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Sample records for acetonitrile phosphate buffer

  1. Acetonitrile

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetonitrile ; CASRN 75 - 05 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  2. Isotherm parameters and intraparticle mass transfer kinetics on molecularly imprinted polymers in acetonitrile/buffer mobile phases

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyunjung; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Guiochon, Georges A

    2006-03-01

    The equilibrium isotherm and the intraparticle mass transfer kinetics of the enantiomers of the template were investigated on an Fmoc-L-tryptophan (Fmoc-L-Trp) imprinted polymer at different pHs and water concentrations in acetonitrile/aqueous buffer mobile phases. The equilibrium isotherm data were measured using frontal analysis at 25 {+-} 2 C. The adsorption energy distribution was found to be trimodal, with narrow modes. Consistent with this distribution, the adsorption data were modeled using a tri-Langmuir isotherm equation and the best estimates of the isotherm parameters were determined. The intraparticle mass transfer parameters were derived by comparing the profiles of experimental overloaded bands and the profiles calculated using the isotherm model and the lumped pore diffusion (POR) model of chromatography. These results showed that different adsorption and mass transfer mechanisms exist in mobile phases made of acetonitrile/aqueous buffer and of acetonitrile/acetic acid solutions.

  3. Dominant oceanic bacteria secure phosphate using a large extracellular buffer.

    PubMed

    Zubkov, Mikhail V; Martin, Adrian P; Hartmann, Manuela; Grob, Carolina; Scanlan, David J

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitous SAR11 and Prochlorococcus bacteria manage to maintain a sufficient supply of phosphate in phosphate-poor surface waters of the North Atlantic subtropical gyre. Furthermore, it seems that their phosphate uptake may counter-intuitively be lower in more productive tropical waters, as if their cellular demand for phosphate decreases there. By flow sorting (33)P-phosphate-pulsed (32)P-phosphate-chased cells, we demonstrate that both Prochlorococcus and SAR11 cells exploit an extracellular buffer of labile phosphate up to 5-40 times larger than the amount of phosphate required to replicate their chromosomes. Mathematical modelling is shown to support this conclusion. The fuller the buffer the slower the cellular uptake of phosphate, to the point that in phosphate-replete tropical waters, cells can saturate their buffer and their phosphate uptake becomes marginal. Hence, buffer stocking is a generic, growth-securing adaptation for SAR11 and Prochlorococcus bacteria, which lack internal reserves to reduce their dependency on bioavailable ambient phosphate. PMID:26198420

  4. Dominant oceanic bacteria secure phosphate using a large extracellular buffer

    PubMed Central

    Zubkov, Mikhail V.; Martin, Adrian P.; Hartmann, Manuela; Grob, Carolina; Scanlan, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitous SAR11 and Prochlorococcus bacteria manage to maintain a sufficient supply of phosphate in phosphate-poor surface waters of the North Atlantic subtropical gyre. Furthermore, it seems that their phosphate uptake may counter-intuitively be lower in more productive tropical waters, as if their cellular demand for phosphate decreases there. By flow sorting 33P-phosphate-pulsed 32P-phosphate-chased cells, we demonstrate that both Prochlorococcus and SAR11 cells exploit an extracellular buffer of labile phosphate up to 5–40 times larger than the amount of phosphate required to replicate their chromosomes. Mathematical modelling is shown to support this conclusion. The fuller the buffer the slower the cellular uptake of phosphate, to the point that in phosphate-replete tropical waters, cells can saturate their buffer and their phosphate uptake becomes marginal. Hence, buffer stocking is a generic, growth-securing adaptation for SAR11 and Prochlorococcus bacteria, which lack internal reserves to reduce their dependency on bioavailable ambient phosphate. PMID:26198420

  5. Complex formation of Am(III) and Am(IV) with phosphate ions in acetonitrile solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Perevalov, S.A.; Lebedev, I.A.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1988-05-01

    The first dissociation constant of H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ in acetonitrile solution (K/sub 1//sup 0/ = 1.75/centered dot/10/sup /minus/13/) and the constant of formation of H(H/sub 2/PO/sub 4/)/sub 2//sup /minus// dimers (K/sub d//sup 0/ = 8/centered dot/10/sup 2/) were determined by the method of pH-potentiometry. The complex formation of Am(III) in acetonitrile solutions containing 0.05-2.0 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ was investigated by a spectrophotometric method; the stability constants of the complexes AmH/sub 2/PO/sub 4//sup 2+/ (/beta//sub 1//sup III/ = 1.0/centered dot/10/sup 12/) and Am(H/sub 2/PO/sub 4/)/sub 2//sup +/ (/beta//sub 2//sup III/ = 4.3/centered dot/10/sup 24/) were determined. The formal potentials of the couple Am/sup (IV)//Am/sup (III)/ in 0.3-1.9 M solutions of H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ in acetonitrile were measured, and the stability constant of the phosphate complex of tetravalent americium Am(H/sub 2/PO/sub 4/)/sub 3//sup +/ (/beta//sub 3//sup IV/ = 2.5/centered dot/10/sup 46/) was calculated according to the value of the shift of the potential relative to the standard.

  6. Influence of glyphosate on the copper dissolution in phosphate buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutinho, C. F. B.; Silva, M. O.; Machado, S. A. S.; Mazo, L. H.

    2007-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of copper microelectrode in phosphate buffer in the presence of glyphosate was investigated by electrochemical techniques. It was observed that the additions of glyphosate in the phosphate buffer increased the anodic current of copper microelectrode and the electrochemical dissolution was observed. This phenomenon could be associated with the Cu(II) complexation by glyphosate forming a soluble complex. Physical characterization of the surface showed that, in absence of glyphosate, an insoluble layer covered the copper surface; on the other hand, in presence of glyphosate, it was observed a corroded copper surface with the formation of glyphosate complex in solution.

  7. Nacre surface transformation to hydroxyapatite in a phosphate buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ming; Ratner, Buddy D

    2003-10-01

    Nacre, also known as mother-of-pearl, constitutes the inner layer of mollusc shells. Nacre is a natural composite material consisting mostly of calcium carbonate in the aragonite crystal form and some organic matter. Previous studies have shown that geological aragonite, coral and nacre can convert hydrothermally to hydroxyapatite (HAP) in phosphate solution by a solid-state topotactic ion-exchange reaction. This conversion typically occurs within the range of 140-260 degrees C, although higher temperatures are possible. In this work, we have found that nacre can transform to HAP in a phosphate buffer solution at room temperature via a surface reaction. The morphology of the nacre-transformed HAP surface was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The HAP surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). A layer covered with packed particles was found in contrast to the tablet structure typical of nacre surfaces. XPS and SIMS indicated that the mineral phase of the nacre surface had converted from an aragonite phase to an HAP phase. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed that phosphate (PO(4)) bands appeared after nacre was soaked in a phosphate buffer and the intensity of the PO(4) bands increased with exposure time. The FTIR was consistent with XPS and SIMS results. We suggest that this surface reaction occurs by a dissolution-precipitation mechanism. Calcium ions are released from the nacre surface, react with phosphate ions in the buffer solution, and then precipitate as HAP on the nacre surface. PMID:12853263

  8. Influence of phosphate ions on buffer capacity of soil humic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguta, P.; Sokołowska, Z.

    2012-02-01

    The object of this study was to determine change of natural buffer capacity of humic acids by strong buffering agents, which were phosphate ions. Studies were carried out on the humic acids extracted from peat soils. Additional information was obtained by determination of water holding capacity, density, ash and pH for peats and optical parameter Q4/6 for humic acids. Humic acid suspensions exhibited the highest buffer properties at low pH and reached maximum at pH ~ 4. Phosphates possessed buffer properties in the pH range from 4.5 to 8.0. The maximum of buffering was at pH~6.8 and increased proportionally with an increase in the concentration of phosphate ions. The study indicated that the presence of phosphate ions may strongly change natural buffer capacity of humic acids by shifting buffering maximum toward higher pH values. Significant correlations were found for the degree of the secondary transformation with both the buffer capacity and the titrant volume used during titration.

  9. Effects of phosphate buffer in parenteral drugs on particle formation from glass vials.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Toru; Miyajima, Makoto; Wakiyama, Naoki; Terada, Katsuhide

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of inorganic particles generated in glass vials filled with phosphate buffer solutions were investigated. During storage, particles were visually detected in the phosphate buffer solution in particular glass vials which pass compendial tests of containers for injectable drugs. These particles were considered to be different from ordinal glass delamination, which has been reported in a number of papers because the particles were mainly composed of Al, P and O, but not Si. The formation of the particles accelerated at higher storage temperatures. Among the surface treatments tested for the glass vials, sulfur treatment showed a protective effect on the particle formation in the vials, whereas the SiO(2) coating did not have any protective effects. It was found that the elution ratio of Al and Si in the solution stored in the glass vials after the heating was similar to the ratio of Al and Si in borosilicate glass. However, the Al concentration decreased during storage (5°C, 6 months), and consequently, particle formation was observed in the solution. Adding citrate, which is a chelating agent for Al, effectively suppressed the particle formation in the heated solution. When 50 ppb and higher concentrations of Al ion were added to the phosphate buffer solution, the formation of white particles containing Al, P and O was detected. It is suggested that a phosphate buffer solution in a borosilicate glass vial has the ability to form particles due to interactions with the Al that is eluted from the glass during storage. PMID:23420583

  10. Bioconversion of cyanide and acetonitrile by a municipal-sewage-derived anaerobic consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Nagle, N.J.; Rivard, C.J.; Mohagheghi, A.; Philippidis, G.

    1995-12-31

    In this study, an anaerobic consortium was examined for its ability to adapt to and degrade the representative organonitriles, cyanide and acetonitrile. Adaptation to cyanide and acetonitrile was achieved by adding increasing levels of cyanide and acetonitrile to the anaerobic consortium, followed by extensive incubation over a 90-day period. The anaerobic consortium adapted most rapidly to the lower concentrations of each substrate and resulted in reductions of 85% and 83% of the cyanide and acetonitrile, respectively, at the 50 mg/L addition level. Increasing the concentration of both cyanide and acetonitrile resulted in reduced bioconversion. Two continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTR) were set up to examine the potential for continuous bioconversion of organonitriles. The anaerobic consortium was adapted to continuous infusion of acetonitrile at an initial concentration of 10 mg/L{center_dot}day in phosphate buffer.

  11. Matching phosphate and maleate buffer systems for dissolution of weak acids: Equivalence in terms of buffer capacity of bulk solution or surface pH?

    PubMed

    Cristofoletti, Rodrigo; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2016-06-01

    The development of in vitro dissolution tests able to anticipate the in vivo fate of drug products has challenged pharmaceutical scientists over time, especially in the case of ionizable compounds. In the seminal model proposed by Mooney et al. thirty-five years ago, the pH at the solid-liquid interface (pH0) was identified as a key parameter in predicting dissolution rate. In the current work it is demonstrated that the in vitro dissolution of the weak acid ibuprofen in maleate and phosphate buffer systems is a function of the pH0, which in turn is affected by properties of the drug and the medium. The reported pH0 for ibuprofen dissolution in bicarbonate buffer, the predominant buffer species in the human small intestine under fasting conditions, can be achieved by reducing the phosphate buffer concentration to 5.0mM or the maleate buffer concentration to 2.2mM. Using this approach to identify the appropriate buffer/buffer capacity combination for in vitro experiments in FaSSIF-type media, it would be possible to increase the physiological relevance of this important biopharmaceutics tool. However, the necessity of monitoring and adjusting the bulk pH during the experiments carried out in 5.0mM phosphate or 2.2mM maleate buffers must also be taken into consideration. PMID:27032508

  12. Retention of ionisable compounds on high-performance liquid chromatography. XV. Estimation of the pH variation of aqueous buffers with the change of the acetonitrile fraction of the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Subirats, Xavier; Bosch, Elisabeth; Rosés, Martí

    2004-12-01

    The most commonly used mobile phases in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) are hydro-organic mixtures of an aqueous buffer and an organic modifier. The addition of this organic solvent to buffered aqueous solutions involves a variation of the buffer properties (pH and buffer capacity). In this paper, the pH variation is studied for acetic acid-acetate, phosphoric acid-dihydrogenphosphate-hydrogenphosphate, citric acid-dihydrogencitrate-citrate, and ammonium-ammonia buffers. The proposed equations allow pH estimation of acetonitrile-water buffered mobile phases up to 60% (v/v) of organic modifier and initial aqueous buffer concentrations between 0.001 and 0.1 mol L(-1), from the initial aqueous pH. The estimated pH variation of the mobile phase and the pKa variation of the analytes allow us to predict the degree of ionisation of the analytes and from this and analyte hydrophobicities, to interpret the relative retention and separation of analyte mixtures. PMID:15628122

  13. Reaction of nerve agents with phosphate buffer at pH 7.

    PubMed

    Creasy, William R; Fry, Roderick A; McGarvey, David J

    2012-07-12

    Chemical weapon nerve agents, including isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate (GB or Sarin), pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate (GD or Soman), and S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) O-ethyl methylphosphonothioate (VX), are slow to react in aqueous solutions at midrange pH levels. The nerve agent reactivity increases in phosphate buffer at pH 7, relative to distilled water or acetate buffer. Reactions were studied using (31)P NMR. Phosphate causes faster reaction to the corresponding alkyl methylphosphonic acids, and produces a mixed phosphate/phosphonate compound as an intermediate reaction product. GB has the fastest reaction rate, with a bimolecular rate constant of 4.6 × 10(-3) M(-1)s(-1)[PO(4)(3-)]. The molar product branching ratio of GB acid to the pyro product (isopropyl methylphosphonate phosphate anhydride) is 1:1.4, independent of phosphate concentration, and the pyro product continues to react much slower to form GB acid. The pyro product has two doublets in the (31)P NMR spectrum. The rate of reaction for GD is slower than GB, with a rate constant of 1.26 × 10(-3) M(-1)s(-1) [PO(4)(3-)]. The rate for VX is considerably slower, with a rate constant of 1.39 × 10(-5) M(-1)s(-1) [PO(4)(3-)], about 2 orders of magnitude slower than the rate for GD. The rate constant of the reaction of GD with pyrophosphate at pH 8 is 2.04 × 10(-3) min(-1) at a concentration of 0.0145 M. The rate of reaction for diisopropyl fluorophosphate is 2.84 × 10(-3) min(-1) at a concentration of 0.153 M phosphate, a factor of 4 slower than GD and a factor of 15 slower than GB, and there is no detectable pyro product. The half-lives of secondary reaction of the GB pyro product in 0.153 and 0.046 M solution of phosphate are 23.8 and 28.0 h, respectively, which indicates little or no dependence on phosphate. PMID:22667763

  14. Phosphate-Buffered Saline-Based Nucleofection of Primary Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jinjoo; Ramu, Swapnika; Lee, Sunju; Aguilar, Berenice; Ganesan, Sathish Kumar; Yoo, Jaehyuk; Kalra, Vijay K.; Koh, Chester J.; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2009-01-01

    Although various non-viral transfection methods are available, cell-toxicity, low transfection efficiency and high-cost remain hurdles for in vitro gene delivery in cultured primary endothelial cells. Recently, unprecedented transfection efficiency for primary endothelial cells has been achieved due to the newly developed nucleofection technology that utilizes a combination of novel electroporation conditions and specific buffer components that stabilize the cells in the electrical field. Despite its superior transfection efficiency and cell viability, high cost of the technology has discouraged the cardiovascular researchers to liberally adopt this new technology. Here, we report that a phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-based nucleofection method can be used for efficient gene delivery into primary endothelial cells and other types of cells. Comparative analyses of transfection efficiency and cell viability for primary arterial, venous, microvascular and lymphatic endothelial cells were performed by using PBS. Compared to the commercial buffers, PBS can support equally remarkable nucleofection efficiency to both primary and non-primary cells. Moreover, PBS-mediated nucleofection of siRNA showed more than 90% knockdown of the expression of target genes in primary endothelial cells. Together, we demonstrate that PBS can be an unprecedented economical alternative for the high-cost buffers for nucleofection of various primary and non-primary cells. PMID:19150324

  15. The use of phosphate buffered saline for the recovery of cells and spermatozoa from swabs.

    PubMed

    Martin, N C; Pirie, A A; Ford, L V; Callaghan, C L; McTurk, K; Lucy, D; Scrimger, D G

    2006-01-01

    In the forensic science laboratory, the recovery of spermatozoa from vaginal swabs, or vaginal cells from penile swabs, can help determine if sexual intercourse may have taken place. There are several methods used to recover spermatozoa and cells from the swabs before visualisation on a microscope slide and most of these methods use water. Phosphate buffered saline (PBS) is a non-toxic solution used in many biological laboratories. Unlike water, PBS prevents cells rupturing or shrivelling up due to osmosis. This study demonstrates that PBS can be used for the extraction of spermatozoa and cells from swabs and that PBS does not affect subsequent DNA profiling. PMID:17388245

  16. Key comparison on pH of an unknown phosphate buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastkowski, F.; Spitzer, P.; Sander, B.; Máriássy, M.; Dimitrova, L.; Reyes, A.; Rodríguez, A.; Manzano, V. Lara; Vospelova, A.; Jakobsen, P. T.; Pawlina, M.; Korol, M.; Kozlowski, W.; Delgado, M.; Ticona Canaza, G.; Dias, J. C.; Gonzaga, F. B.; Nagyné Szilágyi, Z.; Jakusovszky, B.; Nongluck, T.; Waters, J.; Pratt, K. W.; Asakai, T.; Maksimov, I.; Hankova, Z.; Uysal, E.; Gavrilkin, V.; Prokunin, S. V.; Ferreira, E.; Fajardo, S.

    2016-01-01

    Results of CCQM-K99 key comparison on unknown phosphate buffer pH ~ 7.5 at 5 °C, 15 °C, 25 °C, 37 °C and 50 °C are reported. Good agreement is found between the majority of participants. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  17. Calcium Gluconate in Phosphate Buffered Saline Increases Gene Delivery with Adenovirus Type 5

    PubMed Central

    Ahonen, Marko T.; Diaconu, Iulia; Pesonen, Sari; Kanerva, Anna; Baumann, Marc; Parviainen, Suvi T.; Spiller, Brad

    2010-01-01

    Background Adenoviruses are attractive vectors for gene therapy because of their stability in vivo and the possibility of production at high titers. Despite exciting preclinical data with various approaches, there are only a few examples of clear efficacy in clinical trials. Effective gene delivery to target cells remains the key variable determining efficacy and thus enhanced transduction methods are important. Methods/Results We found that heated serum could enhance adenovirus 5 mediated gene delivery up to twentyfold. A new protein-level interaction was found between fiber knob and serum transthyretin, but this was not responsible for the observed effect. Instead, we found that heating caused the calcium and phosphate present in the serum mix to precipitate, and this was responsible for enhanced gene delivery. This finding could have relevance for designing preclinical experiments with adenoviruses, since calcium and phosphate are present in many solutions. To translate this into an approach potentially testable in patients, we used calcium gluconate in phosphate buffered saline, both of which are clinically approved, to increase adenoviral gene transfer up to 300-fold in vitro. Gene transfer was increased with or without heating and in a manner independent from the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor. In vivo, in mouse studies, gene delivery was increased 2-, 110-, 12- and 13-fold to tumors, lungs, heart and liver and did not result in increased pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. Antitumor efficacy of a replication competent virus was also increased significantly. Conclusion In summary, adenoviral gene transfer and antitumor efficacy can be enhanced by calcium gluconate in phosphate buffered saline. PMID:20927353

  18. Phosphate and HEPES buffers potently affect the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of Alzheimer's A{beta} peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, Megan; Tepper, Katharina; Haupt, Caroline; Knuepfer, Uwe; Klement, Karolin; Meinhardt, Jessica; Horn, Uwe; Balbach, Jochen; Faendrich, Marcus

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} Sodium phosphate buffer accelerated A{beta}(1-40) nucleation relative to HEPES. {yields} A{beta}(1-40) fibrils formed in the two buffers show only minor structural differences. {yields} NMR revealed that A{beta}(1-40) histidine residues mediate buffer dependent changes. -- Abstract: The oligomerization of A{beta} peptide into amyloid fibrils is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Due to its biological relevance, phosphate is the most commonly used buffer system for studying the formation of A{beta} and other amyloid fibrils. Investigation into the characteristics and formation of amyloid fibrils frequently relies upon material formed in vitro, predominantly in phosphate buffers. Herein, we examine the effects on the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of A{beta} peptide that occur due solely to the influence of phosphate buffer. We reveal that significant differences in amyloid fibrillation are observed due to fibrillation being initiated in phosphate or HEPES buffer (at physiological pH and temperature). Except for the differing buffer ions, all experimental parameters were kept constant. Fibril formation was assessed using fluorescently monitored kinetic studies, microscopy, X-ray fiber diffraction and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Based on this set up, we herein reveal profound effects on the mechanism and speed of A{beta} fibrillation. The three histidine residues at positions 6, 13 and 14 of A{beta}(1-40) are instrumental in these mechanistic changes. We conclude that buffer plays a more significant role in fibril formation than has been generally acknowledged.

  19. Development of a Single Ion Pair HPLC Method for Analysis of Terbinafine, Ofloxacin, Ornidazole, Clobetasol, and Two Preservatives in a Cream Formulation: Application to In Vitro Drug Release in Topical Simulated Media-Phosphate Buffer Through Rat Skin.

    PubMed

    Dewani, Anil P; Bakal, Ravindra L; Kokate, Pranjali G; Chandewar, Anil V; Patra, Srdhanjali

    2015-01-01

    Present work reports an HPLC method with UV detection for quantification of terbinafine, ofloxacin, ornidazole, and clobetasol in a cream formulation along with two preservatives methyl and propyl paraben. The chromatographic separation and quantification was achieved by an octyl bonded column and a gradient elution program involving an ion-pairing reagent, hexanesulfonic acid (0.2%, pH modified to 2.7 using orthophosphoric acid) and acetonitrile. The method was simple and devoid of buffer salts and therefore advantageous for system and column life. The three step gradient program was initiated with 30% (v/v) acetonitrile for the first 5 min and ramped linearly to 60% in the next 7 min. The mobile phase remained constant for the next 11 min and then concluded at 30% (v/v) of acetonitrile. Flow rate throughout was 0.8 mL/min, and all the signals were monitored at 243 nm. The method was applied for assay of a cream formulation and its in vitro permeation studies to determine the penetration profile of the four drugs and two preservatives. A marketed cream formulation was selected for the permeation study, which was carried out using a diffusion cell consisting of topical simulated media, phosphate buffer (pH=6.8) solution containing 1% sodium lauryl sulfate as a receiver medium. PMID:26268972

  20. Effect of phosphate buffer concentration on the heat resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores suspended in parenteral solutions.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, C A; Smith, G M; Pflug, I J

    1978-09-01

    The effect of various quantities of Butterfield phosphate buffer added to four parenteral solutions on the survival of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores heated at 121 degrees C was determined. The effect of the addition of phosphate buffer on spore survival varied with the parenteral solution. Spore survival was increased or decreased, depending upon the composition of the parenteral solution and the buffer concentration. The results obtained in these experiments attest to the fact that environmental factors, including the type of ions present and ionic concentration, affect the heat destruction rate of B. stearothermophilus spores. Therefore, the sterilization requirements of a product such as a parenteral solution may be affected by small changes in formulation. PMID:727778

  1. Effect of phosphate buffer concentration on the heat resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores suspended in parenteral solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, C A; Smith, G M; Pflug, I J

    1978-01-01

    The effect of various quantities of Butterfield phosphate buffer added to four parenteral solutions on the survival of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores heated at 121 degrees C was determined. The effect of the addition of phosphate buffer on spore survival varied with the parenteral solution. Spore survival was increased or decreased, depending upon the composition of the parenteral solution and the buffer concentration. The results obtained in these experiments attest to the fact that environmental factors, including the type of ions present and ionic concentration, affect the heat destruction rate of B. stearothermophilus spores. Therefore, the sterilization requirements of a product such as a parenteral solution may be affected by small changes in formulation. PMID:727778

  2. Thermal inactivation of ileal loop-reactive Clostridium perfringens type A strains in phosphate buffer and beef gravy.

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, J G; Peeler, J T; Twedt, R M

    1977-01-01

    The thermal resistance of spore crops produced from each of two ileal loop-reactive strains of Clostridium perfringens type A was determined in two suspending vehicles consisting of 0.067 M (pH 7.0) phosphate buffer and a commercial beef gravy. D115.6 values obtained in buffer and enumerated after pretreatment with sodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate and recovery in plating medium containing lysozyme were two- to threefold greater than those obtained without this treatment. D115.6 values obtained with beef gravy were less than those obtained in buffer with or without lysozyme; however, the D98.9 and D104.4 values were 1.3 to 2 times greater than those obtained in buffer with lysozyme. The z values were within the ranges reported by previous investigators. PMID:199113

  3. Substituent Effects on the Photodeprotection Reactions of Selected Ketoprofen Derivatives in Phosphate Buffered Aqueous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingyue; Li, Ming-De; Huang, Jinqing; Li, Tianlu; Liu, Han; Li, Xuechen; Phillips, David Lee

    2016-01-01

    Photodeprotection is an important reaction that has been attracting broad interest for use in a variety of applications. Recent advances in ultrafast and vibrational time-resolved spectroscopies can facilitate obtaining data to help unravel the reaction mechanisms involving in the photochemical reactions of interest. The kinetics and reaction mechanisms for the photodeprotection reactions of ketoprofen derivatives containing three different substituents (ibuprofen, Br and I) were investigated by femtosecond transient absorption (fs-TA) and nanosecond time-resolved resonance Raman (ns-TR3) spectroscopy methods in phosphate buffered solutions (PBS). Fs-TA allows us to detect the decay kinetics of the triplet species as the key precursor for formation of a carbanion species for three different substituents attached to ketoprofen. To characterize the structural and electronic properties of the corresponding carbanion and triplet intermediates, TR3 spectroscopic experiments were conducted. The transient spectroscopy work reveals that the different substituents affect the photodecarboxylation reaction to produce carbon dioxide which in turn influences the generation of the carbanion species which determines the rate of the photorelease of the functional groups attached on the ketoprofen parent molecule. The fingerprint TR3 spectroscopy results suggest that ketoprofen derivatives may be deactivated to produce a triplet carbanion when increasing the atom mass of the halogen atoms. PMID:26899243

  4. Substituent Effects on the Photodeprotection Reactions of Selected Ketoprofen Derivatives in Phosphate Buffered Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mingyue; Li, Ming-De; Huang, Jinqing; Li, Tianlu; Liu, Han; Li, Xuechen; Phillips, David Lee

    2016-02-01

    Photodeprotection is an important reaction that has been attracting broad interest for use in a variety of applications. Recent advances in ultrafast and vibrational time-resolved spectroscopies can facilitate obtaining data to help unravel the reaction mechanisms involving in the photochemical reactions of interest. The kinetics and reaction mechanisms for the photodeprotection reactions of ketoprofen derivatives containing three different substituents (ibuprofen, Br and I) were investigated by femtosecond transient absorption (fs-TA) and nanosecond time-resolved resonance Raman (ns-TR3) spectroscopy methods in phosphate buffered solutions (PBS). Fs-TA allows us to detect the decay kinetics of the triplet species as the key precursor for formation of a carbanion species for three different substituents attached to ketoprofen. To characterize the structural and electronic properties of the corresponding carbanion and triplet intermediates, TR3 spectroscopic experiments were conducted. The transient spectroscopy work reveals that the different substituents affect the photodecarboxylation reaction to produce carbon dioxide which in turn influences the generation of the carbanion species which determines the rate of the photorelease of the functional groups attached on the ketoprofen parent molecule. The fingerprint TR3 spectroscopy results suggest that ketoprofen derivatives may be deactivated to produce a triplet carbanion when increasing the atom mass of the halogen atoms.

  5. Substituent Effects on the Photodeprotection Reactions of Selected Ketoprofen Derivatives in Phosphate Buffered Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingyue; Li, Ming-De; Huang, Jinqing; Li, Tianlu; Liu, Han; Li, Xuechen; Phillips, David Lee

    2016-01-01

    Photodeprotection is an important reaction that has been attracting broad interest for use in a variety of applications. Recent advances in ultrafast and vibrational time-resolved spectroscopies can facilitate obtaining data to help unravel the reaction mechanisms involving in the photochemical reactions of interest. The kinetics and reaction mechanisms for the photodeprotection reactions of ketoprofen derivatives containing three different substituents (ibuprofen, Br and I) were investigated by femtosecond transient absorption (fs-TA) and nanosecond time-resolved resonance Raman (ns-TR(3)) spectroscopy methods in phosphate buffered solutions (PBS). Fs-TA allows us to detect the decay kinetics of the triplet species as the key precursor for formation of a carbanion species for three different substituents attached to ketoprofen. To characterize the structural and electronic properties of the corresponding carbanion and triplet intermediates, TR(3) spectroscopic experiments were conducted. The transient spectroscopy work reveals that the different substituents affect the photodecarboxylation reaction to produce carbon dioxide which in turn influences the generation of the carbanion species which determines the rate of the photorelease of the functional groups attached on the ketoprofen parent molecule. The fingerprint TR(3) spectroscopy results suggest that ketoprofen derivatives may be deactivated to produce a triplet carbanion when increasing the atom mass of the halogen atoms. PMID:26899243

  6. A laboratory assessment of bacterial leakage in MTA apical plugs exposed to phosphate-buffered saline.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Josiane; Pimenta, Andrea L; Felippe, Wilson T

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated the influence of the exposure of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) - with and without calcium chloride (CaCl2) -to phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) on apical microleakage. Sixty root segments were divided into 4 experimental groups (n=15). Apical cavities were filled with MTA with or without CaCl2, and the root canals dressed with a moistened cotton pellet or PBS: 1) MTA/cotton pellet; 2) MTA/PBS; 3) MTA+ 10%CaCl2/cotton pellet; 4) MTA+10%CaCl2/PBS. After 2 months, E. faecalis penetration was analyzed along the apical plugs. Samples were observed weekly for 70 days, and leakage was detected by turbidity of the medium in contact with the root segment. Teeth in the control groups (n=2) were either made completely impermeable or kept without an apical plug. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze survival and the Logrank test was used to compare the survival curves (p<0.05). All specimens in the positive control group showed evidence of leakage within 24h, while none in the negative control group showed leakage up to 70 days. There was no statistically significant difference among the experimental groups (p=0.102). The use of PBS as intracanal dressing may improve MTA sealing ability, but cannot prevent bacterial leakage. The addition of CaCl2 to the MTA did not improve MTA sealing ability. PMID:26355884

  7. [The coagulation characteristics of human oxyhemoglobin in the presence of a mercury (II) ion in a neutral phosphate buffer].

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, L D; Myshkin, A E

    1990-01-01

    The kinetics of human oxyhemoglobin coagulation in neutral phosphate buffer in the presence of mercury acetate at 20 degrees has been studied using turbidimetric methods. The addition of small amounts of concentrated Hg2+ solution leads to rapid local protein coagulation with subsequent dissolution of the formed coagulate. Coagulation can be inhibited by addition of Tris that binds to mercury ions. The pattern of oxyhemoglobin coagulation is determined by molar Hg2+/protein ration rather than by total Hg2+ concentration. PMID:2362035

  8. Individual variations of pH, buffer capacity, and concentrations of calcium and phosphate in unstimulated whole saliva.

    PubMed

    Larsen, M J; Jensen, A F; Madsen, D M; Pearce, E I

    1999-02-01

    In order to evaluate the risk of development of dental caries and/or of formation of dental calculus, salivary variables have often been used, but not with particular success. A reason for the apparent lack of association could be that the individual temporal variation of a characteristic was so substantial relative to the overall variation that it is not possible to characterize an individual by a single salivary measurement. The aim here was to examine the individual variation of pH, buffer capacity, and concentrations of calcium and phosphate and to compare it with the overall variation of the characteristics in order to shed light on the above problem. Eight weekly samples of up to 4 ml of unstimulated whole saliva were collected from 11 dental students before tooth brushing on their arrival at 8 a.m. in the dental school. Calcium was determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy, phosphate colorimetrically, and pH electrometrically. The buffer capacity was assessed by titration of the saliva sample from the pH initially observed to pH 3. It was found that within each individual the concentration of calcium and of phosphate, pH, the hydroxyapatite ion product and the buffer capacity varied considerably over the 7 weeks. The individual range frequently covered more than a third of the total range. Further, within each of the variables, single individuals could be found whose samples covered 60% or more of the overall range, whilst others covered less than 10% of the range. It was therefore concluded that, although collected at the same time of the day, pH, buffer capacity and concentrations of calcium and phosphate in unstimulated whole saliva in the single individual vary so much that characterization of individuals and of their saliva based on a single salivary analysis is unreliable and hazardous. PMID:10206329

  9. The stability of DLC film on nitrided CoCrMo alloy in phosphate buffer solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. F.; Liu, B.; Wu, B. J.; Liu, J.; Sun, H.; Leng, Y. X.; Huang, N.

    2014-07-01

    CoCrMo alloy is often used as the material for metal artificial joint, but metal debris and metal ions are the main concern on tissue inflammation or tissue proliferation for metal prosthesis. In this paper, nitrogen ion implantation and diamond like carbon (DLC) film composite treatment was used to reduce the wear and ion release of biomedical CoCrMo substrate. The mechanical properties and stability of N-implanted/DLC composite layer in phosphate buffer solution (PBS) was evaluated to explore the full potential of N-implanted/DLC composite layer as an artificial joint surface modification material. The results showed that the DLC film on N implanted CoCrMo (N-implanted/DLC composite layer) had the higher surface hardness and wear resistance than the DLC film on virgin CoCrMo alloy, which was resulted from the strengthen effect of the N implanted layer on CoCrMo alloy. After 30 days immersion in PBS, the structure of DLC film on virgin CoCrMo or on N implanted CoCrMo had no visible change. But the adhesion and corrosion resistance of DLC on N implanted CoCrMo (N-implanted/DLC composite layer) was weakened due to the dissolution of the N implanted layer after 30 days immersion in PBS. The adhesion reduction of N-implanted/DLC composite layer was adverse for in vivo application in long term. So researcher should be cautious to use N implanted layer as an inter-layer for increasing CoCrMo alloy load carrying capacity in vivo environment.

  10. Functional PEG–PAMAM-Tetraphosphonate Capped NaLnF4 Nanoparticles and their Colloidal Stability in Phosphate Buffer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Developing surface coatings for NaLnF4 nanoparticles (NPs) that provide long-term stability in solutions containing competitive ions such as phosphate remains challenging. An amine-functional polyamidoamine tetraphosphonate (NH2-PAMAM-4P) as a multidentate ligand for these NPs has been synthesized and characterized as a ligand for the surface of NaGdF4 and NaTbF4 nanoparticles. A two-step ligand exchange protocol was developed for introduction of the NH2-PAMAM-4P ligand on oleate-capped NaLnF4 NPs. The NPs were first treated with methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-monophosphoric acid (Mn = 750) in tetrahydrofuran. The mPEG750-OPO3-capped NPs were stable colloidal solutions in water, where they could be ligand-exchanged with NH2-PAMAM-4P. The surface amine groups on the NPs were available for derivatization to attach methoxy-PEG (Mn = 2000) and biotin-terminated PEG (Mn = 2000) chains. The surface coverage of ligands on the NPs was examined by thermal gravimetric analysis, and by a HABA analysis for biotin-containing NPs. Colloidal stability of the NPs was examined by dynamic light scattering. NaGdF4 and NaTbF4 NPs capped with mPEG2000–PAMAM-4P showed colloidal stability in DI water and in phosphate buffer (10 mM, pH 7.4). A direct comparison with NaTbF4 NPs capped with a mPEG2000-lysine-based tetradentate ligand that we reported previously (Langmuir2012, 28, 12861−1287022906305) showed that both ligands provided long-term stability in phosphate buffer, but that the lysine-based ligand provided better stability in phosphate-buffered saline. PMID:24898128

  11. In Vivo Predictive Dissolution: Comparing the Effect of Bicarbonate and Phosphate Buffer on the Dissolution of Weak Acids and Weak Bases.

    PubMed

    Krieg, Brian J; Taghavi, Seyed Mohammad; Amidon, Gordon L; Amidon, Gregory E

    2015-09-01

    Bicarbonate is the main buffer in the small intestine and it is well known that buffer properties such as pKa can affect the dissolution rate of ionizable drugs. However, bicarbonate buffer is complicated to work with experimentally. Finding a suitable substitute for bicarbonate buffer may provide a way to perform more physiologically relevant dissolution tests. The dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs was conducted in bicarbonate and phosphate buffer using rotating disk dissolution methodology. Experimental results were compared with the predicted results using the film model approach of (Mooney K, Mintun M, Himmelstein K, Stella V. 1981. J Pharm Sci 70(1):22-32) based on equilibrium assumptions as well as a model accounting for the slow hydration reaction, CO2 + H2 O → H2 CO3 . Assuming carbonic acid is irreversible in the dehydration direction: CO2 + H2 O ← H2 CO3 , the transport analysis can accurately predict rotating disk dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs in bicarbonate buffer. The predictions show that matching the dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs in phosphate and bicarbonate buffer is possible. The phosphate buffer concentration necessary to match physiologically relevant bicarbonate buffer [e.g., 10.5 mM (HCO3 (-) ), pH = 6.5] is typically in the range of 1-25 mM and is very dependent upon drug solubility and pKa . PMID:25980464

  12. Halogenated earth abundant metalloporphyrins as photostable sensitizers for visible-light-driven water oxidation in a neutral phosphate buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Cheng; Reek, Joost N H; Williams, René M; Brouwer, Albert M

    2016-06-01

    Very photostable tetrachloro-metalloporphyrins were developed as sensitizers for visible-light-driven water oxidation coupled to cobalt based water-oxidation catalysts in concentrated (0.1 M) phosphate buffer solution. Potassium persulfate (K2S2O8) acts as a sacrificial electron acceptor to oxidize the metalloporphyrin photosensitizers in their excited states. The radical cations thus produced drive the cobalt based water-oxidation catalysts: Co4O4-cubane and Co(NO3)2 as pre-catalyst for cobalt-oxide (CoOx) nanoparticles. Two different metalloporphyrins (Cu(ii) and Ni(ii)) both showed very high photostability in the photocatalytic reaction, as compared to non-halogenated analogues. This indicates that photostability primarily depends on the substitution of the porphyrin macrocycle, not on the central metal. Furthermore, our molecular design strategy not only positively increases the electrochemical potential by 120-140 mV but also extends the absorption spectrum up to ∼600 nm. As a result, the solar photon capturing abilities of halogenated metalloporphyrins (Cu(ii) and Ni(ii)) are comparable to that of the natural photosynthetic pigment, chlorophyll a. We successfully demonstrate long-term (>3 h) visible-light-driven water oxidation using our molecular system based on earth-abundant (first-row transition) metals in concentrated phosphate buffer solution. PMID:27197873

  13. Biomimetic apatite formation on calcium phosphate-coated titanium in Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline solution containing CaCl(2) with and without fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cen; Lee, In-Seop; Zhang, Sheng-Min; Yang, Hyeong Cheol

    2010-06-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) thin films with different degrees of crystallinity were coated on the surfaces of commercially pure titanium by electron beam evaporation. The details of apatite nucleation and growth on the coating layer were investigated in Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline solutions containing calcium chloride (DPBS) or DPBS with fibronectin (DPBSF). The surfaces of the samples were examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The concentrations of fibronectin and calcium ions (Ca(2+)) were monitored by the bicinchoninic acid method (BCA) and use of a calcium assay kit (DICA-500), respectively. Apatite initially formed at the fastest rate on the CaP-coated samples with the lowest degree of crystallinity and reached the maximum Ca(2+) concentration after immersion in DPBS solution for 15min. After 15min the concentration of Ca(2+) decreased with the growth of apatite on the coating layers. For all the samples the maximum Ca(2+) concentration in the DPBS solutions decreased with increasing crystallinity and immersion time to reach the maximum concentration increased. The presence of fibronectin in the DPBS solutions delayed the formation and affected the morphology of the apatite. Fibronectin incorporated into apatite deposited on the surface of titanium did not affect its biological activity in terms of promoting osteoblast adhesion. PMID:19962459

  14. Effect of Phosphate-Buffered Solution Corrosion on the Ratcheting Fatigue Behavior of a Duplex Mg-Li-Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xin; Yu, Dunji; Gao, Li-Lan; Gao, Hong

    2016-05-01

    This work reports the uniaxial ratcheting and fatigue behavior of a duplex Mg-Li-Al alloy under the influence of phosphate-buffered solution corrosion. Microstructural observations reveal pitting and filament corrosion defects, which impair the load-bearing capacity of the alloy and cause stress concentration, thus leading to an accelerated accumulation of ratcheting strain and shortened fatigue life under the same nominal loading conditions. Comparing Smith model, Smith-Watson-Topper model, and Paul-Sivaprasad-Dhar model, a ratcheting fatigue life prediction model based on the Broberg damage rule and the Paul-Sivaprasad-Dhar model was proposed, and the model yielded a superior prediction for the studied magnesium alloy.

  15. Electrochemical Behavior of Pure Copper in Phosphate Buffer Solutions: A Comparison Between Micro- and Nano-Grained Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imantalab, O.; Fattah-alhosseini, A.; Keshavarz, M. K.; Mazaheri, Y.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, electrochemical behavior of annealed (micro-) and nano-grained pure copper (fabricated by accumulative roll bonding process) in phosphate buffer solutions of various pH values ranging from 10.69 to 12.59 has been studied. Before any electrochemical measurements, evaluation of microstructure was obtained by optical microscope and transmission electron microscopy. To investigate the electrochemical behavior of the samples, the potentiodynamic polarization, Mott-Schottky analysis, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were carried out. Potentiodynamic polarization plots and EIS measurements revealed that as a result of grain refinement, the passive behavior of the nano-grained sample was improved compared to that of annealed pure copper. Also, Mott-Schottky analysis indicated that the passive films behaved as p-type semiconductors and grain refinement did not change the semiconductor type of passive films.

  16. Sensitivity of Listeria monocytogenes Scott A to nisin and diacetyl after starvation in sodium phosphate buffered saline.

    PubMed

    O'Bryan, Corliss A; Sostrin, Michael L; Nannapaneni, Ramakrishna; Ricke, Steven C; Crandall, Philip G; Johnson, Michael G

    2009-01-01

    This study determined the effectiveness of nisin and diacetyl to inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) under normal cell cultivation and starvation conditions in sodium phosphate buffered saline (SPBS). Inhibitory effects of nisin at 320 or 1000 AU/mL or diacetyl at 0.25%, 0.50%, or 1.0% and combinations on Lm in brain heart infusion (BHI), SPBS, and potassium phosphate buffered saline (KPBS) were determined on BHIA (nonselective medium) and PALCAM (selective medium) agar at 0 and 2 h posttreatment after 0, 7, 14, and 21 d of starvation. Two-hour exposure to 1000 AU/mL nisin and 1% diacetyl gave 8 to 9 log CFU/mL reductions of nonstarved control cells regardless of plating medium after suspension in BHI, SPBS, or KPBS with inhibitors, but with 7 d starved cells a 2-h exposure reduced Lm levels to less than the detection limit (20 CFU/mL). Cells starved in SPBS for 14 or 21 d then suspended in BHI plus inhibitors were reduced 5 to 6 log CFU/mL. SPBS suspensions on days 14 and 21 were reduced 4 log CFU/mL and 2 to 3 log CFU/mL, respectively, on BHI media and 5 to 6 log CFU/mL and 2 to 3 log CFU/mL on PALCAM. Recovery was the same regardless of plating medium, indicating treated cells were killed and not merely injured by the nisin and diacetyl treatments. This study showed that nisin and diacetyl combinations were more effective on Lm than when either chemical was used separately in BHI, SPBS, or KPBS. Lm cells starved for 14 or more days were much more resistant to the nisin and diacetyl combinations than were nonstarved control cells. PMID:20492120

  17. Saline catholytes as alternatives to phosphate buffers in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yongtae; Logan, Bruce E

    2013-03-01

    Highly saline solutions were examined as alternatives to chemical buffers in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The performance of two-chamber MFCs with different concentrations of saline solutions in the cathode chamber was compared to those with a buffered catholyte (50mM PBS). The use of a NaCl catholyte improved the CE to 43-60% (28% with no membrane) due to a reduction in oxygen transfer into the anolyte. The saline catholyte also reduced the membrane and solution resistance to 23Ω (41Ω without a membrane). The maximum power density of 491mW/m(2) (240mM NaCl) was only 17% less than the MFC with 50mM PBS. The decrease in power output with highest salinity was due to reduced proton transfer due to the ion exchange membrane, and pH changes in the two solutions. These results show that MFC performance can be improved by using a saline catholyte without pH control. PMID:23433978

  18. Comparison of adhesive properties of water- and phosphate-buffer-washed cottonseed meals with cottonseed protein isolate on bonding maple and poplar veneers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water- and phosphate buffer (35 mM Na2HPO4/NaH2PO4, pH 7.5)-washed cottonseed meals (abbreviated as WCM and BCM, respectively) could be low-cost and environmentally friendly protein-based adhesives as their preparation does not involve corrosive alkali and acid solutions that are needed for cottonse...

  19. Effects of Phosphate Buffered Saline Concentration and Incubation Time on the Mechanical and Structural Properties of Electrochemically Aligned Collagen Threads

    PubMed Central

    Uquillas, Jorge Alfredo; Kishore, Vipuil; Akkus, Ozan

    2011-01-01

    A key step during the synthesis of collagen constructs is the incubation of monomeric collagen in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) to promote fibrillogenesis in the collagen network. Optimal PBS treatment conditions for monomeric collagen solutions to induce gelation are well established in the literature. Recently, a report in the literature[1] showed a novel method to fabricate highly oriented electrochemically aligned collagen (ELAC) threads which have orders of magnitude greater packing density than collagen gels. The optimal PBS treatment conditions for induction of D-banding pattern in such dense and anisotropic collagen network are unknown. This study aimed to optimize PBS treatment of ELAC threads by investigating the effect of phosphate ion concentration (0.5×, 1×, 5× or 10×) and incubation time (3, 12 or 96 hours) on the mechanical strength and ultrastructural organization by monotonic mechanical testing, small angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy. ELAC threads incubated in water (No PBS) served as the control. ELAC threads incubated in 1× PBS showed significantly higher extensibility compared to 0.5× or 10× PBS along with the presence of D-banded patterns with a periodicity of 63.83 nm. Incubation of ELAC threads in 1× PBS for 96 hours resulted in significantly higher ultimate stress compared to 3 or 12 hours. However, these threads lacked D-banding pattern. TEM showed no significant differences in the microfibril diameter distribution of ELAC threads treated with or without PBS. This indicates that microfibrils lacked D-banding following electrochemical alignment and the subsequent PBS treatment induced D-banding by reorganization within microfibrils. It was concluded that incubation of aligned collagen in 1× PBS for 12 hours results in mechanically competent, D-banded ELAC threads which can be used for the regeneration of load bearing tissues such as tendons and ligaments. PMID:21540522

  20. The electrochemical evaluation of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass in a phosphate-buffered saline electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Morrison, M L; Buchanan, R A; Leon, R V; Liu, C T; Green, B A; Liaw, P K; Horton, J A

    2005-09-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) represent an emerging class of materials with an amorphous structure and a unique combination of properties. The objectives of this investigation were to define the electrochemical behavior of a specific Zr-based BMG alloy in a physiologically relevant environment and to compare these properties to standard, crystalline biomaterials as well as other Zr-based BMG compositions. Cyclic-anodic-polarization studies were conducted with a Zr52.5Cu17.9Ni14.6Al10.0Ti5.0 (at %) BMG in a phosphate-buffered saline electrolyte with a physiologically relevant oxygen content at 37 degrees C. The results were compared to three common, crystalline biomaterials: CoCrMo, 316L stainless steel, and Ti-6Al-4V. The BMG alloy was found to have a lower corrosion penetration rate (CPR), as compared to the 316L stainless steel, and an equivalent CPR, as compared to the CoCrMo and Ti-6Al-4V alloys. Furthermore, the BMG alloy demonstrated better localized corrosion resistance than the 316L stainless steel. However, the localized corrosion resistance of the BMG alloy was not as high as those of the CoCrMo and Ti-6Al-4V alloys in the tested environment. The excellent electrochemical properties demonstrated by the BMG alloy are combined with a low modulus and unparalleled strength. This unique combination of properties dramatically demonstrates the potential for amorphous alloys as a new generation of biomaterials. PMID:16013063

  1. The electrochemical Evaluation of a Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass in a Phosphate-Buffered Saline Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, M. L.; Buchanan, R. A.; Leon, R. V.; Liu, Chain T; Green, B. A.; Liaw, Peter K; Horton Jr, Joe A

    2005-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) represent an emerging class of materials with an amorphous structure and a unique combination of properties. The objectives of this investigation were to define the electrochemical behavior of a specific Zr-based BMG alloy in a physiologically relevant environment and to compare these properties to standard, crystalline biomaterials as well as other Zr-based BMG compositions. Cyclic-anodic-polarization studies were conducted with a Zr{sub 52.5}Cu{sub 17.9}Ni{sub 14.6}Al{sub 10.0}Ti{sub 5.0} (at %) BMG in a phosphate-buffered saline electrolyte with a physiologically relevant oxygen content at 37 C. The results were compared to three common, crystalline biomaterials: CoCrMo, 316L stainless steel, and Ti-6Al-4V. The BMG alloy was found to have a lower corrosion penetration rate (CPR), as compared to the 316L stainless steel, and an equivalent CPR, as compared to the CoCrMo and Ti-6Al-4V alloys. Furthermore, the BMG alloy demonstrated better localized corrosion resistance than the 316L stainless steel. However, the localized corrosion resistance of the BMG alloy was not as high as those of the CoCrMo and Ti-6Al-4V alloys in the tested environment. The excellent electrochemical properties demonstrated by the BMG alloy are combined with a low modulus and unparalleled strength. This unique combination of properties dramatically demonstrates the potential for amorphous alloys as a new generation of biomaterials.

  2. Corrosion behavior of Mg-3Zn/bioglass (45S5) composite in simulated body fluid (SBF) and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ab llah, N.; Jamaludin, S. B.; Daud, Z. C.; Zaludin, M. A. F.; Jamal, Z. A. Z.; Idris, M. S.; Osman, R. A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Magnesium has emerged as promising materials in biomaterials research due to its good mechanical and physical properties closer to human bones. However, magnesium has poor corrosion resistance to chloride ions that exist in human blood plasma thus preventing its application in biomedical. The addition of zinc and bioglass can reduce magnesium corrosion rate. In this work, the effect of different solution media (Simulated Body Fluid and Phosphate Buffered Saline) to the corrosion behavior of Mg-Zn/bioglass (45S5) composites was investigated. The composites of Mg-3Zn added with 5, 10, 15, 20, 15 and 30 wt. % bioglass were fabricated by powder metallurgy. The composites were prepared by mixing at 140 rpm for 1 hour, pressing at 500 MPa and sintering in an argon environment at a temperature of 450°C for 3 hours. Sintered samples were immersed in Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) and Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) in order to investigate the corrosion behavior. Samples mass loss was determined after 3 days of immersion. Samples microstructure and corrosion products were analyzed using optical microscope and x-ray diffraction (XRD) respectively. The results revealed that the samples immersed in the Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) shows lower mass loss compare to the samples immersed in the Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) for all composition except for Mg-3Zn without bio-glass. The results indicated that the existence of high phosphate ions in PBS has retarded the corrosion rate of composite Mg-3Zn/45S5. The pH value of the PBS solution after immersion showed significant increase between 10.3 and 11.09. Diffraction pattern (XRD) showed the presence of Mg(OH)2 as the major corrosion product for samples immersed in the SBF and PBS solutions. The mass loss of samples decreased with the addition of bio-glass.

  3. Analysis of pesticides residues in fresh produce using buffered acetonitrile extraction and aminopropyl cleanup with gas chromatography/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry, gas chromatography/ion trap detector mass spectrometry, and GC with a halogen-specific detector.

    PubMed

    Brown, Amy N; Cook, Jo Marie; Hammack, Walter T; Stepp, Jason S; Pelt, Jonathan V; Gerard, Ghislain

    2011-01-01

    A rapid and inexpensive multiresidue method for determining pesticides in fruits and vegetables is presented. Extraction of a 15 g sample with 15 mL acetonitrile was followed by buffering with magnesium sulfate, sodium chloride, sodium citrate dihydrate, and disodium citrate. Acidification with formic acid prior to dispersive cleanup with aminopropyl sorbent and magnesium sulfate was used to stabilize base-sensitive pesticides such as chlorothalonil. Extracts were concentrated to 2 g/mL. Analyses were conducted by GC/ion trap detector MS, GC-halogen-specific detector, and LC/triple quadrupole MS. Accuracy and repeatability for 166 compounds in tomato, potato, and cabbage were 70-120% and <20% CV in 85% of the compounds, respectively. Reproducibility over a 4 month period in multiple commodities and analytical conditions was 62-124%, with CVs better than 30% for 91% of the compounds. Supply cost/sample was reduced 66%, and time to extract a batch of 24 samples was reduced by half compared to the prior method that used a 50 g sample, 100 mL acetonitrile, multiple SPE columns, and additional instrumentation. Additional extraction studies were conducted in tomatoes, oranges, and green beans at 4 g/mL using a GC/MS triple quadrupole system with a programmable temperature vaporization inlet. Recoveries of 70-120% were achieved in 93% of all compounds in green beans, 95% in tomatoes, and 97% in oranges. PMID:21797022

  4. Sodium citrate and potassium phosphate as alternative adsorption buffers in hydrophobic and aromatic thiophilic chromatographic purification of plasmid DNA from neutralized lysate.

    PubMed

    Bonturi, Nemailla; Radke, Vanessa Soraia Cortez Oliveira; Bueno, Sônia Maria Alves; Freitas, Sindélia; Azzoni, Adriano Rodrigues; Miranda, Everson Alves

    2013-03-01

    The number of studies on gene therapy using plasmid vectors (pDNA) has increased in recent years. As a result, the demand for preparations of pDNA in compliance with recommendations of regulatory agencies (EMEA, FDA) has also increased. Plasmid DNA is often obtained through fermentation of transformed Escherichia coli and purification by a series of unit operations, including chromatography. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) and thiophilic aromatic chromatography (TAC), both using ammonium sulfate buffers, are commonly employed with success. This work was aimed at studying the feasibility of utilizing alternative salts in the purification of pDNA from neutralized lysate with phenyl-agarose (HIC) and mercaptopyrimidine-agarose (TAC) adsorbents. Their selectivity toward sc pDNA was evaluated through adsorption studies using 1.5 mol/L sodium citrate and 2.0 mol/L potassium phosphate as adsorption buffers. Chromatography with mercaptopyrimidine-agarose adsorbent and 1.5 mol/L sodium citrate was able to recover 91.1% of the pDNA with over 99.0% removal of gDNA and endotoxin. This represents a potential alternative for the primary recovery of sc pDNA. However, the most promising result was obtained using 2.0 mol/L potassium phosphate buffer and a mercaptopyrimidine-agarose column. In a single chromatographic step, this latter buffer/adsorbent system recovered 68.5% of the pDNA with 98.8% purity in accordance with the recommendations of regulatory agencies with regard to RNA and endotoxin impurity. PMID:23411021

  5. Conformational change induced by electron transfer in a monolayer of cytochrome P450 reductase adsorbed at the Au(110)-phosphate buffer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weightman, P.; Smith, C. I.; Convery, J. H.; Harrison, P.; Khara, B.; Scrutton, N. S.

    2013-09-01

    The reflection anisotropy spectroscopy profiles of a variant of cytochrome P450 reductase adsorbed at the Au(110)-phosphate buffer interface depend on the sequence of potentials applied to the Au(110) electrode. It is suggested that this dependence arises from changes in the orientation of the isoalloxazine ring structures in the protein with respect to the Au(110) surface. This offers a method of monitoring conformational change in this protein by measuring variations in the reflection anisotropy spectrum arising from changes in the redox potential.

  6. The influence of the structure of the Au(110) surface on the ordering of a monolayer of cytochrome P450 reductase at the Au(110)/phosphate buffer interface

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C. I.; Convery, J. H.; Khara, B.; Scrutton, N. S.; Weightman, P.

    2016-01-01

    The reflection anisotropy spectra (RAS) observed initially from Au(110)/phosphate buffer interfaces at applied potentials of −0.652 and 0.056 V are very similar to the spectra observed from ordered Au(110) (1 × 3) and anion induced (1 × 1) surface structures respectively. These RAS profiles transform to a common profile after cycling the potential between these two values over 72 h indicating the formation of a less ordered surface. The RAS of a monolayer of a P499C variant of the human flavoprotein cytochrome P450 reductase adsorbed at 0.056 V at an ordered Au(110)/phosphate buffer interface is shown to arise from an ordered layer in which the optical dipole transitions are in a plane that is orientated roughly normal to the surface and parallel to either the [11̄0] or [001] axes of the Au(110) surface. The same result was found previously for adsorption of P499C on an ordered interface at −0.652 V. The adsorption of P499C at the disordered surface does not result in the formation of an ordered monolayer confirming that the molecular ordering is strongly influenced by both the local structure and the long range macroscopic order of the Au(110) surface.

  7. Detection of adulteration in acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guoxiang; Fujimori, Kiyoshi; Lee, Hans; Nashed-Samuel, Yasser; Phillips, Joseph; Rogers, Gary; Shen, Hong; Yee, Chanel

    2011-05-01

    To address the increasing concern that acetonitrile may be intentionally adulterated to meet the shortfall in global supplies resulting from a downturn in its manufacturing, three analytical techniques were examined in this study. Gas Chromatography with Thermal Conductivity Detection (GC-TCD), Near Infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were assessed for their ability to detect and quantify potential adulterants including water, alternative organic solvents, and by-products associated with the production of acetonitrile. The results of the assessment of the three techniques for acetonitrile adulteration testing are discussed.

  8. Surface runoff pollution by cattle slurry and inorganic fertilizer spreading: chemical oxygen demand, ortho-phosphates, and electrical conductivity levels for different buffer strip lengths.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Delgado, A; López-Periago, E; Quiroga-Lago, F; Díaz-Fierros Viqueira, F

    2001-01-01

    As a way of dealing with the removal of pollutants from farming practices generated wastewater in the EU, we investigate the effect of spreading cattle slurry and inorganic fertiliser on 8 x 5 m2 and 8 x 3 m2 areas, referred to surface runoff chemical oxygen demand (COD), ortho-phosphates (o-P) and electrical conductivity (EC) levels, and the efficiency of grass buffer strips of various lengths in removing pollutants from runoff. The experimental plot was a 15% sloped Lolium perenne pasture. Surface runoff was generated by means of a rainfall simulator working at 47 mm h-1 rainfall intensity. Runoff was sampled by using Gerlach-type troughs situated 2, 4, 6 and 8 m downslope from the amended areas. During the first rainfall simulation, COD, o-P and EC levels were consistently higher in the slurry zone, more evidently in the larger amended area. During the second and third rainfall simulations, concentration and mass levels show a downslope drift into the buffer zones, with no clear buffer strip length attenuation. Correlation between runoff and mass drift is clearly higher in the slurry zone. Percentage attenuation in COD and o-P levels, referred to initial slurry concentrations--including rainfall dilution--were higher than 98%, and higher than 90% for EC. PMID:11496670

  9. Catalysis of hydrolysis and nucleophilic substitution at the P-N bond of phosphoimidazolide-activated nucleotides in phosphate buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Rosenbach, M. T.

    1991-01-01

    Phosphoimidazolide-activated derivatives of guanosine and cytidine 5'-monophosphates, henceforth called ImpN's, exhibit enhanced rates of degradation in the presence of aqueous inorganic phosphate in the range 4.0 < or = pH < or = 8.6. This degradation is been attributed to (i) nucleophilic substitution of the imidazolide and (ii) catalysis of the P-N bond hydrolysis by phosphate. The first reaction results in the formation of nucleoside 5'-diphosphate and the second in nucleoside 5'-monophosphate. Analysis of the observed rates as well as the product ratios as a function of pH and phosphate concentration allow distinction between various mechanistic possibilities. The results show that both H2PO4- and HPO4(2-) participate in both hydrolysis and nucleophilic substitution. Statistically corrected biomolecular rate constants indicate that the dianion is 4 times more effective as a general base than the monoanion, and 8 times more effective as nucleophile. The low Bronsted value beta = 0.15 calculated for these phosphate species, presumed to act as general bases in facilitating water attack, is consistent with the fact that catalysis of the hydrolysis of the P-N bond in ImpN's has not been detected before. The beta nuc = 0.35 calculated for water, H2PO4-, HPO4(2-), and hydroxide acting as nucleophiles indicates a more associative transition state for nucleotidyl (O2POR- with R = nucleoside) transfers than that observed for phosphoryl (PO3(2-)) transfers (beta nuc = 0.25). With respect to the stability/reactivity of ImpN's under prebiotic conditions, our study shows that these materials would not suffer additional degradation due to inorganic phosphate, assuming the concentrations of phosphate, Pi, on prebiotic Earth were similar to those in the present oceans ([Pi] approximately 2.25 micromoles).

  10. Conformational change in cytochrome P450 reductase adsorbed at a Au(110)—phosphate buffer interface induced by interaction with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. I.; Convery, J. H.; Harrison, P.; Khara, B.; Scrutton, N. S.; Weightman, P.

    2014-08-01

    Changes observed in the reflection anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) profiles of monolayers of cytochrome P450 reductase adsorbed at Au(110)-electrolyte interfaces at 0.056 V following the addition of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP+) are explained in terms of a simple model as arising from changes in the orientation of an isoalloxazine ring located in the flavin mononucleotide binding domain of the protein. The model also accounts for the changes observed in the RAS as the potential applied to the Au(110) surface is varied and suggests that differences in the dependence of the RAS profile of the adsorbed protein on the potential applied to the electrode in the absence and presence of NADP+ are explicable as arising from a competition between the applied potential acting to reduce the protein and the NADP+ to oxidize it.

  11. Abiotic transformations and decomposition kinetics of 4-carbamoyl-2'-[(hydroxyimino)methyl]-1,1'-(oxydimethylene)-bis(pyridin ium chloride) in aqueous phosphate buffers.

    PubMed

    Mdachi, R E; Marshall, W D; Ecobichon, D J; Fouad, F M; Connolley-Mendoza, C E

    1990-01-01

    The rate of disappearance of 4-carbamoyl-2'-[(hydroxyimino)methyl]-1,1'-(oxydimethylene) bis (pyridinium chloride) (HI-6) from aqueous phosphate buffers (pH 3.0-9.1) was both pH and temperature sensitive. In midrange buffers (pH 6.0-9.1, mu = 0.2 M) at 37, 25, or 4 degrees C the decomposition followed first-order kinetics consistent with hydroxide-promoted decomposition of the un-ionized drug or with hydrolysis of the ionized oxime anion to result in 4-carbamoyl-2'-hydroxy-1,1'-(oxydimethylene)bis(pyridinium) cation (intermediate 1). The subsequent conversion of intermediate 1 to 4-carboxy-2'-hydroxy-1,1'-(oxydimethylene)bis(pyridinium) cation (intermediate 2) followed higher order kinetics which were consistent with either acid- or base-promoted hydrolysis of the B-ring amide functionality. After approximately 138 days in the dark, the sum of the residual HI-6, intermediate 1, and intermediate 2 in the crude decomposition mixture accounted for 89.9 +/- 10.0% of the initial substrate. Minor byproducts included 4-carbamoyl-2'-carboxy-1,1'-(oxydimethylene)bis(pyridinium) cation, 2-pyridinealdoxime, 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde, 2-hydroxypyridine, isonicotinamide, isonicotinic acid, and traces of cyanide. In addition, 2-cyanopyridine appeared to be a transient intermediate in more alkaline media. In total, this drug resembles other mono- and bis(pyridinium) aldoximes in terms of the decomposition routes in aqueous solutions at intermediate pHs. PMID:2133092

  12. Effect of synovial fluid, phosphate-buffered saline solution, and water on the dissolution and corrosion properties of CoCrMo alloys as used in orthopedic implants.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A C; Kilburn, M R; Papageorgiou, I; Allen, G C; Case, C P

    2005-06-15

    The corrosion and dissolution of high- and low-carbon CoCrMo alloys, as used in orthopedic joint replacements, were studied by immersing samples in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), water, and synovial fluid at 37 degrees C for up to 35 days. Bulk properties were analyzed with a fine ion beam microscope. Surface analyses by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy showed surprisingly that synovial fluid produced a thin oxide/hydroxide layer. Release of ions into solution from the alloy also followed an unexpected pattern where synovial fluid, of all the samples, had the highest Cr concentration but the lowest Co concentration. The presence of carbide inclusions in the alloy did not affect the corrosion or the dissolution mechanisms, although the carbides were a significant feature on the metal surface. Only one mechanism was recognized as controlling the thickness of the oxide/hydroxide interface. The analysis of the dissolved metal showed two mechanisms at work: (1) a protein film caused ligand-induced dissolution, increasing the Cr concentration in synovial fluid, and was explained by the equilibrium constants; (2) corrosion at the interface increased the Co in PBS. The effect of prepassivating the samples (ASTM F-86-01) did not always have the desired effect of reducing dissolution. The release of Cr into PBS increased after prepassivation. The metal-synovial fluid interface did not contain calcium phosphate as a deposit, typically found where samples are exposed to calcium rich bodily fluids. PMID:15900610

  13. Ultra high pressure homogenization (UHPH) inactivation of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and milk

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Peng; Georget, Erika S.; Aganovic, Kemal; Heinz, Volker; Mathys, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Ultra high pressure homogenization (UHPH) opens up new areas for dynamic high pressure assisted thermal sterilization of liquids. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores are resistant to high isostatic pressure and temperature and were suggested as potential surrogate for high pressure thermal sterilization validation. B. amyloliquefaciens spores suspended in PBS buffer (0.01 M, pH 7.0), low fat milk (1.5%, pH 6.7), and whole milk (3.5%, pH 6.7) at initial concentration of ~106 CFU/mL were subjected to UHPH treatments at 200, 300, and 350 MPa with an inlet temperature at ~80°C. Thermal inactivation kinetics of B. amyloliquefaciens spores in PBS and milk were assessed with thin wall glass capillaries and modeled using first-order and Weibull models. The residence time during UHPH treatments was estimated to determine the contribution of temperature to spore inactivation by UHPH. No sublethal injury was detected after UHPH treatments using sodium chloride as selective component in the nutrient agar medium. The inactivation profiles of spores in PBS buffer and milk were compared and fat provided no clear protective effect for spores against treatments. Treatment at 200 MPa with valve temperatures lower than 125°C caused no reduction of spores. A reduction of 3.5 log10CFU/mL of B. amyloliquefaciens spores was achieved by treatment at 350 MPa with a valve temperature higher than 150°C. The modeled thermal inactivation and observed inactivation during UHPH treatments suggest that temperature could be the main lethal effect driving inactivation. PMID:26236296

  14. Ultra high pressure homogenization (UHPH) inactivation of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and milk.

    PubMed

    Dong, Peng; Georget, Erika S; Aganovic, Kemal; Heinz, Volker; Mathys, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Ultra high pressure homogenization (UHPH) opens up new areas for dynamic high pressure assisted thermal sterilization of liquids. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores are resistant to high isostatic pressure and temperature and were suggested as potential surrogate for high pressure thermal sterilization validation. B. amyloliquefaciens spores suspended in PBS buffer (0.01 M, pH 7.0), low fat milk (1.5%, pH 6.7), and whole milk (3.5%, pH 6.7) at initial concentration of ~10(6) CFU/mL were subjected to UHPH treatments at 200, 300, and 350 MPa with an inlet temperature at ~80°C. Thermal inactivation kinetics of B. amyloliquefaciens spores in PBS and milk were assessed with thin wall glass capillaries and modeled using first-order and Weibull models. The residence time during UHPH treatments was estimated to determine the contribution of temperature to spore inactivation by UHPH. No sublethal injury was detected after UHPH treatments using sodium chloride as selective component in the nutrient agar medium. The inactivation profiles of spores in PBS buffer and milk were compared and fat provided no clear protective effect for spores against treatments. Treatment at 200 MPa with valve temperatures lower than 125°C caused no reduction of spores. A reduction of 3.5 log10CFU/mL of B. amyloliquefaciens spores was achieved by treatment at 350 MPa with a valve temperature higher than 150°C. The modeled thermal inactivation and observed inactivation during UHPH treatments suggest that temperature could be the main lethal effect driving inactivation. PMID:26236296

  15. One-step electrochemical detection of cholesterol in the presence of suitable K₃Fe(CN)₆/phosphate buffer mediator by an electrochemical approach.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammed M; Asiri, Abdullah M

    2015-08-01

    One-step approach of cholesterol biosensor was fabricated onto smart micro-chips based on cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) co-immobilized thioglycolic acid self-assembled monolayer (TGA-SAM) for biomedical applications. The selective cholesterol biosensor was investigated with modified tiny micro-chip (Au/SAM/ChOx) by the facile and reliable cyclic voltammetric (CV) method in a K3Fe(CN)6/phosphate buffer (PB) system. The modified micro-chip displayed a large dynamic range (1.0 nmol L(-1) to 1.0 mmol L(-1)), lower detection limit (~0.49 nmol L(-1), based on S/N~3), higher sensitivity (~93.75 µA µmol L(-2) cm(-2)), good linearity (correlation coefficient r(2), 0.9995), lower sample volume (<50.0 μL), and good stability as well as reproducibility. The Au/TGA system was implemented for a facile and simple approach to the immobilization of ChOx onto micro-chip, which can offer analytical access to a large group of enzymes for a wide range of bio-molecule applications in health-care and biomedical fields. This integrated microchip provides a promising low-cost platform for the sensitive and rapid detection of biomolecules using miniatured samples. PMID:26048829

  16. Delayed cyanide poisoning following acetonitrile ingestion.

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, M.; Borland, C.

    1997-01-01

    Acetonitrile (methyl cyanide) is a common industrial organic solvent but is a rare cause of poisoning. We report the first recorded UK case. Acetonitrile is slowly converted to cyanide, resulting in delayed toxicity. We describe a case of deliberate self-poisoning by a 39-year-old woman resulting in cyanide poisoning 11 hours later which was successfully treated by repeated boluses of sodium nitrite and thiosulphate. The half-life of conversion of acetonitrile was 40 hours and harmful blood cyanide levels persisted for over 24 hours after ingestion. Departments treating or advising in cases of poisoning need to be aware of the delayed toxicity of acetonitrile. Monitoring in an intensive care unit of cases of acetonitrile poisoning should continue for 24-48 hours. PMID:9196706

  17. Photochemistry of nitrate ion in acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meera, N.; Ramamurthy, P.

    1988-12-01

    The photochemistry of cobalt(II) nitrate in acetonitrile is investigated using steady-state and flash photolysis techniques. Formation of NO 3• radical has been observed as an intermediate by direct photolysis of nitrate ion and the reaction of the nitrate radical with the solvent is observed as a transient absorption around 600 nm in air-equilibrated acetonitrile. Nitrite ion forms as a product through a collision electron transfer complex intermediate.

  18. Acetonitrile in the air over Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, S.; Helas, G.; Warneck, P.

    1989-06-01

    A gas chromatographic technique was developed to measure acetonitrile mixing ratios in air samples collected during three aircraft flights over Europe. Uniform mixing ratios were observed in the troposphere independent of altitude, with an average of 144+-26 pptv for the first two flights, and 194+-7 pptv for the third. /copyright/ American Geophysical Union 1989

  19. Electronic structure of the acetonitrile and acetonitrile dimer anions: a topological investigation.

    PubMed

    Timerghazin, Qadir K; Peslherbe, Gilles H

    2008-01-17

    Acetonitrile molecules are known for their intriguing ability to accommodate an excess electron in either a diffuse dipole-bound orbital, away from the valence electrons, or in its valence orbitals, depending on the environment. In this work, we report a computational investigation of the monomer and dimer acetonitrile anions, with the main goal of gaining further insight into the unusual electronic structure of these species. To this end, the topology of the electron density distribution has been examined in detail with the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (AIM). The excess electron is found to affect the topology of the electron density very differently for two dipole-bound-electron isomers of the acetonitrile dimer anion: for the head-to-tail isomer, the electron density simply decays away from the atomic nuclei, and the presence of the excess electron only manifests itself in the Laplacian of the electron density as a very diffuse region of "dipole-bound" charge concentration; in contrast, for the "solvated-electron" head-to-head isomer, a maximum of electron density without a corresponding atomic nucleus is observed, which topologically corresponds to a pseudo-atom of electron density. The acetonitrile dimer appears to be the smallest solvent cluster anion to exhibit such a non-nuclear attractor due to the presence of a solvated electron. Although the "solvated-electron" isomer is thermodynamically less stable than the head-to-tail isomer at 0 K, its floppy nature leads to a higher vibrational entropy that makes it the most stable acetonitrile dimer, anionic or neutral, above 150 K. As for the acetonitrile dimer anion with a valence-bound electron, its structure is characterized by acetonitrile molecules connected to each other at the cyanide carbon atoms; the AIM analysis reveals that, although this C-C bond is relatively weak, with an estimated bond order of 0.6, it possesses genuine covalent character and is not a "pseudo-bond" as previously speculated

  20. Buffer capacity of biologics--from buffer salts to buffering by antibodies.

    PubMed

    Karow, Anne R; Bahrenburg, Sven; Garidel, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Controlling pH is essential for a variety of biopharmaceutical process steps. The chemical stability of biologics such as monoclonal antibodies is pH-dependent and slightly acidic conditions are favorable for stability in a number of cases. Since control of pH is widely provided by added buffer salts, the current study summarizes the buffer characteristics of acetate, citrate, histidine, succinate, and phosphate buffers. Experimentally derived values largely coincide with values calculated from a model that had been proposed in 1922 by van Slyke. As high concentrated protein formulations become more and more prevalent for biologics, the self-buffering potential of proteins becomes of relevance. The current study provides information on buffer characteristics for pH ranges down to 4.0 and up to 8.0 and shows that a monoclonal antibody at 50 mg/mL exhibits similar buffer capacity as 6 mM citrate or 14 mM histidine (pH 5.0-6.0). Buffer capacity of antibody solutions scales linearly with protein concentration up to more than 200 mg/mL. At a protein concentration of 220 mg/mL, the buffer capacity resembles the buffer capacity of 30 mM citrate or 50 mM histidine (pH 5.0-6.0). The buffer capacity of monoclonal antibodies is practically identical at the process relevant temperatures 5, 25, and 40°C. Changes in ionic strength of ΔI=0.15, in contrast, can alter the buffer capacity up to 35%. In conclusion, due to efficient self-buffering by antibodies in the pH range of favored chemical stability, conventional buffer excipients could be dispensable for pH stabilization of high concentrated protein solutions. PMID:23296746

  1. Buffer Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Kelly

    2000-01-01

    Presents a science experiment in which students test the buffering capacity of household products such as shampoo, hand lotion, fizzies candy, and cola. Lists the standards addressed in this experiment and gives an example of a student lab write-up. (YDS)

  2. Stacking and separation of coproporphyrin isomers by acetonitrile-salt mixtures in micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    So, T S; Jia, L; Huie, C W

    2001-07-01

    The effectiveness of the addition of salt and acetonitrile in the sample matrix to induce narrowing of the analyte zones is demonstrated for the first time in micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC). Using coproporphyrin (CP) I and III isomers as test compounds, the use of sodium cholate (SC) as the micelle in the separation buffer and a high concentration of sodium chloride in the aqueous sample solution (without the presence of an organic solvent) were found to provide enhancement in peak heights for both CP I and III, but yielded very poor resolution of these two positional isomers at sample size of 10% capillary volume or larger. With the addition of acetonitrile as the organic solvent in the aqueous sample solution (acetonitrile-salt mixtures), baseline/partial resolution of CP I and III was obtained even at large injection volumes, along with significant increase in peak heights for both isomers. Possible mechanisms responsible for the narrowing of analyte zones are briefly discussed. The effects of experimental parameters, such as concentrations of salt and acetonitrile, on peak heights and resolution of the test compounds were studied. Importantly, the usefulness of the present method was demonstrated for the MEKC determination of endogenous CP I and III present in normal urine samples with good separation and detection performances. PMID:11504047

  3. Pyrolysis and Combustion of Acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN)

    SciTech Connect

    Britt, P.F.

    2002-05-22

    Acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN) is formed from the thermal decomposition of a variety of cyclic, noncyclic, and polymeric nitrogen-containing compounds such as pyrrole and polyacrylonitrile. The pyrolysis and combustion of acetonitrile have been studied over the past 30 years to gain a more detailed understanding of the complex mechanisms involved in the release of nitrogen-containing compounds such as hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in fires and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in coal combustion. This report reviews the literature on the formation of HCN and NOx from the pyrolysis and combustion of acetonitrile and discusses the possible products found in an acetonitrile fire.

  4. Intermolecular forces in acetonitrile + ethanol binary liquid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, A.; Shanmugam, R.; Arivazhagan, G.; Mahendraprabu, A.; Karthick, N. K.

    2015-10-01

    FTIR spectral measurements have been carried out on the binary mixtures of acetonitrile with ethanol at 1:0 (acetonitrile:ethanol), 1:1, 1:2, 1:3 and 0:1 at room temperature. DFT and isosurface calculations have been performed. The acetonitrile + ethanol binary mixtures consist of 1:1, 1:2, 1:3 and 1:4 complexes formed through both the red and blue shifting H-bonds. Inter as well as intra molecular forces are found to exist in 1:3 and 1:4 complexes.

  5. Low temperature properties of acetonitrile confined in MCM-41.

    PubMed

    Kittaka, Shigeharu; Iwashita, Takafumi; Serizawa, Akihiro; Kranishi, Miki; Takahara, Shuichi; Kuroda, Yasushige; Mori, Toshinori; Yamaguchi, Toshio

    2005-12-15

    The effect of confinement on the phase changes and dynamics of acetonitrile in mesoporous MCM-41 was studied by use of adsorption, FT-IR, DSC, and quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements. Acetonitrile molecules in a monolayer interact strongly with surface hydroxyls to be registered and perturb the triple bond in the C[triple bond]N group. Adsorbed molecules above the monolayer through to the central part of the cylindrical pores are capillary condensed molecules (cc-acetonitrile), but they do not show the hysteresis loop in adsorption-desorption isotherms, i.e., second order capillary condensation. FT-IR measurements indicated that the condensed phase is very similar to the bulk liquid. The cc-acetonitrile freezes at temperatures that depend on the pore size of the MCM-41 down to 29.1 A (C14), below which it is not frozen. In addition, phase changes between alpha-type and beta-type acetonitriles were observed below the melting points. Application of the Gibbs-Thomson equation, assuming the unfrozen layer thickness to be 0.7 nm, gave the interface free energy differences between the interfaces, i.e., Deltagamma(l/alpha) = 22.4 mJ m(-2) for the liquid/pore surface (ps) and alpha-type/ps, and Deltagamma(alpha/beta) = 3.17 mJ m(-2) for alpha-type/ps and beta-type/ps, respectively. QENS experiments substantiate the differing behaviors of monolayer acetonitrile and cc-acetonitrile. The monolayer acetonitrile molecules are anchored so as not to translate. The two Lorentzian analysis of QENS spectra for cc-acetonitriles showed translational motion but markedly slowed. However, the activation energy for cc-acetonitrile in MCM-41 (C18) is 7.0 kJ mol(-1) compared to the bulk value of 12.7 kJ mol(-1). The relaxation times for tumbling rotational diffusion of cc-acetonitrile are similar to bulk values. PMID:16375278

  6. Kinetic Study of the Alkaline Degradation of Oseltamivir Phosphate and Valacyclovir Hydrochloride using Validated Stability Indicating HPLC.

    PubMed

    Al-Bagary, Ramzia I; El-Zaher, Asmaa A; Morsy, Fahima A; Fouad, Mai M

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous alkaline degradation was performed for oseltamivir phosphate (OP) and valacyclovir hydrochloride (VA). Isocratic stability indicating the use of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was presented for each drug in the presence of its degradation product. The separations were performed using the Nucleosil ODS column and a mobile phase consisting of phosphate buffer (pH = 7), acetonitrile, and methanol 50:25:25 (v/v/v) for OP. For VA separation, a Nucleosil CN column using phosphate buffer (pH = 7) and methanol 85:15 (v/v) was used as a mobile phase. Ultraviolet detection at 210 nm and 254 nm was used for OP and VA, respectively. The method showed high sensitivity concerning linearity, accuracy, and precision over the range 1-250 μg mL(-1) for both drugs. The proposed method was used to determine the drug in its pharmaceutical formulation and to investigate the degradation kinetics of each drug's alkaline-stressed samples. The reactions were found to follow a first-order reaction. The activation energy could also be estimated. International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines were adopted for method validation. PMID:24932100

  7. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Acetonitrile in rats. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, T.J.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.; Boyd, P.J.; Hayden, B.K.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.

    1994-02-01

    The potential for acetonitrile to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 0, 100, 400, or 1200 ppM acetonitrile, 6 hours/day, 7 days/week. Exposure of rats to these concentrations of acetonitrile resulted in mortality in the 1200 ppM group (2/33 pregnant females; 1/10 non-pregnant females). However, there were no treatment-related effects upon body weights or reproduction indices at any exposure level, nor was there a significant increase in the incidence of fetal malformations or variations. The only effect observed in the fetuses was a slight, but not statiscally significant, exposure-correlated increase in the incidence of supernumerary ribs. Determination of acetonitrile and cyanide concentrations in maternal rat blood showed that acetonitrile concentration in the blood increased with exposure concentration for all exposed maternal rats. Detectable amounts of cyanide in the blood were found only in the rats exposed to 1200 ppM acetonitrile ({approximately}2 {mu}g cyanide/g of blood).

  8. Iron autoxidation in Mops and Hepes buffers.

    PubMed

    Tadolini, B

    1987-01-01

    Iron autoxidation in Mops and Hepes buffers is characterized by a lag phase that becomes shorter with increasing FeCl2 concentration and pH. During iron oxidation in these buffers a yellow colour develops in the solution. When the reaction is conducted in the presence of nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT), blue formazan is formed. Of the many OH scavengers tested, mannitol and sorbitol are most effective in inhibiting Fe2+ oxidation, yellow colour development and NBT reduction. Some inhibition was also noted with catalase. The iron product of the oxidative reaction differs from Fe3+ in its absorption spectrum and its low reactivity with thiocyanate. Similar results are obtained when iron autoxidation is studied in unbuffered solutions brought to alkaline pH with NaOH. In phosphate buffer, no lag phase is evident and the absorption spectrum of the final solution is identical to that of Fe3+ in this buffer. The iron product reacts immediately with thiocyanate. When iron oxidation is conducted in the presence of NBT the formation of formazan is almost undetectable. Of the many compounds tested only catalase inhibits iron autoxidation in this buffer. The sequence of reactions leading to iron autoxidation in Good-type buffers thus resembles that occurring in unbuffered solutions brought to alkaline pH with NaOH and greatly differs from that occurring in phosphate buffer. These results are in agreement with the observation that these buffers have very low affinity for iron. The data presented define experimental conditions where Fe2+ is substantially stable for a considerable length of time in Mops buffer. PMID:3148493

  9. Tris buffer modulates polydopamine growth, aggregation, and paramagnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Della Vecchia, Nicola Fyodor; Luchini, Alessandra; Napolitano, Alessandra; D'Errico, Gerardino; Vitiello, Giuseppe; Szekely, Noemi; d'Ischia, Marco; Paduano, Luigi

    2014-08-19

    Despite the growing technological interest of polydopamine (dopamine melanin)-based coatings for a broad variety of applications, the factors governing particle size, shape, and electronic properties of this bioinspired multifunctional material have remained little understood. Herein, we report a detailed characterization of polydopamine growth, particle morphology, and paramagnetic properties as a function of dopamine concentration and nature of the buffer (pH 8.5). Dynamic Light Scattering data revealed an increase in the hydrodynamic radii (Rh) of melanin particles with increasing dopamine concentration in all buffers examined, especially in phosphate buffer. Conversely, a marked inhibition of particle growth was apparent in Tris buffer, with Rh remaining as low as <100 nm during polymerization of 0.5 mM dopamine. Small angle neutron scattering data suggested formation of bidimensional structures in phosphate or bicarbonate buffers, while apparently three-dimensional fractal objects prevailed in Tris buffer. Finally, electron paramagnetic resonance spectra revealed a broader signal amplitude with a peculiar power saturation decay profile for polydopamine samples prepared in Tris buffer, denoting more homogeneous paramagnetic centers with respect to similar samples obtained in phosphate and bicarbonate buffers. Overall, these results disclose Tris buffer as an efficient modulator of polydopamine buildup and properties for the rational control and fine-tuning of melanin aggregate size, morphology, and free radical behavior. PMID:25066905

  10. The Electrodeposition of Silver from Supercritical Carbon Dioxide/Acetonitrile

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Philip N; Perdjon-Abel, Magdalena; Cook, David; Reid, Gillian; Levason, William; Cheng, Fei; Zhang, Wenjian; George, Michael W; Ke, Jie; Beanland, Richard; Sloan, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry of silver coordination complexes in acetonitrile and in a single-phase supercritical carbon dioxide/acetonitrile (scCO2/CH3CN) system is reported. Five silver precursors are investigated: (1,5-cyclooctadiene)(hexafluoroacetylacetonato) silver(I) [Ag(hfac)(COD)], (hexafluoroacetylacetonato)(triphenylphosphine) silver(I) [Ag(hfac)(PPh3)], (perfluorooctanoato)bis(triphenylphosphine) silver(I) [Ag(CF3(CF2)6CO2)(PPh3)2], tetrakis(triphenylphosphine) silver(I) tetrafluoroborate [Ag(PPh3)4][BF4] and tetrakis(acetonitrile) silver(I) tetrafluoroborate [Ag(CH3CN)4][BF4]. Of these, [Ag(CH3CN)4][BF4] is found to be the most suitable for electrodeposition of silver from scCO2/CH3CN.

  11. Novel Stability-Indicating RP-HPLC Method for the Simultaneous Estimation of Clindamycin Phosphate and Adapalene along with Preservatives in Topical Gel Formulations.

    PubMed

    Modi, Prakash B; Shah, Nehal J

    2014-12-01

    A novel stability-indicating RP-HPLC method was developed for the simultaneous estimation of clindamycin phosphate (hydrophilic), adapalene (hydro-phobic), phenoxyethanol, and methylparaben in topical gel formulations. Optimum chromatographic separation among the analytes and stress-induced degradants peaks was achieved on the XBridge C18 (50 × 4.6 mm, 3.5 µm) column using a mobile phase consisting of a variable mixture of pH 2.50 ammonium hydrogen phosphate buffer, acetonitrile, and tetrahydrofuran with gradient elution. Detection was performed at 210 nm for phenoxyethanol, methylparaben, and clindamycin phosphate and 321 nm for adapalene. The method was optimized with a unique diluent selection for the extraction of clindamycin phosphate and adapalene from the gel matrix. The developed method was validated for method precision, specificity, LOD and LOQ, linearity, accuracy, robustness, and solution stability as per ICH guidelines. The proposed method can be employed for the quantification of clindamycin phosphate, adapalene, phenoxyethanol, and methylparaben in commercial topical gel formulations. PMID:26171325

  12. Novel Stability-Indicating RP-HPLC Method for the Simultaneous Estimation of Clindamycin Phosphate and Adapalene along with Preservatives in Topical Gel Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Prakash B.; Shah, Nehal J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A novel stability-indicating RP-HPLC method was developed for the simultaneous estimation of clindamycin phosphate (hydrophilic), adapalene (hydro-phobic), phenoxyethanol, and methylparaben in topical gel formulations. Optimum chromatographic separation among the analytes and stress-induced degradants peaks was achieved on the XBridge C18 (50 × 4.6 mm, 3.5 µm) column using a mobile phase consisting of a variable mixture of pH 2.50 ammonium hydrogen phosphate buffer, acetonitrile, and tetrahydrofuran with gradient elution. Detection was performed at 210 nm for phenoxyethanol, methylparaben, and clindamycin phosphate and 321 nm for adapalene. The method was optimized with a unique diluent selection for the extraction of clindamycin phosphate and adapalene from the gel matrix. The developed method was validated for method precision, specificity, LOD and LOQ, linearity, accuracy, robustness, and solution stability as per ICH guidelines. The proposed method can be employed for the quantification of clindamycin phosphate, adapalene, phenoxyethanol, and methylparaben in commercial topical gel formulations. PMID:26171325

  13. Laser synthesis and spectroscopy of acetonitrile/silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akin, S. T.; Liu, X.; Duncan, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    Silver nanoparticles with acetonitrile ligands are produced in a laser ablation flow reactor. Excimer laser ablation produces gas phase metal clusters which are thermalized with helium or argon collisions in the flowtube, and reactions with acetonitrile vapor coordinate this ligand to the particle surface. The gaseous mixture is captured in a cryogenic trap; warming produces a solution of excess ligand and coated particles. TEM images reveal particle sizes of 10-30 nm diameter. UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectra are compared to those of standard silver nanoparticles with surfactant coatings. Deep-UV ligand absorption is strongly enhanced by nanoparticle adsorption.

  14. Direct catalytic asymmetric addition of acetonitrile to N-thiophosphinoylimines.

    PubMed

    Kawato, Yuji; Kumagai, Naoya; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2013-12-11

    Direct catalytic addition of acetonitrile pronucleophiles to thiophosphinoylimines is described. Soft Lewis acid-hard Brønsted base cooperative catalysis is crucial to promote this elusive carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction in an enantioselective fashion. PMID:24158566

  15. Phosphate salts

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken by mouth or used as enemas. Indigestion. Aluminum phosphate and calcium phosphate are FDA-permitted ingredients ... Phosphate salts containing sodium, potassium, aluminum, or calcium are LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth short-term, when sodium phosphate is inserted into the ...

  16. VIRTUAL FRAME BUFFER INTERFACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    Large image processing systems use multiple frame buffers with differing architectures and vendor supplied user interfaces. This variety of architectures and interfaces creates software development, maintenance, and portability problems for application programs. The Virtual Frame Buffer Interface program makes all frame buffers appear as a generic frame buffer with a specified set of characteristics, allowing programmers to write code which will run unmodified on all supported hardware. The Virtual Frame Buffer Interface converts generic commands to actual device commands. The virtual frame buffer consists of a definition of capabilities and FORTRAN subroutines that are called by application programs. The virtual frame buffer routines may be treated as subroutines, logical functions, or integer functions by the application program. Routines are included that allocate and manage hardware resources such as frame buffers, monitors, video switches, trackballs, tablets and joysticks; access image memory planes; and perform alphanumeric font or text generation. The subroutines for the various "real" frame buffers are in separate VAX/VMS shared libraries allowing modification, correction or enhancement of the virtual interface without affecting application programs. The Virtual Frame Buffer Interface program was developed in FORTRAN 77 for a DEC VAX 11/780 or a DEC VAX 11/750 under VMS 4.X. It supports ADAGE IK3000, DEANZA IP8500, Low Resolution RAMTEK 9460, and High Resolution RAMTEK 9460 Frame Buffers. It has a central memory requirement of approximately 150K. This program was developed in 1985.

  17. Dipolar ordering and relaxations in acetonitrile-β-hydroquinone clathrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rheinstädter, M. C.; Kityk, A. V.; Klöpperpieper, A.; Knorr, K.

    2002-08-01

    Single crystals of this clathrate have been studied by measurements of the frequency and temperature dependent dielectric permittivity as well as with polarization-electric field cycles and x-ray diffraction. The dipole moments of the acetonitrile guest molecules form Ising chains that are coupled by the electric dipole-dipole interaction and that are arranged in a triangular array. At 345 K a phase transition from a partially disordered antiferroelectric to a ferrielectric arrangement is observed.

  18. Stability-Indicating HPLC Method for Simultaneous Determination of Chloramphenicol, Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate and Tetrahydrozoline Hydrochloride in Ophthalmic Solution

    PubMed Central

    AlAani, Hashem; Alnukkary, Yasmin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A simple stability-indicating RP-HPLC assay method was developed and validated for quantitative determination of Chloramphenicol, Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate and Tetrahydrozoline Hydrochloride in ophthalmic solution in the presence of 2-amino-1-(4-nitrophenyl)propane-1,3-diol, a degradation product of Chloramphenicol, and Dexamethasone, a degradation product of Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate. Methods: Effective chromatographic separation was achieved using C18 column (250 mm, 4.6 mm i.d., 5 μm) with isocratic mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile - phosphate buffer (pH 4.0; 0.05 M) (30:70, v/v) at a flow rate of 1 mL/minute. The column temperature was maintained at 40°C and the detection wavelength was 230 nm. Results: The proposed HPLC procedure was statistically validated according to the ICH guideline, and was proved to be stability-indicating by resolution of the APIs from their forced degradation products. Conclusion: The developed method is suitable for the routine analysis as well as stability studies. PMID:27123429

  19. MESOPOROUS IRON PHOSPHATE AS AN ACTIVE, SELECTIVE AND RECYCLABLE CATALYST FOR THE SYNTHESIS OF NOPOL BY PRINS CONDENSATION

    EPA Science Inventory


    Mesoporous iron phosphate is found to be a highly active and recyclable heterogeneous catalyst for the selective synthesis of nopol by Prins condensation of ?-pinene and paraformaldehyde in acetonitrile at 80 oC.



  20. Phosphate salts

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a laxative to clean the bowels before surgery or intestinal tests. Healthcare providers sometimes give potassium phosphate intravenously (by IV) for treating low phosphate and high calcium levels in the blood, and for preventing low phosphate in patients who are being tube-fed.

  1. Photophysics of Diphenylbutadiynes in Water, Acetonitrile-Water, and Acetonitrile Solvent Systems: Application to Single Component White Light Emission.

    PubMed

    Pati, Avik Kumar; Jana, Rounak; Gharpure, Santosh J; Mishra, Ashok K

    2016-07-28

    Diacetylenes have been the subject of current research because of their interesting optoelectronic properties. Herein, we report that substituted diphenylbutadiynes exhibit locally excited (LE) and excimer emissions in water and multiple emissions from the LE, excimer, and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) states in acetonitrile-water solvent systems. The LE, excimer, and ICT emissions are clearly distinguishable for a diphenylbutadiynyl derivative with push (-NMe2)-pull (-CN) substituents and those are closely overlapped for non-push-pull analogues. In neat acetonitrile, the excimer emission disappears and the LE and ICT emissions predominate. In the case of the push (-NMe2)-pull (-CN) diphenylbutadiyne, the intensity of the ICT emission increases with increasing the fluorophore concentration. This suggests that the ICT emission accompanies with intermolecular CT emission which is of exciplex type. As the LE and exciplex emissions of the push-pull diphenylbutadiyne together cover the visible region (400-700 nm) in acetonitrile, a control of the fluorophore concentration makes the relative intensities of the LE and exciplex emissions such that pure white light emission is achieved. The white light emission is not observed in those diphenylbutadiynyl analogues in which the peripheral substituents of the phenyl rings do not possess strong push-pull character. PMID:27379734

  2. Common data buffer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, F.

    1981-01-01

    Time-shared interface speeds data processing in distributed computer network. Two-level high-speed scanning approach routes information to buffer, portion of which is reserved for series of "first-in, first-out" memory stacks. Buffer address structure and memory are protected from noise or failed components by error correcting code. System is applicable to any computer or processing language.

  3. Buffer Therapy for Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Maria de Lourdes C; Silva, Ariosto S; Bailey, Kate M; Kumar, Nagi B; Sellers, Thomas A; Gatenby, Robert A; Ibrahim-Hashim, Arig; Gillies, Robert J

    2012-08-15

    Oral administration of pH buffers can reduce the development of spontaneous and experimental metastases in mice, and has been proposed in clinical trials. Effectiveness of buffer therapy is likely to be affected by diet, which could contribute or interfere with the therapeutic alkalinizing effect. Little data on food pH buffering capacity was available. This study evaluated the pH and buffering capacity of different foods to guide prospective trials and test the effect of the same buffer (lysine) at two different ionization states. Food groups were derived from the Harvard Food Frequency Questionnaire. Foods were blended and pH titrated with acid from initial pH values until 4.0 to determine "buffering score", in mmol H(+)/pH unit. A "buffering score" was derived as the mEq H(+) consumed per serving size to lower from initial to a pH 4.0, the postprandial pH of the distal duodenum. To differentiate buffering effect from any metabolic byproduct effects, we compared the effects of oral lysine buffers prepared at either pH 10.0 or 8.4, which contain 2 and 1 free base amines, respectively. The effect of these on experimental metastases formation in mice following tail vein injection of PC-3M prostate cancer cells were monitored with in vivo bioluminescence. Carbohydrates and dairy products' buffering score varied between 0.5 and 19. Fruits and vegetables showed a low to zero buffering score. The score of meats varied between 6 and 22. Wine and juices had negative scores. Among supplements, sodium bicarbonate and Tums(®) had the highest buffering capacities, with scores of 11 and 20 per serving size, respectively. The "de-buffered" lysine had a less pronounced effect of prevention of metastases compared to lysine at pH 10. This study has demonstrated the anti-cancer effects of buffer therapy and suggests foods that can contribute to or compete with this approach to manage cancer. PMID:24371544

  4. Aluminum elution and precipitation in glass vials: effect of pH and buffer species.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Toru; Miyajima, Makoto; Wakiyama, Naoki; Terada, Katsuhide

    2015-02-01

    Inorganic extractables from glass vials may cause particle formation in the drug solution. In this study, the ability of eluting Al ion from borosilicate glass vials, and tendencies of precipitation containing Al were investigated using various pHs of phosphate, citrate, acetate and histidine buffer. Through heating, all of the buffers showed that Si and Al were eluted from glass vials in ratios almost the same as the composition of borosilicate glass, and the amounts of Al and Si from various buffer solutions at pH 7 were in the following order: citrate > phosphate > acetate > histidine. In addition, during storage after heating, the Al concentration at certain pHs of phosphate and acetate buffer solution decreased, suggesting the formation of particles containing Al. In citrate buffer, Al did not decrease in spite of the high elution amount. Considering that the solubility profile of aluminum oxide and the Al eluting profile of borosilicate glass were different, it is speculated that Al ion may be forced to leach into the buffer solution according to Si elution on the surface of glass vials. When Al ions were added to the buffer solutions, phosphate, acetate and histidine buffer showed a decrease of Al concentration during storage at a neutral range of pHs, indicating the formation of particles containing Al. In conclusion, it is suggested that phosphate buffer solution has higher possibility of forming particles containing Al than other buffer solutions. PMID:24261406

  5. Buffer Therapy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Maria de Lourdes C; Silva, Ariosto S.; Bailey, Kate M.; Kumar, Nagi B.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Gatenby, Robert A.; Ibrahim-Hashim, Arig; Gillies, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Oral administration of pH buffers can reduce the development of spontaneous and experimental metastases in mice, and has been proposed in clinical trials. Effectiveness of buffer therapy is likely to be affected by diet, which could contribute or interfere with the therapeutic alkalinizing effect. Little data on food pH buffering capacity was available. This study evaluated the pH and buffering capacity of different foods to guide prospective trials and test the effect of the same buffer (lysine) at two different ionization states. Food groups were derived from the Harvard Food Frequency Questionnaire. Foods were blended and pH titrated with acid from initial pH values until 4.0 to determine “buffering score”, in mmol H+/pH unit. A “buffering score” was derived as the mEq H+ consumed per serving size to lower from initial to a pH 4.0, the postprandial pH of the distal duodenum. To differentiate buffering effect from any metabolic byproduct effects, we compared the effects of oral lysine buffers prepared at either pH 10.0 or 8.4, which contain 2 and 1 free base amines, respectively. The effect of these on experimental metastases formation in mice following tail vein injection of PC-3M prostate cancer cells were monitored with in vivo bioluminescence. Carbohydrates and dairy products’ buffering score varied between 0.5 and 19. Fruits and vegetables showed a low to zero buffering score. The score of meats varied between 6 and 22. Wine and juices had negative scores. Among supplements, sodium bicarbonate and Tums® had the highest buffering capacities, with scores of 11 and 20 per serving size, respectively. The “de-buffered” lysine had a less pronounced effect of prevention of metastases compared to lysine at pH 10. This study has demonstrated the anti-cancer effects of buffer therapy and suggests foods that can contribute to or compete with this approach to manage cancer. PMID:24371544

  6. Buffer Effects in the Solubility, Nucleation and Growth of Chicken Egg White Lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Ursula J.

    1999-01-01

    The growth of protein crystals is important for determination of their three-dimensional structure, which relates to their biochemical functions and to the practical goal of designing pharmaceuticals to modify that function. While many proteins have been successfully crystallized by a variety of methods, there is still limited understanding of the process of nucleation and growth of even the simplest proteins. Chicken egg-white lysozyme (CEWL) is readily crystallized under a variety of conditions, and studies underway at MSFC are designed to elucidate the mechanisms by which the crystals nucleate and grow. We have investigated the effect of buffer choice on the solubility, nucleation and growth of CEWL. CEWL was purified by dialysis against a .05M phosphate buffer and chromatographic separation from contaminants in a sepharose column. Solubility studies were made as a function of buffer concentration for phosphate and formate buffers, and the nucleation and growth of crystals at 10 C was studied as a function of pH for oxalate, succinate, formate, butyrate, carbonate, phosphate and acetate buffer solutions. The solubility data support the conclusion that there is a solubility minimum as a function of buffer concentration for amphiphilic molecules, while no minimum is observed for a phosphate buffer. Nucleation is suppressed at pH greater than pKa for all buffers except phosphate. The aspect ratio of the (110) faces is shown to be a function of crystal size, rather than pH.

  7. Unexpected superoxide dismutase antioxidant activity of ferric chloride in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Foti, Mario C; Ingold, K U

    2003-11-14

    The azobis(isobutyronitrile)-initiated autoxidation of gamma-terpinene in acetonitrile at 50 degrees C yields only p-cymene and hydrogen peroxide (1:1) in a chain reaction carried by the hydroperoxyl radical, HOO. (Foti, M. C.; Ingold, K. U. J. Agric. Food Chem. 2003, 51, 2758-2765). This reaction is retarded by very low (microM) concentrations of FeCl(3) and CuCl(2). The kinetics of the FeCl(3)-inhibited autoxidation are consistent with chain-termination via the following: Fe(3+) + HOO. <==>[Fe(IV)-OOH](3+) and [Fe(IV)-OOH](3+) + HOO. --> Fe(3+) + H2O2 + O2. Thus, FeCl(3) in acetonitrile can be regarded as a very effective (and very simple) superoxide dismutase. The kinetics of the CuCl(2)-inhibited autoxidation indicate that chain transfer occurs and becomes more and more important as the reaction proceeds, i.e., the inhibition is replaced by autocatalysis. These kinetics are consistent withreduction of Cu2+ to Cu+ by HOO. and then the reoxidation of Cu+ to Cu2+ by both HOO.and the H2O2 product. The latter reaction yields HO. radicals which continue the chain. PMID:14604404

  8. Conversion of Dinitrogen into Acetonitrile under Ambient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Klopsch, Isabel; Kinauer, Markus; Finger, Markus; Würtele, Christian; Schneider, Sven

    2016-04-01

    About 20% of the ammonia production is used as the chemical feedstock for nitrogen-containing chemicals. However, while synthetic nitrogen fixation at ambient conditions has had some groundbreaking contributions in recent years, progress for the direct conversion of N2 into organic products remains limited and catalytic reactions are unknown. Herein, the rhenium-mediated synthesis of acetonitrile using dinitrogen and ethyl triflate is presented. A synthetic cycle in three reaction steps with high individual isolated yields and recovery of the rhenium pincer starting complex is shown. The cycle comprises alkylation of a nitride that arises from N2 splitting and subsequent imido ligand centered oxidation to nitrile via a 1-azavinylidene (ketimido) intermediate. Different synthetic strategies for intra- and intermolecular imido ligand oxidation and associated metal reduction were evaluated that rely on simple proton, electron, and hydrogen-atom transfer steps. PMID:26948973

  9. Ultrafast vibrational energy flow in water monomers in acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahms, Fabian; Costard, Rene; Nibbering, Erik T. J.; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Vibrational relaxation of the OH stretching and bending modes of water monomers in acetonitrile is studied by two-color pump-probe experiments in a frequency range from 1400 to 3800 cm-1. Measurements with resonant infrared excitation reveal vibrational lifetimes of 6.4 ± 1.0 ps of the OH stretching modes and 4.0 ± 0.5 ps of the OH bending mode. After OH stretching excitation, the OH bending mode shows an instantaneous response, a hallmark of the anharmonic coupling of stretching and bending modes, and a delayed population buildup by relaxation of the stretching via the bending mode. The relaxation steps are discussed within the framework of current theoretical pictures of water's vibrational relaxation.

  10. Capacitance of edge plane of pyrolytic graphite in acetonitrile solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Minick, S.K.; Ishida, Takanobu.

    1991-05-01

    The capacitance of the edge plane of pyrolytic graphite electrodes, in acetonitrile solutions, is measured by recording the current response to an applied triangular voltage sweep; TVS, and then fitting the current response with an appropriate function, (via a set of adjustable parameters). The pretreatment of the electrodes, the supporting electrolyte concentration used, and the frequency of the input TVS, were all found to affect the measured capacitance. In these experiments, a background current was also seen and the shape of the current output for the TVS; the charging/discharging curve, is shown to correlate with the magnitude of this background current. In addition, the size of the background current was found to have some dependence on the type of electrode pretreatment procedure used. 60 refs., 49 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. The buffer effect in neutral electrolyte supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vindt, Steffen T.; Skou, Eivind M.

    2016-02-01

    The observation that double-layer capacitors based on neutral aqueous electrolytes can have significantly wider usable potential windows than those based on acidic or alkaline electrolytes is studied. This effect is explained by a local pH change taking place at the electrode surfaces, leading to a change in the redox potential of water in opposite directions on the two electrodes, resulting in the wider stability window. The magnitude of this effect is suggested to be dependent on the buffer capacity, rather than the intrinsic pH value of the electrolyte. This is confirmed by studying the impact of addition of a buffer to such systems. It is shown that a 56 % higher dynamic storage capacity may be achieved, simply by controlling the buffer capacity of the electrolyte. The model system used, is based on a well-known commercial activated carbon (NORIT™ A SUPRA) as the electrode material, aqueous potassium nitrate as the electrolyte and potassium phosphates as the buffer system.

  12. The SVT Hit Buffer

    SciTech Connect

    Belforte, S.; Dell`Orso, M.; Donati, S.

    1996-06-01

    The Hit Buffer is part of the Silicon Vertex Tracker, a trigger processor dedicated to the reconstruction of particle trajectories in the Silicon Vertex Detector and the Central Tracking Chamber of the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The Hit Buffer is a high speed data-traffic node, where thousands of words are received in arbitrary order and simultaneously organized in an internal structured data base, to be later promptly retrieved and delivered in response to specific requests. The Hit Buffer is capable of processing data at a rate of 25 MHz, thanks to the use of special fast devices like Cache-Tag RAMs and high performance Erasable Programmable Logic Devices from the XILINX XC7300 family.

  13. Phosphorus sorption and buffering mechanisms in suspended sediments from the Yangtze Estuary and Hangzhou Bay, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Whelan, M. J.; Wang, G. Q.; White, S. M.

    2013-05-01

    The adsorption isotherm and the mechanism of the buffering effect are important controls on phosphorus (P) behaviors in estuaries and are important for estimating phosphate concentrations in aquatic environments. In this paper, we derive phosphate adsorption isotherms in order to investigate sediment adsorption and buffering capacity for phosphorus discharged from sewage outfalls in the Yangtze Estuary and Hangzhou Bay near Shanghai, China. Experiments were also carried out at different temperatures in order to explore the buffering effects for phosphate. The results show that P sorption in sediments with low fine particle fractions was best described using exponential equations. Some P interactions between water and sediment may be caused by the precipitation of CaHPO4 from Ca2+ and HPO42- when the phosphate concentration in the liquid phase is high. Results from the buffering experiments suggest that the Zero Equilibrium Phosphate Concentrations (EPC0) vary from 0.014 mg L-1 to 0.061 mg L-1, which are consistent with measured phosphate concentrations in water samples collected at the same time as sediment sampling. Values of EPC0 and linear sorption coefficients (K) in sediments with high fine particle and organic matter contents are relatively high, which implies that they have high buffering capacity. Both EPC0 and K increase with increasing temperature, indicating a higher P buffering capacity at high temperatures.

  14. Phosphorus sorption and buffering mechanisms in suspended sediments from the Yangtze Estuary and Hangzhou Bay, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Whelan, M. J.; Wang, G.; White, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    The adsorption isotherm and the mechanism of the buffering effect are important controls on phosphorus behaviors in estuaries and are important for estimating phosphate concentrations in aquatic environments. In this paper, we derive phosphate adsorption isotherms in order to investigate sediment adsorption and buffering capacity for phosphorus discharged from sewage outfalls in the Yangtze Estuary and Hangzhou Bay near Shanghai, China. Experiments were also carried out at different temperatures in order to explore the buffering effects for phosphate. The results show that P sorption in sediments with low fine particle fractions was best described using exponential equations. Some P interactions between water and sediment may be caused by the precipitation of CaHPO4 from Ca2+ and HPO42- when the phosphate concentration in the liquid phase is high. Results from the buffering experiments suggest that the Zero Equilibrium Phosphate Concentrations (EPC0) vary from 0.014 mg l-1 to 0.061 mg l-1, which are consistent with measured phosphate concentrations in water samples collected at the same time as sediment sampling. Values of EPC0 and linear sorption coefficients (K) in sediments with high fine particle and organic matter contents are relatively high, which implies that they have high buffering capacity. Both EPC0 and K increase with increasing temperature, indicating a higher P buffering capacity at high temperatures.

  15. Bromidotris(triphenyl­phosphane)silver acetonitrile monosolvate monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Owczarzak, Anita M.; Kyros, Loukas; Hadjikakou, Sotiris K.; Kubicki, Maciej

    2011-01-01

    In the title compound, [AgBr(C18H15P)3]·C2H3N·H2O, the coordination of the Ag atom is close to ideal tetra­hedral, with the three Ag—P bond lengths almost equal [2.5441 (10), 2.5523 (9) and 2.5647 (10) ° A] and the Ag—Br bond slightly longer [2.7242 (5) Å]. The coordination tetra­hedron is slightly flattened, the Ag atom is closer to the PPP plane; the P—Ag—P angles are wider than the Br—Ag—P angles. The voids in the crystal structure are filled with ordered acetonitrile solvent mol­ecules. The remaining electron density was inter­preted as a water mol­ecule, disordered over three alternative positions. Neither of the solvent mol­ecules is connected by any directional specific inter­actions with the complex. PMID:22219758

  16. Bromidotris(triphenyl-phosphane)silver acetonitrile monosolvate monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Owczarzak, Anita M; Kyros, Loukas; Hadjikakou, Sotiris K; Kubicki, Maciej

    2011-11-01

    In the title compound, [AgBr(C(18)H(15)P)(3)]·C(2)H(3)N·H(2)O, the coordination of the Ag atom is close to ideal tetra-hedral, with the three Ag-P bond lengths almost equal [2.5441 (10), 2.5523 (9) and 2.5647 (10) ° A] and the Ag-Br bond slightly longer [2.7242 (5) Å]. The coordination tetra-hedron is slightly flattened, the Ag atom is closer to the PPP plane; the P-Ag-P angles are wider than the Br-Ag-P angles. The voids in the crystal structure are filled with ordered acetonitrile solvent mol-ecules. The remaining electron density was inter-preted as a water mol-ecule, disordered over three alternative positions. Neither of the solvent mol-ecules is connected by any directional specific inter-actions with the complex. PMID:22219758

  17. Lithium solvation in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile mixtures.

    PubMed

    Semino, Rocío; Zaldívar, Gervasio; Calvo, Ernesto J; Laria, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results pertaining to the solvation of Li(+) in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile binary mixtures. The results are potentially relevant in the design of Li-air batteries that rely on aprotic mixtures as solvent media. To analyze effects derived from differences in ionic size and charge sign, the solvation of Li(+) is compared to the ones observed for infinitely diluted K(+) and Cl(-) species, in similar solutions. At all compositions, the cations are preferentially solvated by dimethyl sulfoxide. Contrasting, the first solvation shell of Cl(-) shows a gradual modification in its composition, which varies linearly with the global concentrations of the two solvents in the mixtures. Moreover, the energetics of the solvation, described in terms of the corresponding solute-solvent coupling, presents a clear non-ideal concentration dependence. Similar nonlinear trends were found for the stabilization of different ionic species in solution, compared to the ones exhibited by their electrically neutral counterparts. These tendencies account for the characteristics of the free energy associated to the stabilization of Li(+)Cl(-), contact-ion-pairs in these solutions. Ionic transport is also analyzed. Dynamical results show concentration trends similar to those recently obtained from direct experimental measurements. PMID:25481154

  18. Lithium solvation in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Semino, Rocío; Zaldívar, Gervasio; Calvo, Ernesto J.; Laria, Daniel

    2014-12-07

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results pertaining to the solvation of Li{sup +} in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile binary mixtures. The results are potentially relevant in the design of Li-air batteries that rely on aprotic mixtures as solvent media. To analyze effects derived from differences in ionic size and charge sign, the solvation of Li{sup +} is compared to the ones observed for infinitely diluted K{sup +} and Cl{sup −} species, in similar solutions. At all compositions, the cations are preferentially solvated by dimethyl sulfoxide. Contrasting, the first solvation shell of Cl{sup −} shows a gradual modification in its composition, which varies linearly with the global concentrations of the two solvents in the mixtures. Moreover, the energetics of the solvation, described in terms of the corresponding solute-solvent coupling, presents a clear non-ideal concentration dependence. Similar nonlinear trends were found for the stabilization of different ionic species in solution, compared to the ones exhibited by their electrically neutral counterparts. These tendencies account for the characteristics of the free energy associated to the stabilization of Li{sup +}Cl{sup −}, contact-ion-pairs in these solutions. Ionic transport is also analyzed. Dynamical results show concentration trends similar to those recently obtained from direct experimental measurements.

  19. Lithium solvation in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semino, Rocío; Zaldívar, Gervasio; Calvo, Ernesto J.; Laria, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results pertaining to the solvation of Li+ in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile binary mixtures. The results are potentially relevant in the design of Li-air batteries that rely on aprotic mixtures as solvent media. To analyze effects derived from differences in ionic size and charge sign, the solvation of Li+ is compared to the ones observed for infinitely diluted K+ and Cl- species, in similar solutions. At all compositions, the cations are preferentially solvated by dimethyl sulfoxide. Contrasting, the first solvation shell of Cl- shows a gradual modification in its composition, which varies linearly with the global concentrations of the two solvents in the mixtures. Moreover, the energetics of the solvation, described in terms of the corresponding solute-solvent coupling, presents a clear non-ideal concentration dependence. Similar nonlinear trends were found for the stabilization of different ionic species in solution, compared to the ones exhibited by their electrically neutral counterparts. These tendencies account for the characteristics of the free energy associated to the stabilization of Li+Cl-, contact-ion-pairs in these solutions. Ionic transport is also analyzed. Dynamical results show concentration trends similar to those recently obtained from direct experimental measurements.

  20. A convenient pathway to Sm(II)-mediated chemistry in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Maisano, Todd; Tempest, Kevin E; Sadasivam, Dhandapani V; Flowers, Robert A

    2011-03-21

    In this communication we show that the instability of samarium diiodide (SmI(2)) in acetonitrile is a consequence of ionization of the reductant in this solvent. Samarium triflate (Sm(OTf)(2)) is exceptionally stable in acetonitrile for periods over six months and can be used with appropriate additives to initiate a ketyl-olefin coupling reaction in high yield. PMID:21321772

  1. Improved ultrastructure of marine invertebrates using non-toxic buffers

    PubMed Central

    Montanaro, Jacqueline; Gruber, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Many marine biology studies depend on field work on ships or remote sampling locations where sophisticated sample preservation techniques (e.g., high-pressure freezing) are often limited or unavailable. Our aim was to optimize the ultrastructural preservation of marine invertebrates, especially when working in the field. To achieve chemically-fixed material of the highest quality, we compared the resulting ultrastructure of gill tissue of the mussel Mytilus edulis when fixed with differently buffered EM fixatives for marine specimens (seawater, cacodylate and phosphate buffer) and a new fixative formulation with the non-toxic PHEM buffer (PIPES, HEPES, EGTA and MgCl2). All buffers were adapted for immersion fixation to form an isotonic fixative in combination with 2.5% glutaraldehyde. We showed that PHEM buffer based fixatives resulted in equal or better ultrastructure preservation when directly compared to routine standard fixatives. These results were also reproducible when extending the PHEM buffered fixative to the fixation of additional different marine invertebrate species, which also displayed excellent ultrastructural detail. We highly recommend the usage of PHEM-buffered fixation for the fixation of marine invertebrates. PMID:27069800

  2. Improved ultrastructure of marine invertebrates using non-toxic buffers.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Jacqueline; Gruber, Daniela; Leisch, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    Many marine biology studies depend on field work on ships or remote sampling locations where sophisticated sample preservation techniques (e.g., high-pressure freezing) are often limited or unavailable. Our aim was to optimize the ultrastructural preservation of marine invertebrates, especially when working in the field. To achieve chemically-fixed material of the highest quality, we compared the resulting ultrastructure of gill tissue of the mussel Mytilus edulis when fixed with differently buffered EM fixatives for marine specimens (seawater, cacodylate and phosphate buffer) and a new fixative formulation with the non-toxic PHEM buffer (PIPES, HEPES, EGTA and MgCl2). All buffers were adapted for immersion fixation to form an isotonic fixative in combination with 2.5% glutaraldehyde. We showed that PHEM buffer based fixatives resulted in equal or better ultrastructure preservation when directly compared to routine standard fixatives. These results were also reproducible when extending the PHEM buffered fixative to the fixation of additional different marine invertebrate species, which also displayed excellent ultrastructural detail. We highly recommend the usage of PHEM-buffered fixation for the fixation of marine invertebrates. PMID:27069800

  3. Electrodialytic membrane suppressors for ion chromatography make programmable buffer generators.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongjing; Srinivasan, Kannan; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2012-01-01

    The use of buffer solutions is immensely important in a great variety of disciplines. The generation of continuous pH gradients in flow systems plays an important role in the chromatographic separation of proteins, high-throughput pK(a) determinations, etc. We demonstrate here that electrodialytic membrane suppressors used in ion chromatography can be used to generate buffers. The generated pH, computed from first principles, agrees well with measured values. We demonstrate the generation of phosphate and citrate buffers using a cation-exchange membrane (CEM) -based anion suppressor and Tris and ethylenediamine buffers using an anion-exchange membrane (AEM) -based cation suppressor. Using a mixture of phosphate, citrate, and borate as the buffering ions and using a CEM suppressor, we demonstrate the generation of a highly reproducible (avg RSD 0.20%, n = 3), temporally linear (pH 3.0-11.9, r(2) > 0.9996), electrically controlled pH gradient. With butylamine and a large concentration (0.5 M) of added NaCl, we demonstrate a similar linear pH gradient of large range with a near-constant ionic strength. We believe that this approach will be of value for the generation of eluents in the separation of proteins and other biomolecules and in online process titrations. PMID:22103670

  4. First characterization of extremely halophilic 2-deoxy-D-ribose-5-phosphate aldolase.

    PubMed

    Ohshida, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Junji; Satomura, Takenori; Kawakami, Ryushi; Ohshima, Toshihisa; Sakuraba, Haruhiko

    2016-10-01

    2-Deoxy-d-ribose-5-phosphate aldolase (DERA) catalyzes the aldol reaction between two aldehydes and is thought to be a potential biocatalyst for the production of a variety of stereo-specific materials. A gene encoding DERA from the extreme halophilic archaeon, Haloarcula japonica, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The gene product was successfully purified, using procedures based on the protein's halophilicity, and characterized. The expressed enzyme was stable in a buffer containing 2 M NaCl and exhibited high thermostability, retaining more than 90% of its activity after heating at 70 °C for 10 min. The enzyme was also tolerant to high concentrations of organic solvents, such as acetonitrile and dimethylsulfoxide. Moreover, H. japonica DERA was highly resistant to a high concentration of acetaldehyde and retained about 35% of its initial activity after 5-h' exposure to 300 mM acetaldehyde at 25 °C, the conditions under which E. coli DERA is completely inactivated. The enzyme exhibited much higher activity at 25 °C than the previously characterized hyperthermophilic DERAs (Sakuraba et al., 2007). Our results suggest that the extremely halophilic DERA has high potential to serve as a biocatalyst in organic syntheses. This is the first description of the biochemical characterization of a halophilic DERA. PMID:27215670

  5. Valuation of forested buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basnyat, Prakash

    The research concentrated on two fronts: (1) defining relationships between land use complex and nitrate and sediment concentrations; and (2) developing a method for assessing the extent of potential and water quality improvements available through land management options and their associated costs. In this work, selected basins of the Fish River (Alabama) were delineated, land use/land cover types were classified, and "contributing zones" were delineated using Geographic Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) analytical tools. Water samples collected from these basins were analyzed for their nutrient contents. Based on measured nitrate and sediment concentrations in basin streams, a linkage model was developed. This linkage model relates land use/land cover with the pollution levels in the stream. The linkage model was evaluated at three different scales: (1) the basin scale; (2) the contributing zone scale; and (3) the stream buffer/riparian zone scale. The contributing zone linkage model suggests that forests act as a sink or transformation zone. Residential/urban/built-up areas were identified as the strongest contributors of nitrate in the contributing zones model and active agriculture was identified as the second largest contributor. Regression results for the "land use/land cover diversity" model (stream buffer/riparian zone scale) suggest that areas that are close (adjacent) to the stream and any disturbances in these areas will have major impacts on stream water quality. The economic model suggests the value of retiring lands from agricultural land uses to forested buffers varies from 0 to 3067 per hectare, depending on the types of crops currently grown. Along with conversion costs, this land value forms the basis for estimates of the costs of land management options for improving (or maintaining) water quality throughout the study area. The model also shows the importance of stream-side management zones, which are key to maintenance of stream

  6. Laboratory investigations of irradiated acetonitrile-containing ices on an interstellar dust analog

    SciTech Connect

    Abdulgalil, Ali G. M.; Marchione, Demian; Rosu-Finsen, Alexander; Collings, Mark P.; McCoustra, Martin R. S.

    2012-07-15

    Reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy is used to study the impact of low-energy electron irradiation of acetonitrile-containing ices, under conditions close to those in the dense star-forming regions in the interstellar medium. Both the incident electron energy and the surface coverage were varied. The experiments reveal that solid acetonitrile is desorbed from its ultrathin solid films with a cross section of the order of 10{sup -17} cm{sup 2}. Evidence is presented for a significantly larger desorption cross section for acetonitrile molecules at the water-ice interface, similar to that previously observed for the benzene-water system.

  7. Buffer Capacity: An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Steven O.; Hanania, George I. H.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a quantitative experiment designed to demonstrate buffer action and the measurement of buffer capacity. Discusses how to make acetate buffers, determine their buffer capacity, plot the capacity/pH curve, and interpret the data obtained. (TW)

  8. EVALUATION OF MUTAGENIC AND CARCINOGENIC PROPERTIES OF BROMINATED AND CHLORINATED ACETONITRILES: BY-PRODUCTS OF CHLORINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study was undertaken to determine if chlorinated and brominated acetonitriles formed during the chlorination of drinking water possess mutagenic and/or carcinogenic properties. Chloroacetonitrile (CAN), dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN), trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN), bromoc...

  9. Facilitated Diffusion of Acetonitrile Revealed by Quantitative Breath Analysis Using Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Ding, Jianhua; Gu, Haiwei; Zhang, Yan; Pan, Susu; Xu, Ning; Chen, Huanwen; Li, Hongmei

    2013-01-01

    By using silver cations (Ag+) as the ionic reagent in reactive extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS), the concentrations of acetonitrile in exhaled breath samples from the volunteers including active smokers, passive smokers, and non-smokers were quantitatively measured in vivo, without any sample pretreatment. A limit of detection (LOD) and relative standard deviation (RSD) were 0.16 ng/L and 3.5% (n = 8), respectively, for the acetonitrile signals in MS/MS experiments. Interestingly, the concentrations of acetonitrile in human breath continuously increased for 1–4 hours after the smoker finished smoking and then slowly decreased to the background level in 7 days. The experimental data of a large number of (> 165) samples indicated that the inhaled acetonitrile is excreted most likely by facilitated diffusion, instead of simple diffusion reported previously for other volatile compounds. PMID:23386969

  10. Reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride using buffered alkaline ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ya-Ting; Liang, Chenju

    2015-10-01

    Alkaline ascorbic acid (AA) was recently discovered as a novel in-situ chemical reduction (ISCR) reagent for remediating chlorinated solvents in the subsurface. For this ISCR process, the maintenance of an alkaline pH is essential. This study investigated the possibility of the reduction of carbon tetrachloride (CT) using alkaline AA solution buffered by phosphate and by NaOH. The results indicated that CT was reduced by AA, and chloroform (CF) was a major byproduct at a phosphate buffered pH of 12. However, CT was completely reduced by AA in 2M NaOH without CF formation. In the presence of iron/soil minerals, iron could be reduced by AA and Fe(2+) tends to precipitate on the mineral surface to accelerate CT degradation. A simultaneous transfer of hydrogenolysis and dichloroelimination would occur under phosphate buffered pH 12. This implies that a high alkaline environment is a crucial factor for maintaining the dominant pathway of two electron transfer from dianionic AA to dehydroascorbic acid, and to undergo dichloroelimination of CT. Moreover, threonic acid and oxalic acid were identified to be the major AA decomposition products in alkaline solutions. PMID:25912910

  11. Virtual Frame Buffer Interface Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Thomas L.

    1990-01-01

    Virtual Frame Buffer Interface program makes all frame buffers appear as generic frame buffer with specified set of characteristics, allowing programmers to write codes that run unmodified on all supported hardware. Converts generic commands to actual device commands. Consists of definition of capabilities and FORTRAN subroutines called by application programs. Developed in FORTRAN 77 for DEC VAX 11/780 or DEC VAX 11/750 computer under VMS 4.X.

  12. Combined carbon and nitrogen removal from acetonitrile using algal-bacterial bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Raul; Jacinto, Marco; Guieysse, Benoit; Mattiasson, Bo

    2005-06-01

    When compared with Chlorella vulgaris, Scenedesmus obliquus and Selenastrum capricornutum, C. sorokiniana presented the highest tolerance to acetonitrile and the highest O(2) production capacity. It also supported the fastest acetonitrile biodegradation when mixed with a suitable acetonitrile-degrading bacterial consortium. Consequently, this microalga was tested in symbiosis with the bacterial culture for the continuous biodegradation of acetonitrile at 2 g l(-1) in a stirred tank photobioreactor and in a column photobioreactor under continuous illumination (250 microE m(-2) s(-1)). Acetonitrile removal rates of up to 2.3 g l(-1) day(-1) and 1.9 g l(-1) day(-1) were achieved in the column photobioreactor and the stirred-tank photobioreactor, respectively, when operated at the shortest retention times tested (0.4 days, 0.6 days, respectively). In addition, when the stirred-tank photobioreactor was operated with a retention time of 3.5 days, the microbial culture was capable of assimilating up to 71% and nitrifying up to 12% of the NH(4) (+) theoretically released through the biodegradation of acetonitrile, thus reducing the need for subsequent nitrogen removal. This study suggests that complete removal of N-organics can be combined with a significant removal of nitrogen by using algal-bacterial systems and that further residual biomass digestion could pay-back part of the operation costs of the treatment plant. PMID:15666149

  13. Ring Buffered Network Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the research effort to demonstrate the integration of a data sharing technology, Ring Buffered Network Bus, in development by Dryden Flight Research Center, with an engine simulation application, the Java Gas Turbine Simulator, in development at the University of Toledo under a grant from the Glenn Research Center. The objective of this task was to examine the application of the RBNB technologies as a key component in the data sharing, health monitoring and system wide modeling elements of the NASA Aviation Safety Program (AVSP) [Golding, 1997]. System-wide monitoring and modeling of aircraft and air safety systems will require access to all data sources which are relative factors when monitoring or modeling the national airspace such as radar, weather, aircraft performance, engine performance, schedule and planning, airport configuration, flight operations, etc. The data sharing portion of the overall AVSP program is responsible for providing the hardware and software architecture to access and distribute data, including real-time flight operations data, among all of the AVSP elements. The integration of an engine code capable of numerically "flying" through recorded flight paths and weather data using a software tool that allows for distributed access of data to this engine code demonstrates initial steps toward building a system capable of monitoring and modeling the National Airspace.

  14. Oracle Log Buffer Queueing

    SciTech Connect

    Rivenes, A S

    2004-12-08

    The purpose of this document is to investigate Oracle database log buffer queuing and its affect on the ability to load data using a specialized data loading system. Experiments were carried out on a Linux system using an Oracle 9.2 database. Previous experiments on a Sun 4800 running Solaris had shown that 100,000 entities per minute was an achievable rate. The question was then asked, can we do this on Linux, and where are the bottlenecks? A secondary question was also lurking, how can the loading be further scaled to handle even higher throughput requirements? Testing was conducted using a Dell PowerEdge 6650 server with four CPUs and a Dell PowerVault 220s RAID array with 14 36GB drives and 128 MB of cache. Oracle Enterprise Edition 9.2.0.4 was used for the database and Red Hat Linux Advanced Server 2.1 was used for the operating system. This document will detail the maximum observed throughputs using the same test suite that was used for the Sun tests. A detailed description of the testing performed along with an analysis of bottlenecks encountered will be made. Issues related to Oracle and Linux will also be detailed and some recommendations based on the findings.

  15. BUFFERS AND VEGETATIVE FILTER STRIPS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Buffers and filter strips are areas of permanent vegetation located within and between agricultural fields and the water courses to which they drain. These buffers are intended to intercept and slow runoff thereby providing water quality benefits. In addition, in many settings they are intended to...

  16. Interaction of acetonitrile with the surfaces of amorphous and crystalline ice

    SciTech Connect

    Schaff, J.E.; Roberts, J.T.

    1999-10-12

    The adsorption of acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN) on ultrathin films of ice under ultrahigh vacuum was investigated with temperature-programmed desorption ass spectrometry (TPD) and Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FTIRAS). Two types of film were studied, amorphous and crystalline. On the amorphous films, two sates of adsorbed acetonitrile were observed by TPD and FTIRAS. One of the states is attributed to acetonitrile that is hydrogen bonded to agree OH group at the ice surface; the other state is assigned to acetonitrile that is purely physiorbed. Evidence for the hydrogen-bonded state is two-fold. First, there is a large kinetic isotope effect for desorption from H{sub 2}O-and D{sub 2}O-ice: the desorption temperatures from ice-h{sub 2} and ice-d{sub 2} are {approximately}161 and {approximately}176 K, respectively. Second, the C{triple{underscore}bond}N stretching frequency (2,265 cm{sup {minus}1}) is 16 cm{sup {minus}1} is greater than that of physisorbed acetonitrile, and it is roughly equal to that of acetonitrile which is hydrogen bonded to an OH group at the air-liquid water interface. On the crystalline films, there is no evidence for a hydrogen-bonded state in the TPD spectra. The FTIRAS spectra do show that some hydrogen-bonded acetonitrile is present but at a maximum coverage that is roughly one-sixth of that on the amorphous surface. The difference between the amorphous and crystalline surfaces cannot be attributed to a difference n surface areas. Rather, this work provides additional evidence that the surface chemical properties of amorphous ice are different from those of crystalline ice.

  17. Aqueous Two-Phase Systems formed by Biocompatible and Biodegradable Polysaccharides and Acetonitrile

    PubMed Central

    de Brito Cardoso, Gustavo; Souza, Isabela Nascimento; Pereira, Matheus M.; Freire, Mara G.; Soares, Cleide Mara Faria; Lima, Álvaro Silva

    2015-01-01

    In this work, it is shown that novel aqueous two-phase systems can be formed by the combination of acetonitrile and polysaccharides, namely dextran. Several ternary phase diagrams were determined at 25 °C for the systems composed of water + acetonitrile + dextran. The effect of the dextran molecular weight (6,000, 40,000 and 100,000 g.mol−1) was ascertained toward their ability to undergo liquid-liquid demixing. An increase in the dextran molecular weight favors the phase separation. Furthermore, the effect of temperature (25, 35 and 45 °C) was evaluated for the system constituted by the dextran of higher molecular weight. Lower temperatures are favorable for phase separation since lower amounts of dextran and acetonitrile are required for the creation of aqueous two-phase systems. In general, acetonitrile is enriched in the top phase while dextran is majorly concentrated in the bottom phase. The applicability of this new type of two-phase systems as liquid-liquid extraction approaches was also evaluated by the study of the partition behavior of a well-known antioxidant – vanillin - and used here as a model biomolecule. The optimized conditions led to an extraction efficiency of vanillin of 95% at the acetonitrile-rich phase. PMID:25729320

  18. Acetone as a greener alternative to acetonitrile in liquid chromatographic fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Funari, Cristiano Soleo; Carneiro, Renato Lajarim; Khandagale, Manish M; Cavalheiro, Alberto José; Hilder, Emily F

    2015-05-01

    A considerable amount of chemical waste from liquid chromatography analysis is generated worldwide. Acetonitrile is the most employed solvent in liquid chromatography analyses since it exhibits favorable physicochemical properties for separation and detection, but it is an unwelcome solvent from an environmental point of view. Acetone might be a much greener alternative to replace acetonitrile in reversed-phase liquid chromatography, since both share similar physicochemical properties, but its applicability with ultraviolet absorbance-based detectors is limited. In this work, a reference method using acetonitrile and high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to an ultraviolet photodiode array detector coupled to a corona charged aerosol detector system was developed to fingerprint a complex sample. The possibility of effectively substituting acetonitrile with acetone was investigated. Design of experiments was adopted to maximize the number of peaks acquired in both fingerprint developments. The methods with acetonitrile or acetone were successfully optimized and proved to be statistically similar when only the number of peaks or peak capacity was taken into consideration. However, the superiority of the latter was evidenced when parameters of separation and those related to greenness were heuristically combined. A green, comprehensive, time- and resource-saving approach is presented here, which is generic and applicable to other complex matrices. Furthermore, it is in line with environmental legislation and analytical trends. PMID:25708832

  19. [Effect of Acetonitrile and n-hexane on the Immunoassay of Environmental Representative Pollutants].

    PubMed

    Lou, Xue-ning; Zhou, Li-ping; Song, Dan; Yang, Rong; Long, Feng

    2016-01-15

    Based on indirect competitive immunoassay mechanism, bisphenol A (BPA) was detected by the evanescent wave all-fiber immunosensor previously developed with the detection limit of 0.2 microg x L(-1) and the linear detection range of 0.3-33.4 microg x L(-1). The effects of two commonly used organic solvents, including acetonitrile and n-hexane, on the immunosensing assay of BPA were investigated. The influence mechanism of organic solvents on immunosensing assay was discussed. The experimental results showed that the effect of n-hexane on immunosensing assay was negligible even at a high concentration of up to 10%, whereas the effect of acetonitrile on the immunosensing assay was relatively great. BPA could be detected in solutions containing a low concentration of acetonitrile. However, the specific binding reaction between antibody and antigen in homogeneous solution was completely inhibited by high concentrations of acetonitrile, and the quantitative analysis of BPA was not achieved. This might result from the changes of antibody conformation or binding capability between antibody and antigen because acetonitrile replaced a part of the water molecules on the antibody surface. PMID:27078982

  20. Characterization of acetonitrile-tolerant marine bacterium Exiguobacterium sp. SBH81 and its tolerance mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kongpol, Ajiraporn; Kato, Junichi; Tajima, Takahisa; Vangnai, Alisa S

    2012-01-01

    A Gram-positive marine bacterium, Exiguobacterium sp. SBH81, was isolated as a hydrophilic organic-solvent tolerant bacterium, and exhibited high tolerance to various types of toxic hydrophilic organic solvents, including acetonitrile, at relatively high concentrations (up to 6% [v/v]) under the growing conditions. Investigation of its tolerance mechanisms illustrated that it does not rely on solvent inactivation processes or modification of cell surface characteristics, but rather, increase of the cell size lowers solvent partitioning into cells and the extrusion of solvents through the efflux system. A test using efflux pump inhibitors suggested that secondary transporters, i.e. resistance nodulation cell division (RND) and the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family, are involved in acetonitrile tolerance in this strain. In addition, its acetonitrile tolerance ability could be stably and significantly enhanced by repetitive growth in the presence of toxic acetonitrile. The marked acetonitrile tolerance of Exiguobacterium sp. SBH81 indicates its potential use as a host for biotechnological fermentation processes as well as bioremediation. PMID:21971080

  1. Electrodialysis operation with buffer solution

    DOEpatents

    Hryn, John N.; Daniels, Edward J.; Krumdick, Greg K.

    2009-12-15

    A new method for improving the efficiency of electrodialysis (ED) cells and stacks, in particular those used in chemical synthesis. The process entails adding a buffer solution to the stack for subsequent depletion in the stack during electrolysis. The buffer solution is regenerated continuously after depletion. This buffer process serves to control the hydrogen ion or hydroxide ion concentration so as to protect the active sites of electrodialysis membranes. The process enables electrodialysis processing options for products that are sensitive to pH changes.

  2. Buffering agents modify the hydration landscape at charged interfaces.

    PubMed

    Trewby, William; Livesey, Duncan; Voïtchovsky, Kislon

    2016-02-23

    Buffering agents are widely used to stabilise the pH of solutions in soft matter and biological sciences. They are typically composed of weak acids and bases mixed in an aqueous solution, and can interact electrostatically with charged surfaces such as biomembranes. Buffers can induce protein aggregation and structural modification of soft interfaces, but a molecular-level picture is still lacking. Here we use high-resolution atomic force microscopy to investigate the effect of five commonly used buffers, namely 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES), 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES), monosodium phosphate, saline sodium citrate (SSC) and tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) on the hydration landscape of Muscovite mica in solution. Mica is an ideal model substrate due to its negative surface charge and identical lattice parameter when compared with gel-phase lipid bilayers. We show that buffer molecules can produce cohesive aggregates spanning over tens of nanometres of the interface. SSC, Tris and monosodium phosphate tend to create an amorphous mesh layer several molecules thick and with no preferential ordering. In contrast, MES and HEPES adopt epitaxial arrangements commensurate with the underlying mica lattice, suggesting that they offer the most suitable solution for high-resolution studies. To confirm that this effect persisted in biologically-relevant interfaces, the experiments were repeated on a silica-supported lipid bilayer. Similar trends were observed for this system using atomic force microscopy as well as ellipsometry. The effect of the buffering agents can be mitigated by the inclusion of salt which helps displace them from the interface. PMID:26837938

  3. Diagnosis and misdiagnosis of poisoning with the cyanide precursor acetonitrile: nail polish remover or nail glue remover?

    PubMed

    Rainey, P M; Roberts, W L

    1993-03-01

    Accurate diagnosis of acetonitrile ingestion is critical to management. Often this involves differentiating nail polish remover (acetone) from nail glue remover (acetonitrile). Initial symptoms of acetonitrile ingestion are indistinguishable from those of acetone and common alcohols. However, acetonitrile is metabolized to cyanide, producing severe delayed toxicity. Acetonitrile produced increased serum osmolality and osmolal gap, but these findings are non-specific and normal values cannot rule out potentially fatal exposure. Acetone, but not acetonitrile, was detectable in urine or serum with Acetest tablets; both were unreactive with a ketone dipstick. Acetone and acetonitrile could be detected with routine gas chromatography methods for alcohols. Both substances had identical retention times on the widely used stationary phase, 5% Carbowax 20M on graphitized carbon, and with GasChrom 254. Three other systems afforded unique retention times, but acetonitrile was easily mistaken for ethanol in two. Physicians and laboratories must take care to avoid misdiagnosis of acetonitrile ingestion as exposure to acetone, ethanol or another alcohol. PMID:8476448

  4. Buffer Gas Acquisition and Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F.; Lueck, Dale E.; Jennings, Paul A.; Callahan, Richard A.; Delgado, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The acquisition and storage of buffer gases (primarily argon and nitrogen) from the Mars atmosphere provides a valuable resource for blanketing and pressurizing fuel tanks and as a buffer gas for breathing air for manned missions. During the acquisition of carbon dioxide (CO2), whether by sorption bed or cryo-freezer, the accompanying buffer gases build up in the carbon dioxide acquisition system, reduce the flow of CO2 to the bed, and lower system efficiency. It is this build up of buffer gases that provide a convenient source, which must be removed, for efficient capture Of CO2 Removal of this buffer gas barrier greatly improves the charging rate of the CO2 acquisition bed and, thereby, maintains the fuel production rates required for a successful mission. Consequently, the acquisition, purification, and storage of these buffer gases are important goals of ISRU plans. Purity of the buffer gases is a concern e.g., if the CO, freezer operates at 140 K, the composition of the inert gas would be approximately 21 percent CO2, 50 percent nitrogen, and 29 percent argon. Although there are several approaches that could be used, this effort focused on a hollow-fiber membrane (HFM) separation method. This study measured the permeation rates of CO2, nitrogen (ND, and argon (Ar) through a multiple-membrane system and the individual membranes from room temperature to 193K and 10 kpa to 300 kPa. Concentrations were measured with a gas chromatograph that used a thermoconductivity (TCD) detector with helium (He) as the carrier gas. The general trend as the temperature was lowered was for the membranes to become more selective, In addition, the relative permeation rates between the three gases changed with temperature. The end result was to provide design parameters that could be used to separate CO2 from N2 and Ar.

  5. Free flow cell electrophoresis using zwitterionic buffer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodkey, R. Scott

    1990-01-01

    Studies of a zwitterionic buffer formulated for cell electrophoresis were done using the McDonnell-Douglas Continuous Flow Electrophoresis System. Standard buffers were analyzed for their stability in the electrical field and the results showed that both buffers tested were inherently unstable. Further, titration studies showed that the standards buffers buffered poorly at the pH employed for electrophoresis. The zwitterionic buffer buffered well at its nominal pH and was shown to be stable in the electrical field. Comparative studies of the buffer with standard cell separation buffers using formalin fixed rabbit and goose red blood cells showed that the zwitterionic buffer gave better resolution of the fixed cells. Studies with viable hybridoma cells showed that buffer Q supported cell viability equal to Hank's Balanced Salt Solution and that hybridoma cells in different stages of the growth cycle demonstrated reproducible differences in electrophoretic mobility.

  6. DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF HALOGENATED ACETONITRILES: DRINKING WATER BY-PRODUCTS OF CHLORINE DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The developmental toxicity of acetonitrile and five halogenated derivatives was examined with an in vivo teratology screen adapted for use in the Long Evans rat. The screen was extended to an evaluation of growth till postnatal days 41-42, and weight of several organs at sacrific...

  7. Phosphate Ions Affect the Water Structure at Functionalized Membrane Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Aliyah; Imbrogno, Joseph; Belfort, Georges; Petersen, Poul B

    2016-09-01

    Antifouling surfaces improve function, efficiency, and safety in products such as water filtration membranes, marine vehicle coatings, and medical implants by resisting protein and biofilm adhesion. Understanding the role of water structure at these materials in preventing protein adhesion and biofilm formation is critical to designing more effective coatings. Such fouling experiments are typically performed under biological conditions using isotonic aqueous buffers. Previous studies have explored the structure of pure water at a few different antifouling surfaces, but the effect of electrolytes and ionic strength (I) on the water structure at antifouling surfaces is not well studied. Here sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy is used to characterize the interfacial water structure at poly(ether sulfone) (PES) and two surface-modified PES films in contact with 0.01 M phosphate buffer with high and low salt (Ionic strength, I= 0.166 and 0.025 M, respectively). Unmodified PES, commonly used as a filtration membrane, and modified PES with a hydrophobic alkane (C18) and with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) were used. In the low ionic strength phosphate buffer, water was strongly ordered near the surface of the PEG-modified PES film due to exclusion of phosphate ions and the creation of a surface potential resulting from charge separation between phosphate anions and sodium cations. However, in the high ionic strength phosphate buffer, the sodium and potassium chloride (138 and 3 mM, respectively) in the phosphate buffered saline screened this charge and substantially reduced water ordering. A much smaller water ordering and subsequent reduction upon salt addition was observed for the C18-modified PES, and little water structure change was seen for the unmodified PES. The large difference in water structuring with increasing ionic strength between widely used phosphate buffer and phosphate buffered saline at the PEG interface demonstrates the importance of studying

  8. Why a diaminopyrrolic tripodal receptor binds mannosides in acetonitrile but not in water?

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Viçosa, Diogo; Francesconi, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Summary Intermolecular interactions involving carbohydrates and their natural receptors play important roles in several biological processes. The development of synthetic receptors is very useful to study these recognition processes. Recently, it was synthetized a diaminopyrrolic tripodal receptor that is selective for mannosides, which are obtained from mannose, a sugar with significant relevance in living systems. However, this receptor is significantly more active in acetonitrile than in water. In this work, we performed several molecular dynamics and constant-pH molecular dynamics simulations in acetonitrile and water to evaluate the conformational space of the receptor and to understand the molecular detail of the receptor–mannoside interaction. The protonation states sampled by the receptor show that the positive charges are always as distant as possible in order to avoid large intramolecular repulsions. Moreover, the conformational space of the receptor is very similar in water above pH 4.0 and in acetonitrile. From the simulations with the mannoside, we observe that the interactions are more specific in acetonitrile (mainly hydrogen bonds) than in water (mainly hydrophobic). Our results suggest that the readiness of the receptor to bind mannoside is not significantly affected in water (above pH 4.0). Probably, the hydrogen bond network that is formed in acetonitrile (which is weaker in water) is the main reason for the higher activity in this solvent. This work also presents a new implementation of the stochastic titration constant-pH molecular dynamics method to a synthetic receptor of sugars and attests its ability to describe the protonation/conformation coupling in these molecules. PMID:25161708

  9. Palladium-catalyzed oxidative arylalkylation of activated alkenes: dual C-H bond cleavage of an arene and acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Mu, Xin; Liu, Guosheng

    2011-12-23

    Not one but two: The title reaction proceeds through the dual C-H bond cleavage of both aniline and acetonitrile. The reaction affords a variety of cyano-bearing indolinones in excellent yield. Mechanistic studies demonstrate that this reaction involves a fast arylation of the olefin and a rate-determining C-H activation of the acetonitrile. PMID:22076660

  10. Microbial solubilization of phosphate

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, R.D.; Wolfram, J.H.

    1993-10-26

    A process is provided for solubilizing phosphate from phosphate containing ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of phosphate ore, microorganisms operable for solubilizing phosphate from the phosphate ore and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the microbial solubilization process. An aqueous solution containing soluble phosphorus can be separated from the reacted mixture by precipitation, solvent extraction, selective membrane, exchange resin or gravity methods to recover phosphate from the aqueous solution. 6 figures.

  11. Microbial solubilization of phosphate

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Robert D.; Wolfram, James H.

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for solubilizing phosphate from phosphate containing ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of phosphate ore, microorganisms operable for solubilizing phosphate from the phosphate ore and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the microbial solubilization process. An aqueous solution containing soluble phosphorous can be separated from the reacted mixture by precipitation, solvent extraction, selective membrane, exchange resin or gravity methods to recover phosphate from the aqueous solution.

  12. Proteins contribute insignificantly to the intrinsic buffering capacity of yeast cytoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Poznanski, Jaroslaw; Szczesny, Pawel; Ruszczynska, Katarzyna; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Paczek, Leszek

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We predicted buffering capacity of yeast proteome from protein abundance data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We measured total buffering capacity of yeast cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed that proteins contribute insignificantly to buffering capacity. -- Abstract: Intracellular pH is maintained by a combination of the passive buffering of cytoplasmic dissociable compounds and several active systems. Over the years, a large portion of and possibly most of the cell's intrinsic (i.e., passive non-bicarbonate) buffering effect was attributed to proteins, both in higher organisms and in yeast. This attribution was not surprising, given that the concentration of proteins with multiple protonable/deprotonable groups in the cell exceeds the concentration of free protons by a few orders of magnitude. Using data from both high-throughput experiments and in vitro laboratory experiments, we tested this concept. We assessed the buffering capacity of the yeast proteome using protein abundance data and compared it to our own titration of yeast cytoplasm. We showed that the protein contribution is less than 1% of the total intracellular buffering capacity. As confirmed with NMR measurements, inorganic phosphates play a crucial role in the process. These findings also shed a new light on the role of proteomes in maintaining intracellular pH. The contribution of proteins to the intrinsic buffering capacity is negligible, and proteins might act only as a recipient of signals for changes in pH.

  13. Buffering in cyclic gene networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyzin, S. D.; Kolesov, A. Yu.; Rozov, N. Kh.

    2016-06-01

    We consider cyclic chains of unidirectionally coupled delay differential-difference equations that are mathematical models of artificial oscillating gene networks. We establish that the buffering phenomenon is realized in these system for an appropriate choice of the parameters: any given finite number of stable periodic motions of a special type, the so-called traveling waves, coexist.

  14. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003671.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a type of ...

  15. Chloroquine Phosphate Oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... allergic to chloroquine phosphate, chloroquine hydrochloride (Aralen HCl), hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil), or any other drugs.tell your doctor ... taking chloroquine phosphate, chloroquine hydrochloride (Aralen HCl), or hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil).tell your doctor if you are pregnant ...

  16. Chloroquine Phosphate Oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... allergic to chloroquine phosphate, chloroquine hydrochloride (Aralen HCl), hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil), or any other drugs.tell your doctor and ... taking chloroquine phosphate, chloroquine hydrochloride (Aralen HCl), or hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil).tell your doctor if you are pregnant ...

  17. Uranium from phosphate ores

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    The following topics are described briefly: the way phosphate fertilizers are made; how uranium is recovered in the phosphate industry; and how to detect covert uranium recovery operations in a phsophate plant.

  18. Electrosynthesis and characterization of oligophenylene deriving from 4-(methoxyphenyl)acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amor, Sarra Ben; Said, Ayoub Haj; Chemek, Mourad; Ayachi, Sahbi; Massuyeau, Florian; Wéry, Jany; Alimi, Kamel; Roudesli, Sadok

    2013-01-01

    An oligophenylene deriving from the 4-(methoxyphenyl)acetonitrile (MPA), was electrosynthesized by direct anodic oxidation at a constant potential in acetonitrile on a platinium electrode. This oligomer (OMPA) showed a good solubility in common organic solvents. The results of osmometry and gel permeation chromatography analyzes indicated that the average chain length for OMPA was about 5 units. Its chemical structure was elucidated by 1H and 13C NMR, FTIR and UV spectroscopy. A thermal study carried out by thermogravimetric analysis and Differential Scanning Calorimetry showed that the oligomer was stable up to 268 °C. In addition, the photoluminescent properties of OMPA were investigated. In solution, an emission was recorded in the indigo-blue region, however, in solid state this emission was shifted to the orange-red zone. Finally a mechanism for the electro-oligomerization was evoked in the light of the electronic structures of the MPA and its radical cation obtained by DFT calculation.

  19. Copper(I) halide adducts with acetonitrile: an infrared and Raman investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarembowitch, J.; Maleki, R.

    Infrared (4000-200 cm -1) and Raman (4000-15 cm -1) spectra are reported for polycrystalline samples of aN . CuCl and aN . CuBr (aN = acetonitrile). Comparison with the spectral data obtained for liquid acetonitrile leads to a thorough assignment of the bands. The frequency shifts of the stretching modes νCN, νCCN and νCH upon coordination is discussed. The loosening observed for the CH bonds and the fact that the νCN frequency increases only slightly (20 cm -1) upon coordination are accounted for by the existence of a significant π back-bonding from copper(I) to nitrogen. The stretching fundamentals νCuN and νCuX can be identified unambiguously.

  20. Copper-mediated direct C2-cyanation of indoles using acetonitrile as the cyanide source.

    PubMed

    Pan, Changduo; Jin, Hongming; Xu, Pan; Liu, Xu; Cheng, Yixiang; Zhu, Chengjian

    2013-09-20

    A copper-mediated C2-cyanation of indoles using cheap and commercially available acetonitrile as the "nonmetallic" cyanide source was achieved through sequential C-C and C-H bond cleavages. The installation of a removable pyrimidyl group on the indole nitrogen atom is the key for this C2 selectivity. This approach provides a novel and alternative route leading to indole-2-carbonitrile. PMID:23957858

  1. Photochemistry of rose bengal in water and acetonitrile: a comprehensive kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Ludvíková, Lucie; Friš, Pavel; Heger, Dominik; Šebej, Peter; Wirz, Jakob; Klán, Petr

    2016-06-28

    The photophysical and photochemical properties of rose bengal (RB) in degassed aqueous and acetonitrile solutions were studied using steady-state and transient absorption spectroscopies. This comprehensive investigation provides detailed information about the kinetics and the optical properties of all intermediates involved: the triplet excited state and the oxidized and reduced forms of RB. A full kinetic description is used to control the concentrations of these intermediates by changing the initial experimental conditions. PMID:27253480

  2. Critical evaluation of buffering solutions for pKa determination by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Fuguet, Elisabet; Reta, Mario; Gibert, Carme; Rosés, Martí; Bosch, Elisabeth; Ràfols, Clara

    2008-07-01

    The performance of the most common and also some other less common CE buffers has been tested for the pKa determination of several types of compounds (pyridine, amines, and phenols). The selected buffers cover a pH ranging from 3.7 to 11.8. Whereas some buffers, like acetic acid/acetate, BisTrisH+/BisTris, TrisH+/Tris, CHES/CHES-, and CAPS/CAPS- can be used with all type of analytes, others like ammonium/ammonia, butylammonium/butylammonia, ethylammonium/ethylammonia, diethylammonium/diethylammonia, and hydrogenphosphate/phosphate are not recommended because they interact with a wide range of compounds. The rest of the tested buffers (dihydrogenphosphate/hydrogenphosphate, MES/MES-, HEPES/HEPES-, and boric acid/borate) can show specific interactions depending on the nature of the analytes, and their use in some applications should be restricted. PMID:18546174

  3. In vitro dissolution of proton-pump inhibitor products intended for paediatric and geriatric use in physiological bicarbonate buffer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Shokrollahi, Honaz

    2015-05-15

    Proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) products based on enteric coated multiparticulates are design to meet the needs of patients who cannot swallow tablets such as children and older adults. Enteric coated PPI preparations exhibit delays in in vivo absorption and onset of antisecretory effects, which is not reflected by the rapid in vitro dissolution in compendial pH 6.8 phosphate buffer commonly used for assessment of these products. A more representative and physiological medium, pH 6.8 mHanks bicarbonate buffer, was used in this study to evaluate the in vitro dissolution of enteric coated multiparticulate-based PPI products. Commercially available omeprazole, lansoprazole and esomeprazole products were subject to dissolution tests using USP-II apparatus in pH 4.5 phosphate buffer saline for 45 min (acid stage) followed by pH 6.8 phosphate buffer or pH 6.8 mHanks bicarbonate buffer. In pH 6.8 phosphate buffer, all nine tested products displayed rapid and comparable dissolution profiles meeting the pharmacopeia requirements for delayed release preparations. In pH 6.8 mHanks buffer, drug release was delayed and failed the pharmacopeia requirements from most enteric coated preparations. Despite that the same enteric polymer, methacrylic acid-ethyl acrylate copolymer (1:1), was applied to all commercial multiparticulate-based products, marked differences were observed between dissolution profiles of these preparations. The use of pH 6.8 physiological bicarbonate (mHanks) buffer can serve as a useful tool to provide realistic and discriminative in vitro release assessment of enteric coated PPI preparations and to assist rational formulation development of these products. PMID:25746736

  4. Comparison of methanol and acetonitrile eluents for the quantitation of chelators specific to soft-metal ions by HPLC.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shinya; Yoshimura, Etsuro

    2012-11-15

    HPLC eluent systems employing acetonitrile and methanol were evaluated for the quantitation of glutathione (GSH) and phytochelatin (PC(n)), a family of peptides implicated in heavy-metal detoxification in higher plants. The detection system is based on the dequenching of copper(I)-bathocuproine disulfonate and is specific for soft-metal chelators. Although both elution systems yielded comparable analytical performance for each PC(n), the acetonitrile system had a lower sensitivity for GSH and a steadily increasing baseline. The inferior properties of the acetonitrile system may be due to complex formation between acetonitrile and Cu(I) ions. Both methods were applied to measure peptide levels in the primitive red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae. Coefficients of variation (CVs) were less than 5%, except for GSH and PC(4) determinations in the acetonitrile system, in cases when CV values were found to be 8.8% and 6.3%, respectively. Recoveries were greater than 96%, except for GSH determination in the acetonitrile system, with a recovery of 84.4%; however, the concentration measured in the acetonitrile system did not differ from that measured in the methanol system at a significance level of 0.05. PMID:23153641

  5. Convenient treatment of acetonitrile-containing wastes using the tandem combination of nitrile hydratase and amidase-producing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Kohyama, Erina; Yoshimura, Akihiro; Aoshima, Daisuke; Yoshida, Toyokazu; Kawamoto, Hiroyoshi; Nagasawa, Toru

    2006-09-01

    This study aimed to construct an acetonitrile-containing waste treatment process by using nitrile-degrading microorganisms. To degrade high concentrations of acetonitrile, the microorganisms were newly acquired from soil and water samples. Although no nitrilase-producing microorganisms were found to be capable of degrading high concentrations of acetonitrile, the resting cells of Rhodococcus pyridinivorans S85-2 containing nitrile hydratase could degrade acetonitrile at concentrations as high as 6 M. In addition, an amidase-producing bacterium, Brevundimonas diminuta AM10-C-1, of which the resting cells degraded 6 M acetamide, was isolated. The combination of R. pyridinivorans S85-2 and B. diminuta AM10-C-1 was tested for the conversion of acetonitrile into acetic acid. The resting cells of B. diminuta AM10-C-1 were added after the first conversion involving R. pyridinivorans S85-2. Through this tandem process, 6 M acetonitrile was converted to acetic acid at a conversion rate of >90% in 10 h. This concise procedure will be suitable for practical use in the treatment of acetonitrile-containing wastes on-site. PMID:16402166

  6. Cell buffer with built-in test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, William E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A cell buffer with built-in testing mechanism is provided. The cell buffer provides the ability to measure voltage provided by a power cell. The testing mechanism provides the ability to test whether the cell buffer is functioning properly and thus providing an accurate voltage measurement. The testing mechanism includes a test signal-provider to provide a test signal to the cell buffer. During normal operation, the test signal is disabled and the cell buffer operates normally. During testing, the test signal is enabled and changes the output of the cell buffer in a defined way. The change in the cell buffer output can then be monitored to determine if the cell buffer is functioning correctly. Specifically, if the voltage output of the cell buffer changes in a way that corresponds to the provided test signal, then the functioning of the cell buffer is confirmed. If the voltage output of the cell buffer does not change correctly, then the cell buffer is known not to be operating correctly. Thus, the built in testing mechanism provides the ability to quickly and accurately determine if the cell buffer is operating correctly. Furthermore, the testing mechanism provides this functionality without requiring excessive device size and complexity.

  7. Laser velocimeter (autocovariance) buffer interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemmons, J. I., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A laser velocimeter (autocovariance) buffer interface (LVABI) was developed to serve as the interface between three laser velocimeter high speed burst counters and a minicomputer. A functional description is presented of the instrument and its unique features which allow the studies of flow velocity vector analysis, turbulence power spectra, and conditional sampling of other phenomena. Typical applications of the laser velocimeter using the LVABI are presented to illustrate its various capabilities.

  8. Understanding, Deriving, and Computing Buffer Capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbansky, Edward T.; Schock, Michael R.

    2000-12-01

    The concept of buffer capacity appears in varied disciplines, including bio-, geo-, analytical, and environmental chemistry, physiology, medicine, dentistry, and agriculture. Unfortunately, however, derivation and systematic calculation of buffer capacity is a topic that seems to be neglected in the undergraduate analytical chemistry curriculum. In this work, we give an account of the development of the buffer capacity concept and derive the buffer capacity contribution equations for buffer systems containing mono-, di-, and triprotic weak acids (and their conjugate bases) and aluminum(III), which undergoes hydrolysis. A brief review of pH is provided because pH is involved in applying buffer capacity to the real world. In addition, we discuss evaluation of the equations, numerical approximation of buffer capacity when an analytic solution is not derived, and the mathematical properties of the buffer capacity expressions.

  9. Effect of buffers on testing of Candida species susceptibility to flucytosine.

    PubMed Central

    MacKerrow, S D; Merry, J M; Hoeprich, P D

    1987-01-01

    Synthetic amino acid medium for fungi (SAAMF) is a totally defined, nutritionally adequate, macromolecule-free culture medium for fungi that is buffered with an organic weak acid-weak base pair: 2-(N-morpholino)-propanesulfonic acid (MOPS) and 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol (Tris). In 1984, it was reported that MOPS-Tris in SAAMF antagonized the activity of flucytosine against Candida albicans (D. L. Calhoun and J. N. Galgiani, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 26:364-367, 1984). Accordingly, we evaluated the buffering capacity of seven synthetic organic buffers and monobasic potassium phosphate, both singly and in pairs, over the pH range 7.4 to 6.0. Of these buffers, MOPS, BES [N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-2-aminomethanesulfonic acid], a BES-MOPS combination, and KH2PO4 provided the best buffering. Growth of C. albicans, in unbuffered SAAMF was equivalent overall to that in SAAMF containing buffers, singly or in pairs. Twelve strains of C. albicans and five strains of Candida lusitaniae were tested for susceptibility to flucytosine in SAAMF, with and without buffers. In the presence of Tris, the geometric mean MICs were 6.5- and 3.6-fold higher, respectively, for C. albicans and C. lusitaniae. We recommend replacing Tris with the nonantagonistic MOPS. PMID:3294891

  10. Doped LZO buffer layers for laminated conductors

    DOEpatents

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [Knoxville, TN; Schoop, Urs [Westborough, MA; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Thieme, Cornelis Leo Hans [Westborough, MA; Verebelyi, Darren T [Oxford, MA; Rupich, Martin W [Framingham, MA

    2010-03-23

    A laminated conductor includes a metallic substrate having a surface, a biaxially textured buffer layer supported by the surface of the substrate, the biaxially textured buffer layer comprising LZO and a dopant for mitigating metal diffusion through the LZO, and a biaxially textured conductor layer supported by the biaxially textured buffer layer.

  11. RESEARCH NEEDS IN RIPARIAN BUFFER RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian buffer restorations are used as management tools to produce favorable water quality impacts; moreover, the basis for riparian buffers as an instrument of water quality restoration rests on a relatively firm foundation. However, the extent to which buffers can restore rip...

  12. Immobilization of Rhodococcus rhodochrous BX2 (an acetonitrile-degrading bacterium) with biofilm-forming bacteria for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Li, Yue; Cheng, Xiaosong; Feng, Liping; Xi, Chuanwu; Zhang, Ying

    2013-03-01

    In this study, a unique biofilm consisting of three bacterial strains with high biofilm-forming capability (Bacillus subtilis E2, E3, and N4) and an acetonitrile-degrading bacterium (Rhodococcus rhodochrous BX2) was established for acetonitrile-containing wastewater treatment. The results indicated that this biofilm exhibited strong resistance to acetonitrile loading shock and displayed a typical spatial and structural heterogeneity and completely depleted the initial concentration of acetonitrile (800mgL(-1)) within 24h in a moving-bed-biofilm reactor (MBBR) after operation for 30days. The immobilization of BX2 cells in the biofilm was confirmed by PCR-DGGE. It has been demonstrated that biofilm-forming bacteria can promote the immobilization of contaminant-degrading bacteria in the biofilms and can subsequently improve the degradation of contaminants in wastewater. This approach offers a novel strategy for enhancing biological oxidation of toxic pollutants in wastewater. PMID:23376196

  13. Phosphate, inositol and polyphosphates.

    PubMed

    Livermore, Thomas M; Azevedo, Cristina; Kolozsvari, Bernadett; Wilson, Miranda S C; Saiardi, Adolfo

    2016-02-15

    Eukaryotic cells have ubiquitously utilized the myo-inositol backbone to generate a diverse array of signalling molecules. This is achieved by arranging phosphate groups around the six-carbon inositol ring. There is virtually no biological process that does not take advantage of the uniquely variable architecture of phosphorylated inositol. In inositol biology, phosphates are able to form three distinct covalent bonds: phosphoester, phosphodiester and phosphoanhydride bonds, with each providing different properties. The phosphoester bond links phosphate groups to the inositol ring, the variable arrangement of which forms the basis of the signalling capacity of the inositol phosphates. Phosphate groups can also form the structural bridge between myo-inositol and diacylglycerol through the phosphodiester bond. The resulting lipid-bound inositol phosphates, or phosphoinositides, further expand the signalling potential of this family of molecules. Finally, inositol is also notable for its ability to host more phosphates than it has carbons. These unusual organic molecules are commonly referred to as the inositol pyrophosphates (PP-IPs), due to the presence of high-energy phosphoanhydride bonds (pyro- or diphospho-). PP-IPs themselves constitute a varied family of molecules with one or more pyrophosphate moiety/ies located around the inositol. Considering the relationship between phosphate and inositol, it is no surprise that members of the inositol phosphate family also regulate cellular phosphate homoeostasis. Notably, the PP-IPs play a fundamental role in controlling the metabolism of the ancient polymeric form of phosphate, inorganic polyphosphate (polyP). Here we explore the intimate links between phosphate, inositol phosphates and polyP, speculating on the evolution of these relationships. PMID:26862212

  14. 21 CFR 520.1696a - Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent. 520.1696a Section 520.1696a Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696a Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered...

  15. 21 CFR 520.1696a - Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent. 520.1696a Section 520.1696a Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696a Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered...

  16. Strategies for the Hyperpolarization of Acetonitrile and Related Ligands by SABRE

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report on a strategy for using SABRE (signal amplification by reversible exchange) for polarizing 1H and 13C nuclei of weakly interacting ligands which possess biologically relevant and nonaromatic motifs. We first demonstrate this via the polarization of acetonitrile, using Ir(IMes)(COD)Cl as the catalyst precursor, and confirm that the route to hyperpolarization transfer is via the J-coupling network. We extend this work to the polarization of propionitrile, benzylnitrile, benzonitrile, and trans-3-hexenedinitrile in order to assess its generality. In the 1H NMR spectrum, the signal for acetonitrile is enhanced 8-fold over its thermal counterpart when [Ir(H)2(IMes)(MeCN)3]+ is the catalyst. Upon addition of pyridine or pyridine-d5, the active catalyst changes to [Ir(H)2(IMes)(py)2(MeCN)]+ and the resulting acetonitrile 1H signal enhancement increases to 20- and 60-fold, respectively. In 13C NMR studies, polarization transfers optimally to the quaternary 13C nucleus of MeCN while the methyl 13C is hardly polarized. Transfer to 13C is shown to occur first via the 1H–1H coupling between the hydrides and the methyl protons and then via either the 2J or 1J couplings to the respective 13Cs, of which the 2J route is more efficient. These experimental results are rationalized through a theoretical treatment which shows excellent agreement with experiment. In the case of MeCN, longitudinal two-spin orders between pairs of 1H nuclei in the three-spin methyl group are created. Two-spin order states, between the 1H and 13C nuclei, are also created, and their existence is confirmed for Me13CN in both the 1H and 13C NMR spectra using the Only Parahydrogen Spectroscopy protocol. PMID:25539423

  17. Acetonitrile and N-Chloroacetamide Formation from the Reaction of Acetaldehyde and Monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Susana Y; Vu, Trang Nha; Komaki, Yukako; Plewa, Michael J; Mariñas, Benito J

    2015-08-18

    Nitriles and amides are two classes of nitrogenous disinfection byproducts (DBPs) associated with chloramination that are more cytotoxic and genotoxic than regulated DBPs. Monochloramine reacts with acetaldehyde, a common ozone and free chlorine disinfection byproduct, to form 1-(chloroamino)ethanol. Equilibrium (K1) and forward and reverse rate (k1,k-1) constants for the reaction between initial reactants and 1-(chloroamino)ethanol were determined between 2 and 30 °C. Activation energies for k1 and k-1 were 3.04 and 45.2 kJ·mol(-1), respectively, and enthalpy change for K1 was -42.1 kJ·mol(-1). In parallel reactions, 1-(chloroamino)ethanol (1) slowly dehydrated (k2) to (chloroimino)ethane that further decomposed to acetonitrile and (2) was oxidized (k3) by monochloramine to produce N-chloroacetamide. Both reactions were acid/base catalyzed, and rate constants were characterized at 10, 18, and 25 °C. Modeling for drinking water distribution system conditions showed that N-chloroacetamide and acetonitrile concentrations were 5-9 times higher at pH 9.0 compared to 7.8. Furthermore, acetonitrile concentration was found to form 7-10 times higher than N-chloroacetamide under typical monochloramine and acetaldehyde concentrations. N-chloroacetamide cytotoxicity (LC50 = 1.78 × 10(-3) M) was comparable to dichloroacetamide and trichloroacetamide, but less potent than N,2-dichloroacetamide and chloroacetamide. While N-chloroacetamide was not found to be genotoxic, N,2-dichloroacetamide genotoxic potency (5.19 × 10(-3) M) was on the same order of magnitude as chloroacetamide and trichloroacetamide. PMID:26167888

  18. Tropospheric light alcohols, carbonyls, and acetonitrile: Concentrations in the southwestern United States and Henry's Law data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snider, Jefferson R.; Dawson, G. A.

    1985-04-01

    Aliphatic alcohols (C1 - C4), aldehydes (C1 - C2) and ketones (C3 - C4) have been determined at Tucson, Arizona, and at two rural sites about 40 km distant. Acetonitrile was also measured at the rural sites. The method involved condensation sampling, condensate preconcentration, and gas chromatography. Henry's law coefficients were required for all components and were determined. Mean concentrations in Tucson were higher than those in the rural areas by factors typically between 2 and 8; urban formaldehyde was only slightly elevated. Mean alcohol concentrations ranged from 7.9 ppb (C1) to 0.12 ppb (C4) within the city and from 2.6 ppb (C1) to 0.06 ppb (C4) at the rural sites. Acetone was found at 12 ppb in the city and 2.8 ppb at the rural sites. Concentrations of butanone were a factor of 5 lower. Acetaldehyde, at 23 ppb (city) and 6.9 ppb (rural), far exceeded formaldehyde concentrations (1.8 ppb in the city, and 1.5 ppb at the rural sites). Acetonitrile was found at the rural sites at a mean concentration of 60 ppt. A dimensionless Henry's law coefficient (mol L-1 of liquid/mol L-1 of vapor) was suprisingly similar for the alcohols at 0°C, ranging between 2×104 and 3.4×104 (900-1500 mol L-1 atm-1) the ketones were a factor of 10 lower. For acetaldehyde the coefficient was 1.7×103 (76 mol L-1 atm-1) and for acetonitrile 3.7×103 (165 mol L-1 atm-1). Concentrations of oxygenated organics in the condensates and in precipitation were compared; it was tentatively concluded that concentration differences of the carbonyls were consistent with these species being produced within the cloud, for example, by aqueous photochemistry.

  19. Ligand sensitized luminescence of uranyl by benzoic acid in acetonitrile medium: A new luminescent uranyl benzoate specie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Satendra; Maji, S.; Joseph, M.; Sankaran, K.

    2015-03-01

    Benzoic acid (BA) is shown to sensitize and enhance the luminescence of uranyl ion in acetonitrile medium. Luminescence spectra and especially UV-Vis spectroscopy studies reveal the formation of tri benzoate complex of uranyl i.e. [UO2(C6H5COO)3]- which is highly luminescent. In particular, three sharp bands at 431, 443, 461 nm of absorption spectra provides evidence for tri benzoate specie of uranyl in acetonitrile medium. The luminescence lifetime of uranyl in this complex is 68 μs which is much more compared to the lifetime of uncomplexed uranyl (20 μs) in acetonitrile medium. In contrary to aqueous medium where uranyl benzoate forms 1:1 and 1:2 species, spectroscopic data reveal formation of 1:3 complex in acetonitrile medium. Addition of water to acetonitrile results in decrease of luminescence intensity of this specie and the luminescence features implode at 20% (v/v) of water content. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the existence of [UO2(C6H5COO)3]- specie in acetonitrile is reported. Mechanism of luminescence enhancement is discussed.

  20. Ligand sensitized luminescence of uranyl by benzoic acid in acetonitrile medium: a new luminescent uranyl benzoate specie.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satendra; Maji, S; Joseph, M; Sankaran, K

    2015-03-01

    Benzoic acid (BA) is shown to sensitize and enhance the luminescence of uranyl ion in acetonitrile medium. Luminescence spectra and especially UV-Vis spectroscopy studies reveal the formation of tri benzoate complex of uranyl i.e. [UO2(C6H5COO)3](-) which is highly luminescent. In particular, three sharp bands at 431, 443, 461nm of absorption spectra provides evidence for tri benzoate specie of uranyl in acetonitrile medium. The luminescence lifetime of uranyl in this complex is 68μs which is much more compared to the lifetime of uncomplexed uranyl (20μs) in acetonitrile medium. In contrary to aqueous medium where uranyl benzoate forms 1:1 and 1:2 species, spectroscopic data reveal formation of 1:3 complex in acetonitrile medium. Addition of water to acetonitrile results in decrease of luminescence intensity of this specie and the luminescence features implode at 20% (v/v) of water content. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the existence of [UO2(C6H5COO)3](-) specie in acetonitrile is reported. Mechanism of luminescence enhancement is discussed. PMID:25528510

  1. Improving Water Quality With Conservation Buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowrance, R.; Dabney, S.; Schultz, R.

    2003-12-01

    Conservation buffer technologies are new approaches that need wider application. In-field buffer practices work best when used in combination with other buffer types and other conservation practices. Vegetative barriers may be used in combination with edge-of-field buffers to protect and improve their function and longevity by dispersing runoff and encouraging sediment deposition upslope of the buffer. It's important to understand how buffers can be managed to help reduce nutrient transport potential for high loading of nutrients from manure land application sites, A restored riparian wetland buffer retained or removed at least 59 percent of the nitrogen and 66 percent of the phosphorus that entered from an adjacent manure land application site. The Bear Creek National Restoration Demonstration Watershed project in Iowa has been the site of riparian forest buffers and filter strips creation; constructed wetlands to capture tile flow; stream-bank bioengineering; in-stream structures; and controlling livestock grazing. We need field studies that test various widths of buffers of different plant community compositions for their efficacy in trapping surface runoff, reducing nonpoint source pollutants in subsurface waters, and enhancing the aquatic ecosystem. Research is needed to evaluate the impact of different riparian grazing strategies on channel morphology, water quality, and the fate of livestock-associated pathogens and antibiotics. Integrating riparian buffers and other conservation buffers into these models is a key objective in future model development.

  2. Density Functional Studies on the Complexation and Spectroscopy of Uranyl Ligated with Acetonitrile and Acetone Derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Schoendorff, George E.; Windus, Theresa L.; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2009-12-12

    The coordination of nitrile (acetonitrile, propionitrile, and benzonitrile) and carbonyl (formaldehyde, ethanal, and acetone) ligands to the uranyl dication (UO22+) has been examined using density functional theory (DFT) utilizing relativistic effective core potentials (RECPs). Complexes containing up to six ligands have been modeled for all ligands except formaldehyde, for which no minimum could be found. A comparison of relative binding energies indicates that five coordinate complexes are predominant while a six coordinate complex involving propionitrile ligands might be possible. Additionally, the relative binding energy and the weakening of the uranyl bond is related to the size of the ligand and, in general, nitriles bind more strongly to uranyl than carbonyls.

  3. Elemental step thermodynamics of various analogues of indazolium alkaloids to obtaining hydride in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Lei, Nan-Ping; Fu, Yan-Hua; Zhu, Xiao-Qing

    2015-12-21

    A series of analogues of indazolium alkaloids were designed and synthesized. The thermodynamic driving forces of the 6 elemental steps for the analogues of indazolium alkaloids to obtain hydride in acetonitrile were determined using an isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC) and electrochemical methods, respectively. The effects of molecular structure and substituents on the thermodynamic driving forces of the 6 steps were examined. Meanwhile, the oxidation mechanism of NADH coenzyme by indazolium alkaloids was examined using the chemical mimic method. The result shows that the oxidation of NADH coenzyme by indazolium alkaloids in vivo takes place by one-step concerted hydride transfer mechanism. PMID:26451708

  4. Possible stabilization of the tetravalent oxidation state of berkelium and californium in acetonitrile with triphenylarsine oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, G.F.; Peterson, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    It appears that we may have prepared Bk(IV) nitrate.nTPAs0 and Bk(IV) perchlorate.nTPAs0 complexes which formed the corresponding Cf(IV) complexes through the beta decay of Bk-249. Definitive proof should come from similar experiments with quantities of Bk-249 large enough to allow spectrophotometric detection of the characteristic f..-->..f transitions in these berkelium and californium species. It is clear, however, that TPAs0 and acetonitrile can play a pivotal role in the stabilization of lanact(IV) species.

  5. Buffered Electrochemical Polishing of Niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Tian, Hui; Corcoran, Sean

    2011-03-01

    The standard preparation of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of pure niobium include the removal of a 'damaged' surface layer, by buffered chemical polishing (BCP) or electropolishing (EP), after the cavities are formed. The performance of the cavities is characterized by a sharp degradation of the quality factor when the surface magnetic field exceeds about 90 mT, a phenomenon referred to as 'Q-drop.' In cavities made of polycrystalline fine grain (ASTM 5) niobium, the Q-drop can be significantly reduced by a low-temperature (? 120 °C) 'in-situ' baking of the cavity if the chemical treatment was EP rather than BCP. As part of the effort to understand this phenomenon, we investigated the effect of introducing a polarization potential during buffered chemical polishing, creating a process which is between the standard BCP and EP. While preliminary results on the application of this process to Nb cavities have been previously reported, in this contribution we focus on the characterization of this novel electrochemical process by measuring polarization curves, etching rates, surface finish, electrochemical impedance and the effects of temperature and electrolyte composition. In particular, it is shown that the anodic potential of Nb during BCP reduces the etching rate and improves the surface finish.

  6. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.

    1997-02-18

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate {alpha}-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal. 33 figs.

  7. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1997-01-01

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

  8. Glucose buffer is suitable for blood group conversion with α-N acetylgalactosaminidase and α-galactosidase

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hong-Wei; Li, Su-Bo; Bao, Guo-Qiang; Zhang, Xue; Li, Hui; Wang, Ying-Li; Tan, Ying-Xia; Ji, Shou-Ping; Gong, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Background It is well known that the buffer plays a key role in the enzymatic reaction involved in blood group conversion. In previous study, we showed that a glycine buffer is suitable for A to O or B to O blood group conversion. In this study, we investigated the use of 5% glucose and other buffers for A to O or B to O blood group conversion by α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase or α-galactosidase. Materials and methods We compared the binding ability of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase/α-galactosidase with red blood cells (RBC) in different reaction buffers, such as normal saline, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), a disodium hydrogen phosphate-based buffer (PCS), and 5% commercial glucose solution. The doses of enzymes necessary for the A/B to O conversion in different reaction buffers were determined and compared. The enzymes’ ability to bind to RBC was evaluated by western blotting, and routine blood typing and fluorescence activated cell sorting was used to evaluate B/A to O conversion efficiency. Results The A to O conversion efficiency in glucose buffer was similar to that in glycine buffer with the same dose (>0.06 mg/mL pRBC). B to O conversion efficiency in glucose buffer was also similar to that in glycine buffer with the same dose (>0.005 mg/mL pRBC). Most enzymes could bind with RBC in glycine or glucose buffer, but few enzymes could bind with RBC in PBS, PCS, or normal saline. Conclusion These results indicate that 5% glucose solution provides a suitable condition for enzymolysis, especially for enzymes combining with RBC. Meanwhile, the conversion efficiency of A/B to O was similar in glucose buffer and glycine buffer. Moreover, 5% glucose solution has been used for years in venous transfusion, it is safe for humans and its cost is lower. Our results do, therefore, suggest that 5% glucose solution could become a novel suitable buffer for A/B to O blood group conversion. PMID:24333060

  9. Vibrational Relaxation of the Aqueous Proton in Acetonitrile: Ultrafast Cluster Cooling and Vibrational Predissociation.

    PubMed

    Ottosson, N; Liu, L; Bakker, H J

    2016-07-28

    We study the ultrafast O-H stretch vibrational relaxation dynamics of protonated water clusters embedded in a matrix of deuterated acetonitrile, using polarization-resolved mid-IR femtosecond spectroscopy. The clusters are produced by mixing triflic (trifluoromethanesulfonic) acid and H2O in molar ratios of 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3, thus varying the degree of hydration of the proton. At all hydration levels the excited O-H stretch vibration of the hydrated proton shows an ultrafast vibrational relaxation with a time constant T1 < 100 fs, leading to an ultrafast local heating of the protonated water cluster. This excess thermal energy, initially highly localized to the region of the excited proton, first re-distributes over the aqueous cluster and then dissipates into the surrounding acetonitrile matrix. For clusters with a triflic acid to H2O ratio of 1:3 these processes occur with time constants of 320 ± 20 fs and 1.4 ± 0.1 ps, respectively. The cooling of the clusters reveals a long-living, underlying transient absorption change with high anisotropy. We argue that this feature stems from the vibrational predissociation of a small fraction of the proton hydration structures, directly following the ultrafast infrared excitation. PMID:27333302

  10. Pediatric cyanide intoxication and death from an acetonitrile-containing cosmetic

    SciTech Connect

    Caravati, E.M.; Litovitz, T.L. )

    1988-12-16

    Two cases of pediatric accidental ingestion of an acetonitrile-containing cosmetic are reported. One of the children, a 16-month-old boy, was found dead in bed the morning after ingesting the product. No therapy had been undertaken, as the product was mistakenly assumed to be an acetone-containing nail polish remover. The second child, a 2-year-old boy, experienced signs of severe cyanide poisoning, but survived with vigorous supportive care. Both children had blood cyanide levels in the potentially lethal range. The observed delayed onset of severe toxic reactions supports the proposed mechanism of acetonitrile conversion to inorganic cyanide via hepatic microsomal enzymes. Physicians and poison centers should be alerted to the existence of this highly toxic product, sold for removal of sculptured nails and likely to be confused with the less toxic acetone-containing nail polish removers. The authors urge regulatory agencies to reconsider the wisdom of marketing a cosmetic that poses such an extreme health hazard.

  11. Pediatric cyanide intoxication and death from an acetonitrile-containing cosmetic.

    PubMed

    Caravati, E M; Litovitz, T L

    1988-12-16

    Two cases of pediatric accidental ingestion of an acetonitrile-containing cosmetic are reported. One of the children, a 16-month-old boy, was found dead in bed the morning after ingesting the product. No therapy had been undertaken, as the product was mistakenly assumed to be an acetone-containing nail polish remover. The second child, a 2-year-old boy, experienced signs of severe cyanide poisoning, but survived with vigorous supportive care. Both children had blood cyanide levels in the potentially lethal range. The observed delayed onset of severe toxic reactions supports the proposed mechanism of acetonitrile conversion to inorganic cyanide via hepatic microsomal enzymes. Physicians and poison centers should be alerted to the existence of this highly toxic product, sold for removal of sculptured nails and likely to be confused with the less toxic acetone-containing nail polish removers. We urge regulatory agencies to reconsider the wisdom of marketing a cosmetic that poses such an extreme health hazard. PMID:3062198

  12. A tetranuclear cadmium(II) complex based on the 2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)acetonitrile ligand.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Liang; Ye, Qiong

    2013-01-01

    The hydrothermal reaction of 2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)acetonitrile and Cd(ClO(4))(2) yielded the noncentrosymmetric coordination complex tetrakis[μ-2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)acetato]tetrakis[μ-2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)acetonitrile]tetracadmium tetrakis(perchlorate) dihydrate, [Cd(4)(C(11)H(8)NO(3))(4)(C(11)H(8)N(2)O)(4)](ClO(4))(4)·2H(2)O. The local coordination environment around the Cd(II) cation can be best described as a capped octahedron defined by two N atoms and five O atoms from three ligands. The Cd(II) cations are linked by the ligands with Cd-O-Cd and Cd-O-C-C-O-Cd bridges, forming tetranuclear units, there being two independent tertranuclear units in the structure. The fourfold rotoinversion centre sits at the centre of each Cd(4) core. The two perchlorate anions in the asymmetric unit are linked by the water molecule through O-H...O hydrogen bonds. PMID:23282905

  13. Dual β-cyclodextrin functionalized Au@SiC nanohybrids for the electrochemical determination of tadalafil in the presence of acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Yang, Long; Zhao, Hui; Li, Can-Peng; Fan, Shuangmei; Li, Bingchan

    2015-02-15

    This finding described the electrochemical detection of tadalafil based on CM-β-cyclodextrin and SH-β-cyclodextrin functionalized Au@SiC nanohybrids film. The tadalafil electrochemical signal could be dramatically amplified by introducing 40% of acetonitrile in buffer medium and further enhanced by the host-guest molecular recognition capacity of β-cyclodextrin. Uniform and monodispersed ~5.0 nm Au NPs were anchored on the SiC-NH2 surface via a chemical reduction process by using polyethylene glycol and sodium citrate as dispersant and stabilizing agent. CM-β-CD was covalently bound on Au@SiC by combining the amine group of SiC-NH2 with the carboxyl group of CM-β-CD with the aid of EDC/NHS coupling agent. SH-β-CD could tightly attach to the surface of Au@SiC by the strong coordinating capability between Au and thiol. Differential pulse voltammetry was successfully used to quantify tadalafil within the concentration range of 0.01-100 µM under optimal conditions with a detection limit (S/N = 3) of 2.5 nM. In addition, the β-CD-Au@SiC nanohybrid electrochemical sensor showed high selectivity to two other erectile dysfunction drugs sildenafil and vardenafil. The proposed electrochemical sensing platform was successfully used to determine tadalafil in raw materials, herbal sexual health products, and spiked human serum samples. PMID:25216449

  14. Inhibition of carbamoyl-phosphate synthase (ammonia) by Tris and Hepes. Effect on Ka for N-acetylglutamate.

    PubMed Central

    Lund, P; Wiggins, D

    1987-01-01

    The apparent Ka for N-acetylglutamate of rat liver carbamoyl-phosphate synthase is 11 microM in phosphate buffer, a value 10-fold lower than reported in other buffer systems. Tris and Hepes inhibit competitively with N-acetylglutamate. The proportion of carbamoyl-phosphate synthase in the active enzyme-acetylglutamate complex in vivo may be higher than previous calculations suggest, which re-opens the question of the involvement of N-acetylglutamate in the regulation of urea synthesis. PMID:3606575

  15. Melatonin: Buffering the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Vico, Antonio; Lardone, Patricia J.; Álvarez-Sánchez, Nuria; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Ana; Guerrero, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin modulates a wide range of physiological functions with pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Despite the large number of reports implicating melatonin as an immunomodulatory compound, it still remains unclear how melatonin regulates immunity. While some authors argue that melatonin is an immunostimulant, many studies have also described anti-inflammatory properties. The data reviewed in this paper support the idea of melatonin as an immune buffer, acting as a stimulant under basal or immunosuppressive conditions or as an anti-inflammatory compound in the presence of exacerbated immune responses, such as acute inflammation. The clinical relevance of the multiple functions of melatonin under different immune conditions, such as infection, autoimmunity, vaccination and immunosenescence, is also reviewed. PMID:23609496

  16. A Cyanuric Acid Platform Based Tripodal Bis-heteroleptic Ru(II) Complex of Click Generated Ligand for Selective Sensing of Phosphates via C-H···Anion Interaction.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Bijit; Dutta, Ranjan; Khatua, Snehadrinarayan; Ghosh, Pradyut

    2016-01-01

    A new bis-heteroleptic trinuclear Ru(II) complex (1[PF6]6) has been synthesized from electron deficient cyanuric acid platform based copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition, i.e., CuAAC click generated ligand, 1,3,5-tris [(2-aminoethyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)-pyridine]-1,3,5-triazinane-2,4,6-trione (L1). Complex 1[PF6]6 displays weak luminescence (ϕf = 0.002) at room temperature with a short lifetime of ∼5 ns in acetonitrile. It shows selective sensing of hydrogen pyrophosphate (HP2O7(3-)) through 20-fold enhanced emission intensity (ϕf = 0.039) with a 15 nm red shift in emission maxima even in the presence of a large excess of various competitive anions like F(-), Cl(-), AcO(-), BzO(-), NO3(-), HCO3(-), HSO4(-), HO(-), and H2PO4(-) in acetonitrile. Selective change in the decay profile as well as in the lifetime of 1[PF6]6 in the presence of HP2O7(3-) (108 ns) further supports its selectivity toward HP2O7(3-). UV-vis and photoluminescence titration profiles and corresponding Job's plot analyses suggest 1:3 host-guest stoichiometric binding between 1[PF6]6 and HP2O7(3-). High emission enhancement of 1[PF6]6 in the presence of HP2O7(3-) has resulted in the detection limit of the anion being as low as 0.02 μM. However, 1[PF6]6 shows selectivity toward higher analogues of phosphates (e.g., ATP, ADP, and AMP) over HP2O7(3-)/H2PO4(-) in 10% Tris HCl buffer (10 mM)/acetonitrile medium. Downfield shifting of the triazole C-H in a (1)H NMR titration study confirms that the binding of HP2O7(3-)/H2PO4(-) is occurring via C-H···anion interaction. The single crystal X-ray structure of complex 1 having NO3(-) counteranion, 1[NO3]6 shows binding of NO3(-) with complex 1 via C-H···NO3(-) interactions. PMID:26653882

  17. CADMIUM PHOSPHATE GLASS

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, H.W.; Johnson, P.D.

    1963-04-01

    A method of preparing a cadmium phosphate glass that comprises providing a mixture of solid inorganic compounds of cadmuim and phosphate having vaporizable components and heating the resulting composition to a temperature of at least 850 un. Concent 85% C is presented. (AEC)

  18. Buffer strips in composites at elevated temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    The composite material 'buffer strip' concept is presently investigated at elevated temperatures for the case of graphite/polyimide buffer strip panels using a (45/0/45/90)2S layup, where the buffer strip material was 0-deg S-glass/polyimide. Each panel was loaded in tension until it failed, and radiographs and crack opening displacements were recorded during the tests to determine fracture onset, fracture arrest, and the extent of damage in the buffer strip after crack arrest. At 177 + or - 3 C, the buffer strips increased the panel strength by at least 40 percent in comparison with panels without buffer strips. Compared to similar panels tested at room temperature, those tested at elevated temperature had lower residual strengths, but higher failure strains.

  19. Signature-based store checking buffer

    DOEpatents

    Sridharan, Vilas; Gurumurthi, Sudhanva

    2015-06-02

    A system and method for optimizing redundant output verification, are provided. A hardware-based store fingerprint buffer receives multiple instances of output from multiple instances of computation. The store fingerprint buffer generates a signature from the content included in the multiple instances of output. When a barrier is reached, the store fingerprint buffer uses the signature to verify the content is error-free.

  20. SODR Memory Control Buffer Control ASIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, Robert F.

    1994-01-01

    The Spacecraft Optical Disk Recorder (SODR) is a state of the art mass storage system for future NASA missions requiring high transmission rates and a large capacity storage system. This report covers the design and development of an SODR memory buffer control applications specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The memory buffer control ASIC has two primary functions: (1) buffering data to prevent loss of data during disk access times, (2) converting data formats from a high performance parallel interface format to a small computer systems interface format. Ten 144 p in, 50 MHz CMOS ASIC's were designed, fabricated and tested to implement the memory buffer control function.

  1. The interhemispheric distribution and the budget of acetonitrile in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, Stephan; Warneck, Peter

    1990-11-01

    Gas chromatography in conjunction with a thermionic nitrogen-specific detector was used to determine mixing ratios of acetonitrile in air samples collected in Europe and over the Atlantic Ocean. In the city of Mainz, values of the order of 340 pptv were observed with large variations indicating the vicinity of sources. In the rural community of Deuselbach the average mixing ratio was 147±28 pptv; over the North Sea the range was 65-196 pptv depending on wind direction, with the lowest values occurring for northerly winds from the open ocean. The distribution of CH3 CN with geographic latitude over the Atlantic Ocean was explored between 30°S and 50°N on board R/V Polarstern during the cruise ANT V/5 in March-April 1987. Over the open ocean, maximum mixing ratios were observed near 4°S with values of 175 pptv. At latitudes near 30°S the mixing ratio averaged 90.4 pptv, whereas at 30°N the average was 52.1 pptv. The lowest mixing ratios of 21 pptv were found near 50°N. The tropical maximum is attributed to the advection with the trade winds of continental air from Africa, enriched with acetonitrile from biomass burning. The mixing ratios north and south of the maximum correlate well with the surface temperature of seawater, indicating a gas-liquid equilibrium for CH3 CN dissolved in seawater. From the observations and with the further assumption that CH3 CN is vertically well mixed, its total mass content in the troposphere was estimated as 0.37-0.57 Tg. Global emission rates for various sources were estimated as follows: automobiles 0.27 Tg/year, oil-fired power stations 0.0035 Tg/year, and biomass burning 0.80 Tg/year. The total estimated source strength is 1.1±0.5 Tg/year. The tropospheric residence time of acetonitrile was calculated from these data as 0.23-0.90 year with a probable value of 0.45 year. Wet precipitation and reaction with OH radicals are known sinks for tropospheric CH3 CN, but they can take up only 30% of the global emission rate. We

  2. PHOSPHATE MANAGEMENT: FY2010 RESULTS OF PHOSPHATE PRECIPITATION TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M.; King, W.

    2011-04-04

    The Phosphate Management program seeks to develop treatment options for caustic phosphate solutions resulting from the caustic leaching of the bismuth phosphate sludge. The SRNL subtask investigated the precipitation of phosphate salts from caustic solutions through addition of fluoride and by crystallization. The scoping tests examined the: precipitation of phosphate by the addition of sodium fluoride to form the sodium fluorophosphate double salt, Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} {center_dot} 19H{sub 2}O, crystallization of phosphate by reducing the temperature of saturated phosphate solutions, and combinations of precipitation and crystallization. A simplified leachate simulant was used in the study produced by dissolving sodium phosphate in 1 M to 3.5 M sodium hydroxide solutions. The results show that all three processes; precipitation with sodium fluoride, crystallization, and combined precipitation/crystallization can be effective for removing large amounts of phosphate from solution. The combined process of precipitation/crystallization showed >90% removal of phosphate at all hydroxide concentrations when cooling a non-saturated phosphate solution from 65 C to 25 C. Based on the measured solubility of sodium phosphate, pH adjustment/caustic addition will also remove large amounts of phosphate from solution (>80%). For all three processes, the phosphate concentration in the caustic solution must be managed to keep the phosphate from becoming too concentrated and thereby potentially forming a solid mass of sodium phosphate after an effective phosphate removal process.

  3. An Analysis of the Rotational Spectrum of Acetonitrile (CH_3CN) in Excited Vibrational States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neese, Christopher F.; McMillan, James; Fortman, Sarah; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2014-06-01

    Acetonitrile (CH_3CN) is a well-known interstellar molecule whose vibrationally excited states need to be accounted for in searches for new molecules in the interstellar medium. To help catalog such `weed' molecules, we have developed a technique that involves recording complete spectra over a range of astrophysically significant temperatures. With such a data set, we can experimentally measure the line strengths and lower state energies of unassigned lines in the spectrum. In this talk we will present the ongoing analysis of complete temperature resolved spectra in the 215-265 GHz and 570-650 GHz regions. We have been able to assign many vibrationally hot lines from this data and a room temperature data set spanning 165-700 GHz. To date, we have assigned lines from most of the vibrational states below ν_6 at 1448 wn.

  4. Photon emission via surface state at the gold/acetonitrile solution interface

    SciTech Connect

    Uosaki, Kohei; Murakoshi, Kei; Kita, Hideaki )

    1991-01-24

    The emission of light caused by an electron-transfer reaction at a gold electrode in acetonitrile solution containing one of three redox species (benzophenone, trans-stilbene, and benzonitrile) with different redox potentials was studied. The high-energy threshold of the spectrum decreases linearly as the potential of the gold electrode becomes more negative. The peak position with respect to the high-energy threshold of the spectrum varies with electrode potential and is not affected by the redox potential of the electron injection species at the same electrode potential. The emission efficiency also depends on the potential. From these results, the authors proposed that the emission is due to a charge-transfer reaction inverse photoemission (CTRIP) process that takes place via a surface state.

  5. Isolation and identification of (3-methoxyphenyl)acetonitrile as a phytotoxin from meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba) seedmeal.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, S F; Boydston, R A; Mallory-Smith, C A

    1996-10-01

    Ethyl ether, ethanol, and water extracts of meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba Hartweg ex. Benth.) seedmeal were prepared and bioassayed against velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti Medicus) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L. "Cardinal"). Both the ethyl ether and ethanol fractions, but not the water extract, inhibited velvetleaf and wheat radicle elongation. Fractionation of the extracts indicated that (3-methoxyphenyl)acetonitrile (3-MPAN) was the active compound from both extracts, comprising >97% of the active ethanol fraction. 3-Methoxybenzyl isothiocyanate, which had been previously shown to be the major breakdown product of glucolimnanthin, the majorL. alba glucosinolate, was not detected in either extract. Radicle elongation of velvetleaf and wheat were inhibited by 3-MPAN with I50 (the concentration required to inhibit growth by 50%) values of approximately 4 × 10(-4) M (velvetleaf) and 7×10(-4) M (wheat). PMID:24227117

  6. The biochemical pathway for the breakdown of methyl cyanide (acetonitrile) in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Firmin, J L; Gray, D O

    1976-01-01

    [2-14C]Methyl cyanide (acetonitrile) is metabolized to citrate, succinate, fumarate, malate, glutamate, pyrrolidonecarboxylic acid and aspartate. Non-radioactive acetamide and acetate compete with 14C from methyl cyanide, and [2-14C]acetate and [2-14C]methyl cyanide are metabolized at similar rates, giving identical products. This evidence, combined with the inhibitory effect of fluoroacetate and arsenite on methyl cyanide metabolism, indicates that the pathway is: methyl cyanide leads to acetamide leads to acetate leads to tricarboxylic acid-cycle intermediates. The pathway was investigated in a species of Pseudomonas (group III; N.C.I.B. 10477), but comparison of labelling patterns suggests that it also exists in several higher plants. PMID:985423

  7. Electrolyte Solvation and Ionic Association. VI. Acetonitrile-Lithium Salt Mixtures. Highly Associated Salts Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Borodin, Oleg; Han, Sang D.; Daubert, James S.; Seo, D. M.; Yun, Sung-Hyun; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2015-01-14

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of acetonitrile (AN) mixtures with LiBF4, LiCF3SO3 and LiCF3CO2 provide extensive details about the molecular- and mesoscale-level solution interactions and thus explanations as to why these electrolytes have very different thermal phase behavior and electrochemical/physicochemical properties. The simulation results are in full accord with a previous experimental study of these (AN)n-LiX electrolytes. This computational study reveals how the structure of the anions strongly influences the ionic association tendency of the ions, the manner in which the aggregate solvates assemble in solution and the length of time in which the anions remain coordinated to the Li+ cations in the solvates which result in dramatic variations in the transport properties of the electrolytes.

  8. The response of Paracoccus sp. SKG to acetonitrile-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kirankumar, B; Guruprasad, B Kulkarni; Santoshkumar, M; Anand, S Nayak; Karegoudar, T B

    2013-11-01

    Organic solvents enhance intracellular oxidative stress and induce various physiological responses in bacteria. The study shows the morphological changes in Paracoccus sp. SKG when exposed to higher concentrations of acetonitrile, which alter the composition of the membrane fatty acid that accompanies the increase in K(+) efflux. This enhances the oxidative stress with greater activities of catalase and super oxide dismutase (SOD). The increased oxidative stress results in the generation of free radicals, which was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies. The free radical scavenging activities were measured by ABTS and DPPH to understand the non-enzymatic defensive system during oxidative stress. The studies demonstrate the increase in free radicals in association with enzymatic and non-enzymatic defense systems under solvent stress. PMID:24092001

  9. Biosynthesis of Dolichyl Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Hopp, H. Esteban; Daleo, Gustavo R.; Romero, Pedro A.; Lezica, Rafael Pont

    1978-01-01

    This is the first report not only on the presence of polyprenyl phosphates and their site of synthesis in algae, but also on the formation of their sugar derivatives in this system. A glucose acceptor lipid was isolated from the nonphotosynthetic alga Prototheca zopfii. The lipid was acidic and resistant to mild acid and alkaline treatments. The glucosylated lipid was labile to mild acid hydrolysis and resistant to phenol treatment and catalytic hydrogenation, as dolichyl phosphate glucose is. These results are consistent with the properties of an α-saturated polyprenyl phosphate. The polyprenylic nature of the lipid was confirmed by biosynthesis from radioactive mevalonate. The [14C]lipid had the same chromatographic properties as dolichyl phosphate in DEAE-cellulose and Sephadex LH-20. Strong alkaline treatment and enzymic hydrolysis liberated free alcohols with chain lengths ranging from C90 to C105, C95 and C100 being the most abundant molecular forms. The glucose acceptor activity of the biosynthesized polyprenyl phosphate was confirmed. The ability of different subcellular fractions to synthesize dolichyl phosphate was studied. Mitochondria and the Golgi apparatus were the sites of dolichyl phosphate synthesis from mevalonate. PMID:16660269

  10. Standard Reduction Potentials for Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide Couples in Acetonitrile and N,N-Dimethylformamide

    SciTech Connect

    Pegis, Michael L.; Roberts, John A.; Wasylenko, Derek J.; Mader, Elizabeth A.; Appel, Aaron M.; Mayer, James M.

    2015-12-21

    A variety of energy processes utilize the electrochemical interconversions of dioxygen and water, the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Reported here are the first estimates of the equilibrium reduction potential of the O2 + 4e– + 4H+ 2H2O couple in organic solvents. The values are +1.21 V in acetonitrile (MeCN) and +0.60 V in dimethylformamide (DMF), each versus the ferrocenium/ferrocene couple (Fc+/0) in the respective solvent (as are all the potentials reported here). The potentials have been determined using a thermochemical cycle that combines the free energy for transferring water from aqueous solution to organic solvent, -0.43 kcal mol-1 for MeCN and -1.47 kcal mol-1 for DMF, and the potential of the H+/H2 couple, –0.028 V in MeCN and –0.662 V in DMF. The H+/H2 couple in DMF has been directly measured electrochemically, using the previously reported procedure for the MeCN value. The thermochemical approach used for the O2/H2O couple can also be extended to the CO2/CO and CO2/CH4 couples to give values of -0.12 V and +0.15 V in MeCN, and -0.73 V and -0.48 V in DMF. Extensions to other reduction potentials are discussed. Additionally, the free energy for transfer of protons from water to organic solvent is roughly estimated as +14 kcal mol-1 for acetonitrile and +0.6 kcal mol-1 for dimethylformamide. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  11. Standard Reduction Potentials for Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide Couples in Acetonitrile and N,N-Dimethylformamide.

    PubMed

    Pegis, Michael L; Roberts, John A S; Wasylenko, Derek J; Mader, Elizabeth A; Appel, Aaron M; Mayer, James M

    2015-12-21

    A variety of next-generation energy processes utilize the electrochemical interconversions of dioxygen and water as the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Reported here are the first estimates of the standard reduction potential of the O2 + 4e(-) + 4H(+) ⇋ 2H2O couple in organic solvents. The values are +1.21 V in acetonitrile (MeCN) and +0.60 V in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), each versus the ferrocenium/ferrocene couple (Fc(+/0)) in the respective solvent (as are all of the potentials reported here). The potentials have been determined using a thermochemical cycle that combines the free energy for transferring water from aqueous solution to organic solvent, -0.43 kcal mol(-1) for MeCN and -1.47 kcal mol(-1) for DMF, and the potential of the H(+)/H2 couple, - 0.028 V in MeCN and -0.662 V in DMF. The H(+)/H2 couple in DMF has been directly measured electrochemically using the previously reported procedure for the MeCN value. The thermochemical approach used for the O2/H2O couple has been extended to the CO2/CO and CO2/CH4 couples to give values of -0.12 and +0.15 V in MeCN and -0.73 and -0.48 V in DMF, respectively. Extensions to other reduction potentials are discussed. Additionally, the free energy for transfer of protons from water to organic solvent is estimated as +14 kcal mol(-1) for acetonitrile and +0.6 kcal mol(-1) for DMF. PMID:26640971

  12. New method for the photo-chemiluminometric determination of benzoylurea insecticides based on acetonitrile chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Gil García, M D; Martínez Galera, M; Santiago Valverde, R

    2007-03-01

    The viability of tandem photochemical reaction-chemiluminescence detection has been studied for the determination of five benzoylurea insecticides, namely, diflubenzuron, triflumuron, hexaflumuron, lufenuron and flufenoxuron. The 'on-line' photochemical reaction of benzoylurea pesticides provides an enhanced chemiluminescence response of the pesticides during their oxidation by potassium hexacyanoferrate(III) and sodium hydroxide, whose signal increases with the percentage of acetonitrile in the reaction medium. The determination was performed using a photoreactor consisting of a PFA (perfluoroalkoxy) tube reactor coil (5 mx1.6-mm O.D. and 0.8-mm I.D.) and an 8-W xenon lamp. As the yield of the photoderivatization process and the chemiluminescent signals depend on the percentage of acetonitrile, the chromatographic column (a Gemini C18, Phenomenex 150 mmx4.6 mm, 5-microm particle size) was chosen with the aim of using high percentages of this organic solvent in the mobile phase. Previous studies showed that the rate of the chemiluminescent reaction was very fast. Therefore, a modification was carried out in the detector in order to mix the analytes and reactants as near as possible to the measure cell. The optimised method was validated with respect to linearity, precision, limits of detection and quantification accuracy. Under the optimised conditions, linear working range extends three orders of magnitude with the relative standard deviation of intra-day precision below 10% and detection limits between 0.012 and 0.18 microg mL-1, according to the compound. The proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of benzoylureas in cucumber with good results. PMID:17205265

  13. Frog striated muscle is permeable to hydroxide and buffer anions.

    PubMed

    Venosa, R A; Kotsias, B A; Horowicz, P

    1994-04-01

    Hydroxide, bicarbonate and buffer anion permeabilities in semitendinosus muscle fibers of Rana pipiens were measured. In all experiments, the fibers were initially equilibrated in isotonic, high K2SO4 solutions at pHo = 7.2 buffered with phosphate. Two different methods were used to estimate permeabilities: (i) membrane potential changes were recorded in response to changes in external ion concentrations, and (ii) intracellular pH changes were recorded in response to changes in external concentrations of ions that alter intracellular pH. Constant field equations were used to calculate relative or absolute permeabilities. In the first method, to increase the size of the membrane potential change produced by a sudden change in anion entry, external K+ was replaced by Cs+ prior to changes of the anion under study. At constant external Cs+ activity, a hyperpolarization results from increasing external pH from 7.2 to 10.0 or higher, using either CAPS (3-[cyclohexylamino]-1-propanesulfonic acid) or CHES (2-[N-cyclohexylamino]-ethanesulfonic acid) as buffer. For each buffer, the protonated form is a zwitterion of zero net charge and the nonprotonated form is an anion. Using reported values of H+ permeability, calculations show that the reduction in [H+]o cannot account for the hyperpolarizations produced by alkaline solutions. Membrane hyperpolarization increases with increasing total external buffer concentration at constant external pH, and with increasing external pH at constant external buffer anion concentration. Taken together, these observations indicate that both OH- and buffer anions permeate the surface membrane. The following relative permeabilities were obtained at pHo = 10.0 +/- 0.3: (POH/PK) = 890 +/- 150, (PCAPS/PK) = 12 +/- 2, (PCHES/PK) = 5.3 +/- 0.9, and (PNO3/PK) = 4.7 +/- 0.5. PNO3/PK was independent of pHo up to 10.75. At pHo = 9.6, (PHCO3/PK) = 0.49 +/- 0.03; at pHo = 8.9, (PCl/PK) = 18 +/- 2 and at pHo = 7.1, (PHEPES/PK) = 20 +/- 2. In the second

  14. A kinetic study on the bioremediation of sodium cyanide and acetonitrile by free and immobilized cells of pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Chapatwala, K.D.; Babu, G.R.V.; Armstead, E.R.

    1995-12-31

    Pseudomonas putida capable of utilizing organic nitrile (acetonitrile) and inorganic cyanide (sodium cyanide) as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen was isolated from contaminated industrial sites and waste water. The bacterium possesses nitrile aminohydrolase (EC 3.5.5.1) and amidase (EC 3.5.1.4), which are involved in the transformation of cyanides and nitrites into ammonia and CO{sub 2} through the formation of amide as an intermediate. Both of the enzymes have a high selectivity and affinity toward the {sup -}CN group. The rate of degradation of acetonitrile and sodium cyanide to ammonia and CO{sub 2} by the calcium-alginate immobilized cells of P. putida was studied. The rate of reaction during the biodegradation of acetonitrile and sodium cyanide, and the substrate- and product-dependent kinetics of these toxic compounds were studied using free and immobilized cells of P. putida and modeled using a simple Michaelis-Menten equation.

  15. High stability buffered phase comparator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. A.; Reinhardt, V. S. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A low noise RF signal phase comparator comprised of two high stability driver buffer amplifiers driving a double balanced mixer which operate to generate a beat frequency between the two RF input signals coupled to the amplifiers from the RF sources is described. The beat frequency output from the mixer is applied to a low noise zero crossing detector which is the phase difference between the two RF inputs. Temperature stability is provided by mounting the amplifiers and mixer on a common circuit board with the active circuit elements located on one side of a circuit board and the passive circuit elements located on the opposite side. A common heat sink is located adjacent the circuit board. The active circuit elements are embedded into the bores of the heat sink which slows the effect of ambient temperature changes and reduces the temperature gradients between the active circuit elements, thus improving the cancellation of temperature effects. The two amplifiers include individual voltage regulators, which increases RF isolation.

  16. 21 CFR 520.1696a - Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with... FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696a Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent. (a) Specifications. When reconstituted, each milliliter contains penicillin G procaine...

  17. Effects of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate on uterine estrogen receptor. II. Inhibition of estrogen . receptor transformation.

    PubMed

    Traish, A; Müller, R E; Wotiz, H H

    1980-05-10

    Previous observations suggested that pyridoxal 5'-phosphate was capable of inhibiting estrogen . receptor (R . E2) activation, or translocation to the nucleus, or both. The present study attempts to define more specifically the locus of this action. To this end we have examined the physicochemical alteration produced by interaction of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate with estrogen . receptor complex, using sucrose density gradient analysis and dissociation kinetics. Receptor transformation was inhibited when activation was performed in the presence of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. This effect was protein- and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate concentration-dependent. When pyridoxal 5'-phosphate was introduced postactivation it did not have any effect on the activated receptor, but when similar treatment was followed by NABH4 reduction, the complex reverted to the monomeric entity. The dissociation behavior obtained with cytosol R . E2, warmed in the presence of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, showed a biphasic curve suggesting that a significant portion of receptors remained nonactivated as demonstrated by the fast dissociating component. Due to the fact that Tris buffers cannot be used for pyridoxal 5'-phosphate experiments, we have used a borate buffer which resulted in a displacement of the sedimentation values from a 4S to 4.6 S for the unactivated receptor and 5S to 6 S for the activated form. The observations reported suggest that at least the initial effect of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate results in the inhibition of cytosolic receptor transformation from the nonactivated to the activated form. PMID:7372667

  18. FIFO Buffer for Asynchronous Data Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascle, K. P.

    1985-01-01

    Variable-rate, asynchronous data signals from up to four measuring instruments or other sources combined in first-in/first-out (FIFO) buffer for transmission on single channel. Constructed in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) logic, buffer consumes low power (only 125 mW at 5V) and conforms to aerospace standards of reliability and maintainability.

  19. UNDERSTANDING, DERIVING, AND COMPUTING BUFFER CAPACITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Derivation and systematic calculation of buffer capacity is a topic that seems often to be neglected in chemistry courses and given minimal treatment in most texts. However, buffer capacity is very important in the chemistry of natural waters and potable water. It affects corro...

  20. The buffer capacity of airway epithelial secretions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dusik; Liao, Jie; Hanrahan, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The pH of airway epithelial secretions influences bacterial killing and mucus properties and is reduced by acidic pollutants, gastric reflux, and respiratory diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). The effect of acute acid loads depends on buffer capacity, however the buffering of airway secretions has not been well characterized. In this work we develop a method for titrating micro-scale (30 μl) volumes and use it to study fluid secreted by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3, a widely used model for submucosal gland serous cells. Microtitration curves revealed that HCO−3 is the major buffer. Peak buffer capacity (β) increased from 17 to 28 mM/pH during forskolin stimulation, and was reduced by >50% in fluid secreted by cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-deficient Calu-3 monolayers, confirming an important role of CFTR in HCO−3 secretion. Back-titration with NaOH revealed non-volatile buffer capacity due to proteins synthesized and released by the epithelial cells. Lysozyme and mucin concentrations were too low to buffer Calu-3 fluid significantly, however model titrations of porcine gastric mucins at concentrations near the sol-gel transition suggest that mucins may contribute to the buffer capacity of ASL in vivo. We conclude that CFTR-dependent HCO−3 secretion and epithelially-derived proteins are the predominant buffers in Calu-3 secretions. PMID:24917822

  1. Buffer Management Simulation in ATM Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaprak, E.; Xiao, Y.; Chronopoulos, A.; Chow, E.; Anneberg, L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a simulation of a new dynamic buffer allocation management scheme in ATM networks. To achieve this objective, an algorithm that detects congestion and updates the dynamic buffer allocation scheme was developed for the OPNET simulation package via the creation of a new ATM module.

  2. 46 CFR 58.25-45 - Buffers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Buffers. 58.25-45 Section 58.25-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-45 Buffers. For each vessel on an ocean, coastwise, or Great Lakes...

  3. Riparian buffer transpiration and watershed scale impacts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forested riparian buffers are prevalent throughout the Southeastern Coastal Plain Region of the United States (US). Because they make up a significant portion of the regional landscape, transpiration within these riparian buffers is believed to have an important impact on the hydrologic budget of r...

  4. 46 CFR 58.25-45 - Buffers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Buffers. 58.25-45 Section 58.25-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-45 Buffers. For each vessel on an ocean, coastwise, or Great Lakes...

  5. African American College Women's Suicide Buffers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marion, Michelle S.; Range, Lillian M.

    2003-01-01

    To examine the relationships buffers may have with suicide ideation, 300 African American female college students completed measures of suicide ideation and buffers. Three variables accounted for a significant and unique portion of the variance in suicide ideation: family support, a view that suicide is unacceptable, and a collaborative religious…

  6. 46 CFR 58.25-45 - Buffers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Buffers. 58.25-45 Section 58.25-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-45 Buffers. For each vessel on an ocean, coastwise, or Great Lakes...

  7. 46 CFR 58.25-45 - Buffers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Buffers. 58.25-45 Section 58.25-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-45 Buffers. For each vessel on an ocean, coastwise, or Great Lakes...

  8. 46 CFR 58.25-45 - Buffers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Buffers. 58.25-45 Section 58.25-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-45 Buffers. For each vessel on an ocean, coastwise, or Great Lakes...

  9. Metal-phosphate binders

    DOEpatents

    Howe, Beth Ann [Lewistown, IL; Chaps-Cabrera, Jesus Guadalupe [Coahuila, MX

    2009-05-12

    A metal-phosphate binder is provided. The binder may include an aqueous phosphoric acid solution, a metal-cation donor including a metal other than aluminum, an aluminum-cation donor, and a non-carbohydrate electron donor.

  10. Phosphate control in dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Cupisti, Adamasco; Gallieni, Maurizio; Rizzo, Maria Antonietta; Caria, Stefania; Meola, Mario; Bolasco, Piergiorgio

    2013-01-01

    Prevention and correction of hyperphosphatemia is a major goal of chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD) management, achievable through avoidance of a positive phosphate balance. To this aim, optimal dialysis removal, careful use of phosphate binders, and dietary phosphate control are needed to optimize the control of phosphate balance in well-nourished patients on a standard three-times-a-week hemodialysis schedule. Using a mixed diffusive–convective hemodialysis tecniques, and increasing the number and/or the duration of dialysis tecniques are all measures able to enhance phosphorus (P) mass removal through dialysis. However, dialytic removal does not equal the high P intake linked to the high dietary protein requirement of dialysis patients; hence, the use of intestinal P binders is mandatory to reduce P net intestinal absorption. Unfortunately, even a large dose of P binders is able to bind approximately 200–300 mg of P on a daily basis, so it is evident that their efficacy is limited in the case of an uncontrolled dietary P load. Hence, limitation of dietary P intake is needed to reach the goal of neutral phosphate balance in dialysis, coupled to an adequate protein intake. To this aim, patients should be informed and educated to avoid foods that are naturally rich in phosphate and also processed food with P-containing preservatives. In addition, patients should preferentially choose food with a low P-to-protein ratio. For example, patients could choose egg white or protein from a vegetable source. Finally, boiling should be the preferred cooking procedure, because it induces food demineralization, including phosphate loss. The integrated approach outlined in this article should be actively adapted as a therapeutic alliance by clinicians, dieticians, and patients for an effective control of phosphate balance in dialysis patients. PMID:24133374

  11. Review of casein phosphopeptides-amorphous calcium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Reema, Sharma Dhar; Lahiri, Prateek Kumar; Roy, Shantanu Sen

    2014-01-01

    Casein phosphopeptides-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) is a bioactive agent with a base of milk products, which has been formulated from two parts: casein phosphopeptides (CPP) and amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP). CPP was produced from milk protein casein and has a remarkable ability to stabilize calcium phosphate in solution and to substantially increase the level of calcium phosphate in dental plaque. CPP-ACP buffers the free calcium and phosphate ion activities, thereby helping to maintain a state of supersaturation with respect to tooth enamel, reducing demineralisation and promoting remineralisation. The free calcium and phosphate ions move out of the CPP, enter the enamel rods and reform onto apatite crystals. Laboratory, animal and human studies have shown that CPP-ACP inhibits cariogenic activity. CPP-ACP is useful in the treatment of white spot lesions, hypomineralised enamel, mild fluorosis, tooth sensitivity and erosion, and prevents plaque accumulation around brackets and other orthodontic appliances. CPP-ACP also facilitates a normal post-eruptive maturation process and is ideal for protecting primary teeth at a time when oral care is difficult. CPP-ACP has commercial potential as an additive to foods, soft drinks and chewing gum, as well as additive to toothpastes and mouthwashes to control dental caries. PMID:25028684

  12. Modelling of calcium phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderin Hidalgo, Lazaro Juan

    This work is a contribution to a large scale joint experimental and theoretical effort to understand the biological properties of silicon doped calcium phosphates undertaken by Queen's University and Millenium Biologix Corp. We have modeled calcium phosphates and silicon doped calcium phosphates in close relation to experiment in order to study possible location of silicon in the lattice. Density functional theory has been used to study the structural and dynamical properties of small systems of calcium phosphates to gain preliminary information on phosphates and the performance of the theoretical methods. The same methods were used to investigate structural and electronic properties of larger scale calcium phosphate systems, while a classical shell model was developed to investigate the dynamical properties of such large and complex systems. In the context of the shell model a method was devised to calculate the dynamical matrix corrected for the long range Coulomb interaction in the long wave length limit. It was necessary also to develop a theoretical expression for the dielectric function in the context of the shell model. Infrared spectra and thermal parameters were calculated based on these methods. We also propose some directions for future research.

  13. Cheese whey as substrate of batch hydrogen production: effect of temperature and addition of buffer.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Páez, K M; Poggi-Varaldo, H M; García-Mena, J; Ponce-Noyola, M T; Ramos-Valdivia, A C; Barrera-Cortés, J; Robles-González, I V; Ruiz-Ordáz, N; Villa-Tanaca, L; Rinderknecht-Seijas, N

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of buffer addition and process temperature (ambient and 35°C) on H2 production in batch fermentation of cheese whey (CW). When the H2 production reached a plateau, the headspace of the reactors were flushed with N2 and reactors were re-incubated. Afterwards, only the reactors with phosphate buffer showed a second cycle of H2 production and 48% more H2 was obtained. The absence of a second cycle in non-buffered reactors could be related to a lower final pH than in the buffered reactors; the low pH could drive the fermentation to solvents production. Indeed a high solvent production was observed in non-buffered bioreactors as given by low ρ ratios (defined as the ratio between sum of organic acid production and sum of solvents production). Regarding the process temperatures, no significant difference between the H2 production of reactors incubated at ambient temperature and at 35°C was described. After flushing the headspace of bioreactors with N2 at the end of the second cycle, the H2 production did not resume (in all reactors). PMID:24821747

  14. Optimized DPPH assay in a detergent-based buffer system for measuring antioxidant activity of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nicklisch, Sascha C.T.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2014-01-01

    The free radical method using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) is a well established assay for the in vitro determination of antioxidant activity in food and biological extracts. The standard DPPH assay uses methanol or ethanol as solvents, or buffered alcoholic solutions in a ratio of 40%/60% (buffer/alcohol, v/v) to keep the hydrophobic hydrazyl radical and phenolic test compounds soluble while offering sufficient buffering capacity at different pHs tested. Following this protocol, we were unable to keep proteinaceous antioxidants soluble at different pHs to test for their antioxidant activity. Thus, the assay protocol was modified as follows to improve its utility:•Non-ionic detergents were added to keep the DPPH radical soluble and to provide a mild and non-denaturing environment for the antioxidant protein.•Maximal concentration of DPPH was limited to 100 μM to stay within the sensitivity range of the detector at the given wavelength (515 nm) and to increase the dynamic range of the assay.•0.1 M citrate phosphate buffer was introduced to prevent experimental artifacts due to changing buffer compositions at different pHs. PMID:25530949

  15. Sediment retention in rangeland riparian buffers.

    PubMed

    Hook, Paul B

    2003-01-01

    Controlling nonpoint-source sediment pollution is a common goal of riparian management, but there is little quantitative information about factors affecting performance of rangeland riparian buffers. This study evaluated the influence of vegetation characteristics, buffer width, slope, and stubble height on sediment retention in a Montana foothills meadow. Three vegetation types (sedge wetland, rush transition, bunchgrass upland) were compared using twenty-six 6- x 2-m plots spanning 2 to 20% slopes. Plots were clipped moderately (10-15 cm stubble) or severely (2-5 cm stubble). Sediment (silt + fine sand) was added to simulated overland runoff 6, 2, or 1 m above the bottom of each plot. Runoff was sampled at 15-s to > 5-min intervals until sediment concentrations approached background levels. Sediment retention was affected strongly by buffer width and moderately by vegetation type and slope, but was not affected by stubble height. Mean sediment retention ranged from 63 to > 99% for different combinations of buffer width and vegetation type, with 94 to 99% retention in 6-m-wide buffers regardless of vegetation type or slope. Results suggest that rangeland riparian buffers should be at least 6 m wide, with dense vegetation, to be effective and reliable. Narrower widths, steep slopes, and sparse vegetation increase risk of sediment delivery to streams. Vegetation characteristics such as biomass, cover, or density are more appropriate than stubble height for judging capacity to remove sediment from overland runoff, though stubble height may indirectly indicate livestock impacts that can affect buffer performance. PMID:12809315

  16. Electrophoretic mobilities of erythrocytes in various buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.; Kunze, M. E.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    The calibration of space flight equipment depends on a source of standard test particles, this test particle of choice is the fixed erythrocyte. Erythrocytes from different species have different electrophoretic mobilities. Electrophoretic mobility depends upon zeta potential, which, in turn depends upon ionic strength. Zeta potential decreases with increasing ionic strength, so cells have high electrophoretic mobility in space electrophoresis buffers than in typical physiological buffers. The electrophoretic mobilities of fixed human, rat, and rabbit erythrocytes in 0.145 M salt and buffers of varying ionic strength, temperature, and composition, to assess the effects of some of the unique combinations used in space buffers were characterized. Several effects were assessed: glycerol or DMSO (dimethylsulfoxide) were considered for use as cryoprotectants. The effect of these substances on erythrocyte electrophoretic mobility was examined. The choice of buffer depended upon cell mobility. Primary experiments with kidney cells established the choice of buffer and cryoprotectant. A nonstandard temperature of EPM in the suitable buffer was determined. A loss of ionic strength control occurs in the course of preparing columns for flight, the effects of small increases in ionic strength over the expected low values need to be evaluated.

  17. A novel structure of optical buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, AiMing; Wu, Chongqing; Gao, Huali; Gong, Yandong; Shum, Ping

    2005-02-01

    Optical buffers are critical for low packet-loss probability in future photonic packet-switched networks. In particular, they would be required to store packets during rate conversion and header processing, and to overcome the receiver's bottleneck. They would be required for queuing packets while transmitters await access to the network. In this paper, we present a novel structure of optical buffer with compact size. This kind of optical buffer is based on a collinear 3x3 fiber coupler in which three fibers are completely in the same plane and weakly coupled. A SOA is used as its nonlinear element as well as an amplifier in it.The experiment result will be also given in the paper. Storage results obtained with this novel structure optical buffer at 100Mb/s will be presented first and then its capacity is extended to higher data rates of 2.5Gb/s, more compatible with present optical networks. Storage has been observed for time up to 1.568ms(more than 32 circulations) in both cases without obvious degration. The novel structure of optical buffer could be a more compact device which makes it possible to be integrated in a chip. SOA in the buffer is used as a nonlinear element as well as an amplifier to compensate loss in the buffer loop. The buffer needs low control power for switch operation. It is easy to control 'write' and 'erase' operation because the same TOAD switch in the buffer can be used for both 'write' and 'erase' operation.

  18. Decay dynamics of nascent acetonitrile and nitromethane dipole-bound anions produced by intracluster charge-transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Yandell, Margaret A.; King, Sarah B.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2014-05-14

    Decay dynamics of nascent dipole bound states of acetonitrile and nitromethane are examined using time-resolved photoelectron imaging of iodide-acetonitrile (I{sup −}·CH{sub 3}CN) and iodide-nitromethane (I{sup −}·CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}) complexes. Dipole-bound anions are created by UV-initiated electron transfer to the molecule of interest from the associated iodide ion at energies just below the vertical detachment energy of the halide-molecule complex. The acetonitrile anion is observed to decay biexponentially with time constants in the range of 4–900 ps. In contrast, the dipole bound state of nitromethane decays rapidly over 400 fs to form the valence bound anion. The nitromethane valence anion species then decays biexponentially with time constants of 2 ps and 1200 ps. The biexponential decay dynamics in acetonitrile are interpreted as iodine atom loss and autodetachment from the excited dipole-bound anion, followed by slower autodetachment of the relaxed metastable ion, while the dynamics of the nitromethane system suggest that a dipole-bound anion to valence anion transition proceeds via intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution to nitro group modes in the vicinity of the iodine atom.

  19. Theoretical analysis of co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water–acetonitrile mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, Yukako; Yoshida, Norio Nakano, Haruyuki

    2015-05-28

    The co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water–acetonitrile mixture was examined using the reference interaction-site model self-consistent field theory. The free energy profiles of the proton transfer reaction of glycine between the carboxyl oxygen and amino nitrogen were computed in a water–acetonitrile mixture solvent at various molar fractions. Two types of reactions, the intramolecular proton transfer and water-mediated proton transfer, were considered. In both types of the reactions, a similar tendency was observed. In the pure water solvent, the zwitterionic form, where the carboxyl oxygen is deprotonated while the amino nitrogen is protonated, is more stable than the neutral form. The reaction free energy is −10.6 kcal mol{sup −1}. On the other hand, in the pure acetonitrile solvent, glycine takes only the neutral form. The reaction free energy from the neutral to zwitterionic form gradually increases with increasing acetonitrile concentration, and in an equally mixed solvent, the zwitterionic and neutral forms are almost isoenergetic, with a difference of only 0.3 kcal mol{sup −1}. The free energy component analysis based on the thermodynamic cycle of the reaction also revealed that the free energy change of the neutral form is insensitive to the change of solvent environment but the zwitterionic form shows drastic changes. In particular, the excess chemical potential, one of the components of the solvation free energy, is dominant and contributes to the stabilization of the zwitterionic form.

  20. Effect of the physicochemical parameters of benzimidazole molecules on their retention by a nonpolar sorbent from an aqueous acetonitrile solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafigulin, R. V.; Safonova, I. A.; Bulanova, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of the structure of benzimidazoles on their chromatographic retention on octadecyl silica gel from an aqueous acetonitrile eluent was studied. One- and many-parameter correlation equations were obtained by linear regression analysis, and their prognostic potential in determining the retention factors of benzimidazoles under study was analyzed.

  1. Theoretical analysis of co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water-acetonitrile mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Yukako; Yoshida, Norio; Nakano, Haruyuki

    2015-05-01

    The co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water-acetonitrile mixture was examined using the reference interaction-site model self-consistent field theory. The free energy profiles of the proton transfer reaction of glycine between the carboxyl oxygen and amino nitrogen were computed in a water-acetonitrile mixture solvent at various molar fractions. Two types of reactions, the intramolecular proton transfer and water-mediated proton transfer, were considered. In both types of the reactions, a similar tendency was observed. In the pure water solvent, the zwitterionic form, where the carboxyl oxygen is deprotonated while the amino nitrogen is protonated, is more stable than the neutral form. The reaction free energy is -10.6 kcal mol-1. On the other hand, in the pure acetonitrile solvent, glycine takes only the neutral form. The reaction free energy from the neutral to zwitterionic form gradually increases with increasing acetonitrile concentration, and in an equally mixed solvent, the zwitterionic and neutral forms are almost isoenergetic, with a difference of only 0.3 kcal mol-1. The free energy component analysis based on the thermodynamic cycle of the reaction also revealed that the free energy change of the neutral form is insensitive to the change of solvent environment but the zwitterionic form shows drastic changes. In particular, the excess chemical potential, one of the components of the solvation free energy, is dominant and contributes to the stabilization of the zwitterionic form.

  2. Deconvoluting the effects of buffer salt concentration in hydrophilic interaction chromatography on a zwitterionic stationary phase.

    PubMed

    West, Caroline; Auroux, Emeline

    2016-08-26

    Quantitative structure-retention relationships (QSRRs) furnish a detailed and reliable description of the role and extent of different molecular interactions that can be established between the analytes and the chromatographic system. Among QSRRs, the solvation parameter model using Abraham descriptors has gained acceptance as a general tool to explore the factors affecting retention in chromatographic systems. We have previously shown how a modified version of the solvation parameter model, with two extra terms to take account of interactions occurring with ionic and ionizable species (with positive and/or negative charges), could be applied to the characterization of hydrophilic interaction chromatographic (HILIC) systems. In the present study, we will show how this methodology can be used to evaluate the effects of increasing buffer salt concentration on retention and separation in a HILIC system. A commercial stationary phase possessing a sulfobetaine zwitterionic bonded ligand (Nucleodur HILIC) was used with a mobile phase composed of 80% acetonitrile and 20% pwwH4 ammonium acetate buffer, with aqueous buffer concentrations varying from 10 to 100mM, resulting in overall concentrations ranging from 2 to 20mM in the mobile phase. Retention factors were measured for a selection of 76 probe analytes. The chosen compounds are small molecules presenting a wide diversity of molecular structures and are relevant to biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. The QSRR models obtained allow for a rationalization of the interactions contributing to retention and separation in the HILIC system considered and shed some light on the effect of varying buffer salt concentration, namely the progressive transition from ion-exchange and electrostatic-repulsion mechanisms to hydrophilic partitioning. PMID:27475992

  3. A novel liquid/liquid extraction process composed of surfactant and acetonitrile for purification of polygalacturonase enzyme from Durio zibethinus.

    PubMed

    Amid, Mehrnoush; Manap, Yazid; Azmira, Farhana; Hussin, Muhaini; Sarker, Zaidul Islam

    2015-07-01

    Polygalacturonase is one of the important enzymes used in various industries such as food, detergent, pharmaceutical, textile, pulp and paper. A novel liquid/liquid extraction process composed of surfactant and acetonitrile was employed for the first time to purify polygalacturonase from Durio zibethinus. The influences of different parameters such as type and concentration of surfactants, concentrations of acetonitrile and composition of surfactant/acetonitrile on partitioning behavior and recovery of polygalacturonase was investigated. Moreover, the effect of pH of system and crude load on purification fold and yield of purified polygalacturonase were studied. The results of the experiment indicated the polygalacturonase was partitioned into surfactant top rich phase with impurities being partitioned into acetonitrile bottom rich phase in the novel method of liquid/liquid process composed of 23% (w/w) Triton X-100 and 19% (w/w) acetonitrile, at 55.6% of TLL (tie line length) crude load of 25% (w/w) at pH 6.0. Recovery and recycling of components also was measured in each successive step of liquid/liquid extraction process. The enzyme was successfully recovered by the method with a high purification factor of 14.3 and yield of 97.3% while phase components were also recovered and recycled above 95%. This study demonstrated that the novel method of liquid/liquid extraction process can be used as an efficient and economical extraction method rather than the traditional methods of extraction for the purification and recovery of the valuable enzyme. PMID:25973865

  4. Optimizing buffering chemistry to maintain near neutral pH of broiler feed during pre-enrichment for Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Berrang, M E; Cosby, D E; Cox, N A; Cason, J A; Richardson, K E

    2015-12-01

    Salmonella is a human pathogen that can accompany live broilers to the slaughter plant, contaminating fully processed carcasses. Feed is one potential source of Salmonella to growing broilers. Monitoring feed for the presence of Salmonella is part of good agricultural practice. The first step in culturing feed for Salmonella (which may be at low numbers and sub-lethally stressed) is to add it to a pre-enrichment broth which is incubated for 24 h. During the course of pre-enrichment, extraneous bacteria metabolize carbohydrates in some feed and excrete acidic byproducts, causing the pH to drop dramatically. An acidic pre-enrichment pH can injure or kill Salmonella resulting in a failure to detect, even if it is present and available to infect chickens. The objective of this study was to test an array of buffering chemistries to prevent formation of an injurious acidic environment during pre-enrichment of feed in peptone water. Five grams of feed were added to 45 mL of peptone water buffered with carbonate, Tris pH 8, and phosphate buffering ingredients individually and in combination. Feed was subjected to a pre-enrichment at 35°C for 24 h; pH was measured at 0, 18, and 24 h. Standard phosphate buffering ingredients at concentrations up to 4 times the normal formulation were unable to fully prevent acidic conditions. Likewise, carbonate and Tris pH 8 were not fully effective. The combination of phosphate, carbonate, and Tris pH 8 was the most effective buffer tested. It is recommended that a highly buffered pre-enrichment broth be used to examine feed for the presence of Salmonella. PMID:26467004

  5. Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Achari, A; Marshall, S E; Muirhead, H; Palmieri, R H; Noltmann, E A

    1981-06-26

    Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (EC 5.3.1.9) is a dimeric enzyme of molecular mass 132000 which catalyses the interconversion of D-glucose-6-phosphate and D-fructose-6-phosphate. The crystal structure of the enzyme from pig muscle has been determined at a nominal resolution of 2.6 A. The structure is of the alpha/beta type. Each subunit consists of two domains and the active site is in both the domain interface and the subunit interface (P.J. Shaw & H. Muirhead (1976), FEBS Lett. 65, 50-55). Each subunit contains 13 methionine residues so that cyanogen bromide cleavage will produce 14 fragments, most of which have been identified and at least partly purified. Sequence information is given for about one-third of the molecule from 5 cyanogen bromide fragments. One of the sequences includes a modified lysine residue. Modification of this residue leads to a parallel loss of enzymatic activity. A tentative fit of two of the peptides to the electron density map has been made. It seems possible that glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, triose phosphate isomerase and pyruvate kinase all contain a histidine and a glutamate residue at the active site. PMID:6115414

  6. Polymerization of Acetonitrile via a Hydrogen Transfer Reaction from CH3 to CN under Extreme Conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zheng, Haiyan; Li, Kuo; Cody, George D.; Tulk, Christopher A.; Dong, Xiao; Gao, Guoying; Molaison, Jamie J.; Liu, Zhenxian; Feygenson, Mikhail; Yang, Wenge; et al

    2016-08-25

    Acetonitrile (CH3CN) is the simplest and one of the most stable nitriles. Reactions usually occur on the C≡N triple bond, while the C-H bond is very inert and can only be activated by a very strong base or a metal catalyst. In this study, it is demonstrated that C-H bonds can be activated by the cyano group under high pressure, but at room temperature. The hydrogen atom transfers from the CH3 to CN along the CH···N hydrogen bond, which produces an amino group and initiates polymerization to form a dimer, 1D chain, and 2D nanoribbon with mixed sp2 and sp3more » bonded carbon. Lastly, it transforms into a graphitic polymer by eliminating ammonia. This study shows that applying pressure can induce a distinctive reaction which is guided by the structure of the molecular crystal. It highlights the fact that very inert C-H can be activated by high pressure, even at room temperature and without a catalyst.« less

  7. Polymerization of Acetonitrile via a Hydrogen Transfer Reaction from CH3 to CN under Extreme Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haiyan; Li, Kuo; Cody, George D; Tulk, Christopher A; Dong, Xiao; Gao, Guoying; Molaison, Jamie J; Liu, Zhenxian; Feygenson, Mikhail; Yang, Wenge; Ivanov, Ilia N; Basile, Leonardo; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Guthrie, Malcolm; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2016-09-19

    Acetonitrile (CH3 CN) is the simplest and one of the most stable nitriles. Reactions usually occur on the C≡N triple bond, while the C-H bond is very inert and can only be activated by a very strong base or a metal catalyst. It is demonstrated that C-H bonds can be activated by the cyano group under high pressure, but at room temperature. The hydrogen atom transfers from the CH3 to CN along the CH⋅⋅⋅N hydrogen bond, which produces an amino group and initiates polymerization to form a dimer, 1D chain, and 2D nanoribbon with mixed sp(2) and sp(3) bonded carbon. Finally, it transforms into a graphitic polymer by eliminating ammonia. This study shows that applying pressure can induce a distinctive reaction which is guided by the structure of the molecular crystal. It highlights the fact that very inert C-H can be activated by high pressure, even at room temperature and without a catalyst. PMID:27561179

  8. Quantitative determination of aflatoxin B1 concentration in acetonitrile by chemometric methods using terahertz spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hongyi; Jiang, Yuying; Lian, Feiyu; Zhang, Yuan; Xia, Shanhong

    2016-10-15

    Aflatoxins contaminate and colonize agricultural products, such as grain, and thereby potentially cause human liver carcinoma. Detection via conventional methods has proven to be time-consuming and complex. In this paper, the terahertz (THz) spectra of aflatoxin B1 in acetonitrile solutions with concentration ranges of 1-50μg/ml and 1-50μg/l are obtained and analyzed for the frequency range of 0.4-1.6THz. Linear and nonlinear regression models are constructed to relate the absorption spectra and the concentrations of 160 samples using the partial least squares (PLS), principal component regression (PCR), support vector machine (SVM), and PCA-SVM methods. Our results indicate that PLS and PCR models are more accurate for the concentration range of 1-50μg/ml, whereas SVM and PCA-SVM are more accurate for the concentration range of 1-50μg/l. Furthermore, ten unknown concentration samples extracted from mildewed maize are analyzed quantitatively using these methods. PMID:27173565

  9. DFT simulation, quantum chemical electronic structure, spectroscopic and structure-activity investigations of 2-benzothiazole acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, V; Thillai Govindaraja, S; Jose, Sujin P; Mohan, S

    2014-07-15

    The Fourier transform infrared and FT-Raman spectra of 2-benzothiazole acetonitrile (BTAN) have been recorded in the range 4000-450 and 4000-100 cm(-1) respectively. The conformational analysis of the compound has been carried out to obtain the stable geometry of the compound. The complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound are carried out using the experimental FTIR and FT-Raman data and quantum chemical studies. The experimental vibrational frequencies are compared with the wavenumbers derived theoretically by B3LYP gradient calculations employing the standard 6-31G(**), high level 6-311++G(**) and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The structural parameters, thermodynamic properties and vibrational frequencies of the normal modes obtained from the B3LYP methods are in good agreement with the experimental data. The (1)H (400 MHz; CDCl3) and (13)C (100 MHz;CDCl3) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra are also recorded. The electronic properties, the energies of the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals are measured by DFT approach. The kinetic stability of the molecule has been determined from the frontier molecular orbital energy gap. The charges of the atoms and the structure-chemical reactivity relations of the compound are determined by its chemical potential, global hardness, global softness, electronegativity, electrophilicity and local reactivity descriptors by conceptual DFT methods. The non-linear optical properties of the compound have been discussed by measuring the polarisability and hyperpolarisability tensors. PMID:24662754

  10. Surprisingly Long-Lived Ascorbyl Radicals in Acetonitrile: Concerted Proton-Electron Transfer Reactions and Thermochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Jeffrey J.; Mayer, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions and thermochemistry of 5,6-isopropylidene ascorbate (iAscH−) have been examined in acetonitrile solvent.iAscH− is oxidized by 2,4,6-tBu3C6H2O• and by excess TEMPO• to give the corresponding 5,6-isopropylidene ascorbyl radical anion (iAsc•−), which persists for hours at 298 K in dry MeCN solution. The stability of iAsc•− is surprising in light of the transience of the ascorbyl radical in aqueous solutions, and is due to the lack of the protons needed for radical disproportionation. A concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) mechanism is indicated for the reactions of iAscH−. Redox potential, pKa and equilibrium measurements define the thermochemical landscape for 5,6-isopropylidene ascorbic acid and its derivatives in MeCN. These measurements give an O–H bond dissociation free energy (BDFE) for iAscH−of 65.4 ± 1.5 kcal mol−1 in MeCN. Similar studies on underivatized ascorbate indicate a BDFE of 67.8 ± 1.2 kcal mol−1. These values are much lower than the aqueous BDFE for ascorbate of 74.0 ± 1.5 kcal mol−1 derived from reported data. PMID:18505256

  11. Surprisingly long-lived ascorbyl radicals in acetonitrile: concerted proton-electron transfer reactions and thermochemistry.

    PubMed

    Warren, Jeffrey J; Mayer, James M

    2008-06-18

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions and thermochemistry of 5,6-isopropylidene ascorbate (iAscH-) have been examined in acetonitrile solvent. iAscH- is oxidized by 2,4,6-tBu3C6H2O. and by excess TEMPO. to give the corresponding 5,6-isopropylidene ascorbyl radical anion (iAsc.-), which persists for hours at 298 K in dry MeCN solution. The stability of iAsc.- is surprising in light of the transience of the ascorbyl radical in aqueous solutions and is due to the lack of the protons needed for radical disproportionation. A concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) mechanism is indicated for the reactions of iAscH-. Redox potential, pKa and equilibrium measurements define the thermochemical landscape for 5,6-isopropylidene ascorbic acid and its derivatives in MeCN. These measurements give an O-H bond dissociation free energy (BDFE) for iAscH- of 65.4 +/- 1.5 kcal mol-1 in MeCN. Similar studies on underivatized ascorbate indicate a BDFE of 67.8 +/- 1.2 kcal mol-1. These values are much lower than the aqueous BDFE for ascorbate of 74.0 +/- 1.5 kcal mol-1 derived from reported data. PMID:18505256

  12. ALMA Spectroscopy of Titan's Atmosphere: First Detections of Vinyl Cyanide and Acetonitrile Isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordiner, Martin; Y Palmer, Maureen; Nixon, Conor A.; Charnley, Steven B.; Mumma, Michael J.; Irwin, Pat G. J.; Teanby, Nick A.; Kisiel, Zbigniew; Serigano, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Studies of Titan's atmospheric chemistry provide a unique opportunity to explore the origin and evolution of complex organic matter in primitive planetary atmospheres. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is a powerful new telescope, well suited to the study of molecular emission from Titan's stratosphere and mesosphere. Here we present early results from our ongoing study to exploit the large volume of Titan data taken using ALMA in Early Science Mode (during the period 2012-2014). Combining data from multiple ALMA Band 6 observations, we obtained high-resolution mm-wave spectra with unprecedented sensitivity, enabling the first detection of vinyl cyanide (C2H3CN) in Titan's atmosphere. Initial estimates indicate a mesospheric abundance ratio with respect to ethyl cyanide (C2H5CN) of [C2H3CN]/[C2H5CN] = 0.31. In addition, we report the first detections on Titan of the 13C and 15N-substituted isotopologues of acetonitrile (13CH3CN and CH3C15N). Radiative transfer models and possible chemical formation pathways for these molecules will be discussed.

  13. Marriage a Buffer Against Drinking Problems?

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_158887.html Marriage a Buffer Against Drinking Problems? Study found protective benefit for both men ... News) -- Married people are less likely to have drinking problems than single people, and that protective effect ...

  14. Marriage a Buffer Against Drinking Problems?

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158887.html Marriage a Buffer Against Drinking Problems? Study found protective ... aware of the potentially important protective effects of marriage on alcohol problems, our study puts this observation ...

  15. A MICROPROCESSOR ASCII CHARACTER BUFFERING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A microprocessor buffering system (MBS) was developed at the Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory -Cincinnati (EMSL-CI) to provide an efficient transfer for serial ASCII information between intelligent instrument systema and a Data General NOVA laboratory automation co...

  16. Optical imaging: Ultrafast buffering by molecular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertz, Edouard; Lavorel, Bruno; Faucher, Olivier

    2011-02-01

    A simple molecular gas sample can be used to achieve ultrafast optical buffering in two-dimensional optical imaging, thus serving as a promising extension of the well-developed liquid-crystal display technology.

  17. Buffer layer for thin film structures

    DOEpatents

    Foltyn, Stephen R.; Jia, Quanxi; Arendt, Paul N.; Wang, Haiyan

    2006-10-31

    A composite structure including a base substrate and a layer of a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate is provided. A superconducting article can include a composite structure including an outermost layer of magnesium oxide, a buffer layer of strontium titanate or a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate and a top-layer of a superconducting material such as YBCO upon the buffer layer.

  18. Buffer layer for thin film structures

    DOEpatents

    Foltyn, Stephen R.; Jia, Quanxi; Arendt, Paul N.; Wang, Haiyan

    2010-06-15

    A composite structure including a base substrate and a layer of a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate is provided. A superconducting article can include a composite structure including an outermost layer of magnesium oxide, a buffer layer of strontium titanate or a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate and a top-layer of a superconducting material such as YBCO upon the buffer layer.

  19. Phosphate Mines, Jordan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Jordan's leading industry and export commodities are phosphate and potash, ranked in the top three in the world. These are used to make fertilizer. The Jordan Phosphate Mines Company is the sole producer, having started operations in 1935. In addition to mining activities, the company produces phosphoric acid (for fertilizers, detergents, pharmaceuticals), diammonium phosphate (for fertilizer), sulphuric acid (many uses), and aluminum fluoride (a catalyst to make aluminum and magnesium).

    The image covers an area of 27.5 x 49.4 km, was acquired on September 17, 2005, and is located near 30.8 degrees north latitude, 36.1 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  20. Buffer regulation of calcium puff sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraiman, Daniel; Ponce Dawson, Silvina

    2014-02-01

    Puffs are localized Ca2 + signals that arise in oocytes in response to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). They are the result of the liberation of Ca2 + from the endoplasmic reticulum through the coordinated opening of IP3 receptor/channels clustered at a functional release site. The presence of buffers that trap Ca2 + provides a mechanism that enriches the spatio-temporal dynamics of cytosolic calcium. The expression of different types of buffers along the cell's life provides a tool with which Ca2 + signals and their responses can be modulated. In this paper we extend the stochastic model of a cluster of IP3R-Ca2 + channels introduced previously to elucidate the effect of buffers on sequences of puffs at the same release site. We obtain analytically the probability laws of the interpuff time and of the number of channels that participate of the puffs. Furthermore, we show that under typical experimental conditions the effect of buffers can be accounted for in terms of a simple inhibiting function. Hence, by exploring different inhibiting functions we are able to study the effect of a variety of buffers on the puff size and interpuff time distributions. We find the somewhat counter-intuitive result that the addition of a fast Ca2 + buffer can increase the average number of channels that participate of a puff.

  1. Social buffering: relief from stress and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Kikusui, Takefumi; Winslow, James T; Mori, Yuji

    2006-01-01

    Communication is essential to members of a society not only for the expression of personal information, but also for the protection from environmental threats. Highly social mammals have a distinct characteristic: when conspecific animals are together, they show a better recovery from experiences of distress. This phenomenon, termed ‘social buffering’, has been found in rodents, birds, non-human primates and also in humans. This paper reviews classical findings on social buffering and focuses, in particular, on social buffering effects in relation to neuroendocrine stress responses. The social cues that transmit social buffering signals, the neural mechanisms of social buffering and a partner's efficacy with respect to social buffering are also detailed. Social contact appears to have a very positive influence on the psychological and the physiological aspects of social animals, including human beings. Research leading towards further understanding of the mechanisms of social buffering could provide alternative medical treatments based on the natural, individual characteristics of social animals, which could improve the quality of life. PMID:17118934

  2. Quantitative and qualitative optimization of allergen extraction from peanut and selected tree nuts. Part 2. Optimization of buffer and ionic strength using a full factorial experimental design.

    PubMed

    L'Hocine, Lamia; Pitre, Mélanie

    2016-03-01

    A full factorial design was used to assess the single and interactive effects of three non-denaturing aqueous (phosphate, borate, and carbonate) buffers at various ionic strengths (I) on allergen extractability from and immunoglobulin E (IgE) immunoreactivity of peanut, almond, hazelnut, and pistachio. The results indicated that the type and ionic strength of the buffer had different effects on protein recovery from the nuts under study. Substantial differences in protein profiles, abundance, and IgE-binding intensity with different combinations of pH and ionic strength were found. A significant interaction between pH and ionic strength was observed for pistachio and almond. The optimal buffer system conditions, which maximized the IgE-binding efficiency of allergens and provided satisfactory to superior protein recovery yield and profiles, were carbonate buffer at an ionic strength of I=0.075 for peanut, carbonate buffer at I=0.15 for almond, phosphate buffer at I=0.5 for hazelnut, and borate at I=0.15 for pistachio. The buffer type and its ionic strength could be manipulated to achieve the selective solubility of desired allergens. PMID:26471623

  3. Effects of buffer additives and thermal processing methods on the solubility of shrimp (Penaeus monodon) proteins and the immunoreactivity of its major allergen.

    PubMed

    Lasekan, Adeseye O; Nayak, Balunkeswar

    2016-06-01

    This study examines the potential of two buffer additives (Tween 20 and DTT) to improve the solubility of proteins from shrimp subjected to different heat treatments and the allergenicity of tropomyosin in the extracts. The concentration of soluble proteins extracted by all the buffers from processed shrimp was significantly reduced compared with untreated samples. The concentration of total soluble proteins from heat treated shrimp increased significantly when phosphate buffer containing both surfactant and reducing agent was used as the extraction buffer. However, the concentrations of heat-stable proteins in the buffers were mostly similar. The electrophoretic profile of extracted proteins showed that tropomyosin is very stable under the different heat treatment methods used in this study except for high pressure steaming where the intensity of tropomyosin band was reduced. Competitive inhibition ELISA showed that high pressure steaming reduced the allergenicity of tropomyosin compared with other heat treatments methods. PMID:26830572

  4. Fundamentals of phosphate transfer.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Anthony J; Nome, Faruk

    2015-07-21

    Historically, the chemistry of phosphate transfer-a class of reactions fundamental to the chemistry of Life-has been discussed almost exclusively in terms of the nucleophile and the leaving group. Reactivity always depends significantly on both factors; but recent results for reactions of phosphate triesters have shown that it can also depend strongly on the nature of the nonleaving or "spectator" groups. The extreme stabilities of fully ionised mono- and dialkyl phosphate esters can be seen as extensions of the same effect, with one or two triester OR groups replaced by O(-). Our chosen lead reaction is hydrolysis-phosphate transfer to water: because water is the medium in which biological chemistry takes place; because the half-life of a system in water is an accepted basic index of stability; and because the typical mechanisms of hydrolysis, with solvent H2O providing specific molecules to act as nucleophiles and as general acids or bases, are models for reactions involving better nucleophiles and stronger general species catalysts. Not least those available in enzyme active sites. Alkyl monoester dianions compete with alkyl diester monoanions for the slowest estimated rates of spontaneous hydrolysis. High stability at physiological pH is a vital factor in the biological roles of organic phosphates, but a significant limitation for experimental investigations. Almost all kinetic measurements of phosphate transfer reactions involving mono- and diesters have been followed by UV-visible spectroscopy using activated systems, conveniently compounds with good leaving groups. (A "good leaving group" OR* is electron-withdrawing, and can be displaced to generate an anion R*O(-) in water near pH 7.) Reactivities at normal temperatures of P-O-alkyl derivatives-better models for typical biological substrates-have typically had to be estimated: by extended extrapolation from linear free energy relationships, or from rate measurements at high temperatures. Calculation is free

  5. Low noise buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators for precise time and frequency measurement and distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichinger, R. A.; Dachel, P.; Miller, W. H.; Ingold, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    Extremely low noise, high performance, wideband buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators were developed. These buffer amplifiers are designed to distribute reference frequencies from 30 KHz to 45 MHz from a hydrogen maser without degrading the hydrogen maser's performance. The buffered phase comparators are designed to intercompare the phase of state of the art hydrogen masers without adding any significant measurement system noise. These devices have a 27 femtosecond phase stability floor and are stable to better than one picosecond for long periods of time. Their temperature coefficient is less than one picosecond per degree C, and they have shown virtually no voltage coefficients.

  6. Identification and separation of the organic compounds in coal-gasification condensate waters. [5,5 dimethyl hydantoin, dihydroxy benzenes, acetonitrile

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, D.H. Jr.; King, C.J.

    1983-08-01

    A substantial fraction of the organic solutes in condensate waters from low-temperature coal-gasification processes are not identified by commonly employed analytical techniques, have low distriution coefficients (K/sub C/) into diisopropyl ether (DIPE) or methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK), and are resistant to biological oxidation. These compounds represent an important wastewater-treatment problem. Analytical techniques were developed to detect these polar compounds, and the liquid-liquid phase equilibria were measured with several solvents. A high-performance liquid - chromatography (HPLC) technique was employed to analyze four condensate-water samples from a slagging fixed-bed gasifier. A novel sample-preparation technique, consisting of an azeotropic distillation with isopropanol, allowed identification of compounds in the HPLC eluant by combined gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. 5,5-dimethyl hydantoin and related compounds were identified in condensate waters for the first time, and they account for 1 to 6% of the chemical oxygen demand (COD). Dimethyl hydatoin has a K/sub D/ of 2.6 into tributyl phosphate (TBP) and much lower K/sub D/ values into six other solvents. It is also resistant to biological oxidation. Phenols (59 to 76% of the COD), dihydroxy benzenes (0.02 to 9.5% of the COD), and methanol, acetonitrile, and acetone (15% of the COD in one sample) were also detected. Extraction with MIBK removed about 90% of the COD. MIBK has much higher K/sub D/ values than DIPE for dihydroxy benzenes. Chemical reactions occurred during storage of condensate-water samples. The reaction products had low K/sub D/ values into MIBK. About 10% of the COD had a K/sub D/ of nearly zero into MIBK. These compounds were not extracted by MIBK over a wide range of pH. 73 references, 6 figures, 35 tables.

  7. Chemical composition, electrochemical, and morphological properties of iron phosphate conversion coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Warburton, Y.J.; Gibbon, D.L.; Jackson, K.M.; Gate, L.F.; Rodnyansky, A.; Warburton, P.R.

    1999-09-01

    Iron phosphate conversion coatings are used widely in the pretreatment industry to enhance paint adherence to metal substrates and therefore improve corrosion resistance. However, very limited nonproprietary literature describing the properties of iron phosphate coating is available, as compared to volumes dedicated to zinc phosphate coating. The present study described chemical, electrochemical, and morphological characterizations of iron phosphate coating using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), potentiodynamic scans, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For the samples under investigation, the mode of operation of iron phosphate coating was to promote paint adhesion, and the coating itself did not impart significant corrosion protection to the metal substrate. It also was shown that the Fe/P ratio in the phosphate coating ranged from 1:2 to 1:1. When tested in pH 7 buffered phosphate solution, the phosphate coating displayed a passivation region, which also possessed the highest impedance value. The phosphate coating was found to comprise two layers: a dense, adherent layer and a loose, granular top layer. For samples with coating weights of 20 mg/ft{sup 2} to 30 mg/ft{sup 2} (0.22 g/m{sup 2} to 0.32 g/m{sup 2}), the corresponding coating thickness was {approximately} 0.1 {micro}m to 0.3 {micro}m.

  8. Temperature buffer test design, instrumentation and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandén, Torbjörn; Goudarzi, Reza; de Combarieu, Michel; Åkesson, Mattias; Hökmark, Harald

    The Temperature Buffer Test, TBT, is a heated full-scale field experiment carried out jointly by ANDRA and SKB at the SKB Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory in Southeast Sweden. An existing 8 m deep, 1.8 m diameter KBS-3-type deposition hole located at -420 m level has been selected for the test. The objectives are to improve the general understanding of Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical, THM, behavior of buffer materials submitted to severe thermal conditions with temperatures well over 100 °C during water uptake of partly saturated bentonite-based buffer materials, and to check, in due time, their properties after water saturation. The test includes two carbon steel heating canisters each 3 m high and 0.6 m diameter, surrounded by 0.6 m of buffer material. There is a 0.2 m thick sand shield between the upper heater and the surrounding bentonite, while the lower heater is surrounded by bentonite only. On top of the stack of bentonite blocks is a confining plug anchored to the rock. In the slot between buffer and rock wall is a sand filter equipped with pipes to control the water pressure at the boundary, which is seldom done with an EBS in situ experiment. Both heater mid-height planes are densely instrumented in order to follow, with direct or indirect methods, buffer THM evolution. Temperature, relative humidity, stress and pore pressure have been monitored since the test start in March 2003. Total water inflow is also monitored. Firstly, the present paper describes the test design, the instrumentation, the plug anchoring system and the system for water boundary pressure control. Second, having described the test, the paper shows different measurements that illustrate evolution of temperature, saturation, suction and swelling pressure in the upper and the lower buffer.

  9. The solvation of ions in acetonitrile and acetone. II. Monte Carlo simulations using polarizable solvent models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, R.; Richardi, J.; Fries, P. H.; Krienke, H.

    2002-11-01

    Structural properties and energies of solvation are simulated for alkali and halide ions. The solvation structure is discussed in terms of various site-site distribution functions, of solvation numbers, and of orientational correlation functions of the solvent molecules around the ions. The solvent polarizability has notable effects which cannot be intuitively predicted. In particular, it is necessary to reproduce the experimental solvation numbers of small ions. The changes of solvation properties are investigated along the alkali and halide series. By comparing the solvation of ions in acetone to that in acetonitrile, it is shown that the spatial correlations among the solvent molecules around an ion result in a strong screening of the ion-solvent direct intermolecular potential and are essential to understand the changes in the solvation structures and energies between different solvents. The solvation properties derived from the simulations are compared to earlier predictions of the hypernetted chain (HNC) approximation of the molecular Ornstein-Zernike (MOZ) theory [J. Richardi, P. H. Fries, and H. Krienke, J. Chem. Phys. 108, 4079 (1998)]. The MOZ(HNC) formalism gives an overall qualitatively correct picture of the solvation and its various unexpected findings are corroborated. For the larger ions, its predictions become quantitative. The MOZ approach allows to calculate solvent-solvent and ion-solvent potentials of mean force, which shed light on the 3D labile molecular and ionic architectures in the solution. These potentials of mean force convey a unique information which is necessary to fully interpret the angle-averaged structural functions computed from the simulations. Finally, simulations of solutions at finite concentrations show that the solvent-solvent and ion-solvent spatial correlations at infinite dilution are marginally altered by the introduction of fair amounts of ions.

  10. Iron(II) catalysis in oxidation of hydrocarbons with ozone in acetonitrile

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bataineh, Hajem; Pestovsky, Oleg; Bakac, Andreja

    2015-02-11

    Oxidation of alcohols, ethers, and sulfoxides by ozone in acetonitrile is catalyzed by submillimolar concentrations of Fe(CH3CN)62+. The catalyst provides both rate acceleration and greater selectivity toward the less oxidized products. For example, Fe(CH3CN)62+-catalyzed oxidation of benzyl alcohol yields benzaldehyde almost exclusively (>95%), whereas the uncatalyzed reaction generates a 1:1 mixture of benzaldehyde and benzoic acid. Similarly, aliphatic alcohols are oxidized to aldehydes/ketones, cyclobutanol to cyclobutanone, and diethyl ether to a 1:1 mixture of ethanol and acetaldehyde. The kinetics of oxidation of alcohols and diethyl ether are first-order in [Fe(CH3CN)62+] and [O3] and independent of [substrate] at concentrations greater thanmore » ~5 mM. In this regime, the rate constant for all of the alcohols is approximately the same, kcat = (8 ± 1) × 104 M–1 s–1, and that for (C2H5)2O is (5 ± 0.5) × 104 M–1 s–1. In the absence of substrate, Fe(CH3CN)62+ reacts with O3 with kFe = (9.3 ± 0.3) × 104 M–1 s–1. The similarity between the rate constants kFe and kcat strongly argues for Fe(CH3CN)62+/O3 reaction as rate-determining in catalytic oxidation. The active oxidant produced in Fe(CH3CN)62+/O3 reaction is suggested to be an Fe(IV) species in analogy with a related intermediate in aqueous solutions. As a result, this assignment is supported by the similarity in kinetic isotope effects and relative reactivities of the two species toward substrates.« less

  11. Kinetics and mechanism of monomolecular heterolysis of framework compounds. VI. Dehydrobromination of 2-bromo-2-methyladamantane in acetonitrile

    SciTech Connect

    Ponomareva, E.A.; Vasil'kevich, A.I.; Tarsenko, P.V.; Dvorko, G.F.

    1988-08-10

    The kinetics of dehydrobromination of 2-bromo-2-methyladamantane in acetonitrile were studied in the presence of triphenylverdazyl as internal indicator; k/sub 25/ = 8.57 /times/ 10/sup /minus/5/ sec/sup /minus/1/, /Delta/H/sup /ne// 79 kJ/mole, /Delta/S/sup /ne// /minus/58 kJ/mole /times/ deg. Additions of water, phenols, lithium perchlorate, and bromides increase the reaction rate, and additions of nitrates and picrates reduce it. A similar pattern is observed in the dehydrobromination of tert-butyl bromide in acetonitrile. In the presence of tetraethylammonium chloride the heterolysis rate of 2-bromo-2-methyladamantane decreases, while that of tert-butyl bromide increases. The positive salt effect is explained by stabilization of the transition state by the salt, and the negative salt effect is explained by the reaction of the anion with the sterically separated or solvent-separated ion pair of the substrate.

  12. Fluorescence of excited charge-transfer complexes and absolute dynamics of radical-ion pairs in acetonitrile

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, I.R.; Farid, S.

    1992-09-17

    An analysis of the dynamics of the radical-ion pairs of a series of 2,6,9,10-tetracyanoanthracene acceptor/alkylbenzene donor systems in acetonitrile is described in this paper. This analysis is carried out by using a combination of time-resolved emission and absorption spectroscopies and measurements of {Phi} {sub ions} from the contact radical-ion pair (CRIP) and the solvent-separated radical-ion pair (SSRIP).

  13. Complexation dynamics of CH3SCN and Li(+) in acetonitrile studied by two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kwon, YoungAh; Park, Sungnam

    2015-10-01

    Ion-molecule complexation dynamics were studied with CH3SCN and Li(+) in acetonitrile by vibrationally probing the nitrile stretching vibration of CH3SCN. The nitrile stretching vibration of CH3SCN has a long lifetime (T1 = ∼90 ps) and its frequency is significantly blue-shifted when CH3SCN is bound with Li(+) ions to form a CH3SCNLi(+) complex in acetonitrile. Such spectral properties enable us to distinguish free CH3SCN and the CH3SCNLi(+) complex in solutions and measure their dynamics occurring on hundred picosecond timescales. For the complexation between CH3SCN and Li(+) in acetonitrile, the change in enthalpy (ΔH = -7.17 kJ mol(-1)) and the change in entropy (ΔS = -34.4 J K(-1) mol(-1)) were determined by temperature-dependent FTIR experiments. Polarization-controlled infrared pump-probe (IR PP) spectroscopy was used to measure the population decay and orientational dynamics of free CH3SCN and the CH3SCNLi(+) complex. Especially, the orientational relaxation of the CH3SCNLi(+) complex was found to be almost 3 times slower than those of free CH3SCN because Li(+) ions strongly interact with the neighboring solvents. Most importantly, the complexation dynamics of CH3SCN and Li(+) in acetonitrile were successfully measured in real time by 2DIR spectroscopy for the first time and the dissociation and association time constants were directly determined by using the two-species exchange kinetic model. Our experimental results provide a comprehensive overview of the ion-molecule complexation dynamics in solutions occurring under thermal equilibrium conditions. PMID:26323322

  14. Substitution of carbonate buffer by water for IgG immobilization in enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Shrivastav, Tulsidas G; Basu, Anupam; Kariya, Kiran P

    2003-01-01

    The first step of enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), namely, adsorption of antigen or antibody to the plastic microtiter well plate, was studied as a function of insolubility of IgG in water. Immobilization efficiency was assessed in terms of number of wells coated per milliliter of primary antiserum. We have compared different coating/immobilization protocols, i.e., direct and indirect immobilization of primary antibody to the plastic microtiter well plate using carbonate buffer and phosphate buffer with glutaraldehyde. We have observed efficient coating when the immobilization of primary antibody through an immunobridge technique was performed, where water was used as a coating medium. It gave a higher number of wells coated per milliliter of anti-serum (primary or secondary) than other compared coating protocols and it allowed the use of serum (non-immune) and anti-serum (primary and secondary antibody) dilutions, avoiding the need for gamma-globulin purification from normal and immunized serum. PMID:12778971

  15. Stability of ribosomes of Staphylococcus aureus S6 sublethally heated in different buffers.

    PubMed

    Hurst, A; Hughes, A

    1978-02-01

    Cells of Staphylococcus aureus heated at 52 degrees C in magnesium-chelating buffers [pH 7.2, 50 mM potassium phosphate or 50 mM tris(hydroxymethyl)-aminomethane containing 1 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid] leaked 260-nm absorbing material, shown to be RNA, and suffered destruction of their ribosomes. These cells did not regain their salt tolerance when repair was carried out in the presence of actinomycin D (5 microgram/ml). Cells similarly heated in magnesium-conserving buffers [pH 7.2, 50 mM tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane containing 10 mM MgCl2 or piperazine buffer] did not leak RNA, suffered no ribosomal damage when heated for 15 min, and recovered, at least partially, in the presence of actinomycin D. Ribosomal damage, is therefore, a consequence of Mg2+ loss and is not an effect of heat per se. Cells suspended in either Mg2+-chelating or Mg2+-conserving buffers lost salt tolerance to about the same extent during heating at 52 degrees C. Therefore, sublethal heat injury can not be attributed to ribosomal damage. PMID:627531

  16. Dissolution properties of co-amorphous drug-amino acid formulations in buffer and biorelevant media.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, A T; DeClerck, L; Löbmann, K; Grohganz, H; Rades, T; Laitinen, R

    2015-07-01

    Co-amorphous formulations, particularly binary drug-amino acid mixtures, have been shown to provide enhanced dissolution for poorly-soluble drugs and improved physical stability of the amorphous state. However, to date the dissolution properties (mainly intrinsic dissolution rate) of the co-amorphous formulations have been tested only in buffers and their supersaturation ability remain unexplored. Consequently, dissolution studies in simulated intestinal fluids need to be conducted in order to better evaluate the potential of these systems in increasing the oral bioavailability of biopharmaceutics classification system class II drugs. In this study, solubility and dissolution properties of the co-amorphous simvastatin-lysine, gibenclamide-serine, glibenclamide-threonine and glibenclamide-serine-threonine were studied in phosphate buffer pH 7.2 and biorelevant media (fasted and fed state simulated intestinal fluids (FaSSIF and FeSSIF, respectively)). The co-amorphous formulations were found to provide a long-lasting supersaturation and improve the dissolution of the drugs compared to the crystalline and amorphous drugs alone in buffer. Similar improvement, but in lesser extent, was observed in biorelevant media suggesting that a dissolution advantage observed in aqueous buffers may overestimate the advantage in vivo. However, the results show that, in addition to stability advantage shown earlier, co-amorphous drug-amino acid formulations provide dissolution advantage over crystalline drugs in both aqueous and biorelevant conditions. PMID:26373205

  17. Dialysis buffer with different ionic strength affects the antigenicity of cultured nervous necrosis virus (NNV) suspensions.

    PubMed

    Gye, Hyun Jung; Nishizawa, Toyohiko

    2016-09-01

    Nervous necrosis virus (NNV) belongs to the genus Betanodavirus (Nodaviridae). It is highly pathogenic to various marine fishes. Here, we investigated the antigenicity changes of cultured NNV suspensions during 14days of dialyses using a dialysis tube at 1.4×10(4) molecular weight cut off (MWCO) in three different buffers (Dulbecco's phosphate buffered saline (D-PBS), 15mM Tris-HCl (pH 8.0), and deionized water (DIW)). Total NNV antigen titers of cultured NNV suspension varied depending on different dialysis buffers. For example, total NNV antigen titer during D-PBS dialysis was increased once but then decreased. During Tris-HCl dialysis, it was relatively stable. During dialysis in DIW, total NNV antigen titer was increased gradually. These antigenicity changes in NNV suspension might be due to changes in the aggregation state of NNV particles and/or coat proteins (CPs). ELISA values of NNV suspension changed due to changing aggregates state of NNV antigens. NNV particles in suspension were aggregated at a certain level. These aggregates were progressive after D-PBS dialysis, but regressive after Tris-HCl dialysis. The purified NNV particles self-aggregated after dialysis in D-PBS or in Tris-HCl containing 600mM NaCl, but not after dialysis in Tris-HCl or DIW. Quantitative analysis is merited to determine NNV antigens in the highly purified NNV particles suspended in buffer at low salt condition. PMID:27381060

  18. 12 CFR 3.11 - Capital conservation buffer and countercyclical capital buffer amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... or Federal savings association under subparts H and I of this part; 12 CFR 5.46, 12 CFR part 5, subpart E; 12 CFR part 6. (b) Countercyclical capital buffer amount. (1) General. An advanced approaches... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Capital conservation buffer and...

  19. 12 CFR 324.11 - Capital conservation buffer and countercyclical capital buffer amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... Additional limitations on distributions may apply to an FDIC-supervised institution under 12 CFR 303.241 and... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Capital conservation buffer and countercyclical capital buffer amount. 324.11 Section 324.11 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE...

  20. 12 CFR 217.11 - Capital conservation buffer and countercyclical capital buffer amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... distributions. Additional limitations on distributions may apply to a Board-regulated institution under 12 CFR 225.4, 12 CFR 225.8, and 12 CFR 263.202. (b) Countercyclical capital buffer amount. (1) General. An... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Capital conservation buffer and...

  1. Undergraduate Chemistry Students' Perceptions of and Misconceptions about Buffers and Buffer Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orgill, MaryKay; Sutherland, Aynsley

    2008-01-01

    Both upper- and lower-level chemistry students struggle with understanding the concept of buffers and with solving corresponding buffer problems. While it might be reasonable to expect general chemistry students to struggle with this abstract concept, it is surprising that upper-level students in analytical chemistry and biochemistry continue to…

  2. Tris buffer improves fluorescence yield of ram spermatozoa when evaluating membrane integrity.

    PubMed

    Yániz, Jesús Luis; Mateos, José Angel; Santolaria, Pilar

    2012-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of various buffers on the fluorescence signal intensity of two fluorochromes (IP and CFDA) when used to assess the membrane integrity of ram sperm. Second ejaculates (18) from nine adult males were collected using an artificial vagina and diluted in either MOPS, TRIS, TES, HEPES, citrate, or phosphate-based extenders. Semen samples were stored at 15°C and the membrane integrity was assessed within the first 24 h of storage. Mean fluorescence intensity (FI) of PI- and CDFA-labeled sperm heads and fluorescence background noise (FBN) were determined quantitatively using Image J software. Fluorescence contrast (FC) was expressed as the difference between FI and FBN. Significantly, higher FI and FC were recorded when TRIS diluent was used, rather than the other diluents, both in the propidium- and fluorescein-labeled cells. The citrate and phosphate-based extenders showed intermediate results of FC between those of TRIS and zwitterionic (MOPS, TES and HEPES) groups for the PI-labeled sperm. However, in the CFDA-labeled sperm, the lower values of FC were obtained in the citrate and phosphate groups due to increased levels of FBN. For the membrane-damaged sperm, fluorescent labeling was limited to the sperm heads when TRIS-buffer was used, whereas in the other groups, the sperm tail was also frequently observed. It was concluded that TRIS buffer solution markedly increases the fluorescence yield of IP/CFDA-labeled sperm cells in the ram and that this should be considered when evaluating their membrane integrity. PMID:22553829

  3. Photochemical oxidation of thiophene by O2 in an oil/acetonitrile two-phase extraction system.

    PubMed

    Li, Fa-Tang; Zhao, Di-Shun; Li, Hong-Xia; Liu, Rui-Hong

    2008-10-01

    Photochemical oxidation of thiophene in an n-octane/acetonitrile extraction system using O(2) as oxidant was studied. Results obtained here can be used as a reference for desulfurization of gasoline, because thiophene is one of the main components containing sulfur in fluid catalytic cracking gasoline. A 500-W high-pressure mercury lamp was used as a light source for irradiation, and air was introduced by a gas pump to supply O(2). Thiophene dissolved in nopolar n-octane solvent was photodecomposed and removed into the polar acetonitrile phase. The desulfurization rate of thiophene in n-octane was 65.2% under photoirradiation for 5 h under the conditions of air flow at 150 mL min(-1), and V(n-octane):V(acetonitrile) = 1:1. This can be improved to 96.5% by adding 0.15 g Na-ZSM-5 zeolite into the 100-mL reaction system, which is the absorbent for O(2) and thiophene. Under such conditions, the photooxidation kinetics of thiophene with O(2) and Na-ZSM-5 zeolite is first-order with an apparent rate constant of 0.6297 h(-1) and half-time of 1.10 h. The sulfur content can be reduced from 800 microL L(-1) to 28 microL L(-1). PMID:18991938

  4. Another glimpse over the salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction in acetonitrile/water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Valente, Inês Maria; Gonçalves, Luís Moreira; Rodrigues, José António

    2013-09-20

    The use of the salting-out effect in analytical chemistry is very diverse and can be applied to increase the volatility of the analytes in headspace extractions, to cause the precipitation of proteins in biological samples or to improve the recoveries in liquid-liquid extractions. In the latter, the salting-out process can be used to create a phase separation between water-miscible organic solvents and water. Salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE) is an advantageous sample preparation technique aiming HPLC-UV analysis when developing analytical methodologies. In fact, some new extraction methodologies like QuEChERS include the SALLE concept. This manuscript discusses another point of view over SALLE with particular emphasis over acetonitrile-water mixtures for HPLC-UV analysis; the influence of the salting-out agents, their concentration and the water-acetonitrile volume ratios were the studied parameters. α-dicarbonyl compounds and beer were used as test analytes and test samples, respectively. The influence of the studied parameters was characterized by the obtained phase separation volume ratio and the fraction of α-dicarbonyls extracted to the acetonitrile phase. Results allowed the distribution of salts within three groups according to the phase separation and their extractability: (1) chlorides and acetates, (2) carbonates and sulfates and (3) magnesium sulfate; of all tested salts, sodium chloride had the highest influence on the α-dicarbonyls fraction extracted. PMID:23958692

  5. Nonlinear spelling in graphemic buffer deficit.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Teresa; Nickels, Lyndsey

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a case of nonlinear spelling and its implications for theories of the graphemic buffer. C.T.J., an individual with an acquired deficit of the graphemic buffer, often wrote the letters of his responses in a nonlinear temporal order when writing to dictation. The spatial ordering of the letters was maintained: Letters in the later positions of the words were written towards the right side of the response, even when written before letters in earlier positions. This unusual phenomenon has been briefly reported in three prior cases but this study provides the most detailed analysis of the phenomenon to date. We specifically contend that the decoupling of the temporal and spatial aspects of spelling is difficult to reconcile with competitive queuing accounts of the graphemic buffer. PMID:27355609

  6. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate, dibasic...

  7. The adsorption and reaction of Acetonitrile on clean and oxygen covered Ag(110) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capote, Armand J.; Hamza, Alex V.; Canning, Nicholas D. S.; Madix, Robert J.

    1986-10-01

    The adsorption and reaction of acetonitrile (CH 3CN) on clean and oxygen covered Ag(110) surfaces has been studied using temperature programmed reaction spectroscopy (TPRS), isotope exchange, chemical displacement reactions and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). On the clean Ag(110) surface, CH 3CN was reversibly adsorbed, desorbing with an activation energy of 10 kcal mol -1 at 166 K from a monolayer state and at 158 K from a multilayer state. Vibrational spectra of multilayer, monolayer and sub-monolayer CH 3CN were in excellent agreement with that of gas phase CH 3CN indicating that CH 3CN is only weakly bonded to the clean Ag(110) surface. On the partially oxidized surface CH 3CN reacts with atomic oxygen to form adsorbed CH 2CN, OH and H 2O in addition to forming another molecular adsorption state with a desorption peak at 240 K. This molecular state shows a CN stretching frequency of 1840 cm -1, which is indicative of substantial rehybridization of the CN bond and is associated with side-on coordination via the π system. The CH 2CN species is stable up to 430 K, where C-H bond breaking and reformation begins, leading to the formation of CH 3CN at 480 K and HCN at 510 K and leaving only carbon on the surface. In the presence of excess oxygen atoms C-H bond breaking and reformation is more facile leading to additional desorption peaks for CH 3CN and H 2O at 420 K. This destabilizing effect of O (a) on Ch 2CN (a) is explained in terms of an anionic (CH 2CN -1) species. Comparison of the vibrational spectra from CH 2CN (a) and CD 2CN (a) supports the following assignment for the modes of adsorbed CH 2CN: ν(Ag-C) 215: δ(CCN) 545; ϱ t(CH 2) 695; ϱ w(CH 2) 850; ν(C-C) 960; ϱ r(CH 2) 1060; δ(CH 2) 1375; ν(CN) 2075; and ν(CH 2) 2940 cm -1. These results serve to further indicate the wide applicability of the acid-base reaction concept for reactions between gas phase Brönsted acids and adsorbed oxygen atoms on solver surfaces.

  8. Iron(II) catalysis in oxidation of hydrocarbons with ozone in acetonitrile

    SciTech Connect

    Bataineh, Hajem; Pestovsky, Oleg; Bakac, Andreja

    2015-02-11

    Oxidation of alcohols, ethers, and sulfoxides by ozone in acetonitrile is catalyzed by submillimolar concentrations of Fe(CH3CN)62+. The catalyst provides both rate acceleration and greater selectivity toward the less oxidized products. For example, Fe(CH3CN)62+-catalyzed oxidation of benzyl alcohol yields benzaldehyde almost exclusively (>95%), whereas the uncatalyzed reaction generates a 1:1 mixture of benzaldehyde and benzoic acid. Similarly, aliphatic alcohols are oxidized to aldehydes/ketones, cyclobutanol to cyclobutanone, and diethyl ether to a 1:1 mixture of ethanol and acetaldehyde. The kinetics of oxidation of alcohols and diethyl ether are first-order in [Fe(CH3CN)62+] and [O3] and independent of [substrate] at concentrations greater than ~5 mM. In this regime, the rate constant for all of the alcohols is approximately the same, kcat = (8 ± 1) × 104 M–1 s–1, and that for (C2H5)2O is (5 ± 0.5) × 104 M–1 s–1. In the absence of substrate, Fe(CH3CN)62+ reacts with O3 with kFe = (9.3 ± 0.3) × 104 M–1 s–1. The similarity between the rate constants kFe and kcat strongly argues for Fe(CH3CN)62+/O3 reaction as rate-determining in catalytic oxidation. The active oxidant produced in Fe(CH3CN)62+/O3 reaction is suggested to be an Fe(IV) species in analogy with a related intermediate in aqueous solutions. As a result, this assignment is supported by the similarity in kinetic isotope effects and relative reactivities of the two species toward substrates.

  9. Structural and energetic properties of acetonitrile-Group IV (A & B) halide complexes.

    PubMed

    Helminiak, Heather M; Knauf, Robin R; Danforth, Samuel J; Phillips, James A

    2014-06-19

    We have conducted an extensive computational study of the structural and energetic properties of select acetonitrile-Group IV (A & B) tetrahalide complexes, both CH3CN-MX4 and (CH3CN)2-MX4 (M = Si, Ge, Ti; X = F, Cl). We have also examined the reactivity of CH3CN with SiF4, SiCl4, GeCl4, and TiCl4, and measured low-temperature IR spectra of thin films containing CH3CN with SiF4, GeCl4, or TiCl4. The six 1:1 complexes fall into two general structural classes. CH3CN-TiCl4, CH3CN-TiF4, and CH3CN-GeF4, exhibit relatively short M-N bonds (~2.3 Å), an intermediate degree of distortion in the MX4 subunit, and binding energies ranging from 11.0 to 13.0 kcal/mol. Conversely, CH3CN-GeCl4, CH3CN-SiF4, and CH3CN-SiCl4, are weakly bonded systems, with long M-N distances (>3.0 Å), little distortion in the MX4 subunit, and binding energies ranging from 3.0 to 4.4 kcal/mol. The structural features of analogous 2:1 systems resemble those of their 1:1 counterparts, whereas the binding energies (relative to three isolated fragments) are roughly twice as large. Calculated M-N potential curves in the gas phase and bulk, dielectric media are reported for all 1:1 complexes, and for two systems, CH3CN-GeF4 and CH3CN-SiF4, these data predict significant condensed-phase structural changes. The effect on the CH3CN-SiF4 potential is extreme; the curve becomes quite flat over a broad range in dielectric media, and at higher ε values, the global minimum shifts inward by about 1.0 Å. In bulk reactivity experiments, no reaction was observed between CH3CN and SiF4, SiCl4, or GeCl4, whereas CH3CN and TiCl4 were found to react immediately upon contact. Also, thin-film IR spectra indicate a strong interaction between CH3CN and TiCl4, yet only weak interactions between CH3CN and GeCl4 or SiF4 in the solid state. PMID:24852185

  10. Biomediated continuous release phosphate fertilizer

    DOEpatents

    Goldstein, A.H.; Rogers, R.D.

    1999-06-15

    A composition is disclosed for providing phosphate fertilizer to the root zone of plants. The composition comprises a microorganism capable of producing and secreting a solubilization agent, a carbon source for providing raw material for the microorganism to convert into the solubilization agent, and rock phosphate ore for providing a source of insoluble phosphate that is solubilized by the solubilization agent and released as soluble phosphate. The composition is provided in a physical form, such as a granule, that retains the microorganism, carbon source, and rock phosphate ore, but permits water and soluble phosphate to diffuse into the soil. A method of using the composition for providing phosphate fertilizer to plants is also disclosed. 13 figs.

  11. Biomediated continuous release phosphate fertilizer

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Alan H.; Rogers, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    A composition is disclosed for providing phosphate fertilizer to the root zone of plants. The composition comprises a microorganism capable of producing and secreting a solubilization agent, a carbon source for providing raw material for the microorganism to convert into the solubilization agent, and rock phosphate ore for providing a source of insoluble phosphate that is solubilized by the solubilization agent and released as soluble phosphate. The composition is provided in a physical form, such as a granule, that retains the microorganism, carbon source, and rock phosphate ore, but permits water and soluble phosphate to diffuse into the soil. A method of using the composition for providing phosphate fertilizer to plants is also disclosed.

  12. Dysregulation of phosphate metabolism and conditions associated with phosphate toxicity.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ronald B; Razzaque, Mohammed S

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate homeostasis is coordinated and regulated by complex cross-organ talk through delicate hormonal networks. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), secreted in response to low serum calcium, has an important role in maintaining phosphate homeostasis by influencing renal synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, thereby increasing intestinal phosphate absorption. Moreover, PTH can increase phosphate efflux from bone and contribute to renal phosphate homeostasis through phosphaturic effects. In addition, PTH can induce skeletal synthesis of another potent phosphaturic hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), which is able to inhibit renal tubular phosphate reabsorption, thereby increasing urinary phosphate excretion. FGF23 can also fine-tune vitamin D homeostasis by suppressing renal expression of 1-alpha hydroxylase (1α(OH)ase). This review briefly discusses how FGF23, by forming a bone-kidney axis, regulates phosphate homeostasis, and how its dysregulation can lead to phosphate toxicity that induces widespread tissue injury. We also provide evidence to explain how phosphate toxicity related to dietary phosphorus overload may facilitate incidence of noncommunicable diseases including kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, cancers and skeletal disorders. PMID:26131357

  13. Dysregulation of phosphate metabolism and conditions associated with phosphate toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ronald B; Razzaque, Mohammed S

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate homeostasis is coordinated and regulated by complex cross-organ talk through delicate hormonal networks. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), secreted in response to low serum calcium, has an important role in maintaining phosphate homeostasis by influencing renal synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, thereby increasing intestinal phosphate absorption. Moreover, PTH can increase phosphate efflux from bone and contribute to renal phosphate homeostasis through phosphaturic effects. In addition, PTH can induce skeletal synthesis of another potent phosphaturic hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), which is able to inhibit renal tubular phosphate reabsorption, thereby increasing urinary phosphate excretion. FGF23 can also fine-tune vitamin D homeostasis by suppressing renal expression of 1-alpha hydroxylase (1α(OH)ase). This review briefly discusses how FGF23, by forming a bone–kidney axis, regulates phosphate homeostasis, and how its dysregulation can lead to phosphate toxicity that induces widespread tissue injury. We also provide evidence to explain how phosphate toxicity related to dietary phosphorus overload may facilitate incidence of noncommunicable diseases including kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, cancers and skeletal disorders. PMID:26131357

  14. Tribocorrosion behavior of beta titanium biomedical alloys in phosphate buffer saline solution.

    PubMed

    Pina, V Guiñón; Dalmau, A; Devesa, F; Amigó, V; Muñoz, A Igual

    2015-06-01

    The tribo-electrochemical behavior of different β titanium alloys for biomedical applications sintered by powder metallurgy has been investigated. Different mechanical, electrochemical and optical techniques were used to study the influence of the chemical composition, Sn content, and the electrochemical conditions on the tribocorrosion behavior of those alloys Ti30NbxSn alloys (where "x" is the weight percentage of Sn content, 2% and 4%). Sn content increases the active and passive dissolution rate of the titanium alloys, thus increasing the mechanically activated corrosion under tribocorrosion conditions. It also increases the mechanical wear of the alloy. Prevailing electrochemical conditions between -1 and 2V influences the wear accelerated corrosion by increasing it with the applied potential and slightly increases the mechanical wear of Ti30Nb4Sn. Wear accelerated corrosion can be predicted by existing models as a function of electrochemical and mechanical parameters of the titanium alloys. PMID:25771257

  15. Electrocatalytic water oxidation by a macrocyclic Cu(ii) complex in neutral phosphate buffer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fengshou; Li, Fei; Hu, Jixiang; Bai, Lichen; Zhu, Yong; Sun, Licheng

    2016-08-16

    A single-site copper complex, [Cu(TMC)(H2O)](NO3)2 (1, TMC = 1,4,8,11-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane), was found to be the most active copper-based catalyst towards electrocatalytic water oxidation in neutral aqueous solution. Complex 1 leads to a cathodic shift of approximately 200 mV in potential to reach a current density of 1 mA cm(-2) in comparison with that of the previously reported dinuclear copper complex under the same conditions. Upon immobilization of complex 1 on carbon cloth, it shows greatly improved activity than other copper-based WOCs including CuOx and Cu(2+). PMID:27480218

  16. O-buffer: a framework for sample-based graphics.

    PubMed

    Qu, Huamin; Kaufman, Arie E

    2004-01-01

    We present an innovative modeling and rendering primitive, called the O-buffer, as a framework for sample-based graphics. The 2D or 3D O-buffer is, in essence, a conventional image or a volume, respectively, except that samples are not restricted to a regular grid. A sample position in the O-buffer is recorded as an offset to the nearest grid point of a regular base grid (hence the name O-buffer). The O-buffer can greatly improve the expressive power of images and volumes. Image quality can be improved by storing more spatial information with samples and by avoiding multiple resamplings. It can be exploited to represent and render unstructured primitives, such as points, particles, and curvilinear or irregular volumes. The O-buffer is therefore a unified representation for a variety of graphics primitives and supports mixing them in the same scene. It is a semiregular structure which lends itself to efficient construction and rendering. O-buffers may assume a variety of forms including 2D O-buffers, 3D O-buffers, uniform O-buffers, nonuniform O-buffers, adaptive O-buffers, layered-depth O-buffers, and O-buffer trees. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the O--buffer in a variety of applications, such as image-based rendering, point sample rendering, and volume rendering. PMID:18579969

  17. Inorganic phosphate promotes redox cycling of iron in liver microsomes: effects on free radical reactions.

    PubMed

    Reinke, L A; Moore, D R; Rau, J M; McCay, P B

    1995-02-01

    The phosphate buffer concentration used in spin trapping experiments with liver microsomes markedly influenced rates of free radical formation from ethanol and dimethylsulfoxide, but not from carbon tetrachloride. Effects of phosphate concentration on ethanol radical formation were abolished by addition of deferoxamine or bathophenanthrolene, indicating that an iron-phosphate complex might be involved. High concentrations of phosphate stimulated rates of microsomal Fe+3 reduction and facilitated the mobilization of microsomal nonheme iron, but had little effect on a variety of microsomal monooxygenase enzyme activities. Although microsomal oxygen utilization and superoxide production were relatively unaffected by phosphate, hydrogen peroxide concentrations were markedly decreased in the presence of high concentrations of phosphate. Taken together, the data suggest that a ferric-phosphate complex may be enzymatically reduced by microsomal enzymes and NADPH. Reoxidation of ferrous ion is nonenzymatically promoted by phosphate and/or H2O2 produced by the microsomes. During the process of reoxidation, one or more oxidizing intermediates may be formed which initiate secondary free radical reactions. Although the reactivity of the intermediate(s) is similar to that of the hydroxyl radical, no spin trapping evidence was obtained to support this assignment. PMID:7864631

  18. Printing without Waiting: Buffers and Spoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Brian

    1989-01-01

    Describes two methods to increase the speed of printing on microcomputers: (1) buffers, which are external storage devices used to temporarily store data bound for the printer; and (2) spoolers, which are software programs used to capture printer output and send it to the computer's memory or to a disk file. (LRW)

  19. Buffer layers on biaxially textured metal substrates

    DOEpatents

    Shoup, Shara S.; Paranthamam, Mariappan; Beach, David B.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Goyal, Amit

    2001-01-01

    A method is disclosed for forming a biaxially textured buffer layer on a biaxially oriented metal substrate by using a sol-gel coating technique followed by pyrolyzing/annealing in a reducing atmosphere. This method is advantageous for providing substrates for depositing electronically active materials thereon.

  20. A Discovery Chemistry Experiment on Buffers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulevich, Suzanne E.; Herrick, Richard S.; Mills, Kenneth V.

    2014-01-01

    The Holy Cross Chemistry Department has designed and implemented an experiment on buffers as part of our Discovery Chemistry curriculum. The pedagogical philosophy of Discovery Chemistry is to make the laboratory the focal point of learning for students in their first two years of undergraduate instruction. We first pose questions in prelaboratory…

  1. Body Buffer Zone and Proxemics in Blocking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockwell, John C.; Bahs, Clarence W.

    This paper investigates the effect of personal body buffer zones on compositional arrangements staged by novice directors. Relationships between directors' concepts of personal space and their projection of its dimensions into staging are studied through the use of a variety of proximity measures--distance, area angles of approach, and physical…

  2. Baroreflex buffering and susceptibility to vasoactive drugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Jens; Tank, Jens; Shannon, John R.; Diedrich, Andre; Lipp, Axel; Schroder, Christoph; Arnold, Guy; Sharma, Arya M.; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, David; Luft, Friedrich C.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The overall effect of vasoactive drugs on blood pressure is determined by a combination of the direct effect on vascular tone and an indirect baroreflex-mediated effect, a baroreflex buffering of blood pressure. Differences in baroreflex function affect the responsiveness to vasoactive medications, particularly baroreflex buffering of blood pressure; however, the magnitude is not known. METHODS AND RESULTS: We characterized baroreflex function and responses to vasoactive drugs in patients with idiopathic orthostatic intolerance, patients with essential hypertension, patients with monogenic hypertension and brachydactyly, patients with multiple system atrophy, and control subjects. We used phenylephrine sensitivity during ganglionic blockade as a measure of baroreflex buffering. Phenylephrine (25 microg) increased systolic blood pressure 6+/-1.6 mm Hg in control subjects, 6+/-1.1 mm Hg in orthostatic intolerance patients, 18+/-3.9 mm Hg in patients with essential hypertension, 31+/-3.4 mm Hg in patients with monogenic hypertension, and 25+/-3.4 mm Hg in patients with multiple system atrophy. Similar differences in sensitivities between groups were observed with nitroprusside. The sensitivity to vasoactive drugs was highly correlated with baroreflex buffering function and to a lesser degree with baroreflex control of heart rate. In control subjects, sensitivities to nitroprusside and phenylephrine infusions were correlated with baroreflex heart rate control and sympathetic nerve traffic. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings are consistent with an important effect of baroreflex blood pressure buffering on the sensitivity to vasoactive drugs. They suggest that even moderate changes in baroreflex function may have a substantial effect on the sensitivity to vasoactive medications.

  3. Dual Effect of Phosphate Transport on Mitochondrial Ca2+ Dynamics*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, An-Chi; Liu, Ting; O'Rourke, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The large inner membrane electrochemical driving force and restricted volume of the matrix confer unique constraints on mitochondrial ion transport. Cation uptake along with anion and water movement induces swelling if not compensated by other processes. For mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, these include activation of countertransporters (Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and Na+/H+ exchanger) coupled to the proton gradient, ultimately maintained by the proton pumps of the respiratory chain, and Ca2+ binding to matrix buffers. Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is known to affect both the Ca2+ uptake rate and the buffering reaction, but the role of anion transport in determining mitochondrial Ca2+ dynamics is poorly understood. Here we simultaneously monitor extra- and intra-mitochondrial Ca2+ and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) to examine the effects of anion transport on mitochondrial Ca2+ flux and buffering in Pi-depleted guinea pig cardiac mitochondria. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake proceeded slowly in the absence of Pi but matrix free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]mito) still rose to ∼50 μm. Pi (0.001–1 mm) accelerated Ca2+ uptake but decreased [Ca2+]mito by almost 50% while restoring ΔΨm. Pi-dependent effects on Ca2+ were blocked by inhibiting the phosphate carrier. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake rate was also increased by vanadate (Vi), acetate, ATP, or a non-hydrolyzable ATP analog (AMP-PNP), with differential effects on matrix Ca2+ buffering and ΔΨm recovery. Interestingly, ATP or AMP-PNP prevented the effects of Pi on Ca2+ uptake. The results show that anion transport imposes an upper limit on mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and modifies the [Ca2+]mito response in a complex manner. PMID:25963147

  4. Thermodynamics of Neptunium (V) Complexes with Phosphate at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Y.; Friese, Judah I.; Bachelor, Paula P.; Moore, Dean A.; Rao, Linfeng

    2009-06-01

    Abstract – The complexation of Np(V) with phosphate at elevated temperatures was studied by a synergistic extraction method. A mixed buffer solution of TRIS and MES was used to maintain an appropriate pH value during the distribution experiments. The distribution ratio of Np(V) between the organic and aqueous phases was found to decrease as the concentrations of phosphate were increased. Stability constants of the 1:1 and 1:2 Np(V)-HPO42- complexes, dominant in the aqueous phase under the experimental conditions, were calculated from the effect of [HPO42-] on the distribution ratio. The thermodynamic parameters including enthalpy and entropy of complexation between Np(V) and HPO42- at 25o C – 55o C were calculated by the temperature coefficient method.

  5. Induction of polymerization of purified tubulin by sulfonate buffers. Marked differences between 4-morpholineethanesulfonate (Mes) and 1,4-piperazineethanesulfonate (Pipes).

    PubMed

    Waxman, P G; del Campo, A A; Lowe, M C; Hamel, E

    1981-11-01

    Interactions of both purified tubulin and microtubule protein (tubulin plus associated proteins) with two commonly used sulfonate buffers were examined. 1,4-Piperazineethanesulfonate (Pipes) and 4-morpholineethanesulfonate (Mes) at high concentrations induce the polymerization of purified tubulin in reactions requiring only buffer, tubulin and GTP. While both reactions were temperature-dependent, cold-reversible and inhibited by GDP, colchicine or Ca2+, there were significant differences between them. Substantially lower tubulin and buffer concentrations were required for Pipes-induced polymerization; and turbidity was much more intense in the Pipes-induced than in the Mes-induced reaction at the same protein concentration. Electron microscopy demonstrated that for the most part typical smooth-walled microtubules were formed in Mes, while aberrant forms were the predominant structures formed in Pipes. When the polymerization of microtubule protein was examined as a function of buffer concentration, biphasic patterns were observed with both Pipes and Mes: polymerization occurred at both low and high, but not intermediate, buffer concentrations. The turbidity observed at high concentrations of Pipes greatly exceeded that at low concentrations. With Mes, equivalent turbidity developed at both high and low buffer concentrations. Although associated proteins copolymerized with tubulin at low buffer concentrations, they were excluded from the polymerized material at high buffer concentrations. Pipes and Mes were compared to sodium phosphate, Tris/HCl and imidazole/HCl buffers at 0.1 M in several polymerization systems using both purified tubulin and microtubule protein. The sulfonate buffers were invariably associated with more vigorous reactions than the other buffers. PMID:6273166

  6. Pyrazolylamidino ligands from coupling of acetonitrile and pyrazoles: a systematic study.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Iglesias, Patricia; Arroyo, Marta; Bajo, Sonia; Strohmann, Carsten; Miguel, Daniel; Villafañe, Fernando

    2014-12-01

    Mixed pyrazole-acetonitrile complexes, both neutral fac-[ReBr(CO)3(NCMe)(pz*H)] (pz*H = pzH, pyrazole; dmpzH, 3,5-dimethylpyrazole; or indzH, indazole) and cationic fac-[Re(CO)3(NCMe)(pz*H)2]A (A = BF4, ClO4, or OTf), are described. Their role as the only starting products to obtain final pyrazolylamidino complexes fac-[ReBr(CO)3(NH═C(Me)pz*-κ(2)N,N)] and fac-[Re(CO)3(pz*H)(NH═C(Me)pz*-κ(2)N,N)]A, respectively, is examined. Other products involved in the processes, such as fac-[ReBr(CO)3(pz*H)2], fac-[Re(CO)3(NCMe)(NH═C(Me)pz*-κ(2)N,N)]A, and fac-[Re(CO)3(pz*H)2(OTf)] are also described. Warming CD3CN solutions of fac-[Re(CO)3(NCMe)(pz*H)2]A at 40 °C gives cleanly the pyrazolylamidino complexes [Re(CO)3(pz*H)(NH═C(Me)pz*-κ(2)N,N)]A as the only products, pointing to an intramolecular process. This is confirmed by carrying out reactions in the presence of one equivalent of a pyrazole different from that coordinated, which affords complexes where the pyrazolylamidino ligand contains only the pyrazole previously coordinated. When the reactions lead to an equilibrium mixture of the final and starting products, the reverse reaction gives the same equilibrium mixture, which indicates that the coupling reaction of pyrazoles and nitriles to obtain pyrazolylamidino ligands is a reversible intramolecular process. A systematic study of the possible factors which may affect the reaction gives the following results: (a) the yields of the direct reactions are higher for lower temperatures; (b) the tendency of the pyrazoles to give pyrazolylamidino complexes follows the sequence indzH > pzH > dmpzH; and (c) the reaction rates do not depend on the nature of the anion even when a large excess is added. The presence of a small amount of aqueous solution of NaOH catalyzes the reaction. Thus, addition of 0.5-1% of NaOH (aq) to solutions of fac-[ReBr(CO)3(NCMe)(pz*H)] (in CD3CN) or fac-[Re(CO)3(NCMe)(pz*H)2]A (in CD3CN, CD3NO2 or (CD3)2CO) allowed the syntheses of the

  7. Change in creep behavior of plexiform bone with phosphate ion treatment.

    PubMed

    Regimbal, R L; DePaula, C Alex; Guzelsu, N

    2003-01-01

    The effect of phosphate ions on the mechanical properties of plexiform bone in tension was investigated with an in-vitro model. Bone samples were treated with saline and phosphate ion solutions for three days at 25 degrees C and 37 degrees C and tested in tension. The mechanical properties of the bone samples treated with phosphate were not different than controls (saline treated). Electro kinetic measurements on plexiform bone particles treated with phosphate ions at 37 degrees C showed that phosphate ions alter electro kinetic potentials of bone particles by interacting with bone mineral as compare to saline treated particles near physiological pH. Because of the limited diffusion properties of intact plexiform bone tissue, the tension experiments indicate that, the effect of phosphate ions on the bone mineral-matrix interface is negligible after three days treatment. On the other hand, electro kinetic measurements demonstrated that in a short period of treatment time, phosphate ions diffuse through organic matrix barrier and interact with bone mineral when plexiform bone is in the particle form. As a final experiments bone samples were tested at 37 degrees C in three point bending configuration for three days in saline and phosphate buffer solution. The maximum tension stress generated in bending samples was about 75 percent of the tension yield stress of the samples. The creep experiments showed that the bending rigidity of bone samples tested in phosphate solution reduced in time hence the creep deformation increased compare to control samples tested in saline. This observation is attributed to the acceleration of phosphate ion diffusion into the bending samples due to micro cracks accumulation in bone tissue during the creep experiments which facilitated the phosphate ion interaction with bone mineral. PMID:12652019

  8. Rapid degradation of zinc oxide nanoparticles by phosphate ions

    PubMed Central

    García-García, F Javier; Reller, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Zinc oxide nanoparticles are highly sensitive towards phosphate ions even at pH 7. Buffer solutions and cell culture media containing phosphate ions are able to destroy ZnO nanoparticles within a time span from less than one hour to one day. The driving force of the reaction is the formation of zinc phosphate of very low solubility. The morphology of the zinc oxide particles has only a minor influence on the kinetics of this reaction. Surface properties related to different production methods and the presence and absence of labelling with a perylene fluorescent dye are more important. Particles prepared under acidic conditions are more resistant than those obtained in basic or neutral reaction medium. Surprisingly, the presence of a SiO2 coating does not impede the degradation of the ZnO core. In contrast to phosphate ions, β-glycerophosphate does not damage the ZnO nanoparticles. These findings should be taken into account when assessing the biological effects or the toxicology of zinc oxide nanoparticles. PMID:25383310

  9. Premixed acidic calcium phosphate cement: characterization of strength and microstructure.

    PubMed

    Aberg, J; Brisby, H; Henriksson, H B; Lindahl, A; Thomsen, P; Engqvist, H

    2010-05-01

    By using a premixed calcium phosphate cement (CPC), the handling properties of the cement are drastically improved, which is a challenge for traditional injectable CPCs. Previously premixed cements have been based on apatitic cements. In this article, acidic cement has been developed and evaluated. Monocalcium phosphate monohydrate and beta-tricalcium phosphate were mixed with glycerol to form a paste. As the paste does not contain water, no setting reaction starts and thus the working time is indefinite. Powder/liquid ratios (P/L) of 2.25, 3.5 and 4.75 were evaluated. Setting time (ST) and compressive strength (CS) were measured after 1 day, 1 week and 4 weeks in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution, and the corresponding microstructure was evaluated using electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The ST started when the cements were placed in PBS and ranged from 28 to 75 min, higher P/L gave a lower ST. Higher P/L also gave a higher CS, which ranged from 2 to 16 MPa. The microstructure mainly consisted of monetite, 1-5 microm in grain size. After 4 weeks in PBS, the strength increased. As acidic cements are resorbed faster in vivo, this cement should allow faster bone regeneration than apatitic cements. Premixed cements show a great handling benefit when compared with normal CPCs and can be formulated with similar ST and mechanical properties. PMID:20127991

  10. Dopamine-melanin film deposition depends on the used oxidant and buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Bernsmann, Falk; Ball, Vincent; Addiego, Frédéric; Ponche, Arnaud; Michel, Marc; Gracio, José Joaquin de Almeida; Toniazzo, Valérie; Ruch, David

    2011-03-15

    The deposition of "polydopamine" films, from an aqueous solution containing dopamine or other catecholamines, constitutes a new and versatile way to functionalize solid-liquid interfaces. Indeed such films can be deposited on almost all kinds of materials. Their deposition kinetics does not depend markedly on the surface chemistry of the substrate, and the films can reach thickness of a few tens of nanometers in a single reaction step. Up to now, even if a lot is known about the oxidation mechanism of dopamine in solution, only little information is available to describe the deposition mechanism on surfaces either by oxidation in solution or by electrodeposition. The deposition kinetics of melanin was only investigated from dopamine solutions using oxygen or ammonium persulfate as an oxidant and from a tris(hydroxymethyl) aminomethane (Tris) containing buffer solutions at pH 8.5. Many other oxidants could be used, and the buffer agent containing a primary amine group may influence the deposition process. Herein we show that the deposition kinetics of melanin from dopamine containing buffers at pH 8.5 can be markedly modified using Cu(2+) instead of O2 as an oxidant: the deposition kinetics remains linear up to thicknesses of more than 70 nm, whereas the film growth stops at 45 ± 5 nm in the presence of 02. In addition, the films prepared from Cu(2+) containing solutions display an absorption spectrum with defined peaks at 320 and 370 nm, which are absent in the spectra of films prepared in oxygenated solutions. The replacement of Tris buffer by phosphate buffer also has a marked effect on the melanin deposition kinetics. PMID:21332218

  11. Effect of buffer conditions on CYP2C8-mediated paclitaxel 6α-hydroxylation and CYP3A4-mediated triazolam α- and 4-hydroxylation by human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Toshiyuki; Ozaki, Yuya; Kusano, Tomomi; Hotta, Eri; Oya, Yuka; Komatsu, Seina; Goda, Hitomi; Ito, Kiyomi

    2016-01-01

    1. Buffer conditions in in vitro metabolism studies using human liver microsomes (HLM) have been reported to affect the metabolic activities of several cytochrome P450 (CYP) isozymes in different ways, although there are no reports about the dependence of CYP2C8 activity on buffer conditions. 2. The present study investigated the effect of buffer components (phosphate or Tris-HCl) and their concentration (10-200 mM) on the CYP2C8 and CYP3A4 activities of HLM, using paclitaxel and triazolam, respectively, as marker substrates. 3. The Km (or S50) and Vmax values for both paclitaxel 6α-hydroxylation and triazolam α- and 4-hydroxylation, estimated by fitting analyses based on the Michaelis-Menten or Hill equation, greatly depended on the buffer components and their concentration. 4. The CLint values in phosphate buffer were 1.2-3.0-fold (paclitaxel) or 3.1-6.4-fold (triazolam) higher than in Tris-HCl buffer at 50-100 mM. These values also depended on the buffer concentration, with a maximum 2.3-fold difference observed between 50 and 100 mM which are both commonly used in drug metabolism studies. 5. These findings suggest the necessity for optimization of the buffer conditions in the quantitative evaluation of metabolic clearances, such as in vitro-in vivo extrapolation and also estimating the contribution of a particular enzyme in drug metabolism. PMID:26290405

  12. Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles with Buffer-Dependent Variations of Size and Morphology in Biological Buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Syed Rahin; Oh, Sangjin; Baba, Rina; Zhou, Hongjian; Hwang, Sungu; Lee, Jaebeom; Park, Enoch Y.

    2016-02-01

    The demand for biologically compatible and stable noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) has increased in recent years due to their inert nature and unique optical properties. In this article, we present 11 different synthetic methods for obtaining gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) through the use of common biological buffers. The results demonstrate that the sizes, shapes, and monodispersity of the NPs could be varied depending on the type of buffer used, as these buffers acted as both a reducing agent and a stabilizer in each synthesis. Theoretical simulations and electrochemical experiments were performed to understand the buffer-dependent variations of size and morphology exhibited by these Au NPs, which revealed that surface interactions and the electrostatic energy on the (111) surface of Au were the determining factors. The long-term stability of the synthesized NPs in buffer solution was also investigated. Most NPs synthesized using buffers showed a uniquely wide range of pH stability and excellent cell viability without the need for further modifications.

  13. Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles with Buffer-Dependent Variations of Size and Morphology in Biological Buffers.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Syed Rahin; Oh, Sangjin; Baba, Rina; Zhou, Hongjian; Hwang, Sungu; Lee, Jaebeom; Park, Enoch Y

    2016-12-01

    The demand for biologically compatible and stable noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) has increased in recent years due to their inert nature and unique optical properties. In this article, we present 11 different synthetic methods for obtaining gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) through the use of common biological buffers. The results demonstrate that the sizes, shapes, and monodispersity of the NPs could be varied depending on the type of buffer used, as these buffers acted as both a reducing agent and a stabilizer in each synthesis. Theoretical simulations and electrochemical experiments were performed to understand the buffer-dependent variations of size and morphology exhibited by these Au NPs, which revealed that surface interactions and the electrostatic energy on the (111) surface of Au were the determining factors. The long-term stability of the synthesized NPs in buffer solution was also investigated. Most NPs synthesized using buffers showed a uniquely wide range of pH stability and excellent cell viability without the need for further modifications. PMID:26847691

  14. Electrolyte Solvation and Ionic Association. V. Acetonitrile-Lithium Bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Sang D.; Borodin, Oleg; Seo, D. M.; Zhou, Zhi B.; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2014-09-30

    Electrolytes with the salt lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) have been evaluated relative to comparable electrolytes with other lithium salts. Acetonitrile (AN) has been used as a model electrolyte solvent. The information obtained from the thermal phase behavior, solvation/ionic association interactions, quantum chemical (QC) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (with an APPLE&P many-body polarizable force field for the LiFSI salt) of the (AN)n-LiFSI mixtures provides detailed insight into the coordination interactions of the FSI- anions and the wide variability noted in the electrolyte transport property (i.e., viscosity and ionic conductivity).

  15. Impact of solute concentration on the electrocatalytic conversion of dissolved gases in buffered solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-08-01

    To maintain local pH levels near the electrode during electrochemical reactions, the use of buffer solutions is effective. Nevertheless, the critical effects of the buffer concentration on electrocatalytic performances have not been discussed in detail. In this study, two fundamental electrochemical reactions, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR), on a platinum rotating disk electrode are chosen as model gas-related aqueous electrochemical reactions at various phosphate concentrations. Our detailed investigations revealed that the kinetic and limiting diffusion current densities for both the ORR and HOR logarithmically decrease with increasing solute concentration (log |jORR | = - 0.39 c + 0.92 , log |jHOR | = - 0.35 c + 0.73) . To clarify the physical aspects of this phenomenon, the electrolyte characteristics are addressed: with increasing phosphate concentration, the gas solubility decrease, the kinematic viscosity of the solution increase and the diffusion coefficient of the dissolved gases decrease. The simulated limiting diffusion currents using the aforementioned parameters match the measured ones very well (log |jORR | = - 0.43 c + 0.99 , log |jHOR | = - 0.40 c + 0.54) , accurately describing the consequences of the electrolyte concentration. These alterations of the electrolyte properties associated with the solute concentration are universally applicable to other aqueous gas-related electrochemical reactions because the currents are purely determined by mass transfer of the dissolved gases.

  16. Spacecraft optical disk recorder memory buffer control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, Robert F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the research completed under the NASA-ASEE summer faculty fellowship program. The project involves development of an Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) to be used as a Memory Buffer Controller (MBC) in the Spacecraft Optical Disk System (SODR). The SODR system has demanding capacity and data rate specifications requiring specialized electronics to meet processing demands. The system is being designed to support Gigabit transfer rates with Terabit storage capability. The complete SODR system is designed to exceed the capability of all existing mass storage systems today. The ASIC development for SODR consist of developing a 144 pin CMOS device to perform format conversion and data buffering. The final simulations of the MBC were completed during this summer's NASA-ASEE fellowship along with design preparations for fabrication to be performed by an ASIC manufacturer.

  17. The Effects of pH on the Growth and Aspect Ratio of Chicken Egg White Lysozyme Crystals Prepared in Different Buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, U. J.; Horrell, E. E.; Kou, Y.; Pusey, Marc

    2000-01-01

    We have measured the nucleation and aspect ratio of CEWL crystals grown by vapor diffusion in acetate, butyrate, carbonate, succinate, and phosphate buffers in a range of pH spanning the pK(sub a) of these buffers. The nucleation numbers drop off significantly in the vicinity of pK(sub a) for each of the buffers except the phosphate system, in which we used only the pH range around the second titration point(pK2). There is a concomitant increase in the sizes of the crystals. Some typical nucleation number results are shown. These data support and extend other observations. In addition, we have examined changes in aspect ratio which accompany the suppression of nucleation within each buffer system. The length of the face in the [001] direction was measured, and compared to the width of the (110) face in the [110] type directions. We find that while the aspect ratio of the crystals is affected by pH, it is dominated by a correlation with the size of the crystals. Small crystals are longer in the [0011 direction than crystals that are larger (higher pH within a buffer system). This relationship is found to hold independent of the choice of buffer. These results are consistent with those of Judge et al, who used a batch process which resulted in uniform sizing of crystals at each pH. In these experiments, we specifically avoid agitating the protein/salt buffer mixture when combining the two. This permits the formation of a range of sizes at a given pH. The results for a .05 M acetate 5% NaCl buffer are also shown. We will discuss these results in light of a growth model.

  18. The effects of buffers and pH on the thermal stability, unfolding and substrate binding of RecA.

    PubMed

    Metrick, Michael A; Temple, Joshua E; MacDonald, Gina

    2013-12-31

    The Escherichia coli protein RecA is responsible for catalysis of the strand transfer reaction used in DNA repair and recombination. Previous studies in our lab have shown that high concentrations of salts stabilize RecA in a reverse-anionic Hofmeister series. Here we investigate how changes in pH and buffer alter the thermal unfolding and cofactor binding. RecA in 20mM HEPES, MES, Tris and phosphate buffers was studied in the pH range from 6.5 to 8.5 using circular dichroism (CD), infrared (IR) and fluorescence spectroscopies. The results show all of the buffers studied stabilize RecA up to 50°C above the Tris melting temperature and influence RecA's ability to nucleate on double-stranded DNA. Infrared and CD spectra of RecA in the different buffers do not show that secondary structural changes are associated with increased stability or decreased ability to nucleate on dsDNA. These results suggest the differences in stability arise from decreasing positive charge and/or buffer interactions. PMID:24036048

  19. Buffered explosions in steel pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    The impulse delivered to the walls of a vessel containing an explosion will increase if material is placed between the walls and the charge. If the impulse application time is small in compared with the eigenperiod of the vessel, the wall stress will increase in direct proportion to the impulse. Conversely, if the application period can be extended beyond half the eigenperiod, the peak stress will be proportional to the ratio of the impulse to the delivery period. With powder or granular buffers, it is possible for the delivery period to increase faster than the impulse as the buffer mass is increased. This is the reason why certain powders, or porous materials, can provide stress reduction even below that observed by evacuating the space between the walls and the explosive. If the buffer material is to serve as an effective mitigator, it must collapse on shock loading to a final density that depends only weakly on pressure; the criterion is that the wave speed in the material that impacts the wall must be small comparison with the impact (particle) speed. This behavior apparently occurs with salt, at least for modest values of the charge parameter, but to a lesser extent with snow under the same conditions. The vermiculite data are comparable to the salt in the charge paramete region where the two overlap; with increasing explosive, however, the vermiculite appears to behave like the snow and its effectiveness as a mitigator rapidly diminishes. It is also clear that once the wave speed criterion is seriously violated, the use of a powder buffer will result in a higher wall stress than if only air filled the space between walls and charge. 5 refs.

  20. Role of phosphate on stability and catalase mimetic activity of cerium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ragini; Singh, Sanjay

    2015-08-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeNPs) have been recently shown to scavenge reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) in different experimental model systems. CeNPs (3+) and CeNPs (4+) have been shown to exhibit superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase mimetic activity, respectively. Due to their nanoscale dimension, CeNPs are expected to interact with the components of biologically relevant buffers and medium, which could alter their catalytic properties. We have demonstrated earlier that CeNPs (3+) interact with phosphate and lose the SOD activity. However, very little is known about the interaction of CeNPs (4+) with the phosphate and other anions, predominantly present in biological buffers and their effects on the catalase mimetic-activity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we report that catalase mimetic-activity of CeNPs (4+) is resistant to the phosphate anions, pH changes and composition of cell culture media. Given the abundance of phosphate anions in the biological system, it is likely that internalized CeNPs would be influenced by cytoplasmic and nucleoplasmic concentration of phosphate. PMID:26011425

  1. META-ANALYSIS OF NITROGEN REMOVAL IN RIPARIAN BUFFERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian buffer zones, the vegetated region adjacent to streams and wetlands, are thought to be effective at intercepting and controlling nitrogen loads entering water bodies. Riparian buffer width may be positively related to nitrogen removal effectiveness by influencing nitrog...

  2. Complexation of buffer constituents with neutral complexation agents: part I. Impact on common buffer properties.

    PubMed

    Riesová, Martina; Svobodová, Jana; Tošner, Zdeněk; Beneš, Martin; Tesařová, Eva; Gaš, Bohuslav

    2013-09-17

    The complexation of buffer constituents with the complexation agent present in the solution can very significantly influence the buffer properties, such as pH, ionic strength, or conductivity. These parameters are often crucial for selection of the separation conditions in capillary electrophoresis or high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and can significantly affect results of separation, particularly for capillary electrophoresis as shown in Part II of this paper series (Beneš, M.; Riesová, M.; Svobodová, J.; Tesařová, E.; Dubský, P.; Gaš, B. Anal. Chem. 2013, DOI: 10.1021/ac401381d). In this paper, the impact of complexation of buffer constituents with a neutral complexation agent is demonstrated theoretically as well as experimentally for the model buffer system composed of benzoic acid/LiOH or common buffers (e.g., CHES/LiOH, TAPS/LiOH, Tricine/LiOH, MOPS/LiOH, MES/LiOH, and acetic acid/LiOH). Cyclodextrins as common chiral selectors were used as model complexation agents. We were not only able to demonstrate substantial changes of pH but also to predict the general complexation characteristics of selected compounds. Because of the zwitterion character of the common buffer constituents, their charged forms complex stronger with cyclodextrins than the neutral ones do. This was fully proven by NMR measurements. Additionally complexation constants of both forms of selected compounds were determined by NMR and affinity capillary electrophoresis with a very good agreement of obtained values. These data were advantageously used for the theoretical descriptions of variations in pH, depending on the composition and concentration of the buffer. Theoretical predictions were shown to be a useful tool for deriving some general rules and laws for complexing systems. PMID:23889602

  3. On-column nitrosation of amines observed in liquid chromatography impurity separations employing ammonium hydroxide and acetonitrile as mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Myers, David P; Hetrick, Evan M; Liang, Zhongming; Hadden, Chad E; Bandy, Steven; Kemp, Craig A; Harris, Thomas M; Baertschi, Steven W

    2013-12-01

    The availability of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) columns capable of operation at pH values up to 12 has allowed a greater selectivity space to be explored for method development in pharmaceutical analysis. Ammonium hydroxide is of particular value in the mobile phase because it is compatible with direct interfacing to electrospray mass spectrometers. This paper reports an unexpected N-nitrosation reaction that occurs with analytes containing primary and secondary amines when ammonium hydroxide is used to achieve the high pH and acetonitrile is used as the organic modifier. The nitrosation reaction has generality. It has been observed on multiple columns from different vendors and with multiple amine-containing analytes. Ammonia was established to be the source of the nitroso nitrogen. The stainless steel column frit and metal ablated from the frit have been shown to be the sites of the reactions. The process is initiated by removal of the chromium oxide protective film from the stainless steel by acetonitrile. It is hypothesized that the highly active, freshly exposed metals catalyze room temperature oxidation of ammonia to NO but that the actual nitrosating agent is likely N(2)O(3). PMID:24182763

  4. Isomerization and fragmentation of acetonitrile upon interaction with N(4S) atoms: the chemistry of nitrogen in dense molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mencos, Alejandro; Krim, Lahouari

    2016-08-01

    We experimentally show that the reaction between ground state nitrogen atoms N(4S) and acetonitrile CH3CN can lead to two distinct chemical pathways that are both thermally activated at very low temperatures. First is CH3CN isomerization which produces CH3NC and H2CCNH. Second is CH3CN decomposition which produces HNC and CH3CNH+CN- fragments, with the possible release of H2. Our results reveal that the mobility of N(4S)-atoms is stimulated in the 3-11 K temperature range, and that its subsequent encounter with one acetonitrile molecule is sufficient for the aforementioned reactions to occur without the need for additional energy to be supplied to the CH3CN + N(4S) system. These findings shed more light on the nitrogen chemistry that can possibly take place in dense molecular clouds, which until now was thought to only involve high-energy processes and therefore be unlikely to occur in such cold and dark interstellar regions. The reaction pathways we propose in this study have very important astrochemical implications, as it was shown recently that the atomic nitrogen might be more abundant, in many interstellar icy grain mantles, than previously thought. Also, these reaction pathways can now be considered within dense molecular clouds, and possibly affect the branching ratios for N-bearing molecules computed in astrochemical modelling.

  5. Structure of and hydrogen bonding in a 3:2 inclusion compound of N-methylmorpholine betaine hydrochloride with acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dega-Szafran, Z.; Szafran, M.; Antkowiak, A.; Grundwald-Wyspianska, M.; Nowak, E.; Gdaniec, M.; Kosturkiewicz, Z.

    2002-03-01

    N-Methylmorpholine betaine hydrochloride (MMB·HCl) forms a 3:2 inclusion compound with acetonitrile. The crystal structure of the compound has been determined at 100 K from a twinned crystal to be trigonal with the space group Poverline3; a= b=16.767(2), c=6.996(1) Å, γ=120°. The host framework is constructed from the ionic pairs formed by the chlorine anion and the protonated, at the carboxylate group, betaine cation. The cation and anion are joined by the O-H⋯Cl - hydrogen bond of the length 2.974(2) Å and angle 173(3)°. The guest molecules are included in two kinds of channels formed in the host matrix. The narrow channel runs parallel to the z axis at x=2/3, y=1/3 and is filled with acetonitrile molecules situated at the three-fold axis. The second channel, also parallel to the z axis, joins large cavities with the center at 0,0,1/2 of overline3 symmetry. The cavity accommodates two guest molecules which exhibit disorder in the crystal. There are only van der Waals interactions between the host and the guest. FTIR spectra of MMB·HCl and its deuterated analog have been discussed.

  6. Infrared spectra and structure of isomeric (cyanophenyl)acetonitriles and their carbanions: an ab initio force field treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binev, I. G.; Tsenov, J. A.; Velcheva, E. A.; Radomirska, V. B.; Juchnovski, I. N.

    1996-05-01

    The structures of o-, m- and p-(cyanophenyl)acetonitrile molecules and their carbanions were studied on the basis of infrared spectroscopic data and ab initio force field calculations. The assignment was given for the 3100-1100 cm -1 bands of the substances studied. The scaled theoretical infrared band frequencies agree well with those measured experimentally. An excellent linear correlation ( R = 0.999) was found between the theoretical and experimental vCN frequencies of both molecules and carbanions. The calculations predict well the strong increase in intensity (1.5- to 70-fold) of the vCN, v8 and v19 bands, which accompanies the conversion of the isomeric (cyanophenyl)acetonitrile molecules into the corresponding carbanions. The structures of the lithium, sodium and potassium derivatives of the nitriles studied in dimethyl sulphoxide are close to those of the kinetically free carbanions. The carbanionic centres are practically planar; the cyano groups carry considerable negative charges, but their influences on the carbanionic centres are mainly inductive. The carbanionic charges are delocalized over the phenylene rings (0.35-0.40 e-), methide (0.22-0.29 e-), α-cyano (0.24-0.27 e-) and ring-cyano (0.08-0.14 e-) groups.

  7. Direct Determination of Equilibrium Potentials for Hydrogen Oxidation/Production by Open Circuit Potential Measurements in Acetonitrile

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, John A. S.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2013-04-01

    Open circuit potentials were measured for acetonitrile solutions of a variety of acids and their conjugate bases under 1 atm H2. Acids examined were triethylammonium, dimethylformamidium, 2,6-dichloroanilinium, 4-cyanoanilinium, 4-bromoanilinium, and 4-anisidinium salts. These potentials, along with the pKa values of the acids, establish the value of the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) potential in acetonitrile as -0.028(4) V vs the ferrocenium/ferrocene couple. Dimethylformamidium forms homoconjugates and other aggregates with dimethylformamide; open circuit potentials (OCPs) were used to quantify the extent of these reactions. Overpotentials for electrocatalytic hydrogen production and oxidation were determined from open circuit potentials and voltammograms of acidic or basic catalyst solutions under H2. For these solutions, agreement between OCP values and potentials calculated using the Nernst equation is within 12 mV. Finally, use of the measured equilibrium potential allows direct comparison of catalytic systems in different media; it requires neither pKa values, homoconjugation constants, nor the SHE potential.

  8. Striking Effects of Storage Buffers on Apparent Half-Lives of the Activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Arylsulfatase.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuwei; Yang, Xiaolan; Wang, Deqiang; Hu, Xiaolei; Yuan, Mei; Pu, Jun; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Yang, Zhaoyong; Liao, Fei

    2016-08-01

    To obtain the label enzyme for enzyme-linked-immunoabsorbent-assay of two components each time in one well with conventional microplate readers, molecular engineering of Pseudomonas aeruginosa arylsulfatase (PAAS) is needed. To compare thermostability of PAAS/mutants of limited purity, effects of buffers on the half-activity time (t 0.5) at 37 °C were tested. At pH 7.4, PAAS showed non-exponential decreases of activity, with the apparent t 0.5 of ~6.0 days in 50 mM HEPES, but ~42 days in 10 mM sodium borate with >85 % activity after 15 days; protein concentrations in both buffers decreased at slower rates after there were significant decreases of activities. Additionally, the apparent t 0.5 of PAAS was ~14 days in 50 mM Tris-HCl, and ~21 days in 10 mM sodium phosphate. By sodium dodecyl-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the purified PAAS gave single polypeptide; after storage for 14 days at 37 °C, there were many soluble and insoluble fragmented polypeptides in the HEPES buffer, but just one principal insoluble while negligible soluble fragmented polypeptides in the borate buffer. Of tested mutants in the neutral borate buffer, rates for activity decreases and polypeptide degradation were slower than in the HEPES buffer. Hence, dilute neutral borate buffers were favorable for examining thermostability of PAAS/mutants. PMID:27372107

  9. Apoferritin Templated Synthesis of Metal Phosphate Nanoparticle Labels for Electrochemical Immunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Wu, Hong; Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2006-08-29

    W have introduced template-synthesized metal phosphate nanoparticle labels for electrochemical immunoassay. Such use of an apoferritin template offers a simple and convenient route to prepare metallic nanoparticle labels for electrochemical immunoassays and avoid the complicated and time-consuming nanoparticle synthesis process (QD synthesis). Releasing metal ions from metal phosphate in an acetate buffer (pH 4.6) eliminates the harsh condition in the traditional metallic nanoparticle dissolution (e.g., strong acid dissolution of QDs and gold nanoparticles). This method is ultrasensitive and its DL is low to 77fM. The simultaneous detection of multiple protein targets is easily performed by using different metal phosphate nanoparticle labels (cadmium phosphate and lead phosphate). This approach can be extended to prepare multiple metal (such as zinc, lead, cadmium, copper, indium, gold, silver) phosphate nanoparticle labels or hybrid metal (bimetallic or trimetallic with predetermined ratios) phosphate nanoparticle labels for a multiplex electrochemical immunoassay. The new nanoparticle labels could be applicable to other electrochemical bioassays, such as DNA, and is thus expected to lead to wide applications for protein diagnostics and for bioanalysis in general.

  10. Mono- and polyprotic buffer systems in anion exchange chromatography of influenza virus particles.

    PubMed

    Vajda, Judith; Weber, Dennis; Stefaniak, Sabine; Hundt, Boris; Rathfelder, Tanja; Müller, Egbert

    2016-05-27

    Different ions typically used in downstream processing of biologicals are evaluated for their potential in anion exchange chromatography of an industrially produced, pandemic influenza H1N1 virus. Capacity, selectivity and recovery are investigated based on single step elution parallel chromatography experiments. The inactivated H1N1 feedstream is produced in Madin-Darby Bovine Kidney cells. Interesting effects are found for sodium phosphate and sodium citrate. Both anions are triprotic kosmotropes. Anion exchange chromatography generally offers high scalability to satisfy sudden demands for vaccines, which may occur in case of an emerging influenza outbreak. Appropriate pH conditions for H1N1 adsorption are determined by Zeta potential measurements. The dynamic binding capacity of a salt tolerant polyamine-type resin is up to 6.4 times greater than the capacity of a grafted Q-type resin. Pseudo-affinity interactions of polyamines with the M2 protein of influenza may contribute to the obtained capacity increase. Both resins achieve greater capacity in sodium phosphate buffer compared to Tris/HCl. A recovery of 67% and DNA clearance close to 100% without DNAse treatment are achieved for the Q-type resin. Recovery of the virus from the salt tolerant resin requires the use of polyprotic acids in the elution buffer. 85% of the DNA and 60% of the proteins can be removed by the salt tolerant resin. The presence of sodium phosphate during anion exchange chromatography seems to support stability of the H1N1 particles in presence of hydrophobic cations. PMID:27130581

  11. Patterns of sediment and phosphorus accumulation in a riparian buffer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Riparian buffers prevent sediment and phosphorus (P) from reaching streams, but their accumulation in buffers is seldom measured. This study's objectives were to determine accumulations of sediment and P in a multi-species riparian buffer, and characterize spatial-temporal patterns of P in soil wate...

  12. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... EXPLORATION AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  13. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... EXPLORATION AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  14. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones. (a... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  15. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... EXPLORATION AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  16. Phosphonomethyl analogues of hexose phosphates.

    PubMed

    Webster, D; Jondorf, W R; Dixon, H B

    1976-05-01

    The analogue of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate in which the phosphate group, -O-PO3H2, on C-6 is replaced by the phosphonomethyl group, -CH2-PO3H2, was made enzymically from the corresponding analogue of 3-phosphoglycerate. It was a substrate for aldolase, which was used to form it, but not for fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase. It was hydrolysed chemically to yield the corresponding analogue of fructose 6-phosphate [i.e. 6-deoxy-6-(phosphonomethyl)-D-fructose, or, more strictly, 6,7-dideoxy-7-phosphono-D-arabino-2-heptulose]. This proved to be a substrate for the sequential actions of glucose 6-phosphate isomerase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. Thus seven out of the nine enzymes of the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways so far tested catalyse the reactions of the phosphonomethyl isosteres of their substrates. PMID:7247

  17. Effect of phosphate on heterogeneous Fenton oxidation of catechol by nano-Fe₃O₄ Inhibitor or stabilizer?

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaofang; He, Jie; Sun, Zhongxi; Holmgren, Allan; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    The effect of phosphate on adsorption and oxidation of catechol, 1,2-dihydroxybenzene, in a heterogeneous Fenton system was investigated. In situ attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was used to monitor the surface speciation at the nano-Fe3O4 catalyst surface. The presence of phosphate decreased the removal rate of catechol and the abatement of dissolved organic compounds, as well as the decomposition of H2O2. This effect of phosphate was mainly due to its strong reaction with surface sites on the iron oxide catalyst. At neutral and acid pH, phosphate could displace the adsorbed catechol from the surface of catalyst and also could compete for surface sites with H2O2. In situ IR spectra indicated the formation of iron phosphate precipitation at the catalyst surface. The iron phosphate surface species may affect the amount of iron atoms taking part in the catalytic decomposition of H2O2 and formation of hydroxyl radicals, and inhibit the catalytic ability of Fe3O4 catalyst. Therefore, phosphate ions worked as stabilizer and inhibitor in a heterogeneous Fenton reaction at the same time, in effect leading to an increase in oxidation efficiency in this study. However, before use of phosphate as pH buffer or H2O2 stabilizer in a heterogeneous Fenton system, the possible inhibitory effect of phosphate on the actual removal of organic pollutants should be fully considered. PMID:26899646

  18. Phosphate oxygen isotope analysis on microsamples of bioapatite: removal of organic contamination and minimization of sample size.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann-Bidlack, Felicitas B; Colman, Albert S; Fogel, Marilyn L

    2008-06-01

    Modern and fossil teeth record seasonal information on climate, diet, and migration through stable isotope compositions in enamel and dentine. Climatic signals such as seasonal variation in meteoric water isotopic composition can be recovered through a microscale histology-based sampling and isotopic analysis of enamel phosphate oxygen. The phosphate moiety in bioapatite is particularly resistant to post mortem diagenesis. In order to determine the phosphate oxygen isotope composition of enamel, phosphate must be chemically purified from other oxygen sources in the enamel lattice and matrix, mainly hydroxyl and carbonate ions, and trace quantities of organics. We present a wet chemical technique for purifying phosphate from microsampled enamel and dentine. This technique uses a sodium hypochlorite oxidation step to remove interferences from residual organic constituents of the enamel and/or dentine scaffold, isolates phosphate as relatively large and easily manipulated Ag(3)PO(4) crystals by using a strongly buffered, moderate-temperature microprecipitation, and preserves the oxygen isotope composition of the initial tooth phosphate. The reproducibility of phosphate oxygen isotope compositions thus determined (measured as delta(18)O, V-SMOW scale) is typically 0.2-0.3 per thousand (1 s.d.) on samples as small as 300 microg of enamel or dentine, a considerable improvement over available techniques for analyses of bioapatite phosphate oxygen. PMID:18470876

  19. Sphingosine 1-phosphate signalling.

    PubMed

    Mendelson, Karen; Evans, Todd; Hla, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a lipid mediator formed by the metabolism of sphingomyelin. In vertebrates, S1P is secreted into the extracellular environment and signals via G protein-coupled S1P receptors to regulate cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion, and thereby influence cell migration, differentiation and survival. The expression and localization of S1P receptors is dynamically regulated and controls vascular development, vessel stability and immune cell trafficking. In addition, crucial events during embryogenesis, such as angiogenesis, cardiogenesis, limb development and neurogenesis, are regulated by S1P signalling. Here, and in the accompanying poster, we provide an overview of S1P signalling in development and in disease. PMID:24346695

  20. Templated, layered manganese phosphate

    DOEpatents

    Thoma, Steven G.; Bonhomme, Francois R.

    2004-08-17

    A new crystalline maganese phosphate composition having an empirical formula: O). The compound was determined to crystallize in the trigonal space group P-3c1 with a=8.8706(4) .ANG., c=26.1580(2) .ANG., and V (volume)=1783 .ANG..sup.3. The structure consists of sheets of corner sharing Mn(II)O.sub.4 and PO.sub.4 tetrahedra with layers of (H.sub.3 NCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.3 N and water molecules in-between. The pronated (H.sub.3 NCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.3 N molecules provide charge balancing for the inorganic sheets. A network of hydrogen bonds between water molecules and the inorganic sheets holds the structure together.

  1. Light weight phosphate cements

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Natarajan, Ramkumar,; Kahn, David

    2010-03-09

    A sealant having a specific gravity in the range of from about 0.7 to about 1.6 for heavy oil and/or coal bed methane fields is disclosed. The sealant has a binder including an oxide or hydroxide of Al or of Fe and a phosphoric acid solution. The binder may have MgO or an oxide of Fe and/or an acid phosphate. The binder is present from about 20 to about 50% by weight of the sealant with a lightweight additive present in the range of from about 1 to about 10% by weight of said sealant, a filler, and water sufficient to provide chemically bound water present in the range of from about 9 to about 36% by weight of the sealant when set. A porous ceramic is also disclosed.

  2. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Reaction of Hydoxyl Radicals with Acetonitrile under Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hynes, A. J.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    The pulsed laser photolysis-pulsed laser induced fluorescence technique has been employed to determine absolute rate coefficients for the reaction OH + CH3CN (1) and its isotopic variants, OH + CD3CN (2), OD + CH3CN (3), and OD + CD3CN (4). Reactions 1 and 2 were studied as a function of pressure and temperature in N2, N2/O2, and He buffer gases. In the absence of O2 all four reactions displayed well-behaved kinetics with exponential OH decays and pseudo-first rate constants which were proportional to substrate concentration. Data obtained in N2 over the range 50-700 Torr at 298 K are consistent with k(sub 1), showing a small pressure dependence. The Arrhenius expression obtained by averaging data at all pressures in k(sub 1)(T) = (1.1(sup +0.5)/(sub -0.3)) x 10(exp -12) exp[(-1130 +/- 90)/T] cu cm /(molecule s). The kinetics of reaction 2 are found to be pressure dependent with k(sub 2) (298 K) increasing from (1.21 +/- 0.12) x 10(exp -14) to (2.16 +/- 0.11) x 10(exp -14) cm(exp 3)/ (molecule s) over the pressure range 50-700 Torr of N2 at 298 K. Data at pressures greater than 600 Torr give k(sub 2)(T) = (9.4((sup +13.4)(sub -5.0))) x 10(exp -13) exp[(-1180 +/- 250)/T] cu cm/(molecule s). The rates of reactions 3 and 4 are found to be independent of pressure over the range 50-700 Torr of N2 with 298 K rate coefficient given by k(sub 3) =(3.18 +/- 0.40) x 10(exp -14) cu cm/(molecule s) and k(sub 4) = (2.25 +/-0.28) x 10(exp -14) cu cm/(molecule s). In the presence of O2 each reaction shows complex (non-pseudo-first-order) kinetic behavior and/or an apparent decrease in the observed rate constant with increasing [O2], indicating the presence of significant OH or OD regeneration. Observation of regeneration of OH in (2) and OD in (3) is indicative of a reaction channel which proceeds via addition followed by reaction of the adduct, or one of its decomposition products, with O2. The observed OH and OD decay profiles have been modeled by using a simple mechanistic

  3. 21 CFR 520.823 - Erythromycin phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... (a) Specifications. Erythromycin phosphate is the phosphate salt of the antibiotic substance produced by the growth of Streptomyces erythreus or the same antibiotic substance produced by any other...

  4. 21 CFR 520.823 - Erythromycin phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... (a) Specifications. Erythromycin phosphate is the phosphate salt of the antibiotic substance produced by the growth of Streptomyces erythreus or the same antibiotic substance produced by any other...

  5. Flow injection potentiometric system for the simultaneous determination of inositol phosphates and phosphate: phosphorus nutritional evaluation on seeds and grains.

    PubMed

    Parra, Aleix; Ramon, Meritxell; Alonso, Julián; Lemos, Sherlan G; Vieira, Edivan C; Nogueira, Ana R A

    2005-10-01

    A simple flow injection potentiometric (FIP) system, which uses a tubular cobalt electrode, has been developed for phosphorus nutritional evaluation of seeds and grains. Inorganic phosphorus, P(i), is determined using a 1 x 10(-2) mol.L(-1) potassium phthalate buffer solution adjusted at pH 4. A sensitivity of 47 mV/decade and an operating range from 10 to 1000 mg.L(-1) (1 x 10(-4)-1 x 10(-2) M) of dihydrogen phosphate are obtained. The inositol phosphates amount, which is referred to the organic phosphorus, P(org), is directly determined from extracts using a 1 x 10(-2) mol.L(-1) Tris-HCl buffer solution adjusted at pH 8. A sensitivity of 127 mV/decade and an operating range of 10-1000 mg.L(-1) (2.5 x 10(-4)-5 x 10(-3) M) of P(org) (expressed as inositol hexakisphosphoric acid monocalcium) are achieved. Some samples of seed and grain are analyzed by an ICP-OES and a spectrophotometric method to compare results to the developed flow system; no significant differences at the 95% confidence level are observed using a paired t test. Other samples such as animal nursing feed, soybean meal, and corn are also analyzed with the proposed FIP system, showing a good correlation to the ICP-OES values. PMID:16190610

  6. Buffer for a gamma-insensitive optical sensor with gas and a buffer assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kruger, H.W.

    1994-05-10

    A buffer assembly is disclosed for a gamma-insensitive gas avalanche focal plane array operating in the ultra-violet/visible/infrared energy wavelengths and using a photocathode and an avalanche gas located in a gap between an anode and the photocathode. The buffer assembly functions to eliminate chemical compatibility between the gas composition and the materials of the photocathode. The buffer assembly in the described embodiment is composed of two sections, a first section constructed of glass honeycomb under vacuum and a second section defining a thin barrier film or membrane constructed, for example, of Al and Be, which is attached to and supported by the honeycomb. The honeycomb section, in turn, is supported by and adjacent to the photocathode. 7 figures.

  7. Buffer for a gamma-insensitive optical sensor with gas and a buffer assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kruger, Hans W.

    1994-01-01

    A buffer assembly for a gamma-insensitive gas avalanche focal plane array operating in the ultra-violet/visible/infrared energy wavelengths and using a photocathode and an avalanche gas located in a gap between an anode and the photocathode. The buffer assembly functions to eliminate chemical compatibility between the gas composition and the materials of the photocathode. The buffer assembly in the described embodiment is composed of two sections, a first section constructed of glass honeycomb under vacuum and a second section defining a thin barrier film or membrane constructed, for example, of Al and Be, which is attached to and supported by the honeycomb. The honeycomb section, in turn, is supported by and adjacent to the photocathode.

  8. Size Control of (99m)Tc-tin Colloid Using PVP and Buffer Solution for Sentinel Lymph Node Detection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong

    2015-06-01

    Colloidal particle size is an important characteristic that allows mapping sentinel nodes in lymphoscintigraphy. This investigation aimed to introduce different ways of making a (99m)Tc-tin colloid with a size of tens of nanometers. All agents, tin fluoride, sodium fluoride, poloxamer-188, and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), were mixed and labeled with (99m)Tc. Either phosphate or sodium bicarbonate buffers were used to adjust the pH levels. When the buffers were added, the size of the colloids increased. However, as the PVP continued to increase, the size of the colloids was controlled to within tens of nanometers. In all samples, phosphate buffer added PVP (30 mg) stabilized tin colloid ((99m)Tc-PPTC-30) and sodium bicarbonate solution added PVP (50 mg) stabilized tin colloid ((99m)Tc-BPTC-50) were chosen for in vitro and in vivo studies. (99m)Tc-BPTC-50 (<20 nm) was primarily located in bone marrow and was then secreted through the kidneys, and (99m)Tc-PPTC-30 (>100 nm) mainly accumulated in the liver. When a rabbit was given a toe injection, the node uptake of (99m)Tc-PPTC-30 decreased over time, while (99m)Tc-BPTC-50 increased. Therefore, (99m)Tc-BPTC-50 could be a good candidate radiopharmaceutical for sentinel node detection. The significance of this study is that nano-sized tin colloid can be made very easily and quickly by PVP. PMID:26028937

  9. Hybrid Silicon AWG Lasers and Buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurczveil, Geza

    Silicon photonics promises the low cost integration of optical components with CMOS electronics thus enabling optical interconnects in future generation processors. The hybrid silicon platform (HSP) is one approach to make optically active components on silicon. While many optical components on the HSP have been demonstrated, few photonic integrated circuits (PICs), consisting of multiple elements, have been demonstrated. In this dissertation, two Hybrid Silicon PICs and their building blocks will be presented. The first PIC to be presented is a multiwavelength laser based on an AWG. It consists of Fabry-Perot cavities integrated with hybrid silicon amplifiers and an intracavity filter in the form of an AWG with a channel spacing of 360 GHz. Four-channel lasing operation is shown. Single-sided fiber-coupled output powers as high as 35 µW are measured. The SMSR is as high as 35 dB. Various device characteristics are compromised as the AWG was attacked during the III-V process, thus showing the need to properly protect passive components during III-V processing. The second PIC to be presented is a fully integrated optical buffer. The device consists of a hybrid silicon switch, a 1.1 m long silicon waveguide, and cascaded hybrid silicon amplifiers. The passive delay line is protected by dielectric layers to limit passive losses to 0.5 dB/cm. Noise filters in the form of saturable absorbers are integrated in the buffer to allow for a larger number of recirculations in the delay line compared to a delay without filters. Tapers are used to transition the mode from the passive region to the hybrid region with losses as low as 0.22 dB per transition and reflectivities below -35 dB. Error free operation of the hybrid silicon switch is demonstrated in all four paths. The integrated buffer failed due to low yield, showing the current limitations of the HSP.

  10. Analysis of a hybrid, unidirectional buffer strip laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharani, L. R.; Goree, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    A method of analysis capable of predicting accurately the fracture behavior of a unidirectional composite laminate containing symmetrically placed buffer strips is presented. As an example, for a damaged graphite/epoxy laminate, the results demonstrate the manner in which to select the most efficient combination of buffer strip properties necessary to inhibit crack growth. Ultimate failure of the laminate after crack arrest can occur under increasing load either by continued crack extension through the buffer strips or the crack can jump the buffer strips. For some typical hybrid materials it is found that a buffer strip spacing-to-width ratio of about four to one is the most efficient.

  11. Analysis of a hybrid-undirectional buffer strip laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharani, L. R.; Goree, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    A method of analysis capable of predicting accurately the fracture behavior of a unidirectional composite laminate containing symmetrically placed buffer strips is presented. As an example, for a damaged graphite/epoxy laminate, the results demonstrate the manner in which to select the most efficient combination of buffer strip properties necessary to inhibit crack growth. Ultimate failure of the laminate after the arrest can occur under increasing load either by continued crack extension through the buffer strips or the crack can jump the buffer strips. For some typical hybrid materials it is found that a buffer strip spacing to width ratio of about four to one is the most efficient.

  12. Concentrated Flow through a Riparian Buffer: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. B.; Nogues, J. P.; Hutchinson, S. L.

    2005-05-01

    Riparian buffers are often used for in-situ treatment of agricultural runoff. Although the benefits of riparian buffers are well recongized, concentration of flow can restrict the efficiency of contaminant removal. This study evaluates flow concentration at a agricultural site near Manhattan, Kansas. Manual and automated GIS analyses of a high-resolution digital elevation model were used to determine the fraction of runoff contributing to each buffer segment. Subsequent simulation of the system in WEPP (Water Erosion and Prediction Project) demonstrates the extent to which flow concentration affects buffer efficiency. Recommendations are presented for the design of adaptive-width buffers.

  13. k(+)-buffer: An Efficient, Memory-Friendly and Dynamic k-buffer Framework.

    PubMed

    Vasilakis, Andreas-Alexandros; Papaioannou, Georgios; Fudos, Ioannis

    2015-06-01

    Depth-sorted fragment determination is fundamental for a host of image-based techniques which simulates complex rendering effects. It is also a challenging task in terms of time and space required when rasterizing scenes with high depth complexity. When low graphics memory requirements are of utmost importance, k-buffer can objectively be considered as the most preferred framework which advantageously ensures the correct depth order on a subset of all generated fragments. Although various alternatives have been introduced to partially or completely alleviate the noticeable quality artifacts produced by the initial k-buffer algorithm in the expense of memory increase or performance downgrade, appropriate tools to automatically and dynamically compute the most suitable value of k are still missing. To this end, we introduce k(+)-buffer, a fast framework that accurately simulates the behavior of k-buffer in a single rendering pass. Two memory-bounded data structures: (i) the max-array and (ii) the max-heap are developed on the GPU to concurrently maintain the k-foremost fragments per pixel by exploring pixel synchronization and fragment culling. Memory-friendly strategies are further introduced to dynamically (a) lessen the wasteful memory allocation of individual pixels with low depth complexity frequencies, (b) minimize the allocated size of k-buffer according to different application goals and hardware limitations via a straightforward depth histogram analysis and (c) manage local GPU cache with a fixed-memory depth-sorting mechanism. Finally, an extensive experimental evaluation is provided demonstrating the advantages of our work over all prior k-buffer variants in terms of memory usage, performance cost and image quality. PMID:26357252

  14. Branch target buffer design and optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perleberg, Chris H.; Smith, Alan J.

    1993-01-01

    Consideration is given to two major issues in the design of branch target buffers (BTBs), with the goal of achieving maximum performance for a given number of bits allocated to the BTB design. The first issue is BTB management; the second is what information to keep in the BTB. A number of solutions to these problems are reviewed, and various optimizations in the design of BTBs are discussed. Design target miss ratios for BTBs are developed, making it possible to estimate the performance of BTBs for real workloads.

  15. Spacecraft optical disk recorder memory buffer control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, Robert F.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) for use in the control electronics of the Spacecraft Optical Disk Recorder (SODR). Specifically, this project is to design an extendable memory buffer controller ASIC for rate matching between a system Input/Output port and the SODR's device interface. The aforementioned goal can be partitioned into the following sub-goals: (1) completion of ASIC design and simulation (on-going via ASEE fellowship); (2) ASIC Fabrication (at ASIC manufacturer); and (3) ASIC Testing (NASA/LaRC, Christopher Newport University).

  16. Buffer layers and articles for electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Paranthaman, Mariappan P.; Aytug, Tolga; Christen, David K.; Feenstra, Roeland; Goyal, Amit

    2004-07-20

    Materials for depositing buffer layers on biaxially textured and untextured metallic and metal oxide substrates for use in the manufacture of superconducting and other electronic articles comprise RMnO.sub.3, R.sub.1-x A.sub.x MnO.sub.3, and combinations thereof; wherein R includes an element selected from the group consisting of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, and Y, and A includes an element selected from the group consisting of Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, and Ra.

  17. Oxidative phosphorylation and energy buffering in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Nitschmann, W H; Peschek, G A

    1986-01-01

    The onset of respiration in the cyanobacteria Anacystis nidulans and Nostoc sp. strain Mac upon a shift from dark anaerobic to aerobic conditions was accompanied by rapid energization of the adenylate pool (owing to the combined action of ATP synthase and adenylate kinase) and also the guanylate, uridylate, and cytidylate pools (owing to nucleoside diphosphate and nucleoside monophosphate kinases). Rates of the various transphosphorylation reactions were comparable to the rate of oxidative phosphorylation, thus explaining, in part, low approximately P/O ratios which incorporate adenylates only. The increase of ATP, GTP, UTP, and CTP levels (nanomoles per minute per milligram [dry weight]) in oxygen-pulsed cells of A. nidulans and Nostoc species was calculated to be, on average, 2.3, 1.05, 0.8, and 0.57, respectively. Together with aerobic steady-state pool sizes of 1.35, 0.57, 0.5, and 0.4 nmol/mg (dry weight) for these nucleotides, a fairly uniform turnover of 1.3 to 1.5 min-1 was derived. All types of nucleotides, therefore, may be conceived of as being in equilibrium with each other, reflecting the energetic homeostasis or energy buffering of the (respiring) cyanobacterial cell. For the calculation of net efficiencies of oxidative phosphorylation in terms of approximately P/O ratios, this energy buffering was taken into account. Moreover, in A. nidulans an additional 30% of the energy initially conserved in ATP by oxidative phosphorylation was immediately used up by a plasma membrane-bound reversible H+-ATPase for H+ extrusion. Consequently, by allowing for energy buffering and ATPase-linked H+ extrusion, maximum P/O ratios of 2.6 to 3.3 were calculated. By contrast, in Nostoc sp. all the H+ extrusion, appeared to be linked to a plasma membrane-bound respiratory chain, thus bypassing any ATP formation and leading to P/O ratios of only 1.3 to 1.5 despite the correction for energy buffering. PMID:3023299

  18. Comparison of peak shape in hydrophilic interaction chromatography using acidic salt buffers and simple acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Heaton, James C; Russell, Joseph J; Underwood, Tim; Boughtflower, Robert; McCalley, David V

    2014-06-20

    The retention and peak shape of neutral, basic and acidic solutes was studied on hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) stationary phases that showed both strong and weak ionic retention characteristics, using aqueous-acetonitrile mobile phases containing either formic acid (FA), ammonium formate (AF) or phosphoric acid (PA). The effect of organic solvent concentration on the results was also studied. Peak shape was good for neutrals under most mobile phase conditions. However, peak shapes for ionised solutes, particularly for basic compounds, were considerably worse in FA than AF. Even neutral compounds showed deterioration in performance with FA when the mobile phase water concentration was reduced. The poor performance in FA cannot be entirely attributed to the negative impact of ionic retention on ionised silanols on the underlying silica base materials, as results using PA at lower pH (where their ionisation is suppressed) were inferior to those in AF. Besides the moderating influence of the salt cation on ionic retention, it is likely that salt buffers improve peak shape due to the increased ionic strength of the mobile phase and its impact on the formation of the water layer on the column surface. PMID:24813934

  19. Distribution of pesticides in n-hexane/water and n-hexane/acetonitrile systems and estimation of possibilities of their extraction isolation and preconcentration from various matrices.

    PubMed

    Zayats, M F; Leschev, S M; Petrashkevich, N V; Zayats, M A; Kadenczki, L; Szitás, R; Szemán Dobrik, H; Keresztény, N

    2013-04-24

    Distribution of 150 most widely used pesticides of different chemical classes (amides, anilinopirimidines, aromatics, benzenesulfonates, carbamates, dicarboximides, organophosphorus compounds, phenyl esters, phenylureas, pyrazoles, pyrethroids, pyrimidines, strobilurins, sulfamides, triazines, triazoles, etc.) in n-hexane/water and n-hexane/acetonitrile systems was investigated at 25°C. Distribution constants of pesticides (P) have been calculated as ratio of pesticide concentration in n-hexane to its concentration in water or acetonitrile phase. HPLC and GC methods were used for pesticides determination in phases. It was found that the overwhelming majority of pesticides are hydrophobic, i.e. in n-hexane/water system LgP≫0, and the difference in LgP values can reach 9.1 units. Replacement of water for acetonitrile leads to dramatic fall of LgP values reaching 9.5 units. The majority of LgP values in this case are negative and their differences is strongly leveled in comparison with a hexane/water system. Thus, maximal difference in pesticides LgP values for n-hexane/acetonitrile system is 3.2 units. It is shown that n-hexane can be used for selective and efficient extraction and preconcentration of pesticides from water matrices. On the other hand, acetonitrile is effective for the isolation and preconcentration of pesticides from hydrocarbon and vegetable oil matrices. The distribution constants described in the paper may be effectively used for the estimation of possibilities of extraction isolation, preconcentration and separation of pesticides. PMID:23567114

  20. Acanthamoeba encystment: multifactorial effects of buffers, biocides, and demulcents present in contact lens care solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Christopher J; Lynch, Shawn C; Rah, Marjorie J; Millard, Kimberly A; Morris, Timothy W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether agents which are purportedly capable of inducing encystment of Acanthamoeba can recapitulate the signal when tested in differing formulations. Methods In accordance with the International Standard ISO 19045, Acanthamoeba castellanii ATCC 50370 trophozoites were cultured in antibiotic-free axenic medium, treated with test solutions, and encystment rates plus viability were measured via bright field and fluorescent microscopy. Test solutions included phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), borate-buffered saline, biguanide- and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-based biocides, propylene glycol (PG) and povidone (POV) ophthalmic demulcents, and one-step H2O2-based contact lens disinfection systems. Results Only PBS solutions with 0.25 ppm polyaminopropyl biguanide (PAPB) and increasing concentrations of PG and POV stimulated A. castellanii encystment in a dose-dependent manner, whereas PBS solutions containing 3% H2O2 and increasing concentrations of PG and POV did not stimulate encystment. Borate-buffered saline and PBS/citrate solutions containing PG also did not stimulate encystment. In addition, no encystment was observed after 24 hours, 7 days, or 14 days of exposures of trophozoites to one-step H2O2 contact lens disinfection products or related solutions. Conclusion The lack of any encystment observed when trophozoites were treated with existing or new one-step H2O2 contact lens care products, as well as when trophozoites were exposed to various related test solutions, confirms that Acanthamoeba encystment is a complex process which depends upon simultaneous contributions of multiple factors including buffers, biocides, and demulcents. PMID:26508829

  1. Quasi-isoelectric buffers for protein analysis in a fast alternative to conventional capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Antonioli, Paolo; Mendieta, Martha E; Sebastiano, Roberto; Citterio, Attilio; Peltre, Gabriel; Busnel, Jean-Marc; Descroix, Stephanie; Candiano, Giovanni; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2006-03-20

    Two different approaches are here reported for obtaining ultra-narrow pI cuts from 2-pH unit wide carrier ampholyte ranges, as commercially available, for use as quasi-isoelectric buffers in capillary electrophoresis separations of proteins. One of them uses multicompartment electrolyzers endowed with isoelectric membranes (Immobiline technology); the other employs the Rotofor equipment. Although the first approach results in more precise pI cuts, the latter technique is much faster, easier to handle and permits the immediate collection of 20 fractions in a single run. This results in ultra-narrow, ca. 0.1-pH unit intervals, uniformly spaced apart along the original wider gradient utilized for the fractionation. It is here shown that such quasi-isoelectric buffers, especially those in the pH 8-9 interval, have the unique property of coating the silica wall, thus preventing interaction of the proteins with the silica surface, that would otherwise totally disrupt the separation. On the contrary, such a shielding is not obtained in control, non isoelectric buffers (such as phosphate), that give very poor separations in uncoated capillaries. It is hypothesized that such a unique shielding effect is due to the oligo-amino backbone of the carrier ampholytes, typically composed (in the Vesterberg's synthetic approach) of 4-6 nitrogens spaced apart by ethylene moieties. Although such oligoprotic buffers should bear, in the isoelectric state, just one positive and one negative charge, they might be transiently ionized upon contact with the silanols, thus inducing a cooperative binding to the silica wall. PMID:16289957

  2. Isolation and phosphate-solubilizing ability of a fungus, Penicillium sp. from soil of an alum mine.

    PubMed

    Chai, Bo; Wu, Yan; Liu, Pengming; Liu, Biao; Gao, Meiying

    2011-02-01

    The use of microorganisms to solubilize elemental phosphorus from insoluble rock phosphate is a promising method to greatly reduce not only environmental pollution but also production costs. Phosphate-solubilizing microorganisms were isolated from soils in China, and a fungus strain (PSM11-5) from a soil sample from an alum mine, with the highest phosphate solubilization potential, was selected and identified as a Penicillium sp. Strain PSM11-5 could grow in buffered medium with pH values between 3.0 and 8.0 and showed phosphate solubilizing activity at pH values from 5.0 to 8.0. It also exhibited a degree of tolerance to the heavy metal ions, Cd(2+), Co(2+), and Cr(6+). PSM11-5 could rapidly solubilize tricalcium phosphate, and a high phosphate-solubilizing efficiency of 98% was achieved in an optimized medium. The strain could solubilize rock phosphate and aluminum phosphate with a solubilizing efficiency of approximately 74.5%, but did not solubilize iron phosphate. Solubilization of phosphate depended on acidification. Analysis of PSM11-5 culture supernatants by capillary electrophoresis showed that tricalcium phosphate was solubilized to PO(4) (3-) and Ca(2+) , and that the organic acid produced by the fungus was mainly gluconic acid at approximately ca. 13 g l(-1). In addition, PSM11-5 produced ca. 830 mg l(-1) of citric acid when it was used to solubilize rock phosphate. These excellent properties of strain PSM11-5 suggest that the fungus has potential for agricultural and industrial utilization. PMID:21259286

  3. Microchip electrospray: cone-jet stability analysis for water-acetonitrile and water-methanol mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Jung, Stephanie; Effelsberg, Uwe; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2011-03-25

    Changes in mobile phase composition during high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) gradient elution coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) sensitively affect electrospray operation modes. In this work, we identify the influences of dynamic changes in bulk conductivity on the cone-jet stability island for aqueous acetonitrile and aqueous methanol mobile phases commonly used in reversed-phase HPLC. Bulk conductivities of the mobile phases were varied by adding different amounts of formic acid. A commercial microchip-HPLC/ESI-MS configuration was modified to enable in situ electrospray diagnostics by frequency analysis of the microchip emitter current and spray imaging. This approach facilitated the detection of different spray modes together with their onset potentials. The established spray modes are described and the differences in onset potentials and stability regions explained by the physicochemical properties of the electrosprayed liquid. PMID:21333298

  4. Solvation of fluoro-acetonitrile in water by 2D-IR spectroscopy: A combined experimental-computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Cazade, Pierre-André; Das, Akshaya K.; Tran, Halina; Kläsi, Felix; Hamm, Peter; Bereau, Tristan; Meuwly, Markus

    2015-06-07

    The solvent dynamics around fluorinated acetonitrile is characterized by 2-dimensional infrared spectroscopy and atomistic simulations. The lineshape of the linear infrared spectrum is better captured by semiempirical (density functional tight binding) mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics simulations, whereas force field simulations with multipolar interactions yield lineshapes that are significantly too narrow. For the solvent dynamics, a relatively slow time scale of 2 ps is found from the experiments and supported by the mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics simulations. With multipolar force fields fitted to the available thermodynamical data, the time scale is considerably faster—on the 0.5 ps time scale. The simulations provide evidence for a well established CF–HOH hydrogen bond (population of 25%) which is found from the radial distribution function g(r) from both, force field and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations.

  5. An analytical method for the determination of perfluorinated compounds in whole blood using acetonitrile and solid phase extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Leo W Y; Taniyasu, Sachi; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Xu, Della Z Y; Guruge, Keerthi S; Lam, Paul K S; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi

    2009-06-19

    A method for the analysis of perfluorinated compounds (perfluoroalkyl sulfonates: C4, C6, C8, C10; perfluoroalkyl sulfinates: C6, C8, C10; perfluorooctanesulfonamide, N-ethyl perfluorooctanesulfonamide, N-ethyl perfluorooctanesulfonamidoacetate, perfluorocarboxylates: C4-C14; fluorotelomer carboxylate (7:3, 8:2) in whole blood using acetonitrile and OASIS WAX solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge was developed. Separation of target compounds in two HPLC columns (ion exchange JJ50-2D and C18 Betasil columns) was examined. Matrix recoveries of the developed methods ranged from 70% to 120%. Separation of possible inferences such as taurodeoxycholic acid (TDC) was accomplished using an ion exchange JJ50-2D column, and this separation was validated using whole blood of different animals. PMID:19439311

  6. Carbon-hydrogen vs. carbon-carbon bond cleavage of 1,2-diarylethane radical cations in acetonitrile-water

    SciTech Connect

    Camaioni, D.M.; Franz, J.A.

    1984-05-04

    Radical cations of 1,2-diarylethanes and 1-phenyl-2-arylethanes (Ar = phenyl, p-tolyl, p-anisyl) were generated in acidic 70% acetonitrile-water by Cu/sup 2 +/-catalyzed peroxydisulfate oxidation. The radical cations fragment mainly by loss of benzylic protons (C-H cleavage) rather than by alkyl C-C bond cleavage. The 1,2-diarylethanol products undergo further selective oxidation to aryl aldehydes and arylmethanols via rapid equilibration of diarylethane and diarylethanol radical cations. The radical cation of 2,3-dimethyl-2,3-diphenylbutane fragments efficiently by C-C cleavage, forming cumyl radical and cumyl cation. Oxidations of bibenzyl-bicumyl mixtures show selective oxidation of bicumyl dependent on total substrate concentration, providing evidence of equilibrating radical cations and showing that bicumyl fragments faster than bibenzyl loses protons. The effects of reaction conditions and substrate structure on reactivity are discussed.

  7. IR spectra and structure of (4-nitrophenyl)acetonitrile and of its carbanion: experimental and ab initio studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binev, Y. I.; Petrova, R. R.; Tsenov, J. A.; Binev, I. G.

    2000-01-01

    The structures of (4-nitrophenyl)acetonitrile and of its carbanion were studied on the basis of both quantitative IR spectra and ab initio force field calculations. The spectral and structural changes, which take place in the course of the conversion of the parent molecule into the carbanion, are essential and spread over the whole species. In agreement between theory and experiment, the conversion studied causes strong frequency decreases (down to 136 cm -1) and intensity increases (up to 90-fold) of the cyano and nitro stretching bands. The molecule→carbanion conversion is accompanied by both quinoidization of the phenylene ring and a change in the configuration of the methylenic carbon atom: from tetrahedral in the molecule it becomes planar in the carbanion. The carbanionic charge is delocalized over the carbanionic center (0.40 e -), phenylene (0.24 e -), nitro (0.21 e -) and cyano (0.15 e -) groups.

  8. Effect of phase symmetry on the NMR spectrum of acetonitrile oriented in a uniaxial-biaxial-uniaxial phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepak, H. S. Vinay; Yelamaggad, C. V.; Khetrapal, C. L.; Ramanathan, K. V.

    2016-09-01

    We report here the measurement of the Csbnd H and the Hsbnd H dipolar couplings of the methyl group of acetonitrile oriented in the biaxial liquid crystal potassium laurate/1-decanol/water system. These parameters show large variations when measured as a function of temperature. The variations follow the symmetry of the phase as the liquid crystal goes through the sequence of uniaxial - biaxial - uniaxial phases and show a close correspondence to the phase changes that occur in the liquid crystalline solvent coinciding with the onset of biaxiality. The Hsbnd Csbnd H bond angle calculated after incorporating vibrational corrections to the dipolar couplings is discussed in terms of contributions in the case of the biaxial liquid crystal arising from vibration-rotation interaction effects.

  9. Temperature deactivation of excited Tb{sup 3+} in the presence of 1, 2-dioxetane in acetonitrile

    SciTech Connect

    Ableeva, N.Sh.; Voloshin, A.I.; Ostakhov, S.S.

    1994-10-01

    Quenching the fluorescence (FL) of terbium perchlorate by 2,2{prime}-adamantane-2,2{prime}-dioxide (1) was shown to have a chemical character and was caused by the formation of the [1...Tb{sup 3+}] complex. The dependence of the lifetime ({tau}) of FL of Tb{sup *3+} in acetonitrile on the temperature and concentration of 1 has been studied. The temperature dependence of {tau} is caused by a rearrangement of the inner sphere of the aquasolvate complexes of Tb{sup 3+}, which leads to the replacement of H{sub 2}O with MeCN and 1. The energy of replacing the H{sub 2}O molecule in the inner sphere of complexes with a solvent molecule has been calculated.

  10. Adsorption of water from aqueous acetonitrile on silica-based stationary phases in aqueous normal-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Jan; Jandera, Pavel

    2014-12-29

    Excess adsorption of water from aqueous acetonitrile mobile phases was investigated on 16 stationary phases using the frontal analysis method and coulometric Karl-Fischer titration. The stationary phases include silica gel and silica-bonded phases with different polarities, octadecyl and cholesterol, phenyl, nitrile, pentafluorophenylpropyl, diol and zwitterionic sulfobetaine and phosphorylcholine ligands bonded on silica, hybrid organic-silica and hydrosilated matrices. Both fully porous and core-shell column types were included. Preferential uptake of water by the columns can be described by Langmuir isotherms. Even though a diffuse rather than a compact adsorbed discrete layer of water on the adsorbent surface can be formed because of the unlimited miscibility of water with acetonitrile, for convenience, the preferentially adsorbed water was expressed in terms of a hypothetical monomolecular water layer equivalent in the inner pores. The uptake of water strongly depends on the polarity and type of the column. Less than one monomolecular water layer equivalent was adsorbed on moderate polar silica hydride-based stationary phases, Ascentis Express F5 and Ascentis Express CN column at the saturation capacity, while on more polar stationary phases, several water layer equivalents were up-taken from the mobile phase. The strongest affinity to water was observed on the ZIC cHILIC stationary phases, where more than nine water layer equivalents were adsorbed onto its surface at its saturation capacity. Columns with bonded hydroxyl and diol ligands show stronger water adsorption in comparison to bare silica. Columns based on hydrosilated silica generally show significantly decreased water uptake in comparison to stationary phases bonded on ordinary silica. Significant correlations were found between the water uptake and the separation selectivity for compounds with strong polarity differences. PMID:25544246

  11. Thermodynamics of various F420 coenzyme models as sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ke; Shen, Guang-Bin; Zhu, Xiao-Qing

    2015-06-14

    32 F420 coenzyme models with alkylation of the three different N atoms (N1, N3 and N10) in the core structure (XFH(-)) were designed and synthesized and the thermodynamic driving forces (defined in terms of the molar enthalpy changes or the standard redox potentials in this work) of the 32 XFH(-) releasing hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and electrons, the thermodynamic driving forces of the 32 XFH˙ releasing protons and hydrogen atoms and the thermodynamic driving forces of XF(-)˙ releasing electrons in acetonitrile were determined using titration calorimetry and electrochemical methods. The effects of the methyl group at N1, N3 and N10 and a negative charge on N1 and N10 atoms on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were examined; the results show that seating arrangements of the methyl group and the negative charge have remarkably different effects on the thermodynamic properties of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates. The effects of the substituents at C7 and C8 on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were also examined; the results show that the substituents at C7 and C8 have good Hammett linear free energy relationships with the six thermodynamic parameters. Meanwhile, a reasonable determination of possible reactions between members of the F420 family and NADH family in vivo was given according to a thermodynamic analysis platform constructed using the elementary step thermodynamic parameter of F420 coenzyme model 2FH(-) and NADH model MNAH releasing hydride ions in acetonitrile. The information disclosed in this work can not only fill a gap in the chemical thermodynamics of F420 coenzyme models as a class of very important organic sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons, but also strongly promote the fast development of the chemistry and applications of F420 coenzyme

  12. Low-temperature growth of nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers by acetonitrile catalytic CVD using Ni-based catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Tomohiro; Makino, Yuri; Fukukawa, Makoto; Nakamura, Hideya; Watano, Satoru

    2016-06-01

    To synthesize nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers (N-CNFs) at high growth rates and low temperatures less than 673 K, nickel species (metallic nickel and nickel oxide) supported on alumina particles were used as the catalysts for an acetonitrile catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The nickel:alumina mass ratio in the catalysts was fixed at 0.05:1. The catalyst precursors were prepared from various nickel salts (nitrate, chloride, sulfate, acetate, and lactate) and then calcined at 1073 K for 1 h in oxidative (air), reductive (hydrogen-containing argon), or inert (pure argon) atmospheres to activate the nickel-based catalysts. The effects of precursors and calcination atmosphere on the catalyst activity at low temperatures were studied. We found that the catalysts derived from nickel nitrate had relatively small crystallite sizes of nickel species and provided N-CNFs at high growth rates of 57 ± 4 g-CNF/g-Ni/h at 673 K in the CVD process using 10 vol% hydrogen-containing argon as the carrier gas of acetonitrile vapor, which were approximately 4 times larger than that of a conventional CVD process. The obtained results reveal that nitrate ions in the catalyst precursor and hydrogen in the carrier gas can contribute effectively to the activation of catalysts in low-temperature CVD. The fiber diameter and nitrogen content of N-CNFs synthesized at high growth rates were several tens of nanometers and 3.5 ± 0.3 at.%, respectively. Our catalysts and CVD process may lead to cost reductions in the production of N-CNFs.

  13. Studies on the nuances of the electrochemically induced room temperature isomerization of cis-stilbene in acetonitrile and ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Rahim, Omar; Simonov, Alexandr N; Boas, John F; Rüther, Thomas; Collins, David J; Perlmutter, Patrick; Bond, Alan M

    2014-03-20

    Electrochemical reduction of cis-stilbene occurs by two well-resolved one-electron reduction steps in acetonitrile with (n-Bu)4NPF6 as the supporting electrolyte and in N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium (Pyrr1,4(+)) and (trimethylamine)(dimethylethylamine)-dihydroborate bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide (NTf2(-)) ionic liquids (ILs). Mechanistic details of the electroreduction have been probed by dc and Fourier transformed ac voltammetry, simulation of the voltammetry, bulk electrolysis, and EPR spectroscopy. The first one-electron reduction induces fast cis to trans isomerization in CH3CN and ILs, most likely occurring via disproportionation of cis-stilbene radical anions and fast transformation of the cis-dianion to the trans-configuration. The second reduction process is chemically irreversible in CH3CN due to protonation of the dianion but chemically reversible in highly aprotic ILs under high cis-stilbene concentration conditions. Increase of the (n-Bu)4NPF6 supporting electrolyte concentration (0.01-1.0 M) in CH3CN induces substantial positive shifts in the potentials for reduction of cis-stilbene, consistent with strong ion pairing of the anion radical and dianion with (n-Bu)4N(+). However, protection by ion pairing against protonation of the stilbene dianions or electrochemically induced cis-trans-stilbene isomerization is not achieved. Differences in electrode kinetics and reversible potentials for cis-stilbene(0/•-) and trans-stilbene(0/•-) processes are less pronounced in the Pyrr1,4-NTf2 ionic liquid than in the molecular solvent acetonitrile. PMID:24558952

  14. Applications and functions of food-grade phosphates.

    PubMed

    Lampila, Lucina E

    2013-10-01

    Food-grade phosphates are used in the production of foods to function as buffers, sequestrants, acidulants, bases, flavors, cryoprotectants, gel accelerants, dispersants, nutrients, precipitants, and as free-flow (anticaking) or ion-exchange agents. The actions of phosphates affect the chemical leavening of cakes, cookies, pancakes, muffins, and doughnuts; the even melt of processed cheese; the structure of a frankfurter; the bind and hydration of delicatessen meats; the fluidity of evaporated milk; the distinctive flavor of cola beverages; the free flow of spice blends; the mineral content of isotonic beverages; and the light color of par-fried potato strips. In the United States, food-grade phosphates are generally recognized as safe, but use levels have been defined for some foods by the Code of Federal Regulations, specifically Titles 9 and 21 for foods regulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), respectively. Standards for food purity are defined nationally and internationally in sources such as the Food Chemicals Codex and the Joint Food and Agriculture Organization and World Health Organization (FAO/WHO) Expert Committee on Food Additives. PMID:24033359

  15. Calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles for caries control.

    PubMed

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Birkedal, Henrik; Olsen, Jakob; Skovgaard, Jonas; Sutherland, Duncan S; Wejse, Peter L; Nyvad, Bente; Meyer, Rikke L

    2016-01-01

    Caries is caused by acid production in biofilms on dental surfaces. Preventing caries therefore involves control of microorganisms and/or the acid produced. Here, calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles are presented as a new approach to caries control. The particles are made by co-precipitation and designed to bind to bacteria in biofilms, impede biofilm build-up without killing the microflora, and release phosphate ions to buffer bacterial acid production if the pH decreases below 6. Analysis of biofilm formation and pH in a five-species biofilm model for dental caries showed that treatment with particles or pure osteopontin led to less biofilm formation compared to untreated controls or biofilms treated with osteopontin-free particles. The anti-biofilm effect can thus be ascribed to osteopontin. The particles also led to a slower acidification of the biofilm after exposure to glucose, and the pH always remained above 5.5. Hence, calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles show potential for applications in caries control. PMID:26923119

  16. Identification of plant vacuolar transporters mediating phosphate storage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tzu-Yin; Huang, Teng-Kuei; Yang, Shu-Yi; Hong, Yu-Ting; Huang, Sheng-Min; Wang, Fu-Nien; Chiang, Su-Fen; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Lu, Wen-Chien; Chiou, Tzyy-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Plant vacuoles serve as the primary intracellular compartments for inorganic phosphate (Pi) storage. Passage of Pi across vacuolar membranes plays a critical role in buffering the cytoplasmic Pi level against fluctuations of external Pi and metabolic activities. Here we demonstrate that the SPX-MFS proteins, designated as PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER 5 family (PHT5), also named Vacuolar Phosphate Transporter (VPT), function as vacuolar Pi transporters. Based on 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis, Arabidopsis pht5;1 loss-of-function mutants accumulate less Pi and exhibit a lower vacuolar-to-cytoplasmic Pi ratio than controls. Conversely, overexpression of PHT5 leads to massive Pi sequestration into vacuoles and altered regulation of Pi starvation-responsive genes. Furthermore, we show that heterologous expression of the rice homologue OsSPX-MFS1 mediates Pi influx to yeast vacuoles. Our findings show that a group of Pi transporters in vacuolar membranes regulate cytoplasmic Pi homeostasis and are required for fitness and plant growth. PMID:27029856

  17. Identification of plant vacuolar transporters mediating phosphate storage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tzu-Yin; Huang, Teng-Kuei; Yang, Shu-Yi; Hong, Yu-Ting; Huang, Sheng-Min; Wang, Fu-Nien; Chiang, Su-Fen; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Lu, Wen-Chien; Chiou, Tzyy-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Plant vacuoles serve as the primary intracellular compartments for inorganic phosphate (Pi) storage. Passage of Pi across vacuolar membranes plays a critical role in buffering the cytoplasmic Pi level against fluctuations of external Pi and metabolic activities. Here we demonstrate that the SPX-MFS proteins, designated as PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER 5 family (PHT5), also named Vacuolar Phosphate Transporter (VPT), function as vacuolar Pi transporters. Based on (31)P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis, Arabidopsis pht5;1 loss-of-function mutants accumulate less Pi and exhibit a lower vacuolar-to-cytoplasmic Pi ratio than controls. Conversely, overexpression of PHT5 leads to massive Pi sequestration into vacuoles and altered regulation of Pi starvation-responsive genes. Furthermore, we show that heterologous expression of the rice homologue OsSPX-MFS1 mediates Pi influx to yeast vacuoles. Our findings show that a group of Pi transporters in vacuolar membranes regulate cytoplasmic Pi homeostasis and are required for fitness and plant growth. PMID:27029856

  18. Apoferritin-Templated Synthesis of Encoded Metallic Phosphate Nanoparticle Tags

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Wu, Hong; Dohnalkova, Alice; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-07-31

    Encoded metallic-phosphate nanoparticle tags, with distinct encoding patterns, have been prepared using an apoferritin template. A center-cavity structure as well as the disassociation and reconstructive characteristics of apoferritin at different pH environments provide a facile route for preparing such encoded nanoparticle tags. Encapsulation and diffusion approaches have been investigated during the preparation. The encapsulation approach, which is based on the dissociation and reconstruction of apoferritin at different pHs, exhibits an effective route to prepare such encoded metallic-phosphate nanoparticle tags. The compositionally encoded nanoparticle tag leads to a high coding capacity with a large number of distinguishable voltammetric signals, reflecting the predetermined composition of the metal mixture solution (and hence the nanoparticle composition). Releasing the metal components from the nanoparticle tags at pH 4.6 acetate buffer avoids harsh dissolution conditions, such as strong acids. Such a synthesis of encoded nanoparticle tags, including single-component and compositionally encoded nanoparticle tags, is substantially simple, fast, and convenient compared to that of encoded metal nanowires and semiconductor nanoparticle (CdS, PbS, and ZnS) incorporated polystyrene beads. The encoded metallic-phosphate nanoparticle tags thus show great promise for bioanalytical or product-tracking/identification/protection applications.

  19. Acetonitrile and benzene in the breath of smokers and non-smokers investigated by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, A.; Hansel, A.; Holzinger, R.; Lindinger, W.

    1995-09-01

    Benzene and acetonitrile are both present in greater concentrations in the breath of smokers than in non-smokers. The concentrations of these neutrals can be readily detected in the gas phase by their proton transfer reactions with H3O+. The concentration of benzene in the breath of smokers rapidly decreases with the time since the last cigarette was smoked, declining to values similar to those of non-smokers within an hour. In contrast, the concentration of acetonitrile in the breath of smokers takes nearly a week to decrease to that of non-somokers, once smoking stops. Thus the analysis of acetonitrile in the breath is a most suitable indicator of whether a given subject is or is not a smoker.

  20. Factors influencing high voltage performance of coconut char derived carbon based electrical double layer capacitor made using acetonitrile and propylene carbonate based electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Changzheng; Qu, Weiguo; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Randall, Clive

    2014-12-01

    Symmetric EDLCs made using high purity carbon electrodes derived from coconut char were tested using 1 M Tetraethylammonium hexafluorophosphate dissolved in two different solvents namely acetonitrile and propylene carbonate. The cell voltage of the capacitor made using propylene carbonate can be extended to 3.5 V and it exhibited good cycling and thermal stability upto 70 °C while the voltage was limited to below 3.0 V in acetonitrile. XPS analysis of the positive and negative electrodes of EDLCs post cycling showed that the primary degradation products were related to ring opening reactions in propylene carbonate based electrolytes while water played a key role in degradation of acetonitrile based EDLCs.

  1. Hirshfeld and DFT analysis of the N-heterocyclic carbene proligand methylenebis(N-butylimidazolium) as the acetonitrile-solvated diiodide salt.

    PubMed

    Cebollada, Andrea; Vellé, Alba; Sanz Miguel, Pablo J

    2016-06-01

    N-Heterocyclic carbene (NHC) based systems are usually exploited in the exploration of catalytic mechanisms and processes in organocatalysis, and homo- and heterogeneous catalysis. However, their molecular structures have not received adequate attention. The NHC proligand methylenebis(N-butylimidazolium) has been synthesized as the acetonitrile solvate of the diiodide salt, C15H26N4(2+)·2I(-)·CH3CN [1,1'-methylenebis(3-butylimidazolium) diiodide acetonitrile monosolvate], and fully characterized. An interesting cation-anion connection pattern has been identified in the crystal lattice, in which three iodide anions interact simultaneously with the cisoid-oriented cation. A Hirshfeld surface analysis reveals the predominance of hydrogen bonding over anion-π interactions. This particular arrangement is observed in different methylene-bridged bis(imidazolium) cations bearing chloride or bromide counter-anions. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations with acetonitrile as solvent reproduce the geometry of the title cation. PMID:27256692

  2. Buffer allocation in an ATM switch with output buffer and speed constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anil K.; Georganas, N. D.

    A synchronous nonblocking N times N switch for asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) networks or high speed packet switching networks transporting fixed length packets called cells is considered. Such a switch with output queuing achieves the optimal performance, however it requires the switch fabric to work at the speed of N. In practice the switch may operate L times faster than the input/output trunk. It is assumed that queues at each output port have a limited buffer space and whenever an output queue is full, the back-pressure is applied and the packets are retained at the head of the input queues. The upper bound on the packet loss probability at the input queues in such a switch are computed. To achieve a given packet loss rate, the switch with L equals 2 requires almost the same amount of input and output buffers as with L equals 4 up to 70 percent input load, but as the load increases beyond 70 percent the switch with L equals 4 would require more output buffers and less input buffers in comparison with a switch operating at L equals 2. The performance of a switch with L equals 3 is very similar to that for L equals 4 and is not considered.

  3. Chemoenzymatic synthesis of polyprenyl phosphates.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Meredith D; Larkin, Angelyn; Imperiali, Barbara

    2008-05-01

    Polyprenyl phosphates, including undecaprenyl phosphate and dolichyl phosphate, are essential intermediates in several important biochemical pathways including N-linked protein glycosylation in eukaryotes and prokaryotes and prokaryotic cell wall biosynthesis. Herein, we describe the evaluation of three potential undecaprenol kinases as agents for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of polyprenyl phosphates. Target enzymes were expressed in crude cell envelope fractions and quantified via the use of luminescent lanthanide-binding tags (LBTs). The Streptococcus mutans diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) was shown to be a very useful agent for polyprenol phosphorylation using ATP as the phosphoryl transfer agent. In addition, the S. mutans DGK can be coupled with two Campylobacter jejuni glycosyltransferases involved in N-linked glycosylation to efficiently biosynthesize the undecaprenyl pyrophosphate-linked disaccharide needed for studies of PglB, the C. jejuni oligosaccharyl transferase. PMID:18374576

  4. SOURCE ASSESSMENT: PHOSPHATE FERTILIZER INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a study of air emissions, water effluents, and solid residues resulting from the manufacture of phosphate fertilizers. It includes the production of wet process phosphoric acid, superphosphoric acid, normal superphosphate, triple superphosphate, and ammonium ...

  5. Study of the mechanism of acetonitrile stacking and its application for directly combining liquid-phase microextraction with micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingru; Feng, Jing; Shi, Ludi; Liu, Laping; He, Hui; Fan, Yingying; Hu, Shibin; Liu, Shuhui

    2016-08-26

    Acetonitrile stacking is an online concentration method that is distinctive due to its inclusion of a high proportion of organic solvent in sample matrices. We previously designed a universal methodology for the combination of liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) and capillary electrophoresis (CE) using acetonitrile stacking and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) mode, thereby achieving large-volume injection of the diluted LPME extractant and the online concentration. In this report, the methodology was extended to the analysis of highly substituted hydrophobic chlorophenols in wines using diethyl carbonate as the extractant. Additionally, the mechanism of acetonitrile stacking was studied. The results indicated that the combination of LPME and MEKC exhibited good analytical performance: with ∼40-fold concentration by LPME, a 20-cm (33% of the total length) sample plug injection of an eight-fold dilution of diethyl carbonate with the organic solvent-saline solution produced enrichments higher by a factor of 260-791. Limits of qualification ranged from 5.5 to 16.0ng/mL. Acceptable reproducibilities of lower than 1.8% for migration time and 8.6% for peak areas were obtained. A dual stacking mechanism of acetonitrile stacking was revealed, involving transient isotachophoresis plus pH-junction stacking. The latter was associated with a pH shift induced by the presence of acetonitrile. The pseudo-stationary phase (Brij-35) played an important role in reducing the CE running time by weakening the isotachophoretic migration of the analyte ions following Cl(-) ions. The combination of acetonitrile stacking and nonionic micelle-based MEKC appears to be a perfect match for introducing water-immiscible LPME extractants into an aqueous CE system and can thus significantly expand the application of LPME-CE in green analytical chemistry. PMID:27451260

  6. Damage tolerance of woven graphite-epoxy buffer strip panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, John M.

    1990-01-01

    Graphite-epoxy panels with S glass buffer strips were tested in tension and shear to measure their residual strengths with crack-like damage. The buffer strips were regularly spaced narrow strips of continuous S glass. Panels were made with a uniweave graphite cloth where the S glass buffer material was woven directly into the cloth. Panels were made with different width and thickness buffer strips. The panels were loaded to failure while remote strain, strain at the end of the slit, and crack opening displacement were monitoring. The notched region and nearby buffer strips were radiographed periodically to reveal crack growth and damage. Except for panels with short slits, the buffer strips arrested the propagating crack. The strength (or failing strain) of the panels was significantly higher than the strength of all-graphite panels with the same length slit. Panels with wide, thick buffer strips were stronger than panels with thin, narrow buffer strips. A shear-lag model predicted the failing strength of tension panels with wide buffer strips accurately, but over-estimated the strength of the shear panels and the tension panels with narrow buffer strips.

  7. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ferric chloride or ferric citrate. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food... GRAS § 184.1301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Ferric phosphate (ferric orthophosphate, iron (III) phosphate,...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... reaction of sodium phosphate with ferric chloride or ferric citrate. (b) The ingredient meets the... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Ferric phosphate...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... reaction of sodium phosphate with ferric chloride or ferric citrate. (b) The ingredient meets the... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Ferric phosphate...

  10. 21 CFR 520.823 - Erythromycin phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Erythromycin phosphate. 520.823 Section 520.823... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.823 Erythromycin phosphate. (a) Specifications. Erythromycin phosphate is the phosphate salt of the antibiotic substance...

  11. 21 CFR 520.823 - Erythromycin phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Erythromycin phosphate. 520.823 Section 520.823... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.823 Erythromycin phosphate. (a) Specifications. Erythromycin phosphate is the phosphate salt of the antibiotic substance...

  12. Novel bioactive composite bone cements based on the beta-tricalcium phosphate-monocalcium phosphate monohydrate composite cement system.

    PubMed

    Huan, Zhiguang; Chang, Jiang

    2009-05-01

    Bioactive composite bone cements were obtained by incorporation of tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5, C3S) into a brushite bone cement composed of beta-tricalcium phosphate [beta-Ca3(PO4)2, beta-TCP] and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate [Ca(H2PO4)2.H2O, MCPM], and the properties of the new cements were studied and compared with pure brushite cement. The results indicated that the injectability, setting time and short- and long-term mechanical strength of the material are higher than those of pure brushite cement, and the compressive strength of the TCP/MCPM/C3S composite paste increased with increasing aging time. Moreover, the TCP/MCPM/C3S specimens showed significantly improved in vitro bioactivity in simulated body fluid and similar degradability in phosphate-buffered saline as compared with brushite cement. Additionally, the reacted TCP/MCPM/C3S paste possesses the ability to stimulate osteoblast proliferation and promote osteoblastic differentiation of the bone marrow stromal cells. The results indicated that the TCP/MCPM/C3S cements may be used as a bioactive material for bone regeneration, and might have significant clinical advantage over the traditional beta-TCP/MCPM brushite cement. PMID:18996779

  13. Driving forces and the influence of the buffer composition on the complexation reaction between ibuprofen and HPCD.

    PubMed

    Perlovich, German L; Skar, Merete; Bauer-Brandl, Annette

    2003-10-01

    Cyclodextrins are often used in order to increase the aqueous solubility of drug substances by complexation. In order to investigate the complexation reaction of ibuprofen and hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin, titration calorimetry was used as a direct method. The thermodynamic parameters of the complexation process (stability constant, K(11); complexation enthalpy, deltaH(c) degrees ) were obtained in two different buffer systems (citric acid/sodium-phosphate and phosphoric acid) at various pH values. Based on these data the relative contributions of the enthalpic and entropic terms of the Gibbs energy to the complexation process have been analyzed. In both buffers the enthalpic and entropic terms are of different sign and this case corresponds to a 'nonclassical' model of hydrophobic interaction. In citric buffer, the main driving force of complexation is the entropy, which increases from 60 to 67% while the pH of the solution increases from 3.2 to 8.0. However, for the phosphoric buffer the entropic term decreases from 60 to 45%, while the pH-value of the solution increases from 5.0 to 8.2, and the driving force of the complexation process changes from entropy to enthalpy. The experimental data of the present study are compared to results of other authors and discrepancies discussed in detail. PMID:14550885

  14. Artificial citrate operon and Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene enhanced mineral phosphate solubilizing ability of Enterobacter hormaechei DHRSS.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Kavita; Kumar, Chanchal; Archana, G; Kumar, G Naresh

    2014-10-01

    Mineral phosphate solubilization by bacteria is mediated through secretion of organic acids, among which citrate is one of the most effective. To overproduce citrate in bacterial systems, an artificial citrate operon comprising of genes encoding NADH-insensitive citrate synthase of E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium sodium-dependent citrate transporter was constructed. In order to improve its mineral phosphate solubilizing (MPS) ability, the citrate operon was incorporated into E. hormaechei DHRSS. The artificial citrate operon transformant secreted 7.2 mM citric acid whereas in the native strain, it was undetectable. The transformant released 0.82 mM phosphate in flask studies in buffered medium containing rock phosphate as sole P source. In fermenter studies, similar phenotype was observed under aerobic conditions. However, under microaerobic conditions, no citrate was detected and P release was not observed. Therefore, an artificial citrate gene cluster containing Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (vgb) gene under its native promoter, along with artificial citrate operon under constitutive tac promoter, was constructed and transformed into E. hormaechei DHRSS. This transformant secreted 9 mM citric acid under microaerobic conditions and released 1.0 mM P. Thus, incorporation of citrate operon along with vgb gene improves MPS ability of E. hormaechei DHRSS under buffered, microaerobic conditions mimicking rhizospheric environment. PMID:25016342

  15. Responses to phosphate deprivation in yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Kamlesh Kumar; Singh, Neelima; Rajasekharan, Ram

    2016-05-01

    Inorganic phosphate is an essential nutrient because it is required for the biosynthesis of nucleotides, phospholipids and metabolites in energy metabolism. During phosphate starvation, phosphatases play a major role in phosphate acquisition by hydrolyzing phosphorylated macromolecules. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, PHM8 (YER037W), a lysophosphatidic acid phosphatase, plays an important role in phosphate acquisition by hydrolyzing lysophosphatidic acid and nucleotide monophosphate that results in accumulation of triacylglycerol and nucleotides under phosphate limiting conditions. Under phosphate limiting conditions, it is transcriptionally regulated by Pho4p, a phosphate-responsive transcription factor. In this review, we focus on triacylglycerol metabolism in transcription factors deletion mutants involved in phosphate metabolism and propose a link between phosphate and triacylglycerol metabolism. Deletion of these transcription factors results in an increase in triacylglycerol level. Based on these observations, we suggest that PHM8 is responsible for the increase in triacylglycerol in phosphate metabolising gene deletion mutants. PMID:26615590

  16. Analysis of pH and buffer effects on flucytosine activity in broth dilution susceptibility testing of Candida albicans in two synthetic media.

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, D L; Galgiani, J N

    1984-01-01

    We examined the influences of different pH levels and three different buffers on flucytosine activity against 12 isolates of Candida albicans in two synthetic media, yeast nitrogen base (YNB) and synthetic amino acid medium-fungal (SAAMF), using broth dilution techniques and measuring the endpoints of visual MICs and turbidimetric 50% inhibitory concentrations. The two media were originally prepared as follows: YNB, unbuffered, pH 5.6; SAAMF, buffered with morpholinepropanesulfonic acid-Tris, pH 7.4; the resultant geometric mean MIC and 50% inhibitory concentration of 5-FC were 78- and 32-fold higher, respectively, in SAAMF. Raising the pH of YNB or lowering the pH of SAAMF had virtually no effect on these differences in MIC and 50% inhibitory concentration in the two media. In contrast, virtually all of the discrepancy appeared to be due to morpholinepropanesulfonic acid-Tris, which exerted concentration-dependent inhibition of flucytosine activity not evident when N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-ethanesulfonic acid or phosphate buffer systems were substituted. In other turbidimetric studies, growth was slowed more than 50% in YNB as the pH was raised to 7.4, regardless of which buffer was used. Based on our studies, we recommend modifying the composition of SAAMF by substituting a nonantagonistic buffer if any buffer is to be used with SAAMF in the testing of flucytosine. With this modification, SAAMF warrants further study as a generally applicable medium for fungal-susceptibility testing. PMID:6391370

  17. A construction of novel iron-foam-based calcium phosphate/chitosan coating biodegradable scaffold material.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhaohui; Zhang, Liming; Chen, Chao; Liu, Yibo; Wu, Changjun; Dai, Changsong

    2013-04-01

    Slow corrosion rate and poor bioactivity restrict iron-based implants in biomedical application. In this study, we design a new iron-foam-based calcium phosphate/chitosan coating biodegradable composites offering a priority mechanical and bioactive property for bone tissue engineering through electrophoretic deposition (EPD) followed by a conversion process into a phosphate buffer solution (PBS). Tensile test results showed that the mechanical property of iron foam could be regulated through altering the construction of polyurethane foam. The priority coatings were deposited from 40% nano hydroxyapatite (nHA)/ethanol suspension mixed with 60% nHA/chitosan-acetic acid aqueous solution. In vitro immersion test showed that oxidation-iron foam as the matrix decreased the amount of iron implanted and had not influence on the bioactivity of this implant, obviously. So, this method could also be a promising method for the preparation of a new calcium phosphate/chitosan coating on foam construction. PMID:23827538

  18. Surface Treatments of Nb by Buffered Electropolishing

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Andy T.; Rimmer, Robert A.; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Manus, Robert L.; Reece, Charles E.; Williams, J. S.; Eozénou, F.; Jin, S.; Wang, E.

    2009-11-01

    Buffered electropolishing (BEP) is a Nb surface treatment technique developed at Jefferson Lab1. Experimental results obtained from flat Nb samples show2-4 that BEP can produce a surface finish much smoother than that produced by the conventional electropolishing (EP), while Nb removal rate can be as high as 4.67 μm/min. This new technique has been applied to the treatments of Nb SRF single cell cavity employing a vertical polishing system5 constructed at JLab as well as a horizontal polishing system at CEA Saclay. Preliminary results show that the accelerating gradient can reach 32 MV/m for a large grain cavity and 26.7 MV/m for a regular grain cavity. In this presentation, the latest progresses from the international collaboration between Peking University, CEA Saclay, and JLab on BEP will be summarized.

  19. Microscopic optical buffering in a harmonic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumetsky, M.

    2015-12-01

    In the early days of quantum mechanics, Schrödinger noticed that oscillations of a wave packet in a one-dimensional harmonic potential well are periodic and, in contrast to those in anharmonic potential wells, do not experience distortion over time. This original idea did not find applications up to now since an exact one-dimensional harmonic resonator does not exist in nature and has not been created artificially. However, an optical pulse propagating in a bottle microresonator (a dielectric cylinder with a nanoscale-high bump of the effective radius) can exactly imitate a quantum wave packet in the harmonic potential. Here, we propose a tuneable microresonator that can trap an optical pulse completely, hold it as long as the material losses permit, and release it without distortion. This result suggests the solution of the long standing problem of creating a microscopic optical buffer, the key element of the future optical signal processing devices.

  20. Microscopic optical buffering in a harmonic potential

    PubMed Central

    Sumetsky, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the early days of quantum mechanics, Schrödinger noticed that oscillations of a wave packet in a one-dimensional harmonic potential well are periodic and, in contrast to those in anharmonic potential wells, do not experience distortion over time. This original idea did not find applications up to now since an exact one-dimensional harmonic resonator does not exist in nature and has not been created artificially. However, an optical pulse propagating in a bottle microresonator (a dielectric cylinder with a nanoscale-high bump of the effective radius) can exactly imitate a quantum wave packet in the harmonic potential. Here, we propose a tuneable microresonator that can trap an optical pulse completely, hold it as long as the material losses permit, and release it without distortion. This result suggests the solution of the long standing problem of creating a microscopic optical buffer, the key element of the future optical signal processing devices. PMID:26689546

  1. Aerosol buffering of marine boundary layer cloudiness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazil, J.; Feingold, G.; Wang, H.

    2010-12-01

    The role of aerosol particles in maintaining a cloudy boundary layer in the remote marine environment is explored. It has previously been shown that precipitation can result in the transition from a closed- to open-cellular state but that the boundary layer cannot maintain this open-cell state without a resupply of particles. Potential sources include wind-driven production of sea salt particles from the ocean, nucleation from the gas phase, and entrainment from the free troposphere. Here we investigate with model simulations how the interplay of cloud properties, aerosol production, and boundary layer dynamics results in aerosol sources acting as a buffer against processes that destabilize cloudiness and the dynamic state of the marine boundary layer. For example, at nighttime, cloud liquid water increases in the absence of solar heating, resulting in increased precipitation, stronger cloud top cooling, accelerated boundary layer turbulence, and faster surface wind speeds. Faster surface wind speeds drive an enhanced flux of sea salt aerosol, at a time when aerosol particles are scavenged more readily by enhanced precipitation. In contrast, absorption of solar radiation during daytime reduces cloud water, decelerates boundary layer turbulence, reduces surface wind speeds, and therefore slows surface emissions. This is compensated by nucleation of small aerosol particles from the gas phase in response to the nigh complete removal of cloud condensation nuclei in precipitating open cell walls. These newly formed particles need to grow to larger sizes before they can serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), but will likely contribute to the CCN population during the nighttime and, together with ocean emissions, buffer the system against precipitation removal.

  2. Cost of riparian buffer zones: A comparison of hydrologically adapted site-specific riparian buffers with traditional fixed widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, T.; Lundström, J.; Kuglerová, L.; Laudon, H.; Öhman, K.; Ågren, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    Traditional approaches aiming at protecting surface waters from the negative impacts of forestry often focus on retaining fixed width buffer zones around waterways. While this method is relatively simple to design and implement, it has been criticized for ignoring the spatial heterogeneity of biogeochemical processes and biodiversity in the riparian zone. Alternatively, a variable width buffer zone adapted to site-specific hydrological conditions has been suggested to improve the protection of biogeochemical and ecological functions of the riparian zone. However, little is known about the monetary value of maintaining hydrologically adapted buffer zones compared to the traditionally used fixed width ones. In this study, we created a hydrologically adapted buffer zone by identifying wet areas and groundwater discharge hotspots in the riparian zone. The opportunity cost of the hydrologically adapted riparian buffer zones was then compared to that of the fixed width zones in a meso-scale boreal catchment to determine the most economical option of designing riparian buffers. The results show that hydrologically adapted buffer zones were cheaper per hectare than the fixed width ones when comparing the total cost. This was because the hydrologically adapted buffers included more wetlands and low productive forest areas than the fixed widths. As such, the hydrologically adapted buffer zones allows more effective protection of the parts of the riparian zones that are ecologically and biogeochemically important and more sensitive to disturbances without forest landowners incurring any additional cost than fixed width buffers.

  3. Biphasic calcium phosphate in periapical surgery

    PubMed Central

    Suneelkumar, Chinni; Datta, Krithika; Srinivasan, Manali R; Kumar, Sampath T

    2008-01-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramics like hydroxyapatite and β -tricalcium phosphate (β -TCP) possess mineral composition that closely resembles that of the bone. They can be good bone substitutes due to their excellent biocompatibility. Biphasic calcium phosphate is a bone substitute which is a mixture of hydroxyapatite and β -tricalcium phosphate in fixed ratios. Studies have demonstrated the osteoconductive potential of this composition. This paper highlights the clinical use of biphasic calcium phosphate as a bone substitute in periapical surgery. PMID:20142892

  4. Buffer strip design for protecting water quality and fish habitat

    SciTech Connect

    Belt, G.H.; O'Laughlin, J. )

    1994-04-01

    Buffer strips are protective areas adjacent to streams or lakes. Among other functions, they protect water quality and fish habitat. A typical buffer strip is found in western Oregon, where they are called Riparian Management Areas (RMAs). The authors use the term buffer strip to include functional descriptions such as filter, stabilization, or leave strips, and administrative designations such as Idaho's Stream Protection Zone (SPZ), Washington's Riparian Management Zone (RMZ), and the USDA Forest Service's Streamside Management Zone (SMZ). They address water quality and fishery protective functions of buffer strips on forestlands, pointing out improvements in buffer strip design possible through research or administrative changes. Buffer strip design requirements found in some western Forest Practices Act (FPA) regulations are also compared and related to findings in the scientific literature.

  5. The Multimission Image Processing Laboratory's virtual frame buffer interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, T.

    1984-01-01

    Large image processing systems use multiple frame buffers with differing architectures and vendor supplied interfaces. This variety of architectures and interfaces creates software development, maintenance and portability problems for application programs. Several machine-dependent graphics standards such as ANSI Core and GKS are available, but none of them are adequate for image processing. Therefore, the Multimission Image Processing laboratory project has implemented a programmer level virtual frame buffer interface. This interface makes all frame buffers appear as a generic frame buffer with a specified set of characteristics. This document defines the virtual frame uffer interface and provides information such as FORTRAN subroutine definitions, frame buffer characteristics, sample programs, etc. It is intended to be used by application programmers and system programmers who are adding new frame buffers to a system.

  6. Uranium phosphate biomineralization by fungi.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xinjin; Hillier, Stephen; Pendlowski, Helen; Gray, Nia; Ceci, Andrea; Gadd, Geoffrey Michael

    2015-06-01

    Geoactive soil fungi were investigated for phosphatase-mediated uranium precipitation during growth on an organic phosphorus source. Aspergillus niger and Paecilomyces javanicus were grown on modified Czapek-Dox medium amended with glycerol 2-phosphate (G2P) as sole P source and uranium nitrate. Both organisms showed reduced growth on uranium-containing media but were able to extensively precipitate uranium and phosphorus-containing minerals on hyphal surfaces, and these were identified by X-ray powder diffraction as uranyl phosphate species, including potassium uranyl phosphate hydrate (KPUO6 .3H2 O), meta-ankoleite [(K1.7 Ba0.2 )(UO2 )2 (PO4 )2 .6H2 O], uranyl phosphate hydrate [(UO2 )3 (PO4 )2 .4H2 O], meta-ankoleite (K(UO2 )(PO4 ).3H2 O), uramphite (NH4 UO2 PO4 .3H2 O) and chernikovite [(H3 O)2 (UO2 )2 (PO4 )2 .6H2 O]. Some minerals with a morphology similar to bacterial hydrogen uranyl phosphate were detected on A. niger biomass. Geochemical modelling confirmed the complexity of uranium speciation, and the presence of meta-ankoleite, uramphite and uranyl phosphate hydrate between pH 3 and 8 closely matched the experimental data, with potassium as the dominant cation. We have therefore demonstrated that fungi can precipitate U-containing phosphate biominerals when grown with an organic source of P, with the hyphal matrix serving to localize the resultant uranium minerals. The findings throw further light on potential fungal roles in U and P biogeochemistry as well as the application of these mechanisms for element recovery or bioremediation. PMID:25580878

  7. Grass buffers for playas in agricultural landscapes: A literature synthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melcher, Cynthia P.; Skagen, Susan K.

    2005-01-01

    Future research should entail multiple-scale approaches at regional, wetland-complex, and individual watershed scales. Information needs include direct measures of buffer effectiveness in ‘real-world’ systems, refinement and field tests of buffer-effectiveness models, how buffers may affect floral and faunal communities of playas, and basic ecological information on playa function and playa wildlife ecology. Understanding how wildlife communities respond to patch size and habitat fragmentation is crucial for addressing questions regarding habitat quality of grass buffers in playa systems.

  8. An assessment of buffer strips for improving damage tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.; Kennedy, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy panels with buffer strips were tested in tension to measure their residual strength with crack-like damage. Panels were made with 45/0/-45/90(2S) and 45/0/450(2S) layups. The buffer strips were parallel to the loading directions. They were made by replacing narrow strips of the 0 deg graphite plies with strips of either 0 deg S-Glass/epoxy or Kevlar-49/epoxy on either a one for one or a two for one basis. In a third case, O deg graphite/epoxy was used as the buffer material and thin, perforated Mylar strips were placed between the 0 deg piles and the cross-plies to weaken the interfaces and thus to isolate the 0 deg plies. Some panels were made with buffer strips of different widths and spacings. The buffer strips arrested the cracks and increased the residual strengths significantly over those plain laminates without buffer strips. A shear-lag type stress analysis correctly predicted the effects of layups, buffer material, buffer strip width and spacing, and the number of plies of buffer material.

  9. Concentrated Flow through a Riparian Buffer: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. B.; Nogues, J. P.; Hutchinson, S. L.

    2004-05-01

    Riparian buffers are often used for in-situ treatment of agricultural runoff. Although the benefits of riparian buffers are well recongized, concentration of flow can restrict the efficiency of contaminant removal. This study evaluates flow concentration at a agricultural site near Manhattan, Kansas. Manual and automated GIS analyses of a high-resolution digital elevation model were used to determine the fraction of runoff contributing to each buffer segment. Subsequent simulation of the system in WEPP (Water Erosion and Prediction Project) demonstrates the extend to which flow concentration affects buffer efficiency.

  10. Back contact buffer layer for thin-film solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Compaan, Alvin D.; Plotnikov, Victor V.

    2014-09-09

    A photovoltaic cell structure is disclosed that includes a buffer/passivation layer at a CdTe/Back contact interface. The buffer/passivation layer is formed from the same material that forms the n-type semiconductor active layer. In one embodiment, the buffer layer and the n-type semiconductor active layer are formed from cadmium sulfide (CdS). A method of forming a photovoltaic cell includes the step of forming the semiconductor active layers and the buffer/passivation layer within the same deposition chamber and using the same material source.

  11. Performance of various input-buffered and output-buffered ATM switch design principles under bursty traffic: Simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Soung C.

    1994-02-01

    This paper investigates the packet loss probabilities of several alternative input-buffered and output-buffered switch designs with finite amounts of buffer space. The effects of bursty traffic, modeled by geometrically distributed active and idle periods, are explored. Methods for improving switch performance are classified, and their effectiveness for dealing with bursty traffic discussed. This work indicates that bursty traffic can degrade switch performance significantly and that it is difficult to alleviate the performance degradation by merely restricting the offered traffic load. Unless buffers are shared, or very large buffers provided, strategies that improve throughput under uniform random traffic are not very effective under bursty traffic. For input-buffered switches, our investigation suggests that the specific contention resolution scheme we use is a more important performance factor under bursty traffic than it is under uniform random traffic.

  12. Spectrophotometric study on the proton transfer reaction between 2-amino-4-methylpyridine with 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol in methanol, acetonitrile and the binary mixture 50% methanol+50% acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Al-Ahmary, Khairia M; Habeeb, Moustafa M; Al-Obidan, Areej H

    2016-02-01

    Proton transfer reaction between 2-amino-4-methylpyridine (2AMP) as the proton acceptor with 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol (DCNP) as the proton donor has been investigated spectrophotometrically in methanol (MeOH), acetonitrile (AN) and a binary mixture composed of 50% MeOH and 50% AN (AN-Me). The composition of the complex has been investigated utilizing Job(')s and photometric titration methods to be 1:1. Minimum-maximum absorbance equation has been applied to estimate the formation constant of the proton transfer reaction (K(PT)) where it reached high values in the investigated solvent confirming its high stability. The formation constant recorded higher value in AN compared with MeOH and mixture of AN-Me. Based on the formation of stable proton transfer complex, a sensitive spectrophotometric method was suggested for quantitative determination of 2AMP. The Lambert-Beer(')s law was obeyed in the concentration range 0.5-8 μg mL(-1) with small values of limits of detection and quantification. The solid complex between 2AMP with DCNP has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis to be 1:1 in concordant with the molecular stoichiometry in solution. Further analysis of the solid complex was carried out using infrared and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. PMID:26520474

  13. The Multifunctional Enzyme CYP71B15 (PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT3) Converts Cysteine-Indole-3-Acetonitrile to Camalexin in the Indole-3-Acetonitrile Metabolic Network of Arabidopsis thaliana[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, Christoph; Westphal, Lore; Schmotz, Constanze; Prade, Elke; Scheel, Dierk; Glawischnig, Erich

    2009-01-01

    Accumulation of camalexin, the characteristic phytoalexin of Arabidopsis thaliana, is induced by a great variety of plant pathogens. It is derived from Trp, which is converted to indole-3-acetonitrile (IAN) by successive action of the cytochrome P450 enzymes CYP79B2/B3 and CYP71A13. Extracts from wild-type plants and camalexin biosynthetic mutants, treated with silver nitrate or inoculated with Phytophthora infestans, were comprehensively analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. This metabolomics approach was combined with precursor feeding experiments to characterize the IAN metabolic network and to identify novel biosynthetic intermediates and metabolites of camalexin. Indole-3-carbaldehyde and indole-3-carboxylic acid derivatives were shown to originate from IAN. IAN conjugates with glutathione, γ-glutamylcysteine, and cysteine [Cys(IAN)] accumulated in challenged phytoalexin deficient3 (pad3) mutants. Cys(IAN) rescued the camalexin-deficient phenotype of cyp79b2 cyp79b3 and was itself converted to dihydrocamalexic acid (DHCA), the known substrate of CYP71B15 (PAD3), by microsomes isolated from silver nitrate–treated Arabidopsis leaves. Surprisingly, yeast-expressed CYP71B15 also catalyzed thiazoline ring closure, DHCA formation, and cyanide release with Cys(IAN) as substrate. In conclusion, in the camalexin biosynthetic pathway, IAN is derivatized to the intermediate Cys(IAN), which serves as substrate of the multifunctional cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP71B15. PMID:19567706

  14. Spectrophotometric study on the proton transfer reaction between 2-amino-4-methylpyridine with 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol in methanol, acetonitrile and the binary mixture 50% methanol + 50% acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ahmary, Khairia M.; Habeeb, Moustafa M.; Al-Obidan, Areej H.

    2016-02-01

    Proton transfer reaction between 2-amino-4-methylpyridine (2AMP) as the proton acceptor with 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol (DCNP) as the proton donor has been investigated spectrophotometrically in methanol (MeOH), acetonitrile (AN) and a binary mixture composed of 50% MeOH and 50% AN (AN-Me). The composition of the complex has been investigated utilizing Job's and photometric titration methods to be 1:1. Minimum-maximum absorbance equation has been applied to estimate the formation constant of the proton transfer reaction (KPT) where it reached high values in the investigated solvent confirming its high stability. The formation constant recorded higher value in AN compared with MeOH and mixture of AN-Me. Based on the formation of stable proton transfer complex, a sensitive spectrophotometric method was suggested for quantitative determination of 2AMP. The Lambert-Beer's law was obeyed in the concentration range 0.5-8 μg mL- 1 with small values of limits of detection and quantification. The solid complex between 2AMP with DCNP has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis to be 1:1 in concordant with the molecular stoichiometry in solution. Further analysis of the solid complex was carried out using infrared and 1H NMR spectroscopy.

  15. Extracellular ATP hydrolysis inhibits synaptic transmission by increasing ph buffering in the synaptic cleft.

    PubMed

    Vroman, Rozan; Klaassen, Lauw J; Howlett, Marcus H C; Cenedese, Valentina; Klooster, Jan; Sjoerdsma, Trijntje; Kamermans, Maarten

    2014-05-01

    Neuronal computations strongly depend on inhibitory interactions. One such example occurs at the first retinal synapse, where horizontal cells inhibit photoreceptors. This interaction generates the center/surround organization of bipolar cell receptive fields and is crucial for contrast enhancement. Despite its essential role in vision, the underlying synaptic mechanism has puzzled the neuroscience community for decades. Two competing hypotheses are currently considered: an ephaptic and a proton-mediated mechanism. Here we show that horizontal cells feed back to photoreceptors via an unexpected synthesis of the two. The first one is a very fast ephaptic mechanism that has no synaptic delay, making it one of the fastest inhibitory synapses known. The second one is a relatively slow (τ≈200 ms), highly intriguing mechanism. It depends on ATP release via Pannexin 1 channels located on horizontal cell dendrites invaginating the cone synaptic terminal. The ecto-ATPase NTPDase1 hydrolyses extracellular ATP to AMP, phosphate groups, and protons. The phosphate groups and protons form a pH buffer with a pKa of 7.2, which keeps the pH in the synaptic cleft relatively acidic. This inhibits the cone Ca²⁺ channels and consequently reduces the glutamate release by the cones. When horizontal cells hyperpolarize, the pannexin 1 channels decrease their conductance, the ATP release decreases, and the formation of the pH buffer reduces. The resulting alkalization in the synaptic cleft consequently increases cone glutamate release. Surprisingly, the hydrolysis of ATP instead of ATP itself mediates the synaptic modulation. Our results not only solve longstanding issues regarding horizontal cell to photoreceptor feedback, they also demonstrate a new form of synaptic modulation. Because pannexin 1 channels and ecto-ATPases are strongly expressed in the nervous system and pannexin 1 function is implicated in synaptic plasticity, we anticipate that this novel form of synaptic

  16. Extracellular ATP Hydrolysis Inhibits Synaptic Transmission by Increasing pH Buffering in the Synaptic Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Vroman, Rozan; Klaassen, Lauw J.; Howlett, Marcus H.C.; Cenedese, Valentina; Klooster, Jan; Sjoerdsma, Trijntje; Kamermans, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal computations strongly depend on inhibitory interactions. One such example occurs at the first retinal synapse, where horizontal cells inhibit photoreceptors. This interaction generates the center/surround organization of bipolar cell receptive fields and is crucial for contrast enhancement. Despite its essential role in vision, the underlying synaptic mechanism has puzzled the neuroscience community for decades. Two competing hypotheses are currently considered: an ephaptic and a proton-mediated mechanism. Here we show that horizontal cells feed back to photoreceptors via an unexpected synthesis of the two. The first one is a very fast ephaptic mechanism that has no synaptic delay, making it one of the fastest inhibitory synapses known. The second one is a relatively slow (τ≈200 ms), highly intriguing mechanism. It depends on ATP release via Pannexin 1 channels located on horizontal cell dendrites invaginating the cone synaptic terminal. The ecto-ATPase NTPDase1 hydrolyses extracellular ATP to AMP, phosphate groups, and protons. The phosphate groups and protons form a pH buffer with a pKa of 7.2, which keeps the pH in the synaptic cleft relatively acidic. This inhibits the cone Ca2+ channels and consequently reduces the glutamate release by the cones. When horizontal cells hyperpolarize, the pannexin 1 channels decrease their conductance, the ATP release decreases, and the formation of the pH buffer reduces. The resulting alkalization in the synaptic cleft consequently increases cone glutamate release. Surprisingly, the hydrolysis of ATP instead of ATP itself mediates the synaptic modulation. Our results not only solve longstanding issues regarding horizontal cell to photoreceptor feedback, they also demonstrate a new form of synaptic modulation. Because pannexin 1 channels and ecto-ATPases are strongly expressed in the nervous system and pannexin 1 function is implicated in synaptic plasticity, we anticipate that this novel form of synaptic modulation

  17. Analysis of Triacylglycerol and Fatty Acid Isomers by Low-Temperature Silver-Ion High Performance Liquid Chromatography with Acetonitrile in Hexane as Solvent: Limitations of the Methodology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Silver ion HPLC (Ag HPLC), utilizing columns containing silver ions bonded to a silica substrate and acetonitrile in hexane as solvent, has proven to be a powerful technology for the analysis of geometric (cis or trans) or positional fatty acids, fatty acid ester (primarily methyl ester; FAME), or t...

  18. The role of low levels of water in the electrochemical oxidation of α-tocopherol (vitamin E) and other phenols in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying Shan; Chen, Shanshan; Hong, Wan Mei; Kan, Jia Min; Kwek, Edwin Swee Hee; Lim, Shi Yu; Lim, Zhen Hui; Tessensohn, Malcolm E; Zhang, Yinlu; Webster, Richard D

    2011-07-28

    The phenol, α-tocopherol, can be electrochemically oxidised in a -2e(-)/-H(+) process to form a diamagnetic cation that is long-lived in dry organic solvents such as acetonitrile and dichloromethane, but in the presence of water quickly reacts to form a hemiketal. Variable scan rate cyclic voltammetry experiments in acetonitrile with carefully controlled amounts of water between 0.010 M-0.6 M were performed in order to determine the rate of reaction of the diamagnetic cation with water. The water content of the solvent was accurately determined by Karl Fischer coulometric titrations and the voltammetric data were modelled using digital simulation techniques. The oxidation peak potential of α-tocopherol measured during cyclic voltammetry experiments was found to shift to less positive potentials as increasing amounts of water (0.01-0.6 M) were added to the acetonitrile, which was interpreted based on hydrogen-bonding interactions between the phenolic hydrogen atom and water. Several other phenols were examined and they displayed similar voltammetric features to α-tocopherol, suggesting that interactions of phenols with trace amounts of water were a common occurrence in acetonitrile. The H-bonding interactions of α-tocopherol with water were also examined via NMR and UV-vis spectroscopies, with the voltammetric and spectroscopic studies extended to include other coordinating solvents (dimethyl sulfoxide and pyridine). PMID:21670827

  19. Uranium endowments in phosphate rock.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Andrea E; Schnug, Ewald; Prasser, Horst-Michael; Frossard, Emmanuel

    2014-04-15

    This study seeks to identify and specify the components that make up the prospects of U recovery from phosphate rock. A systems approach is taken. The assessment includes i) reviewing past recovery experience and lessons learned; ii) identifying factors that determine recovery; and iii) establishing a contemporary evaluation of U endowments in phosphate rock reserves, as well as the available and recoverable amounts from phosphate rock and phosphoric acid production. We find that in the past, recovery did not fulfill its potential and that the breakup of the Soviet Union worsened then-favorable recovery market conditions in the 1990s. We find that an estimated 5.7 million tU may be recoverable from phosphate rock reserves. In 2010, the recoverable tU from phosphate rock and phosphoric acid production may have been 15,000 tU and 11,000 tU, respectively. This could have filled the world U supply-demand gap for nuclear energy production. The results suggest that the U.S., Morocco, Tunisia, and Russia would be particularly well-suited to recover U, taking infrastructural considerations into account. We demonstrate future research needs, as well as sustainability orientations. We conclude that in order to promote investment and production, it seems necessary to establish long-term contracts at guaranteed prices, ensuring profitability for phosphoric acid producers. PMID:24556272

  20. Mechanisms of Arsenic Hyperaccumulation in Pteris vittata. Uptake Kinetics, Interactions with Phosphate, and Arsenic Speciation1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junru; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Meharg, Andrew A.; Raab, Andrea; Feldmann, Joerg; McGrath, Steve P.

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms of arsenic (As) hyperaccumulation in Pteris vittata, the first identified As hyperaccumulator, are unknown. We investigated the interactions of arsenate and phosphate on the uptake and distribution of As and phosphorus (P), and As speciation in P. vittata. In an 18-d hydroponic experiment with varying concentrations of arsenate and phosphate, P. vittata accumulated As in the fronds up to 27,000 mg As kg−1 dry weight, and the frond As to root As concentration ratio varied between 1.3 and 6.7. Increasing phosphate supply decreased As uptake markedly, with the effect being greater on root As concentration than on shoot As concentration. Increasing arsenate supply decreased the P concentration in the roots, but not in the fronds. Presence of phosphate in the uptake solution decreased arsenate influx markedly, whereas P starvation for 8 d increased the maximum net influx by 2.5-fold. The rate of arsenite uptake was 10% of that for arsenate in the absence of phosphate. Neither P starvation nor the presence of phosphate affected arsenite uptake. Within 8 h, 50% to 78% of the As taken up was distributed to the fronds, with a higher translocation efficiency for arsenite than for arsenate. In fronds, 49% to 94% of the As was extracted with a phosphate buffer (pH 5.6). Speciation analysis using high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy showed that >85% of the extracted As was in the form of arsenite, and the remaining mostly as arsenate. We conclude that arsenate is taken up by P. vittata via the phosphate transporters, reduced to arsenite, and sequestered in the fronds primarily as As(III). PMID:12428020

  1. What's in your buffer? Solute altered millisecond motions detected by solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Wong, Madeline; Khirich, Gennady; Loria, J Patrick

    2013-09-17

    To date, little work has been conducted on the relationship between solute and buffer molecules and conformational exchange motion in enzymes. This study uses solution NMR to examine the effects of phosphate, sulfate, and acetate in comparison to MES- and HEPES-buffered references on the chemical shift perturbation and millisecond, chemical, or conformational exchange motions in the enzyme ribonuclease A (RNase A), triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) and HisF. The results indicate that addition of these solutes has a small effect on (1)H and (15)N chemical shifts for RNase A and TIM but a significant effect for HisF. For RNase A and TIM, Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation dispersion experiments, however, show significant solute-dependent changes in conformational exchange motions. Some residues show loss of millisecond motions relative to the reference sample upon addition of solute, whereas others experience an enhancement. Comparison of exchange parameters obtained from fits of dispersion data indicates changes in either or both equilibrium populations and chemical shifts between conformations. Furthermore, the exchange kinetics are altered in many cases. The results demonstrate that common solute molecules can alter observed enzyme millisecond motions and play a more active role than what is routinely believed. PMID:23991940

  2. Influence of amino acids, buffers, and ph on the γ-irradiation-induced degradation of alginates.

    PubMed

    Ulset, Ann-Sissel T; Mori, Hideki; Dalheim, Marianne Ø; Hara, Masayuki; Christensen, Bjørn E

    2014-12-01

    Alginate-based biomaterials and medical devices are commonly subjected to γ-irradiation as a means of sterilization, either in the dry state or the gel (hydrated) state. In this process the alginate chains degrade randomly in a dose-dependent manner, altering alginates' material properties. The addition of free radical scavenging amino acids such as histidine and phenylalanine protects the alginate significantly against degradation, as shown by monitoring changes in the molecular weight distributions using SEC-MALLS and determining the pseudo first order rate constants of degradation. Tris buffer (0.5 M), but not acetate, citrate, or phosphate buffers had a similar effect on the degradation rate. Changes in pH itself had only marginal effects on the rate of alginate degradation and on the protective effect of amino acids. Contrary to previous reports, the chemical composition (M/G profile) of the alginates, including homopolymeric mannuronan, was unaltered following irradiation up to 10 kGy. PMID:25412478

  3. A Buffered Alcohol-Based Fixative for Histomorphologic and Molecular Applications.

    PubMed

    Perry, Candice; Chung, Joon-Yong; Ylaya, Kris; Choi, Chel Hun; Simpson, Amari; Matsumoto, Kaipo T; Smith, William A; Hewitt, Stephen M

    2016-07-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is the predominant preparation for diagnostic histopathological evaluation and increasingly the biospecimen on which molecular diagnostics are performed. However, formalin is carcinogenic and results in cross-linking of proteins and nicking and alterations of nucleic acids. Alternative fixatives, including 70% ethanol, improved biomolecular integrity; however, they have yet to replace neutral-buffered formalin (NBF). Herein, we describe the phosphate-buffered ethanol 70% (BE70) fixative. The histomorphology of BE70-fixed tissue is very similar to that of NBF; however, it is a non-cross-linking fixative and lacks the carcinogenic profile of formaldehyde-based fixatives. RNA isolated from tissue fixed in BE70 was of substantially higher quality and quantity than that was recovered from formalin-fixed tissue. Furthermore, the BE70 fixative showed excellent RNA and DNA integrity compared with that of NBF fixative based on real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis results. Immunohistochemical staining was similar for the antigen tested. In conclusion, BE70 is a non-cross-linking fixative that is superior to NBF and 70% ethanol with reference to biomolecule recovery and quality from paraffin-embedded tissue. Additional studies to compare the histomorphologic and immunohistochemical performance and utility in a clinical setting are required. PMID:27221702

  4. Detergent phosphate bans and eutrophication

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, G.F.; Jones, R.A.

    1986-04-01

    The Vollenweider-OECD eutrophication model has been expanded to approximately 400 lakes. It is possible to make a quantitative prediction of the effects of a detergent phosphate ban and thereby to ascertain the potential benefits of such a ban. In order to assess the effect of a detergent phosphate ban on water quality it is necessary to know the percentage of phosphorus in the domestic waste water that enters the water body, either directly or indirectly, and the percentage of the total phosphorus load that is derived from domestic wastewater. Although detergent phosphate bans generally will not result in an overall improvement to water quality, there may be some situations in which eutrophication-related water quality would be improved by a ban. 8 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  5. Thionations using a P4S10-pyridine complex in solvents such as acetonitrile and dimethyl sulfone.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Jan; Pettersson, Birgitta; Hasimbegovic, Vedran; Svensson, Per H

    2011-03-18

    Tetraphosphorus decasulfide (P(4)S(10)) in pyridine has been used as a thionating agent for a long period of time. The moisture-sensitive reagent has now been isolated in crystalline form, and the detailed structure has been determined by X-ray crystallography. The thionating power of this storable reagent has been studied and transferred to solvents such as acetonitrile in which it has proven to be synthetically useful and exceptionally selective. Its properties have been compared with the so-called Lawesson reagent (LR). Particularly interesting are the results from thionations at relatively high temperatures (∼165 °C) in dimethyl sulfone as solvent. Under these conditions, for instance, acridone and 3-acetylindole could quickly be transformed to the corresponding thionated derivatives. Glycylglycine similarly gave piperazinedithione. At these temperatures, LR is inefficient due to rapid decomposition. The thionated products are generally cleaner and more easy to obtain because in the crystalline reagent, impurities which invariably are present in the conventional reagents, P(4)S(10) in pyridine or LR, have been removed. PMID:21341727

  6. Vibrational spectroscopic characterization of stable solvates in the LiClO 4/formamide:acetonitrile system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Wagner A.

    2007-03-01

    Raman and infrared (IR) experiments of extremely high concentrated solutions (1.0-5.0 M) of lithium perchlorate in equimolar formamide (FA) and acetonitrile (ACN) mixture were carried out. Raman quantitative analyses performed in the C dbnd O and C tbnd N bands of FA and ACN, respectively, the appearance of a new IR band in the N-H stretching region and the presence of the band at 939 cm -1 were interpreted in terms of a solvent separated ion pairs model. In salt concentrations higher than 3.0 M, a weak band at 945 cm -1 (contact ion pairs) can also be seen. Indeed, the mixture of solvents with considerable differences in the acid-base characters allows to prepare electrolytic solutions where the contact ion pairs formation is low. A coordination number of 4 for the lithium cation is suggested and this value is in full agreement with other authors. Fundamental aspects and the importance of the present system for the development of new lithium-based rechargeable batteries are also discussed.

  7. Rate theory of solvent exchange and kinetics of Li(+) - BF4 (-)/PF6 (-) ion pairs in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Dang, Liem X; Chang, Tsun-Mei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we describe our efforts to apply rate theories in studies of solvent exchange around Li(+) and the kinetics of ion pairings in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). We report one of the first computer simulations of the exchange dynamics around solvated Li(+) in acetonitrile (ACN), which is a common solvent used in LIBs. We also provide details of the ion-pairing kinetics of Li(+)-[BF4] and Li(+)-[PF6] in ACN. Using our polarizable force-field models and employing classical rate theories of chemical reactions, we examine the ACN exchange process between the first and second solvation shells around Li(+). We calculate exchange rates using transition state theory and weighted them with the transmission coefficients determined by the reactive flux, Impey, Madden, and McDonald approaches, and Grote-Hynes theory. We found the relaxation times changed from 180 ps to 4600 ps and from 30 ps to 280 ps for Li(+)-[BF4] and Li(+)-[PF6] ion pairs, respectively. These results confirm that the solvent response to the kinetics of ion pairing is significant. Our results also show that, in addition to affecting the free energy of solvation into ACN, the anion type also should significantly influence the kinetics of ion pairing. These results will increase our understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of LIB systems. PMID:27608999

  8. Thermodynamic and transport properties of spiro-(1,1')-bipyrrolidinium tetrafluoroborate and acetonitrile mixtures: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing-Yin, Zhang; Peng, Xie; Xin, Wang; Xue-Wen, Yu; Zhi-Qiang, Shi; Shi-Huai, Zhao

    2016-06-01

    Organic salts such as spiro-(1,1')-bipyrrolidinium tetrafluoroborate ([SBP][BF4]) dissolved in liquid acetonitrile (ACN) are a new kind of organic salt solution, which is expected to be used as an electrolyte in electrical double layer capacitors (EDLCs). To explore the physicochemical properties of the solution, an all-atom force field is established on the basis of AMBER parameter values and quantum mechanical calculations. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out to explore the liquid structure and physicochemical properties of [SBP][BF4] electrolyte at room temperature. The computed thermodynamic and transport properties match the available experimental results very well. The microscopic structures of [SBP][BF4] salt solution are also discussed in detail. The method used in this work provides an efficient way of predicting the properties of organic salt solvent as an electrolyte in EDLCs. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21476172 and 51172160), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2013AA050905), and the Natural Science Foundation of Tianjin, China (Grant Nos. 12JCZDJC28400, 14RCHZGX00859, 14JCTPJC00484, and 14JCQNJC07200).

  9. Diffusion-controlled reactions in supercritical CHF[sub 3] and CO[sub 2]/acetonitrile mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.B.; Zhang, J.; Chateauneuf, J.E.; Brennecke, J.F. )

    1993-10-20

    We present results of the triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) process of benzophenone (Ph[sub 2]C = O) and the self-termination reaction of benzyl radical (PhCH[sub 2]) to investigate the possibility of diffusion-controlled processes being hindered or enhanced in supercritical fluids (SCFs) or fluid mixtures. However, both reactions occur essentially at the diffusion-control limit in supercritical fluoroform (CHF[sub 3]) and carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) doped with 1 mol % acetonitrile (CH[sub 3]CN) when spin statistical factors are taken into account. The reaction kinetics were measured by laser flash photolysis at various pressures above the critical pressure along three isotherms. This study corroborates our earlier report of these reactions in supercritical CO[sub 2] and ethane (C[sub 2]H[sub 6]). In all of the fluids and fluid mixture, the locally higher density of the solvent around the solutes in no way enhances or slows the bimolecular annihilation or termination reaction. In addition, there is no evidence of enhanced solute-solute interaction. Finally, we studied the photocleavage of dibenzyl ketone (DBK) and the subsequent decarbonylation of the phenylacetyl radical (PhCH[sub 2]CO) and did not observe any enhanced cage effects or anomalous behavior due to the increased local density. 54 refs., 6 figs.

  10. A new insight into the photochemistry of avobenzone in gas phase and acetonitrile from ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Kojić, Marko; Petković, Milena; Etinski, Mihajlo

    2016-08-10

    Avobenzone (4-tert-butyl-4'-methoxydibenzoylmethane, AB) is one of the most widely used filters in sunscreens for skin photoprotection in the UVA band. The photochemistry of AB includes keto-enol tautomerization, cis-trans isomerization, rotation about the single bond and α bond cleavages of carbonyl groups. In this contribution we study chelated and non-chelated enol, rotamers Z and E, and keto tautomers of AB in the ground and excited states in gas phase and acetonitrile by means of a coupled cluster method. Our findings suggest that torsion around the double C2-C3 bond of photoexcited chelated enol leads to internal conversion to the ground state and formation of rotamer E. In addition, opening of the chelated hydrogen ring by torsion of the hydroxyl group creates non-chelated enol. The possible mechanisms of rotamer Z formation are discussed. The solvent dependent photolability is related to the relative order of the lowest triplet ππ* and nπ* states of the keto tautomer. PMID:27443629

  11. Protective effects of 6-hydroxy-1-methylindole-3-acetonitrile on cisplatin-induced oxidative nephrotoxicity via Nrf2 inactivation.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji Hee; Shin, Ji-Sun; Kim, Jong-Bin; Baek, Nam-In; Cho, Young-Wuk; Lee, Yong Sup; Kay, Hee Yeon; Kim, Soo-dong; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2013-12-01

    We previously demonstrated the ethanol extract of the roots of Brassica rapa protects against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by attenuating oxidative stress. Here, we investigated the nephroprotective effects of 6-hydroxy-1-methylindole-3-acetonitrile (6-HMA), which was isolated from the roots of B. rapa, on cisplatin-induced toxicity in renal epithelial LLC-PK1 cells and in rats with acute renal injury. Pretreatment of LLC-PK1 cells with 6-HMA ameliorated cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity caused by oxidative stress, as was demonstrated by reductions in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) and increased levels of glutathione (GSH). In addition, 6-HMA inhibited cisplatin-induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression, possibly due to the suppression of the nuclear translocation and binding activity of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Furthermore, 6-HMA administered rats showed lower levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, and urinary lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) than cisplatin alone-treated rats in cisplatin-induced renal injury model. Moreover, 6-HMA inhibited the cisplatin-induced formation of MDA and GSH depletion and increased the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione reductase (GR). Taken together, these findings indicate 6-HMA is a major active constituent from the roots of B. rapa to have a protective effect against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by attenuating oxidative stress. PMID:23989062

  12. Spectroscopic studies and molecular orbital calculations of charge transfer complexation between 3,5-dimethylpyrazole with DDQ in acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habeeb, Moustafa M.; Al-Attas, Amirah S.; Al-Raimi, Doaa S.

    2015-05-01

    Charge transfer (CT) interaction between 3,5-dimethylpyrazole (DMP) with the π-acceptor 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinon (DDQ) has been investigated spectrophotometrically in acetonitrile (AN). Simultaneous reddish brown color has been observed upon mixing donor with acceptor solutions attributing to CT complex formation. The electronic spectra of the formed complex exhibited multi-charge transfer bands at 429, 447, 506, 542 and 589 nm, respectively. Job's method of continuous variations and spectrophotometric titration methods confirmed the formation of the studied complex in 1:2 ratio between DMP and DDQ. Benesi-Hildebrand equation has been applied to calculate the stability constant of the formed complex where it recorded high value supporting formation of stable complex. Molecular orbital calculations using MM2 method and GAMESS (General Atomic and Molecular Electronic Structure System) interface computations as a package of ChemBio3D Ultra12 software were carried out for more analysis of the formed complex in the gas phase. The computational analysis included energy minimisation, stabilisation energy, molecular geometry, Mullikan charges, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) surfaces of reactants and complex as well as characterization of the higher occupied molecular orbitals (HOMO) and lower unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMO) surfaces of the complex. A good consistency between experimental and theoretical results has been recorded.

  13. Identification of the amino-acetonitrile derivative monepantel (AAD 1566) as a new anthelmintic drug development candidate

    PubMed Central

    Gauvry, N.; Schorderet Weber, S.; Skripsky, T.; Bouvier, J.; Wenger, A.; Schroeder, F.; Desaules, Y.; Hotz, R.; Goebel, T.; Hosking, B. C.; Pautrat, F.; Wieland-Berghausen, S.; Ducray, P.

    2008-01-01

    Anthelmintic resistance has become a global phenomenon in gastro-intestinal nematodes of farm animals, including multi-drug resistance against the three major classes of anthelmintics. There is an urgent need for an anthelmintic with a new mode of action. The recently discovered amino-acetonitrile derivatives (AADs) offer a new class of synthetic chemicals with anthelmintic activity. The evaluation of AADs was pursued applying in vitro assays and efficacy and tolerability studies in rodents, sheep, and cattle. Amongst various suitable compounds, AAD 1566 eliminated many tested pathogenic nematode species, both at larval and adult stages, at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg bodyweight in sheep and 5.0 mg/kg bodyweight in cattle. The same doses were sufficient to cure animals infected with resistant or multi-drug-resistant nematode isolates. These findings, complemented by the good tolerability and low toxicity to mammals, suggest that AAD 1566, monepantel, would be a suitable anthelmintic drug development candidate. PMID:18594861

  14. Identification of 2-[4-[(4-Methoxyphenyl)methoxy]-phenyl]acetonitrile and Derivatives as Potent Oct3/4 Inducers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xinlai; Dimou, Eleni; Alborzinia, Hamed; Wenke, Frank; Göhring, Axel; Reuter, Stefanie; Mah, Nancy; Fuchs, Heiko; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A; Adjaye, James; Gul, Sheraz; Harms, Christoph; Utikal, Jochen; Klipp, Edda; Mrowka, Ralf; Wölfl, Stefan

    2015-06-25

    Reprogramming somatic cells into induced-pluripotent cells (iPSCs) provides new access to all somatic cell types for clinical application without any ethical controversy arising from the use of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Established protocols for iPSCs generation based on viral transduction with defined factors are limited by low efficiency and the risk of genetic abnormality. Several small molecules have been reported as replacements for defined transcriptional factors, but a chemical able to replace Oct3/4 allowing the generation of human iPSCs is still unavailable. Using a cell-based High Throughput Screening (HTS) campaign, we identified that 2-[4-[(4-methoxyphenyl)methoxy]phenyl]acetonitrile (1), termed O4I1, enhanced Oct3/4 expression. Structural verification and modification by chemical synthesis showed that O4I1 and its derivatives not only promoted expression and stabilization of Oct3/4 but also enhanced its transcriptional activity in diverse human somatic cells, implying the possible benefit from using this class of compounds in regenerative medicine. PMID:25898186

  15. Supported bilayer electrophoresis under controlled buffer conditions.

    PubMed

    Monson, Christopher F; Pace, Hudson P; Liu, Chunming; Cremer, Paul S

    2011-03-15

    A pH controlled flow cell device was constructed to allow electrophoretic movement of charged lipids and membrane associated proteins in supported phospholipid bilayers. The device isolated electrolysis products near the electrodes from the electrophoresis process within the bilayer. This allowed the pH over the bilayer region to remain within ±0.2 pH units or better over many hours at salt concentrations up to 10 mM. Using this setup, it was found that the electrophoretic mobility of a dye conjugated lipid (Texas Red 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (TR-DHPE)) was essentially constant between pH 3.3 and 9.3. In contrast, streptavidin, which was bound to biotinylated lipids, shifted from migrating cathodically at acidic pH values to migrating anodically under basic conditions. This shift was due to the modulation of the net charge on the protein, which changed the electrophoretic forces experienced by the macromolecule. The addition of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) cushion beneath the bilayer or the increase in the ionic strength of the buffer solution resulted in a decrease of the electroosmotic force experienced by the streptavidin with little effect on the Texas Red-DHPE. As such, it was possible in part to control the electrophoretic and electroosmotic contributions to streptavidin independently of one another. PMID:21319743

  16. Effect of the Dialysis Fluid Buffer on Peritoneal Membrane Function in Children

    PubMed Central

    Nau, Barbara; Gemulla, Gita; Bonzel, Klaus E.; Hölttä, Tuula; Testa, Sara; Fischbach, Michel; John, Ulrike; Kemper, Markus J.; Sander, Anja; Arbeiter, Klaus; Schaefer, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Double-chamber peritoneal dialysis fluids exert less toxicity by their neutral pH and reduced glucose degradation product content. The role of the buffer compound (lactate and bicarbonate) has not been defined in humans. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A multicenter randomized controlled trial in 37 children on automated peritoneal dialysis was performed. After a 2-month run-in period with conventional peritoneal dialysis fluids, patients were randomized to neutral-pH, low-glucose degradation product peritoneal dialysis fluids with 35 mM lactate or 34 mM bicarbonate content. Clinical and biochemical monitoring was performed monthly, and peritoneal equilibration tests and 24-hour clearance studies were performed at 0, 3, 6, and 10 months. Results No statistically significant difference in capillary blood pH, serum bicarbonate, or oral buffer supplementation emerged during the study. At baseline, peritoneal solute equilibration and clearance rates were similar. During the study, 4-hour dialysis to plasma ratio of creatinine tended to increase, and 24-hour dialytic creatinine and phosphate clearance increased with lactate peritoneal dialysis fluid but not with bicarbonate peritoneal dialysis fluid. Daily net ultrafiltration, which was similar at baseline (lactate fluid=5.4±2.6 ml/g glucose exposure, bicarbonate fluid=4.9±1.9 ml/g glucose exposure), decreased to 4.6±1.0 ml/g glucose exposure in the lactate peritoneal dialysis fluid group, whereas it increased to 5.1±1.7 ml/g glucose exposure in the bicarbonate content peritoneal dialysis fluid group (P=0.006 for interaction). Conclusions When using biocompatible peritoneal dialysis fluids, equally good acidosis control is achieved with lactate and bicarbonate buffers. Improved long-term preservation of peritoneal membrane function may, however, be achieved with bicarbonate-based peritoneal dialysis fluids. PMID:23124784

  17. Current isolating epitaxial buffer layers for high voltage photodiode array

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Cooper, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    An array of photodiodes in series on a common semi-insulating substrate has a non-conductive buffer layer between the photodiodes and the semi-insulating substrate. The buffer layer reduces current injection leakage between the photodiodes of the array and allows optical energy to be converted to high voltage electrical energy.

  18. Inhibited fragmentation of mAbs in buffered ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Mazid, Romiza R; Vijayaraghavan, R; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Cortez-Jugo, Christina; Cheng, Wenlong

    2015-05-11

    We thoroughly investigated the biological, structural and chemical stability of epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody (EGFR mAb) using choline-based buffered ionic liquids (BILs). The results demonstrated substantially enhanced stabilities in our BILs, indicating their huge promise as real-world green biological buffers for antibody storage and transportation. PMID:25869239

  19. Study on the principle and defense of buffer overflow attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wang

    2013-03-01

    Buffer overflow attacks have been the most common form in the network attacks and become a predominant problem in the system and network security area. With specific programs, this paper describes in detail the type of buffer overflow attacks and technical principles, so we have a good understanding of them, and then gives several common preventive measures.

  20. Improved pH buffering agent for sodium hypochlorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, J. R.; Veeder, L. N.

    1969-01-01

    Sodium citrate/citric acid was found to be an effective buffer for pH control when used with sodium hypochlorite. The mixture does not corrode aluminum. The buffer appears to form a type of conversion coating that may provide corrosion-resistant properties to aluminum in other applications.

  1. Atmospheric Delivery of Herbicides to Riparian Buffer Zones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have evaluated the ability of a riparian buffer to intercept herbicides from the air and deliver them directly by rainfall to a receiving stream in the buffer zone. The study was conducted over a four year period at a site in an agricultural watershed in Maryland. The rain collections included ...

  2. Microbial Community Diversity in Agroforestry and Grass Buffer Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agroforesty and grass buffer systems have long been promoted as a soil conservation practice that yields many environmental benefits. Previous research has described the ability of buffer systems to retain nutrients, slow water flow and soil erosion, or mitigate the potentially harmful effects of e...

  3. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers

    DOEpatents

    Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    2014-07-15

    Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

  4. [Phosphate metabolism and iron deficiency].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Keitaro

    2016-02-01

    Autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets(ADHR)is caused by gain-of-function mutations in FGF23 that prevent its proteolytic cleavage. Fibroblast growth factor 23(FGF23)is a hormone that inhibits renal phosphate reabsorption and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D biosynthesis. Low iron status plays a role in the pathophysiology of ADHR. Iron deficiency is an environmental trigger that stimulates FGF23 expression and hypophosphatemia in ADHR. It was reported that FGF23 elevation in patients with CKD, who are often iron deficient. In patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD, treatment with ferric citrate hydrate resulted in significant reductions in serum phosphate and FGF23. PMID:26813504

  5. In situ ellipsometric investigation of stainless steel corrosion behavior in buffered solutions with amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinnichenko, M. V.; Pham, M. T.; Chevolleau, T.; Poperenko, L. V.; Maitz, M. F.

    2003-02-01

    The corrosion of metals is associated both with a release of ions and changes in optical surface properties. In this study, these two effects were correlated by a potentiodynamic corrosion test and in situ probing of the surface by ellipsometry. The studies were carried out with stainless steel (SS) AISI 304 and 316 in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and in Dulbecco's modified minimal essential medium (DMEM) at pH 7.4. In both media, 304 steel is more susceptible to corrosion than 316 grade. The 316 steel shows a higher corrosion potential and higher corrosion current density in PBS than in DMEM, for 304 steel this behavior is vice versa. Ellipsometry demonstrated a higher sensitivity than potentiodynamics to surface modification in the cathodic area. In DMEM the removal of a surface layer at negative potential and a further repassivation with increasing potential was characteristic. In PBS a surface layer started to grow immediately. X-ray photoelectron spectra of this layer formed in PBS are consistent with iron phosphate. Its formation is inhibited in DMEM; the presence of amino acids is discussed as the reason.

  6. Purification and characterization of ribulose-5-phosphate kinase from spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, M.A.; Milanez, S.; Stringer, C.D.; Hartman, F.C.

    1986-02-15

    An efficient purification procedure utilizing affinity chromatography is described for spinach ribulose-5-phosphate kinase, a light-regulated chloroplastic enzyme. Gel filtration and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified enzyme reveal a dimeric structure of 44,000 Mr subunits. Chemical crosslinking with dimethyl suberimidate confirms the presence of two subunits per molecule of native kinase, which are shown to be identical by partial NH2-terminal sequencing. Based on sulfhydryl titrations and on amino acid analyses, each subunit contains four to five cysteinyl residues. The observed slow loss of activity during spontaneous oxidation in air-saturated buffer correlates with the intramolecular oxidation of two sulfhydryl groups, presumably those involved in thioredoxin-mediated regulation.

  7. Mitigation of substrate defects in reticles using multilayer buffer layers

    DOEpatents

    Mirkarimi, Paul B.; Bajt, Sasa; Stearns, Daniel G.

    2001-01-01

    A multilayer film is used as a buffer layer to minimize the size of defects on a reticle substrate prior to deposition of a reflective coating on the substrate. The multilayer buffer layer deposited intermediate the reticle substrate and the reflective coating produces a smoothing of small particles and other defects on the reticle substrate. The reduction in defect size is controlled by surface relaxation during the buffer layer growth process and by the degree of intermixing and volume contraction of the materials at the multilayer interfaces. The buffer layers are deposited at near-normal incidence via a low particulate ion beam sputtering process. The growth surface of the buffer layer may also be heated by a secondary ion source to increase the degree of intermixing and improve the mitigation of defects.

  8. Replenishing data descriptors in a DMA injection FIFO buffer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Cernohous, Bob R.; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer; Parker, Jeffrey J.

    2011-10-11

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for replenishing data descriptors in a Direct Memory Access (`DMA`) injection first-in-first-out (`FIFO`) buffer that include: determining, by a messaging module on an origin compute node, whether a number of data descriptors in a DMA injection FIFO buffer exceeds a predetermined threshold, each data descriptor specifying an application message for transmission to a target compute node; queuing, by the messaging module, a plurality of new data descriptors in a pending descriptor queue if the number of the data descriptors in the DMA injection FIFO buffer exceeds the predetermined threshold; establishing, by the messaging module, interrupt criteria that specify when to replenish the injection FIFO buffer with the plurality of new data descriptors in the pending descriptor queue; and injecting, by the messaging module, the plurality of new data descriptors into the injection FIFO buffer in dependence upon the interrupt criteria.

  9. Visualization of Buffer Capacity with 3-D "Topo" Surfaces: Buffer Ridges, Equivalence Point Canyons and Dilution Ramps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Garon C.; Hossain, Md Mainul

    2016-01-01

    BufCap TOPOS is free software that generates 3-D topographical surfaces ("topos") for acid-base equilibrium studies. It portrays pH and buffer capacity behavior during titration and dilution procedures. Topo surfaces are created by plotting computed pH and buffer capacity values above a composition grid with volume of NaOH as the x axis…

  10. The effect of phosphate content on the bioactivity of soda-lime-phosphosilicate glasses.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, M D; Watts, S J; Hill, R G; Law, R V

    2009-08-01

    We report on the bioactivity of two series of glasses in the SiO(2)-Na(2)O-CaO-P(2)O(5) system after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) after 21 days. The effect of P(2)O(5) content was examined for compositions containing 0-9.25 mol.% phosphate. Both series of glasses degraded to basic pH, but the solutions tended towards to neutrality with increasing phosphate content; a result of the acidic phosphate buffering the effect of the alkali metal and alkaline earth ions on degradation. Bioactivity was assessed by the appearance of features in the X-ray diffraction (XRD) traces and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra consistent with crystalline hydroxyl-carbonate-apatite (HCAp): such as the appearance of the (002) Bragg reflection in XRD and splitting of the P-O stretching vibration around 550 cm(-1) in the FTIR respectively. All glasses formed HCAp in SBF over the time periods studied and the time for formation of this crystalline phase occurred more rapidly in both series as the phosphate contents were increased. For P(2)O(5) content >3 mol.% both series exhibited highly crystalline apatite by 16 h immersion in SBF. This indicates that in the compositions studied, phosphate content is more important for bioactivity than network connectivity (NC) of the silicate phase and compositions showing rapid apatite formation are presented, superior to 45S5 Bioglass which was tested under identical conditions for comparison. PMID:19330429

  11. Genetics Home Reference: glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions GPI deficiency glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) deficiency is an inherited disorder ...

  12. Phosphate bonding to goethite and pyrolusite surfaces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiner, Eugene R.; Goldberg, M.C.; Boymel, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra were obtained from pure and phosphated goethite (??-FeOOH), and pyrolusite (MnO2). The nature of the phosphate-surface bond was determined to be binuclear for goethite and bidentate for pyrolusite.

  13. Long-Sought Vacuolar Phosphate Transporters Identified.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Marcel; Fabiańska, Izabela

    2016-06-01

    The vacuole is an important subcellular compartment that serves as main phosphate storage in plants among other functions. Three recent studies shed light on the underlying molecular mechanisms for vacuolar phosphate transport that had long remained unknown. PMID:27160805

  14. Multiple cytosolic calcium buffers in posterior pituitary nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Shane M; Chang, Che-Wei; Jackson, Meyer B

    2016-03-01

    Cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers bind to a large fraction of Ca(2+) as it enters a cell, shaping Ca(2+) signals both spatially and temporally. In this way, cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers regulate excitation-secretion coupling and short-term plasticity of release. The posterior pituitary is composed of peptidergic nerve terminals, which release oxytocin and vasopressin in response to Ca(2+) entry. Secretion of these hormones exhibits a complex dependence on the frequency and pattern of electrical activity, and the role of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers in controlling pituitary Ca(2+) signaling is poorly understood. Here, cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers were studied with two-photon imaging in patch-clamped nerve terminals of the rat posterior pituitary. Fluorescence of the Ca(2+) indicator fluo-8 revealed stepwise increases in free Ca(2+) after a series of brief depolarizing pulses in rapid succession. These Ca(2+) increments grew larger as free Ca(2+) rose to saturate the cytosolic buffers and reduce the availability of Ca(2+) binding sites. These titration data revealed two endogenous buffers. All nerve terminals contained a buffer with a Kd of 1.5-4.7 µM, and approximately half contained an additional higher-affinity buffer with a Kd of 340 nM. Western blots identified calretinin and calbindin D28K in the posterior pituitary, and their in vitro binding properties correspond well with our fluorometric analysis. The high-affinity buffer washed out, but at a rate much slower than expected from diffusion; washout of the low-affinity buffer could not be detected. This work has revealed the functional impact of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers in situ in nerve terminals at a new level of detail. The saturation of these cytosolic buffers will amplify Ca(2+) signals and may contribute to use-dependent facilitation of release. A difference in the buffer compositions of oxytocin and vasopressin nerve terminals could contribute to the differences in release plasticity of these two hormones. PMID:26880753

  15. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Ferric phosphate (ferric orthophosphate, iron (III) phosphate, FePO4·xH2O, CAS Reg. No. 10045-86-0) is an odorless, yellowish-white...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Ferric phosphate (ferric orthophosphate, iron (III) phosphate, FePO4·xH2O, CAS Reg. No. 10045-86-0) is an odorless, yellowish-white...

  17. Phosphate exchange and ATP synthesis by DMSO-pretreated purified bovine mitochondrial ATP synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Beharry, S; Bragg, P D

    2001-01-01

    Purified soluble bovine mitochondrial F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase contained 2 mol of ATP, 2 mol of ADP and 6 mol of P(i)/mol. Incubation of this enzyme with 1 mM [(32)P]P(i) caused the exchange of 2 mol of P(i)/mol of F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase. The labelled phosphates were not displaced by ATP. Transfer of F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase to a buffer containing 30% (v/v) DMSO and 1 mM [(32)P]P(i) resulted in the loss of bound nucleotides with the retention of 1 mol of ATP/mol of F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase. Six molecules of [(32)P]P(i) were incorporated by exchange with the existing bound phosphate. Removal of the DMSO by passage of the enzyme through a centrifuged column of Sephadex G-50 resulted in the exchange of one molecule of bound [(32)P]P(i) into the bound ATP. Azide did not prevent this [(32)P]P(i)<-->ATP exchange reaction. The bound labelled ATP could be displaced from the enzyme by exogenous ATP. Addition of ADP to the DMSO-pretreated F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase in the original DMSO-free buffer resulted in the formation of an additional molecule of bound ATP. It was concluded that following pretreatment with and subsequent removal of DMSO the F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase contained one molecule of ATP at a catalytic site which was competent to carry out a phosphate-ATP exchange reaction using enzyme-bound inorganic radiolabelled phosphate. In the presence of ADP an additional molecule of labelled ATP was formed from enzyme-bound P(i) at a second catalytic site. The bound phosphate-ATP exchange reaction is not readily accommodated by current mechanisms for the ATP synthase. PMID:11139383

  18. Europium, uranyl, and thorium-phenanthroline amide complexes in acetonitrile solution: an ESI-MS and DFT combined investigation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Cheng-Liang; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Mei, Lei; Zhang, Xin-Rui; Wall, Nathalie; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2015-08-28

    The tetradentate N,N'-diethyl-N,N'-ditolyl-2,9-diamide-1,10-phenanthroline (Et-Tol-DAPhen) ligand with hard-soft donor atoms has been demonstrated to be promising for the group separation of actinides from highly acidic nuclear wastes. To identify the formed complexes of this ligand with actinides and lanthanides, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations was used to probe the possible complexation processes. The 1 : 2 Eu-L species ([EuL2(NO3)](2+)) can be observed in ESI-MS at low metal-to-ligand ([M]/[L]) ratios, whereas the 1 : 1 Eu-L species ([EuL(NO3)2](+)) can be observed when the [M]/[L] ratio is higher than 1.0. However, ([UO2L(NO3)](+)) is the only detected species for the uranyl complexes. The [ThL2(NO3)2](2+) species can be observed at low [M]/[L] ratios; the 1 : 2 species ([ThL2(NO3)](3+)) and a new 1 : 1 species ([ThL(NO3)3](+)) can be detected at high [M]/[L] ratios. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) results showed that Et-Tol-DAPhen ligands can coordinate strongly with metal ions, and the coordination moieties remain intact under CID conditions. Natural bond orbital (NBO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), electron localization function (ELF), atoms in molecules (AIM) and molecular orbital (MO) analyses indicated that the metal-ligand bonds of the actinide complexes exhibited more covalent character than those of the lanthanide complexes. In addition, according to thermodynamic analysis, the stable cationic M-L complexes in acetonitrile are found to be in good agreement with the ESI-MS results. PMID:26200662

  19. Acetonitrile extraction and dual-layer solid phase extraction clean-up for pesticide residue analysis in propolis.

    PubMed

    Oellig, Claudia

    2016-05-01

    Propolis is a very complex mixture of substances that is produced by honey bees and is known to be a rather challenging matrix for residue analysis. Besides resins, flavonoids and phenols, high amount of wax is co-extracted resulting in immense matrix effects. Therefore a suitable clean-up is crucial and indispensable. In this study, a reliable solid phase extraction (SPE) clean-up was developed for pesticide residue analysis in propolis. The clean-up success was quickly and easily monitored by high-performance thin-layer chromatography with different detection possibilities. The final method consists of the extraction of propolis with acetonitrile according to the QuEChERS method followed by an effective extract purification on dual-layer SPE cartridges with spherical hydrophobic polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin/primary secondary amine as sorbent and a mixture of toluene/acetone (95:5, v/v) for elution. Besides fat-soluble components like waxes, flavonoids, and terpenoids, more polar compounds like organic acids, fatty acids, sugars and anthocyanins were also removed to large extent. Method performance was assessed by recovery experiments at spiking levels of 0.5 and 1mg/kg (n=5) for fourteen pesticides that are relevant for propolis. Mean recoveries determined by HPLC-MS against solvent standards were between 40 and 101%, while calculation against matrix-matched standards provided recoveries of 79-104%. Precision of recovery, assessed by relative standard deviations, were below 9%. Thus, the developed dual-layer SPE clean-up enables the reliable pesticide residue analysis in propolis and provides a suitable alternative to time-consuming clean-up procedures proposed in literature. PMID:27059398

  20. Labile Zn ions on octacalcium phosphate-derived Zn-containing hydroxyapatite surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Yoshitomo; Anada, Takahisa; Morimoto, Shinji; Suzuki, Osamu

    2013-05-01

    We previously synthesized and characterized zinc-containing octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and its hydrolyzed Ca-deficient hydroxyapatite (HA). In the present report, we attempted to define the state of Zn in the OCP-derived Zn-calcium phosphates (CaPs) in relation to the presence of specific amino acids. Zn-containing OCPs were prepared in solutions that included Zn ions up to a concentration of 3.5 mM, and their hydrolyzates [hydrolyzed (hy)-Zn-CaP] were obtained in hot water. The materials were characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The concentration of Ca and Zn ions at room temperature was determined by analyzing the supernatant after incubating the materials in α-minimal essential medium (α-MEM) and HEPES buffer including cysteine, histidine, lysine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid. Zn ions were more dissolved in α-MEM than HEPES buffer in the absence of amino acids. The inclusion of the amino acids enhanced Zn dissolution by several hundred fold, even in HEPES buffer. Among the amino acids, both cysteine and histidine enhanced the release of Zn. The effect was particularly remarkable with cysteine even in the presence of the other amino acids tested. These results indicate that Zn ions are present as a surface labile pool, which tends to be preferentially desorbed by cysteine, a ubiquitous molecule present in serum.

  1. 21 CFR 582.5434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 582.5434 Section 582.5434 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Product. Magnesium phosphate (di- and tribasic)....

  2. 21 CFR 182.6290 - Disodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Disodium phosphate. 182.6290 Section 182.6290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... phosphate. (a) Product. Disodium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  3. 21 CFR 182.6285 - Dipotassium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dipotassium phosphate. 182.6285 Section 182.6285 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Dipotassium phosphate. (a) Product. Dipotassium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  5. 21 CFR 182.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium phosphate. 182.1217 Section 182.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  6. 21 CFR 582.6285 - Dipotassium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dipotassium phosphate. 582.6285 Section 582.6285 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Dipotassium phosphate. (a) Product. Dipotassium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  8. 21 CFR 182.6290 - Disodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Disodium phosphate. 182.6290 Section 182.6290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... phosphate. (a) Product. Disodium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  9. 21 CFR 582.6290 - Disodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disodium phosphate. 582.6290 Section 582.6290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Disodium phosphate. (a) Product. Disodium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 582.5434 Section 582.5434 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Product. Magnesium phosphate (di- and tribasic)....

  11. 40 CFR 721.5995 - Polyalkyl phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polyalkyl phosphate. 721.5995 Section... Substances § 721.5995 Polyalkyl phosphate. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polyalkyl phosphate (PMN P-95-1772)...

  12. 21 CFR 582.6285 - Dipotassium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dipotassium phosphate. 582.6285 Section 582.6285 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Dipotassium phosphate. (a) Product. Dipotassium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  13. 21 CFR 182.6285 - Dipotassium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Dipotassium phosphate. 182.6285 Section 182.6285 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Dipotassium phosphate. (a) Product. Dipotassium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  14. 21 CFR 582.1141 - Ammonium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium phosphate. 582.1141 Section 582.1141 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1141 Ammonium phosphate. (a) Product. Ammonium phosphate (mono- and dibasic). (b)...

  15. 21 CFR 582.6290 - Disodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Disodium phosphate. 582.6290 Section 582.6290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Disodium phosphate. (a) Product. Disodium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1141 - Ammonium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ammonium phosphate. 582.1141 Section 582.1141 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1141 Ammonium phosphate. (a) Product. Ammonium phosphate (mono- and dibasic). (b)...

  17. 21 CFR 182.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 182.1217 Section 182.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  18. Urea phosphate as granular or fluid fertilizers

    SciTech Connect

    Blouin, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    Studies are being conducted of the production and agronomic characteristics of the phosphoric acid-urea adduct, urea phosphate, and of the various granular and fluid fertilizers that can be produced from it. Flowsheets are given for the production of urea phosphate. Characteristics of unpurified and purified urea phosphate are also given. (DLC)

  19. 21 CFR 182.8217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 182.8217 Section 182.8217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate...

  20. 21 CFR 182.8778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 182.8778 Section 182.8778 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  1. 21 CFR 582.5778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.5778 Section 582.5778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  2. 21 CFR 582.1778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.1778 Section 582.1778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  3. 21 CFR 582.6778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.6778 Section 582.6778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use....

  4. 21 CFR 182.6778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 182.6778 Section 182.6778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Sequestrants 1 § 182.6778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate...

  5. 21 CFR 582.5778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.5778 Section 582.5778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  6. 21 CFR 182.1778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 182.1778 Section 182.1778 Food... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  7. 21 CFR 182.1778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 182.1778 Section 182.1778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  8. 21 CFR 582.6778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.6778 Section 582.6778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use....

  9. 21 CFR 182.1778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 182.1778 Section 182.1778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  10. 21 CFR 182.8778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 182.8778 Section 182.8778 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.5778 Section 582.5778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  12. 21 CFR 182.8778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 182.8778 Section 182.8778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-,...

  13. 21 CFR 582.1778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.1778 Section 582.1778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  14. 21 CFR 182.6778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 182.6778 Section 182.6778 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Sequestrants 1 § 182.6778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  15. 21 CFR 582.6778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.6778 Section 582.6778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use....

  16. 21 CFR 182.6778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 182.6778 Section 182.6778 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Sequestrants 1 § 182.6778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  17. 21 CFR 182.1778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 182.1778 Section 182.1778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  18. 21 CFR 582.6778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.6778 Section 582.6778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use....

  19. 21 CFR 182.8778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium phosphate. 182.8778 Section 182.8778 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  20. 21 CFR 182.8778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 182.8778 Section 182.8778 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  1. 21 CFR 582.6778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.6778 Section 582.6778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use....

  2. 21 CFR 182.1778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium phosphate. 182.1778 Section 182.1778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  3. 21 CFR 582.1778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.1778 Section 582.1778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  4. 21 CFR 182.6778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium phosphate. 182.6778 Section 182.6778 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Sequestrants 1 § 182.6778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  5. 21 CFR 182.6778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 182.6778 Section 182.6778 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Sequestrants 1 § 182.6778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  6. 21 CFR 582.1778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.1778 Section 582.1778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  7. 21 CFR 582.5778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.5778 Section 582.5778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  8. 21 CFR 582.1778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.1778 Section 582.1778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  9. 21 CFR 582.5778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.5778 Section 582.5778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  10. 21 CFR 582.1141 - Ammonium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonium phosphate. 582.1141 Section 582.1141 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1141 Ammonium phosphate. (a) Product. Ammonium phosphate (mono- and dibasic). (b)...

  11. 21 CFR 182.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 182.1217 Section 182.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  12. 21 CFR 182.6285 - Dipotassium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dipotassium phosphate. 182.6285 Section 182.6285...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Sequestrants 1 § 182.6285 Dipotassium phosphate. (a) Product. Dipotassium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  13. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  14. 21 CFR 582.6285 - Dipotassium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dipotassium phosphate. 582.6285 Section 582.6285 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Dipotassium phosphate. (a) Product. Dipotassium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  15. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  16. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  17. 21 CFR 182.6290 - Disodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Disodium phosphate. 182.6290 Section 182.6290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... phosphate. (a) Product. Disodium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 582.5434 Section 582.5434 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Product. Magnesium phosphate (di- and tribasic)....

  19. 21 CFR 182.6290 - Disodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Disodium phosphate. 182.6290 Section 182.6290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... phosphate. (a) Product. Disodium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  20. 21 CFR 582.6285 - Dipotassium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dipotassium phosphate. 582.6285 Section 582.6285 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Dipotassium phosphate. (a) Product. Dipotassium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...