetone. A tolerance of 30 parts per million is established for acetone in spice oleoresins when present therein as a residue from the extraction of spice....

  1. 21 CFR 173.210 - Acetone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acetone. 173.210 Section 173.210 Food and Drugs..., Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.210 Acetone. A tolerance of 30 parts per million is established for acetone in spice oleoresins when present therein as a residue from the extraction of spice....

  2. 21 CFR 173.210 - Acetone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acetone. 173.210 Section 173.210 Food and Drugs..., Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.210 Acetone. A tolerance of 30 parts per million is established for acetone in spice oleoresins when present therein as a residue from the extraction of spice....

  3. Borax methylene blue: a spectroscopic and staining study.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, P T; Russo, A; Reynolds, C; Lillie, R D

    1978-07-01

    Borax methylene blue is quite stable at room temperatures of 22-25 C. At 30 C polychroming is slow; during 50 days in a water bath at this temperature the absorption peak moves from 665 to 656 nm. At 35 C, the absorption peak reaches 660 nm in 7 days, 654 nm in 14. At 60 C polychroming is rapid, the absorption peak reaching 640-620 nm in 3 days. When the pH of the borax methylene blue solutions, normally about 9.0, is adjusted to pH 6.5, the absorption peak remains at 665 nm even when incubated at 60 C for extended periods. When used as a blood stain 0.4 ml borax methylene blue (1% methylene blue in 1% borax), 4 ml acetone, 2 ml borax-acid phosphate buffer to bring the solution to pH 6.5, and distilled water to make 40 ml, with 0.2 ml 1% eosin added just before using, an excellent Nocht-Giemsa type stain is achieved after 30 minutes staining. The material plasmodia P. falciparum, P. vivax, and P. berghei stain moderate blue with dark red chromatin and green to black pigment granules. The study confirms Malachowski's 1891 results and explains Gautier's 1896-98 failure to duplicate it.

  4. Crystal structures of 6-[(2-hydroxy-1,1-bishydroxymethylethylamino)methylene]-2, 4-dinitrocyclohexa-2, 4-dienone hydrate and complexes of copper(II) chloride and copper(II) nitrate with this ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Chumakov, Yu. M. Tsapkov, V. I.; Jeanneau, E.; Bocelli, G.; Luneau, D.

    2006-07-15

    The crystal structures of 6-[(2-hydroxy-1,1-bishydroxymethylethylamino)methylene]-2, 4-dinitrocyclohexa-2, 4-dienone hydrate L . H{sub 2}O (I), chloro-(2-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpropane-1,3-diol-2-iminomethyl-4, 6-dinitrophenolo)aquacopper hydrate [Cu(H{sub 2}O)(L-H)Cl] . H{sub 2}O (II), and (2-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpropane-1,3-diol-2-iminomethyl-4,6-dinitrophenolo) aquacopper nitrate [Cu(H{sub 2}O)(L-H)]NO{sub 3} (III) are determined using X-ray diffraction. It is established that the salicylidene fragment of azomethine L in the structure of compound I is in a quinoid tautomeric form. In the crystal, molecules L and water molecules are joined together by hydrogen bonds into two-dimensional layers aligned parallel to the (010) plane. The copper atom in the structure of compound II coordinates the singly deprotonated tridentate molecule L (whose salicylidene fragment is in a benzenoid form), the chlorine ion, and the water molecule. The coordination polyhedron of the central copper atom is a distorted tetragonal pyramid. In the structure of compound III, the polymer chains are formed through the coordination bonds of the copper atom with two oxygen atoms of the amino alcohol fragment of azomethine L of the neighboring complex, which is related to the initial complex by the translation along the x axis. The coordination polyhedron of the central atom is an elongated tetragonal bipyramid. Polymers and nitro groups form a three-dimensional framework through hydrogen bonds.

  5. Supramolecular arrangement of 3,5-bis[methylene(dihydroxyphosphoryl)]benzoic acid and its complex with calcium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybył, Bartosz; Zoń, Jerzy; Janczak, Jan

    2013-09-01

    3,5-Bis[methylene(dihydroxyphosphoryl)]benzoic acid and its complex with calcium in the crystalline form were obtained. The 3,5-bis[methylene(dihydroxyphosphoryl)]benzoic acid crystallises as acetone monosolvate (1a) while its calcium complex as methanol disolvate (1b). The solvent molecules in the crystals are disordered. The 3,5-bis[methylene(dihydroxy-phosphoryl)]benzoic acid molecules in crystal 1a are interconnected via OH⋯O hydrogen bonds forming two-dimensional layers parallel to (1 0 0) plane. Within the layers there are present holes that occupied disordered acetone molecules. In 1b the calcium cation is surrounded by six singly deprotonated 3,5-bis[methylene(dihydroxyphosphoryl)]benzoic acid forming distorted octahedral environment. Each singly deprotonated 3,5-bis[methylene(dihydroxyphosphoryl)]benzoic acid links three calcium cations forming two-dimensional coordinating polymers parallel to (0 1 0) plane. The OH···O hydrogen bonds between the singly deprotonated 3,5-bis[methylene(dihydroxyphosphoryl)]benzoic acid ligands stabilize the two-dimensional polymers. Statistically disordered methanol molecules are located in the holes between the two-dimensional coordinating polymers and interact with them via OH···O hydrogen bonds.

  6. Student Preparation of Acetone from 2-Propanol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, J. M.; McKee, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and materials needed are provided for an experiment in which acetone is produced from 2-propanol. The experiment does not use magnetic stirring, avoids the necessity for exhaustive extractions with ether, and produces a 60-percent yield of redistilled acetone within a two-and-one-half-hour laboratory period.…

  7. Differences in mortality among bobwhite fed methylmercury chloride dissolved in various carriers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spann, J.W.; Heinz, G.H.; Camardese, M.B.; Hill, E.F.; Moore, J.F.; Murray, H.C.

    1986-01-01

    Twelve-day-old bobwhite chicks were fed a diet containing 0, 5.4 or 20 ppm methylmercury chloride. The methylmercury chloride was added to the diet either in a dry, pulverized form or dissolved in acetone, propylene glycol or corn oil. Mortality was measured for 6 weeks, and samples of liver were saved for mercury analysis. Mortality was significantly lower in birds fed 20 ppm methylmercury chloride when acetone was the solvent. The reduced mortality could not be explained by effects of acetone on dietary level of mercury or on uptake of mercury into the body.

  8. IRIS Toxicological Review of Dichloromethane (Methylene Chloride) (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is conducting a peer review and public comment of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of Dichloromethane that when finalized will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  9. Citrus pectin derived porous carbons as a superior adsorbent toward removal of methylene blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenlin; Zhang, Lian Ying; Zhao, Xi Juan; Zhou, Zhiqin

    2016-11-01

    An adsorbent, citrus pectin derived porous carbons with ultra-high adsorption capacity, rapid adsorption rate and good reusability toward removal of methylene blue, was synthesized by a facile zinc chloride activation approach in this study. The materials hold a great potential for treatment of dye wastewater.

  10. Disposition of acetone, methyl ethyl ketone and cyclohexanone in acute poisoning.

    PubMed

    Sakata, M; Kikuchi, J; Haga, M; Ishiyama, N; Maeda, T; Ise, T; Hikita, N

    1989-01-01

    A case of coma due to the drinking of a liquid cement for polyvinyl chloride resin, containing acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, cyclohexanone and polyvinyl chloride is described. The patient also simultaneously ingested the alcoholic beverage, sake. After gastric lavage, plasma exchanges and direct hemoperfusions, the patient recovered. The concentrations of these chemicals in plasma and urine were analyzed at various time intervals to estimate the clearance. The elimination half lives for acetone and methyl ethyl ketone were 18 hours and 10 hours, respectively. Although cyclohexanone made up the largest component in the solvents, the blood level was extremely low and a large amount of cyclohexanol, a metabolite of cyclohexanone was detected in the blood and urine. The glucuronide metabolite of cyclohexanol was also estimated after the hydrolysis with beta-glucuronidase. Since the conversion of cyclohexanone to cyclohexanol is known to be catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase, possible interactions between sake ingestion and cyclohexanone metabolism is proposed.

  11. Bacterial degradation of acetone in an outdoor model stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Stephens, D.W.; Tai, D.Y.

    1993-01-01

    Diurnal variations of the acetone concentration in an outdoor model stream were measured with and without a nitrate supplement to determine if the nitrate supplement would stimulate bacterial degradation of the acetone. Acetone loss coefficients were computed from the diurnal data using a fitting procedure based on a Lagrangian particle model. The coefficients indicated that bacterial degradation of the acetone was occurring in the downstream part of the stream during the nitrate addition. However, the acetone concentrations stabilized at values considerably above the limit of detection for acetone determination, in contrast to laboratory respirometer studies where the acetone concentration decreased rapidly to less than the detection limit, once bacterial acclimation to the acetone had occurred. One possible explanation for the difference in behavior was the limited 6-hour residence time of the acetone in the model stream.

  12. Chloride Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Addison disease, or increased salt intake. If both chloride and sodium levels are high in a person on a ... anything else I should know? Drugs that affect sodium blood levels will also cause changes in chloride. In addition, swallowing large amounts of baking soda ...

  13. 21 CFR 172.802 - Acetone peroxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... acetone peroxide, with minor proportions of higher polymers, manufactured by reaction of hydrogen peroxide... grams to 10 grams of hydrogen peroxide equivalent per 100 grams of the additive, plus carrier, for use in flour maturing and bleaching; or (2) approximately 0.75 gram of hydrogen peroxide equivalent...

  14. 21 CFR 172.802 - Acetone peroxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... acetone peroxide, with minor proportions of higher polymers, manufactured by reaction of hydrogen peroxide... grams to 10 grams of hydrogen peroxide equivalent per 100 grams of the additive, plus carrier, for use in flour maturing and bleaching; or (2) approximately 0.75 gram of hydrogen peroxide equivalent...

  15. 21 CFR 172.802 - Acetone peroxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... acetone peroxide, with minor proportions of higher polymers, manufactured by reaction of hydrogen peroxide... grams to 10 grams of hydrogen peroxide equivalent per 100 grams of the additive, plus carrier, for use in flour maturing and bleaching; or (2) approximately 0.75 gram of hydrogen peroxide equivalent...

  16. 21 CFR 172.802 - Acetone peroxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... acetone peroxide, with minor proportions of higher polymers, manufactured by reaction of hydrogen peroxide... grams to 10 grams of hydrogen peroxide equivalent per 100 grams of the additive, plus carrier, for use in flour maturing and bleaching; or (2) approximately 0.75 gram of hydrogen peroxide equivalent...

  17. 21 CFR 172.802 - Acetone peroxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... proportions of higher polymers, manufactured by reaction of hydrogen peroxide and acetone. (b) The additive...; or (2) approximately 0.75 gram of hydrogen peroxide equivalent per 100 grams of the additive, plus... agent in bread and roll production at not to exceed the quantity of hydrogen peroxide...

  18. Ion chromatographic determination of chloride in mustard sauces.

    PubMed

    López Agüero, E; Bosch Bosch, N; Barrera Vázquez, C; López Ruiz, B

    1999-11-01

    A new, simple, precise, and rapid ion chromatography (IC) method has been developed to determine chloride in mustard sauces using a mixture of phthalic acid, acetone, and water adjusted to pH 5.0 as eluent. Conductometric detection was carried out. The retention time for chloride was 1.5 min. Linearity was obtained up to a concentration level of 100 mg/L NaCl. The method was statistically evaluated for accuracy and precision after being used to assay the chloride from mustard sauces. Within the same samples, the chloride levels obtained by IC were compared with the sodium concentrations quantified by atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

  19. Breath acetone analyzer: diagnostic tool to monitor dietary fat loss.

    PubMed

    Kundu, S K; Bruzek, J A; Nair, R; Judilla, A M

    1993-01-01

    Acetone, a metabolite of fat catabolism, is produced in excessive amounts in subjects on restricted-calorie weight-loss programs. Breath acetone measurements are useful as a motivational tool during dieting and for monitoring the effectiveness of weight-loss programs. We have developed a simple, easy-to-read method that quantifies the amount of acetone in a defined volume of exhaled breath after trapping the sample in a gas-analyzer column. The concentration of acetone, as measured by the length of a blue color zone in the analyzer column, correlates with results obtained by gas chromatography. Using the breath acetone analyzer to quantify breath acetone concentrations of dieting subjects, we established a correlation between breath acetone concentration and rate of fat loss (slope 52.2 nmol/L per gram per day, intercept 15.3 nmol/L, n = 78, r = 0.81). We also discussed the possibility of using breath acetone in diabetes management.

  20. Vinyl chloride and polyvinyl chloride.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R

    1999-01-01

    Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) is an important plastic resin for construction, pipe and tubing, siding, and other uses. Exposures to vinyl chloride monomer during the early years of production resulted in an important sentinel health event: the recognition of an excess of a rare liver cancer, hepatic angiosarcoma, at facilities throughout the world. Several other syndromes, including acro-osteolysis, also have been associated with PVC, but less clearly with vinyl chloride. Extensive research ranging from large-scale epidemiologic studies to biomarker research into molecular mechanisms continues to provide valuable insight into the pathogenesis of occupational cancer.

  1. 46 CFR 153.1035 - Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions. 153.1035... Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1035 Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions. No person may operate a tankship carrying a cargo of acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions, unless that cargo is...

  2. 46 CFR 153.1035 - Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions. 153.1035... Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1035 Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions. No person may operate a tankship carrying a cargo of acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions, unless that cargo is...

  3. 46 CFR 153.1035 - Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions. 153.1035... Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1035 Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions. No person may operate a tankship carrying a cargo of acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions, unless that cargo is...

  4. 46 CFR 153.1035 - Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions. 153.1035... Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1035 Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions. No person may operate a tankship carrying a cargo of acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions, unless that cargo is...

  5. 46 CFR 153.1035 - Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions. 153.1035... Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1035 Acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions. No person may operate a tankship carrying a cargo of acetone cyanohydrin or lactonitrile solutions, unless that cargo is...

  6. Acetone-butanol fermentation of marine macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Huesemann, Michael H; Kuo, Li-Jung; Urquhart, Lindsay; Gill, Gary A; Roesijadi, Guri

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was to subject mannitol, either as a sole carbon source or in combination with glucose, and aqueous extracts of the kelp Saccharina spp., containing mannitol and laminarin, to acetone-butanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum (ATCC 824). Both mannitol and glucose were readily fermented. Mixed substrate fermentations with glucose and mannitol resulted in diauxic growth of C. acetobutylicum with glucose depletion preceding mannitol utilization. Fermentation of kelp extract exhibited triauxic growth, with an order of utilization of free glucose, mannitol, and bound glucose, presumably laminarin. The lag in laminarin utilization reflected the need for enzymatic hydrolysis of this polysaccharide into fermentable sugars. The butanol and total solvent yields were 0.12 g/g and 0.16 g/g, respectively, indicating that significant improvements are still needed to make industrial-scale acetone-butanol fermentations of seaweed economically feasible.

  7. Photodegradation of acetone in dilute aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, M.I.; Bolton, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Photochemical methods for destroying organic pollutants found in industrial wastewaters and groundwaters are being used successfully in environment treatment systems. This study focuses on acetone photodegradation in aqueous solution by UV irradiation (1 kW medium pressure Hg lamp) in the presence and absence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Intermediates such as acetic and formic acids were detected. The kinetic data were evaluated and the reaction mechanisms were postulated considering the influence of oxygen concentration and pH. The generation of {sm_bullet}OH radicals from the photolysis of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces a faster decomposition of acetone (depending on H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration) than does direct photolysis.

  8. Mepiquat chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Mepiquat chloride ; CASRN 24307 - 26 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  9. Methyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl chloride ; CASRN 74 - 87 - 3 ( 07 / 17 / 2001 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for

  10. Ethyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 00 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  11. Benzyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzyl chloride ; CASRN 100 - 44 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  12. Vinyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Vinyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 01 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  13. Acetyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 36 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  14. Hydrogen chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Hydrogen chloride ; CASRN 7647 - 01 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  15. Allyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Allyl chloride ; CASRN 107 - 05 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  16. Economic evaluation of the acetone - butanol fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lenz, T.G.; Morevra, A.R.

    1980-12-01

    The economics of producing acetone and 1-butanol via fermentation have been examined for a 45 X 10 to the power of 6 kg of solvents/year plant. For a molasses substrate, the total annual production costs were about $24.4 million vs. a total annual income of $36 million, with about $20 million total required capital. Molasses cost of about $24.4 million/year was critical to these economics. Liquid whey was next evaluated as an alternative feed. Whey feed saved about $11 million annually in feed costs and yielded about $7 million net additional annual revenues from protein sale. These primary differences gave an annual gross profit of about $15 million for the whey case and resulted in a discounted cash flow rate of return of 29%. It is concluded that waste based acetone-butanol production via fermentation deserves further attention in view of the attractive whey-based economics and the excellent potential of butanol as a fuel extender, especially for diesohol blending.

  17. Acetone-butanol Fermentation of Marine Macroalgae

    SciTech Connect

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Urquhart, Lindsay A.; Gill, Gary A.; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2012-03-01

    Mannitol and laminarin, which are present at high concentrations in the brown macroalga Saccharina spp., a type of kelp, are potential biochemical feedstocks for butanol production. To test their bioconversion potential, aqueous extracts of the kelp Saccharina spp., mannitol, and glucose (a product of laminarin hydrolysis) were subjected to acetone-butanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum (ATCC 824). Both mannitol and glucose were readily fermented. Mixed substrate fermentations with glucose and mannitol resulted in diauxic growth of C. acetobutylicum with glucose depletion preceding mannitol utilization. Fermentation of kelp extract exhibited triauxic growth, with an order of utilization of free glucose, mannitol, and bound glucose, presumably laminarin. The lag in laminarin utilization reflected the need for enzymatic hydrolysis of this polysaccharide into fermentable sugars. The butanol and total solvent yields were 0.12 g/g and 0.16 g/g, respectively, indicating that significant improvements are still needed to make industrial-scale acetone-butanol fermentations of seaweed economically feasible.

  18. Enzymology of acetone-butanol-isopropanol formation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiann-Shin.

    1992-01-01

    The long-term goal of the project is to understand the fundamental properties of biological solvent production. Our approach is to elucidate first the molecular properties of solvent-producing enzymes and then to apply to information gained from the enzymological study to investigate control mechanisms for the solvent-producing pathways and the expression of solvent-production genes. Our research primarily involves two strains of Clostridium beijerinckii: C. Beijerinckii NRRL B593 which produces isopropanol in addition to acetone, butanol, and ethanol, and C. beijerinckii NRRL B592 which produces acetone, butanol and ethanol, but not isopropanol. In more recent studies, we also included another solvent-producing organism, Bacillus macerans. Objectives for the reporting period were: to characterize the distinct types of alcohol dehydrogenase; to purify and characterize acetoacetyl-CoA-reacting enzymes; and to clone and sequence the gene encoding the primary/secondary alcohol dehydrogenase of C beijerinckii NRRL B593 and to search for the promoter region for solvent-production genes.

  19. Excellent acetone sensing properties of porous ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang-Bai; Liu, Xing-Yi; Wang, Sheng-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Porous ZnO was obtained by hydrothermal method. The results of scanning electron microscope revealed the porous structure in the as-prepared materials. The acetone sensing test results of porous ZnO show that porous ZnO possesses excellent acetone gas sensing properties. The response is 35.5 at the optimum operating temperature of 320 °C to 100 ppm acetone. The response and recovery times to 50 ppm acetone are 2 s and 8 s, respectively. The lowest detecting limit to acetone is 0.25 ppm, and the response value is 3.8. Moreover, the sensors also exhibit excellent selectivity and long-time stability to acetone. Projected supported by the Project of Challenge Cup for College Students, China (Grant No. 450060497053).

  20. Acetone evaporation monitoring using a caterpillar-like microstructured fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, A. D.; Ferreira, M. F. S.; Moura, J. P.; André, R. M.; Silva, S. O.; Kobelke, J.; Bierlich, J.; Wondraczek, K.; Schuster, K.; Frazão, O.

    2015-09-01

    A new microstructured optical fiber is demonstrated to detect acetone evaporation by observing the time response of the reflected signal at 1550nm. The sensor consists on a caterpillar-like fiber, with a transversal microfluidic channel created with a Focused Ion Beam technique, spliced to a single-mode fiber. Different stages were visible between the dipping and the evaporation of acetone and of a mixture of water and acetone. It was also possible to detect the presence of water vapor.

  1. Apparatus and method for monitoring breath acetone and diabetic diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang; Cao, Wenqing

    2008-08-26

    An apparatus and method for monitoring diabetes through breath acetone detection and quantitation employs a microplasma source in combination with a spectrometer. The microplasma source provides sufficient energy to produce excited acetone fragments from the breath gas that emit light. The emitted light is sent to the spectrometer, which generates an emission spectrum that is used to detect and quantify acetone in the breath gas.

  2. Dissociative electron attachment studies on acetone

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhudesai, Vaibhav S. Tadsare, Vishvesh; Ghosh, Sanat; Gope, Krishnendu; Davis, Daly; Krishnakumar, E.

    2014-10-28

    Dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to acetone is studied in terms of the absolute cross section for various fragment channels in the electron energy range of 0–20 eV. H{sup −} is found to be the most dominant fragment followed by O{sup −} and OH{sup −} with only one resonance peak between 8 and 9 eV. The DEA dynamics is studied by measuring the angular distribution and kinetic energy distribution of fragment anions using Velocity Slice Imaging technique. The kinetic energy and angular distribution of H{sup −} and O{sup −} fragments suggest a many body break-up for the lone resonance observed. The ab initio calculations show that electron is captured in the multi-centered anti-bonding molecular orbital which would lead to a many body break-up of the resonance.

  3. Topical treatment of acne rosacea with benzoyl peroxide acetone gel.

    PubMed

    Montes, L F; Cordero, A A; Kriner, J; Loder, J; Flanagan, A D

    1983-08-01

    A group of patients with acne rosacea was treated with 5 percent benzoyl peroxide acetone gel for four weeks and then with 10 percent benzoyl peroxide acetone gel for an additional four weeks. A parallel group of patients was treated with a matching placebo (acetone gel vehicle). At the end of the first four weeks of treatment the dropout rate due to lack of improvement was 23 and 63 percent for benzoyl peroxide acetone gel and placebo, respectively. Benzoyl peroxide acetone gel was superior to placebo with respect to improvement in the overall severity of the lesions when judged by photographs, and by reduction of erythema, papules, and pustules. Results after treatment with benzoyl peroxide acetone gel were better during weeks five to eight than during weeks one to four for all lesions except telangiectasia. Benzoyl peroxide acetone gel was superior to placebo when the overall responses were compared. In addition, the benzoyl peroxide acetone gel-treated group, but not the placebo-treated group, showed a significantly better response during weeks five to eight compared to weeks one to four.

  4. Effect of Cobalt Particle Size on Acetone Steam Reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Junming; Zhang, He; Yu, Ning; Davidson, Stephen D.; Wang, Yong

    2015-06-11

    Carbon-supported cobalt nanoparticles with different particle sizes were synthesized and characterized by complementary characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, N-2 sorption, acetone temperature-programmed desorption, transmission electron microscopy, and CO chemisorption. Using acetone steam reforming reaction as a probe reaction, we revealed a volcano-shape curve of the intrinsic activity (turnover frequency of acetone) and the CO2 selectivity as a function of the cobalt particle size with the highest activity and selectivity observed at a particle size of approximately 12.8nm. Our results indicate that the overall performance of acetone steam reforming is related to a combination of particle-size-dependent acetone decomposition, water dissociation, and the oxidation state of the cobalt nanoparticles.

  5. Modified pineapple peel cellulose hydrogels embedded with sepia ink for effective removal of methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hongjie; Huang, Huihua

    2016-09-01

    Novel composite hydrogels based on pineapple peel cellulose and sepia ink were synthesized by homogeneous acetylation of cellulose in ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride. The structure and morphology of the prepared hydrogels were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. The effects of acetylation time, acetylation temperature, molar ratio of acetic anhydride/anhydroglucose unit and the additive amount of sepia ink on methylene blue adsorption capacity of the hydrogels embedded with sepia ink were also investigated. Methylene blue adsorption of the hydrogels followed pseudo-second-order kinetic model and sepia ink improved adsorption capacity significantly. The adsorption capacity at equilibrium was increased from 53.72 to 138.25mg/g when the additive amount of sepia ink of the hydrogels was 10%. PMID:27185109

  6. Acetone odor and irritation thresholds obtained from acetone-exposed factory workers and from control (occupationally unexposed) subjects.

    PubMed

    Wysocki, C J; Dalton, P; Brody, M J; Lawley, H J

    1997-10-01

    Sensitivity of olfaction (smell) and chemesthesis (irritation) was evaluated for 2-propanone (acetone) and 1-butanol in acetone-exposed workers (AEW; N = 32) during a workday and unexposed subjects (microES; N = 32). Irritation sensitivity was assessed using a method that relies on the ability of individuals to localize irritants on the body. When a volatile compound is inhaled into one nostril and air into the other, the stimulated side can be determined (lateralized) only after the concentration reaches a level that stimulates the trigeminal nerve (irritation); compounds stimulating olfaction alone cannot be lateralized. Intranasal lateralization thresholds offer an objective measure of sensory irritation elicited by volatile compounds. Test results indicated that neither olfactory nor lateralization thresholds for butanol differed between AEW and microES. Olfactory thresholds to acetone in AEW (855 ppm) were elevated relative to those of microES (41 ppm), as were lateralization thresholds (36,669 ppm and 15,758 ppm, respectively). Within AEW, level of occupational exposure was not correlated with thresholds. Other measures revealed that microES used more irritation descriptors than did AEW on trials where the acetone concentration was below the lateralization threshold. This is noteworthy because microES received lower concentrations of acetone to evaluate than did AEW. These results suggest that exposures to acetone induce changes in acetone sensitivity that are specific to acetone. The acetone concentrations eliciting sensory irritation using the lateralization technique were all well above current occupational exposure standards. The current study indicates that acetone is a weak sensory irritant and that sensory adaptation is an important factor affecting its overall irritancy. PMID:9342830

  7. Adsorption thermodynamics of Methylene Blue onto bentonite.

    PubMed

    Hong, Song; Wen, Cheng; He, Jing; Gan, Fuxing; Ho, Yuh-Shan

    2009-08-15

    The effect of temperature on the equilibrium adsorption of Methylene Blue dye from aqueous solution using bentonite was investigated. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed using three widely applied isotherms: Langmuir, Freundlich, and Redlich-Peterson. A non-linear method was used for comparing the best fit of the isotherms. Best fit was found to be Redlich-Peterson isotherm. Thermodynamic parameters, such as DeltaG degrees, DeltaH degrees, and DeltaS degrees were calculated using adsorption equilibrium constant obtained from the Langmuir isotherm. Results suggested that the Methylene Blue adsorption on bentonite was a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  8. Severe anaphylactic shock with methylene blue instillation.

    PubMed

    Dewachter, Pascale; Mouton-Faivre, Claudie; Tréchot, Philippe; Lleu, Jean-Claude; Mertes, Paul Michel

    2005-07-01

    We report a documented severe immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity reaction associated with use of 1% methylene blue for detection of tubal permeability occurring during general anesthesia. Clinical symptoms, biological assessment results, and cutaneous test positivity confirmed an anaphylactic reaction to methylene blue. This case report confirms the need for systematic allergological investigation of all drugs and substances administered during the perioperative period in the event of a hypersensitivity reaction occurring during anesthesia. Anesthesiologists should be aware of the possibility of hypersensitivity reactions involving any drug or substance used during surgery.

  9. An ethanolamine plasmalogen artifact formed by acetone extraction of freeze-dried tissue.

    PubMed

    Helmy, F M; Hack, M H

    1966-07-01

    Extraction of freeze-dried tissues by acetone results in the in vitro production of an acetone derivative (imine) of the ethanolamine phosphatides. Some of the properties of the acetone imine of ethanolamine plasmalogen are discussed.

  10. Measuring breath acetone for monitoring fat loss: Review

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective Endogenous acetone production is a by‐product of the fat metabolism process. Because of its small size, acetone appears in exhaled breath. Historically, endogenous acetone has been measured in exhaled breath to monitor ketosis in healthy and diabetic subjects. Recently, breath acetone concentration (BrAce) has been shown to correlate with the rate of fat loss in healthy individuals. In this review, the measurement of breath acetone in healthy subjects is evaluated for its utility in predicting fat loss and its sensitivity to changes in physiologic parameters. Results BrAce can range from 1 ppm in healthy non‐dieting subjects to 1,250 ppm in diabetic ketoacidosis. A strong correlation exists between increased BrAce and the rate of fat loss. Multiple metabolic and respiratory factors affect the measurement of BrAce. BrAce is most affected by changes in the following factors (in descending order): dietary macronutrient composition, caloric restriction, exercise, pulmonary factors, and other assorted factors that increase fat metabolism or inhibit acetone metabolism. Pulmonary factors affecting acetone exchange in the lung should be controlled to optimize the breath sample for measurement. Conclusions When biologic factors are controlled, BrAce measurement provides a non‐invasive tool for monitoring the rate of fat loss in healthy subjects. PMID:26524104

  11. Acetone cluster ion beam irradiation on solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryuto, H.; Kakumoto, Y.; Itozaki, S.; Takeuchi, M.; Takaoka, G. H.

    2013-11-01

    Acetone cluster ions were produced by the adiabatic expansion method without using a support gas. The acceleration voltage of the acetone cluster ion beam was from 3 to 9 kV. The sputter depths of silicon irradiated with acetone cluster ion beams increased with acceleration voltage and fluence of the acetone cluster ion beams. The sputter depth was close to that induced by the ethanol cluster ion beam accelerated at the same acceleration voltage. The sputtering yield of silicon by the acetone cluster ion beam at an acceleration voltage of 9 kV was approximately 100 times larger than that for an argon monomer ion beam at 9 keV. The sputter depths of silicon dioxide irradiated with the acetone cluster ion beams were smaller than those of silicon, but larger than those induced by ethanol cluster ion beams. The XPS analysis of silicon surface indicated that the silicon surface was more strongly oxidized by the irradiation of acetone cluster ion beam than ethanol cluster ion beam.

  12. Determination of breath acetone in 149 type 2 diabetic patients using a ringdown breath-acetone analyzer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meixiu; Chen, Zhuying; Gong, Zhiyong; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Jiang, Chenyu; Yuan, Yuan; Wang, Zhennang; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2015-02-01

    Over 90% of diabetic patients have Type 2 diabetes. Although an elevated mean breath acetone concentration has been found to exist in Type 1 diabetes (T1D), information on breath acetone in Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has yet to be obtained. In this study, we first used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to validate a ringdown breath-acetone analyzer based on the cavity-ringdown-spectroscopy technique, through comparing breath acetone concentrations in the range 0.5-2.5 ppm measured using both methods. The linear fitting of R = 0.99 suggests that the acetone concentrations obtained using both methods are consistent with a largest standard deviation of ±0.4 ppm in the lowest concentration of the range. Next, 620 breath samples from 149 T2D patients and 42 healthy subjects were collected and tested using the breath analyzer. Four breath samples were taken from each subject under each of four different conditions: fasting, 2 h post-breakfast, 2 h post-lunch, and 2 h post-dinner. Simultaneous blood glucose levels were also measured using a standard diabetic-management blood-glucose meter. For the 149 T2D subjects, their exhaled breath acetone concentrations ranged from 0.1 to 19.8 ppm; four different ranges of breath acetone concentration, 0.1-19.8, 0.1-7.1, 0.1-6.3, and 0.1-9.5 ppm, were obtained for the subjects under the four different conditions, respectively. For the 42 healthy subjects, their breath acetone concentration ranged from 0.1 to 2.6 ppm; four different ranges of breath acetone concentration, 0.3-2.6, 0.1-2.6, 0.1-1.7, and 0.3-1.6 ppm, were obtained for the four different conditions. The mean breath acetone concentration of the 149 T2D subjects was determined to be 1.5 ± 1.5 ppm, which was 1.5 times that of 1.0 ± 0.6 ppm for the 42 healthy subjects. No correlation was found between the breath acetone concentration and the blood glucose level of the T2D subjects and the healthy volunteers. This study using a relatively large number of

  13. Methylene Blue Causing Serotonin Syndrome Following Cystocele Repair.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Kailash; Cheung, Felix; Lee, Wai; Thalappillil, Richard; Florence, F Barry; Kim, Jason

    2016-11-01

    Methylene blue is an intravenously administered agent that may potentiate serotonin syndrome. The usage of methylene blue to evaluate ureters for injuries and patency during urological surgeries is recognized as common practice. However, there is no mention of serotonin syndrome caused by methylene blue in urological literature or for urological surgery. We report the first urological case in order to raise awareness of the risk for serotonin toxicity with utilizing methylene blue. PMID:27617215

  14. Number of Oxidations Relative to Methylene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjonaas, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a new way of quantifying organic oxidation-reduction reactions that extends the traditional method of assigning oxidation numbers by replacing them with NORM's (Number of Oxidations Relative to Methylene). This modification allows the system to be applied to more complex examples without the cumbersomeness inherent in the original…

  15. Conformational analysis of oleandomycin and its 8-methylene-9-oxime derivative by NMR and molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Novak, Predrag; Tomisić, Zrinka Banić; Tepes, Predrag; Lazarevski, Gorjana; Plavec, Janez; Turkalj, Gordana

    2005-01-01

    Conformations of the 14-membered macrolide antibiotic oleandomycin and its 8-methylene-9-oxime derivative were determined in various solvents. The experimental NMR data--coupling constants and NOE contacts--were compared with the results of molecular modelling--molecular mechanics calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. The conformational changes, on the right-hand side of the 14-membered ring, affected mostly the 3JH2,H3 values and NOE crosspeaks H3 or H4 to H11. Oleandomycin was found to be present predominantly in the C3-C5 folded-in conformations in DMSO-d6 solution, whereas in buffered D2O, acetone-d6 and CDCl3, there was a mixture of folded-in and folded-out conformational families. The predominant conformation of the 8-methylene-oleandomycin-9-oxime derivative in solution was a folded-out one although different amounts of folded-in conformation were also present depending on the solvent. Oleandrose and desosamine sugar moieties adopted the usual and expected chair conformation. The conformation around the glycosidic bonds, governing the relative orientation of sugars vs. the lactone ring, showed a certain flexibility within two conformationally close families. We believe that by combining the experimental NMR data and the molecular modelling techniques, as reported in this paper, we have made significant progress in understanding the conformational behaviour and properties of macrolides. Our belief is based on our own current studies on oleandomycins as well as on the previously reported results and best practices concerning other macrolides. A rational for macrolide conformational studies and advances in methodology has been suggested accordingly. PMID:15602597

  16. Toward portable breath acetone analysis for diabetes detection.

    PubMed

    Righettoni, Marco; Tricoli, Antonio

    2011-09-01

    Diabetes is a lifelong condition that may cause death and seriously affects the quality of life of a rapidly growing number of individuals. Acetone is a selective breath marker for diabetes that may contribute to the monitoring of related metabolic disorder and thus simplify the management of this illness. Here, the overall performance of Si-doped WO(3) nanoparticles, made by flame spray pyrolysis, as portable acetone detectors is critically reviewed focusing on the requirements for medical diagnostics. The effect of flow rate, chamber volume and acetone dissociation within the measuring chamber is discussed with respect to the calibration of the sensor response. The challenges for the fabrication of portable breath acetone sensors based on chemo-resistive detectors are underlined indicating possible solutions and novel research directions. PMID:21828897

  17. Toward Portable Breath Acetone Analysis for Diabetes Detection

    PubMed Central

    Righettoni, Marco; Tricoli, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a lifelong condition that may cause death and seriously affects the quality of life of a rapidly growing number of individuals. Acetone is a selective breath marker for diabetes that may contribute to the monitoring of related metabolic disorder and thus simplify the management of this illness. Here, the overall performance of Si-doped WO3 nanoparticles made by flame spray pyrolysis as portable acetone detectors is critically reviewed focusing on the requirements for medical diagnostic. The effect of flow rate, chamber volume and acetone dissociation within the measuring chamber are discussed with respect to the calibration of the sensor response. The challenges for the fabrication of portable breath acetone sensors based on chemo-resistive detectors are underlined indicating possible solutions and novel research directions. PMID:21828897

  18. Characterisation of cellulose films regenerated from acetone/water coagulants.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hongjuan; Yuan, Zaiwu; Fan, Qingrui; Dai, Xiaonan; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Zhaojiang; Qin, Menghua

    2014-02-15

    A precooled aqueous solution of 7 wt% NaOH/12 wt% urea was used to dissolve cellulose up to a concentration of 2 wt%, which was then coagulated in an acetone/water mixture to regenerate cellulose film. The volume ratio of acetone to water (φ) had a dominant influence on film dimensional stability, film-forming ability, micromorphology, and mechanical strength. The film regenerated at φ=2.0 showed excellent performance in both dimensional stability and film-forming ability. Compared to that from pure acetone, the cellulose film from the acetone/water mixture with φ=2.0 was more densely interwoven, since the cellulosic fibrils formed during regeneration had pores with smaller average diameter. The alkali capsulated in the film during film formation could be released at quite a slow rate into the surrounding aqueous solution. The regenerated cellulose film with adjustable structure and properties may have potential applications in drug release and ultra filtration.

  19. Acetone sensor based on zinc oxide hexagonal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Hastir, Anita Singh, Onkar Anand, Kanika Singh, Ravi Chand

    2014-04-24

    In this work hexagonal tubes of zinc oxide have been synthesized by co-precipitation method. For structural, morphological, elemental and optical analysis synthesized powders were characterized by using x-ray diffraction, field emission scanning microscope, EDX, UV-visible and FTIR techniques. For acetone sensing thick films of zinc oxide have been deposited on alumina substrate. The fabricated sensors exhibited maximum sensing response towards acetone vapour at an optimum operating temperature of 400°C.

  20. Maximizing recovery of water-soluble proteins through acetone precipitation.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Andrew M J; Wall, Mark J; Doucette, Alan A

    2013-09-24

    Solvent precipitation is commonly used to purify protein samples, as seen with the removal of sodium dodecyl sulfate through acetone precipitation. However, in its current practice, protein loss is believed to be an inevitable consequence of acetone precipitation. We herein provide an in depth characterization of protein recovery through acetone precipitation. In 80% acetone, the precipitation efficiency for six of 10 protein standards was poor (ca. ≤15%). Poor recovery was also observed for proteome extracts, including bacterial and mammalian cells. As shown in this work, increasing the ionic strength of the solution dramatically improves the precipitation efficiency of individual proteins, and proteome mixtures (ca. 80-100% yield). This is obtained by including 1-30 mM NaCl, together with acetone (50-80%) which maximizes protein precipitation efficiency. The amount of salt required to restore the recovery correlates with the amount of protein in the sample, as well as the intrinsic protein charge, and the dielectric strength of the solution. This synergistic approach to protein precipitation in acetone with salt is consistent with a model of ion pairing in organic solvent, and establishes an improved method to recover proteins and proteome mixtures in high yield.

  1. Quantitative Clinical Diagnostic Analysis of Acetone in Human Blood by HPLC: A Metabolomic Search for Acetone as Indicator

    PubMed Central

    Akgul Kalkan, Esin; Sahiner, Mehtap; Ulker Cakir, Dilek; Alpaslan, Duygu; Yilmaz, Selehattin

    2016-01-01

    Using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH) as a derivatizing reagent, an analytical method was developed for the quantitative determination of acetone in human blood. The determination was carried out at 365 nm using an ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) diode array detector (DAD). For acetone as its 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone derivative, a good separation was achieved with a ThermoAcclaim C18 column (15 cm × 4.6 mm × 3 μm) at retention time (tR) 12.10 min and flowrate of 1 mL min−1 using a (methanol/acetonitrile) water elution gradient. The methodology is simple, rapid, sensitive, and of low cost, exhibits good reproducibility, and allows the analysis of acetone in biological fluids. A calibration curve was obtained for acetone using its standard solutions in acetonitrile. Quantitative analysis of acetone in human blood was successfully carried out using this calibration graph. The applied method was validated in parameters of linearity, limit of detection and quantification, accuracy, and precision. We also present acetone as a useful tool for the HPLC-based metabolomic investigation of endogenous metabolism and quantitative clinical diagnostic analysis. PMID:27298750

  2. Determination of low level sulfides in environmental waters by automated gas dialysis/methylene blue colorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Francom, D. Goodwin, L.R.; Dieken, F.P. )

    1990-01-01

    A sensitive and rapid automated method has been developed for the selective analysis of acid extractable sulfide in environmental samples by combining gas dialysis separation techniques with methylene blue detection procedures. Acid extractable sulfide is separated from the sample matrix by the gas dialysis membrane and subsequently trapped in a dilute sodium hydroxide receiving stream. This stream is reacted with N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine and ferric chloride to produce methylene blue which is then quantitated colorimetrically at 660 nm. For standards and nonturbid environmental samples, there is good agreement between the results obtained by this procedure and the standard methylene blue method. The effect of interferences on the accurate determination of sulfide by both methods was also examined and it was found that cupric ions significantly interfered with sulfide estimation. To obtain adequate sulfide recoveries in tap water and environmental samples ascorbic acid must be added as an antioxidant. A detection limit of 2 {mu}g/L of sulfide has been obtained using this procedure.

  3. Featured Molecules: Ascorbic Acid and Methylene Blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, William F.; Wildman, Randall J.

    2003-05-01

    The WebWare molecules of the month for May are featured in several articles in this issue. "Arsenic: Not So Evil After All?" discusses the pharmaceutical uses of methylene blue and its development as the first synthetic drug used against a specific disease. The JCE Classroom Activity "Out of the Blue" and the article "Greening the Blue Bottle" feature methylene blue and ascorbic acid as two key ingredients in the formulation of the blue bottle. You can also see a colorful example of these two molecules in action on the cover. "Sailing on the 'C': A Vitamin Titration with a Twist" describes an experiment to determine the vitamin C (ascorbic acid) content of citrus fruits and challenges students, as eighteenth-century sea captains, to decide the best fruit to take on a long voyage. Fully manipulable (Chime) versions of these and other molecules are available at Only@JCE Online.

  4. Acetone production with metabolically engineered strains of Acetobacterium woodii.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeister, Sabrina; Gerdom, Marzena; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Linder, Sonja; Flüchter, Sebastian; Öztürk, Hatice; Blümke, Wilfried; May, Antje; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg; Bahl, Hubert; Dürre, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Expected depletion of oil and fossil resources urges the development of new alternative routes for the production of bulk chemicals and fuels beyond petroleum resources. In this study, the clostridial acetone pathway was used for the formation of acetone in the acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The acetone production operon (APO) containing the genes thlA (encoding thiolase A), ctfA/ctfB (encoding CoA transferase), and adc (encoding acetoacetate decarboxylase) from Clostridium acetobutylicum were cloned under the control of the thlA promoter into four vectors having different replicons for Gram-positives (pIP404, pBP1, pCB102, and pCD6). Stable replication was observed for all constructs. A. woodii [pJIR_actthlA] achieved the maximal acetone concentration under autotrophic conditions (15.2±3.4mM). Promoter sequences of the genes ackA from A. woodii and pta-ack from C. ljungdahlii were determined by primer extension (PEX) and cloned upstream of the APO. The highest acetone production in recombinant A. woodii cells was achieved using the promoters PthlA and Ppta-ack. Batch fermentations using A. woodii [pMTL84151_actthlA] in a bioreactor revealed that acetate concentration had an effect on the acetone production, due to the high Km value of the CoA transferase. In order to establish consistent acetate concentration within the bioreactor and to increase biomass, a continuous fermentation process for A. woodii was developed. Thus, acetone productivity of the strain A. woodii [pMTL84151_actthlA] was increased from 1.2mgL(-1)h(-1) in bottle fermentation to 26.4mgL(-1)h(-1) in continuous gas fermentation. PMID:26971669

  5. Acetone production with metabolically engineered strains of Acetobacterium woodii.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeister, Sabrina; Gerdom, Marzena; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Linder, Sonja; Flüchter, Sebastian; Öztürk, Hatice; Blümke, Wilfried; May, Antje; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg; Bahl, Hubert; Dürre, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Expected depletion of oil and fossil resources urges the development of new alternative routes for the production of bulk chemicals and fuels beyond petroleum resources. In this study, the clostridial acetone pathway was used for the formation of acetone in the acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The acetone production operon (APO) containing the genes thlA (encoding thiolase A), ctfA/ctfB (encoding CoA transferase), and adc (encoding acetoacetate decarboxylase) from Clostridium acetobutylicum were cloned under the control of the thlA promoter into four vectors having different replicons for Gram-positives (pIP404, pBP1, pCB102, and pCD6). Stable replication was observed for all constructs. A. woodii [pJIR_actthlA] achieved the maximal acetone concentration under autotrophic conditions (15.2±3.4mM). Promoter sequences of the genes ackA from A. woodii and pta-ack from C. ljungdahlii were determined by primer extension (PEX) and cloned upstream of the APO. The highest acetone production in recombinant A. woodii cells was achieved using the promoters PthlA and Ppta-ack. Batch fermentations using A. woodii [pMTL84151_actthlA] in a bioreactor revealed that acetate concentration had an effect on the acetone production, due to the high Km value of the CoA transferase. In order to establish consistent acetate concentration within the bioreactor and to increase biomass, a continuous fermentation process for A. woodii was developed. Thus, acetone productivity of the strain A. woodii [pMTL84151_actthlA] was increased from 1.2mgL(-1)h(-1) in bottle fermentation to 26.4mgL(-1)h(-1) in continuous gas fermentation.

  6. Acetone in the atmosphere: Distribution, sources, and sinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, H. B.; O'Hara, D.; Herlth, D.; Sachse, W.; Blake, D. R.; Bradshaw, J. D.; Kanakidou, M.; Crutzen, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    Acetone (CH3COCH3) was found to be the dominant nonmethane organic species present in the atmosphere sampled primarily over eastern Canada (0-6 km, 35 deg-65 deg N) during ABLE3B (July to August 1990). A concentration range of 357 to 2310 ppt (= 10(exp -12) v/v) with a mean value of 1140 +/- 413 ppt was measured. Under extremely clean conditions, generally involving Arctic flows, lowest (background) mixing ratios of 550 +/- 100 ppt were present in much of the troposphere studied. Correlations between atmospheric mixing ratios of acetone and select species such as C2H2, CO, C3H8, C2Cl4 and isoprene provided important clues to its possible sources and to the causes of its atmospheric variability. Biomass burning as a source of acetone has been identified for the first time. By using atmospheric data and three-dimensional photochemical models, a global acetone source of 40-60 Tg (= 10(exp 12) g)/yr is estimated to be present. Secondary formation from the atmospheric oxidation of precursor hydrocarbons (principally propane, isobutane, and isobutene) provides the single largest source (51%). The remainder is attributable to biomass burning (26%), direct biogenic emissions (21%), and primary anthropogenic emissions (3%). Atmospheric removal of acetone is estimated to be due to photolysis (64%), reaction with OH radicals (24%), and deposition (12%). Model calculations also suggest that acetone photolysis contributed significantly to PAN formation (100-200 ppt) in the middle and upper troposphere of the sampled region and may be important globally. While the source-sink equation appears to be roughly balanced, much more atmospheric and source data, especially from the southern hemisphere, are needed to reliably quantify the atmospheric budget of acetone.

  7. Acetone in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere: Impact on trace gases and aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, F.; Bürger, V.; Droste-Fanke, B.; Grimm, F.; Krieger, A.; Schneider, J.; Stilp, T.

    Upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric acetone measurements have been performed in summer and winter 1994 through 1996 at latitudes between 30°N and 75°N using ion-molecule reaction mass spectrometry. We observed very high acetone volume mixing ratios of up to 3000 pptv (parts per trillion by volume) in extended air masses and in summer when acetone destruction by photodissociation is fast. This indicates efficient transport of acetone and photochemical acetone precursors to the upper troposphere and efficient upper tropospheric formation of acetone products, especially HOx radicals and PAN. Our data indicate large HOx production from acetone which has important implications for other trace gases and aerosols.

  8. The Mechanochemical Reaction of Palladium(II) Chloride with a Bidentate Phosphine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David E.; Carrie, Philippa; Fawkes, Kelli L.; Rebner, Bruce; Xing, Yao

    2010-01-01

    This experiment describes the reaction of palladium(II) chloride with 1,5-bis(diphenylphosphino)pentane by grinding the two powders together in the solid state. The product is the precursor for the metalation reaction at one of the methylene carbon atoms of the ligand's backbone. The final product is known to be a catalyst for Suzuki-Miyaura…

  9. Biogenic and biomass burning sources of acetone to the troposphere

    SciTech Connect

    Atherton, C.S.

    1997-04-01

    Acetone may be an important source of reactive odd hydrogen in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. This source of odd hydrogen may affect the concentration of a number of species, including ozone, nitrogen oxides, methane, and others. Traditional, acetone had been considered a by-product of the photochemical oxidation of other species, and had not entered models as a primary emission. However, recent work estimates a global source term of 40-60 Tg acetone/year. Of this, 25% is directly emitted during biomass burning, and 20% is directly emitted by evergreens and other plants. Only 3% is due to anthropogenic/industrial emissions. The bulk of the remainder, 51% of the acetone source, is a secondary product from the oxidation of propane, isobutane, and isobutene. Also, while it is speculated that the oxidation of pinene (a biogenic emission) may also contribute about 6 Tg/year, this term is highly uncertain. Thus, the two largest primary sources of acetone are biogenic emission and biomass burning, with industrial/anthropogenic emissions very small in comparison.

  10. Sensor gas analyzer for acetone determination in expired air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, Vitaly V.

    2001-05-01

    Diseases and changes in the way of life change the concentration and composition of the expired air. Our adaptable gas analyzer is intended for the selective analysis of expired air and can be adapted for the solution of current diagnostic and analytical tasks by the user (a physician or a patient). Having analyzed the existing trends in the development of noninvasive diagnostics we have chosen the method of noninvasive acetone detection in expired air, where the acetone concentration correlates with blood and urine glucose concentrations. The appearance of acetone in expired air is indicative of disorders that may be caused not only by diabetes but also be wrong diet, incorrect sportsmen training etc. To control the disorders one should know the acetone concentration in the human body. This knowledge allows one to judge upon the state of the patient, choose a correct diet that will not cause damage to the patient's health, determine sportsmen training efficiency and results and solve the artificial pancreas problem. Our device provide highly accurate analysis, rapid diagnostics and authentic acetone quantification in the patient's body at any time aimed at prediction of the patient's state and assessing the efficiency of the therapy used. Clinical implementation of the device will improve the health and save lives of many thousands of diabetes sufferers.

  11. Urea enhances the photodynamic efficiency of methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, Silvia C; Yoshimura, Tania M; Ribeiro, Martha S; Junqueira, Helena C; Maciel, Cleiton; Coutinho-Neto, Maurício D; Baptista, Maurício S

    2015-09-01

    Methylene blue (MB) is a well-known photosensitizer used mostly for antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT). MB tends to aggregate, interfering negatively with its singlet oxygen generation, because MB aggregates lean towards electron transfer reactions, instead of energy transfer with oxygen. In order to avoid MB aggregation we tested the effect of urea, which destabilizes solute-solute interactions. The antimicrobial efficiency of MB (30 μM) either in water or in 2M aqueous urea solution was tested against a fungus (Candida albicans). Samples were kept in the dark and irradiation was performed with a light emitting diode (λ = 645 nm). Without urea, 9 min of irradiation was needed to achieve complete microbial eradication. In urea solution, complete eradication was obtained with 6 min illumination (light energy of 14.4 J). The higher efficiency of MB/urea solution was correlated with a smaller concentration of dimers, even in the presence of the microorganisms. Monomer to dimer concentration ratios were extracted from the absorption spectra of MB solutions measured as a function of MB concentration at different temperatures and at different concentrations of sodium chloride and urea. Dimerization equilibrium decreased by 3 and 6 times in 1 and 2M urea, respectively, and increased by a factor of 6 in 1M sodium chloride. The destabilization of aggregates by urea seems to be applied to other photosensitizers, since urea also destabilized aggregation of Meso-tetra(4-n-methyl-pyridyl)porphyrin, which is a positively charged porphyrin. We showed that urea destabilizes MB aggregates mainly by causing a decrease in the enthalpic gain of dimerization, which was exactly the opposite of the effect of sodium chloride. In order to understand this phenomenon at the molecular level, we computed the free energy for the dimer association process (ΔG(dimer)) in aqueous solution as well as its enthalpic component in aqueous and in aqueous/urea solutions by molecular dynamics

  12. Nitrate-Dependent Degradation of Acetone by Alicycliphilus and Paracoccus Strains and Comparison of Acetone Carboxylase Enzymes ▿

    PubMed Central

    Dullius, Carlos Henrique; Chen, Ching-Yuan; Schink, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    A novel acetone-degrading, nitrate-reducing bacterium, strain KN Bun08, was isolated from an enrichment culture with butanone and nitrate as the sole sources of carbon and energy. The cells were motile short rods, 0.5 to 1 by 1 to 2 μm in size, which gave Gram-positive staining results in the exponential growth phase and Gram-negative staining results in the stationary-growth phase. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolate was assigned to the genus Alicycliphilus. Besides butanone and acetone, the strain used numerous fatty acids as substrates. An ATP-dependent acetone-carboxylating enzyme was enriched from cell extracts of this bacterium and of Alicycliphilus denitrificans K601T by two subsequent DEAE Sepharose column procedures. For comparison, acetone carboxylases were enriched from two additional nitrate-reducing bacterial species, Paracoccus denitrificans and P. pantotrophus. The products of the carboxylase reaction were acetoacetate and AMP rather than ADP. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of cell extracts and of the various enzyme preparations revealed bands corresponding to molecular masses of 85, 78, and 20 kDa, suggesting similarities to the acetone carboxylase enzymes described in detail for the aerobic bacterium Xanthobacter autotrophicus strain Py2 (85.3, 78.3, and 19.6 kDa) and the phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus. Protein bands were excised and compared by mass spectrometry with those of acetone carboxylases of aerobic bacteria. The results document the finding that the nitrate-reducing bacteria studied here use acetone-carboxylating enzymes similar to those of aerobic and phototrophic bacteria. PMID:21841031

  13. Acetone Powder From Dormant Seeds of Ricinus communis L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcanti, Elisa D. C.; Maciel, Fábio M.; Villeneuve, Pierre; Lago, Regina C. A.; Machado, Olga L. T.; Freire, Denise M. G.

    The influence of several factors on the hydrolytic activity of lipase, present in the acetone powder from dormant castor seeds (Ricinus communis) was evaluated. The enzyme showed a marked specificity for short-chain substrates. The best reaction conditions were an acid medium, Triton X-100 as the emulsifying agent and a temperature of 30°C. The lipase activity of the acetone powder of different castor oil genotypes showed great variability and storage stability of up to 90%. The toxicology analysis of the acetone powder from genotype Nordestina BRS 149 showed a higher ricin (toxic component) content, a lower 2S albumin (allergenic compound) content, and similar allergenic potential compared with untreated seeds.

  14. Chloride in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... found in table salt or sea salt as sodium chloride. It is also found in many vegetables. Foods ... Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes for Water, Potassium, Sodium, Chloride, and Sulfate. National Academy Press, Washington, DC: 2005. ...

  15. Specific Anion Effects on the Kinetics of Iodination of Acetone.

    PubMed

    Lo Nostro, Pierandrea; Mazzini, Virginia; Ninham, Barry W; Ambrosi, Moira; Dei, Luigi; Baglioni, Piero

    2016-08-18

    Specific ion effects on the kinetics of iodination of acetone in an acidic medium are investigated by UV/Vis spectrophotometry as a function of nature of the acid and temperature. The results indicate that the order of the reaction with respect to acetone is practically unaffected by the composition of the acid while the value of the mixed constant k1 K increases according to the sequence HBr

  16. Acne vulgaris: treatment with topical benzoyl peroxide acetone gel.

    PubMed

    Montes, L F

    1977-05-01

    The topical effect on acne of a benzoyl peroxide acetone gel was studied over an eight week period and simultaneously compared with the effect of a benzoyl peroxide lotion and a vitamin A acid cream. The three formulations produced a significant reduction in the number of comedones. The two benzoyl peroxide formulations substantially reduced the number of papules, but this effect was not observed to a significant degree with the vitamin A acid. Burning sensation following application, a common problem with the benzoyl peroxide alcohol gels, was not reported by patients using the benzoyl peroxide acetone gel.

  17. CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING IN CENTER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING IN CENTER, CALCIUM CHLORIDE STORAGE BUILDING ON RIGHT WITH SA (SODA ASH) BUILDING IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Solvay Process Company, Calcium Chloride Plant, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  18. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of methylene blue active substances by spectrophotometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkhardt, Mark R.; Cinotto, Pete J.; Frahm, Galen W.; Woodworth, Mark T.; Pritt, Jeffrey W.

    1995-01-01

    A method for the determination of methylene blue active substances in whole-water samples by liquid-liquid extraction and spectrophotometric detection is described. Sulfate and sulfonate-based surfectants are reacted with methylene blue to form a blue-colored complex. The complex is extracted into chloroform, back-washed with an acidified phosphate-based buffer solution, and measured against external standards with a probe spectrophotometer. The method detection limt for routine analysis is 0.02 milligram per liter. The precision is plus/minus 10 percent relative standard deviation. The positive bias from nitrate and chloride and U.S. Geological Survey method O-3111-83 for methylene blue active substances is minized by adding a back-washing step.

  19. Determination of trace amounts of formaldehyde in acetone.

    PubMed

    Huang, X H Hilda; Ip, H S Simon; Yu, Jian Zhen

    2007-12-01

    A method to quantify sub-ppm levels of formaldehyde in acetone has been developed and it is reported here. In this method, the different reactivities and stabilities of sulfite with formaldehyde and acetone are used to separate the two carbonyl compounds. Sulfite reacts with formaldehyde to form hydroxymethanesulfonate (HMS), the non-volatile and stable nature of which allows its separation from bulk acetone solvent. The resulting HMS is then converted back to formaldehyde under basic conditions, and formaldehyde is derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) and quantified in its DNP hydrazone form using high-performance liquid chromatography-UV detection. The method detection limit at the 99% confidence level was 0.051 mg L(-1). A batch of samples can be processed within 4 h. The method has been applied to quantify the amount of formaldehyde in an analytical-grade acetone and in a commercial nail polish remover and the level of formaldehyde was found to be 0.175 and 0.184 mg L(-1), respectively. PMID:17996534

  20. NASOPHARYNGEAL CONCENTRATIONS IN THE HUMAN VOLUNTEER BREATHING ACETONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In an effort to examine the absorption of a common chemical into the nasopharyngeal region in humans, a 57 year old male volunteer inhaled uniformly labeled 13C-acetone at 1.4 ppm for 30 min while performing different breathing maneuvers; nose inhale, nose exhale (NINE); mouth ...

  1. A fully integrated standalone portable cavity ringdown breath acetone analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Meixiu; Jiang, Chenyu; Gong, Zhiyong; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Chen, Zhuying; Wang, Zhennan; Kang, Meiling; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2015-09-01

    Breath analysis is a promising new technique for nonintrusive disease diagnosis and metabolic status monitoring. One challenging issue in using a breath biomarker for potential particular disease screening is to find a quantitative relationship between the concentration of the breath biomarker and clinical diagnostic parameters of the specific disease. In order to address this issue, we need a new instrument that is capable of conducting real-time, online breath analysis with high data throughput, so that a large scale of clinical test (more subjects) can be achieved in a short period of time. In this work, we report a fully integrated, standalone, portable analyzer based on the cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique for near-real time, online breath acetone measurements. The performance of the portable analyzer in measurements of breath acetone was interrogated and validated by using the certificated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results show that this new analyzer is useful for reliable online (online introduction of a breath sample without pre-treatment) breath acetone analysis with high sensitivity (57 ppb) and high data throughput (one data per second). Subsequently, the validated breath analyzer was employed for acetone measurements in 119 human subjects under various situations. The instrument design, packaging, specifications, and future improvements were also described. From an optical ringdown cavity operated by the lab-set electronics reported previously to this fully integrated standalone new instrument, we have enabled a new scientific tool suited for large scales of breath acetone analysis and created an instrument platform that can even be adopted for study of other breath biomarkers by using different lasers and ringdown mirrors covering corresponding spectral fingerprints.

  2. A fully integrated standalone portable cavity ringdown breath acetone analyzer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meixiu; Jiang, Chenyu; Gong, Zhiyong; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Chen, Zhuying; Wang, Zhennan; Kang, Meiling; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2015-09-01

    Breath analysis is a promising new technique for nonintrusive disease diagnosis and metabolic status monitoring. One challenging issue in using a breath biomarker for potential particular disease screening is to find a quantitative relationship between the concentration of the breath biomarker and clinical diagnostic parameters of the specific disease. In order to address this issue, we need a new instrument that is capable of conducting real-time, online breath analysis with high data throughput, so that a large scale of clinical test (more subjects) can be achieved in a short period of time. In this work, we report a fully integrated, standalone, portable analyzer based on the cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique for near-real time, online breath acetone measurements. The performance of the portable analyzer in measurements of breath acetone was interrogated and validated by using the certificated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results show that this new analyzer is useful for reliable online (online introduction of a breath sample without pre-treatment) breath acetone analysis with high sensitivity (57 ppb) and high data throughput (one data per second). Subsequently, the validated breath analyzer was employed for acetone measurements in 119 human subjects under various situations. The instrument design, packaging, specifications, and future improvements were also described. From an optical ringdown cavity operated by the lab-set electronics reported previously to this fully integrated standalone new instrument, we have enabled a new scientific tool suited for large scales of breath acetone analysis and created an instrument platform that can even be adopted for study of other breath biomarkers by using different lasers and ringdown mirrors covering corresponding spectral fingerprints.

  3. Measurement of the diffusion coefficient of acetone in succinonitrile at its melting point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chopra, M. A.; Glicksman, M. E.; Singh, N. B.

    1988-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of acetone in liquid succinonitrile at 331.1 K was determined using the method of McBain and Dawson (1935). Only dilute mixtures of SCN-acetone were studied. The interdiffusion constant was determined to be 0.0000127 sq cm/s and was essentially independent of the acetone concentration over the range investigated (0.5 to 18 mol pct acetone).

  4. Economic evaluation of the acetone-butane fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lenz, T.G.; Moreira, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    The economics of producing acetone as 1-butanol via fermentation have been examined for a 45 x 1 kg of solvents/year plant. For a molasses substrate the total annual production costs were approximately $39 million vs. a total annual income of $36 million, with approximatley $20 million total required capital. Molasses cost of approximately $24.4 million/year was critical to these economics. Liquid whey was next evaluated as an alternative feed. Whey feed saved approximately 11 million dollars annually in feed costs and yielded approximately 8 million net additional annual revenues from protein sale. The primary differences gave an annual gross profit of approximately $15 million for the whey case and resulted in a discounted cash flow rate return of 29%. Waste-based acetone-butanol production via fermentation deserves further attention in view of the attractive whey-based economics and the excellent potential of butanol as a fuel extender, especially for diesohol blending.

  5. Effects of acetone on methyl ethyl ketone peroxide runaway reaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan-Fu; Tseng, Jo-Ming; Wu, Tsung-Chih; Shu, Chi-Min

    2008-05-30

    Runaway reactions by methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (MEKPO) are an important issue in Asia, due to its unstable structure and extensive heat release during upset situations. This study employed differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to draw the experimental data for MEKPO 31 mass% and with acetone 99 mass% on three types of heating rate of 2, 4, and 10 degrees C/min; the kinetic and safety parameters were then evaluated via curve fitting. Through the reproducible tests in each condition, the results show that acetone is not a contaminant, because it could increase the activation energy (Ea) and onset temperature (To) when combined with MEKPO, which differs from the hazard information of the material safety data sheet (MSDS).

  6. Ethanol, acetone and ammonia gas room temperature operated sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Iqbal; Bedi, R. K.

    2013-06-01

    CuO nanocrystalline thick films were fabricated from powder synthesized by a sol-gel auto combustion route at different pH value of the precursor solution. The gas sensing response of thick film samples towards ethanol, acetone and ammonia gases has been tested and response has been found to be higher for ammonia gas. The sensor recovers its original state after ammonia exposure.

  7. Self-Associating Behavior of Acetone in Liquid Krypton.

    PubMed

    De Beuckeleer, Liene I; Herrebout, Wouter A

    2016-02-18

    Acetone molecules are inclined to self-associate through dipole-dipole interactions because of their large dipole moment. Infrared spectroscopy of compounds dissolved in liquid noble gases supported by high level ab initio calculations allows investigating the self-associating behavior and determining the thermodynamical properties. In this study, infrared spectra of various concentrations of acetone dissolved in liquid krypton are recorded at constant temperature. Overlapping monomer and dimer spectra are separated by analyzing the obtained data sets with numerical methods based on least-squares fitting. Although acetone is known to self-associate, only a few spectral features have been presented in literature before. In this study, the application of new numerical approaches succeeds in resolving overlapping spectra and allows observing isolated acetone dimer absorption bands for the complete mid infrared spectrum. By use of data sets of spectra recorded at temperatures between 134 and 142 K, the experimental standard dimerization enthalpy was determined to be -10.8 kJ mol(-1). MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ calculations predicted a stacked and planar dimer geometry of which the stacked geometry is more stable. Combining MP2 energies and single point corrections involving CCSD(T) calculations and complete basis set extrapolations based on the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ equilibrium geometry lead to complexation energy of -28.4 kJ mol(-1) for the stacked geometry and -15.1 kJ mol(-1) for the planar geometry. The corresponding values for the complexation enthalpies in solution, obtained by combining these values with corrections for thermal and solvent influences are -13.7 and -5.8 kJ mol(-1).

  8. Self-Associating Behavior of Acetone in Liquid Krypton.

    PubMed

    De Beuckeleer, Liene I; Herrebout, Wouter A

    2016-02-18

    Acetone molecules are inclined to self-associate through dipole-dipole interactions because of their large dipole moment. Infrared spectroscopy of compounds dissolved in liquid noble gases supported by high level ab initio calculations allows investigating the self-associating behavior and determining the thermodynamical properties. In this study, infrared spectra of various concentrations of acetone dissolved in liquid krypton are recorded at constant temperature. Overlapping monomer and dimer spectra are separated by analyzing the obtained data sets with numerical methods based on least-squares fitting. Although acetone is known to self-associate, only a few spectral features have been presented in literature before. In this study, the application of new numerical approaches succeeds in resolving overlapping spectra and allows observing isolated acetone dimer absorption bands for the complete mid infrared spectrum. By use of data sets of spectra recorded at temperatures between 134 and 142 K, the experimental standard dimerization enthalpy was determined to be -10.8 kJ mol(-1). MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ calculations predicted a stacked and planar dimer geometry of which the stacked geometry is more stable. Combining MP2 energies and single point corrections involving CCSD(T) calculations and complete basis set extrapolations based on the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ equilibrium geometry lead to complexation energy of -28.4 kJ mol(-1) for the stacked geometry and -15.1 kJ mol(-1) for the planar geometry. The corresponding values for the complexation enthalpies in solution, obtained by combining these values with corrections for thermal and solvent influences are -13.7 and -5.8 kJ mol(-1). PMID:26805773

  9. Reverse osmosis application for butanol-acetone fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, A.; Iannotti, E.L.; Fischer, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The problems of dilute solvent concentration in butanol-acetone fermentation can be solved by using reverse osmosis to dewater the fermentation liquor. Polyamide membranes exhibited butanol rejection rates as high as 85%. Optimum rejection of butanol occurs at a pressure of approximately 5.5 to 6.5 MPa and hydraulic recoveries of 50-70%. Flux ranged from 0.5 to 1.8 l.

  10. Acetone oxidation using ozone on manganese oxide catalysts.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yan; Reed, Corey; Lee, Yong-Kul; Oyama, S Ted

    2005-09-22

    Supported manganese oxide catalysts were prepared by the impregnation of alumina foam blocks washcoated with alumina and silica. The manganese content based on the weight of the washcoats was 10 wt % calculated as MnO2. Fourier transform profiles of the Mn K-edge EXAFS spectra for these samples gave three distinctive peaks at 0.15, 0.25, and 0.32 nm and were close to the profiles of Mn3O4 and beta-MnO2. The number of surface active sites was determined through oxygen chemisorption measurements at a reduction temperature (Tred = 443 K) obtained from temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) experiments. Acetone catalytic oxidation was studied from room temperature to 573 K, and was found to be highly accelerated by the use of ozone on both catalysts with substantial reductions in the reaction temperature. The only carbon-containing product detected was CO2. The alumina-supported catalyst was found to be more active than the silica-supported catalyst in acetone and ozone conversion, with higher turnover frequencies (TOFs) for both reactions. The pressure drop through the foam was low and increased little (0.003 kPa/10 000 h(-1)) with space velocity. In situ steady-state Raman spectroscopy measurements during the acetone catalytic oxidation reaction showed the presence of an adsorbed acetone species with a C-H bond at 2930 cm(-1) and a peroxide species derived from ozone with an O-O bond at 890 cm(-1).

  11. Acetone Oxidation using Ozone on Manganese Oxide Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Xi,Y.; Reed, C.; Lee, Y.; Oyama, S.

    2005-01-01

    Supported manganese oxide catalysts were prepared by the impregnation of alumina foam blocks washcoated with alumina and silica. The manganese content based on the weight of the washcoats was 10 wt % calculated as MnO{sub 2}. Fourier transform profiles of the Mn K-edge EXAFS spectra for these samples gave three distinctive peaks at 0.15, 0.25, and 0.32 nm and were close to the profiles of Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} and {beta}-MnO{sub 2}. The number of surface active sites was determined through oxygen chemisorption measurements at a reduction temperature (T{sub red} = 443 K) obtained from temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) experiments. Acetone catalytic oxidation was studied from room temperature to 573 K, and was found to be highly accelerated by the use of ozone on both catalysts with substantial reductions in the reaction temperature. The only carbon-containing product detected was CO{sub 2}. The alumina-supported catalyst was found to be more active than the silica-supported catalyst in acetone and ozone conversion, with higher turnover frequencies (TOFs) for both reactions. The pressure drop through the foam was low and increased little (0.003 kPa/10 000 h{sup -1}) with space velocity. In situ steady-state Raman spectroscopy measurements during the acetone catalytic oxidation reaction showed the presence of an adsorbed acetone species with a C-H bond at 2930 cm{sup -1} and a peroxide species derived from ozone with an O-O bond at 890 cm{sup -1}.

  12. Effect of Coadsorbed Water on the Photodecomposition of Acetone on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael A.

    2008-06-10

    The influence of coadsorbed water on the photodecomposition of acetone on TiO2 was examined using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and the rutile TiO2(110) surface as a model photocatalyst. Of the two major influences ascribed to water in the heterogeneous photocatalysis literature (promotion via OH radical supply and inhibition due to site blocking), only the negative influence of water was observed. As long as the total water and acetone coverage was maintained well below the first layer saturation coverage (‘1 ML’), little inhibition of acetone photodecomposition was observed. However, as the total water+acetone coverage exceeded 1 ML, acetone was preferentially displaced from the first layer to physisorbed states by water and the extent of acetone photodecomposition attenuated. The displacement originated from water compressing acetone into high coverage regions where increased acetone-acetone repulsions caused displacement from the first layer. The immediate product of acetone photodecomposition was adsorbed acetate, which occupies twice as many surface sites per molecule as compared to acetone. Since the acetate intermediate was more stable on the TiO2(110) surface than either water or acetone (as gauged by TPD) and since its photodecomposition rate was less than that of acetone, additional surface sites were not opened up during acetone photodecomposition for previously displaced acetone molecules to re-enter the first layer. Results in this study suggest that increased molecular-level repulsions between organic molecules brought about by increased water coverage are as influential in the inhibiting effect of water on photooxidation rates as are water-organic repulsions.

  13. Methylene Blue Inhibits Caspases by Oxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine.

    PubMed

    Pakavathkumar, Prateep; Sharma, Gyanesh; Kaushal, Vikas; Foveau, Bénédicte; LeBlanc, Andrea C

    2015-09-24

    Methylene blue, currently in phase 3 clinical trials against Alzheimer Disease, disaggregates the Tau protein of neurofibrillary tangles by oxidizing specific cysteine residues. Here, we investigated if methylene blue can inhibit caspases via the oxidation of their active site cysteine. Methylene blue, and derivatives, azure A and azure B competitively inhibited recombinant Caspase-6 (Casp6), and inhibited Casp6 activity in transfected human colon carcinoma cells and in serum-deprived primary human neuron cultures. Methylene blue also inhibited recombinant Casp1 and Casp3. Furthermore, methylene blue inhibited Casp3 activity in an acute mouse model of liver toxicity. Mass spectrometry confirmed methylene blue and azure B oxidation of the catalytic Cys163 cysteine of Casp6. Together, these results show a novel inhibitory mechanism of caspases via sulfenation of the active site cysteine. These results indicate that methylene blue or its derivatives could (1) have an additional effect against Alzheimer Disease by inhibiting brain caspase activity, (2) be used as a drug to prevent caspase activation in other conditions, and (3) predispose chronically treated individuals to cancer via the inhibition of caspases.

  14. Methylene Blue Inhibits Caspases by Oxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine

    PubMed Central

    Pakavathkumar, Prateep; Sharma, Gyanesh; Kaushal, Vikas; Foveau, Bénédicte; LeBlanc, Andrea C.

    2015-01-01

    Methylene blue, currently in phase 3 clinical trials against Alzheimer Disease, disaggregates the Tau protein of neurofibrillary tangles by oxidizing specific cysteine residues. Here, we investigated if methylene blue can inhibit caspases via the oxidation of their active site cysteine. Methylene blue, and derivatives, azure A and azure B competitively inhibited recombinant Caspase-6 (Casp6), and inhibited Casp6 activity in transfected human colon carcinoma cells and in serum-deprived primary human neuron cultures. Methylene blue also inhibited recombinant Casp1 and Casp3. Furthermore, methylene blue inhibited Casp3 activity in an acute mouse model of liver toxicity. Mass spectrometry confirmed methylene blue and azure B oxidation of the catalytic Cys163 cysteine of Casp6. Together, these results show a novel inhibitory mechanism of caspases via sulfenation of the active site cysteine. These results indicate that methylene blue or its derivatives could (1) have an additional effect against Alzheimer Disease by inhibiting brain caspase activity, (2) be used as a drug to prevent caspase activation in other conditions, and (3) predispose chronically treated individuals to cancer via the inhibition of caspases. PMID:26400108

  15. DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF COPPER SULFATE AND METHYLENE CHLORIDE TO SHRIMP EMBRYOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The embryos of the grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) have shown sensitivity to the water-soluble fraction of Number 2 fuel oil which indicates they may be a useful test species in estuarine developmental toxicity tests. Detailed concentration-response curves for copper sulfate an...

  16. Extractive spectrophotometric determination of some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs using methylene blue.

    PubMed

    El-Kommos, Michael E; Mohamed, Niveen A; Hakiem, Ahmed F Abdel

    2013-01-01

    A simple, rapid, sensitive, and accurate extractive spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of seven nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)--namely diclofenac sodium, ibuprofen, indomethacin, ketoprofen, ketorolac tromethamine, mefenamic acid, and naproxen-in pure forms as well as their pharmaceutical dosage forms (tablets, capsules, effervescent granules, syrups, oral drops, ampules, eye drops, gels, and suppositories). The method depends on the formation of an intensely colored ion-pair complex between the acidic drug and methylene blue in alkaline medium. The complex is stable and extractable into methylene chloride. All parameters were optimized. Beer-Lambert's law was obeyed in concentrations ranging from 0.04 to 9 microg/mL. Statistical analysis of the calibration data was carried out, and correlation coefficients were in the range from 0.9996 to 0.9998. The developed method was fully validated according to International Conference on Harmonization guidelines, and complied with U.S. Pharmacopeia guidelines. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of the investigated drugs in their pharmaceutical formulations, and good recoveries were obtained. The results obtained were compared with those of reported and official methods, and no significant differences were found with t- and F-tests. Interference effects of some compounds usually present in combination with NSAIDs were studied, and the tolerance limits of these compounds were determined. PMID:24000745

  17. Prophylaxis and reversal of ifosfamide encephalopathy with methylene-blue.

    PubMed

    Küpfer, A; Aeschlimann, C; Wermuth, B; Cerny, T

    1994-03-26

    The antineoplastic ifosfamide produces dose-dependent signs of neurotoxicity. After ifosfamide overdose in a patient, we found excessive urinary excretion of glutaric acid and sarcosine, which is compatible with glutaric aciduria type II, a defect in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation that results from defective electron transfer to flavoproteins. We therefore used the electron-accepting drug methylene-blue as an antidote for ifosfamide encephalopathy. In one patient, ifosfamide neurotoxicity was rapidly reversed by methylene-blue 50 mg intravenously. In another patient with previous episodes of ifosfamide encephalopathy, methylene-blue was administered orally prophylactically. No symptoms of neurotoxicity were noted.

  18. Proteomic analysis of nitrate-dependent acetone degradation by Alicycliphilus denitrificans strain BC.

    PubMed

    Oosterkamp, Margreet J; Boeren, Sjef; Atashgahi, Siavash; Plugge, Caroline M; Schaap, Peter J; Stams, Alfons J M

    2015-06-01

    Alicycliphilus denitrificans strain BC grows anaerobically on acetone with nitrate as electron acceptor. Comparative proteomics of cultures of A. denitrificans strain BC grown on either acetone or acetate with nitrate was performed to study the enzymes involved in the acetone degradation pathway. In the proposed acetone degradation pathway, an acetone carboxylase converts acetone to acetoacetate, an AMP-dependent synthetase/ligase converts acetoacetate to acetoacetyl-CoA, and an acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase cleaves acetoacetyl-CoA to two acetyl-CoA. We also found a putative aldehyde dehydrogenase associated with acetone degradation. This enzyme functioned as a β-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase catalyzing the conversion of surplus acetoacetate to β-hydroxybutyrate that may be converted to the energy and carbon storage compound, poly-β-hydroxybutyrate. Accordingly, we confirmed the formation of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate in acetone-grown cells of strain BC. Our findings provide insight in nitrate-dependent acetone degradation that is activated by carboxylation of acetone. This will aid studies of similar pathways found in other microorganisms degrading acetone with nitrate or sulfate as electron acceptor.

  19. Acetone Chemistry on Oxidized and Reduced TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael A

    2004-12-09

    The chemistry of acetone on the oxidized and reduced surfaces of TiO2(110) was examined using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). The reduced surface was prepared with about 7% oxygen vacancy sites by annealing in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) at 850 K, and the oxidized surface was prepared by exposure of the reduced surface to molecular oxygen at 95 K followed by heating the surface to a variety of temperatures between 200 and 500 K. Acetone adsorbs molecularly on the reduced surface with no evidence for either decomposition or preferential binding at vacancy sites. Based on HREELS, the majority of acetone molecules adsorbed in an η¹ configuration at Ti⁴⁺ sites through interaction of lone pair electrons on the carbonyl oxygen atom. Repulsive acetone-acetone interactions shift the desorption peak from 345 K at low coverage to 175 K as the first layer saturates with a coverage of ~ 1 ML. In contrast, about 7% of the acetone adlayer decomposes when the surface is pretreated with molecular oxygen. Acetate is among the detected decomposition products, but only comprises about 1/3rd of the amount of acetone decomposed and its yield depends on the temperature at which the O₂ exposed surface was preheated to prior to acetone adsorption. Aside from the small level of irreversible decomposition, about 0.25 ML of acetone is stabilized to 375 K by coadsorbed oxygen. These acetone species exhibit an HREELS spectrum unlike that of η¹-acetone or of any other species proposed to exist from the interaction of acetone with TiO₂ powders. Based on the presence of extensive ¹⁶O/¹⁸O exchange between acetone and coadsorbed oxygen in the 375 K acetone TPD state, it is proposed that a polymeric form of acetone forms on the TiO₂(110) surface through nucleophilic attack of oxygen on the carbonyl carbon atom of acetone, and is propagated to neighboring η¹-acetone molecules. This process is initiated

  20. Phosphonium chloride for thermal storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, J. G.; Heimlich, P. F.; Tepper, E. H.

    1972-01-01

    Development of systems for storage of thermal energy is discussed. Application of phosphonium chloride for heat storage through reversible dissociation is described. Chemical, physical, and thermodynamic properties of phosphonium chloride are analyzed and dangers in using phosphonium chloride are explained.

  1. Thoracoscopic resection with intraoperative use of methylene blue to localize mediastinal parathyroid adenomas.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yoshin; Nakamura, Hiroshige; Taniguchi, Yuji; Miwa, Ken; Fujioka, Shinji; Haruki, Tomohiro

    2012-03-01

    We report a case of thoracoscopic resection of mediastinal parathyroid adenomas using methylene blue to localize the tumors during the operation. After methylene blue 4 mg/kg was injected intravenously, we easily identified methylene blue-stained parathyroid glands and successfully resected them with sufficient surgical margins. The use of methylene blue for detection of parathyroid adenoma is a useful technique.

  2. Insights into Acetone Photochemistry on Rutile TiO2(110). 1. Off-Normal CH3 Ejection from Acetone Diolate.

    SciTech Connect

    Petrik, Nikolay G.; Henderson, Michael A.; Kimmel, Gregory A.

    2015-06-04

    Thermal- and photon-stimulated reactions of acetone co-adsorbed with oxygen on rutile TiO2(110) surface are studied with infrared reflection-adsorption spectroscopy (IRAS) combined with temperature programmed desorption and angle-resolved photon stimulated desorption. IRAS results show that n2-acetone diolate ((CH3)2COO) is produced via thermally-activated reactions between the chemisorbed oxygen with co-adsorbed acetone. Formation of acetone diolate is also consistent with 18O / 16O isotopic exchange experiments. During UV irradiation at 30 K, CH3 radicals are ejected from the acetone diolate with a distribution that is peaked at .-. +- 66 degrees from the surface normal along the azimuth (i.e. perpendicular to the rows of bridging oxygen and Ti5c ions). This distribution is also consistent with the orientation of the C–CH3 bonds in the n2-acetone diolate on TiO2(110). The acetone diolate peaks disappear from the IRAS spectra after UV irradiation and new peaks are observed and associated with n2-acetate. The data presented here demonstrate direct signatures of the proposed earlier 2-step mechanism for acetone photooxidation on TiO2(110)

  3. Chloride flux in phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun

    2016-09-01

    Phagocytes, such as neutrophils and macrophages, engulf microbes into phagosomes and launch chemical attacks to kill and degrade them. Such a critical innate immune function necessitates ion participation. Chloride, the most abundant anion in the human body, is an indispensable constituent of the myeloperoxidase (MPO)-H2 O2 -halide system that produces the potent microbicide hypochlorous acid (HOCl). It also serves as a balancing ion to set membrane potentials, optimize cytosolic and phagosomal pH, and regulate phagosomal enzymatic activities. Deficient supply of this anion to or defective attainment of this anion by phagocytes is linked to innate immune defects. However, how phagocytes acquire chloride from their residing environment especially when they are deployed to epithelium-lined lumens, and how chloride is intracellularly transported to phagosomes remain largely unknown. This review article will provide an overview of chloride protein carriers, potential mechanisms for phagocytic chloride preservation and acquisition, intracellular chloride supply to phagosomes for oxidant production, and methods to measure chloride levels in phagocytes and their phagosomes. PMID:27558337

  4. Methylene blue treatment in experimental ischemic stroke: a mini review

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhao; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and long-term disability. Methylene blue, a drug grandfathered by the Food and Drug Administration with a long history of safe usage in humans for treating methemoglobinemia and cyanide poisoning, has recently been shown to be neuroprotective in neurodegenerative diseases and brain injuries. The goal of this paper is to review studies on methylene blue in experimental stroke models. PMID:27042692

  5. Neurometabolic mechanisms for memory enhancement and neuroprotection of methylene blue

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Julio C.; Bruchey, Aleksandra K.; Gonzalez-Lima, F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides the first review of the memory-enhancing and neuroprotective metabolic mechanisms of action of methylene blue in vivo. These mechanisms have important implications as a new neurobiological approach to improve normal memory and to treat memory impairment and neurodegeneration associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Methylene blue’s action is unique because its neurobiological effects are not determined by regular drug-receptor interactions or drug-response paradigms. Methylene blue shows a hormetic dose-response, with opposite effects at low and high doses. At low doses, methylene blue is an electron cycler in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, with unparalleled antioxidant and cell respiration-enhancing properties that affect the function of the nervous system in a versatile manner. A major role of the respiratory enzyme cytochrome oxidase on the memory-enhancing effects of methylene blue is supported by available data. The memory-enhancing effects have been associated with improvement of memory consolidation in a network-specific and use-dependent fashion. In addition, low doses of methylene blue have also been used for neuroprotection against mitochondrial dysfunction in humans and experimental models of disease. The unique auto-oxidizing property of methylene blue and its pleiotropic effects on a number of tissue oxidases explain its potent neuroprotective effects at low doses. The evidence reviewed supports a mechanistic role of low-dose methylene blue as a promising and safe intervention for improving memory and for the treatment of acute and chronic conditions characterized by increased oxidative stress, neurodegeneration and memory impairment. PMID:22067440

  6. Phase transitions of amorphous solid acetone in confined geometry investigated by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sunghwan; Kang, Hani; Kim, Jun Soo; Kang, Heon

    2014-11-26

    We investigated the phase transformations of amorphous solid acetone under confined geometry by preparing acetone films trapped in amorphous solid water (ASW) or CCl4. Reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) were used to monitor the phase changes of the acetone sample with increasing temperature. An acetone film trapped in ASW shows an abrupt change in the RAIRS features of the acetone vibrational bands during heating from 80 to 100 K, which indicates the transformation of amorphous solid acetone to a molecularly aligned crystalline phase. Further heating of the sample to 140 K produces an isotropic solid phase, and eventually a fluid phase near 157 K, at which the acetone sample is probably trapped in a pressurized, superheated condition inside the ASW matrix. Inside a CCl4 matrix, amorphous solid acetone crystallizes into a different, isotropic structure at ca. 90 K. We propose that the molecularly aligned crystalline phase formed in ASW is created by heterogeneous nucleation at the acetone-water interface, with resultant crystal growth, whereas the isotropic crystalline phase in CCl4 is formed by homogeneous crystal growth starting from the bulk region of the acetone sample.

  7. Molybdenum disulfide catalyzed tungsten oxide for on-chip acetone sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong; Ahn, Sung Hoon; Park, Sangwook; Cai, Lili; Zhao, Jiheng; He, Jiajun; Zhou, Minjie; Park, Joonsuk; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2016-09-01

    Acetone sensing is critical for acetone leak detection and holds a great promise for the noninvasive diagnosis of diabetes. It is thus highly desirable to develop a wearable acetone sensor that has low cost, miniature size, sub-ppm detection limit, great selectivity, as well as low operating temperature. In this work, we demonstrate a cost-effective on-chip acetone sensor with excellent sensing performances at 200 °C using molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) catalyzed tungsten oxide (WO3). The WO3 based acetone sensors are first optimized via combined mesoscopic nanostructuring and silicon doping. Under the same testing conditions, our optimized mesoporous silicon doped WO3 [Si:WO3(meso)] sensor shows 2.5 times better sensitivity with ˜1000 times smaller active device area than the state-of-art WO3 based acetone sensor. Next, MoS2 is introduced to catalyze the acetone sensing reactions for Si:WO3(meso), which reduces the operating temperature by 100 °C while retaining its high sensing performances. Our miniaturized acetone sensor may serve as a wearable acetone detector for noninvasive diabetes monitoring or acetone leakage detection. Moreover, our work demonstrates that MoS2 can be a promising nonprecious catalyst for catalytic sensing applications.

  8. Acetone PLIF concentration measurements in a submerged round turbulent jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, Z. D.; Chikishev, L. M.; Dulin, V. M.

    2016-10-01

    Transport of passive scalar in near-field of a submerged turbulent jet, was studied experimentally by using the planar laser-induced fluorescence technique. The jet issued from a round pipe with the inner diameter and length of 21 mm and 700 mm, respectively. Three cases of Reynolds numbers were studied: Re=3000, 6000, and 9000. Vapor of acetone, mixed to the jet flow, served as a passive fluorescent tracer. The paper describes data processing utilized to convert intensity of fluorescence images to the instantaneous concentration.

  9. CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING ON LEFT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING ON LEFT, CALCIUM CHLORIDE STORAGE BUILDING ON RIGHT OF CENTER WITH TOP OF SA (SODA ASH) BUILDING IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Solvay Process Company, Calcium Chloride Plant, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  10. Strontium-89 Chloride

    MedlinePlus

    ... ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.Strontium-89 chloride is in a class of drugs known as radioisotopes. It delivers radiation to cancer sites and ultimately decreases bone pain. The length of treatment depends on the ...

  11. Mercuric chloride poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mercuric chloride is a very poisonous form of mercury. It is a type of mercury salt. There are different types of mercury poisonings . This article discusses poisoning from swallowing mercuric ...

  12. Hydrogen chloride test set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    Detector uses tertiary amine, which makes reaction fairly specific for relatively small highly polarized hydrogen chloride molecule. Reaction is monitored by any microbalance capable of measuring extremely small mass differences in real time.

  13. Acetone-Assisted Oxygen Vacancy Diffusion on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yaobiao; Zhang, Bo; Ye, Jingyun; Ge, Qingfeng; Zhang, Zhenrong

    2012-10-18

    We have studied the dynamic relationship between acetone and bridge-bonded oxygen (Ob) vacancy (VO) defect sites on the TiO2(110)-1 × 1 surface using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density function theory (DFT) calculations. We report an adsorbate-assisted VO diffusion mechanism. The STM images taken at 300 K show that acetone preferably adsorbs on the VO site and is mobile. The sequential isothermal STM images directly show that the mobile acetone effectively migrates the position of VO by a combination of two acetone diffusion channels: one is the diffusion along the Ob row and moving as an alkyl group, which heals the initial VO; another is the diffusion from the Ob row to the fivecoordinated Ti4+ row and then moving along the Ti4+ row as an acetone, which leaves a VO behind. The calculated acetone diffusion barriers for the two channels are comparable and agree with experimental results.

  14. Fate of acetone in an outdoor model stream in southern Mississippi, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Stephens, D.W.; Shultz, D.J.; Tai, D.Y.

    1988-01-01

    The fate of acetone in water was investigated in an outdoor model stream located in southern Mississippi, U.S.A. Acetone was injected continuously for 32 days resulting in small milligram-perliter concentrations in the stream. Rhodamine-WT dye was injected at the beginning and at the end of the study to determine the time-of-travel and dispersion characteristics of the stream. A 12-h injection of t-butyl alcohol (TBA) was used to determine the volatilization characteristics of the stream. Volatilization controlled the acetone concentration in the stream. Significant bacterial degradation of acetone did not occur, contrary to expectations based on previous laboratory studies. Attempts to induce degradation of the acetone by injecting glucose and a nutrient solution containing bacteria acclimated to acetone were unsuccessful. Possible explanations for the lack of bacterial degradation included a nitrate limitation and a limited residence time in the stream system. ?? 1988.

  15. Fabrication of a SnO2-based acetone gas sensor enhanced by molecular imprinting.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wenhu; Ruan, Xiaofan; Yu, Qiuxiang; Yu, Zetai; Huang, Xintang

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a new route to design a highly sensitive SnO2-based sensor for acetone gas enhanced by the molecular imprinting technique. Unassisted and acetone-assisted thermal synthesis methods are used to synthesis SnO2 nanomaterials. The prepared SnO2 nanomaterials have been characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and N2 adsorption-desorption. Four types of SnO2 films were obtained by mixing pure deionized water and liquid acetone with the two types of as-prepared powders, respectively. The acetone gas sensing properties of sensors coated by these films were evaluated. Testing results reveal that the sensor coated by the film fabricated by mixing liquid acetone with the SnO2 nanomaterial synthesized by the acetone-assisted thermal method exhibits the best acetone gas sensing performance. The sensor is optimized for the smooth adsorption and desorption of acetone gas thanks to the participation of acetone both in the procedure of synthesis of the SnO2 nanomaterial and the device fabrication, which results in a distinct response-recovery behavior.

  16. Assessment of the Polyphenolic Content, Free Radical Scavenging, Anti-inflammatory, and Antimicrobial Activities of Acetone and Aqueous Extracts of Lippia javanica (Burm.F.) Spreng

    PubMed Central

    Asowata-Ayodele, Abiola M.; Otunola, Gloria A.; Afolayan, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lippia javanica (Burm.F.) Spreng is one of the spice plants commonly found in almost every part of South Africa. Apart from its culinary uses, it is also traditionally used as an insect repellant and infusion for fever, flu, kidney stone treatment, cough, common cold, and chest pain. Materials and Methods: The antioxidant activities of the aqueous and acetone extracts were determined by measuring their effects against 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl, 2,2’azino-bis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), nitric oxide, phosphomolybdate, lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide, and reducing power. The antimicrobial activities were evaluated against four bacterial (two Gram-positive, two Gram-negative) strains and 9 fungal pathogens using the agar well diffusion and microdilution methods. Anti-inflammatory activity was assessed by determining the inhibition against protein denaturation and membrane stabilizing effects. Objective: The polyphenolic content, free radical scavenging, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial activities of the aqueous and acetone extracts of the plant were evaluated. Results: A significantly high total phenolic content and free radical scavenging activities were observed in the acetone extracts of the plants. The study also revealed a concentration-dependent inhibition of protein denaturation and membrane stabilization effects by both the aqueous and acetone extracts at the concentrations studied. The ability of L. javanica extracts to inhibit protein denaturation and maintain membrane stability could be responsible for its folkloric use. The overall antimicrobial activity indicates that both extracts were active against the bacterial strains but the acetone extract exhibited the most potent antifungal activity higher than even the reference drugs. Conclusion: Overall, the acetone extract of L. javanica exhibited a more pronounced antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial effects than the aqueous extract. SUMMARY The

  17. Effect of acetone accumulation on structure and dynamics of lipid membranes studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Posokhov, Yevgen O; Kyrychenko, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    The modulation of the properties and function of cell membranes by small volatile substances is important for many biomedical applications. Despite available experimental results, molecular mechanisms of action of inhalants and organic solvents, such as acetone, on lipid membranes remain not well understood. To gain a better understanding of how acetone interacts with membranes, we have performed a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a POPC bilayer in aqueous solution in the presence of acetone, whose concentration was varied from 2.8 to 11.2 mol%. The MD simulations of passive distribution of acetone between a bulk water phase and a lipid bilayer show that acetone favors partitioning into the water-free region of the bilayer, located near the carbonyl groups of the phospholipids and at the beginning of the hydrocarbon core of the lipid membrane. Using MD umbrella sampling, we found that the permeability barrier of ~0.5 kcal/mol exists for acetone partitioning into the membrane. In addition, a Gibbs free energy profile of the acetone penetration across a bilayer demonstrates a favorable potential energy well of -3.6 kcal/mol, located at 15-16Å from the bilayer center. The analysis of the structural and dynamics properties of the model membrane revealed that the POPC bilayer can tolerate the presence of acetone in the concentration range of 2.8-5.6 mol%. The accumulation of the higher acetone concentration of 11.2 mol% results, however, in drastic disordering of phospholipid packing and the increase in the membrane fluidity. The acetone molecules push the lipid heads apart and, hence, act as spacers in the headgroup region. This effect leads to the increase in the average headgroup area per molecule. In addition, the acyl tail region of the membrane also becomes less dense. We suggest, therefore, that the molecular mechanism of acetone action on the phospholipid bilayer has many common features with the effects of short chain alcohols, DMSO, and

  18. Evaluating the Potential Importance of Monoterpene Degradation for Global Acetone Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelp, M. M.; Brewer, J.; Keller, C. A.; Fischer, E. V.

    2015-12-01

    Acetone is one of the most abundant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere, but estimates of the global source of acetone vary widely. A better understanding of acetone sources is essential because acetone serves as a source of HOx in the upper troposphere and as a precursor to the NOx reservoir species peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN). Although there are primary anthropogenic and pyrogenic sources of acetone, the dominant acetone sources are thought to be from direct biogenic emissions and photochemical production, particularly from the oxidation of iso-alkanes. Recent work suggests that the photochemical degradation of monoterpenes may also represent a significant contribution to global acetone production. We investigate that hypothesis using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. In this work, we calculate the emissions of eight terpene species (α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, Δ3-carene, myrcene, sabinene, trans-β-ocimene, and an 'other monoterpenes' category which contains 34 other trace species) and couple these with upper and lower bound literature yields from species-specific chamber studies. We compare the simulated acetone distributions against in situ acetone measurements from a global suite of NASA aircraft campaigns. When simulating an upper bound on yields, the model-to-measurement comparison improves for North America at both the surface and in the upper troposphere. The inclusion of acetone production from monoterpene degradation also improves the ability of the model to reproduce observations of acetone in East Asian outflow. However, in general the addition of monoterpenes degrades the model comparison for the Southern Hemisphere.

  19. An analysis of human response to the irritancy of acetone vapors.

    PubMed

    Arts, J H E; Mojet, J; van Gemert, L J; Emmen, H H; Lammers, J H C M; Marquart, J; Woutersen, R A; Feron, V J

    2002-01-01

    Studies on the irritative effects of acetone vapor in humans and experimental animals have revealed large differences in the lowest acetone concentration found to be irritative to the respiratory tract and eyes. This has brought on much confusion in the process of setting occupational exposure limits for acetone. A literature survey was carried out focusing on the differences in results between studies using subjective (neuro)behavioral methods (questionnaires) and studies using objective measurements to detect odor and irritation thresholds. A critical review of published studies revealed that the odor detection threshold of acetone ranges from about 20 to about 400 ppm. Loss of sensitivity due to adaptation and/or habituation to acetone odor may occur, as was shown in studies comparing workers previously exposed to acetone with previously unexposed subjects. It further appeared that the sensory irritation threshold of acetone lies between 10,000 and 40,000 ppm. Thus, the threshold for sensory irritation is much higher than the odor detection limit, a conclusion that is supported by observations in anosmics, showing a ten times higher irritation threshold level than the odor threshold found in normosmics. The two-times higher sensory irritation threshold observed in acetone-exposed workers compared with previously nonexposed controls can apart from adaptation be ascribed to habituation. An evaluation of studies on subjectively reported irritation at acetone concentrations < 1000 ppm shows that perception of odor intensity, information bias, and exposure history (i.e., habituation) are confounding factors in the reporting of irritation thresholds and health symptoms. In conclusion, subjective measures alone are inappropriate for establishing sensory irritation effects and sensory irritation threshold levels of odorants such as acetone. Clearly, the sensory irritation threshold of acetone should be based on objective measurements. PMID:11852913

  20. Expression of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 Genes in Escherichia coli for Acetone Production and Acetate Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo, Lourdes L.; Welker, Neil E.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.

    1998-01-01

    A synthetic acetone operon (ace4) composed of four Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 genes (adc, ctfAB, and thl, coding for the acetoacetate decarboxylase, coenzyme A transferase, and thiolase, respectively) under the control of the thl promoter was constructed and was introduced into Escherichia coli on vector pACT. Acetone production demonstrated that ace4 is expressed in E. coli and resulted in the reduction of acetic acid levels in the fermentation broth. Since different E. coli strains vary significantly in their growth characteristics and acetate metabolism, ace4 was expressed in three E. coli strains: ER2275, ATCC 11303, and MC1060. Shake flask cultures of MC1060(pACT) produced ca. 2 mM acetone, while both strains ER2275(pACT) and ATCC 11303(pACT) produced ca. 40 mM acetone. Glucose-fed cultures of strain ATCC 11303(pACT) resulted in a 150% increase in acetone titers compared to those of batch shake flask cultures. External addition of sodium acetate to glucose-fed cultures of ATCC 11303(pACT) resulted in further increased acetone titers. In bioreactor studies, acidic conditions (pH 5.5 versus 6.5) improved acetone production. Despite the substantial acetone evaporation due to aeration and agitation in the bioreactor, 125 to 154 mM acetone accumulated in ATCC 11303(pACT) fermentations. These acetone titers are equal to or higher than those produced by wild-type C. acetobutylicum. This is the first study to demonstrate the ability to use clostridial genes in nonclostridial hosts for solvent production. In addition, acetone-producing E. coli strains may be useful hosts for recombinant protein production in that detrimental acetate accumulation can be avoided. PMID:9501448

  1. Adsorption of methylene blue from aqueous solution by graphene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tonghao; Li, Yanhui; Du, Qiuju; Sun, Jiankun; Jiao, Yuqin; Yang, Guangming; Wang, Zonghua; Xia, Yanzhi; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei; Wu, Dehai

    2012-02-01

    Graphene was prepared using a modified Hummers' method. The physico-chemical properties of graphene were characterized by TEM, BET specific surface area, FTIR, Raman and XRD measurements. The effect factors including pH, contact time, temperature and dosage on the adsorption properties of methylene blue onto graphene were investigated. The experimental data of isotherm followed the Langmuir isotherm model better than the Freundlich model. The maximum adsorption capacity obtained from Langmuir isotherm equation at 293 K was 153.85 mg/g, indicating graphene is a good adsorbent for the adsorption of MB. The kinetic study illustrated that the adsorption of methylene blue onto graphene fit the pseudo second-order model. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption of methylene blue onto graphene was an endothermic and spontaneous process.

  2. [Adsorption characteristics of acetone and butanone onto honeycomb ZSM-5 molecular sieve].

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Luan, Zhi-Qiang; Xie, Qiang; Ye, Ping-Wei; Li, Kai; Wang, Xi-Qin

    2013-12-01

    Adsorption capacity of acetone and acetone-butanone mixture onto honeycomb ZSM-5 molecular sieve was measured in this paper, and the influences of relative humidity, initial adsorbate concentration and airflow velocity on the adsorption process were investigated. Besides, adsorption performance parameters were calculated by Wheeler's equation. The results showed that relative humidity had no obvious influence on the acetone adsorption performance, which suggests that this material has good hydrophobic ability; in the low concentration range, the dynamic saturated adsorption capacity of acetone increased with the increase of initial concentration, but in the occasion of high concentration of acetone gas (more than 9 mg x L(-1)), the dynamic saturated adsorption capacity maintained at a certain level and did not vary with the increase of initial concentration; the increase of air flow velocity resulted in significant increase of acetone adsorption rate constant, at the same time the critical layer thickness of the adsorbent bed also increased significantly. In the cases of acetone-butanone mixture, the adsorption capacity of butanone onto ZSM-5 was clearly higher than that of acetone.

  3. Densities and refractive indices of acetone + methanol + 2-methyl-2-butanol at 298.15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Orge, B.; Iglesias, M.; Tojo, J.; Legido, J.L.

    1995-11-01

    Densities and refractive indices at 298.15 K for acetone + methanol + 2-methyl-2-butanol and the binary acetone + 2-methyl-2-butanol and methanol + 2-methyl-2-butanol mixtures have been measured as a function of the mole fraction at atmospheric pressure. Results have been correlated with analytical expressions.

  4. Increased microsomal interaction with iron and oxygen radical generation after chronic acetone treatment.

    PubMed

    Puntarulo, S; Cederbaum, A I

    1988-01-12

    In vivo administration of acetone influences a variety of reactions catalyzed by rat liver microsomes. The effect of chronic treatment with acetone (1% acetone in the water for 10-12 days) on interaction with iron and subsequent oxygen radical generation by liver microsomes was evaluated. Microsomes from the acetone-treated rats displayed elevated rates of H2O2 generation, an increase in iron-dependent lipid peroxidation, and enhanced chemiluminescence upon the addition of t-butylhydroperoxide. The ferric EDTA-catalyzed production of formaldehyde from DMSO or of ethylene from 2-keto-4-thiomethylbutyrate was increased 2-fold after acetone treatment. This increase in hydroxyl radical generation was accompanied by a corresponding increase in NADPH utilization and was sensitive to inhibition by catalase and a competitive scavenger, ethanol, but not to superoxide dismutase. In vitro addition of acetone to microsomes had no effect on oxygen radical generation. Associated with the chronic acetone treatment was a 2-fold increase in the microsomal content of cytochrome P-450 and in the activity of NADPH-cytochrome-P-450 reductase. It appears that increased oxygen radical generation by microsomes after chronic acetone treatment reflects the increase in the major enzyme components which comprise the mixed-function oxidase system.

  5. Detection of acetone processing of castor bean mash for forensic investigation of ricin preparation methods.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Helen W; Wahl, Jon H; Metoyer, Candace N; Colburn, Heather A; Wahl, Karen L

    2010-07-01

    Samples containing the toxic castor bean protein ricin have been recently seized in connection with biocriminal activity. Analytical methods that enable investigators to determine how the samples were prepared and to match seized samples to potential source materials are needed. One commonly described crude ricin preparation method is acetone extraction of crushed castor beans. Here, we describe the use of solid-phase microextraction and headspace analysis to determine whether castor beans were processed by acetone extraction. We prepared acetone-extracted castor bean mash, along with controls of unextracted mash and mash extracted with nonacetone organic solvents. Samples of acetone-extracted mash and unextracted mash were stored in closed containers for up to 109 days at both room temperature and -20 degrees C, and in open containers at room temperature for up to 94 days. Acetone-extracted bean mash could consistently be statistically distinguished from controls, even after storage in open containers for 94 days. PMID:20345778

  6. Integration of stable isotope and trace contaminant concentration for enhanced forensic acetone discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, James J.; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Wahl, Jon H.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2013-07-18

    We analyzed 21 neat acetone samples from 15 different suppliers to demonstrate the utility of a coupled stable isotope and trace contaminant strategy for distinguishing forensically-relevant samples. By combining these two pieces of orthogonal data we could discriminate all of the acetones that were produced by the 15 different suppliers. Using stable isotope ratios alone, we were able to distinguish 9 acetone samples, while the remaining 12 fell into four clusters with highly similar signatures. Adding trace chemical contaminant information enhanced discrimination to 13 individual acetones with three residual clusters. The acetones within each cluster shared a common manufacturer and might, therefore, not be expected to be resolved. The data presented here demonstrates the power of combining orthogonal data sets to enhance sample fingerprinting and highlights the role disparate data could play in future forensic investigations.

  7. Boron nitride nanotube based nanosensor for acetone adsorption: a DFT simulation.

    PubMed

    Ganji, Masoud Darvish; Rezvani, Mahyar

    2013-03-01

    We have investigated the adsorption properties of acetone on zigzag single-walled BNNTs using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The results obtained show that acetone is strongly bound to the outer surface of a (5,0) BNNT on the top site directly above the boron atom, with a binding energy of -96.16 kJ mol(-1) and a B-O binding distance of 1.654 Å. Our first-principles calculations also predict that the ability of zigzag BNNTs to adsorb acetone is significantly stronger than the corresponding ability of zigzag CNTs. A comparative investigation of BNNTs with different diameters indicated that the ability of the side walls of the tubes to adsorb acetone decreases significantly for nanotubes with larger diameters. Furthermore, the stability of the most stable acetone/BNNT complex was tested using ab initio molecular dynamics simulation at room temperature. PMID:23179768

  8. An acetone bio-sniffer (gas phase biosensor) enabling assessment of lipid metabolism from exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ming; Chien, Po-Jen; Toma, Koji; Arakawa, Takahiro; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2015-11-15

    Several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released from human breath or skin. Like chemical substances in blood or urine, some of these vapors can provide valuable information regarding the state of the human body. A highly sensitive acetone biochemical gas sensor (bio-sniffer) was developed and used to measure exhaled breath acetone concentration, and assess lipid metabolism based on breath acetone analysis. A fiber-optic biochemical gas sensing system was constructed by attaching a flow-cell with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (S-ADH) immobilized membrane onto a fiber-optic NADH measurement system. The NADH measurement system utilizes an ultraviolet-light emitting diode with peak emission of 335 nm as an excitation light source. NADH is consumed by the enzymatic reaction of S-ADH, and the consumption is proportional to the concentration of acetone vapor. Phosphate buffer which contained NADH was circulated into the flow-cell to rinse products and the excessive substrates from the optode. The change of fluorescent emitted from NADH is analyzed by the PMT. Hence, fluorescence intensity decreased as the acetone concentration increased. The relationship between fluorescence intensity and acetone concentration was identified from 20 ppb to 5300 ppb. This interval included the concentration of acetone vapor in the breath of healthy people and those suffering from disorders of carbohydrate metabolism. Finally, the acetone bio-sniffer was used to measure breath acetone during an exercise stress test on an ergometer after a period of fasting. The concentration of acetone in breath was shown to significantly increase after exercise. This biosensor allows rapid, highly sensitive and selective measurement of lipid metabolism.

  9. An acetone bio-sniffer (gas phase biosensor) enabling assessment of lipid metabolism from exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ming; Chien, Po-Jen; Toma, Koji; Arakawa, Takahiro; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2015-11-15

    Several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released from human breath or skin. Like chemical substances in blood or urine, some of these vapors can provide valuable information regarding the state of the human body. A highly sensitive acetone biochemical gas sensor (bio-sniffer) was developed and used to measure exhaled breath acetone concentration, and assess lipid metabolism based on breath acetone analysis. A fiber-optic biochemical gas sensing system was constructed by attaching a flow-cell with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (S-ADH) immobilized membrane onto a fiber-optic NADH measurement system. The NADH measurement system utilizes an ultraviolet-light emitting diode with peak emission of 335 nm as an excitation light source. NADH is consumed by the enzymatic reaction of S-ADH, and the consumption is proportional to the concentration of acetone vapor. Phosphate buffer which contained NADH was circulated into the flow-cell to rinse products and the excessive substrates from the optode. The change of fluorescent emitted from NADH is analyzed by the PMT. Hence, fluorescence intensity decreased as the acetone concentration increased. The relationship between fluorescence intensity and acetone concentration was identified from 20 ppb to 5300 ppb. This interval included the concentration of acetone vapor in the breath of healthy people and those suffering from disorders of carbohydrate metabolism. Finally, the acetone bio-sniffer was used to measure breath acetone during an exercise stress test on an ergometer after a period of fasting. The concentration of acetone in breath was shown to significantly increase after exercise. This biosensor allows rapid, highly sensitive and selective measurement of lipid metabolism. PMID:26079672

  10. Molecular modeling of phase behavior and microstructure of acetone-chloroform-methanol binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Ganesh; Georgiev, Grigor; Potoff, Jeffrey J

    2005-10-20

    Force fields based on a Lennard-Jones (LJ) 12-6 plus point charge functional form are developed for acetone and chloroform specifically to reproduce the minimum pressure azeotropy found experimentally in this system. Point charges are determined from a CHELPG population analysis performed on an acetone-chloroform dimer. The required electrostatic surface for this dimer is determined from ab initio calculations performed with MP2 theory and the 6-31g++(3df,3pd) basis set. LJ parameters are then optimized such that the liquid-vapor coexistence curve, critical parameters, and vapor pressures are well reproduced by simulation. Histogram-reweighting Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical ensemble are used to determine the phase diagrams for the binary mixtures acetone-chloroform, acetone-methanol, and chloroform-methanol. The force fields developed in this work reproduce the minimum pressure azeotrope in the acetone-chloroform mixture found in experiment. The predicted azeotropic composition of x(CHCl3) = 0.77 is in fair agreement with the experimental value of x(CHCl3)expt = 0.64. The new force fields were also found to provide improved predictions of the pressure-composition behavior of acetone-methanol and chloroform-methanol when compared to other force fields commonly used for vapor-liquid equilibria calculations. NPT simulations were conducted at 300 K and 1 bar for equimolar mixtures of acetone-chloroform, acetone-methanol, and methanol-chloroform. Analysis of the microstructure reveals significant hydrogen bonding occurring between acetone and chloroform. Limited interspecies hydrogen bonding was found in the acetone-methanol or chloroform-methanol mixtures.

  11. Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate (monomeric MDI) and polymeric MDI (PMDI)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW of METHYLENE DIPHENYL DIISOCYANATE ( MDI ) ( CAS No . 101 - 68 - 8 and 9016 - 87 - 9 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) February 1998 U.S . ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY WASHINGTON , DC TABLE OF CONTENTS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW

  12. 4,4\\'-Methylene bis(N,N\\'-dimethyl)aniline

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    4,4 ' - Methylene bis ( N , N ' - dimethyl ) aniline ; CASRN 101 - 61 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Haz

  13. Extinction Memory Improvement by the Metabolic Enhancer Methylene Blue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Lima, F.; Bruchey, Aleksandra K.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated whether postextinction administration of methylene blue (MB) could enhance retention of an extinguished conditioned response. MB is a redox compound that at low doses elevates cytochrome oxidase activity, thereby improving brain energy production. Saline or MB (4 mg/kg intraperitoneally) were administered to rats for 5 d following…

  14. Methylene Blue-Ascorbic Acid: An Undergraduate Experiment in Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snehalatha, K. C.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise involving methylene blue and L-ascorbic acid in a simple clock reaction technique to illustrate the basic concepts of chemical kinetics. If stock solutions are supplied and each type of experiment takes no more than half an hour, the entire investigation can be completed in three practical sessions of three hours…

  15. Formation of halogenated acetones in the lower troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattler, Tobias; Wittmer, Julian; Krause, Torsten; Schöler, Heinz Friedrich; Kamilli, Katharina; Held, Andreas; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Ofner, Johannes; Atlas, Elliot

    2015-04-01

    Western Australia is a semi-/arid region that is heavily influenced by climate change and agricultural land use. The area is known for its saline lakes with a wide range of hydrogeochemical parameters and consists of ephemeral saline and saline groundwater fed lakes with a pH range from 2.5 to 7.1. In 2012 a novel PTFE-chamber was setup directly on the lakes. The 1.5 m³ cubic chamber was made of UV transparent PTFE foil to permit photochemistry while preventing dilution of the air due to lateral wind transport. This experimental setup allows linking measured data directly to the chemistry of and above the salt lakes. Air samples were taken using stainless steel canisters and measured by GC-MS/ECD. Sediment, crust and water samples were taken for investigation of potential VOC and VOX emissions in the laboratory using GC-MS. Several lakes were investigated and canister samples were taken over the day to see diurnal variations. The first samples were collected at 6 a.m. and from this time every 2 hours a canister was filled with chamber air. Concentrations of chloroacetone up to 15 ppb and of bromoacetone up to 40 ppb in the air samples were detected. The concentrations vary over the day and display their highest values around noon. Soil and water samples showed a variety of highly volatile and semi-volatile VOC/VOX but no halogenated acetones. An abiotic formation of these VOC/VOX seems conclusive due to iron-catalysed reactions below the salt crust [1]. The salt crust is the interface through which VOC/VOX pass from soil/groundwater to the atmosphere where they were photochemically altered. This explains the finding of halo acetones only in the air samples and not in water and soil samples measured in the laboratory. The main forming pathway for these haloacetones is the direct halogenation due to atomic chlorine and bromine above the salt lakes [2]. A minor pathway is the atmospheric degradation of chloropropane and bromopropane [3]. These halopropanes were found

  16. Chloride Channels of Intracellular Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, John C.; Kahl, Christina R.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins implicated as intracellular chloride channels include the intracellular ClC proteins, the bestrophins, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, the CLICs, and the recently described Golgi pH regulator. This paper examines current hypotheses regarding roles of intracellular chloride channels and reviews the evidence supporting a role in intracellular chloride transport for each of these proteins. PMID:20100480

  17. Acetone and Water on TiO₂ (110): Competition for Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael A.

    2005-04-12

    The competitive interaction between acetone and water for surface sites on TiO? (110) was examined using temperature programmed desorption (TPD). Two surface pretreatment methods were employed, one involving vacuum reduction of the surface by annealing at 850 K in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) and another involving surface oxidation with molecular oxygen. In the former case the surface possessed about 7% oxygen vacancy sites and in the latter reactive oxygen species (adatoms and molecules) were deposited on the surface as a result of oxidative filling of vacancy sites. On the reduced surface, excess water displaced all but about 20% of a saturated d6-acetone first layer to physisorbed desorption states, whereas about 40% of the first layer d6-acetone was stabilized on the oxidized surface against displacement by water through a reaction between oxygen and d6-acetone. The displacement of acetone on both surface is explained in terms of the relative desorption energies of each molecule on the clean surface and role of intermolecular repulsions in shifting their respective desorption features to lower temperatures with increasing coverage. Although first layer water desorbs from TiO? (110) at slightly lower temperature (275 K) than submonolayer coverages of d6-acetone (340 K), intermolecular repulsions between d6-acetone molecules shift its leading edge for desorption to 170 K as the first layer is saturated In contrast, the desorption leading edge for first layer water (with or without coadsorbed d6-acetone) was at 210 K. This small difference in the onsets for d6-acetone and water desorption resulted in the majority of d6-acetone being compressed into islands by water and eventually displaced from the first layer when excess water was adsorbed. On the oxidized surface the species resulting from reaction of d6-acetone and oxygen was not influence by increasing water coverages. This species was stable on the clean surface up to 375 K (well past the first layer water TPD

  18. A Portable Real-Time Ringdown Breath Acetone Analyzer: Toward Potential Diabetic Screening and Management.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chenyu; Sun, Meixiu; Wang, Zhennan; Chen, Zhuying; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2016-07-30

    Breath analysis has been considered a suitable tool to evaluate diseases of the respiratory system and those that involve metabolic changes, such as diabetes. Breath acetone has long been known as a biomarker for diabetes. However, the results from published data by far have been inconclusive regarding whether breath acetone is a reliable index of diabetic screening. Large variations exist among the results of different studies because there has been no "best-practice method" for breath-acetone measurements as a result of technical problems of sampling and analysis. In this mini-review, we update the current status of our development of a laser-based breath acetone analyzer toward real-time, one-line diabetic screening and a point-of-care instrument for diabetic management. An integrated standalone breath acetone analyzer based on the cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique has been developed. The instrument was validated by using the certificated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The linear fittings suggest that the obtained acetone concentrations via both methods are consistent. Breath samples from each individual subject under various conditions in total, 1257 breath samples were taken from 22 Type 1 diabetic (T1D) patients, 312 Type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients, which is one of the largest numbers of T2D subjects ever used in a single study, and 52 non-diabetic healthy subjects. Simultaneous blood glucose (BG) levels were also tested using a standard diabetic management BG meter. The mean breath acetone concentrations were determined to be 4.9 ± 16 ppm (22 T1D), and 1.5 ± 1.3 ppm (312 T2D), which are about 4.5 and 1.4 times of the one in the 42 non-diabetic healthy subjects, 1.1 ± 0.5 ppm, respectively. A preliminary quantitative correlation (R = 0.56, p < 0.05) between the mean individual breath acetone concentration and the mean individual BG levels does exist in 20 T1D subjects with no ketoacidosis. No direct correlation is observed in T1D subjects, T2D

  19. A Portable Real-Time Ringdown Breath Acetone Analyzer: Toward Potential Diabetic Screening and Management.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chenyu; Sun, Meixiu; Wang, Zhennan; Chen, Zhuying; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2016-01-01

    Breath analysis has been considered a suitable tool to evaluate diseases of the respiratory system and those that involve metabolic changes, such as diabetes. Breath acetone has long been known as a biomarker for diabetes. However, the results from published data by far have been inconclusive regarding whether breath acetone is a reliable index of diabetic screening. Large variations exist among the results of different studies because there has been no "best-practice method" for breath-acetone measurements as a result of technical problems of sampling and analysis. In this mini-review, we update the current status of our development of a laser-based breath acetone analyzer toward real-time, one-line diabetic screening and a point-of-care instrument for diabetic management. An integrated standalone breath acetone analyzer based on the cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique has been developed. The instrument was validated by using the certificated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The linear fittings suggest that the obtained acetone concentrations via both methods are consistent. Breath samples from each individual subject under various conditions in total, 1257 breath samples were taken from 22 Type 1 diabetic (T1D) patients, 312 Type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients, which is one of the largest numbers of T2D subjects ever used in a single study, and 52 non-diabetic healthy subjects. Simultaneous blood glucose (BG) levels were also tested using a standard diabetic management BG meter. The mean breath acetone concentrations were determined to be 4.9 ± 16 ppm (22 T1D), and 1.5 ± 1.3 ppm (312 T2D), which are about 4.5 and 1.4 times of the one in the 42 non-diabetic healthy subjects, 1.1 ± 0.5 ppm, respectively. A preliminary quantitative correlation (R = 0.56, p < 0.05) between the mean individual breath acetone concentration and the mean individual BG levels does exist in 20 T1D subjects with no ketoacidosis. No direct correlation is observed in T1D subjects, T2D

  20. A Portable Real-Time Ringdown Breath Acetone Analyzer: Toward Potential Diabetic Screening and Management

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chenyu; Sun, Meixiu; Wang, Zhennan; Chen, Zhuying; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2016-01-01

    Breath analysis has been considered a suitable tool to evaluate diseases of the respiratory system and those that involve metabolic changes, such as diabetes. Breath acetone has long been known as a biomarker for diabetes. However, the results from published data by far have been inconclusive regarding whether breath acetone is a reliable index of diabetic screening. Large variations exist among the results of different studies because there has been no “best-practice method” for breath-acetone measurements as a result of technical problems of sampling and analysis. In this mini-review, we update the current status of our development of a laser-based breath acetone analyzer toward real-time, one-line diabetic screening and a point-of-care instrument for diabetic management. An integrated standalone breath acetone analyzer based on the cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique has been developed. The instrument was validated by using the certificated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The linear fittings suggest that the obtained acetone concentrations via both methods are consistent. Breath samples from each individual subject under various conditions in total, 1257 breath samples were taken from 22 Type 1 diabetic (T1D) patients, 312 Type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients, which is one of the largest numbers of T2D subjects ever used in a single study, and 52 non-diabetic healthy subjects. Simultaneous blood glucose (BG) levels were also tested using a standard diabetic management BG meter. The mean breath acetone concentrations were determined to be 4.9 ± 16 ppm (22 T1D), and 1.5 ± 1.3 ppm (312 T2D), which are about 4.5 and 1.4 times of the one in the 42 non-diabetic healthy subjects, 1.1 ± 0.5 ppm, respectively. A preliminary quantitative correlation (R = 0.56, p < 0.05) between the mean individual breath acetone concentration and the mean individual BG levels does exist in 20 T1D subjects with no ketoacidosis. No direct correlation is observed in T1D subjects, T

  1. Conditioned Place Preference to Acetone Inhalation and the Effects on Locomotor Behavior and 18FDG Uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, J.C.; Dewey, S.L.; Schiffer, W.; Lee, D.

    2006-01-01

    Acetone is a component in many inhalants that have been widely abused. While other solvents have addictive potential, such as toluene, it is unclear whether acetone alone contains addictive properties. The locomotor, relative glucose metabolism and abusive effects of acetone inhalation were studied in animals using the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm and [18F]2-fluorodeoxy-D-glucose (18FDG) imaging. The CPP apparatus contains two distinct conditioning chambers and a middle adaptation chamber, each lined with photocells to monitor locomotor activity. Adolescent Sprague-Dawley rats (n=16; 90-110 g) were paired with acetone in least preferred conditioning chamber, determined on the pretest day. The animals were exposed to a 10,000 ppm dose for an hour, alternating days with air. A CPP test was conducted after the 3rd, 6th and 12th pairing. In these same animals, the relative glucose metabolism effects were determined using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18FDG. Following the 3rd pairing, there was a significant aversion to the acetone paired chamber (190.9 ± 13.7 sec and 241.7 ± 16.9 sec, acetone and air, respectively). After the 6th pairing, there was no significant preference observed with equal time spent in each chamber (222 ± 21 sec and 207 ± 20 sec, acetone and air-paired, respectively). A similar trend was observed after the 12th pairing (213 ± 21 sec and 221 ± 22 sec, acetone and air-paired, respectively). Locomotor analysis indicated a significant decrease (p<0.05) from air pairings to acetone pairings on the first and sixth pairings. The observed locomotor activity was characteristic of central nervous system (CNS) depressants, without showing clear abusive effects in this CPP model. In these studies, acetone vapors were not as reinforcing as other solvents, shown by overall lack of preference for the acetone paired side of the chamber. PET imaging indicated a regionally specific distribution of 18FDG uptake following

  2. Determination of acetone and methyl ethyl ketone in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tai, D.Y.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical procedures for the determination of acetone and methyl ethyl ketone in water samples were developed. Concentrations in the milligram-per-liter range were determined by injecting an aqueous sample into the analysis system through an injection port, trapping the organics on Tenax-GC at room temperature, and thermally desorbing the organics into a gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector for analysis. Concentrations in the microgram-per-liter range were determined by sweeping the headspace vapors over a water sample at 50C, trapping on Tenax-GC, and thermally desorbing the organics into the gas chromatograph. The precision for two operators of the milligram-per-liter concentration procedure, expressed as the coefficient of variation, was generally less than 2 percent for concentrations ranging from 16 to 160 milligrams per liter. The precision from two operators of the microgram-per-liter concentration procedure was between 2 and 4 percent for concentrations of 20 and 60 micrograms per liter. (Woodard-USGS)

  3. Biochemical activities of acetone extracts of Hyssopus angustifolius.

    PubMed

    Alinezhad, Heshmatollah; Baharfar, Robabeh; Zare, Mahboobeh; Azimi, Razieh; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidant and antihemolytic activities of acetone extracts of Hyssopus angustifolius flowers, leaf and stems were investigated employing different in vitro and ex vivo assay systems. IC50, for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activity were 239.4 +/- 8.4 microg/mL for flowers, 357.8 +/- 11.1 microg/mL for stems and 182.5 +/- 7.5 microg/mL for leaf. All extracts showed moderate nitric oxide scavenging activity. The leaf extract exhibited better hydrogen peroxide scavenging and Fe2+ chelating activity than the others (IC50 were 261.0 +/- 6.2 microg/mL for hydrogen peroxide and 534.0 +/- 9.9 microg/mL for Fe3+ chelating activity). The extracts exhibited good antioxidant activity in linoleic acid peroxidation system and weak reducing power ability. The leaf extract showed better antihemolytic activity than the flower and stem (IC50 = 65.7 +/- 1.8 microg/mL).

  4. Derivatization reaction-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detection of trace acetone.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying; Chen, Zhuo; Zheng, Chengbin; Lee, Yong-Ill; Hou, Xiandeng; Wu, Li; Tian, Yunfei

    2016-08-01

    A facile method was developed for determination of trace volatile acetone by coupling a derivatization reaction to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). With iodide modified Ag nanoparticles (Ag IMNPs) as the SERS substrate, acetone without obvious Raman signal could be converted to SERS-sensitive species via a chemical derivatization reaction with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH). In addition, acetone can be effectively separated from liquid phase with a purge-sampling device and then any serious interference from sample matrices can be significantly reduced. The optimal conditions for the derivatization reaction and the SERS analysis were investigated in detail, and the selectivity and reproducibility of this method were also evaluated. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for acetone was 5mgL(-1) or 0.09mM (3σ). The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 80mgL(-1) acetone (n=9) was 1.7%. This method was successfully used for the determination of acetone in artificial urine and human urine samples with spiked recoveries ranging from 92% to 110%. The present method is convenient, sensitive, selective, reliable and suitable for analysis of trace acetone, and it could have a promising clinical application in early diabetes diagnosis. PMID:27216660

  5. Adsorption and Reaction of Acetone over CeOX(111) Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, David R; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Gordon, Wesley O; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H

    2009-01-01

    This study reports the interaction of acetone (CH3COCH3), the simplest ketone, with well ordered CeO2(111) thin film surfaces. The fully oxidized CeO2(111) surface shows a weak interaction with acetone with the sole desorption product (TPD) being acetone at 210 K. The chemisorbed molecule binds to the surface as the ?1-acetone species rather than through a bridge-bonded dioxy-configuration. Exposure of a CeO2(111) surface to acetone at 600K removes oxygen as CO and results in the conversion of Ce4+ to Ce3+. Acetone chemisorbs strongly on reduced CeO2-x(111) with molecular acetone desorbing near 500 K. Decomposition also occurs with H2 desorbing between 450 and 600 K and C reacting with O in the ceria to desorb above 650 K. A stable species exists from 200 to 500 K on the reduced surface that has three unique types of C. High resolution C 1s XPS spectra indicate these are Ce-CH2, C-CH3 and C-O species. C k-edge NEXAFS indicates the presence of C{double_bond}C and C{double_bond}O bonds. It is postulated that the intermediate is a carbanion bonded through both O and C atoms to Ce cations.

  6. Derivatization reaction-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detection of trace acetone.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying; Chen, Zhuo; Zheng, Chengbin; Lee, Yong-Ill; Hou, Xiandeng; Wu, Li; Tian, Yunfei

    2016-08-01

    A facile method was developed for determination of trace volatile acetone by coupling a derivatization reaction to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). With iodide modified Ag nanoparticles (Ag IMNPs) as the SERS substrate, acetone without obvious Raman signal could be converted to SERS-sensitive species via a chemical derivatization reaction with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH). In addition, acetone can be effectively separated from liquid phase with a purge-sampling device and then any serious interference from sample matrices can be significantly reduced. The optimal conditions for the derivatization reaction and the SERS analysis were investigated in detail, and the selectivity and reproducibility of this method were also evaluated. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for acetone was 5mgL(-1) or 0.09mM (3σ). The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 80mgL(-1) acetone (n=9) was 1.7%. This method was successfully used for the determination of acetone in artificial urine and human urine samples with spiked recoveries ranging from 92% to 110%. The present method is convenient, sensitive, selective, reliable and suitable for analysis of trace acetone, and it could have a promising clinical application in early diabetes diagnosis.

  7. Adsorption and Reaction of Acetone over CeOx(111) Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Senanayake, S.; Gordon, W; Overbury, S; Mullins, D

    2009-01-01

    This study reports the interaction of acetone (CH{sub 3}COCH{sub 3}), the simplest ketone, with well ordered CeO2(111) thin film surfaces. The fully oxidized CeO{sub 2}(111) surface shows a weak interaction with acetone with the sole desorption product (TPD) being acetone at 210 K. The chemisorbed molecule binds to the surface as the 1-acetone species rather than through a bridge-bonded dioxy-configuration. Exposure of a CeO{sub 2}(111) surface to acetone at 600K removes oxygen as CO and results in the conversion of Ce{sup 4+} to Ce{sup 3+}. Acetone chemisorbs strongly on reduced CeO{sub 2-x}(111) with molecular acetone desorbing near 500 K. Decomposition also occurs with H{sub 2} desorbing between 450 and 600 K and C reacting with O in the ceria to desorb above 650 K. A stable species exists from 200 to 500 K on the reduced surface that has three unique types of C. High resolution C 1s XPS spectra indicate these are Ce-CH{sub 2}, C-CH{sub 3} and C-O species. C k-edge NEXAFS indicates the presence of C{double_bond}C and C{double_bond}O bonds. It is postulated that the intermediate is a carbanion bonded through both O and C atoms to Ce cations.

  8. A cross-sectional study of breath acetone based on diabetic metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenwen; Liu, Yong; Lu, Xiaoyong; Huang, Yanping; Liu, Yu; Cheng, Shouquan; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-02-26

    Breath acetone is a known biomarker for diabetes mellitus in breath analysis. In this work, a cross-sectional study of breath acetone based on clinical metabolic disorders of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was carried out. Breath acetone concentrations of 113 T2DM patients and 56 apparently healthy individuals were measured at a single time point. Concentrations varied from 0.22 to 9.41 ppmv (mean 1.75 ppmv) for T2DM, which were significantly higher than those for normal controls (ranged from 0.32 to 1.96 ppmv, mean 0.72 ppmv, p = 0.008). Observations in our work revealed that breath acetone concentrations elevated to different degrees, along with the abnormality of blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), triglyceride and cholesterol. Breath acetone showed obviously positive correlations with blood ketone and urine ketone. Possible metabolic relations between breath acetone and diabetic disorders were also discussed. This work aimed at giving an overall assessment of breath acetone from the perspective of clinical parameters for type 2 diabetes.

  9. Catalytic function of the mycobacterial binuclear iron monooxygenase in acetone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Toshiki; Nakao, Tomomi; Kino, Kuniki

    2015-10-01

    Mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium smegmatis strain mc(2)155 and Mycobacterium goodii strain 12523 are able to grow on acetone and use it as a source of carbon and energy. We previously demonstrated by gene deletion analysis that the mimABCD gene cluster, which encodes a binuclear iron monooxygenase, plays an essential role in acetone metabolism in these mycobacteria. In the present study, we determined the catalytic function of MimABCD in acetone metabolism. Whole-cell assays were performed using Escherichia coli cells expressing the MimABCD complex. When the recombinant E. coli cells were incubated with acetone, a product was detected by gas chromatography (GC) analysis. Based on the retention time and the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) spectrum, the reaction product was identified as acetol (hydroxyacetone). The recombinant E. coli cells produced 1.02 mM of acetol from acetone within 24 h. Furthermore, we demonstrated that MimABCD also was able to convert methylethylketone (2-butanone) to 1-hydroxy-2-butanone. Although it has long been known that microorganisms such as mycobacteria metabolize acetone via acetol, this study provides the first biochemical evidence for the existence of a microbial enzyme that catalyses the conversion of acetone to acetol.

  10. Interactions of ionic liquids and acetone: thermodynamic properties, quantum-chemical calculations, and NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Elia; Ferro, Victor R; Palomar, Jose; Ortega, Juan; Rodriguez, Juan Jose

    2013-06-20

    The interactions between ionic liquids (ILs) and acetone have been studied to obtain a further understanding of the behavior of their mixtures, which generally give place to an exothermic process, mutual miscibility, and negative deviation of Raoult's law. COSMO-RS was used as a suitable computational method to systematically analyze the excess enthalpy of IL-acetone systems (>300), in terms of the intermolecular interactions contributing to the mixture behavior. Spectroscopic and COSMO-RS results indicated that acetone, as a polar compound with strong hydrogen bond acceptor character, in most cases, establishes favorable hydrogen bonding with ILs. This interaction is strengthened by the presence of an acidic cation and an anion with dispersed charge and non-HB acceptor character in the IL. COSMO-RS predictions indicated that gas-liquid and vapor-liquid equilibrium data for IL-acetone systems can be finely tuned by the IL selection, that is, acting on the intermolecular interactions between the molecular and ionic species in the liquid phase. NMR measurements for IL-acetone mixtures at different concentrations were also carried out. Quantum-chemical calculations by using molecular clusters of acetone and IL species were finally performed. These results provided additional evidence of the main role played by hydrogen bonding in the behavior of systems containing ILs and HB acceptor compounds, such as acetone. PMID:23688030

  11. Protein precipitation of diluted samples in SDS-containing buffer with acetone leads to higher protein recovery and reproducibility in comparison with TCA/acetone approach.

    PubMed

    Santa, Cátia; Anjo, Sandra I; Manadas, Bruno

    2016-07-01

    Proteomic approaches are extremely valuable in many fields of research, where mass spectrometry methods have gained an increasing interest, especially because of the ability to perform quantitative analysis. Nonetheless, sample preparation prior to mass spectrometry analysis is of the utmost importance. In this work, two protein precipitation approaches, widely used for cleaning and concentrating protein samples, were tested and compared in very diluted samples solubilized in a strong buffer (containing SDS). The amount of protein recovered after acetone and TCA/acetone precipitation was assessed, as well as the protein identification and relative quantification by SWATH-MS yields were compared with the results from the same sample without precipitation. From this study, it was possible to conclude that in the case of diluted samples in denaturing buffers, the use of cold acetone as precipitation protocol is more favourable than the use of TCA/acetone in terms of reproducibility in protein recovery and number of identified and quantified proteins. Furthermore, the reproducibility in relative quantification of the proteins is even higher in samples precipitated with acetone compared with the original sample.

  12. Comment on "Can existing models quantitatively describe the mixing behavior of acetone with water" [J. Chem. Phys. 130, 124516 (2009)].

    PubMed

    Kang, Myungshim; Perera, Aurelien; Smith, Paul E

    2009-10-21

    A recent publication indicated that simulations of acetone-water mixtures using the KBFF model for acetone indicate demixing at mole fractions less than 0.28 of acetone, in disagreement with experiment and two previously published studies. Here, we indicate some inconsistancies in the current study which could help to explain these differences. PMID:20568888

  13. Evaluation of Tribulus terrestris Linn (Zygophyllaceae) acetone extract for larvicidal and repellence activity against mosquito vectors.

    PubMed

    Singh, S P; Raghavendra, K; Singh, R K; Mohanty, S S; Dash, A P

    2008-12-01

    Acetone extracts of leaves and seeds from the Tribulus terrestris (Zygophyllaceae) were tested against mature and immature different mosquito vectors under laboratory condition. The extract showed strong larvicidal, properties 100 per cent mortality in the 3rd-instar larvae was observed in the bioassays with An. culicifacies Giles species A, An. stephensi Liston, Culex quinquefasciatus Say and Aedes aegypti Linn, against 200 ppm of the leaf acetone extract and 100 ppm seed acetone extract. The LC50 values of leaf acetone extract estimated for 3rd-instars An. culicifacies species A, An. stephensi, Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. aegypti after 24 hour of exposure were 117, 124, 168 and 185 ppm respectively. The LC50 values of seed acetone extract estimated for 3rd-instars An. culicifacies species A, An. stephensi, Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. aegypti after 24 hour of exposure were 100, 72, 91 and 91 ppm respectively. It is confirmed from the LC50 values that the seed acetone extract of T. terrestris is more effective compared to leaf extracts. A significant (P<0.004) higher concentration of acetone extract leaf was required to kill equal number of larvae i.e. against acetone extract of seed. The seed acetone extract showed strong repellent activity against adults mosquitoes. Per cent protection obtained against Anopheles culicifacies species A 100% repellency in 1 h, 6 h; Anopheles stephensi 100% repellency in 0 h, 4 h, 6 h; and Culex quinquefasciatus 100% repellency in 0 h, 2 h, 4 h, at 10% concentration respectively. Against Deet- 2.5% An. culicifacies Giles species A has shown 100% repellency in 1 h, 2 h, 6 h, An. stephensi Liston 99% repellency in 4 h, and Culex quinquefasciatus Say has shown 100% repellency in 1 h, 2 h.

  14. Chronic effects of acetone on the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) during early life-stage development

    SciTech Connect

    Mank, M.; Swigert, J.

    1995-12-31

    A 28-day post-hatch early life-stage development toxicity test was conducted to determine the chronic effects of acetone on the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). In this study, less than 24-hour old fathead minnow embryos were exposed to 0.25, 0.50, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 mL acetone/L and a negative control for a 4-day pre-hatch period and 28 days following hatch. During the pre-hatch period, no adverse effects on embryo survival or hatching success were observed in any of the treatment groups tested when compared to the negative control. From completion of matching to test termination, fathead minnows exposed to 4.0 mL acetone/L, experienced reduced survival, a statistically significant reduction in growth and impairment of critical behavioral functions when compared to the negative control group. Growth of fathead minnows exposed to 2.0 mL acetone/L also experienced a statistically significant effect upon growth when compared to the negative control, however, survival and behavior were not affected during the post-hatch period. Survival, growth, and behavior of fathead minnows exposed to 0.25, 0.50, and 1.0 mL acetone/L from hatching to test termination was comparable to the control group. The no observed effect concentration (NOEC) for fathead minnows exposed to acetone during early life-stage development was 1.0 mL acetone/L, and the lowest observed effect concentration (LOEC) was 2.0 mL acetone/L. The maximum acceptable toxicant concentration (MATC) was calculated to be 1.4 mL acetone/L.

  15. Evaluation of Tribulus terrestris Linn (Zygophyllaceae) acetone extract for larvicidal and repellence activity against mosquito vectors.

    PubMed

    Singh, S P; Raghavendra, K; Singh, R K; Mohanty, S S; Dash, A P

    2008-12-01

    Acetone extracts of leaves and seeds from the Tribulus terrestris (Zygophyllaceae) were tested against mature and immature different mosquito vectors under laboratory condition. The extract showed strong larvicidal, properties 100 per cent mortality in the 3rd-instar larvae was observed in the bioassays with An. culicifacies Giles species A, An. stephensi Liston, Culex quinquefasciatus Say and Aedes aegypti Linn, against 200 ppm of the leaf acetone extract and 100 ppm seed acetone extract. The LC50 values of leaf acetone extract estimated for 3rd-instars An. culicifacies species A, An. stephensi, Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. aegypti after 24 hour of exposure were 117, 124, 168 and 185 ppm respectively. The LC50 values of seed acetone extract estimated for 3rd-instars An. culicifacies species A, An. stephensi, Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. aegypti after 24 hour of exposure were 100, 72, 91 and 91 ppm respectively. It is confirmed from the LC50 values that the seed acetone extract of T. terrestris is more effective compared to leaf extracts. A significant (P<0.004) higher concentration of acetone extract leaf was required to kill equal number of larvae i.e. against acetone extract of seed. The seed acetone extract showed strong repellent activity against adults mosquitoes. Per cent protection obtained against Anopheles culicifacies species A 100% repellency in 1 h, 6 h; Anopheles stephensi 100% repellency in 0 h, 4 h, 6 h; and Culex quinquefasciatus 100% repellency in 0 h, 2 h, 4 h, at 10% concentration respectively. Against Deet- 2.5% An. culicifacies Giles species A has shown 100% repellency in 1 h, 2 h, 6 h, An. stephensi Liston 99% repellency in 4 h, and Culex quinquefasciatus Say has shown 100% repellency in 1 h, 2 h. PMID:19579717

  16. Chloride channels as drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Galietta, Luis J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Chloride channels represent a relatively under-explored target class for drug discovery as elucidation of their identity and physiological roles has lagged behind that of many other drug targets. Chloride channels are involved in a wide range of biological functions, including epithelial fluid secretion, cell-volume regulation, neuroexcitation, smooth-muscle contraction and acidification of intracellular organelles. Mutations in several chloride channels cause human diseases, including cystic fibrosis, macular degeneration, myotonia, kidney stones, renal salt wasting and hyperekplexia. Chloride-channel modulators have potential applications in the treatment of some of these disorders, as well as in secretory diarrhoeas, polycystic kidney disease, osteoporosis and hypertension. Modulators of GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid A) receptor chloride channels are in clinical use and several small-molecule chloride-channel modulators are in preclinical development and clinical trials. Here, we discuss the broad opportunities that remain in chloride-channel-based drug discovery. PMID:19153558

  17. Characteristics of acetone cluster ion beam for surface processing and modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryuto, H.; Kakumoto, Y.; Takeuchi, M.; Takaoka, G. H.

    2014-02-01

    An acetone cluster ion beam was produced by the adiabatic expansion method without using helium as a support gas. The cluster source for the production of ethanol clusters was replaced with that sealed with metal gaskets. The Laval nozzle for the production of ethanol clusters was also replaced with a stainless steel conical nozzle. The cluster size distributions of the acetone cluster ion beams had mean values approximately at 2 × 103 molecules and increased with source pressure. The typical beam current density of the acetone cluster ion beam was approximately 0.5 μA/cm2.

  18. Characteristics of acetone cluster ion beam for surface processing and modification.

    PubMed

    Ryuto, H; Kakumoto, Y; Takeuchi, M; Takaoka, G H

    2014-02-01

    An acetone cluster ion beam was produced by the adiabatic expansion method without using helium as a support gas. The cluster source for the production of ethanol clusters was replaced with that sealed with metal gaskets. The Laval nozzle for the production of ethanol clusters was also replaced with a stainless steel conical nozzle. The cluster size distributions of the acetone cluster ion beams had mean values approximately at 2 × 10(3) molecules and increased with source pressure. The typical beam current density of the acetone cluster ion beam was approximately 0.5 μA/cm(2).

  19. [Test method for 6 phthalates in polyvinyl chloride].

    PubMed

    Abe, Yutaka; Mutsuga, Motoh; Hirahara, Yoshichika; Kawamura, Yoko

    2011-01-01

    A test method for 6 phthalates, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, dibutyl phthalate, benzyl butyl phthalate, diisononyl phthalate, diisodecyl phthalate and di-n-octyl phthalate, in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) was developed. GC/MS was used in the SIM mode for the separation and detection of phthalates. For preparation of the test solution, the extraction method with acetone-hexane mixture (3 : 7) and the dissolution method with tetrahydrofuran and ethanol were compared and it was confirmed that each method gave good recoveries. Dilution of the test solution was effective to reduce the influence of PVC. In a collaborative study with nine laboratories, the intra-laboratory variations showed good repeatability, but the measurements at some laboratories deviated widely. It appears that this method is unsuitable for the judgment of acceptability, but it may be suitable for the determination of phthalate content in PVC products.

  20. Uptake and therapeutic effectiveness of /sup 125/I- and /sup 211/At-methylene blue for pigmented melanoma in an animal model system

    SciTech Connect

    Link, E.M.; Brown, I.; Carpenter, R.N.; Mitchell, J.S.

    1989-08-01

    The investigations concerning a targeted radiotherapy for pigmented melanoma with a radiolabeled phenothiazine derivative, 3,7-(dimethylamino)phenazathionium chloride (methylene blue (MTB)), were continued using melanotic and amelanotic sublines of B16 melanoma. Two radionuclides, 125I and 211At, emitting Auger electrons and alpha particles, respectively, replaced 35S previously studied since their biological effectiveness is significantly higher. In vitro autoradiography revealed a selective accumulation of methylene blue labeled with either of the radioisotopes in pigmented melanoma cells but its absence in nonpigmented cells. Treatments with (125I)MTB and (211At)MTB were performed both in vitro and in vivo, with their effectiveness determined by lung clonogenic assay. (125I)MTB proved to be relatively ineffective when incorporated into melanosomes distributed in the cytoplasm, i.e., too far away from the genome. Conspicuous therapeutic effects were achieved with (211At)MTB for pigmented melanoma only. 211At itself did not affect either of the investigated sublines of B16 melanoma confirming once again the high affinity of methylene blue to melanin. Calculations of cumulative radiation doses from (211At)MTB deposited in melanotic melanoma tumors and pigmented normal organs which would be at a particular risk led to the conclusion that (211At)MTB could be used for a highly selective and very efficient targeted radiotherapy of pigmented melanomas without damaging normal tissues.

  1. Methylene blue adsorption on graphene oxide/calcium alginate composites.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhui; Du, Qiuju; Liu, Tonghao; Sun, Jiankun; Wang, Yonghao; Wu, Shaoling; Wang, Zonghua; Xia, Yanzhi; Xia, Linhua

    2013-06-01

    Graphene oxide has been used as an adsorbent in wastewater treatment. However, the dispersibility in aqueous solution and the biotoxicity to human cells of graphene oxide limits its practical application in environmental protection. In this research, a novel environmental friendly adsorbent, calcium alginate immobilized graphene oxide composites was prepared. The effects of pH, contact time, temperature and dosage on the adsorption properties of methylene blue onto calcium alginate immobilized graphene oxide composites were investigated. The equilibrium adsorption data were described by the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The maximum adsorption capacity obtained from Langmuir isotherm equation was 181.81 mg/g. The pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, and intraparticle diffusion equation were used to evaluate the kinetic data. Thermodynamic analysis of equilibriums indicated that the adsorption reaction of methylene blue onto calcium alginate immobilized graphene oxide composites was exothermic and spontaneous in nature.

  2. DFT study on the chemical sensitivity of C3N nanotubes toward acetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Zargham

    2016-02-01

    Potential application of single-walled C3N nanotubes was investigated as chemical sensors for acetone molecules based on the density functional theory calculations. It was found that the pristine nanotube weakly adsorbs an acetone molecule with the adsorption energy of - 9.7 kcal/mol, and its electronic properties are not sensitive to this molecule. By replacing a C atom with a Si atom, the nanotube becomes a p-type semiconductor. The adsorption energy of the acetone molecule on the Si-doped nanotube becomes much more negative (Ead=-67.4 kcal/mol). The adsorption process leads to a sizable increase in the resistance of the Si-doped tube, thereby, it can show the presence of acetone molecule, creating an electronic signal. Also, the sensitivity of these devices can be controlled by the doping level of Si atoms. By increasing the number of dopant atoms from 1 to 4, the sensitivity is gradually increased.

  3. Preparation of spherical optical microresonators and their resonance spectra in air and gaseous acetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matějec, Vlastimil; Todorov, Filip; Jelínek, Michal; Fibrich, Martin; Chomát, Miroslav; Kubeček, Vaclav; Barton, Ivo; Martan, Tomas; Berková, Daniela

    2012-02-01

    This paper deals with the preparation of spherical silica whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microresonators and with their resonance spectra measured in air and in acetone vapors. Spherical microresonators with a diameter ranging from 320 to 360 micrometers have been prepared by heating the tip of a silica fiber by a hydrogen-oxygen burner. Details of this preparation are shown on spherical and spheroidal microresonators. The prepared microspheres were excited by a fiber taper and their resonance spectra were measured and Q factors estimated. Changes in the resonance spectra of the microspheres due to their contact with acetone vapor heated to 55 °C or with liquid acetone have been observed. These changes are explained by interaction of acetone with silica and by temperature changes of the microspheres.

  4. Site Competition During Coadsorption of Acetone with Methanol and Water on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Mingmin; Henderson, Michael A.

    2011-08-02

    The competitive interaction between acetone and two solvent molecules (methanol and water) for surface sites on rutile TiO2(110) was studied using temperature programmed desorption (TPD). On a vacuum reduced TiO2(110) surface, which possessed ~5% oxygen vacancy sites, excess methanol displaced preadsorbed acetone molecules to weakly bound and physisorbed desorption states below 200 K, whereas acetone was stabilized to 250 K against displacement by methanol on an oxidized surface through formation of an acetone-diolate species. These behaviors of acetone differ from the competitive interactions between acetone and water in that acetone is less susceptible to displacement by water. Examination of acetone+methanol and acetone+water multilayer combinations shows that acetone is more compatible in water-ice films than in methanol-ice films, presumably because water has greater potential as a hydrogen-bond donor than does methanol. Acetone molecules displaced from the TiO2(110) surface by water are more likely to be retained in the near-surface region, having a greater opportunity to revisit the surface, than when methanol is used as a coadsorbate. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  5. Electrocatalytic reduction of acetone in a proton-exchange-membrane reactor: a model reaction for the electrocatalytic reduction of biomass.

    PubMed

    Green, Sara K; Tompsett, Geoffrey A; Kim, Hyung Ju; Bae Kim, Won; Huber, George W

    2012-12-01

    Acetone was electrocatalytically reduced to isopropanol in a proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) reactor on an unsupported platinum cathode. Protons needed for the reduction were produced on the unsupported Pt-Ru anode from either hydrogen gas or electrolysis of water. The current efficiency (the ratio of current contributing to the desired chemical reaction to the overall current) and reaction rate for acetone conversion increased with increasing temperature or applied voltage for the electrocatalytic acetone/water system. The reaction rate and current efficiency went through a maximum with respect to acetone concentration. The reaction rate for acetone conversion increased with increasing temperature for the electrocatalytic acetone/hydrogen system. Increasing the applied voltage for the electrocatalytic acetone/hydrogen system decreased the current efficiency due to production of hydrogen gas. Results from this study demonstrate the commercial feasibility of using PEM reactors to electrocatalytically reduce biomass-derived oxygenates into renewable fuels and chemicals. PMID:22961747

  6. Electrocatalytic reduction of acetone in a proton-exchange-membrane reactor: a model reaction for the electrocatalytic reduction of biomass.

    PubMed

    Green, Sara K; Tompsett, Geoffrey A; Kim, Hyung Ju; Bae Kim, Won; Huber, George W

    2012-12-01

    Acetone was electrocatalytically reduced to isopropanol in a proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) reactor on an unsupported platinum cathode. Protons needed for the reduction were produced on the unsupported Pt-Ru anode from either hydrogen gas or electrolysis of water. The current efficiency (the ratio of current contributing to the desired chemical reaction to the overall current) and reaction rate for acetone conversion increased with increasing temperature or applied voltage for the electrocatalytic acetone/water system. The reaction rate and current efficiency went through a maximum with respect to acetone concentration. The reaction rate for acetone conversion increased with increasing temperature for the electrocatalytic acetone/hydrogen system. Increasing the applied voltage for the electrocatalytic acetone/hydrogen system decreased the current efficiency due to production of hydrogen gas. Results from this study demonstrate the commercial feasibility of using PEM reactors to electrocatalytically reduce biomass-derived oxygenates into renewable fuels and chemicals.

  7. Evaluation of acetone vapors toxicity on Plodia interpunctella (Hubner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) eggs.

    PubMed

    Pourmirza, Ali Asghr; Nasab, Fershteh Sadeghi; Zadeh, Abas Hossein

    2007-08-01

    The efficacy of acetone vapors against carefully aged eggs of Plodia interpunctella (Hubner) at 17+/-1 and 27+/-1 degrees C at different dosage levels of acetone over various exposure times was determined. Acetone was found to be toxic to Indian meal moth eggs. Considerable variation in the susceptibility of different age groups of eggs was apparent in the fiducial limits of the LD50 values. An inverse relationship between LD50 values and exposure times was observed in age groups of tested eggs. At 27+/-1 degrees C and 24 h exposure period, eggs aged 1-2 day-old were more tolerant to acetone than other age groups, followed by 0-1 day-old, 2-3 day-old and 3-4 day-old eggs. A similar pattern of susceptibility of eggs was observed at 72 h exposure. In all bioassays, eggs exposed to higher dosages of acetone developed at smaller rate. This was significant for the eggs, which were exposed to the highest dosage for 24 h. Increasing the temperature from 17+/-1 to 27+/-1 degrees C greatly increased the efficacy of acetone. At 27+/-1 degrees C eggs of P. interpunctella were killed by less than one-third of the dosage required for control at 17+/-1 degrees C. Acetone achieved 50% mortality with a dosage of 82.76 mg L(-1) in 1-2 day-old eggs at 27+/-1 degrees C. At this temperature hatching was retarded and greatly diminished when eggs aged 1-2 day-old were exposed to 80 mg L(-1) of acetone for the 24 h exposure period. There was no evidence of a hatch delay longer than the time spent under vapors for eggs exposed at 17+/-1 or 27+/-1 degrees C, indicating that some development must have occurred under fumigation.

  8. Upper Bound for Neutron Emission from Sonoluminescing Bubbles in Deuterated Acetone

    SciTech Connect

    Camara, C. G.; Putterman, S. J.; Hopkins, S. D.; Suslick, K. S.

    2007-02-09

    An experimental search for nuclear fusion inside imploding bubbles of degassed deuterated acetone at 0 degree sign C driven by a 15 atm sound field and seeded with a neutron generator reveals an upper bound that is a factor of 10 000 less than the signal reported by Taleyarkhan et al. The strength of our upper bound is limited by the weakness of sonoluminescence, which we ascribe to the relatively high vapor pressure of acetone.

  9. The Marangoni convection induced by acetone desorption from the falling soap film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Yong; Li, Zhangyun; Wang, Yongyi; Huang, Jiali

    2012-05-01

    By means of the falling soap film tunnel and the Schlieren optical method, the Marangoni convection were observed directly in the immediate interfacial neighborhood during the desorption process of acetone from the falling soap film. Moreover, the hydraulic characteristics of the falling soap film tunnel, the acetone concentration, the surface tension of the soap liquid and the mass transfer has been investigated in details through the experimental or theoretical method.

  10. KI-catalyzed α-acyloxylation of acetone with carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ya-Dong; Huang, Bei; Zhang, Yue-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Xu; Dai, Jian-Jun; Xu, Jun; Xu, Hua-Jian

    2016-07-01

    The KI-catalyzed reaction of acetone with aromatic carboxylic acids is achieved, leading to α-acyloxycarbonyl compounds in good to excellent yields under mild reaction conditions. The present method exhibits good functional-group compatibility. Notably, this reaction system is even suitable for cinnamic acid, 3-phenylpropiolic acid and 4-phenylbutanoic acid. A kinetic isotope effect (KIE) study indicates that C-H cleavage of the acetone is the rate-limiting step in the catalytic cycle. PMID:27251323

  11. Densities and refractive indices for acetone + methanol + 1-propanol at 298.15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesias, M.; Orge, B.; Tojo, J.

    1996-03-01

    Densities and refractive indices at 298.15 K for acetone + methanol + 1-propanol and the binary acetone + 1-propanol and methanol + 1-propanol mixtures have been measured as a function of the mole fraction at atmospheric pressure. Parameters of analytical expressions which represent the composition dependences of physical properties and excess values are reported. The refractive index results are compared with estimation methods. The excess properties for the ternary mixture are compared with those estimated on the basis of binary property contributions.

  12. Acetone and isopropanol in ruminal fluid and feces of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroshi; Shiogama, Yumiko

    2010-03-01

    Acetone and its metabolite isopropanol are produced by gut microbes as well as by the host's metabolism. To evaluate the production of acetone and isopropanol in alimentary tracts, a total of 80 pair-samples of feces and ruminal fluid were taken in lactating dairy cows that had been fed silage-containing diets. Acetone and isopropanol were analyzed, together with ethanol and volatile fatty acids (VFAs). Isopropanol was detected in 57 fecal and all the ruminal samples; however, the ruminal isopropanol and ethanol concentrations were distinctly lower than those in the feces. Acetone was detected in 13 fecal and 53 ruminal samples; however, there was no significant difference in acetone concentrations between the feces and the ruminal fluid. The group with higher fecal isopropanol concentration showed higher fecal proportions of acetate accompanied by low proportion of minor VFA, which consisted of isobutyrate and iso- and n-valerate. In the group with higher ruminal isopropanol concentration, ethanol concentration was higher; the ruminal VFA profiles showed only a negligible difference. Fecal and ruminal ethanol concentrations were not affected by feed ethanol. Thus, the colon showed an accelerated alcoholic fermentation compared with the rumen of dairy cows; however, acetone was present at higher frequency in the rumen than in the feces.

  13. Fermentation and genomic analysis of acetone-uncoupled butanol production by Clostridium tetanomorphum.

    PubMed

    Gong, Fuyu; Bao, Guanhui; Zhao, Chunhua; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin; Dong, Hongjun

    2016-02-01

    In typical acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation, acetone is the main by-product (50 % of butanol mass) of butanol production, resulting in a low yield of butanol. It is known that some Clostridium tetanomorphum strains are able to produce butanol without acetone in nature. Here, we described that C. tetanomorphum strain DSM665 can produce 4.16 g/L butanol and 4.98 g/L ethanol at pH 6.0, and 9.81 g/L butanol and 1.01 g/L ethanol when adding 1 mM methyl viologen. Butyrate and acetate could be reassimilated and no acetone was produced. Further analysis indicated that the activity of the acetate/butyrate:acetoacetyl-CoA transferase responsible for acetone production is lost in C. tetanomorphum DSM665. The genome of C. tetanomorphum DSM665 was sequenced and deposited in DDBJ, EMBL, and GenBank under the accession no. APJS00000000. Sequence analysis indicated that there are no typical genes (ctfA/B and adc) that are typically parts of an acetone synthesis pathway in C. tetanomorphum DSM665. This work provides new insights in the mechanism of clostridial butanol production and should prove useful for the design of a high-butanol-producing strain.

  14. Adsorption study of acetone on acid-doped ice surfaces between 203 and 233 K.

    PubMed

    Journet, E; Le Calvé, S; Mirabel, Ph

    2005-07-28

    Adsorption studies of acetone on pure ice surfaces obtained by water freezing or deposition or on frozen ice surfaces doped either with HNO3 or H2SO4 have been performed using a coated wall flow tube coupled to a mass spectrometric detection. The experiments were conducted over the temperature range 203-233 K and freezing solutions containing either H2SO4 (0.2 N) or HNO3 (0.2-3 N). Adsorption of acetone on these ice surfaces was always found to be totally reversible whatever were the experimental conditions. The number of acetone molecules adsorbed per ice surface unit N was conventionally plotted as a function of acetone concentration in the gas phase. For the same conditions, the amount of acetone molecules adsorbed on pure ice obtained by deposition are about 3-4 times higher than those measured on frozen ice films, H2SO4-doped ice surfaces lead to results comparable to those obtained on pure ice. On the contrary, N increases largely with increasing concentrations of nitric acid in ice surfaces, up to about 300 times under our experimental conditions and for temperatures ranging between 213 and 233 K. Finally, the results are discussed and used to reestimate the partitioning of acetone between the ice and gas phases in clouds of the upper troposphere.

  15. [Adsorption of methylene blue from water by the biochars generated from crop residues].

    PubMed

    Xu, Ren-Kou; Zhao, An-Zhen; Xiao, Shuang-Cheng; Yuan, Jin-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Biochars were prepared from straws of rice, peanut and soybean and rice hull using a low temperature pyrolysis method and adsorption of methylene blue by these biochars were investigated with batch and leaching experiments. Results indicated that biochars have high adsorption capacity for methylene blue and followed the order: rice straw char > soybean straw char > peanut straw char > rice hull char. This order is generally consistent with the amount of negative charge and specific surface area of these biochars. While methylene blue was mainly adsorbed specifically by the biochars, because the adsorption of methylene blue increased with the increase of ionic strength and the adsorption led to the shift of zeta potential of biochar particles to positive value direction. Langmuir equation fitted the adsorption isotherms well and can be used to describe the adsorption behaviors of methylene blue by the biochars. The maximum adsorption capacity of methylene blue predicted by langmuir equation was 196.1, 169.5, 129.9 and 89.3 mmol x kg(-1) for rice straw char, soybean straw char, peanut straw char and rice hull char, respectively. Leaching experiments show that rice hull char of 156 g can remove methylene blue from 30 L water containing 0.3 mmol x L(-1) of methylene blue completely and the cumulative amount of methylene blue absorbed by the biochar reaches 57.7 mmol x kg(-1). The biochars can be used as efficient adsorbents to remove methylene blue from waste water of dye.

  16. [Adsorption of methylene blue from water by the biochars generated from crop residues].

    PubMed

    Xu, Ren-Kou; Zhao, An-Zhen; Xiao, Shuang-Cheng; Yuan, Jin-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Biochars were prepared from straws of rice, peanut and soybean and rice hull using a low temperature pyrolysis method and adsorption of methylene blue by these biochars were investigated with batch and leaching experiments. Results indicated that biochars have high adsorption capacity for methylene blue and followed the order: rice straw char > soybean straw char > peanut straw char > rice hull char. This order is generally consistent with the amount of negative charge and specific surface area of these biochars. While methylene blue was mainly adsorbed specifically by the biochars, because the adsorption of methylene blue increased with the increase of ionic strength and the adsorption led to the shift of zeta potential of biochar particles to positive value direction. Langmuir equation fitted the adsorption isotherms well and can be used to describe the adsorption behaviors of methylene blue by the biochars. The maximum adsorption capacity of methylene blue predicted by langmuir equation was 196.1, 169.5, 129.9 and 89.3 mmol x kg(-1) for rice straw char, soybean straw char, peanut straw char and rice hull char, respectively. Leaching experiments show that rice hull char of 156 g can remove methylene blue from 30 L water containing 0.3 mmol x L(-1) of methylene blue completely and the cumulative amount of methylene blue absorbed by the biochar reaches 57.7 mmol x kg(-1). The biochars can be used as efficient adsorbents to remove methylene blue from waste water of dye. PMID:22452202

  17. Acetone and Water on TiO₂(110): H/D Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael A.

    2005-04-12

    Isotopic H/D exchange between coadsorbed acetone and water on the TiO?(110) surface was examined using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) as a function of coverage and two surface pretreatments (oxidation and reduction). Coadsorbed acetone and water interact repulsively on reduced TiO?(110) based on results from the companion paper to this study, with water exerting a greater influence in destabilizing acetone and acetone having only a nominal influence on water. Despite the repulsive interaction between these coadsorbates, about 0.02 ML of a 1 ML d6-acetone on the reduced surface exhibits H/D exchange with coadsorbed water, with the exchange occurring exclusively in the high temperature region of the d?-acetone TPD spectrum at {approx}340 K. The effect was confirmed with combinations of d?-acetone and D?O. The extent of exchange decreased on the reduced surface with water coverages above {approx}0.3 ML due to the ability of water to displace coadsorbed acetone from first layer sites to the multilayer. In contrast, the extent of exchange increased by a factor of 3 when the surface was pre-oxidized prior to coadsorption. In this case, there was no evidence for the negative influence of high water coverages on the extent of H/D exchange. Comparison of the TPD spectra from the exchange products (either d?- or d?-acetone depending on the coadsorption pairing) suggests that, in addition to the 340 K exchange process seen on the reduced surface, a second exchange process was observed on the oxidized surface at {approx}390 K. In both cases (oxidized and reduced), desorption of the H/D exchange products appeared to be reaction limited and to involve the influence of OH/OD groups (or water formed during recombinative desorption of OH/OD groups) instead of molecularly adsorbed water. The 340 K exchange process is assigned to reaction at step sites and the 390 K exchange process is attributed to the influence of oxygen adatoms deposited during surface oxidation. The H

  18. Determination of residual acetone and acetone related impurities in drug product intermediates prepared as Spray Dried Dispersions (SDD) using gas chromatography with headspace autosampling (GCHS).

    PubMed

    Quirk, Emma; Doggett, Adrian; Bretnall, Alison

    2014-08-01

    Spray Dried Dispersions (SDD) are uniform mixtures of a specific ratio of amorphous active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and polymer prepared via a spray drying process. Volatile solvents are employed during spray drying to facilitate the formation of the SDD material. Following manufacture, analytical methodology is required to determine residual levels of the spray drying solvent and its associated impurities. Due to the high level of polymer in the SDD samples, direct liquid injection with Gas Chromatography (GC) is not a viable option for analysis. This work describes the development and validation of an analytical approach to determine residual levels of acetone and acetone related impurities, mesityl oxide (MO) and diacetone alcohol (DAA), in drug product intermediates prepared as SDDs using GC with headspace (HS) autosampling. The method development for these analytes presented a number of analytical challenges which had to be overcome before the levels of the volatiles of interest could be accurately quantified. GCHS could be used after two critical factors were implemented; (1) calculation and application of conversion factors to 'correct' for the reactions occurring between acetone, MO and DAA during generation of the headspace volume for analysis, and the addition of an equivalent amount of polymer into all reference solutions used for quantitation to ensure comparability between the headspace volumes generated for both samples and external standards. This work describes the method development and optimisation of the standard preparation, the headspace autosampler operating parameters and the chromatographic conditions, together with a summary of the validation of the methodology. The approach has been demonstrated to be robust and suitable to accurately determine levels of acetone, MO and DAA in SDD materials over the linear concentration range 0.008-0.4μL/mL, with minimum quantitation limits of 20ppm for acetone and MO, and 80ppm for DAA.

  19. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III)...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride, FeC13, CAS Reg. No. 7705-08-0) may be prepared from iron and chlorine or from ferric oxide and hydrogen chloride. The pure... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III)...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III)...

  3. Benzalkonium Chloride and Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Paul L.; Kiland, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Glaucoma patients routinely take multiple medications, with multiple daily doses, for years or even decades. Benzalkonium chloride (BAK) is the most common preservative in glaucoma medications. BAK has been detected in the trabecular meshwork (TM), corneal endothelium, lens, and retina after topical drop installation and may accumulate in those tissues. There is evidence that BAK causes corneal and conjunctival toxicity, including cell loss, disruption of tight junctions, apoptosis and preapoptosis, cytoskeleton changes, and immunoinflammatory reactions. These same effects have been reported in cultured human TM cells exposed to concentrations of BAK found in common glaucoma drugs and in the TM of primary open-angle glaucoma donor eyes. It is possible that a relationship exists between chronic exposure to BAK and glaucoma. The hypothesis that BAK causes/worsens glaucoma is being tested experimentally in an animal model that closely reflects human physiology. PMID:24205938

  4. Removal of methylene blue from dye effluent using ageratum conyzoide leaf powder (ACLP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezechi, Ezerie Henry; Kutty, Shamsul Rahman bin Mohamed; Malakahmad, Amirhossein; Isa, Mohamed Hasnain; Aminu, Nasiru; Salihi, Ibrahim Umar

    2015-07-01

    Methylene blue (MB), a common environmental pollutant discharged from dye effluents were removed from synthetic effluents in this study using ageratum conyzoide leaf powder. Effects of operating parameters such as pH, initial Methylene blue concentration, adsorbent weight and contact time were examined on methylene blue removal whereas stirring speed was constant at 100 rpm. Results show that low pH (3-4) had more Methylene blue removal than high pH. Methylene blue removal decreased when initial concentration was increased but increased when adsorbent weight was increased. Removal of Methylene blue by Ageratum conyzoide leaf powder was rapid and significantly above 80% in all initial concentrations examined. At optimum conditions of pH 3, 20 minutes contact time and adsorbent weight of 60 mg for Methylene blue initial concentration of 20 mg/L, 40 mg/L and 60 mg/L, Methylene blue removal of 84.7%, 83.9% and 81.2% were obtained respectively. Results suggest that Ageratum conyzoide leaf powder could be potential adsorbents for Methylene blue removal from dye effluents.

  5. A Reminder of Methylene Blue's Effectiveness in Treating Vasoplegic Syndrome after On-Pump Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Manghelli, Joshua; Brown, Lisa; Tadros, Hany B; Munfakh, Nabil A

    2015-10-01

    The inflammatory response induced by cardiopulmonary bypass decreases vascular tone, which in turn can lead to vasoplegic syndrome. Indeed the hypotension consequent to on-pump cardiac surgery often necessitates vasopressor and intravenous fluid support. Methylene blue counteracts vasoplegic syndrome by inhibiting the formation of nitric oxide. We report the use of methylene blue in a 75-year-old man who developed vasoplegic syndrome after cardiac surgery. After the administration of methylene blue, his hypotension improved to the extent that he could be weaned from vasopressors. The use of methylene blue should be considered in patients who develop hypotension refractory to standard treatment after cardiac surgery. PMID:26504450

  6. Acetone laser-induced fluorescence for temperature and multiparameter imaging in gaseous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Mark Clinton

    1999-10-01

    Acetone (CH3COCH3) is an excellent tracer for planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging in gaseous flows due to its low toxicity, high vapor pressure, and accessible absorption (225-320 nm) and fluorescence (350-550 nm) features. A fluorescence yield limited by rapid intersystem crossing reduces the importance of collisional effects. Since the initial work of Lozano (1992), acetone PLIF has been applied with quantitative success in studies of gas-phase mixing under isothermal, isobaric conditions. More recently, improved understanding of acetone fluorescence dependences has opened up possibilities for new diagnostics across a range of conditions. Through modeling and experimental measurement of fluorescence dependences, the current work aims to make existing diagnostics more quantitative and to allow development of new diagnostics for other parameters, in particular temperature. To this end, temperature dependences of fluorescence are measured at excitation wavelengths across the acetone absorption spectrum. Fluorescence per unit acetone mole fraction decreases significantly with increasing temperature for short wavelengths (248 and 266 nm) and weakly (308 nm) or not at all (320 nm) for longer wavelengths. These effects are related to changes in absorption cross-section and fluorescence yield with temperature. A quantitative multistep decay model of fluorescence yield explains the observed temperature and wavelength functionalities and also predicts effects of pressure and composition. Measurements of pressure and composition dependences of acetone fluorescence between 0.5 and 16 atm, with excitation at 248, 266, and 308 nm, are found to agree with model predictions. A mild fluorescence quenching effect of oxygen is observed, which the model, with slight modification, can explain as well. Temperature and multiparameter imaging diagnostics are made possible by the improved understanding of acetone photophysical behavior. Excitation at 248 or 266 nm is

  7. Reactor-chromatographic determination of vinyl chloride in polyvinyl chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Berezkin, V.G.

    1986-08-01

    The authors carry out a chromatographic study of the volatile products that evolve when various grades of domestic polyvinyl chloride are heated, to determine the concentration of residual monomer. To find vinyl chloride in complex mixtures of air pollutants the authors used sorptive reaction concentration of impurities. This new combination of methods is based on preliminary separation at the sampling stage of impurities that interfere in the analysis, followed by concentration of the desired components in a trap with an adsorbent, and chromatographic determination of the concentrated trace materials. The method obtains low vinyl chloride concentrations (down to 10/sup -4/-10/sup -5/ wt. %) with +/-5 relative error.

  8. Breath acetone monitoring by portable Si:WO3 gas sensors

    PubMed Central

    Righettoni, Marco; Tricoli, Antonio; Gass, Samuel; Schmid, Alex; Amann, Anton; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

    2013-01-01

    Breath analysis has the potential for early stage detection and monitoring of illnesses to drastically reduce the corresponding medical diagnostic costs and improve the quality of life of patients suffering from chronic illnesses. In particular, the detection of acetone in the human breath is promising for non-invasive diagnosis and painless monitoring of diabetes (no finger pricking). Here, a portable acetone sensor consisting of flame-deposited and in situ annealed, Si-doped epsilon-WO3 nanostructured films was developed. The chamber volume was miniaturized while reaction-limited and transport-limited gas flow rates were identified and sensing temperatures were optimized resulting in a low detection limit of acetone (~20 ppb) with short response (10–15 s) and recovery times (35–70 s). Furthermore, the sensor signal (response) was robust against variations of the exhaled breath flow rate facilitating application of these sensors at realistic relative humidities (80–90%) as in the human breath. The acetone content in the breath of test persons was monitored continuously and compared to that of state-of-the-art proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Such portable devices can accurately track breath acetone concentration to become an alternative to more elaborate breath analysis techniques. PMID:22790702

  9. Recovery and reuse of spent acetone via a mobile solvent recovery unit

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, M.W.

    1996-11-01

    The Monsanto Chemical Company operates a plastics and resins plant located in Addyston, Ohio. The process equipment requires routine rinsing with technical grade acetone between batches. Due to the volumes of spent acetone generated and the associated RCRA hazardous waste regulations, the plant sought to recycle and reuse the acetone to reduce the purchase cost of virgin acetone and the cost of spent acetone disposal. One of the first options explored was package unit distillation units. The cost of these units was in the $20--$30,000 range in 1989 dollars. Even though the cost of a package unit was not deemed unreasonable, there were additional costs and concerns that led to elimination of this option. The unit would have required additional manpower to operate and maintain, i.e., at least a fraction of an operator and mechanic. For plant safety reasons, it was desired to operate this package unit outside the production building, thus construction of an outbuilding would have added to the expense of the project. Additionally, there were concerns of package unit reliability. During this evaluation, tractor-trailer mounted distillation units were discovered. The portable units were equipped with either thin-film evaporator technology capable of processing 240 to 480 gallons per hour, or pot still (batch) distillation technology capable of rates from 120 to 240 gallons per hour. Both units were constructed of stainless steel.

  10. Field Demonstration of Acetone Pretreatment and Composting of Particulate-TNT-Contaminated Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Radtke, Corey William; Smith, D.; Owen, S.; Roberto, Francisco Figueroa

    2002-02-01

    Solid fragments of explosives in soil are common in explosives testing and training areas. In this study we initially sieved the upper 6 in of contaminated soil through a 3-mm mesh, and found 2, 4, 6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) fragments. These contributed to an estimated concentration of 1.7 kg per cubic yard soil, or for 2000 ppm TNT in the soil. Most of the fragments ranged 4 mm to 10 mm diameter in size, but explosives particles weighing up to 56 g (about 4 cm diameter) were frequently observed. An acetone pretreatment/composting system was then demonstrated at field scale. The amount of acetone required for a TNT-dissolving slurry process was controlled by the viscosity of the soil/acetone mix rather than the TNT dissolution rate. The amount needed was estimated at about 55 gallons acetone per cubic yard soil. Smaller, 5- to 10-mm-diameter fragments went into solution in less than 15 min at a mixer speed of 36 rpm, with a minimum of 2 g TNT going into solution per 30 min for the larger chunks. The slurries were than mixed with compost starting materials and composted in a vented 1 yd3 container. After 34 days incubation time TNT was below the site-specific regulatory threshold of 44 ppm. TNT metabolites and acetone were also below their regulatory thresholds established for the site.

  11. The Reactions of Acetone with the Surfaces of Uranium Dioxide Single Crystal and Thin Film

    SciTech Connect

    King,R.; Senanayake, S.; Chong, S.; Idriss, H.

    2007-01-01

    The reaction of acetone, as an example of a carbonyl compound, is studied over UO2 (1 1 1) single crystal and thin film surfaces. Over the stoichiometric single crystal surface, acetone is molecularly and weakly adsorbed with a computed activation energy for desorption in the range of 95-65 kJ/mol with pre-exponential factors between 1011 and 1013 s-1. On the contrary, acetone reacts very strongly on the O-defected single crystal and thin film surfaces. In addition to total decomposition evidence of aldolization and cyclization reactions were seen. The thin film of UO2 was studied by synchrotron light, providing high resolution photoelectron spectroscopy in the core level, and high sensitivity in the both the core and valence band regions. The U5f line was considerably enhanced at grazing angle when compared to that obtained at normal angle for the O-defected surface, showing that the surface is more reduced than the next layers. The U 4f lines indicated the presence of U cations in lower oxidation states than +4 for the O-defected surface. These lines were considerably attenuated upon adsorption of acetone, due to surface oxidation by C{double_bond}O bond dissociation. The reaction pathway for acetone on the O-defected surface is presented, and compared to that of the previously studied acetaldehyde molecule.

  12. Dielectric barrier discharge micro-plasma emission spectrometry for the detection of acetone in exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting; Gao, Dong-Xue; Yu, Yong-Liang; Chen, Ming-Li; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Acetone is a predominant volatile organic compound (VOC) in the exhaled breath and a promising biomarker for diabetes and ketoacidosis. A non-thermal micro-plasma generated in a planar dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is used as a radiation source for the excitation of gaseous acetone followed by its quantification with optical emission spectrometry (OES). Gaseous acetone can be directly sampled, while liquid acetone is evaporated by heated tungsten coil and then introduced into the DBD micro-plasma by a helium carrier flow for performing optical emission and detection at a 519 nm emission line. In the present study, the exhaled breath is collected and transferred into aqueous medium for sampling. With a sampling volume of 7 μL in a micro-drop, a linear range of 40-1600 mg L(-1) is obtained along with a detection limit of 44 ng and a precision of 5.7% RSD. The present system is successfully applied to the determination of breath acetone for both diabetic patients and healthy volunteers.

  13. Study of the exhaled acetone in type 1 diabetes using quantum cascade laser spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Reyes, Adonis; Horsten, Roland C; Urbach, H Paul; Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2015-01-01

    The acetone concentration exhaled in the breath of three type 1 diabetes patients (two minors and one adult) and one healthy volunteer is studied using a quantum cascade laser-based spectroscopic system. Using the acetone signature between 1150 and 1250 cm(-1) and a multiline fitting method, the concentration variations on the order of parts per billion by volume were measured. Blood glucose and ketone concentrations in blood measurements were performed simultaneously to study their relation with acetone in exhaled breath. We focus on personalized studies to better understand the role of acetone in diabetes. For each volunteer, we performed a series of measurements over a period of time, including overnight fastings of 11 ± 1 h and during ketosis-hyperglycemia events for the minors. Our results highlight the importance of performing personalized studies because the response of the minors to the presence of ketosis was consistent but unique for each individual. Also, our results emphasize the need for performing more studies with T1D minors, because the acetone concentration in the breath of the minors differs, with respect to those reported in the literature, which are based on adults.

  14. Breath acetone monitoring by portable Si:WO3 gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Righettoni, Marco; Tricoli, Antonio; Gass, Samuel; Schmid, Alex; Amann, Anton; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2012-08-13

    Breath analysis has the potential for early stage detection and monitoring of illnesses to drastically reduce the corresponding medical diagnostic costs and improve the quality of life of patients suffering from chronic illnesses. In particular, the detection of acetone in the human breath is promising for non-invasive diagnosis and painless monitoring of diabetes (no finger pricking). Here, a portable acetone sensor consisting of flame-deposited and in situ annealed, Si-doped epsilon-WO(3) nanostructured films was developed. The chamber volume was miniaturized while reaction-limited and transport-limited gas flow rates were identified and sensing temperatures were optimized resulting in a low detection limit of acetone (∼20ppb) with short response (10-15s) and recovery times (35-70s). Furthermore, the sensor signal (response) was robust against variations of the exhaled breath flow rate facilitating application of these sensors at realistic relative humidities (80-90%) as in the human breath. The acetone content in the breath of test persons was monitored continuously and compared to that of state-of-the-art proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Such portable devices can accurately track breath acetone concentration to become an alternative to more elaborate breath analysis techniques. PMID:22790702

  15. Photochemical degradation of citrate buffers leads to covalent acetonation of recombinant protein therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Valliere-Douglass, John F; Connell-Crowley, Lisa; Jensen, Randy; Schnier, Paul D; Trilisky, Egor; Leith, Matt; Follstad, Brian D; Kerr, Jennifer; Lewis, Nathan; Vunnum, Suresh; Treuheit, Michael J; Balland, Alain; Wallace, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Novel acetone and aldimine covalent adducts were identified on the N-termini and lysine side chains of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. Photochemical degradation of citrate buffers, in the presence of trace levels of iron, is demonstrated as the source of these modifications. The link between degradation of citrate and the observed protein modifications was conclusively established by tracking the citrate decomposition products and protein adducts resulting from photochemical degradation of isotope labeled 13C citrate by mass spectrometry. The structure of the acetone modification was determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy on modified–free glycine and found to correspond to acetone linked to the N-terminus of the amino acid through a methyl carbon. Results from mass spectrometric fragmentation of glycine modified with an acetone adduct derived from 13C labeled citrate indicated that the three central carbons of citrate are incorporated onto protein amines in the presence of iron and light. While citrate is known to stoichiometrically decompose to acetone and CO2 through various intermediates in photochemical systems, it has never been shown to be a causative agent in protein carbonylation. Our results point to a previously unknown source for the generation of reactive carbonyl species. This work also highlights the potential deleterious impact of trace metals on recombinant protein therapeutics formulated in citrate buffers. PMID:20836085

  16. Vibrational Excitation of Both Products of the Reaction of CN Radicals with Acetone in Solution

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Transient electronic and vibrational absorption spectroscopy unravel the mechanisms and dynamics of bimolecular reactions of CN radicals with acetone in deuterated chloroform solutions. The CN radicals are produced by ultrafast ultraviolet photolysis of dissolved ICN. Two reactive forms of CN radicals are distinguished by their electronic absorption bands: “free” (uncomplexed) CN radicals, and “solvated” CN radicals that are complexed with solvent molecules. The lifetimes of the free CN radicals are limited to a few picoseconds following their photolytic production because of geminate recombination to ICN and INC, complexation with CDCl3 molecules, and reaction with acetone. The acetone reaction occurs with a rate coefficient of (8.0 ± 0.5) × 1010 M–1 s–1 and transient vibrational spectra in the C=N and C=O stretching regions reveal that both the nascent HCN and 2-oxopropyl (CH3C(O)CH2) radical products are vibrationally excited. The rate coefficient for the reaction of solvated CN with acetone is 40 times slower than for free CN, with a rate coefficient of (2.0 ± 0.9) × 109 M–1 s–1 obtained from the rise in the HCN product v1(C=N stretch) IR absorption band. Evidence is also presented for CN complexes with acetone that are more strongly bound than the CN–CDCl3 complexes because of CN interactions with the carbonyl group. The rates of reactions of these more strongly associated radicals are slower still. PMID:26192334

  17. Efficient acetone-butanol-ethanol production by Clostridium beijerinckii from sugar beet pulp.

    PubMed

    Bellido, Carolina; Infante, Celia; Coca, Mónica; González-Benito, Gerardo; Lucas, Susana; García-Cubero, María Teresa

    2015-08-01

    Sugar beet pulp (SBP) has been investigated as a promising feedstock for ABE fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii. Although lignin content in SBP is low, a pretreatment is needed to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation yields. Autohydrolysis at pH 4 has been selected as the best pretreatment for SBP in terms of sugars release and acetone and butanol production. The best overall sugars release yields from raw SBP ranged from 66.2% to 70.6% for this pretreatment. The highest ABE yield achieved was 0.4g/g (5.1g/L of acetone and 6.6g/L butanol) and 143.2g ABE/kg SBP (62.3g acetone and 80.9g butanol) were obtained when pretreated SBP was enzymatically hydrolyzed at 7.5% (w/w) solid loading. Higher solid loadings (10%) offered higher acetone and butanol titers (5.8g/L of acetone and 7.8g/L butanol). All the experiments were carried out under not-controlling pH conditions reaching about 5.3 in the final samples.

  18. Vibrational Excitation of Both Products of the Reaction of CN Radicals with Acetone in Solution.

    PubMed

    Dunning, Greg T; Preston, Thomas J; Greaves, Stuart J; Greetham, Gregory M; Clark, Ian P; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2015-12-17

    Transient electronic and vibrational absorption spectroscopy unravel the mechanisms and dynamics of bimolecular reactions of CN radicals with acetone in deuterated chloroform solutions. The CN radicals are produced by ultrafast ultraviolet photolysis of dissolved ICN. Two reactive forms of CN radicals are distinguished by their electronic absorption bands: "free" (uncomplexed) CN radicals, and "solvated" CN radicals that are complexed with solvent molecules. The lifetimes of the free CN radicals are limited to a few picoseconds following their photolytic production because of geminate recombination to ICN and INC, complexation with CDCl3 molecules, and reaction with acetone. The acetone reaction occurs with a rate coefficient of (8.0 ± 0.5) × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1) and transient vibrational spectra in the C═N and C═O stretching regions reveal that both the nascent HCN and 2-oxopropyl (CH3C(O)CH2) radical products are vibrationally excited. The rate coefficient for the reaction of solvated CN with acetone is 40 times slower than for free CN, with a rate coefficient of (2.0 ± 0.9) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) obtained from the rise in the HCN product v1(C═N stretch) IR absorption band. Evidence is also presented for CN complexes with acetone that are more strongly bound than the CN-CDCl3 complexes because of CN interactions with the carbonyl group. The rates of reactions of these more strongly associated radicals are slower still. PMID:26192334

  19. Application of finite inverse gas chromatography in hypromellose acetate succinate-water-acetone systems.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Sheng-Wei; Sturm, Derek R; Moser, Justin D; Danner, Ronald P

    2016-09-30

    A modification of a GC was developed to investigate both infinitely dilute and finite concentrations of solvents in polymers. Thermodynamic properties of hypromellose acetate succinate (HPMCAS-L)-acetone-water systems are important for the optimization of spray-drying processes used in pharmaceutical manufacturing of solid dispersion formulations. These properties, at temperatures below the glass transition temperature, were investigated using capillary column inverse gas chromatography (CCIGC). Water was much less soluble in the HPMCAS-L than acetone. Experiments were also conducted at infinitely dilute concentrations of one of the solvents in HPMCAS-L that was already saturated with the other solvent. Overall the partitioning of the water was not significantly affected by the presence of either water or acetone in the polymer. The acetone partition coefficient decreased as either acetone or water was added to the HPMCAS-L. A representation of the HPMCAS-L structure in terms of UNIFAC groups has been developed. With these groups, the UNIFAC-vdw-FV model did a reasonable job of predicting the phase equilibria in the binary and ternary systems. The Flory-Huggins correlation with fitted interaction parameters represented the data well. PMID:27629480

  20. Destruction of acetone using a small-scale arcjet plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, H.R.; Fleddermann, C.B.; Gahl, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    A small-scale thermal plasma torch has been constructed to determine the feasibility of its use to dispose of hazardous solvent wastes. The system has been studied using acetone as a test compound. The plasma jet is generated using argon and a commercial AC/DC welding supply. The system is operated using torch currents ranging from 50 to 200 A and solvent flow rates in the range 0--200 ml/h. Oxygen is added to alter the chemistry occurring in the reaction chamber. The destruction of acetone and the relative amounts of the reaction by-products are monitored using a residual gas analyzer. The pyrolysis products consist primarily of CO, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and other C{sub x}H{sub y} radicals when no oxygen is added to the system. By adding oxygen to the system, thermal oxidation processes occur that increase the production of CO{sub 2} and significantly decrease the amount of acetone in the exhaust gases. This paper includes data on the destruction efficiency of acetone as a function of solvent flow rate, torch power, argon flow rate and oxygen injection rate. The results indicate that greater than 99% destruction efficiency of acetone can be achieved with addition of oxygen to the reaction mixture using an arcjet current of 75 A.

  1. Detection of Acetone Processing of Castor Bean Mash for Forensic Investigation of Ricin Preparation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Wahl, Jon H.; Metoyer, Candace N.; Colburn, Heather A.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2010-07-01

    The toxic protein ricin is of concern as a potential biological threat agent (BTA) Recently, several samples of ricin have been seized in connection with biocriminal activity. Analytical methods are needed that enable federal investigators to determine how the samples were prepared, to match seized samples to potential source materials, and to identify samples that may have been prepared by the same method using the same source materials. One commonly described crude ricin preparation method is acetone extraction of crushed castor beans. Here we describe the use of solid-phase microextraction and headspace analysis of crude ricin preparation samples to determine whether they were processed by acetone extraction. In all cases, acetone-extracted bean mash could be distinguished from un-extracted mash or mash extracted with other organic solvents. Statistical analysis showed that storage in closed containers for up to 109 days had no effect on acetone signal intensity. Signal intensity in acetone-extracted mash decreased during storage in open containers, but extracted mash could still be distinguished from un-extracted mash after 94 days.

  2. Dielectric barrier discharge micro-plasma emission spectrometry for the detection of acetone in exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting; Gao, Dong-Xue; Yu, Yong-Liang; Chen, Ming-Li; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Acetone is a predominant volatile organic compound (VOC) in the exhaled breath and a promising biomarker for diabetes and ketoacidosis. A non-thermal micro-plasma generated in a planar dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is used as a radiation source for the excitation of gaseous acetone followed by its quantification with optical emission spectrometry (OES). Gaseous acetone can be directly sampled, while liquid acetone is evaporated by heated tungsten coil and then introduced into the DBD micro-plasma by a helium carrier flow for performing optical emission and detection at a 519 nm emission line. In the present study, the exhaled breath is collected and transferred into aqueous medium for sampling. With a sampling volume of 7 μL in a micro-drop, a linear range of 40-1600 mg L(-1) is obtained along with a detection limit of 44 ng and a precision of 5.7% RSD. The present system is successfully applied to the determination of breath acetone for both diabetic patients and healthy volunteers. PMID:26695309

  3. Measurement of Fuel Concentration Profile at Leading Edge of Lifted Flame with Acetone Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Mitsutomo; Sekine, Kazushi; Hashimoto, Kouta; Saiki, Atsushi; Takahashi, Hidemi; Masuya, Goro

    This is a study of the leading-edge characteristics of a methane-air triple flame. Few experiment results are available for physical examination of such characteristics, so further experimental investigations are strongly needed to understand the stability mechanism in a mixture with a steep concentration gradient. To this end, we measured concentration profiles at the leading edge of a flame using acetone laser-induced fluorescence (acetone LIF). The results demonstrated that the lifted height of the flame changed when acetone was added to the mixture and correlated well with increased C2 radical behind the flame edge. However, the OH radical luminous intensity, measured with a spectroscope, did not change with addition of acetone. Moreover, the burning velocity obtained by the Bunsen-burner method remained constant when acetone was added to the mixture. Therefore, acetone had little influence on burning intensity. Acetone LIF can thus be employed to measure the local concentration gradient at the leading edge of a flame. The acetone LIF signals could be corrected to consider the thermal effect by using silicone oil vanishing-plane data. From the corrected acetone LIF data, the width between the lean and rich flammability limits (flammability limit width) in the flow upstream of the flame with a steep concentration gradient was clearly observed and could be quantitatively compared with the recent numerical results.

  4. Using acetone as solvent to study removal of anthracene in soil inhibits microbial activity and alters nitrogen dynamics.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Edgar Vázquez; Rodríguez, Viviana; Gaytán, Alejandro García; Luna-Guido, Marco; Betancur-Galvis, Liliana A; Marsch, Rodolfo; Dendooven, Luc

    2009-08-01

    Acetone is often used as a carrier to contaminate soil with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and then to study the factors that control their removal. Acetone is an organic solvent that might affect soil processes. An alkaline saline (Texcoco soil) and an agricultural soil (Acolman soil) were amended with or without acetone, nitrogen + phosphorus (NP), and contaminated with anthracene at 520 mg/kg soil while emissions of CO2 and N2O and concentrations of NH4+, NO2(-) and NO3(-) were monitored. The CO2 emission rate decreased greater than 10 times in the soils amended with acetone. Emission of N2O decreased 70 times in the Acolman soil amended with acetone and NP and 5 times in the Texcoco soil. The concentration of NH4+ decreased in the unamended Acolman and Texcoco soil but increased when acetone was added in the first and remained constant in the latter. Acetone inhibited the increase in the amount of NO3(-) in the Acolman soil but not in the Texcoco soil. It was found that microbial activity as evidenced by the emission of CO2, nitrification, and production of N2O were inhibited by acetone. The amount of acetone used as solvent should thus be kept to a minimum, but it can be assumed that its effect on soil processes will be temporary, as microorganisms are known to repopulate soil quickly.

  5. Increased blood concentration of isopropanol in ketotic dairy cows and isopropanol production from acetone in the rumen.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroshi

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate acetone and isopropanol metabolism in bovine ketosis, the blood concentrations of isopropanol, acetone, plasma 3-hydroxybutyrate (3-HB) and other metabolites were analyzed in 12 healthy controls and 15 ketotic dairy cows including fatty liver and inferior prognosis after laparotomy for displaced abomasum. In ruminal fluid taken from 6 ketotic cows, ruminal isopropanol and acetone were also analyzed. Ketotic cows showed higher concentrations of isopropanol, acetone, 3-HB and nonesterified fatty acid, and higher activities of aspartate transaminase and gamma-glutamyl transferase than control cows. Blood samples had higher concentration of isopropanol accompanied by increased acetone. In the ketotic cows, acetone was detected not only in blood but also in ruminal fluid, while higher ruminal isopropanol did not necessarily accompany its elevation in the blood. Using 2 steers with rumen cannula, all ruminal content was emptied and then substituted with artificial saliva to evaluate the importance of ruminal microbes in isopropanol production. Under each condition of intact and emptied rumen, acetone was infused into the rumen and blood isopropanol was analyzed. The elevation in the blood isopropanol concentration after acetone infusion was markedly inhibited by the emptying. Here, increased blood concentrations of isopropanol and acetone were observed in ketotic cows, and the importance of ruminal microbes in isopropanol production was confirmed.

  6. High-sensitivity detection of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and its precursor acetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunayevskiy, Ilya; Tsekoun, Alexei; Prasanna, Manu; Go, Rowel; Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2007-09-01

    Triacetone triperoxide (C9H18O6, molecular mass of 222.24 g/mol) (TATP) is a powerful explosive that is easy to synthesize using commonly available household chemicals, acetone, and hydrogen peroxide 1 2. Because of the simplicity of its synthesis, TATP is often the explosive of choice for terrorists, including suicide bombers. For providing safety to the population, early detection of TATP and isolation of such individuals are essential. We report unambiguous, high-sensitivity detection of TATP and its precursor, acetone, using room-temperature quantum cascade laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (QCL-PAS). The available sensitivity is such that TATP, carried on a person (at a nominal body temperature of 37 °C), should be detectable at some distance. The combination of demonstrated detection of TATP and acetone should be ideal for screening at airports and other public places for providing increased public safety.

  7. Detection of Interstellar Acetone toward the Orion-KL Hot Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedel, D. N.; Snyder, L. E.; Remijan, Anthony J.; Turner, B. E.

    2005-10-01

    We present the first detection of interstellar acetone [(CH3)2CO] toward the high-mass star-forming region Orion-KL and the first detection of vibrationally excited (CH3)2CO in the interstellar medium (ISM). Using the BIMA array, 28 emission features that can be assigned to 54 acetone transitions were detected. Furthermore, 37 of these transitions have not been previously observed in the ISM. The observations also show that the acetone emission is concentrated toward the hot core region of Orion-KL, contrary to the distribution of other large oxygen-bearing molecules. From our rotational temperature diagram, we find a beam-averaged (CH3)2CO column density of [2.0(0.3)-8.0(1.2)]×1016 cm-2 and a rotational temperature of 176(48)-194(66) K.

  8. Mid-Infrared vibrational spectra of discrete acetone-ligated cerium hydroxide cations

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Groenewold; A. K. Gianotto; K. C. Cossel; M. J. Van Stipdonk; J. Oomens; N. Polfer; W. A. De JOng; M. E. McIllwain

    2007-02-01

    Cerium (III) hydroxy reactive sites are responsible for several important heterogeneous catalysis processes, and understanding the reaction chemistry of substrate molecules like CO, H2O, and CH3OH as they occur in heterogeneous media is a challenging task. We report here the first infrared spectra of model gas-phase cerium complexes and use the results as a benchmark to assist evaluation of the accuracy of ab initio calculations. Complexes containing [CeOH]2+ ligated by three- and four-acetone molecules were generated by electrospray ionization and characterized using wavelength-selective infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). The C=O stretching frequency for the [CeOH(acetone)4]2+ species appeared at 1650 cm-1 and was red-shifted by 90 cm-1 compared to unligated acetone. The magnitude of this shift for the carbonyl frequency was even greater for the [CeOH(acetone)3]2+ complex: the IRMPD peak consisted of two dissociation channels, an initial elimination of acetone at 1635 cm-1, and elimination of acetone accompanied by a serial charge separation producing [CeO(acetone)]+ at 1599 cm-1, with the overall frequency centered at 1616 cm-1. The increasing red shift observed as the number of acetone ligands decreases from four to three is consistent with transfer of more electron density per ligand in the less coordinated complexes. The lower frequency measured for the elimination/charge separation process is likely due to anharmonicity resulting from population of higher vibrational states. The C-C stretching frequency in the complexes is also influenced by coordination to the metal: it is blue-shifted compared to bare acetone, indicating a slight strengthening of the C-C bond in the complex, with the intensity of the absorption decreasing with decreasing ligation. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations using three different functionals (LDA, B3LYP, and PBE0) are used to predict the infrared spectra of the complexes. Calculated frequencies for the carbonyl

  9. Mid-Infrared Vibrational Spectra of Discrete Acetone-Ligated Cerium Hydroxide Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G. S.; Gianotto, Anita K.; Cossel, Kevin C.; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Oomens, Jos; Polfer, Nick; Moore, D.T.; De Jong, Wibe A.; McIIwain, Michael E.

    2007-02-15

    Cerium (III) hydroxy reactive sites are responsible for several important heterogeneous catalysis processes, and understanding the reaction chemistry of substrate molecules like CO, H2O, and CH3OH as they occur in heterogeneous media is a challenging task. We report here the first infrared spectra of model gas-phase cerium complexes and use the results as a benchmark to assist evaluation of the accuracy of ab initio calculations. Complexes containing [CeOH]2+ ligated by three- and four-acetone molecules were generated by electrospray ionization and characterized using wavelength-selective infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). The C=O stretching frequency for the [CeOH(acetone)4]2+ species appeared at 1650 cm-1 and was red-shifted by 90 cm-1 compared to unligated acetone. The magnitude of this shift for the carbonyl frequency was even greater for the [CeOH(acetone)3]2+ complex: the IRMPD peak consisted of two dissociation channels, an initial elimination of acetone at 1635 cm-1, and elimination of acetone accompanied by a serial charge separation producing [CeO(acetone)]+ at 1599 cm-1, with the overall frequency centered at 1616 cm-1. The increasing red shift observed as the number of acetone ligands decreases from four to three is consistent with transfer of more electron density per ligand in the less coordinated complexes. The lower frequency measured for the elimination/charge separation process is likely due to anharmonicity resulting from population of higher vibrational states. The C-C stretching frequency in the complexes is also influenced by coordination to the metal: it is blue-shifted compared to bare acetone, indicating a slight strengthening of the C-C bond in the complex, with the intensity of the absorption decreasing with decreasing ligation. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations using three different functionals (LDA, B3LYP, and PBE0) are used to predict the infrared spectra of the complexes. Calculated frequencies for the carbonyl

  10. Thiamine pyrophosphate stimulates acetone activation by Desulfococcus biacutus as monitored by a fluorogenic ATP analogue.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez Acosta, Olga B; Hardt, Norman; Hacker, Stephan M; Strittmatter, Tobias; Schink, Bernhard; Marx, Andreas

    2014-06-20

    Acetone can be degraded by aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. Studies with the strictly anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfococcus biacutus indicate that acetone degradation by these bacteria starts with an ATP-dependent carbonylation reaction leading to acetoacetaldehyde as the first reaction product. The reaction represents the second example of a carbonylation reaction in the biochemistry of strictly anaerobic bacteria, but the exact mechanism and dependence on cofactors are still unclear. Here, we use a novel fluorogenic ATP analogue to investigate its mechanism. We find that thiamine pyrophosphate is a cofactor of this ATP-dependent reaction. The products of ATP cleavage are AMP and pyrophosphate, providing first insights into the reaction mechanism by indicating that the reaction proceeds without intermediate formation of acetone enol phosphate.

  11. Mobility and molecular ions of dimethyl methyl phosphonate, methyl salicylate and acetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, D. M.

    1983-06-01

    The mobilities of positive and negative reactant ions are reported for (H2O)nH(+); (H2O)2O2 and (H2O)2CO3(-) ion clusters. The formation of positive DMMP monomer and dimer is reported, and equilbria molecular reactions are reported. Acetone is reported as forming a dimer at 81 ppb with a reduced mobility (K sub o) of 1.82, Methyl salicylate is shown to form a protonated and hydrated positive monomer. Mixtures of DMMP and methyl salicylate with acetone showed a substantial change in DMMP ion clustering and little or no change in the methyl salicylate mobility spectra. Negative ions were not observed for DMMP, methyl salicylate, acetone and the mixtures under the conditions reported.

  12. Acetone-Linked Peptides: A Convergent Approach for Peptide Macrocyclization and Labeling.

    PubMed

    Assem, Naila; Ferreira, David J; Wolan, Dennis W; Dawson, Philip E

    2015-07-20

    Macrocyclization is a broadly applied approach for overcoming the intrinsically disordered nature of linear peptides. Herein, it is shown that dichloroacetone (DCA) enhances helical secondary structures when introduced between peptide nucleophiles, such as thiols, to yield an acetone-linked bridge (ACE). Aside from stabilizing helical structures, the ketone moiety embedded in the linker can be modified with diverse molecular tags by oxime ligation. Insights into the structure of the tether were obtained through co-crystallization of a constrained S-peptide in complex with RNAse S. The scope of the acetone-linked peptides was further explored through the generation of N-terminus to side chain macrocycles and a new approach for generating fused macrocycles (bicycles). Together, these studies suggest that acetone linking is generally applicable to peptide macrocycles with a specific utility in the synthesis of stabilized helices that incorporate functional tags.

  13. Demonstration of a mid-infrared cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer for breath acetone detection.

    PubMed

    Ciaffoni, Luca; Hancock, Gus; Harrison, Jeremy J; van Helden, Jean-Pierre H; Langley, Cathryn E; Peverall, Robert; Ritchie, Grant A D; Wood, Simon

    2013-01-15

    A high-resolution absorption spectrum of gaseous acetone near 8.2 μm has been taken using both Fourier transform and quantum cascade laser (QCL)-based infrared spectrometers. Absolute absorption cross sections within the 1215-1222 cm(-1) range have been determined, and the spectral window around 1216.5 cm(-1) (σ = 3.4 × 10(-19) cm(2) molecule(-1)) has been chosen for monitoring trace acetone in exhaled breath. Acetone at sub parts-per-million (ppm) levels has been measured in a breath sample with a precision of 0.17 ppm (1σ) by utilizing a cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer constructed from the QCL source and a linear, low-volume, optical cavity. The use of a water vapor trap ensured the accuracy of the results, which have been corroborated by mass spectrometric measurements.

  14. High-sensitivity detection of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and its precursor acetone.

    PubMed

    Dunayevskiy, Ilya; Tsekoun, Alexei; Prasanna, Manu; Go, Rowel; Patel, C Kumar N

    2007-09-01

    Triacetone triperoxide (C(9)H(18)O(6), molecular mass of 222.24 g/mol) (TATP) is a powerful explosive that is easy to synthesize using commonly available household chemicals, acetone, and hydrogen peroxide 1 2. Because of the simplicity of its synthesis, TATP is often the explosive of choice for terrorists, including suicide bombers. For providing safety to the population, early detection of TATP and isolation of such individuals are essential. We report unambiguous, high-sensitivity detection of TATP and its precursor, acetone, using room-temperature quantum cascade laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (QCL-PAS). The available sensitivity is such that TATP, carried on a person (at a nominal body temperature of 37 degrees C), should be detectable at some distance. The combination of demonstrated detection of TATP and acetone should be ideal for screening at airports and other public places for providing increased public safety.

  15. Decomposition of acetone by hydrogen peroxide/ozone process in a rotating packed contactor.

    PubMed

    Ku, Young; Huang, Yun-Jen; Chen, Hua-Wei; Hou, Wei-Ming

    2011-07-01

    The direct use of ozone (O3) in water and wastewater treatment processes is found to be inefficient, incomplete, and limited by the ozone transfer between the gas-liquid interface because of its low solubility and instability in aqueous solutions. Therefore, rotating packed contactors were introduced to improve the transfer of ozone from the gaseous phase to the solution phase, and the effect of several reaction parameters were investigated on the temporal variations of acetone concentration in aqueous solution. The decomposition rate constant of acetone was enhanced by increasing the rotor speed from 450 to 1800 rpm. Increasing the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)/O3 molar ratios accelerated the decomposition rate until a certain optimum H2O2/O3 molar ratio was reached; further addition of H2O2 inhibited the decomposition of acetone, possibly because excessive amounts of H2O2 added might serve as a scavenger to deplete hydroxyl free radicals.

  16. Acetone Sensing Properties of a Gas Sensor Composed of Carbon Nanotubes Doped With Iron Oxide Nanopowder

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Qiulin; Fang, Jiahua; Liu, Wenyi; Xiong, Jijun; Zhang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide (Fe2O3) nanopowder was prepared by a precipitation method and then mixed with different proportions of carbon nanotubes. The composite materials were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. A fabricated heater-type gas sensor was compared with a pure Fe2O3 gas sensor under the influence of acetone. The effects of the amount of doping, the sintering temperature, and the operating temperature on the response of the sensor and the response recovery time were analyzed. Experiments show that doping of carbon nanotubes with iron oxide effectively improves the response of the resulting gas sensors to acetone gas. It also reduces the operating temperature and shortens the response recovery time of the sensor. The response of the sensor in an acetone gas concentration of 80 ppm was enhanced, with good repeatability. PMID:26569253

  17. Aminothienopyridazines and Methylene Blue Affect Tau Fibrillization via Cysteine Oxidation*

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Alex; James, Michael J.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Smith, Amos B.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Ballatore, Carlo; Brunden, Kurt R.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease and several other neurodegenerative disorders are characterized by the accumulation of intraneuronal fibrils comprised of the protein Tau. Tau is normally a soluble protein that stabilizes microtubules, with splice isoforms that contain either three (3-R) or four (4-R) microtubule binding repeats. The formation of Tau fibrils is thought to result in neuronal damage, and inhibitors of Tau fibrillization may hold promise as therapeutic agents. The process of Tau fibrillization can be replicated in vitro, and a number of small molecules have been identified that inhibit Tau fibril formation. However, little is known about how these molecules affect Tau fibrillization. Here, we examined the mechanism by which the previously described aminothieno pyridazine (ATPZ) series of compounds inhibit Tau fibrillization. Active ATPZs were found to promote the oxidation of the two cysteine residues within 4-R Tau by a redox cycling mechanism, resulting in the formation of a disulfide-containing compact monomer that was refractory to fibrillization. Moreover, the ATPZs facilitated intermolecular disulfide formation between 3-R Tau monomers, leading to dimers that were capable of fibrillization. The ATPZs also caused cysteine oxidation in molecules unrelated to Tau. Interestingly, methylene blue, an inhibitor of Tau fibrillization under evaluation in Alzheimer disease clinical trials, caused a similar oxidation of cysteines in Tau and other molecules. These findings reveal that the ATPZs and methylene blue act by a mechanism that may affect their viability as potential therapeutic agents. PMID:23443659

  18. Adsorption behavior of methylene blue on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yunjin; Xu, Feifei; Chen, Ming; Xu, Zhongxiao; Zhu, Zhiwen

    2010-05-01

    The effect of temperature on the equilibrium adsorption of methylene blue dye from aqueous solution using carbon nanotubes was investigated. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed using two widely applied isotherms: Langmuir and Freundlich. The results revealed that Langmuir isotherm fit the experimental results well. Kinetic analyses were conducted using pseudo-first and second-order models and the intraparticle diffusion model. The regression results showed that the adsorption kinetics were more accurately represented by pseudo-second-order model. The activation energy of system (Ea) was calculated as 18.54 kJ/mol. Standard free energy changes (DeltaG(0)), standard enthalpy change (DeltaH(0)), and standard entropy change (DeltaS(0)) were calculated using adsorption equilibrium constants obtained from the Langmuir isotherm at different temperatures. All DeltaG(0) values were negative; the DeltaH(0) values and DeltaS(0) values of CNTs were 7.29 kJ/mol and 64.6 J/mol K, respectively. Results suggested that the methylene blue adsorption on CNTs was a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  19. Photobiological properties of positively charged methylene violet analogs.

    PubMed

    Houghtaling, M A; Perera, R; Owen, K E; Wagner, S; Kuhn, R J; Morrison, H

    2000-01-01

    O-Methyl methylene violet (OMeMV), O-methyl bromomethylene violet (OMeBrMV) and O-methyl iodomethylene violet (OMeIMV) have been prepared in order to test their potential utility as anti-viral and anti-tumor phototoxic dyes. Rates of photosensitized toxicity of KB cells with 633 nm irradiation are (x 10(-19) photon-1): 2.4, 2.2, 1.9 and 0.17 for OMeIMV, OMeBrMV, methylene violet (MV) and OMeMV, respectively. Rates of photosensitized inactivation of Sindbis virus in phosphate-buffered saline with 633 nm irradiation are (x 10(-18) photon-1): 3.3, 1.8, 0.99, 0.15 for MV, OMeIMV, OMeBrMV and OMeMV, respectively. Quantum efficiencies for singlet oxygen formation were determined as OMeIMV, 0.64; OMeBrMV, 0.40; OMeMV, 0.054. Titration of the dyes with double-stranded (ds)DNA resulted in bathochromic shifts and hypochromic effects in the visible absorption spectra. Association constants for interaction of the methylated dyes with dsDNA of approximately 1 x 10(5) M-1 were determined by Scatchard analysis of equilibrium dialysis and UV absorption titration data. Photolysis of the halogenated dyes with DNA under argon led to covalent bond formation with the nucleic acid; there was no evidence of covalent binding in the dark.

  20. Free energy of mixing of acetone and methanol: a computer simulation investigation.

    PubMed

    Idrissi, Abdenacer; Polok, Kamil; Barj, Mohammed; Marekha, Bogdan; Kiselev, Mikhail; Jedlovszky, Pál

    2013-12-19

    The change of the Helmholtz free energy, internal energy, and entropy accompanying the mixing of acetone and methanol is calculated in the entire composition range by the method of thermodynamic integration using three different potential model combinations of the two compounds. In the first system, both molecules are described by the OPLS, and in the second system, both molecules are described by the original TraPPE force field, whereas in the third system a modified version of the TraPPE potential is used for acetone in combination with the original TraPPE model of methanol. The results reveal that, in contrast with the acetone-water system, all of these three model combinations are able to reproduce the full miscibility of acetone and methanol, although the thermodynamic driving force of this mixing is very small. It is also seen, in accordance with the finding of former structural analyses, that the mixing of the two components is driven by the entropy term corresponding to the ideal mixing, which is large enough to overcompensate the effect of the energy increase and entropy loss due to the interaction of the unlike components in the mixtures. Among the three model combinations, the use of the original TraPPE model of methanol and modified TraPPE model of acetone turns out to be clearly the best in this respect, as it is able to reproduce the experimental free energy, internal energy, and entropy of mixing values within 0.15 kJ/mol, 0.2 kJ/mol, and 1 J/(mol K), respectively, in the entire composition range. The success of this model combination originates from the fact that the use of the modified TraPPE model of acetone instead of the original one in these mixtures improves the reproduction of the entropy of mixing, while it retains the ability of the original model of excellently reproducing the internal energy of mixing.

  1. Relationship of O2 Photodesorption in Photooxidation of Acetone on TiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael A.

    2008-07-31

    Organic photooxidation on TiO2 invariably involves the coexistence of organic species with oxygen on the surface at the same time. In the case of acetone and oxygen, both species exhibit their own interesting photochemistry on TiO2, but interdependences between the two are not understood. In this study, a rutile TiO2(110) surface possessing 7% surface oxygen vacancy sites is used as a model surface to probe the relationship between O2 photodesorption and acetone photodecomposition. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and photon stimulated desorption (PSD) measurements indicate that coadsorbed oxygen is essential to acetone photodecomposition on this surface, however the form of oxygen (molecular and dissociative) is not known. The first steps in acetone photodecomposition on TiO2(110) involve thermal activation with oxygen to form an acetone diolate ((CH3)2COO) species followed by photochemical decomposition to adsorbed acetate (CH3COO) and an ejected CH3 radical that is detected in PSD. Depending on the surface conditions, O2 PSD is also observed during the latter process. However, the time scales for the two PSD events (CH3 and O2) are quite different, withthe former occurring at ~10 times faster than the latter. By varying the preheating conditions or performing pre-irradiation on an O2 exposed surface, it becomes clear that the two PSD events are uncorrelated. That is, the O2 species responsible for O2 PSD is not a significant participant in the photochemistry of acetone on TiO2(110) and likely originates from a minority form of O2 on the surface. The CH3 and O2 PSD events do not appear to be in competition with each other suggesting either that ample charge carriers exist under the experimental conditions employed or that different charge carriers or excitation mechanisms are involved.

  2. sup 211 At-methylene blue for targeted radiotherapy of human melanoma xenografts: Treatment of micrometastases

    SciTech Connect

    Link, E.M.; Carpenter, R.N. )

    1990-05-15

    Treatment of micrometastases of HX34 human melanoma grown as xenografts in nude mice represents an advanced stage of preclinical investigations concerning targeted radiotherapy of this neoplasm using 3,7-(dimethylamino)phenazathionium chloride methylene blue (MTB) labeled with astatine-211 (211At) (alpha-particle emitter). The therapeutic effectiveness of 211At-MTB administered i.v. was determined by a lung colony assay combined with a search for metastases to organs other than the lungs. A single dose of 211At-MTB lowered the HX34 cell surviving fraction in lungs to below 10% almost independently of the time interval between cell inoculation and radioisotope injection and of 211At-MTB radioactivity within its investigated range. Radiation dose and the time of its administration did, however, influence the size of lung colonies. In contrast, the efficacy of 211At-MTB treatment as assessed by both surviving fraction and colony size was significantly dependent on a number of HX34 cells inoculated initially into mice. These results are explained by a short range of alpha-particles emitted by 211At and a mechanism of growth of lung colonies from tumor cells circulating with blood and blocking lung capillaries. Metastases in organs other than lungs and characteristic of control animals were not found in mice treated with 211At-MTB. The high therapeutic efficacy achieved proved that 211At-MTB is a very efficient scavenger of single melanoma cells distributed through blood and micrometastases with sizes below the limit of clinical detection.

  3. Kinetic Energy Release of the Singly and Doubly Charged Methylene Chloride Molecule: The Role of Fast Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, K F; Rocha, A B; Gomes, A H A; Wolff, W; Sigaud, L; Santos, A C F

    2016-09-01

    The center of mass kinetic energy release distribution (KERD) spectra of selected ionic fragments, formed through dissociative single and double photoionization of CH2Cl2 at photon energies around the Cl 2p edge, were extracted from the shape and width of the experimentally obtained time-of-flight (TOF) distributions. The KERD spectra exhibit either smooth profiles or structures, depending on the moiety and photon energy. In general, the heavier the ionic fragments, the lower their average KERDs are. In contrast, the light H(+) fragments are observed with kinetic energies centered around 4.5-5.5 eV, depending on the photon energy. It was observed that the change in the photon energy involves a change in the KERDs, indicating different processes or transitions taking place in the breakup process. In the particular case of double ionization with the ejection of two charged fragments, the KERDs present have characteristics compatible with the Coulombic fragmentation model. Intending to interpret the experimental data, singlet and triplet states at Cl 2p edge of the CH2Cl2 molecule, corresponding to the Cl (2p → 10a1*) and Cl (2p → 4b1*) transitions, were calculated at multiconfigurational self-consistent field (MCSCF) level and multireference configuration interaction (MRCI). These states were selected to form the spin-orbit coupling matrix elements, which after diagonalization result in a spin-orbit manifold. Minimum energy pathways for dissociation of the molecule were additionally calculated aiming to give support to the presence of the ultrafast dissociation mechanism in the molecular breakup.

  4. 76 FR 55949 - Methylene Chloride Standard; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... published a notice in the Federal Register on March 16, 2011 (76 FR 14432, Docket No. OSHA-2011-0060... Standards Improvement Project-Phase III final rule (76 FR 33590), published on June 8, 2011, the ``transfer... Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3506 et seq.) and Secretary of Labor's Order No. 4-2010 (75 FR 55355)....

  5. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products. [Polychlorinated biphenyls; methylene chloride; perchloroethylene; trichlorofluoroethane; trichloroethylene; chlorobenzene

    DOEpatents

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1982-03-31

    A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contracting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible polyhydroxy compound, such as, water, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds in the low polar or nonpolar solvent by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered for recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 2 tables.

  6. 75 FR 24509 - Notice of Availability of the Regulatory Flexibility Act Review of the Methylene Chloride Standard

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... reduce the regulatory burden on small businesses, or whether it is no longer needed and should be... per million (ppm) to 25 ppm.\\3\\ \\1\\ 62 FR 1497, January 10, 1997. \\2\\ 62 FR 1494. \\3\\ Regulatory... overlaps, duplicates or conflicts with other Federal rules, and, to the extent feasible, with State...

  7. Kinetic Energy Release of the Singly and Doubly Charged Methylene Chloride Molecule: The Role of Fast Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, K F; Rocha, A B; Gomes, A H A; Wolff, W; Sigaud, L; Santos, A C F

    2016-09-01

    The center of mass kinetic energy release distribution (KERD) spectra of selected ionic fragments, formed through dissociative single and double photoionization of CH2Cl2 at photon energies around the Cl 2p edge, were extracted from the shape and width of the experimentally obtained time-of-flight (TOF) distributions. The KERD spectra exhibit either smooth profiles or structures, depending on the moiety and photon energy. In general, the heavier the ionic fragments, the lower their average KERDs are. In contrast, the light H(+) fragments are observed with kinetic energies centered around 4.5-5.5 eV, depending on the photon energy. It was observed that the change in the photon energy involves a change in the KERDs, indicating different processes or transitions taking place in the breakup process. In the particular case of double ionization with the ejection of two charged fragments, the KERDs present have characteristics compatible with the Coulombic fragmentation model. Intending to interpret the experimental data, singlet and triplet states at Cl 2p edge of the CH2Cl2 molecule, corresponding to the Cl (2p → 10a1*) and Cl (2p → 4b1*) transitions, were calculated at multiconfigurational self-consistent field (MCSCF) level and multireference configuration interaction (MRCI). These states were selected to form the spin-orbit coupling matrix elements, which after diagonalization result in a spin-orbit manifold. Minimum energy pathways for dissociation of the molecule were additionally calculated aiming to give support to the presence of the ultrafast dissociation mechanism in the molecular breakup. PMID:27523328

  8. Nanomolar determination of 4-nitrophenol based on a poly(methylene blue)-modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Giribabu, Krishnamoorthy; Suresh, Ranganathan; Manigandan, Ramadoss; Munusamy, Settu; Kumar, Sivakumar Praveen; Muthamizh, Selvamani; Narayanan, Vengidusamy

    2013-10-01

    A poly(methylene blue)-modified glassy carbon electrode (PMB/GCE) was fabricated by electropolymerisation of methylene blue on a GCE and further utilized to investigate the electrochemical determination of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) by cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential pulse voltammetry and chronocoulometry. The morphology of the PMB on GCE was examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). An oxidation peak of 4-NP at the PMB modified electrode was observed at 0.28 V, and in the case of bare GCE, no oxidation peak was observed, which indicates that PMB/GCE exhibits a remarkable effect on the electrochemical determination of 4-NP. Due to this remarkable effect of PMB/GCE, a sensitive and simple electrochemical method was proposed for the determination of 4-NP. The effect of the scan rate and pH was investigated to determine the optimum conditions at which the PMB/GCE exhibits a higher sensitivity with a lower detection limit. Moreover, kinetic parameters such as the electron transfer number, proton transfer number and standard heterogeneous rate constant were calculated. Under optimum conditions, the oxidation current of 4-NP is proportional to its concentration in the range of 15-250 nM with a correlation coefficient of 0.9963. The detection limit was found to be 90 nM (S/N = 3). The proposed method based on PMB/GCE is simple, easy and cost effective. To further confirm its possible application, the proposed method was successfully used for the determination of 4-NP in real water samples with recoveries ranging from 97% to 101.6%. The interference due to sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, copper, zinc, iron, sulphate, carbonate, chloride, nitrate and phosphate was found to be almost negligible. PMID:23897002

  9. Nanomolar determination of 4-nitrophenol based on a poly(methylene blue)-modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Giribabu, Krishnamoorthy; Suresh, Ranganathan; Manigandan, Ramadoss; Munusamy, Settu; Kumar, Sivakumar Praveen; Muthamizh, Selvamani; Narayanan, Vengidusamy

    2013-10-01

    A poly(methylene blue)-modified glassy carbon electrode (PMB/GCE) was fabricated by electropolymerisation of methylene blue on a GCE and further utilized to investigate the electrochemical determination of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) by cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential pulse voltammetry and chronocoulometry. The morphology of the PMB on GCE was examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). An oxidation peak of 4-NP at the PMB modified electrode was observed at 0.28 V, and in the case of bare GCE, no oxidation peak was observed, which indicates that PMB/GCE exhibits a remarkable effect on the electrochemical determination of 4-NP. Due to this remarkable effect of PMB/GCE, a sensitive and simple electrochemical method was proposed for the determination of 4-NP. The effect of the scan rate and pH was investigated to determine the optimum conditions at which the PMB/GCE exhibits a higher sensitivity with a lower detection limit. Moreover, kinetic parameters such as the electron transfer number, proton transfer number and standard heterogeneous rate constant were calculated. Under optimum conditions, the oxidation current of 4-NP is proportional to its concentration in the range of 15-250 nM with a correlation coefficient of 0.9963. The detection limit was found to be 90 nM (S/N = 3). The proposed method based on PMB/GCE is simple, easy and cost effective. To further confirm its possible application, the proposed method was successfully used for the determination of 4-NP in real water samples with recoveries ranging from 97% to 101.6%. The interference due to sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, copper, zinc, iron, sulphate, carbonate, chloride, nitrate and phosphate was found to be almost negligible.

  10. Studies Update Vinyl Chloride Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1980-01-01

    Extensive study affirms that vinyl chloride is a potent animal carcinogen. Epidemiological studies show elevated rates of human cancers in association with extended contact with the compound. (Author/RE)

  11. 21 CFR 500.27 - Methylene blue-containing drugs for use in animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Methylene blue-containing drugs for use in animals. 500.27 Section 500.27 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... according to label directions. The specific cause of the reaction was determined to be the methylene...

  12. Synthesis of novel 6,6'-methylene-bis-[3-(2-anilinoacetyl)-4-hydroxycoumarin] derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sanjeeva Reddy, Cherkupally; Raghu, Mekala

    2008-12-01

    The synthesis of novel 6,6'-methylene-bis-[3-(2-anilinoacetyl)-4-hydroxycoumarin] derivatives 6a-f was achieved in excellent yields from 6,6'-methylene-bis-[3-(2-bromoacetyl)-4-hydroxycoumarin] 5 and various arylamines. 5,5'-Methylene-bis-ethylsalicylate 3 was obtained by the esterfication of 5,5'-methylene-bis-salicylic acid 2 with ethanol, which was in turn obtained from salicylic acid 1 and formaldehyde. Cyclocondensation of 3 with ethyl acetoacetate resulted in 6,6'-methylene-bis-[3-acetyl-4-hydroxycoumarin] 4, which on selective alpha-bromination with molecular bromine in the presence of montmorillonite K10-AlCl(3) catalyst, in chloroform-ethyl acetate binary solvent mixture at room temperature, afforded the compound 5 in excellent yield. All the newly synthesized compounds were characterized by their spectral data.

  13. Appendix C -- Soil gas analysis of vadose zone monitoring system installation report for McClellan AFB

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-31

    This appendix compiles the data from gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy measurements of gas samples from McClellan AFB soils collected and analyzed in December, 1995. Compounds detected include: vinyl chloride, methylene chloride, chloroethanes, chloroethenes, benzene, chlorobenzenes, propylene, trimethylbenzenes, acetone, toluene, xylenes.

  14. An XAFS study of nickel chloride in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride/ aluminum chloride

    SciTech Connect

    D Roeper; G Cheek; K Pandya; W OGrady

    2011-12-31

    Nickel chloride was studied with cyclic voltammetry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy in acidic and basic aluminum chloride/1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (EMIC) ionic liquids. Acidic melts display metal stripping peaks which are not observed in the basic melt. EXAFS analysis shows that the nickel is tetrahedrally coordinated with chloride ions in the basic solution. In the acidic solution the nickel is coordinated by six chloride ions that are also associated with aluminum ions.

  15. Terahertz Spectroscopy of Deuterated Methylene Bi-Radical CD_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Bailleux, Stephane

    2015-06-01

    Methylene, the parent of the carbene compounds, plays a crucial role in many chemical reactions. This bi-radical is a known interstellar molecule that has been detected towards hot cores in dense interstellar clouds. CH_2 is also thought to be present in cometary atmospheres. In the gas phase chemical models of both dense and diffuse molecular clouds, CH_2 is a key intermediate in interstellar carbon chemistry which is produced primarily by dissociative recombination of the methyl ion, CH^+_3. Recently tentative detection of the mono-deuterated methyl ion, CH_2D^+ has been reported toward an infrared source in the vicinity of Orion. Deuterated methylene CHD and CD_2 can be produced from this ion or its counterpart CHD^+_2 by dissociative recombination with an electron: CH2D+ + e- → CHD+ H or {CH2 + D}, CHD2+ ~+ e- → CHD+ D or CD2 + H. Thus, both CHD and CD_2 can be observed in warm interstellar clouds, where the deuterium fractionation process is important. Precise laboratory reference data are desirable for radioastronomical observation of these molecules. Here we report on our high-resolution spectroscopic investigation on the deuterated methylene radical, CD_2 (X ^3B_1) up to 1.45 THz. At present time, eleven out of the twelve fine-structure components of four pure rotational transitions have been newly recorded, and these measurements double the number of previously observed transitions. CD_2 was generated in a discharge in CD_2CO which was obtained from the flash pyrolysis of acetic anhydride-d6 ((CD_3CO)_2O). Effort is currently made to measure the astronomically important 111 - 000 transition whose fine-structure components are predicted to occur at 1.224,1.228 and 1.234 THz. D. C. Lis, P. F. Goldsmith, E. A. Bergin et al. 2009, in Submillimeter Astrophysics and Technology, ASP Conf. Ser., 417, 23. H. Ozeki and S. Saito J. Chem. Phys. 1996, 104, 2167.

  16. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg. No. 7447-40-7) is a white... manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in infant formula in accordance with section 412(g)...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... from the filtrate on cooling. Alternatively, hydrogen chloride formed by the burning of hydrogen in... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... from the filtrate on cooling. Alternatively, hydrogen chloride formed by the burning of hydrogen in... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... from the filtrate on cooling. Alternatively, hydrogen chloride formed by the burning of hydrogen in... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... from the filtrate on cooling. Alternatively, hydrogen chloride formed by the burning of hydrogen in... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... Alternatively, hydrogen chloride formed by the burning of hydrogen in chlorine is dissolved in water and then... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS Reg. No. 12125-02-9) is...

  5. Regeneration of zinc chloride hydrocracking catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Zielke, Clyde W.

    1979-01-01

    Improved rate of recovery of zinc values from the solids which are carried over by the effluent vapors from the oxidative vapor phase regeneration of spent zinc chloride catalyst is achieved by treatment of the solids with both hydrogen chloride and calcium chloride to selectively and rapidly recover the zinc values as zinc chloride.

  6. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  7. CHLORIDE WASHER PERFORMACE TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, J; David Best, D; Robert Pierce, R

    2007-11-30

    Testing was performed to determine the chloride (Cl-) removal capabilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) designed and built Cl- washing equipment intended for HB-Line installation. The equipment to be deployed was tested using a cerium oxide (CeO2) based simulant in place of the 3013 plutonium oxide (PuO2) material. Two different simulant mixtures were included in this testing -- one having higher Cl- content than the other. The higher Cl- simulant was based on K-Area Interim Surveillance Inspection Program (KIS) material with Cl- content approximately equal to 70,000 ppm. The lower Cl- level simulant was comparable to KIS material containing approximately 8,000-ppm Cl- content. The performance testing results indicate that the washer is capable of reducing the Cl- content of both surrogates to below 200 ppm with three 1/2-liter washes of 0.1M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution. Larger wash volumes were used with similar results - all of the prescribed test parameters consistently reduced the Cl- content of the surrogate to a value below 200 ppm Cl- in the final washed surrogate material. The washer uses a 20-micron filter to retain the surrogate solids. Tests showed that 0.16-0.41% of the insoluble fraction of the starting mass passed through the 20-micron filter. The solids retention performance indicates that the fissile masses passing through the 20-micron filter should not exceed the waste acceptance criteria for discard in grout to TRU waste. It is recommended that additional testing be pursued for further verification and optimization purposes. It is likely that wash volumes smaller than those tested could still reduce the Cl- values to acceptable levels. Along with reduced wash volumes, reuse of the third wash volume (in the next run processed) should be tested as a wash solution minimization plan. A 67% reduction in the number of grouted paint pails could be realized if wash solution minimization testing returned acceptable results.

  8. 40 CFR 721.10238 - Formaldehyde, polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts. 721.10238 Section 721.10238 Protection of..., polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance..., polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts (PMN P-09-147; CAS...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10238 - Formaldehyde, polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts. 721.10238 Section 721.10238 Protection of..., polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance..., polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts (PMN P-09-147; CAS...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10238 - Formaldehyde, polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts. 721.10238 Section 721.10238 Protection of..., polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts. (a) Chemical substance..., polymers with acetone-phenol reaction products and phenol, potassium sodium salts (PMN P-09-147; CAS...

  11. Neurotoxicity associated with occupational exposure to acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, and cyclohexanone.

    PubMed

    Mitran, E; Callender, T; Orha, B; Dragnea, P; Botezatu, G

    1997-01-01

    The neurotoxic effects of acetone, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), and cyclohexanone on Romanian workers and the impact of those effects on industry environmental standards have been controversial subjects. To scientifically substantiate the standards, a study was conducted on three groups of workers to determine the changes induced by ketone solvents on the central and peripheral nervous systems. Groups of exposed workers and matched controls were studied for each solvent: acetone, 71 exposed and 86 controls from a coin printing factory; MEK, 41 exposed and 63 controls from a cable factory; and cyclohexanone, 75 exposed and 85 controls from a furniture factory. The subjects' mean age was 36 years. The mean length of exposure was 14 years. Study participants completed a questionnaire, responded to questions about alcohol consumption, submitted to a clinical examination, submitted samples for identification of biological exposure markers, and underwent motor nerve conduction velocity and neurobehavioral tests. Results showed that workers exposed to acetone were most affected in terms of human performance and evidence of neurotoxicity, followed by workers exposed to MEK and workers exposed to cyclohexanone. On the basis of the results, it was proposed that the 6-hr permissible exposure limits for acetone, MEK, and cyclohexanone be reduced to less than 500, 200, and 150 mg/m3, respectively.

  12. A simple procedure for preparing chitin oligomers through acetone precipitation after hydrolysis in concentrated hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Kazami, Nao; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Mizutani, Daisuke; Masuda, Tatsuhiko; Wakita, Satoshi; Oyama, Fumitaka; Kawakita, Masao; Sugahara, Yasusato

    2015-11-01

    Chitin oligomers are of interest because of their numerous biologically relevant properties. To prepare chitin oligomers containing 4-6 GlcNAc units [(GlcNAc)4-6], α- and β-chitin were hydrolyzed with concentrated hydrochloric acid at 40 °C. The reactant was mixed with acetone to recover the acetone-insoluble material, and (GlcNAc)4-6 was efficiently recovered after subsequent water extraction. Composition analysis using gel permeation chromatography and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry indicated that (GlcNAc)4-6 could be isolated from the acetone-insoluble material with recoveries of approximately 17% and 21% from the starting α-chitin and β-chitin, respectively. The acetone precipitation method is highly useful for recovering chitin oligomers from the acid hydrolysate of chitin. The changes in the molecular size and higher-order structure of chitin during the course of hydrolysis were also analyzed, and a model that explains the process of oligomer accumulation is proposed.

  13. Microscopic roots of alcohol-ketone demixing: infrared spectroscopy of methanol-acetone clusters.

    PubMed

    Kollipost, Franz; Domanskaya, Alexandra V; Suhm, Martin A

    2015-03-19

    Infrared spectra of isolated methanol-acetone clusters up to tetramers are experimentally characterized for the first time. They show evidence for a nanometer-scale demixing trend of the cold species. In combination with quantum calculations, the mutual repulsion is demonstrated to start beyond three molecular units, whereas individual molecules still prefer to form a mixed complex.

  14. Photooxidation of Isopropanol and Acetone Using TiO(sub 2) Suspension and UV Light

    SciTech Connect

    El-Morsi, Taha; Nanny, Mark A.

    2004-03-31

    Small polar organic compounds such as alcohols, ketones and aldehydes are highly soluble and do not adsorb strongly to the TiO2 surface and, therefore, may be fairly resistant to photocatalytic degradation. Photodegradation of an aqueous solution of isopropanol and its resulting photodegradation product acetone was investigated as a function of TiO2 substrate concentrations and solution ionic strength and pH. In the presence of 2g/L TiO2, isopropanol completely disappeared within 3 hrs, resulting in the nearly complete transformation into acetone. Subsequent photodegradation of acetone occurred at a much slower rate and resulted in complete mineralization. Increasing the pH slightly decreased the photodegradation rate. Conversely, the degradation rate was enhanced slightly by increasing the ionic strength. The presence of tetranitromethane decreased the isopropanol degradation significantly. This result, combined with the minimal degree of adsorption of isopropanol and acetone onto the surface of the photocatalyst, suggests that the photodegradation pathway occurs via free OH radicals in bulk solution rather than on the catalyst surface.

  15. Chemical-specific adjustment factors for intraspecies variability of acetone toxicokinetics using a probabilistic approach.

    PubMed

    Mörk, Anna-Karin; Johanson, Gunnar

    2010-07-01

    Human health risk assessment has begun to depart from the traditional methods by replacement of the default assessment factors by more reasonable, data-driven, so-called chemical-specific adjustment factors (CSAFs). This study illustrates a scheme for deriving CSAFs in the general and occupationally exposed populations by quantifying the intraspecies toxicokinetic variability in surrogate dose using probabilistic methods. Acetone was used as a model substance. The CSAFs were derived by Monte Carlo simulation, combining a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for acetone, probability distributions of the model parameters from a Bayesian analysis of male volunteer experimental data, and published distributions of physiological and anatomical parameters for females and children. The simulations covered how factors such as age, gender, endogenous acetone production, and fluctuations in workplace air concentration and workload influence peak and average acetone levels in blood, used as surrogate doses. According to the simulations, CSAFs of 2.1, 2.9, and 3.8 are sufficient to cover the differences in surrogate dose at the upper 90th, 95th, and 97.5th percentile, respectively, of the general population. However, higher factors were needed to cover the same percentiles of children. The corresponding CSAFs for the occupationally exposed population were 1.6, 1.8, and 1.9. The methodology presented herein allows for derivation of CSAFs not only for populations as a whole but also for subpopulations of interest. Moreover, various types of experimental data can readily be incorporated in the model. PMID:20400482

  16. Assessment of in situ butanol recovery by vacuum during acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butanol fermentation is product limiting due to butanol toxicity to microbial cells. Butanol (boiling point: 118 deg C) boils at a greater temperature than water (boiling point: 100 deg C) and application of vacuum technology to integrated acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation and recovery may ...

  17. Synthesis and antimalarial activity of dihydroperoxides and tetraoxanes conjugated with bis(benzyl)acetone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Franco, Lucas Lopardi; de Almeida, Mauro Vieira; E Silva, Luiz Francisco Rocha; Vieira, Pedro Paulo Ribeiro; Pohlit, Adrian Martin; Valle, Marcelo Siqueira

    2012-05-01

    Dihydroperoxides and tetraoxanes derived from symmetrically substituted bis(arylmethyl)acetones were synthesized in modest to good yields using several methods. Three of these compounds exhibit an important in vitro antimalarial activity (1.0 μm ≤ IC(50)  ≤ 5.0 μm) against blood forms of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

  18. Study of Methylene Blue adsorption on keratin nanofibrous membranes.

    PubMed

    Aluigi, A; Rombaldoni, F; Tonetti, C; Jannoke, L

    2014-03-15

    In this work, keratin nanofibrous membranes (mean diameter of about 220nm) were prepared by electrospinning and tested as adsorbents for Methylene Blue through batch adsorption tests. The adsorption capacity of the membranes was evaluated as a function of initial dye concentration, pH, adsorbent dosage, time and temperature. The adsorption capacity increased with increasing the initial dye concentration and pH, while it decreased with increasing the adsorbent dosage and temperature, indicating an exothermic process. The adsorption results indicated that the Langmuir isotherm fitted the experimental data better than the Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models. A mean free energy evaluated through the Dubinin-Radushkevich model of about 16kJmol(-1), indicated a chemisorption process which occurred by ion exchange. The kinetic data were found to fit the pseudo-second-order model better than the pseudo-first-order model. The obtained results suggest that keratin nanofibrous membranes could be promising candidates as dye adsorption filters.

  19. Sequestration of Methylene Blue into Polyelectrolyte Complex Coacervates.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mengmeng; Zacharia, Nicole S

    2016-08-01

    Polyelectrolyte complex coacervation is a process that has been proposed as a model for protocell formation due to its ability to compartmentalize chemicals in solution without a membrane. During the liquid-liquid phase separation that results in water rich and polyelectrolyte rich phases, small molecules present in solution selectively partition to one phase over the other. This sequestration is based on relative affinities. Here, a study of the sequestration of methylene blue (MB) into the complex coacervate phase of three pairs of synthetic polyelectrolytes is presented; branched polyethylene imine with polyacrylic acid, polyvinyl sulfonate, or poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid). These materials are characterized with UV-vis, zeta potential measurements, and dynamic light scattering. The branched polyethylene imine/poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid) system is shown to have a significantly higher sequestration capacity for the MB as compared to either of the other two systems, based on π-π interactions which are not possible in the other systems. PMID:27336461

  20. Methylene blue adsorption on a DMPA lipid langmuir monolayer.

    PubMed

    Giner Casares, Juan José; Camacho, Luis; Martín-Romero, Maria Teresa; López Cascales, José Javier

    2010-07-12

    Adsorption of methylene blue (MB) onto a dimyristoylphosphatidic acid (DMPA) Langmuir air/water monolayer is studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, UV reflection spectroscopy and surface potential measurements. The free-energy profile associated with MB transfer from water to the lipid monolayer shows two minima of -66 and -60 kJ mol(-1) for its solid and gas phase, respectively, corresponding to a spontaneous thermodynamic process. From the position of the free-energy minima, it is possible to predict the precise location of MB in the interior of the DMPA monolayer. Thus, MB is accommodated in the phosphoryl or carbonyl region of the DMPA Langmuir air/water interface, depending on the isomorphic state (solid or gas phase, respectively). Reorientation of MB, measured from the bulk solution to the interior of the lipid monolayer, passes from a random orientation in bulk solution to an orientation parallel to the surface of the lipid monolayer when MB is absorbed. PMID:20544777

  1. Methylene blue adsorption on a DMPA lipid langmuir monolayer.

    PubMed

    Giner Casares, Juan José; Camacho, Luis; Martín-Romero, Maria Teresa; López Cascales, José Javier

    2010-07-12

    Adsorption of methylene blue (MB) onto a dimyristoylphosphatidic acid (DMPA) Langmuir air/water monolayer is studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, UV reflection spectroscopy and surface potential measurements. The free-energy profile associated with MB transfer from water to the lipid monolayer shows two minima of -66 and -60 kJ mol(-1) for its solid and gas phase, respectively, corresponding to a spontaneous thermodynamic process. From the position of the free-energy minima, it is possible to predict the precise location of MB in the interior of the DMPA monolayer. Thus, MB is accommodated in the phosphoryl or carbonyl region of the DMPA Langmuir air/water interface, depending on the isomorphic state (solid or gas phase, respectively). Reorientation of MB, measured from the bulk solution to the interior of the lipid monolayer, passes from a random orientation in bulk solution to an orientation parallel to the surface of the lipid monolayer when MB is absorbed.

  2. Preparation of photocrosslinkable polystyrene methylene cinnamate nanofibers via electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Yi, Chuan; Nirmala, R; Navamathavan, R; Li, Xiang-Dan; Kim, Hak-Yong

    2011-10-01

    Nanoscaled photocrosslinkable polystyrene methylene cinnamate (PSMC) nanofibers were fabricated by electrospinning. The PSMC was prepared by the modification of polystyrene as a starting material via a two-step reaction process, chloromethylation and esterification. The chemical structure of PSMC was confirmed by 1H NMR and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The photosensitivity of the PSMC was investigated using ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopic methods. Electrospun PSMC nanofiber mat showed excellent solubility in many organic solvents. UV irradiation of the electrospun mats led to photodimerization to resist dissolving in organic solvents. The morphology of the nanofiber was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the result indicated that the average diameter of nanofibers is 350 nm and the crosslinked nanofibers were not collapsed after dipping into organic solvent showing good solvent-stability. This photocrosslinked nanofibers has the potential application in filtration, catalyst carrier and protective coating.

  3. Methylene blue mediated laser therapy of maxillary sinusitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genina, E. A.; Bashkatov, A. N.; Chikina, E. E.; Knyazev, A. B.; Mareev, O. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of the present work is a clinical study of photodynamic therapy of maxillary sinusitis. 0.1%-Methylene Blue aqueous solution in combination with He-Ne laser irradiation (632.8 nm) have been used for treatment of maxillary sinus mucous of patients with acute and chronic maxillary sinusitis. The differences between the results of the treatment with dye and light versus treatment with a drug for every group of patients were statistically analyzed by Student’s t test. The efficacy of the photodynamic therapy was estimated with the use of the following criteria: the state of respiration, olfaction, duration of purulent discharge, reconstruction of transport function of ciliary epithelium, etc. The obtained results have shown that the photodynamic therapy is effective in comparison with conservative methods of treatment of the disease.

  4. Solvent mimicry with methylene carbene to probe protein topography.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Gabriela Elena; Monti, José Luis E; Mundo, Mariana Rocío; Delfino, José María

    2015-10-01

    The solvent accessible surface area (SASA) of the polypeptide chain plays a key role in protein folding, conformational change, and interaction. This fundamental biophysical parameter is elusive in experimental measurement. Our approach to this problem relies on the reaction of the minimal photochemical reagent diazirine (DZN) with polypeptides. This reagent (i) exerts solvent mimicry because its size is comparable to water and (ii) shows scant chemical selectivity because it generates extremely reactive methylene carbene. Methylation gives rise to the EM (extent of modification) signal, which is useful for scrutinizing the conformational change triggered by Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin (CaM). The increased EM observed for the full protein is dominated by the enhanced exposure of hydrophobic area in Ca(2+)-CaM. Fragmentation allowed us to quantify the methylene incorporation at specific sites. Peptide 91-106 reveals a major reorganization around the calcium 151 binding site, resulting in local ordering and a greater exposure of the hydrophobic surface. Additionally, this technique shows a high sensitivity to probe recognition between CaM and melittin (Mel). The large decrease in EM indicates the occlusion of a significant hydrophobic area upon complexation. Protection from labeling reveals a larger involvement of the N-terminal and central regions of CaM in this interaction. Despite its smaller size, Mel's differential exposure can also be quantified. Moreover, MS/MS fragmentation realizes the goal of extending the resolution of labeled sites at the amino acid level. Overall, DZN labeling emerges as a useful footprinting method capable of shedding light on physiological conformational changes and interactions. PMID:26348271

  5. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride, FeC13, CAS Reg. No. 7705-08-0) may be prepared from iron and chlorine or from ferric oxide and hydrogen chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food...

  6. An acetone microsensor with a ring oscillator circuit fabricated using the commercial 0.18 μm CMOS process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming-Zhi; Dai, Ching-Liang; Shih, Po-Jen

    2014-07-17

    This study investigates the fabrication and characterization of an acetone microsensor with a ring oscillator circuit using the commercial 0.18 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The acetone microsensor contains a sensitive material, interdigitated electrodes and a polysilicon heater. The sensitive material is α-Fe2O3 synthesized by the hydrothermal method. The sensor requires a post-process to remove the sacrificial oxide layer between the interdigitated electrodes and to coat the α-Fe2O3 on the electrodes. When the sensitive material adsorbs acetone vapor, the sensor produces a change in capacitance. The ring oscillator circuit converts the capacitance of the sensor into the oscillation frequency output. The experimental results show that the output frequency of the acetone sensor changes from 128 to 100 MHz as the acetone concentration increases 1 to 70 ppm.

  7. Radical Scavenging by Acetone: A New Perspective to Understand Laccase/ABTS Inactivation and to Recover Redox Mediator.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Zhou, Pandeng; Wu, Xing; Sun, Jianliang; Chen, Shicheng

    2015-11-04

    The biosynthetic utilization of laccase/mediator system is problematic because the use of organic cosolvent causes significant inhibition of laccase activity. This work explored how the organic cosolvent impacts on the laccase catalytic capacity towards 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) in aqueous solution. Effects of acetone on the kinetic constants of laccase were determined and the results showed Km and Vmax varied exponentially with increasing acetone content. Acetone as well as some other cosolvents could transform ABTS radicals into its reductive form. The content of acetone in media significantly affected the radical scavenging rates. Up to 95% of the oxidized ABTS was successfully recovered in 80% (v/v) acetone in 60 min. This allows ABTS recycles at least six times with 70%-75% of active radicals recovered after each cycle. This solvent-based recovery strategy may help improve the economic feasibility of laccase/ABTS system in biosynthesis.

  8. An Acetone Microsensor with a Ring Oscillator Circuit Fabricated Using the Commercial 0.18 μm CMOS Process

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming-Zhi; Dai, Ching-Liang; Shih, Po-Jen

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the fabrication and characterization of an acetone microsensor with a ring oscillator circuit using the commercial 0.18 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The acetone microsensor contains a sensitive material, interdigitated electrodes and a polysilicon heater. The sensitive material is α-Fe2O3 synthesized by the hydrothermal method. The sensor requires a post-process to remove the sacrificial oxide layer between the interdigitated electrodes and to coat the α-Fe2O3 on the electrodes. When the sensitive material adsorbs acetone vapor, the sensor produces a change in capacitance. The ring oscillator circuit converts the capacitance of the sensor into the oscillation frequency output. The experimental results show that the output frequency of the acetone sensor changes from 128 to 100 MHz as the acetone concentration increases 1 to 70 ppm. PMID:25036331

  9. Profiling and relative quantification of phosphatidylethanolamine based on acetone stable isotope derivatization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Wei, Fang; Xu, Ji-qu; Lv, Xin; Dong, Xu-yan; Han, Xianlin; Quek, Siew-young; Huang, Feng-hong; Chen, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) is considered to be one of the pivotal lipids for normal cellular function as well as disease initiation and progression. In this study, a simple, efficient, reliable, and inexpensive method for the qualitative analysis and relative quantification of PE, based on acetone stable isotope derivatization combined with double neutral loss scan-shotgun electrospray ionization tandem-quadrupole mass spectrometry analysis (ASID-DNLS-Shotgun ESI-MS/MS), was developed. The ASID method led to alkylation of the primary amino groups of PE with an isopropyl moiety. The use of acetone (d0-acetone) and deuterium-labeled acetone (d6-acetone) introduced a 6 Da mass shift that was ideally suited for relative quantitative analysis, and enhanced sensitivity for mass analysis. The DNLS model was introduced to simultaneously analyze the differential derivatized PEs by shotgun ESI-MS/MS with high selectivity and accuracy. The reaction specificity, labeling efficiency, and linearity of the ASID method were thoroughly evaluated in this study. Its excellent applicability was validated by qualitative and relative quantitative analysis of PE species presented in liver samples from rats fed different diets. Using the ASID-DNLS-Shotgun ESI-MS/MS method, 45 PE species from rat livers have been identified and quantified in an efficient manner. The level of total PEs tended to decrease in the livers of rats on high fat diets compared with controls. The levels of PE 32:1, 34:3, 34:2, 36:3, 36:2, 42:10, plasmalogen PE 36:1 and lyso PE 22:6 were significantly reduced, while levels of PE 36:1 and lyso PE 16:0 increased.

  10. Perceived odor, irritation, and health symptoms following short-term exposure to acetone.

    PubMed

    Dalton, P; Wysocki, C J; Brody, M J; Lawley, H J

    1997-05-01

    The subjectivity of irritancy judgments can bias attempts to establish exposure guidelines that protect individuals from the sensory irritation produced by volatile chemicals. At low to moderate chemical concentrations, naive and occupationally exposed individuals often show considerable variation in the reported levels of perceived irritation. Such variation could result from differences in exposure history, differences in the perceived odor of a chemical, or differences in generalized response tendencies to report irritation, or response bias. Thus, experimental evaluation of sensory irritancy must dissociate sensory irritation from response bias. To this end, judgments of perceived irritation from 800 ppm acetone were obtained from acetone-exposed workers and age- and gender-matched naive controls. To assess the role of response bias during exposure to odorants, subjects were also exposed to phenylethyl alcohol (PEA), an odorant that does not produce sensory irritation. Following exposure, subjects completed a subjective symptom survey that included symptoms that have been associated with long-term solvent exposures and symptoms that have not. Acetone-exposed workers and naive controls reported large differences in the perceived intensity of odor and irritation from acetone, yet no differences in the perception of PEA. However, for both groups, the most significant factors mediating reported irritancy and health symptoms from acetone were the perceived intensity of its odor and an individual's bias to report irritation from PEA. The perception of odor intensity and degree of response bias will differ between and within groups of exposed and naive individuals; hence, an assessment of the influence of these factors in experimental and workplace studies of chemical irritancy is warranted. PMID:9099358

  11. BaFe12O19 powder with high magnetization prepared by acetone-aided coprecipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hsuan-Fu

    2013-09-01

    BaFe12O19 particles with high magnetization were produced using an acetone-aided coprecipitation process. An aqueous solution of iron and barium nitrates, in an Fe3+/Ba2+ molar ratio of 12, was added in a stirred precipitation liquid medium composed of H2O, CH3(CO)CH3 and NH4OH. After reacting metallic ions with ammonia, the precipitates were formed, centrifugally filtered, freeze dried and calcined. Effects of amount of the acetone in the precipitation liquid medium on the formation of crystalline BaFe12O19 were investigated. The presence of acetone in the precipitation liquid medium can greatly promote formation of the crystalline BaFe12O19 at temperature as low as 650 °C and can enhance magnetization of the derived particles. On the other hand, raising the calcination temperature can effectively accelerate development of crystallite morphology and magnetic characters of the barium hexaferrites. While the barium hexaferrite powder obtained without acetone additions and calcined at 1000 °C had magnetization (measured at 50 kOe; M(50 kOe)) of 63.5 emu/g, remanence magnetization (Mr) of 31.3 emu/g and coercivity (Hc) of 4.7 kOe, the single magnetic domain size BaFe12O19 powder with M(50 kOe) of 70.6 emu/g, Mr of 34.4 emu/g and Hc of 3.7 kOe was produced at 1000 °C, using a precipitation liquid medium of 64 vol% acetone.

  12. Worker exposure to vinyl chloride and poly(vinyl chloride).

    PubMed

    Jones, J H

    1981-10-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in early 1974 began industrial hygiene studies of vinyl chloride exposed workers. Three VC monomer plants, three VC polymerization plants, and seven PVC fabrication plants were surveyed. V polymerization plant workers and workers in one job category in VC monomer plants were exposed to average levels above 1 ppm. The highest average exposure was 22 ppm. NIOSH health hazard evaluation studies since these initial surveys have primarily shown nondetectable levels of vinyl chloride. A NIOSH control technology study in 1977 showed that exposure levels in VC polymerization plants had been drastically reduced but exposure levels above 1 ppm were still found in several cases.

  13. Methylene blue prevents retinal damage in an experimental model of ischemic proliferative retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Rey-Funes, Manuel; Larrayoz, Ignacio M; Fernández, Juan C; Contartese, Daniela S; Rolón, Federico; Inserra, Pablo I F; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo; López-Costa, Juan J; Dorfman, Verónica B; Martínez, Alfredo; Loidl, César F

    2016-06-01

    Perinatal asphyxia induces retinal lesions, generating ischemic proliferative retinopathy, which may result in blindness. Previously, we showed that the nitrergic system was involved in the physiopathology of perinatal asphyxia. Here we analyze the application of methylene blue, a well-known soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, as a therapeutic strategy to prevent retinopathy. Male rats (n = 28 per group) were treated in different ways: 1) control group comprised born-to-term animals; 2) methylene blue group comprised animals born from pregnant rats treated with methylene blue (2 mg/kg) 30 and 5 min before delivery; 3) perinatal asphyxia (PA) group comprised rats exposed to perinatal asphyxia (20 min at 37°C); and 4) methylene blue-PA group comprised animals born from pregnant rats treated with methylene blue (2 mg/kg) 30 and 5 min before delivery, and then the pups were subjected to PA as above. For molecular studies, mRNA was obtained at different times after asphyxia, and tissue was collected at 30 days for morphological and biochemical analysis. Perinatal asphyxia produced significant gliosis, angiogenesis, and thickening of the inner retina. Methylene blue treatment reduced these parameters. Perinatal asphyxia resulted in a significant elevation of the nitrergic system as shown by NO synthase (NOS) activity assays, Western blotting, and (immuno)histochemistry for the neuronal isoform of NOS and NADPH-diaphorase activity. All these parameters were also normalized by the treatment. In addition, methylene blue induced the upregulation of the anti-angiogenic peptide, pigment epithelium-derived factor. Application of methylene blue reduced morphological and biochemical parameters of retinopathy. This finding suggests the use of methylene blue as a new treatment to prevent or decrease retinal damage in the context of ischemic proliferative retinopathy. PMID:26984891

  14. Adsorption and photocatalytic oxidation of acetone on TiO{sub 2}: An in situ transmission FT-IR study

    SciTech Connect

    El-Maazawi, M.; Finken, A.N.; Nair, A.B.; Grassian, V.H.

    2000-04-01

    In situ transmission Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy has been used to study the mechanistic details of adsorption and photocatalytic oxidation of acetone on TiO{sub 2} surfaces at 298 K. The adsorption of acetone has been followed as a function of coverage on clean TiO{sub 2} surfaces (dehydrated TiO{sub 2}). Infrared spectra at low acetone coverages ({theta} < 0.05 ML) show absorption bands at 2,973, 2,931, 1,702, 1,448, and 1,363 cm{sup {minus}1} which are assigned to the vibrational modes of molecularly adsorbed acetone. At higher coverages, the infrared spectra show that adsorbed acetone can undergo an Aldol condensation reaction followed by dehydration to yield (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}C{double_bond}CHCOCH{sub 3}, 4-methyl-3-penten-2-one or, more commonly called, mesityl oxide. The ratio of surface-bound mesityl oxide to acetone depends on surface coverage. At saturation coverage, nearly 60% of the adsorbed acetone has reacted to yield mesityl oxide on the surface. In contrast, on TiO{sub 2} surfaces with preadsorbed water (hydrated TiO{sub 2}), very little mesityl oxide forms. Infrared spectroscopy was also used to monitor the photocatalytic oxidation of adsorbed acetone as a function of acetone coverage, oxygen pressure, and water adsorption. Based on the dependence of the rate of the reaction on oxygen pressure, acetone coverage, and water adsorption, it is proposed that there are potentially three mechanisms for the photooxidation of adsorbed acetone on TiO{sub 2}. In the absence of preadsorbed H{sub 2}O, one mechanism involves the formation of a reactive O{sup {minus}}(ads) species, from gas-phase O{sub 2}, which reacts with adsorbed acetone molecules. The second mechanism involves TiO{sub 2} lattice oxygen. In the presence of adsorbed H{sub 2}O, reactive hydroxyl radicals are proposed to initiate the photooxidation of acetone.

  15. l-Nebiviololinium chloride dihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Tuchalski, Gisbert; Hänsicke, Andre; Reck, Günther; Emmerling, Franziska

    2008-01-01

    The hydro­chloride salt of chiral l-nebivolol {systematic name: (+)−(R,S,S,S)-bis­[2-(6-fluoro-3,4-dihydro-2H-1-benzopyran-2-yl)-2-hydroxy­ethyl]ammonium chloride dihydrate}, C22H26F2NO4 +·Cl−·2H2O, was obtained by chiral liquid chromatography as a dihydrate. The pyran rings adopt half-chair conformations. Hydrogen bonds between the cation, anions and water mol­ecules contribute to the formation of layers parallel to the ac plane. PMID:21200930

  16. Metachromasy as an indicator of photostabilization of methylene blue adsorbed to clays and minerals.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Maya; Mor, Omer; Rytwo, Giora

    2013-04-01

    The influence of methylene blue adsorption to different clays on its photodegradation was studied. Methylene blue in solution was decomposed by sunlight in a zero-order process. Adsorption to some clay minerals (sepiolite and vermiculite) and a zeolite (clinoptilolite) accelerated the degradation process, and converted it to a first-order reaction. On the other hand, adsorption to other clay minerals (palygorskite and montmorillonite) stabilized the dye and prevented its degradation. Interestingly, in the clay-dye complexes that exhibited stability, clear metachromasy of the adsorbed methylene blue occurred, whereas the effect was not observed in the clay-dye complexes that underwent photodegradation.

  17. ON THE NATURE OF THE DYE PENETRATING THE VACUOLE OF VALONIA FROM SOLUTIONS OF METHYLENE BLUE.

    PubMed

    Irwin, M

    1927-07-20

    When uninjured cells of Valonia are placed in methylene blue dissolved in sea water it is found, after 1 to 3 hours, that at pH 5.5 practically no dye penetrates, while at pH 9.5 more enters the vacuole. As the cells become injured more dye enters at pH 5.5, as well as at pH 9.5. No dye in reduced form is found in the sap of uninjured cells exposed from 1 to 3 hours to methylene blue in sea water at both pH values. When uninjured cells are placed in azure B solution, the rate of penetration of dye into the vacuole is found to increase with the rise in the pH value of the external dye solution. The partition coefficient of the dye between chloroform and sea water is higher at pH 9.5 than at pH 5.5 with both methylene blue and azure B. The color of the dye in chloroform absorbed from methylene blue or from azure B in sea water at pH 5.5 is blue, while it is reddish purple when absorbed from methylene blue and azure B at pH 9.5. Dry salt of methylene blue and azure B dissolved in chloroform appears blue. It is shown that chiefly azure B in form of free base is absorbed by chloroform from methylene blue or azure B dissolved in sea water at pH 9.5, but possibly a mixture of methylene blue and azure B in form of salt is absorbed from methylene blue at pH 5.5, and azure B in form of salt is absorbed from azure B in sea water at pH 5.5. Spectrophotometric analysis of the dye shows the following facts. 1. The dye which is absorbed by the cell wall from methylene blue solution is found to be chiefly methylene blue. 2. The dye which has penetrated from methylene blue solution into the vacuole of uninjured cells is found to be azure B or trimethyl thionine, a small amount of which may be present in a solution of methylene blue especially at a high pH value. 3. The dye which has penetrated from methylene blue solution into the vacuole of injured cells is either methylene blue or a mixture of methylene blue and azure B. 4. The dye which is absorbed by chloroform from methylene

  18. Determination of equilibrium constants for the reaction between acetone and HO2 using infrared kinetic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Grieman, Fred J; Noell, Aaron C; Davis-Van Atta, Casey; Okumura, Mitchio; Sander, Stanley P

    2011-09-29

    The reaction between the hydroperoxy radical, HO(2), and acetone may play an important role in acetone removal and the budget of HO(x) radicals in the upper troposphere. We measured the equilibrium constants of this reaction over the temperature range of 215-272 K at an overall pressure of 100 Torr using a flow tube apparatus and laser flash photolysis to produce HO(2). The HO(2) concentration was monitored as a function of time by near-IR diode laser wavelength modulation spectroscopy. The resulting [HO(2)] decay curves in the presence of acetone are characterized by an immediate decrease in initial [HO(2)] followed by subsequent decay. These curves are interpreted as a rapid (<100 μs) equilibrium reaction between acetone and the HO(2) radical that occurs on time scales faster than the time resolution of the apparatus, followed by subsequent reactions. This separation of time scales between the initial equilibrium and ensuing reactions enabled the determination of the equilibrium constant with values ranging from 4.0 × 10(-16) to 7.7 × 10(-18) cm(3) molecule(-1) for T = 215-272 K. Thermodynamic parameters for the reaction determined from a second-law fit of our van't Hoff plot were Δ(r)H°(245) = -35.4 ± 2.0 kJ mol(-1) and Δ(r)S°(245) = -88.2 ± 8.5 J mol(-1) K(-1). Recent ab initio calculations predict that the reaction proceeds through a prereactive hydrogen-bonded molecular complex (HO(2)-acetone) with subsequent isomerization to a hydroxy-peroxy radical, 2-hydroxyisopropylperoxy (2-HIPP). The calculations differ greatly in the energetics of the complex and the peroxy radical, as well as the transition state for isomerization, leading to significant differences in their predictions of the extent of this reaction at tropospheric temperatures. The current results are consistent with equilibrium formation of the hydrogen-bonded molecular complex on a short time scale (100 μs). Formation of the hydrogen-bonded complex will have a negligible impact on the

  19. Determination of equilibrium constants for the reaction between acetone and HO2 using infrared kinetic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Grieman, Fred J; Noell, Aaron C; Davis-Van Atta, Casey; Okumura, Mitchio; Sander, Stanley P

    2011-09-29

    The reaction between the hydroperoxy radical, HO(2), and acetone may play an important role in acetone removal and the budget of HO(x) radicals in the upper troposphere. We measured the equilibrium constants of this reaction over the temperature range of 215-272 K at an overall pressure of 100 Torr using a flow tube apparatus and laser flash photolysis to produce HO(2). The HO(2) concentration was monitored as a function of time by near-IR diode laser wavelength modulation spectroscopy. The resulting [HO(2)] decay curves in the presence of acetone are characterized by an immediate decrease in initial [HO(2)] followed by subsequent decay. These curves are interpreted as a rapid (<100 μs) equilibrium reaction between acetone and the HO(2) radical that occurs on time scales faster than the time resolution of the apparatus, followed by subsequent reactions. This separation of time scales between the initial equilibrium and ensuing reactions enabled the determination of the equilibrium constant with values ranging from 4.0 × 10(-16) to 7.7 × 10(-18) cm(3) molecule(-1) for T = 215-272 K. Thermodynamic parameters for the reaction determined from a second-law fit of our van't Hoff plot were Δ(r)H°(245) = -35.4 ± 2.0 kJ mol(-1) and Δ(r)S°(245) = -88.2 ± 8.5 J mol(-1) K(-1). Recent ab initio calculations predict that the reaction proceeds through a prereactive hydrogen-bonded molecular complex (HO(2)-acetone) with subsequent isomerization to a hydroxy-peroxy radical, 2-hydroxyisopropylperoxy (2-HIPP). The calculations differ greatly in the energetics of the complex and the peroxy radical, as well as the transition state for isomerization, leading to significant differences in their predictions of the extent of this reaction at tropospheric temperatures. The current results are consistent with equilibrium formation of the hydrogen-bonded molecular complex on a short time scale (100 μs). Formation of the hydrogen-bonded complex will have a negligible impact on the

  20. Ultratrace Measurement of Acetone from Skin Using Zeolite: Toward Development of a Wearable Monitor of Fat Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuki; Hiyama, Satoshi; Toyooka, Tsuguyoshi; Takeuchi, Shoji; Itabashi, Keiji; Okubo, Tatsuya; Tabata, Hitoshi

    2015-08-01

    Analysis of gases emitted from human skin and contained in human breath has received increasing attention in recent years for noninvasive clinical diagnoses and health checkups. Acetone emitted from human skin (skin acetone) should be a good indicator of fat metabolism, which is associated with diet and exercise. However, skin acetone is an analytically challenging target because it is emitted in very low concentrations. In the present study, zeolite was investigated for concentrating skin acetone for subsequent semiconductor-based analysis. The adsorption and desorption characteristics of five zeolites with different structures and those hydrophobicities were compared. A hydrophobic zeolite with relatively large pores (approximately 1.6 times larger than the acetone molecule diameter) was the best concentrator of skin acetone among the zeolites tested. The concentrator developed using zeolite was applied in a semiconductor-based gas sensor in a simulated mobile environment where the closed space was frequently collapsed to reflect the twisting and elastic movement of skin that would be encountered in a wearable device. These results could be used to develop a wearable analyzer for skin acetone, which would be a powerful tool for preventing and alleviating lifestyle-related diseases.

  1. A two-stage combined trickle bed reactor/biofilter for treatment of styrene/acetone vapor mixtures.

    PubMed

    Vanek, Tomas; Halecky, Martin; Paca, Jan; Zapotocky, Lubos; Gelbicova, Tereza; Vadkertiova, Renata; Kozliak, Evguenii; Jones, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Performance of a two-stage biofiltration system was investigated for removal of styrene-acetone mixtures. High steady-state acetone loadings (above C(in)(Ac) = 0.5 g.m(-3) corresponding to the loadings > 34.5 g.m(-3).h(-1)) resulted in a significant inhibition of the system's performance in both acetone and styrene removal. This inhibition was shown to result from the acetone accumulation within the upstream trickle-bed bioreactor (TBR) circulating mineral medium, which was observed by direct chromatographic measurements. Placing a biofilter (BF) downstream to this TBR overcomes the inhibition as long as the biofilter has a sufficient bed height. A different kind of inhibition of styrene biodegradation was observed within the biofilter at very high acetone loadings (above C(in)(Ac) = 1.1 g.m(-3) or 76 g.m(-3).h(-1) loading). In addition to steady-state measurements, dynamic tests confirmed that the reactor overloading can be readily overcome, once the accumulated acetone in the TBR fluids is degraded. No sizable metabolite accumulation in the medium was observed for either TBR or BF. Analyses of the biodegradation activities of microbial isolates from the biofilm corroborated the trends observed for the two-stage biofiltration system, particularly the occurrence of an inhibition threshold by excess acetone.

  2. Photocatalytic degradation of gaseous acetone, toluene, and p-xylene using a TiO2 thin film.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wen J; Li, Jian; Jin, Yu Q

    2010-09-01

    A nano-structured TiO(2) thin film immobilized on glass springs was prepared by the sol-gel method, and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Acetone, toluene and p-xylene were chosen as common VOCs for a photocatalytic degradation study of both mixed and pure gases using the TiO(2) thin film. Addition of hydrogen peroxide promoted activation of the catalyst during acetone degradation. The effects of gas flow rate and UV light wavelength were investigated with the pure gases. Gas flow rate greatly influenced the degradation. The highest degradation rates were 77.7% (at 3 L/min) for acetone, 61.9% (at 3 L/min) for toluene, and 55% (at 7 L/min) for p-xylene. A UV light wavelength of 254 nm provided greater degradation of the VOCs than 365 nm UV light. The degradation rates of p-xylene and acetone in the gas mixture were lower than those of pure p-xylene and acetone. The opposite trend was observed for toluene. Acetone, both in the mixed gas and pure, had the highest degradation efficiency. Acetone, toluene and p-xylene degradation followed Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics.

  3. 40 CFR 721.6660 - Polymer of alkanepolyol and poly-alkyl-poly-iso-cyan-ato-car-bo-mo-no-cycle, acetone oxime...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-poly-iso-cyan-ato-car-bo-mo-no-cycle, acetone oxime-blocked (generic name). 721.6660 Section 721.6660... Polymer of alkanepolyol and poly-alkyl-poly-iso-cyan-ato-car-bo-mo-no-cycle, acetone oxime-blocked..., acetone oxime-blocked (PMN P-88-1658) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  4. 40 CFR 721.6660 - Polymer of alkanepolyol and poly-alkyl-poly-iso-cyan-ato-car-bo-mo-no-cycle, acetone oxime...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-poly-iso-cyan-ato-car-bo-mo-no-cycle, acetone oxime-blocked (generic name). 721.6660 Section 721.6660... Polymer of alkanepolyol and poly-alkyl-poly-iso-cyan-ato-car-bo-mo-no-cycle, acetone oxime-blocked..., acetone oxime-blocked (PMN P-88-1658) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  5. Insights on Clusters Formation Mechanism by Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry. 2. The Case of Acetone-Water Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apicella, B.; Li, X.; Passaro, M.; Russo, C.

    2016-11-01

    This paper is the second of a series dealing with clusters formation mechanism. In part 1, water clusters with the addition of an electrophilic molecule such as ethanol were studied by Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry (TOFMS). Mass distributions of molecular clusters of ethanol, water and ethanol-water mixed clusters, were obtained by means of two different ionization methods: Electron Ionization (EI) and picosecond laser Photo-Ionization (PI) at a wavelength of 355 nm. In part 2, the same experimental approach was employed to obtain mass spectra of clusters generated by acetone-water binary mixtures with a different composition. Strong dependence of the mass spectra of clusters with EI and PI on the acetone-water mixing ratio was observed. It was shown that the spectral pattern changes gradually and water-rich cluster signals become fainter while acetone-rich cluster signals become more intensive with increasing acetone concentrations from 0.3% to 40%. Owing to the hydrogen bond acceptor character of acetone, its self-association is discouraged with respect to ethanol. The autocorrelation function (AF) was used to analyze the variation of the water clusters composition with the increase of the acetone concentration in terms of fundamental periodicities. However, although acetone and ethanol present a very different hydrogen-bonding ability, similarly to ethanol-water system, in acetone-water system the formation of water-rich clusters and subsequent metastable fragmentation are the dominant process that determine the clusters distribution, irrespective of the ionization process, while the ionization process significantly affects the acetone-rich clusters distribution.

  6. Photooxidation of Acetone on TiO2(110): Conversion to Acetate via Methyl Radical Ejection

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael A.

    2005-06-23

    It is generally held that radicals form and participate in heterogeneous photocatalytic processes on oxide surfaces, although understanding the mechanistic origins and fates of such species is difficult. In this study, photodesorption and thermal desorption techniques show that acetone is converted into acetate on the surface of TiO(110) in a two step process that involves, first, a thermal reaction between acetone and coadsorbed oxygen to make a surface acetone-oxygen complex, followed second by a photochemical reaction that ejects a methyl radical from the surface and converts the acetone-oxygen complex into acetate. Designation of the photodesorption species to methyl radicals was confirmed using isotopically labeled acetone. The yield of photodesorbed methyl radicals correlates well with the amount depleted of acetone and with the yield of acetate left on the surface, both gauged using post-irradiation temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The thermal reaction between adsorbed acetone and oxygen to form the acetone-oxygen complex exhibits an approximate activation barrier of about 10 kJ/mol. A prerequisite to this reaction is the presence of surface Ti?? sites that enable O? adsorption. Creation of these sites by vacuum reduction of the surface prior to acetone and oxygen co-adsorption results in an initial spike in the photodecomposition rate, but replenishment of these sites by photolytic means (i.e., by trapping excited electrons at the surface) appears to be a slow step a sustained reaction. Evidence in this study for the ejection of organic radicals from the surface during photo-oxidation catalysis on TiO provides support for mechanistic pathways that involve both adsorbed and non-adsorbed species.

  7. Insights on Clusters Formation Mechanism by Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry. 2. The Case of Acetone-Water Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apicella, B.; Li, X.; Passaro, M.; Russo, C.

    2016-08-01

    This paper is the second of a series dealing with clusters formation mechanism. In part 1, water clusters with the addition of an electrophilic molecule such as ethanol were studied by Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry (TOFMS). Mass distributions of molecular clusters of ethanol, water and ethanol-water mixed clusters, were obtained by means of two different ionization methods: Electron Ionization (EI) and picosecond laser Photo-Ionization (PI) at a wavelength of 355 nm. In part 2, the same experimental approach was employed to obtain mass spectra of clusters generated by acetone-water binary mixtures with a different composition. Strong dependence of the mass spectra of clusters with EI and PI on the acetone-water mixing ratio was observed. It was shown that the spectral pattern changes gradually and water-rich cluster signals become fainter while acetone-rich cluster signals become more intensive with increasing acetone concentrations from 0.3% to 40%. Owing to the hydrogen bond acceptor character of acetone, its self-association is discouraged with respect to ethanol. The autocorrelation function (AF) was used to analyze the variation of the water clusters composition with the increase of the acetone concentration in terms of fundamental periodicities. However, although acetone and ethanol present a very different hydrogen-bonding ability, similarly to ethanol-water system, in acetone-water system the formation of water-rich clusters and subsequent metastable fragmentation are the dominant process that determine the clusters distribution, irrespective of the ionization process, while the ionization process significantly affects the acetone-rich clusters distribution.

  8. Morphology and structure of microcapsules prepared by interfacial polycondensation of methylene bis(phenyl isocyanate) with hexamethylene diamine.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, E

    2001-01-01

    Polyurea microcapsules containing 2- chloro-N-(2,6-diethylphenyl)-N-(methoxymethyl) acetamide as the active agent were prepared by the method of interfacial polycondensation with methylene bis(phenyl isocyanate) the multifunctional isocyanatae, hexamethylene diamine as the diamine, and anionic (SLS) as the emulsifying sodium lignin liinin the agent. The internal structure and morphology of the microcapsules were examined with transmission electron microscopy. The microcapsules had a micro-reservoir structure in which the wall extended well into the core and the active agent was accomodated by the micro-reservoirs, distributed uniformly throughout the entire volume of a microcapsule. Based on the observed morphology, permeability of the water soluble monomer in the polyurea film and its solubility in the oil phase have a significant effect on the morphology and microstructure of the microcapsules. The multivalent salt, calcium chloride, plays a significant role in stabilizing the microcapsule structure, by interacting with the anionic surfactant SLS, and physically crosslinks the SLS chains, by interacting with the negatively charged carboxylic and phenolic groups, with subsequent phase separation of the physically crosslinked chains to form a concentrated gel phase. This gel phase encompasses the microcapsule, increases the stability, and modifies its release behaviour.

  9. Calculated Third Order Rate Constants for Interpreting the Mechanisms of Hydrolyses of Chloroformates, Carboxylic Acid Halides, Sulfonyl Chlorides and Phosphorochloridates

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, T. William

    2015-01-01

    Hydrolyses of acid derivatives (e.g., carboxylic acid chlorides and fluorides, fluoro- and chloroformates, sulfonyl chlorides, phosphorochloridates, anhydrides) exhibit pseudo-first order kinetics. Reaction mechanisms vary from those involving a cationic intermediate (SN1) to concerted SN2 processes, and further to third order reactions, in which one solvent molecule acts as the attacking nucleophile and a second molecule acts as a general base catalyst. A unified framework is discussed, in which there are two reaction channels—an SN1-SN2 spectrum and an SN2-SN3 spectrum. Third order rate constants (k3) are calculated for solvolytic reactions in a wide range of compositions of acetone-water mixtures, and are shown to be either approximately constant or correlated with the Grunwald-Winstein Y parameter. These data and kinetic solvent isotope effects, provide the experimental evidence for the SN2-SN3 spectrum (e.g., for chloro- and fluoroformates, chloroacetyl chloride, p-nitrobenzoyl p-toluenesulfonate, sulfonyl chlorides). Deviations from linearity lead to U- or V-shaped plots, which assist in the identification of the point at which the reaction channel changes from SN2-SN3 to SN1-SN2 (e.g., for benzoyl chloride). PMID:26006228

  10. Phenoxyethanol absorption by polyvinyl chloride.

    PubMed

    Lee, M G

    1984-12-01

    Phenoxyethanol was found to be absorbed by polyvinyl chloride administration sets during continuous irrigation therapy. Depending upon the conditions of administration up to 20% loss of potency could occur. Absorption of the drug by the rigid plastic luer-lock fitting of the set caused softening and decreased rigidity of the plastic.

  11. Hydrothermal Synthesis of ZnO Structures Formed by High-Aspect-Ratio Nanowires for Acetone Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhen; Wang, Yong; Li, Zhanguo; Yu, Naisen

    2016-07-01

    Snowflake-like ZnO structures originating from self-assembled nanowires were prepared by a low-temperature aqueous solution method. The as-grown hierarchical ZnO structures were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The results showed that the snowflake-like ZnO structures were composed of high-aspect-ratio nanowires. Furthermore, gas-sensing properties to various testing gases of 10 and 50 ppm were measured, which confirms that the ZnO structures were of good selectivity and response to acetone and could serve for acetone sensor to detect low-concentration acetone.

  12. Technical and economic assessment of processes for the production of butanol and acetone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This report represents a preliminary technical and economic evaluation of a process which produces mixed solvents (butaol/acetone/ethanol) via fermentation of sugars derived from renewable biomass resources. The objective is to assess the technology of producing butanol/acetone from biomass, and select a viable process capable of serving as a base case model for technical and economic analysis. It is anticipated that the base case process developed herein can then be used as the basis for subsequent studies concerning biomass conversion processes capable of producing a wide range of chemicals. The general criteria utilized in determining the design basis for the process are profit potential and non-renewable energy displacement potential. The feedstock chosen, aspen wood, was selected from a number of potential renewable biomass resources as the most readily available in the United States and for its relatively large potential for producing reducing sugars.

  13. DSC and curing kinetics study of epoxy grouting diluted with furfural -acetone slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, H.; Sun, D. W.; Li, B.; Liu, Y. T.; Ran, Q. P.; Liu, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    The use of furfural-acetone slurry as active diluents of Bisphenol-A epoxy resin (DGEBA) groutings has been studied by dynamic and non-isothermal DSC for the first time. Curing kinetics study was investigated by non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetries at different heating rates. Activation enery (Ea) was calculated based on Kissinger and Ozawa Methods, and the results showed that Ea increased from 58.87 to 71.13KJ/mol after the diluents were added. The furfural-acetone epoxy matrix could cure completely at the theoretical curing temperature of 365.8K and the curing time of 139mins, which were determined by the kinetic model parameters.

  14. Investigations on the structure of DMSO and acetone in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    McLain, Sylvia E; Soper, Alan K

    2007-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and acetone have been investigated using neutron diffraction augmented with isotopic substitution and empirical potential structure refinement computer simulations. Each solute has been measured at two concentrations-1:20 and 1:2 solute:water mole ratios. At both concentrations for each solute, the tetrahedral hydrogen bonding network of water is largely unperturbed, though the total water molecule coordination number is reduced in the higher 1:2 concentrations. With higher concentrations of acetone, water tends to segregate into clusters, while in higher concentrations of DMSO the present study reconfirms that the structure of the liquid is dominated by DMSO-water interactions. This result may have implications for the highly nonideal behavior observed in the thermodynamic functions for 1:2 DMSO-water solutions.

  15. Graphene oxide foams and their excellent adsorption ability for acetone gas

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yongqiang; Zhang, Nana; Wu, Fei; Xu, Fangqiang; Liu, Yu; Gao, Jianping

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • GO and RGO foams were prepared using a simple and green method, unidirectional freeze-drying. • The porous structure of the foams can be adjusted by changing GO concentrations. • GO and RGO foams show good adsorption efficiency for acetone gas. - Abstract: Graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) foams were prepared using a unidirectional freeze-drying method. These porous carbon materials were characterized by thermal gravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The adsorption behavior of the two kinds of foams for acetone was studied. The result showed that the saturated adsorption efficiency of the GO foams was over 100%, and was higher than that of RGO foams and other carbon materials.

  16. Roles of Acetone and Diacetone Alcohol in Coordination and Dissociation Reactions of Uranyl Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, Daniel; Schoendorff, George E.; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.; Gibson, John K.; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2012-12-03

    Combined collision-induced dissociation mass-spectrometry experiments and DFT calculations were employed to elucidate the molecular structure of "hypercoordinated" species and the energetics of water-elimination reactions of uranyl acetone complexes observed in earlier work (Rios, D.; Rutkowski, P. X.; Van Stipdonk, M. J.; Gibson, J. K. Inorg. Chem. 2011, 50, 4781). It is shown that the "hypercoordinated" species contain diacetone alcohol ligands bonded in either bidentate or monodentate fashion, which are indistinguishable from (acetone)2 in mass spectrometry. Calculations confirm that four diacetone ligands can form stable complexes, but that the effective number of atoms coordinating with uranium in the equatorial plane does not exceed five. Diacetone alcohol ligands are shown to form mesityl oxide ligands and alkoxide species through the elimination of water, providing an explanation for the observed water-elimination reactions.

  17. Proton transfer reactions between nitric acid and acetone, hydroxyacetone, acetaldehyde and benzaldehyde in the solid phase.

    PubMed

    Lasne, Jérôme; Laffon, Carine; Parent, Philippe

    2012-12-01

    The heterogeneous and homogeneous reactions of acetone, hydroxyacetone, acetaldehyde and benzaldehyde with solid nitric acid (HNO(3)) films have been studied with Reflection-Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy (RAIRS) under Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV) conditions in the 90-170 K temperature range. In the bulk or at the surface of the films, nitric acid transfers its proton to the carbonyl function of the organic molecules, producing protonated acetone-H(+), hydroxyacetone-H(+), acetaldehyde-H(+) and benzaldehyde-H(+), and nitrate anions NO(3)(-), a reaction not observed when nitric acid is previously hydrated [J. Lasne, C. Laffon and Ph. Parent, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012, 14, 697]. This provides a molecular-scale description of the carbonyl protonation reaction in an acid medium, the first step of the acid-catalyzed condensation of carbonyl compounds, fuelling the growth of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere.

  18. Mechanism for the uncatalyzed cyclic acetone-peroxide formation reaction: an experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Fuentes, Eduardo A; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C; Hidalgo-Santiago, Migdalia; Moreno, Martha; Vivas-Reyes, Ricardo; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P

    2013-10-17

    In this study, a mechanism for the uncatalyzed reaction between acetone and hydrogen peroxide is postulated. The reaction leads to the formation of the important homemade explosives collectively known as cyclic acetone peroxides (CAP). The proposed mechanistic scheme is based on Raman, GC-MS, and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, and it is supported by ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The results demonstrate that the proposed mechanism for the uncatalyzed formation reaction of CAP occurs in three steps: monomer formation, polymerization of the 2-hydroperoxipropan-2-ol monomer, and cyclization. The temporal decay of the intensities of important assigned-bands is in excellent agreement with the proposed mechanism. Previous reports also confirm that the polymerization step is favored in comparison to other possible pathways.

  19. Biofiltration of a mixture of ethylene, ammonia, n-butanol, and acetone gases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hun; Li, Congna; Heber, Albert J; Ni, Jiqin; Huang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    This study describes cleaning of a waste gas stream using bench scale biofilters (BFs) or biotrickling filters (BTFs). The gas stream contained a mixture of acetone, n-butanol, methane, ethylene, and ammonia, and was diverted uniformly to six biofilters and four biotrickling filters. The biofilters were packed with either perlite (BF-P), polyurethane foam (BF-F), or a mixture of compost, wood chips, and straw (BF-C), whereas the biotrickling filters contained either perlite (BTF-P) or polyurethane foam (BTF-F). Experimental results showed that both BFs and BTFs packed with various media were able to achieve complete removal of highly soluble compounds such as acetone, n-butanol, and ammonia of which the dimensionless Henry's constants (H) are less than 0.01. Methane was not removed due to its extreme insolubility (H>30). However, the ethylene (H ≈ 9) removal efficiencies depended on trickle water flow rates, media surface areas, and ammonia gas levels.

  20. Amended safety assessment of formaldehyde and methylene glycol as used in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Ivan J; Heldreth, Bart; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2013-01-01

    Formaldehyde and methylene glycol may be used safely in cosmetics if established limits are not exceeded and are safe for use in nail hardeners in the present practices of use and concentration, which include instructions to avoid skin contact. In hair-smoothing products, however, in the present practices of use and concentration, formaldehyde and methylene glycol are unsafe. Methylene glycol is continuously converted to formaldehyde, and vice versa, even at equilibrium, which can be easily shifted by heating, drying, and other conditions to increase the amount of formaldehyde. This rapid, reversible formaldehyde/methylene glycol equilibrium is distinguished from the slow, irreversible release of formaldehyde resulting from the so-called formaldehyde releaser preservatives, which are not addressed in this safety assessment (formaldehyde releasers may continue to be safely used in cosmetics at the levels established in their individual Cosmetic Ingredient Review safety assessments). PMID:24335968

  1. Quantum dot/methylene blue FRET mediated NIR fluorescent nanomicelles with large Stokes shift for bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Liu, Jianbo; Yang, Xiaohai; Peng, Zhihong; Liu, Wei; Xu, Jianguo; Tang, Jinlu; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin

    2015-10-01

    Here we present a novel large Stokes shifting NIR fluorescent nanomicelle through the encapsulation of a quantum dot/methylene blue FRET pair, which is employed as an excellent contrast reagent for NIR fluorescence bioimaging. PMID:26267557

  2. Safety of methylene blue dye for lymphatic mapping in patients taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shah-Khan, Miraj G; Lovely, Jenna; Degnim, Amy C

    2012-11-01

    Methylene blue dye has an important role in lymphatic mapping for sentinel lymph node surgery. A recent safety announcement from the US Food and Drug Administration warned physicians about possible serious central nervous system reactions in patients on serotonergic medications who received intravenous methylene blue for the identification of parathyroid glands. This report summarizes evidence from the Food and Drug Administration's announcement and methylene blue pharmacokinetics. The authors conclude that the use of methylene blue dye at low doses for lymphatic mapping likely carries very little risk for serotonin neurotoxicity, although breast surgeons should be aware of this potential complication in the event of mental status or neuromuscular changes in patients after lymphatic mapping.

  3. Removal of methylene blue from wastewater using fly ash as an adsorbent by hydrocyclone.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, K; Sahu, J N; Meikap, B C; Biswas, M N

    2008-10-30

    The excessive release of color into the environment is a major concern worldwide. Adsorption process is among the most effective techniques for color removal from wastewater and fly ash has been widely used as an adsorbent. Therefore, this study was carried out to understand the adsorption behavior of methylene blue from aqueous systems onto fly ash using the continuous mode. Continuous mode sorption experiments were carried out to remove methylene blue from its aqueous solutions in hydrocyclone equipment. The experiments were performed at constant temperature and dimensions of hydrocyclone with variation of flows through the equipment, concentrations of methylene blue solutions and fly ash concentration, respectively. A maximum removal of 58.24% was observed at adsorbent dosage of 900 mg/l at pH 6.75 for an initial methylene blue concentration of 65 mg/l.

  4. Fast and considerable adsorption of methylene blue dye onto graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjie; Zhou, Chunjiao; Zhou, Weichang; Lei, Aihua; Zhang, Qinglin; Wan, Qiang; Zou, Bingsuo

    2011-07-01

    The quite efficient adsorption of methylene blue dye from an aqueous solution by graphene oxide was studied. The favorable electrostatic attraction is the main interaction between methylene blue and graphene oxide. As graphene oxide has the special nanostructural properties and negatively charged surface, the positively charged methylene blue molecules can be easily adsorbed on it. In the aqueous solution of methylene blue at 293 K, the adsorption data could be fitted by the Langmuir equation with a maximum adsorption amount of 1.939 mg/mg and a Langmuir adsorption equilibrium constant of 18.486 mL/mg. The adsorption amount increased with the increase of the solution pH (3-11), was not affected significantly by KCl under the examined condition and the adsorption process was exothermic in nature. The fast and considerable adsorption of graphene oxide could be regarded as a potential adsorbent for cationic dye removal in wastewater treatment process.

  5. Adsorption of methylene blue onto bamboo-based activated carbon: kinetics and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Hameed, B H; Din, A T M; Ahmad, A L

    2007-03-22

    Bamboo, an abundant and inexpensive natural resource in Malaysia was used to prepare activated carbon by physiochemical activation with potassium hydroxide (KOH) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) as the activating agents at 850 degrees C for 2h. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of methylene blue dye on such carbon were then examined at 30 degrees C. Adsorption isotherm of the methylene blue (MB) on the activated carbon was determined and correlated with common isotherm equations. The equilibrium data for methylene blue adsorption well fitted to the Langmuir equation, with maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 454.2mg/g. Two simplified kinetic models including pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order equation were selected to follow the adsorption processes. The adsorption of methylene blue could be best described by the pseudo-second-order equation. The kinetic parameters of this best-fit model were calculated and discussed.

  6. Formaldehyde and methylene glycol equivalence: critical assessment of chemical and toxicological aspects.

    PubMed

    Golden, R; Valentini, M

    2014-07-01

    Due largely to the controversy concerning the potential human health effects from exposure to formaldehyde gas in conjunction with the misunderstanding of the well-established equilibrium relationship with its hydrated reaction product, methylene glycol, the concept of chemical equivalence between these two distinctly different chemicals has been adopted by regulatory authorities. Chemical equivalence implies not only that any concentration of methylene glycol under some condition of use would be nearly or completely converted into formaldehyde gas, but also that these two substances would be toxicologically equivalent as well. A relatively simple worst case experiment using 37% formalin (i.e., concentrated methylene glycol) dispels the concept of chemical equivalence and a review of relevant literature demonstrates that methylene glycol has no inherent toxicity apart from whatever concentration of formaldehyde that might be present in equilibrium with such solutions.

  7. Reaction pathway of methylenation of carbonyl compounds with bis(iodozincio)methane.

    PubMed

    Sada, Mutsumi; Komagawa, Shinsuke; Uchiyama, Masanobu; Kobata, Masami; Mizuno, Tsuyoshi; Utimoto, Kiitiro; Oshima, Koichiro; Matsubara, Seijiro

    2010-12-15

    About 40 years have passed since methylene dizinc reagent was discovered as a substitute for Wittig reagent. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to understand the reaction pathways of methylenation of carbonyl compounds with bis(iodozincio)methane. The present computational/theoretical study concluded that the methylenation reaction with gem-dizinc reagent proceeds as a two-step reaction, that is, methylene addition (RDS) and olefination. In the first step, the nucleophilic attack of the CH2 group enhanced by two Zn proceeds under the assistance of the electrophilic activation of the carbonyl group with the Zn atom. In the second step, the olefination is facilitated by both Zn atoms of the gem-dizinc reagent without an electron transfer process. PMID:21082850

  8. Uptake of acetone, ethanol and benzene to snow and ice: effects of surface area and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbatt, J. P. D.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Ullerstam, M.; Ye, T. J.

    2008-10-01

    The interactions of gas-phase acetone, ethanol and benzene with smooth ice films and artificial snow have been studied. In one technique, the snow is packed into a cylindrical column and inserted into a low-pressure flow reactor coupled to a chemical-ionization mass spectrometer for gas-phase analysis. At 214 and 228 K, it is found for acetone and ethanol that the adsorbed amounts per surface area match those for adsorption to thin films of ice formed by freezing liquid water, when the specific surface area of the snow (as determined from Kr adsorption at 77 K) and the geometric surface area of the ice films are used. This indicates that freezing thin films of water leads to surfaces that are smooth at the molecular level. Experiments performed to test the effect of film growth on ethanol uptake indicate that uptake is independent of ice growth rate, up to 2.4 µm min-1. In addition, traditional Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) experiments were performed with these gases on artificial snow from 238 to 266.5 K. A transition from a BET type I isotherm indicative of monolayer formation to a BET type II isotherm indicative of multilayer uptake is observed for acetone at T>=263 K and ethanol at T>=255 K, arising from solution formation on the ice. When multilayer formation does not occur, as was the case for benzene at T<=263 K and for acetone at T<=255 K, the saturated surface coverage increased with increasing temperature, consistent with the quasi-liquid layer affecting adsorption prior to full dissolution/multilayer formation.

  9. Excess protons in water-acetone mixtures. II. A conductivity study.

    PubMed

    Semino, Rocío; Longinotti, M Paula

    2013-10-28

    In the present work we complement a previous simulation study [R. Semino and D. Laria, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 194503 (2012)] on the disruption of the proton transfer mechanism in water by the addition of an aprotic solvent, such as acetone. We provide experimental measurements of the mobility of protons in aqueous-acetone mixtures in a wide composition range, for water molar fractions, xw, between 0.05 and 1.00. Furthermore, new molecular dynamics simulation results are presented for rich acetone mixtures, which provide further insight into the proton transport mechanism in water-non-protic solvent mixtures. The proton mobility was analyzed between xw 0.05 and 1.00 and compared to molecular dynamics simulation data. Results show two qualitative changes in the proton transport composition dependence at xw ∼ 0.25 and 0.8. At xw < 0.25 the ratio of the infinite dilution molar conductivities of HCl and LiCl, Λ(0)(HCl).Λ(0)(LiCl)(-1), is approximately constant and equal to one, since the proton diffusion is vehicular and equal to that of Li(+). At xw ∼ 0.25, proton mobility starts to differ from that of Li(+) indicating that above this concentration the Grotthuss transport mechanism starts to be possible. Molecular dynamics simulation results showed that at this threshold concentration the probability of interconversion between two Eigen structures starts to be non-negligible. At xw ∼ 0.8, the infinite molar conductivity of HCl concentration dependence qualitatively changes. This result is in excellent agreement with the analysis presented in the previous simulation work and it has been ascribed to the interchange of water and acetone molecules in the second solvation shell of the hydronium ion.

  10. Excess protons in water-acetone mixtures. II. A conductivity study.

    PubMed

    Semino, Rocío; Longinotti, M Paula

    2013-10-28

    In the present work we complement a previous simulation study [R. Semino and D. Laria, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 194503 (2012)] on the disruption of the proton transfer mechanism in water by the addition of an aprotic solvent, such as acetone. We provide experimental measurements of the mobility of protons in aqueous-acetone mixtures in a wide composition range, for water molar fractions, xw, between 0.05 and 1.00. Furthermore, new molecular dynamics simulation results are presented for rich acetone mixtures, which provide further insight into the proton transport mechanism in water-non-protic solvent mixtures. The proton mobility was analyzed between xw 0.05 and 1.00 and compared to molecular dynamics simulation data. Results show two qualitative changes in the proton transport composition dependence at xw ∼ 0.25 and 0.8. At xw < 0.25 the ratio of the infinite dilution molar conductivities of HCl and LiCl, Λ(0)(HCl).Λ(0)(LiCl)(-1), is approximately constant and equal to one, since the proton diffusion is vehicular and equal to that of Li(+). At xw ∼ 0.25, proton mobility starts to differ from that of Li(+) indicating that above this concentration the Grotthuss transport mechanism starts to be possible. Molecular dynamics simulation results showed that at this threshold concentration the probability of interconversion between two Eigen structures starts to be non-negligible. At xw ∼ 0.8, the infinite molar conductivity of HCl concentration dependence qualitatively changes. This result is in excellent agreement with the analysis presented in the previous simulation work and it has been ascribed to the interchange of water and acetone molecules in the second solvation shell of the hydronium ion. PMID:24182052

  11. Surface tension isotherms of the dioxane-acetone-water and glycerol-ethanol-water ternary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhambulatov, R. S.; Dadashev, R. Kh.; Elimkhanov, D. Z.; Dadashev, I. N.

    2016-10-01

    The results of the experimental and theoretical studies of the concentration dependence of surface tension of aqueous solutions of the 1,4-dioxane-acetone-water and glycerol-ethanol-water ternary systems were given. The studies were performed by the hanging-drop method on a DSA100 tensiometer. The maximum error of surface tension was 1%. The theoretical models for calculating the surface tension of the ternary systems of organic solutions were analyzed.

  12. Acetone variability in the upper troposphere: analysis of CARIBIC observations and LMDz-INCA chemistry-climate model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, T.; Szopa, S.; Zahn, A.; Schuck, T.; Brenninkmeijer, C.; Sprung, D.; Slemr, F.

    2011-03-01

    This paper investigates the acetone variability in the upper troposphere (UT) as sampled during the CARIBIC airborne experiment and simulated by the LMDz-INCA global chemistry climate model. The aim is to (1) describe spatial distribution and temporal variability of acetone; (2) define observation-based constraints to improve tropospheric modelling of the acetone; and (3) investigate the representativeness of the observational data set. According to the model results, South Asia (including part of the Indian Ocean, all India, China, and Indochinese peninsula) and Europe are net source regions of acetone, where near 25% of North Hemispheric (NH) primary emissions and 40% of the NH chemical production of acetone take place. The impact of these net source regions on continental upper tropospheric acetone is studied by analysing CARIBIC observations of 2006 and 2007 when most flight routes stretch between Frankfurt, Germany, and Manila, Philippines, and by focussing over 3 sub-regions where acetone variability is strong: Europe-Mediterranean, Central South China and South China Sea. Acetone volume mixing ratio (vmr) in UT varies with the season, increasing from winter to summer by a factor 2 to 4. Spatial variability is also important, as acetone vmr may vary in summer by more than 1000 pptv within only 5 latitude-longitude degrees, and standard deviation on measurements acquired during a short flight sequence over a sub-region may reach 40%. 200 pptv difference may also be observed between successive inbound and outbound flights over the same sub-region, due to different flight specifications (trajectory in relation to plume, time for insulation). A satisfactory agreement for the abundance of acetone is found between model results and observations, with e.g. only 30% over-estimation of the annual average over Central-South China and the South China Sea (between 450 and 600 pptv), and an under-estimation by less than 20% over Europe Mediterranean (around 800 pptv

  13. Photoacoustic lifetime imaging of dissolved oxygen using methylene blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkenazi, Shai

    2010-07-01

    Measuring distribution of dissolved oxygen in biological tissue is of prime interest for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy optimization. Tumor hypoxia indicates poor prognosis and resistance to radiotherapy. Despite its major clinical significance, no current imaging modality provides direct imaging of tissue oxygen. We present preliminary results demonstrating the potential of photoacoustic lifetime imaging (PALI) for noninvasive, 3-D imaging of tissue oxygen. The technique is based on photoacoustic probing of the excited state lifetime of methylene blue (MB) dye. MB is an FDA-approved water soluble dye with a peak absorption at 660 nm. A double pulse laser system (pump probe) is used to excite the dye and probe its transient absorption by detecting photoacoustic emission. The relaxation rate of MB depends linearly on oxygen concentration. Our measurements show high photoacoustic signal contrast at a probe wavelength of 810 nm, where the excited state absorption is more than four times higher than the ground state absorption. Imaging of a simple phantom is demonstrated. We conclude by discussing possible implementations of the technique in clinical settings and combining it with photodynamic therapy (PDT) for real-time therapy monitoring.

  14. Adsorption of methylene blue onto sonicated sepiolite from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Küncek, Ilknur; Sener, Savaş

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to enhance the methylene blue (MB) adsorption of sepiolite by ultrasonic treatment. The natural sepiolite was pretreated by sonication to improve the surface characteristics and enhance the dye uptake capacity. Sonication process resulted in a significant increase in the specific surface area (SSA) of sepiolite. The FTIR spectrum of the sonicated sepiolite indicates that the tetrahedral sheet is probably distorted after sonication process. The effect of various parameters such as sonication, pH, initial dye concentration and temperature on dye adsorption has been investigated. The adsorbed amount of MB on sepiolite increased after sonication as well as with increasing pH and temperature. The experimental data were evaluated by applying the pseudo-first- and second-order, and the intraparticle diffusion adsorption kinetic models. Adsorption process of MB onto sepiolite followed the pseudo-second-order rate expression. The experimental data were analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, and found that the isotherm data were reasonably well correlated by Langmuir isotherm. Maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of sepiolite for MB increased from 79.37 to 128.21 mg/g after the sonication. Various thermodynamic parameters, such as Delta G(0), Delta H(0) and DeltaS(0) were calculated. The thermodynamics of MB/sepiolite system indicated spontaneous and endothermic nature of the process. Adsorption measurements showed that the process was very fast and physical in nature.

  15. Removal of methylene blue by lava adsorption and catalysis oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianfeng; Zhang, Jinbao; Li, Dinglong

    2010-03-01

    Adsorption has been found to be effective for the removal of dyes from effluent; however, the contaminant will cause secondary pollution if it is not properly treated. In this paper, the ability of lava as a low-cost adsorbent and catalyst for the removal of a commercial dye, Methylene Blue (MB), from aqueous solution has been investigated under various experimental conditions. It was found that lava had a high efficiency (more than 98%) for MB removal by adsorption. The adsorption equilibrium data can be fitted well by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. The adsorption kinetics was shown to be pseudo-second-order. After adsorption the contaminant could be catalysis oxidized by lava with the aids of H2O2 and ultrasound. The result showed that 95% of the MB could be decomposed in 100 min with the aid of ultrasound at 85 W/cm2. Overall, this study demonstrates lava as a promising material for wastewater treatment to remove and decompose dyes in a single treatment step.

  16. Degradation of Methylene Blue Using Biologically Synthesized Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Vanaja, M.; Paulkumar, K.; Baburaja, M.; Rajeshkumar, S.; Gnanajobitha, G.; Malarkodi, C.; Sivakavinesan, M.; Annadurai, G.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays plant mediated synthesis of nanoparticles has great interest and achievement due to its eco-benign and low time consuming properties. In this study silver nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by using Morinda tinctoria leaf extract under different pH. The aqueous leaf extract was added to silver nitrate solution; the color of the reaction medium was changed from pale yellow to brown and that indicates reduction of silver ions to silver nanoparticles. Thus synthesized silver nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Vis spectrophotometer. Dispersity and morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM); crystalline nature and purity of synthesized silver nanoparticles were revealed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). FTIR spectrum was examined to identify the effective functional molecules responsible for the reduction and stabilization of silver nanoparticles synthesized by leaf extract. The photocatalytic activity of the synthesized silver nanoparticles was examined by degradation of methylene blue under sunlight irradiation. Green synthesized silver nanoparticles were effectively degrading the dye nearly 95% at 72 h of exposure time. PMID:24772055

  17. [Adsorption of methylene blue onto vanadium-doped magnetite].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yuan-Hong; Liang, Xiao-Liang; Zhu, Jian-Xi; He, Hong-Ping; Yuan, Peng

    2010-06-01

    A series of vanadium-doped magnetite (Fe3-x VxO4, x < 0.4) synthesized by an oxidation-precipitation method, were characterized using chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), as well as thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) analyses. The obtained results show that the synthetic Fe3-x VxO4 has spinel structure while vanadium mostly replaces Fe3+ in the octahedral sites. The synthetic Fe3-x VxO4 is magnetic material, with crystal size ranging from 28 to 35 nm. The substitution of vanadium in the magnetite structure increases the amount of surface hydroxyls. The experimental adsorption results indicate that, in neutral pH condition, the maximum adsorption capacities of Fe3-x VxO4 increase obviously with the increase of vanadium concentration in magnetite while the adsorption isotherm complies well with the Langmuir model. The adsorption of methylene blue (MB) on Fe3-x VxO4 can get equilibrium in the first 25 min, supporting a pseudo-second order equation. Moreover, the rise of the solution pH value results in an increase of the adsorption capability of MB on Fe3-x VxO4.

  18. A Novel Use of Methylene Blue in the Pediatric ICU.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, Chrystal; Brown, Brian; Benner, Kimberley; Prabhakaran, Priya; Hayes, Leslie

    2015-10-01

    Methylene blue (MB) is a medication commonly used to treat methemoglobinemia, reducing methemoglobin to hemoglobin. A novel use of MB, as detailed here, is in the treatment of refractory hypotension. A number of reports have detailed use of MB for this purpose in adults, but few data in pediatrics. A 22-month-old girl with Noonan syndrome, biventricular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and chronic positive pressure ventilation developed shock with tachycardia, hypotension, and fever after 3 days of diarrhea. She was critically ill, with warm extremities, bounding pulses, and brisk capillary refill. Laboratory tests revealed metabolic acidosis, low mixed venous oxygen saturation, and leukocytosis with bandemia. Treatment of severe septic shock was initiated with fluid resuscitation, inotropic support, sedation, and paralysis. She remained hypotensive despite norepinephrine at 0.7 μg/kg per minute, dopamine at 20 μg/kg per minute, and vasopressin at 0.04 U/kg per hour. Her vasoplegic shock worsened, despite aggressive conventional therapy. Intravenous MB was initiated, with a loading dose of 1 mg/kg followed by a continuous infusion at 0.25 mg/kg per hour. Upon initiation of MB, her systolic blood pressure increased by 33 points (40% increase), and diastolic blood pressure increased by 20 points (46% increase). She was able to wean off all inotropes quickly after initiation of MB. MB should be considered in the setting of refractory vasoplegic shock in the PICU. PMID:26347436

  19. Method for the abatement of hydrogen chloride

    DOEpatents

    Winston, S.J.; Thomas, T.R.

    1975-11-14

    A method is described for reducing the amount of hydrogen chloride contained in a gas stream by reacting the hydrogen chloride with ammonia in the gas phase so as to produce ammonium chloride. The combined gas stream is passed into a condensation and collection vessel, and a cyclonic flow is created in the combined gas stream as it passes through the vessel. The temperature of the gas stream is reduced in the vessel to below the condensation temperature of ammonium chloride in order to crystallize the ammonium chloride on the walls of the vessel. The cyclonic flow creates a turbulence which breaks off the larger particles of ammonium chloride which are, in turn, driven to the bottom of the vessel where the solid ammonium chloride can be removed from the vessel. The gas stream exiting from the condensation and collection vessel is further cleaned and additional ammonium chloride is removed by passing through additional filters.

  20. Method for the abatement of hydrogen chloride

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Steven J.; Thomas, Thomas R.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for reducing the amount of hydrogen chloride contained in a gas stream by reacting the hydrogen chloride with ammonia in the gas phase so as to produce ammonium chloride. The combined gas stream is passed into a condensation and collection vessel and a cyclonic flow is created in the combined gas stream as it passes through the vessel. The temperature of the gas stream is reduced in the vessel to below the condensation temperature of ammonium chloride in order to crystallize the ammonium chloride on the walls of the vessel. The cyclonic flow creates a turbulence which breaks off the larger particles of ammonium chloride which are, in turn, driven to the bottom of the vessel where the solid ammonium chloride can be removed from the vessel. The gas stream exiting from the condensation and collection vessel is further cleaned and additional ammonium chloride is removed by passing through additional filters.

  1. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  2. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  3. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  4. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  5. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  6. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  7. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  8. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  9. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  10. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  11. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  12. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  13. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  14. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  15. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2, CAS Reg. No. 7773-01-5) is a pink... manganous oxide, pyrolusite ore (MnO2), or reduced manganese ore in hydrochloric acid. The...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2, CAS Reg.... It is prepared by dissolving manganous oxide, pyrolusite ore (MnO2), or reduced manganese ore...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2, CAS Reg.... It is prepared by dissolving manganous oxide, pyrolusite ore (MnO2), or reduced manganese ore...

  18. Methylene Blue to Treat Protamine-induced Anaphylaxis Reactions. An Experimental Study in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Agnes Afrodite S.; Margarido, Edson A.; Menardi, Antonio Carlos; Scorzoni Filho, Adilson; Celotto, Andrea Carla; Rodrigues, Alfredo J.; Vicente, Walter Vilella A.; Evora, Paulo Roberto B.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine if methylene blue (MB) can counteract or prevent protamine (P) cardiovascular effects. METHODS: The protocol included five heparinized pig groups: Group Sham -without any drug; Group MB - MB 3 mg/kg infusion; Group P - protamine; Group P/MB - MB after protamine; Group MB/P - MB before protamine. Nitric oxide levels were obtained by the nitric oxide/ozone chemiluminescence method, performed using the Nitric Oxide Analizer 280i (Sievers, Boulder, CO, USA). Malondialdehyde plasma levels were estimated using the thiobarbiturate technique. RESULTS: 1) Groups Sham and MB presented unchanged parameters; 2) Group P - a) Intravenous protamine infusion caused mean arterial pressure decrease and recovery trend after 25-30 minutes, b) Cardiac output decreased and remained stable until the end of protamine injection, and c) Sustained systemic vascular resistance increased until the end of protamine injection; 3) Methylene blue infusion after protamine (Group P/MB) - a) Marked mean arterial pressure decreased after protamine, but recovery after methylene blue injection, b) Cardiac output decreased after protamine infusion, recovering after methylene blue infusion, and c) Sustained systemic vascular resistance increased after protamine infusion and methylene blue injections; 4) Methylene blue infusion before protamine (Group MB/P) - a) Mean arterial pressure decrease was less severe with rapid recovery, b) After methylene blue, there was a progressive cardiac output increase up to protamine injection, when cardiac output decreased, and c) Sustained systemic vascular resistance decreased after protamine, followed by immediate Sustained systemic vascular resistance increase; 5) Plasma nitrite/nitrate and malondialdehyde values did not differ among the experimental groups. CONCLUSION: Reviewing these experimental results and our clinical experience, we suggest methylene blue safely prevents and treats hemodynamic protamine complications, from the endothelium

  19. Insecticidal Activity of α-Methylene-γ-butyrolactone against Several Insect Pests.

    PubMed

    Datta, P K; Kim, C S; Hara, T; Itoh, E; Horiike, M

    1999-01-01

    α-Methylene-γ-butyrolactone (tulipalin A), which has been found to possess effective insecticidal activity against Thrips palmi (Thysanoptera; Thripinae), was examined on several insect pests. This compound caused high mortality against thrips species such as Frankliniella occidentallis and Frankliniella intonsa. In addition, some mortality was observed against other agricultural pest species. It is considered that α-methylene-γ-butyrolactone has a wide spectrum of insecticidal activity.

  20. Acetone in theGlobal Troposphere: Its Possible Role as a Global Source of PAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, H. B.; Kanakidou, M.

    1994-01-01

    Oxygenated hydrocarbons are thought to be important components of the atmosphere but, with the exception of formaldehyde, very little about their distribution and fate is known. Aircraft measurements of acetone (CH3COCH3), PAN (CH3CO3NO2) and other organic species (e. g. acetaldehyde, methanol and ethanol) have been performed over the Pacific, the southern Atlantic, and the subarctic atmospheres. Sampled areas extended from 0 to 12 km altitude over latitudes of 70 deg N to 40 deg S. All measurements are based on real time in-situ analysis of cryogenically preconcentrated air samples. Substantial concentrations of these oxygenated species (10-2000 ppt) have been observed at all altitudes and geographical locations in the troposphere. Important sources include, emissions from biomass burning, plant and vegetation, secondary oxidation of primary non-methane hydrocarbons, and man-made emissions. Direct measurements within smoke plumes have been used to estimate the biomass burning source. Photochemistry studies are used to suggest that acetone could provide a major source of peroxyacetyl radicals in the atmosphere and play an important role in sequestering reactive nitrogen. Model calculations show that acetone photolysis contributes significantly to PAN formation in the middle and upper troposphere.

  1. Multinuclear NMR spectroscopy for differentiation of molecular configurations and solvent properties between acetone and dimethyl sulfoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yuan-Chun; Kuo, Hsiao-Ching; Jia, Hsi-Wei

    2016-04-01

    The differences in molecular configuration and solvent properties between acetone and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) were investigated using the developed technique of 1H, 13C, 17O, and 1H self-diffusion liquid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Acetone and DMSO samples in the forms of pure solution, ionic salt-added solution were used to deduce their active sites, relative dipole moments, dielectric constants, and charge separations. The NMR results suggest that acetone is a trigonal planar molecule with a polarized carbonyl double bond, whereas DMSO is a trigonal pyramidal-like molecule with a highly polarized S-O single bond. Both molecules use their oxygen atoms as the active sites to interact other molecules. These different molecular models explain the differences their physical and chemical properties between the two molecules and explain why DMSO is classified as an aprotic but highly dipolar solvent. The results are also in agreement with data obtained using X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, and theoretical calculations.

  2. Bayesian population analysis of a washin-washout physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for acetone

    SciTech Connect

    Moerk, Anna-Karin; Jonsson, Fredrik; Johanson, Gunnar

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to derive improved estimates of population variability and uncertainty of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model parameters, especially of those related to the washin-washout behavior of polar volatile substances. This was done by optimizing a previously published washin-washout PBPK model for acetone in a Bayesian framework using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation. The sensitivity of the model parameters was investigated by creating four different prior sets, where the uncertainty surrounding the population variability of the physiological model parameters was given values corresponding to coefficients of variation of 1%, 25%, 50%, and 100%, respectively. The PBPK model was calibrated to toxicokinetic data from 2 previous studies where 18 volunteers were exposed to 250-550 ppm of acetone at various levels of workload. The updated PBPK model provided a good description of the concentrations in arterial, venous, and exhaled air. The precision of most of the model parameter estimates was improved. New information was particularly gained on the population distribution of the parameters governing the washin-washout effect. The results presented herein provide a good starting point to estimate the target dose of acetone in the working and general populations for risk assessment purposes.

  3. Sensitive and selective cataluminescence-based sensor system for acetone and diethyl ether determination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qihui; Li, Bo; Wang, Yuhuai; Shou, Zhouxiang; Shi, Guolong

    2015-05-01

    A three-dimensional hierarchical CdO nanostructure with a novel bio-inspired morphology is reported. The field emission scanning electronic microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometer were employed to characterize the as-prepared samples. In gas-sensing measurements, acetone and diethyl ether were employed as target gases to investigate cataluminescence (CTL) sensing properties of the CdO nanostructure. The results show that the as-fabricated CdO nanostructure exhibited outstanding CTL properties such as stable intensity, high signal/noise values, short response and recovery time. The limit of detection of acetone and diethyl ether was ca. 6.5 ppm and 6.7 ppm, respectively, which was below the standard permitted concentrations. Additionally, a principal components analysis method was used to investigate the recognizable ability of the CTL sensor, and it was found that acetone and diethyl ether can be distinguished clearly. The performance of the bio-inspired CdO nanostructure-based sensor system suggested the promising application of the CdO nanostructure as a novel highly efficient CTL sensing material.

  4. Flow injection spectrofluorimetric determination of reserpine in tablets by on-line acetone sensitized photochemical reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; He, Q

    2000-11-01

    On-line photochemical reaction of reserpine in the presence of acetone was investigated. Acetone was found to speed up the on-line photochemical conversion of reserpine into an intensively fluorescent compound. Not only reaction acidity but also the acetate buffer concentration affected the on-line photochemical induced fluorescence signal. Based on the observation an automated flow injection photochemical fluorimetric approach was developed. An injected sample zone was carried by a water stream to be merged with a acetate buffer (pH 3.4) solution containing 0.02% acetone in a knotted PTFE reactor (KR), which was freely coiled around a 6-W low pressure mercury lamp. While passing the KR, reserpine was transformed into an intensively fluorescent compound. It was on-line detected in a flow-through cell at the emission wavelength of 490 nm and excitation wavelength of 386 nm. At optimized conditions, a detection limit 0.45 mug l(-1) was achieved at a sampling rate of 90 h(-1). Eleven determinations of a 0.5 mg l(-1) reserpine standard solution gave a R.S.D. of 0.3%. The linear dynamic range of reserpine calibration curve was 0.01-0.75 mg l(-1). The proposed method was applied to assay the reserpine content in tablets and to monitor the dissolution profile of reserpine tablets. Satisfactory results were obtained for both the assays and dissolution studies. PMID:18968131

  5. Acetone Sensing by Modified SnO2 Nanocrystalline Sensor Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivetsky, V. V.; Petukhov, D. V.; Eliseev, A. A.; Smirnov, A. V.; Rumyantseva, M. N.; Gaskov, Aleksandre M.

    A complementary gas sensor and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry study was performed to investigate the chemical basis of acetone vapor sensing via semiconductor metal oxide gas sensors. The effect of additives to nanocrystalline SnO2-based sensor materials was analyzed. The main process that contributes to the electrical yield of this interaction and thus to the sensor response is a complete acetone oxidation to CO2and H2O. At the same time it is clearly shown that this sensor response is severely limited by the rate of desorption of the reaction products. The main contributors to this negative influence on the sensor response are heavy organic compounds with molar masses larger than that of acetone. It is also shown that their negative effect could be mitigated by the incorporation of catalytic clusters of gold on the surface of SnO2based sensor materials. This kind of catalyst acts either as a preventor of the formation of heavy and complex organic molecules on the sensor surface or as a combustion catalyst, which facilitates their decomposition.

  6. Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, a halophilic bacterium producing acetone, butanol, and ethanol under aerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Hamid; Azarbaijani, Reza; Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Abolhassan; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Hosseini Salekdeh, Ghasem; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2016-01-01

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, which was isolated from Aran-Bidgol Lake (Iran), has the ability to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) as well as acetic and butyric acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This result is the first report of ABE production with a wild microorganism from a family other than Clostridia and also the first halophilic species shown to produce butanol under aerobic cultivation. The cultivation of Nesterenkonia sp. strain F under anaerobic conditions with 50 g/l of glucose for 72 h resulted in the production of 105 mg/l of butanol, 122 mg/l of acetone, 0.2 g/l of acetic acid, and 2.5 g/l of butyric acid. Furthermore, the strain was cultivated on media with different glucose concentrations (20, 50, and 80 g/l) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Through fermentation with a 50 g/l initial glucose concentration under aerobic conditions, 66 mg/l of butanol, 125 mg/l of acetone, 291 mg/l of ethanol, 5.9 g/l of acetic acid, and 1.2 g/l of butyric acid were produced. The enzymes pertaining to the fermentation pathway in the strain were compared with the enzymes of Clostridium spp., and the metabolic pathway of fermentation used by Nesterenkonia sp. strain F was investigated. PMID:26725518

  7. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of acetone in mice and rats: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Stoney, K.H.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1988-11-01

    Acetone, an aliphatic ketone, is a ubiquitous industrial solvent and chemical intermediate; consequently, the opportunity for human exposure is high. The potential for acetone to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 0, 440, 2200, or 11000 ppm, and in Swiss (CD-1) mice exposed to 0, 440, 2200, and 6600 ppm acetone vapors, 6 h/day, 7 days/week. Each of the four treatment groups consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and approx.32 positively mated rats or mice. Positively mated mice were exposed on days 6-17 of gestation (dg), and rats on 6-19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 46 refs., 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  8. Research into acetone removal from air by biofiltration using a biofilter with straight structure plates

    PubMed Central

    Baltrėnas, Pranas; Zagorskis, Alvydas; Misevičius, Antonas

    2015-01-01

    The biological air treatment method is based on the biological destruction of organic compounds using certain cultures of microorganisms. This method is simple and may be applied in many branches of industry. The main element of biological air treatment devices is a filter charge. Tests were carried out using a new-generation laboratory air purifier with a plate structure. This purifier is called biofilter. The biofilter has a special system for packing material humidification which does not require additional energy inputs. In order to extend the packing material's durability, it was composed of thermally treated birch fibre. Pollutant (acetone) biodegradation occurred on thermally treated wood fibre in this research. According to the performed tests and the received results, the process of biodestruction was highly efficient. When acetone was passed through biofilter's packing material at 0.08 m s−1 rate, the efficiency of the biofiltration process was from 70% up to 90%. The species of bacteria capable of removing acetone vapour from the air, i.e. Bacillus (B. cereus, B. subtilis), Pseudomonas (P. aeruginosa, P. putida), Stapylococcus (S. aureus) and Rhodococcus sp., was identified in this study during the process of biofiltration. Their amount in the biological packing material changed from 1.6 × 107 to 3.7 × 1011 CFU g−1. PMID:26019659

  9. A Ringdown Breath Analyzer for Diabetes Monitoring: Breath Acetone in Diabetic Patients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuji; Mbi, Armstrong; Shepherd, Mark

    2008-03-01

    It is highly desirable for millions of diabetic patients to have a non-blood, non-invasive, point-of-care device for monitoring daily blood glucose (BG) levels and the adequacy of diabetic treatment and control. Cavity ringdown spectroscopy, due to its unique capability of high sensitivity, fast-response, and relatively low cost for instrumentation, has the potential for medical application through non-invasive analysis of breath biomarkers. We report the first ringdown acetone breath analyzer for clinic testing with diabetic outpatients. The instrument was set in a clinic center and 34 outpatients (24 T1D and 10 T2D) were tested during a four-day period. 10 T1D subjects and 15 nondiabetic persons were tested in our laboratory. Three juvenile-onset T1D subjects were selected for a 24-hr monitoring on the variations of breath acetone and simultaneous BG level. In this talk, we present our research findings including the correlations of breath acetone with BG level and A1C.

  10. Sources and sinks of acetone, methanol, and acetaldehyde in North Atlantic marine air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, A. C.; Hopkins, J. R.; Carpenter, L. J.; Stanton, J.; Read, K. A.; Pilling, M. J.

    2005-08-01

    Measurements of acetone, methanol, acetaldehyde and a range of non-methane hydrocarbons have been made in North Atlantic marine air at the Mace Head observatory. Under maritime conditions the combination of OVOCs (acetone, methanol and acetaldehyde) contributed up to 85% of the total mass of measured non methane organics in air and up to 80% of the OH radical organic sink, when compared with the sum of all other organic compounds including non-methane hydrocarbons, DMS and OH-reactive halocarbons (trichloromethane and tetrachloroethylene). The observations showed anomalies in the variance and abundance of acetaldehyde and acetone over that expected for species with a remote terrestrial emission source and OH controlled chemical lifetime. A detailed model incorporating an explicit chemical degradation mechanism indicated in situ formation during air mass transport was on timescales longer than the atmospheric lifetime of precursor hydrocarbons or primary emission. The period over which this process was significant was similar to that of airmass motion on intercontinental scales, and formation via this route may reproduce that of a widespread diffuse source. The model indicates that continued short chain OVOC formation occurs many days from the point of emission, via longer lived intermediates of oxidation such as organic peroxides and long chain alcohols.

  11. Sources and sinks of acetone, methanol, and acetaldehyde in North Atlantic air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, A. C.; Hopkins, J. R.; Carpenter, L. J.; Stanton, J.; Read, K. A.; Pilling, M. J.

    2005-03-01

    Measurements of acetone, methanol, acetaldehyde and a range of non-methane hydrocarbons have been made in North Atlantic marine air at the Mace Head observatory. Under maritime conditions the combination of OVOCs (acetone, methanol and 5 acetaldehyde) contributed up to 85% of the total mass of measured non methane organics in air and up to 80% of the OH radical organic sink, when compared with the sum of all other organic compounds including non-methane hydrocarbons, DMS and OH-reactive halocarbons (trichloromethane and tetrachloroethylene). The observations showed anomalies in the variance and abundance of acetaldehyde and acetone 10 over that expected for species with a remote terrestrial emission source and OH controlled chemical lifetime. A detailed model incorporating an explicit chemical degradation mechanism indicated in situ formation during air mass transport was on timescales longer than the atmospheric lifetime of precursor hydrocarbons or primary emission. The period over which this process was significant was similar to that of airmass mo15 tion on intercontinental scales, and formation via this route may reproduce that of a widespread diffuse source. The model indicates that continued short chain OVOC formation occurs many days from the point of emission, via longer lived intermediates of oxidation such as organic peroxides and long chain alcohols.

  12. Mechanism of cell destruction and cell protection during methylene-blue-induced PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueck, Angelika C.; Beck, G.; Heckelsmiller, K.; Knoedlsdorfer, U.; Genze, Felicitas; Orth, K.

    1999-02-01

    Methylene Blue (MB+) is a well-known dye in medicine and has been discussed as an easily applicable drug for the topical treatment in photodynamic therapy (PDT). MB+ can potentially be used as a redox indicator to detect the important redox reactions that are induced during PDT. MB+ induced PDT was successful in the intraluminal treatment of inoperable esophageal tumors and in the topical treatment of psoriasis. In order to improve the therapy, the reaction mechanism of MB+ was investigated in vivo by local injection of MB+ in a xenotransplanted subcutaneous tumor (adeno-carcinoma, G-3) in female nude mice. The MB+ preparation 'MB+1%' was applied both undiluted and diluted to 0.1% and 0.01% with isotonic sodium chloride. After an incubation period of 1 h, the tumors were irradiated at 662 nm. Treatment with 1% MB+ and subsequent irradiation with 100 J/cm2 led to complete tumor destruction in 79% of the treated animals. A decrease of the fluence rate from 100 mW/cm2 to 50 mW/cm2 significantly increased the phototoxic response, which was attributed to oxygen depletion but also to nonlinear redox reactions. In addition, fractionated light application with 15 s interruption intervals enhanced the effect. When 0.1% MB+ was used, complete tumor destruction was observed only in 10% of the treated animals. Below a relatively high threshold dose the therapeutic response was not significant. The efficiency of the therapy was correlated with nonlinear dynamics of MB+ on a subcellular level, using laser scanning microscopy. During MB+-PDT nonlinear redox- reactions were induced. This could be deduced from local fast changes of the MB+-fluorescence as well as the pH-value during irradiation of single cells. The light induced reaction of MB+ seems to be correlated with the nonlinear production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). As a consequence below a threshold dose the reducing ability of MB+ prevents tissue from oxidative damage. However, above this dose, as a point of no

  13. Microbial reductive dehalogenation of vinyl chloride

    DOEpatents

    Spormann, Alfred M [Stanford, CA; Muller, Jochen A [Baltimore, MD; Rosner, Bettina M [Berlin, DE; Von Abendroth, Gregory [Mannheim, DE; Meshulam-Simon, Galit [Los Angeles, CA; McCarty, Perry L [Stanford, CA

    2014-02-11

    Compositions and methods are provided that relate to the bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes, particularly the bioremediation of vinyl chloride by Dehalococcoides-like organisms. An isolated strain of bacteria, Dehalococcoides sp. strain VS, that metabolizes vinyl chloride is provided; the genetic sequence of the enzyme responsible for vinyl chloride dehalogenation; methods of assessing the capability of endogenous organisms at an environmental site to metabolize vinyl chloride; and a method of using the strains of the invention for bioremediation.

  14. Microbial reductive dehalogenation of vinyl chloride

    DOEpatents

    Spormann, Alfred M.; Muller, Jochen A.; Rosner, Bettina M.; Von Abendroth, Gregory; Meshulam-Simon, Galit; McCarty, Perry L

    2011-11-22

    Compositions and methods are provided that relate to the bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes, particularly the bioremediation of vinyl chloride by Dehalococcoides-like organisms. An isolated strain of bacteria, Dehalococcoides sp. strain VS, that metabolizes vinyl chloride is provided; the genetic sequence of the enzyme responsible for vinyl chloride dehalogenation; methods of assessing the capability of endogenous organisms at an environmental site to metabolize vinyl chloride; and a method of using the strains of the invention for bioremediation.

  15. 21 CFR 184.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 184.1193 Section 184.1193 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Calcium chloride (CaCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10035-04-8) or anhydrous calcium chloride (CaCl2, CAS Reg. No. 10043-52-4) may be...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 184.1193 Section 184.1193 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Calcium chloride (CaCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10035-04-8) or anhydrous calcium chloride (CaCl2, CAS Reg. No. 10043-52-4) may be...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 184.1193 Section 184.1193 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Calcium chloride (CaCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10035-04-8) or anhydrous calcium chloride (CaCl2, CAS Reg. No. 10043-52-4) may be...

  18. Can methylene blue only be used in sentinel lymph node biopsy for breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Golshan, Mehra; Nakhlis, Faina

    2006-01-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) has become an accepted standard of care to stage the axilla for clinically node-negative early stage breast cancer. In experienced hands, studies have shown an acceptable rate of identification of the sentinel lymph node (SLN) with blue dye only. Lymphazurin is occasionally associated with severe allergic reaction, including anaphylaxis and death. The use of methylene blue alone as a method of identifying the SLN in breast cancer has been reported once previously in the literature. Methylene blue may be an acceptable alternative with fewer deleterious side effects. Medical records of patients, who underwent sentinel node mapping between September 2003 and March 2005 by two surgeons at an academic medical center were reviewed. SLN mapping was performed by periareolar injection of 5 cc of 1% methylene blue. All patients with positive SLNs underwent completion axillary node dissection. During the study period, 141 consecutive patients with clinically node-negative axillas and without evidence of inflammatory breast cancer underwent SLNB with injection of methylene blue only. A SLN was identified in 136 of 141 patients (96.5%). Thirty-three of 136 SLNs (24%) harbored metastatic disease. No cases of anaphylaxis were noted. In experienced hands, methylene blue alone is a highly sensitive method of detecting SLNs. Avoiding the greater frequency of allergic reactions seen with lymphazurin is an important advantage of methylene blue.

  19. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  20. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  1. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b)...

  2. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  3. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  4. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  5. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  6. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  7. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  8. 21 CFR 172.180 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Preservatives § 172.180 Stannous chloride. The food additive stannous chloride may be safely used for color... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Stannous chloride. 172.180 Section 172.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR...

  9. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride....

  10. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  11. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in...

  15. 21 CFR 582.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.1193 Section 582.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  16. 21 CFR 582.6193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.6193 Section 582.6193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  17. 21 CFR 582.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.1193 Section 582.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  18. 21 CFR 582.6193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.6193 Section 582.6193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  19. 21 CFR 582.6193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.6193 Section 582.6193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  20. 21 CFR 582.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.1193 Section 582.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  1. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the...

  2. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the...

  3. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the...

  4. 21 CFR 582.6193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.6193 Section 582.6193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  5. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the...

  6. 21 CFR 582.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.1193 Section 582.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  7. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the...

  8. 21 CFR 582.6193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.6193 Section 582.6193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  9. 21 CFR 582.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.1193 Section 582.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  11. REMOVAL OF CHLORIDE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, W.W.

    1959-08-01

    The removal of chlorides from aqueons solutions is described. The process involves contacting the aqueous chloride containing solution with a benzene solution about 0.005 M in phenyl mercuric acetate whereby the chloride anions are taken up by the organic phase and separating the organic phase from the aqueous solutions.

  12. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in...

  13. 21 CFR 172.180 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Food Preservatives § 172.180 Stannous chloride. The food additive stannous chloride may be safely used... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 172.180 Section 172.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  14. 21 CFR 172.180 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Food Preservatives § 172.180 Stannous chloride. The food additive stannous chloride may be safely used... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 172.180 Section 172.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  15. 21 CFR 172.180 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Food Preservatives § 172.180 Stannous chloride. The food additive stannous chloride may be safely used... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 172.180 Section 172.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  16. First discovery of acetone extract from cottonseed oil sludge as a novel antiviral agent against plant viruses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Feng, Chaohong; Hou, Caiting; Hu, Lingyun; Wang, Qiaochun; Wu, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    A novel acetone extract from cottonseed oil sludge was firstly discovered against plant viruses including Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Rice stripe virus (RSV) and Southern rice black streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV). Gossypol and β-sitosterol separated from the acetone extract were tested for their effects on anti-TMV and analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assay. In vivo and field trials in different geographic distributions and different host varieties declared that this extract mixture was more efficient than the commercial agent Ningnanmycin with a broad spectrum of anti-plant-viruses activity. No phytotoxic activity was observed in the treated plants and environmental toxicology showed that this new acetone extract was environmentally friendly, indicating that this acetone extract has potential application in the control of plant virus in the future.

  17. First Discovery of Acetone Extract from Cottonseed Oil Sludge as a Novel Antiviral Agent against Plant Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Feng, Chaohong; Hou, Caiting; Hu, Lingyun; Wang, Qiaochun; Wu, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    A novel acetone extract from cottonseed oil sludge was firstly discovered against plant viruses including Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Rice stripe virus (RSV) and Southern rice black streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV). Gossypol and β-sitosterol separated from the acetone extract were tested for their effects on anti-TMV and analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assay. In vivo and field trials in different geographic distributions and different host varieties declared that this extract mixture was more efficient than the commercial agent Ningnanmycin with a broad spectrum of anti-plant-viruses activity. No phytotoxic activity was observed in the treated plants and environmental toxicology showed that this new acetone extract was environmentally friendly, indicating that this acetone extract has potential application in the control of plant virus in the future. PMID:25705894

  18. Co-production of acetone and ethanol with molar ratio control enables production of improved gasoline or jet fuel blends.

    PubMed

    Baer, Zachary C; Bormann, Sebastian; Sreekumar, Sanil; Grippo, Adam; Toste, F Dean; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2016-10-01

    The fermentation of simple sugars to ethanol has been the most successful biofuel process to displace fossil fuel consumption worldwide thus far. However, the physical properties of ethanol and automotive components limit its application in most cases to 10-15 vol% blends with conventional gasoline. Fermentative co-production of ethanol and acetone coupled with a catalytic alkylation reaction could enable the production of gasoline blendstocks enriched in higher-chain oxygenates. Here we demonstrate a synthetic pathway for the production of acetone through the mevalonate precursor hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA. Expression of this pathway in various strains of Escherichia coli resulted in the co-production of acetone and ethanol. Metabolic engineering and control of the environmental conditions for microbial growth resulted in controllable acetone and ethanol production with ethanol:acetone molar ratios ranging from 0.7:1 to 10.0:1. Specifically, use of gluconic acid as a substrate increased production of acetone and balanced the redox state of the system, predictively reducing the molar ethanol:acetone ratio. Increases in ethanol production and the molar ethanol:acetone ratio were achieved by co-expression of the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE) from E. coli MG1655 and by co-expression of pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhB) from Z. mobilis. Controlling the fermentation aeration rate and pH in a bioreactor raised the acetone titer to 5.1 g L(-1) , similar to that obtained with wild-type Clostridium acetobutylicum. Optimizing the metabolic pathway, the selection of host strain, and the physiological conditions employed for host growth together improved acetone titers over 35-fold (0.14-5.1 g/L). Finally, chemical catalysis was used to upgrade the co-produced ethanol and acetone at both low and high molar ratios to higher-chain oxygenates for gasoline and jet fuel applications. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2079-2087. © 2016 Wiley

  19. Co-production of acetone and ethanol with molar ratio control enables production of improved gasoline or jet fuel blends.

    PubMed

    Baer, Zachary C; Bormann, Sebastian; Sreekumar, Sanil; Grippo, Adam; Toste, F Dean; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2016-10-01

    The fermentation of simple sugars to ethanol has been the most successful biofuel process to displace fossil fuel consumption worldwide thus far. However, the physical properties of ethanol and automotive components limit its application in most cases to 10-15 vol% blends with conventional gasoline. Fermentative co-production of ethanol and acetone coupled with a catalytic alkylation reaction could enable the production of gasoline blendstocks enriched in higher-chain oxygenates. Here we demonstrate a synthetic pathway for the production of acetone through the mevalonate precursor hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA. Expression of this pathway in various strains of Escherichia coli resulted in the co-production of acetone and ethanol. Metabolic engineering and control of the environmental conditions for microbial growth resulted in controllable acetone and ethanol production with ethanol:acetone molar ratios ranging from 0.7:1 to 10.0:1. Specifically, use of gluconic acid as a substrate increased production of acetone and balanced the redox state of the system, predictively reducing the molar ethanol:acetone ratio. Increases in ethanol production and the molar ethanol:acetone ratio were achieved by co-expression of the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE) from E. coli MG1655 and by co-expression of pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhB) from Z. mobilis. Controlling the fermentation aeration rate and pH in a bioreactor raised the acetone titer to 5.1 g L(-1) , similar to that obtained with wild-type Clostridium acetobutylicum. Optimizing the metabolic pathway, the selection of host strain, and the physiological conditions employed for host growth together improved acetone titers over 35-fold (0.14-5.1 g/L). Finally, chemical catalysis was used to upgrade the co-produced ethanol and acetone at both low and high molar ratios to higher-chain oxygenates for gasoline and jet fuel applications. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2079-2087. © 2016 Wiley

  20. An XAFS Study of Tantalum Chloride in the Ionic Liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl Imidazolium Chloride/ aluminum Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    D Roeper; K Pandya; G Cheek; W OGrady

    2011-12-31

    Tantalum chloride was studied with extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) in acidic and basic aluminum chloride/1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ionic liquids (ILs). Anhydrous Ta2Cl10 is more soluble in the basic solution than in the acidic solution and the X-ray absorption data shows that the coordination shell of chlorides around the tantalum is larger in the basic solution. In the acidic solution, tantalum has five chlorides in its coordination shell while in the basic solution; the tantalum is coordinated by seven chlorides. This indicates that the Lewis acidity of the tantalum chloride causes the Ta to coordinate differently in the acidic and the basic solutions.

  1. Nano sized bismuth oxy chloride by metal organic chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagdale, Pravin; Castellino, Micaela; Marrec, Françoise; Rodil, Sandra E.; Tagliaferro, Alberto

    2014-06-01

    Metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) method was used to prepare thin films of bismuth based nano particles starting from bismuth salts. Nano sized bismuth oxy chloride (BiOCl) crystals were synthesized from solution containing bismuth chloride (BiCl3) in acetone (CH3sbnd COsbnd CH3). Self-assembly of nano sized BiOCl crystals were observed on the surface of silicon, fused silica, copper, carbon nanotubes and aluminium substrates. Various synthesis parameters and their significant impact onto the formation of self-assembled nano-crystalline BiOCl were investigated. BiOCl nano particles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Micro-Raman spectroscopy. These analyses confirm that bismuth nanometer-sized crystal structures showing a single tetragonal phase were indeed bismuth oxy chloride (BiOCl) square platelets 18-250 nm thick and a few micrometres wide.

  2. Methylene blue solder re-absorption in microvascular anastomoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, Jeremy F.; Hepplewhite, J.; Frier, Malcolm; Bell, Peter R. F.

    2003-06-01

    Soldered vascular anastomoses have been reported using several chromophores but little is known of the optimal conditions for microvascular anastomosis. There are some indications of the optimal protein contents of a solder, and the effects of methylene blue on anastomotic strength. The effects of varying laser power density in vivo have also been described, showing a high rate of thrombosis with laser power over 22.9Wcm-2. However no evidence exists to describe how long the solder remains at the site of the anastomosis. Oz et al reported that the fibrin used in their study had been almost completely removed by 90 days but without objective evidence of solder removal. In order to address the issue of solder re-absorption from the site of an anastomosis we used radio-labelled albumin (I-125) incorporated into methylene blue based solder. This was investigated in both the situation of the patent and thrombosed anastomosis with anastomoses formed at high and low power. Iodine-125 (half life: 60.2 days) was covalently bonded to porcine albumin and mixed with the solder solution. Radio-iodine has been used over many years to determine protein turnover using either I-125 or I-131. Iodine-125 labelled human albumin is regularly used as a radiopharmaceutical tool for the determination of plasma volume. Radio-iodine has the advantages of not affecting protein metabolism and the label is rapidly excreted after metabolic breakdown. Labelling with chromium (Cr-51) causes protein denaturation and is lost from the protein with time. Labelled albumin has been reported in human studies over a 21-day period, with similar results reported by Matthews. Most significantly McFarlane reported a different rate of catabolism of I-131 and I-125 over a 22-day period. The conclusion from this is that the rate of iodine clearance is a good indicator of protein catabolism. In parallel with the surgery a series of blank standards were prepared with a known mass of solder to correct for isotope

  3. Selective Concentration of Ultra-trace Acetone in the Air by Cryogenic Temperature Programmed Desorption (cryo-TPD).

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Taku T; Sakaguchi, Isao

    2016-01-01

    A gas analytical technique with compact size, low cost, sufficient sensitivity, and excellent reproducibility is required in many fields including exhaled breath analysis for medical monitoring. In the present study, we examined selective acetone concentration by quench condensation at cryogenic temperature followed by temperature programmed desorption (cryogenic temperature programmed desorption (cryo-TPD)) for possible applications to breath analysis for medical monitoring. The essence of cryo-TPD is rough mass selection by thermal desorption followed by quantification of certain species using mass spectrometry. The performance of cryo-TPD was investigated in the acetone concentration range below 1 × 10(-6) volume fraction (1 ppmv). It was found that acetone is selectively quench-condensed on a tungsten substrate at 50 K without the major components of air, such as N2 and O2. The concentrated acetone gas was obtained by the following thermal desorption at around 151 K. Under conditions of condensation for 1 min and pressure of 1 × 10(-2) Pa, the lowest limit of detection reached well below 10 × 10(-9) volume fraction (10 ppbv). The relationship between the cetone intensity of cryo-TPD and the acetone concentration in the gas was almost linear in the ppbv range. The separation of acetone and propanal using the fragmentation pattern, which have almost the identical molecular mass, was also demonstrated in the present study. PMID:27682397

  4. Methylene blue mediated photodynamic therapy for resistant plaque psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Salah, Manal; Samy, Nevien; Fadel, Maha

    2009-01-01

    Topical treatment of resistant psoriatic plaque stage lesions may be difficult and the systemic therapies seem inappropriate. Therefore, a topical 0.1% methylene blue (MB) hydrogel was prepared and evaluated for percent drug content, drug uniformity, pH, rheological and organoleptic characters such as feel tackiness, grittiness sensation, and transparency in addition to release kinetics study in vitro. The efficiency of the photodynamic therapy (PDT) of MB photo-activated using 565 mW Light emitting diode (LED) 670 nm was evaluated in patients with resistant plaque psoriasis. The gel was evaluated in single blinded study. The patients were subjected to repeated sessions of irradiation, skin biopsies from each patient in the beginning and at the end of the sessions were taken for histopathological studies. Results showed the hydrogel was transparent nongritty and the drug uniformly dispersed with pH=7.2 and viscosity value=25.04 Pa. The drug content was found to be 99.4 +/- 0.15 %. Drug release was following zero order kinetics with rate constant K=0.348 +/- 0.01 and T(1/2) = 0.95 +/- 0.5 hours. Sixteen patients experienced complete clearance of their treated lesions. Skin appeared normal in color, texture, and pliability with no complications indicating the lack of skin sensitivity. Histopathological examinations showed nearly normal epidermis at the end of all sessions. The authors concluded that the prepared hydrogel was safe, stable, and very effective. The results are encouraging to accept MB as a photosensitizer for PDT and as a safe and effective method for treatment of selected cases of resistant localized psoriasis PMID:19180895

  5. Methylene blue mediated photodynamic therapy for resistant plaque psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Salah, Manal; Samy, Nevien; Fadel, Maha

    2009-01-01

    Topical treatment of resistant psoriatic plaque stage lesions may be difficult and the systemic therapies seem inappropriate. Therefore, a topical 0.1% methylene blue (MB) hydrogel was prepared and evaluated for percent drug content, drug uniformity, pH, rheological and organoleptic characters such as feel tackiness, grittiness sensation, and transparency in addition to release kinetics study in vitro. The efficiency of the photodynamic therapy (PDT) of MB photo-activated using 565 mW Light emitting diode (LED) 670 nm was evaluated in patients with resistant plaque psoriasis. The gel was evaluated in single blinded study. The patients were subjected to repeated sessions of irradiation, skin biopsies from each patient in the beginning and at the end of the sessions were taken for histopathological studies. Results showed the hydrogel was transparent nongritty and the drug uniformly dispersed with pH=7.2 and viscosity value=25.04 Pa. The drug content was found to be 99.4 +/- 0.15 %. Drug release was following zero order kinetics with rate constant K=0.348 +/- 0.01 and T(1/2) = 0.95 +/- 0.5 hours. Sixteen patients experienced complete clearance of their treated lesions. Skin appeared normal in color, texture, and pliability with no complications indicating the lack of skin sensitivity. Histopathological examinations showed nearly normal epidermis at the end of all sessions. The authors concluded that the prepared hydrogel was safe, stable, and very effective. The results are encouraging to accept MB as a photosensitizer for PDT and as a safe and effective method for treatment of selected cases of resistant localized psoriasis

  6. Functional inactivation of lymphocytes by methylene blue with visible light.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Cheng, Zhenzhen; Mo, Qin; Wang, Li; Wang, Xun; Wu, Xiaofei; Jia, Yao; Huang, Yuwen

    2015-10-01

    Transfusion of allogeneic white blood cells (WBCs) may cause adverse reactions in immunocompromised recipients, including transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD), which is often fatal and incurable. In this study, the in vitro effect of methylene blue with visible light (MB + L) treatment on lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production was measured to investigate whether MB + L can be used to prevent immune reactions that result from transfused lymphocytes. WBCs and 3 μM of MB were mixed and transferred into medical PVC bags, which were then exposed to visible light. Gamma irradiation was conducted as a parallel positive control. The cells without treatment were used as untreated group. All the groups were tested for the ability of cell proliferation and cytokine production upon stimulation. After incubation with mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or plate-bound anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28, the proliferation of MB + L/gamma-irradiation treated lymphocytes was significantly inhibited (P < 0.01) as compared to the untreated ones; the proliferation inhibitive rate of the MB + L group was even higher than that of gamma-irradiated cells (73.77% ± 28.75% vs. 44.72% ± 38.20%). MB + L treated cells incubated up to 7 days with PHA also showed no significant proliferation. The levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-1β present in the supernatant of MB + L treated lymphocytes upon stimulation were significantly lower than those of untreated lymphocytes. These results demonstrated that MB + L treatment functionally and irreversibly inactivated lymphocytes by inhibiting lymphocyte proliferation and the production of cytokines. MB + L treatment might be a promising method for the prevention of adverse immune responses caused by WBCs. PMID:26295729

  7. Chloride flux out of Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norton, D.R.; Friedman, I.

    1985-01-01

    Monitoring of the chloride concentration, electrical conductivity, and discharge was carried out for the four major rivers of Yellowstone National Park from September 1982 to January 1984. Chloride flux out of the Park was determined from the measured values of chloride concentration and discharge. The annual chloride flux from the Park was 5.86 ?? 1010 g. Of this amount 45% was from the Madison River drainage basin, 32% from the Yellowstone River basin, 12% from the Snake River basin, and 11% from the Falls River basin. Of the annual chloride flux from the Yellowstone River drainage basin 36% was attributed to the Yellowstone Lake drainage basin. The geothermal contribution to the chloride flux was determined by subtracting the chloride contribution from rock weathering and atmospheric precipitation and is 94% of the total chloride flux. Calculations of the geothermal chloride flux for each river are given and the implications of an additional chloride flux out of the western Park boundary discussed. An anomalous increase in chloride flux out of the Park was observed for several weeks prior to the Mt. Borah earthquake in Central Idaho on October 28, 1983, reaching a peak value shortly thereafter. It is suggested that the rise in flux was a precursor of the earthquake. The information in this paper provides baseline data against which future changes in the hydrothermal systems can be measured. It also provides measurements related to the thermal contributions from the different drainage basins of the Park. ?? 1985.

  8. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M

    2015-08-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense.

  9. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  10. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M

    2015-08-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  11. Interpretation of PAN, acetone and acetylene measurements from the MIPAS-E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, D. P.; Remedios, J. J.; Parker, R. J.

    2009-04-01

    Emissions of anthropogenic pollution, from biomass burning events in particular, result in the injection of a wide range of carbon compounds into the atmosphere. Carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released in significant amounts, affecting both the oxidation capacity of the troposphere and ozone production. Upper troposphere (UT) measurements of PAN, acetone and acetylene have, in the past, been generally limited to sporadic in situ sampling during specialised campaign periods. The recent rapid progress in both the detection and retrieval of many VOC species from spaceborne instrumentation has been large. It has recently been established that the observation of the global distribution of VOCs in the UT can be made by measurements provided by instruments such as the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding onboard ENVISAT (MIPAS-E) or the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) onboard SCISAT-1. In this work, we discuss the ability of MIPAS-E to provide new global measurements of acetone in the UT. We also describe both the distribution and seasonality observed in UT PAN volume mixing ratios (vmrs). From the MIPAS-E acetylene measurements, we analyse the extent and magnitude of the chemical isolation observed over the Middle East during August 2003. We show that this enhancement is due to fast westward transport from Asia via the Easterly Jet associated with the Asian monsoon anticyclone. A full error analysis is carried out for each of the three gases we analyse. Previous work has shown that characteristic infrared signatures of PAN, acetone and acetylene can be detected in MIPAS-E thermal emission spectra, with the 787-790 cm-1, 1216-1218 cm-1 and 776.0-776.15 cm-1 spectral ranges respectively being particularly sensitive to changes in each of the gases. We invert the measured MIPAS-E spectra into vmrs using an independent offline-retrieval scheme based on the optimal estimation approach which was

  12. Effect of zinc supplementation on acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Wu, You-Duo; Xue, Chuang; Chen, Li-Jie; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2013-05-10

    In this article, effect of zinc supplementation on acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum was studied. It was found that when 0.001 g/L ZnSO4·7H2O was supplemented into the medium, solventogenesis was initiated earlier, with 21.0 g/L ABE (12.6 g/L butanol, 6.7 g/L acetone and 1.7 g/L ethanol) produced with a fermentation time of 40 h, compared to 19.4 g/L ABE (11.7 g/L butanol, 6.4 g/L acetone and 1.3g/L ethanol) produced with a fermentation time of 64 h in the control without zinc supplementation, and correspondingly ABE and butanol productivities were increased to 0.53 and 0.32 g/L/h from 0.30 and 0.18 g/L/h, increases of 76.7% and 77.8%, respectively, but their yields were not compromised. The reason for this phenomenon was attributed to rapid acids re-assimilation for more efficient ABE production, which was in accordance with relatively high pH and ORP levels maintained during the fermentation process. The maximum cell density increased by 23.8%, indicating that zinc supplementation stimulated cell growth, and consequently facilitated glucose utilization. However, more zinc supplementation exhibited an inhibitory effect, indicating that zinc supplementation at very low levels such as 0.001 g/L ZnSO4·7H2O will be an economically competitive strategy for improving butanol production.

  13. Sensitive gas chromatographic detection of acetaldehyde and acetone using a reduction gas detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Hara, Dean; Singh, Hanwant B.

    1988-01-01

    The response of a newly available mercuric oxide Reduction Gas Detector (RGD-2) to subpicomole and larger quantities of acetaldehyde and acetone is tested. The RGD-2 is found to be capable of subpicomole detection for these carbonyls and is more sensitive than an FID (Flame Ionization Detector) by an order of magnitude. Operating parameters can be further optimized to make the RGD-2 some 20-40 times more sensitive than an FID. The detector is linear over a wide range and is easily adapted to a conventional gas chromatograph (GC). Such a GC-RGD-2 system should be suitable for atmospheric carbonyl measurements in clean as well as polluted environments.

  14. Density Functional Studies on the Complexation and Spectroscopy of Uranyl Ligated with Acetonitrile and Acetone Derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Schoendorff, George E.; Windus, Theresa L.; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2009-12-12

    The coordination of nitrile (acetonitrile, propionitrile, and benzonitrile) and carbonyl (formaldehyde, ethanal, and acetone) ligands to the uranyl dication (UO22+) has been examined using density functional theory (DFT) utilizing relativistic effective core potentials (RECPs). Complexes containing up to six ligands have been modeled for all ligands except formaldehyde, for which no minimum could be found. A comparison of relative binding energies indicates that five coordinate complexes are predominant while a six coordinate complex involving propionitrile ligands might be possible. Additionally, the relative binding energy and the weakening of the uranyl bond is related to the size of the ligand and, in general, nitriles bind more strongly to uranyl than carbonyls.

  15. Complexation between carrageenan and methylene blue for sensor design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Yew Pei; Heng, Lee Yook

    2013-11-01

    Theoretical studies on the methylene blue (MB)-carrageenans complexation at solution and solid states have been carried out via ultraviolet spectrophotoscopy and reflectometry methods. The equilibrium constant (Ka) of the MBcarrageenans complexation follows the order of Iota > Lambda > Kappa carrageenans, which indicated Iota-carrageenan forms a stable complex. MB-carrageenan complexation reaction showed decrease in Ka value from 210.71 ppm-1 to 114.57 ppm-1 when the reaction temperature increased from 298 K to 323 K. Le Chatelier's principle and mass action law explained that the MB-carrageenan complexation was an exothermic reaction (ΔH=-18.54 kJmol-1) that release heat. Thus MB-carrageenan complex was less stable at high temperature and tend to dissociate into free MB and carrageenan molecules. It was also supported by the van't Hoff equation. The reaction is a spontaneous process (ΔG=-13.23 kJmol-1) where the randomness of the molecules reduced (ΔS=-17.83 Jmol-1K-1) due to complexation. Besides, linear regression of the concentration and absorption of the MB-carrageenan reaction obeys the Beer Lambert law, which elucidated that the complexation process was not affected by any concentration dependent factors such as aggregation and self-quenching. Moreover, linear Benesi Hilderbrend plot revealed that the interaction between MB and carrageenan was a reversible and stoichiometric reaction with 1:1 ratio. However, the molar extinction coefficient (ɛ) and molar adsorption coefficient (μa) of the MB-carrageenan complex were lower compared to free MB, described that the complex was less adsorptive. The sensor constructed based on these theoretical investigations showed response behavior that was similar with solution test as both have attraction for carrageenans in the sequence of Iota-, Lambda-, Kappa- carrageenans. Likewise, carrageenan sensor was more selective towards Iota-carrageenan than to Lambda- and Kappa-carrageenans, and no response observed when

  16. The interaction between methylene blue and the cholinergic system

    PubMed Central

    Pfaffendorf, M; Bruning, T A; Batink, H D; van Zwieten, P A

    1997-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of methylene blue (MB) on different types of cholinesterases and [3H]-N-methylscopolamine ([3H]-NMS) binding to muscarinic receptors were studied. Human plasma from young healthy male volunteers, purified human pseudocholinesterase and purified bovine true acetylcholinesterase were incubated with acetylcholine and increasing concentrations of MB (0.1–100 μmol l−1) in the presence of the pH-indicator m-nitrophenol for 30 min at 25°C. The amount of acetic acid produced by the enzymatic hydrolysis of acetylcholine was determined photometrically. Rat cardiac left ventricle homogenate was incubated with [3H]-NMS and with increasing concentrations of MB (0.1 nmol l−1–100 μmol l−1) at 37°C for 20 min. The binding of [3H]-NMS to the homogenate was quantified by a standard liquid scintillation technique. MB inhibited the esterase activity of human plasma, human pseudocholinesterase and bovine acetylcholinesterase concentration-dependently with IC50 values of 1.05±0.05 μmol l−1, 5.32±0.36 μmol l−1 and 0.42±0.09 μmol l−1, respectively. MB induced complete inhibition of the esterase activity of human plasma and human pseudocholinesterase, whereas bovine acetylcholinesterase was maximally inhibited by 73±3.3%. MB was able to inhibit specific [3H]-NMS binding to rat cardiac left ventricle homogenate completely with an IC50 value of 0.77±0.03 μmol l−1, which resulted in a Ki value for MB of 0.58±0.02 μmol l−1. In conclusion, MB may be considered as a cholinesterase inhibitor with additional, relevant affinity for muscarinic binding sites at concentrations at which MB is used for investigations into the endothelial system. In our opinion these interactions between MB and the cholinergic system invalidate the use of MB as a tool for the investigation of the L-arginine-NO-pathway, in particular when muscarinic receptor stimulation is involved. PMID:9298533

  17. Synthetic method and biological activities of cis-fused alpha-methylene gamma-lactones.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Yohsuke; Shimoma, Fumito; Ando, Masayoshi

    2003-06-01

    A reliable method was developed for the synthesis of cis-fused alpha-methylene gamma-lactones via alpha-methyl gamma-lactones. Bromination of alpha-methyl gamma-lactones with LDA/CBr(4) or TMSOTf/PTAB and successive dehydrobromination with DBU or TBAF of the resulting alpha-bromo-alpha-methyl gamma-lactones gave the desired alpha-methylene gamma-lactones in high yield. This method was successfully applied to the synthesis of biologically active compounds. alpha-Methylene gamma-lactone derivatives 1c, 2c, 4c, and 17 showed cell growth inhibitory activity to P388 lymphocytic leukemia. They also showed significant activities to crop diseases. Thus, alpha-methylene gamma-lactone 1c showed preventive activity in controlling scab of apple caused by Venturia inaequalis. alpha-Methylene gamma-lactones 2c, 4c, 17, and 18 also showed significant preventive activities in controlling damping off of cucumber caused by Pythium aphanidermatum.

  18. Infrared microscopy for the study of biological cell monolayers. I. Spectral effects of acetone and formalin fixation.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Gary; Wang, Ruili; Krug, Peter; Katz, David; Hilliard, Julia

    2008-11-01

    Infrared spectroscopy of biological cell monolayers grown on surfaces is a poorly developed field. This is unfortunate because these monolayers have potential as biological sensors. Here we have used infrared microscopy, in both transmission and transflection geometries, to study air-dried Vero cell monolayers. Using both methods allows one to distinguish sampling artefactual features from real sample spectral features. In transflection experiments, amide I/II absorption bands down-shift 9/4 cm(-1), respectively, relative to the corresponding bands in transmission experiments. In all other spectral regions no pronounced frequency differences in spectral bands in transmission and transflection experiments were observed. Transmission and transflection infrared microscopy were used to obtain infrared spectra for unfixed and acetone- or formalin-fixed Vero cell monolayers. Formalin-fixed monolayers display spectra that are very similar to that obtained using unfixed cells. However, acetone fixation leads to considerable spectral modifications. For unfixed and formalin-fixed monolayers, a distinct band is observed at 1740 cm(-1). This band is absent in spectra obtained using acetone-fixed monolayers. The 1740 cm(-1) band is associated with cellular ester lipids. In support of this hypothesis, two bands at 2925 and 2854 cm(-1) are also found to disappear upon acetone fixation. These bands are associated with C-H modes of the cellular lipids. Acetone fixation also leads to modification of protein amide I and II absorption bands. This may be expected as acetone causes coagulation of soluble cellular proteins. Other spectral changes associated with acetone or formalin fixation in the 1400-800 cm(-1) region are discussed.

  19. The targets of acetone cyanohydrin neurotoxicity in the rat are not the ones expected in an animal model of konzo.

    PubMed

    Soler-Martín, Carla; Riera, Judith; Seoane, Ana; Cutillas, Blanca; Ambrosio, Santiago; Boadas-Vaello, Pere; Llorens, Jordi

    2010-01-01

    Konzo is a neurotoxic motor disease caused by excess consumption of insufficiently processed cassava. Cassava contains the cyanogenic glucoside linamarin, but konzo does not present the known pathological effects of cyanide. We hypothesized that the aglycone of linamarin, acetone cyanohydrin, may be the cause of konzo. This nitrile rapidly decomposes into cyanide and acetone, but the particular exposure and nutrition conditions involved in the emergence of konzo may favor its stabilization and subsequent acute neurotoxicity. A number of preliminary observations were used to design an experiment to test this hypothesis. In the experiment, young female Long-Evans rats were given 10mM acetone cyanohydrin in drinking water for 2 weeks, and then 20mM for 6 weeks. Nutrition deficits associated with konzo were modeled by providing tapioca (cassava starch) as food for the last 3 of these weeks. After this period, rats were fasted for 24h in order to increase endogenous acetone synthesis, and then exposed to 0 (control group) or 50 micromol/kg-h of acetone cyanohydrin for 24h (treated group) through subcutaneous osmotic minipump infusion (n=6/group). Motor activity and gait were evaluated before exposure (pre-test), and 1 and 6 days after exposure. Brains (n=4) were stained for neuronal degeneration by fluoro-jade B. Rats exposed to 50 micromol/kg-h of acetone cyanohydrin showed acute signs of toxicity, but no persistent motor deficits. Two animals showed fluoro-jade staining in discrete thalamic nuclei, including the paraventricular and the ventral reuniens nuclei; one also exhibited labeling of the dorsal endopiriform nucleus. Similar effects were not elicited by equimolar KCN exposure. Therefore, acetone cyanohydrin may cause selective neuronal degeneration in the rat, but the affected areas are not those expected in an animal model of konzo.

  20. Chloride Transporting CLC Proteins1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusch, Michael

    In the early 1980s, Chris Miller and colleagues described a curious "double-barreled" chloride channel from the electric organ of Torpedo fish reconstituted in planar lipid bilayers (Miller and White, 1980). Single-channel openings occurred in "bursts" separated by long closures. A single burst was characterized by the presence of two open conductance levels of equal size and the gating (i.e., openings and closings) during a burst could be almost perfectly described as a superposition of two identical and independent conductances that switched between open and closed states with voltage-dependent rates α and β (Hanke and Miller, 1983) (Fig. 8.1).

  1. An XAFS Study of Niobium chloride in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride/ aluminum chloride

    SciTech Connect

    D Roeper; K Pandya; G Cheek; W OGrady

    2011-12-31

    Niobium chloride was studied with extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) in acidic and basic aluminum chloride/1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (EMIC) ionic liquids. Although anhydrous Nb2Cl10 is more soluble in the basic melt than in the acidic melt, the EXAFS data shows that the coordination shell around the niobium does not change in the different ionic liquids. Both the acidic and basic melts show a coordination of five chlorides in the first shell. This indicates that in this series of ionic liquids, the Nb2Cl10 breaks up into two NbCl5 entities in both the acidic and the basic melts.

  2. Production of anhydrous aluminum chloride composition

    DOEpatents

    Vandergrift, G.F. III; Krumpelt, M.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1981-10-08

    A process is described for producing an anhydrous aluminum chloride composition from a water-based aluminous material such as a slurry of aluminum hydroxide in a multistage extraction process in which the aluminum ion is first extracted into an organic liquid containing an acidic extractant and then extracted from the organic phase into an alkali metal chloride or chlorides to form a melt containing a mixture of chlorides of alkali metal and aluminum. In the process, the organic liquid may be recycled. In addition, the process advantageously includes an electrolysis cell for producing metallic aluminum and the alkali metal chloride or chlorides may be recycled for extraction of the aluminum from the organic phase.

  3. [Sodium chloride 0.9%: nephrotoxic crystalloid?].

    PubMed

    Dombre, Vincent; De Seigneux, Sophie; Schiffer, Eduardo

    2016-02-01

    Sodium chloride 0.9%, often incorrectly called physiological saline, contains higher concentration of chloride compared to plasma. It is known that the administration of sodium chloride 0.9% can cause hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis in a reproducible manner. The elevated chloride concentration in 0.9% NaCl solution can also adversely affect renal perfusion. This effect is thought to be induced by hyperchloremia that causes renal artery vasoconstriction. For these reasons, the use of 0.9% NaCl solution is raising attention and some would advocate the use of a more "physiological" solution, such as balanced solutions that contain a level of chloride closer to that of plasma. Few prospective, randomized, controlled trials are available today and most were done in a perioperative setting. Some studies suggest that the chloride excess in 0.9% NaCl solution could have clinical consequences; however, this remains to be established by quality randomized controlled trials. PMID:26999998

  4. [Sodium chloride 0.9%: nephrotoxic crystalloid?].

    PubMed

    Dombre, Vincent; De Seigneux, Sophie; Schiffer, Eduardo

    2016-02-01

    Sodium chloride 0.9%, often incorrectly called physiological saline, contains higher concentration of chloride compared to plasma. It is known that the administration of sodium chloride 0.9% can cause hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis in a reproducible manner. The elevated chloride concentration in 0.9% NaCl solution can also adversely affect renal perfusion. This effect is thought to be induced by hyperchloremia that causes renal artery vasoconstriction. For these reasons, the use of 0.9% NaCl solution is raising attention and some would advocate the use of a more "physiological" solution, such as balanced solutions that contain a level of chloride closer to that of plasma. Few prospective, randomized, controlled trials are available today and most were done in a perioperative setting. Some studies suggest that the chloride excess in 0.9% NaCl solution could have clinical consequences; however, this remains to be established by quality randomized controlled trials.

  5. Heinz-body hemolytic anemia associated with ingestion of methylene blue in a river otter.

    PubMed

    Narurkar, Neelesh S; Thomas, Jennifer S; Phalen, David N

    2002-02-01

    Heinz-body hemolytic anemia and nephrosis associated with hemoglobinuria were diagnosed in a North American river otter. Fluids were administered, and the signs of renal failure improved immediately. Severe anemia developed, and the otter received a semisynthetic hemoglobin product to maintain the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood until a blood transfusion could be given. Immediate clinical improvement was observed following hemoglobin administration, and adverse effects were not seen. Six days after admission, the otter began to produce its own RBC and recovered without complications. The Heinz-body anemia was determined to be caused by methylene blue that was in the water of minnows consumed by the otter the night before it became ill. Methylene blue is a common ingredient in products used to extend the life of bait fish. Bait fish kept in water treated with methylene blue should not be used as food for fish-eating animals.

  6. Adsorption of chlorophenol, chloroaniline and methylene blue on fuel oil fly ash.

    PubMed

    Andini, Salvatore; Cioffi, Raffaele; Colangelo, Francesco; Montagnaro, Fabio; Santoro, Luciano

    2008-09-15

    Fuel oil fly ash has been tested as low-cost carbon-based adsorbent of 2-chlorophenol (CP), 2-chloroaniline (CA) and methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solutions. In all the cases the adsorption was found to be of cooperative type. Different adsorption capacities were found for the three organics. Specifically, it was highest for 2-chlorophenol, reaching about 70 mg g(-1), and quite lower in the other two cases, that is about 47 and 36 mg g(-1) for methylene blue and 2-chloroaniline, respectively. Varying the initial pH and adding KCl were found to have different effects on the adsorption of the three organics. In particular, the presence of other ions had no effect on the adsorption of methylene blue, adverse effect in the case of 2-chlorophenol and enhancing effect in the case of 2-chloroaniline.

  7. Utility of methylene blue for the reversal of excessive levels of methemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Vick, J.; Von Bredow, J.; Brown, L.; Kaminskis, A.; Bossone, C.

    1993-05-13

    Many new prophylactic and therapeutic compounds are being studied as potential sources of methemoglobin useful in counteracting the lethal effects of cyanide intoxication. The formation of methemoglobin also leads to a reduction in the blood oxygen carrying capacity which may, in extreme cases, lead to lethal consequences. The i.v. administration of Methylene blue rapidly reverses methemoglobin to hemoglobin. Unanticipated high levels of methemoglobin (65 - 85%) in three sheep exposed to propiophenone derivatives led to a lethal outcome in one untreated sheep and complete recovery in two sheep which were treated with 3.0 mg/kg methylene blue i.v. methemoglobin was reduced to safe levels within minutes following administration. A similar exposure of dogs to propriophenone derivatives led to high levels (77 - 78%) of methemoglobin which were readily reversed following the intravenous administration of the same dose of methylene blue.

  8. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS Reg. No. 7786-30-3) is a... prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in aqueous hydrochloric acid solution...

  9. Metal chloride cathode for a battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); Distefano, Salvador (Inventor); Bankston, C. Perry (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method of fabricating a rechargeable battery is disclosed which includes a positive electrode which contains a chloride of a selected metal when the electrode is in its active state. The improvement comprises fabricating the positive electrode by: providing a porous matrix composed of a metal; providing a solution of the chloride of the selected metal; and impregnating the matrix with the chloride from the solution.

  10. [Toluene, Benzene and Acetone Adsorption by Activated Carbon Coated with PDMS].

    PubMed

    Liu, Han-bing; Jiang, Xin; Wang, Xin; Yang, Bing; Xue, Nan-dong; Zhang, Shi-lei

    2016-04-15

    To improve the adsorption selectivity of volatile organic compounds ( VOCs) , activated carbon ( AC) was modified by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and characterized by BET analysis and Boehm titration. Dynamic adsorption column experiments were conducted and Yoon-Neslon(Y-N) model was used to identify adsorption effect for toluene, beuzene and acetone on AC when relative humidity was 0%, 50% and 90%, respectively. The results showed that the BET area, micropore volume and surface functional groups decreased with the PDMS modification, and surface hydrophobicity of the modified AC was enhanced leading to a lower water adsorption capacity. The results of dynamic adsorption showed that the adsorption kinetics and capacity of Bare-AC decreased with the increase of relative humidity, and the adsorption capacities of PDMS coated AC were 1.86 times (toluene) and 1.92 times (benzene) higher than those of Bare-AC, while a significant improvement of adsorption capacity for acetone was not observed. These findings suggest that polarity of molecule can be an important influencing factor for adsorption on hydrophobic surface developed by PDMS. PMID:27548948

  11. Shear viscosity of polar liquid mixtures via non-equilibrium molecular dynamics: water, methanol, and acetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler Richard, Dean R.; Rowley, L.

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) with isobaric and isokinetic controls were used to simulate the shear viscosity for binary mixtures of water, methanol and acetone, and for ternary mixtures. In all, 22 different liquid composition points were simulated at 298.15 K and 0.1 MPa. A new set of acetone potential parameters was developed, while slight variants to existing water and methanol models were used. Long range Coulombic interactions were computed with the Ewald sum adapted to Lees-Edwards boundary conditions as formulated in Wheeler, D. R., Fuller, N. G., and Rowley, R. L., 1997, Molec. Phys., 92, 55. The attractive (dispersive) part of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions also was handled by a lattice sum. A hybrid mixing rule was used for the LJ cross interactions. Viscosities extrapolated to zero shear compared well with experimental results, having a mean absolute error of 14% and no errors greater than 30%. Although the simulations successfully predicted viscosity maxima for mixtures high in water content, the peak heights tended to be too low, probably due to the limitations of the water model. The results suggest that NEMD may be a viable means of estimating viscosities for polar liquid mixtures with an unrestricted number of components.

  12. Industrial production of acetone and butanol by fermentation—100 years later

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Microbial production of acetone and butanol was one of the first large-scale industrial fermentation processes of global importance. During the first part of the 20th century, it was indeed the second largest fermentation process, superseded in importance only by the ethanol fermentation. After a rapid decline after the 1950s, acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation has recently gained renewed interest in the context of biorefinery approaches for the production of fuels and chemicals from renewable resources. The availability of new methods and knowledge opens many new doors for industrial microbiology, and a comprehensive view on this process is worthwhile due to the new interest. This thematic issue of FEMS Microbiology Letters, dedicated to the 100th anniversary of the first industrial exploitation of Chaim Weizmann's ABE fermentation process, covers the main aspects of old and new developments, thereby outlining a model development in biotechnology. All major aspects of industrial microbiology are exemplified by this single process. This includes new technologies, such as the latest developments in metabolic engineering, the exploitation of biodiversity and discoveries of new regulatory systems such as for microbial stress tolerance, as well as technological aspects, such as bio- and down-stream processing. PMID:27199350

  13. Acetone-soluble cellulose acetate extracted from waste blended fabrics via ionic liquid catalyzed acetylation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xunwen; Lu, Canhui; Zhang, Wei; Tian, Dong; Zhang, Xinxing

    2013-10-15

    Isolation of cellulose from waste polyester/cotton blended fabrics (WBFs) is a bottleneck for recycling and exploiting waste textiles. The objective of this study was to provide a new environmental-friendly and efficient approach for extracting cellulose derivatives and polyester from WBFs. A Bronsted acidic ionic liquid (IL) N-methyl-imidazolium bisulfate, [Hmim]HSO4, was used as a novel catalyst for acetylation of cellulose rather than a solvent with the aim to overcome low isolation efficiency associated with the very high viscosity and relatively high costs of ILs. The extraction yield of acetone-soluble cellulose acetate (CA) was 49.3%, which corresponded to a conversion of 84.5% of the cellulose in the original WBFs; meanwhile, 96.2% of the original poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) was recovered. The extracted CA was characterized by (1)H NMR, FTIR, XRD and TGA analysis, and the results indicated that high purity acetone-soluble CA and carbohydrate-free PET could be isolated in this manner from WBFs.

  14. Rate coefficients for reaction of OH with acetone between 202 and 395 K

    SciTech Connect

    Wollenhaupt, M.; Carl, S.A.; Horowitz, A.; Crowley, J.N.

    2000-03-30

    The kinetics of the title reaction were investigated between 202 and 395 K and at 20, 50, and 100 Torr of Ar or N{sub 2} bath gas using pulsed laser photolysis (PLP) generation of OH combined with both resonance fluorescence (RF) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection. OH was generated either by the sequential 439 nm, two-photon dissociation of NO{sub 2} in the presence of H{sub 2}, or by HONO photolysis at 351 nm. The accuracy of the rate constants obtained was enhanced by optical absorption measurements of acetone concentrations both before and after the photolysis reactor. The temperature dependence is not describe by a simple Arrhenius expression but by k{sub 1} (202--395 K) = 8.8 x 10{sup {minus}12} exp({minus}1,320/T) + 1.7 x 10{sup {minus}14} exp(423/T) cm{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1}, indicating that a simple H atom abstraction may not be the only reaction mechanism. The estimated total error (95% confidence) associated wit the rate coefficient derived from this expression is estimated as 5% and is independent of temperature. The curvature in the Arrhenius plot results in a significantly larger rate coefficient at low temperatures than obtained by extrapolation of the previous measurement and implies greater significance for the reaction with OH as a sink for acetone in the upper troposphere than presently assumed.

  15. [Toluene, Benzene and Acetone Adsorption by Activated Carbon Coated with PDMS].

    PubMed

    Liu, Han-bing; Jiang, Xin; Wang, Xin; Yang, Bing; Xue, Nan-dong; Zhang, Shi-lei

    2016-04-15

    To improve the adsorption selectivity of volatile organic compounds ( VOCs) , activated carbon ( AC) was modified by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and characterized by BET analysis and Boehm titration. Dynamic adsorption column experiments were conducted and Yoon-Neslon(Y-N) model was used to identify adsorption effect for toluene, beuzene and acetone on AC when relative humidity was 0%, 50% and 90%, respectively. The results showed that the BET area, micropore volume and surface functional groups decreased with the PDMS modification, and surface hydrophobicity of the modified AC was enhanced leading to a lower water adsorption capacity. The results of dynamic adsorption showed that the adsorption kinetics and capacity of Bare-AC decreased with the increase of relative humidity, and the adsorption capacities of PDMS coated AC were 1.86 times (toluene) and 1.92 times (benzene) higher than those of Bare-AC, while a significant improvement of adsorption capacity for acetone was not observed. These findings suggest that polarity of molecule can be an important influencing factor for adsorption on hydrophobic surface developed by PDMS.

  16. Roles of acetone and diacetone alcohol in coordination and dissociation reactions of uranyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Rios, Daniel; Schoendorff, George; Van Stipdonk, Michael J; Gordon, Mark S; Windus, Theresa L; Gibson, John K; de Jong, Wibe A

    2012-12-01

    Combined collision-induced dissociation mass spectrometry experiments with DFT and MP2 calculations were employed to elucidate the molecular structures and energetics of dissociation reactions of uranyl species containing acetone and diacetone alcohol ligands. It is shown that solutions containing diacetone alcohol ligands can produce species with more than five oxygen atoms available for coordination. Calculations confirm that complexes with up to four diacetone alcohol ligands can be energetically stable but that the effective number of atoms coordinating with uranium in the equatorial plane does not exceed five. Water elimination reactions of diacetone alcohol ligands are shown to have two coordination-dependent reaction channels, through formation of mesityl oxide ligands or formation of alkoxide and protonated mesityl oxide species. The present results provide an explanation for the implausible observation of "[UO(2)(ACO)(6,7,8)](2+)" in and observed water-elimination reactions from purportedly uranyl-acetone complexes (Rios, D.; Rutkowski, P. X.; Van Stipdonk, M. J.; Gibson, J. K. Inorg. Chem. 2011, 50, 4781). PMID:23146003

  17. Chemistry in Acetone Complexes of Metal Dications: A Remarkable Ethylene Production Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jianhua; Liu, Dan; Zhou, Jian-Ge; Hagelberg, Frank; Park, Sung S.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2007-05-16

    Electrospray ionization can generate microsolvated multiply charged metal ions for various metals and ligands, allowing exploration of chemistry within such clusters. The finite size of these systems permits comparing experimental results with accurate calculations, creating a natural laboratory to research ion solvation. Mass spectrometry has provided much insight into the stability and dissociation of ligated metal cations. While solvated singly charged ions tend to shrink by ligand evaporation, solvated polycations below a certain size exhibit charge reduction and/or ligand fragmentation due to organometallic reactions. Here we investigate the acetone complexes of typical divalent metals (Ca, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, and Cu), comparing the results of collision-induced dissociation with the predictions from density functional theory. As for other solvated dications, dissociation channels involving proton or electron transfer compete with ligand loss and become dominant for smaller complexes. The heterolytic C-C bond cleavage is common, as one would expect from previous work on DMSO and acetonitrile complexes. Of primary interest is the highly unintuitive neutral ethylene loss, found for all metals studied except Cu and particularly intense for Ca, Mn, and Fe. We focus on understanding that process in the context of competing dissociation channels, as a function of metal identity and number of ligands. According to first-principles modeling, ethylene elimination proceeds along a complex path involving a rearrangement of two acetone ligands and multiple transition states.

  18. Lignin hydrolysis and phosphorylation mechanism during phosphoric acid-acetone pretreatment: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wu; Wu, Lingnan; Zheng, Zongming; Dong, Changqing; Yang, Yongping

    2014-12-18

    The study focused on the structural sensitivity of lignin during the phosphoric acid-acetone pretreatment process and the resulting hydrolysis and phosphorylation reaction mechanisms using density functional theory calculations. The chemical stabilities of the seven most common linkages (β-O-4, β-β, 4-O-5, β-1, 5-5, α-O-4, and β-5) of lignin in H3PO4, CH3COCH3, and H2O solutions were detected, which shows that α-O-4 linkage and β-O-4 linkage tend to break during the phosphoric acid-acetone pretreatment process. Then α-O-4 phosphorylation and β-O-4 phosphorylation follow a two-step reaction mechanism in the acid treatment step, respectively. However, since phosphorylation of α-O-4 is more energetically accessible than phosphorylation of β-O-4 in phosphoric acid, the phosphorylation of α-O-4 could be controllably realized under certain operational conditions, which could tune the electron and hole transfer on the right side of β-O-4 in the H2PO4- functionalized lignin. The results provide a fundamental understanding for process-controlled modification of lignin and the potential novel applications in lignin-based imprinted polymers, sensors, and molecular devices.

  19. Central nervous system activity of an aqueous acetonic extract of Ficus carica L. in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhanushali, Mittal M.; Makhija, Dinesh T.; Joshi, Yadunath M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ficus carica Linn. is reported to possess variety of activities, but its potential in CNS disorders is still to be explored. Objective: The present study was carried out to evaluate the CNS depressant activity of aqueous acetonic extract of Ficus carica Linn on different models in mice. Materials and Methods: The aerial parts of the plant Ficus carica L. were extracted with aqueous acetone and the solvent was removed by rotary vacuum evaporator under reduced pressure. A crude extract was given orally and its effects were tested on ketamine-induced sleeping time, muscle-coordination, anxiety (elevated-plus maze and Staircase test), convulsions [maximal electroshock (MES) and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures], and nociception. In addition, we determined the levels of neurotransmitters, norepinephrine (NE) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Results: Results from the experimental models tested showed: (1) a delay on onset and prolongation of sleep of ketamine-induced sleeping time; (2) significant muscle relaxant activity; (3) a significant attenuation in the anxiety-response (4) a delay in the onset of seizures and reduction in duration of seizures and mortality induced by MES and PTZ; (5) a reduction in the licking time in nociception test and (6) increased levels of NE and 5-HT. Conclusion: This suggests that Ficus carica L. exerts its CNS depressive effect by modulating the neurotransmitters NE and 5-HT in the brain. PMID:24948859

  20. Acetone Extract of Almond Hulls Provides Protection against Oxidative Damage and Membrane Protein Degradation.

    PubMed

    Meshkini, Azadeh

    2016-06-01

    Several studies have revealed that among foods, the consumption of edible nuts has beneficial effects on health which are attributed to their high content of potent antioxidants. Among nuts, the whole seed of the almond (Prunus dulcis) has been demonstrated to possess potent free radical scavenging activity, which is related to the presence of phenolic compounds. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the polyphenol content and the antioxidant ability of almond hull, which is an agriculture solid waste. The present results revealed that among different extraction methods, the acetone extract of almond hulls has a high content of phenolic and flavonoid compounds and a high antioxidant ability, which were determined by using the phosphomolybdenum method and by measuring the potency of the antioxidant, respectively. Moreover, the experimental data disclosed that the acetone extract of almond hulls provides protection against the oxidative damage and the membrane protein degradation that are caused in human erythrocytes by hydrogen peroxide. These phenomena may likely be due to the recruitment of antioxidants by cell membranes and/or translocation to cytosol. Overall, almond hull extract could be considered as a natural source of antioxidants, and its consumption could have a positive effect on human health. PMID:27342887