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Sample records for acetonitrile mobile phase

  1. Effect of temperature on the chromatographic retention of ionizable compounds. II. Acetonitrile-water mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, Leonardo G; Castells, Cecilia B; Ràfols, Clara; Rosés, Martí; Bosch, Elisabeth

    2005-06-10

    The retentive behavior of weak acids and bases in reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) upon changes in column temperature has been theoretically and experimentally studied. The study focuses on examining the temperature dependence of the retention of various solutes at eluent pH close to their corresponding pKa values, and on the indirect role exerted by the buffer ionization equilibria on retention and selectivity. Retention factors of several ionizable compounds in a typical octadecylsilica column and using buffer solutions dissolved in 30% (v/v) acetonitrile as eluent at five temperatures in the range from 25 to 50 degrees C were carefully measured. Six buffer solutions were prepared from judiciously chosen conjugated pairs of different chemical nature. Their pKa values in this acetonitrile-water composition and within the range of 15-50 degrees C were determined potentiometrically. These compounds exhibit very different standard ionization enthalpies within this temperature range. Thus, whenever they are used to control mobile phase pH, the column temperature determines their final pH. Predictive equations of retention that take into account the temperature effect on both the transfer and the ionization processes are evaluated. This study demonstrates the significant role that the selected buffer would have on retention and selectivity in RPLC at temperatures higher than 25 degrees C, particularly for solutes that coelute. PMID:16001552

  2. Effect of temperature on the chromatographic retention of ionizable compounds. II. Acetonitrile-water mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, Leonardo G; Castells, Cecilia B; Ràfols, Clara; Rosés, Martí; Bosch, Elisabeth

    2005-06-10

    The retentive behavior of weak acids and bases in reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) upon changes in column temperature has been theoretically and experimentally studied. The study focuses on examining the temperature dependence of the retention of various solutes at eluent pH close to their corresponding pKa values, and on the indirect role exerted by the buffer ionization equilibria on retention and selectivity. Retention factors of several ionizable compounds in a typical octadecylsilica column and using buffer solutions dissolved in 30% (v/v) acetonitrile as eluent at five temperatures in the range from 25 to 50 degrees C were carefully measured. Six buffer solutions were prepared from judiciously chosen conjugated pairs of different chemical nature. Their pKa values in this acetonitrile-water composition and within the range of 15-50 degrees C were determined potentiometrically. These compounds exhibit very different standard ionization enthalpies within this temperature range. Thus, whenever they are used to control mobile phase pH, the column temperature determines their final pH. Predictive equations of retention that take into account the temperature effect on both the transfer and the ionization processes are evaluated. This study demonstrates the significant role that the selected buffer would have on retention and selectivity in RPLC at temperatures higher than 25 degrees C, particularly for solutes that coelute.

  3. Retention of ionizable compounds on HPLC. 12. The properties of liquid chromatography buffers in acetonitrile-water mobile phases that influence HPLC retention.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Sonia; Bosch, Elisabeth; Rosés, Marti

    2002-08-01

    The addition of acetonitrile to aqueous buffers to prepare RP HPLC mobile phases changes the buffer properties (pH and buffer capacity). This variation is studied for ace tate, phosphate, phthalate, citrate, and ammonia buffers in acetonitrile-water mixtures up to 60% in acetonitrile (v/v). Equations are proposed to relate pH and buffer capacity change of these buffers to the initial aqueous pH value and to the volume fraction of acetonitrile added. It is demonstrated that the pH change of the buffer depends not only on the initial aqueous pH of the buffer and on the percentage of acetonitrile added but also on the particular buffer used. The proposed equations allow an accurate prediction of this ionization for the studied buffers. Since the retention of acid/base compounds shows a strong dependence of their degree of ionization, the equations are used to predict the change in this ionization with addition of acetonitrile when the RP HPLC mobile phase is prepared. This prediction allows estimation of the retention of an acid/base compound in a particular acetonitrile-water buffered mobile phase.

  4. Retention of ionizable compounds on HPLC. 5. pH scales and the retention of acids and bases with acetonitrile-water mobile phases

    PubMed

    Espinosa; Bosch; Roses

    2000-11-01

    The pH calibration procedures that lead to the different pH scales in acetonitrile-water mixtures used as mobile phases in reversed-phase liquid chromatography are discussed. Appropriate buffers of known pH value in acetonitrile-water mixtures are selected and used to establish the relationship (delta values) between the two rigorous acetonitrile-water pH scales: sspH and wspH (pH measured in acetonitrile-water mixtures and referred to acetonitrile-water or water, respectively, as standard state). These delta values allow one to convert pH values measured in acetonitrile-water with electrode systems calibrated with aqueous buffers (wspH scale) to sspH values, which are directly related to the thermodynamic acid-base constants. This offers an easy way to measure the pH of acetonitrile-water mobile phases and to relate this pH to the chromatographic retention of acids and bases through the thermodynamic acid-base constants. The relationships are tested for the variation of the retention of acids and bases with the pH of the mobile phase at several mobile-phase compositions and favorably compared with the relationships obtained with the common wwpH scale (pH measured in the aqueous buffer before mixing it with the organic modifier). The use of the rigorous sspH and wspH scales allows one to explain the retention behavior of bases, which in many instances cannot be justified from the pH measurement in the ill-founded wwpH scale. PMID:11080863

  5. Retention of ionizable compounds on HPLC. 5. pH scales and the retention of acids and bases with acetonitrile-water mobile phases

    PubMed

    Espinosa; Bosch; Roses

    2000-11-01

    The pH calibration procedures that lead to the different pH scales in acetonitrile-water mixtures used as mobile phases in reversed-phase liquid chromatography are discussed. Appropriate buffers of known pH value in acetonitrile-water mixtures are selected and used to establish the relationship (delta values) between the two rigorous acetonitrile-water pH scales: sspH and wspH (pH measured in acetonitrile-water mixtures and referred to acetonitrile-water or water, respectively, as standard state). These delta values allow one to convert pH values measured in acetonitrile-water with electrode systems calibrated with aqueous buffers (wspH scale) to sspH values, which are directly related to the thermodynamic acid-base constants. This offers an easy way to measure the pH of acetonitrile-water mobile phases and to relate this pH to the chromatographic retention of acids and bases through the thermodynamic acid-base constants. The relationships are tested for the variation of the retention of acids and bases with the pH of the mobile phase at several mobile-phase compositions and favorably compared with the relationships obtained with the common wwpH scale (pH measured in the aqueous buffer before mixing it with the organic modifier). The use of the rigorous sspH and wspH scales allows one to explain the retention behavior of bases, which in many instances cannot be justified from the pH measurement in the ill-founded wwpH scale.

  6. Effect of basic and acidic additives on the separation of some basic drug enantiomers on polysaccharide-based chiral columns with acetonitrile as mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Gogaladze, Khatuna; Chankvetadze, Lali; Tsintsadze, Maia; Farkas, Tivadar; Chankvetadze, Bezhan

    2015-03-01

    The separation of enantiomers of 16 basic drugs was studied using polysaccharide-based chiral selectors and acetonitrile as mobile phase with emphasis on the role of basic and acidic additives on the separation and elution order of enantiomers. Out of the studied chiral selectors, amylose phenylcarbamate-based ones more often showed a chiral recognition ability compared to cellulose phenylcarbamate derivatives. An interesting effect was observed with formic acid as additive on enantiomer resolution and enantiomer elution order for some basic drugs. Thus, for instance, the enantioseparation of several β-blockers (atenolol, sotalol, toliprolol) improved not only by the addition of a more conventional basic additive to the mobile phase, but also by the addition of an acidic additive. Moreover, an opposite elution order of enantiomers was observed depending on the nature of the additive (basic or acidic) in the mobile phase.

  7. Greening pharmaceutical applications of liquid chromatography through using propylene carbonate-ethanol mixtures instead of acetonitrile as organic modifier in the mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Tache, Florentin; Udrescu, Stefan; Albu, Florin; Micăle, Florina; Medvedovici, Andrei

    2013-03-01

    Substitution of acetonitrile (ACN) as organic modifier in mobile phases for liquid chromatography by mixtures of propylene carbonate (PC) and ethanol (EtOH) may be considered a greener approach for pharmaceutical applications. Such a replacement is achievable without any major compromise in terms of elution order, chromatographic retention, efficiency and peak symmetry. This has been equally demonstrated for reverse phase (RP), ion pair formation (IP) and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) separation modes. The impact on the sensitivity induced by the replacement between these organic solvents is discussed for UV-vis and mass spectrometric detection. A comparison between Van Deemter plots obtained under elution conditions based on ACN and PC/EtOH is presented. The alternative elution modes were also compared in terms of thermodynamic parameters, such as standard enthalpy (ΔH⁰) and entropic contributions to the partition between the mobile and the stationary phases, for some model compounds. Van't Hoff plots demonstrated that differences between the thermodynamic parameters are minor when shifting from ACN/water to PC/EtOH/water elution on an octadecyl chemically modified silicagel stationary phase. As long as large volume injection (LVI) of diluents non-miscible with the mobile phase is a recently developed topic having a high potential of greening the sample preparation procedures through elimination of the solvent evaporation stage, this feature was also assessed in the case of ACN replacement by PC/EtOH. PMID:23277155

  8. Acetonitrile

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetonitrile ; CASRN 75 - 05 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  9. Retention of ionisable compounds on high-performance liquid chromatography XVIII: pH variation in mobile phases containing formic acid, piperazine, tris, boric acid or carbonate as buffering systems and acetonitrile as organic modifier.

    PubMed

    Subirats, Xavier; Bosch, Elisabeth; Rosés, Martí

    2009-03-20

    In the present work dissociation constants of commonly used buffering species, formic acid, piperazine, tris(hydroxymethyl)-aminomethane, boric acid and carbonate, have been determined for several acetonitrile-water mixtures. From these pK(a) values a previous model has been successfully evaluated to estimate pH values in acetonitrile-aqueous buffer mobile phases from the aqueous pH and concentration of the above mentioned buffers up to 60% of acetonitrile, and aqueous buffer concentrations between 0.005 (0.001 mol L(-1) for formic acid-formate) and 0.1 mol L(-1). The relationships derived for the presently studied buffers, together with those established for previously considered buffering systems, allow a general prediction of the pH variation of the most commonly used HPLC buffers when the composition of the acetonitrile-water mobile phase changes during the chromatographic process, such as in gradient elution. Thus, they are an interesting tool that can be easily implemented in general retention models to predict retention of acid-base analytes and optimize chromatographic separations.

  10. Gradient retention prediction of acid-base analytes in reversed phase liquid chromatography: a simplified approach for acetonitrile-water mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Axel; Rosés, Martí; Bosch, Elisabeth

    2014-11-28

    In previous work, a two-parameter model to predict chromatographic retention of ionizable analytes in gradient mode was proposed. However, the procedure required some previous experimental work to get a suitable description of the pKa change with the mobile phase composition. In the present study this previous experimental work has been simplified. The analyte pKa values have been calculated through equations whose coefficients vary depending on their functional group. Forced by this new approach, other simplifications regarding the retention of the totally neutral and totally ionized species also had to be performed. After the simplifications were applied, new prediction values were obtained and compared with the previously acquired experimental data. The simplified model gave pretty good predictions while saving a significant amount of time and resources.

  11. Retention of ionisable compounds on high-performance liquid chromatography. XV. Estimation of the pH variation of aqueous buffers with the change of the acetonitrile fraction of the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Subirats, Xavier; Bosch, Elisabeth; Rosés, Martí

    2004-12-01

    The most commonly used mobile phases in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) are hydro-organic mixtures of an aqueous buffer and an organic modifier. The addition of this organic solvent to buffered aqueous solutions involves a variation of the buffer properties (pH and buffer capacity). In this paper, the pH variation is studied for acetic acid-acetate, phosphoric acid-dihydrogenphosphate-hydrogenphosphate, citric acid-dihydrogencitrate-citrate, and ammonium-ammonia buffers. The proposed equations allow pH estimation of acetonitrile-water buffered mobile phases up to 60% (v/v) of organic modifier and initial aqueous buffer concentrations between 0.001 and 0.1 mol L(-1), from the initial aqueous pH. The estimated pH variation of the mobile phase and the pKa variation of the analytes allow us to predict the degree of ionisation of the analytes and from this and analyte hydrophobicities, to interpret the relative retention and separation of analyte mixtures.

  12. Aqueous Two-Phase Systems formed by Biocompatible and Biodegradable Polysaccharides and Acetonitrile

    PubMed Central

    de Brito Cardoso, Gustavo; Souza, Isabela Nascimento; Pereira, Matheus M.; Freire, Mara G.; Soares, Cleide Mara Faria; Lima, Álvaro Silva

    2015-01-01

    In this work, it is shown that novel aqueous two-phase systems can be formed by the combination of acetonitrile and polysaccharides, namely dextran. Several ternary phase diagrams were determined at 25 °C for the systems composed of water + acetonitrile + dextran. The effect of the dextran molecular weight (6,000, 40,000 and 100,000 g.mol−1) was ascertained toward their ability to undergo liquid-liquid demixing. An increase in the dextran molecular weight favors the phase separation. Furthermore, the effect of temperature (25, 35 and 45 °C) was evaluated for the system constituted by the dextran of higher molecular weight. Lower temperatures are favorable for phase separation since lower amounts of dextran and acetonitrile are required for the creation of aqueous two-phase systems. In general, acetonitrile is enriched in the top phase while dextran is majorly concentrated in the bottom phase. The applicability of this new type of two-phase systems as liquid-liquid extraction approaches was also evaluated by the study of the partition behavior of a well-known antioxidant – vanillin - and used here as a model biomolecule. The optimized conditions led to an extraction efficiency of vanillin of 95% at the acetonitrile-rich phase. PMID:25729320

  13. Determination of the solvent density profiles across mesopores of silica-C18 bonded phases in contact with acetonitrile/water mixtures: A semi-empirical approach.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice

    2015-09-01

    The local volume fractions of water, acetonitrile, and C18-bonded chains across the 96Åmesopores of 5μm Symmetry particles were determined semi-empirically. The semi-empirical approach was based on previous molecular dynamics studies, which provided relevant mathematical expressions for the density profiles of C18 chains and water molecules, and on minor disturbance experiments, which measured the excess amount of acetonitrile adsorbed in the pores of Symmetry-C18 particles. The pore walls of the Symmetry-C18 material were in thermodynamic equilibrium with a series of binary mixtures of water and acetonitrile. The results show that C18 chains are mostly solvated by acetonitrile molecules, water is excluded from the C18-bonded layer, and acetonitrile concentrates across a 15-25Åthick interface region between the C18 layer and the bulk phase. These actual density profiles are expected to have a direct impact on the retention behaviour of charged, polar, and neutral analytes in RPLC. They also provide clues to predict the local mobility of analytes inside the pores and a sound physico-chemical description of the phenomenon of surface diffusion observed in RPLC.

  14. Effect of phase symmetry on the NMR spectrum of acetonitrile oriented in a uniaxial-biaxial-uniaxial phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepak, H. S. Vinay; Yelamaggad, C. V.; Khetrapal, C. L.; Ramanathan, K. V.

    2016-09-01

    We report here the measurement of the Csbnd H and the Hsbnd H dipolar couplings of the methyl group of acetonitrile oriented in the biaxial liquid crystal potassium laurate/1-decanol/water system. These parameters show large variations when measured as a function of temperature. The variations follow the symmetry of the phase as the liquid crystal goes through the sequence of uniaxial - biaxial - uniaxial phases and show a close correspondence to the phase changes that occur in the liquid crystalline solvent coinciding with the onset of biaxiality. The Hsbnd Csbnd H bond angle calculated after incorporating vibrational corrections to the dipolar couplings is discussed in terms of contributions in the case of the biaxial liquid crystal arising from vibration-rotation interaction effects.

  15. A new insight into the photochemistry of avobenzone in gas phase and acetonitrile from ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Kojić, Marko; Petković, Milena; Etinski, Mihajlo

    2016-08-10

    Avobenzone (4-tert-butyl-4'-methoxydibenzoylmethane, AB) is one of the most widely used filters in sunscreens for skin photoprotection in the UVA band. The photochemistry of AB includes keto-enol tautomerization, cis-trans isomerization, rotation about the single bond and α bond cleavages of carbonyl groups. In this contribution we study chelated and non-chelated enol, rotamers Z and E, and keto tautomers of AB in the ground and excited states in gas phase and acetonitrile by means of a coupled cluster method. Our findings suggest that torsion around the double C2-C3 bond of photoexcited chelated enol leads to internal conversion to the ground state and formation of rotamer E. In addition, opening of the chelated hydrogen ring by torsion of the hydroxyl group creates non-chelated enol. The possible mechanisms of rotamer Z formation are discussed. The solvent dependent photolability is related to the relative order of the lowest triplet ππ* and nπ* states of the keto tautomer.

  16. A new insight into the photochemistry of avobenzone in gas phase and acetonitrile from ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Kojić, Marko; Petković, Milena; Etinski, Mihajlo

    2016-08-10

    Avobenzone (4-tert-butyl-4'-methoxydibenzoylmethane, AB) is one of the most widely used filters in sunscreens for skin photoprotection in the UVA band. The photochemistry of AB includes keto-enol tautomerization, cis-trans isomerization, rotation about the single bond and α bond cleavages of carbonyl groups. In this contribution we study chelated and non-chelated enol, rotamers Z and E, and keto tautomers of AB in the ground and excited states in gas phase and acetonitrile by means of a coupled cluster method. Our findings suggest that torsion around the double C2-C3 bond of photoexcited chelated enol leads to internal conversion to the ground state and formation of rotamer E. In addition, opening of the chelated hydrogen ring by torsion of the hydroxyl group creates non-chelated enol. The possible mechanisms of rotamer Z formation are discussed. The solvent dependent photolability is related to the relative order of the lowest triplet ππ* and nπ* states of the keto tautomer. PMID:27443629

  17. Study of the mechanism of acetonitrile stacking and its application for directly combining liquid-phase microextraction with micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingru; Feng, Jing; Shi, Ludi; Liu, Laping; He, Hui; Fan, Yingying; Hu, Shibin; Liu, Shuhui

    2016-08-26

    Acetonitrile stacking is an online concentration method that is distinctive due to its inclusion of a high proportion of organic solvent in sample matrices. We previously designed a universal methodology for the combination of liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) and capillary electrophoresis (CE) using acetonitrile stacking and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) mode, thereby achieving large-volume injection of the diluted LPME extractant and the online concentration. In this report, the methodology was extended to the analysis of highly substituted hydrophobic chlorophenols in wines using diethyl carbonate as the extractant. Additionally, the mechanism of acetonitrile stacking was studied. The results indicated that the combination of LPME and MEKC exhibited good analytical performance: with ∼40-fold concentration by LPME, a 20-cm (33% of the total length) sample plug injection of an eight-fold dilution of diethyl carbonate with the organic solvent-saline solution produced enrichments higher by a factor of 260-791. Limits of qualification ranged from 5.5 to 16.0ng/mL. Acceptable reproducibilities of lower than 1.8% for migration time and 8.6% for peak areas were obtained. A dual stacking mechanism of acetonitrile stacking was revealed, involving transient isotachophoresis plus pH-junction stacking. The latter was associated with a pH shift induced by the presence of acetonitrile. The pseudo-stationary phase (Brij-35) played an important role in reducing the CE running time by weakening the isotachophoretic migration of the analyte ions following Cl(-) ions. The combination of acetonitrile stacking and nonionic micelle-based MEKC appears to be a perfect match for introducing water-immiscible LPME extractants into an aqueous CE system and can thus significantly expand the application of LPME-CE in green analytical chemistry. PMID:27451260

  18. Study of the mechanism of acetonitrile stacking and its application for directly combining liquid-phase microextraction with micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingru; Feng, Jing; Shi, Ludi; Liu, Laping; He, Hui; Fan, Yingying; Hu, Shibin; Liu, Shuhui

    2016-08-26

    Acetonitrile stacking is an online concentration method that is distinctive due to its inclusion of a high proportion of organic solvent in sample matrices. We previously designed a universal methodology for the combination of liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) and capillary electrophoresis (CE) using acetonitrile stacking and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) mode, thereby achieving large-volume injection of the diluted LPME extractant and the online concentration. In this report, the methodology was extended to the analysis of highly substituted hydrophobic chlorophenols in wines using diethyl carbonate as the extractant. Additionally, the mechanism of acetonitrile stacking was studied. The results indicated that the combination of LPME and MEKC exhibited good analytical performance: with ∼40-fold concentration by LPME, a 20-cm (33% of the total length) sample plug injection of an eight-fold dilution of diethyl carbonate with the organic solvent-saline solution produced enrichments higher by a factor of 260-791. Limits of qualification ranged from 5.5 to 16.0ng/mL. Acceptable reproducibilities of lower than 1.8% for migration time and 8.6% for peak areas were obtained. A dual stacking mechanism of acetonitrile stacking was revealed, involving transient isotachophoresis plus pH-junction stacking. The latter was associated with a pH shift induced by the presence of acetonitrile. The pseudo-stationary phase (Brij-35) played an important role in reducing the CE running time by weakening the isotachophoretic migration of the analyte ions following Cl(-) ions. The combination of acetonitrile stacking and nonionic micelle-based MEKC appears to be a perfect match for introducing water-immiscible LPME extractants into an aqueous CE system and can thus significantly expand the application of LPME-CE in green analytical chemistry.

  19. Acetonitrile extraction and dual-layer solid phase extraction clean-up for pesticide residue analysis in propolis.

    PubMed

    Oellig, Claudia

    2016-05-01

    Propolis is a very complex mixture of substances that is produced by honey bees and is known to be a rather challenging matrix for residue analysis. Besides resins, flavonoids and phenols, high amount of wax is co-extracted resulting in immense matrix effects. Therefore a suitable clean-up is crucial and indispensable. In this study, a reliable solid phase extraction (SPE) clean-up was developed for pesticide residue analysis in propolis. The clean-up success was quickly and easily monitored by high-performance thin-layer chromatography with different detection possibilities. The final method consists of the extraction of propolis with acetonitrile according to the QuEChERS method followed by an effective extract purification on dual-layer SPE cartridges with spherical hydrophobic polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin/primary secondary amine as sorbent and a mixture of toluene/acetone (95:5, v/v) for elution. Besides fat-soluble components like waxes, flavonoids, and terpenoids, more polar compounds like organic acids, fatty acids, sugars and anthocyanins were also removed to large extent. Method performance was assessed by recovery experiments at spiking levels of 0.5 and 1mg/kg (n=5) for fourteen pesticides that are relevant for propolis. Mean recoveries determined by HPLC-MS against solvent standards were between 40 and 101%, while calculation against matrix-matched standards provided recoveries of 79-104%. Precision of recovery, assessed by relative standard deviations, were below 9%. Thus, the developed dual-layer SPE clean-up enables the reliable pesticide residue analysis in propolis and provides a suitable alternative to time-consuming clean-up procedures proposed in literature. PMID:27059398

  20. Acetonitrile extraction and dual-layer solid phase extraction clean-up for pesticide residue analysis in propolis.

    PubMed

    Oellig, Claudia

    2016-05-01

    Propolis is a very complex mixture of substances that is produced by honey bees and is known to be a rather challenging matrix for residue analysis. Besides resins, flavonoids and phenols, high amount of wax is co-extracted resulting in immense matrix effects. Therefore a suitable clean-up is crucial and indispensable. In this study, a reliable solid phase extraction (SPE) clean-up was developed for pesticide residue analysis in propolis. The clean-up success was quickly and easily monitored by high-performance thin-layer chromatography with different detection possibilities. The final method consists of the extraction of propolis with acetonitrile according to the QuEChERS method followed by an effective extract purification on dual-layer SPE cartridges with spherical hydrophobic polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin/primary secondary amine as sorbent and a mixture of toluene/acetone (95:5, v/v) for elution. Besides fat-soluble components like waxes, flavonoids, and terpenoids, more polar compounds like organic acids, fatty acids, sugars and anthocyanins were also removed to large extent. Method performance was assessed by recovery experiments at spiking levels of 0.5 and 1mg/kg (n=5) for fourteen pesticides that are relevant for propolis. Mean recoveries determined by HPLC-MS against solvent standards were between 40 and 101%, while calculation against matrix-matched standards provided recoveries of 79-104%. Precision of recovery, assessed by relative standard deviations, were below 9%. Thus, the developed dual-layer SPE clean-up enables the reliable pesticide residue analysis in propolis and provides a suitable alternative to time-consuming clean-up procedures proposed in literature.

  1. Determination of main tetrahydrocannabinoids by GC-MS: impact of protein precipitation by acetonitrile on solid phase extraction of cannabinoids from human serum.

    PubMed

    Hidvégi, E; Somogyi, G P

    2014-06-01

    The analysis of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) and its main metabolites [11-hydroxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-delta9-THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol] in serum is a routine assay in forensic toxicology in the case of drivers influenced by Cannabis abuse and in other cases. Analysis of the specimen may involve protein precipitation, although there are authors who do not use this step. In this study we investigated the effect of acetonitrile as protein precipitant added to the serum on the absolute extraction recoveries of the analytes. This is very important not only from a forensic point of view, but also from the aspect of impact of delta9-THC therapy. Our results showed that in the case of spiked serum (2 ml), 80-87% extraction recovery can be achieved if 4 ml of acetonitrile is added before solid phase extraction. The second best result could be reached if no acetonitrile was added (64-73%). However, in the case of physiological sera of Cannabis consumers, no precipitation may be more advantageous in some cases. Matrix effects, which were studied by comparing the detectability and relative intensities of matrix peaks within the corresponding time windows of the analytes, were less influenced if the extraction was achieved with or without acetonitrile. PMID:24974573

  2. Isopropylammonium Formate as a Mobile Phase Modifier for Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Matthew P.; Zhou, Ling; Camp, Suzanne E.; Danielson, Neil D.

    2012-01-01

    Isopropylammonium formate (IPAF), a new alkylammonium formate (AAF) room temperature ionic liquid, has been synthesized from isopropylamine and formic acid and characterized as an organic solvent mobile phase replacement for reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC). Characterization of IPAF solvent properties in water such as pH, conductivity, and viscosity, as well as its synthesis, is described. The LC polarity (P′) and the solvent strength (S) parameters are determined to be 6.0 and 2.4, respectively, similar to those same parameters for methanol and acetonitrile. Application of this RTIL is demonstrated as an organic solvent replacement for reversed-phase LC to separate a test mixture of niacinamide, acetophenone and p-nitroaniline. The van Deemter plot profile for several columns of different dimensions, particle size, pore size and stationary phase are compared using an IPAF–water mobile phase. At flow rates above 2 mL/min, on-line mixing of the viscous IPAF with water appears not to be uniform. A flattening of the van Deemter profile is noted for particularly short (50 mm) wide bore (4.6 mm) columns packed with larger particles (10 µm). Small particle longer columns likely facilitated mixing at the beginning of the column generating typical linearly increasing van Deemeter curves. IPAF has been further shown as a function of temperature to be a non-denaturing modifier solvent for the separation of the protein cytochrome c from tryptophan compared to methanol. This is important to show, because the semi-preparative separation of native proteins using AAF mobile phases is the long-term goal of this research program. PMID:22718743

  3. Mixture design optimization of extraction and mobile phase media for fingerprint analysis of Bauhinia variegata L.

    PubMed

    Delaroza, Fernanda; Scarminio, Ieda Spacino

    2008-04-01

    Two statistical mixture designs were used to optimize the proportions of solvents used in both the extraction medium and the reversed liquid chromatographic mobile phase to improve the quality of chromatographic fingerprints of Bauhinia variegata L extracts. For modeling, the number of peaks was used as a measure of fingerprint information. Three mobile phases, each with a chromatographic strength of two, gave good results. A methanol/water (77:23 v/v) mixture resulted in 17 peaks in the chromatographic fingerprint whereas acetonitrile/water (64.5:35.5 v/v) and methanol/acetonitrile/water (35:35:30 v/v/v) mixtures resulted in 18 and 20 peaks, respectively. The corresponding optimum solvent compositions to extract chemical substances for these three mobile phases were ethanol/acetone (25:75 v/v/v) and dichloromethane/acetone (70:30 v/v) mixtures, and pure dichloromethane, respectively. The mixture designs are useful for understanding the influence of different solvents on the strengths of the extraction medium and the mobile phase.

  4. Highly stereoselective, uniformly sized molecularly imprinted polymers for cinchona alkaloids in hydro-organic mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Haginaka, Jun; Kagawa, Chino

    2003-01-01

    Highly stereoselective, uniformly sized molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for cinchona alkaloids, cinchonine (CN) and cinchonidine (CD), were prepared using methacrylic acid (MAA) as a functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDMA) as a cross-linker. The MIPs were evaluated using a mixture of phosphate buffer and acetonitrile as the mobile phase. The CN- and CD-imprinted MAA-co-EDMA polymers can recognize the respective template molecule more than the other diastereomer, and afford an excellent diastereomer separation of CN and CD. In addition, the MIPs gave diastereomer separations of structurally related compounds, quinidine and quinine. The retentive and stereoselective properties of those compounds on the MIPs suggest that electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions can work to recognize these compounds. Furthermore, thermodynamic studies reveal that the entropy-driven effect is significant at mobile-phase pH 5.4, while the enthalpy-driven interactions seem to be dominant at mobile-phase pH 9.6.

  5. Effect of Mobile Phase on Electrospray Ionization Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liigand, Jaanus; Kruve, Anneli; Leito, Ivo; Girod, Marion; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2014-08-01

    Electrospray (ESI) ionization efficiencies (IE) of a set of 10 compounds differing by chemical nature, extent of ionization in solution (basicity), and by hydrophobicity (tetrapropylammonium and tetraethylammonium ion, triethylamine, 1-naphthylamine, N,N-dimethylaniline, diphenylphthalate, dimethylphtahalate, piperidine, pyrrolidine, pyridine) have been measured in seven mobile phases (three acetonitrile percentages 20%, 50%, and 80%, and three different pH-adjusting additives, 0.1% formic acid, 1 mM ammonia, pH 5.0 buffer combination) using the relative measurement method. MS parameters were optimized separately for each ion. The resulting relative IE data were converted into comparable logIE values by anchoring them to the logIE of tetrapropylammonium ion taking into account the differences of ionization in different solvents and thereby making the logIE values of the compounds comparable across solvents. The following conclusions were made from analysis of the data. The compounds with pK a values in the range of the solution pH values displayed higher IE at lower pH. The sensitivity of IE towards pH depends on hydrophobicity being very strong with pyridine, weaker with N,N-dimethylaniline, and weakest with 1-naphthylamine. IEs of tetraalkylammonium ions and triethylamine were expectedly insensitive towards solution pH. Surprisingly high IEs of phthalate esters were observed. The differences in solutions with different acetonitrile content and similar pH were smaller compared with the pH effects. These results highlight the importance of hydrophobicity in electrospray and demonstrate that high hydrophobicity can sometimes successfully compensate for low basicity.

  6. 47 CFR 54.1008 - Mobility Fund Phase I disbursements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Mobility Fund § 54.1008 Mobility Fund Phase I disbursements. (a) A winning... compliance with all requirements for receipt of Mobility Fund Phase I support at the time that it...

  7. 47 CFR 54.1008 - Mobility Fund Phase I disbursements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Mobility Fund § 54.1008 Mobility Fund Phase I disbursements. (a) A winning... compliance with all requirements for receipt of Mobility Fund Phase I support at the time that it...

  8. Influence of preferential adsorption of mobile phase on retention behavior of amino acids on the teicoplanin chiral selector.

    PubMed

    Poplewskaa, Izabela; Kramarz, Renata; Piatkowski, Wojciech; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Antos, Dorota

    2007-11-30

    The adsorption behavior of two amino acids, i.e., l,d-threonine and l,d-methionine has been investigated on the chiral stationary phase (CSP)column packed with teicoplanin bonded to a silica support. The study has been performed under non-linear conditions of adsorption isotherm for various types of organic modifiers (methanol, ethanol, propan-2-ol and acetonitrile) in the reversed-phase mode. A heterogeneous adsorption mechanism of amino acids has been identified that was strongly affected by the nature of organic modifier. Generally, isotherm non-linearity and retention decreased with decrease of the modifier content in the mobile phase exhibiting a minimum at water-rich mobile phases. These trends were suggested to result from a combined effect of the mobile as well as the adsorbed phase composition. To determine the composition of the adsorbed phase the excess adsorption of modifiers in aqueous solutions has been measured and their binary adsorption equilibria have been quantified and compared. Strongly non-ideal behavior of solvents in the mobile phase and the adsorbed phase has been accounted for by activity coefficients. The fraction of the modifiers in the adsorbed phase decreased in the sequence: methanol, ethanol, propan-2-ol and acetonitrile.

  9. 47 CFR 54.1008 - Mobility Fund Phase I disbursements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mobility Fund Phase I disbursements. 54.1008 Section 54.1008 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Mobility Fund § 54.1008 Mobility Fund Phase I disbursements. (a) A winning bidder for Mobility Fund Phase I...

  10. Use of vancomycin silica stationary phase in packed capillary electrochromatography: III. enantiomeric separation of basic compounds with the polar organic mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Fanali, Salvatore; Catarcini, Paolo; Quaglia, Maria Giovanna

    2002-02-01

    The separation of basic compounds into their enantiomers was achieved using capillary electrochromatography in 50 or 75 microm inner diameter (ID) fused-silica capillaries packed with silica a stationary phase derivatized with vancomycin and mobile phases composed of mixtures of polar organic solvents containing 13 mM ammonium acetate. Enantiomer resolution, electroosmotic flow, and the number of theoretical plates were strongly influenced by the type and concentration of the organic solvent. Mobile phases composed of 13 mM ammonium acetate dissolved in mixtures of acetonitrile/methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, or isopropanol were tested and the highest enantioresolutions were achieved using the first mobile phase, allowing the separation of almost all investigated enantiomers (9 from 11 basic compounds). The use of capillaries with different ID (50 and 75 microm ID) packed with the same chiral stationary phase revealed that a higher number of theoretical plates and higher enantioresolution was achieved with the tube with lowest ID.

  11. Prediction of the chromatographic retention of acid-base compounds in pH buffered methanol-water mobile phases in gradient mode by a simplified model.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Axel; Rosés, Martí; Bosch, Elisabeth

    2015-03-13

    Retention of ionizable analytes under gradient elution depends on the pH of the mobile phase, the pKa of the analyte and their evolution along the programmed gradient. In previous work, a model depending on two fitting parameters was recommended because of its very favorable relationship between accuracy and required experimental work. It was developed using acetonitrile as the organic modifier and involves pKa modeling by means of equations that take into account the acidic functional group of the compound (carboxylic acid, protonated amine, etc.). In this work, the two-parameter predicting model is tested and validated using methanol as the organic modifier of the mobile phase and several compounds of higher pharmaceutical relevance and structural complexity as testing analytes. The results have been quite good overall, showing that the predicting model is applicable to a wide variety of acid-base compounds using mobile phases prepared with acetonitrile or methanol.

  12. Enhanced extraction yields and mobile phase separations by solvent mixtures for the analysis of metabolites in Annona muricata L. leaves.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro de Souza, Eloana Benassi; da Silva, Renata Reis; Afonso, Sabrina; Scarminio, Ieda Spacino

    2009-12-01

    The effects of five extraction solvents and their mixtures on the yield of metabolites in crude and fractionated extracts of Annona muricata L. leaves were investigated by direct comparison. Extraction media were prepared using simplex centroid mixtures of ethanol, ethyl acetate, dichloromethane, acetone, and chloroform. The effects of the mobile phase solvent strength and the analysis wavelength on the chromatographic separation were also investigated. Solvent mixtures rather than pure solvents were found to be the most efficient extractors for the different fractions. The results indicated that the mobile phase composed of methanol/acetonitrile/water (26:27:47 v/v/v) was most suitable for the basic fraction analysis at 254 nm, whereas the mobile phase composed of methanol/acetonitrile/water (35:35:30 v/v/v) was the most adequate for the organic fraction analysis at 254 nm. The results indicated that the chromatographic profiles and number of peaks were affected by the mobile phase strength and analysis wavelength.

  13. Multiresidue pesticide analysis of botanical dietary supplements using salt-out acetonitrile extraction, solid-phase extraction cleanup column, and gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Douglas G; Wong, Jon W; Shi, Feng; Zhang, Kai; Lee, Nathaniel S; DiBenedetto, Alex L; Hengel, Mathew J

    2013-05-01

    Dietary supplements form an increasing part of the American diet, yet broadly applicable multiresidue pesticide methods have not been evaluated for many of these supplements. A method for the analysis of 310 pesticides, isomers, and pesticide metabolites in dried botanical dietary supplements has been developed and validated. Sample preparation involved acetonitrile:water added to the botanical along with anhydrous magnesium sulfate and sodium chloride for extraction, followed by cleanup with solid-phase extraction using a tandem cartridge consisting of graphitized carbon black (GCB) and primary-secondary amine sorbent (PSA). Pesticides were measured by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Accuracy and precision were evaluated through fortifications of 24 botanicals at 10, 25, 100, and 500 μg/kg. Mean pesticide recoveries and relative standard deviations (RSDs) for all botanicals were 97%, 91%, 90%, and 90% and 15%, 10%, 8%, and 6% at 10, 25, 100, and 500 μg/kg, respectively. The method was applied to 21 incurred botanicals. Quinoxyfen was measured in hops (100-620 μg/kg). Tetraconazole (48 μg/kg), tetramethrin (15 μg/kg), methamidophos (50 μg/kg), and chlorpyrifos (93 μg/kg) were measured in licorice, mallow, tea, and tribulus, respectively. Quintozene, its metabolites and contaminants (pentachloroaniline, pentachlorobenzene, pentachloroanisole, and pentachlorothioanisole and hexachlorobenzene and tecnazene, respectively), with hexachlorocyclohexanes and DDT were identified in ginseng sources along with azoxystrobin, diazinon, and dimethomorph between 0.7 and 2800 μg/kg. Validation with these botanicals demonstrated the extent of this method's applicability for screening 310 pesticides in a wide array of botanical dietary supplements. PMID:23534560

  14. Multiresidue pesticide analysis of botanical dietary supplements using salt-out acetonitrile extraction, solid-phase extraction cleanup column, and gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Douglas G; Wong, Jon W; Shi, Feng; Zhang, Kai; Lee, Nathaniel S; DiBenedetto, Alex L; Hengel, Mathew J

    2013-05-01

    Dietary supplements form an increasing part of the American diet, yet broadly applicable multiresidue pesticide methods have not been evaluated for many of these supplements. A method for the analysis of 310 pesticides, isomers, and pesticide metabolites in dried botanical dietary supplements has been developed and validated. Sample preparation involved acetonitrile:water added to the botanical along with anhydrous magnesium sulfate and sodium chloride for extraction, followed by cleanup with solid-phase extraction using a tandem cartridge consisting of graphitized carbon black (GCB) and primary-secondary amine sorbent (PSA). Pesticides were measured by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Accuracy and precision were evaluated through fortifications of 24 botanicals at 10, 25, 100, and 500 μg/kg. Mean pesticide recoveries and relative standard deviations (RSDs) for all botanicals were 97%, 91%, 90%, and 90% and 15%, 10%, 8%, and 6% at 10, 25, 100, and 500 μg/kg, respectively. The method was applied to 21 incurred botanicals. Quinoxyfen was measured in hops (100-620 μg/kg). Tetraconazole (48 μg/kg), tetramethrin (15 μg/kg), methamidophos (50 μg/kg), and chlorpyrifos (93 μg/kg) were measured in licorice, mallow, tea, and tribulus, respectively. Quintozene, its metabolites and contaminants (pentachloroaniline, pentachlorobenzene, pentachloroanisole, and pentachlorothioanisole and hexachlorobenzene and tecnazene, respectively), with hexachlorocyclohexanes and DDT were identified in ginseng sources along with azoxystrobin, diazinon, and dimethomorph between 0.7 and 2800 μg/kg. Validation with these botanicals demonstrated the extent of this method's applicability for screening 310 pesticides in a wide array of botanical dietary supplements.

  15. Simultaneous effect of pH, temperature and mobile phase composition in the chromatographic retention of ionizable compounds.

    PubMed

    Agrafiotou, Panagiota; Ràfols, Clara; Castells, Cecilia; Bosch, Elisabeth; Rosés, Martí

    2011-07-29

    The retention of 22 monoprotic acid-base solutes in 12 buffers (pH from 2 to 12) at 3 temperatures (25, 40 and 55°C) and in 3 mobile phase compositions (20, 40 and 60% acetonitrile) was measured. The retention data for each solute, temperature and mobile phase compositions was fitted to pH by means of the common sigmoidal equation and the retention and acid-base parameters were obtained (logk(HA), logk(A) and pK(a)). The dependence of these parameters on temperature (van't Hoff plots), mobile phase composition (ϕ, volume fraction of acetonitrile) and mobile phase polarity (P(m)(N) parameter) was investigated. Linear plots of the parameter values against the reverse of the absolute temperature, on one hand, and ϕ or P(m)(N), in the other hand, were generally obtained. From this analysis we propose 6-parameter equations to relate retention to pH and T at constant mobile phase composition, and to pH and ϕ or P(m)(N) at constant temperature. A general 12 parameter equation is also proposed to relate retention simultaneously to pH, T and ϕ or P(m)(N). The general constancy of some terms of the equations allow to simplify the 12 parameter equation to a 8 parameter equation able to predict retention of the studied solutes. The accuracy of the proposed method provided excellent results with the advantage of modeling the effects of various optimization variables (modifier concentration, mobile phase pH and temperature) using a single equation, based on only eight fitting parameters.

  16. Continuous acetonitrile degradation in a packed-bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Manolov, Taras; Kristina, Håkansson; Benoit, Guieysse

    2005-02-01

    A 20-l packed-bed reactor filled with foamed glass beads was tested for the treatment of acetonitrile HPLC wastes. Aeration was provided by recirculating a portion of the reactor liquid phase through an aeration tank, where the dissolved oxygen concentration was kept at 6 mg/l. At a feeding rate of 0.77 g acetonitrile l(-1) reactor day(-1), 99% of the acetonitrile was removed; and 86% of the nitrogen present in acetonitrile was released as NH3, confirming that acetonitrile volatilization was not significant. Increasing the acetonitrile loading resulted in lower removal efficiencies, but a maximum removal capacity of 1.0 g acetonitrile l(-1) reactor day(-1) was achieved at a feeding rate of 1.6 g acetonitrile l(-1) reactor day(-1). The removal capacity of the system was well correlated with the oxygenation capacity, showing that acetonitrile removal was likely to be limited by oxygen supply. Microbial characterization of the biofilm resulted in the isolation of a Comamonas sp. able to mineralize acetonitrile as sole carbon, nitrogen and energy source. This organism was closely related to C. testosteroni (91.2%) and might represent a new species in the Comamonas genus. This study confirms the potential of packed-bed reactors for the treatment of a concentrated mixture of volatile pollutants.

  17. An automated mobile phase preparation workstation.

    PubMed

    Swinney, Kelly; Young, Benjamin; Jakubik, Matthew E; Clark, Hinton; Troisi, John; Fermier, Adam M

    2007-02-01

    An automated solvent dispensing workstation capable of delivering volumes ranging from 10 mL to 4.5 L for the preparation of solutions/mobile phases was developed and implemented into the industrial R&D laboratory. The workstation was designed to address business, safety, and compliance needs while meeting or exceeding the precision and accuracy of current manual methods of preparation. The system's performance was optimized with respect to liquid transfer tubing inner diameter, pumping pressure, flow characteristics of the valve, and computer control logic. The automated solvent dispensing workstation was shown to exceed the specifications set by the ASTM for Class A graduated cylinders for all dispense volumes (10 mL-4.5 L).

  18. Ionic liquids as mobile phase additives for feasible assay of naphazoline in pharmaceutical formulation by HPTLC-UV-densitometric method.

    PubMed

    Marszałł, Michał Piotr; Sroka, Wiktor Dariusz; Balinowska, Aleksandra; Mieszkowski, Dominik; Koba, Marcin; Kaliszan, Roman

    2013-07-01

    A specific and reliable high-performance thin layer chromatography method with densitometry detection has been developed for the determination of naphazoline nitrate in nasal drops. The best separation of the basic analyte, without spot tailing, was achieved by using a mobile phase composed of acetonitrile-water (60:40, v/v), adding 1.5 % (v/v) imidazolium-class ionic liquid and covering the plates with a stationary phase based on RP-18 with F254S (10 × 20 cm). The presented results confirm that imidazolium tetrafluoroborate ionic liquids are efficient suppressors of free silanols, which are considered to be responsible for troublesome and irreproducible chromatographic determinations of basic compounds. The developed chromatographic system was found to be convenient in use and to provide a repeatable assay of naphazoline nitrate in nasal drops, which could not be obtained with the use of standard silanol suppressing mobile phase additives such as triethylamine or dimethyloctylamine.

  19. Detection of adulteration in acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guoxiang; Fujimori, Kiyoshi; Lee, Hans; Nashed-Samuel, Yasser; Phillips, Joseph; Rogers, Gary; Shen, Hong; Yee, Chanel

    2011-05-01

    To address the increasing concern that acetonitrile may be intentionally adulterated to meet the shortfall in global supplies resulting from a downturn in its manufacturing, three analytical techniques were examined in this study. Gas Chromatography with Thermal Conductivity Detection (GC-TCD), Near Infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were assessed for their ability to detect and quantify potential adulterants including water, alternative organic solvents, and by-products associated with the production of acetonitrile. The results of the assessment of the three techniques for acetonitrile adulteration testing are discussed.

  20. Prediction of the zeta potentials and ionic descriptors of a silica hydride stationary phase with mobile phases of different pH and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Kulsing, Chadin; Yang, Yuanzhong; Matyska, Maria T; Pesek, Joseph J; Boysen, Reinhard I; Hearn, Milton T W

    2015-02-15

    In this study, the zeta potentials of a silica hydride stationary phase (Diamond Hydride™) in the presence of different water-acetonitrile mixtures (from 0-80% (v/v) acetonitrile) of different ionic strengths (from 0-40mM) and pH values (from pH 3.0-7.0) have been investigated. Debye-Hückel theory was applied to explain the effect of changes in the pH and ionic strength of these aqueous media on the negative zeta potential of this stationary phase. The experimental zeta potentials of the Diamond Hydride™ particles as a function of acetonitrile content up to 50% (v/v) correlated (R(2)=0.998) with the predicted zeta potential values based on this established theory, when the values of the dissociation constant of all related species, as well as viscosity, dielectric constant and refractive index of the aqueous medium were taken into consideration. Further, the retention behavior of basic, acidic and neutral analytes was investigated under mobile phase conditions of higher pH and lower ionic strength. Under these conditions, the Diamond Hydride™ stationary phase surface became more negative, as assessed from the increasingly more negative zeta potentials, resulting in the ion exchange characteristics becoming more dominant and the basic analytes showing increasing retention. Ionic descriptors were derived from these chromatographic experiments based on the assumption that linear solvation energy relationships prevail. The results were compared with predicted ionic descriptors based on the different calculated zeta potential values resulting in an overall correlation of R(2)=0.888. These studies provide fundamental insights into the impact on the separation performance of changes in the zeta potential of the Diamond Hydride™ surface with the results relevant to other silica hydride and, potentially, to other types of stationary phase materials. PMID:25622609

  1. Prediction of the zeta potentials and ionic descriptors of a silica hydride stationary phase with mobile phases of different pH and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Kulsing, Chadin; Yang, Yuanzhong; Matyska, Maria T; Pesek, Joseph J; Boysen, Reinhard I; Hearn, Milton T W

    2015-02-15

    In this study, the zeta potentials of a silica hydride stationary phase (Diamond Hydride™) in the presence of different water-acetonitrile mixtures (from 0-80% (v/v) acetonitrile) of different ionic strengths (from 0-40mM) and pH values (from pH 3.0-7.0) have been investigated. Debye-Hückel theory was applied to explain the effect of changes in the pH and ionic strength of these aqueous media on the negative zeta potential of this stationary phase. The experimental zeta potentials of the Diamond Hydride™ particles as a function of acetonitrile content up to 50% (v/v) correlated (R(2)=0.998) with the predicted zeta potential values based on this established theory, when the values of the dissociation constant of all related species, as well as viscosity, dielectric constant and refractive index of the aqueous medium were taken into consideration. Further, the retention behavior of basic, acidic and neutral analytes was investigated under mobile phase conditions of higher pH and lower ionic strength. Under these conditions, the Diamond Hydride™ stationary phase surface became more negative, as assessed from the increasingly more negative zeta potentials, resulting in the ion exchange characteristics becoming more dominant and the basic analytes showing increasing retention. Ionic descriptors were derived from these chromatographic experiments based on the assumption that linear solvation energy relationships prevail. The results were compared with predicted ionic descriptors based on the different calculated zeta potential values resulting in an overall correlation of R(2)=0.888. These studies provide fundamental insights into the impact on the separation performance of changes in the zeta potential of the Diamond Hydride™ surface with the results relevant to other silica hydride and, potentially, to other types of stationary phase materials.

  2. MSAT mobile electronically steered phased array antenna development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Fred

    1988-01-01

    The Mobile Satellite Experiment (MSAT-X) breadboard antenna design demonstrates the feasibility of using a phased array in a mobile satellite application. An electronically steerable phased array capable of tracking geosynchronous satellites from anywhere in the Continental United States has been developed. The design is reviewed along with the test data. Cost analysis are presented which indicate that this design can be produced at a cost of $1620 per antenna.

  3. Impact of the nature and composition of the mobile phase on the mass transfer mechanism in chiral reversed phase liquid chromatography. Application to the minimization of the solvent cost in chiral separations.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2014-01-31

    The mechanism of mass transfer was studied on a cellulose-based chiral stationary phase (CSP, Lux Cellulose-1) using aqueous mixtures of acetonitrile (50/50-90/10, v/v) or methanol (90/10 and 100/0, v/v) as the mobile phase. An experimental protocol validated in RPLC and HILIC chromatography and recently extended to chiral RPLC was applied. The five mass-transfer contributions (longitudinal diffusion, short-range and long-range eddy dispersion, solid-liquid mass transfer resistances due to finite intra-particle diffusivity and slow adsorption-desorption) to the reduced height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) were measured. The experimental results show that the adsorption rate constants kads of trans-stilbene enantiomers onto the CSP are three times larger with acetonitrile than with methanol as the organic modifier. This is correlated to the decrease of enantioselectivity from 1.4 (in methanol) to only 1.1 (in acetonitrile). The amount of solvent needed to achieve a separation factor of exactly 2.0 was determined. This showed that analysis cost could be reduced seven times by selecting pure methanol as the eluent for a 5cm long column rather than an acetonitrile-water mixture for a longer (20-45cm) column.

  4. Enantioseparation of Citalopram by RP-HPLC, Using Sulfobutyl Ether-β-Cyclodextrin as a Chiral Mobile Phase Additive

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yangfeng; He, Quan Sophia; Cai, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Enantiomeric separation of citalopram (CIT) was developed using a reversed phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) with sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin (SBE-β-CD) as a chiral mobile phase additive. The effects of the pH value of aqueous buffer, concentration of chiral additive, composition of mobile phase, and column temperature on the enantioseparation of CIT were investigated on the Hedera ODS-2 C18 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm × 5.0 um). A satisfactory resolution was achieved at 25°C using a mobile phase consisting of a mixture of aqueous buffer (pH of 2.5, 5 mM sodium dihydrogen phosphate, and 12 mM SBE-β-CD), methanol, and acetonitrile with a volumetric ratio of 21 : 3 : 1 and flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. This analytical method was evaluated by examining the precision (lower than 3.0%), linearity (regression coefficients close to 1), limit of detection (0.070 µg/mL for (R)-CIT and 0.076 µg/mL for (S)-CIT), and limit of quantitation (0.235 µg/mL for (R)-CIT and 0.254 µg/mL for (S)-CIT). PMID:26880921

  5. Enantioseparation of Citalopram by RP-HPLC, Using Sulfobutyl Ether-β-Cyclodextrin as a Chiral Mobile Phase Additive.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yangfeng; He, Quan Sophia; Cai, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Enantiomeric separation of citalopram (CIT) was developed using a reversed phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) with sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin (SBE-β-CD) as a chiral mobile phase additive. The effects of the pH value of aqueous buffer, concentration of chiral additive, composition of mobile phase, and column temperature on the enantioseparation of CIT were investigated on the Hedera ODS-2 C18 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm × 5.0 um). A satisfactory resolution was achieved at 25°C using a mobile phase consisting of a mixture of aqueous buffer (pH of 2.5, 5 mM sodium dihydrogen phosphate, and 12 mM SBE-β-CD), methanol, and acetonitrile with a volumetric ratio of 21 : 3 : 1 and flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. This analytical method was evaluated by examining the precision (lower than 3.0%), linearity (regression coefficients close to 1), limit of detection (0.070 µg/mL for (R)-CIT and 0.076 µg/mL for (S)-CIT), and limit of quantitation (0.235 µg/mL for (R)-CIT and 0.254 µg/mL for (S)-CIT). PMID:26880921

  6. Unified pH values of liquid chromatography mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Suu, Agnes; Jalukse, Lauri; Liigand, Jaanus; Kruve, Anneli; Himmel, Daniel; Krossing, Ingo; Rosés, Martí; Leito, Ivo

    2015-03-01

    This work introduces a conceptually new approach of measuring pH of mixed-solvent liquid chromatography (LC) mobile phases. Mobile phase pH is very important in LC, but its correct measurement is not straightforward, and all commonly used approaches have deficiencies. The new approach is based on the recently introduced unified pH (pH(abs)) scale, which enables direct comparison of acidities of solutions made in different solvents based on chemical potential of the proton in the solutions. This work represents the first experimental realization of the pH(abs) concept using differential potentiometric measurement for comparison of the chemical potentials of the proton in different solutions (connected by a salt bridge), together with earlier published reference points for obtaining the pH(abs) values (referenced to the gas phase) or pH(abs)(H₂O) values (referenced to the aqueous solution). The liquid junction potentials were estimated in the framework of Izutsu's three-component method. pH(abs) values for a number of common LC and LC-MS mobile phases have been determined. The pH(abs) scale enables for the first time direct comparison of acidities of any LC mobile phases, with different organic additives, different buffer components, etc. A possible experimental protocol of putting this new approach into chromatographic practice has been envisaged and its applicability tested. It has been demonstrated that the ionization behavior of bases (cationic acids) in the mobile phases can be better predicted by using the pH(abs)(H₂O) values and aqueous pKa values than by using the alternative means of expressing mobile phase acidity. Description of the ionization behavior of acids on the basis of pH(abs)(H₂O) values is possible if the change of their pKa values with solvent composition change is taken into account. PMID:25664372

  7. Utilization of deep eutectic solvents as novel mobile phase additives for improving the separation of bioactive quaternary alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ting; Zhang, Mingliang; Wan, Yiqun; Qiu, Hongdeng

    2016-01-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were used as novel mobile phase additives to improve chromatographic separation of four quaternary alkaloids including coptisine chloride, sanguinarine, berberine chloride and chelerythrine on a C18 column. DESs as a new class of ionic liquids are renewably sourced, environmentally benign, low cost and easy to prepare. Seven DESs were obtained by mixing different hydrogen acceptors and hydrogen-bond donors. The effects of organic solvents, the concentration of DESs, the types of DESs and the pH values of the buffer solution on the separation of the analytes were investigated. The composition of acetonitrile and 1.0% deep eutectic solvents aqueous solution (pH 3.3, adjusted with hydrochloric acid) in a 32:68 (v/v) ratio was used as optimized mobile phase, with which four quaternary alkaloids were well separated. When a small amount of DESs was added in the mobile phase for the separation of alkaloids on the C18 column, noticeable improvements were distinctly observed such as decreasing peak tailing and improving resolution. The separation mechanism mediated by DESs as mobile phase additives can be attributed to combined effect of both hydrogen acceptors and hydrogen-bond donors. For example, choline chloride can effectively cover the residual silanols on silica surface and ethylene glycol can reduce the retention time of analytes. The proposed method has been applied to determine BerbC in Lanqin Chinese herbal oral solution and BerbC tablet. Utilization of DESs in mobile phase can efficiently improve separation and selectivity of analytes from complex samples.

  8. Utilization of deep eutectic solvents as novel mobile phase additives for improving the separation of bioactive quaternary alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ting; Zhang, Mingliang; Wan, Yiqun; Qiu, Hongdeng

    2016-03-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were used as novel mobile phase additives to improve chromatographic separation of four quaternary alkaloids including coptisine chloride, sanguinarine, berberine chloride and chelerythrine on a C18 column. DESs as a new class of ionic liquids are renewably sourced, environmentally benign, low cost and easy to prepare. Seven DESs were obtained by mixing different hydrogen acceptors and hydrogen-bond donors. The effects of organic solvents, the concentration of DESs, the types of DESs and the pH values of the buffer solution on the separation of the analytes were investigated. The composition of acetonitrile and 1.0% deep eutectic solvents aqueous solution (pH 3.3, adjusted with hydrochloric acid) in a 32:68 (v/v) ratio was used as optimized mobile phase, with which four quaternary alkaloids were well separated. When a small amount of DESs was added in the mobile phase for the separation of alkaloids on the C18 column, noticeable improvements were distinctly observed such as decreasing peak tailing and improving resolution. The separation mechanism mediated by DESs as mobile phase additives can be attributed to combined effect of both hydrogen acceptors and hydrogen-bond donors. For example, choline chloride can effectively cover the residual silanols on silica surface and ethylene glycol can reduce the retention time of analytes. The proposed method has been applied to determine BerbC in Lanqin Chinese herbal oral solution and BerbC tablet. Utilization of DESs in mobile phase can efficiently improve separation and selectivity of analytes from complex samples. PMID:26717817

  9. Separation and characterization of phenolic compounds and triterpenoid saponins in licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis) using mobile phase-dependent reversed-phase×reversed-phase comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xue; Song, Wei; Ji, Shuai; Wang, Qi; Guo, De-an; Ye, Min

    2015-07-10

    Licorice is one of the most popular herbal medicines worldwide. It contains a big array of phenolic compounds (flavonoids, coumarins, and diphenylethanones). Due to high structural diversity, low abundance, and co-elution with licorice saponins, these phenolic compounds are difficult to be separated by conventional chromatography. In this study, a mobile phase-dependent reversed-phase×reversed phase comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (RP×RP 2DLC) method was established to separate phenolic compounds in licorice (the roots of Glycyrrhiza uralensis). Organic solvents in the mobile phase were optimized to improve orthogonality of the first and second dimensions, and a synchronized gradient mode was used to improve chromatographic resolution. Finally, licorice extracts were eluted with methanol/water/formic acid in the first dimension (Acquity CSH C18 column), and acetonitrile/water/formic acid in the second dimension (Poroshell Phenyl-Hexyl column). By using this 2DLC system, a total of 311 compounds were detected within 40min. The practical and effective peak capacity was 1329 and 524, respectively, and the orthogonality was 79.8%. The structures of 21 selected unknown compounds were tentatively characterized by mass spectrometry, and 8 of them were discovered from G. uralensis for the first time. The mobile phase-dependent 2DLC/MS system could benefit the separation and characterization of natural products in complicated herbal extracts.

  10. Liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometric bioanalysis using normal-phase columns with aqueous/organic mobile phases - a novel approach of eliminating evaporation and reconstitution steps in 96-well SPE.

    PubMed

    Naidong, Weng; Shou, Wilson Z; Addison, Thomas; Maleki, Saber; Jiang, Xiangyu

    2002-01-01

    Bioanalytical methods using automated 96-well solid-phase extraction (SPE) and liquid chromatography with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry. SPE methods typically require manual steps of drying of the eluates and reconstituting of the analytes with a suitable injection solvent possessing elution strength weaker than the mobile phase. In this study, we demonstrated a novel approach of eliminating these two steps in 96-well SPE by using normal-phase LC/MS/MS methods with low aqueous/high organic mobile phases, which consisted of 70-95% organic solvent, 5-30% water, and small amount of volatile acid or buffer. While the commonly used SPE elution solvents (i.e. acetonitrile and methanol) have stronger elution strength than a mobile phase on reversed-phase chromatography, they are weaker elution solvents than a mobile phase for normal-phase LC/MS/MS and therefore can be injected directly. Analytical methods for a range of polar pharmaceutical compounds, namely, omeprazole, metoprolol, fexofenadine, pseudoephedrine as well as rifampin and its metabolite 25-desacetyl-rifampin, in biological fluids, were developed and optimized based on the foregoing principles. As a result of the time saving, a batch of 96 samples could be processed in one hour. These bioanalytical LC/MS/MS methods were validated according to "Guidance for Industry - Bioanalytical Method Validation" recommended by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the United States.

  11. Binary Solvent Organization at Silica/Liquid Interfaces: Preferential Ordering in Acetonitrile-Methanol Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gobrogge, Eric A; Walker, Robert A

    2014-08-01

    Nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy experiments examined solvent organization at the silica/binary solvent interface where the binary solvent consisted of methanol and acetonitrile in varying mole fractions. Data were compared with surface vibrational spectra acquired from silica surfaces exposed to a vapor phase saturated with the same binary solvent mixtures. Changes in vibrational band intensities suggest that methanol ideally adsorbs to the silica/vapor interface but acetonitrile accumulates in excess relative to vapor-phase composition. At the silica/liquid interface, acetonitrile's signal increases until a solution phase mole fraction of ∼0.85. At higher acetonitrile concentrations, acetonitrile's signal decreases dramatically until only a weak signature persists with the neat solvent. This behavior is ascribed to dipole-paired acetonitrile forming a bilayer with the first sublayer associating with surface silanol groups and a second sublayer consisting of weakly associating, antiparallel partners. On the basis of recent simulations, we propose that the second sublayer accumulates in excess. PMID:26277964

  12. Determination of the pH of binary mobile phases for reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Rosés, Martí

    2004-05-28

    The measurement of pH in chromatographic mobile phases has been a constant subject of discussion during many years. The pH of the mobile phase is an important parameter that determines the chromatographic retention of many analytes with acid-base properties. In many instances a proper pH measurement is needed to assure the accuracy of retention-pH relationships or the reproducibility of chromatographic procedures. Three different methods are common in pH measurement of mobile phases: measurement of pH in the aqueous buffer before addition of the organic modifier, measurement of pH in the mobile phase prepared by mixing aqueous buffer and organic modifier after pH calibration with standard solutions prepared in the same mobile phase solvent, and measurement of pH in the mobile phase prepared by mixing aqueous buffer and organic modifier after pH calibration with aqueous standard solutions. This review discusses the different pH measurement and calibration procedures in terms of the theoretical and operational definitions of the different pH scales that can be applied to water-organic solvent mixtures. The advantages and disadvantages of each procedure are also presented through chromatographic examples. Finally, practical recommendations to select the most appropriate pH measurement procedure for particular chromatographic problems are given.

  13. Formation of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based liquid chromatography mobile phases as interference ions in liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometric analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Anil K.; Zhang, Rui; Orton, Daniel J.; Zhao, Rui; Clauss, Therese RW; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-05-30

    Two unexpected singly charged ions at m/z 1103 and 944 have been observed in mass spectra obtained from electrospray ionization-mass spectrometric analysis of liquid chromatography effluents with mobile phases containing trifluoroacetic acid. Accurate mass measurement and tandem mass spectrometry studies revealed that these two ions are not due to any contamination from solvents and chemicals used for mobile and stationary phases or from the laboratory atmospheric environment. Instead these ions are clusters of trifluoroacetic acid formed in association with acetonitrile, water and iron from the stainless steel union used to connect the column with the electrospray tip and to apply high voltage; the molecular formulae are Fe+((OH)(H2O)2)9(CF3COOH)5 and Fe+((OH)(H2O)2)6 (CF3COOH)5.

  14. Phase transitions in contagion processes mediated by recurrent mobility patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcan, Duygu; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2011-07-01

    Human mobility and activity patterns mediate contagion on many levels, including the spatial spread of infectious diseases, diffusion of rumours, and emergence of consensus. These patterns however are often dominated by specific locations and recurrent flows and poorly modelled by the random diffusive dynamics generally used to study them. Here we develop a theoretical framework to analyse contagion within a network of locations where individuals recall their geographic origins. We find a phase transition between a regime in which the contagion affects a large fraction of the system and one in which only a small fraction is affected. This transition cannot be uncovered by continuous deterministic models because of the stochastic features of the contagion process and defines an invasion threshold that depends on mobility parameters, providing guidance for controlling contagion spread by constraining mobility processes. We recover the threshold behaviour by analysing diffusion processes mediated by real human commuting data.

  15. Enantioseparation of mandelic acid derivatives by high performance liquid chromatography with substituted β-cyclodextrin as chiral mobile phase additive and evaluation of inclusion complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Shengqiang; Zhang, Hu; Shen, Mangmang

    2014-01-01

    The enantioseparation of ten mandelic acid derivatives was performed by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) or sulfobutyl ether-β-cyclodextrin (SBE-β-CD) as chiral mobile phase additives, in which inclusion complex formations between cyclodextrins and enantiomers were evaluated. The effects of various factors such as the composition of mobile phase, concentration of cyclodextrins and column temperature on retention and enantioselectivity were studied. The peak resolutions and retention time of the enantiomers were strongly affected by the pH, the organic modifier and the type of β-cyclodextrin in the mobile phase, while the concentration of buffer solution and temperature had a relatively low effect on resolutions. Enantioseparations were successfully achieved on a Shimpack CLC-ODS column (150×4.6 mm i.d., 5 μm). The mobile phase was a mixture of acetonitrile and 0.10 mol L-1 of phosphate buffer at pH 2.68 containing 20 mmol L-1 of HP-β-CD or SBE-β-CD. Semi-preparative enantioseparation of about 10 mg of α-cyclohexylmandelic acid and α-cyclopentylmandelic acid were established individually. Cyclodextrin-enantiomer complex stoichiometries as well as binding constants were investigated. Results showed that stoichiomertries for all the inclusion complex of cyclodextrin-enantiomers were 1:1. PMID:24893270

  16. A novel method for the determination of three volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath by solid-phase microextraction-ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Allafchian, Ali Reza; Majidian, Zahra; Ielbeigi, Vahideh; Tabrizchi, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    A method was carried out for the quantitative determination of the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using solid-phase microextraction and ion mobility spectrometry (SPME-IMS). This method was optimized and evaluated. The best results were obtained at sorption temperature 70 °C, desorption temperature 200 °C, and extraction time 15 min. Under the optimized conditions, the linear dynamic range was found to be 0.01-4.0 ppb (R(2) > 0.995), 2.3-400 ppm (R(2) > 0.994), and 2.5-76 ppb (R(2) > 0.998) for acetone, acetaldehyde, and acetonitrile, respectively. The detection limits for acetone, acetaldehyde, and acetonitrile were 0.001 ppb, 0.18 ppm, and 0.22 ppb, respectively. As a practical application, the method was applied for the determination of acetone, acetaldehyde, and acetonitrile in human breath matrix. Therefore, the proposed method was found to be effective and simple enough to be strongly recommended for real sample analysis.

  17. Phase transition and surface sublimation of a mobile Potts model.

    PubMed

    Bailly-Reyre, A; Diep, H T; Kaufman, M

    2015-10-01

    We study in this paper the phase transition in a mobile Potts model by the use of Monte Carlo simulation. The mobile Potts model is related to a diluted Potts model, which is also studied here by a mean-field approximation. We consider a lattice where each site is either vacant or occupied by a q-state Potts spin. The Potts spin can move from one site to a nearby vacant site. In order to study the surface sublimation, we consider a system of Potts spins contained in a recipient with a concentration c defined as the ratio of the number of Potts spins N(s) to the total number of lattice sites N(L)=N(x)×N(y)×N(z). Taking into account the attractive interaction between the nearest-neighboring Potts spins, we study the phase transitions as functions of various physical parameters such as the temperature, the shape of the recipient, and the spin concentration. We show that as the temperature increases, surface spins are detached from the solid phase to form a gas in the empty space. Surface order parameters indicate different behaviors depending on the distance to the surface. At high temperatures, if the concentration is high enough, the interior spins undergo a first-order phase transition to an orientationally disordered phase. The mean-field results are shown as functions of temperature, pressure, and chemical potential, which confirm in particular the first-order character of the transition. PMID:26565221

  18. 77 FR 14012 - Eligible Telecommunications Carrier Designation for Participation in Mobility Fund Phase I

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ... Telecommunications Carrier Designation for Participation in Mobility Fund Phase I AGENCY: Federal Communications... Telecommunications Carrier (ETC) Designation from the Commission for participation in Mobility Fund Phase I Auction...) Mobility Fund Phase I support must be designated as an eligible telecommunications carrier in...

  19. Considerations of digital phase modulation for narrowband satellite mobile communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grythe, Knut

    1990-01-01

    The Inmarsat-M system for mobile satellite communication is specified as a frequency division multiple access (FDMA) system, applying Offset Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (QPSK) for transmitting 8 kbit/sec in 10 kHz user channel bandwidth. We consider Digital Phase Modulation (DPM) as an alternative modulation format for INMARSAT-M. DPM is similar to Continuous Phase Modulation (CPM) except that DPM has a finite memory in the premodular filter with a continuous varying modulation index. It is shown that DPM with 64 states in the VA obtains a lower bit error rate (BER). Results for a 5 kHz system, with the same 8 kbit/sec transmitted bitstream, is also presented.

  20. Methylammonium formate as a mobile phase modifier for reversed-phase liquid chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Shau; Danielson, Neil D.

    2009-01-01

    Although alkylammonium ionic liquids such as ethylammonium nitrate and ethylammonium formate have been used as mobile phase “solvents” for liquid chromatography (LC), we have shown that methylammonium formate (MAF), in part because of its lower viscosity, can be an effective replacement for methanol (MeOH) in reversed-phase LC. Plots of log retention factor versus the fraction of MeOH and MAF in the mobile phase indicate quite comparable solvent strength slope values of 2.50 and 2.05, respectively. Using a polar endcapped C18 column, furazolidone and nitrofurantoin using 20% MAF-80% water could be separated in 22 min but no baseline separation was possible using MeOH as the modifier, even down to 10%. Suppression of silanol peak broadening effects by MAF is important permitting a baseline separation of pyridoxine, thiamine, and nicotinamide using 5% MAF-95% water at 0.7 mL/min. Using 5% MeOH-95% water, severe peak broadening for thiamine is evident. The compatibility of MAF as a mobile phase modifer for LC with mass spectrometry detection of water soluble vitamins is also shown. PMID:18849044

  1. Detailed insights into the retention mechanism of caffeine metabolites on the amide stationary phase in hydrophilic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yong; Shah, Rajan

    2016-09-01

    The amide phase was investigated using a wide range of acetonitrile content in the mobile phase in both the HILIC and RPLC modes. Using caffeine metabolites as the model compounds, the retention, thermodynamic and kinetic data was obtained under various mobile phase conditions and supported the previous postulation that there might be a transition of the predominant retention mechanism in relation to the acetonitrile content in HILIC. On the amide phase, hydrophilic partitioning seemed to be the predominant retention mechanism below 85% acetonitrile; and a different retention mechanism (presumably surface adsorption) made more and more significant contributions to the overall retention when the acetonitrile content reached above 85%. This study also provided more direct evidences to explain the effect of salt concentration on the retention of non-charged solutes in HILIC. In addition, the retention, thermodynamic and kinetic data suggest that the amide phase behaved very differently from the conventional C18 phase in the RPLC mode. PMID:27522153

  2. Combined column-mobile phase mixture statistical design optimization of high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of multicomponent systems.

    PubMed

    Breitkreitz, Márcia C; Jardim, Isabel C S F; Bruns, Roy E

    2009-02-27

    A statistical approach for the simultaneous optimization of the mobile and stationary phases used in reversed-phase liquid chromatography is presented. Mixture designs using aqueous mixtures of acetonitrile (ACN), methanol (MeOH) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) organic modifiers were performed simultaneously with column type optimization, according to a split-plot design, to achieve the best separation of compounds in two sample sets: one containing 10 neutral compounds with similar retention factors and another containing 11 pesticides. Combined models were obtained by multiplying a linear model for column type, C8 or C18, by quadratic or special cubic mixture models. Instead of using an objective response function, combined models were built for elementary chromatographic criteria (retention factors, resolution and relative retention) of each solute or pair of solutes and, after their validation, the global separation was accomplished by means of Derringer's desirability functions. For neutral compounds a 37:12:8:43 (v/v/v/v) percentage mixture of ACN:MeOH:THF:H2O with the C18 column and for pesticides a 15:15:70 (v/v/v) ACN:THF:H2O mixture with the C8 column provide excellent resolution of all peaks.

  3. Study of the electroosmotic flow as a means to propel the mobile phase in capillary electrochromatography in view of further miniaturization of capillary electrochromatography systems.

    PubMed

    Szekely, Laszlo; Freitag, Ruth

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the phenomenon of electroosmosis as a means to propel a mobile phase, in particular in view of an application in microfluidic systems, which are characterized by significantly smaller volumes of the reservoirs and the separation channels compared to conventional instrumentation. In the microfluidic chip, pH changes due to water electrolysis quickly showed an effect on the electroosmotic flow (EOF), which could be counteracted by either regularly exchanging or buffering the mobile phase. Surface treatment was of no effect in regard to EOF stabilization in empty channels but may have an influence in channels filled with a charged monolith. In fused-silica capillaries the EOF was generally found to decrease from 'naked' to surface-treated to monolith-filled capillaries. The EOF tended to be higher when an organic solvent (acetonitrile) was added to the mobile phase and could be further increased by substituting the water with equal amounts of methanol. In addition, the hydrostatic pressure exerted by the EOF was investigated. In a microfluidic chip with empty (cross-)channels such an effect could be responsible for a redirection of the flow. In capillaries partially filled with a noncharged (non-EOF-generating) monolith, a linear relationship could be established between the EOF created in the empty section of the capillary (apparent mobility) and the length of the monolith (backpressure). In capillaries partially filled with a charged (EOF-producing) monolith, flow inhomogeneities must be expected as a consequence of a superimposition of hydrodynamic pressure and EOF as mobile phase driving force.

  4. Adsorbed solution model for prediction of normal-phase chromatography process with varying composition of the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Piatkowski, Wojciech; Petrushka, Igor; Antos, Dorota

    2005-10-21

    The adsorbed solution model has been used to predict competitive adsorption equilibria of the solute and the active component of mobile phase in a normal-phase liquid chromatography system. The inputs to the calculations were the single adsorption isotherms accounting for energetic heterogeneity of the adsorbent surface and non-ideality of the mobile phase solution. The competitive adsorption model has been coupled with a model of the column dynamics and used for simulating of chromatography process at different mobile phase composition. The predictions have been verified by comparing the simulated and experimental chromatograms. The model allowed quantitative prediction of chromatography process on the basis of the pure-species adsorption isotherms.

  5. Analysis of Phenacylester Derivatives of Fatty Acids from Human Skin Surface Sebum by Reversed-Phase HPLC: Chromatographic Mobility as a Function of Physico-Chemical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Bodoprost, Juliana; Rosemeyer, Helmut

    2007-01-01

    A set of 13 fatty acids was transformed into their phenacyl esters by reaction with phenacyl bromide in acetonitrile using 18-crown-6 as phase-transfer catalyst. Conditions for the RP-18 HPL chromatographic separation of most of the esters has been worked out. Using this standard the fatty acid spectra from skin surface sebum lipids of 17 test persons was taken after microwave-assisted hydrolysis, neutralization and extraction with n-hexane. Quantitative evaluation of the chromatograms exhibits that oleic acid predominates in the sebum of all test persons. In the second part of the work the chromatographic mobility (RE values) of fatty acid phenacyl esters is correlated with calculated physico-chemical parameters of the corresponding acids. The best linear correlation was found between the RE and the logP values. This is helpful for the structural elucidation of un-identified fatty acids in a chromatogram.

  6. High resolution ion mobility measurements for gas phase proteins: correlation between solution phase and gas phase conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudgins, Robert R.; Woenckhaus, Jürgen; Jarrold, Martin F.

    1997-11-01

    Our high resolution ion mobility apparatus has been modified by attaching an electrospray source to perform measurements for biological molecules. While the greater resolving power permits the resolution of more conformations for BPTI and cytochrome c, the resolved features are generally much broader than expected for a single rigid conformation. A major advantage of the new experimental configuration is the much gentler introduction of ions into the drift tube, so that the observed gas phase conformations appear to more closely reflect those present in solution. For example, it is possible to distinguish between the native state of cytochrome c and the methanol-denatured form on the basis of the ion mobility measurements; the mass spectra alone are not sensitive enough to detect this change. Thus this approach may provide a quick and sensitive tool for probing the solution phase conformations of biological molecules.

  7. Polarons and Mobile Impurities Near a Quantum Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadkhoo, Shahriar

    This dissertation aims at improving the current understanding of the physics of mobile impurities in highly correlated liquid-like phases of matter. Impurity problems pose challenging and intricate questions in different realms of many-body physics. For instance, the problem of ''solvation'' of charged solutes in polar solvents, has been the subject of longstanding debates among chemical physicists. The significant role of quantum fluctuations of the solvent, as well as the break down of linear response theory, render the ordinary treatments intractable. Inspired by this complicated problem, we first attempt to understand the role of non-specific quantum fluctuations in the solvation process. To this end, we calculate the dynamic structure factor of a model polar liquid, using the classical Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. We verify the failure of linear response approximation in the vicinity of a hydrated electron, by comparing the outcomes of MD simulations with the predictions of linear response theory. This nonlinear behavior is associated with the pronounced peaks of the structure factor, which reflect the strong fluctuations of the local modes. A cavity picture is constructed based on heuristic arguments, which suggests that the electron, along with the surrounding polarization cloud, behave like a frozen sphere, for which the linear response theory is broken inside and valid outside. The inverse radius of the spherical region serves as a UV momentum cutoff for the linear response approximation to be applicable. The problem of mobile impurities in polar liquids can be also addressed in the framework of the ''polaron'' problem. Polaron is a quasiparticle that typically acquires an extended state at weak couplings, and crossovers to a self-trapped state at strong couplings. Using the analytical fits to the numerically obtained charge-charge structure factor, a phenomenological approach is proposed within the Leggett's influence functional formalism, which

  8. Acetonitrile in the air over Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, S.; Helas, G.; Warneck, P.

    1989-06-01

    A gas chromatographic technique was developed to measure acetonitrile mixing ratios in air samples collected during three aircraft flights over Europe. Uniform mixing ratios were observed in the troposphere independent of altitude, with an average of 144+-26 pptv for the first two flights, and 194+-7 pptv for the third. /copyright/ American Geophysical Union 1989

  9. Polarons and Mobile Impurities Near a Quantum Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadkhoo, Shahriar

    This dissertation aims at improving the current understanding of the physics of mobile impurities in highly correlated liquid-like phases of matter. Impurity problems pose challenging and intricate questions in different realms of many-body physics. For instance, the problem of ''solvation'' of charged solutes in polar solvents, has been the subject of longstanding debates among chemical physicists. The significant role of quantum fluctuations of the solvent, as well as the break down of linear response theory, render the ordinary treatments intractable. Inspired by this complicated problem, we first attempt to understand the role of non-specific quantum fluctuations in the solvation process. To this end, we calculate the dynamic structure factor of a model polar liquid, using the classical Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. We verify the failure of linear response approximation in the vicinity of a hydrated electron, by comparing the outcomes of MD simulations with the predictions of linear response theory. This nonlinear behavior is associated with the pronounced peaks of the structure factor, which reflect the strong fluctuations of the local modes. A cavity picture is constructed based on heuristic arguments, which suggests that the electron, along with the surrounding polarization cloud, behave like a frozen sphere, for which the linear response theory is broken inside and valid outside. The inverse radius of the spherical region serves as a UV momentum cutoff for the linear response approximation to be applicable. The problem of mobile impurities in polar liquids can be also addressed in the framework of the ''polaron'' problem. Polaron is a quasiparticle that typically acquires an extended state at weak couplings, and crossovers to a self-trapped state at strong couplings. Using the analytical fits to the numerically obtained charge-charge structure factor, a phenomenological approach is proposed within the Leggett's influence functional formalism, which

  10. Differing stabilities of snake venom cardiotoxins in acidic aqueous acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Osthoff, G

    1990-01-01

    1. Although snake venom cardiotoxins constitute a homologous family of proteins, subclasses with different structural and biological properties exist. 2. By using circular dichroism spectroscopy of twelve cardiotoxins belonging to two structural classes and one non-classified group, this investigation indicated that cardiotoxins differ in their stabilities towards denaturation in acidic aqueous acetonitrile, as used in some reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography separations. 3. It was also shown that cardiotoxins of the structural class II are in general less stable towards this denaturation than class I and non-classified cardiotoxins.

  11. 77 FR 38803 - Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Updated Data For Auction 901

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... Public Notice, 77 FR 32092, May 31, 2012, the Bureaus described how they identified census blocks... COMMISSION Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Updated Data For Auction 901 AGENCY: Federal Communications... Competition Bureaus (Bureaus) announce updated data files of census blocks eligible for the Mobility...

  12. 77 FR 38061 - Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Supplemental Short-Form Instructions and Other Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... Notice, 77 FR 32092, May 31, 2012, the Bureaus provided general instructions for completing FCC Form 180... COMMISSION Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Supplemental Short-Form Instructions and Other Information AGENCY... Telecommunications and Wireline ] Competition Bureaus provide supplemental filing instructions for the Mobility...

  13. Water versus acetonitrile coordination to uranyl. Density functional study of cooperative polarization effects in solution.

    PubMed

    Bühl, Michael; Sieffert, Nicolas; Chaumont, Alain; Wipff, Georges

    2011-01-01

    Optimizations at the BLYP and B3LYP levels are reported for mixed uranyl-water/acetonitrile complexes [UO(2)(H(2)O)(5-n)(MeCN)(n)](2+) (n = 0-5), in both the gas phase and a polarizable continuum modeling acetonitrile. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations have been performed for these complexes in the gas phase, and for selected species (n = 0, 1, 3, 5) in a periodic box of liquid acetonitrile. According to structural and energetic data, uranyl has a higher affinity for acetonitrile than for water in the gas phase, in keeping with the higher dipole moment and polarizability of acetonitrile. In acetonitrile solution, however, water is the better ligand because of specific solvation effects. Analysis of the dipole moment of the coordinated water molecule in [UO(2)(H(2)O)(MeCN)(4)](2+) reveals that the interaction with the second-shell solvent molecules (through fairly strong and persistent O-H···N hydrogen bonds) causes a significant increase of this dipole moment (by more than 1 D). This cooperative polarization of water reinforces the uranyl-water bond as well as the water solvation via strengthened (UO(2))OH(2)···NCMe hydrogen bonds. Such cooperativity is essentially absent in the acetonitrile ligands that make much weaker (UO(2))NCMe···NCMe hydrogen bonds. Beyond the uranyl case, this study points to the importance of cooperative polarization effects to enhance the M(n+) ion affinity for water in condensed phases involving M(n+)-OH(2)···A fragments, where A is a H-bond proton acceptor and M(n+) is a hard cation. PMID:21126026

  14. New method for the photo-chemiluminometric determination of benzoylurea insecticides based on acetonitrile chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Gil García, M D; Martínez Galera, M; Santiago Valverde, R

    2007-03-01

    The viability of tandem photochemical reaction-chemiluminescence detection has been studied for the determination of five benzoylurea insecticides, namely, diflubenzuron, triflumuron, hexaflumuron, lufenuron and flufenoxuron. The 'on-line' photochemical reaction of benzoylurea pesticides provides an enhanced chemiluminescence response of the pesticides during their oxidation by potassium hexacyanoferrate(III) and sodium hydroxide, whose signal increases with the percentage of acetonitrile in the reaction medium. The determination was performed using a photoreactor consisting of a PFA (perfluoroalkoxy) tube reactor coil (5 mx1.6-mm O.D. and 0.8-mm I.D.) and an 8-W xenon lamp. As the yield of the photoderivatization process and the chemiluminescent signals depend on the percentage of acetonitrile, the chromatographic column (a Gemini C18, Phenomenex 150 mmx4.6 mm, 5-microm particle size) was chosen with the aim of using high percentages of this organic solvent in the mobile phase. Previous studies showed that the rate of the chemiluminescent reaction was very fast. Therefore, a modification was carried out in the detector in order to mix the analytes and reactants as near as possible to the measure cell. The optimised method was validated with respect to linearity, precision, limits of detection and quantification accuracy. Under the optimised conditions, linear working range extends three orders of magnitude with the relative standard deviation of intra-day precision below 10% and detection limits between 0.012 and 0.18 microg mL-1, according to the compound. The proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of benzoylureas in cucumber with good results.

  15. New method for the photo-chemiluminometric determination of benzoylurea insecticides based on acetonitrile chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Gil García, M D; Martínez Galera, M; Santiago Valverde, R

    2007-03-01

    The viability of tandem photochemical reaction-chemiluminescence detection has been studied for the determination of five benzoylurea insecticides, namely, diflubenzuron, triflumuron, hexaflumuron, lufenuron and flufenoxuron. The 'on-line' photochemical reaction of benzoylurea pesticides provides an enhanced chemiluminescence response of the pesticides during their oxidation by potassium hexacyanoferrate(III) and sodium hydroxide, whose signal increases with the percentage of acetonitrile in the reaction medium. The determination was performed using a photoreactor consisting of a PFA (perfluoroalkoxy) tube reactor coil (5 mx1.6-mm O.D. and 0.8-mm I.D.) and an 8-W xenon lamp. As the yield of the photoderivatization process and the chemiluminescent signals depend on the percentage of acetonitrile, the chromatographic column (a Gemini C18, Phenomenex 150 mmx4.6 mm, 5-microm particle size) was chosen with the aim of using high percentages of this organic solvent in the mobile phase. Previous studies showed that the rate of the chemiluminescent reaction was very fast. Therefore, a modification was carried out in the detector in order to mix the analytes and reactants as near as possible to the measure cell. The optimised method was validated with respect to linearity, precision, limits of detection and quantification accuracy. Under the optimised conditions, linear working range extends three orders of magnitude with the relative standard deviation of intra-day precision below 10% and detection limits between 0.012 and 0.18 microg mL-1, according to the compound. The proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of benzoylureas in cucumber with good results. PMID:17205265

  16. Development and application of a specially designed heating system for temperature-programmed high-performance liquid chromatography using subcritical water as the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Teutenberg, T; Goetze, H-J; Tuerk, J; Ploeger, J; Kiffmeyer, T K; Schmidt, K G; Kohorst, W gr; Rohe, T; Jansen, H-D; Weber, H

    2006-05-01

    A specially designed heating system for temperature-programmed HPLC was developed based on experimental measurements of eluent temperature inside a stainless steel capillary using a very thin thermocouple. The heating system can be operated at temperatures up to 225 degrees C and consists of a preheating, a column heating and a cooling unit. Fast cycle times after a temperature gradient can be realized by an internal silicone oil bath which cools down the preheating and column heating unit. Long-term thermal stability of a polybutadiene-coated zirconium dioxide column has been evaluated using a tubular oven in which the column was placed. The packing material was stable after 50h of operation at 185 degrees C. A mixture containing four steroids was separated at ambient conditions using a mobile phase of 25% acetonitrile:75% deionized water and a mobile phase of pure deionized water at 185 degrees C using the specially designed heating system and the PBD column. Analysis time could be drastically reduced from 17 min at ambient conditions and a flow rate of 1 mL/min to only 1.2 min at 185 degrees C and a flow rate of 5 mL/min. At these extreme conditions, no thermal mismatch was observed and peaks were not distorted, thus underlining the performance of the developed heating system. Temperature programming was performed by separating cytostatic and antibiotic drugs with a temperature gradient using only water as the mobile phase. In contrast to an isocratic elution of this mixture at room temperature, overall analysis time could be reduced two-fold from 20 to 10 min. PMID:16530210

  17. Enhanced lipid isomer separation in human plasma using reversed-phase UPLC with ion-mobility/high-resolution MS detection[S

    PubMed Central

    Damen, Carola W. N.; Isaac, Giorgis; Langridge, James; Hankemeier, Thomas; Vreeken, Rob J.

    2014-01-01

    An ultraperformance LC (UPLC) method for the separation of different lipid molecular species and lipid isomers using a stationary phase incorporating charged surface hybrid (CSH) technology is described. The resulting enhanced separation possibilities of the method are demonstrated using standards and human plasma extracts. Lipids were extracted from human plasma samples with the Bligh and Dyer method. Separation of lipids was achieved on a 100 × 2.1 mm inner diameter CSH C18 column using gradient elution with aqueous-acetonitrile-isopropanol mobile phases containing 10 mM ammonium formate/0.1% formic acid buffers at a flow rate of 0.4 ml/min. A UPLC run time of 20 min was routinely used, and a shorter method with a 10 min run time is also described. The method shows extremely stable retention times when human plasma extracts and a variety of biofluids or tissues are analyzed [intra-assay relative standard deviation (RSD) <0.385% and <0.451% for 20 and 10 min gradients, respectively (n = 5); interassay RSD <0.673% and <0.763% for 20 and 10 min gradients, respectively (n = 30)]. The UPLC system was coupled to a hybrid quadrupole orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometer, equipped with a traveling wave ion-mobility cell. Besides demonstrating the separation for different lipids using the chromatographic method, we demonstrate the use of the ion-mobility MS platform for the structural elucidation of lipids. The method can now be used to elucidate structures of a wide variety of lipids in biological samples of different matrices. PMID:24891331

  18. Mobile phase additives for enhancing the chromatographic performance of astaxanthin on nonendcapped polymeric C30-bonded stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Philipp; Surmann, Peter; Fuhrmann, Herbert

    2009-01-01

    Astaxanthin shows peak deformation and reduced peak area response when eluted with methanol and methyl tert-butyl ether on nonendcapped polymeric C30-bonded HPLC phases. The present study tested different column manufacturers, column batches, and ten mobile phase additives including acids, bases, buffers, complexing and antioxidant agents for improvement of peak shape and peak area response. Concerning chromatographic benefits and feasibility, ammonium acetate was found to be the best additive followed by triethylamine for all columns tested. Variation of the mobile phase pH equivalent and the column temperature showed no synergistic effects on peak shape and peak area response. Results indicate that peak tailing and variation of peak area response are due to different on-column effects. Possible mechanisms of the observed phenomenon will be discussed. PMID:19051191

  19. Change of mobile phase pH during gradient reversed-phase chromatography with 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol-water as mobile phase and its effect on the chromatographic hydrophobicity index determination.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Sonia; Bosch, Elisabeth; Rosés, Martí; Valkó, Klára

    2002-04-19

    We have shown previously that using a trifluoroethanol containing mobile phase provides a unique chromatographic selectivity. This is essential to derive molecular descriptors by HPLC which requires retention data from several systems. It also requires that the ionisation is suppressed so that retention times reflect the properties of the neutral molecules. Therefore the pH change of the mobile phase during gradient elution and its effect on the solute ionisation have been studied. During gradient elution of mixtures of ammonium acetate and butylammonium formate with trifluoroethanol as an organic modifier it was found that the pH was almost constant when the gradient started with a low pH. However, when the starting mobile phase pH was above 8 the pH dropped very quickly as the trifluoroethanol concentration increased in the mobile phase. The CHI descriptor (a retention index derived directly from gradient retention times) of several basic compounds as a function of starting mobile phase pH has been measured using trifluoroethanol gradient. The effect of the trifluoroethanol on the pKa change of the compounds has been investigated. The experimental data fit closely to a previously derived equation that describes gradient retention times as a function of mobile phase pH and analyte ionisation constant (pKa). This equation makes it possible to predict the CHI descriptor for ionisable compounds at various pH values. We have used butylamine for high pH mobile phase preparation as is more basic than ammonia and for many basic drugs the retention of the neutral form could be obtained directly (without extrapolation).

  20. Pyrolysis and Combustion of Acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN)

    SciTech Connect

    Britt, P.F.

    2002-05-22

    Acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN) is formed from the thermal decomposition of a variety of cyclic, noncyclic, and polymeric nitrogen-containing compounds such as pyrrole and polyacrylonitrile. The pyrolysis and combustion of acetonitrile have been studied over the past 30 years to gain a more detailed understanding of the complex mechanisms involved in the release of nitrogen-containing compounds such as hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in fires and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in coal combustion. This report reviews the literature on the formation of HCN and NOx from the pyrolysis and combustion of acetonitrile and discusses the possible products found in an acetonitrile fire.

  1. 77 FR 9655 - Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Updated List of Potentially Eligible Census Blocks

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ..., 77 FR 7152, February 10, 2012, comments are due on or before February 24, 2012. Reply comments are... Public Notice, 77 FR 7152, February 10, 2012, all filings in response to the notice must refer to AU... program requirements in the Auction 901 (Mobility Fund Phase I) Comment Public Notice, 77 FR...

  2. Dependence of negative-mode electrospray ionization response factors on mobile phase composition and molecular structure for newly-authenticated neutral acylsucrose metabolites.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Banibrata; Jones, A Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Authentic standards of known concentrations serve as references for accurate absolute quantification of plant metabolites using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). However, often such standards are not commercially available or not amenable for custom syntheses. Despite the widespread use of electrospray ionization for metabolite analyses, the fundamentals needed for reliable prediction of molecular response factors have yet to be explored in detail for analytes that lack ionized functional groups. In order to lay a foundation for quantifying unknown neutral plant metabolites in absence of authentic standards, sub-milligram quantities of purified homologous acylsucrose metabolites were authenticated by subjecting each to basic hydrolysis and quantifying the sucrose product using stable-isotope dilution ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). Once authenticated, molar response factors of [M + formate](-) ions for the acylsucrose metabolites were determined at different mobile phase compositions ranging from 40%-80% acetonitrile, and demonstrated relationships of response factors with mobile phase composition and metabolite structural features including nonpolar surface areas, the length of the longest acyl chain, and the number of hydroxyl groups. This approach was employed to calculate predicted response factors for three authenticated acylsucroses based on mean values for all isomers with a common number of total acyl carbon atoms. Absolute UHPLC-MS quantification was performed on these three metabolites in an extract from leaves of the wild tomato Solanum habrochaites LA1777, yielding deviations of 26%, 6.7%, and 7.3% from values established using compound-specific response factors. PMID:26331907

  3. 78 FR 21355 - Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Scheduled for October 24, 2013; Comment Sought on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... Mobility Fund Phase I, 77 FR 14012. Petitions for designation as an ETC should be filed in WC Docket No. 09..., 76 FR 73830, November 29, 2011 and 76 FR 81562, December 28, 2011. Auction 902 will award one-time... COMMISSION Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Scheduled for October 24, 2013; Comment Sought on...

  4. 78 FR 61350 - Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I Auction (Auction 902); Short-Form Application Filing Window...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    .... In the list of bidding areas released with the Auction 902 Procedures Public Notice, 78 FR 56875... COMMISSION Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I Auction (Auction 902); Short-Form Application Filing Window... Bureau, Auctions and Spectrum Access Division: For Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I questions:...

  5. The Role of Fluorinated Alcohols as Mobile Phase Modifiers for LC-MS Analysis of Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basiri, Babak; van Hattum, Hilde; van Dongen, William D.; Murph, Mandi M.; Bartlett, Michael G.

    2016-09-01

    Hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) has been widely used as an acidic modifier for mobile phases for liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis of oligonucleotides ever since the first report of its use for this purpose. This is not surprising, considering the exceptional performance of HFIP compared with carboxylic acids, which cause significant MS signal suppression in electrospray ionization. However, we have found that other fluorinated alcohols can also be utilized for mobile phase preparation and the choice of optimal fluorinated alcohol is determined by the ion-pairing (IP) agent. Although HFIP is a very good choice to be used alongside less hydrophobic IP agents, other fluorinated alcohols such as 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-methyl-2-propanol (HFMIP) can significantly outperform HFIP when used with more hydrophobic IP agents. We also found that more acidic fluorinated alcohols assist with the transfer of oligonucleotides with secondary structure (e.g., folded strands and hairpins) into the gas phase.

  6. Thermodynamic studies of the solvent effects in chromatography on molecularly imprinted polymers. 3. Nature of the organic mobile phase

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyunjung; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-04-01

    Experimental isotherm data of the Fmoc-tryptophan (Fmoc-Trp) enantiomers were measured by frontal analysis on a Fmoc-L-Trp imprinted polymer, using different organic mobile phases, in a wide concentration range. The nonlinear regression of the data and the independent calculation of the affinity energy distributions of the two enantiomers allowed the selection of the isotherm model and the determination of the isotherm parameters. The organic solvents studied were acetonitrile (MeCN), methylene chloride, chloroform, and tetrahydrofuran (THF), all in the presence of the same concentration of acetic acid, used as an organic modifier. It was found that the highest overall affinity and enantiomeric selectivity were obtained in MeCN, which is also the solvent used in the polymerization. In the other solvents, the overall affinity decreases with increasing hydrogen-bonding ability of the solvents but not the enantiomer selectivity. In MeCN, three types of adsorption sites coexist for the two enantiomers on the MIP. The highest energy sites for Fmoc-L-Trp in MeCN are inactive in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, CHCl{sub 3}, and THF, and only two types of sites were identified in these solvents. Increasing the acetic acid concentration from 0.2 to 0.9 M causes a large decrease in the association constant of the highest energy sites in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, CHCl{sub 3}, and THF but not in MeCN. The overall affinity of Fmoc-L-trp in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, CHCl{sub 3}, and THF is dominated by adsorption on the lowest energy sites, the most abundant ones. In contrast, in MeCN, the overall affinity of Fmoc-L-Trp is dominated by adsorption on the highest energy sites, the least abundant sites. In CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, CHCl{sub 3}, and THF, the number of each type of sites increases with decreasing hydrogen-bonding ability of the solvents while the association constant of the corresponding sites does not change significantly.

  7. The mobile phase in coals: Its nature and modes of release: Part 2, Efforts to better define the nature and magnitude of the mobile phase: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Given, P.H.

    1987-04-01

    Several liquefaction conditions and many extracting solvents were used in attempts to set up conditions such that, as the conditions became more severe, progressively more hexane-solubles, analyzable by GC/MS, would be released. It was hoped to identify a threshold beyond which trapped mobile phase molecules would become evident. A set of 10 hexane-soluble fractions, all obtained under various conditions from the same coal (a sample of Herrin No. 6 seam, Illinois), were subjected to analysis by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Yields ranged from 0.6 to 16% of the organic matter in the coal. Prominent constituents of all of the fractions were homologous series of alkyl aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols and heterocycles, notably alkylacenaphthenes. Alkyl chains were either unbranched or lightly branched. There was a similarity in the spectra of all of the fractions irrespective of yield. The ease with which a certain homologous series can be released from a coal is highly variable. Thus the data are consistent with the concept of a mobile phase some components of which are trapped in cavities with entrances and exits of restricted size. Release of the various physically held species and the fragments from thermal breakdown of the structure will certainly present a very complex system for kinetic modeling. 30 refs., 10 tabs.

  8. Effect of mobile phase on resolution of the isomers and homologues of tocopherols on a triacontyl stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Saha, Supradip; Walia, Suresh; Kundu, Aditi; Pathak, Niti

    2013-11-01

    Reversed-phase liquid chromatographic (RPLC) separation of isomers and homologues of similar polarity is challenging. Tocopherol isomers and homologues are one such example. α, β, γ, and δ-tocopherols have been successfully separated by RPLC on triacontyl (C30) stationary phase. System suitability was tested by using four mobile phases, and observed chromatographic separations of β and γ-tocopherols were compared. Comparison indicated that methanol-tert-butyl methyl ether (TBME) 95:5 (v/v) at a flow rate of 0.75 mL min(-1) was the best mobile phase. Detection systems were also evaluated on the basis of limit of quantification; it was concluded that fluorescence detection was best. The method was validated by analysis of two homologues and two isomers of tocopherol in sesame, maize, and soybean samples. MS coupled with an ESI interface in negative-ion mode [M - H](-) was used for identification of individual components. It was concluded that addition of TBME to methanol was required to enhance the separation of β and γ-tocopherols, although methanol alone provided similar results. The applicability of the method to cereal, pulse, and oilseed samples was confirmed. The reproducibility of the procedure was good, with relative standard deviations in the range 1.7-3.9%. Recovery of tocopherols added to sesame samples ranged from 91 to 99%.

  9. A two-phase approach to Fourier transform ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Clowers, Brian H; Siems, William F; Yu, Zhihao; Davis, Austen L

    2015-10-21

    It is well known that the duty cycle of common drift-tube ion mobility experiments is often below 1%. However, multiplexing approaches such as Fourier and Hadamard pulsing schemes have been shown to independently enhance the throughput of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) experiments to levels that approach 50%. While challenges remain to their broad scale implementation we describe a new Fourier transform (FT) IMS experiment that is directly compatible with standard drift tube ion mobility mass spectrometers (DT-IMMS). Compared to previous FT-IMS experiments, our new approach requires only a single gate and circumvents the need for signal apodization by combining data from two frequency pulsing sequences 180° out of phase. Assessment of our initial results highlights an increase in signal-to-noise (SNR) relative to both previous implementations FT-IMS experiments and signal averaged (SA) experiments. For select tetraalkylammonium salts SNR improvements of more than one order of magnitude are routinely possible. To explore the performance metrics associated with the technique a number of experimental variables were systematically altered including frequency sweep range, sweep time, and data acquisition time. Using this experimental design we present the key aspects, considerations, and minimum resources necessary for other IMS researchers to incorporate this operational mode into their research. The two-phase FT-IMMS technique offers a tractable mechanism to enhance sensitivity for IMMS measurements and its broad-scale adoption by IMMS researchers promises to enhance the acquisition speed for mobility measurements using hybrid instrumentation.

  10. Fundamental studies of gas phase ionic reactions by ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, K.; Knighton, W. B.; Sahlstrom, K. E.; Grimsrud, E. P.

    1995-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) provides a promising approach to the study of gas phase ionic reactions in buffer gases at unusually high pressures. This point is illustrated here by studies of the Sn2 nucleophilic displacement reaction, Cl(-) + CH3Br yields Br + CH3Br, using IMS at atmospheric pressure. The equilibrium clustering reaction, Cl(-)(CHCI3)(n - 1) + CHCI3 yields Cl(-)(CHCI3)(n), where n = 1 and 2, and the effect of clustering on the Sn2 reaction with CH3Br have also been characterized by this IMS-based kinetic method. Present problems and anticipated improvements in the application of ion mobility spectrometry to studies of other gas phase ionic processes are discussed.

  11. 78 FR 45071 - Annual Report for Mobility Fund Phase I Support and Record Retention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    .... 54.1008(d) and (e), 54.1009(a) through (c) and 54.1010, published at 76 FR 73830, November 29, 2011.... 10-208; FCC 11-161, 76 FR 73830 and FCC 12-52, 77 FR 30904, May 24, 2012. If you have any comments on.... 01-92, 96-45; WT Docket No. 10-208; FCC 11-161; FCC 12-52] Annual Report for Mobility Fund Phase...

  12. Mobile phone imaging module with extended depth of focus based on axial irradiance equalization phase coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hsin-Yueh; Chen, Po-Chang; Chang, Chuan-Chung; Chang, Chir-Weei; Yang, Sidney S.; Chang, Horng

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a mobile phone imaging module with extended depth of focus (EDoF) by using axial irradiance equalization (AIE) phase coding. From radiation energy transfer along optical axis with constant irradiance, the focal depth enhancement solution is acquired. We introduce the axial irradiance equalization phase coding to design a two-element 2-megapixel mobile phone lens for trade off focus-like aberrations such as field curvature, astigmatism and longitudinal chromatic defocus. The design results produce modulation transfer functions (MTF) and phase transfer functions (PTF) with substantially similar characteristics at different field and defocus positions within Nyquist pass band. Besides, the measurement results are shown. Simultaneously, the design results and measurement results are compared. Next, for the EDoF mobile phone camera imaging system, we present a digital decoding design method and calculate a minimum mean square error (MMSE) filter. Then, the filter is applied to correct the substantially similar blur image. Last, the blur and de-blur images are demonstrated.

  13. Intermolecular forces in acetonitrile + ethanol binary liquid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, A.; Shanmugam, R.; Arivazhagan, G.; Mahendraprabu, A.; Karthick, N. K.

    2015-10-01

    FTIR spectral measurements have been carried out on the binary mixtures of acetonitrile with ethanol at 1:0 (acetonitrile:ethanol), 1:1, 1:2, 1:3 and 0:1 at room temperature. DFT and isosurface calculations have been performed. The acetonitrile + ethanol binary mixtures consist of 1:1, 1:2, 1:3 and 1:4 complexes formed through both the red and blue shifting H-bonds. Inter as well as intra molecular forces are found to exist in 1:3 and 1:4 complexes.

  14. Modulation of phase behaviors and charge carrier mobilities by linkage length in discotic liquid crystal dimers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Fei; Zhang, Chun-Xiu; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Ao; Wang, Jian-Chuang; Zhang, Shuai-Feng; Pu, Jia-Ling

    2015-01-28

    A clear structure-property relationship was revealed in a series of triphenylene-based dimers, which contained two triphenylene nuclei each bearing five β-OC4H9 substituents and are linked through a flexible O(CH2)nO polymethylene chain (n=6-12). Dimers with the linkage close to twice the length of the free side chains (n=8, 9) exhibited a single Colhp phase, while others with the linkage shorter (n=6, 7) or longer (n=10, 11, 12) showed multiphase behaviors with a transition from the Colhp phase to Colh phase; hole mobilities of Colhp phases reached 1.4×10(-2) cm2 V(-1) s(-1) in the dimer for which the linkage is exactly twice the length of the free side chains (n=8), and decreased regularly both with linkage length becoming shorter or longer. This modulation of phase behaviors and charge carrier mobilities was demonstrated to be generated by various steric perturbations introduced by linkages with different lengths, which result in different degrees of lateral fluctuations of discotic moieties in the columns. PMID:25467212

  15. Degenerate mobilities in phase field models are insufficient to capture surface diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Alpha A.; Münch, Andreas; Süli, Endre

    2015-08-01

    Phase field models frequently provide insight into phase transitions and are robust numerical tools to solve free boundary problems corresponding to the motion of interfaces. A body of prior literature suggests that interface motion via surface diffusion is the long-time, sharp interface limit of microscopic phase field models such as the Cahn-Hilliard equation with a degenerate mobility function. Contrary to this conventional wisdom, we show that the long-time behaviour of degenerate Cahn-Hilliard equation with a polynomial free energy undergoes coarsening, reflecting the presence of bulk diffusion, rather than pure surface diffusion. This reveals an important limitation of phase field models that are frequently used to model surface diffusion.

  16. Acetonitrile Ion Suppression in Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colizza, Kevin; Mahoney, Keira E.; Yevdokimov, Alexander V.; Smith, James L.; Oxley, Jimmie C.

    2016-08-01

    Efforts to analyze trace levels of cyclic peroxides by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry gave evidence that acetonitrile suppressed ion formation. Further investigations extended this discovery to ketones, linear peroxides, esters, and possibly many other types of compounds, including triazole and menadione. Direct ionization suppression caused by acetonitrile was observed for multiple adduct types in both electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. The addition of only 2% acetonitrile significantly decreased the sensitivity of analyte response. Efforts to identify the mechanism were made using various nitriles. The ion suppression was reduced by substitution of an acetonitrile hydrogen with an electron-withdrawing group, but was exacerbated by electron-donating or steric groups adjacent to the nitrile. Although current theory does not explain this phenomenon, we propose that polar interactions between the various functionalities and the nitrile may be forming neutral aggregates that manifest as ionization suppression.

  17. Acetonitrile Ion Suppression in Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colizza, Kevin; Mahoney, Keira E.; Yevdokimov, Alexander V.; Smith, James L.; Oxley, Jimmie C.

    2016-11-01

    Efforts to analyze trace levels of cyclic peroxides by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry gave evidence that acetonitrile suppressed ion formation. Further investigations extended this discovery to ketones, linear peroxides, esters, and possibly many other types of compounds, including triazole and menadione. Direct ionization suppression caused by acetonitrile was observed for multiple adduct types in both electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. The addition of only 2% acetonitrile significantly decreased the sensitivity of analyte response. Efforts to identify the mechanism were made using various nitriles. The ion suppression was reduced by substitution of an acetonitrile hydrogen with an electron-withdrawing group, but was exacerbated by electron-donating or steric groups adjacent to the nitrile. Although current theory does not explain this phenomenon, we propose that polar interactions between the various functionalities and the nitrile may be forming neutral aggregates that manifest as ionization suppression.

  18. Vibrational spectroscopic properties of hydrogen bonded acetonitrile studied by DFT.

    PubMed

    Alía, Jose M; Edwards, Howell G M

    2005-09-01

    Vibrational properties (band position, Infrared and Raman intensities) of the acetonitrile C[triple bond]N stretching mode were studied in 27 gas-phase medium intensity (length range: = 1.71-2.05 angstroms; -deltaE range = 13-48 kJ/mol) hydrogen-bonded 1:1 complexes of CH3CN with organic and inorganic acids using density functional theory (DFT) calculations [B3LYP-6-31++G(2d,2p)]. Furthermore, general characteristics of the hydrogen bonds and vibrational changes in the OH stretching band of the acids were also considered. Experimentally observed blue-shifts of the C[triple bond]N stretching band promoted by the hydrogen bonding, which shortens the triple bond length, are very well reproduced and quantitatively depend on the hydrogen bond length. Both predicted enhancement of the infrared and Raman nu(C[triple bond]N) band intensities are in good agreement with the experimental results. Infrared band intensity increase is a direct function of the hydrogen bond energy. However, the predicted increase in the Raman band intensity increase is a more complex function, depending simultaneously on the characteristics of both the hydrogen bond (C[triple bond]N bond length) and the H-donating acid polarizability. Accounting for these two parameters, the calculated nu(C[triple bond]N) Raman intensities of the complexes are explained with a mean error of +/- 2.4%.

  19. STTR Phase 1 Final Technical Report for Project Entitled "Developing a Mobile Torrefaction Machine"

    SciTech Connect

    James, Joseph J.

    2014-03-11

    The goal of this project, sponsored by Agri-Tech Producers, LLC (ATP), the small business grantee, was to determine if the torrefaction technology, developed by North Carolina State University (NCSU), which ATP has licensed, could be feasibly deployed in a mobile unit. The study adds to the area investigated, by having ATP’s STTR Phase I team give thoughtful consideration to how to use NCSU’s technology in a mobile unit. The findings by ATP’s team were that NCSU’s technology would best perform in units 30’ by 80’ (See Spec Sheet for the Torre-Tech 5.0 Unit in the Appendix) and the technical effectiveness and economic feasibility investigation suggested that such units were not easily, efficiently or safely utilized in a forest or farm setting. (Note rendering of possible mobile system in the Appendix) Therefore, the findings by ATP’s team were that NCSU’s technology could not feasibly be deployed as a mobile unit.

  20. 77 FR 7152 - Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Scheduled for September 27, 2012; Comment Sought on Competitive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... the Commission in the USF/ICC Transformation Order, 76 FR 73830, November 29, 2011 and 76 FR 81562... COMMISSION Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Scheduled for September 27, 2012; Comment Sought on Competitive... Wireline Competition Bureaus announce a reverse auction to award $300 million in one-time Mobility...

  1. The mobility of the amorphous phase in polyethylene as a determining factor for slow crack growth.

    PubMed

    Men, Y F; Rieger, J; Enderle, H-F; Lilge, D

    2004-12-01

    Polyethylene (PE) pipes generally exhibit a limited lifetime, which is considerably shorter than their chemical degradation period. Slow crack growth failure occurs when pipes are used in long-distance water or gas distribution though being exposed to a pressure lower than the corresponding yield stress. This slow crack growth failure is characterized by localized craze growth and craze fibril rupture. In the literature, the lifetime of PE pipes is often considered as being determined by the density of tie chains connecting adjacent crystalline lamellae. But this consideration cannot explain the excellent durability of the recent bimodal grade PE for pipe application. We show in this paper the importance of the craze fibril length as the determining factor for the pipe lifetime. The conclusions are drawn from stress analysis. It is found that longer craze fibrils sustain lower stress and are deformed to a lesser degree. The mobility of the amorphous phase is found to control the amount of material that can be "sucked" in by the craze fibrils and thus the length of the craze fibrils. The mobility of the amorphous phase can be monitored by dynamic mechanical analysis measurements. Excellent agreement between the mobility thus derived and lifetimes of PE materials as derived from FNCT (full notch creep test) is given, thus providing an effective means to estimate the lifetime of PE pipes by considering well-defined physical properties.

  2. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Acetonitrile in rats. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, T.J.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.; Boyd, P.J.; Hayden, B.K.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.

    1994-02-01

    The potential for acetonitrile to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 0, 100, 400, or 1200 ppM acetonitrile, 6 hours/day, 7 days/week. Exposure of rats to these concentrations of acetonitrile resulted in mortality in the 1200 ppM group (2/33 pregnant females; 1/10 non-pregnant females). However, there were no treatment-related effects upon body weights or reproduction indices at any exposure level, nor was there a significant increase in the incidence of fetal malformations or variations. The only effect observed in the fetuses was a slight, but not statiscally significant, exposure-correlated increase in the incidence of supernumerary ribs. Determination of acetonitrile and cyanide concentrations in maternal rat blood showed that acetonitrile concentration in the blood increased with exposure concentration for all exposed maternal rats. Detectable amounts of cyanide in the blood were found only in the rats exposed to 1200 ppM acetonitrile ({approximately}2 {mu}g cyanide/g of blood).

  3. Effect of trace amounts of water in the mobile phase of normal-phase enantioselective high-performance liquid chromatography on selectivity and resolution of optical isomers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Rustum, Abu M

    2009-04-01

    The irreproducibility of normal-phase enantioselective high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) could be attributed to the presence or absence of trace amounts of water in one or more components of the mobile phase. The effect of trace amounts of water on chromatographic characteristics in normal-phase enantioselective HPLC was investigated by deliberate addition of controlled, trace amounts of water into the mobile phase for the separation of T-3811ME and its undesired enantiomer. Commercial 2-propanol was pre-mixed with 2% (v/v) water and then used for preparation of the mobile phase in combination with such organic modifiers as ethanol and methanol at different ratios. The results showed up to 30% improvement in the resolution (Rs), 4% in selectivity (alpha), and 39% in efficiency (plate number N) compared to using a mobile phase prepared from neat commercial 2-propanol. Thus, the effect of trace amounts of water in the mobile phase of normal-phase enantioselective HPLC was demonstrated. PMID:19406020

  4. Computer simulation of acetonitrile and methanol with ab initio-based pair potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hloucha, M.; Sum, A. K.; Sandler, S. I.

    2000-10-01

    This study address the adequacy of ab initio pair interaction energy potentials for the prediction of macroscopic properties. Recently, Bukowski et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 103, 7322 (1999)] performed a comprehensive study of the potential energy surfaces for several pairs of molecules using symmetry-adapted perturbation theory. These ab initio energies were then fit to an appropriate site-site potential form. In an attempt to bridge the gap between ab initio interaction energy information and macroscopic properties prediction, we performed Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo (GEMC) simulations using their developed pair potentials for acetonitrile and methanol. The simulations results show that the phase behavior of acetonitrile is well described by just the pair interaction potential. For methanol, on the other hand, pair interactions are insufficient to properly predict its vapor-liquid phase behavior, and its saturated liquid density. We also explored simplified forms for representing the ab initio interaction energies by refitting a selected range of the data to a site-site Lennard-Jones and to a modified Buckingham (exponential-6) potentials plus Coulombic interactions. These were also used in GEMC simulations in order to evaluate the quality and computational efficiency of these different potential forms. It was found that the phase behavior prediction for acetonitrile and methanol are highly dependent on the details of the interaction potentials developed.

  5. Direct chiral resolution of metalaxyl and metabolite metalaxyl acid in aged mobile phases: the role of trace water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxiang; Xia, Tingting; Chen, Jingwen; Huang, Liping; Cai, Xiyun

    2010-04-28

    The separation of chiral transformation products greatly complements the understanding of the stereochemistry of chiral pollutants. In this study, direct enantiomeric resolution of metalaxyl and its main degradation product metalaxyl acid, often co-occurring in the environment, was carried out in normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with a Chiralcel OJ-H column. (R)-Metalaxyl acid and (S)-metalaxyl, which were almost parallel bonding to the chiral stationary phase, tended to separate, started to overlap, coeluted, and separated again with subtle changes of the mobile phase consisting of n-hexane, 2-propanol, acetic acid, and trace water. Their competition above hampered an acceptable direct separation in fresh mobile phases. Aged mobile phases with a storage period of 3-5 days, however, significantly improved their separation, in which trace water from moisture air diffusion was found to play a major role. Trace water differentially affected peak width and retention times and then induced enhanced peak separation, confirmed by deliberate addition of water to fresh mobile phases. Furthermore, none of the studied factors, involving temperature, concomitant analytes, and trace water, could cause changes of the configuration of the chiral stationary phase. Simultaneous enantiomeric separation of both compounds was achieved in aged or fresh mobile phases with adventitious or added water and gave satisfactory peak separation, all with Rs values of more than 1.20 in environmental samples.

  6. Use of vancomycin silica stationary phase in packed capillary electrochromatography I. Enantiomer separation of basic compounds.

    PubMed

    Desiderio, C; Aturki, Z; Fanali, S

    2001-02-01

    Chiral separation of basic compounds was achieved by using 75 or 100 microm ID fused-silica capillaries packed with a vanoomycin-modified diol silica stationary phase. The capillary was firstly packed for about 12 cm with a slurry mixture composed of diolsilica (3:1) then with the vancomycin modified diol-silica (3:1) (23 cm), and finally with diol-silica (3:1) for about 2 cm. Frits were prepared by a heating wire at the two ends of the capillary; the detector window was prepared at 8.5 cm from the end of the capillary where vancomycin was not present. The influence of the mobile phase composition (pH and concentration, organic modifier type and concentration) on the velocity of the electroosmotic flow, chiral resolution and enantioselectivity was studied. Good enantiomeric resolution was achieved for atenolol, oxprenolol, propranolol, and venlafaxine using a mobile phase composition of 100 mM ammonium acetate solution (pH 6)/water/acetonitrile (5:5:90 v/v/v) while for terbutaline a mixture of 5:15:80 v/v/v provided the best separations. The use of methanol instead of acetonitrile caused a general increase of enantiomer resolution of the studied compounds together with a reduction of efficiency and detector response. However, the combination of acetonitrile and methanol in the mobile phase (as, e.g., 10% methanol and 80% acetonitrile) allowed to improve the enantiomer resolution with satisfactory detector response.

  7. Mobile terminal equipment design utilising split-loop phase-lock techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenington, P. B.; Mcgeehan, J. P.; Edwards, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    The design and resultant performance of the terminal equipment in a mobile satellite system is vitally important in respect to the overall cost/performance compromise of the whole system. Improvements in system performance which also result in a reduction of the equipment cost are rare. However, this paper details a significant advance in terminal design, utilizing a novel form of 'split-loop' phase locked receiver/downconverter system to enable an accurate, stable and wide coverage terminal to be realized at a reduced cost. The system has the capability of automatically locking onto any carrier within a complete transponder, and can cope with severe amplitude modulation and fading effects.

  8. Gas-phase metalloprotein complexes interrogated by ion mobility-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faull, Peter A.; Korkeila, Karoliina E.; Kalapothakis, Jason M.; Gray, Andrew; McCullough, Bryan J.; Barran, Perdita E.

    2009-06-01

    Gas-phase biomolecular structure may be explored through a number of analytical techniques. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) continues to prove itself as a sensitive and reliable bioanalytical tool for gas-phase structure determination due to intense study and development over the past 15 years. A vast amount of research interest, especially in protein and peptide conformational studies has generated a wealth of structural information for biological systems from small peptides to megadalton-sized biomolecules. In this work, linear low field IM-MS has been used to study gas-phase conformations and determine rotationally averaged collision cross-sections of three metalloproteins--cytochrome c, haemoglobin and calmodulin. Measurements have been performed on the MoQToF, a modified QToF 1 instrument (Micromass UK Ltd., Manchester, UK) modified in house. Gas-phase conformations and cross-sections of multimeric cytochrome c ions of the form [xM + nH+]n+ for x = 1-3 (monomer to trimer) have been successfully characterised and measured. We believe these to be the first reported collision cross-sections of higher order multimeric cytochrome c. Haemoglobin is investigated to obtain structural information on the associative mechanism of tetramer formation. Haemoglobin molecules, comprising apo- and holo-monomer chains, dimer and tetramer are transferred to the gas phase under a range of solution conditions. Structural information on the proposed critical intermediate, semi-haemoglobin, is reported. Cross-sections of the calcium binding protein calmodulin have been obtained under a range of calcium-bound conditions. Metalloprotein collision cross-sections from ion mobility measurements are compared with computationally derived values from published NMR and X-ray crystallography structural data. Finally we consider the change in the density of the experimentally measured rotationally averaged collision cross-section for compact geometries of the electrosprayed proteins.

  9. Trying to detect gas-phase ions? Understanding Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Cumeras, R.; Figueras, E.; Davis, C.E.; Baumbach, J.I.; Gràcia, I.

    2014-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used and ‘well-known’ technique of ion separation in gaseous phase based on the differences of ion mobilities under an electric field. This technique has received increased interest over the last several decades as evidenced by the pace and advances of new IMS devices available. In this review we explore the hyphenated techniques that are used with IMS, especially mass spectrometry as identification approach and multi-capillary column as pre-separation approach. Also, we will pay special attention to the key figures of merit of the ion mobility spectrum and how data is treated, and the influences of the experimental parameters in both a conventional drift time IMS (DTIMS) and a miniaturized IMS also known as high Field Asymmetric IMS (FAIMS) in the planar configuration. The current review article is preceded by a companion review article which details the current instrumentation and to the sections that configures both a conventional DTIMS and FAIMS devices. Those reviews will give the reader an insightful view of the main characteristics and aspects of the IMS technique. PMID:25465248

  10. Physicochemical study of the acetonitrile insertion into polypyrrole films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira Costa, S. D.; Fernández Romero, A. J.; López Cascales, J. J.

    2010-04-01

    A study by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the acetonitrile diffusion into a polypyrrole film was carried out with atomic detail in a 0.1N lithium perchlorate solution. From the simulated trajectories, the acetonitrile behavior was estimated from bulk solution to the interior of the polypyrrole film, across the polypyrrole/solution interface, for a neutral (reduced) and charged (oxidized) state of the polymer. Among other properties, the translational diffusion coefficient and rotational relaxation time of the acetonitrile were calculated, where a diminution in the translational diffusion coefficient was measured in the interior of the polypyrrole matrix compared to bulk, independently of the oxidation state of the polymer, in contrast with the behavior of the rotational relaxation time that increases from bulk to the interior of the polymer for both oxidation states. In addition, the difference of free energy ΔG associated to the acetonitrile penetration into the polymer was calculated. From the results, it was evidenced that the scarce affinity of acetonitrile to diffuse into the polymer in its reduced state is related with the positive uniform difference of free energy ΔG ≈20 kJ/mol, while in the oxidized state, an important free energy barrier of ΔG ≈10 kJ/mol has to pass trough for reaching stable sites inside the polymer with values of ΔG up to -10 kJ/mol.

  11. Calculation of Vibrational Spectra for Coordinated Thiocyanate Ion in Acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, G. P.

    2016-07-01

    The impact of the association of lithium cation with NCS- ion in acetonitrile on the vibrational spectrum was studied by the density-functional method in the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) approximation. The best agreement between experimental and calculated ionic association data was achieved taking into account the nonspecific solvation, oversolvation, and solubility of ionic complexes within the discrete-continuum model. The microstructures of the thiocyanate ion in a contact ion pair with lithium cation and ion-pair dimer and trimer in acetonitrile were established.

  12. Cryogenic Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry: Tracking Ion Structure from Solution to the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Servage, Kelly A; Silveira, Joshua A; Fort, Kyle L; Russell, David H

    2016-07-19

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) combined with ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is adding new dimensions, that is, structure and dynamics, to the field of biological mass spectrometry. There is increasing evidence that gas-phase ions produced by ESI can closely resemble their solution-phase structures, but correlating these structures can be complicated owing to the number of competing effects contributing to structural preferences, including both inter- and intramolecular interactions. Ions encounter unique hydration environments during the transition from solution to the gas phase that will likely affect their structure(s), but many of these structural changes will go undetected because ESI-IM-MS analysis is typically performed on solvent-free ions. Cryogenic ion mobility-mass spectrometry (cryo-IM-MS) takes advantage of the freeze-drying capabilities of ESI and a cryogenically cooled IM drift cell (80 K) to preserve extensively solvated ions of the type [M + xH](x+)(H2O)n, where n can vary from zero to several hundred. This affords an experimental approach for tracking the structural evolution of hydrated biomolecules en route to forming solvent-free gas-phase ions. The studies highlighted in this Account illustrate the varying extent to which dehydration can alter ion structure and the overall impact of cryo-IM-MS on structural studies of hydrated biomolecules. Studies of small ions, including protonated water clusters and alkyl diammonium cations, reveal structural transitions associated with the development of the H-bond network of water molecules surrounding the charge carrier(s). For peptide ions, results show that water networks are highly dependent on the charge-carrying species within the cluster. Specifically, hydrated peptide ions containing lysine display specific hydration behavior around the ammonium ion, that is, magic number clusters with enhanced stability, whereas peptides containing arginine do not display specific hydration around the

  13. Effects of twin boundary mobility on domain microstructure evolution in magnetic shape memory alloys: Phase field simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Yongmei M.

    2009-02-09

    Effects of twin boundary mobility on domain microstructure evolution during magnetic field-induced deformation in magnetic shape memory alloys are studied by phase field micromagnetic microelastic modeling. The simulations show that different twin boundary mobilities lead to drastically different domain microstructures and evolution pathways, yielding very different magnetization and strain responses, even with opposite signs. The study also reveals complex domain phenomena in magnetic shape memory alloys.

  14. Study of the cerium(IV)-picrate system in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Kratochvil, B; Tipler, M; McKay, B

    1966-07-01

    A potentiometric and spectrophotometric study has been made of the reaction between hexanitratocerate and picrate in dry acetonitrile. Several cerium(IV)-picrate complexes are formed; the formation constant for the first is estimated to be 4 from spectrophotometric measurements. The catalytic effect of picrate on hydroquinone oxidation by nitratocerate is postulated to be due to more rapid electron transfer by cerium picrate complexes.

  15. Computational studies of coarsening rates for the Cahn-Hilliard equation with phase-dependent diffusion mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shibin; Du, Qiang

    2016-04-01

    We study computationally coarsening rates of the Cahn-Hilliard equation with a smooth double-well potential, and with phase-dependent diffusion mobilities. The latter is a feature of many materials systems and makes accurate numerical simulations challenging. Our numerical simulations confirm earlier theoretical predictions on the coarsening dynamics based on asymptotic analysis. We demonstrate that the numerical solutions are consistent with the physical Gibbs-Thomson effect, even if the mobility is degenerate in one or both phases. For the two-sided degenerate mobility, we report computational results showing that the coarsening rate is on the order of l ∼ ct 1 / 4, independent of the volume fraction of each phase. For the one-sided degenerate mobility, that is non-degenerate in the positive phase but degenerate in the negative phase, we illustrate that the coarsening rate depends on the volume fraction of the positive phase. For large positive volume fractions, the coarsening rate is on the order of l ∼ ct 1 / 3 and for small positive volume fractions, the coarsening rate becomes l ∼ ct 1 / 4.

  16. Explosive ordnance detection in land and water environments with solid phase extraction/ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, William B.; Phelan, James M.; Rodacy, Philip J.; Reber, Steven; Woodfin, Ronald L.

    1999-08-01

    The qualitative and quantitative determination of nitroaromatic compounds such as trinitrotoluene (TNT) and dinitrotoluene (DNT) in water and soil has applications to environmental remediation and the detection of buried military ordnance. Recent results of laboratory and field test have shown that trace level concentrations of these compounds can be detected in water, soil, and solid gas samples taken from the vicinity of submerged or buried ordnance using specialized sampling and signal enhancement techniques. Solid phase micro-extraction methods have been combined with Ion Mobility Spectroscopy to provide rapid, sub-parts-per-billion analysis of these compounds. In this paper, we will describe the gas. These sampling systems, when combined with field-portable IMS, are being developed as a means of classifying buried or submerged objects as explosive ordnance.

  17. Mineral phases and mobility of trace metals in white aluminum precipitates found in acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeongkyoo

    2015-01-01

    The white aluminum precipitates (S1,S2,S4-1,S4-2) collected at three different locations affected by acid mine and rock drainage were studied to characterize the mineral phases and mobility of trace metals. Chemical analysis, XRD, SEM, NMR, and sequential extraction method were mainly used. XRD data showed that most white aluminum precipitates are amorphous with small amount of gypsum, which was also confirmed by SEM. The (27)Al MAS NMR spectra provide more detailed information on the local environments of aluminum in those samples. The samples collected at two locations (S3, and S4-1 and S4-2) contain 4-coordinated aluminum, suggesting that the samples contain a significant amount of amorphous phase from Al13-tridecamer. Chemical data of calcium and sulfur with (27)Al MAS NMR spectra suggest that the relative amounts of amorphous phase from Al13-tridecamer, hydrobasaluminite, aluminum hydroxide, and gypsum are different for each sample. Different amount of amorphous phase from Al13-tridecamer in those samples are probably caused by the different geochemical conditions and hydrolysis by aging in water. Sequential extraction results show that water soluble fraction and sorbed and exchangeable fraction of trace metals in sample collected as suspended particles (S1) are higher than other samples, and can affect the ecological system in waters by releasing aluminum and trace metals. These results suggest that careful characterization of white aluminum precipitates is needed to estimate the environmental effects of those precipitates in acid mine drainage. PMID:25213794

  18. Performance of different C18 columns in reversed-phase liquid chromatography with hydro-organic and micellar-organic mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Angel, M J; Pous-Torres, S; Carda-Broch, S; García-Alvarez-Coque, M C

    2014-05-30

    Column selection in reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) can become a challenge if the target compounds interact with the silica-based packing. One of such interactions is the attraction of cationic solutes to the free silanols in silica-based columns, which is a slow sorption-desorption interaction process that gives rise to tailed and broad peaks. The effect of silanols is minimised by the addition of a competing agent in the mobile phase, such as the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS). In micellar-organic RPLC, the adsorption of an approximately fixed amount of SDS monomers gives rise to a stable modified stationary phase, with properties remarkably different from those of the underlying bonded phase. The chromatographic behaviour (in terms of selectivity, analysis time and peak shape) of eight C18 columns in the analysis of weakly acidic phenols and basic β-blockers was examined with hydro-organic and micellar-organic mobile phases. The behaviour of the columns differed significantly when the cationic basic drugs were eluted with hydro-organic mobile phases. With micellar-organic mobile phases, the adsorption of surfactant, instead of making the columns similar, gave rise to a greater diversity of behaviours (especially in terms of selectivity and analysis time), for both groups of phenols and β-blockers, which should be explained by the residual effect of the underlying bonded stationary phase and the different amount of surfactant covering the packing. Therefore, the implementation of a micellar-organic procedure in RPLC will depend significantly on the selected type of C18 column.

  19. A novel liquid/liquid extraction process composed of surfactant and acetonitrile for purification of polygalacturonase enzyme from Durio zibethinus.

    PubMed

    Amid, Mehrnoush; Manap, Yazid; Azmira, Farhana; Hussin, Muhaini; Sarker, Zaidul Islam

    2015-07-01

    Polygalacturonase is one of the important enzymes used in various industries such as food, detergent, pharmaceutical, textile, pulp and paper. A novel liquid/liquid extraction process composed of surfactant and acetonitrile was employed for the first time to purify polygalacturonase from Durio zibethinus. The influences of different parameters such as type and concentration of surfactants, concentrations of acetonitrile and composition of surfactant/acetonitrile on partitioning behavior and recovery of polygalacturonase was investigated. Moreover, the effect of pH of system and crude load on purification fold and yield of purified polygalacturonase were studied. The results of the experiment indicated the polygalacturonase was partitioned into surfactant top rich phase with impurities being partitioned into acetonitrile bottom rich phase in the novel method of liquid/liquid process composed of 23% (w/w) Triton X-100 and 19% (w/w) acetonitrile, at 55.6% of TLL (tie line length) crude load of 25% (w/w) at pH 6.0. Recovery and recycling of components also was measured in each successive step of liquid/liquid extraction process. The enzyme was successfully recovered by the method with a high purification factor of 14.3 and yield of 97.3% while phase components were also recovered and recycled above 95%. This study demonstrated that the novel method of liquid/liquid extraction process can be used as an efficient and economical extraction method rather than the traditional methods of extraction for the purification and recovery of the valuable enzyme. PMID:25973865

  20. A novel liquid/liquid extraction process composed of surfactant and acetonitrile for purification of polygalacturonase enzyme from Durio zibethinus.

    PubMed

    Amid, Mehrnoush; Manap, Yazid; Azmira, Farhana; Hussin, Muhaini; Sarker, Zaidul Islam

    2015-07-01

    Polygalacturonase is one of the important enzymes used in various industries such as food, detergent, pharmaceutical, textile, pulp and paper. A novel liquid/liquid extraction process composed of surfactant and acetonitrile was employed for the first time to purify polygalacturonase from Durio zibethinus. The influences of different parameters such as type and concentration of surfactants, concentrations of acetonitrile and composition of surfactant/acetonitrile on partitioning behavior and recovery of polygalacturonase was investigated. Moreover, the effect of pH of system and crude load on purification fold and yield of purified polygalacturonase were studied. The results of the experiment indicated the polygalacturonase was partitioned into surfactant top rich phase with impurities being partitioned into acetonitrile bottom rich phase in the novel method of liquid/liquid process composed of 23% (w/w) Triton X-100 and 19% (w/w) acetonitrile, at 55.6% of TLL (tie line length) crude load of 25% (w/w) at pH 6.0. Recovery and recycling of components also was measured in each successive step of liquid/liquid extraction process. The enzyme was successfully recovered by the method with a high purification factor of 14.3 and yield of 97.3% while phase components were also recovered and recycled above 95%. This study demonstrated that the novel method of liquid/liquid extraction process can be used as an efficient and economical extraction method rather than the traditional methods of extraction for the purification and recovery of the valuable enzyme.

  1. Ratchet Effects, Negative Mobility, and Phase Locking for Skyrmions on Periodic Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, Charles; Ray, Dipanjan; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia

    We examine the dynamics of skyrmions interacting with 1D and 2D periodic substrates in the presence of dc and ac drives. We find that the Magnus term strongly affects the skyrmion dynamics and that new kinds of phenomena can occur which are absent for overdamped ac and dc driven particles interacting with similar substrates. We show that it is possible to realize a Magnus induced ratchet for skyrmions interacting with an asymmetric potential, where the application of an ac drive can produce quantized dc motion of the skyrmions even when the ac force is perpendicular to the substrate asymmetry direction. For symmetric substrates it is also possible to achieve a negative mobility effect where the net skyrmion motion runs counter to an applied dc drive. Here, as a function of increasing dc drive, the velocity-force curves show a series of locking phases that have different features from the classic Shapiro steps found in overdamped systems. In the phase locking and ratcheting states, the skyrmions undergo intricate 2D orbits induced by the Magnus term.

  2. Studying Gas-Phase Interconversion of Tautomers Using Differential Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. Larry; Yang, Amy Meng-Ci; Melo, Luke R.; Hopkins, W. Scott

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we report on the use of differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) as a tool for studying tautomeric species, allowing a more in-depth interrogation of these elusive isomers using ion/molecule reactions and tandem mass spectrometry. As an example, we revisit a case study in which gas-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX)—a probe of ion structure in mass spectrometry—actually altered analyte ion structure by tautomerization. For the N- and O-protonated tautomers of 4-aminobenzoic acid, when separated using DMS and subjected to subsequent HDX with trace levels of D2O, the anticipated difference between the exchange rates of the two tautomers is observed. However, when using higher levels of D2O or a more basic reagent, equivalent and almost complete exchange of all labile protons is observed. This second observation is a result of the interconversion of the N-protonated tautomer to the O-protonated form during HDX. We can monitor this transformation experimentally, with support from detailed molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations. In fact, calculations suggest the onset of bulk solution phase properties for 4-aminobenzoic acid upon solvation with eight CH3OH molecules. These findings also underscore the need for choosing HDX reagents and conditions judiciously when separating interconvertible isomers using DMS.

  3. 30 CFR 77.900 - Low- and medium-voltage circuits serving portable or mobile three-phase alternating current...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Low- and medium-voltage circuits serving... Medium-Voltage Alternating Current Circuits § 77.900 Low- and medium-voltage circuits serving portable or mobile three-phase alternating current equipment; circuit breakers. Low- and medium-voltage...

  4. 30 CFR 77.900 - Low- and medium-voltage circuits serving portable or mobile three-phase alternating current...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Low- and medium-voltage circuits serving... Medium-Voltage Alternating Current Circuits § 77.900 Low- and medium-voltage circuits serving portable or mobile three-phase alternating current equipment; circuit breakers. Low- and medium-voltage...

  5. 77 FR 57085 - Mobility Fund Phase I Auction; Release of Files with Recalculated Road Miles for Auction 901...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    .../ecfs/ . 1. In the Auction 901 Procedures Public Notice, 77 FR 32092, May 31, 2012, the Bureaus... Notice, 77 FR 7152, February 10, 2012, in calculating the number of road miles associated with each... COMMISSION Mobility Fund Phase I Auction; Release of Files with Recalculated Road Miles for Auction 901;...

  6. 77 FR 11115 - Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Limited Extension of Deadlines for Comments and Reply Comments on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... released the Auction 901 Comment Public Notice, 77 FR 7152, February 10, 2012, which seeks comment on... Commission in the USF/ICC Transformation Order, 76 FR 73830, November 29, 2011 and 76 FR 81562, December 28... COMMISSION Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Limited Extension of Deadlines for Comments and Reply Comments...

  7. Understanding gas phase modifier interactions in rapid analysis by Differential Mobility-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kafle, Amol; Coy, Stephen L.; Wong, Bryan M.; Fornace, Albert J.; Glick, James J.; Vouros, Paul

    2014-01-01

    A systematic study involving the use and optimization of gas phase modifiers in quantitative differential mobility- mass spectrometry (DMS-MS) analysis is presented using mucleoside-adduct biomarkers of DNA damage as an important reference point for analysis in complex matrices. Commonly used polar protic and polar aprotic modifiers have been screened for use against two deoxyguanosine adducts of DNA: N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4-aminobiphenyl (dG-C8-4-ABP) and N-(deoxyguanosin-8-y1)-2-amino-l-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (dG-C8-PhIP). Particular attention was paid to compensation voltage (CoV) shifts, peak shapes and product ion signal intensities while optimizing the DMS-MS conditions. The optimized parameters were then applied to rapid quantitation of the DNA adducts in calf thymus DNA. After a protein precipitation step, adduct levels corresponding to less than one modification in 106 normal DNA bases were detected using the DMS-MS platform. Based on DMS fundamentals and ab-initio thermochemical results we interpret the complexity of DMS modifier responses in terms of thermal activation and the development of solvent shells. At very high bulk gas temperature, modifier dipole moment may be the most important factor in cluster formation and cluster geometry in mobility differences, but at lower temperatures multi-neutral clusters are important and less predictable. This work provides a useful protocol for targeted DNA adduct quantitation and a basis for future work on DMS modifier effects. PMID:24452298

  8. Quinine-Based Zwitterionic Chiral Stationary Phase as a Complementary Tool for Peptide Analysis: Mobile Phase Effects on Enantio- and Stereoselectivity of Underivatized Oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Ianni, Federica; Sardella, Roccaldo; Carotti, Andrea; Natalini, Benedetto; Lindner, Wolfgang; Lämmerhofer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Peptide stereoisomer analysis is of importance for quality control of therapeutic peptides, the analysis of stereochemical integrity of bioactive peptides in food, and the elucidation of the stereochemistry of peptides from a natural chiral pool which often contains one or more D-amino acid residues. In this work, a series of model peptide stereoisomers (enantiomers and diastereomers) were analyzed on a zwitterionic ion-exchanger chiral stationary phase (Chiralpak ZWIX(+) 5 µm), in order to investigate the retention and separation performance for such compounds on this chiral stationary phase and elucidate its utility for this purpose. The goal of the study focused on 1) investigations of the effects of the sample matrix used to dissolve the peptide samples; 2) optimization of the mobile phase (enabling deriving information on factors of relevance for retention and separation); and 3) derivation of structure-selectivity relationships. It turned out that small di- and tripeptides can be well resolved under optimized conditions, typically with resolutions larger than 1.5. The optimized mobile phase often consisted of methanol-tetrahydrofuran-water (49:49:2; v/v/v) with 25 mM formic acid and 12.5 mM diethylamine. This work proposes some guidance on which mobile phases can be most efficiently used for peptide stereoisomer separations on Chiralpak ZWIX. Chirality 28:5-16, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Influence of mobile phase composition on electroosmotic flow velocity, solute retention and column efficiency in open-tubular reversed-phase capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Crego, A L; Martínez, J; Marina, M L

    2000-02-11

    The effects of some experimental parameters, such as the volume fraction and type of organic modifier in the mobile phase, and the concentration, type and pH of the buffer on the electroosmotic flow velocity, the retention behavior of test solutes, and the column efficiency have been investigated in capillary electrochromatography (CEC) using an open-tubular column of 9.60 microm I.D. with a porous silica layer chemically modified with C18 as stationary phase. The retention of a group of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) used as a test mixture varied significantly by changing the organic modifier content in the hydroorganic mobile phase according to the reversed-phase-like selectivity of the stationary phase. In addition, an increase in the percentage of organic modifier resulted in a slight increase in the linear velocity of the EOF. On the other hand, when the phosphate buffer concentration was increased over the range 1-50 mM, the electroosmotic mobility fell dramatically, the retention of the solutes decreased steadily, and the plate height showed a significant increase. The results obtained with phosphate, trishydroxymethylaminomethane or 2-morpholinoethanesulfonic acid as buffers were similar when pH remained constant. Optimization in CEC was essential to achieve further enhancement of separation performance, because the analysis time and separation resolution are essentially affected when varying operating parameters. Separations of seven PAHs with more than 100000 plates are presented within 4 min analysis time.

  10. Synthesis of a mixed-model stationary phase derived from glutamine for HPLC separation of structurally different biologically active compounds: HILIC and reversed-phase applications.

    PubMed

    Aral, Tarık; Aral, Hayriye; Ziyadanoğulları, Berrin; Ziyadanoğulları, Recep

    2015-01-01

    A novel mixed-mode stationary phase was synthesised starting from N-Boc-glutamine, aniline and spherical silica gel (4 µm, 60 Å). The prepared stationary phase was characterized by IR and elemental analysis. The new stationary phase bears an embedded amide group into phenyl ring, highly polar a terminal amide group and non-polar groups (phenyl and alkyl groups). At first, this new mixed-mode stationary phase was used for HILIC separation of four nucleotides and five nucleosides. The effects of different separation conditions, such as pH value, mobile phase and temperature, on the separation process were investigated. The optimum separation for nucleotides was achieved using HILIC isocratic elution with aqueous mobile phase and acetonitrile with 20°C column temperature. Under these conditions, the four nucleotides could be separated and detected at 265 nm within 14 min. Five nucleosides were separated under HILIC isocratic elution with aqueous mobile phase containing pH=3.25 phosphate buffer (10mM) and acetonitrile with 20°C column temperature and detected at 265 nm within 14 min. Chromatographic parameters as retention factor, selectivity, theoretical plate number and peak asymmetry factor were calculated for the effect of temperature and water content in mobile phase on the separation process. The new column was also tested for nucleotides and nucleosides mixture and six analytes were separated in 10min. The chromatographic behaviours of these polar analytes on the new mixed-model stationary phase were compared with those of HILIC columns under similar conditions. Further, phytohormones and phenolic compounds were separated in order to see influence of the new stationary phase in reverse phase conditions. Eleven plant phytohormones were separated within 13 min using RP-HPLC gradient elution with aqueous mobile phase containing pH=2.5 phosphate buffer (10mM) and acetonitrile with 20°C column temperature and detected at 230 or 278 nm. The best separation

  11. Hydride affinities of cumulated, isolated, and conjugated dienes in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Qing; Liang, Hao; Zhu, Yan; Cheng, Jin-Pei

    2008-11-01

    The hydride affinities (defined as the enthalpy changes in this work) of 15 polarized dienes [five phenyl sulfone substituted allenes (1a), the corresponding five isolated dienes (1b), and the corresponding five conjugated dienes (1c)] in acetonitrile solution were determined by titration calorimetry for the first time. The results display that the hydride affinity scales of the 15 dienes in acetonitrile range from -71.6 to -73.9 kcal/mol for 1a, from -46.2 to -49.7 kcal/mol for 1b, and from -45.0 to -46.5 kcal/mol for 1c, which indicates that the hydride-obtaining abilities of the cumulated dienes (1a) are not only much larger than those of the corresponding conjugated dienes (1c) but also much larger than those of the corresponding isolated dienes (1b). The hydrogen affinities of the 15 dienes as well as the hydrogen affinities and the proton affinities of the radical anions of the dienes (1(-*)) in acetonitrile were also evaluated by using relative thermodynamic cycles according to Hess's law. The results show that (i) the hydrogen affinities of the neutral dienes 1 cover a range from -44.5 to -45.6 kcal/mol for 1a, from -20.4 to -21.4 kcal/mol for 1b, and from -17.3 to -18.5 kcal/mol for 1c; (ii) the hydrogen affinities of the radical anions of the dienes (1(-*)) in acetonitrile cover a range from -40.6 to -47.2 kcal/mol for 1a(-*), from -21.6 to -29.6 kcal/mol for 1b(-*), and from -10.0 to -15.4 kcal/mol for 1c(-*); (iii) the proton affinities of the 15 1a(-*) in acetonitrile cover a range from -97.0 to -100.6 kcal/mol for 1a(-*), from -77.8 to -83.4 kcal/mol for 1b(-*), and from -66.2 to -68.9 kcal/mol for 1c(-*). The main reasons for the great difference between the cumulated dienes and the corresponding isolated and conjugated dienes in the hydride affinity, hydrogen affinity, and proton affinity have been examined. It is evident that these experimental results should be quite valuable to facilitate the elucidation of the origins of the especially high

  12. Photophysics of Diphenylbutadiynes in Water, Acetonitrile-Water, and Acetonitrile Solvent Systems: Application to Single Component White Light Emission.

    PubMed

    Pati, Avik Kumar; Jana, Rounak; Gharpure, Santosh J; Mishra, Ashok K

    2016-07-28

    Diacetylenes have been the subject of current research because of their interesting optoelectronic properties. Herein, we report that substituted diphenylbutadiynes exhibit locally excited (LE) and excimer emissions in water and multiple emissions from the LE, excimer, and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) states in acetonitrile-water solvent systems. The LE, excimer, and ICT emissions are clearly distinguishable for a diphenylbutadiynyl derivative with push (-NMe2)-pull (-CN) substituents and those are closely overlapped for non-push-pull analogues. In neat acetonitrile, the excimer emission disappears and the LE and ICT emissions predominate. In the case of the push (-NMe2)-pull (-CN) diphenylbutadiyne, the intensity of the ICT emission increases with increasing the fluorophore concentration. This suggests that the ICT emission accompanies with intermolecular CT emission which is of exciplex type. As the LE and exciplex emissions of the push-pull diphenylbutadiyne together cover the visible region (400-700 nm) in acetonitrile, a control of the fluorophore concentration makes the relative intensities of the LE and exciplex emissions such that pure white light emission is achieved. The white light emission is not observed in those diphenylbutadiynyl analogues in which the peripheral substituents of the phenyl rings do not possess strong push-pull character. PMID:27379734

  13. Another glimpse over the salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction in acetonitrile/water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Valente, Inês Maria; Gonçalves, Luís Moreira; Rodrigues, José António

    2013-09-20

    The use of the salting-out effect in analytical chemistry is very diverse and can be applied to increase the volatility of the analytes in headspace extractions, to cause the precipitation of proteins in biological samples or to improve the recoveries in liquid-liquid extractions. In the latter, the salting-out process can be used to create a phase separation between water-miscible organic solvents and water. Salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE) is an advantageous sample preparation technique aiming HPLC-UV analysis when developing analytical methodologies. In fact, some new extraction methodologies like QuEChERS include the SALLE concept. This manuscript discusses another point of view over SALLE with particular emphasis over acetonitrile-water mixtures for HPLC-UV analysis; the influence of the salting-out agents, their concentration and the water-acetonitrile volume ratios were the studied parameters. α-dicarbonyl compounds and beer were used as test analytes and test samples, respectively. The influence of the studied parameters was characterized by the obtained phase separation volume ratio and the fraction of α-dicarbonyls extracted to the acetonitrile phase. Results allowed the distribution of salts within three groups according to the phase separation and their extractability: (1) chlorides and acetates, (2) carbonates and sulfates and (3) magnesium sulfate; of all tested salts, sodium chloride had the highest influence on the α-dicarbonyls fraction extracted.

  14. Collection of ethanolamines in air and determination by mobile phase ion chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Bouyoucos, S.A.; Melcher, R.G.

    1986-03-01

    A method is described for the collection and determination of monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA) and triethanolamine (TEA) in air. Samples were collected by pulling air through a glass tube containing alumina, cleaned especially to remove interfering inorganic ions. The ethanolamines were desorbed with water and determined by Mobile Phase Ion Chromatography (MPIC). The recovery and total relative precision for MEA, DEA, and TEA - all collected from air at a flow rate of 100 mL/min for 7 hr - was 93.1 +/- 17%, 92.7 +/- 15% and 89.4 +/- 21%, respectively (95% confidence level). The method was validated for all three compounds from approximately the limit of detection (3 x noise) to ten times the limit of detection. Based on a sample size of 42 L, MEA was validated over the range from 0.12 to 3.0 ppm v/v (TLV=3), DEA over the range from 0.25 to 3.3 ppm v/v (TLV=3) and TEA from 0.31 to 3.7 ppm v/v (no TLV assigned). No effect on recovery was observed when sampling at high humidity or on storage of the samples for up to 31 days.

  15. Freeze-out extraction of monocarboxylic acids from water into acetonitrile under the action of centrifugal forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekhterev, V. N.

    2016-10-01

    It is established that the efficiency of the freezing-out extraction of monocarboxylic acids C3-C;8 and sorbic acid from water into acetonitrile increases under the action of centrifugal forces. The linear growth of the partition coefficient in the homologous series of C2-C8 acids with an increase in molecule length, and the difference between the efficiency of extracting sorbic and hexanoic acid, are discussed using a theoretical model proposed earlier and based on the adsorption-desorption equilibrium of the partition of dissolved organic compounds between the resulting surface of ice and the liquid phase of the extract. The advantages of the proposed technique with respect to the degree of concentration over the method of low-temperature liquid-liquid extraction are explained in light of the phase diagram for the water-acetonitrile mixture.

  16. Analysis of pharmaceutical dosage forms for oxfendazole: I. Reverse phase liquid chromatographic determination of oxfendazole in swine premix.

    PubMed

    Fleitman, J; Neu, D; Visor, G

    1986-01-01

    A reverse phase liquid chromatographic (LC) procedure is described for quantitating oxfendazole (2-(methoxycarbonylamino)-5-phenylsulfinylbenzimidazole] in swine premix. Sample preparation consists of extracting oxfendazole with an acetone-methanol mixture. An aliquot of the extract is then centrifuged to separate undissolved premix excipients. Internal standard is added to the supernate and the sample is further diluted with water-acetonitrile-phosphoric acid (80 + 20 + 1). Oxfendazole is quantitatively determined using a Partisil-5-ODS-3 column with acetonitrile-0.01 M phosphate buffer (pH 6.0) as the mobile phase. The method is stability specific and yields a mean recovery of 101.1 +/- 0.4% for the 1.35% premix formulation. The dependence of chromatographic performance characteristics on mobile phase organic content, pH, and buffer concentration is also reported.

  17. Determination of seven artificial sweeteners in diet food preparations by reverse-phase liquid chromatography with absorbance detection.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, J F; Charbonneau, C F

    1988-01-01

    The artificial sweeteners aspartame, saccharin, cyclamate, alitame, acesulfam-K, sucralose, and dulcin are determined in diet soft drinks and tabletop sweetener preparations. Samples are diluted, filtered, and analyzed directly by liquid chromatography on a C-18 reverse-phase column with a mobile phase gradient ranging from 3% acetonitrile in 0.02M KH2PO4 (pH 5) to 20% acetonitrile in 0.02M KH2PO4 (pH 3.5). Diet puddings and dessert toppings are extracted with ethanol, filtered, and diluted with mobile phase for analysis. The sweeteners, except sucralose and cyclamate, were detected by UV absorbance at either 200 or 210 nm. Sucralose was determined at 200 nm or by refractive index. Cyclamate was determined after post-column ion-pair extraction. The sweeteners stevioside and talin were not detected. Additives such as caffeine, sorbic acid, and benzoic acid did not interfere.

  18. Greener liquid chromatography using a guard column with micellar mobile phase for separation of some pharmaceuticals and determination of parabens.

    PubMed

    Youngvises, Napaporn; Chaida, Thanatcha; Khonyoung, Supada; Kuppithayanant, Nattawan; Tiyapongpattana, Warawut; Itharat, Arunporn; Jakmunee, Jaroon

    2013-03-15

    In this research, a greener chromatography employing a short column, Zorbax SB C18 cartridge (12.5 × 4.6 mm, 5 μm) commonly used as a guard column in a reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), was utilized as the analytical column in conjunction with a more eco-friendly micellar mobile phase of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) for separation tertiary mixtures of local anesthetics and antihistamines; and binary mixture of colds drugs; and quaternary mixture of some parabens with different separation conditions. The chromatographic behavior of these analytes was studied to demonstrate separation efficiency of this guard column in a micellar mobile phase. Moreover, this column and SDS mobile phase was exploited for determination of parabens in 64 samples of cosmetic product, both those that were produced locally in the community and those that were commercially manufactured. Linear calibration graphs of the parabens as detected at 254 nm were obtained in the range of 1-100 μmol L(-1) with R(2)>0.9990. Percentage recoveries were 92.4-109.2 with %RSD<3, and the limit of detection and quantitation were 0.04-0.10 and 0.20-0.80 μmol L(-1), respectively. This analytical system is not only greener but also faster and employing simpler sample preparation than a conventional liquid chromatographic system. PMID:23598137

  19. Greener liquid chromatography using a guard column with micellar mobile phase for separation of some pharmaceuticals and determination of parabens.

    PubMed

    Youngvises, Napaporn; Chaida, Thanatcha; Khonyoung, Supada; Kuppithayanant, Nattawan; Tiyapongpattana, Warawut; Itharat, Arunporn; Jakmunee, Jaroon

    2013-03-15

    In this research, a greener chromatography employing a short column, Zorbax SB C18 cartridge (12.5 × 4.6 mm, 5 μm) commonly used as a guard column in a reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), was utilized as the analytical column in conjunction with a more eco-friendly micellar mobile phase of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) for separation tertiary mixtures of local anesthetics and antihistamines; and binary mixture of colds drugs; and quaternary mixture of some parabens with different separation conditions. The chromatographic behavior of these analytes was studied to demonstrate separation efficiency of this guard column in a micellar mobile phase. Moreover, this column and SDS mobile phase was exploited for determination of parabens in 64 samples of cosmetic product, both those that were produced locally in the community and those that were commercially manufactured. Linear calibration graphs of the parabens as detected at 254 nm were obtained in the range of 1-100 μmol L(-1) with R(2)>0.9990. Percentage recoveries were 92.4-109.2 with %RSD<3, and the limit of detection and quantitation were 0.04-0.10 and 0.20-0.80 μmol L(-1), respectively. This analytical system is not only greener but also faster and employing simpler sample preparation than a conventional liquid chromatographic system.

  20. Tris(acetonitrile)chloropalladium tetrafluoroborate synthesis, application and structural analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybała, Izabela; Demchuk, Oleg M.

    2016-10-01

    Results of the single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of tris(acetonitrile)chloropalladium tetrafluoroborate [PdCl(CH3CN)3]BF4 are presented in details. It was found that the title compound crystallises in the monoclinic system, in the space group C2/c. The role of charge-assisted C-HṡṡṡF-B interactions in crystal architecture was investigated. Due to its untypical properties the prepared [PdCl(CH3CN)3]BF4 has proved to be an excellent palladium source in the synthesis of phosphine-palladium complexes.

  1. Impact of the intermixed phase and the channel network on the carrier mobility of nanostructured solar cells.

    PubMed

    Woellner, Cristiano F; Freire, José A

    2016-02-28

    We analyzed the impact of the complex channel network of donor and acceptor domains in nanostructured solar cells on the mobility of the charge carriers moving by thermally activated hopping. Particular attention was given to the so called intermixed phase, or interface roughness, that has recently been shown to promote an increase in the cell efficiency. The domains were obtained from a Monte Carlo simulation of a two-species lattice gas. We generated domain morphologies with controllable channel size and interface roughness. The field and density dependence of the carrier hopping mobility in different morphologies was obtained by solving a master equation. Our results show that the mobility decreases with roughness and increases with typical channel sizes. The deleterious effect of the roughness on the mobility is quite dramatic at low carrier densities and high fields. The complex channel network is shown to be directly responsible for two potentially harmful effects to the cell performance: a remarkable decrease of the mobility with increasing field and the accumulation of charge at the domains interface, which leads to recombination losses.

  2. Comparison of zirconia- and silica-based reversed stationary phases for separation of enkephalins.

    PubMed

    Soukupová, K; Krafková, E; Suchánková, Jana; Tesarová, E

    2005-09-16

    In this study, the separation of biologically active peptides on two zirconia-based phases, polybutadiene (PBD)-ZrO2 and polystyrene (PS)-ZrO2, and a silica-based phase C18 was compared. Basic differences in interactions on both types of phases led to quite different selectivity. The retention characteristics were investigated in detail using a variety of organic modifiers, buffers, and temperatures. These parameters affected retention, separation efficiency, resolution and symmetry of peaks. Separation systems consisting of Discovery PBD-Zr column and mobile phase composed of a mixture of acetonitrile and phosphate buffer, pH 2.0 (45:55, v/v) at 70 degrees C and Discovery PS-Zr with acetonitrile and phosphate buffer, pH 3.5 in the same (v/v) ratio at 40 degrees C were suitable for a good resolution of enkephalin related peptides. Mobile phase composed of acetonitrile and phosphate buffer, pH 5.0 (22:78, v/v) was appropriate for separation of enkephalins on Supelcosil C18 stationary phase. PMID:16130703

  3. Understanding Gas Phase Modifier Interactions in Rapid Analysis by Differential Mobility-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafle, Amol; Coy, Stephen L.; Wong, Bryan M.; Fornace, Albert J.; Glick, James J.; Vouros, Paul

    2014-07-01

    A systematic study involving the use and optimization of gas-phase modifiers in quantitative differential mobility-mass spectrometry (DMS-MS) analysis is presented using nucleoside-adduct biomarkers of DNA damage as an important reference point for analysis in complex matrices. Commonly used polar protic and polar aprotic modifiers have been screened for use against two deoxyguanosine adducts of DNA: N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4-aminobiphenyl (dG-C8-4-ABP) and N-(deoxyguanosin-8-y1)-2-amino-l-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (dG-C8-PhIP). Particular attention was paid to compensation voltage (CoV) shifts, peak shapes, and product ion signal intensities while optimizing the DMS-MS conditions. The optimized parameters were then applied to rapid quantitation of the DNA adducts in calf thymus DNA. After a protein precipitation step, adduct levels corresponding to less than one modification in 106 normal DNA bases were detected using the DMS-MS platform. Based on DMS fundamentals and ab initio thermochemical results, we interpret the complexity of DMS modifier responses in terms of thermal activation and the development of solvent shells. At very high bulk gas temperature, modifier dipole moment may be the most important factor in cluster formation and cluster geometry, but at lower temperatures, multi-neutral clusters are important and less predictable. This work provides a useful protocol for targeted DNA adduct quantitation and a basis for future work on DMS modifier effects.

  4. Understanding gas phase modifier interactions in rapid analysis by differential mobility-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kafle, Amol; Coy, Stephen L; Wong, Bryan M; Fornace, Albert J; Glick, James J; Vouros, Paul

    2014-07-01

    A systematic study involving the use and optimization of gas-phase modifiers in quantitative differential mobility-mass spectrometry (DMS-MS) analysis is presented using nucleoside-adduct biomarkers of DNA damage as an important reference point for analysis in complex matrices. Commonly used polar protic and polar aprotic modifiers have been screened for use against two deoxyguanosine adducts of DNA: N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4-aminobiphenyl (dG-C8-4-ABP) and N-(deoxyguanosin-8-y1)-2-amino-l-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (dG-C8-PhIP). Particular attention was paid to compensation voltage (CoV) shifts, peak shapes, and product ion signal intensities while optimizing the DMS-MS conditions. The optimized parameters were then applied to rapid quantitation of the DNA adducts in calf thymus DNA. After a protein precipitation step, adduct levels corresponding to less than one modification in 10(6) normal DNA bases were detected using the DMS-MS platform. Based on DMS fundamentals and ab initio thermochemical results, we interpret the complexity of DMS modifier responses in terms of thermal activation and the development of solvent shells. At very high bulk gas temperature, modifier dipole moment may be the most important factor in cluster formation and cluster geometry, but at lower temperatures, multi-neutral clusters are important and less predictable. This work provides a useful protocol for targeted DNA adduct quantitation and a basis for future work on DMS modifier effects.

  5. Use of micellar mobile phases and microbore column switching for the assay of drugs in physiological fluids.

    PubMed

    Koenigbauer, M J; Curtis, M A

    1988-06-01

    The feasibility of directly assaying drugs in physiological fluids using on-line preconcentration and microbore high-performance liquid chromatography has been demonstrated. The untreated sample is injected onto a hydrophobic pre-column, using micellar sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in the case of serum or phosphate buffer in the case of urine, as the load mobile phase. This traps the components of interest which are then backflushed onto a microbore analytical column using a stronger mobile phase. This procedure was then applied to diazepam in serum and phenobarbital in urine. Recovery was linear and quantitative over the range 30-3000 ng/ml for diazepam in serum and 2-200 micrograms/ml for phenobarbital in urine. The diazepam method was specific against caffeine and the three major metabolites of diazepam: oxazepam, temazepam, and nordiazepam. The effects of varying pre-column dimensions, pre-column loading time, and SDS concentration volume were evaluated. PMID:3410911

  6. Retention of ionizable compounds on HPLC. 4. Mobile-phase pH measurement in methanol/water

    PubMed

    Canals; Portal; Bosch; Roses

    2000-04-15

    The different procedures used in HPLC to measure the pH of a mobile phase are evaluated in terms of the rigorous IUPAC definition of pH. The three procedures evaluated are as follows: measurement of the pH of the aqueous HPLC buffer before mixing it with the organic modifier, measurement of the pH of the HPLC buffer after mixing it with the organic modifier using a pH electrode system calibrated with aqueous buffers, and measurement of the pH of the HPLC buffer after mixing it with the organic modifier but calibrating the electrode system with reference buffers prepared in the same mixed solvent used as mobile phase. Following IUPAC definitions and recommendations, the three pH values can be related with the pH scales: w(w)pH, s(w)pH, and s(s)pH, respectively. The relationships between these three pH scales are also presented. The retention of several compounds with acid/base behavior in a C-18 and a polymeric column with buffered methanol/water as mobile phase is related to the mobile phase pH value measured in the three pH scales. It is demonstrated that the s(w)pH and s(s)pH scales give better relationships than the w(w)pH scale (pH measured in the aqueous buffer before mixing it with the organic modifier), commonly used on HPLC. The s(w)pH scale is specially recommended because of its simplicity of measurement: the pH is measured after mixing the aqueous buffer with the organic modifier, but the pH calibration is performed with the common aqueous reference buffers.

  7. Unexpected superoxide dismutase antioxidant activity of ferric chloride in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Foti, Mario C; Ingold, K U

    2003-11-14

    The azobis(isobutyronitrile)-initiated autoxidation of gamma-terpinene in acetonitrile at 50 degrees C yields only p-cymene and hydrogen peroxide (1:1) in a chain reaction carried by the hydroperoxyl radical, HOO. (Foti, M. C.; Ingold, K. U. J. Agric. Food Chem. 2003, 51, 2758-2765). This reaction is retarded by very low (microM) concentrations of FeCl(3) and CuCl(2). The kinetics of the FeCl(3)-inhibited autoxidation are consistent with chain-termination via the following: Fe(3+) + HOO. <==>[Fe(IV)-OOH](3+) and [Fe(IV)-OOH](3+) + HOO. --> Fe(3+) + H2O2 + O2. Thus, FeCl(3) in acetonitrile can be regarded as a very effective (and very simple) superoxide dismutase. The kinetics of the CuCl(2)-inhibited autoxidation indicate that chain transfer occurs and becomes more and more important as the reaction proceeds, i.e., the inhibition is replaced by autocatalysis. These kinetics are consistent withreduction of Cu2+ to Cu+ by HOO. and then the reoxidation of Cu+ to Cu2+ by both HOO.and the H2O2 product. The latter reaction yields HO. radicals which continue the chain. PMID:14604404

  8. Mechanisms for trapping and mobilization of residual fluids during capillary-dominated three-phase flow in porous rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helland, J. O.; Jettestuen, E.

    2016-07-01

    We use a multiphase level set approach to simulate capillary-controlled motions of isolated fluid ganglia surrounded by two other continuous fluids (i.e., double displacements) during three-phase flow on 3-D porous rock geometries. Double displacements and three-phase snap-off mechanisms are closely related. Water snap-off on gas/oil interfaces can initiate double displacements that mobilize isolated oil ganglia in water-wet rock, but it can also terminate ongoing double displacements and trap oil in water. The multiphase level set approach allows for calculating the evolution of disconnected-phase pressure during the motion. In the events of pore filling by double displacement of oil ganglia, and water snap-off on gas/oil interfaces, we find that the local gas/oil capillary pressure drops, while local oil/water capillary pressure increases, by a similar magnitude as observed for the capillary pressure drops during single-pore filling events in dynamic pore-scale experiments of two-phase drainage. We also find that oil ganglia decrease their surface area, and achieve a more compact shape, when the gas/oil interfacial area decreases at the expense of increased oil/water interfacial area during double displacement. By comparison with similar two-phase gas/water simulations, we find that the level of the gas/water capillary pressure curves, including hysteresis loops, are smaller when a mobile, disconnected oil is present, which suggests double displacement of oil is more favorable than direct gas/water displacement. We also present cases in which phase trapping occurred in the three-phase simulations, but not in the corresponding two-phase simulations, supporting the view that more trapping is possible in three-phase flow.

  9. Pulsed field gradient MAS-NMR studies of the mobility of carboplatin in cubic liquid-crystalline phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pampel, André; Michel, Dieter; Reszka, Regina

    2002-05-01

    A drug delivery system with cubic liquid-crystalline phase structure (cubic phase) containing the anti-cancer drug Carboplatin is studied. It is demonstrated that the combination of pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR and MAS-NMR is a useful tool to study the biophysical properties of a cubic phase. The linewidth in 1H-NMR spectra is narrowed by MAS, which can be exploited to perform PFG diffusion NMR experiments under high-resolution conditions. Measurement of self-diffusion coefficients of all components of the cubic phase becomes possible. The influence of polyethylene glycol chains on the drug mobility is discussed. It is shown that polyethylene glycol chains interact with Carboplatin.

  10. Green chromatography separation of analytes of greatly differing properties using a polyethylene glycol stationary phase and a low-toxic water-based mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Šatínský, Dalibor; Brabcová, Ivana; Maroušková, Alena; Chocholouš, Petr; Solich, Petr

    2013-07-01

    A simple, rapid, and environmentally friendly HPLC method was developed and validated for the separation of four compounds (4-aminophenol, caffeine, paracetamol, and propyphenazone) with different chemical properties. A "green" mobile phase, employing water as the major eluent, was proposed and applied to the separation of analytes with different polarity on polyethylene glycol (PEG) stationary phase. The chromatography separation of all compounds and internal standard benzoic acid was performed using isocratic elution with a low-toxicity mobile phase consisting of 0.04% (v/v) triethylamine and water. HPLC separation was carried out using a PEG reversed-phase stationary phase Supelco Discovery HS PEG column (15 × 4 mm; particle size 3 μm) at a temperature of 30 °C and flow rate at 1.0 mL min(-1). The UV detector was set at 210 nm. In this study, a PEG stationary phase was shown to be suitable for the efficient isocratic separation of compounds that differ widely in hydrophobicity and acid-base properties, particularly 4-aminophenol (log P, 0.30), caffeine (log P, -0.25), and propyphenazone (log P, 2.27). A polar PEG stationary phase provided specific selectivity which allowed traditional chromatographic problems related to the separation of analytes with different polarities to be solved. The retention properties of the group of structurally similar substances (aromatic amines, phenolic compounds, and xanthine derivatives) were tested with different mobile phases. The proposed green chromatography method was successfully applied to the analysis of active substances and one degradation impurity (4-aminophenol) in commercial preparation. Under the optimum chromatographic conditions, standard calibration was carried out with good linearity correlation coefficients for all compounds in the range (0.99914-0.99997, n = 6) between the peak areas and concentration of compounds. Recovery of the sample preparation was in the range 100 ± 5% for all compounds

  11. Effect of the endcapping of reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography adsorbents on the adsorption isotherm

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-09-01

    The retention mechanisms of n-propylbenzoate, 4-t ert-butylphenol, and caffeine on the endcapped Symmetry-C{sub 18} and the non-endcapped Resolve-C{sub 18} are compared. The adsorption isotherms were measured by frontal analysis (FA), using as the mobile phase mixtures of methanol or acetonitrile and water of various compositions. The isotherm data were modeled and the adsorption energy distributions calculated. The surface heterogeneity increases faster with decreasing methanol concentration on the non-endcapped than on the endcapped adsorbent. For instance, for methanol concentrations exceeding 30% (v/v), the adsorption of caffeine is accounted for by assuming three and two different types of adsorption sites on Resolve-C{sub 18} and Symmetry-C{sub 18}, respectively. This is explained by the effect of the mobile phase composition on the structure of the C{sub 18}-bonded layer. The bare surface of bonded silica appears more accessible to solute molecules at high water contents in the mobile phase. On the other hand, replacing methanol by a stronger organic modifier like acetonitrile dampens the differences between non-endcapped and endcapped stationary phase and decreases the degree of surface heterogeneity of the adsorbent. For instance, at acetonitrile concentrations exceeding 20%, the surface appears nearly homogeneous for the adsorption of caffeine.

  12. Electron Transport in a High Mobility Free-Standing GaN Substrate Grown by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, L.; Kurdak, C.; Yun, F.; Morkoc, H.; Rode, D. L.; Tsen, K. T.; Park, S. S.; Lee, K. Y.

    2001-03-01

    We studied electron transport properties in a high quality free-standing GaN grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy. The GaN, with a thickness of more than 200 μm, was lifted off the sapphire substrate and mechanically polished. At room temperature the carrier density is 1.3x10^16cm-3 and the Hall mobility is 1200 cm^2/V-s, which is the highest reported electron mobility for GaN with a wurtzite structure. Transport properties are studied using a van der Pauw geometry in a temperature range of 20 to 300 K and in magnetic fields up to 8 Tesla. Electron mobility is found to increase at lower temperatures with a peak mobility of 7400 cm^2/V-s at 48 K. The carrier density decreases exponentially at temperatures below 80 K with an activation energy of 28 meV. The electron transport measurements were used to examine the contributions of different scattering mechanisms. Numerical solution of the Boltzmann transport equation was carried out, including non-parabolic conduction bands and wavefunction admixture, along with lattice scattering and ionized-impurity scattering. LO and TO phonon energies were determined by Raman spectroscopy.

  13. Capacitance of edge plane of pyrolytic graphite in acetonitrile solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Minick, S.K.; Ishida, Takanobu.

    1991-05-01

    The capacitance of the edge plane of pyrolytic graphite electrodes, in acetonitrile solutions, is measured by recording the current response to an applied triangular voltage sweep; TVS, and then fitting the current response with an appropriate function, (via a set of adjustable parameters). The pretreatment of the electrodes, the supporting electrolyte concentration used, and the frequency of the input TVS, were all found to affect the measured capacitance. In these experiments, a background current was also seen and the shape of the current output for the TVS; the charging/discharging curve, is shown to correlate with the magnitude of this background current. In addition, the size of the background current was found to have some dependence on the type of electrode pretreatment procedure used. 60 refs., 49 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Conversion of Dinitrogen into Acetonitrile under Ambient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Klopsch, Isabel; Kinauer, Markus; Finger, Markus; Würtele, Christian; Schneider, Sven

    2016-04-01

    About 20% of the ammonia production is used as the chemical feedstock for nitrogen-containing chemicals. However, while synthetic nitrogen fixation at ambient conditions has had some groundbreaking contributions in recent years, progress for the direct conversion of N2 into organic products remains limited and catalytic reactions are unknown. Herein, the rhenium-mediated synthesis of acetonitrile using dinitrogen and ethyl triflate is presented. A synthetic cycle in three reaction steps with high individual isolated yields and recovery of the rhenium pincer starting complex is shown. The cycle comprises alkylation of a nitride that arises from N2 splitting and subsequent imido ligand centered oxidation to nitrile via a 1-azavinylidene (ketimido) intermediate. Different synthetic strategies for intra- and intermolecular imido ligand oxidation and associated metal reduction were evaluated that rely on simple proton, electron, and hydrogen-atom transfer steps. PMID:26948973

  15. Electrolyte Solvation and Ionic Association. VI. Acetonitrile-Lithium Salt Mixtures. Highly Associated Salts Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Borodin, Oleg; Han, Sang D.; Daubert, James S.; Seo, D. M.; Yun, Sung-Hyun; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2015-01-14

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of acetonitrile (AN) mixtures with LiBF4, LiCF3SO3 and LiCF3CO2 provide extensive details about the molecular- and mesoscale-level solution interactions and thus explanations as to why these electrolytes have very different thermal phase behavior and electrochemical/physicochemical properties. The simulation results are in full accord with a previous experimental study of these (AN)n-LiX electrolytes. This computational study reveals how the structure of the anions strongly influences the ionic association tendency of the ions, the manner in which the aggregate solvates assemble in solution and the length of time in which the anions remain coordinated to the Li+ cations in the solvates which result in dramatic variations in the transport properties of the electrolytes.

  16. Modified dispersion of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes in acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Heng; Nie, Jia Cai; Kunsági-Máté, Sándor

    2010-06-01

    The dispersion of hydroxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes was modified in non-protic acetonitrile solvent using a treatment by ethanol. The dispersion was examined by photoluminescence and Rayleigh-scattering methods. In spite of well known very low solubility of nanotubes, present results showed presence of nanotube dimers in the solution with considerable concentration. Applying a qualitative model, Δ H = -46.6 ± 12 kJ/mol and Δ S = -29.9 ± 7 J/K mol enthalpy and entropy changes were obtained during formation of nanotube dimers. This highly negative entropy term is of great importance for the deposition of carbon nanotubes by liquid phase epitaxy to enlarge the surface coverage.

  17. [Chiral separation of five beta-blockers using di-n-hexyl L-tartrate-boric acid complex as mobile phase additive by reversed-phase liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Yang, Juan; Wang, Lijuan; Guo, Qiaoling; Yang, Gengliang

    2012-03-01

    A reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method using the di-n-hexyl L-tartrate-boric acid complex as a chiral mobile phase additive was developed for the enantioseparation of five beta-blockers including propranolol, esmolol, metoprolol, bisoprolol and sotalol. In order to obtain a better enantioseparation, the influences of concentrations of di-n-butyl L-tartrate and boric acid, the type, concentration and pH of the buffer, methanol content as well as the molecular structure of analytes were extensively investigated. The separation of the analytes was performed on a Venusil MP-C18 column (250 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 microm). The mobile phase was 15 mmol/L ammonium acetate-methanol containing 60 mmol/L boric acid, 70 mmol/L di-n-hexyl L-tartrate (pH 6.00). The volume ratios of 15 mmol/L ammonium acetate to methanol were 20: 80 for propranolol, esmolol, metoprolol, bisoprolol and 30: 70 for sotalol. The flow rate was 0.5 mL/min and the detection wavelength was set at 214 nm. Under the optimized conditions, baseline enantioseparation was obtained separately for the five pairs of analytes.

  18. ENHANCED MOBILITY OF DENSE NONAQUEOUS-PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPLs) USING DISSOLVED HUMIC ACIDS

    SciTech Connect

    EDWIN S. OLSON; JOHN R. GALLAGHER; MARC D. KURZ

    1998-10-01

    The specific objectives of this subtask are as follows: � Evaluate the suitability of using humic acids to enhance the solubility and mobility of DNAPL contaminants sorbed to soils. � Evaluate the toxicity and bioavailablity of the DNAPLs to biodegrading microorganisms. To meet the first objective, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) evaluated a set of humic acids (two) with different chemical compositions and polarities for the following: � Ability of the humates to mobilize/solubilize selected (three) DNAPLs � Mobilization/solubilization in batch soil�water experiments (one soil) � Removal rate via biotreatment with a well-established active microbial culture. The second objective was met by evaluating the inhibiting effects of a leonardite-derived humic acid on active microbial populations.

  19. Bioconversion of cyanide and acetonitrile by a municipal-sewage-derived anaerobic consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Nagle, N.J.; Rivard, C.J.; Mohagheghi, A.; Philippidis, G.

    1995-12-31

    In this study, an anaerobic consortium was examined for its ability to adapt to and degrade the representative organonitriles, cyanide and acetonitrile. Adaptation to cyanide and acetonitrile was achieved by adding increasing levels of cyanide and acetonitrile to the anaerobic consortium, followed by extensive incubation over a 90-day period. The anaerobic consortium adapted most rapidly to the lower concentrations of each substrate and resulted in reductions of 85% and 83% of the cyanide and acetonitrile, respectively, at the 50 mg/L addition level. Increasing the concentration of both cyanide and acetonitrile resulted in reduced bioconversion. Two continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTR) were set up to examine the potential for continuous bioconversion of organonitriles. The anaerobic consortium was adapted to continuous infusion of acetonitrile at an initial concentration of 10 mg/L{center_dot}day in phosphate buffer.

  20. Peak shapes of acids and bases under overloaded conditions in reversed-phase liquid chromatography, with weakly buffered mobile phases of various pH: a thermodynamic interpretation.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2009-01-01

    We measured overloaded band profiles for a series of nine compounds (phenol, caffeine, 3-phenyl 1-propanol, 2-phenylbutyric acid, amphetamine, aniline, benzylamine, p-toluidine, and procainamidium chloride) on columns packed with four different C(18)-bonded packing materials: XTerra-C(18), Gemini-C(18), Luna-C(18)(2), and Halo-C(18), using buffered methanol-water mobile phases. The pHWS of the mobile phase was increased from 2.6 to 11.3. The buffer concentration (either phosphate, acetate, or carbonate buffers) was set constant at values below the maximum concentration of the sample in the band. The influence of the surface chemistry of the packing material on the retention and the shape of the peaks was investigated. Adsorbents having a hybrid inorganic/organic structure tend to give peaks exhibiting moderate or little tailing. The retention and the shape of the band profiles can easily be interpreted at pHsWS that are well above or well below the pKWS(a) of the compound studied. In contrast, the peak shapes in the intermediary pH range (i.e., close to the compound pKWS(a)) have rarely been studied. These shapes reveal the complexity of the competitive adsorption behavior of couples of acido-basic conjugated compounds at pHsWS that are close to their pKWS(a). They also reveal the role of the buffer capacity on the resulting peak shape. With increasing pHWS, the overloaded profiles are first langmuirian (isotherm type I) at low pHsWS, they become S-shaped (isotherm type II), then anti-langmuirian (isotherm type III), S-shaped again at intermediate pHsWS, and finally return to a langmuirian shape at high pHsWS. A new general adsorption isotherm model that takes into account the dissociation equilibrium of conjugated acidic and basic species in the bulk mobile phase accounts for these transient band shapes. An excellent agreement was achieved between experimental profiles and those calculated with a two-sites adsorption isotherm model at all pHsWS. The neutral

  1. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography of the stereoisomers of some sweetener peptides with a helical nickel(II) chelate in the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Bazylak, G

    1994-05-13

    The use of a chiral mobile phase additive in the form of the helically distorted, square-planar, chiral nickel(II) chelate dl-[4,4'-(1-methyl-2-propylethane-1,2-diyldiimino)bis(pent-3 -en-2- onato)]nickel(II) was investigated for the resolution of optical isomers of dipeptide-type sweeteners, viz., aspartame, alitame and antiaspartame, and some of their decomposition products, e.g., diketopiperazines. The chiral discrimination mechanism for the solutes was elucidated. The proposed chiral RP-HPLC system was applied to the stereoselective determination of aspartame impurities in samples of its commercial dietetic and pharmaceutical formulations.

  2. Advanced heat pump for recovery of volatile organic compounds, Phase III - demonstration of BCSRHP mobile regenerator. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    Under Phase I of the subject contract, feasibility studies and basic engineering studies were performed for a Brayton Cycle Solvent Recovery Heat Pump (BCSRBP) system to prevent pollution from small source emitters. It was determined that the cost of a complete system, including adsorbers and regeneration process, would be far too much for the small emission source in most cases. This {open_quotes}integrated{close_quotes} approach was therefore not feasible. However, it was concluded that the expensive portion of the Brayton cycle process, the regenerator, could be shared by mounting it on a trailer that could be transported to different sites to regenerate an adsorber. Under Phase II of the project a mobile regenerator (BCSRI-IP) was designed and built to serve a large number of sites. Adsorbers were designed to control emissions for a week or more between regenerations. The purpose of phase III was to demonstrate the cost effectiveness and efficiency of the shared (decoupled) BRAYSORB{reg_sign} solvent recovery system in energy use and emission control compared to other control technologies through a performance testing program at representative industrial and commercial host sites in Southern California. NUCON was the prime contractor for the demonstration portion of this project. Support and funding were received from Southern California Edison Company, South Coast Air Quality Management District, and the U.S. Department of Energy in addition to the contribution by NUCON. Contractual arrangements were completed with each of the host sites and permits for both the stationary and mobile equipment were acquired. The adsorbers were installed at each host site and the appropriate interface connections were made. The mobile regenerator was transported to Southern California for the demonstration.

  3. Chain Mobility in Polymer Systems: On the Borderline between Solid and Melt. 2. Crystal Size Influence in Phase Transition and Sintering of Ultrahigh Molecular Weight Polyethylene via the Mobile Hexagonal Phase.

    PubMed

    Rastogi; Kurelec; Lemstra

    1998-07-28

    Polymorphism is a well-established phenomenon in crystalline materials and is important for pharmaceutical and polymeric materials. In our study concerning the processability of polymers, we came across an unusual observation related to polymorphism induced by pressure. The experimental observation is that polyethylene crystals transform from the stable orthorhombic crystal into a transient hexagonal phase. The occurrence of a transient hexagonal phase is shown to be dependent on the polymer crystal size; smaller crystals transform into the transient hexagonal phase at temperatures and pressures much below the thermodynamic critical point Qo, which is located at P = 3.6 kbar and T = 230 degreesC. The crystal size dependence in the phase transition was investigated by in situ X-ray studies in the unirradiated and irradiated solution-crystallized films. Since the chain mobility is rather high in the hexagonal phase, sintering has been attempted via this transient phase using ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) as a model system. UHMW-PE is an intractable polymer due to its high molar mass but possesses excellent abrasion resistance properties. For this reason it is used as an inlay in demanding applications such as artificial hip and knee joints. The service life of UHMW-PE in these artificial joints, however, is limited due to the poor processing characteristics notably during sintering, and often a second operation is needed to replace the UHMW-PE interface. Sintering via the transient hexagonal phase could provide a solution for this important problem which concerns an increasing number of people. PMID:9680442

  4. Trellis coding with Continuous Phase Modulation (CPM) for satellite-based land-mobile communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This volume of the final report summarizes the results of our studies on the satellite-based mobile communications project. It includes: a detailed analysis, design, and simulations of trellis coded, full/partial response CPM signals with/without interleaving over various Rician fading channels; analysis and simulation of computational cutoff rates for coherent, noncoherent, and differential detection of CPM signals; optimization of the complete transmission system; analysis and simulation of power spectrum of the CPM signals; design and development of a class of Doppler frequency shift estimators; design and development of a symbol timing recovery circuit; and breadboard implementation of the transmission system. Studies prove the suitability of the CPM system for mobile communications.

  5. Lithium solvation in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Semino, Rocío; Zaldívar, Gervasio; Calvo, Ernesto J.; Laria, Daniel

    2014-12-07

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results pertaining to the solvation of Li{sup +} in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile binary mixtures. The results are potentially relevant in the design of Li-air batteries that rely on aprotic mixtures as solvent media. To analyze effects derived from differences in ionic size and charge sign, the solvation of Li{sup +} is compared to the ones observed for infinitely diluted K{sup +} and Cl{sup −} species, in similar solutions. At all compositions, the cations are preferentially solvated by dimethyl sulfoxide. Contrasting, the first solvation shell of Cl{sup −} shows a gradual modification in its composition, which varies linearly with the global concentrations of the two solvents in the mixtures. Moreover, the energetics of the solvation, described in terms of the corresponding solute-solvent coupling, presents a clear non-ideal concentration dependence. Similar nonlinear trends were found for the stabilization of different ionic species in solution, compared to the ones exhibited by their electrically neutral counterparts. These tendencies account for the characteristics of the free energy associated to the stabilization of Li{sup +}Cl{sup −}, contact-ion-pairs in these solutions. Ionic transport is also analyzed. Dynamical results show concentration trends similar to those recently obtained from direct experimental measurements.

  6. Direct, preparative enantioselective chromatography of propranolol hydrochloride and thioridazine hydrochloride using carbon dioxide-based mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Geiser, F; Schultz, M; Betz, L; Shaimi, M; Lee, J; Champion, W

    1999-12-31

    In this paper, we describe the direct, preparative enantioselective chromatography of racemic (rac)-propranolol hydrochloride (HCI) and rac-thioridazine.HCl using Chiralpak AD chiral stationary phase and mobile phase systems containing carbon dioxide and methanol without the use of basic or acidic additives. Isolated fractions of propranolol.HCl were positively identified by mass spectrometry, Beilstein flame test, melting point, and chemical analysis to be HCI enantiomers of propranolol-HCl salts exhibited characteristic mass spectra peaks at 36 and 38 mass-to-charge ratio in the expected 3:1 isotopic ratio for the solute that were absent in the mass spectra for the free-base forms. To our knowledge, the direct, preparative enantioselective isolation of HCI enantiomeric salts of rac-propranolol and of rac-thioridazine have not been previously demonstrated and published. PMID:10674944

  7. Direct, preparative enantioselective chromatography of propranolol hydrochloride and thioridazine hydrochloride using carbon dioxide-based mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Geiser, F; Schultz, M; Betz, L; Shaimi, M; Lee, J; Champion, W

    1999-12-31

    In this paper, we describe the direct, preparative enantioselective chromatography of racemic (rac)-propranolol hydrochloride (HCI) and rac-thioridazine.HCl using Chiralpak AD chiral stationary phase and mobile phase systems containing carbon dioxide and methanol without the use of basic or acidic additives. Isolated fractions of propranolol.HCl were positively identified by mass spectrometry, Beilstein flame test, melting point, and chemical analysis to be HCI enantiomers of propranolol-HCl salts exhibited characteristic mass spectra peaks at 36 and 38 mass-to-charge ratio in the expected 3:1 isotopic ratio for the solute that were absent in the mass spectra for the free-base forms. To our knowledge, the direct, preparative enantioselective isolation of HCI enantiomeric salts of rac-propranolol and of rac-thioridazine have not been previously demonstrated and published.

  8. Effects of temperature and mobile-phase composition on retentions in column liquid chromatography. [Hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, A.

    1982-08-01

    Binary-additive mobile phase systems were investigated for a more exact control over chromatography. If the mobile phase was nonpolar binary solvents (e.g., n-hexane and dichloromethane), trace amounts of THF and/or ACN could be added to control solute retentions as a function of solvent composition. Temperature also plays an important role in the coverage of modifier molecules on the surface of the adsorbent. Higher efficiencies were obtained at lower temperatures. For chromatographic systems having large extra-column volumes, higher column temperature will also reduce column efficiency. Solvophobic effects and polar-group selectivity control the chromatographic behavior of phenols in reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC). The former effect predominates with the THF system, and the latter with the MeOH system. Substituent groups decrease the hydrophobic effect of phenols in aqueous media. However, owing to steric effects, ortho-substituted phenols usually eluted later. Separation of the phenols was also found with 35% MeOH/H/sub 2/O eluent. Application of window diagrams led to baseline separation with 22% THF/H/sub 2/O. Optimum column temperature was 42/sup 0/C with a Zorbax C8 microbore column. The enthalpy-entropy compensation principle was applied to the retention data observed with reversed-phase systems. Relative retention data were found to provide a more consistent compensation temperature. RPLC was shown to be useful in the separation of high molecular-weight compounds such as hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB). HMDS-treated HTPB eluted without difficulty from silical gel. Sample overload can provide unique separations in GPC. (DLC)

  9. A convenient pathway to Sm(II)-mediated chemistry in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Maisano, Todd; Tempest, Kevin E; Sadasivam, Dhandapani V; Flowers, Robert A

    2011-03-21

    In this communication we show that the instability of samarium diiodide (SmI(2)) in acetonitrile is a consequence of ionization of the reductant in this solvent. Samarium triflate (Sm(OTf)(2)) is exceptionally stable in acetonitrile for periods over six months and can be used with appropriate additives to initiate a ketyl-olefin coupling reaction in high yield. PMID:21321772

  10. Combined effects of potassium chloride and ethanol as mobile phase modulators on hydrophobic interaction and reversed-phase chromatography of three insulin variants.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Karolina; Frederiksen, Søren S; Degerman, Marcus; Breil, Martin P; Mollerup, Jørgen M; Nilsson, Bernt

    2015-02-13

    The two main chromatographic modes based on hydrophobicity, hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) and reversed-phase chromatography (RPC), are widely used for both analytical and preparative chromatography of proteins in the pharmaceutical industry. Despite the extensive application of these separation methods, and the vast amount of studies performed on HIC and RPC over the decades, the underlying phenomena remain elusive. As part of a systematic study of the influence of mobile phase modulators in hydrophobicity-based chromatography, we have investigated the effects of both KCl and ethanol on the retention of three insulin variants on two HIC adsorbents and two RPC adsorbents. The focus was on the linear adsorption range, separating the modulator effects from the capacity effects, but some complementary experiments at higher load were included to further investigate observed phenomena. The results show that the modulators have the same effect on the two RPC adsorbents in the linear range, indicating that the modulator concentration only affects the activity of the solute in the mobile phase, and not that of the solute-ligand complex, or that of the ligand. Unfortunately, the HIC adsorbents did not show the same behavior. However, the insulin variants displayed a strong tendency toward self-association on both HIC adsorbents; on one in particular. Since this causes peak fronting, the retention is affected, and this could probably explain the lack of congruity. This conclusion was supported by the results from the non-linear range experiments which were indicative of double-layer adsorption on the HIC adsorbents, while the RPC adsorbents gave the anticipated increased tailing at higher load.

  11. Electrolyte Solvation and Ionic Association. V. Acetonitrile-Lithium Bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Sang D.; Borodin, Oleg; Seo, D. M.; Zhou, Zhi B.; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2014-09-30

    Electrolytes with the salt lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) have been evaluated relative to comparable electrolytes with other lithium salts. Acetonitrile (AN) has been used as a model electrolyte solvent. The information obtained from the thermal phase behavior, solvation/ionic association interactions, quantum chemical (QC) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (with an APPLE&P many-body polarizable force field for the LiFSI salt) of the (AN)n-LiFSI mixtures provides detailed insight into the coordination interactions of the FSI- anions and the wide variability noted in the electrolyte transport property (i.e., viscosity and ionic conductivity).

  12. Isomerization and fragmentation of acetonitrile upon interaction with N(4S) atoms: the chemistry of nitrogen in dense molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mencos, Alejandro; Krim, Lahouari

    2016-08-01

    We experimentally show that the reaction between ground state nitrogen atoms N(4S) and acetonitrile CH3CN can lead to two distinct chemical pathways that are both thermally activated at very low temperatures. First is CH3CN isomerization which produces CH3NC and H2CCNH. Second is CH3CN decomposition which produces HNC and CH3CNH+CN- fragments, with the possible release of H2. Our results reveal that the mobility of N(4S)-atoms is stimulated in the 3-11 K temperature range, and that its subsequent encounter with one acetonitrile molecule is sufficient for the aforementioned reactions to occur without the need for additional energy to be supplied to the CH3CN + N(4S) system. These findings shed more light on the nitrogen chemistry that can possibly take place in dense molecular clouds, which until now was thought to only involve high-energy processes and therefore be unlikely to occur in such cold and dark interstellar regions. The reaction pathways we propose in this study have very important astrochemical implications, as it was shown recently that the atomic nitrogen might be more abundant, in many interstellar icy grain mantles, than previously thought. Also, these reaction pathways can now be considered within dense molecular clouds, and possibly affect the branching ratios for N-bearing molecules computed in astrochemical modelling.

  13. Determination of oxfendazole in cow milk by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tsina, I W; Matin, S B

    1981-08-01

    A specific and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the analysis of oxfendazole in cow milk is described. Oxfendazole was extracted from milk using a mixture of acetone and chloroform under alkaline conditions. The solvents were evaporated, and the oily residue was purified by hexane-acetonitrile partition and acid-base extraction. The residue obtained after cleanup was redissolved in methanol for chromatographic analysis. Chromatography was performed on a reversed-phase column with acetonitrile-water as the mobile phase. As low as 0.005 microgram of oxfendazole/g can be measured by this method using 50 g of milk. The method was applied to measure oxfendazole in the milk of a cow given an oral 5-mg/kg dose.

  14. Effect of the water content on the retention and enantioselectivity of albendazole and fenbendazole sulfoxides using amylose-based chiral stationary phases in organic-aqueous conditions.

    PubMed

    Materazzo, Sabrina; Carradori, Simone; Ferretti, Rosella; Gallinella, Bruno; Secci, Daniela; Cirilli, Roberto

    2014-01-31

    Four commercially available immobilized amylose-derived CSPs (Chiralpak IA-3, Chiralpak ID-3, Chiralpak IE-3 and Chiralpak IF-3) were used in the HPLC analysis of the chiral sulfoxides albendazole (ABZ-SO) and fenbendazole (FBZ-SO) and their in vivo sulfide precursor (ABZ and FBZ) and sulfone metabolite (ABZ-SO2 and FBZ-SO2) under organic-aqueous mode. U-shape retention maps, established by varying the water content in the acetonitrile- and ethanol-water mobile phases, were indicative of two retention mechanisms operating on the same CSP. The dual retention behavior of polysaccharide-based CSPs was exploited to design greener enantioselective and chemoselective separations in a short time frame. The enantiomers of ABZ-SO and FBZ-SO were baseline resolved with water-rich mobile phases (with the main component usually being 50-65% water in acetonitrile) on the IF-3 CSP and ethanol-water 100:5 mixture on the IA-3 and IE-3 CSPs. A simultaneous separation of ABZ (or FBZ), enantiomers of the corresponding sulfoxide and sulfone was achieved on the IA-3 using ethanol-water 100:60 (acetonitrile-water 100:100 for FBZ) as a mobile phase.

  15. Peak shapes of acids and bases under overloaded conditions in reversed-phase liquid chromatography, with weakly buffered mobile phases of various pH: A thermodynamic interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2009-01-01

    We measured overloaded band profiles for a series of nine compounds (phenol, caffeine, 3-phenyl 1-propanol, 2-phenylbutyric acid, amphetamine, aniline, benzylamine, p-toluidine, and procainamidium chloride) on columns packed with four different C{sub 18}-bonded packing materials: XTerra-C{sub 18}, Gemini-C{sub 18}, Luna-C{sub 18}(2), and Halo-C{sub 18}, using buffered methanol-water mobile phases. The {sub W}{sup S}pH of the mobile phase was increased from 2.6 to 11.3. The buffer concentration (either phosphate, acetate, or carbonate buffers) was set constant at values below the maximum concentration of the sample in the band. The influence of the surface chemistry of the packing material on the retention and the shape of the peaks was investigated. Adsorbents having a hybrid inorganic/organic structure tend to give peaks exhibiting moderate or little tailing. The retention and the shape of the band profiles can easily be interpreted at {sub W}{sup S}pHs that are well above or well below the {sub W}{sup S}pK{sub a} of the compound studied. In contrast, the peak shapes in the intermediary pH range (i.e., close to the compound {sub W}{sup S}pK{sub a}) have rarely been studied. These shapes reveal the complexity of the competitive adsorption behavior of couples of acido-basic conjugated compounds at {sub W}{sup S}pHs that are close to their {sub W}{sup S}pK{sub a}. They also reveal the role of the buffer capacity on the resulting peak shape. With increasing {sub W}{sup S}pH, the overloaded profiles are first langmuirian (isotherm type I) at low {sub W}{sup S}pHs, they become S-shaped (isotherm type II), then anti-langmuirian (isotherm type III), S-shaped again at intermediate {sub W}{sup S}pHs, and finally return to a langmuirian shape at high {sub W}{sup S}pHs. A new general adsorption isotherm model that takes into account the dissociation equilibrium of conjugated acidic and basic species in the bulk mobile phase accounts for these transient band shapes. An

  16. Towards the Development of a Mobile Phonopneumogram: Automatic Breath-Phase Classification Using Smartphones.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Bersain A; Reljin, Natasa; Kong, Youngsun; Nam, Yunyoung; Ha, Sangho; Chon, Ki H

    2016-09-01

    Correct labeling of breath phases is useful in the automatic analysis of respiratory sounds, where airflow or volume signals are commonly used as temporal reference. However, such signals are not always available. The development of a smartphone-based respiratory sound analysis system has received increased attention. In this study, we propose an optical approach that takes advantage of a smartphone's camera and provides a chest movement signal useful for classification of the breath phases when simultaneously recording tracheal sounds. Spirometer and smartphone-based signals were acquired from N = 13 healthy volunteers breathing at different frequencies, airflow and volume levels. We found that the smartphone-acquired chest movement signal was highly correlated with reference volume (ρ = 0.960 ± 0.025, mean ± SD). A simple linear regression on the chest signal was used to label the breath phases according to the slope between consecutive onsets. 100% accuracy was found for the classification of the analyzed breath phases. We found that the proposed classification scheme can be used to correctly classify breath phases in more challenging breathing patterns, such as those that include non-breath events like swallowing, talking, and coughing, and alternating or irregular breathing. These results show the feasibility of developing a portable and inexpensive phonopneumogram for the analysis of respiratory sounds based on smartphones.

  17. Adsorption mechanism of acids and bases in reversed-phase liquid chromatography in weak buffered mobile phases designed for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2009-03-01

    The overloaded band profiles of five acido-basic compounds were measured, using weakly buffered mobile phases. Low buffer concentrations were selected to provide a better understanding of the band profiles recorded in LC/MS analyses, which are often carried out at low buffer concentrations. In this work, 10 microL samples of a 50 mM probe solution were injected into C(18)-bonded columns using a series of five buffered mobile phases at (SW)pH between 2 and 12. The retention times and the shapes of the bands were analyzed based on thermodynamic arguments. A new adsorption model that takes into account the simultaneous adsorption of the acidic and the basic species onto the endcapped adsorbent, predicts accurately the complex experimental profiles recorded. The adsorption mechanism of acido-basic compounds onto RPLC phases seems to be consistent with the following microscopic model. No matter whether the acid or the base is the neutral or the basic species, the neutral species adsorbs onto a large number of weak adsorption sites (their saturation capacity is several tens g/L and their equilibrium constant of the order of 0.1 L/g). In contrast, the ionic species adsorbs strongly onto fewer active sites (their saturation capacity is about 1g/L and their equilibrium constant of the order of a few L/g). From a microscopic point of view and in agreement with the adsorption isotherm of the compound measured by frontal analysis (FA) and with the results of Monte-Carlo calculations performed by Schure et al., the first type of adsorption sites are most likely located in between C(18)-bonded chains and the second type of adsorption sites are located deeper in contact with the silica surface. The injected concentration (50 mM) was too low to probe the weakest adsorption sites (saturation capacity of a few hundreds g/L with an equilibrium constant of one hundredth of L/g) that are located at the very interface between the C(18)-bonded layer and the bulk phase. PMID:18976999

  18. Adsorption mechanism of acids and bases in reversed-phase liquid chromatography in weak buffered mobile phases designed for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2009-03-01

    The overloaded band profiles of five acido-basic compounds were measured, using weakly buffered mobile phases. Low buffer concentrations were selected to provide a better understanding of the band profiles recorded in LC/MS analyses, which are often carried out at low buffer concentrations. In this work, 10 microL samples of a 50 mM probe solution were injected into C(18)-bonded columns using a series of five buffered mobile phases at (SW)pH between 2 and 12. The retention times and the shapes of the bands were analyzed based on thermodynamic arguments. A new adsorption model that takes into account the simultaneous adsorption of the acidic and the basic species onto the endcapped adsorbent, predicts accurately the complex experimental profiles recorded. The adsorption mechanism of acido-basic compounds onto RPLC phases seems to be consistent with the following microscopic model. No matter whether the acid or the base is the neutral or the basic species, the neutral species adsorbs onto a large number of weak adsorption sites (their saturation capacity is several tens g/L and their equilibrium constant of the order of 0.1 L/g). In contrast, the ionic species adsorbs strongly onto fewer active sites (their saturation capacity is about 1g/L and their equilibrium constant of the order of a few L/g). From a microscopic point of view and in agreement with the adsorption isotherm of the compound measured by frontal analysis (FA) and with the results of Monte-Carlo calculations performed by Schure et al., the first type of adsorption sites are most likely located in between C(18)-bonded chains and the second type of adsorption sites are located deeper in contact with the silica surface. The injected concentration (50 mM) was too low to probe the weakest adsorption sites (saturation capacity of a few hundreds g/L with an equilibrium constant of one hundredth of L/g) that are located at the very interface between the C(18)-bonded layer and the bulk phase.

  19. Adsorption mechanism of acids and bases in reversed-phase liquid chromatography in weak buffered mobile phases designed for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2009-01-01

    The overloaded band profiles of five acido-basic compounds were measured, using weakly buffered mobile phases. Low buffer concentrations were selected to provide a better understanding of the band profiles recorded in LC/MS analyses, which are often carried out at low buffer concentrations. In this work, 10 {micro}L samples of a 50 mM probe solution were injected into C{sub 18}-bonded columns using a series of five buffered mobile phases at {sub W}{sup S}pH between 2 and 12. The retention times and the shapes of the bands were analyzed based on thermodynamic arguments. A new adsorption model that takes into account the simultaneous adsorption of the acidic and the basic species onto the endcapped adsorbent, predicts accurately the complex experimental profiles recorded. The adsorption mechanism of acido-basic compounds onto RPLC phases seems to be consistent with the following microscopic model. No matter whether the acid or the base is the neutral or the basic species, the neutral species adsorbs onto a large number of weak adsorption sites (their saturation capacity is several tens g/L and their equilibrium constant of the order of 0.1 L/g). In contrast, the ionic species adsorbs strongly onto fewer active sites (their saturation capacity is about 1 g/L and their equilibrium constant of the order of a few L/g). From a microscopic point of view and in agreement with the adsorption isotherm of the compound measured by frontal analysis (FA) and with the results of Monte-Carlo calculations performed by Schure et al., the first type of adsorption sites are most likely located in between C{sub 18}-bonded chains and the second type of adsorption sites are located deeper in contact with the silica surface. The injected concentration (50 mM) was too low to probe the weakest adsorption sites (saturation capacity of a few hundreds g/L with an equilibrium constant of one hundredth of L/g) that are located at the very interface between the C{sub 18}-bonded layer and the bulk

  20. Reverse-phase HPLC of benzylpropionitrile dithiocarbamate complexes for the determination of priority pollutant metals

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.J.

    1990-01-01

    A new dithiocarbamate, benzylpropionitrile dithiocarbamate (BPDTC), has been synthesized for use in metal analysis. The HPLC behavior of metal chelates of BPDTC has been investigated for the simultaneous determination of antimony, cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, nickel, lead, selenium, thallium, and zinc, all of which are on the Environmental Protection Agency's list of priority pollutant metals. Metals are extracted into dichloromethane as BPDTC chelates, and then separated on a C-18 column. Cobalt is added as an internal standard. The effects of pH and of three organic modifiers (methanol, acetonitrile, tetrahydrofuran) of the mobile phase on retention time have been investigated. Addition of dichloromethane to the mobile phase increases solubility and chelate stability, and improves the separation of metal BPDTC complexes. BPDTC is added to the aqueous mobile phase to reduce on-column dissociation of the complexes. Detection limits at 260 nm are in the range of 0.1 to 3 ppb using a 1 liter sample.

  1. Chemical systems for improved oil recovery: Phase behavior, oil recovery, and mobility control studies

    SciTech Connect

    Llave, F.; Gall, B.; Gao, H., Scott, L., Cook, I.

    1995-09-01

    Selected surfactant systems containing a series of ethoxylated nonionic surfactants in combination with an anionic surfactant system have been studied to evaluate phase behavior as well as oil recovery potential. These experiments were conducted to evaluate possible improved phase behavior and overall oil recovery potential of mixed surfactant systems over a broad range of conditions. Both polyacrylamide polymers and Xanthan biopolymers were evaluated. Studies were initiated to use a chemical flooding simulation program, UTCHEM, to simulate oil recovery for laboratory and field applications and evaluate its use to simulate oil saturation distributions obtained in CT-monitoring of oil recovery experiments. The phase behavior studies focused on evaluating the effect of anionic-nonionic surfactant proportion on overall phase behavior. Two distinct transition behaviors were observed, depending on the dominant surfactant in the overall system. The first type of transition corresponded to more conventional behavior attributed to nonionic-dominant surfactant systems. This behavior is manifested by an oil-water-surfactant system that inverts from a water-external (highly conducting) microemulsion to an oil-external (nonconducting) one, as a function of temperature. The latter type which inverts in an opposite manner can be attributed to the separation of the anionic-nonionic mixtures into water- and oil-soluble surfactants. Both types of transition behavior can still be used to identify relative proximity to optimal areas. Determining these transition ranges provided more insight on how the behavior of these surfactant mixtures was affected by altering component proportions. Efforts to optimize the chemical system for oil displacement experiments were also undertaken. Phase behavior studies with systems formulated with biopolymer in solution were conducted.

  2. Boric acid as a mobile phase additive for high performance liquid chromatography separation of ribose, arabinose and ribulose.

    PubMed

    De Muynck, Cassandra; Beauprez, Joeri; Soetaert, Wim; Vandamme, Erick J

    2006-01-01

    A new high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method is described for the analysis of ribose, arabinose and ribulose mixtures obtained from (bio)chemical isomerization processes. These processes gain importance since the molecules can be used for the synthesis of antiviral therapeutics. The HPLC method uses boric acid as a mobile phase additive to enhance the separation on an Aminex HPX-87K column. By complexing with boric acid, the carbohydrates become negatively charged, thus elute faster from the column by means of ion exlusion and are separated because the complexation capacity with boric acid differs from one carbohydrate to another. Excellent separation between ribose, ribulose and arabinose was achieved with concentrations between 0.1 and 10 gL(-1) of discrete sugar.

  3. Observation of a topological 3D Dirac semimetal phase in high-mobility Cd3As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupane, M.; Xu, S.-Y.; Sankar, R.; Alidoust, N.; Bian, G.; Liu, Chang; Belopolski, I.; Chang, T.-R.; Jeng, H.-T.; Lin, H.; Bansil, A.; Chou, Fangcheng; Hasan, M. Z.

    2014-03-01

    Experimental identification of three-dimensional (3D) Dirac semimetals in solid state systems is critical for realizing exotic topological phenomena and quantum transport. Using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we performed systematic electronic structure studies on well-known compound Cd3As2. For the first time, we observe a highly linear bulk Dirac cone located at the Brillouin zone center projected onto the (001) surface, which is consistent with a 3D Dirac semimetal phase in Cd3As2. Remarkably, an unusually high Dirac Fermion velocity is seen in samples where the mobility far exceeds 20,000 cm2/V.s suggesting that Cd3As2 can be a promising candidate as a hypercone analog of graphene in many device-applications, which can also incorporate topological quantum phenomena in a large gap setting. This work is primarily supported by U.S. DOE and Princeton University.

  4. Carrier concentration and mobility in two-phase eutectic A/sup III/B/sup V/-Ge(Si) alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Leonov, V.V.

    1988-06-01

    The authors proposes a technique of determining the carrier concentration and mobility in the separate phases of two-phase alloys in which oriented rod-like inclusions have carrier concentrations similar to the host material. The calculations are then used to determine the carrier concentration and mobility in each alloy phase, and to discuss the doping processes and mechanisms of impurity incorporation in two-phase semiconductors. He studied the Hall constant R in two-phase, oriented eutectic alloys of InSb-Ge, InAs-Ge, GaAs-Ge, and GaAs-Si. He established that R depends on the relative orientations of the current flow, magnetic field, and elongated inclusions. Furthermore, the particular impurity concentration in the alloy also has an effect on R.

  5. Electrochemical detection of benzo(a)pyrene in acetonitrile-water binary medium.

    PubMed

    Du, Chunyan; Hu, Yaqi; Li, Yunchao; Fan, Louzhen; Li, Xiaohong

    2015-06-01

    Electrochemical oxidation of adsorbed benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was explored in acetonitrile-water. When the GCE was incubated in 100 nM BaP acetonitrile-water (V(water):V(acetonitrile)=1:1) for 10 min at open circuit, and then transferred into blank acetonitrile-water (V(water):V(acetonitrile)=1:1, pH= 0.70) for differential pulse voltammetry measurement, a distinct oxidation peak at 0.98 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) was observed. The peak potential was about 180 mV lower than that in acetonitrile. Importantly, the peak current was more than 22 times greater. The effects of water on BaP preconcentration on the electrode and electrochemical oxidation were revealed, respectively. Based on the results, an electrochemical assay for BaP detection was developed. The GCE was respectively incubated in acetonitrile-water (V(water):V(acetonitrile)=1:1)with BaP concentration ranged from 0 nM to 1000 nM, and then transferred into the corresponding blank acetonitrile-water (pH= 0.70) for DPV measurements. When the BaP concentration was increased, an increased oxidative current at 0.98 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) was observed, and a detection limit of 0.67 nM was achieved. Because all other priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons could not be electrochemically oxidized at 0.98 V, the electrochemical assay showed very high selectivity to BaP. Finally, the developed electrochemical assay was successfully applied to determination of BaP in a series of real world samples, such as drinking water, tap water, lake water and river water.

  6. The Use of Mobile, Electrochemical Sensor Nodes for the Measurement of Personal Exposure to Gas-Phase Air Pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, G.; Popoola, O. A.; Mead, M. I.; McKeating, S. J.; Calleja, M.; Hayes, M.; Baron, R. P.; Saffell, J.; Jones, R.

    2012-12-01

    , and thus also the potential insufficiency at quantifying the risks to health in the surrounding area. Recent campaigns with mobile sensor nodes have included attempts to probe the differences in personal exposure to gas-phase air pollutants at different heights of breathing zone and between different methods of transport.

  7. Gas phase ion chemistry of an ion mobility spectrometry based explosive trace detector elucidated by tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kozole, Joseph; Levine, Lauren A; Tomlinson-Phillips, Jill; Stairs, Jason R

    2015-08-01

    The gas phase ion chemistry for an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) based explosive detector has been elucidated using tandem mass spectrometry. The IMS system, which is operated with hexachloroethane and isobutyramide reagent gases and an ion shutter type gating scheme, is connected to the atmospheric pressure interface of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS/MS). Product ion masses, daughter ion masses, and reduced mobility values for a collection of nitro, nitrate, and peroxide explosives measured with the IMS/MS/MS instrument are reported. The mass and mobility data together with targeted isotopic labeling experiments and information about sample composition and reaction environment are leveraged to propose molecular formulas, structures, and ionization pathways for the various product ions. The major product ions are identified as [DNT-H](-) for DNT, [TNT-H](-) for TNT, [RDX+Cl](-) and [RDX+NO2](-) for RDX, [HMX+Cl](-) and [HMX+NO2](-) for HMX, [NO3](-) for EGDN, [NG+Cl](-) and [NG+NO3](-) for NG, [PETN+Cl](-) and [PETN+NO3](-) for PETN, [HNO3+NO3](-) for NH4NO3, [NO2](-) for DMNB, [HMTD-NC3H6O3+H+Cl](-) and [HMTD+H-CH2O-H2O2](+) for HMTD, and [(CH3)3CO2](+) for TATP. In general, the product ions identified for the IMS system studied here are consistent with the product ions reported previously for an ion trap mobility spectrometer (ITMS) based explosive trace detector, which is operated with dichloromethane and ammonia reagent gases and an ion trap type gating scheme. Differences between the explosive trace detectors include the [NG+Cl](-) and [PETN+Cl](-) product ions being major ions in the IMS system compared to minor ions in the ITMS system as well as the major product ion for TATP being [(CH3)3CO2](+) for the IMS system and [(CH3)2CNH2](+) for the ITMS system. PMID:26048817

  8. Gas phase ion chemistry of an ion mobility spectrometry based explosive trace detector elucidated by tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kozole, Joseph; Levine, Lauren A; Tomlinson-Phillips, Jill; Stairs, Jason R

    2015-08-01

    The gas phase ion chemistry for an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) based explosive detector has been elucidated using tandem mass spectrometry. The IMS system, which is operated with hexachloroethane and isobutyramide reagent gases and an ion shutter type gating scheme, is connected to the atmospheric pressure interface of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS/MS). Product ion masses, daughter ion masses, and reduced mobility values for a collection of nitro, nitrate, and peroxide explosives measured with the IMS/MS/MS instrument are reported. The mass and mobility data together with targeted isotopic labeling experiments and information about sample composition and reaction environment are leveraged to propose molecular formulas, structures, and ionization pathways for the various product ions. The major product ions are identified as [DNT-H](-) for DNT, [TNT-H](-) for TNT, [RDX+Cl](-) and [RDX+NO2](-) for RDX, [HMX+Cl](-) and [HMX+NO2](-) for HMX, [NO3](-) for EGDN, [NG+Cl](-) and [NG+NO3](-) for NG, [PETN+Cl](-) and [PETN+NO3](-) for PETN, [HNO3+NO3](-) for NH4NO3, [NO2](-) for DMNB, [HMTD-NC3H6O3+H+Cl](-) and [HMTD+H-CH2O-H2O2](+) for HMTD, and [(CH3)3CO2](+) for TATP. In general, the product ions identified for the IMS system studied here are consistent with the product ions reported previously for an ion trap mobility spectrometer (ITMS) based explosive trace detector, which is operated with dichloromethane and ammonia reagent gases and an ion trap type gating scheme. Differences between the explosive trace detectors include the [NG+Cl](-) and [PETN+Cl](-) product ions being major ions in the IMS system compared to minor ions in the ITMS system as well as the major product ion for TATP being [(CH3)3CO2](+) for the IMS system and [(CH3)2CNH2](+) for the ITMS system.

  9. Wireless Roadside Inspection Phase II Tennessee Commercial Mobile Radio Services Pilot Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Franzese, Oscar; Lascurain, Mary Beth; Capps, Gary J; Siekmann, Adam

    2011-05-01

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) Wireless Roadside Inspection (WRI) Program is researching the feasibility and value of electronically assessing truck and bus driver and vehicle safety at least 25 times more often than is possible using only roadside physical inspections. The WRI program is evaluating the potential benefits to both the motor carrier industry and to government. These potential benefits include reduction in accidents, fatalities and injuries on our highways and keeping safe and legal drivers and vehicles moving on the highways. WRI Pilot tests were conducted to prototype, test and demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of electronically collecting safety data message sets from in-service commercial vehicles and performing wireless roadside inspections using three different communication methods. This report summarizes the design, conduct and results of the Tennessee CMRS WRI Pilot Test. The purpose of this Pilot test was to demonstrate the implementation of commercial mobile radio services to electronically request and collect safety data message sets from a limited number of commercial vehicles operating in Tennessee. The results of this test have been used in conjunction with the results of the complimentary pilot tests to support an overall assessment of the feasibility and benefits of WRI in enhancing motor carrier safety (reduction in accidents) due to increased compliance (change in motor carrier and driver behavior) caused by conducting frequent safety inspections electronically, at highway speeds, without delay or need to divert into a weigh station

  10. The stereochemical resolution of the enantiomers of aspartame on an immobilized alpha-chymotrypsin HPLC chiral stationary phase: the effect of mobile-phase composition and enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Jadaud, P; Wainer, I W

    1990-01-01

    The enantioselective and diastereoselective resolutions of the stereoisomers of N alpha-aspartyl-phenylalanine 1-methyl ester (APME) have been accomplished on an HPLC chiral stationary phase based upon alpha-chymotrypsin (the ACHT-CSP) with observed enantioselectivities (alpha 1) for the DL-/LD-enantiomer of as high as 29.17 and for the DD-/LL-enantiomers of as high as 28.97. In addition, the effect on the chromatographic retention of the APME stereoisomers of the activity of the ACHT and the composition of the mobile phase--structure of the anionic component, molarity, and pH--have been studied. The results of this study suggest that the aspartyl moiety and/or the aspartyl-phenylalanine amide linkage play key roles in the observed enantioselectivity; the APME stereoisomers containing L-phenylalanine, i.e., DL- and LL-APME, bind at a different site in the ACHT molecule (the L-Phe site) than the APME stereoisomers containing D-phenylalanine (the D-Phe site); and the observed enantioselectivity is a measure of the difference in the binding affinities at the two sites rather than the consequence of differential affinities at a single site.

  11. Comparison of the performance of non-ionic and anionic surfactants as mobile phase additives in the RPLC analysis of basic drugs.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ángel, María J; García-Álvarez-Coque, María C

    2011-03-01

    Surfactants added to the mobile phases in reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) give rise to a modified stationary phase, due to the adsorption of surfactant monomers. Depending on the surfactant nature (ionic or non-ionic), the coated stationary phase can exhibit a positive net charge, or just change its polarity remaining neutral. Also, micelles in the mobile phase introduce new sites for solute interaction. This affects the chromatographic behavior, especially in the case of basic compounds. Two surfactants of different nature, the non-ionic Brij-35 and the anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) added to water or aqueous-organic mixtures, are here compared in the separation of basic compounds (β-blockers and tricyclic antidepressants). The reversible/irreversible adsorption of the monomers of both surfactants on the stationary phase was examined. The changes in the nature of the chromatographic system using different columns and chromatographic conditions were followed based on the changes in retention and peak shape. The study revealed that Brij-35 is suitable for analyzing basic compounds of intermediate polarity, using "green chemistry", since the addition of an organic solvent is not needed and Brij-35 is a biodegradable surfactant. In contrast, RPLC with hydro-organic mixtures or mobile phases containing SDS required high concentrations of organic solvents. PMID:21328695

  12. Reversed phase HPLC-FTIR by on-line extraction and solvent elimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somsen, G. W.; Gooijer, Cees; Brinkman, Udo A. T.; Velthorst, Nel H.; Visser, T.

    1994-01-01

    A reversed phase LC-FTIR interface is described using on-line extraction of the aqueous effluent with a volatile organic solvent in conjunction with a solvent eliminating spray-jet device. Results are shown of the analysis of a 2. 10-4 M solution of acenaphthenequinone, phenanthrenequinone and two polar pesticides linuron and diuron. The mixture was separated with a mobile phase of acetonitrile-phosphate buffer and post-column extracted with dichloro-methane. Detection was carried out by FTIR transmission microscopy. The characteristics of the on-line extraction system are discussed in relation to results obtained from a direct deposition method.

  13. Thermodynamics of Complexation between Thiourea-based Receptor and Acetate in Water/Acetonitrile Mixture.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takaya; Shibuya, Yuuta; Sato, Takaya; Nishizawa, Seiichi; Sato, Itaru; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2016-01-01

    A thiourea-based receptor has been extensively studied for selective anion recognition for reasons of its strong hydrogen bond donor ability. In the present study, the thermodynamics of complexation between a thiourea-based receptor and acetate was examined in a water/acetonitrile mixture. The receptor used in this study was N,N'-bis(p-nitrophenyl)thiourea (BNPTU). UV/vis spectroscopic titration and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments clearly revealed endothermic and entropy-driven complexation of BNPTU with acetate in water/acetonitrile mixtures. Since the endothermic peaks found in water/acetonitrile mixtures were about three times greater than those in acetonitrile, it appears that preferential hydration of both receptor and acetate was responsible for the endothermic and entropy-driven complexation reaction. The thermodynamic properties found in this study have the potential to contribute to the design of a thiourea-based anion receptor. PMID:27396654

  14. MICROWAVE-EXPEDITED OLEFIN EPOXIDATION OVER HYDROTALCITES USING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE AND ACETONITRILE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An efficient microwave-assisted expoxidation of olefins is described over hydrotalcite catalysts in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and acetonitrile. This general and selective protocol is extremely fast and is applicable to a wide variety of subtrates.

  15. Tensor-based classification of an auditory mobile BCI without a subject-specific calibration phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zink, Rob; Hunyadi, Borbála; Van Huffel, Sabine; De Vos, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Objective. One of the major drawbacks in EEG brain-computer interfaces (BCI) is the need for subject-specific training of the classifier. By removing the need for a supervised calibration phase, new users could potentially explore a BCI faster. In this work we aim to remove this subject-specific calibration phase and allow direct classification. Approach. We explore canonical polyadic decompositions and block term decompositions of the EEG. These methods exploit structure in higher dimensional data arrays called tensors. The BCI tensors are constructed by concatenating ERP templates from other subjects to a target and non-target trial and the inherent structure guides a decomposition that allows accurate classification. We illustrate the new method on data from a three-class auditory oddball paradigm. Main results. The presented approach leads to a fast and intuitive classification with accuracies competitive with a supervised and cross-validated LDA approach. Significance. The described methods are a promising new way of classifying BCI data with a forthright link to the original P300 ERP signal over the conventional and widely used supervised approaches.

  16. Effect of the mobile phase on antibody-based enantiomer separations of amino acids in high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, Oliver; Lindstrom, Heather; Hofstetter, Heike

    2004-09-17

    The effect of the mobile phase parameters flow rate, temperature, pH and ionic strength, as well as the addition of various organic modifiers on the enantiomer separation of various aromatic alpha-amino acids was investigated using two antibody-based chiral stationary phases that have opposing stereoselectivity. On both columns, a decrease in flow rate or temperature resulted in increased interaction with the retained enantiomer. It was found that the retention factor k2 depends on the affinity between the analyte and the immobilized antibody and is not independent of the flow rate. Optimum separations of all amino acids investigated were obtained at pH 7.4 on both columns. While increased k2 values were obtained at low ionic strength on the anti-D-amino acid antibody column, no such effect was observed on the anti-L-amino acid antibody column. The addition of organic modifiers did not improve separations. In all studies, the unretained enantiomer eluted with the void volume.

  17. Chromatographic behavior of small organic compounds in low-temperature high-performance liquid chromatography using liquid carbon dioxide as the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Motono, Tomohiro; Nagai, Takashi; Kitagawa, Shinya; Ohtani, Hajime

    2015-07-01

    Low-temperature high-performance liquid chromatography, in which a loop injector, column, and detection cell were refrigerated at -35ºC, using liquid carbon dioxide as the mobile phase was developed. Small organic compounds (polyaromatic hydrocarbons, alkylbenzenes, and quinones) were separated by low-temperature high-performance liquid chromatography at temperatures from -35 to -5ºC. The combination of liquid carbon dioxide mobile phase with an octadecyl-silica (C18 ) column provided reversed phase mode separation, and a bare silica-gel column resulted in normal phase mode separation. In both the cases, nonlinear behavior at approximately -15ºC was found in the relationship between the temperature and the retention factors of the analytes (van't Hoff plots). In contrast to general trends in high-performance liquid chromatography, the decrease in temperature enhanced the separation efficiency of both the columns.

  18. Use of basic mobile phase to improve chromatography and boost sensitivity for quantifying tetrahydrocurcumin in human plasma by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Tan, Aimin; Wu, Yanxin; Wong, Molly; Licollari, Albert; Bolger, Gordon; Fanaras, John C; Shopp, George; Helson, Lawrence

    2016-08-15

    Tetrahydrocurcumin (THC), a major metabolite of curcumin, is often quantified by LC-MS or LC-MS/MS using acidic mobile phases due to the concern of its instability in a basic medium. However, acidic mobile phases often lead to poor chromatography (e.g. split or double peaks) and reduced detection sensitivity in the commonly used negative ionization mode. To overcome these shortcomings, a basic mobile phase was used for the first time in the LC-MS/MS quantification of THC. In comparison with the acidic mobile phases, a single symmetrical chromatographic peak was obtained and the sensitivity increased by 7-fold or more under the equivalent conditions. The new LC-MS/MS method using the basic mobile phase has been successfully validated for the quantification of THC in human EDTA plasma over the concentration range of 5-2500ng/ml. The within-batch accuracy (% nominal concentration) was between 88.7 and 104.9 and the between-batch accuracy ranged from 96.7 to 108.6. The CVs for within- and between-batch precisions were equal to or less than 5.5% and 9.1%, respectively. No significant matrix interference or matrix effect was observed from normal or lipemic and hemolytic plasma matrices. In addition, the common stabilities with adequate durations were established, including up to 5days of post-preparative stability. Furthermore, when the validated method was applied to a clinical study, the passing rate of ISR samples was 83%, indicating the good reproducibility of the method. The success of the unconventional approach presented in this article demonstrates that a mobile phase could be selected based mainly on its merits to facilitate LC separation and/or MS detection. There is no need for excessive concern about the stability of the compound(s) of interest in the selected mobile phase because the run time of modern LC-MS or LC-MS/MS methods is typically only a few minutes. PMID:27327398

  19. Use of basic mobile phase to improve chromatography and boost sensitivity for quantifying tetrahydrocurcumin in human plasma by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Tan, Aimin; Wu, Yanxin; Wong, Molly; Licollari, Albert; Bolger, Gordon; Fanaras, John C; Shopp, George; Helson, Lawrence

    2016-08-15

    Tetrahydrocurcumin (THC), a major metabolite of curcumin, is often quantified by LC-MS or LC-MS/MS using acidic mobile phases due to the concern of its instability in a basic medium. However, acidic mobile phases often lead to poor chromatography (e.g. split or double peaks) and reduced detection sensitivity in the commonly used negative ionization mode. To overcome these shortcomings, a basic mobile phase was used for the first time in the LC-MS/MS quantification of THC. In comparison with the acidic mobile phases, a single symmetrical chromatographic peak was obtained and the sensitivity increased by 7-fold or more under the equivalent conditions. The new LC-MS/MS method using the basic mobile phase has been successfully validated for the quantification of THC in human EDTA plasma over the concentration range of 5-2500ng/ml. The within-batch accuracy (% nominal concentration) was between 88.7 and 104.9 and the between-batch accuracy ranged from 96.7 to 108.6. The CVs for within- and between-batch precisions were equal to or less than 5.5% and 9.1%, respectively. No significant matrix interference or matrix effect was observed from normal or lipemic and hemolytic plasma matrices. In addition, the common stabilities with adequate durations were established, including up to 5days of post-preparative stability. Furthermore, when the validated method was applied to a clinical study, the passing rate of ISR samples was 83%, indicating the good reproducibility of the method. The success of the unconventional approach presented in this article demonstrates that a mobile phase could be selected based mainly on its merits to facilitate LC separation and/or MS detection. There is no need for excessive concern about the stability of the compound(s) of interest in the selected mobile phase because the run time of modern LC-MS or LC-MS/MS methods is typically only a few minutes.

  20. Ten- to 15-year results of the Oxford Phase III mobile unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lisowski, L. A.; Meijer, L. I.; van den Bekerom, M. P. J.; Pilot, P.; Lisowski, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The interest in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) for medial osteoarthritis has increased rapidly but the long-term follow-up of the Oxford UKAs has yet to be analysed in non-designer centres. We have examined our ten- to 15-year clinical and radiological follow-up data for the Oxford Phase III UKAs. Patients and Methods Between January 1999 and January 2005 a total of 138 consecutive Oxford Phase III arthroplasties were performed by a single surgeon in 129 patients for medial compartment osteoarthritis (71 right and 67 left knees, mean age 72.0 years (47 to 91), mean body mass index 28.2 (20.7 to 52.2)). Both clinical data and radiographs were prospectively recorded and obtained at intervals. Of the 129 patients, 32 patients (32 knees) died, ten patients (12 knees) were not able to take part in the final clinical and radiological assessment due to physical and mental conditions, but via telephone interview it was confirmed that none of these ten patients (12 knees) had a revision of the knee arthroplasty. One patient (two knees) was lost to follow-up. Results The mean follow-up was 11.7 years (10 to 15). A total of 11 knees (8%) were revised. The survival at 15 years with revision for any reason as the endpoint was 90.6% (95% confidence interval (CI) 85.2 to 96.0) and revision related to the prosthesis was 99.3% (95% CI 97.9 to 100). The mean total Knee Society Score was 47 (0 to 80) pre-operatively and 81 (30 to 100) at latest follow-up. The mean Oxford Knee Score was 19 (12 to 40) pre-operatively and 42 (28 to 55) at final follow-up. Radiolucency beneath the tibial component occurred in 22 of 81 prostheses (27.2%) without evidence of loosening. Conclusion This study supports the use of UKA in medial compartment osteoarthritis with excellent long-term functional and radiological outcomes with an excellent 15-year survival rate. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B(10 Suppl B):41–7. PMID:27694515

  1. Effect of temperature on the chromatographic retention of ionizable compounds. I. Methanol-water mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Castells, Cecilia B; Gagliardi, Leonardo G; Ràfols, Clara; Rosés, Martí; Bosch, Elisabeth

    2004-07-01

    The retention mechanism of acids and bases in reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) has been experimentally studied by examining the temperature dependence of retention, with emphasis on the role of the buffer ionization equilibria in the retention and selectivity. Retention factors of several ionizable compounds in a typical octadecylsilica column and using buffers dissolved in 50% (w/w) methanol as eluents at three temperatures in the range of 25-50 degrees C were measured. Two pairs of buffer solutions were prepared by a close adjusting of their pH at 25 degrees C; differences in their ionization enthalpies determined a different degree of ionization when temperature was raised and, as a consequence, a different shift in the eluent pH. Predictive equations of retention that take into account the temperature effect on both the transfer and the ionization processes are proposed. This study demonstrates the significant role that the selected buffer would have in retention and selectivity in RPLC at temperatures higher than 25 degrees C, particularly for co-eluted solutes. PMID:15296385

  2. Effect of temperature on the chromatographic retention of ionizable compounds. I. Methanol-water mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Castells, Cecilia B; Gagliardi, Leonardo G; Ràfols, Clara; Rosés, Martí; Bosch, Elisabeth

    2004-07-01

    The retention mechanism of acids and bases in reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) has been experimentally studied by examining the temperature dependence of retention, with emphasis on the role of the buffer ionization equilibria in the retention and selectivity. Retention factors of several ionizable compounds in a typical octadecylsilica column and using buffers dissolved in 50% (w/w) methanol as eluents at three temperatures in the range of 25-50 degrees C were measured. Two pairs of buffer solutions were prepared by a close adjusting of their pH at 25 degrees C; differences in their ionization enthalpies determined a different degree of ionization when temperature was raised and, as a consequence, a different shift in the eluent pH. Predictive equations of retention that take into account the temperature effect on both the transfer and the ionization processes are proposed. This study demonstrates the significant role that the selected buffer would have in retention and selectivity in RPLC at temperatures higher than 25 degrees C, particularly for co-eluted solutes.

  3. Properties of subcritical water as an eluent for reversed-phase liquid chromatography--disruption of the hydrogen-bond network at elevated temperature and its consequences.

    PubMed

    Allmon, Steven D; Dorsey, John G

    2010-09-10

    The use of subcritical water as an eluent for reversed-phase liquid chromatography is further explored. Shape selectivity as well as thermodynamic values for solute transfer were measured and compared to those seen with traditional ambient methanol/water and acetonitrile/water mobile phases. Linear solvation energy analysis was also used to analyze extrapolated values of the retention factor in pure water at ambient temperatures (k'w) for subcritical water and ambient hydroorganic mobile phases. Results indicate that it is likely that a large disruption in the hydrogen-bonding network of water at high temperatures causes unique chromatographic selectivity, as well as prohibits accurate extrapolation from high temperature to ambient conditions using pure water. Additionally, subcritical water was not found to be a suitable mobile phase for determining k'w for use in estimating octanol/water partition coefficients.

  4. Evaluation of new mixed-mode UHPLC stationary phases and the importance of stationary phase choice when using low ionic-strength mobile phase additives.

    PubMed

    Nováková, Lucie; Vlčková, Hana; Petr, Solich

    2012-05-15

    In this study, the selectivity, retention properties, peak shape and loading capacity for bases were practically evaluated using two UHPLC mixed-mode hybrid CSH stationary phases modified by C18 or Phenyl group. The data were compared with the data obtained on other UHPLC hybrid stationary phases (BEH C18, BEH C8, BEH Phenyl and BEH Shield RP18) at both basic and acidic conditions using conventional HPLC buffers (50mM ammonium formate/acetate) as well as low ionic-strength additives such as, e.g. 0.1-0.01% formic/acetic acid and 1mM solution of ammonium formate/acetate, which are widely used in LC-MS applications. Ten pharmaceutically important compounds encompassing acids, bases and neutral were included into the study. Due to properties of CSH sorbent (which possess positively charged surface besides RP group), much improved peak shapes and weaker retention was obtained for bases even at very low concentration of acidic additives. Such conditions are ideally suited for LC-MS analysis of bases, where typical RP chromatographic separation (retention and good selectivity at basic pH) and LS-MS conditions (efficient ionization at acidic pH) are not in agreement. On the other hand, acids were more strongly retained and for some compounds the peak shape was influenced negatively due to ion-exchange mechanism. Further, the behavior of acidic, basic and neutral solutes is discussed using various additives at both basic and acidic pH for all above stated columns. The robustness of retention times after pH change from basic to acidic was also evaluated. The new CSH stationary phases represent an interesting selectivity tool preferably for separation of basic compounds. PMID:22483883

  5. Solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatographic quantitation of quinfamide in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Morales, J M; Jung, C H; Alarcón, A; Barreda, A

    2000-09-15

    This paper describes a high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the assay of quinfamide and its main metabolite, 1-(dichloroacetyl)-1,2,3,4,-tetrahydro-6-quinolinol, in plasma, urine and feces. It requires 1 ml of biological fluid, an extraction using Sep-Pack cartridges and acetonitrile for drug elution. Analysis was performed on a CN column (5 microm) using water-acetonitrile-methanol (40:50:10) as a mobile phase at 269 nm. Results showed that the assay was linear in the range between 0.08 and 2.0 microg/ml. The limit of quantitation was 0.08 microg/ml. Maximum assay coefficient of variation was 14%. Recovery obtained in plasma, urine and feces ranged from 82% to 98%.

  6. Interaction of acetonitrile with the surfaces of amorphous and crystalline ice

    SciTech Connect

    Schaff, J.E.; Roberts, J.T.

    1999-10-12

    The adsorption of acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN) on ultrathin films of ice under ultrahigh vacuum was investigated with temperature-programmed desorption ass spectrometry (TPD) and Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FTIRAS). Two types of film were studied, amorphous and crystalline. On the amorphous films, two sates of adsorbed acetonitrile were observed by TPD and FTIRAS. One of the states is attributed to acetonitrile that is hydrogen bonded to agree OH group at the ice surface; the other state is assigned to acetonitrile that is purely physiorbed. Evidence for the hydrogen-bonded state is two-fold. First, there is a large kinetic isotope effect for desorption from H{sub 2}O-and D{sub 2}O-ice: the desorption temperatures from ice-h{sub 2} and ice-d{sub 2} are {approximately}161 and {approximately}176 K, respectively. Second, the C{triple{underscore}bond}N stretching frequency (2,265 cm{sup {minus}1}) is 16 cm{sup {minus}1} is greater than that of physisorbed acetonitrile, and it is roughly equal to that of acetonitrile which is hydrogen bonded to an OH group at the air-liquid water interface. On the crystalline films, there is no evidence for a hydrogen-bonded state in the TPD spectra. The FTIRAS spectra do show that some hydrogen-bonded acetonitrile is present but at a maximum coverage that is roughly one-sixth of that on the amorphous surface. The difference between the amorphous and crystalline surfaces cannot be attributed to a difference n surface areas. Rather, this work provides additional evidence that the surface chemical properties of amorphous ice are different from those of crystalline ice.

  7. Applicability of the Remote Mobile Emplacement Package (RMEP) design as a mobility aid for proposed post-84 Mars missions, phase O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The results of study to determine the applicability of the Remote Mobile Emplacement Package (RMEP) design concept as a mobility aid for the proposed post-'84 Mars missions are presented. The RMEP wheel and mobility subsystem parameters: wheel tire size, weight, stowed volume, and environmental effects; obstacle negotiation; reliability and wear; motor and drive train; and electrical power demand were reviewed. Results indicated that: (1) the basic RMEP wheel design would be satisfactory, with additional attention to heating, side loading, tread wear and ultraviolet radiation protection; (2) motor and drive train power requirements on Mars would be less than on Earth; and (3) the mobility electrical power requirements would be small enough to offer the option of operating the Mars mini rover untethered. Payload power required for certain sampling functions would preclude the use of battery power for these missions. Hazard avoidance and reverse direction maneuvers are discussed. Limited examination of vehicle payload integration and thermal design was made, pending establishment of a baseline vehicle/payload design.

  8. Solvent viscosity mismatch between the solute plug and the mobile phase: Considerations in the applications of two-dimensional HPLC

    SciTech Connect

    Shalliker, R. Andrew; Guiochon, Georges A

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the nature of viscosity contrast induced flow instabilities is an important aspect in the design of two-dimensional HPLC separations. When the viscosity contrast between the sample plug and the mobile phase is sufficiently large, the phenomenon known as viscous fingering can be induced. Viscous fingering is a flow instability phenomenon that occurs at the interface between two fluids with different viscosities. In liquid chromatography, viscous fingering results in the solute band undergoing a change in form as it enters into the chromatography column. Moreover, even in the absence of viscous fingering, band shapes change shape at low viscosity contrasts. These changes can result in a noticeable change in separation performance, with the result depending on whether the solvent pushing the solute plug has a higher or lower viscosity than the solute plug. These viscosity induced changes become more important as the solute injection volume increases and hence understanding the process becomes critical in the implementation of multidimensional HPLC techniques, since in these techniques the sample injection plug into the second dimension is an order of magnitude greater than in one-dimensional HPLC. This review article assesses the current understanding of the viscosity contrast induced processes as they relate to liquid chromatographic separation behaviour.

  9. Detection of cocaine and its metabolites in urine using solid phase extraction-ion mobility spectrometry with alternating least squares.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao; O'Donnell, Ryan M; Harrington, Peter B

    2009-08-10

    A reliable, alternative screening method for detection of cocaine and its metabolites, benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene in urine is demonstrated using solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled with ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Data analysis with alternating least squares (ALS) is used to model IMS spectral datasets and separate the reactant ion peak from the product ion peaks. IMS has been used as a screening device for drug and explosive detection for many years. It has the advantages of atmospheric pressure operation, simple sample preparation, portability, fast analysis, and high sensitivity when compared to similar methods. Coupling SPE with IMS decreases the detection limits of drug metabolites in urine while removing salts and other polar compounds that suppress ionization during the measurement. The IMS analysis time in this experiment is 20s, much shorter than traditional chromatographic analysis. The application of ALS further increases the sensitivity and selectivity of this method. The detection limits of benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene are 10 ng/mL and 4 ng/mL, respectively. Commercial adulteration of urine specimens does not influence the ability to detect cocaine metabolites after sampling the urine with SPE. This method provides forensic chemists a viable approach for fast and simple drug screening. PMID:19457629

  10. Simultaneous Determination of Diosmin and Hesperidin in Pharmaceuticals by RPLC using Ionic Liquids as Mobile Phase Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Szymański, Marcin; Młynarek, Daria; Szymański, Arkadiusz; Matławska, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Diosmin and hesperidin are natural flavonoid glycosides found in various plant materials, mainly in citrus fruits in different concentrations. Diosmin for pharmaceutical use is obtained mainly semi-synthetically from hesperidin. Hesperidin often accompanies diosmin as a natural impurity in different pharmaceutical formulations; therefore, a simple, fast and precise method for the simultaneous assay of diosmin and hesperidin in pharmaceutical formulations has been developed to control their contents. Chromatographic resolution was performed using a column with C-18 packing and the following mobile phase: methanol/water (45:55, v/v) with 0.025% added didecyldimethylammonium lactate, which significantly affects retention, shortening analysis time and having a positive impact on the symmetry of resulting chromatographic peaks. The method shows linearity between 2.5 and 100 μg/mL, high repeatability (0.39 and 0.42% for diosmin and hesperidin, respectively) and accuracy of 96 to 102% for both the assayed compounds. Intraday and interday precision of the new method were less than RSD% 1, 2. The limit of detection of the assayed compounds is 2.5 and 1.2 μg/mL for diosmin and hesperidin, respectively. The method was tested on several pharmaceutical products available in Poland. PMID:27610154

  11. Proton-driven amide bond-cleavage pathways of gas-phase peptide ions lacking mobile protons.

    PubMed

    Bythell, Benjamin J; Suhai, Sándor; Somogyi, Arpád; Paizs, Béla

    2009-10-01

    The mobile proton model (Dongre, A. R., Jones, J. L., Somogyi, A. and Wysocki, V. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1996, 118 , 8365-8374) of peptide fragmentation states that the ionizing protons play a critical role in the gas-phase fragmentation of protonated peptides upon collision-induced dissociation (CID). The model distinguishes two classes of peptide ions, those with or without easily mobilizable protons. For the former class mild excitation leads to proton transfer reactions which populate amide nitrogen protonation sites. This enables facile amide bond cleavage and thus the formation of b and y sequence ions. In contrast, the latter class of peptide ions contains strongly basic functionalities which sequester the ionizing protons, thereby often hindering formation of sequence ions. Here we describe the proton-driven amide bond cleavages necessary to produce b and y ions from peptide ions lacking easily mobilizable protons. We show that this important class of peptide ions fragments by different means from those with easily mobilizable protons. We present three new amide bond cleavage mechanisms which involve salt-bridge, anhydride, and imine enol intermediates, respectively. All three new mechanisms are less energetically demanding than the classical oxazolone b(n)-y(m) pathway. These mechanisms offer an explanation for the formation of b and y ions from peptide ions with sequestered ionizing protons which are routinely fragmented in large-scale proteomics experiments.

  12. Fast detection of methyl tert-butyl ether from water using solid phase microextraction and ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nousiainen, Marjaana; Holopainen, Sanna; Puton, Jaroslaw; Sillanpää, Mika

    2011-05-15

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is commonly used as chemical additive to increase oxygen content and octane rating of reformulated gasoline. Despite its impact on enhancing cleaner combustion of gasoline, MTBE poses a threat to surface and ground water when gasoline is released into the environment. Methods for onsite analysis of MTBE in water samples are also needed. A less common technique for MTBE detection from water is ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). We describe a method for fast sampling and screening of MTBE from water by solid phase microextraction (SPME) and IMS. MTBE is adsorbed from the head space of a sample to the coating of SPME fiber. The interface containing a heated sample chamber, which couples SPME and IMS, was constructed and the SPME fiber was introduced into the sample chamber for thermal desorption and IMS detection of MTBE vapors. The demonstrated SPME-IMS method proved to be a straightforward method for the detection of trace quantities of MTBE from waters including surface and ground water. We determined the relative standard deviation of 8.3% and detection limit of 5 mg L(-1) for MTBE. Because of short sampling, desorption, and detection times, the described configuration of combined SPME and IMS is a feasible method for the detection of hazardous substances from environmental matrices.

  13. Gas-phase microsolvation of ubiquitin: investigation of crown ether complexation sites using ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Göth, Melanie; Lermyte, Frederik; Schmitt, Xiao Jakob; Warnke, Stephan; von Helden, Gert; Sobott, Frank; Pagel, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    In this study the gas-phase structure of ubiquitin and its lysine-to-arginine mutants was investigated using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and electron transfer dissociation-mass spectrometry (ETD-MS). Crown ether molecules were attached to positive charge sites of the proteins and the resulting non-covalent complexes were analysed. Collision induced dissociation (CID) experiments revealed relative energy differences between the wild type and the mutant crown-ether complexes. ETD-MS experiments were performed to identify the crown ether binding sites. Although not all of the binding sites could be revealed, the data confirm that the first crown ether is able to bind to the N-terminus. IM-MS experiments show a more compact structure for specific charge states of wild type ubiquitin when crown ethers are attached. However, data on ubiquitin mutants reveal that only specific lysine residues contribute to the effect of charge microsolvation. A compaction is only observed for one of the investigated mutants, in which the lysine has no proximate interaction partner. On the other hand when the lysine residues are involved in salt bridges, attachment of crown ethers has little effect on the structure. PMID:27494002

  14. A closure-independent Generalized Roe solver for free-surface, two-phase flows over mobile bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosatti, Giorgio; Begnudelli, Lorenzo

    2013-12-01

    Several different natural phenomena can be studied in the framework of free-surface, two-phase flows over mobile bed. Mathematically, they can be described by the same set of highly nonlinear, hyperbolic nonconservative PDEs but they differ in the possible algebraic closure relations. These affect significantly the relevant eigenvalues and consequently, all finite-volume numerical methods based on upwind Godunov-type fluxes. In this work the Generalized Roe solver, introduced in [29] for the case of a specific closure, is reformulated in a complete closure-independent way. This gives the solver a quite general applicability to the class of problems previously mentioned. Moreover, the new method maintains all the desirable features shown by the original one: full two-dimensionality and exact well-balanceness. This result is made possible thanks to the development of a novel Multiple Averages (MAs) approach that allows a straightforward determination of the matrices required by the solver. Several tests show the capabilities of the proposed numerical strategy.

  15. Simultaneous Determination of Diosmin and Hesperidin in Pharmaceuticals by RPLC using Ionic Liquids as Mobile Phase Modifiers.

    PubMed

    Szymański, Marcin; Młynarek, Daria; Szymański, Arkadiusz; Matławska, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Diosmin and hesperidin are natural flavonoid glycosides found in various plant materials, mainly in citrus fruits in different concentrations. Diosmin for pharmaceutical use is obtained mainly semi-synthetically from hesperidin. Hesperidin often accompanies diosmin as a natural impurity in different pharmaceutical formulations; therefore, a simple, fast and precise method for the simultaneous assay of diosmin and hesperidin in pharmaceutical formulations has been developed to control their contents. Chromatographic resolution was performed using a column with C-18 packing and the following mobile phase: methanol/water (45:55, v/v) with 0.025% added didecyldimethylammonium lactate, which significantly affects retention, shortening analysis time and having a positive impact on the symmetry of resulting chromatographic peaks. The method shows linearity between 2.5 and 100 μg/mL, high repeatability (0.39 and 0.42% for diosmin and hesperidin, respectively) and accuracy of 96 to 102% for both the assayed compounds. Intraday and interday precision of the new method were less than RSD% 1, 2. The limit of detection of the assayed compounds is 2.5 and 1.2 μg/mL for diosmin and hesperidin, respectively. The method was tested on several pharmaceutical products available in Poland. PMID:27610154

  16. Selection of two reliable parameters to evaluate the impact of the mobile-phase composition on capillary electrochromatography performance with monolithic and particle-packed capillary columns.

    PubMed

    Progent, Frédéric; Augustin, Violaine; Tran, N Thuy; Descroix, Stéphanie; Taverna, Myriam

    2006-02-01

    Different models have been described in the literature to evaluate the total porosity of CEC columns: gravimetric, flow as well as conductivity-based methods. In this study, these models have been compared for two kinds of CEC columns: two mixed-mode silica particle stationary phases and different monolithic columns (acrylate or polystyrene divinylbenzene-based). The total porosities measured from the conductivity-based methods were lower than the total column porosities obtained by gravimetric or flow methods for all the investigated columns while the wide distribution of observed values shows that conductivity-based methods discriminate columns more efficiently with very different properties. We propose a conductivity-based method taking into account the actual length proposed by Horvath, to evaluate what we call an "actual electrokinetic" porosity (AEP). This parameter, based on electrokinetic theory only, affords the most consistent evaluation of porosity under experimental CEC conditions for the packed- and acrylate-based monolithic columns. To illustrate the potential of AEP and actual EOF for the estimation of the performances of a CEC system (stationary and mobile phases) we studied the influence of the mobile-phase composition on these parameters for CEC separations with an ammonium embedded packed stationary phase. The AEP and the actual electroosmotic mobility should allow a better understanding of the perfusive EOF and stationary-phase wettability. For neutral compounds (substituted phenols), AEP evaluation allowed us to predict the mobile-phase conditions able to enhance the efficiency while both AEP and actual EOF had to be considered in the case of peptide analysis.

  17. Enantioselective separation of racemic secondary amines on a chiral crown ether-based liquid chromatography stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Steffeck, Robert J; Zelechonok, Yury; Gahm, Kyung H

    2002-02-22

    The first general enantioselective separation of racemic secondary amines on a crown ether-based liquid chromatography chiral stationary phase (CSP) is presented. The CSP is based on (+)- or (-)-(18-crown-6)-2,3,11,12-tetracarboxylic acid covalently bonded to silica gel. A mobile phase containing methanol, acetonitrile, triethylamine and acetic acid was employed in these separations of secondary amines with crown ether CSPs. The separation mechanism is believed to be the secondary amine forming a complex which includes crown ether coordination and electrostatic interaction of the positively charged amine with a carboxylate anion of the immobilized crown ether.

  18. Thermodynamics of the sorption of water-soluble vitamins in reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirkin, V. A.; Karpov, S. I.; Selemenev, V. F.

    2012-12-01

    The thermodynamics of the sorption of certain water-soluble vitamins on a C18 reverse phase from water-acetonitrile solutions of different compositions is studied. The thermodynamic characteristics of the investigated chromatographic systems are calculated. The dependences of standard molar enthalpy and changes in entropy when the sorbate transfers from the bulk solution to the surface layer on the concentration of the organic component in the mobile phase are analyzed. The boundaries for applying the main retention models describing the sorption of the investigated compounds are discussed.

  19. [Effect of Acetonitrile and n-hexane on the Immunoassay of Environmental Representative Pollutants].

    PubMed

    Lou, Xue-ning; Zhou, Li-ping; Song, Dan; Yang, Rong; Long, Feng

    2016-01-15

    Based on indirect competitive immunoassay mechanism, bisphenol A (BPA) was detected by the evanescent wave all-fiber immunosensor previously developed with the detection limit of 0.2 microg x L(-1) and the linear detection range of 0.3-33.4 microg x L(-1). The effects of two commonly used organic solvents, including acetonitrile and n-hexane, on the immunosensing assay of BPA were investigated. The influence mechanism of organic solvents on immunosensing assay was discussed. The experimental results showed that the effect of n-hexane on immunosensing assay was negligible even at a high concentration of up to 10%, whereas the effect of acetonitrile on the immunosensing assay was relatively great. BPA could be detected in solutions containing a low concentration of acetonitrile. However, the specific binding reaction between antibody and antigen in homogeneous solution was completely inhibited by high concentrations of acetonitrile, and the quantitative analysis of BPA was not achieved. This might result from the changes of antibody conformation or binding capability between antibody and antigen because acetonitrile replaced a part of the water molecules on the antibody surface. PMID:27078982

  20. Fourier transform infrared assay of membrane lipids immobilized to silica: leaching and stability of immobilized artificial membrane-bonded phases.

    PubMed

    Markovich, R J; Stevens, J M; Pidgeon, C

    1989-11-01

    A nondestructive, sensitive assay to monitor the hydrocarbon content of silica-based chromatography particles has been developed. The assay requires a microscope accessory interfaced with a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. For determining hydrocarbon content, undiluted alkyl-silica-bonded phases were pressed into a thin wafer. Hydrocarbon content was quantitated using the integrated hydrocarbon band intensity between 2995 and 2825 cm-1 [i.e., band area C-H] and the integrated silica oxide band intensity between 1945 and 1780 cm-1 [i.e., band area Si-O]. Plotting the [band area C-H]/[band area Si-O] ratio vs the carbon content determined by elemental analysis gave a correlation coefficient of r = 0.997. The FTIR assay was validated on 5-, 7-, and 12-microns silica particles using three different immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) silica-bonded phases. The utility of the FTIR assay in determining hydrocarbon content was demonstrated by evaluating hydrocarbon leaching from IAM phases exposed to mobile-phase solvents. The ability of organic solvents to leach hydrocarbon from IAM phases containing phosphatidylcholine (PC) as the immobilized ligand was chloroform greater than ethanol approximately methanol greater than ethyl acetate greater than methylene chloride greater than acetonitrile greater than acetone. Acetone and acetonitrile cause very little hydrocarbon leaching from HPLC-IAM.PC columns. When challenged with different mobile phases, IAM.PC columns perfused with mobile phase are more stable than IAM.PC-bonded phases stirred in mobile phases. IAM.PC contains lecithin linked to silica by amide bonds.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2558589

  1. Study of cellulase enzymes self-assembly in aqueous-acetonitrile solvent: Viscosity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaouar, N.; Aschi, A.; Belbahri, L.; Trabelsi, S.; Gharbi, A.

    2009-11-01

    The present study extends the viscosity measurements performed by Ghaouar et al. [Physica B, submitted for publication.] to study the conformational change of the cellulase enzymes in aqueous-acetonitrile mixture. We aim to investigate: (i) the denaturation process by measuring the specific viscosity for temperatures varying between 25 and 65 °C and acetonitrile concentrations between 0% and 50%, (ii) the enzyme-enzyme interaction by calculating the Huggins coefficient and (iii) the enzyme sizes by following the hydrodynamic radius for various temperatures. The precipitation of cellulases versus acetonitrile concentration is also considered. We show from all physical quantities measured in this work that the precipitation and the denaturation processes of cellulase enzymes exist together.

  2. Analysis of nucleic acids by capillary ion-pair reversed-phase HPLC coupled to negative-ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huber, C G; Krajete, A

    1999-09-01

    Ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography was successfully coupled to negative-ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry by using 60 × 0.20 mm i.d. capillary columns packed with 2.3-μm micropellicular, octadecylated poly(styrene/divinylbenzene) particles as stationary phase and gradients of acetonitrile in 50 mM aqueous triethylammonium bicarbonate as mobile phase. Systematic variation of the eluent composition, such as concentration of ion-pair reagent, anion in the ion-pair reagent, solution pH, and acetonitrile concentration led to the conclusion that most parameters have opposite effects on chromatographic and mass spectrometric performances. The use of acetonitrile as sheath liquid enabled the rapid and highly efficient separation and detection of phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated oligonucleotides ranging in size from 8 to 40 nucleotides. High-quality full-scan mass spectra showing little cation adduction were acquired from which the molecular masses of the separated oligonucleotides were calculated with an accuracy of 0.011%. With calibration curves being linear over at least 2 orders of magnitude, the lower limits of detection for a oligodeoxythymidine 16-mer were 104 fmol with full scan and 710 amol with selected-ion-monitoring data acquisition. The potential of ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was demonstrated for mixed-sequence oligomers by the characterization of a reaction mixture from solid-phase synthesis of a 40-mer oligonucleotide.

  3. Defect-mediated relaxation in the random tiling phase of a binary mixture: Birth, death and mobility of an atomic zipper

    SciTech Connect

    Tondl, Elisabeth; Ramsay, Malcolm; Harrowell, Peter; Widmer-Cooper, Asaph

    2014-03-14

    This paper describes the mechanism of defect-mediated relaxation in a dodecagonal square-triangle random tiling phase exhibited by a simulated binary mixture of soft discs in 2D. We examine the internal transitions within the elementary mobile defect (christened the “zipper”) that allow it to move, as well as the mechanisms by which the zipper is created and annihilated. The structural relaxation of the random tiling phase is quantified and we show that this relaxation is well described by a model based on the distribution of waiting times for each atom to be visited by the diffusing zipper. This system, representing one of the few instances where a well defined mobile defect is capable of structural relaxation, can provide a valuable test case for general theories of relaxation in complex and disordered materials.

  4. Defect-mediated relaxation in the random tiling phase of a binary mixture: Birth, death and mobility of an atomic zipper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tondl, Elisabeth; Ramsay, Malcolm; Harrowell, Peter; Widmer-Cooper, Asaph

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the mechanism of defect-mediated relaxation in a dodecagonal square-triangle random tiling phase exhibited by a simulated binary mixture of soft discs in 2D. We examine the internal transitions within the elementary mobile defect (christened the "zipper") that allow it to move, as well as the mechanisms by which the zipper is created and annihilated. The structural relaxation of the random tiling phase is quantified and we show that this relaxation is well described by a model based on the distribution of waiting times for each atom to be visited by the diffusing zipper. This system, representing one of the few instances where a well defined mobile defect is capable of structural relaxation, can provide a valuable test case for general theories of relaxation in complex and disordered materials.

  5. [The resolution of racemic sec-phenethyl alcohol on cellulose tribenzoate-based CSP: influence of different alcohols in the mobile phase].

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Lü, S; Gao, P; Li, S

    1999-07-01

    Several primary and secondary alcohols (ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol) were used as the mobile phase components separately, to investigate their effects on the capacity factor and stereoselectivity of sec-phenethyl alcohol enantiomers on cellulose tribenzoate-based CSP. The chiral recognition mechanism for the enantiomeric aromatic alcohols studied may involve: (1) the aromatic portion of the solute may insert into a chiral cavity of the CSP through a hydrogen bonding interaction between the solute's alcoholic hydrogen and the ester carbonyl group on the CSP; (2) the mobile phase modifiers (various alcohols) compete with the solutes for chiral, as well as achiral, binding sites on the CSP; (3) the structure of the modifier has some effect on stereoselectivity through an alteration of the steric environment of the chiral cavity.

  6. The effect of pressure and mobile phase velocity on the retention properties of small analytes and large biomolecules in ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Szabolcs; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; McCalley, David V; Guillarme, Davy

    2012-12-28

    A possible complication of ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) is related to the effect of pressure and mobile phase velocity on the retention properties of the analytes. In the present work, numerous model compounds have been selected including small molecules, peptides, and proteins (such as monoclonal antibodies). Two instrumental setups were considered to attain elevated pressure drops, firstly the use of a post-column restrictor capillary at low mobile phase flow rate (pure effect of pressure) and secondly the increase of mobile phase flow rate without restrictor (i.e. a combined effect of pressure and frictional heating). In both conditions, the goal was to assess differences in retention behaviour, depending on the type or character of the analyte. An important conclusion is that the effect of pressure and mobile phase velocity on retention varied in proportion with the size of the molecule and in some cases showed very different behaviour. In isocratic mode, the pure effect of pressure (experiments with a post-column restrictor capillary) induces an increase in retention by 25-100% on small molecules (MW<300 g/mol), 150% for peptides (~1.3 kDa), 800% for insulin (~6 kDa) and up to >3000% for myoglobin (~17 kDa) for an increase in pressure from 100 bar up to 1100 bar. The important effect observed for the isocratic elution of proteins is probably related to conformational changes of the protein in addition to the effect of molecular size. Working in gradient elution mode, the pressure related effects on retention were found to be less pronounced but still present (an increase of apparent retention factor between 0.2 and 2.5 was observed).

  7. Pressure, temperature and density drops along supercritical fluid chromatography columns in different thermal environments. III. Mixtures of carbon dioxide and methanol as the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Poe, Donald P; Veit, Devon; Ranger, Megan; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Tarafder, Abhijit; Guiochon, Georges

    2014-01-01

    The pressure, temperature and density drops along SFC columns eluted with a CO2/methanol mobile phase were measured and compared with theoretical values. For columns packed with 3- and 5-μm particles the pressure and temperature drops were measured using a mobile phase of 95% CO2 and 5% methanol at a flow rate of 5mL/min, at temperatures from 20 to 100°C, and outlet pressures from 80 to 300bar. The density drop was calculated based on the temperature and pressure at the column inlet and outlet. The columns were suspended in a circulating air bath, either bare or covered with foam insulation. The experimental measurements were compared to theoretical results obtained by numerical simulation. For the convective air condition at outlet pressures above 100bar the average difference between the experimental and calculated temperature drops and pressure drops were 0.1°C and 0.7% for the bare 3-μm column, respectively, and were 0.6°C and 4.1% for the insulated column. The observed temperature drops for the insulated columns are consistent with those predicted by the Joule-Thomson coefficients for isenthalpic expansion. The dependence of the temperature and the pressure drops on the Joule-Thomson coefficient and kinematic viscosity are described for carbon dioxide mobile phases containing up to 20% methanol.

  8. [Intersection point rule for the retention value with mobile phase composition and boiling point of the homologues and chlorobenzenes in soil leaching column chromatography].

    PubMed

    Xu, F; Liang, X; Lin, B; Su, F

    1999-03-01

    Based on the linear retention equation of the logarithm of the capacity factor (logk') vs. the methanol volume fraction (psi) of aqueous binary mobile phase in soil leaching column chromatography, the intersection point rule for the logk' of homologues and weak polar chlorobenzenes, with psi, as well as with boiling point, has been derived due to existence of the similar interactions among solutes of the same series, stationary phase (soil) and eluent (methanol-water). These rules were testified by experimental data of homologues (n-alkylbenzenes, methylbenzenes) and weak polar chlorobenzenes.

  9. Simultaneous determination of fangchinoline and tetrandrine in Stephania tetrandra S. Moore by using 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids as the RP-HPLC mobile phase additives.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan; Sun, Ailing; Liu, Renmin; Zhang, Yongqing

    2013-03-12

    A reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method for simultaneous determination of fangchinoline (FAN) and tetrandrine (TET) in Stephania tetrandra S. Moore was established by using 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate as the mobile phase additives in this paper. Four types of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) were used as additives of the mobile phase to separate FAN and TET by RP-HPLC. The effects of the length of the alkyl group on the imidazolium ring and its counterion, the concentrations of IL and the pH of the mobile phase, which influenced the chromatographic behaviors of FAN and TET, were investigated in detail. The linearity, sensitivity, accuracy and repeatability of the proposed method were also investigated. The probable mechanism of the separation with ILs as the mobile phase additives was explored and discussed. PMID:23452799

  10. Effect of (+) or (-) camphorsulfonic acid additives to the mobile phase on enantioseparations of some basic drugs on a Chiralcel OD column.

    PubMed

    Bielejewska, A; Duszczyk, K; Zukowski, J

    2005-08-12

    This paper describes the modification of Chiralcel OD column properties by adsorption of (+) or (-) camphorsulfonic acids (CSAs) used as additives to the mobile phase. The effects on retention, selectivity and efficiency, of adsorption of (+) and (-) CSAs on a Chiralcel OD column were examined. Racemic anti-histamines, anti-malarial and anti-fungal drugs, namely doxylamine, miconazole, sulconazole, hydroxyzine, homochlorcyclizine, methoxypheniramine, cyclopentolate and ephedrine were investigated as chiral tested compounds. All the studied drugs have an amino nitrogen atom in their structure. Only the enantioseparation of ephedrine enantiomers with CSAs alone was studied on the Nucleosil stationary phase, and these results were compared with the results obtained on the Chiralcel OD phase. A new dynamically generated stationary phase, with very good enantioseparation ability towards the studied compounds, was obtained by the adsorption of (-) CSA on the Chiralcel OD column. PMID:16078699

  11. A diffuse interface model for two-phase incompressible flows with non-local interactions and non-constant mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigeri, Sergio; Grasselli, Maurizio; Rocca, Elisabetta

    2015-05-01

    We consider a diffuse interface model for incompressible isothermal mixtures of two immiscible fluids with matched constant densities. This model consists of the Navier-Stokes system coupled with a convective non-local Cahn-Hilliard equation with non-constant mobility. We first prove the existence of a global weak solution in the case of non-degenerate mobilities and regular potentials of polynomial growth. Then we extend the result to degenerate mobilities and singular (e.g. logarithmic) potentials. In the latter case we also establish the existence of a global attractor in dimension two. Using a similar technique, we show that there is a global attractor for the convective non-local Cahn-Hilliard equation with degenerate mobility and singular potential in dimension three.

  12. A reversed-phase HPLC-UV method developed and validated for simultaneous quantification of six alkaloids from Nicotiana spp.

    PubMed

    Moghbel, Nahid; Ryu, BoMi; Steadman, Kathryn J

    2015-08-01

    A reversed-phase HPLC-UV method was developed, optimized, and validated for the separation and quantitation of six target alkaloids from leaves of Nicotiana species (nicotine, nornicotine, anatabine, anabasine, myosmine, and cotinine). A bidentate reversed-phase C18 column was used as stationary phase and an alkaline ammonium formate buffer and acetonitrile as mobile phase. The alkaloids were well separated in a short run time of 13min with mobile phase pH 10.5 and a small gradient of 9-13% acetonitrile, and detected using UV at 260nm. Peak parameters were acceptable for all six closely related alkaloids. The proposed method has enough linearity with correlation coefficient >0.999 within the investigated range for all tested alkaloids. Satisfactory precision was achieved for both intra- and inter-day assay, with RSD less than 2% for all alkaloid standards. Reproducibility was also within the acceptable range of RSD <2%. Limit of detection was 1.6μg/mL for nicotine and below 1μg/mL for all other alkaloids. The limit of quantification was 2.8 and 4.8μg/mL for nornicotine and nicotine respectively, and below 2μg/mL for all other alkaloids. The method was successfully applied for simultaneous analysis of alkaloids in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana.

  13. Why a diaminopyrrolic tripodal receptor binds mannosides in acetonitrile but not in water?

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Viçosa, Diogo; Francesconi, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Summary Intermolecular interactions involving carbohydrates and their natural receptors play important roles in several biological processes. The development of synthetic receptors is very useful to study these recognition processes. Recently, it was synthetized a diaminopyrrolic tripodal receptor that is selective for mannosides, which are obtained from mannose, a sugar with significant relevance in living systems. However, this receptor is significantly more active in acetonitrile than in water. In this work, we performed several molecular dynamics and constant-pH molecular dynamics simulations in acetonitrile and water to evaluate the conformational space of the receptor and to understand the molecular detail of the receptor–mannoside interaction. The protonation states sampled by the receptor show that the positive charges are always as distant as possible in order to avoid large intramolecular repulsions. Moreover, the conformational space of the receptor is very similar in water above pH 4.0 and in acetonitrile. From the simulations with the mannoside, we observe that the interactions are more specific in acetonitrile (mainly hydrogen bonds) than in water (mainly hydrophobic). Our results suggest that the readiness of the receptor to bind mannoside is not significantly affected in water (above pH 4.0). Probably, the hydrogen bond network that is formed in acetonitrile (which is weaker in water) is the main reason for the higher activity in this solvent. This work also presents a new implementation of the stochastic titration constant-pH molecular dynamics method to a synthetic receptor of sugars and attests its ability to describe the protonation/conformation coupling in these molecules. PMID:25161708

  14. Design of Experiment (DOE) Utilization to Develop a Simple and Robust Reversed-Phase HPLC Technique for Related Substances’ Estimation of Omeprazole Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Manranjan, Vayeda Chintan; Yadav, Devendra Singh; Jogia, Hitesh Amrutlal; Chauhan, Praful Lalitkumar

    2013-01-01

    A simple, fast, and sensitive reversed-phase HPLC method with UV detection was developed for the quantitation of omeprazole and its eleven related compounds (impurities) in pharmaceutical formulation using the Thermo Accucore C–18 (50 mm × 4.6 mm, 2.6 μm) column. The separation among all the compounds was achieved with a flow rate of 0.8 mL min−1 employing a gradient program of mobile phase A [0.08 M glycine buffer pH 9.0: acetonitrile; 95:05 (v/v)] and mobile phase B [acetonitrile: methanol; 65:35 (v/v)]. The chromatographic detection was carried out at a wavelength of 305 nm. The method was validated for specificity, linearity, and recovery. The huskiness of the method was determined prior to validation using the Design of Experiments (DOE). The ANOVA analysis of DOE with a 95% confidence interval (CI) confirmed the buffer pH of mobile phase A (p <0.0001) and column temperature (p<0.0001) as significant Critical Method Parameters (CMPs). PMID:24482772

  15. Liquid phase separation of proteins based on electrophoretic effects in an electrospray setup during sample introduction into a gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analyzer (CE–GEMMA/CE–ES–DMA)

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Victor U.; Kerul, Lukas; Kallinger, Peter; Szymanski, Wladyslaw W.; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle characterization is gaining importance in food technology, biotechnology, medicine, and pharmaceutical industry. An instrument to determine particle electrophoretic mobility (EM) diameters in the single-digit to double-digit nanometer range receiving increased attention is the gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analyzer (GEMMA) separating electrophoretically single charged analytes in the gas-phase at ambient pressure. A fused-silica capillary is used for analyte transfer to the gas-phase by means of a nano electrospray (ES) unit. The potential of this capillary to separate analytes electrophoretically in the liquid phase due to different mobilities is, at measurement conditions recommended by the manufacturer, eliminated due to elevated pressure applied for sample introduction. Measurements are carried out upon constant feeding of analytes to the system. Under these conditions, aggregate formation is observed for samples including high amounts of non-volatile components or complex samples. This makes the EM determination of individual species sometimes difficult, if not impossible. With the current study we demonstrate that liquid phase electrophoretic separation of proteins (as exemplary analytes) occurs in the capillary (capillary zone electrophoresis, CE) of the nano ES unit of the GEMMA. This finding was consecutively applied for on-line desalting allowing EM diameter determination of analytes despite a high salt concentration within samples. The present study is to our knowledge the first report on the use of the GEMMA to determine EM diameters of analytes solubilized in the ES incompatible electrolyte solutions by the intended use of electrophoresis (in the liquid phase) during sample delivery. Results demonstrate the proof of concept of such an approach and additionally illustrate the high potential of a future on-line coupling of a capillary electrophoresis to a GEMMA instrument. PMID:25109866

  16. Effects of lipid-analog detergent solubilization on the functionality and lipidic cubic phase mobility of the Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Morales, Luis F; Morales-Pérez, Claudio L; De La Cruz-Rivera, Pamela C; Asmar-Rovira, Guillermo; Báez-Pagán, Carlos A; Quesada, Orestes; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2011-10-01

    Over the past three decades, the Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been one of the most extensively studied membrane protein systems. However, the effects of detergent solubilization on nAChR stability and function are poorly understood. The use of lipid-analog detergents for nAChR solubilization has been shown to preserve receptor stability and functionality. The present study used lipid-analog detergents from phospholipid-analog and cholesterol-analog detergent families for solubilization and affinity purification of the receptor and probed nAChR ion channel function using planar lipid bilayers (PLBs) and stability using analytical size exclusion chromatography (A-SEC) in the detergent-solubilized state. We also examined receptor mobility on the lipidic cubic phase (LCP) by measuring the nAChR mobile fraction and diffusion coefficient through fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments using lipid-analog and non-lipid-analog detergents. Our results show that it is possible to isolate stable and functional nAChRs using lipid-analog detergents, with characteristic ion channel currents in PLBs and minimal aggregation as observed in A-SEC. Furthermore, fractional mobility and diffusion coefficient values observed in FRAP experiments were similar to the values observed for these parameters in the recently LCP-crystallized β(2)-adrenergic receptor. The overall results show that phospholipid-analog detergents with 16 carbon acyl-chains support nAChR stability, functionality and LCP mobility.

  17. Advantages of the AlGaN spacer in InAlN high-electron-mobility transistors grown using metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Atsushi; Ishiguro, Tetsuro; Kotani, Junji; Tomabechi, Shuichi; Nakamura, Norikazu; Watanabe, Keiji

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate the advantages of an AlGaN spacer layer in an InAlN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT). We investigated the effects of the growth parameters of the spacer layer on electron mobility in InAlN HEMTs grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy, focusing on the surface roughness of the spacer layer and sharpness of the interface with the GaN channel layer. The electron mobility degraded, as evidenced by the formation of a graded AlGaN layer at the top of the GaN channel layer and the surface roughness of the AlN spacer layer. We believe that the short migration length of aluminum atoms is responsible for the observed degradation. An AlGaN spacer layer was employed to suppress the formation of the graded AlGaN layer and improve surface morphology. A high electron mobility of 1550 cm2 V-1 s-1 and a low sheet resistance of 211 Ω/sq were achieved for an InAlN HEMT with an AlGaN spacer layer.

  18. Practical method development for the separation of monoclonal antibodies and antibody-drug-conjugate species in hydrophobic interaction chromatography, part 1: optimization of the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Aller, Marta; Guillarme, Davy; Beck, Alain; Fekete, Szabolcs

    2016-01-25

    The goal of this work is to provide some recommendations for method development in HIC using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) as model drug candidates. The effects of gradient steepness, mobile phase pH, salt concentration and type, as well as organic modifier were evaluated for tuning selectivity and retention in HIC. Except the nature of the stationary phase, which was not discussed in this study, the most important parameter for modifying selectivity was the gradient steepness. The addition of organic solvent (up to 15% isopropanol) in the mobile phase was also found to be useful for mAbs analysis, since it could provide some changes in elution order, in some cases. On the contrary, isopropanol was not beneficial with ADCs, since the most hydrophobic DAR species (DAR6 and DAR8) cannot be eluted from the stationary phase under these conditions. This study also illustrates the possibility to perform HIC method development using optimization software, such as Drylab. The optimum conditions suggested by the software were tested using therapeutic mAbs and commercial cysteine linked ADC (brentuximab-vedotin) and the average retention time errors between predicted and experimental retention times were ∼ 1%.

  19. The hydrophilicity vs. ion interaction selectivity plot revisited: The effect of mobile phase pH and buffer concentration on hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography selectivity behavior.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Chad D; Gu, Xinyun; Lucy, Charles A

    2016-08-01

    This work systematically investigates the selectivity changes on many HILIC phases from w(w)pH 3.7-6.8, at 5 and 25mM buffer concentrations. Hydrophilicity (kcytosine/kuracil) vs. ion interaction (kBTMA/kuracil) selectivity plots developed by Ibrahim et al. (J. Chromatogr. A 1260 (2012) 126-131) are used to investigate the effect of mobile phase changes on the selectivity of 18 HILIC columns from various classes. "Selectivity change plots" focus on the change in hydrophilicity and ion interaction that the columns exhibit upon changing mobile phase conditions. In general, the selectivity behavior of most HILIC columns is dominated by silanol activity. Minimal changes in selectivity are observed upon changing pH between w(w)pH 5 and 6.8. However, a reduction in ionic interaction is observed when the buffer concentration is increased at w(w)pH≥5.0 due to ionic shielding. Reduction of the w(w)pH to<5.0 results in decreasing cation exchange activity due to silanol protonation. Under all eluent conditions, the majority of phases show little change in their hydrophilicity.

  20. Understanding the importance of the viscosity contrast between the sample solvent plug and the mobile phase and its potential consequences in two-dimensional high-performance liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Shalliker, R. Andrew; Guiochon, Georges A

    2009-01-01

    The effect of solvent viscosity mismatch on elution performance in reversed-phase HPLC was studied using moment analysis. Two conditions were tested: (1) the mobile phase viscosity was less than the injection plug viscosity, and (2) the mobile phase viscosity was greater than the injection plug viscosity. Under the first condition, retention time and elution performance decreased as the viscosity contrast between the mobile phase and injection plug increased. The effect on performance was more marked as the injection volume increased. A decrease in performance of 12% for compounds with retention factors up to 2.8 was apparent even when the viscosity contrast was only 0.165 cP. In the second set of conditions, elution performance was actually observed to increase, by as much as 25% for a 40 {micro}L injection, as the viscosity contrast between the mobile phase and the solute plug increased. No change in the retention factor was observed. This behaviour was attributed to the shape of an injection plug as it enters into the column, whereby a low viscosity plug permeates away from the wall when the column contains a higher viscosity mobile phase, and vice a versa for a high viscosity plug entering a low viscosity mobile phase. At no stage was either a band splitting or shoulders observed with viscosity contrasts up to 1.283 cP, as could have been expected.

  1. Effect of temperature in reversed phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Guillarme, D; Heinisch, S; Rocca, J L

    2004-10-15

    The high temperature liquid chromatography (HTLC) reveals interesting chromatographic properties but even now, it misses some theoretical aspects concerning the influence of high temperature on thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of chromatography: such a knowledge is very essential for method development. In this work, the effect of temperature on solute behavior has been studied using various stationary phases which are representative of the available thermally stable materials present on the market. The thermodynamic properties were evaluated by using different mobile phases: acetonitrile-water, methanol-water and pure water. The obtained results were discussed on the basis of both type of mobile phases and type of stationary phases. Type of mobile phase was found to play an important role on the retention of solutes. The kinetic aspect was studied at various temperatures ranging from ambient temperature to high temperature (typically from about 30 to 200 degrees C) by fitting the experimental data with the Knox equation and it was shown that the efficiency is improved significantly when the temperature is increased. In this paper, we also discussed the problem of temperature control for thermostating columns which may represent a significant source of peak broadening: by taking into account the three main parameters such as heat transfer, pressure drop and band broadening resulting from the preheating tube, suitable rules are set up for a judicious choice of the column internal diameter. PMID:15527119

  2. Retention characteristics of polybutadiene-coated zirconia and comparison to conventional bonded phases.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Carr, P W

    1996-09-01

    This paper presents a detailed study of retention on a reversed-phase material made by coating polybutadiene (PBD) on porous zirconia. PBD-coated zirconia particles with six different carbon loads (0.25-5.6% carbon by weight) were prepared by evaporatively depositing and cross-linking PBD on microparticulate porous zirconia. Retention data of a homologous series of alkylbenzenes were obtained on the six PBD phases as a function of mobile phase composition in methanol-water and acetonitrile-water mixtures from 20 to 50% (v/v). The results obtained for the phase were compared to those for conventional octadecylsilane (ODS) bonded phases, and the effect of the amount of PBD on retention was studied in detail. We find that, per amount of bonded phase, the PBD phase is less retentive than is the ODS phase, but it has comparable hydrophobic selectivity. Furthermore, the PBD phase has about the same sensitivity toward changes in mobile phase composition as does the ODS phase, and its solute shape selectivity is similar to that of a monomeric ODS phase. Finally, we conclude that retention arises primarily from a partition-like process. PMID:8794923

  3. pH effect on the mechanical performance and phase mobility of thermally processed wheat gluten-based natural polymer materials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Hoobin, Pam; Burgar, Iko; Do, My Dieu

    2006-12-01

    The mechanical properties, phase composition, and molecular motions of thermally processed wheat gluten- (WG-) based natural polymer materials were studied by mechanical testing, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The performance of the materials was mainly determined by the denaturization and cross-linking occurring in the thermal processing and the nature or amount of plasticizers used. The pH effect also played an important role in the materials when water was used as the only plasticizer (WG-w). Alkaline conditions modified the chemical structure of WG, possibly via deamidation; enhanced the thermal cross-linking of WG macromolecules to form a more stable aggregation structure; and promoted intermolecular interactions between water and all components in WG (proteins, starch, and lipid), resulting in a strong adhesion among different components and phases. The saponification of lipid under alkaline conditions also enhanced the hydrophilicity of lipid and the miscibility among lipid, water, and WG components. However, when glycerol was used with water as a plasticizer (WG-wg), the phase mobility and composition of the materials mainly depended on the content of glycerol when the water content was constant. During thermal processing under either acidic or alkaline conditions, glycerol was unlikely to thermally cross-link with WG as suggested previously. The advanced mechanical performance of the WG-wg materials was attributed to the nature of hydrogen-bonding interactions between glycerol and WG components in the materials. This caused the whole material to behave like a strengthened "cross-linked" structure at room temperature due to the low mobility of glycerol. The pH effect on phase mobility and compositions of WG-wg systems was not as significant as that for WG-w materials.

  4. Simultaneous determination of four anti-dandruff agents including octopirox in shampoo products by reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chao, L

    2001-06-01

    A method based on reversed-phase liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been developed for the simultaneous identification and quantitative determination of four anti-dandruff agents such as salicylic acid, ketoconazole, climbazole, octopirox in commercial anti-dandruff shampoo products. A symmetry C18 column (5 microm, 250 mm x 4.6 mm i.d.) was used at temperature of 35 degrees C, mobile phase with flow rate of 0.8 mL min(-1) was acetonitrile: water (containing 10 mm potassium dihydrogen phosphate, pH 4.0, adjusted with orthophosphoric acid) = 60 : 40 (V/V) and UV detection at 224 nm and 305 nm. Samples were extracted with mobile phase by stirring and ultrasonic method. The average recoveries of four anti-dandruff agents were 98.0-104.1%. The relative standard deviations for samples were 0.11-0.90%. The method is simple, rapid and reproducible. PMID:18498472

  5. Palladium-catalyzed oxidative arylalkylation of activated alkenes: dual C-H bond cleavage of an arene and acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Mu, Xin; Liu, Guosheng

    2011-12-23

    Not one but two: The title reaction proceeds through the dual C-H bond cleavage of both aniline and acetonitrile. The reaction affords a variety of cyano-bearing indolinones in excellent yield. Mechanistic studies demonstrate that this reaction involves a fast arylation of the olefin and a rate-determining C-H activation of the acetonitrile.

  6. Portable solid phase micro-extraction coupled with ion mobility spectrometry system for on-site analysis of chemical warfare agents and simulants in water samples.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Han, Qiang; Cao, Shuya; Yang, Jie; Yang, Junchao; Ding, Mingyu

    2014-01-01

    On-site analysis is an efficient approach to facilitate analysis at the location of the system under investigation as it can result in more accurate, more precise and quickly available analytical data. In our work, a novel self-made thermal desorption based interface was fabricated to couple solid-phase microextraction with ion mobility spectrometry for on-site water analysis. The portable interface can be connected with the front-end of an ion mobility spectrometer directly without other modifications. The analytical performance was evaluated via the extraction of chemical warfare agents and simulants in water samples. Several parameters including ionic strength and extraction time have been investigated in detail. The application of the developed method afforded satisfactory recoveries ranging from 72.9% to 114.4% when applied to the analysis of real water samples.

  7. Portable Solid Phase Micro-Extraction Coupled with Ion Mobility Spectrometry System for On-Site Analysis of Chemical Warfare Agents and Simulants in Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Han, Qiang; Cao, Shuya; Yang, Jie; Yang, Junchao; Ding, Mingyu

    2014-01-01

    On-site analysis is an efficient approach to facilitate analysis at the location of the system under investigation as it can result in more accurate, more precise and quickly available analytical data. In our work, a novel self-made thermal desorption based interface was fabricated to couple solid-phase microextraction with ion mobility spectrometry for on-site water analysis. The portable interface can be connected with the front-end of an ion mobility spectrometer directly without other modifications. The analytical performance was evaluated via the extraction of chemical warfare agents and simulants in water samples. Several parameters including ionic strength and extraction time have been investigated in detail. The application of the developed method afforded satisfactory recoveries ranging from 72.9% to 114.4% when applied to the analysis of real water samples. PMID:25384006

  8. Portable solid phase micro-extraction coupled with ion mobility spectrometry system for on-site analysis of chemical warfare agents and simulants in water samples.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Han, Qiang; Cao, Shuya; Yang, Jie; Yang, Junchao; Ding, Mingyu

    2014-01-01

    On-site analysis is an efficient approach to facilitate analysis at the location of the system under investigation as it can result in more accurate, more precise and quickly available analytical data. In our work, a novel self-made thermal desorption based interface was fabricated to couple solid-phase microextraction with ion mobility spectrometry for on-site water analysis. The portable interface can be connected with the front-end of an ion mobility spectrometer directly without other modifications. The analytical performance was evaluated via the extraction of chemical warfare agents and simulants in water samples. Several parameters including ionic strength and extraction time have been investigated in detail. The application of the developed method afforded satisfactory recoveries ranging from 72.9% to 114.4% when applied to the analysis of real water samples. PMID:25384006

  9. Hydration of the pyrimidine radical cation and stepwise solvation of protonated pyrimidine with water, methanol, and acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Ahmed M; Sharma, Pramod; El-Shall, M Samy; Hilal, Rifaat; Elroby, Shaaban; Aziz, Saadullah G; Alyoubi, Abdulrahman O

    2013-08-28

    Equilibrium thermochemical measurements using an ion mobility drift cell technique have been utilized to investigate the binding energies and entropy changes associated with the stepwise hydration of the biologically significant ions pyrimidine radical cation and protonated pyrimidine. The binding energy of the hydrated pyrimidine radical cation is weaker than that of the proton-bound dimer pyrimidineH(+)(H2O) consistent with the formation of a weak carbon-based CH(δ+)··OH2 hydrogen bond (11.9 kcal/mol) and a stronger NH(+)··OH2 hydrogen bond (15.6 kcal/mol), respectively. Other proton-bound dimers such as pyrimidineH(+)(CH3OH) and pyrimidineH(+)(CH3CN) exhibit higher binding energies (18.2 kcal/mol and 22.8 kcal/mol, respectively) due to the higher proton affinities and dipole moments of acetonitrile and methanol as compared to water. The measured collisional cross sections of the proton-bound dimers provide experimental-based support for the DFT calculated structures at the M06-2x/6-311++G (d,p) level. The calculations show that the hydrated pyrimidine radical cation clusters form internally solvated structures in which the water molecules are bonded to the C4N2H4(●+) ion by weak CH(δ+)··OH2 hydrogen bonds. The hydrated protonated pyrimidine clusters form externally solvated structures where the water molecules are bonded to each other and the ion is external to the water cluster. Dissociative proton transfer reactions C4N2H4(●+)(H2O)(n-1) + H2O → C4N2H3(●) + (H2O)(n)H(+) and C4N2H5(+)(H2O)(n-1) + H2O → C4N2H4 + (H2O)(n)H(+) are observed for n ≥ 4 where the reactions become thermoneutral or exothermic. The absence of the dissociative proton transfer reaction within the C4N2H5(+)(CH3CN)n clusters results from the inability of acetonitrile molecules to form extended hydrogen bonding structures such as those formed by water and methanol due to the presence of the methyl groups which block the extension of hydrogen bonding networks.

  10. Electronic structure calculations of mercury mobilization from mineral phases and photocatalytic removal from water and the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Da Pieve, Fabiana; Stankowski, Martin; Hogan, Conor

    2014-09-15

    Mercury is a hazardous environmental pollutant mobilized from natural sources, and anthropogenically contaminated and disturbed areas. Current methods to assess mobility and environmental impact are mainly based on field measurements, soil monitoring, and kinetic modelling. In order to understand in detail the extent to which different mineral sources can give rise to mercury release it is necessary to investigate the complexity at the microscopic level and the possible degradation/dissolution processes. In this work, we investigated the potential for mobilization of mercury structurally trapped in three relevant minerals occurring in hot spring environments and mining areas, namely, cinnabar (α-HgS), corderoite (α-Hg3S2Cl2), and mercuric chloride (HgCl2). Quantum chemical methods based on density functional theory as well as more sophisticated approaches are used to assess the possibility of a) direct photoreduction and formation of elemental Hg at the surface of the minerals, providing a path for ready release in the environment; and b) reductive dissolution of the minerals in the presence of solutions containing halogens. Furthermore, we study the use of TiO2 as a potential photocatalyst for decontamination of polluted waters (mainly Hg(2+)-containing species) and air (atmospheric Hg(0)). Our results partially explain the observed pathways of Hg mobilization from relevant minerals and the microscopic mechanisms behind photocatalytic removal of Hg-based pollutants. Possible sources of disagreement with observations are discussed and further improvements to our approach are suggested.

  11. Socio-Technical Dimensions of an Outdoor Mobile Learning Environment: A Three-Phase Design-Based Research Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Land, Susan M.; Zimmerman, Heather Toomey

    2015-01-01

    This design-based research project examines three iterations of Tree Investigators, a learning environment designed to support science learning outdoors at an arboretum and nature center using mobile devices (iPads). Researchers coded videorecords and artifacts created by children and parents (n = 53) to understand how both social and…

  12. 78 FR 56875 - Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Rescheduled for December 19, 2013; Notice and Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ... service support through reverse competitive bidding. The USF/ICC Transformation Order, 76 FR 73830, November 29, 2011 and 76 FR 81562, December 28, 2011, established the Mobility Fund as a universal service... program details. On March 29, 2013, the Bureaus released the Auction 902 Comment Public Notice, 78...

  13. [Simultaneous determination of captan and folpet pesticide residues in apples by solid-phase extraction and high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuju; Yu, Yanbin; Tan, Peigong; Miao, Zaijing; Wei, Yishan

    2007-03-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of captan and folpet pesticide residues in apples was developed by solid-phase extraction and high performance liquid chromatography. The sample was extracted with acetonitrile and cleaned-up by a mixture of homemade sorbent and silica gel with hexane-dichloromethane-acetonitrile (50:49: 1, v/v) as the eluent. The cleaned effects by using Florisil column, amino column, the mixed sorbent were compared, and the effect of the mixed sorbent was the best. The optimal analytical conditions were follow as: an methanol-acetonitrile-water (50: 5:45, v/v) containing 0. 1 mmol/L acetic-acetate buffer (pH 3. 80) as the mobile phase, detection at 210 nm. The method had a good linear relationship in the range of 0. 40 - 8. 00 mg/kg for captan and folpet (r > 0. 999 9). The detection limits of captan and folpet were 0. 27 mg/kg and 0. 20 mg/kg, respectively. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of retention time were no more than 0. 60%. The average recoveries of captan and folpet from the apples spiked at three levels ranged from 69. 3% - 106% and 101% - 108%, with RSD of 3. 7% - 4. 7% and 1. 3% - 5. 4%, respectively.

  14. Semiconducting tin and lead iodide perovskites with organic cations: phase transitions, high mobilities, and near-infrared photoluminescent properties.

    PubMed

    Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Malliakas, Christos D; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2013-08-01

    A broad organic-inorganic series of hybrid metal iodide perovskites with the general formulation AMI3, where A is the methylammonium (CH3NH3(+)) or formamidinium (HC(NH2)2(+)) cation and M is Sn (1 and 2) or Pb (3 and 4) are reported. The compounds have been prepared through a variety of synthetic approaches, and the nature of the resulting materials is discussed in terms of their thermal stability and optical and electronic properties. We find that the chemical and physical properties of these materials strongly depend on the preparation method. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of 1-4 classifies the compounds in the perovskite structural family. Structural phase transitions were observed and investigated by temperature-dependent single crystal X-ray diffraction in the 100-400 K range. The charge transport properties of the materials are discussed in conjunction with diffuse reflectance studies in the mid-IR region that display characteristic absorption features. Temperature-dependent studies show a strong dependence of the resistivity as a function of the crystal structure. Optical absorption measurements indicate that 1-4 behave as direct-gap semiconductors with energy band gaps distributed in the range of 1.25-1.75 eV. The compounds exhibit an intense near-IR photoluminescence (PL) emission in the 700-1000 nm range (1.1-1.7 eV) at room temperature. We show that solid solutions between the Sn and Pb compounds are readily accessible throughout the composition range. The optical properties such as energy band gap, emission intensity, and wavelength can be readily controlled as we show for the isostructural series of solid solutions CH3NH3Sn(1-x)Pb(x)I3 (5). The charge transport type in these materials was characterized by Seebeck coefficient and Hall-effect measurements. The compounds behave as p- or n-type semiconductors depending on the preparation method. The samples with the lowest carrier concentration are prepared from solution and are n-type; p

  15. Potentiometric titrations in acetonitrile-water mixtures: evaluation of aqueous ionisation constant of ketoprofen.

    PubMed

    Herrador, M Angeles; González, A Gustavo

    2002-03-11

    Non ideality of acetonitrile-water mixtures was studied from data on the excess of molar volumes and viscosities. pH and autoprotolisis constants were evaluated at the standard state of the mixed solvent from titrations of a strong acid with a strong base. In order to illustrate the evaluation of the aqueous ionisation constant of water insoluble compounds from pH titrations in ACN-water mixtures, a typical insoluble arylpropionic acid, ketoprofen, was chosen. Ketoprofen was titrated in mixtures from 10 to 70% w/w of acetonitrile against a strong base. From the titration data, the ionisation constant of ketoprofen was evaluated at the standard state of the solvent mixture (pK(a)(*)). Aqueous pK(a) was determined by extrapolation, as the intercept of the plot of pK(a)(*) versus ACN mole fraction.

  16. Structure of water + acetonitrile solutions from acoustic and positron annihilation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerie, Kazimierz; Baranowski, Andrzej; Koziol, Stan; Gliński, Jacek; Burakowski, Andrzej

    2005-03-01

    We report the results of acoustic and positron annihilation measurements in aqueous solutions of acetonitrile (CH 3CN). Hydrophobicity of the solute is discussed, as well as the possibility of describing the title system in terms of hydrophobic solvation. A new method of calculating the "ideal" positronium lifetimes is proposed, based on the mean volume of cavities (holes) in liquid structure available for positronium pseudoatom. The results are almost identical with those obtained from molar volumes using the concept of Levay et al. On the other hand, the same calculations performed using the "bubble" model of annihilation yield very different results. It seems that either acetonitrile forms with water clathrate-like hydrates of untypical architecture, or it is too weak hydrophobic agent to form clathrate-like hydrates at all. The former interpretation seems to be more probable.

  17. Structure of Aqueous Solutions of Acetonitrile Investigated by Acoustic and Positron Annihilation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerie, K.; Baranowski, A.; Koziol, S.; Burakowski, A.

    2005-05-01

    We report the results of acoustic and positron annihilation measurements in aqueous solutions of acetonitrile (CH3CN). Hydrophobicity of the solute is discussed, as well as the possibility of describing the title system in terms of hydrophobic solvation. The concept of Levay et al. of calculating the "ideal positronium lifetimes is applied, basing on the mean volume of cavities (holes) in liquid structure available for positronium pseudoatom. The same calculations performed using the Tao model of annihilation yield very different results. It can be concluded that either acetonitrile forms with water clathrate-like hydrates of untypical architecture, or it is too weak hydrophobic agent to form clathrate-like hydrates at all. The former interpretation seems to be more probable.

  18. Complex formation of Am(III) and Am(IV) with phosphate ions in acetonitrile solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Perevalov, S.A.; Lebedev, I.A.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1988-05-01

    The first dissociation constant of H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ in acetonitrile solution (K/sub 1//sup 0/ = 1.75/centered dot/10/sup /minus/13/) and the constant of formation of H(H/sub 2/PO/sub 4/)/sub 2//sup /minus// dimers (K/sub d//sup 0/ = 8/centered dot/10/sup 2/) were determined by the method of pH-potentiometry. The complex formation of Am(III) in acetonitrile solutions containing 0.05-2.0 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ was investigated by a spectrophotometric method; the stability constants of the complexes AmH/sub 2/PO/sub 4//sup 2+/ (/beta//sub 1//sup III/ = 1.0/centered dot/10/sup 12/) and Am(H/sub 2/PO/sub 4/)/sub 2//sup +/ (/beta//sub 2//sup III/ = 4.3/centered dot/10/sup 24/) were determined. The formal potentials of the couple Am/sup (IV)//Am/sup (III)/ in 0.3-1.9 M solutions of H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ in acetonitrile were measured, and the stability constant of the phosphate complex of tetravalent americium Am(H/sub 2/PO/sub 4/)/sub 3//sup +/ (/beta//sub 3//sup IV/ = 2.5/centered dot/10/sup 46/) was calculated according to the value of the shift of the potential relative to the standard.

  19. Effect of dilution on compressibility of naproxen in acetonitrile studied by ultrasonic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marczak, W.; Kowalska, T.; Bucek, M.; Piotrowski, D.; Sajewicz, M.

    2006-11-01

    Naproxen, ibuprofen, and ketoprofen are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. All of them belong to chiral 2-arylpropionic acids (2-APAs). Chiral compounds may remain in a patient's body as two antimers, even if administered as a single one, due to transenantiomerization. That is dangerous if therapeutic enantiomer has a toxic antipode. Chromatographic data suggest that solutions of S-(+)-naproxen in acetonitrile are stiffer than the pure solvent that favours oscillatory transenantiomerisation. Acoustic and volumetric studies of dilute solutions of naproxen in acetonitrile have been undertaken to verify that supposition. The molar adiabatic compressibility and volume depend linearly on the molar percent of naproxen at temperatures from 298.15 K to 313.15 K. Limiting partial compressibility of naproxen is close to zero and decreases slightly with increasing temperature. Thus, the compressibility of dilute solutions is mainly due to compressibility of acetonitrile, while naproxen is virtually incompressible. The hydrogen-bonded dimers of naproxen probably remain intact, even at infinite dilution.

  20. Comparison of methanol and acetonitrile eluents for the quantitation of chelators specific to soft-metal ions by HPLC.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shinya; Yoshimura, Etsuro

    2012-11-15

    HPLC eluent systems employing acetonitrile and methanol were evaluated for the quantitation of glutathione (GSH) and phytochelatin (PC(n)), a family of peptides implicated in heavy-metal detoxification in higher plants. The detection system is based on the dequenching of copper(I)-bathocuproine disulfonate and is specific for soft-metal chelators. Although both elution systems yielded comparable analytical performance for each PC(n), the acetonitrile system had a lower sensitivity for GSH and a steadily increasing baseline. The inferior properties of the acetonitrile system may be due to complex formation between acetonitrile and Cu(I) ions. Both methods were applied to measure peptide levels in the primitive red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae. Coefficients of variation (CVs) were less than 5%, except for GSH and PC(4) determinations in the acetonitrile system, in cases when CV values were found to be 8.8% and 6.3%, respectively. Recoveries were greater than 96%, except for GSH determination in the acetonitrile system, with a recovery of 84.4%; however, the concentration measured in the acetonitrile system did not differ from that measured in the methanol system at a significance level of 0.05. PMID:23153641

  1. Fast vaporization solid phase microextraction and ion mobility spectrometry: A new approach for determination of creatinine in biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mostafa; Ebrahimzadeh, Homeira; Banitaba, Mohamma Hossein

    2015-11-01

    In this work a rapid and simple method for creatinine determination in urine and plasma samples based on aqueous derivatization of creatinine and complete vaporization of sample (as low as 10 µL), followed by ion mobility spectrometry analysis has been proposed. The effect of four important parameters (extraction temperature, total volume of solution, desorption temperature and extraction time) on ion mobility signal has been studied. Under the optimized conditions, the quantitative response of ion mobility spectrometry for creatinine was linear in the range of 0-500 mg L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.6 mg L(-1) in urine and 0-250 mg L(-1) with a detection limit of 2.6 mg L(-1) in plasma sample. The limit of quantitation of creatinine was 2.1 mg L(-1) and 8.7 mg L(-1) in urine and plasma samples, respectively. The relative standard deviation of the method was found to be 13%. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of creatinine in biological samples, showing recoveries from 92% to 104% in urine and 101-110% in plasma samples. PMID:26452850

  2. Insights into chiral recognition mechanisms in supercritical fluid chromatography V. Effect of the nature and proportion of alcohol mobile phase modifier with amylose and cellulose tris-(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Khater, Syame; West, Caroline

    2014-12-19

    In enantioselective supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) with chiral stationary phases (CSP), the elution strength of carbon dioxide is usually modulated by the use of polar organic solvents, also called modifiers. Alcohols like methanol, ethanol and isopropanol are the most commonly used co-solvents. While most applications of chiral SFC are optimized through a process of varying the co-solvent nature and proportion, only a limited number of thorough investigations have been carried out to unravel the effects of the co-solvent on the enantioseparation process. In an attempt to clarify the effect of the mobile phase co-solvent on enantioselective SFC separations, a wide range of compounds (achiral and chiral) were analyzed on an amylosic (Chiralpak AD-H) and a cellulosic (Lux cellulose-1) CSP. The influence of the modifier polarity and steric hindrance must be considered thus several different alcoholic solvents were evaluated: methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol and 1-butanol, with a proportion of 10% in carbon dioxide. A selected group of racemates was further analyzed with varying proportions of each alcohol ranging from 5 to 25%. Besides, because mixtures of solvents were sometimes reported to produce unexpected results, a 50:50 mixture of methanol and ethanol was also evaluated. Chemometric methods provide some insight into the enantio-separation process and help identifying the differences between the mobile phase conditions.

  3. Chiral separation of cathinone and amphetamine derivatives by HPLC/UV using sulfated ß-cyclodextrin as chiral mobile phase additive.

    PubMed

    Taschwer, Magdalena; Seidl, Yvonne; Mohr, Stefan; Schmid, Martin G

    2014-08-01

    In the last years the identification of new legal and illegal highs has become a huge challenge for the police and prosecution authorities. In an analytical context, only a few analytical methods are available to identify these new substances. Moreover, many of these recreational drugs are chiral and it is supposed that the enantiomers differ in their pharmacological potency. Since nonenantioselective synthesis is easier and cheaper, they are mainly sold as racemic mixtures. The goal of this research work was to develop an inexpensive method for the chiral separation of cathinones and amphetamines. This should help to discover if the substances are sold as racemic mixtures and give further information about their quality as well as their origin. Chiral separation of a set of 6 amphetamine and 25 cathinone derivatives, mainly purchased from various Internet shops, is presented. A LiChrospher 100 RP-18e, 250 x 4 mm, 5 µm served as the stationary phase. The chiral mobile phase consisted of methanol, water, and sulfated ß-cyclodextrin. Measurements were performed under isocratic conditions in reversed phase mode using UV detection. Four model compounds of the two substance classes were used to optimize the mobile phase. Under final conditions (methanol:water 2.5:97.5 + 2% sulfated ß-cyclodextrin) enantiomers of amphetamine and five derivatives were baseline separated within 23 min. In all, 17 cathinones were completely or partially chirally separated. However, as only 3 of 25 cathinones were baseline resolved, the application of this method is limited for cathinone analogs. Additionally, the results were compared with an RP-8e column.

  4. Industrial application of green chromatography--I. Separation and analysis of niacinamide in skincare creams using pure water as the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Strickland, Zackary; Kapalavavi, Brahmam; Marple, Ronita; Gamsky, Chris

    2011-03-15

    In this work, chromatographic separation of niacin and niacinamide using pure water as the sole component in the mobile phase has been investigated. The separation and analysis of niacinamide have been optimized using three columns at different temperatures and various flow rates. Our results clearly demonstrate that separation and analysis of niacinamide from skincare products can be achieved using pure water as the eluent at 60°C on a Waters XTerra MS C18 column, a Waters XBridge C18 column, or at 80°C on a Hamilton PRP-1 column. The separation efficiency, quantification quality, and analysis time of this new method are at least comparable with those of the traditional HPLC methods. Compared with traditional HPLC, the major advantage of this newly developed green chromatography technique is the elimination of organic solvents required in the HPLC mobile phase. In addition, the pure water chromatography separations described in this work can be directly applied in industrial plant settings without further modification of the existing HPLC equipment.

  5. Conformational ordering of biomolecules in the gas phase: nitrogen collision cross sections measured on a prototype high resolution drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    May, Jody C; Goodwin, Cody R; Lareau, Nichole M; Leaptrot, Katrina L; Morris, Caleb B; Kurulugama, Ruwan T; Mordehai, Alex; Klein, Christian; Barry, William; Darland, Ed; Overney, Gregor; Imatani, Kenneth; Stafford, George C; Fjeldsted, John C; McLean, John A

    2014-02-18

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry measurements which describe the gas-phase scaling of molecular size and mass are of both fundamental and pragmatic utility. Fundamentally, such measurements expand our understanding of intrinsic intramolecular folding forces in the absence of solvent. Practically, reproducible transport properties, such as gas-phase collision cross-section (CCS), are analytically useful metrics for identification and characterization purposes. Here, we report 594 CCS values obtained in nitrogen drift gas on an electrostatic drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) instrument. The instrument platform is a newly developed prototype incorporating a uniform-field drift tube bracketed by electrodynamic ion funnels and coupled to a high resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The CCS values reported here are of high experimental precision (±0.5% or better) and represent four chemically distinct classes of molecules (quaternary ammonium salts, lipids, peptides, and carbohydrates), which enables structural comparisons to be made between molecules of different chemical compositions for the rapid "omni-omic" characterization of complex biological samples. Comparisons made between helium and nitrogen-derived CCS measurements demonstrate that nitrogen CCS values are systematically larger than helium values; however, general separation trends between chemical classes are retained regardless of the drift gas. These results underscore that, for the highest CCS accuracy, care must be exercised when utilizing helium-derived CCS values to calibrate measurements obtained in nitrogen, as is the common practice in the field.

  6. Injury Risk Assessment of Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Phase VI and Series 4000 Gloves During Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Hand Manipulation Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilby, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Functional Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs) with high precision gloves are essential for the success of Extravehicular Activity (EVA). Previous research done at NASA has shown that total strength capabilities and performance are reduced when wearing a pressurized EMU. The goal of this project was to characterize the human-space suit glove interaction and assess the risk of injury during common EVA hand manipulation tasks, including pushing, pinching and gripping objects. A custom third generation sensor garment was designed to incorporate a combination of sensors, including force sensitive resistors, strain gauge sensors, and shear force sensors. The combination of sensors was used to measure the forces acting on the finger nails, finger pads, finger tips, as well as the knuckle joints. In addition to measuring the forces, data was collected on the temperature, humidity, skin conductance, and blood perfusion of the hands. Testing compared both the Phase VI and Series 4000 glove against an ungloved condition. The ungloved test was performed wearing the sensor garment only. The project outcomes identified critical landmarks that experienced higher workloads and are more likely to suffer injuries. These critical landmarks varied as a function of space suit glove and task performed. The results showed that less forces were acting on the hands while wearing the Phase VI glove as compared to wearing the Series 4000 glove. Based on our findings, the engineering division can utilize these methods for optimizing the current space suit glove and designing next generation gloves to prevent injuries and optimize hand mobility and comfort.

  7. Relative quantification of multi-components in Panax notoginseng (Sanqi) by high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry using mobile phase compensation.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chang-jiang-sheng; Tan, Ting; Zeng, Su-ling; Dong, Xin; Liu, E-Hu; Li, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Relative quantification of multi-components in complex mixture is significantly affected by the ionization variance caused by mobile phase composition in high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) analyses. The normalization methods for eliminating the variance are still less investigated. Herein, the mobile-phase compensation (MPC) method was applied to overcome the above problem. The developed method was firstly used for convenient evaluation of the coeluent interference and subsequently applied for relative quantification of the identified multi-components in Panax notoginseng (Sanqi) samples. The good linearity, precision and low limit of quantification of targeted analytes confirmed that the MPC-HPLC-ESI-MS method in gradient elution could achieve the isocratic test results compared with classical HPLC-ESI-MS. The established method was used for relative quantification of the minor Sanqi saponins by their detected peak areas divided by that of ginsenoside Rd. The results demonstrated the potential of the newly developed method for obtaining the normalized data shared in different laboratories.

  8. Ultra high performance supercritical fluid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry for screening of doping agents. I: Investigation of mobile phase and MS conditions.

    PubMed

    Nováková, Lucie; Grand-Guillaume Perrenoud, Alexandre; Nicoli, Raul; Saugy, Martial; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Guillarme, Davy

    2015-01-01

    The conditions for the analysis of selected doping substances by UHPSFC-MS/MS were optimized to ensure suitable peak shapes and maximized MS responses. A representative mixture of 31 acidic and basic doping agents was analyzed, in both ESI+ and ESI- modes. The best compromise for all compounds in terms of MS sensitivity and chromatographic performance was obtained when adding 2% water and 10mM ammonium formate in the CO2/MeOH mobile phase. Beside mobile phase, the nature of the make-up solvent added for interfacing UHPSFC with MS was also evaluated. Ethanol was found to be the best candidate as it was able to compensate for the negative effect of 2% water addition in ESI- mode and provided a suitable MS response for all doping agents. Sensitivity of the optimized UHPSFC-MS/MS method was finally assessed and compared to the results obtained in conventional UHPLC-MS/MS. Sensitivity was improved by 5-100-fold in UHPSFC-MS/MS vs. UHPLC-MS/MS for 56% of compounds, while only one compound (bumetanide) offered a significantly higher MS response (4-fold) under UHPLC-MS/MS conditions. In the second paper of this series, the optimal conditions for UHPSFC-MS/MS analysis will be employed to screen >100 doping agents in urine matrix and results will be compared to those obtained by conventional UHPLC-MS/MS.

  9. Direct determination of theophylline in human serum by high-performance liquid chromatography using zwitterionic micellar mobile phase. Comparison with an enzyme multiplied immunoassay technique.

    PubMed

    Habel, D; Guermouche, S; Guermouche, M H

    1993-12-01

    A liquid chromatographic procedure is reported for the direct determination of theophylline in human serum. It includes the use of a micellar zwitterionic mobile phase [10(-3) mol l-1 3-(dimethyldodecylammonio) propanesulfonate (also known as C12 DAPS)-propanol (97 + 3, v/v) and a muBondapak phenyl column. Detection is based on ultraviolet absorption at a wavelength of 273 nm. After dilution with the mobile phase, the serum is injected into the chromatography; no solvent extraction or deproteinization is performed. The linearity of the method described was excellent over the range 0.5-20 mg l-1. The within-run precision was better than 2%, and the recovery of the theophylline approached 98%. Two hundred direct injections of serum samples did not affect the column life. The total analysis time, including chromatography, was approximately 15 min. As little as 0.5 mg l-1 of theophylline could be detected, and the results were in good agreement with those of an enzyme multiplied immunoassay technique.

  10. Characterizing the gas phase ion chemistry of an ion trap mobility spectrometry based explosive trace detector using a tandem mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Kozole, Joseph; Tomlinson-Phillips, Jill; Stairs, Jason R; Harper, Jason D; Lukow, Stefan R; Lareau, Richard T; Boudries, Hacene; Lai, Hanh; Brauer, Carolyn S

    2012-09-15

    A commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) ion trap mobility spectrometry (ITMS) based explosive trace detector (ETD) has been interfaced to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS/MS) for the purpose of characterizing the gas phase ion chemistry intrinsic to the ITMS instrument. The overall objective of the research is to develop a fundamental understanding of the gas phase ionization processes in the ITMS based ETD to facilitate the advancement of its operational effectiveness as well as guide the development of next generation ETDs. Product ion masses, daughter ion masses, and reduced mobility values measured by the ITMS/MS/MS configuration for a suite of nitro, nitrate, and peroxide containing explosives are reported. Molecular formulas, molecular structures, and ionization pathways for the various product ions are inferred using the mass and mobility data in conjunction with density functional theory. The predominant product ions are identified as follows: [TNT-H](-) for trinitrotoluene (TNT), [RDX+Cl](-) for cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene-2,4,6-trinitramine (RDX), [NO(3)](-) for ethylene glycol dinitrate (EGDN), [NG+NO(3)](-) for nitroglycerine (NG), [PETN+NO(3)](-) for pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), [HNO(3)+NO(3)](-) for ammonium nitrate (NH(4)NO(3)), [HMTD-NC(3)H(6)O(3)+H+Cl](-) for hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD), and [(CH(3))(2)CNH(2)](+) for triacetone triperoxide (TATP). The predominant ionization pathways for the formation of the various product ions are determined to include proton abstraction, ion-molecule attachment, autoionization, first-order and multi-order thermolysis, and nucleophilic substitution. The ion trapping scheme in the reaction region of the ITMS instrument is shown to increase predominant ion intensities relative to the secondary ion intensities when compared to non-ion trap operation. PMID:22967626

  11. Aminoglycoside analysis in food of animal origin with a zwitterionic stationary phase and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Díez, Cristina; Guillarme, Davy; Staub Spörri, Aline; Cognard, Emmanuelle; Ortelli, Didier; Edder, Patrick; Rudaz, Serge

    2015-07-01

    In this study, fourteen highly polar aminoglycoside (AGs) antibiotics were selected. Various stationary phases were tested, including Obelisc R, ZIC-HILIC, BEH amide and aminopropyl. The nature of the stationary phase, mobile phase (water or buffer solutions and acetonitrile), pH (percentage of formic acid), gradient conditions and injection solvents were systematically studied as relevant parameters for tuning retention selectivity and detectability of AGs in liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-(ESI)-MS/MS). Only the two zwitterionic phases (Obelisc R and ZIC-HILIC) achieved a proper chromatographic separation considering interferences due to the crosstalk effect in low resolution mass spectrometers. The water/acetonitrile mobile phase containing 1% formic acid used with Obelisc R provided more sensitivity than the highly concentrated buffered mobile phases required for ZIC-HILIC. A solid phase extraction (SPE) clean-up procedure with polymeric weak cation exchange (WCX) cartridges was optimized for honey, milk and liver samples. Different brands of cartridges and elution solvents were tested, and the Taurus WCX offered the best recovery rate with a buffer elution at pH 3. The final optimized method was validated in these matrices according to Decision 2002/657/EC. A monitoring campaign for sixty honey, milk and liver samples was carried out at the Food Authority Control in Geneva. The concentration of dihydrostreptomycin (DSTP) found in one ovine liver exceeded the established maximum residue levels (MRLs) within the European and Swiss legislations but it was compliant taking into account the validation data. PMID:26043099

  12. Retention mechanism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in reversed-phase liquid chromatography with monomeric stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Jake L; Siepmann, J Ilja; Schure, Mark R

    2011-12-23

    Reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) is the foremost technique for the separation of analytes that have very similar chemical functionalities, but differ only in their molecular shape. This ability is crucial in the analysis of various mixtures with environmental and biological importance including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and steroids. A large amount of effort has been devoted to studying this phenomenon experimentally, but a detailed molecular-level description remains lacking. To provide some insight on the mechanism of shape selectivity in RPLC, particle-based simulations were carried out for stationary phases and chromatographic parameters that closely mimic those in an experimental study by Sentell and Dorsey [J. Chromatogr. 461 (1989) 193]. The retention of aromatic hydrocarbons ranging in size from benzene to the isomeric PAHs of the formula C(18)H(12) was examined for model RPLC systems consisting of monomeric dimethyl octadecylsilane (ODS) stationary phases with surface coverages ranging from 1.6 to 4.2 μmol/m(2) (i.e., stationary phases yielding low to intermediate shape selectivity) in contact with a 67/33 mol% acetonitrile/water mobile phase. The simulations show that the stationary phase acts as a very heterogeneous environment where analytes with different shapes prefer different spatial regions with specific local bonding environments of the ODS chains. However, these favorable retentive regions cannot be described as pre-existing cavities because the chain conformation in these local stationary phase regions adapts to accommodate the analytes.

  13. Acetonitrile shortage: use of isopropanol as an alternative elution system for ultra/high performance liquid chromatography†

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Ankur M.; Andreae, Mark; Mullen, Douglas G.; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak; Baker, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Acetonitrile is a choice of solvent for almost all chromatographic separations. In recent years, researchers around the globe have faced an acetonitrile shortage that affected routine analytical operations. Researchers have tried to counter this shortage by applying many innovative solutions, including using ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) columns that are shorter and smaller in diameter than traditional high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) columns, thus significantly decreasing the volume of eluent required. Although utilizing UPLC in place of HPLC can alleviate the solvent demand to some extent, acetonitrile is generally thought of as the solvent of choice due to its versatility. In the following communication, we describe an alternative eluent system that uses isopropanol in place of acetonitrile as an organic modifier for routine chromatographic separations. We report here the development of an isopropanol based UPLC protocol for G5 PAMAM dendrimer based conjugates that was transferred to semi-preparative applications. PMID:21572563

  14. Immobilization of Rhodococcus rhodochrous BX2 (an acetonitrile-degrading bacterium) with biofilm-forming bacteria for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Li, Yue; Cheng, Xiaosong; Feng, Liping; Xi, Chuanwu; Zhang, Ying

    2013-03-01

    In this study, a unique biofilm consisting of three bacterial strains with high biofilm-forming capability (Bacillus subtilis E2, E3, and N4) and an acetonitrile-degrading bacterium (Rhodococcus rhodochrous BX2) was established for acetonitrile-containing wastewater treatment. The results indicated that this biofilm exhibited strong resistance to acetonitrile loading shock and displayed a typical spatial and structural heterogeneity and completely depleted the initial concentration of acetonitrile (800mgL(-1)) within 24h in a moving-bed-biofilm reactor (MBBR) after operation for 30days. The immobilization of BX2 cells in the biofilm was confirmed by PCR-DGGE. It has been demonstrated that biofilm-forming bacteria can promote the immobilization of contaminant-degrading bacteria in the biofilms and can subsequently improve the degradation of contaminants in wastewater. This approach offers a novel strategy for enhancing biological oxidation of toxic pollutants in wastewater. PMID:23376196

  15. Spectroscopic studies and molecular orbital calculations of charge transfer complexation between 3,5-dimethylpyrazole with DDQ in acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habeeb, Moustafa M.; Al-Attas, Amirah S.; Al-Raimi, Doaa S.

    2015-05-01

    Charge transfer (CT) interaction between 3,5-dimethylpyrazole (DMP) with the π-acceptor 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinon (DDQ) has been investigated spectrophotometrically in acetonitrile (AN). Simultaneous reddish brown color has been observed upon mixing donor with acceptor solutions attributing to CT complex formation. The electronic spectra of the formed complex exhibited multi-charge transfer bands at 429, 447, 506, 542 and 589 nm, respectively. Job's method of continuous variations and spectrophotometric titration methods confirmed the formation of the studied complex in 1:2 ratio between DMP and DDQ. Benesi-Hildebrand equation has been applied to calculate the stability constant of the formed complex where it recorded high value supporting formation of stable complex. Molecular orbital calculations using MM2 method and GAMESS (General Atomic and Molecular Electronic Structure System) interface computations as a package of ChemBio3D Ultra12 software were carried out for more analysis of the formed complex in the gas phase. The computational analysis included energy minimisation, stabilisation energy, molecular geometry, Mullikan charges, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) surfaces of reactants and complex as well as characterization of the higher occupied molecular orbitals (HOMO) and lower unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMO) surfaces of the complex. A good consistency between experimental and theoretical results has been recorded.

  16. Retention of ionisable compounds on high-performance liquid chromatography XVII. Estimation of the pH variation of aqueous buffers with the change of the methanol fraction of the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Subirats, Xavier; Bosch, Elisabeth; Rosés, Martí

    2007-01-01

    The use of methanol-aqueous buffer mobile phases in HPLC is a common election when performing chromatographic separations of ionisable analytes. The addition of methanol to the aqueous buffer to prepare such a mobile phase changes the buffer capacity and the pH of the solution. In the present work, the variation of these buffer properties is studied for acetic acid-acetate, phosphoric acid-dihydrogenphosphate-hydrogenphosphate, citric acid-dihydrogencitrate-hydrogencitrate-citrate, and ammonium-ammonia buffers. It is well established that the pH change of the buffers depends on the initial concentration and aqueous pH of the buffer, on the percentage of methanol added, and on the particular buffer used. The proposed equations allow the pH estimation of methanol-water buffered mobile phases up to 80% in volume of organic modifier from initial aqueous buffer pH and buffer concentration (before adding methanol) between 0.001 and 0.01 mol L(-1). From both the estimated pH values of the mobile phase and the estimated pKa of the ionisable analytes, it is possible to predict the degree of ionisation of the analytes and therefore, the interpretation of acid-base analytes behaviour in a particular methanol-water buffered mobile phase.

  17. [Influences of the mobile phase constitution, salt concentration and pH value on retention characters of proteins on the metal chelate column].

    PubMed

    Li, R; Di, Z M; Chen, G L

    2001-09-01

    The effects of the nature and concentration of salts, pH value and competitive eluent in the mobile phase on the protein retention have been systematically investigated. A mathematical expression describing the protein retention in metal chelate chromatography has been derived. It is proposed that the eluting power of the salt solution can be expressed by the eluent strength exponent epsilon. According to the retention characters of protein under different chromatographic conditions, the interaction between the various metal chelate ligands and proteins is discussed. The protein retention on the metal chelate column is a cooperative interactions of coordination, electrostatic and hydrophobic interaction. For the strong combined metal column with proteins such as IDA-Cu, the coordination is the most important, and the electrostatic interaction is secondary in chromatographic process. However, for the weak combined metal columns with proteins such as IDA-Ni, IDA-Co and IDA-Zn, the electrostatic interaction between the metal chelate ligands and proteins is the chief one, while the coordination is the next in importance. When the mobile phase contains high concentration of salt which can't form complex with the immobilized metal, the hydrophobic interaction between the protein and stationary phase will be increased. As the interaction between the metal chelate ligand and proteins relates to chromatographic operating conditions closely, different elution processes may be selected for different metal chelate columns. The gradient elution is generally performed by the low concentration of salt or different pH for weakly combined columns with proteins, however the competitive elution procedure is commonly utilized for strongly combined column. The experiment showed that NH3 is an excellent competitive eluent. It isn't only give the efficient separation of proteins, but also has the advantages of cheapness, less bleeding of the immobilized metals and ease of controlling NH3

  18. Analysis of a common cold virus and its subviral particles by gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis and native mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Victor U; Bereszcazk, Jessica Z; Havlik, Marlene; Kallinger, Peter; Gösler, Irene; Kumar, Mohit; Blaas, Dieter; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Heck, Albert J R; Szymanski, Wladyslaw W; Allmaier, Günter

    2015-09-01

    Gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis (GEMMA) separates nanometer-sized, single-charged particles according to their electrophoretic mobility (EM) diameter after transition to the gas-phase via a nano electrospray process. Electrospraying as a soft desorption/ionization technique preserves noncovalent biospecific interactions. GEMMA is therefore well suited for the analysis of intact viruses and subviral particles targeting questions related to particle size, bioaffinity, and purity of preparations. By correlating the EM diameter to the molecular mass (Mr) of standards, the Mr of analytes can be determined. Here, we demonstrate (i) the use of GEMMA in purity assessment of a preparation of a common cold virus (human rhinovirus serotype 2, HRV-A2) and (ii) the analysis of subviral HRV-A2 particles derived from such a preparation. (iii) Likewise, native mass spectrometry was employed to obtain spectra of intact HRV-A2 virions and empty viral capsids (B-particles). Charge state resolution for the latter allowed its Mr determination. (iv) Cumulatively, the data measured and published earlier were used to establish a correlation between the Mr and EM diameter for a range of globular proteins and the intact virions. Although a good correlation resulted from this analysis, we noticed a discrepancy especially for the empty and subviral particles. This demonstrates the influence of genome encapsulation (preventing analytes from shrinking upon transition into the gas-phase) on the measured analyte EM diameter. To conclude, GEMMA is useful for the determination of the Mr of intact viruses but needs to be employed with caution when subviral particles or even empty viral capsids are targeted. The latter could be analyzed by native MS.

  19. Photo-assisted cyanation of transition metal nitrates coupled with room temperature C-C bond cleavage of acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Zou, Shihui; Li, Renhong; Kobayashi, Hisayoshi; Liu, Juanjuan; Fan, Jie

    2013-03-01

    It is a challenge to use acetonitrile as a cyanating agent because of the difficulty in cleaving its C-CN bond. Herein, we report a mild photo-assisted route to conduct the cyanation of transition metal nitrates using acetonitrile as the cyanating agent coupled with room-temperature C-C bond cleavage. DFT calculations and experimental observations suggest a radical-involved reaction mechanism, which excludes toxicity from free cyanide ions.

  20. Novel dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction combined with ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry to determine morpholine residues in citrus and apples.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dawei; Miao, Hong; Zou, Jianhong; Cao, Pei; Ma, Ning; Zhao, Yunfeng; Wu, Yongning

    2015-01-21

    This paper presents a new analytical method for the determination of morpholine residues in citrus and apples using a novel dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction (DMSPE), followed by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS). Samples were extracted with 1% formic acid in acetonitrile/water (1:1, v/v) and then cleaned up using the DMSPE procedure. Morpholine from the extract was adsorbed to a polymer cation exchange sorbent and eluted with ammonium hydroxide/acetonitrile (3:97, v/v) through a 1 mL syringe with a 0.22 μm nylon syringe filter. All of the samples were analyzed by UHPLC-HRMS/MS on a Waters Acquity BEH hydrophilic interaction chromatography column using 0.1% formic acid and 4 mM ammonium formate in water/acetonitrile as the mobile phase with gradient elution. The method showed good linearity (R(2) > 0.999) in the range of 1-100 μg/L for the analyte. The limit of detection and limit of quantitation values of morpholine were 2 and 5 μg/kg, respectively. The average recoveries of morpholine from the citrus and apple samples spiked at three different concentrations (5, 20, and 100 μg/kg) were in a range from 78.4 to 102.7%.

  1. Strategies for the Hyperpolarization of Acetonitrile and Related Ligands by SABRE

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report on a strategy for using SABRE (signal amplification by reversible exchange) for polarizing 1H and 13C nuclei of weakly interacting ligands which possess biologically relevant and nonaromatic motifs. We first demonstrate this via the polarization of acetonitrile, using Ir(IMes)(COD)Cl as the catalyst precursor, and confirm that the route to hyperpolarization transfer is via the J-coupling network. We extend this work to the polarization of propionitrile, benzylnitrile, benzonitrile, and trans-3-hexenedinitrile in order to assess its generality. In the 1H NMR spectrum, the signal for acetonitrile is enhanced 8-fold over its thermal counterpart when [Ir(H)2(IMes)(MeCN)3]+ is the catalyst. Upon addition of pyridine or pyridine-d5, the active catalyst changes to [Ir(H)2(IMes)(py)2(MeCN)]+ and the resulting acetonitrile 1H signal enhancement increases to 20- and 60-fold, respectively. In 13C NMR studies, polarization transfers optimally to the quaternary 13C nucleus of MeCN while the methyl 13C is hardly polarized. Transfer to 13C is shown to occur first via the 1H–1H coupling between the hydrides and the methyl protons and then via either the 2J or 1J couplings to the respective 13Cs, of which the 2J route is more efficient. These experimental results are rationalized through a theoretical treatment which shows excellent agreement with experiment. In the case of MeCN, longitudinal two-spin orders between pairs of 1H nuclei in the three-spin methyl group are created. Two-spin order states, between the 1H and 13C nuclei, are also created, and their existence is confirmed for Me13CN in both the 1H and 13C NMR spectra using the Only Parahydrogen Spectroscopy protocol. PMID:25539423

  2. Strategies for the hyperpolarization of acetonitrile and related ligands by SABRE.

    PubMed

    Mewis, Ryan E; Green, Richard A; Cockett, Martin C R; Cowley, Michael J; Duckett, Simon B; Green, Gary G R; John, Richard O; Rayner, Peter J; Williamson, David C

    2015-01-29

    We report on a strategy for using SABRE (signal amplification by reversible exchange) for polarizing (1)H and (13)C nuclei of weakly interacting ligands which possess biologically relevant and nonaromatic motifs. We first demonstrate this via the polarization of acetonitrile, using Ir(IMes)(COD)Cl as the catalyst precursor, and confirm that the route to hyperpolarization transfer is via the J-coupling network. We extend this work to the polarization of propionitrile, benzylnitrile, benzonitrile, and trans-3-hexenedinitrile in order to assess its generality. In the (1)H NMR spectrum, the signal for acetonitrile is enhanced 8-fold over its thermal counterpart when [Ir(H)2(IMes)(MeCN)3](+) is the catalyst. Upon addition of pyridine or pyridine-d5, the active catalyst changes to [Ir(H)2(IMes)(py)2(MeCN)](+) and the resulting acetonitrile (1)H signal enhancement increases to 20- and 60-fold, respectively. In (13)C NMR studies, polarization transfers optimally to the quaternary (13)C nucleus of MeCN while the methyl (13)C is hardly polarized. Transfer to (13)C is shown to occur first via the (1)H-(1)H coupling between the hydrides and the methyl protons and then via either the (2)J or (1)J couplings to the respective (13)Cs, of which the (2)J route is more efficient. These experimental results are rationalized through a theoretical treatment which shows excellent agreement with experiment. In the case of MeCN, longitudinal two-spin orders between pairs of (1)H nuclei in the three-spin methyl group are created. Two-spin order states, between the (1)H and (13)C nuclei, are also created, and their existence is confirmed for Me(13)CN in both the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra using the Only Parahydrogen Spectroscopy protocol.

  3. Acetonitrile and N-Chloroacetamide Formation from the Reaction of Acetaldehyde and Monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Susana Y; Vu, Trang Nha; Komaki, Yukako; Plewa, Michael J; Mariñas, Benito J

    2015-08-18

    Nitriles and amides are two classes of nitrogenous disinfection byproducts (DBPs) associated with chloramination that are more cytotoxic and genotoxic than regulated DBPs. Monochloramine reacts with acetaldehyde, a common ozone and free chlorine disinfection byproduct, to form 1-(chloroamino)ethanol. Equilibrium (K1) and forward and reverse rate (k1,k-1) constants for the reaction between initial reactants and 1-(chloroamino)ethanol were determined between 2 and 30 °C. Activation energies for k1 and k-1 were 3.04 and 45.2 kJ·mol(-1), respectively, and enthalpy change for K1 was -42.1 kJ·mol(-1). In parallel reactions, 1-(chloroamino)ethanol (1) slowly dehydrated (k2) to (chloroimino)ethane that further decomposed to acetonitrile and (2) was oxidized (k3) by monochloramine to produce N-chloroacetamide. Both reactions were acid/base catalyzed, and rate constants were characterized at 10, 18, and 25 °C. Modeling for drinking water distribution system conditions showed that N-chloroacetamide and acetonitrile concentrations were 5-9 times higher at pH 9.0 compared to 7.8. Furthermore, acetonitrile concentration was found to form 7-10 times higher than N-chloroacetamide under typical monochloramine and acetaldehyde concentrations. N-chloroacetamide cytotoxicity (LC50 = 1.78 × 10(-3) M) was comparable to dichloroacetamide and trichloroacetamide, but less potent than N,2-dichloroacetamide and chloroacetamide. While N-chloroacetamide was not found to be genotoxic, N,2-dichloroacetamide genotoxic potency (5.19 × 10(-3) M) was on the same order of magnitude as chloroacetamide and trichloroacetamide.

  4. Ligand sensitized luminescence of uranyl by benzoic acid in acetonitrile medium: A new luminescent uranyl benzoate specie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Satendra; Maji, S.; Joseph, M.; Sankaran, K.

    2015-03-01

    Benzoic acid (BA) is shown to sensitize and enhance the luminescence of uranyl ion in acetonitrile medium. Luminescence spectra and especially UV-Vis spectroscopy studies reveal the formation of tri benzoate complex of uranyl i.e. [UO2(C6H5COO)3]- which is highly luminescent. In particular, three sharp bands at 431, 443, 461 nm of absorption spectra provides evidence for tri benzoate specie of uranyl in acetonitrile medium. The luminescence lifetime of uranyl in this complex is 68 μs which is much more compared to the lifetime of uncomplexed uranyl (20 μs) in acetonitrile medium. In contrary to aqueous medium where uranyl benzoate forms 1:1 and 1:2 species, spectroscopic data reveal formation of 1:3 complex in acetonitrile medium. Addition of water to acetonitrile results in decrease of luminescence intensity of this specie and the luminescence features implode at 20% (v/v) of water content. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the existence of [UO2(C6H5COO)3]- specie in acetonitrile is reported. Mechanism of luminescence enhancement is discussed.

  5. Possible stabilization of the tetravalent oxidation state of berkelium and californium in acetonitrile with triphenylarsine oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, G.F.; Peterson, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    It appears that we may have prepared Bk(IV) nitrate.nTPAs0 and Bk(IV) perchlorate.nTPAs0 complexes which formed the corresponding Cf(IV) complexes through the beta decay of Bk-249. Definitive proof should come from similar experiments with quantities of Bk-249 large enough to allow spectrophotometric detection of the characteristic f..-->..f transitions in these berkelium and californium species. It is clear, however, that TPAs0 and acetonitrile can play a pivotal role in the stabilization of lanact(IV) species.

  6. Density Functional Studies on the Complexation and Spectroscopy of Uranyl Ligated with Acetonitrile and Acetone Derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Schoendorff, George E.; Windus, Theresa L.; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2009-12-12

    The coordination of nitrile (acetonitrile, propionitrile, and benzonitrile) and carbonyl (formaldehyde, ethanal, and acetone) ligands to the uranyl dication (UO22+) has been examined using density functional theory (DFT) utilizing relativistic effective core potentials (RECPs). Complexes containing up to six ligands have been modeled for all ligands except formaldehyde, for which no minimum could be found. A comparison of relative binding energies indicates that five coordinate complexes are predominant while a six coordinate complex involving propionitrile ligands might be possible. Additionally, the relative binding energy and the weakening of the uranyl bond is related to the size of the ligand and, in general, nitriles bind more strongly to uranyl than carbonyls.

  7. Elemental step thermodynamics of various analogues of indazolium alkaloids to obtaining hydride in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Lei, Nan-Ping; Fu, Yan-Hua; Zhu, Xiao-Qing

    2015-12-21

    A series of analogues of indazolium alkaloids were designed and synthesized. The thermodynamic driving forces of the 6 elemental steps for the analogues of indazolium alkaloids to obtain hydride in acetonitrile were determined using an isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC) and electrochemical methods, respectively. The effects of molecular structure and substituents on the thermodynamic driving forces of the 6 steps were examined. Meanwhile, the oxidation mechanism of NADH coenzyme by indazolium alkaloids was examined using the chemical mimic method. The result shows that the oxidation of NADH coenzyme by indazolium alkaloids in vivo takes place by one-step concerted hydride transfer mechanism.

  8. High-Rate Oxygen Reduction in Mixed Nonaqueous Electrolyte Containing Acetonitrile

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng D.; Yang X.; Qu D.

    2011-12-02

    A mixed nonaqueous electrolyte that contains acetonitrile and propylene carbonate (PC) was found to be suitable for a LiO2 battery with a metallic Li anode. Both the concentration and diffusion coefficient for the dissolved O2 are significantly higher in the mixed electrolyte than those in the pure PC electrolyte. A powder microelectrode was used to investigate the O2 solubility and diffusion coefficient. A 10 mA?cm-2 discharge rate on a gas-diffusion electrode is demonstrated by using the mixed electrolyte in a LiO2 cell.

  9. Cu-Catalyzed Cyanation of Arylboronic Acids with Acetonitrile: A Dual Role of TEMPO.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yamin; Li, Linyi; Shen, Zengming

    2015-09-14

    The cyanation of arylboronic acids by using acetonitrile as the "CN" source has been achieved under a Cu(cat.)/TEMPO system (TEMPO=2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine N-oxide). The broad substrate scope includes a variety of electron-rich and electron-poor arylboronic acids, which react well to give the cyanated products in high to excellent yields. Mechanistic studies reveal that TEMPO-CH2 CN, generated in situ, is an active cyanating reagent, and shows high reactivity for the formation of the CN(-) moiety. Moreover, TEMPO acts as a cheap oxidant to enable the reaction to be catalytic in copper.

  10. CsSnI3: Semiconductor or metal? High electrical conductivity and strong near-infrared photoluminescence from a single material. High hole mobility and phase-transitions.

    PubMed

    Chung, In; Song, Jung-Hwan; Im, Jino; Androulakis, John; Malliakas, Christos D; Li, Hao; Freeman, Arthur J; Kenney, John T; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2012-05-23

    CsSnI(3) is an unusual perovskite that undergoes complex displacive and reconstructive phase transitions and exhibits near-infrared emission at room temperature. Experimental and theoretical studies of CsSnI(3) have been limited by the lack of detailed crystal structure characterization and chemical instability. Here we describe the synthesis of pure polymorphic crystals, the preparation of large crack-/bubble-free ingots, the refined single-crystal structures, and temperature-dependent charge transport and optical properties of CsSnI(3), coupled with ab initio first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In situ temperature-dependent single-crystal and synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction studies reveal the origin of polymorphous phase transitions of CsSnI(3). The black orthorhombic form of CsSnI(3) demonstrates one of the largest volumetric thermal expansion coefficients for inorganic solids. Electrical conductivity, Hall effect, and thermopower measurements on it show p-type metallic behavior with low carrier density, despite the optical band gap of 1.3 eV. Hall effect measurements of the black orthorhombic perovskite phase of CsSnI(3) indicate that it is a p-type direct band gap semiconductor with carrier concentration at room temperature of ∼ 10(17) cm(-3) and a hole mobility of ∼585 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). The hole mobility is one of the highest observed among p-type semiconductors with comparable band gaps. Its powders exhibit a strong room-temperature near-IR emission spectrum at 950 nm. Remarkably, the values of the electrical conductivity and photoluminescence intensity increase with heat treatment. The DFT calculations show that the screened-exchange local density approximation-derived band gap agrees well with the experimentally measured band gap. Calculations of the formation energy of defects strongly suggest that the electrical and light emission properties possibly result from Sn defects in the crystal structure, which arise

  11. CsSnI3: Semiconductor or metal? High electrical conductivity and strong near-infrared photoluminescence from a single material. High hole mobility and phase-transitions.

    PubMed

    Chung, In; Song, Jung-Hwan; Im, Jino; Androulakis, John; Malliakas, Christos D; Li, Hao; Freeman, Arthur J; Kenney, John T; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2012-05-23

    CsSnI(3) is an unusual perovskite that undergoes complex displacive and reconstructive phase transitions and exhibits near-infrared emission at room temperature. Experimental and theoretical studies of CsSnI(3) have been limited by the lack of detailed crystal structure characterization and chemical instability. Here we describe the synthesis of pure polymorphic crystals, the preparation of large crack-/bubble-free ingots, the refined single-crystal structures, and temperature-dependent charge transport and optical properties of CsSnI(3), coupled with ab initio first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In situ temperature-dependent single-crystal and synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction studies reveal the origin of polymorphous phase transitions of CsSnI(3). The black orthorhombic form of CsSnI(3) demonstrates one of the largest volumetric thermal expansion coefficients for inorganic solids. Electrical conductivity, Hall effect, and thermopower measurements on it show p-type metallic behavior with low carrier density, despite the optical band gap of 1.3 eV. Hall effect measurements of the black orthorhombic perovskite phase of CsSnI(3) indicate that it is a p-type direct band gap semiconductor with carrier concentration at room temperature of ∼ 10(17) cm(-3) and a hole mobility of ∼585 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). The hole mobility is one of the highest observed among p-type semiconductors with comparable band gaps. Its powders exhibit a strong room-temperature near-IR emission spectrum at 950 nm. Remarkably, the values of the electrical conductivity and photoluminescence intensity increase with heat treatment. The DFT calculations show that the screened-exchange local density approximation-derived band gap agrees well with the experimentally measured band gap. Calculations of the formation energy of defects strongly suggest that the electrical and light emission properties possibly result from Sn defects in the crystal structure, which arise

  12. Determination of bevantolol in human plasma by high performance liquid chromatography using solid phase extraction technique.

    PubMed

    Trung, Tran Quoc; Long, Pham Hai; Al-Abd, Ahmed M; Ku, Hyo Jeong; Lee, Ho Yoon; Hwang, Sung Joo; Kim, Kyeong Ho

    2007-07-01

    A method was developed and fully validated for the determination of bevantolol, an adrenergic-receptor blocker, in human plasma. Bevantolol and betaxolol as internal standard (I.S) were extracted from 1 mL of human plasma by solid phase extraction technique using Sep-pak silica cartridge. Chromatographic separation was accomplished under isocratic conditions using a reverse-phase C8 analytical column and mixture of dibasic ammonium phosphate (pH 5.7; 50 mM)-acetonitrile (75:25, v/v) as mobile phase, with a detection wavelength at 220 nm. The method was proved to be specific by testing six different human plasma sources. Linearity was established for the concentration ranges of 40-1600 ng/mL with correlation coefficent of 0.9995. The lower limit of quantification 40 ng/mL with precision of 10.9% as C.V%.

  13. Development of an achiral supercritical fluid chromatography method with ultraviolet absorbance and mass spectrometric detection for impurity profiling of drug candidates. Part I: Optimization of mobile phase composition.

    PubMed

    Lemasson, Elise; Bertin, Sophie; Hennig, Philippe; Boiteux, Hélène; Lesellier, Eric; West, Caroline

    2015-08-21

    Supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) is a very useful tool in the purpose of impurity profiling of drug candidates, as an adequate selection of stationary phases can provide orthogonal separations so as to maximize the chances to see all impurities. The purpose of the present work is to develop a method for chemical purity assessment. The first part, presented here, focuses on mobile phase selection to ensure adequate elution and detection of drug-like molecules, while the second part focuses on stationary phase selection for optimal separation and orthogonality. The use of additives in the carbon dioxide - solvent mobile phase in SFC is now commonplace, and enables in particular to increase the number of eluted compounds and to improve peak shapes. The objective of this first part was to test different additives (acids, bases, salts and water) for their chromatographic performance assessed in gradient elution with a diode-array detector, but also for the mass responses obtained with a single-quadrupole mass detector, equipped with an electrospray ionization source (Waters ACQUITY QDa). In this project, we used a selection of one hundred and sixty compounds issued from Servier Research Laboratories to screen a set of columns and additives in SFC with a Waters ACQUITY UPC(2) system. The selected columns were all high-performance columns (1.7-1.8μm with totally porous particles or 2.6-2.7μm with superficially porous particles) with a variety of stationary phase chemistries. Initially, eight additives dissolved in the methanol co-solvent were tested on a UPC(2) ACQUITY UPC(2) HSS C18 SB column. A Derringer desirability function was used to classify the additives according to selected criteria: elution capability, peak shapes, UV baseline drift, and UV and mass responses (signal-to-noise ratios). Following these tests, the two best additives (ammonium acetate and ammonium hydroxide) were tested on a larger number of columns (10) where the two additives appeared

  14. Ion mobility, conductivity, structure, and phase transitions in K0.7M0.3SbF4 compounds with M=Rb, NH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavun, V. Ya.; Gerasimenko, A. V.; Uvarov, N. F.; Polyantsev, M. M.; Zemnukhova, L. A.

    2016-09-01

    Ion mobility, phase transitions, structure, and conductivity in the K0.7M0.3SbF4 (M=Rb, NH4) compounds were studied by NMR spectroscopy, DSC, X-ray, and conductivity measurements. The predominant form in the ion motions resulting from the phase transition of high modification was diffusion of fluoride and ammonium ions above 450 K. The high-temperature phases of K0.7M0.3SbF4 (M=Rb, NH4) are superionic, while their conductivity attains the values of ~10-2-10-4 S/cm at 450-500 K. The structures of α- and β-modifications of the K0.7Rb0.3SbF4 are monoclinic (space group P21/m). The main structural units in them are statistically substituting each other K+ and Rb+ cations and complex ∞1[ SbF4]- anions linked into zigzag-like chains by bridge fluorine atoms. The nearest surrounding of each antimony atom contains five fluorine atoms, so that the antimony coordination polyhedron can be described, taking into account the lone electron pair, as a distorted SbF5E octahedron (ψ-octahedron).

  15. Ion mobility, conductivity, structure, and phase transitions in K0.7M0.3SbF4 compounds with M=Rb, NH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavun, V. Ya.; Gerasimenko, A. V.; Uvarov, N. F.; Polyantsev, M. M.; Zemnukhova, L. A.

    2016-09-01

    Ion mobility, phase transitions, structure, and conductivity in the K0.7M0.3SbF4 (M=Rb, NH4) compounds were studied by NMR spectroscopy, DSC, X-ray, and conductivity measurements. The predominant form in the ion motions resulting from the phase transition of high modification was diffusion of fluoride and ammonium ions above 450 K. The high-temperature phases of K0.7M0.3SbF4 (M=Rb, NH4) are superionic, while their conductivity attains the values of ~10-2-10-4 S/cm at 450-500 K. The structures of α- and β-modifications of the K0.7Rb0.3SbF4 are monoclinic (space group P21/m). The main structural units in them are statistically substituting each other K+ and Rb+ cations and complex 1[ SbF4 ]- ∞ anions linked into zigzag-like chains by bridge fluorine atoms. The nearest surrounding of each antimony atom contains five fluorine atoms, so that the antimony coordination polyhedron can be described, taking into account the lone electron pair, as a distorted SbF5E octahedron (ψ-octahedron).

  16. On-site quantitation of arsenic in drinking water by disk solid-phase extraction/mobile X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Kenta; Koike, Yuya; Aizawa, Mamoru; Nakamura, Toshihiro

    2015-11-01

    A rapid and simple method was developed for As determination in drinking water by solid-phase extraction (SPE)/mobile X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry. A 50 mL aqueous sample was adjusted to pH 3 with dilute hydrochloric acid, and then passed through a Ti and Zr-loaded carbon disk (TiZr-CD) to pre-concentrate the As. The SPE disk was adhered to an acrylic plate with cellophane tape, and then examined by mobile XRF spectrometry. The TiZr-CD adsorbed inorganic As (as As(III) and As(V)) and organic As (as methyl, phenyl and aromatic arsenic compounds) from water. The As calibration curve had good linearity over the range of 0.5-5 μg, and the limit of detection was 0.10 μg (2.0 μgL(-1) in As concentration). The concentrations of As in well water samples were determined using the proposed method were similar to results obtained from atomic absorption spectrometry. The proposed method did not require a power supply or a toxic solution and/or gas in any analytical step, therefore it is suitable for the on-site determination of As in drinking water. PMID:26452891

  17. Energetics and structural characterization of isomers using ion mobility and gas-phase H/D exchange: Learning from lasso peptides.

    PubMed

    Hanozin, Emeline; Morsa, Denis; De Pauw, Edwin

    2015-08-01

    State-of-the-art characterization of proteins using MS namely relies on fragmentation methods that allow exploring featured dissociative reaction pathways. These pathways are often initiated by a series of potentially informative mass-constant conformational changes that are nonetheless frequently overlooked by lack of adequate investigation techniques. In the present study, we propose a methodology to readily address both structural and energetic aspects of stereoisomerization reactions using ion mobility coupled with MS. To this end, a commercial spectrometer was used as a reactor comprising an energy resolved collisional activation step intended at promoting controlled conformational changes and a structural assignment step dedicated to the identification of the generated isomers. This identification relies on ion mobility and other on-line coupled techniques, namely an originally designed gas-phase H/D exchange experiment. We here apply this methodology to characterize the isomerization kinetics of capistruin, a 19-residue long lasso-folded peptide. We expect this approach to bring insights into the physical origin of global dissociation thresholds monitored in MS/MS experiments and to set a promising basis for quantitative investigations of the stability of different molecular folds.

  18. On-site quantitation of arsenic in drinking water by disk solid-phase extraction/mobile X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Kenta; Koike, Yuya; Aizawa, Mamoru; Nakamura, Toshihiro

    2015-11-01

    A rapid and simple method was developed for As determination in drinking water by solid-phase extraction (SPE)/mobile X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry. A 50 mL aqueous sample was adjusted to pH 3 with dilute hydrochloric acid, and then passed through a Ti and Zr-loaded carbon disk (TiZr-CD) to pre-concentrate the As. The SPE disk was adhered to an acrylic plate with cellophane tape, and then examined by mobile XRF spectrometry. The TiZr-CD adsorbed inorganic As (as As(III) and As(V)) and organic As (as methyl, phenyl and aromatic arsenic compounds) from water. The As calibration curve had good linearity over the range of 0.5-5 μg, and the limit of detection was 0.10 μg (2.0 μgL(-1) in As concentration). The concentrations of As in well water samples were determined using the proposed method were similar to results obtained from atomic absorption spectrometry. The proposed method did not require a power supply or a toxic solution and/or gas in any analytical step, therefore it is suitable for the on-site determination of As in drinking water.

  19. Development of a novel amide-silica stationary phase for the reversed-phase HPLC separation of different classes of phytohormones.

    PubMed

    Aral, Hayriye; Aral, Tarık; Ziyadanoğulları, Berrin; Ziyadanoğulları, Recep

    2013-11-15

    A novel amide-bonded silica stationary phase was prepared starting from N-Boc-phenylalanine, cyclohexylamine and spherical silica gel (4 µm, 60 Å). The amide ligand was synthesised with high yield. The resulting amide bonded stationary phase was characterised by SEM, IR and elemental analysis. The resulting selector bearing a polar amide group is used for the reversed-phase chromatography separation of different classes of thirteen phytohormones (plant hormones). The chromatographic behaviours of these analytes on the amide-silica stationary phase were compared with those of RP-C18 column under same conditions. The effects of different separation conditions, such as mobile phase, pH value, flow rate and temperature, on the separation and retention behaviours of the 13 phytohormones in this system were studied. The optimum separation was achieved using reversed-phase HPLC gradient elution with an aqueous mobile phase containing pH=6.85 potassium phosphate buffer (20 mM) and acetonitrile with a 22 °C column temperature. Under these experimental conditions, the 12 phytohormones could be separated and detected at 230 or 270 nm within 26 min.

  20. The origin of halide melt phases in layered intrusions, and their significance to platinum-group element mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, J. J.

    2007-12-01

    Fluid and melt inclusions are preserved within pegmatite bodies and cumulus minerals within mafic-ultramafic layered intrusions that host economic concentrations of the platinum-group elements (e.g., Bushveld Complex, South Africa; Stillwater Complex, Montana). The inclusions indicate that the earliest volatile phase to have exsolved from the crystallizing intrusions was a relatively anhydrous carbonic fluid (CO2-dominated). As crystallization proceeded, volatiles became increasingly water-rich and saline, consistent with the relative saturation limits of carbonic and aqueous fluids in mafic silicate liquids, and the partitioning behavior of Cl in fluid-melt systems. Previously unreported, the latest stage volatiles in the layered intrusions were halide melts (slightly hydrous molten salts) of relatively simply composition (NaCl with minor KCl or CaCl2) with salinities in excess of 90 wt% eq. NaCl or CaCl2. These volatiles were trapped at minimum temperatures of 760-800°C, near the eutectic temperature for water-saturated granitic liquid at moderate crustal pressures. Trace element analysis of the salt melt inclusions by laser ablation ICP-MS (ETH Zürich) show that they contain no detectable concentrations of ore and accessory metals. This is in contrast to the earlier, lower salinity volatiles which contain ppm-concentrations of Pt, Pd, As, Bi, Sb as well as abundant S and base metals. Heterogeneous entrapment of late-stage silicate melt and halide melt provides unambiguous evidence for the coexistence of both phases. However, experimental constraints on the nature of exsolved volatiles from mafic or felsic silicate liquids suggest that the halide melt phases cannot represent an exsolved phase from that coexisting silicate liquid, since this would require unrealistically high (initial) Cl:H2O ratios for the parental silicate liquid (> 9 for a granitic residue). Analysis of rhyodacitic silicate melt inclusions that coexist with the halide melt inclusions show

  1. Intelligent mobile sensor system for drum inspection and monitoring: Phase 1. Topical report, October 1, 1992--June 8, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The objective of this project was to develop an operational system for monitoring and inspection activities for waste storage facility operations at several DOE sites. Specifically, the product of this effort is a robotic device with enhanced intelligence and maneuverability capable of conducting routine inspection of stored waste drums. The device is capable of operating in narrow aisles and interpolating the free aisle space between rows of stacked drums. The system has an integrated sensor suite for leak detection, and is interfaced with a site database both for inspection planning and for data correlation, updating, and report generation. The system is capable of departing on an assigned mission, collecting required data, recording which positions of its mission had to be aborted or modified due to environmental constraints, and reporting back when the mission is complete. Successful identification of more than 90% of all drum defects has been demonstrated in a high fidelity waste storage facility mockup. Identified anomalies included rust spots, rust streaks, areas of corrosion, dents, and tilted drums. All drums were positively identified and correlated with the site database. This development effort is separated into three phases of which phase one is now complete. The first phase has demonstrated an integrated system for monitoring and inspection activities for waste storage facility operations. This demonstration system was quickly fielded and evaluated by leveraging technologies developed from previous NASA and DARPA contracts and internal research. The second phase will demonstrate a prototype system appropriate for operational use in an actual storage facility. The prototype provides an integrated design that considers operational requirements, hardware costs, maintenance, safety, and robustness. The final phase will demonstrate commercial viability using the prototype vehicle in a pilot waste operations and inspection project.

  2. Dielectric permittivity and temperature effects on spin-spin couplings studied on acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Sahakyan, Aleksandr B; Shahkhatuni, Astghik A; Shahkhatuni, Aleksan G; Panosyan, Henry A

    2008-01-01

    Dielectric permittivity (epsilon) and temperature effects on indirect spin-spin coupling constants were studied using acetonitrile as a probe molecule. Experiments were accompanied by hybrid DFT (density functional theory) studies, where the solvent was modeled using the polarization continuum model. Owing to its numerous types of J-couplings, acetonitrile is a very convenient molecule against which various basis sets can be tested or the best basis set can be selected for a given study. The results show reasonable agreement between calculated and experimental values. According to our data, scalar spin-spin coupling constants undergo substantial shifts at lower values of the dielectric constant. Thus J-coupling values are not transferable between measurements made at differing epsilon-conditions, and the assumption of the epsilon-independence of the J-coupling can lead to crucial mistakes in experiments using low-epsilon media. Dielectric permittivity also causes small geometric fluctuations within the molecule, which themselves can affect J-coupling values. Examinations of the results computed with frozen and relaxed geometries show that geometry mediation mostly affects the spin-dipole term of the J-coupling; hence, for accurate evaluation of the latter, frozen geometries are not acceptable. Another interesting fact revealed is the connection between the solvent dielectric properties and the temperature-dependence slopes of J-couplings in corresponding media. PMID:18098231

  3. Pediatric cyanide intoxication and death from an acetonitrile-containing cosmetic

    SciTech Connect

    Caravati, E.M.; Litovitz, T.L. )

    1988-12-16

    Two cases of pediatric accidental ingestion of an acetonitrile-containing cosmetic are reported. One of the children, a 16-month-old boy, was found dead in bed the morning after ingesting the product. No therapy had been undertaken, as the product was mistakenly assumed to be an acetone-containing nail polish remover. The second child, a 2-year-old boy, experienced signs of severe cyanide poisoning, but survived with vigorous supportive care. Both children had blood cyanide levels in the potentially lethal range. The observed delayed onset of severe toxic reactions supports the proposed mechanism of acetonitrile conversion to inorganic cyanide via hepatic microsomal enzymes. Physicians and poison centers should be alerted to the existence of this highly toxic product, sold for removal of sculptured nails and likely to be confused with the less toxic acetone-containing nail polish removers. The authors urge regulatory agencies to reconsider the wisdom of marketing a cosmetic that poses such an extreme health hazard.

  4. Vibrational Relaxation of the Aqueous Proton in Acetonitrile: Ultrafast Cluster Cooling and Vibrational Predissociation.

    PubMed

    Ottosson, N; Liu, L; Bakker, H J

    2016-07-28

    We study the ultrafast O-H stretch vibrational relaxation dynamics of protonated water clusters embedded in a matrix of deuterated acetonitrile, using polarization-resolved mid-IR femtosecond spectroscopy. The clusters are produced by mixing triflic (trifluoromethanesulfonic) acid and H2O in molar ratios of 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3, thus varying the degree of hydration of the proton. At all hydration levels the excited O-H stretch vibration of the hydrated proton shows an ultrafast vibrational relaxation with a time constant T1 < 100 fs, leading to an ultrafast local heating of the protonated water cluster. This excess thermal energy, initially highly localized to the region of the excited proton, first re-distributes over the aqueous cluster and then dissipates into the surrounding acetonitrile matrix. For clusters with a triflic acid to H2O ratio of 1:3 these processes occur with time constants of 320 ± 20 fs and 1.4 ± 0.1 ps, respectively. The cooling of the clusters reveals a long-living, underlying transient absorption change with high anisotropy. We argue that this feature stems from the vibrational predissociation of a small fraction of the proton hydration structures, directly following the ultrafast infrared excitation. PMID:27333302

  5. Comprehensive Size-Determination of Whole Virus Vaccine Particles Using Gas-Phase Electrophoretic Mobility Macromolecular Analyzer, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Havlik, Marlene; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Friedbacher, Gernot; Winkler, Wolfgang; Messner, Paul; Perez-Burgos, Laura; Tauer, Christa; Allmaier, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Biophysical properties including particle size distribution, integrity, and shape of whole virus vaccine particles at different stages in tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccines formulation were analyzed by a new set of methods. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) was used as a conservative sample preparation for vaccine particle fractionation and gas-phase electrophoretic mobility macromolecular analyzer (GEMMA) for analyzing electrophoretic mobility diameters of isolated TBE virions. The derived particle diameter was then correlated with molecular weight. The diameter of the TBE virions determined after SEC by GEMMA instrumentation was 46.8 ± 1.1 nm. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were implemented for comparison purposes and to gain morphological information on the virion particle. Western blotting (Dot Blot) as an immunological method confirmed biological activity of the particles at various stages of the developed analytical strategy. AFM and TEM measurements revealed higher diameters with much higher SD for a limited number of virions, 60.4 ± 8.5 and 53.5 ± 5.3 nm, respectively. GEMMA instrumentation was also used for fractionation of virions with specifically selected diameters in the gas-phase, which were finally collected by means of an electrostatic sampler. At that point (i.e., after particle collection), AFM and TEM showed that the sampled virions were still intact, exhibiting a narrow size distribution (i.e., 59.8 ± 7.8 nm for AFM and 47.5 ± 5.2 nm for TEM images), and most importantly, dot blotting confirmed immunological activity of the collected samples. Furthermore dimers and virion artifacts were detected, too. PMID:26266988

  6. Use of a Novel Sub-2 µm Silica Hydride Vancomycin Stationary Phase in Nano-Liquid Chromatography. II. Separation of Derivatized Amino Acid Enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Silvia; Fanali, Chiara; Fanali, Salvatore

    2015-11-01

    A novel vancomycin silica hydride stationary phase was synthesized and the particles of 1.8 µm were packed into fused silica capillaries of 75 µm internal diameter (I.D.). The chiral stationary phase (CSP) was tested for the separation of some derivatized amino acid enantiomers by using nano-liquid chromatography (nano-LC). Some experimental parameters such as the type and the content of organic modifier, the pH, and the concentration of the buffer added to the mobile phase were modified and the effect on enantioselectivity, retention time, and enantioresolution factor was studied. The separation of selected dansyl amino acids (Dns-AAs), e.g., Asp, Glu, Leu, and Phe in their enantiomers was initially achieved utilizing a mobile phase containing 85% (v/v) methanol (MeOH) and formate buffer measuring the enantioresolution factor and enantioselectivity in the range 1.74-4.17 and 1.39-1.59, respectively. Better results were obtained employing a more polar organic solvent as acetonitrile (ACN) in the mobile phase. Optimum results (Rs 1.41-6.09 and α 1.28-2.36) were obtained using a mobile phase containing formate buffer pH 2.5/water/MeOH/ACN 6:19:12.5:62.5 (v/v/v/v) in isocratic elution mode at flow rate of 130 nL/min.

  7. A radial differential mobility analyzer for the size-classification of gas-phase synthesized nanoparticles at low pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanda, K. K.; Kruis, F. E.

    2014-07-01

    Differential mobility analyzers (DMAs) are commonly used to generate monodisperse nanoparticle aerosols. Commercial DMAs operate at quasi-atmospheric pressures and are therefore not designed to be vacuum-tight. In certain particle synthesis methods, the use of a vacuum-compatible DMA is a requirement as a process step for producing high-purity metallic particles. A vacuum-tight radial DMA (RDMA) has been developed and tested at low pressures. Its performance has been evaluated by using a commercial NANO-DMA as the reference. The performance of this low-pressure RDMA (LP-RDMA) in terms of the width of its transfer function is found to be comparable with that of other NANO-DMAs at atmospheric pressure and is almost independent of the pressure down to 30 mbar. It is shown that LP-RDMA can be used for the classification of nanometer-sized particles (5-20 nm) under low pressure condition (30 mbar) and has been successfully applied to nanoparticles produced by ablating FeNi at low pressures.

  8. Performance of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU): Airlock Coolant Loop Recovery (A/L CLR) Hardware - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John; Rector, tony; Gazda, Daniel; Lewis, John

    2009-01-01

    An EMU water processing kit (Airlock Coolant Loop Recovery A/L CLR) was developed as a corrective action to Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) coolant flow disruptions experienced on the International Space Station (ISS) in May of 2004 and thereafter. Conservative schedules for A/L CLR use and component life were initially developed and implemented based on prior analysis results and analytical modeling. The examination of postflight samples and EMU hardware in November of 2006 indicated that the A/L CLR kits were functioning well and had excess capacity that would allow a relaxation of the initially conservative schedules of use and component life. A relaxed use schedule and list of component lives was implemented thereafter. Since the adoption of the relaxed A/L CLR schedules of use and component lives, several A/L CLR kit components, transport loop water samples and sensitive EMU transport loop components have been examined to gage the impact of the relaxed requirements. The intent of this paper is to summarize the findings of that evaluation, and to outline updated schedules for A/L CLR use and component life.

  9. Use of vancomycin silica stationary phase in packed capillary electrochromatography. II. Enantiomer separation of venlafaxine and O-desmethylvenlafaxine in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Fanali, S; Rudaz, S; Veuthey, J L; Desiderio, C

    2001-06-01

    A capillary electrochromatography method, using vancomycin chiral stationary phase packed capillary, was optimized for the simultaneous chiral separation of the antidepressant drug venlafaxine and its main active metabolite O-desmethylvenlafaxine. Simultaneous baseline enantiomeric separation of the two compounds was obtained using a mobile phase composed of 100 mM ammonium acetate buffer pH 6/water/acetonitrile (5:5:90, v/v). The electrokinetic injection for sample introduction provided a limit of quantitation for both the compounds of 0.05 microg/ml racemate concentration suitable for the analysis of venlafaxine and metabolite in biological samples. The acetonitrile mobile phase concentration was found to modulate the analytes elution times, the enantiomeric resolution and the efficiency of the separation. The column was tested for repeatability and linearity showing RSD values (%) in the range of 0.13-0.24, 2.47-3.66 and 1.35-2.50 for migration time, sample/internal standard peak area ratio and enantiomeric resolution, respectively and correlation coefficients higher than 0.9990. The method was applied to the analysis of clinical samples of patients under depression therapy showing a stereoselective metabolism for venlafaxine.

  10. Development and validation of a new stability indicating reversed phase liquid chromatographic method for the determination of prednisolone acetate and impurities in an ophthalmic suspension.

    PubMed

    Marley, Adrian; Stalcup, Apryll M; Connolly, Damian

    2015-01-01

    A new stability indicating reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method was developed and validated under current International Conference of Harmonisation (ICH) guidance for the determination of prednisolone acetate (PAC) and impurities in an ophthalmic suspension. The developed method is presented as an alternative to a modified version of the current RP-HPLC method described in the USP monograph for the assay of PAC in an ophthalmic suspension. Along with the assay of PAC, the new method is also capable of identifying and quantifying eight selected PAC impurities and degradation products in an ophthalmic suspension. Using an Agilent Poroshell 120 EC-C18 100 mm × 4.6mm (dp: 2.7 μm) column set to 60°C with step gradient elution generated using mobile phase A: acetonitrile/water (10:90) (v/v) and mobile phase B: acetonitrile delivered at 1.2 mL min(-1), all peaks of interest are eluted in 33 min with resolution of 1.5 between the critical pairs. The developed method was validated for PAC and impurities to ICH recommendations for accuracy, linearity, precision (repeatability), limit of detection, limit of quantitation, robustness and specificity.

  11. Supercritical fluid chromatography and two-dimensional supercritical fluid chromatography of polar car lubricant additives with neat CO(2) as mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Lavison, Gwenaelle; Bertoncini, Fabrice; Thiébaut, Didier; Beziau, Jean-François; Carrazé, Bernadette; Valette, Pascale; Duteurtre, Xavier

    2007-08-17

    Car lubricant additives are added to mineral or synthetic base stocks to improve viscosity and resistance to oxidation of the lubricant and to limit wear of engines. Their total amount in the commercial lubricant varies from a few percents to 20-25%. As they belong to various chemical classes and are added to a very complex medium, the base stock, their detailed chromatographic analysis is very difficult and time consuming as it should involve sample treatment and preparative scale separations in order to simplify the sample. The aim of this work is to determine the feasibility of the separation of low molecular weight lubricant additives using various packed columns with pure CO(2) as a mobile phase to enable implementation of flame ionisation detection as universal detector. This is part of a hypernated system including more sophisticated specific detectors, such as AED, FTIR or MS to obtain detailed structural information of compounds. This paper is devoted to the comparison of some stationary phases supposed to provide hydrocarbon group type separation (silica and normal phase) or separations on alkyl-bonded silica in non-aqueous mode of some selected classes of additives in test mixtures or in base stocks. Adsorption chromatography allows partial separation of additives from the base stocks while the direct elution of test additives can only be obtained on reversed phase supports having a very efficient silanol group protection so the interaction of the more polar compounds is much reduced. A two-dimensional scheme of analysis is also described. It combines adsorption chromatography to separate most of the polar additives from the base stock and alkyl-bonded silica for more detailed separation of the additives. However, overlapping between groups of compounds and the lack of resolution between some additives and the base stock should be addressed by the implementing of selective detectors. PMID:17582427

  12. Alterations in oxidant/antioxidant balance, high-mobility group box 1 protein and acute phase response in cross-bred suckling piglets suffering from rotaviral enteritis.

    PubMed

    Kumar De, Ujjwal; Mukherjee, Reena; Nandi, Sukdeb; Patel, Bhimnere Hanumatnagouda Manjunatha; Dimri, Umesh; Ravishankar, Chintu; Verma, Ashok Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Rotaviral enteritis has emerged as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in piglets during their post-natal life. The present study was carried out to examine high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, acute phase response and oxidative stress indices in the serum of suckling piglets suffering from enteritis with or without association of porcine group A rotavirus infection. The present investigation utilized 23 clinical cases with signs of acute enteritis and 12 more healthy piglets of a similar age group as control animals. Out of 23 enteritis cases, 12 cases were found to be positive for porcine group A rotavirus infection as confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using specific primers for group A rotavirus, and the rest were found negative. The acute enteritis cases in piglets were associated with an elevated level of HMGB1 protein and serum haptoglobin and ceruloplasmin suggestive of an acute phase response. Among the oxidative stress indices, the concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) in serum were significantly increased. A pronounced drop of total antioxidant capacity and the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as catalase and superoxide dismutase in the serum of piglets suffering from acute enteritis compared to healthy ones were also noticed. The alterations in HMGB1 protein, acute phase response and oxidative stress indices were more pronounced in cases with the involvement of porcine rotavirus as compared to rotavirus-negative cases. It is concluded that HMGB1 protein, markers of oxidative stress and acute phase proteins might play an important role in the aetiopathogenesis of porcine diarrhoea caused by rotavirus and might be true markers in diagnosing the conditions leading to the extension of the prompt and effective therapeutic care.

  13. Universal model based on the mobile order and disorder theory for predicting lipophilicity and partition coefficients in all mutually immiscible two-phase liquid systems

    PubMed

    Ruelle

    2000-05-01

    The quantitative thermodynamic development of the mobile order and disorder theory in H-bonded liquids has been extended in order to predict partition coefficients. The model enables "a priori" estimation of the partition coefficient (log P) of neutral solutes, not only in the conventional 1-octanol/water reference but also in all mutually saturated two-phase systems made up of largely immiscible solvents. The model is obtained from the thermodynamic treatment of the various physicochemical free energy processes encoded in the overall distribution process and accordingly provides a useful tool for better understanding both the origin and the factors, such as the solute molar volume, that determine the partition coefficient of nonelectrolytes in a given system. From the comparison of the relative magnitude of the processes contributing to the log P value, a lot of information can also be gained regarding the variation in log P of the same substance partitioned between different solvent systems. As a demonstration, the model has been successfully applied to predict the log P of a great number of chemicals of varying structure, size, and chemical nature partitioned in a large set of essentially immiscible solvent pairs, differing either by their nonpolar or by their polar phase. In the systems involving water as the polar phase, the hydrophobic effect is always the driving force that governs the distribution process irrespective of the interacting or noninteracting nature of the substances studied. In the other two-phase systems, the partitioning of complexing solutes in particular appears to be ruled rather by their hydrogen-bonding capabilities than by their hydrophobicities.

  14. The interhemispheric distribution and the budget of acetonitrile in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, Stephan; Warneck, Peter

    1990-11-01

    Gas chromatography in conjunction with a thermionic nitrogen-specific detector was used to determine mixing ratios of acetonitrile in air samples collected in Europe and over the Atlantic Ocean. In the city of Mainz, values of the order of 340 pptv were observed with large variations indicating the vicinity of sources. In the rural community of Deuselbach the average mixing ratio was 147±28 pptv; over the North Sea the range was 65-196 pptv depending on wind direction, with the lowest values occurring for northerly winds from the open ocean. The distribution of CH3 CN with geographic latitude over the Atlantic Ocean was explored between 30°S and 50°N on board R/V Polarstern during the cruise ANT V/5 in March-April 1987. Over the open ocean, maximum mixing ratios were observed near 4°S with values of 175 pptv. At latitudes near 30°S the mixing ratio averaged 90.4 pptv, whereas at 30°N the average was 52.1 pptv. The lowest mixing ratios of 21 pptv were found near 50°N. The tropical maximum is attributed to the advection with the trade winds of continental air from Africa, enriched with acetonitrile from biomass burning. The mixing ratios north and south of the maximum correlate well with the surface temperature of seawater, indicating a gas-liquid equilibrium for CH3 CN dissolved in seawater. From the observations and with the further assumption that CH3 CN is vertically well mixed, its total mass content in the troposphere was estimated as 0.37-0.57 Tg. Global emission rates for various sources were estimated as follows: automobiles 0.27 Tg/year, oil-fired power stations 0.0035 Tg/year, and biomass burning 0.80 Tg/year. The total estimated source strength is 1.1±0.5 Tg/year. The tropospheric residence time of acetonitrile was calculated from these data as 0.23-0.90 year with a probable value of 0.45 year. Wet precipitation and reaction with OH radicals are known sinks for tropospheric CH3 CN, but they can take up only 30% of the global emission rate. We

  15. Mobile satellite service for Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sward, David

    1988-01-01

    The Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system and a special program designed to provide interim mobile satellite services (IMSS) during the construction phase of MSAT are described. A mobile satellite system is a key element in extending voice and and data telecommunications to all Canadians.

  16. A solid-state NMR study of phase structure, molecular interactions, and mobility in blends of citric acid and paracetamol.

    PubMed

    Schantz, S; Hoppu, P; Juppo, A M

    2009-05-01

    Citric acid anhydrate (CAA) and paracetamol (PARA), prepared as crystalline physical mixtures and as amorphous blends, were studied using (13)C solid-state cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR. Amorphous blends showed significant line broadening from the conformational distribution as compared to the crystalline samples. Also, chemical shift variations were observed between crystalline and amorphous blends, which were attributed to differences in intermolecular interactions. Averaging of proton rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1rho)) probed via different (13)C sites in the amorphous blends confirmed molecular level mixing. For some, initially amorphous, sample compositions the onset of crystallization was evident directly from spectra and from the significantly longer T(1rho) relaxations. Thus, crystallization caused phase separation with properties of the two phases resembling those of pure CAA and PARA, respectively. (13)C spectra of amorphous 50/50 (w/w, %) CAA/PARA recorded from above the glass transition temperature broadened as the temperature increased to a maximum at T approximately T(g) + 33 K. This was the result of a dynamic interference between the line narrowing techniques being applied and the time scale of molecular reorientation in the miscible melt. The derived average correlation time was found to correspond well with previous results from melt rheology. We conclude that the underlying reasons for physical instability (i.e., crystallization from the miscible melt, including molecular interactions and dynamics) of this class of amorphous binary mixtures can be effectively evaluated using NMR spectroscopy.

  17. Detection of aqueous phase chemical warfare agent degradation products by negative mode ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry [IM(tof)MS].

    PubMed

    Steiner, Wes E; Harden, Charles S; Hong, Feng; Klopsch, Steve J; Hill, Herbert H; McHugh, Vincent M

    2006-02-01

    The use of negative ion monitoring mode with an atmospheric pressure ion mobility orthogonal reflector time-of-flight mass spectrometer [IM(tof)MS] to detect chemical warfare agent (CWA) degradation products from aqueous phase samples has been determined. Aqueous phase sampling used a traditional electrospray ionization (ESI) source for sample introduction and ionization. Certified reference materials (CRM) of CWA degradation products for the detection of Schedule 1, 2, or 3 toxic chemicals or their precursors as defined by the chemical warfare convention (CWC) treaty verification were used in this study. A mixture of six G-series nerve related CWA degradation products (EMPA, IMPA, EHEP, IHEP, CHMPA, and PMPA) and their related collision induced dissociation (CID) fragment ions (MPA and EPA) were found in each case to be clearly resolved and detected using the IM(tof)MS instrument in negative ion monitoring mode. Corresponding ions, masses, drift times, K(o) values, and signal intensities for each of the CWA degradation products are reported. PMID:16413205

  18. The estimation of melting points and fusion enthalpies using experimental solubilities, estimated total phase change entropies, and mobile order and disorder theory.

    PubMed

    Chickos, James S; Nichols, Gary; Ruelle, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Melting points and fusion enthalpies are predicted for a series of 81 compounds by combining experimental solubilities in a variety of solvents and analyzed according to the theory of mobile order and disorder (MOD) and using the total phase change entropy estimated by a group additivity method. The error associated in predicting melting points is dependent on the magnitude of the temperature predicted. An error of +/- 12 K (+/- 1 sigma) was obtained for compounds melting between ambient temperature and 350 K (24 entries). This error increased to +/- 23 K when the temperature range was expanded to 400 K (46 entries) and +/- 39 K for the temperature range 298-555 K (79 entries). Fusion enthalpies were predicted within +/- 2sigma of the experimental values (+/- 6.4 kJ mol(-1)) for 79 entries. The uncertainty in the fusion enthalpy did not appear dependent on the magnitude of the melting point. Two outliers, adamantane and camphor, have significant phase transitions that occur below room temperature. Estimates of melting temperature and fusion enthalpy for these compounds were characterized by significantly larger errors.

  19. Nano electrospray gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis (nES GEMMA) of liposomes: applicability of the technique for nano vesicle batch control

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Victor U.; Urey, Carlos; Gondikas, Andreas; Golesne, Monika; Friedbacher, Gernot; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo; Andersson, Roland; Marko-Varga, György; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Liposomes are biodegradable nanoparticle vesicles consisting of a lipid bilayer encapsulating an aqueous core. Entrapped cargo material is shielded from the extra-vesicular medium and sustained release of encapsulated material can be achieved. However, application of liposomes as nano-carriers demands their characterization concerning size and size distribution, particle-number concentration, occurrence of vesicle building blocks in solution and determination of the resulting vesicle encapsulation capacity. These questions can be targeted via gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis (GEMMA) based on a nano electrospray (nES) charge-reduction source. This instrument separates single-charged nanoparticles in the gas-phase according to size in a high-laminar sheath-flow by means of an orthogonal, tunable electric field. nES GEMMA analysis enables to confirm liposome integrity after passage through the instrument (in combination with atomic force microscopy) as well as to exclude vesicle aggregation. Additionally, nanoparticle diameters at peak apexes and size distribution data are obtained. Differences of hydrodynamic and dry particle diameter values, as well as the effect of number- and mass-based concentration data analysis on obtained liposome diameters are shown. Furthermore, the repeatability of liposome preparation is studied, especially upon incorporation of PEGylated lipids in the bilayer. Finally, the instruments applicability to monitor mechanical stress applied to vesicles is demonstrated. PMID:27549027

  20. Extraction of toxic compounds from saliva by magnetic-stirring-assisted micro-solid-phase extraction step followed by headspace-gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Criado-García, Laura; Arce, Lourdes

    2016-09-01

    A new sample extraction procedure based on micro-solid-phase extraction (μSPE) using a mixture of sorbents of different polarities (polymeric reversed-phase sorbent HLB, silica-based sorbent C18, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes) was applied to extract benzene, toluene, butyraldehyde, benzaldehyde, and tolualdehyde present in saliva to avoid interference from moisture and matrix components and enhance sensitivity and selectivity of the ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) methodology proposed. The extraction of target analytes from saliva samples by using μSPE were followed by the desorption step carried out in the headspace vials placed in the autosampler of the IMS device. Then, 200 μL of headspace was injected into the GC column coupled to the IMS for its analysis. The method was fully validated in terms of sensitivity, precision, and recovery. The LODs and LOQs obtained, when analytes were dissolved in saliva samples to consider the matrix effect, were within the range of 0.38-0.49 and 1.26-1.66 μg mL(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviations were <3.5 % for retention time and drift time values, which indicate that the method proposed can be applied to determine toxic compounds in saliva samples. Graphical abstract Summary of steps followed in the experimental set up of this work. PMID:27481168

  1. Rapid analysis of tile industry gaseous emissions by ion mobility spectrometry and comparison with solid phase micro-extraction/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, R; Bocchini, P; Pinelli, F; Galletti, G C

    2006-12-01

    The present paper reports on a rapid method for the analysis of gaseous emissions from ceramic industry, based on ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) as a means for on-site monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during tile baking. IMS was calibrated with a set of reference compounds (i.e. ethyl acetate, ethanol, ethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, 2-methyl-1,3-dioxolane, 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxolane, 1,3-dioxolane, 1,4-dioxane, benzene, toluene, cyclohexane, acetone, acetic acid) via air-flow permeation. The technique was tested on a laboratory-scale kiln and tiles prepared with selected glycol- and resin-based additives. Finally, the analytical method was applied to emissions from two industries in the Modena (Italy) ceramic area. The results of all experimental phases were compared to those obtained by solid phase micro-extraction/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (SPME/GC/MS). IMS showed potential as a real-time monitoring device for quality assessment in ceramic industry emissions. IMS spectra, SPME/GC/MS data, relationship between additives/baking conditions and produced VOCs and advantages and limitations of both techniques will be discussed.

  2. Preparation, characterization and application of a reversed phase liquid chromatography/hydrophilic interaction chromatography mixed-mode C18-DTT stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Long, Yao; Yao, Lin; Xu, Li; Shi, Zhi-Guo; Xu, Lanying

    2016-01-01

    A mixed-mode chromatographic stationary phase, C18-DTT (dithiothreitol) silica (SiO2) was prepared through "thiol-ene" click chemistry. The obtained material was characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscope, nitrogen adsorption analysis and contact angle analysis. Chromatographic performance of the C18-DTT was systemically evaluated by studying the effect of acetonitrile content, pH, buffer concentration of the mobile phase and column temperature. It was demonstrated that the novel stationary phase possessed reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC)/hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) mixed-mode property. The stop-flow test revealed that C18-DTT exhibited excellent compatibility with 100% aqueous mobile phase. Additionally, the stability and column-to-column reproducibility of the C18-DTT material were satisfactory, with relative standard deviations of retention factor of the tested analytes (verapamil, fenbufen, guanine, tetrandrine and nicotinic acid) in the range of 1.82-3.72% and 0.85-1.93%, respectively. Finally, the application of C18-DTT column was demonstrated in the separation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, aromatic carboxylic acids, alkaloids, nucleo-analytes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. It had great resolving power in the analysis of various compounds in HILIC and RPLC chromatographic conditions and was a promising RPLC/HILIC mixed-mode stationary phase. PMID:26695288

  3. Preparation, characterization and application of a reversed phase liquid chromatography/hydrophilic interaction chromatography mixed-mode C18-DTT stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Long, Yao; Yao, Lin; Xu, Li; Shi, Zhi-Guo; Xu, Lanying

    2016-01-01

    A mixed-mode chromatographic stationary phase, C18-DTT (dithiothreitol) silica (SiO2) was prepared through "thiol-ene" click chemistry. The obtained material was characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscope, nitrogen adsorption analysis and contact angle analysis. Chromatographic performance of the C18-DTT was systemically evaluated by studying the effect of acetonitrile content, pH, buffer concentration of the mobile phase and column temperature. It was demonstrated that the novel stationary phase possessed reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC)/hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) mixed-mode property. The stop-flow test revealed that C18-DTT exhibited excellent compatibility with 100% aqueous mobile phase. Additionally, the stability and column-to-column reproducibility of the C18-DTT material were satisfactory, with relative standard deviations of retention factor of the tested analytes (verapamil, fenbufen, guanine, tetrandrine and nicotinic acid) in the range of 1.82-3.72% and 0.85-1.93%, respectively. Finally, the application of C18-DTT column was demonstrated in the separation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, aromatic carboxylic acids, alkaloids, nucleo-analytes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. It had great resolving power in the analysis of various compounds in HILIC and RPLC chromatographic conditions and was a promising RPLC/HILIC mixed-mode stationary phase.

  4. [Influences of ion-suppressors on retention behaviors of nine food additives in reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatographic separation].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yonggang; Chen, Xiaohong; Li, Xiaoping; Yao, Shanshan; Jin, Micong

    2011-10-01

    The influences of ion-suppressors on retention behaviors of nine food additives, i.e., acesulfame, saccharin, caffeine, aspartame, benzoic acid, sorbic acid, stevioside, dehydroacetic acid and neotame in reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatographic (RP-HPLC) separation were investigated. The organic modification effects of acids, i. e. , trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and buffer salts, i. e. , TFA-ammonium acetate (AmAc) were studied emphatically. The relationships between retention factors of solutes and volume percentages of ion-suppressors in the mobile phase systems of acetonitrile-TFA aqueous solution and acetonitrile-TFA-AmAc aqueous solution were quantitatively established, separately. The separation of nine food additives was completed by a gradient elution with acetonitrile-TFA (0.01%, v/v)-AmAc (2. 5 mmol/L) aqueous solution as the mobile phases. An RP-HPLC method was established for the simultaneous determination of nine food additives in red wine. In the range of 10. 0 - 100. 0 mg/L, nine food additives showed good linearity with the correlation coefficients ( r2 ) larger than 0. 999 1. The limits of detection (LODs) were in the range of 0. 33 - 2. 36 mg/L and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were in the range of 1. 11 - 7. 80 mg/L. The spiked recoveries were between 87. 61% and 108. 4% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 2. 2% -9. 4%. These results are of referential significance for the rapid establishment and accu- rate optimization of RP-HPLC separation for the simultaneous determination of food additives in other foods.

  5. Effect of solvent strength and temperature on retention for a polar-endcapped, octadecylsiloxane-bonded silica stationary phase with methanol-water mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Kiridena, Waruna; Poole, Colin F; Koziol, Wladyslaw W

    2004-12-10

    Synergi Hydro-RP is a new type of polar-endcapped, octadecylsiloxane-bonded silica packing for reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Its retention properties as a function of solvent strength and temperature are evaluated from the change in retention factors over the composition range (0-70% v/v methanol) and temperature range (25-65 degrees C) using the solvation parameter model and response surface methodologies. The main factors that affect retention are solute size and hydrogen-bond basicity, with minor contributions from solute hydrogen-bond acidity, dipole-type and electron lone pair interactions. Within the easily accessible range for both temperature and solvent strength, the ability to change selectivity is much greater for solvent strength than temperature. Also, a significant portion of the effect of increasing temperature is to reduce retention without changing selectivity. Response surfaces for the system constants are smooth and non-linear, except for cavity formation and dispersion interactions (v system constant), which is linear. Modeling of the response surfaces suggests that solvent strength and temperature are not independent factors for the b, s and e system constants and for the model intercept (c term). PMID:15628160

  6. Mobile Learning Using Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicente, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The participation in mobile learning programs is conditioned by having/using mobile communication technology. Those who do not have or use such technology cannot participate in mobile learning programs. This study evaluates who are the most likely participants of mobile learning programs by examining the demographic profile and mobile phone usage…

  7. The Conductance of Naland Tetraethylammonium Iodide in Mixtures of Methanol with Acetonitrile and Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawlicka, E.; Grabowski, R.

    1991-02-01

    The conductance of Nal and Et4NI in methanol-acetonitrile and methanol-water mixtures was measured at 25 ± 0.005 °C for the whole range of the solvent compositions, the salt molarity ranging from 5 • 10-5 up to 1 • 10-2. Several equations describing the influence of the salt concentration on the equivalent conductance are examined and the Fuoss-Hsia equation with the Fernandez-Prini parameters is found to be the most appropriate one for systems with weak ionic association. Variations with the solvent composition of the limiting equivalent conductance, the distance between ions forming ion pairs and the association constant are discussed. Nonmonotonous changes of the association constant are concluded to be a feature of microheterogenous systems.

  8. An Analysis of the Rotational Spectrum of Acetonitrile (CH_3CN) in Excited Vibrational States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neese, Christopher F.; McMillan, James; Fortman, Sarah; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2014-06-01

    Acetonitrile (CH_3CN) is a well-known interstellar molecule whose vibrationally excited states need to be accounted for in searches for new molecules in the interstellar medium. To help catalog such `weed' molecules, we have developed a technique that involves recording complete spectra over a range of astrophysically significant temperatures. With such a data set, we can experimentally measure the line strengths and lower state energies of unassigned lines in the spectrum. In this talk we will present the ongoing analysis of complete temperature resolved spectra in the 215-265 GHz and 570-650 GHz regions. We have been able to assign many vibrationally hot lines from this data and a room temperature data set spanning 165-700 GHz. To date, we have assigned lines from most of the vibrational states below ν_6 at 1448 wn.

  9. Influences of halogen atoms on indole-3-acetonitrile (IAN): Crystal structure and Hirshfeld surfaces analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yang-Hui; Yang, Li-Jing; Han, Guangjun; Liu, Qing-Ling; Wang, Wei; Ling, Yang; Sun, Bai-Wang

    2014-11-01

    Crystal structural investigations and Hirshfeld surface analysis of three halogen atoms (4-Cl, 6-Cl and 4-Br) substituted indole-3-acetonitrile (IAN) were reported in this work. The structures of the present three compounds were characterized by Infrared spectra, Elemental analyses, NMR spectra, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) and hot stage microscopy (HSM). The Hirshfeld surfaces analysis in terms of crystal structure, intermolecular interactions and π⋯π stacking motifs were performed. We found that the different kinds of halogen atoms and the different substituted positions have a significant effect on the crystal structures, molecular π⋯π stacking motifs, melting points, and the nature of intermolecular interactions for IANs.

  10. Aqueous acetonitrile extraction for pesticide residue analysis in agricultural products with HPLC-DAD.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Eiki; Kobara, Yuso; Baba, Koji; Eun, Heesoo

    2014-07-01

    To reduce hazardous organic solvent consumption during sample preparation procedures as much as possible, an extraction method of smallest feasible sample volume (5g) using aqueous acetonitrile (MeCN) was developed to extract pesticide residues from agricultural samples prior to HPLC-DAD determination. Extraction with MeCN/water (1:1, v/v), and adjustment of the MeCN concentration by diluting with water after extraction recovered successfully most pesticides showing various physicochemical properties. The matrix effects of tested samples on the proposed method developed herein were generally negligibly-small. The average recoveries were in the range 70-120% for all pesticides with the coefficient of variation values below 20%. The reduction rate of organic solvents used for the proposed sample preparation method was up to approximately 60% compared with the Japanese authorised official method for pesticide residue analyses. These results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method for pesticides with diverse properties.

  11. Mixed solutions of silver cation and chloride anion in acetonitrile: voltammetric and EQCM study.

    PubMed

    Skompska, Magdalena; Vorotyntsev, Mikhail A; Rajchowska, Aleksandra; Levin, Oleg V

    2010-09-21

    Electrochemical behavior of Pt and Au electrodes in acetonitrile solutions at different concentration ratios of Cl(-) and Ag(+) ions was studied by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM). The composition of the mixed silver chloride solutions, i.e. the amount of each component of the system (solid AgCl and solute species: Ag(+), Cl(-), AgCl(2)(-)), is governed by the solubility product of AgCl and the stability constant of AgCl(2)(-)complex and depends strongly on the ratio of the total concentrations of chloride and silver ions. In this work we analyze in detail the influence of the Cl(-)/Ag(+) concentration ratio on the value of equilibrium electrode potential and the shape of cyclic voltammograms. We explain the complicated shapes of the experimental curves observed at different concentration ranges, propose the mechanisms of the processes occurring at the electrode and substantiate them by EQCM data.

  12. Bis{2-[(Tri-phenyl-meth-yl)amino]-phen-yl} diselenide aceto-nitrile monosolvate.

    PubMed

    Neuba, Adam; Schneider, Tobias; Flörke, Ulrich; Henkel, Gerald

    2014-05-01

    The mol-ecular structure of the title compound, C50H40N2Se2·C2H3N, shows a syn conformation of the benzene rings bound to the Se atoms, with an Se-Se bond length of 2.3529 (6) Å and a C-Se-Se-C torsion angle of 93.53 (14)°. The two Se-bonded aromatic ring planes make a dihedral angle of 18.42 (16)°. Intra-molecular N-H⋯Se hydrogen bonds are noted. Inter-molecular C-H⋯Se inter-actions give rise to supra-molecular chains extended along [100]. One severely disordered aceto-nitrile solvent mol-ecule per asymmetric unit was treated with SQUEEZE in PLATON [Spek (2009 ▶). Acta Cryst. D65, 148-155]; the crystal data take the presence of this mol-ecule into account. PMID:24860347

  13. Photon emission via surface state at the gold/acetonitrile solution interface

    SciTech Connect

    Uosaki, Kohei; Murakoshi, Kei; Kita, Hideaki )

    1991-01-24

    The emission of light caused by an electron-transfer reaction at a gold electrode in acetonitrile solution containing one of three redox species (benzophenone, trans-stilbene, and benzonitrile) with different redox potentials was studied. The high-energy threshold of the spectrum decreases linearly as the potential of the gold electrode becomes more negative. The peak position with respect to the high-energy threshold of the spectrum varies with electrode potential and is not affected by the redox potential of the electron injection species at the same electrode potential. The emission efficiency also depends on the potential. From these results, the authors proposed that the emission is due to a charge-transfer reaction inverse photoemission (CTRIP) process that takes place via a surface state.

  14. Arsenic removal from contaminated brackish sea water by sorption onto Al hydroxides and Fe phases mobilized by land-use.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changxun; Peltola, Pasi; Nystrand, Miriam I; Virtasalo, Joonas J; Österholm, Peter; Ojala, Antti E K; Hogmalm, Johan K; Åström, Mats E

    2016-01-15

    This study examines the spatial and temporal distribution patterns of arsenic (As) in solid and aqueous materials along the mixing zone of an estuary, located in the south-eastern part of the Bothnian Bay and fed by a creek running through an acid sulfate (AS) soil landscape. The concentrations of As in solution form (<1 kDa) increase steadily from the creek mouth to the outer estuary, suggesting that inflowing seawater, rather than AS soil, is the major As source in the estuary. In sediments at the outer estuary, As was accumulated and diagenetically cycled in the surficial layers, as throughout much of the Bothnian Bay. In contrast, in sediments in the inner estuary, As concentrations and accumulation rates showed systematical peaks at greater depths. These peaks were overall consistent with the temporal trend of past As discharges from the Rönnskär smelter and the accompanied As concentrations in past sea-water of the Bothnian Bay, pointing to a connection between the historical smelter activities and the sediment-bound As in the inner estuary. However, the concentrations and accumulation rates of As peaked at depths where the smelter activities had already declined, but a large increase in the deposition of Al hydroxides and Fe phases occurred in response to intensified land-use in the mid 1960's and early 1970's. This correspondence suggests that, apart from the inflowing As-contaminated seawater, capture by Al hydroxides, Fe hydroxides and Fe-organic complexes is another important factor for As deposition in the inner estuary. After accumulating in the sediment, the solid-phase As was partly remobilized, as reflected by increased pore-water As concentrations, a process favored by As(V) reduction and high concentrations of dissolved organic matter.

  15. Arsenic removal from contaminated brackish sea water by sorption onto Al hydroxides and Fe phases mobilized by land-use.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changxun; Peltola, Pasi; Nystrand, Miriam I; Virtasalo, Joonas J; Österholm, Peter; Ojala, Antti E K; Hogmalm, Johan K; Åström, Mats E

    2016-01-15

    This study examines the spatial and temporal distribution patterns of arsenic (As) in solid and aqueous materials along the mixing zone of an estuary, located in the south-eastern part of the Bothnian Bay and fed by a creek running through an acid sulfate (AS) soil landscape. The concentrations of As in solution form (<1 kDa) increase steadily from the creek mouth to the outer estuary, suggesting that inflowing seawater, rather than AS soil, is the major As source in the estuary. In sediments at the outer estuary, As was accumulated and diagenetically cycled in the surficial layers, as throughout much of the Bothnian Bay. In contrast, in sediments in the inner estuary, As concentrations and accumulation rates showed systematical peaks at greater depths. These peaks were overall consistent with the temporal trend of past As discharges from the Rönnskär smelter and the accompanied As concentrations in past sea-water of the Bothnian Bay, pointing to a connection between the historical smelter activities and the sediment-bound As in the inner estuary. However, the concentrations and accumulation rates of As peaked at depths where the smelter activities had already declined, but a large increase in the deposition of Al hydroxides and Fe phases occurred in response to intensified land-use in the mid 1960's and early 1970's. This correspondence suggests that, apart from the inflowing As-contaminated seawater, capture by Al hydroxides, Fe hydroxides and Fe-organic complexes is another important factor for As deposition in the inner estuary. After accumulating in the sediment, the solid-phase As was partly remobilized, as reflected by increased pore-water As concentrations, a process favored by As(V) reduction and high concentrations of dissolved organic matter. PMID:26558848

  16. Pyridine versus acetonitrile coordination in rhodium-N-heterocyclic carbene square-planar complexes.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Laura; Di Giuseppe, Andrea; Castarlenas, Ricardo; Lahoz, Fernando J; Pérez-Torrente, Jesús J; Oro, Luis A

    2015-03-28

    Experimental and theoretical studies on the factors that control the coordination chemistry of N-donor ligands in square-planar complexes of the type RhCl(NHC)L(1)L(2) (NHC = N-heterocyclic carbene) are presented. The dinuclear complexes [Rh(μ-Cl)(IPr)(η(2)-olefin)]2 {IPr = 1,3-bis-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imidazol-2-carbene} have been reacted with different combinations of ligands including pyridine, acetonitrile, 2-pyridylacetonitrile, triphenylphosphine, tricyclohexylphosphine, carbon monoxide or molecular oxygen. In addition, the reactivity of RhCl(IPr)(PPh3)2 has also been studied. Pyridine preferentially coordinates trans to the carbene ligand whereas π-acceptor ligands (olefin, CO or PPh3) are prone to bind cis to IPr and trans to chlorido, unless steric bulk hinders the coordination of the ligand (PCy3). In contrast, acetonitrile is more labile than pyridine but is able to form complexes coordinated cis-to-IPr. Molecular dioxygen also displaces the labile cyclooctene ligand in RhCl(IPr)(η(2)-coe)(py) to give a square-planar dioxygen adduct which can be transformed into a peroxo derivative by additional coordination of pyridine. Charge decomposition analysis (CDA) shows that σ-donation values are similar for coordination at cis- or trans-IPr positions, whereas efficient π-backbonding is significantly observed at cis position being the favoured coordination site for π-acceptor ligands. The Rh-IPr rotational barrier in a series of square-planar complexes has been analysed. It has been found that the main contribution is the steric hindrance of the ancillary ligand. The presence of a π-donor ligand such as chlorido slows down the dynamic process.

  17. Standard Reduction Potentials for Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide Couples in Acetonitrile and N,N-Dimethylformamide

    SciTech Connect

    Pegis, Michael L.; Roberts, John A.; Wasylenko, Derek J.; Mader, Elizabeth A.; Appel, Aaron M.; Mayer, James M.

    2015-12-21

    A variety of energy processes utilize the electrochemical interconversions of dioxygen and water, the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Reported here are the first estimates of the equilibrium reduction potential of the O2 + 4e– + 4H+ 2H2O couple in organic solvents. The values are +1.21 V in acetonitrile (MeCN) and +0.60 V in dimethylformamide (DMF), each versus the ferrocenium/ferrocene couple (Fc+/0) in the respective solvent (as are all the potentials reported here). The potentials have been determined using a thermochemical cycle that combines the free energy for transferring water from aqueous solution to organic solvent, -0.43 kcal mol-1 for MeCN and -1.47 kcal mol-1 for DMF, and the potential of the H+/H2 couple, –0.028 V in MeCN and –0.662 V in DMF. The H+/H2 couple in DMF has been directly measured electrochemically, using the previously reported procedure for the MeCN value. The thermochemical approach used for the O2/H2O couple can also be extended to the CO2/CO and CO2/CH4 couples to give values of -0.12 V and +0.15 V in MeCN, and -0.73 V and -0.48 V in DMF. Extensions to other reduction potentials are discussed. Additionally, the free energy for transfer of protons from water to organic solvent is roughly estimated as +14 kcal mol-1 for acetonitrile and +0.6 kcal mol-1 for dimethylformamide. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  18. Raman spectroscopic studies on the dynamic and equilibrium processes in binary mixtures containing methanol and acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besnard, Marcel; Isabel Cabaço, M.; Strehle, Frank; Yarwood, Jack

    1992-06-01

    Raman isotropic band profiles of the ν 2 mode of acetonitrile in binary mixtures with methanol have been studied over the whole concentration range and between 196 and 330 K. Attempts have been made to understand the spectral behaviour in terms of variations in vibrational dephasing as a function of environment and in terms of rapid chemical exchange between complexed and non-complexed acetonitrile molecules. If exchange dynamics are assumed to be important it is found that the dissociation rate constant ( k21) for this reaction is of the order of 10 11 s -1. This rate seems unrealistically high although similar rates have been obtained for other hydrogen-bonded systems. Nevertheless, the band shape changes dramatically across the temperature range and this demonstrates clearly that a "merging" band profile does not necessarily prove that exchange dynamic processes are important. Bandwidth and frequency shifts across the concentration range could be attributed to increases in exchange rate as the amount of methanol increases or the temperature increases. However, the most probable explanation is that there is a change in vibrational dephasing rate due to environmental fluctuations. We clearly demonstrate that even at 0.001 molar fraction of CH 3CN in CH 3OH a finite number of CH 3CN molecules are "free" (on the vibrational timescale) from the hydrogen-bonded interaction. An explanation for this rather surprising behaviour has been sought (and found) in terms of multiple hydrogen-bonding equilibria in this system. The effect has been shown to be associated with extensive methanol aggregation. An equilibrium model has been devised which predicts accurately the relative intensities of the two ν(CN) bands and the unusual behaviour in binary mixtures of this type.

  19. Toward a Rational Design of Highly Folded Peptide Cation Conformations. 3D Gas-Phase Ion Structures and Ion Mobility Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, Robert; Laszlo, Kenneth J.; Marek, Aleš; Peng, Bo; Bush, Matthew F.; Lavanant, Helène; Afonso, Carlos; Tureček, František

    2016-10-01

    Heptapeptide ions containing combinations of polar Lys, Arg, and Asp residues with non-polar Leu, Pro, Ala, and Gly residues were designed to study polar effects on gas-phase ion conformations. Doubly and triply charged ions were studied by ion mobility mass spectrometry and electron structure theory using correlated ab initio and density functional theory methods and found to exhibit tightly folded 3D structures in the gas phase. Manipulation of the basic residue positions in LKGPADR, LRGPADK, KLGPADR, and RLGPADK resulted in only minor changes in the ion collision cross sections in helium. Replacement of the Pro residue with Leu resulted in only marginally larger collision cross sections for the doubly and triply charged ions. Disruption of zwitterionic interactions in doubly charged ions was performed by converting the C-terminal and Asp carboxyl groups to methyl esters. This resulted in very minor changes in the collision cross sections of doubly charged ions and even slightly diminished collision cross sections in most triply charged ions. The experimental collision cross sections were related to those calculated for structures of lowest free energy ion conformers that were obtained by extensive search of the conformational space and fully optimized by density functional theory calculations. The predominant factors that affected ion structures and collision cross sections were due to attractive hydrogen bonding interactions and internal solvation of the charged groups that overcompensated their Coulomb repulsion. Structure features typically assigned to the Pro residue and zwitterionic COO-charged group interactions were only secondary in affecting the structures and collision cross sections of these gas-phase peptide ions.

  20. Toward a Rational Design of Highly Folded Peptide Cation Conformations. 3D Gas-Phase Ion Structures and Ion Mobility Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, Robert; Laszlo, Kenneth J.; Marek, Aleš; Peng, Bo; Bush, Matthew F.; Lavanant, Helène; Afonso, Carlos; Tureček, František

    2016-07-01

    Heptapeptide ions containing combinations of polar Lys, Arg, and Asp residues with non-polar Leu, Pro, Ala, and Gly residues were designed to study polar effects on gas-phase ion conformations. Doubly and triply charged ions were studied by ion mobility mass spectrometry and electron structure theory using correlated ab initio and density functional theory methods and found to exhibit tightly folded 3D structures in the gas phase. Manipulation of the basic residue positions in LKGPADR, LRGPADK, KLGPADR, and RLGPADK resulted in only minor changes in the ion collision cross sections in helium. Replacement of the Pro residue with Leu resulted in only marginally larger collision cross sections for the doubly and triply charged ions. Disruption of zwitterionic interactions in doubly charged ions was performed by converting the C-terminal and Asp carboxyl groups to methyl esters. This resulted in very minor changes in the collision cross sections of doubly charged ions and even slightly diminished collision cross sections in most triply charged ions. The experimental collision cross sections were related to those calculated for structures of lowest free energy ion conformers that were obtained by extensive search of the conformational space and fully optimized by density functional theory calculations. The predominant factors that affected ion structures and collision cross sections were due to attractive hydrogen bonding interactions and internal solvation of the charged groups that overcompensated their Coulomb repulsion. Structure features typically assigned to the Pro residue and zwitterionic COO-charged group interactions were only secondary in affecting the structures and collision cross sections of these gas-phase peptide ions.

  1. Elastic Properties, Defect Thermodynamics, Electrochemical Window, Phase Stability, and Li(+) Mobility of Li3PS4: Insights from First-Principles Calculations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanhan; Wu, Qu; Cui, Yanhua; Chen, Yongchang; Shi, Siqi; Wang, Ru-Zhi; Yan, Hui

    2016-09-28

    The improved ionic conductivity (1.64 × 10(-4) S cm(-1) at room temperature) and excellent electrochemical stability of nanoporous β-Li3PS4 make it one of the promising candidates for rechargeable all-solid-state lithium-ion battery electrolytes. Here, elastic properties, defect thermodynamics, phase diagram, and Li(+) migration mechanism of Li3PS4 (both γ and β phases) are examined via the first-principles calculations. Results indicate that both γ- and β-Li3PS4 phases are ductile while γ-Li3PS4 is harder under volume change and shear stress than β-Li3PS4. The electrochemical window of Li3PS4 ranges from 0.6 to 3.7 V, and thus the experimentally excellent stability (>5 V) is proposed due to the passivation phenomenon. The dominant diffusion carrier type in Li3PS4 is identified over its electrochemical window. In γ-Li3PS4 the direct-hopping of Lii(+) along the [001] is energetically more favorable than other diffusion processes, whereas in β-Li3PS4 the knock-off diffusion of Lii(+) along the [010] has the lowest migration barrier. The ionic conductivity is evaluated from the concentration and the mobility calculations using the Nernst-Einstein relationship and compared with the available experimental results. According to our calculated results, the Li(+) prefers to transport along the [010] direction. It is suggested that the enhanced ionic conductivity in nanostructured β-Li3PS4 is due to the larger possibility of contiguous (010) planes provided by larger nanoporous β-Li3PS4 particles. By a series of motivated and closely linked calculations, we try to provide a portable method, by which researchers could gain insights into the physicochemical properties of solid electrolyte. PMID:27588896

  2. Toward a Rational Design of Highly Folded Peptide Cation Conformations. 3D Gas-Phase Ion Structures and Ion Mobility Characterization.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Robert; Laszlo, Kenneth J; Marek, Aleš; Peng, Bo; Bush, Matthew F; Lavanant, Helène; Afonso, Carlos; Tureček, František

    2016-10-01

    Heptapeptide ions containing combinations of polar Lys, Arg, and Asp residues with non-polar Leu, Pro, Ala, and Gly residues were designed to study polar effects on gas-phase ion conformations. Doubly and triply charged ions were studied by ion mobility mass spectrometry and electron structure theory using correlated ab initio and density functional theory methods and found to exhibit tightly folded 3D structures in the gas phase. Manipulation of the basic residue positions in LKGPADR, LRGPADK, KLGPADR, and RLGPADK resulted in only minor changes in the ion collision cross sections in helium. Replacement of the Pro residue with Leu resulted in only marginally larger collision cross sections for the doubly and triply charged ions. Disruption of zwitterionic interactions in doubly charged ions was performed by converting the C-terminal and Asp carboxyl groups to methyl esters. This resulted in very minor changes in the collision cross sections of doubly charged ions and even slightly diminished collision cross sections in most triply charged ions. The experimental collision cross sections were related to those calculated for structures of lowest free energy ion conformers that were obtained by extensive search of the conformational space and fully optimized by density functional theory calculations. The predominant factors that affected ion structures and collision cross sections were due to attractive hydrogen bonding interactions and internal solvation of the charged groups that overcompensated their Coulomb repulsion. Structure features typically assigned to the Pro residue and zwitterionic COO-charged group interactions were only secondary in affecting the structures and collision cross sections of these gas-phase peptide ions. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  3. Toward a Rational Design of Highly Folded Peptide Cation Conformations. 3D Gas-Phase Ion Structures and Ion Mobility Characterization.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Robert; Laszlo, Kenneth J; Marek, Aleš; Peng, Bo; Bush, Matthew F; Lavanant, Helène; Afonso, Carlos; Tureček, František

    2016-10-01

    Heptapeptide ions containing combinations of polar Lys, Arg, and Asp residues with non-polar Leu, Pro, Ala, and Gly residues were designed to study polar effects on gas-phase ion conformations. Doubly and triply charged ions were studied by ion mobility mass spectrometry and electron structure theory using correlated ab initio and density functional theory methods and found to exhibit tightly folded 3D structures in the gas phase. Manipulation of the basic residue positions in LKGPADR, LRGPADK, KLGPADR, and RLGPADK resulted in only minor changes in the ion collision cross sections in helium. Replacement of the Pro residue with Leu resulted in only marginally larger collision cross sections for the doubly and triply charged ions. Disruption of zwitterionic interactions in doubly charged ions was performed by converting the C-terminal and Asp carboxyl groups to methyl esters. This resulted in very minor changes in the collision cross sections of doubly charged ions and even slightly diminished collision cross sections in most triply charged ions. The experimental collision cross sections were related to those calculated for structures of lowest free energy ion conformers that were obtained by extensive search of the conformational space and fully optimized by density functional theory calculations. The predominant factors that affected ion structures and collision cross sections were due to attractive hydrogen bonding interactions and internal solvation of the charged groups that overcompensated their Coulomb repulsion. Structure features typically assigned to the Pro residue and zwitterionic COO-charged group interactions were only secondary in affecting the structures and collision cross sections of these gas-phase peptide ions. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27400696

  4. Elastic Properties, Defect Thermodynamics, Electrochemical Window, Phase Stability, and Li(+) Mobility of Li3PS4: Insights from First-Principles Calculations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanhan; Wu, Qu; Cui, Yanhua; Chen, Yongchang; Shi, Siqi; Wang, Ru-Zhi; Yan, Hui

    2016-09-28

    The improved ionic conductivity (1.64 × 10(-4) S cm(-1) at room temperature) and excellent electrochemical stability of nanoporous β-Li3PS4 make it one of the promising candidates for rechargeable all-solid-state lithium-ion battery electrolytes. Here, elastic properties, defect thermodynamics, phase diagram, and Li(+) migration mechanism of Li3PS4 (both γ and β phases) are examined via the first-principles calculations. Results indicate that both γ- and β-Li3PS4 phases are ductile while γ-Li3PS4 is harder under volume change and shear stress than β-Li3PS4. The electrochemical window of Li3PS4 ranges from 0.6 to 3.7 V, and thus the experimentally excellent stability (>5 V) is proposed due to the passivation phenomenon. The dominant diffusion carrier type in Li3PS4 is identified over its electrochemical window. In γ-Li3PS4 the direct-hopping of Lii(+) along the [001] is energetically more favorable than other diffusion processes, whereas in β-Li3PS4 the knock-off diffusion of Lii(+) along the [010] has the lowest migration barrier. The ionic conductivity is evaluated from the concentration and the mobility calculations using the Nernst-Einstein relationship and compared with the available experimental results. According to our calculated results, the Li(+) prefers to transport along the [010] direction. It is suggested that the enhanced ionic conductivity in nanostructured β-Li3PS4 is due to the larger possibility of contiguous (010) planes provided by larger nanoporous β-Li3PS4 particles. By a series of motivated and closely linked calculations, we try to provide a portable method, by which researchers could gain insights into the physicochemical properties of solid electrolyte.

  5. Gas-Phase Structure of Amyloid-β (12 - 28) Peptide Investigated by Infrared Spectroscopy, Electron Capture Dissociation and Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Thi Nga; Poully, Jean Christophe; Lecomte, Frédéric; Nieuwjaer, Nicolas; Manil, Bruno; Desfrançois, Charles; Chirot, Fabien; Lemoine, Jerome; Dugourd, Philippe; van der Rest, Guillaume; Grégoire, Gilles

    2013-12-01

    The gas-phase structures of doubly and triply protonated Amyloid-β12-28 peptides have been investigated through the combination of ion mobility (IM), electron capture dissociation (ECD) mass spectrometry, and infrared multi-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy together with theoretical modeling. Replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to explore the conformational space of these protonated peptides, from which several classes of structures were found. Among the low-lying conformers, those with predicted diffusion cross-sections consistent with the ion mobility experiment were further selected and their IR spectra simulated using a hybrid quantum mechanical/semiempirical method at the ONIOM DFT/B3LYP/6-31 g(d)/AM1 level. In ECD mass spectrometry, the c/z product ion abundance (PIA) has been analyzed for the two charge states and revealed drastic differences. For the doubly protonated species, N - Cα bond cleavage occurs only on the N and C terminal parts, while a periodic distribution of PIA is clearly observed for the triply charged peptides. These PIA distributions have been rationalized by comparison with the inverse of the distances from the protonated sites to the carbonyl oxygens for the conformations suggested from IR and IM experiments. Structural assignment for the amyloid peptide is then made possible by the combination of these three experimental techniques that provide complementary information on the possible secondary structure adopted by peptides. Although globular conformations are favored for the doubly protonated peptide, incrementing the charge state leads to a conformational transition towards extended structures with 310- and α-helix motifs.

  6. Tetra­pyrazine­platinum(II) bis­(tetra­fluoro­borate) acetonitrile hemisolvate

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Paul J.; Wang, Xiaoping; Smucker, Bradley W.

    2008-01-01

    The improved synthesis and characterization of tetra­pyrazine­platinum(II) bis­(tetra­fluoro­borate) acetonitrile hemisolvate, [Pt(C4H4N2)4](BF4)2·0.5CH3CN, is reported. The unit cell contains a half equivalent of an acetonitrile solvent mol­ecule per tetra­pyrazine­platinum(II) ion. The coordination geometry of the PtII ion is almost square-planar, with the Pt atom residing on an inversion center. The BF4 − counter-anion, located at a general position, has an idealized tetra­hedral geometry and an acetonitrile solvent mol­ecule, the methyl group of which is disordered over two equal positions, sits on a twofold rotation axis. PMID:21580888

  7. Spectroscopic Study of the Use of Lanthanide Metalloporphyrins as Sensors for Benzene and Acetonitrile Detection in Aqueous Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Carlos Lemarr, Jr.

    This work entails the research on lanthanide metalloporphyrins for their potential use as chemical sensors for benzene and acetonitrile. This research is of importance due to the health implications that benzene and acetonitrile cause; benzene is a known carcinogen and acetonitrile is a known lung irritant. The use of UV-Vis spectroscopy, Fluorescence spectroscopy, Gaussian DFT, and X-ray diffraction crystallography were used in the characterization and analysis of the lanthanide porphyrin complexes. Europium, terbium, dysprosium, cerium, and gadolinium were the lanthanides used in conjunction with 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin, TPP and 5,10,15,20-tetrakissulfonato porphyrin, TBSP. Based on the luminescence spectroscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy data, an aqueous sensor for acetonitrile and benzene was shown to be promising. Among the compounds studied, EuTPP and DyTPP complexes exposed to sodium hydroxide showed promising results for sensing acetonitrile due to significant narrowing of the soret band and the decrease of Q bands in the UV-Vis spectra, along with the blue shifting of luminescence emission spectra. On the other hand, the CeTPP and EuTPP solutions show promise as benzene sensors due to the blue shifting of emission luminescence and variation in intensity. Based on the lanthanide TBSP complexes, TbTBSP was shown to be a promising sensor for acetonitrile due to the narrow soret band, decreased Q bands, and blue shifted emission spectra. EuTBSP, DyTBSP, and TbTBSP were shown to be promising for benzene sensors. Benzene stabilized the TBSP at a higher energy state, S2, to facilitate the energy transfer to the lanthanide ions.

  8. Quantification of phytochelatins in plants by reversed-phase HPLC-ESI-MS-MS.

    PubMed

    El-Zohri, M H A; Cabala, R; Frank, H

    2005-08-01

    An on-line HPLC-ESI-MS-MS method has been developed for determination of glutathione and phytochelatins (PC) in plant tissues. For sample pretreatment, dithiothreitol (DTT) must be added at the very beginning, as an anti-oxidant. Optimization of instrumental conditions i.e. composition of HPLC mobile phase, ionization efficiency of the electrospray interface, and MS-MS detection in the multiple ion-monitoring mode, are the central aspects of this work. A polystyrene-packed column was found to be superior to a standard silica-packed reversed-phase column. A concave quadratic gradient of ammonium formate buffer and acetonitrile was found to be optimum. The limits of quantitation were 0.2 micromol kg(-1) plant tissue for glutathione and PC. The method has been applied to analysis of tissue samples from Vicia faba grown in Cd-containing nutrient solutions. PMID:16001238

  9. Identification of cosmetic dyes by ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, L; Cavazzutti, G; Amato, A; Basili, A; Tonelli, D

    1987-05-22

    A method based on ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with detection at four wavelengths between 400 and 600 nm is reported for the separation and identification of the most common synthetic colour additives in cosmetic products. All the dyes generally employed in the U.S.A. and almost all those in current use in cosmetics in the European Community have been taken into account. The chromatography was performed on a C8 bonded silica packed column, with a 60-min gradient changing from 10 to 95% acetonitrile in water containing 10(-2) M sodium perchlorate (pH 3.0) as mobile phase (flow-rate 2.5 ml/min). Detection limits are in the range 20-100 ng for all dyes investigated. The method has been applied to the analysis of commercial lipsticks.

  10. Quantification of phytochelatins in plants by reversed-phase HPLC-ESI-MS-MS.

    PubMed

    El-Zohri, M H A; Cabala, R; Frank, H

    2005-08-01

    An on-line HPLC-ESI-MS-MS method has been developed for determination of glutathione and phytochelatins (PC) in plant tissues. For sample pretreatment, dithiothreitol (DTT) must be added at the very beginning, as an anti-oxidant. Optimization of instrumental conditions i.e. composition of HPLC mobile phase, ionization efficiency of the electrospray interface, and MS-MS detection in the multiple ion-monitoring mode, are the central aspects of this work. A polystyrene-packed column was found to be superior to a standard silica-packed reversed-phase column. A concave quadratic gradient of ammonium formate buffer and acetonitrile was found to be optimum. The limits of quantitation were 0.2 micromol kg(-1) plant tissue for glutathione and PC. The method has been applied to analysis of tissue samples from Vicia faba grown in Cd-containing nutrient solutions.

  11. Reverse-phase liquid chromatographic determination of clioquinol in cream and ointment preparations: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Wojtowicz, E J

    1989-01-01

    Seven laboratories participated in a collaborative study to analyze, in duplicate, 2 synthetic formulations and 2 commercial preparations, labeled to contain 3% clioquinol. Clioquinol is determined as its nickel (II) complex by reverse-phase liquid chromatography on a phenyl-bonded column with a mobile phase of acetonitrile-methanol-water, containing ammonium acetate and nickel chloride. Detection is at 273 nm and diphenylamine is added as an internal standard. Mean recoveries were 99.1 and 101.1%, respectively, for the ointment and cream synthetic preparations and 96.7 and 99.7%, respectively, for the commercial ointment and cream. All results are consistent with the variability of other methods at this concentration range. The method has been approved interim official first action.

  12. [Determination of main degradation products of lignin using reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhijing; Zhu, Junjun; Li, Xin; Lian, Zhina; Yu, Shiyuan; Yong, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    An analytical method using reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) was developed for the separation and quantitative determination of main degradation products of lignin (4-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, vanillin and syringaldehyde) during the steam exploded pretreatment for corn stovers. The separation was carried out on a C18 column with the mobile phase of acetonitrile-water (containing 1.5% acetic acid) at 30 degrees C at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min and the detection wavelengths of 254 and 280 nm. Under the optimized conditions, the correlation coefficients of the 6 compounds were between 0.999 9 and 1.000 0. The recoveries of the 6 compounds were all above 96% and the relative standard deviations (n = 6) were less than 2.5%. This method is suitable for the determination of the main degradation products of lignin during the steam exploded pretreatment of lignocellulosics.

  13. Minimizing ultraviolet noise due to mis-matches between detector flow cell and post column mobile phase temperatures in supercritical fluid chromatography: effect of flow cell design.

    PubMed

    Berger, Terry A

    2014-10-17

    A mis-match between the post-column mobile phase temperature and the UV detector flow cell temperature can cause significant UV noise in supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). Deviations as little as 5 °C can increase noise as much as 5 times, making the detector unsuited for trace analysis. Two approaches were used to minimize this noise. When a flow cell was in direct thermal contact (metal on metal) with the detector optical bench, the mobile phase temperature was actively controlled to the measured flow cell temperature, by using one of the heat exchangers (HX) in the column compartment. However, with some older, but still widely used flow cell designs, this required repeated, hourly monitoring of the flow cell temperature and repeated manual adjustment of the heat exchanger temperature, due to thermal drift. Flow cell design had a strong influence on susceptibility to this thermally induced noise. Thermally insulating the flow cell from the optical bench made some cells much less susceptible to such thermally induced noise. Five different flow cells, some insulated, some un-insulated, were evaluated. Most had a truncated conical flow path, but one had a cylindrical flow path. Using either approach, the ASTM noise, with a 10mm, 13 μL conical flow cell, could be optimized to ≈0.007 mAU at 2.5 Hz, in SFC, which is very near the 0.006 mAU manufacturer's specification for HPLC. The insulated version of this flow cell required far less optimization, compared to the un-insulated version. At 150 bar, an experimental 3mm, 2 μL flow cell, with only one side insulated, yielded noise slightly too high (≈0.16-0.18 mAU) for trace analysis, at 80 Hz. However, at 200 bar, noise at 80 Hz was <0.06 mAU, which should allow quantification of a 1 mAU tall trace component with a signal to noise ratio (S/N) >10. Even partially un-insulated, this flow cell design was much less susceptible to thermally induced noise. Further insulating this flow cell design failed to improve

  14. Minimizing ultraviolet noise due to mis-matches between detector flow cell and post column mobile phase temperatures in supercritical fluid chromatography: effect of flow cell design.

    PubMed

    Berger, Terry A

    2014-10-17

    A mis-match between the post-column mobile phase temperature and the UV detector flow cell temperature can cause significant UV noise in supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). Deviations as little as 5 °C can increase noise as much as 5 times, making the detector unsuited for trace analysis. Two approaches were used to minimize this noise. When a flow cell was in direct thermal contact (metal on metal) with the detector optical bench, the mobile phase temperature was actively controlled to the measured flow cell temperature, by using one of the heat exchangers (HX) in the column compartment. However, with some older, but still widely used flow cell designs, this required repeated, hourly monitoring of the flow cell temperature and repeated manual adjustment of the heat exchanger temperature, due to thermal drift. Flow cell design had a strong influence on susceptibility to this thermally induced noise. Thermally insulating the flow cell from the optical bench made some cells much less susceptible to such thermally induced noise. Five different flow cells, some insulated, some un-insulated, were evaluated. Most had a truncated conical flow path, but one had a cylindrical flow path. Using either approach, the ASTM noise, with a 10mm, 13 μL conical flow cell, could be optimized to ≈0.007 mAU at 2.5 Hz, in SFC, which is very near the 0.006 mAU manufacturer's specification for HPLC. The insulated version of this flow cell required far less optimization, compared to the un-insulated version. At 150 bar, an experimental 3mm, 2 μL flow cell, with only one side insulated, yielded noise slightly too high (≈0.16-0.18 mAU) for trace analysis, at 80 Hz. However, at 200 bar, noise at 80 Hz was <0.06 mAU, which should allow quantification of a 1 mAU tall trace component with a signal to noise ratio (S/N) >10. Even partially un-insulated, this flow cell design was much less susceptible to thermally induced noise. Further insulating this flow cell design failed to improve

  15. Development of porous polymer monoliths for reverse-phase chromatography of proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Stephens, Christopher P.

    2003-09-01

    The polymers developed in this project are intended for use as a stationary phase in reverse-phase chromatography of proteins, where the mobile phase is a solution of acetonitrile and a phosphate buffer, 6.6 pH. A full library of pore sizes have been developed ranging from 0.41{micro}m to 4.09 {micro}m; these pore sizes can be determined by the solvent ratio of tetrahydrofuran:methoxyethanol during polymerization. A column that can separate proteins in an isocratic mode would be a vast improvement from the common method of separating proteins through gradient chromatography using multiple solvents. In the stationary phase, the main monomers have hydrophobic tails, lauryl acrylate and steryl acrylate. Separations of small hydrophobic molecules and peptides (trial molecules) have efficiencies of 24,000-33,000 theoretical plates m{sup -1}. The combination of a highly non-polar stationary phase and a mobile phase where the polarity can be controlled provide for excellent separation.

  16. Determination of hydrogen ion by ion chromatography (IC) with sulfonated cation-exchange resin as the stationary phase and aqueous EDTA (ethylenediamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid) solution as the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Hu, W; Iles, A; Hasebe, K; Matsukami, H; Cao, S; Tanaka, K

    2001-05-01

    An ion chromatographic (IC) method has been developed for determination of hydrogen ion (H+). It is based on the use of sulfonated cation-exchange resin as stationary phase, aqueous ethylenediamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (dipotassium salt, EDTA-2K, written as K2H2Y) solution as mobile phase, and conductivity for detection. H+ was separated mainly by cation-exchange, but its elution was accelerated by the presence of EDTA. The order of elution for the model cations was H+ > Li+ > Na+ > NH4+ > Ca2+ > > Mg2+. A sharp and highly symmetrical peak was obtained for H+ and this was attributed to the capacity of H2Y2(2-) to receive and bind H+. H+ was detected conductiometrically and detector response (reduction in conductivity as a result of H+ +H2Y2- --> H3Y-) was linearly proportional to the concentration of H+ in the sample. The detection limit for H+ with this IC system was better than 4.7 micromol L(-1). A significant advantage of this method was the ability to separate and determine, in one step, H+ and other cations. The successful determination of H+ and other cation species in real acid-rain samples demonstrated the usefulness of this method.

  17. Liquid chromatographic method for enantiopurity control of alaptide using polysaccharide stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Douša, Michal; Lemr, Karel

    2011-06-01

    Separation of veterinary drug alaptide ((S)-8-methyl-6,9-diazaspiro(4,5)decane-7,10-dione) from a chiral impurity (R-enantiomer) was developed. Five chiral columns (three amylose and two cellulose type) were evaluated in a reversed-phase system. Three of them offered satisfactory enantiomeric resolution. Finally, three methods were validated and proved to be applicable for the determination of a chiral impurity content below 0.1% (method A: 3-AmyCoat column, tris-[3,5-dimethylphenyl]carbamoyl amylose; mobile phase: water/methanol/propan-2-ol/butan-2-ol=75:20:3.5:1.5 v/v, flow rate: 0.40 mL/min; column temperature: 30 °C; method B: Chiralpak AS-3R, tris-[1-phenylethyl]carbamoyl amylose; water/acetonitrile=80:20 v/v, 0.40 mL/min; 40 °C; method C: Chiralcel OZ-3R, tris-[3-chloro-4-methylphenyl] carbamoyl cellulose; water/acetonitrile=80:20 v/v, 0.40 mL/min; 40 °C). Some decrease in efficiency with repeated sample injections was observed for the 3-AmyCoat column. The resistance to mass transfer in the stationary phase increased probably due to the change in chiral selector conformation. This effect was considerably suppressed by propan-2-ol or to a greater extent by butan-2-ol added to a mobile phase. Simple regeneration was also suggested to recover efficiency of the column.

  18. Soil phosphorus mobility and solid-to-solution phase resupply studied by diffusive gradients in thin films: background soil properties driving their variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes-Blackburn, Daniel; Zhang, Hao; Giles, Courtney; George, Timothy; Shand, Charlie; Lumsdon, David; Cooper, Patricia; Wendler, Renate; Brown, Lawrie; Stutter, Marc; Blackwell, Martin; Darch, Tegan; Wearing, Catherine; Philip, Haygarth

    2015-04-01

    The mobility and resupply of inorganic phosphorus (P) from the solid phase was studied in 32 representative soils from the UK. The objective was to identify the background soil properties driving the variation of soil inorganic P desorption kinetics across different soil types. Diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT), diffusive equilibration in thin films (DET) and the DGT-induced fluxes in sediments model (DIFS) were used as tools for exploring solid-to-solution desorption kinetics. Previously characterized physicochemical properties of the same soils were used for correlation analysis. On average and across soil types, the inorganic P maximum distance of depletion was 0.42±0.10 cm, the equilibration time (Tc) was 3.63 h, the desorption rate constant (k-1) was 0.0046 h-1, and the desorption rate was 4.71 nmol l-1 s-1. The correlation between P in Olsen extractcs (POlsen) with PDGT, PDET and phosphorus effective concentration (PE) was enhanced when similar soils were isolated and used in the comparison, clearly showing that these parameters are affected differently by soil types. The PE was better correlated to Ptot, POlsen, PFeO, and PNaOH/EDTA than PDGT. This may indicate that PE is a better representation of P availability across soil types than PDGT. While the relative DGT-induced inorganic P flux in the first hour is mainly a function of soil wetting properties and % Corg, at longer times it is a function of the resupply capacity (R-Rdiff) of the soil solid phase. In general, resupply of P from the solid phase was less than that for other chemical elements, as shown by high Tc and low k-1 values. Desorption rates and resupply from the solid phase were fundamentally influenced by P saturation status, as reflected by their strong correlation with P concentration in water, FeO strips, Olsen and NaOH-EDTA extracts. Soil pH and particle size distribution had little or no effect on the evaluated parameters. The DGT and DET techniques, along with the DIFS model

  19. Application of statistical design for the optimization of amino acid separation by reverse-phase HPLC.

    PubMed

    Gheshlaghi, R; Scharer, J M; Moo-Young, M; Douglas, P L

    2008-12-01

    Modified resolution and overall separation factors used to quantify the separation of complex chromatography systems are described. These factors were proven to be applicable to the optimization of amino acid resolution in reverse-phase (RP) HPLC chromatograms. To optimize precolumn derivatization with phenylisothiocyanate, a 2(5-1) fractional factorial design in triplicate was employed. The five independent variables for optimizing the overall separation factor were triethylamine content of the aqueous buffer, pH of the aqueous buffer, separation temperature, methanol/acetonitrile concentration ratio in the organic eluant, and mobile phase flow rate. Of these, triethylamine concentration and methanol/acetonitrile concentration ratio were the most important. The methodology captured the interaction between variables. Temperature appeared in the interaction terms; consequently, it was included in the hierarchic model. The preliminary model based on the factorial experiments was not able to explain the response curvature in the design space; therefore, a central composite design was used to provide a quadratic model. Constrained nonlinear programming was used for optimization purposes. The quadratic model predicted the optimal levels of the variables. In this study, the best levels of the five independent variables that provide the maximum modified resolution for each pair of consecutive amino acids appearing in the chromatograph were determined. These results are of utmost importance for accurate analysis of a subset of amino acids.

  20. Aqueous phase oligomerization of α,β-unsaturated carbonyls and acids investigated using ion mobility spectrometry coupled to mass spectrometry (IMS-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Pascal; Tlili, Sabrine; Ravier, Sylvain; Quivet, Etienne; Monod, Anne

    2016-04-01

    One of the current essential issues to unravel our ability to forecast future climate change and air quality, implies a better understanding of natural processes leading to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, and in particular the formation and fate of oligomers. The difficulty in characterizing macromolecules is to discern between large oxygenated molecules from series of oligomers containing repeated small monomers of diverse structures. In the present study, taking advantage from previously established radical vinyl oligomerization of methyl vinylketone (MVK) in the aqueous phase, where relatively simple oligomers containing up to 14 monomers were observed, we have investigated the same reactivity on several other unsaturated water soluble organic compounds (UWSOCs) and on a few mixtures of these precursor compounds. The technique used to characterize the formed oligomers was a traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry coupled to a hybrid quadrupole - time of flight mass spectrometer (IMS-MS) fitted with an electrospray source and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC). The technique allows for an additional separation, especially for large ions, containing long carbon chains. We have shown the efficiency of the IMS-mass spectrometry technique to detect oligomers derived from MVK photooxidation in the aqueous phase. The results were then compared to other oligomers, derived from ten other individual biogenic UWSOCs. The technique allowed distinguishing between different oligomers arising from different precursors. It also clearly showed that compounds bearing a non-conjugated unsaturation did not provide oligomerization. Finally, it was shown that the IMS-mass spectrometry technique, applied to mixtures of unsaturated conjugated precursors, exhibited the ability of these precursors to co-oligomerize, i.e. forming only one complex oligomer system bearing monomers of different structures. The results are discussed in terms of atmospheric

  1. Comparison of large scale purification processes of naproxen enantiomers by chromatography using methanol-water and methanol-supercritical carbon dioxide mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Kamarei, Fahimeh; Vajda, Péter; Guiochon, Georges

    2013-09-20

    This paper compares two methods used for the preparative purification of a mixture of (S)-, and (R)-naproxen on a Whelk-O1 column, using either high performance liquid chromatography or supercritical fluid chromatography. The adsorption properties of both enantiomers were measured by frontal analysis, using methanol-water and methanol-supercritical carbon dioxide mixtures as the mobile phases. The measured adsorption data were modeled, providing the adsorption isotherms and their parameters, which were derived from the nonlinear fit of the isotherm models to the experimental data points. The model used was a Bi-Langmuir isotherm, similar to the model used in many enantiomeric separations. These isotherms were used to calculate the elution profiles of overloaded elution bands, assuming competitive Bi-Langmuir behavior of the two enantiomers. The analysis of these profiles provides the basis for a comparison between supercritical fluid chromatographic and high performance liquid chromatographic preparative scale separations. It permits an illustration of the advantages and disadvantages of these methods and a discussion of their potential performance.

  2. Detection of piperonal emitted from polymer controlled odor mimic permeation systems utilizing Canis familiaris and solid phase microextraction-ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Macias, Michael S; Guerra-Diaz, Patricia; Almirall, José R; Furton, Kenneth G

    2010-02-25

    Currently, in the field of odor detection, there is generally a wider variation in limit of detections (LODs) for canines than instruments. The study presented in this paper introduces an improved protocol for the creation of controlled odor mimic permeation system (COMPS) devices for use as standards in canine training and discusses the canine detection thresholds of piperonal, a starting material for the illicit drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), when exposed to these devices. Additionally, this paper describes the first-ever reported direct comparison of solid phase microextraction-ion mobility spectrometry (SPME-IMS) to canine detection for the MDMA odorant, piperonal. The research presented shows the reliability of COMPS devices as low cost field calibrants providing a wide range of odorant concentrations for biological and instrumental detectors. The canine LOD of piperonal emanating from the 100 ng s(-1) COMPS was found to be 1 ng as compared to the SPME-IMS LOD of piperonal in a static, closed system at 2 ng, with a linear dynamic range from 2 ng to 11 ng. The utilization of the COMPS devices would allow for training that will reduce the detection variability between canines and maintain improved consistency for training purposes. Since both SPME and IMS are field portable technologies, it is expected that this coupled method will be useful as a complement to canine detection for the field detection of MDMA. PMID:20044224

  3. High Sensitivity Method to Estimate Distribution of Hyaluronan Molecular Sizes in Small Biological Samples Using Gas-Phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Do, Lan; Dahl, Christen P.; Kerje, Susanne; Hansell, Peter; Mörner, Stellan; Lindqvist, Ulla; Engström-Laurent, Anna; Larsson, Göran; Hellman, Urban

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan is a negatively charged polydisperse polysaccharide where both its size and tissue concentration play an important role in many physiological and pathological processes. The various functions of hyaluronan depend on its molecular size. Up to now, it has been difficult to study the role of hyaluronan in diseases with pathological changes in the extracellular matrix where availability is low or tissue samples are small. Difficulty to obtain large enough biopsies from human diseased tissue or tissue from animal models has also restricted the study of hyaluronan. In this paper, we demonstrate that gas-phase electrophoretic molecular mobility analyzer (GEMMA) can be used to estimate the distribution of hyaluronan molecular sizes in biological samples with a limited amount of hyaluronan. The low detection level of the GEMMA method allows for estimation of hyaluronan molecular sizes from different parts of small organs. Hence, the GEMMA method opens opportunity to attain a profile over the distribution of hyaluronan molecular sizes and estimate changes caused by disease or experimental conditions that has not been possible to obtain before. PMID:26448761

  4. Determination of furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural from baby formula using headspace solid phase microextraction based on nanostructured polypyrrole fiber coupled with ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kamalabadi, Mahdie; Ghaemi, Elham; Mohammadi, Abdorreza; Alizadeh, Naader

    2015-08-15

    Furfural (Fu) and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMFu) are extracted using a dodecylbenzenesulfonate-doped polypyrrole coating as a fiber for headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) method in baby formula samples and detected using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Sample pH, salt effect, extraction time and temperature were investigated and optimized as effective parameters in HS-SPME. The calibration curves were linear in the range of 20-300 ng g(-1) (R(2)>0.99). Limits of detection for Fu and HMFu were 6 ng g(-1) and 5 ng g(-1), respectively. The RSD% of Fu and HMFu for five analyses was 4.4 and 4.9, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to determine of Fu and HMFu in the different baby formula samples with satisfactory result. The results were in agreement with those obtained using HPLC analysis. The HS-SPME-IMS is precise, selective and sensitive analytical method for determination of Fu and HMFu in baby formula samples, without any derivatization process.

  5. Dependence on the mobile phase pH of the adsorption behavior of propranolol enantiomers on a cellulase protein used as the chiral selector

    SciTech Connect

    Fornstedt, T.; Goetmar, G.; Andersson, M.; Guiochon, G.

    1999-02-17

    The authors reported previously on the unusual thermodynamic characteristics of the enantioselective interactions between the enantiomers of the {beta}-blocker propranolol and the protein cellobiohydrolase I immobilized on silica. The adsorption of the more retained enantiomer, (S)-propranolol, is endothermic while that of the (R)-propranolol is exothermic. This causes a rapid increase of the selectivity factor with increasing temperature. In this work, the complex dependence of the selectivity factor on the pH of the solvent is studied. They determined the equilibrium isotherms of (R)- and (S)-propranolol in a wide concentration range (0.25 {micro}M to 1.1 mM) at six different mobile-phase pHs (4.7, 5.0, 5.2, 5.5, 5.7, and 6.0) and fitted the data obtained to the bi-Langmuir model. This gave the saturation capacity and the binding constant of the nonselective contribution for the two enantiomers. It also gave these parameters for the enantioselective contributions of each of them. The dependence of these parameters on the pH is discussed and interpreted in terms of the retention mechanism. Conclusions are in excellent agreement with recent, independent results on the structure of the protein obtained by X-ray crystallography.

  6. Carbon nanotubes@silicon dioxide nanohybrids coating for solid-phase microextraction of organophosphorus pesticides followed by gas chromatography-corona discharge ion mobility spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Saraji, Mohammad; Jafari, Mohammad Taghi; Mossaddegh, Mehdi

    2016-01-15

    A high efficiency solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber coated with porous carbon nanotubes-silicon dioxide (CNTs-SiO2) nanohybrids was synthesized and applied for the determination of some organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) in vegetables, fruits and water samples. Gas chromatography-corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry was used as the detection system. Glucose, as a biocompatible compound, was used for connecting CNT and SiO2 during a hydrothermal process. The electrospinning technique was also applied for the fiber preparation. The parameters affecting the efficiency of extraction, including stirring rate, salt effect, extraction temperature, extraction time, desorption temperature and desorption time, were investigated and optimized. The developed CNTs@SiO2 fiber presented better extraction efficiency than the commercial SPME fibers (PA, PDMS, and PDMS-DVB). The intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations were found to be lower than 6.2 and 9.0%, respectively. For water samples, the limits of detection were in the range of 0.005-0.020 μg L(-1) and the limits of quantification were between 0.010 and 0.050 μg L(-1). The results showed a good linearity in the range of 0.01-3.0 μg L(-1) for the analytes. The spiking recoveries ranged from 79 (± 9) to 99 (± 8). The method was successfully applied for the determination of OPPs in real samples.

  7. HPLC/APCI Mass Spectrometry of Saturated and Unsaturated Hydrocarbons by Using Hydrocarbon Solvents as the APCI Reagent and HPLC Mobile Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jinshan; Owen, Benjamin C.; Borton, David J.; Jin, Zhicheng; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2012-05-01

    Saturated and unsaturated, linear, branched, and cyclic hydrocarbons, as well as polyaromatic and heteroaromatic hydrocarbons, were successfully ionized by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) using small hydrocarbons as reagents in a linear quadrupole ion trap (LQIT) mass spectrometer. Pentane was proved to be the best reagent among the hydrocarbon reagents studied. This ionization method generated different types of abundant ions (i.e., [M + H]+, M+•, [M - H]+ and [M - 2H]+ •), with little or no fragmentation. The radical cations can be differentiated from the even-electron ions by using dimethyl disulfide, thus facilitating molecular weight (MW) determination. While some steroids and lignin monomer model compounds, such as androsterone and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde, also formed abundant M+• and [M + H]+ ions, this was not true for all of them. Analysis of two known mixtures as well as a base oil sample demonstrated that each component of the known mixtures could be observed and that a correct MW distribution was obtained for the base oil. The feasibility of using this ionization method on the chromatographic time scale was demonstrated by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with hexane as the mobile phase (and APCI reagent) to separate an artificial mixture prior to mass spectrometric analysis.

  8. Polypyrrole nanowire as an excellent solid phase microextraction fiber for bisphenol A analysis in food samples followed by ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kamalabadi, Mahdie; Mohammadi, Abdorreza; Alizadeh, Naader

    2016-08-15

    A polypyrrole nanowire coated fiber was prepared and used in head-space solid phase microextraction coupled with ion mobility spectrometry (HS-SPME-IMS) to the analysis of bisphenol A (BPA) in canned food samples, for the first time. This fiber was synthesized by electrochemical oxidation of the monomer in aqueous solution. The fiber characterization by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the new fiber exhibited two-dimensional structures with a nanowire morphology. The effects of important extraction parameters on the efficiency of HS-SPME were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the linearity of 10-150ngg(-1) and limit of detection (based on S/N=3) of 1ngg(-1) were obtained in BPA analysis. The repeatability (n=5) expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD%) was 5.8%. At the end, the proposed method was successfully applied to determine BPA in various canned food samples (peas, corns, beans). Relative recoveries were obtained 93-96%. Method validation was conducted by comparing our results with those obtained through HPLC with fluorescence detection (FLD). Compatible results indicate that the proposed method can be successfully used in BPA analysis. This method is simple and cheaper than chromatographic methods, with no need of extra organic solvent consumption and derivatization prior to sample introduction. PMID:27260447

  9. Determining urea levels in dialysis human serum by means of headspace solid phase microextraction coupled with ion mobility spectrometry and on the basis of nanostructured polypyrrole film.

    PubMed

    Kalhor, Hamideh; Alizadeh, Naader

    2013-06-01

    A simple and sensitive headspace (HS) solid phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) method is presented for analysis of urea in dialysis human serum samples. A dodecylbenzenesulfonate-doped polypyrrole coating was used as a fiber for SPME. The HS-SPME-IMS method exhibits good repeatability (relative standard deviation of 3% or less), simplicity, and good sensitivity. The influence of various analytical parameters such as pH, ionic strength, extraction time and temperature was investigated and the parameters were optimized. The calibration graph was linear in the range from 5 to 50 μg mL(-1), and the detection limit was 2 μg mL(-1). The method was applied successfully for determination of urea in human serum and with acceptable recovery (more than 98%). Finally, a standard addition calibration method was applied to the HS-SPME-IMS method for the analysis of human serum samples before and at the end of dialysis. The proposed method appears to be suitable for the analysis of urea in serum samples as it is not time-consuming and requires only small quantities of the sample without any derivatization process.

  10. [Rapid determination of six preservative residues in fruits and vegetables by high performance liquid chromatography using dispersive solid phase extraction].

    PubMed

    Lin, Haidan; Zou, Zhifei; Qin, Yan; Xie, Shouxin; Chen, Yufang; Xu, Juan; Wang, Lan; Chen, Chuying

    2013-02-01

    A dispersive solid phase extraction-high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method was established for the simultaneous determination of 2,4-D, thiabendazole, 2-naphthol, o-phenyl phenol, diphenyl ether and biphenyl in the fruits and vegetables. The samples were vortexed for extraction with acetonitrile containing sodium chloride and anhydrous magnesium sulfate. The acetonitrile extraction was purified by acidic alumina dispersed solid phase extraction. The analysis was performed on an Agilent TC C18 column (250 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 microm) and an ultraviolet detector at 235 nm with a mobile phase of methanol-0.02 mol/L (pH 6) potassium dihydrogen phosphate solution, at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min with gradient elution. Good linearities were observed in the range of 0.5-20 mg/L with correlation coefficients greater than 0.99. The average recoveries of the six preservatives in fruits and vegetables were in the range of 84.2% -99. 1% at three spiked levels of 1, 2 and 10 mg/kg (n = 6) and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were in the range of 1.67%-10.3%. The limits of quantification were 1 mg/kg. This method is simple, accurate and suitable for the determination of the six preservatives in fruits and vegetables.

  11. Theoretical analysis of co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water–acetonitrile mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, Yukako; Yoshida, Norio Nakano, Haruyuki

    2015-05-28

    The co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water–acetonitrile mixture was examined using the reference interaction-site model self-consistent field theory. The free energy profiles of the proton transfer reaction of glycine between the carboxyl oxygen and amino nitrogen were computed in a water–acetonitrile mixture solvent at various molar fractions. Two types of reactions, the intramolecular proton transfer and water-mediated proton transfer, were considered. In both types of the reactions, a similar tendency was observed. In the pure water solvent, the zwitterionic form, where the carboxyl oxygen is deprotonated while the amino nitrogen is protonated, is more stable than the neutral form. The reaction free energy is −10.6 kcal mol{sup −1}. On the other hand, in the pure acetonitrile solvent, glycine takes only the neutral form. The reaction free energy from the neutral to zwitterionic form gradually increases with increasing acetonitrile concentration, and in an equally mixed solvent, the zwitterionic and neutral forms are almost isoenergetic, with a difference of only 0.3 kcal mol{sup −1}. The free energy component analysis based on the thermodynamic cycle of the reaction also revealed that the free energy change of the neutral form is insensitive to the change of solvent environment but the zwitterionic form shows drastic changes. In particular, the excess chemical potential, one of the components of the solvation free energy, is dominant and contributes to the stabilization of the zwitterionic form.

  12. Theoretical analysis of co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water-acetonitrile mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Yukako; Yoshida, Norio; Nakano, Haruyuki

    2015-05-01

    The co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water-acetonitrile mixture was examined using the reference interaction-site model self-consistent field theory. The free energy profiles of the proton transfer reaction of glycine between the carboxyl oxygen and amino nitrogen were computed in a water-acetonitrile mixture solvent at various molar fractions. Two types of reactions, the intramolecular proton transfer and water-mediated proton transfer, were considered. In both types of the reactions, a similar tendency was observed. In the pure water solvent, the zwitterionic form, where the carboxyl oxygen is deprotonated while the amino nitrogen is protonated, is more stable than the neutral form. The reaction free energy is -10.6 kcal mol-1. On the other hand, in the pure acetonitrile solvent, glycine takes only the neutral form. The reaction free energy from the neutral to zwitterionic form gradually increases with increasing acetonitrile concentration, and in an equally mixed solvent, the zwitterionic and neutral forms are almost isoenergetic, with a difference of only 0.3 kcal mol-1. The free energy component analysis based on the thermodynamic cycle of the reaction also revealed that the free energy change of the neutral form is insensitive to the change of solvent environment but the zwitterionic form shows drastic changes. In particular, the excess chemical potential, one of the components of the solvation free energy, is dominant and contributes to the stabilization of the zwitterionic form.

  13. Decay dynamics of nascent acetonitrile and nitromethane dipole-bound anions produced by intracluster charge-transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Yandell, Margaret A.; King, Sarah B.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2014-05-14

    Decay dynamics of nascent dipole bound states of acetonitrile and nitromethane are examined using time-resolved photoelectron imaging of iodide-acetonitrile (I{sup −}·CH{sub 3}CN) and iodide-nitromethane (I{sup −}·CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}) complexes. Dipole-bound anions are created by UV-initiated electron transfer to the molecule of interest from the associated iodide ion at energies just below the vertical detachment energy of the halide-molecule complex. The acetonitrile anion is observed to decay biexponentially with time constants in the range of 4–900 ps. In contrast, the dipole bound state of nitromethane decays rapidly over 400 fs to form the valence bound anion. The nitromethane valence anion species then decays biexponentially with time constants of 2 ps and 1200 ps. The biexponential decay dynamics in acetonitrile are interpreted as iodine atom loss and autodetachment from the excited dipole-bound anion, followed by slower autodetachment of the relaxed metastable ion, while the dynamics of the nitromethane system suggest that a dipole-bound anion to valence anion transition proceeds via intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution to nitro group modes in the vicinity of the iodine atom.

  14. Theoretical analysis of co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water-acetonitrile mixture.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Yukako; Yoshida, Norio; Nakano, Haruyuki

    2015-05-28

    The co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water-acetonitrile mixture was examined using the reference interaction-site model self-consistent field theory. The free energy profiles of the proton transfer reaction of glycine between the carboxyl oxygen and amino nitrogen were computed in a water-acetonitrile mixture solvent at various molar fractions. Two types of reactions, the intramolecular proton transfer and water-mediated proton transfer, were considered. In both types of the reactions, a similar tendency was observed. In the pure water solvent, the zwitterionic form, where the carboxyl oxygen is deprotonated while the amino nitrogen is protonated, is more stable than the neutral form. The reaction free energy is -10.6 kcal mol(-1). On the other hand, in the pure acetonitrile solvent, glycine takes only the neutral form. The reaction free energy from the neutral to zwitterionic form gradually increases with increasing acetonitrile concentration, and in an equally mixed solvent, the zwitterionic and neutral forms are almost isoenergetic, with a difference of only 0.3 kcal mol(-1). The free energy component analysis based on the thermodynamic cycle of the reaction also revealed that the free energy change of the neutral form is insensitive to the change of solvent environment but the zwitterionic form shows drastic changes. In particular, the excess chemical potential, one of the components of the solvation free energy, is dominant and contributes to the stabilization of the zwitterionic form. PMID:26026430

  15. Effect of the physicochemical parameters of benzimidazole molecules on their retention by a nonpolar sorbent from an aqueous acetonitrile solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafigulin, R. V.; Safonova, I. A.; Bulanova, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of the structure of benzimidazoles on their chromatographic retention on octadecyl silica gel from an aqueous acetonitrile eluent was studied. One- and many-parameter correlation equations were obtained by linear regression analysis, and their prognostic potential in determining the retention factors of benzimidazoles under study was analyzed.

  16. Theoretical analysis of co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water-acetonitrile mixture.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Yukako; Yoshida, Norio; Nakano, Haruyuki

    2015-05-28

    The co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water-acetonitrile mixture was examined using the reference interaction-site model self-consistent field theory. The free energy profiles of the proton transfer reaction of glycine between the carboxyl oxygen and amino nitrogen were computed in a water-acetonitrile mixture solvent at various molar fractions. Two types of reactions, the intramolecular proton transfer and water-mediated proton transfer, were considered. In both types of the reactions, a similar tendency was observed. In the pure water solvent, the zwitterionic form, where the carboxyl oxygen is deprotonated while the amino nitrogen is protonated, is more stable than the neutral form. The reaction free energy is -10.6 kcal mol(-1). On the other hand, in the pure acetonitrile solvent, glycine takes only the neutral form. The reaction free energy from the neutral to zwitterionic form gradually increases with increasing acetonitrile concentration, and in an equally mixed solvent, the zwitterionic and neutral forms are almost isoenergetic, with a difference of only 0.3 kcal mol(-1). The free energy component analysis based on the thermodynamic cycle of the reaction also revealed that the free energy change of the neutral form is insensitive to the change of solvent environment but the zwitterionic form shows drastic changes. In particular, the excess chemical potential, one of the components of the solvation free energy, is dominant and contributes to the stabilization of the zwitterionic form.

  17. Femtosecond relaxation of 2-amino-7-nitrofluorene in acetonitrile: Observation of the oscillatory contribution to the solvent response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruthmann, J.; Kovalenko, S. A.; Ernsting, N. P.; Ouw, D.

    1998-10-01

    Transient absorption measurements of aminonitrofluorene in acetonitrile reveal for the first time an oscillatory behavior in the dynamic Stokes shift of stimulated emission. The measured relaxation curve for the maximum of the stimulated emission band is in excellent agreement with the solvation correlation function C(t) obtained from the simple continuum theory of dipolar solvation.

  18. Evaluation of the phase ratio for three C18 high performance liquid chromatographic columns.

    PubMed

    Caiali, Edvin; David, Victor; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y; Moldoveanu, Serban C

    2016-02-26

    For a chromatographic column, phase ratio Φ is defined as the ratio between the volume of the stationary phase Vst and the void volume of the column V0, and it is an important parameter characterizing the HPLC process. Although apparently simple, the evaluation of Φ presents difficulties because there is no sharp boundary between the mobile phase and the stationary phase. In addition, the boundary depends not only on the nature of the stationary phase, but also on the composition of the mobile phase. In spite of its importance, phase ratio is seldom reported for commercially available HPLC columns and the data typically provided by the vendors about the columns do not provide key information that would allow the calculation of Φ based on Vst and V0 values. A different procedure for the evaluation of Φ is based on the following formula: log k'j=a log Kow,j+log Φ, where k'j is the retention factor for a compound j that must be a hydrocarbon, Kow,j is the octanol/water partition coefficient, and a is a proportionality constant. Present study describes the experimental evaluation of Φ based on the measurement of k'j for the compounds in the homologous series between benzene and butylbenzene for three C18 columns: Gemini C18, Luna C18 both with 5 μm particles, and a Chromolith Performance RP-18. The evaluation was performed for two mobile phase systems at different proportions of methanol/water and acetonitrile/water. The octanol/water partition coefficients were obtained from the literature. The results obtained in the study provide further support for the new procedure for the evaluation of phase ratio.

  19. Structure and dynamics of 1-N-alkyl-3-N-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate + acetonitrile mixtures.

    PubMed

    Stoppa, Alexander; Hunger, Johannes; Hefter, Glenn; Buchner, Richard

    2012-06-28

    A detailed investigation of the binary mixtures of the ionic liquids (ILs) 1-N-R-3-N-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (R = ethyl, n-butyl, n-hexyl) with the important molecular solvent acetonitrile (AN) over the entire composition range has been made at 25 °C using broadband dielectric spectroscopy. All spectra showed two modes: a Cole-Cole (CC) mode centered at ~2 GHz and a Debye mode centered at ~50 GHz. However, detailed analysis indicated both relaxations were composites. The Debye mode arises from the rotational diffusion of free AN molecules with contributions from ultrafast vibrations and librations of the ILs. The CC mode corresponds to the jump rotation of the imidazolium cations and the hindered rotational diffusion of "slow" AN molecules solvating them. At very low IL concentrations 1:1 contact ion pairs are dominant. Overall, these IL + AN mixtures can be divided into two broad regions: at IL mole fraction (x(IL)) ≲ 0.2 the IL behaves as a rather weakly associated conventional electrolyte while at x(IL) ≳ 0.2 it takes on its IL characteristics, "lubricated" by the AN.

  20. Early-Lanthanide(III) Acetonitrile-Solvento Adducts with Iodide and Noncoordinating Anions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jessie L; Davis, Benjamin L; Scott, Brian L; Gaunt, Andrew J

    2015-12-21

    Dissolution of LnI3 (Ln = La, Ce) in acetonitrile (MeCN) results in the highly soluble solvates LnI3(MeCN)5 [Ln = La (1), Ce (2)] in good yield. The ionic complex [La(MeCN)9][LaI6] (4), containing a rare homoleptic La(3+) cation and anion, was also isolated as a minor product. Extending this chemistry to NdI3 results in the consistent formation of the complex ionic structure [Nd(MeCN)9]2[NdI5(MeCN)][NdI6][I] (3), which contains an unprecedented pentaiodide lanthanoid anion. Also described is the synthesis, isolation, and structural characterization of several homoleptic early-lanthanide MeCN solvates with noncoordinating anions, namely, [Ln(MeCN)9][AlCl4]3 [Ln = La (5), Ce (6), Nd (7)]. Notably, complex 6 is the first homoleptic cerium MeCN solvate reported to date. All reported complexes were structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography, as well as by IR spectroscopy and CHN elemental analysis. Complexes 1-3 were also characterized by thermogravimetric analysis coupled with mass spectrometry to further elucidate their bulk composition in the solid-state.

  1. Speciation of La(III) chloride complexes in water and acetonitrile: a density functional study.

    PubMed

    Bühl, Michael; Sieffert, Nicolas; Partouche, Aurélie; Chaumont, Alain; Wipff, Georges

    2012-12-17

    Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CMPD) simulations and static computations are reported at the BLYP level of density functional theory (DFT) for mixed [LaCl(x)(H(2)O)(y)(MeCN)(z)](3-x) complexes in aqueous and nonaqueous solution (acetonitrile). Both methodologies predict coordination numbers (i.e., x + y + z) that are successively lower than nine as the Cl content increases from x = 0 to 3. While the static DFT method with implicit solvation through a polarizable continuum model overestimates the binding strength of chloride and erroneously predicts [LaCl(2)(H(2)O)(5)](+) as global free-energy minimum, constrained CPMD simulations with explicit solvent and thermodynamic integration reproduce the weak binding of chloride in water reasonably well. Special attention is called to the dipole moments of coordinated water molecules as function of coligands and solvent, evaluated through maximally localized Wannier function centers along the CPMD trajectories. Cooperative polarization of these water ligands by the metal cation and the surrounding solvent is remarkably sensitive to fluctuations of the La-O distances and, to a lesser extent, on the La-water tilt angles. The mean dipole moment of water ligands is rather insensitive to the other coligands, oscillating around 3.2 D, 3.5 D, and 3.3 D in MeCN, water, and [dmim]Cl solution, respectively, the latter being an archetypical ionic liquid.

  2. Substituent effects in the 13C NMR chemical shifts of alpha-mono-substituted acetonitriles.

    PubMed

    Reis, Adriana K C A; Rittner, Roberto

    2007-03-01

    13C chemical shifts empirical calculations, through a very simple additivity relationship, for the alpha-methylene carbon of some alpha-mono-substituted acetonitriles, Y-CH(2)-CN (Y=H, F, Cl, Br, I, OMe, OEt, SMe, SEt, NMe(2), NEt(2), Me and Et), lead to similar, or even better, results in comparison to the reported values obtained through Quantum Mechanics methods. The observed deviations, for some substituents, are very similar for both approaches. This divergence between experimental and calculated, either empirically or theoretically, values are smaller than for the corresponding acetones, amides, acetic acids and methyl esters, which had been named non-additivity effects (or intramolecular interaction chemical shifts, ICS) and attributed to some orbital interactions. Here, these orbital interactions do not seem to be the main reason for the non-additivity effects in the empirical calculations, which must be due solely to the magnetic anisotropy of the heavy atom present in the substituent. These deviations, which were also observed in the theoretical calculations, were attributed in that case to the non-inclusion of relativistic effects and spin-orbit coupling in the Hamiltonian. Some divergence is also observed for the cyano carbon chemical shifts, probably due to the same reasons.

  3. Hydrophobic collapse of foldamer capsules drives picomolar-level chloride binding in aqueous acetonitrile solutions.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yuran; Liu, Yun; Chen, Chun-Hsing; Flood, Amar H

    2013-09-25

    Aqueous media are competitive environments in which to perform host-guest chemistry, particularly when the guest is highly charged. While hydrophobic binding is a recognized approach to this challenge in which apolar pockets can be designed to recognize apolar guests in water, complementary strategies are required for hydrophilic anions like chloride. Here, we present evidence of such an alternative mechanism, used everyday by proteins yet rare for artificial receptors, wherein hydrophobic interactions are shown to be responsible for organizing and stabilizing an aryl-triazole foldamer to help extract hydrophilic chloride ions from increasingly aqueous solutions. Therein, a double-helical complex gains stability upon burial of ∼80% of the π surfaces that simultaneously creates a potent, solvent-excluding microenvironment for hydrogen bonding. The chloride's overall affinity to the duplex is substantial in 25% water v/v in acetonitrile (log β2 = 12.6), and it remains strong (log β2 = 13.0) as the water content is increased to 50%. With the rise in predictable designs of abiological foldamers, this water-assisted strategy can, in principle, be utilized for binding other hydrophilic guests.

  4. Low-temperature branching ratios for the reaction of state-prepared N2(+) with acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Gichuhi, Wilson K; Suits, Arthur G

    2012-01-26

    In this work, the primary product branching ratio (BR) for the reaction of state-prepared nitrogen cation (N(2)(+)) with acetonitrile (CH(3)CN), a possible minor constituent of Titan's upper atmosphere, is reported. The ion-molecule reaction occurs in the collision region of the supersonic nozzle expansion that is characterized by a rotational temperature of 45 ± 5 K. A BR of 0.86 ± 0.01/0.14 ± 0.01 is obtained for the formation CH(2)CN(+) and the CH(3)CN(+) product ions, respectively. The reported BR overwhelmingly favors the formation of CH(2)CN(+) product channel and is consistent with a simple capture process that is accompanied by a nonresonant dissociative charge transfer reaction. The BRs are independent of the N(2) rotational levels excited. Apart from providing insights onto the dynamics of the title ion-molecule reaction, the reported BR represents the most accurate available low-temperature experimental measurement for the reaction useful to aid in the accurate modeling of Titan's nitrile chemistry.

  5. Quantitative determination of aflatoxin B1 concentration in acetonitrile by chemometric methods using terahertz spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hongyi; Jiang, Yuying; Lian, Feiyu; Zhang, Yuan; Xia, Shanhong

    2016-10-15

    Aflatoxins contaminate and colonize agricultural products, such as grain, and thereby potentially cause human liver carcinoma. Detection via conventional methods has proven to be time-consuming and complex. In this paper, the terahertz (THz) spectra of aflatoxin B1 in acetonitrile solutions with concentration ranges of 1-50μg/ml and 1-50μg/l are obtained and analyzed for the frequency range of 0.4-1.6THz. Linear and nonlinear regression models are constructed to relate the absorption spectra and the concentrations of 160 samples using the partial least squares (PLS), principal component regression (PCR), support vector machine (SVM), and PCA-SVM methods. Our results indicate that PLS and PCR models are more accurate for the concentration range of 1-50μg/ml, whereas SVM and PCA-SVM are more accurate for the concentration range of 1-50μg/l. Furthermore, ten unknown concentration samples extracted from mildewed maize are analyzed quantitatively using these methods. PMID:27173565

  6. Polymerization of Acetonitrile via a Hydrogen Transfer Reaction from CH3 to CN under Extreme Conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Haiyan; Li, Kuo; Cody, George D.; Tulk, Christopher A.; Dong, Xiao; Gao, Guoying; Molaison, Jamie J.; Liu, Zhenxian; Feygenson, Mikhail; Yang, Wenge; et al

    2016-08-25

    Acetonitrile (CH3CN) is the simplest and one of the most stable nitriles. Reactions usually occur on the C≡N triple bond, while the C-H bond is very inert and can only be activated by a very strong base or a metal catalyst. In this study, it is demonstrated that C-H bonds can be activated by the cyano group under high pressure, but at room temperature. The hydrogen atom transfers from the CH3 to CN along the CH···N hydrogen bond, which produces an amino group and initiates polymerization to form a dimer, 1D chain, and 2D nanoribbon with mixed sp2 and sp3more » bonded carbon. Lastly, it transforms into a graphitic polymer by eliminating ammonia. This study shows that applying pressure can induce a distinctive reaction which is guided by the structure of the molecular crystal. It highlights the fact that very inert C-H can be activated by high pressure, even at room temperature and without a catalyst.« less

  7. Ionic association and solvation in solutions of magnesium and nickel perchlorates in acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalugin, O. N.; Agieienko, V. N.; Otroshko, N. A.; Moroz, V. V.

    2009-02-01

    The paper presents the conductometric data on solutions of Mg(ClO4)2 and Ni(ClO4)2 in acetonitrile over the temperature ranges 5-55°C for Mg(ClO4)2 and 25-75°C for Ni(ClO4)2. The extended Lee-Wheaton equation for unsymmetrical electrolytes was used to determine the limiting equivalent conductivities of the Mg2+, Ni2+, and ClO{4/-} ions and first-step ionic association constants with the formation of [KtClO4]+ ion pairs. Lower ionic association constants for Ni(ClO4)2 compared with Mg(ClO4)2 were a consequence of stronger non-Coulomb repulsion in the formation of [KtClO4]+ ion pairs because of the formation of a firmer solvation shell by the nickel compared with magnesium cation. The structure-dynamic parameter of ionic solvation was estimated. It was found that spatial-time correlations in the nearest environment of ions increased in the series ClO{4/-} > Mg2+ > Ni2+.

  8. Structures of the ozonolysis products and ozonolysis pathway of aflatoxin B1 in acetonitrile solution.

    PubMed

    Diao, Enjie; Shan, Changpo; Hou, Hanxue; Wang, Shanshan; Li, Minghua; Dong, Haizhou

    2012-09-12

    The ozonolysis of aflatoxin B(1) (400 μg/mL) in acetonitrile solution was conducted with an ozone concentration of 6.28 mg/L at the flow rate of 60 mL/min for different times. The results showed that ozone was an effective detoxification agent because of its powerful oxidative role. Thin-layer chromatography and liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectra were applied to confirm and identify the ozonolysis products of aflatoxin B(1). A total of 13 products were identified, and 6 of them were main products. The structural identification of these products provided effective information for understanding the ozonolysis pathway of aflatoxin B(1). Two ozonolysis pathways were proposed on the basis of the accurate mass and molecular formulas of these product ions. Nine ozonolysis products came from the first oxidative pathway based on the Criegee mechanism, and the other four products were produced from the second pathway based on the oxidative and electrophilic reactions of ozone. According to the toxicity mechanism of aflatoxin B(1) to animals, the toxicity of aflatoxin B(1) was significantly reduced because of the disappearance of the double bond on the terminal furan ring or the lactone moiety on the benzene ring.

  9. Polymerization of Acetonitrile via a Hydrogen Transfer Reaction from CH3 to CN under Extreme Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haiyan; Li, Kuo; Cody, George D; Tulk, Christopher A; Dong, Xiao; Gao, Guoying; Molaison, Jamie J; Liu, Zhenxian; Feygenson, Mikhail; Yang, Wenge; Ivanov, Ilia N; Basile, Leonardo; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Guthrie, Malcolm; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2016-09-19

    Acetonitrile (CH3 CN) is the simplest and one of the most stable nitriles. Reactions usually occur on the C≡N triple bond, while the C-H bond is very inert and can only be activated by a very strong base or a metal catalyst. It is demonstrated that C-H bonds can be activated by the cyano group under high pressure, but at room temperature. The hydrogen atom transfers from the CH3 to CN along the CH⋅⋅⋅N hydrogen bond, which produces an amino group and initiates polymerization to form a dimer, 1D chain, and 2D nanoribbon with mixed sp(2) and sp(3) bonded carbon. Finally, it transforms into a graphitic polymer by eliminating ammonia. This study shows that applying pressure can induce a distinctive reaction which is guided by the structure of the molecular crystal. It highlights the fact that very inert C-H can be activated by high pressure, even at room temperature and without a catalyst. PMID:27561179

  10. Analysis of nine food additives in red wine by ion-suppression reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography using trifluoroacetic acid and ammonium acetate as ion-suppressors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong-Gang; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Yao, Shan-Shan; Pan, Sheng-Dong; Li, Xiao-Ping; Jin, Mi-Cong

    2012-01-01

    A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method was developed for the simultaneous determination of nine food additives, i.e., acesulfame, saccharin, caffeine, aspartame, benzoic acid, sorbic acid, stevioside, dehydroacetic acid and neotame in red wine. The effects of ion-suppressors, i.e., trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and ammonium acetate (AmAc) on retention behavior of nine food additives in RP-HPLC separation were discussed in detail. The relationships between retention factors of solutes and volume percent of ion-suppressors in the mobile-phase systems of acetonitrile-TFA aqueous solution and acetonitrile-TFA-AmAc aqueous solution were quantitatively established, respectively. The results showed that the ion suppressors had not only an ion suppression effect, but also an organic modification effect on the acidic analytes. The baseline separation of nine food additives was completed by a gradient elution with acetonitrile-TFA(0.01%, v/v)-AmAc(2.5 mmol L(-1)) aqueous solution as the mobile phase. The recoveries were between 80.2 - 99.5% for all analytes with RSDs in the range of 1.5 - 8.9%. The linearities were in the range of 0.2 - 100.0 mg L(-1) with determination coefficients (r(2)) higher than 0.9991 for all analytes. The limits of quantification (LOQs) were between 0.53 - 0.99 mg L(-1). The applicability of the proposed method to detect and quantify food additives has been demonstrated in the analysis of 30 real samples.

  11. Liquid chromatographic resolution of amino acid esters of acyclovir including racemic valacyclovir on crown ether-based chiral stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Seong Ae; Hyun, Myung Ho

    2015-03-01

    Valacyclovir, a potential prodrug for the treatment of patients with herpes simplex and herpes zoster, and its analogs were resolved on two chiral stationary phases (CSPs) based on (3,3'-diphenyl-1,1'-binaphthyl)-20-crown-6 covalently bonded to silica gel. In order to find out an appropriate mobile phase condition, various mobile phases consisting of various organic modifiers in water containing various acidic modifiers were applied to the resolution of valacyclovir and its analogs. When 30% acetonitrile in water containing any of 0.05 M, 0.10 M, or 0.15 M perchloric acid was used as a mobile phase, valacyclovir and its analogs were resolved quite well on the two CSPs with the separation factors (α) in the range of 2.49 ~ 6.35 and resolutions (RS ) in the range of 2.95 ~ 12.21. Between the two CSPs, the CSP containing residual silanol protecting n-octyl groups on the silica surface was found to be better than the CSP containing residual silanol groups.

  12. Liquid chromatographic resolution of amino acid esters of acyclovir including racemic valacyclovir on crown ether-based chiral stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Seong Ae; Hyun, Myung Ho

    2015-03-01

    Valacyclovir, a potential prodrug for the treatment of patients with herpes simplex and herpes zoster, and its analogs were resolved on two chiral stationary phases (CSPs) based on (3,3'-diphenyl-1,1'-binaphthyl)-20-crown-6 covalently bonded to silica gel. In order to find out an appropriate mobile phase condition, various mobile phases consisting of various organic modifiers in water containing various acidic modifiers were applied to the resolution of valacyclovir and its analogs. When 30% acetonitrile in water containing any of 0.05 M, 0.10 M, or 0.15 M perchloric acid was used as a mobile phase, valacyclovir and its analogs were resolved quite well on the two CSPs with the separation factors (α) in the range of 2.49 ~ 6.35 and resolutions (RS ) in the range of 2.95 ~ 12.21. Between the two CSPs, the CSP containing residual silanol protecting n-octyl groups on the silica surface was found to be better than the CSP containing residual silanol groups. PMID:25626672

  13. Development and validation of a method for the quantitation of Delta9 tetrahydrocannabinol in human plasma by high performance liquid chromatography after solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Abbara, Chadi; Galy, Romain; Benyamina, Amine; Reynaud, Michel; Bonhomme-Faivre, Laurence

    2006-06-01

    A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) procedure for the determination of Delta9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in human plasma is described. A two-step solid-phase extraction on CN cartridges was coupled with a reversed phase HPLC system. THC was eluted using a mobile phase composed of methanol, acetonitrile and tetrabutylammonium perchlorate solution (0.005 M, pH 3.2), through a C18 Nucleosil column and detected at a wavelength of 215 nm. Calibration curve was linear over the range 5-100 ng/ml with a lower limit of quantification validated at 5 ng/ml. Extraction recovery using the developed extraction procedure was higher than 85%. This method is presently used for the quantification of THC in plasma samples from regular cannabis smokers.

  14. Rapid determination of alpha tocopherol in olive oil adulterated with sunflower oil by reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bakre, S M; Gadmale, D K; Toche, R B; Gaikwad, V B

    2015-05-01

    A new method is developed to determine the presence of sunflower oil in olive oil. α-tocopherol is selected as discriminating parameter for detecting sunflower oil adulterant in olive oil. Admixtures of olive oil and sunflower oil (5 %, 10 %, 15 % and 20 % sunflower oil in olive oil) are prepared. These admixtures are analysed by reversed phase high pressure liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detector. The sample preparation does not require saponification or addition of antioxidant. The chromatographic system consists of a C18 column with methanol: acetonitrile (50:50) mobile phase. Fluorescence detector excitation wavelength is set at 290 nm and emission wavelength is set at 330 nm. The α tocopherol concentration increases linearly in olive oil adulterated with sunflower oil. The method is simple, selective, sensitive and is precise (RSD = 2.65 %) for α tocopherol. The present method can precisely detect 5 % sunflower oil in olive oil.

  15. Development and validation of a reversed-phase HPLC method for the determination of ezetimibe in pharmaceutical dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Sistla, R; Tata, V S S K; Kashyap, Y V; Chandrasekar, D; Diwan, P V

    2005-09-15

    Ezetimibe belongs to a group of selective and very effective 2-azetidione cholesterol absorption inhibitors that act on the level of cholesterol entry into enterocytes. A rapid, specific reversed-phase HPLC method has been developed for assaying ezetimibe in pharmaceutical dosage forms. The assay involved an isocratic elution of ezetimibe in a Kromasil 100 C18 column using a mobile phase composition of water (pH 6.8, 0.05%, w/v 1-heptane sulfonic acid) and acetonitrile (30:70, v/v). The flow rate was 0.5 ml/min and the analyte monitored at 232 nm. The assay method was found to be linear from 0.5 to 50 microg/ml. All the validation parameters were within the acceptance range. The developed method was successfully applied to estimate the amount of ezetimibe in tablets.

  16. Halloysite nanotubes-titanium dioxide as a solid-phase microextraction coating combined with negative corona discharge-ion mobility spectrometry for the determination of parathion.

    PubMed

    Saraji, Mohammad; Jafari, Mohammad Taghi; Mossaddegh, Mehdi

    2016-07-01

    Halloysite nanotubes-titanium dioxide (HNTs-TiO2) as a biocompatible environmentally friendly solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber coating was prepared. HNTs-TiO2 was chemically coated on the surface of a fused-silica fiber using a sol-gel process. Parathion as an organophosphorus pesticide was selected as a model compound to investigate the extraction efficiency of the fiber. The extracted analyte was detected by negative corona discharge-ion mobility spectrometer (NCD-IMS). The effective parameters on the extraction efficiency, such as salt effect, extraction temperature and extraction time were investigated and optimized. The extraction efficiency of HNTs-TiO2 fiber was compared with bare-silica (sol-gel based coating without HNTs-TiO2), HNTs, carbon nanotubes and commercial SPME fibers (PA, PDMS, and PDMS-DVB). The HNTs-TiO2 fiber showed highest extraction efficiency among the studied fibers. The intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations were found to be 4.3 and 6.3%, respectively. The limit of detection and limit of quantification values were 0.03 and 0.1 μg L(-1), respectively. The dynamic range of the method was in the range of 0.1-25 μg L(-1). The spiking recoveries were between 85 (±9) and 97 (±6). The SPME-HNTs-TiO2 combined with NCD-IMS was successfully applied for the determination of parathion in apple, strawberry, celery and water samples. PMID:27216393

  17. Rapid screening of methamphetamines in human serum by headspace solid-phase microextraction using a dodecylsulfate-doped polypyrrole film coupled to ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Naader; Mohammadi, Abdorreza; Tabrizchi, Mahmoud

    2008-03-01

    A simple, rapid and highly sensitive method for simultaneous analysis of methamphetamine (MA) and 3,4-methylenedioxy methamphetamine (MDMA) in human serum was developed using the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) combined with ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). A dodecylsulfate-doped polypyrrole (PPy-DS) was applied as a new fiber for SPME. Electrochemically polymerized PPy is formed on the surface of a platinum wire and will contain charge-compensating anion (dodecylsulfate) incorporated during synthesis using cyclic voltammetry (CV) technique. The extraction properties of the fiber to MA and MDMA were examined, using a headspace-SPME (HS-SPME) device and thermal desorption in injection port of IMS. The results show that PPy-DS as a SPME fiber coating is suitable for the successful extraction of these compounds. This method is suitable for the identification and determination of MAs, is not time-consuming, requires small quantities of sample and does not require any derivatization. Parameters like pH, extraction time, ionic strength, and temperature of the sample were studied and optimized to obtain the best extraction results. The HS-SPME-IMS method provided good repeatability (RSDs<7.8 %) for spiked serum samples. The calibration graphs were linear in the range of 20-4000 ng ml(-1) (R(2)>0.99) and detection limits for MDMA and MA were 5 and 8 ng ml(-1), respectively. HS-SPME-IMS of non-spiked serum sample provided a spectrum without any peak from the matrix, supporting an effective sample clean-up. Finally, the proposed method was applied for analysis one of the ecstasy tablet.

  18. N-MOSFETs Formed on Solid Phase Epitaxially Grown GeSn Film with Passivation by Oxygen Plasma Featuring High Mobility.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yung-Chin; Chen, Kuen-Yi; Hsieh, Ching-Heng; Su, Chang-Chia; Wu, Yung-Hsien

    2015-12-01

    Solid phase epitaxially grown GeSn was employed as the platform to assess the eligibility of direct O2 plasma treatment on GeSn surface for passivation of GeSn N-MOSFETs. It has been confirmed that O2 plasma treatment forms a GeSnO(x) film on the surface and the GeSnO(x) topped by in situ Al2O3 constitutes the gate stack of GeSn MOS devices. The capability of the surface passivation was evidenced by the low interface trap density (D(it)) of 1.62 × 10(11) cm(-2) eV(-1), which is primarily due to the formation of Ge-O and Sn-O bonds at the surface by high density/reactivity oxygen radicals that effectively suppress dangling bonds and decrease gap states. The good D(it) not only makes tiny frequency dispersion in the characterization of GeSn MOS capacitors, but results in GeSn N-MOSFETs with outstanding peak electron mobility as high as 518 cm(2)/(V s) which outperforms other devices reported in the literature due to reduced undesirable carrier scattering. In addition, the GeSn N-MOSFETs also exhibit promising characteristics in terms of acceptable subthreshold swing of 156 mV/dec and relatively large I(ON)/I(OFF) ratio more than 4 orders. Moreover, the robust reliability in terms small V(t) variation against high field stress attests the feasibility of using the O2 plasma-treated passivation to advanced GeSn technology.

  19. The impact of highly correlated potential energy surfaces on the anharmonically corrected IR spectrum of acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Oliver M D; Rode, Bernd M; Bonn, Günther K; Huck, Christian W

    2014-10-15

    This paper discusses the quality and feasibility of highly correlated ab initio techniques in a vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) approach using acetonitrile as a model system. The topical renormalized coupled-cluster technique exploiting the similarity-transformed Hamiltonian's left eigenstates (i.e. CR-CC(2,3)) is investigated alongside the well-known Hartree-Fock (HF), Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory (MP2) and coupled cluster (CCSD(T)) methods. The inclusion of mode triple interactions is discussed and it is found that the use of an effective core potential (ECP) serves as a viable compromise during the highly demanding task of computing such contributions, thus enabling a grid-based evaluation of three mode interaction terms with coupled cluster techniques also for larger molecules. In this context, a previously proposed reduced coupling scheme [1] is investigated, confirming the applicability of this technique to a system exhibiting a rather complex electronic structure. A combination of Ahlrichs' triple-ζ valence polarized (TZVP) basis set with Dunning's set of core-valence correlation functions is found to deliver results in good agreement with experiment while being computationally very feasible. Since CH3CN exhibits four degenerate vibrational degrees of freedom, it serves as an ideal model system for critically assessing the qualities of the degenerate second-order perturbation theory corrected (DPT2) VSCF technique. Besides fundamental vibrations, a thorough investigation of overtone transitions and combination bands is conducted by means of comparing the results to both available and newly recorded experimental data.

  20. The impact of highly correlated potential energy surfaces on the anharmonically corrected IR spectrum of acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Oliver M. D.; Rode, Bernd M.; Bonn, Günther K.; Huck, Christian W.

    2014-10-01

    This paper discusses the quality and feasibility of highly correlated ab initio techniques in a vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) approach using acetonitrile as a model system. The topical renormalized coupled-cluster technique exploiting the similarity-transformed Hamiltonian's left eigenstates (i.e. CR-CC(2,3)) is investigated alongside the well-known Hartree-Fock (HF), Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory (MP2) and coupled cluster (CCSD(T)) methods. The inclusion of mode triple interactions is discussed and it is found that the use of an effective core potential (ECP) serves as a viable compromise during the highly demanding task of computing such contributions, thus enabling a grid-based evaluation of three mode interaction terms with coupled cluster techniques also for larger molecules. In this context, a previously proposed reduced coupling scheme [1] is investigated, confirming the applicability of this technique to a system exhibiting a rather complex electronic structure. A combination of Ahlrichs' triple-ζ valence polarized (TZVP) basis set with Dunning's set of core-valence correlation functions is found to deliver results in good agreement with experiment while being computationally very feasible. Since CH3CN exhibits four degenerate vibrational degrees of freedom, it serves as an ideal model system for critically assessing the qualities of the degenerate second-order perturbation theory corrected (DPT2) VSCF technique. Besides fundamental vibrations, a thorough investigation of overtone transitions and combination bands is conducted by means of comparing the results to both available and newly recorded experimental data.

  1. Iron(II) catalysis in oxidation of hydrocarbons with ozone in acetonitrile

    DOE PAGES

    Bataineh, Hajem; Pestovsky, Oleg; Bakac, Andreja

    2015-02-11

    Oxidation of alcohols, ethers, and sulfoxides by ozone in acetonitrile is catalyzed by submillimolar concentrations of Fe(CH3CN)62+. The catalyst provides both rate acceleration and greater selectivity toward the less oxidized products. For example, Fe(CH3CN)62+-catalyzed oxidation of benzyl alcohol yields benzaldehyde almost exclusively (>95%), whereas the uncatalyzed reaction generates a 1:1 mixture of benzaldehyde and benzoic acid. Similarly, aliphatic alcohols are oxidized to aldehydes/ketones, cyclobutanol to cyclobutanone, and diethyl ether to a 1:1 mixture of ethanol and acetaldehyde. The kinetics of oxidation of alcohols and diethyl ether are first-order in [Fe(CH3CN)62+] and [O3] and independent of [substrate] at concentrations greater thanmore » ~5 mM. In this regime, the rate constant for all of the alcohols is approximately the same, kcat = (8 ± 1) × 104 M–1 s–1, and that for (C2H5)2O is (5 ± 0.5) × 104 M–1 s–1. In the absence of substrate, Fe(CH3CN)62+ reacts with O3 with kFe = (9.3 ± 0.3) × 104 M–1 s–1. The similarity between the rate constants kFe and kcat strongly argues for Fe(CH3CN)62+/O3 reaction as rate-determining in catalytic oxidation. The active oxidant produced in Fe(CH3CN)62+/O3 reaction is suggested to be an Fe(IV) species in analogy with a related intermediate in aqueous solutions. As a result, this assignment is supported by the similarity in kinetic isotope effects and relative reactivities of the two species toward substrates.« less

  2. Acetonitrile-water hydrogen-bonded interaction: Matrix-isolation infrared and ab initio computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopi, R.; Ramanathan, N.; Sundararajan, K.

    2015-08-01

    The 1:1 hydrogen-bonded complex of acetonitrile (CH3CN) and water (H2O) was trapped in Ar and N2 matrices and studied using infrared technique. Ab initio computations showed two types of complexes formed between CH3CN and H2O, a linear complex A with a Ctbnd N⋯H interaction between nitrogen of CH3CN and hydrogen of H2O and a cyclic complex B, in which the interactions are between the hydrogen of CH3CN with oxygen of H2O and hydrogen of H2O with π cloud of sbnd Ctbnd N of CH3CN. Vibrational wavenumber calculations revealed that both the complexes A and B were minima on the potential energy surface. Interaction energies computed at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) showed that linear complex A is more stable than cyclic complex B. Computations identified a blue shift of ∼11.5 cm-1 and a red shift of ∼6.5 cm-1 in the CN stretching mode for the complexes A and B, respectively. Experimentally, we observed a blue shift of ∼15.0 and ∼8.3 cm-1 in N2 and Ar matrices, respectively, in the CN stretching mode of CH3CN, which supports the formation of complex A. The Onsager Self Consistent Reaction Field (SCRF) model was used to explain the influence of matrices on the complexes A and B. To understand the nature of the interactions, Atoms in Molecules (AIM) and Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analyses were carried out for the complexes A and B.

  3. Electron-transfer fluorescence quenching of aromatic hydrocarbons by europium and ytterbium ions in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Inada, Taeko; Funasaka, Yoko; Kikuchi, Koichi; Takahashi, Yasutake; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    2006-03-01

    To make the effects of molecular size on photoinduced electron-transfer (ET) reactions clear, the ET fluorescence quenching of aromatic hydrocarbons by trivalent lanthanide ions M3+ (europium ion Eu3+ and ytterbium ion Yb3+) and the following ET reactions such as the geminate and free radical recombination were studied in acetonitrile. The rate constant k(q) of fluorescence quenching, the yields of free radical (phi(R)) and fluorescer triplet (phi(T)) in fluorescence quenching, and the rate constant k(rec) of free radical recombination were measured. Upon analysis of the free energy dependence of k(q), phi(R), phi(T), and k(rec), it was found that the switchover of the fluorescence quenching mechanism occurs at deltaG(fet) = -1.4 to -1.6 eV: When deltaG(fet) < -1.6 eV, the fluorescence quenching by M3+ is induced by a long-distance ET yielding the geminate radical ion pairs. When deltaG(fet) > -1.4 eV, it is induced by an exciplex formation. The exciplex dissociates rapidly to yield either the fluorescer triplet or the geminate radical ion pairs. The large shift of switchover deltaG(fet) from -0.5 eV for aromatic quenchers to -1.4 to -1.6 eV for lanthanide ions is almost attributed to the difference in the molecular size of the quenchers. Furthermore, it was substantiated that the free energy dependence of ET rates for the geminate and free radical recombination is satisfactorily interpreted within the limits of the Marcus theory.

  4. Simultaneous determination of atorvastatin calcium and olmesartan medoxomil in a pharmaceutical formulation by reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography, high-performance thin-layer chromatography, and UV spectrophotometric methods.

    PubMed

    Soni, Hiral; Kothari, Charmy; Khatri, Deepak; Mehta, Priti

    2014-01-01

    Validated RP-HPLC, HPTLC, and UV spectrophotometric methods have been developed for the simultaneous determination of atorvastatin calcium (ATV) and olmesartan medoxomil (OLM) in a pharmaceutical formulation. The RP-HPLC separation was achieved on a Kromasil C18 column (250 x 4.6 mm, 5 microm particle size) using 0.01 M potassium dihydrogen o-phosphate (pH 4 adjusted with o-phosphoric acid)-acetonitrile (50 + 50, v/v) as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.5 mL/min. Quantification was achieved by UV detection at 276 nm. The HPTLC separation was achieved on precoated silica gel 60F254 plates using chloroform-methanol-acetonitrile (4 + 2+ 4, v/v/v) mobile phase. Quantification was achieved with UV detection at 276 nm. The UV-Vis spectrophotometric method was based on the simultaneous equation method that involves measurement of absorbance at two wavelengths, i.e., 255 nm (lambda max of OLM) and 246.2 nm (lambda max of ATV) in methanol. All three methods were validated as per International Conference on Harmonization guidelines. The proposed methods were simple, precise, accurate, and applicable for the simultaneous determination of ATV and OLM in a marketed formulation. The results obtained by applying the proposed methods were statistically analyzed and were found satisfactory.

  5. Overload for ionized solutes in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    McCalley, David V

    2006-04-15

    Overloading occurs for submicrogram quantities of ionized solutes particularly when using low ionic strength mobile phases at low pH (e.g., formic acid), even with highly inert silica RP-HPLC columns of normal dimensions. Much higher loads can produce a sharp L-shaped peak with retention above the column void volume, in line with the hypothesis that a small number of high-energy sites fill first and are rapidly overloaded, followed by a much larger number of weaker sites. However, charged acids and bases show identical overloading behavior; overloading is reduced as the mobile-phase ionic strength is increased. These findings raise questions about the physical nature of the strong sites. The rapid overloading of silica and purely polymeric phases could be explained by mutual repulsion of ionic species or their inability to fully penetrate the hydrophobic structure of the phase. However, these alternative hypotheses cannot readily explain the high total saturation capacities obtained using frontal analysis. Ion pairing with trifluoroacetic acid may reduce overload, while the effect is less important for formate or phosphate buffers. A surface layer of acetonitrile is not a prerequisite for rapid overloading, as shown by studies using purely aqueous buffers. PMID:16615761

  6. Determination of Sudan dyes in chili pepper powder by online solid-phase extraction with a butyl methacrylate monolithic column coupled to liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao; Wang, Man-Man; Ai, Lian-Feng; Zhang, Chang-Kun; Li, Xin; Wang, Xue-Sheng

    2014-07-01

    A poly(butyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolithic column was fabricated and used as a novel sorbent for online solid-phase extraction coupled to liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of Sudan I-IV in chili pepper powder. The prepared columns were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, and pressure drop measurements. Online solid-phase extraction was performed on the synthesized monolithic column using 10 mM ammonium acetate solution as the loading solution with the aid of an online cleanup chromatography system. The desorption of Sudan I-IV was achieved with acetonitrile as the eluting solution at the flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. The extracted analytes were subsequently eluted into a C18 analytical column for chromatographic separation using a mixture of 10% acetonitrile/90% formic acid (0.5%) solution as the mobile phase. Under the optimized conditions, the developed method had linear range of 1.0-50 μg/kg, a detection limit of 0.3 μg/kg, and a quantification limit of 1.0 μg/kg for each analyte. The intraday and interday recoveries of Sudan I-IV in chili pepper powder samples ranged from 94.8 to 100.9% and 94.9 to 99.4%, respectively. The intraday and interday precision were between 3.37-7.01% and 5.01-7.68%, respectively. PMID:24723310

  7. Determination of Sudan dyes in chili pepper powder by online solid-phase extraction with a butyl methacrylate monolithic column coupled to liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao; Wang, Man-Man; Ai, Lian-Feng; Zhang, Chang-Kun; Li, Xin; Wang, Xue-Sheng

    2014-07-01

    A poly(butyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolithic column was fabricated and used as a novel sorbent for online solid-phase extraction coupled to liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of Sudan I-IV in chili pepper powder. The prepared columns were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, and pressure drop measurements. Online solid-phase extraction was performed on the synthesized monolithic column using 10 mM ammonium acetate solution as the loading solution with the aid of an online cleanup chromatography system. The desorption of Sudan I-IV was achieved with acetonitrile as the eluting solution at the flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. The extracted analytes were subsequently eluted into a C18 analytical column for chromatographic separation using a mixture of 10% acetonitrile/90% formic acid (0.5%) solution as the mobile phase. Under the optimized conditions, the developed method had linear range of 1.0-50 μg/kg, a detection limit of 0.3 μg/kg, and a quantification limit of 1.0 μg/kg for each analyte. The intraday and interday recoveries of Sudan I-IV in chili pepper powder samples ranged from 94.8 to 100.9% and 94.9 to 99.4%, respectively. The intraday and interday precision were between 3.37-7.01% and 5.01-7.68%, respectively.

  8. [Determination of deoxynivalenol in grain and its products by solid-phase extraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Huang, Juan; Chen, Guosong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Shen, Chongyu; Lü, Chen; Wu, Bin; Liu, Yan; Chen, Huilan; Ding, Tao

    2012-11-01

    A method was established for the determination of deoxynivalenol (vomitoxin) in grain and its products based on solid-phase extraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). The sample was firstly extracted by acetonitrile-water (84:16, v/v). The extract was then cleaned-up by an HLB solid phase extraction cartridge. The separation was carried out on a Phenomenex Kinetex C18 column (100 mm x4. 6 mm, 2.6 microm) with a gradient elution using 0.3% per hundred ammonia solution-acetonitrile as mobile phases. The analysis of deoxynivalenol was performed under electrospray negative ionization mode. The limit of detection (LOD, S/N= 3) and the limit of quantification (LOQ, S/N = 10) were 20 microg/kg and 50 microg/kg, respectively. A good linearity (r > 0.99) was achieved for the target compound over the range of 20-1000 pg/L. The recoveries at the three spiked levels (50, 100, 500 microg/kg) in the blank matrices such as flour, barley, soybean, rice, cornmeal, cassava and wheat, were varied from 75.6% to 111.0% with the relative standard deviations no more than 13. 0%. The method is accurate, efficient, sensitive and practical. The cost of pretreatment is obviously reduced by replacing immunoaffinity columns and Mycosep columns with HLB columns which have the same purification effect. PMID:23451526

  9. [Determination of deoxynivalenol in grain and its products by solid-phase extraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Huang, Juan; Chen, Guosong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Shen, Chongyu; Lü, Chen; Wu, Bin; Liu, Yan; Chen, Huilan; Ding, Tao

    2012-11-01

    A method was established for the determination of deoxynivalenol (vomitoxin) in grain and its products based on solid-phase extraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). The sample was firstly extracted by acetonitrile-water (84:16, v/v). The extract was then cleaned-up by an HLB solid phase extraction cartridge. The separation was carried out on a Phenomenex Kinetex C18 column (100 mm x4. 6 mm, 2.6 microm) with a gradient elution using 0.3% per hundred ammonia solution-acetonitrile as mobile phases. The analysis of deoxynivalenol was performed under electrospray negative ionization mode. The limit of detection (LOD, S/N= 3) and the limit of quantification (LOQ, S/N = 10) were 20 microg/kg and 50 microg/kg, respectively. A good linearity (r > 0.99) was achieved for the target compound over the range of 20-1000 pg/L. The recoveries at the three spiked levels (50, 100, 500 microg/kg) in the blank matrices such as flour, barley, soybean, rice, cornmeal, cassava and wheat, were varied from 75.6% to 111.0% with the relative standard deviations no more than 13. 0%. The method is accurate, efficient, sensitive and practical. The cost of pretreatment is obviously reduced by replacing immunoaffinity columns and Mycosep columns with HLB columns which have the same purification effect.

  10. Effects of acetone, acetonitrile, ethanol, methanol and DMSO on cytochrome P450 in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatic microsomes.

    PubMed

    Sakalli, Sidika; Burkina, Viktoriia; Zlabek, Vladimir; Zamaratskaia, Galia

    2015-01-01

    In vitro impacts of five organic solvents on cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme activity were investigated using hepatic microsomes of rainbow trout. The rates of several CYP450-mediated reactions were investigated at solvent concentrations ranging from 0.01% to 3%. The solvents greatly affected all tested reactions. In at least 0.8% ethanol, 2% methanol or acetone, 1% acetonitrile or 3% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity decreased and at 3% acetonitrile or ethanol, it was undetected. At 3%, all tested solvents except methanol reduced 7-benzyloxy-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin-O-debenzylase (BFCOD) activity, but at low concentrations of ethanol (2% and lower) or DMSO (1% and lower), it was induced. This was not seen with the inclusion of a pre-incubation step. p-Nitrophenolhydroxylase (PNPH) activity was not affected at concentrations below 1% DMSO, and at 2% acetonitrile it was reduced, as it was above 1% methanol or 0.5% ethanol. Acetone did not affect PNPH activity with or without a pre-incubation step. In general, the degree of inhibition was similar with and without the pre-incubation step. We conclude that the concentration of organic solvent for solubilizing the substrate and inhibitor in in vitro microsomal studies should be minimized.

  11. The effects of mobile ATM switches on PNNI peer group operation

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, L.; Sholander, P.; Tolendino, L.

    1997-04-01

    This contribution discusses why, and how, mobile networks and mobile switches might be discussed during Phase 1 of the WATM standards process. Next, it reviews mobile routers within Mobile IP. That IP mobility architecture may not apply to the proposed mobile ATM switches. Finally, it discusses problems with PNNI peer group formation and operation when mobile ATM switches are present.

  12. Coupling of acetonitrile deproteinization and salting-out extraction with acetonitrile stacking for biological sample clean-up and the enrichment of hydrophobic compounds (porphyrins) in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Huie, Carmen W

    2006-11-01

    A new sample pretreatment approach in CE was developed for concurrent biological sample clean-up and the concentration of hydrophobic compounds based on the combination of ACN deproteinization with salting-out extraction. Further enhancement in concentration detection sensitivity was achieved by coupling (offline) salting-out extraction with an online CE sample enrichment technique known as "ACN stacking". By optimizing the pH of salting-out extraction, a number of model compounds (hydrophobic porphyrins with clinical significances), i.e. zinc-protoporphyrin, protoporphyrin, and coproporphyrin (CP) III and I, can be efficiently extracted from the aqueous sample into a smaller volume organic solvent (ACN) phase and an enrichment factor of ca. 100 can be obtained. The pressure injection of the enriched ACN phase (containing ca.1% NaCl) into the CE capillary at 10% capillary volume resulted in additional concentration of the various hydrophobic porphyrins, allowing for a combined enrichment factor of ca.1000 to be obtained. Calibration curves obtained for the determination of a pair of positional isomers with significant diagnostic value, urinary CPIII and CPI, were found to be linear between 10-300 ng/mL (with R2 = 0.999), and LODs (absorbance detection at 400 nm) were ca. 0.8 ng/mL (1.1 nmol/L of CPIII or CPI). Based on a single salting-out extraction, intraday precisions (nine consecutive injections) for both CPIII and CPI (at spiked concentrations of 10-300 ng/mL into urine) in terms of migration time and peak area were found to be within the range of 0.2-0.5 and 0.8-2.9%, respectively.

  13. Experimental FTIR and theoretical studies of gallic acid-acetonitrile clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirun, Namon; Dokmaisrijan, Supaporn; Tantishaiyakul, Vimon

    2012-02-01

    Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, GA) has many possible conformers depending on the orientations of its three OH and COOH groups. The biological activity of polyphenolic compounds has been demonstrated to depend on their conformational characteristics. Therefore, experimental FTIR and theoretical studies of the GA-solvent clusters were performed to investigate the possible most favored conformation of GA. Acetonitrile (ACN) was selected as the solvent since its spectrum did not interfere with the OH stretching bands of GA. Also of importance was that these OH groups, in addition to the carboxyl group, of the GA are the most likely groups to interact with receptors. The solution of GA in the ACN solution was measured and the complex OH bands were deconvoluted to four component bands. These component bands corresponded to the three OH bands on the benzene ring and a broad band which is a combination band of mainly the OH of the COOH group and the inter- and intramolecular H-bonds from the OH groups on the ring. The conformations, relative stabilities and vibrational analysis of the GA monomers and the GA-ACN clusters were investigated using the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) method. Conformational analysis of the GA monomer yielded four most possible conformers, GA-I, GA-II, GA-III and GA-IV. These conformers were subsequently used for the study of the GA:ACN clusters at the 1:1, 1:2 and 1:4 mole ratios. The IR spectra of the most stable structures of these clusters were simulated and the vibrational wavenumbers of the OH and C dbnd O groups were compared with those from the experiment. The FTIR component bands were comparable to the computed OH bands of the GA-I-(ACN) 2, GA-IV-(ACN) 2 and GA-I-(ACN) 4 clusters. Furthermore, the C dbnd O stretching bands and the bands in the regions of 1800-1000 cm -1 obtained by computing and the experiment were similar for these clusters. Thus, GA-I and GA-IV are the most preferable conformations of GA in ACN and perhaps in the

  14. Iron(II) catalysis in oxidation of hydrocarbons with ozone in acetonitrile

    SciTech Connect

    Bataineh, Hajem; Pestovsky, Oleg; Bakac, Andreja

    2015-02-11

    Oxidation of alcohols, ethers, and sulfoxides by ozone in acetonitrile is catalyzed by submillimolar concentrations of Fe(CH3CN)62+. The catalyst provides both rate acceleration and greater selectivity toward the less oxidized products. For example, Fe(CH3CN)62+-catalyzed oxidation of benzyl alcohol yields benzaldehyde almost exclusively (>95%), whereas the uncatalyzed reaction generates a 1:1 mixture of benzaldehyde and benzoic acid. Similarly, aliphatic alcohols are oxidized to aldehydes/ketones, cyclobutanol to cyclobutanone, and diethyl ether to a 1:1 mixture of ethanol and acetaldehyde. The kinetics of oxidation of alcohols and diethyl ether are first-order in [Fe(CH3CN)62+] and [O3] and independent of [substrate] at concentrations greater than ~5 mM. In this regime, the rate constant for all of the alcohols is approximately the same, kcat = (8 ± 1) × 104 M–1 s–1, and that for (C2H5)2O is (5 ± 0.5) × 104 M–1 s–1. In the absence of substrate, Fe(CH3CN)62+ reacts with O3 with kFe = (9.3 ± 0.3) × 104 M–1 s–1. The similarity between the rate constants kFe and kcat strongly argues for Fe(CH3CN)62+/O3 reaction as rate-determining in catalytic oxidation. The active oxidant produced in Fe(CH3CN)62+/O3 reaction is suggested to be an Fe(IV) species in analogy with a related intermediate in aqueous solutions. As a result, this assignment is supported by the similarity in kinetic isotope effects and relative reactivities of the two species toward substrates.

  15. Rapid analysis of pesticide residues in drinking water samples by dispersive solid-phase extraction based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes and pulse glow discharge ion source ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zou, Nan; Gu, Kejia; Liu, Shaowen; Hou, Yanbing; Zhang, Jialei; Xu, Xiang; Li, Xuesheng; Pan, Canping

    2016-03-01

    An analytical method based on dispersive solid-phase extraction with a multiwalled carbon nanotubes sorbent coupled with positive pulse glow discharge ion mobility spectrometry was developed for analysis of 30 pesticide residues in drinking water samples. Reduced ion mobilities and the mass-mobility correlation of 30 pesticides were measured. The pesticides were divided into five groups to verify the separation capability of pulse glow discharge in mobility spectrometry. The extraction conditions such as desorption solvent, ionic strength, conditions of adsorption and desorption, the amounts of multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and solution pH were optimized. The enrichment factors of pesticides were 5.4- to 48.7-fold (theoretical enrichment factor was 50-fold). The detection limits of pesticides were 0.01∼0.77 μg/kg. The linear range was 0.005-0.2 mg/L for pesticide standard solutions, with determination coefficients from 0.9616 to 0.9999. The method was applied for the analysis of practical and spiked drinking water samples. All results were confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. The proposed method was proven to be a commendably rapid screening qualitative and semiquantitative technique for the analysis of pesticide residues in drinking water samples on site. PMID:27027594

  16. Rapid analysis of pesticide residues in drinking water samples by dispersive solid-phase extraction based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes and pulse glow discharge ion source ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zou, Nan; Gu, Kejia; Liu, Shaowen; Hou, Yanbing; Zhang, Jialei; Xu, Xiang; Li, Xuesheng; Pan, Canping

    2016-03-01

    An analytical method based on dispersive solid-phase extraction with a multiwalled carbon nanotubes sorbent coupled with positive pulse glow discharge ion mobility spectrometry was developed for analysis of 30 pesticide residues in drinking water samples. Reduced ion mobilities and the mass-mobility correlation of 30 pesticides were measured. The pesticides were divided into five groups to verify the separation capability of pulse glow discharge in mobility spectrometry. The extraction conditions such as desorption solvent, ionic strength, conditions of adsorption and desorption, the amounts of multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and solution pH were optimized. The enrichment factors of pesticides were 5.4- to 48.7-fold (theoretical enrichment factor was 50-fold). The detection limits of pesticides were 0.01∼0.77 μg/kg. The linear range was 0.005-0.2 mg/L for pesticide standard solutions, with determination coefficients from 0.9616 to 0.9999. The method was applied for the analysis of practical and spiked drinking water samples. All results were confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. The proposed method was proven to be a commendably rapid screening qualitative and semiquantitative technique for the analysis of pesticide residues in drinking water samples on site.

  17. Simultaneous analysis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs using electrochemically controlled solid-phase microextraction based on nanostructure molecularly imprinted polypyrrole film coupled to ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ameli, Akram; Kalhor, Hamideh; Alizadeh, Naader

    2013-06-01

    A simple, rapid, and highly sensitive method for simultaneous analysis of anti-inflammatory drugs (naproxen, ibuprofen, and mefenamic acid) in diluted human serum was developed using the electrochemically controlled solid-phase microextraction coupled to ion mobility spectrometry. A conducting molecularly imprinted polymer film based on polypyrrole was synthesized for the selective uptake and release of drugs. The film was prepared by incorporation of a template molecule (naproxen) during the electropolymerization of pyrrole onto a platinum electrode using cyclic voltammetry method. The measured ion mobility spectrometry intensity was related to the concentration of analytes taken up into the films. The calibration graphs (naproxen, ibuprofen, and mefenamic acid) were linear in the range of 0.1-30 ng/mL and detection limits were 0.07-0.37 ng/mL and relative standard deviation was lower than 6%. On the basis of the results obtained in this work, the conducting molecularly imprinted polymer films as absorbent have been applied in the electrochemically controlled solid-phase microextraction and ion mobility spectrometry system for the selective clean-up and quantification of trace amounts of anti-inflammatory drugs in human serum samples. Scanning electron microscopy has confirmed the nano-structure morphology of the polypyrrole film.

  18. The clinical usefulness of ESR, CRP, and disease duration in ankylosing spondylitis: the product of these acute-phase reactants and disease duration is associated with patient's poor physical mobility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Hsiung; Chen, Hung-An; Liao, Hsien-Tzung; Liu, Chin-Hsiu; Tsai, Chang-Youh; Chou, Chung-Tei

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated the clinical usefulness of ESR, CRP, and disease duration in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) disease severity. There were 156 Chinese AS patients included in Taiwan. Patients completed the questionnaires, containing demographic data, disease activity (BASDAI), functional status (BASFI), and patient's global assessment (BASG). Meanwhile, patient's physical mobility (BASMI) and acute-phase reactants, including ESR and CRP levels were measured. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) plot analysis was used to evaluate the performance of ESR, CRP, and disease duration in the AS patients. ESR mildly correlated with BASFI (r = 0.176, p = 0.028) and disease duration (r = 0.214, p = 0.008), and moderately correlated with BASMI (r = 0.427, p < 0.001). CRP moderately correlated with BASMI (r = 0.410, p < 0.001). By using ROC plot analysis, ESR, CRP, and disease duration showed the best and significant "area under the curve (AUC)", in distinguishing the AS patients with poor physical mobility (BASMI ≥ 3.6, the Median) (AUC = 0.748, 0.751 and 0.738, respectively, all p < 0.001), as compared to BASDAI, BASFI, and BASG. ESR × disease duration (AUC = 0.801, p < 0.001) and CRP × disease duration (AUC = 0.821, p < 0.001) showed higher AUC values than ESR or CRP alone in indicating poor physical mobility. For detecting poor physical mobility (BASMI ≥ 3.6) in the AS patients: ESR × disease duration (≥60.0 mm/h × year): sensitivity = 72.7 % and specificity = 72.8 %; CRP × disease duration (≥8.3 mg/dl × year): sensitivity = 72.7 % and specificity = 74.6 %. ESR, CRP, and disease duration are particularly related to AS patient's poor physical mobility. Combining the usefulness of acute-phase reactants and disease duration, the values of ESR × disease duration and CRP × disease duration demonstrate better association with poor physical mobility in AS patients.

  19. Terahertz Frequency-Domain Spectroscopy of Low-Pressure Acetonitrile Gas by a Photomixing Terahertz Synthesizer Referenced to Dual Optical Frequency Combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yi-Da; Kimura, Hiroto; Hayashi, Kenta; Minamikawa, Takeo; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Iwata, Tetsuo; Inaba, Hajime; Minoshima, Kaoru; Hindle, Francis; Yasui, Takeshi

    2016-09-01

    A terahertz (THz) frequency synthesizer based on photomixing of two near-infrared lasers with a sub-THz to THz frequency offset is a powerful tool for spectroscopy of polar gas molecules due to its broad spectral coverage; however, its frequency accuracy and resolution are relatively low. To tune the output frequency continuously and widely while maintaining its traceability to a frequency standard, we developed a photomixing THz synthesizer phase-locked to dual optical frequency combs (OFCs). While the phase-locking to dual OFCs ensured continuous tuning within a spectral range of 120 GHz, in addition to the traceability to the frequency standard, use of a broadband uni-traveling carrier photodiode for photomixing enabled the generation of CW-THz radiation within a frequency range from 0.2 to 1.5 THz. We demonstrated THz frequency-domain spectroscopy of gas-phase acetonitrile CH3CN and its isotope CH3 13CN in the frequency range of 0.600-0.720 THz using this THz synthesizer. Their rotational transitions were assigned with a frequency accuracy of 8.42 × 10-8 and a frequency resolution of 520 kHz. Furthermore, the concentration of the CH3CN gas at 20 Pa was determined to be (5.41 ± 0.05) × 1014 molecules/cm3 by curve fitting analysis of the measured absorbance spectrum, and the mixture ratio of the mixed CH3CN/CH3 13CN gas was determined to be 1:2.26 with a gas concentration of 1014-1015 molecules/cm3. The developed THz synthesizer is highly promising for high-precision THz-FDS of low-pressure molecular gases and will enable the qualitative and quantitative analyses of multiple gases.

  20. Effects of liquid chromatography mobile phases and buffer salts on phosphorus inductively coupled plasma atomic emission and mass spectrometries utilizing ultrasonic nebulization and membrane desolvation.

    PubMed

    Carr, John E; Kwok, Kaho; Webster, Gregory K; Carnahan, Jon W

    2006-01-23

    Atomic spectrometry, specifically inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) show promise for heteroatom-based detection of pharmaceutical compounds. The combination of ultrasonic nebulization (USN) with membrane desolvation (MD) greatly enhances detection limits with these approaches. Because pharmaceutical analyses often incorporate liquid chromatography, the study herein was performed to examine the effects of solvent composition on the analytical behaviors of these approaches. The target analyte was phosphorus, introduced as phosphomycin. AES response was examined at the 253.7 nm atom line and mass 31 ions were monitored for the MS experiments. With pure aqueous solutions, detection limits of 5 ppb (0.5 ng in 0.1 mL injection volumes) were obtained with ICP-MS. The ICP-AES detection limit was 150 ppb. Solvent compositions were varied from 0 to 80% organic (acetonitrile and methanol) with nine buffers at concentrations typically used in liquid chromatography. In general, solvents and buffers had statistically significant, albeit small, effects on ICP-AES sensitivities. A few exceptions occurred in cases where typical liquid chromatography buffer concentrations produced higher mass loadings on the plasma. Indications are that isocratic separations can be reliably performed. Within reasonable accuracy tolerances, it appears that gradient chromatography can be performed without the need for signal response normalization. Organic solvent and buffer effects were more significant with ICP-MS. Sensitivities varied significantly with different buffers and organic solvent content. In these cases, gradient chromatography will require careful analytical calibration as solvent and buffer content is varied. However, for most buffer and solvent combinations, signal and detection limits are only moderately affected. Isocratic separations and detection are feasible.

  1. Convenient One-Step Synthesis of Benzo[c]phenanthridines by Three-Component Reactions of Isochromenylium Tetrafluoroborates and Stilbenes in Acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang-Gang; Wei, Jun-Qiang; Yang, Xiaoliang; Yao, Zhu-Jun

    2016-04-01

    A new type of three-component reaction of air-stable isochromenylium tetrafluoroborates with electron-rich stilbenes in acetonitrile has been developed under catalyst-free conditions in this work. This cascade multibond-formation reaction is initiated by an intermolecular oxa [4 + 2]-cycloaddition, relayed with a nucleophilic addition of acetonitrile, and terminated by an intramolecular Friedel-Crafts reaction, affording the corresponding benzo[c]phenanthridine analogues in one step. PMID:26977528

  2. [[Chiral separation of five arylpropionic acid drugs and determination of their enantiomers in pharmaceutical preparations by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography with cellulose-tris-(4-methylbenzoate) stationary phase

    PubMed

    Luo, An; Wan, Qiang; Fan, Huajun; Chen, Zhi; Wu, Xuehao; Huang, Xiaowen; Zang, Linquan

    2014-09-01

    Chromatographic behaviors for enantiomeric separation of arylpropionic acid drugs were systematically developed by reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) using cellulose-tris-(4-methylbenzoate) (CTMB) as chiral stationary phase (CSP). The effects of the composition of the mobile phase, additives and temperature on chiral separation of flurbiprofen, pranoprofen, naproxen, ibuprofen and loxoprofen were further investigated. The enantiomers had been successfully separated on CSP of CTMB by the mobile phase of methanol-0.1% (v/v) formic acid except naproxen by acetonitrile-0.1% (v/v) formic acid at 25 °C. The mechanisms of the racemic resolution for the above mentioned five drugs are discussed thermodynamically and structurally. The resolutions between respective enantiomers for arylpropionic acid drugs on CTMB had significant differences due to their chromatographic behaviors. The order of resolutions ranked pranoprofen, loxoprofen, flurbiprofen, ibuprofen and naproxen. The method established has been successfully applied to the determination of the enantiomers of the five drugs in commercial preparations under the optimized conditions. It proved that the method is simple, reliable and accurate.

  3. Use of oleic-acid functionalized nanoparticles for the magnetic solid-phase microextraction of alkylphenols in fruit juices using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Viñas, Pilar; Pastor-Belda, Marta; Torres, Aitor; Campillo, Natalia; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles of cobalt ferrite with oleic acid as the surfactant (CoFe2O4/oleic acid) were used as sorbent material for the determination of alkylphenols in fruit juices. High sensitivity and specificity were achieved by liquid chromatography and detection using both diode-array (DAD) and electrospray-ion trap-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-IT-MS/MS) in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode of the negative fragment ions for alkylphenols (APs) and in positive mode for ethoxylate APs (APEOs). The optimized conditions for the different variables influencing the magnetic separation procedure were: mass of magnetic nanoparticles, 50mg, juice volume, 10mL diluted to 25mL with water, pH 6, stirring for 10min at room temperature, separation with an external neodymium magnet, desorption with 3mL of methanol and orbital shaking for 5min. The enriched organic phase was evaporated and reconstituted with 100µL acetonitrile before injecting 30µL into a liquid chromatograph with a mobile phase composed of acetonitrile/0.1% (v/v) formic acid under gradient elution. Quantification limits were in the range 3.6 to 125ngmL(-1). The recoveries obtained were in the 91-119% range, with RSDs lower than 14%. The ESI-MS/MS spectra permitted the correct identification of both APs and APEOs in the fruit juice samples. PMID:26946030

  4. Determination of Triazine Herbicides in Drinking Water by Dispersive Micro Solid Phase Extraction with Ultrahigh-Performance Liquid Chromatography-High-Resolution Mass Spectrometric Detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dawei; Zhang, Yiping; Miao, Hong; Zhao, Yunfeng; Wu, Yongning

    2015-11-11

    A novel dispersive micro solid phase extraction (DMSPE) method based on a polymer cation exchange material (PCX) was applied to the simultaneous determination of the 30 triazine herbicides in drinking water with ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometric detection. Drinking water samples were acidified with formic acid, and then triazines were adsorbed by the PCX sorbent. Subsequently, the analytes were eluted with ammonium hydroxide/acetonitrile. The chromatographic separation was performed on an HSS T3 column using water (4 mM ammonium formate and 0.1% formic acid) and acetonitrile (0.1% formic acid) as the mobile phase. The method achieved LODs of 0.2-30.0 ng/L for the 30 triazines, with recoveries in the range of 70.5-112.1%, and the precision of the method was better than 12.7%. These results indicated that the proposed method had the advantages of convenience and high efficiency when applied to the analysis of the 30 triazines in drinking water.

  5. Ultrafast studies of excess electrons in liquid acetonitrile: revisiting the solvated electron/solvent dimer anion equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Doan, Stephanie C; Schwartz, Benjamin J

    2013-04-25

    We examine the ultrafast relaxation dynamics of excess electrons injected into liquid acetonitrile using air- and water-free techniques and compare our results to previous work on this system [Xia, C. et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2002, 117, 8855]. Excess electrons in liquid acetonitrile take on two forms: a "traditional" solvated electron that absorbs in the near-IR, and a solvated molecular dimer anion that absorbs weakly in the visible. We find that excess electrons initially produced via charge-transfer-to-solvent excitation of iodide prefer to localize as solvated electrons, but that there is a subsequent equilibration to form the dimer anion on an ~80 ps time scale. The spectral signature of this interconversion between the two forms of the excess electron is a clear isosbestic point. The presence of the isosbestic point makes it possible to fully deconvolute the spectra of the two species. We find that solvated molecular anion absorbs quite weakly, with a maximum extinction coefficient of ~2000 M(-1)cm(-1). With the extinction coefficient of the dimer anion in hand, we are also able to determine the equilibrium constant for the two forms of excess electron, and find that the molecular anion is favored by a factor of ~4. We also find that relatively little geminate recombination takes place, and that the geminate recombination that does take place is essentially complete within the first 20 ps. Finally, we show that the presence of small amounts of water in the acetonitrile can have a fairly large effect on the observed spectral dynamics, explaining the differences between our results and those in previously published work.

  6. An integrated electrophoretic mobility control device with split design for signal improvement in liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis of aminoglycosides using a heptafluorobutyric acid containing mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Hung, Sih-Hua; Yu, Meng-Ju; Wang, Nan-Hsuan; Hsu, Ren-Yu; Wei, Guor-Jien; Her, Guor-Rong

    2016-08-24

    Electrophoretic mobility control (EMC) was used to alleviate the adverse effect of the ion-pairing agent heptafluorobutyric acid (HFBA) in the liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) analysis of aminoglycosides. Aminoglycosides separated by LC were directed to a connecting column before their detection via ESI. Applying an electric field across the connecting column caused the positively charged aminoglycosides to migrate toward the mass spectrometer whereas the HFBA anions remained in the junction reservoir, thus alleviating the ion suppression caused by HFBA. To accommodate the flow rate of a narrow-bore column, minimize the effect of electrophoretic mobility on separation, and facilitate the operation, an integrated EMC device with a split design was fabricated. With the proposed EMC device, the signals of aminoglycosides were enhanced by a factor of 5-85 without affecting the separation efficiency or elution order. For the analysis of aminoglycosides in bovine milk, the proposed approach demonstrates a sensitivity that is at least 10 times below the maximum residue limits set by most countries. PMID:27497008

  7. Satellite mobile data service for Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, Glenn R.; Sward, David J.

    1990-01-01

    A commercial mobile satellite system which is to be constructed and operated in Canada is examined. This is done in two phases. First, mobile data services was introduced. Hub equipment and 3000 mobile data terminals were supplied. Over the satellite tests were performed. The mobile data service provides full two way digital messaging automatic vehicle location and fleet management services. The second phase is to construct, launch and make operational the MSAT satellite and associated network control facilities. The implementation is examined of the mobile data service in Canada, including the technical description. Marketing and applications are also examined.

  8. catena-Poly[[tris-(acetonitrile-κN)praseodymium(III)]tris-(μ-trifluoro-methane-sulfonato-κ(2) O:O')].

    PubMed

    Apostolidis, Christos; Walter, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    In the colourless title compound, [Pr(CF3O3S)3(CH3CN)3] n , the three trifluoro-methane-sulfonate anions form three bridges via O:O'-coordination between two Pr(III) atoms. The structure contains [Pr(NCMe)3-μ2(OTf)3-Pr(NCMe)3-μ2(OTf)3] n (NCMe is acetonitrile; OTf is trifluoromethanesulfonate) chains parallel to the a axis. The Pr(III) atom is nine-coordinate in a distorted tricapped trigonal-prismatic environment.

  9. An aqueous normal-phase chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry method for determining unbound brain-to-plasma concentration ratio of AZD1775, a Wee1 kinase inhibitor, in patients with glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianmei; Sanai, Nader; Bao, Xun; LoRusso, Patricia; Li, Jing

    2016-08-15

    A rapid, sensitive, and robust aqueous normal-phase chromatography method coupled with tandem mass spectrometry was developed and validated for the quantitation of AZD1775, a Wee-1 inhibitor, in human plasma and brain tumor tissue. Sample preparation involved simple protein precipitation with acetonitrile. Chromatographic separation was achieved on ethylene bridged hybrid stationary phases (i.e., Waters XBridge Amide column) under an isocratic elution with the mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile/ammonium formate in water (10mM, pH 3.0) (85:15,v/v) at a flow rate of 0.8mL/min for 5min. The lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) was 0.2ng/mL of AZD1775 in plasma and tissue homogenate. The calibration curve was linear over AZD1775 concentration range of 0.2-1000ng/mL in plasma and tissue homogenate. The intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy were within the generally accepted criteria for bioanalytical method (<15%). The method was successfully applied to assess the penetration of AZD1775 across the blood-brain tumor barrier, as assessed by the unbound brain-to-plasma ratio, in patients with glioblastoma. PMID:27318641

  10. Retention of ionisable compounds on high-performance liquid chromatography XIX. pH variation in mobile phases containing formic acid, piperazine and tris as buffering systems and methanol as organic modifier.

    PubMed

    Subirats, Xavier; Bosch, Elisabeth; Rosés, Martí

    2009-07-10

    In previous works a model to estimate the pH of methanol-aqueous buffer mobile phases from the aqueous pH and concentration of the buffer and the fraction of organic modifier was developed. This model was successfully applied and validated for buffers prepared from ammonia, acetic, phosphoric and citric acids. In the present communication this model has been extended to formic acid, piperazine and tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane buffers. Prior to the modelling work, the pK(a) values of the studied buffers at several methanol-water compositions were determined.

  11. Simplified reversed-phase HPLC method with spectrophotometric detection for the assay of verapamil in rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Lau-Cam, C A; Piemontese, D

    1998-02-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method was developed for the assay of verapamil in rat plasma. After deproteinization of the plasma sample with an acetonitrile-perchloric acid (8:2) mixture containing dextromethorphan, the internal standard, an aliquot of the supernatant was directly analyzed on a cyanopropylsilane column with methanol-acetonitrile-triethylamine acetate buffer (10:30:60) as the mobile phase and detection at 235 mm. At a flow rate of 1.5 ml min-1, a complete analysis was completed in less than 6 min. The method was linear for verapamil concentrations in the range 0.5-10 micrograms ml-1 (r = 0.9999). Recoveries for the same drug concentrations from spiked rat plasma ranged from 85.6-93.0% (n = 8). The mean RSD values for intraday and interday assay reproducibility (n = 3) were, in both cases, less than 0.9%. The limit of detectability was about 0.1 microgram ml-1. The method was found useful to monitor the plasma levels of verapamil in rats that had received this drug by the nasal, oral and intravenous routes of administration.

  12. Three-phase solvent systems for the comprehensive separation of a wide variety of compounds from Dicranostigma leptopodum by high-speed counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanjuan; Chen, Xiaofen; Liu, JunXi; Di, Duolong

    2015-06-01

    A three-phase solvent system was efficiently applied for high-speed counter-current chromatography to separate secondary metabolites with a wide range of hydrophobicity in Dicranostigma leptopodum. The three-phase solvent system of n-hexane/methyl tert-butyl ether/acetonitrile/0.5% triethylamine (2:2:3:2, v/v/v/v) was selected for high-speed counter-current chromatography separation. The separation was initiated by filling the column with a mixture of intermediate phase and lower phase as a stationary phase followed by elution with upper phase to separate the hydrophobic compounds. Then the mobile phase was switched to the intermediate phase to elute the moderately hydrophobic compounds, and finally the polar compounds still retained in the column were fractionated by eluting the column with the lower phase. In this research, 12 peaks were eluted out in one-step operation within 110 min, among them, eight compounds with acceptable purity were obtained and identified. The purities of β-sitosterol, protopine, allocryptopine, isocorydione, isocorydine, coptisine, berberrubine, and berberine were 94.7, 96.5, 97.9, 86.6, 98.9, 97.6, 95.7, and 92.8%, respectively.

  13. [Determination of oleanic acid and paeoniflorin in Paeonia lactiflora by ultrasound-assisted ionic liquid-reversed phase liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Li, Dong-dong; Yang, Hong-shuai; Chen, Yuan-yuan; Wei, Jin-feng; Kang, Wen-yi; Guo, Xiu-chun

    2015-02-01

    Four kinds of ionic liquids [BMIM] Br, [BMIM] BF4, [BMIM] PF6, [HMIM] PF6 were used to analyze the content of oleanic acid and paeoniflorin in Paeonia lactiflora with ultrasonic-assisted extraction coupled with HPLC. The chromatographic column, Purospher star RP-C18 (4.6 mm x 250 mm, 5 μm), was used. Acetonitrile and water (90:10) as mobile phase was used to determine the content of oleanic acid with a gradient elution and flow rate at 1.00 mL · min(-1), detection wavelength at 210 nm, chromatographic column temperature at room temperature. Paeoniflorin content was determined using acetonitrile and water (18:82) as mobile phase with a gradient elution and flow rate at 1.00 mL · min(-1), detection wavelength at 250 nm, the chromatographic column temperature at room temperature. The result show that oleanic acid has the highest extraction yield when the conditions are solid-liquid ratio of 1:80 (g · mL(-1)), and the [BMIM] Br methanol solution concentration of 0.6 mol · L(-1). Under the optimal extraction conditions, the content of oleanic acid from 0.24 to 3.76 μg showed a good linearity (r = 0.9999), the average recovery was 97.20%. Paeoniflorin has the highest extraction yield when the conditions are solid-liquid ratio of 1:130 (g · mL(-1)), and the [C4 MIM] PF6 methanol solution concentration of 0.6 mol · L(-1). Under the optimal extraction conditions, paeoniflorin content from 0.42 to 4.20 μg showed a good lin- earity (r = 1.000), the average recovery was 98.84%. This method is simple and reliable, its repeatability is also very good. It has important significance in the study P. lactiflora of ionic liquid microextraction. PMID:26084167

  14. Chemical defenses of crucifers: elicitation and metabolism of phytoalexins and indole-3-acetonitrile in brown mustard and turnip.

    PubMed

    Pedras, M Soledade C; Nycholat, Corwin M; Montaut, Sabine; Xu, Yiming; Khan, Abdul Q

    2002-03-01

    The metabolism of the cruciferous phytoalexins brassinin and cyclobrassinin, and the related compounds indole-3-carboxaldehyde, glucobrassicin, and indole-3-acetaldoxime was investigated in various plant tissues of Brassica juncea and B. rapa. Metabolic studies with brassinin showed that stems of B. juncea metabolized radiolabeled brassinin to indole-3-acetic acid, via indole-3-carboxaldehyde, a detoxification pathway similar to that followed by the "blackleg" fungus (Phoma lingam/Leptosphaeria maculans). In addition, it was established that tetradeuterated brassinin was incorporated into the phytoalexin brassilexin in B. juncea and B. rapa. On the other hand, the tetradeuterated indole glucosinolate glucobrassicin was not incorporated into brassinin, although the chemical structures of brassinins and indole glucosinolates suggest an interconnected biogenesis. Importantly, tetradeuterated indole-3-acetaldoxime was an efficient precursor of phytoalexins brassinin, brassilexin, and spirobrassinin. Elicitation experiments in tissues of Brassica juncea and B. rapa showed that indole-3-acetonitrile was an inducible metabolite produced in leaves and stems of B. juncea but not in B. rapa. Indole-3-acetonitrile displayed antifungal activity similar to that of brassilexin, was metabolized by the blackleg fungus at slower rates than brassinin, cyclobrassinin, or brassilexin, and appeared to be involved in defense responses of B. juncea.

  15. Direct Determination of Equilibrium Potentials for Hydrogen Oxidation/Production by Open Circuit Potential Measurements in Acetonitrile

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, John A. S.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2013-04-01

    Open circuit potentials were measured for acetonitrile solutions of a variety of acids and their conjugate bases under 1 atm H2. Acids examined were triethylammonium, dimethylformamidium, 2,6-dichloroanilinium, 4-cyanoanilinium, 4-bromoanilinium, and 4-anisidinium salts. These potentials, along with the pKa values of the acids, establish the value of the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) potential in acetonitrile as -0.028(4) V vs the ferrocenium/ferrocene couple. Dimethylformamidium forms homoconjugates and other aggregates with dimethylformamide; open circuit potentials (OCPs) were used to quantify the extent of these reactions. Overpotentials for electrocatalytic hydrogen production and oxidation were determined from open circuit potentials and voltammograms of acidic or basic catalyst solutions under H2. For these solutions, agreement between OCP values and potentials calculated using the Nernst equation is within 12 mV. Finally, use of the measured equilibrium potential allows direct comparison of catalytic systems in different media; it requires neither pKa values, homoconjugation constants, nor the SHE potential.

  16. Direct determination of equilibrium potentials for hydrogen oxidation/production by open circuit potential measurements in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Roberts, John A S; Bullock, R Morris

    2013-04-01

    Open circuit potentials were measured for acetonitrile solutions of a variety of acids and their conjugate bases under 1 atm H2. Acids examined were triethylammonium, dimethylformamidium, 2,6-dichloroanilinium, 4-cyanoanilinium, 4-bromoanilinium, and 4-anisidinium salts. These potentials, along with the pKa values of the acids, establish the value of the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) potential in acetonitrile as -0.028(4) V vs the ferrocenium/ferrocene couple. Dimethylformamidium forms homoconjugates and other aggregates with dimethylformamide; open circuit potentials (OCPs) were used to quantify the extent of these reactions. Overpotentials for electrocatalytic hydrogen production and oxidation were determined from open circuit potentials and voltammograms of acidic or basic catalyst solutions under H2. For these solutions, agreement between OCP values and potentials calculated using the Nernst equation is within 12 mV. Use of the measured equilibrium potential allows direct comparison of catalytic systems in different media; it requires neither pKa values, homoconjugation constants, nor the SHE potential. PMID:23488870

  17. Modeling Mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berl, Andras

    In wireless networks, communication can take place based on an infrastructure (e.g. WLAN access point or GPRS base station) or it can take place in adhoc mode, where mobile devices are connected directly to each other and care for the routing by themselves (mobile ad-hoc networks). When such wireless networks are investigated and simulations are performed, it is often necessary to consider the movement of entities within the simulated environment.

  18. [Research on the separation of limonoid glucosides by reversed-phase preparative high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Tian, Q G; Dai, J; Ding, X L

    2000-03-01

    Obacunone-17-beta-D-glucopyranoside (OG) was isolated from the seeds of Citrus Sinensis Osbeck by using solvent extraction, classical polymer adsorption column separation and weak base anion ion-exchange separation, OG was finally purified by C18 reversed-phase preparative high performance liquid chromatography and was identified by thin-layer chromatography. The purity of OG was analyzed by analytical reversed-phase HPLC. At last the structure of OG was determined by 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR). In this work, the conditions of the reversed-phase preparative HPLC technique to purify limonoid glucosides was optimized. The reversed-phase preparative HPLC on a C18 column with a mobile phase of acidic acetonitrile-water (about 0.2% TFA, V/V) at pH 3 enabled the baseline separation of limonoid glucosides in the extract. The results show that OG is the predominant limonoid glucoside in the seeds of Citrus Sinensis Osbeck and nomilin glucoside is the second one. The results also show that the classical polymer adsorption column separation and weak base anion ion-exchange separation are effective for purifying limonoid glucosides.

  19. Tailoring ultraresins based on the cross-linking of polyethylene imines. Comparative investigation of the chemical composition, the swelling, the mobility, the chemical accessibility, and the performance in solid-phase synthesis of very high loaded resins.

    PubMed

    Barth, Michael; Rademann, Jörg

    2004-01-01

    Ultraresins have been prepared from polyethyleneimines and cross-linking molecules and have been provided with various degrees of cross-linking. The total nitrogen loading and the loading with secondary and with tertiary amines have been determined in all products. Nitrogen loadings of the novel resins were up to 15 mmol/g, reactive secondary amines up to 13.8 mmol/g. In addition to the exceptionally high loading, the novel resins displayed efficient swelling volumes in polar and nonpolar solvents. The mobility of resin-bound species as determined by EPR-spectroscopy, depending on the amount of cross-linker, indicated good flexibility and reactivity of this resin type. The novel, high-loaded resins have been investigated subsequently in solid-phase synthesis. The Rink amide linker and two different hydroxy linkers (hydroxyacetamide, HMPB) have been attached to the resin. Despite the high loadings, the secondary amines were easily accessible and could be functionalized exhaustively. Reactivity of the linker-coupled resins was found to be closely related to the resin composition. Increased resin cross-linking led to reduced swelling, reduced mobility, and reduced reactivity in the synthesis of a medium-sized model peptide. As the result of the systematic investigation of structure-property relations in Ultraresins, a support material was identified that combined high reactivity and a mobility in the range of the extremely flexible Tentagel supports. In the optimized Ultraresin, >95% of all available secondary nitrogens could be coupled with Rink linker or with the small 2-hydroxyacetamide anchor, resulting in loadings from 2.7 to 6.8 mmol/g, respectively. A resin with an attached HMPB linker and spacer delivered analytically pure peptides in solid-phase synthesis, fully exploiting the exceptionally high loadings.

  20. Liquid chromatographic resolution of 1-aryl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolines on a chiral stationary phase based on (+)-(18-crown-6)-2,3,11,12-tetracarboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Lee, Areum; Choi, Hee Jung; Jin, Kab Bong; Hyun, Myung Ho

    2011-07-01

    A liquid chromatographic chiral stationary phase (CSP) based on (+)-(18-crown-6)-2,3,11,12-tetracarboxylic acid was applied for the first time to the resolution of biologically important 1-aryl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolines. The unusual resolution of cyclic secondary amino compounds on a chiral crown ether-based CSP was quite successful with the use of a mixture of methanol-acetonitrile-triethylamine at a ratio of 30/70/0.5 (v/v/v) as a mobile phase. From the chromatographic behaviours for the resolution of seven 1-aryl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolines, the steric bulkiness of the 1-phenyl ring at the chiral center of analytes was concluded to play an important role in the chiral recognition.

  1. [Preparation of 1 µm non-porous C18 silica gel stationary phase for chiral-pressurized capillary electrochromatography].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yangfang; Wang, Hui; Wang, Guiming; Wang, Yan; Gu, Xue; Yan, Chao

    2015-03-01

    Non-porous C18 silica gel stationary phase (1 µm) was prepared and applied to chiral separation in pressurized capillary electrochromatography (pCEC) for the enantioseparation of various basic compounds. The non-porous silica particles (1 µm) were synthesized using modified St6ber method. C18 stationary phase (1 µm) was prepared by immobilization of chloro-dimethyl-octadecylsilane. Using carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin (CM-β-CD) as the chiral additive, the pCEC conditions including the content of acetonitrile (ACN), concentration of buffer, pH, the concentration of chiral additive and flow rate as well as applied voltage were investigated to obtain the optimal pCEC conditions for the separation of four basic chiral compounds. The column provided an efficiency of up to 190,000 plates/m. Bupropion hydrochloride, clenbuterol hydrochloride, metoprolol tartrate, and esmolol hydrochloride were baseline separated under the conditions of 5 mmol/L ammonium acetate buffer at pH 4. 0 with 20% (v/ v) acetonitrile, and 15 mmol/L CM-β-CD as the chiral additive. The applied voltage was 2 kV and flow rate was 0.03 mL/min with splitting ratio of 300:1. The resolution were 1.55, 2.82, 1. 69, 1. 70 for bupropion hydrochloride, clenbuterol hydrochloride, metoprolol tartrate, esmolol hydrochloride, respectively. The C18 coverage was improved by repeating silylation method. The synthesized 1 µm C18 packings have better mechanical strength and longer service life because of the special, non-porous structure. The column used in pCEC mode showed better separation of the racemates and a higher rate compared with those used in the capillary liquid chromatography (cLC) mode. This study provided an alternative way for the method of pCEC enantioseparation with chiral additives in the mobile phase and demonstrated the feasibility of micron particle stationary phase in chiral separation. PMID:26182460

  2. [Preparation of 1 µm non-porous C18 silica gel stationary phase for chiral-pressurized capillary electrochromatography].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yangfang; Wang, Hui; Wang, Guiming; Wang, Yan; Gu, Xue; Yan, Chao

    2015-03-01

    Non-porous C18 silica gel stationary phase (1 µm) was prepared and applied to chiral separation in pressurized capillary electrochromatography (pCEC) for the enantioseparation of various basic compounds. The non-porous silica particles (1 µm) were synthesized using modified St6ber method. C18 stationary phase (1 µm) was prepared by immobilization of chloro-dimethyl-octadecylsilane. Using carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin (CM-β-CD) as the chiral additive, the pCEC conditions including the content of acetonitrile (ACN), concentration of buffer, pH, the concentration of chiral additive and flow rate as well as applied voltage were investigated to obtain the optimal pCEC conditions for the separation of four basic chiral compounds. The column provided an efficiency of up to 190,000 plates/m. Bupropion hydrochloride, clenbuterol hydrochloride, metoprolol tartrate, and esmolol hydrochloride were baseline separated under the conditions of 5 mmol/L ammonium acetate buffer at pH 4. 0 with 20% (v/ v) acetonitrile, and 15 mmol/L CM-β-CD as the chiral additive. The applied voltage was 2 kV and flow rate was 0.03 mL/min with splitting ratio of 300:1. The resolution were 1.55, 2.82, 1. 69, 1. 70 for bupropion hydrochloride, clenbuterol hydrochloride, metoprolol tartrate, esmolol hydrochloride, respectively. The C18 coverage was improved by repeating silylation method. The synthesized 1 µm C18 packings have better mechanical strength and longer service life because of the special, non-porous structure. The column used in pCEC mode showed better separation of the racemates and a higher rate compared with those used in the capillary liquid chromatography (cLC) mode. This study provided an alternative way for the method of pCEC enantioseparation with chiral additives in the mobile phase and demonstrated the feasibility of micron particle stationary phase in chiral separation.

  3. Investigating changes in the gas-phase conformation of Antithrombin III upon binding of Arixtra using traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuejie; Singh, Arunima; Li, Lingyun; Linhardt, Robert J.; Xu, Yongmei; Liu, Jian; Woods, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    We validate the utility of ion mobility to measure protein conformational changes induced by the binding of glycosaminoglycan ligands, using the well characterized system of Antithrombin III (ATIII) and Arixtra, a pharmaceutical agent with heparin (Hp) activity. Heparin has been used as a therapeutic anticoagulant drug for several decades through its interaction with ATIII, a serine protease inhibitor that plays a central role in the blood coagulation cascade. This interaction induces conformational changes within ATIII that dramatically enhance the ATIII-mediated inhibition rate. Arixtra is the smallest synthetic Hp containing the specific pentasaccharide sequence required to bind with ATIII. Here we report the first travelling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TWIMS) investigation of the conformational changes in ATIII induced by its interaction with Arixtra. Native electrospray ionization mass spectrometry allowed the gentle transfer of the native topology of ATIII and ATIII–Arixtra complex. IM measurements of ATIII and ATIII–Arixtra complex showed a single structure, with well-defined collisional cross section (CCS) values. An average 3.6% increase in CCS of ATIII occurred as a result of its interaction with Arixtra, which agrees closely with the theoretical estimation of the change in CCS based on protein crystal structures. A comparison of the binding behavior of ATIII under both denaturing and non-denaturing conditions confirmed the significance of a folded tertiary structure of ATIII for its biological activity. A Hp oligosaccharide whose structure is similar to Arixtra but missing the 3-O sulfo group on the central glucosamine residue showed a dramatic decrease in binding affinity towards ATIII, but no change in the mobility behavior of the complex, consistent with prior studies that suggested that 3-O sulfation affects the equilibrium constant for binding to ATIII, but not the mode of interaction. In contrast, nonspecific binding by a Hp

  4. Chromatographic analysis of some drugs employed in erectile dysfunction therapy: qualitative and quantitative studies using calixarene stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Hisham; Ibrahim, Adel Ehab; Elhenawee, Magda

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the effect of change in chromatographic process variables on the retention behavior of four drugs employed in erectile dysfunction therapy on a calixarene stationary phase is described. Three of these drugs are known to treat erectile dysfunction, namely, sildenafil citrate, tadalafil, and apomorphine hydrochloride, and one drug that is used as opioid analgesic, tramadol hydrochloride, which is quiet widely misused to treat premature ejaculation. The results indicate the importance of considering the structure and pKa values of drugs to be separated along with mobile phase composition. A new optimized, rapid, and accurate liquid chromatography method is also established for simultaneous determination of sildenafil citrate, tadalafil, and apomorphine hydrochloride in pharmaceutical preparations and bulk powders. The chromatographic separation of the three pharmaceuticals was achieved on a calixarene column in less than 10 min using a binary mobile phase of 35% acetonitrile and 65% 50 mM sodium perchlorate pH2.5 at 1 mL/min flow rate. The method was validated for system efficiency, linearity, accuracy, precision, limits of detection and quantitation, specificity, stability, and robustness. Statistical analysis proved that the method enabled reproducible and selective quantification of all three analytes in bulk drugs and in pharmaceutical preparations.

  5. [Determination of rhodamine B in spices by solid phase extraction-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Yin, Feng; Ding, Zhaowei; Yang, Zhijian

    2012-07-01

    Rhodamine B (RB), as an unlawful colour, is forbidden to add into foods by Chinese government. A solid phase extraction-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-HPLC-MS/MS) method for the determination of RB in spices has been developed. The sample was extracted by acetonitrile and then centrifugated, purified and enriched with a strong positive ion exchange SPE column (Bond Elut Plexa PCX SPE column) after adding 10 mL 1% trichloroacetic acid solution. The HPLC separation was performed on a Pursuit C18 column (100 mm x 2.0 mm, 3 microm) by gradient elution with 0.1% (v/v) formic acid solution and methanol as the mobile phase. The analyte was detected by electrospray ionization in positive ion mode-MS/MS in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The good linearity (R2 > 0.99) was obtained over the range of 0.6-6 microg/L. The limit of quantification (LOQ) for RB was 1.2 microg/kg. The average recoveries were ranged from 80% to 121% at the spiked levels of 1.197, 2.992 and 5.985 microg/L, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were not more than 15%. The conditions of mobile phase elution gradients, extraction solvents, and SPE columns were optimized. This method is highly selective and has weak matrix effect for qualitative and quantitative analyses of RB in spices.

  6. Analysis of tricyclic antidepressant drugs in plasma by means of solid-phase microextraction-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alves, Claudete; Santos-Neto, Alvaro J; Fernandes, Christian; Rodrigues, José C; Lanças, Fernando M

    2007-10-01

    Solid-phase microextraction coupled to liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (SPME-LC-MS) was used to analyze tricyclic antidepressant drugs desipramine, imipramine, nortriptyline, amitriptyline, and clomipramine (internal standard) in plasma samples. SPME was performed by direct extraction on a PDMS/DVB (60 microm) coated fiber, employing a stirring rate of 1200 rpm for 30 min, pH 11.0, and temperature of 30 degrees C. Drug desorption was carried out by exposing the fiber to the liquid chromatography mobile phase for 20 min, using a labmade SPME-LC interface at 50 degrees C. The main variables experimentally influencing LC-MS response were evaluated and mathematically modeled. A rational optimization with fewer experiments was achieved using a factorial design approach. The constructed empirical models were adjusted with 96-98% of explained deviation allowing an adequate data set comprehension. The chromatographic separation was realized using an RP-18 column (150 mm x 2.1 mm, 5 microm particles) and ammonium acetate buffer (0.01 mol/l, pH 5.50) : acetonitrile (50 : 50 v/v) as mobile phase. Low detection levels were achieved with electrospray interface (0.1 ng/ml). The developed method showed specificity, linearity, precision, and limit of quantification adequate to assay tricyclic antidepressant drugs in plasma.

  7. Acetonitrile hydration and ethyl acetate hydrolysis by pyrazolate-bridged cobalt(II) dimers containing hydrogen-bond donors.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Paul J; Sorrell, Thomas N; Powell, Douglas R; Day, Victor W; Borovik, A S

    2007-11-26

    The preparation of new CoII-mu-OH-CoII dimers with the binucleating ligands 3,5-bis{bis[(N'-R-ureaylato)-N-ethyl]aminomethyl}-1H-pyrazolate ([H4PRbuam]5-, R=tBu, iPr) is described. The molecular structure of the isopropyl derivative reveals that each CoII center has a trigonal-bipyramidial coordination geometry, with a Co...Co separation of 3.5857(5) A. Structural and spectroscopic studies show that there are four hydrogen-bond (H-bond) donors near the CoII-micro-OH-CoII moiety; however, they are too far away to be form intramolecular H-bonds with the bridging hydroxo ligand. Treating [CoII2H4PRbuam(micro-OH)]2- with acetonitrile led to the formation of bridging acetamidato complexes, [CoII2H4PRbuam(micro-1,3-OC(NH)CH3)]2-; in addition, these CoII-micro-OH-CoII dimers hydrolyze ethyl acetate to form CoII complexes with bridging acetato ligands. The CoII-1,3-micro-X'-CoII complexes (X'=OAc-, [OC(NH)CH3]-) were prepared independently by reacting [CoII2H3PRbuam]2- with acetamide or [CoII2H4PRbuam]- with acetate. X-ray diffraction studies show that the orientation of the acetate ligand within the H-bonding cavity depends on the size of the R substituent appended from the urea groups. The tetradentate ligand 3-{bis[(N'-tert-butylureaylato)-N-ethyl]aminomethyl}-5-tert-butyl-1H-pyrazolato ([H2PtBuuam]3-) was also developed and its CoII-OH complex prepared. In the crystalline state, [CoIIH2PtBuuam(OH)]2- contains two intramolecular H-bonds between the urea groups of [H2PtBuuam]3- and the terminal hydroxo ligand. [nPr4N]2[CoIIH2PtBuuam(OH)] does not hydrate acetonitrile or hydrolyze ethyl acetate. In contrast, K2[CoIIH2PtBuuam(OH)] does react with ethyl acetate to produce KOAc; this enhanced reactivity is attributed to the presence of the K+ ions, which can possibly interact with the CoII-OH unit and ester substrate to assist in hydrolysis. However, K2[CoIIH2PtBuuam(OH)] was still unable to hydrate acetonitrile.

  8. rhGM-CSF vs placebo following rhGM-CSF-mobilized PBPC transplantation: a phase III double-blind randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Legros, M; Fleury, J; Bay, J O; Choufi, B; Basile, M; Condat, P; Glenat, C; Communal, Y; Tavernier, F; Bons, J M; Chollet, P; Plagne, R; Chassagne, J

    1997-02-01

    In this placebo-controlled randomized trial we evaluated the hematological and clinical effects of r-Hu GM-CSF after high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) followed by GM-CSF-mobilized PBPC transplantation. Fifty patients with poor prognosis malignancies were randomized in a double-blind study to receive either GM-CSF or placebo after HDC followed by PBPC rescue. For all patients, PBPCs were recruited using a combination of VP-16 (300 mg/m2 on days 1 and 2), cytoxan (3 g/m2 on days 3 and 4) and GM-CSF (5 micrograms/kg from day 5). No differences were demonstrated between the two groups in median time to neutrophil or platelet recoveries. There was no significant difference between the GM-CSF group and the placebo group in the median duration of post-transplant hospitalization, in the number of days of antibiotic treatment, in the number of infections and in red blood cell or platelet transfusion requirements. There was a significant difference with an advantage for the placebo group in the mean duration of febrile days (P = 0.01). We conclude that the administration of GM-CSF in patients transplanted with GM-CSF-mobilized PBPC is not associated with a clinical benefit in term of tempo of engraftment, numbers of documented infections, transfusion requirements and mucositis grading.

  9. Simple setup for gas-phase H/D exchange mass spectrometry coupled to electron transfer dissociation and ion mobility for analysis of polypeptide structure on a liquid chromatographic time scale.

    PubMed

    Mistarz, Ulrik H; Brown, Jeffery M; Haselmann, Kim F; Rand, Kasper D

    2014-12-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) is a fast and sensitive, yet unharnessed analytical approach for providing information on the structural properties of biomolecules, in a complementary manner to mass analysis. Here, we describe a simple setup for ND3-mediated millisecond gas-phase HDX inside a mass spectrometer immediately after ESI (gas-phase HDX-MS) and show utility for studying the primary and higher-order structure of peptides and proteins. HDX was achieved by passing N2-gas through a container filled with aqueous deuterated ammonia reagent (ND3/D2O) and admitting the saturated gas immediately upstream or downstream of the primary skimmer cone. The approach was implemented on three commercially available mass spectrometers and required no or minor fully reversible reconfiguration of gas-inlets of the ion source. Results from gas-phase HDX-MS of peptides using the aqueous ND3/D2O as HDX reagent indicate that labeling is facilitated exclusively through gaseous ND3, yielding similar results to the infusion of purified ND3-gas, while circumventing the complications associated with the use of hazardous purified gases. Comparison of the solution-phase- and gas-phase deuterium uptake of Leu-Enkephalin and Glu-Fibrinopeptide B, confirmed that this gas-phase HDX-MS approach allows for labeling of sites (heteroatom-bound non-amide hydrogens located on side-chains, N-terminus and C-terminus) not accessed by classical solution-phase HDX-MS. The simple setup is compatible with liquid chromatography and a chip-based automated nanoESI interface, allowing for online gas-phase HDX-MS analysis of peptides and proteins separated on a liquid chromatographic time scale at increased throughput. Furthermore, online gas-phase HDX-MS could be performed in tandem with ion mobility separation or electron transfer dissociation, thus enabling multiple orthogonal analyses of the structural properties of peptides and proteins in a single automated LC-MS workflow.

  10. A novel dispersive micro solid phase extraction using PCX as the sorbent for the determination of melamine and cyromazine in milk and milk powder by UHPLC-HRMS/MS.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dawei; Zhao, Yunfeng; Miao, Hong; Wu, Yongning

    2015-03-01

    A novel dispersive micro solid phase extraction (DMSPE) cleanup method based on the PCX sorbent (a kind of cation exchange polymer material) was applied to the analysis of melamine and cyromazine residues in milk and milk powder, and ultra high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS) was used as instrument detection. Milk powder samples were first extracted with 1% formic acid in acetonitrile/water (1:1 v/v), and milk samples were cleaned up directly without any pre-extraction. Then, melamine and cyromazine in the extracts or milk were adsorbed to the PCX powder. Subsequently, the analytes in PCX sorbent were eluted with ammonium hydroxide/acetonitrile (2.5:97.5 v/v) through a simple unit device equipped with 1 mL syringe and 0.22 μm nylon syringe filter. All the samples were analyzed by UHPLC-HRMS/MS on a Waters Acquity BEH HILIC column with 0.1% formic acid and 4mM ammonium formate in water/acetonitrile as the mobile phase with gradient elution. The matrix effect, recovery, and repeatability, within laboratory reproducibility, CCα and CCβ of the DMSPE cleanup method were investigated. The proposed method provided a significant improvement for the determination of melamine and cyromazine in milk and milk powder in terms of efficient, rapid, economical, and miniaturized sample preparation methods, which yielded fewer matrix effects compared with SPE method. The established cleanup method is expected to be widely applied for the sample preparation of alkaline contaminants at trace levels in the future. PMID:25618651

  11. Solvation of fluoro-acetonitrile in water by 2D-IR spectroscopy: A combined experimental-computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Cazade, Pierre-André; Das, Akshaya K.; Tran, Halina; Kläsi, Felix; Hamm, Peter; Bereau, Tristan; Meuwly, Markus

    2015-06-07

    The solvent dynamics around fluorinated acetonitrile is characterized by 2-dimensional infrared spectroscopy and atomistic simulations. The lineshape of the linear infrared spectrum is better captured by semiempirical (density functional tight binding) mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics simulations, whereas force field simulations with multipolar interactions yield lineshapes that are significantly too narrow. For the solvent dynamics, a relatively slow time scale of 2 ps is found from the experiments and supported by the mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics simulations. With multipolar force fields fitted to the available thermodynamical data, the time scale is considerably faster—on the 0.5 ps time scale. The simulations provide evidence for a well established CF–HOH hydrogen bond (population of 25%) which is found from the radial distribution function g(r) from both, force field and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations.

  12. Voltammetric and electrochemical ESR studies of oxidation reactions mediated by tris(4-bromophenyl)amine in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Wain, Andrew J; Streeter, Ian; Thompson, Mary; Fietkau, Nicole; Drouin, Ludovic; Fairbanks, Antony J; Compton, Richard G

    2006-02-16

    The electrochemical oxidation of tris(4-bromophenyl)amine in the presence of 2,6-lutidine is examined in acetonitrile. Voltammetric and spectroscopic investigations suggest that the electrogenerated triaryl aminium radical cation oxidizes 2,6-lutidine in an EC' mechanism, and an equilibrium constant for this homogeneous electron transfer is estimated. The mediated oxidation of a protected phenyl selenoglycoside by this reaction mixture is studied by the use of electrochemical ESR, employing a tubular flow cell, and signal intensity data is found to be consistent with the proposed mechanism, allowing the determination of kinetic parameters by computational simulation. Products of the mediated glycoside oxidation are determined by proton NMR and mass spectrometry. PMID:16471872

  13. Cluster-continuum quasichemical theory calculation of the lithium ion solvation in water, acetonitrile and dimethyl sulfoxide: an absolute single-ion solvation free energy scale.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Nathalia F; Pliego, Josefredo R

    2015-10-28

    Absolute single-ion solvation free energy is a very useful property for understanding solution phase chemistry. The real solvation free energy of an ion depends on its interaction with the solvent molecules and on the net potential inside the solute cavity. The tetraphenyl arsonium-tetraphenyl borate (TATB) assumption as well as the cluster-continuum quasichemical theory (CC-QCT) approach for Li(+) solvation allows access to a solvation scale excluding the net potential. We have determined this free energy scale investigating the solvation of the lithium ion in water (H2O), acetonitrile (CH3CN) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvents via the CC-QCT approach. Our calculations at the MP2 and MP4 levels with basis sets up to the QZVPP+diff quality, and including solvation of the clusters and solvent molecules by the dielectric continuum SMD method, predict the solvation free energy of Li(+) as -116.1, -120.6 and -123.6 kcal mol(-1) in H2O, CH3CN and DMSO solvents, respectively (1 mol L(-1) standard state). These values are compatible with the solvation free energy of the proton of -253.4, -253.2 and -261.1 kcal mol(-1) in H2O, CH3CN and DMSO solvents, respectively. Deviations from the experimental TATB scale are only 1.3 kcal mol(-1) in H2O and 1.8 kcal mol(-1) in DMSO solvents. However, in the case of CH3CN, the deviation reaches a value of 9.2 kcal mol(-1). The present study suggests that the experimental TATB scale is inconsistent for CH3CN. A total of 125 values of the solvation free energy of ions in these three solvents were obtained. These new data should be useful for the development of theoretical solvation models.

  14. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of phenols by acetonitrile stacking coupled with sweeping-micellar electrokinetic chromatography with large-volume injection.

    PubMed

    He, Hui; Liu, Shuhui; Meng, Zhaofu; Hu, Shibing

    2014-09-26

    The current routes to couple dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) with capillary electrophoresis (CE) are evaporation of water immiscible extractants and backextraction of analytes. The former is not applicable to extractants with high boiling points, the latter being effective only for acidic or basic analytes, both of which limit the further application of DLLME-CE. In this study, with 1-octanol as a model DLLME extractant and six phenols as model analytes, a novel method based on acetonitrile stacking and sweeping is proposed to accomplish large-volume injection of 1-octanol diluted with a solvent-saline mixture before micellar electrokinetic chromatography. Brij-35 and β-cyclodextrin were employed as pseudostationary phases for sweeping and also for improving the compatibility of sample zone and aqueous running buffer. A short solvent-saline plug was used to offset the adverse effect of the water immiscible extractant on focusing efficiency. The key parameters affecting separation and concentration were systematically optimized; the effect of Brij-35 and 1-octanol on focusing mechanism was discussed. Under the optimized conditions, with ∼ 30-fold concentration enrichment by DLLME, the diluted extractant (8×) was then injected into the capillary with a length of 21 cm (42% of the total length), which yielded the overall improvements in sensitivity of 170-460. Limits of detection and qualification ranged from 0.2 to 1.0 ng/mL and 1.0 to 3.4 g/mL, respectively. Acceptable repeatability lower than 3.0% for migration time and 9.0% for peak areas were obtained. The developed method was successfully applied for analysis of the phenol pollutants in real water samples. PMID:25155065

  15. Identification and separation of the organic compounds in coal-gasification condensate waters. [5,5 dimethyl hydantoin, dihydroxy benzenes, acetonitrile

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, D.H. Jr.; King, C.J.

    1983-08-01

    A substantial fraction of the organic solutes in condensate waters from low-temperature coal-gasification processes are not identified by commonly employed analytical techniques, have low distriution coefficients (K/sub C/) into diisopropyl ether (DIPE) or methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK), and are resistant to biological oxidation. These compounds represent an important wastewater-treatment problem. Analytical techniques were developed to detect these polar compounds, and the liquid-liquid phase equilibria were measured with several solvents. A high-performance liquid - chromatography (HPLC) technique was employed to analyze four condensate-water samples from a slagging fixed-bed gasifier. A novel sample-preparation technique, consisting of an azeotropic distillation with isopropanol, allowed identification of compounds in the HPLC eluant by combined gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. 5,5-dimethyl hydantoin and related compounds were identified in condensate waters for the first time, and they account for 1 to 6% of the chemical oxygen demand (COD). Dimethyl hydatoin has a K/sub D/ of 2.6 into tributyl phosphate (TBP) and much lower K/sub D/ values into six other solvents. It is also resistant to biological oxidation. Phenols (59 to 76% of the COD), dihydroxy benzenes (0.02 to 9.5% of the COD), and methanol, acetonitrile, and acetone (15% of the COD in one sample) were also detected. Extraction with MIBK removed about 90% of the COD. MIBK has much higher K/sub D/ values than DIPE for dihydroxy benzenes. Chemical reactions occurred during storage of condensate-water samples. The reaction products had low K/sub D/ values into MIBK. About 10% of the COD had a K/sub D/ of nearly zero into MIBK. These compounds were not extracted by MIBK over a wide range of pH. 73 references, 6 figures, 35 tables.

  16. An HPLC-DAD and LC-MS study of condensation oscillations with S(+)-ketoprofen dissolved in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Sajewicz, Mieczysław; Gontarska, Monika; Kronenbach, Dorota; Berry, Etienne; Kowalska, Teresa

    2012-03-01

    In our earlier studies, a spontaneous chiral conversion of the selected low-molecular-weight carboxylic acids (i.e., amino acids, hydroxy acids, and profen drugs) dissolved in aqueous ethanol medium, running in vitro was described. Then it became clear that this spontaneous chiral conversion is accompanied by the spontaneous condensation of the discussed compounds. With several acids, it was established that this condensation is also oscillatory in nature. The theoretical models were developed aiming to give a rough explanation of the observed non-linear processes. In this paper, the results of these studies on the dynamics of condensation with S(+)-ketoprofen, a very popular profen drug, when stored for certain amount of time dissolved in a non-aqueous medium (i.e., acetonitrile) is presented. These investigations were carried out with the aid of two independent high-performance liquid chromatographic systems with the diode array detection and of a third high-performance liquid chromatographic system equipped with mass spectrometric detection. In one cycle of chromatographic measurements, it was possible to monitor condensation of S(+)-ketoprofen in 25-min intervals for 30 h, thus obtaining kinetic information on the progress of this process. Mass spectrometric detection confirmed the presence of new species in the stored solution with molecular weights much higher than that of S(+)-ketoprofen, which can be attributed to the condensation products. The obtained data show that condensation of S(+)-ketoprofen dissolved in acetonitrile progresses in a rapid manner, and that the observed oscillatory concentration changes with S(+)-ketoprofen and with the main condensation product characterize with an irregularity and shallow amplitudes. A theoretical model was referenced that jointly describes the oscillatory chiral conversion and the oscillatory condensation with the low-molecular-weight chiral carboxylic acids.

  17. Low-temperature growth of nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers by acetonitrile catalytic CVD using Ni-based catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Tomohiro; Makino, Yuri; Fukukawa, Makoto; Nakamura, Hideya; Watano, Satoru

    2016-06-01

    To synthesize nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers (N-CNFs) at high growth rates and low temperatures less than 673 K, nickel species (metallic nickel and nickel oxide) supported on alumina particles were used as the catalysts for an acetonitrile catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The nickel:alumina mass ratio in the catalysts was fixed at 0.05:1. The catalyst precursors were prepared from various nickel salts (nitrate, chloride, sulfate, acetate, and lactate) and then calcined at 1073 K for 1 h in oxidative (air), reductive (hydrogen-containing argon), or inert (pure argon) atmospheres to activate the nickel-based catalysts. The effects of precursors and calcination atmosphere on the catalyst activity at low temperatures were studied. We found that the catalysts derived from nickel nitrate had relatively small crystallite sizes of nickel species and provided N-CNFs at high growth rates of 57 ± 4 g-CNF/g-Ni/h at 673 K in the CVD process using 10 vol% hydrogen-containing argon as the carrier gas of acetonitrile vapor, which were approximately 4 times larger than that of a conventional CVD process. The obtained results reveal that nitrate ions in the catalyst precursor and hydrogen in the carrier gas can contribute effectively to the activation of catalysts in low-temperature CVD. The fiber diameter and nitrogen content of N-CNFs synthesized at high growth rates were several tens of nanometers and 3.5 ± 0.3 at.%, respectively. Our catalysts and CVD process may lead to cost reductions in the production of N-CNFs.

  18. Thermodynamics of various F420 coenzyme models as sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ke; Shen, Guang-Bin; Zhu, Xiao-Qing

    2015-06-14

    32 F420 coenzyme models with alkylation of the three different N atoms (N1, N3 and N10) in the core structure (XFH(-)) were designed and synthesized and the thermodynamic driving forces (defined in terms of the molar enthalpy changes or the standard redox potentials in this work) of the 32 XFH(-) releasing hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and electrons, the thermodynamic driving forces of the 32 XFH˙ releasing protons and hydrogen atoms and the thermodynamic driving forces of XF(-)˙ releasing electrons in acetonitrile were determined using titration calorimetry and electrochemical methods. The effects of the methyl group at N1, N3 and N10 and a negative charge on N1 and N10 atoms on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were examined; the results show that seating arrangements of the methyl group and the negative charge have remarkably different effects on the thermodynamic properties of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates. The effects of the substituents at C7 and C8 on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were also examined; the results show that the substituents at C7 and C8 have good Hammett linear free energy relationships with the six thermodynamic parameters. Meanwhile, a reasonable determination of possible reactions between members of the F420 family and NADH family in vivo was given according to a thermodynamic analysis platform constructed using the elementary step thermodynamic parameter of F420 coenzyme model 2FH(-) and NADH model MNAH releasing hydride ions in acetonitrile. The information disclosed in this work can not only fill a gap in the chemical thermodynamics of F420 coenzyme models as a class of very important organic sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons, but also strongly promote the fast development of the chemistry and applications of F420 coenzyme.

  19. Thermodynamics of various F420 coenzyme models as sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ke; Shen, Guang-Bin; Zhu, Xiao-Qing

    2015-06-14

    32 F420 coenzyme models with alkylation of the three different N atoms (N1, N3 and N10) in the core structure (XFH(-)) were designed and synthesized and the thermodynamic driving forces (defined in terms of the molar enthalpy changes or the standard redox potentials in this work) of the 32 XFH(-) releasing hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and electrons, the thermodynamic driving forces of the 32 XFH˙ releasing protons and hydrogen atoms and the thermodynamic driving forces of XF(-)˙ releasing electrons in acetonitrile were determined using titration calorimetry and electrochemical methods. The effects of the methyl group at N1, N3 and N10 and a negative charge on N1 and N10 atoms on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were examined; the results show that seating arrangements of the methyl group and the negative charge have remarkably different effects on the thermodynamic properties of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates. The effects of the substituents at C7 and C8 on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were also examined; the results show that the substituents at C7 and C8 have good Hammett linear free energy relationships with the six thermodynamic parameters. Meanwhile, a reasonable determination of possible reactions between members of the F420 family and NADH family in vivo was given according to a thermodynamic analysis platform constructed using the elementary step thermodynamic parameter of F420 coenzyme model 2FH(-) and NADH model MNAH releasing hydride ions in acetonitrile. The information disclosed in this work can not only fill a gap in the chemical thermodynamics of F420 coenzyme models as a class of very important organic sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons, but also strongly promote the fast development of the chemistry and applications of F420 coenzyme

  20. Hirshfeld and DFT analysis of the N-heterocyclic carbene proligand methylenebis(N-butylimidazolium) as the acetonitrile-solvated diiodide salt.

    PubMed

    Cebollada, Andrea; Vellé, Alba; Sanz Miguel, Pablo J

    2016-06-01

    N-Heterocyclic carbene (NHC) based systems are usually exploited in the exploration of catalytic mechanisms and processes in organocatalysis, and homo- and heterogeneous catalysis. However, their molecular structures have not received adequate attention. The NHC proligand methylenebis(N-butylimidazolium) has been synthesized as the acetonitrile solvate of the diiodide salt, C15H26N4(2+)·2I(-)·CH3CN [1,1'-methylenebis(3-butylimidazolium) diiodide acetonitrile monosolvate], and fully characterized. An interesting cation-anion connection pattern has been identified in the crystal lattice, in which three iodide anions interact simultaneously with the cisoid-oriented cation. A Hirshfeld surface analysis reveals the predominance of hydrogen bonding over anion-π interactions. This particular arrangement is observed in different methylene-bridged bis(imidazolium) cations bearing chloride or bromide counter-anions. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations with acetonitrile as solvent reproduce the geometry of the title cation.

  1. Factors influencing high voltage performance of coconut char derived carbon based electrical double layer capacitor made using acetonitrile and propylene carbonate based electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Changzheng; Qu, Weiguo; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Randall, Clive

    2014-12-01

    Symmetric EDLCs made using high purity carbon electrodes derived from coconut char were tested using 1 M Tetraethylammonium hexafluorophosphate dissolved in two different solvents namely acetonitrile and propylene carbonate. The cell voltage of the capacitor made using propylene carbonate can be extended to 3.5 V and it exhibited good cycling and thermal stability upto 70 °C while the voltage was limited to below 3.0 V in acetonitrile. XPS analysis of the positive and negative electrodes of EDLCs post cycling showed that the primary degradation products were related to ring opening reactions in propylene carbonate based electrolytes while water played a key role in degradation of acetonitrile based EDLCs.

  2. Study of the genotoxic activity of six halogenated acetonitriles, using the SOS chromotest, the Ames-fluctuation test and the newt micronucleus test.

    PubMed

    Le Curieux, F; Giller, S; Gauthier, L; Erb, F; Marzin, D

    1995-02-01

    Three short-term assays (the SOS chromotest, the Ames-fluctuation test and the newt micronucleus test) were carried out to evaluate the genotoxicity of six halogenated acetonitriles identified in chlorinated waters (monochloro-, dichloro-, trichloro-, monobromo-, dibromo- and bromochloroacetonitrile). With the SOS chromotest, three of the chemicals studied (dichloro-, dibromo- and bromochloroacetonitrile) were found to induce primary DNA damage in Escherichia coli PQ37. In the Ames-fluctuation test, all the compounds except dibromoacetonitrile showed mutagenic activity on Salmonella typhimurium strain TA100. The newt micronucleus assay detected a clastogenic effect on the peripheral blood erythrocytes of Pleurodeles waltl larvae for all the six haloacetonitriles studied. Moreover, two structure-activity relationships were noted: (1) the genotoxic activity of haloacetonitriles containing bromine substituents appeared higher than the corresponding chlorinated acetonitriles and (2) the clastogenic activity of the chlorinated acetonitriles increased with the number of chlorine substituents.

  3. Enantioselective determination of selfotel in human urine by high-performance liquid chromatography on a chiral stationary phase after derivatization with 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate.

    PubMed

    Knoche, B; Milosavljev, S; Gropper, S; Brunner, L A; Powell, M L

    1997-08-01

    An analytical method for the enantioselective determination of selfotel in human urine has been developed and validated. The method is based on high-performance liquid chromatography and utilizes CGS 20005 (a selfotel analog) as the internal standard. Urine samples were derivatized in situ with o-phthalic dicarboxaldehyde-3-mercaptopropionic acid and 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate (FMOC). Chromatographic separations of the FMOC derivatives of selfotel enantiomers and the internal standard were achieved using a column switching system consisting of an Inertsil ODS-2 column (75x4.6 mm I.D., 5 microm) and a Chiralcel OD-R column (250x4.6 mm I.D., 10 microm). The composition of the mobile phase was acetonitrile-0.1 M phosphate buffer, pH 2.50 (35:65) for the Inertsil ODS-2 column and acetonitrile-0.1 M phosphate buffer, pH 2.00 (35:65) for the Chiralcel OD-R column. The analytes were monitored using fluorescence detection at an excitation wavelength of 262 nm and an emission wavelength of 314 nm. The limit of quantification (LOQ) for this method is 0.25 microg/ml for each selfotel enantiomer. The method was successfully utilized to determine preliminary selfotel stereospecific pharmacokinetics. PMID:9300872

  4. Gas-Phase Analysis of the Complex of Fibroblast GrowthFactor 1 with Heparan Sulfate: A Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry (TWIMS) and Molecular Modeling Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuejie; Singh, Arunima; Xu, Yongmei; Zong, Chengli; Zhang, Fuming; Boons, Geert-Jan; Liu, Jian; Linhardt, Robert J.; Woods, Robert J.; Amster, I. Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) regulate several cellular developmental processes by interacting with cell surface heparan proteoglycans and transmembrane cell surface receptors (FGFR). The interaction of FGF with heparan sulfate (HS) is known to induce protein oligomerization, increase the affinity of FGF towards its receptor FGFR, promoting the formation of the HS-FGF-FGFR signaling complex. Although the role of HS in the signaling pathways is well recognized, the details of FGF oligomerization and formation of the ternary signaling complex are still not clear, with several conflicting models proposed in literature. Here, we examine the effect of size and sulfation pattern of HS upon FGF1 oligomerization, binding stoichiometry and conformational stability, through a combination of ion mobility (IM) and theoretical modeling approaches. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS) of FGF1 in the presence of several HS fragments ranging from tetrasaccharide (dp4) to dodecasaccharide (dp12) in length was performed. A comparison of the binding stoichiometry of variably sulfated dp4 HS to FGF1 confirmed the significance of the previously known high-affinity binding motif in FGF1 dimerization, and demonstrated that certain tetrasaccharide-length fragments are also capable of inducing dimerization of FGF1. The degree of oligomerization was found to increase in the presence of dp12 HS, and a general lack of specificity for longer HS was observed. Additionally, collision cross-sections (CCSs) of several FGF1-HS complexes were calculated, and were found to be in close agreement with experimental results. Based on the (CCSs) a number of plausible binding modes of 2:1 and 3:1 FGF1-HS are proposed.

  5. Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions characterization during the flow-back phase of a hydraulically refractured well in the Uintah Basin, Utah using mobile PTR-MS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, F.; Warneke, C.; Brown, S. S.; De Gouw, J. A.; Dube, W. P.; Edwards, P.; Gilman, J.; Graus, M.; Helleis, F.; Kofler, J.; Lerner, B. M.; Orphal, J.; Petron, G.; Roberts, J. M.; Zahn, A.

    2014-12-01

    Ongoing improvements in advanced technologies for crude oil and natural gas extraction from unconventional reserves, such as directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing, have greatly increased the production of fossil fuels within recent years. The latest forecasts even estimate an enhancement of 56% in total natural gas production due to increased development of shale gas, tight gas and offshore natural gas resources from 2012 to 2040 with the largest contribution from shale formations [US EIA: Annual Energy Outlook 2014]. During the field intensive 'Energy and Environment - Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study (UBWOS)', measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were made using proton-transfer-reactions mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) at the ground site Horse Pool and using a mobile laboratory in the Uintah Basin, Utah, which is a region well known for intense fossil fuel production. A reworked gas well in the Red Wash fields was sampled regularly within two weeks performing mobile laboratory measurements downwind of the well site. The well had been recently hydraulically refractured at that time and waste water was collected into an open flow-back pond. Very high mixing ratios of aromatic hydrocarbons (C6-C13) up to the ppm range were observed coming from condensate and flow-back reservoirs. The measurements are used to determine sources of specific VOC emissions originating from the different parts of the well site and mass spectra are used to classify the air composition in contrast to samples taken at the Horse Pool field site and crude oil samples from South Louisiana. Enhancement ratios and time series of measured peak values for aromatics showed no clear trend, which indicates changes in emissions with operations at the site.

  6. Synthesis of indolyl-3-acetonitrile derivatives and their inhibitory effects on nitric oxide and PGE2 productions in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Tae Hoon; Yoon, Ik Hwan; Shin, Ji-Sun; Lee, Young Hun; Kwon, Bong Jin; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Lee, Yong Sup

    2013-05-01

    Arvelexin is one of major constituents of Brassica rapa that exerts anti-inflammatory activities. Several indolyl-3-acetonitrile derivatives were synthesized as arvelexin analogs and evaluated for their abilities to inhibit NO and PGE2 productions in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 cells. Of the indolyl-3-acetonitriles synthesized, compound 2k, which possesses a hydroxyl group at C-7 position of the indole ring and an N-methyl substituent, more potently inhibited NO and PGE2 productions and was less cytotoxic than arvelexin on macrophage cells.

  7. Silica-based polypeptide-monolithic stationary phase for hydrophilic chromatography and chiral separation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Licong; Yang, Limin; Wang, Qiuquan

    2016-05-13

    Glutathione (GSH)-, somatostatin acetate (ST)- and ovomucoid (OV)-functionalized silica-monolithic stationary phases were designed and synthesized for HILIC and chiral separation using capillary electrochromatography (CEC). GSH, ST and OV were covalently incorporated into the silica skeleton via the epoxy ring-opening reaction between their amino groups and the glycidyl moiety in γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS) together with polycondensation and copolymerization of tetramethyloxysilane and GPTMS. Not only could the direction and electroosmotic flow magnitude on the prepared GSH-, ST- and OV-silica hybrid monolithic stationary phases be controlled by the pH of the mobile phase, but also a typical HILIC behavior was observed so that the nucleotides and HPLC peptide standard mixture could be baseline separated using an aqueous mobile phase without any acetonitrile during CEC. Moreover, the prepared monolithic columns had a chiral separation ability to separate dl-amino acids. The OV-silica hybrid monolithic column was most effective in chiral separation and could separate dl-glutamic acid (Glu) (the resolution R=1.07), dl-tyrosine (Tyr) (1.57) and dl-histidine (His) (1.06). Importantly, the chiral separation ability of the GSH-silica hybrid monolithic column could be remarkably enhanced when using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to fabricate an AuNP-mediated GSH-AuNP-GSH-silica hybrid monolithic column. The R of dl-Glu, dl-Tyr and dl-His reached 1.19, 1.60 and 2.03. This monolithic column was thus applied to separate drug enantiomers, and quantitative separation of all four R/S drug enantiomers were achieved with R ranging from 4.36 to 5.64. These peptide- and protein-silica monolithic stationary phases with typical HILIC separation behavior and chiral separation ability implied their promise for the analysis of not only the future metabolic studies, but also drug enantiomers recognition.

  8. Characterization of TATP gas phase product ion chemistry via isotope labeling experiments using ion mobility spectrometry interfaced with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson-Phillips, Jill; Wooten, Alfred; Kozole, Joseph; Deline, James; Beresford, Pamela; Stairs, Jason

    2014-09-01

    Identification of the fragment ion species associated with the ion reaction mechanism of triacetone triperoxide (TATP), a homemade peroxide-based explosive, is presented. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has proven to be a key analytical technique in the detection of trace explosive material. Unfortunately, IMS alone does not provide chemical identification of the ions detected; therefore, it is unknown what ion species are actually formed and separated by the IMS. In IMS, ions are primarily characterized by their drift time, which is dependent on the ion׳s mass and molecular cross-section; thus, IMS as a standalone technique does not provide structural signatures, which is in sharp contrast to the chemical and molecular information that is generally obtained from other customary analytical techniques, such as NMR, Raman and IR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. To help study the ion chemistry that gives rise to the peaks observed in IMS, the hardware of two different commercial IMS instruments has been directly coupled to triple quadrupole (QQQ) mass spectrometers, in order to ascertain each ion׳s corresponding mass/charge (m/z) ratios with different dopants at two temperatures. Isotope labeling was then used to help identify and confirm the molecular identity of the explosive fragment and adduct ions of TATP. The m/z values and isotope labeling experiments were used to help propose probable molecular formulas for the ion fragments. In this report, the fragment and adduct ions m/z 58 and 240 of TATP have been confirmed to be [C3H6NH·H](+) and [TATP·NH4](+), respectively; while the fragment ions m/z 73 and 89 of TATP are identified as having the molecular formulas [C4H9NH2](+) and [C4H9O2](+), respectively. It is anticipated that the work in this area will not only help to facilitate improvements in mobility-based detection (IMS and MS), but also aid in the development and optimization of MS-based detection algorithms for TATP.

  9. Characterization of TATP gas phase product ion chemistry via isotope labeling experiments using ion mobility spectrometry interfaced with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson-Phillips, Jill; Wooten, Alfred; Kozole, Joseph; Deline, James; Beresford, Pamela; Stairs, Jason

    2014-09-01

    Identification of the fragment ion species associated with the ion reaction mechanism of triacetone triperoxide (TATP), a homemade peroxide-based explosive, is presented. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has proven to be a key analytical technique in the detection of trace explosive material. Unfortunately, IMS alone does not provide chemical identification of the ions detected; therefore, it is unknown what ion species are actually formed and separated by the IMS. In IMS, ions are primarily characterized by their drift time, which is dependent on the ion׳s mass and molecular cross-section; thus, IMS as a standalone technique does not provide structural signatures, which is in sharp contrast to the chemical and molecular information that is generally obtained from other customary analytical techniques, such as NMR, Raman and IR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. To help study the ion chemistry that gives rise to the peaks observed in IMS, the hardware of two different commercial IMS instruments has been directly coupled to triple quadrupole (QQQ) mass spectrometers, in order to ascertain each ion׳s corresponding mass/charge (m/z) ratios with different dopants at two temperatures. Isotope labeling was then used to help identify and confirm the molecular identity of the explosive fragment and adduct ions of TATP. The m/z values and isotope labeling experiments were used to help propose probable molecular formulas for the ion fragments. In this report, the fragment and adduct ions m/z 58 and 240 of TATP have been confirmed to be [C3H6NH·H](+) and [TATP·NH4](+), respectively; while the fragment ions m/z 73 and 89 of TATP are identified as having the molecular formulas [C4H9NH2](+) and [C4H9O2](+), respectively. It is anticipated that the work in this area will not only help to facilitate improvements in mobility-based detection (IMS and MS), but also aid in the development and optimization of MS-based detection algorithms for TATP. PMID:24913870

  10. Phase Behavior, Solid Organic Precipitation, and Mobility Characterization Studies in Support of Enhanced Heavy Oil Recovery on the Alaska North Slope

    SciTech Connect

    Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar; Santanu Khataniar

    2008-12-31

    The medium-heavy oil (viscous oil) resources in the Alaska North Slope are estimated at 20 to 25 billion barrels. These oils are viscous, flow sluggishly in the formations, and are difficult to recover. Recovery of this viscous oil requires carefully designed enhanced oil recovery processes. Success of these recovery processes is critically dependent on accurate knowledge of the phase behavior and fluid properties, especially viscosity, of these oils under variety of pressure and temperature conditions. This project focused on predicting phase behavior and viscosity of viscous oils using equations of state and semi-empirical correlations. An experimental study was conducted to quantify the phase behavior and physical properties of viscous oils from the Alaska North Slope oil field. The oil samples were compositionally characterized by the simulated distillation technique. Constant composition expansion and differential liberation tests were conducted on viscous oil samples. Experiment results for phase behavior and reservoir fluid properties were used to tune the Peng-Robinson equation of state and predict the phase behavior accurately. A comprehensive literature search was carried out to compile available compositional viscosity models and their modifications, for application to heavy or viscous oils. With the help of meticulously amassed new medium-heavy oil viscosity data from experiments, a comparative study was conducted to evaluate the potential of various models. The widely used corresponding state viscosity model predictions deteriorate when applied to heavy oil systems. Hence, a semi-empirical approach (the Lindeloff model) was adopted for modeling the viscosity behavior. Based on the analysis, appropriate adjustments have been suggested: the major one is the division of the pressure-viscosity profile into three distinct regions. New modifications have improved the overall fit, including the saturated viscosities at low pressures. However, with the limited

  11. Mobile Customer Relationship Management and Mobile Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanayei, Ali; Mirzaei, Abas

    The purpose of this study is twofold. First, in order to guarantee a coherent discussion about mobile customer relationship management (mCRM), this paper presents a conceptualization of mCRM delineating its unique characteristics because of Among the variety of mobile services, considerable attention has been devoted to mobile marketing and in particular to mobile customer relationship management services. Second, the authors discusses the security risks in mobile computing in different level(user, mobile device, wireless network,...) and finally we focus on enterprise mobile security and it's subgroups with a series of suggestion and solution for improve mobile computing security.

  12. Retention prediction of highly polar ionizable solutes under gradient conditions on a mixed-mode reversed-phase and weak anion-exchange stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Balkatzopoulou, P; Fasoula, S; Gika, H; Nikitas, P; Pappa-Louisi, A

    2015-05-29

    In the present work the retention of three highly polar and ionizable solutes - uric acid, nicotinic acid and ascorbic acid - was investigated on a mixed-mode reversed-phase and weak anion-exchange (RP/WAX) stationary phase in buffered aqueous acetonitrile (ACN) mobile phases. A U-shaped retention behavior was observed for all solutes with respect to the eluent organic modifier content studied in a range of 5-95% (v/v). This retention behavior clearly demonstrates the presence of a HILIC-type retention mechanism at ACN-rich hydro-organic eluents and an RP-like retention at aqueous-rich hydro-organic eluents. Hence, this column should be promising for application under both RP and HILIC gradient elution modes. For this reason, a series of programmed elution runs were carried out with increasing (RP) and decreasing (HILIC) organic solvent concentration in the mobile phase. This dual gradient process was successfully modeled by two retention models exhibiting a quadratic or a cubic dependence of the logarithm of the solute retention factor (lnk) upon the organic modifier volume fraction (φ). It was found that both models produced by gradient retention data allow the prediction of solute retention times for both types of programmed elution on the mixed-mode column. Four, in the case of the quadratic model, or five, in the case of the cubic model, initial HILIC- and RP-type gradient runs gave satisfactory retention predictions of any similar kind elution program, even with different flow rate, with an overall error of only 2.5 or 1.7%, respectively.

  13. Are the Radical Centers in Peptide Radical Cations Mobile? The Generation, Tautomerism, and Dissociation of Isomeric α-Carbon-Centered Triglycine Radical Cations in the Gas Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Ivan K.; Zhao, Junfang; Xu, Minjie; Siu, Shiu On; Hopkinson, Alan C.; Siu , K W Michael

    2008-05-31

    The mobility of the radical center in three isomeric triglycine radical cationss[G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+shas been investigated theoretically via density functional theory (DFT) and experimentally via tandem mass spectrometry. These radical cations were generated by collision-induced dissociations (CIDs) of Cu(II)-containing ternary complexes that contain the tripeptides YGG, GYG, and GGY, respectively (G and Y are the glycine and tyrosine residues, respectively). Dissociative electron transfer within the complexes led to observation of [Y•GG]+, [GY•G]+, and [GGY•]+; CID resulted in cleavage of the tyrosine side chain as p-quinomethide, yielding [G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+, respectively. Interconversions between these isomeric triglycine radical cations have relatively high barriers (g44.7 kcal/mol), in support of the thesis that isomerically pure [G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+ can be experimentally produced. This is to be contrasted with barriers < 17 kcal/mol that were encountered in the tautomerism of protonated triglycine [Rodriquez C. F. et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001, 123, 3006-3012]. The CID spectra of [G•GG]+, [GG•G]+, and [GGG•]+ were substantially different, providing experimental proof that initially these ions have distinct structures. DFT calculations showed that direct dissociations are competitive with interconversions followed by dissociation.

  14. Investigations on the mobility of the glycosidic linkage in sucrose by study of the phase space structure of a two-degrees of freedom model.

    PubMed

    Longhi, G; Malandrino, M; Abbate, S

    2000-04-01

    Using the theoretical Ramachandran (phi, psi) maps reported in the literature for sucrose in vacuo and in aqueous solution, we constructed a two-degrees of freedom model in which the glucose and fructose units are substituted by pseudo-atoms. The complete dynamics of this model is studied numerically at fixed energies. Use is made of the graphic method of the Poincaré surfaces of section in phase space and of the Lissajous maps in configuration space. The reduction to just two degrees of freedom allows one to deal with all initial conditions in phase space, whereas the results of molecular dynamics calculations with all internal degrees of freedoms and with the explicit consideration of solvent molecules are taken into account via effective kinetic and potential energy terms. The conformational isomerization mechanism is investigated by singling out the most reactive trajectories in phase space that are associated with the so-called reactive islands and with the resonances found between the phi and psi motions. PMID:10994519

  15. Going mobile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brus, Eric

    1987-12-01

    By 1990, all metropolitan areas in the U.S. and rural areas close to major cities or towns are expected to have cellular telephone service; 22 Canadian cities also feature cellular service. To supply mobile telecommunication services to sparsely-populated rural areas, a mobile satellite service (MSS) is now being developed. In this paper the projected possibilities of the MSS system are discussed, including a possibility that a piggyback-MSS payload be added to the GSTAR-4 satellite which is scheduled for a launch in 1988 or 1989; one in which some of the hardware from aborted direct-broadcast satellites would be used; and the possibility of building a new MSS satellite with large servicing capacity. Canada is planning to launch its own mobile satellite, MSAT, in the early 1990s. The MSS is expected to be 'generic', serving not only people on land but maritime and aeronautical users as well. It will also offer major benefits to truck and automobile drivers, making it possible for them to conduct business or to call for assistance from locations beyond the range of cellular systems.

  16. Mobile antennas for COMETS advanced mobile Satcom experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hase, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Masato; Saito, Haruo

    1995-01-01

    Advanced mobile satellite communication experiments in the Ka-band and the mm-wave will be carried out using the COMETS satellite, which is scheduled for launch in 1997. Mobile antennas will play a much more key role in high frequency systems such as COMETS than in conventional L-band mobile systems. This paper describes three types of antennas which are now being developed by the Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) for the COMETS mobile experiments. One is a mechanically steered waveguide slot array antenna, another is an electronically steered active phased array antenna, and the third is a mechanically steered torus reflector antenna. The first two antennas will be used in the Ka-band, while the latter will be used in the mm-wave.

  17. Development and validation of a multi-residue method for the determination of pesticides in honeybees using acetonitrile-based extraction and gas chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Walorczyk, Stanisław; Gnusowski, Bogusław

    2009-09-11

    An optimized analytical method employing gas chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) has been developed for the simultaneous screening of roughly 150 pesticides in honeybees suspected of poisoning by pesticides during field spraying. In this work, a sample preparation approach based on acetonitrile extraction followed by dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) cleanup was implemented and validated for pesticides in honeybees for the first time. The procedure involved homogenization of a 2g sample (23 insects on average) with acetonitrile-water mixture followed by salting out with citrate buffer, magnesium sulphate and sodium chloride. An amount of matrix constituents with limited solubility in acetonitrile was reduced in the extract by precipitation at low-temperature (freezing-out cleanup). Hereafter, d-SPE cleanup was carried out using primary secondary amine (PSA), octadecyl (C18) and graphitized carbon black (GCB). This combination of cleanup steps ensured efficient extract purification. Linearity of the calibration curves was studied using matrix-matched standards in the concentration range between 4 and 500 ng mL(-1) (equivalent to 10 and 1250 ng g(-1)), and coefficients of determination (R(2)) were > or =0.99 for approximately 90% of the targeted compounds. The recovery data were obtained by spiking honeybees samples free of pesticides at three concentration levels of 10, 50, and 500 ng g(-1) (approximately 0.9, 4.3, 43.5 ng per bee). At these spiking levels 47, 77 and 92% of the targeted compounds were recovered, respectively. Generally the recoveries were in the range between 70 and 120% with precision values, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD) < or =20%. The expanded uncertainty was estimated following a "top down" empirical model as being 28% on average (coverage factor k=2, confidence level 95%). Preliminary results from practical application to analysis of real samples are presented. A total of 25 samples of

  18. Spectrophotometric study on the proton transfer reaction between 2-amino-4-methylpyridine with 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol in methanol, acetonitrile and the binary mixture 50% methanol+50% acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Al-Ahmary, Khairia M; Habeeb, Moustafa M; Al-Obidan, Areej H

    2016-02-01

    Proton transfer reaction between 2-amino-4-methylpyridine (2AMP) as the proton acceptor with 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol (DCNP) as the proton donor has been investigated spectrophotometrically in methanol (MeOH), acetonitrile (AN) and a binary mixture composed of 50% MeOH and 50% AN (AN-Me). The composition of the complex has been investigated utilizing Job(')s and photometric titration methods to be 1:1. Minimum-maximum absorbance equation has been applied to estimate the formation constant of the proton transfer reaction (K(PT)) where it reached high values in the investigated solvent confirming its high stability. The formation constant recorded higher value in AN compared with MeOH and mixture of AN-Me. Based on the formation of stable proton transfer complex, a sensitive spectrophotometric method was suggested for quantitative determination of 2AMP. The Lambert-Beer(')s law was obeyed in the concentration range 0.5-8 μg mL(-1) with small values of limits of detection and quantification. The solid complex between 2AMP with DCNP has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis to be 1:1 in concordant with the molecular stoichiometry in solution. Further analysis of the solid complex was carried out using infrared and (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

  19. Spectrophotometric study on the proton transfer reaction between 2-amino-4-methylpyridine with 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol in methanol, acetonitrile and the binary mixture 50% methanol+50% acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Al-Ahmary, Khairia M; Habeeb, Moustafa M; Al-Obidan, Areej H

    2016-02-01

    Proton transfer reaction between 2-amino-4-methylpyridine (2AMP) as the proton acceptor with 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol (DCNP) as the proton donor has been investigated spectrophotometrically in methanol (MeOH), acetonitrile (AN) and a binary mixture composed of 50% MeOH and 50% AN (AN-Me). The composition of the complex has been investigated utilizing Job(')s and photometric titration methods to be 1:1. Minimum-maximum absorbance equation has been applied to estimate the formation constant of the proton transfer reaction (K(PT)) where it reached high values in the investigated solvent confirming its high stability. The formation constant recorded higher value in AN compared with MeOH and mixture of AN-Me. Based on the formation of stable proton transfer complex, a sensitive spectrophotometric method was suggested for quantitative determination of 2AMP. The Lambert-Beer(')s law was obeyed in the concentration range 0.5-8 μg mL(-1) with small values of limits of detection and quantification. The solid complex between 2AMP with DCNP has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis to be 1:1 in concordant with the molecular stoichiometry in solution. Further analysis of the solid complex was carried out using infrared and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. PMID:26520474

  20. Spectrophotometric study on the proton transfer reaction between 2-amino-4-methylpyridine with 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol in methanol, acetonitrile and the binary mixture 50% methanol + 50% acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ahmary, Khairia M.; Habeeb, Moustafa M.; Al-Obidan, Areej H.

    2016-02-01

    Proton transfer reaction between 2-amino-4-methylpyridine (2AMP) as the proton acceptor with 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol (DCNP) as the proton donor has been investigated spectrophotometrically in methanol (MeOH), acetonitrile (AN) and a binary mixture composed of 50% MeOH and 50% AN (AN-Me). The composition of the complex has been investigated utilizing Job's and photometric titration methods to be 1:1. Minimum-maximum absorbance equation has been applied to estimate the formation constant of the proton transfer reaction (KPT) where it reached high values in the investigated solvent confirming its high stability. The formation constant recorded higher value in AN compared with MeOH and mixture of AN-Me. Based on the formation of stable proton transfer complex, a sensitive spectrophotometric method was suggested for quantitative determination of 2AMP. The Lambert-Beer's law was obeyed in the concentration range 0.5-8 μg mL- 1 with small values of limits of detection and quantification. The solid complex between 2AMP with DCNP has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis to be 1:1 in concordant with the molecular stoichiometry in solution. Further analysis of the solid complex was carried out using infrared and 1H NMR spectroscopy.

  1. Monolithic metal-organic framework MIL-53(Al)-polymethacrylate composite column for the reversed-phase capillary liquid chromatography separation of small aromatics.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Kareem; Badjah-Hadj-Ahmed, Ahmed Yacine; Aqel, Ahmad; ALOthman, Zeid Abdullah

    2016-03-01

    A monolithic capillary column containing a composite of metal-organic framework MIL-53(Al) incorporated into hexyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate was prepared to enhance the separation of mixtures of small aromatic compounds by using capillary liquid chromatography. The addition of 10 mg/mL MIL-53(Al) microparticles increased the micropore content in the monolithic matrix and increased the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area from 26.92 to 85.12 m(2) /g. The presence of 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate moieties within the structure of MIL-53(Al) as an organic linker greatly influenced the separation of aromatic mixtures through π-π interactions. High-resolution separation was obtained for a series of alkylbenzenes (with resolution factors in the range 0.96-1.75) in less than 8 min, with 14 710 plates/m efficiency for propylbenzene, using a binary polar mobile phase of water/acetonitrile in isocratic mode. A reversed-phase separation mechanism was indicated by the increased retention factor and resolution as the water percentage in the mobile phase increased. A stability study on the composite column showed excellent mechanical stability under various conditions. The higher resolution and faster separation observed at increased temperature indicated an exothermic separation, whereas the negative values for the free energy change of transfer indicated a spontaneous process.

  2. Stability indicating reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic and thin layer densitometric methods for the determination of ziprasidone in bulk powder and in pharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    El-Sherif, Zeinab A; El-Zeany, Badr; El-Houssini, Ola M; Rashed, Mohamed S; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2004-04-01

    Two sensitive and reproducible methods were developed and validated for the determination of ziprasidone (ZIP) in the presence of its degradation products in pure form and in pharmaceutical formulations. The fi rst method was based on reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), on a Lichrosorb RP C(18) column using water:acetonitrile:phosphoric acid (76:24:0.5 v/v/v) as the mobile phase at a fl ow rate of 1.5 mL min(-1) at ambient temperature. Quantification was achieved with UV detection at 229 nm over a concentration range of 10-500 micro g mL(-1) with mean percentage recovery of 99.71 +/- 0.55. The method retained its accuracy in presence of up to 90% of ZIP degradation products. The second method was based on TLC separation of ZIP from its degradation products followed by densitometric measurement of the intact drug spot at 247 nm. The separation was carried out on aluminium sheet of silica gel 60 F(254) using choloroform:methanol:glacial acetic acid (75:5:4.5 v/v/v) as the mobile phase, over a concentration range of 1-10 micro g per spot and mean percentage recovery of 99.26 +/- 0.39. Both methods were applied successfully to laboratory prepared mixtures and pharmaceutical capsules.

  3. Development and Validation of Reversed-Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatographic Method for Hydroxychloroquine Sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Singh, A.; Roopkishora; Singh, C. L.; Gupta, R.; Kumar, S.; Kumar, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the present work new, simple reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatographic method was developed and validated for the determination of hydroxychloroquine sulphate in blood plasma. Chloroquine sulphate was used as an internal standard. The chromatographic separation was achieved with octadecyl silane Hypersil C18 column (250×6 mm, 5 μm) using water and organic (acetonitrile:methanol: 50:50, v/v) mobile phase in 75:25 v/v ratio, with sodium 1-pentanesulfonate and phosphoric acid. This organic phase was maintained at pH 3.0 by orthophosphoric acid. The flow rate of 2.0 ml/min. with detection at 343 nm was used in the analysis. The calibration curve of standard hydroxychloroquine sulphate was linear in range 0.1-20.0 μg/ml. The method was validated with respected to linearity, range, precision, accuracy, specificity and robustness studies according to ICH guidelines. The method was found to be accurate and robust to analyze the hydroxychloroquine sulphate in plasma samples. PMID:26798174

  4. Development and Validation of Reversed-Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatographic Method for Hydroxychloroquine Sulphate.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Roopkishora; Singh, C L; Gupta, R; Kumar, S; Kumar, M

    2015-01-01

    In the present work new, simple reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatographic method was developed and validated for the determination of hydroxychloroquine sulphate in blood plasma. Chloroquine sulphate was used as an internal standard. The chromatographic separation was achieved with octadecyl silane Hypersil C18 column (250×6 mm, 5 μm) using water and organic (acetonitrile:methanol: 50:50, v/v) mobile phase in 75:25 v/v ratio, with sodium 1-pentanesulfonate and phosphoric acid. This organic phase was maintained at pH 3.0 by orthophosphoric acid. The flow rate of 2.0 ml/min(.) with detection at 343 nm was used in the analysis. The calibration curve of standard hydroxychloroquine sulphate was linear in range 0.1-20.0 μg/ml. The method was validated with respected to linearity, range, precision, accuracy, specificity and robustness studies according to ICH guidelines. The method was found to be accurate and robust to analyze the hydroxychloroquine sulphate in plasma samples. PMID:26798174

  5. Plasma mitomycin C concentrations determined by HPLC coupled to solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Paroni, R; Arcelloni, C; De Vecchi, E; Fermo, I; Mauri, D; Colombo, R

    1997-04-01

    The aim of this study was to set up a method for quantification of plasma mitomycin C (MMC) concentrations during intravesical chemotherapy delivered in the presence of local bladder hyperthermia (HT). In comparison with existing methods, this assay, characterized by relative simplicity and efficiency, resulted in the facilitation of performance with nondedicated instrumentation or nonspecialized staff. Purification from plasma matrix was carried out by solid-phase extraction under vaccuum. The purified drug was then collected directly into the vials of the HPLC autosampler. Chromatographic analysis was performed on a reversed-phase C18 column with water:acetonitrile (85:15 by vol) as the mobile phase and the UV detector set at 365 nm. The use of porfiromycin as internal standard provided a method with good within-day precision (CV 6.0% at 5 micrograms/L, n = 6), linearity (0.5-50 micrograms/L), and specificity. The lower limit of detection (< or = 0.5 microgram/L) proved to be suitable for plasma pharmacokinetics monitoring in two tested patients treated with MMC + HT for superficial bladder cancer. PMID:9105262

  6. Electrospray ionization-ion mobility spectrometry as a detection system for three-phase hollow fiber microextraction technique and simultaneous determination of trimipramine and desipramine in urine and plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Jafari, M T; Saraji, M; Sherafatmand, H

    2011-04-01

    A novel method based on three-phase hollow fiber microextraction technique (HF-LPME) coupled with electrospray ionization-ion mobility spectrometry (ESI-IMS) was developed for the simultaneous determination of two antidepressant drugs (trimipramine and desipramine) in urine and plasma samples. The effects of various parameters such as type of organic solvent, composition of donor and acceptor phase, stirring rate, salt addition, extraction time, and temperature were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the relative standard deviation was in the range of 5-6%, and the method quantitation limit (MQL) of utilizing HF-LPME/ESI-IMS was 5 μg/L for both drugs. The relative recoveries obtained by the proposed method from urine and plasma samples were in the range 94% to 97% for trimipramine and 92% to 96% for desipramine. Finally, the feasibility of the proposed method was successfully confirmed by extraction and determination of trace amounts of trimipramine and desipramine in biological samples without any significant matrix effect.

  7. Protective effects of 6-hydroxy-1-methylindole-3-acetonitrile on cisplatin-induced oxidative nephrotoxicity via Nrf2 inactivation.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji Hee; Shin, Ji-Sun; Kim, Jong-Bin; Baek, Nam-In; Cho, Young-Wuk; Lee, Yong Sup; Kay, Hee Yeon; Kim, Soo-dong; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2013-12-01

    We previously demonstrated the ethanol extract of the roots of Brassica rapa protects against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by attenuating oxidative stress. Here, we investigated the nephroprotective effects of 6-hydroxy-1-methylindole-3-acetonitrile (6-HMA), which was isolated from the roots of B. rapa, on cisplatin-induced toxicity in renal epithelial LLC-PK1 cells and in rats with acute renal injury. Pretreatment of LLC-PK1 cells with 6-HMA ameliorated cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity caused by oxidative stress, as was demonstrated by reductions in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) and increased levels of glutathione (GSH). In addition, 6-HMA inhibited cisplatin-induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression, possibly due to the suppression of the nuclear translocation and binding activity of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Furthermore, 6-HMA administered rats showed lower levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, and urinary lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) than cisplatin alone-treated rats in cisplatin-induced renal injury model. Moreover, 6-HMA inhibited the cisplatin-induced formation of MDA and GSH depletion and increased the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione reductase (GR). Taken together, these findings indicate 6-HMA is a major active constituent from the roots of B. rapa to have a protective effect against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by attenuating oxidative stress.

  8. Water-Promoted Generation of a Diazairida Homobarrelene by C-C Coupling Between an Iridacyclic Alkylidene and Acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Espada, María F; López-Serrano, Joaquín; Poveda, Manuel L; Carmona, Ernesto

    2015-07-20

    The stable cationic iridacyclopentenylidene [Tp(Me2)Ir(=CHC(Me)=C(Me)CH2(NCMe)]PF6 (A; Tp(Me2)=hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate) has been obtained by α-hydride abstraction from the iridacyclopent-2-ene [Tp(Me2)Ir(CH2C(Me)=C(Me)CH2)(NCMe)]. Complex A exhibits Brønsted-Lowry acidity at the Ir-CH2 and proximal (relative to Ir-CH2 ) methyl sites. The coordination of an extra molecule of acetonitrile to the iridium center initiates the reversible isomerization of the chelating carbon chain of A to the monodentate butadienyl ligand of complex [Tp(Me2)Ir(CH=C(Me)C(Me)=CH2)(NCMe)2]PF6, which is capable to engage in a water-promoted C-C coupling with the MeCN co-ligands. The product is an aesthetically appealing bicyclic structure that resembles the hydrocarbon barrelene.

  9. 63Cu Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Viscosity Studies of Copper (I) Perchlorate in Mixed Solvents Containing Acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Dip Singh; Byrne, Lindsay; Quiekenden, Terry I.

    1998-12-01

    63Cu nuclear magnetic resonance and viscosity studies of 0.064 M copper (I) Perchlorate solutions have been made at 298 K in binary mixtures of acetonitrile (AN) with dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO), hexamethylphosphotriamide (HMPA), N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA), nitromethane (NM), propylene carbonate (PC) and 3-hydroxypropionitrile (3 HPN) at several compositions of the mixtures using a 500 MHz NMR Spectrometer and Ubbelohde viscometer, respectively. The chemical shift (δ), linewidth (Δ) and line intensity (I) of the 63Cu NMR signal in these mixed solvents have been measured relative to the 63Cu signal in 0.064 M copper (I) Perchlorate (CuClO4) solution in pure AN. The quadrupolar re-laxation rates (1/T2)Q, reorientational correlation times (τR) and quadrupolar coupling constants (QCC) of the copper (I) solvates have also been estimated from the data. The QCC values show a big variation in all solvent systems with the change of solvent composition, indicating the formation of mixed com-plexes. The variation of all NMR parameters with solvent composition shows strong effects of DMSO, HMPA, and DMA on the solvation behaviour of Cu + in the first three mixtures, and relatively much weaker effects of PC, NM and 3HPN in the other three mixtures.

  10. Identification of 2-[4-[(4-Methoxyphenyl)methoxy]-phenyl]acetonitrile and Derivatives as Potent Oct3/4 Inducers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xinlai; Dimou, Eleni; Alborzinia, Hamed; Wenke, Frank; Göhring, Axel; Reuter, Stefanie; Mah, Nancy; Fuchs, Heiko; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A; Adjaye, James; Gul, Sheraz; Harms, Christoph; Utikal, Jochen; Klipp, Edda; Mrowka, Ralf; Wölfl, Stefan

    2015-06-25

    Reprogramming somatic cells into induced-pluripotent cells (iPSCs) provides new access to all somatic cell types for clinical application without any ethical controversy arising from the use of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Established protocols for iPSCs generation based on viral transduction with defined factors are limited by low efficiency and the risk of genetic abnormality. Several small molecules have been reported as replacements for defined transcriptional factors, but a chemical able to replace Oct3/4 allowing the generation of human iPSCs is still unavailable. Using a cell-based High Throughput Screening (HTS) campaign, we identified that 2-[4-[(4-methoxyphenyl)methoxy]phenyl]acetonitrile (1), termed O4I1, enhanced Oct3/4 expression. Structural verification and modification by chemical synthesis showed that O4I1 and its derivatives not only promoted expression and stabilization of Oct3/4 but also enhanced its transcriptional activity in diverse human somatic cells, implying the possible benefit from using this class of compounds in regenerative medicine. PMID:25898186

  11. Rate theory of solvent exchange and kinetics of Li+ - BF4-/PF6- ion pairs in acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Liem X.; Chang, Tsun-Mei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we describe our efforts to apply rate theories in studies of solvent exchange around Li+ and the kinetics of ion pairings in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). We report one of the first computer simulations of the exchange dynamics around solvated Li+ in acetonitrile (ACN), which is a common solvent used in LIBs. We also provide details of the ion-pairing kinetics of Li+-[BF4] and Li+-[PF6] in ACN. Using our polarizable force-field models and employing classical rate theories of chemical reactions, we examine the ACN exchange process between the first and second solvation shells around Li+. We calculate exchange rates using transition state theory and weighted them with the transmission coefficients determined by the reactive flux, Impey, Madden, and McDonald approaches, and Grote-Hynes theory. We found the relaxation times changed from 180 ps to 4600 ps and from 30 ps to 280 ps for Li+-[BF4] and Li+-[PF6] ion pairs, respectively. These results confirm that the solvent response to the kinetics of ion pairing is significant. Our results also show that, in addition to affecting the free energy of solvation into ACN, the anion type also should significantly influence the kinetics of ion pairing. These results will increase our understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of LIB systems.

  12. Rate theory of solvent exchange and kinetics of Li(+) - BF4 (-)/PF6 (-) ion pairs in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Dang, Liem X; Chang, Tsun-Mei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we describe our efforts to apply rate theories in studies of solvent exchange around Li(+) and the kinetics of ion pairings in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). We report one of the first computer simulations of the exchange dynamics around solvated Li(+) in acetonitrile (ACN), which is a common solvent used in LIBs. We also provide details of the ion-pairing kinetics of Li(+)-[BF4] and Li(+)-[PF6] in ACN. Using our polarizable force-field models and employing classical rate theories of chemical reactions, we examine the ACN exchange process between the first and second solvation shells around Li(+). We calculate exchange rates using transition state theory and weighted them with the transmission coefficients determined by the reactive flux, Impey, Madden, and McDonald approaches, and Grote-Hynes theory. We found the relaxation times changed from 180 ps to 4600 ps and from 30 ps to 280 ps for Li(+)-[BF4] and Li(+)-[PF6] ion pairs, respectively. These results confirm that the solvent response to the kinetics of ion pairing is significant. Our results also show that, in addition to affecting the free energy of solvation into ACN, the anion type also should significantly influence the kinetics of ion pairing. These results will increase our understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of LIB systems.

  13. Rate theory of solvent exchange and kinetics of Li(+) - BF4 (-)/PF6 (-) ion pairs in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Dang, Liem X; Chang, Tsun-Mei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we describe our efforts to apply rate theories in studies of solvent exchange around Li(+) and the kinetics of ion pairings in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). We report one of the first computer simulations of the exchange dynamics around solvated Li(+) in acetonitrile (ACN), which is a common solvent used in LIBs. We also provide details of the ion-pairing kinetics of Li(+)-[BF4] and Li(+)-[PF6] in ACN. Using our polarizable force-field models and employing classical rate theories of chemical reactions, we examine the ACN exchange process between the first and second solvation shells around Li(+). We calculate exchange rates using transition state theory and weighted them with the transmission coefficients determined by the reactive flux, Impey, Madden, and McDonald approaches, and Grote-Hynes theory. We found the relaxation times changed from 180 ps to 4600 ps and from 30 ps to 280 ps for Li(+)-[BF4] and Li(+)-[PF6] ion pairs, respectively. These results confirm that the solvent response to the kinetics of ion pairing is significant. Our results also show that, in addition to affecting the free energy of solvation into ACN, the anion type also should significantly influence the kinetics of ion pairing. These results will increase our understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of LIB systems. PMID:27608999

  14. Thermodynamic and transport properties of spiro-(1,1')-bipyrrolidinium tetrafluoroborate and acetonitrile mixtures: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing-Yin, Zhang; Peng, Xie; Xin, Wang; Xue-Wen, Yu; Zhi-Qiang, Shi; Shi-Huai, Zhao

    2016-06-01

    Organic salts such as spiro-(1,1')-bipyrrolidinium tetrafluoroborate ([SBP][BF4]) dissolved in liquid acetonitrile (ACN) are a new kind of organic salt solution, which is expected to be used as an electrolyte in electrical double layer capacitors (EDLCs). To explore the physicochemical properties of the solution, an all-atom force field is established on the basis of AMBER parameter values and quantum mechanical calculations. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out to explore the liquid structure and physicochemical properties of [SBP][BF4] electrolyte at room temperature. The computed thermodynamic and transport properties match the available experimental results very well. The microscopic structures of [SBP][BF4] salt solution are also discussed in detail. The method used in this work provides an efficient way of predicting the properties of organic salt solvent as an electrolyte in EDLCs. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21476172 and 51172160), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2013AA050905), and the Natural Science Foundation of Tianjin, China (Grant Nos. 12JCZDJC28400, 14RCHZGX00859, 14JCTPJC00484, and 14JCQNJC07200).

  15. Diffusion-controlled reactions in supercritical CHF[sub 3] and CO[sub 2]/acetonitrile mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.B.; Zhang, J.; Chateauneuf, J.E.; Brennecke, J.F. )

    1993-10-20

    We present results of the triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) process of benzophenone (Ph[sub 2]C = O) and the self-termination reaction of benzyl radical (PhCH[sub 2]) to investigate the possibility of diffusion-controlled proces