Science.gov

Sample records for acetone-butanol-ethanol abe fermentation

  1. Assessment of in situ butanol recovery by vacuum during acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butanol fermentation is product limiting due to butanol toxicity to microbial cells. Butanol (boiling point: 118 deg C) boils at a greater temperature than water (boiling point: 100 deg C) and application of vacuum technology to integrated acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation and recovery may ...

  2. Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol (ABE) Fermentation Wastewater Treatment by Oleaginous Yeast Trichosporon cutaneum.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lian; Huang, Chao; Li, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Xue-Fang; Wang, Bo; Wang, Can; Zeng, Xin-An; Chen, Xin-De

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation wastewater with high chemical oxygen demand (COD) value (about 18,000 mg/L) was biologically treated by oleaginous yeast Trichosporon cutaneum without any pretreatment. During fermentation, most COD degradation was finished within 48 h and finally, a maximum COD degradation of 68% was obtained. The highest biomass and lipid content was 4.9 g/L and 14.7%, respectively. Various materials including sugars (glucose and xylose), organic acids (acetic acid and butyric acid), and alcohol compounds (ethanol and butanol) could be utilized as carbon sources by T. cutaneum simultaneously; thus, it has a broad carbon source spectrum and is a potential microorganism for biological treatment for various wastewaters. Overall, the lipid composition of microbial oils produced by this bioconversion is similar to that of vegetable oils, and thus, it could be used for biodiesel production.

  3. Impact of sweet sorghum cuticular waxes (SSCW) on acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation using Clostridium acetobutylicum ABE1201.

    PubMed

    Cai, Di; Chang, Zhen; Wang, Chengyu; Ren, Wenqiang; Wang, Zheng; Qin, Peiyong; Tan, Tianwei

    2013-12-01

    The effect of cuticular waxes of sweet sorghum stem on acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation process was investigated. About 22.9% of butanol and 25.4% of ABE were decreased with fermentation period extended when SSCW was added. The inhibition of SSCW militate against both acidogenesis and solventogenesis phase, which were inconsistent with the inhibition of lignocellulose hydrolysate. Further studies on the composition of SSCW were performed. Regulations of inhibition with different carbon chain length of main compositions of SSCW on ABE fermentation were also investigated.

  4. Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation in an immobilized cell trickle bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Park, C H; Okos, M R; Wankat, P C

    1989-06-05

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was successfully carried out in an immobilized cell trickle bed reactor. The reactor was composed of two serial columns packed with Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 entrapped on the surface of natural sponge segments at a cell loading in the range of 2.03-5.56 g dry cells/g sponge. The average cell loading was 3.58 g dry cells/g sponge. Batch experiments indicated that a critical pH above 4.2 is necessary for the initiation of cell growth. One of the media used during continuous experiments consisted of a salt mixture alone and the other a nutrient medium containing a salt mixture with yeast extract and peptone. Effluent pH was controlled by supplying various fractions of the two different types of media. A nutrient medium fraction above 0.6 was crucial for successful fermentation in a trickle bed reactor. The nutrient medium fraction is the ratio of the volume of the nutrient medium to the total volume of nutrient plus salt medium. Supplying nutrient medium to both columns continuously was an effective way to meet both pH and nutrient requirement. A 257-mL reactor could ferment 45 g/L glucose from an initial concentration of 60 g/L glucose at a rate of 70 mL/h. Butanol, acetone, and ethanol concentrations were 8.82, 5.22, and 1.45 g/L, respectively, with a butanol and total solvent yield of 19.4 and 34.1 wt %. Solvent productivity in an immobilized cell trickle bed reactor was 4.2 g/L h, which was 10 times higher than that obtained in a batch fermentation using free cells and 2.76 times higher than that of an immobilized CSTR. If the nutrient medium fraction was below 0.6 and the pH was below 4.2, the system degenerated. Oxygen also contributed to the system degeneration. Upon degeneration, glucose consumption and solvent yield decreased to 30.9 g/L and 23.0 wt %, respectively. The yield of total liquid product (40.0 wt %) and butanol selectivity (60.0 wt %) remained almost constant. Once the cells were degenerated

  5. Efficient production of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) from cassava by a fermentation-pervaporation coupled process.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Chen, Xiangrong; Qi, Benkun; Luo, Jianquan; Zhang, Yuming; Su, Yi; Wan, Yinhua

    2014-10-01

    Production of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) from cassava was investigated with a fermentation-pervaporation (PV) coupled process. ABE products were in situ removed from fermentation broth to alleviate the toxicity of solvent to the Clostridium acetobutylicum DP217. Compared to the batch fermentation without PV, glucose consumption rate and solvent productivity increased by 15% and 21%, respectively, in batch fermentation-PV coupled process, while in continuous fermentation-PV coupled process running for 304 h, the substrate consumption rate, solvent productivity and yield increased by 58%, 81% and 15%, reaching 2.02 g/Lh, 0.76 g/Lh and 0.38 g/g, respectively. Silicalite-1 filled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) membrane modules ensured media recycle without significant fouling, steadily generating a highly concentrated ABE solution containing 201.8 g/L ABE with 122.4 g/L butanol. After phase separation, a final product containing 574.3g/L ABE with 501.1g/L butanol was obtained. Therefore, the fermentation-PV coupled process has the potential to decrease the cost in ABE production.

  6. Continuous acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation and gas production under slight pressure in a membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunyan; Wang, Linyuan; Xiao, Guoqing; Liu, Yucheng; Xiao, Zeyi; Deng, Qing; Yao, Peina

    2014-07-01

    Two rounds of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation under slight pressure were carried out in the continuous and closed-circulating fermentation (CCCF) system. Spores of the clostridium were observed and counted, with the maximum number of 2.1 × 10(8) and 2.3 × 10(8)ml(-1) separately. The fermentation profiles were comparable with that at atmospheric pressure, showing an average butanol productivity of 0.14 and 0.13 g L(-1)h(-1). Moreover, the average gas productivities of 0.28 and 0.27 L L(-1)h(-1) were obtained in two rounds of CCCF, and the cumulative gas production of 52.64 and 25.92 L L(-1) were achieved, with the hydrogen volume fraction of 41.43% and 38.08% respectively. The results suggested that slight pressures have no obvious effect on fermentation performance, and also indicated the significance and feasibility of gas recovery in the continuous ABE fermentation process.

  7. Production of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) in direct fermentation of cassava by Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4.

    PubMed

    Thang, Vu Hong; Kanda, Kohzo; Kobayashi, Genta

    2010-05-01

    In this work, acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation characteristics of cassava starch and cassava chips when using Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4 was presented. The obtained results in batch mode using a 1-L fermenter showed that C. saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4 was a hyperamylolytic strain and capable of producing solvents efficiently from cassava starch and cassava chips, which was comparable to when glucose was used. Batch fermentation of cassava starch and cassava chips resulted in 21.0 and 19.4 g/L of total solvent as compared with 24.2 g/L of total solvent when using glucose. Solvent productivity in fermentation of cassava starch was from 42% to 63% higher than that obtained in fermentation using corn and sago starches in the same condition. In fermentation of cassava starch and cassava chips, maximum butanol concentration was 16.9 and 15.5 g/L, respectively. Solvent yield and butanol yield (based on potential glucose) was 0.33 and 0.41, respectively, for fermentation of cassava starch and 0.30 and 0.38, respectively for fermentation using cassava chips.

  8. Enhancing clostridial acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production and improving fuel properties of ABE-enriched biodiesel by extractive fermentation with biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Cai, Hao; Hao, Bo; Zhang, Congling; Yu, Ziniu; Zhou, Shengde; Chenjuan, Liu

    2010-12-01

    The extractive acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentations of Clostridium acetobutylicum were evaluated using biodiesel as the in situ extractant. The biodiesel preferentially extracted butanol, minimized product inhibition, and increased production of butanol (from 11.6 to 16.5 g L⁻¹) and total solvents (from 20.0 to 29.9 g L⁻¹) by 42% and 50%, respectively. The fuel properties of the ABE-enriched biodiesel obtained from the extractive fermentations were analyzed. The key quality indicators of diesel fuel, such as the cetane number (increased from 48 to 54) and the cold filter plugging point (decreased from 5.8 to 0.2 °C), were significantly improved for the ABE-enriched biodiesel. Thus, the application of biodiesel as the extractant for ABE fermentation would increase ABE production, bypass the energy intensive butanol recovery process, and result in an ABE-enriched biodiesel with improved fuel properties.

  9. Allopurinol-mediated lignocellulose-derived microbial inhibitor tolerance by Clostridium beijerinckii during acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ujor, Victor; Agu, Chidozie Victor; Gopalan, Venkat; Ezeji, Thaddeus Chukwuemeka

    2015-04-01

    In addition to glucans, xylans, and arabinans, lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates contain significant levels of nonsugar components that are toxic to the microbes that are typically used to convert biomass to biofuels and chemicals. To enhance the tolerance of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE)-generating Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 to these lignocellulose-derived microbial inhibitory compounds (LDMICs; e.g., furfural), we have been examining different metabolic perturbation strategies to increase the cellular reductant pools and thereby facilitate detoxification of LDMICs. As part of these efforts, we evaluated the effect of allopurinol, an inhibitor of NAD(P)H-generating xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH), on C. beijerinckii grown in furfural-supplemented medium and found that it unexpectedly increased the rate of detoxification of furfural by 1.4-fold and promoted growth, butanol, and ABE production by 1.2-, 2.5-, and 2-fold, respectively. Since NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) levels in C. beijerinckii were largely unchanged upon allopurinol treatment, we postulated and validated a possible basis in DNA repair to account for the solventogenic gains with allopurinol. Following the observation that supplementation of allopurinol in the C. beijerinckii growth media mitigates the toxic effects of nalidixic acid, a DNA-damaging antibiotic, we found that allopurinol elicited 2.4- and 6.7-fold increase in the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of xanthine and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferases, key purine-salvage enzymes. Consistent with this finding, addition of inosine (a precursor of hypoxanthine) and xanthine led to 1.4- and 1.7-fold increase in butanol production in furfural-challenged cultures of C. beijerinckii. Taken together, our results provide a purine salvage-based rationale for the unanticipated effect of allopurinol in improving furfural tolerance of the ABE-fermenting C. beijerinckii.

  10. A quantitative metabolomics study of high sodium response in Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinhe; Condruz, Stefan; Chen, Jingkui; Jolicoeur, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Hemicellulose hydrolysates, sugar-rich feedstocks used in biobutanol refinery, are normally obtained by adding sodium hydroxide in the hydrolyze process. However, the resulting high sodium concentration in the hydrolysate inhibits ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol) fermentation, and thus limits the use of these low-cost feedstocks. We have thus studied the effect of high sodium on the metabolic behavior of Clostridium acetobutyricum ATCC 824, with xylose as the carbon source. At a threshold sodium concentration of 200 mM, a decrease of the maximum cell dry weight (−19.50 ± 0.85%) and of ABE yield (−35.14 ± 3.50% acetone, −33.37 ± 0.74% butanol, −22.95 ± 1.81% ethanol) were observed compared to control culture. However, solvents specific productivities were not affected by supplementing sodium. The main effects of high sodium on cell metabolism were observed in acidogenesis, during which we observed the accumulation of ATP and NADH, and the inhibition of the pentose phosphate (PPP) and the glycolytic pathways with up to 80.73 ± 1.47% and 68.84 ± 3.42% decrease of the associated metabolic intermediates, respectively. However, the NADP+-to-NADPH ratio was constant for the whole culture duration, a phenomenon explaining the robustness of solvents specific productivities. Therefore, high sodium, which inhibited biomass growth through coordinated metabolic effects, interestingly triggered cell robustness on solvents specific productivity. PMID:27321153

  11. Effect of cellulosic sugar degradation products (furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural) on acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation using Clostridium beijerinckii P260

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies were performed to identify chemicals present in wheat straw hydrolysate (WSH) that enhance acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) productivity. These chemicals were identified as furfural and hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF). Control experiment resulted in the production of 21.09-21.66 gL**-1 ABE with a ...

  12. Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation using Clostridium acetobutylicum XY16 and in situ recovery by PDMS/ceramic composite membrane.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Chen, Xiao-Peng; Liu, Gong-Ping; Jiang, Min; Guo, Ting; Jin, Wan-Qin; Wei, Ping; Zhu, Da-Wei

    2012-09-01

    PDMS/ceramic composite membrane was directly integrated with acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation using Clostridium acetobutylicum XY16 at 37 °C and in situ removing ABE from fermentation broth. The membrane was integrated with batch fermentation, and approximately 46 % solvent was extracted. The solvent in permeates was 118 g/L, and solvent productivity was 0.303 g/(L/h), which was approximately 33 % higher compared with the batch fermentation without in situ recovery. The fed-batch fermentation with in situ recovery by pervaporation continued for more than 200 h, 61 % solvent was extracted, and the solvent in penetration was 96.2 g/L. The total flux ranged from 0.338 to 0.847 kg/(m(2)/h) and the separation factor of butanol ranged from 5.1 to 27.1 in this process. The membrane was fouled by the active fermentation broth, nevertheless the separation performances were partially recovered by offline membrane cleaning, and the solvent productivity was increased to 0.252 g/(L/h), which was 19 % higher compared with that in situ recovery process without membrane cleaning.

  13. The enhancement of butanol production by in situ butanol removal using biodiesel extraction in the fermentation of ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol).

    PubMed

    Yen, Hong-Wei; Wang, Yi-Cheng

    2013-10-01

    High butanol accumulation is due to feedback inhibition which leads to the low butanol productivity observed in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. The aim of this study is to use biodiesel as an extractant for the in situ removal of butanol from the broth. The results indicate that adding biodiesel as an extractant at the beginning of fermentation significantly enhances butanol production. No significant toxicity of biodiesel on the growth of Clostridium acetobutylicum is observed. In the fed-batch operation with glucose feeding, the maximum total butanol obtained is 31.44 g/L, as compared to the control batch (without the addition of biodiesel) at 9.85 g/L. Moreover, the productivity obtained is 0.295 g/L h in the fed-batch, which is higher than that of 0.185 g/L h for the control batch. The in situ butanol removal by the addition of biodiesel has great potential for commercial ABE production.

  14. Mathematical modelling of clostridial acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Millat, Thomas; Winzer, Klaus

    2017-03-01

    Clostridial acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation features a remarkable shift in the cellular metabolic activity from acid formation, acidogenesis, to the production of industrial-relevant solvents, solventogensis. In recent decades, mathematical models have been employed to elucidate the complex interlinked regulation and conditions that determine these two distinct metabolic states and govern the transition between them. In this review, we discuss these models with a focus on the mechanisms controlling intra- and extracellular changes between acidogenesis and solventogenesis. In particular, we critically evaluate underlying model assumptions and predictions in the light of current experimental knowledge. Towards this end, we briefly introduce key ideas and assumptions applied in the discussed modelling approaches, but waive a comprehensive mathematical presentation. We distinguish between structural and dynamical models, which will be discussed in their chronological order to illustrate how new biological information facilitates the 'evolution' of mathematical models. Mathematical models and their analysis have significantly contributed to our knowledge of ABE fermentation and the underlying regulatory network which spans all levels of biological organization. However, the ties between the different levels of cellular regulation are not well understood. Furthermore, contradictory experimental and theoretical results challenge our current notion of ABE metabolic network structure. Thus, clostridial ABE fermentation still poses theoretical as well as experimental challenges which are best approached in close collaboration between modellers and experimentalists.

  15. Direct in situ butanol recovery inside the packed bed during continuous acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin-Rong; Chiang, Yu-Sheng; Chuang, Po-Jen; Chao, Yun-Peng; Li, Si-Yu

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the integrated in situ extraction-gas stripping process was coupled with continuous ABE fermentation using immobilized Clostridium acetobutylicum. At the same time, oleyl alcohol was cocurrently flowed into the packed bed reactor with the fresh medium and then recycled back to the packed bed reactor after removing butanol in the stripper. A high glucose consumption of 52 g/L and a high butanol productivity of 11 g/L/h were achieved, resulting in a high butanol yield of 0.21 g-butanol/g-glucose. This can be attributed to both the high bacterial activity for solvent production as well as a threefold increase in the bacterial density inside the packed bed reactor. Also reported is that 64 % of the butanol produced can be recovered by the integrated in situ extraction-gas stripping process. A high butanol productivity and a high glucose consumption were simultaneously achieved.

  16. Kinetic Study of Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol Fermentation in Continuous Culture

    PubMed Central

    Buehler, Edward A.; Mesbah, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by clostridia has shown promise for industrial-scale production of biobutanol. However, the continuous ABE fermentation suffers from low product yield, titer, and productivity. Systems analysis of the continuous ABE fermentation will offer insights into its metabolic pathway as well as into optimal fermentation design and operation. For the ABE fermentation in continuous Clostridium acetobutylicum culture, this paper presents a kinetic model that includes the effects of key metabolic intermediates and enzymes as well as culture pH, product inhibition, and glucose inhibition. The kinetic model is used for elucidating the behavior of the ABE fermentation under the conditions that are most relevant to continuous cultures. To this end, dynamic sensitivity analysis is performed to systematically investigate the effects of culture conditions, reaction kinetics, and enzymes on the dynamics of the ABE production pathway. The analysis provides guidance for future metabolic engineering and fermentation optimization studies. PMID:27486663

  17. Pervaporation of model acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation product solutions using polytetrafluoroethylene membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Vrana, D.L.; Meagher, M.M.; Hutkins, R.W.; Duffield, B. )

    1993-10-01

    A pervaporation apparatus was designed and tested in an effort to develop an integrated fermentation and product recovery process for acetone-butanol-ethanol(ABE) fermentation. A crossflow membrane module able to accommodate flat sheet hydrophobic membranes was used for the experiments. Permeate vapors were collected under vacuum and condensed in a dry ice/ethanol cold trap. The apparatus containing polytetrafluoroethylene membranes was tested using butanol-water and model solutions of ABE products. Parameters such as product concentration, component effect, temperature, and permeate side pressure were examined. 25 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Recent progress on industrial fermentative production of acetone-butanol-ethanol by Clostridium acetobutylicum in China.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ye; Sun, Zhihao

    2009-06-01

    China is one of the few countries, which maintained the fermentative acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production for several decades. Until the end of the last century, the ABE fermentation from grain was operated in a few industrial scale plants. Due to the strong competition from the petrochemical industries, the fermentative ABE production lost its position in the 1990s, when all the solvent fermentation plants in China were closed. Under the current circumstances of concern about energy limitations and environmental pollution, new opportunities have emerged for the traditional ABE fermentation industry since it could again be potentially competitive with chemical synthesis. From 2006, several ABE fermentation plants in China have resumed production. The total solvent (acetone, butanol, and ethanol) production capacity from ten plants reached 210,000 tons, and the total solvent production is expected to be extended to 1,000,000 tons (based on the available data as of Sept. 2008). This article reviews current work in strain development, the continuous fermentation process, solvent recovery, and economic evaluation of ABE process in China. Challenges for an economically competitive ABE process in the future are also discussed.

  19. Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol (ABE) production in fermentation of enzymatically hydrolyzed cassava flour by Clostridium beijerinckii BA101 and solvent separation.

    PubMed

    Lépiz-Aguilar, Leonardo; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Carlos E; Arias, María Laura; Lutz, Giselle

    2013-08-01

    Cassava constitutes an abundant substrate in tropical regions. The production of butanol in ABE fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii BA101 using cassava flour (CF) was scaled-up to bioreactor level (5 L). Optimized fermentation conditions were applied; that is, 40℃, 60 g/l CF, and enzymatic pretreatment of the substrate. The batch fermentation profile presented an acidogenic phase for the first 24 h and a solventogenic phase afterwards. An average of 37.01 g/l ABE was produced after 83 h, with a productivity of 0.446 g/l/h. Butanol production was 25.71 g/l with a productivity of 0.310 g/l/h, high or similar to analogous batch processes described for other substrates. Solvent separation by different combinations of fractioned and azeotropic distillation and liquid-liquid separation were assessed to evaluate energetic and economic costs in downstream processing. Results suggest that the use of cassava as a substrate in ABE fermentation could be a cost-effective way of producing butanol in tropical regions.

  20. Acetone-butanol-ethanol production from Kraft paper mill sludge by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Guan, Wenjian; Shi, Suan; Tu, Maobing; Lee, Yoon Y

    2016-01-01

    Paper mill sludge (PS), a solid waste from pulp and paper industry, was investigated as a feedstock for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). ABE fermentation of paper sludge by Clostridium acetobutylicum required partial removal of ash in PS to enhance its enzymatic digestibility. Enzymatic hydrolysis was found to be a rate-limiting step in the SSF. A total of 16.4-18.0g/L of ABE solvents were produced in the SSF of de-ashed PS with solid loading of 6.3-7.4% and enzyme loading of 10-15FPU/g-glucan, and the final solvent yield reached 0.27g/g sugars. No pretreatment and pH control were needed in ABE fermentation of paper sludge, which makes it an attractive feedstock for butanol production. The results suggested utilization of paper sludge should not only consider the benefits of buffering effect of CaCO3 in fermentation, but also take into account its inhibitory effect on enzymatic hydrolysis.

  1. Microbial inhibitors: formation and effects on acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Baral, Nawa Raj; Shah, Ajay

    2014-11-01

    Biobutanol is a promising biofuel due to the close resemblance of its fuel properties to gasoline, and it is produced via acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation using Clostridium species. However, lignin in the crystalline structure of the lignin-cellulose-hemicellulose biomass complex is not readily consumed by the Clostridium; thus, pretreatment is required to degrade this complex. During pretreatment, some fractions of cellulose and hemicellulose are converted into fermentable sugars, which are further converted to ABE. However, a major setback resulting from common pretreatment processes is the formation of sugar and lignin degradation compounds, including weak acids, furan derivatives, and phenolic compounds, which have inhibitory effects on the Clostridium. In addition, butanol concentration above 13 g/L in the fermentation broth is itself toxic to most Clostridium strain(s). This review summarizes the current state-of-the-art knowledge on the formation of microbial inhibitors during the most common lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment processes. Metabolic effects of inhibitors and their impacts on ABE production, as well as potential solutions for reducing inhibitor formation, such as optimizing pretreatment process parameters, using inhibitor tolerant strain(s) with high butanol yield ability, continuously recovering butanol during ABE fermentation, and adopting consolidated bioprocessing, are also discussed.

  2. Genome analysis of a hyper acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) producing Clostridium acetobutylicum BKM19.

    PubMed

    Cho, Changhee; Choe, Donghui; Jang, Yu-Sin; Kim, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Won Jun; Cho, Byung-Kwan; Papoutsakis, E Terry; Bennett, George N; Seung, Do Young; Lee, Sang Yup

    2017-02-01

    Previously the development of a hyper acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) producing Clostridium acetobutylicum BKM19 strain capable of producing 30.5% more total solvent by random mutagenesis of its parental strain PJC4BK, which is a buk mutant C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 strain is reported. Here, BKM19 and PJC4BK strains are re-sequenced by a high-throughput sequencing technique to understand the mutations responsible for enhanced solvent production. In comparison with the C. acetobutylicum PJC4BK, 13 single nucleotide variants (SNVs), one deletion and one back mutation SNV are identified in the C. acetobutylicum BKM19 genome. Except for one SNV found in the megaplasmid, all mutations are found in the chromosome of BKM19. Among them, a mutation in the thlA gene encoding thiolase is further studied with respect to enzyme activity and butanol production. The mutant thiolase (thlA(V5A) ) is showed a 32% higher activity than that of the wild-type thiolase (thlA(WT) ). In batch fermentation, butanol production is increased by 26% and 23% when the thlA(V5A) gene is overexpressed in the wild-type C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and in its derivative, the thlA-knockdown TKW-A strain, respectively. Based on structural analysis, the mutation in thiolase does not have a direct effect on the regulatory determinant region (RDR). However, the mutation at the 5(th) residue seems to influence the stability of the RDR, and thus, increases the enzymatic activity and enhances solvent production in the BKM19 strain.

  3. History of the acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation industry in China: development of continuous production technology.

    PubMed

    Chiao, Jui-shen; Sun, Zhi-hao

    2007-01-01

    The acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation industry in China was started in the early 1950s in Shanghai and expanded rapidly thereafter. At its peak, there were about 30 plants all over the country and the total annual production of solvents reached 170,000 tons. This large enterprise was compelled to complete shutdown at the end of the 20th century due to the rapid increase of petrochemicals. The success of the ABE industry in China had special features like the development of a continuous fermentation technology. Its main strategic considerations were as follows: maintaining maximal growth and acid production phase, adoption of multiple stages in the solvent phase to allow gradual adaptation to increasing solvent, and the incorporation of stillage to offer enough nutrients to delay cell degeneration. Due to the tremendous national demand for solvents, China has begun a new round of ABE fermentation research. It is expected that a new era in the ABE industry is on the horizon.

  4. Integrated, systems metabolic picture of acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chen; Seo, Seung-Oh; Celik, Venhar; Liu, Huaiwei; Kong, Wentao; Wang, Yi; Blaschek, Hans; Jin, Yong-Su; Lu, Ting

    2015-07-07

    Microbial metabolism involves complex, system-level processes implemented via the orchestration of metabolic reactions, gene regulation, and environmental cues. One canonical example of such processes is acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum, during which cells convert carbon sources to organic acids that are later reassimilated to produce solvents as a strategy for cellular survival. The complexity and systems nature of the process have been largely underappreciated, rendering challenges in understanding and optimizing solvent production. Here, we present a system-level computational framework for ABE fermentation that combines metabolic reactions, gene regulation, and environmental cues. We developed the framework by decomposing the entire system into three modules, building each module separately, and then assembling them back into an integrated system. During the model construction, a bottom-up approach was used to link molecular events at the single-cell level into the events at the population level. The integrated model was able to successfully reproduce ABE fermentations of the WT C. acetobutylicum (ATCC 824), as well as its mutants, using data obtained from our own experiments and from literature. Furthermore, the model confers successful predictions of the fermentations with various network perturbations across metabolic, genetic, and environmental aspects. From foundation to applications, the framework advances our understanding of complex clostridial metabolism and physiology and also facilitates the development of systems engineering strategies for the production of advanced biofuels.

  5. Artificial symbiosis for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation from alkali extracted deshelled corn cobs by co-culture of Clostridium beijerinckii and Clostridium cellulovorans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Butanol is an industrial commodity and also considered to be a more promising gasoline substitute compared to ethanol. Renewed attention has been paid to solvents (acetone, butanol and ethanol) production from the renewable and inexpensive substrates, for example, lignocellulose, on account of the depletion of oil resources, increasing gasoline prices and deteriorating environment. Limited to current tools for genetic manipulation, it is difficult to develop a genetically engineered microorganism with combined ability of lignocellulose utilization and solvents production. Mixed culture of cellulolytic microorganisms and solventogenic bacteria provides a more convenient and feasible approach for ABE fermentation due to the potential for synergistic utilization of the metabolic pathways of two organisms. But few bacteria pairs succeeded in producing biobutanol of high titer or high productivity without adding butyrate. The aim of this work was to use Clostridium cellulovorans 743B to saccharify lignocellulose and produce butyric acid, instead of adding cellulase and butyric acid to the medium, so that the soluble sugars and butyric acid generated can be subsequently utilized by Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 to produce butanol in one pot reaction. Results A stable artificial symbiotic system was constructed by co-culturing a celluloytic, anaerobic, butyrate-producing mesophile (C. cellulovorans 743B) and a non-celluloytic, solventogenic bacterium (C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052) to produce solvents by consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) with alkali extracted deshelled corn cobs (AECC), a low-cost renewable feedstock, as the sole carbon source. Under optimized conditions, the co-culture degraded 68.6 g/L AECC and produced 11.8 g/L solvents (2.64 g/L acetone, 8.30 g/L butanol and 0.87 g/L ethanol) in less than 80 h. Besides, a real-time PCR assay based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence was performed to study the dynamics of the abundance of each strain

  6. Butanol production in acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation with in situ product recovery by adsorption.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chuang; Liu, Fangfang; Xu, Mengmeng; Tang, I-Ching; Zhao, Jingbo; Bai, Fengwu; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2016-11-01

    Activated carbon Norit ROW 0.8, zeolite CBV901, and polymeric resins Dowex Optipore L-493 and SD-2 with high specific loadings and partition coefficients were studied for n-butanol adsorption. Adsorption isotherms were found to follow Langmuir model, which can be used to estimate the amount of butanol adsorbed in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. In serum-bottle fermentation with in situ adsorption, activated carbon showed the best performance with 21.9g/L of butanol production. When operated in a fermentor, free- and immobilized-cell fermentations with adsorption produced 31.6g/L and 54.6g/L butanol with productivities of 0.30g/L·h and 0.45g/L·h, respectively. Thermal desorption produced a condensate containing ∼167g/L butanol, which resulted in a highly concentrated butanol solution of ∼640g/L after spontaneous phase separation. This in situ product recovery process with activated carbon is energy efficient and can be easily integrated with ABE fermentation for n-butanol production.

  7. Effect of zinc supplementation on acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Wu, You-Duo; Xue, Chuang; Chen, Li-Jie; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2013-05-10

    In this article, effect of zinc supplementation on acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum was studied. It was found that when 0.001 g/L ZnSO4·7H2O was supplemented into the medium, solventogenesis was initiated earlier, with 21.0 g/L ABE (12.6 g/L butanol, 6.7 g/L acetone and 1.7 g/L ethanol) produced with a fermentation time of 40 h, compared to 19.4 g/L ABE (11.7 g/L butanol, 6.4 g/L acetone and 1.3g/L ethanol) produced with a fermentation time of 64 h in the control without zinc supplementation, and correspondingly ABE and butanol productivities were increased to 0.53 and 0.32 g/L/h from 0.30 and 0.18 g/L/h, increases of 76.7% and 77.8%, respectively, but their yields were not compromised. The reason for this phenomenon was attributed to rapid acids re-assimilation for more efficient ABE production, which was in accordance with relatively high pH and ORP levels maintained during the fermentation process. The maximum cell density increased by 23.8%, indicating that zinc supplementation stimulated cell growth, and consequently facilitated glucose utilization. However, more zinc supplementation exhibited an inhibitory effect, indicating that zinc supplementation at very low levels such as 0.001 g/L ZnSO4·7H2O will be an economically competitive strategy for improving butanol production.

  8. Effects of nutritional enrichment on the production of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) by Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung Jun; Lee, Joungmin; Jang, Yu-Sin; Park, Jin Hwan; Lee, Sang Yup; Kim, In Ho

    2012-12-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum is an industrially important organism that produces acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE). The main objective of this study was to characterize the effects of increased cell density on the production of ABE during the phase transition from acidogenesis to solventogenesis in C. acetobutylicum. The increased ABE productivity of C. acetobutylicum was obtained by increasing the cell density using a newly designed medium (designated C. a cetobutylicum medium 1; CAM1). The maximum OD(600) value of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 strain obtained with CAM1 was 19.7, which is 1.8 times higher than that obtained with clostridial growth medium (CGM). The overall ABE productivity obtained in the CAM1-fermetation of the ATCC 824 strain was 0.83 g/L/h, which is 1.5 times higher than that (0.55 g/L/h) obtained with CGM. However, the increased productivity obtained with CAM1 did not result in an increase in the final ABE titer, because phase transition occurred at a high titer of acids.

  9. A comparison of the energy use of in situ product recovery techniques for the Acetone Butanol Ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Outram, Victoria; Lalander, Carl-Axel; Lee, Jonathan G M; Davis, E Timothy; Harvey, Adam P

    2016-11-01

    The productivity of the Acetone Butanol Ethanol (ABE) fermentation can be significantly increased by application of various in situ product recovery (ISPR) techniques. There are numerous technically viable processes, but it is not clear which is the most economically viable in practice. There is little available information about the energy requirements and economics of ISPR for the ABE fermentation. This work compares various ISPR techniques based on UniSim process simulations of the ABE fermentation. The simulations provide information on the process energy and separation efficiency, which is fed into an economic assessment. Perstraction was the only technique to reduce the energy demand below that of a batch process, by approximately 5%. Perstraction also had the highest profit increase over a batch process, by 175%. However, perstraction is an immature technology, so would need significant development before being integrated to an industrial process.

  10. Assessment of morphological changes of Clostridium acetobutylicum by flow cytometry during acetone/butanol/ethanol extractive fermentation.

    PubMed

    González-Peñas, Helena; Lu-Chau, Thelmo Alejandro; Moreira, Maria Teresa; Lema, Juan Manuel

    2015-03-01

    Acetone/butanol/ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum was investigated in extractive fed-batch experiments. In conventional fermentations, metabolic activity ceases when a critical threshold products concentration is reached (~21.6 g solvents l(-1)). Solvents production was increased up to 36.6 and 37.2 g l(-1), respectively, using 2-butyl-1-octanol (aqueous to organic ratio: 1:0.25 v/v) and pomace olive oil (1:1 v/v) as extraction solvents. The morphological changes of different cell types were monitored and quantified using flow cytometry. Butanol production in extractive fermentations with pomace olive oil was achieved mainly by vegetative cells, whereas the percentage of sporulating cells was lower than 10%.

  11. Modulation of Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol Fermentation by Carbon Monoxide and Organic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Rathin; Zeikus, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    Metabolic modulation of acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum with carbon monoxide (CO) and organic acids is described. CO, which is a known inhibitor of hydrogenase, was found to be effective in the concentration range of dissolved CO corresponding to a CO partial pressure of 0.1 to 0.2 atm. Metabolic modulation by CO was particularly effective when organic acids such as acetic and butyric acids were added to the fermentation as electron sinks. The uptake of organic acids was enhanced, and increases in butyric acid uptake by 50 to 200% over control were observed. Hydrogen production could be reduced by 50% and the ratio of solvents could be controlled by CO modulation and organic acid addition. Acetone production could be eliminated if desired. Butanol yield could be increased by 10 to 15%. Total solvent yield could be increased 1 to 3% and the electron efficiency to acetone-butanol-ethanol solvents could be increased from 73 to 78% for controls to 80 to 85% for CO- and organic acid-modulated fermentations. Based on these results, the dynamic nature of electron flow in this fermentation has been elucidated and mechanisms for metabolic control have been hypothesized. PMID:16346746

  12. Effective multiple stages continuous acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation by immobilized bioreactors: Making full use of fresh corn stalk.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhen; Cai, Di; Wang, Yong; Chen, Changjing; Fu, Chaohui; Wang, Guoqing; Qin, Peiyong; Wang, Zheng; Tan, Tianwei

    2016-04-01

    In order to make full use of the fresh corn stalk, the sugar containing juice was used as the sole substrate for acetone-butanol-ethanol production without any nutrients supplement, and the bagasse after squeezing the juice was used as the immobilized carrier. A total 21.34g/L of ABE was produced in batch cells immobilization system with ABE yield of 0.35g/g. A continuous fermentation containing three stages with immobilized cells was conducted and the effect of dilution rate on fermentation was investigated. As a result, the productivity and ABE solvents concentration reached 0.80g/Lh and 19.93g/L, respectively, when the dilution rate in each stage was 0.12/h (corresponding to a dilution rate of 0.04/h in the whole system). And the long-term operation indicated the continuous multiple stages ABE fermentation process had good stability and showed the great potential in future industrial applications.

  13. Targeted mutagenesis of the Clostridium acetobutylicum acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation pathway.

    PubMed

    Cooksley, Clare M; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Hengzheng; Redl, Stephanie; Winzer, Klaus; Minton, Nigel P

    2012-11-01

    The production of the chemical solvents acetone and butanol by the bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum was one of the first large-scale industrial processes to be developed, and in the first part of the last century ranked second in importance only to ethanol production. After a steep decline in its industrial use, there has been a recent resurgence of interest in the acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation process, with a particular emphasis on butanol production. In order to generate strains suitable for efficient use on an industrial scale, metabolic engineering is required to alter the AB ratio in favour of butanol, and eradicate the production of unwanted products of fermentation. Using ClosTron technology, a large-scale targeted mutagenesis in C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was carried out, generating a set of 10 mutants, defective in alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (adhE1, adhE2), butanol dehydrogenases A and B (bdhA, bdhB), phosphotransbutyrylase (ptb), acetate kinase (ack), acetoacetate decarboxylase (adc), CoA transferase (ctfA/ctfB), and a previously uncharacterised putative alcohol dehydrogenase (CAP0059). However, inactivation of the main hydrogenase (hydA) and thiolase (thl) could not be achieved. Constructing such a series of mutants is paramount for the acquisition of information on the mechanism of solvent production in this organism, and the subsequent development of industrial solvent producing strains. Unexpectedly, bdhA and bdhB mutants did not affect solvent production, whereas inactivation of the previously uncharacterised gene CAP0059 resulted in increased acetone, butanol, and ethanol formation. Other mutants showed predicted phenotypes, including a lack of acetone formation (adc, ctfA, and ctfB mutants), an inability to take up acids (ctfA and ctfB mutants), and a much reduced acetate formation (ack mutant). The adhE1 mutant in particular produced very little solvents, demonstrating that this gene was indeed the main contributor to

  14. Evaluation of asymmetric polydimethylsiloxane-polyvinylidene fluoride composite membrane and incorporated with acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation for butanol recovery.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chuang; Du, Guang-Qing; Chen, Li-Jie; Ren, Jian-Gang; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2014-10-20

    The polydimethylsiloxane-polyvinylidene fluoride (PDMS-PVDF) composite membrane was studied for its pervaporation performance to removal of butanol from butanol/ABE solution, fermentation broth as well as incorporated with acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. The total flux and butanol titer in permeate through the PDMS-PVDF membrane were up to 769.6 g/m(2)h and 323.5 g/L at 80 °C, respectively. The butanol flux and total flux increased with increasing the feed temperature as well as the feed butanol titer. The butanol separation factor and butanol titer in permeate decreased slightly in the presence of acetone and ethanol in the feed due to their preferential dissolution and competitive permeation through the membrane. In fed-batch fermentation incorporated with pervaporation, butanol titer and flux in permeate maintained at a steady level with the range of 139.9-154.0 g/L and 13.3-16.3 g/m(2)h, respectively, which was attributed to the stable butanol titer in fermentation broth as well as the excellent hydrophobic nature of the PDMS-PVDF matrix. Therefore, the PDMS-PVDF composite membrane had a great potential in the in situ product recovery with ABE fermentation, enabling the economic production of biobutanol.

  15. Enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis and acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation of sugarcane bagasse by combined diluted acid with oxidate ammonolysis pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Hailong; Xiong, Lian; Chen, Xuefang; Wang, Can; Qi, Gaoxiang; Huang, Chao; Luo, Mutan; Chen, Xinde

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to propose a biorefinery pretreatment technology for the bioconversion of sugarcane bagasse (SB) into biofuels and N-fertilizers. Performance of diluted acid (DA), aqueous ammonia (AA), oxidate ammonolysis (OA) and the combined DA with AA or OA were compared in SB pretreatment by enzymatic hydrolysis, structural characterization and acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. Results indicated that DA-OA pretreatment improves the digestibility of SB by sufficiently hydrolyzing hemicellulose into fermentable monosaccharides and oxidating lignin into soluble N-fertilizer with high nitrogen content (11.25%) and low C/N ratio (3.39). The enzymatic hydrolysates from DA-OA pretreated SB mainly composed of glucose was more suitable for the production of ABE solvents than the enzymatic hydrolysates from OA pretreated SB containing high ratio of xylose. The fermentation of enzymatic hydrolysates from DA-OA pretreated SB produced 12.12g/L ABE in 120h. These results suggested that SB could be utilized efficient, economic, and environmental by DA-OA pretreatment.

  16. Acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation in a continuous and closed-circulating fermentation system with PDMS membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunyan; Xiao, Zeyi; Tang, Xiaoyu; Cui, Haidi; Zhang, Junqing; Li, Weijia; Ying, Chao

    2013-01-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by combining a PDMS membrane bioreactor and Clostridium acetobutylicum was studied, and a long continuous and closed-circulating fermentation (CCCF) system has been achieved. Two cycles of experiment were conducted, lasting for 274 h and 300 h, respectively. The operation mode of the first cycle was of fermentation intermittent coupling with pervaporation, and the second cycle was of continuous coupling. The average cell weight, glucose consumption rate, butanol productivity and butanol production of the first cycle were 1.59 g L(-1), 0.63 g L(-1)h(-1), 0.105 g L(-1)h(-1) and 28.03 g L(-1), respectively. Correspondingly, the four parameters of the second cycle were 1.68 g L(-1), 1.12 g L(-1)h(-1), 0.205 g L(-1)h(-1) and 61.43 g L(-1), respectively. The results indicate the fermentation behaviors under continuous coupling mode were superior to that under intermittent coupling mode. Besides, two peak values were observed in the time course profiles, which means the microorganism could adapt the long CCCF membrane bioreactor system.

  17. Periodic peristalsis increasing acetone-butanol-ethanol productivity during simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of steam-exploded corn straw.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingwen; Wang, Lan; Chen, Hongzhang

    2016-11-01

    The acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation of lignocellulose at high solids content has recently attracted extensive attention. However, the productivity of high solids ABE fermentation of lignocellulose is typically low in traditional processes due to the lack of efficient intensifying methods. In the present study, periodic peristalsis, a novel intensifying method, was applied to improve ABE production by the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of steam-exploded corn straw using Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC824. The ABE concentration and the ABE productivity of SSF at a solids content of 17.5% (w/w) with periodic peristalsis were 17.1 g/L and 0.20 g/(L h), respectively, which were higher than those obtained under static conditions (15.2 g/L and 0.14 g/(L h)). The initial sugar conversion rate over the first 12 h with periodic peristalsis was 4.67 g/(L h) at 10 FPU/g cellulase dosage and 15% (w/w) solids content, an increase of 49.7% compared with the static conditions. With periodic peristalsis, the period of batch fermentation was shortened from 108 h to 84 h. The optimal operating regime was a low frequency (6 h(-1)) of periodic peristalsis in the acid-production phase (0-48 h) of SSF. Therefore, periodic peristalsis should be an effective intensifying method to increase the productivity of ABE fermentation at high solids content.

  18. Optimization and validation of a GC-FID method for the determination of acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation products.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoqing; Fan, Jiansheng; Wen, Qingshi; Li, Renjie; Jin, Xiaohong; Wu, Jinglan; Qian, Wenbin; Liu, Dong; Xie, Jingjing; Bai, Jianxin; Ying, Hanjie

    2014-03-01

    An improved, simple gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) method was developed for measuring the products of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation and the combined fermentation/separation processes. The analysis time per sample was reduced to less than 10 min compared to those of a conventional GC-FID (more than 20 min). The behavior of the compounds in temperature-programmed gas chromatographic runs was predicted using thermodynamic parameters derived from isothermal runs. The optimum temperature programming condition was achieved when the resolution for each peak met the analytical requirement and the analysis time was shortest. With the exception of acetic acid, the detection limits of the presented method for various products were below 10 mg/L. The repeatability and intermediate precision of the method were less than 10% (relative standard deviation). Validation and quantification results demonstrated that this method is a sensitive, reliable and fast alternative for conventional investigation of the adsorption-coupled ABE fermentation process.

  19. Continuous two stage acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation with integrated solvent removal using Clostridium acetobutylicum B 5313.

    PubMed

    Bankar, Sandip B; Survase, Shrikant A; Singhal, Rekha S; Granström, Tom

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to optimize continuous acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation using a two stage chemostat system integrated with liquid-liquid extraction of solvents produced in the first stage. This minimized end product inhibition by butanol and subsequently enhanced glucose utilization and solvent production in continuous cultures of Clostridium acetobutylicum B 5313. During continuous two-stage ABE fermentation, sugarcane bagasse was used as the cell holding material for the both stages and liquid-liquid extraction was performed using an oleyl alcohol and decanol mixture. An overall solvent production of 25.32g/L (acetone 5.93g/L, butanol 16.90g/L and ethanol 2.48g/L) was observed as compared to 15.98g/L in the single stage chemostat with highest solvent productivity and solvent yield of 2.5g/Lh and of 0.35g/g, respectively. Maximum glucose utilization (83.21%) at a dilution rate of 0.051/h was observed as compared to 54.38% in the single stage chemostat.

  20. Genome shuffling of Clostridium acetobutylicum CICC 8012 for improved production of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE).

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Hai; Zhang, Guohua; He, Kaize; Jin, Yanling

    2012-08-01

    Genome shuffling was applied to increase ABE production of the strict anaerobe C. acetobutylicum CICC 8012. By using physical and chemical mutagenesis, strains with superior streptomycin sulfate, 2-deoxy-D-glucose and butanol tolerance levels were isolated. These strains were used for genome shuffling. The best performing strain F2-GA was screened after two rounds of genome shuffling. With 55 g glucose/l as carbon source, F2-GA produced 22.21 g ABE/l in 72 h and ABE yield reached 0.42 g/g which was about 34.53 % improvement compared to the wild type. Fermentation parameters and gene expression of several key enzymes in ABE metabolic pathways were varied significantly between F2-GA and the wild type. These results demonstrated the potential use of genome shuffling to microbial breeding which were difficult to deal with traditional methods.

  1. Electrooptical measurements for monitoring metabolite fluxes in acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentations.

    PubMed

    Junne, Stefan; Klein, Eva; Angersbach, Alexander; Goetz, Peter

    2008-03-01

    Anisotropy of electrical polarizability in Clostridium acetobutylicum cells during pH 5 controlled acetone butanol ethanol fermentations was observed. Cell length was determined from the electrooptical data. Mean length was determined as being 2.5 microm in the growth phase and 3.5 microm in the early stationary phase. Based on the obtained frequency dispersion of polarizability anisotropy (FDPA) in the range of 190 to 2,100 kHz, the switch from the acidogenic to the solventogenic phase could be monitored. The slope of polarizability versus the frequency made it possible to differentiate between phases of dominating acid and solvent production. Metabolite fluxes determined from concentration measurements correlated well to the polarizability. A partial least-squares (PLS) model was established and validated by applying data from several fermentations. The root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC) was 0.09 for the acid fluxes and 0.11 for the solvent fluxes. The root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) was 0.20 for acid fluxes and 0.24 for solvent fluxes. The ratio of polarizability at high and low frequencies correlated to the ongoing sporulation process. At ratios below 0.25, spore formation in the cells became visible under the microscope. The advantage of using electrooptical measurements is the ability to observe metabolite fluxes rather than concentrations, which provides useful information on productivity during a bioprocess.

  2. Efficient carbon dioxide utilization and simultaneous hydrogen enrichment from off-gas of acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation by succinic acid producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    He, Aiyong; Kong, Xiangping; Wang, Chao; Wu, Hao; Jiang, Min; Ma, Jiangfeng; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2016-08-01

    The off-gas from acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was firstly used to be CO2 source (co-substrate) for succinic acid production. The optimum ratio of H2/CO2 indicated higher CO2 partial pressures with presence of H2 could enhance C4 pathway flux and reductive product productivity. Moreover, when an inner recycling bioreactor was used for CO2 recycling at a high total pressure (0.2Mpa), a maximum succinic acid concentration of 65.7g·L(-1) was obtained, and a productivity of 0.76g·L(-1)·h(-1) and a high yield of 0.86g·g(-1) glucose were achieved. Furthermore, the hydrogen content was simultaneously enriched to 92.7%. These results showed one successful attempt to reuse the off-gas of ABE fermentation which can be an attractive CO2 source for succinic acid production.

  3. Acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) production from concentrated substrate: reduction in substrate inhibition by fed-batch technique and product inhibition by gas stripping.

    PubMed

    Ezeji, T C; Qureshi, N; Blaschek, H P

    2004-02-01

    Acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) was produced in an integrated fed-batch fermentation-gas stripping product-recovery system using Clostridium beijerinckii BA101, with H(2) and CO(2) as the carrier gases. This technique was applied in order to eliminate the substrate and product inhibition that normally restricts ABE production and sugar utilization to less than 20 g l(-1) and 60 g l(-1), respectively. In the integrated fed-batch fermentation and product recovery system, solvent productivities were improved to 400% of the control batch fermentation productivities. In a control batch reactor, the culture used 45.4 g glucose l(-1) and produced 17.6 g total solvents l(-1) (yield 0.39 g g(-1), productivity 0.29 g l(-1) h(-1)). Using the integrated fermentation-gas stripping product-recovery system with CO(2) and H(2) as carrier gases, we carried out fed-batch fermentation experiments and measured various characteristics of the fermentation, including ABE production, selectivity, yield and productivity. The fed-batch reactor was operated for 201 h. At the end of the fermentation, an unusually high concentration of total acids (8.5 g l(-1)) was observed. A total of 500 g glucose was used to produce 232.8 g solvents (77.7 g acetone, 151.7 g butanol, 3.4 g ethanol) in 1 l culture broth. The average solvent yield and productivity were 0.47 g g(-1) and 1.16 g l(-1) h(-1), respectively.

  4. Enhancement of n-butanol production by in situ butanol removal using permeating-heating-gas stripping in acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Ren, Hengfei; Liu, Dong; Zhao, Ting; Shi, Xinchi; Cheng, Hao; Zhao, Nan; Li, Zhenjian; Li, Bingbing; Niu, Huanqing; Zhuang, Wei; Xie, Jingjing; Chen, Xiaochun; Wu, Jinglan; Ying, Hanjie

    2014-07-01

    Butanol recovery from acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fed-batch fermentation using permeating-heating-gas was determined in this study. Fermentation was performed with Clostridium acetobutylicum B3 in a fibrous bed bioreactor and permeating-heating-gas stripping was used to eliminate substrate and product inhibition, which normally restrict ABE production and sugar utilization to below 20 g/L and 60 g/L, respectively. In batch fermentation (without permeating-heating-gas stripping), C. acetobutylicum B3 utilized 60 g/L glucose and produced 19.9 g/L ABE and 12 g/L butanol, while in the integrated process 290 g/L glucose was utilized and 106.27 g/L ABE and 66.09 g/L butanol were produced. The intermittent gas stripping process generated a highly concentrated condensate containing approximately 15% (w/v) butanol, 4% (w/v) acetone, a small amount of ethanol (<1%), and almost no acids, resulting in a highly concentrated butanol solution [∼ 70% (w/v)] after phase separation. Butanol removal by permeating-heating-gas stripping has potential for commercial ABE production.

  5. Enhanced sugar production from pretreated barley straw by additive xylanase and surfactants in enzymatic hydrolysis for acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Zhang, Junhua; Kuittinen, Suvi; Vepsäläinen, Jouko; Soininen, Pasi; Keinänen, Markku; Pappinen, Ari

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to improve enzymatic sugar production from dilute sulfuric acid-pretreated barley straw for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. The effects of additive xylanase and surfactants (polyethylene glycol [PEG] and Tween) in an enzymatic reaction system on straw hydrolysis yields were investigated. By combined application of 2g/100g dry-matter (DM) xylanase and PEG 4000, the glucose yield was increased from 53.2% to 86.9% and the xylose yield was increased from 36.2% to 70.2%, which were considerably higher than results obtained with xylanase or surfactant alone. The ABE fermentation of enzymatic hydrolysate produced 10.8 g/L ABE, in which 7.9 g/L was butanol. The enhanced sugar production increased the ABE yield from 93.8 to 135.0 g/kg pretreated straw. The combined application of xylanase and surfactants has a large potential to improve sugar production from barley straw pretreated with a mild acid and that the hydrolysate showed good fermentability in ABE production.

  6. Use of Proteomic Analysis To Elucidate the Role of Calcium in Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol Fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bei; Ujor, Victor; Lai, Lien B.; Gopalan, Venkat

    2013-01-01

    Calcium carbonate increases growth, substrate utilization, and acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052. Toward an understanding of the basis for these pleiotropic effects, we profiled changes in the C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 proteome that occur in response to the addition of CaCO3. We observed increases in the levels of different heat shock proteins (GrpE and DnaK), sugar transporters, and proteins involved in DNA synthesis, repair, recombination, and replication. We also noted significant decreases in the levels of proteins involved in metabolism, nucleic acid stabilization, sporulation, oxidative and antibiotic stress responses, and signal transduction. We determined that CaCO3 enhances ABE fermentation due to both its buffering effects and its ability to influence key cellular processes, such as sugar transport, butanol tolerance, and solventogenesis. Moreover, activity assays in vitro for select solventogenic enzymes revealed that part of the underpinning for the CaCO3-mediated increase in the level of ABE fermentation stems from the enhanced activity of these catalysts in the presence of Ca2+. Collectively, these proteomic and biochemical studies provide new insights into the multifactorial basis for the stimulation of ABE fermentation and butanol tolerance in the presence of CaCO3. PMID:23104411

  7. Saccharification of polysaccharide content of palm kernel cake using enzymatic catalysis for production of biobutanol in acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Shukor, Hafiza; Abdeshahian, Peyman; Al-Shorgani, Najeeb Kaid Nasser; Hamid, Aidil Abdul; Rahman, Norliza A; Kalil, Mohd Sahaid

    2016-02-01

    In this work, hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose content of palm kernel cake (PKC) by different types of hydrolytic enzymes was studied to evaluate monomeric sugars released for production of biobutanol by Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4 (ATCC 13564) in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. Experimental results revealed that when PKC was hydrolyzed by mixed β-glucosidase, cellulase and mannanase, a total simple sugars of 87.81±4.78 g/L were produced, which resulted in 3.75±0.18 g/L butanol and 6.44±0.43 g/L ABE at 168 h fermentation. In order to increase saccharolytic efficiency of enzymatic treatment, PKC was pretreated by liquid hot water before performing enzymatic hydrolysis. Test results showed that total reducing sugars were enhanced to 97.81±1.29 g/L with elevated production of butanol and ABE up to 4.15±1.18 and 7.12±2.06 g/L, respectively which represented an A:B:E ratio of 7:11:1.

  8. Co-fermentation of hemicellulose and starch from barley straw and grain for efficient pentoses utilization in acetone-butanol-ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Kuittinen, Suvi; Zhang, Junhua; Vepsäläinen, Jouko; Keinänen, Markku; Pappinen, Ari

    2015-03-01

    This study aims to efficiently use hemicellulose-based biomass for ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol) production by co-fermentation with starch-based biomass. Two processes were investigated: (I) co-fermentation of sugars derived from hemicellulose and starch in a mixture of barley straw and grain that was pretreated with dilute acid; (II) co-fermentation of straw hemicellulosic hydrolysate and gelatinized grain slurry in which the straw was pretreated with dilute acid. The two processes produced 11.3 and 13.5 g/L ABE that contains 7.4 and 7.8 g/L butanol, respectively. In process I, pretreatment with 1.0% H2SO4 resulted in better ABE fermentability than with 1.5% H2SO4, but only 19% of pentoses were consumed. In process II, 95% of pentoses were utilized even in the hemicellulosic hydrolysate pretreated with more severe condition (1.5% H2SO4). The results suggest that process II is more favorable for hemicellulosic biomass utilization, and it is also attractive for sustainable biofuel production due to great biomass availability.

  9. Effect of dilute alkaline pretreatment on the conversion of different parts of corn stalk to fermentable sugars and its application in acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Di; Li, Ping; Luo, Zhangfeng; Qin, Peiyong; Chen, Changjing; Wang, Yong; Wang, Zheng; Tan, Tianwei

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the effect of dilute alkaline pretreatment on different parts of biomass, corn stalk was separated into flower, leaf, cob, husk and stem, which were treated by NaOH in range of temperature and chemical loading. The NaOH-pretreated solid was then enzymatic hydrolysis and used as the substrate for batch acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. The results demonstrated the five parts of corn stalk could be used as potential feedstock separately, with vivid performances in solvents production. Under the optimized conditions towards high product titer, 7.5g/L, 7.6g/L, 9.4g/L, 7g/L and 7.6g/L of butanol was obtained in the fermentation broth of flower, leaf, cob, husk and stem hydrolysate, respectively. Under the optimized conditions towards high product yield, 143.7g/kg, 126.3g/kg, 169.1g/kg, 107.7g/kg and 116.4g/kg of ABE solvent were generated, respectively.

  10. Production of butanol by Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4 from palm kernel cake in acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation using an empirical model.

    PubMed

    Shukor, Hafiza; Al-Shorgani, Najeeb Kaid Nasser; Abdeshahian, Peyman; Hamid, Aidil Abdul; Anuar, Nurina; Rahman, Norliza Abd; Kalil, Mohd Sahaid

    2014-10-01

    Palm kernel cake (PKC) was used for biobutanol production by Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4 in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. PKC was subjected to acid hydrolysis pretreatment and hydrolysates released were detoxified by XAD-4 resin. The effect of pH, temperature and inoculum size on butanol production was evaluated using an empirical model. Twenty ABE fermentations were run according to an experimental design. Experimental results revealed that XAD-4 resin removed 50% furfural and 77.42% hydroxymethyl furfural. The analysis of the empirical model showed that linear effect of inoculums size with quadratic effect of pH and inoculum size influenced butanol production at 99% probability level (P<0.01). The optimum conditions for butanol production were pH 6.28, temperature of 28°C and inoculum size of 15.9%. ABE fermentation was carried out under optimum conditions which 0.1g/L butanol was obtained. Butanol production was enhanced by diluting PKC hydrolysate up to 70% in which 3.59g/L butanol was produced.

  11. Continuous acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation using SO2-ethanol-water spent liquor from spruce.

    PubMed

    Survase, Shrikant A; Sklavounos, Evangelos; Jurgens, German; van Heiningen, Adriaan; Granström, Tom

    2011-12-01

    SO2-ethanol-water (SEW) spent liquor from spruce chips was successfully used for batch and continuous production of acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE). Initially, batch experiments were performed using spent liquor to check the suitability for production of ABE. Maximum concentration of total ABE was found to be 8.79 g/l using 4-fold diluted SEW liquor supplemented with 35 g/l of glucose. The effect of dilution rate on solvent production, productivity and yield was studied in column reactor consisting of immobilized Clostridium acetobutylicum DSM 792 on wood pulp. Total solvent concentration of 12 g/l was obtained at a dilution rate of 0.21 h(-1). The maximum solvent productivity (4.86 g/l h) with yield of 0.27 g/g was obtained at dilution rate of 0.64 h(-1). Further, to increase the solvent yield, the unutilized sugars were subjected to batch fermentation.

  12. Novel spectrophotometric method for detection and estimation of butanol in acetone-butanol-ethanol fermenter.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Sampa; Sarma, Saurabh Jyoti; Brar, Satinder Kaur; Bihan, Yann Le; Drogui, Patrick; Buelna, Gerardo; Verma, Mausam; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2015-08-15

    A new, simple, rapid and selective spectrophotometric method has been developed for detection and estimation of butanol in fermentation broth. The red colored compound, produced during reduction of diquat-dibromide-monohydrate with 2-mercaptoethanol in aqueous solution at high pH (>13), becomes purple on phase transfer to butanol and gives distinct absorption at λ520nm. Estimation of butanol in the fermentation broth has been performed by salting out extraction (SOE) using saturated K3PO4 solution at high pH (>13) followed by absorbance measurement using diquat reagent. Compatibility and optimization of diquat reagent concentration for detection and estimation of butanol concentration in the fermentation broth range was verified by central composite design. A standard curve was constructed to estimate butanol in acetone-ethanol-butanol (ABE) mixture under optimized conditions. The spectrophotometric results for butanol estimation, was found to have 87.5% concordance with the data from gas chromatographic analysis.

  13. Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production by Clostridium beijerinckii from wheat straw hydrolysates: efficient use of penta and hexa carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Bellido, Carolina; Loureiro Pinto, Marina; Coca, Mónica; González-Benito, Gerardo; García-Cubero, María Teresa

    2014-09-01

    ABE fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii of steam-exploded and ozonated wheat straw hydrolysates was investigated. In steam-exploded hydrolysates, highest yields of 0.40 g/g ABE yield and 127.71 g ABE/kg wheat straw were achieved when the whole slurry from the pretreatment was used. In ozonated hydrolysates, 0.32 g/g ABE yield and 79.65 g ABE/kg wheat straw were obtained from washed ozonated wheat straw. Diverse effects were observed in steam explosion and ozonolysis of wheat straw which resulted in hemicellulose removal and acid insoluble lignin solubilization, respectively. SEM analysis showed structural differences in untreated and pretreated biomass. Depending on the operational strategy, after pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis, the glucose recovery ranged between 65.73-66.49% and 63.22-65.23% and the xylose recovery ranged between 45.19-61.00% and 34.54-40.91% in steam-exploded and ozonated hydrolysates, respectively. The effect of the main inhibitory compounds found in hydrolysates (oxalic acid, acetic acid, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and furfural) was studied through ABE fermentation in model media.

  14. Integrative modelling of pH-dependent enzyme activity and transcriptomic regulation of the acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Millat, Thomas; Janssen, Holger; Bahl, Hubert; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg; Wolkenhauer, Olaf

    2013-09-01

    In a continuous culture under phosphate limitation the metabolism of Clostridium acetobutylicum depends on the external pH level. By comparing seven steady-state conditions between pH 5.7 and pH 4.5 we show that the switch from acidogenesis to solventogenesis occurs between pH 5.3 and pH 5.0 with an intermediate state at pH 5.1. Here, an integrative study is presented investigating how a changing external pH level affects the clostridial acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation pathway. This is of particular interest as the biotechnological production of n-butanol as biofuel has recently returned into the focus of industrial applications. One prerequisite is the furthering of the knowledge of the factors determining the solvent production and their integrative regulations. We have mathematically analysed the influence of pH-dependent specific enzyme activities of branch points of the metabolism on the product formation. This kinetic regulation was compared with transcriptomic regulation regarding gene transcription and the proteomic profile. Furthermore, both regulatory mechanisms were combined yielding a detailed projection of their individual and joint effects on the product formation. The resulting model represents an important platform for future developments of industrial butanol production based on C. acetobutylicum.

  15. A novel in situ gas stripping-pervaporation process integrated with acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation for hyper n-butanol production.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chuang; Liu, Fangfang; Xu, Mengmeng; Zhao, Jingbo; Chen, Lijie; Ren, Jiangang; Bai, Fengwu; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Butanol is considered as an advanced biofuel, the development of which is restricted by the intensive energy consumption of product recovery. A novel two-stage gas stripping-pervaporation process integrated with acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was developed for butanol recovery, with gas stripping as the first-stage and pervaporation as the second-stage using the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) filled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mixed matrix membrane (MMM). Compared to batch fermentation without butanol recovery, more ABE (27.5 g/L acetone, 75.5 g/L butanol, 7.0 g/L ethanol vs. 7.9 g/L acetone, 16.2 g/L butanol, 1.4 g/L ethanol) were produced in the fed-batch fermentation, with a higher butanol productivity (0.34 g/L · h vs. 0.30 g/L · h) due to reduced butanol inhibition by butanol recovery. The first-stage gas stripping produced a condensate containing 155.6 g/L butanol (199.9 g/L ABE), which after phase separation formed an organic phase containing 610.8 g/L butanol (656.1 g/L ABE) and an aqueous phase containing 85.6 g/L butanol (129.7 g/L ABE). Fed with the aqueous phase of the condensate from first-stage gas stripping, the second-stage pervaporation using the CNTs-PDMS MMM produced a condensate containing 441.7 g/L butanol (593.2 g/L ABE), which after mixing with the organic phase from gas stripping gave a highly concentrated product containing 521.3 g/L butanol (622.9 g/L ABE). The outstanding performance of CNTs-PDMS MMM can be attributed to the hydrophobic CNTs giving an alternative route for mass transport through the inner tubes or along the smooth surface of CNTs. This gas stripping-pervaporation process with less contaminated risk is thus effective in increasing butanol production and reducing energy consumption.

  16. Impact of zinc supplementation on the improved fructose/xylose utilization and butanol production during acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Wu, You-Duo; Xue, Chuang; Chen, Li-Jie; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass and dedicated energy crops such as Jerusalem artichoke are promising alternatives for biobutanol production by solventogenic clostridia. However, fermentable sugars such as fructose or xylose released from the hydrolysis of these feedstocks were subjected to the incomplete utilization by the strains, leading to relatively low butanol production and productivity. When 0.001 g/L ZnSO4·7H2O was supplemented into the medium containing fructose as sole carbon source, 12.8 g/L of butanol was achieved with butanol productivity of 0.089 g/L/h compared to only 4.5 g/L of butanol produced with butanol productivity of 0.028 g/L/h in the control without zinc supplementation. Micronutrient zinc also led to the improved butanol production up to 8.3 g/L derived from 45.2 g/L xylose as sole carbon source with increasing butanol productivity by 31.7%. Moreover, the decreased acids production was observed under the zinc supplementation condition, resulting in the increased butanol yields of 0.202 g/g-fructose and 0.184 g/g-xylose, respectively. Similar improvements were also observed with increasing butanol production by 130.2 % and 8.5 %, butanol productivity by 203.4% and 18.4%, respectively, in acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentations from sugar mixtures of fructose/glucose (4:1) and xylose/glucose (1:2) simulating the hydrolysates of Jerusalem artichoke tubers and corn stover. The results obtained from transcriptional analysis revealed that zinc may have regulatory mechanisms for the sugar transport and metabolism of Clostridium acetobutylicum L7. Therefore, micronutrient zinc supplementation could be an effective way for economic development of butanol production derived from these low-cost agricultural feedstocks.

  17. Acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation of corn stover by Clostridium species: present status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianzheng; Baral, Nawa Raj; Jha, Ajay Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Sustainable vehicle fuel is indispensable in future due to worldwide depletion of fossil fuel reserve, oil price fluctuation and environmental degradation. Microbial production of butanol from renewable biomass could be one of the possible options. Renewable biomass such as corn stover has no food deficiency issues and is also cheaper in most of the agricultural based countries. Thus it can effectively solve the existing issue of substrate cost. In the last 30 years, a few of Clostridium strains have been successfully implemented for biobutanol fermentation. However, the commercial production is hindered due to their poor tolerance to butanol and inhibitors. Metabolic engineering of Clostridia strains is essential to solve above problems and ultimately enhance the solvent production. An effective and efficient pretreatment of raw material as well as optimization of fermentation condition could be another option. Furthermore, biological approaches may be useful to optimize both the host and pathways to maximize butanol production. In this context, this paper reviews the existing Clostridium strains and their ability to produce butanol particularly from corn stover. This study also highlights possible fermentation pathways and biological approaches that may be useful to optimize fermentation pathways. Moreover, challenges and future perspectives are also discussed.

  18. Acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation of corn stover: current production methods, economic viability and commercial use.

    PubMed

    Baral, Nawa R; Slutzky, Lauren; Shah, Ajay; Ezeji, Thaddeus C; Cornish, Katrina; Christy, Ann

    2016-03-01

    Biobutanol is a next-generation liquid biofuel with properties akin to those of gasoline. There is a widespread effort to commercialize biobutanol production from agricultural residues, such as corn stover, which do not compete with human and animal foods. This pursuit is backed by extensive government mandates to expand alternative energy sources. This review provides an overview of research on biobutanol production using corn stover feedstock. Structural composition, pretreatment, sugar yield (following pretreatment and hydrolysis) and generation of lignocellulose-derived microbial inhibitory compounds (LDMICs) from corn stover are discussed. The review also discusses different Clostridium species and strains employed for biobutanol production from corn stover-derived sugars with respect to solvent yields, tolerance to LDMICs and in situ solvent recovery (integrated fermentation). Further, the economics of cellulosic biobutanol production are highlighted and compared to corn starch-derived ethanol and gasoline. As discussed herein, the economic competitiveness of biobutanol production from corn stover largely depends on feedstock processing and fermentation process design.

  19. Acetone-butanol-ethanol from sweet sorghum juice by an immobilized fermentation-gas stripping integration process.

    PubMed

    Cai, Di; Wang, Yong; Chen, Changjing; Qin, Peiyong; Miao, Qi; Zhang, Changwei; Li, Ping; Tan, Tianwei

    2016-07-01

    In this study, sweet sorghum juice (SSJ) was used as the substrate in a simplified ABE fermentation-gas stripping integration process without nutrients supplementation. The sweet sorghum bagasse (SSB) after squeezing the fermentable juice was used as the immobilized carrier. The results indicated that the productivity of ABE fermentation process was improved by gas stripping integration. A total 24g/L of ABE solvents was obtained from 59.6g/L of initial sugar after 80h of fermentation with gas stripping. Then, long-term of fed-batch fermentation with continuous gas stripping was further performed. 112.9g/L of butanol, 44.1g/L of acetone, 9.5g/L of ethanol (total 166.5g/L of ABE) was produced in overall 312h of fermentation. At the same time, concentrated ABE product was obtained in the condensate of gas stripping.

  20. Efficient acetone-butanol-ethanol production (ABE) by Clostridium acetobutylicum XY16 immobilized on chemically modified sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangping; He, Aiyong; Zhao, Jie; Wu, Hao; Jiang, Min

    2015-07-01

    Sugarcane bagasse was chemically modified by polyethylenimine (PEI) and glutaraldehyde (GA) and then used as a support to immobilize Clostridium acetobutylicum XY16 in the process of butanol production. Compared with batch fermentation using unmodified sugarcane bagasse, 22.3 g/L total solvents were produced by cells immobilized on 4 g/L PEI treated sugarcane bagasse with high solvent productivity of 0.62 g/(L h) and glucose consumption rate of 1.67 g/(L h). Improvement of 14, 43, and 37 % in total solvent titer, solvent productivity and glucose consumption rate was observed, respectively. Enhanced solvent production of 25.14 g/L was obtained when using a high concentration of glucose of 80 g/L. Continuous fermentation was studied using PEI/GA modified sugarcane bagasse as immobilization support with a range of dilution which rates from 0.2 to 2.5 to find an optimal condition. The maximum solvent productivity of 11.32 g/(L h) was obtained at a high dilution rate of 2.0 h(-1).

  1. Two-stage pervaporation process for effective in situ removal acetone-butanol-ethanol from fermentation broth.

    PubMed

    Cai, Di; Hu, Song; Miao, Qi; Chen, Changjing; Chen, Huidong; Zhang, Changwei; Li, Ping; Qin, Peiyong; Tan, Tianwei

    2017-01-01

    Two-stage pervaporation for ABE recovery from fermentation broth was studied to reduce the energy cost. The permeate after the first stage in situ pervaporation system was further used as the feedstock in the second stage of pervaporation unit using the same PDMS/PVDF membrane. A total 782.5g/L of ABE (304.56g/L of acetone, 451.98g/L of butanol and 25.97g/L of ethanol) was achieved in the second stage permeate, while the overall acetone, butanol and ethanol separation factors were: 70.7-89.73, 70.48-84.74 and 9.05-13.58, respectively. Furthermore, the theoretical evaporation energy requirement for ABE separation in the consolidate fermentation, which containing two-stage pervaporation and the following distillation process, was estimated less than ∼13.2MJ/kg-butanol. The required evaporation energy was only 36.7% of the energy content of butanol. The novel two-stage pervaporation process was effective in increasing ABE production and reducing energy consumption of the solvents separation system.

  2. Models construction for acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentations with acetate/butyrate consecutively feeding by graph theory.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhigang; Shi, Zhongping; Li, Xin

    2014-05-01

    Several fermentations with consecutively feeding of acetate/butyrate were conducted in a 7 L fermentor and the results indicated that exogenous acetate/butyrate enhanced solvents productivities by 47.1% and 39.2% respectively, and changed butyrate/acetate ratios greatly. Then extracellular butyrate/acetate ratios were utilized for calculation of acids rates and the results revealed that acetate and butyrate formation pathways were almost blocked by corresponding acids feeding. In addition, models for acetate/butyrate feeding fermentations were constructed by graph theory based on calculation results and relevant reports. Solvents concentrations and butanol/acetone ratios of these fermentations were also calculated and the results of models calculation matched fermentation data accurately which demonstrated that models were constructed in a reasonable way.

  3. Oil palm empty fruit bunch as alternative substrate for acetone-butanol-ethanol production by Clostridium butyricum EB6.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohamad Faizal; Abd-Aziz, Suraini; Razak, Mohamad Nafis Abdul; Phang, Lai Yee; Hassan, Mohd Ali

    2012-04-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production from renewable resources has been widely reported. In this study, Clostridium butyricum EB6 was employed for ABE fermentation using fermentable sugar derived from treated oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB). A higher amount of ABE (2.61 g/l) was produced in a fermentation using treated OPEFB as the substrate when compared to a glucose based medium that produced 0.24 g/l at pH 5.5. ABE production was increased to 3.47 g/l with a yield of 0.24 g/g at pH 6.0. The fermentation using limited nitrogen concentration of 3 g/l improved the ABE yield by 64%. The study showed that OPEFB has the potential to be applied for renewable ABE production by C. butyricum EB6.

  4. Acetone-butanol-ethanol production in a novel continuous flow system.

    PubMed

    Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Dhar, Bipro Ranjan; Hafez, Hisham; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates the potential of using a novel integrated biohydrogen reactor clarifier system (IBRCS) for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production using a mixed culture at different organic loading rates (OLRs). The results of this study showed that using a setting tank after the fermenter and recycle the settled biomass to the fermenter is a practical option to achieve high biomass concentration in the fermenter and thus sustainable ABE fermentation in continuous mode. The average ABE concentrations of 2.3, 7.0, and 14.6gABE/L which were corresponding to ABE production rates of 0.4, 1.4, and 2.8gABE/Lreactorh were achieved at OLRs of 21, 64, and 128gCOD/Lreactord, respectively. The main volatile fatty acids components in the effluent were acetic, propionic, and butyric acids. Acetic acid was the predominant component in the OLR-1, while butyric acid was the predominant acid in OLRs 2 and 3.

  5. Production of acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) by a hyper-producing mutant strain of Clostridium beijerinckii BA101 and recovery by pervaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, N.; Blaschek, H.P.

    1999-07-01

    A silicone membrane was used to study butanol separation from model butanol solutions and fermentation broth. Depending upon the butanol feed concentration in the model solution and pervaporation conditions, butanol selectivities of 20.88--68.32 and flux values of 158.7--215.4 g m{sup {minus}2} h{sup {minus}1} were achieved. Higher flux values were obtained at higher butanol concentrations using air as sweep gas. In an integrated process of butanol fermentation--recovery, solvent productivities were improved to 200% of the control batch fermentation productivities. In a batch reactor the hyper-butanol-producing mutant strain C. beijerinckii BA101 utilized 57.3 g/L glucose and produced 24.2 g/L total solvents, while in the integrated process it produced 51.5 g/L (culture volume) total solvents. Concentrated glucose medium was also fermented. The C. beijerinckii BA101 mutant strain was not negatively affected by the pervaporative conditions. In the integrated experiment, acids were not produced. With the active fermentation broth, butanol selectivity was reduced by a factor of 2--3. However, the membrane flux was not affected by the active fermentation broth. The butanol permeate concentration ranged from 26.4 to 95.4 g/L, depending upon butanol concentration in the fermentation broth. Since the permeate of most membranes contains acetone, butanol, and ethanol, it is suggested that distillation be used for further purification.

  6. Production of acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) by a hyper-producing mutant strain of Clostridium beijerinckii BA101 and recovery by pervaporation.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, N; Blaschek, H P

    1999-01-01

    A silicone membrane was used to study butanol separation from model butanol solutions and fermentation broth. Depending upon the butanol feed concentration in the model solution and pervaporation conditions, butanol selectivities of 20.88-68.32 and flux values of 158.7-215.4 g m(-)(2) h(-)(1) were achieved. Higher flux values (400 g m(-)(2) h(-)(1)) were obtained at higher butanol concentrations using air as sweep gas. In an integrated process of butanol fermentation-recovery, solvent productivities were improved to 200% of the control batch fermentation productivities. In a batch reactor the hyper-butanol-producing mutant strain C. beijerinckii BA101 utilized 57.3 g/L glucose and produced 24.2 g/L total solvents, while in the integrated process it produced 51.5 g/L (culture volume) total solvents. Concentrated glucose medium was also fermented. The C. beijerinckii BA101 mutant strain was not negatively affected by the pervaporative conditions. In the integrated experiment, acids were not produced. With the active fermentation broth, butanol selectivity was reduced by a factor of 2-3. However, the membrane flux was not affected by the active fermentation broth. The butanol permeate concentration ranged from 26.4 to 95.4 g/L, depending upon butanol concentration in the fermentation broth. Since the permeate of most membranes contains acetone, butanol, and ethanol (and small concentrations of acids), it is suggested that distillation be used for further purification.

  7. Enhancing acetone biosynthesis and acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation performance by co-culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae integrated with exogenous acetate addition.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hongzhen; Ge, Laibing; Zhang, Jingshu; Ding, Jian; Chen, Rui; Shi, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Acetone is the major by-product in ABE fermentations, most researches focused on increasing butanol/acetone ratio by decreasing acetone biosynthesis. However, economics of ABE fermentation industry strongly relies on evaluating acetone as a valuable platform chemical. Therefore, a novel ABE fermentation strategy focusing on bio-acetone production by co-culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae with exogenous acetate addition was proposed. Experimental and theoretical analysis revealed the strategy could, enhance C. acetobutylicum survival oriented amino acids assimilation in the cells; control NADH regeneration rate at moderately lower level to enhance acetone synthesis but without sacrificing butanol production; enhance the utilization ability of C. acetobutylicum on glucose and direct most of extra consumed glucose into acetone/butanol synthesis routes. By implementing the strategy using synthetic or acetate fermentative supernatant, acetone concentrations increased to 8.27-8.55g/L from 5.86g/L of the control, while butanol concentrations also elevated to the higher levels of 13.91-14.23g/L from 11.63g/L simultaneously.

  8. Acetone-butanol-ethanol production with high productivity using Clostridium acetobutylicum BKM19.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yu-Sin; Malaviya, Alok; Lee, Sang Yup

    2013-06-01

    Conventional acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation is severely limited by low solvent titer and productivities. Thus, this study aims at developing an improved Clostridium acetobutylicum strain possessing enhanced ABE production capability followed by process optimization for high ABE productivity. Random mutagenesis of C. acetobutylicum PJC4BK was performed by screening cells on fluoroacetate plates to isolate a mutant strain, BKM19, which exhibited the total solvent production capability 30.5% higher than the parent strain. The BKM19 produced 32.5 g L(-1) of ABE (17.6 g L(-1) butanol, 10.5 g L(-1) ethanol, and 4.4 g L(-1) acetone) from 85.2 g L(-1) glucose in batch fermentation. A high cell density continuous ABE fermentation of the BKM19 in membrane cell-recycle bioreactor was studied and optimized for improved solvent volumetric productivity. Different dilution rates were examined to find the optimal condition giving highest butanol and ABE productivities. The maximum butanol and ABE productivities of 9.6 and 20.0 g L(-1)  h(-1) , respectively, could be achieved at the dilution rate of 0.85 h(-1) . Further cell recycling experiments were carried out with controlled cell-bleeding at two different bleeding rates. The maximum solvent productivities were obtained when the fermenter was operated at a dilution rate of 0.86 h(-1) with the bleeding rate of 0.04 h(-1) . Under the optimal operational condition, butanol and ABE could be produced with the volumetric productivities of 10.7 and 21.1 g L(-1)  h(-1) , and the yields of 0.17 and 0.34 g g(-1) , respectively. The obtained butanol and ABE volumetric productivities are the highest reported productivities obtained from all known-processes.

  9. Acetone-butanol-ethanol production from corn stover pretreated by alkaline twin-screw extrusion pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuedong; Hou, Tongang; Li, Bin; Liu, Chao; Mu, Xindong; Wang, Haisong

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the alkaline twin-screw extrusion pretreated corn stover was subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis after washing. The impact of solid loading and enzyme dose on enzymatic hydrolysis was investigated. It was found that 68.2 g/L of total fermentable sugar could be obtained after enzymatic hydrolysis with the solid loading of 10 %, while the highest sugar recovery of 91.07 % was achieved when the solid loading was 2 % with the cellulase dose of 24 FPU/g substrate. Subsequently, the hydrolyzate was fermented by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. The acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production of the hydrolyzate was compared with the glucose, xylose and simulated hydrolyzate medium which have the same reducing sugar concentration. It was shown that 7.1 g/L butanol and 11.2 g/L ABE could be produced after 72 h fermentation for the hydrolyzate obtained from enzymatic hydrolysis with 6 % solid loading. This is comparable to the glucose and simulated hydrozate medium, and the overall ABE yield could reach 0.112 g/g raw corn stover.

  10. In situ hydrogen, acetone, butanol, ethanol and microdiesel production by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 from oleaginous fungal biomass.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Elhagag Ahmed; Abd-Alla, Mohamed Hemida; Bagy, Magdy Mohamed Khalil; Morsy, Fatthy Mohamed

    2015-08-01

    An in situ batch fermentation technique was employed for biohydrogen, acetone, butanol, ethanol and microdiesel production from oleaginous fungal biomass using the anaerobic fermentative bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. Oleaginous fungal Cunninghamella echinulata biomass which has ability to accumulate up to 71% cellular lipid was used as the substrate carbon source. The maximum cumulative hydrogen by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 from crude C. echinulata biomass was 260 ml H2 l(-1), hydrogen production efficiency was 0.32 mol H2 mole(-1) glucose and the hydrogen production rate was 5.2 ml H2 h(-1). Subsequently, the produced acids (acetic and butyric acids) during acidogenesis phase are re-utilized by ABE-producing clostridia and converted into acetone, butanol, and ethanol. The total ABE produced by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 during batch fermentation was 3.6 g l(-1) from crude fungal biomass including acetone (1.05 g l(-1)), butanol (2.19 g l(-1)) and ethanol (0.36 g l(-1)). C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 has ability to produce lipolytic enzymes with a specific activity 5.59 U/mg protein to hydrolyze ester containing substrates. The lipolytic potential of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was used as a biocatalyst for a lipase transesterification process using the produced ethanol from ABE fermentation for microdiesel production. The fatty acid ethyl esters (microdiesel) generated from the lipase transesterification of crude C. echinulata dry mass was analyzed by GC/MS as 15.4% of total FAEEs. The gross energy content of biohydrogen, acetone, butanol, ethanol and biodiesel generated through C. acetobutylicum fermentation from crude C. echinulata dry mass was 3113.14 kJ mol(-1). These results suggest a possibility of integrating biohydrogen, acetone, butanol and ethanol production technology by C. acetobutylicum with microdiesel production from crude C. echinulata dry mass and therefore improve the feasibility and commercialization of bioenergy production.

  11. Acetone-butanol-ethanol competitive sorption simulation from single, binary, and ternary systems in a fixed-bed of KA-I resin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinglan; Zhuang, Wei; Ying, Hanjie; Jiao, Pengfei; Li, Renjie; Wen, Qingshi; Wang, Lili; Zhou, Jingwei; Yang, Pengpeng

    2015-01-01

    Separation of butanol based on sorption methodology from acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation broth has advantages in terms of biocompatibility and stability, as well as economy, and therefore gains much attention. In this work a chromatographic column model based on the solid film linear driving force approach and the competitive Langmuir isotherm equations was used to predict the competitive sorption behaviors of ABE single, binary, and ternary mixture. It was observed that the outlet concentration of weaker retained components exceeded the inlet concentration, which is an evidence of competitive adsorption. Butanol, the strongest retained component, could replace ethanol almost completely and also most of acetone. In the end of this work, the proposed model was validated by comparison of the experimental and predicted ABE ternary breakthrough curves using the real ABE fermentation broth as a feed solution.

  12. Microbial production of a biofuel (acetone-butanol-ethanol) in a continuous bioreactor: impact of bleed and simultaneous product removal.

    PubMed

    Ezeji, Thaddeus Chukwuemeka; Qureshi, Nasib; Blaschek, Hans Peter

    2013-01-01

    Acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) was produced in an integrated continuous one-stage fermentation and gas stripping product recovery system using Clostridium beijerinckii BA101 and fermentation gases (CO(2) and H(2)). In this system, the bioreactor was fed with a concentrated sugar solution (250-500 g L(-1) glucose). The bioreactor was bled semi-continuously to avoid accumulation of inhibitory chemicals and products. The continuous system was operated for 504 h (21 days) after which the fermentation was intentionally terminated. The bioreactor produced 461.3 g ABE from 1,125.0 g total sugar in 1 L culture volume as compared to a control batch process in which 18.4 g ABE was produced from 47.3 g sugar. These results demonstrate that ABE fermentation can be operated in an integrated continuous one-stage fermentation and product recovery system for a long period of time, if butanol and other microbial metabolites in the bioreactor are kept below threshold of toxicity.

  13. Efficient butanol recovery from acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation cultures grown on sweet sorghum juice by pervaporation using silicalite-1 membrane.

    PubMed

    Kanemoto, Miho; Negishi, Hideyuki; Sakaki, Keiji; Ikegami, Toru; Chohnan, Shigeru; Nitta, Youji; Kurusu, Yasurou; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    We investigated butanol recovery by pervaporation separation, using a silicalite-1 membrane, from batch cultures of butanol-producing Clostridium beijerinckii SBP2 grown on sweet sorghum juice as a fermentation medium. The pervaporation system yielded 73% (w/v) butanol from intact feed cultures containing 1% (w/v) butanol, and had a butanol permeation flux of 11 g m(-2) h(-1). Upon neutralization and activated charcoal treatment of the feed cultures, butanol yield and total flux increased to 82% (w/v) and 40 g m(-2) h(-1), respectively. This system is applicable to refining processes for practical biobutanol production from a promising energy crop, sweet sorghum.

  14. Kinetic modeling and sensitivity analysis of acetone-butanol-ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Shinto, Hideaki; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Yamashita, Mayu; Kobayashi, Genta; Sekiguchi, Tatsuya; Hanai, Taizo; Kuriya, Yuki; Okamoto, Masahiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2007-08-01

    A kinetic simulation model of metabolic pathways that describes the dynamic behaviors of metabolites in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production by Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4 was proposed using a novel simulator WinBEST-KIT. This model was validated by comparing with experimental time-course data of metabolites in batch cultures over a wide range of initial glucose concentrations (36.1-295 mM). By introducing substrate inhibition, product inhibition of butanol, activation of butyrate and considering the cessation of metabolic reactions in the case of insufficiency of energy after glucose exhaustion, the revised model showed 0.901 of squared correlation coefficient (r(2)) between experimental time-course of metabolites and calculated ones. Thus, the final revised model is assumed to be one of the best candidates for kinetic simulation describing dynamic behavior of metabolites in ABE production. Sensitivity analysis revealed that 5% increase in reaction of reverse pathway of butyrate production (R(17)) and 5% decrease in reaction of CoA transferase for butyrate (R(15)) highly contribute to high production of butanol. These system analyses should be effective in the elucidation which pathway is metabolic bottleneck for high production of butanol.

  15. Butanol production by fermentation: efficient bioreactors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Energy security, environmental concerns, and business opportunities in the emerging bio-economy have generated strong interest in the production of n-butanol by fermentation. Acetone butanol ethanol (ABE or solvent) batch fermentation process is product limiting because butanol even at low concentra...

  16. A novel process for direct production of acetone-butanol-ethanol from native starches using granular starch hydrolyzing enzyme by Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4.

    PubMed

    Thang, Vu Hong; Kobayashi, Genta

    2014-02-01

    In this work, a new approach for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production has been proposed. Direct fermentation of native starches (uncooked process) was investigated by using granular starch hydrolyzing enzyme (GSHE) and Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4. Even the process was carried out under suboptimal condition for activity of GSHE, the production of ABE was similar with that observed in conventional process or cooked process in terms of final solvent concentration (21.3 ± 0.4 to 22.4 ± 0.4 g/L), butanol concentration (17.5 ± 0.4 to 17.8 ± 0.3 g/L) and butanol yield (0.33 to 0.37 g/g). The production of solvents was significantly dependent on the source of starches. Among investigated starches, corn starch was more susceptible to GSHE while cassava starch was the most resistant to this enzyme. Fermentation using native corn starch resulted in the solvent productivity of 0.47 g/L h, which was about 15 % higher than that achieved in cooked process. On the contrary, uncooked process using cassava and wheat starch resulted in the solvent productivity of 0.30 and 0.37 g/L h, which were respectively about 30 % lower than those obtained in cooked process. No contamination was observed during all trials even fermentation media were prepared without sterilization. During the fermentation using native starches, no formation of foam is observed. This uncooked process does not require cooking starchy material; therefore, the thermal energy consumption for solvent production would remarkably be reduced in comparison with cooked process.

  17. Cellulosic butanol biofuel production from sweet sorghum bagasse (SSB): Impact of hot water pretreatment and solid loadings on fermentation employing Clostridium beijerinckii P260

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel butanol fermentation process was developed in which sweet sorghum bagasse (SSB) was pretreated using liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatment technique followed by enzymatic hydrolysis and butanol (acetone butanol ethanol; ABE) fermentation. A pretreatment temperature of 200 deg C resulted in the...

  18. Application of continuous substrate feeding to the ABE fermentation: Relief of product inhibition using extraction, perstraction, stripping, and pervaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, N.; Maddox, I.S.; Friedl, A.

    1992-09-01

    The technique of continuous substrate feeding has been applied to the batch fermentation process using freely suspended cells, for ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol) production. To avoid the product inhibition which normally restricts ABE production to less than 20 g/L and sugar utilization to 60 g/L, a product removal technique has been integrated into the fermentation process. The techniques investigated were liquid-liquid extraction, perstraction, gas-stripping, and pervaporation. By using a substrate of whey permeate, the reactor productivity has been improved over that observed in a traditional batch fermentation, while equivalent lactose utilization and ABE production values of 180 g and 69 g, respectively, have been achieved in a 1-L culture volume. 17 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Novel developments in butanol fermentation: Microbial genetics to agricultural substrates, process technology, and downstream processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butanol is the major product of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE; ratio 3:6:1) fermentation. It can be produced from various carbohydrates such as glucose, corn, molasses, and whey permeate (a by-product of the dairy industry) using microbial strains such as Clostridium beijerinckii and/or C. acetobuty...

  20. Process integration for simultaneous saccharification, fermentation, and recovery (SSFR): Production of butanol from corn stover using Clostridium beijerinckii P260

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simultaneous saccharification, fermentation, and recovery (SSFR) process was developed for production of acetone butanol ethanol (AB or ABE), of which butanol is the main product, from corn stover employing Clostridium beijerinckii P260. Of the 86 gL^-1^ corn stover, over 97% of the sugars were r...

  1. High acetone-butanol-ethanol production in pH-stat co-feeding of acetate and glucose.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ming; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Wang, Qunhui; Sakai, Kenji; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    We previously reported the metabolic analysis of butanol and acetone production from exogenous acetate by (13)C tracer experiments (Gao et al., RSC Adv., 5, 8486-8495, 2015). To clarify the influence of acetate on acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production, we first performed an enzyme assay in Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4. Acetate addition was found to drastically increase the activities of key enzymes involved in the acetate uptake (phosphate acetyltransferase and CoA transferase), acetone formation (acetoacetate decarboxylase), and butanol formation (butanol dehydrogenase) pathways. Subsequently, supplementation of acetate during acidogenesis and early solventogenesis resulted in a significant increase in ABE production. To establish an efficient ABE production system using acetate as a co-substrate, several shot strategies were investigated in batch culture. Batch cultures with two substrate shots without pH control produced 14.20 g/L butanol and 23.27 g/L ABE with a maximum specific butanol production rate of 0.26 g/(g h). Furthermore, pH-controlled (at pH 5.5) batch cultures with two substrate shots resulted in not only improved acetate consumption but also a further increase in ABE production. Finally, we obtained 15.13 g/L butanol and 24.37 g/L ABE at the high specific butanol production rate of 0.34 g/(g h) using pH-stat co-feeding method. Thus, in this study, we established a high ABE production system using glucose and acetate as co-substrates in a pH-stat co-feeding system with C. saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4.

  2. Study of in situ 1-butanol pervaporation from A-B-E fermentation using a PDMS composite membrane: validity of solution-diffusion model for pervaporative A-B-E fermentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Si-Yu; Srivastava, Ranjan; Parnas, Richard S

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the application of a new polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)/dual support composite membrane was investigated by incorporating the pervaporation process into the A-B-E (acetone-butanol-ethanol) fermentation. The performance of the A-B-E fermentation using the integrated pervaporation/fermentation process showed higher biomass concentrations and higher glucose consumption rates than those of the A-B-E fermentation without pervaporation. The performance of the membrane separation was studied during the separation of 1-butanol from three different 1-butanol solutions: binary, model, and fermentation culture solutions. The solution-diffusion model, specifically the mass transfer equation based on Fick's First Law, was shown to be applicable to the undefined A-B-E fermentation culture solutions. A quantitative comparison of 1-butanol separation from the three different solutions was made by calculating overall mass transfer coefficients of 1-butanol. It was found that the overall mass transfer coefficients during the separation of binary, model, and fermentation culture solutions were 1.50, 1.26, and 1.08 mm/h, respectively.

  3. Simultaneous fermentation and separation in an immobilized cell trickle bed reactor: Acetone-butanol-ethane (ABE) and ethanol fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    A novel process employing immobilized cells and in-situ product removal was studied for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum and ethanol fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Experimental studies of ABE fermentation in a trickle bed reactor without product separation showed that solvent production could be improved by one order of magnitude compared to conventional batch fermentation. Control of effluent pH near 4.3 and feed glucose concentrations higher than 10 g/L were the necessary conditions for cell growth and solvent production. A mathematical model using an equilibrium staged model predicted efficient separation of butanol from the fermentation broth. Activity coefficients of multicomponent system were estimated by Wilson's equation or the ASOG method. Inhibition by butanol and organic acids was incorporated into the kinetic expression. Experimental performance of simultaneous fermentation and separation in an immobilized cell trickle bed reactor showed that glucose conversion was improved as predicted by mathematical modeling and analysis. The effect of pH and temperature on ethanol fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied in free and immobilized cell reactors. Conditions for the highest glucose conversion, cell viability and least glycerol yield were determined.

  4. Efficient acetone-butanol-ethanol production by Clostridium beijerinckii from sugar beet pulp.

    PubMed

    Bellido, Carolina; Infante, Celia; Coca, Mónica; González-Benito, Gerardo; Lucas, Susana; García-Cubero, María Teresa

    2015-08-01

    Sugar beet pulp (SBP) has been investigated as a promising feedstock for ABE fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii. Although lignin content in SBP is low, a pretreatment is needed to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation yields. Autohydrolysis at pH 4 has been selected as the best pretreatment for SBP in terms of sugars release and acetone and butanol production. The best overall sugars release yields from raw SBP ranged from 66.2% to 70.6% for this pretreatment. The highest ABE yield achieved was 0.4g/g (5.1g/L of acetone and 6.6g/L butanol) and 143.2g ABE/kg SBP (62.3g acetone and 80.9g butanol) were obtained when pretreated SBP was enzymatically hydrolyzed at 7.5% (w/w) solid loading. Higher solid loadings (10%) offered higher acetone and butanol titers (5.8g/L of acetone and 7.8g/L butanol). All the experiments were carried out under not-controlling pH conditions reaching about 5.3 in the final samples.

  5. Improved efficiency of separate hexose and pentose fermentation from steam-exploded corn stalk for butanol production using Clostridium beijerinckii.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xindong; Sun, Wei; Liu, Chao; Wang, Haisong

    2011-08-01

    Water extract of steam-exploded corn stalk (SECS) was detoxified and used as feed for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation using Clostridium beijerinckii. Utilization of water extract improved the total ABE yield (g ABE/g dry SECS). Separated fermentation showed higher fermentability (0.078 g ABE/g dry SECS) over typical fermentation (0.058 g ABE/g dry SECS). Furthermore, the final ABE yields (g ABE/g utilized sugar) from water extract neutralized by Ca(OH)(2), NaOH, and Na(2)SO(3) were 0.16, 0.1 and 0.07, respectively, suggesting that Ca(OH)(2) had the best detoxification effect.

  6. Acetone-butanol-ethanol production from substandard and surplus dates by Egyptian native Clostridium strains.

    PubMed

    Abd-Alla, Mohamed Hemida; Zohri, Abdel-Naser Ahmed; El-Enany, Abdel-Wahab Elsadek; Ali, Shimaa Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    One hundred and seven mesophilic isolates of Clostridium were isolated from agricultural soils cultivated with different plants in Assuit Governorate, Egypt. Eighty isolates (out of 107) showed the ability to produce ABE (Acetone, butanol and ethanol) on T6 medium ranging from 0.036 to 31.89 g/L. The highest numbers of ABE producing isolates were obtained from soil samples of potato contributing 27 isolates, followed by 18 isolates from wheat and 10 isolates from onion. On the other hand, there were three native isolates that produced ABE more than those produced by the reference isolate Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 (11.543 g/L). The three isolates were identified based on phenotypic and gene encoding 16S rRNA as Clostridium beijerinckii ASU10 (KF372577), Clostridium chauvoei ASU55 (KF372580) and Clostridium roseum ASU58 (KF372581). The highest ABE level from substandard and surplus dates was produced by C. beijerinckii ASU10 (24.07 g/L) comprising butanol 67.15% (16.16 g/L), acetone 30.73% (7.4 g/L) and ethanol 2.12% (0.51 g/L), while C. roseum ASU58 and C. chauvoei ASU55 produced ABE contributing 20.20 and 13.79 g/L, respectively. ABE production by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was 15.01 g/L. This study proved that the native strains C. beijerinckii ASU10 and C. roseum ASU58 have high competitive efficacy on ABE production from economical substrate as substandard and surplus date fruits. Additionally, using this substrate without any nutritional components is considered to be a commercial substrate for desired ABE production.

  7. Introducing a single secondary alcohol dehydrogenase into butanol-tolerant Clostridium acetobutylicum Rh8 switches ABE fermentation to high level IBE fermentation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previously we have developed a butanol tolerant mutant of Clostridium acetobutylicum Rh8, from the wild type strain DSM 1731. Strain Rh8 can tolerate up to 19 g/L butanol, with solvent titer improved accordingly, thus exhibiting industrial application potential. To test if strain Rh8 can be used for production of high level mixed alcohols, a single secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B593 was overexpressed in strain Rh8 under the control of thl promoter. Results The heterogenous gene sADH was functionally expressed in C. acetobutylicum Rh8. This simple, one-step engineering approach switched the traditional ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol) fermentation to IBE (isopropanol-butanol-ethanol) fermentation. The total alcohol titer reached 23.88 g/l (7.6 g/l isopropanol, 15 g/l butanol, and 1.28 g/l ethanol) with a yield to glucose of 31.42%. The acid (butyrate and acetate) assimilation rate in isopropanol producing strain Rh8(psADH) was increased. Conclusions The improved butanol tolerance and the enhanced solvent biosynthesis machinery in strain Rh8 is beneficial for production of high concentration of mixed alcohols. Strain Rh8 can thus be considered as a good host for further engineering of solvent/alcohol production. PMID:22742819

  8. Continuous acetone-butanol-ethanol production by corn stalk immobilized cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuedong; Ma, Yujiu; Yang, Fangxiao; Zhang, Chunhui

    2009-08-01

    Corn stalk was used as a support to immobilize Clostridia beijerinckii ATCC 55025 in the fermentation process of acetone, butanol, and ethanol production. The effect of the dilution rate on solvent production was examined in a steady-state 20-day continuous flow operation. The maximum total solvent concentration of 8.99 g l(-1) was obtained at a dilution rate of 0.2 h(-1). Increasing the dilution rate between 0.2 and 1.0 h(-1) resulted in an increased solvent productivity, and the highest solvent productivity was obtained at 5.06 g l(-1) h(-1) with a dilution rate of 1 h(-1). The maximum solvent yield from glucose of 0.32 g g(-1) was observed at 0.25 h(-1). The cell adsorption and morphology change during the growth on corn stalk support were examined by the SEM.

  9. Improved efficiency of butanol production by absorbed lignocellulose fermentation.

    PubMed

    He, Qin; Chen, Hongzhang

    2013-03-01

    Alkali-treated steam-exploded corn stover (SECSAT) was used as solid substrate for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production by absorbed lignocellulose fermentation (ALF) using Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. The ABE concentration in ALF culture had increased by 47% compared with that in submerged culture. More surprisingly, the acetone production was promoted and ethanol production was lower in the presence of SECSAT than that in its absence. ALF was also successfully in cofermentation of glucose and xylose, although decreased fermentability with an increase in the proportion of xylose. An invariable chemical composition and dry weight of SECSAT was found in ALF. Partial simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of SECSAT using a certain amount of cellulase could not only enhance the ABE concentration by 71%, but also significantly increase the area proportion of fiber cells in SECSAT from 53% to 90%, which would be an excellent paper making material.

  10. Energy-efficient recovery of butanol from model solutions and fermentation broth by adsorption.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, N; Hughes, S; Maddox, I S; Cotta, M A

    2005-07-01

    This article discusses the separation of butanol from aqueous solutions and/or fermentation broth by adsorption. Butanol fermentation is also known as acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) or solvent fermentation. Adsorbents such as silicalite, resins (XAD-2, XAD-4, XAD-7, XAD-8, XAD-16), bone charcoal, activated charcoal, bonopore, and polyvinylpyridine have been studied. Use of silicalite appears to be the more attractive as it can be used to concentrate butanol from dilute solutions (5 to 790-810 g L(-1)) and results in complete desorption of butanol (or ABE). In addition, silicalite can be regenerated by heat treatment. The energy requirement for butanol recovery by adsorption-desorption processes has been calculated to be 1,948 kcal kg(-1) butanol as compared to 5,789 kcal kg(-1) butanol by steam stripping distillation. Other techniques such as gas stripping and pervaporation require 5,220 and 3,295 kcal kg(-1) butanol, respectively.

  11. Use of the composite membrane of poly(ether-block-amide) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a pervaporation system incorporated with fermentation for butanol production by Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Yen, Hong-Wei; Chen, Zhi-Heng; Yang, I-Kuan

    2012-04-01

    Fermentation incorporated with pervaporation was regarded as an efficient way to relieve the feedback inhibition of butanol in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. The addition of CNTs (carbon nanotubes) to PEBA (poly(ether-block-amide)) could greatly enhance the removal flux of solvents (acetone, butanol and ethanol) in a model solution test. The butanol removing rate results in a 61% increase in the batch with PEBA+CNTs (5%) membrane compared with that of the batch with PEBA alone. Besides the increase of removal flux, the addition of CNTs enforces the mechanical strength of the pervaporation membrane, which leads to more resistance for a longer operational time. The combination of a 5-L fermenter with the pervaporation membrane of PEBA+CNTs (10%) indicates a 20% increase both in productivity and yield compared to using PEBA. In conclusion, the addition of CNTs to a PEBA pervaporation membrane has great potential when applied in the ABE fermentation industry.

  12. Effect of chemical pretreatments on corn stalk bagasse as immobilizing carrier of Clostridium acetobutylicum in the performance of a fermentation-pervaporation coupled system.

    PubMed

    Cai, Di; Li, Ping; Chen, Changjing; Wang, Yong; Hu, Song; Cui, Caixia; Qin, Peiyong; Tan, Tianwei

    2016-11-01

    In this study, different pretreatment methods were evaluated for modified the corn stalk bagasse and further used the pretreated bagasse as immobilized carrier in acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation process. Structural changes of the bagasses pretreated by different methods were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared, crystallinity index and scanning pictures by electron microscope. And the performances of batch fermentation using the corn stalk based carriers were evaluated. Results indicated that the highest ABE concentration of 23.86g/L was achieved using NaOH pretreated carrier in batch fermentation. Immobilized fermentation-pervaporation integration process was further carried out. The integration process showed long-term stability with 225-394g/L of ABE solvents on the permeate side of pervaporation membrane. This novel integration process was found to be an efficient method for biobutanol production.

  13. Improvement in the bioreactor specific productivity by coupling continuous reactor with repeated fed-batch reactor for acetone-butanol-ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Setlhaku, Mpho; Brunberg, Sina; Villa, Eva Del Amor; Wichmann, Rolf

    2012-10-15

    In comparison to the different fermentation modes for the production of acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) researched to date, the continuous fermentation is the most economically favored. Continuous fermentation with two or more reactor cascade is reported to be the most efficient as it results in a more stable solvent production process. In this work, it is shown that a continuous (first-stage) reactor coupled to a repeated fed-batch (second stage) is superior to batch and fed-batch fermentations, including two-stage continuous fermentation. This is due to the efficient catalyst use, reported through the specific product rate and rapid glucose consumption rate. High solvents are produced at 19.4 g(ABE) l⁻¹, with volumetric productivities of 0.92 g(butanol) l⁻¹ h⁻¹ and 1.47 g(ABE) l ⁻¹ h⁻¹. The bioreactor specific productivities of 0.62 and 0.39 g g⁻¹(cdw) h⁻¹ obtained show a high catalyst activity. This new process mode has not been reported before in the development of ABE fermentation and it shows great potential and superiority to the existing fermentation methods.

  14. Production of an acetone-butanol-ethanol mixture from Clostridium acetobutylicum and its conversion to high-value biofuels.

    PubMed

    Sreekumar, Sanil; Baer, Zachary C; Pazhamalai, Anbarasan; Gunbas, Gorkem; Grippo, Adam; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S; Toste, F Dean

    2015-03-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum is a bacterial species that ferments sugar to a mixture of organic solvents (acetone, butanol and ethanol). This protocol delineates a methodology to combine solventogenic clostridial fermentation and chemical catalysis via extractive fermentation for the production of biofuel blendstocks. Extractive fermentation of C. acetobutylicum is operated in fed-batch mode with a concentrated feed solution (500 grams per liter glucose and 50 grams per liter yeast extract) for 60 h, producing in excess of 40 g of solvents (acetone, butanol and ethanol) between the completely immiscible extractant and aqueous phases of the bioreactor. After distillation of the extractant phase, the acetone, butanol and ethanol mixture is upgraded to long-chain ketones over a palladium-hydrotalcite (Pd-HT) catalyst. This reaction is generally carried out in batch with a high-pressure Q-tube for 20 h at 250 °C. Following this protocol enables the production of ∼0.5 g of high-value biofuel precursors from a 1.7-g portion of fermentation solvents.

  15. Comparative shotgun proteomic analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum from butanol fermentation using glucose and xylose

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Butanol is a second generation biofuel produced by Clostridium acetobutylicum through acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation process. Shotgun proteomics provides a direct approach to study the whole proteome of an organism in depth. This paper focuses on shotgun proteomic profiling of C. acetobutylicum from ABE fermentation using glucose and xylose to understand the functional mechanisms of C. acetobutylicum proteins involved in butanol production. Results We identified 894 different proteins in C. acetobutylicum from ABE fermentation process by two dimensional - liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) method. This includes 717 proteins from glucose and 826 proteins from the xylose substrate. A total of 649 proteins were found to be common and 22 significantly differentially expressed proteins were identified between glucose and xylose substrates. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that flagellar proteins are highly up-regulated with glucose compared to xylose substrate during ABE fermentation. Chemotactic activity was also found to be lost with the xylose substrate due to the absence of CheW and CheV proteins. This is the first report on the shotgun proteomic analysis of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 in ABE fermentation between glucose and xylose substrate from a single time data point and the number of proteins identified here is more than any other study performed on this organism up to this report. PMID:22008648

  16. Two-stage in situ gas stripping for enhanced butanol fermentation and energy-saving product recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, C; Zhao, JB; Liu, FF; Lu, CC; Yang, ST; Bai, FW

    2013-05-01

    Two-stage gas stripping for butanol recovery from acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation with Clostridium acetobutylicum JB200 in a fibrous bed bioreactor was studied. Compared to fermentation without in situ gas stripping, more ABE (10.0 g/L acetone, 19.2 g/L butanol, 1.7 g/L ethanol vs. 7.9 g/L acetone, 16.2 g/L butanol, 1.4 g/L ethanol) were produced, with a higher butanol yield (0.25 g/g vs. 0.20 g/g) and productivity (0.40 g/L.h vs. 0.30 g/L-h) due to reduced butanol inhibition. The first-stage gas stripping produced a condensate containing 175.6 g/L butanol (227.0 g/L ABE), which after phase separation formed an organic phase containing 612.3 g/L butanol (660.7 g/L ABE) and an aqueous phase containing 101.3 g/L butanol (153.2 g/L ABE). After second-stage gas stripping, a highly concentrated product containing 420.3 g/L butanol (532.3 g/L ABE) was obtained. The process is thus effective in producing high-titer butanol that can be purified with much less energy. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Glycerol supplementation of the growth medium enhances in situ detoxification of furfural by Clostridium beijerinckii during butanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ujor, Victor; Agu, Chidozie Victor; Gopalan, Venkat; Ezeji, Thaddeus Chukwuemeka

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulose-derived microbial inhibitors such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethyl furfural adversely affect fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates to fuels and chemicals due to their toxicity on fermenting microbes. To harness the potential of lignocellulose as a cheap source of fermentable sugars, in situ detoxification of furfural and other lignocellulose-derived microbial inhibitors is essential. To enhance in situ detoxification and tolerance of furfural by Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 during acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation, the effect of glycerol on NADH/NADPH generation and ABE production by furfural (4, 5, and 6 g/L)-challenged cultures was investigated in this study. In all instances, beneficial outcomes were observed. For example, the fermentation medium supplemented with glycerol and subjected to 5 g/L furfural elicited up to 1.8- and 3-fold increases, respectively, in NADH and NADPH levels in C. beijerinckii 8052 relative to the control culture. These critical changes are the likely underpinnings for the glycerol-mediated 2.3-fold increase in the rate of detoxification of 5 g/L furfural, substrate consumption, and ABE production compared to the unsupplemented medium. Collectively, these results demonstrate that increased intracellular NADH/NADPH in C. beijerinckii 8052 due to glycerol utilization engenders favorable effects on many aspects of cellular metabolism, including enhanced furfural reduction and increased ABE production.

  18. Immobilization of Clostridium acetobutylicum onto natural textiles and its fermentation properties.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Wei; Liu, Xiaojing; Yang, Jing; Wu, Jinglan; Zhou, Jingwei; Chen, Yong; Liu, Dong; Ying, Hanjie

    2017-03-01

    Immobilized fermentation has several advantages over traditional suspended fermentation, including simple and continuous operation, improved fermentation performance and reduced cost. Carrier is the most adjustable element among three elements of immobilized fermentation, including carrier, bacteria and environment. In this study, we characterized carrier roughness and surface properties of four types of natural fibres, including linen, cotton, bamboo fibre and silk, to assess their effects on cell immobilization, fermentation performance and stability. Linen with higher specific surface area and roughness could adsorb more bacteria during immobilized fermentation, thereby improving fermentation performance; thus, linen was selected as a suitable carrier and was applied for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. To further improve fermentation performance, we also found that microbes of Clostridium acetobutylicum were negatively charged surfaces during fermentation. Therefore, we then modified linen with polyetherimide (PEI) and steric acid (SA) to increase surface positive charge and improve surface property. During ABE fermentation, the adhesion between modified linen and bacteria was increased, adsorption was increased about twofold compared with that of unmodified linen, and butanol productivity was increased 8.16% and 6.80% with PEI- and SA-modified linen as carriers respectively.

  19. Solvents Production from a Mixture of Glucose and Xylose by Mixed Fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Qi, Gao-Xiang; Xiong, Lian; Huang, Chao; Chen, Xue-Fang; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Xin-De

    2015-10-01

    To overcome the xylose utilization defect in ethanol fermentation by wide-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae and alleviate the carbon catabolite repression (CCR) in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum, a novel mixed fermentation of S. cerevisiae and C. acetobutylicum was developed. When S. cerevisiae was inoculated 24 h earlier than C. acetobutylicum CH02, a higher solvents yield was achieved with 0.41 g/g, compared to 0.38 g/g in ABE fermentation, and when S. cerevisiae and C. acetobutylicum CH02 were inoculated simultaneously, a higher productivity was achieved with 0.32 g/L/h, compared to 0.15 g/L/h in ABE fermentation. The total solvents yield was improved by the high ethanol yield from glucose. The CCR in mixed fermentation was alleviated when glucose was utilized quickly by S. cerevisiae, and therefore, the productivity was improved. This study suggests that mixed fermentation is an effective solvents production method from a mixture of glucose and xylose.

  20. Shotgun proteomic monitoring of Clostridium acetobutylicum during stationary phase of butanol fermentation using xylose and comparison with the exponential phase

    SciTech Connect

    Sivagnanam, Kumaran; Raghavan, Vijaya G. S.; Shah, Manesh B; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Lefsrud, Mark G

    2012-01-01

    Economically viable production of solvents through acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) fermentation requires a detailed understanding of Clostridium acetobutylicum. This study focuses on the proteomic profiling of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 from the stationary phase of ABE fermentation using xylose and compares with the exponential growth by shotgun proteomics approach. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed 22.9% of the C. acetobutylicum genome and 18.6% was found to be common in both exponential and stationary phases. The proteomic profile of C. acetobutylicum changed during the ABE fermentation such that 17 proteins were significantly differentially expressed between the two phases. Specifically, the expression of five proteins namely, CAC2873, CAP0164, CAP0165, CAC3298, and CAC1742 involved in the solvent production pathway were found to be significantly lower in the stationary phase compared to the exponential growth. Similarly, the expression of fucose isomerase (CAC2610), xylulose kinase (CAC2612), and a putative uncharacterized protein (CAC2611) involved in the xylose utilization pathway were also significantly lower in the stationary phase. These findings provide an insight into the metabolic behavior of C. acetobutylicum between different phases of ABE fermentation using xylose.

  1. Butanol production from wood pulping hydrolysate in an integrated fermentation-gas stripping process

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, CC; Dong, J; Yang, ST

    2013-09-01

    Wood pulping hydrolysate (WPH) containing mainly xylose and glucose as a potential substrate for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was studied. Due to the inhibitors present in the hydrolysate, several dilution levels and detoxification treatments, including overliming, activated charcoal adsorption, and resin adsorption, were evaluated for their effectiveness in relieving the inhibition on fermentation. Detoxification using resin and evaporation was found to be the most effective method in reducing the toxicity of WPH. ABE production in batch fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii increased 68%, from 6.73 g/L in the non-treated and non-diluted WPH to 11.35 g/L in the resin treated WPH. With gas stripping for in situ product removal, ABE production from WPH increased to 17.73 g/L, demonstrating that gas stripping was effective in alleviating butanol toxicity by selectively separating butanol from the fermentation broth, which greatly improved solvents production and sugar conversion in the fermentation. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Improving performance of a gas stripping-based recovery system to remove butanol from Clostridium beijerinckii fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ezeji, Thaddeus C; Karcher, Patrick M; Qureshi, Nasib; Blaschek, Hans P

    2005-05-01

    The effect of factors such as gas recycle rate, bubble size, presence of acetone, and ethanol in the solution/broth were investigated in order to remove butanol from model solution or fermentation broth (also called acetone butanol ethanol or ABE or solvents). Butanol (8 g L(-1), model solution, Fig. 2) stripping rate was found to be proportional to the gas recycle rate. In the bubble size range attempted (< 0.5 and 0.5-5.0 mm), the bubble size did not have any effect on butanol removal rate (Fig. 3, model solution). In Clostridium beijerinckii fermentation, ABE productivity was reduced from 0.47 g L(-1) h(-1) to 0.25 g L(-1) h(-1) when smaller (< 0.5 mm) bubble size was used to remove ABE (Fig. 4, results reported as butanol/ABE concentration). The productivity was reduced as a result of addition of an excessive amount of antifoam used to inhibit the production of foam caused by the smaller bubbles. This suggested that the fermentation was negatively affected by antifoam.

  3. High-efficient n-butanol production by co-culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae integrated with butyrate fermentative supernatant addition.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hongzhen; Zeng, Qingwei; Han, Shuo; Wang, Zhaoyu; Dong, Qing; Bi, Yanhong; Zhao, Yuping

    2017-04-01

    Butanol is not only an important chemical intermediate and solvent in pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries, but also considered as an advanced biofuel. Although species of the natural host Clostridium have been engineered, butanol titers in the anaerobe seem to be limited by its intolerance to butanol less than 13 g/L. Here we aimed to develop a technology for enhancing butanol production by a co-culture system with butyrate fermentative supernatant addition. First, when adding 4.0 g/L butyrate into the acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation broth with single-shot at 24 h, the "acid crash" phenomenon occurred and the ABE fermentation performance deteriorated. Subsequently, we found that adding certain amino acids could effectively enhance butyrate re-assimilation, butanol tolerance and titer (from 11.1 to 14.8 g/L). Additionally, in order to decrease the raw material cost, butyrate fermentative supernatant produced by Clostridium tyrobutyricum was applied to butanol production in the Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae co-culture system, instead of adding synthetic butyrate. Final butanol and total ABE concentrations reached higher levels of 16.3 and 24.8 g/L with increments of 46.8 and 37.8%, respectively. These results show that the proposed fermentation strategy has great potential for efficiently butanol production with an economic approach.

  4. Hybrid Vapor Stripping-Vapor Permeation Process for Recovery and Dehydration of 1-Butanol and Acetone/Butanol/Ethanol from Dilute Aqueous Solutions. Part 1. Process Simulations

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Fermentative production of butanol is limited to low concentrations, typically less than 2 wt% solvent, due to product inhibition. The result is high separation energy demand by conventional distillation approaches, despite favorable vapor-liquid equilibrium and parti...

  5. Enhanced mannan-derived fermentable sugars of palm kernel cake by mannanase-catalyzed hydrolysis for production of biobutanol.

    PubMed

    Shukor, Hafiza; Abdeshahian, Peyman; Al-Shorgani, Najeeb Kaid Nasser; Hamid, Aidil Abdul; Rahman, Norliza A; Kalil, Mohd Sahaid

    2016-10-01

    Catalytic depolymerization of mannan composition of palm kernel cake (PKC) by mannanase was optimized to enhance the release of mannan-derived monomeric sugars for further application in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. Efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of PKC was studied by evaluating effects of PKC concentration, mannanase loading, hydrolysis pH value, reaction temperature and hydrolysis time on production of fermentable sugars using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The ANOVA results revealed that all factors studied had highly significant effects on total sugar liberated (P<0.01). The optimum conditions for PKC hydrolysis were 20% (w/v) PKC concentration, 5% (w/w) mannanase loading, hydrolysis pH 4.5, 45°C temperature and 72h hydrolysis time. Enzymatic experiments in optimum conditions revealed total fermentable sugars of 71.54±2.54g/L were produced including 67.47±2.51g/L mannose and 2.94±0.03g/L glucose. ABE fermentation of sugar hydrolysate by Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4 resulted in 3.27±1.003g/L biobutanol.

  6. Improving Butanol Fermentation To Enter the Advanced Biofuel Market

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Bryan P.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT 1-Butanol is a large-volume, intermediate chemical with favorable physical and chemical properties for blending with or directly substituting for gasoline. The per-volume value of butanol, as a chemical, is sufficient for investing into the recommercialization of the classical acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) (E. M. Green, Curr. Opin. Biotechnol. 22:337–343, 2011) fermentation process. Furthermore, with modest improvements in three areas of the ABE process, operating costs can be sufficiently decreased to make butanol an economically viable advanced biofuel. The three areas of greatest interest are (i) maximizing yields of butanol on any particular substrate, (ii) expanding substrate utilization capabilities of the host microorganism, and (iii) reducing the energy consumption of the overall production process, in particular the separation and purification operations. In their study in the September/October 2012 issue of mBio, Jang et al. [mBio 3(5):e00314-12, 2012] describe a comprehensive study on driving glucose metabolism in Clostridium acetobutylicum to the production of butanol. Moreover, they execute a metabolic engineering strategy to achieve the highest yet reported yields of butanol on glucose. PMID:23232720

  7. Alternative non-chromatographic method for alcohols determination in Clostridium acetobutylicum fermentations.

    PubMed

    Noriega-Medrano, Laura J; Vega-Estrada, Jesús; Ortega-López, Jaime; Ruiz-Medrano, Roberto; Cristiani-Urbina, Eliseo; Montes-Horcasitas, Maria Del Carmen

    2016-07-01

    An economic, simple, quantitative, and non-chromatographic method for the determination of alcohols using microdiffusion principle has been adapted and validated for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation samples. This method, based on alcohols oxidation using potassium dichromate in acid medium, and detection by spectrophotometry, was evaluated varying, both, temperature (35°C, 45°C, and 55°C) and reaction time (0 to 125min). With a sample analysis time of 90min at 45°C, a limit of detection (LOD), and a limit of quantification (LOQ) of 0.10, and 0.40g/L, respectively. The proposed method has been successfully applied to determine butanol and ethanol concentrations in ABE fermentation samples with the advantage that multiple samples can be analyzed simultaneously. The measurements obtained with the proposed method were in good agreement with those obtained with the Gas Chromatography Method (GCM). This proposed method is useful for routine analysis of alcohols and screening samples in laboratories and industries.

  8. Continuous butanol fermentation and feed starch retrogradation: butanol fermentation sustainability using Clostridium beijerinckii BA101.

    PubMed

    Ezeji, T C; Qureshi, N; Blaschek, H P

    2005-01-26

    Use of starch solution as feed for butanol bioconversion processes employing Clostridium beijerinckii BA101 may have added economic advantage over the use of glucose. Acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) was produced from 30 gL(-1) starch solution using a continuous process. The bioreactor was fed at a dilution rate of 0.02 h(-1) and starch solution/feed volume (3 L) was replaced every 72 h. The continuous reactor fed with cornstarch solution (feed temperature 19 degrees C) produced approximately 6.0 gL(-1) total ABE. Increasing the feed storage temperature to 37 degrees C improved ABE production to 7.2 gL(-1) suggesting that retrogradation was occurring more rapidly at 19 degrees C. In both these cases the fermentation drifted toward acid production after approximately 260 h, consistent with the retrogradation of starch overtime. The use of soluble starch, which is less prone to retrogradation, resulted in the production of 9.9 gL(-1) ABE at 37 degrees C feed storage temperature, as compared to 7.2 gL(-1) ABE when cornstarch was used. It should be noted that gelatinized starch retrogradation takes place after sterilization and prior to use of the feed medium, and does not occur during long-term storage of the raw corn material in the months leading up to processing. The degree of hydrolysis of gelatinized starch decreased from 68.8 to 56.2% in 3 days when stored at 37 degrees C. Soluble starch which does not retrograde demonstrated no change in the degree of hydrolysis.

  9. Process integration for simultaneous saccharification, fermentation, and recovery (SSFR): production of butanol from corn stover using Clostridium beijerinckii P260.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, N; Singh, V; Liu, S; Ezeji, T C; Saha, B C; Cotta, M A

    2014-02-01

    A simultaneous saccharification, fermentation, and recovery (SSFR) process was developed for the production of acetone-butanol-ethanol (AB or ABE), of which butanol is the main product, from corn stover employing Clostridium beijerinckii P260. Of the 86 g L(-1) corn stover provided, over 97% of the sugars were released during hydrolysis and these were fermented completely with an ABE productivity of 0.34 g L(-1)h(-1) and yield of 0.39. This productivity is higher than 0.31 g L(-1)h(-1) when using glucose as a substrate demonstrating that AB could be produced efficiently from lignocellulosic biomass. Acetic acid that was released from the biomass during pretreatment and hydrolysis was also used by the culture to produce AB. An average rate of generation of sugars during corn stover hydrolysis was 0.98 g L(-1)h(-1). In this system AB was recovered using vacuum, and as a result of this (simultaneous product recovery), 100% sugars were used by the culture.

  10. Pervaporative butanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum B18

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Q.; Park, C.H. . Dept. of Agricultural Engineering)

    1994-04-15

    Extractive acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was carried out successfully using pervaporation and a low-acid-producing Clostridium acetobutylicum B18. A pervaporation module with 0.17 m[sup 2] of surface area was made of silicone membrane of 240 [mu]m thickness. Pervaporation experiments using make-up solutions showed that butanol and acetone fluxes increased linearly with their concentrations in the aqueous phase. Fickian diffusion coefficients were constants for fixed air flow rates, and increased at higher sweep air flow rates. During batch and fed-batch fermentation, pervaporation at an air flow rate of 8 L/min removed butanol and acetone efficiently. Butanol concentration was maintained below 4.5 g/L even though Clostridium acetobutylicum B18 produced butanol steadily. Pervaporation could not remove organic acids efficiently, but organic acids did not accumulate because strain B18 produced little organic acid and recycled added organic acids efficiently. With pervaporation, glucose consumption rate increased compared to without pervaporation, and up to 160 g/L of glucose was consumed during 80 h. Cell growth was not inhibited by possible salt accumulation or oxygen diffusion through the silicone tubing. The culture volume was maintained relatively constant during fed-batch operation because of an offsetting effect of water and product removal by pervaporation and addition of nutrient supplements.

  11. Production of Butanol (A Biofuel) from Agricultural Residues: Part I - Use of Barley Straw Hydrolysate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fermentation of dilute sulfuric acid barley straw hydrolyzate (BSH; undiluted/untreated) by Clostridium beijerinckii P260 resulted in the production of 7.09 gL**-1 ABE (acetone butanol ethanol; AB or ABE), an ABE yield of 0.33, and productivity of 0.10 gL**-1h**-1. This level of ABE is much less th...

  12. Predictive modeling in Clostridium acetobutylicum fermentations employing Raman spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis for real-time culture monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Theresah N. K.; Liu, Sanchao; Germane, Katherine L.; Servinsky, Matthew D.; Gerlach, Elliot S.; Mackie, David M.; Sund, Christian J.

    2016-05-01

    The coupling of optical fibers with Raman instrumentation has proven to be effective for real-time monitoring of chemical reactions and fermentations when combined with multivariate statistical data analysis. Raman spectroscopy is relatively fast, with little interference from the water peak present in fermentation media. Medical research has explored this technique for analysis of mammalian cultures for potential diagnosis of some cancers. Other organisms studied via this route include Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and some Bacillus sp., though very little work has been performed on Clostridium acetobutylicum cultures. C. acetobutylicum is a gram-positive anaerobic bacterium, which is highly sought after due to its ability to use a broad spectrum of substrates and produce useful byproducts through the well-known Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol (ABE) fermentation. In this work, real-time Raman data was acquired from C. acetobutylicum cultures grown on glucose. Samples were collected concurrently for comparative off-line product analysis. Partial-least squares (PLS) models were built both for agitated cultures and for static cultures from both datasets. Media components and metabolites monitored include glucose, butyric acid, acetic acid, and butanol. Models were cross-validated with independent datasets. Experiments with agitation were more favorable for modeling with goodness of fit (QY) values of 0.99 and goodness of prediction (Q2Y) values of 0.98. Static experiments did not model as well as agitated experiments. Raman results showed the static experiments were chaotic, especially during and shortly after manual sampling.

  13. Butanol production from the effluent of hydrogen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, W H; Chen, S Y; Chao, S J; Jian, Z C

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to recover butanol from the effluent of the hydrogen-producing bioreactor containing acetate, butyrate, and carbohydrate. The butanol production by Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B592 was evaluated under both unsterilized and sterilized conditions for examining the potential of butanol production for the practical application. Sucrose of 10 g/L and butyrate of 2 g/L coupled with acetate buffer were used to mimic the effluent. Sucrose was completely consumed in the both unsterilized and sterilized conditions during acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. However, the results illustrate that the carbohydrate consumption rate in the unsterilized condition was higher than that in the sterilized condition. The maximum butanol concentrations of 3,500 and 3,750 mg/L were achieved in the sterilized and unsterilized conditions, respectively. Meanwhile, it was found that the acetate and the butyrate concentrations of 600 and 1,500 mg/L, and 300 and 1,000 mg/L were ingested to yield butanol in the sterilized condition and in the unsterilized condition, respectively. The results concluded that high levels of acetate and butyrate could eliminate the interference of other microbial populations, resulting in the enrichment of C. beijerinckii NRRL B592 in the fermentor. The butanol production by C. beijerinckii NRRL B592 could be, therefore, produced from the effluent of the hydrogen-producing bioreactor. It promised that the microbial butanol production is one of attractive bioprocesses to recover energy from wastes.

  14. Butanol production from hexoses and pentoses by fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Raganati, Francesca; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Götz, Peter; Marzocchella, Antonio; Salatino, Piero

    2015-08-01

    The present paper reports the characterization of ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol) production by Clostridium acetobutylicum DSM 792 for sugars representative of hydrolysed lignocellulosic biomass (glucose, mannose, arabinose, xylose). The attention was focused on: the selection of an optimal medium for the simultaneous conversion of the investigated sugars; the assessment of interference-synergistic effects during the fermentation of mixtures of the investigated sugars. The synthetic medium was optimised in terms of nutritional factors: the KH2PO4-K2HPO4 concentration was increased up to 5 g/L; the MgSO4 concentration was increased up to 2 g/L; the MnSO4 concentration was increased up to 0.1 g/L; the FeSO4 concentration ranged between 0.002 and 0.01 g/L); the CaCO3 concentration was increased up to 10 g/L. The optimal concentration of the investigated factors was assessed and it varied from one sugar to another. The batch fermentations of a mixture of the four sugars highlighted their synergistic effects. Once set the initial concentration of the sugars (60 g/L), the butanol and solvent concentration increased up to 14.6 and 20.6 g/L, respectively, when the four sugars were present.

  15. Butanol production employing fed-batch fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum GX01 using alkali-pretreated sugarcane bagasse hydrolysed by enzymes from Thermoascus aurantiacus QS 7-2-4.

    PubMed

    Pang, Zong-Wen; Lu, Wei; Zhang, Hui; Liang, Zheng-Wu; Liang, Jing-Juan; Du, Liang-Wei; Duan, Cheng-Jie; Feng, Jia-Xun

    2016-07-01

    Sugarcane bagasse (SB) is a potential feedstock for butanol production. However, biological production of butanol from SB is less economically viable. In this study, evaluation of eight pretreatments on SB showed that alkali pretreatment efficiently removed lignin from SB while retaining the intact native structure of the released microfibrils. In total, 99% of cellulose and 100% of hemicellulose in alkali-pretreated SB were hydrolysed by enzymes from Thermoascus aurantiacus. The hydrolysate was used to produce butanol in a fed-batch fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum. At 60h, 14.17 and 21.11gL(-1) of butanol and acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) were produced from 68.89gL(-1) of total sugars, respectively, yielding 0.22 and 0.33gg(-1) of sugars. The maximum yield of butanol and ABE reached 15.4g and 22.9g per 100g raw SB, respectively. This established process may have potential application for butanol production from SB.

  16. Optimization of butanol production from tropical maize stalk juice by fermentation with Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Blaschek, Hans P

    2011-11-01

    Mixed sugars from tropical maize stalk juice were used to carry out butanol fermentation with Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052. Batch experiments employing central composite design (CCD) and response surface methodology (RSM) optimization were performed to evaluate effects of three factors, i.e. pH, initial total sugar concentration, and agitation rate on butanol production. Optimum conditions of pH 6.7, sugar concentration 42.2g/L and agitation rate 48 rpm were predicted, under which a maximum butanol yield of 0.27 g/g-sugar was estimated. Further experiments demonstrated that higher agitation facilitated acetone production, leading to lower butanol selectivity in total acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE). While glucose and fructose are more preferable by C. beijerinckii, sucrose can also be easily degraded by the microorganism. This study indicated that RSM is a useful approach for optimizing operational conditions for butanol production, and demonstrated that tropical maize, with high yield of biomass and stalk sugars, is a promising biofuel crop.

  17. Fermentation and genomic analysis of acetone-uncoupled butanol production by Clostridium tetanomorphum.

    PubMed

    Gong, Fuyu; Bao, Guanhui; Zhao, Chunhua; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin; Dong, Hongjun

    2016-02-01

    In typical acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation, acetone is the main by-product (50 % of butanol mass) of butanol production, resulting in a low yield of butanol. It is known that some Clostridium tetanomorphum strains are able to produce butanol without acetone in nature. Here, we described that C. tetanomorphum strain DSM665 can produce 4.16 g/L butanol and 4.98 g/L ethanol at pH 6.0, and 9.81 g/L butanol and 1.01 g/L ethanol when adding 1 mM methyl viologen. Butyrate and acetate could be reassimilated and no acetone was produced. Further analysis indicated that the activity of the acetate/butyrate:acetoacetyl-CoA transferase responsible for acetone production is lost in C. tetanomorphum DSM665. The genome of C. tetanomorphum DSM665 was sequenced and deposited in DDBJ, EMBL, and GenBank under the accession no. APJS00000000. Sequence analysis indicated that there are no typical genes (ctfA/B and adc) that are typically parts of an acetone synthesis pathway in C. tetanomorphum DSM665. This work provides new insights in the mechanism of clostridial butanol production and should prove useful for the design of a high-butanol-producing strain.

  18. Ultrasound-enhanced recovery of butanol/ABE by pervaporation.

    PubMed

    Menchavez, Russel Navarro; Ha, Sung Ho

    2013-11-01

    The search for renewable sources of energy has led to renewed interests on the biochemical route for the production of butanol. Butanol production suffers from several drawbacks, mainly caused by butanol inhibition to the butanol-producing microorganism which makes it economically uncompetitive against the chemical process. One possible solution proposed is the in situ recovery of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE). Among the in situ recovery options, membrane processes like pervaporation have a great potential. Thus, the effects of temperature, feed concentration, and ultrasound irradiation on permeate concentration and permeation flux for the recovery of butanol/ABE by pervaporation from aqueous solutions were investigated in this study. In the butanol-water system, permeate butanol concentration as well as flux increased with an increase in temperature and butanol feed concentration. When pervaporation studies with ABE-water mixture were carried out at 60 °C for 2, 4, 8, 16, and 24 h, pervaporation profile revealed an optimal permeate concentration as well as permeation flux. Applications of ultrasound irradiation on pervaporation improved permeate concentration by about 23 g/L for both butanol and ABE. Ultrasound irradiation also improved butanol and ABE mass permeation flux by about 13 and 11 %, respectively.

  19. Bioproduction of butanol in bioreactors: new insights from simultaneous in situ butanol recovery to eliminate product toxicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simultaneous acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii 260 and in situ product recovery was investigated using a vacuum process operated in two modes: continuous and intermittent. Integrated batch fermentations and ABE recovery were conducted at 37 deg C using a 14-L bio...

  20. Hybrid Vapor Stripping-Vapor Permeation Process for Recovery and Dehydration of 1-Butanol and Acetone/Butanol/Ethanol from Dilute Aqueous Solutions. Part 2. Experimental Validation with Simple Mixtures and Actual Fermentation Broth

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: In Part1 of this work, a process integrating vapor stripping, vapor compression, and a vapor permeation membrane separation step, Membrane Assisted Vapor Stripping (MAVS), was predicted to produce energy savings compared to traditional distillation systems for separat...

  1. Effect of ozonolysis parameters on the inhibitory compound generation and on the production of ethanol by Pichia stipitis and acetone-butanol-ethanol by Clostridium from ozonated and water washed sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Travaini, Rodolfo; Barrado, Enrique; Bolado-Rodríguez, Silvia

    2016-10-01

    Sugarcane bagasse (SCB) was ozone pretreated and detoxified by water washing, applying a L9(3)(4) orthogonal array (OA) design of experiments to study the effect of pretreatment parameters (moisture content, ozone concentration, ozone/oxygen flow and particle size) on the generation of inhibitory compounds and on the composition of hydrolysates of ozonated-washed samples. Ozone concentration resulted the highest influence process parameter on delignification and sugar release after washing; while, for inhibitory compound formation, moisture content also had an important role. Ozone expended in pretreatment related directly with sugar release and inhibitory compound formation. Washing detoxification was effective, providing non-inhibitory hydrolysates. Maximum glucose and xylose release yields obtained were 84% and 67%, respectively, for ozonated-washed SCB. Sugar concentration resulted in the decisive factor for biofuels yields. Ethanol production achieved an 88% yield by Pichia stipitis, whereas Clostridium acetobutylicum produced 0.072gBUTANOL/gSUGAR and 0.188gABE/gSUGAR, and, Clostridium beijerinckii 0.165gBUTANOL/gSUGAR and 0.257gABE/gSUGAR.

  2. Butanol productivity enhancers in wheat straw hydrolyzate: employing potential of enhanced reaction rate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butanol production by fermentation is gaining momentum due to increased prices of fossil fuels. This biofuel is a major product of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation that can be produced from hydrolyzed agricultural residues and/or corn. A control glucose (60 g/L) based batch fermentation us...

  3. Cellulosic Substrates and Challenges Ahead

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cost of production of butanol (acetone-butanol-ethanol; or ABE) is determined by feedstock prices, fermentation, recovery, by-product credits and the waste water treatment. Along these lines, we have an intensive research program on the use of various agricultural substrates, fermentation strate...

  4. Butanol production from concentrated lactose/whey permeate: Use of pervaporation membrane to recover and concentrate product

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In these studies butanol (acetone butanol ethanol, or ABE) was produced from concentrated lactose/whey permeate containing 211 gL-1 lactose. Fermentation of such a highly concentrated lactose solution was possible due to simultaneous product removal using a pervaporation membrane. In this system a p...

  5. Oil palm empty fruit bunch to biofuels and chemicals via SO2-ethanol-water fractionation and ABE fermentation.

    PubMed

    Sklavounos, Evangelos; Iakovlev, Mikhail; Survase, Shrikant; Granström, Tom; van Heiningen, Adriaan

    2013-11-01

    A process has been developed for conversion of spent liquor produced by SO2-ethanol-water (SEW) fractionation of oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fibers to biofuels by ABE fermentation. The fermentation process utilizes Clostridia bacteria that produce butanol, ethanol and acetone solvents at a total yield of 0.26 g/g sugars. A conditioning scheme is developed, which demonstrates that it is possible to utilize the hemicellulose sugars from this agricultural waste stream by traditional ABE fermentation. Fractionation as well as sugar hydrolysis in the spent liquor is hindered by the high cation content of OPEFB, which can be partly removed by acidic leaching suggesting that a better deashing method is necessary. Furthermore, it is inferred that better and more selective lignin removal is needed during conditioning to improve liquor fermentability.

  6. Increasing butanol/acetone ratio and solvent productivity in ABE fermentation by consecutively feeding butyrate to weaken metabolic strength of butyrate loop.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Shi, Zhongping; Li, Zhigang

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we attempted to increase butanol/acetone ratio and total solvent productivity in ABE fermentations with corn- and cassava-based media, by consecutively feeding a small amount of butyrate/acetate during solventogenic phase to weaken the metabolic strengths in butyrate/acetate closed-loops. Consecutively feeding a small amount of butyrate (a total of 3.0 g/L-broth) is most effective in improving performance of corn-based ABE fermentations, as it simultaneously increased average butanol/acetone ratio by 23 % (1.92-2.36) and total solvent productivity by 16 % (0.355-0.410 g/L/h) as compared with those of control. However, the butyrate feeding strategy could not improve butanol/acetone ratio and total solvent productivity in cassava-based ABE fermentations, where the metabolic strength of butyrate closed-loop had already been very low.

  7. ARTP mutation and genome shuffling of ABE fermentation symbiotic system for improvement of butanol production.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chunkai; Wang, Genyu; Mai, Shuai; Wu, Pengfei; Wu, Jianrong; Wang, Gehua; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jianan

    2017-03-01

    Butanol is an ideal renewable biofuel which possesses superior fuel properties. Previously, butanol-producing symbiotic system TSH06 was isolated in our lab, with microoxygen tolerance ability. To boost butanol yield for large-scale industrial production, TSH06 was used as parental strain and subjected to atmospheric and room temperature plasma (ARTP) and four rounds of genome shuffling (GS). ARTP mutant and GS strain were co-cultured with facultative anaerobic Bacillus cereus TSH2 to form a symbiotic system with microoxygen tolerance, which was then subjected to fermentation. Relative messenger RNA (mRNA) level of key enzyme gene was measured by real-time PCR. The highest butanol titer of TS4-30 reached 15.63 g/L, which was 34% higher than TSH06 (12.19 g/L). Compared with parental strain, mRNA of acid-forming gene in TS4-30 decreased in acidogenesis phase, while solvent-forming gene increased in solventogenesis phase. This gene expression pattern was consistent with high butanol yield and low acid level in TS4-30. In summary, symbiotic system TS4-30 was obtained with butanol titer improvement and microoxygen tolerance.

  8. Capturing the response of Clostridium acetobutylicum to chemical stressors using a regulated genome-scale metabolic model

    SciTech Connect

    Dash, Satyakam; Mueller, Thomas J.; Venkataramanan, Keerthi P.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2014-10-14

    Clostridia are anaerobic Gram-positive Firmicutes containing broad and flexible systems for substrate utilization, which have been used successfully to produce a range of industrial compounds. Clostridium acetobutylicum has been used to produce butanol on an industrial scale through acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. A genome-scale metabolic (GSM) model is a powerful tool for understanding the metabolic capacities of an organism and developing metabolic engineering strategies for strain development. The integration of stress related specific transcriptomics information with the GSM model provides opportunities for elucidating the focal points of regulation.

  9. Capturing the response of Clostridium acetobutylicum to chemical stressors using a regulated genome-scale metabolic model

    DOE PAGES

    Dash, Satyakam; Mueller, Thomas J.; Venkataramanan, Keerthi P.; ...

    2014-10-14

    Clostridia are anaerobic Gram-positive Firmicutes containing broad and flexible systems for substrate utilization, which have been used successfully to produce a range of industrial compounds. Clostridium acetobutylicum has been used to produce butanol on an industrial scale through acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. A genome-scale metabolic (GSM) model is a powerful tool for understanding the metabolic capacities of an organism and developing metabolic engineering strategies for strain development. The integration of stress related specific transcriptomics information with the GSM model provides opportunities for elucidating the focal points of regulation.

  10. Cell growth behaviors of Clostridium acetobutylicum in a pervaporation membrane bioreactor for butanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Peina; Xiao, Zeyi; Chen, Chunyan; Li, Weijia; Deng, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation using Clostridium acetobutylicum was studied in the continuous and closed-circulating fermentation (CCCF) system. The experiment lasting for 192 H was carried out by integrating fermentation with in situ pervaporation. In the entire process, the cell growth profile took place in the following two phases: the logarithmic phase during early 28 H and the linear phase from 130 to 150 H. This was a unique characteristic compared with the curve of traditional fermentation, and the fitting equations of two growth phases were obtained by Origin software according to the kinetic model of cell growth. Besides, the kinetic parameters that include the butanol yield, maximum specific growth rate, average specific formation rate, and volumetric productivity of butanol were measured as 0.19 g g(-1) , 0.345 H(-1) , 0.134 H(-1) and 0.23 g L(-1)  H(-1) , respectively. The C. acetobutylicum in the CCCF system showed good adaptability and fermentation performance, and the prolonged fermentation period and high production were also the main advantages of CCCF technology.

  11. Extractive acetonobutylic fermentation by coupling ultrafiltration and distillation.

    PubMed

    Minier, M; Grateloup, R; Blanc-Ferras, E; Goma, G

    1990-04-15

    An extractive acetonobutylic fermentation process is developed by integrating bioproduction, Ultrafiltration, and distillation, providing simultaneous retention of biomass, selective removal of inhibitors from the permeate, as well as separation and purification of acetone-butanol-ethanol solvents. Successive batch fermentations were performed with normal pressure distillation (98 degrees C), which permitted prolonging and enhancing (by a factor of 3) solvent production, with very few volume exchanges of medium (average dilution rate ws 0.002 h(-1)), and recovering on-line concentrated solvents. Different operating conditions were also tested in order to study the presence of extracellular autolytic enzymes as inhibition factors: It was shown that, (1) extracellular autolytic activity remains low during the larger part of fermentations, even without enzyme-inactivating thermotreatment in the distillation boiler, and (2) high-temperature distillation causes deleterious effects to the culture medium for long duration treatments. Progressive improvements of the process were achieved, first, by managing continuous runs, providing a minimum renewal of the culture medium and, mainly, by decreasing temperature and pressure of distilation. Solvent productivity then reached 2.6 g/L h for a 0.036 h(-1) average dilution rate, corresponding to a feed concentration of 156 g/L glucose actually consumed.

  12. Butanol production by immobilised Clostridium acetobutylicum in repeated batch, fed-batch, and continuous modes of fermentation.

    PubMed

    Dolejš, Igor; Krasňan, Vladimír; Stloukal, Radek; Rosenberg, Michal; Rebroš, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum immobilised in polyvinylalcohol, lens-shaped hydrogel capsules (LentiKats(®)) was studied for production of butanol and other products of acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation. After optimising the immobilisation protocol for anaerobic bacteria, continuous, repeated batch, and fed-batch fermentations in repeated batch mode were performed. Using glucose as a substrate, butanol productivity of 0.41 g/L/h and solvent productivity of 0.63 g/L/h were observed at a dilution rate of 0.05 h(-1) during continuous fermentation with a concentrated substrate (60 g/L). Through the process of repeated batch fermentation, the duration of fermentation was reduced from 27.8h (free-cell fermentation) to 3.3h (immobilised cells) with a solvent productivity of 0.77 g/L/h (butanol 0.57 g/L/h). The highest butanol and solvent productivities of 1.21 and 1.91 g/L/h were observed during fed-batch fermentation operated in repeated batch mode with yields of butanol (0.15 g/g) and solvents (0.24 g/g), respectively, produced per gram of glucose.

  13. Fermentative production of butanol: Perspectives on synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Sonil; Golemi-Kotra, Dasantila; McDermott, John C; Dalai, Ajay K; Gökalp, Iskender; Kozinski, Janusz A

    2017-03-09

    Apprehensions relating to global warming, climate change, pollution, rising energy demands as well as fluctuating crude oil prices and supply are leading to a shift in global interest to find suitable alternatives to fossil fuels. This review aims to highlight the many different facets of butanol as an advanced next-generation transportation biofuel. Butanol has fuel properties almost on a par with gasoline, such as high energy content, low vapor pressure, non-hygroscopic nature, less volatility, flexible fuel blends and high octane number. The paper reviews some recent advances in acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation with special emphasis on the primary challenges encountered in butanol fermentation, including butanol toxicity, solvent intolerance and bacteriophage contamination. The mechanisms for butanol recovery techniques have been covered along with their benefits and limitations. A comprehensive discussion of genetic and metabolic engineering of butanol-producing microorganisms is made for the prospective development of industrially-relevant strains that can overcome the technical challenges involved in efficient butanol production.

  14. Sustainable biobutanol production from pineapple waste by using Clostridium acetobutylicum B 527: Drying kinetics study.

    PubMed

    Khedkar, Manisha A; Nimbalkar, Pranhita R; Gaikwad, Shashank G; Chavan, Prakash V; Bankar, Sandip B

    2017-02-01

    Present investigation explores the use of pineapple peel, a food industry waste, for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production using Clostridium acetobutylicum B 527. Proximate analysis of pineapple peel shows that it contains 35% cellulose, 19% hemicellulose, and 16% lignin on dry basis. Drying experiments on pineapple peel waste were carried out in the temperature range of 60-120°C and experimental drying data was modeled using moisture diffusion control model to study its effect on ABE production. The production of ABE was further accomplished via acid hydrolysis, detoxification, and fermentation process. Maximum total sugar release obtained by using acid hydrolysis was 97g/L with 95-97% and 10-50% removal of phenolics and acetic acid, respectively during detoxification process. The maximum ABE titer obtained was 5.23g/L with 55.6% substrate consumption when samples dried at 120°C were used as a substrate (after detoxification).

  15. Cellulosic butanol production from alkali-pretreated switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) and phragmites (Phragmites australis).

    PubMed

    Gao, Kai; Boiano, Simone; Marzocchella, Antonio; Rehmann, Lars

    2014-12-01

    A potential dedicated energy crop (switchgrass) and an invasive (North America) plant species (phragmites) were compared as potential substrates for acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) fermentation. Both biomass were pretreated with 1% (w/v) NaOH and subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis. Total reducing sugar yields were 365 and 385gkg(-1) raw biomass for switchgrass and phragmites. Fermentation of the hydrolysates resulted in overall ABE yields of 146 and 150gkg(-1) (per kg dry plant material), with a theoretical maximum of 189 and 208gkg(-1), respectively. Though similar overall solvent yields were obtained from both crops, the largest carbon loss in the case of switchgrass occurred during pretreatment, while the largest loss in the case of phragmites occurred to enzymatic hydrolysis. These findings suggest that higher overall yields are achievable and that both crops are suitable feedstocks for butanol fermentation.

  16. Improvement of acetone, butanol, and ethanol production from woody biomass using organosolv pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Hamid; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2015-10-01

    A suitable pretreatment is a prerequisite of efficient acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production from wood by Clostridia. In this study, organosolv fractionation, an effective pretreatment with ability to separate lignin as a co-product, was evaluated for ABE production from softwood pine and hardwood elm. ABE production from untreated woods was limited to the yield of 81 g ABE/kg wood and concentration of 5.5 g ABE/L. Thus, the woods were pretreated with aqueous ethanol at elevated temperatures before hydrolysis and fermentation to ABE by Clostridium acetobutylicum. Hydrolysis of pine and elm pretreated at 180 °C for 60 min resulted in the highest sugar concentrations of 16.8 and 23.2 g/L, respectively. The hydrolysate obtained from elm was fermented to ABE with the highest yield of 121.1 g/kg and concentration of 11.6 g/L. The maximum yield of 87.9 g/kg was obtained from pine pretreated for 30 min at 150 °C. Moreover, structural modifications in the woods were investigated and related to the improvements. The woody biomasses are suitable feedstocks for ABE production after the organosolv pretreatment. Effects of the pretreatment conditions on ABE production might be related to the reduced cellulose crystallinity, reduced lignin and hemicellulose content, and lower total phenolic compounds in the hydrolysates.

  17. Butanol production in a first-generation Brazilian sugarcane biorefinery: technical aspects and economics of greenfield projects.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Adriano Pinto; Dias, Marina O S; Junqueira, Tassia L; Cunha, Marcelo P; Bonomi, Antonio; Filho, Rubens Maciel

    2013-05-01

    The techno-economics of greenfield projects of a first-generation sugarcane biorefinery aimed to produce ethanol, sugar, power, and n-butanol was conducted taking into account different butanol fermentation technologies (regular microorganism and mutant strain with improved butanol yield) and market scenarios (chemicals and automotive fuel). The complete sugarcane biorefinery with the batch acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation process was simulated using Aspen Plus®. The biorefinery was designed to process 2 million tonne sugarcane per year and utilize 25%, 50%, and 25% of the available sugarcane juice to produce sugar, ethanol, and butanol, respectively. The investment on a biorefinery with butanol production showed to be more attractive [14.8% IRR, P(IRR>12%)=0.99] than the conventional 50:50 (ethanol:sugar) annexed plant [13.3% IRR, P(IRR>12%)=0.80] only in the case butanol is produced by an improved microorganism and traded as a chemical.

  18. Evaluation of recycling the effluent of hydrogen fermentation for biobutanol production: kinetic study with butyrate and sucrose concentrations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Hsing; Jian, Zih-Ce

    2013-10-01

    Butyrate in the effluent of hydrogen-producing bioreactor is a potential feed for biobutanol production. For recycling butyrate, this study investigated the kinetics of biobutanol production by Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B592 from different paired concentrations of butyrate and sucrose in a series of batch reactors. Results show that the lag time of butanol production increased with higher concentration of either sucrose or butyrate. In regression analyses, the maximum specific butanol production potential of 6.49 g g(-1) of dry cell was projected for 31.9 g L(-1) sucrose and 1.3 g L(-1) butyrate, and the maximum specific butanol production rate of 0.87 g d(-1) g(-1) of dry cell was predicted for 25.0 g L(-1) sucrose and 2.6 g L(-1) butyrate. The specific butanol production potential will decrease if more butyrate is added to the reactor. However, both sucrose and butyrate concentrations are weighted equally on the specific butanol production rate. This observation also is true on butanol yield. The maximum butanol yield of 0.49 mol mol(-1) was projected for 25.0 g L(-1) sucrose and 2.3 g L(-1) butyrate. In addition, a confirmation study found butanol yield increased from 0.2 to 0.3 mol mol(-1) when butyrate addition increased from 0 to 1 g L(-1) under low sugar concentration (3.8 g L(-1) sucrose). The existence of butyrate increases the activity of biobutanol production and reduces the fermentable sugar concentration needed for acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation.

  19. Investigation of gas stripping and pervaporation for improved feasibility of two-stage butanol production process.

    PubMed

    Setlhaku, Mpho; Heitmann, Sebastian; Górak, Andrzej; Wichmann, Rolf

    2013-05-01

    Gas stripping and pervaporation are investigated for butanol recovery in a two-stage acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation process. The first stage is operated in a continuous mode and the second stage as a fed-batch. Gas stripping coupled to the second stage and operated intermittently enabled additional glucose feeding in the second stage and up to 59 g/L butanol and 73 g/L total ABE solvents in the condensate. Concentration of 167 g/L butanol and 269 g/L ABE in the permeate was measured in ex situ pervaporation experiments using a PDMS membrane at temperature of 37 °C and pressure of 10mbars. The "operating window" tool is introduced to evaluate the feasibility of the existing ABE fermentations operated as continuous with cell recycle, as two-stages, with biomass immobilization or with integrated product removal. This tool enables the identification of the most favorable process configuration, which is the combination of cell immobilization and integrated product removal.

  20. Use of poly(ether-block-amide) in pervaporation coupling with a fermentor to enhance butanol production in the cultivation of Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Yen, Hong-Wei; Lin, Shang-Fu; Yang, I-Kuan

    2012-03-01

    The toxicity of the end-products of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) process, mainly butanol, is recognized as the major problem contributing to the low productivity of butanol. The pervaporation technique was regarded as one of the ways to efficiently remove organic components. The results of pervaporation performance of poly(ether-block-amide) (PEBA) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane in a model solution indicated that PEBA membrane owned a higher butanol permeation flux of 9.975 gm(-2)h(-1) as opposed to 3.911 gm(-2)h(-1) using a PDMS membrane. Moreover, a higher temperature would result in a higher permeation flux, but has a lower separation factor (α) obtained, while using PEBA membrane. The batch fermentor operation connected to the pervaporation with PEBA membrane created 43% and 34% of increase in the butanol productivity and in the yield as compared to that of the simple batch. The fed-batch fermentation mode by glucose feeding combined with PEBA pervaporation lasting for 24h could achieve 39% increase of butanol productivity as compared to a simple batch. Conclusively, the pervaporation with PEBA membrane coupling with fermentor was presumed to be capable of enhancing butanol production in ABE fermentation, which might have the potential applied in the commercialized ABE fermentation process.

  1. Industrial production of acetone and butanol by fermentation—100 years later

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Microbial production of acetone and butanol was one of the first large-scale industrial fermentation processes of global importance. During the first part of the 20th century, it was indeed the second largest fermentation process, superseded in importance only by the ethanol fermentation. After a rapid decline after the 1950s, acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation has recently gained renewed interest in the context of biorefinery approaches for the production of fuels and chemicals from renewable resources. The availability of new methods and knowledge opens many new doors for industrial microbiology, and a comprehensive view on this process is worthwhile due to the new interest. This thematic issue of FEMS Microbiology Letters, dedicated to the 100th anniversary of the first industrial exploitation of Chaim Weizmann's ABE fermentation process, covers the main aspects of old and new developments, thereby outlining a model development in biotechnology. All major aspects of industrial microbiology are exemplified by this single process. This includes new technologies, such as the latest developments in metabolic engineering, the exploitation of biodiversity and discoveries of new regulatory systems such as for microbial stress tolerance, as well as technological aspects, such as bio- and down-stream processing. PMID:27199350

  2. Organosolv pretreatment of rice straw for efficient acetone, butanol, and ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Hamid; Karimi, Keikhosro; Zilouei, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) was produced from rice straw using a process containing ethanol organosolv pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum bacterium. Pretreatment of the straw with 75% (v/v) aqueous ethanol containing 1% w/w sulfuric acid at 150 °C for 60 min resulted in the highest total sugar concentration of 31 g/L in the enzymatic hydrolysis. However, the highest ABE concentration and productivity (10.5 g/L and 0.20 g/Lh, respectively) were obtained from the straw pretreated at 180 °C for 30 min. Enzymatic hydrolysis of the straw pretreated at 180 °C for 30 min with 5% solid loading resulted in glucose yield of 46.2%, which was then fermented to 80.3 g butanol, 21.1 g acetone, and 22.5 g ethanol, the highest overall yield of ABE production. Thus, the organosolv pretreatment can be applied for efficient production of the solvents from rice straw.

  3. Butanol production from wheat straw hydrolysate using Clostridium beijerinckii.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Nasib; Saha, Badal C; Cotta, Michael A

    2007-11-01

    In these studies, butanol (acetone butanol ethanol or ABE) was produced from wheat straw hydrolysate (WSH) in batch cultures using Clostridium beijerinckii P260. In control fermentation 48.9 g L(-1) glucose (initial sugar 62.0 g L(-1)) was used to produce 20.1 g L(-1) ABE with a productivity and yield of 0.28 g L(-1 )h(-1) and 0.41, respectively. In a similar experiment where WSH (60.2 g L(-1) total sugars obtained from hydrolysis of 86 g L(-1) wheat straw) was used, the culture produced 25.0 g L(-1) ABE with a productivity and yield of 0.60 g L(-1 )h(-1) and 0.42, respectively. These results are superior to the control experiment and productivity was improved by 214%. When WSH was supplemented with 35 g L(-1) glucose, a reactor productivity was improved to 0.63 g L(-1 )h(-1) with a yield of 0.42. In this case, ABE concentration in the broth was 28.2 g L(-1). When WSH was supplemented with 60 g L(-1) glucose, the resultant medium containing 128.3 g L(-1) sugars was successfully fermented (due to product removal) to produce 47.6 g L(-1) ABE, and the culture utilized all the sugars (glucose, xylose, arabinose, galactose, and mannose). These results demonstrate that C. beijerinckii P260 has excellent capacity to convert biomass derived sugars to solvents and can produce over 28 g L(-1) (in one case 41.7 g L(-1) from glucose) ABE from WSH. Medium containing 250 g L(-1) glucose resulted in no growth and no ABE production. Mixtures containing WSH + 140 g L(-1) glucose (total sugar approximately 200 g L(-1)) showed poor growth and poor ABE production.

  4. Improvement of the butanol production selectivity and butanol to acetone ratio (B:A) by addition of electron carriers in the batch culture of a new local isolate of Clostridium acetobutylicum YM1.

    PubMed

    Nasser Al-Shorgani, Najeeb Kaid; Kalil, Mohd Sahaid; Wan Yusoff, Wan Mohtar; Shukor, Hafiza; Hamid, Aidil Abdul

    2015-12-01

    Improvement in the butanol production selectivity or enhanced butanol:acetone ratio (B:A) is desirable in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium strains. In this study, artificial electron carriers were added to the fermentation medium of a new isolate of Clostridium acetobutylicum YM1 in order to improve the butanol yield and B:A ratio. The results revealed that medium supplementation with electron carriers changed the metabolism flux of electron and carbon in ABE fermentation by YM1. A decrease in acetone production, which subsequently improved the B:A ratio, was observed. Further improvement in the butanol production and B:A ratios were obtained when the fermentation medium was supplemented with butyric acid. The maximum butanol production (18.20 ± 1.38 g/L) was gained when a combination of methyl red and butyric acid was added. Although the addition of benzyl viologen (0.1 mM) and butyric acid resulted in high a B:A ratio of 16:1 (800% increment compared with the conventional 2:1 ratio), the addition of benzyl viologen to the culture after 4 h resulted in the production of 18.05 g/L butanol. Manipulating the metabolic flux to butanol through the addition of electron carriers could become an alternative strategy to achieve higher butanol productivity and improve the B:A ratio.

  5. Improvement of butanol production from a hardwood hemicelluloses hydrolysate by combined sugar concentration and phenols removal.

    PubMed

    Mechmech, Fatma; Chadjaa, Hassan; Rahni, Mohamed; Marinova, Mariya; Ben Akacha, Najla; Gargouri, Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    The feasibility of using hardwood hemicellulosic pre-hydrolysate recovered from a dissolving pulping process for Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol (ABE) fermentation has been investigated. Dilutions and detoxification methods based on flocculation and nanofiltration were tested to determine the inhibitory concentration of phenolic compounds and to evaluate the efficiency of inhibitors removal on fermentation. Flocculation carried out with ferric sulfate was the most effective method for removal of phenolics (56%) and acetic acid (80%). The impact on fermentation was significant, with an ABE production of 6.40 g/L and 4.25 g/L when using flocculation or combined nanofiltration/flocculation respectively, as compared to a non-significant production for the untreated hydrolysate. By decreasing the toxicity effect of inhibitors, this study reports for the first time that the use of these techniques is efficient to increase the inhibitory concentration threshold of phenols, from 0.3g/L in untreated hydrolysate, to 1.1g/L in flocculated and in nanofiltrated and flocculated hydrolysates.

  6. Enhancing Butanol Production under the Stress Environments of Co-Culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae Integrated with Exogenous Butyrate Addition.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hongzhen; Ge, Laibing; Zhang, Jingshu; Zhao, Yanli; Ding, Jian; Li, Zhigang; He, Zhenni; Chen, Rui; Shi, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an efficient acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation strategy integrating Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae co-culturing system with exogenous butyrate addition, was proposed and experimentally conducted. In solventogenic phase, by adding 0.2 g-DCW/L-broth viable S. cerevisiae cells and 4.0 g/L-broth concentrated butyrate solution into C. acetobutylicum culture broth, final butanol concentration and butanol/acetone ratio in a 7 L anaerobic fermentor reached the highest levels of 15.74 g/L and 2.83 respectively, with the increments of 35% and 43% as compared with those of control. Theoretical and experimental analysis revealed that, the proposed strategy could, 1) extensively induce secretion of amino acids particularly lysine, which are favorable for both C. acetobutylicum survival and butanol synthesis under high butanol concentration environment; 2) enhance the utilization ability of C. acetobutylicum on glucose and over-produce intracellular NADH for butanol synthesis in C. acetobutylicum metabolism simultaneously; 3) direct most of extra consumed glucose into butanol synthesis route. The synergetic actions of effective amino acids assimilation, high rates of substrate consumption and NADH regeneration yielded highest butanol concentration and butanol ratio in C. acetobutylicum under this stress environment. The proposed method supplies an alternative way to improve ABE fermentation performance by traditional fermentation technology.

  7. Acetone production in solventogenic Clostridium species: new insights from non-enzymatic decarboxylation of acetoacetate.

    PubMed

    Han, Bei; Gopalan, Venkat; Ezeji, Thaddeus Chukwuemeka

    2011-08-01

    Development of a butanologenic strain with high selectivity for butanol production is often proposed as a possible route for improving the economics of biobutanol production by solventogenic Clostridium species. The acetoacetate decarboxylase (aadc) gene encoding acetoacetate decarboxylase (AADC), which catalyzes the decarboxylation of acetoacetate into acetone and CO(2), was successfully disrupted by homologous recombination in solventogenic Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 to generate an aadc ( - ) mutant. Our fermentation studies revealed that this mutant produces a maximum acetone concentration of 3 g/L (in P2 medium), a value comparable to that produced by wild-type C. beijerinckii 8052. Therefore, we postulated that AADC-catalyzed decarboxylation of acetoacetate is not the sole means for acetone generation. Our subsequent finding that non-enzymatic decarboxylation of acetoacetate in vitro, under conditions similar to in vivo acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation, produces 1.3 to 5.2 g/L acetone between pH 6.5 and 4 helps rationalize why various knock-out and knock-down strategies designed to disrupt aadc in solventogenic Clostridium species did not eliminate acetone production during ABE fermentation. Based on these results, we discuss alternatives to enhance selectivity for butanol production.

  8. Enhancing Butanol Production under the Stress Environments of Co-Culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae Integrated with Exogenous Butyrate Addition

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hongzhen; Ge, Laibing; Zhang, Jingshu; Zhao, Yanli; Ding, Jian; Li, Zhigang; He, Zhenni; Chen, Rui; Shi, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an efficient acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation strategy integrating Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae co-culturing system with exogenous butyrate addition, was proposed and experimentally conducted. In solventogenic phase, by adding 0.2 g-DCW/L-broth viable S. cerevisiae cells and 4.0 g/L-broth concentrated butyrate solution into C. acetobutylicum culture broth, final butanol concentration and butanol/acetone ratio in a 7 L anaerobic fermentor reached the highest levels of 15.74 g/L and 2.83 respectively, with the increments of 35% and 43% as compared with those of control. Theoretical and experimental analysis revealed that, the proposed strategy could, 1) extensively induce secretion of amino acids particularly lysine, which are favorable for both C. acetobutylicum survival and butanol synthesis under high butanol concentration environment; 2) enhance the utilization ability of C. acetobutylicum on glucose and over-produce intracellular NADH for butanol synthesis in C. acetobutylicum metabolism simultaneously; 3) direct most of extra consumed glucose into butanol synthesis route. The synergetic actions of effective amino acids assimilation, high rates of substrate consumption and NADH regeneration yielded highest butanol concentration and butanol ratio in C. acetobutylicum under this stress environment. The proposed method supplies an alternative way to improve ABE fermentation performance by traditional fermentation technology. PMID:26489085

  9. Butanol production from concentrated lactose/whey permeate: use of pervaporation membrane to recover and concentrate product.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, N; Friedl, A; Maddox, I S

    2014-12-01

    In these studies, butanol (acetone butanol ethanol or ABE) was produced from concentrated lactose/whey permeate containing 211 g L(-1) lactose. Fermentation of such a highly concentrated lactose solution was possible due to simultaneous product removal using a pervaporation membrane. In this system, a productivity of 0.43 g L(-1) h(-1) was obtained which is 307 % of that achieved in a non-product removal batch reactor (0.14 g L(-1) h(-1)) where approximately 60 g L(-1) whey permeate lactose was fermented. The productivity obtained in this system is much higher than that achieved in other product removal systems (perstraction 0.21 g L(-1) h(-1) and gas stripping 0.32 g L(-1) h(-1)). This membrane was also used to concentrate butanol from approximately 2.50 g L(-1) in the reactor to 755 g L(-1). Using this membrane, ABE selectivities and fluxes of 24.4-44.3 and 0.57-4.05 g m(-2) h(-1) were obtained, respectively. Pervaporation restricts removal of water from the reaction mixture thus requiring significantly less energy for product recovery when compared to gas stripping.

  10. Enhanced butanol production by coculture of Clostridium beijerinckii and Clostridium tyrobutyricum.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Ai, Hongxia; Zhang, Shexi; Li, Shuang; Liang, Zexin; Wu, Zhen-Qiang; Yang, Shang-Tian; Wang, Ju-Fang

    2013-09-01

    Cocultures of Clostridium beijerinckii and Clostridium tyrobutyricum in free-cell and immobilized-cell fermentation modes were investigated as a means of enhancing butanol production. The immobilized fermentation was performed in a fibrous-bed bioreactor (FBB). The results demonstrated that two-strain coculture significantly enhanced butanol production, yield and volumetric productivity compared with those in pure culture with or without butyric acid. Further, continuous immobilized-cell cocultures in two FBBs using glucose, cassava starch, or cane molasses were conducted at a dilution rate of 0.144 h(-1). The butanol production (6.66 g/L), yield (0.18 g/g), and productivity (0.96 g/L/h) were obtained with cassava starch as the substrate. Meanwhile, the acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) yield (0.36 g/g) was the highest among all processes investigated, suggesting that this continuous coculture mode may be suitable for industrial ABE production with no need for repeated sterilization and inoculation.

  11. Recent advances and state-of-the-art strategies in strain and process engineering for biobutanol production by Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chuang; Zhao, Jingbo; Chen, Lijie; Yang, Shang-Tian; Bai, Fengwu

    Butanol as an advanced biofuel has gained great attention due to its environmental benefits and superior properties compared to ethanol. However, the cost of biobutanol production via conventional acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum is not economically competitive, which has hampered its industrial application. The strain performance and downstream process greatly impact the economics of biobutanol production. Although various engineered strains with carefully orchestrated metabolic and sporulation-specific pathways have been developed, none of them is ideal for industrial biobutanol production. For further strain improvement, it is necessary to develop advanced genome editing tools and a deep understanding of cellular functioning of genes in metabolic and regulatory pathways. Processes with integrated product recovery can increase fermentation productivity by continuously removing inhibitory products while generating butanol (ABE) in a concentrated solution. In this review, we provide an overview of recent advances in C. acetobutylicum strain engineering and process development focusing on in situ product recovery. With deep understanding of systematic cellular bioinformatics, the exploration of state-of-the-art genome editing tools such as CRISPR-Cas for targeted gene knock-out and knock-in would play a vital role in Clostridium cell engineering for biobutanol production. Developing advanced hybrid separation processes for in situ butanol recovery, which will be discussed with a detailed comparison of advantages and disadvantages of various recovery techniques, is also imperative to the economical development of biobutanol.

  12. A carbon nanotube filled polydimethylsiloxane hybrid membrane for enhanced butanol recovery

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Chuang; Du, Guang-Qing; Chen, Li-Jie; Ren, Jian-Gang; Sun, Jian-Xin; Bai, Feng-Wu; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2014-01-01

    The carbon nanotubes (CNTs) filled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) hybrid membrane was fabricated to evaluate its potential for butanol recovery from acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation broth. Compared with the homogeneous PDMS membrane, the CNTs filled into the PDMS membrane were beneficial for the improvement of butanol recovery in butanol flux and separation factor. The CNTs acting as sorption-active sites with super hydrophobicity could give an alternative route for mass transport through the inner tubes or along the smooth surface. The maximum total flux and butanol separation factor reached up to 244.3 g/m2·h and 32.9, respectively, when the PDMS membrane filled with 10 wt% CNTs was used to separate butanol from the butanol/water solution at 80°C. In addition, the butanol flux and separation factor increased dramatically as temperature increased from 30°C to 80°C in feed solution since the higher temperature produced more free volumes in polymer chains to facilitate butanol permeation. A similar increase was also observed when butanol titer in solution increased from 10 g/L to 25 g/L. Overall, the CNTs/PDMS hybrid membrane with higher butanol flux and selectivity should have good potential for pervaporation separation of butanol from ABE fermentation broth. PMID:25081019

  13. Enhanced solvent production by metabolic engineering of a twin-clostridial consortium.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhiqiang; Minton, Nigel P; Zhang, Ying; Li, Qi; Liu, Jinle; Jiang, Yu; Yang, Sheng

    2017-01-01

    The efficient fermentative production of solvents (acetone, n-butanol, and ethanol) from a lignocellulosic feedstock using a single process microorganism has yet to be demonstrated. Herein, we developed a consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) based on a twin-clostridial consortium composed of Clostridium cellulovorans and Clostridium beijerinckii capable of producing cellulosic butanol from alkali-extracted, deshelled corn cobs (AECC). To accomplish this a genetic system was developed for C. cellulovorans and used to knock out the genes encoding acetate kinase (Clocel_1892) and lactate dehydrogenase (Clocel_1533), and to overexpress the gene encoding butyrate kinase (Clocel_3674), thereby pulling carbon flux towards butyrate production. In parallel, to enhance ethanol production, the expression of a putative hydrogenase gene (Clocel_2243) was down-regulated using CRISPR interference (CRISPRi). Simultaneously, genes involved in organic acids reassimilation (ctfAB, cbei_3833/3834) and pentose utilization (xylR, cbei_2385 and xylT, cbei_0109) were engineered in C. beijerinckii to enhance solvent production. The engineered twin-clostridia consortium was shown to decompose 83.2g/L of AECC and produce 22.1g/L of solvents (4.25g/L acetone, 11.5g/L butanol and 6.37g/L ethanol). This titer of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) approximates to that achieved from a starchy feedstock. The developed twin-clostridial consortium serves as a promising platform for ABE fermentation from lignocellulose by CBP.

  14. Combined Detoxification and In-situ Product Removal by a Single Resin During Lignocellulosic Butanol Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Kai; Rehmann, Lars

    2016-07-01

    Phragmites australis (an invasive plant in North America) was used as feedstock for ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol) fermentation by Clostridium saccharobutylicum. Sulphuric acid pretreated phragmites hydrolysate (SAEH) without detoxification inhibited butanol production (0.73 g/L butanol from 30 g/L sugars). The treatment of SAEH with resin L-493 prior the fermentation resulted in no inhibitory effects and an ABE titer of 14.44 g/L, including 5.49 g/L butanol was obtained, corresponding to an ABE yield and productivity of 0.49 g/g and 0.60 g/L/h, respectively. Dual functionality of the resin was realized by also using it as an in-situ product removal agent. Integrating in-situ product removal allowed for the use of high substrate concentrations without the typical product inhibition. Resin-detoxified SAEH was supplemented with neat glucose and an effective ABE titer of 33 g/L (including 13.7 g/L acetone, 16.4 g/L butanol and 1.9 g/L ethanol) was achieved with resin-based in-situ product removal, corresponding to an ABE yield and productivity of 0.41 g/g and 0.69 g/L/h, respectively. Both detoxification of the substrate and the products was achieved by the same resin, which was added prior the fermentation. Integrating hydrolysate detoxification and in-situ butanol removal in a batch process through single resin can potentially simplify cellulosic butanol production.

  15. Combined Detoxification and In-situ Product Removal by a Single Resin During Lignocellulosic Butanol Production

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Kai; Rehmann, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Phragmites australis (an invasive plant in North America) was used as feedstock for ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol) fermentation by Clostridium saccharobutylicum. Sulphuric acid pretreated phragmites hydrolysate (SAEH) without detoxification inhibited butanol production (0.73 g/L butanol from 30 g/L sugars). The treatment of SAEH with resin L-493 prior the fermentation resulted in no inhibitory effects and an ABE titer of 14.44 g/L, including 5.49 g/L butanol was obtained, corresponding to an ABE yield and productivity of 0.49 g/g and 0.60 g/L/h, respectively. Dual functionality of the resin was realized by also using it as an in-situ product removal agent. Integrating in-situ product removal allowed for the use of high substrate concentrations without the typical product inhibition. Resin-detoxified SAEH was supplemented with neat glucose and an effective ABE titer of 33 g/L (including 13.7 g/L acetone, 16.4 g/L butanol and 1.9 g/L ethanol) was achieved with resin-based in-situ product removal, corresponding to an ABE yield and productivity of 0.41 g/g and 0.69 g/L/h, respectively. Both detoxification of the substrate and the products was achieved by the same resin, which was added prior the fermentation. Integrating hydrolysate detoxification and in-situ butanol removal in a batch process through single resin can potentially simplify cellulosic butanol production. PMID:27459906

  16. Modifying the product pattern of Clostridium acetobutylicum: physiological effects of disrupting the acetate and acetone formation pathways.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Dörte; Hönicke, Daniel; Ehrenreich, Armin; Schmidt, Michael; Weuster-Botz, Dirk; Bahl, Hubert; Lütke-Eversloh, Tina

    2012-05-01

    Clostridial acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation is a natural source for microbial n-butanol production and regained much interest in academia and industry in the past years. Due to the difficult genetic accessibility of Clostridium acetobutylicum and other solventogenic clostridia, successful metabolic engineering approaches are still rare. In this study, a set of five knock-out mutants with defects in the central fermentative metabolism were generated using the ClosTron technology, including the construction of targeted double knock-out mutants of C. acetobtuylicum ATCC 824. While disruption of the acetate biosynthetic pathway had no significant impact on the metabolite distribution, mutants with defects in the acetone pathway, including both acetoacetate decarboxylase (Adc)-negative and acetoacetyl-CoA:acyl-CoA transferase (CtfAB)-negative mutants, exhibited high amounts of acetate in the fermentation broth. Distinct butyrate increase and decrease patterns during the course of fermentations provided experimental evidence that butyrate, but not acetate, is re-assimilated via an Adc/CtfAB-independent pathway in C. acetobutylicum. Interestingly, combining the adc and ctfA mutations with a knock-out of the phosphotransacetylase (Pta)-encoding gene, acetate production was drastically reduced, resulting in an increased flux towards butyrate. Except for the Pta-negative single mutant, all mutants exhibited a significantly reduced solvent production.

  17. Ready Ready Exercises. "Ready-Set-ABE" To Ease Students' Transition into ABE Level Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molek, Carol

    This booklet is intended to assist tutors in helping transitional and low-level adult basic education (ABE) students acquire the reading skills required to make a successful adjustment to regular ABE classes. The exercises provided are intended primarily for use in student-tutor learning teams, with students gradually completing greater portions…

  18. Assessment of potential life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission effects from using corn-based butanol as a transportation fuel.

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

    2008-01-01

    Since advances in the ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol) fermentation process in recent years have led to significant increases in its productivity and yields, the production of butanol and its use in motor vehicles have become an option worth evaluating. This study estimates the potential life-cycle energy and emission effects associated with using bio-butanol as a transportation fuel. It employs a well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis tool: the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The estimates of life-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are based on an Aspen Plus(reg. sign) simulation for a corn-to-butanol production process, which describes grain processing, fermentation, and product separation. Bio-butanol-related WTW activities include corn farming, corn transportation, butanol production, butanol transportation, and vehicle operation. In this study, we also analyzed the bio-acetone that is coproduced with bio-butanol as an alternative to petroleum-based acetone. We then compared the results for bio-butanol with those of conventional gasoline. Our study shows that driving vehicles fueled with corn-based butanol produced by the current ABE fermentation process could result in substantial fossil energy savings (39%-56%) and avoid large percentage of the GHG emission burden, yielding a 32%-48% reduction relative to using conventional gasoline. On energy basis, a bushel of corn produces less liquid fuel from the ABE process than that from the corn ethanol dry mill process. The coproduction of a significant portion of acetone from the current ABE fermentation presents a challenge. A market analysis of acetone, as well as research and development on robust alternative technologies and processes that minimize acetone while increase the butanol yield, should be conducted.

  19. Assessment of potential life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission effects from using corn-based butanol as a transportation fuel.

    PubMed

    Wu, May; Wang, Michael; Liu, Jiahong; Huo, Hong

    2008-01-01

    Since advances in the ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol) fermentation process in recent years have led to significant increases in its productivity and yields, the production of butanol and its use in motor vehicles have become an option worth evaluating. This study estimates the potential life-cycle energy and emission effects associated with using bio-butanol as a transportation fuel. It employs a well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis tool: the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The estimates of life-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are based on an Aspen Plus(R) simulation for a corn-to-butanol production process, which describes grain processing, fermentation, and product separation. Bio-butanol-related WTW activities include corn farming, corn transportation, butanol production, butanol transportation, and vehicle operation. In this study, we also analyzed the bio-acetone that is coproduced with bio-butanol as an alternative to petroleum-based acetone. We then compared the results for bio-butanol with those of conventional gasoline. Our study shows that driving vehicles fueled with corn-based butanol produced by the current ABE fermentation process could result in substantial fossil energy savings (39%-56%) and avoid large percentage of the GHG emission burden, yielding a 32%-48% reduction relative to using conventional gasoline. On energy basis, a bushel of corn produces less liquid fuel from the ABE process than that from the corn ethanol dry mill process. The coproduction of a significant portion of acetone from the current ABE fermentation presents a challenge. A market analysis of acetone, as well as research and development on robust alternative technologies and processes that minimize acetone while increase the butanol yield, should be conducted.

  20. Functional Characterization of AbeD, an RND-Type Membrane Transporter in Antimicrobial Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Vijaya Bharathi; Venkataramaiah, Manjunath; Mondal, Amitabha; Rajamohan, Govindan

    2015-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter baumannii is becoming an increasing menace in health care settings especially in the intensive care units due to its ability to withstand adverse environmental conditions and exhibit innate resistance to different classes of antibiotics. Here we describe the biological contributions of abeD, a novel membrane transporter in bacterial stress response and antimicrobial resistance in A. baumannii. Results The abeD mutant displayed ~ 3.37 fold decreased survival and >5-fold reduced growth in hostile osmotic (0.25 M; NaCl) and oxidative (2.631 μM–6.574 μM; H2O2) stress conditions respectively. The abeD inactivated cells displayed increased susceptibility to ceftriaxone, gentamicin, rifampicin and tobramycin (~ 4.0 fold). The mutant displayed increased sensitivity to the hospital-based disinfectant benzalkonium chloride (~3.18-fold). In Caenorhabditis elegans model, the abeD mutant exhibited (P<0.01) lower virulence capability. Binding of SoxR on the regulatory fragments of abeD provide strong evidence for the involvement of SoxR system in regulating the expression of abeD in A. baumannii. Conclusion This study demonstrates the contributions of membrane transporter AbeD in bacterial physiology, stress response and antimicrobial resistance in A. baumannii for the first time. PMID:26496475

  1. Biobutanol production by Clostridium acetobutylicum using xylose recovered from birch Kraft black liquor.

    PubMed

    Kudahettige-Nilsson, Rasika L; Helmerius, Jonas; Nilsson, Robert T; Sjöblom, Magnus; Hodge, David B; Rova, Ulrika

    2015-01-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was studied using acid-hydrolyzed xylan recovered from hardwood Kraft black liquor by CO2 acidification as the only carbon source. Detoxification of hydrolyzate using activated carbon was conducted to evaluate the impact of inhibitor removal and fermentation. Xylose hydrolysis yields as high as 18.4% were demonstrated at the highest severity hydrolysis condition. Detoxification using active carbon was effective for removal of both phenolics (76-81%) and HMF (38-52%). Batch fermentation of the hydrolyzate and semi-defined P2 media resulted in a total solvent yield of 0.12-0.13g/g and 0.34g/g, corresponding to a butanol concentration of 1.8-2.1g/L and 7.3g/L respectively. This work is the first study of a process for the production of a biologically-derived biofuel from hemicelluloses solubilized during Kraft pulping and demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing xylan recovered directly from industrial Kraft pulping liquors as a feedstock for biological production of biofuels such as butanol.

  2. Metabolic engineering of Clostridium acetobutylicum for the enhanced production of isopropanol-butanol-ethanol fuel mixture.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yu-Sin; Malaviya, Alok; Lee, Joungmin; Im, Jung Ae; Lee, Sang Yup; Lee, Julia; Eom, Moon-Ho; Cho, Jung-Hee; Seung, Do Young

    2013-01-01

    Butanol is considered as a superior biofuel, which is conventionally produced by clostridial acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. Among ABE, only butanol and ethanol can be used as fuel alternatives. Coproduction of acetone thus causes lower yield of fuel alcohols. Thus, this study aimed at developing an improved Clostridium acetobutylicum strain possessing enhanced fuel alcohol production capability. For this, we previously developed a hyper ABE producing BKM19 strain was further engineered to convert acetone into isopropanol. The BKM19 strain was transformed with the plasmid pIPA100 containing the sadh (primary/secondary alcohol dehydrogenase) and hydG (putative electron transfer protein) genes from the Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B593 cloned under the control of the thiolase promoter. The resulting BKM19 (pIPA100) strain produced 27.9 g/l isopropanol-butanol-ethanol (IBE) as a fuel alcohols with negligible amount of acetone (0.4 g/l) from 97.8 g/l glucose in lab-scale (2 l) batch fermentation. Thus, this metabolically engineered strain was able to produce 99% of total solvent produced as fuel alcohols. The scalability and stability of BKM19 (pIPA100) were evaluated at 200 l pilot-scale fermentation, which showed that the fuel alcohol yield could be improved to 0.37 g/g as compared to 0.29 g/g obtained at lab-scale fermentation, while attaining a similar titer. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest titer of IBE achieved and the first report on the large scale fermentation of C. acetobutylicum for IBE production.

  3. Regional, Rural Home ABE Program Spells Impact.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vachon, Claude

    Maine's State Division of Adult Education began setting up a regionalized Adult Basic Education (ABE) program in rural Franklin county in 1974 to serve the area's functional illiterates. Located in the building housing the Franklin County Community Action Program (CAP), linkages were developed with a large number of agencies; initially the 10 CAP…

  4. Innovative Materials for High Risk ABE Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connett, Dian; Rathburn, Rene

    This resource book contains innovative group activities, units of instruction, writing packets, and math activities that were developed to serve high-risk adult basic education (ABE) students. Included in the first section are units of study dealing with the following topics: Oregon history, personal health issues, controversial issues in science,…

  5. Effective ABE Programming: Nine Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sjogren, Douglas; Jacobson, Larry

    The document presents an indepth study of nine selected exemplary adult basic education (ABE) programs in Region 8: Volunteers Clearing House, Fort Collins, Colorado; Utah Navajo Development Council, Blanding, Utah; Adult Education Tutorial Program, Denver, Colorado; Project SAVE, Lemmon, South Dakota; Gates Rubber Company, Denver, Colorado;…

  6. Chemostat cultivation and transcriptional analyses of Clostridium acetobutylicum mutants with defects in the acid and acetone biosynthetic pathways.

    PubMed

    Hönicke, Daniel; Lütke-Eversloh, Tina; Liu, Ziyong; Lehmann, Dörte; Liebl, Wolfgang; Ehrenreich, Armin

    2014-12-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum is a model organism for the biotechnologically important acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. With the objective to rationally develop strains with improved butanol production, detailed insights into the physiological and genetic mechanisms of solvent production are required. Therefore, pH-controlled phosphate-limited chemostat cultivation and DNA microarray technology were employed for an in-depth analysis of knockout mutants with defects in the central fermentative metabolism. The set of studied mutants included strains with inactivated phosphotransacetylase (pta), phosphotransbutyrylase (ptb), and acetoacetate decarboxylase (adc) encoding genes, as well as an adc/pta double knockout mutant. A comprehensive physiological characterization of the mutants was performed by continuous cultivation, allowing for a well-defined separation of acidogenic and solventogenic growth, combined with the advantage of the high reproducibility of steady-state conditions. The ptb-negative strain C. acetobutylicum ptb::int(87) exhibited the most striking metabolite profile: Sizable amounts of butanol (29 ± 1.3 mM) were already produced during acidogenic growth. The product patterns of the mutants as well as accompanying transcriptomic data are presented and discussed.

  7. Enhanced butanol production in a microbial electrolysis cell by Clostridium beijerinckii IB4.

    PubMed

    He, Ai-Yong; Yin, Chun-Yan; Xu, Hao; Kong, Xiang-Ping; Xue, Jia-Wei; Zhu, Jing; Jiang, Min; Wu, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Reducing power such as NADH is an essential factor for acetone/butanol/ethanol (ABE) fermentation using Clostridium spp. The objective of this study was to increase available NADH in Clostridium beijerinckii IB4 by a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) with an electron carrier to enhance butanol production. First of all, a MEC was performed without electron carrier to study the function of cathodic potential applying. Then, various electron carriers were tested, and neutral red (NR)-amended cultures showed an increase of butanol concentration. Optimal NR concentration (0.1 mM) was used to add in a MEC. Electricity stimulated the cell growth obviously and dramatically diminished the fermentation time from 40 to 28 h. NR and electrically reduced NR improved the final butanol concentration and inhibited the acetone generation. In the MEC with NR, the butanol concentration, yield, proportion and productivity were increased by 12.2, 17.4, 7.2 and 60.3 %, respectively. To further understand the mechanisms of NR, cathodic potential applying and electrically reduced NR, NADH and NAD(+) levels, ATP levels and hydrogen production were determined. NR and electrically reduced NR also improved ATP levels and the ratio of NADH/NAD(+), whereas they decreased hydrogen production. Thus, the MEC is an efficient method for enhancing the butanol production.

  8. The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, S. A.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: Infrared spectroscopy in the 2.5- 16 micron range is a principle means by which organic compounds can be detected and identified in space via their vibrational transitions. Ground-based, airborne, and spaceborne IR spectral studies have already demonstrated that a significant fraction of the carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM) resides in the form of complex organic molecular species. Furthermore, the presence of D-enriched organics in meteorites suggests that a portion of these materials survives incorporation into protosolar nebulae. Unfortunately, neither the distribution of these materials in space nor their genetic and evolutionary relationships with each other or their environments are currently well understood. The Astrobiology Explorer (ABE) is a MIDEX mission concept designed to use infrared spectroscopy to address outstanding problems in Astrochemistry which are particularly relevant to Astrobiology and are amenable to astronomical observation. ABE is currently under study at NASA's Ames Research Center in collaboration with Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. ABE was selected for Phase A study during the last MIDEX AO round, but has yet to be selected for flight.

  9. Development of a High-Efficiency Transformation Method and Implementation of Rational Metabolic Engineering for the Industrial Butanol Hyperproducer Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum Strain N1-4.

    PubMed

    Herman, Nicolaus A; Li, Jeffrey; Bedi, Ripika; Turchi, Barbara; Liu, Xiaoji; Miller, Michael J; Zhang, Wenjun

    2017-01-15

    While a majority of academic studies concerning acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) production by Clostridium have focused on Clostridium acetobutylicum, other members of this genus have proven to be effective industrial workhorses despite the inability to perform genetic manipulations on many of these strains. To further improve the industrial performance of these strains in areas such as substrate usage, solvent production, and end product versatility, transformation methods and genetic tools are needed to overcome the genetic intractability displayed by these species. In this study, we present the development of a high-efficiency transformation method for the industrial butanol hyperproducer Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum strain N1-4 (HMT) ATCC 27021. Following initial failures, we found that the key to creating a successful transformation method was the identification of three distinct colony morphologies (types S, R, and I), which displayed significant differences in transformability. Working with the readily transformable type I cells (transformation efficiency, 1.1 × 10(6) CFU/μg DNA), we performed targeted gene deletions in C. saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4 using a homologous recombination-mediated allelic exchange method. Using plasmid-based gene overexpression and targeted knockouts of key genes in the native acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) metabolic pathway, we successfully implemented rational metabolic engineering strategies, yielding in the best case an engineered strain (Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum strain N1-4/pWIS13) displaying an 18% increase in butanol titers and 30% increase in total ABE titer (0.35 g ABE/g sucrose) in batch fermentations. Additionally, two engineered strains overexpressing aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenases (encoded by adh11 and adh5) displayed 8.5- and 11.8-fold increases (respectively) in batch ethanol production.

  10. Biobutanol from cheese whey.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Manuel; Cerdán, María Esperanza; González-Siso, María Isabel

    2015-03-05

    At present, due to environmental and economic concerns, it is urgent to evolve efficient, clean and secure systems for the production of advanced biofuels from sustainable cheap sources. Biobutanol has proved better characteristics than the more widely used bioethanol, however the main disadvantage of biobutanol is that it is produced in low yield and titer by ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol) fermentation, this process being not competitive from the economic point of view. In this review we summarize the natural metabolic pathways for biobutanol production by Clostridia and yeasts, together with the metabolic engineering efforts performed up to date with the aim of either enhancing the yield of the natural producer Clostridia or transferring the butanol production ability to other hosts with better attributes for industrial use and facilities for genetic manipulation. Molasses and starch-based feedstocks are main sources for biobutanol production at industrial scale hitherto. We also review herewith (and for the first time up to our knowledge) the research performed for the use of whey, the subproduct of cheese making, as another sustainable source for biobutanol production. This represents a promising alternative that still needs further research. The use of an abundant waste material like cheese whey, that would otherwise be considered an environmental pollutant, for biobutanol production, makes economy of the process more profitable.

  11. Life-cycle assessment of corn-based butanol as a potential transportation fuel.

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

    2007-12-31

    Butanol produced from bio-sources (such as corn) could have attractive properties as a transportation fuel. Production of butanol through a fermentation process called acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) has been the focus of increasing research and development efforts. Advances in ABE process development in recent years have led to drastic increases in ABE productivity and yields, making butanol production worthy of evaluation for use in motor vehicles. Consequently, chemical/fuel industries have announced their intention to produce butanol from bio-based materials. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential life-cycle energy and emission effects associated with using bio-butanol as a transportation fuel. The study employs a well-to-wheels analysis tool--the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory--and the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} model developed by AspenTech. The study describes the butanol production from corn, including grain processing, fermentation, gas stripping, distillation, and adsorption for products separation. The Aspen{reg_sign} results that we obtained for the corn-to-butanol production process provide the basis for GREET modeling to estimate life-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. The GREET model was expanded to simulate the bio-butanol life cycle, from agricultural chemical production to butanol use in motor vehicles. We then compared the results for bio-butanol with those of conventional gasoline. We also analyzed the bio-acetone that is coproduced with bio-butanol as an alternative to petroleum-based acetone. Our study shows that, while the use of corn-based butanol achieves energy benefits and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, the results are affected by the methods used to treat the acetone that is co-produced in butanol plants.

  12. Carbon monoxide bioconversion to butanol-ethanol by Clostridium carboxidivorans: kinetics and toxicity of alcohols.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Naveira, Ánxela; Abubackar, Haris Nalakath; Veiga, María C; Kennes, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Butanol production from carbon monoxide-rich waste gases or syngas is an attractive novel alternative to the conventional acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. Solvent toxicity is a key factor reported in ABE fermentation with carbohydrates as substrates. However, in the gas-fermentation process, kinetic aspects and the inhibition effect of solvents have not thoroughly been studied. Therefore, different batch bottle experiments were carried out with the bacterial species Clostridium carboxidivorans using CO as carbon source for butanol-ethanol fermentation. A maximum specific growth rate of 0.086 ± 0.004 h(-1) and a biomass yield of 0.011 gbiomass/gCO were found, which is significantly lower than in other clostridia grown on sugars. Besides, three assays were carried out to check the inhibitory effect of butanol, ethanol, and their mixtures. Butanol had a higher inhibitory effect on the cells than ethanol and showed a lower IC50, reduced growth rate, and slower CO consumption with increasing alcohol concentrations. A concentration of 14-14.50 g/L butanol caused 50 % growth inhibition in C. carboxidivorans, and 20 g/L butanol resulted in complete inhibition, with a growth rate of 0 h(-1). Conversely, 35 g/L ethanol decreased by 50 % the final biomass concentration respect to the control and yielded the lowest growth rate of 0.024 h(-1). The inhibitory effect of mixtures of both alcohols was also checked adding similar, near identical, concentrations of each one. Growth decreased by 50 % in the presence of a total concentration of alcohols of 16.22 g/L, consisting of similar amounts of each alcohol. Occasional differences in initially added concentrations of alcohols were minimal. The lowest growth rate (0.014 h(-1)) was observed at the highest concentration assayed (25 g/L).

  13. Colorado Certificate of Accomplishment. Level 1 ABE Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kenya

    This resource guide contains learning activities designed to complement existing ABE curricula or become the cornerstone of an ABE curriculum integrating reading, writing, and math skills with practical life knowledge. The guide begins with an introduction, acknowledgments, and an overview of Colorado's Certificate of Accomplishment program, which…

  14. The cold-induced two-component system CBO0366/CBO0365 regulates metabolic pathways with novel roles in group I Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502 cold tolerance.

    PubMed

    Dahlsten, Elias; Zhang, Zhen; Somervuo, Panu; Minton, Nigel P; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    The two-component system CBO0366/CBO0365 was recently demonstrated to have a role in cold tolerance of group I Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502. The mechanisms under its control, ultimately resulting in increased sensitivity to low temperature, are unknown. A transcriptomic analysis with DNA microarrays was performed to identify the differences in global gene expression patterns of the wild-type ATCC 3502 and a derivative mutant with insertionally inactivated cbo0365 at 37 and 15°C. Altogether, 150 or 141 chromosomal coding sequences (CDSs) were found to be differently expressed in the cbo0365 mutant at 37 or 15°C, respectively, and thus considered to be under the direct or indirect transcriptional control of the response regulator CBO0365. Of the differentially expressed CDSs, expression of 141 CDSs was similarly affected at both temperatures investigated, suggesting that the putative CBO0365 regulon was practically not affected by temperature. The regulon involved genes related to acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation, motility, arsenic resistance, and phosphate uptake and transport. Deteriorated growth at 17°C was observed for mutants with disrupted ABE fermentation pathway components (crt, bcd, bdh, and ctfA), arsenic detoxifying machinery components (arsC and arsR), or phosphate uptake mechanism components (phoT), suggesting roles for these mechanisms in cold tolerance of group I C. botulinum. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed recombinant CBO0365 to bind to the promoter regions of crt, arsR, and phoT, as well as to the promoter region of its own operon, suggesting direct DNA-binding transcriptional activation or repression as a means for CBO0365 in regulating these operons. The results provide insight to the mechanisms group I C. botulinum utilizes in coping with cold.

  15. Reaching the Least Educated. 130 Local ABE Directors Tell How. Pennsylvania's Handbook on Recruitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madeira, Eugene L.

    Based on the experience of 130 local adult basic education (ABE) directors in Pennsylvania, this guide presents suggestions for recruiting the least educated adults into ABE programs. Following an introduction that defines ABE and examines whose responsibility ABE is, the guide is divided into 12 chapters. Each of the chapters develops one…

  16. Readability as Applied to an ABE Assessment Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, M. C.; Wahlstrom, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    Examines the procedure for applying the Fog, Flesch, and Fry readability formulas to the Internal, Powerful Others, and Chance Scales and for modifying the instrument for use with adult basic education (ABE) students. (Author/CH)

  17. Prospective and development of butanol as an advanced biofuel.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chuang; Zhao, Xin-Qing; Liu, Chen-Guang; Chen, Li-Jie; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2013-12-01

    Butanol has been acknowledged as an advanced biofuel, but its production through acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by clostridia is still not economically competitive, due to low butanol yield and titer. In this article, update progress in butanol production is reviewed. Low price and sustainable feedstocks such as lignocellulosic residues and dedicated energy crops are needed for butanol production at large scale to save feedstock cost, but processes are more complicated, compared to those established for ABE fermentation from sugar- and starch-based feedstocks. While rational designs targeting individual genes, enzymes or pathways are effective for improving butanol yield, global and systems strategies are more reasonable for engineering strains with stress tolerance controlled by multigenes. Compared to solvent-producing clostridia, engineering heterologous species such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae with butanol pathway might be a solution for eliminating the formation of major byproducts acetone and ethanol so that butanol yield can be improved significantly. Although batch fermentation has been practiced for butanol production in industry, continuous operation is more productive for large scale production of butanol as a biofuel, but a single chemostat bioreactor cannot achieve this goal for the biphasic ABE fermentation, and tanks-in-series systems should be optimized for alternative feedstocks and new strains. Moreover, energy saving is limited for the distillation system, even total solvents in the fermentation broth are increased significantly, since solvents are distilled to ~40% by the beer stripper, and more than 95% water is removed with the stillage without phase change, even with conventional distillation systems, needless to say that advanced chemical engineering technologies can distil solvents up to ~90% with the beer stripper, and the multistage pressure columns can well balance energy consumption for solvent fraction

  18. AstroBiology Explorer Mission Concepts (ABE/ASPIRE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott; Ennico, Kimberly A.

    2006-01-01

    The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) and the Astrobiology Space InfraRed Explorer (ASPIRE) Mission Concepts are two missions designed to address the questions (1) Where do we come from? and (2) Are we alone? as outlined in NASA s Origins Program using infrared spectroscopy to explore the identity, abundance, and distribution of molecules of astrobiological importance throughout the Universe. The ABE mission s observational program is focused on six tasks to: (1) Investigate the evolution of ice and organics in dense clouds and star formation regions, and the young stellar/planetary systems that form in them; (2) Measure the evolution of complex organic molecules in stellar outflows; (3) Study the organic composition of a wide variety of solar system objects including asteroids, comets, and the planets and their satellites; (4) Identify organic compounds in the diffuse interstellar medium and determine their distribution , abundance, and change with environment; (5) Detect and identify organic compounds in other galaxies and determine their dependence on galactic type; and (6) Measure deuterium enrichments in interstellar organics and use them as tracers of chemical processes. The ASPIRE mission s observational program expands upon ABE's core mission and adds tasks that (7) Address the role of silicates in interstellar organic chemistry; and (8) Use different resolution spectra to assess the relative roles and abundances of gas- and solid-state materials. ABE (ASPIRE) achieves these goals using a highly sensitive, cryogenically-cooled telescope in an Earth drift-away heliocentric orbit, armed with a suite of infrared spectrometers that cover the 2.5-20(40) micron spectral region at moderate spectral resolution (R>2000). ASPIRE's spectrometer complement also includes a high-resolution (R>25,000) module over the 4-8 micron spectral region. Both missions target lists are chosen to observe a statistically significant sample of a large number of objects of varied types in

  19. Biobutanol production from rice bran and de-oiled rice bran by Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4.

    PubMed

    Al-Shorgani, Najeeb Kaid Nasser; Kalil, Mohd Sahaid; Yusoff, Wan Mohtar Wan

    2012-06-01

    Rice bran (RB) and de-oiled rice bran (DRB) have been treated and used as the carbon source in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production using Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4. The results showed that pretreated DRB produced more ABE than pretreated RB. Dilute sulfuric acid was the most suitable treatment method among the various pretreatment methods that were applied. The highest ABE obtained was 12.13 g/L, including 7.72 g/L of biobutanol, from sulfuric acid. The enzymatic hydrolysate of DRB (ESADRB), when treated with XAD-4 resin, resulted in an ABE productivity and yield of 0.1 g/L h and 0.44 g/g, respectively. The results also showed that the choice of pretreatment method for RB and DRB is an important factor in butanol production.

  20. Global transcriptional changes of Clostridium acetobutylicum cultures with increased butanol:acetone ratios.

    PubMed

    Hönicke, Daniel; Janssen, Holger; Grimmler, Christina; Ehrenreich, Armin; Lütke-Eversloh, Tina

    2012-05-15

    Artificial electron carriers have been widely used to shift the solvent ratio toward butanol in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation of solventogenic clostridia according to decreased hydrogen production. In this study, first insights on the molecular level were gained to explore the effect of methyl viologen addition to cultures of Clostridium acetobutylicum. Employing batch fermentation in mineral salts medium, the butanol:acetone ratio was successively increased from 2.3 to 12.4 on a 100-ml scale in serum bottles and from 1.4 to 16.5 on a 1300-ml scale in bioreactors, respectively. The latter cultures were used for DNA microarray analyses to provide new information on the transcriptional changes referring to methyl viologen exposure and thus, exhibit gene expression patterns according to the manipulation of the cellular redox balance. Methyl viologen-exposed cultures revealed lower expression levels of the sol operon (CAP0162-0164) and the adjacent adc gene (CAP0165) responsible for solvent formation as well as iron and sulfate transporters and the CAC0105-encoded ferredoxin. On the contrary, genes for riboflavin biosynthesis, for the butyrate/butanol metabolic pathway and genes coding for sugar transport systems were induced. Interestingly, the adhE2-encoded bifunctional NADH-dependent aldhehyde/alcohol-dehydrogenase (CAP0035) was upregulated up to more than 100-fold expression levels as compared to the control culture without methyl viologen addition. The data presented here indicate a transcriptional regulation for decreased acetone biosynthesis and the redox-dependent substitution of adhE1 (CAP0162) by adhE2.

  1. A Study to Determine Competencies Needed by ABE/APL Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mocker, Donald W.; Spear, George E.

    The research was conducted to identify competencies appropriate for adult basic education (ABE) teachers who use the adult performance level (APL) approach, and to determine which are critical for ABE/APL teachers. A jury of APL authorities was impaneled to: (1) validate that all ABE competencies established by Mocker in 1974 were appropriate for…

  2. Kidney Dialysis Patients Discover New Hope through ABE Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amonette, Linda; And Others

    A program was developed to provide adult basic education (ABE) to kidney patients while they are receiving dialysis treatment. The program, which relies on an individualized learning approach, involved the coordinated efforts of the following parties: West Virginia Dialysis Facilities, Inc.; the Charleston Renal Group; and the Kanawha County Adult…

  3. National Issues Forums in an ABE Setting. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molek, Carol

    National Issues Forums (NIFs) were conducted for adult basic education (ABE) students in a Pennsylvania adult education and job training center. The forums provide a process of sharing thoughts and opinions about areas of pressing national concerns in an open exchange of everyone's opinion. After instructors participated in NIFs, they developed a…

  4. Training Manual for Experienced ABE/GED Instructors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Harry P.; Wischropp, Theodore W.

    Intended for adult basic education (ABE) and general educational development (GED) instructors with at least one year of experience, this staff development training manual is designed for use in structured inservice training or as a guide or reference. Its eight chapters, written by practitioners throughout Kansas, cover some of the most important…

  5. The BEST Blueprint. Quality ABE in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westberry, Susan

    The Basic Educational Skills Training (BEST) workplace literacy demonstration model was designed to provide adult basic education (ABE) services simultaneously for multiple employers in Maury County, Tennessee. The BEST model focused on job-related instruction. The goal of the program was to achieve increased safety, productivity, and employee…

  6. The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) MIDEX Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Sandford, Scott; Cox, Sylvia; Ellis, Benton; Gallagher, Dennis; Gautier, Nick; Greene, Thomas; McCreight, Craig; Mills, Gary; Purcell, William; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Astrobiology Explorer (ABE) is a MIDEX mission concept under study at NASA's Ames Research Center in collaboration with Ball Aerospace & Technologies, Corp. ABE will conduct IR spectroscopic observations to address important problems in astrobiology, astrochemistry, and astrophysics. The core observational program would make fundamental scientific progress in understanding the distribution, identity, and evolution of ices and organic matter in dense molecular clouds, young forming stellar systems, stellar outflows, the general diffuse ISM, HII regions, Solar System bodies, and external galaxies. The ABE instrument concept includes a 0.6 m aperture Cassegrain telescope and two moderate resolution (R = 2000-3000) spectrographs covering the 2.5-16 micron spectral region. Large format (1024x 1024 pixel or larger) IR detector arrays and bandpass filters will allow each spectrograph to cover an entire octave of spectral range or more per exposure without any moving parts. The telescope will be cooled below 50K by a cryogenic dewar shielded by a sunshade. The detectors will be cooled to approximately 8K. The optimum orbital configuration for achieving the scientific objectives of the ABE mission is a low background, 1 AU Earth driftaway orbit requiring a Delta II launch vehicle. This configuration provides a low thermal background and allows adequate communications bandwidth and good access to the entire sky over the approximate 1-2 year mission lifetime.

  7. Integration of chemical catalysis with extractive fermentation to produce fuels.

    PubMed

    Anbarasan, Pazhamalai; Baer, Zachary C; Sreekumar, Sanil; Gross, Elad; Binder, Joseph B; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S; Toste, F Dean

    2012-11-08

    Nearly one hundred years ago, the fermentative production of acetone by Clostridium acetobutylicum provided a crucial alternative source of this solvent for manufacture of the explosive cordite. Today there is a resurgence of interest in solventogenic Clostridium species to produce n-butanol and ethanol for use as renewable alternative transportation fuels. Acetone, a product of acetone-n-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation, harbours a nucleophilic α-carbon, which is amenable to C-C bond formation with the electrophilic alcohols produced in ABE fermentation. This functionality can be used to form higher-molecular-mass hydrocarbons similar to those found in current jet and diesel fuels. Here we describe the integration of biological and chemocatalytic routes to convert ABE fermentation products efficiently into ketones by a palladium-catalysed alkylation. Tuning of the reaction conditions permits the production of either petrol or jet and diesel precursors. Glyceryl tributyrate was used for the in situ selective extraction of both acetone and alcohols to enable the simple integration of ABE fermentation and chemical catalysis, while reducing the energy demand of the overall process. This process provides a means to selectively produce petrol, jet and diesel blend stocks from lignocellulosic and cane sugars at yields near their theoretical maxima.

  8. Comparative shotgun proteomic analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum from butanol fermentation using glucose and xylose

    SciTech Connect

    Sivagnanam, Kumaran; Raghavan, Vijaya G. S.; Shah, Manesh B; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Lefsrud, Mark G

    2011-01-01

    Background: Butanol is a second generation biofuel produced by Clostridium acetobutylicum through acetonebutanol- ethanol (ABE) fermentation process. Shotgun proteomics provides a direct approach to study the whole proteome of an organism in depth. This paper focuses on shotgun proteomic profiling of C. acetobutylicum from ABE fermentation using glucose and xylose to understand the functional mechanisms of C. acetobutylicum proteins involved in butanol production. Results: We identified 894 different proteins in C. acetobutylicum from ABE fermentation process by two dimensional - liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) method. This includes 717 proteins from glucose and 826 proteins from the xylose substrate. A total of 649 proteins were found to be common and 22 significantly differentially expressed proteins were identified between glucose and xylose substrates. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that flagellar proteins are highly up-regulated with glucose compared to xylose substrate during ABE fermentation. Chemotactic activity was also found to be lost with the xylose substrate due to the absence of CheW and CheV proteins. This is the first report on the shotgun proteomic analysis of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 in ABE fermentation between glucose and xylose substrate from a single time data point and the number of proteins identified here is more than any other study performed on this organism up to this report.

  9. Production of Butyric Acid and Butanol from Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Ramey, David E.; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2005-08-25

    Butanol replaced gasoline gallon for gallon in a 10,000 miles trip across the United States without the need to highly modify a ’92 Buick (your existing car today). Butanol can now be made for less than ethanol and yields more Btu’s from the same corn, making the plow to tire equation positive – more energy out than it takes to make it and Butanol is much safer. Butanol when substituted for gasoline gives better gas mileage and does not pollute as tested in 10 states. Butanol should now receive the same recognition as ethanol in U.S. legislation “ethanol/butanol”. There is abundant plant biomass present as low-value agricultural commodities or processing wastes requiring proper disposal to avoid pollution problems. One example is in the corn refinery industry, which processes more than 13% of the ~9.5 billion bushels (~240 million metric tons) of corn annually produced in the U.S. to produce high-fructose-corn-syrup, dextrose, starch, and fuel alcohol, and generates more than 10 million metric tons of corn byproducts that are currently of limited use and pose significant environmental problems. The abundant inexpensive renewable resources as feedstock for fermentation, and recent advances in the fields of biotechnology and bioprocessing have resulted in a renewed interest in the fermentation production of chemicals and fuels, including n-butanol. The historic acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum is one of the oldest known industrial fermentations. It was ranked second only to ethanol fermentation by yeast in its scale of production, and is one of the largest biotechnological processes ever known. However, since the 1950's industrial ABE fermentation has declined continuously, and almost all butanol is now produced via petrochemical routes (Chemical Marketing Reporter, 1993). Butanol is an important industrial solvent and is a better fuel for replacing gasoline – gallon for gallon than ethanol. Current butanol prices

  10. The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.

    2004-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy in the 2.5-16 micron range is a principle means by which organic compounds can be detected and identified in space via their vibrational transitions. Ground-based, airborne, and spaceborne IR spectral studies have already demonstrated that a significant fraction of the carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM) resides in the form of complex organic molecular species. Unfortunately, neither the distribution of these materials nor their genetic and evolutionary relationships with each other or their environments are well understood. The Astrobiology Explorer (ABE) is a MIDEX mission concept currently under study by a team of partners: NASA's Ames Research Center, Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. ABE will conduct IR spectroscopic observations to address outstanding important problems in astrobiology, astrochemistry, and astrophysics. The core observational program would make fundamental scientific progress in understanding (1) The evolution of ices and organic matter in dense molecular clouds and young forming stellar systems, (2) The chemical evolution of organic molecules in the ISM as they transition from AGB outflows to planetary nebulae to the general diffuse ISM to HII regions and dense clouds, (3) The distribution of organics in the diffuse ISM, (4) The nature of organics in the Solar System (in comets, asteroids, satellites), and (5) The nature and distribution of organics in local galaxies. The technical considerations of achieving these science objectives in a MIDEX-sized mission will be presented.

  11. In-Service Training Model for TESOL/ABE Teacher-Aides. Vol. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwestern Cooperative Educational Lab., Albuquerque, NM.

    This document contains discussion of each of the 10 objectives of the inservice program to prepare teachers and aides for the TESOL/ABE (Teaching English as a Second Language/Adult Basic Education) class. The objectives are to instruct participants in 1) the component parts of an ABE/TESOL class; 2) construction and design of visual aides such as…

  12. Adults Who Have a Learning Disability: A Guide for the ABE Instructor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutto, Melanie D.

    This monograph is intended to be a guide to the teacher of adult basic education (ABE) whose students include those with learning disabilities. An introductory chapter notes that participants with learning disabilities in ABE programs may or may not have received special educational services depending on whether they attended school before or…

  13. Development of Teaching Aids for ABE/ESL Adult Education Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berna, Joan; Alkasab, Helen

    The purpose of Special Project E-109A, Development of Teaching Aids for Adult Basic Education/English (Second Language) (ABE/ESL) Adult Education Programs, was to develop skill packets consisting of visual materials, teacher manuals, and student work sheets for statewide use in ABE/ESL classes in Illinois. The project was conducted cooperatively…

  14. The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) MIDEX Mission: Using Infrared Spectroscopy to Identify Organic Molecules in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, S. A.

    2002-01-01

    The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) mission is one of four selected for Phase A Concept Study in NASA's current call for MIDEX class missions. ABE is a cooled space telescope equipped with spectrographs covering the 2.5-20 micron spectral range. The ABE mission is devoted to the detection and identification of organic and related molecular species in space. ABE is currently under study at NASA's Ames Research Center in collaboration with Ball Aerospace.

  15. Production of biobutanol from acid-pretreated corncob using Clostridium beijerinckii TISTR 1461: Process optimization studies.

    PubMed

    Boonsombuti, A; Tangmanasakul, K; Nantapipat, J; Komolpis, K; Luengnaruemitchai, A; Wongkasemjit, S

    2016-01-01

    Corncob is a potential feedstock in Thailand that can be used for fermentable sugar production through dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. To recover high amounts of monomeric sugars from corncob, the sulfuric pretreatment conditions were optimized by using response surface methodology with three independent variables: sulfuric acid concentration, temperature, and time. The highest response of total sugars, 48.84 g/L, was found at 122.78°C, 4.65 min, and 2.82% (v/v) H2SO4. With these conditions, total sugars from the confirmation experiment were 46.29 g/L, with 5.51% error from the predicted value. The hydrolysate was used as a substrate for acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation to evaluate its potential for microbial growth. The simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) showed that C. beijerinckii TISTR 1461 can generate acetone-butanol-ethanol products at 11.64 g/L (5.29 g/L acetone, 6.26 g/L butanol, and 0.09 g/L ethanol) instantly using sugars from the hydrolysed corncob with Novozymes 50013 cellulase enzyme without an overliming process.

  16. On mobile element transport in heated Abee. [chondrite thermal metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikramuddin, M.; Lipschutz, M. E.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Abee chondrite samples were heated at 700 C for one week at 0.00001 to 0.001 atm Ne or at 0.00001 atm H2. Samples heated in Ne showed greater loss of Bi and Se and greater retention of Zn than those heated in H2. An inverse relationship between Zn retention and ambient Ne pressure was found. Seven trace elements (Ag, Co, Cs, Ga, In, Te, and Tl) were retained or lost to the same extent regardless of the heating conditions. Variations in the apparent activation energy for C above and below 700 C suggest that diffusive loss from different hosts and/or different mobile transport processes over the temperature range may have been in effect.

  17. VISIT TO DR SHARP - BEN PINKEL - ABE SILVERSTEIN - OSCAR SCHEY - JESSE HALL - JOHN COLLINS BY CONGRE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1949-01-01

    VISIT TO DR SHARP - BEN PINKEL - ABE SILVERSTEIN - OSCAR SCHEY - JESSE HALL - JOHN COLLINS BY CONGRESSMAN CARL HENSHAW FROM CALIFORNIA - NORWICK ROSS DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE - SENOR BUCH DE PERADA REPRESENTATIVE FROM MEXICO -

  18. 77 FR 65936 - ABE Fairmont, LLC-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-BNSF Railway Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-31

    ... and the north property line of County Road H, at or near Fairmont. See ABE Fairmont, LLC--Acquis. and..., Director, Office of Proceedings. Derrick A. Gardner, Clearance Clerk. BILLING CODE 4915-01-P...

  19. More than a "Basic Skill": Breaking down the Complexities of Summarizing for ABE/ESL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouellette-Schramm, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the complex cognitive and linguistic challenges of summarizing expository text at vocabulary, syntactic, and rhetorical levels. It then outlines activities to help ABE/ESL learners develop corresponding skills.

  20. Characterization of ultra-fine grained aluminum produced by accumulative back extrusion (ABE)

    SciTech Connect

    Alihosseini, H.; Faraji, G.; Dizaji, A.F.; Dehghani, K.

    2012-06-15

    In the present work, the microstructural evolutions and microhardness of AA1050 subjected to one, two and three passes of accumulative back extrusion (ABE) were investigated. The microstructural evolutions were characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The results revealed that applying three passes of accumulative back extrusion led to significant grain refinement. The initial grain size of 47 {mu}m was refined to the grains of 500 nm after three passes of ABE. Increasing the number of passes resulted in more decrease in grain size, better microstructure homogeneity and increase in the microhardness. The cross-section of ABEed specimen consisted of two different zones: (i) shear deformation zone, and (ii) normal deformation zone. The microhardness measurements indicated that the hardness increased from the initial value of 31 Hv to 67 Hv, verifying the significant microstructural refinement via accumulative back extrusion. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A significant grain refinement can be achieved in AA1050, Al alloy by applying ABE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructural homogeneity of ABEed samples increased by increasing the number of ABE cycles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A substantial increase in the hardness, from 31 Hv to 67 Hv, was recorded.

  1. Quadrivalvular marantic endocarditis (ME) mimicking acute bacterial endocarditis (ABE).

    PubMed

    Durie, Nicole M; Eisenstein, Lawrence E; Cunha, Burke A; Plummer, Maria Maratta

    2007-01-01

    Marantic endocarditis (ME) is defined by noninfectious valvular vegetations. The most common disorders associated with ME are malignancy with or without hypercoagulable state, intercardiac instrumentation, residual vegetations from previously treated infective endocarditis (IE), renal insufficiency, and burns. Another important cause of ME is systemic lupus erythematosus when accompanied by vegetations, that is, Libman-Sacks endocarditis. ME should be differentiated from IE because they may present with similar clinical features. Both ME and IE may present with fever and a heart murmur with or without embolic phenomenon. Leukocytosis and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate suggest the diagnosis of IE. The hallmark of IE is a cardiac vegetation and continuous high-grade bacteremia. After exclusion of the causes of culture negative endocarditis, the absence of bacteremia clearly differentiates ME from IE. We present a case of ME mimicking acute bacterial endocarditis (ABE). The differential diagnostic features of ME versus IE are discussed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of quadrivalvular ME with massive vegetations on all cardiac valves, as well as the aorta, atria, and pulmonary artery.

  2. Butanol fermentation from microalgae-derived carbohydrates after ionic liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Gao, Kai; Orr, Valerie; Rehmann, Lars

    2016-04-01

    Lipid extracted algae (LEA) is an attractive feedstock for alcohol fuel production as it is a non-food crop which is largely composed of readily fermented carbohydrates like starch rather than the more recalcitrant lignocellulosic materials currently under intense development. This study compares the suitability of ionic liquid extracted algae (ILEA) and hexane extracted algae (HEA) for acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) fermentation. The highest butanol titers (8.05 g L(-1)) were achieved with the fermentation of the acid hydrolysates of HEA, however, they required detoxification to support product formation after acid hydrolysis while ILEA did not. Direct ABE fermentation of ILEA and HEA (without detoxification) starches resulted in a butanol titer of 4.99 and 6.63 g L(-1), respectively, which significantly simplified the LEA to butanol process. The study demonstrated the compatibility of producing biodiesel and butanol from a single feedstock which may help reduce the feedstock costs of each individual process.

  3. Comparative genomic analysis of single-molecule sequencing and hybrid approaches for finishing the Clostridium autoethanogenum JA1-1 strain DSM 10061 genome

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Nagaraju, Shilpa; Utturkar, Sagar M; De Tissera, Sashini; Segovia, Simón; Mitchell, Wayne; Land, Miriam L; Dassanayake, Asela; Köpke, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium autoethanogenum strain JA1-1 (DSM 10061) is an acetogen capable of fermenting CO, CO2 and H2 (e.g. from syngas or waste gases) into biofuel ethanol and commodity chemicals such as 2,3-butanediol. A draft genome sequence consisting of 100 contigs has been published. Results A closed, high-quality genome sequence for C. autoethanogenum DSM10061 was generated using only the latest single-molecule DNA sequencing technology and without the need for manual finishing. It is assigned to the most complex genome classification based upon genome features such as repeats, prophage, nine copies of the rRNA gene operons. It has a low G + C content of 31.1%. Illumina, 454, Illumina/454 hybrid assemblies were generated and then compared to the draft and PacBio assemblies using summary statistics, CGAL, QUAST and REAPR bioinformatics tools and comparative genomic approaches. Assemblies based upon shorter read DNA technologies were confounded by the large number repeats and their size, which in the case of the rRNA gene operons were ~5 kb. CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Paloindromic Repeats) systems among biotechnologically relevant Clostridia were classified and related to plasmid content and prophages. Potential associations between plasmid content and CRISPR systems may have implications for historical industrial scale Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol (ABE) fermentation failures and future large scale bacterial fermentations. While C. autoethanogenum contains an active CRISPR system, no such system is present in the closely related Clostridium ljungdahlii DSM 13528. A common prophage inserted into the Arg-tRNA shared between the strains suggests a common ancestor. However, C. ljungdahlii contains several additional putative prophages and it has more than double the amount of prophage DNA compared to C. autoethanogenum. Other differences include important metabolic genes for central metabolism (as an additional hydrogenase and the absence of a

  4. Fermentation process

    SciTech Connect

    Lutzen, N.W.

    1982-02-23

    Fermentation process consists essentially of fermenting a 10-45% w/w aqueous slurry of granular starch for the production of ethanol with an ethanol-producing microorganism in the presence of alpha-amylase and glucoamylase, the conduct of said fermentation being characterized by low levels of dextrin and fermentable sugars in solution in the fermentation broth throughout the fermentation, and thereafter recovering enzymes from the fermentation broth for use anew in fermentation of granular starch.

  5. D-depleted organic matter and graphite in the Abee enstatite chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remusat, L.; Rouzaud, J.-N.; Charon, E.; Le Guillou, C.; Guan, Y.; Eiler, J. M.

    2012-11-01

    A combination of NanoSIMS and High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) imaging along with Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the carbonaceous phases in HF/HCl residue of the Abee enstatite chondrite. This acid residue hosts a very D-depleted component (δD = -480‰). This residue is a mixture of graphite and highly disordered insoluble organic matter. The latter exhibits a significant mesoporosity (i.e., 200-500 nm scale), and also shows concentric and elongated stacks of polyaromatic layers. Insoluble organic matter is shown to be the most D-depleted component in Abee. We also determined, by using NanoSIMS, carbon isotopic composition of graphite and insoluble organic matter in the acid residue (δ13C = -11.3 ± 2.9‰ and -28.4 ± 2.2‰, respectively). We identified graphite in metal-rich clasts and in the matrix of Abee, associated with enstatite, sulfide and metal, but we could not localize highly disordered organic matter in our section. Regardless, given the vulnerability of organic matter to thermal degradation, we suggest that it was added to Abee parent body during the latest stage of its formation, after any thermal metamorphism or partial melting of Abee parent body. A genetic link between organic matter and graphite in Abee is excluded based on our HRTEM and carbon isotopic data. The differences in carbon isotopic compositions between these phases are consistent with previous data obtained by stepwise heating experiments and indicate that graphite is not derived from a pure thermal solid-state graphitization of the organic matter. Rather, we suggest that graphite precipitated from a melt rich in C during the partial melting of the Abee parent body. Insoluble organic matter in Abee has the lowest D/H ratio among the extraterrestrial organics. Organics in most carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites are believed to have been subjected to irradiations in low temperature environments, resulting in a dramatic isotopic fractionation

  6. Toward a New Pluralism in ABE/ESOL Classrooms: Teaching to Multiple "Cultures Of Mind." Research Monograph. NCSALL Reports #19

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kegan, Robert; Broderick, Maria; Drago-Severson, Eleanor; Helsing, Deborah; Popp, Nancy; Portnow, Kathryn

    2001-01-01

    How do ABE/ESOL (Adult Basic Education/English for Speakers of Other Languages) programs shape adult learners, and how do adult learners, in turn, shape their programs? Beyond the acquisition of important skills (such as greater fluency in the English language) what are the bigger internal meanings for adults of participating in ABE/ESOL…

  7. Toward a New Pluralism in ABE/ESOL Classrooms: Teaching to Multiple "Cultures of Mind." Research Monograph. NCSALL Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kegan, Robert; Broderick, Maria; Drago-Severson, Eleanor; Helsing, Deborah; Popp, Nancy; Portnow, Kathryn

    This document contains information about and from a study of the experiences of 41 adults enrolled in adult basic education/English for speakers of other languages (ABE/ESOL) programs that was conducted to determine what their learning meant to them and to identify strategies for developing a new pluralism in ABE/ESOL classrooms and teaching to…

  8. Team Learning. Training Packet for a Three-Session Workshop. Study of ABE/ESL Instructor Training Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tibbetts, John; And Others

    This training packet on team learning is 1 of 10 developed by the Study of Adult Basic Education (ABE)/English as a Second Language (ESL) Training Approaches Project to assist ABE instructors, both professionals and volunteers. The packet is intended to stand alone and encompasses a three-session workshop series with activities scheduled for…

  9. 77 FR 58624 - ABE Fairmont, LLC-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-Fillmore Western Railway Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... the north property line of County Road H, at or near Fairmont, Fillmore County, Neb.\\1\\ \\1\\ ABE, which... what it has recently learned is an active rail line. The transaction is scheduled to be consummated on... misleading information, the exemption is void ab initio. Petitions to revoke the exemption under 49...

  10. Three Adult Education Projects: Local History Sparks ABE Class; Teleteacher; Project TARA: An Approach to AE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringley, Ray; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes three instructional approaches in adult basic education: a class in which retired coal miners recorded their experiences in early coal mining camps; a telephone-based instructional system using "Teleteacher" specially designed and built machines; and an approach to ABE in New York emphasizing adult functional literacy, Project…

  11. Themes for Literacy Acquisition: Some Beliefs and Approaches for Teaching GED, ABE, and ESL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Marcie; And Others

    This report presents work done by participating General Educational Development (GED), adult basic education (ABE), and English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instructors in collaboration with the Institute for Literacy Studies at Lehman College (City University of New York). The report is in three sections. The first section is a statement, in list…

  12. The Teaching of Reading in ABE [Adult Basic Education]: Survey Report 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Univ., Lincoln. Dept. of Adult and Continuing Education.

    The teaching of reading is an important aspect of the total Adult Basic Education (ABE) program. The basic problem was: How is the teaching of reading in Nebraska being carried out? In trying to answer this question the document lays the groundwork by opening with a review of related literature and then discusses in detail the type of data…

  13. Adult Basic Education Curriculum Guide for ABE Programs Serving Psychiatrically Ill Adult Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, Ezma V.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use in adult basic education (ABE) programs serving psychiatrically ill adult students. Covered in the individual units are the following topics: personal hygiene and grooming, nutrition and health, money and money management, transportation and safety, government and law, values clarification, and…

  14. A Pilot Program to Recruit, Orient, and Use Classroom Volunteers to Assist ABE/ESL Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, William M.; Koehler, C. Russell

    The pilot project described and evaluated in this report was conducted at Olympic College to test the assignment of volunteer classroom assistants under the supervision of Adult Basic Education (ABE) and English as a Second Language (ESL) instructors to help individualize classroom instruction. Section I introduces the project, the college and its…

  15. ABE/ESL Reading Manual: A Guide for Lincoln County Instructors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Elizabeth; And Others

    Designed as a guide for instructors in Lincoln County, Oregon Adult Basic Education (ABE) and English as a Second Language (ESL) programs, this reading manual attempts to assist in the diagnosis and remediation of student reading problems. Introductory sections provide information on the development and use of the manual, and on the philosophy and…

  16. Where We Live: A Curriculum Guide. ABE Materials that Address Housing Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellowitch, Azi

    This curriculum was developed to give adult basic education (ABE) teachers starting points for developing their own units around housing-related issues. The texts have been chosen thematically, rather than by skill level. The materials are designed for group work--oral reading and discussion. Readings focus on housing repairs, court procedures,…

  17. The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) MIDEX Mission Concept: Identifying Organic Molecules in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Sandford, Scott; Allamandola, Louis; Bregman, Jesse; Cohen, Martin; Cruikshank, Dale; Greene, Thomas; Hudgins, Douglas; Kwok, Sun; Lord, Steven; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Astrobiology Explorer (ABE) is a MIDEX mission concept, currently under Concept Phase A study at NASA's Ames Research Center in collaboration with Ball Aerospace & Technologies, Corp., and managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. ABE will conduct infrared spectroscopic observations to address important problems in astrobiology, astrochemistry, and astrophysics. The core observational program would make fundamental scientific progress in understanding the distribution, identity, and evolution of ices and organic matter in dense molecular clouds, young forming stellar systems, stellar outflows, the general diffuse ISM, HII regions, Solar System bodies, and external galaxies. The ABE instrument concept includes a 0.6 m aperture Ritchey-Chretien telescope and three moderate resolution (R = 2000-3000) spectrometers together covering the 2.5-20 micron spectral region. Large format (1024 x 1024 pixel) IR detector arrays will allow each spectrometer to cover an entire octave of spectral range per exposure without any moving parts. The telescope will be cooled below 50 K by a cryogenic dewar shielded by a sunshade. The detectors will be cooled to approx. 7.5 K by a solid hydrogen cryostat. The optimum orbital configuration for achieving the scientific objectives of the ABE mission is a low background, 1 AU Earth driftaway orbit requiring a Delta II launch vehicle. This configuration provides a low thermal background and allows adequate communications bandwidth and good access to the entire sky over the approx. 1.5 year mission lifetime.

  18. ABE Phase III: Progress and Problems. September 1, 1969-April 1, 1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwestern Cooperative Educational Lab., Albuquerque, NM.

    Interim information concerning the ABE III grants is provided in the three parts of this report. Part 1 (outline) describes the goals and objectives of each component; Part 2 describes accomplishments and problems to date; and Part 3 deals with coordination and supervision activities undertaken by the Lab. The components of the program are: (1)…

  19. Achievement Motivation Training--Effects on ABE/ASE Students' Psychosocial Self-Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Larry G.

    A study was conducted to identify psychosocial needs of Adult Basic Education (ABE)/Adult Secondary Education (ASE) students by using the Self-Description Questionnaire (SDQ). A second purpose was to test effectiveness of Achievement Motivation Training (AMT) as a technique to counterbalance the negative impact of these students' former…

  20. Newspaper Delivery of ABE/GED Curriculum Materials. Final Report and Final Product.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenz, Kitty

    This report describes the delivery of adult basic education/general educational development (ABE/GED) materials throuqh a local newspaper. The materials, 24 English and math lessons developed by the Vineland (New Jersey) Adult Education Center and later distributed by Project Rural in Centre County, Pennsylvania, were published by the "Valley…

  1. Mineralogy and petrology of the Abee enstatite chondrite breccia and its dark inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, A. E.; Keil, K.

    1983-01-01

    A model is proposed for the petrogenesis of the Abee E4 enstatite chondrite breccia, which consists of clasts, dark inclusions and matrix, and whose dark inclusions are an unusual kind of enstatite chondritic material. When the maximum metamorphic temperature of the breccia parent material was greater than 840 C, euhedral enstatite crystals in metallic Fe, Ni, and sulfide-rich areas grew into pliable metal and sulfide. Breccia parent material was impact-excavated, admixed with dark inclusions, and rapidly cooled. During this cooling, the clast and matrix material acquired thermal remanent magnetization. A subsequent ambient magnetic field imparted a uniform net magnetic orientation to the matrix and caused the magnetic orientation of the clasts to be less random. The Abee breccia was later consolidated by shock or by shallow burial and long period, low temperature metamorphism.

  2. Defending against Key Abuse Attacks in KP-ABE Enabled Broadcast Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shucheng; Ren, Kui; Lou, Wenjing; Li, Jin

    Key-Policy Attribute-Based Encryption (KP-ABE) is a promising cryptographic primitive which enables fine-grained access control over sensitive data. However, key abuse attacks in KP-ABE may impede its wide application especially in copyright-sensitive systems. To defend against this kind of attacks, this paper proposes a novel KP-ABE scheme which is able to disclose any illegal key distributor’s ID when key abuse is detected. In our scheme, each bit of user ID is defined as an attribute and the user secret key is associated with his unique ID. The tracing algorithm fulfills its task by tricking the pirate device into decrypting the ciphertext associated with the corresponding bits of his ID. Our proposed scheme has the salient property of black box tracing, i.e., it traces back to the illegal key distributor’s ID only by observing the pirate device’s outputs on certain inputs. In addition, it does not require the pirate device’s secret keys to be well-formed as compared to some previous work. Our proposed scheme is provably secure under the Decisional Bilinear Diffie-Hellman (DBDH) assumption and the Decisional Linear (DL) assumption.

  3. Biocatalyzed processes for production of commodity chemicals: Assessment of future research advances for N-butanol production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingham, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    This report is a summary of assessments by Chem Systems Inc. and a further evaluation of the impacts of research advances on energy efficiency and the potential for future industrial production of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) solvents and other products by biocatalyzed processes. Brief discussions of each of the assessments made by CSI, followed by estimates of minimum projected energy consumption and costs for production of solvents by ABE biocatalyzed processes are included. These assessments and further advances discussed in this report show that substantial decreases in energy consumption and costs are possible on the basis of specific research advances; therefore, it appears that a biocatalyzed process for ABE can be developed that will be competitive with conventional petrochemical processes for production of n-butanol and acetone. (In this work, the ABE process was selected and utilized only as an example for methodology development; other possible bioprocesses for production of commodity chemicals are not intended to be excluded.) It has been estimated that process energy consumption can be decreased by 50%, with a corresponding cost reduction of 15-30% (in comparison with a conventional petrochemical process) by increasing microorganism tolerance to n-butanol and efficient recovery of product solvents from the vapor phase.

  4. Butanol production from lignocellulose by simultaneous fermentation, saccharification, and pervaporation or vacuum evaporation.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Víctor Hugo Grisales; Tost, Gerard Olivar

    2016-10-01

    Techno-economic study of acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) fermentation from lignocellulose was performed. Simultaneous saccharification, fermentation and vacuum evaporation (SFS-V) or pervaporation (SFS-P) were proposed. A kinetic model of metabolic pathways for ABE fermentation with the effect of phenolics and furans in the growth was proposed based on published laboratory results. The processes were optimized in Matlab®. The end ABE purification was carried out by heat-integrated distillation. The objective function of the minimization was the total annualized cost (TAC). Fuel consumption of SFS-P using poly[1-(trimethylsilyl)-1-propyne] membrane was between 13.8 and 19.6% lower than SFS-V. Recovery of furans and phenolics for the hybrid reactors was difficult for its high boiling point. TAC of SFS-P was increased 1.9 times with supplementation of phenolics and furans to 3g/l each one for its high toxicity. Therefore, an additional detoxification method or an efficient pretreatment process will be necessary.

  5. The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) MIDEX Mission Concept: Using Infrared Spectroscopy to Identify Organic Molecules in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Ennico, Kimberly; Allamandola, Louis; Bregman, Jesse; Greene, Thomas; Hudgins, Douglas

    2002-01-01

    One of the principal means by which organic compounds are detected and identified in space is by infrared spectroscopy. Past IR telescopic and laboratory studies have shown that much of the carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM) is in complex organic species but the distribution, abundance and evolutionary relationships of these materials are not well understood. The Astrobiology Explorer (ABE) is a MIDEX mission concept designed to conduct IR spectroscopic observations to detect and identify these materials and address outstanding problems in astrobiology, astrochemistry, and astrophysics. ABE's core science program includes observations of planetary nebulae and stellar outflows, protostellar objects, Solar System objects, and galaxies, and lines of sight through dense molecular clouds and the diffuse ISM. ABE is a cryogenically-cooled 60 cm diameter space telescope equipped with 3 cross-dispersed R-2000 spectrometers that share a single common slit. Each spectrometer measures one spectral octave and together cover the entire 2.5-20 micron region simultaneously. The spectrometers use state-of-the-art InSb and Si:As 1024x1024 pixel detectors. ABE would operate in a heliocentric, Earth drift-away orbit and have a core science mission lasting approximately 1.5 years. ABE is currently under study at NASA's Ames Research Center in collaboration with Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp.

  6. Rare earth and other elements in components of the Abee enstatite chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, R. M.; Boynton, W. V.

    1985-01-01

    Radiochemical and instrumental neutron activation analyses of REEs and other elements have been conducted for Abee clast samples, a matrix sample, a dark inclusion, magnetic and nonmagnetic samples, and bulk samples. Correlations of the REEs and oldhamite abundance for both the clasts and dark inclusions indicate that the REEs chiefly occur in oldhamite. The similar REE patterns for clasts and dark inclusions, and the similar mineral composition of oldhamite in clast and dark inclusions, suggest that the oldhamite in both the clasts and dark inclusions is of a common origin.

  7. Synergistic dark and photo-fermentation continuous system for hydrogen production from molasses by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and Rhodobacter capsulatus DSM 1710.

    PubMed

    Morsy, Fatthy Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated synergistic dark and photo-fermentation using continuous fermentation system (CFS). The system relies on connecting several fermenters from bottom of one to top culture level of the next in a manner that allows for delaying movement of the substrate and thus for its full consumption. While H2 was collected, CFS allowed for moving liquid byproducts toward the outlet and hence continuous productivity. CFS could be efficiently used for: (1) Continuous dark and photo-fermentation H2 production by Clostridium acetobutylicum and Rhodobacter capsulatus producing 5.65moleH2mole(-1) hexose; (2) Continuous dark-fermentation synergistic H2, acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) production by C. acetobutylicum which produced per mole hexose, 2.43mol H2 along with 73.08g ABE (3) Continuous H2 and methane production by C. acetobutylicum and bacterial sludge producing, per mole hexose, 1.64mol pure H2 and 2.56mol CH4 mixed with 0.37mol H2·The hydraulic retention time (HRT) for whole system was short where organic acids produced in dark-fermentation in first fermenter were synergistically utilized for H2 production by R. capsulatus in subsequent fermenters. CFS is suitable for fast-digestible sugars but not lignocelluloses or other hard-digestible organics, requiring prolonged HRT, unless such polymeric organics were hydrolyzed prior to fermentation.

  8. Ar-40/Ar-39 and U-Th-Pb dating of separated clasts from the Abee E4 chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Unruh, D. M.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1983-01-01

    Ar-40/Ar-39 and U-Th-Pb are investigated for three clasts from the Abee (E4) enstatite chondrite, yielding Ar-40/Ar-39 plateau ages (and/or maximum ages) of 4.5 Gy, while two of the clasts give average ages of 4.4 Gy. The 4.4-4.5 Gy range does not resolve possible age differences among the clasts. The U-Th-Pb data are consistent with the interpretation that initial clast formation occurred 4.58 Gy ago, and that the clasts have since remained closed systems which have been contaminated with terrestrial Pb. The thermal history of Abee deduced from Ar data seems consistent with that deduced from magnetic data, suggesting that various Abee components experienced separate histories until brecciation no later than 4.4 Gy ago, experiencing no significant subsequent heating.

  9. BIOASPEN: System for technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The public version of ASPEN was installed in the VAX 11/750 computer. To examine the idea of BIOASPEN, a test example (the manufacture of acetone, butanol, and ethanol through a biological route) was chosen for simulation. Previous reports on the BIOASPEN project revealed the limitations of ASPEN in modeling this process. To overcome some of the difficulties, modules were written for the acid and enzyme hydrolyzers, the fermentor, and a sterilizer. Information required for these modules was obtained from the literature whenever possible. Additional support modules necessary for interfacing with ASPEN were also written. Some of ASPEN subroutines were themselves altered in order to ensure the correct running of the simulation program. After testing of these additions and charges was completed, the Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol (ABE) process was simulated. A release of ASPEN (which contained the Economic Subsystem) was obtained and installed. This subsection was tested and numerous charges were made in the FORTRAN code. Capital investment and operating cost studies were performed on the ABE process. Some alternatives in certain steps of the ABE simulation were investigated in order to elucidate their effects on the overall economics of the process.

  10. Enhanced butanol production by Clostridium acetobutylicum NCIMB 13357 grown on date fruit as carbon source in P2 medium.

    PubMed

    Khamaiseh, Emran I; Abdul Hamid, Aidil; Abdeshahian, Peyman; Wan Yusoff, Wan Mohtar; Kalil, Mohd Sahaid

    2014-01-01

    The production of biobutanol was studied by the cultivation of Clostridium acetobutylicum NCIMB 13557 in P2 medium including date fruit as the sole substrate. The effect of P2 medium and the effect of different concentrations of date fruit ranging from 10 to 100 g/L on biobutanol production were investigated. Anaerobic batch culture was carried out at 35 °C incubation temperature and pH 7.0 ± 0.2 for 72 h. Experimental results showed that the lowest yield of biobutanol and acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) was 0.32 and 0.35 gram per gram of carbohydrate consumed (g/g), respectively, when an initial date fruit concentration of 10 g/L was utilized. At this fruit date concentration a biobutanol production value of 1.56 g/L was obtained. On the other hand, the maximum yield of biobutanol (0.48 g/g) and ABE (0.63 g/g) was produced at 50 g/L date fruit concentration with a biobutanol production value as high as 11 g/L. However, when a higher initial date fruit concentration was used, biobutanol and ABE production decreased to reach the yield of 0.22 g/g and 0.35 g/g, respectively, where 100 g/L date fruit was used. Similar results also revealed that 10.03 g/L biobutanol was produced using 100 g/L date fruit.

  11. Identifying Organic Molecules in Space: The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Sandford, S.; Allamandola, L.; Bregman, J.; Cohen, M.; Cruikshank, D.; Dumas, C.; Greene, T.; Hudgins, D.; Kwok, S.

    2004-01-01

    The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) mission concept consists of a modest dedicated space observatory having a 60 cm class primary mirror cooled to T less than 50 K equipped with medium resolution cross-dispersed spectrometers having cooled large format near- and mid-infrared detector arrays. Such a system would be capable of addressing outstanding problems in Astrochemistry and Astrophysics that are particularly relevant to Astrobiology and addressable via astronomical observation. The mission's observaticxiai program woiild make fundamental scieztific: prngress in establishing the nature, distribution, formation and evolution of organic and other molecular materials in the following extra-terrestrial environments: 1) The Outflow of Dying Stars; 2) The Diffuse Interstellar Medium (DISM); 3) Dense Molecular Clouds, Star Formation Regions, and Young Stellar/Planetary Systems; 4) Planets, Satellites, and Small Bodies within the Solar System; and 5) The Interstellar Media of Other Galaxies ABE could make fundamental progress in all of these area by conducting a 1 to 2 year mission to obtain a coordinated set of infrared spectroscopic observations over the 2.5 - 20 micron spectral range at a spectral resolution of R greater than 2500 of about 1500 galaxies, stars, planetary nebulae, young stellar objects, and solar system objects.

  12. Identifying Organic Molecules in Space - The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennico, K. A.; Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.; Bregman, J. D.; Cohen, M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Dumas, C.; Greene, T. P.; Hudgins, D. M.; Kwok, S.; Lord, S. D.; Madden, S. C.; McCreight, C. R.; Roellig, T. L.; Strecker, D. W.; Tielens, A. G.; Werner, M. W.; Wilmoth, K. L.

    2003-12-01

    The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) mission concept consists of a modest dedicated space observatory having a 60 cm class primary mirror cooled to T < 50 K equipped with a modest resolution cross-dispersed spectrometers having cooled large format near- and mid-infrared detector arrays. Such as system would be capable of addressing outstanding problems in Astrochemistry and Astrophysics that are particularly relevant to Astrobiology and addressable via astronomical observation. This mission's observationsal program would make fundamental scientific progress in establishing the nature, distribution, formation and evolution of organic and other molecular materials in the following extraterrestrial environments: 1 The Outflow of Dying Stars 2 The Diffuse Interstellar Medium 3 Dense Molecular Clouds, Star Formation Regions, and Young Stellar/Planetary Systems 4 Planets, Satellites, and Small Bodies within the Solar System, and 5 Interstellar Media of Other Galaxies ABE could make fundamental progress in all of these areas by conducting a 1 to 2 year mission to obtain a coordinated set of infrared spectroscopic observations over the 2.5-20 micron spectral range at a spectral resolution of R > 2500 of about 1500 galaxies, stars, planetary nebulae, young stellar objects, and solar system objects.

  13. Identifying organic molecules in space: the AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) mission concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennico, Kimberly A.; Sandford, Scott A.

    2004-10-01

    The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) mission concept consists of a dedicated space observatory having a 60 cm class primary mirror cooled to T < 50 K equipped with medium resolution cross-dispersed spectrometers having cooled large format near- and mid-infrared detector arrays. Such a system would be capable of addressing outstanding problems in Astrochemistry and Astrophysics that are particularly relevant to Astrobiology and addressable via astronomical observation. The mission's observational program would make fundamental scientific progress in establishing the nature, distribution, formation and evolution of organic and other molecular materials in the following extra-terrestrial environments: 1) The Outflow of Dying Stars, 2) The Diffuse Interstellar Medium, 3) Dense Molecular Clouds, Star Formation Regions, and Young Stellar/Planetary Systems, 4) Planets, Satellites, and Small Bodies within the Solar System, and 5) The Interstellar Media of Other Galaxies. ABE could make fundamental progress in all of these areas by conducting a 1 to 2 year mission to obtain a coordinated set of infrared spectroscopic observations over the 2.5-20 micron spectral range at a spectral resolution of R > 2000 of about 1500 objects including galaxies, stars, planetary nebulae, young stellar objects, and solar system objects.

  14. Identifying Organic Molecules in Space: The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennico, K. A.; Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L.; Bregman, J.; Cohen, M.; Cruikshank, D.; Dumas, C.; Greene, T.; Hudgins, D.; Kwok, S.

    2004-01-01

    The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) mission concept consists of a dedicated space observatory having a 60 cm class primary mirror cooled to T < 50 K equipped with medium resolution cross-dispersed spectrometers having cooled large format near- and mid-infrared detector arrays. Such a system would be capable of addressing outstanding problems in Astrochemistry and Astrophysics that are particularly relevant to Astrobiology and addressable via astronomical observation. The mission s observational program would make fundamental scientific progress in establishing the nature, distribution, formation and evolution of organic and other molecular materials in the following extra-terrestrial environments: 1) The Outflow of Dying Stars, 2) The Diffuse Interstellar Medium, 3) Dense Molecular Clouds, Star Formation Regions, and Young StellarPlanetary Systems, 4) Planets, Satellites, and Small Bodies within the Solar System, and 5 ) The Interstellar Media of Other Galaxies. ABE could make fundamental progress in all of these areas by conducting a 1 to 2 year mission to obtain a coordinated set of infrared spectroscopic observations over the 2.5-20 micron spectral range at a spectral resolution of R > 2000 of about 1500 objects including galaxies, stars, planetary nebulae, young stellar objects, and solar system objects. Keywords: Astrobiology, infrared, Explorers, interstellar organics, telescope, spectrometer, space, infrared detectors

  15. Development Of Sustainable Biobased Products And Bioenergy In Cooperation With The Midwest Consortium For Sustainable Biobased Products And Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Ladisch; Randy Woodson

    2009-03-18

    Collaborative efforts of Midwest Consortium have been put forth to add value to distiller's grains by further processing them into fermentable sugars, ethanol, and a protein rich co-product consistent with a pathway to a biorenewables industry (Schell et al, 2008). These studies were recently published in the enclosed special edition (Volume 99, Issue 12) of Bioresource Technology journal. Part of them have demonstrated the utilization of distillers grains as additional feedstock for increased ethanol production in the current dry grind process (Kim et al., 2008a, b; Dien et al.,2008, Ladisch et al., 2008a, b). Results showed that both liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatment and ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) were effective for enhancing digestibility of distiller's grains. Enzymatic digestion of distiller's grains resulted in more than 90% glucose yield under standard assay conditions, although the yield tends to drop as the concentration of dry solids increases. Simulated process mass balances estimated that hydrolysis and fermentation of distillers grains can increase the ethanol yield by 14% in the current dry milling process (Kim et al., 2008c). Resulting co-products from the modified process are richer in protein and oil contents than conventional distiller's grains, as determined both experimentally and computationally. Other research topics in the special edition include water solubilization of DDGS by transesterification reaction with phosphite esters (Oshel el al., 2008) to improve reactivity of the DDGS to enzymes, hydrolysis of soluble oligomers derived from DDGS using functionalized mesoporous solid catalysts (Bootsma et al., 2008), and ABE (acetone, butanol, ethanol) production from DDGS by solventogenic Clostridia (Ezeji and Blaschek, 2008). Economic analysis of a modified dry milling process, where the fiber and residual starch is extracted and fermented to produce more ethanol from the distillers grains while producing highly concentrated protein co

  16. Cucumber fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Humans have consumed fermented cucumber products since before the dawn of civilization. Although cucumber fermentation remains largely a traditional process, it has proven to be a consistently safe process by which raw cucumbers are transformed into high quality pickles that have a long shelf-life ...

  17. Project on Teaching Charts and Graphs to ABE Students. Part I: Teacher's Guide [and] Part II: Transparency Assembly Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renton Vocational Inst., WA.

    The teacher's guide and collection of transparency masters are designed for use in teaching adult basic education (ABE) students how to read and interpret graphs and charts. Covered in the individual lessons of the instructional unit are the reading and interpretation of charts as well as picture, line, bar, and circle graphs. Each unit contains a…

  18. Implementing the Massachusetts Adult Basic Education Math Standards: Our Research Stories. The ABE Math Standards Project. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonelli, Esther, Ed.; And Others

    The product of a project conducted in Massachusetts to apply the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' (NCTM) "Curriculum and Evaluation Standards for School Mathematics" to adult basic education (ABE) learning environments, this volume is a collection of teacher-researchers' essays on field-based application of the adapted…

  19. Village Literacy Programming in Pakistan: A Comparative ABE Study with Guidelines. Monographs on Comparative and Area Studies in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesser, Florence E.

    Ten literacy pilot programs developed by the Adult Basic Education Society (ABES) of Pakistan in Gujranwala, Pakistan, between 1963 and 1973 were analyzed and evaluated to evolve a series of adult literacy program development guidelines. The programs were evaluated on the basis of an eleven-category evaluation system developed by Cyril Houle in…

  20. The AstroBiology Explorer (ABE) MIDEX Mission Concept: Using Infrared Spectroscopy to Identify Organic Molecules in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Vincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    One of the principal means by which organic compounds are detected and identified in space is by infrared spectroscopy. Past IR studies (telescopic and laboratory) have demonstrated that much of the carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM) is in complex organic species of a variety of types, but the distribution, abundance, and evolutionary relationships of these materials are not well understood. The Astrobiology Explorer (ABE) is a MIDEAST mission concept designed to conduct IR spectroscopic observations to detect and identify these materials to address outstanding important problems in astrobiology, astrochemistry, and astrophysics. Systematic studies include the observation of planetary nebulae and stellar outflows, protostellar objects, Solar System Objects, and galaxies, and multiple lines of sight through dense molecular clouds and the diffuse ISM. ABE will also search for evidence of D enrichment in complex molecules in all these environments. The mission is currently under study at NASA's Ames Research Center in collaboration with Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp. ABE is a cryogenically-cooled 60 cm diameter space telescope equipped with 3 cryogenic cross-dispersed spectrographs that share a single common slit. The 3 spectrometers each measure single spectral octaves (2.5-5, 5-10, 10-20 microns) and together cover the entire 2.5 - 20 micron region simultaneously. The spectrometers use state-of-the-art 1024x1024 pixel detectors, with a single InSb array for the 2.5-5 micron region and two Si:As arrays for the 5-10 and 10-20 micron regions. The spectral resolution is wavelength dependent but is greater than 2000 across the entire spectral range. ABE would operate in a heliocentric, Earth drift-away orbit and is designed to take maximum advantage of this environment for cooling, thermal stability, and mission lifetime. ABE would have a core science mission lasting approximately 1.5 years.

  1. The role of 1,3-propanediol production in fermentation of glycerol by Clostridium pasteurianum.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erin E; Rehmann, Lars

    2016-06-01

    Waste crude glycerol from biodiesel production can be used to produce biobutanol using Clostridium pasteurianum with the main products being n-butanol, 1,3-propanediol (PDO) and ethanol. There has been much discrepancy and mystery around the cause and effect of process parameters on the product distribution, thus a better understanding of the pathway regulation is required. This study shows that as process pH decreased, the rate of cell growth and CO2 production also decreased, resulting in slower fermentations, increased duration of butanol production and higher butanol concentrations and yields. The production rate of PDO was multi-modal and the role of PDO appears to function in redox homeostasis. The results also showed that C. pasteurianum displayed little biphasic behavior when compared to Clostridia spp. typically used in ABE fermentation due to the alternative glycolysis-independent reductive pathway of PDO production, rendering it suitable for a continuous fermentation process.

  2. Optimization of wastewater microalgae saccharification using dilute acid hydrolysis for acetone, butanol, and ethanol fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Yessica; Ellis, Joshua T.; Miller, Charles D.; Sims, Ronald C.

    2015-02-01

    Exploring and developing sustainable and efficient technologies for biofuel production are crucial for averting global consequences associated with fuel shortages and climate change. Optimization of sugar liberation from wastewater algae through acid hydrolysis was determined for subsequent fermentation to acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) by Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4. Acid concentration, retention time, and temperature were evaluated to determine optimal hydrolysis conditions by assessing the sugar and ABE yield as well as the associated costs. Sulfuric acid concentrations ranging from 0-1.5 M, retention times of 40-120 min, and temperatures from 23°C- 90°C were combined to form a full factorial experiment. Acid hydrolysis pretreatment of 10% dried wastewater microalgae using 1.0 M sulfuric acid for 120 min at 80-90°C was found to be the optimal parameters, with a sugar yield of 166.1 g for kg of dry algae, concentrations of 5.23 g/L of total ABE, and 3.74 g/L of butanol at a rate of USD $12.83 per kg of butanol.

  3. Fermentation Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, C. P. L., Jr.; Grady, J. K.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastes from the fermentation industry, covering publications of 1976-77. This review focuses on: (1) alcoholic beverage production; (2) pharmaceuticals and biochemicals production; and (3) biomass production. A list of 62 references is also presented. (HM)

  4. Soy molasses as fermentation substrate for production of butanol using Clostridium beijerinckii BA101.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, N; Lolas, A; Blaschek, H P

    2001-05-01

    Spray-dried soy molasses (SDSM) contains the sugars dextrose, sucrose, fructose, pinitol, raffinose, verbascose, melibiose, and stachyose. Of the 746 g kg(-1) total sugars in SDSM, 434 g kg(-1) is fermentable using Clostridium beijerinckii BA101. SDSM was used to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) by C. beijerinckii BA101 in batch cultures. Using 80 g l(-1) SDSM, 10.7 g l(-1) ABE was produced in P2 medium. Higher concentrations of SDSM resulted in poor solvent production due to the presence of excessive salt and inhibitory components. C. beijerinckii BA101 in SDSM at 80 g l(-1) concentration produced 22.8 g l(-1) ABE when supplemented with 25.3 g l(-1) glucose. SDSM contains 57.4 g kg(-1) mineral ash and 2% tri-calcium phosphate. Tri-calcium phosphate up to 43.1 g l(-1) was not inhibitory and at a tri-calcium phosphate concentration of 28.8 g l(-1), the culture produced more solvents (30.1 g l(-1)) than the control experiment (23.8 g l(-1)). In contrast, sodium chloride was a strong inhibitor of C. beijerinckii BA101 cell growth. At a concentration of 10 g l(-1) sodium chloride, a maximum cell concentration of 0.6 g l(-1) was achieved compared to 1.7 g l(-1) in the control experiment. The effects of two salts on specific growth rate constant (mu) and specific rate of ABE production (nu) for C. beijerinckii BA101 were examined.

  5. Physiological response of Clostridium ljungdahlii DSM 13528 of ethanol production under different fermentation conditions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bin-Tao; Liu, Zi-Yong; Tian, Lei; Li, Fu-Li; Chen, Xiao-Hua

    2015-02-01

    In this study, cell growth, gene expression and ethanol production were monitored under different fermentation conditions. Like its heterotrophical ABE-producing relatives, a switch from acidogenesis to solventogenesis of Clostridium ljungdahlii during the autotrophic fermentation with CO/CO2 could be observed, which occurred surprisingly in the late-log phase rather than in the transition phase. The gene expression profiles indicated that aor1, one of the putative aldehyde oxidoreductases in its genome played a critical role in the formation of ethanol, and its transcription could be induced by external acids. Moreover, a low amount of CaCO3 was proved to have positive influences on the cell density and substrate utilization, followed by an increase of over 40% ethanol and 30% acetate formation.

  6. Why Understanding 1-3/4 divided by 1/2 Matters to Math Reform: ABE Teachers Learn the Math They Teach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brover, Charles; Deagan, Denise; Farina, Solange

    This paper explains the investigative attempts of The New York City Math Exchange Group (MEG) on elementary mathematics teachers' content knowledge in Adult Basic Education (ABE). The study is comparative in nature and took place in a workshop at the Adults Learning Maths Conference in Boston. The new members of the MEG professional development…

  7. Integrated process for microbial solvent production from whey permeate. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    Acetone and butanol were historically produced through fermentation of carbohydrate raw materials. Conventional feedstocks such as grain and molasses, and the energy required to recover products by distillation, are too costly for traditional batch fermentation to compete with petrochemical synthesis. The authors proposed to evaluate an acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation of acid whey permeate, a cheap carbohydrate source, using up-to-date bioreactor technology continuous fermentation with cell recycle and in-situ butanol recovery by gas stripping. Clostridium acetobutylicum P262 was the strain chosen, as it assimilates both the lactose and lactic acid in acid whey. Single-stage continuous culture proved unsuitable for butanol production, since productivity is low and cultures degenerated quickly. Two-stage culture improved productivity by a factor of two over batch runs. All continuous cultures showed major oscillations in cell density, substrate concentration and products formed. Under these conditions, cell recycle did not affect productivity in two-stage culture. Gas stripping with fermentor off-gases recovered a clean condensate of butanol and acetone at 70--90% yield and with purification factors of 14 to 35. Stripping maintained solvent concentrations in the range of 2--4 g/l even at the peak of solventogenesis, eliminating product inhibition. Gas stripping produced a 50% improvement in substrate uptake and a 10--20% improvement in solvent productivity.

  8. Problems with the microbial production of butanol.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yan-Ning; Li, Liang-Zhi; Xian, Mo; Ma, Yu-Jiu; Yang, Jian-Ming; Xu, Xin; He, Dong-Zhi

    2009-09-01

    With the incessant fluctuations in oil prices and increasing stress from environmental pollution, renewed attention is being paid to the microbial production of biofuels from renewable sources. As a gasoline substitute, butanol has advantages over traditional fuel ethanol in terms of energy density and hygroscopicity. A variety of cheap substrates have been successfully applied in the production of biobutanol, highlighting the commercial potential of biobutanol development. In this review, in order to better understand the process of acetone-butanol-ethanol production, traditional clostridia fermentation is discussed. Sporulation is probably induced by solvent formation, and the molecular mechanism leading to the initiation of sporulation and solventogenesis is also investigated. Different strategies are employed in the metabolic engineering of clostridia that aim to enhancing solvent production, improve selectivity for butanol production, and increase the tolerance of clostridia to solvents. However, it will be hard to make breakthroughs in the metabolic engineering of clostridia for butanol production without gaining a deeper understanding of the genetic background of clostridia and developing more efficient genetic tools for clostridia. Therefore, increasing attention has been paid to the metabolic engineering of E. coli for butanol production. The importation and expression of a non-clostridial butanol-producing pathway in E. coli is probably the most promising strategy for butanol biosynthesis. Due to the lower butanol titers in the fermentation broth, simultaneous fermentation and product removal techniques have been developed to reduce the cost of butanol recovery. Gas stripping is the best technique for butanol recovery found so far.

  9. High solids fermentation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wyman, Charles E.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Richard, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

  10. High solids fermentation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wyman, Charles E.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Richard, Christopher J.

    1993-03-02

    A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

  11. Direct fermentation of gelatinized cassava starch to acetone, butanol, and ethanol using Clostridium acetobutylicum mutant obtained by atmospheric and room temperature plasma.

    PubMed

    Li, Han-guang; Luo, Wei; Wang, Qiang; Yu, Xiao-bin

    2014-04-01

    The mutant strain designated as ART18, obtained from the wild-type strain Clostridium acetobutylicum PW12 treated by atmospheric and room temperature plasma, showed higher solvent tolerance and butanol production than that of the wild-type strain. The production of butanol was 11.3 ± 0.5 g/L, 31 % higher than that of the wild-type strain when it was used for acetone, butanol, and ethanol fermentation in P2 medium. Furthermore, the effects of cassava flour concentration, pH regulators, and vitamins on the ABE production were also investigated. The highest butanol production of 15.8 ± 0.8 g/L and butanol yield (0.31 g/g) were achieved after the above factors were optimized. When acetone, butanol, and ethanol fermentation by ART18 was carried out in a 15-L bioreactor, the butanol production, the productivity of butanol, and the total solvent were 16.3 ± 0.9, 0.19, and 0.28 g/L(/)h, respectively. These results indicate that ART18 is a promising industrial producer in ABE fermentation.

  12. Integrated butanol recovery for an advanced biofuel: current state and prospects.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chuang; Zhao, Jing-Bo; Chen, Li-Jie; Bai, Feng-Wu; Yang, Shang-Tian; Sun, Jian-Xin

    2014-04-01

    Butanol has recently gained increasing interest due to escalating prices in petroleum fuels and concerns on the energy crisis. However, the butanol production cost with conventional acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation by Clostridium spp. was higher than that of petrochemical processes due to the low butanol titer, yield, and productivity in bioprocesses. In particular, a low butanol titer usually leads to an extremely high recovery cost. Conventional biobutanol recovery by distillation is an energy-intensive process, which has largely restricted the economic production of biobutanol. This article thus reviews the latest studies on butanol recovery techniques including gas stripping, liquid-liquid extraction, adsorption, and membrane-based techniques, which can be used for in situ recovery of inhibitory products to enhance butanol production. The productivity of the fermentation system is improved efficiently using the in situ recovery technology; however, the recovered butanol titer remains low due to the limitations from each one of these recovery technologies, especially when the feed butanol concentration is lower than 1 % (w/v). Therefore, several innovative multi-stage hybrid processes have been proposed and are discussed in this review. These hybrid processes including two-stage gas stripping and multi-stage pervaporation have high butanol selectivity, considerably higher energy and production efficiency, and should outperform the conventional processes using single separation step or method. The development of these new integrated processes will give a momentum for the sustainable production of industrial biobutanol.

  13. Fermentation broth degassification

    SciTech Connect

    Wegner, E.W.; Seals, M.T.

    1990-08-28

    This paper discusses an improvement in an apparatus for continuous pressurized fermentation with high air circulation. It is of the type employing a pressurizable fermenter equipped with agitator means, sparging means including gas delivery and distribution means, nutrient supply means, bottom located harvesting part means and a throttle valve means associated therewith, and control means. The improvement comprises associating with the fermenter a degassing apparatus.

  14. Ferment in Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossland, Janice

    1974-01-01

    A pollution-reducing and energy-saving alternative to petroleum use could be the fermentation industry and other technologies based on the use of renewable resources. Expansion of the fermentation industry could reduce our dependence on petroleum, reduce growing waste disposal problems, and help solve world food shortages. (BT)

  15. Lignocellulosic butanol production from Napier grass using semi-simultaneous saccharification fermentation.

    PubMed

    He, Chi-Ruei; Kuo, Yu-Yuan; Li, Si-Yu

    2017-05-01

    Napier grass is a potential feedstock for biofuel production because of its strong adaptability and wide availability. Compositional analysis has been done on Napier grass which was collected from a local area of Taiwan. By comparing acid- and alkali-pretreatment, it was found that the alkali-pretreatment process is favorable for Napier grass. An overall glucose yield of 0.82g/g-glucosetotal can be obtained with the combination of alkali-pretreatment (2.5wt% NaOH, 8wt% sample loading, 121°C, and a reaction time of 40min) and enzymatic hydrolysis (40FPU/g-substrate). Semi-simultaneous saccharification fermentation (sSSF) was carried out, where enzymatic hydrolysis and ABE fermentation were operated in the same batch. It was found that after 24-h hydrolysis, followed by 96-h fermentation, the butanol and acetone concentrations reached 9.45 and 4.85g/L, respectively. The butanol yield reached 0.22g/g-sugarglucose+xylose. Finally, the efficiency of butanol production from Napier grass was calculated at 31%.

  16. A first principles study of structural stability, electronic structure and mechanical properties of ABeH{sub 3} (A = Li, Na)

    SciTech Connect

    Santhosh, M.; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R.; Priyanga, G. Sudha; Murugan, A.; Kanagaprabha, S.; Iyakutti, K.

    2015-06-24

    Ab initio calculations are performed to investigate the structural stability, electronic structure and mechanical properties of ABeH{sub 3} (A = Li, Na) for three different crystal structures, namely orthorhombic (Pnma), monoclinic (P2{sub 1}/c) and triclinic (P-1) phase. Among the considered structures monoclinic (P2{sub 1}/c) phase is found to be the most stable one for all the three hydrides at ambient condition. The electronic structure reveals that these materials are wide band gap semiconductors. The calculated elastic constants indicate that these materials are mechanically stable at ambient condition.

  17. Fermentative alcohol production

    DOEpatents

    Wilke, Charles R.; Maiorella, Brian L.; Blanch, Harvey W.; Cysewski, Gerald R.

    1982-01-01

    An improved fermentation process for producing alcohol which includes the combination of vacuum fermentation and vacuum distillation. Preferably, the vacuum distillation is carried out in two phases, one a fermentor proper operated at atmospheric pressure and a flash phase operated at reduced pressure with recycle of fermentation brew having a reduced alcohol content to the fermentor, using vapor recompression heating of the flash-pot recycle stream to heat the flash-pot or the distillation step, and using "water load balancing" (i.e., the molar ratio of water in the fermentor feed is the same as the molar ratio of water in the distillation overhead).

  18. Fermentative alcohol production

    SciTech Connect

    Blanch, H.W.; Cysewski, G.R.; Maiorella, B.L.; Wilke, C.R.

    1982-11-16

    An improved fermentation process is disclosed for producing alcohol which includes the combination of vacuum fermentation and vacuum distillation. Preferably, the vacuum distillation is carried out in two phases. One is a fermentor proper operated at atmospheric pressure and the other is a flash phase operated at reduced pressure with recycle of fermentation brew having a reduced alcohol content to the fermentor, using vapor recompression heating of the flash-pot recycle stream to heat the flash-pot or the distillation step, and using ''water load balancing'' (i.e., the molar ratio of water in the fermentor feed is the same as the molar ratio of water in the distillation overhead).

  19. Improved fermentative alcohol production

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke, C.R.; Maiorella, B.L.; Blanch, M.W.; Cysewski, G.R.

    1980-11-26

    An improved fermentation process is described for producing alcohol which includes the combination of vacuum fermentation and vacuum distillation. Preferably, the vacuum distillation is carried out in two phases, one a fermentor proper operated at atmospheric pressure and a flash phase operated at reduced pressure with recycle of fermentation brew having a reduced alcohol content to the fermentor, using vapor recompression heating of the flash-pot recycle stream to heat the flash-pot or the distillation step, and using water load balancing (i.e., the molar ratio of water in the fermentor feed is the same as the molar ratio of water in the distillation overhead).

  20. Tapé Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Djien, Ko Swan

    1972-01-01

    Microorganisms isolated from ragi, originally obtained from Indonesia, were selected for their ability to convert steamed glutinous rice into tapé, an Indonesian fermented food. A mixture of Chlamydomucor oryzae and Endomycopsis fibuliger had good fermentation characteristics. Prepared starters, produced by growing pure cultures on rice and drying them, were as active as pure cultures grown for 4 days on Difco mycological agar slants at 30 C. PMID:16349926

  1. Xylose fermentation to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    The past several years have seen tremendous progress in the understanding of xylose metabolism and in the identification, characterization, and development of strains with improved xylose fermentation characteristics. A survey of the numerous microorganisms capable of directly fermenting xylose to ethanol indicates that wild-type yeast and recombinant bacteria offer the best overall performance in terms of high yield, final ethanol concentration, and volumetric productivity. The best performing bacteria, yeast, and fungi can achieve yields greater than 0.4 g/g and final ethanol concentrations approaching 5%. Productivities remain low for most yeast and particularly for fungi, but volumetric productivities exceeding 1.0 g/L-h have been reported for xylose-fermenting bacteria. In terms of wild-type microorganisms, strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis show the most promise in the short term for direct high-yield fermentation of xylose without byproduct formation. Of the recombinant xylose-fermenting microorganisms developed, recombinant E. coli ATTC 11303 (pLOI297) exhibits the most favorable performance characteristics reported to date.

  2. Fermentative production of curdlan.

    PubMed

    Saudagar, Parag S; Singhal, Rekha S

    2004-01-01

    Curdlan was produced by pure culture fermentation using Agrobacterium radiobacter NCIM 2443. Three different carbon sources (glucose, sucrose, maltose) were selected for study. Sucrose was found to be the most efficient. Utilization of sugar during the course of fermentation was studied, and the data were correlated to the production of curdlan. Curdlan mimics a secondary metabolite, in that its synthesis is associated with the poststationary growth phase of nitrogen-depleted batch culture. This was inferred from the results obtained from utilization of nitrogen. Regulation of pH at 6.1 +/- 0.3 resulted in an increased yield of curdlan from 2.48 to 4.8 g/L, and the corresponding increase in succinoglucan production was from 1.78 to 2.8 g/L. An attempt was made to increase curdlan production by the addition of the uridine nucleotides UMP and UDP-glucose to the fermentation broth. It was found that UDP-glucose at 0.8 microg/mL and UMP at 0.6 microg/mL served as precursors for curdlan and succinoglucan production when added after 18 h of nitrogen depletion in the fermentation broth.

  3. Fermented and Acidified Vegetables

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetables may be preserved by fermentation, direct acidification, or a combination of these along with pasteurization or refrigeration and selected additives to yield products with an extended shelf life and enhanced safety. Organic acids such as lactic, acetic, sorbic and benzoic acids along with ...

  4. Fermentative production of isobutene.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Bianca N M; van der Wulp, Albertus M; Duijnstee, Isabelle; van Maris, Antonius J A; Straathof, Adrie J J

    2012-02-01

    Isobutene (2-methylpropene) is one of those chemicals for which bio-based production might replace the petrochemical production in the future. Currently, more than 10 million metric tons of isobutene are produced on a yearly basis. Even though bio-based production might also be achieved through chemocatalytic or thermochemical methods, this review focuses on fermentative routes from sugars. Although biological isobutene formation is known since the 1970s, extensive metabolic engineering is required to achieve economically viable yields and productivities. Two recent metabolic engineering developments may enable anaerobic production close to the theoretical stoichiometry of 1isobutene + 2CO(2) + 2H(2)O per mol of glucose. One relies on the conversion of 3-hydroxyisovalerate to isobutene as a side activity of mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase and the other on isobutanol dehydration as a side activity of engineered oleate hydratase. The latter resembles the fermentative production of isobutanol followed by isobutanol recovery and chemocatalytic dehydration. The advantage of a completely biological route is that not isobutanol, but instead gaseous isobutene is recovered from the fermenter together with CO(2). The low aqueous solubility of isobutene might also minimize product toxicity to the microorganisms. Although developments are at their infancy, the potential of a large scale fermentative isobutene production process is assessed. The production costs estimate is 0.9 Euro kg(-1), which is reasonably competitive. About 70% of the production costs will be due to the costs of lignocellulose hydrolysate, which seems to be a preferred feedstock.

  5. [Genetic algorithm for fermentation kinetics of submerged fermentation by Morchella].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Piao, Meizi; Sun, Yonghai

    2008-08-01

    Fermentation kinetics is important for optimizing control and up-scaling fermentation process. We studied submerged fermentation kinetics of Morchella. Applying the genetic Algorithm in the Matlab software platform, we compared suitability of the Monod and Logistic models, both are commonly used in process of fungal growth, to describe Morchella growth kinetics. Meanwhile, we evaluated parameters involved in the models for Morchella growth, EPS production and substrate consumption. The results indicated that Logistic model fit better with the experimental data. The average error of this model was 5.8%. This kinetics model can be useful for optimizing and up-scaling fungal fermentation process.

  6. Acidogenic fermentation of lactose

    SciTech Connect

    Kisaalita, W.S.; Pinder, K.L.; Lo, K.V.

    1987-01-01

    Cheese whey is the main component of waste streams from cheese manufacturing plants. Whey is a high biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) effluent that must be reduced before the streams are sent to the sewer. It is proposed in this article that the production of methane by anaerobic fermentation would be the best use of this stream, especially for small plants. Single-stage fermentation of lactose, the main component of whey, results in a very low pH and a stalled process. Two-phase fermentation will eliminate this problem. The acidogenic stage of fermentation has been studied at pH of between 4 and 6.5. The nature of the main products of the reaction have been found to be pH dependent. Below a pH of 4.5 a gas (CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/) is produced along with ethanol, acetate, and butyrate. Above a pH of 4.5 no gas was produced and the liquid products included less ethanol and butyrate and more acetate. A separate study on the conditions for gas formation showed that if the pH dropped for a short time below 4.5 gases were formed at all subsequent pH. This would indicate a change in population distribution due to the period at a low pH. By assuming that the desired products from the acidogenic stage were butyrate, acetate, and no gases, the optimum pH range was found to be between 6.0 and 6.5.

  7. Acidogenic fermentation of lactose.

    PubMed

    Kisaalita, W S; Pinder, K L; Lo, K V

    1987-07-01

    Cheese whey is the main component of waste streams from cheese manufacturing plants. Whey is a high biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) effluent that must be reduced before the streams are sent to the sewer. It is proposed in this article that the production of methane by anaerobic fermentation would be the best use of this stream, especially for small plants. Single-stage fermentation of lactose, the main component of whey, results in a very low pH and a stalled process. Two-phase fermentation will eliminate this problem. The acidogenic stage of fermentation has been studied at pH of between 4 and 6.5. The nature of the main products of the reaction have been found to be pH dependent. Below a pH of 4.5 a gas (CO(2) and H(2)) is produced along with ethanol, acetate, and butyrate. Above a pH of 4.5 no gas was produced, and the liquid products included less ethanol and butyrate and more acetate. A separate study on the conditions for gas formation showed that if the pH dropped for a short time below 4.5 gases were formed at all subsequent pH. This would indicate a change in population distribution due to the period at a low pH. By assuming that the desired products from the acidogenic stage were butyrate, acetate, and no gases, the optimum pH range was found to be between 6.0 and 6.5.

  8. Fermentation method producing ethanol

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Daniel I. C.; Dalal, Rajen

    1986-01-01

    Ethanol is the major end product of an anaerobic, thermophilic fermentation process using a mutant strain of bacterium Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum. This organism is capable of converting hexose and pentose carbohydrates to ethanol, acetic and lactic acids. Mutants of Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum are capable of converting these substrates to ethanol in exceptionally high yield and with increased productivity. Both the mutant organism and the technique for its isolation are provided.

  9. Bacteriophages and dairy fermentations.

    PubMed

    Marcó, Mariángeles Briggiler; Moineau, Sylvain; Quiberoni, Andrea

    2012-07-01

    This review highlights the main strategies available to control phage infection during large-scale milk fermentation by lactic acid bacteria. The topics that are emphasized include the factors influencing bacterial activities, the sources of phage contamination, the methods available to detect and quantify phages, as well as practical solutions to limit phage dispersion through an adapted factory design, the control of air flow, the use of adequate sanitizers, the restricted used of recycled products, and the selection and growth of bacterial cultures.

  10. Biorefinery of the green seaweed Ulva lactuca to produce animal feed, chemicals and biofuels.

    PubMed

    Bikker, Paul; van Krimpen, Marinus M; van Wikselaar, Piet; Houweling-Tan, Bwee; Scaccia, Nazareno; van Hal, Jaap W; Huijgen, Wouter J J; Cone, John W; López-Contreras, Ana M

    2016-01-01

    The growing world population demands an increase in animal protein production. Seaweed may be a valuable source of protein for animal feed. However, a biorefinery approach aimed at cascading valorisation of both protein and non-protein seaweed constituents is required to realise an economically feasible value chain. In this study, such a biorefinery approach is presented for the green seaweed Ulva lactuca containing 225 g protein (N × 4.6) kg(-1) dry matter (DM). The sugars in the biomass were solubilised by hot water treatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis and centrifugation resulting in a sugar-rich hydrolysate (38.8 g L(-1) sugars) containing glucose, rhamnose and xylose, and a protein-enriched (343 g kg(-1) in DM) extracted fraction. This extracted fraction was characterised for use in animal feed, as compared to U. lactuca biomass. Based on the content of essential amino acids and the in vitro N (85 %) and organic matter (90 %) digestibility, the extracted fraction seems a promising protein source in diets for monogastric animals with improved characteristics as compared to the intact U. lactuca. The gas production test indicated a moderate rumen fermentation of U. lactuca and the extracted fraction, about similar to that of alfalfa. Reduction of the high content of minerals and trace elements may be required to allow a high inclusion level of U. lactuca products in animal diets. The hydrolysate was used successfully for the production of acetone, butanol, ethanol and 1,2-propanediol by clostridial fermentation, and the rhamnose fermentation pattern was studied.

  11. Recombinant Zymomonas for pentose fermentation

    DOEpatents

    Picataggio, S.K.; Zhang, M.; Eddy, C.K.; Deanda, K.A.; Finkelstein, M.

    1996-05-07

    The invention relates to microorganisms which normally do not ferment a pentose sugar and which are genetically altered to ferment this pentose to produce ethanol. A representative example is Zymomonas mobilis which has been transformed with E. coli xylose isomerase, xylulokinase, transaldolase and transketolase genes. Expression of the added genes are under the control of Zymomonas mobilis promoters. This newly created microorganism is useful for fermenting pentoses and glucose, produced by hydrolysis of hemicellulose and cellulose, to produce ethanol. 2 figs.

  12. Recombinant zymomonas for pentose fermentation

    DOEpatents

    Picataggio, Stephen K.; Zhang, Min; Eddy, Christina K.; Deanda, Kristine A.; Finkelstein, Mark

    1996-01-01

    The invention relates to microorganisms which normally do not ferment a pentose sugar and which are genetically altered to ferment this pentose to produce ethanol. A representative example is Zymomonas mobilis which has been transformed with E. coli xylose isomerase, xylulokinase, transaldolase and transketolase genes. Expression of the added genes are under the control of Zymomonas mobilis promoters. This newly created microorganism is useful for fermenting pentoses and glucose, produced by hydrolysis of hemicellulose and cellulose, to produce ethanol.

  13. Pentose fermentation by recombinant Zymomonas

    DOEpatents

    Picataggio, S.K.; Zhang, M.; Eddy, C.K.; Deanda, K.A.; Finkelstein, M.; Mohagheghi, A.; Newman, M.M.; McMillan, J.D.

    1998-01-27

    The invention relates to microorganisms which normally do not ferment pentose sugar and which are genetically altered to ferment pentose sugar to produce ethanol, and fermentation processes utilizing the same. Examples include Zymomonas mobilis which has been transformed with combinations of E. coli genes for xylose isomerase, xylulokinase, transaldolase, transketolase, L-arabinose isomerase, L-ribulokinase, and L-ribulose 5-phosphate 4-epimerase. Expression of the added genes are under the control of Zymomonas mobilis promoters. These newly created microorganisms are useful for fermenting pentoses and glucose, produced by hydrolysis of hemicellulose and cellulose, to produce ethanol. 7 figs.

  14. Recombinant Zymomonas for pentose fermentation

    DOEpatents

    Picataggio, S.K.; Min Zhang; Eddy, C.K.; Deanda, K.A.

    1998-03-10

    The invention relates to microorganisms which normally do not ferment pentose sugar and which are genetically altered to ferment pentose sugar to produce ethanol, and fermentation processes utilizing the same. Examples include Zymomonas mobilis which has been transformed with combinations of E. coli genes for xylose isomerase, xylulokinase, transaldolase, transketolase, L-arabinose isomerase, L-ribulokinase, and L-ribulose-5-phosphate 4-epimerase. Expression of the added genes are under the control of Zymomonas mobilis promoters. These newly created microorganisms are useful for fermenting pentoses and glucose, produced by hydrolysis of hemicellulose and cellulose, to produce ethanol. 7 figs.

  15. Pentose fermentation by recombinant zymomonas

    DOEpatents

    Picataggio, Stephen K.; Zhang, Min; Eddy, Christina K.; Deanda, Kristine A.; Finkelstein, Mark; Mohagheghi, Ali; Newman, Mildred M.; McMillan, James D.

    1998-01-01

    The invention relates to microorganisms which normally do not ferment pentose sugar and which are genetically altered to ferment pentose sugar to produce ethanol, and fermentation processes utilizing the same. Examples include Zymomonas mobilis which has been transformed with combinations of E. coli genes for xylose isomerase, xylulokinase, transaldolase, transketolase, L-arabinose isomerase, L-ribulokinase, and L-ribulose 5-phosphate 4-epimerase. Expression of the added genes are under the control of Zymomonas mobilis promoters. These newly created microorganisms are useful for fermenting pentoses and glucose, produced by hydrolysis of hemicellulose and cellulose, to produce ethanol.

  16. Recombinant Zymomonas for pentose fermentation

    DOEpatents

    Picataggio, Stephen K.; Zhang, Min; Eddy, Christina K.; Deanda, Kristine A.

    1998-01-01

    The invention relates to microorganisms which normally do not ferment pentose sugar and which are genetically altered to ferment pentose sugar to produce ethanol, and fermentation processes utilizing the same. Examples include Zymomonas mobilis which has been transformed with combinations of E. coli genes for xylose isomerase, xylulokinase, transaldolase, transketolase, L-arabinose isomerase, L-ribulokinase, and L-ribulose-5-phosphate 4-epimerase. Expression of the added genes are under the control of Zymomonas mobilis promoters. These newly created microorganisms are useful for fermenting pentoses and glucose, produced by hydrolysis of hemicellulose and cellulose, to produce ethanol.

  17. Bacteriophages and dairy fermentations

    PubMed Central

    Marcó, Mariángeles Briggiler; Moineau, Sylvain; Quiberoni, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    This review highlights the main strategies available to control phage infection during large-scale milk fermentation by lactic acid bacteria. The topics that are emphasized include the factors influencing bacterial activities, the sources of phage contamination, the methods available to detect and quantify phages, as well as practical solutions to limit phage dispersion through an adapted factory design, the control of air flow, the use of adequate sanitizers, the restricted used of recycled products, and the selection and growth of bacterial cultures. PMID:23275866

  18. Fumaric acid production by fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Roa Engel, Carol A.; Zijlmans, Tiemen W.; van Gulik, Walter M.; van der Wielen, Luuk A. M.

    2008-01-01

    The potential of fumaric acid as a raw material in the polymer industry and the increment of cost of petroleum-based fumaric acid raises interest in fermentation processes for production of this compound from renewable resources. Although the chemical process yields 112% w/w fumaric acid from maleic anhydride and the fermentation process yields only 85% w/w from glucose, the latter raw material is three times cheaper. Besides, the fermentation fixes CO2. Production of fumaric acid by Rhizopus species and the involved metabolic pathways are reviewed. Submerged fermentation systems coupled with product recovery techniques seem to have achieved economically attractive yields and productivities. Future prospects for improvement of fumaric acid production include metabolic engineering approaches to achieve low pH fermentations. PMID:18214471

  19. Yeast ecology of Kombucha fermentation.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Ai Leng; Heard, Gillian; Cox, Julian

    2004-09-01

    Kombucha is a traditional fermentation of sweetened tea, involving a symbiosis of yeast species and acetic acid bacteria. Despite reports of different yeast species being associated with the fermentation, little is known of the quantitative ecology of yeasts in Kombucha. Using oxytetracycline-supplemented malt extract agar, yeasts were isolated from four commercially available Kombucha products and identified using conventional biochemical and physiological tests. During the fermentation of each of the four products, yeasts were enumerated from both the cellulosic pellicle and liquor of the Kombucha. The number and diversity of species varied between products, but included Brettanomyces bruxellensis, Candida stellata, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Torulaspora delbrueckii and Zygosaccharomyces bailii. While these yeast species are known to occur in Kombucha, the enumeration of each species present throughout fermentation of each of the four Kombucha cultures demonstrated for the first time the dynamic nature of the yeast ecology. Kombucha fermentation is, in general, initiated by osmotolerant species, succeeded and ultimately dominated by acid-tolerant species.

  20. Lactose fermentation by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of fermenting cellobiose.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Oh, Eun Joong; Pathanibul, Panchalee; Turner, Timothy L; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-09-20

    Lactose is an inevitable byproduct of the dairy industry. In addition to cheese manufacturing, the growing Greek yogurt industry generates excess acid whey, which contains lactose. Therefore, rapid and efficient conversion of lactose to fuels and chemicals would be useful for recycling the otherwise harmful acid whey. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a popular metabolic engineering host, cannot natively utilize lactose. However, we discovered that an engineered S. cerevisiae strain (EJ2) capable of fermenting cellobiose can also ferment lactose. This finding suggests that a cellobiose transporter (CDT-1) can transport lactose and a β-glucosidase (GH1-1) can hydrolyze lactose by acting as a β-galactosidase. While the lactose fermentation by the EJ2 strain was much slower than the cellobiose fermentation, a faster lactose-fermenting strain (EJ2e8) was obtained through serial subcultures on lactose. The EJ2e8 strain fermented lactose with a consumption rate of 2.16g/Lh. The improved lactose fermentation by the EJ2e8 strain was due to the increased copy number of cdt-1 and gh1-1 genes. Looking ahead, the EJ2e8 strain could be exploited for the production of other non-ethanol fuels and chemicals from lactose through further metabolic engineering.

  1. Social Ferment and School Finance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hack, Walter G.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the nature of contemporary society in terms of gross or general changes observed during the past twenty years in order to consider possible breakthroughs of school finance as products of social ferment. (Author/AN)

  2. Optimal design of airlift fermenters

    SciTech Connect

    Moresi, M.

    1981-11-01

    In this article a modeling of a draft-tube airlift fermenter (ALF) based on perfect back-mixing of liquid and plugflow for gas bubbles has been carried out to optimize the design and operation of fermentation units at different working capacities. With reference to a whey fermentation by yeasts the economic optimization has led to a slim ALF with an aspect ratio of about 15. As far as power expended per unit of oxygen transfer is concerned, the responses of the model are highly influenced by kLa. However, a safer use of the model has been suggested in order to assess the feasibility of the fermentation process under study. (Refs. 39).

  3. High pressure synthesis gas fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The construction of the high pressure gas phase fermentation system has been completed. Photographs of the various components of the system are presented, along with an operating procedure for the equipment.

  4. Fermentation studies on extracts of beet

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.M.

    1983-03-01

    Fodder beet juice and sugar beet juice were found to be good substrates for the production of ethanol. Two strains of flocculent yeast were selected to ferment fodder beet juice and sugar beet juice. Beet juice was found to have a high level of contaminating microorganisms. Elimination of these microorganisms from the beet juice before fermentation was an essential step if high fermentation efficiencies were to be achieved. Continuous fermentation of fodder beet juice and sugar beet juice provided higher fermenter productivities than rapid batch fermentation. Under New Zealand farming conditions, it is estimated that 4000 litres of ethanol per hectare could be produced on a nation-wide basis.

  5. Yeasts Diversity in Fermented Foods and Beverages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamang, Jyoti Prakash; Fleet, Graham H.

    People across the world have learnt to culture and use the essential microorganisms for production of fermented foods and alcoholic beverages. A fermented food is produced either spontaneously or by adding mixed/pure starter culture(s). Yeasts are among the essential functional microorganisms encountered in many fermented foods, and are commercially used in production of baker's yeast, breads, wine, beer, cheese, etc. In Asia, moulds are predominant followed by amylolytic and alcohol-producing yeasts in the fermentation processes, whereas in Africa, Europe, Australia and America, fermented products are prepared exclusively using bacteria or bacteria-yeasts mixed cultures. This chapter would focus on the varieties of fermented foods and alcoholic beverages produced by yeasts, their microbiology and role in food fermentation, widely used commercial starters (pilot production, molecular aspects), production technology of some common commercial fermented foods and alcoholic beverages, toxicity and food safety using yeasts cultures and socio-economy

  6. Treatment of biomass to obtain fermentable sugars

    DOEpatents

    Dunson, Jr., James B.; Tucker, Melvin; Elander, Richard; Hennessey, Susan M.

    2011-04-26

    Biomass is pretreated using a low concentration of aqueous ammonia at high biomass concentration. Pretreated biomass is further hydrolyzed with a saccharification enzyme consortium. Fermentable sugars released by saccharification may be utilized for the production of target chemicals by fermentation.

  7. Experiments with Fungi Part 2: Fermentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Michele; Hetherington, Shane

    1996-01-01

    Gives details of three experiments with alcoholic fermentation by yeasts which yield carbon dioxide and ethanol. Lists procedures for making cider, vinegar, and fermentation gases. Provides some historical background and detailed equipment requirements. (DDR)

  8. Solar fermentation and distillation process

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, D.M.

    1984-06-19

    A solar fermentation process and distillation system for the manufacture of ethanol product suitable for blending with motor gasoline or as a substitute fuel for gasoline. Fermentation of starches or sugars is carried out in situ in solar collector tubes. The raw beer product emanating from the solar tubes is purified into a high quality ethanol fuel product by passing the beer product through a series of distillation columns whose internal reboil vapor is generated in whole or in substantial part through direct application of solar heat energy. The use of solar energy as heating source in the fermentation and distillation steps markedly reduces the need for external utilities such as steam and fuel to run the plant thereby greatly reducing the operating costs of the plant.

  9. Guidelines for ABE Learning Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sourifman, Vivian M., Ed.

    A federally funded demonstration project in adult basic education is presented. The project's proposal set forth the development of demonstration adult basic education learning centers within the central cities area of the cities of Camden and Newark, New Jersey. During 22 months of operation on a demonstration basis, each center developed…

  10. Antioxidant properties of fermented mango leaf extracts.

    PubMed

    Park, Anna; Ku, Taekyu; Yoo, Ilsou

    2015-01-01

    Antioxidant properties of mango (Mangifera indica) leaves were evaluated. Hydroalcoholic leaf extracts that were lyophilized were subsequently fermented with either Lactobacillus casei or effective microorganisms (EM) such as probiotic bacteria and/or other anaerobic organisms. Antioxidant properties were measured as a function of the mango leaf extract concentration in the fermentation broth. Tests for radical scavenging using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical showed higher antioxidant activity for Lactobacillus- and EM-fermented mango leaf extracts than for the synthetic antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene. Antioxidant activity generally increased with increasing fermented extract concentration as did the fermented extracts' polyphenol and flavonoid contents. Fermented extracts reduced reactive oxygen species generation by lipopolysaccharide in RAW 264.7 cells when measured via fluorescence of dichlorodihydrofluorescein acetate treated cells using flow cytometry. RAW 264.7 cells also showed a concentration-dependent cytotoxic effect of the fermented extracts using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthialol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Inhibition of mushroom tyrosinase activity as well as nitrite scavenging by the fermented extracts increased as fermented extract concentrations increased. Tyrosinase activity was assayed with 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine as substrate. Nitrite scavenging was assessed via measurement of inhibition of chromophore production from nitrite-naphthylamine-sulfanilic acid mixtures. The antioxidant properties of fermented mango leaf extracts suggest the fermented extracts may be useful in developing health food and fermentation-based beauty products.

  11. 27 CFR 19.296 - Fermented materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fermented materials. 19.296 Section 19.296 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU..., Use, and Disposal of Materials § 19.296 Fermented materials. Fermented materials that a...

  12. 27 CFR 19.296 - Fermented materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fermented materials. 19.296 Section 19.296 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU..., Use, and Disposal of Materials § 19.296 Fermented materials. Fermented materials that a...

  13. 27 CFR 19.296 - Fermented materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fermented materials. 19.296 Section 19.296 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU..., Use, and Disposal of Materials § 19.296 Fermented materials. Fermented materials that a...

  14. Ethanol fermentation using novel techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.

    1984-01-01

    Potato starch, sweet potato, and Jerusalem artichoke were hydrolyzed using high pressure extrusion and/or acid and the hydrolysates were utilized as substrates for ethanol fermentation. The first extrusion at 13,000 to 40,000 psi did not completely hydrolyze the starch solution to fermentable sugar. At elevated temperatures (79-97/sup 0/C) and in the presence of HCl, the high pressure extrusion (13,000 psi) effectively hydrolyzed starch into fermentable sugars to yield 12.1, 22.4, and 30.5 dextrose equivalent (DE) in 1, 2, and 3 N HCl, respectively. Maximal reducing sugar value of 84.2 DE and 0.056% hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) was achieved after heating 8% sweet potato slurry (SPS) in 1 N HCl at 110/sup 0/C for 15 min. The degraded SPS was then fermented at 37/sup 0/C using an alcohol-tolerant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to give 41.6 g of 200 proof ethanol from 400 g fresh Georgia Red Sweet potato tuber. A maximal reducing sugar value of 83.5 fructose equivalent and 0.004% HMF was formed from Jerusalem artichoke slurry (JAS) containing 8% total solid following heating in 0.1 N HCl at 97/sup 0/C for 10 min. The degraded JAS was then fermented at 37 C and 29.1 g 200 proof ethanol was produced from 320 g fresh tuber of Jerusalem artichoke. Continuous ethanol fermentation was successfully achieved using a bioreactor where cells were immobilized onto inorganic, channeled porous alumina beads. A maximum productivity (27.0/g ethanol/l.h) was achieved with the bioreactor at 35 C using malt yeast extract broth containing 10% glucose as the feedstock. The immobilized cell system showed good operational and storage stability, and could be stored for more than five months without loss of productivities.

  15. First proof of concept of sustainable metabolite production from high solids fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass using a bacterial co-culture and cycling flush system.

    PubMed

    Yao, Wanying; Nokes, Sue E

    2014-12-01

    To improve the lignocellulose conversion for ABE in high solids fermentation, this study explored the feasibility of cycling the process through the cellulolytic or/and solventogenic phases via intermittent flushing of the fermentation media. Five different flushing strategies (varying medium ingredients, inoculum supplement and cycling through phases) were investigated. Flushing regularly throughout the cellulolytic phase is necessary because re-incubation at 65 °C significantly improved glucose availability by at least 6-fold. The solvents accumulation was increased by 4-fold using corn stover (3-fold using miscanthus) over that produced by flushing only through the solventogenic phase. In addition, cycling process was simplified by re-incubating the flushed cellulolytic phase with no re-inoculation because the initial inoculum of Clostridiumthermocellum remained viable throughout sequential co-culture. This study served as the first proof of the cycling flush system applied in co-cultural SSC and the knowledge gained can be used to design a farm-scale flushing system.

  16. Bacterial fermentation in the gastrointestinal tract of non-ruminants: influence of fermented feeds and fermentable carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Niba, A T; Beal, J D; Kudi, A C; Brooks, P H

    2009-10-01

    The search for alternatives to in-feed antibiotics in animal nutrition has highlighted the role dietary modulation can play in improving gut health. Current antibiotic replacement strategies have involved the use of microbes beneficial to health (probiotics) or fermentable carbohydrates (prebiotics) or both (synbiotics). The present review recognises the contribution of fermented feeds and fermentable carbohydrates in improving the gut environment in non-ruminants. It proposes the screening of probiotic bacteria for the production of fermented feeds and supplementation of these feeds with fermentable carbohydrates prior to feeding animals. It is suggested that the term 'fermbiotics' should be used to describe this intervention strategy.

  17. Fermentation of raffinose by lactose-fermenting strains of Yersinia enterocolitica and by sucrose-fermenting strains of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, G; Luke, R K; Richmond, M H

    1978-01-01

    Introduction of plasmids carrying the lacY gene (lactose permease gene) into Yersinia enterocolitica results in cells being able to ferment both lactose and raffinose. Transfer of such plasmids into Escherichia coli C600 (lacY) confers ability to ferment lactose but not raffinose. Derivatives of C600 that ferment both lactose and sucrose (Lac+ Scr+ strains) are able to ferment raffinose, but do not grow well on raffinose minimal medium. Fermentation of raffinose by Lac+ strains of Y. enterocolitica, and by Lac+ Scr+ strains of E. coli, is explained in terms of transport of raffinose via the lac permease and subsequent breakdown catalyzed by invertase. PMID:344338

  18. Yeasts are essential for cocoa bean fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Zhao, Jian; Fleet, Graham

    2014-03-17

    Cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao) are the major raw material for chocolate production and fermentation of the beans is essential for the development of chocolate flavor precursors. In this study, a novel approach was used to determine the role of yeasts in cocoa fermentation and their contribution to chocolate quality. Cocoa bean fermentations were conducted with the addition of 200ppm Natamycin to inhibit the growth of yeasts, and the resultant microbial ecology and metabolism, bean chemistry and chocolate quality were compared with those of normal (control) fermentations. The yeasts Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia kudriavzevii and Kluyveromyces marxianus, the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum and the acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii were the major species found in the control fermentation. In fermentations with the presence of Natamycin, the same bacterial species grew but yeast growth was inhibited. Physical and chemical analyses showed that beans fermented without yeasts had increased shell content, lower production of ethanol, higher alcohols and esters throughout fermentation and lesser presence of pyrazines in the roasted product. Quality tests revealed that beans fermented without yeasts were purplish-violet in color and not fully brown, and chocolate prepared from these beans tasted more acid and lacked characteristic chocolate flavor. Beans fermented with yeast growth were fully brown in color and gave chocolate with typical characters which were clearly preferred by sensory panels. Our findings demonstrate that yeast growth and activity were essential for cocoa bean fermentation and the development of chocolate characteristics.

  19. African fermented foods and probiotics.

    PubMed

    Franz, Charles M A P; Huch, Melanie; Mathara, Julius Maina; Abriouel, Hikmate; Benomar, Nabil; Reid, Gregor; Galvez, Antonio; Holzapfel, Wilhelm H

    2014-11-03

    Africa has an age old history of production of traditional fermented foods and is perhaps the continent with the richest variety of lactic acid fermented foods. These foods have a large impact on the nutrition, health and socio-economy of the people of the continent, often plagued by war, drought, famine and disease. Sub-Saharan Africa is the world's region with the highest percentage of chronically malnourished people and high child mortality. Further developing of traditional fermented foods with added probiotic health features would be an important contribution towards reaching the UN Millennium Development Goals of eradication of poverty and hunger, reduction in child mortality rates and improvement of maternal health. Specific probiotic strains with documented health benefits are sparsely available in Africa and not affordable to the majority of the population. Furthermore, they are not used in food fermentations. If such probiotic products could be developed especially for household food preparation, such as cereal or milk foods, it could make a profound impact on the health and well-being of adults and children. Suitable strains need to be chosen and efforts are needed to produce strains to make products which will be available for clinical studies. This can gauge the impact of probiotics on consumers' nutrition and health, and increase the number of people who can benefit.

  20. Anaerobic fermentation of beef cattle manure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, A. G.; Chen, Y. R.; Varel, V. H.

    1981-01-01

    The conversion of livestock manure and crop residues into methane and a high protein feed ingredient by thermophilic anaerobic fermentation is summarized. The major biological and operational factors involved in methanogenesis are discussed, and a kinetic model that describes the fermentation process is presented. Substrate biodegradability, fermentation temperature, and influent substrate concentration to have significant effects on CH4 production rate. Assessment of the energy requirements for anaerobic fermentation systems showed that the major energy requirement for a thermophilic system was for maintaining the fermenter temperature. The next major energy consumption was due to the mixing of the influent slurry and fermenter liquor. An approach to optimizing anaerobic fermenter s by selecting design criteria that maximize the net energy production per unit cost is presented.

  1. [Chemistry of life: ferments and fermentation in 17th-century iatrochemistry].

    PubMed

    Clericuzio, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    The concepts of ferment and fermentation played an important, though heretofore neglected, role in 17th-century physiology. Though these notions can be found in ancient philosophy and medicine, as well as in medieval medicine, they became integral part of the chemical medicine that was advocated by Paracelsus and his school. Paracelsians made fermentation a central concept in their successful effort to give chemical foundation to medicine. Jean Baptiste van Helmont and Sylvius used the concepts of ferment and fermentation to explain a variety of physiological processes in human body. Corpuscular philosophers like Robert Boyle and Thomas Willis reinterpreted these notions in corpuscular terms and separated the concept of ferment from that of fermentation. In the second half of the seventeenth century, physiologist tried to explain fermentation by means of chemical reactions, as for instance acid -alkali, and ruled out the notion of ferment as superfluous to their investigations. At the end of hte seventeenth century fermentation attracted the interest of physicists like Johannes Bernoulli and Isaac Newton, who tried to explain fermentative processes in terms of matter and motion (Bernoulli) and short-range forces (Newton). George Ernst Stahl devoted a work to fermentation: the Zymotechnia. He explained fermentation as the outcome of the reactions of molecules formed of saline, oily and earthy corpuscles with particles of water. He saw fermentation as a mechanical process, i.e. as collision of different kinds of corpuscles.

  2. Health Benefits of Fiber Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Wendy J; Agro, Nicole C; Eliasson, Åsa M; Mialki, Kaley L; Olivera, Joseph D; Rusch, Carley T; Young, Carly N

    2017-02-01

    Although fiber is well recognized for its effect on laxation, increasing evidence supports the role of fiber in the prevention and treatment of chronic disease. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the health benefits of fiber and its fermentation, and describe how the products of fermentation may influence disease risk and treatment. Higher fiber intakes are associated with decreased risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and some forms of cancer. Fiber may also have a role in lowering blood pressure and in preventing obesity by limiting weight gain. Fiber is effective in managing blood glucose in type 2 diabetes, useful for weight loss, and may provide therapeutic adjunctive roles in kidney and liver disease. In addition, higher fiber diets are not contraindicated in inflammatory bowel disease or irritable bowel syndrome and may provide some benefit. Common to the associations with disease reduction is fermentation of fiber and its potential to modulate microbiota and its activities and inflammation, specifically the production of anti-inflammatory short chain fatty acids, primarily from saccharolytic fermentation, versus the deleterious products of proteolytic activity. Because fiber intake is inversely associated with all-cause mortality, mechanisms by which fiber may reduce chronic disease risk and provide therapeutic benefit to those with chronic disease need further elucidation and large, randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm causality.Teaching Points• Strong evidence supports the association between higher fiber diets and reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and some forms of cancer.• Higher fiber intakes are associated with lower body weight and body mass index, and some types of fiber may facilitate weight loss.• Fiber is recommended as an adjunctive medical nutritional therapy for type 2 diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and certain liver diseases.• Fermentation and the resulting shifts in

  3. Microbiological and fermentation characteristics of togwa, a Tanzanian fermented food.

    PubMed

    Mugula, J K; Nnko, S A M; Narvhus, J A; Sørhaug, T

    2003-02-15

    Selected microbiological and metabolic characteristics of sorghum, maize, millet and maize-sorghum togwa were investigated during natural fermentation for 24 h. The process was predominated by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and yeasts. The mesophiles, lactic acid bacteria, and yeasts increased and the Enterobacteriaceae decreased to undetectable levels within 24 h. The isolated microorganisms were tentatively identified as Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus cellobiosus, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Weissella confusa, Issatchenkia orientalis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida pelliculosa and Candida tropicalis. The pH decreased from 5.24-5.52 to 3.10-3.34. Maltose increased initially and then decreased, fructose decreased and glucose levels increased during the first 12 h of fermentation. The organic acids detected during fermentation included DL-lactic, succinic, formic, pyruvic, citric, pyroglutamic and uric acid. Lactate was the predominant acid and increased significantly with time. The volatile organic compounds (VOC) detected included acetaldehyde, 2-methyl-propanal, 2-methyl-butanal, 3-methyl-butanal, ethanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, diacetyl and acetoin. Ethanol was the predominant VOC and it increased significantly with time.

  4. High pressure synthesis gas fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this research project is to build and test a pressure fermentation system for the production of ethanol from synthesis gas. The fermenters, pumps, controls, and analytical system will be procured or fabricated and assembled in our laboratory. This system will then be used to determine the effects of high pressure on growth and ethanol production by clostridium ljungdahlii. The limits of cell concentration and mass transport relationships will be found in continuous stirred tank reactor and immobilized cell reactors. The minimum retention times and reactor volumes will be found for ethanol production in these reactors. Retention times of a few seconds are expected to result from these experiments. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Ultrafiltration of hemicellulose hydrolysate fermentation broth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kresnowati, M. T. A. P.; Desiriani, Ria; Wenten, I. G.

    2017-03-01

    Hemicelulosic material is often used as the main substrate to obtain high-value products such as xylose. The five carbon sugar, xylose, could be further processed by fermentation to produce xylitol. However, not only the hemicellulose hydrolysate fermentation broth contains xylitol, but also metabolite products, residual substances, biomass and mineral salts. Therefore, in order to obtain the end products, various separation processes are required to separate and purify the desired product from the fermentation broth. One of the most promising downstream processing methods of fermentation broth clarification is ultrafiltration due to its potential for energy saving and higher purity. In addition, ultrafiltration membrane has a high performance in separating inhibitory components in the fermentation broth. This paper assesses the influence of operating conditions; including trans-membrane pressure, velocity, pH of the fermentation broth solutions, and also to the xylitol concentration in the product. The challenges of the ultrafiltration process will be pointed out.

  6. Pilot-scale semisolid fermentation of straw.

    PubMed

    Grant, G A; Han, Y W; Anderson, A W

    1978-03-01

    Semisolid fermentation of ryegrass straw to increase its animal feed value was successfully performed on a pilot scale. The pilot plant, which could handle 100 kg of straw per batch, was designed so that all major operations could take place in one vessel. The straw was hydrolyzed at 121 degrees C for 30 min with 0.5 N H2SO4 (7:3 liquid:solid), treated with ammonia to raise the pH to 5.0, inoculated with Candida utilis, and fermented in a semisolid state (70% moisture). During fermentation the straw was held stationary with air blown up through it. Batch fermentation times were 12 to 29 h. Semisolid fermentation did not require agitation and supported abundant growth at 20 to 40 degrees C even at near zero oxygen tensions. Fermentation increased the protein content, crude fat content, and in vitro rumen digestibility of the straw.

  7. Pesticides' influence on wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Caboni, Pierluigi; Cabras, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Wine quality strongly depends on the grape quality. To obtain high-quality wines, it is necessary to process healthy grapes at the correct ripeness stage and for this reason the farmer has to be especially careful in the prevention of parasite attacks on the grapevine. The most common fungal diseases affecting grape quality are downy and powdery mildew (Plasmopara viticola and Uncinula necator), and gray mold (Botrytis cinerea). On the other hand, the most dangerous insects are the grape moth (Lobesia botrana), vine mealybug (Planococcus ficus), and the citrus mealybug (Planococcus citri). Farmers fight grape diseases and insects applying pesticides that can be found at harvest time on grapes. The persistence of pesticides depends on the chemical characteristic of the active ingredients as well as on photodegradation, thermodegradation, codistillation, and enzymatic degradation. The pesticide residues on grapes can be transferred to the must and this can influence the selection and development of yeast strains. Moreover, yeasts can also influence the levels of the pesticides in the wine by reducing or adsorbing them on lees. During the fermentative process, yeasts can cause the disappearance of pesticide residues by degradation or absorption at the end of the fermentation when yeasts are deposited as lees. In this chapter, we reviewed the effect of commonly used herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides on yeasts. We also studied the effect of alcoholic and malolactic fermentation on pesticide residues.

  8. Functional Properties of Microorganisms in Fermented Foods.

    PubMed

    Tamang, Jyoti P; Shin, Dong-Hwa; Jung, Su-Jin; Chae, Soo-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Fermented foods have unique functional properties imparting some health benefits to consumers due to presence of functional microorganisms, which possess probiotics properties, antimicrobial, antioxidant, peptide production, etc. Health benefits of some global fermented foods are synthesis of nutrients, prevention of cardiovascular disease, prevention of cancer, gastrointestinal disorders, allergic reactions, diabetes, among others. The present paper is aimed to review the information on some functional properties of the microorganisms associated with fermented foods and beverages, and their health-promoting benefits to consumers.

  9. Process for the fermentative production of acetone, butanol and ethanol

    DOEpatents

    Glassner, David A.; Jain, Mahendra K.; Datta, Rathin

    1991-01-01

    A process including multistage continuous fermentation followed by batch fermentation with carefully chosen temperatures for each fermentation step, combined with an asporogenic strain of C. acetobutylicum and a high carbohydrate substrate concentration yields extraordinarily high butanol and total solvents concentrations.

  10. PERVAPORATION MEMBRANE SYSTEMS FOR VOLATILE FERMENTATION PRODUCT RECOVERY AND DEHYDRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The economics of fermentative production of fuels and commodity chemicals can be a strong function of the efficiency with which the fermentation products are removed from the biological media. Due to growth inhibition by some fermentation products, including ethanol, concentrati...

  11. Kinetics model development of cocoa bean fermentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kresnowati, M. T. A. P.; Gunawan, Agus Yodi; Muliyadini, Winny

    2015-12-01

    Although Indonesia is one of the biggest cocoa beans producers in the world, Indonesian cocoa beans are oftenly of low quality and thereby frequently priced low in the world market. In order to improve the quality, adequate post-harvest cocoa processing techniques are required. Fermentation is the vital stage in series of cocoa beans post harvest processing which could improve the quality of cocoa beans, in particular taste, aroma, and colours. During the fermentation process, combination of microbes grow producing metabolites that serve as the precursors for cocoa beans flavour. Microbial composition and thereby their activities will affect the fermentation performance and influence the properties of cocoa beans. The correlation could be reviewed using a kinetic model that includes unstructured microbial growth, substrate utilization and metabolic product formation. The developed kinetic model could be further used to design cocoa bean fermentation process to meet the expected quality. Further the development of kinetic model of cocoa bean fermentation also serve as a good case study of mixed culture solid state fermentation, that has rarely been studied. This paper presents the development of a kinetic model for solid-state cocoa beans fermentation using an empirical approach. Series of lab scale cocoa bean fermentations, either natural fermentations without starter addition or fermentations with mixed yeast and lactic acid bacteria starter addition, were used for model parameters estimation. The results showed that cocoa beans fermentation can be modelled mathematically and the best model included substrate utilization, microbial growth, metabolites production and its transport. Although the developed model still can not explain the dynamics in microbial population, this model can sufficiently explained the observed changes in sugar concentration as well as metabolic products in the cocoa bean pulp.

  12. Fermentation performance of lager yeast in high gravity beer fermentations with different sugar supplementations.

    PubMed

    Lei, Hongjie; Xu, Huaide; Feng, Li; Yu, Zhimin; Zhao, Haifeng; Zhao, Mouming

    2016-11-01

    The effects of glucose, sucrose and maltose supplementations on the fermentation performance and stress tolerance of lager yeast (Saccharomyces pastorianus) during high gravity (18°P) and very high gravity (24°P) fermentations were studied. Results showed that throughout 18°P wort fermentation, fermentation performance of lager yeast was significantly improved by glucose or sucrose supplementation, compared with maltose supplementation, especially for sucrose supplementation increasing wort fermentability and ethanol production by 6% and 8%, respectively. However, in the later stage of 24°P wort fermentation, fermentation performance of lager yeast was dramatically improved by maltose supplementation, which increased wort fermentability and ethanol production by 14% and 10%, respectively, compared with sucrose supplementation. Furthermore, higher HSP12 expression level and more intracellular trehalose accumulation in yeast cells were observed by maltose supplementation with increase of the wort gravity from 18°P to 24°P, indicating higher stress response of yeast cells. The excretion of Gly and Ala, and the absorption of Pro in the later stage of fermentation were promoted by maltose supplementation. In addition, with increase of the wort gravity from 18°P to 24°P, higher alcohols level was decreased with maltose supplementation, while esters formation was increased significantly with glucose supplementation. This study suggested that the choice of optimal fermentable sugars maintaining better fermentation performance of lager yeast should be based on not only strain specificity, but also wort gravity.

  13. Manufacturing Ethyl Acetate From Fermentation Ethanol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, Naresh K.; Ingham, John D.

    1991-01-01

    Conceptual process uses dilute product of fermentation instead of concentrated ethanol. Low-concentration ethanol, extracted by vacuum from fermentation tank, and acetic acid constitutes feedstock for catalytic reaction. Product of reaction goes through steps that increases ethyl acetate content to 93 percent by weight. To conserve energy, heat exchangers recycle waste heat to preheat process streams at various points.

  14. Fermentation: From Sensory Experience to Conceptual Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Eugene B.

    1977-01-01

    Presented is a laboratory exercise that utilizes the natural yeast carbonation method of making homemade root beer to study fermentation and the effect of variables upon the fermentation process. There are photographs, a sample data sheet, and procedural hints included. (Author/MA)

  15. Extractive fermentation of acetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Busche, R.M.

    1991-12-31

    In this technoeconomic evaluation of the manufacture of acetic acid by fermentation, the use of the bacterium: Acetobacter suboxydans from the old vinegar process was compared with expected performance of the newer Clostridium thermoaceticum bacterium. Both systems were projected to operate as immobilized cells in a continuous, fluidized bed bioreactor, using solvent extraction to recover the product. Acetobacter metabolizes ethanol aerobically to produce acid at 100 g/L in a low pH medium. This ensures that the product is in the form of a concentrated extractable free acid, rather than as an unextractable salt. Unfortunately, yields from glucose by way of the ethanol fermentation are poor, but near the biological limits of the organisms involved. Conversely, C. thermoaceticum is a thermophilic anaerobe that operates at high fermentation rates on glucose at neutral pH to produce acetate salts directly in substantially quantitative yields. However, it is severely inhibited by product, which restricts concentration to a dilute 20 g/L. An improved Acetobacter system operating with recycled cells at 50 g/L appears capable of producing acid at $0.38/lb, as compared with a $0.29/lb price for synthetic acid. However, this system has only a limited margin for process improvement. The present Clostridium system cannot compete, since the required selling price would be $0.42/lb. However, if the organism could be adapted to tolerate higher product concentrations at acid pH, selling price could be reduced to $0.22/lb, or about 80% of the price of synthetic acid.

  16. High pressure synthesis gas fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Construction of the high pressure gas phase fermentation system is nearing completion. All non-explosion proof components will be housed separately in a gas-monitored plexiglas cabinet. A gas-monitoring system has been designed to ensure the safety of the operations in case of small or large accidental gas releases. Preliminary experiments investigating the effects of high pressure on Clostridium 1jungdahlii have shown that growth and CO uptake are not negatively affected and CO uptake by an increased total pressure of 100 psig at a syngas partial pressure of 10 psig.

  17. Functional compounds in fermented buckwheat sprouts.

    PubMed

    Maejima, Yasunori; Nakatsugawa, Hiroki; Ichida, Daiki; Maejima, Mayumi; Aoyagi, Yasuo; Maoka, Takashi; Etoh, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    Fermented buckwheat sprouts (FBS) are used as multifunctional foods. Their production process includes fermentation with lactic acid bacteria. The major strains were found to include Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus pentosus, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, and Pediococcus pentosaceus in an investigation of the lactic acid bacteria. We searched for the functional components, and nicotianamine (NA) and 2″-hydroxynicotianamine (HNA) were identified as angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. NA and HNA increased during fermentation. Indole-3-ethanol was identified as an antioxidant (a SOD active substance), and may have been generated from tryptophan during fermentation because it was not contained in green buckwheat juice. A safety test demonstrated that FBS contained were safe functional food components, showing negative results in buckwheat allergy tests. Any buckwheat allergy substances might have been degraded during the fermentation process.

  18. Lactic acid fermentation of crude sorghum extract

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, W.A.; Lee, Y.Y.; Anthony, W.B.

    1980-04-01

    Crude extract from sweet sorghum supplemented with vetch juice was utilized as the carbohydrate source for fermentative production of lactic acid. Fermentation of media containing 7% (w/v) total sugar was completed in 60-80 hours by Lactobacillus plantarum, product yield averaging 85%. Maximum acid production rates were dependent on pH, initial substrate distribution, and concentration, the rates varying from 2 to 5 g/liter per hour. Under limited medium supplementation the lactic acid yield was lowered to 67%. The fermented ammoniated product contained over eight times as much equivalent crude protein (N x 6.25) as the original medium. Unstructured kinetic models were developed for cell growth, lactic acid formation, and substrate consumption in batch fermentation. With the provision of experimentally determined kinetic parameters, the proposed models accurately described the fermentation process. 15 references.

  19. Low investment approach to alcohol fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Bungay, H.R.

    1980-01-01

    The paper suggests attitudes for designing a low investment fuel alcohol plant instead of providing a specific blueprint, noting that the criteria for an agro-industrial complex can be applied rather than those of a modern chemical plant. In the case of fermenter design, for example, alternative approaches suggested are, the use of open-vat fermenters, tower fermentation maintaining high concentrations of organisms, combined fermentation and storage and use of 12 ft diameter plastic sewer pipe buried in the ground for an inexpensive and well-insulated fermenter. Instead of 3 or more distillation columns, the proposed plant would have only one, producing 85% alcohol, plus a tank or column for a drying agent to remove the remaining water. A direct fired still using biomass residues or coal could be designed to avoid the major expense of a large power plant to generate process steam.

  20. Ultrasound technology for food fermentation applications.

    PubMed

    Ojha, K Shikha; Mason, Timothy J; O'Donnell, Colm P; Kerry, Joseph P; Tiwari, Brijesh K

    2017-01-01

    Fermentation processes involve the participation of enzymes and organic catalysts, generated by range of microorganisms to produce chemical transformations. Ultrasound can be used in such processes to either monitor the progress of fermentation or to influence its progress. High frequency ultrasound (>2MHz) has been extensively reported as a tool for the measurement of the changes in chemical composition during fermentation providing real time information on reaction progress. Low frequency ultrasound (20-50kHz) can influence the course of fermentation by improving mass transfer and cell permeability leading to improved process efficiency and production rates. It can also be used to eliminate micro-organisms which might otherwise hinder the process. This review summarises key applications of high and low frequency ultrasound in food fermentation applications.

  1. Fermented liquid feed for pigs.

    PubMed

    Missotten, Joris A M; Michiels, Joris; Ovyn, Anneke; De Smet, Stefaan; Dierick, Noël A

    2010-12-01

    Since the announcement of the ban on the use of antibiotics as antimicrobial growth promoters in the feed of pigs in 2006 the investigation towards alternative feed additives has augmented considerably. Although fermented liquid feed is not an additive, but a feeding strategy, the experimental work examining its possible advantages also saw a rise. The use of fermented liquid feed (FLF) has two main advantages, namely that the simultaneous provision of feed and water may result in an alleviation of the transition from the sow milk to solid feed and may also reduce the time spent to find both sources of nutrients, and secondly, that offering FLF with a low pH may strengthen the potential of the stomach as a first line of defence against possible pathogenic infections. Because of these two advantages, FLF is often stated as an ideal feed for weaned piglets. The results obtained so far are rather variable, but in general they show a better body weight gain and worse feed/gain ratio for the piglets. However, for growing-finishing pigs on average a better feed/gain ratio is found compared to pigs fed dry feed. This better performance is mostly associated with less harmful microbiota and better gut morphology. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of FLF for pigs,dealing with the FLF itself as well as its effect on the gastrointestinal tract and animal performance.

  2. Recent advances to improve fermentative butanol production: genetic engineering and fermentation technology.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jin; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Wang, Qunhui; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Butanol has recently attracted attention as an alternative biofuel because of its various advantages over other biofuels. Many researchers have focused on butanol fermentation with renewable and sustainable resources, especially lignocellulosic materials, which has provided significant progress in butanol fermentation. However, there are still some drawbacks in butanol fermentation in terms of low butanol concentration and productivity, high cost of feedstock and product inhibition, which makes butanol fermentation less competitive than the production of other biofuels. These hurdles are being resolved in several ways. Genetic engineering is now available for improving butanol yield and butanol ratio through overexpression, knock out/down, and insertion of genes encoding key enzymes in the metabolic pathway of butanol fermentation. In addition, there are also many strategies to improve fermentation technology, such as multi-stage continuous fermentation, continuous fermentation integrated with immobilization and cell recycling, and the inclusion of additional organic acids or electron carriers to change metabolic flux. This review focuses on the most recent advances in butanol fermentation especially from the perspectives of genetic engineering and fermentation technology.

  3. 27 CFR 24.197 - Production by fermentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... fermentation. In producing special natural wine by fermentation, flavoring materials may be added before or during fermentation. Special natural wine produced by fermentation may be ameliorated in the same manner... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Production by...

  4. 27 CFR 24.197 - Production by fermentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... fermentation. In producing special natural wine by fermentation, flavoring materials may be added before or during fermentation. Special natural wine produced by fermentation may be ameliorated in the same manner... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Production by...

  5. 27 CFR 24.197 - Production by fermentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... fermentation. In producing special natural wine by fermentation, flavoring materials may be added before or during fermentation. Special natural wine produced by fermentation may be ameliorated in the same manner... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Production by...

  6. 27 CFR 24.197 - Production by fermentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... fermentation. In producing special natural wine by fermentation, flavoring materials may be added before or during fermentation. Special natural wine produced by fermentation may be ameliorated in the same manner... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Production by...

  7. 27 CFR 24.197 - Production by fermentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... fermentation. In producing special natural wine by fermentation, flavoring materials may be added before or during fermentation. Special natural wine produced by fermentation may be ameliorated in the same manner... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Production by...

  8. Characteristics of spoilage-associated secondary cucumber fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Secondary fermentations during the bulk storage of fermented cucumbers can result in spoilage that causes a total loss of the fermented product, at an estimated cost of $6,000 to $15,000 per affected tank. Previous research has suggested that such fermentations are the result of microbiological util...

  9. Transcription profiling of sparkling wine second fermentation.

    PubMed

    Penacho, Vanessa; Valero, Eva; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2012-02-01

    There is a specific set of stress factors that yeast cells must overcome under second fermentation conditions, during the production of sparkling wines by the traditional (Champenoise) method. Some of them are the same as those of the primary fermentation of still wines, although perhaps with a different intensity (high ethanol concentration, low pH, nitrogen starvation) while others are more specific to second fermentation (low temperature, CO(2) overpressure). The transcription profile of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during primary wine fermentation has been studied by several research groups, but this is the first report on yeast transcriptome under second fermentation conditions. Our results indicate that the main pathways affected by these particular conditions are related to aerobic respiration, but genes related to vacuolar and peroxisomal functions were also highlighted in this study. A parallelism between the transcription profile of wine yeast during primary and second fermentation is appreciated, with ethanol appearing as the main factor driving gene transcription during second fermentation. Low temperature seems to also influence yeast transcription profile under these particular winemaking conditions.

  10. Biomass fermentation to augment biological phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Q; Oleszkiewicz, J A

    2010-01-01

    A combination of a lab scale biological phosphorus removal sequencing batch reactor (called mother reactor) and a side-stream biomass fermenter was setup. It was found that when fermented biomass was recirculated back into the mother reactor as volatile fatty acid (VFA) supplement, the phosphate concentration in the effluent decreased from 6 in the control reactor to 4.5 mgL(-1) in the effluent from mother reactor. The addition of the fermentation effluent into the mother reactor increased the phosphate and ammonium loads and resulted in deterioration of nitrification. Phosphorus removal and nitrification improved when the fermented biomass was separated from the liquid phase using an up-flow system, followed by the addition of MgO to the supernatant to precipitate phosphate and ammonium. Phosphorus removal was further improved by delaying the time of VFA addition into mother reactor during the anaerobic period as soon as denitrification ceased. Biomass fermentation was found to generate 157 mg VFA-COD by fermenting 1g of biomass at a solids retention time of 5d. Acetate (78% of generated COD) and propionic acid (10%) were the major components of the produced VFA. It was concluded that biomass fermentation to augment a biological nutrient removal process can be effective if generated phosphate and ammonia are removed, e.g. through struvite precipitation.

  11. Discovery and History of Amino Acid Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Shin-Ichi

    2016-12-02

    There has been a strong demand in Japan and East Asia for L-glutamic acid as a seasoning since monosodium glutamate was found to present umami taste in 1907. The discovery of glutamate fermentation by Corynebacterium glutamicum in 1956 enabled abundant and low-cost production of the amino acid, creating a large market. The discovery also prompted researchers to develop fermentative production processes for other L-amino acids, such as lysine. Currently, the amino acid fermentation industry is so huge that more than 5 million metric tons of amino acids are manufactured annually all over the world, and this number continues to grow. Research on amino acid fermentation fostered the notion and skills of metabolic engineering which has been applied for the production of other compounds from renewable resources. The discovery of glutamate fermentation has had revolutionary impacts on both the industry and science. In this chapter, the history and development of glutamate fermentation, including the very early stage of fermentation of other amino acids, are reviewed.

  12. Relevance of protein fermentation to gut health.

    PubMed

    Windey, Karen; De Preter, Vicky; Verbeke, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    It is generally accepted that carbohydrate fermentation results in beneficial effects for the host because of the generation of short chain fatty acids, whereas protein fermentation is considered detrimental for the host's health. Protein fermentation mainly occurs in the distal colon, when carbohydrates get depleted and results in the production of potentially toxic metabolites such as ammonia, amines, phenols and sulfides. However, the effectivity of these metabolites has been established mainly in in vitro studies. In addition, some important bowel diseases such as colorectal cancer (CRC) and ulcerative colitis appear most often in the distal colon, which is the primary site of protein fermentation. Finally, epidemiological studies revealed that diets rich in meat are associated with the prevalence of CRC, as is the case in Western society. Importantly, meat intake not only increases fermentation of proteins but also induces increased intake of fat, heme and heterocyclic amines, which may also play a role in the development of CRC. Despite these indications, the relationship between gut health and protein fermentation has not been thoroughly investigated. In this review, the existing evidence about the potential toxicity of protein fermentation from in vitro animal and human studies will be summarized.

  13. Hydrothermal Exploration of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 5-10°S, using the AUV ABE and the ROV Quest a brief overview of RV Meteor Cruise M68/1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koschinsky, A.; Devey, C.; Garbe-Schönberg, D.; German, C.; Yoerger, D.; Shank, T.

    2006-12-01

    We report a brief overview of results from a recent expedition to the first vent sites ever located on the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. These results are part of an on-going study by the German Ridge program, in collaboration with NOAA-OE in the USA and with NERC in the UK. During the M68/1 Cruise (April 27-June 2, 2006), we targeted three specific areas:- the 5°S area where hydrothermal fields had previously been located (German et al., EOS, 2005; Haase et al., EOS, 2005); the Nibelungen area near 8°S where strong hydrothermal plume signals had been determined (Devey et al., EOS, 2005) and the 9°S area where the shallow ridge-crest hosts diffuse hydrothermal venting (Devey et al., EOS, 2005). At 5°S, we confirmed the temperature of the hottest known hydrothermal vents issuing fluids at 407°C at 3000m water depth, corresponding directly to the critical point for seawater at these depths. In addition to revisiting the "Turtle Pits" vents and the previously discovered "Red Lion" sites we also located new high-temperature and low-temperature vents with ABE which we were able to return to and sample with Quest during a single dive day. At 8°S, we used the ABE AUV to pinpoint and photograph a new tectonically-hosted vent site situated within a non-transform discontinuity between two adjacent ridge segments similar to, for example, the Rainbow hydrothermal field on the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. This vent, when revisited by Quest was too vigorous to allow end-member fluid-sampling: it was extremely vigorous and situated in a crater most closely resembling those observed at the Logatchev vent-field (MAR 15°N). The atypical absence of vent-fauna at this "Drachenschlund" (Dragon's throat) vent site is currently under investigation. Finally, at 9°S we detected evidence for numerous additional low-temperature sites similar to the already known Lilliput site and all intimately associated with collapse pits in extensive lava-flows.

  14. Influence of nitrogen sources on ethanol fermentation in an integrated ethanol-methane fermentation system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Mao, Zhonggui; Zhang, Chengming; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhang, Hongjian; Tang, Lei

    2012-09-01

    An integrated ethanol-methane fermentation system was proposed to resolve wastewater pollution in cassava ethanol production. In the integrated system, wastewater originating from ethanol distillation was treated by two-stage anaerobic digestion and then used in medium for the next batch of ethanol fermentation. Ammonium and other components in the effluent promoted yeast growth and fermentation rate but did not increase the yield of ethanol. Fermentations with the effluent as the nitrogen source showed higher growth and ethanol production rates (0.215 h(-1) and 1.276 g/L/h, respectively) than urea that resulted in corresponding rates of 0.176 h(-1) and 0.985 g/L/h, respectively. Results indicated that anaerobic digestion effluent can be used as nitrogen source for the ethanol fermentation instead of urea in the ethanol-methane fermentation system.

  15. [The research progress of succinic acid fermentation strains].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Zhao; Zhao, Xue-Ming

    2007-07-01

    The potential of succinic acid as an important chemical intermediates had been realized and fermentation is one of the best ways to make it possible in economical aspect. Fermentation organism is the key part of the fermentation method. The updated research developments of fermentation organisms and the fermentation characteristics and problems of them were reviewed and analyzed in this paper. Finally,the development future of fermenation organism was forecasted.

  16. Alcoholic fermentation of sorghum without cooking

    SciTech Connect

    Thammarutwasik, P.; Koba, Y.; Ueda, S.

    1986-07-01

    Sorgum was used as raw material for alcoholic fermentation without cooking. Two varieties of sorghum grown in Thailand, KU 439 and KU 257, contained 80.0 and 75.8% of total sugar. Optimum amount of sorghum for alcoholic fermentation should be between 30 and 35% (w/v) in the fermentation broth. In these conditions 13.0 and 12.6% (v/v) of alcohol could be obtained in 84 and 91.9% yield based on the theoretical value of the starch content from KU 439 and KU 257, respectively.

  17. Improved fermentative alcohol production. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Wilke, C.R.; Maiorella, B.L.; Blanch, H.W.; Cysewski, G.R.

    1980-11-26

    An improved fermentation process is described for producing alcohol which includes the combination of vacuum fermentation and vacuum distillation. Preferably, the vacuum distillation is carried out in two phases, one a fermentor proper operated at atmospheric pressure and a flash phase operated at reduced pressure with recycle of fermentation brew having a reduced alcohol content to the fermentor, using vapor recompression heating of the flash-pot recycle stream to heat the flash-pot or the distillation step, and using water load balancing (i.e., the molar ratio of water in the fermentor feed is the same as the molar ratio of water in the distillation overhead).

  18. Optimization of fermentation conditions for alcohol production

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, L.; Geiger, E.

    1984-12-01

    The quantitative effects of carbohydrate levels, degree of initial saccharification, glucoamylase dosage, temperature, and fermentation time were investigated using a Box-Wilson central composite design protocol. With Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 4126, it was found that the use of a partially saccharified starch substrate markedly increased yields and attainable alcohol levels. Balancing the degree of initial saccharification with the level of glucoamylase used to complete hydrolysis was found necessary to obtain optimum yields. The temperature optimum was found to be 36 degrees C. The regression equations obtained were used to model the fermentation in order to determine optimum fermentation conditions. 11 references.

  19. Functional Properties of Microorganisms in Fermented Foods

    PubMed Central

    Tamang, Jyoti P.; Shin, Dong-Hwa; Jung, Su-Jin; Chae, Soo-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Fermented foods have unique functional properties imparting some health benefits to consumers due to presence of functional microorganisms, which possess probiotics properties, antimicrobial, antioxidant, peptide production, etc. Health benefits of some global fermented foods are synthesis of nutrients, prevention of cardiovascular disease, prevention of cancer, gastrointestinal disorders, allergic reactions, diabetes, among others. The present paper is aimed to review the information on some functional properties of the microorganisms associated with fermented foods and beverages, and their health-promoting benefits to consumers. PMID:27199913

  20. Biotechnology of Flavor Generation in Fermented Meats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toldrá, Fidel

    Traditionally, meat fermentation was based on the use of natural flora, including the “back-slopping”, or addition of a previous successful fermented sausage. However, these practices gave a great variability in the developed flora and affected the safety and quality of the sausages (Toldrá, 2002; Toldrá & Flores, 2007). The natural flora of fermented meat has been studied for many years (Leistner, 1992; Toldrá, 2006a), and more recently, these micro-organisms have been isolated and biochemically identified through molecular methods applied to extracted DNA and RNA (Cocolin, Manzano, Aggio, Cantoni, & Comi, 2001; Cocolin, Manzano, Cantoni, & Comi, 2001; Comi, Urso, Lacumin, Rantsiou, Cattaneo & Cantoni, 2005).

  1. GLYOXYLATE FERMENTATION BY STREPTOCOCCUS ALLANTOICUS

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, R. C.; Drucker, H.; Wolfe, R. S.

    1964-01-01

    Valentine, R. C. (University of Illinois, Urbana), H. Drucker, and R. S. Wolfe. Glyoxylate fermentation by Streptococcus allantoicus. J. Bacteriol. 87:241–246. 1964.—Extracts of Streptococcus allantoicus were found to degrade glyoxylate, yielding tartronic semialdehyde and CO2. Tartronic semialdehyde was prepared chemically, and its properties were compared with the enzymatic product: reduction by sodium borohydride yielded glycerate; heating at 100 C yielded glycolaldehyde and CO2; autoxidation yielded mesoxalic semialdehyde; periodate oxidation yielded glyoxylate and a compound presumed to be formate. Tartronic semialdehyde reductase was present in extracts of S. allantoicus and in a species of Pseudomonas grown on allantoin. A scheme for the synthesis of acetate from glyoxylate by S. allantoicus is discussed. PMID:14151040

  2. Dry fermentation of agricultural residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, W. J.; Chandler, J. A.; Dellorto, S.; Fanfoni, K. J.; Fast, S.; Jackson, D.; Kabrick, R. M.

    1981-09-01

    A dry fermentation process is discussed which converts agricultural residues to methane, using the residues in their as produced state. The process appears to simplify and enhance the possibilities for using crop residues as an energy source. The major process variables investigated include temperature, the amount and type of inoculum, buffer requirements, compaction, and pretreatment to control the initial available organic components that create pH problems. A pilot-scale reactor operation on corn stover at a temperature of 550 C, with 25 percent initial total solids, a seed-to-feed ratio of 2.5 percent, and a buffer-to-feed ratio of 8 percent achieved 33 percent total volatile solids destruction in 60 days. Volumetric biogas yields from this unit were greater than 1 vol/vol day for 12 days, and greater than 0.5 vol/vol day for 32 days, at a substrate density of 169 kg/m (3).

  3. Pervaporation of ethanol from lignocellulosic fermentation broth.

    PubMed

    Gaykawad, Sushil S; Zha, Ying; Punt, Peter J; van Groenestijn, Johan W; van der Wielen, Luuk A M; Straathof, Adrie J J

    2013-02-01

    Pervaporation can be applied in ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. Hydrophobic pervaporation, using a commercial PDMS membrane, was employed to concentrate the ethanol produced by fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysate. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing this. Pervaporation carried out with three different lignocellulosic fermentation broths reduced the membrane performance by 17-20% as compared to a base case containing only 3 wt.% ethanol in water. The membrane fouling caused by these fermentation broths was irreversible. Solutions containing model lignocellulosic components were tested during pervaporation at the same conditions. A total flux decrease of 12-15%, as compared to the base case, was observed for each component except for furfural. Catechol was found to be most fouling component whereas furfural permeated through the membrane and increased the total flux. The membrane selectivity increased in the presence of fermentation broth but remained unchanged for all selected components.

  4. The microflora of fermented nixtamalized corn.

    PubMed

    Sefa-Dedeh, Samuel; Cornelius, Beatrice; Amoa-Awua, Wisdom; Sakyi-Dawson, Esther; Afoakwa, Emmanuel Ohene

    2004-10-01

    Nixtamalization is a traditional process that improves the nutritional quality of corn. To provide a means of utilizing the nutritional benefits of nixtamalized corn and improve product acceptability, lactic acid fermentation was applied. The objective of the study was to study the microbial profile and establish the important lactobacilli of fermenting nixtamalized corn dough. Two batches of cleaned whole corn were subjected to the process of nixtamalization, using two concentrations of lime (0.5 or 1.0%), milled, made into a dough (50% moisture) and fermented spontaneously for 72 h. A control sample was prepared without alkaline treatment. pH and titratable acidity of the dough were measured. Aerobic mesophiles, lactic acid bacteria, yeasts and molds were enumerated on Plate Count Agar (PCA), deMan, Rogossa and Sharpe (MRS) Agar and Malt Extract Agar (MEA), respectively. The identity of lactobacilli present was established at the species level using API 50 CHL. The pH of all the fermenting systems decreased with fermentation time with concomitant increase in titratable acidity. Lactic acid bacteria in numbers of 1.6 x 10(9), 2.3 x 10(9) and 1.8 x 10(9) cfu/g, respectively yeasts and molds, and numbers of 8.0 x 10(7), 5.0 x 10(5) and 1.7 x 10(5) cfu/g, respectively were observed in the control and the two nixtamalized (0.5% and 1.0% lime) samples after 48 h of fermentation. Lactobacilli identified in the fermenting nixtamalized corn dough were Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus cellobiosus as well as Pediococcus spp. The study demonstrates that nixtamalized corn though alkaline in nature can be subjected to spontaneous fermentation to produce a sour product.

  5. Microbial contamination of fuel ethanol fermentations.

    PubMed

    Beckner, M; Ivey, M L; Phister, T G

    2011-10-01

    Microbial contamination is a pervasive problem in any ethanol fermentation system. These infections can at minimum affect the efficiency of the fermentation and at their worse lead to stuck fermentations causing plants to shut down for cleaning before beginning anew. These delays can result in costly loss of time as well as lead to an increased cost of the final product. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are the most common bacterial contaminants found in ethanol production facilities and have been linked to decreased ethanol production during fermentation. Lactobacillus sp. generally predominant as these bacteria are well adapted for survival under high ethanol, low pH and low oxygen conditions found during fermentation. It has been generally accepted that lactobacilli cause inhibition of Saccharomyces sp. and limit ethanol production through two basic methods; either production of lactic and acetic acids or through competition for nutrients. However, a number of researchers have demonstrated that these mechanisms may not completely account for the amount of loss observed and have suggested other means by which bacteria can inhibit yeast growth and ethanol production. While LAB are the primary contaminates of concern in industrial ethanol fermentations, wild yeast may also affect the productivity of these fermentations. Though many yeast species have the ability to thrive in a fermentation environment, Dekkera bruxellensis has been repeatedly targeted and cited as one of the main contaminant yeasts in ethanol production. Though widely studied for its detrimental effects on wine, the specific species-species interactions between D. bruxellensis and S. cerevisiae are still poorly understood.

  6. Maloalcoholic fermentation by immobilized Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Guo, L Y; Tsay, S S

    1989-11-01

    Cells of Schizosaccharomyces pombe TMB 1138, which are capable of metabolizing-malate, was immobilized in calcium alginate gel to carry out maloalcoholic fermentation. Four milliliters of cell suspension containing about 2.0 X 10(7) cells were entrapped in 16 ml of sodium alginate solution in order to prepare 2% Na-alginate (w/v) gel bead. After activation by incubating at 28 degrees C for 24 h in grape juice, 300 beads of immobilized cells were inoculated into the fermentation medium. After fermentation was proceeded at 25 or 28 degrees C for 24 h by shaking, it could metabolize L-malate completely and the total acidity was also reduced. Under the same condition for batch fermentation, it was found that the utilization of L-malic acid was over 97% for the first 7 days in fermentation medium, 85% for the first 4 days in grape juice and 87% for the first 4 days in wine. Furthermore, for the continuous fermentation in wine, the conversion of L-malic acid reached 92% in 24 h and could be maintained at 75% in the following 9 days.

  7. Acetone-butanol Fermentation of Marine Macroalgae

    SciTech Connect

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Urquhart, Lindsay A.; Gill, Gary A.; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2012-03-01

    Mannitol and laminarin, which are present at high concentrations in the brown macroalga Saccharina spp., a type of kelp, are potential biochemical feedstocks for butanol production. To test their bioconversion potential, aqueous extracts of the kelp Saccharina spp., mannitol, and glucose (a product of laminarin hydrolysis) were subjected to acetone-butanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum (ATCC 824). Both mannitol and glucose were readily fermented. Mixed substrate fermentations with glucose and mannitol resulted in diauxic growth of C. acetobutylicum with glucose depletion preceding mannitol utilization. Fermentation of kelp extract exhibited triauxic growth, with an order of utilization of free glucose, mannitol, and bound glucose, presumably laminarin. The lag in laminarin utilization reflected the need for enzymatic hydrolysis of this polysaccharide into fermentable sugars. The butanol and total solvent yields were 0.12 g/g and 0.16 g/g, respectively, indicating that significant improvements are still needed to make industrial-scale acetone-butanol fermentations of seaweed economically feasible.

  8. Coffee fermentation and flavor--An intricate and delicate relationship.

    PubMed

    Lee, Liang Wei; Cheong, Mun Wai; Curran, Philip; Yu, Bin; Liu, Shao Quan

    2015-10-15

    The relationship between coffee fermentation and coffee aroma is intricate and delicate at which the coffee aroma profile is easily impacted by the fermentation process during coffee processing. However, as the fermentation process in coffee processing is conducted mainly for mucilage removal, its impacts on coffee aroma profile are usually neglected. Therefore, this review serves to summarize the available literature on the impacts of fermentation in coffee processing on coffee aroma as well as other unconventional avenues where fermentation is employed for coffee aroma modulation. Studies have noted that proper control over the fermentation process imparts desirable attributes and prevents undesirable fermentation which generates off-flavors. Other unconventional avenues in which fermentation is employed for aroma modulation include digestive bioprocessing and the fermentation of coffee extracts and green coffee beans. The latter is an area that should be explored further with appropriate microorganisms given its potential for coffee aroma modulation.

  9. Microbial diversity and their roles in the vinegar fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Li, Sha; Li, Pan; Feng, Feng; Luo, Li-Xin

    2015-06-01

    Vinegar is one of the oldest acetic acid-diluted solution products in the world. It is produced from any fermentable sugary substrate by various fermentation methods. The final vinegar products possess unique functions, which are endowed with many kinds of compounds formed in the fermentation process. The quality of vinegar is determined by many factors, especially by the raw materials and microbial diversity involved in vinegar fermentation. Given that metabolic products from the fermenting strains are directly related to the quality of the final products of vinegar, the microbial diversity and features of the dominant strains involved in different fermentation stages should be analyzed to improve the strains and stabilize fermentation. Moreover, although numerous microbiological studies have been conducted to examine the process of vinegar fermentation, knowledge about microbial diversity and their roles involved in fermentation is still fragmentary and not systematic enough. Therefore, in this review, the dominant microorganism species involved in the stages of alcoholic fermentation and acetic acid fermentation of dissimilar vinegars were summarized. We also summarized various physicochemical properties and crucial compounds in disparate types of vinegar. Furthermore, the merits and drawbacks of vital fermentation methods were generalized. Finally, we described in detail the relationships among microbial diversity, raw materials, fermentation methods, physicochemical properties, compounds, functionality, and final quality of vinegar. The integration of this information can provide us a detailed map about the microbial diversity and function involved in vinegar fermentation.

  10. Characteristics of some fermentative bacteria from a thermophilic methane-producing fermenter

    SciTech Connect

    Varel, V.H.

    1984-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria from a 55/sup 0/C methane-producing beef waste fermenter were enumerated, isolated, and characterized. Direct microscopic bacterial counts were 5.2-6.8 X 10/sup 10/ per g fermenter effluent. Using a nonselective roll-tube medium which contained 40% fermenter effluent, 8.5-14.1% of microscopic count was culturable. Deletion of fermenter effluent significantly reduced the viable count. Sixty-four randomly picked strains were characterized. All were pleomorphic, gram-negative, anaerobic rods, many of which were difficult to grow in liquid media. The strains were divided into 5 major groups based on glucose fermentation, hydrogen sulfide production, starch hydrolysis, fermentation products, and morphology. Glucose was fermented by 75% of the isolates, 76% utilized starch, 25% produced hydrogen sulfide, 76% produced hydrogen, 37% produced indole, 21% hydrolyzed gelatin, and 13% were sporeformers. Ethanol, lactate, formate, acetate, and hydrogen were common fermentation products. Twenty-four representative strains had 1-12 flagella. Growth was observed between 35 and 73/sup 0/C. These studies indicate that species diversity among the isolated organisms was low. 38 references, 3 tables.

  11. Batch and fed-batch fermentation of Bacillus thuringiensis using starch industry wastewater as fermentation substrate.

    PubMed

    Vu, Khanh Dang; Tyagi, Rajeshwar Dayal; Valéro, José R; Surampalli, Rao Y

    2010-08-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki biopesticide was produced in batch and fed-batch fermentation modes using starch industry wastewater as sole substrate. Fed-batch fermentation with two intermittent feeds (at 10 and 20 h) during the fermentation of 72 h gave the maximum delta-endotoxin concentration (1,672.6 mg/L) and entomotoxicity (Tx) (18.5 x 10(6) SBU/mL) in fermented broth which were significantly higher than maximum delta-endotoxin concentration (511.0 mg/L) and Tx (15.8 x 10(6) SBU/mL) obtained in batch process. However, fed-batch fermentation with three intermittent feeds (at 10, 20 and 34 h) of the fermentation resulted in the formation of asporogenous variant (Spo-) from 36 h to the end of fermentation (72 h) which resulted in a significant decrease in spore and delta-endotoxin concentration and finally the Tx value. Tx of suspended pellets (27.4 x 10(6) SBU/mL) obtained in fed-batch fermentation with two feeds was the highest value as compared to other cases.

  12. Enhanced Butanol Production Obtained by Reinforcing the Direct Butanol-Forming Route in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yu-Sin; Lee, Jin Young; Lee, Joungmin; Park, Jin Hwan; Im, Jung Ae; Eom, Moon-Ho; Lee, Julia; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Song, Hyohak; Cho, Jung-Hee; Seung, Do Young; Lee, Sang Yup

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Butanol is an important industrial solvent and advanced biofuel that can be produced by biphasic fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum. It has been known that acetate and butyrate first formed during the acidogenic phase are reassimilated to form acetone-butanol-ethanol (cold channel). Butanol can also be formed directly from acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) through butyryl-CoA (hot channel). However, little is known about the relative contributions of the two butanol-forming pathways. Here we report that the direct butanol-forming pathway is a better channel to optimize for butanol production through metabolic flux and mass balance analyses. Butanol production through the hot channel was maximized by simultaneous disruption of the pta and buk genes, encoding phosphotransacetylase and butyrate kinase, while the adhE1D485G gene, encoding a mutated aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase, was overexpressed. The ratio of butanol produced through the hot channel to that produced through the cold channel increased from 2.0 in the wild type to 18.8 in the engineered BEKW(pPthlAAD**) strain. By reinforcing the direct butanol-forming flux in C. acetobutylicum, 18.9 g/liter of butanol was produced, with a yield of 0.71 mol butanol/mol glucose by batch fermentation, levels which are 160% and 245% higher than those obtained with the wild type. By fed-batch culture of this engineered strain with in situ recovery, 585.3 g of butanol was produced from 1,861.9 g of glucose, with the yield of 0.76 mol butanol/mol glucose and productivity of 1.32 g/liter/h. Studies of two butanol-forming routes and their effects on butanol production in C. acetobutylicum described here will serve as a basis for further metabolic engineering of clostridia aimed toward developing a superior butanol producer. PMID:23093384

  13. Importance of lactic acid bacteria in Asian fermented foods

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria play important roles in various fermented foods in Asia. Besides being the main component in kimchi and other fermented foods, they are used to preserve edible food materials through fermentation of other raw-materials such as rice wine/beer, rice cakes, and fish by producing organic acids to control putrefactive microorganisms and pathogens. These bacteria also provide a selective environment favoring fermentative microorganisms and produce desirable flavors in various fermented foods. This paper discusses the role of lactic acid bacteria in various non-dairy fermented food products in Asia and their nutritional and physiological functions in the Asian diet. PMID:21995342

  14. Improved fermentation performance in an expanded ectopic fermentation system inoculated with thermophilic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui; Zhu, Changxiong; Geng, Bing; Liu, Xue; Ye, Jing; Tian, Yunlong; Peng, Xiawei

    2015-12-01

    Previous research showed that ectopic fermentation system (EFS) inoculated with thermophilic bacteria is an excellent alternative for cow wastewater treatment. In this study, the effects of thermophilic bacterial consortium on the efficiency and quality of the fermentation process in EFS were evaluated by measuring physicochemical and environmental factors and the changes in organic matter composition. In parallel, the microbial communities correlated with fermentation performance were identified. Inoculation of EFS with thermophilic bacterial consortium led to higher temperatures, increased wastewater requirements for continuous fermentation, and improved quality of the litters in terms of physicochemical factors, security test, functional group analysis, and bacterial community composition. The relationship between the transformation of organic component and the dominant bacteria species indicated that environmental factors contributed to strain growth, which subsequently promoted the fermentation process. The results highlight the great potential of EFS model for wide application in cow wastewater treatment and re-utilization as bio-fertilizer.

  15. Defective quiescence entry promotes the fermentation performance of bottom-fermenting brewer's yeast.

    PubMed

    Oomuro, Mayu; Kato, Taku; Zhou, Yan; Watanabe, Daisuke; Motoyama, Yasuo; Yamagishi, Hiromi; Akao, Takeshi; Aizawa, Masayuki

    2016-11-01

    One of the key processes in making beer is fermentation. In the fermentation process, brewer's yeast plays an essential role in both the production of ethanol and the flavor profile of beer. Therefore, the mechanism of ethanol fermentation by of brewer's yeast is attracting much attention. The high ethanol productivity of sake yeast has provided a good basis from which to investigate the factors that regulate the fermentation rates of brewer's yeast. Recent studies found that the elevated fermentation rate of sake Saccharomyces cerevisiae species is closely related to a defective transition from vegetative growth to the quiescent (G0) state. In the present study, to clarify the relationship between the fermentation rate of brewer's yeast and entry into G0, we constructed two types of mutant of the bottom-fermenting brewer's yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus Weihenstephan 34/70: a RIM15 gene disruptant that was defective in entry into G0; and a CLN3ΔPEST mutant, in which the G1 cyclin Cln3p accumulated at high levels. Both strains exhibited higher fermentation rates under high-maltose medium or high-gravity wort conditions (20° Plato) as compared with the wild-type strain. Furthermore, G1 arrest and/or G0 entry were defective in both the RIM15 disruptant and the CLN3ΔPEST mutant as compared with the wild-type strain. Taken together, these results indicate that regulation of the G0/G1 transition might govern the fermentation rate of bottom-fermenting brewer's yeast in high-gravity wort.

  16. Microbial community dynamics during fermentation of doenjang-meju, traditional Korean fermented soybean.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji Young; Lee, Se Hee; Jeon, Che Ok

    2014-08-18

    Bacterial and fungal community dynamics, along with viable plate counts and water content, were investigated in the exterior and interior regions of doenjang-meju, traditional Korean fermented soybean, during its fermentation process. Measurement of viable cells showed that the meju molding equipment might be an important source of bacterial cells (mostly Bacillus) during doenjang-meju fermentation, whereas fungi might be mostly derived from the fermentation environment including incubation shelves, air, and rice straws. Community analysis using rRNA-targeted pyrosequencing revealed that Bacillus among bacteria and Mucor among fungi were predominant in both the exterior and interior regions of doenjang-meju during the early fermentation period. Bacteria such as Ignatzschineria, Myroides, Enterococcus, Corynebacterium, and Clostridium and fungi such as Geotrichum, Scopulariopsis, Monascus, Fusarium, and eventually Aspergillus were mainly detected as the fermentation progressed. Bacillus, an aerobic bacterial group, was predominant in the exterior regions during the entire fermentation period, while anaerobic, facultative anaerobic, and microaerobic bacteria including Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Clostridium, Myroides, and Ignatzschineria were much more abundant in the interior regions. Principal component analysis (PCA) also indicated that the bacterial communities in the exterior and interior regions were clearly differentiated, suggesting that aeration might be an important factor in determining the bacterial communities during doenjang-meju fermentation. However, PCA showed that fungal communities were not separated in the exterior and interior regions and Pearson's correlation coefficients showed that the major fungal taxa had significantly positive (Mucor and Geotrichum) or negative (Aspergillus) correlations with the water content during doenjang-meju fermentation, indicating that water content might be a significant factor in determining the fungal

  17. Lysine Fermentation: History and Genome Breeding.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Masato

    2016-11-11

    Lysine fermentation by Corynebacterium glutamicum was developed in 1958 by Kyowa Hakko Kogyo Co. Ltd. (current Kyowa Hakko Bio Co. Ltd.) and is the second oldest amino acid fermentation process after glutamate fermentation. The fundamental mechanism of lysine production, discovered in the early stages of the process's history, gave birth to the concept known as "metabolic regulatory fermentation," which is now widely applied to metabolite production. After the development of rational metabolic engineering, research on lysine production first highlighted the need for engineering of the central metabolism from the viewpoints of precursor supply and NADPH regeneration. Furthermore, the existence of active export systems for amino acids was first demonstrated for lysine in C. glutamicum, and this discovery has resulted in the current recognition of such exporters as an important consideration in metabolite production. Lysine fermentation is also notable as the first process to which genomics was successfully applied to improve amino acid production. The first global "genome breeding" strategy was developed using a lysine producer as a model; this has since led to new lysine producers that are more efficient than classical industrial producers. These advances in strain development technology, combined with recent systems-level approaches, have almost achieved the optimization of entire cellular systems as cell factories for lysine production. In parallel, the continuous improvement of the process has resulted not only in fermentation processes with reduced load on downstream processing but also in commercialization of various product forms according to their intended uses. Nowadays lysine fermentation underpins a giant lysine demand of more than 2 million metric tons per year.

  18. Pure Culture Fermentation of Brined Cucumbers1

    PubMed Central

    Etchells, J. L.; Costilow, R. N.; Anderson, T. E.; Bell, T. A.

    1964-01-01

    The relative abilities of Pediococcus cerevisiae, Lactobacillus plantarum, L. brevis, and several other species of lactic acid bacteria to grow and produce acid in brined cucumbers were evaluated in pure culture fermentations. Such fermentations were made possibly by the use of two techniques, gamma radiation (0.83 to 1.00 Mrad) and hot-water blanching (66 to 80 C for 5 min), designed first to rid the cucumbers of naturally occurring, interfering, and competitive microbial groups prior to brining, followed by inoculation with the desired lactic acid bacteria. Of the nine species tested, strains of the three common to cucumber fermentations, P. cerevisiae, L. plantarum, and L. brevis, grew to the highest populations, and produced the highest levels of brine acidity and the lowest pH values in fermentations at 5.4 to 5.6% NaCl by weight; also, their sequence of active development in fermentations, with the use of a three-species mixture for inoculation, was in the species order just named. This sequence of occurrence was similar to that estimated by others for natural fermentations. The rates of growth and acid production in fermentations with a mixture of P. cerevisiae, L. plantarum, and L. brevis increased as the incubation temperature was increased from 21 to 27 to 32 C; however, the maximal populations and acidities attained were essentially the same for fermentations at each temperature. Further, these same three species were found to be the most salt tolerant of those tested; their upper limit for appreciable growth and measurable acid production was about 8% salt, whereas thermophilic species such as L. thermophilus, L. lactis, L. helveticus, L. fermenti, and L. delbrueckii exhibited a much lower salt tolerance, ranging from about 2.5 to 4.0%. However, certain strains of L. delbrueckii grew very rapidly in cucumbers brined at 2.5 to 3.0% salt, and produced sufficient acid in about 30 hr at 48 C to reduce the brine pH from above 7.0 to below 4.0. An inexpensive

  19. Yeast Biodiversity from DOQ Priorat Uninoculated Fermentations

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Beatriz; García-Fernández, David; González, Beatriz; Izidoro, Iara; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Beltran, Gemma; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Climate, soil, and grape varieties are the primary characteristics of terroir and lead to the definition of various appellations of origin. However, the microbiota associated with grapes are also affected by these conditions and can leave a footprint in a wine that will be part of the characteristics of terroir. Thus, a description of the yeast microbiota within a vineyard is of interest not only to provide a better understanding of the winemaking process, but also to understand the source of microorganisms that maintain a microbial footprint in wine from the examined vineyard. In this study, two typical grape varieties, Grenache and Carignan, have been sampled from four different vineyards in the DOQ Priorat winegrowing region. Afterward, eight spontaneous alcoholic fermentations containing only grapes from one sampling point and of one variety were conducted at laboratory scale. The fermentation kinetics and yeast population dynamics within each fermentation experiment were evaluated. Yeast identification was performed by RFLP-PCR of the 5.8S-ITS region and by sequencing D1/D2 of the 26S rRNA gene of the isolates. The fermentation kinetics did not indicate clear differences between the two varieties of grapes or among vineyards. Approximately 1,400 isolates were identified, exhibiting high species richness in some fermentations. Of all the isolates studied, approximately 60% belong to the genus Hanseniaspora, 16% to Saccharomyces, and 11% to Candida. Other minor genera, such as Hansenula, Issatchenkia, Kluyveromyces, Saccharomycodes, and Zygosaccharomyces, were also found. The distribution of the identified yeast throughout the fermentation process was studied, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was found to be present mainly at the end of the fermentation process, while Aureobasidium pullulans was isolated primarily during the first days of fermentation in three of the eight spontaneous fermentations. This work highlights the complexity and diversity of the vineyard

  20. Pure Culture Fermentation of Brined Cucumbers.

    PubMed

    Etchells, J L; Costilow, R N; Anderson, T E; Bell, T A

    1964-11-01

    The relative abilities of Pediococcus cerevisiae, Lactobacillus plantarum, L. brevis, and several other species of lactic acid bacteria to grow and produce acid in brined cucumbers were evaluated in pure culture fermentations. Such fermentations were made possibly by the use of two techniques, gamma radiation (0.83 to 1.00 Mrad) and hot-water blanching (66 to 80 C for 5 min), designed first to rid the cucumbers of naturally occurring, interfering, and competitive microbial groups prior to brining, followed by inoculation with the desired lactic acid bacteria. Of the nine species tested, strains of the three common to cucumber fermentations, P. cerevisiae, L. plantarum, and L. brevis, grew to the highest populations, and produced the highest levels of brine acidity and the lowest pH values in fermentations at 5.4 to 5.6% NaCl by weight; also, their sequence of active development in fermentations, with the use of a three-species mixture for inoculation, was in the species order just named. This sequence of occurrence was similar to that estimated by others for natural fermentations. The rates of growth and acid production in fermentations with a mixture of P. cerevisiae, L. plantarum, and L. brevis increased as the incubation temperature was increased from 21 to 27 to 32 C; however, the maximal populations and acidities attained were essentially the same for fermentations at each temperature. Further, these same three species were found to be the most salt tolerant of those tested; their upper limit for appreciable growth and measurable acid production was about 8% salt, whereas thermophilic species such as L. thermophilus, L. lactis, L. helveticus, L. fermenti, and L. delbrueckii exhibited a much lower salt tolerance, ranging from about 2.5 to 4.0%. However, certain strains of L. delbrueckii grew very rapidly in cucumbers brined at 2.5 to 3.0% salt, and produced sufficient acid in about 30 hr at 48 C to reduce the brine pH from above 7.0 to below 4.0. An inexpensive

  1. Fermentation of 6-Deoxyhexoses by Bacillus macerans†

    PubMed Central

    Weimer, Paul J.

    1984-01-01

    Under anaerobic conditions Bacillus macerans ATCC 7068 fermented 6-deoxyhexoses (l-rhamnose, l-fucose, and d-fucose) to a mixture of 1,2-propanediol (PD), acetone, H2, CO2, and ethanol. The final PD concentration was proportional to the amount of l-rhamnose fermented (∼0.9 mol of PD per mol of rhamnose). PD was not produced from hexoses (e.g., d-glucose or l-mannose), despite active fermentation of these substrates. Relative to the fermentation of d-glucose, the fermentation of l-rhamnose was accompanied by a twofold reduction in yield of H2, CO2, and cell mass. Exposure of cell extracts to l-rhamnose resulted in the transient appearance of an aldehyde intermediate. Cell extracts contained a pyridine nucleotide-linked lactaldehyde reductase activity which converted synthetic d- or l-lactaldehyde to PD. The data suggest an Embden-Meyerhof pathway for 6-deoxyhexose catabolism, with the formation of lactaldehyde by a conventional aldolase cleavage reaction and subsequent reduction to PD. PMID:16346466

  2. Xylose fermentation to ethanol. A review

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, J D

    1993-01-01

    The past several years have seen tremendous progress in the understanding of xylose metabolism and in the identification, characterization, and development of strains with improved xylose fermentation characteristics. A survey of the numerous microorganisms capable of directly fermenting xylose to ethanol indicates that wild-type yeast and recombinant bacteria offer the best overall performance in terms of high yield, final ethanol concentration, and volumetric productivity. The best performing bacteria, yeast, and fungi can achieve yields greater than 0.4 g/g and final ethanol concentrations approaching 5%. Productivities remain low for most yeast and particularly for fungi, but volumetric productivities exceeding 1.0 g/L-h have been reported for xylose-fermenting bacteria. In terms of wild-type microorganisms, strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis show the most promise in the short term for direct high-yield fermentation of xylose without byproduct formation. Of the recombinant xylose-fermenting microorganisms developed, recombinant E. coli ATTC 11303 (pLOI297) exhibits the most favorable performance characteristics reported to date.

  3. Continuous membrane fermentor separator for ethanol fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, C.

    1987-01-01

    The inhibiting effect of ethanol on yeast growth and ethanol production has been studied using the strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL-Y-2034 under anaerobic conditions. Batch and continuous fermentation data were fitted to a kinetic model. The integration of continuous fermentation and separation of ethanol in the same unit has been proposed. Pervaporation with ethanol selective silicone rubber hollow fiber membranes was considered for separation. A laboratory scale Continuous Membrane Fermentor Separator (CMFS) unit utilizing a shell and tube configuration was designed and fabricated. Two types of continuous fermentation experiments were carried out: fermentation with dead membranes as the reference and fermentation with live membranes through which ethanol was continuously removed by pervaporation from the fermentor. Performance of the CMFS results in higher yeast cell densities, reduction of ethanol inhibition, longer residence time of substrate, more glucose consumption, and recovery of clean and concentrated ethanol. A mathematical model was developed and used to determine the effects of design and operation parameters of the CMFS, including dilution rate, dimensionless membrane volume, substrate concentration, membrane properties, etc. Computer simulation results indicated that the CMFS could provide significant improvements not only in ethanol productivity but also in glucose consumption for highly concentrated substrate when the dimensionless membrane volume and/or permeability of ethanol was increased.

  4. Regulation of alcohol fermentation by Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to elucidate the way in which the fermentative synthesis of ethanol is regulated in the facultative anaerobe Escherichia coli. We are also investigating the control of other genes required for fermentation and anaerobic growth. We have isolated both structural and regulatory mutations affecting the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase, the enzyme responsible for the final step in alcohol synthesis. Some of these regulatory mutations also affect other anaerobically induced genes. The adh gene has been cloned and sequenced. The ADH protein is one of the largest highly expressed proteins in E. coli and requires approximately 2700bp of DNA for its cloning sequence. We have also isolated mutations affecting the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase. In consequence it is now possible to construct E. coli strains defective in the production of any one or more of their normal fermentation products (i.e. formate, acetate, lactate, ethanol and succinate). The factors affecting the ratio of fermentation products are being investigated by in vivo NMR spectroscopy.

  5. Fermentation studies using Saccharomyces diastaticus yeast strains

    SciTech Connect

    Erratt, J.A.; Stewart, G.G.

    1981-01-01

    The yeast species, Saccharomyces diastaticus, has the ability to ferment starch and dextrin, because of the extracellular enzyme, glucoamylase, which hydrolyzes the starch/dextrin to glucose. A number of nonallelic genes--DEX 1, DEX 2, and dextrinase B which is allelic to STA 3--have been isolated, which impart to the yeast the ability to ferment dextrin. Various diploid yeast strains were constructed, each being either heterozygous or homozygous for the individual dextrinase genes. Using 12 (sup 0) plato hopped wort (30% corn adjunct) under agitated conditions, the fermentation rates of the various diploid yeast strains were monitored. A gene-dosage effect was exhibited by yeast strains containing DEX 1 or DEX 2, however, not with yeast strains containing dextrinase B (STA 3). The fermentation and growth rates and extents were determined under static conditions at 14.4 C and 21 C. With all yeast strains containing the dextrinase genes, both fermentation and growth were increased at the higher incubation temperature. Using 30-liter fermentors, beer was produced with the various yeast strains containing the dextrinase genes and the physical and organoleptic characteristics of the products were determined. The concentration of glucose in the beer was found to increase during a 3-mo storage period at 21 C, indicating that the glucoamylase from Saccharomyces diastaticus is not inactivated by pasteurization. (Refs. 36).

  6. Extractive microbial fermentation in cloud point system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhilong; Dai, Zewen

    2010-05-05

    Extractive microbial fermentation of organic compounds in liquid-liquid two-phase systems is a potential strategy to overcome the limitations of microbial fermentation in an aqueous solution, such as low substrate solubility, substrate/product inhibition and product further degradation. A conventional aqueous-organic solvent two-phase system is inaccessible to extractive fermentation of a relatively high polar bioproduct as the confliction between the biocompatibility and the extraction ability of the corresponding organic solvent. An exploitation of cloud point system as a novel medium engineering method for extractive microbial fermentation is reviewed in present work. The relationship between phase separation of nonionic surfactant aqueous solution forming cloud point system and its corresponding biocompatibility to microorganisms, and the relationship between solubilization and bioavailability of organic compounds in a cloud point system are discussed. Paradigms of extractive microbial fermentation in cloud point system are highlighted with some cases in our lab. The downstream processing for nonionic surfactant recovery and product separation with microemulsion extraction is also presented.

  7. Inhibition of cellulase by fermentation products

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, M.

    1984-12-01

    Cellulosic materials are important resources for the production of fuels and chemicals. One of the processes designed to utilize cellulosic materials is enzymatic hydrolysis followed by fermentation to final products. It was shown that simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) is effective in the production of ethanol from cellulose. The acceleration of the rate of cellulose degradation in SSF was caused by less inhibition of cellulase by ethanol than by glucose and/or cellobiose. In order to apply the SSF method effectively to the production of substances derived from glucose by fermentation, several conditions should be satisfied. One of them is the coincidence of conditions of enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of hydrolyzate, such as pH and temperature. The second condition is that the inhibition of cellulase by the final product is less than that by glucose and/or cellobiose. There has been a comprehensive review and some reports on inhibition of cellulase by saccharides such as glucose, cellobiose, xylose, lactose, maltose, metals, and some chemicals such as dyes, detergents, halogenated compounds, and phenolic compounds. In this communication, the inhibition of cellulase by several substances derived by fermentation of glucose is reported. 7 references.

  8. Generalised additive modelling approach to the fermentation process of glutamate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Bo; Li, Yun; Pan, Feng; Shi, Zhong-Ping

    2011-03-01

    In this work, generalised additive models (GAMs) were used for the first time to model the fermentation of glutamate (Glu). It was found that three fermentation parameters fermentation time (T), dissolved oxygen (DO) and oxygen uptake rate (OUR) could capture 97% variance of the production of Glu during the fermentation process through a GAM model calibrated using online data from 15 fermentation experiments. This model was applied to investigate the individual and combined effects of T, DO and OUR on the production of Glu. The conditions to optimize the fermentation process were proposed based on the simulation study from this model. Results suggested that the production of Glu can reach a high level by controlling concentration levels of DO and OUR to the proposed optimization conditions during the fermentation process. The GAM approach therefore provides an alternative way to model and optimize the fermentation process of Glu.

  9. Fermentation of corn starch to ethanol with genetically engineered yeast.

    PubMed

    Inlow, D; McRae, J; Ben-Bassat, A

    1988-07-05

    Expression of the glucoamylase gene from Aspergillus awamori by laboratory and distiller's strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae allowed them to ferment soluble starch. Approximately 95% of the carbohydrates in the starch were utilized. Glycerol production was significantly decreased when soluble starch was used instead of glucose. Ethanol yield on soluble starch was higher than that on glucose. The rate of starch fermentation was directly related to the level of glucoamylase activity. Strains with higher levels of glucoamylase expression fermented starch faster. The decline in starch fermentation rates toward the end of the fermentation was associated with accumulation of disaccharides and limit dextrins, poor substrates for glucoamylase. The buildup of these products in continuous fermentations inhibited glucoamylase activity and complete utilization of the starch. Under these conditions maltose-fermenting strains had a significant advantage over nonfermenting strains. The synthesis and secretion of glucoamylase showed no deleterious effects on cell growth rates, fermetation rates, and fermentation products.

  10. Fermentation and recovery process for lactic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Tsai, S.P.; Moon, S.H.; Coleman, R.

    1995-11-07

    A method is described for converting starch to glucose and fermenting glucose to lactic acid, including simultaneous saccharification and fermentation through use of a novel consortium of bacterial strains. 2 figs.

  11. Fermentation characteristics of yeasts isolated from traditionally fermented masau (Ziziphus mauritiana) fruits.

    PubMed

    Nyanga, Loveness K; Nout, Martinus J R; Smid, Eddy J; Boekhout, Teun; Zwietering, Marcel H

    2013-09-16

    Yeast strains were characterized to select potential starter cultures for the production of masau fermented beverages. The yeast species originally isolated from Ziziphus mauritiana (masau) fruits and their traditionally fermented fruit pulp in Zimbabwe were examined for their ability to ferment glucose and fructose using standard broth under aerated and non-aerated conditions. Most Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were superior to other species in ethanol production. The best ethanol producing S. cerevisiae strains, and strains of the species Pichia kudriavzevii, Pichia fabianii and Saccharomycopsis fibuligera were tested for production of flavor compounds during fermentation of masau fruit juice. Significant differences in the production of ethanol and other volatile compounds during fermentation of masau juice were observed among and within the four tested species. Alcohols and esters were the major volatiles detected in the fermented juice. Trace amounts of organic acids and carbonyl compounds were detected. Ethyl hexanoate and ethyl octanoate were produced in highest amounts as compared to the other volatile compounds. S. cerevisiae strains produced higher amounts of ethanol and flavor compounds as compared to the other species, especially fatty acid ethyl esters that provide the major aroma impact of freshly fermented wines. The developed library of characteristics can help in the design of mixtures of strains to obtain a specific melange of product functionalities.

  12. Glycerol production by fermenting yeast cells is essential for optimal bread dough fermentation.

    PubMed

    Aslankoohi, Elham; Rezaei, Mohammad Naser; Vervoort, Yannick; Courtin, Christophe M; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Glycerol is the main compatible solute in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When faced with osmotic stress, for example during semi-solid state bread dough fermentation, yeast cells produce and accumulate glycerol in order to prevent dehydration by balancing the intracellular osmolarity with that of the environment. However, increased glycerol production also results in decreased CO2 production, which may reduce dough leavening. We investigated the effect of yeast glycerol production level on bread dough fermentation capacity of a commercial bakery strain and a laboratory strain. We find that Δgpd1 mutants that show decreased glycerol production show impaired dough fermentation. In contrast, overexpression of GPD1 in the laboratory strain results in increased fermentation rates in high-sugar dough and improved gas retention in the fermenting bread dough. Together, our results reveal the crucial role of glycerol production level by fermenting yeast cells in dough fermentation efficiency as well as gas retention in dough, thereby opening up new routes for the selection of improved commercial bakery yeasts.

  13. A review on traditional Turkish fermented non-alcoholic beverages: microbiota, fermentation process and quality characteristics.

    PubMed

    Altay, Filiz; Karbancıoglu-Güler, Funda; Daskaya-Dikmen, Ceren; Heperkan, Dilek

    2013-10-01

    Shalgam juice, hardaliye, boza, ayran (yoghurt drink) and kefir are the most known traditional Turkish fermented non-alcoholic beverages. The first three are obtained from vegetables, fruits and cereals, and the last two ones are made of milk. Shalgam juice, hardaliye and ayran are produced by lactic acid fermentation. Their microbiota is mainly composed of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei in shalgam fermentation and L. paracasei subsp. paracasei and Lactobacillus casei subsp. pseudoplantarum in hardaliye fermentation are predominant. Ayran is traditionally prepared by mixing yoghurt with water and salt. Yoghurt starter cultures are used in industrial ayran production. On the other hand, both alcohol and lactic acid fermentation occur in boza and kefir. Boza is prepared by using a mixture of maize, wheat and rice or their flours and water. Generally previously produced boza or sourdough/yoghurt are used as starter culture which is rich in Lactobacillus spp. and yeasts. Kefir is prepared by inoculation of raw milk with kefir grains which consists of different species of yeasts, LAB, acetic acid bacteria in a protein and polysaccharide matrix. The microbiota of boza and kefir is affected from raw materials, the origin and the production methods. In this review, physicochemical properties, manufacturing technologies, microbiota and shelf life and spoilage of traditional fermented beverages were summarized along with how fermentation conditions could affect rheological properties of end product which are important during processing and storage.

  14. Acidogenic fermentation of lignocellulose - acid yield and conversion of components

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, R.

    1981-01-01

    Corn stover was fermented with a mixed culture of anaerobic microorganisms to form simple (C2-C6), volatile organic acids. Alkaline pretreatment allowed a greater fermentation of the pectin and hemicellulose than of the cellulose and lignin, but all components were utilized. The percent fermentation of the soluble fraction, hemicellulose, cellulose, and lignin was 79.6, 74.1, 36.9, and 20.9%, respively. The yield of acid (as acetate) with respect to material fermented was 84%.

  15. Kinetics of ethanol inhibition in alcohol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Luong, J H

    1985-03-01

    The inhibitory effect of ethanol on yeast growth and fermentation has been studied for the strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC No. 4126 under anaerobic batch conditions. The results obtained reveal that there is no striking difference between the response of growth and ethanol fermentation. Two kinetic models are also proposed to describe the kinetic pattern of ethanol inhibition on the specific rates of growth and ethanol fermentation: microi/micro0 = 1 - (P/Pm)alpha (for growth) nui/nu0 = 1 - (P/P'm)beta (for ethanol production). The maximum allowable ethanol concentration above which cells do not grow was predicted to be 112 g/L. The ethanol-producing capability of the cells was completely inhibited at 115 g/L ethanol. The proposed models appear to accurately represent the experimental data obtained in this study and the literature data.

  16. Kinetics of ethanol inhibition in alcohol fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Luong, J.H.T.

    1985-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of ethanol on yeast growth and fermentation has been studied for the strain Saccharo-myces cerevisiae ATCC No. 4126 under anaerobic batch conditions. The results obtained reveal that there is no striking difference between the response of growth and ethanol fermentation. Two kinetic models are also proposed to describe the kinetic pattern of ethanol inhibition on the specific rates of growth and ethanol fermentation. The maximum allowable ethanol concentration above which cells do not grow was predicted to be 112 g/L. The ethanol-producing capability of the cells was completely inhibited at 115 g/L ethanol. The proposed models appear to accurately represent the experimental data obtained in this study and the literature data.

  17. Yeast Interactions in Inoculated Wine Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Ciani, Maurizio; Capece, Angela; Comitini, Francesca; Canonico, Laura; Siesto, Gabriella; Romano, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    The use of selected starter culture is widely diffused in winemaking. In pure fermentation, the ability of inoculated Saccharomyces cerevisiae to suppress the wild microflora is one of the most important feature determining the starter ability to dominate the process. Since the wine is the result of the interaction of several yeast species and strains, many studies are available on the effect of mixed cultures on the final wine quality. In mixed fermentation the interactions between the different yeasts composing the starter culture can led the stability of the final product and the analytical and aromatic profile. In the present review, we will discuss the recent developments regarding yeast interactions in pure and in mixed fermentation, focusing on the influence of interactions on growth and dominance in the process. PMID:27148235

  18. System for extracting protein from a fermentation product

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Jr., John Warren; Bootsma, Jason Alan; Lewis, Stephen Michael

    2016-04-26

    A method of producing bioproducts from a feedstock in a system configured to produce ethanol and distillers grains from a fermentation product is disclosed. A system configured to process feedstock into a fermentation product and bioproducts including ethanol and meal is disclosed. A bioproduct produced from a fermentation product produced from a feedstock in a biorefining system is disclosed.

  19. 27 CFR 24.212 - High fermentation wine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false High fermentation wine. 24..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Production of Other Than Standard Wine § 24.212 High fermentation wine. High fermentation wine is wine made with the addition of sugar within the limitations...

  20. 27 CFR 24.212 - High fermentation wine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false High fermentation wine. 24..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Production of Other Than Standard Wine § 24.212 High fermentation wine. High fermentation wine is wine made with the addition of sugar within the limitations...

  1. 27 CFR 24.212 - High fermentation wine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false High fermentation wine. 24..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Production of Other Than Standard Wine § 24.212 High fermentation wine. High fermentation wine is wine made with the addition of sugar within the limitations...

  2. 27 CFR 24.212 - High fermentation wine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false High fermentation wine. 24..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Production of Other Than Standard Wine § 24.212 High fermentation wine. High fermentation wine is wine made with the addition of sugar within the limitations...

  3. 27 CFR 24.212 - High fermentation wine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false High fermentation wine. 24..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Production of Other Than Standard Wine § 24.212 High fermentation wine. High fermentation wine is wine made with the addition of sugar within the limitations...

  4. Method for extracting protein from a fermentation product

    DOEpatents

    Lawton, Jr., John Warren; Bootsma, Jason Alan; Lewis, Stephen Michael

    2014-02-18

    A method of producing bioproducts from a feedstock in a system configured to produce ethanol and distillers grains from a fermentation product is disclosed. A system configured to process feedstock into a fermentation product and bioproducts including ethanol and meal is disclosed. A bioproduct produced from a fermentation product produced from a feedstock in a biorefining system is disclosed.

  5. Liquefaction, Saccharification, and Fermentation of Ammoniated Corn to ethanol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Treatment of whole corn kernels with anhydrous ammonia gas has been proposed as a way to facilitate the separation of non-fermentable coproducts before fermentation of the starch to ethanol, but the fermentability of ammoniated corn has not been thoroughly investigated. Also, it is intended that the...

  6. Anaerobic fermentation of beef cattle manure. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, A.G.; Chen, Y.R.; Varel, V.H.

    1981-01-01

    The research to convert livestock manure and crop residues into methane and a high protein feed ingredient by thermophilic anaerobic fermentation are summarized. The major biological and operational factors involved in methanogenesis were discussed, and a kinetic model that describes the fermentation process was presented. Substrate biodegradability, fermentation temperature, and influent substrate concentration were shown to have significant effects on CH/sub 4/ production rate. The kinetic model predicted methane production rates of existing pilot and full-scale fermentation systems to within 15%. The highest methane production rate achieved by the fermenter was 4.7 L CH/sub 4//L fermenter day. This is the highest rate reported in the literature and about 4 times higher than other pilot or full-scale systems fermenting livestock manures. Assessment of the energy requirements for anaerobic fermentation systems showed that the major energy requirement for a thermophilic system was for maintaining the fermenter temperature. The next major energy consumption was due to the mixing of the influent slurry and fermenter liquor. An approach to optimizing anaerobic fermenter designs by selecting design criteria that maximize the net energy production per unit cost was presented. Based on the results, we believe that the economics of anaerobic fermentation is sufficiently favorable for farm-scale demonstration of this technology.

  7. Fermentation exhaust gas analysis using mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Buckland, B.; Brix, Fastert, H.; Gbewonyo, K.; Hunt, G.; Jain, D.

    1985-11-01

    A Perkin Elmer MGA-1200 mass spectrometer has been coupled with a mini-computer and a sampling manifold to analyze up to 8 components in the exhaust gases of fermentors. Carbon dioxide, oxygen, and nitrogen are typically analyzed, but ethanol for yeast fermentations can also be tested by heating the line from the fermentor to the sampling manifold. Specifications, operation, and performance of the system are described. The system has been used for process control, the study of fermentation kinetics, and process development. 8 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

  8. Kombucha tea fermentation: Microbial and biochemical dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Somnath; Bhattacharya, Semantee; Chatzinotas, Antonis; Chakraborty, Writachit; Bhattacharya, Debanjana; Gachhui, Ratan

    2016-03-02

    Kombucha tea, a non-alcoholic beverage, is acquiring significant interest due to its claimed beneficial properties. The microbial community of Kombucha tea consists of bacteria and yeast which thrive in two mutually non-exclusive compartments: the soup or the beverage and the biofilm floating on it. The microbial community and the biochemical properties of the beverage have so far mostly been described in separate studies. This, however, may prevent understanding the causal links between the microbial communities and the beneficial properties of Kombucha tea. Moreover, an extensive study into the microbial and biochemical dynamics has also been missing. In this study, we thus explored the structure and dynamics of the microbial community along with the biochemical properties of Kombucha tea at different time points up to 21 days of fermentation. We hypothesized that several biochemical properties will change during the course of fermentation along with the shifts in the yeast and bacterial communities. The yeast community of the biofilm did not show much variation over time and was dominated by Candida sp. (73.5-83%). The soup however, showed a significant shift in dominance from Candida sp. to Lachancea sp. on the 7th day of fermentation. This is the first report showing Candida as the most dominating yeast genus during Kombucha fermentation. Komagateibacter was identified as the single largest bacterial genus present in both the biofilm and the soup (~50%). The bacterial diversity was higher in the soup than in the biofilm with a peak on the seventh day of fermentation. The biochemical properties changed with the progression of the fermentation, i.e., beneficial properties of the beverage such as the radical scavenging ability increased significantly with a maximum increase at day 7. We further observed a significantly higher D-saccharic acid-1,4-lactone content and caffeine degradation property compared to previously described Kombucha tea fermentations. Our

  9. Characteristics of traditional Chinese shanlan wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongsheng; Luo, Xianqun; Wang, Xinguang

    2014-02-01

    Shanlan rice wine is made by a unique method by removing the saccharified liquid from wine mash constantly since it appeared during saccharification and fermentation. The objective of this study is to find the advantages of this technique of wine making by analyzing data of shanlan wine fermentation. Since the liquid was removed, the mash (rice) bed was fluffier than immersed in the saccharified liquid, under ambient condition constantly and it is favorable for starch degradation. This technique made shanlan rice wine tasted sweet and slightly acidic, lower content of alcohol and higher alcohol than in other non-distilled rice wines.

  10. Third Generation Biofuels via Direct Cellulose Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Carere, Carlo R.; Sparling, Richard; Cicek, Nazim; Levin, David B.

    2008-01-01

    Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) is a system in which cellulase production, substrate hydrolysis, and fermentation are accomplished in a single process step by cellulolytic microorganisms. CBP offers the potential for lower biofuel production costs due to simpler feedstock processing, lower energy inputs, and higher conversion efficiencies than separate hydrolysis and fermentation processes, and is an economically attractive near-term goal for “third generation” biofuel production. In this review article, production of third generation biofuels from cellulosic feedstocks will be addressed in respect to the metabolism of cellulolytic bacteria and the development of strategies to increase biofuel yields through metabolic engineering. PMID:19325807

  11. Pyrosequencing-based analysis of bacterial community and metabolites profiles in Korean traditional seafood fermentation: a flatfish-fermented seafood.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaejoon; Lee, Se Hee; Jin, Hyun Mi; Jeon, Che Ok; Park, Woojun

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial community and metabolites were analyzed in a flatfish jeotgal, a Korean fermented seafood. Inverse relationship of pH and 16S rRNA gene copy number was identified during fermentation. Lactobacillus was the predominant bacterial genus. Increase of Firmicutes was a common characteristic shared by other fermented seafood. Fructose, glucose, and maltose were the major metabolites.

  12. The effect of lactic acid bacteria on cocoa bean fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Zhao, Jian; Fleet, Graham

    2015-07-16

    Cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao L.) are the raw material for chocolate production. Fermentation of cocoa pulp by microorganisms is crucial for developing chocolate flavor precursors. Yeasts conduct an alcoholic fermentation within the bean pulp that is essential for the production of good quality beans, giving typical chocolate characters. However, the roles of bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria in contributing to the quality of cocoa bean and chocolate are not fully understood. Using controlled laboratory fermentations, this study investigated the contribution of lactic acid bacteria to cocoa bean fermentation. Cocoa beans were fermented under conditions where the growth of lactic acid bacteria was restricted by the use of nisin and lysozyme. The resultant microbial ecology, chemistry and chocolate quality of beans from these fermentations were compared with those of indigenous (control) fermentations. The yeasts Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia kudriavzevii, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus fermentum and the acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii were the major species found in control fermentations. In fermentations with the presence of nisin and lysozyme, the same species of yeasts and acetic acid bacteria grew but the growth of lactic acid bacteria was prevented or restricted. These beans underwent characteristic alcoholic fermentation where the utilization of sugars and the production of ethanol, organic acids and volatile compounds in the bean pulp and nibs were similar for beans fermented in the presence of lactic acid bacteria. Lactic acid was produced during both fermentations but more so when lactic acid bacteria grew. Beans fermented in the presence or absence of lactic acid bacteria were fully fermented, had similar shell weights and gave acceptable chocolates with no differences

  13. Modification of the acetaldehyde concentration during alcoholic fermentation and effects on fermentation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Roustan, Jean Louis; Sablayrolles, Jean-Marie

    2002-01-01

    We studied the kinetic effects of increasing the residual acetaldehyde concentration during alcoholic fermentation, especially during the stationary phase. We added this compound via pulse or continuous injections. The yeast response depended on the amount of acetaldehyde added: high concentrations inhibited fermentation while low concentrations led to stimulation. When regular small additions were made, up to 100 mM acetaldehyde could be added and this caused a very significant drop in the fermentation duration. We also modulated the acetaldehyde concentration by modifying the alcohol dehydrogenase-catalyzed reaction. Two approaches were tested (i) adding aldehydes (propanal and furfural) that competitively inhibited the reduction of acetaldehyde and (ii) adding electron acceptors that reduced the quantity of NADH available. Several possible mechanisms responsible for (i) the impact of acetaldehyde on fermentation kinetics and (ii) the modulation of the residual acetaldehyde concentration are discussed.

  14. Ethanol production from xylose by enzymic isomerization and yeast fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, L.C.; Hsiao, H.Y.; Ueng, P.P.; Chen, L.F.; Tsao, G.T.

    1981-01-01

    Repetitive enzymic isomerization of xylose followed by yeast fermentation of xylulose, and simultaneous enzymic isomerization and yeast fermentation were proven to be methods capable of converting xylose to ethanol. The fermentation product, ethanol, xylitol, or glycerol, has little inhibitory or deactivation effect on the activity of isomerase. In a comparison of the ability of yeasts to ferment xylulose to ethanol, Schizosaccharomyces pombe was found to be superior to industrial bakers' yeast. Under optimal conditions (pH 6, temperature 30/sup 0/C), a final ethanol concentration of 6.3 wt.% was obtained from simulated hemicellulose hydrolysate using a simultaneous fermentation process. The ethanol yield was over 80% of the theoretical value.

  15. Analysis of problems with dry fermentation process for biogas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilát, Peter; Patsch, Marek; Jandačka, Jozef

    2012-04-01

    The technology of dry anaerobic fermentation is still meeting with some scepticism, and therefore in most biogas plants are used wet fermentation technology. Fermentation process would be not complete without an optimal controlled condition: dry matter content, density, pH, and in particular the reaction temperature. If is distrust of dry fermentation eligible it was on the workplace of the Department of Power Engineering at University of Zilina built an experimental small-scale biogas station that allows analysis of optimal parameters of the dry anaerobic fermentation, in particular, however, affect the reaction temperature on yield and quality of biogas.

  16. Ethanol fermentation from biomass resources: current state and prospects.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Tanaka, Shuzo

    2006-02-01

    In recent years, growing attention has been devoted to the conversion of biomass into fuel ethanol, considered the cleanest liquid fuel alternative to fossil fuels. Significant advances have been made towards the technology of ethanol fermentation. This review provides practical examples and gives a broad overview of the current status of ethanol fermentation including biomass resources, microorganisms, and technology. Also, the promising prospects of ethanol fermentation are especially introduced. The prospects included are fermentation technology converting xylose to ethanol, cellulase enzyme utilized in the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials, immobilization of the microorganism in large systems, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation, and sugar conversion into ethanol.

  17. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using cellobiose fermenting yeast Brettanomyces custersii

    DOEpatents

    Spindler, D.D.; Grohmann, K.; Wyman, C.E.

    1992-03-31

    A process for producing ethanol from plant biomass includes forming a substrate from the biomass with the substrate including hydrolysates of cellulose and hemicellulose. A species of the yeast Brettanomyces custersii (CBS 5512), which has the ability to ferment both cellobiose and glucose to ethanol, is then selected and isolated. The substrate is inoculated with this yeast, and the inoculated substrate is then fermented under conditions favorable for cell viability and conversion of hydrolysates to ethanol. 2 figs.

  18. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using cellobiose fermenting yeast Brettanomyces custersii

    DOEpatents

    Spindler, Diane D.; Grohmann, Karel; Wyman, Charles E.

    1992-01-01

    A process for producing ethanol from plant biomass includes forming a substrate from the biomass with the substrate including hydrolysates of cellulose and hemicellulose. A species of the yeast Brettanomyces custersii (CBS 5512), which has the ability to ferment both cellobiose and glucose to ethanol, is then selected and isolated. The substrate is inoculated with this yeast, and the inoculated substrate is then fermented under conditions favorable for cell viability and conversion of hydrolysates to ethanol.

  19. Microbial diversity and flavor formation in onion fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lili; Luo, Jianfei; Li, Pan; Yu, Hang; Huang, Jianfei; Luo, Lixin

    2014-09-01

    Fermented onion products are popular in many countries. We conducted fermentation with and without salt to identify the microorganisms responsible for onion fermentation and the unique taste of fermented onion. The results of PCR-DGGE (polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) revealed that lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus zymae, L. malefermentans, L. plantarum), acetic acid bacteria (Acetobacter pasteurianus, A. orientalis), citric acid bacteria (Citrobacter sp., C. freundii), and yeasts (Candida humilis, Kazachstania exigua, Saccharomyces boulardii) were the dominant microorganisms involved in onion fermentation. Organic acid analysis indicated that lactic acid and acetic acid significantly increased after fermentation. There were no significant changes in the types of amino acids after fermentation, but the total concentration of amino acids significantly decreased after fermentation with salt. The increase in esters, alcohols, and aldehydes after fermentation was responsible for the unique flavor of fermented onion. Fermentation with salt inhibited the accumulation of organic acids and limited the conversion of proteins into amino acids but maintained the unique odor of onion by limiting the degradation of sulfur-containing compounds.

  20. Role of water activity in ethanol fermentations

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.P.; Greenfield, P.F.

    1986-01-01

    A separate role for water activity in the conversion of sugars to ethanol by two strains of yeast is identified. During fermentation of both single and mixed sugar substrates, the water activity was shown to remain constant during the logarithmic growth phase. This is despite the changes in concentration of substrates and production, the constancy reflecting the fact that the greater influence of ethanol on the solution activity is counterbalanced, in the early stages of the fermentation, by its low yield. The end of the log phase of growth coincides with the start of a period of gradually decreasing water activity. For the more ethanol-tolerant strain UQM66Y, growth was found to cease at a constant value of water activity while that for the less tolerant strain UQM70Y depended on both ethanol concentration and water activity. It is argued that water activity is a more appropriate variable than ethanol concentration for describing some of the nonspecific inhibitory effects apparent in ethanol fermentations. A straightforward method for the calculation of water activity during such fermentations based on the use of solution osmolarity is presented.

  1. Removing Biostatic Agents From Fermentation Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    Liquid carbon dioxide inexpensive solvent. Inexpensive process proposed for removing such poisons as furfural and related compounds from fermentation baths of biomass hydrolysates. New process based on use of liquid carbon dioxide as extraction solvent. Liquid CO2 preferable to such other liquid solvents as ether or methylene chloride.

  2. Recovery of carboxylic acids produced by fermentation.

    PubMed

    López-Garzón, Camilo S; Straathof, Adrie J J

    2014-01-01

    Carboxylic acids such as citric, lactic, succinic and itaconic acids are useful products and are obtained on large scale by fermentation. This review describes the options for recovering these and other fermentative carboxylic acids. After cell removal, often a primary recovery step is performed, using liquid-liquid extraction, adsorption, precipitation or conventional electrodialysis. If the carboxylate is formed rather than the carboxylic acid, the recovery process involves a step for removing the cation of the formed carboxylate. Then, bipolar electrodialysis and thermal methods for salt splitting can prevent that waste inorganic salts are co-produced. Final carboxylic acid purification requires either distillation or crystallization, usually involving evaporation of water. Process steps can often be combined synergistically. In-situ removal of carboxylic acid by extraction during fermentation is the most popular approach. Recovery of the extractant can easily lead to waste inorganic salt formation, which counteracts the advantage of the in-situ removal. For industrial production, various recovery principles and configurations are used, because the fermentation conditions and physical properties of specific carboxylic acids differ.

  3. Fermentation and oxygen transfer in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlop, Eric H.

    1989-01-01

    The need for high rate oxygen transfer in microgravity for a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) environment offers a number of difficulties and challenges. The use of a phase separated bioreactor appears to provide a way of overcoming these problems resulting in a system capable of providing high cell densities with rapid fermentation rates. Some of the key design elements are discussed.

  4. New fermentation route cuts energy costs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-08

    Alcon Biotechnology has built a containerized continuous-fermentation demonstration unit and claims a steam consumption of under 20 lb/gallon of alcohol. Crawford and Russell (Stamford, Conn.) is offering this new power-alcohol technology in the U.S. which is designed for a range of feeds including cane and beet sugar juice, molasses and cereal grains.

  5. Production of Star Fruit Alcoholic Fermented Beverage.

    PubMed

    Valim, Flávia de Paula; Aguiar-Oliveira, Elizama; Kamimura, Eliana Setsuko; Alves, Vanessa Dias; Maldonado, Rafael Resende

    2016-12-01

    Star fruit (Averrhoa carambola) is a nutritious tropical fruit. The aim of this study was to evaluate the production of a star fruit alcoholic fermented beverage utilizing a lyophilized commercial yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The study was conducted utilizing a 2(3) central composite design and the best conditions for the production were: initial soluble solids between 23.8 and 25 °Brix (g 100 g(-1)), initial pH between 4.8 and 5.0 and initial concentration of yeast between 1.6 and 2.5 g L(-1). These conditions yielded a fermented drink with an alcohol content of 11.15 °GL (L 100 L(-1)), pH of 4.13-4.22, final yeast concentration of 89 g L(-1) and fermented yield from 82 to 94 %. The fermented drink also presented low levels of total and volatile acidities.

  6. Monitoring alcoholic fermentation: an untargeted approach.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, António César Silva; Monforte, Ana Rita; Teixeira, Carla Silva; Martins, Rosa; Fairbairn, Samantha; Bauer, Florian F

    2014-07-16

    This work describes the utility and efficiency of a metabolic profiling pipeline that relies on an unsupervised and untargeted approach applied to a HS-SPME/GC-MS data. This noninvasive and high throughput methodology enables "real time" monitoring of the metabolic changes inherent to the biochemical dynamics of a perturbed complex biological system and the extraction of molecular candidates that are latter validated on its biochemical context. To evaluate the efficiency of the pipeline five different fermentations, carried on a synthetic media and whose perturbation was the nitrogen source, were performed in 5 and 500 mL. The smaller volume fermentations were monitored online by HS-SPME/GC-MS, allowing to obtain metabolic profiles and molecular candidates time expression. Nontarget analysis was applied using MS data in two ways: (i) one dimension (1D), where the total ion chromatogram per sample was used, (ii) two dimensions (2D), where the integrity time vs m/z per sample was used. Results indicate that the 2D procedure captured the relevant information more efficiently than the 1D. It was also seen that although there were differences in the fermentation performance in different scales, the metabolic pathways responsible for production of metabolites that impact the quality of the volatile fraction was unaffected, so the proposed pipeline is suitable for the study of different fermentation systems that can undergo subsequent sensory validation on a larger scale.

  7. Fermentation alcohol: better to convert to fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Maiorella, B.L.

    1982-01-01

    Production of gasoline from fermentative ethanol offers many advantages over distillation to alcohol and blending to gasohol. A 70% process energy saving is possible and a superior liquid fuel is produced. The conversion of ethanol to gasoline was demonstrated under a wide variety of process conditions and the results were verified by pilot-plant tests.

  8. Regulation of alcohol fermentation by Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to elucidate the way in which the synthesis of ethanol and related fermentation products are regulated in the facultative anaerobe Escherichia coli. We are also investigating the control of other genes required for anaerobic growth. We have isolated both structural and regulatory mutations affecting the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase, the enzyme responsible for the final step in alcohol synthesis. Some of these regulatory mutations also affect other anaerobically induced genes. The adh gene has been cloned and sequenced. The ADH protein is one of the largest highly expressed proteins in E. coli and requires approximately 2700bp of DNA for its coding sequence. We have also isolated mutations affecting the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase and have recently cloned the ldh gene. In consequence it is now possible to construct E. coli strains defective in the production of any one or more of their normal fermentation products (i.e. formate, acetate, lactate, ethanol and succinate). The factors affecting ratio of fermentation products are being investigated by in vivo NMR spectroscopy.

  9. Colonic Fermentation Promotes Decompression sickness in Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Maistre, Sébastien; Vallée, Nicolas; Gempp, Emmanuel; Lambrechts, Kate; Louge, Pierre; Duchamp, Claude; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Massive bubble formation after diving can lead to decompression sickness (DCS). During dives with hydrogen as a diluent for oxygen, decreasing the body’s H2 burden by inoculating hydrogen-metabolizing microbes into the gut reduces the risk of DCS. So we set out to investigate if colonic fermentation leading to endogenous hydrogen production promotes DCS in fasting rats. Four hours before an experimental dive, 93 fasting rats were force-fed, half of them with mannitol and the other half with water. Exhaled hydrogen was measured before and after force-feeding. Following the hyperbaric exposure, we looked for signs of DCS. A higher incidence of DCS was found in rats force-fed with mannitol than in those force-fed with water (80%, [95%CI 56, 94] versus 40%, [95%CI 19, 64], p < 0.01). In rats force-fed with mannitol, metronidazole pretreatment reduced the incidence of DCS (33%, [95%CI 15, 57], p = 0.005) at the same time as it inhibited colonic fermentation (14 ± 35 ppm versus 118 ± 90 ppm, p = 0.0001). Pre-diveingestion of mannitol increased the incidence of DCS in fasting rats when colonic fermentation peaked during the decompression phase. More generally, colonic fermentation in rats on a normal diet could promote DCS through endogenous hydrogen production. PMID:26853722

  10. Yeast communities in a natural tequila fermentation.

    PubMed

    Lachance, M A

    1995-08-01

    Fresh and cooked agave, Drosophila spp., processing equipment, agave molasses, agave extract, and fermenting must at a traditional tequila distillery (Herradura, Amatitan, Jalisco, México) were studied to gain insight on the origin of yeasts involved in a natural tequila fermentations. Five yeast communities were identified. (1) Fresh agave contained a diverse mycobiota dominated by Clavispora lusitaniae and an endemic species, Metschnikowia agaveae. (2) Drosophila spp. from around or inside the distillery yielded typical fruit yeasts, in particular Hanseniaspora spp., Pichia kluyveri, and Candida krusei. (3) Schizosaccharomyces pombe prevailed in molasses. (4) Cooked agave and extract had a considerable diversity of species, but included Saccharomyces cerevisiae. (5) Fermenting juice underwent a gradual reduction in yeast heterogeneity. Torulaspora delbrueckii, Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Hanseniaspora spp. progressively ceded the way to S. cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Candida milleri, and Brettanomyces spp. With the exception of Pichia membranaefaciens, which was shared by all communities, little overlap existed. That separation was even more manifest when species were divided into distinguishable biotypes based on morphology or physiology. It is concluded that crushing equipment and must holding tanks are the main source of significant inoculum for the fermentation process. Drosophila species appear to serve as internal vectors. Proximity to fruit trees probably contributes to maintaining a substantial Drosophila community, but the yeasts found in the distillery exhibit very little similarity to those found in adjacent vegetation. Interactions involving killer toxins had no apparent direct effects on the yeast community structure.

  11. Degradation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural during yeast fermentation.

    PubMed

    Akıllıoglu, Halise Gül; Mogol, Burçe Ataç; Gökmen, Vural

    2011-12-01

    5-Hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF) may occur in malt in high quantities depending on roasting conditions. However, the HMF content of different types of beers is relatively low, indicating its potential for degradation during fermentation. This study investigates the degradation kinetics of HMF in wort during fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results indicated that HMF decreased exponentially as fermentation progressed. The first-order degradation rate of HMF was 0.693 × 10(-2) and 1.397 × 10(-2)min(-1) for wort and sweet wort, respectively, indicating that sugar enhances the activity of yeasts. In wort, HMF was converted into hydroxymethyl furfuryl alcohol by yeasts with a high yield (79-84% conversion). Glucose and fructose were utilised more rapidly by the yeasts in dark roasted malt than in pale malt (p<0.05). The conversion of HMF into hydroxymethyl furfuryl alcohol seems to be a primary activity of yeast cells, and presence of sugars in the fermentation medium increases this activity.

  12. Ruminal fermentation of propylene glycol and glycerol.

    PubMed

    Trabue, Steven; Scoggin, Kenwood; Tjandrakusuma, Siska; Rasmussen, Mark A; Reilly, Peter J

    2007-08-22

    Bovine rumen fluid was fermented anaerobically with 25 mM R-propylene glycol, S-propylene glycol, or glycerol added. After 24 h, all of the propylene glycol enantiomers and approximately 80% of the glycerol were metabolized. Acetate, propionate, butyrate, valerate, and caproate concentrations, in decreasing order, all increased with incubation time. Addition of any of the three substrates somewhat decreased acetate formation, while addition of either propylene glycol increased propionate formation but decreased that of butyrate. R- and S-propylene glycol did not differ significantly in either their rates of disappearance or the products formed when they were added to the fermentation medium. Fermentations of rumen fluid containing propylene glycol emitted the sulfur-containing gases 1-propanethiol, 1-(methylthio)propane, methylthiirane, 2,4-dimethylthiophene, 1-(methylthio)-1-propanethiol, dipropyl disulfide, 1-(propylthio)-1-propanethiol, dipropyl trisulfide, 3,5-diethyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 2-ethyl-1,3-dithiane, and 2,4,6-triethyl-1,3,5-trithiane. Metabolic pathways that yield each of these gases are proposed. The sulfur-containing gases produced during propylene glycol fermentation in the rumen may contribute to the toxic effects seen in cattle when high doses are administered for therapeutic purposes.

  13. Effects of fermentation substrate conditions on corn-soy co-fermentation for fuel ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Yao, Linxing; Lee, Show-Ling; Wang, Tong; de Moura, Juliana M L N; Johnson, Lawrence A

    2012-09-01

    Soy skim, a protein-rich liquid co-product from the aqueous extraction of soybeans, was co-fermented with corn to produce ethanol. Effects of soy skim addition level, type of skim, corn particle size, water-to-solids ratio, and urea on co-fermentation were determined. The addition of 20-100% skim increased the fermentation rate by 18-27% and shortened the fermentation time by 5-7h without affecting ethanol yield. Finely ground corn or high water-to-solids ratio (≥ 3.0) in the mash gave higher fermentation rates, but did not increase the ethanol yield. When the water was completely replaced with soy skim, the addition of urea became unnecessary. Soy skim retentate that was concentrated by nanofiltration increased fermentation rate by 25%. The highest level of skim addition resulted in a finished beer with 16% solids, 47% protein (dwb) containing 3.6% lysine, and an ethanol yield of 39 g/100g dry corn.

  14. Functional Characterization of Bacterial Communities Responsible for Fermentation of Doenjang: A Traditional Korean Fermented Soybean Paste

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Woo Yong; Jung, Ji Young; Lee, Hyo Jung; Jeon, Che Ok

    2016-01-01

    Doenjang samples were prepared in triplicate and their microbial abundance, bacterial communities, and metabolites throughout fermentation were analyzed to investigate the functional properties of microorganisms in doenjang. Viable bacterial cells were approximately three orders of magnitude higher than fungal cells, suggesting that bacteria are more responsible for doenjang fermentation. Pyrosequencing and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were applied for the analysis of bacterial communities and metabolites, respectively. Bacterial community analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that doenjang samples included Bacillus, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Clostridium, Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium, Oceanobacillus, and Tetragenococcus. These genera were found either in doenjang-meju or solar salts, but not in both, suggesting two separate sources of bacteria. Bacillus and Enterococcus were dominant genera during the fermentation, but their abundances were not associated with metabolite changes, suggesting that they may not be major players in doenjang fermentation. Tetragenococcus was dominant in 108 day-doenjang samples, when lactate, acetate, putrescine, and tyramine increased quickly as glucose and fructose decreased, indicating that Tetragenococcus might be primarily responsible for organic acid and biogenic amine production. Lactobacillus was identified as a dominant group from the 179-day samples, associated with the increase of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and the decrease of galactose, indicating a potential role for this genus as a major GABA producer during fermentation. The results of this study clarified the functional properties of major bacterial communities in the doenjang fermentation process, contributing to the production of safe and high-quality doenjang. PMID:27303399

  15. Functional Characterization of Bacterial Communities Responsible for Fermentation of Doenjang: A Traditional Korean Fermented Soybean Paste.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woo Yong; Jung, Ji Young; Lee, Hyo Jung; Jeon, Che Ok

    2016-01-01

    Doenjang samples were prepared in triplicate and their microbial abundance, bacterial communities, and metabolites throughout fermentation were analyzed to investigate the functional properties of microorganisms in doenjang. Viable bacterial cells were approximately three orders of magnitude higher than fungal cells, suggesting that bacteria are more responsible for doenjang fermentation. Pyrosequencing and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were applied for the analysis of bacterial communities and metabolites, respectively. Bacterial community analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that doenjang samples included Bacillus, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Clostridium, Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium, Oceanobacillus, and Tetragenococcus. These genera were found either in doenjang-meju or solar salts, but not in both, suggesting two separate sources of bacteria. Bacillus and Enterococcus were dominant genera during the fermentation, but their abundances were not associated with metabolite changes, suggesting that they may not be major players in doenjang fermentation. Tetragenococcus was dominant in 108 day-doenjang samples, when lactate, acetate, putrescine, and tyramine increased quickly as glucose and fructose decreased, indicating that Tetragenococcus might be primarily responsible for organic acid and biogenic amine production. Lactobacillus was identified as a dominant group from the 179-day samples, associated with the increase of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and the decrease of galactose, indicating a potential role for this genus as a major GABA producer during fermentation. The results of this study clarified the functional properties of major bacterial communities in the doenjang fermentation process, contributing to the production of safe and high-quality doenjang.

  16. Pure Culture Fermentation of Green Olives1

    PubMed Central

    Etchells, J. L.; Borg, A. F.; Kittel, I. D.; Bell, T. A.; Fleming, H. P.

    1966-01-01

    The method previously developed by us for the pure-culture fermentation of brined cucumbers and other vegetables has been applied successfully to Manzanillo variety olives. Field-run grade fruit was processed first by conventional procedures to remove most of the bitterness. Then the relative abilities of Lactobacillus plantarum, L. brevis, Pediococcus cerevisiae, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides to become established and produce acid in both heat-shocked (74 C for 3 min) and unheated olives, brined at 4.7 to 5.9% NaCl (w/v basis), were evaluated. The heat-shock treatment not only proved effective in ridding the fruit of naturally occurring, interfering, and competitive microbial groups prior to brining and inoculation, but also made the olives highly fermentable with respect to growth and acid production by the introduced culture, particularly L. plantarum. Of the four species used as inocula, L. plantarum was by far the most vigorous in fermentation ability. It consistently produced the highest levels of brine acidity (1.0 to 1.2% calculated as lactic acid) and the lowest pH values (3.8 to 3.9) during the fermentation of heat-shocked olives. Also, L. plantarum completely dominated fermentations when used in two-species (with P. cerevisiae) and three-species (with P. cerevisiae and L. brevis) combinations as inocula. In contrast, when L. plantarum was inoculated into the brines of unheated olives it failed to become properly established; the same was true for the other species tested, but even to a more pronounced degree. L. brevis was the only species used that failed to develop in brines of both heat-shocked and unheated olives. Modification of the curing brine by the addition of lactic acid at the outset, either with or without dextrose, led to a much earlier onset of fermentation with accompanying acid development, as compared to treatments with dextrose alone or nonadditive controls. Reasons for the marked improvement of the fermentability of Manzanillo olives

  17. Ethanol fermentation kinetics in a continuous and closed-circulating fermentation system with a pervaporation membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunyan; Tang, Xiaoyu; Xiao, Zeyi; Zhou, Yihui; Jiang, Yue; Fu, Shengwei

    2012-06-01

    The kinetics of ethanol fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied in a continuous and closed-circulating fermentation (CCCF) system with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) pervaporation membrane bioreactor. Three sequential 500-h cycles of CCCF experiments were carried out. A glucose volumetric consumption of 3.8 g L(-1) h(-1) and ethanol volumetric productivity of 1.39 g L(-1) h(-1) were obtained in the third cycle, with a specific glucose utilization rate of 0.32 h(-1) and ethanol yield rate of 0.13 h(-1). The prolonged fermentation time and good fermentation performance indicate that the CCCF would be a feasible and promising fermentation process technology.

  18. Acoustical experiment of yogurt fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, H; Mizutani, K; Ohbuchi, T; Nakamura, T

    2006-12-22

    One of the important factors through food manufacturing is hygienic management. Thus, food manufactures prove their hygienic activities by taking certifications like a Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP). This concept also applies to food monitoring. Acoustical measurements have advantage for other measurement in food monitoring because they make it possible to measure with noncontact and nondestructive. We tried to monitor lactic fermentation of yogurt by a probing sensor using a pair of acoustic transducers. Temperature of the solution changes by the reaction heat of fermentation. Consequently the sound velocity propagated through the solution also changes depending on the temperature. At the same time, the solution change its phase from liquid to gel. The transducers usage in the solution indicates the change of the temperature as the change of the phase difference between two transducers. The acoustic method has advantages of nondestructive measurement that reduces contamination of food product by measuring instrument. The sensor was inserted into milk with lactic acid bacterial stain of 19 degrees C and monitored phase retardation of propagated acoustic wave and its temperature with thermocouples in the mild. The monitoring result of fermentation from milk to Caspian Sea yogurt by the acoustic transducers with the frequency of 3.7 MHz started to show gradient change in temperature caused by reaction heat of fermentation but stop the gradient change at the end although the temperature still change. The gradient change stopped its change because of phase change from liquid to gel. The present method will be able to measure indirectly by setting transducers outside of the measuring object. This noncontact sensing method will have great advantage of reduces risk of food contamination from measuring instrument because the measurement probes are set out of fermentation reactor or food containers. Our proposed method will contribute to the

  19. Comparison of fermentation of diets of variable composition and microbial populations in the rumen of sheep and Rusitec fermenters. I. Digestibility, fermentation parameters, and microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Martínez, M E; Ranilla, M J; Tejido, M L; Ramos, S; Carro, M D

    2010-08-01

    Four ruminally and duodenally cannulated sheep and 8 Rusitec fermenters were used to determine the effects of forage to concentrate (F:C) ratio and type of forage in the diet on ruminal fermentation and microbial protein synthesis. The purpose of the study was to assess how closely fermenters can mimic the dietary differences found in vivo. The 4 experimental diets contained F:C ratios of 70:30 or 30:70 with either alfalfa hay or grass hay as the forage. Microbial growth was determined in both systems using (15)N as a microbial marker. Rusitec fermenters detected differences between diets similar to those observed in sheep by changing F:C ratio on pH; neutral detergent fiber digestibility; total volatile fatty acid concentrations; molar proportions of acetate, propionate, butyrate, isovalerate, and caproate; and amylase activity. In contrast, Rusitec fermenters did not reproduce the dietary differences found in sheep for NH(3)-N and lactate concentrations, dry matter (DM) digestibility, proportions of isobutyrate and valerate, carboxymethylcellulase and xylanase activities, and microbial growth and its efficiency. Regarding the effect of the type of forage in the diet, Rusitec fermenters detected differences between diets similar to those found in sheep for most determined parameters, with the exception of pH, DM digestibility, butyrate proportion, and carboxymethylcellulase activity. Minimum pH and maximal volatile fatty acid concentrations were reached at 2h and at 6 to 8h postfeeding in sheep and fermenters, respectively, indicating that feed fermentation was slower in fermenters compared with that in sheep. There were differences between systems in the magnitude of most determined parameters. In general, fermenters showed lower lactate concentrations, neutral detergent fiber digestibility, acetate:propionate ratios, and enzymatic activities. On the contrary, fermenters showed greater NH(3)-N concentrations, DM digestibility, and proportions of propionate

  20. Influence of the timing of nitrogen additions during synthetic grape must fermentations on fermentation kinetics and nitrogen consumption.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Gemma; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Rozès, Nicolas; Mas, Albert; Guillamón, José M

    2005-02-23

    Nitrogen deficiencies in grape musts are one of the main causes of stuck or sluggish wine fermentations. In the present study, we have supplemented nitrogen-deficient fermentations with a mixture of ammonium and amino acids at various stages throughout the alcoholic fermentation. The timing of the nitrogen additions influenced the biomass yield, the fermentation performance, the patterns of ammonium and amino acid consumption, and the production of secondary metabolites. These nitrogen additions induced a nitrogen-repressed situation in the cells, and this situation determined which nitrogen sources were selected. Glutamine and tryptophan were the main amino acids consumed in all the fermentations. Ammonium is the preferred nitrogen source for biomass production but was hardly consumed when it was added in the final stages of the fermentation. The higher ammonium consumption in some fermentations correlated with a greater synthesis of glycerol, acetate, and acetaldehyde but with a lower synthesis of higher alcohols.

  1. Increased flavour diversity of Chardonnay wines by spontaneous fermentation and co-fermentation with Hanseniaspora vineae.

    PubMed

    Medina, K; Boido, E; Fariña, L; Gioia, O; Gomez, M E; Barquet, M; Gaggero, C; Dellacassa, E; Carrau, F

    2013-12-01

    Discovery, characterisation and use of novel yeast strains for winemaking is increasingly regarded as a way for improving quality and to provide variation, including subtle characteristic differences in fine wines. The objective of this work was to evaluate the use of a native apiculate strain, selected from grapes, Hanseniaspora vineae (H. vineae) 02/5A. Fermentations were done in triplicate, working with 225 L oak barrels, using a Chardonnay grape must. Three yeast fermentation strategies were compared: conventional inoculation with a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, ALG 804, sequential inoculation with H. vineae and then strain ALG 804 and spontaneous fermentation. Yeast strain identification was performed during fermentation, in which the apiculate strain was found to be active, until 9% of alcohol in volume, for the co-fermentation and the spontaneous fermentation was completed by three native S. cerevisiae strains. Basic winemaking parameters and some key chemical analysis, such as concentration of glycerol, biogenic amines, organic acids, and aroma compounds were analysed. Sensory analysis was done using a trained panel and further evaluated with professional winemakers. Sequential inoculation with H. vineae followed by S. cerevisiae resulted in relatively dry wines, with increased aroma and flavour diversity compared with wines resulting from inoculation with S. cerevisiae alone. Wines produced from sequential inoculations were considered, by a winemaker's panel, to have an increased palate length and body. Characteristics of wines derived from sequential inoculation could be explained due to significant increases in glycerol and acetyl and ethyl ester flavour compounds and relative decreases in alcohols and fatty acids. Aroma sensory analysis of wine character and flavour, attributed to winemaking using H. vineae, indicated a significant increase in fruit intensity described as banana, pear, apple, citric fruits and guava. GC analysis of the

  2. Physiological and fermentation properties of Bacillus coagulans and a mutant lacking fermentative lactate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Su, Yue; Rhee, Mun Su; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2011-03-01

    Bacillus coagulans, a sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, grows optimally at 50-55 °C and produces lactic acid as the primary fermentation product from both hexoses and pentoses. The amount of fungal cellulases required for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) at 55 °C was previously reported to be three to four times lower than for SSF at the optimum growth temperature for Saccharomyces cerevisiae of 35 °C. An ethanologenic B. coagulans is expected to lower the cellulase loading and production cost of cellulosic ethanol due to SSF at 55 °C. As a first step towards developing B. coagulans as an ethanologenic microbial biocatalyst, activity of the primary fermentation enzyme L-lactate dehydrogenase was removed by mutation (strain Suy27). Strain Suy27 produced ethanol as the main fermentation product from glucose during growth at pH 7.0 (0.33 g ethanol per g glucose fermented). Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) acting in series contributed to about 55% of the ethanol produced by this mutant while pyruvate formate lyase and ADH were responsible for the remainder. Due to the absence of PDH activity in B. coagulans during fermentative growth at pH 5.0, the l-ldh mutant failed to grow anaerobically at pH 5.0. Strain Suy27-13, a derivative of the l-ldh mutant strain Suy27, that produced PDH activity during anaerobic growth at pH 5.0 grew at this pH and also produced ethanol as the fermentation product (0.39 g per g glucose). These results show that construction of an ethanologenic B. coagulans requires optimal expression of PDH activity in addition to the removal of the LDH activity to support growth and ethanol production.

  3. Fermentation of five sucrose isomers by human dental plaque bacteria.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, J; Sato, T; Hoshino, E; Noda, T; Takahashi, N

    2003-01-01

    Sucrose has five structural isomers: palatinose, trehalulose, turanose, maltulose and leucrose. Although these isomers have been reported to be noncariogenic disaccharides, which cannot be utilized by mutans streptococci, there is no information about their fermentability by other bacteria in dental plaque. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether these isomers were fermented by predominant bacteria in human dental plaque. Clinical bacterial isolates obtained from dental plaque from 3 children aged 22 months to 50 months (146 strains) were inoculated into 3 ml of peptone-yeast extract (PY medium) containing glucose for 1 day, then an aliquot of 20 microl of culture medium was inoculated into 1 ml of PY medium containing 1% (w/v) of the respective test carbohydrates. After incubation for 1 day, the pH values and the optical density at 660 nm of the cultures were measured. Fermentation ability was measured by pH or=0.5. Of the clinical isolates, 33% fermented palatinose, and 69% of these were Actinomyces species. All of the palatinose-fermenting bacterial strains fermented trehalulose, 25% fermented turanose, 70% fermented maltulose and 23% fermented leucrose. We therefore conclude that, in human dental plaque, there are significant numbers of bacteria that are able to ferment sucrose isomers.

  4. Fermentation to ethanol of pentose-containing spent sulphite liquor

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.; Wayman, M.; Parekh, S.K.

    1987-06-01

    Ethanolic fermentation of spent sulphite liquor with ordinary bakers' yeast is incomplete because this yeast cannot ferment the pentose sugars in the liquor. This results in poor alcohol yields, and a residual effluent problem. By using the yeast Candida shehatae (R) for fermentation of the spent sulphite liquor from a large Canadian alcohol-producing sulphite pulp and paper mill, pentoses as well as hexoses were fermented nearly completely, alcohol yields were raised by 33%, and sugar removal increased by 46%. Inhibitors were removed prior to fermentation by steam stripping. Major benefits were obtained by careful recycling of this yeast, which was shown to be tolerant both of high sugar concentrations and high alcohol concentrations. When sugar concentrations over 250 g/L (glucose:xylose 70:30) were fermented, ethanol became an inhibitor when its concentration reached 90 g/L. However, when the ethanol was removed by low-temperature vacuum distillation, fermentation continued and resulted in a yield of 0.50 g ethanol/g sugar consumed. Further improvement was achieved by combining enzyme saccharification of sugar oligomers with fermentation. This yeast is able to ferment both hexoses and pentoses simultaneously, efficiently, and rapidly. Present indications are that it is well suited to industrial operations wherever hexoses and pentoses are both to be fermented to ethanol, for example, in wood hydrolysates. (Refs. 6).

  5. High throughput biotechnology in traditional fermented food industry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Xu, Rong-man; Song, Jia; Wang, Wei-min

    2010-11-01

    Traditional fermented food is not only the staple food for most of developing countries but also the key healthy food for developed countries. As the healthy function of these foods are gradually discovered, more and more high throughput biotechnologies are being used to promote the old and new industry. As a result, the microflora, manufacturing processes and product healthy function of these foods were pushed forward either in the respect of profundity or extensiveness nowadays. The application and progress of the high throughput biotechnologies into traditional fermented food industries were different from each other, which was reviewed and detailed by the catalogues of fermented milk products (yogurt, cheese), fermented sausages, fermented vegetables (kimchi, sauerkraut), fermented cereals (sourdough) and fermented beans (tempeh, natto). Given the further promotion by high throughput biotechnologies, the middle and/or down-stream process of traditional fermented foods would be optimized and the process of industrialization of local traditional fermented food having many functional factors but in small quantity would be accelerated. The article presents some promising patents on traditional fermented food industry.

  6. Handbook for the ESL/ABE Administrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escobar, Joanna Sculley; Daugherty, John

    This 1975 handbook consists of three books to be used, together or independently, by administrators in developing, implementing, and evaluating an adult English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) program. The first book, an administrator's checklist, is designed as an inventory that specifies succinctly the critical and significant program elements. The…

  7. Television Basics for TV-ABE Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland Univ., Baltimore.

    The guide opens with a discussion of television's limitations: its initial blankness; its technical constraints; its need for studios; its relatively high costs; the need for extensive planning; and its need to be integrated into a broader program. A discussion of television's strengths follows: its flexibility; its ability to focus and magnify;…

  8. ABE: An Integral Part of Personal Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeton, Patricia McCarthy; Parker, James T.

    1993-01-01

    Recent reports examining the federal Adult Education for the Homeless and Job Opportunities and Basic Skills programs conclude that adult education must consider the purposes for which participants will use basic skills and the barriers they face. A comprehensive human resource development system would include case management, use of formerly…

  9. Lactic acid bacteria and yeasts involved in the fermentation ofamabere amaruranu, a Kenyan fermented milk

    PubMed Central

    Nyambane, Bitutu; Thari, William M; Wangoh, John; Njage, Patrick M K

    2014-01-01

    Indigenous fermented milk products contain microbiota composed of technologically important species and strains which are gradually getting lost with new technologies. We investigated the microbial diversity inamabere amaruranu, a traditionally fermented milk product from Kenya. Sixteen samples of the product from different containers were obtained. One hundred and twenty isolates of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and 67 strains of yeasts were identified using API 50 CH and API 20 C AUX identification kits, respectively. The average pH of all the traditional fermented samples was 4.00 ± 0.93. Lactobacilli, yeasts, and molds as well asEnterobacteriaceae counts from the plastic containers were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those from gourd.Enterobacteriaceae were below 1.00 ± 1.11 log10 cfu/mL in products from the gourds and 2.17 ± 1.92 log10 cfu/mL from the plastic containers. The LAB species were identified asStreptococcus thermophilus (25%),Lactobacillus plantarum (20%), andLeuconostoc mesenteroides (20%). The predominant yeasts wereSaccharomyces cerevisiae (25%),Trichosporum mucoides (15%),Candida famata (10%), andCandida albicans (10%). The type of vessel used for fermentation had no significant influence on the type of isolated and identified species. The diverse mixture of LAB and yeasts microflora forms a potential consortium for further product innovation inamabere amaruranu and other fermented milk products. PMID:25493187

  10. Sugaring-out extraction of acetoin from fermentation broth by coupling with fermentation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jian-Ying; Ma, Lin-Hui; Wang, Zhuang-Fei; Guan, Wen-Tian; Xiu, Zhi-Long

    2017-03-01

    Acetoin is a natural flavor and an important bio-based chemical which could be separated from fermentation broth by solvent extraction, salting-out extraction or recovered in the form of derivatives. In this work, a novel method named as sugaring-out extraction coupled with fermentation was tried in the acetoin production by Bacillus subtilis DL01. The effects of six solvents on bacterial growth and the distribution of acetoin and glucose in different solvent-glucose systems were explored. The operation parameters such as standing time, glucose concentration, and volume ratio of ethyl acetate to fermentation broth were determined. In a system composed of fermentation broth, glucose (100%, m/v) and two-fold volume of ethyl acetate, nearly 100% glucose was distributed into bottom phase, and 61.2% acetoin into top phase without coloring matters and organic acids. The top phase was treated by vacuum distillation to remove solvent and purify acetoin, while the bottom phase was used as carbon source to produce acetoin in the next batch of fermentation.

  11. Fermentation broth components influence droplet coalescence and hinder advanced biofuel recovery during fermentation.

    PubMed

    Heeres, Arjan S; Schroën, Karin; Heijnen, Joseph J; van der Wielen, Luuk A M; Cuellar, Maria C

    2015-08-01

    Developments in synthetic biology enabled the microbial production of long chain hydrocarbons, which can be used as advanced biofuels in aviation or transportation. Currently, these fuels are not economically competitive due to their production costs. The current process offers room for improvement: by utilizing lignocellulosic feedstock, increasing microbial yields, and using cheaper process technology. Gravity separation is an example of the latter, for which droplet growth by coalescence is crucial. The aim of this study was to study the effect of fermentation broth components on droplet coalescence. Droplet coalescence was measured using two setups: a microfluidic chip and regular laboratory scale stirred vessel (2 L). Some fermentation broth components had a large impact on droplet coalescence. Especially components present in hydrolysed cellulosic biomass and mannoproteins from the yeast cell wall retard coalescence. To achieve a technically feasible gravity separation that can be integrated with the fermentation, the negative effects of these components on coalescence should be minimized. This could be achieved by redesign of the fermentation medium or adjusting the fermentation conditions, aiming to minimize the release of surface active components by the microorganisms. This way, another step can be made towards economically feasible advanced biofuel production.

  12. Safety assessment of the biogenic amines in fermented soya beans and fermented bean curd.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juan; Ding, Xiaowen; Qin, Yingrui; Zeng, Yitao

    2014-08-06

    To evaluate the safety of biogenic amines, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to evaluate the levels of biogenic amines in fermented soya beans and fermented bean curd. In fermented soya beans, the total biogenic amines content was in a relatively safe range in many samples, although the concentration of histamine, tyramine, and β-phenethylamine was high enough in some samples to cause a possible safety threat, and 8 of the 30 samples were deemed unsafe. In fermented bean curd, the total biogenic amines content was more than 900 mg/kg in 19 white sufu amples, a level that has been determined to pose a safety hazard; putrescine was the only one detected in all samples and also had the highest concentration, which made samples a safety hazard; the content of tryptamine, β-phenethylamine, tyramine, and histamine had reached the level of threat to human health in some white and green sufu samples, and that may imply another potential safety risk; and 25 of the 33 samples were unsafe. In conclusion, the content of biogenic amines in all fermented soya bean products should be studied and appropriate limits determined to ensure the safety of eating these foods.

  13. Dynamics of the yeast transcriptome during wine fermentation reveals a novel fermentation stress response

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Virginia D.; Ho Sui, Shannan J.; Erasmus, Daniel; van der Merwe, George K.; Brumm, Jochen; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Bryan, Jennifer; van Vuuren, Hennie J. J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, genome-wide expression analyses were used to study the response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to stress throughout a 15-day wine fermentation. Forty per cent of the yeast genome significantly changed expression levels to mediate long-term adaptation to fermenting grape must. Among the genes that changed expression levels, a group of 223 genes was identified, which was designated as fermentation stress response (FSR) genes that were dramatically induced at various points during fermentation. FSR genes sustain high levels of induction up to the final time point and exhibited changes in expression levels ranging from four- to 80-fold. The FSR is novel; 62% of the genes involved have not been implicated in global stress responses and 28% of the FSR genes have no functional annotation. Genes involved in respiratory metabolism and gluconeogenesis were expressed during fermentation despite the presence of high concentrations of glucose. Ethanol, rather than nutrient depletion, seems to be responsible for entry of yeast cells into the stationary phase. PMID:18215224

  14. Extraction chemistry of fermentation product carboxylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kertes, A.S.; King, C.J.

    1986-02-01

    Within the framework of a program aiming to improve the existing extractive recovery technology of fermentation products, the state of the art is critically reviewed. The acids under consideration are propionic, lactic, pyruvic, succinic, fumaric, maleic, malic, itaconic, tartaric, citric, and isocitric, all obtained by the aerobic fermentation of glucose via the glycolytic pathway and glyoxylate bypass. With no exception, it is the undissociated monomeric acid that is extracted into carbon-bonded and phosphorus-bonded oxygen donor extractants. In the organic phase, the acids are usually dimerized. The extractive transfer process obeys the Nernst law, and the measured partition coefficients range from about 0.003 for aliphatic hydrocarbons to about 2 to 3 for aliphatic alcohols and ketones to about 10 or more for organophosphates. Equally high distribution ratios are measured when long-chain tertiary amines are employed as extractants, forming bulky salts preferentially soluble in the organic phase. 123 references.

  15. Extraction chemistry of fermentation product carboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Kertes, A.S.; King, C.J.

    1986-02-01

    Within the framework of a program aiming to improve the existing extractive recovery technology of fermentation products, the state of the art is critically reviewed. The acids under consideration are propionic, lactic, pyruvic, succinic, fumaric, maleic, malic, itaconic, tartaric, citric, and isocitric, all obtained by the aerobic fermentation of glucose via the glycolytic pathways and glyoxylate bypass. With no exception, it is the undissociated monomeric acid that is extracted into carbon-bonded and phosphorus-bonded oxygen donor extractants. In the organic phase, the acids are usually dimerized. The extractive transfer process obeys the Nernst law, and the measured partition coefficients range from about 0.003 for aliphatic hydrocarbons to about 2 to 3 for aliphatic alcohols and ketones to about 10 or more for organophosphates. Equally high distribution ratios are measured when long-chain tertiary amines are employed as extractants, forming bulky salts preferentially soluble in the organic phase.

  16. Foam and its mitigation in fermentation systems.

    PubMed

    Junker, Beth

    2007-01-01

    Key aspects of foaming and its mitigation in fermentation systems are presented. Foam properties and behavior, conditions that affect foaming, and consequences of foaming are discussed, followed by methods to detect and prevent foam, both without and with the use of antifoam, and their implications. Antifoams were catalogued according to their class (e.g., polyalkylene glycols, silicone emulsions, etc.) to facilitate recognition of antifoams possessing similar base compositions. Relatively few published studies directly comparing antifoams experimentally are available, but those reports found only partially identify clear benefits/disadvantages of any one antifoam type. Consequently, desired characteristics, trends in antifoam application, and chemical types of antifoams are evaluated on the basis of a thorough review of available literature reports describing a specific antifoam's usage. Finally, examples of specific foaming situations taken from both the literature and from actual experience in an industrial fermentation pilot plant are examined for their agreement with expected behavior.

  17. Review: Diversity of Microorganisms in Global Fermented Foods and Beverages

    PubMed Central

    Tamang, Jyoti P.; Watanabe, Koichi; Holzapfel, Wilhelm H.

    2016-01-01

    Culturalable and non-culturable microorganisms naturally ferment majority of global fermented foods and beverages. Traditional food fermentation represents an extremely valuable cultural heritage in most regions, and harbors a huge genetic potential of valuable but hitherto undiscovered strains. Holistic approaches for identification and complete profiling of both culturalable and non-culturable microorganisms in global fermented foods are of interest to food microbiologists. The application of culture-independent technique has thrown new light on the diversity of a number of hitherto unknown and non-cultural microorganisms in naturally fermented foods. Functional bacterial groups (“phylotypes”) may be reflected by their mRNA expression in a particular substrate and not by mere DNA-level detection. An attempt has been made to review the microbiology of some fermented foods and alcoholic beverages of the world. PMID:27047484

  18. Mathematical model of sugar uptake in fermenting yeasted dough.

    PubMed

    Loveday, S M; Winger, R J

    2007-07-25

    Fermentation prior to freezing significantly reduces the shelf life of frozen dough, measured as a decline in proofing power. Changes during fermentation caused by yeast metabolism have previously been described empirically on a dough weight basis and have not been mathematically modeled. In this work, yeast metabolites were quantified in fermenting dough and their concentrations were estimated in the aqueous environment around yeast cells. The osmotic pressure in the aqueous phase increases by 23% during 3 h of fermentation, which depresses the freezing point by 1 degrees C. The rise in osmotic pressure and the accumulation of ethanol may affect phase equilibria in the dough, baking properties, and the shelf life of frozen dough. Predictive modeling equations fitted sugar concentration data accurately. It was found that the preference of baker's yeast for glucose over fructose was stronger in fermenting dough than in liquid fermentations. The usefulness of the model in industrial bakery formulation work was demonstrated.

  19. Fermentation of polysaccharides by Klebsielleae and other facultative bacilli.

    PubMed

    Ochuba, G U; von Riesen, V L

    1980-05-01

    Fermentations of 10 polysaccharides by species of the family Enterobacteriaceae were examined. Algin, guar, karaya, xanthan, and xylan were not fermented by any of the strains tested. Most of the activity was found in the tribe Klebsielleae. Klebsiella oxytoca fermented amylopectin (97% of the strains studied), carrageenan (100%), inulin (68%), polypectate (100%), and tragacanth (100%). Klebsiella pneumoniae fermented amylopectin (91%), carrageenan (100%), and tragacanth (86%). Carrageenan was also fermented by Enterobacter aerogenes (100%), Enterobacter agglomerans (63%), Enterobacter cloacae (95%), and Pectobacterium (38%). Pectobacterium shared polypectate fermentation (100%) with K. oxytoca. With one exception, Serratia strains were negative on all polysaccharides. These results, along with other evidence, indicate that (i) the genus Klebsiella is biochemically the most versatile genus of the tribe, (ii) because of its distinct characteristics, K. oxytoca warrants species designation separate from K. pneumoniae, and (iii) some food additives generally considered indigestible can be metabolized by a few species of facultative bacilli, whereas others appear to be resistant.

  20. Fermentation of polysaccharides by Klebsiella and other facultative bacilli

    SciTech Connect

    Ochuba, G.U.; Von Riesen, V.L.

    1980-05-01

    Fermentations of 10 polysaccharides by species of the family Enterobacteriaceae were examined. Algin, guar, karaya, xanthan, and xylan were not fermented by any of the strains tested. Most of the activity was found in the tribe Klebsielleae. Klebseilla oxytoca fermented amylopectin (97% of the strains studied), carrageenan (100%), inulin (68%), polypectate (100%), and tragacanth (100%). Klebsiella pneumoniae fermented amylopectin (91%), carrageenan (100%), and tragacanth (86%). Carraggeenan was also fermented by Enterobacter aerogenes (100%), Enterobacter agglomerans (63%), Enterobacter cloacae (95%), and pectobacterium (38%). pectobacterium shared polypectate fermentation (100%) with K. oxytoca. With one exception, Serratia strains were negative on all polysaccharides. These results, along with other evidence, indicate that (i) the genus Klebsiella is biochemically the most versatile genus of the tribe, (ii) because of its distinct characteristics, K. oxytoca warrants species designation separate from K. pneumoniae, and (iii) some food additives generally considered indigestible can be metabolized by a few species of facultative bacilli, whereas others appear to be resistant.

  1. Lactic acid fermentation in cell-recycle membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, B; Swaminathan, T

    2006-02-01

    Traditional lactic acid fermentation suffers from low productivity and low product purity. Cell-recycle fermentation has become one of the methods to obtain high cell density, which results in higher productivity. Lactic acid fermentation was investigated in a cell-recycle membrane bioreactor at higher substrate concentrations of 100 and 120 g/dm3. A maximum cell density of 145 g/dm3 and a maximum productivity of 34 g/(dm3.h) were achieved in cell-recycle fermentation. In spite of complete consumption of substrate, there was a continuous increase in cell density in cell-recycle fermentation. Control of cell density in cell-recycle fermentation was attempted by cell bleeding and reduction in yeast extract concentration.

  2. Comparison of bifidogenic growth stimulation activities of fermented whey prototypes.

    PubMed

    Moon, Gi-Seong

    2013-12-01

    Fermented whey solution presenting bifidogenic growth stimulation (BGS) activity was processed as prototypes such as sterilized fermented whey (SFW), spray-dried fermented whey (SDFW), and freeze-dried fermented whey (FDFW) and their BGS activities were compared. In optical density (OD600) test, the BGS activity of three prototypes, which showed similar activities, were significantly different with non-fermented whey solution adjusted to pH 4.5 as a control (P<0.05). In viable cell count test, SDFW had the most positive influence than other prototypes on the BGS activity even though the difference was not significant. However, the activities of all prototypes were significantly different than the negative control (no addition). These results indicate that the processed prototypes of fermented whey solution show BGS activities and might be commercialized, with further evidences, in animal or human studies.

  3. Combined enzyme mediated fermentation of cellulose and xylose to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Lastick, S.M.; Mohagheghi, A.; Tucker, M.P.; Grohmann, K.

    1991-03-21

    A process for producing ethanol from mixed sugar streams from pretreated biomass comprising xylose and cellulose using enzymes to convert these substrates to fermentable sugars; selecting and isolating a yeast having the ability to ferment these sugars as they are being formed to produce ethanol; loading the substrates with the fermentation mix composed of yeast, enzymes and substrates; fermenting the loaded substrates and enzymes under anaerobic conditions at a pH range of between about 5.0 to about 6.0 and at a temperature range of between about 35{degrees}C to about 40{degrees}C until the fermentation is completed, the xylose being isomerized to xylulose, the cellulose being converted to glucose, and these sugars being concurrently converted to ethanol by yeast through means of the anaerobic fermentation; and recovering the ethanol.

  4. Combined enzyme mediated fermentation of cellulose and xylose to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Lastick, S.M.; Mohagheghi, A.; Tucker, M.P.; Grohmann, K.

    1991-03-21

    A process for producing ethanol from mixed sugar streams from pretreated biomass comprising xylose and cellulose using enzymes to convert these substrates to fermentable sugars; selecting and isolating a yeast having the ability to ferment these sugars as they are being formed to produce ethanol; loading the substrates with the fermentation mix composed of yeast, enzymes and substrates; fermenting the loaded substrates and enzymes under anaerobic conditions at a pH range of between about 5.0 to about 6.0 and at a temperature range of between about 35[degrees]C to about 40[degrees]C until the fermentation is completed, the xylose being isomerized to xylulose, the cellulose being converted to glucose, and these sugars being concurrently converted to ethanol by yeast through means of the anaerobic fermentation; and recovering the ethanol.

  5. Challenges in industrial fermentation technology research.

    PubMed

    Formenti, Luca Riccardo; Nørregaard, Anders; Bolic, Andrijana; Hernandez, Daniela Quintanilla; Hagemann, Timo; Heins, Anna-Lena; Larsson, Hilde; Mears, Lisa; Mauricio-Iglesias, Miguel; Krühne, Ulrich; Gernaey, Krist V

    2014-06-01

    Industrial fermentation processes are increasingly popular, and are considered an important technological asset for reducing our dependence on chemicals and products produced from fossil fuels. However, despite their increasing popularity, fermentation processes have not yet reached the same maturity as traditional chemical processes, particularly when it comes to using engineering tools such as mathematical models and optimization techniques. This perspective starts with a brief overview of these engineering tools. However, the main focus is on a description of some of the most important engineering challenges: scaling up and scaling down fermentation processes, the influence of morphology on broth rheology and mass transfer, and establishing novel sensors to measure and control insightful process parameters. The greatest emphasis is on the challenges posed by filamentous fungi, because of their wide applications as cell factories and therefore their relevance in a White Biotechnology context. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is introduced as a promising tool that can be used to support the scaling up and scaling down of bioreactors, and for studying mixing and the potential occurrence of gradients in a tank.

  6. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-06-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here we produced living hybrid materials by giving to unicellular organisms the nutrient to grow. Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the CNTs were internalized by the cell after fermentation bridging the cells. Tensile tests on dried composite films have been rationalized in terms of a CNT cell bridging mechanism where the strongly enhanced strength of the composite is governed by the adhesion energy between the bridging carbon nanotubes and the matrix. The addition of CNTs also significantly improved the electrical conductivity along with a higher photoconductive activity. The proposed process could lead to the development of more complex and interactive structures programmed to self-assemble into specific patterns, such as those on strain or light sensors that could sense damage or convert light stimulus in an electrical signal.

  7. Fermentation based carbon nanotube multifunctional bionic composites

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, Luca; Bon, Silvia Bittolo; Signetti, Stefano; Tripathi, Manoj; Iacob, Erica; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the processes used by microorganisms to digest nutrients for their growth can be a viable method for the formation of a wide range of so called biogenic materials that have unique properties that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here we produced living hybrid materials by giving to unicellular organisms the nutrient to grow. Based on bread fermentation, a bionic composite made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a single-cell fungi, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast extract, was prepared by fermentation of such microorganisms at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the CNTs were internalized by the cell after fermentation bridging the cells. Tensile tests on dried composite films have been rationalized in terms of a CNT cell bridging mechanism where the strongly enhanced strength of the composite is governed by the adhesion energy between the bridging carbon nanotubes and the matrix. The addition of CNTs also significantly improved the electrical conductivity along with a higher photoconductive activity. The proposed process could lead to the development of more complex and interactive structures programmed to self-assemble into specific patterns, such as those on strain or light sensors that could sense damage or convert light stimulus in an electrical signal. PMID:27279425

  8. Amylolytic bacterial lactic acid fermentation - a review.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Gopal; Altaf, Md; Naveena, B J; Venkateshwar, M; Kumar, E Vijay

    2008-01-01

    Lactic acid, an enigmatic chemical has wide applications in food, pharmaceutical, leather, textile industries and as chemical feed stock. Novel applications in synthesis of biodegradable plastics have increased the demand for lactic acid. Microbial fermentations are preferred over chemical synthesis of lactic acid due to various factors. Refined sugars, though costly, are the choice substrates for lactic acid production using Lactobacillus sps. Complex natural starchy raw materials used for production of lactic acid involve pretreatment by gelatinization and liquefaction followed by enzymatic saccharification to glucose and subsequent conversion of glucose to lactic acid by Lactobacillus fermentation. Direct conversion of starchy biomass to lactic acid by bacteria possessing both amylolytic and lactic acid producing character will eliminate the two step process to make it economical. Very few amylolytic lactic acid bacteria with high potential to produce lactic acid at high substrate concentrations are reported till date. In this view, a search has been made for various amylolytic LAB involved in production of lactic acid and utilization of cheaply available renewable agricultural starchy biomass. Lactobacillus amylophilus GV6 is an efficient and widely studied amylolytic lactic acid producing bacteria capable of utilizing inexpensive carbon and nitrogen substrates with high lactic acid production efficiency. This is the first review on amylolytic bacterial lactic acid fermentations till date.

  9. Development of yeasts for xylose fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, T.W.; Yang, V.; Marks, J.; Amartey, S.; Kenealy, W.R.; Cho, J.Y.; Dahn, K.; Davis, B.P.

    1993-12-31

    Xylose is an abundant sugar in hardwoods and agricultural residues. Its use is essential for any economical conversion of lignocellulose to ethanol. Only a few yeasts ferment xylose effectively. Our results show that the best strains are Candida shehatae ATCC 2984 and Pichia stipitis CBS 6054. Wild type strains of C. shehatae ATCC 22984 will produce 56 g/L of ethanol from xylose within 48 h in a fed batch fermentation. We have obtained improved mutants of P.stipitis by selecting for growth on L-xylose and L-arabinose. Mutant strains produce up to 55% more ethanol than the parent and exhibit higher specific fermentation rates. We have also developed an effective transformation system that enables the introduction and expression of heterologous DNA on integrating and autonomous vectors. The transformation system for P. stipitis is based on its URA3 gene as a selectable marker and an autonomous replication sequence (ARS) which we isolated from the parent. We are using integrating and ARS vectors to metabolically engineer P. stipitis by altering the regulation and expression of key enzymes. As model systems we are examining the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) that are present in limiting amounts or induced only under non-growth conditions.

  10. Bioethanol Production from Fermentable Sugar Juice

    PubMed Central

    Zabed, Hossain; Faruq, Golam; Sahu, Jaya Narayan; Azirun, Mohd Sofian; Hashim, Rosli; Nasrulhaq Boyce, Amru

    2014-01-01

    Bioethanol production from renewable sources to be used in transportation is now an increasing demand worldwide due to continuous depletion of fossil fuels, economic and political crises, and growing concern on environmental safety. Mainly, three types of raw materials, that is, sugar juice, starchy crops, and lignocellulosic materials, are being used for this purpose. This paper will investigate ethanol production from free sugar containing juices obtained from some energy crops such as sugarcane, sugar beet, and sweet sorghum that are the most attractive choice because of their cost-effectiveness and feasibility to use. Three types of fermentation process (batch, fed-batch, and continuous) are employed in ethanol production from these sugar juices. The most common microorganism used in fermentation from its history is the yeast, especially, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, though the bacterial species Zymomonas mobilis is also potentially used nowadays for this purpose. A number of factors related to the fermentation greatly influences the process and their optimization is the key point for efficient ethanol production from these feedstocks. PMID:24715820

  11. [The antihypertensive effect of fermented milks].

    PubMed

    Domínguez González, Karina N; Cruz Guerrero, Alma E; Márquez, Humberto González; Gómez Ruiz, Lorena C; García-Garibay, Mariano; Rodríguez Serrano, Gabriela M

    2014-01-01

    There is a great variety of fermented milks containing lactic acid bacteria that present health-promoting properties. Milk proteins are hydrolyzed by the proteolytic system of these microorganisms producing peptides which may also perform other functions in vivo. These peptides are encrypted within the primary structure of proteins and can be released through food processing, either by milk fermentation or enzymatic hydrolysis during gastrointestinal transit. They perform different activities, since they act in the cardiovascular, digestive, endocrine, immune and nervous systems. Bioactive peptides that have an antihypertensive, antithrombotic, antioxidant and hypocholesterolemic effect on the cardiovascular system can reduce the risk factors for chronic disease manifestation and help improve human health. Most studied bioactive peptides are those which exert an antihypertensive effect by inhibiting the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Recently, the study of these peptides has focused on the implementation of tests to prove that they have an effect on health. This paper focuses on the production of ACEinhibitory antihypertensive peptides from fermented milks, its history, production and in vivo tests on rats and humans, on which its hypotensive effect has been shown.

  12. Metabolic engineering for improved microbial pentose fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Global concern over the depletion of fossil fuel reserves, and the detrimental impact that combustion of these materials has on the environment, is focusing attention on initiatives to create sustainable approaches for the production and use of biofuels from various biomass substrates. The development of a low-cost, safe and eco-friendly process for the utilization of renewable resources to generate value-added products with biotechnological potential as well as robust microorganisms capable of efficient fermentation of all types of sugars are essential to underpin the economic production of biofuels from biomass feedstocks. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the most established fermentation yeast used in large scale bioconversion strategies, does not however metabolise the pentose sugars, xylose and arabinose and bioengineering is required for introduction of efficient pentose metabolic pathways and pentose sugar transport proteins for bioconversion of these substrates. Our approach provided a basis for future experiments that may ultimately lead to the development of industrial S. cerevisiae strains engineered to express pentose metabolising proteins from thermophilic fungi living on decaying plant material and here we expand our original article and discuss the strategies implemented to improve pentose fermentation. PMID:21468211

  13. Simultaneous saccharification: fermentation with Zymomonas mobilis

    SciTech Connect

    Spangler, D.J.; Emert, G.H.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years, an ethanol production process has been developed which utilizes Trichoderma reesei cellulase and Candida brassicae IFO 1664 in the simultaneous saccharification/fermentation (SSF) of cellulose to ethanol. The direct production of ethanol from cellulose in an SSF process alleviates the problem of end production inhibition. Glucose does not accumulate in this system, but rather is fermented to ethanol immediately following saccharification. The result is an increase in yield of 25% or greater as compared with separate processes of saccharification and fermentation. An alternative organisms which might be used in place of yeasts in ethanol production processes is Zymomonas mobilis. The optimum temperature for hydrolysis of cellulose by Trichoderma reesei cellulases is 50/sup 0/C. Since this hydrolysis is the rate limiting step in the SSF process, it is advantageous to utilize the most temperature tolerant ethanol producer available. Candida brassicae is currently the organism of choice due to its ability to produce ethanol efficiently at 40/sup 0/C. This investigation reports on the screening of Zymomonas strains and evaluating the feasibility of utilizing the most temperature tolerant strain in place of C. brassicae in SSF.

  14. Fermentation alcohol: better to convert to fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Maiorella, P.L.

    1982-08-01

    In the conversion of farm products to liquid fuel by fermentation, large energy savings are possible if distillation to anhydrous alcohol for gasohol blending is replaced by gasoline production with a Mobil zeolite catalyst. Simple fermentation yields a roughly 10 wt% alcohol beer product. Conventional distillation to produce anhydrous alcohol requires 32.6 M Btu/gal of ethanol. Even the most efficient steam reuse methods require at least 21 M Btu/gal. Thus, distillation energy requirements are a major fraction (28 to 43 percent) of the energy content (75.6 M Btu/ gal) of the final alcohol product. Use of the fermentation beer in a gasoline production process would be far more energy efficient, using only 11.1 M Btu/gal of alcohol processed. Also, a more desirable liquid fuel would be produced. Distillation savings more than offset conversion costs, but a small portion of the alcohol feed is converted to lower value LPG gas, and gasoline price must be incremented correspondingly. The upgrading of ethanol to gasoline results in a 10% increase in cost per Btu for the liquid fuel. It must be decided if this increase is justified by downstream savings in using the superior fuel and by the large production energy savings.

  15. Regulation of alcohol fermentation by Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to elucidate the way in which the fermentative synthesis of ethanol is regulated in the facultative anaerobe Escherichia coli. Focus is on the two final steps in alcohol synthesis, which are catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde CoA dehydrogenase. We have isolated a series of mutations affecting the expression of these enzymes. Some of these mutations are in the structural genes for these enzymes; others affect the regulation of the adh operon. We have recently cloned the genes coding for these enzymes and are now studying the effect of multiple copies of the adh gene on fermentative growth and its regulation. A recently invented technique, proton suicide has allowed the selection of a variety of novel mutants affecting fermentation which are presently being characterized. We have isolated a comprehensive collection of operon fusions in which the lacZ structural gene is fused to promoters that are inactive aerobically but active anaerobically. Although these genes (like adh) are only expressed under anaerobic conditions, the level of induction varies from two-fold to nearly 100-fold. The nitrogen source, medium pH, nature of the buffer, presence of alternative electron acceptors (e.g., nitrate), and other factors exert a great effect on the expression of many of these genes. In the near future we will investigate control mechanisms common to the adh operon and other anaerobically regulated genes.

  16. Kombucha fermentation and its antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Sreeramulu, G; Zhu, Y; Knol, W

    2000-06-01

    Kombucha was prepared in a tea broth (0.5% w/v) supplemented with sucrose (10% w/v) by using a commercially available starter culture. The pH decreased steadily from 5 to 2.5 during the fermentation while the weight of the "tea fungus" and the OD of the tea broth increased through 4 days of the fermentation and remained fairly constant thereafter. The counts of acetic acid-producing bacteria and yeasts in the broth increased up to 4 days of fermentation and decreased afterward. The antimicrobial activity of Kombucha was investigated against a number of pathogenic microorganisms. Staphylococcus aureus, Shigella sonnei, Escherichia coli, Aeromonas hydrophila, Yersinia enterolitica, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter cloacae, Staphylococcus epidermis, Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella enteritidis, Salmonella typhimurium, Bacillus cereus, Helicobacterpylori, and Listeria monocytogenes were found to be sensitive to Kombucha. According to the literature on Kombucha, acetic acid is considered to be responsible for the inhibitory effect toward a number of microbes tested, and this is also valid in the present study. However, in this study, Kombucha proved to exert antimicrobial activities against E. coli, Sh. sonnei, Sal. typhimurium, Sal. enteritidis, and Cm. jejuni, even at neutral pH and after thermal denaturation. This finding suggests the presence of antimicrobial compounds other than acetic acid and large proteins in Kombucha.

  17. Metabolic engineering for improved microbial pentose fermentation.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Sara; Murray, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Global concern over the depletion of fossil fuel reserves, and the detrimental impact that combustion of these materials has on the environment, is focusing attention on initiatives to create sustainable approaches for the production and use of biofuels from various biomass substrates. The development of a low-cost, safe and eco-friendly process for the utilization of renewable resources to generate value-added products with biotechnological potential as well as robust microorganisms capable of efficient fermentation of all types of sugars are essential to underpin the economic production of biofuels from biomass feedstocks. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the most established fermentation yeast used in large scale bioconversion strategies, does not however metabolise the pentose sugars, xylose and arabinose and bioengineering is required for introduction of efficient pentose metabolic pathways and pentose sugar transport proteins for bioconversion of these substrates. Our approach provided a basis for future experiments that may ultimately lead to the development of industrial S. cerevisiae strains engineered to express pentose metabolising proteins from thermophilic fungi living on decaying plant material and here we expand our original article and discuss the strategies implemented to improve pentose fermentation.

  18. Bioethanol production from fermentable sugar juice.

    PubMed

    Zabed, Hossain; Faruq, Golam; Sahu, Jaya Narayan; Azirun, Mohd Sofian; Hashim, Rosli; Boyce, Amru Nasrulhaq

    2014-01-01

    Bioethanol production from renewable sources to be used in transportation is now an increasing demand worldwide due to continuous depletion of fossil fuels, economic and political crises, and growing concern on environmental safety. Mainly, three types of raw materials, that is, sugar juice, starchy crops, and lignocellulosic materials, are being used for this purpose. This paper will investigate ethanol production from free sugar containing juices obtained from some energy crops such as sugarcane, sugar beet, and sweet sorghum that are the most attractive choice because of their cost-effectiveness and feasibility to use. Three types of fermentation process (batch, fed-batch, and continuous) are employed in ethanol production from these sugar juices. The most common microorganism used in fermentation from its history is the yeast, especially, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, though the bacterial species Zymomonas mobilis is also potentially used nowadays for this purpose. A number of factors related to the fermentation greatly influences the process and their optimization is the key point for efficient ethanol production from these feedstocks.

  19. Citric acid fermentation in whey permeate

    SciTech Connect

    Somkuti, G.A.; Bencivengo, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    Acid-whey permeate was used for the production of citric acid by Aspergillus niger. The fermentation proceeded in 2 phases: a growth phase when citric acid was not accumulated, followed by an acidogenic phase when citric acid accumulated and mold growth was greatly reduced. Optimal production of citric acid occurred after 8-12 days at 30 degrees. Maximum citric acid yields were influenced by the initial lactose concentration and reached 10 g/l when the lactose concentration in the acid-whey permeate was adjusted to 15%. MeOH at 2-4% markedly increased the production of citric acid. Fermentation of acid-whey permeate by a mutant strain (A. niger 599-3) was more reproducible, and yields of citric acid were substantially improved. The amount of citric acid produced by A. niger 599-3 was 18-23 g/l after 12-14 days, depending on the lactose content of the whey permeate. Throughout the fermentation, galactose was apparently co-metabolized with glucose.

  20. Anaerobic fermentation of beef cattle manure and crop residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, A. G.; Chen, Y. R.; Varel, V. H.; Robinson, S.

    1981-05-01

    Research on the feasibility of fermenting manure crop residue mixtures to methane, and on factors affecting the rate and extent of methane production is summarized. Experiments were conducted to evaluate effects of temperature, pH, substrate concentration, and alkaline pretreatment on the rate and extent of hydrolysis of manure straw mixtures. The effects of mixing duration and vacuum fermenters on methane production rates from anaerobically fermented beef cattle wastes were also determined.

  1. A biochemically structured model for ethanol fermentation by Kluyveromyces marxianus: A batch fermentation and kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Sansonetti, S; Hobley, T J; Calabrò, V; Villadsen, J; Sin, G

    2011-08-01

    Anaerobic batch fermentations of ricotta cheese whey (i.e. containing lactose) were performed under different operating conditions. Ethanol concentrations of ca. 22g L(-1) were found from whey containing ca. 44g L(-1) lactose, which corresponded to up to 95% of the theoretical ethanol yield within 15h. The experimental data could be explained by means of a simple knowledge-driven biochemically structured model that was built on bioenergetics principles applied to the metabolic pathways through which lactose is converted into major products. Use of the model showed that the observed concentrations of ethanol, lactose, biomass and glycerol during batch fermentation could be described within a ca. 6% deviation, as could the yield coefficients for biomass and ethanol produced on lactose. The model structure confirmed that the thermodynamics considerations on the stoichiometry of the system constrain the metabolic coefficients within a physically meaningful range thereby providing valuable and reliable insight into fermentation processes.

  2. Use of a continuous multistage bioreactor to mimic winemaking fermentation.

    PubMed

    Clement, T; Perez, M; Mouret, J R; Sablayrolles, J M; Camarasa, C

    2011-10-17

    Continuous fermentation set-ups are of great interest for studying the physiology of microorganisms. In winemaking conditions, yeasts go through a growth phase and a stationary phase during which more than half of the sugar is fermented. A comprehensive study of wine-yeast physiology must therefore include yeasts in a non-growing phase. This condition is impossible to achieve within a chemostat, which led us to design a multi-stage fermentation device. In this study, we evaluated the ability of such a device to reproduce, in a series of steady states, the conditions of batch fermentation. Two-stage and four-stage fermentations were carried out with two different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The main characteristics of the fermentation process (biomass growth, by-product content of the medium) were compared with those observed in batch mode at the same stage of fermentation, which was defined by glucose uptake. The four-stage configuration showed a better ability to reproduce batch fermentation characteristics than the two-stage set-up. It also allowed to uncouple the variations of environmental parameters and proved to be a promising tool to gain new insights into yeast metabolism during alcoholic fermentation.

  3. Investigating the proteins released by yeasts in synthetic wine fermentations.

    PubMed

    Mostert, Talitha T; Divol, Benoit

    2014-02-03

    Proteins from various biological sources previously identified in wine play important roles in the functioning and survival of their producers and may exhibit oenological properties. Yeasts contribute significantly to the protein pool during and after alcoholic fermentation. While the extracellular proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the main wine yeast species, have been characterised, those of non-Saccharomyces yeasts remain restricted to a few enzymes. A more comprehensive insight into all proteins released during fermentation could improve our understanding of how yeasts survive and interact in mixed culture fermentations. This study aimed to characterise the exo-proteome of Saccharomyces and selected non-Saccharomyces yeasts in pure and mixed cultures in a wine-like medium. While S. cerevisiae completed the fermentation rapidly, Metschnikowia pulcherrima hardly fermented and Lachancea thermotolerans fermented slowly but steadily. In sequential fermentations, the kinetics resembled those of the non-Saccharomyces yeasts for a period before switching to that of S. cerevisiae. Identification of the proteins present in wine at the end of fermentation using mass fingerprinting revealed the large diversity of proteins secreted and the influence of yeast interactions therein. The fermentation kinetics observed could partially be explained by the extent of the contribution of the different yeast to the protein content.

  4. Yeast Diversity and Persistence in Botrytis-Affected Wine Fermentations

    PubMed Central

    Mills, David A.; Johannsen, Eric A.; Cocolin, Luca

    2002-01-01

    Culture-dependent and -independent methods were used to examine the yeast diversity present in botrytis-affected (“botrytized”) wine fermentations carried out at high (∼30°C) and ambient (∼20°C) temperatures. Fermentations at both temperatures possessed similar populations of Saccharomyces, Hanseniaspora, Pichia, Metschnikowia, Kluyveromyces, and Candida species. However, higher populations of non-Saccharomyces yeasts persisted in ambient-temperature fermentations, with Candida and, to a lesser extent, Kluyveromyces species remaining long after the fermentation was dominated by Saccharomyces. In general, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles of yeast ribosomal DNA or rRNA amplified from the fermentation samples correlated well with the plating data. The direct molecular methods also revealed a Hanseniaspora osmophila population not identified in the plating analysis. rRNA analysis also indicated a large population (>106 cells per ml) of a nonculturable Candida strain in the high-temperature fermentation. Monoculture analysis of the Candida isolate indicated an extreme fructophilic phenotype and correlated with an increased glucose/fructose ratio in fermentations containing higher populations of Candida. Analysis of wine fermentation microbial ecology by using both culture-dependent and -independent methods reveals the complexity of yeast interactions enriched during spontaneous fermentations. PMID:12324335

  5. Thiosulfate as a metabolic product: the bacterial fermentation of taurine.

    PubMed

    Denger, K; Laue, H; Cook, A M

    1997-10-01

    Thiosulfate (S2O32-) is a natural product that is widely utilized in natural ecosystems as an electron sink or as an electron donor. However, the major biological source(s) of this thiosulfate is unknown. We present the first report that taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonate), the major mammalian solute, is subject to fermentation. This bacterial fermentation was found to be catalyzed by a new isolate, strain GKNTAU, a strictly anaerobic, gram-positive, motile rod that formed subterminal spores. Thiosulfate was a quantitative fermentation product. The other fermentation products were ammonia and acetate, and all could be formed by cell-free extracts.

  6. Tow steps biohydrogen production: biomass pretreatment and fermentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.; Yang, H. H.; Guo, L. J.

    2010-03-01

    This paper investigated the pretreatment of cornstalk and integrated dark-photo fermentation for hydrogen production. Five parameters of the pretreatment experiments, including NaOH concentration, temperature, residence time, and dosage of cellulase and xylanase, were optimized through the L25 (5≙5) orthogonal test. The optimal NaOH concentration, temperature, residence time, and dosage of cellulase and xylanase were 0.5wt%, 115 °C, 3 h, 0.08g/g cornstalk, 0.08g/g cornstalk, respectively. Under the optimal conditions, 0.31g glucose/g cornstalk was obtained. The two-step fermentation consisted of dark fermentation and photo fermentation. The pretreated cornstalk was used as the substrate for dark fermentation, with cow dung as the inoculum. Then the effluents of dark fermentation were employed as the substrate for photo fermentation by photosynthetic bacteria. H2 yield of dark fermentation was 116.7 mL/g cornstalk, with H2 concentration of 41%. After photo fermentation, the total H2 yield increased to 294 mL/g cornstalk.

  7. Effect of mixing during fermentation in yogurt manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Ezkauriatza, E J; Galarza-González, M G; Uribe-Bujanda, A I; Ríos-Licea, M; López-Pacheco, F; Hernández-Brenes, C M; Alvarez, M M

    2008-12-01

    In traditional yogurt manufacturing, the yogurt is not agitated during fermentation. However, stirring could be beneficial, particularly for improving heat and mass transport across the fermentation tank. In this contribution, we studied the effect of low-speed agitation during fermentation on process time, acidity profile, and microbial dynamics during yogurt fermentation in 2 laboratory-scale fermenters (3 and 5 L) with different heat-transfer characteristics. Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus were used as fermenting bacteria. Curves of pH, lactic acid concentration, lactose concentration, and bacterial population profiles during fermentation are presented for static and low-agitation conditions during fermentation. At low-inoculum conditions, agitation reduced the processing time by shortening the lag phase. However, mixing did not modify the duration or the shape of the pH profiles during the exponential phase. In fermentors with poor heat-transfer characteristics, important differences in microbial dynamics were observed between the agitated and nonagitated fermentation experiments; that is, agitation significantly increased the observable specific growth rate and the final microbial count of L. bulgaricus.

  8. Characterization of the microbial diversity in yacon spontaneous fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Reina, L. D.; Pérez-Díaz, I. M.; Breidt, F.; Azcarate-Peril, M. A.; Medina, E.; Butz, N.V.

    2015-01-01

    The prebiotic fructooligosaccharides (FOS) content of yacon makes this root an attractive alternative for the supplementation of a variety of food products. The preservation of yacon by fermentation has been proposed as an alternative to increase the probiotic content of the root concomitantly with its shelf life. Thus the fermented yacon could have significant functional content. The objective of this research was to characterize the biochemistry and microbiology of spontaneous yacon fermentation and define the viability of the proposed process. The biochemical analysis of spontaneous heterolactic fermentation of yacon showed a progressive drop in pH with increased lactic and acetic acids, and the production of mannitol during fermentation. The microbial ecology of yacon fermentation was investigated using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. Bacterial cell counts revealed a dominance of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) over yeasts, which were also present during fermentation. Results showed that the heterofermentative LAB were primarily Leuconostoc species, which dominated the fermentation. The fermentation of yacon by Leuconostoc spp. is thus presented as a viable method to achieve long term preservation of this root. PMID:25777679

  9. Stability of high cell density brewery fermentations during serial repitching.

    PubMed

    Verbelen, Pieter J; Dekoninck, Tinne M L; Van Mulders, Sebastiaan E; Saerens, Sofie M G; Delvaux, Filip; Delvaux, Freddy R

    2009-11-01

    The volumetric productivity of the beer fermentation process can be increased by using a higher pitching rate (i.e. higher inoculum size). However, the decreased yeast net growth observed in these high cell density brewery fermentations can adversely affect the physiological stability throughout subsequent yeast generations. Therefore, different O(2) conditions (wort aeration and yeast preoxygenation) were applied to high cell density fermentation and eight generations of fermentations were evaluated together with conventional fermentations. Freshly propagated high cell density populations adapted faster to the fermentative conditions than normal cell density populations. Preoxygenating the yeast was essential for the yeast physiological and beer flavor compound stability of high cell density fermentations during serial repitching. In contrast, the use of non-preoxygenated yeast resulted in inadequate growth which caused (1) insufficient yield of biomass to repitch all eight generations, (2) a 10% decrease in viability, (3) a moderate increase of yeast age, (4) and a dramatic increase of the unwanted flavor compounds acetaldehyde and total diacetyl during the sequence of fermentations. Therefore, to achieve sustainable high cell density fermentations throughout the economical valuable process of serial repitching, adequate yeast growth is essential.

  10. Single Zymomonas mobilis strain for xylose and arabinose fermentation

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, M.; Chou, Y.C.; Picataggio, S.K.; Finkelstein, M.

    1998-12-01

    This invention relates to single microorganisms which normally do not ferment pentose sugars which are genetically altered to ferment the pentose sugars, xylose and arabinose, to produce ethanol, and a fermentation process utilizing the same. Examples include Zymomonas mobilis which has been transformed with a combination of E. coli genes for xylose isomerase, xylulokinase, L-arabinose isomerase, L-ribulokinase, L-ribulose 5-phosphate 4-epimerase, transaldolase and transketolase. Expression of added genes are under the control of Z. mobilis promoters. These newly created microorganisms are useful for fermenting glucose, xylose and arabinose, produced by hydrolysis of hemicellulose and cellulose or starch, to produce ethanol. 6 figs.

  11. Single zymomonas mobilis strain for xylose and arabinose fermentation

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Min; Chou, Yat-Chen; Picataggio, Stephen K.; Finkelstein, Mark

    1998-01-01

    This invention relates to single microorganisms which normally do not ferment pentose sugars which are genetically altered to ferment the pentose sugars, xylose and arabinose, to produce ethanol, and a fermentation process utilizing the same. Examples include Zymomonas mobilis which has been transformed with a combination of E. coli genes for xylose isomerase, xylulokinase, L-arabinose isomerase, L-ribulokinase, L-ribulose 5-phosphate 4-epimerase, transaldolase and transketolase. Expression of added genes are under the control of Z. mobilis promoters. These newly created microorganisms are useful for fermenting glucose, xylose and arabinose, produced by hydrolysis of hemicellulose and cellulose or starch, to produce ethanol.

  12. Inhibition of alcoholic fermentation by substrate and ethanol. [Candida pseudotropicalis

    SciTech Connect

    Maulin, H.B.; Galzy, P.

    1980-11-01

    The effect of ethanol and sugars on rates of fermentation was studied. A strain of Candida pseudotropicalis was used. The specific rate of fermentation was determined by using the Warburg manometer. The effect of ethanol was formulated as an exponential function of ethanol concentration, but the empirical constant was different when glucose or lactose was used as a substrate. The effects of both ethanol and substrate were formulated. It was demonstrated that when lactose and glucose were present in the medium with a small amount of alcohol, a synergistic effect on the rate of fermentation appeared. This phenomenon considerably limits the rate of fermentation.

  13. Similarity of rpoB gene sequences of sucrose-fermenting and non-fermenting Corynebacterium diphtheriae strains.

    PubMed

    Hirata, R; Pacheco, L G; Soares, S C; Santos, L S; Moreira, L O; Sabbadini, P S; Santos, C S; Miyoshi, A; Azevedo, V A; Mattos-Guaraldi, A L

    2011-03-01

    During the last decades, the majority of Brazilian Corynebacterium diphtheriae isolates were shown to be capable to metabolize sucrose, sometimes leading to erroneous identification as a non-diphtheric Corynebacterium species. The sequencing of the polymorphic region of the RNA polymerase beta subunit-encoding gene (rpoB) is an important taxonomic tool for identification of corynebacteria. The present study aimed to investigate the rpoB gene polymorphic features of sucrose-fermenting and non sucrose-fermenting strains. The results showed that sucrose-fermenting strains presented rpoB gene polymorphic regions with more than 98% similarity with the sequences deposited in the gene bank corresponding to non sucrose-fermenting strains. Data indicate that sucrose-fermenting isolates may act as a variant of C. diphtheriae biotype mitis. In addition we alert that sucrose-fermenting strains should not be discarded as contaminants mainly in countries where the possibility of isolation of this variant is higher.

  14. High-strength fermentable wastewater reclamation through a sequential process of anaerobic fermentation followed by microalgae cultivation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenqiang; Chen, Taojing; Wang, Liang; Wu, Minghong; Zhao, Quanyu; Wei, Wei

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the sequential process of anaerobic fermentation followed by microalgae cultivation was evaluated from both nutrient and energy recovery standpoints. The effects of different fermentation type on the biogas generation, broth metabolites' composition, algal growth and nutrients' utilization, and energy conversion efficiencies for the whole processes were discussed. When the fermentation was designed to produce hydrogen-dominating biogas, the total energy conversion efficiency (TECE) of the sequential process was higher than that of the methane fermentation one. With the production of hydrogen in anaerobic fermentation, more organic carbon metabolites were left in the broth to support better algal growth with more efficient incorporation of ammonia nitrogen. By applying the sequential process, the heat value conversion efficiency (HVCE) for the wastewater could reach 41.2%, if methane was avoided in the fermentation biogas. The removal efficiencies of organic metabolites and NH4(+)-N in the better case were 100% and 98.3%, respectively.

  15. Effect of Fermentation Temperature on the Volatile Composition of Kimchi.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sang Pil; Lee, Eun Joo; Kim, Young Ho; Ahn, Dong Uk

    2016-10-17

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of fermentation temperature on the volatile composition in Kimchi. Kimchi was fermented at 2 temperature conditions (4 and 20 °C). Volatile compounds of Kimchi samples were analyzed during the fermentation periods using the dynamic headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method. The optimum ripening time for the Kimchi fermented at 4 °C was 35 d, and that of 20 °C was 2 d. The pH at the optimum ripening time was 4.97 and 4.41, and the titratable acidity was 0.59% and 0.76% for the Kimchi fermented at 4 and 20 °C, respectively. Forty different types of volatile compounds, including alcohol, aldehyde, ester, and sulfur compounds, were identified. The Kimchi fermented at 20 °C produced greater amounts of volatile compounds than that at 4 °C. The amounts of most volatiles increased as the fermentation time increased, but those of aldehydes decreased rapidly during both 4 and 20 °C fermentation. Organic acids, ester, and nitriles were detected only in Kimchi fermented at 20 °C. The amounts of dimethyl disulfide, methyl-2-propenyl disulfide, and di-2-propenyl disulfide produced from the Kimchi fermented at 20 °C were more than 2-times of those at 4 °C. Therefore, it is concluded that the strong pungent odor of Kimchi fermented at 20° C is probably due to the high amount of organic acids (low pH) and sulfur compounds (dimethyl disulfide, methyl-2-propenyl disulfide, and di-2-propenyl disulfide) between the 2 Kimchi.

  16. Characteristics of Spoilage-Associated Secondary Cucumber Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Wendy; Johanningsmeier, Suzanne D.; McFeeters, Roger F.

    2012-01-01

    Secondary fermentations during the bulk storage of fermented cucumbers can result in spoilage that causes a total loss of the fermented product, at an estimated cost of $6,000 to $15,000 per affected tank. Previous research has suggested that such fermentations are the result of microbiological utilization of lactic acid and the formation of acetic, butyric, and propionic acids. The objectives of this study were to characterize the chemical and environmental conditions associated with secondary cucumber fermentations and to isolate and characterize potential causative microorganisms. Both commercial spoilage samples and laboratory-reproduced secondary fermentations were evaluated. Potential causative agents were isolated based on morphological characteristics. Two yeasts, Pichia manshurica and Issatchenkia occidentalis, were identified and detected most commonly concomitantly with lactic acid utilization. In the presence of oxygen, yeast metabolic activities lead to lactic acid degradation, a small decline in the redox potential (Eh, Ag/AgCl, 3 M KCl) of the fermentation brines, and an increase in pH to levels at which bacteria other than the lactic acid bacteria responsible for the primary fermentation can grow and produce acetic, butyric, and propionic acids. Inhibition of these yeasts by allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) resulted in stabilization of the fermented medium, while the absence of the preservative resulted in the disappearance of lactic and acetic acids in a model system. Additionally, three Gram-positive bacteria, Lactobacillus buchneri, a Clostridium sp., and Pediococcus ethanolidurans, were identified as potentially relevant to different stages of the secondary fermentation. The unique opportunity to study commercial spoilage samples generated a better understanding of the microbiota and environmental conditions associated with secondary cucumber fermentations. PMID:22179234

  17. Biologically active amines in fermented and non-fermented commercial soybean products from the Spanish market.

    PubMed

    Toro-Funes, N; Bosch-Fuste, J; Latorre-Moratalla, M L; Veciana-Nogués, M T; Vidal-Carou, M C

    2015-04-15

    Biologically active amines were determined in commercial soybean products. The antioxidant polyamines were found in both non-fermented and fermented soybean products. Natto and tempeh showed the highest content of polyamines (75-124 and 11-24 mg/kg of spermidine and spermine, respectively). On the other hand, the bacterial-related biogenic amines, tyramine, histamine, tryptamine and β-phenylethylamine, were detected in practically all fermented products with a high variability. The highest contents were found in sufu, tamari and soybean paste. Extremely high tyramine and histamine contents, 1700 and 700 mg/kg, respectively, found in some sufu samples could be unhealthy. However, biogenic amines observed in the other soybean products should not be a risk for healthy consumers. However, individuals who take monoamine and diamine oxidase inhibitors drugs should be strongly recommended to avoid this kind of products in order to suffer no adverse health effects. These biogenic amines were not detected in non-fermented soybean products.

  18. Anti-inflammatory effects of fermented and non-fermented Sophora flavescens: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The roots of Sophora flavescens (Leguminosae) have been used in East Asian countries as an herbal medicine and a food ingredient for thousands of years. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of S. flavescens fermentation on endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) in rats. Methods EIU was induced in rats via a footpad injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Immediately after the LPS inoculation, fermented and non-fermented extracts of S. flavescens (FSE and NFSE, respectively) were administered orally, and the aqueous humor was collected from both eyes 24 hours later. The anti-inflammatory effects of FSE and NFSE were examined in terms of regulation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation and the expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), intercellular cell adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The regulation of maleic dialdehyde (MDA) levels and polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) infiltration by FSE and NFSE were also examined. Results Treatment with FSE significantly inhibited LPS-induced increases in IL-1β and TNF-α production and the expression of iNOS, ICAM-1 and COX-2. Moreover, FSE suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB activation, and reduced both MDA levels and infiltration by PMN. Conclusion These results indicate that solid state fermentation may enhance the anti-inflammatory effects of S. flavescens. PMID:22026927

  19. Changes in antioxidant activities and physicochemical properties of Kapi, a fermented shrimp paste, during fermentation.

    PubMed

    Faithong, Nandhsha; Benjakul, Soottawat

    2014-10-01

    Changes in chemical composition, physical properties and antioxidant activities of Kapi were monitored during fermentation for 12 months. DPPH (2, 2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl), ABTS (2, 2 - azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) radical scavenging activity as well as ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) gradually increased as the fermentation time increased, particularly during the first 8 months (P < 0.05). Thereafter, the decreases in DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activities were observed (P < 0.05), whereas FRAP remained constant (P > 0.05). The continuous increases in ammonia nitrogen, formaldehyde nitrogen and amino nitrogen contents were noticeable within the first 8 months (P < 0.05), indicating the formation of peptides and free amino acids via the hydrolysis of protein by both microbial and indigenous proteases. Browning intensity most likely caused by the formation of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) were concomitantly observed throughout fermentation, as evidenced by the decreases in lightness (L*-value), but the increases in redness (a*-value) and yellowness (b*-value). Low level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in Kapi was found during 12 months. Antioxidant activities of Kapi were more likely governed by the low molecular weight peptides, amino acids as well as Maillard reaction products generated during fermentation.

  20. Alkaline-fermented foods: a review with emphasis on pidan fermentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Fung, D Y

    1996-01-01

    Alkaline-fermented foods constitute a group of less-known food products that are widely consumed in Southeast Asia and African countries. They can be made from different raw ingredients. For instance, Japanese natto, Thai thua-nao, and kinema are made from cooked soybeans, dawadawa from African locust beans, ogiri from melon seeds, ugba from African oil beans, kawal from fresh legale leaves, owoh from cotton seeds, and pidan from fresh poultry eggs. In alkaline-fermented foods, the protein of the raw materials is broken down into amino acids and peptides; ammonia is released during the fermentation, raising the pH of the final products and giving the food a strong ammoniacal smell. Most alkaline fermentations are achieved spontaneously by mixed bacteria cultures, principally dominated by Bacillus subtilis. In other cases, pure cultures can be used. For example, Japanese natto is inoculated with a pure culture of B. subtilis var natto. Pidan is a special example of alkaline fermentation. Instead of using microorganisms, pidan is made using an alkali-treated fermentation. Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) is produced from the reaction of sodium carbonate (Na2CO3), water (H2O), and calcium oxide (CaO) of pickle or coating mud. NaOH penetrates into the eggs, causing the physicochemical changes, color changes, and gelation. The appearance of pidan differs from fresh eggs in that the white becomes a semitransparent tea-brown color, and the yolk is solid or semisolid with a dark-green color. The nutritional value of pidan is slightly decreased compared with fresh eggs, but pidan has an extremely long shelf life and a pleasant, fragrant taste that is preferred by most people in Southeast Asian countries. In a small-scale laboratory study conducted by the authors, B. subtilis was not found in pidan. Four Staphylococcus spp. (S. cohnii, S. epidermidis, S. haemolyticus, and S. warneri) and two strains of Bacillus spp. (B. cereus and B. macerans) were isolated from pidan. Staphylococcus

  1. Controlled fermentation and preservation of UGBA -an indigenous Nigerian fermented food.

    PubMed

    Okorie, Chimezie Princewill; Olasupo, Nurudeen Ayoade

    2013-01-01

    Studies were carried out to screen various microbial isolates of UGBA obtained from both traditionally fermented and laboratory samples for some technical properties required for the fermentation of the product. The technical properties screened for were; ability to produce enzymes (amylase, protease and lipase) and bacteriocin production. Possible starter cultures were selected from the screened isolates for controlled fermentation of the product. Preservation of the product by dehydration method was also investigated. Various dehydrating temperatures were studied and the most appropriate temperature regime was adopted. The shelf- life of the dehydrated product was also determined. Proximate composition and the amino acid profile of both fresh samples and the dehydrated ones were also carried out so as to ensure that there is no significant nutrient lost during the process of dehydration. Rehydration of the preserved product was also examined. The following groups of organisms were isolated; Bacillus species, Proteus species, Staphylococcus species, Micrococcus species and Pseudomonas species. Bacillus species exhibited the highest potential for the fermentation of the product based on the result of the technical properties screened for. Two isolates identified as Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus lichenformis were particularly outstanding and were therefore selected as possible starter cultures. Controlled fermentation of UGBA using the selected organisms singly and as mixed culture produced samples that were similar to the ones produced by the traditional method. However, fermentation period was reduced from 72 hr to 48 hr using the two isolates as mixed culture for the fermentation process. The most appropriate temperature regime for dehydrating the product was found to be 50°C. Proximate analysis and amino acid profile assay of the products show that there is no significant difference between the preserved product and fresh sample. Shelf- life studies of the

  2. Effects of lactic acid bacteria contamination on lignocellulosic ethanol fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Slower fermentation rates, mixed sugar compositions, and lower sugar concentrations may make lignocellulosic fermentations more susceptible to contamination by lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which is a common and costly problem to the corn-based fuel ethanol industry. To examine the effects of LAB con...

  3. Yogurt Fermentation in the Presence of Starch-Lipid Composite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effect of Starch-lipid composites (SLC) on the fermentation of set-style yogurt was investigated by incorporating 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5% of SLC into the yogurt mix. The fermentation was performed at 40 deg C and its process was monitored with an optical microscope. It was found that SLC acce...

  4. Bacillus paralicheniformis sp. nov., isolated from fermented soybean paste

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An isolate of a Gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, motile, rod-shaped, endospore forming bacterium was recovered from soybean-based fermented paste. It was isolated from cheonggukjang, a Korean fermented soybean food product. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that the strain ...

  5. Optimization of batch alcoholic fermentation of glucose syrup substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.L.

    1981-08-01

    The quantitative effects of substrate concentration, yeast concentration, and nutrient supplementation on ethanol content, fermentation time, and ethanol productivity were investigated in a Box-Wilson central composite design experiment, consisting of five levels of each variable. High substrate concentration, up to 30 degrees Brix, resulted in higher ethanol content (i.e., up to 15.7% w/v or 19.6% v/v) but longer fermentation time and hence lower ethanol productivity. Increasing yeast concentration, on the other hand, resulted in shorter fermentation time and higher ethanol productivity. Higher levels of nutrient supplementation generally led to shorter fermentation time and higher productivity. The highest ethanol productivity of about 21 g ethanol h was obtained at low substrate concentration (i.e., 12 degrees Brix), low alcohol content (i.e., 6% by weight), high yeast concentration (i.e., 4.4%), and high supplementation of yeast extract (i.e., 2.8%). Productivity of this magnitude is substantially higher than that of the traditional batch fermentation or fed-batch fermentation. It is comparable to the results of continuous fermentation but lower than those of vacuum fermentation. Optimal conditions for maximal ethanol productivity can be established by a multiple regression analysis technique and by plotting the contours of constant response to conform to the constraints of individual operations. (Refs. 12).

  6. How-to-Do-It: A Simple Demonstration of Fermentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurkiewicz, William J.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Described is a simple demonstration of fermentation. The materials needed, the basic experimental set-up, and various projects are outlined. Included are a diagram of an apparatus for measuring carbon dioxide production and a table showing typical results of the effect of pH on fermentation. (RT)

  7. Fermentation and Electrohydrogenic Approaches to Hydrogen Production (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Maness, P. C.; Thammannagowda, S.; Magnusson, L.; Logan, B.

    2010-06-01

    This work describes the development of a waste biomass fermentation process using cellulose-degrading bacteria for hydrogen production. This process is then integrated with an electrohydrogenesis process via the development of a microbial electrolysis cell reactor, during which fermentation waste effluent is further converted to hydrogen to increase the total output of hydrogen from biomass.

  8. Improvement of dry fractionation ethanol fermentation by partial germ supplementation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethanol fermentation of dry fractionated grits (corn endosperm pieces) containing different levels of germ was studied using the dry grind process. Partial removal of germ fraction allows for marketing the germ fraction and potentially more efficient fermentation. Grits obtained from a dry milling p...

  9. Effect of fermentation and drying on cocoa polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Albertini, Barbara; Schoubben, Aurélie; Guarnaccia, Davide; Pinelli, Filippo; Della Vecchia, Mirco; Ricci, Maurizio; Di Renzo, Gian Carlo; Blasi, Paolo

    2015-11-18

    Cocoa seed polyphenols have demonstrated interesting beneficial effects in humans. Most polyphenols contained in fresh seeds are chemically modified during fermentation, drying, and cocoa powder or chocolate production. The improvement of these procedures to obtain a high-polyphenol-content cocoa is highly desirable. To this aim, a field investigation on the effect of fermentation and natural drying on fine flavor National cocoa (cacao Nacional) was performed. Cocoa seeds were fermented for 6 days and, every day, samples were sun-dried and analyzed for polyphenol content and antioxidant power. During the first 2 days of fermentation, Folin-Ciocalteu and FRAP tests evidenced a significant reduction of polyphenol content and antioxidant capacity, respectively. Changes during the following days of fermentation were less significant. Epicatechin, the most studied member of the catechin family, followed a similar pathway of degradation. Data confirmed the high impact of fermentation and drying on cocoa seed polyphenols. Fermentation and drying are, on the one hand, necessary to obtain cocoa flavor and palatability but, on the other hand, are responsible for greatly compromising polyphenol content. To obtain high-polyphenol-content cocoa, the existing fermentation, drying, and manufacturing protocols should be scientifically reviewed to understand and modify the critical steps.

  10. Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing bacteriophage endolysins reduce Lactobacillus contamination during fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the challenges facing the fuel ethanol industry is the management of bacterial contamination during fermentation. Lactobacillus species are the predominant contaminants that decrease the profitability of biofuel production by reducing ethanol yields and causing “stuck” fermentations, which i...

  11. Bacillus glycinifermentans sp. nov., isolated from fermented soybean paste

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two independent isolates of a Gram-positive, aerobic, motile rod-shaped bacterium were recovered from soybean-based fermented foodstuffs. Two were isolated from cheonggukjang, a Korean fermented soybean food product. Multilocus sequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and 5 protein coding genes indi...

  12. Recovery of butanol from fermentation broth by pervaporation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butanol can be produced by fermentation from corn, molasses or lignocellulosic biomass for use as a chemical or superior biofuel. However, butanol’s production is hampered by its toxicity to the microbial culture that produces it. In fermentation broths, final butanol concentrations typically range ...

  13. Carbohydrate utilization and the lager yeast transcriptome during brewery fermentation.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Brian R; Boulton, Chris A; Box, Wendy G; Graham, Neil S; Lawrence, Stephen J; Linforth, Robert S T; Smart, Katherine A

    2008-08-01

    The fermentable carbohydrate composition of wort and the manner in which it is utilized by yeast during brewery fermentation have a direct influence on fermentation efficiency and quality of the final product. In this study the response of a brewing yeast strain to changes in wort fermentable carbohydrate concentration and composition during full-scale (3275 hl) brewery fermentation was investigated by measuring transcriptome changes with the aid of oligonucleotide-based DNA arrays. Up to 74% of the detectable genes showed a significant (pfermentation and the majority of these genes showed transient or prolonged peaks in expression following the exhaustion of the monosaccharides from the wort. Transcriptional activity of many genes was consistent with their known responses to glucose de/repression under laboratory conditions, despite the presence of di- and trisaccharide sugars in the wort. In a number of cases the transcriptional response of genes was not consistent with their known responses to glucose, suggesting a degree of complexity during brewery fermentation which cannot be replicated in small-scale wort fermentations or in laboratory experiments involving defined media.

  14. Lactobacillus plantarum mediated fermentation of Psidium guajava L. fruit extract.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Ravish; Suryanarayana, Lakshminarayana Chikkanayakanahalli; Chandrashekara, Karunakara Alageri; Krishnan, Padma; Kush, Anil; Ravikumar, Puja

    2015-04-01

    Sixteen hour fermentation of the white flesh raw guava Lucknow 49 cultivar using Lactobacillus plantarum NCIM 2912 was taken up for enhancing the antioxidant potential. The fermented guava product with high antioxidant potential, total phenolic content and short and medium chain fatty acids can be used as functional food.

  15. Xylose fermentation: Analysis, modelling, and design

    SciTech Connect

    Slininger, P.J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Ethanolic fermentation is a means of utilizing xylose-rich industrial wastes, but an optimized bioprocess is lacking. Pachysolen tannophilus NRRL Y-7124 was the first yeast discovered capable of significant ethanol production from xylose and has served as a model for studies of other yeasts mediating this conversion. However, a comparative evaluation of strains led the authors to focus on Pichia stipitis NRRL Y-7124 as the yeast with highest potential for application. Given 150 g/l xylose in complex medium, strain Y-7124 functioned optimally at 25-26C pH 4-7 to accumulate 56 g/l ethanol with negligible xylitol production. Dissolved oxygen concentration was critical to cell growth; and in order to measure it accurately, a colorimetric assay was developed to allow calibration of electrodes based on oxygen solubility in media of varying composition. Specific growth rate was a Monod function of limiting substrate concentration (oxygen and/or xylose). Both specific ethanol productivity and oxygen uptake rate were growth-associated, but only the former was maintenance-associated. Both growth and fermentation were inhibited by high xylose and ethanol concentrations. Carbon and cofactor balances supported modelling xylose metabolism as a combination of four processes: assimilation, pentose phosphate oxidation, respiration, and ethanolic fermentation. A mathematical model describing the stoichiometry and kinetics was constructed, and its predictive capacity was confirmed by comparing simulated and experimental batch cultures. Consideration of example processes indicated that this model constitutes an important tool for designing the optimum bioprocess for utilizing xylose-rich wastes.

  16. Microgravity and its implication for fermentation biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Klaus, D M

    1998-09-01

    Fermentation processes are highly dependent upon physical and chemical environmental parameters, many of which are influenced by gravity. Extending biotechnology into the realm of space flight provides researchers with an opportunity to investigate the role that gravity plays in natural growth processes. Physical factors governing cell sedimentation, nutrient mixing and byproduct dispersion are altered in the absence of the constant sedimenting force of gravity. In addition, space flight has also been shown to give rise to a wide variety of indirect consequences associated with the physiology of the organisms themselves.

  17. Design of penicillin fermentation process simulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xiaoyu; Yuan, Zhonghu; Qi, Xiaoxuan; Zhang, Wenqi

    2011-10-01

    Real-time monitoring for batch process attracts increasing attention. It can ensure safety and provide products with consistent quality. The design of simulation system of batch process fault diagnosis is of great significance. In this paper, penicillin fermentation, a typical non-linear, dynamic, multi-stage batch production process, is taken as the research object. A visual human-machine interactive simulation software system based on Windows operation system is developed. The simulation system can provide an effective platform for the research of batch process fault diagnosis.

  18. Health benefits of fermented foods: microbiota and beyond.

    PubMed

    Marco, Maria L; Heeney, Dustin; Binda, Sylvie; Cifelli, Christopher J; Cotter, Paul D; Foligné, Benoit; Gänzle, Michael; Kort, Remco; Pasin, Gonca; Pihlanto, Anne; Smid, Eddy J; Hutkins, Robert

    2016-12-17

    Fermented foods and beverages were among the first processed food products consumed by humans. The production of foods such as yogurt and cultured milk, wine and beer, sauerkraut and kimchi, and fermented sausage were initially valued because of their improved shelf life, safety, and organoleptic properties. It is increasingly understood that fermented foods can also have enhanced nutritional and functional properties due to transformation of substrates and formation of bioactive or bioavailable end-products. Many fermented foods also contain living microorganisms of which some are genetically similar to strains used as probiotics. Although only a limited number of clinical studies on fermented foods have been performed, there is evidence that these foods provide health benefits well-beyond the starting food materials.

  19. Sterilization of fermentation vessels by ethanol/water mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Wyman, C.E.

    1991-03-20

    This invention is comprised of a method for sterilizing process fermentation vessels with a concentrated alcohol and water mixture integrated in a fuel alcohol or other alcohol production facility. Hot, concentrated alcohol is drawn from a distillation or other purification stage and sprayed into the empty fermentation vessels. This sterilizing alcohol/water mixture should be of a sufficient concentration, preferably higher than 12% alcohol by volume, to be toxic to undesirable microorganisms. Following sterilization, this sterilizing alcohol/water mixture can be recovered back into the same distillation or other purification stage from which it was withdrawn. The process of this invention has its best application in, but is not limited to, batch fermentation processes, wherein the fermentation vessels must be emptied, cleaned, and sterilized following completion of each batch fermentation process.

  20. In vitro ruminal fermentation of organic acids common in forage.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, J B; Van Soest, P J

    1984-01-01

    Mixed rumen bacteria from cows fed either timothy hay or a 60% concentrate were incubated with 7.5 mM citrate, trans-aconitate, malate, malonate, quinate, and shikimate. Citrate, trans-aconitate, and malate were fermented at faster rates than malonate, quinate, and shikimate. Acetate was the primary fermentation product for all six acids. Quinate and shikimate fermentations gave rist to butyrate, whereas malate and malonate produced significant amounts of propionic acid. High-pressure liquid chromatography of fermentation products from trans-aconitate incubations revealed a compound that was subsequently identified as tricarballylate. As much as 40% of the trans-aconitate acid was converted to tricarballylate, and tricarballylate was fermented slowly. The slow rate of tricarballylate metabolism by mixed rumen bacteria and its potential as a magnesium chelator suggest that tricarballylate formation could be an important factor in the hypomagnesemia that leads to grass tetany. PMID:6696413