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Sample records for acetonitrile phosphate buffer

  1. Acetonitrile

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF ACETONITRILE ( CAS No . 75 - 05 - 8 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) January 1999 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordance with U.S . Environmental Prot

  2. Dominant oceanic bacteria secure phosphate using a large extracellular buffer

    PubMed Central

    Zubkov, Mikhail V.; Martin, Adrian P.; Hartmann, Manuela; Grob, Carolina; Scanlan, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitous SAR11 and Prochlorococcus bacteria manage to maintain a sufficient supply of phosphate in phosphate-poor surface waters of the North Atlantic subtropical gyre. Furthermore, it seems that their phosphate uptake may counter-intuitively be lower in more productive tropical waters, as if their cellular demand for phosphate decreases there. By flow sorting 33P-phosphate-pulsed 32P-phosphate-chased cells, we demonstrate that both Prochlorococcus and SAR11 cells exploit an extracellular buffer of labile phosphate up to 5–40 times larger than the amount of phosphate required to replicate their chromosomes. Mathematical modelling is shown to support this conclusion. The fuller the buffer the slower the cellular uptake of phosphate, to the point that in phosphate-replete tropical waters, cells can saturate their buffer and their phosphate uptake becomes marginal. Hence, buffer stocking is a generic, growth-securing adaptation for SAR11 and Prochlorococcus bacteria, which lack internal reserves to reduce their dependency on bioavailable ambient phosphate. PMID:26198420

  3. Dominant oceanic bacteria secure phosphate using a large extracellular buffer.

    PubMed

    Zubkov, Mikhail V; Martin, Adrian P; Hartmann, Manuela; Grob, Carolina; Scanlan, David J

    2015-07-22

    The ubiquitous SAR11 and Prochlorococcus bacteria manage to maintain a sufficient supply of phosphate in phosphate-poor surface waters of the North Atlantic subtropical gyre. Furthermore, it seems that their phosphate uptake may counter-intuitively be lower in more productive tropical waters, as if their cellular demand for phosphate decreases there. By flow sorting (33)P-phosphate-pulsed (32)P-phosphate-chased cells, we demonstrate that both Prochlorococcus and SAR11 cells exploit an extracellular buffer of labile phosphate up to 5-40 times larger than the amount of phosphate required to replicate their chromosomes. Mathematical modelling is shown to support this conclusion. The fuller the buffer the slower the cellular uptake of phosphate, to the point that in phosphate-replete tropical waters, cells can saturate their buffer and their phosphate uptake becomes marginal. Hence, buffer stocking is a generic, growth-securing adaptation for SAR11 and Prochlorococcus bacteria, which lack internal reserves to reduce their dependency on bioavailable ambient phosphate.

  4. Isotherm parameters and intraparticle mass transfer kinetics on molecularly imprinted polymers in acetonitrile/buffer mobile phases

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyunjung; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Guiochon, Georges A

    2006-03-01

    The equilibrium isotherm and the intraparticle mass transfer kinetics of the enantiomers of the template were investigated on an Fmoc-L-tryptophan (Fmoc-L-Trp) imprinted polymer at different pHs and water concentrations in acetonitrile/aqueous buffer mobile phases. The equilibrium isotherm data were measured using frontal analysis at 25 {+-} 2 C. The adsorption energy distribution was found to be trimodal, with narrow modes. Consistent with this distribution, the adsorption data were modeled using a tri-Langmuir isotherm equation and the best estimates of the isotherm parameters were determined. The intraparticle mass transfer parameters were derived by comparing the profiles of experimental overloaded bands and the profiles calculated using the isotherm model and the lumped pore diffusion (POR) model of chromatography. These results showed that different adsorption and mass transfer mechanisms exist in mobile phases made of acetonitrile/aqueous buffer and of acetonitrile/acetic acid solutions.

  5. Automatized sspKa measurements of dihydrogen phosphate and Tris(hydroxymethyl) aminomethane in acetonitrile/water mixtures from 20 to 60°C.

    PubMed

    Acquaviva, A; Tascon, M; Padró, J M; Gagliardi, L G; Castells, C B

    2014-09-01

    We measured pKa values of Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and dihydrogen phosphate; both are commonly used to prepare buffers for reverse-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), in acetonitrile/water mixtures from 0% to 70% (v/v) (64.6% (w/w)) acetonitrile and at 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60°C. The procedure is based on potentiometric measurements of pH of buffer solutions of variable solvent compositions using a glass electrode and a novel automated system. The method consists in the controlled additions of small volumes of a thermostated solution from an automatic buret into another isothermal solution containing exactly the same buffer-component concentrations, but a different solvent composition. The continuous changes in the solvent composition induce changes in the potentials. Thus, only two sequences of additions are needed: increasing the amount of acetonitrile from pure water and decreasing the content of acetonitrile from 70% (v/v) (64.6% (w/w)). In the procedure with homemade apparatus, times for additions, stirring, homogenization, and data acquisition are entirely controlled by software programmed for this specific routine. This rapid, fully automated method was applied to acquire more than 40 potential data covering the whole composition range (at each temperature) in about two hours and allowed a systematic study of the effect of temperature and acetonitrile composition on acid-base equilibria of two widely used substances to control pH close to 7. The experimental pKa results were fitted to empirical functions between pKa and temperature and acetonitrile composition. These equations allowed predictions of pKa to estimate the pH of mixtures at any composition and temperature, which would be very useful, for instance, during chromatographic method development.

  6. CE-MS of antihistamines using nonvolatile phosphate buffer.

    PubMed

    Chien, Chiu-Tang; Li, Fu-An; Huang, Ju-Li; Her, Guor-Rong

    2007-05-01

    Antihistamines were analyzed by CE-ESI-MS using phosphate buffer. The separation was performed in an acidic environment so that phosphate ions had a net velocity flowing toward the inlet reservoir instead of the ESI source. To further reduce the effect of ion suppression, the sodium ion in sodium phosphate was replaced with an ammonium ion. Furthermore, with the combination of reducing the concentration of acid added to the sheath liquid and the use of a low-flow interface, phosphoric acid could be added to the sheath liquid. Because of the use of the same counterion (phosphate ion) in running buffer and in sheath liquid, the separation integrity (resolution, elution order, and peak shape) was preserved. In addition, ion suppression was also greatly alleviated because a minimal amount of phosphate flowed into the ESI source.

  7. Influence of glyphosate on the copper dissolution in phosphate buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutinho, C. F. B.; Silva, M. O.; Machado, S. A. S.; Mazo, L. H.

    2007-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of copper microelectrode in phosphate buffer in the presence of glyphosate was investigated by electrochemical techniques. It was observed that the additions of glyphosate in the phosphate buffer increased the anodic current of copper microelectrode and the electrochemical dissolution was observed. This phenomenon could be associated with the Cu(II) complexation by glyphosate forming a soluble complex. Physical characterization of the surface showed that, in absence of glyphosate, an insoluble layer covered the copper surface; on the other hand, in presence of glyphosate, it was observed a corroded copper surface with the formation of glyphosate complex in solution.

  8. Reaction of Thymidine with Hypobromous Acid in Phosphate Buffer.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshinori; Kitabatake, Akihiko; Koide, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    When thymidine was treated with hypobromous acid (HOBr) in 100 mM phosphate buffer at pH 7.2, two major product peaks appeared in the HPLC chromatogram. The products in each peak were identified by NMR and MS as two isomers of 5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymidine-6-phosphate (a novel compound) and two isomers of 5,6-dihydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymidine (thymidine glycol) with comparable yields. 5-Hydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymidine-6-phosphate was relatively stable, and decomposed with a half-life of 32 h at pH 7.2 and 37°C generating thymidine glycol. The results suggest that 5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymidine-6-phosphate in addition to thymidine glycol may have importance for mutagenesis by the reaction of HOBr with thymine residues in nucleotides and DNA.

  9. Complete NMR analysis of oxytocin in phosphate buffer.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Akiko; Kawasaki, Nana; Fukuhara, Kiyoshi; Okuda, Haruhiro; Yamaguchi, Teruhide

    2010-02-01

    Complete NMR analysis of oxytocin (OXT) in phosphate buffer was elucidated by one-dimensional (1D)- and two-dimensional (2D)-NMR techniques, which involve the assignment of peptide amide NH protons and carbamoyl NH(2) protons. The (1)H-(15)N correlation of seven amide NH protons and three carbamoyl NH(2) protons were also shown by HSQC NMR of OXT without (15)N enrichment.

  10. Stability of glufosfamide in phosphate buffers and in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuming; Chen, Xiaoyan; Xu, Haiyan; Guan, Zhongmin; Zhong, Dafang

    2006-03-07

    Glufosfamide is a new, potential chemotherapeutic agent currently under investigation. Stability of glufosfamide was investigated in sodium phosphate buffers with different pH and temperature and in biological samples. Glufosfamide and isophosphamide mustard were quantified simultaneously using a liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometric method; precision and accuracy were within 15% for each analyte. Glufosfamide was stable in neutral buffers, but decomposed to form isophosphoramide mustard under acidic and basic conditions, which was pH- and temperature-dependent. The stability of glufosfamide varied in different biological samples. Results indicated that glufosfamide was unstable in some biological samples, such as the small intestine, smooth muscles, pancreas and urine, especially in the small intestine homogenate, with a half-life of 1.1 h. But the pH (<8) and beta-glucosidase of the tissue homogenate was found to have negligible contribution to the degradation of glufosfamide. The enzymatic inhibition experiment with the specific inhibitor, saccharo-1,4-lactone, demonstrated that it was glucuronidase that resulted in the degradation of glufosfamide in small intestine homogenate. Methanol was recommended to be used to homogenize the tissue in an ice water bath, and the container for urine collection should also be maintained in an ice water bath, and all the biological samples collected should be preserved in frozen condition until analysis.

  11. Amelogenin-enamelin association in phosphate buffered saline

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiudong; Fan, Daming; Mattew, Shibi; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2011-01-01

    The structures and interactions among the macromolecules in the enamel extracellular matrix play vital roles in regulating hydroxyapatite crystal nucleation, growth and maturation. We used dynamic light scattering, circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy to investigate association of amelogenin and the 32-kDa enamelin, at physiological pH 7.4, in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Amelogenin (rP148) self-assembly behavior was altered following addition of the 32-kDa enamelin. Dynamic light scattering revealed a trend of decrease in aggregate size in the solution following the addition of enamelin to amelogenin. A blue-shift and intensity increase of the ellipticity minima of rP148 in the circular dichroism spectra, upon the addition of the 32-kDa enamelin, suggest a direct interaction between the two proteins. In the fluorescence spectra, the maximum emission of rP148 was red-shifted from 335 to 341 nm with a marked intensity increase in the presence of enamelin as a result of complexation of the two proteins. In agreement with DLS data, TEM imaging showed that the 32-kDa enamelin dispersed the amelogenin aggregates into oligomeric particles and stabilizing them. Our study provides novel insights into understanding possible cooperation between enamelin and amelogenin in macromolecular co-assembly and in controlling enamel mineral formation. PMID:22243267

  12. Toward an in vivo dissolution methodology: a comparison of phosphate and bicarbonate buffers.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jennifer J; McNamara, Daniel P; Amidon, Gordon L

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the difference between the pharmaceutical phosphate buffers and the gastrointestinal bicarbonates in dissolution of ketoprofen and indomethacin, to illustrate the dependence of buffer differential on biopharmaceutical properties of BCS II weak acids, and to recommend phosphate buffers equivalent to bicarbonates. The intrinsic dissolution rates of ketoprofen and indomethacin were experimentally measured using a rotating disk method at 37 degrees C in USP SIF/FaSSIF and various concentrations of bicarbonates. Theoretical models including an improved reaction plane model and a film model were applied to estimate the surrogate phosphate buffers equivalent to the bicarbonates. Experimental results show that the intrinsic dissolution rates of ketoprofen and indomethacin in USP and FaSSIF phosphate buffers are 1.5-3.0 times that in the 15 mM bicarbonates. Theoretical analysis demonstrates that the buffer differential is largely dependent on the drug pK(a) and second on solubility, and weakly dependent on the drug diffusivity. Further, in accordance with the drug pK(a), solubility and diffusivity, a simple phosphate surrogate was proposed to match an average bicarbonate value (15 mM) of the upper gastrointestinal region. Specifically, phosphate buffers of 13-15 mM and 3-4 mM were recommended for ketoprofen and indomethacin, respectively. For both ketoprofen and indomethacin, the intrinsic dissolution using the phosphate surrogate buffers closely approximated the 15 mM bicarbonate buffer. This work demonstrates the substantial difference between pharmaceutical phosphates and physiological bicarbonates in determining the drug intrinsic dissolution rates of BCS II weak acids, such as ketoprofen and indomethacin. Surrogate phosphates were recommended in order to closely reflect the in vivo dissolution of ketoprofen and indomethacin in gastrointestinal bicarbonates, which has significant implications for defining buffer systems for

  13. Influence of phosphate-buffered sucrose solution on early graft function in feline renal autotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Masaaki; Okamura, Yasuhiko; Shimamura, Shunsuke; Katayama, Rieko; Kamishina, Hiroaki; Uzuka, Yuji

    2014-10-01

    Graft perfusion with cold heparinized saline has known to induce ischemia and reperfusion injury in feline kidney transplantation. In this study, the effects of phosphate-buffered sucrose solution and heparinized saline solution on early kidney graft function were compared in feline kidney autotransplantation. Perfusion of grafts with or without hypothermic storage with chilled phosphate-buffered sucrose solution prevented ischemia and reperfusion injury despite a very short ischemic time. The results of our study suggest that phosphate-buffered sucrose perfusion and storage solution should be effective to reduce ischemia and reperfusion injury despite a very short ischemic time in feline kidney transplantation.

  14. Phosphate buffer effects on thermal stability and H2O2-resistance of horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Asad, Sedigheh; Torabi, Seyed-Fakhreddin; Fathi-Roudsari, Mehrnoosh; Ghaemi, Nasser; Khajeh, Khosro

    2011-05-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) has attracted intense research interest due to its potential applications in biotechnological fields. However, inadequate stability under prevalent conditions such as elevated temperatures and H(2)O(2) exposure, has limited its industrial application. In this study, stability of HRP was investigated in the presence of different buffer systems (potassium phosphate and Tris-HCl) and additives. It was shown that the concentration of phosphate buffer severely affects enzyme thermostability in a way that in diluted potassium phosphate buffer (10mM) half-life (from 13 to 35 min at 80 °C) and T(m) (from 73 to 77.5 °C) increased significantly. Among additives tested, trehalose had the most thermostabilizing effect. Exploring the role of glycosylation in stabilizing effect of phosphate buffer, non-glycosylated recombinant HRP was also examined for its thermal and H(2)O(2) stability in both diluted and concentrated phosphate buffers. The recombinant enzyme was more thermally stable in diluted buffer in accordance to glycosylated HRP; but interestingly recombinant HRP showed higher H(2)O(2) tolerance in concentrated buffer.

  15. Density measurements of potassium phosphate buffer from 4 to 45 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Schiel, John E; Hage, David S

    2005-01-30

    Potassium phosphate buffer is often used in methods such as equilibrium dialysis, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) for characterizing the binding of drugs and hormones with proteins or other ligands within the body. In these experiments, the buffer density is often approximated to be that of water and the concentrations of all reagents are assumed to be constant with temperature. However, some difference in density between phosphate buffer and water would be expected, and variations in this density could lead to significant changes in the concentrations of dissolved solutes with temperature. This, in turn, could affect the binding observed for a solute-ligand system in such a buffer. In this study, the densities of potassium phosphate buffers with concentrations up to 0.10M were measured at or near physiological pH for temperatures ranging from 4-45 degrees C. The general change in density versus temperature followed a quadratic equation, while the changes in density with concentration and pH followed a linear response. The results were used to formulate a general equation that could be used to calculate the density of potassium phosphate buffer at any pH, temperature, and concentration within the tested range. This equation and more specialized relationships developed in the temperature, concentration, and pH studies were found to give much greater accuracy in describing the density of these buffers versus a previous relationship developed for solutions containing only potassium dihydrogen phosphate.

  16. Influence of phosphate ions on buffer capacity of soil humic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguta, P.; Sokołowska, Z.

    2012-02-01

    The object of this study was to determine change of natural buffer capacity of humic acids by strong buffering agents, which were phosphate ions. Studies were carried out on the humic acids extracted from peat soils. Additional information was obtained by determination of water holding capacity, density, ash and pH for peats and optical parameter Q4/6 for humic acids. Humic acid suspensions exhibited the highest buffer properties at low pH and reached maximum at pH ~ 4. Phosphates possessed buffer properties in the pH range from 4.5 to 8.0. The maximum of buffering was at pH~6.8 and increased proportionally with an increase in the concentration of phosphate ions. The study indicated that the presence of phosphate ions may strongly change natural buffer capacity of humic acids by shifting buffering maximum toward higher pH values. Significant correlations were found for the degree of the secondary transformation with both the buffer capacity and the titrant volume used during titration.

  17. Sources of conductance changes during bacterial reduction of trimethylamine oxide to trimethylammonium in phosphate buffer.

    PubMed

    Owens, J D; Miskin, D R; Wacher-Viveros, M C; Benge, L C

    1985-06-01

    The sources of conductance changes during reduction of trimethylamine oxide to trimethylamine by Escherichia coli with formate as electron donor and in the presence of phosphate buffer were investigated. Theoretical considerations and experimental results suggest that the major source of conductance change is the conversion of dihydrogen phosphate to hydrogen phosphate. This transformation contributes almost twice as much to the total conductance change as does the conversion of uncharged trimethylamine oxide to charged trimethylammonium.

  18. Phosphate and HEPES buffers potently affect the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of Alzheimer's Aβ peptide.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Megan; Tepper, Katharina; Haupt, Caroline; Knüpfer, Uwe; Klement, Karolin; Meinhardt, Jessica; Horn, Uwe; Balbach, Jochen; Fändrich, Marcus

    2011-06-10

    The oligomerization of Aβ peptide into amyloid fibrils is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Due to its biological relevance, phosphate is the most commonly used buffer system for studying the formation of Aβ and other amyloid fibrils. Investigation into the characteristics and formation of amyloid fibrils frequently relies upon material formed in vitro, predominantly in phosphate buffers. Herein, we examine the effects on the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of Aβ peptide that occur due solely to the influence of phosphate buffer. We reveal that significant differences in amyloid fibrillation are observed due to fibrillation being initiated in phosphate or HEPES buffer (at physiological pH and temperature). Except for the differing buffer ions, all experimental parameters were kept constant. Fibril formation was assessed using fluorescently monitored kinetic studies, microscopy, X-ray fiber diffraction and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Based on this set up, we herein reveal profound effects on the mechanism and speed of Aβ fibrillation. The three histidine residues at positions 6, 13 and 14 of Aβ(1-40) are instrumental in these mechanistic changes. We conclude that buffer plays a more significant role in fibril formation than has been generally acknowledged.

  19. Retention of ionisable compounds on high-performance liquid chromatography XVIII: pH variation in mobile phases containing formic acid, piperazine, tris, boric acid or carbonate as buffering systems and acetonitrile as organic modifier.

    PubMed

    Subirats, Xavier; Bosch, Elisabeth; Rosés, Martí

    2009-03-20

    In the present work dissociation constants of commonly used buffering species, formic acid, piperazine, tris(hydroxymethyl)-aminomethane, boric acid and carbonate, have been determined for several acetonitrile-water mixtures. From these pK(a) values a previous model has been successfully evaluated to estimate pH values in acetonitrile-aqueous buffer mobile phases from the aqueous pH and concentration of the above mentioned buffers up to 60% of acetonitrile, and aqueous buffer concentrations between 0.005 (0.001 mol L(-1) for formic acid-formate) and 0.1 mol L(-1). The relationships derived for the presently studied buffers, together with those established for previously considered buffering systems, allow a general prediction of the pH variation of the most commonly used HPLC buffers when the composition of the acetonitrile-water mobile phase changes during the chromatographic process, such as in gradient elution. Thus, they are an interesting tool that can be easily implemented in general retention models to predict retention of acid-base analytes and optimize chromatographic separations.

  20. Development of a liquid-junction/low-flow interface for phosphate buffer capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Fu-An; Huang, Ju-Li; Shen, Shang-Yu; Wang, Che-Wei; Her, Guor-Rong

    2009-04-01

    To alleviate ion suppression from phosphate buffer and to preserve separation integrity, a new capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry (CE-MS) interface was developed. The interface consisted of a low-flow interface and a liquid junction. In this design, both the inlet reservoir and the liquid-junction reservoir were filled with phosphate running buffer. Because the phosphate anions in the column migrated toward the inlet reservoir (away from the electrospray ionization (ESI) source) the problem of ion suppression in ESI was avoided. The liquid junction was incorporated to eliminate issues of degraded separation observed when sheath liquid interfaces use different buffers for separation and MS analysis attributed to differences in anion velocity. The utility of the interface was demonstrated by the analysis of antihistamines at pH 3.5 and the analysis of perfluorocarboxylic acid at pH 9.5.

  1. Improving phosphate buffer-free cathode performance of microbial fuel cell based on biological nitrification.

    PubMed

    You, Shi-Jie; Ren, Nan-Qi; Zhao, Qing-Liang; Kiely, Patrick D; Wang, Jing-Yuan; Yang, Feng-Lin; Fu, Lei; Peng, Luo

    2009-08-15

    To reduce the amount of phosphate buffer currently used in Microbial Fuel Cell's (MFC's), we investigated the role of biological nitrification at the cathode in the absence of phosphate buffer. The addition of a nitrifying mixed consortia (NMC) to the cathode compartment and increasing ammonium concentration in the catholyte resulted in an increase of cell voltage from 0.3 V to 0.567 V (external resistance of 100 Omega) and a decrease of catholyte pH from 8.8 to 7.05. A large fraction of ammonium was oxidized to nitrite, as indicated by an increase of nitrate-nitrogen (NO(3)(-)-N). An MFC inoculated with an NMC and supplied with 94.2 mgN/l ammonium to the catholyte could generate a maximum power of 2.1+/-0.14 mW (10.94+/-0.73 W/m(3)). This compared favorably to an MFC supplied with either buffered or non-buffered solution. The buffer-free NMC inoculated cathodic chamber showed the smallest polarization resistance, suggesting that nitrification resulted in improved cathode performance. The improved performances of the phosphate buffer-free cathode and cell are positively related to biological nitrification, in which we suggest additional protons produced from ammonium oxidation facilitated electrochemical reduction of oxygen at cathode.

  2. Effects of phosphate buffer in parenteral drugs on particle formation from glass vials.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Toru; Miyajima, Makoto; Wakiyama, Naoki; Terada, Katsuhide

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of inorganic particles generated in glass vials filled with phosphate buffer solutions were investigated. During storage, particles were visually detected in the phosphate buffer solution in particular glass vials which pass compendial tests of containers for injectable drugs. These particles were considered to be different from ordinal glass delamination, which has been reported in a number of papers because the particles were mainly composed of Al, P and O, but not Si. The formation of the particles accelerated at higher storage temperatures. Among the surface treatments tested for the glass vials, sulfur treatment showed a protective effect on the particle formation in the vials, whereas the SiO(2) coating did not have any protective effects. It was found that the elution ratio of Al and Si in the solution stored in the glass vials after the heating was similar to the ratio of Al and Si in borosilicate glass. However, the Al concentration decreased during storage (5°C, 6 months), and consequently, particle formation was observed in the solution. Adding citrate, which is a chelating agent for Al, effectively suppressed the particle formation in the heated solution. When 50 ppb and higher concentrations of Al ion were added to the phosphate buffer solution, the formation of white particles containing Al, P and O was detected. It is suggested that a phosphate buffer solution in a borosilicate glass vial has the ability to form particles due to interactions with the Al that is eluted from the glass during storage.

  3. Aggregation of normal and sickle hemoglobin in high concentration phosphate buffer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kejing; Ballas, Samir K; Hantgan, Roy R; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B

    2004-12-01

    Sickle cell disease is caused by a mutant form of hemoglobin, hemoglobin S, that polymerizes under hypoxic conditions. The extent and mechanism of polymerization are thus the subject of many studies of the pathophysiology of the disease and potential treatment strategies. To facilitate such studies, a model system using high concentration phosphate buffer (1.5 M-1.8 M) has been developed. To properly interpret results from studies using this model it is important to understand the similarities and differences in hemoglobin S polymerization in the model compared to polymerization under physiological conditions. In this article, we show that hemoglobin S and normal adult hemoglobin, hemoglobin A, aggregate in high concentration phosphate buffer even when the concentration of hemoglobin is below the solubility defined for polymerization. This phenomenon was not observed using 0.05 M phosphate buffer or in another model system we studied that uses dextran to enhance polymerization. We have used static light scattering, dynamic light scattering, and differential interference contrast microscopy to confirm aggregation of deoxygenated and oxygenated hemoglobins below their solubility and have shown that this aggregation is not observable using turbidity measurements, a common technique for assessing polymerization. We have also shown that the aggregation increases with increasing temperature in the range of 15 degrees -37 degrees C and that it increases as the concentration of phosphate increases. These studies contribute to the working knowledge of how to properly apply studies of hemoglobin S polymerization that are conducted using the high phosphate model.

  4. Explanation for the enhanced dissolution of silica column packing in high pH phosphate and carbonate buffers.

    PubMed

    Tindall, G W; Perry, R L

    2003-02-28

    It has been reported that at high pH, the rate of bonded phase packing degradation in methanol/water mobile phases is greater for carbonate and phosphate buffers than for amine buffers. This conclusion was based on buffer pH determined in the aqueous buffer before dilution with methanol. Changes in buffer species pKa, and therefore buffer pH, upon methanol dilution are consistent with the observed degradation results. Measurements of pH in the methanol/water solutions confirm that the carbonate and phosphate buffers were considerably more basic than the amine buffer, even though all the buffers were pH 10 before dilution with methanol. These results demonstrate that it can be misleading to extrapolate aqueous pH data to partially aqueous solutions. Measurements of pH in the mixed solvent provide more reliable predictions of column and sample stability.

  5. Matching phosphate and maleate buffer systems for dissolution of weak acids: Equivalence in terms of buffer capacity of bulk solution or surface pH?

    PubMed

    Cristofoletti, Rodrigo; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2016-06-01

    The development of in vitro dissolution tests able to anticipate the in vivo fate of drug products has challenged pharmaceutical scientists over time, especially in the case of ionizable compounds. In the seminal model proposed by Mooney et al. thirty-five years ago, the pH at the solid-liquid interface (pH0) was identified as a key parameter in predicting dissolution rate. In the current work it is demonstrated that the in vitro dissolution of the weak acid ibuprofen in maleate and phosphate buffer systems is a function of the pH0, which in turn is affected by properties of the drug and the medium. The reported pH0 for ibuprofen dissolution in bicarbonate buffer, the predominant buffer species in the human small intestine under fasting conditions, can be achieved by reducing the phosphate buffer concentration to 5.0mM or the maleate buffer concentration to 2.2mM. Using this approach to identify the appropriate buffer/buffer capacity combination for in vitro experiments in FaSSIF-type media, it would be possible to increase the physiological relevance of this important biopharmaceutics tool. However, the necessity of monitoring and adjusting the bulk pH during the experiments carried out in 5.0mM phosphate or 2.2mM maleate buffers must also be taken into consideration.

  6. Effect of fluoride in phosphate buffer solution on bonding to artificially carious enamel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Shimada, Yasushi; Tagami, Junji

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of fluoride on resin bonding to artificially carious enamel. Specimens from demineralized human enamel sections were prepared using two commercially available adhesives (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray; Single Bond, 3M) and a composite resin (Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray) according to manufacturers' instructions. They were then immersed in phosphate buffered saline solution with varied fluoride concentrations at 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 10 ppm. After immersion in each solution for one, three, or seven days, microshear bond strength was measured. The bond strengths of both adhesive systems to artificially carious enamel significantly increased after immersion in fluoride-phosphate buffer solution. Based on the findings obtained, we thus proposed not to remove the white enamel lesions for bonding in the clinic. They might be preserved and treated using fluoride applications.

  7. Selective recognition of sulfate anions by a cyclopeptide-derived receptor in aqueous phosphate buffer.

    PubMed

    Schaly, Astrid; Belda, Raquel; García-España, Enrique; Kubik, Stefan

    2013-12-20

    A cyclopeptide-based anion receptor containing alternating 6-aminopicolinic acid and substituted (4R)-4-aminoproline subunits with appended β-alanine residues binds sulfate anions in water. Importantly, appreciable sulfate binding is even observed in phosphate buffer, hence in the presence of anions of similar structure but with a different degree of protonation. The cause for the high selectivity of this receptor is related to the mode of action of the sulfate-binding protein.

  8. Lyophilization-induced protein denaturation in phosphate buffer systems: monomeric and tetrameric beta-galactosidase.

    PubMed

    Pikal-Cleland, K A; Carpenter, J F

    2001-09-01

    During freezing in phosphate buffers, selective precipitation of a less soluble buffer component and subsequent pH shifts may induce protein denaturation. Previous reports indicate significantly more inactivation and secondary structural perturbation of monomeric and tetrameric beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) during freeze-thawing in sodium phosphate (NaP) buffer as compared with potassium phosphate (KP) buffer. This observation was attributed to the significant pH shifts (from 7.0 to as low as 3.8) observed during freezing in the NaP buffer (1). In the current study, we investigated the impact of the additional stress of dehydration after freezing on the recovery of active protein on reconstitution and the retention of the native structure in the dried state. Freeze-drying monomeric and tetrameric beta-gal in either NaP or KP buffer resulted in significant secondary structural perturbations, which were greatest for the NaP samples. However, similar recoveries of active monomeric protein were observed after freeze-thawing and freeze-drying, indicating that most dehydration-induced unfolding was reversible on reconstitution of the freeze-dried protein. In contrast, the tetrameric protein was more susceptible to dehydration-induced denaturation as seen by the greater loss in activity after reconstitution of the freeze-dried samples relative to that measured after freeze-thawing. To ensure optimal protein stability during freeze-drying, the protein must be protected from both freezing and dehydration stresses. Although poly(ethylene glycol) and dextran are preferentially excluded solutes and should confer protection during freezing, they were unable to prevent lyophilization-induced denaturation. In addition, Tween did not foster maintenance of native protein during freeze-drying. However, sucrose, which hydrogen bonds to dried protein in the place of lost water, greatly reduced freezing- and drying-induced denaturation, as observed by the high retention of native

  9. Bioconversion of cyanide and acetonitrile by a municipal-sewage-derived anaerobic consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Nagle, N.J.; Rivard, C.J.; Mohagheghi, A.; Philippidis, G.

    1995-12-31

    In this study, an anaerobic consortium was examined for its ability to adapt to and degrade the representative organonitriles, cyanide and acetonitrile. Adaptation to cyanide and acetonitrile was achieved by adding increasing levels of cyanide and acetonitrile to the anaerobic consortium, followed by extensive incubation over a 90-day period. The anaerobic consortium adapted most rapidly to the lower concentrations of each substrate and resulted in reductions of 85% and 83% of the cyanide and acetonitrile, respectively, at the 50 mg/L addition level. Increasing the concentration of both cyanide and acetonitrile resulted in reduced bioconversion. Two continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTR) were set up to examine the potential for continuous bioconversion of organonitriles. The anaerobic consortium was adapted to continuous infusion of acetonitrile at an initial concentration of 10 mg/L{center_dot}day in phosphate buffer.

  10. Reaction of nerve agents with phosphate buffer at pH 7.

    PubMed

    Creasy, William R; Fry, Roderick A; McGarvey, David J

    2012-07-12

    Chemical weapon nerve agents, including isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate (GB or Sarin), pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate (GD or Soman), and S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) O-ethyl methylphosphonothioate (VX), are slow to react in aqueous solutions at midrange pH levels. The nerve agent reactivity increases in phosphate buffer at pH 7, relative to distilled water or acetate buffer. Reactions were studied using (31)P NMR. Phosphate causes faster reaction to the corresponding alkyl methylphosphonic acids, and produces a mixed phosphate/phosphonate compound as an intermediate reaction product. GB has the fastest reaction rate, with a bimolecular rate constant of 4.6 × 10(-3) M(-1)s(-1)[PO(4)(3-)]. The molar product branching ratio of GB acid to the pyro product (isopropyl methylphosphonate phosphate anhydride) is 1:1.4, independent of phosphate concentration, and the pyro product continues to react much slower to form GB acid. The pyro product has two doublets in the (31)P NMR spectrum. The rate of reaction for GD is slower than GB, with a rate constant of 1.26 × 10(-3) M(-1)s(-1) [PO(4)(3-)]. The rate for VX is considerably slower, with a rate constant of 1.39 × 10(-5) M(-1)s(-1) [PO(4)(3-)], about 2 orders of magnitude slower than the rate for GD. The rate constant of the reaction of GD with pyrophosphate at pH 8 is 2.04 × 10(-3) min(-1) at a concentration of 0.0145 M. The rate of reaction for diisopropyl fluorophosphate is 2.84 × 10(-3) min(-1) at a concentration of 0.153 M phosphate, a factor of 4 slower than GD and a factor of 15 slower than GB, and there is no detectable pyro product. The half-lives of secondary reaction of the GB pyro product in 0.153 and 0.046 M solution of phosphate are 23.8 and 28.0 h, respectively, which indicates little or no dependence on phosphate.

  11. Effect of phosphate buffer on photodegradation reactions of riboflavin in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iqbal; Fasihullah, Q; Vaid, Faiyaz H M

    2005-03-01

    The effect of phosphate buffer on aerobic photodegradation reactions of riboflavin (RF) at pH 7.0 has been studied. The photoproducts of the two major reactions, viz., intramolecular photoreduction and intramolecular photoaddition, have been determined by a specific multicomponent spectrophotometric method. The overall photodegradation of riboflavin in the presence of phosphate buffer involves the participation of both H2PO4-and HPO4(2-) species. The second-order rate constants for the H2PO4(-)-catalysed photodegradation of riboflavin (normal photolysis) to lumichrome (LC) and HPO4(2-)-catalysed photodegradation of riboflavin (photoaddition) to cyclodehydroriboflavin (CDRF) are 0.93 x 10(-4) and 4.0 x 10(-4) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The addition of 0.25-2.00 M phosphate to RF solutions at pH 7.0 gives rise to RF-HPO4(2-) complex and hence the quenching of 4-36% fluorescence, respectively. This results in the suppression of normal photolysis leading to the formation of LC in favour of photoaddition to yield CDRF. The present study shows the involvement of H2PO4- anions in the base-catalysed degradation of riboflavin by normal photolysis vis-a-vis the involvement of HPO42- anions in photoaddition reactions of riboflavin suggested earlier [M. Schuman Jorns, G. Schollnhammer, P. Hemmerich, Intramolecular addition of the riboflavin side chain. Anion-catalysed neutral photochemistry, Eur. J. Biochem. 57 (1975) 35-48].

  12. Effects of protein and phosphate buffer concentrations on thermal denaturation of lysozyme analyzed by isoconversional method.

    PubMed

    Cao, X M; Tian, Y; Wang, Z Y; Liu, Y W; Wang, C X

    2016-07-03

    Thermal denaturation of lysozymes was studied as a function of protein concentration, phosphate buffer concentration, and scan rate using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), which was then analyzed by the isoconversional method. The results showed that lysozyme thermal denaturation was only slightly affected by the protein concentration and scan rate. When the protein concentration and scan rate increased, the denaturation temperature (Tm) also increased accordingly. On the contrary, the Tm decreased with the increase of phosphate buffer concentration. The denaturation process of lysozymes was accelatated and the thermal stability was reduced with the increase of phosphate concentration. One part of degeneration process was not reversible where the aggregation occurred. The other part was reversible. The apparent activation energy (Ea) was computed by the isoconversional method. It decreased with the increase of the conversion ratio (α). The observed denaturation process could not be described by a simple reaction mechanism. It was not a process involving 2 standard reversible states, but a multi-step process. The new opportunities for investigating the kinetics process of protein denaturation can be supplied by this novel isoconversional method.

  13. Recovery of nicotine-free proteins from tobacco leaves using phosphate buffer system under controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Fu, H; Machado, P A; Hahm, T S; Kratochvil, R J; Wei, C I; Lo, Y M

    2010-03-01

    Establishment of an effective, high-throughput processing system to recover protein from tobacco with no nicotine contamination is essential and vital to the development of value-added, alternative applications for tobacco farmers. We have successfully developed a mechanism capable of processing up to 60 kg of tobacco leaves per hour with phosphate buffer (Na(2)HPO(4)-KH(2)PO(4)) simultaneously added to stabilize the protein as the plant was being disintegrated. The optimal processing parameters were identified, including the ratio of buffer to leaf (BLR) at 4.75 (w/w), buffer pH 7.85, and buffer concentration 0.085 mol/L, achieving a maximum yield of soluble protein at 12.85 mg/g fresh leaf. Acetone at -20 degrees C was the most effective among all methods investigated to remove nicotine from protein; however, it also drastically reduced the recovery rate of protein (63.3%). Ultrafiltration was only able to remove about 50% of the residual nicotine, although the protein recovery rate was high (94.7%). The residual nicotine content inherent in the recovered protein was completely removed by rinsing the protein with 85% phosphoric acid at pH 3.5 for three times with a protein recovery of 94.5%. The pilot-scale operation provides a solid foundation for further scale-up to industrial production of nicotine-free tobacco protein that could bring added value to tobacco for nonsmoking applications.

  14. Study on the oxidation form of adenine in phosphate buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuan-Zhi; Zhou, Jian-Feng; Zhu, Feng-Xia; Ye, Yong; Xie, Ji-Min

    2010-07-01

    The oxidation of adenine in phosphate buffer solution is investigated using square-wave voltammetry and in situ UV spectroelectrochemistry. The geometry of adenine and the derivatives optimized at DFTB3LYP-6-31G (d, p)-PCM level is in agreement with the crystal structure, and the imitated UV spectra of adenine and the product at electrode are consistent with the in situ UV spectra. The relationship between the electrochemical property and the molecular structure is also discussed. The experimental and theoretical results show that the adenine oxidation origins from the neutral adenine.

  15. Key comparison on pH of an unknown phosphate buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastkowski, F.; Spitzer, P.; Sander, B.; Máriássy, M.; Dimitrova, L.; Reyes, A.; Rodríguez, A.; Manzano, V. Lara; Vospelova, A.; Jakobsen, P. T.; Pawlina, M.; Korol, M.; Kozlowski, W.; Delgado, M.; Ticona Canaza, G.; Dias, J. C.; Gonzaga, F. B.; Nagyné Szilágyi, Z.; Jakusovszky, B.; Nongluck, T.; Waters, J.; Pratt, K. W.; Asakai, T.; Maksimov, I.; Hankova, Z.; Uysal, E.; Gavrilkin, V.; Prokunin, S. V.; Ferreira, E.; Fajardo, S.

    2016-01-01

    Results of CCQM-K99 key comparison on unknown phosphate buffer pH ~ 7.5 at 5 °C, 15 °C, 25 °C, 37 °C and 50 °C are reported. Good agreement is found between the majority of participants. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  16. Phosphate and HEPES buffers potently affect the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of Alzheimer's A{beta} peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, Megan; Tepper, Katharina; Haupt, Caroline; Knuepfer, Uwe; Klement, Karolin; Meinhardt, Jessica; Horn, Uwe; Balbach, Jochen; Faendrich, Marcus

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} Sodium phosphate buffer accelerated A{beta}(1-40) nucleation relative to HEPES. {yields} A{beta}(1-40) fibrils formed in the two buffers show only minor structural differences. {yields} NMR revealed that A{beta}(1-40) histidine residues mediate buffer dependent changes. -- Abstract: The oligomerization of A{beta} peptide into amyloid fibrils is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Due to its biological relevance, phosphate is the most commonly used buffer system for studying the formation of A{beta} and other amyloid fibrils. Investigation into the characteristics and formation of amyloid fibrils frequently relies upon material formed in vitro, predominantly in phosphate buffers. Herein, we examine the effects on the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of A{beta} peptide that occur due solely to the influence of phosphate buffer. We reveal that significant differences in amyloid fibrillation are observed due to fibrillation being initiated in phosphate or HEPES buffer (at physiological pH and temperature). Except for the differing buffer ions, all experimental parameters were kept constant. Fibril formation was assessed using fluorescently monitored kinetic studies, microscopy, X-ray fiber diffraction and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Based on this set up, we herein reveal profound effects on the mechanism and speed of A{beta} fibrillation. The three histidine residues at positions 6, 13 and 14 of A{beta}(1-40) are instrumental in these mechanistic changes. We conclude that buffer plays a more significant role in fibril formation than has been generally acknowledged.

  17. Effect of glycine on pH changes and protein stability during freeze-thawing in phosphate buffer systems.

    PubMed

    Pikal-Cleland, Katherine A; Cleland, Jeffrey L; Anchordoquy, Thomas J; Carpenter, John F

    2002-09-01

    Previous studies have established that the selective precipitation of a less soluble buffer component during freezing can induce a significant pH shift in the freeze concentrate. During freezing of sodium phosphate solutions, crystallization of the disodium salt can produce a pH decrease as great as 3 pH units which can dramatically affect protein stability. The objective of our study was to determine how the presence of glycine (0-500 mM), a commonly used bulking agent in pharmaceutical protein formulations, affects the pH changes normally observed during freezing in sodium phosphate buffer solutions and to determine whether these pH changes contribute to instability of model proteins in glycine/phosphate formulations. During freezing in sodium phosphate buffers, the presence of glycine significantly influenced the pH. Glycine at the lower concentrations (< or = 50 mM) suppressed the pH decrease normally observed during freezing in 10 and 100 mM sodium phosphate buffer, possibly by reducing the nucleation rate of salt and thereby decreasing the extent of buffer salt crystallization. The presence of glycine at higher concentration (> 100 mM) in the sodium phosphate buffer resulted in a more complete crystallization of the disodium salt as indicated by the frozen pH values closer to the equilibrium value (pH 3.6). Although high concentrations of glycine can facilitate more buffer salt crystallization and these pH shifts may prove to be potentially damaging to the protein, glycine, in its amorphous state, can also act to stabilize a protein via the preferential exclusion mechanism.

  18. Development of a Single Ion Pair HPLC Method for Analysis of Terbinafine, Ofloxacin, Ornidazole, Clobetasol, and Two Preservatives in a Cream Formulation: Application to In Vitro Drug Release in Topical Simulated Media-Phosphate Buffer Through Rat Skin.

    PubMed

    Dewani, Anil P; Bakal, Ravindra L; Kokate, Pranjali G; Chandewar, Anil V; Patra, Srdhanjali

    2015-01-01

    Present work reports an HPLC method with UV detection for quantification of terbinafine, ofloxacin, ornidazole, and clobetasol in a cream formulation along with two preservatives methyl and propyl paraben. The chromatographic separation and quantification was achieved by an octyl bonded column and a gradient elution program involving an ion-pairing reagent, hexanesulfonic acid (0.2%, pH modified to 2.7 using orthophosphoric acid) and acetonitrile. The method was simple and devoid of buffer salts and therefore advantageous for system and column life. The three step gradient program was initiated with 30% (v/v) acetonitrile for the first 5 min and ramped linearly to 60% in the next 7 min. The mobile phase remained constant for the next 11 min and then concluded at 30% (v/v) of acetonitrile. Flow rate throughout was 0.8 mL/min, and all the signals were monitored at 243 nm. The method was applied for assay of a cream formulation and its in vitro permeation studies to determine the penetration profile of the four drugs and two preservatives. A marketed cream formulation was selected for the permeation study, which was carried out using a diffusion cell consisting of topical simulated media, phosphate buffer (pH=6.8) solution containing 1% sodium lauryl sulfate as a receiver medium.

  19. Photoluminescent distinction among plant life forms using phosphate buffered saline extract solutions.

    PubMed

    Danielson, Timothy L; Obeidat, Safwan; Rayson, Gary D; Anderson, Dean M; Fredrickson, Ed L; Estell, Rick E

    2006-07-01

    Photoluminescence of plant extract solutions has been investigated for discrimination of plant life forms (grasses, forbs, and shrubs) using principal component analysis (PCA). Clippings from each of six plant species representing three different plant life forms potentially found in the diets of free-ranging herbivores in the Chihuahuan Desert of North America were investigated for possible discernment. These plants included Sporobolus flexuosus (mesa dropseed, a grass), Pleuraphis mutica (tobosa, a grass), Dimorphocarpa wislizenii (spectacle pod, a forb), Sphaeralcea incana (pale globemallow, a forb), Flourensia cernua leaves (tarbush, a shrub), and Atriplex canescens leaves and stems (fourwing saltbush, a shrub). Emission spectra (370-600 nm) from phosphate buffered saline (PBS) extract solutions (pH 2.2, 7.5 and 12.5) were recorded for each plant with excitation at 365 nm. Use of PBS minimized chlorophyll interference. Discernment among plant life forms within these plant species was achieved.

  20. Determination of impurities in heparin by capillary electrophoresis using high molarity phosphate buffers.

    PubMed

    Wielgos, Todd; Havel, Karalyn; Ivanova, Nadia; Weinberger, Robert

    2009-02-20

    Oversulfated chondroitin sulfate (OSCS), an impurity found in some porcine intestinal heparin samples was separated from intact heparin by capillary electrophoresis (CE) using a 600mM phosphate buffer, pH 3.5 as the background electrolyte in a 56cm x 25microm i.d. capillary. This method was confirmed in two separate labs, was shown to be linear, reproducible, robust, easy to use and provided the highest resolution and superior limits of detection compared to other available CE methods. Glycosoaminoglycans such as dermatan sulfate and heparan sulfate were separated and quantified as well during a single run. The heparin peak area response correlated well to values obtained using the official assay for biological activity. A high speed, high resolution version of the method was developed using 600mM lithium phosphate, pH 2.8 in a 21.5cm x 25microm i.d. capillary which provided limits of detection for OSCS that were below 0.1%.

  1. Effect of phosphate buffer on aggregation kinetics of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles induced by monovalent and divalent electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Afshinnia, K; Baalousha, M

    2017-03-01

    The attachment efficiency (α) is an important parameter that can be used to characterize nanoparticle (NPs) aggregation behavior and has been a topic of discussion of several papers in the past few years. The importance of α is because it is one of the key parameters that can be used to model NP environmental fate and behavior. This study uses UV-vis and laser Doppler electrophoresis to monitor the aggregation behavior of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (cit-AgNPs) induced by Na(+) and Ca(2+) as counter ions in the presence and absence of Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) as a surrogate of natural organic matter and different concentrations of phosphate buffer (0-1mM). Results demonstrate that phosphate buffer, which serves to maintain pH nearly constant over the course of a reaction, is an important determinant of NP aggregation behavior. Increasing phosphate buffer concentration results in a decrease in the critical coagulation concentrations (CCC) of cit-AgNPs to lower counter ion concentration and an increase of α at the same counter ion concentration, both in the absence and presence of SRFA. SRFA stabilizes AgNPs and increases the CCC to higher counter ion concentrations. The outcome of this study can be used to rationalize the variation in α and CCC values reported in the literature for NPs with similar physicochemical properties, where different α and CCC values are reported when different types of buffers and buffer concentrations are used in different studies.

  2. Effect of phosphate electrolyte buffer on the dynamics of water in tendon and cartilage.

    PubMed

    Zheng, ShaoKuan; Xia, Yang

    2009-02-01

    A number of NMR spectroscopic and microscopic MRI (microMRI) techniques were used to study proton dynamics in canine tendon and articular cartilage immersed in normal saline solution (NaCl solution) and high-concentration phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution. In a proton CPMG experiment on tendons, the T(2) relaxation of the tissue was found to be anisotropic and had two populations. When immersed in saline, the T(2) values were short and their relative populations were anisotropic. When immersed in PBS, the T(2) values increased and their relative populations became isotropic. These phenomena, also verified by proton double-quantum-filtered (DQF) NMR spectroscopy, were interpreted as the catalyzing effect of phosphate ions on proton exchange between water molecules. In the experiment on articular cartilage, the immersion of cartilage-bone blocks in PBS resulted in a significant reduction in the laminar appearance of cartilage on MRI (the magic angle effect). The quantitative T(2) anisotropy by microMRI at 13 microm pixel resolution and DQF NMR spectroscopy confirmed the substantial effect of PBS on the water dynamics in cartilage tissue blocks. This preliminary study has two important implications. For in vitro cartilage research, this work confirms the importance of the salt solution in which the specimen is stored - not all salts have the same effect on the measurable quantities in NMR and MRI. For in vivo cartilage diagnosis, especially using whole-body MRI scanners, this work suggests the possibility of using a suitable electrolyte as a novel contrast agent to assess the ultrastructural changes in cartilage due to tissue degradation.

  3. Substituent Effects on the Photodeprotection Reactions of Selected Ketoprofen Derivatives in Phosphate Buffered Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingyue; Li, Ming-De; Huang, Jinqing; Li, Tianlu; Liu, Han; Li, Xuechen; Phillips, David Lee

    2016-02-22

    Photodeprotection is an important reaction that has been attracting broad interest for use in a variety of applications. Recent advances in ultrafast and vibrational time-resolved spectroscopies can facilitate obtaining data to help unravel the reaction mechanisms involving in the photochemical reactions of interest. The kinetics and reaction mechanisms for the photodeprotection reactions of ketoprofen derivatives containing three different substituents (ibuprofen, Br and I) were investigated by femtosecond transient absorption (fs-TA) and nanosecond time-resolved resonance Raman (ns-TR(3)) spectroscopy methods in phosphate buffered solutions (PBS). Fs-TA allows us to detect the decay kinetics of the triplet species as the key precursor for formation of a carbanion species for three different substituents attached to ketoprofen. To characterize the structural and electronic properties of the corresponding carbanion and triplet intermediates, TR(3) spectroscopic experiments were conducted. The transient spectroscopy work reveals that the different substituents affect the photodecarboxylation reaction to produce carbon dioxide which in turn influences the generation of the carbanion species which determines the rate of the photorelease of the functional groups attached on the ketoprofen parent molecule. The fingerprint TR(3) spectroscopy results suggest that ketoprofen derivatives may be deactivated to produce a triplet carbanion when increasing the atom mass of the halogen atoms.

  4. Substituent Effects on the Photodeprotection Reactions of Selected Ketoprofen Derivatives in Phosphate Buffered Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mingyue; Li, Ming-De; Huang, Jinqing; Li, Tianlu; Liu, Han; Li, Xuechen; Phillips, David Lee

    2016-02-01

    Photodeprotection is an important reaction that has been attracting broad interest for use in a variety of applications. Recent advances in ultrafast and vibrational time-resolved spectroscopies can facilitate obtaining data to help unravel the reaction mechanisms involving in the photochemical reactions of interest. The kinetics and reaction mechanisms for the photodeprotection reactions of ketoprofen derivatives containing three different substituents (ibuprofen, Br and I) were investigated by femtosecond transient absorption (fs-TA) and nanosecond time-resolved resonance Raman (ns-TR3) spectroscopy methods in phosphate buffered solutions (PBS). Fs-TA allows us to detect the decay kinetics of the triplet species as the key precursor for formation of a carbanion species for three different substituents attached to ketoprofen. To characterize the structural and electronic properties of the corresponding carbanion and triplet intermediates, TR3 spectroscopic experiments were conducted. The transient spectroscopy work reveals that the different substituents affect the photodecarboxylation reaction to produce carbon dioxide which in turn influences the generation of the carbanion species which determines the rate of the photorelease of the functional groups attached on the ketoprofen parent molecule. The fingerprint TR3 spectroscopy results suggest that ketoprofen derivatives may be deactivated to produce a triplet carbanion when increasing the atom mass of the halogen atoms.

  5. Effect of phosphate buffer saline on coronal leakage of mineral trioxide aggregate.

    PubMed

    Parirokh, Masoud; Askarifard, Sara; Mansouri, Shahla; Haghdoost, Ali A; Raoof, Maryam; Torabinejad, Mahmoud

    2009-06-01

    This study was carried out to compare the bacterial leakage of MTA used as a root-end filling material when it was kept in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) or normal saline. In this study, 72 freshly extracted teeth were used. The roots were randomly divided into four experimental groups of 15 each (groups I and II gutta-percha obturation + MTA, groups III and IV only MTA) and two positive and negative control groups of six each. The samples in groups I and III were kept in normal saline for 1 month while the samples in groups II and IV were kept in PBS. Enterococcus faecalis was used for determination of the bacterial penetration. Kaplan-Meier survival curve and chi(2) test were employed for data analysis. The obturated samples with root-end filling showed significantly longer duration of resistance to bacterial penetration than canals without obturation (P < 0.05). The roots that were placed in PBS (groups II and IV) showed significantly less bacterial penetration in comparison with the roots that were stored in normal saline (P < 0.05). In conclusion, MTA, which acts as a bioactive material, should be placed in a synthetic tissue fluid before any leakage evaluation.

  6. Fabrication of gelatin nanofibrous scaffolds using ethanol/phosphate buffer saline as a benign solvent.

    PubMed

    Zha, Zhengbao; Teng, Weibing; Markle, Valerie; Dai, Zhifei; Wu, Xiaoyi

    2012-12-01

    Electrospinning of natural polymer nanofibers useful for biomedical applications often requires the use of cytotoxic organic solvents. In this study, gelatin nanofibers are electrospun from phosphate buffer saline/ethanol binary mixtures as a benign solvent at ambient temperature. The influences of ionic strength, ethanol concentration, and gelatin concentration on the electrospinnability of gelatin solutions and the fiber microarchitectures are analyzed. The electrospun scaffolds retain their morphologies during vapor-phase crosslinking with glutaraldehyde in ethanol and the subsequent removal of salts contained in the nanofibers via water rinsing. When fully hydrated, the mechanically preconditioned scaffolds display a Young's modulus of 25.5 ± 5.3 kPa, tensile strength of 55.5 ± 13.9 kPa, deformability of 160 ± 15%, and resilience of 89.9 ± 1.8%. When cultured on the gelatin scaffolds, 3T3 fibroblasts displayed spindle-like morphology, similar to the cell's normal morphology in a 3D extracellular matrix.

  7. Transformation of nacre coatings into apatite coatings in phosphate buffer solution at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yaping; Zhou, Yu

    2008-08-01

    Nacre coatings were deposited on Ti6Al4V substrates by electrophoretic technique, and subsequently converted into apatite coatings with hierarchical porous structures by treatment with a phosphate buffer solution. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and N(2) adsorption-desorption isotherms. The results show that the nacre coatings are converted into the plate-like apatite coatings via a dissolution-precipitation reaction, while the organic components of the nacre are reserved. The mesopores with pore size of 4.4 nm are formed within the plate-like structure, and the macropores are formed among the plate-like structure. Simulated body fluid (SBF) immersion tests reveal that the apatite coatings have a good in vitro bioactivity. Bone-like apatite crystals are formed on the surfaces of the apatite coatings after soaking in SBF for 12 h, and fill up the macropores on the coatings with increasing the soaking time. In addition, XPS indicates that a TiO(x) layer and PO(4) (3-) ions appear on the substrate surfaces by pretreatment with a H(3)PO(4)/HF solution. The TiO(x) layer and PO(4) (3-) ions can induce the formation of apatite crystals, resulting in a composition gradient from the oxide layer to the external apatite layer.

  8. A laboratory assessment of bacterial leakage in MTA apical plugs exposed to phosphate-buffered saline.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Josiane; Pimenta, Andrea L; Felippe, Wilson T

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of the exposure of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) - with and without calcium chloride (CaCl2) -to phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) on apical microleakage. Sixty root segments were divided into 4 experimental groups (n=15). Apical cavities were filled with MTA with or without CaCl2, and the root canals dressed with a moistened cotton pellet or PBS: 1) MTA/cotton pellet; 2) MTA/PBS; 3) MTA+ 10%CaCl2/cotton pellet; 4) MTA+10%CaCl2/PBS. After 2 months, E. faecalis penetration was analyzed along the apical plugs. Samples were observed weekly for 70 days, and leakage was detected by turbidity of the medium in contact with the root segment. Teeth in the control groups (n=2) were either made completely impermeable or kept without an apical plug. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze survival and the Logrank test was used to compare the survival curves (p<0.05). All specimens in the positive control group showed evidence of leakage within 24h, while none in the negative control group showed leakage up to 70 days. There was no statistically significant difference among the experimental groups (p=0.102). The use of PBS as intracanal dressing may improve MTA sealing ability, but cannot prevent bacterial leakage. The addition of CaCl2 to the MTA did not improve MTA sealing ability.

  9. Influence of buffer species on the thermodynamics of short DNA duplex melting: sodium phosphate versus sodium cacodylate.

    PubMed

    Alemayehu, Saba; Fish, Daniel J; Brewood, Greg P; Horne, M Todd; Manyanga, Fidelis; Dickman, Rebekah; Yates, Ian; Benight, Albert S

    2009-03-05

    Thermodynamic parameters of the melting transitions of 53 short duplex DNAs were experimentally evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry melting curve analysis. Solvents for the DNA solutions contained approximately 1 M Na+ and either 10 mM cacodylate or phosphate buffer. Thermodynamic parameters obtained in the two solvent environments were compared and quantitatively assessed. Thermodynamic stabilities (deltaG(o) (25 degrees C)) of the duplexes studied ranged from quite stable perfect match duplexes (approximately -30 kcal/mol) to relatively unstable mismatch duplexes (approximately -9 kcal/mol) and ranged in length from 18 to 22 basepairs. A significant difference in stability (average free energy difference of approximately 3 kcal/mol) was found for all duplexes melted in phosphate (greater stability) versus cacodylate buffers. Measured effects of buffer species appear to be relatively unaffected by duplex length or sequence content. The popular sets of published nearest-neighbor (n-n) stability parameters for Watson-Crick (w/c) and single-base mismatches were evaluated from melting studies performed in cacodylate buffer (SantaLucia and Hicks, Annu. Rev. Biophys. Biomol. Struct. 2004, 33, 415). Thus, when using these parameters to make predictions of sequence dependent stability of DNA oligomers in buffers other than cacodylate (e.g., phosphate) one should be mindful that in addition to sodium ion concentration, the type of buffer species also provides a minor but significant contribution to duplex stability. Such considerations could potentially influence results of sequence dependent analysis using published n-n parameters and impact results of thermodynamic calculations. Such calculations and analyses are typically employed in the design and interpretation of DNA multiplex hybridization experiments.

  10. Antibacterial and photocatalytic activity of TiO2 and ZnO nanomaterials in phosphate buffer and saline solution.

    PubMed

    Ng, Alan Man Ching; Chan, Charis May Ngor; Guo, Mu Yao; Leung, Yu Hang; Djurišić, Aleksandra B; Hu, Xu; Chan, Wai Kin; Leung, Frederick Chi Chung; Tong, Shuk Yin

    2013-06-01

    We studied antibacterial and photocatalytic activity of anatase TiO2 and ZnO in phosphate buffer and saline solution. We found that the different anions in the suspension medium (chloride and phosphate) significantly affected the following suspension properties: the stability of nanoparticle suspension, the release of metal ions from the nanoparticles, and the production of the reactive oxygen species by the nanoparticles. As a result, antibacterial activity and photocatalytic dye degradation were also affected. However, the effect of the suspension medium was different for ZnO and TiO2. Obtained results are discussed.

  11. [The coagulation characteristics of human oxyhemoglobin in the presence of a mercury (II) ion in a neutral phosphate buffer].

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, L D; Myshkin, A E

    1990-01-01

    The kinetics of human oxyhemoglobin coagulation in neutral phosphate buffer in the presence of mercury acetate at 20 degrees has been studied using turbidimetric methods. The addition of small amounts of concentrated Hg2+ solution leads to rapid local protein coagulation with subsequent dissolution of the formed coagulate. Coagulation can be inhibited by addition of Tris that binds to mercury ions. The pattern of oxyhemoglobin coagulation is determined by molar Hg2+/protein ration rather than by total Hg2+ concentration.

  12. Effect of Tris, MOPS, and phosphate buffers on the hydrolysis of polyethylene terephthalate films by polyester hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Juliane; Wei, Ren; Oeser, Thorsten; Belisário-Ferrari, Matheus Regis; Barth, Markus; Then, Johannes; Zimmermann, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    The enzymatic degradation of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) occurs at mild reaction conditions and may find applications in environmentally friendly plastic waste recycling processes. The hydrolytic activity of the homologous polyester hydrolases LC cutinase (LCC) from a compost metagenome and TfCut2 from Thermobifida fusca KW3 against PET films was strongly influenced by the reaction medium buffers tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris), 3-(N-morpholino)propanesulfonic acid (MOPS), and sodium phosphate. LCC showed the highest initial hydrolysis rate of PET films in 0.2 m Tris, while the rate of TfCut2 was 2.1-fold lower at this buffer concentration. At a Tris concentration of 1 m, the hydrolysis rate of LCC decreased by more than 90% and of TfCut2 by about 80%. In 0.2 m MOPS or sodium phosphate buffer, no significant differences in the maximum initial hydrolysis rates of PET films by both enzymes were detected. When the concentration of MOPS was increased to 1 m, the hydrolysis rate of LCC decreased by about 90%. The activity of TfCut2 remained low compared to the increasing hydrolysis rates observed at higher concentrations of sodium phosphate buffer. In contrast, the activity of LCC did not change at different concentrations of this buffer. An inhibition study suggested a competitive inhibition of TfCut2 and LCC by Tris and MOPS. Molecular docking showed that Tris and MOPS interfered with the binding of the polymeric substrate in a groove located at the protein surface. A comparison of the K i values and the average binding energies indicated MOPS as the stronger inhibitor of the both enzymes.

  13. The sealing ability of MTA apical plugs exposed to a phosphate-buffered saline

    PubMed Central

    de ALMEIDA, Josiane; ALVES, Ana Maria Hecke; de MELO, Roberto Ferreira; FELIPPE, Mara Cristina Santos; BORTOLUZZI, Eduardo Antunes; TEIXEIRA, Cleonice da Silveira; FELIPPE, Wilson Tadeu

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of exposure of the mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) - with and without calcium chloride (CaCl2) - to phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) on the apical microleakage using a glucose leakage system. Material and Methods Sixty root segments were randomly divided into 4 experimental groups (n=15). After resecting the apical segments and enlarging the canals with Gates-Glidden drills, the apical cavities were filled with MTA with or without CaCl2 and the root canals were dressed with a moistened cotton pellet or PBS, as follows: 1) MTA/cotton pellet; 2) MTA/PBS; 3) MTA+10%CaCl2/cotton pellet; 4) MTA+10%CaCl2/PBS. All root segments were introduced in floral foams moistened with PBS. After 2 months, all root segments were prepared to evaluate the glucose leakage along the apical plugs. The amount of glucose leakage was measured following an enzymatic reaction and quantified by a spectrophotometer. Four roots were used as controls. The data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (p<0.05). Results There were no differences between groups 1 and 2 (p>0.05), and 3 and 4 (p>0.05). The addition of CaCl2 to the MTA significantly decreased its sealing ability (p<0.05). Conclusion The interaction with PBS did not improve the MTA sealing ability. The addition of CaCl2 to the MTA negatively influenced the apical seal. PMID:24037073

  14. The stability of DLC film on nitrided CoCrMo alloy in phosphate buffer solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. F.; Liu, B.; Wu, B. J.; Liu, J.; Sun, H.; Leng, Y. X.; Huang, N.

    2014-07-01

    CoCrMo alloy is often used as the material for metal artificial joint, but metal debris and metal ions are the main concern on tissue inflammation or tissue proliferation for metal prosthesis. In this paper, nitrogen ion implantation and diamond like carbon (DLC) film composite treatment was used to reduce the wear and ion release of biomedical CoCrMo substrate. The mechanical properties and stability of N-implanted/DLC composite layer in phosphate buffer solution (PBS) was evaluated to explore the full potential of N-implanted/DLC composite layer as an artificial joint surface modification material. The results showed that the DLC film on N implanted CoCrMo (N-implanted/DLC composite layer) had the higher surface hardness and wear resistance than the DLC film on virgin CoCrMo alloy, which was resulted from the strengthen effect of the N implanted layer on CoCrMo alloy. After 30 days immersion in PBS, the structure of DLC film on virgin CoCrMo or on N implanted CoCrMo had no visible change. But the adhesion and corrosion resistance of DLC on N implanted CoCrMo (N-implanted/DLC composite layer) was weakened due to the dissolution of the N implanted layer after 30 days immersion in PBS. The adhesion reduction of N-implanted/DLC composite layer was adverse for in vivo application in long term. So researcher should be cautious to use N implanted layer as an inter-layer for increasing CoCrMo alloy load carrying capacity in vivo environment.

  15. Dehydration and delayed proton equilibria of red blood cells suspended in isosmotic phosphate buffers. Implications for studies of sickled cells.

    PubMed

    Bookchin, R M; Lew, D J; Balazs, T; Ueda, Y; Lew, V L

    1984-12-01

    PO4 buffers isosmotic with plasma or phosphate-buffered saline solution with a substantial proportion of PO4 are often used to wash and suspend red blood cells in studies of respiratory or sickling behavior. Measurements of sequential changes in mean cell hemoglobin concentration, pH, and ion content of red blood cells suspended in 295 mOsm Na-phosphate, pH 7.4, at 23 degrees or 37 degrees C, showed (1) rapid, persistent cell dehydration (mean cell hemoglobin concentration greater than 40 gm/dl) caused initially by Cl- efflux and later by replacement of monovalent Cl- by divalent HPO=4; and (2) temporary reversal of membrane pH gradients with normalization time (30 to 120 minutes) dependent on factors controlling the rate of phosphate-chloride exchange. Sequential equilibration of red blood cells in isosmotic citrate (impermeable) followed by PO4 demonstrated the two stages of the observed shifts in PO4 alone, and red blood cells suspended in 0.15 mol/L 32PO4 at 37 degrees C showed PO4 influx consistent with pH equilibrium kinetics. Sickle trait red blood cells deoxygenated at 37 degrees C, pH 7.4, in plasma or 10 mmol/L HEPES-buffered saline solution showed only 6% to 20% sickling. In isosmotic PO4, mean cell hemoglobin concentration was 40 to 41 gm/dl with approximately 80% sickling. In phosphate-buffered saline solution containing 70 mmol/L PO4, red blood cells showed smaller, similar changes (mean cell hemoglobin concentration approximately 38 gm/dl) with a longer equilibration period and deoxygenated sickle trait cells showed 40% sickling. The altered properties of red blood cells suspended in PO4 or phosphate-buffered saline solution were neither intended nor appropriate for many studies using these media, particularly with hemoglobin S-containing red blood cells, and interpretations of reported results must be reassessed in light of these findings.

  16. Functional PEG–PAMAM-Tetraphosphonate Capped NaLnF4 Nanoparticles and their Colloidal Stability in Phosphate Buffer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Developing surface coatings for NaLnF4 nanoparticles (NPs) that provide long-term stability in solutions containing competitive ions such as phosphate remains challenging. An amine-functional polyamidoamine tetraphosphonate (NH2-PAMAM-4P) as a multidentate ligand for these NPs has been synthesized and characterized as a ligand for the surface of NaGdF4 and NaTbF4 nanoparticles. A two-step ligand exchange protocol was developed for introduction of the NH2-PAMAM-4P ligand on oleate-capped NaLnF4 NPs. The NPs were first treated with methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-monophosphoric acid (Mn = 750) in tetrahydrofuran. The mPEG750-OPO3-capped NPs were stable colloidal solutions in water, where they could be ligand-exchanged with NH2-PAMAM-4P. The surface amine groups on the NPs were available for derivatization to attach methoxy-PEG (Mn = 2000) and biotin-terminated PEG (Mn = 2000) chains. The surface coverage of ligands on the NPs was examined by thermal gravimetric analysis, and by a HABA analysis for biotin-containing NPs. Colloidal stability of the NPs was examined by dynamic light scattering. NaGdF4 and NaTbF4 NPs capped with mPEG2000–PAMAM-4P showed colloidal stability in DI water and in phosphate buffer (10 mM, pH 7.4). A direct comparison with NaTbF4 NPs capped with a mPEG2000-lysine-based tetradentate ligand that we reported previously (Langmuir2012, 28, 12861−1287022906305) showed that both ligands provided long-term stability in phosphate buffer, but that the lysine-based ligand provided better stability in phosphate-buffered saline. PMID:24898128

  17. Functional PEG-PAMAM-tetraphosphonate capped NaLnF₄ nanoparticles and their colloidal stability in phosphate buffer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangyao; Tong, Lemuel; Cao, Pengpeng; Nitz, Mark; Winnik, Mitchell A

    2014-06-17

    Developing surface coatings for NaLnF4 nanoparticles (NPs) that provide long-term stability in solutions containing competitive ions such as phosphate remains challenging. An amine-functional polyamidoamine tetraphosphonate (NH2-PAMAM-4P) as a multidentate ligand for these NPs has been synthesized and characterized as a ligand for the surface of NaGdF4 and NaTbF4 nanoparticles. A two-step ligand exchange protocol was developed for introduction of the NH2-PAMAM-4P ligand on oleate-capped NaLnF4 NPs. The NPs were first treated with methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-monophosphoric acid (M(n) = 750) in tetrahydrofuran. The mPEG750-OPO3-capped NPs were stable colloidal solutions in water, where they could be ligand-exchanged with NH2-PAMAM-4P. The surface amine groups on the NPs were available for derivatization to attach methoxy-PEG (M(n) = 2000) and biotin-terminated PEG (M(n) = 2000) chains. The surface coverage of ligands on the NPs was examined by thermal gravimetric analysis, and by a HABA analysis for biotin-containing NPs. Colloidal stability of the NPs was examined by dynamic light scattering. NaGdF4 and NaTbF4 NPs capped with mPEG2000-PAMAM-4P showed colloidal stability in DI water and in phosphate buffer (10 mM, pH 7.4). A direct comparison with NaTbF4 NPs capped with a mPEG2000-lysine-based tetradentate ligand that we reported previously (Langmuir 2012, 28, 12861-12870) showed that both ligands provided long-term stability in phosphate buffer, but that the lysine-based ligand provided better stability in phosphate-buffered saline.

  18. In Vivo Predictive Dissolution: Comparing the Effect of Bicarbonate and Phosphate Buffer on the Dissolution of Weak Acids and Weak Bases.

    PubMed

    Krieg, Brian J; Taghavi, Seyed Mohammad; Amidon, Gordon L; Amidon, Gregory E

    2015-09-01

    Bicarbonate is the main buffer in the small intestine and it is well known that buffer properties such as pKa can affect the dissolution rate of ionizable drugs. However, bicarbonate buffer is complicated to work with experimentally. Finding a suitable substitute for bicarbonate buffer may provide a way to perform more physiologically relevant dissolution tests. The dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs was conducted in bicarbonate and phosphate buffer using rotating disk dissolution methodology. Experimental results were compared with the predicted results using the film model approach of (Mooney K, Mintun M, Himmelstein K, Stella V. 1981. J Pharm Sci 70(1):22-32) based on equilibrium assumptions as well as a model accounting for the slow hydration reaction, CO2 + H2 O → H2 CO3 . Assuming carbonic acid is irreversible in the dehydration direction: CO2 + H2 O ← H2 CO3 , the transport analysis can accurately predict rotating disk dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs in bicarbonate buffer. The predictions show that matching the dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs in phosphate and bicarbonate buffer is possible. The phosphate buffer concentration necessary to match physiologically relevant bicarbonate buffer [e.g., 10.5 mM (HCO3 (-) ), pH = 6.5] is typically in the range of 1-25 mM and is very dependent upon drug solubility and pKa .

  19. Effects of a phosphate buffered extracellular (Ep4) solution in preservation and reperfusion injury in the canine liver.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Y; Ohwada, S; Sakata, K; Ohya, T; Tomizawa, N; Takeyoshi, I; Morishita, Y

    1999-02-01

    The Ep4 solution, a phosphate buffered extracellular-type solution, is effective in canine lung transplantation following a 96-hour hypothermic (4 degrees C) preservation. In this experiment, we used this solution for liver preservation followed by transplantation. We compared the Ep4 solution with the lactated Ringer's (LR) and the Collins' M (CM) solution (a phosphate buffered intracellular-type solution) in two studies, 1) 48-hour liver preservation, and 2) orthotopic liver transplantation after 5-hour preservation. In the preservation study, purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) levels as a marker of endothelial damage, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels were significantly lower in the livers immersed into the Ep4 solution than in those immersed into other solutions at 36 and 48 hours after preservation. Microscopically, the endothelial injury occurred 24 hours after preservation in the CM solution, and 36 hours after preservation in the LR and Ep4 solutions. In the transplantation study, serum PNP and ALT levels in the livers immersed in Ep4 solution showed a lower tendency compared with those in other solutions at the time of reperfusion, but the histological differences among three groups were not apparent. The present study suggests that the liver can be stored better for a longer time using Ep4 solution than using LR and CM solutions.

  20. Inactivation of avirulent Yersinia pestis in Butterfield's phosphate buffer and frankfurters by UVC (254 nm) and gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Sommers, Christopher H; Cooke, Peter H

    2009-04-01

    Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of plague. Although rare, pharyngeal plague in humans has been associated with consumption or handling of meat prepared from infected animals. The risks of contracting plague from consumption of deliberately contaminated food are currently unknown. Gamma radiation is a penetrating form of electromagnetic radiation, and UVC radiation is used for decontamination of liquids or food surfaces. Gamma radiation D10-values (the radiation dose needed to inactivate 1 log unit pathogen) were 0.23 (+/-0.01) and 0.31 (+/-0.03) kGy for avirulent Y. pestis inoculated into Butterfield's phosphate buffer and onto frankfurter surfaces, respectively, at 0 degree C. A UVC radiation dose of 0.25 J/cm2 inactivated avirulent Y. pestis suspended in Butterfield's phosphate buffer. UVC radiation doses of 0.5 to 4.0 J/cm2 inactivated 0.97 to 1.20 log units of the Y. pestis surface inoculated onto frankfurters. A low gamma radiation dose of 1.6 kGy could provide a 5-log reduction and a UVC radiation dose of 1 to 4 J/cm2 would provide a 1-log reduction of Y. pestis surface inoculated onto frankfurters. Y. pestis was capable of growth on frankfurters during refrigerated storage (10 degrees C). Gamma radiation of frankfurters inhibited the growth of Y. pestis during refrigerated storage, and UVC radiation delayed the growth of Y. pestis.

  1. The protective effect of supplemental calcium on colonic permeability depends on a calcium phosphate-induced increase in luminal buffering capacity.

    PubMed

    Schepens, Marloes A A; ten Bruggencate, Sandra J M; Schonewille, Arjan J; Brummer, Robert-Jan M; van der Meer, Roelof; Bovee-Oudenhoven, Ingeborg M J

    2012-04-01

    An increased intestinal permeability is associated with several diseases. Previously, we have shown that dietary Ca decreases colonic permeability in rats. This might be explained by a calcium-phosphate-induced increase in luminal buffering capacity, which protects against an acidic pH due to microbial fermentation. Therefore, we investigated whether dietary phosphate is a co-player in the effect of Ca on permeability. Rats were fed a humanised low-Ca diet, or a similar diet supplemented with Ca and containing either high, medium or low phosphate concentrations. Chromium-EDTA was added as an inert dietary intestinal permeability marker. After dietary adaptation, short-chain fructo-oligosaccharides (scFOS) were added to all diets to stimulate fermentation, acidify the colonic contents and induce an increase in permeability. Dietary Ca prevented the scFOS-induced increase in intestinal permeability in rats fed medium- and high-phosphate diets but not in those fed the low-phosphate diet. This was associated with higher faecal water cytotoxicity and higher caecal lactate levels in the latter group. Moreover, food intake and body weight during scFOS supplementation were adversely affected by the low-phosphate diet. Importantly, luminal buffering capacity was higher in rats fed the medium- and high-phosphate diets compared with those fed the low-phosphate diet. The protective effect of dietary Ca on intestinal permeability is impaired if dietary phosphate is low. This is associated with a calcium phosphate-induced increase in luminal buffering capacity. Dragging phosphate into the colon and thereby increasing the colonic phosphate concentration is at least part of the mechanism behind the protective effect of Ca on intestinal permeability.

  2. Electrochemical Behavior of Pure Copper in Phosphate Buffer Solutions: A Comparison Between Micro- and Nano-Grained Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imantalab, O.; Fattah-alhosseini, A.; Keshavarz, M. K.; Mazaheri, Y.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, electrochemical behavior of annealed (micro-) and nano-grained pure copper (fabricated by accumulative roll bonding process) in phosphate buffer solutions of various pH values ranging from 10.69 to 12.59 has been studied. Before any electrochemical measurements, evaluation of microstructure was obtained by optical microscope and transmission electron microscopy. To investigate the electrochemical behavior of the samples, the potentiodynamic polarization, Mott-Schottky analysis, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were carried out. Potentiodynamic polarization plots and EIS measurements revealed that as a result of grain refinement, the passive behavior of the nano-grained sample was improved compared to that of annealed pure copper. Also, Mott-Schottky analysis indicated that the passive films behaved as p-type semiconductors and grain refinement did not change the semiconductor type of passive films.

  3. Effect of Phosphate-Buffered Solution Corrosion on the Ratcheting Fatigue Behavior of a Duplex Mg-Li-Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xin; Yu, Dunji; Gao, Li-Lan; Gao, Hong

    2016-05-01

    This work reports the uniaxial ratcheting and fatigue behavior of a duplex Mg-Li-Al alloy under the influence of phosphate-buffered solution corrosion. Microstructural observations reveal pitting and filament corrosion defects, which impair the load-bearing capacity of the alloy and cause stress concentration, thus leading to an accelerated accumulation of ratcheting strain and shortened fatigue life under the same nominal loading conditions. Comparing Smith model, Smith-Watson-Topper model, and Paul-Sivaprasad-Dhar model, a ratcheting fatigue life prediction model based on the Broberg damage rule and the Paul-Sivaprasad-Dhar model was proposed, and the model yielded a superior prediction for the studied magnesium alloy.

  4. Effect of exogenous phytase on feed inositol phosphate hydrolysis in an in vitro rumen fluid buffer system.

    PubMed

    Brask-Pedersen, D N; Glitsø, L V; Skov, L K; Lund, P; Sehested, J

    2011-02-01

    Three in vitro experiments using a rumen fluid buffer system were performed to investigate the effect of addition of 4 experimental phytases (Phy1, Phy2, Phy3, and Phy4) compared with no addition of phytase on feed inositol phosphate hydrolysis in wheat and rapeseed cake to determine which of the 4 phytases was most suitable under rumen-like conditions. The feedstuffs were incubated with a mixture of physiological buffer, ruminal fluid, and exogenous phytase at pH 6.2, after which the samples were incubated for different periods. Incubations were stopped using HCl, and the samples were analyzed for inositol phosphates via high performance ion chromatography. Addition of phytase (Phy1) resulted in enhanced degradation of myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP(6)) in rapeseed cake, whereas addition of exogenous phytase did not improve the degradation of InsP(6) in wheat. Only rapeseed cake was therefore used subsequently. All 4 phytases increased degradation of InsP(6) in rapeseed cake in the in vitro system, and degradability of InsP(6) increased with higher incubation time and higher phytase dosages, independent of phytase. Addition of 2 units of phytase per gram of substrate of the phytases Phy1, Phy2, Phy3, and Phy4 led to an undegraded InsP(6) content of 56, 49, 70, and 18%, respectively, when incubated with rapeseed cake for 6h, indicating that Phy2 and Phy4 were the most effective phytases. However, Phy2 had a higher specific activity than Phy4, as 60% of the original InsP(6) content was remaining after 3h when 5mg of enzyme protein per gram of substrate of Phy2 was added to rapeseed cake, whereas 150 mg of enzyme protein per gram of substrate of Phy4 was necessary to achieve a similar result. Therefore, Phy2 appeared to be most applicable under rumen-like conditions.

  5. Saline catholytes as alternatives to phosphate buffers in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yongtae; Logan, Bruce E

    2013-03-01

    Highly saline solutions were examined as alternatives to chemical buffers in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The performance of two-chamber MFCs with different concentrations of saline solutions in the cathode chamber was compared to those with a buffered catholyte (50mM PBS). The use of a NaCl catholyte improved the CE to 43-60% (28% with no membrane) due to a reduction in oxygen transfer into the anolyte. The saline catholyte also reduced the membrane and solution resistance to 23Ω (41Ω without a membrane). The maximum power density of 491mW/m(2) (240mM NaCl) was only 17% less than the MFC with 50mM PBS. The decrease in power output with highest salinity was due to reduced proton transfer due to the ion exchange membrane, and pH changes in the two solutions. These results show that MFC performance can be improved by using a saline catholyte without pH control.

  6. Formation of pyrophosphate-like adducts from nerve agents sarin, soman and cyclosarin in phosphate buffer: implications for analytical and toxicological investigations.

    PubMed

    Gäb, Jürgen; John, Harald; Blum, Marc-Michael

    2011-01-15

    Phosphate buffer is frequently used in biological, biochemical and biomedical applications especially when pH is to be controlled around the physiological value of 7.4. One of the prerequisites of a buffer compound among good buffering capacity and pH stability over time is its non-reactivity with other constituents of the solution. This is especially important for quantitative analytical or toxicological assays. Previous work has identified a number of amino alcohol buffers like TRIS to react with G-type nerve agents sarin, soman and cyclosarin to form stable phosphonic diesters. In case of phosphate buffer we were able to confirm not only the rapid hydrolysis of these agents to the respective alkyl methylphosphonates but also the formation of substantial amounts of pyrophosphate-like adducts (phosphorylated methylphosphonates), which very slowly hydrolyzed following zero-order kinetics. This led to a complex mixture of phosphorus containing species with changing concentrations over time. We identified the molecular structure of these buffer adducts using 1D ¹H-³¹P HSQC NMR and LC-ESI-MS/MS techniques. Reaction rates of adduct formation are fast enough to compete with hydrolysis in aqueous solution and to yield substantial amounts of buffer adduct over the course of just a couple of minutes. Possible reaction mechanisms are discussed with respect to the formation and subsequent hydrolysis of the pyrophosphate-like compounds as well as the increased rate of hydrolysis of the nerve agent to the corresponding alkyl methylphosphonates. In summary, the use of phosphate buffer for the development of new assays with sarin, soman and cyclosarin is discouraged. Already existing protocols should be carefully reexamined on an individual basis.

  7. Comparison of adhesive properties of water- and phosphate-buffer-washed cottonseed meals with cottonseed protein isolate on maple and poplar veneers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water- and phosphate buffer (35 mM Na2HPO4/NaH2PO4, pH 7.5)-washed cottonseed meals (abbreviated as WCM and BCM, respectively) could be low-cost and environmentally friendly protein-based adhesives as their preparation does not involve corrosive alkali and acid solutions that are needed for cottonse...

  8. Mechanisms and kinetics of melting of HbS aggregates studied in high concentration phosphate buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aroutiounian, Svetlana

    The importance of melting kinetics in the pathogenesis of sickle cell disease originates from the inhibition of sickle hemoglobin polymer formation by the presence of oxygen. Sickle hemoglobin polymers form in the absence of oxygen or similar ligands, like carbon monoxide (CO). Melting of HbS polymers is initiated when red cells enter the lungs. Under the double nucleation mechanism, the formation of a sickle hemoglobin (HbS) polymer is composed of two events. Homogeneous nucleation with a characteristic delay time is prior to heterogeneous nucleation, which shows an avalanche-like kinetics. Two thirds of the transit time through the circulatory system, red cells spend under hypoxic conditions. In this work the role that ligand saturation plays in the kinetics of HbS polymer melting is investigated. There are two possible pathways connecting the initial and final states, direct ligation of molecules bound to the polymers followed by melting of ligated molecule, and melting of deoxy molecules followed by ligation of free molecules. Hence four kinetic rates describe the relaxation: two rates for CO binding (one to monomer phase Hb and one to polymer phase Hb) and two for Hb dissociation from polymers (one for CO-ligated Hb and for deoxyHb). We examine two models that gradually incorporate CO presence into the mechanism of polymer melting. The Homogeneous Model (HM) describes the melting of HbS polymers due to dilution and CO binding of HbS. We assume that the melting starts with the dissociation of monomers from the fiber ends. As a result the polymer concentration remains unchanged at the beginning of melting. The Simple Ends Model (SEM) describes melting from HbS fiber ends when melting is induced by diluting with deoxy buffer (DMM). The extended Ends Model (EEM) describes melting of HbS aggregates with dissociation of monomers from fiber ends when CO fully saturated buffer is applied. An additional (second) assumption is that the CO molecules bind only to free Hb

  9. Optimization of a model of red blood cells for the study of anti-oxidant drugs, in terms of concentration of oxidant and phosphate buffer.

    PubMed

    Bureau, A; Lahet, J-J; Lenfant, F; Bouyer, F; Petitjean, M; Chaillot, B; Freysz, M

    2005-08-01

    The aggression of erythrocytes by an oxidative stress induces hemolysis. This paper aims to valid a model of erythrocytes in terms of composition of the phosphate buffer solution and of concentration of a well-known oxidant, AAPH. Three compositions of phosphate buffer solution are mixed with three concentrations of oxidant. The influence of these two parameters on hemolysis is independently studied by a variance analysis and a Kruskal-Wallis test when ANOVA is not available. The hemolysis rate increases with time at fixed oxidant concentration, but is not influenced by the composition of the buffer solution. The highest hemolysis rate, 90%, was only measured within 2 h with the highest oxidant concentration. If we retain this concentration of oxidant, the lower concentration of the buffer can by eliminated by a significant less hemolysis and the highest concentration of the buffer can by chosen in regard of the better precision for a similar hemolysis compared to the mean buffer. We hope to study the effect of anti-oxidant agent with such a model of erythrocytes.

  10. The influence of potassium clavulanate on the rate of amoxicillin sodium degradation in phosphate and acetate buffers in the liquid state.

    PubMed

    Vahdat, Laleh; Sunderland, Bruce

    2009-04-01

    The stability of aqueous admixtures of amoxicillin sodium and potassium clavulanate was studied in the liquid state at selected pH values. Potassium clavulanate was found to catalyze the rate of degradation of amoxicillin sodium under the conditions of this study. In phosphate buffer (at pH 7.0) both amoxicillin sodium and potassium clavulanate showed first-order degradation when stored separately. However, when combined the rate of amoxicillin degradation increased and t(90) values for amoxicillin decreased from 69.6 min for amoxicillin alone to 10.8 min for amoxicillin in the combination at 55 degrees C. A kinetic model was developed that explained the catalytic behavior of potassium clavulanate and phosphate buffer. In acetate buffer the rate of degradation of amoxicillin sodium followed first-order kinetics, but the catalytic effect of clavulanate caused curvature in the rate plots at higher temperatures and clavulanate concentrations. This catalytic effect was less than that occurred in phosphate buffer (where the t(90) value of amoxicillin decreased from 137.3 min for amoxicillin alone to 52.5 min for amoxicillin in combination at 55 degrees C). First-order bi-exponential decay occurred with amoxicillin degradation, which explained this change in rate.

  11. Final report of the key comparison APMP.QM-K9: APMP comparison on pH measurement of phosphate buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hioki, Akiharu; Ohata, Masaki; Cherdchu, Chainarong; Tangpaisarnkul, Nongluck

    2011-01-01

    The APMP.QM-K9 was organised by TCQM of APMP to test the abilities of the national metrology institutes in the APMP region to measure a pH value of a phosphate buffer. This APMP comparison on pH measurement was proposed by the National Metrology Institute of Japan, NMIJ, and the National Institute of Metrology of Thailand, NIMT, in August 2009. After approval by TCQM, the comparison has been conducted by NMIJ and NIMT. The comparison is a key comparison following CCQM-K9, CCQM-K9.1 and CCQM-K9.2. The comparison material was a phosphate buffer of pH around 6.86 and the measurement temperatures were 15 °C, 25 °C and 37 °C. This is the first APMP key comparison on pH measurement and the third APMP comparison on pH measurement following APMP.QM-P06 (two phosphate buffers) in 2004 and APMP.QM-P09 (a phthalate buffer) in 2006. The results can be used further by any participant to support its CMC claim for a phosphate buffer. That claim will concern the pH method employed by the participant during this comparison and will cover the temperature(s) used or the full temperature range between 15 °C and 37 °C for the participant which measured pH values at the three temperatures. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  12. Quantification of the effects of organic and carbonate buffers on arsenate and phosphate adsorption on a goethite-based granular porous adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Masakazu; Young, Thomas M; Fukushi, Keisuke; Sverjensky, Dimitri A; Green, Peter G; Darby, Jeannie L

    2011-01-15

    Interest in the development of oxide-based materials for arsenate removal has led to a variety of experimental methods and conditions for determining arsenate adsorption isotherms, which hinders comparative evaluation of their adsorptive capacities. Here, we systematically investigate the effects of buffer (HEPES or carbonate), adsorbent dose, and solution pH on arsenate and phosphate adsorption isotherms for a previously well characterized goethite-based adsorbent (Bayoxide E33 (E33)). All adsorption isotherms obtained at different adsorbate/adsorbent concentrations were identical when 1 mM of HEPES (96 mg C/L) was used as a buffer. At low aqueous arsenate and phosphate concentration (∼1.3 μM), however, adsorption isotherms obtained using 10 mM of NaHCO(3) buffer, which is a reasonable carbonate concentration in groundwater, are significantly different from those obtained without buffer or with HEPES. The carbonate competitive effects were analyzed using the extended triple layer model (ETLM) with the adsorption equilibrium constant of carbonate calibrated using independent published carbonate adsorption data for pure goethite taking into consideration the different surface properties. The successful ETLM calculations of arsenate adsorption isotherms for E33 under various conditions allowed quantitative comparison of the arsenate adsorption capacity between E33 and other major adsorbents initially tested under varied experimental conditions in the literature.

  13. Formation of directly mutagenic alpha-hydroxy-N-nitrosopiperidine phosphate ester by near-ultraviolet irradiation of N-nitrosopiperidine in phosphate buffer

    SciTech Connect

    Arimoto, S.; Shimada, H.; Ukawa, S.; Mochizuki, M.; Hayatsu, H. )

    1989-08-15

    Previously we found that direct-acting mutagens can be formed from N-nitrosodialkylamines on exposure to near-ultraviolet light in the presence of phosphates. We have now isolated the mutagenic photoproduct formed from N-nitrosopiperidine and inorganic phosphate and identified its structure as the phosphate ester of alpha-hydroxy-N-nitrosopiperidine. This reaction represents a new, non-enzymatic activation of promutagenic N-nitrosodialkylamines.

  14. Corrosion behavior of Mg-3Zn/bioglass (45S5) composite in simulated body fluid (SBF) and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ab llah, N.; Jamaludin, S. B.; Daud, Z. C.; Zaludin, M. A. F.; Jamal, Z. A. Z.; Idris, M. S.; Osman, R. A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Magnesium has emerged as promising materials in biomaterials research due to its good mechanical and physical properties closer to human bones. However, magnesium has poor corrosion resistance to chloride ions that exist in human blood plasma thus preventing its application in biomedical. The addition of zinc and bioglass can reduce magnesium corrosion rate. In this work, the effect of different solution media (Simulated Body Fluid and Phosphate Buffered Saline) to the corrosion behavior of Mg-Zn/bioglass (45S5) composites was investigated. The composites of Mg-3Zn added with 5, 10, 15, 20, 15 and 30 wt. % bioglass were fabricated by powder metallurgy. The composites were prepared by mixing at 140 rpm for 1 hour, pressing at 500 MPa and sintering in an argon environment at a temperature of 450°C for 3 hours. Sintered samples were immersed in Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) and Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) in order to investigate the corrosion behavior. Samples mass loss was determined after 3 days of immersion. Samples microstructure and corrosion products were analyzed using optical microscope and x-ray diffraction (XRD) respectively. The results revealed that the samples immersed in the Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) shows lower mass loss compare to the samples immersed in the Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) for all composition except for Mg-3Zn without bio-glass. The results indicated that the existence of high phosphate ions in PBS has retarded the corrosion rate of composite Mg-3Zn/45S5. The pH value of the PBS solution after immersion showed significant increase between 10.3 and 11.09. Diffraction pattern (XRD) showed the presence of Mg(OH)2 as the major corrosion product for samples immersed in the SBF and PBS solutions. The mass loss of samples decreased with the addition of bio-glass.

  15. The smallest active fragment of microtubule-associated protein 4 and its interaction with microtubules in phosphate buffer.

    PubMed

    Hashi, Yurika; Nagase, Lisa; Matsushima, Kazuyuki; Kotani, Susumu

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the interaction between microtubule-associated protein (MAP) 4 and microtubules physicochemically, a MAP4 active site fragment was designed for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) use. The fragment was bacterially expressed and purified to homogeneity. The buffer conditions for NMR were optimized to support microtubule assembly. The fragment was found to bind to microtubules under the optimized buffer conditions.

  16. Avoiding Buffer Interference in ITC Experiments: A Case Study from the Analysis of Entropy-Driven Reactions of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Bianconi, M Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a label-free technique that allows the direct determination of the heat absorbed or released in a reaction. Frequently used to determining binding parameters in biomolecular interactions, it is very useful to address enzyme-catalyzed reactions as both kinetic and thermodynamic parameters can be obtained. Since calorimetry measures the total heat effects of a reaction, it is important to consider the contribution of the heat of protonation/deprotonation that is possibly taking place. Here, we show a case study of the reaction catalyzed by the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) from Leuconostoc mesenteroides. This enzyme is able to use either NAD(+) or NADP(+) as a cofactor. The reactions were done in five buffers of different enthalpy of protonation. Depending on the buffer used, the observed calorimetric enthalpy (ΔH(cal)) of the reaction varied from -22.93 kJ/mol (Tris) to 19.37 kJ/mol (phosphate) for the NADP(+)-linked reaction, and -11.67 kJ/mol (Tris) to 7.32 kcal/mol or 30.63 kJ/mol (phosphate) for the NAD(+) reaction. We will use this system as an example of how to extract proton-independent reaction enthalpies from kinetic data to ensure that the reported accurately represent the intrinsic heat of reaction.

  17. Highly efficient aldol additions of DHA and DHAP to N-Cbz-amino aldehydes catalyzed by L-rhamnulose-1-phosphate and L-fuculose-1-phosphate aldolases in aqueous borate buffer.

    PubMed

    Garrabou, Xavier; Calveras, Jordi; Joglar, Jesús; Parella, Teodor; Bujons, Jordi; Clapés, Pere

    2011-12-21

    Aldol addition reactions of dihydroxyacetone (DHA) to N-Cbz-amino aldehydes catalyzed by L-rhamnulose-1-phosphate aldolase (RhuA) in the presence of borate buffer are reported. High yields of aldol adduct (e.g. 70-90%) were achieved with excellent (>98 : 2 syn/anti) stereoselectivity for most S or R configured acceptors, which compares favorably to the reactions performed with DHAP. The stereochemical outcome was different and depended on the N-Cbz-amino aldehyde enantiomer: the S acceptors gave the syn (3R,4S) aldol adduct whereas the R ones gave the anti (3R,4R) diastereomer. Moreover, the tactical use of Cbz protecting group allows simple and efficient elimination of borate and excess of DHA by reverse phase column chromatography or even by simple extraction. This, in addition to the use of unphosphorylated donor nucleophile, makes a useful and expedient methodology for the synthesis of structurally diverse iminocyclitols. The performance of aldol additions of dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) to N-Cbz-amino aldehydes using RhuA and L-fuculose-1-phosphate aldolase (FucA) catalyst in borate buffer was also evaluated. For FucA catalysts, including FucA F131A, the initial velocity of the aldol addition reactions using DHAP were between 2 and 10 times faster and the yields between 1.5 and 4 times higher than those in triethanolamine buffer. In this case, the retroaldol velocities measured for some aldol adducts were lower than those without borate buffer indicating some trapping effect that could explain the improvement of yields.

  18. Sodium citrate and potassium phosphate as alternative adsorption buffers in hydrophobic and aromatic thiophilic chromatographic purification of plasmid DNA from neutralized lysate.

    PubMed

    Bonturi, Nemailla; Radke, Vanessa Soraia Cortez Oliveira; Bueno, Sônia Maria Alves; Freitas, Sindélia; Azzoni, Adriano Rodrigues; Miranda, Everson Alves

    2013-03-01

    The number of studies on gene therapy using plasmid vectors (pDNA) has increased in recent years. As a result, the demand for preparations of pDNA in compliance with recommendations of regulatory agencies (EMEA, FDA) has also increased. Plasmid DNA is often obtained through fermentation of transformed Escherichia coli and purification by a series of unit operations, including chromatography. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) and thiophilic aromatic chromatography (TAC), both using ammonium sulfate buffers, are commonly employed with success. This work was aimed at studying the feasibility of utilizing alternative salts in the purification of pDNA from neutralized lysate with phenyl-agarose (HIC) and mercaptopyrimidine-agarose (TAC) adsorbents. Their selectivity toward sc pDNA was evaluated through adsorption studies using 1.5 mol/L sodium citrate and 2.0 mol/L potassium phosphate as adsorption buffers. Chromatography with mercaptopyrimidine-agarose adsorbent and 1.5 mol/L sodium citrate was able to recover 91.1% of the pDNA with over 99.0% removal of gDNA and endotoxin. This represents a potential alternative for the primary recovery of sc pDNA. However, the most promising result was obtained using 2.0 mol/L potassium phosphate buffer and a mercaptopyrimidine-agarose column. In a single chromatographic step, this latter buffer/adsorbent system recovered 68.5% of the pDNA with 98.8% purity in accordance with the recommendations of regulatory agencies with regard to RNA and endotoxin impurity.

  19. Application of encapsulation (pH-sensitive polymer and phosphate buffer macrocapsules): a novel approach to remediation of acidic ground water.

    PubMed

    Aelion, C Marjorie; Davis, Harley T; Flora, Joseph R V; Kirtland, Brian C; Amidon, Mark B

    2009-01-01

    Macrocapsules, composed of a pH-sensitive polymer and phosphate buffer, offer a novel remediation alternative for acidic ground waters. To test their potential effectiveness, laboratory experiments were carried out followed by a field trial within a coal pile runoff (CPR) acidic contaminant plume. Results of traditional limestone and macrocapsule treatments were compared in both laboratory and field experiments. Macrocapsules were more effective than limestone as a passive treatment for raising pH in well water from 2.5 to 6 in both laboratory and field experiments. The limestone treatments had limited impact on pH, only increasing pH as high as 3.3, and armoring by iron was evident in the field trial. Aluminum, iron and sulfate concentrations remained relatively constant throughout the experiments, but phosphate increased (0.15-32 mg/L), indicating macrocapsule release. This research confirmed that macrocapsules may be an effective alternative to limestone to treat highly acidic ground water.

  20. Conformational change induced by electron transfer in a monolayer of cytochrome P450 reductase adsorbed at the Au(110)-phosphate buffer interface.

    PubMed

    Weightman, P; Smith, C I; Convery, J H; Harrison, P; Khara, B; Scrutton, N S

    2013-09-01

    The reflection anisotropy spectroscopy profiles of a variant of cytochrome P450 reductase adsorbed at the Au(110)-phosphate buffer interface depend on the sequence of potentials applied to the Au(110) electrode. It is suggested that this dependence arises from changes in the orientation of the isoalloxazine ring structures in the protein with respect to the Au(110) surface. This offers a method of monitoring conformational change in this protein by measuring variations in the reflection anisotropy spectrum arising from changes in the redox potential.

  1. Physical and chemical properties of pyropheophorbide-a methyl ester in ethanol, phosphate buffer and aqueous dispersion of small unilamellar dimyristoyl-L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine vesicles.

    PubMed

    Delanaye, Lisiane; Bahri, Mohamed Ali; Tfibel, Francis; Fontaine-Aupart, Marie-Pierre; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange; Heine, Bélinda; Piette, Jacques; Hoebeke, Maryse

    2006-03-01

    The aggregation process of pyropheophorbide-a methyl ester (PPME), a second-generation photosensitizer, was investigated in various solvents. Absorption and fluorescence spectra showed that the photosensitizer was under a monomeric form in ethanol as well as in dimyristoyl-L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine liposomes while it was strongly aggregated in phosphate buffer. A quantitative determination of reactive oxygen species production by PPME in these solvents has been undertaken by electron spin resonance associated with spin trapping technique and absorption spectroscopy. In phosphate buffer, both electron spin resonance and absorption measurements led to the conclusion that singlet oxygen production was not detectable while hydroxyl radical production was very weak. In liposomes and ethanol, singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radical production increased highly; the singlet oxygen quantum yield was determined to be 0.2 in ethanol and 0.13 in liposomes. The hydroxyl radical production origin was also investigated. Singlet oxygen was formed from PPME triplet state deactivation in the presence of oxygen. Indeed, the triplet state formation quantum yield of PPME was found to be about 0.23 in ethanol, 0.15 in liposomes (too small to be measured in PBS).

  2. Catalysis of hydrolysis and nucleophilic substitution at the P-N bond of phosphoimidazolide-activated nucleotides in phosphate buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Rosenbach, M. T.

    1991-01-01

    Phosphoimidazolide-activated derivatives of guanosine and cytidine 5'-monophosphates, henceforth called ImpN's, exhibit enhanced rates of degradation in the presence of aqueous inorganic phosphate in the range 4.0 < or = pH < or = 8.6. This degradation is been attributed to (i) nucleophilic substitution of the imidazolide and (ii) catalysis of the P-N bond hydrolysis by phosphate. The first reaction results in the formation of nucleoside 5'-diphosphate and the second in nucleoside 5'-monophosphate. Analysis of the observed rates as well as the product ratios as a function of pH and phosphate concentration allow distinction between various mechanistic possibilities. The results show that both H2PO4- and HPO4(2-) participate in both hydrolysis and nucleophilic substitution. Statistically corrected biomolecular rate constants indicate that the dianion is 4 times more effective as a general base than the monoanion, and 8 times more effective as nucleophile. The low Bronsted value beta = 0.15 calculated for these phosphate species, presumed to act as general bases in facilitating water attack, is consistent with the fact that catalysis of the hydrolysis of the P-N bond in ImpN's has not been detected before. The beta nuc = 0.35 calculated for water, H2PO4-, HPO4(2-), and hydroxide acting as nucleophiles indicates a more associative transition state for nucleotidyl (O2POR- with R = nucleoside) transfers than that observed for phosphoryl (PO3(2-)) transfers (beta nuc = 0.25). With respect to the stability/reactivity of ImpN's under prebiotic conditions, our study shows that these materials would not suffer additional degradation due to inorganic phosphate, assuming the concentrations of phosphate, Pi, on prebiotic Earth were similar to those in the present oceans ([Pi] approximately 2.25 micromoles).

  3. Mechanism of enhanced antibacterial activity of ultra-fine ZnO in phosphate buffer solution with various organic acids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Kuang, Huijuan; Liu, Yingxia; Xu, Hengyi; Aguilar, Zoraida P; Xiong, Yonghua; Wei, Hua

    2016-11-01

    Ultra-fine-ZnO showed low toxicity in complex water matrix containing multiple components such as PBS buffer and the toxic mechanism of ultra-fine-ZnO has not been clearly elucidated. In present study, enhanced antibacterial activity of 200 nm diameter ultra-fine-ZnO in PBS buffer against Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli were observed in the presence of several organic acids in comparison with ultra-fine-ZnO in PBS buffer alone. These findings indicated that the toxic effects of the ultra-fine-ZnO was dependent on the concentration of released Zn(2+) which was affected by organic acids. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) did not responsible to the toxic mechanism of ultra-fine-ZnO which was tested using the antioxidant N-Acetylcysteine (NAC). Indeed, ultra-fine-ZnO induced bacteria cell membrane leakages and cell morphology damages that eventually led to cell death, which were confirmed using propidium monoazide (PMA) in combination with PCR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All data gathered herein suggested that released Zn(2+) played a major role in the microbial toxicity of ultra-fine-ZnO.

  4. Ultra high pressure homogenization (UHPH) inactivation of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and milk.

    PubMed

    Dong, Peng; Georget, Erika S; Aganovic, Kemal; Heinz, Volker; Mathys, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Ultra high pressure homogenization (UHPH) opens up new areas for dynamic high pressure assisted thermal sterilization of liquids. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores are resistant to high isostatic pressure and temperature and were suggested as potential surrogate for high pressure thermal sterilization validation. B. amyloliquefaciens spores suspended in PBS buffer (0.01 M, pH 7.0), low fat milk (1.5%, pH 6.7), and whole milk (3.5%, pH 6.7) at initial concentration of ~10(6) CFU/mL were subjected to UHPH treatments at 200, 300, and 350 MPa with an inlet temperature at ~80°C. Thermal inactivation kinetics of B. amyloliquefaciens spores in PBS and milk were assessed with thin wall glass capillaries and modeled using first-order and Weibull models. The residence time during UHPH treatments was estimated to determine the contribution of temperature to spore inactivation by UHPH. No sublethal injury was detected after UHPH treatments using sodium chloride as selective component in the nutrient agar medium. The inactivation profiles of spores in PBS buffer and milk were compared and fat provided no clear protective effect for spores against treatments. Treatment at 200 MPa with valve temperatures lower than 125°C caused no reduction of spores. A reduction of 3.5 log10CFU/mL of B. amyloliquefaciens spores was achieved by treatment at 350 MPa with a valve temperature higher than 150°C. The modeled thermal inactivation and observed inactivation during UHPH treatments suggest that temperature could be the main lethal effect driving inactivation.

  5. Ultra high pressure homogenization (UHPH) inactivation of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and milk

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Peng; Georget, Erika S.; Aganovic, Kemal; Heinz, Volker; Mathys, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Ultra high pressure homogenization (UHPH) opens up new areas for dynamic high pressure assisted thermal sterilization of liquids. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores are resistant to high isostatic pressure and temperature and were suggested as potential surrogate for high pressure thermal sterilization validation. B. amyloliquefaciens spores suspended in PBS buffer (0.01 M, pH 7.0), low fat milk (1.5%, pH 6.7), and whole milk (3.5%, pH 6.7) at initial concentration of ~106 CFU/mL were subjected to UHPH treatments at 200, 300, and 350 MPa with an inlet temperature at ~80°C. Thermal inactivation kinetics of B. amyloliquefaciens spores in PBS and milk were assessed with thin wall glass capillaries and modeled using first-order and Weibull models. The residence time during UHPH treatments was estimated to determine the contribution of temperature to spore inactivation by UHPH. No sublethal injury was detected after UHPH treatments using sodium chloride as selective component in the nutrient agar medium. The inactivation profiles of spores in PBS buffer and milk were compared and fat provided no clear protective effect for spores against treatments. Treatment at 200 MPa with valve temperatures lower than 125°C caused no reduction of spores. A reduction of 3.5 log10CFU/mL of B. amyloliquefaciens spores was achieved by treatment at 350 MPa with a valve temperature higher than 150°C. The modeled thermal inactivation and observed inactivation during UHPH treatments suggest that temperature could be the main lethal effect driving inactivation. PMID:26236296

  6. Effects of phosphate-buffered saline concentration and incubation time on the mechanical and structural properties of electrochemically aligned collagen threads.

    PubMed

    Uquillas, Jorge Alfredo; Kishore, Vipuil; Akkus, Ozan

    2011-06-01

    A key step during the synthesis of collagen constructs is the incubation of monomeric collagen in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) to promote fibrillogenesis in the collagen network. Optimal PBS-treatment conditions for monomeric collagen solutions to induce gelation are well established in the literature. Recently, a report in the literature (Cheng et al 2008 Biomaterials 29 3278-88) showed a novel method to fabricate highly oriented electrochemically aligned collagen (ELAC) threads which have orders of magnitude greater packing density than collagen gels. The optimal PBS-treatment conditions for induction of D-banding pattern in such a dense and anisotropic collagen network are unknown. This study aimed to optimize PBS treatment of ELAC threads by investigating the effect of phosphate ion concentration (0.5×, 1×, 5× and 10×) and incubation time (3, 12 and 96 h) on the mechanical strength and ultrastructural organization by monotonic mechanical testing, small angle x-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). ELAC threads incubated in water (no PBS) served as the control. ELAC threads incubated in 1× PBS showed significantly higher extensibility compared to those in 0.5× or 10× PBS along with the presence of D-banded patterns with a periodicity of 63.83 nm. Incubation of ELAC threads in 1× PBS for 96 h resulted in significantly higher ultimate stress compared to 3 or 12 h. However, these threads lacked the D-banding pattern. TEM observations showed no significant differences in the microfibril diameter distribution of ELAC threads treated with or without PBS. This indicates that microfibrils lacked D-banding following electrochemical alignment and the subsequent PBS-treatment-induced D-banding by reorganization within microfibrils. It was concluded that incubation of aligned collagen in 1× PBS for 12 h results in mechanically competent, D-banded ELAC threads which can be used for the regeneration of load bearing tissues such as tendons and

  7. Succinimide Formation from an NGR-Containing Cyclic Peptide: Computational Evidence for Catalytic Roles of Phosphate Buffer and the Arginine Side Chain.

    PubMed

    Kirikoshi, Ryota; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Takahashi, Ohgi

    2017-02-16

    The Asn-Gly-Arg (NGR) motif and its deamidation product isoAsp-Gly-Arg (isoDGR) have recently attracted considerable attention as tumor-targeting ligands. Because an NGR-containing peptide and the corresponding isoDGR-containing peptide target different receptors, the spontaneous NGR deamidation can be used in dual targeting strategies. It is well known that the Asn deamidation proceeds via a succinimide derivative. In the present study, we computationally investigated the mechanism of succinimide formation from a cyclic peptide, c[CH₂CO-NGRC]-NH₂, which has recently been shown to undergo rapid deamidation in a phosphate buffer. An H₂PO₄(-) ion was explicitly included in the calculations. We employed the density functional theory using the B3LYP functional. While geometry optimizations were performed in the gas phase, hydration Gibbs energies were calculated by the SM8 (solvation model 8) continuum model. We have found a pathway leading to the five-membered ring tetrahedral intermediate in which both the H₂PO₄(-) ion and the Arg side chain act as catalyst. This intermediate, once protonated at the NH₂ group on the five-membered ring, was shown to easily undergo NH₃ elimination leading to the succinimide formation. This study is the first to propose a possible catalytic role for the Arg side chain in the NGR deamidation.

  8. Succinimide Formation from an NGR-Containing Cyclic Peptide: Computational Evidence for Catalytic Roles of Phosphate Buffer and the Arginine Side Chain

    PubMed Central

    Kirikoshi, Ryota; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Takahashi, Ohgi

    2017-01-01

    The Asn-Gly-Arg (NGR) motif and its deamidation product isoAsp-Gly-Arg (isoDGR) have recently attracted considerable attention as tumor-targeting ligands. Because an NGR-containing peptide and the corresponding isoDGR-containing peptide target different receptors, the spontaneous NGR deamidation can be used in dual targeting strategies. It is well known that the Asn deamidation proceeds via a succinimide derivative. In the present study, we computationally investigated the mechanism of succinimide formation from a cyclic peptide, c[CH2CO-NGRC]-NH2, which has recently been shown to undergo rapid deamidation in a phosphate buffer. An H2PO4− ion was explicitly included in the calculations. We employed the density functional theory using the B3LYP functional. While geometry optimizations were performed in the gas phase, hydration Gibbs energies were calculated by the SM8 (solvation model 8) continuum model. We have found a pathway leading to the five-membered ring tetrahedral intermediate in which both the H2PO4− ion and the Arg side chain act as catalyst. This intermediate, once protonated at the NH2 group on the five-membered ring, was shown to easily undergo NH3 elimination leading to the succinimide formation. This study is the first to propose a possible catalytic role for the Arg side chain in the NGR deamidation. PMID:28212316

  9. Equilibrium drug solubility measurements in 96-well plates reveal similar drug solubilities in phosphate buffer pH 6.8 and human intestinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Tiina; Karjalainen, Milja; Ojala, Krista; Partola, Kirsi; Lammert, Frank; Augustijns, Patrick; Urtti, Arto; Yliperttula, Marjo; Peltonen, Leena; Hirvonen, Jouni

    2011-02-28

    This study was conducted to develop a high throughput screening (HTS) method for the assessment of equilibrium solubility of drugs. Solid-state compounds were precipitated from methanol in 96-well plates, in order to eliminate the effect of co-solvent. Solubility of twenty model drugs was analyzed in water and aqueous solutions (pH 1.2 and 6.8) in 96-well plates and in shake-flasks (UV detection). The results obtained with the 96-well plate method correlated well (R(2)=0.93) between the shake-flask and 96-well plates over the wide concentration scale of 0.002-169.2mg/ml. Thereafter, the solubility tests in 96-well plates were performed using fasted state human intestinal fluid (HIF) from duodenum of healthy volunteers. The values of solubility were similar in phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.8) and HIF over the solubility range of 10(2)-10(5)μg/ml. The new 96-well plate method is useful for the screening of equilibrium drug solubility during the drug discovery process and it also allows the use of human intestinal fluid in solubility screening.

  10. One-step electrochemical detection of cholesterol in the presence of suitable K₃Fe(CN)₆/phosphate buffer mediator by an electrochemical approach.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammed M; Asiri, Abdullah M

    2015-08-01

    One-step approach of cholesterol biosensor was fabricated onto smart micro-chips based on cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) co-immobilized thioglycolic acid self-assembled monolayer (TGA-SAM) for biomedical applications. The selective cholesterol biosensor was investigated with modified tiny micro-chip (Au/SAM/ChOx) by the facile and reliable cyclic voltammetric (CV) method in a K3Fe(CN)6/phosphate buffer (PB) system. The modified micro-chip displayed a large dynamic range (1.0 nmol L(-1) to 1.0 mmol L(-1)), lower detection limit (~0.49 nmol L(-1), based on S/N~3), higher sensitivity (~93.75 µA µmol L(-2) cm(-2)), good linearity (correlation coefficient r(2), 0.9995), lower sample volume (<50.0 μL), and good stability as well as reproducibility. The Au/TGA system was implemented for a facile and simple approach to the immobilization of ChOx onto micro-chip, which can offer analytical access to a large group of enzymes for a wide range of bio-molecule applications in health-care and biomedical fields. This integrated microchip provides a promising low-cost platform for the sensitive and rapid detection of biomolecules using miniatured samples.

  11. Bioanalytical solutions to acetonitrile shortages.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong; Williams, John; Carrier, Scott; Brummel, Christopher L

    2010-09-01

    The acetonitrile shortage during 2008 to 2009 challenged bioanalytical scientists due to the ubiquitous role that acetonitrile plays in sample preparation and analysis. Replacement, reduction and reuse of acetonitrile were the core tenants behind each approach used to tackle the shortage. Sample preparation of biological matrices can be accomplished by protein precipitation using a variety of solvents; methanol is usually the best substitute for acetonitrile. The potential liabilities in using methanol can be handled with appropriate modifications. Often methanol is superior to acetonitrile for both protein precipitation and chromatography if phospholipid interference is a problem. Solvent consumption can be minimized by reducing column dimensions and particle size. Separations can be achieved at greatly reduced run times using sub-2-μm and fused-core particle columns. Emerging technologies, such as desorption ESI, direct analysis in real time and laser diode thermal desorption, eliminate the need for chromatography and achieve significant solvent and time savings. Acetonitrile recyclers can purify HPLC waste for reuse.

  12. Analysis of BNP7787 thiol-disulfide exchange reactions in phosphate buffer and human plasma using microscale electrochemical high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Shanmugarajah, Dakshine; Ding, Daoyuan; Huang, Quili; Chen, Xinghai; Kochat, Harry; Petluru, Pavankumar N; Ayala, Philippe Y; Parker, Aulma R; Hausheer, Frederick H

    2009-04-01

    BNP7787 (disodium 2,2'-dithio-bis ethane sulfonate; Tavocept) is a novel water-soluble investigational agent that is undergoing clinical development for prevention and mitigation of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. BNP7787 is a disulfide that undergoes thiol-disulfide exchange reactions in vivo with physiological thiols. Mesna-disulfide heteroconjugates that form as a result of these exchange reactions may play a key role in the protection against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Although several analytical methods have been used to detect thiols and disulfides, they have notable limitations including (i) low sensitivity, (ii) interference by chemical modification by derivatization reagents, and (iii) cumbersome sample preparation. In this paper, a sensitive micro-HPLC-EC method is described that identifies BNP7787 and mesna in plasma and phosphate buffer across a broad concentration range from 500nM to 100microM. This method utilizes a dual electrochemical detector equipped with a wall-jet gold electrode. The approach described here facilitates the identification of BNP7787 and mesna down to nanomolar levels. Although we did not focus on optimizing the approach for other thiol and disulfide compounds, we believe this approach could be optimized and used in the identification of other thiols and disulfides in plasma. The assay requires significantly less sample preparation and does not involve the use of derivatizing agents (i.e., the thiol and disulfide species can be detected directly) and represents an important advance over previous methods. This method was used to detect and quantitate BNP7787 and to monitor and kinetically characterize the interactions of BNP7787 with glutathione, cysteine, cysteinyl-glycine, cysteinyl-glutamate and homocysteine.

  13. Effect of phosphate-buffered saline on push-out bond strength of a new bioceramic sealer to root canal dentin

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Hoseini, Atefeh; Gorjestani, Hedayat; Raoof, Maryam; Assadian, Hadi; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare push-out bond strength of a new bioceramic endodontic sealer, EndoSequence BC sealer (Brasseler USA, Savannah, GA), used with gutta-percha in the presence or absence of phosphate-buffered saline solution (PBS) within the root canals. Materials and Methods: Forty single-rooted human teeth were prepared and randomly divided into four groups. Samples in groups 1 and 2 were dried, but those in groups 3 and 4 were moistened with PBS before obturation. All root canals were obturated with gutta-percha/EndoSequence BC sealer. The specimens were stored in PBS for 7 days in groups 1 and 3 and for 2 months in groups 2 and 4. Push-out bond strength values and failure modes were evaluated. The data on push-out bond strength were analyzed using two-way ANOVA. Results: The mean value for the bond strength of the obturation material in moistened canals was significantly higher than that in dried ones at 1 week (P = 0.00). Contrarily, there was no significant difference between dried and moistened root canals at 2 months (P = 0.61). In dried canals, bond strength increased significantly with time but in moistened ones, the difference was not significant. Inspection of the specimens revealed the bond failure to be mainly cohesive for all groups. Conclusion: The presence of PBS within the root canals increased the bond strength of EndoSequence BC sealer/gutta-percha at 1 week. However, no difference was found between the bond strength of EndoSequence BC sealer/gutta-percha in the presence or absence of PBS in the root canals at 2 months. PMID:23559925

  14. Crystal structure of (2,11-di-aza-[3.3](2,6)pyridino-phane-κ (4) N,N',N'',N''')(1,6,7,12-tetra-aza-perylene-κ (2) N (1),N (12))ruthenium(II) bis-(hexa-fluorido-phosphate) aceto-nitrile 1.422-solvate.

    PubMed

    Brietzke, Thomas; Rottke, Falko Otto; Kelling, Alexandra; Schilde, Uwe; Holdt, Hans-Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    In the title compound, [Ru(C14H16N4)(C16H8N4)](PF6)2·1.422CH3CN, discrete dimers of complex cations, [Ru(L-N4H2)tape](2+) are formed {L-N4H2 = 2,11-di-aza-[3.3](2,6)pyridino-phane; tape = 1,6,7,12-tetra-aza-perylene}, held together by π-π stacking inter-actions via the tape ligand moieties with a centroid-centroid distance of 3.49 (2) Å, assisted by hydrogen bonds between the non-coordinating tape ligand α,α'-di-imine unit and the amine proton of a 2,11-di-aza-[3.3](2,6)-pyridino-phane ligand of the opposite complex cation. The combination of these inter-actions leads to an unusual nearly face-to-face π-π stacking mode. Additional weak C-H⋯N, C-H⋯F, N-H⋯F and P-F⋯π-ring (tape, py) (with F⋯centroid distances of 2.925-3.984 Å) inter-actions are found, leading to a three-dimensional architecture. The Ru(II) atom is coordinated in a distorted octa-hedral geometry, particularly manifested by the Namine-Ru-Namine angle of 153.79 (10)°. The counter-charge is provided by two hexa-fluorido-phosphate anions and the asymmetric unit is completed by aceto-nitrile solvent mol-ecules of crystallization. Disorder was observed for both the hexa-fluorido-phosphate anions as well as the aceto-nitrile solvate mol-ecules, with occupancies for the major moieties of 0.801 (6) for one of the PF6 anions, and a shared occupancy of 0.9215 (17) for the second PF6 anion and a partially occupied aceto-nitrile mol-ecule. A second CH3CN mol-ecule is fully occupied, but 1:1 disordered across a crystallographic inversion center.

  15. Peak distortion in the column liquid chromatographic determination of omeprazole dissolved in borax buffer.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, T; Collijn, E; Tivert, A M; Rosén, L

    1991-11-22

    Injection of a sample containing omeprazole dissolved in borax buffer (pH 9.2) into a reversed-phase liquid chromatographic system consisting of a mixture of acetonitrile and phosphate buffer (pH 7.6) as the mobile phase and a C18 surface-modified silica as the solid phase resulted under special conditions in split peaks of omeprazole. The degree of peak split and the retention time of omeprazole varied with the concentration of borax in the sample solution and the ionic strength of the mobile phase buffer as well as with the column used. Borax is eluted from the column in a broad zone starting from the void volume of the column. The retention is probably due to the presence of polyborate ions. The size of the zone varies with the concentration of borax in the sample injected. In the borax zone the pH is increased compared with the pH of the mobile phase, and when omeprazole (a weak acid) is co-eluting in the borax zone its retention is affected. In the front part and in the back part of the borax zone, pH gradients are formed, and these gradients can induce the peak splitting. When the dissolving medium is changed to a phosphate buffer or an ammonium buffer at pH 9 no peak distortion of omeprazole is observed.

  16. Analysis of synthetic peptides by capillary zone electrophoresis in organic/aqueous buffers.

    PubMed

    Miller, C; Rivier, J

    1998-06-01

    Whereas synthetic peptides have been routinely analyzed for purity by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RPHPLC) for a number of years, it is only in the last decade that the use of capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) in aqueous buffers has been taken advantage of as an orthogonal method for the detection of impurities. However, we have found that hydrophobic amino acids and peptides often migrate as very broad, tailing absorbances or even precipitate in the aqueous buffers during CZE analysis. As a result, alternative buffer systems containing organic modifiers were sought. Varying concentrations of acetonitrile, methanol and isopropanol in sodium phosphate and triethylammonium phosphate buffers were used to study their effects on the electrophoretic migration of several synthetic peptides [gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) and analogs] and an enantiomeric synthetic amino acid. The organic/aqueous buffers used to obtain the best conditions for separation of porcine gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and chicken II GnRH were then used to optimize a separation of nine native forms of GnRH decapeptides. Interestingly, several of these GnRHs have identical formal charges and yet could be separated. This suggests a mixed mechanism of separation that discriminates not only on the basis of peptide charge and structure but also of adsorptive properties (Van der Waals forces, dipole-dipole interactions and hydrogen bonding) of the capillaries.

  17. Stacking and Analysis of Melamine in Milk Products with Acetonitrile-Salt Stacking Technique in Capillary Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chong; Hou, Zhanwu; Wang, Zilong; Yuan, Jiaqiang; Yu, Jiang; Zhao, Yongxi; Tang, Yuhai; Gao, Meili

    2014-01-01

    Melamine was measured in real milk products with capillary electrophoresis (CE) based on acetonitrile-salt stacking (ASS) method. Real milk samples were deproteinized with acetonitrile at a final concentration of 60% (v/v) and then injected hydrodynamically at 50 mBar for 40.0 s. The optimized buffer contains 80.0 mmol/L pH 2.8 phosphates. Melamine could be detected within 20.0 min at +10 kV with a low limit of detection (LOD) of 0.03 μmol/L. Satisfactory reproducibility (inter- and intraday RSD% both for migration time and peak area was lower than 5.0%) and a wide linearity range of 0.05 μmol/L ~ 10.0 μmol/L were achieved. The proposed method was suitable for routine assay of MEL in real milk samples that was subjected to a simple treatment step. PMID:25197612

  18. Persistence of acetonitrile bilayers at the interface of acetonitrile/water mixtures with silica.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Christopher A; Bender, John S; Manfred, Katherine; Fourkas, John T

    2013-11-21

    Previous experiments and simulations have shown that acetonitrile organizes into a lipid-like bilayer at the liquid/silica interface. Recent simulations have further suggested that this bilayer structure persists in mixtures of acetonitrile with water, even at low acetonitrile concentrations. This behavior is indicative of microscopic phase separation of these liquids near silica interfaces and may have important ramifications for the use of acetonitrile in chromatography and heterogeneous catalysis. To explore this phenomenon, we have used vibrational sum-frequency-generation spectroscopy to probe acetonitrile/water mixtures at a silica interface. Our spectra provide evidence that acetonitrile partitions to the hydrated silica interface even when the mole fraction of acetonitrile is as low as 10%. A blue shift is observed in the spectrum of the methyl symmetric stretch upon increasing water mole fraction, in agreement with vibrational spectra of bulk mixtures. Line shape analysis suggests that acetonitrile may exist in the form of bilayer patches at high water mole fractions.

  19. Vertical distribution of acetonitrile in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingels, J.; Nevejans, D.; Arijs, E.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of acetonitrile in the atmosphere was confirmed by results of surface and stratospheric investigations. Stratospheric measurements give mixing ratios typically decreasing with height from 3 ppt at 25 km to 0.5 ppt at 40 km. Measurements at the Earth's surface are less unanimous, although a ground level background mixing ratio of a few times 10 ppt seems realistic. Measurements are compatible with a small global surface source of acetonitrile and a small tropospheric loss. The vertical distribution of acetonitrile presented in consistent with general knowledge of its atmospheric chemistry.

  20. Buffer capacity of biologics--from buffer salts to buffering by antibodies.

    PubMed

    Karow, Anne R; Bahrenburg, Sven; Garidel, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Controlling pH is essential for a variety of biopharmaceutical process steps. The chemical stability of biologics such as monoclonal antibodies is pH-dependent and slightly acidic conditions are favorable for stability in a number of cases. Since control of pH is widely provided by added buffer salts, the current study summarizes the buffer characteristics of acetate, citrate, histidine, succinate, and phosphate buffers. Experimentally derived values largely coincide with values calculated from a model that had been proposed in 1922 by van Slyke. As high concentrated protein formulations become more and more prevalent for biologics, the self-buffering potential of proteins becomes of relevance. The current study provides information on buffer characteristics for pH ranges down to 4.0 and up to 8.0 and shows that a monoclonal antibody at 50 mg/mL exhibits similar buffer capacity as 6 mM citrate or 14 mM histidine (pH 5.0-6.0). Buffer capacity of antibody solutions scales linearly with protein concentration up to more than 200 mg/mL. At a protein concentration of 220 mg/mL, the buffer capacity resembles the buffer capacity of 30 mM citrate or 50 mM histidine (pH 5.0-6.0). The buffer capacity of monoclonal antibodies is practically identical at the process relevant temperatures 5, 25, and 40°C. Changes in ionic strength of ΔI=0.15, in contrast, can alter the buffer capacity up to 35%. In conclusion, due to efficient self-buffering by antibodies in the pH range of favored chemical stability, conventional buffer excipients could be dispensable for pH stabilization of high concentrated protein solutions.

  1. Wheat cultivar discrimination by capillary electrophoresis of gliadins in isoelectric buffers.

    PubMed

    Capelli, L; Forlani, F; Perini, F; Guerrieri, N; Cerletti, P; Righetti, P G

    1998-02-01

    A modified method is reported for screening of wheat cultivars: capillary zone electrophoresis of gliadins in isoelectric buffers. Previously published procedures recommended a 100 mM phosphate buffer, supplemented with 0.05% hydroxypropylmethylcellulose and 20% acetonitrile, in uncoated capillaries. Due to the very high conductivity of such a buffer (4.7 mmhos at 25 degrees C) high speed separations (10-12 min analysis time at 800 V/cm) could only be elicited in 20 microm internal diameter (ID) capillaries, at the expense of sensitivity. In the present report, we optimized the background electrolyte as follows: 40 mM aspartic acid (pH=pI=2.77) in the presence of 7 M urea and 0.5% short-chain hydroxyethylcellulose (Mn 27000 Da; apparent pH 3.9 in 7 M urea). As an alternative recipe, the same isoelectric buffer can be supplemented with a mixed organic solvent composed of 4 M urea and 20% acetonitrile (apparent pH 3.66). Due to the much lower conductivity (0.7 mmhos), separations can be carried out at 1000 V/cm in only 10 min, but in larger bore capillaries (50 microm ID), ensuring a five-times higher sensitivity. The gliadin patterns thus obtained are species-specific and allow easy identification of all cultivars tested of both durum and bread wheat. No adsorption of proteins to the silica wall seems to occur and high reproducibility in peak areas and transit times is obtained.

  2. HPLC-UV method for simultaneous determination of MK-1775 and AZD-7762 in both acetonitrile-aqueous solution and mouse plasma.

    PubMed

    Ebeid, Kareem; Ho, Giang N; Salem, Aliasger K

    2017-02-15

    A sensitive and precise method is described for the simultaneous determination of two small molecule kinase inhibitors: MK-1775 (MK) and AZD-7762 (AZD), in acetonitrile (ACN)-aqueous solution and in mouse plasma. A Nova-Pak C18 reversed phase column (3.9mm×150mm, 4μm, 60Å) was utilized in the separation using an isocratic mobile phase of 0.1% v/v triethylamine in phosphate buffer (pH=7.4): acetonitrile (ACN) (60:40, v/v), at a flow rate of 0.8mL/min. Detection wavelength was set at 310nm for both MK and AZD, and 431nm for the internal standard sunitinib (SUN). The developed method was validated following the ICH guidelines and it was shown to be accurate, precise and linear in the range of 41ng/mL to 8333ng/mL for both drugs in the ACN-aqueous solution and from 83ng/mL to 8333ng/mL for both drugs in mouse plasma samples. For the first time, the presented data suggest the suitability of this method for the simultaneous separation and quantification of MK and AZD in both ACN aqueous solution as well as in mouse plasma samples.

  3. Buffer Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Kelly

    2000-01-01

    Presents a science experiment in which students test the buffering capacity of household products such as shampoo, hand lotion, fizzies candy, and cola. Lists the standards addressed in this experiment and gives an example of a student lab write-up. (YDS)

  4. Acetonitrile in the air over Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, S.; Helas, G.; Warneck, P.

    1989-06-01

    A gas chromatographic technique was developed to measure acetonitrile mixing ratios in air samples collected during three aircraft flights over Europe. Uniform mixing ratios were observed in the troposphere independent of altitude, with an average of 144+-26 pptv for the first two flights, and 194+-7 pptv for the third. /copyright/ American Geophysical Union 1989

  5. Optimization of acetonitrile co-solvent and copper stoichiometry for pseudo-ligandless click chemistry with nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Eduardo; Das, Subha R

    2012-08-15

    The copper(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition 'click' reaction yields a specific product under mild conditions and in some of the most chemically complex environments. This reaction has been used extensively to tag DNA, proteins, glycans and only recently RNA. Click reactions in aqueous buffer typically include a ligand for Cu(I), however we find that acetonitrile as a minor co-solvent can serve this role. Here we investigate the click labeling of RNA and DNA in aqueous buffer to determine the relationship between the stoichoimetry of Cu(I) and the acetonitrile co-solvent that affects nucleic acid stability. We find that very low concentrations of acetonitrile perform equally well and obviate the need for any additional Cu(I) stabilizing ligand. These pseudo-ligandless reaction conditions are optimal for nucleic acids click conjugations.

  6. Kinetic buffers.

    PubMed

    Alibrandi, Giuseppe; Fabbrizzi, Luigi; Licchelli, Maurizio; Puglisi, Antonio

    2015-01-12

    This paper proposes a new type of molecular device that is able to act as an inverse proton sponge to slowly decrease the pH inside a reaction vessel. This makes the automatic monitoring of the concentration of pH-sensitive systems possible. The device is a composite formed of an alkyl chloride, which kinetically produces acidity, and a buffer that thermodynamically modulates the variation in pH value. Profiles of pH versus time (pH-t plots) have been generated under various experimental conditions by computer simulation, and the device has been tested by carrying out automatic spectrophotometric titrations, without using an autoburette. To underline the wide variety of possible applications, this new system has been used to realize and monitor HCl uptake by a di-copper(II) bistren complex in a single run, in a completely automatic experiment.

  7. Acetone potentiation of acute acetonitrile toxicity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, J.J.; Hayes, E.P.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of these studies was to investigate the nature and mechanism of a toxicologic interaction between acetonitrile and acetone. Results of oral doe-response studies utilizing 1:1 (w/w) mixture of acetonitrile and acetone, or varying doses of acetonitrile administered together with a constant dose of acetone, indicated that acetone potentiated acute acetonitrile toxicity three- to fourfold in rats. The onset of severe toxicity (manifested by tremors and convulsions) was delayed in the groups dosed with both solvents compared to the groups that received acetonitrile or acetone alone. Blood cyanide (a metabolite of acetonitrile) and serum acetonitrile and acetone concentrations were measured after oral administration of 25% aqueous solutions of acetonitrile, acetone, or acetonitrile plus acetone. Concentrations of cyanide in the blood of rats given acetonitrile plus acetone remained near baseline, in contrast to the high concentrations found in rats dosed with acetonitrile alone. At 34-36 h, high blood cyanide concentrations were found in rats dosed with both of the solvents. This delayed onset of elevation of blood cyanide coincided with the occurrence of clinical signs and with the disappearance of serum acetone. In further pharmacokinetic studies, blood cyanide concentrations were measured after similar dosage regimens of acetone and acetonitrile. Peak cyanide concentrations were found to be significantly greater in rats dosed with both solvents than in rats given only acetonitrile. Administration of either sodium thiosulfate or a second dose of acetone prevented the toxicity associated with exposure to both solvents.

  8. 40 CFR 721.10118 - Substituted aryl acetonitrile (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted aryl acetonitrile (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10118 Substituted aryl acetonitrile (generic). (a) Chemical substance... substituted aryl acetonitrile (PMN P-05-35) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10118 - Substituted aryl acetonitrile (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted aryl acetonitrile (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10118 Substituted aryl acetonitrile (generic). (a) Chemical substance... substituted aryl acetonitrile (PMN P-05-35) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10118 - Substituted aryl acetonitrile (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted aryl acetonitrile (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10118 Substituted aryl acetonitrile (generic). (a) Chemical substance... substituted aryl acetonitrile (PMN P-05-35) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10118 - Substituted aryl acetonitrile (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted aryl acetonitrile (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10118 Substituted aryl acetonitrile (generic). (a) Chemical substance... substituted aryl acetonitrile (PMN P-05-35) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10118 - Substituted aryl acetonitrile (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted aryl acetonitrile (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10118 Substituted aryl acetonitrile (generic). (a) Chemical substance... substituted aryl acetonitrile (PMN P-05-35) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  13. S-Transnitrosation reactions of hydrogen sulfide (H2S/HS(-)/S(2-)) with S-nitrosated cysteinyl thiols in phosphate buffer of pH 7.4: Results and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tsikas, Dimitrios; Böhmer, Anke

    2017-02-06

    Cysteine (CysSH) and its derivatives including N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and glutathione (GSH), and cysteine residues in proteins and enzymes are nitrosated with nitric oxide (NO) reaction products such as N2O3 to form S-nitrosated cysteine thiols (RCysSNO). RCysSNO undergo with cysteine thiols (RCysSH) S-transnitrosation reactions, thereby transferring reversibly their nitrosyl ((+)NO) group to RCysSH to form RCysSNO. (•)NO release from RCysSNO and S-transnitrosation are considered the most important features and signalling pathways of RCysSNO. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S: pKa1, 7; HS(-): pKa2, 12.9) is an endogenous product of cysteine metabolism. We hypothesized that RCysSNO would also undergo S-transnitrosation reaction with H2S/HS(-)/S(2-) to form thionitrite (ONS(-)), the smallest S-nitrosated thiol. This article describes spectrophotometric and mass spectrometric investigations of S-transnitrosation reactions in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) of pH 7.4 between H2S/HS(-)/S(2-) (supplied as Na2S) and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), S-nitroso-l-cysteine (CysSNO), S-nitroso-N-acetyl-l-cysteine (SNAC), and the synthetic S-nitroso-N-acetyl-l-cysteine ethyl ester (SNACET). For comparison, we also investigated the reactions of H2S/HS(-)/S(2-) with NO(+)BF4(-) and NO2(+)BF4(-), direct ON(+) and O2N(+) donors, respectively, and assumed formation of ONS(-) and thionitrate (O2NS(-)), respectively. Addition of Na2S (at 1 mM) to buffered RCysSNO solutions resulted in decreases of the absorbance at 340 nm and concomitant increases in the absorbance at 410 nm depending upon the nature and concentration of RCysSNO (range, 25-1000 μM). The reactivity order of RCysSNO against H2S/HS(-)/S(2-) was: CysSNO > SNACET > GSNO > SNAC. Our spectrophotometric and GC-MS analyses indicate that H2S/HS(-)/S(2-) and RCysSNO undergo multiple reactions. Major final reaction products were found to be nitrite and nitrate. ONS(-) and O2NS(-) were not detected by GC-MS, suggesting rapid and

  14. Formation and recombination of protonated acetonitrile clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plasil, R.; Glosík, J.; Zakouril, P.

    1999-07-01

    Formation of the protonated acetonitrile cluster ions CH3CNH+.CH3CN and their subsequent dissociative recombination with electrons was studied in a high-pressure flowing afterglow using the axially movable Langmuir probe. The first step is the binary proton transfer reaction of H3O+ with CH3CN with the rate coefficient k1 = (5.9±1.9) × 10-9 cm3 s-1. Resulting CH3CNH+ ions further associate with the neutral acetonitrile molecules at pressures 3-5 Torr with the effective binary rate coefficient k2eff = (2.1±0.7) × 10-9 cm3 s-1 forming the clusters H+.(CH3CN)2. Further reaction of these clusters with CH3CN is very slow with the effective binary rate coefficient k3eff = (1.1±0.3) × 10-12 cm3 s-1. The large difference between k2eff and k3eff facilitated the study of dissociative recombination of H+.(CH3CN)2 cluster ions with electrons at thermal energy and pressure p = 4.5-7.0 Torr. The recombination rate coefficient thus obtained is (2.8±1) × 10-6 cm3 s-1.

  15. Simultaneous Determination of Sitagliptin Phosphate Monohydrate and Metformin Hydrochloride in Tablets by a Validated UPLC Method.

    PubMed

    Malleswararao, Chellu S N; Suryanarayana, Mulukutla V; Mukkanti, Khagga

    2012-01-01

    A novel approach was used to develop and validate a rapid, specific, accurate and precise reverse phase ultra performance liquid chromatographic (UPLC) method for the simultaneous determination of Sitagliptin phosphate monohydrate and Metformin hydrochloride in pharmaceutical dosage forms. The chromatographic separation was achieved on Aquity UPLC BEH C8 100 × 2.1 mm, 1.7 μm, column using a buffer consisting of 10 mM potassium dihydrogen phosphate and 2 mM hexane-1-sulfonic acid sodium salt (pH adjusted to 5.50 with diluted phosphoric acid) and acetonitrile as organic solvent in a gradient program. The flow rate was 0.2 mL min(-1) and the detection wavelength was 210 nm. The limit of detection (LOD) for Sitagliptin phosphate monohydrate and Metformin hydrochloride was 0.2 and 0.06 μg mL(-1), respectively. The limit of quantification (LOQ) for Sitagliptin phosphate monohydrate and Metformin hydrochloride was 0.7 and 0.2 μg mL(-1), respectively. This method was validated with respect to linearity, accuracy, precision, specificity and robustness. The method was also found to be stability-indicating.

  16. Pyrolysis and Combustion of Acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN)

    SciTech Connect

    Britt, P.F.

    2002-05-22

    Acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN) is formed from the thermal decomposition of a variety of cyclic, noncyclic, and polymeric nitrogen-containing compounds such as pyrrole and polyacrylonitrile. The pyrolysis and combustion of acetonitrile have been studied over the past 30 years to gain a more detailed understanding of the complex mechanisms involved in the release of nitrogen-containing compounds such as hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in fires and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in coal combustion. This report reviews the literature on the formation of HCN and NOx from the pyrolysis and combustion of acetonitrile and discusses the possible products found in an acetonitrile fire.

  17. Comparison of protein profiles between acetonitrile- and non-acetonitrile-treated sera from patients with nasopharyngeal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuan-Jiao; Deng, Kai-Feng; Xuan, Chao; Zhang, Bei-Bei; Zhou, Yi; Yang, Xiaoli; He, Ming

    2011-05-01

    Serum proteins may be abnormally increased or decreased during the occurrence and development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, currently there are no simple or effective methods to collect and differentiate these abnormally secreted proteins from abundant serum proteins. In this study, acetonitrile was used to remove the majority of high-abundance proteins from serum samples obtained from patients with NPC. The samples were subjected to surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry with a CM10 (weak cation exchange) ProteinChip, and the resulting protein profiles were compared with those of non-acetonitrile-treated serum samples. The results showed that the protein profiles differed between the acetonitrile- and non-acetonitrile-treated sera from patients with NPC. A large proportion of the non-acetonitrile-treated NPC serum protein peaks were <6000 kDa, while the detection rate of protein peaks >6000 kDa was relatively higher in the acetonitrile-treated NPC sera, accounting for more than half of all protein peaks (26.2+37.5%). Few differentially upregulated proteins were lost, and the peak value density increased after acetonitrile treatment. In conclusion, acetonitrile treatment of serum samples is effective in removing high-abundance macromolecular proteins. Therefore, acetonitrile treatment can be applied for the investigation of serum proteomics and may aid in the identification of differentially expressed proteins.

  18. Acetonitrile boosts conductivity of imidazolium ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Voroshylova, Iuliia V; Kalugin, Oleg N; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2012-07-05

    We apply a new methodology in the force field generation (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys.2011, 13, 7910) to study binary mixtures of five imidazolium-based room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) with acetonitrile (ACN). Each RTIL is composed of tetrafluoroborate (BF(4)) anion and dialkylimidazolium (MMIM) cations. The first alkyl group of MIM is methyl, and the other group is ethyl (EMIM), butyl (BMIM), hexyl (HMIM), octyl (OMIM), and decyl (DMIM). Upon addition of ACN, the ionic conductivity of RTILs increases by more than 50 times. It significantly exceeds an impact of most known solvents. Unexpectedly, long-tailed imidazolium cations demonstrate the sharpest conductivity boost. This finding motivates us to revisit an application of RTIL/ACN binary systems as advanced electrolyte solutions. The conductivity correlates with a composition of ion aggregates simplifying its predictability. Addition of ACN exponentially increases diffusion and decreases viscosity of the RTIL/ACN mixtures. Large amounts of ACN stabilize ion pairs, although they ruin greater ion aggregates.

  19. Tris buffer modulates polydopamine growth, aggregation, and paramagnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Della Vecchia, Nicola Fyodor; Luchini, Alessandra; Napolitano, Alessandra; D'Errico, Gerardino; Vitiello, Giuseppe; Szekely, Noemi; d'Ischia, Marco; Paduano, Luigi

    2014-08-19

    Despite the growing technological interest of polydopamine (dopamine melanin)-based coatings for a broad variety of applications, the factors governing particle size, shape, and electronic properties of this bioinspired multifunctional material have remained little understood. Herein, we report a detailed characterization of polydopamine growth, particle morphology, and paramagnetic properties as a function of dopamine concentration and nature of the buffer (pH 8.5). Dynamic Light Scattering data revealed an increase in the hydrodynamic radii (Rh) of melanin particles with increasing dopamine concentration in all buffers examined, especially in phosphate buffer. Conversely, a marked inhibition of particle growth was apparent in Tris buffer, with Rh remaining as low as <100 nm during polymerization of 0.5 mM dopamine. Small angle neutron scattering data suggested formation of bidimensional structures in phosphate or bicarbonate buffers, while apparently three-dimensional fractal objects prevailed in Tris buffer. Finally, electron paramagnetic resonance spectra revealed a broader signal amplitude with a peculiar power saturation decay profile for polydopamine samples prepared in Tris buffer, denoting more homogeneous paramagnetic centers with respect to similar samples obtained in phosphate and bicarbonate buffers. Overall, these results disclose Tris buffer as an efficient modulator of polydopamine buildup and properties for the rational control and fine-tuning of melanin aggregate size, morphology, and free radical behavior.

  20. Real-time observation of liposome bursting induced by acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazunari; Horii, Keitaro; Fujii, Yasuhiro; Nishio, Izumi

    2014-10-06

    We show the bursting process of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) liposomes in response to the addition of acetonitrile, a small toxic molecule widely used in the fields of chemistry and industry. The percentage of destroyed liposomes is reduced upon decreasing the acetonitrile fraction in the aqueous solution and vesicle bursting is not observed at volume ratios of 4:6 and below. This indicates that a high fraction of acetonitrile causes the bursting of liposomes, and it is proposed that this occurs through insertion of the molecules into outer leaflet of the lipid bilayer. The elapsed time between initial addition of acetonitrile and liposome bursting at each vesicle is also measured and demonstrated to be dependent on the volume fraction of acetonitrile and the vesicle size.

  1. A model potential for acetonitrile: from small clusters to liquid.

    PubMed

    Albertí, M; Amat, A; De Angelis, F; Pirani, F

    2013-06-13

    A portable model potential, representing the intermolecular interaction of acetonitrile with itself and with ions, is proposed. Such model, formulated as a combination of a few effective components, given in terms of the polarizability and dipole moment values of the molecular partners, is here adopted as a building block of the force field of acetonitrile clusters in molecular dynamics simulations. Its reliability is tested by comparing the predicted features for both small ionic and neutral clusters containing acetonitrile with ab initio results and experimental information. Its application to molecular dynamics simulations of liquid acetonitrile and of the solvated Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and I(-), performed at several values of the temperature, discloses an ample and interesting phenomenology, described in an internally consistent way. Such model will be useful to assess the effect of intermolecular interactions on the dynamics of acetonitrile processes occurring in various environments of applied relevance, with emphasis on the dye-sensitized solar cell framework.

  2. Buffer Zone Fact Sheets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    New requirements for buffer zones and sign posting contribute to soil fumigant mitigation and protection for workers and bystanders. The buffer provides distance between the pesticide application site and bystanders, reducing exposure risk.

  3. Microstructure and hydrogen bonding in water-acetonitrile mixtures.

    PubMed

    Mountain, Raymond D

    2010-12-16

    The connection of hydrogen bonding between water and acetonitrile in determining the microheterogeneity of the liquid mixture is examined using NPT molecular dynamics simulations. Mixtures for six, rigid, three-site models for acetonitrile and one water model (SPC/E) were simulated to determine the amount of water-acetonitrile hydrogen bonding. Only one of the six acetonitrile models (TraPPE-UA) was able to reproduce both the liquid density and the experimental estimates of hydrogen bonding derived from Raman scattering of the CN stretch band or from NMR quadrupole relaxation measurements. A simple modification of the acetonitrile model parameters for the models that provided poor estimates produced hydrogen-bonding results consistent with experiments for two of the models. Of these, only one of the modified models also accurately determined the density of the mixtures. The self-diffusion coefficient of liquid acetonitrile provided a final winnowing of the modified model and the successful, unmodified model. The unmodified model is provisionally recommended for simulations of water-acetonitrile mixtures.

  4. VIRTUAL FRAME BUFFER INTERFACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    Large image processing systems use multiple frame buffers with differing architectures and vendor supplied user interfaces. This variety of architectures and interfaces creates software development, maintenance, and portability problems for application programs. The Virtual Frame Buffer Interface program makes all frame buffers appear as a generic frame buffer with a specified set of characteristics, allowing programmers to write code which will run unmodified on all supported hardware. The Virtual Frame Buffer Interface converts generic commands to actual device commands. The virtual frame buffer consists of a definition of capabilities and FORTRAN subroutines that are called by application programs. The virtual frame buffer routines may be treated as subroutines, logical functions, or integer functions by the application program. Routines are included that allocate and manage hardware resources such as frame buffers, monitors, video switches, trackballs, tablets and joysticks; access image memory planes; and perform alphanumeric font or text generation. The subroutines for the various "real" frame buffers are in separate VAX/VMS shared libraries allowing modification, correction or enhancement of the virtual interface without affecting application programs. The Virtual Frame Buffer Interface program was developed in FORTRAN 77 for a DEC VAX 11/780 or a DEC VAX 11/750 under VMS 4.X. It supports ADAGE IK3000, DEANZA IP8500, Low Resolution RAMTEK 9460, and High Resolution RAMTEK 9460 Frame Buffers. It has a central memory requirement of approximately 150K. This program was developed in 1985.

  5. Development of an ion-pair reversed-phase HPLC method with indirect UV detection for determination of phosphates and phosphites as impurities in sodium risedronate.

    PubMed

    Breuzovska, Katerina; Dimitrovska, Aneta; Kitanovski, Zoran; Petrusevska, Jelena; Ribarska, Jasmina Tonic; Jolevska, Suzana Trajkovic

    2010-01-01

    A method based on RP-HPLC with indirect UV detection was developed for the determination of phosphates and phosphites as impurities in sodium risedronate. RP separation of the phosphates and phosphites was achieved by adding tetrabutylammonium hydroxide as an ion-pairing agent in the mobile phase. Potassium hydrogen phthalate was added to the mobile phase as an ionic chromophore in order to obtain high background absorption of the mobile phase. Separation was performed on a C18 column using a mixture of pH 8.2 buffer (containing 0.5 mM tetrabutylammonium hydroxide and 1 mM phthalate) and acetonitrile (95 + 5, v/v) as the mobile phase, with indirect UV detection at 248 nm. The validation of the method included determination of specificity/selectivity, linearity, LOD, LOQ, accuracy, precision, and robustness. The LOD was 0.86 microg/mL for phosphates and 0.76 microg/mL for phosphites. The LOQ was 2.60 microg/mL for phosphates and 2.29 microg/mL for phosphites. The developed method is suitable for quantitative determination of phosphates and phosphites as impurities in QC of sodium risedronate.

  6. Intermolecular forces in acetonitrile + ethanol binary liquid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, A.; Shanmugam, R.; Arivazhagan, G.; Mahendraprabu, A.; Karthick, N. K.

    2015-10-01

    FTIR spectral measurements have been carried out on the binary mixtures of acetonitrile with ethanol at 1:0 (acetonitrile:ethanol), 1:1, 1:2, 1:3 and 0:1 at room temperature. DFT and isosurface calculations have been performed. The acetonitrile + ethanol binary mixtures consist of 1:1, 1:2, 1:3 and 1:4 complexes formed through both the red and blue shifting H-bonds. Inter as well as intra molecular forces are found to exist in 1:3 and 1:4 complexes.

  7. Acetonitrile Ion Suppression in Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colizza, Kevin; Mahoney, Keira E.; Yevdokimov, Alexander V.; Smith, James L.; Oxley, Jimmie C.

    2016-11-01

    Efforts to analyze trace levels of cyclic peroxides by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry gave evidence that acetonitrile suppressed ion formation. Further investigations extended this discovery to ketones, linear peroxides, esters, and possibly many other types of compounds, including triazole and menadione. Direct ionization suppression caused by acetonitrile was observed for multiple adduct types in both electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. The addition of only 2% acetonitrile significantly decreased the sensitivity of analyte response. Efforts to identify the mechanism were made using various nitriles. The ion suppression was reduced by substitution of an acetonitrile hydrogen with an electron-withdrawing group, but was exacerbated by electron-donating or steric groups adjacent to the nitrile. Although current theory does not explain this phenomenon, we propose that polar interactions between the various functionalities and the nitrile may be forming neutral aggregates that manifest as ionization suppression.

  8. Monoalkylation of acetonitrile by primary alcohols catalyzed by iridium complexes.

    PubMed

    Anxionnat, Bruno; Pardo, Domingo Gomez; Ricci, Gino; Cossy, Janine

    2011-08-05

    The monoalkylation of acetonitrile by primary alcohols was achieved in a one-pot sequence in the presence of iridium catalysts. A diversity of nitriles has been obtained from aryl- and alkyl-methanols in excellent yield.

  9. Acetonitrile Ion Suppression in Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Colizza, Kevin; Mahoney, Keira E; Yevdokimov, Alexander V; Smith, James L; Oxley, Jimmie C

    2016-11-01

    Efforts to analyze trace levels of cyclic peroxides by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry gave evidence that acetonitrile suppressed ion formation. Further investigations extended this discovery to ketones, linear peroxides, esters, and possibly many other types of compounds, including triazole and menadione. Direct ionization suppression caused by acetonitrile was observed for multiple adduct types in both electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. The addition of only 2% acetonitrile significantly decreased the sensitivity of analyte response. Efforts to identify the mechanism were made using various nitriles. The ion suppression was reduced by substitution of an acetonitrile hydrogen with an electron-withdrawing group, but was exacerbated by electron-donating or steric groups adjacent to the nitrile. Although current theory does not explain this phenomenon, we propose that polar interactions between the various functionalities and the nitrile may be forming neutral aggregates that manifest as ionization suppression. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  10. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Acetonitrile in rats. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, T.J.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.; Boyd, P.J.; Hayden, B.K.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.

    1994-02-01

    The potential for acetonitrile to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 0, 100, 400, or 1200 ppM acetonitrile, 6 hours/day, 7 days/week. Exposure of rats to these concentrations of acetonitrile resulted in mortality in the 1200 ppM group (2/33 pregnant females; 1/10 non-pregnant females). However, there were no treatment-related effects upon body weights or reproduction indices at any exposure level, nor was there a significant increase in the incidence of fetal malformations or variations. The only effect observed in the fetuses was a slight, but not statiscally significant, exposure-correlated increase in the incidence of supernumerary ribs. Determination of acetonitrile and cyanide concentrations in maternal rat blood showed that acetonitrile concentration in the blood increased with exposure concentration for all exposed maternal rats. Detectable amounts of cyanide in the blood were found only in the rats exposed to 1200 ppM acetonitrile ({approximately}2 {mu}g cyanide/g of blood).

  11. Is bicarbonate buffer suitable as a dissolution medium?

    PubMed

    Boni, Julia Elisabeth; Brickl, Rolf Stefan; Dressman, Jennifer

    2007-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare two methods for the preparation of bicarbonate buffer, and to compare media prepared with bicarbonate buffer with commonly used biorelevant and pharmacopoeial media in terms of their suitability for dissolution testing. The various media were compared with regard to ease of preparation, robustness and reproducibility of composition. The dissolution of three formulations of a typical Biopharmaceutical Classification System Class II drug (BIXX) was compared in bicarbonate buffer, standard phosphate buffer, a biorelevant buffer (fasted-state simulating intestinal fluid, FaSSIF) and a modified FaSSIF prepared with bicarbonate buffer. The bicarbonate buffer used for dissolution testing was produced by supplying carbon dioxide to a saline solution (0.9% NaCl, to which 12 or 42 mmol NaOH had been added). The bicarbonate buffer had to be prepared in-situ, which proved to be time-consuming, and the pH stability of the bicarbonate buffer could only be maintained under constant CO2 supply. To minimize the mechanical stress caused by inflow and evaporation of gas, the carbon dioxide was supplied above the medium during the dissolution test. Despite taking these measures, use of bicarbonate buffer led to less reproducible dissolution results than the phosphate buffers commonly used to prepare compendial media and FaSSIF, with coefficient of variance values 1.5- to 5-times higher in bicarbonate buffer. It was concluded that although a bicarbonate buffer system would be physiologically relevant for the fasted state in the small intestine, its suitability for dissolution testing is restricted by lack of practicability and poor reproducibility of results.

  12. Organellar calcium buffers.

    PubMed

    Prins, Daniel; Michalak, Marek

    2011-03-01

    Ca(2+) is an important intracellular messenger affecting many diverse processes. In eukaryotic cells, Ca(2+) storage is achieved within specific intracellular organelles, especially the endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum, in which Ca(2+) is buffered by specific proteins known as Ca(2+) buffers. Ca(2+) buffers are a diverse group of proteins, varying in their affinities and capacities for Ca(2+), but they typically also carry out other functions within the cell. The wide range of organelles containing Ca(2+) and the evidence supporting cross-talk between these organelles suggest the existence of a dynamic network of organellar Ca(2+) signaling, mediated by a variety of organellar Ca(2+) buffers.

  13. Removal of sample background buffering ions and myoglobin enrichment via a pH junction created by discontinuous buffers in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Booker, Christina J; Sun, Samuel; Woolsey, Sarah; Mejia, Jose S; Yeung, Ken K-C

    2011-08-19

    Traditional CE sample stacking is ineffective for samples containing a high concentration of salt and/or buffer. We recently reported the use of a discontinuous buffer system for protein enrichment that was applicable to samples containing millimolar concentrations of salt. In this paper, the technique was investigated for samples containing unwanted buffering ions, including TRIS, MES, and phosphate, which are commonly used in biological sample preparation. Using myoglobin as a model protein, the results demonstrated that background buffering ions can be effectively removed or separated from the enriched protein. The key is to use either the acid or the base of the discontinuous buffers to adjust the pH of the sample, such that the net charge of the unwanted buffering ions is near-zero. The successful isolation and enrichment of myoglobin from up to 100 mM TRIS and 50 mM MES was demonstrated. The enrichment factors remained at approximately 200. Removal of phosphate was more challenging because its net charge was anionic in both the acid and the base of the discontinuous buffers. The enrichment was only achievable up to 30 mM of sodium phosphate, the enrichment factors observed were significantly lower, below 50, and the process was delayed due to the higher ionic strength resulted from phosphate. The migration of phosphate during enrichment was studied using a UV-absorbing analogue, phenyl phosphate. In addition, Simul 5.0 was used to simulate the discontinuous buffers in the absence and presence of TRIS and phosphate. The stimulated TRIS and phosphate concentration profiles were generally in agreement with the experimental results. The simulation also provided a better understanding on the effect of phosphate on the formation of the pH junction.

  14. Common data buffer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, F.

    1981-01-01

    Time-shared interface speeds data processing in distributed computer network. Two-level high-speed scanning approach routes information to buffer, portion of which is reserved for series of "first-in, first-out" memory stacks. Buffer address structure and memory are protected from noise or failed components by error correcting code. System is applicable to any computer or processing language.

  15. Physicochemical study of the acetonitrile insertion into polypyrrole films.

    PubMed

    Oliveira Costa, S D; Fernández Romero, A J; López Cascales, J J

    2010-04-14

    A study by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the acetonitrile diffusion into a polypyrrole film was carried out with atomic detail in a 0.1N lithium perchlorate solution. From the simulated trajectories, the acetonitrile behavior was estimated from bulk solution to the interior of the polypyrrole film, across the polypyrrole/solution interface, for a neutral (reduced) and charged (oxidized) state of the polymer. Among other properties, the translational diffusion coefficient and rotational relaxation time of the acetonitrile were calculated, where a diminution in the translational diffusion coefficient was measured in the interior of the polypyrrole matrix compared to bulk, independently of the oxidation state of the polymer, in contrast with the behavior of the rotational relaxation time that increases from bulk to the interior of the polymer for both oxidation states. In addition, the difference of free energy DeltaG associated to the acetonitrile penetration into the polymer was calculated. From the results, it was evidenced that the scarce affinity of acetonitrile to diffuse into the polymer in its reduced state is related with the positive uniform difference of free energy DeltaG approximately 20 kJ/mol, while in the oxidized state, an important free energy barrier of DeltaG approximately 10 kJ/mol has to pass trough for reaching stable sites inside the polymer with values of DeltaG up to -10 kJ/mol.

  16. Buffer Therapy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Maria de Lourdes C; Silva, Ariosto S.; Bailey, Kate M.; Kumar, Nagi B.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Gatenby, Robert A.; Ibrahim-Hashim, Arig; Gillies, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Oral administration of pH buffers can reduce the development of spontaneous and experimental metastases in mice, and has been proposed in clinical trials. Effectiveness of buffer therapy is likely to be affected by diet, which could contribute or interfere with the therapeutic alkalinizing effect. Little data on food pH buffering capacity was available. This study evaluated the pH and buffering capacity of different foods to guide prospective trials and test the effect of the same buffer (lysine) at two different ionization states. Food groups were derived from the Harvard Food Frequency Questionnaire. Foods were blended and pH titrated with acid from initial pH values until 4.0 to determine “buffering score”, in mmol H+/pH unit. A “buffering score” was derived as the mEq H+ consumed per serving size to lower from initial to a pH 4.0, the postprandial pH of the distal duodenum. To differentiate buffering effect from any metabolic byproduct effects, we compared the effects of oral lysine buffers prepared at either pH 10.0 or 8.4, which contain 2 and 1 free base amines, respectively. The effect of these on experimental metastases formation in mice following tail vein injection of PC-3M prostate cancer cells were monitored with in vivo bioluminescence. Carbohydrates and dairy products’ buffering score varied between 0.5 and 19. Fruits and vegetables showed a low to zero buffering score. The score of meats varied between 6 and 22. Wine and juices had negative scores. Among supplements, sodium bicarbonate and Tums® had the highest buffering capacities, with scores of 11 and 20 per serving size, respectively. The “de-buffered” lysine had a less pronounced effect of prevention of metastases compared to lysine at pH 10. This study has demonstrated the anti-cancer effects of buffer therapy and suggests foods that can contribute to or compete with this approach to manage cancer. PMID:24371544

  17. Tetrapyrazineplatinum(II) bis(tetrafluoroborate) acetonitrile hemisolvate

    SciTech Connect

    Derry, Paul J.; Wang, Xiaoping; Smucker, Bradley W.

    2008-01-01

    The improved synthesis and characterization of tetrapyrazineplatinum(II) bis(tetrafluoroborate) acetonitrile hemisolvate, [Pt(C4H4N2)4](BF4)2 0.5CH3CN, is reported. The unit cell contains a half equivalent of an acetonitrile solvent molecule per tetrapyrazineplatinum(II) ion. The coordination geometry of the PtII ion is almost square-planar, with the Pt atom residing on an inversion center. The BF4- counter-anion, located at a general position, has an idealized tetrahedral geometry and an acetonitrile solvent molecule, the methyl group of which is disordered over two equal positions, sits on a twofold rotation axis.

  18. Aluminum elution and precipitation in glass vials: effect of pH and buffer species.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Toru; Miyajima, Makoto; Wakiyama, Naoki; Terada, Katsuhide

    2015-02-01

    Inorganic extractables from glass vials may cause particle formation in the drug solution. In this study, the ability of eluting Al ion from borosilicate glass vials, and tendencies of precipitation containing Al were investigated using various pHs of phosphate, citrate, acetate and histidine buffer. Through heating, all of the buffers showed that Si and Al were eluted from glass vials in ratios almost the same as the composition of borosilicate glass, and the amounts of Al and Si from various buffer solutions at pH 7 were in the following order: citrate > phosphate > acetate > histidine. In addition, during storage after heating, the Al concentration at certain pHs of phosphate and acetate buffer solution decreased, suggesting the formation of particles containing Al. In citrate buffer, Al did not decrease in spite of the high elution amount. Considering that the solubility profile of aluminum oxide and the Al eluting profile of borosilicate glass were different, it is speculated that Al ion may be forced to leach into the buffer solution according to Si elution on the surface of glass vials. When Al ions were added to the buffer solutions, phosphate, acetate and histidine buffer showed a decrease of Al concentration during storage at a neutral range of pHs, indicating the formation of particles containing Al. In conclusion, it is suggested that phosphate buffer solution has higher possibility of forming particles containing Al than other buffer solutions.

  19. Stability-Indicating HPLC Method for Simultaneous Determination of Chloramphenicol, Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate and Tetrahydrozoline Hydrochloride in Ophthalmic Solution

    PubMed Central

    AlAani, Hashem; Alnukkary, Yasmin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A simple stability-indicating RP-HPLC assay method was developed and validated for quantitative determination of Chloramphenicol, Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate and Tetrahydrozoline Hydrochloride in ophthalmic solution in the presence of 2-amino-1-(4-nitrophenyl)propane-1,3-diol, a degradation product of Chloramphenicol, and Dexamethasone, a degradation product of Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate. Methods: Effective chromatographic separation was achieved using C18 column (250 mm, 4.6 mm i.d., 5 μm) with isocratic mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile - phosphate buffer (pH 4.0; 0.05 M) (30:70, v/v) at a flow rate of 1 mL/minute. The column temperature was maintained at 40°C and the detection wavelength was 230 nm. Results: The proposed HPLC procedure was statistically validated according to the ICH guideline, and was proved to be stability-indicating by resolution of the APIs from their forced degradation products. Conclusion: The developed method is suitable for the routine analysis as well as stability studies. PMID:27123429

  20. Water versus acetonitrile coordination to uranyl. Effect of chloride ligands.

    PubMed

    Bühl, Michael; Sieffert, Nicolas; Chaumont, Alain; Wipff, Georges

    2012-02-06

    Optimizations at the BLYP and B3LYP levels are reported for the mixed uranyl chloro/water/acetonitrile complexes [UO(2)Cl(n)(H(2)O)(x)(MeCN)(5-n-x)](2-n) (n = 1-3) and [UO(2)Cl(n)(H(2)O)(x)(MeCN)(4-n-x)](2-n) (n = 2-4), in both the gas phase and a polarizable continuum modeling acetonitrile. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations have been performed for [UO(2)Cl(2)(H(2)O)(MeCN)(2)] in the gas phase and in a periodic box of liquid acetonitrile. According to population analyses and dipole moments evaluated from maximally localized Wannier function centers, uranium is less Lewis acidic in the neutral UO(2)Cl(2) than in the UO(2)(2+) moiety. In the gas phase the latter binds acetonitrile ligands more strongly than water, whereas in acetonitrile solution, the trend is reversed due to cooperative polarization effects. In the polarizable continuum the chloro complexes have a slight energetic preference for water over acetonitrile ligands, but several mixed complexes are so close in free energy ΔG that they should exist in equilibrium, in accord with previous interpretations of EXAFS data in solution. The binding strengths of the fifth neutral ligands decrease with increasing chloride content, to the extent that the trichlorides should be formulated as four-coordinate [UO(2)Cl(3)L](-) (L = H(2)O, MeCN). Limitations to their accuracy notwithstanding, density functional calculations can offer insights into the speciation of a complex uranyl system in solution, a key feature in the context of nuclear waste partitioning by complexant molecules.

  1. Laser synthesis and spectroscopy of acetonitrile/silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akin, S. T.; Liu, X.; Duncan, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    Silver nanoparticles with acetonitrile ligands are produced in a laser ablation flow reactor. Excimer laser ablation produces gas phase metal clusters which are thermalized with helium or argon collisions in the flowtube, and reactions with acetonitrile vapor coordinate this ligand to the particle surface. The gaseous mixture is captured in a cryogenic trap; warming produces a solution of excess ligand and coated particles. TEM images reveal particle sizes of 10-30 nm diameter. UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectra are compared to those of standard silver nanoparticles with surfactant coatings. Deep-UV ligand absorption is strongly enhanced by nanoparticle adsorption.

  2. MESOPOROUS IRON PHOSPHATE AS AN ACTIVE, SELECTIVE AND RECYCLABLE CATALYST FOR THE SYNTHESIS OF NOPOL BY PRINS CONDENSATION

    EPA Science Inventory


    Mesoporous iron phosphate is found to be a highly active and recyclable heterogeneous catalyst for the selective synthesis of nopol by Prins condensation of ?-pinene and paraformaldehyde in acetonitrile at 80 oC.



  3. Buffer Effects in the Solubility, Nucleation and Growth of Chicken Egg White Lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Ursula J.

    1999-01-01

    The growth of protein crystals is important for determination of their three-dimensional structure, which relates to their biochemical functions and to the practical goal of designing pharmaceuticals to modify that function. While many proteins have been successfully crystallized by a variety of methods, there is still limited understanding of the process of nucleation and growth of even the simplest proteins. Chicken egg-white lysozyme (CEWL) is readily crystallized under a variety of conditions, and studies underway at MSFC are designed to elucidate the mechanisms by which the crystals nucleate and grow. We have investigated the effect of buffer choice on the solubility, nucleation and growth of CEWL. CEWL was purified by dialysis against a .05M phosphate buffer and chromatographic separation from contaminants in a sepharose column. Solubility studies were made as a function of buffer concentration for phosphate and formate buffers, and the nucleation and growth of crystals at 10 C was studied as a function of pH for oxalate, succinate, formate, butyrate, carbonate, phosphate and acetate buffer solutions. The solubility data support the conclusion that there is a solubility minimum as a function of buffer concentration for amphiphilic molecules, while no minimum is observed for a phosphate buffer. Nucleation is suppressed at pH greater than pKa for all buffers except phosphate. The aspect ratio of the (110) faces is shown to be a function of crystal size, rather than pH.

  4. Study of the cerium(IV)-picrate system in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Kratochvil, B; Tipler, M; McKay, B

    1966-07-01

    A potentiometric and spectrophotometric study has been made of the reaction between hexanitratocerate and picrate in dry acetonitrile. Several cerium(IV)-picrate complexes are formed; the formation constant for the first is estimated to be 4 from spectrophotometric measurements. The catalytic effect of picrate on hydroquinone oxidation by nitratocerate is postulated to be due to more rapid electron transfer by cerium picrate complexes.

  5. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence of tris(2-phenylpyridine)iridium(III) in water, acetonitrile and trifluorethanol.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Wesley D; Richter, Mark M

    2015-02-01

    The spectroscopic, electrochemical and coreactant electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) properties of Ir(ppy)3 (where ppy = 2-phenylpyridine) have been obtained in aqueous buffered (KH2PO4), 50 : 50 (v/v) acetonitrile-aqueous buffered (MeCN-KH2PO4) and 30% trifluoroethanol (TFE) solutions. Tri-n-propylamine was used as the oxidative-reductive ECL coreactant. The photoluminescence (PL) efficiency (ϕem) of Ir(ppy)3 in TFE (ϕem ≈ 0.029) was slightly higher than in 50 : 50 MeCN-KH2PO4 (ϕem ≈ 0.0021) and water (ϕem ≈ 0.00016) compared to a Ru(bpy)32+ standard solution in water (Φem ≈ 0.042). PL and ECL emission spectra were nearly identical in all three solvents, with dual emission maxima at 510 and 530 nm. The similarity between the ECL and PL spectra indicate that the same excited state is probably formed in both experiments. ECL efficiencies (ϕecl) in 30% TFE solution (ϕecl = 0.0098) were higher than aqueous solution (ϕecl = 0.00092) system yet lower than a 50% MeCN-KH2PO4 solution (ϕecl = 0.0091).

  6. Validation of dilution of plasma samples with phosphate buffered saline to eliminate the problem of small volumes associated with children infected with HIV-1 for viral load testing using Cobas AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 test, version 2.0 (CAP CTM HIV v2.0).

    PubMed

    Mine, Madisa; Nkoane, Tapologo; Sebetso, Gaseene; Sakyi, Bright; Makhaola, Kgomotso; Gaolathe, Tendani

    2013-12-01

    The sample requirement of 1 mL for the Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 test, version 2.0 (CAP CTM HIV v2.0) limits its utility in measuring plasma HIV-1 RNA levels for small volume samples from children infected with HIV-1. Viral load monitoring is the standard of care for HIV-1-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy in Botswana. The study aimed to validate the dilution of small volume samples with phosphate buffered saline (1× PBS) when quantifying HIV-1 RNA in patient plasma. HIV RNA concentrations were determined in undiluted and diluted pairs of samples comprising panels of quality assessment standards (n=52) as well as patient samples (n=325). There was strong correlation (R(2)) of 0.98 and 0.95 within the dynamic range of the CAP CTM HIV v2.0 test between undiluted and diluted samples from quality assessment standards and patients, respectively. The difference between viral load measurements of diluted and undiluted pairs of quality assessment standards and patient samples using the Altman-Bland test showed that the 95% limits of agreement were between -0.40 Log 10 and 0.49 Log 10. This difference was within the 0.5 Log 10 which is generally considered as normal assay variation of plasma RNA levels. Dilution of samples with 1× PBS produced comparable viral load measurements to undiluted samples.

  7. The buffer effect in neutral electrolyte supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vindt, Steffen T.; Skou, Eivind M.

    2016-02-01

    The observation that double-layer capacitors based on neutral aqueous electrolytes can have significantly wider usable potential windows than those based on acidic or alkaline electrolytes is studied. This effect is explained by a local pH change taking place at the electrode surfaces, leading to a change in the redox potential of water in opposite directions on the two electrodes, resulting in the wider stability window. The magnitude of this effect is suggested to be dependent on the buffer capacity, rather than the intrinsic pH value of the electrolyte. This is confirmed by studying the impact of addition of a buffer to such systems. It is shown that a 56 % higher dynamic storage capacity may be achieved, simply by controlling the buffer capacity of the electrolyte. The model system used, is based on a well-known commercial activated carbon (NORIT™ A SUPRA) as the electrode material, aqueous potassium nitrate as the electrolyte and potassium phosphates as the buffer system.

  8. Variation of power generation at different buffer types and conductivities in single chamber microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Nam, Joo-Youn; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Lim, Kyeong-Ho; Shin, Hang-Sik; Logan, Bruce E

    2010-01-15

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are operated with solutions containing various chemical species required for the growth of electrochemically active microorganisms including nutrients and vitamins, substrates, and chemical buffers. Many different buffers are used in laboratory media, but the effects of these buffers and their inherent electrolyte conductivities have not been examined relative to current generation in MFCs. We investigated the effect of several common buffers (phosphate, MES, HEPES, and PIPES) on power production in single chambered MFCs compared to a non-buffered control. At the same concentrations the buffers produced different solution conductivities which resulted in different ohmic resistances and power densities. Increasing the solution conductivities to the same values using NaCl produced comparable power densities for all buffers. Very large increases in conductivity resulted in a rapid voltage drop at high current densities. Our results suggest that solution conductivity at a specific pH for each buffer is more important in MFC studies than the buffer itself given relatively constant pH conditions. Based on our analysis of internal resistance and a set neutral pH, phosphate and PIPES are the most useful buffers of those examined here because pH was maintained close to the pK(a) of the buffer, maximizing the ability of the buffer to contribute to increase current generation at high power densities.

  9. Coulometric determination of americium in acetonitrile solution of phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Perevalov, S.A.; Kulyakov, Yu.M.; Lebedev, I.A.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1986-10-20

    A procedure was developed for the coulometric determination of americium using the electrochemical couple Am(IV)-Am(III). An acetonitrile solution of 0.3-0.2 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ was used as the electrolyte. Americium can be determined in the presence of large amounts of Cm, Pu, Ce, and other impurities; limit of detection approx. 10 ..mu..g.

  10. Phosphate salts

    MedlinePlus

    ... sodium if you have heart disease. Fluid retention (edema): Avoid using phosphate salts that contain sodium if ... heart failure, or other conditions that can cause edema. High levels of calcium in the blood (hypercalcemia): ...

  11. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of clindamycin in human plasma or serum: application to the bioequivalency study of clindamycin phosphate injections.

    PubMed

    Liu, C M; Chen, Y K; Yang, T H; Hsieh, S Y; Hung, M H; Lin, E T

    1997-08-29

    This paper presents an assay of clindamycin phosphate injection in human plasma or serum. A 0.5-ml volume of plasma was used with the internal standard, propranolol. The sample was loaded onto a silica extraction column. The column was washed with deionized water and then eluted with methanol. The eluates were evaporated under nitrogen gas. The residue was reconstituted with the mobile phase and injected onto the high-performance liquid chromatographic system: a 5-micron, 25 cm X 4.6 mm I.D. ODS2 column was used with acetonitrile, tetrahydrofuran and 0.05 M phosphate buffer as the mobile phase and with ultraviolet detection at 204 nm. A limit of quantitation of 0.05 microgram/ml was found, with a coefficient of variation of 11.6% (n = 6). The linear range is between 0.05 and 20.00 micrograms/ml and gives a coefficient of determination (r2) or 0.9992. The method has been successfully applied to the bioavailability study of two commercial preparations of clindamycin phosphate injection (300 mg each) in twelve healthy adult male volunteers.

  12. Antioxidant and antibacterial activities of acetonitrile and hexane extracts of Lentinus tigrinus and Pleurotus djamour

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper highlighted the antioxidant and antibacterial activities of Lentinus tigrinus and Pleurotus djamour. Extracts of mushroom fruiting bodies were obtained using hexane and acetonitrile solvents. Acetonitrile extracts of both mushrooms exhibited higher biological activities than hexane extrac...

  13. Photophysics of Diphenylbutadiynes in Water, Acetonitrile-Water, and Acetonitrile Solvent Systems: Application to Single Component White Light Emission.

    PubMed

    Pati, Avik Kumar; Jana, Rounak; Gharpure, Santosh J; Mishra, Ashok K

    2016-07-28

    Diacetylenes have been the subject of current research because of their interesting optoelectronic properties. Herein, we report that substituted diphenylbutadiynes exhibit locally excited (LE) and excimer emissions in water and multiple emissions from the LE, excimer, and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) states in acetonitrile-water solvent systems. The LE, excimer, and ICT emissions are clearly distinguishable for a diphenylbutadiynyl derivative with push (-NMe2)-pull (-CN) substituents and those are closely overlapped for non-push-pull analogues. In neat acetonitrile, the excimer emission disappears and the LE and ICT emissions predominate. In the case of the push (-NMe2)-pull (-CN) diphenylbutadiyne, the intensity of the ICT emission increases with increasing the fluorophore concentration. This suggests that the ICT emission accompanies with intermolecular CT emission which is of exciplex type. As the LE and exciplex emissions of the push-pull diphenylbutadiyne together cover the visible region (400-700 nm) in acetonitrile, a control of the fluorophore concentration makes the relative intensities of the LE and exciplex emissions such that pure white light emission is achieved. The white light emission is not observed in those diphenylbutadiynyl analogues in which the peripheral substituents of the phenyl rings do not possess strong push-pull character.

  14. Optimization and validation of a rapid method to determine citrate and inorganic phosphate in milk by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Izco, J M; Tormo, M; Harris, A; Tong, P S; Jimenez-Flores, R

    2003-01-01

    Quantification of phosphate and citrate compounds is very important because their distribution between soluble and colloidal phases of milk and their interactions with milk proteins influence the stability and some functional properties of dairy products. The aim of this work was to optimize and validate a capillary electrophoresis method for the rapid determination of these compounds in milk. Various parameters affecting analysis have been optimized, including type, composition, and pH of the electrolyte, and sample extraction. Ethanol, acetonitrile, sulfuric acid, water at 50 degrees C or at room temperature were tested as sample buffers (SB). Water at room temperature yielded the best overall results and was chosen for further validation. The extraction time was checked and could be shortened to less than 1 min. Also, sample preparation was simplified to pipet 12 microl of milk into 1 ml of water containing 20 ppm of tartaric acid as an internal standard. The linearity of the method was excellent (R2 > 0.999) with CV values of response factors <3%. The detection limits for phosphate and citrate were 5.1 and 2.4 nM, respectively. The accuracy of the method was calculated for each compound (103.2 and 100.3%). In addition, citrate and phosphate content of several commercial milk samples were analyzed by this method, and the results deviated less than 5% from values obtained when analyzing the samples by official methods. To study the versatility of the technique, other dairy productssuch as cream cheese, yogurt, or Cheddar cheese were analyzed and accuracy was similar to milk in all products tested. The procedure is rapid and offers a very fast and simple sample preparation. Once the sample has arrived at the laboratory, less than 5 min (including handling, preparation, running, integration, and quantification) are necessary to determine the concentration of citric acid and inorganic phosphate. Because of the speed and accuracy of this method, it is promising as an

  15. Photorelease of phosphates: Mild methods for protecting phosphate derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Senadheera, Sanjeewa N; Yousef, Abraham L

    2014-01-01

    Summary We have developed a new photoremovable protecting group for caging phosphates in the near UV. Diethyl 2-(4-hydroxy-1-naphthyl)-2-oxoethyl phosphate (14a) quantitatively releases diethyl phosphate upon irradiation in aq MeOH or aq MeCN at 350 nm, with quantum efficiencies ranging from 0.021 to 0.067 depending on the solvent composition. The deprotection reactions originate from the triplet excited state, are robust under ambient conditions and can be carried on to 100% conversion. Similar results were found with diethyl 2-(4-methoxy-1-naphthyl)-2-oxoethyl phosphate (14b), although it was significantly less efficient compared with 14a. A key step in the deprotection reaction in aq MeOH is considered to be a Favorskii rearrangement of the naphthyl ketone motif of 14a,b to naphthylacetate esters 25 and 26. Disruption of the ketone-naphthyl ring conjugation significantly shifts the photoproduct absorption away from the effective incident wavelength for decaging of 14, driving the reaction to completion. The Favorskii rearrangement does not occur in aqueous acetonitrile although diethyl phosphate is released. Other substitution patterns on the naphthyl or quinolin-5-yl core, such as the 2,6-naphthyl 10 or 8-benzyloxyquinolin-5-yl 24 platforms, also do not rearrange by aryl migration upon photolysis and, therefore, do not proceed to completion. The 2,6-naphthyl ketone platform instead remains intact whereas the quinolin-5-yl ketone fragments to a much more complex, highly absorbing reaction mixture that competes for the incident light. PMID:25246963

  16. Liquid growth hormone: preservatives and buffers.

    PubMed

    Kappelgaard, Anne-Marie; Bojesen, Anders; Skydsgaard, Karsten; Sjögren, Ingrid; Laursen, Torben

    2004-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) treatment is a successful medical therapy for children and adults with GH deficiency as well as for growth retardation due to chronic renal disease, Turner syndrome and in children born small for gestational age. For all of these conditions, treatment is long term and patients receive daily subcutaneous injections of GH for many years. Patient compliance is therefore of critical importance to ensure treatment benefit. One of the major factors influencing compliance is injection pain. Besides the injection device used, pain perception and local tissue reaction following injection are dependent on the preservative used in the formulation and the concentration of GH. Injection pain may also be related to the buffer substance and injection volume. A liquid formulation of GH, Norditropi SimpleXx, has been developed that dispenses with the need for reconstitution before administration. The formulation uses phenol (3 mg/ml) as a preservative (to protect product from microbial degradation or contamination) and histidine as a buffer. Alternative preservatives used in other GH formulations include m-cresol (9 mg/ml) and benzyl alcohol (3-9 mg/ml). Buffering agents include citrate and phosphate. Phenol has been successfully used as a preservative in drug formulations for more than 50 years and is considered a safe and effective agent which complies with strict international requirements for preservatives in drug formulations. In toxicological studies, no or only mild local reactions have been observed following subcutaneous administration of phenol (7.5 mg/ml), m-cresol (3-4 mg/ml) and benzyl alcohol (9 mg/ml). No general toxicity reactions were observed after subcutaneous administration of these agents. Clinical evaluation of the preservatives and buffers used in Norditropin SimpleXx showed that pain perception was similar between formulations containing phenol and benzyl alcohol, whereas m-cresol was associated with more painful injections than benzyl

  17. Cooperativity and cluster growth patterns in acetonitrile: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Remya, Karunakaran; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H

    2014-05-05

    Cooperativity in intermolecular interactions and cluster growth patterns of acetonitrile has been studied using M06L density functional theory. Cyclic, ladder-type, stacked, cross-stacked, and mixed patterns are studied. Total interaction energy (E(int)) and interaction energy per monomer (E(m)) show maximum stability and cooperativity in stacked clusters followed by cross-stacked ones. As cluster size increased, magnitude of E(m) showed significant increase. Compared to E(m) of dimer (-2.97 kcal/mol), the increase is 2.6-fold for 27mer. Higher stabilization in larger clusters is attributed to strong cooperativity in intermolecular C-H···N and dipolar interactions. Enhanced cooperativity in stacked structures is supported by atoms-in-molecule electron density (ρ) data. Sum of ρ at intermolecular bond critical points is the highest for stacked clusters. Further, area of negative-valued molecular electrostatic potential is linearly related with E(int) and showed the lowest value in stacked followed by cross-stacked clusters, indicating maximum utilization of lone pair density and maximum cooperativity in such growth patterns. A red shift in the average C-N stretching frequencies with increase in the number of monomers and its direct correlation with E(int) in stacked clusters also supported their stability. Further, two known crystal patterns of acetonitrile (α and β) with 16 monomers are optimized and compared with the most stable hexadecamer pattern and are found to show lower values for E(int) and E(m) compared to the latter. Based on this result, we predict the existence of a third crystal pattern for acetonitrile which will be more ordered and more stable than α and β forms.

  18. Tris(acetonitrile)chloropalladium tetrafluoroborate synthesis, application and structural analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybała, Izabela; Demchuk, Oleg M.

    2016-10-01

    Results of the single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of tris(acetonitrile)chloropalladium tetrafluoroborate [PdCl(CH3CN)3]BF4 are presented in details. It was found that the title compound crystallises in the monoclinic system, in the space group C2/c. The role of charge-assisted C-HṡṡṡF-B interactions in crystal architecture was investigated. Due to its untypical properties the prepared [PdCl(CH3CN)3]BF4 has proved to be an excellent palladium source in the synthesis of phosphine-palladium complexes.

  19. Improved ultrastructure of marine invertebrates using non-toxic buffers.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Jacqueline; Gruber, Daniela; Leisch, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    Many marine biology studies depend on field work on ships or remote sampling locations where sophisticated sample preservation techniques (e.g., high-pressure freezing) are often limited or unavailable. Our aim was to optimize the ultrastructural preservation of marine invertebrates, especially when working in the field. To achieve chemically-fixed material of the highest quality, we compared the resulting ultrastructure of gill tissue of the mussel Mytilus edulis when fixed with differently buffered EM fixatives for marine specimens (seawater, cacodylate and phosphate buffer) and a new fixative formulation with the non-toxic PHEM buffer (PIPES, HEPES, EGTA and MgCl2). All buffers were adapted for immersion fixation to form an isotonic fixative in combination with 2.5% glutaraldehyde. We showed that PHEM buffer based fixatives resulted in equal or better ultrastructure preservation when directly compared to routine standard fixatives. These results were also reproducible when extending the PHEM buffered fixative to the fixation of additional different marine invertebrate species, which also displayed excellent ultrastructural detail. We highly recommend the usage of PHEM-buffered fixation for the fixation of marine invertebrates.

  20. Improved ultrastructure of marine invertebrates using non-toxic buffers

    PubMed Central

    Montanaro, Jacqueline; Gruber, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Many marine biology studies depend on field work on ships or remote sampling locations where sophisticated sample preservation techniques (e.g., high-pressure freezing) are often limited or unavailable. Our aim was to optimize the ultrastructural preservation of marine invertebrates, especially when working in the field. To achieve chemically-fixed material of the highest quality, we compared the resulting ultrastructure of gill tissue of the mussel Mytilus edulis when fixed with differently buffered EM fixatives for marine specimens (seawater, cacodylate and phosphate buffer) and a new fixative formulation with the non-toxic PHEM buffer (PIPES, HEPES, EGTA and MgCl2). All buffers were adapted for immersion fixation to form an isotonic fixative in combination with 2.5% glutaraldehyde. We showed that PHEM buffer based fixatives resulted in equal or better ultrastructure preservation when directly compared to routine standard fixatives. These results were also reproducible when extending the PHEM buffered fixative to the fixation of additional different marine invertebrate species, which also displayed excellent ultrastructural detail. We highly recommend the usage of PHEM-buffered fixation for the fixation of marine invertebrates. PMID:27069800

  1. Breath testing and personal exposure--SIFT-MS detection of breath acetonitrile for exposure monitoring.

    PubMed

    Storer, Malina; Curry, Kirsty; Squire, Marie; Kingham, Simon; Epton, Michael

    2015-05-26

    Breath testing has potential for the rapid assessment of the source and impact of exposure to air pollutants. During the development of a breath test for acetonitrile using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) raised acetonitrile concentrations in the breath of volunteers were observed that could not be explained by known sources of exposure. Workplace/laboratory exposure to acetonitrile was proposed since this was common to the volunteers with increased breath concentrations. SIFT-MS measurements of acetonitrile in breath and air were used to confirm that an academic chemistry laboratory was the source of exposure to acetonitrile, and quantify the changes that occurred to exhaled acetonitrile after exposure. High concentrations of acetonitrile were detected in the air of the chemistry laboratory. However, concentrations in the offices were not significantly different across the campus. There was a significant difference in the exhaled acetonitrile concentrations of people who worked in the chemistry laboratories (exposed) and those who did not (non-exposed). SIFT-MS testing of air and breath made it possible to determine that occupational exposure to acetonitrile in the chemistry laboratory was the cause of increased exhaled acetonitrile. Additionally, the sensitivity was adequate to measure the changes to exhaled amounts and found that breath concentrations increased quickly with short exposure and remained increased even after periods of non-exposure. There is potential to add acetonitrile to a suite of VOCs to investigate source and impact of poor air quality.

  2. Electrodialytic membrane suppressors for ion chromatography make programmable buffer generators.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongjing; Srinivasan, Kannan; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2012-01-03

    The use of buffer solutions is immensely important in a great variety of disciplines. The generation of continuous pH gradients in flow systems plays an important role in the chromatographic separation of proteins, high-throughput pK(a) determinations, etc. We demonstrate here that electrodialytic membrane suppressors used in ion chromatography can be used to generate buffers. The generated pH, computed from first principles, agrees well with measured values. We demonstrate the generation of phosphate and citrate buffers using a cation-exchange membrane (CEM) -based anion suppressor and Tris and ethylenediamine buffers using an anion-exchange membrane (AEM) -based cation suppressor. Using a mixture of phosphate, citrate, and borate as the buffering ions and using a CEM suppressor, we demonstrate the generation of a highly reproducible (avg RSD 0.20%, n = 3), temporally linear (pH 3.0-11.9, r(2) > 0.9996), electrically controlled pH gradient. With butylamine and a large concentration (0.5 M) of added NaCl, we demonstrate a similar linear pH gradient of large range with a near-constant ionic strength. We believe that this approach will be of value for the generation of eluents in the separation of proteins and other biomolecules and in online process titrations.

  3. Valuation of forested buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basnyat, Prakash

    The research concentrated on two fronts: (1) defining relationships between land use complex and nitrate and sediment concentrations; and (2) developing a method for assessing the extent of potential and water quality improvements available through land management options and their associated costs. In this work, selected basins of the Fish River (Alabama) were delineated, land use/land cover types were classified, and "contributing zones" were delineated using Geographic Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) analytical tools. Water samples collected from these basins were analyzed for their nutrient contents. Based on measured nitrate and sediment concentrations in basin streams, a linkage model was developed. This linkage model relates land use/land cover with the pollution levels in the stream. The linkage model was evaluated at three different scales: (1) the basin scale; (2) the contributing zone scale; and (3) the stream buffer/riparian zone scale. The contributing zone linkage model suggests that forests act as a sink or transformation zone. Residential/urban/built-up areas were identified as the strongest contributors of nitrate in the contributing zones model and active agriculture was identified as the second largest contributor. Regression results for the "land use/land cover diversity" model (stream buffer/riparian zone scale) suggest that areas that are close (adjacent) to the stream and any disturbances in these areas will have major impacts on stream water quality. The economic model suggests the value of retiring lands from agricultural land uses to forested buffers varies from 0 to 3067 per hectare, depending on the types of crops currently grown. Along with conversion costs, this land value forms the basis for estimates of the costs of land management options for improving (or maintaining) water quality throughout the study area. The model also shows the importance of stream-side management zones, which are key to maintenance of stream

  4. Identification of Furosemide Photodegradation Products in Water-Acetonitrile Mixture.

    PubMed

    Katsura, Shinji; Yamada, Nobuo; Nakashima, Atsushi; Shiraishi, Sumihiro; Furuishi, Takayuki; Ueda, Haruhisa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the chemical structure of the photodegradation products of furosemide in a water-acetonitrile mixture (1 : 1). Furosemide solution was irradiated with a D65 fluorescent lamp and the products were isolated by preparative HPLC. The fractions were evaporated to dryness in vacuo. The purity of the photodegradation products was measured by HPLC. The purity of products 1, 3, and 4 was greater than 90%, whereas that of product 2 was 13%, therefore, photodegradation product 2 was unstable. We identified photodegradation products 1 and 3 as 4-chloro-5-sulfamoylanthranilic acid and 4-hydroxy-N-furfuryl-5-sulfamoylanthranilic acid, respectively, by LC/MS and NMR. Additionally, we assumed that photodegradation product 4 was methyl 2-((furan-2-ylmethyl)amino)-4-hydroxy-3-(methyleneamino)-5-sulfamoylbenzoate by LC/MS and NMR. This showed that furosemide underwent hydrolysis and substitution, and reacted with the acetonitrile under the light of a D65 fluorescent lamp. We were furthermore able to determine the elution times of the photodegradation products of furosemide by applying the Japanese Pharmacopoeia chromatographic method for related substances to the isolated products.

  5. Buffer Capacity: An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Steven O.; Hanania, George I. H.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a quantitative experiment designed to demonstrate buffer action and the measurement of buffer capacity. Discusses how to make acetate buffers, determine their buffer capacity, plot the capacity/pH curve, and interpret the data obtained. (TW)

  6. Capacitance of edge plane of pyrolytic graphite in acetonitrile solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Minick, S.K.; Ishida, Takanobu.

    1991-05-01

    The capacitance of the edge plane of pyrolytic graphite electrodes, in acetonitrile solutions, is measured by recording the current response to an applied triangular voltage sweep; TVS, and then fitting the current response with an appropriate function, (via a set of adjustable parameters). The pretreatment of the electrodes, the supporting electrolyte concentration used, and the frequency of the input TVS, were all found to affect the measured capacitance. In these experiments, a background current was also seen and the shape of the current output for the TVS; the charging/discharging curve, is shown to correlate with the magnitude of this background current. In addition, the size of the background current was found to have some dependence on the type of electrode pretreatment procedure used. 60 refs., 49 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Photodegradation of Oryzalin in aqueous isopropanol and acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Sukhendu Kumar; Joarder, Soumen; Das, Saktipada; Roy, Sankhajit; Bhattacharyya, Anjan

    2016-01-01

    The phototransformation of Oryzalin was studied under UV light (λmax ≥ 290 nm) and sunlight (λmax ≥ 250 nm) in aqueous isopropanol and acetonitrile solution in absence and presence of TiO2 as sensitizer. The rate of photodegradation of Oryzalin in different solvent system followed first-order kinetics, and calculated half-lives were found to be in the range of 23.52-53.75 h for UV light and 41.23-61.43 h for sunlight. From this study, total 12 photoproducts were identified and characterized on the basis of column chromatography and Q-Tof micromass spectral data. The plausible mechanism of phototransformation involved was hydrolysis, breaking of sulfonic bond, and loss of amino and sulfonic acid group.

  8. Coulometric titration of bases in acetic acid and acetonitrile media.

    PubMed

    Vajgand, V J; Mihajlović, R

    1969-09-01

    The working conditions and the results for coulometric titration of milligram amounts of some bases in 0.1M sodium perchlorate in a mixture of acetic acid and acetic anhydride (1:6), are given. Determinations were made both by coulometric back-titration or direct titration at the platinum anode. Back-titration was done in the catholyte, by coulometric titration of the excess of added perchloric acid. The titration end-point was detected photometrically with Crystal Violet as indicator. The direct titration of bases was done at the platinum anode, in the same electrolyte, to which hydroquinone was added as anode depolarizer and as the source of hydrogen ions, Malachite Green being used as indicator. Similarly, bases can be determined in acetonitrile if sodium perchlorate, hydroquinone and Malachite Green are added to the solvent. Errors are below 1 %, and the precision is satisfactory.

  9. Virtual Frame Buffer Interface Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Thomas L.

    1990-01-01

    Virtual Frame Buffer Interface program makes all frame buffers appear as generic frame buffer with specified set of characteristics, allowing programmers to write codes that run unmodified on all supported hardware. Converts generic commands to actual device commands. Consists of definition of capabilities and FORTRAN subroutines called by application programs. Developed in FORTRAN 77 for DEC VAX 11/780 or DEC VAX 11/750 computer under VMS 4.X.

  10. Binary Solvent Organization at Silica/Liquid Interfaces: Preferential Ordering in Acetonitrile-Methanol Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gobrogge, Eric A; Walker, Robert A

    2014-08-07

    Nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy experiments examined solvent organization at the silica/binary solvent interface where the binary solvent consisted of methanol and acetonitrile in varying mole fractions. Data were compared with surface vibrational spectra acquired from silica surfaces exposed to a vapor phase saturated with the same binary solvent mixtures. Changes in vibrational band intensities suggest that methanol ideally adsorbs to the silica/vapor interface but acetonitrile accumulates in excess relative to vapor-phase composition. At the silica/liquid interface, acetonitrile's signal increases until a solution phase mole fraction of ∼0.85. At higher acetonitrile concentrations, acetonitrile's signal decreases dramatically until only a weak signature persists with the neat solvent. This behavior is ascribed to dipole-paired acetonitrile forming a bilayer with the first sublayer associating with surface silanol groups and a second sublayer consisting of weakly associating, antiparallel partners. On the basis of recent simulations, we propose that the second sublayer accumulates in excess.

  11. cis-cis-trans-Bis(acetonitrile-κN)dichloridobis(triphenyl­phosphine-κP)ruthenium(II) acetonitrile disolvate

    PubMed Central

    Al-Far, Ahmad M.; Slaughter, LeGrande M.

    2008-01-01

    The title compound, [RuCl2(C2H3N)2(C18H15P)2]·2C2H3N, was obtained upon stirring an acetonitrile/ethanol solution of [RuCl2(PPh3)3]. In the crystal structure, each RuII ion is coordinated by two Cl [Ru—Cl = 2.4308 (7) and 2.4139 (7) Å], two N [Ru—N = 2.016 (2) and 2.003 (2) Å], and two P [Ru—P = 2.3688 (7) and 2.3887 (7) Å] atoms in a distorted octa­hedral geometry. Packing inter­actions include typical C—H⋯π contacts involving phenyl groups as well as weak hydrogen bonds between CH3CN methyl H atoms and Cl or solvent CH3CN N atoms. PMID:21200532

  12. Determination of pKa values of organic bases in aqueous acetonitrile solutions using capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Buckenmaier, Stephan M C; McCalley, David V; Euerby, Melvin R

    2003-07-04

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used for the determination of ionisation constants (pKa) of a variety of organic bases in aqueous acetonitrile solutions over the range 0-60% (v/v) acetonitrile. These bases are used as test compounds in HPLC column evaluation, thus knowledge of their pKa in hydro-organic solutions is useful. The base pKa decreased with acetonitrile concentration and significant shifts from the aqueous pKa (up to -0.8) were found using 60% acetonitrile. The CE application was confirmed to be very suitable for fast and accurate pKa measurement in aqueous organic solutions.

  13. Ring Buffered Network Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the research effort to demonstrate the integration of a data sharing technology, Ring Buffered Network Bus, in development by Dryden Flight Research Center, with an engine simulation application, the Java Gas Turbine Simulator, in development at the University of Toledo under a grant from the Glenn Research Center. The objective of this task was to examine the application of the RBNB technologies as a key component in the data sharing, health monitoring and system wide modeling elements of the NASA Aviation Safety Program (AVSP) [Golding, 1997]. System-wide monitoring and modeling of aircraft and air safety systems will require access to all data sources which are relative factors when monitoring or modeling the national airspace such as radar, weather, aircraft performance, engine performance, schedule and planning, airport configuration, flight operations, etc. The data sharing portion of the overall AVSP program is responsible for providing the hardware and software architecture to access and distribute data, including real-time flight operations data, among all of the AVSP elements. The integration of an engine code capable of numerically "flying" through recorded flight paths and weather data using a software tool that allows for distributed access of data to this engine code demonstrates initial steps toward building a system capable of monitoring and modeling the National Airspace.

  14. Oracle Log Buffer Queueing

    SciTech Connect

    Rivenes, A S

    2004-12-08

    The purpose of this document is to investigate Oracle database log buffer queuing and its affect on the ability to load data using a specialized data loading system. Experiments were carried out on a Linux system using an Oracle 9.2 database. Previous experiments on a Sun 4800 running Solaris had shown that 100,000 entities per minute was an achievable rate. The question was then asked, can we do this on Linux, and where are the bottlenecks? A secondary question was also lurking, how can the loading be further scaled to handle even higher throughput requirements? Testing was conducted using a Dell PowerEdge 6650 server with four CPUs and a Dell PowerVault 220s RAID array with 14 36GB drives and 128 MB of cache. Oracle Enterprise Edition 9.2.0.4 was used for the database and Red Hat Linux Advanced Server 2.1 was used for the operating system. This document will detail the maximum observed throughputs using the same test suite that was used for the Sun tests. A detailed description of the testing performed along with an analysis of bottlenecks encountered will be made. Issues related to Oracle and Linux will also be detailed and some recommendations based on the findings.

  15. Mechanisms of buffer therapy resistance.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Kate M; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Cornnell, Heather H; Ribeiro, Maria C; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Hashim, Arig Ibrahim; Gillies, Robert J

    2014-04-01

    Many studies have shown that the acidity of solid tumors contributes to local invasion and metastasis. Oral pH buffers can specifically neutralize the acidic pH of tumors and reduce the incidence of local invasion and metastatic formation in multiple murine models. However, this effect is not universal as we have previously observed that metastasis is not inhibited by buffers in some tumor models, regardless of buffer used. B16-F10 (murine melanoma), LL/2 (murine lung) and HCT116 (human colon) tumors are resistant to treatment with lysine buffer therapy, whereas metastasis is potently inhibited by lysine buffers in MDA-MB-231 (human breast) and PC3M (human prostate) tumors. In the current work, we confirmed that sensitive cells utilized a pH-dependent mechanism for successful metastasis supported by a highly glycolytic phenotype that acidifies the local tumor microenvironment resulting in morphological changes. In contrast, buffer-resistant cell lines exhibited a pH-independent metastatic mechanism involving constitutive secretion of matrix degrading proteases without elevated glycolysis. These results have identified two distinct mechanisms of experimental metastasis, one of which is pH-dependent (buffer therapy sensitive cells) and one which is pH-independent (buffer therapy resistant cells). Further characterization of these models has potential for therapeutic benefit.

  16. Interaction of acetonitrile with thin films of solid water

    SciTech Connect

    Bahr, S.; Kempter, V.

    2009-06-07

    Thin films of water were prepared on Ag at 124 K. Their properties were studied with metastable impact electron spectroscopy, reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy, and temperature programmed desorption. The interaction of acetonitrile (ACN) with these films was studied with the abovementioned techniques. From the absence of any infrared activity in the initial adsorption stage, it is concluded that ACN adsorbs linearly and that the C{identical_to}N axis is aligned parallel to the water surface (as also found on neat Ag). Initially, the interaction with water surface species involves their dangling OD groups. During the completion of the first adlayer the ACN-ACN lateral interaction becomes of importance as well, and the ACN molecules become tilted with respect to the water surface. ACN shows propensity to stay at the surface after surface adsorption even during annealing up to the onset of desorption. The present results for the ACN-water interaction are compared with available classical molecular dynamics calculations providing the orientation profile for ACN on water as well as the ACN bonding properties.

  17. Lithium solvation in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Semino, Rocío; Zaldívar, Gervasio; Calvo, Ernesto J.; Laria, Daniel

    2014-12-07

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results pertaining to the solvation of Li{sup +} in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile binary mixtures. The results are potentially relevant in the design of Li-air batteries that rely on aprotic mixtures as solvent media. To analyze effects derived from differences in ionic size and charge sign, the solvation of Li{sup +} is compared to the ones observed for infinitely diluted K{sup +} and Cl{sup −} species, in similar solutions. At all compositions, the cations are preferentially solvated by dimethyl sulfoxide. Contrasting, the first solvation shell of Cl{sup −} shows a gradual modification in its composition, which varies linearly with the global concentrations of the two solvents in the mixtures. Moreover, the energetics of the solvation, described in terms of the corresponding solute-solvent coupling, presents a clear non-ideal concentration dependence. Similar nonlinear trends were found for the stabilization of different ionic species in solution, compared to the ones exhibited by their electrically neutral counterparts. These tendencies account for the characteristics of the free energy associated to the stabilization of Li{sup +}Cl{sup −}, contact-ion-pairs in these solutions. Ionic transport is also analyzed. Dynamical results show concentration trends similar to those recently obtained from direct experimental measurements.

  18. Interaction of acetonitrile with thin films of solid water.

    PubMed

    Bahr, S; Kempter, V

    2009-06-07

    Thin films of water were prepared on Ag at 124 K. Their properties were studied with metastable impact electron spectroscopy, reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy, and temperature programmed desorption. The interaction of acetonitrile (ACN) with these films was studied with the abovementioned techniques. From the absence of any infrared activity in the initial adsorption stage, it is concluded that ACN adsorbs linearly and that the C identical withN axis is aligned parallel to the water surface (as also found on neat Ag). Initially, the interaction with water surface species involves their dangling OD groups. During the completion of the first adlayer the ACN-ACN lateral interaction becomes of importance as well, and the ACN molecules become tilted with respect to the water surface. ACN shows propensity to stay at the surface after surface adsorption even during annealing up to the onset of desorption. The present results for the ACN-water interaction are compared with available classical molecular dynamics calculations providing the orientation profile for ACN on water as well as the ACN bonding properties.

  19. Interaction of acetonitrile with thin films of solid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, S.; Kempter, V.

    2009-06-01

    Thin films of water were prepared on Ag at 124 K. Their properties were studied with metastable impact electron spectroscopy, reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy, and temperature programmed desorption. The interaction of acetonitrile (ACN) with these films was studied with the abovementioned techniques. From the absence of any infrared activity in the initial adsorption stage, it is concluded that ACN adsorbs linearly and that the C≡N axis is aligned parallel to the water surface (as also found on neat Ag). Initially, the interaction with water surface species involves their dangling OD groups. During the completion of the first adlayer the ACN-ACN lateral interaction becomes of importance as well, and the ACN molecules become tilted with respect to the water surface. ACN shows propensity to stay at the surface after surface adsorption even during annealing up to the onset of desorption. The present results for the ACN-water interaction are compared with available classical molecular dynamics calculations providing the orientation profile for ACN on water as well as the ACN bonding properties.

  20. New zwitterionic butanesulfonic acids that extend the alkaline range of four families of Good buffers: evaluation for use in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Thiel, T; Liczkowski, L; Bissen, S T

    1998-11-18

    Four new zwitterionic butanesulfonic acid buffers that are structurally related to four families of Good buffers were evaluated for use in biological systems. These buffers, with pKa values from 7.6 to 10.7, were compared with a variety of other buffers from the same family and with unrelated buffers to determine their effect on enzyme activity and on microbial growth. The activity of four enzymes with optimum pH values in the alkaline range were tested: beta-galactosidase, esterase, phosphodiesterase and alkaline phosphatase. In general, all the Good buffers, including the new butanesulfonic acid buffers, gave good activity; however, there was variation in activity of certain enzymes with certain buffers. Tris, glycine, and phosphate buffers typically showed variation in activity compared to the family of Good buffers. beta-Galactosidase, in particular, showed greater activity with Good buffers than with phosphate or Tris buffers. Similarly, growth of seven bacterial strains was consistent, with a few exceptions, for all the Good family of buffers with Tris often inhibiting growth. Quantitation of alkaline phosphatase conjugated to antibodies is an important tool in many applications in molecular biology. Several Good buffers gave good signals when compared with Tris at pH 9.5 for detection of proteins using alkaline phosphatase-conjugated antibodies.

  1. 78 FR 14241 - Acetonitrile; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... Technical Review of Acetonitrile (Methyl Cyanide) (Ref. 2). The sections below summarize the human health...) (70 FR 37698). A. Metabolism Acetonitrile is metabolized to inorganic cyanide through the intermediate production of hydrogen cyanide. Data demonstrate that the metabolism to cyanide is oxygen- and...

  2. [Influence of buffer solutions on the performance of microbial fuel cell electricity generation].

    PubMed

    Qiang, Lin; Yuan, Lin-jiang; Ding, Qing

    2011-05-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a potential green technology due to its application in wastewater treatment and renewable energy generation. Phosphate buffer solution (PBS) has been commonly used in MFC studies to maintain a suitable pH for electricity generating bacteria and/or to increase the solution conductivity. However, it has some drawbacks using PBS in MFC: One is that the addition of a high concentration of phosphate buffer in MFCs is expensive, especially for the application in wastewater treatment; the other is that phosphates can contribute to the eutrophication conditions of water bodies if the effluents are discharged without the removal of phosphates. By adding PBS buffer as the comparison, the study investigated the effect of borax buffer and in the absence of buffer on the performance of electrical power, coulomb efficiency and effluent pH. 200 mmol/L PBS was the best, conductivity was 1.973 mS/cm,the maximum power density was 36.4 mW/m2 and the maximum coulomb efficiency was 2.92%, effluent pH was almost at (7.00 +/- 0.05). 100 mmol/L borax buffer solution, conductivity was 1.553 mS/cm; the maximum power density was 26.2 mW/m2 coulomb efficiency of 6.26%, which was 2.14 times to PBS and greatly increased the electron recovery efficiency with the effluent pH was (7.35 +/- 0.05). While free buffer solution conductivity was 0.314 mS/cm, maximum power density was 27.64 mW/m2; coulomb efficiency was 2.82% and the effluent pH of approximately 7.43. The electrolyte which in absence of buffer solution conductivity was 1/6 of adding PBS buffer, 1/5 of borax buffer, while its power density lower 8.76 mW/mr2 than adding PBS and higher 1.24 mW/m2 than borax buffer. The results showed that adding the suitable concentration of borax buffer may improve the electron recovery efficiency and under batch conditions, MFC run successfully without adding buffer solution to MFC.

  3. Determination of new Cu+, Cu2+, and Zn2+ Lennard-Jones ion parameters in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Torras, Juan; Alemán, Carlos

    2013-09-12

    We present new Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters for Cu(+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+) ion-acetonitrile interactions. The adjustment of ion parameters is made to reproduce simultaneously experimental solvation free energy and structural properties, namely ion-N distance and coordination numbers. Initially, the methodology has been validated deriving parameters for well-studied Na(+) and Cl(-) ions in acetonitrile being compared with experimental and theoretical data. The transferability of parameters is checked by the calculation of thermodynamic and structural properties with three different acetonitrile models. The results obtained for transition metal ions show an overall agreement with reference values. The solvation free energy calculated with new LJ trained parameters using a six-site acetonitrile model, and two older three- and six-site acetonitrile models presents, respectively, percent differences of 0.4, 4.8, and 7.3% when compared with experimental values.

  4. Electrodialysis operation with buffer solution

    DOEpatents

    Hryn, John N.; Daniels, Edward J.; Krumdick, Greg K.

    2009-12-15

    A new method for improving the efficiency of electrodialysis (ED) cells and stacks, in particular those used in chemical synthesis. The process entails adding a buffer solution to the stack for subsequent depletion in the stack during electrolysis. The buffer solution is regenerated continuously after depletion. This buffer process serves to control the hydrogen ion or hydroxide ion concentration so as to protect the active sites of electrodialysis membranes. The process enables electrodialysis processing options for products that are sensitive to pH changes.

  5. Investigation of structural mimetics of natural phosphate ion binding motifs.

    PubMed

    Kataev, Evgeny A; Shumilova, Tatiana A

    2015-02-16

    Phosphates are ubiquitous in biology and nearly half of all proteins interact with their partners by means of recognition of phosphate residues. Therefore, a better understanding of the phosphate ion binding by peptidic structures is highly desirable. Two new receptors have been designed and synthesized and their anion binding properties in an acetonitrile solution have been determined. The structure of hosts mimics a part of the kinase active site that is responsible for the recognition of the phosphate residue. New hosts contain additional free amino groups with the aim to facilitate coordination of protonated anions, such as dihydrogen phosphate. According to spectrophotometric measurements, stepwise 1:1 and 1:2 binding modes have been observed for both receptors in the presence of acetate, hydrogen sulfate and dihydrogen phosphate. Compared with the acyclic receptor, the macrocyclic receptor has demonstrated a remarkably enhanced selectivity for dihydrogen phosphate over other anions. Fluorometric measurements have revealed different responses of the acyclic and macrocyclic receptors towards anions. However, in both cases, a 5-8 nm hypsochromic shift of fluorescence maximum has been observed upon interaction of acetate and dihydrogen phosphate with receptors.

  6. Effect of different buffers on kinetic properties of human acetylcholinesterase and the interaction with organophosphates and oximes.

    PubMed

    Wille, T; Thiermann, H; Worek, F

    2011-03-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is the primary target of organophosphorus compounds (OP). The investigation into interactions between AChE, OP and oximes in vitro may be affected by the experimental conditions, e.g. by the buffer system. Hence, it was tempting to investigate the Michaelis-Menten kinetics and the inhibition and reactivation kinetics of paraoxon-ethyl, sarin, soman and VX in the presence of phosphate, MOPS, Tyrode and TRIS buffer with human AChE. Compared to phosphate buffer, the inhibition and reactivation kinetics of human erythrocyte AChE were markedly changed by TRIS and in part by MOPS, whereas Tyrode showed similar results to phosphate buffer. These results indicate an effect of the tested buffers on the properties of AChE, and an interaction between OP and oximes has to be considered for the design of in vitro studies and may impair the comparison of data from different laboratories. In view of the comparability of human in vitro kinetic data determined with phosphate buffer with data from human OP poisoning, it seems to be a suitable buffer for the investigation into interactions between AChE, OP and oximes.

  7. Buffering agents modify the hydration landscape at charged interfaces.

    PubMed

    Trewby, William; Livesey, Duncan; Voïtchovsky, Kislon

    2016-03-07

    Buffering agents are widely used to stabilise the pH of solutions in soft matter and biological sciences. They are typically composed of weak acids and bases mixed in an aqueous solution, and can interact electrostatically with charged surfaces such as biomembranes. Buffers can induce protein aggregation and structural modification of soft interfaces, but a molecular-level picture is still lacking. Here we use high-resolution atomic force microscopy to investigate the effect of five commonly used buffers, namely 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES), 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES), monosodium phosphate, saline sodium citrate (SSC) and tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) on the hydration landscape of Muscovite mica in solution. Mica is an ideal model substrate due to its negative surface charge and identical lattice parameter when compared with gel-phase lipid bilayers. We show that buffer molecules can produce cohesive aggregates spanning over tens of nanometres of the interface. SSC, Tris and monosodium phosphate tend to create an amorphous mesh layer several molecules thick and with no preferential ordering. In contrast, MES and HEPES adopt epitaxial arrangements commensurate with the underlying mica lattice, suggesting that they offer the most suitable solution for high-resolution studies. To confirm that this effect persisted in biologically-relevant interfaces, the experiments were repeated on a silica-supported lipid bilayer. Similar trends were observed for this system using atomic force microscopy as well as ellipsometry. The effect of the buffering agents can be mitigated by the inclusion of salt which helps displace them from the interface.

  8. Programmable pH buffers

    DOEpatents

    Gough, Dara Van; Huber, Dale L.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Roberts, Mark E.

    2017-01-24

    A programmable pH buffer comprises a copolymer that changes pK.sub.a at a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) in water. The copolymer comprises a thermally programmable polymer that undergoes a hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic phase change at the LCST and an electrolytic polymer that exhibits acid-base properties that are responsive to the phase change. The programmable pH buffer can be used to sequester CO.sub.2 into water.

  9. Suppression of peak tailing of phosphate prodrugs in reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Wang, Qinggang; Kleintop, Brent; Raglione, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Peak tailing of phosphate prodrugs in acidic mobile phases was thoroughly investigated. The results indicated that both metal-phosphate interactions and silanophilic interactions contributed to the observed peak tailing. Column pretreatment with phosphate buffers was demonstrated to be an effective and robust approach in suppressing metal-phosphate interaction. Silanophilic interactions, such as hydrogen bonding interactions between protonated isolated silanol groups and partially deprotonated phosphate groups were mobile phase pH dependent. The combination of column pretreatment and volatile low pH mobile phase buffers can be used to mitigate peak tailing issues in developing MS compatible RPLC methods for phosphate prodrugs. The use of non-endcapped columns should be avoided in RPLC analysis for phosphate prodrugs due to large amount of residual silanol groups in the stationary phases.

  10. Mass spectrometry-guided refinement of chemical energy buffers.

    PubMed

    Chen, T-R; Urban, P L

    2016-06-01

    Biocatalytic reactions often require supplying chemical energy and phosphate groups in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Auxiliary enzymes can be used to convert a reaction by-product-adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-back to ATP. By employing real-time mass spectrometry (RTMS), one can gain an insight into inter-conversions of reactants in multi-enzyme reaction systems and optimize the reaction conditions. In this study, temporal traces of ions corresponding to adenosine monophosphate (AMP), ADP and ATP provided vital information that could be used to adjust activities of the 'buffering enzymes'. Using the RTMS results as a feedback, we also characterized a bienzymatic energy buffer that enables the recovery of ATP in the cases where it is directly hydrolysed to AMP in the main enzymatic reaction. The significance of careful selection of enzyme activities-guided by RTMS-is exemplified in the synthesis of glucose-6-phosphate by hexokinase in the presence of a buffering enzyme, pyruvate kinase. Relative activities of the two enzymes, present in the reaction mixture, influence biosynthetic reaction yields. This observation supports the conclusion that optimization of chemical energy recycling procedures is critical for the biosynthetic reaction economy.

  11. Acetonitrile adduct formation as a sensitive means for simple alcohol detection by LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Bogseth, Roy; Edgcomb, Eric; Jones, Christopher M; Chess, Edward K; Hu, Peifeng

    2014-11-01

    Simple alcohols formed protonated acetonitrile adducts containing up to two acetonitrile molecules when analyzed by ESI or APCI in the presence of acetonitrile in the solvent. These acetonitrile adducts underwent dissociation to form a nitrilium ion, also referred to as the substitution ion. Diols and triols behaved differently. In ESI, they formed only one acetonitrile adduct containing one acetonitrile. The S ion was not observed in ESI and was only weakly observed from the dissociation of the (M + ACN + H)(+) ion. On the other hand, the S ion was abundantly formed from the diols in APCI. This formation of acetonitrile adducts and substitution ion from simple alcohols/diols offers an opportunity to detect simple alcohols/diols sensitively by LC-MS interfaced by ESI or APCI. The utility of this chemistry was demonstrated in a method developed for the quantification of cyclohexanol in rat plasma by monitoring the CID-induced fragmentation from the S ion to a fragment ion.

  12. Influence of buffer composition on the distribution of inkjet printed protein molecules and the resulting spot morphology.

    PubMed

    Mujawar, Liyakat Hamid; van Amerongen, Aart; Norde, Willem

    2012-08-30

    Producing high quality protein microarrays on inexpensive substrates like polystyrene is a big challenge in the field of diagnostics. Using a non-contact inkjet printer we have produced microarrays on polystyrene slides for two different biotinylated biomolecules, bovine serum albumin (BSA-biotin) and immunoglobulin-G (IgG-biotin), and studied the influence of buffer (composition and pH) on the spot morphology and signal intensity. Atomic force microscopy revealed the morphological pattern of the (biomolecule) spots printed from phosphate buffer (pH 7.4), phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4) and carbonate buffer (pH 9.6). The spots showed an irregular crust-like appearance when printed in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4), mainly due to the high NaCl content, whereas spots of biomolecules printed in carbonate buffer (pH 9.6) showed a smooth morphology. In addition, the rinsing of these dried spots led to the loss of a considerable fraction of the biomolecules, leaving behind a small fraction that is compatible with the (mono)layer. It was confirmed by confocal laser microscopy that the quality of the spots with respect to the uniformity and distribution of the biomolecules therein was superior when printed in carbonate buffer (pH 9.6) as compared to other buffer systems. Particularly, spotting in PBS yielded spots having a very irregular distribution and morphology.

  13. Electrochemical detection of benzo(a)pyrene in acetonitrile-water binary medium.

    PubMed

    Du, Chunyan; Hu, Yaqi; Li, Yunchao; Fan, Louzhen; Li, Xiaohong

    2015-06-01

    Electrochemical oxidation of adsorbed benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was explored in acetonitrile-water. When the GCE was incubated in 100 nM BaP acetonitrile-water (V(water):V(acetonitrile)=1:1) for 10 min at open circuit, and then transferred into blank acetonitrile-water (V(water):V(acetonitrile)=1:1, pH= 0.70) for differential pulse voltammetry measurement, a distinct oxidation peak at 0.98 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) was observed. The peak potential was about 180 mV lower than that in acetonitrile. Importantly, the peak current was more than 22 times greater. The effects of water on BaP preconcentration on the electrode and electrochemical oxidation were revealed, respectively. Based on the results, an electrochemical assay for BaP detection was developed. The GCE was respectively incubated in acetonitrile-water (V(water):V(acetonitrile)=1:1)with BaP concentration ranged from 0 nM to 1000 nM, and then transferred into the corresponding blank acetonitrile-water (pH= 0.70) for DPV measurements. When the BaP concentration was increased, an increased oxidative current at 0.98 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) was observed, and a detection limit of 0.67 nM was achieved. Because all other priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons could not be electrochemically oxidized at 0.98 V, the electrochemical assay showed very high selectivity to BaP. Finally, the developed electrochemical assay was successfully applied to determination of BaP in a series of real world samples, such as drinking water, tap water, lake water and river water.

  14. Buffer Gas Acquisition and Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F.; Lueck, Dale E.; Jennings, Paul A.; Callahan, Richard A.; Delgado, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The acquisition and storage of buffer gases (primarily argon and nitrogen) from the Mars atmosphere provides a valuable resource for blanketing and pressurizing fuel tanks and as a buffer gas for breathing air for manned missions. During the acquisition of carbon dioxide (CO2), whether by sorption bed or cryo-freezer, the accompanying buffer gases build up in the carbon dioxide acquisition system, reduce the flow of CO2 to the bed, and lower system efficiency. It is this build up of buffer gases that provide a convenient source, which must be removed, for efficient capture Of CO2 Removal of this buffer gas barrier greatly improves the charging rate of the CO2 acquisition bed and, thereby, maintains the fuel production rates required for a successful mission. Consequently, the acquisition, purification, and storage of these buffer gases are important goals of ISRU plans. Purity of the buffer gases is a concern e.g., if the CO, freezer operates at 140 K, the composition of the inert gas would be approximately 21 percent CO2, 50 percent nitrogen, and 29 percent argon. Although there are several approaches that could be used, this effort focused on a hollow-fiber membrane (HFM) separation method. This study measured the permeation rates of CO2, nitrogen (ND, and argon (Ar) through a multiple-membrane system and the individual membranes from room temperature to 193K and 10 kpa to 300 kPa. Concentrations were measured with a gas chromatograph that used a thermoconductivity (TCD) detector with helium (He) as the carrier gas. The general trend as the temperature was lowered was for the membranes to become more selective, In addition, the relative permeation rates between the three gases changed with temperature. The end result was to provide design parameters that could be used to separate CO2 from N2 and Ar.

  15. Buffer gas acquisition and storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrish, Clyde F.; Lueck, Dale E.; Jennings, Paul A.

    2001-02-01

    The acquisition and storage of buffer gases (primarily argon and nitrogen) from the Mars atmosphere provides a valuable resource for blanketing and pressurizing fuel tanks and as a buffer gas for breathing air for manned missions. During the acquisition of carbon dioxide (CO2), whether by sorption bed or cryo-freezer, the accompanying buffer gases build up in the carbon dioxide acquisition system, reduce the flow of CO2 to the bed, and lower system efficiency. It is this build up of buffer gases that provide a convenient source, which must be removed, for efficient capture of CO2. Removal of this buffer gas barrier greatly improves the charging rate of the CO2 acquisition bed and, thereby, maintains the fuel production rates required for a successful mission. Consequently, the acquisition, purification, and storage of these buffer gases are important goals of ISRU plans. Purity of the buffer gases is a concern e.g., if the CO2 freezer operates at 140 K, the composition of the inert gas would be approximately 21 percent CO2, 50 percent nitrogen, and 29 percent argon. Although there are several approaches that could be used, this effort focused on a hollow-fiber membrane (HFM) separation method. This study measured the permeation rates of CO2, nitrogen (N2), and argon (Ar) through a multiple-membrane system and the individual membranes from room temperature to 193 K and 10 kPa to 300 kPa. Concentrations were measured with a gas chromatograph. The end result was data necessary to design a system that could separate CO2, N2, and Ar. .

  16. Laboratory investigations of irradiated acetonitrile-containing ices on an interstellar dust analog

    SciTech Connect

    Abdulgalil, Ali G. M.; Marchione, Demian; Rosu-Finsen, Alexander; Collings, Mark P.; McCoustra, Martin R. S.

    2012-07-15

    Reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy is used to study the impact of low-energy electron irradiation of acetonitrile-containing ices, under conditions close to those in the dense star-forming regions in the interstellar medium. Both the incident electron energy and the surface coverage were varied. The experiments reveal that solid acetonitrile is desorbed from its ultrathin solid films with a cross section of the order of 10{sup -17} cm{sup 2}. Evidence is presented for a significantly larger desorption cross section for acetonitrile molecules at the water-ice interface, similar to that previously observed for the benzene-water system.

  17. Free flow cell electrophoresis using zwitterionic buffer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodkey, R. Scott

    1990-01-01

    Studies of a zwitterionic buffer formulated for cell electrophoresis were done using the McDonnell-Douglas Continuous Flow Electrophoresis System. Standard buffers were analyzed for their stability in the electrical field and the results showed that both buffers tested were inherently unstable. Further, titration studies showed that the standards buffers buffered poorly at the pH employed for electrophoresis. The zwitterionic buffer buffered well at its nominal pH and was shown to be stable in the electrical field. Comparative studies of the buffer with standard cell separation buffers using formalin fixed rabbit and goose red blood cells showed that the zwitterionic buffer gave better resolution of the fixed cells. Studies with viable hybridoma cells showed that buffer Q supported cell viability equal to Hank's Balanced Salt Solution and that hybridoma cells in different stages of the growth cycle demonstrated reproducible differences in electrophoretic mobility.

  18. Thermodynamics of Complexation between Thiourea-based Receptor and Acetate in Water/Acetonitrile Mixture.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takaya; Shibuya, Yuuta; Sato, Takaya; Nishizawa, Seiichi; Sato, Itaru; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2016-01-01

    A thiourea-based receptor has been extensively studied for selective anion recognition for reasons of its strong hydrogen bond donor ability. In the present study, the thermodynamics of complexation between a thiourea-based receptor and acetate was examined in a water/acetonitrile mixture. The receptor used in this study was N,N'-bis(p-nitrophenyl)thiourea (BNPTU). UV/vis spectroscopic titration and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments clearly revealed endothermic and entropy-driven complexation of BNPTU with acetate in water/acetonitrile mixtures. Since the endothermic peaks found in water/acetonitrile mixtures were about three times greater than those in acetonitrile, it appears that preferential hydration of both receptor and acetate was responsible for the endothermic and entropy-driven complexation reaction. The thermodynamic properties found in this study have the potential to contribute to the design of a thiourea-based anion receptor.

  19. Detection of adulteration in acetonitrile using near infrared spectroscopy coupled with pattern recognition techniques.

    PubMed

    Hu, Le-Qian; Yin, Chun-Ling; Zeng, Zhi-Peng

    2015-12-05

    In this paper, near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) in cooperation with the pattern recognition techniques were used to determine the type of neat acetonitrile and the adulteration in acetonitrile. NIR spectra were collected between 400 nm and 2498 nm. The experimental data were first subjected to analysis of principal component analysis (PCA) to reveal significant differences and potential patterns between samples. Then support vector machine (SVM) were applied to develop classification models and the best parameter combination was selected by grid search. Under the best parameter combination, the classification accuracy rates of three types of neat acetonitrile reached 87.5%, and 100% for the adulteration with different concentration levels. The results showed that NIR spectroscopy combined with SVM could be utilized for determining the potential adulterants including water, ethanol, isopropyl alcohol, acrylonitrile, methanol, and by-products associated with the production of acetonitrile.

  20. Facilitated diffusion of acetonitrile revealed by quantitative breath analysis using extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Ding, Jianhua; Gu, Haiwei; Zhang, Yan; Pan, Susu; Xu, Ning; Chen, Huanwen; Li, Hongmei

    2013-01-01

    By using silver cations (Ag⁺) as the ionic reagent in reactive extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS), the concentrations of acetonitrile in exhaled breath samples from the volunteers including active smokers, passive smokers, and non-smokers were quantitatively measured in vivo, without any sample pretreatment. A limit of detection (LOD) and relative standard deviation (RSD) were 0.16 ng/L and 3.5% (n = 8), respectively, for the acetonitrile signals in MS/MS experiments. Interestingly, the concentrations of acetonitrile in human breath continuously increased for 1-4 hours after the smoker finished smoking and then slowly decreased to the background level in 7 days. The experimental data of a large number of (> 165) samples indicated that the inhaled acetonitrile is excreted most likely by facilitated diffusion, instead of simple diffusion reported previously for other volatile compounds.

  1. Reactions of buffers in cyanogen bromide-induced ligations.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Heike; Gerlach, Claudia; Richert, Clemens

    2013-01-01

    Rapid, template-directed ligation reactions between a phosphate-terminated oligonucleotide and an unphosphorylated reaction partner may be induced by cyanogen bromide (BrCN). Frequently, however, the reaction is low yielding, and even a large excess of the condensing agent can fail to induce quantitative conversions. In this study, we used BrCN to induce chemical primer extension reactions. Here, we report that buffers containing hydroxyl groups react with short oligodeoxynucleotides in the presence of BrCN. One stable adduct between HEPBS buffer and cytosine was characterized by mass spectrometry and NMR after HPLC purification, indicating that a side reaction occurred at this nucleobase. Further, a first example of a primer extension reaction between an unmodified oligodeoxynucleotide as primer and dGMP is reported. Together, our results shed light on the potency, as well as the drawbacks of BrCN as a highly reactive condensing reagent for the ligation of unmodified nucleic acids.

  2. Physiological bicarbonate buffers: stabilisation and use as dissolution media for modified release systems.

    PubMed

    Fadda, Hala M; Merchant, Hamid A; Arafat, Basel T; Basit, Abdul W

    2009-12-01

    Bicarbonate media are reflective of the ionic composition and buffer capacity of small intestinal luminal fluids. Here we investigate methods to stabilise bicarbonate buffers which can be readily applied to USP-II dissolution apparatus. The in vitro drug release behaviour of three enteric coated mesalazine (mesalamine) products is investigated. Asacol 400 mg and Asacol 800 mg (Asacol HD) and the new generation, high dose (1200 mg) delayed and sustained release formulation, Mezavant (Lialda), are compared in pH 7.4 Krebs bicarbonate and phosphate buffers. Bicarbonate stabilisation was achieved by: continuous sparging of the medium with 5% CO(2)(g), application of a layer of liquid paraffin above the medium, or a specially designed in-house seal device that prevents CO(2)(g) loss. Each of the products displayed a delayed onset of drug release in physiological bicarbonate media compared to phosphate buffer. Moreover, Mezavant displayed a zero-order, sustained release profile in phosphate buffer; in bicarbonate media, however, this slow drug release was no longer apparent and a profile similar to that of Asacol 400 mg was observed. These similar release patterns of Asacol 400 mg and Mezavant displayed in bicarbonate media are in agreement with their pharmacokinetic profiles in humans. Bicarbonate media provide a better prediction of the in vivo behaviour of the mesalazine preparations investigated.

  3. Influence of high-conductivity buffer composition on field-enhanced sample injection coupled to sweeping in CE.

    PubMed

    Anres, Philippe; Delaunay, Nathalie; Vial, Jérôme; Thormann, Wolfgang; Gareil, Pierre

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this work was to clarify the mechanism taking place in field-enhanced sample injection coupled to sweeping and micellar EKC (FESI-Sweep-MEKC), with the utilization of two acidic high-conductivity buffers (HCBs), phosphoric acid or sodium phosphate buffer, in view of maximizing sensitivity enhancements. Using cationic model compounds in acidic media, a chemometric approach and simulations with SIMUL5 were implemented. Experimental design first enabled to identify the significant factors and their potential interactions. Simulation demonstrates the formation of moving boundaries during sample injection, which originate at the initial sample/HCB and HCB/buffer discontinuities and gradually change the compositions of HCB and BGE. With sodium phosphate buffer, the HCB conductivity increased during the injection, leading to a more efficient preconcentration by staking (about 1.6 times) than with phosphoric acid alone, for which conductivity decreased during injection. For the same injection time at constant voltage, however, a lower amount of analytes was injected with sodium phosphate buffer than with phosphoric acid. Consequently sensitivity enhancements were lower for the whole FESI-Sweep-MEKC process. This is why, in order to maximize sensitivity enhancements, it is proposed to work with sodium phosphate buffer as HCB and to use constant current during sample injection.

  4. Membrane-aerated biofilm reactor for the treatment of acetonitrile wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Tinggang; Liu, Junxin; Bai, Renbi; Wong, F S

    2008-03-15

    A membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) was studied for the treatment of wastewater containing acetonitrile, a typical organonitrile compound. The MABR used hydrophobic hollow fiber membranes as the diffusers for bubbleless aeration as well as the carriers for biofilm growth. The objectives were to prevent the stripping-loss of acetonitrile during aeration and to achieve acetonitrile biodegradation plus nitrogen removal simultaneously in a single biolfilm on the membranes. In the MABR, oxygen and substrates were supplied to the biofilm from opposite sides, in contrast to those from the same side in conventional biofilm bioreactors. Operational factors, including surface loading rate and upflow fluid velocity in the bioreactor, on the effect of acetonitrile biodegradation performance were examined. The profiles of dissolved oxygen concentration and microbial activities and populations in the biofilm were investigated. Experimental results showed that, with the adapted microorganisms, removal of acetonitrile at approximately 98.6 and 83.3%, in terms of total organic carbon and total nitrogen, were achieved at a surface loading rate (in terms of membrane surface) of up to 11.29 g acetonitrile/ m2 x d with an upflow fluid velocity of 12 cm/s and a hydraulic retention time of 30 h. The biofilm on the membranes developed an average thickness of about 1.6 mm in the steady state and consisted of oxic/anoxic/anaerobic zones that provided different functions for acetonitrile degradation, nitrification, and denitrification. The acetonitrile-degrading bacteria in the MABR appeared to secrete more extracellular polymeric substances that enhanced the attachment and development of the biofilm on the membranes. The study demonstrated the potential of using the MABR for the treatment of organonitrile wastewater.

  5. The potential of the acetonitrile biodegradation by Mesorhizobium sp. F28.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yun-Shu; Lee, Chi-Mei

    2009-05-30

    Mesorhizobium sp. F28 was used in the NHase/amidase enzyme system to convert acetonitrile into acetamide and acetic acid, and the cells grew with the production of acetic acid. The NHase activity of the strain F28 was 78 U mg(-1)dcw, observed in the conversion of 19.5mM acetonitrile at 0.2h. As the initial pH value was between 6.5 and 8.3, 18.3mM acetonitrile completely converted into acetamide within 2h and the accumulation of acetamide subsequently converted into acetic acid and ammonia within 46h. When 20.3mM acetamide was added in the medium, the conversion rate of acetonitrile was 80% at 2h and the conversion rate of the accumulative acetamide was slightly affected. The concentrations of acetic acid and ammonia were respectively 6.01 and 6.68 mM at 46h. The addition of acetic acid decreased the activities of the NHase and amidase. The conversion rate of acetonitrile was 94% at 9.5h and traces of acetic acid (0.25 mM) and ammonia (0.29 mM) were produced. The effects of product-inhibition indicated that the appropriate operation of bioreactor would be beneficial for Mesorizobium sp. F28 to degrade acetonitrile continuously.

  6. Replacement of acetonitrile by ethanol as solvent in reversed phase chromatography of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Brettschneider, F; Jankowski, V; Günthner, T; Salem, S; Nierhaus, M; Schulz, A; Zidek, W; Jankowski, J

    2010-03-15

    Acetonitrile, which is a by-product of acrylonitrile synthesis, is the commonly used solvent in ion-pair reversed phase chromatography. In consequence of the decreasing demand for acrylonitrile due to the financial crisis, a worldwide shortage of acetonitrile is observed. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish ion-pair reversed phase chromatographic assays using alternative eluents for acetonitrile and to decrease costs incurred hereby. We compared the performance of ion-pair reversed phase chromatography using acetonitrile with the alternative eluents methanol, ethanol and n-propanol, using monolithic reversed phase C5 as well as C18 chromatography columns. We used triethylammonium acetate (TEAA) and tetrabutylammonium sulfate (TBA) as representative cationic ion-pair reagents and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) as representative anionic ion-pair reagent. For covering a large field of applications, we fractionated representative low, middle and high-molecular weight biomolecules, in particular dinucleoside polyphosphates, peptides, proteins and tryptic digested human serum albumin. Whereas the chromatographic characteristics of both methanol and n-propanol were partly insufficient, ethanol was characterised equally or partly even better in the matter of elution strength and separation quality compared to the eluent water-acetonitrile. In conclusion, ethanol is an appropriate alternative for acetonitrile in ion-pair reversed phase chromatography of biomolecules.

  7. Cavity-Enhanced Near-Infrared Laser Absorption Spectrometer for the Measurement of Acetonitrile in Breath.

    PubMed

    Gianella, Michele; Ritchie, Grant A D

    2015-07-07

    Elevated concentrations of acetonitrile have been found in the exhaled breath of patients with cystic fibrosis1 and may indicate the severity of their condition or the presence of an accompanying bacterial infection of the airways. There is therefore interest in detecting acetonitrile in exhaled breath. For this purpose, a cavity-enhanced laser absorption spectrometer (λ = 1.65 μm) with a preconcentration stage was built and is described here. The spectrometer has a limit of detection of 72 ppbv and 114 ppbv of acetonitrile in nitrogen and breath, respectively, with a measurement duration of just under 5 min. The preconcentration stage, which employs a carbon molecular sieve and an adsorption/thermal desorption cycle, can increase the acetonitrile concentration by up to a factor 93, thus, lowering the overall limit of detection to approximately 1 ppbv. The suitability of the system for acetonitrile measurements in breath is demonstrated with breath samples taken from the authors, which yielded acetonitrile concentrations of 23 ± 3 ppbv and 29 ± 3 ppbv, respectively.

  8. Airborne measurements of acetonitrile and other organic tracers during MIRAGE- MEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, E. C.; Hills, A.; Emmons, L.; Orlando, J.; Riemer, D.; Sive, B.

    2007-05-01

    Biomass burning (BB) plumes are known to impact air quality throughout the globe and can be important sources of pollution in megacities. A number of chemical tracers for BB have been used in the recent past with acetonitrile, a long-lived (~6 months) organic trace gas, among them. However, the atmospheric budget of acetonitrile is not well-known. It has been accepted in the recent literature that the primary source for acetonitrile is from BB, but a recent study points to an oceanic source. Loss is believed to be by reaction with OH and oceanic uptake. Earlier studies indicated that acetonitrile may be produced in emissions from automobile exhaust but a study done in the late 1990s appeared to discredit this. We use measurements from the Trace Organic Gas Analyzer (TOGA) onboard the NCAR C-130 aircraft to investigate the sources and sinks of acetonitrile in and around the Mexico City Metropolitan Area, investigate its utility as a tracer of emissions, and present data on emissions characterization based on measurements of acetonitrile and other co-measured VOCs.

  9. Approaches to Computer Modeling of Phosphate Hide-Out.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-28

    phosphate acts as a buffer to keep pH at a value above which acid corrosion occurs . and below which caustic corrosion becomes significant. Difficulties are...ionization of dihydrogen phosphate : HIPO - + + 1PO, K (B-7) H+ + - £Iao 1/1, (B-8) H , PO4 - + O- - H0 4 + H20 K/Kw (0-9) 19 * Such zero heat...OF STANDARDS-1963-A +. .0 0 0 9t~ - 4 NRL Memorandum Report 5361 4 Approaches to Computer Modeling of Phosphate Hide-Out K. A. S. HARDY AND J. C

  10. Buffering in cyclic gene networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyzin, S. D.; Kolesov, A. Yu.; Rozov, N. Kh.

    2016-06-01

    We consider cyclic chains of unidirectionally coupled delay differential-difference equations that are mathematical models of artificial oscillating gene networks. We establish that the buffering phenomenon is realized in these system for an appropriate choice of the parameters: any given finite number of stable periodic motions of a special type, the so-called traveling waves, coexist.

  11. Microbial solubilization of phosphate

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Robert D.; Wolfram, James H.

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for solubilizing phosphate from phosphate containing ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of phosphate ore, microorganisms operable for solubilizing phosphate from the phosphate ore and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the microbial solubilization process. An aqueous solution containing soluble phosphorous can be separated from the reacted mixture by precipitation, solvent extraction, selective membrane, exchange resin or gravity methods to recover phosphate from the aqueous solution.

  12. Microbial solubilization of phosphate

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, R.D.; Wolfram, J.H.

    1993-10-26

    A process is provided for solubilizing phosphate from phosphate containing ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of phosphate ore, microorganisms operable for solubilizing phosphate from the phosphate ore and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the microbial solubilization process. An aqueous solution containing soluble phosphorus can be separated from the reacted mixture by precipitation, solvent extraction, selective membrane, exchange resin or gravity methods to recover phosphate from the aqueous solution. 6 figures.

  13. Phosphate homeostasis and disorders.

    PubMed

    Manghat, P; Sodi, R; Swaminathan, R

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies of inherited disorders of phosphate metabolism have shed new light on the understanding of phosphate metabolism. Phosphate has important functions in the body and several mechanisms have evolved to regulate phosphate balance including vitamin D, parathyroid hormone and phosphatonins such as fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23). Disorders of phosphate homeostasis leading to hypo- and hyperphosphataemia are common and have clinical and biochemical consequences. Notably, recent studies have linked hyperphosphataemia with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This review outlines the recent advances in the understanding of phosphate homeostasis and describes the causes, investigation and management of hypo- and hyperphosphataemia.

  14. Multisite inhibition of Pinus pinea isocitrate lyase by phosphate.

    PubMed

    Ranaldi, F; Vanni, P; Giachetti, E

    2000-11-01

    Our results show that the phosphate ion is a nonlinear competitive inhibitor of Pinus pinea isocitrate lyase. In addition, this compound induces a sigmoidal response of the enzyme, which usually exhibits standard Michaelis-Menten kinetics. This peculiar behavior of P. pinea isocitrate lyase could be explained by a dimer (two-site) model, in which phosphate binds cooperatively, but the affinity of the vacant site for substrate (the magnesium-isocitrate complex) remains the same. As a result, the interaction of phosphate with free enzyme produces an inhibitor-enzyme-inhibitor species that is of significant importance in determining reaction rate; a possible regulatory role of the glyoxylate cycle by inorganic phosphate is suggested. The mode of phosphate inhibition is consistent with both the mechanism for magnesium ion activation of P. pinea isocitrate lyase and its site heterogeneity. Our results explain the cooperative effects observed by some authors in kinetic studies of isocitrate lyase carried out in phosphate buffers and also account for the higher K(m) values determined by using such assay systems. Phosphate buffer should be avoided in performing isocitrate lyase kinetics.

  15. Optimization of buffer solutions to analyze inflammatory cytokines in gingival crevicular fluid by multiplex flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Ríos-Lugo, María-Judith; Martin, Conchita; Alarcón, José-Antonio; Esquifino, Ana; Solano, Patricia; Sanz, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Objective: the aim of this study was to test two buffer solutions in order to attain a reliable and reproducible analysis of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, OPG, OPN and OC), in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) by flow cytometry. Material and Methods: GCF samples from healthy volunteers were collected with perio-paper strips and diluted either in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or Tris-HCl buffer, with and without protease inhibitors (PI). Cytokine immunoassays were carried out by flow cytometry (Luminex Xmap 200) generating standard curves. Results: standards curves generated with the use of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) demonstrated best adjustment for cytokines IL-1ß, IL-6 and TNF- α levels, when using Tris-HCl (p<0.05). Conclusions: The use of PBS buffer with the addition of PI provided reliable measurements of inflammatory biomarkers in GCF samples of healthy volunteers. Key words:Curve fitting, flow cytometer, immunoassay buffer, crevicular fluid, cytokines. PMID:24880451

  16. Kinetics of an acid-base catalyzed reaction (aspartame degradation) as affected by polyol-induced changes in buffer pH and pK values.

    PubMed

    Chuy, S; Bell, L N

    2009-01-01

    The kinetics of an acid-base catalyzed reaction, aspartame degradation, were examined as affected by the changes in pH and pK(a) values caused by adding polyols (sucrose, glycerol) to phosphate buffer. Sucrose-containing phosphate buffer solutions had a lower pH than that of phosphate buffer alone, which contributed, in part, to reduced aspartame reactivity. A kinetic model was introduced for aspartame degradation that encompassed pH and buffer salt concentrations, both of which change with a shift in the apparent pK(a) value. Aspartame degradation rate constants in sucrose-containing solutions were successfully predicted using this model when corrections (that is, lower pH, lower apparent pK(a) value, buffer dilution from the polyol) were applied. The change in buffer properties (pH, pK(a)) from adding sucrose to phosphate buffer does impact food chemical stability. These effects can be successfully incorporated into predictive kinetic models. Therefore, pH and pK(a) changes from adding polyols to buffer should be considered during food product development.

  17. Proteins contribute insignificantly to the intrinsic buffering capacity of yeast cytoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Poznanski, Jaroslaw; Szczesny, Pawel; Ruszczynska, Katarzyna; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Paczek, Leszek

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We predicted buffering capacity of yeast proteome from protein abundance data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We measured total buffering capacity of yeast cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed that proteins contribute insignificantly to buffering capacity. -- Abstract: Intracellular pH is maintained by a combination of the passive buffering of cytoplasmic dissociable compounds and several active systems. Over the years, a large portion of and possibly most of the cell's intrinsic (i.e., passive non-bicarbonate) buffering effect was attributed to proteins, both in higher organisms and in yeast. This attribution was not surprising, given that the concentration of proteins with multiple protonable/deprotonable groups in the cell exceeds the concentration of free protons by a few orders of magnitude. Using data from both high-throughput experiments and in vitro laboratory experiments, we tested this concept. We assessed the buffering capacity of the yeast proteome using protein abundance data and compared it to our own titration of yeast cytoplasm. We showed that the protein contribution is less than 1% of the total intracellular buffering capacity. As confirmed with NMR measurements, inorganic phosphates play a crucial role in the process. These findings also shed a new light on the role of proteomes in maintaining intracellular pH. The contribution of proteins to the intrinsic buffering capacity is negligible, and proteins might act only as a recipient of signals for changes in pH.

  18. Synthesis and kinetic studies of a low-molecular weight organocatalyst for phosphate hydrolysis in water.

    PubMed

    Merschky, Michael; Schmuck, Carsten

    2009-12-07

    Kinetic studies of a low-molecular weight organocatalyst 1 are presented. Compound 1 contains two histidines and one cationic side chain attached to a central aromatic core. In aqueous solution 1 accelerates the hydrolysis of a prototypal phosphodiester with rate enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude. A detailed HPLC analysis of hydrolysis experiments in Bis-Tris-buffer showed that the buffer itself can act as a nucleophile at least with the cyclic phosphate 16. Compound 1 is also an efficient host for the binding of bis-(para-nitrophenyl)-phosphate 14 with extraordinary high affinity of K(ass) = 24,400 M(-1) in buffered water.

  19. Water versus acetonitrile coordination to uranyl. Density functional study of cooperative polarization effects in solution.

    PubMed

    Bühl, Michael; Sieffert, Nicolas; Chaumont, Alain; Wipff, Georges

    2011-01-03

    Optimizations at the BLYP and B3LYP levels are reported for mixed uranyl-water/acetonitrile complexes [UO(2)(H(2)O)(5-n)(MeCN)(n)](2+) (n = 0-5), in both the gas phase and a polarizable continuum modeling acetonitrile. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations have been performed for these complexes in the gas phase, and for selected species (n = 0, 1, 3, 5) in a periodic box of liquid acetonitrile. According to structural and energetic data, uranyl has a higher affinity for acetonitrile than for water in the gas phase, in keeping with the higher dipole moment and polarizability of acetonitrile. In acetonitrile solution, however, water is the better ligand because of specific solvation effects. Analysis of the dipole moment of the coordinated water molecule in [UO(2)(H(2)O)(MeCN)(4)](2+) reveals that the interaction with the second-shell solvent molecules (through fairly strong and persistent O-H···N hydrogen bonds) causes a significant increase of this dipole moment (by more than 1 D). This cooperative polarization of water reinforces the uranyl-water bond as well as the water solvation via strengthened (UO(2))OH(2)···NCMe hydrogen bonds. Such cooperativity is essentially absent in the acetonitrile ligands that make much weaker (UO(2))NCMe···NCMe hydrogen bonds. Beyond the uranyl case, this study points to the importance of cooperative polarization effects to enhance the M(n+) ion affinity for water in condensed phases involving M(n+)-OH(2)···A fragments, where A is a H-bond proton acceptor and M(n+) is a hard cation.

  20. Interaction of acetonitrile with the surfaces of amorphous and crystalline ice

    SciTech Connect

    Schaff, J.E.; Roberts, J.T.

    1999-10-12

    The adsorption of acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN) on ultrathin films of ice under ultrahigh vacuum was investigated with temperature-programmed desorption ass spectrometry (TPD) and Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FTIRAS). Two types of film were studied, amorphous and crystalline. On the amorphous films, two sates of adsorbed acetonitrile were observed by TPD and FTIRAS. One of the states is attributed to acetonitrile that is hydrogen bonded to agree OH group at the ice surface; the other state is assigned to acetonitrile that is purely physiorbed. Evidence for the hydrogen-bonded state is two-fold. First, there is a large kinetic isotope effect for desorption from H{sub 2}O-and D{sub 2}O-ice: the desorption temperatures from ice-h{sub 2} and ice-d{sub 2} are {approximately}161 and {approximately}176 K, respectively. Second, the C{triple{underscore}bond}N stretching frequency (2,265 cm{sup {minus}1}) is 16 cm{sup {minus}1} is greater than that of physisorbed acetonitrile, and it is roughly equal to that of acetonitrile which is hydrogen bonded to an OH group at the air-liquid water interface. On the crystalline films, there is no evidence for a hydrogen-bonded state in the TPD spectra. The FTIRAS spectra do show that some hydrogen-bonded acetonitrile is present but at a maximum coverage that is roughly one-sixth of that on the amorphous surface. The difference between the amorphous and crystalline surfaces cannot be attributed to a difference n surface areas. Rather, this work provides additional evidence that the surface chemical properties of amorphous ice are different from those of crystalline ice.

  1. Chloroquine Phosphate Oral

    MedlinePlus

    Chloroquine phosphate is in a class of drugs called antimalarials and amebicides. It is used to prevent and treat ... Chloroquine phosphate comes as a tablet to take by mouth. For prevention of malaria in adults, one dose is ...

  2. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with acetonitrile stacking through capillary electrophoresis for the determination of three selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs in body fluids.

    PubMed

    Lin, En-Ping; Chiu, Tai-Chia; Hsieh, Ming-Mu

    2016-12-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was combined with acetonitrile stacking in capillary electrophoresis for the identification of three selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (citalopram, fluoxetine, and fluvoxamine) in human fluids such as urine and plasma. Parameters that affect the extraction and stacking efficiency, such as the type and volume of the extraction and disperser solvent, extraction time, salt addition for dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, and sample matrices, pH, and concentration of the separation buffer for stacking, were investigated and optimized. Under optimum conditions, the enrichment factors were in the range of 1195-1441. Limits of detection ranged from 1.4 to 1.7 nM for the target analytes. Calibration graphs displayed satisfied linearity with R(2) greater than or equal to 0.9978, and relative standard deviations of the peak area analysis were in the range of 2.9-5.0% (n = 3). The recoveries of all tricyclic antidepressant drugs from urine and plasma were in the range of 77-117 and 79-106%, respectively. The findings of this study show that dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction acetonitrile-stacking capillary electrophoresis is a rapid and convenient method for identifying tricyclic antidepressant drugs in urine and plasma.

  3. Selective Photodissociation of Acetonitrile Ligands in Ruthenium Polypyridyl Complexes Studied by Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yi-Jung; Mazumder, Shivnath; Endicott, John F; Turro, Claudia; Kodanko, Jeremy J; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2015-08-17

    Metal complexes that release ligands upon photoexcitation are important tools for biological research and show great potential as highly specific therapeutics. Upon excitation with visible light, [Ru(TQA)(MeCN)2](2+) [TQA = tris(2-quinolinylmethyl)amine] exchanges one of the two acetonitriles (MeCNs), whereas [Ru(DPAbpy)MeCN](2+) [DPAbpy = N-(2,2'-bipyridin-6-yl)-N,N-bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amine] does not release MeCN. Furthermore, [Ru(TQA)(MeCN)2](2+) is highly selective for release of the MeCN that is perpendicular to the plane of the two axial quinolines. Density functional theory calculations provide a clear explanation for the photodissociation behavior of these two complexes. Excitation by visible light and intersystem crossing leads to a six-coordinate (3)MLCT state. Dissociation of acetonitrile can occur after internal conversion to a dissociative (3)MC state, which has an occupied dσ* orbital that interacts in an antibonding fashion with acetonitrile. For [Ru(TQA)(MeCN)2](2+), the dissociative (3)MC state is lower than the (3)MLCT state. In contrast, the (3)MC state of [Ru(DPAbpy)MeCN](2+) that releases acetonitrile has an energy higher than that of the (3)MLCT state, indicating dissociation is unfavorable. These results are consistent with the experimental observations that efficient photodissociation of acetonitrile occurs for [Ru(TQA)(MeCN)2](2+) but not for [Ru(DPAbpy)MeCN](2+). For the release of the MeCN ligand in [Ru(TQA)(MeCN)2](2+) that is perpendicular to the axial quinoline rings, the (3)MLCT state has an occupied quinoline π* orbital that can interact with a dσ* Ru-NCCH3 antibonding orbital as the Ru-NCCH3 bond is stretched and the quinolines bend toward the departing acetonitrile. This reduces the barrier for the formation of the dissociative (3)MC state, leading to the selective photodissociation of this acetonitrile. By contrast, when the acetonitrile is in the plane of the quinolines or bpy, no interaction occurs between the ligand

  4. An integrated recirculating optical buffer.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyundai; Mack, John P; Bluementhal, Daniel J; Bowers, John E

    2008-07-21

    This paper reports an integrated optical buffer consisting of a low loss silicon waveguide delay line and a silicon evanescent gate matrix switch. The integrated device demonstrates an error free operation at 40 Gb/s data rate with a packet delay of 1.1 ns. This demonstration also highlights the silicon evanescent device platform to realize new types of photonic integrated devices by combining the low loss silicon passive components with the silicon evanescent photonic active devices.

  5. Laser velocimeter (autocovariance) buffer interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemmons, J. I., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A laser velocimeter (autocovariance) buffer interface (LVABI) was developed to serve as the interface between three laser velocimeter high speed burst counters and a minicomputer. A functional description is presented of the instrument and its unique features which allow the studies of flow velocity vector analysis, turbulence power spectra, and conditional sampling of other phenomena. Typical applications of the laser velocimeter using the LVABI are presented to illustrate its various capabilities.

  6. Aqueous Two-Phase Systems formed by Biocompatible and Biodegradable Polysaccharides and Acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    de Brito Cardoso, Gustavo; Souza, Isabela Nascimento; Pereira, Matheus M; Freire, Mara G; Soares, Cleide Mara Faria; Lima, Álvaro Silva

    2014-11-05

    In this work, it is shown that novel aqueous two-phase systems can be formed by the combination of acetonitrile and polysaccharides, namely dextran. Several ternary phase diagrams were determined at 25 °C for the systems composed of water + acetonitrile + dextran. The effect of the dextran molecular weight (6,000, 40,000 and 100,000 g.mol(-1)) was ascertained toward their ability to undergo liquid-liquid demixing. An increase in the dextran molecular weight favors the phase separation. Furthermore, the effect of temperature (25, 35 and 45 °C) was evaluated for the system constituted by the dextran of higher molecular weight. Lower temperatures are favorable for phase separation since lower amounts of dextran and acetonitrile are required for the creation of aqueous two-phase systems. In general, acetonitrile is enriched in the top phase while dextran is majorly concentrated in the bottom phase. The applicability of this new type of two-phase systems as liquid-liquid extraction approaches was also evaluated by the study of the partition behavior of a well-known antioxidant - vanillin - and used here as a model biomolecule. The optimized conditions led to an extraction efficiency of vanillin of 95% at the acetonitrile-rich phase.

  7. ESP and ESM1 mediate indol-3-acetonitrile production from indol-3-ylmethyl glucosinolate in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Burow, Meike; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Ober, James A; Lambrix, Virginia M; Wittstock, Ute; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Kliebenstein, Daniel J

    2008-02-01

    Glucosinolates are plant secondary metabolites that act as direct defenses against insect herbivores and various pathogens. Recent analysis has shown that methionine-derived glucosinolates are hydrolyzed/activated into either nitriles or isothiocyanates depending upon the plants genotype at multiple loci. While it has been hypothesized that tryptophan-derived glucosinolates can be a source of indole-acetonitriles, it has not been explicitly shown if the same proteins control nitrile production from tryptophan-derived glucosinolates as from methionine-derived glucosinolates. In this report, we formally test if the proteins involved in controlling aliphatic glucosinolate hydrolysis during tissue disruption can control production of nitriles during indolic glucosinolate hydrolysis. We show that myrosinase is not sufficient for indol-3-acetonitrile production from indol-3-ylmethyl glucosinolate and requires the presence of functional epithospecifier protein in planta and in vitro to produce significant levels of indol-3-acetonitrile. This reaction is also controlled by the Epithiospecifier modifier 1 gene. Thus, like formation of nitriles from aliphatic glucosinolates, indol-3-acetonitrile production following tissue disruption is controlled by multiple loci raising the potential for complex regulation and fine tuning of indol-3-acetonitrile production from indol-3-ylmethyl glucosinolate.

  8. Kinetic sonication effects in aqueous acetonitrile solutions. Reaction rate levelling by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Piiskop, Sander; Salmar, Siim; Tuulmets, Ants; Kuznetsov, Aleksei; Järv, Jaak

    2013-11-01

    The kinetics of the pH-independent hydrolysis of 4-methoxyphenyl dichloroacetate were investigated with and without ultrasonic irradiation in acetonitrile-water binary mixtures containing 0.008 to 35 wt.% of acetonitrile and the kinetic sonication effects (kson/knon) were calculated. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the structure of the solutions were performed with ethyl acetate as the model ester. The ester is preferentially solvated by acetonitrile. The excess of acetonitrile over water in the solvation shell grows fast with an increase in the co-solvent content in the bulk solution. In parallel, the formation of a second solvation shell rich in acetonitrile takes place. Significant kinetic sonication effects for the hydrolysis were explained with facile destruction of the diffuse second solvation shell followed by a rearrangement of the remaining solvent layer under sonication. The rate levelling effect of ultrasound was discussed. In an aqueous-organic binary solvent, independent of the solvent composition, the ultrasonic irradiation evokes changes in the reaction medium which result in an almost identical solvation state of the reagent thus leading to the reaction rate levelling.

  9. Characterization of acetonitrile-tolerant marine bacterium Exiguobacterium sp. SBH81 and its tolerance mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kongpol, Ajiraporn; Kato, Junichi; Tajima, Takahisa; Vangnai, Alisa S

    2012-01-01

    A Gram-positive marine bacterium, Exiguobacterium sp. SBH81, was isolated as a hydrophilic organic-solvent tolerant bacterium, and exhibited high tolerance to various types of toxic hydrophilic organic solvents, including acetonitrile, at relatively high concentrations (up to 6% [v/v]) under the growing conditions. Investigation of its tolerance mechanisms illustrated that it does not rely on solvent inactivation processes or modification of cell surface characteristics, but rather, increase of the cell size lowers solvent partitioning into cells and the extrusion of solvents through the efflux system. A test using efflux pump inhibitors suggested that secondary transporters, i.e. resistance nodulation cell division (RND) and the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family, are involved in acetonitrile tolerance in this strain. In addition, its acetonitrile tolerance ability could be stably and significantly enhanced by repetitive growth in the presence of toxic acetonitrile. The marked acetonitrile tolerance of Exiguobacterium sp. SBH81 indicates its potential use as a host for biotechnological fermentation processes as well as bioremediation.

  10. A nitromethane-based HPLC system alternative to acetonitrile for carotenoid analysis of fruit and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Sandmann, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Acetonitrile-based HPLC systems are the most commonly used for carotenoid analysis from different plant tissues. Because of the acetonitrile shortage, an HPLC system for the separation of carotenoids on C(18) reversed-phase columns was developed in which an acetonitrile-alcohol-based mobile phase was replaced by nitromethane. This solvent comes closest to acetonitrile with respect to its elutrophic property. Our criterion was to obtain similar separation and retention times for a range of differently structured carotenoids. This was achieved by further increase in the lipophilicity with ethylacetate. For all the carotenoids which we tested, we found co-elution only of β-cryptoxanthin and lycopene. By addition of 1% of water, separation of this pair of carotenoids was also achieved. The final recommended mobile phase consisted of nitromethane : 2-propanol : ethyl acetate : water (79 : 10 : 10 : 1, by volume). On Nucleosil C(18) columns and related ones like Hypersil C(18), we obtained separation of carotenes, hydroxyl, epoxy and keto derivatives, which resembles the excellent separation properties of acetonitrile-based mobile phases on C(18) reversed phase columns. We successfully applied the newly developed HPLC system to the separation of carotenoids from different vegetables and fruit.

  11. [Effect of Acetonitrile and n-hexane on the Immunoassay of Environmental Representative Pollutants].

    PubMed

    Lou, Xue-ning; Zhou, Li-ping; Song, Dan; Yang, Rong; Long, Feng

    2016-01-15

    Based on indirect competitive immunoassay mechanism, bisphenol A (BPA) was detected by the evanescent wave all-fiber immunosensor previously developed with the detection limit of 0.2 microg x L(-1) and the linear detection range of 0.3-33.4 microg x L(-1). The effects of two commonly used organic solvents, including acetonitrile and n-hexane, on the immunosensing assay of BPA were investigated. The influence mechanism of organic solvents on immunosensing assay was discussed. The experimental results showed that the effect of n-hexane on immunosensing assay was negligible even at a high concentration of up to 10%, whereas the effect of acetonitrile on the immunosensing assay was relatively great. BPA could be detected in solutions containing a low concentration of acetonitrile. However, the specific binding reaction between antibody and antigen in homogeneous solution was completely inhibited by high concentrations of acetonitrile, and the quantitative analysis of BPA was not achieved. This might result from the changes of antibody conformation or binding capability between antibody and antigen because acetonitrile replaced a part of the water molecules on the antibody surface.

  12. Aqueous Two-Phase Systems formed by Biocompatible and Biodegradable Polysaccharides and Acetonitrile

    PubMed Central

    de Brito Cardoso, Gustavo; Souza, Isabela Nascimento; Pereira, Matheus M.; Freire, Mara G.; Soares, Cleide Mara Faria; Lima, Álvaro Silva

    2015-01-01

    In this work, it is shown that novel aqueous two-phase systems can be formed by the combination of acetonitrile and polysaccharides, namely dextran. Several ternary phase diagrams were determined at 25 °C for the systems composed of water + acetonitrile + dextran. The effect of the dextran molecular weight (6,000, 40,000 and 100,000 g.mol−1) was ascertained toward their ability to undergo liquid-liquid demixing. An increase in the dextran molecular weight favors the phase separation. Furthermore, the effect of temperature (25, 35 and 45 °C) was evaluated for the system constituted by the dextran of higher molecular weight. Lower temperatures are favorable for phase separation since lower amounts of dextran and acetonitrile are required for the creation of aqueous two-phase systems. In general, acetonitrile is enriched in the top phase while dextran is majorly concentrated in the bottom phase. The applicability of this new type of two-phase systems as liquid-liquid extraction approaches was also evaluated by the study of the partition behavior of a well-known antioxidant – vanillin - and used here as a model biomolecule. The optimized conditions led to an extraction efficiency of vanillin of 95% at the acetonitrile-rich phase. PMID:25729320

  13. Acetone as a greener alternative to acetonitrile in liquid chromatographic fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Funari, Cristiano Soleo; Carneiro, Renato Lajarim; Khandagale, Manish M; Cavalheiro, Alberto José; Hilder, Emily F

    2015-05-01

    A considerable amount of chemical waste from liquid chromatography analysis is generated worldwide. Acetonitrile is the most employed solvent in liquid chromatography analyses since it exhibits favorable physicochemical properties for separation and detection, but it is an unwelcome solvent from an environmental point of view. Acetone might be a much greener alternative to replace acetonitrile in reversed-phase liquid chromatography, since both share similar physicochemical properties, but its applicability with ultraviolet absorbance-based detectors is limited. In this work, a reference method using acetonitrile and high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to an ultraviolet photodiode array detector coupled to a corona charged aerosol detector system was developed to fingerprint a complex sample. The possibility of effectively substituting acetonitrile with acetone was investigated. Design of experiments was adopted to maximize the number of peaks acquired in both fingerprint developments. The methods with acetonitrile or acetone were successfully optimized and proved to be statistically similar when only the number of peaks or peak capacity was taken into consideration. However, the superiority of the latter was evidenced when parameters of separation and those related to greenness were heuristically combined. A green, comprehensive, time- and resource-saving approach is presented here, which is generic and applicable to other complex matrices. Furthermore, it is in line with environmental legislation and analytical trends.

  14. Ethanol and acetonitrile induces conformational changes in porcine pepsin at alkaline denatured state.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Ganesh; Selvi, C Chinnarul; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2012-11-01

    Pepsin, a member of the aspartate protease family, exists in a partially unfolded state at alkaline pH where the N-terminal domain of pepsin has a flexible structure while the C-terminal domain has a highly folded structure. In this work, the conformational stability of porcine pepsin in an alkaline denatured (A(D)) state against acetonitrile and ethanol solvents was studied using a combination of electronic circular dichroism (ECD) and fluorescence techniques. The ECD results demonstrate that both ethanol and acetonitrile induce secondary structural changes in pepsin at A(D) state. However, the minimum concentration required to induce significant secondary structural changes in pepsin varies for ethanol (>30%, v/v) and acetonitrile (>60%, v/v) solvents. At maximum concentration used (90%, v/v), both solvents induce predominantly β-sheet conformation. Unlike acetonitrile, ethanol induces significant amount of non-native α-helical conformations at the intermediate concentrations (50-80%). The tryptophan fluorescence results demonstrate that both acetonitrile and ethanol induce substantial changes in the tertiary structure of pepsin in the A(D) state above certain concentrations. The current results have important implications in understanding the effect of co-solvents on the conformation of proteins in the "denatured state".

  15. Critical evaluation of buffering solutions for pKa determination by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Fuguet, Elisabet; Reta, Mario; Gibert, Carme; Rosés, Martí; Bosch, Elisabeth; Ràfols, Clara

    2008-07-01

    The performance of the most common and also some other less common CE buffers has been tested for the pKa determination of several types of compounds (pyridine, amines, and phenols). The selected buffers cover a pH ranging from 3.7 to 11.8. Whereas some buffers, like acetic acid/acetate, BisTrisH+/BisTris, TrisH+/Tris, CHES/CHES-, and CAPS/CAPS- can be used with all type of analytes, others like ammonium/ammonia, butylammonium/butylammonia, ethylammonium/ethylammonia, diethylammonium/diethylammonia, and hydrogenphosphate/phosphate are not recommended because they interact with a wide range of compounds. The rest of the tested buffers (dihydrogenphosphate/hydrogenphosphate, MES/MES-, HEPES/HEPES-, and boric acid/borate) can show specific interactions depending on the nature of the analytes, and their use in some applications should be restricted.

  16. Cell buffer with built-in test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, William E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A cell buffer with built-in testing mechanism is provided. The cell buffer provides the ability to measure voltage provided by a power cell. The testing mechanism provides the ability to test whether the cell buffer is functioning properly and thus providing an accurate voltage measurement. The testing mechanism includes a test signal-provider to provide a test signal to the cell buffer. During normal operation, the test signal is disabled and the cell buffer operates normally. During testing, the test signal is enabled and changes the output of the cell buffer in a defined way. The change in the cell buffer output can then be monitored to determine if the cell buffer is functioning correctly. Specifically, if the voltage output of the cell buffer changes in a way that corresponds to the provided test signal, then the functioning of the cell buffer is confirmed. If the voltage output of the cell buffer does not change correctly, then the cell buffer is known not to be operating correctly. Thus, the built in testing mechanism provides the ability to quickly and accurately determine if the cell buffer is operating correctly. Furthermore, the testing mechanism provides this functionality without requiring excessive device size and complexity.

  17. In vitro dissolution of proton-pump inhibitor products intended for paediatric and geriatric use in physiological bicarbonate buffer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Shokrollahi, Honaz

    2015-05-15

    Proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) products based on enteric coated multiparticulates are design to meet the needs of patients who cannot swallow tablets such as children and older adults. Enteric coated PPI preparations exhibit delays in in vivo absorption and onset of antisecretory effects, which is not reflected by the rapid in vitro dissolution in compendial pH 6.8 phosphate buffer commonly used for assessment of these products. A more representative and physiological medium, pH 6.8 mHanks bicarbonate buffer, was used in this study to evaluate the in vitro dissolution of enteric coated multiparticulate-based PPI products. Commercially available omeprazole, lansoprazole and esomeprazole products were subject to dissolution tests using USP-II apparatus in pH 4.5 phosphate buffer saline for 45 min (acid stage) followed by pH 6.8 phosphate buffer or pH 6.8 mHanks bicarbonate buffer. In pH 6.8 phosphate buffer, all nine tested products displayed rapid and comparable dissolution profiles meeting the pharmacopeia requirements for delayed release preparations. In pH 6.8 mHanks buffer, drug release was delayed and failed the pharmacopeia requirements from most enteric coated preparations. Despite that the same enteric polymer, methacrylic acid-ethyl acrylate copolymer (1:1), was applied to all commercial multiparticulate-based products, marked differences were observed between dissolution profiles of these preparations. The use of pH 6.8 physiological bicarbonate (mHanks) buffer can serve as a useful tool to provide realistic and discriminative in vitro release assessment of enteric coated PPI preparations and to assist rational formulation development of these products.

  18. Role of Buffers in Protein Formulations.

    PubMed

    Zbacnik, Teddy J; Holcomb, Ryan E; Katayama, Derrick S; Murphy, Brian M; Payne, Robert W; Coccaro, Richard C; Evans, Gabriel J; Matsuura, James E; Henry, Charles S; Manning, Mark Cornell

    2017-03-01

    Buffers comprise an integral component of protein formulations. Not only do they function to regulate shifts in pH, they also can stabilize proteins by a variety of mechanisms. The ability of buffers to stabilize therapeutic proteins whether in liquid formulations, frozen solutions, or the solid state is highlighted in this review. Addition of buffers can result in increased conformational stability of proteins, whether by ligand binding or by an excluded solute mechanism. In addition, they can alter the colloidal stability of proteins and modulate interfacial damage. Buffers can also lead to destabilization of proteins, and the stability of buffers themselves is presented. Furthermore, the potential safety and toxicity issues of buffers are discussed, with a special emphasis on the influence of buffers on the perceived pain upon injection. Finally, the interaction of buffers with other excipients is examined.

  19. Buffer Zone Requirements for Soil Fumigant Applications

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Updated pesticide product labels require fumigant users to establish a buffer zone around treated fields to reduce risks to bystanders. Useful information includes tarp testing guidance and a buffer zone calculator.

  20. Urban Runoff: Model Ordinances for Aquatic Buffers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Aquatic Buffers serve as natural boundaries between local waterways and existing development. The model and example ordinaces below provide suggested language or technical guidance designed to create the most effective stream buffer zones possible.

  1. 46 CFR 58.25-45 - Buffers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-45 Buffers. For each vessel on an ocean, coastwise, or Great Lakes voyage, steering gear other than hydraulic must be designed with suitable buffering arrangements to relieve...

  2. 46 CFR 58.25-45 - Buffers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-45 Buffers. For each vessel on an ocean, coastwise, or Great Lakes voyage, steering gear other than hydraulic must be designed with suitable buffering arrangements to relieve...

  3. Coupling of acetonitrile deproteinization and salting-out extraction with acetonitrile stacking in chiral capillary electrophoresis for the determination of warfarin enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Cai, Zongwei; Xu, Lin

    2011-07-01

    Concurrent sample clean-up and enhancement in detection sensitivity for chiral capillary electrophoresis was demonstrated based on the coupling of salting-out extraction with acetonitrile stacking and the use of dimethyl-beta-cyclodextrin as the chiral selector for the sensitive and enantioselective separation of warfarin enantiomers in urine samples. By optimizing the pH of salting-out extraction, warfarin enantiomers can be efficiently extracted from the aqueous sample solution into a smaller volume organic solvent (acetonitrile) phase. The pressure injection of the enriched acetonitrile phase (containing ca. 1% NaCl) into the CE capillary at 10% capillary volume resulted in additional concentration of the warfarin enantiomers. The limit of detection for both warfarin enantiomers was as low as 1.5 ng/mL in urine sample. Our results show that the novel strategy offers improved sensitivity compared to conventional CE analysis, reaching a combined enrichment factor higher than 1000. Calibration curves of warfarin enantiomers in urine samples were found to be linear between 10 and 1000 ng/mL, and intra- and inter-day precision (N=9) for both warfarin enantiomers in terms of migration time and peak area were found to be within the range of 0.1-0.8% and 1.0-6.7%, respectively. The recovery of warfarin enantiomers from urine was ca. 90%.

  4. The Triply Deprotonated Acetonitrile Anion CCN(3-) Stabilized in a Solid.

    PubMed

    Jach, Franziska; Brückner, Stephan Ingmar; Ovchinnikov, Alexander; Isaeva, Anna; Bobnar, Matej; Groh, Matthias Friedrich; Brunner, Eike; Höhn, Peter; Ruck, Michael

    2017-03-06

    The unprecedented, fully deprotonated form of acetonitrile, the acetonitriletriide anion CCN(3-) , is experimentally realized for the first time in the stabilizing bulk host framework of the Ba5 [TaN4 ][C2 N] nitridometalate via a one-pot synthesis from the elements under moderate conditions (920 K). The molecular structure of this long-sought acetonitrile derivative is confirmed by X-ray diffraction, as well as NMR, IR, and Raman spectroscopy. The anion is isoelectronic to the CO2 molecule, and, in contrast to acetonitrile (H3 C-C≡N), the electron pairs are shifted towards two double bonds, that is, [C=C=N](3-) .

  5. Comparison of chlorine dioxide photochemistry in acetonitrile and water using subpicosecond pump probe spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philpott, Matthew J.; Charalambous, Sophia; Reid, Philip J.

    1997-12-01

    The photochemical reaction dynamics of chlorine dioxide (OClO) dissolved in water and acetonitrile are investigated using subpicosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. The spectral dynamics observed at 267 and 400 nm demonstrate that the quantum yield for geminate recombination of ClO and O to form OClO is reduced in acetonitrile relative to water. However, the dynamics at 800 nm are similar for both solvents consistent with ClOO rather than OClO being responsible for the evolution at this wavelength. The kinetics for ground-state ClOO production and decomposition are significantly slower in acetonitrile relative to water suggesting that solvent-solute hydrogen bonding is important in defining the ground state reactivity of this photoproduct.

  6. Titration of selected bases in benzene-acetonitrile binary solvent system.

    PubMed

    Amirjahed, K; al-Khamis, K I

    1980-10-01

    The benzene-acetonitrile binary solvent system was used in the determination of the half-neutralization potentials (hnp) of selected bases varying widely in basicity (pKb). The solvent mixtures had specific dielectric constants (Dm). The hnp values of the bases determined in a solvent of a specific Dm value were related to the corresponding pKb values. The slopes of these linear relationships were related to Dm values. A certain mixture of the binary solvent system was selected, and successful differentiating titration of various base mixtures was demonstrated in this medium. The delta hnp/delta pK versus Dm data for acids were compared with those of bases in the benzene-acetonitrile binary solvent system. The resulting data on bases were compared with previously published data on acids, and the present report describes the behavior of acids and bases in the entire composition spectrum of the benzene-acetonitrile binary solvent system.

  7. Why nature chose phosphates.

    PubMed

    Westheimer, F H

    1987-03-06

    Phosphate esters and anhydrides dominate the living world but are seldom used as intermediates by organic chemists. Phosphoric acid is specially adapted for its role in nucleic acids because it can link two nucleotides and still ionize; the resulting negative charge serves both to stabilize the diesters against hydrolysis and to retain the molecules within a lipid membrane. A similar explanation for stability and retention also holds for phosphates that are intermediary metabolites and for phosphates that serve as energy sources. Phosphates with multiple negative charges can react by way of the monomeric metaphosphate ion PO3- as an intermediate. No other residue appears to fulfill the multiple roles of phosphate in biochemistry. Stable, negatively charged phosphates react under catalysis by enzymes; organic chemists, who can only rarely use enzymatic catalysis for their reactions, need more highly reactive intermediates than phosphates.

  8. Polarizability anisotropy relaxation in nanoconfinement: molecular simulation study of acetonitrile in silica pores.

    PubMed

    Milischuk, Anatoli A; Ladanyi, Branka M

    2013-12-12

    We present the results of a molecular simulation study of polarizability anisotropy relaxation of liquid acetonitrile confined in approximately cylindrical silica pores of diameters in the range of 20-40 Å. Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulation is used to determine the density of acetonitrile in pores in equilibrium with the bulk liquid, and canonical-ensemble molecular dynamics is then used to calculate the trajectories of the filled pores prepared in this way. We find that the pores are wetting, partially due to hydrogen bonding between acetonitrile nitrogen and pore silanol groups and that acetonitrile molecules have preferential orientations relative to the interface. The mobility of molecules in interfacial regions is considerably reduced and dependent mainly on their proximity to the interface. We include the contributions of molecular and interaction-induced polarizabilities to the collective polarizability anisotropy relaxation. We find that this relaxation includes a slowly relaxing component absent from the corresponding process in bulk acetonitrile and that the amplitude of this component increases as the pore diameter decreases. These results are in agreement with optical Kerr effect experiments on acetonitrile in silica pores in a similar diameter range. Further analysis of our data indicates that collective reorientation and predominantly translational "collision-induced" polarizability dynamics both contribute to the slowly relaxing portion of polarizability anisotropy decay. We further find that pore anisotropy plays a role, giving rise to different relaxation rates of polarizability anisotropy components with a different mix of axial and radial character and that collective reorientation contributing to polarizability anisotropy relaxation is somewhat faster at long times than single-molecule orientational relaxation.

  9. Improving the determination of moisture in edible oils by FTIR spectroscopy using acetonitrile extraction.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianghe; Sedman, J; van de Voort, F R

    2012-11-15

    A Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) method developed for the analysis of moisture in edible oils using dry acetonitrile as the extraction solvent was re-examined with the objective of improving its overall sensitivity and reproducibility. Quantitation was based on the H-O-H bending absorption at ∼1630 cm(-1) instead of the bands in the OH stretching region, fewer interferences being an issue in the former as opposed to the latter region. In addition, a spectroscopic dilution correction procedure was developed to compensate for any miscibility of oil samples with acetonitrile, and gap-segment 2nd derivative spectra were employed to minimise the associated possibility of spectral interferences from absorptions of the oils. In comprehensive standard addition experiments using a variety of edible oils, the FTIR method was shown to recover the amounts of water quantitatively added to dry oil with an accuracy of ±20 ppm when the spectra of the acetonitrile extracts of the water-spiked oils were ratioed against the spectra of the acetonitrile extracts of the corresponding dry oils. The accuracy deteriorated substantially when the spectra of the acetonitrile extracts of the water-spiked oils were ratioed against the spectrum of the acetonitrile extraction solvent only. However, the primary variable affecting the apparent difference in the accuracy of the two approaches was determined to be the variability in the residual moisture content of the dried oils used in the standard addition experiments, as confirmed by an FTIR procedure based on H-D exchange with D(2)O. The FTIR method as structured is amenable to automation (>120 samples/h) and provides a very competitive means by which to routinely measure moisture present in a variety of hydrophobic materials that are normally the domain of Karl Fischer titration, such as edible oils, mineral oils, biodiesel and fuels.

  10. Doped LZO buffer layers for laminated conductors

    DOEpatents

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [Knoxville, TN; Schoop, Urs [Westborough, MA; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Thieme, Cornelis Leo Hans [Westborough, MA; Verebelyi, Darren T [Oxford, MA; Rupich, Martin W [Framingham, MA

    2010-03-23

    A laminated conductor includes a metallic substrate having a surface, a biaxially textured buffer layer supported by the surface of the substrate, the biaxially textured buffer layer comprising LZO and a dopant for mitigating metal diffusion through the LZO, and a biaxially textured conductor layer supported by the biaxially textured buffer layer.

  11. RESEARCH NEEDS IN RIPARIAN BUFFER RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian buffer restorations are used as management tools to produce favorable water quality impacts; moreover, the basis for riparian buffers as an instrument of water quality restoration rests on a relatively firm foundation. However, the extent to which buffers can restore rip...

  12. Phosphate, inositol and polyphosphates.

    PubMed

    Livermore, Thomas M; Azevedo, Cristina; Kolozsvari, Bernadett; Wilson, Miranda S C; Saiardi, Adolfo

    2016-02-01

    Eukaryotic cells have ubiquitously utilized the myo-inositol backbone to generate a diverse array of signalling molecules. This is achieved by arranging phosphate groups around the six-carbon inositol ring. There is virtually no biological process that does not take advantage of the uniquely variable architecture of phosphorylated inositol. In inositol biology, phosphates are able to form three distinct covalent bonds: phosphoester, phosphodiester and phosphoanhydride bonds, with each providing different properties. The phosphoester bond links phosphate groups to the inositol ring, the variable arrangement of which forms the basis of the signalling capacity of the inositol phosphates. Phosphate groups can also form the structural bridge between myo-inositol and diacylglycerol through the phosphodiester bond. The resulting lipid-bound inositol phosphates, or phosphoinositides, further expand the signalling potential of this family of molecules. Finally, inositol is also notable for its ability to host more phosphates than it has carbons. These unusual organic molecules are commonly referred to as the inositol pyrophosphates (PP-IPs), due to the presence of high-energy phosphoanhydride bonds (pyro- or diphospho-). PP-IPs themselves constitute a varied family of molecules with one or more pyrophosphate moiety/ies located around the inositol. Considering the relationship between phosphate and inositol, it is no surprise that members of the inositol phosphate family also regulate cellular phosphate homoeostasis. Notably, the PP-IPs play a fundamental role in controlling the metabolism of the ancient polymeric form of phosphate, inorganic polyphosphate (polyP). Here we explore the intimate links between phosphate, inositol phosphates and polyP, speculating on the evolution of these relationships.

  13. Improving Water Quality With Conservation Buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowrance, R.; Dabney, S.; Schultz, R.

    2003-12-01

    Conservation buffer technologies are new approaches that need wider application. In-field buffer practices work best when used in combination with other buffer types and other conservation practices. Vegetative barriers may be used in combination with edge-of-field buffers to protect and improve their function and longevity by dispersing runoff and encouraging sediment deposition upslope of the buffer. It's important to understand how buffers can be managed to help reduce nutrient transport potential for high loading of nutrients from manure land application sites, A restored riparian wetland buffer retained or removed at least 59 percent of the nitrogen and 66 percent of the phosphorus that entered from an adjacent manure land application site. The Bear Creek National Restoration Demonstration Watershed project in Iowa has been the site of riparian forest buffers and filter strips creation; constructed wetlands to capture tile flow; stream-bank bioengineering; in-stream structures; and controlling livestock grazing. We need field studies that test various widths of buffers of different plant community compositions for their efficacy in trapping surface runoff, reducing nonpoint source pollutants in subsurface waters, and enhancing the aquatic ecosystem. Research is needed to evaluate the impact of different riparian grazing strategies on channel morphology, water quality, and the fate of livestock-associated pathogens and antibiotics. Integrating riparian buffers and other conservation buffers into these models is a key objective in future model development.

  14. Phosphate taxis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kato, J; Ito, A; Nikata, T; Ohtake, H

    1992-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was shown to be attracted to phosphate. The chemotactic response was induced by phosphate starvation. The specificity of chemoreceptors for phosphate was high so that no other tested phosphorus compounds elicited a chemotactic response as strong as that elicited by phosphate. Competition experiments showed that the chemoreceptors for phosphate appeared to be different from those for the common amino acids. Mutants constitutive for alkaline phosphatase showed the chemotactic response to phosphate regardless of whether the cells were starved for phosphate.

  15. Buffered Electrochemical Polishing of Niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Tian, Hui; Corcoran, Sean

    2011-03-01

    The standard preparation of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of pure niobium include the removal of a 'damaged' surface layer, by buffered chemical polishing (BCP) or electropolishing (EP), after the cavities are formed. The performance of the cavities is characterized by a sharp degradation of the quality factor when the surface magnetic field exceeds about 90 mT, a phenomenon referred to as 'Q-drop.' In cavities made of polycrystalline fine grain (ASTM 5) niobium, the Q-drop can be significantly reduced by a low-temperature (? 120 °C) 'in-situ' baking of the cavity if the chemical treatment was EP rather than BCP. As part of the effort to understand this phenomenon, we investigated the effect of introducing a polarization potential during buffered chemical polishing, creating a process which is between the standard BCP and EP. While preliminary results on the application of this process to Nb cavities have been previously reported, in this contribution we focus on the characterization of this novel electrochemical process by measuring polarization curves, etching rates, surface finish, electrochemical impedance and the effects of temperature and electrolyte composition. In particular, it is shown that the anodic potential of Nb during BCP reduces the etching rate and improves the surface finish.

  16. Hydrogen-bonding interactions between [BMIM][BF4] and acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yan-Zhen; Wang, Nan-Nan; Luo, Jun-Jie; Zhou, Yu; Yu, Zhi-Wu

    2013-11-07

    In this work, the interactions between a representative imidazolium-based ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM][BF4]) and acetonitrile (CH3CN) were investigated in detail using attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR), and density functional theory calculations. The main conclusions are: (1) a number of species in the [BMIM][BF4]-CH3CN mixtures were identified with the help of excess infrared spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The dilution process of the ionic liquid by acetonitrile was found to be the transformation from ion clusters to ion pairs. (2) The solvent molecules cannot break apart the strong Coulombic interaction between [BMIM](+) and [BF4](-) but can break apart the ion cluster into an ion pair within the concentration range investigated. The strength of hydrogen bonds between the C-Hs of [BMIM](+) and the N of acetonitrile is enhanced during the dilution process. (3) The methyl group of CH3CN locates above/below the imidazolium ring in the solution. These in-depth studies on the properties of the ionic liquid-acetonitrile mixed solvents may shed light on exploring their applications as reaction media in electrochemistry and chemical synthesis.

  17. Theoretical studies on the anionic association of phenol and its derivatives in acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiśniewska, Marta; Makowski, Mariusz

    2014-11-01

    The potentials of mean force (PMF) were determined for homoconjugated systems of anionic complexes composed of phenol and its derivatives with their conjugate anionic bases in acetonitrile (ACN). For each acid-base pair studied, a series of umbrella-sampling molecular dynamics simulations using the AMBER force field with explicit solvent was carried out; the respective PMF was calculated using the Weighted Histogram Analysis Method (WHAM). Subsequently, association equilibrium constants were calculated by numerical integration of the PMF profiles. The PMF curves had a typical shape, i.e., a very deep and narrow contact-minimum, a desolvation maximum, and a shallow solvent-separated minimum. All pairs formed complexes in solution, which was confirmed by the presence of contact minima corresponding to the existence of hydrogen bonds in the PMF curves. The calculated association constants in acetonitrile were subsequently compared with experimentally obtained values for the same solvent. Ab initio methods at the RHF level (utilizing the Gaussian 6-31++G** basis set) enabled the in vacuo calculation of energies and Gibbs free energies of interaction for each phenol derivative and anionic base pair along with a molecule of acetonitrile; this allowed the contribution of the solvent molecule to the PMF to be assessed. It was found that the interaction energies of anionic bases in acetonitrile are stronger than their related neutral phenol derivatives.

  18. Continuous analysis of phosphate in a Greenland shallow ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjær, Helle Astrid; Svensson, Anders; Bigler, Matthias; Vallelonga, Paul; Kettner, Ernesto; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe

    2010-05-01

    Phosphate is an important and sometimes limiting nutrient for primary production in the oceans. Because of deforestation and the use of phosphate as a fertilizer changes in the phosphate cycle have occurred over the last centuries. On longer time scales, sea level changes are thought to have also caused changes in the phosphate cycle. Analyzing phosphate concentrations in ice cores may help to gain important knowledge about those processes. In the present study, we attach a phosphate detection line to an existing continuous flow analysis (CFA) setup for ice core analysis at the University of Copenhagen. The CFA system is optimized for high-resolution measurements of insoluble dust particles, electrolytic melt water conductivity, and the concentrations of ammonium and sodium. For the phosphate analysis we apply a continuous and highly sensitive absorption method that has been successfully applied to determine phosphate concentrations of sea water (Zhang and Chi, 2002). A line of melt water from the CFA melt head (1.01 ml per minute) is combined with a molybdate blue reagent and an ascorbic acid buffer. An uncompleted reaction takes place in five meters of heated mixing coils before the absorption measurement at a wavelength of 710 nanometer takes place in a 2 m long liquid waveguide cell (LWCC) with an inner volume of 0.5 ml. The method has a detection limit of around 0.1 ppb and we are currently investigating a possible interference from molybdate reacting with silicates that are present in low amounts in the ice. Preliminary analysis of early Holocene samples from the NGRIP ice core show phosphate concentration values of a few ppb. In this study, we will attempt to determine past levels of phosphate in a shallow Northern Greenland firn core with an annual layer thickness of about 20 cm ice equivalent. With a melt speed of 2.5 cm ice per minute our method should allow the resolution of any seasonal variability in phosphate concentrations.

  19. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.

    1997-02-18

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate {alpha}-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal. 33 figs.

  20. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1997-01-01

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

  1. Physiological HEPES buffer proposed as a calibrator for pH measurement in human blood.

    PubMed

    Lang, W; Zander, R

    1999-05-01

    N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-piperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid, known as HEPES buffer, with pK in the physiological range was studied for use as an alternative to conventional phosphate buffer for the calibration of pH in modern clinical analyzers. In different series of aqueous equimolar HEPES buffer, pH was measured at 37 degrees C with a capillary glass electrode standardized previously using phosphate, and variations due to changes in total HEPES buffer concentration (0.025 to 0.320 mol/l), and NaCl (0 to 0.250 mol/l) were monitored. For 0.05 equimolar HEPES buffer without NaCl, the pH of 7.362+/-0.003 (n = 15) obtained coincided well with the reference pH (7.364) from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In particular, in the preferred 0.05 equimolar HEPES buffer/0.110 mol/l NaCl, which is isotonic to human plasma (0.160 mol/l), and termed physiological HEPES buffer (PHB), the pH of 7.346+/-0.003 (n = 84) can be related to the calculated corresponding reference pH from NIST without liquid junction (7.374), and is also compatible with the pH measured in normal arterial blood, pH = 7.403+/-0.003 (n = 20). Hence, in the two-point calibration of clinical analyzers, PHB, which is defined operationally with respect to the glass electrode and to phosphate buffer, may be useful as a calibrator in the range of buffer adjustment control to meet the correct values for pH when measuring in blood. Whereas Na-HEPES salt is hygroscopic and does not meet the declared purity grade (> 99%), pure HEPES acid is non-hygroscopic and conforms to the manufacturer's purity grade (> or = 99%). Therefore, for easy preparation of PHB, HEPES acid is the preferred starting material.

  2. Why a diaminopyrrolic tripodal receptor binds mannosides in acetonitrile but not in water?

    PubMed

    Vila-Viçosa, Diogo; Francesconi, Oscar; Machuqueiro, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Intermolecular interactions involving carbohydrates and their natural receptors play important roles in several biological processes. The development of synthetic receptors is very useful to study these recognition processes. Recently, it was synthetized a diaminopyrrolic tripodal receptor that is selective for mannosides, which are obtained from mannose, a sugar with significant relevance in living systems. However, this receptor is significantly more active in acetonitrile than in water. In this work, we performed several molecular dynamics and constant-pH molecular dynamics simulations in acetonitrile and water to evaluate the conformational space of the receptor and to understand the molecular detail of the receptor-mannoside interaction. The protonation states sampled by the receptor show that the positive charges are always as distant as possible in order to avoid large intramolecular repulsions. Moreover, the conformational space of the receptor is very similar in water above pH 4.0 and in acetonitrile. From the simulations with the mannoside, we observe that the interactions are more specific in acetonitrile (mainly hydrogen bonds) than in water (mainly hydrophobic). Our results suggest that the readiness of the receptor to bind mannoside is not significantly affected in water (above pH 4.0). Probably, the hydrogen bond network that is formed in acetonitrile (which is weaker in water) is the main reason for the higher activity in this solvent. This work also presents a new implementation of the stochastic titration constant-pH molecular dynamics method to a synthetic receptor of sugars and attests its ability to describe the protonation/conformation coupling in these molecules.

  3. Melatonin: Buffering the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Vico, Antonio; Lardone, Patricia J.; Álvarez-Sánchez, Nuria; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Ana; Guerrero, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin modulates a wide range of physiological functions with pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Despite the large number of reports implicating melatonin as an immunomodulatory compound, it still remains unclear how melatonin regulates immunity. While some authors argue that melatonin is an immunostimulant, many studies have also described anti-inflammatory properties. The data reviewed in this paper support the idea of melatonin as an immune buffer, acting as a stimulant under basal or immunosuppressive conditions or as an anti-inflammatory compound in the presence of exacerbated immune responses, such as acute inflammation. The clinical relevance of the multiple functions of melatonin under different immune conditions, such as infection, autoimmunity, vaccination and immunosenescence, is also reviewed. PMID:23609496

  4. Bactericidal pathway of Escherichia coli in buffered saline treated with oxygen radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Iwata, Natsumi; Oh, Jun-Seok; Hahizume, Hiroshi; Ohta, Takayuki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2017-04-01

    Bactericidal effects of phosphate buffered saline treated with electrically neutral oxygen radicals on Escherichia coli (E. coli) are studied using an atmospheric pressure radical source and colony counting method. To clarify the bactericidal mechanism, the chemistry in phosphate buffers treated with oxygen radicals with and without saline has been quantitatively investigated using the well-established chemical reporters N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine reagent and Amplex Red for residual chlorine (HClO and ClO‑) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), respectively. From the results, we have found that the presence of chlorine in the solutions treated with oxygen radicals is the most important factor in the further chemical reactions to generate hypochlorous acid in E. coli death, and H2O2 is also linked to the bactericidal effect via an indirect chemical pathway.

  5. Selective frame dropping based on hypothetical reference decoder buffer model for initial buffering delay reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Sachin

    2008-02-01

    We propose a method for selective frame dropping based on hypothetical reference decoder buffer model for initial buffering delay reduction. The client side buffering consists of two logical buffers: a de-jitter buffer and a pre-decoder buffer. To playback an encoded bit-stream without underflow the client must do a minimum initial buffering. This minimum initial buffering is a property of the bit-stream. The minimum initial buffering relates to the pre-decoder buffer. In addition the client can do additional initial buffering to handle network jitter and other bandwidth variations. Our proposed approach relates to reducing the minimum initial buffering delay for an already encoded bit-stream. We propose a method for selectively dropping frames to reduce the amount of initial buffering the client needs to do to avoid underflow during the streaming. Our proposed method is especially applicable to pre-stored content. The method is also particularly useful for variable bit-rate (VBR) encoded media. The method can be used by a streaming server. Alternatively the method can be implemented by a trans-rater/ transcoder. In a preferred embodiment our method can be applied in advance on a pre-stored bit-stream to decide which frames to drop to reduce the required minimum initial buffering.

  6. Palladium-catalyzed oxidative arylalkylation of activated alkenes: dual C-H bond cleavage of an arene and acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Mu, Xin; Liu, Guosheng

    2011-12-23

    Not one but two: The title reaction proceeds through the dual C-H bond cleavage of both aniline and acetonitrile. The reaction affords a variety of cyano-bearing indolinones in excellent yield. Mechanistic studies demonstrate that this reaction involves a fast arylation of the olefin and a rate-determining C-H activation of the acetonitrile.

  7. Buffer strips in composites at elevated temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    The composite material 'buffer strip' concept is presently investigated at elevated temperatures for the case of graphite/polyimide buffer strip panels using a (45/0/45/90)2S layup, where the buffer strip material was 0-deg S-glass/polyimide. Each panel was loaded in tension until it failed, and radiographs and crack opening displacements were recorded during the tests to determine fracture onset, fracture arrest, and the extent of damage in the buffer strip after crack arrest. At 177 + or - 3 C, the buffer strips increased the panel strength by at least 40 percent in comparison with panels without buffer strips. Compared to similar panels tested at room temperature, those tested at elevated temperature had lower residual strengths, but higher failure strains.

  8. CADMIUM PHOSPHATE GLASS

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, H.W.; Johnson, P.D.

    1963-04-01

    A method of preparing a cadmium phosphate glass that comprises providing a mixture of solid inorganic compounds of cadmuim and phosphate having vaporizable components and heating the resulting composition to a temperature of at least 850 un. Concent 85% C is presented. (AEC)

  9. Buffered nanoemulsion for nose to brain delivery of ziprasidone hydrochloride: preformulation and pharmacodynamic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bahadur, Shiv; Pathak, Kamla

    2012-11-01

    The study was undertaken to develop buffered nanoemulsion of ziprasidone hydrochloride (fifth generation antipshychotic) and evaluate its potential for efficacious nose to brain delivery drug delivery in animal models. Homogeneous buffered ziprasidone nanoemulsions (BZNE) were prepared by aqueous (phosphate buffer, pH 8.0) titration method using capmul MCM, labrasol and transcutol as oil, surfactant and cosurfactant respectively. The NEs (F1-F7) were characterized for pharmaceutical characteristics (% transmittance, PDI value, Zeta potential, globule size, viscosity and diffusion coefficient) and F6 with mean globule size of 145.24 ± 4.75nm (PDI = 0.186 ± 0.40) and diffusion coefficient of 0.1901± 0.04cm2/min was thermodynamically stable and was developed as buffered mucoadhesive nanoemulsions. The buffered mucoadhesive NE (βmax = 0.57) that contained 0.5% by weight of chitosan (BZMNE) exhibited 1.79 times higher diffusion coefficient (0.3418 ± 0.03) than BZNE. Pharmacodynamic study confirmed the superiority of BZMNE over BZNE in locomotor activity test (p < 0.05) and paw test (p < 0.05). Nasal ciliotoxicity study revealed the optimized BZMNE to be free from acute toxicity. Conclusively, a stable and efficacious buffered mucoadhesive NE of ziprasidone hydrochloride, that can be safely administered by intranasal route was developed.

  10. Comparative analyses of universal extraction buffers for assay of stress related biochemical and physiological parameters.

    PubMed

    Han, Chunyu; Chan, Zhulong; Yang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Comparative efficiency of three extraction solutions, including the universal sodium phosphate buffer (USPB), the Tris-HCl buffer (UTHB), and the specific buffers, were compared for assays of soluble protein, free proline, superoxide radical (O2∙-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and the antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), guaiacol peroxidase (POD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and glutathione reductase (GR) in Populus deltoide. Significant differences for protein extraction were detected via sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Between the two universal extraction buffers, the USPB showed higher efficiency for extraction of soluble protein, CAT, GR, O2∙-, GPX, SOD, and free proline, while the UTHB had higher efficiency for extraction of APX, POD, and H2O2. When compared with the specific buffers, the USPB showed higher extraction efficiency for measurement of soluble protein, CAT, GR, and O2∙-, parallel extraction efficiency for GPX, SOD, free proline, and H2O2, and lower extraction efficiency for APX and POD, whereas the UTHB had higher extraction efficiency for measurement of POD and H2O2. Further comparisons proved that 100 mM USPB buffer showed the highest extraction efficiencies. These results indicated that USPB would be suitable and efficient for extraction of soluble protein, CAT, GR, GPX, SOD, H2O2, O2∙-, and free proline.

  11. Signature-based store checking buffer

    DOEpatents

    Sridharan, Vilas; Gurumurthi, Sudhanva

    2015-06-02

    A system and method for optimizing redundant output verification, are provided. A hardware-based store fingerprint buffer receives multiple instances of output from multiple instances of computation. The store fingerprint buffer generates a signature from the content included in the multiple instances of output. When a barrier is reached, the store fingerprint buffer uses the signature to verify the content is error-free.

  12. Two-dimensional femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy: Observation of cascading Raman signals in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kristina C; Lyons, Brendon; Mehlenbacher, Randy; Sabatini, Randy; McCamant, David W

    2009-12-07

    A new methodology for two-dimensional Raman spectroscopy-termed two-dimensional femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (2D-FSRS)-is presented and experimental results for acetonitrile are discussed. 2D-FSRS can potentially observe molecular anharmonicity by measuring the modulation of the frequency of a probed Raman mode, at frequency omega(hi), by the coherent motion of an impulsively driven mode, at frequency omega(low). In acetonitrile, the signal is generated by driving the CCN bend (379 cm(-1)) and CC stretch (920 cm(-1)) into coherence via impulsive stimulated Raman scattering and subsequently probing the stimulated Raman spectrum of the CC stretch, the CN stretch (2250 cm(-1)) and the CH stretch (2942 cm(-1)). The resultant signal can be generated by two alternative mechanisms: a fifth-order Raman process that would directly probe anharmonic coupling between the two modes, or a third-order cascade in which a third-order coherent Raman process produces a field that goes on to participate in a third-order stimulated Raman transition. The third-order cascade is shown to dominate the 2D-FSRS spectrum as determined by comparison with the predicted magnitude of the two signals, the 2D spectrum of a mixed isotope experiment, and the concentration dependence of the signal. In acetonitrile, theoretical calculations of the vibrational anharmonicity indicate that the third-order cascade signal should be 10(4) times larger than the fifth-order Raman signal. 2D-FSRS signals are observed between acetonitrile's CCN bend, of E symmetry, and several different A(1) modes but are forbidden by symmetry in the fifth-order pathway. A 2D-FSRS spectrum of a 50:50 mixture of acetonitrile and d(3)-acetonitrile shows equivalent intensity for intramolecular coupling peaks and intermolecular coupling peaks, indicating that the observed signal cannot be probing molecular anharmonicity. Finally, the magnitudes of the 2D-FSRS peaks are observed to be proportional to the square of the

  13. SODR Memory Control Buffer Control ASIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, Robert F.

    1994-01-01

    The Spacecraft Optical Disk Recorder (SODR) is a state of the art mass storage system for future NASA missions requiring high transmission rates and a large capacity storage system. This report covers the design and development of an SODR memory buffer control applications specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The memory buffer control ASIC has two primary functions: (1) buffering data to prevent loss of data during disk access times, (2) converting data formats from a high performance parallel interface format to a small computer systems interface format. Ten 144 p in, 50 MHz CMOS ASIC's were designed, fabricated and tested to implement the memory buffer control function.

  14. Effects of common buffer systems on drug activity: the case of clerocidin.

    PubMed

    Richter, Sara; Fabris, Daniele; Binaschi, Monica; Gatto, Barbara; Capranico, Giovanni; Palumbo, Manlio

    2004-04-01

    Two widely used biological buffers [tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (TRIS) and phosphate] covalently react with the topoisomerase II inhibitor clerocidin, affecting the drug's reactivity profile. Comprehensive analytical and structural analysis obtained by LC/MS, MS/MS, NMR, and IR techniques shows that these buffers form reversible and irreversible adducts through reactions with chemical groups, such as carbonyls, aldehydes, and epoxide. Analysis of the kinetic data on adducts formation suggests two parallel mechanisms for the inhibition of drug activity. The first involves modulation of the reactivity of the epoxide group obtained by elimination of the spiro system and relief of ring strain. This effect does not abolish epoxide reactivity and is more evident for the TRIS adduct, which can count on intramolecular stabilization of the form devoid of the spiro system. The second mechanism involves the slow nucleophilic attack to the epoxide ring, which results in permanent deactivation of the functional group responsible for topoisomerase II inhibition. This effect is predominant in phosphate buffer and is more evident for longer reaction times. These results provide a compelling reminder that the activity of chemically complex drugs in biological systems can be severely altered by buffer interactions, which may not be immediately predictable from the identity of the active group(s) and may require a more detailed knowledge of the subtle effects induced by vicinal groups.

  15. PHOSPHATE MANAGEMENT: FY2010 RESULTS OF PHOSPHATE PRECIPITATION TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M.; King, W.

    2011-04-04

    The Phosphate Management program seeks to develop treatment options for caustic phosphate solutions resulting from the caustic leaching of the bismuth phosphate sludge. The SRNL subtask investigated the precipitation of phosphate salts from caustic solutions through addition of fluoride and by crystallization. The scoping tests examined the: precipitation of phosphate by the addition of sodium fluoride to form the sodium fluorophosphate double salt, Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} {center_dot} 19H{sub 2}O, crystallization of phosphate by reducing the temperature of saturated phosphate solutions, and combinations of precipitation and crystallization. A simplified leachate simulant was used in the study produced by dissolving sodium phosphate in 1 M to 3.5 M sodium hydroxide solutions. The results show that all three processes; precipitation with sodium fluoride, crystallization, and combined precipitation/crystallization can be effective for removing large amounts of phosphate from solution. The combined process of precipitation/crystallization showed >90% removal of phosphate at all hydroxide concentrations when cooling a non-saturated phosphate solution from 65 C to 25 C. Based on the measured solubility of sodium phosphate, pH adjustment/caustic addition will also remove large amounts of phosphate from solution (>80%). For all three processes, the phosphate concentration in the caustic solution must be managed to keep the phosphate from becoming too concentrated and thereby potentially forming a solid mass of sodium phosphate after an effective phosphate removal process.

  16. Electrospray ionization in concentrated acetonitrile vapor improves the performance of mass spectrometry for proteomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; Wang, Fangjun; Liu, Zheyi; Liu, Jing; Zhu, Yixin; Zhang, Yukui; Zou, Hanfa

    2017-02-03

    Suppressing the background interferences and enhancing the analytes signals are long-term goals in high performance electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) analyses. We observed that performing electrospray in the presence of a concentrated acetonitrile atmosphere suppresses background interferences and enhances peptide signals. An enclosed nanoESI source was utilized to provide a stable atmosphere of concentrated acetonitrile vapor for high performance ESI-MS analyses. The median MS signal intensity increased by 5 times for a set of 23 BSA tryptic peptides in direct ESI-MS analysis. Further, the number of reproducibly and precisely quantified peptides could be improved 67% in six replicate label-free quantitative proteome analyses by this strategy.

  17. Topological and spatial structure in the liquid-water-acetonitrile mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, Dan L.; Laaksonen, Aatto

    1998-10-01

    We have studied the structure of the liquid-water-acetonitrile mixture using molecular configurations obtained by molecular dynamics simulation. Spatial distribution functions have been used to analyze the local structures surrounding the molecules. The effective hydrogen-bond definition has been used to study basic hydrogen-bond properties and topological properties of the hydrogen-bond network. The topology of the network depends on the acetonitrile concentration. Up to a critical concentration, there is an infinite network of hydrogen-bonded water molecules. At higher concentrations, the network cannot be supported, and finite water clusters form. In order to characterize the networks and clusters, we have calculated some properties of loops and chains of water molecules. The patterns of hydrogen bonds surrounding the molecules and the size distribution of the clusters have also been calculated. We suggest that this approach can be useful when studying the structure of other liquid mixtures where hydrogen bonds are an important mode of interaction.

  18. High-performance reversed-phase ion-pair chromatographic study of myo-inositol phosphates. Separation of myo-inositol phosphates, some common nucleotides and sugar phosphates.

    PubMed

    Patthy, M; Balla, T; Arányi, P

    1990-12-07

    A detailed study of all the major chromatographic variables affecting the retention behaviour and separation of myo-inositol phosphates in reversed-phase ion-pair chromatographic systems was carried out. The parameters studied included the eluent concentration of the pairing ion, the eluent concentration of the organic modifier and the buffer salt, the pH of the eluent, the minimum column plate count necessary for the separation of the inositol trisphosphate isomers and isocratic and gradient modes of separation. The retention behaviour of some common nucleotides and sugar phosphates was also investigated as these phosphates present chromatographic interference problems in biochemical studies based on the cellular incorporation of [32P]Pi. The separation methods developed appear to be superior to established anion-exchange separation techniques in terms of separation speed and "mildness" of the chromatographic conditions.

  19. Sorption of substituted indoles on highly cross-linked polystyrene from water-acetonitrile solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafigulin, R. V.; Myakishev, A. A.; Il'Ina, E. A.; Il'in, M. M.; Davankov, V. A.; Bulanova, A. V.

    2011-07-01

    The sorption of first synthesized indole derivatives by highly cross-linked polystyrenes from water-acetonitrile solutions was studied by high-performance liquid chromatography. The retention factors and differences in the Gibbs energy of adsorption from infinite diluted solutions were calculated, and the applicability of the Snyder-Soczewinski and Scott-Kucera models for describing the chromatographic retention of sorbates on a polymer network of highly cross-linked polystyrene was shown.

  20. Reaction of singlet oxygen with thioanisole in ionic liquid-acetonitrile binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Baciocchi, Enrico; Chiappe, Cinzia; Fasciani, Chiara; Lanzalunga, Osvaldo; Lapi, Andrea

    2010-11-19

    A study of the reaction of thioanisole with singlet oxygen in different ionic liquid-acetonitrile binary mixtures has shown that ILs are able to accelerate the thioanisole sulfoxidation when used as additives. With imidazolium ILs, the maximum efficiency is reached at x(IL) ∼ 0.1-0.2, whereas for the pyrrolidinium IL a plateau is reached. These results are discussed in terms of the ILs' tendency to form ionic aggregates and of differences in sulfoxidation reaction mechanism.

  1. Sorption of adamantane phenylamide derivatives on hyper-cross-linked polystyrene from water-acetonitrile eluents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafigulin, R. V.; Konstantinov, A. V.; Bulanova, A. V.; Il'in, M. M.; Davankov, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    Study of the main physicochemical features of the sorption of phenylamide adamantane derivatives on hyper-cross-linked polystyrene from water-acetonitrile solutions shows that both hydrophobic and electronic interactions make a large contribution to retention, especially for a chlorine-containing derivative in which there are π- p and π- d interactions between the outer-shell electrons of the chlorine atom in addition to π- π interactions between aromatic fragments of the sorbate and sorbent.

  2. High stability buffered phase comparator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. A.; Reinhardt, V. S. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A low noise RF signal phase comparator comprised of two high stability driver buffer amplifiers driving a double balanced mixer which operate to generate a beat frequency between the two RF input signals coupled to the amplifiers from the RF sources is described. The beat frequency output from the mixer is applied to a low noise zero crossing detector which is the phase difference between the two RF inputs. Temperature stability is provided by mounting the amplifiers and mixer on a common circuit board with the active circuit elements located on one side of a circuit board and the passive circuit elements located on the opposite side. A common heat sink is located adjacent the circuit board. The active circuit elements are embedded into the bores of the heat sink which slows the effect of ambient temperature changes and reduces the temperature gradients between the active circuit elements, thus improving the cancellation of temperature effects. The two amplifiers include individual voltage regulators, which increases RF isolation.

  3. Buffer-free therapeutic antibody preparations provide a viable alternative to conventionally buffered solutions: from protein buffer capacity prediction to bioprocess applications.

    PubMed

    Bahrenburg, Sven; Karow, Anne R; Garidel, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Protein therapeutics, including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), have significant buffering capacity, particularly at concentrations>50 mg/mL. This report addresses pH-related issues critical to adoption of self-buffered monoclonal antibody formulations. We evaluated solution conditions with protein concentrations ranging from 50 to 250 mg/mL. Samples were both buffer-free and conventionally buffered with citrate. Samples were non-isotonic or adjusted for isotonicity with NaCl or trehalose. Studies included accelerated temperature stability tests, shaking stability studies, and pH changes in infusion media as protein concentrate is added. We present averaged buffering slopes of capacity that can be applied to any mAb and present a general method for calculating buffering capacity of buffer-free, highly concentrated antibody liquid formulations. In temperature stability tests, neither buffer-free nor conventionally buffered solution conditions showed significant pH changes. Conventionally buffered solutions showed significantly higher opalescence than buffer-free ones. In general, buffer-free solution conditions showed less aggregation than conventionally buffered solutions. Shaking stability tests showed no differences between buffer-free and conventionally buffered solutions. "In-use" preparation experiments showed that pH in infusion bag medium can rapidly approximate that of self-buffered protein concentrate as concentrate is added. In summary, the buffer capacity of proteins can be predicted and buffer-free therapeutic antibody preparations provide a viable alternative to conventionally buffered solutions.

  4. Managing biosolids runoff phosphorus using buffer strips enhanced with drinking water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Wagner, D J; Elliott, H A; Brandt, R C; Jaiswal, D

    2008-01-01

    Vegetated buffers strips typically have limited ability to reduce delivery of dissolved phosphorus (DP) from agricultural fields to surface waters. A field study was conducted to evaluate the ability of buffer strips enhanced with drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs) to control runoff P losses from surface-applied biosolids characterized by high water-extractable P (4 g kg(-)(1)). Simulated rainfall (62.4 mm h(-1)) was applied to grassed plots (3 m x 10.7 m including a 2.67 m downslope buffer) surface-amended with biosolids at 102 kg P ha(-1) until 30 min of runoff was collected. With buffer strips top-dressed with WTR (20 Mg ha(-1)), runoff total P (TP = 2.5 mg L(-1)) and total DP (TDP = 1.9 mg L(-1)) were not statistically lower (alpha = 0.05) compared to plots with unamended grass buffers (TP = 2.7 mg L(-1); TDP = 2.6 mg L(-1)). Although the applied WTR had excess capacity (Langmuir P maxima of 25 g P kg(-1)) to sorb all runoff P, kinetic experiments suggest that sheet flow travel time across the buffers ( approximately 30 s) was insufficient for significant P reduction. Effective interception of dissolved P in runoff water by WTR-enhanced buffer strips requires rapid P sorption kinetics and hydrologic flow behavior ensuring sufficient runoff residence time and WTR contact in the buffer. Substantial phosphate-adsorbent contact opportunity may be more easily achieved by incorporating WTRs into P-enriched soils or blending WTRs with applied P sources.

  5. Acetonitrile cluster solvation in a cryogenic ethane-methane-propane liquid: Implications for Titan lake chemistry.

    PubMed

    Corrales, L René; Yi, Thomas D; Trumbo, Samantha K; Shalloway, David; Lunine, Jonathan I; Usher, David A

    2017-03-14

    The atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon, exhibits interesting UV- and radiation-driven chemistry between nitrogen and methane, resulting in dipolar, nitrile-containing molecules. The assembly and subsequent solvation of such molecules in the alkane lakes and seas found on the moon's surface are of particular interest for investigating the possibility of prebiotic chemistry in Titan's hydrophobic seas. Here we characterize the solvation of acetonitrile, a product of Titan's atmospheric radiation chemistry tentatively detected on Titan's surface [H. B. Niemann et al., Nature 438, 779-784 (2005)], in an alkane mixture estimated to match a postulated composition of the smaller lakes during cycles of active drying and rewetting. Molecular dynamics simulations are employed to determine the potential of mean force of acetonitrile (CH3CN) clusters moving from the alkane vapor into the bulk liquid. We find that the clusters prefer the alkane liquid to the vapor and do not dissociate in the bulk liquid. This opens up the possibility that acetonitrile-based microscopic polar chemistry may be possible in the otherwise nonpolar Titan lakes.

  6. Evidence of three-body correlation functions in Rb+ and Sr2+ acetonitrile solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, P.; Pavel, N. V.

    1999-09-01

    The local structure of Sr2+ and Rb+ ions in acetonitrile has been investigated by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and molecular dynamics simulations. The extended x-ray absorption fine structure above the Sr and Rb K edges has been interpreted in the framework of multiple scattering (MS) formalism and, for the first time, clear evidence of MS contributions has been found in noncomplexing ion solutions. Molecular dynamics has been used to generate the partial pair and triangular distribution functions from which model χ(k) signals have been constructed. The Sr2+ and Rb+ acetonitrile pair distribution functions show very sharp and well-defined first peaks indicating the presence of a well organized first solvation shell. Most of the linear acetonitrile molecules have been found to be distributed like hedgehog spines around the Sr2+ and Rb+ ions. The presence of three-body correlations has been singled out by the existence of well-defined peaks in the triangular configurations. Excellent agreement has been found between the theoretical and experimental data enforcing the reliability of the interatomic potentials used in the simulations. These results demonstrate the ability of the XAS technique in probing the higher-order correlation functions in solution.

  7. Interaction of counterions with subtilisin in acetonitrile: insights from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lousa, Diana; Cianci, Michele; Helliwell, John R; Halling, Peter J; Baptista, António M; Soares, Cláudio M

    2012-05-24

    A recent X-ray structure has enabled the location of chloride and cesium ions on the surface of subtilisin Carlsberg in acetonitrile soaked crystals. (1) To complement the previous study and analyze the system in solution, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, in acetonitrile, were performed using this structure. Additionally, Cl(-) and Cs(+) ions were docked on the protein surface and this system was also simulated. Our results indicate that chloride ions tend to stay close to the protein, whereas cesium ions frequently migrate to the solvent. The distribution of the ions around the enzyme surface is not strongly biased by their initial locations. Replacing cesium by sodium ions showed that the distribution of the two cations is similar, indicating that Cs(+) can be used to find the binding sites of cations like Na(+) and K(+), which, unlike Cs(+), have physiological and biotechnological roles. The Na(+)Cl(-) is more stable than the Cs(+)Cl(-) ion pair, decreasing the probability of interaction between Cl(-) and subtilisin. The comparison of water and acetonitrile simulations indicates that the solvent influences the distribution of the ions. This work provides an extensive theoretical analysis of the interaction between ions and the model enzyme subtilisin in a nonaqueous medium.

  8. Femtosecond pump probe studies of chlorine dioxide photochemistry in water and acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philpott, Matthew J.; Hayes, Sophia C.; Reid, Philip J.

    1998-09-01

    The reaction dynamics of chlorine dioxide (OClO) dissolved in water and acetonitrile are investigated using femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. The change in optical density following photoexcitation of OClO at 400 nm is monitored at 12 wavelengths ranging from 267 to 900 nm. The dynamics observed at 267 and 400 nm demonstrate that the geminate recombination quantum yield of the primary ClO and O photofragments to reform ground-state OClO is reduced by a factor of six in acetonitrile relative to water. Calculations are presented that model the contribution of vibrationally excited OClO formed by geminate recombination to the pump-probe dynamics. Comparison of the experimental and computational results demonstrates that a portion of the dynamics can be attributed to vibrationally excited OClO. However, the optical-density changes observed between 700 and 900 nm are similar in magnitude for both solvents, suggesting that another species not produced by geminate recombination is responsible for these dynamics. The appearance and relaxation kinetics in acetonitrile are significantly slower than in water demonstrating the solvent dependence of photoproduct formation and ground-state vibrational relaxation. Reasons for this dependence including Coulombic solvent-solute interactions and intermolecular hydrogen bonding are discussed.

  9. Effect of dilution on compressibility of naproxen in acetonitrile studied by ultrasonic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marczak, W.; Kowalska, T.; Bucek, M.; Piotrowski, D.; Sajewicz, M.

    2006-11-01

    Naproxen, ibuprofen, and ketoprofen are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. All of them belong to chiral 2-arylpropionic acids (2-APAs). Chiral compounds may remain in a patient's body as two antimers, even if administered as a single one, due to transenantiomerization. That is dangerous if therapeutic enantiomer has a toxic antipode. Chromatographic data suggest that solutions of S-(+)-naproxen in acetonitrile are stiffer than the pure solvent that favours oscillatory transenantiomerisation. Acoustic and volumetric studies of dilute solutions of naproxen in acetonitrile have been undertaken to verify that supposition. The molar adiabatic compressibility and volume depend linearly on the molar percent of naproxen at temperatures from 298.15 K to 313.15 K. Limiting partial compressibility of naproxen is close to zero and decreases slightly with increasing temperature. Thus, the compressibility of dilute solutions is mainly due to compressibility of acetonitrile, while naproxen is virtually incompressible. The hydrogen-bonded dimers of naproxen probably remain intact, even at infinite dilution.

  10. Analysing Cytochrome c Aggregation and Fibrillation upon Interaction with Acetonitrile: an in Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Furkan, Mohammad; Fazili, Naveed Ahmad; Afsar, Mohammad; Naeem, Aabgeena

    2016-11-01

    The propensity of native state to form aggregated and fibrillar assemblies is a hallmark of amyloidosis. Our study was focused at analyzing the aggregation and fibrillation tendency of cytochrome c in presence of an organic solvent i.e. acetonitrile. In vitro analysis revealed that the interaction of cytochrome c with acetonitrile facilitated the oligomerization of cytochrome c via the passage through an intermediate state which was obtained at 20 % v/v concentration of acetonitrile featured by a sharp hike in the ANS fluorescence intensity with a blue shift of 20 nm compared to the native state. Oligomers and fibrils were formed at 40 and 50 % v/v concentration respectively as indicated by a significant hike in the ThT fluorescence intensity, red shift of 55 nm in congo red binding assay and an increase in absorbance at 350 nm. They possess β-sheet structure as evident from appearance of peak at 217 nm. Finally, authenticity of oligomeric and fibrillar species was confirmed by TEM imaging which revealed bead like aggregates and a meshwork of thread like fibrils respectively. It could be suggested that the fibrillation of bovine cytchrome c could serve as a model protein to unravel the general aggregation and fibrillation pattern of heme proteins. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  11. Theoretical and experimental examination of SFG polarization analysis at acetonitrile-water solution surfaces.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kengo; Peng, Qiling; Qiao, Lin; Wang, Lin; Joutsuka, Tatsuya; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Ye, Shen; Morita, Akihiro

    2017-03-16

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy is widely used to observe molecular orientation at interfaces through a combination of various types of polarization. The present work thoroughly examines the relation between the polarization dependence of SFG signals and the molecular orientation, by comparing SFG measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of acetonitrile/water solutions. The present SFG experiment and MD simulations yield quite consistent results on the ratios of χ((2)) elements, supporting the reliability of both means. However, the subsequent polarization analysis tends to derive more upright tilt angles of acetonitrile than the direct MD calculations. The reasons for discrepancy are examined in terms of three issues; (i) anisotropy of the Raman tensor, (ii) cross-correlation, and (iii) orientational distribution. The analysis revealed that the issues (i) and (iii) are the main causes of errors in the conventional polarization analysis of SFG spectra. In methyl CH stretching, the anisotropy of Raman tensor cannot be estimated from the simple bond polarizability model. The neglect of the orientational distribution is shown to systematically underestimate the tilt angle of acetonitrile. Further refined use of polarization analysis in collaboration with MD simulations should be proposed.

  12. Computer simulation of acetonitrile and methanol with ab initio-based pair potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hloucha, M.; Sum, A. K.; Sandler, S. I.

    2000-10-01

    This study address the adequacy of ab initio pair interaction energy potentials for the prediction of macroscopic properties. Recently, Bukowski et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 103, 7322 (1999)] performed a comprehensive study of the potential energy surfaces for several pairs of molecules using symmetry-adapted perturbation theory. These ab initio energies were then fit to an appropriate site-site potential form. In an attempt to bridge the gap between ab initio interaction energy information and macroscopic properties prediction, we performed Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo (GEMC) simulations using their developed pair potentials for acetonitrile and methanol. The simulations results show that the phase behavior of acetonitrile is well described by just the pair interaction potential. For methanol, on the other hand, pair interactions are insufficient to properly predict its vapor-liquid phase behavior, and its saturated liquid density. We also explored simplified forms for representing the ab initio interaction energies by refitting a selected range of the data to a site-site Lennard-Jones and to a modified Buckingham (exponential-6) potentials plus Coulombic interactions. These were also used in GEMC simulations in order to evaluate the quality and computational efficiency of these different potential forms. It was found that the phase behavior prediction for acetonitrile and methanol are highly dependent on the details of the interaction potentials developed.

  13. Acetonitrile cluster solvation in a cryogenic ethane-methane-propane liquid: Implications for Titan lake chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrales, L. René; Yi, Thomas D.; Trumbo, Samantha K.; Shalloway, David; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Usher, David A.

    2017-03-01

    The atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon, exhibits interesting UV- and radiation-driven chemistry between nitrogen and methane, resulting in dipolar, nitrile-containing molecules. The assembly and subsequent solvation of such molecules in the alkane lakes and seas found on the moon's surface are of particular interest for investigating the possibility of prebiotic chemistry in Titan's hydrophobic seas. Here we characterize the solvation of acetonitrile, a product of Titan's atmospheric radiation chemistry tentatively detected on Titan's surface [H. B. Niemann et al., Nature 438, 779-784 (2005)], in an alkane mixture estimated to match a postulated composition of the smaller lakes during cycles of active drying and rewetting. Molecular dynamics simulations are employed to determine the potential of mean force of acetonitrile (CH3CN) clusters moving from the alkane vapor into the bulk liquid. We find that the clusters prefer the alkane liquid to the vapor and do not dissociate in the bulk liquid. This opens up the possibility that acetonitrile-based microscopic polar chemistry may be possible in the otherwise nonpolar Titan lakes.

  14. Buffer Management Simulation in ATM Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaprak, E.; Xiao, Y.; Chronopoulos, A.; Chow, E.; Anneberg, L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a simulation of a new dynamic buffer allocation management scheme in ATM networks. To achieve this objective, an algorithm that detects congestion and updates the dynamic buffer allocation scheme was developed for the OPNET simulation package via the creation of a new ATM module.

  15. FIFO Buffer for Asynchronous Data Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascle, K. P.

    1985-01-01

    Variable-rate, asynchronous data signals from up to four measuring instruments or other sources combined in first-in/first-out (FIFO) buffer for transmission on single channel. Constructed in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) logic, buffer consumes low power (only 125 mW at 5V) and conforms to aerospace standards of reliability and maintainability.

  16. Riparian buffer transpiration and watershed scale impacts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forested riparian buffers are prevalent throughout the Southeastern Coastal Plain Region of the United States (US). Because they make up a significant portion of the regional landscape, transpiration within these riparian buffers is believed to have an important impact on the hydrologic budget of r...

  17. African American College Women's Suicide Buffers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marion, Michelle S.; Range, Lillian M.

    2003-01-01

    To examine the relationships buffers may have with suicide ideation, 300 African American female college students completed measures of suicide ideation and buffers. Three variables accounted for a significant and unique portion of the variance in suicide ideation: family support, a view that suicide is unacceptable, and a collaborative religious…

  18. UNDERSTANDING, DERIVING, AND COMPUTING BUFFER CAPACITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Derivation and systematic calculation of buffer capacity is a topic that seems often to be neglected in chemistry courses and given minimal treatment in most texts. However, buffer capacity is very important in the chemistry of natural waters and potable water. It affects corro...

  19. 46 CFR 58.25-45 - Buffers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Buffers. 58.25-45 Section 58.25-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-45 Buffers. For each vessel on an ocean, coastwise, or Great Lakes...

  20. 46 CFR 58.25-45 - Buffers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Buffers. 58.25-45 Section 58.25-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-45 Buffers. For each vessel on an ocean, coastwise, or Great Lakes...

  1. 46 CFR 58.25-45 - Buffers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Buffers. 58.25-45 Section 58.25-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-45 Buffers. For each vessel on an ocean, coastwise, or Great Lakes...

  2. 21 CFR 520.1696a - Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with... FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696a Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent. (a) Specifications. When reconstituted, each milliliter contains penicillin G procaine...

  3. 21 CFR 520.1696a - Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with... FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696a Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent. (a) Specifications. When reconstituted, each milliliter contains penicillin G procaine...

  4. 21 CFR 520.1696a - Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with... FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696a Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent. (a) Specifications. When reconstituted, each milliliter contains penicillin G procaine...

  5. Comparison of methanol and acetonitrile eluents for the quantitation of chelators specific to soft-metal ions by HPLC.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shinya; Yoshimura, Etsuro

    2012-11-15

    HPLC eluent systems employing acetonitrile and methanol were evaluated for the quantitation of glutathione (GSH) and phytochelatin (PC(n)), a family of peptides implicated in heavy-metal detoxification in higher plants. The detection system is based on the dequenching of copper(I)-bathocuproine disulfonate and is specific for soft-metal chelators. Although both elution systems yielded comparable analytical performance for each PC(n), the acetonitrile system had a lower sensitivity for GSH and a steadily increasing baseline. The inferior properties of the acetonitrile system may be due to complex formation between acetonitrile and Cu(I) ions. Both methods were applied to measure peptide levels in the primitive red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae. Coefficients of variation (CVs) were less than 5%, except for GSH and PC(4) determinations in the acetonitrile system, in cases when CV values were found to be 8.8% and 6.3%, respectively. Recoveries were greater than 96%, except for GSH determination in the acetonitrile system, with a recovery of 84.4%; however, the concentration measured in the acetonitrile system did not differ from that measured in the methanol system at a significance level of 0.05.

  6. Assessment of acetone as an alternative to acetonitrile in peptide analysis by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Ria; Ruth, Wolfgang; Kragl, Udo

    2009-07-01

    Acetonitrile as a solvent used in liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) of peptides and proteins is a relatively toxic solvent (LD50 oral; rat; 2,460 mg/kg) compared to alternatives like methanol (LD50 oral; rat; 5,628 mg/kg) and acetone (LD50 oral; rat; 5,800 mg/kg). Strategies to minimize its consumption in LC are either to reduce the inner diameter of the column or replace acetonitrile with a suitable alternative. Methanol is often recommended to replace acetonitrile in peptide analysis. In this study however, the main focus lies on another alternative solvent for LC/MS of peptides; acetone. A number of model proteins were tryptically digested and the peptide solutions were analyzed on a linear trap quadrupole (LTQ) mass spectrometer. The performances of acetonitrile, methanol and acetone were compared according to the quality of the chromatograms obtained and identification of the peptides using the BioWorks software developed by Thermo Scientific. In accordance to the elutropic series, acetone was found to significantly reduce the retention times of peptides separated by C18 column material with regard to acetonitrile while methanol led to increased retention times. Acetone was the superior solvent to methanol for most of the tested model proteins reaching similar sequence coverage and numbers of identified peptides as acetonitrile. We therefore propose acetone as an alternative to acetonitrile in LC/MS of peptides.

  7. Carbonated calcium phosphates are suitable pH-stabilising fillers for biodegradable polyesters.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Carsten; Epple, Matthias

    2003-05-01

    Carbonated amorphous calcium phosphates were prepared with different carbonate content. Their ability to neutralise acidity was probed by time-resolved titration experiments with lactic acid, the monomer that results from degradation of polylactide. The results show that although calcium phosphate as such can reduce acidity, their buffering range lies at a pH of about 4, i.e. outside the physiological range. This is not related to the rate of dissolution. Carbonated calcium phosphates as well as calcium carbonate (calcite) alone are able to keep the pH around 7.4. Consequently, carbonated calcium phosphates are suitable basic filler materials as they are able to compensate acidity, and to buffer within the physiological pH-range.

  8. Purification and characterization of 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate synthetase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ray, P H

    1980-01-01

    3-Deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate (KDO)-8-phosphate synthetase has been purified 450-fold from frozen Escherichia coli B cells. The purified enzyme catalyzed the stoichiometric formation of KDO-8-phosphate and Pi from phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and D-arabinose-5-phosphate. The enzyme showed no metal requirement for activity and was inhibited by 1 mM Cd2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, and Hg2+. The inhibition by Hg2+ could be reversed by dithiothreitol. The optimum temperature for enzyme activity was determined to be 45 degrees C, and the energy of activation calculated by the Arrhenius equation was 15,000 calories (ca. 3,585 J) per mol. The enzyme activity was shown to be pH and buffer dependent, showing two pH optima, one at pH 4.0 to 6.0 in succinate buffer and one at pH 9.0 in glycine buffer. The isoelectric point of the enzyme was 5.1. KDO-8-phosphate synthetase had a molecular weight of 90,000 +/- 6,000 as determined by molecular sieving through G-200 Sephadex and by Ferguson analysis using polyacrylamide gels. Based on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the 90,000-molecular-weight native enzyme was composed of three identical subunits, each with an apparent molecular weight of 32,000 +/- 4,000. The enzyme had an apparent Km for D-arabinose-5-phosphate of 2 X 10(-5) M and an apparent Km for PEP of 6 X 10(-6) M. No other sugar or sugar-phosphate could substitute for D-arabinose-5-phosphate. D-Ribose-5-phosphate was a competitive inhibitor of D-arabinose-5-phosphate, with an apparent Ki of 1 X 10(-3) M. The purified enzyme has been utilized to synthesize millimole quantities of pure KDO-8-phosphate. PMID:6988389

  9. Optimization of protein buffer cocktails using Thermofluor.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Linda; Mayerhofer, Hubert; Geerlof, Arie; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen; Weiss, Manfred S

    2013-02-01

    The stability and homogeneity of a protein sample is strongly influenced by the composition of the buffer that the protein is in. A quick and easy approach to identify a buffer composition which increases the stability and possibly the conformational homogeneity of a protein sample is the fluorescence-based thermal-shift assay (Thermofluor). Here, a novel 96-condition screen for Thermofluor experiments is presented which consists of buffer and additive parts. The buffer screen comprises 23 different buffers and the additive screen includes small-molecule additives such as salts and nucleotide analogues. The utilization of small-molecule components which increase the thermal stability of a protein sample frequently results in a protein preparation of higher quality and quantity and ultimately also increases the chances of the protein crystallizing.

  10. [Mechanical buffering characteristics of feline paw pads].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yang, Jialing; Yu, Hui

    2012-12-01

    In the long time of natural evolution, the bodies of some animals, such as feline, that live in the wild and complicate surroundings have evolved to possess outstanding buffering characteristics, which make the animals adapt to the environment perfectly. These animals generally have well-developed paw pads under their soles to play an important role in attenuating the intensity of impact when they land on the ground. Investigating the buffering characteristics of these animals' paw pads could help us to design "bionic" buffering and energy-absorption devices. In this paper, based on observations of animal jumping test, a simple mass-spring-buffer model was proposed to explore the buffering characteristics of the animals' paw pads. By analytically solving the differential equations of this model, the parameters concerned with paw pads functions were discussed and some significant results were obtained.

  11. Acute phosphate nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Monfared, Ali; Habibzadeh, Seyed Mahmoud; Mesbah, Seyed Alireza

    2014-05-01

    We present acute phosphate nephropathy in a 28-year-old man, which was developed after a car accident due to rhabdomyolysis. Treatment of acute kidney injury was done with administration of sodium bicarbonate.

  12. Metal-phosphate binders

    DOEpatents

    Howe, Beth Ann [Lewistown, IL; Chaps-Cabrera, Jesus Guadalupe [Coahuila, MX

    2009-05-12

    A metal-phosphate binder is provided. The binder may include an aqueous phosphoric acid solution, a metal-cation donor including a metal other than aluminum, an aluminum-cation donor, and a non-carbohydrate electron donor.

  13. Are buffers boring? Uniqueness and asymptotical stability of traveling wave fronts in the buffered bistable system.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Je-Chiang; Sneyd, James

    2007-04-01

    Traveling waves of calcium are widely observed under the condition that the free cytosolic calcium is buffered. Thus it is of physiological interest to determine how buffers affect the properties of calcium waves. Here we summarise and extend previous results on the existence, uniqueness and stability of traveling wave solutions of the buffered bistable equation, which is the simplest possible model of the upstroke of a calcium wave. Taken together, the results show that immobile buffers do not change the existence, uniqueness or stability of the traveling wave, while mobile buffers can eliminate a traveling wave. However, if a wave exists in the latter case, it remains unique and stable.

  14. Analysis of drugs of forensic interest with capillary zone electrophoresis/time-of-flight mass spectrometry based on the use of non-volatile buffers.

    PubMed

    Gottardo, Rossella; Mikšík, Ivan; Aturki, Zeineb; Sorio, Daniela; Seri, Catia; Fanali, Salvatore; Tagliaro, Franco

    2012-02-01

    The present work is aimed at investigating the influence of the background electrolyte composition and concentration on the separation efficiency and resolution and mass spectrometric detection of illicit drugs in a capillary zone electrophoresis-electrospray ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (CZE-ESI-TOF MS) system. The effect of phosphate, borate and Tris buffers on the separation and mass spectrometry response of a mixture of 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, methadone, cocaine, morphine, codeine and 6-monoacetylmorphine was studied, in comparison with a reference ammonium formate separation buffer. Inorganic non-volatile borate and Tris buffers proved hardly suitable for capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) analysis, but quite unexpectedly ammonium phosphate buffers showed good separation and ionization performances for all the analytes tested. Applications of this method to real samples of hair from drug addicts are also provided.

  15. Phosphate control in dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Cupisti, Adamasco; Gallieni, Maurizio; Rizzo, Maria Antonietta; Caria, Stefania; Meola, Mario; Bolasco, Piergiorgio

    2013-01-01

    Prevention and correction of hyperphosphatemia is a major goal of chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD) management, achievable through avoidance of a positive phosphate balance. To this aim, optimal dialysis removal, careful use of phosphate binders, and dietary phosphate control are needed to optimize the control of phosphate balance in well-nourished patients on a standard three-times-a-week hemodialysis schedule. Using a mixed diffusive–convective hemodialysis tecniques, and increasing the number and/or the duration of dialysis tecniques are all measures able to enhance phosphorus (P) mass removal through dialysis. However, dialytic removal does not equal the high P intake linked to the high dietary protein requirement of dialysis patients; hence, the use of intestinal P binders is mandatory to reduce P net intestinal absorption. Unfortunately, even a large dose of P binders is able to bind approximately 200–300 mg of P on a daily basis, so it is evident that their efficacy is limited in the case of an uncontrolled dietary P load. Hence, limitation of dietary P intake is needed to reach the goal of neutral phosphate balance in dialysis, coupled to an adequate protein intake. To this aim, patients should be informed and educated to avoid foods that are naturally rich in phosphate and also processed food with P-containing preservatives. In addition, patients should preferentially choose food with a low P-to-protein ratio. For example, patients could choose egg white or protein from a vegetable source. Finally, boiling should be the preferred cooking procedure, because it induces food demineralization, including phosphate loss. The integrated approach outlined in this article should be actively adapted as a therapeutic alliance by clinicians, dieticians, and patients for an effective control of phosphate balance in dialysis patients. PMID:24133374

  16. Phosphate control in dialysis.

    PubMed

    Cupisti, Adamasco; Gallieni, Maurizio; Rizzo, Maria Antonietta; Caria, Stefania; Meola, Mario; Bolasco, Piergiorgio

    2013-10-04

    Prevention and correction of hyperphosphatemia is a major goal of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) management, achievable through avoidance of a positive phosphate balance. To this aim, optimal dialysis removal, careful use of phosphate binders, and dietary phosphate control are needed to optimize the control of phosphate balance in well-nourished patients on a standard three-times-a-week hemodialysis schedule. Using a mixed diffusive-convective hemodialysis tecniques, and increasing the number and/or the duration of dialysis tecniques are all measures able to enhance phosphorus (P) mass removal through dialysis. However, dialytic removal does not equal the high P intake linked to the high dietary protein requirement of dialysis patients; hence, the use of intestinal P binders is mandatory to reduce P net intestinal absorption. Unfortunately, even a large dose of P binders is able to bind approximately 200-300 mg of P on a daily basis, so it is evident that their efficacy is limited in the case of an uncontrolled dietary P load. Hence, limitation of dietary P intake is needed to reach the goal of neutral phosphate balance in dialysis, coupled to an adequate protein intake. To this aim, patients should be informed and educated to avoid foods that are naturally rich in phosphate and also processed food with P-containing preservatives. In addition, patients should preferentially choose food with a low P-to-protein ratio. For example, patients could choose egg white or protein from a vegetable source. Finally, boiling should be the preferred cooking procedure, because it induces food demineralization, including phosphate loss. The integrated approach outlined in this article should be actively adapted as a therapeutic alliance by clinicians, dieticians, and patients for an effective control of phosphate balance in dialysis patients.

  17. Electrophoretic mobilities of erythrocytes in various buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.; Kunze, M. E.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    The calibration of space flight equipment depends on a source of standard test particles, this test particle of choice is the fixed erythrocyte. Erythrocytes from different species have different electrophoretic mobilities. Electrophoretic mobility depends upon zeta potential, which, in turn depends upon ionic strength. Zeta potential decreases with increasing ionic strength, so cells have high electrophoretic mobility in space electrophoresis buffers than in typical physiological buffers. The electrophoretic mobilities of fixed human, rat, and rabbit erythrocytes in 0.145 M salt and buffers of varying ionic strength, temperature, and composition, to assess the effects of some of the unique combinations used in space buffers were characterized. Several effects were assessed: glycerol or DMSO (dimethylsulfoxide) were considered for use as cryoprotectants. The effect of these substances on erythrocyte electrophoretic mobility was examined. The choice of buffer depended upon cell mobility. Primary experiments with kidney cells established the choice of buffer and cryoprotectant. A nonstandard temperature of EPM in the suitable buffer was determined. A loss of ionic strength control occurs in the course of preparing columns for flight, the effects of small increases in ionic strength over the expected low values need to be evaluated.

  18. Social buffering: relief from stress and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kikusui, Takefumi; Winslow, James T; Mori, Yuji

    2006-12-29

    Communication is essential to members of a society not only for the expression of personal information, but also for the protection from environmental threats. Highly social mammals have a distinct characteristic: when conspecific animals are together, they show a better recovery from experiences of distress. This phenomenon, termed 'social buffering', has been found in rodents, birds, non-human primates and also in humans. This paper reviews classical findings on social buffering and focuses, in particular, on social buffering effects in relation to neuroendocrine stress responses. The social cues that transmit social buffering signals, the neural mechanisms of social buffering and a partner's efficacy with respect to social buffering are also detailed. Social contact appears to have a very positive influence on the psychological and the physiological aspects of social animals, including human beings. Research leading towards further understanding of the mechanisms of social buffering could provide alternative medical treatments based on the natural, individual characteristics of social animals, which could improve the quality of life.

  19. A novel structure of optical buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, AiMing; Wu, Chongqing; Gao, Huali; Gong, Yandong; Shum, Ping

    2005-02-01

    Optical buffers are critical for low packet-loss probability in future photonic packet-switched networks. In particular, they would be required to store packets during rate conversion and header processing, and to overcome the receiver's bottleneck. They would be required for queuing packets while transmitters await access to the network. In this paper, we present a novel structure of optical buffer with compact size. This kind of optical buffer is based on a collinear 3x3 fiber coupler in which three fibers are completely in the same plane and weakly coupled. A SOA is used as its nonlinear element as well as an amplifier in it.The experiment result will be also given in the paper. Storage results obtained with this novel structure optical buffer at 100Mb/s will be presented first and then its capacity is extended to higher data rates of 2.5Gb/s, more compatible with present optical networks. Storage has been observed for time up to 1.568ms(more than 32 circulations) in both cases without obvious degration. The novel structure of optical buffer could be a more compact device which makes it possible to be integrated in a chip. SOA in the buffer is used as a nonlinear element as well as an amplifier to compensate loss in the buffer loop. The buffer needs low control power for switch operation. It is easy to control 'write' and 'erase' operation because the same TOAD switch in the buffer can be used for both 'write' and 'erase' operation.

  20. Effects of different extraction buffers on peanut protein detectability and lateral flow device (LFD) performance.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, J; Ansari, P; Kern, C; Ludwig, T; Baumgartner, S

    2012-01-01

    The accidental uptake of peanuts can cause severe health reactions in allergic individuals. Reliable determination of traces of peanuts in food products is required to support correct labelling and therefore minimise consumers' risk. The immunoanalytical detectability of potentially allergenic peanut proteins is dependent on previous heat treatment, the extraction capacity of the applied buffer and the specificity of the antibody. In this study a lateral flow device (LFD) for the detection of peanut protein was developed and the capacity of 30 different buffers to extract proteins from mildly and strongly roasted peanut samples as well as their influence on the test strip performance were investigated. Most of the tested buffers showed good extraction capacity for putative Ara h 1 from mildly roasted peanuts. Protein extraction from dark-roasted samples required denaturing additives, which were proven to be incompatible with LFD performance. High-pH buffers increased the protein yield but inhibited signal generation on the test strip. Overall, the best results were achieved using neutral phosphate buffers but equal detectability of differently altered proteins due to food processing cannot be assured yet for immunoanalytical methods.

  1. Cheese whey as substrate of batch hydrogen production: effect of temperature and addition of buffer.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Páez, K M; Poggi-Varaldo, H M; García-Mena, J; Ponce-Noyola, M T; Ramos-Valdivia, A C; Barrera-Cortés, J; Robles-González, I V; Ruiz-Ordáz, N; Villa-Tanaca, L; Rinderknecht-Seijas, N

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of buffer addition and process temperature (ambient and 35°C) on H2 production in batch fermentation of cheese whey (CW). When the H2 production reached a plateau, the headspace of the reactors were flushed with N2 and reactors were re-incubated. Afterwards, only the reactors with phosphate buffer showed a second cycle of H2 production and 48% more H2 was obtained. The absence of a second cycle in non-buffered reactors could be related to a lower final pH than in the buffered reactors; the low pH could drive the fermentation to solvents production. Indeed a high solvent production was observed in non-buffered bioreactors as given by low ρ ratios (defined as the ratio between sum of organic acid production and sum of solvents production). Regarding the process temperatures, no significant difference between the H2 production of reactors incubated at ambient temperature and at 35°C was described. After flushing the headspace of bioreactors with N2 at the end of the second cycle, the H2 production did not resume (in all reactors).

  2. Immobilization of Rhodococcus rhodochrous BX2 (an acetonitrile-degrading bacterium) with biofilm-forming bacteria for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Li, Yue; Cheng, Xiaosong; Feng, Liping; Xi, Chuanwu; Zhang, Ying

    2013-03-01

    In this study, a unique biofilm consisting of three bacterial strains with high biofilm-forming capability (Bacillus subtilis E2, E3, and N4) and an acetonitrile-degrading bacterium (Rhodococcus rhodochrous BX2) was established for acetonitrile-containing wastewater treatment. The results indicated that this biofilm exhibited strong resistance to acetonitrile loading shock and displayed a typical spatial and structural heterogeneity and completely depleted the initial concentration of acetonitrile (800mgL(-1)) within 24h in a moving-bed-biofilm reactor (MBBR) after operation for 30days. The immobilization of BX2 cells in the biofilm was confirmed by PCR-DGGE. It has been demonstrated that biofilm-forming bacteria can promote the immobilization of contaminant-degrading bacteria in the biofilms and can subsequently improve the degradation of contaminants in wastewater. This approach offers a novel strategy for enhancing biological oxidation of toxic pollutants in wastewater.

  3. Photo-assisted cyanation of transition metal nitrates coupled with room temperature C-C bond cleavage of acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Zou, Shihui; Li, Renhong; Kobayashi, Hisayoshi; Liu, Juanjuan; Fan, Jie

    2013-03-07

    It is a challenge to use acetonitrile as a cyanating agent because of the difficulty in cleaving its C-CN bond. Herein, we report a mild photo-assisted route to conduct the cyanation of transition metal nitrates using acetonitrile as the cyanating agent coupled with room-temperature C-C bond cleavage. DFT calculations and experimental observations suggest a radical-involved reaction mechanism, which excludes toxicity from free cyanide ions.

  4. Ligand sensitized luminescence of uranyl by benzoic acid in acetonitrile medium: a new luminescent uranyl benzoate specie.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satendra; Maji, S; Joseph, M; Sankaran, K

    2015-03-05

    Benzoic acid (BA) is shown to sensitize and enhance the luminescence of uranyl ion in acetonitrile medium. Luminescence spectra and especially UV-Vis spectroscopy studies reveal the formation of tri benzoate complex of uranyl i.e. [UO2(C6H5COO)3](-) which is highly luminescent. In particular, three sharp bands at 431, 443, 461nm of absorption spectra provides evidence for tri benzoate specie of uranyl in acetonitrile medium. The luminescence lifetime of uranyl in this complex is 68μs which is much more compared to the lifetime of uncomplexed uranyl (20μs) in acetonitrile medium. In contrary to aqueous medium where uranyl benzoate forms 1:1 and 1:2 species, spectroscopic data reveal formation of 1:3 complex in acetonitrile medium. Addition of water to acetonitrile results in decrease of luminescence intensity of this specie and the luminescence features implode at 20% (v/v) of water content. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the existence of [UO2(C6H5COO)3](-) specie in acetonitrile is reported. Mechanism of luminescence enhancement is discussed.

  5. Development of an improved method to extract pesticide residues in foods using acetonitrile with magnesium sulfate and chloroform.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guozhu; Rong, Lei; Guo, Bin; Zhang, Mingshan; Li, Shengjun; Wu, Qing; Chen, Jitao; Chen, Bo; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2011-03-18

    A multiresidue method was developed based on extraction of 10 g sample with 10 mL acetonitrile and subsequent liquid-liquid partitioning formed by adding 4 g MgSO₄ plus 1 mL chloroform. During the partitioning process, the extraction recoveries of polar analytes were found to be essentially determined by the acetonitrile content in the aqueous phase. The use of MgSO₄ gave the least acetonitrile left in the aqueous phase (lower than 5%) and thus promoting complete partitioning of analytes into the organic phase. At the same time, removal of water from the acetonitrile phase was achieved by adding only a small amount of chloroform with no influence on the acetonitrile content in the aqueous phase, thus leading to decreasing the co-extraction of polar matrix components. The most complete mutual separation of acetonitrile and water was achieved by the joint use of MgSO₄ and chloroform and thus the optimal extraction recovery and analytical selectivity were obtained simultaneously. The new method, with higher recoveries of polar analytes, better analytical selectivity and simpler manipulation, is a claimed improvement to the original QuEChERS method. The proposed method was finally validated by the determination of 20 pesticides in a mixed food matrix by using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrum (LC-MS/MS). Acceptable linearity, sensitivity, recovery, precision and selectivity results were obtained.

  6. Strategies for the hyperpolarization of acetonitrile and related ligands by SABRE.

    PubMed

    Mewis, Ryan E; Green, Richard A; Cockett, Martin C R; Cowley, Michael J; Duckett, Simon B; Green, Gary G R; John, Richard O; Rayner, Peter J; Williamson, David C

    2015-01-29

    We report on a strategy for using SABRE (signal amplification by reversible exchange) for polarizing (1)H and (13)C nuclei of weakly interacting ligands which possess biologically relevant and nonaromatic motifs. We first demonstrate this via the polarization of acetonitrile, using Ir(IMes)(COD)Cl as the catalyst precursor, and confirm that the route to hyperpolarization transfer is via the J-coupling network. We extend this work to the polarization of propionitrile, benzylnitrile, benzonitrile, and trans-3-hexenedinitrile in order to assess its generality. In the (1)H NMR spectrum, the signal for acetonitrile is enhanced 8-fold over its thermal counterpart when [Ir(H)2(IMes)(MeCN)3](+) is the catalyst. Upon addition of pyridine or pyridine-d5, the active catalyst changes to [Ir(H)2(IMes)(py)2(MeCN)](+) and the resulting acetonitrile (1)H signal enhancement increases to 20- and 60-fold, respectively. In (13)C NMR studies, polarization transfers optimally to the quaternary (13)C nucleus of MeCN while the methyl (13)C is hardly polarized. Transfer to (13)C is shown to occur first via the (1)H-(1)H coupling between the hydrides and the methyl protons and then via either the (2)J or (1)J couplings to the respective (13)Cs, of which the (2)J route is more efficient. These experimental results are rationalized through a theoretical treatment which shows excellent agreement with experiment. In the case of MeCN, longitudinal two-spin orders between pairs of (1)H nuclei in the three-spin methyl group are created. Two-spin order states, between the (1)H and (13)C nuclei, are also created, and their existence is confirmed for Me(13)CN in both the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra using the Only Parahydrogen Spectroscopy protocol.

  7. Effects of organic solvents and substrate binding on trypsin in acetonitrile and hexane media.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yanyan; Yuan, Yuan; Zhu, Yanyan; Guo, Yanzhi; Li, Menglong; Wang, Zhimeng; Pu, Xuemei; Jiang, Lin

    2013-09-01

    In this work, we used molecular dynamic (MD) simulation to study trypsin with and without a six-amino-acid peptide bound in three different solvents (water, acetonitrile and hexane) in order to provide molecular information for well understanding the structure and function of enzymes in non-aqueous media. The results show that the enzyme is more compact and less native-like in hexane than in the other two polar solvents. The substrate could stabilize the native protein structure in the two polar media, but not in the non-polar hexane. There are no significant differences in the conformation of the S1 pocket upon the substrate binding in water and acetonitrile media while a reverse behavior is observed in hexane media, implying a possible induced fit binding mechanism in the non-polar media. The substrate binding enhances the stability of catalytic H-bond network since it could expel the solvent molecules from the active site. The enzyme and the substrate appear to be more appropriate to the reactive conformation in the organic solvents compared with aqueous solution. There is much greater substrate binding strength in hexane media than the water and acetonitrile ones since the polar solvent significantly weakens electrostatic interactions, which are observed to be the main driving force to the binding. In addition, some residues of the S1 pocket could remain favorable contribution to the binding despite the solvent change, but with differences in the contribution extent, the number and the type of residues between the three media.

  8. Strategies for the Hyperpolarization of Acetonitrile and Related Ligands by SABRE

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report on a strategy for using SABRE (signal amplification by reversible exchange) for polarizing 1H and 13C nuclei of weakly interacting ligands which possess biologically relevant and nonaromatic motifs. We first demonstrate this via the polarization of acetonitrile, using Ir(IMes)(COD)Cl as the catalyst precursor, and confirm that the route to hyperpolarization transfer is via the J-coupling network. We extend this work to the polarization of propionitrile, benzylnitrile, benzonitrile, and trans-3-hexenedinitrile in order to assess its generality. In the 1H NMR spectrum, the signal for acetonitrile is enhanced 8-fold over its thermal counterpart when [Ir(H)2(IMes)(MeCN)3]+ is the catalyst. Upon addition of pyridine or pyridine-d5, the active catalyst changes to [Ir(H)2(IMes)(py)2(MeCN)]+ and the resulting acetonitrile 1H signal enhancement increases to 20- and 60-fold, respectively. In 13C NMR studies, polarization transfers optimally to the quaternary 13C nucleus of MeCN while the methyl 13C is hardly polarized. Transfer to 13C is shown to occur first via the 1H–1H coupling between the hydrides and the methyl protons and then via either the 2J or 1J couplings to the respective 13Cs, of which the 2J route is more efficient. These experimental results are rationalized through a theoretical treatment which shows excellent agreement with experiment. In the case of MeCN, longitudinal two-spin orders between pairs of 1H nuclei in the three-spin methyl group are created. Two-spin order states, between the 1H and 13C nuclei, are also created, and their existence is confirmed for Me13CN in both the 1H and 13C NMR spectra using the Only Parahydrogen Spectroscopy protocol. PMID:25539423

  9. Acetonitrile and N-Chloroacetamide Formation from the Reaction of Acetaldehyde and Monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Susana Y; Vu, Trang Nha; Komaki, Yukako; Plewa, Michael J; Mariñas, Benito J

    2015-08-18

    Nitriles and amides are two classes of nitrogenous disinfection byproducts (DBPs) associated with chloramination that are more cytotoxic and genotoxic than regulated DBPs. Monochloramine reacts with acetaldehyde, a common ozone and free chlorine disinfection byproduct, to form 1-(chloroamino)ethanol. Equilibrium (K1) and forward and reverse rate (k1,k-1) constants for the reaction between initial reactants and 1-(chloroamino)ethanol were determined between 2 and 30 °C. Activation energies for k1 and k-1 were 3.04 and 45.2 kJ·mol(-1), respectively, and enthalpy change for K1 was -42.1 kJ·mol(-1). In parallel reactions, 1-(chloroamino)ethanol (1) slowly dehydrated (k2) to (chloroimino)ethane that further decomposed to acetonitrile and (2) was oxidized (k3) by monochloramine to produce N-chloroacetamide. Both reactions were acid/base catalyzed, and rate constants were characterized at 10, 18, and 25 °C. Modeling for drinking water distribution system conditions showed that N-chloroacetamide and acetonitrile concentrations were 5-9 times higher at pH 9.0 compared to 7.8. Furthermore, acetonitrile concentration was found to form 7-10 times higher than N-chloroacetamide under typical monochloramine and acetaldehyde concentrations. N-chloroacetamide cytotoxicity (LC50 = 1.78 × 10(-3) M) was comparable to dichloroacetamide and trichloroacetamide, but less potent than N,2-dichloroacetamide and chloroacetamide. While N-chloroacetamide was not found to be genotoxic, N,2-dichloroacetamide genotoxic potency (5.19 × 10(-3) M) was on the same order of magnitude as chloroacetamide and trichloroacetamide.

  10. Calculating Buffer Zones: A Guide for Applicators

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Buffer zones provide distance between the application block (i.e., edge of the treated field) and bystanders, in order to control pesticide exposure risk from soil fumigants. Distance requirements may be reduced by credits such as tarps.

  11. Capture effeciency of a vegetative environmental buffer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Particulate matter emitted from tunnel-ventilated animal feeding operations (AFOs) is known to transport malodorous compounds. As a mitigation strategy, vegetative environmental buffers (VEBs) are often installed surrounding AFOs to capture particulates and induce lofting and dispersion. Currently, ...

  12. Possible stabilization of the tetravalent oxidation state of berkelium and californium in acetonitrile with triphenylarsine oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, G.F.; Peterson, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    It appears that we may have prepared Bk(IV) nitrate.nTPAs0 and Bk(IV) perchlorate.nTPAs0 complexes which formed the corresponding Cf(IV) complexes through the beta decay of Bk-249. Definitive proof should come from similar experiments with quantities of Bk-249 large enough to allow spectrophotometric detection of the characteristic f..-->..f transitions in these berkelium and californium species. It is clear, however, that TPAs0 and acetonitrile can play a pivotal role in the stabilization of lanact(IV) species.

  13. Density Functional Studies on the Complexation and Spectroscopy of Uranyl Ligated with Acetonitrile and Acetone Derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Schoendorff, George E.; Windus, Theresa L.; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2009-12-12

    The coordination of nitrile (acetonitrile, propionitrile, and benzonitrile) and carbonyl (formaldehyde, ethanal, and acetone) ligands to the uranyl dication (UO22+) has been examined using density functional theory (DFT) utilizing relativistic effective core potentials (RECPs). Complexes containing up to six ligands have been modeled for all ligands except formaldehyde, for which no minimum could be found. A comparison of relative binding energies indicates that five coordinate complexes are predominant while a six coordinate complex involving propionitrile ligands might be possible. Additionally, the relative binding energy and the weakening of the uranyl bond is related to the size of the ligand and, in general, nitriles bind more strongly to uranyl than carbonyls.

  14. High-Rate Oxygen Reduction in Mixed Nonaqueous Electrolyte Containing Acetonitrile

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng D.; Yang X.; Qu D.

    2011-12-02

    A mixed nonaqueous electrolyte that contains acetonitrile and propylene carbonate (PC) was found to be suitable for a LiO2 battery with a metallic Li anode. Both the concentration and diffusion coefficient for the dissolved O2 are significantly higher in the mixed electrolyte than those in the pure PC electrolyte. A powder microelectrode was used to investigate the O2 solubility and diffusion coefficient. A 10 mA?cm-2 discharge rate on a gas-diffusion electrode is demonstrated by using the mixed electrolyte in a LiO2 cell.

  15. Solvation structure of coumarin 1 in acetonitrile: role of the electrostatic solute solvent potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diraison, M.; Millie, P.; Pommeret, S.; Gustavsson, T.; Mialocq, J.-Cl

    1998-01-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation study of a coumarin 1 molecule solvated in acetonitrile, in its S 0 and S 1 electronic states, is presented. Three solute-solvent interaction potentials, all containing the same Lennard-Jones component but different electrostatic interactions, have been considered. The structure of the solvent around the large dye solute strongly depends on the electrostatic solute-solvent potential, illustrating the crucial role of the local electric field. An accurate description of the charge distribution of the solute is therefore necessary to describe correctly the solute-solvent structure and the solvation energy.

  16. Raman Spectroscopy Study of Solvation Structure in Acetonitrile/Water Mixtures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-22

    in liquid 120). sENO9 ! F,,r comparison. the boiling point of methanol i similar densitv :i and moiecular weight). which exists as a hydrogen - bonded ...microenvironment.PARfl ,EN03 i The CN stretch in acetonitrile exhibits a rather unique shift IIti higher frequency vnen hydrogen bonded 113) or coordi...frequencies when CHCN is hydrogen oonded 113. 19).PARI2 sENO3 I The liquid structure of CHC.N is alto of interest and re- SENe 12 mains unresolved. Strong

  17. Cu-Catalyzed Cyanation of Arylboronic Acids with Acetonitrile: A Dual Role of TEMPO.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yamin; Li, Linyi; Shen, Zengming

    2015-09-14

    The cyanation of arylboronic acids by using acetonitrile as the "CN" source has been achieved under a Cu(cat.)/TEMPO system (TEMPO=2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine N-oxide). The broad substrate scope includes a variety of electron-rich and electron-poor arylboronic acids, which react well to give the cyanated products in high to excellent yields. Mechanistic studies reveal that TEMPO-CH2 CN, generated in situ, is an active cyanating reagent, and shows high reactivity for the formation of the CN(-) moiety. Moreover, TEMPO acts as a cheap oxidant to enable the reaction to be catalytic in copper.

  18. Buffer layer for thin film structures

    SciTech Connect

    Foltyn, Stephen R.; Jia, Quanxi; Arendt, Paul N.; Wang, Haiyan

    2010-06-15

    A composite structure including a base substrate and a layer of a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate is provided. A superconducting article can include a composite structure including an outermost layer of magnesium oxide, a buffer layer of strontium titanate or a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate and a top-layer of a superconducting material such as YBCO upon the buffer layer.

  19. Buffer layer for thin film structures

    DOEpatents

    Foltyn, Stephen R.; Jia, Quanxi; Arendt, Paul N.; Wang, Haiyan

    2006-10-31

    A composite structure including a base substrate and a layer of a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate is provided. A superconducting article can include a composite structure including an outermost layer of magnesium oxide, a buffer layer of strontium titanate or a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate and a top-layer of a superconducting material such as YBCO upon the buffer layer.

  20. Optimizing buffering chemistry to maintain near neutral pH of broiler feed during pre-enrichment for Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Berrang, M E; Cosby, D E; Cox, N A; Cason, J A; Richardson, K E

    2015-12-01

    Salmonella is a human pathogen that can accompany live broilers to the slaughter plant, contaminating fully processed carcasses. Feed is one potential source of Salmonella to growing broilers. Monitoring feed for the presence of Salmonella is part of good agricultural practice. The first step in culturing feed for Salmonella (which may be at low numbers and sub-lethally stressed) is to add it to a pre-enrichment broth which is incubated for 24 h. During the course of pre-enrichment, extraneous bacteria metabolize carbohydrates in some feed and excrete acidic byproducts, causing the pH to drop dramatically. An acidic pre-enrichment pH can injure or kill Salmonella resulting in a failure to detect, even if it is present and available to infect chickens. The objective of this study was to test an array of buffering chemistries to prevent formation of an injurious acidic environment during pre-enrichment of feed in peptone water. Five grams of feed were added to 45 mL of peptone water buffered with carbonate, Tris pH 8, and phosphate buffering ingredients individually and in combination. Feed was subjected to a pre-enrichment at 35°C for 24 h; pH was measured at 0, 18, and 24 h. Standard phosphate buffering ingredients at concentrations up to 4 times the normal formulation were unable to fully prevent acidic conditions. Likewise, carbonate and Tris pH 8 were not fully effective. The combination of phosphate, carbonate, and Tris pH 8 was the most effective buffer tested. It is recommended that a highly buffered pre-enrichment broth be used to examine feed for the presence of Salmonella.

  1. Social buffering: relief from stress and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Kikusui, Takefumi; Winslow, James T; Mori, Yuji

    2006-01-01

    Communication is essential to members of a society not only for the expression of personal information, but also for the protection from environmental threats. Highly social mammals have a distinct characteristic: when conspecific animals are together, they show a better recovery from experiences of distress. This phenomenon, termed ‘social buffering’, has been found in rodents, birds, non-human primates and also in humans. This paper reviews classical findings on social buffering and focuses, in particular, on social buffering effects in relation to neuroendocrine stress responses. The social cues that transmit social buffering signals, the neural mechanisms of social buffering and a partner's efficacy with respect to social buffering are also detailed. Social contact appears to have a very positive influence on the psychological and the physiological aspects of social animals, including human beings. Research leading towards further understanding of the mechanisms of social buffering could provide alternative medical treatments based on the natural, individual characteristics of social animals, which could improve the quality of life. PMID:17118934

  2. Buffer regulation of calcium puff sequences.

    PubMed

    Fraiman, Daniel; Dawson, Silvina Ponce

    2014-02-01

    Puffs are localized Ca(2 +) signals that arise in oocytes in response to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). They are the result of the liberation of Ca(2 +) from the endoplasmic reticulum through the coordinated opening of IP3 receptor/channels clustered at a functional release site. The presence of buffers that trap Ca(2 +) provides a mechanism that enriches the spatio-temporal dynamics of cytosolic calcium. The expression of different types of buffers along the cell's life provides a tool with which Ca(2 +) signals and their responses can be modulated. In this paper we extend the stochastic model of a cluster of IP3R-Ca(2 +) channels introduced previously to elucidate the effect of buffers on sequences of puffs at the same release site. We obtain analytically the probability laws of the interpuff time and of the number of channels that participate of the puffs. Furthermore, we show that under typical experimental conditions the effect of buffers can be accounted for in terms of a simple inhibiting function. Hence, by exploring different inhibiting functions we are able to study the effect of a variety of buffers on the puff size and interpuff time distributions. We find the somewhat counter-intuitive result that the addition of a fast Ca(2 +) buffer can increase the average number of channels that participate of a puff.

  3. Stacking and determination of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid with low pKa in soil via moving reaction boundary formed by alkaline and double acidic buffers in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chong; Yang, Xiao-Di; Fan, Liu-Yin; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Yu-Quan; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2011-04-01

    As shown herein, a normal moving reaction boundary (MRB) formed by an alkaline buffer and a single acidic buffer had poor stacking to the new important plant growth promoter of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) in soil due to the leak induced by its low pK(a). To stack the PCA with low pK(a) efficiently, a novel stacking system of MRB was developed, which was formed by an alkaline buffer and double acidic buffers (viz., acidic sample and blank buffers). With the novel system, the PCA leaking into the blank buffer from the sample buffer could be well stacked by the prolonged MRB formed between the alkaline buffer and blank buffer. The relevant mechanism of stacking was discussed briefly. The stacking system, coupled with sample pretreatment, could achieve a 214-fold increase of PCA sensitivity under the optimal conditions (15 mM (pH 11.5) Gly-NaOH as the alkaline buffer, 15 mM (pH 3.0) Gly-HCl-acetonitrile (20%, v/v) as the acidic sample buffer, 15 mM (pH 3.0) Gly-HCl as the blank buffer, 3 min 13 mbar injection of double acidic buffers, benzoic acid as the internal standard, 75 μm i.d. × 53 cm (44 cm effective length) capillary, 25 kV and 248 nm). The limit of detection of PCA in soil was decreased to 17 ng/g, the intra-day and inter-day precision values (expressed as relative standard deviations) were 3.17-4.24% and 4.17-4.87%, respectively, and the recoveries of PCA at three concentration levels changed from 52.20% to 102.61%. The developed method could be used for the detection of PCA in soil at trace level.

  4. Deconvoluting the effects of buffer salt concentration in hydrophilic interaction chromatography on a zwitterionic stationary phase.

    PubMed

    West, Caroline; Auroux, Emeline

    2016-08-26

    Quantitative structure-retention relationships (QSRRs) furnish a detailed and reliable description of the role and extent of different molecular interactions that can be established between the analytes and the chromatographic system. Among QSRRs, the solvation parameter model using Abraham descriptors has gained acceptance as a general tool to explore the factors affecting retention in chromatographic systems. We have previously shown how a modified version of the solvation parameter model, with two extra terms to take account of interactions occurring with ionic and ionizable species (with positive and/or negative charges), could be applied to the characterization of hydrophilic interaction chromatographic (HILIC) systems. In the present study, we will show how this methodology can be used to evaluate the effects of increasing buffer salt concentration on retention and separation in a HILIC system. A commercial stationary phase possessing a sulfobetaine zwitterionic bonded ligand (Nucleodur HILIC) was used with a mobile phase composed of 80% acetonitrile and 20% pwwH4 ammonium acetate buffer, with aqueous buffer concentrations varying from 10 to 100mM, resulting in overall concentrations ranging from 2 to 20mM in the mobile phase. Retention factors were measured for a selection of 76 probe analytes. The chosen compounds are small molecules presenting a wide diversity of molecular structures and are relevant to biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. The QSRR models obtained allow for a rationalization of the interactions contributing to retention and separation in the HILIC system considered and shed some light on the effect of varying buffer salt concentration, namely the progressive transition from ion-exchange and electrostatic-repulsion mechanisms to hydrophilic partitioning.

  5. Improved Manganese Phosphate Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    Conversion coatings 3 . Phosphating bath 20 AGrjC onln odd*. ta It .. c..soMV midP 1J.,alft. by block noc.mb) Work was conducted to determine the mechanism by...34 TABULAR DATA Table I Analyses of Solution and Coating for Phosphating Baths 4 of Di-ferlng Compositions 11 Atomic Absorption...manganese and iron phosphate coating: k * a. Mn(H 2PO4) 2 Nn-P0 4 + H3PO0 k2 k) b. 3MnHPO4 - Mn3 (P04) 2 + H3i’O4 k4 k5 c. Fe(H 2PO4) 2 -01 FeHPO4

  6. Phosphate Mines, Jordan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Jordan's leading industry and export commodities are phosphate and potash, ranked in the top three in the world. These are used to make fertilizer. The Jordan Phosphate Mines Company is the sole producer, having started operations in 1935. In addition to mining activities, the company produces phosphoric acid (for fertilizers, detergents, pharmaceuticals), diammonium phosphate (for fertilizer), sulphuric acid (many uses), and aluminum fluoride (a catalyst to make aluminum and magnesium).

    The image covers an area of 27.5 x 49.4 km, was acquired on September 17, 2005, and is located near 30.8 degrees north latitude, 36.1 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  7. Influence of Buffer Composition and Calcium Chloride on GdnHCl Denaturation of Bacillus licheniformis α-Amylase.

    PubMed

    Kandandapani, Salanee; Tan, Cheau Y; Shuib, Adawiyah S; Tayyab, Saad

    2016-01-01

    The influence of buffer composition on the conformational stability of native and calciumdepleted Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase (BLA) was investigated against guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) denaturation using circular dichroism, fluorescence and UV-difference spectroscopy. Differential effect of buffer composition on GdnHCl denaturation of BLA was evident from the magnitude of these spectral signals, which followed the order: sodium phosphate > Tris-HCl > HEPES > MOPS. These effects became more pronounced with calcium-depleted BLA. Sephacryl S-200 gel chromatographic results showed significant BLA aggregation in the presence of 6 M GdnHCl.

  8. Nostoc commune UTEX 584 gene expressing indole phosphate hydrolase activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Xie, W Q; Whitton, B A; Simon, J W; Jäger, K; Reed, D; Potts, M

    1989-01-01

    A gene encoding an enzyme capable of hydrolyzing indole phosphate was isolated from a recombinant gene library of Nostoc commune UTEX 584 DNA in lambda gt10. The gene (designated iph) is located on a 2.9-kilobase EcoRI restriction fragment and is present in a single copy in the genome of N. commune UTEX 584. The iph gene was expressed when the purified 2.9-kilobase DNA fragment, free of any vector sequences, was added to a cell-free coupled transcription-translation system. A polypeptide with an Mr of 74,000 was synthesized when the iph gene or different iph-vector DNA templates were expressed in vitro. When carried by different multicopy plasmids and phagemids (pMP005, pBH6, pB8) the cyanobacterial iph gene conferred an Iph+ phenotype upon various strains of Escherichia coli, including a phoA mutant. Hydrolysis of 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate was detected in recombinant E. coli strains grown in phosphate-rich medium, and the activity persisted in assay buffers that contained phosphate. In contrast, indole phosphate hydrolase activity only developed in cells of N. commune UTEX 584, when they were partially depleted of phosphorus, and the activity associated with these cells was suppressed partially by the addition of phosphate to assay buffers. Indole phosphate hydrolase activity was detected in periplasmic extracts from E. coli (Iph+) transformants. Images PMID:2536677

  9. Low noise buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators for precise time and frequency measurement and distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichinger, R. A.; Dachel, P.; Miller, W. H.; Ingold, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    Extremely low noise, high performance, wideband buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators were developed. These buffer amplifiers are designed to distribute reference frequencies from 30 KHz to 45 MHz from a hydrogen maser without degrading the hydrogen maser's performance. The buffered phase comparators are designed to intercompare the phase of state of the art hydrogen masers without adding any significant measurement system noise. These devices have a 27 femtosecond phase stability floor and are stable to better than one picosecond for long periods of time. Their temperature coefficient is less than one picosecond per degree C, and they have shown virtually no voltage coefficients.

  10. A tetranuclear cadmium(II) complex based on the 2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)acetonitrile ligand.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Liang; Ye, Qiong

    2013-01-01

    The hydrothermal reaction of 2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)acetonitrile and Cd(ClO(4))(2) yielded the noncentrosymmetric coordination complex tetrakis[μ-2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)acetato]tetrakis[μ-2-(quinolin-8-yloxy)acetonitrile]tetracadmium tetrakis(perchlorate) dihydrate, [Cd(4)(C(11)H(8)NO(3))(4)(C(11)H(8)N(2)O)(4)](ClO(4))(4)·2H(2)O. The local coordination environment around the Cd(II) cation can be best described as a capped octahedron defined by two N atoms and five O atoms from three ligands. The Cd(II) cations are linked by the ligands with Cd-O-Cd and Cd-O-C-C-O-Cd bridges, forming tetranuclear units, there being two independent tertranuclear units in the structure. The fourfold rotoinversion centre sits at the centre of each Cd(4) core. The two perchlorate anions in the asymmetric unit are linked by the water molecule through O-H...O hydrogen bonds.

  11. Vibrational Relaxation of the Aqueous Proton in Acetonitrile: Ultrafast Cluster Cooling and Vibrational Predissociation.

    PubMed

    Ottosson, N; Liu, L; Bakker, H J

    2016-07-28

    We study the ultrafast O-H stretch vibrational relaxation dynamics of protonated water clusters embedded in a matrix of deuterated acetonitrile, using polarization-resolved mid-IR femtosecond spectroscopy. The clusters are produced by mixing triflic (trifluoromethanesulfonic) acid and H2O in molar ratios of 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3, thus varying the degree of hydration of the proton. At all hydration levels the excited O-H stretch vibration of the hydrated proton shows an ultrafast vibrational relaxation with a time constant T1 < 100 fs, leading to an ultrafast local heating of the protonated water cluster. This excess thermal energy, initially highly localized to the region of the excited proton, first re-distributes over the aqueous cluster and then dissipates into the surrounding acetonitrile matrix. For clusters with a triflic acid to H2O ratio of 1:3 these processes occur with time constants of 320 ± 20 fs and 1.4 ± 0.1 ps, respectively. The cooling of the clusters reveals a long-living, underlying transient absorption change with high anisotropy. We argue that this feature stems from the vibrational predissociation of a small fraction of the proton hydration structures, directly following the ultrafast infrared excitation.

  12. Pediatric cyanide intoxication and death from an acetonitrile-containing cosmetic

    SciTech Connect

    Caravati, E.M.; Litovitz, T.L. )

    1988-12-16

    Two cases of pediatric accidental ingestion of an acetonitrile-containing cosmetic are reported. One of the children, a 16-month-old boy, was found dead in bed the morning after ingesting the product. No therapy had been undertaken, as the product was mistakenly assumed to be an acetone-containing nail polish remover. The second child, a 2-year-old boy, experienced signs of severe cyanide poisoning, but survived with vigorous supportive care. Both children had blood cyanide levels in the potentially lethal range. The observed delayed onset of severe toxic reactions supports the proposed mechanism of acetonitrile conversion to inorganic cyanide via hepatic microsomal enzymes. Physicians and poison centers should be alerted to the existence of this highly toxic product, sold for removal of sculptured nails and likely to be confused with the less toxic acetone-containing nail polish removers. The authors urge regulatory agencies to reconsider the wisdom of marketing a cosmetic that poses such an extreme health hazard.

  13. Photoinduced electron transfer and solvation in iodide-doped acetonitrile clusters.

    PubMed

    Ehrler, Oli T; Griffin, Graham B; Young, Ryan M; Neumark, Daniel M

    2009-04-02

    We have used ultrafast time-resolved photoelectron imaging to measure charge transfer dynamics in iodide-doped acetonitrile clusters I(-)(CH(3)CN)(n) with n = 5-10. Strong modulations of vertical detachment energies were observed following charge transfer from the halide, allowing interpretation of the ongoing dynamics. We observe a sharp drop in the vertical detachment energy (VDE) within 300-400 fs, followed by a biexponential increase that is complete by approximately 10 ps. Comparison to theory suggests that the iodide is internally solvated and that photodetachment results in formation of a diffuse electron cloud in a confined cavity. We interpret the initial drop in VDE as a combination of expansion of the cavity and localization of the excess electron on one or two solvent molecules. The subsequent increase in VDE is attributed to a combination of the I atom leaving the cavity and rearrangement of the acetonitrile molecules to solvate the electron. The n = 5-8 clusters then show a drop in VDE of around 50 meV on a much longer time scale. The long-time VDEs are consistent with those of (CH(3)CN)(n)(-) clusters with internally solvated electrons. Although the excited-state created by the pump pulse decays by emission of a slow electron, no such decay is seen by 200 ps.

  14. Temperature buffer test design, instrumentation and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandén, Torbjörn; Goudarzi, Reza; de Combarieu, Michel; Åkesson, Mattias; Hökmark, Harald

    The Temperature Buffer Test, TBT, is a heated full-scale field experiment carried out jointly by ANDRA and SKB at the SKB Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory in Southeast Sweden. An existing 8 m deep, 1.8 m diameter KBS-3-type deposition hole located at -420 m level has been selected for the test. The objectives are to improve the general understanding of Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical, THM, behavior of buffer materials submitted to severe thermal conditions with temperatures well over 100 °C during water uptake of partly saturated bentonite-based buffer materials, and to check, in due time, their properties after water saturation. The test includes two carbon steel heating canisters each 3 m high and 0.6 m diameter, surrounded by 0.6 m of buffer material. There is a 0.2 m thick sand shield between the upper heater and the surrounding bentonite, while the lower heater is surrounded by bentonite only. On top of the stack of bentonite blocks is a confining plug anchored to the rock. In the slot between buffer and rock wall is a sand filter equipped with pipes to control the water pressure at the boundary, which is seldom done with an EBS in situ experiment. Both heater mid-height planes are densely instrumented in order to follow, with direct or indirect methods, buffer THM evolution. Temperature, relative humidity, stress and pore pressure have been monitored since the test start in March 2003. Total water inflow is also monitored. Firstly, the present paper describes the test design, the instrumentation, the plug anchoring system and the system for water boundary pressure control. Second, having described the test, the paper shows different measurements that illustrate evolution of temperature, saturation, suction and swelling pressure in the upper and the lower buffer.

  15. Domestic phosphate deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKelvey, V.E.; Cathcart, J.B.; Altschuler, Z.S.; Swanson, R.W.; Lutz, Katherine

    1953-01-01

    Most of the worlds phosphate deposits can be grouped into six types: 1) igneous apatite deposits; 2) marine phosphorites; 3) residual phosphorites; 4) river pebble deposits; 5) phosphatized rock; and 6) guano. The igneous apatites and marine phosphorites form deposits measurable in millions or billions of tons; the residual deposits are measurable in thousands or millions; and the other types generally only in thousands of tons. Igneous apatite deposits have been mined on a small scale in New York, New Jersey, and Virginia. Marine phosphorites have been mined in Montana, Idaho, Utah, Wyoming, Arkansas, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. Residual phosphorites have been mined in Tennessee, Pennsylvania, and Florida. River pebble has been produced in South Carolina and Florida; phosphatized rock in Tennessee and Florida; and guano in New Mexico and Texas. Present production is limited almost entirely to Florida, Tennessee, Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming. Incomplete but recently partly revised estimates indicate the presence of about 5 billion tons of phosphate deposits in the United States that is minable under present economic conditions. Deposits too lean in quality or thickness to compete with those in the western and southeastern fields probably contain tens of billions of tons.

  16. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    MedlinePlus

    ... Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 42. Read More Enzyme Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Hemoglobin Review Date 2/11/2016 Updated by: ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics G6PD Deficiency Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  17. Evaluation of Manganese Phosphate Coatings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-02-01

    84003 _____________ 4 . TTLE and -bitle)5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED EVALUATION OF MANGANESE PHOSPHATE COATINGS Final 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT...rosion resistance of the Endurion phosphate was significantly superior to the 4 . basic manganese phosphate . Endurion phosphate with a Supplementary...OF CONTENTS Page STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM 1 BACKGROUND 1 APPROACH TO THE PROBLEM 3 RESULTS 4 CONCLUSIONS 7 TABLES I. Falex Wear Life Test Procedure 8

  18. Infrared electroabsorption spectroscopy of N,N-dimethyl-p-nitroaniline in acetonitrile/C2Cl4: solvation of the solute and self-association of acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Chieh; Shigeto, Shinsuke

    2011-05-05

    Solvated structures of N,N-dimethyl-p-nitroaniline (DMPNA), an analog of p-nitroaniline (PNA), and self-associated structures of acetonitrile (ACN) in mixed solvents of ACN and C(2)Cl(4) were studied using infrared (IR) electroabsorption and FTIR spectroscopies. IR electroabsorption spectroscopy measures changes in IR absorption intensity upon application of external electric field modulation, which are a sensitive probe for permanent dipole moments. In ACN/CCl(4), PNA has been shown to occur as two distinct solvated forms, namely, 1:1 and 1:2 forms, which have one and two ACN molecule(s), respectively, associated with PNA. The IR electroabsorption and FTIR measurements on DMPNA show that, unlike PNA, DMPNA occurs as a monomer in ACN/C(2)Cl(4) rather than as specific solvated structures analogous to the 1:1 and 1:2 forms because of the substitution effect. Not only does the N,N-dimethyl substitution in DMPNA hamper solvation of ACN at the N(CH(3))(2) group, but it also indirectly blocks strong interactions with ACN at the NO(2) group. Furthermore, by using the ΔA signal of DMPNA as an internal intensity standard, it was found that the dipole moment of ACN in the DMPNA/ACN/C(2)Cl(4) system is about 1.5 times larger than that of the ACN monomer in dilute CCl(4) solution. This large value of the dipole moment in the solution studied here is attributable to the formation of a head-to-tail linear dimer of ACN, whereas the antiparallel dimer is energetically more favorable in the gas phase.

  19. Reconstitution of the renal brush-border membrane sodium/phosphate co-transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Vachon, V; Delisle, M C; Laprade, R; Béliveau, R

    1991-01-01

    A simple and rapid procedure was developed for the reconstitution of Na(+)-dependent phosphate-transport activity from bovine kidney brush-border membranes. The phosphate transporter appears to be particularly sensitive to extraction conditions. To prevent its inactivation, the phosphate carrier was solubilized in a buffer containing its substrates, Na+ and phosphate, CHAPS, dithiothreitol, brush-border membrane lipids and glycerol. The uptake of phosphate by reconstituted vesicles was strongly stimulated by the presence of a transmembrane Na+ gradient. This stimulation was abolished when the Na+ gradient was dissipated by monensin. The affinity of the carrier for phosphate was similar in proteoliposomes and in brush-border membrane vesicles (apparent Kt = 40 microM). The transporter was also stimulated by the presence of a high concentration of phosphate on the trans side of the membrane. The reconstituted transport activity was inhibited by arsenate, a known inhibitor of phosphate transport. However, the bovine phosphate carrier, intact or reconstituted, was much less sensitive to inhibition by phosphonoformic and phosphonoacetic acids than were those of other species studied so far. SDS/PAGE revealed that only a small number of brush-border membrane proteins were incorporated into the proteoliposomes. This reconstitution procedure should be useful for the purification and identification of the carrier protein. Images Fig. 5. PMID:1832858

  20. Chemical composition, electrochemical, and morphological properties of iron phosphate conversion coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Warburton, Y.J.; Gibbon, D.L.; Jackson, K.M.; Gate, L.F.; Rodnyansky, A.; Warburton, P.R.

    1999-09-01

    Iron phosphate conversion coatings are used widely in the pretreatment industry to enhance paint adherence to metal substrates and therefore improve corrosion resistance. However, very limited nonproprietary literature describing the properties of iron phosphate coating is available, as compared to volumes dedicated to zinc phosphate coating. The present study described chemical, electrochemical, and morphological characterizations of iron phosphate coating using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), potentiodynamic scans, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For the samples under investigation, the mode of operation of iron phosphate coating was to promote paint adhesion, and the coating itself did not impart significant corrosion protection to the metal substrate. It also was shown that the Fe/P ratio in the phosphate coating ranged from 1:2 to 1:1. When tested in pH 7 buffered phosphate solution, the phosphate coating displayed a passivation region, which also possessed the highest impedance value. The phosphate coating was found to comprise two layers: a dense, adherent layer and a loose, granular top layer. For samples with coating weights of 20 mg/ft{sup 2} to 30 mg/ft{sup 2} (0.22 g/m{sup 2} to 0.32 g/m{sup 2}), the corresponding coating thickness was {approximately} 0.1 {micro}m to 0.3 {micro}m.

  1. Interaction of acetonitrile with Na-zeolites: adsorption modes and vibrational dynamics in the zeolite channels and cavities.

    PubMed

    Nachtigallová, Dana; Vrbka, L; Bludský, O; Nachtigall, P

    2008-07-28

    The interaction of acetonitrile with the extra-framework Na(+) cations in zeolites, namely Na-LTA and Na-FER, was investigated. The relative stabilities of possible types of adsorption complexes were calculated at the periodic DFT level. Individual effects on the complex stability and on the vibrational dynamics of adsorbed acetonitrile were qualitatively analysed on various cluster models. The acetonitrile primarily interacts with the Na(+) cation (via the N end), and the complex stability is modulated by the interaction of the methyl group with the framework oxygen atoms, which has a partial hydrogen-bond character. In line with the results of recent analyses of CO interactions with metal-exchanged zeolites [D. Nachtigallová, O. Bludský, C. O. Areán, R. Bulanek and P. Nachtigall, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2006, 8, 4849], two types of effects should be taken into consideration for acetonitrile complexes in Na-zeolites: (i) the effects from the bottom, reflecting the accessibility and coordination of the primary metal cation, to which the acetonitrile molecule is bonded via the N atom; and (ii) the effects from the top, including H-bond formation (stabilising effect) or repulsion due to the secondary metal cation. The effect from the bottom results in a blue shift of nu(CN) while the effect from the top (H-bond formation) results in a red shift in both nu(CN) and nu(CH).

  2. Undergraduate Chemistry Students' Perceptions of and Misconceptions about Buffers and Buffer Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orgill, MaryKay; Sutherland, Aynsley

    2008-01-01

    Both upper- and lower-level chemistry students struggle with understanding the concept of buffers and with solving corresponding buffer problems. While it might be reasonable to expect general chemistry students to struggle with this abstract concept, it is surprising that upper-level students in analytical chemistry and biochemistry continue to…

  3. Vegetative buffer strips for reducing herbicide transport in runoff: effects of season, vegetation, and buffer width

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effectiveness of vegetative buffer strips (VBS) for reducing herbicide transport in runoff may be affected by season, plant species composition, and buffer width. A plot-scale study was conducted from 2007-2012 on an eroded claypan soil with the objectives of: 1) assessing the effects of season ...

  4. Labview virtual instruments for calcium buffer calculations.

    PubMed

    Reitz, Frederick B; Pollack, Gerald H

    2003-01-01

    Labview VIs based upon the calculator programs of Fabiato and Fabiato (J. Physiol. Paris 75 (1979) 463) are presented. The VIs comprise the necessary computations for the accurate preparation of multiple-metal buffers, for the back-calculation of buffer composition given known free metal concentrations and stability constants used, for the determination of free concentrations from a given buffer composition, and for the determination of apparent stability constants from absolute constants. As implemented, the VIs can concurrently account for up to three divalent metals, two monovalent metals and four ligands thereof, and the modular design of the VIs facilitates further extension of their capacity. As Labview VIs are inherently graphical, these VIs may serve as useful templates for those wishing to adapt this software to other platforms.

  5. Nonlinear spelling in graphemic buffer deficit.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Teresa; Nickels, Lyndsey

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a case of nonlinear spelling and its implications for theories of the graphemic buffer. C.T.J., an individual with an acquired deficit of the graphemic buffer, often wrote the letters of his responses in a nonlinear temporal order when writing to dictation. The spatial ordering of the letters was maintained: Letters in the later positions of the words were written towards the right side of the response, even when written before letters in earlier positions. This unusual phenomenon has been briefly reported in three prior cases but this study provides the most detailed analysis of the phenomenon to date. We specifically contend that the decoupling of the temporal and spatial aspects of spelling is difficult to reconcile with competitive queuing accounts of the graphemic buffer.

  6. The effect of magnesium ions on vitamin D(2)-phospholipid model membrane interactions in the presence of different buffer media.

    PubMed

    Toyran, N; Severcan, F

    2000-10-02

    Vitamin D plays important roles in the bone formation, in calcium and phosphorus homeostasis and in the treatment and prevention of many diseases. Ions, especially divalent cations like Mg(2+), have indispensable roles in many vital biological events. Mg(2+) is involved in many fundamental processes such as stabilization of membranes and macromolecules, synthesis of nucleic acid and proteins and formation and use of high-energy phosphate bonds. Mg(2+) is also required for synthesis of more than 310 different enzymes of the body and is, therefore, involved in many important activities. The roles of vitamin D and major ions in the body are quite well known. While there are still many unresolved points about the exact molecular mechanism behind such diverse functions, in the present study, the interaction of Mg(2+) with dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) model membranes has been studied in the presence and absence of vitamin D(2) by using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and turbidity technique at 440 nm. The effect of different buffer media on the system has also been investigated. The temperature dependent investigation of the wavelength of the CH(2) antisymmetric stretching bands revealed that, in the presence of N-[2-hydroxyethyl] piperazine-N'-[2-ethanesulfonic acid] (Hepes) and phosphate buffer, addition of Mg(2+) and/or vitamin D(2) into pure DPPC liposomes does not change the shape of the phase transition profile. Turbidity studies support these results. In the presence of Hepes buffer, the inclusion of Mg(2+) and/or vitamin D(2) into pure DPPC liposomes orders the system. In the presence of phosphate buffer, FTIR study showed that, addition of Mg(2+) into pure DPPC liposomes disorders the system in the gel phase. The precipitation of Mg(2+) with phosphates, which is present in phosphate buffer, may be a reason for this difference in the effect. It is seen that, the binary mixture of Mg(2+)-DPPC and the ternary mixture of Mg(2+)-vitamin D(2

  7. Coaxial atomic force microscope probes for dielectrophoresis of DNA under different buffer conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yinglei; Kumar Wickramasinghe, H.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate a coaxial AFM nanoprobe device for dielectrophoretic (DEP) trapping of DNA molecules in Tris-EDTA (TE) and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) buffers. The DEP properties of 20 nm polystyrene beads were studied with coaxial probes in media with different conductivities. Due to the special geometry of our DEP probe device, sufficiently high electric fields were generated at the probe end to focus DNA molecules with positive DEP. DEP trapping for both polystyrene beads and DNA molecules was quantitatively analyzed over the frequency range from 100 kHz to 50 MHz and compared with the Clausius-Mossotti theory. Finally, we discussed the negative effect of medium salinity during DEP trapping.

  8. Dissolution properties of co-amorphous drug-amino acid formulations in buffer and biorelevant media.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, A T; DeClerck, L; Löbmann, K; Grohganz, H; Rades, T; Laitinen, R

    2015-07-01

    Co-amorphous formulations, particularly binary drug-amino acid mixtures, have been shown to provide enhanced dissolution for poorly-soluble drugs and improved physical stability of the amorphous state. However, to date the dissolution properties (mainly intrinsic dissolution rate) of the co-amorphous formulations have been tested only in buffers and their supersaturation ability remain unexplored. Consequently, dissolution studies in simulated intestinal fluids need to be conducted in order to better evaluate the potential of these systems in increasing the oral bioavailability of biopharmaceutics classification system class II drugs. In this study, solubility and dissolution properties of the co-amorphous simvastatin-lysine, gibenclamide-serine, glibenclamide-threonine and glibenclamide-serine-threonine were studied in phosphate buffer pH 7.2 and biorelevant media (fasted and fed state simulated intestinal fluids (FaSSIF and FeSSIF, respectively)). The co-amorphous formulations were found to provide a long-lasting supersaturation and improve the dissolution of the drugs compared to the crystalline and amorphous drugs alone in buffer. Similar improvement, but in lesser extent, was observed in biorelevant media suggesting that a dissolution advantage observed in aqueous buffers may overestimate the advantage in vivo. However, the results show that, in addition to stability advantage shown earlier, co-amorphous drug-amino acid formulations provide dissolution advantage over crystalline drugs in both aqueous and biorelevant conditions.

  9. Differential effect of buffer on the spin trapping of nitric oxide by iron chelates.

    PubMed

    Porasuphatana, S; Weaver, J; Budzichowski, T A; Tsai, P; Rosen, G M

    2001-11-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) generates nitric oxide (NO*) by the oxidation of l-arginine. Spin trapping in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy using ferro-chelates is considered one of the best methods to detect NO* in real time and at its site of generation. The spin trapping of NO* from isolated NOS I oxidation of L-arginine by ferro-N-dithiocarboxysarcosine (Fe(DTCS)2) and ferro-N-methyl-d-glucamide dithiocarbamate (Fe(MGD)2) in different buffers was investigated. We detected NO-Fe(DTCS)2, a nitrosyl complex, resulting from the reaction of NO* and Fe(DTCS)2, in phosphate buffer. However, Hepes and Tris buffers did not allow formation of NO-Fe(DTCS)2. Instead, both of these buffers reacted with Fe2+, generating sparingly soluble complexes in the absence of molecular oxygen. Fe(DTCS)2 and Fe(MGD)2 were found to inhibit, to a small degree, NOS I activity with a greater effect observed with Fe(MGD)2. In contrast, Fe(MGD)2 was more efficient at spin trapping NO* from the lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophage cell line RAW264.7 than was Fe(DTCS)2. Data suggested that Fe(DTCS)2 and Fe(MGD)2 are efficient at spin trapping NO* but their maximal efficiency may be affected by experimental conditions.

  10. Assessment of buffer systems for harvesting proteins from tissue interstitial fluid for proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Teng, Pang-ning; Rungruang, Bunja J; Hood, Brian L; Sun, Mai; Flint, Melanie S; Bateman, Nicholas W; Dhir, Rajiv; Bhargava, Rohit; Richard, Scott D; Edwards, Robert P; Conrads, Thomas P

    2010-08-06

    Tissue interstitial fluid (TIF) bathes cells in tissues, and it is hypothesized that TIF proximal to a developing tumor may contain an enriched population of tumor-specific shed and secreted proteins relative to peripheral blood. Extraction of TIF proteins is typically accomplished through passive incubation of surgically resected tissues in phosphate buffered saline (PBS); however, its influence on cellular activity and viability has not been fully explored. The present investigation sought to characterize whether different buffer systems influence the recovered TIF proteome. Five TIF buffer systems were investigated including PBS, Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM), and three organ transplantation preservative solutions: Celsior solution S (CS), histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate (HTK), and University of Wisconsin (UW). Kidney tumor, adjacent normal kidney, and ovarian tumor tissues were incubated in each of the buffer systems, and the harvested TIF proteins were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Although the present results indicate that no significant differences exist in the recovered proteins from these two neoplasms between the five solution groups, additional sample preparative steps are required prior to LC-MS/MS for TIF proteins harvested from DMEM, UW, CS, and HTK. These data support that PBS is a suitable and convenient solution for harvesting TIF proteins for MS-based proteomics.

  11. Oxygen permeability of soft contact lenses in different pH, osmolality and buffering solution

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Se Eun; Kim, So Ra; Park, Mijung

    2015-01-01

    AIM To determine the effect of pH, osmolality, and buffering system on the oxygen permeability (Dk) of soft contact lenses. METHODS Two hydrogel lenses (nelfilcon A and etafilcon A) and 2 silicone hydrogel lenses (lotrafilcon A and balafilcon A) were used in the study. These lenses were incubated in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and borate-buffered saline (BBS) solutions adjusted by 0.8 pH increments to a pH in the range of 5.8-9.0 or in hypotonic (280 mOsmol/kg), isotonic (310 mOsmol/kg) and hypertonic (380 mOsmol/kg) PBS solutions. Polarographic method was used for measuring the Dk and lenses were stacked as 4 layers to correct the boundary effect. RESULTS Dk values of all contact lenses measured in BBS solutions were more stable than those in PBS solutions. Especially the etafilcon A lens showed a relative big change compared with other types of contact lenses at the same conditions. When the osmolality of PBS solution increased from hypotonic to hypertonic, Dk of all contact lenses decreased. Variations in Dk existed depending on lens materials, etafilcon A lens was the most affected and nelfilcon A was the least affected by osmolality. CONCLUSION From the result obtained, it is revealed that Dk of contact lenses is changed by the pH, osmolality, and buffering condition of tear. Thus, Dk of contact lens can be varied by the lens wearers' physiological and/or pathological conditions. PMID:26558223

  12. Tris buffer improves fluorescence yield of ram spermatozoa when evaluating membrane integrity.

    PubMed

    Yániz, Jesús Luis; Mateos, José Angel; Santolaria, Pilar

    2012-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of various buffers on the fluorescence signal intensity of two fluorochromes (IP and CFDA) when used to assess the membrane integrity of ram sperm. Second ejaculates (18) from nine adult males were collected using an artificial vagina and diluted in either MOPS, TRIS, TES, HEPES, citrate, or phosphate-based extenders. Semen samples were stored at 15°C and the membrane integrity was assessed within the first 24 h of storage. Mean fluorescence intensity (FI) of PI- and CDFA-labeled sperm heads and fluorescence background noise (FBN) were determined quantitatively using Image J software. Fluorescence contrast (FC) was expressed as the difference between FI and FBN. Significantly, higher FI and FC were recorded when TRIS diluent was used, rather than the other diluents, both in the propidium- and fluorescein-labeled cells. The citrate and phosphate-based extenders showed intermediate results of FC between those of TRIS and zwitterionic (MOPS, TES and HEPES) groups for the PI-labeled sperm. However, in the CFDA-labeled sperm, the lower values of FC were obtained in the citrate and phosphate groups due to increased levels of FBN. For the membrane-damaged sperm, fluorescent labeling was limited to the sperm heads when TRIS-buffer was used, whereas in the other groups, the sperm tail was also frequently observed. It was concluded that TRIS buffer solution markedly increases the fluorescence yield of IP/CFDA-labeled sperm cells in the ram and that this should be considered when evaluating their membrane integrity.

  13. Self-consistent spectrophotometric basicity scale in acetonitrile covering the range between pyridine and DBU

    PubMed

    Kaljurand; Rodima; Leito; Koppel; Schwesinger

    2000-09-22

    A self-consistent spectrophotometric basicity scale in acetonitrile, including DBU, ten (arylimino)tris(1-pyrrolidinyl)phosphoranes, two (arylimino)tris(dimethylamino)phosphoranes, 2-phenyl-1,1,3, 3-tetramethylguanidine, 1-(2-tolyl)biguanide, benzylamine, two substituted benzimidazoles, pyridine, and ten substituted pyridines, has been created. The span of the scale is almost 12 pK(a) units. Altogether, 29 different bases were studied and 53 independent equilibrium constant measurements were carried out, each describing the relative basicity of two bases. The scale is anchored to the pK(a) value of pyridine of 12.33 that has been measured by Coetzee et al. Comparison of the basicity data of phenyliminophosphoranes and phenyltetramethylguanidines implies that the P=N bond in the (arylimino)tris(1-pyrrolidinyl)phosphoranes involves contribution from the ylidic (zwitterionic) structure analogous to that found in phosphorus ylides.

  14. Electrolyte Solvation and Ionic Association. VI. Acetonitrile-Lithium Salt Mixtures. Highly Associated Salts Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Borodin, Oleg; Han, Sang D.; Daubert, James S.; Seo, D. M.; Yun, Sung-Hyun; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2015-01-14

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of acetonitrile (AN) mixtures with LiBF4, LiCF3SO3 and LiCF3CO2 provide extensive details about the molecular- and mesoscale-level solution interactions and thus explanations as to why these electrolytes have very different thermal phase behavior and electrochemical/physicochemical properties. The simulation results are in full accord with a previous experimental study of these (AN)n-LiX electrolytes. This computational study reveals how the structure of the anions strongly influences the ionic association tendency of the ions, the manner in which the aggregate solvates assemble in solution and the length of time in which the anions remain coordinated to the Li+ cations in the solvates which result in dramatic variations in the transport properties of the electrolytes.

  15. Quenching of superoxide ions by curcumin. A mechanistic study in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Toniolo, Rosanna; Di Narda, Francesca; Susmel, Sabina; Martelli, Mario; Martelli, Laura; Bontempelli, Gino

    2002-03-01

    The quenching of superoxide ions, O2.-, by curcumin has been studied by electrogenerating this anion radical from oxygen dissolved in acetonitrile solvent (that is, at best, a mimic of the lipofilic layer of biological membranes), containing known amounts of curcumin. Voltammetric tests, combined with coulometric and spectrophotometric measurements, pointed out that each mol of curcumin is able to react with six mols of such anion radical, through a process initiated by an acid-base step, which provides the perhydroxyl radical, HO2.; that disproportionates rapidly to the anionic form of hydrogen peroxide, HO2-, and oxygen, which is thus partially regenerated. At the same time, curcumin is converted to the corresponding three-charged anion. The strict resemblance existing between the mechanism of the rapid superoxide radical decay caused by curcumin and that involved in the presence of the superoxodismutase enzyme (SOD) is also underlined.

  16. Application of the Extended Langmuir Model for the Determination of Lyophobicity of 1-Propanol in Acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsierkezos, Nikos G.

    2009-06-01

    Surface tensions ( σ) of binary liquid mixtures of acetonitrile (ACN) with 1-propanol (PrOH) were measured over the entire composition range at eight different temperatures, 278.15 K, 283.15 K, 288.15 K, 293.15 K, 298.15 K, 303.15 K, 308.15 K, and 313.15 K. The lyophobicities ( β) of the surfactant PrOH relative to that of ACN as well as the surface mole fractions ({x^S2}) of PrOH at various temperatures were derived using the extended Langmuir model (Langmuir 17, 4261, 2001). The β values indicate the greater affinity of PrOH for the surface, and this trend slightly increases with rising temperature. The determined {x^S_{2 }} values indicate that the surface concentration of PrOH is always higher than its bulk concentration and consequently confirm that the surface is enriched with PrOH.

  17. An Analysis of the Rotational Spectrum of Acetonitrile (CH_3CN) in Excited Vibrational States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neese, Christopher F.; McMillan, James; Fortman, Sarah; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2014-06-01

    Acetonitrile (CH_3CN) is a well-known interstellar molecule whose vibrationally excited states need to be accounted for in searches for new molecules in the interstellar medium. To help catalog such `weed' molecules, we have developed a technique that involves recording complete spectra over a range of astrophysically significant temperatures. With such a data set, we can experimentally measure the line strengths and lower state energies of unassigned lines in the spectrum. In this talk we will present the ongoing analysis of complete temperature resolved spectra in the 215-265 GHz and 570-650 GHz regions. We have been able to assign many vibrationally hot lines from this data and a room temperature data set spanning 165-700 GHz. To date, we have assigned lines from most of the vibrational states below ν_6 at 1448 wn.

  18. Simultaneous pollutant removal and electricity generation in denitrifying microbial fuel cell with boric acid-borate buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Shaohui; Li, Meng; Wei, Yan

    2015-01-01

    A double-chamber denitrifying microbial fuel cell (MFC), using boric acid-borate buffer solution as an alternative to phosphate buffer solution, was set up to investigate the influence of buffer solution concentration, temperature and external resistance on electricity generation and pollutant removal efficiency. The result revealed that the denitrifying MFC with boric acid-borate buffer solution was successfully started up in 51 days, with a stable cell voltage of 205.1 ± 1.96 mV at an external resistance of 50 Ω. Higher concentration of buffer solution favored nitrogen removal and electricity generation. The maximum power density of 8.27 W/m(3) net cathodic chamber was obtained at a buffer solution concentration of 100 mmol/L. An increase in temperature benefitted electricity generation and nitrogen removal. A suitable temperature for this denitrifying MFC was suggested to be 25 °C. Decreasing the external resistance favored nitrogen removal and organic matter consumption by exoelectrogens.

  19. Remarkable effect of mobile phase buffer on the SEC-ICP-AES derived Cu, Fe and Zn-metalloproteome pattern of rabbit blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Jahromi, Elham Zeini; White, Wade; Wu, Qiao; Yamdagni, Raghav; Gailer, Jürgen

    2010-07-01

    The development of an analytical method to quantify the major Cu, Fe and Zn-containing metalloproteins in mammalian plasma has been recently reported. This method is based on the separation of plasma proteins by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) followed by the on-line detection of the metalloproteins by an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES). To assess whether the mobile phase buffer can affect the SEC-ICP-AES-derived metalloproteome pattern, thawed rabbit plasma was analyzed using phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-buffer (0.15 M, pH 7.4), Tris-buffer (0.1 and 0.05 M, pH 7.4), Hepes-buffer (0.1 M, pH 7.4) or Mops-buffer (0.1 M, pH 7.4). In contrast to the Cu-specific chromatograms, the Fe and Zn-specific chromatograms that were obtained with Tris, Hepes and Mops-buffer were considerably different from those attained with PBS-buffer. The Tris, Hepes and Mops-buffer mediated redistribution of ~25% plasma Zn(2+) from <100 kDa to >100-600 kDa plasma proteins and to a smaller extent to a <10 kDa (Tris)(2)Zn(2+)-complex can be rationalized in terms of the abstraction of Zn(2+) from the weak binding site on albumin. In contrast, only Hepes and Mops-buffer redistributed ~20% of plasma Fe(3+) from the <100 kDa to the >600 kDa elution range. Based on these results and considering that the utilization of PBS-buffer has previously resulted in the detection of a number of Cu, Fe and Zn-containing metalloentities in rabbit plasma that was most consistent with literature data, this mobile phase buffer is recommended for metallomic studies regarding mammalian blood plasma.

  20. TES buffer-induced phase separation of aqueous solutions of several water-miscible organic solvents at 298.15 K: Phase diagrams and molecular dynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Mohamed; Lee, Ming-Jer

    2013-06-01

    Water and the organic solvents tetrahydrofuran, 1,3-dioxolane, 1,4-dioxane, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, tert-butanol, acetonitrile, or acetone are completely miscible in all proportions at room temperature. Here, we present new buffering-out phase separation systems that the above mentioned organic aqueous solutions can be induced to form two liquid phases in the presence of a biological buffer 2-[[1,3-dihydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)propan-2-yl]amino]ethanesulfonic acid (TES). The lower liquid phase is rich in water and buffer, and the upper phase is organic rich. This observation has both practical and mechanistic interests. The phase diagrams of these systems were constructed by experimental measurements at ambient conditions. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations were performed for TES + water + THF system to understand the interactions between TES, water, and organic solvent at molecular level. Several composition-sets for this system, beyond and inside the liquid-liquid phase-splitting region, have been simulated. Interestingly, the MD simulation for compositions inside the phase separation region showed that THF molecules are forced out from the water network to start forming a new liquid phase. The hydrogen-bonds, hydrogen-bonds lifetimes, hydrogen-bond energies, radial distribution functions, coordination numbers, the electrostatic interactions, and the van der Waals interactions between the different pairs have been calculated. Additionally, MD simulations for TES + water + tert-butanol/acetonitrile/acetone phase separation systems were simulated. The results from MD simulations provide an explanation for the buffering-out phenomena observed in [TES + water + organic solvent] systems by a mechanism controlled by the competitive interactions of the buffer and the organic solvent with water. The molecular mechanism reported here is helpful for designing new benign separation materials.

  1. Calcium Phosphates and Human Beings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V.

    2006-05-01

    This article describes the general importance of calcium phosphates for human beings. The basic information on the structure and chemical properties of the biologically relevant calcium phosphates is summarized. Basic facts on the natural occurrence and the industrial use of natural calcium phosphates are discussed. Fundamental details on the presence of calcium phosphates in major calcified tissues (bones and teeth) of humans and mammals, as well as on biomaterials made of calcium phosphates are discussed. The article will be of value for chemistry teachers for expansion of their general background and point the students' attention to the rapidly growing topic of bone-substituting biomaterials.

  2. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate,...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate,...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434... GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate, dibasic (MgHPO4·3H2O, CAS Reg. No....

  5. Standard Reduction Potentials for Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide Couples in Acetonitrile and N,N-Dimethylformamide.

    PubMed

    Pegis, Michael L; Roberts, John A S; Wasylenko, Derek J; Mader, Elizabeth A; Appel, Aaron M; Mayer, James M

    2015-12-21

    A variety of next-generation energy processes utilize the electrochemical interconversions of dioxygen and water as the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Reported here are the first estimates of the standard reduction potential of the O2 + 4e(-) + 4H(+) ⇋ 2H2O couple in organic solvents. The values are +1.21 V in acetonitrile (MeCN) and +0.60 V in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), each versus the ferrocenium/ferrocene couple (Fc(+/0)) in the respective solvent (as are all of the potentials reported here). The potentials have been determined using a thermochemical cycle that combines the free energy for transferring water from aqueous solution to organic solvent, -0.43 kcal mol(-1) for MeCN and -1.47 kcal mol(-1) for DMF, and the potential of the H(+)/H2 couple, - 0.028 V in MeCN and -0.662 V in DMF. The H(+)/H2 couple in DMF has been directly measured electrochemically using the previously reported procedure for the MeCN value. The thermochemical approach used for the O2/H2O couple has been extended to the CO2/CO and CO2/CH4 couples to give values of -0.12 and +0.15 V in MeCN and -0.73 and -0.48 V in DMF, respectively. Extensions to other reduction potentials are discussed. Additionally, the free energy for transfer of protons from water to organic solvent is estimated as +14 kcal mol(-1) for acetonitrile and +0.6 kcal mol(-1) for DMF.

  6. Tribocorrosion behavior of beta titanium biomedical alloys in phosphate buffer saline solution.

    PubMed

    Pina, V Guiñón; Dalmau, A; Devesa, F; Amigó, V; Muñoz, A Igual

    2015-06-01

    The tribo-electrochemical behavior of different β titanium alloys for biomedical applications sintered by powder metallurgy has been investigated. Different mechanical, electrochemical and optical techniques were used to study the influence of the chemical composition, Sn content, and the electrochemical conditions on the tribocorrosion behavior of those alloys Ti30NbxSn alloys (where "x" is the weight percentage of Sn content, 2% and 4%). Sn content increases the active and passive dissolution rate of the titanium alloys, thus increasing the mechanically activated corrosion under tribocorrosion conditions. It also increases the mechanical wear of the alloy. Prevailing electrochemical conditions between -1 and 2V influences the wear accelerated corrosion by increasing it with the applied potential and slightly increases the mechanical wear of Ti30Nb4Sn. Wear accelerated corrosion can be predicted by existing models as a function of electrochemical and mechanical parameters of the titanium alloys.

  7. Electrochemical behavior of near-beta titanium biomedical alloys in phosphate buffer saline solution.

    PubMed

    Dalmau, A; Guiñón Pina, V; Devesa, F; Amigó, V; Igual Muñoz, A

    2015-03-01

    The electrochemical behavior of three different near-β titanium alloys (composed by Ti, Nb and Sn) obtained by powder metallurgy for biomedical applications has been investigated. Different electrochemical and microscopy techniques were used to study the influence of the chemical composition (Sn content) and the applied potential on the microstructure and the corrosion mechanisms of those titanium alloys. The addition of Sn below 4wt.% to the titanium powder improves the microstructural homogeneity and generates an alloy with high corrosion resistance with low elastic modulus, being more suitable as a biomaterial. When the Sn content is above 4%, the corrosion resistance considerably decreases by increasing the passive dissolution rate; this effect is enhanced with the applied potential.

  8. Buffers more than buffering agent: introducing a new class of stabilizers for the protein BSA.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Bhupender S; Taha, Mohamed; Lee, Ming-Jer

    2015-01-14

    In this study, we have analyzed the influence of four biological buffers on the thermal stability of bovine serum albumin (BSA) using dynamic light scattering (DLS). The investigated buffers include 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES), 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazine-propanesulfonic acid (EPPS), 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid sodium salt (HEPES-Na), and 4-morpholinepropanesulfonic acid sodium salt (MOPS-Na). These buffers behave as a potential stabilizer for the native structure of BSA against thermal denaturation. The stabilization tendency follows the order of MOPS-Na > HEPES-Na > HEPES ≫ EPPS. To obtain an insight into the role of hydration layers and peptide backbone in the stabilization of BSA by these buffers, we have also explored the phase transition of a thermoresponsive polymer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAM)), a model compound for protein, in aqueous solutions of HEPES, EPPS, HEPES-Na, and MOPS-Na buffers at different concentrations. It was found that the lower critical solution temperatures (LCST) of PNIPAM in the aqueous buffer solutions substantially decrease with increase in buffer concentration. The mechanism of interactions between these buffers and protein BSA was probed by various techniques, including UV-visible, fluorescence, and FTIR. The results of this series of studies reveal that the interactions are mainly governed by the influence of the buffers on the hydration layers surrounding the protein. We have also explored the possible binding sites of BSA with these buffers using a molecular docking technique. Moreover, the activities of an industrially important enzyme α-chymotrypsin (α-CT) in 0.05 M, 0.5 M, and 1.0 M of HEPES, EPPS, HEPES-Na, and MOPS-Na buffer solutions were analyzed at pH = 8.0 and T = 25 °C. Interestingly, the activities of α-CT were found to be enhanced in the aqueous solutions of these investigated buffers. Based upon the Jones-Dole viscosity parameters, the

  9. Spectroscopic Study of the Use of Lanthanide Metalloporphyrins as Sensors for Benzene and Acetonitrile Detection in Aqueous Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Carlos Lemarr, Jr.

    This work entails the research on lanthanide metalloporphyrins for their potential use as chemical sensors for benzene and acetonitrile. This research is of importance due to the health implications that benzene and acetonitrile cause; benzene is a known carcinogen and acetonitrile is a known lung irritant. The use of UV-Vis spectroscopy, Fluorescence spectroscopy, Gaussian DFT, and X-ray diffraction crystallography were used in the characterization and analysis of the lanthanide porphyrin complexes. Europium, terbium, dysprosium, cerium, and gadolinium were the lanthanides used in conjunction with 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin, TPP and 5,10,15,20-tetrakissulfonato porphyrin, TBSP. Based on the luminescence spectroscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy data, an aqueous sensor for acetonitrile and benzene was shown to be promising. Among the compounds studied, EuTPP and DyTPP complexes exposed to sodium hydroxide showed promising results for sensing acetonitrile due to significant narrowing of the soret band and the decrease of Q bands in the UV-Vis spectra, along with the blue shifting of luminescence emission spectra. On the other hand, the CeTPP and EuTPP solutions show promise as benzene sensors due to the blue shifting of emission luminescence and variation in intensity. Based on the lanthanide TBSP complexes, TbTBSP was shown to be a promising sensor for acetonitrile due to the narrow soret band, decreased Q bands, and blue shifted emission spectra. EuTBSP, DyTBSP, and TbTBSP were shown to be promising for benzene sensors. Benzene stabilized the TBSP at a higher energy state, S2, to facilitate the energy transfer to the lanthanide ions.

  10. Biomediated continuous release phosphate fertilizer

    DOEpatents

    Goldstein, Alan H.; Rogers, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    A composition is disclosed for providing phosphate fertilizer to the root zone of plants. The composition comprises a microorganism capable of producing and secreting a solubilization agent, a carbon source for providing raw material for the microorganism to convert into the solubilization agent, and rock phosphate ore for providing a source of insoluble phosphate that is solubilized by the solubilization agent and released as soluble phosphate. The composition is provided in a physical form, such as a granule, that retains the microorganism, carbon source, and rock phosphate ore, but permits water and soluble phosphate to diffuse into the soil. A method of using the composition for providing phosphate fertilizer to plants is also disclosed.

  11. Biomediated continuous release phosphate fertilizer

    DOEpatents

    Goldstein, A.H.; Rogers, R.D.

    1999-06-15

    A composition is disclosed for providing phosphate fertilizer to the root zone of plants. The composition comprises a microorganism capable of producing and secreting a solubilization agent, a carbon source for providing raw material for the microorganism to convert into the solubilization agent, and rock phosphate ore for providing a source of insoluble phosphate that is solubilized by the solubilization agent and released as soluble phosphate. The composition is provided in a physical form, such as a granule, that retains the microorganism, carbon source, and rock phosphate ore, but permits water and soluble phosphate to diffuse into the soil. A method of using the composition for providing phosphate fertilizer to plants is also disclosed. 13 figs.

  12. Renal phosphate handling: Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Narayan; Bhadauria, Dharmendra

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus is a common anion. It plays an important role in energy generation. Renal phosphate handling is regulated by three organs parathyroid, kidney and bone through feedback loops. These counter regulatory loops also regulate intestinal absorption and thus maintain serum phosphorus concentration in physiologic range. The parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, Fibrogenic growth factor 23 (FGF23) and klotho coreceptor are the key regulators of phosphorus balance in body. PMID:23961477

  13. Augmentation of bacterial homeostasis by regulating in situ buffer capacity: Significance of total dissolved salts over acidogenic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Venkata Mohan, S; Srikanth, S; Nikhil, G N

    2017-02-01

    During anaerobic fermentation, consequent accumulation of acidic fermented products leads to the failure of pH homeostasis. The present study aimed to comprehend the changes in buffering capacity with addition of sodium salts of hydroxide, bicarbonate and phosphate. The results showed notable augmentation in buffer capacity and cumulative hydrogen production (CHP) compared to control. The influential factor is the amount of undissociated volatile fatty acids released that affected the cell metabolism and consequently biohydrogen generation. It is inferred that among the tested salts, sodium bicarbonate has substantial buffering capacity (β, 0.035± mol) ensuing maximum CHP (468± mL). Besides, bioelectrochemical analysis revealed variations in redox currents that aligned with biohydrogen production. The study provides valuable information on the role of inorganic dissolved salts that would be required to regulate H2 generation and acidogenesis in the aspects of acid-gas phase system.

  14. A continuous-flow method for the determination of the activity of serum alkaline phosphatase in diethanolamine buffer.

    PubMed

    Viitala, A J; Jokela, H A; Penttilä, I M; Nummi, S

    1975-05-01

    A procedure for determination of serum alkaline phosphatase activity (EC 3.1.3.1) in diethanolamine (DEA) buffer with an AutoAnalyzer II apparatus was designed. The buffer used was 1.0 mol/l DEA-HC buffer, pH 9.8 at 37 degree C, containing 0.5 mmol/l of MgCl2 and 10 mmol/l of substrate 4-nitrophenyl-phosphate. The reaction time was about 3 min at 37 degree C. The enzyme activity (U/l) was calculated by determining the amount of 4-nitrophenol formed in reaction. A sampling rate of 70 samples per hour can be used with good linearity up to 1000 U/l. The results obtained by the new continuous-flow system were compared with those measured by the kinetic method according to the Scandinavian recommendation (10). A close correlation between the two methods was observed.

  15. Buffer layers on biaxially textured metal substrates

    DOEpatents

    Shoup, Shara S.; Paranthamam, Mariappan; Beach, David B.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Goyal, Amit

    2001-01-01

    A method is disclosed for forming a biaxially textured buffer layer on a biaxially oriented metal substrate by using a sol-gel coating technique followed by pyrolyzing/annealing in a reducing atmosphere. This method is advantageous for providing substrates for depositing electronically active materials thereon.

  16. Body Buffer Zone and Proxemics in Blocking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockwell, John C.; Bahs, Clarence W.

    This paper investigates the effect of personal body buffer zones on compositional arrangements staged by novice directors. Relationships between directors' concepts of personal space and their projection of its dimensions into staging are studied through the use of a variety of proximity measures--distance, area angles of approach, and physical…

  17. Printing without Waiting: Buffers and Spoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Brian

    1989-01-01

    Describes two methods to increase the speed of printing on microcomputers: (1) buffers, which are external storage devices used to temporarily store data bound for the printer; and (2) spoolers, which are software programs used to capture printer output and send it to the computer's memory or to a disk file. (LRW)

  18. Buffer placement improves when topography is considered

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Best Management Practices (BMPs) protect streams by excluding cattle from streambanks and by filtering the run-off flowing from animal heavy use areas like feeding and watering stations. Conservation standards recommend placing buffers and filter strips downslope from heavy use areas, but do not exp...

  19. A Discovery Chemistry Experiment on Buffers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulevich, Suzanne E.; Herrick, Richard S.; Mills, Kenneth V.

    2014-01-01

    The Holy Cross Chemistry Department has designed and implemented an experiment on buffers as part of our Discovery Chemistry curriculum. The pedagogical philosophy of Discovery Chemistry is to make the laboratory the focal point of learning for students in their first two years of undergraduate instruction. We first pose questions in prelaboratory…

  20. Buffering children from marital conflict and dissolution.

    PubMed

    Katz, L F; Gottman, J M

    1997-06-01

    Examined several protective mechanisms that may reduce deleterious correlates of marital conflict and marital dissolution in young children. One set of potential buffers focused on parent-child interaction: parental warmth, parental scaffolding/praise, and inhibition of parental rejection. As a second set of potential buffers, each parent was interviewed about their "meta-emotion philosophy"--that is, their feelings about their own emotions, and their attitudes and responses to their children's anger and sadness. The third set of potential buffers concerned intraindividual characteristics of the child, including the child's intelligence and regulatory physiology (basal vagal tone and vagal suppression). Fifty-six families with a preschool child were studied at two time points: when the children were 5 years old (Time 1) and again when the children were 8 years old (Time 2). At Time 1, naturalistic observations of marital and parent-child interaction were conducted and assessment of child regulatory physiology was obtained through measures of basal vagal tone and suppression of vagal tone. Parents were also interviewed individually about their feelings about their own and their children's emotions, and children's intelligence was assessed. At Time 2, assessment of child outcomes were obtained, including observations of peer interaction, mother ratings of behavior problems and mother and teacher ratings of peer aggression, mother ratings of child physical illness, and measures of achievement. Results indicated that all Time 1 buffering factors protected children in face of marital conflict and dissolution.

  1. Baroreflex buffering and susceptibility to vasoactive drugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Jens; Tank, Jens; Shannon, John R.; Diedrich, Andre; Lipp, Axel; Schroder, Christoph; Arnold, Guy; Sharma, Arya M.; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, David; Luft, Friedrich C.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The overall effect of vasoactive drugs on blood pressure is determined by a combination of the direct effect on vascular tone and an indirect baroreflex-mediated effect, a baroreflex buffering of blood pressure. Differences in baroreflex function affect the responsiveness to vasoactive medications, particularly baroreflex buffering of blood pressure; however, the magnitude is not known. METHODS AND RESULTS: We characterized baroreflex function and responses to vasoactive drugs in patients with idiopathic orthostatic intolerance, patients with essential hypertension, patients with monogenic hypertension and brachydactyly, patients with multiple system atrophy, and control subjects. We used phenylephrine sensitivity during ganglionic blockade as a measure of baroreflex buffering. Phenylephrine (25 microg) increased systolic blood pressure 6+/-1.6 mm Hg in control subjects, 6+/-1.1 mm Hg in orthostatic intolerance patients, 18+/-3.9 mm Hg in patients with essential hypertension, 31+/-3.4 mm Hg in patients with monogenic hypertension, and 25+/-3.4 mm Hg in patients with multiple system atrophy. Similar differences in sensitivities between groups were observed with nitroprusside. The sensitivity to vasoactive drugs was highly correlated with baroreflex buffering function and to a lesser degree with baroreflex control of heart rate. In control subjects, sensitivities to nitroprusside and phenylephrine infusions were correlated with baroreflex heart rate control and sympathetic nerve traffic. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings are consistent with an important effect of baroreflex blood pressure buffering on the sensitivity to vasoactive drugs. They suggest that even moderate changes in baroreflex function may have a substantial effect on the sensitivity to vasoactive medications.

  2. Report of the key comparison APMP.QM-K19. APMP comparison on pH measurement of borate buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hioki, Akiharu; Asakai, Toshiaki; Maksimov, Igor; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Miura, Tsutomu; Obromsook, Krairerk; Tangpaisarnkul, Nongluck; Rodruangthum, Patumporn; Wong, Siu-Kay; Lam, Wai-Hing; Zakaria, Osman; Anuar Mohd. Amin, Khirul; Thanh, Ngo Huy; Máriássy, Michal; Vyskocil, Leos; Hankova, Zuzana; Fisicaro, Paola; Stoica, Daniela; Singh, Nahar; Soni, Daya; Ticona Canaza, Galia; Kutovoy, Viatcheslav; Barbieri Gonzaga, Fabiano; Dias, Júlio Cesar; Vospelova, Alena; Bakovets, Nickolay; Zhanasbayeva, Bibinur

    2015-01-01

    The APMP.QM-K19 was organised by TCQM of APMP to test the abilities of the national metrology institutes in the APMP region to measure a pH value of a borate buffer. This APMP comparison on pH measurement was proposed by the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) and the National Institute of Metrology (Thailand) (NIMT) at the APMP-TCQM meeting held 26-27 November 2012. After approval by TCQM, the comparison has been conducted by NMIJ and NIMT. The comparison is a key comparison following CCQM-K19 and CCQM-K19.1. The comparison material was a borate buffer of pH around 9.2 and the measurement temperatures were 15 °C, 25 °C and 37 °C. This is the second APMP key comparison on pH measurement and the fourth APMP comparison on pH measurement following APMP.QM-P06 (two phosphate buffers) in 2004, APMP.QM-P09 (a phthalate buffer) in 2006 and APMP.QM-K9/APMP.QM-P16 (a phosphate buffer) in 2010-2011. The results can be used further by any participant to support its CMC claim at least for a borate buffer. That claim will concern the pH method employed by the participant during this comparison and will cover the used temperature(s) or the full temperature range between 15°C and 37 °C for the participant which measured pH values at the three temperatures. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  3. pH and buffer capacities of apoplastic and cytoplasmic cell compartments in leaves.

    PubMed

    Oja; Savchenko; Jakob; Heber

    1999-08-12

    After opening the stomata in CO(2)-free air, darkened leaves of several plant species were titrated with CO(2) at concentrations between 1 and 16%, in air in order to reversibly decrease cellular pH values and to calculate buffer capacities from pH changes and bicarbonate accumulation using both gas-exchange and fluorescence methods for analysis. After equilibration with CO(2) for times ranging between 4.4 and 300 s, fast CO(2) release from bicarbonate indicated catalysis by highly active carbonic anhydrase. Its time constant was below 2.5 s. Additional CO(2) was released with time constants of about 5, 15 and approximately 300 s. With CO(2) as the acidifying agent, calculated buffer capacities depend on assumptions regarding initial pH in the absence of an acid load. At an initial stroma pH of 7.7, the stromal buffer capacity was about 20 mM pH-unit(-1 )in darkened spinach leaves. At an initial pH of 7.5 it would be only 12 mM pH-unit(-1), i.e. not higher than expected solely on the basis of known stromal concentrations of phosphate and phosphate esters, disregarding the contribution of other solutes. At a concentration of 16%, CO(2) reduced the stromal pH by about 1 pH unit. Buffering of the cytosol was measured by the CO(2)-dependent quenching of the fluorescence of pyranine which was fed to spinach leaves via the petiole. Brief exposures to high CO(2) minimized interference by effective cytosolic pH regulation. Cytosolic buffering appeared to be similar to or only somewhat higher than chloroplast buffering if the initial cytosolic pH was assumed to be 7.25, which is in accord with published cytosolic pH values. The difference from chloroplast pH values indicates the existence of a pH gradient across the chloroplast envelope even in darkened leaves. Apoplastic buffering was weak as measured by the CO(2)-dependent quenching of dextran-conjugated fluorescein isothiocyanate which was infiltrated together with sodium vanadate into potato leaves. In the absence of

  4. Determination of sulfonamides in swine muscle after salting-out assisted liquid extraction with acetonitrile coupled with back-extraction by a water/acetonitrile/dichloromethane ternary component system prior to high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Hsien; Huang, Tzou-Chi; Chen, Ho-Hsien; Wu, Yuh-Wern; Huang, Joh-Jong; Chuang, Hung-Yi

    2010-01-15

    A salting-out assisted liquid extraction coupled with back-extraction by a water/acetonitrile/dichloromethane ternary component system combined with high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection (HPLC-DAD) was developed for the extraction and determination of sulfonamides in solid tissue samples. After the homogenization of the swine muscle with acetonitrile and salt-promoted partitioning, an aliquot of 1 mL of the acetonitrile extract containing a small amount of dichloromethane (250-400 microL) was alkalinized with diethylamine. The clear organic extract obtained by centrifugation was used as a donor phase and then a small amount of water (40-55 microL) could be used as an acceptor phase to back-extract the analytes in the water/acetonitrile/dichloromethane ternary component system. In the back-extraction procedure, after mixing and centrifuging, the sedimented phase would be water and could be withdrawn easily into a microsyringe and directly injected into the HPLC system. Under the optimal conditions, recoveries were determined for swine muscle fortified at 10 ng/g and quantification was achieved by matrix-matched calibration. The calibration curves of five sulfonamides showed linearity with the coefficient of estimation above 0.998. Relative recoveries for the analytes were all from 96.5 to 109.2% with relative standard deviation of 2.7-4.0%. Preconcentration factors ranged from 16.8 to 30.6 for 1 mL of the acetonitrile extract. Limits of detection ranged from 0.2 to 1.0 ng/g.

  5. Dual Effect of Phosphate Transport on Mitochondrial Ca2+ Dynamics*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, An-Chi; Liu, Ting; O'Rourke, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The large inner membrane electrochemical driving force and restricted volume of the matrix confer unique constraints on mitochondrial ion transport. Cation uptake along with anion and water movement induces swelling if not compensated by other processes. For mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, these include activation of countertransporters (Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and Na+/H+ exchanger) coupled to the proton gradient, ultimately maintained by the proton pumps of the respiratory chain, and Ca2+ binding to matrix buffers. Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is known to affect both the Ca2+ uptake rate and the buffering reaction, but the role of anion transport in determining mitochondrial Ca2+ dynamics is poorly understood. Here we simultaneously monitor extra- and intra-mitochondrial Ca2+ and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) to examine the effects of anion transport on mitochondrial Ca2+ flux and buffering in Pi-depleted guinea pig cardiac mitochondria. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake proceeded slowly in the absence of Pi but matrix free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]mito) still rose to ∼50 μm. Pi (0.001–1 mm) accelerated Ca2+ uptake but decreased [Ca2+]mito by almost 50% while restoring ΔΨm. Pi-dependent effects on Ca2+ were blocked by inhibiting the phosphate carrier. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake rate was also increased by vanadate (Vi), acetate, ATP, or a non-hydrolyzable ATP analog (AMP-PNP), with differential effects on matrix Ca2+ buffering and ΔΨm recovery. Interestingly, ATP or AMP-PNP prevented the effects of Pi on Ca2+ uptake. The results show that anion transport imposes an upper limit on mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and modifies the [Ca2+]mito response in a complex manner. PMID:25963147

  6. Thermodynamics of Neptunium (V) Complexes with Phosphate at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Y.; Friese, Judah I.; Bachelor, Paula P.; Moore, Dean A.; Rao, Linfeng

    2009-06-01

    Abstract – The complexation of Np(V) with phosphate at elevated temperatures was studied by a synergistic extraction method. A mixed buffer solution of TRIS and MES was used to maintain an appropriate pH value during the distribution experiments. The distribution ratio of Np(V) between the organic and aqueous phases was found to decrease as the concentrations of phosphate were increased. Stability constants of the 1:1 and 1:2 Np(V)-HPO42- complexes, dominant in the aqueous phase under the experimental conditions, were calculated from the effect of [HPO42-] on the distribution ratio. The thermodynamic parameters including enthalpy and entropy of complexation between Np(V) and HPO42- at 25o C – 55o C were calculated by the temperature coefficient method.

  7. Dissolution characteristics of extrusion freeformed hydroxyapatite-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Yang, H Y; Thompson, I; Yang, S F; Chi, X P; Evans, J R G; Cook, R J

    2008-11-01

    The dissolution behaviour of calcium phosphate filaments made by extrusion freeforming for hard tissue scaffolds was measured. The solubility of filaments with different HA/beta-TCP ratios sintered at temperatures from 1,100 to 1,300 degrees C was measured under simulated physiological conditions (tris buffer solution: tris(hydroxyl) methyl-aminomethane-HCl), pH 7.4, 37 degrees C). Calcium and phosphate concentrations were measured separately by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) atomic emission spectroscopy. Surface morphologies and composition before and after immersion were analyzed by SEM and EDS. The results clearly show that as the beta-TCP content increased, the dissolution increased. Higher sintering temperatures, with consequent closure of surface pores, resulted in lower dissolution. Examination of the surface suggested dissolution on preferred sites by pitting.

  8. Effect of the physicochemical parameters of benzimidazole molecules on their retention by a nonpolar sorbent from an aqueous acetonitrile solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafigulin, R. V.; Safonova, I. A.; Bulanova, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of the structure of benzimidazoles on their chromatographic retention on octadecyl silica gel from an aqueous acetonitrile eluent was studied. One- and many-parameter correlation equations were obtained by linear regression analysis, and their prognostic potential in determining the retention factors of benzimidazoles under study was analyzed.

  9. Theoretical analysis of co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water-acetonitrile mixture.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Yukako; Yoshida, Norio; Nakano, Haruyuki

    2015-05-28

    The co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water-acetonitrile mixture was examined using the reference interaction-site model self-consistent field theory. The free energy profiles of the proton transfer reaction of glycine between the carboxyl oxygen and amino nitrogen were computed in a water-acetonitrile mixture solvent at various molar fractions. Two types of reactions, the intramolecular proton transfer and water-mediated proton transfer, were considered. In both types of the reactions, a similar tendency was observed. In the pure water solvent, the zwitterionic form, where the carboxyl oxygen is deprotonated while the amino nitrogen is protonated, is more stable than the neutral form. The reaction free energy is -10.6 kcal mol(-1). On the other hand, in the pure acetonitrile solvent, glycine takes only the neutral form. The reaction free energy from the neutral to zwitterionic form gradually increases with increasing acetonitrile concentration, and in an equally mixed solvent, the zwitterionic and neutral forms are almost isoenergetic, with a difference of only 0.3 kcal mol(-1). The free energy component analysis based on the thermodynamic cycle of the reaction also revealed that the free energy change of the neutral form is insensitive to the change of solvent environment but the zwitterionic form shows drastic changes. In particular, the excess chemical potential, one of the components of the solvation free energy, is dominant and contributes to the stabilization of the zwitterionic form.

  10. Decay dynamics of nascent acetonitrile and nitromethane dipole-bound anions produced by intracluster charge-transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Yandell, Margaret A.; King, Sarah B.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2014-05-14

    Decay dynamics of nascent dipole bound states of acetonitrile and nitromethane are examined using time-resolved photoelectron imaging of iodide-acetonitrile (I{sup −}·CH{sub 3}CN) and iodide-nitromethane (I{sup −}·CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}) complexes. Dipole-bound anions are created by UV-initiated electron transfer to the molecule of interest from the associated iodide ion at energies just below the vertical detachment energy of the halide-molecule complex. The acetonitrile anion is observed to decay biexponentially with time constants in the range of 4–900 ps. In contrast, the dipole bound state of nitromethane decays rapidly over 400 fs to form the valence bound anion. The nitromethane valence anion species then decays biexponentially with time constants of 2 ps and 1200 ps. The biexponential decay dynamics in acetonitrile are interpreted as iodine atom loss and autodetachment from the excited dipole-bound anion, followed by slower autodetachment of the relaxed metastable ion, while the dynamics of the nitromethane system suggest that a dipole-bound anion to valence anion transition proceeds via intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution to nitro group modes in the vicinity of the iodine atom.

  11. Theoretical analysis of co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water-acetonitrile mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Yukako; Yoshida, Norio; Nakano, Haruyuki

    2015-05-01

    The co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water-acetonitrile mixture was examined using the reference interaction-site model self-consistent field theory. The free energy profiles of the proton transfer reaction of glycine between the carboxyl oxygen and amino nitrogen were computed in a water-acetonitrile mixture solvent at various molar fractions. Two types of reactions, the intramolecular proton transfer and water-mediated proton transfer, were considered. In both types of the reactions, a similar tendency was observed. In the pure water solvent, the zwitterionic form, where the carboxyl oxygen is deprotonated while the amino nitrogen is protonated, is more stable than the neutral form. The reaction free energy is -10.6 kcal mol-1. On the other hand, in the pure acetonitrile solvent, glycine takes only the neutral form. The reaction free energy from the neutral to zwitterionic form gradually increases with increasing acetonitrile concentration, and in an equally mixed solvent, the zwitterionic and neutral forms are almost isoenergetic, with a difference of only 0.3 kcal mol-1. The free energy component analysis based on the thermodynamic cycle of the reaction also revealed that the free energy change of the neutral form is insensitive to the change of solvent environment but the zwitterionic form shows drastic changes. In particular, the excess chemical potential, one of the components of the solvation free energy, is dominant and contributes to the stabilization of the zwitterionic form.

  12. Theoretical analysis of co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water–acetonitrile mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, Yukako; Yoshida, Norio Nakano, Haruyuki

    2015-05-28

    The co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water–acetonitrile mixture was examined using the reference interaction-site model self-consistent field theory. The free energy profiles of the proton transfer reaction of glycine between the carboxyl oxygen and amino nitrogen were computed in a water–acetonitrile mixture solvent at various molar fractions. Two types of reactions, the intramolecular proton transfer and water-mediated proton transfer, were considered. In both types of the reactions, a similar tendency was observed. In the pure water solvent, the zwitterionic form, where the carboxyl oxygen is deprotonated while the amino nitrogen is protonated, is more stable than the neutral form. The reaction free energy is −10.6 kcal mol{sup −1}. On the other hand, in the pure acetonitrile solvent, glycine takes only the neutral form. The reaction free energy from the neutral to zwitterionic form gradually increases with increasing acetonitrile concentration, and in an equally mixed solvent, the zwitterionic and neutral forms are almost isoenergetic, with a difference of only 0.3 kcal mol{sup −1}. The free energy component analysis based on the thermodynamic cycle of the reaction also revealed that the free energy change of the neutral form is insensitive to the change of solvent environment but the zwitterionic form shows drastic changes. In particular, the excess chemical potential, one of the components of the solvation free energy, is dominant and contributes to the stabilization of the zwitterionic form.

  13. Dopamine-melanin film deposition depends on the used oxidant and buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Bernsmann, Falk; Ball, Vincent; Addiego, Frédéric; Ponche, Arnaud; Michel, Marc; Gracio, José Joaquin de Almeida; Toniazzo, Valérie; Ruch, David

    2011-03-15

    The deposition of "polydopamine" films, from an aqueous solution containing dopamine or other catecholamines, constitutes a new and versatile way to functionalize solid-liquid interfaces. Indeed such films can be deposited on almost all kinds of materials. Their deposition kinetics does not depend markedly on the surface chemistry of the substrate, and the films can reach thickness of a few tens of nanometers in a single reaction step. Up to now, even if a lot is known about the oxidation mechanism of dopamine in solution, only little information is available to describe the deposition mechanism on surfaces either by oxidation in solution or by electrodeposition. The deposition kinetics of melanin was only investigated from dopamine solutions using oxygen or ammonium persulfate as an oxidant and from a tris(hydroxymethyl) aminomethane (Tris) containing buffer solutions at pH 8.5. Many other oxidants could be used, and the buffer agent containing a primary amine group may influence the deposition process. Herein we show that the deposition kinetics of melanin from dopamine containing buffers at pH 8.5 can be markedly modified using Cu(2+) instead of O2 as an oxidant: the deposition kinetics remains linear up to thicknesses of more than 70 nm, whereas the film growth stops at 45 ± 5 nm in the presence of 02. In addition, the films prepared from Cu(2+) containing solutions display an absorption spectrum with defined peaks at 320 and 370 nm, which are absent in the spectra of films prepared in oxygenated solutions. The replacement of Tris buffer by phosphate buffer also has a marked effect on the melanin deposition kinetics.

  14. Polar solvation dynamics of polyatomic solutes: Simulation studies in acetonitrile and methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P. V.; Maroncelli, M.

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes results of simulations of solvation dynamics of a variety of solutes in two reference solvents, acetonitrile and methanol. Part of these studies involve attempts to realistically model the solvation dynamics observed experimentally with the fluorescence probe coumarin 153 (C153). After showing that linear response simulations afford a reliable route to the dynamics of interest, experimental and simulation results for C153 are compared. Agreement between the observed and calculated dynamics is found to be satisfactory in the case of acetonitrile but poor in the case of methanol. The latter failure is traced to a lack of realism in the dielectric properties of the methanol model employed. A number of further simulations are then reported for solvation of a number of atomic, diatomic, and benzenelike solutes which are used to elucidate what features of the solute are important for determining the time dependence of the solvation response. As far as large polyatomic solutes like C153 are concerned, the solute attribute of foremost importance is shown to be the ``effective moment'' of its charge distribution (actually the difference between the S1 and S0 charge distributions). This effective moment, determined from consideration of continuum electrostatics, provides a simple measure of how rapidly the solute's electric field varies spatially in the important regions of the solvent. Simulations of fictitious excitations in a benzene solute show that this single quantity is able to correlate the dynamics observed in widely different solutes. Also explored is the effect of solute motion on its solvation dynamics. While of minor relevance for large solutes like C153, in small solutes of the size of benzene, solute motion can dramatically enhance the rate of solvation. A model based on independent solvent dynamics and solute rotational motion is able to account for the bulk of the observed effects. Finally, the influence of solute polarizability on

  15. Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles with Buffer-Dependent Variations of Size and Morphology in Biological Buffers.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Syed Rahin; Oh, Sangjin; Baba, Rina; Zhou, Hongjian; Hwang, Sungu; Lee, Jaebeom; Park, Enoch Y

    2016-12-01

    The demand for biologically compatible and stable noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) has increased in recent years due to their inert nature and unique optical properties. In this article, we present 11 different synthetic methods for obtaining gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) through the use of common biological buffers. The results demonstrate that the sizes, shapes, and monodispersity of the NPs could be varied depending on the type of buffer used, as these buffers acted as both a reducing agent and a stabilizer in each synthesis. Theoretical simulations and electrochemical experiments were performed to understand the buffer-dependent variations of size and morphology exhibited by these Au NPs, which revealed that surface interactions and the electrostatic energy on the (111) surface of Au were the determining factors. The long-term stability of the synthesized NPs in buffer solution was also investigated. Most NPs synthesized using buffers showed a uniquely wide range of pH stability and excellent cell viability without the need for further modifications.

  16. Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles with Buffer-Dependent Variations of Size and Morphology in Biological Buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Syed Rahin; Oh, Sangjin; Baba, Rina; Zhou, Hongjian; Hwang, Sungu; Lee, Jaebeom; Park, Enoch Y.

    2016-02-01

    The demand for biologically compatible and stable noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) has increased in recent years due to their inert nature and unique optical properties. In this article, we present 11 different synthetic methods for obtaining gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) through the use of common biological buffers. The results demonstrate that the sizes, shapes, and monodispersity of the NPs could be varied depending on the type of buffer used, as these buffers acted as both a reducing agent and a stabilizer in each synthesis. Theoretical simulations and electrochemical experiments were performed to understand the buffer-dependent variations of size and morphology exhibited by these Au NPs, which revealed that surface interactions and the electrostatic energy on the (111) surface of Au were the determining factors. The long-term stability of the synthesized NPs in buffer solution was also investigated. Most NPs synthesized using buffers showed a uniquely wide range of pH stability and excellent cell viability without the need for further modifications.

  17. Role of phosphate and carboxylate ions in maillard browning.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, George P

    2004-02-25

    The Maillard reaction of carbohydrates and amino acids is the underlying chemical basis for flavor and color formation in many processed foods. Phosphate and other polyatomic anions will accelerate the rate of Maillard browning, and this effect has been explained by invoking enhanced proton abstraction from intermediate Amadori compounds. In this work, the effect of phosphate and carboxylate ions on browning was measured for a series of reducing sugars with and without the presence of beta-alanine. Significant browning was observed for sugars alone suggesting that polyatomic anions contribute to Maillard browning by providing reactive intermediates directly from sugars. A mechanism is proposed for decomposition of sugars by polyatomic anions and efforts to trap reactive species using o-phenylenediamine (OPD) are described. The results of this study suggest how complications may arise from the popular usage of phosphate buffers in the study of Maillard reaction kinetics. In addition, the results imply how phosphates may be useful for enhancing browning during food processing.

  18. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of phenols by acetonitrile stacking coupled with sweeping-micellar electrokinetic chromatography with large-volume injection.

    PubMed

    He, Hui; Liu, Shuhui; Meng, Zhaofu; Hu, Shibing

    2014-09-26

    The current routes to couple dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) with capillary electrophoresis (CE) are evaporation of water immiscible extractants and backextraction of analytes. The former is not applicable to extractants with high boiling points, the latter being effective only for acidic or basic analytes, both of which limit the further application of DLLME-CE. In this study, with 1-octanol as a model DLLME extractant and six phenols as model analytes, a novel method based on acetonitrile stacking and sweeping is proposed to accomplish large-volume injection of 1-octanol diluted with a solvent-saline mixture before micellar electrokinetic chromatography. Brij-35 and β-cyclodextrin were employed as pseudostationary phases for sweeping and also for improving the compatibility of sample zone and aqueous running buffer. A short solvent-saline plug was used to offset the adverse effect of the water immiscible extractant on focusing efficiency. The key parameters affecting separation and concentration were systematically optimized; the effect of Brij-35 and 1-octanol on focusing mechanism was discussed. Under the optimized conditions, with ∼ 30-fold concentration enrichment by DLLME, the diluted extractant (8×) was then injected into the capillary with a length of 21 cm (42% of the total length), which yielded the overall improvements in sensitivity of 170-460. Limits of detection and qualification ranged from 0.2 to 1.0 ng/mL and 1.0 to 3.4 g/mL, respectively. Acceptable repeatability lower than 3.0% for migration time and 9.0% for peak areas were obtained. The developed method was successfully applied for analysis of the phenol pollutants in real water samples.

  19. Buffered local anesthetics and epinephrine degradation.

    PubMed

    Murakami, C S; Odland, P B; Ross, B K

    1994-03-01

    Lidocaine with epinephrine is currently the most common local anesthetic agent used for facial soft tissue surgery. This combination is generally safe and effective in providing complete anesthesia and adequate hemostasis. Because epinephrine is unstable at physiologic pH, the commercial preparation is formulated with a low pH (3.5-5.5). Unfortunately, this acidic pH causes significant pain during infiltration. To reduce pain, clinicians sometimes buffer acidic local anesthetic agents with sodium bicarbonate. However, little is known about the stability of epinephrine when the pH of epinephrine is clinically altered. Using high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), epinephrine levels were measured after the addition of sodium bicarbonate. Our results indicate a significant amount of epinephrine degradation occurs in some of these specimens. Recommendations regarding the use of buffered local anesthetic agents are made.

  20. Spacecraft optical disk recorder memory buffer control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, Robert F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the research completed under the NASA-ASEE summer faculty fellowship program. The project involves development of an Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) to be used as a Memory Buffer Controller (MBC) in the Spacecraft Optical Disk System (SODR). The SODR system has demanding capacity and data rate specifications requiring specialized electronics to meet processing demands. The system is being designed to support Gigabit transfer rates with Terabit storage capability. The complete SODR system is designed to exceed the capability of all existing mass storage systems today. The ASIC development for SODR consist of developing a 144 pin CMOS device to perform format conversion and data buffering. The final simulations of the MBC were completed during this summer's NASA-ASEE fellowship along with design preparations for fabrication to be performed by an ASIC manufacturer.

  1. Simple buffers for 3D STORM microscopy.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Nicolas; Keller, Debora; Rajan, Vinoth Sundar; Gönczy, Pierre; Manley, Suliana

    2013-06-01

    3D STORM is one of the leading methods for super-resolution imaging, with resolution down to 10 nm in the lateral direction, and 30-50 nm in the axial direction. However, there is one important requirement to perform this type of imaging: making dye molecules blink. This usually relies on the utilization of complex buffers, containing different chemicals and sensitive enzymatic systems, limiting the reproducibility of the method. We report here that the commercial mounting medium Vectashield can be used for STORM of Alexa-647, and yields images comparable or superior to those obtained with more complex buffers, especially for 3D imaging. We expect that this advance will promote the versatile utilization of 3D STORM by removing one of its entry barriers, as well as provide a more reproducible way to compare optical setups and data processing algorithms.

  2. A novel liquid/liquid extraction process composed of surfactant and acetonitrile for purification of polygalacturonase enzyme from Durio zibethinus.

    PubMed

    Amid, Mehrnoush; Manap, Yazid; Azmira, Farhana; Hussin, Muhaini; Sarker, Zaidul Islam

    2015-07-01

    Polygalacturonase is one of the important enzymes used in various industries such as food, detergent, pharmaceutical, textile, pulp and paper. A novel liquid/liquid extraction process composed of surfactant and acetonitrile was employed for the first time to purify polygalacturonase from Durio zibethinus. The influences of different parameters such as type and concentration of surfactants, concentrations of acetonitrile and composition of surfactant/acetonitrile on partitioning behavior and recovery of polygalacturonase was investigated. Moreover, the effect of pH of system and crude load on purification fold and yield of purified polygalacturonase were studied. The results of the experiment indicated the polygalacturonase was partitioned into surfactant top rich phase with impurities being partitioned into acetonitrile bottom rich phase in the novel method of liquid/liquid process composed of 23% (w/w) Triton X-100 and 19% (w/w) acetonitrile, at 55.6% of TLL (tie line length) crude load of 25% (w/w) at pH 6.0. Recovery and recycling of components also was measured in each successive step of liquid/liquid extraction process. The enzyme was successfully recovered by the method with a high purification factor of 14.3 and yield of 97.3% while phase components were also recovered and recycled above 95%. This study demonstrated that the novel method of liquid/liquid extraction process can be used as an efficient and economical extraction method rather than the traditional methods of extraction for the purification and recovery of the valuable enzyme.

  3. Dielectric relaxation and ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy of [C6mim]+[Tf2N]−/acetonitrile mixtures.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Peter W; Bartels, Nils; Stoppa, Alexander; Buchner, Richard; Lenzer, Thomas; Oum, Kawon

    2012-03-14

    Mixtures of the ionic liquid (IL) [C(6)mim](+)[Tf(2)N](-) and acetonitrile have been investigated by a combination of dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (DRS) and ultrafast transient absorption techniques using the molecular probe 12'-apo-β-carotenoic-12'-acid (12'CA). Steady-state absorption spectra of the 12'CA molecule have also been recorded. The position of the probe's S(0)→ S(2) absorption maximum correlates linearly with the polarizability of the mixture, suggesting that the bulk composition is a good approximation to the local composition. The lifetime τ(1) of the S(1)/ICT state of 12'CA varies rather smoothly with composition between the value for pure acetonitrile (42 ps) and neat [C(6)mim](+)[Tf(2)N](-) (94 ps). At low IL contents there appears to be an influence of discrete ion pairs. Employing static dielectric constants from the DRS experiments, one finds that the lifetime of the probe in the IL mixtures is shorter than that in pure organic solvents with the same polarity parameter. This suggests an increased stabilization of the S(1)/ICT state in IL-containing mixtures, most likely due to IL-specific Coulombic interactions between the cation and the negative end of the probe's dipole. An ultrafast solvation component is observed which is ca. 0.5 ps in pure acetonitrile, and approaches the value for the pure IL (2.0 ps) already around x(IL) = 0.3. This is interpreted in terms of an efficient perturbation of the cooperative solvation response of acetonitrile by the presence of small amounts of IL and possibly also the viscosity increase when adding IL. This view is also supported by the increase of the average longitudinal relaxation time of acetonitrile upon addition of small IL amounts extracted from the DRS experiments.

  4. Buffered explosions in steel pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    The impulse delivered to the walls of a vessel containing an explosion will increase if material is placed between the walls and the charge. If the impulse application time is small in compared with the eigenperiod of the vessel, the wall stress will increase in direct proportion to the impulse. Conversely, if the application period can be extended beyond half the eigenperiod, the peak stress will be proportional to the ratio of the impulse to the delivery period. With powder or granular buffers, it is possible for the delivery period to increase faster than the impulse as the buffer mass is increased. This is the reason why certain powders, or porous materials, can provide stress reduction even below that observed by evacuating the space between the walls and the explosive. If the buffer material is to serve as an effective mitigator, it must collapse on shock loading to a final density that depends only weakly on pressure; the criterion is that the wave speed in the material that impacts the wall must be small comparison with the impact (particle) speed. This behavior apparently occurs with salt, at least for modest values of the charge parameter, but to a lesser extent with snow under the same conditions. The vermiculite data are comparable to the salt in the charge paramete region where the two overlap; with increasing explosive, however, the vermiculite appears to behave like the snow and its effectiveness as a mitigator rapidly diminishes. It is also clear that once the wave speed criterion is seriously violated, the use of a powder buffer will result in a higher wall stress than if only air filled the space between walls and charge. 5 refs.

  5. Impact of solute concentration on the electrocatalytic conversion of dissolved gases in buffered solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-08-01

    To maintain local pH levels near the electrode during electrochemical reactions, the use of buffer solutions is effective. Nevertheless, the critical effects of the buffer concentration on electrocatalytic performances have not been discussed in detail. In this study, two fundamental electrochemical reactions, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR), on a platinum rotating disk electrode are chosen as model gas-related aqueous electrochemical reactions at various phosphate concentrations. Our detailed investigations revealed that the kinetic and limiting diffusion current densities for both the ORR and HOR logarithmically decrease with increasing solute concentration (log |jORR | = - 0.39 c + 0.92 , log |jHOR | = - 0.35 c + 0.73) . To clarify the physical aspects of this phenomenon, the electrolyte characteristics are addressed: with increasing phosphate concentration, the gas solubility decrease, the kinematic viscosity of the solution increase and the diffusion coefficient of the dissolved gases decrease. The simulated limiting diffusion currents using the aforementioned parameters match the measured ones very well (log |jORR | = - 0.43 c + 0.99 , log |jHOR | = - 0.40 c + 0.54) , accurately describing the consequences of the electrolyte concentration. These alterations of the electrolyte properties associated with the solute concentration are universally applicable to other aqueous gas-related electrochemical reactions because the currents are purely determined by mass transfer of the dissolved gases.

  6. Wintering bird response to fall mowing of herbaceous buffers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blank, P.J.; Parks, J.R.; Dively, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    Herbaceous buffers are strips of herbaceous vegetation planted between working agricultural land and streams or wetlands. Mowing is a common maintenance practice to control woody plants and noxious weeds in herbaceous buffers. Buffers enrolled in Maryland's Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) cannot be mowed during the primary bird nesting season between 15 April and 15 August. Most mowing of buffers in Maryland occurs in late summer or fall, leaving the vegetation short until the following spring. We studied the response of wintering birds to fall mowing of buffers. We mowed one section to 10-15 cm in 13 buffers and kept another section unmowed. Ninety-two percent of birds detected in buffers were grassland or scrub-shrub species, and 98% of all birds detected were in unmowed buffers. Total bird abundance, species richness, and total avian conservation value were significantly greater in unmowed buffers, and Savannah Sparrows (Passerculus sandwichensis), Song Sparrows (Melospiza melodia), and White-throated Sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis) were significantly more abundant in unmowed buffers. Wintering bird use of mowed buffers was less than in unmowed buffers. Leaving herbaceous buffers unmowed through winter will likely provide better habitat for wintering birds. ?? 2011 by the Wilson Ornithological Society.

  7. DFT simulation, quantum chemical electronic structure, spectroscopic and structure-activity investigations of 2-benzothiazole acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, V.; Thillai Govindaraja, S.; Jose, Sujin P.; Mohan, S.

    2014-07-01

    The Fourier transform infrared and FT-Raman spectra of 2-benzothiazole acetonitrile (BTAN) have been recorded in the range 4000-450 and 4000-100 cm-1 respectively. The conformational analysis of the compound has been carried out to obtain the stable geometry of the compound. The complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound are carried out using the experimental FTIR and FT-Raman data and quantum chemical studies. The experimental vibrational frequencies are compared with the wavenumbers derived theoretically by B3LYP gradient calculations employing the standard 6-31G**, high level 6-311++G** and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The structural parameters, thermodynamic properties and vibrational frequencies of the normal modes obtained from the B3LYP methods are in good agreement with the experimental data. The 1H (400 MHz; CDCl3) and 13C (100 MHz; CDCl3) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra are also recorded. The electronic properties, the energies of the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals are measured by DFT approach. The kinetic stability of the molecule has been determined from the frontier molecular orbital energy gap. The charges of the atoms and the structure-chemical reactivity relations of the compound are determined by its chemical potential, global hardness, global softness, electronegativity, electrophilicity and local reactivity descriptors by conceptual DFT methods. The non-linear optical properties of the compound have been discussed by measuring the polarisability and hyperpolarisability tensors.

  8. Density functional simulation of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering experiments in liquids: acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, Johannes; Kooser, Kuno; Koskelo, Jaakko; Käämbre, Tanel; Kunnus, Kristjan; Pietzsch, Annette; Quevedo, Wilson; Hakala, Mikko; Föhlisch, Alexander; Huotari, Simo; Kukk, Edwin

    2016-09-21

    In this paper we report an experimental and computational study of liquid acetonitrile (H3C-C[triple bond, length as m-dash]N) by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the N K-edge. The experimental spectra exhibit clear signatures of the electronic structure of the valence states at the N site and incident-beam-polarization dependence is observed as well. Moreover, we find fine structure in the quasielastic line that is assigned to finite scattering duration and nuclear relaxation. We present a simple and light-to-evaluate model for the RIXS maps and analyze the experimental data using this model combined with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. In addition to polarization-dependence and scattering-duration effects, we pinpoint the effects of different types of chemical bonding to the RIXS spectrum and conclude that the H2C-C[double bond, length as m-dash]NH isomer, suggested in the literature, does not exist in detectable quantities. We study solution effects on the scattering spectra with simulations in liquid and in vacuum. The presented model for RIXS proved to be light enough to allow phase-space-sampling and still accurate enough for identification of transition lines in physical chemistry research by RIXS.

  9. Enrichment of low molecular weight serum proteins using acetonitrile precipitation for mass spectrometry based proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Kay, Richard; Barton, Chris; Ratcliffe, Lucy; Matharoo-Ball, Balwir; Brown, Pamela; Roberts, Jane; Teale, Phil; Creaser, Colin

    2008-10-01

    A rapid acetonitrile (ACN)-based extraction method has been developed that reproducibly depletes high abundance and high molecular weight proteins from serum prior to mass spectrometric analysis. A nanoflow liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC/MS/MS) multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method for 57 high to medium abundance serum proteins was used to characterise the ACN-depleted fraction after tryptic digestion. Of the 57 targeted proteins 29 were detected and albumin, the most abundant protein in serum and plasma, was identified as the 20th most abundant protein in the extract. The combination of ACN depletion and one-dimensional nano-LC/MS/MS enabled the detection of the low abundance serum protein, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), which has a serum concentration in the region of 100 ng/mL. One-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of the depleted serum showed no bands corresponding to proteins of molecular mass over 75 kDa after extraction, demonstrating the efficiency of the method for the depletion of high molecular weight proteins. Total protein analysis of the ACN extracts showed that approximately 99.6% of all protein is removed from the serum. The ACN-depletion strategy offers a viable alternative to the immunochemistry-based protein-depletion techniques commonly used for removing high abundance proteins from serum prior to MS-based proteomic analyses.

  10. Glutathione-Indole-3-Acetonitrile Is Required for Camalexin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Su, Tongbing; Xu, Juan; Li, Yuan; Lei, Lei; Zhao, Luo; Yang, Hailian; Feng, Jidong; Liu, Guoqin; Ren, Dongtao

    2011-01-01

    Camalexin, a major phytoalexin in Arabidopsis thaliana, consists of an indole ring and a thiazole ring. The indole ring is produced from Trp, which is converted to indole-3-acetonitrile (IAN) by CYP79B2/CYP79B3 and CYP71A13. Conversion of Cys(IAN) to dihydrocamalexic acid and subsequently to camalexin is catalyzed by CYP71B15. Recent studies proposed that Cys derivative, not Cys itself, is the precursor of the thiazole ring that conjugates with IAN. The nature of the Cys derivative and how it conjugates to IAN and subsequently forms Cys(IAN) remain obscure. We found that protein accumulation of multiple glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), elevation of GST activity, and consumption of glutathione (GSH) coincided with camalexin production. GSTF6 overexpression increased and GSTF6-knockout reduced camalexin production. Arabidopsis GSTF6 expressed in yeast cells catalyzed GSH(IAN) formation. GSH(IAN), (IAN)CysGly, and γGluCys(IAN) were determined to be intermediates within the camalexin biosynthetic pathway. Inhibitor treatments and mutant analyses revealed the involvement of γ-glutamyl transpeptidases (GGTs) and phytochelatin synthase (PCS) in the catabolism of GSH(IAN). The expression of GSTF6, GGT1, GGT2, and PCS1 was coordinately upregulated during camalexin biosynthesis. These results suggest that GSH is the Cys derivative used during camalexin biosynthesis, that the conjugation of GSH with IAN is catalyzed by GSTF6, and that GGTs and PCS are involved in camalexin biosynthesis. PMID:21239642

  11. Estimation of molecular diffusivity in aqueous solution of acetonitrile by the Wilke-Chang equation.

    PubMed

    Miyabe, Kanji

    2011-10-01

    It was tried to estimate the molecular diffusivity (D(m)) of solutes in the mixtures of acetonitrile (ACN) and water by the Wilke-Chang equation. Although the information about association coefficient (α) is necessary for the calculation, it has never been proposed for ACN. The value of α was estimated as 1.37 from D(m) of benzene in ACN at 303 K experimentally measured by the peak parking method. The values of α, i.e. 2.6, 1.9, 1.5, and 1.0, which have respectively been proposed for four solvents, i.e. water, methanol, ethanol, and benzene, were correlated with two physico-chemical parameters of the solvents, i.e. solubility parameter and E(T) value. The α value for ACN was plotted around the two correlations, indicating its appropriateness. The values of D(m) calculated by the Wilke-Chang equation using the α value for ACN were compared with those measured by the peak parking method and the Aris-Taylor method in aqueous solutions of ACN. The mean square deviation of the estimation of D(m) was calculated as 8.8 and 14%. It was demonstrated that the Wilke-Chang equation can be used for estimating D(m) with a reasonable accuracy in the mixtures consisting of ACN and water.

  12. Study of Microheterogeneity in Acetonitrile-Water Binary Mixtures by using Polarity-Resolved Solvation Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Koley, Somnath; Ghosh, Subhadip

    2015-11-16

    The solvation dynamics of three coumarin dyes with widely varying polarities were studied in acetonitrile-water (ACN-H2O) mixtures across the entire composition range. At low ACN concentrations [ACN mole fractions (X(ACN))≤0.1], the solvation dynamics are fast (<40 ps), indicating a nearly homogeneous environment. This fast region is followed by a sudden retardation of the average solvation time (230-1120 ps) at higher ACN concentrations (X(ACN)≈0.2), thus indicating the onset of nonideality within the mixture that continues until X(ACN)≈0.8. This nonideality regime (X(ACN)≈0.2-0.8) comprises of multiple dye-dependent anomalous regions. At very high ACN concentrations (X(ACN)≈0.8-1), the ACN-H2O mixtures regain homogeneity, with faster solvation times. The source of the inherent nonideality of the ACN-H2O mixtures is a subject of debate. However, a careful examination of the widths of time-resolved emission spectra shows that the origin of the slow dynamics may be due to the diffusion of polar solvent molecules into the first solvation shell of the excited coumarin dipole.

  13. Infrared characterisation of acetonitrile and propionitrile aerosols under Titan's atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Ennis, C; Auchettl, R; Ruzi, M; Robertson, E G

    2017-01-25

    Pure, crystalline acetonitrile (CH3CN) and propionitrile (CH3CH2CN) particles were formed in a collisional cooling cell allowing for infrared (IR) signatures to be compiled from 50 to 5000 cm(-1). The cell temperature and pressure conditions were controlled to simulate Titan's lower atmosphere (80-130 K and 1-100 mbar), allowing for the comparison of laboratory data to the spectra obtained from the Cassini-Huygens mission. The far-IR features confirmed the morphology of CH3CN aerosols as the metastable β-phase (monoclinic) ice, however, a specific crystalline phase for CH3CH2CN could not be verified. Mie theory and the literature complex refractive indices enabled of the experimental spectra to be modelled. The procedure yielded size distributions for CH3CN (55-140 nm) and CH3CH2CN (140-160 nm) particles. Effective kinetic profiles, tracing the evolution of aerosol band intensities, showed that condensation of CH3CH2CN proceeded at twice the rate of CH3CN aerosols. In addition, the rate of CH3CH2CN aerosol depletion via lateral diffusion of the particles from the interrogation volume was approximately 50% faster than that of CH3CN. The far-IR spectra recorded for both nitrile aerosols did not display absorption profiles that could be attributed to the unassigned 220 cm(-1) feature, which has been observed to fluctuate seasonally in the spectra obtained from Titan's atmosphere.

  14. Evaluating the Thermodynamics of Electrocatalytic N 2 Reduction in Acetonitrile

    SciTech Connect

    Lindley, Brian M.; Appel, Aaron M.; Krogh-Jespersen, Karsten; Mayer, James M.; Miller, Alexander J. M.

    2016-10-14

    The synthesis of ammonia by proton-coupled electroreduction of dinitrogen (N2) represents a sustainable alternative to currently practiced hydrogenation methods. Developments in this area require knowledge of the standard reduction potentials that describe the thermodynamics of N2 reduction. The first collection of N2 reduction standard potentials in organic solvent are reported here. The potentials for reduction of N2 to ammonia (NH3), hydrazine (N2H4), and diazene (N2H2) in acetonitrile (MeCN) solution are derived using thermochemical cycles. Ammonia is the thermodynamically favored product, with a 0.43 V difference between NH3 and N2H4 and a 1.26 V difference between NH3 and N2H2. The thermodynamics for reduction of N2 to the protonated products ammonium (NH4+) and hydrazinium (N2H5+) under strongly acidic conditions are also presented. Comparison with previously determined values for the H+/H2 potential in MeCN reveals a 63 mV thermodynamic preference for N2 reduction to NH3 over H2 production. Combined with knowledge of the kinetics of electrode-catalyzed H2 evolution, a wide working region is identified to guide future electrocatalytic studies.

  15. Polymerization of Acetonitrile via a Hydrogen Transfer Reaction from CH3 to CN under Extreme Conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Haiyan; Li, Kuo; Cody, George D.; ...

    2016-08-25

    Acetonitrile (CH3CN) is the simplest and one of the most stable nitriles. Reactions usually occur on the C≡N triple bond, while the C-H bond is very inert and can only be activated by a very strong base or a metal catalyst. In this study, it is demonstrated that C-H bonds can be activated by the cyano group under high pressure, but at room temperature. The hydrogen atom transfers from the CH3 to CN along the CH···N hydrogen bond, which produces an amino group and initiates polymerization to form a dimer, 1D chain, and 2D nanoribbon with mixed sp2 and sp3more » bonded carbon. Lastly, it transforms into a graphitic polymer by eliminating ammonia. This study shows that applying pressure can induce a distinctive reaction which is guided by the structure of the molecular crystal. It highlights the fact that very inert C-H can be activated by high pressure, even at room temperature and without a catalyst.« less

  16. Structures of the ozonolysis products and ozonolysis pathway of aflatoxin B1 in acetonitrile solution.

    PubMed

    Diao, Enjie; Shan, Changpo; Hou, Hanxue; Wang, Shanshan; Li, Minghua; Dong, Haizhou

    2012-09-12

    The ozonolysis of aflatoxin B(1) (400 μg/mL) in acetonitrile solution was conducted with an ozone concentration of 6.28 mg/L at the flow rate of 60 mL/min for different times. The results showed that ozone was an effective detoxification agent because of its powerful oxidative role. Thin-layer chromatography and liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectra were applied to confirm and identify the ozonolysis products of aflatoxin B(1). A total of 13 products were identified, and 6 of them were main products. The structural identification of these products provided effective information for understanding the ozonolysis pathway of aflatoxin B(1). Two ozonolysis pathways were proposed on the basis of the accurate mass and molecular formulas of these product ions. Nine ozonolysis products came from the first oxidative pathway based on the Criegee mechanism, and the other four products were produced from the second pathway based on the oxidative and electrophilic reactions of ozone. According to the toxicity mechanism of aflatoxin B(1) to animals, the toxicity of aflatoxin B(1) was significantly reduced because of the disappearance of the double bond on the terminal furan ring or the lactone moiety on the benzene ring.

  17. Polymerization of Acetonitrile via a Hydrogen Transfer Reaction from CH3 to CN under Extreme Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haiyan; Li, Kuo; Cody, George D; Tulk, Christopher A; Dong, Xiao; Gao, Guoying; Molaison, Jamie J; Liu, Zhenxian; Feygenson, Mikhail; Yang, Wenge; Ivanov, Ilia N; Basile, Leonardo; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Guthrie, Malcolm; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2016-09-19

    Acetonitrile (CH3 CN) is the simplest and one of the most stable nitriles. Reactions usually occur on the C≡N triple bond, while the C-H bond is very inert and can only be activated by a very strong base or a metal catalyst. It is demonstrated that C-H bonds can be activated by the cyano group under high pressure, but at room temperature. The hydrogen atom transfers from the CH3 to CN along the CH⋅⋅⋅N hydrogen bond, which produces an amino group and initiates polymerization to form a dimer, 1D chain, and 2D nanoribbon with mixed sp(2) and sp(3) bonded carbon. Finally, it transforms into a graphitic polymer by eliminating ammonia. This study shows that applying pressure can induce a distinctive reaction which is guided by the structure of the molecular crystal. It highlights the fact that very inert C-H can be activated by high pressure, even at room temperature and without a catalyst.

  18. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food... GRAS § 184.1301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Ferric phosphate (ferric orthophosphate, iron (III) phosphate, Fe... from one to four molecules of water of hydration. It is prepared by reaction of sodium phosphate...

  19. Photodegradation of Mercaptopropionic Acid- and Thioglycollic Acid-Capped CdTe Quantum Dots in Buffer Solutions.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yanping; Yang, Ping; Zhao, Jie; Du, Yingying; He, Haiyan; Liu, Yunshi

    2015-06-01

    CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized by 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) and thioglycollic acid (TGA) as capping agents. It is confirmed that TGA and MPA molecules were attached on the surface of the QDs using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra. The movement of the QDs in agarose gel electrophoresis indicated that MPA-capped CdTe QDs had small hydrodynamic diameter. The photoluminescence (PL) intensity of TGA-capped QDs is higher than that of MPA-capped QDs at same QD concentration because of the surface passivation of TGA. To systemically investigate the photodegradation, CdTe QDs with various PL peak wavelengths were dispersed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and Tris-borate-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (TBE) buffer solutions. It was found that the PL intensity of the QDs in PBS decreased with time. The PL peak wavelengths of the QDs in PBS solutions remained unchanged. As for TGA-capped CdTe QDs, the results of PL peak wavelengths in TBE buffer solutions indicated that S(2-) released by TGA attached to Cd(2+) and formed CdS-like clusters layer on the surface of aqueous CdTe QDs. In addition, the number of TGA on the CdTe QDs surface was more than that of MPA. When the QDs were added to buffer solutions, agents were removed from the surface of CdTe QDs, which decreased the passivation of agents thus resulted in photodegradation of CdTe QDs in buffer solutions.

  20. The effects of buffers and pH on the thermal stability, unfolding and substrate binding of RecA.

    PubMed

    Metrick, Michael A; Temple, Joshua E; MacDonald, Gina

    2013-12-31

    The Escherichia coli protein RecA is responsible for catalysis of the strand transfer reaction used in DNA repair and recombination. Previous studies in our lab have shown that high concentrations of salts stabilize RecA in a reverse-anionic Hofmeister series. Here we investigate how changes in pH and buffer alter the thermal unfolding and cofactor binding. RecA in 20mM HEPES, MES, Tris and phosphate buffers was studied in the pH range from 6.5 to 8.5 using circular dichroism (CD), infrared (IR) and fluorescence spectroscopies. The results show all of the buffers studied stabilize RecA up to 50°C above the Tris melting temperature and influence RecA's ability to nucleate on double-stranded DNA. Infrared and CD spectra of RecA in the different buffers do not show that secondary structural changes are associated with increased stability or decreased ability to nucleate on dsDNA. These results suggest the differences in stability arise from decreasing positive charge and/or buffer interactions.

  1. Complexation of buffer constituents with neutral complexation agents: part I. Impact on common buffer properties.

    PubMed

    Riesová, Martina; Svobodová, Jana; Tošner, Zdeněk; Beneš, Martin; Tesařová, Eva; Gaš, Bohuslav

    2013-09-17

    The complexation of buffer constituents with the complexation agent present in the solution can very significantly influence the buffer properties, such as pH, ionic strength, or conductivity. These parameters are often crucial for selection of the separation conditions in capillary electrophoresis or high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and can significantly affect results of separation, particularly for capillary electrophoresis as shown in Part II of this paper series (Beneš, M.; Riesová, M.; Svobodová, J.; Tesařová, E.; Dubský, P.; Gaš, B. Anal. Chem. 2013, DOI: 10.1021/ac401381d). In this paper, the impact of complexation of buffer constituents with a neutral complexation agent is demonstrated theoretically as well as experimentally for the model buffer system composed of benzoic acid/LiOH or common buffers (e.g., CHES/LiOH, TAPS/LiOH, Tricine/LiOH, MOPS/LiOH, MES/LiOH, and acetic acid/LiOH). Cyclodextrins as common chiral selectors were used as model complexation agents. We were not only able to demonstrate substantial changes of pH but also to predict the general complexation characteristics of selected compounds. Because of the zwitterion character of the common buffer constituents, their charged forms complex stronger with cyclodextrins than the neutral ones do. This was fully proven by NMR measurements. Additionally complexation constants of both forms of selected compounds were determined by NMR and affinity capillary electrophoresis with a very good agreement of obtained values. These data were advantageously used for the theoretical descriptions of variations in pH, depending on the composition and concentration of the buffer. Theoretical predictions were shown to be a useful tool for deriving some general rules and laws for complexing systems.

  2. Methyl Bromide Commodity Fumigation Buffer Zone Lookup Tables

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Product labels for methyl bromide used in commodity and structural fumigation include requirements for buffer zones around treated areas. The information on this page will allow you to find the appropriate buffer zone for your planned application.

  3. The Effects of pH on the Growth and Aspect Ratio of Chicken Egg White Lysozyme Crystals Prepared in Different Buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, U. J.; Horrell, E. E.; Kou, Y.; Pusey, Marc

    2000-01-01

    We have measured the nucleation and aspect ratio of CEWL crystals grown by vapor diffusion in acetate, butyrate, carbonate, succinate, and phosphate buffers in a range of pH spanning the pK(sub a) of these buffers. The nucleation numbers drop off significantly in the vicinity of pK(sub a) for each of the buffers except the phosphate system, in which we used only the pH range around the second titration point(pK2). There is a concomitant increase in the sizes of the crystals. Some typical nucleation number results are shown. These data support and extend other observations. In addition, we have examined changes in aspect ratio which accompany the suppression of nucleation within each buffer system. The length of the face in the [001] direction was measured, and compared to the width of the (110) face in the [110] type directions. We find that while the aspect ratio of the crystals is affected by pH, it is dominated by a correlation with the size of the crystals. Small crystals are longer in the [0011 direction than crystals that are larger (higher pH within a buffer system). This relationship is found to hold independent of the choice of buffer. These results are consistent with those of Judge et al, who used a batch process which resulted in uniform sizing of crystals at each pH. In these experiments, we specifically avoid agitating the protein/salt buffer mixture when combining the two. This permits the formation of a range of sizes at a given pH. The results for a .05 M acetate 5% NaCl buffer are also shown. We will discuss these results in light of a growth model.

  4. Identification and separation of the organic compounds in coal-gasification condensate waters. [5,5 dimethyl hydantoin, dihydroxy benzenes, acetonitrile

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, D.H. Jr.; King, C.J.

    1983-08-01

    A substantial fraction of the organic solutes in condensate waters from low-temperature coal-gasification processes are not identified by commonly employed analytical techniques, have low distriution coefficients (K/sub C/) into diisopropyl ether (DIPE) or methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK), and are resistant to biological oxidation. These compounds represent an important wastewater-treatment problem. Analytical techniques were developed to detect these polar compounds, and the liquid-liquid phase equilibria were measured with several solvents. A high-performance liquid - chromatography (HPLC) technique was employed to analyze four condensate-water samples from a slagging fixed-bed gasifier. A novel sample-preparation technique, consisting of an azeotropic distillation with isopropanol, allowed identification of compounds in the HPLC eluant by combined gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. 5,5-dimethyl hydantoin and related compounds were identified in condensate waters for the first time, and they account for 1 to 6% of the chemical oxygen demand (COD). Dimethyl hydatoin has a K/sub D/ of 2.6 into tributyl phosphate (TBP) and much lower K/sub D/ values into six other solvents. It is also resistant to biological oxidation. Phenols (59 to 76% of the COD), dihydroxy benzenes (0.02 to 9.5% of the COD), and methanol, acetonitrile, and acetone (15% of the COD in one sample) were also detected. Extraction with MIBK removed about 90% of the COD. MIBK has much higher K/sub D/ values than DIPE for dihydroxy benzenes. Chemical reactions occurred during storage of condensate-water samples. The reaction products had low K/sub D/ values into MIBK. About 10% of the COD had a K/sub D/ of nearly zero into MIBK. These compounds were not extracted by MIBK over a wide range of pH. 73 references, 6 figures, 35 tables.

  5. Role of phosphate on stability and catalase mimetic activity of cerium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ragini; Singh, Sanjay

    2015-08-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeNPs) have been recently shown to scavenge reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) in different experimental model systems. CeNPs (3+) and CeNPs (4+) have been shown to exhibit superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase mimetic activity, respectively. Due to their nanoscale dimension, CeNPs are expected to interact with the components of biologically relevant buffers and medium, which could alter their catalytic properties. We have demonstrated earlier that CeNPs (3+) interact with phosphate and lose the SOD activity. However, very little is known about the interaction of CeNPs (4+) with the phosphate and other anions, predominantly present in biological buffers and their effects on the catalase mimetic-activity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we report that catalase mimetic-activity of CeNPs (4+) is resistant to the phosphate anions, pH changes and composition of cell culture media. Given the abundance of phosphate anions in the biological system, it is likely that internalized CeNPs would be influenced by cytoplasmic and nucleoplasmic concentration of phosphate.

  6. Iron oxidation in Mops buffer. Effect of EDTA, hydrogen peroxide and FeCl3.

    PubMed

    Tadolini, B

    1987-01-01

    The effect of EDTA and H2O2 on iron autoxidation in Mops buffer depends on the pH of the solution. At acidic pH, EDTA caused the oxidation of a stoichiometric amount of iron. At neutral and alkaline pH, EDTA and H2O2 not only oxidizes a stoichiometric amount of iron but also causes the oxidation of the Fe2+ exceeding the concentration of these compounds. In the presence of EDTA, oxidation of Fe2+ in exceeding the concentration of these compounds has a shorter lag phase and an increased rate compared with that in the absence. The solution develops a yellow colour whose intensity is proportional to the amount of Fe2+ exceeding the concentration of these compounds in solution. When the reaction is conducted in the presence of NBT, formazan formation is greatly reduced compared to the control without EDTA and H2O2. The Fe3+-EDTA complex and Fe3+ affected iron oxidation, development of the yellow colour and NBT reduction in a similar fashion. In all these experimental conditions, iron oxidation is greatly reduced in the presence of mannitol, sorbitol and catalase. In phosphate buffer, EDTA oxidized a stoichiometric amount of iron without affecting free Fe2+ oxidation. Fe3+ has no effect on iron oxidation in this buffer.

  7. Comparison of buffers for extraction of mite allergen der p 1 from dust.

    PubMed

    Prester, Ljerka; Kovačić, Jelena; Macan, Jelena

    2012-09-01

    Der p 1 is the main allergen of house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, which has routinely been detected in residential dust. However, the procedure for extracting Der p 1 from reservoir dust has not been well defined. The aim of this study was to compare Der p 1 mass fractions in dust extracts prepared using the following extraction buffers: phosphate (pH 7.4), borate (pH 8.0), and ammonium bicarbonate (pH 8.0), all with 0.05 % Tween 20. Twenty-eight dust samples were divided into three aliquots and each portion was extracted with one of the three buffers at room temperature. Der p 1 mass fractions were measured in a total of 84 dust extracts using the enzyme immunoassay (range: 0.1 μg g-1 to 7.53 μg g-1). Statistical methods including intraclass correlation showed a high agreement between Der p 1 mass fractions irrespective of the extracting medium. Our results suggest that all three buffers are suitable for the extraction of mite allergens and routine Der p 1 analysis in dust.

  8. Irradiation inactivation analysis of acetylcholinesterase and the effect of buffer salts

    SciTech Connect

    Parkinson, D.; Callingham, B.A.

    1982-05-01

    Loss of function of membrane-bound proteins after bombardment with ionizing radiation has been used to obtain information about the size of such proteins. Human erythrocyte ghosts are a convenient source of acetylcholinesterase, a membrane-bound enzyme which has been studied with this technique and so could be used as an internal standard for calibration with the high doses required. After freeze-drying from buffers containing Tris, Hepes, or Bicine, irradiation of erythrocyte ghosts with increasing doses of 16-MeV electrons gave size estimates for acetylcholinesterase of between 56,000 and 80,000 molecular weight. These values are similar to those that have been reported in the literature. However, erythrocyte ghosts freeze dried from phosphate buffer gave larger size estimates for acetylcholinesterase of about twice that found in the other buffers. This value was close to the molecular weight of 154,000 reported for the purified enzyme. The different sizes did not appear to be due to different ionic strengths. The implications of these results for the interpretation of data from irradiation inactivation analysis are discussed.

  9. Striking Effects of Storage Buffers on Apparent Half-Lives of the Activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Arylsulfatase.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuwei; Yang, Xiaolan; Wang, Deqiang; Hu, Xiaolei; Yuan, Mei; Pu, Jun; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Yang, Zhaoyong; Liao, Fei

    2016-08-01

    To obtain the label enzyme for enzyme-linked-immunoabsorbent-assay of two components each time in one well with conventional microplate readers, molecular engineering of Pseudomonas aeruginosa arylsulfatase (PAAS) is needed. To compare thermostability of PAAS/mutants of limited purity, effects of buffers on the half-activity time (t 0.5) at 37 °C were tested. At pH 7.4, PAAS showed non-exponential decreases of activity, with the apparent t 0.5 of ~6.0 days in 50 mM HEPES, but ~42 days in 10 mM sodium borate with >85 % activity after 15 days; protein concentrations in both buffers decreased at slower rates after there were significant decreases of activities. Additionally, the apparent t 0.5 of PAAS was ~14 days in 50 mM Tris-HCl, and ~21 days in 10 mM sodium phosphate. By sodium dodecyl-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the purified PAAS gave single polypeptide; after storage for 14 days at 37 °C, there were many soluble and insoluble fragmented polypeptides in the HEPES buffer, but just one principal insoluble while negligible soluble fragmented polypeptides in the borate buffer. Of tested mutants in the neutral borate buffer, rates for activity decreases and polypeptide degradation were slower than in the HEPES buffer. Hence, dilute neutral borate buffers were favorable for examining thermostability of PAAS/mutants.

  10. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones. (a... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  11. Vegetated buffer management practice to improve surface water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Zhang, X.; Liu, X.

    2007-12-01

    Vegetated buffer best management practices (BMPs) installed in agricultural landscapes have been suggested as promising candidate tactics to reduce erosion and offsite transportation of agrochemicals. A wide range of vegetated buffer management practices have been installed in many areas to reduce agrochemical loss from applied fields, to filter sediments from tailwaters, and to deter their transportation to water bodies. This presentation will focus on reviewing vegetated buffers and their efficacies in reducing agrochemical offsite movements, with a discussion on the major factors influencing BMP efficacy. Percent removal by various BMPs ranged from 16.7 to 100% for sediments, 29 to 98% for nitrogen, 1 to 100% for phosphorus, and 27 to 100% for pesticides, depending on the setting. Preliminary meta-analyses on the data obtained from the literature review showed that vegetated buffers were mostly effective in removing sediment, followed by pesticides and nutrients. BMP efficacy is mainly influenced by buffer width, buffer slope, rainfall and vegetation. As for sediment reduction, the results based on the limited data showed that buffer width and buffer slope are two major factors influencing mitigation efficacy of vegetated buffers. The results also showed that a design with 10-m width and a 9% slope optimizes the sediment trapping capability of vegetated buffers. The meta-analysis results of this study could provide specific recommendations such as buffer width and slope for future vegetated buffer BMP construction to increase soil and water conservation.

  12. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... EXPLORATION AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  13. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... EXPLORATION AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  14. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... EXPLORATION AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  15. The distribution of saliva buffer values in schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Wikner, S; Moum, I

    1986-01-01

    Buffer capacity of stimulated saliva was estimated by Dentobuff in 1596 7-15 years old schoolchildren. 39.7% of the children had a high, 39.9% a low and 20.4% an intermediate buffer capacity. No significant differences between the distributions in different ages were recorded and the mean buffer values did not differ significantly between the age-groups.

  16. Inositol phosphates in the environment.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Benjamin L; Papházy, Michael J; Haygarth, Philip M; McKelvie, Ian D

    2002-01-01

    The inositol phosphates are a group of organic phosphorus compounds found widely in the natural environment, but that represent the greatest gap in our understanding of the global phosphorus cycle. They exist as inositols in various states of phosphorylation (bound to between one and six phosphate groups) and isomeric forms (e.g. myo, D-chiro, scyllo, neo), although myo-inositol hexakisphosphate is by far the most prevalent form in nature. In terrestrial environments, inositol phosphates are principally derived from plants and accumulate in soils to become the dominant class of organic phosphorus compounds. Inositol phosphates are also present in large amounts in aquatic environments, where they may contribute to eutrophication. Despite the prevalence of inositol phosphates in the environment, their cycling, mobility and bioavailability are poorly understood. This is largely related to analytical difficulties associated with the extraction, separation and detection of inositol phosphates in environmental samples. This review summarizes the current knowledge of inositol phosphates in the environment and the analytical techniques currently available for their detection in environmental samples. Recent advances in technology, such as the development of suitable chromatographic and capillary electrophoresis separation techniques, should help to elucidate some of the more pertinent questions regarding inositol phosphates in the natural environment. PMID:12028785

  17. Mono- and polyprotic buffer systems in anion exchange chromatography of influenza virus particles.

    PubMed

    Vajda, Judith; Weber, Dennis; Stefaniak, Sabine; Hundt, Boris; Rathfelder, Tanja; Müller, Egbert

    2016-05-27

    Different ions typically used in downstream processing of biologicals are evaluated for their potential in anion exchange chromatography of an industrially produced, pandemic influenza H1N1 virus. Capacity, selectivity and recovery are investigated based on single step elution parallel chromatography experiments. The inactivated H1N1 feedstream is produced in Madin-Darby Bovine Kidney cells. Interesting effects are found for sodium phosphate and sodium citrate. Both anions are triprotic kosmotropes. Anion exchange chromatography generally offers high scalability to satisfy sudden demands for vaccines, which may occur in case of an emerging influenza outbreak. Appropriate pH conditions for H1N1 adsorption are determined by Zeta potential measurements. The dynamic binding capacity of a salt tolerant polyamine-type resin is up to 6.4 times greater than the capacity of a grafted Q-type resin. Pseudo-affinity interactions of polyamines with the M2 protein of influenza may contribute to the obtained capacity increase. Both resins achieve greater capacity in sodium phosphate buffer compared to Tris/HCl. A recovery of 67% and DNA clearance close to 100% without DNAse treatment are achieved for the Q-type resin. Recovery of the virus from the salt tolerant resin requires the use of polyprotic acids in the elution buffer. 85% of the DNA and 60% of the proteins can be removed by the salt tolerant resin. The presence of sodium phosphate during anion exchange chromatography seems to support stability of the H1N1 particles in presence of hydrophobic cations.

  18. ELECTROENDOSMOSIS THROUGH MAMMALIAN SEROUS MEMBRANES : I. THE HYDROGEN ION REVERSAL POINT WITH BUFFERS CONTAINING POLYVALENT ANIONS.

    PubMed

    Mudd, S

    1925-01-20

    essentially due to admixture with the buffers of buffer salts from the blood. Clear differences between the reversal points of the membranes in the first compared with later hours or days post mortem were not detected, with the possible exception of a small shift toward the acid range of the fat pericardium reversal points estimated several days post mortem. The reversal points with cat membranes were somewhat lower (more acid) than those of the dog. The approximate mean reversal points found with the citrate-phosphate buffers used were as follows: For mesenteries of living animals pH = 4.4; for mesenteries, post mortem, pH = 4.8; for cat pleurae, post mortem, pH = 4.3; for dog pleurae, post mortem, pH = 5.0; for lean and fat pericardia, post mortem, pH = 5.1. The mean reversal point of the two human pericardia was about pH = 5.0. Reversal points determined with buffers containing only monovalent anions are somewhat higher (less acid), as will be shown later. The bearing of these data on the question of the chemical composition of the surfaces of the fat cells of the serous membranes is discussed. Briefly, it is believed that proteins are probably present in important amount in these cell surfaces.

  19. Light weight phosphate cements

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Natarajan, Ramkumar,; Kahn, David

    2010-03-09

    A sealant having a specific gravity in the range of from about 0.7 to about 1.6 for heavy oil and/or coal bed methane fields is disclosed. The sealant has a binder including an oxide or hydroxide of Al or of Fe and a phosphoric acid solution. The binder may have MgO or an oxide of Fe and/or an acid phosphate. The binder is present from about 20 to about 50% by weight of the sealant with a lightweight additive present in the range of from about 1 to about 10% by weight of said sealant, a filler, and water sufficient to provide chemically bound water present in the range of from about 9 to about 36% by weight of the sealant when set. A porous ceramic is also disclosed.

  20. Templated, layered manganese phosphate

    DOEpatents

    Thoma, Steven G.; Bonhomme, Francois R.

    2004-08-17

    A new crystalline maganese phosphate composition having an empirical formula: O). The compound was determined to crystallize in the trigonal space group P-3c1 with a=8.8706(4) .ANG., c=26.1580(2) .ANG., and V (volume)=1783 .ANG..sup.3. The structure consists of sheets of corner sharing Mn(II)O.sub.4 and PO.sub.4 tetrahedra with layers of (H.sub.3 NCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.3 N and water molecules in-between. The pronated (H.sub.3 NCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.3 N molecules provide charge balancing for the inorganic sheets. A network of hydrogen bonds between water molecules and the inorganic sheets holds the structure together.

  1. Novel dosage forms and regimens for sevelamer-based phosphate binders.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Ajay; Hanus, Martin; Zhorov, Eugene; Dagher, Rafif; Plone, Melissa A; Goldberg, Jeffrey; Burke, Steven K

    2006-07-01

    Sevelamer, a nonabsorbed, calcium- and metal-free dietary phosphate binder, consists of a polyallylamine polymer backbone with a cationic charge that shows a high capacity for binding anionically charged compounds such as phosphate. The currently licensed form of sevelamer, Renagel, exists as sevelamer hydrochloride, which disassociates in the acidic environment of the stomach and early gastrointestinal tract, exchanging the chloride ions attached to the polymer backbone for phosphate ions. The resulting absorption of these chloride ions has been reported to be accompanied by a reduction in serum levels of bicarbonate in some patients. To minimize the possibility of this effect, a new salt form of sevelamer has been developed in which carbonate replaces the chloride counter ion, thereby providing a source of buffer. The majority of phosphate binders exist only in tablet form and are dosed three times per day with meals. Genzyme has developed sevelamer carbonate in tablet form and also as a powder formulation that can be taken after mixing with water. This allows for an alternate and potentially more palatable way of dosing. Preliminary data exist suggesting that once daily dosing with sevelamer hydrochloride tablets provides similar phosphate control to three times daily dosing. By providing novel dosage forms and regimens for sevelamer-based phosphate binders, Genzyme will be providing patients and health care providers additional choices and flexibility in controlling phosphorus levels in chronic kidney disease. This should translate to increased compliance and improved rates of phosphate control.

  2. Maltose phosphorylase from Lactobacillus brevis: purification, characterization, and application in a biosensor for ortho-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Hüwel, S; Haalck, L; Conrath, N; Spener, F

    1997-11-01

    With the goal to obtain maltose phosphorylase as a tool to determine ortho-phosphate, the enzyme from Lactobacillus brevis was purified to 98% by an expeditious FPLC-aided procedure which included anion exchange chromatography, gel filtration, and hydroxyapatite chromatography. The native maltose phosphorylase had a molecular mass of 196 kDa and consisted of two 88 kDa subunits. In isoelectric focusing two isoforms with pI values of 4.2 and 4.6 were observed. Maximum enzyme activity was obtained at 36 degrees C and pH 6.5 and was independent of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. The apparent K(m) values with maltose and phosphate as substrates were 0.9 mmol l-1 and 1.8 mmol l-1, respectively. Maltose phosphorylase could be stored in 10 mM phosphate buffer pH 6.5 at 4 degrees C with a loss of activity of only 7% up to 6 months. The stability of the enzyme at high temperatures was enhanced significantly using additives like phosphate, citrate, and imidazole. The purified maltose phosphorylase was used as key enzyme in a phosphate sensor consisting of maltose phosphorylase and glucose oxidase. A detection limit of 0.1 microM phosphate was observed and the sensor response was linear in the range between 0.5 and 10 microM.

  3. Iron(II) catalysis in oxidation of hydrocarbons with ozone in acetonitrile

    DOE PAGES

    Bataineh, Hajem; Pestovsky, Oleg; Bakac, Andreja

    2015-02-11

    Oxidation of alcohols, ethers, and sulfoxides by ozone in acetonitrile is catalyzed by submillimolar concentrations of Fe(CH3CN)62+. The catalyst provides both rate acceleration and greater selectivity toward the less oxidized products. For example, Fe(CH3CN)62+-catalyzed oxidation of benzyl alcohol yields benzaldehyde almost exclusively (>95%), whereas the uncatalyzed reaction generates a 1:1 mixture of benzaldehyde and benzoic acid. Similarly, aliphatic alcohols are oxidized to aldehydes/ketones, cyclobutanol to cyclobutanone, and diethyl ether to a 1:1 mixture of ethanol and acetaldehyde. The kinetics of oxidation of alcohols and diethyl ether are first-order in [Fe(CH3CN)62+] and [O3] and independent of [substrate] at concentrations greater thanmore » ~5 mM. In this regime, the rate constant for all of the alcohols is approximately the same, kcat = (8 ± 1) × 104 M–1 s–1, and that for (C2H5)2O is (5 ± 0.5) × 104 M–1 s–1. In the absence of substrate, Fe(CH3CN)62+ reacts with O3 with kFe = (9.3 ± 0.3) × 104 M–1 s–1. The similarity between the rate constants kFe and kcat strongly argues for Fe(CH3CN)62+/O3 reaction as rate-determining in catalytic oxidation. The active oxidant produced in Fe(CH3CN)62+/O3 reaction is suggested to be an Fe(IV) species in analogy with a related intermediate in aqueous solutions. As a result, this assignment is supported by the similarity in kinetic isotope effects and relative reactivities of the two species toward substrates.« less

  4. The impact of highly correlated potential energy surfaces on the anharmonically corrected IR spectrum of acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Oliver M. D.; Rode, Bernd M.; Bonn, Günther K.; Huck, Christian W.

    2014-10-01

    This paper discusses the quality and feasibility of highly correlated ab initio techniques in a vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) approach using acetonitrile as a model system. The topical renormalized coupled-cluster technique exploiting the similarity-transformed Hamiltonian's left eigenstates (i.e. CR-CC(2,3)) is investigated alongside the well-known Hartree-Fock (HF), Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory (MP2) and coupled cluster (CCSD(T)) methods. The inclusion of mode triple interactions is discussed and it is found that the use of an effective core potential (ECP) serves as a viable compromise during the highly demanding task of computing such contributions, thus enabling a grid-based evaluation of three mode interaction terms with coupled cluster techniques also for larger molecules. In this context, a previously proposed reduced coupling scheme [1] is investigated, confirming the applicability of this technique to a system exhibiting a rather complex electronic structure. A combination of Ahlrichs' triple-ζ valence polarized (TZVP) basis set with Dunning's set of core-valence correlation functions is found to deliver results in good agreement with experiment while being computationally very feasible. Since CH3CN exhibits four degenerate vibrational degrees of freedom, it serves as an ideal model system for critically assessing the qualities of the degenerate second-order perturbation theory corrected (DPT2) VSCF technique. Besides fundamental vibrations, a thorough investigation of overtone transitions and combination bands is conducted by means of comparing the results to both available and newly recorded experimental data.

  5. Acetonitrile-water hydrogen-bonded interaction: Matrix-isolation infrared and ab initio computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopi, R.; Ramanathan, N.; Sundararajan, K.

    2015-08-01

    The 1:1 hydrogen-bonded complex of acetonitrile (CH3CN) and water (H2O) was trapped in Ar and N2 matrices and studied using infrared technique. Ab initio computations showed two types of complexes formed between CH3CN and H2O, a linear complex A with a Ctbnd N⋯H interaction between nitrogen of CH3CN and hydrogen of H2O and a cyclic complex B, in which the interactions are between the hydrogen of CH3CN with oxygen of H2O and hydrogen of H2O with π cloud of sbnd Ctbnd N of CH3CN. Vibrational wavenumber calculations revealed that both the complexes A and B were minima on the potential energy surface. Interaction energies computed at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) showed that linear complex A is more stable than cyclic complex B. Computations identified a blue shift of ∼11.5 cm-1 and a red shift of ∼6.5 cm-1 in the CN stretching mode for the complexes A and B, respectively. Experimentally, we observed a blue shift of ∼15.0 and ∼8.3 cm-1 in N2 and Ar matrices, respectively, in the CN stretching mode of CH3CN, which supports the formation of complex A. The Onsager Self Consistent Reaction Field (SCRF) model was used to explain the influence of matrices on the complexes A and B. To understand the nature of the interactions, Atoms in Molecules (AIM) and Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analyses were carried out for the complexes A and B.

  6. Biodegradation of acetonitrile by adapted biofilm in a membrane-aerated biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Li, Tinggang; Bai, Renbi; Ohandja, Dieudonné-Guy; Liu, Junxin

    2009-07-01

    A membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) was developed to degrade acetonitrile (ACN) in aqueous solutions. The reactor was seeded with an adapted activated sludge consortium as the inoculum and operated under step increases in ACN loading rate through increasing ACN concentrations in the influent. Initially, the MABR started at a moderate selection pressure, with a hydraulic retention time of 16 h, a recirculation rate of 8 cm/s and a starting ACN concentration of 250 mg/l to boost the growth of the biofilm mass on the membrane and to avoid its loss by hydraulic washout. The step increase in the influent ACN concentration was implemented once ACN concentration in the effluent showed almost complete removal in each stage. The specific ACN degradation rate achieved the highest at the loading rate of 101.1 mg ACN/g-VSS h (VSS, volatile suspended solids) and then declined with the further increases in the influent ACN concentration, attributed to the substrate inhibition effect. The adapted membrane-aerated biofilm was capable of completely removing ACN at the removal capacity of up to 21.1 g ACN/m(2) day, and generated negligible amount of suspended sludge in the effluent. Batch incubation experiments also demonstrated that the ACN-degrading biofilm can degrade other organonitriles, such as acrylonitrile and benzonitrile as well. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis studies showed that the ACN-degrading biofilms contained a stable microbial population with a low diversity of sequence of community 16S rRNA gene fragments. Specific oxygen utilization rates were found to increase with the increases in the biofilm thickness, suggesting that the biofilm formation process can enhance the metabolic degradation efficiency towards ACN in the MABR. The study contributes to a better understanding in microbial adaptation in a MABR for biodegradation of ACN. It also highlights the potential benefits in using MABRs for biodegradation of organonitrile contaminants in industrial

  7. Biodegradation of cyanide by acetonitrile-induced cells of Rhodococcus sp. UKMP-5M.

    PubMed

    Nallapan Maniyam, Maegala; Sjahrir, Fridelina; Ibrahim, Abdul Latif; Cass, Anthony E G

    2013-01-01

    A Rhodococcus sp. UKMP-5M isolate was shown to detoxify cyanide successfully, suggesting the presence of an intrinsic property in the bacterium which required no prior cyanide exposure for induction of this property. However, in order to promote growth, Rhodococcus sp. UKMP-5M was fully acclimatized to cyanide after 7 successive subcultures in 0.1 mM KCN for 30 days. To further shorten the lag phase and simultaneously increase the tolerance towards higher cyanide concentrations, the bacterium was induced with various nitrile compounds sharing a similar degradatory pathway to cyanide. Acetonitrile emerged as the most favored inducer and the induced cells were able to degrade 0.1 mM KCN almost completely within 18 h. With the addition of subsequent aliquots of 0.1 mM KCN a shorter period for complete removal of cyanide was required, which proved to be advantageous economically. Both resting cells and crude enzyme of Rhodococcus sp. UKMP-5M were able to biodegrade cyanide to ammonia and formate without the formation of formamide, implying the identification of a simple hydrolytic cyanide degradation pathway involving the enzyme cyanidase. Further verification with SDS-PAGE revealed that the molecular weight of the active enzyme was estimated to be 38 kDa, which is consistent with previously reported cyanidases. Since the recent advancement in the application of biological methods in treating cyanide-bearing wastewater has been promising, the discovery of this new bacterium will add value by diversifying the existing microbial populations capable of cyanide detoxification.

  8. Electron-transfer fluorescence quenching of aromatic hydrocarbons by europium and ytterbium ions in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Inada, Taeko; Funasaka, Yoko; Kikuchi, Koichi; Takahashi, Yasutake; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    2006-03-02

    To make the effects of molecular size on photoinduced electron-transfer (ET) reactions clear, the ET fluorescence quenching of aromatic hydrocarbons by trivalent lanthanide ions M3+ (europium ion Eu3+ and ytterbium ion Yb3+) and the following ET reactions such as the geminate and free radical recombination were studied in acetonitrile. The rate constant k(q) of fluorescence quenching, the yields of free radical (phi(R)) and fluorescer triplet (phi(T)) in fluorescence quenching, and the rate constant k(rec) of free radical recombination were measured. Upon analysis of the free energy dependence of k(q), phi(R), phi(T), and k(rec), it was found that the switchover of the fluorescence quenching mechanism occurs at deltaG(fet) = -1.4 to -1.6 eV: When deltaG(fet) < -1.6 eV, the fluorescence quenching by M3+ is induced by a long-distance ET yielding the geminate radical ion pairs. When deltaG(fet) > -1.4 eV, it is induced by an exciplex formation. The exciplex dissociates rapidly to yield either the fluorescer triplet or the geminate radical ion pairs. The large shift of switchover deltaG(fet) from -0.5 eV for aromatic quenchers to -1.4 to -1.6 eV for lanthanide ions is almost attributed to the difference in the molecular size of the quenchers. Furthermore, it was substantiated that the free energy dependence of ET rates for the geminate and free radical recombination is satisfactorily interpreted within the limits of the Marcus theory.

  9. Crystallization of calcium phosphate in polyacrylamide hydrogels containing phosphate ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, Taishi; Kawashita, Masakazu; Kikuta, Koichi; Ohtsuki, Chikara

    2010-08-01

    Calcium phosphate crystals were formed in polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels containing phosphate ions by diffusion of calcium ions from calcium nitrate (Ca(NO 3) 2) solutions covering the gels. Changes in crystalline phases and crystal morphology of calcium phosphate, and in ion concentrations of the Ca(NO 3) 2 solutions were investigated as a function of reaction time. Single or two coexisting crystalline phases of calcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite (HAp), HAp/dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) or octacalcium phosphate (OCP)/DCPD were formed in the gels. HAp crystals are formed near the surface of the gels. The dense HAp layer and HAp/DCPD layer prevented diffusion of calcium ions from the Ca(NO 3) 2 solution, thus formation of calcium phosphate in the gel phase was inhibited. Formation of DCPD was observed to follow the formation of OCP or HAp. The size of the OCP crystals gradually increased with reaction time, while changes in size of HAp crystals were not observed. The reaction time required for DCPD formation depended on the degree of supersaturation with respect to DCPD in the systems. DCPD formed within 1 day under high supersaturation conditions, whereas it formed at 10 days in low supersaturation conditions.

  10. Phosphate nutrition: improving low-phosphate tolerance in crops.

    PubMed

    López-Arredondo, Damar Lizbeth; Leyva-González, Marco Antonio; González-Morales, Sandra Isabel; López-Bucio, José; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient that is required for all major developmental processes and reproduction in plants. It is also a major constituent of the fertilizers required to sustain high-yield agriculture. Levels of phosphate--the only form of phosphorus that can be assimilated by plants--are suboptimal in most natural and agricultural ecosystems, and when phosphate is applied as fertilizer in soils, it is rapidly immobilized owing to fixation and microbial activity. Thus, cultivated plants use only approximately 20-30% of the applied phosphate, and the rest is lost, eventually causing water eutrophication. Recent advances in the understanding of mechanisms by which wild and cultivated species adapt to low-phosphate stress and the implementation of alternative bacterial pathways for phosphorus metabolism have started to allow the design of more effective breeding and genetic engineering strategies to produce highly phosphate-efficient crops, optimize fertilizer use, and reach agricultural sustainability with a lower environmental cost. In this review, we outline the current advances in research on the complex network of plant responses to low-phosphorus stress and discuss some strategies used to manipulate genes involved in phosphate uptake, remobilization, and metabolism to develop low-phosphate-tolerant crops, which could help in designing more efficient crops.

  11. Buffer for a gamma-insensitive optical sensor with gas and a buffer assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kruger, H.W.

    1994-05-10

    A buffer assembly is disclosed for a gamma-insensitive gas avalanche focal plane array operating in the ultra-violet/visible/infrared energy wavelengths and using a photocathode and an avalanche gas located in a gap between an anode and the photocathode. The buffer assembly functions to eliminate chemical compatibility between the gas composition and the materials of the photocathode. The buffer assembly in the described embodiment is composed of two sections, a first section constructed of glass honeycomb under vacuum and a second section defining a thin barrier film or membrane constructed, for example, of Al and Be, which is attached to and supported by the honeycomb. The honeycomb section, in turn, is supported by and adjacent to the photocathode. 7 figures.

  12. Buffer for a gamma-insensitive optical sensor with gas and a buffer assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kruger, Hans W.

    1994-01-01

    A buffer assembly for a gamma-insensitive gas avalanche focal plane array operating in the ultra-violet/visible/infrared energy wavelengths and using a photocathode and an avalanche gas located in a gap between an anode and the photocathode. The buffer assembly functions to eliminate chemical compatibility between the gas composition and the materials of the photocathode. The buffer assembly in the described embodiment is composed of two sections, a first section constructed of glass honeycomb under vacuum and a second section defining a thin barrier film or membrane constructed, for example, of Al and Be, which is attached to and supported by the honeycomb. The honeycomb section, in turn, is supported by and adjacent to the photocathode.

  13. k(+)-buffer: An Efficient, Memory-Friendly and Dynamic k-buffer Framework.

    PubMed

    Vasilakis, Andreas-Alexandros; Papaioannou, Georgios; Fudos, Ioannis

    2015-06-01

    Depth-sorted fragment determination is fundamental for a host of image-based techniques which simulates complex rendering effects. It is also a challenging task in terms of time and space required when rasterizing scenes with high depth complexity. When low graphics memory requirements are of utmost importance, k-buffer can objectively be considered as the most preferred framework which advantageously ensures the correct depth order on a subset of all generated fragments. Although various alternatives have been introduced to partially or completely alleviate the noticeable quality artifacts produced by the initial k-buffer algorithm in the expense of memory increase or performance downgrade, appropriate tools to automatically and dynamically compute the most suitable value of k are still missing. To this end, we introduce k(+)-buffer, a fast framework that accurately simulates the behavior of k-buffer in a single rendering pass. Two memory-bounded data structures: (i) the max-array and (ii) the max-heap are developed on the GPU to concurrently maintain the k-foremost fragments per pixel by exploring pixel synchronization and fragment culling. Memory-friendly strategies are further introduced to dynamically (a) lessen the wasteful memory allocation of individual pixels with low depth complexity frequencies, (b) minimize the allocated size of k-buffer according to different application goals and hardware limitations via a straightforward depth histogram analysis and (c) manage local GPU cache with a fixed-memory depth-sorting mechanism. Finally, an extensive experimental evaluation is provided demonstrating the advantages of our work over all prior k-buffer variants in terms of memory usage, performance cost and image quality.

  14. Branch target buffer design and optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perleberg, Chris H.; Smith, Alan J.

    1993-01-01

    Consideration is given to two major issues in the design of branch target buffers (BTBs), with the goal of achieving maximum performance for a given number of bits allocated to the BTB design. The first issue is BTB management; the second is what information to keep in the BTB. A number of solutions to these problems are reviewed, and various optimizations in the design of BTBs are discussed. Design target miss ratios for BTBs are developed, making it possible to estimate the performance of BTBs for real workloads.

  15. Spacecraft optical disk recorder memory buffer control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, Robert F.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) for use in the control electronics of the Spacecraft Optical Disk Recorder (SODR). Specifically, this project is to design an extendable memory buffer controller ASIC for rate matching between a system Input/Output port and the SODR's device interface. The aforementioned goal can be partitioned into the following sub-goals: (1) completion of ASIC design and simulation (on-going via ASEE fellowship); (2) ASIC Fabrication (at ASIC manufacturer); and (3) ASIC Testing (NASA/LaRC, Christopher Newport University).

  16. Seasonal buffering of atmospheric pressure on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzurisin, D.; Ingersoll, A. P.

    1975-01-01

    An isothermal reservoir of carbon dioxide in gaseous contact with the Martian atmosphere would reduce the amplitude and advance the phase of global atmospheric pressure fluctuations caused by seasonal growth and decline of polar CO2 frost caps. Adsorbed carbon dioxide in the upper roughly 10 m of Martian regolith is sufficient to buffer the present atmosphere on a seasonal basis. Available observations and related polar cap models do not confirm or refute the operation of such a mechanism. Implications for the amplitude and phase of seasonal pressure fluctuations are subject to direct test by the upcoming Viking mission to Mars.

  17. Lightwave coupler utilizing a tapered buffer layer.

    PubMed

    Kishioka, K

    1988-06-01

    We discuss the performance of a lightwave coupler utilizing a tapered buffer layer. The coupler with a ridge waveguide is fabricated on a glass substrate and high coupling efficiencies of 75% and 50% are measured for the operations of coupling from the waveguide to a light beam and from the laser beam into the waveguide, respectively. Further, experimental results of the rigid connection between the optical fiber and the waveguide are demonstrated. We also describe how the coupler differs from the conventional tapered guiding-layer coupler.

  18. Buffer layers and articles for electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Paranthaman, Mariappan P.; Aytug, Tolga; Christen, David K.; Feenstra, Roeland; Goyal, Amit

    2004-07-20

    Materials for depositing buffer layers on biaxially textured and untextured metallic and metal oxide substrates for use in the manufacture of superconducting and other electronic articles comprise RMnO.sub.3, R.sub.1-x A.sub.x MnO.sub.3, and combinations thereof; wherein R includes an element selected from the group consisting of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, and Y, and A includes an element selected from the group consisting of Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, and Ra.

  19. Effect of phosphate on heterogeneous Fenton oxidation of catechol by nano-Fe₃O₄ Inhibitor or stabilizer?

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaofang; He, Jie; Sun, Zhongxi; Holmgren, Allan; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    The effect of phosphate on adsorption and oxidation of catechol, 1,2-dihydroxybenzene, in a heterogeneous Fenton system was investigated. In situ attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was used to monitor the surface speciation at the nano-Fe3O4 catalyst surface. The presence of phosphate decreased the removal rate of catechol and the abatement of dissolved organic compounds, as well as the decomposition of H2O2. This effect of phosphate was mainly due to its strong reaction with surface sites on the iron oxide catalyst. At neutral and acid pH, phosphate could displace the adsorbed catechol from the surface of catalyst and also could compete for surface sites with H2O2. In situ IR spectra indicated the formation of iron phosphate precipitation at the catalyst surface. The iron phosphate surface species may affect the amount of iron atoms taking part in the catalytic decomposition of H2O2 and formation of hydroxyl radicals, and inhibit the catalytic ability of Fe3O4 catalyst. Therefore, phosphate ions worked as stabilizer and inhibitor in a heterogeneous Fenton reaction at the same time, in effect leading to an increase in oxidation efficiency in this study. However, before use of phosphate as pH buffer or H2O2 stabilizer in a heterogeneous Fenton system, the possible inhibitory effect of phosphate on the actual removal of organic pollutants should be fully considered.

  20. Concentrated Flow through a Riparian Buffer: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. B.; Nogues, J. P.; Hutchinson, S. L.

    2005-05-01

    Riparian buffers are often used for in-situ treatment of agricultural runoff. Although the benefits of riparian buffers are well recongized, concentration of flow can restrict the efficiency of contaminant removal. This study evaluates flow concentration at a agricultural site near Manhattan, Kansas. Manual and automated GIS analyses of a high-resolution digital elevation model were used to determine the fraction of runoff contributing to each buffer segment. Subsequent simulation of the system in WEPP (Water Erosion and Prediction Project) demonstrates the extent to which flow concentration affects buffer efficiency. Recommendations are presented for the design of adaptive-width buffers.

  1. Analysis of a hybrid-undirectional buffer strip laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharani, L. R.; Goree, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    A method of analysis capable of predicting accurately the fracture behavior of a unidirectional composite laminate containing symmetrically placed buffer strips is presented. As an example, for a damaged graphite/epoxy laminate, the results demonstrate the manner in which to select the most efficient combination of buffer strip properties necessary to inhibit crack growth. Ultimate failure of the laminate after the arrest can occur under increasing load either by continued crack extension through the buffer strips or the crack can jump the buffer strips. For some typical hybrid materials it is found that a buffer strip spacing to width ratio of about four to one is the most efficient.

  2. Analysis of a hybrid, unidirectional buffer strip laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharani, L. R.; Goree, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    A method of analysis capable of predicting accurately the fracture behavior of a unidirectional composite laminate containing symmetrically placed buffer strips is presented. As an example, for a damaged graphite/epoxy laminate, the results demonstrate the manner in which to select the most efficient combination of buffer strip properties necessary to inhibit crack growth. Ultimate failure of the laminate after crack arrest can occur under increasing load either by continued crack extension through the buffer strips or the crack can jump the buffer strips. For some typical hybrid materials it is found that a buffer strip spacing-to-width ratio of about four to one is the most efficient.

  3. Freeze-out extraction of monocarboxylic acids from water into acetonitrile under the action of centrifugal forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekhterev, V. N.

    2016-10-01

    It is established that the efficiency of the freezing-out extraction of monocarboxylic acids C3-C;8 and sorbic acid from water into acetonitrile increases under the action of centrifugal forces. The linear growth of the partition coefficient in the homologous series of C2-C8 acids with an increase in molecule length, and the difference between the efficiency of extracting sorbic and hexanoic acid, are discussed using a theoretical model proposed earlier and based on the adsorption-desorption equilibrium of the partition of dissolved organic compounds between the resulting surface of ice and the liquid phase of the extract. The advantages of the proposed technique with respect to the degree of concentration over the method of low-temperature liquid-liquid extraction are explained in light of the phase diagram for the water-acetonitrile mixture.

  4. Evidence to Show that Acetonitrile is Sensitive to Different Interactions Sites of Ionic Liquids as Unveiled by Excess Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Zheng, Yan-Zhen; Zhang, Tian; Deng, Geng; Yu, Zhi-Wu

    2017-02-18

    By studying the interactions between an ionic liquid (IL), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis (trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ([Emim][Tf2N]) and a co-solvent acetonitrile, C≡N stretching vibration was found to be very sensitive to different interaction sites as unveiled by excess infrared spectroscopy. Four existing forms of acetonitrile molecules were identified and the detailed transformation process of the ionic liquid upon dilution was obtained. Such characteristic of nitrile group is discussed from the view point of its ability to form hydrogen bonds with proton donors. It is believed that this is due to the intermediate charge donating ability of C≡N group as compared with other groups such as S=O, CH3, and aromatic C-H.

  5. Electrochemical reduction of Brønsted acids by glassy carbon in acetonitrile-implications for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Brian D; Martin, Daniel J; Rountree, Eric S; Ullman, Alexander C; Dempsey, Jillian L

    2014-08-18

    Molecular catalysts for electrochemically driven hydrogen evolution are often studied in acetonitrile with glassy carbon working electrodes and Brønsted acids. Surprisingly, little information is available regarding the potentials at which acids are directly reduced on glassy carbon. This work examines acid electroreduction in acetonitrile on glassy carbon electrodes by cyclic voltammetry. Reduction potentials, spanning a range exceeding 2 V, were found for 20 acids. The addition of 100 mM water was not found to shift the reduction potential of any acid studied, although current enhancement was observed for some acids. The data reported provides a guide for selecting acids to use in electrocatalysis experiments such that direct electrode reduction is avoided.

  6. 21 CFR 520.823 - Erythromycin phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... (a) Specifications. Erythromycin phosphate is the phosphate salt of the antibiotic substance produced by the growth of Streptomyces erythreus or the same antibiotic substance produced by any other...

  7. 21 CFR 520.823 - Erythromycin phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... (a) Specifications. Erythromycin phosphate is the phosphate salt of the antibiotic substance produced by the growth of Streptomyces erythreus or the same antibiotic substance produced by any other...

  8. 21 CFR 520.823 - Erythromycin phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... (a) Specifications. Erythromycin phosphate is the phosphate salt of the antibiotic substance produced by the growth of Streptomyces erythreus or the same antibiotic substance produced by any other...

  9. 21 CFR 520.823 - Erythromycin phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... (a) Specifications. Erythromycin phosphate is the phosphate salt of the antibiotic substance produced by the growth of Streptomyces erythreus or the same antibiotic substance produced by any other...

  10. 21 CFR 520.823 - Erythromycin phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... (a) Specifications. Erythromycin phosphate is the phosphate salt of the antibiotic substance produced by the growth of Streptomyces erythreus or the same antibiotic substance produced by any other...

  11. Flow injection potentiometric system for the simultaneous determination of inositol phosphates and phosphate: phosphorus nutritional evaluation on seeds and grains.

    PubMed

    Parra, Aleix; Ramon, Meritxell; Alonso, Julián; Lemos, Sherlan G; Vieira, Edivan C; Nogueira, Ana R A

    2005-10-05

    A simple flow injection potentiometric (FIP) system, which uses a tubular cobalt electrode, has been developed for phosphorus nutritional evaluation of seeds and grains. Inorganic phosphorus, P(i), is determined using a 1 x 10(-2) mol.L(-1) potassium phthalate buffer solution adjusted at pH 4. A sensitivity of 47 mV/decade and an operating range from 10 to 1000 mg.L(-1) (1 x 10(-4)-1 x 10(-2) M) of dihydrogen phosphate are obtained. The inositol phosphates amount, which is referred to the organic phosphorus, P(org), is directly determined from extracts using a 1 x 10(-2) mol.L(-1) Tris-HCl buffer solution adjusted at pH 8. A sensitivity of 127 mV/decade and an operating range of 10-1000 mg.L(-1) (2.5 x 10(-4)-5 x 10(-3) M) of P(org) (expressed as inositol hexakisphosphoric acid monocalcium) are achieved. Some samples of seed and grain are analyzed by an ICP-OES and a spectrophotometric method to compare results to the developed flow system; no significant differences at the 95% confidence level are observed using a paired t test. Other samples such as animal nursing feed, soybean meal, and corn are also analyzed with the proposed FIP system, showing a good correlation to the ICP-OES values.

  12. Size Control of (99m)Tc-tin Colloid Using PVP and Buffer Solution for Sentinel Lymph Node Detection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong

    2015-06-01

    Colloidal particle size is an important characteristic that allows mapping sentinel nodes in lymphoscintigraphy. This investigation aimed to introduce different ways of making a (99m)Tc-tin colloid with a size of tens of nanometers. All agents, tin fluoride, sodium fluoride, poloxamer-188, and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), were mixed and labeled with (99m)Tc. Either phosphate or sodium bicarbonate buffers were used to adjust the pH levels. When the buffers were added, the size of the colloids increased. However, as the PVP continued to increase, the size of the colloids was controlled to within tens of nanometers. In all samples, phosphate buffer added PVP (30 mg) stabilized tin colloid ((99m)Tc-PPTC-30) and sodium bicarbonate solution added PVP (50 mg) stabilized tin colloid ((99m)Tc-BPTC-50) were chosen for in vitro and in vivo studies. (99m)Tc-BPTC-50 (<20 nm) was primarily located in bone marrow and was then secreted through the kidneys, and (99m)Tc-PPTC-30 (>100 nm) mainly accumulated in the liver. When a rabbit was given a toe injection, the node uptake of (99m)Tc-PPTC-30 decreased over time, while (99m)Tc-BPTC-50 increased. Therefore, (99m)Tc-BPTC-50 could be a good candidate radiopharmaceutical for sentinel node detection. The significance of this study is that nano-sized tin colloid can be made very easily and quickly by PVP.

  13. Complexation dynamics of CH3SCN and Li(+) in acetonitrile studied by two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kwon, YoungAh; Park, Sungnam

    2015-10-07

    Ion-molecule complexation dynamics were studied with CH3SCN and Li(+) in acetonitrile by vibrationally probing the nitrile stretching vibration of CH3SCN. The nitrile stretching vibration of CH3SCN has a long lifetime (T1 = ∼90 ps) and its frequency is significantly blue-shifted when CH3SCN is bound with Li(+) ions to form a CH3SCNLi(+) complex in acetonitrile. Such spectral properties enable us to distinguish free CH3SCN and the CH3SCNLi(+) complex in solutions and measure their dynamics occurring on hundred picosecond timescales. For the complexation between CH3SCN and Li(+) in acetonitrile, the change in enthalpy (ΔH = -7.17 kJ mol(-1)) and the change in entropy (ΔS = -34.4 J K(-1) mol(-1)) were determined by temperature-dependent FTIR experiments. Polarization-controlled infrared pump-probe (IR PP) spectroscopy was used to measure the population decay and orientational dynamics of free CH3SCN and the CH3SCNLi(+) complex. Especially, the orientational relaxation of the CH3SCNLi(+) complex was found to be almost 3 times slower than those of free CH3SCN because Li(+) ions strongly interact with the neighboring solvents. Most importantly, the complexation dynamics of CH3SCN and Li(+) in acetonitrile were successfully measured in real time by 2DIR spectroscopy for the first time and the dissociation and association time constants were directly determined by using the two-species exchange kinetic model. Our experimental results provide a comprehensive overview of the ion-molecule complexation dynamics in solutions occurring under thermal equilibrium conditions.

  14. A rapid direct solvent extraction method for the extraction of 2-dodecylcyclobutanone from irradiated ground beef patties using acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Hijaz, Faraj; Kumar, Amit; Smith, J Scott

    2010-08-01

    The amount of irradiated beef in the U.S. market is growing, and a reliable, rapid method is needed to detect irradiated beef and quantify the irradiation dose. The official analytical method (BS EN 1785 2003) that has been adopted by the European Union is time consuming. The objective of this study was to develop a rapid method for the analysis of 2-dodecylcyclobutanone (2-DCB) in irradiated beef. A 5 g sample of commercially irradiated ground beef patty (90/10) was extracted with n-hexane using a Soxhlet apparatus or with acetonitrile via direct solvent extraction. The Soxhlet hexane extract was evaporated to dryness, and the sample was dissolved in a mixture of ethyl acetate and acetonitrile (1:1). The defatted extract was purified with a 1 g silica cartridge. Another 5 g aliquot of the same patty was mixed with 50 mL acetonitrile and either blended for 1 min with a hand blender or crushed for 10 min with a glass rod. The extraction procedure was repeated 3 times, and the acetonitrile was collected and evaporated to dryness. Eluants from both methods were concentrated under nitrogen and injected into a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The 2-DCB concentration in the commercial samples was 0.031 +/- 0.0026 ppm (n = 5) for the Soxhlet method and 0.031 +/- 0.0025 ppm (n = 10) for direct solvent extraction. Recovery of 2-DCB from spiked beef samples in the direct solvent extraction method was 93.2 +/- 9.0% (n = 7). This study showed that the direct solvent extraction method is simple and as efficient and reproducible as the Soxhlet method.

  15. A Buffer Management Issue in Designing SSDs for LFSs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaegeuk; Seol, Jinho; Maeng, Seungryoul

    This letter introduces a buffer management issue in designing SSDs for log-structured file systems (LFSs). We implemented a novel trace-driven SSD simulator in SystemC language, and simulated several SSD architectures with the NILFS2 trace. From the results, we give two major considerations related to the buffer management as follows. (1) The write buffer is used as a buffer not a cache, since all write requests are sequential in NILFS2. (2) For better performance, the main architectural factor is the bus bandwidth, but 332MHz is enough. Instead, the read buffer makes a key role in performance improvement while caching data. To enhance SSDs, accordingly, it is an effective way to make efficient read buffer management policies, and one of the examples is tracking the valid data zone in NILFS2, which can increase the data hit ratio in read buffers significantly.

  16. Determination of thermodynamic affinities of various polar olefins as hydride, hydrogen atom, and electron acceptors in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ying; Zhang, Song-Chen; Zhang, Min; Shen, Guang-Bin; Zhu, Xiao-Qing

    2013-07-19

    A series of 69 polar olefins with various typical structures (X) were synthesized and the thermodynamic affinities (defined in terms of the molar enthalpy changes or the standard redox potentials in this work) of the polar olefins obtaining hydride anions, hydrogen atoms, and electrons, the thermodynamic affinities of the radical anions of the polar olefins (X(•-)) obtaining protons and hydrogen atoms, and the thermodynamic affinities of the hydrogen adducts of the polar olefins (XH(•)) obtaining electrons in acetonitrile were determined using titration calorimetry and electrochemical methods. The pure C═C π-bond heterolytic and homolytic dissociation energies of the polar olefins (X) in acetonitrile and the pure C═C π-bond homolytic dissociation energies of the radical anions of the polar olefins (X(•-)) in acetonitrile were estimated. The remote substituent effects on the six thermodynamic affinities of the polar olefins and their related reaction intermediates were examined using the Hammett linear free-energy relationships; the results show that the Hammett linear free-energy relationships all hold in the six chemical and electrochemical processes. The information disclosed in this work could not only supply a gap of the chemical thermodynamics of olefins as one class of very important organic unsaturated compounds but also strongly promote the fast development of the chemistry and applications of olefins.

  17. Effects of acetone, acetonitrile, ethanol, methanol and DMSO on cytochrome P450 in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatic microsomes.

    PubMed

    Sakalli, Sidika; Burkina, Viktoriia; Zlabek, Vladimir; Zamaratskaia, Galia

    2015-01-01

    In vitro impacts of five organic solvents on cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme activity were investigated using hepatic microsomes of rainbow trout. The rates of several CYP450-mediated reactions were investigated at solvent concentrations ranging from 0.01% to 3%. The solvents greatly affected all tested reactions. In at least 0.8% ethanol, 2% methanol or acetone, 1% acetonitrile or 3% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity decreased and at 3% acetonitrile or ethanol, it was undetected. At 3%, all tested solvents except methanol reduced 7-benzyloxy-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin-O-debenzylase (BFCOD) activity, but at low concentrations of ethanol (2% and lower) or DMSO (1% and lower), it was induced. This was not seen with the inclusion of a pre-incubation step. p-Nitrophenolhydroxylase (PNPH) activity was not affected at concentrations below 1% DMSO, and at 2% acetonitrile it was reduced, as it was above 1% methanol or 0.5% ethanol. Acetone did not affect PNPH activity with or without a pre-incubation step. In general, the degree of inhibition was similar with and without the pre-incubation step. We conclude that the concentration of organic solvent for solubilizing the substrate and inhibitor in in vitro microsomal studies should be minimized.

  18. Another glimpse over the salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction in acetonitrile/water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Valente, Inês Maria; Gonçalves, Luís Moreira; Rodrigues, José António

    2013-09-20

    The use of the salting-out effect in analytical chemistry is very diverse and can be applied to increase the volatility of the analytes in headspace extractions, to cause the precipitation of proteins in biological samples or to improve the recoveries in liquid-liquid extractions. In the latter, the salting-out process can be used to create a phase separation between water-miscible organic solvents and water. Salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE) is an advantageous sample preparation technique aiming HPLC-UV analysis when developing analytical methodologies. In fact, some new extraction methodologies like QuEChERS include the SALLE concept. This manuscript discusses another point of view over SALLE with particular emphasis over acetonitrile-water mixtures for HPLC-UV analysis; the influence of the salting-out agents, their concentration and the water-acetonitrile volume ratios were the studied parameters. α-dicarbonyl compounds and beer were used as test analytes and test samples, respectively. The influence of the studied parameters was characterized by the obtained phase separation volume ratio and the fraction of α-dicarbonyls extracted to the acetonitrile phase. Results allowed the distribution of salts within three groups according to the phase separation and their extractability: (1) chlorides and acetates, (2) carbonates and sulfates and (3) magnesium sulfate; of all tested salts, sodium chloride had the highest influence on the α-dicarbonyls fraction extracted.

  19. Photochemical oxidation of thiophene by O2 in an oil/acetonitrile two-phase extraction system.

    PubMed

    Li, Fa-Tang; Zhao, Di-Shun; Li, Hong-Xia; Liu, Rui-Hong

    2008-10-01

    Photochemical oxidation of thiophene in an n-octane/acetonitrile extraction system using O(2) as oxidant was studied. Results obtained here can be used as a reference for desulfurization of gasoline, because thiophene is one of the main components containing sulfur in fluid catalytic cracking gasoline. A 500-W high-pressure mercury lamp was used as a light source for irradiation, and air was introduced by a gas pump to supply O(2). Thiophene dissolved in nopolar n-octane solvent was photodecomposed and removed into the polar acetonitrile phase. The desulfurization rate of thiophene in n-octane was 65.2% under photoirradiation for 5 h under the conditions of air flow at 150 mL min(-1), and V(n-octane):V(acetonitrile) = 1:1. This can be improved to 96.5% by adding 0.15 g Na-ZSM-5 zeolite into the 100-mL reaction system, which is the absorbent for O(2) and thiophene. Under such conditions, the photooxidation kinetics of thiophene with O(2) and Na-ZSM-5 zeolite is first-order with an apparent rate constant of 0.6297 h(-1) and half-time of 1.10 h. The sulfur content can be reduced from 800 microL L(-1) to 28 microL L(-1).

  20. Adsorption characteristics of acetone, chloroform and acetonitrile on sludge-derived adsorbent, commercial granular activated carbon and activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jiun-Horng; Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Huang, Guan-Yinag; Chiang, Hung-Lung

    2008-06-15

    The adsorption characteristics of chloroform, acetone, and acetonitrile on commercial activated carbon (C1), two types of activated carbon fibers (F1 and F2), and sludge adsorbent (S1) was investigated. The chloroform influent concentration ranged from 90 to 7800 ppm and the acetone concentration from 80 to 6900 ppm; the sequence of the adsorption capacity of chloroform and acetone on adsorbents was F2>F1 approximately C1 approximately S1. The adsorption capacity of acetonitrile ranged from 4 to 100 mg/g, corresponding to the influent range from 43 to 2700 ppm for C1, S1, and F1. The acetonitrile adsorption capacity of F2 was approximately 20% higher than that of the other adsorbents at temperatures<30 degrees C. The Freundlich equation fit the data better than the Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) equations. The adsorption rate of carbon fibers is higher than that of the other adsorbents due to their smaller fiber diameter and higher surface area. The micropore diffusion coefficient of VOC on activated carbon and sludge adsorbent was approximately 10(-4) cm2 s(-1). The diffusion coefficient of VOC on carbon fibers ranged from 10(-8) to 10(-7) cm2 s(-1). The small carbon fiber pore size corresponds to a smaller diffusion coefficient.