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Sample records for acetonitrile-phosphate buffer ph

  1. Mapping Soil pH Buffering Capacity of Selected Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, A. R.; Kissel, D. E.; Chen, F.; West, L. T.; Adkins, W.; Rickman, D.; Luvall, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    Soil pH buffering capacity, since it varies spatially within crop production fields, may be used to define sampling zones to assess lime requirement, or for modeling changes in soil pH when acid forming fertilizers or manures are added to a field. Our objective was to develop a procedure to map this soil property. One hundred thirty six soil samples (0 to 15 cm depth) from three Georgia Coastal Plain fields were titrated with calcium hydroxide to characterize differences in pH buffering capacity of the soils. Since the relationship between soil pH and added calcium hydroxide was approximately linear for all samples up to pH 6.5, the slope values of these linear relationships for all soils were regressed on the organic C and clay contents of the 136 soil samples using multiple linear regression. The equation that fit the data best was b (slope of pH vs. lime added) = 0.00029 - 0.00003 * % clay + 0.00135 * % O/C, r(exp 2) = 0.68. This equation was applied within geographic information system (GIS) software to create maps of soil pH buffering capacity for the three fields. When the mapped values of the pH buffering capacity were compared with measured values for a total of 18 locations in the three fields, there was good general agreement. A regression of directly measured pH buffering capacities on mapped pH buffering capacities at the field locations for these samples gave an r(exp 2) of 0.88 with a slope of 1.04 for a group of soils that varied approximately tenfold in their pH buffering capacities.

  2. Improved pH buffering agent for sodium hypochlorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, J. R.; Veeder, L. N.

    1969-01-01

    Sodium citrate/citric acid was found to be an effective buffer for pH control when used with sodium hypochlorite. The mixture does not corrode aluminum. The buffer appears to form a type of conversion coating that may provide corrosion-resistant properties to aluminum in other applications.

  3. Biochar contribution to soil pH buffer capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonutare, Tonu; Krebstein, Kadri; Utso, Maarius; Rodima, Ako; Kolli, Raimo; Shanskiy, Merrit

    2014-05-01

    Biochar as ecologically clean and stable form of carbon has complex of physical and chemical properties which make it a potentially powerful soil amendment (Mutezo, 2013). Therefore during the last decade the biochar application as soil amendment has been a matter for a great number of investigations. For the ecological viewpoint the trend of decreasing of soil organic matter in European agricultural land is a major problem. Society is faced with the task to find possibilities to stabilize or increase soil organic matter content in soil and quality. The availability of different functional groups (e.g. carboxylic, phenolic, acidic, alcoholic, amine, amide) allows soil organic matter to buffer over a wide range of soil pH values (Krull et al. 2004). Therefore the loss of soil organic matter also reduces cation exchange capacity resulting in lower nutrient retention (Kimetu et al. 2008). Biochar can retain elements in soil directly through the negative charge that develops on its surfaces, and this negative charge can buffer acidity in the soil. There are lack of investigations about the effect of biochar to soil pH buffering properties, The aim of our investigation was to investigate the changes in soil pH buffer capacity in a result of addition of carbonizated material to temperate region soils. In the experiment different kind of softwood biochars, activated carbon and different soil types with various organic matter and pH were used. The study soils were Albeluvisols, Leptosols, Cambisols, Regosols and Histosols . In the experiment the series of the soil: biochar mixtures with the biochar content 0 to 100% were used. The times of equiliberation between solid and liquid phase were from 1 to 168 hours. The suspension of soil: biochar mixtures was titrated with HCl solution. The titration curves were established and pH buffer capacities were calculated for the pH interval from 3.0 to 10.0. The results demonstrate the dependence of pH buffer capacity from soil type

  4. Ruminal buffers: temporal effects on buffering capacity and pH of ruminal fluid from cows fed a high concentrate diet.

    PubMed

    Le Ruyet, P; Tucker, W B

    1992-04-01

    In vitro characteristics of several buffers and alkalinizing agents commonly utilized to reduce ruminal acid load were evaluated. Ruminal fluid was collected from five cows consuming a diet containing concentrate and sorghum silage in a 68:32 ratio (DM basis). This fluid was incubated with either NaHCO3, a natural sodium sesquicarbonate, a multielement buffer or MgO (7.1 g/L of ruminal fluid), or no buffer for 48 h; flasks were removed and analyzed for pH, buffering capacity, and buffer value index every 12 h during the 48-h incubation. The buffer value index accounts simultaneously for alterations in pH and buffering capacity. Compared with the unbuffered control, all buffering compounds increased ruminal fluid buffer value index. However, the buffer value index separated these buffering compounds into two categories. The NaH-CO3 and sodium sesquicarbonate exhibited similar buffer value indexes; both were markedly higher than those for the multielement buffer and MgO. Although NaHCO3 and sodium sesquicarbonate each increased both ruminal fluid pH and buffering capacity sharply, the multielement buffer only increased pH and buffering capacity moderately. The increase in buffer value index for MgO primarily was due to an increase in pH. Both NaHCO3 and sodium sesquicarbonate were fully active within the first 12 h of incubation; activity of multielement buffer and MgO reached a plateau at 24 h. Compared with the multielement buffer and MgO, NaHCO3 and sodium sesquicarbonate should be more beneficial in preventing short-term postprandial increases in ruminal fluid hydrogen ion concentration; because of their slower release rates, the multielement buffer and MgO should help stabilize ruminal acid-base status, but efficacy might be reduced because of passage out of the rumen. PMID:1315810

  5. Light adaptation of invertebrate photoreceptors: influence of intracellular pH buffering capacity.

    PubMed Central

    Bolsover, S R; Brown, J E

    1982-01-01

    1. The possible role of pH changes in mediating light adaptation in Limulus ventral photoreceptor cells was studied by intracellular injection of zwitterionic pH buffers. The intracellular concentration of buffer was estimated by inclusion of a radioactive marker in the injection solution. 2. The light-induced increase of intracellular Ca2+ concentration was monitored by intracellular aequorin. The light-induced increase of Ca2+ concentration was not markedly altered by injection of pH buffer to an intracellular concentration of about 200 mM. 3. The progressive decrease in responsiveness during intracellular ionophoretic injection of Ca2+ was not markedly altered by injection of pH buffer to an intracellular concentration of about 200 mM. 4. Photoreceptors of both Limulus and Balanus were impaled with two micropipettes and voltage clamped. Membrane current induced by a prolonged steady illumination declined from an early transient to a plateau. This delayed decline of current indicates a light-induced reduction of sensitivity (i.e. light adaptation). The wave forms were similar before and after injection of pH buffer to an intracellular concentration of about 200 mM. 5. We conclude that it is unlikely that a light-induced change of cytosolic pH mediates light adaptation in Limulus (and Balanus) photoreceptors. PMID:7175745

  6. Buffer-dependent pH sensitivity of the fluorescent chloride-indicator dye SPQ.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, M; Frangne, R; Alvarado, F

    1993-01-01

    The fluorescence intensity of 6-methoxy-N-(3-sulfopropyl)quinolinium (SPQ) in an N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES)-Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane buffer, pH 7.0, decreased as a function of Cl- concentration and/or gluconate concentration, as expected. Contrary to expectation, however, the fluorescence intensity progressively increased as the pH decreased, independently of the presence of gluconate. Consequently, the modulation of SPQ fluorescence by commonly used buffers was investigated as a function of pH. Titration curves demonstrated SPQ quenching and yielded pK values characteristic of each buffer. from here, pH-independent Stern-Volmer constants, KQbase, were calculated for each of the morpholine derivatives, MES and 3-(N-morpholino)-2-hydroxypropanesulfonic acid. In contrast, HEPES and piperazine-N,N'-bis(2-ethanesulfonic acid), which are piperazine derivatives, exhibited an additional pH-independent "molecular" quenching constant KmQ throughout the pH range 3-10. To study chloride fluxes, therefore, what counts is the apparent Cl-Stern-Volmer constant KappCl, which is a function of both pH and buffer composition. Equations describing these relationships are presented. In conclusion, unless both pH and the buffer composition are taken into account, SPQ is unsuitable for studying the concomitant transmembrane fluxes of Cl- and H+. PMID:8381589

  7. Aluminum elution and precipitation in glass vials: effect of pH and buffer species.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Toru; Miyajima, Makoto; Wakiyama, Naoki; Terada, Katsuhide

    2015-02-01

    Inorganic extractables from glass vials may cause particle formation in the drug solution. In this study, the ability of eluting Al ion from borosilicate glass vials, and tendencies of precipitation containing Al were investigated using various pHs of phosphate, citrate, acetate and histidine buffer. Through heating, all of the buffers showed that Si and Al were eluted from glass vials in ratios almost the same as the composition of borosilicate glass, and the amounts of Al and Si from various buffer solutions at pH 7 were in the following order: citrate > phosphate > acetate > histidine. In addition, during storage after heating, the Al concentration at certain pHs of phosphate and acetate buffer solution decreased, suggesting the formation of particles containing Al. In citrate buffer, Al did not decrease in spite of the high elution amount. Considering that the solubility profile of aluminum oxide and the Al eluting profile of borosilicate glass were different, it is speculated that Al ion may be forced to leach into the buffer solution according to Si elution on the surface of glass vials. When Al ions were added to the buffer solutions, phosphate, acetate and histidine buffer showed a decrease of Al concentration during storage at a neutral range of pHs, indicating the formation of particles containing Al. In conclusion, it is suggested that phosphate buffer solution has higher possibility of forming particles containing Al than other buffer solutions. PMID:24261406

  8. THE EFFECT OF THE PH OF PH BUFFERED NUTRIENT SOLUTIONS ON NICKEL HYPERACCUMULATION BY ALYSSUM CORSICUM AND BERKHEYA CODDII

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is hypothesized that plant hyperaccumulation of Ni evolved as a defense mechanism against diseases and insects. Two hyperaccumulators, Alyssum corsicum and Berkheya coddii, were compared to cabbage (Brassica oleracea) grown in MES-HEPES buffered nutrient solutions and maintained at four pH levels...

  9. The potential effects of pH and buffering capacity on dental erosion.

    PubMed

    Owens, Barry M

    2007-01-01

    Soft drink pH (initial pH) has been shown to be a causative factor--but not necessarily the primary initiating factor--of dental erosion. The titratable acidity or buffering capacity has been acknowledged as playing a significant role in the etiology of these lesions. This in vitro study sought to evaluate five different soft drinks (Coca-Cola Classic, Diet Coke, Gatorade sports drink, Red Bull high-energy drink, Starbucks Frappucino coffee drink) and tap water (control) in terms of initial pH and buffering capacity. Initial pH was measured in triplicate for the six beverages. The buffering capacity of each beverage was assessed by measuring the weight (in grams) of 0.10 M sodium hydroxide necessary for titration to pH levels of 5.0, 6.0, 7.0, and 8.3. Coca-Cola Classic produced the lowest mean pH, while Starbucks Frappucino produced the highest pH of any of the drinks except for tap water. Based on statistical analysis using ANOVA and Fisher's post hoc tests at a P < 0.05 level of significance, Red Bull had the highest mean buffering capacity (indicating the strongest potential for erosion of enamel), followed by Gatorade, Coca-Cola Classic, Diet Coke, and Starbucks Frappucino. PMID:18050578

  10. Continuous-flow electrophoresis: Membrane-associated deviations of buffer pH and conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolka, A. J. K.; Mcguire, J. K.

    1978-01-01

    The deviations in buffer pH and conductivity which occur near the electrode membranes in continuous-flow electrophoresis were studied in the Beckman charged particle electrophoresis system and the Hanning FF-5 preparative electrophoresis instrument. The nature of the membranes separating the electrode compartments from the electrophoresis chamber, the electric field strength, and the flow rate of electrophoresis buffer were all found to influence the formation of the pH and conductivity gradients. Variations in electrode buffer flow rate and the time of electrophoresis were less important. The results obtained supported the hypothesis that a combination of Donnan membrane effects and the differing ionic mobilities in the electrophoresis buffer was responsible for the formation of the gradients. The significance of the results for the design and stable operation of continuous-flow electrophoresis apparatus was discussed.

  11. The Determination of the pH of Standard Buffer Solution: A Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, K. R.

    1985-01-01

    Describes an experiment which shows: (1) how measurements of the reaction electromotive force for the cell (Pt/glass/NaCl(aq,m),buffer/AgCl/Ag/Pt) can be utilized in determining the absolute pH of the buffer; and (2) the demonstration of the use of the Debye-Huckel model of an electrolyte solution in solving an important electrochemical problem.…

  12. Single pH buffer refolding screen for protein from inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Coutard, Bruno; Danchin, Etienne G J; Oubelaid, Rachid; Canard, Bruno; Bignon, Christophe

    2012-04-01

    We previously reported the set up of an automated test for screening the refolding of recombinant proteins expressed as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli[1]. The screen used 96 refolding buffers and was validated with 24 proteins, 70% of which remained soluble in at least one buffer. In the present paper, we have analyzed in more detail these experimental data to see if the refolding process can be driven by general rules. Notably, we found that proteins with an acidic isoelectric point (pI) refolded in buffers the average pH of which was alkaline and conversely. In addition, the number of refolding buffers wherein a protein remained soluble increased with the difference between its pI and the average pH of the buffers in which it refolded. A trend analysis of the other variables (ionic strength, detergents, etc.) was also performed. On the basis of this analysis, we devised and validated a new refolding screen made of a single buffer for acidic proteins and a single buffer for alkaline proteins. PMID:22343064

  13. Determination of baseline human nasal pH and the effect of intranasally administered buffers.

    PubMed

    Washington, N; Steele, R J; Jackson, S J; Bush, D; Mason, J; Gill, D A; Pitt, K; Rawlins, D A

    2000-04-01

    The nose is becoming a common route of drug administration, however, little is known about the pH of the human nasal cavity. Local pH may have a direct effect on the rate and extent of absorption of ionizable compounds and hence this study was performed to investigate normal pH values and whether pH could be manipulated by various buffers. Twelve healthy volunteers participated in a study to measure pH in the anterior and posterior sites of the nasal cavity. Miniature pH electrodes were placed 3 cm apart in the nasal cavity and a baseline was recorded for 30 min once the pH had stabilized. One hundred microlitres of isotonic solution was sprayed into the nostril and the pH was measured for 4 h post-dose. The following five formulations were tested: formulation A--sodium chloride (0.9%) at pH 7.2; formulation B--sodium chloride (0.9%) at pH 5.8; formulation C--Sorensens phosphate buffer (0.06 M) at pH 5. 8; formulation D--Sorensens phosphate buffer (0.13 M) at pH 5.8 and formulation E--formulation as (c) but adjusted to pH 5.0. Each formulation also contained saccharin sodium (0.5%) as a taste marker for nasal clearance. The time at which each subject detected the taste of saccharin was noted. The 30-minute baseline recording prior to administration of the nasal spray formulation demonstrates that there was both considerable intersubject and intrasubject variation in nasal pH. The average pH in the anterior of the nose was 6.40 (+0. 11, -0.15 S.D.) when calculated from H(+) values. The pH in the posterior of the nasal cavity was 6.27 (+0.13, -0.18 S.D.). The overall range in pH was 5.17-8.13 for anterior pH and 5.20-8.00 for posterior pH. Formulation A caused the pH in the anterior part of the nasal cavity to reach a maximum of 7.06 in 11.25 min from the baseline of pH 6.14 (P<0.05). The mean baseline pH was 6.5 for the posterior part of the nose which did not change over the recording period. Formulation B caused the anterior pH to increase from pH 6. 60 to 7

  14. Saliva flow rate, buffer capacity, and pH of autistic individuals.

    PubMed

    Bassoukou, Ivy Haralambos; Nicolau, José; dos Santos, Maria Teresa

    2009-03-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate saliva flow rate, buffer capacity, pH levels, and dental caries experience (DCE) in autistic individuals, comparing the results with a control group (CG). The study was performed on 25 noninstitutionalized autistic boys, divided in two groups. G1 composed of ten children, ages 3-8. G2 composed of 15 adolescents ages 9-13. The CG was composed of 25 healthy boys, randomly selected and also divided in two groups: CG3 composed of 14 children ages 4-8, and CG4 composed of 11 adolescents ages 9-14. Whole saliva was collected under slight suction, and pH and buffer capacity were determined using a digital pHmeter. Buffer capacity was measured by titration using 0.01 N HCl, and the flow rate expressed in ml/min, and the DCE was expressed by decayed, missing, and filled teeth (permanent dentition [DMFT] and primary dentition [dmft]). Data were plotted and submitted to nonparametric (Kruskal-Wallis) and parametric (Student's t test) statistical tests with a significance level less than 0.05. When comparing G1 and CG3, groups did not differ in flow rate, pH levels, buffer capacity, or DMFT. Groups G2 and CG4 differ significantly in pH (p = 0.007) and pHi = 7.0 (p = 0.001), with lower scores for G2. In autistic individuals aged 3-8 and 9-13, medicated or not, there was no significant statistical difference in flow rate, pH, and buffer capacity. The comparison of DCE among autistic children and CG children with deciduous (dmft) and mixed/permanent decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) did not show statistical difference (p = 0.743). Data suggest that autistic individuals have neither a higher flow rate nor a better buffer capacity. Similar DCE was observed in both groups studied. PMID:18594879

  15. Matching phosphate and maleate buffer systems for dissolution of weak acids: Equivalence in terms of buffer capacity of bulk solution or surface pH?

    PubMed

    Cristofoletti, Rodrigo; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2016-06-01

    The development of in vitro dissolution tests able to anticipate the in vivo fate of drug products has challenged pharmaceutical scientists over time, especially in the case of ionizable compounds. In the seminal model proposed by Mooney et al. thirty-five years ago, the pH at the solid-liquid interface (pH0) was identified as a key parameter in predicting dissolution rate. In the current work it is demonstrated that the in vitro dissolution of the weak acid ibuprofen in maleate and phosphate buffer systems is a function of the pH0, which in turn is affected by properties of the drug and the medium. The reported pH0 for ibuprofen dissolution in bicarbonate buffer, the predominant buffer species in the human small intestine under fasting conditions, can be achieved by reducing the phosphate buffer concentration to 5.0mM or the maleate buffer concentration to 2.2mM. Using this approach to identify the appropriate buffer/buffer capacity combination for in vitro experiments in FaSSIF-type media, it would be possible to increase the physiological relevance of this important biopharmaceutics tool. However, the necessity of monitoring and adjusting the bulk pH during the experiments carried out in 5.0mM phosphate or 2.2mM maleate buffers must also be taken into consideration. PMID:27032508

  16. Application of Acetate Buffer in pH Adjustment of Mash and its Influence on Fuel Ethanol Fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 2M sodium acetate buffer at pH 4.2 was used to adjust pH of liquefied mashes in a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) procedure. Although 5 mL of the buffer did not bring the pH values of the mashes (~100 mL) from a sorghum hybrid to 4.2, it kept the system stable (pH from 4.7 to ...

  17. Zinc(II) complexation by some biologically relevant pH buffers.

    PubMed

    Wyrzykowski, D; Tesmar, A; Jacewicz, D; Pranczk, J; Chmurzyński, L

    2014-12-01

    The isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) technique supported by potentiometric titration data was used to study the interaction of zinc ions with pH buffer substances, namely 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (Mes), piperazine-N,N'-bis(2-ethanesulfonic acid) (Pipes), and dimethylarsenic acid (Caco). The displacement ITC titration method with nitrilotriacetic acid as a strong, competitive ligand was applied to determine conditional-independent thermodynamic parameters for the binding of Zn(II) to Mes, Pipes, and Caco. Furthermore, the relationship between the proposed coordination mode of the buffers and the binding enthalpy has been discussed. PMID:25319620

  18. Hydrolysis of chlorantraniliprole and cyantraniliprole in various pH buffer solutions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashok K; Zimmerman, William T; Lowrie, Chris; Chapleo, Simon

    2014-04-23

    The hydrolysis reactions of [(14)C]-chlorantraniliprole (CLAP) and cyantraniliprole (CNAP) were investigated in sterile buffer solutions at pH 4, 7, and 9. Both compounds displayed similar degradation reactions. The reactions observed were intramolecular cyclizations and rearrangements instead of the anticipated amide hydrolysis to carboxylic acids. Despite a minor difference in their structures, the degradation rates for the two compounds were substantially different. The reaction rates were examined at multiple temperatures to understand the mechanistic aspects of the underlying transformations. Similarities and differences in the hydrolysis behavior of these compounds in various pH values and temperatures are described. PMID:24694259

  19. pH buffering by metastable mineral-fluid equilibria and evolution of carbon dioxide fugacity during burial diagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hutcheon, I.; Shevalier, M. ); Abercrombie, H.J. )

    1993-03-01

    Numerous potential pH buffers including reactions among aqueous organic acid and carbonate species, and carbonate and silicate minerals are typically present during burial diagenesis. Buffering of pH in natural systems is a function of mass action, mass balance, and kinetic constraints. In most sedimentary basins, carbonate and silicate minerals are present in amounts sufficient to buffer pH, and the activities of aqueous species are consistent with metastable equilibrium among observed diagenetic minerals. These observations indicate that mass balance and kinetic constraints are relatively less important than mass action constraints measured by the buffer index, [beta], here defined. The buffer index ultimately dictates which buffer reaction controls pH under diagenetic conditions; buffer reactions with high [beta] values are favored over those with low values. Buffer indices for a number of potential diagenetic buffer reactions have been calculated by reaction path modeling. Heterogeneous equilibria among carbonate and silicate minerals and an aqueous phase have greater [beta] values than those for homogeneous reactions among aqueous carbonate and organic acid species. This implies that pH, calcite dissolution, and f[sub CO[sub 2

  20. Secular decline of seawater calcium increases seawater buffering and pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hain, M.; Sigman, D. M.; Higgins, J. A.; Haug, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    Reconstructed changes in seawater calcium and magnesium concentration ([Ca2+], [Mg2+]) predictably affect the ocean's acid/base and carbon chemistry. Yet inaccurate formulations of chemical equilibrium "constants" are currently in use to account for these changes. Here we develop an efficient implementation of the MIAMI Ionic Interaction Model (Millero and Pierrot, 1998) to predict all chemical equilibrium constants required for carbon chemistry calculations under variable [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] (Hain et al., 2015). We investigate the impact of [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] on the relationships among the ocean's pH, CO2, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), saturation state of CaCO3 (Ω), and buffer capacity. Increasing [Ca2+] and/or [Mg2+] enhances "ion pairing," which increases seawater buffering by increasing the concentration ratio of total to "free" (uncomplexed) carbonate ion. An increase in [Ca2+], however, also causes a decline in carbonate ion to maintain a given Ω, thereby overwhelming the ion pairing effect and decreasing seawater buffering. Given the reconstructions of Eocene [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] ([Ca2+]~20mM; [Mg2+]~30 mM), Eocene seawater would have required essentially the same DIC as today to simultaneously explain a similar-to-modern Ω and the estimated Eocene atmospheric CO2 of ~1000 ppm. During the Cretaceous, at ~4 times modern [Ca2+], ocean buffering would have been at a minimum. Overall, during times of high seawater [Ca2+], CaCO3 saturation, pH, and atmospheric CO2 were more susceptible to perturbations of the global carbon cycle. For example, given both Eocene and Cretaceous seawater [Ca2+] and [Mg2+], a doubling of atmospheric CO2 would require less carbon addition to the ocean/atmosphere system than under modern seawater composition. Moreover, increase in seawater buffering since the Cretaceous may have been a driver of evolution by raising energetic demands of biologically controlled calcification and CO2 concentration mechanisms that aid photosynthesis.

  1. KEY COMPARISON: Final report of EUROMET Project 696: pH determination of a phthalate buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitzer, Petra; Charlet, Philippe; Eberhard, Ralf; Karpov, Oleg V.; Philippe, Rachel; Rivier, Cedric; Maximov, Igor; Sudmeier, Uwe

    2005-01-01

    The EUROMET project 696, a trilateral comparison between PTB, Germany, LNE, France and VNIIFTRI, Russia was performed in order to demonstrate and document the capability of the participants to measure the pH of a phthalate buffer by the primary measurement procedure for pH. Good agreement of the reported results was observed. The sample was very similar to the one used in the comparison CCQM-K17. PTB acts as pilot laboratory in CCQM-K17 and in EUROMET 696. This comparison allows one to link the results obtained by LNE to the CCQM-K17 key comparison through the degree of equivalence of PTB. On the other hand, the discrepancy between measured pH values at the VNIIFTRI and PTB for the same type of buffer solution decreased, as compared with a bilateral comparison in 1997. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  2. Key comparison on pH of an unknown phosphate buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastkowski, F.; Spitzer, P.; Sander, B.; Máriássy, M.; Dimitrova, L.; Reyes, A.; Rodríguez, A.; Manzano, V. Lara; Vospelova, A.; Jakobsen, P. T.; Pawlina, M.; Korol, M.; Kozlowski, W.; Delgado, M.; Ticona Canaza, G.; Dias, J. C.; Gonzaga, F. B.; Nagyné Szilágyi, Z.; Jakusovszky, B.; Nongluck, T.; Waters, J.; Pratt, K. W.; Asakai, T.; Maksimov, I.; Hankova, Z.; Uysal, E.; Gavrilkin, V.; Prokunin, S. V.; Ferreira, E.; Fajardo, S.

    2016-01-01

    Results of CCQM-K99 key comparison on unknown phosphate buffer pH ~ 7.5 at 5 °C, 15 °C, 25 °C, 37 °C and 50 °C are reported. Good agreement is found between the majority of participants. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  3. Importance of the pH buffering capacity - comparison of various methods to estimate the pH properties of a waste material

    SciTech Connect

    Baeverman, C.

    1997-12-01

    The final pH of the leach water controls the leaching of many metals from MSWI ash in construction materials and landfills. The buffering properties of the ash determines the final pH of the leachate and is therefore one of the most important properties of a waste material. In this study three different methods to investigate the pH buffering capacity of ashes have been compared; two batch methods and one flow-through method. The results of this study showed that the MSWI bottom ash used here had a large buffering capacity in the pH region where the solubility of most pH-sensitive metals is lowest, around pH 8. The buffering reactions are slow. The duration of an experiment should therefore be about 50 days if all material should have time to react. A comparison of the results of the experiments showed that at least 50% of the buffering capacity in a batch system comes from dissolved constituents, that would not buffer in a flow-through system.

  4. Extracellular ATP hydrolysis inhibits synaptic transmission by increasing ph buffering in the synaptic cleft.

    PubMed

    Vroman, Rozan; Klaassen, Lauw J; Howlett, Marcus H C; Cenedese, Valentina; Klooster, Jan; Sjoerdsma, Trijntje; Kamermans, Maarten

    2014-05-01

    Neuronal computations strongly depend on inhibitory interactions. One such example occurs at the first retinal synapse, where horizontal cells inhibit photoreceptors. This interaction generates the center/surround organization of bipolar cell receptive fields and is crucial for contrast enhancement. Despite its essential role in vision, the underlying synaptic mechanism has puzzled the neuroscience community for decades. Two competing hypotheses are currently considered: an ephaptic and a proton-mediated mechanism. Here we show that horizontal cells feed back to photoreceptors via an unexpected synthesis of the two. The first one is a very fast ephaptic mechanism that has no synaptic delay, making it one of the fastest inhibitory synapses known. The second one is a relatively slow (τ≈200 ms), highly intriguing mechanism. It depends on ATP release via Pannexin 1 channels located on horizontal cell dendrites invaginating the cone synaptic terminal. The ecto-ATPase NTPDase1 hydrolyses extracellular ATP to AMP, phosphate groups, and protons. The phosphate groups and protons form a pH buffer with a pKa of 7.2, which keeps the pH in the synaptic cleft relatively acidic. This inhibits the cone Ca²⁺ channels and consequently reduces the glutamate release by the cones. When horizontal cells hyperpolarize, the pannexin 1 channels decrease their conductance, the ATP release decreases, and the formation of the pH buffer reduces. The resulting alkalization in the synaptic cleft consequently increases cone glutamate release. Surprisingly, the hydrolysis of ATP instead of ATP itself mediates the synaptic modulation. Our results not only solve longstanding issues regarding horizontal cell to photoreceptor feedback, they also demonstrate a new form of synaptic modulation. Because pannexin 1 channels and ecto-ATPases are strongly expressed in the nervous system and pannexin 1 function is implicated in synaptic plasticity, we anticipate that this novel form of synaptic

  5. Extracellular ATP Hydrolysis Inhibits Synaptic Transmission by Increasing pH Buffering in the Synaptic Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Vroman, Rozan; Klaassen, Lauw J.; Howlett, Marcus H.C.; Cenedese, Valentina; Klooster, Jan; Sjoerdsma, Trijntje; Kamermans, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal computations strongly depend on inhibitory interactions. One such example occurs at the first retinal synapse, where horizontal cells inhibit photoreceptors. This interaction generates the center/surround organization of bipolar cell receptive fields and is crucial for contrast enhancement. Despite its essential role in vision, the underlying synaptic mechanism has puzzled the neuroscience community for decades. Two competing hypotheses are currently considered: an ephaptic and a proton-mediated mechanism. Here we show that horizontal cells feed back to photoreceptors via an unexpected synthesis of the two. The first one is a very fast ephaptic mechanism that has no synaptic delay, making it one of the fastest inhibitory synapses known. The second one is a relatively slow (τ≈200 ms), highly intriguing mechanism. It depends on ATP release via Pannexin 1 channels located on horizontal cell dendrites invaginating the cone synaptic terminal. The ecto-ATPase NTPDase1 hydrolyses extracellular ATP to AMP, phosphate groups, and protons. The phosphate groups and protons form a pH buffer with a pKa of 7.2, which keeps the pH in the synaptic cleft relatively acidic. This inhibits the cone Ca2+ channels and consequently reduces the glutamate release by the cones. When horizontal cells hyperpolarize, the pannexin 1 channels decrease their conductance, the ATP release decreases, and the formation of the pH buffer reduces. The resulting alkalization in the synaptic cleft consequently increases cone glutamate release. Surprisingly, the hydrolysis of ATP instead of ATP itself mediates the synaptic modulation. Our results not only solve longstanding issues regarding horizontal cell to photoreceptor feedback, they also demonstrate a new form of synaptic modulation. Because pannexin 1 channels and ecto-ATPases are strongly expressed in the nervous system and pannexin 1 function is implicated in synaptic plasticity, we anticipate that this novel form of synaptic modulation

  6. Influence of amino acids, buffers, and ph on the γ-irradiation-induced degradation of alginates.

    PubMed

    Ulset, Ann-Sissel T; Mori, Hideki; Dalheim, Marianne Ø; Hara, Masayuki; Christensen, Bjørn E

    2014-12-01

    Alginate-based biomaterials and medical devices are commonly subjected to γ-irradiation as a means of sterilization, either in the dry state or the gel (hydrated) state. In this process the alginate chains degrade randomly in a dose-dependent manner, altering alginates' material properties. The addition of free radical scavenging amino acids such as histidine and phenylalanine protects the alginate significantly against degradation, as shown by monitoring changes in the molecular weight distributions using SEC-MALLS and determining the pseudo first order rate constants of degradation. Tris buffer (0.5 M), but not acetate, citrate, or phosphate buffers had a similar effect on the degradation rate. Changes in pH itself had only marginal effects on the rate of alginate degradation and on the protective effect of amino acids. Contrary to previous reports, the chemical composition (M/G profile) of the alginates, including homopolymeric mannuronan, was unaltered following irradiation up to 10 kGy. PMID:25412478

  7. Salivary pH and Buffering Capacity as Risk Markers for Early Childhood Caries: A Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, S

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The diagnostic utility of saliva is currently being explored in various branches of dentistry, remarkably in the field of caries research. This study was aimed to determine if assessment of salivary pH and buffering capacity would serve as reliable tools in risk prediction of early childhood caries (ECC). Materials and methods: Paraffin-stimulated salivary samples were collected from 50 children with ECC (group I) and 50 caries free children (group II). Salivary pH and buffering capacity (by titration with 0.1 N hydrochloric acid) were assessed using a handheld digital pH meter in both groups. The data obtained were subjected to statistical analysis. Results: Statistically, no significant difference was observed between both the groups for all salivary parameters assessed, except for the buffering capacity level at 150 μl titration of 0.1 N hydrochloric acid (p = 0.73; significant at 1% level). Conclusion: Salivary pH and buffering capacity may not serve as reliable markers for risk prediction of ECC. How to cite this article: Jayaraj D, Ganesan S. Salivary pH and Buffering Capacity as Risk Markers for Early Childhood Caries: A Clinical Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(3):167-171. PMID:26628849

  8. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence of tris(2,2' bipyridine)ruthenium(II) using common biological buffers as co-reactant, pH buffer and supporting electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Noah; Francis, Paul S; Barbante, Gregory J; Hogan, Conor F

    2015-11-01

    A series of aliphatic tertiary amines (HEPES, POPSO, EPPS and BIS-TRIS) commonly used to buffer the pH in biological experiments, were examined as alternative, non-toxic co-reactants for the electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(ii) ([Ru(bpy)3](2+)). These were found to be very attractive as "multi-tasking" reagents, serving not only as co-reactants, but also fulfiling the roles of pH buffer and supporting electrolyte within an aqueous environment; thus significantly simplifying the overall ECL analysis. Sub-nanomolar detection limits were obtained for [Ru(bpy)3](2+) in the presence of BIS-TRIS, making this species an valuable option for co-reactant ECL-based bioanalytical applications. PMID:26347905

  9. Reaction of nerve agents with phosphate buffer at pH 7.

    PubMed

    Creasy, William R; Fry, Roderick A; McGarvey, David J

    2012-07-12

    Chemical weapon nerve agents, including isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate (GB or Sarin), pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate (GD or Soman), and S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) O-ethyl methylphosphonothioate (VX), are slow to react in aqueous solutions at midrange pH levels. The nerve agent reactivity increases in phosphate buffer at pH 7, relative to distilled water or acetate buffer. Reactions were studied using (31)P NMR. Phosphate causes faster reaction to the corresponding alkyl methylphosphonic acids, and produces a mixed phosphate/phosphonate compound as an intermediate reaction product. GB has the fastest reaction rate, with a bimolecular rate constant of 4.6 × 10(-3) M(-1)s(-1)[PO(4)(3-)]. The molar product branching ratio of GB acid to the pyro product (isopropyl methylphosphonate phosphate anhydride) is 1:1.4, independent of phosphate concentration, and the pyro product continues to react much slower to form GB acid. The pyro product has two doublets in the (31)P NMR spectrum. The rate of reaction for GD is slower than GB, with a rate constant of 1.26 × 10(-3) M(-1)s(-1) [PO(4)(3-)]. The rate for VX is considerably slower, with a rate constant of 1.39 × 10(-5) M(-1)s(-1) [PO(4)(3-)], about 2 orders of magnitude slower than the rate for GD. The rate constant of the reaction of GD with pyrophosphate at pH 8 is 2.04 × 10(-3) min(-1) at a concentration of 0.0145 M. The rate of reaction for diisopropyl fluorophosphate is 2.84 × 10(-3) min(-1) at a concentration of 0.153 M phosphate, a factor of 4 slower than GD and a factor of 15 slower than GB, and there is no detectable pyro product. The half-lives of secondary reaction of the GB pyro product in 0.153 and 0.046 M solution of phosphate are 23.8 and 28.0 h, respectively, which indicates little or no dependence on phosphate. PMID:22667763

  10. Optimizing buffering chemistry to maintain near neutral pH of broiler feed during pre-enrichment for Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Berrang, M E; Cosby, D E; Cox, N A; Cason, J A; Richardson, K E

    2015-12-01

    Salmonella is a human pathogen that can accompany live broilers to the slaughter plant, contaminating fully processed carcasses. Feed is one potential source of Salmonella to growing broilers. Monitoring feed for the presence of Salmonella is part of good agricultural practice. The first step in culturing feed for Salmonella (which may be at low numbers and sub-lethally stressed) is to add it to a pre-enrichment broth which is incubated for 24 h. During the course of pre-enrichment, extraneous bacteria metabolize carbohydrates in some feed and excrete acidic byproducts, causing the pH to drop dramatically. An acidic pre-enrichment pH can injure or kill Salmonella resulting in a failure to detect, even if it is present and available to infect chickens. The objective of this study was to test an array of buffering chemistries to prevent formation of an injurious acidic environment during pre-enrichment of feed in peptone water. Five grams of feed were added to 45 mL of peptone water buffered with carbonate, Tris pH 8, and phosphate buffering ingredients individually and in combination. Feed was subjected to a pre-enrichment at 35°C for 24 h; pH was measured at 0, 18, and 24 h. Standard phosphate buffering ingredients at concentrations up to 4 times the normal formulation were unable to fully prevent acidic conditions. Likewise, carbonate and Tris pH 8 were not fully effective. The combination of phosphate, carbonate, and Tris pH 8 was the most effective buffer tested. It is recommended that a highly buffered pre-enrichment broth be used to examine feed for the presence of Salmonella. PMID:26467004

  11. The formation of stable pH gradients with weak monovalent buffers for isoelectric focusing in free solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, Richard A.; Thormann, Wolfgang; Graham, Aly; Bier, Milan

    1985-01-01

    Two methods which utilize simple buffers for the generation of stable pH gradients (useful for preparative isoelectric focusing) are compared and contrasted. The first employs preformed gradients comprised of two simple buffers in density-stabilized free solution. The second method utilizes neutral membranes to isolate electrolyte reservoirs of constant composition from the separation column. It is shown by computer simulation that steady-state gradients can be formed at any pH range with any number of components in such a system.

  12. Report of key comparison SIM.QM-K91 pH of phthalate buffer (nominal pH ~4.01 at 25 °C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzaga, F. B.; Dias, J. C.; Pratt, K. W.; Waters, J.; Dimitrova, L.; Delgado, M.; Canaza, G. T.; Cristancho, R. O.; Chavarro, L. A.; Fajardo, S.; Rodruangthum, P.; Tangpaisarnkul, N.; Gavrilkin, V.; Nagibin, S.; Petrenko, A.; Manska, A.

    2015-01-01

    At the SIM meeting in Buenos Aires, from 30 May to 1 June 2012, it was decided a RMO key comparison on pH measurement coordinated by INMETRO would be performed, named SIM.QM-K91, in order to investigate the degrees of equivalence of measurement procedures for the pH determination of a phthalate buffer solution (nominal pH around 4.01 at 25 °C). Phthalate buffer is widely used to calibrate pH electrodes in the acid range. A buffer solution of 0.05 mol kg-1 potassium hydrogen phthalate, KHC8H4O4, is one of the primary pH reference buffer solutions recommended by IUPAC. It was only allowed to participate in this comparison by using a differential cell or a glass electrode, instead of primary cells, if the highest metrological standard in the institute or if the CMCs are based on the type of cell to be used. The results obtained by INMETRO and NIST (who also participated in CCQM-K91 comparison) were used to link the results from the other institutes to the key comparison reference value of CCQM-K91. In this comparison, pH measurements were performed at 25 °C, and optionally also at 15 °C and 37 °C. Nine institutes took part in the comparison and the results are presented in this report. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  13. Numerical Study on the Effects of pH Buffering Minerals for CO2 Sequestration in Geology by CMS Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, S.; Suzuki, K.

    2014-12-01

    Among the technical alternatives of CCS, Koide and Xue (2009) proposed the technology, CO2 Microbubble Storage (CMS). In CMS, CO2 is injected into shallow geology as microbubbles in water. Suzuki et al. (2012) studied on the legal, economic, and effective operation of CMS and showed an appropriate one as follows. CO2 microbubbles are injected in a vertical injection well with water withdrawn from the surrounding wells. When the microbubbles are mixed with water, the water is quickly saturated with CO2 because of the large surface area of the bubbles. As a result, CO2 is injected into geology as the solute, mostly bicarbonate ion. The cost efficiency of this operation is reasonbale. There is an issue that should be assessed when CO2 dissolved water is injected in shallow geology. That is the migration of low pH groundwater. The low pH pore solution might have impacts on the underground environment. Here the preliminary numerical study on the pH buffering capacity for CMS was done. In the numerical study, groundwater migration dominated by Darcy law, the advective and dispersive transport of the ions, and the reaction between pore water and minerals were considered. One dimensional geology model was used. There are various mechanisms that bring pH buffering effect in an underground circumstance. Here calcite dissolution by low pH groundwater was considered because it is one of the most casual phenomena that can bring pH buffering effect. The results of the case studies where the different mass fractions of calcite in the model layer were supposed show that the pore solution in the case with calcite was neutralized and that in the case without calcite was not. They also showed that the mass fraction of calcite does not change much the pH buffering effect. Those results were brought by the principle that the pH of the pore solution is controlled by the equilibrium constant of the reaction between minerals and the pore solution. That is, the excess portion of calcite is

  14. The effects of buffers and pH on the thermal stability, unfolding and substrate binding of RecA.

    PubMed

    Metrick, Michael A; Temple, Joshua E; MacDonald, Gina

    2013-12-31

    The Escherichia coli protein RecA is responsible for catalysis of the strand transfer reaction used in DNA repair and recombination. Previous studies in our lab have shown that high concentrations of salts stabilize RecA in a reverse-anionic Hofmeister series. Here we investigate how changes in pH and buffer alter the thermal unfolding and cofactor binding. RecA in 20mM HEPES, MES, Tris and phosphate buffers was studied in the pH range from 6.5 to 8.5 using circular dichroism (CD), infrared (IR) and fluorescence spectroscopies. The results show all of the buffers studied stabilize RecA up to 50°C above the Tris melting temperature and influence RecA's ability to nucleate on double-stranded DNA. Infrared and CD spectra of RecA in the different buffers do not show that secondary structural changes are associated with increased stability or decreased ability to nucleate on dsDNA. These results suggest the differences in stability arise from decreasing positive charge and/or buffer interactions. PMID:24036048

  15. Individual variations of pH, buffer capacity, and concentrations of calcium and phosphate in unstimulated whole saliva.

    PubMed

    Larsen, M J; Jensen, A F; Madsen, D M; Pearce, E I

    1999-02-01

    In order to evaluate the risk of development of dental caries and/or of formation of dental calculus, salivary variables have often been used, but not with particular success. A reason for the apparent lack of association could be that the individual temporal variation of a characteristic was so substantial relative to the overall variation that it is not possible to characterize an individual by a single salivary measurement. The aim here was to examine the individual variation of pH, buffer capacity, and concentrations of calcium and phosphate and to compare it with the overall variation of the characteristics in order to shed light on the above problem. Eight weekly samples of up to 4 ml of unstimulated whole saliva were collected from 11 dental students before tooth brushing on their arrival at 8 a.m. in the dental school. Calcium was determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy, phosphate colorimetrically, and pH electrometrically. The buffer capacity was assessed by titration of the saliva sample from the pH initially observed to pH 3. It was found that within each individual the concentration of calcium and of phosphate, pH, the hydroxyapatite ion product and the buffer capacity varied considerably over the 7 weeks. The individual range frequently covered more than a third of the total range. Further, within each of the variables, single individuals could be found whose samples covered 60% or more of the overall range, whilst others covered less than 10% of the range. It was therefore concluded that, although collected at the same time of the day, pH, buffer capacity and concentrations of calcium and phosphate in unstimulated whole saliva in the single individual vary so much that characterization of individuals and of their saliva based on a single salivary analysis is unreliable and hazardous. PMID:10206329

  16. pH buffering of single rat skeletal muscle fibers in the in vivo environment.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshinori; Inagaki, Tadakatsu; Poole, David C; Kano, Yutaka

    2016-05-15

    Homeostasis of intracellular pH (pHi) has a crucial role for the maintenance of cellular function. Several membrane transporters such as lactate/H(+) cotransporter (MCT), Na(+)/H(+) exchange transporter (NHE), and Na(+)/HCO3 (-) cotransporter (NBC) are thought to contribute to pHi regulation. However, the relative importance of each of these membrane transporters to the in vivo recovery from the low pHi condition is unknown. Using an in vivo bioimaging model, we pharmacologically inhibited each transporter separately and all transporters together and then evaluated the pHi recovery profiles following imposition of a discrete H(+) challenge loaded into single muscle fibers by microinjection. The intact spinotrapezius muscle of adult male Wistar rats (n = 72) was exteriorized and loaded with the fluorescent probe 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein-acetoxymethyl ester (10 μM). A single muscle fiber was then loaded with low-pH solution [piperazine-N,N'-bis(2-ethanesulfonic acid) buffer, pH 6.5, ∼2.33 × 10(-3) μl] by microinjection over 3 s. The rats were divided into groups for the following treatments: 1) no inhibitor (CONT), 2) MCT inhibition (by α-Cyano-4-hydroxyciannamic acid; 4 mM), 3) NHE inhibition (by ethylisopropyl amiloride; 0.5 mM), 4) NBC inhibition (by DIDS; 1 mM), and 5) MCT, NHE, and NBC inhibition (All blockade). The fluorescence ratio (F500 nm/F445 nm) was determined from images captured during 1 min (60 images/min) and at 5, 10, 15, and 20 min after injection. The pHi at 1-2 s after injection significantly decreased from resting pHi (ΔpHi = -0.73 ± 0.03) in CONT. The recovery response profile was biphasic, with an initial rapid and close-to-exponential pHi increase (time constant, τ: 60.0 ± 7.9 s). This initial rapid profile was not affected by any pharmacological blockade but was significantly delayed by carbonic anhydrase inhibition. In contrast, the secondary, more gradual, return toward baseline that restored CONT pHi to

  17. The Effect of Crystallizing and Non-crystallizing Cosolutes on Succinate Buffer Crystallization and the Consequent pH Shift in Frozen Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaramurthi, Prakash; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2011-09-06

    To effectively inhibit succinate buffer crystallization and the consequent pH changes in frozen solutions. Using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD), the crystallization behavior of succinate buffer in the presence of either (i) a crystallizing (glycine, mannitol, trehalose) or (ii) a non-crystallizing cosolute (sucrose) was evaluated. Aqueous succinate buffer solutions, 50 or 200 mM, at pH values 4.0 or 6.0 were cooled from room temperature to -25 C at 0.5 C/min. The pH of the solution was measured as a function of temperature using a probe designed to function at low temperatures. The final lyophiles prepared from these solutions were characterized using synchrotron radiation. When the succinic acid solution buffered to pH 4.0, in the absence of a cosolute, was cooled, there was a pronounced shift in the freeze-concentrate pH. Glycine and mannitol, which have a tendency to crystallize in frozen solutions, remained amorphous when the initial pH was 6.0. Under this condition, they also inhibited buffer crystallization and prevented pH change. At pH 4.0 (50 mM initial concentration), glycine and mannitol crystallized and did not prevent pH change in frozen solutions. While sucrose, a non-crystallizing cosolute, did not completely prevent buffer crystallization, the extent of crystallization was reduced. Sucrose decomposition, based on XRD peaks attributable to {beta}-D-glucose, was observed in frozen buffer solutions with an initial pH of 4.0. Trehalose completely inhibited crystallization of the buffer components when the initial pH was 6.0 but not at pH 4.0. At the lower pH, the crystallization of both trehalose dihydrate and buffer components was evident. When retained amorphous, sucrose and trehalose effectively inhibited succinate buffer component crystallization and the consequent pH shift. However, when trehalose crystallized or sucrose degraded to yield a crystalline decomposition product, crystallization of buffer was

  18. Macrophyte and pH buffering updates to the Klamath River water-quality model upstream of Keno Dam, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Annett B.; Rounds, Stewart A.; Asbill-Case, Jessica R.; Deas, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    A hydrodynamic, water temperature, and water-quality model of the Link River to Keno Dam reach of the upper Klamath River was updated to account for macrophytes and enhanced pH buffering from dissolved organic matter, ammonia, and orthophosphorus. Macrophytes had been observed in this reach by field personnel, so macrophyte field data were collected in summer and fall (June-October) 2011 to provide a dataset to guide the inclusion of macrophytes in the model. Three types of macrophytes were most common: pondweed (Potamogeton species), coontail (Ceratophyllum demersum), and common waterweed (Elodea canadensis). Pondweed was found throughout the Link River to Keno Dam reach in early summer with densities declining by mid-summer and fall. Coontail and common waterweed were more common in the lower reach near Keno Dam and were at highest density in summer. All species were most dense in shallow water (less than 2 meters deep) near shore. The highest estimated dry weight biomass for any sample during the study was 202 grams per square meter for coontail in August. Guided by field results, three macrophyte groups were incorporated into the CE-QUAL-W2 model for calendar years 2006-09. The CE-QUAL-W2 model code was adjusted to allow the user to initialize macrophyte populations spatially across the model grid. The default CE-QUAL-W2 model includes pH buffering by carbonates, but does not include pH buffering by organic matter, ammonia, or orthophosphorus. These three constituents, especially dissolved organic matter, are present in the upper Klamath River at concentrations that provide substantial pH buffering capacity. In this study, CE-QUAL-W2 was updated to include this enhanced buffering capacity in the simulation of pH. Acid dissociation constants for ammonium and phosphoric acid were taken from the literature. For dissolved organic matter, the number of organic acid groups and each group's acid dissociation constant (Ka) and site density (moles of sites per mole of

  19. The dependence of the lipid bilayer membrane: buffer partition coefficient of pentobarbitone on pH and lipid composition.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, K W; Yu, S C

    1977-01-01

    1 The membrane/buffer partition coefficient of [14C]-pentobarbitone has been determined as a function of the lipid composition of bilayer membranes. 2 A new technique based on ultrafiltration gave comparable results to conventional techniques but required less time for equilbration. 3 The membrane/buffer coefficient was independent of pentobarbitone concentration in the range studies. 4 The apparent partition coefficient varied with pH and was a linear function of the degree of dissociation of pentobarbition. 5 Both the charged and uncharged forms of pentobarbitone partitioned into the membrane, the latter to a much greater extent than the former. 6 At low pH the highest partition coefficient observed was in egg phosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes. 7 Incorporation of cholesterol or phosphatidic acid into phosphatidylcholine membranes greatly reduced the partition coefficient. 8 High pressures do not greatly change these partition coefficients. PMID:21013

  20. In situ measurement of reaction volume and calculation of pH of weak acid buffer solutions under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Min, Stephen K; Samaranayake, Chaminda P; Sastry, Sudhir K

    2011-05-26

    Direct measurements of reaction volume, so far, have been limited to atmospheric pressure. This study describes a method for in situ reaction volume measurements under pressure using a variable volume piezometer. Reaction volumes for protonic ionization of weak acid buffering agents (MES, citric acid, sulfanilic acid, and phosphoric acid) were measured in situ under pressure up to 400 MPa at 25 °C. The methodology involved initial separation of buffering agents within the piezometer using gelatin capsules. Under pressure, the volume of the reactants was measured at 25 °C, and the contents were heated to 40 °C to dissolve the gelatin and allow the reaction to occur, and cooled to 25 °C, where the volume of products was measured. Reaction volumes were used to calculate pH of the buffer solutions as a function of pressure. The results show that the measured reaction volumes as well as the calculated pH values generally quite agree with their respective theoretically predicted values up to 100 MPa. The results of this study highlight the need for a comprehensive theory to describe the pressure behavior of ionization reactions in realistic systems especially at higher pressures. PMID:21542618

  1. Calorimetric and Diffractometric Evidence for the Sequential Crystallization of Buffer Components and the Consequential pH Swing in Frozen Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaramurthi, Prakash; Shalaev, Evgenyi; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2010-06-22

    Sequential crystallization of succinate buffer components in the frozen solution has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffractometry (both laboratory and synchrotron sources). The consequential pH shifts were monitored using a low-temperature electrode. When a solution buffered to pH < pK{sub a2} was cooled from room temperature (RT), the freeze-concentrate pH first increased and then decreased. This was attributed to the sequential crystallization of succinic acid, monosodium succinate, and finally disodium succinate. When buffered to pH > pK{sub a2}, the freeze-concentrate pH first decreased and then increased due to the sequential crystallization of the basic (disodium succinate) followed by the acidic (monosodium succinate and succinic acid) buffer components. XRD provided direct evidence of the crystallization events in the frozen buffer solutions, including the formation of disodium succinate hexahydrate [Na{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}COO){sub 2} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O]. When the frozen solution was warmed in a differential scanning calorimeter, multiple endotherms attributable to the melting of buffer components and ice were observed. When the frozen solutions were dried under reduced pressure, ice sublimation was followed by dehydration of the crystalline hexahydrate to a poorly crystalline anhydrate. However, crystalline succinic acid and monosodium succinate were retained in the final lyophiles. The pH and the buffer salt concentration of the prelyo solution influenced the crystalline salt content in the final lyophile. The direction and magnitude of the pH shift in the frozen solution depended on both the initial pH and the buffer concentration. In light of the pH-sensitive nature of a significant fraction of pharmaceuticals (especially proteins), extreme care is needed in both the buffer selection and its concentration.

  2. An evaluation of MES (2(N-Morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid) and Amberlite IRC-50 as pH buffers for nutrient solution studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugbee, B. G.; Salisbury, F. B.

    1985-01-01

    All buffering agents used to stabilize pH in hydroponic research have disadvantages. Inorganic buffers are absorbed and may become phytotoxic. Solid carbonate salts temporarily mitigate decreasing pH but provide almost no protection against increasing pH, and they alter nutrient absorption. Exchange resins are more effective, but we find that they remove magnesium and manganese from solution. We have tested 2(N-Morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) as a buffering agent at concentrations of 1 and 10 mol m-3 (1 and 10 mM) with beans, corn, lettuce, tomatoes, and wheat. MES appears to be biologically inert and does not interact significantly with other solution ions. Relative growth rates among controls and MES treatments were nearly identical for each species during the trial period. The pH was stabilized by 1 mol m-3 MES. This buffer warrants further consideration in nutrient research.

  3. An evaluation of MES (2(N-Morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid) and Amberlite IRC-50 as pH buffers for nutrient solution studies.

    PubMed

    Bugbee, B G; Salisbury, F B

    1985-01-01

    All buffering agents used to stabilize pH in hydroponic research have disadvantages. Inorganic buffers are absorbed and may become phytotoxic. Solid carbonate salts temporarily mitigate decreasing pH but provide almost no protection against increasing pH, and they alter nutrient absorption. Exchange resins are more effective, but we find that they remove magnesium and manganese from solution. We have tested 2(N-Morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) as a buffering agent at concentrations of 1 and 10 mol m-3 (1 and 10 mM) with beans, corn, lettuce, tomatoes, and wheat. MES appears to be biologically inert and does not interact significantly with other solution ions. Relative growth rates among controls and MES treatments were nearly identical for each species during the trial period. The pH was stabilized by 1 mol m-3 MES. This buffer warrants further consideration in nutrient research. PMID:11539688

  4. Modelling study on buffering pH and retaining U using a simplified uranium mill tailings pile example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Diederik; Simunek, Jirka

    2014-05-01

    The hypothetical problem that is presented here considers the release and migration of uranium from a simplified uranium mill tailings pile towards a river. The modeling exercise with the coupled reactive transport model HP2 illustrates the effect of the geochemical conceptual model for sorption on (i) the buffering of the pH in the soil/aquifer system and (ii) the retention of U in the soil. The HP2 module, which couples the PHREEQC geochemical code with HYDRUS (2D/3D), is a two-dimensional equivalent of the one-dimensional HP1 program that was first released in 2005 (Jacques et al., 2008), and used successfully in many applications. Sorption of U is described using a multi-site cation exchange model (see Jacques et al., 2008). This sorption model also buffers the acid pH due to proton exchange. Two scenarios are considered: a soil with a relatively low (8.1 × 10-3 mol/kg) and relatively high (8.1 × 10-2 mol/kg) sorption capacity. In the third scenario, specific sorption of U and other cations and anions on Fe-oxides is described using a non-electrostatic surface complexation model with a very low capacity (8.1 × 10-4 mol/kg), in addition to low exchange complexation. Proton exchange on the cation exchanger buffers the acidity by replacing calcium with protons on the exchanger; the spatial extent of the pH-perturbed region is smaller in the scenario with the higher exchange capacity. Specific sorption has only a small effect on the pH-perturbed zone, although it is important to note that its capacity is one order of magnitude lower than in the scenario with the low sorption capacity. U reaches the river system within 1000 d in scenarios with low and high exchange capacities. Only in the scenario with specific sorption, U migration within the ground water system is retarded, compared to the other two cases. The results of the three scenarios do not seem to be intuitive, especially the equally fast movement of U in the scenario with a high exchange capacity

  5. Differential effects of buffer pH on Ca2+-induced ROS emission with inhibited mitochondrial complexes I and III

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Daniel P.; Camara, Amadou K. S.; Stowe, David F.; Lubbe, Ryan; Aldakkak, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Excessive mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) emission is a critical component in the etiology of ischemic injury. Complex I and complex III of the electron transport chain are considered the primary sources of ROS emission during cardiac ischemia and reperfusion (IR) injury. Several factors modulate ischemic ROS emission, such as an increase in extra-matrix Ca2+, a decrease in extra-matrix pH, and a change in substrate utilization. Here we examined the combined effects of these factors on ROS emission from respiratory complexes I and III under conditions of simulated IR injury. Guinea pig heart mitochondria were suspended in experimental buffer at a given pH and incubated with or without CaCl2. Mitochondria were then treated with either pyruvate, a complex I substrate, followed by rotenone, a complex I inhibitor, or succinate, a complex II substrate, followed by antimycin A, a complex III inhibitor. H2O2 release rate and matrix volume were compared with and without adding CaCl2 and at pH 7.15, 6.9, or 6.5 with pyruvate + rotenone or succinate + antimycin A to simulate conditions that may occur during in vivo cardiac IR injury. We found a large increase in H2O2 release with high [CaCl2] and pyruvate + rotenone at pH 6.9, but not at pHs 7.15 or 6.5. Large increases in H2O2 release rate also occurred at each pH with high [CaCl2] and succinate + antimycin A, with the highest levels observed at pH 7.15. The increases in H2O2 release were associated with significant mitochondrial swelling, and both H2O2 release and swelling were abolished by cyclosporine A, a desensitizer of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). These results indicate that ROS production by complex I and by complex III is differently affected by buffer pH and Ca2+ loading with mPTP opening. The study suggests that changes in the levels of cytosolic Ca2+ and pH during IR alter the relative amounts of ROS produced at mitochondrial respiratory complex I and complex III. PMID

  6. Analysis of pH and buffer effects on flucytosine activity in broth dilution susceptibility testing of Candida albicans in two synthetic media.

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, D L; Galgiani, J N

    1984-01-01

    We examined the influences of different pH levels and three different buffers on flucytosine activity against 12 isolates of Candida albicans in two synthetic media, yeast nitrogen base (YNB) and synthetic amino acid medium-fungal (SAAMF), using broth dilution techniques and measuring the endpoints of visual MICs and turbidimetric 50% inhibitory concentrations. The two media were originally prepared as follows: YNB, unbuffered, pH 5.6; SAAMF, buffered with morpholinepropanesulfonic acid-Tris, pH 7.4; the resultant geometric mean MIC and 50% inhibitory concentration of 5-FC were 78- and 32-fold higher, respectively, in SAAMF. Raising the pH of YNB or lowering the pH of SAAMF had virtually no effect on these differences in MIC and 50% inhibitory concentration in the two media. In contrast, virtually all of the discrepancy appeared to be due to morpholinepropanesulfonic acid-Tris, which exerted concentration-dependent inhibition of flucytosine activity not evident when N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-ethanesulfonic acid or phosphate buffer systems were substituted. In other turbidimetric studies, growth was slowed more than 50% in YNB as the pH was raised to 7.4, regardless of which buffer was used. Based on our studies, we recommend modifying the composition of SAAMF by substituting a nonantagonistic buffer if any buffer is to be used with SAAMF in the testing of flucytosine. With this modification, SAAMF warrants further study as a generally applicable medium for fungal-susceptibility testing. PMID:6391370

  7. Contrasting pH buffering patterns in neutral-alkaline soils along a 3600 km transect in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, W.; Nelson, P. N.; Li, M.-H.; Cai, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Shan, Y.; Wang, R.; Han, X.; Jiang, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Soil pH buffering capacity (pHBC) plays a crucial role in predicting acidification rates, yet its large-scale patterns and controls are poorly understood, especially for neutral-alkaline soils. Here, we evaluated the spatial patterns and drivers of pHBC along a 3600 km long transect (1900 km sub-transect with carbonate containing soils and 1700 km sub-transect with non-carbonate containing soils) across northern China. Soil pHBC was greater in the carbonate containing soils than in the non-carbonate containing soils. Acid addition decreased soil pH in the non-carbonate containing soils more markedly than in the carbonate containing soils. Within the carbonate soil sub-transect, soil pHBC was positively correlated with cation exchange capacity (CEC), carbonate content and exchangeable sodium (Na) concentration, but negatively correlated with initial pH and clay content, and not correlated with soil organic carbon (SOC) content. Within the non-carbonate sub-transect, soil pHBC was positively related to initial pH, clay content, CEC and exchangeable Na concentration, but not related to SOC content. Carbonate content was the primary determinant of pHBC in the carbonate containing soils and CEC was the main determinant of buffering capacity in the non-carbonate containing soils. Soil pHBC was positively related to aridity index and carbonate content across the carbonate containing soil sub-transect. Our results indicated that mechanisms controlling pHBC differ among neutral-alkaline soils of northern China, especially between carbonate and non-carbonate containing soils, leading to different rates, risks, and impacts of acidification. This understanding should be incorporated into the acidification risk assessment and landscape management in a changing world.

  8. Contrasting pH buffering patterns in neutral-alkaline soils along a 3600 km transect in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, W. T.; Nelson, P. N.; Li, M.-H.; Cai, J. P.; Zhang, Y. Y.; Zhang, Y. G.; Yang, S.; Wang, R. Z.; Wang, Z. W.; Wu, Y. N.; Han, X. G.; Jiang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Soil pH buffering capacity (pHBC) plays a crucial role in predicting acidification rates, yet its large-scale patterns and controls are poorly understood, especially for neutral-alkaline soils. Here, we evaluated the spatial patterns and drivers of pHBC along a 3600 km long transect (1900 km sub-transect with carbonate-containing soils and 1700 km sub-transect with non-carbonate-containing soils) across northern China. Soil pHBC was greater in the carbonate-containing soils than in the non-carbonate-containing soils. Acid addition decreased soil pH in the non-carbonate-containing soils more markedly than in the carbonate-containing soils. Within the carbonate soil sub-transect, soil pHBC was positively correlated with cation exchange capacity (CEC), carbonate content and exchangeable sodium (Na) concentration, but negatively correlated with initial pH and clay content, and not correlated with soil organic carbon (SOC) content. Within the non-carbonate sub-transect, soil pHBC was positively related to initial pH, clay content, CEC and exchangeable Na concentration, but not related to SOC content. Carbonate content was the primary determinant of pHBC in the carbonate-containing soils and CEC was the main determinant of buffering capacity in the non-carbonate-containing soils. Along the transect, soil pHBC was different in regions with different aridity index. Soil pHBC was positively related to aridity index and carbonate content across the carbonate-containing soil sub-transect. Our results indicated that mechanisms controlling pHBC differ among neutral-alkaline soils of northern China, especially between carbonate- and non-carbonate-containing soils. This understanding should be incorporated into the acidification risk assessment and landscape management in a changing world.

  9. The effect of carbon dioxide on the intracellular pH and buffering power of snail neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, R C

    1976-01-01

    1. Intracellular pH (pHi) was measured using pH-sensitive glass micro-electrodes. The effects on pHi of CO2 applied externally and HCO3-, H+ and NH4+ injected iontophoretically, were investigated. 2. The transport numbers for iontophoretic injection into aqueous micro-droples were found by potentiometric titration to be 0-3 for HCO3- and 0-94 for H+. 3. Exposure to Ringer, pH 7-5, equilibrated with 2-2% CO2 caused a rapid, but only transient, fall in pHi. Within 1 or 2 min pHi began to return exponentially to normal, with a time constant of about 5 min. 4. When external CO2 was removed, pHi rapidly increased, and then slowly returned to normal. The pHi changes with CO2 application or removal gave a calculated intracellular buffer value of about 30 m-equiv H+/pH unit per litre. 5. Injection of HCO3- caused a rise in pHi very similar to that seen on removal of external CO2. 6. The pHi responses to CO2 application, CO2 removal and HCO3- injection were slowed by the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide. 7. H+ injection caused a transient fall in pHi. In CO2 Ringer pHi fell less and recovered faster than in CO2-free Ringer. Calculation of the internal buffer value from the pHi responses to H+ and HCO3- injection gave very similar values. 8. The internal buffer value (measured by H+ injection) was greatly increased by exposure to CO2 Ringer. Acetazolamide reduced this effect of CO2, suggesting that the function of intracellular carbonic anhydrase may be to maximize the internal buffering power in CO2. 9. It was concluded that the internal HCO3- was determined primarily by the CO2 level and pHi, that internal HCO3- made a large contribution to the buffering power, and that after internal acidfication pHi was restored to normal by active transport of H+, OH- or HCO3- across the cell membrane. The active transport was much faster in CO2 than in CO2-free Ringer. PMID:4614

  10. Declines in Soil pH due to Anthropogenic Nitrogen Inputs Alter Buffering and Exchange Reactions in Tropical Forest Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, K. A.

    2003-12-01

    Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) inputs may alter tropical soil buffering and exchange reactions that have important implications for nutrient cycling, forest productivity, and downstream ecosystems. In contrast to relatively young temperate soils that are typically buffered from N inputs by base cation reactions, aluminum reactions may serve to buffer highly weathered tropical soils and result in immediate increases in aluminum mobility and toxicity. Increased nitrate losses due to chronic N inputs may also deplete residual base cations in already weathered base cation-poor soils, further acidify soils, and thereby reduce nitrate mobility through pH-dependent anion exchange reactions. To test these hypotheses, I determined soil pH and cation and anion exchange capacity (CEC and AEC) and measured base cation and aluminum soil solution losses following first-time and long-term experimental N additions from two Hawaiian tropical forest soils, a 300 year old Andisol and a 4.1 million year old Oxisol. I found that elevated base cation losses accompanied increased nitrate losses after first time N additions to the young Andisol whereas immediate and large aluminum losses were associated with increased nitrate losses from the Oxisol. In the long-term, base cation and aluminum losses increased in proportion to nitrate losses. Long-term N additions at both sites resulted in significant declines in soil pH, decreased CEC and increased AEC. These results suggest that even chronic N inputs resulting in small but elevated nitrate losses may deplete residual base cations, increase mobility and toxicity of aluminum, and potentially lead to declines in forest productivity and acidification of downstream ecosystems. These findings also suggest that AEC may provide a long-term mechanism to delay nitrate losses in tropical forests with significant variable charge that are experiencing chronic anthropogenic N inputs.

  11. Comparison of Salivary pH, Buffering Capacity and Alkaline Phosphatase in Smokers and Healthy Non-Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi-Motamayel, Fatemeh; Falsafi, Parisa; Goodarzi, Mohammad T.; Poorolajal, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Saliva contains alkaline phosphatase (ALP)—a key intracellular enzyme related to destructive processes and cellular damage—and has buffering capacity (BC) against acids due to the presence of bicarbonate and phosphate ions. Smoking may have deleterious effects on the oral environment due to pH changes which can affect ALP activity. This study aimed to evaluate the salivary pH, BC and ALP activity of male smokers and healthy non-smokers. Methods: This retrospective cohort study took place between August 2012 and December 2013. A total of 251 healthy male non-smokers and 259 male smokers from Hamadan, Iran, were selected. Unstimulated whole saliva was collected from each participant and pH and BC were determined using a pH meter. Salivary enzymes were measured by spectrophotometric assay. Results: Mean salivary pH (7.42 ± 0.48 and 7.52 ± 0.43, respectively; P = 0.018) and BC (3.41 ± 0.54 and 4.17 ± 0.71; P = 0.001) was significantly lower in smokers compared to non-smokers. Mean ALP levels were 49.58 ± 23.33 IU/L among smokers and 55.11 ± 27.85 IU/L among non-smokers (P = 0.015). Conclusion: Significantly lower pH, BC and ALP levels were observed among smokers in comparison to a healthy control group. These salivary alterations could potentially be utilised as biochemical markers for the evaluation of oral tissue function and side-effects among smokers. Further longitudinal studies are recommended to evaluate the effects of smoking on salivary components. PMID:27606111

  12. The Effects of pH on the Growth and Aspect Ratio of Chicken Egg White Lysozyme Crystals Prepared in Different Buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, U. J.; Horrell, E. E.; Kou, Y.; Pusey, Marc

    2000-01-01

    We have measured the nucleation and aspect ratio of CEWL crystals grown by vapor diffusion in acetate, butyrate, carbonate, succinate, and phosphate buffers in a range of pH spanning the pK(sub a) of these buffers. The nucleation numbers drop off significantly in the vicinity of pK(sub a) for each of the buffers except the phosphate system, in which we used only the pH range around the second titration point(pK2). There is a concomitant increase in the sizes of the crystals. Some typical nucleation number results are shown. These data support and extend other observations. In addition, we have examined changes in aspect ratio which accompany the suppression of nucleation within each buffer system. The length of the face in the [001] direction was measured, and compared to the width of the (110) face in the [110] type directions. We find that while the aspect ratio of the crystals is affected by pH, it is dominated by a correlation with the size of the crystals. Small crystals are longer in the [0011 direction than crystals that are larger (higher pH within a buffer system). This relationship is found to hold independent of the choice of buffer. These results are consistent with those of Judge et al, who used a batch process which resulted in uniform sizing of crystals at each pH. In these experiments, we specifically avoid agitating the protein/salt buffer mixture when combining the two. This permits the formation of a range of sizes at a given pH. The results for a .05 M acetate 5% NaCl buffer are also shown. We will discuss these results in light of a growth model.

  13. Comparison of the effect of different pH buffering techniques on the toxicity of copper and zinc to Daphnia magna and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata.

    PubMed

    De Schamphelaere, K A C; Heijerick, D G; Janssen, C R

    2004-10-01

    During the time-course of ecotoxicity tests with algae and chronic (reproductive) toxicity tests with daphnids, in which algae are present as a food source, pH can dramatically increase due to photosynthetic activity. As pH changes can significantly affect metal speciation and thus its bioavailability, it may be necessary to buffer the pH of the exposure medium. One class of buffers (Good's N-subtituted aminosulfonic acids) are increasingly being used in biological and chemical applications, including ecotoxicity testing. However, the potential effect of these buffers on metal toxicity has, so far, scarcely been examined. In this study we investigated if MOPS (3-N morpholino propane sulfonic acid) affected the toxicity of copper and zinc to two standard test organisms: the cladoceran Daphnia magna and the green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. First, we demonstrate that up to a concentration of 750 mg l(-1) (which proved to be sufficient for pH buffering) MOPS did not affect 21-day net reproduction of D. magna or the 72-h population growth of P. subcapitata. Second, we conducted bioassays in copper and zinc spiked standard media for the pH range 6-8. For D. magna the possible effect of 750 mg l(-1) MOPS on acute copper and zinc toxicity was investigated by performing parallel 48-h toxicity tests in NaHCO3 and MOPS buffered test media. Seventy-two hour growth inhibition assays with P. subcapitata were performed in parallel in MOPS and NaHCO3 buffered test media and in test media with daily manual pH adjustment with HCl. For daphnids no significant differences in copper and zinc toxicity were observed between MOPS or NaHCO3 buffered test media. For algae no significant differences in metal toxicity were observed between MOPS and HCl buffered media, but in test media buffered with NaHCO3 an increased copper and zinc toxicity was observed as a consequence of pH increases during the test. Clearly, the results of this study demonstrate the importance of pH buffering

  14. Positively charged and pH self-buffering quantum dots for efficient cellular uptake by charge mediation and monitoring cell membrane permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Suhua; Song, Haipeng; Ong, Wei Yi; Han, Ming Yong; Huang, Dejian

    2009-10-01

    Positively charged and pH self-buffering quantum dots (Tren-QDs) were achieved by surface functionalization with tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (Tren) derivatives, which are attached to the inorganic cores of QDs through bidentate chelating of dithiocarbamates. The Tren-QDs exhibit pH buffering capability by absorbing or releasing protons due to the surface polyamine groups as the surrounding pH fluctuates. Such self-buffering capability stabilizes the photoluminescence of the Tren-QDs against acid. The Tren-QDs bear positive charges through protonation of the surface polyamine groups under physiological conditions and the surface positive charges improve their cellular uptake efficiency by charge mediation, which has been demonstrated by BV-2 microglia cells. The photoluminescence of Tren-QDs shows a selective Stern-Volmer response to copper ions and this property has been preliminarily evaluated for investigating the BV-2 cell membrane structure by monitoring the photoluminescence of intracellular Tren-QDs.

  15. An Efficient Protocol for the Oxidative Hydrolysis of Ketone SAMP Hydrazones Employing SeO(2) and H(2)O(2) under Buffered (pH 7) Conditions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Amos B; Liu, Zhuqing; Simov, Vladimir

    2009-06-01

    An effective oxidative protocol for the liberation of ketones from SAMP hydrazones employing peroxyselenous acid under aqueous buffered conditions (pH 7) has been developed. The procedure proceeds without epimerization of adjacent stereocenters or dehydration, respectively, in representative SAMP alkylation and aldol reaction adducts. PMID:20657727

  16. Salivary Parameters (Salivary Flow, pH and Buffering Capacity) in Stimulated Saliva of Mexican Elders 60 Years Old and Older

    PubMed Central

    Islas-Granillo, H; Borges-Yañez, SA; Medina-Solís, CE; Galan-Vidal, CA; Navarrete-Hernández, JJ; Escoffié-Ramirez, M; Maupomé, G

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To compare a limited array of chewing-stimulated saliva features (salivary flow, pH and buffer capacity) in a sample of elderly Mexicans with clinical, sociodemographic and socio-economic variables. Subjects and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 139 adults, 60 years old and older, from two retirement homes and a senior day care centre in the city of Pachuca, Mexico. Socio-demographic, socio-economic and behavioural variables were collected through a questionnaire. A trained and standardized examiner obtained the oral clinical variables. Chewing-stimulated saliva (paraffin method) was collected and the salivary flow rate, pH and buffer capacity were measured. The analysis was performed using non-parametric tests in Stata 9.0. Results: Mean age was 79.1 ± 9.8 years. Most of the subjects included were women (69.1%). Mean chewing-stimulated salivary flow was 0.75 ± 0.80 mL/minute, and the pH and buffer capacity were 7.88 ± 0.83 and 4.20 ± 1.24, respectively. Mean chewing-stimulated salivary flow varied (p < 0.05) across type of retirement home, tooth brushing frequency, number of missing teeth and use of dental prostheses. pH varied across the type of retirement home (p < 0.05) and marginally by age (p = 0.087); buffer capacity (p < 0.05) varied across type of retirement home, tobacco consumption and the number of missing teeth. Conclusions: These exploratory data add to the body of knowledge with regard to chewing-stimulated salivary features (salivary flow rate, pH and buffer capacity) and outline the variability of those features across selected sociodemographic, socio-economic and behavioural variables in a group of Mexican elders. PMID:25867562

  17. Identification and quantification of redox and pH buffering processes in a heterogeneous, low carbonate aquifer during managed aquifer recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibert, Simone; Atteia, Olivier; Ursula Salmon, S.; Siade, Adam; Douglas, Grant; Prommer, Henning

    2016-05-01

    Managed aquifer recharge of aerobic water into deep aquifers often induces the oxidation of pyrite, which can lead to groundwater acidification and metal mobilization. As circumneutral pH is often maintained by the dissolution of sedimentary calcite or high injectant alkalinity little attention is generally paid to potential alternative pH buffering processes. In contrast, this study analyzed water quality evolution from a 2 year long groundwater replenishment trial in an anaerobic, mostly carbonate free aquifer. While injection of aerobic, very low salinity water triggered pyrite oxidation, the comprehensive field data showed that in many aquifer zones pH was buffered without substantial release of inorganic carbon. A numerical analysis was performed to test and evaluate different conceptual models and suggested that either proton buffering or the dissolution of aluminosilicates, or a combination thereof, can explain the observed, rapid buffering at locations where carbonates were absent. In contrast to many previous managed aquifer recharge [MAR) studies, the oxidation of sedimentary pyrite by nitrate was found to be of minor importance or negligible. The study also highlights that the depositional history of the aquifer, and the associated differences in mineralogy and geochemistry, need to be considered when estimating groundwater quality evolution during the injection of various water types for aquifer replenishment or other management purposes.

  18. Control of groundwater pH during bioremediation: Improvement and validation of a geochemical model to assess the buffering potential of ground silicate minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, Elsa; Brovelli, Alessandro; Holliger, Christof; Barry, D. A.

    2014-05-01

    Accurate control of groundwater pH is of critical importance for in situ biological treatment of chlorinated solvents. The use of ground silicate minerals mixed with groundwater is an appealing buffering strategy as silicate minerals may act as long-term sources of alkalinity. In a previous study, we developed a geochemical model for evaluation of the pH buffering capacity of such minerals. The model included the main microbial processes driving groundwater acidification as well as mineral dissolution. In the present study, abiotic mineral dissolution experiments were conducted with five silicate minerals (andradite, diopside, fayalite, forsterite, nepheline). The goal of the study was to validate the model and to test the buffering capacity of the candidate minerals identified previously. These five minerals increased the pH from acidic to neutral and slightly basic values. The model was revised and improved to represent better the experimental observations. In particular, the experiments revealed the importance of secondary mineral precipitation on the buffering potential of silicates, a process not included in the original formulation. The main secondary phases likely to precipitate were identified through model calibration, as well as the degree of saturation at which they formed. The predictions of the revised geochemical model were in good agreement with the observations, with a correlation coefficient higher than 0.9 in most cases. This study confirmed the potential of silicates to act as pH control agents and showed the reliability of the geochemical model, which can be used as a design tool for field applications.

  19. Effects of rehydration and food consumption on salivary flow, pH and buffering capacity in young adult volunteers during ergometer exercise

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the influences of rehydration and food consumption on salivary flow, pH, and buffering capacity during bicycle ergometer exercise in participants. Methods Ten healthy volunteers exercised on a bicycle ergometer at 80% of their maximal heart rate. These sessions lasted for two periods of 20 min separated by 5-min rest intervals. Volunteers were subjected to one of the following conditions: (1) no water (mineral water) or food consumption, (2) only water for rehydration, (3) water and food consumption, (4) a sports drink only for rehydration, and (5) rehydration with a sports drink and food. Statistical significance was assessed using one-way analysis of variance and Dunnett’s test (p < 0.05). Results The salivary pH decreased significantly during and after exercise in conditions 4 and 5. The salivary buffering capacity decreased significantly during exercise and/or after the exercise in conditions 1, 3, 4, and 5. Conclusions The results showed that salivary pH and buffering capacity decreased greatly depending on the combination of a sports drink and food. PMID:24160307

  20. KEY COMPARISON: Final report for CCQM-K17: pH determination on a phthalate buffer by Harned cell measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitzer, Petra; Hongyu, Xiu; Dazhou, Chen; Famnin, Men; Bjame Kristensen, Hans; Hjelmer, Bettina; Nakamura, Susumu; Hwang, Euijin; Lee, Hwashim; Castro, Esther; Monroy Mendoza, Marcela; Kozlowski, Wladyslaw; Wyszynska, Joanna; Mateuszuk, A.; Pawlina, Monika; Karpov, Oleg V.; Zdorikov, Nicolaj; Seyku, Elena; Maximov, Igor; Vyskocil, Leos; Máriássy, Michal; Pratt, Kenneth W.; Vospelova, Alena; Giera, Janine; Eberhard, Ralf

    2003-01-01

    The second key comparison for the quantity pH, CCQM-K17, was carried out to assess the degree of equivalence of the national primary measurement procedures used to determine the pH of primary standard buffer solutions. The CCQM-K17 comparison allows estimations of the capability of ten national metrology institutes (NMIs) to determine the pH of a phthalate buffer of unknown concentration at different temperatures. The key comparison was co-ordinated by the CCQM Working Group on Electrochemical Analysis and piloted by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) with assistance from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Slovak Institute of Metrology (SMU). The measurement results of the NMIs agreed not at the same level as for the first key comparison on pH CCQM-K9. The results obtained by seven of the eleven participants agree very well within the uncertainty stated by the participants. Four participants obtained results somewhat lower. The two groups of results are most obviously evident at a measurement temperature of 37 °C. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  1. Studies of a weak polyampholyte at the air-buffer interface: The effect of varying pH and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicuta, Pietro; Hopkinson, Ian

    2001-05-01

    We have carried out experiments to probe the static and dynamic interfacial properties of β-casein monolayers spread at the air-buffer interface, and analyzed these results in the context of models of weak polyampholytes. Measurements have been made systematically over a wide range of ionic strength and pH. In the semidilute regime of surface concentration a scaling exponent, which can be linked to the degree of chain swelling, is found. This shows that at pH close to the isoelectric point, the protein is compact. At pH away from the isoelectric pH the protein is extended. The transition between compact and extended states is continuous. As a function of increasing ionic strength, we observe swelling of the protein at the isoelectric pH but contraction of the protein at pH values away from it. These behaviors are typical of a those predicted theoretically for a weak polyampholyte. Dilational moduli measurements, made as a function of surface concentration exhibit maxima that are linked to the collapse of hydrophilic regions of the protein into the subphase. Based on this data we present a configuration map of the protein configuration in the monolayer. These findings are supported by strain (surface pressure) relaxation measurements and surface quasielastic light scattering measurements which suggest the existence of loops and tails in the subphase at higher surface concentrations.

  2. A Novel Mechanism of pH Buffering in C. elegans Glia: Bicarbonate Transport via the Voltage-Gated ClC Cl− Channel CLH-1

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Jeff; Matthewman, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    An important function of glia is the maintenance of the ionic composition and pH of the synaptic microenvironment. In terms of pH regulation, HCO3− buffering has been shown to be important in both glia and neurons. Here, we used in vivo fluorescent pH imaging and RNA sequencing of the amphid sheath glia of Caenorhabditis elegans to reveal a novel mechanism of cellular HCO3− uptake. While the classical mechanism of HCO3− uptake involves Na+/HCO3− cotransporters, here we demonstrate that the C. elegans ClC Cl− channel CLH-1 is highly permeable to HCO3− and mediates HCO3− uptake into amphid sheath glia. CLH-1 has homology and electrophysiological properties similar to the mammalian ClC-2 Cl− channel. Our data suggest that, in addition to maintaining synaptic Cl− concentration, these channels may also be involved in maintenance of synaptic pH via HCO3− flux. These findings provide an exciting new facet of study regarding how pH is regulated in the brain. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Maintenance of pH is essential for the physiological function of the nervous system. HCO3− is crucial for pH regulation and is transported into the cell via ion transporters, including ion channels, the molecular identity of which remains unclear. In this manuscript, we describe our discovery that the C. elegans amphid sheath glia regulate intracellular pH via HCO3− flux through the voltage-gated ClC channel CLH-1. This represents a novel function for ClC channels, which has implications for their possible role in mammalian glial pH regulation. This discovery may also provide a novel therapeutic target for pathologic conditions, such as ischemic stroke where acidosis leads to widespread death of glia and subsequently neurons. PMID:26674864

  3. 3-D Surface Visualization of pH Titration "Topos": Equivalence Point Cliffs, Dilution Ramps, and Buffer Plateaus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Garon C.; Hossain, Md Mainul; MacCarthy, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    3-D topographic surfaces ("topos") can be generated to visualize how pH behaves during titration and dilution procedures. The surfaces are constructed by plotting computed pH values above a composition grid with volume of base added in one direction and overall system dilution on the other. What emerge are surface features that…

  4. Association of polymorphisms in the carbonic anhydrase 6 gene with salivary buffer capacity, dental plaque pH, and caries index in children aged 7-9 years.

    PubMed

    Peres, R C R; Camargo, G; Mofatto, L S; Cortellazzi, K L; Santos, M C L G; Nobre-dos-Santos, M; Santos, M N; Bergamaschi, C C; Line, S R P

    2010-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrase VI is a secreted enzyme that catalyzes the hydration of carbon hydroxide in saliva and other body fluids. This enzyme has been implicated in taste and gastrointestinal dysfunctions, tooth erosion, and caries. The purpose of this study was to analyze the allele and genotype distribution of three polymorphisms in the coding sequences of (CA6) gene and check for possible associations with salivary buffer capacity, number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth in deciduous and permanent teeth (dmft/DMFT, Decayed/Missing/Filled Teeth), plaque index (PI), and the plaque pH variation (DeltapH) in children aged 7-9 years. Two hundred and forty-five children from both genders, residents in area with fluoridated water (Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brazil) were divided into two groups: caries free and with caries. The clinical examinations were conducted by a single previously calibrated examiner (kappa=0.91) in an outdoor setting using a mirror and a probe, according to WHO criteria index (dmft/DMFT). Approximately 2 h after the first daily meal, the buffer capacity (BC) and the plaque pH were analyzed by means of a pH meter and an ion selective electrode. Plaque pH was measured immediately and 5 min after a mouth rinse with a 10% sucrose solution. The data were submitted to chi(2), Student's, and Mann-Whitney tests (alpha=0.05). The PI and DeltapH of the upper and lower teeth were significantly higher in the carious group than control (P<0.05). There was no difference between the groups in relation to BC. There was no association between the alleles and genotypes distributions for polymorphisms in the CA6 gene exons 2 and 3 and caries experience (P>0.05). There was a positive association between buffer capacity and the rs2274327 (C/T) polymorphism. The allele T and genotype TT were significantly less frequent in individuals with the highest buffer capacity (P=0.023 and 0.045, respectively). This finding encourages future studies relating CA6 gene polymorphisms

  5. Retention of ionisable compounds on high-performance liquid chromatography. XV. Estimation of the pH variation of aqueous buffers with the change of the acetonitrile fraction of the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Subirats, Xavier; Bosch, Elisabeth; Rosés, Martí

    2004-12-01

    The most commonly used mobile phases in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) are hydro-organic mixtures of an aqueous buffer and an organic modifier. The addition of this organic solvent to buffered aqueous solutions involves a variation of the buffer properties (pH and buffer capacity). In this paper, the pH variation is studied for acetic acid-acetate, phosphoric acid-dihydrogenphosphate-hydrogenphosphate, citric acid-dihydrogencitrate-citrate, and ammonium-ammonia buffers. The proposed equations allow pH estimation of acetonitrile-water buffered mobile phases up to 60% (v/v) of organic modifier and initial aqueous buffer concentrations between 0.001 and 0.1 mol L(-1), from the initial aqueous pH. The estimated pH variation of the mobile phase and the pKa variation of the analytes allow us to predict the degree of ionisation of the analytes and from this and analyte hydrophobicities, to interpret the relative retention and separation of analyte mixtures. PMID:15628122

  6. The adsorption/desorption of phosphorus in freshwater sediments from buffer zones: the effects of sediment concentration and pH.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Du, Yun; Du, Chao; Xu, Meng; Loáiciga, Hugo A

    2016-01-01

    Riparian buffer zones adjacent to reservoirs and lakes protect aquatic ecosystems from polluted surface runoff. Sediments, collected from the buffer zones of Danjiangkou Reservoir (SR) and Honghu Lake (SL) in an ecologically fragile region in central China, were evaluated to reveal their phosphorus-adsorbing/desorbing properties and storage capacities. A nonlinear regression method was used to fit the pseudo-second-order kinetic and the modified crossover-type Langmuir isotherm models to the experimental data. It is shown that the adsorption of phosphorus onto the studied sediments followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic expression. The modified crossover-type Langmuir isotherm model was found to be a suitable method for describing adsorption/desorption processes in the experimental sediments. The maximum adsorption capacities (Q m), partitioning coefficients (K p), native adsorbed exchangeable phosphorus (NAP), and equilibrium phosphorus concentration (EPC0) were subsequently obtained for the experimental sediments. The effects of sediment concentration and pH were also investigated by batch experiments and Fourier transformation infrared and scanning electron microscopy analyses. The adsorption/desorption characteristics of different phosphate species on the sediments from reservoir and lake buffer zones were identified. PMID:26638155

  7. Effect of coexisting Al(III) ions on Pb(II) sorption on biochars: Role of pH buffer and competition.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuxi; Zhang, Weihua; Qiu, Hao; Tsang, Daniel C W; Morel, Jean-Louis; Qiu, Rongliang

    2016-10-01

    Biochar is being widely considered as a promising amendment agent for immobilizing heavy metals in contaminated acidic soils, where plenty of soluble Al(III) ions exist. In view of uncertain significance of the effects of coexisting Al(III) on Pb(II) sorption by biochars, this study used kenaf core biochar (KB550; high carbon, low ash) and sewage sludge biochar (SB550; low carbon, high ash) pyrolyzed at 550 °C to elucidate the influence of coexisting Al(III) species and biochars' mineral components on Pb(II) immobilization conducted in aqueous solution with initial pHs of 3.0-4.5. Results showed that Al(III) reduced Pb(II) sorption on KB550 primarily via pH buffering against biochar alkalinity, thus inhibiting lead carbonate formation. In contrast, the reduction on SB550 mainly resulted from direct competition for sorption sites, especially on Fe-rich phengite 2M1 and metakaolinite. Because of Pb-P precipitation and Pb-K interlayer exchange, the residual Pb(II) adsorption capacity resistant to coexisting Al(III) was 3-5 times higher on SB550 than on KB550. The Pb-K interlayer exchange was enhanced by lower pH and coexisting Al(III), while Pb-P precipitation was the dominant Pb(II) sorption mechanism on SB550 resistant to Al(III) buffering and competition at higher pH. Application of these two biochars as amendments confirmed that the mineral-rich SB550 was more suitable for Pb(II) immobilization in acidic soils with high levels of extractable Al(III). PMID:27454898

  8. The effect of buffering dairy cow diets with limestone, calcareous marine algae, or sodium bicarbonate on ruminal pH profiles, production responses, and rumen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cruywagen, C W; Taylor, S; Beya, M M; Calitz, T

    2015-08-01

    Six ruminally cannulated Holstein cows were used to evaluate the effect of 2 dietary buffers on rumen pH, milk production, milk composition, and rumen fermentation parameters. A high concentrate total mixed ration [35.2% forage dry matter (DM)], formulated to be potentially acidotic, was used to construct 3 dietary treatments in which calcareous marine algae (calcified remains of the seaweed Lithothamnium calcareum) was compared with limestone (control) and sodium bicarbonate plus limestone. One basal diet was formulated and the treatment diets contained either 0.4% of dietary DM as Acid Buf, a calcified marine algae product (AB treatment), or 0.8% of dietary DM as sodium bicarbonate and 0.37% as limestone (BC treatment), or 0.35% of dietary DM as limestone [control (CON) treatment]. Cows were randomly allocated to treatments according to a double 3×3 Latin square design, with 3 treatments and 3 periods. The total experimental period was 66 d during which each cow received each treatment for a period of 15 d before the data collection period of 7 d. Rumen fluid was collected to determine volatile fatty acids, lactic acid, and ammonia concentrations. Rumen pH was monitored every 10min for 2 consecutive days using a portable data logging system fitted with in-dwelling electrodes. Milk samples were analyzed for solid and mineral contents. The effect of treatment on acidity was clearly visible, especially from the period from midday to midnight when rumen pH dropped below 5.5 for a longer period of time (13 h) in the CON treatment than in the BC (8.7 h) and AB (4 h) treatments. Daily milk, 4% fat-corrected milk, and energy-corrected milk yields differed among treatments, with AB being the highest, followed by BC and CON. Both buffers increased milk fat content. Treatment had no effect on milk protein content, but protein yield was increased in the AB treatment. Total rumen volatile fatty acids and acetate concentrations were higher and propionate was lower in the AB

  9. Effect of heavy metals on pH buffering capacity and solubility of Ca, Mg, K, and P in non-spiked and heavy metal-spiked soils.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Sarvenaz; Jalali, Mohsen

    2016-06-01

    In many parts of the world, soil acidification and heavy metal contamination has become a serious concern due to the adverse effects on chemical properties of soil and crop yield. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pH (in the range of 1 to 3 units above and below the native pH of soils) on calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), and phosphorus (P) solubility in non-spiked and heavy metal-spiked soil samples. Spiked samples were prepared by cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn) as chloride salts and incubating soils for 40 days. The pH buffering capacity (pHBC) of each sample was determined by plotting the amount of H(+) or OH(-) added (mmol kg(-1)) versus the related pH value. The pHBC of soils ranged from 47.1 to 1302.5 mmol kg(-1) for non-spiked samples and from 45.0 to 1187.4 mmol kg(-1) for spiked soil samples. The pHBC values were higher in soil 2 (non-spiked and spiked) which had higher calcium carbonate content. The results indicated the presence of heavy metals in soils generally decreased the solution pH and pHBC values in spiked samples. In general, solubility of Ca, Mg, and K decreased with increasing equilibrium pH of non-spiked and spiked soil samples. In the case of P, increasing the pH to about 7, decreased the solubility in all soils but further increase of pH from 7, enhanced P solubility. The solubility trends and values for Ca, Mg, and K did not differed significantly in non-spiked and spiked samples. But in the case of P, a reduction in solubility was observed in heavy metal-spiked soils. The information obtained in this study can be useful to make better estimation of the effects of soil pollutants on anion and cation solubility from agricultural and environmental viewpoints. PMID:27168329

  10. Single-strand conformation polymorphism for p53 mutation by a combination of neutral pH buffer and temperature gradient in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Gelfi, Cecilia; Vigano, Agnese; De Palma, Sara; Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Righetti, Sabin Carla; Corna, Elisabetta; Zunino, Franco

    2002-05-01

    A large number of point mutations in the p53 gene have been detected by capillary zone electrophoresis via single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. A much improved detection sensitivity was obtained via the following modifications in running conditions: use of low-viscosity 3% hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC), a neutral pH (pH 6.8) buffer, in which the standard Tris moiety was substituted with a 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES)/Tris mixture, use of SYBR Green II for improved fluorescent signal at the lower pH adopted; and, finally, the use of a temperature gradient in the 15-25 degrees C interval, for favoring the conformational transitions in the mutated samples. The typical temperature gradient activated had a slope of 2 degrees C/min and were induced externally. A total of 24 samples from affected patients, both in the homo- and heterozygous state, were analyzed. All the mutations could be detected by this improved protocol, raising the sensitivity from the standard ca. 80% of conventional SSCP to essentially 100% with the present methodology. All the mutations were confirmed by sequence analysis of the affected samples. PMID:12116163

  11. Inhibition of potato polyphenol oxidase by anions and activity in various carboxylate buffers (pH 4.8) at constant ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Malkin, B D; Thickman, K R; Markworth, C J; Wilcox, D E; Kull, F J

    2001-01-01

    The activity of potato polyphenol oxidase (tyrosinase) toward DL-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (K(M) 5.39 mM) was studied using a variety of carboxylate buffers at a common pH and ionic strength. Enzyme activity, greatest in citrate and least in oxalate, correlated with increasing carboxyl concentration and molecular mass. The lower activity in oxalate was attributed to more effective chelation of a copper(II) form of the enzyme by the oxalate dianion. Sodium halide salts inhibited the enzyme. Although there was little difference in inhibition between sodium and potassium salts, the degree and type of inhibition was anion dependent; K(is), values for NaCl and KCl, (competitive inhibitors) were 1.82 and 1.62 mM, whereas Na(2) SO(4) and K(2) SO(4) (mixed inhibitors) had K(is) and K(ii) values in the 250 to 450 mM range. PMID:11342282

  12. The hydrophilicity vs. ion interaction selectivity plot revisited: The effect of mobile phase pH and buffer concentration on hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography selectivity behavior.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Chad D; Gu, Xinyun; Lucy, Charles A

    2016-08-01

    This work systematically investigates the selectivity changes on many HILIC phases from w(w)pH 3.7-6.8, at 5 and 25mM buffer concentrations. Hydrophilicity (kcytosine/kuracil) vs. ion interaction (kBTMA/kuracil) selectivity plots developed by Ibrahim et al. (J. Chromatogr. A 1260 (2012) 126-131) are used to investigate the effect of mobile phase changes on the selectivity of 18 HILIC columns from various classes. "Selectivity change plots" focus on the change in hydrophilicity and ion interaction that the columns exhibit upon changing mobile phase conditions. In general, the selectivity behavior of most HILIC columns is dominated by silanol activity. Minimal changes in selectivity are observed upon changing pH between w(w)pH 5 and 6.8. However, a reduction in ionic interaction is observed when the buffer concentration is increased at w(w)pH≥5.0 due to ionic shielding. Reduction of the w(w)pH to<5.0 results in decreasing cation exchange activity due to silanol protonation. Under all eluent conditions, the majority of phases show little change in their hydrophilicity. PMID:27388658

  13. Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) Sodium Bicarbonate/Carbonate Buffer in an Open Aqueous Carbon Dioxide System and Corollary Electrochemical/Chemical Reactions Relative to System pH Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegman, Thomas W.; Wilson, Mark E.; Glasscock, Brad; Holt, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) experienced a number of chemical changes driven by system absorption of CO2 which altered the coolant’s pH. The natural effects of the decrease in pH from approximately 9.2 to less than 8.4 had immediate consequences on system corrosion rates and corrosion product interactions with specified coolant constituents. The alkalinity of the system was increased through the development and implementation of a carbonate/bicarbonate buffer that would increase coolant pH to 9.0 – 10.0 and maintain pH above 9.0 in the presence of ISS cabin concentrations of CO2 up to twenty times higher than ground concentrations. This paper defines how a carbonate/bicarbonate buffer works in an open carbon dioxide system and summarizes the analyses performed on the buffer for safe and effective application in the on-orbit system. The importance of the relationship between the cabin environment and the IATCS is demonstrated as the dominant factor in understanding the system chemistry and pH trends before and after addition of the carbonate/bicarbonate buffer. The paper also documents the corollary electrochemical and chemical reactions the system has experienced and the rationale for remediation of these effects with the addition of the carbonate/bicarbonate buffer.

  14. An unusual parotid gland in the tent-building bat, Uroderma bilobatum: possible correlation of interspecific ultrastructural differences with differences in salivary pH and buffering capacity.

    PubMed

    Nagato, T; Tandler, B; Phillips, C J

    1998-10-01

    cells in Uroderma bilobatum are discussed in the context of salivary pH and buffering capacity. Comparisons are made with four other bat species, including an insectivorous species with a salivary pH > 8.0 and a very high buffering capacity, an intermediate species, and a fruit bat with acidic-stimulated saliva and very low buffering capability. Such interspecific comparisons provide a foundation for hypothesizing that ultrastructural features of the acinar cell basolateral membranes and intercellular canaliculi correlate with differences involving Na/H+ exchangers and release of HCO3- and, thus, are associated with the species differences that are important to diet and nutrient acquisition. PMID:9776084

  15. Peak shapes of acids and bases under overloaded conditions in reversed-phase liquid chromatography, with weakly buffered mobile phases of various pH: A thermodynamic interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2009-01-01

    We measured overloaded band profiles for a series of nine compounds (phenol, caffeine, 3-phenyl 1-propanol, 2-phenylbutyric acid, amphetamine, aniline, benzylamine, p-toluidine, and procainamidium chloride) on columns packed with four different C{sub 18}-bonded packing materials: XTerra-C{sub 18}, Gemini-C{sub 18}, Luna-C{sub 18}(2), and Halo-C{sub 18}, using buffered methanol-water mobile phases. The {sub W}{sup S}pH of the mobile phase was increased from 2.6 to 11.3. The buffer concentration (either phosphate, acetate, or carbonate buffers) was set constant at values below the maximum concentration of the sample in the band. The influence of the surface chemistry of the packing material on the retention and the shape of the peaks was investigated. Adsorbents having a hybrid inorganic/organic structure tend to give peaks exhibiting moderate or little tailing. The retention and the shape of the band profiles can easily be interpreted at {sub W}{sup S}pHs that are well above or well below the {sub W}{sup S}pK{sub a} of the compound studied. In contrast, the peak shapes in the intermediary pH range (i.e., close to the compound {sub W}{sup S}pK{sub a}) have rarely been studied. These shapes reveal the complexity of the competitive adsorption behavior of couples of acido-basic conjugated compounds at {sub W}{sup S}pHs that are close to their {sub W}{sup S}pK{sub a}. They also reveal the role of the buffer capacity on the resulting peak shape. With increasing {sub W}{sup S}pH, the overloaded profiles are first langmuirian (isotherm type I) at low {sub W}{sup S}pHs, they become S-shaped (isotherm type II), then anti-langmuirian (isotherm type III), S-shaped again at intermediate {sub W}{sup S}pHs, and finally return to a langmuirian shape at high {sub W}{sup S}pHs. A new general adsorption isotherm model that takes into account the dissociation equilibrium of conjugated acidic and basic species in the bulk mobile phase accounts for these transient band shapes. An

  16. Buffer Therapy for Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Maria de Lourdes C; Silva, Ariosto S; Bailey, Kate M; Kumar, Nagi B; Sellers, Thomas A; Gatenby, Robert A; Ibrahim-Hashim, Arig; Gillies, Robert J

    2012-08-15

    Oral administration of pH buffers can reduce the development of spontaneous and experimental metastases in mice, and has been proposed in clinical trials. Effectiveness of buffer therapy is likely to be affected by diet, which could contribute or interfere with the therapeutic alkalinizing effect. Little data on food pH buffering capacity was available. This study evaluated the pH and buffering capacity of different foods to guide prospective trials and test the effect of the same buffer (lysine) at two different ionization states. Food groups were derived from the Harvard Food Frequency Questionnaire. Foods were blended and pH titrated with acid from initial pH values until 4.0 to determine "buffering score", in mmol H(+)/pH unit. A "buffering score" was derived as the mEq H(+) consumed per serving size to lower from initial to a pH 4.0, the postprandial pH of the distal duodenum. To differentiate buffering effect from any metabolic byproduct effects, we compared the effects of oral lysine buffers prepared at either pH 10.0 or 8.4, which contain 2 and 1 free base amines, respectively. The effect of these on experimental metastases formation in mice following tail vein injection of PC-3M prostate cancer cells were monitored with in vivo bioluminescence. Carbohydrates and dairy products' buffering score varied between 0.5 and 19. Fruits and vegetables showed a low to zero buffering score. The score of meats varied between 6 and 22. Wine and juices had negative scores. Among supplements, sodium bicarbonate and Tums(®) had the highest buffering capacities, with scores of 11 and 20 per serving size, respectively. The "de-buffered" lysine had a less pronounced effect of prevention of metastases compared to lysine at pH 10. This study has demonstrated the anti-cancer effects of buffer therapy and suggests foods that can contribute to or compete with this approach to manage cancer. PMID:24371544

  17. Buffer Therapy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Maria de Lourdes C; Silva, Ariosto S.; Bailey, Kate M.; Kumar, Nagi B.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Gatenby, Robert A.; Ibrahim-Hashim, Arig; Gillies, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Oral administration of pH buffers can reduce the development of spontaneous and experimental metastases in mice, and has been proposed in clinical trials. Effectiveness of buffer therapy is likely to be affected by diet, which could contribute or interfere with the therapeutic alkalinizing effect. Little data on food pH buffering capacity was available. This study evaluated the pH and buffering capacity of different foods to guide prospective trials and test the effect of the same buffer (lysine) at two different ionization states. Food groups were derived from the Harvard Food Frequency Questionnaire. Foods were blended and pH titrated with acid from initial pH values until 4.0 to determine “buffering score”, in mmol H+/pH unit. A “buffering score” was derived as the mEq H+ consumed per serving size to lower from initial to a pH 4.0, the postprandial pH of the distal duodenum. To differentiate buffering effect from any metabolic byproduct effects, we compared the effects of oral lysine buffers prepared at either pH 10.0 or 8.4, which contain 2 and 1 free base amines, respectively. The effect of these on experimental metastases formation in mice following tail vein injection of PC-3M prostate cancer cells were monitored with in vivo bioluminescence. Carbohydrates and dairy products’ buffering score varied between 0.5 and 19. Fruits and vegetables showed a low to zero buffering score. The score of meats varied between 6 and 22. Wine and juices had negative scores. Among supplements, sodium bicarbonate and Tums® had the highest buffering capacities, with scores of 11 and 20 per serving size, respectively. The “de-buffered” lysine had a less pronounced effect of prevention of metastases compared to lysine at pH 10. This study has demonstrated the anti-cancer effects of buffer therapy and suggests foods that can contribute to or compete with this approach to manage cancer. PMID:24371544

  18. Relative contribution of ruminal buffering systems to pH regulation in feedlot cattle fed either low- or high-forage diets.

    PubMed

    Chibisa, G E; Beauchemin, K A; Penner, G B

    2016-07-01

    The relative contribution of ruminal short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) absorption and salivary buffering to pH regulation could potentially change under different dietary conditions. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the effects of altering the ruminal supply of rapidly fermentable carbohydrate (CHO) on absorptive function and salivation in beef cattle. Eight heifers (mean BW±SD=410±14 kg) were randomly allocated to two treatments in a crossover design with 37-day periods. Dietary treatments were barley silage at 30% low forage (LF) or 70% high forage (HF) of dietary dry matter (DM), with the remainder of the diet consisting of barley grain (65% or 25% on a DM basis) and a constant level (5%) of supplement. The LF and HF diets contained 45.3% and 30.9% starch, and 4.1% and 14.0% physically effective fiber (DM basis), respectively. Ruminal pH was continuously measured from day 17 to day 23, whereas ruminal fluid was collected on day 23 to determine SCFA concentration. Ruminal liquid passage rate was determined on day 23 using Cr-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Eating or resting salivation was measured by collecting masticate (days 28 and 29) or saliva samples (days 30 and 31) at the cardia, respectively. On days 30 and 31, the temporarily isolated and washed reticulo-rumen technique was used to measure total, and Cl--competitive (an indirect measure of protein-mediated transport) absorption of acetate, propionate and butyrate. As a result of the higher dietary starch content and DM intake, the ruminal supply of rapidly fermentable CHO, total ruminal SCFA concentration (118 v. 95 mM; P<0.001) and osmolality (330 v. 306 mOsm/kg; P=0.018) were greater in cattle fed LF compared with HF. In addition, feeding LF resulted in a longer duration (2.50 v. 0.09 h/day; P=0.02) and a larger area (0.44 v. 0.01 (pH×h)/day; P=0.050) that pH was below 5.5. There was no diet effect on total and Cl--competitive absorption (mmol/h and %/h) of acetate, propionate

  19. Proton transfer dynamics at the membrane/water interface: dependence on the fixed and mobile pH buffers, on the size and form of membrane particles, and on the interfacial potential barrier.

    PubMed

    Cherepanov, Dmitry A; Junge, Wolfgang; Mulkidjanian, Armen Y

    2004-02-01

    Crossing the membrane/water interface is an indispensable step in the transmembrane proton transfer. Elsewhere we have shown that the low dielectric permittivity of the surface water gives rise to a potential barrier for ions, so that the surface pH can deviate from that in the bulk water at steady operation of proton pumps. Here we addressed the retardation in the pulsed proton transfer across the interface as observed when light-triggered membrane proton pumps ejected or captured protons. By solving the system of diffusion equations we analyzed how the proton relaxation depends on the concentration of mobile pH buffers, on the surface buffer capacity, on the form and size of membrane particles, and on the height of the potential barrier. The fit of experimental data on proton relaxation in chromatophore vesicles from phototropic bacteria and in bacteriorhodopsin-containing membranes yielded estimates for the interfacial potential barrier for H(+)/OH(-) ions of approximately 120 meV. We analyzed published data on the acceleration of proton equilibration by anionic pH buffers and found that the height of the interfacial barrier correlated with their electric charge ranging from 90 to 120 meV for the singly charged species to >360 meV for the tetra-charged pyranine. PMID:14747306

  20. Buffer capacity of biologics--from buffer salts to buffering by antibodies.

    PubMed

    Karow, Anne R; Bahrenburg, Sven; Garidel, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Controlling pH is essential for a variety of biopharmaceutical process steps. The chemical stability of biologics such as monoclonal antibodies is pH-dependent and slightly acidic conditions are favorable for stability in a number of cases. Since control of pH is widely provided by added buffer salts, the current study summarizes the buffer characteristics of acetate, citrate, histidine, succinate, and phosphate buffers. Experimentally derived values largely coincide with values calculated from a model that had been proposed in 1922 by van Slyke. As high concentrated protein formulations become more and more prevalent for biologics, the self-buffering potential of proteins becomes of relevance. The current study provides information on buffer characteristics for pH ranges down to 4.0 and up to 8.0 and shows that a monoclonal antibody at 50 mg/mL exhibits similar buffer capacity as 6 mM citrate or 14 mM histidine (pH 5.0-6.0). Buffer capacity of antibody solutions scales linearly with protein concentration up to more than 200 mg/mL. At a protein concentration of 220 mg/mL, the buffer capacity resembles the buffer capacity of 30 mM citrate or 50 mM histidine (pH 5.0-6.0). The buffer capacity of monoclonal antibodies is practically identical at the process relevant temperatures 5, 25, and 40°C. Changes in ionic strength of ΔI=0.15, in contrast, can alter the buffer capacity up to 35%. In conclusion, due to efficient self-buffering by antibodies in the pH range of favored chemical stability, conventional buffer excipients could be dispensable for pH stabilization of high concentrated protein solutions. PMID:23296746

  1. Dissolution reaction and surface iron speciation of UICC crocidolite in buffered solution at pH 7.4: A combined ICP-OES, XPS and TEM investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacella, Alessandro; Fantauzzi, Marzia; Turci, Francesco; Cremisini, Carlo; Montereali, Maria Rita; Nardi, Elisa; Atzei, Davide; Rossi, Antonella; Andreozzi, Giovanni B.

    2014-02-01

    The dissolution reaction and the surface modifications of crocidolite asbestos fibres incubated for 0.5, 1, 24, 48, 168 and 1440 h in a phosphate buffered solution at pH 7.4 with and without hydrogen peroxide were investigated. Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) was used to monitor the ion release into solution, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) was performed to unveil the chemistry of the leached surface, and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM) was carried out to monitor the structural modifications of the fibres. No significant differences were observed between dissolution experiments carried out with and without H2O2 with the exception of results after the first hour, from which it may be inferred that the dissolution proceeds faster in the presence of H2O2 but only in its very early steps. Congruent mobilization of Si and Mg from crocidolite was observed, increasing with time especially in the range between 1 and 48 h, while Ca decreased after 48 h and Fe was not detected at any incubation time. In the undersaturated conditions (0-48 h), dissolution rate of UICC crocidolite fibres has been estimated to be d(Si)/dt = 0.079 μmol h-1. The fibre surface modification is continuous with time: XPS results showed a regular depletion of Si and Mg and enrichment of Fe along dissolution. The Fe2p3/2 signal on the surface was fitted with four components at 709.0, 710.5, 711.6 and 712.8 eV binding energy values corresponding to: (i) Fe(II)-O and (ii) Fe(III)-O surrounded by oxygen atoms in the silicate structure, (iii) Fe(III)-OOH as a product of the dissolution process, and (iv) Fe in a phosphate precipitate (Fe-P), respectively. The evolution of Fe speciation on the crocidolite surface was followed by integrating the four photoemission peaks, and results showed that the oxidative environment promotes the formation of Fe(III)-O (up to 37% Fetot) and of Fe-P species (up to 16% Fetot), which are found on the fibre

  2. Free flow cell electrophoresis using zwitterionic buffer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodkey, R. Scott

    1990-01-01

    Studies of a zwitterionic buffer formulated for cell electrophoresis were done using the McDonnell-Douglas Continuous Flow Electrophoresis System. Standard buffers were analyzed for their stability in the electrical field and the results showed that both buffers tested were inherently unstable. Further, titration studies showed that the standards buffers buffered poorly at the pH employed for electrophoresis. The zwitterionic buffer buffered well at its nominal pH and was shown to be stable in the electrical field. Comparative studies of the buffer with standard cell separation buffers using formalin fixed rabbit and goose red blood cells showed that the zwitterionic buffer gave better resolution of the fixed cells. Studies with viable hybridoma cells showed that buffer Q supported cell viability equal to Hank's Balanced Salt Solution and that hybridoma cells in different stages of the growth cycle demonstrated reproducible differences in electrophoretic mobility.

  3. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is reduced to pyrroloquinoline quinol (PQQH2) by vitamin C, and PQQH2 produced is recycled to PQQ by air oxidation in buffer solution at pH 7.4.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Kazuo; Ouchi, Aya; Nagaoka, Shin-ichi; Nakano, Masahiko; Ikemoto, Kazuto

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the reaction of sodium salt of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQNa2) with vitamin C (Vit C) were performed in phosphate-buffered solution (pH 7.4) at 25 °C under nitrogen atmosphere, using UV-vis spectrophotometry. The absorption spectrum of PQQNa2 decreased in intensity due to the reaction with Vit C and was changed to that of pyrroloquinoline quinol (PQQH2, a reduced form of PQQ). One molecule of PQQ was reduced by two molecules of Vit C producing a molecule of PQQH2 in the buffer solution. PQQH2, thus produced, was recycled to PQQ due to air oxidation. PQQ and Vit C coexist in many biological systems, such as vegetables, fruits, as well as in human tissues. The results obtained suggest that PQQ is reduced by Vit C and functions as an antioxidant in biological systems, because it has been reported that PQQH2 shows very high free-radical scavenging and singlet-oxygen quenching activities in buffer solutions. PMID:26264520

  4. Evaluation of ampouled tonometered buffer solutions as a quality-control system for pH, pCO2, and pO2 measurement.

    PubMed

    Maas, A H; Veefkind, A H; Van den Camp, R A; Teunissen, A J; Winckers, E K; Jansen, A P

    1977-09-01

    In response to the need for an adequate quality-control system for blood-pH and blood-gas analyzers, we investigated the practical application of ampouled phosphate-bicarbonate-chloride solutions tonometered with mixtures of carbon dioxide, oxygen, and nitrogen. This system offers three discrete sets of pH, pCO2, AND PO2 values, which are consistent with normal and pathophysiologically high and low values. The stated values were based on the U.S. National Bureau of Standards scale for pH and on gas analysis for pCO2 and pO2. Influence of temperature, air contact, calibration gas, and storage was established. Internal and external quality control by means of these ampoules is presented. The system is stable, accurate, precise, and suitable for simultaneous quality control of pH, pCO2, and pO2 measurements. PMID:19168

  5. S-nitrosothiols regulate cell-surface pH buffering by airway epithelial cells during the human immune response to rhinovirus.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Silvia; Doherty, Joseph; Zaman, Khalequz; Gainov, Iain; Turner, Ronald; Vaughan, John; Hunt, John F; Márquez, Javier; Gaston, Benjamin

    2006-05-01

    Human rhinovirus infection is a common trigger for asthma exacerbations. Asthma exacerbations and rhinovirus infections are both associated with markedly decreased pH and ammonium levels in exhaled breath condensates. This observation is thought to be related, in part, to decreased activity of airway epithelial glutaminase. We studied whether direct rhinovirus infection and/or the host immune response to the infection decreased airway epithelial cell surface pH in vitro. Interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, but not direct rhinovirus infection, decreased pH, an effect partly associated with decreased ammonium concentrations. This effect was 1) prevented by nitric oxide synthase inhibition; 2) independent of cyclic GMP; 3) associated with an increase in endogenous airway epithelial cell S-nitrosothiol concentration; 4) mimicked by the exogenous S-nitrosothiol, S-nitroso-N-acetyl cysteine; and 5) independent of glutaminase expression and activity. We then confirmed that decreased epithelial pH inhibits human rhinovirus replication in airway epithelial cells. These data suggest that a nitric oxide synthase-dependent host response to viral infection mediated by S-nitrosothiols, rather than direct infection itself, plays a role in decreased airway surface pH during human rhinovirus infection. This host immune response may serve to protect the lower airways from direct infection in the normal host. In patients with asthma, however, this fall in pH could be associated with the increased mucus production, augmented inflammatory cell degranulation, bronchoconstriction, and cough characteristic of an asthma exacerbation. PMID:16603595

  6. Optimizing the culture environment in the IVF laboratory: impact of pH and buffer capacity on gamete and embryo quality.

    PubMed

    Swain, Jason E

    2010-07-01

    Supplying and maintaining appropriate culture conditions is critical to minimize stress imposed upon gametes and embryos and to optimize the in-vitro environment. One parameter that requires close scrutiny in this endeavour is pH. Though embryos have a limited ability to regulate their internal pH (pH(i)), oocytes lack robust mechanisms. Thus, careful attention to external pH (pH(e)) of culture media is imperative in IVF. Ability to withstand deviations in hydrogen ion concentration varies depending on culture conditions, as well as laboratory procedures. Cryopreserved--thaw--thawed embryos, as well as denuded oocytes, are especially susceptible to perturbations in pH(e). Therefore, proper setting, monitoring and stabilizing of pH(e) during IVF laboratory procedures is a crucial component of a rigorous quality control programme. Here, importance of both pH(i) and pH(e) in respect to gamete and embryo quality are discussed. Furthermore, factors influencing selection of pH(e), as well as emerging methods to stabilize pH(e) in the IVF laboratory are detailed. PMID:20570214

  7. TOF-SIMS Analysis of Sea Salt Particles: Imaging and Depth Profiling in the Discovery of an Unrecognized Mechanism for pH Buffering

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, Dan J.; Laskin, Alexander; Wang, Weihong; Hunt, Sherri W.; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2004-06-15

    As part of a broader effort at understanding the chemistry of sea salt particles, we have performed time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS) analysis of individual sea salt particles deposited on a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grid. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and TOF-SIMS analysis have, in conjunction with OH exposure studies, led to the discovery of an unrecognized buffering mechanism in the uptake and oxidation of SO2 in sea salt particles in the marine boundary layer. This chemistry may resolve several discrepancies in the atmospheric chemistry literature. Several challenges during the acquisition and interpretation of both imaging and depth profiling data on specific particles on the TEM grid identified by the ESEM were overcome. A description of the analysis challenges and the solutions ultimately developed to them is presented here, along with an account of how the TOF-SIMS data were incorporated into the overall research effort. Several issues unique to the analysis of high aspect ratio particles are addressed.[1

  8. TOF-SIMS Analysis of Sea Salt Particles: Imaging and Depth Profiling in the Discovery of an Unrecogized Mechanism for pH Buffering

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, Dan J.; Laskin, Alexander; Wang, Weihong; Hunt, Sherri W.; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2004-06-15

    As part of a broader effort at understanding the chemistry of sea salt particles, we have performed time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS) analysis of individual sea salt particles deposited on a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grid. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and TOF-SIMS analysis have, in conjunction with OH exposure studies, led to the discovery of an unrecognised buffering mechanism in the uptake and oxidation of SO2 in sea salt particles in the marine boundary layer. This chemistry may resolve several discrepancies in the atmospheric chemistry literature. Several challenges during the acquisition and interpretation of both imaging and depth profiling data on specific particles on the TEM grid identified by the ESEM were overcome. A description of the analysis challenges and the solutions ultimately developed to them is presented here, along with an account of how the TOF-SIMS data were incorporated into the overall research effort. Several issues unique to the analysis of high aspect ratio particles are addressed.[1

  9. Dietary Supplementation of Benzoic Acid and Essential Oil Compounds Affects Buffering Capacity of the Feeds, Performance of Turkey Poults and Their Antioxidant Status, pH in the Digestive Tract, Intestinal Microbiota and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Giannenas, I.; Papaneophytou, C. P.; Tsalie, E.; Pappas, I.; Triantafillou, E.; Tontis, D.; Kontopidis, G. A.

    2014-01-01

    Three trials were conducted to evaluate the effect of supplementation of a basal diet with benzoic acid or thymol or a mixture of essential oil blends (MEO) or a combination of benzoic acid with MEO (BMEO) on growth performance of turkey poults. Control groups were fed a basal diet. In trial 1, benzoic acid was supplied at levels of 300 and 1,000 mg/kg. In trial 2, thymol or the MEO were supplied at levels of 30 mg/kg. In trial 3, the combination of benzoic acid with MEO was evaluated. Benzoic acid, MEO and BMEO improved performance, increased lactic acid bacteria populations and decreased coliform bacteria in the caeca. Thymol, MEO and BMEO improved antioxidant status of turkeys. Benzoic acid and BMEO reduced the buffering capacity compared to control feed and the pH values of the caecal content. Benzoic acid and EOs may be suggested as an effective alternative to AGP in turkeys. PMID:25049947

  10. Understanding, Deriving, and Computing Buffer Capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbansky, Edward T.; Schock, Michael R.

    2000-12-01

    The concept of buffer capacity appears in varied disciplines, including bio-, geo-, analytical, and environmental chemistry, physiology, medicine, dentistry, and agriculture. Unfortunately, however, derivation and systematic calculation of buffer capacity is a topic that seems to be neglected in the undergraduate analytical chemistry curriculum. In this work, we give an account of the development of the buffer capacity concept and derive the buffer capacity contribution equations for buffer systems containing mono-, di-, and triprotic weak acids (and their conjugate bases) and aluminum(III), which undergoes hydrolysis. A brief review of pH is provided because pH is involved in applying buffer capacity to the real world. In addition, we discuss evaluation of the equations, numerical approximation of buffer capacity when an analytic solution is not derived, and the mathematical properties of the buffer capacity expressions.

  11. Buffer Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Kelly

    2000-01-01

    Presents a science experiment in which students test the buffering capacity of household products such as shampoo, hand lotion, fizzies candy, and cola. Lists the standards addressed in this experiment and gives an example of a student lab write-up. (YDS)

  12. Electrodialysis operation with buffer solution

    DOEpatents

    Hryn, John N.; Daniels, Edward J.; Krumdick, Greg K.

    2009-12-15

    A new method for improving the efficiency of electrodialysis (ED) cells and stacks, in particular those used in chemical synthesis. The process entails adding a buffer solution to the stack for subsequent depletion in the stack during electrolysis. The buffer solution is regenerated continuously after depletion. This buffer process serves to control the hydrogen ion or hydroxide ion concentration so as to protect the active sites of electrodialysis membranes. The process enables electrodialysis processing options for products that are sensitive to pH changes.

  13. Evidence of the chemical reaction of (18)O-labelled nitrite with CO2 in aqueous buffer of neutral pH and the formation of (18)OCO by isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsikas, Dimitrios; Böhmer, Anke; Gros, Gerolf; Endeward, Volker

    2016-05-01

    Inorganic nitrite (NO2(-), ON-O(-) ←→ (-)O-NO) is the autoxidation product of nitric oxide (NO). Nitrite can also be formed from inorganic nitrate (ONO2(-)), the major oxidation product of NO in erythrocytes, by the catalytic action of bacterial nitrate reductase in gut and oral microflora. Nitrite can be reduced to NO by certain cellular proteins and enzymes, as well as in the gastric juice under acidic conditions. Hemoglobin, xanthine oxidoreductase and carbonic anhydrase (CA) have been reported to convert nitrite to NO. Renal CA isoforms are involved in the reabsorption of nitrite and may, therefore, play an important role in NO homeostasis. Yet, the mechanisms underlying the action of CA on nitrite are incompletely understood. The nitrate/nitrite system is regarded as a reservoir of NO. We have recently shown that nitrite reacts chemically with carbon dioxide (CO2), the regular substrate of CA. The present communication reports a stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) study on the reaction of NO2(-) and CO2 performed in 50 mM HEPES buffer of pH 7.4 at 37 °C. By using (18)O-labelled nitrite ((18)ON-O(-)/(-18)O-NO) and CO2 we observed formation of (18)O-labelled CO2. This finding is an unequivocal evidence of the chemical reaction of (18)ON-O(-)/(-18)O-NO with CO2. The reaction is rapid and involves nucleophilic attack of the negatively charged nitrite via one of its oxygen atoms on the partially positively charged CO2 molecule to form the putative intermediate (18)ON-O-CO2(-)/(-)O2C-(18)O-NO. The by far largest fraction of this intermediate decomposes back to (18)ON-O(-)/(-18)O-NO and CO2. A very small fraction of the intermediate, however, rearranges and finally decomposes to form (18)OCO and nitrite. This reaction is slower in the presence of an isolated erythrocytic CA isoform II. In summary, NO2(-), CO2 and CA are ubiquitous. The chemical reaction of NO2(-) with CO2 and its modulation by CA isoforms may play important roles in the transport of

  14. Visualization of Buffer Capacity with 3-D "Topo" Surfaces: Buffer Ridges, Equivalence Point Canyons and Dilution Ramps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Garon C.; Hossain, Md Mainul

    2016-01-01

    BufCap TOPOS is free software that generates 3-D topographical surfaces ("topos") for acid-base equilibrium studies. It portrays pH and buffer capacity behavior during titration and dilution procedures. Topo surfaces are created by plotting computed pH and buffer capacity values above a composition grid with volume of NaOH as the x axis…

  15. Making pH Tangible.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Elizabeth; Moss, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Presents a laboratory exercise in which students test the pH of different substances, study the effect of a buffer on acidic solutions by comparing the behavior of buffered and unbuffered solutions upon the addition of acid, and compare common over-the-counter antacid remedies. (MKR)

  16. Iron autoxidation in Mops and Hepes buffers.

    PubMed

    Tadolini, B

    1987-01-01

    Iron autoxidation in Mops and Hepes buffers is characterized by a lag phase that becomes shorter with increasing FeCl2 concentration and pH. During iron oxidation in these buffers a yellow colour develops in the solution. When the reaction is conducted in the presence of nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT), blue formazan is formed. Of the many OH scavengers tested, mannitol and sorbitol are most effective in inhibiting Fe2+ oxidation, yellow colour development and NBT reduction. Some inhibition was also noted with catalase. The iron product of the oxidative reaction differs from Fe3+ in its absorption spectrum and its low reactivity with thiocyanate. Similar results are obtained when iron autoxidation is studied in unbuffered solutions brought to alkaline pH with NaOH. In phosphate buffer, no lag phase is evident and the absorption spectrum of the final solution is identical to that of Fe3+ in this buffer. The iron product reacts immediately with thiocyanate. When iron oxidation is conducted in the presence of NBT the formation of formazan is almost undetectable. Of the many compounds tested only catalase inhibits iron autoxidation in this buffer. The sequence of reactions leading to iron autoxidation in Good-type buffers thus resembles that occurring in unbuffered solutions brought to alkaline pH with NaOH and greatly differs from that occurring in phosphate buffer. These results are in agreement with the observation that these buffers have very low affinity for iron. The data presented define experimental conditions where Fe2+ is substantially stable for a considerable length of time in Mops buffer. PMID:3148493

  17. VIRTUAL FRAME BUFFER INTERFACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    Large image processing systems use multiple frame buffers with differing architectures and vendor supplied user interfaces. This variety of architectures and interfaces creates software development, maintenance, and portability problems for application programs. The Virtual Frame Buffer Interface program makes all frame buffers appear as a generic frame buffer with a specified set of characteristics, allowing programmers to write code which will run unmodified on all supported hardware. The Virtual Frame Buffer Interface converts generic commands to actual device commands. The virtual frame buffer consists of a definition of capabilities and FORTRAN subroutines that are called by application programs. The virtual frame buffer routines may be treated as subroutines, logical functions, or integer functions by the application program. Routines are included that allocate and manage hardware resources such as frame buffers, monitors, video switches, trackballs, tablets and joysticks; access image memory planes; and perform alphanumeric font or text generation. The subroutines for the various "real" frame buffers are in separate VAX/VMS shared libraries allowing modification, correction or enhancement of the virtual interface without affecting application programs. The Virtual Frame Buffer Interface program was developed in FORTRAN 77 for a DEC VAX 11/780 or a DEC VAX 11/750 under VMS 4.X. It supports ADAGE IK3000, DEANZA IP8500, Low Resolution RAMTEK 9460, and High Resolution RAMTEK 9460 Frame Buffers. It has a central memory requirement of approximately 150K. This program was developed in 1985.

  18. The buffer capacity of airway epithelial secretions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dusik; Liao, Jie; Hanrahan, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The pH of airway epithelial secretions influences bacterial killing and mucus properties and is reduced by acidic pollutants, gastric reflux, and respiratory diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). The effect of acute acid loads depends on buffer capacity, however the buffering of airway secretions has not been well characterized. In this work we develop a method for titrating micro-scale (30 μl) volumes and use it to study fluid secreted by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3, a widely used model for submucosal gland serous cells. Microtitration curves revealed that HCO−3 is the major buffer. Peak buffer capacity (β) increased from 17 to 28 mM/pH during forskolin stimulation, and was reduced by >50% in fluid secreted by cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-deficient Calu-3 monolayers, confirming an important role of CFTR in HCO−3 secretion. Back-titration with NaOH revealed non-volatile buffer capacity due to proteins synthesized and released by the epithelial cells. Lysozyme and mucin concentrations were too low to buffer Calu-3 fluid significantly, however model titrations of porcine gastric mucins at concentrations near the sol-gel transition suggest that mucins may contribute to the buffer capacity of ASL in vivo. We conclude that CFTR-dependent HCO−3 secretion and epithelially-derived proteins are the predominant buffers in Calu-3 secretions. PMID:24917822

  19. A buffer value index to evaluate effects of buffers on ruminal milieu in cows fed high or low concentrate, silage, or hay diets.

    PubMed

    Tucker, W B; Hogue, J F; Aslam, M; Lema, M; Martin, M; Owens, F N; Shin, I S; Le Ruyet, P; Adams, G D

    1992-03-01

    Our objective was to develop a buffer value index that would incorporate alterations in both ruminal fluid pH and buffering capacity as indicators of the influence of dietary buffering and alkalinizing agents on ruminal acid-base status. This index was evaluated using ruminal fluid from four lactating Holstein cows fed either sorghum silage or alfalfa hay in high or low concentrate diets. Ruminal fluid was incubated in vitro for 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 h with no buffer or with 7.1 g of either NaHCO3, sodium sesquicarbonate, or a multielement buffer added per liter of ruminal fluid. Ruminal fluid pH was lower for diets based on high concentrate or alfalfa; buffering capacity between pH 5 and 7 was greater for high concentrate diets but was not affected by forage type. Ruminal fluid pH was higher for sesquicarbonate than for NaHCO3, the multielement buffer, or the control; however, ruminal fluid H+ concentration was similar between sesquicarbonate and NaHCO3, and both were lower than for the multielement buffer. Hydrogen ion concentration for the multielement buffer was lower than for the control. Buffering capacity was highest for NaHCO3, followed by sesquicarbonate, the multielement buffer, and the control. The buffer value index, which accounted for alterations in both H+ concentration and buffering capacity, was highest for NaCHO3, followed by sesquicarbonate, the multielement buffer, and the control. The poor response to the multielement buffer may be attributable to our relatively short incubation interval (less than 5 h). Dietary buffers increase both ruminal fluid pH and buffering capacity; both of these responses are beneficial.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1314858

  20. Common data buffer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, F.

    1981-01-01

    Time-shared interface speeds data processing in distributed computer network. Two-level high-speed scanning approach routes information to buffer, portion of which is reserved for series of "first-in, first-out" memory stacks. Buffer address structure and memory are protected from noise or failed components by error correcting code. System is applicable to any computer or processing language.

  1. Complexation of buffer constituents with neutral complexation agents: part I. Impact on common buffer properties.

    PubMed

    Riesová, Martina; Svobodová, Jana; Tošner, Zdeněk; Beneš, Martin; Tesařová, Eva; Gaš, Bohuslav

    2013-09-17

    The complexation of buffer constituents with the complexation agent present in the solution can very significantly influence the buffer properties, such as pH, ionic strength, or conductivity. These parameters are often crucial for selection of the separation conditions in capillary electrophoresis or high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and can significantly affect results of separation, particularly for capillary electrophoresis as shown in Part II of this paper series (Beneš, M.; Riesová, M.; Svobodová, J.; Tesařová, E.; Dubský, P.; Gaš, B. Anal. Chem. 2013, DOI: 10.1021/ac401381d). In this paper, the impact of complexation of buffer constituents with a neutral complexation agent is demonstrated theoretically as well as experimentally for the model buffer system composed of benzoic acid/LiOH or common buffers (e.g., CHES/LiOH, TAPS/LiOH, Tricine/LiOH, MOPS/LiOH, MES/LiOH, and acetic acid/LiOH). Cyclodextrins as common chiral selectors were used as model complexation agents. We were not only able to demonstrate substantial changes of pH but also to predict the general complexation characteristics of selected compounds. Because of the zwitterion character of the common buffer constituents, their charged forms complex stronger with cyclodextrins than the neutral ones do. This was fully proven by NMR measurements. Additionally complexation constants of both forms of selected compounds were determined by NMR and affinity capillary electrophoresis with a very good agreement of obtained values. These data were advantageously used for the theoretical descriptions of variations in pH, depending on the composition and concentration of the buffer. Theoretical predictions were shown to be a useful tool for deriving some general rules and laws for complexing systems. PMID:23889602

  2. The buffer effect in neutral electrolyte supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vindt, Steffen T.; Skou, Eivind M.

    2016-02-01

    The observation that double-layer capacitors based on neutral aqueous electrolytes can have significantly wider usable potential windows than those based on acidic or alkaline electrolytes is studied. This effect is explained by a local pH change taking place at the electrode surfaces, leading to a change in the redox potential of water in opposite directions on the two electrodes, resulting in the wider stability window. The magnitude of this effect is suggested to be dependent on the buffer capacity, rather than the intrinsic pH value of the electrolyte. This is confirmed by studying the impact of addition of a buffer to such systems. It is shown that a 56 % higher dynamic storage capacity may be achieved, simply by controlling the buffer capacity of the electrolyte. The model system used, is based on a well-known commercial activated carbon (NORIT™ A SUPRA) as the electrode material, aqueous potassium nitrate as the electrolyte and potassium phosphates as the buffer system.

  3. The SVT Hit Buffer

    SciTech Connect

    Belforte, S.; Dell`Orso, M.; Donati, S.

    1996-06-01

    The Hit Buffer is part of the Silicon Vertex Tracker, a trigger processor dedicated to the reconstruction of particle trajectories in the Silicon Vertex Detector and the Central Tracking Chamber of the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The Hit Buffer is a high speed data-traffic node, where thousands of words are received in arbitrary order and simultaneously organized in an internal structured data base, to be later promptly retrieved and delivered in response to specific requests. The Hit Buffer is capable of processing data at a rate of 25 MHz, thanks to the use of special fast devices like Cache-Tag RAMs and high performance Erasable Programmable Logic Devices from the XILINX XC7300 family.

  4. Inactivation of viruses using novel protein A wash buffers.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Glen R; Selvitelli, Keith R; Iliescu, Ionela; Cecchini, Douglas J

    2015-01-01

    Low pH viral inactivation is typically performed in the eluate pool following the protein A capture step during the manufacturing of monoclonal antibodies and Fc-fusion proteins. However, exposure to low pH has the potential to alter protein quality. To avoid these difficulties, novel wash buffers capable of inactivating viruses while antibodies or Fc-fusion proteins were bound to protein A or mixed mode resins were developed. By equilibrating the column in high salt buffer (2 M ammonium sulfate or 3 M sodium chloride) after loading, the hydrophobic interactions between antibodies and protein A ligands were increased enough to prevent elution at pH 3. The ammonium sulfate was also found to cause binding of an antibody to a mixed mode cation exchange and a mixed mode anion exchange resin at pH values that caused elution in conventional cation and anion exchange resins (pH 3.5 for Capto Adhere and pH 8.0 for Capto MMC), indicating that retention was due to enhanced hydrophobic interactions. The potential of the 2 M ammonium sulfate pH 3 buffer, a 1 M arginine buffer, and a buffer containing the detergent LDAO to inactivate XMuLV virus when used as protein A wash buffers with a 1 hour contact time were studied. The high salt and detergent containing wash buffers provided about five logs of removal, determined using PCR, and complete combined removal and inactivation (> 6 logs), determined by measuring infectivity. The novel protein A washes could provide more rapid, automated viral inactivation steps with lower pool conductivities. PMID:25482293

  5. Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles with Buffer-Dependent Variations of Size and Morphology in Biological Buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Syed Rahin; Oh, Sangjin; Baba, Rina; Zhou, Hongjian; Hwang, Sungu; Lee, Jaebeom; Park, Enoch Y.

    2016-02-01

    The demand for biologically compatible and stable noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) has increased in recent years due to their inert nature and unique optical properties. In this article, we present 11 different synthetic methods for obtaining gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) through the use of common biological buffers. The results demonstrate that the sizes, shapes, and monodispersity of the NPs could be varied depending on the type of buffer used, as these buffers acted as both a reducing agent and a stabilizer in each synthesis. Theoretical simulations and electrochemical experiments were performed to understand the buffer-dependent variations of size and morphology exhibited by these Au NPs, which revealed that surface interactions and the electrostatic energy on the (111) surface of Au were the determining factors. The long-term stability of the synthesized NPs in buffer solution was also investigated. Most NPs synthesized using buffers showed a uniquely wide range of pH stability and excellent cell viability without the need for further modifications.

  6. Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles with Buffer-Dependent Variations of Size and Morphology in Biological Buffers.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Syed Rahin; Oh, Sangjin; Baba, Rina; Zhou, Hongjian; Hwang, Sungu; Lee, Jaebeom; Park, Enoch Y

    2016-12-01

    The demand for biologically compatible and stable noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) has increased in recent years due to their inert nature and unique optical properties. In this article, we present 11 different synthetic methods for obtaining gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) through the use of common biological buffers. The results demonstrate that the sizes, shapes, and monodispersity of the NPs could be varied depending on the type of buffer used, as these buffers acted as both a reducing agent and a stabilizer in each synthesis. Theoretical simulations and electrochemical experiments were performed to understand the buffer-dependent variations of size and morphology exhibited by these Au NPs, which revealed that surface interactions and the electrostatic energy on the (111) surface of Au were the determining factors. The long-term stability of the synthesized NPs in buffer solution was also investigated. Most NPs synthesized using buffers showed a uniquely wide range of pH stability and excellent cell viability without the need for further modifications. PMID:26847691

  7. Electrodialytic membrane suppressors for ion chromatography make programmable buffer generators.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongjing; Srinivasan, Kannan; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2012-01-01

    The use of buffer solutions is immensely important in a great variety of disciplines. The generation of continuous pH gradients in flow systems plays an important role in the chromatographic separation of proteins, high-throughput pK(a) determinations, etc. We demonstrate here that electrodialytic membrane suppressors used in ion chromatography can be used to generate buffers. The generated pH, computed from first principles, agrees well with measured values. We demonstrate the generation of phosphate and citrate buffers using a cation-exchange membrane (CEM) -based anion suppressor and Tris and ethylenediamine buffers using an anion-exchange membrane (AEM) -based cation suppressor. Using a mixture of phosphate, citrate, and borate as the buffering ions and using a CEM suppressor, we demonstrate the generation of a highly reproducible (avg RSD 0.20%, n = 3), temporally linear (pH 3.0-11.9, r(2) > 0.9996), electrically controlled pH gradient. With butylamine and a large concentration (0.5 M) of added NaCl, we demonstrate a similar linear pH gradient of large range with a near-constant ionic strength. We believe that this approach will be of value for the generation of eluents in the separation of proteins and other biomolecules and in online process titrations. PMID:22103670

  8. Tris buffer modulates polydopamine growth, aggregation, and paramagnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Della Vecchia, Nicola Fyodor; Luchini, Alessandra; Napolitano, Alessandra; D'Errico, Gerardino; Vitiello, Giuseppe; Szekely, Noemi; d'Ischia, Marco; Paduano, Luigi

    2014-08-19

    Despite the growing technological interest of polydopamine (dopamine melanin)-based coatings for a broad variety of applications, the factors governing particle size, shape, and electronic properties of this bioinspired multifunctional material have remained little understood. Herein, we report a detailed characterization of polydopamine growth, particle morphology, and paramagnetic properties as a function of dopamine concentration and nature of the buffer (pH 8.5). Dynamic Light Scattering data revealed an increase in the hydrodynamic radii (Rh) of melanin particles with increasing dopamine concentration in all buffers examined, especially in phosphate buffer. Conversely, a marked inhibition of particle growth was apparent in Tris buffer, with Rh remaining as low as <100 nm during polymerization of 0.5 mM dopamine. Small angle neutron scattering data suggested formation of bidimensional structures in phosphate or bicarbonate buffers, while apparently three-dimensional fractal objects prevailed in Tris buffer. Finally, electron paramagnetic resonance spectra revealed a broader signal amplitude with a peculiar power saturation decay profile for polydopamine samples prepared in Tris buffer, denoting more homogeneous paramagnetic centers with respect to similar samples obtained in phosphate and bicarbonate buffers. Overall, these results disclose Tris buffer as an efficient modulator of polydopamine buildup and properties for the rational control and fine-tuning of melanin aggregate size, morphology, and free radical behavior. PMID:25066905

  9. Influence of phosphate ions on buffer capacity of soil humic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguta, P.; Sokołowska, Z.

    2012-02-01

    The object of this study was to determine change of natural buffer capacity of humic acids by strong buffering agents, which were phosphate ions. Studies were carried out on the humic acids extracted from peat soils. Additional information was obtained by determination of water holding capacity, density, ash and pH for peats and optical parameter Q4/6 for humic acids. Humic acid suspensions exhibited the highest buffer properties at low pH and reached maximum at pH ~ 4. Phosphates possessed buffer properties in the pH range from 4.5 to 8.0. The maximum of buffering was at pH~6.8 and increased proportionally with an increase in the concentration of phosphate ions. The study indicated that the presence of phosphate ions may strongly change natural buffer capacity of humic acids by shifting buffering maximum toward higher pH values. Significant correlations were found for the degree of the secondary transformation with both the buffer capacity and the titrant volume used during titration.

  10. Valuation of forested buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basnyat, Prakash

    The research concentrated on two fronts: (1) defining relationships between land use complex and nitrate and sediment concentrations; and (2) developing a method for assessing the extent of potential and water quality improvements available through land management options and their associated costs. In this work, selected basins of the Fish River (Alabama) were delineated, land use/land cover types were classified, and "contributing zones" were delineated using Geographic Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) analytical tools. Water samples collected from these basins were analyzed for their nutrient contents. Based on measured nitrate and sediment concentrations in basin streams, a linkage model was developed. This linkage model relates land use/land cover with the pollution levels in the stream. The linkage model was evaluated at three different scales: (1) the basin scale; (2) the contributing zone scale; and (3) the stream buffer/riparian zone scale. The contributing zone linkage model suggests that forests act as a sink or transformation zone. Residential/urban/built-up areas were identified as the strongest contributors of nitrate in the contributing zones model and active agriculture was identified as the second largest contributor. Regression results for the "land use/land cover diversity" model (stream buffer/riparian zone scale) suggest that areas that are close (adjacent) to the stream and any disturbances in these areas will have major impacts on stream water quality. The economic model suggests the value of retiring lands from agricultural land uses to forested buffers varies from 0 to 3067 per hectare, depending on the types of crops currently grown. Along with conversion costs, this land value forms the basis for estimates of the costs of land management options for improving (or maintaining) water quality throughout the study area. The model also shows the importance of stream-side management zones, which are key to maintenance of stream

  11. Voltammetric pH Nanosensor.

    PubMed

    Michalak, Magdalena; Kurel, Malgorzata; Jedraszko, Justyna; Toczydlowska, Diana; Wittstock, Gunther; Opallo, Marcin; Nogala, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Nanoscale pH evaluation is a prerequisite for understanding the processes and phenomena occurring at solid-liquid, liquid-liquid, and liquid-gas interfaces, e.g., heterogeneous catalysis, extraction, partitioning, and corrosion. Research on the homogeneous processes within small volumes such as intracellular fluids, microdroplets, and microfluidic chips also requires nanometer scale pH assessment. Due to the opacity of numerous systems, optical methods are useless and, if applicable, require addition of a pH-sensitive dye. Potentiometric probes suffer from many drawbacks such as potential drift and lack of selectivity. Here, we present a voltammetric nanosensor for reliable pH assessment between pH 2 and 12 with high spatial resolution. It consists of a pyrolytic carbon nanoelectrode obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) inside a quartz nanopipette. The carbon is modified by adsorption of syringaldazine from its ethanolic solution. It exhibits a stable quasi-reversible cyclic voltammogram with nearly Nernstian dependency of midpeak potentials (-54 mV/pH). This sensor was applied as a probe for scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) in order to map pH over a platinum ultramicroelectrode (UME), generating hydroxide ions (OH(-)) by the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at a diffusion-controlled rate in aerated phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The results reveal the alkalization of the electrolyte close to the oxygen reducing electrode, showing the insufficient buffer capacity of PBS to maintain a stable pH at the given conditions. PMID:26516786

  12. Protein buffering in model systems and in whole human saliva.

    PubMed

    Lamanda, Andreas; Cheaib, Zeinab; Turgut, Melek Dilek; Lussi, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the buffer attributes (value, power, range and optimum) of two model systems for whole human resting saliva, the purified proteins from whole human resting saliva and single proteins. Two model systems, the first containing amyloglucosidase and lysozyme, and the second containing amyloglucosidase and alpha-amylase, were shown to provide, in combination with hydrogencarbonate and di-hydrogenphosphate, almost identical buffer attributes as whole human resting saliva. It was further demonstrated that changes in the protein concentration as small as 0.1% may change the buffer value of a buffer solution up to 15 times. Additionally, it was shown that there was a protein concentration change in the same range (0.16%) between saliva samples collected at the time periods of 13:00 and others collected at 9:00 am and 17:00. The mode of the protein expression changed between these samples corresponded to the change in basic buffer power and the change of the buffer value at pH 6.7. Finally, SDS Page and Ruthenium II tris (bathophenantroline disulfonate) staining unveiled a constant protein expression in all samples except for one 50 kDa protein band. As the change in the expression pattern of that 50 kDa protein band corresponded to the change in basic buffer power and the buffer value at pH 6.7, it was reasonable to conclude that this 50 kDa protein band may contain the protein(s) belonging to the protein buffer system of human saliva. PMID:17327922

  13. Buffer Capacity: An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Steven O.; Hanania, George I. H.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a quantitative experiment designed to demonstrate buffer action and the measurement of buffer capacity. Discusses how to make acetate buffers, determine their buffer capacity, plot the capacity/pH curve, and interpret the data obtained. (TW)

  14. Supported bilayer electrophoresis under controlled buffer conditions.

    PubMed

    Monson, Christopher F; Pace, Hudson P; Liu, Chunming; Cremer, Paul S

    2011-03-15

    A pH controlled flow cell device was constructed to allow electrophoretic movement of charged lipids and membrane associated proteins in supported phospholipid bilayers. The device isolated electrolysis products near the electrodes from the electrophoresis process within the bilayer. This allowed the pH over the bilayer region to remain within ±0.2 pH units or better over many hours at salt concentrations up to 10 mM. Using this setup, it was found that the electrophoretic mobility of a dye conjugated lipid (Texas Red 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (TR-DHPE)) was essentially constant between pH 3.3 and 9.3. In contrast, streptavidin, which was bound to biotinylated lipids, shifted from migrating cathodically at acidic pH values to migrating anodically under basic conditions. This shift was due to the modulation of the net charge on the protein, which changed the electrophoretic forces experienced by the macromolecule. The addition of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) cushion beneath the bilayer or the increase in the ionic strength of the buffer solution resulted in a decrease of the electroosmotic force experienced by the streptavidin with little effect on the Texas Red-DHPE. As such, it was possible in part to control the electrophoretic and electroosmotic contributions to streptavidin independently of one another. PMID:21319743

  15. Virtual Frame Buffer Interface Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Thomas L.

    1990-01-01

    Virtual Frame Buffer Interface program makes all frame buffers appear as generic frame buffer with specified set of characteristics, allowing programmers to write codes that run unmodified on all supported hardware. Converts generic commands to actual device commands. Consists of definition of capabilities and FORTRAN subroutines called by application programs. Developed in FORTRAN 77 for DEC VAX 11/780 or DEC VAX 11/750 computer under VMS 4.X.

  16. Capillary electrophoresis of proteins in buffers containing high concentrations of zwitterionic salts.

    PubMed

    Bushey, M M; Jorgenson, J W

    1989-10-20

    A method for improving protein separations in capillary zone electrophoresis utilizing high concentrations of zwitterionic buffer additives was examined. Lysozyme and alpha-chymotrypsinogen A were used as test proteins in untreated fused-silica capillaries in buffers of pH ca. 7.0 and 9.0 The zwitterion-containing buffers were compared with buffers containing high ionic salt concentrations and a buffer containing a combination of high ionic salt and high zwitterion concentrations. Over 100,000 theoretical plates were obtained in less than 30 min. for both test proteins in a pH 7 buffer containing both trimethylglycine and potassium sulfate. The advantages and disadvantages of this technique compared with those of other methods used to prevent protein adsorption are discussed. PMID:2592485

  17. Molecular Buffers Permit Sensitivity Tuning and Inversion of Riboswitch Signals

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Predictable integration of foreign biological signals and parts remains a key challenge in the systematic engineering of synthetic cellular actuations, and general methods to improve signal transduction and sensitivity are needed. To address this problem we modeled and built a molecular signal buffer network in Saccharomyces cerevisiae inspired by chemical pH buffer systems. The molecular buffer system context-insulates a riboswitch enabling synthetic control of colony formation and modular signal manipulations. The riboswitch signal is relayed to a transcriptional activation domain of a split transcription factor, while interacting DNA-binding domains mediate the transduction of signal and form an interacting molecular buffer. The molecular buffer system enables modular signal inversion through integration with repressor modules. Further, tuning of input sensitivity was achieved through perturbation of the buffer pair ratio guided by a mathematical model. Such buffered signal tuning networks will be useful for domestication of RNA-based sensors enabling tunable outputs and library-wide selections for drug discovery and metabolic engineering. PMID:27138234

  18. Molecular Buffers Permit Sensitivity Tuning and Inversion of Riboswitch Signals.

    PubMed

    Rugbjerg, Peter; Genee, Hans Jasper; Jensen, Kristian; Sarup-Lytzen, Kira; Sommer, Morten Otto Alexander

    2016-07-15

    Predictable integration of foreign biological signals and parts remains a key challenge in the systematic engineering of synthetic cellular actuations, and general methods to improve signal transduction and sensitivity are needed. To address this problem we modeled and built a molecular signal buffer network in Saccharomyces cerevisiae inspired by chemical pH buffer systems. The molecular buffer system context-insulates a riboswitch enabling synthetic control of colony formation and modular signal manipulations. The riboswitch signal is relayed to a transcriptional activation domain of a split transcription factor, while interacting DNA-binding domains mediate the transduction of signal and form an interacting molecular buffer. The molecular buffer system enables modular signal inversion through integration with repressor modules. Further, tuning of input sensitivity was achieved through perturbation of the buffer pair ratio guided by a mathematical model. Such buffered signal tuning networks will be useful for domestication of RNA-based sensors enabling tunable outputs and library-wide selections for drug discovery and metabolic engineering. PMID:27138234

  19. Ring Buffered Network Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the research effort to demonstrate the integration of a data sharing technology, Ring Buffered Network Bus, in development by Dryden Flight Research Center, with an engine simulation application, the Java Gas Turbine Simulator, in development at the University of Toledo under a grant from the Glenn Research Center. The objective of this task was to examine the application of the RBNB technologies as a key component in the data sharing, health monitoring and system wide modeling elements of the NASA Aviation Safety Program (AVSP) [Golding, 1997]. System-wide monitoring and modeling of aircraft and air safety systems will require access to all data sources which are relative factors when monitoring or modeling the national airspace such as radar, weather, aircraft performance, engine performance, schedule and planning, airport configuration, flight operations, etc. The data sharing portion of the overall AVSP program is responsible for providing the hardware and software architecture to access and distribute data, including real-time flight operations data, among all of the AVSP elements. The integration of an engine code capable of numerically "flying" through recorded flight paths and weather data using a software tool that allows for distributed access of data to this engine code demonstrates initial steps toward building a system capable of monitoring and modeling the National Airspace.

  20. Oracle Log Buffer Queueing

    SciTech Connect

    Rivenes, A S

    2004-12-08

    The purpose of this document is to investigate Oracle database log buffer queuing and its affect on the ability to load data using a specialized data loading system. Experiments were carried out on a Linux system using an Oracle 9.2 database. Previous experiments on a Sun 4800 running Solaris had shown that 100,000 entities per minute was an achievable rate. The question was then asked, can we do this on Linux, and where are the bottlenecks? A secondary question was also lurking, how can the loading be further scaled to handle even higher throughput requirements? Testing was conducted using a Dell PowerEdge 6650 server with four CPUs and a Dell PowerVault 220s RAID array with 14 36GB drives and 128 MB of cache. Oracle Enterprise Edition 9.2.0.4 was used for the database and Red Hat Linux Advanced Server 2.1 was used for the operating system. This document will detail the maximum observed throughputs using the same test suite that was used for the Sun tests. A detailed description of the testing performed along with an analysis of bottlenecks encountered will be made. Issues related to Oracle and Linux will also be detailed and some recommendations based on the findings.

  1. BUFFERS AND VEGETATIVE FILTER STRIPS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Buffers and filter strips are areas of permanent vegetation located within and between agricultural fields and the water courses to which they drain. These buffers are intended to intercept and slow runoff thereby providing water quality benefits. In addition, in many settings they are intended to...

  2. Tested Demonstrations: Visualization of Buffer Action and the Acidifying Effect of Carbon Dioxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a buffer demonstration which features visualization of the effects of carbon dioxide on pH. Background information, list of materials needed, procedures used, and a discussion of results obtained are included. (JN)

  3. INFLUENCE OF ORGANIC BUFFERS ON BACTERIOCIN PRODUCTION BY STREPTOCOCCUS THERMOPHILUS ST110

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of the organic buffer salts MES, MOPS and PIPES on the growth of S. thermophilus ST110, medium pH and accumulation of the antipediococcal bacteriocin thermophilin 110 were evaluated in whey permeate media over a period of 24 h. In non buffered medium, thermophilin 110 production at 37°C ...

  4. INFLUENCE OF BUFFER CAPACITY, CHLORINE RESIDUAL, AND FLOW RATE ON CORROSION OF MILD STEEL AND COPPER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The corrosion rates of mild steel decreased as buffer capacity was increased with pH at constant alkalinity. The corrosion-promoting effect of ionic strength, however, appeared to predominate over the buffer action in water systems with relatively high total dissolved solids and ...

  5. Effect of buffer media composition on the solubility and effective permeability coefficient of ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Levis, Karl A; Lane, Majella E; Corrigan, Owen I

    2003-03-01

    The effect of perfusion medium composition on the two important biopharmaceutical parameters drug solubility and permeability was determined for ibuprofen. Eight commonly used buffers were examined. Equilibrium solubility, buffer capacity profiles and permeability coefficients, using the in situ rat gut perfusion model, were determined for each medium at 37 degrees C. The solubility of ibuprofen differed sixfold over the range of buffer systems studied. The differences in solubility were associated with different pHs of the buffers when saturated with drug and also the presence of micelles and divalent ions. The solubility of ibuprofen in FeSSIF was significantly higher than predicted from the pH due to micellisation, while that in Krebs was significantly lower due to ibuprofen-calcium salt formation. Buffer capacities varied over a 40-fold range. The pK(a) values of the buffer components were determined from the buffer capacity versus pH profiles and were in good agreement with the thermodynamic values when corrected for temperature and ionic strength. Smaller, but statistically significant differences in P(app) values for ibuprofen were also observed between some of the buffers. During perfusion, pHs of the perfusate samples gradually changed over time towards a median value of approximately 6.5. HBSS gave a P(app) approximately 50% greater than that observed in PBS 7.4. Physicochemical factors such as medium pH, buffer capacity and osmolarity should be considered when determining the P(app) values of ionisable compounds. Care needs to be exercised when comparing P(app) values from different laboratories as buffer composition can have a significant effect on both solubility and permeability of a drug, whose ionisation is substantially changed over the pH range of the buffers. Despite the high amount ionised, ibuprofen appears to be well absorbed and it can be classified as a highly permeable drug. PMID:12593936

  6. Reduction of metastasis using a non-volatile buffer.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim Hashim, Arig; Cornnell, Heather H; Coelho Ribeiro, Maria de Lourdes; Abrahams, Dominique; Cunningham, Jessica; Lloyd, Mark; Martinez, Gary V; Gatenby, Robert A; Gillies, Robert J

    2011-12-01

    The tumor microenvironment is acidic as a consequence of upregulated glycolysis and poor perfusion and this acidity, in turn, promotes invasion and metastasis. We have recently demonstrated that chronic consumption of sodium bicarbonate increased tumor pH and reduced spontaneous and experimental metastases. This occurred without affecting systemic pH, which was compensated. Additionally, these prior data did not rule out the possibility that bicarbonate was working though effects on carbonic anhydrase, and not as a buffer per se. Here, we present evidence that chronic ingestion of a non-volatile buffer, 2-imidazole-1-yl-3-ethoxycarbonylpropionic acid (IEPA) with a pK (a) of 6.9 also reduced metastasis in an experimental PC3M prostate cancer mouse model. Animals (n = 30) were injected with luciferase expressing PC3M prostate cancer cells either subcutaneously (s.c., n = 10) or intravenously (i.v., n = 20). Four days prior to inoculations, half of the animals for each experiment were provided drinking water containing 200 mM IEPA buffer. Animals were imaged weekly to follow metastasis, and these data showed that animals treated with IEPA had significantly fewer experimental lung metastasis compared to control groups (P < 0.04). Consistent with prior work, the pH of treated tumors was elevated compared to controls. IEPA is observable by in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy and this was used to measure the presence of IEPA in the bladder, confirming that it was orally available. The results of this study indicate that metastasis can be reduced by non-volatile buffers as well as bicarbonate and thus the effect appears to be due to pH buffering per se. PMID:21861189

  7. Proteins contribute insignificantly to the intrinsic buffering capacity of yeast cytoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Poznanski, Jaroslaw; Szczesny, Pawel; Ruszczynska, Katarzyna; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Paczek, Leszek

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We predicted buffering capacity of yeast proteome from protein abundance data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We measured total buffering capacity of yeast cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed that proteins contribute insignificantly to buffering capacity. -- Abstract: Intracellular pH is maintained by a combination of the passive buffering of cytoplasmic dissociable compounds and several active systems. Over the years, a large portion of and possibly most of the cell's intrinsic (i.e., passive non-bicarbonate) buffering effect was attributed to proteins, both in higher organisms and in yeast. This attribution was not surprising, given that the concentration of proteins with multiple protonable/deprotonable groups in the cell exceeds the concentration of free protons by a few orders of magnitude. Using data from both high-throughput experiments and in vitro laboratory experiments, we tested this concept. We assessed the buffering capacity of the yeast proteome using protein abundance data and compared it to our own titration of yeast cytoplasm. We showed that the protein contribution is less than 1% of the total intracellular buffering capacity. As confirmed with NMR measurements, inorganic phosphates play a crucial role in the process. These findings also shed a new light on the role of proteomes in maintaining intracellular pH. The contribution of proteins to the intrinsic buffering capacity is negligible, and proteins might act only as a recipient of signals for changes in pH.

  8. Buffer Effects in the Solubility, Nucleation and Growth of Chicken Egg White Lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Ursula J.

    1999-01-01

    The growth of protein crystals is important for determination of their three-dimensional structure, which relates to their biochemical functions and to the practical goal of designing pharmaceuticals to modify that function. While many proteins have been successfully crystallized by a variety of methods, there is still limited understanding of the process of nucleation and growth of even the simplest proteins. Chicken egg-white lysozyme (CEWL) is readily crystallized under a variety of conditions, and studies underway at MSFC are designed to elucidate the mechanisms by which the crystals nucleate and grow. We have investigated the effect of buffer choice on the solubility, nucleation and growth of CEWL. CEWL was purified by dialysis against a .05M phosphate buffer and chromatographic separation from contaminants in a sepharose column. Solubility studies were made as a function of buffer concentration for phosphate and formate buffers, and the nucleation and growth of crystals at 10 C was studied as a function of pH for oxalate, succinate, formate, butyrate, carbonate, phosphate and acetate buffer solutions. The solubility data support the conclusion that there is a solubility minimum as a function of buffer concentration for amphiphilic molecules, while no minimum is observed for a phosphate buffer. Nucleation is suppressed at pH greater than pKa for all buffers except phosphate. The aspect ratio of the (110) faces is shown to be a function of crystal size, rather than pH.

  9. Buffer Gas Acquisition and Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F.; Lueck, Dale E.; Jennings, Paul A.; Callahan, Richard A.; Delgado, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The acquisition and storage of buffer gases (primarily argon and nitrogen) from the Mars atmosphere provides a valuable resource for blanketing and pressurizing fuel tanks and as a buffer gas for breathing air for manned missions. During the acquisition of carbon dioxide (CO2), whether by sorption bed or cryo-freezer, the accompanying buffer gases build up in the carbon dioxide acquisition system, reduce the flow of CO2 to the bed, and lower system efficiency. It is this build up of buffer gases that provide a convenient source, which must be removed, for efficient capture Of CO2 Removal of this buffer gas barrier greatly improves the charging rate of the CO2 acquisition bed and, thereby, maintains the fuel production rates required for a successful mission. Consequently, the acquisition, purification, and storage of these buffer gases are important goals of ISRU plans. Purity of the buffer gases is a concern e.g., if the CO, freezer operates at 140 K, the composition of the inert gas would be approximately 21 percent CO2, 50 percent nitrogen, and 29 percent argon. Although there are several approaches that could be used, this effort focused on a hollow-fiber membrane (HFM) separation method. This study measured the permeation rates of CO2, nitrogen (ND, and argon (Ar) through a multiple-membrane system and the individual membranes from room temperature to 193K and 10 kpa to 300 kPa. Concentrations were measured with a gas chromatograph that used a thermoconductivity (TCD) detector with helium (He) as the carrier gas. The general trend as the temperature was lowered was for the membranes to become more selective, In addition, the relative permeation rates between the three gases changed with temperature. The end result was to provide design parameters that could be used to separate CO2 from N2 and Ar.

  10. Use of buffered hypochlorite solution for disinfecting fibrescopes.

    PubMed Central

    Coates, D; Death, J E

    1982-01-01

    The possible use of sodium hypochlorite solution buffered to pH 7.6 and containing 100 ppm available chlorine (avCl) for disinfecting fibrescopes was investigated. A flexible fibrescope experimentally contaminated with Pseudomonas putida, Mycobacterium fortuitum, or Bacillus subtilis spores was effectively disinfected within 10 m in repeatedly and without any observable adverse effect on the instrument. The corrosive nature of buffered hypochlorite was investigated by immersing various fibrescope components and metal wires in solutions of different strength for long periods and examining them for damage. Stainless steel, platinum, glass, Teflon, polythene and epoxy resin were apparently unaffected whereas polyurethane, rubber and other metals tested were damaged to different extents. Buffered hypochlorite solutions may have many applications pertaining to the disinfection of items which are either thermolabile or require rapid effective disinfection. PMID:6802880

  11. Salt Effect on the pH Profile and Kinetic Parameters of Microbial Phytases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pH profiles of two well-characterized microbial phytases were determined. Four different general-purpose buffers at different pH were used. The roles of calcium chloride, sodium chloride, and sodium fluoride on activity were compared in these buffers. For Aspergillus niger phytase, calcium ex...

  12. Frog striated muscle is permeable to hydroxide and buffer anions.

    PubMed

    Venosa, R A; Kotsias, B A; Horowicz, P

    1994-04-01

    Hydroxide, bicarbonate and buffer anion permeabilities in semitendinosus muscle fibers of Rana pipiens were measured. In all experiments, the fibers were initially equilibrated in isotonic, high K2SO4 solutions at pHo = 7.2 buffered with phosphate. Two different methods were used to estimate permeabilities: (i) membrane potential changes were recorded in response to changes in external ion concentrations, and (ii) intracellular pH changes were recorded in response to changes in external concentrations of ions that alter intracellular pH. Constant field equations were used to calculate relative or absolute permeabilities. In the first method, to increase the size of the membrane potential change produced by a sudden change in anion entry, external K+ was replaced by Cs+ prior to changes of the anion under study. At constant external Cs+ activity, a hyperpolarization results from increasing external pH from 7.2 to 10.0 or higher, using either CAPS (3-[cyclohexylamino]-1-propanesulfonic acid) or CHES (2-[N-cyclohexylamino]-ethanesulfonic acid) as buffer. For each buffer, the protonated form is a zwitterion of zero net charge and the nonprotonated form is an anion. Using reported values of H+ permeability, calculations show that the reduction in [H+]o cannot account for the hyperpolarizations produced by alkaline solutions. Membrane hyperpolarization increases with increasing total external buffer concentration at constant external pH, and with increasing external pH at constant external buffer anion concentration. Taken together, these observations indicate that both OH- and buffer anions permeate the surface membrane. The following relative permeabilities were obtained at pHo = 10.0 +/- 0.3: (POH/PK) = 890 +/- 150, (PCAPS/PK) = 12 +/- 2, (PCHES/PK) = 5.3 +/- 0.9, and (PNO3/PK) = 4.7 +/- 0.5. PNO3/PK was independent of pHo up to 10.75. At pHo = 9.6, (PHCO3/PK) = 0.49 +/- 0.03; at pHo = 8.9, (PCl/PK) = 18 +/- 2 and at pHo = 7.1, (PHEPES/PK) = 20 +/- 2. In the second

  13. Estuarine acidification and minimum buffer zone—A conceptual study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xinping; Cai, Wei-Jun

    2013-10-01

    This study uses a simulation method to explore how estuarine pH is affected by mixing between river water, anthropogenic CO2 enriched seawater, and by respiration. Three rivers with different levels of weathering products (Amazon, Mississippi, and St. Johns) are selected for this simulation. The results indicate that estuaries that receive low to moderate levels of weathering products (Amazon and St. Johns) exhibit a maximum pH decrease in the midsalinity region as a result of anthropogenic CO2 intrusion. This maximum pH decrease coincides with a previously unrecognized mid-salinity minimum buffer zone (MBZ). In addition, water column oxygen consumption can further depress pH for all simulated estuaries. We suggest that recognition of the estuarine MBZs may be important for studying estuarine calcifying organisms and pH-sensitive biogeochemical processes.

  14. Reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride using buffered alkaline ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ya-Ting; Liang, Chenju

    2015-10-01

    Alkaline ascorbic acid (AA) was recently discovered as a novel in-situ chemical reduction (ISCR) reagent for remediating chlorinated solvents in the subsurface. For this ISCR process, the maintenance of an alkaline pH is essential. This study investigated the possibility of the reduction of carbon tetrachloride (CT) using alkaline AA solution buffered by phosphate and by NaOH. The results indicated that CT was reduced by AA, and chloroform (CF) was a major byproduct at a phosphate buffered pH of 12. However, CT was completely reduced by AA in 2M NaOH without CF formation. In the presence of iron/soil minerals, iron could be reduced by AA and Fe(2+) tends to precipitate on the mineral surface to accelerate CT degradation. A simultaneous transfer of hydrogenolysis and dichloroelimination would occur under phosphate buffered pH 12. This implies that a high alkaline environment is a crucial factor for maintaining the dominant pathway of two electron transfer from dianionic AA to dehydroascorbic acid, and to undergo dichloroelimination of CT. Moreover, threonic acid and oxalic acid were identified to be the major AA decomposition products in alkaline solutions. PMID:25912910

  15. Comparison of Buffer Effect of Different Acids During Sandstone Acidizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umer Shafiq, Mian; Khaled Ben Mahmud, Hisham; Hamid, Mohamed Ali

    2015-04-01

    The most important concern of sandstone matrix acidizing is to increase the formation permeability by removing the silica particles. To accomplish this, the mud acid (HF: HCl) has been utilized successfully for many years to stimulate the sandstone formations, but still it has many complexities. This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations of different acid combinations (HF: HCl, HF: H3PO4 and HF: HCOOH). Hydrofluoric acid and fluoboric acid are used to dissolve clays and feldspar. Phosphoric and formic acids are added as a buffer to maintain the pH of the solution; also it allows the maximum penetration of acid into the core sample. Different tests have been performed on the core samples before and after the acidizing to do the comparative study on the buffer effect of these acids. The analysis consists of permeability, porosity, color change and pH value tests. There is more increase in permeability and porosity while less change in pH when phosphoric and formic acids were used compared to mud acid. From these results it has been found that the buffer effect of phosphoric acid and formic acid is better than hydrochloric acid.

  16. Buffer salt effects in off-line coupling of capillary electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marák, Jozef; Stanová, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    In this work, the impact of buffer salts/matrix effects on the signal in direct injection MS with an electrospray interface (DI-ESI-MS) following pITP fractionation of the sample was studied. A range of buffers frequently used in CE analyses (pH 3-10) was prepared containing 10, 50, and 90% v/v of ACN, respectively. The sets of calibration solutions of cetirizine (an antihistaminic drug with an amphiprotic character) within a 0.05-2.0 mg/L concentration range were prepared in different buffers. The greatest enhancements in the MS signal (in terms of change in the slope of the calibration line) were obtained for the beta-alanine buffer (pH 3.5) in positive ionization and for the borate buffer (pH 9.2) in negative ionization, respectively. The procedure was successfully applied to the analysis of buserelin (a peptidic drug). The slope of the calibration line for solutions containing the beta-alanine buffer with 50% of ACN was 4 times higher than for water or urine, respectively. This study clearly demonstrates that the buffer salt/matrix effects in an offline combination of pITP and DI-ESI-MS can also play a positive role, as they can enhance the signal in MS. A similar influence of the above effects can also be presumed in the CE techniques combined on-line with ESI-MS. PMID:24868586

  17. Biophysical stability of hyFc fusion protein with regards to buffers and various excipients.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jun Yeul; Kim, Nam Ah; Lim, Dae Gon; Eun, Chang-yong; Choi, Donghoon; Jeong, Seong Hoon

    2016-05-01

    A novel non-cytolytic hybrid Fc (hyFc) with an intact Ig structure without any mutation in the hyFc region, was developed to construct a long-acting agonistic protein. The stability of interleukin-7 (IL-7) fused with the hyFc (GXN-04) was evaluated to develop early formulations. Various biophysical methods were utilized and three different buffer systems with various pH ranges were investigated including histidine-acetate, sodium citrate, and tris buffers. Various excipients were incorporated into the systems to obtain optimum protein stability. Two evident thermal transitions were observed with the unfolding of IL-7 and hyFc. The Tm and ΔH increased with pH, suggesting increased conformational stability. Increased Z-average size with PDI and decreased zeta potential with pH increase, with the exception of tris buffer, showed aggregation issues. Moreover, tris buffer at higher pH showed aggregation peaks from DLS. Non-ionic surfactants were effective against agitation by outcompeting protein molecules for hydrophobic surfaces. Sucrose and sorbitol accelerated protein aggregation during agitation, but exhibited a protective effect against oxidation, with preferential exclusion favoring the compact states of GXN-04. The stability of GXN-04 was varied by basal buffers and excipients, hence the buffers and excipients need to be evaluated carefully to achieve the maximum stability of proteins. PMID:26851357

  18. Buffering in cyclic gene networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyzin, S. D.; Kolesov, A. Yu.; Rozov, N. Kh.

    2016-06-01

    We consider cyclic chains of unidirectionally coupled delay differential-difference equations that are mathematical models of artificial oscillating gene networks. We establish that the buffering phenomenon is realized in these system for an appropriate choice of the parameters: any given finite number of stable periodic motions of a special type, the so-called traveling waves, coexist.

  19. Cell wall pH and auxin transport velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Rayle, D.

    1984-01-01

    According to the chemiosmotic polar diffusion hypothesis, auxin pulse velocity and basal secretion should increase with decreasing cell wall pH. Experiments were designed to test this prediction. Avena coleoptile sections were preincubated in either fusicoccin (FC), cycloheximide, pH 4.0, or pH 8.0 buffer and subsequently their polar transport capacities were determined. Relative to controls, FC enhanced auxin (IAA) uptake while CHI and pH 8.0 buffer reduced IAA uptake. Nevertheless, FC reduced IAA pulse velocity while cycloheximide increased velocity. Additional experiments showed that delivery of auxin to receivers is enhanced by increased receiver pH. This phenomenon was overcome by a pretreatment of the tissue with IAA. Our data suggest that while acidic wall pH values facilitate cellular IAA uptake, they do not enhance pulse velocity or basal secretion. These findings are inconsistent with the chemiosmotic hypothesis for auxin transport.

  20. Cell wall pH and auxin transport velocity.

    PubMed Central

    Hasenstein, K H; Rayle, D

    1984-01-01

    According to the chemiosmotic polar diffusion hypothesis, auxin pulse velocity and basal secretion should increase with decreasing cell wall pH. Experiments were designed to test this prediction. Avena coleoptile sections were preincubated in either fusicoccin (FC), cycloheximide, pH 4.0, or pH 8.0 buffer and subsequently their polar transport capacities were determined. Relative to controls, FC enhanced auxin (IAA) uptake while CHI and pH 8.0 buffer reduced IAA uptake. Nevertheless, FC reduced IAA pulse velocity while cycloheximide increased velocity. Additional experiments showed that delivery of auxin to receivers is enhanced by increased receiver pH. This phenomenon was overcome by a pretreatment of the tissue with IAA. Our data suggest that while acidic wall pH values facilitate cellular IAA uptake, they do not enhance pulse velocity or basal secretion. These findings are inconsistent with the chemiosmotic hypothesis for auxin transport. PMID:11540807

  1. Carbon Dioxide Addition to Microbial Fuel Cell Cathodes Maintains Sustainable Catholyte pH and Improves Anolyte pH, Alkalinity, and Conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioelectrochemical system (BES) pH imbalances develop due to anodic proton-generating oxidation reactions and cathodic hydroxide-ion-generating reduction reactions. Until now, workers added unsustainable buffers to reduce the pH difference between the anode and cathode because the pH imbalance cont...

  2. Mechanisms of drug release in citrate buffered HPMC matrices.

    PubMed

    Pygall, Samuel R; Kujawinski, Sarah; Timmins, Peter; Melia, Colin D

    2009-03-31

    Few studies report the effects of alkalizing buffers in HPMC matrices. These agents are incorporated to provide micro-environmental buffering, protection of acid-labile ingredients, or pH-independent release of weak acid drugs. In this study, the influence of sodium citrate on the release kinetics, gel layer formation, internal gel pH and drug release mechanism was investigated in HPMC 2910 and 2208 (Methocel E4M and K4M) matrices containing 10% felbinac 39% HPMC, dextrose and sodium citrate. Matrix dissolution at pH 1.2 and pH 7.5 resulted in complex release profiles. HPMC 2910 matrices exhibited biphasic release, with citrate increasing the immediate release phase (<60min) and reducing the extended release. HPMC 2208 matrices were accelerated, but without the loss of extended release characteristics. Studies of early gel layer formation suggested gel barrier disruption and enhanced liquid penetration. pH modification of the gel layer was transitory (<2h) and corresponded temporally with the immediate release phase. Results suggest that in HPMC 2910 matrices, high initial citrate concentrations within the gel layer suppress particle swelling, interfere with diffusion barrier integrity, but are lost rapidly whereupon drug solubility reduces and the diffusion barrier recovers. These Hofmeister or osmotic-mediated effects are better resisted by the less methoxylated HPMC 2208. PMID:19100822

  3. In vitro dissolution of proton-pump inhibitor products intended for paediatric and geriatric use in physiological bicarbonate buffer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Shokrollahi, Honaz

    2015-05-15

    Proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) products based on enteric coated multiparticulates are design to meet the needs of patients who cannot swallow tablets such as children and older adults. Enteric coated PPI preparations exhibit delays in in vivo absorption and onset of antisecretory effects, which is not reflected by the rapid in vitro dissolution in compendial pH 6.8 phosphate buffer commonly used for assessment of these products. A more representative and physiological medium, pH 6.8 mHanks bicarbonate buffer, was used in this study to evaluate the in vitro dissolution of enteric coated multiparticulate-based PPI products. Commercially available omeprazole, lansoprazole and esomeprazole products were subject to dissolution tests using USP-II apparatus in pH 4.5 phosphate buffer saline for 45 min (acid stage) followed by pH 6.8 phosphate buffer or pH 6.8 mHanks bicarbonate buffer. In pH 6.8 phosphate buffer, all nine tested products displayed rapid and comparable dissolution profiles meeting the pharmacopeia requirements for delayed release preparations. In pH 6.8 mHanks buffer, drug release was delayed and failed the pharmacopeia requirements from most enteric coated preparations. Despite that the same enteric polymer, methacrylic acid-ethyl acrylate copolymer (1:1), was applied to all commercial multiparticulate-based products, marked differences were observed between dissolution profiles of these preparations. The use of pH 6.8 physiological bicarbonate (mHanks) buffer can serve as a useful tool to provide realistic and discriminative in vitro release assessment of enteric coated PPI preparations and to assist rational formulation development of these products. PMID:25746736

  4. Cell buffer with built-in test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, William E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A cell buffer with built-in testing mechanism is provided. The cell buffer provides the ability to measure voltage provided by a power cell. The testing mechanism provides the ability to test whether the cell buffer is functioning properly and thus providing an accurate voltage measurement. The testing mechanism includes a test signal-provider to provide a test signal to the cell buffer. During normal operation, the test signal is disabled and the cell buffer operates normally. During testing, the test signal is enabled and changes the output of the cell buffer in a defined way. The change in the cell buffer output can then be monitored to determine if the cell buffer is functioning correctly. Specifically, if the voltage output of the cell buffer changes in a way that corresponds to the provided test signal, then the functioning of the cell buffer is confirmed. If the voltage output of the cell buffer does not change correctly, then the cell buffer is known not to be operating correctly. Thus, the built in testing mechanism provides the ability to quickly and accurately determine if the cell buffer is operating correctly. Furthermore, the testing mechanism provides this functionality without requiring excessive device size and complexity.

  5. Laser velocimeter (autocovariance) buffer interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemmons, J. I., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A laser velocimeter (autocovariance) buffer interface (LVABI) was developed to serve as the interface between three laser velocimeter high speed burst counters and a minicomputer. A functional description is presented of the instrument and its unique features which allow the studies of flow velocity vector analysis, turbulence power spectra, and conditional sampling of other phenomena. Typical applications of the laser velocimeter using the LVABI are presented to illustrate its various capabilities.

  6. Formation Buffering Potential Pertaining to Geological Storage of Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, B. R.; Peters, C. A.; Buschkuehle, M.

    2007-12-01

    One promising strategy for decreasing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere is carbon capture and storage in deep saline formations. Modeling efforts and the experimental measurements that support these efforts are critical to determining the fate of injected CO2. The focus of this work is CO2-water-rock interactions as they pertain to formation buffering potential. PHREEQC was used to model pH evolution in siliciclastic and carbonate rocks after simulated injection of CO2. The initial mineral and formation water compositions were determined from analysis of core samples and brines from several formations in the Alberta sedimentary basin in western Canada. Simulation parameters correspond to injection conditions of 50°C, CO2 pressure of 100 bar and high ionic strength. Results indicate that the carbonate formations have a higher buffering potential relative to siliciclastic formations. Considerable variability of acid-catalyzed reactions among formations with similar mineralogical compositions was also observed. To assess the effect of grain coating by clay minerals, a comparative simulation was performed with kaolinite as the dominant mineral in contact with the pore fluids. Results from this simulation showed a pronounced retardation in pH buffering reaction kinetics. This emphasizes the importance for differentiating between mineral abundance and accessibility in model calculations when clay coatings may obscure contact between pore fluids and potentially reactive minerals.

  7. Doped LZO buffer layers for laminated conductors

    DOEpatents

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [Knoxville, TN; Schoop, Urs [Westborough, MA; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Thieme, Cornelis Leo Hans [Westborough, MA; Verebelyi, Darren T [Oxford, MA; Rupich, Martin W [Framingham, MA

    2010-03-23

    A laminated conductor includes a metallic substrate having a surface, a biaxially textured buffer layer supported by the surface of the substrate, the biaxially textured buffer layer comprising LZO and a dopant for mitigating metal diffusion through the LZO, and a biaxially textured conductor layer supported by the biaxially textured buffer layer.

  8. RESEARCH NEEDS IN RIPARIAN BUFFER RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian buffer restorations are used as management tools to produce favorable water quality impacts; moreover, the basis for riparian buffers as an instrument of water quality restoration rests on a relatively firm foundation. However, the extent to which buffers can restore rip...

  9. 21 CFR 520.1696a - Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent. 520.1696a Section 520.1696a Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696a Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered...

  10. 21 CFR 520.1696a - Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent. 520.1696a Section 520.1696a Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696a Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered...

  11. Electrokinetic determination of the buffer capacity of Andisols.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Mario V; Hernández-Luis, Felipe; Benjumea, Dora; Grandoso, Domingo; Lemus, Mercedes; Arbelo, Carmen D

    2007-05-25

    Among methods which involve the flow of electric current, the electro-remediation techniques have shown useful both for the removal of polluting species, and for obtaining a series of parameters in relatively laboratory simple experiments which can be used to characterize soils. This technique was applied in the present study to obtain experimental results with two soils from Tenerife. The capacity of the method as methodology for the measurement of the buffering capacity of these soils during electrokinetic experiments was analyzed. The results obtained on electrokinetic determination of buffer capacity correlated quite well with behaviour observed in the pH curves. The technique was promising for soil description primarily because important information could be obtained in shorter time periods than those required when using routine laboratory methods of soil analysis. PMID:17320934

  12. Improving Water Quality With Conservation Buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowrance, R.; Dabney, S.; Schultz, R.

    2003-12-01

    Conservation buffer technologies are new approaches that need wider application. In-field buffer practices work best when used in combination with other buffer types and other conservation practices. Vegetative barriers may be used in combination with edge-of-field buffers to protect and improve their function and longevity by dispersing runoff and encouraging sediment deposition upslope of the buffer. It's important to understand how buffers can be managed to help reduce nutrient transport potential for high loading of nutrients from manure land application sites, A restored riparian wetland buffer retained or removed at least 59 percent of the nitrogen and 66 percent of the phosphorus that entered from an adjacent manure land application site. The Bear Creek National Restoration Demonstration Watershed project in Iowa has been the site of riparian forest buffers and filter strips creation; constructed wetlands to capture tile flow; stream-bank bioengineering; in-stream structures; and controlling livestock grazing. We need field studies that test various widths of buffers of different plant community compositions for their efficacy in trapping surface runoff, reducing nonpoint source pollutants in subsurface waters, and enhancing the aquatic ecosystem. Research is needed to evaluate the impact of different riparian grazing strategies on channel morphology, water quality, and the fate of livestock-associated pathogens and antibiotics. Integrating riparian buffers and other conservation buffers into these models is a key objective in future model development.

  13. Buffered Electrochemical Polishing of Niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Tian, Hui; Corcoran, Sean

    2011-03-01

    The standard preparation of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of pure niobium include the removal of a 'damaged' surface layer, by buffered chemical polishing (BCP) or electropolishing (EP), after the cavities are formed. The performance of the cavities is characterized by a sharp degradation of the quality factor when the surface magnetic field exceeds about 90 mT, a phenomenon referred to as 'Q-drop.' In cavities made of polycrystalline fine grain (ASTM 5) niobium, the Q-drop can be significantly reduced by a low-temperature (? 120 °C) 'in-situ' baking of the cavity if the chemical treatment was EP rather than BCP. As part of the effort to understand this phenomenon, we investigated the effect of introducing a polarization potential during buffered chemical polishing, creating a process which is between the standard BCP and EP. While preliminary results on the application of this process to Nb cavities have been previously reported, in this contribution we focus on the characterization of this novel electrochemical process by measuring polarization curves, etching rates, surface finish, electrochemical impedance and the effects of temperature and electrolyte composition. In particular, it is shown that the anodic potential of Nb during BCP reduces the etching rate and improves the surface finish.

  14. Buffering agents modify the hydration landscape at charged interfaces.

    PubMed

    Trewby, William; Livesey, Duncan; Voïtchovsky, Kislon

    2016-02-23

    Buffering agents are widely used to stabilise the pH of solutions in soft matter and biological sciences. They are typically composed of weak acids and bases mixed in an aqueous solution, and can interact electrostatically with charged surfaces such as biomembranes. Buffers can induce protein aggregation and structural modification of soft interfaces, but a molecular-level picture is still lacking. Here we use high-resolution atomic force microscopy to investigate the effect of five commonly used buffers, namely 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES), 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES), monosodium phosphate, saline sodium citrate (SSC) and tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) on the hydration landscape of Muscovite mica in solution. Mica is an ideal model substrate due to its negative surface charge and identical lattice parameter when compared with gel-phase lipid bilayers. We show that buffer molecules can produce cohesive aggregates spanning over tens of nanometres of the interface. SSC, Tris and monosodium phosphate tend to create an amorphous mesh layer several molecules thick and with no preferential ordering. In contrast, MES and HEPES adopt epitaxial arrangements commensurate with the underlying mica lattice, suggesting that they offer the most suitable solution for high-resolution studies. To confirm that this effect persisted in biologically-relevant interfaces, the experiments were repeated on a silica-supported lipid bilayer. Similar trends were observed for this system using atomic force microscopy as well as ellipsometry. The effect of the buffering agents can be mitigated by the inclusion of salt which helps displace them from the interface. PMID:26837938

  15. A Proton Buffering Role for Silica in Diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milligan, Allen J.; Morel, François M. M.

    2002-09-01

    For 40 million years, diatoms have dominated the reverse weathering of silica on Earth. These photosynthetic protists take up dissolved silicic acid from the water and precipitate opaline silica to form their cell wall. We show that the biosilica of diatoms is an effective pH buffer, enabling the enzymatic conversion of bicarbonate to CO2, an important step in inorganic carbon acquisition by these organisms. Because diatoms are responsible for one-quarter of global primary production and for a large fraction of the carbon exported to the deep sea, the global cycles of Si and C may be linked mechanistically.

  16. Interaction of ICT receptor with serum albumins in aqueous buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fang-Ying; Ji, Zhao-Jun; Wu, Yu-Mei; Wan, Xiao-Fen

    2006-06-01

    A novel compound, p-(dimethylamino)benzamido-thiosemicarbazide ( 1), based on intramolecular charge transfer fluorescence was synthesized. In pH 7.4 Tris-HCl buffer, the emission intensity of 1 increased upon the addition of HSA or BSA due to the energy transfer from the protein to 1 and also the hydrophobic microenvironment provided by HSA or BSA. The binding constants between 1 and proteins were 1.41 × 10 5 mol -1 L for HSA and 8.68 × 10 4 mol -1 L for BSA, respectively. There is only one binding site. The interaction between 1 and proteins was further investigated by synchronous fluorescence.

  17. BUFCALC: A Program for the Calculation of Buffers of Specified pH, Ionic Strength, and Buffer Capacity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, William J.

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed is a computer software package for IBM personal computers. The theoretical background and functions including several examples are discussed. The algorithm used in computation by the program is given. (CW)

  18. Computer model of unstirred layer and intracellular pH changes. Determinants of unstirred layer pH.

    PubMed

    Marrannes, Roger

    2013-06-01

    Transmembrane acid-base fluxes affect the intracellular pH and unstirred layer pH around a superfused biological preparation. In this paper the factors influencing the unstirred layer pH and its gradient are studied. An analytical expression of the unstirred layer pH gradient in steady state is derived as a function of simultaneous transmembrane fluxes of (weak) acids and bases with the dehydration reaction of carbonic acid in equilibrium. Also a multicompartment computer model is described consisting of the extracellular bulk compartment, different unstirred layer compartments and the intracellular compartment. With this model also transient changes and the influence of carbonic anhydrase (CA) can be studied. The analytical expression and simulations with the multicompartment model demonstrate that in steady state the unstirred layer pH and its gradient are influenced by the size and type of transmembrane flux of acids and bases, their dissociation constant and diffusion coefficient, the concentration, diffusion coefficient and type of mobile buffers and the activity and location of CA. Similar principles contribute to the amplitude of the unstirred layer pH transients. According to these models an immobile buffer does not influence the steady-state pH, but reduces the amplitude of pH transients especially when these are fast. The unstirred layer pH provides useful information about transmembrane acid-base fluxes. This paper gives more insight how the unstirred layer pH and its transients can be interpreted. Methodological issues are discussed. PMID:23860924

  19. The absorption of acetylsalicylic acid from the stomach in relation to intragastric pH.

    PubMed

    Dotevall, G; Ekenved, G

    1976-01-01

    A comparative study on the effect of a buffered (pH 6.5) and an unbuffered (pH 2.9) solution of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on gastric pH, gastric emptying, and gastric absorption of ASA was performed in 10 healthy volunteers. Gastric pH was recorded using radiotelemetry. Gastric emptying and gastric absorption was studied with an aspiration technique and phenol red as nonabsorbable marker. Administration of the unbuffered solution to the fasting subjects resulted in a gastric pH of about 2 and absorption of ASA from the stomach was found to occur. The buffered solution of ASA increased gastric pH to above 5 and gastric absorption of ASA was found to be significantly less than after the unbuffered solution. The buffered solution was emptied from the stomach more rapidly than the unbuffered one. PMID:12558

  20. Melatonin: Buffering the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Vico, Antonio; Lardone, Patricia J.; Álvarez-Sánchez, Nuria; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Ana; Guerrero, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin modulates a wide range of physiological functions with pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Despite the large number of reports implicating melatonin as an immunomodulatory compound, it still remains unclear how melatonin regulates immunity. While some authors argue that melatonin is an immunostimulant, many studies have also described anti-inflammatory properties. The data reviewed in this paper support the idea of melatonin as an immune buffer, acting as a stimulant under basal or immunosuppressive conditions or as an anti-inflammatory compound in the presence of exacerbated immune responses, such as acute inflammation. The clinical relevance of the multiple functions of melatonin under different immune conditions, such as infection, autoimmunity, vaccination and immunosenescence, is also reviewed. PMID:23609496

  1. Alteration of the surface charge of aluminum goethites by a sulfonic acid buffer.

    PubMed

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera

    2004-07-01

    Four samples of synthetic low-substitution Al-goethites (mol% Al<10) were incubated with 10 mM NaClO4 and 5 mM MES buffer (MES buffer (2-[N-morpholino]ethanesulfonic acid) at pH 5. It was found that MES buffer, although commonly used to control pH, profoundly affected the results of our electrophoretic mobility measurements. The presence of MES buffer caused a large decrease in EM values for unsubstituted goethite, from 5.7 +/- 0.7 to 1.8 +/- 0.4 m2 v(-1) s(-1), while increases in Al substitution in goethite led to a progressive increase in EM values. The charge reversal following addition of MES buffer to suspension containing Al-goethites was explained by specific sorption that, at pH 5, is thought to occur via cation surface complexation because of (i) sulfonate induced-dipole or (ii) N and O lone-pair dipole-dipole interactions with structural Fe. PMID:15158383

  2. Buffer strips in composites at elevated temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    The composite material 'buffer strip' concept is presently investigated at elevated temperatures for the case of graphite/polyimide buffer strip panels using a (45/0/45/90)2S layup, where the buffer strip material was 0-deg S-glass/polyimide. Each panel was loaded in tension until it failed, and radiographs and crack opening displacements were recorded during the tests to determine fracture onset, fracture arrest, and the extent of damage in the buffer strip after crack arrest. At 177 + or - 3 C, the buffer strips increased the panel strength by at least 40 percent in comparison with panels without buffer strips. Compared to similar panels tested at room temperature, those tested at elevated temperature had lower residual strengths, but higher failure strains.

  3. Signature-based store checking buffer

    DOEpatents

    Sridharan, Vilas; Gurumurthi, Sudhanva

    2015-06-02

    A system and method for optimizing redundant output verification, are provided. A hardware-based store fingerprint buffer receives multiple instances of output from multiple instances of computation. The store fingerprint buffer generates a signature from the content included in the multiple instances of output. When a barrier is reached, the store fingerprint buffer uses the signature to verify the content is error-free.

  4. Evaluating the buffering capacity of various soft drinks, fruit juices and tea

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Smita; Jindal, Rahul

    2010-01-01

    Aims and Objective: The purpose of this study is to measure the initial pH of various commonly used beverages and to determine their ability to maintain a low pH by measuring their buffering capacities. Materials and Methods: Twelve commercially available drinks were taken and divided into four groups (preserved fruit juices, tea, mineral water and carbonated drinks. Each group comprised of three drinks. Their initial pH were measured with pH meter and their buffering capacities were measured by adding 1M NaOH in the increments of 0.2 ml into 100 ml of each drink till the pH raised to 5.5 and 7 respectively. Statistical Analysis: The volume of NaOH required to raise the pH to 5.5 and 7 were recorded in all the groups. This data was subjected to statistical analysis using Mann- Whitney tests. Results: Total titratable acidity measurement shows that among all the drinks, there was no significant difference between carbonated drinks and preserved fruit juices while a significant difference was present between carbonated drinks, preserved fruit juices and tea. Conclusion: In this in vitro study, it was found that packaged apple juice had the most buffering capacity with maximum erosive potential whereas green tea had the least. PMID:21116386

  5. SODR Memory Control Buffer Control ASIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, Robert F.

    1994-01-01

    The Spacecraft Optical Disk Recorder (SODR) is a state of the art mass storage system for future NASA missions requiring high transmission rates and a large capacity storage system. This report covers the design and development of an SODR memory buffer control applications specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The memory buffer control ASIC has two primary functions: (1) buffering data to prevent loss of data during disk access times, (2) converting data formats from a high performance parallel interface format to a small computer systems interface format. Ten 144 p in, 50 MHz CMOS ASIC's were designed, fabricated and tested to implement the memory buffer control function.

  6. pH regulation of urease levels in Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Sissons, C H; Perinpanayagam, H E; Hancock, E M; Cutress, T W

    1990-05-01

    Potential mechanisms for regulation of urease levels in Streptococcus salivarius were examined, including: induction by urea, nitrogen or carbon source repression, and effects of pH and CO2 (because CO2 enrichment enhanced urease detection on urea agar plates). Regulation by either pH or CO2 was confirmed by comparison of the urease accumulation pattern during anaerobic growth under CO2 with that under N2. Under CO2, there was an initial buffering plateau at pH 6.2 and a rate of Streptococcus salivarius urease accumulation three-fold that under N2, with a pH 7.6 plateau. With both gas phases there was also an increase in the rate of urease appearance coincident with the decrease in medium pH following the pH plateau. The effects of pH, CO2, and HCO3- on urease levels and on growth were separately assessed by culture in media containing 0, 25, 100 mmol/L KHCO3 buffered at different pH levels. There was an inverse relationship between the logarithm of the urease level after 24-hour growth and the pH during growth-the urease specific activity was 100-fold higher at pH 5.5, compared with pH 7.0 and above. HCO3-/CO2 (100 mmol/L) had little effect on urease levels, but was essential for growth at pH 5.5. There was no significant urease induction by urea, or repression by ammonia or glucose. There was also evidence of pH regulation of urease levels in some staphylococci, Klebsiella pneumonia, and Corynebacterium renale, but not in Actinomyces naeslundii and several other species. We conclude that the external pH is a major factor regulating urease levels in S. salivarius and possibly some other species-a mechanism equivalent to urease repression by OH-. PMID:2110582

  7. Optimization of buffer injection for the effective bioremediation of chlorinated solvents in aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovelli, A.; Robinson, C.; Barry, A.; Kouznetsova, I.; Gerhard, J.

    2008-12-01

    Various techniques have been proposed to enhance biologically-mediated reductive dechlorination of chlorinated solvents in the subsurface, including the addition of fermentable organic substrate for the generation of H2 as an electron donor. One rate-limiting factor for enhanced dechlorination is the pore fluid pH. Organic acids and H+ ions accumulate in dechlorination zones, generating unfavorable conditions for microbial activity (pH < 6.5). The pH variation is a nonlinear function of the amount of reduced chlorinated solvents, and is affected by the organic material fermented, the chemical composition of the pore fluid and the soil's buffering capacity. Consequently, in some cases enhanced remediation schemes rely on buffer injection (e.g., bicarbonate) to alleviate this problem, particularly in the presence of solvent nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source zones. However, the amount of buffer required - particularly in complex, evolving biogeochemical environments - is not well understood. To investigate this question, this work builds upon a geochemical numerical model (Robinson et al., Science of the Total Environment, submitted), which computes the amount of additional buffer required to maintain the pH at a level suitable for bacterial activity for batch systems. The batch model was coupled to a groundwater flow/solute transport/chemical reaction simulator to permit buffer optimization computations within the context of flowing systems exhibiting heterogeneous hydraulic, physical and chemical properties. A suite of simulations was conducted in which buffer optimization was examined within the bounds of the minimum concentration necessary to sustain a pH favorable to microbial activity and the maximum concentration to avoid excessively high pH values (also not suitable to bacterial activity) and mineral precipitation (e.g., calcite, which may lead to pore-clogging). These simulations include an examination of the sensitivity of this buffer concentration range

  8. Computer simulation of two electrophoretic columns coupled for isoelectric focusing in simple buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Amos; Mosher, Richard A.; Bier, Milan

    1986-01-01

    Computer simulation is used to analyze a system of two electrophoretic columns coupled by mixing the anolyte of one with the catholyte of the other. A mathematical model is presented which is used to predict the pH gradients formed by monovalent buffers in this system, when the currents in the columns are unequal. In the column with the higher current a pH gradient is created which increases from anode to cathode and is potentially useful for isoelectric focusing. The breadth of this gradient is dependent upon the ratio of the currents. The function of the second column is the compensation of buffer migration which occurs in the first column, thereby maintaining constant electrolyte composition. The effects of buffer pKs and mobilities are evaluated.

  9. Critical evaluation of buffering solutions for pKa determination by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Fuguet, Elisabet; Reta, Mario; Gibert, Carme; Rosés, Martí; Bosch, Elisabeth; Ràfols, Clara

    2008-07-01

    The performance of the most common and also some other less common CE buffers has been tested for the pKa determination of several types of compounds (pyridine, amines, and phenols). The selected buffers cover a pH ranging from 3.7 to 11.8. Whereas some buffers, like acetic acid/acetate, BisTrisH+/BisTris, TrisH+/Tris, CHES/CHES-, and CAPS/CAPS- can be used with all type of analytes, others like ammonium/ammonia, butylammonium/butylammonia, ethylammonium/ethylammonia, diethylammonium/diethylammonia, and hydrogenphosphate/phosphate are not recommended because they interact with a wide range of compounds. The rest of the tested buffers (dihydrogenphosphate/hydrogenphosphate, MES/MES-, HEPES/HEPES-, and boric acid/borate) can show specific interactions depending on the nature of the analytes, and their use in some applications should be restricted. PMID:18546174

  10. Evaluation of a newly developed triple buffered peptone broth for detection of Salmonella in broiler feed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactose broth (LB) and buffered peptone (BP) are used as pre-enrichment media to recover Salmonella from feed. Bacterial utilization of feed carbohydrates results in the production of acidic byproducts causing a drop in the media pH which can injure or kill Salmonella and yield false negative resul...

  11. Effect of buffers on testing of Candida species susceptibility to flucytosine.

    PubMed Central

    MacKerrow, S D; Merry, J M; Hoeprich, P D

    1987-01-01

    Synthetic amino acid medium for fungi (SAAMF) is a totally defined, nutritionally adequate, macromolecule-free culture medium for fungi that is buffered with an organic weak acid-weak base pair: 2-(N-morpholino)-propanesulfonic acid (MOPS) and 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol (Tris). In 1984, it was reported that MOPS-Tris in SAAMF antagonized the activity of flucytosine against Candida albicans (D. L. Calhoun and J. N. Galgiani, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 26:364-367, 1984). Accordingly, we evaluated the buffering capacity of seven synthetic organic buffers and monobasic potassium phosphate, both singly and in pairs, over the pH range 7.4 to 6.0. Of these buffers, MOPS, BES [N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-2-aminomethanesulfonic acid], a BES-MOPS combination, and KH2PO4 provided the best buffering. Growth of C. albicans, in unbuffered SAAMF was equivalent overall to that in SAAMF containing buffers, singly or in pairs. Twelve strains of C. albicans and five strains of Candida lusitaniae were tested for susceptibility to flucytosine in SAAMF, with and without buffers. In the presence of Tris, the geometric mean MICs were 6.5- and 3.6-fold higher, respectively, for C. albicans and C. lusitaniae. We recommend replacing Tris with the nonantagonistic MOPS. PMID:3294891

  12. Automated high precision secondary pH measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastkowski, F.; Jakobsen, P. T.; Stefan, F.; Kristensen, H. B.; Jensen, H. D.; Kawiecki, R.; Wied, C. E.; Kauert, A.; Seidl, B.; Spitzer, P.; Eberhardt, R.; Adel, B.

    2013-04-01

    A new setup for high precision, automated secondary pH measurements together with a reference measurement procedure has been developed and tested in interlaboratory comparisons using buffers pH 4.005, pH 7.000, and pH 10.012 at 25 °C and 37 °C. Using primary buffers as standards, a standard uncertainty in pH better than 0.005 can be reached. The central measuring device is a one piece, thermostatted cell of PFA (perfluoroalkoxy) with a built-in Hamilton® Single Pore™ Glass electrode. Due to its flow-through principle this device allows pH measurements with low consumption of measurement solutions. The very hydrophobic and smooth PFA as construction material facilitates complete emptying of the cell. Furthermore, the tempering unit affords very precise temperature control and hence contributes to the low target uncertainty of the produced secondary buffer solutions. Use of a symmetric measurement sequence and the two point calibration was sufficient to reach high precision and accuracy.

  13. Buffer capacity, ecosystem feedbacks, and seawater chemistry under global change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jury, C. P.; Thomas, F. I.; Atkinson, M. J.; Jokiel, P. L.; Onuma, M. A.; Kaku, N.; Toonen, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) results in reduced seawater pH and aragonite saturation state (Ωarag), but also reduced seawater buffer capacity. As buffer capacity decreases, diel variation in seawater chemistry increases. However, a variety of ecosystem feedbacks can modulate changes in both average seawater chemistry and diel seawater chemistry variation. Here we model these effects for a coastal, reef flat ecosystem. We show that an increase in offshore pCO2 and temperature (to 900 μatm and +3°C) can increase diel pH variation by as much as a factor of 2.5 and can increase diel pCO2 variation by a factor of 4.6, depending on ecosystem feedbacks and seawater residence time. Importantly, these effects are different between day and night. With increasing seawater residence time and increasing feedback intensity, daytime seawater chemistry becomes more similar to present-day conditions while nighttime seawater chemistry becomes less similar to present-day conditions. Better constraining ecosystem feedbacks under global change will improve projections of coastal water chemistry, but this study shows the importance of considering changes in both average carbonate chemistry and diel chemistry variation for organisms and ecosystems. Further, we will discuss our recent work examining the effects of diel seawater chemistry variation on coral calcification rates.

  14. High stability buffered phase comparator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. A.; Reinhardt, V. S. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A low noise RF signal phase comparator comprised of two high stability driver buffer amplifiers driving a double balanced mixer which operate to generate a beat frequency between the two RF input signals coupled to the amplifiers from the RF sources is described. The beat frequency output from the mixer is applied to a low noise zero crossing detector which is the phase difference between the two RF inputs. Temperature stability is provided by mounting the amplifiers and mixer on a common circuit board with the active circuit elements located on one side of a circuit board and the passive circuit elements located on the opposite side. A common heat sink is located adjacent the circuit board. The active circuit elements are embedded into the bores of the heat sink which slows the effect of ambient temperature changes and reduces the temperature gradients between the active circuit elements, thus improving the cancellation of temperature effects. The two amplifiers include individual voltage regulators, which increases RF isolation.

  15. 21 CFR 520.1696a - Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with... FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696a Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent. (a) Specifications. When reconstituted, each milliliter contains penicillin G procaine...

  16. FIFO Buffer for Asynchronous Data Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascle, K. P.

    1985-01-01

    Variable-rate, asynchronous data signals from up to four measuring instruments or other sources combined in first-in/first-out (FIFO) buffer for transmission on single channel. Constructed in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) logic, buffer consumes low power (only 125 mW at 5V) and conforms to aerospace standards of reliability and maintainability.

  17. UNDERSTANDING, DERIVING, AND COMPUTING BUFFER CAPACITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Derivation and systematic calculation of buffer capacity is a topic that seems often to be neglected in chemistry courses and given minimal treatment in most texts. However, buffer capacity is very important in the chemistry of natural waters and potable water. It affects corro...

  18. Buffer Management Simulation in ATM Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaprak, E.; Xiao, Y.; Chronopoulos, A.; Chow, E.; Anneberg, L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a simulation of a new dynamic buffer allocation management scheme in ATM networks. To achieve this objective, an algorithm that detects congestion and updates the dynamic buffer allocation scheme was developed for the OPNET simulation package via the creation of a new ATM module.

  19. 46 CFR 58.25-45 - Buffers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Buffers. 58.25-45 Section 58.25-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-45 Buffers. For each vessel on an ocean, coastwise, or Great Lakes...

  20. Riparian buffer transpiration and watershed scale impacts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forested riparian buffers are prevalent throughout the Southeastern Coastal Plain Region of the United States (US). Because they make up a significant portion of the regional landscape, transpiration within these riparian buffers is believed to have an important impact on the hydrologic budget of r...

  1. 46 CFR 58.25-45 - Buffers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Buffers. 58.25-45 Section 58.25-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-45 Buffers. For each vessel on an ocean, coastwise, or Great Lakes...

  2. African American College Women's Suicide Buffers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marion, Michelle S.; Range, Lillian M.

    2003-01-01

    To examine the relationships buffers may have with suicide ideation, 300 African American female college students completed measures of suicide ideation and buffers. Three variables accounted for a significant and unique portion of the variance in suicide ideation: family support, a view that suicide is unacceptable, and a collaborative religious…

  3. 46 CFR 58.25-45 - Buffers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Buffers. 58.25-45 Section 58.25-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-45 Buffers. For each vessel on an ocean, coastwise, or Great Lakes...

  4. 46 CFR 58.25-45 - Buffers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Buffers. 58.25-45 Section 58.25-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-45 Buffers. For each vessel on an ocean, coastwise, or Great Lakes...

  5. 46 CFR 58.25-45 - Buffers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Buffers. 58.25-45 Section 58.25-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-45 Buffers. For each vessel on an ocean, coastwise, or Great Lakes...

  6. Cytoplasmic calcium buffers in intact human red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tiffert, T; Lew, V L

    1997-01-01

    1. Precise knowledge of the cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering behaviour in intact human red cells is essential for the characterization of their [Ca2+]i-dependent functions. This was investigated by using a refined method and experimental protocols which allowed continuity in the estimates of [Ca2+]i, from nanomolar to millimolar concentrations, in the presence and absence of external Ca2+ chelators. 2. The study was carried out in human red cells whose plasma membrane Ca2+ pump was inhibited either by depleting the cells of ATP or by adding vanadate to the cell suspension. Cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering was analysed from plots of total cell calcium content vs. ionized cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([CaT]i vs. [Ca2+]i) obtained from measurements of the equilibrium distribution of 45Ca2+ at different external Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]o), in conditions known to clamp cell volume and pH. The equilibrium distribution of 45Ca2+ was induced by the divalent cation ionophore A23187. 3. The results showed the following. (i) The known red cell Ca2+ buffer represented by alpha, with a large capacity and low Ca2+ affinity, was the main cytoplasmic Ca2+ binding agent. (ii) The value of alpha was remarkably constant; the means for each of four donors ranged from 0.33 to 0.35, with a combined value of all independent measurements of 0.34 +/- 0.01 (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 16). This contrasts with the variability previously reported. (iii) There was an additional Ca2+ buffering complex with a low capacity (approximately 80 micromol (340 g Hb)(-1)) and intermediate Ca2+ affinity (apparent dissociation constant, K(D,app) approximately 4-50 microM) whose possible identity is discussed. (iv) The cell content of putative Ca2+ buffers with submicromolar Ca2+ dissociation constants was below the detection limit of the methods used here (less than 2 micromol (340 g Hb)(-1)). 4. Vanadate (1 mM) inhibited the Vmax of the Ca2+ pump in inosine-fed cells by 99.7%. The cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering behaviour

  7. Alveolar Subphase pH in the Lungs of Anesthetized Rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, D. W.; Goerke, J.; Clements, J. A.

    1981-11-01

    We measured the pH of the alveolar subphase fluid by puncturing the most superficial alveoli of the exposed lungs of anesthetized rabbits with H+-selective and nonselective KCl microelectrodes. In these experiments, we bathed the lung surface with paraffin oil or buffered Ringer's solutions that had a CO2 tension of 40 Torr (1 Torr = 133.3 Pa) and found an alveolar pH of 6.92± 0.01 (mean ± SEM). When the pH of the surface buffer was below 6.7 or above 7.5, alveolar pH varied with surface buffer pH. With the nonselective electrode, we did not find a significant electrical potential difference between the alveolar fluid and the pleural surface. These results are consistent with active transport of H+ (or HCO3-) across alveolar epithelium.

  8. Photosynthetic activity buffers ocean acidification in seagrass meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, I. E.; Olsen, Y. S.; Ramajo, L.; Basso, L.; Steckbauer, A.; Moore, T. S.; Howard, J.; Duarte, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophytes growing in shallow coastal zones characterised by intense metabolic activity have the capacity to modify pH within their canopy and beyond. We observed diel pH changes in shallow (5-12 m) seagrass (Posidonia oceanica) meadows spanning 0.06 pH units in September to 0.24 units in June. The carbonate system (pH, DIC, and aragonite saturation state (ΩAr)) and O2 within the meadows displayed strong diel variability driven by primary productivity, and changes in chemistry were related to structural parameters of the meadow, in particular, the leaf surface area available for photosynthesis (LAI). LAI was positively correlated to mean, max and range pHNBS and max and range ΩAr. In June, vertical mixing (as Turbulent Kinetic Energy) influenced max and min ΩAr, while in September there was no effect of hydrodynamics on the carbonate system within the canopy. Max and range ΩAr within the meadow showed a positive trend with the calcium carbonate load of the leaves, pointing to a possible link between structural parameters, ΩAr and carbonate deposition. Calcifying organisms, e.g. epiphytes with carbonate skeletons, may benefit from the modification of the carbonate system by the meadow. There is, however, concern for the ability of seagrasses to provide modifications of similar importance in the future. The predicted decline of seagrass meadows may alter the scope for alteration of pH within a seagrass meadow and in the water column above the meadow, particularly if shoot density and biomass decline, on which LAI is based. Organisms associated with seagrass communities may therefore suffer from the loss of pH buffering capacity in degraded meadows.

  9. The suitability of tris(hydroxylmethyl) aminomethane (THAM) as a buffering system for hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) hydrophilic matrices containing a weak acid drug.

    PubMed

    Pygall, Samuel R; Kujawinski, Sarah; Timmins, Peter; Melia, Colin D

    2010-03-15

    There are few studies of alkalising pH-modifiers in HPMC hydrophilic matrices. These agents may be incorporated to provide microenvironmental buffering and facilitate pH-independent release of weak acid drugs. This study compared tris(hydroxylmethyl) aminomethane (THAM, TRIS, tromethamine, trometamol) with sodium citrate as internal buffering agents for HPMC (4000 cps) 2208 and 2910 matrices containing felbinac, a weak acid drug which exhibits pH-dependent solubility. Drug release at pH 1.2 and 7.5 was accelerated by both buffers, but THAM-buffered matrices provided extended, diffusion-based release kinetics, without loss of matrix integrity at high buffer concentrations. Release kinetics appeared to be independent of media pH. THAM did not depress the sol-gel transition temperature or suppress HPMC particle swelling, and had minimal effects on gel layer formation. Sodium citrate promoted greater thickness of the early gel layer than THAM. Measurements of internal gel layer pH showed that both buffers produced a rapid alkalisation of the gel layer which was progressively lost. As result of its higher pK(a) and molar ratio on a percent weight basis, THAM provided a higher internal pH and a greater longevity of pH modification. It is concluded that THAM offers a useful buffering option for weak acid drugs in HPMC-based systems. PMID:20005935

  10. Cheese whey as substrate of batch hydrogen production: effect of temperature and addition of buffer.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Páez, K M; Poggi-Varaldo, H M; García-Mena, J; Ponce-Noyola, M T; Ramos-Valdivia, A C; Barrera-Cortés, J; Robles-González, I V; Ruiz-Ordáz, N; Villa-Tanaca, L; Rinderknecht-Seijas, N

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of buffer addition and process temperature (ambient and 35°C) on H2 production in batch fermentation of cheese whey (CW). When the H2 production reached a plateau, the headspace of the reactors were flushed with N2 and reactors were re-incubated. Afterwards, only the reactors with phosphate buffer showed a second cycle of H2 production and 48% more H2 was obtained. The absence of a second cycle in non-buffered reactors could be related to a lower final pH than in the buffered reactors; the low pH could drive the fermentation to solvents production. Indeed a high solvent production was observed in non-buffered bioreactors as given by low ρ ratios (defined as the ratio between sum of organic acid production and sum of solvents production). Regarding the process temperatures, no significant difference between the H2 production of reactors incubated at ambient temperature and at 35°C was described. After flushing the headspace of bioreactors with N2 at the end of the second cycle, the H2 production did not resume (in all reactors). PMID:24821747

  11. Acid-base buffering of soils in transitional and transitional-accumulative positions of undisturbed southern-taiga landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusakova, E. S.; Ishkova, I. V.; Tolpeshta, I. I.; Sokolova, T. A.

    2012-05-01

    The method of continuous potentiometric titration (CPT) of soil water suspensions was used to evaluate the acid-base buffering of samples from the major genetic horizons of podzolic soils on a slope and soddy gley soils on the adjacent floodplain of a rivulet. In the soils of the slope, the buffering to acid upon titration from the pH of the initial titration point (ITP) to pH 3 in all the horizons was 1.5-2.0 times lower than that in the podzolic soils of the leveled interfluve, which could be due to the active leaching of exchangeable bases and oxalate-soluble aluminum and iron compounds with the later soil flows. In the soddy gley soils, the buffering to acid in the mineral horizons was 2-10 times higher than that in the podzolic soils. A direct dependence of the soil buffering to acid on the total content of exchangeable bases and on the content of oxalate-soluble aluminum compounds was found. A direct dependence of the buffering to basic upon titration from the ITP to pH 10 on the contents of the oxalate-soluble aluminum and organic matter was observed in the mineral horizons of all the studied soils. The soil treatment with Tamm's reagent resulted in the decrease of the buffering to acid in the soddy gley soils of the floodplain, as well as in the decrease of the buffering to basic in the soils on the slopes and in the soddy gley soils. It was also found that the redistribution of the mobile aluminum compounds between the eluvial, transitional, and transitional-accumulative positions in the undisturbed southern taiga landscapes leads to significant spatial differentiation of the acid-base buffering of the mineral soil horizons with a considerable increase in the buffer capacity of the soils within the transitional-accumulative terrain positions.

  12. Sediment retention in rangeland riparian buffers.

    PubMed

    Hook, Paul B

    2003-01-01

    Controlling nonpoint-source sediment pollution is a common goal of riparian management, but there is little quantitative information about factors affecting performance of rangeland riparian buffers. This study evaluated the influence of vegetation characteristics, buffer width, slope, and stubble height on sediment retention in a Montana foothills meadow. Three vegetation types (sedge wetland, rush transition, bunchgrass upland) were compared using twenty-six 6- x 2-m plots spanning 2 to 20% slopes. Plots were clipped moderately (10-15 cm stubble) or severely (2-5 cm stubble). Sediment (silt + fine sand) was added to simulated overland runoff 6, 2, or 1 m above the bottom of each plot. Runoff was sampled at 15-s to > 5-min intervals until sediment concentrations approached background levels. Sediment retention was affected strongly by buffer width and moderately by vegetation type and slope, but was not affected by stubble height. Mean sediment retention ranged from 63 to > 99% for different combinations of buffer width and vegetation type, with 94 to 99% retention in 6-m-wide buffers regardless of vegetation type or slope. Results suggest that rangeland riparian buffers should be at least 6 m wide, with dense vegetation, to be effective and reliable. Narrower widths, steep slopes, and sparse vegetation increase risk of sediment delivery to streams. Vegetation characteristics such as biomass, cover, or density are more appropriate than stubble height for judging capacity to remove sediment from overland runoff, though stubble height may indirectly indicate livestock impacts that can affect buffer performance. PMID:12809315

  13. Electrophoretic mobilities of erythrocytes in various buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.; Kunze, M. E.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    The calibration of space flight equipment depends on a source of standard test particles, this test particle of choice is the fixed erythrocyte. Erythrocytes from different species have different electrophoretic mobilities. Electrophoretic mobility depends upon zeta potential, which, in turn depends upon ionic strength. Zeta potential decreases with increasing ionic strength, so cells have high electrophoretic mobility in space electrophoresis buffers than in typical physiological buffers. The electrophoretic mobilities of fixed human, rat, and rabbit erythrocytes in 0.145 M salt and buffers of varying ionic strength, temperature, and composition, to assess the effects of some of the unique combinations used in space buffers were characterized. Several effects were assessed: glycerol or DMSO (dimethylsulfoxide) were considered for use as cryoprotectants. The effect of these substances on erythrocyte electrophoretic mobility was examined. The choice of buffer depended upon cell mobility. Primary experiments with kidney cells established the choice of buffer and cryoprotectant. A nonstandard temperature of EPM in the suitable buffer was determined. A loss of ionic strength control occurs in the course of preparing columns for flight, the effects of small increases in ionic strength over the expected low values need to be evaluated.

  14. An oral sodium citrate-citric acid non-particulate buffer in humans.

    PubMed

    Hauptfleisch, J J; Payne, K A

    1996-11-01

    We have investigated the effect on the pH of the gastric fluid of a single dose of sodium citrate 0.3 mol litre-1 (antacid) and a solution containing sodium citrate dehydrate (100 mg ml-1) with citric acid monohydrate (66 mg ml-1) (buffer). The dose for both solutions was 0.4 ml kg-1 via a nasogastric tube. Each group comprised 10 patients undergoing neurosurgical operations of 5-7 h duration. A control group of 10 patients received no gastric solution. The pH of the gastric aspirate was measured hourly using a Metrohm 632 digital pH meter (Synectics Medical, Sweden). Mean baseline gastric pH was 2.64 (SD 1.71). In the control group, pH increased to 4.4 (1.51) at 5 h, returning to baseline at 7 h. In the antacid group, pH increased to 6.11 (0.47) at 15 min and decreased to 3.70 (1.94) at 7 h (P < 0.01). In the buffer group, pH was stable at 3.80-3.95 (0.22) over 7 h (P > 0.01). Total mean gastric aspirate was 0.5 ml kg-1. PMID:8957982

  15. Cytoplasmic alkalization reduces calcium buffering in molluscan central neurons.

    PubMed

    Zucker, R S

    1981-11-23

    The effect of raised cytoplasmic pH (pHi) on intracellular concentration ([Ca2+]i) transients following calcium influx during membrane depolarization was studied in identified neurons in the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia californica. The pHi was monitored with pH-sensitive microelectrodes. Sea water containing 15 mM NH4Cl at pH 7.7 elevated pHi about 0.35 pH units from the normal level of 7.17. These cells have an estimated buffering power of about 60 mM/pH unit. Calcium influx was elicited by depolarizing pulses under voltage clamp and [Ca2+]i transients were monitored with the photoprotein aequorin or the metallochromic dye arsenazo III. Aequorin photo-emissions increased by 21--131% (mean, 48%) and arsenazo III absorbance changes accompanying depolarization increased by 9--33% (mean, 20%) after 30 min in NH4+, corresponding roughly to a 14% increase in [Ca2+]i transients. Calcium-dependent potassium tail currents following a depolarizing pulse were somewhat slower and 4--91% (mean, 38%) large in NH4+. The magnitude and time- and voltage-dependence of the membrane calcium conductance was studied using calcium tail currents following depolarizing pulses. The calcium current was unaffected by NH4+, so the enhanced [Ca2+]i transients must reflect reduced calcium buffering at high pHi. Either reduced cytoplasmic calcium binding or slowed active extrusion of calcium may be responsible for this effect. PMID:6271335

  16. A novel structure of optical buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, AiMing; Wu, Chongqing; Gao, Huali; Gong, Yandong; Shum, Ping

    2005-02-01

    Optical buffers are critical for low packet-loss probability in future photonic packet-switched networks. In particular, they would be required to store packets during rate conversion and header processing, and to overcome the receiver's bottleneck. They would be required for queuing packets while transmitters await access to the network. In this paper, we present a novel structure of optical buffer with compact size. This kind of optical buffer is based on a collinear 3x3 fiber coupler in which three fibers are completely in the same plane and weakly coupled. A SOA is used as its nonlinear element as well as an amplifier in it.The experiment result will be also given in the paper. Storage results obtained with this novel structure optical buffer at 100Mb/s will be presented first and then its capacity is extended to higher data rates of 2.5Gb/s, more compatible with present optical networks. Storage has been observed for time up to 1.568ms(more than 32 circulations) in both cases without obvious degration. The novel structure of optical buffer could be a more compact device which makes it possible to be integrated in a chip. SOA in the buffer is used as a nonlinear element as well as an amplifier to compensate loss in the buffer loop. The buffer needs low control power for switch operation. It is easy to control 'write' and 'erase' operation because the same TOAD switch in the buffer can be used for both 'write' and 'erase' operation.

  17. Effect of Buffer Conditions and Organic Cosolvents on the Rate of Strain-Promoted Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Davis, Derek L; Price, Erin K; Aderibigbe, Sabrina O; Larkin, Maureen X-H; Barlow, Emmett D; Chen, Renjie; Ford, Lincoln C; Gray, Zackery T; Gren, Stephen H; Jin, Yuwei; Keddington, Keith S; Kent, Alexandra D; Kim, Dasom; Lewis, Ashley; Marrouche, Rami S; O'Dair, Mark K; Powell, Daniel R; Scadden, Mick'l H C; Session, Curtis B; Tao, Jifei; Trieu, Janelle; Whiteford, Kristen N; Yuan, Zheng; Yun, Goyeun; Zhu, Judy; Heemstra, Jennifer M

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the effect of buffer identity, ionic strength, pH, and organic cosolvents on the rate of strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition with the widely used DIBAC cyclooctyne. The rate of reaction between DIBAC and a hydrophilic azide is highly tolerant to changes in buffer conditions but is impacted by organic cosolvents. Thus, bioconjugation reactions using DIBAC can be carried out in the buffer that is most compatible with the biomolecules being labeled, but the use of organic cosolvents should be carefully considered. PMID:27387821

  18. Crystallization Optimum Solubility Screening: using crystallization results to identify the optimal buffer for protein crystal formation

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Bernard; Stevens, Raymond C.; Page, Rebecca

    2005-12-01

    It is shown how protein crystallization results can be used to identify buffers that improve protein solubility and, in turn, crystallization success. An optimal solubility screen is described that uses the results of crystallization trials to identify buffers that improve protein solubility and, in turn, crystallization success. This screen is useful not only for standard crystallization experiments, but also can easily be implemented into any high-throughput structure-determination pipeline. As a proof of principle, the predicted novel-fold protein AF2059 from Archaeoglobus fulgidus, which was known to precipitate in most buffers and particularly during concentration experiments, was selected. Using the crystallization results of 192 independent crystallization trials, it was possible to identify a buffer containing 100 mM CHES pH 9.25 that significantly improves its solubility. After transferring AF2059 into this ‘optimum-solubility’ buffer, the protein was rescreened for crystal formation against these same 192 conditions. Instead of extensive precipitation, as observed initially, it was found that 24 separate conditions produced crystals and the exchange of AF2059 into CHES buffer significantly improved crystallization success. Fine-screen optimization of these conditions led to the production of a crystal suitable for high-resolution (2.2 Å) structure determination.

  19. MES Buffer Affects Arabidopsis Root Apex Zonation and Root Growth by Suppressing Superoxide Generation in Root Apex

    PubMed Central

    Kagenishi, Tomoko; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František

    2016-01-01

    In plants, growth of roots and root hairs is regulated by the fine cellular control of pH and reactive oxygen species (ROS). MES, 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid as one of the Good’s buffers has broadly been used for buffering medium, and it is thought to suit for plant growth with the concentration at 0.1% (w/v) because the buffer capacity of MES ranging pH 5.5–7.0 (for Arabidopsis, pH 5.8). However, many reports have shown that, in nature, roots require different pH values on the surface of specific root apex zones, namely meristem, transition zone, and elongation zone. Despite the fact that roots always grow on a media containing buffer molecule, little is known about impact of MES on root growth. Here, we have checked the effects of different concentrations of MES buffer using growing roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results show that 1% of MES significantly inhibited root growth, the number of root hairs and length of meristem, whereas 0.1% promoted root growth and root apex area (region spanning from the root tip up to the transition zone). Furthermore, superoxide generation in root apex disappeared at 1% of MES. These results suggest that MES disturbs normal root morphogenesis by changing the ROS homeostasis in root apex. PMID:26925066

  20. MES Buffer Affects Arabidopsis Root Apex Zonation and Root Growth by Suppressing Superoxide Generation in Root Apex.

    PubMed

    Kagenishi, Tomoko; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František

    2016-01-01

    In plants, growth of roots and root hairs is regulated by the fine cellular control of pH and reactive oxygen species (ROS). MES, 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid as one of the Good's buffers has broadly been used for buffering medium, and it is thought to suit for plant growth with the concentration at 0.1% (w/v) because the buffer capacity of MES ranging pH 5.5-7.0 (for Arabidopsis, pH 5.8). However, many reports have shown that, in nature, roots require different pH values on the surface of specific root apex zones, namely meristem, transition zone, and elongation zone. Despite the fact that roots always grow on a media containing buffer molecule, little is known about impact of MES on root growth. Here, we have checked the effects of different concentrations of MES buffer using growing roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results show that 1% of MES significantly inhibited root growth, the number of root hairs and length of meristem, whereas 0.1% promoted root growth and root apex area (region spanning from the root tip up to the transition zone). Furthermore, superoxide generation in root apex disappeared at 1% of MES. These results suggest that MES disturbs normal root morphogenesis by changing the ROS homeostasis in root apex. PMID:26925066

  1. Marriage a Buffer Against Drinking Problems?

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_158887.html Marriage a Buffer Against Drinking Problems? Study found protective benefit for both men ... News) -- Married people are less likely to have drinking problems than single people, and that protective effect ...

  2. Marriage a Buffer Against Drinking Problems?

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158887.html Marriage a Buffer Against Drinking Problems? Study found protective ... aware of the potentially important protective effects of marriage on alcohol problems, our study puts this observation ...

  3. A MICROPROCESSOR ASCII CHARACTER BUFFERING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A microprocessor buffering system (MBS) was developed at the Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory -Cincinnati (EMSL-CI) to provide an efficient transfer for serial ASCII information between intelligent instrument systema and a Data General NOVA laboratory automation co...

  4. Optical imaging: Ultrafast buffering by molecular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertz, Edouard; Lavorel, Bruno; Faucher, Olivier

    2011-02-01

    A simple molecular gas sample can be used to achieve ultrafast optical buffering in two-dimensional optical imaging, thus serving as a promising extension of the well-developed liquid-crystal display technology.

  5. Basal buffer systems for a newly glycosylated recombinant human interferon-β with biophysical stability and DoE approaches.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Ah; Song, Kyoung; Lim, Dae Gon; Hada, Shavron; Shin, Young Kee; Shin, Sangmun; Jeong, Seong Hoon

    2015-10-12

    The purpose of this study was to develop a basal buffer system for a biobetter version of recombinant human interferon-β 1a (rhIFN-β 1a), termed R27T, to optimize its biophysical stability. The protein was pre-screened in solution as a function of pH (2-11) using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). According to the result, its experimental pI and optimal pH range were 5.8 and 3.6-4.4, respectively. Design of experiment (DoE) approach was developed as a practical tool to aid formulation studies as a function of pH (2.9-5.7), buffer (phosphate, acetate, citrate, and histidine), and buffer concentration (20 mM and 50 mM). This method employed a weight-based procedure to interpret complex data sets and to investigate critical key factors representing protein stability. The factors used were Tm, enthalpy, and relative helix contents which were obtained by DSC and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Although the weights changed by three responses, objective functions from a set of experimental designs based on four buffers were highest in 20 mM acetate buffer at pH 3.6 among all 19 scenarios tested. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) was adopted to investigate accelerated storage stability in order to optimize the pH value with susceptible stability since the low pH was not patient-compliant. Interestingly, relative helix contents and storage stability (monomer remaining) increased with pH and was the highest at pH 4.0. On the other hand, relative helix contents and thermodynamic stability decreased at pH 4.2 and 4.4, suggesting protein aggregation issues. Therefore, the optimized basal buffer system for the novel biobetter was proposed to be 20 mM acetate buffer at pH 3.8±0.2. PMID:26215462

  6. Amelogenins as Potential Buffers during Secretory-stage Amelogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, J.; Lyaruu, D.M.; Takano, Y.; Gibson, C.W.; DenBesten, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenins are the most abundant protein species in forming dental enamel, taken to regulate crystal shape and crystal growth. Unprotonated amelogenins can bind protons, suggesting that amelogenins could regulate the pH in enamel in situ. We hypothesized that without amelogenins the enamel would acidify unless ameloblasts were buffered by alternative ways. To investigate this, we measured the mineral and chloride content in incisor enamel of amelogenin-knockout (AmelX-/-) mice and determined the pH of enamel by staining with methyl-red. Ameloblasts were immunostained for anion exchanger-2 (Ae2), a transmembrane pH regulator sensitive for acid that secretes bicarbonate in exchange for chloride. The enamel of AmelX-/- mice was 10-fold thinner, mineralized in the secretory stage 1.8-fold more than wild-type enamel and containing less chloride (suggesting more bicarbonate secretion). Enamel of AmelX-/- mice stained with methyl-red contained no acidic bands in the maturation stage as seen in wild-type enamel. Secretory ameloblasts of AmelX-/- mice, but not wild-type mice, were immunopositive for Ae2, and stained more intensely in the maturation stage compared with wild-type mice. Exposure of AmelX-/- mice to fluoride enhanced the mineral content in the secretory stage, lowered chloride, and intensified Ae2 immunostaining in the enamel organ in comparison with non-fluorotic mutant teeth. The results suggest that unprotonated amelogenins may regulate the pH of forming enamel in situ. Without amelogenins, Ae2 could compensate for the pH drop associated with crystal formation. PMID:25535204

  7. Influence of pH on yeast immobilization on polystyrene surfaces modified by energetic ion bombardment.

    PubMed

    Tran, Clara T H; Kondyurin, Alexey; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Bilek, Marcela M M; McKenzie, David R

    2013-04-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) treatment is a novel method for immobilizing yeast on polymer surfaces by covalent linkage. This study of the immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in both rehydrated and cultured forms showed that the density of cell attachment on PIII treated polystyrene (PS) was strongly dependent on the pH of the incubation medium and was higher for rehydrated yeast. A study of the surface charge was undertaken to explain this result. A high density of cell attachment occurs in acidic conditions (pH 3-5) and a significantly reduced cell density occurs in neutral and alkaline buffers (pH 6-10) for both types of yeast. Force measurements using atomic force microscopy show that a negative charge is present on polystyrene after PIII treatment. The charge is close to zero at pH 3 to pH 5 and increasingly negative from pH 6 to pH 10. Both rehydrated yeast and cultured yeast have negative electrophoretic mobility in the pH range studied. The repulsive forces are weak in acidic buffers and stronger in neutral and alkaline buffers, in good agreement with the cell densities observed. Rehydrated yeast cells are found to be more hydrophobic than cultured yeasts in the same buffer. The higher hydrophobicity explains the higher attachment of rehydrated yeast compared to cultured yeast. PMID:23298600

  8. Buffer layer for thin film structures

    DOEpatents

    Foltyn, Stephen R.; Jia, Quanxi; Arendt, Paul N.; Wang, Haiyan

    2006-10-31

    A composite structure including a base substrate and a layer of a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate is provided. A superconducting article can include a composite structure including an outermost layer of magnesium oxide, a buffer layer of strontium titanate or a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate and a top-layer of a superconducting material such as YBCO upon the buffer layer.

  9. Buffer layer for thin film structures

    DOEpatents

    Foltyn, Stephen R.; Jia, Quanxi; Arendt, Paul N.; Wang, Haiyan

    2010-06-15

    A composite structure including a base substrate and a layer of a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate is provided. A superconducting article can include a composite structure including an outermost layer of magnesium oxide, a buffer layer of strontium titanate or a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate and a top-layer of a superconducting material such as YBCO upon the buffer layer.

  10. Buffer regulation of calcium puff sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraiman, Daniel; Ponce Dawson, Silvina

    2014-02-01

    Puffs are localized Ca2 + signals that arise in oocytes in response to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). They are the result of the liberation of Ca2 + from the endoplasmic reticulum through the coordinated opening of IP3 receptor/channels clustered at a functional release site. The presence of buffers that trap Ca2 + provides a mechanism that enriches the spatio-temporal dynamics of cytosolic calcium. The expression of different types of buffers along the cell's life provides a tool with which Ca2 + signals and their responses can be modulated. In this paper we extend the stochastic model of a cluster of IP3R-Ca2 + channels introduced previously to elucidate the effect of buffers on sequences of puffs at the same release site. We obtain analytically the probability laws of the interpuff time and of the number of channels that participate of the puffs. Furthermore, we show that under typical experimental conditions the effect of buffers can be accounted for in terms of a simple inhibiting function. Hence, by exploring different inhibiting functions we are able to study the effect of a variety of buffers on the puff size and interpuff time distributions. We find the somewhat counter-intuitive result that the addition of a fast Ca2 + buffer can increase the average number of channels that participate of a puff.

  11. Social buffering: relief from stress and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Kikusui, Takefumi; Winslow, James T; Mori, Yuji

    2006-01-01

    Communication is essential to members of a society not only for the expression of personal information, but also for the protection from environmental threats. Highly social mammals have a distinct characteristic: when conspecific animals are together, they show a better recovery from experiences of distress. This phenomenon, termed ‘social buffering’, has been found in rodents, birds, non-human primates and also in humans. This paper reviews classical findings on social buffering and focuses, in particular, on social buffering effects in relation to neuroendocrine stress responses. The social cues that transmit social buffering signals, the neural mechanisms of social buffering and a partner's efficacy with respect to social buffering are also detailed. Social contact appears to have a very positive influence on the psychological and the physiological aspects of social animals, including human beings. Research leading towards further understanding of the mechanisms of social buffering could provide alternative medical treatments based on the natural, individual characteristics of social animals, which could improve the quality of life. PMID:17118934

  12. Lack of Buffering by Composites Promotes Shift to More Cariogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nedeljkovic, I; De Munck, J; Slomka, V; Van Meerbeek, B; Teughels, W; Van Landuyt, K L

    2016-07-01

    Secondary caries (SC) remains a very important problem with composite restorations. The objectives of this study were to test the acid-buffering ability of several restorative materials and to evaluate whether buffering of the restorative material has an impact on the microbial composition of the biofilm. Disk-shaped specimens of conventional composite, composite with surface prereacted glass-ionomer filler particles (so-called giomer), glass-ionomer cement (GIC), amalgam, and hydroxyapatite (HAp) (control) were exposed to aqueous solutions with pH 4, 5, 6, and 7 and to the medium containing bacteria-produced acids, and pH changes were recorded over several days. Next, material specimens were immersed in bacterial growth medium with pH adjusted to 5. After a 24-h incubation, the extracts were collected and inoculated with a cariogenic (Streptococcus mutans) and a noncariogenic (Streptococcus sanguinis) species. The bacterial growth was monitored both in a single-species model by spectrophotometry and in a dual-species model by viability quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Amalgam and HAp showed the strongest acid-buffering ability, followed by the GIC and the giomer, while the conventional composite did not exhibit any buffering capacity. Furthermore, due to the lack of acid-buffering abilities, composite was not able to increase the pH of the medium (pH 5), which, in the absence of antibacterial properties, allowed the growth of S. mutans, while the growth of S. sanguinis, a less aciduric species, was completely inhibited. A similar effect was observed when bacteria were cultured together: there was a higher percentage of S. mutans and lower percentage of S. sanguinis with the conventional composite than with other materials and HAp. In conclusion, conventional composites lack the ability to increase the local pH, which leads to the outgrowth of more acidogenic/aciduric bacteria and higher cariogenicity of the biofilm. Together with lack of antibacterial

  13. Low noise buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators for precise time and frequency measurement and distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichinger, R. A.; Dachel, P.; Miller, W. H.; Ingold, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    Extremely low noise, high performance, wideband buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators were developed. These buffer amplifiers are designed to distribute reference frequencies from 30 KHz to 45 MHz from a hydrogen maser without degrading the hydrogen maser's performance. The buffered phase comparators are designed to intercompare the phase of state of the art hydrogen masers without adding any significant measurement system noise. These devices have a 27 femtosecond phase stability floor and are stable to better than one picosecond for long periods of time. Their temperature coefficient is less than one picosecond per degree C, and they have shown virtually no voltage coefficients.

  14. Temperature buffer test design, instrumentation and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandén, Torbjörn; Goudarzi, Reza; de Combarieu, Michel; Åkesson, Mattias; Hökmark, Harald

    The Temperature Buffer Test, TBT, is a heated full-scale field experiment carried out jointly by ANDRA and SKB at the SKB Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory in Southeast Sweden. An existing 8 m deep, 1.8 m diameter KBS-3-type deposition hole located at -420 m level has been selected for the test. The objectives are to improve the general understanding of Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical, THM, behavior of buffer materials submitted to severe thermal conditions with temperatures well over 100 °C during water uptake of partly saturated bentonite-based buffer materials, and to check, in due time, their properties after water saturation. The test includes two carbon steel heating canisters each 3 m high and 0.6 m diameter, surrounded by 0.6 m of buffer material. There is a 0.2 m thick sand shield between the upper heater and the surrounding bentonite, while the lower heater is surrounded by bentonite only. On top of the stack of bentonite blocks is a confining plug anchored to the rock. In the slot between buffer and rock wall is a sand filter equipped with pipes to control the water pressure at the boundary, which is seldom done with an EBS in situ experiment. Both heater mid-height planes are densely instrumented in order to follow, with direct or indirect methods, buffer THM evolution. Temperature, relative humidity, stress and pore pressure have been monitored since the test start in March 2003. Total water inflow is also monitored. Firstly, the present paper describes the test design, the instrumentation, the plug anchoring system and the system for water boundary pressure control. Second, having described the test, the paper shows different measurements that illustrate evolution of temperature, saturation, suction and swelling pressure in the upper and the lower buffer.

  15. Equilibrium Studies of Dibutyltin(IV)-Zwitterionic Buffer Complexation.

    PubMed

    El-Gahami, M A; Albishri, H M

    2013-01-01

    Equilibrium studies in aqueous solution are reported for dibutyltin(IV) (DBT) complexes of the zwitterionic buffers "Good's buffers" Mes and Mops. Stoichiometric and formation constants of the complexes formed were determined at different temperatures and ionic strength 0.1 mol·L(-1) NaNO3. The results show that the best fit of the titration curves were obtained when the complexes ML, MLH-1, MLH-2 and MLH-3 were considered beside the hydrolysis product of the dibutyltin(IV) cation. The thermodynamic parameters ΔH (o), ΔS (o) and ΔG (o) calculated from the temperature dependence of the formation constant of the dibutyltin(IV) complexes with 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (Mes) and 3-(N-mor-pholino)-propanesulfonic acid (Mops) were investigated. The effect of dioxane as a solvent on the formation constants of DBT-Mes and DBT-Mops complexes decrease linearly with the increase of dioxane proportion in the medium. The concentration distribution of the various complexes species was evaluated as a function of pH. PMID:24273357

  16. The Effects of Acetate Buffer Concentration on Lysozyme Solubility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1996-01-01

    The micro-solubility column technique was employed to systematically investigate the effects of buffer concentration on tetragonal lysozyme solubility. While keeping the NaCl concentrations constant at 2%, 3%, 4%, 5% and 7%, and the pH at 4.0, we have studied the solubility of tetragonal lysozyme over an acetate buffer concentration range of 0.01M to 0.5M as a function of temperature. The lysozyme solubility decreased with increasing acetate concentration from 0.01M to 0.1M. This decrease may simply be due to the net increase in solvent ionic strength. Increasing the acetate concentration beyond 0.1M resulted in an increase in the lysozyme solubility, which reached a peak at - 0.3M acetate concentration. This increase was believed to be due to the increased binding of acetate to the anionic binding sites of lysozyme, preventing their occupation by chloride. In keeping with the previously observed reversal of the Hoffmeister series for effectiveness of anions in crystallizing lysozyme, acetate would be a less effective precipitant than chloride. Further increasing the acetate concentration beyond 0.3M resulted in a subsequent gradual decrease in the lysozyme solubility at all NaCl concentrations.

  17. Photosynthetic activity buffers ocean acidification in seagrass meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, I. E.; Olsen, Y. S.; Ramajo, L.; Basso, L.; Steckbauer, A.; Moore, T. S.; Howard, J.; Duarte, C. M.

    2013-07-01

    Macrophytes growing in shallow coastal zones characterized by intense metabolic activity have the capacity to modify pH within their canopy and beyond. We observed diel pH ranges is in shallow (5-12 m) seagrass (Posidonia oceanica) meadows from 0.06 pH units in September to 0.24 units in June. The carbonate system (pH, DIC, and aragonite saturation state (ΩAr) and O2 within the meadows displayed strong diel variability driven by primary productivity, and changes in chemistry were related to structural parameters of the meadow, in particular, the leaf surface area available for photosynthesis (LAI). LAI was positively correlated to mean and max pHNBS and max ΩAr. Oxygen production positively influenced the range and maximum pHNBS and the range of ΩAr. In June, vertical mixing (as Turbulent Kinetic Energy) influenced ΩAr, while in September there was no effect of hydrodynamics on the carbonate system within the canopy. ΩAr was positively correlated with the calcium carbonate load of the leaves, demonstrating a direct link between structural parameters, ΩAr and carbonate deposition. There was a direct relationship between ΩAr, influenced directly by meadow LAI, and CaCO3 content of the leaves. Therefore, calcifying organisms, e.g. epiphytes with carbonate skeletons, might benefit from the modification of the carbonate system by the meadow. The meadow might be capable of providing refugia for calcifiers by increasing pH and ΩAr through metabolic activity. There is, however, concern for the ability of seagrasses to provide this refugia function in the future. The predicted decline of seagrass meadows may alter the scope for alteration of pH within a seagrass meadow and in the water column above the meadow, particularly if shoot density and biomass decline, both strongly linked to LAI. Organisms associated with seagrass communities may therefore suffer from the loss of pH buffering capacity in degraded meadows.

  18. Inhibition of enamel demineralization by buffering effect of S-PRG filler-containing dental sealant.

    PubMed

    Kaga, Masayuki; Kakuda, Shinichi; Ida, Yusuke; Toshima, Hirokazu; Hashimoto, Masanori; Endo, Kazuhiko; Sano, Hidehiko

    2014-02-01

    The buffering capacity and inhibitory effects on enamel demineralization of two commercially available dental sealants were evaluated in this study. The effects of filler particles were also examined. Disks of enamel and cured sealant materials of BeautiSealant (silica or S-PRG filler) or Teethmate F-1 were incubated in lactic acid solutions (pH 4.0) for 1-6 d. The pH changes and amounts of ions released in the solutions were assessed, and enamel surfaces were observed using a scanning electron microscope. The pH of the solution with BeautiSealant (S-PRG filler) was neutralized from pH 4.0 to pH 6.1 (after incubation for 1 d) and from pH 4.0 to pH 6.7 (after incubation for 6 d). In addition, no release of calcium ions was detected and the enamel surface was morphologically intact in scanning electron microscopy images. However, the pH of the solution with Teethmate F-1 remained below pH 4.0 during incubation from days 1 to 6. Calcium release was increased in solutions up to and after 6 d of incubation. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that the structures of hydroxyapatite rods were exposed at the specimen surfaces as a result of demineralization. Ions released from S-PRG filler-containing dental sealant rapidly buffered the lactic acid solution and inhibited enamel demineralization. PMID:24372898

  19. Total and Labile Phosphorus Concentrations as Influenced by Riparian Buffer Soil Properties.

    PubMed

    Young, Eric O; Ross, Donald S

    2016-01-01

    Riparian buffers can act as a phosphorus (P) source under active stream bank erosion. Using soil and landscape variables (soil series, drainage class, organic matter, and pH) to index P concentrations could improve P loss risk tools for buffers. The objectives of this study were (i) to determine if soil properties could predict total and labile P concentrations within a 10-ha riparian buffer and (ii) to quantify the degree of spatial dependence of P and related properties. Soil samples were taken in 15-cm increments to a depth of 60 cm using a grid ( = 71) from an established riparian buffer along the Rock River in Vermont. Total soil P (TP), plant-available P determined by Modified Morgan extraction (MM-P), pH, soil organic matter (SOM), soil texture, and select cations were measured. We found that TP (152-1536 mg P kg) and MM-P (0.4-14.6 mg kg) ranged widely, with distinct differences between soil series. Mean TP and MM-P were greater in alluvial and glaciolacustrine soils compared with glacial till. Across all samples, MM-P was weakly related to soil properties; however, total labile P (orthophosphate + organic P measured by ICP) and unreactive labile P (ICP-P - colorimetric-P) could both be predicted by SOM ( = 0.59 and 0.73, respectively). Strong spatial dependence was found for P and related properties as revealed by geospatial analyses. Results show that P availability in the buffer was strongly related to soil genesis and support site-specific approaches for P loss risk evaluation in buffers. PMID:26828185

  20. On the pH of Aqueous Attoliter-Volume Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Kieran P.; Velpula, Samson S.; Demille, Trevor B.; Pajela, Ryan; Goldner, Lori S.

    Droplets of water dispersed in perfluorinated liquids have widespread use including microfluidics, drug delivery and single-molecule measurements. Perfluorinated liquids are distinctly biocompatible due to their stability, low surface tension, lipophobicity, and hydrophobicity. For this reason, the effect of the perfluorinated surface on droplet contents is usually ignored. However, as the droplet diameter is reduced, we expect that any effect of the water/oil interface on droplet contents will become more obvious. We studied the pH of attoliter-volume aqueous droplets in perfluorinated liquids using pH-sensing fluorescent dyes. Droplets were prepared either by sonication or extrusion from buffer and perfluorinated liquids (FC40 or FC77). A non-ionic surfactant was used to stabilize the droplets. Buffer strength, ionic strength, and pH of the aqueous phase were varied and resulting droplet pH compared to the pH of the buffer from which they were formed. Preliminary data are consistent with a pH in droplets that depends on the concentration of non-ionic surfactant. At low surfactant concentrations, the pH in droplets is distinctly lower than the stock buffer. However, as the concentration of non-ionic surfactant is increased the change in pH decreases. This work was funded by NSF/DBI-1152386.

  1. Defining the buffering process by a triprotic acid without relying on Stewart-electroneutrality considerations.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minhtri K; Kao, Liyo; Kurtz, Ira

    2011-01-01

    Upon the addition of protons to an aqueous solution, a component of the H+ load will be bound i.e. buffered. In an aqueous solution containing a triprotic acid, H+ can be bound to three different states of the acid as well as to OH- ions that are derived from the auto-ionization of H2O. In quantifying the buffering process of a triprotic acid, one must define the partitioning of H+ among the three states of the acid and also the OH- ions in solution in order to predict the equilibrium pH value. However, previous quantitative approaches that model triprotic acid titration behaviour and used to predict the equilibrium pH rely on the mathematical convenience of electroneutrality/charge balance considerations. This fact has caused confusion in the literature, and has led to the assumption that charge balance/electroneutrality is a causal factor in modulating proton buffering (Stewart formulation). However, as we have previously shown, although charge balance can be used mathematically as a convenient tool in deriving various formulae, electroneutrality per se is not a fundamental physicochemical parameter that is mechanistically involved in the underlying buffering and proton transfer reactions. The lack of distinction between a mathematical tool, and a fundamental physicochemical parameter is in part a reason for the current debate regarding the Stewart formulation of acid-base analysis. We therefore posed the following question: Is it possible to generate an equation that defines and predicts the buffering of a triprotic acid that is based only on H+ partitioning without incorporating electroneutrality in the derivation? Towards this goal, we derived our new equation utilizing: 1) partitioning of H+ buffering; 2) conservation of mass; and 3) acid-base equilibria. In validating this model, we compared the predicted equilibrium pH with the measured pH of an aqueous solution consisting of Na2HPO4 to which HCl was added. The measured pH values were in excellent agreement

  2. 12 CFR 3.11 - Capital conservation buffer and countercyclical capital buffer amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... or Federal savings association under subparts H and I of this part; 12 CFR 5.46, 12 CFR part 5, subpart E; 12 CFR part 6. (b) Countercyclical capital buffer amount. (1) General. An advanced approaches... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Capital conservation buffer and...

  3. 12 CFR 324.11 - Capital conservation buffer and countercyclical capital buffer amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... Additional limitations on distributions may apply to an FDIC-supervised institution under 12 CFR 303.241 and... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Capital conservation buffer and countercyclical capital buffer amount. 324.11 Section 324.11 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE...

  4. 12 CFR 217.11 - Capital conservation buffer and countercyclical capital buffer amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... distributions. Additional limitations on distributions may apply to a Board-regulated institution under 12 CFR 225.4, 12 CFR 225.8, and 12 CFR 263.202. (b) Countercyclical capital buffer amount. (1) General. An... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Capital conservation buffer and...

  5. Undergraduate Chemistry Students' Perceptions of and Misconceptions about Buffers and Buffer Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orgill, MaryKay; Sutherland, Aynsley

    2008-01-01

    Both upper- and lower-level chemistry students struggle with understanding the concept of buffers and with solving corresponding buffer problems. While it might be reasonable to expect general chemistry students to struggle with this abstract concept, it is surprising that upper-level students in analytical chemistry and biochemistry continue to…

  6. Automatic online buffer capacity (alkalinity) measurement of wastewater using an electrochemical cell.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liang; Charles, Wipa; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

    2016-10-01

    The use of an automatic online electrochemical cell (EC) for measuring the buffer capacity of wastewater is presented. pH titration curves of different solutions (NaHCO3, Na2HPO4, real municipal wastewater, and anaerobic digester liquid) were obtained by conventional chemical titration and compared to the online EC measurements. The results show that the pH titration curves from the EC were comparable to that of the conventional chemical titration. The results show a linear relationship between the response of the online EC detection system and the titrimetric partial alkalinity and total alkalinity of all tested samples. This suggests that an EC can be used as a simple online titration device for monitoring the buffer capacity of different industrial processes including wastewater treatment and anaerobic digestion processes. PMID:26935968

  7. Stability of ribosomes of Staphylococcus aureus S6 sublethally heated in different buffers.

    PubMed

    Hurst, A; Hughes, A

    1978-02-01

    Cells of Staphylococcus aureus heated at 52 degrees C in magnesium-chelating buffers [pH 7.2, 50 mM potassium phosphate or 50 mM tris(hydroxymethyl)-aminomethane containing 1 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid] leaked 260-nm absorbing material, shown to be RNA, and suffered destruction of their ribosomes. These cells did not regain their salt tolerance when repair was carried out in the presence of actinomycin D (5 microgram/ml). Cells similarly heated in magnesium-conserving buffers [pH 7.2, 50 mM tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane containing 10 mM MgCl2 or piperazine buffer] did not leak RNA, suffered no ribosomal damage when heated for 15 min, and recovered, at least partially, in the presence of actinomycin D. Ribosomal damage, is therefore, a consequence of Mg2+ loss and is not an effect of heat per se. Cells suspended in either Mg2+-chelating or Mg2+-conserving buffers lost salt tolerance to about the same extent during heating at 52 degrees C. Therefore, sublethal heat injury can not be attributed to ribosomal damage. PMID:627531

  8. Biogeochemical processes and buffering capacity concurrently affect acidification in a seasonally hypoxic coastal marine basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagens, M.; Slomp, C. P.; Meysman, F. J. R.; Seitaj, D.; Harlay, J.; Borges, A. V.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2015-03-01

    Coastal areas are impacted by multiple natural and anthropogenic processes and experience stronger pH fluctuations than the open ocean. These variations can weaken or intensify the ocean acidification signal induced by increasing atmospheric pCO2. The development of eutrophication-induced hypoxia intensifies coastal acidification, since the CO2 produced during respiration decreases the buffering capacity in any hypoxic bottom water. To assess the combined ecosystem impacts of acidification and hypoxia, we quantified the seasonal variation in pH and oxygen dynamics in the water column of a seasonally stratified coastal basin (Lake Grevelingen, the Netherlands). Monthly water-column chemistry measurements were complemented with estimates of primary production and respiration using O2 light-dark incubations, in addition to sediment-water fluxes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA). The resulting data set was used to set up a proton budget on a seasonal scale. Temperature-induced seasonal stratification combined with a high community respiration was responsible for the depletion of oxygen in the bottom water in summer. The surface water showed strong seasonal variation in process rates (primary production, CO2 air-sea exchange), but relatively small seasonal pH fluctuations (0.46 units on the total hydrogen ion scale). In contrast, the bottom water showed less seasonality in biogeochemical rates (respiration, sediment-water exchange), but stronger pH fluctuations (0.60 units). This marked difference in pH dynamics could be attributed to a substantial reduction in the acid-base buffering capacity of the hypoxic bottom water in the summer period. Our results highlight the importance of acid-base buffering in the pH dynamics of coastal systems and illustrate the increasing vulnerability of hypoxic, CO2-rich waters to any acidifying process.

  9. Auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles involves two mechanisms with different pH optima

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleland, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Although rapid auxin-induced growth of coleoptile sections can persist for at least 18 hours, acid-induced growth lasts for a much shorter period of time. Three theories have been proposed to explain this difference in persistence. To distinguish between these theories, the pH dependence for auxin-induced growth of oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptiles has been determined early and late in the elongation process. Coleoptile sections from which the outer epidermis was removed to facilitate buffer entry were incubated, with or without 10 micromolar indoleacetic acid, in 20 millimolar buffers at pH 4.5 to 7.0 to maintain a fixed wall pH. During the first 1 to 2 hours after addition of auxin, elongation occurs by acid-induced extension (i.e. the pH optimum is <5 and the elongation varies inversely with the solution pH). Auxin causes no additional elongation because the buffers prevent further changes in wall pH. After 60 to 90 minutes, a second mechanism of auxin-induced growth, whose pH optimum is 5.5 to 6.0, predominates. It is proposed that rapid growth responses to changes in auxin concentration are mediated by auxin-induced changes in wall pH, whereas the prolonged, steady-state growth rate is controlled by a second, auxin-mediated process whose pH optimum is less acidic.

  10. Nonlinear spelling in graphemic buffer deficit.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Teresa; Nickels, Lyndsey

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a case of nonlinear spelling and its implications for theories of the graphemic buffer. C.T.J., an individual with an acquired deficit of the graphemic buffer, often wrote the letters of his responses in a nonlinear temporal order when writing to dictation. The spatial ordering of the letters was maintained: Letters in the later positions of the words were written towards the right side of the response, even when written before letters in earlier positions. This unusual phenomenon has been briefly reported in three prior cases but this study provides the most detailed analysis of the phenomenon to date. We specifically contend that the decoupling of the temporal and spatial aspects of spelling is difficult to reconcile with competitive queuing accounts of the graphemic buffer. PMID:27355609

  11. Determination of vincamine in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Dal Bo, L; Ceriani, G; Broccali, G

    1992-01-01

    A simple and rapid high-performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for the determination of vincamine in human plasma. Plasma samples were buffered at pH 9 and after extraction with tert.-butyl methyl ether back-extracted into 0.017 M orthophosphoric acid. Propranolol was used as the internal standard. An aliquot was injected on to a high-performance liquid chromatographic system using a C18 reversed-phase column and an acetonitrile-phosphate buffer containing triethylamine (30:70) as mobile phase. Detection was performed with an ultraviolet detector at 273 nm. The method had good accuracy and precision and the detection limit (0.3 ng/ml with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3:1) allowed the assessment of vincamine concentrations in plasma in pharmacokinetic studies on healthy human volunteers. PMID:1564097

  12. Effect of pH and postmortem aging on protein extraction from broiler breast muscle.

    PubMed

    Eady, M; Samuel, D; Bowker, B

    2014-07-01

    This study determined the effects of extraction buffer pH and postmortem aging on the extraction of salt-soluble and water-soluble proteins from broiler pectoralis muscle. Deboned broiler breast fillets were collected at 4 h postmortem, packaged, and then stored at 4°C until 1, 5, or 8 d postmortem. After the designated aging period, salt-soluble and water-soluble protein extractions were performed using buffers at 7 different pH levels (pH 5.4, 6.4, 6.9, 7.2, 7.5, 8.0, 9.0). Protein concentrations of the extracts were measured and SDS-PAGE analysis was performed. Salt-soluble protein concentration increased (P < 0.0001) as buffer pH increased from pH 5.4 to 6.9 and then remained unchanged from pH 6.9 to 9.0. Water-soluble protein concentration increased (P < 0.0001) as buffer pH increased from pH 5.4 to 7.2 and then remained unchanged from pH 7.2 to 9.0. There was not a significant extraction buffer pH by aging treatment interaction for the total protein concentration of either the salt-soluble or water-soluble protein extracts. The protein concentrations of salt-soluble extracts were similar at both 1 and 8 d postmortem but lower (P < 0.0001) at 5 d postmortem. The protein concentrations of water-soluble extracts were similar at both 1 and 5 d postmortem, but higher (P < 0.0001) at 8 d. Both extraction buffer pH and postmortem aging influenced the SDS-PAGE protein profiles of salt-soluble and water-soluble protein extracts from breast muscles. Data demonstrate that postmortem aging and extraction buffer pH influence both the total amount and the composition of the myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins that can be extracted from broiler breast fillets. PMID:24812239

  13. Corrosion in low dielectric constant Si-O based thin films: Buffer concentration effects

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, F. W.; Lane, M. W.; Gates, S. M.

    2014-05-15

    Organosilicate glass (OSG) is often used as an interlayer dielectric (ILD) in high performance integrated circuits. OSG is a brittle material and prone to stress-corrosion cracking reminiscent of that observed in bulk glasses. Of particular concern are chemical-mechanical planarization techniques and wet cleans involving solvents commonly encountered in microelectronics fabrication where the organosilicate film is exposed to aqueous environments. Previous work has focused on the effect of pH, surfactant, and peroxide concentration on the subcritical crack growth of these films. However, little or no attention has focused on the effect of the conjugate acid/base concentration in a buffer. Accordingly, this work examines the “strength” of the buffer solution in both acidic and basic environments. The concentration of the buffer components is varied keeping the ratio of acid/base and therefore pH constant. In addition, the pH was varied by altering the acid/base ratio to ascertain any additional effect of pH. Corrosion tests were conducted with double-cantilever beam fracture mechanics specimens and fracture paths were verified with ATR-FTIR. Shifts in the threshold fracture energy, the lowest energy required for bond rupture in the given environment, G{sub TH}, were found to shift to lower values as the concentration of the base in the buffer increased. This effect was found to be much larger than the effect of the hydroxide ion concentration in unbuffered solutions. The results are rationalized in terms of the salient chemical bond breaking process occurring at the crack tip and modeled in terms of the chemical potential of the reactive species.

  14. Evaluation of amine inhibitors for suitability as crevice buffering agents. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaweera, P.; Hettiarachchi, S.

    1994-03-01

    This report describes the results of a research effort to evaluate the suitability of some selected amines and amino acids as a crevice-buffering agents in pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators. The amines may be useful for buffering acid crevices, and the amino acids, because they contain both acidic and basic groups, may be useful for acidic and caustic crevices. Five commercially available amines and two amino acids were studied during this research. The study involved (1) the hydrolysis of these commercially available amines and amino acids, including measurement of their kinetics of decomposition, in simulated steam generator bulk water at 290 C, and (2) determination of their thermal stability in a simulated crevice environment. The study showed that, although the high-molecular-weight amines undergo hydrothermal decomposition, they have a better buffering capacity than their low-molecular-weight counterparts at 290 C. The amines provide effective crevice buffering by increasing the pH of the crevice solution by as much as 2.84 and to 4.24 units in the experimental setup used in this program. It was concluded that polyamines provide excellent buffering of the simulated crevice environment at 290 C and morpholine remains the best low-molecular-weight amine investigated. However, detailed volatility studies of the amines were not considered in this work. Such data would be needed before in-plant testing to ensure that the amines can concentrate in steam generator crevices to the levels assumed in this study.

  15. Development and evaluation of acid-buffering bioadhesive vaginal tablet for mixed vaginal infections.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohd Aftab; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees; Khan, Zeenat Iqbal; Khar, Roop Krishen; Ali, Mushir

    2007-01-01

    An acid-buffering bioadhesive vaginal tablet was developed for the treatment of genitourinary tract infections. From the bioadhesion experiment and release studies it was found that polycarbophil and sodium carboxymethylcellulose is a good combination for an acid-buffering bioadhesive vaginal tablet. Sodium monocitrate was used as a buffering agent to provide acidic pH (4.4), which is an attribute of a healthy vagina. The effervescent mixture (citric acid and sodium bicarbonate) along with a superdisintegrant (Ac-Di-sol) was used to enhance the swellability of the bioadhesive tablet. The drugs clotrimazole (antifungal) and metronidazole (antiprotozoal as well as an antibacterial) were used in the formulation along with Lactobacillus acidophilus spores to treat mixed vaginal infections. From the ex vivo retention study it was found that the bioadhesive polymers hold the tablet for more than 24 hours inside the vaginal tube. The hardness of the acid-buffering bioadhesive vaginal tablet was optimized, at 4 to 5 kg hardness the swelling was found to be good and the cumulative release profile of the developed tablet was matched with a marketed conventional tablet (Infa-V). The in vitro spreadability of the swelled tablet was comparable to the marketed gel. In the in vitro antimicrobial study it was found that the acid-buffering bioadhesive tablet produces better antimicrobial action than marketed intravaginal drug delivery systems (Infa-V, Candid-V and Canesten 1). PMID:18181530

  16. A change from HCO3(-)-CO2- to hepes-buffered medium modifies membrane properties of rat CA1 pyramidal neurones in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Church, J

    1992-01-01

    1. Intracellular recordings were obtained from CA1 pyramidal neurones in rat hippocampal slices. Perfusion with a HCO3(-)-CO2-free, HEPES-buffered medium at pH 7.4 produced a wide variety of reversible effects on neuronal excitability, compared to responses obtained under standard (21 mM-HCO3-, 5% CO2, pH 7.4) conditions. 2. Introduction of HCO3(-)-CO2-free medium most commonly elicited, within 5-20 min, a fall in resting membrane potential (Vm), a rise in threshold for Na(+)-dependent action potential generation, and a reduction in input resistance. Anomalous inward rectification in the hyperpolarizing direction and subthreshold inward rectification were commonly reduced in HEPES-buffered medium. More prolonged exposure (> or = 25 min) to HCO3(-)-CO2-free medium produced, on occasion, Na+ spike inactivation. 3. The amplitudes of the fast and medium after-hyperpolarizations (AHPs) following a single depolarizing current-evoked action potential were attenuated during perfusion with HEPES-buffered medium at pH 7.4, as was the composite AHP following a train of action potentials. 4. Perfusion with HEPES-buffered medium at pH 7.4 reduced the degree of spike frequency adaptation and abolished depolarizing current-evoked burst-firing behaviour when this was present under standard conditions. 5. In tetrodotoxin (TTX)- and tetraethylammonium (TEA)-poisoned neurones, perfusion with HCO3(-)-CO2-free medium at pH 7.4 slightly raised the threshold for activation of Ca(2+)-dependent potentials and slightly reduced their duration, compared to responses obtained in HCO3(-)-CO2-buffered medium at the same pH. The AHP following the Ca2+ spike was, however, markedly attenuated. 6. Perfusion with a low-pH HCO3(-)-CO2-buffered medium (7 mM-HCO3-, 5% CO2, pH 6.9) produced changes qualitatively similar to those observed during perfusion with HEPES-buffered medium at pH 7.4. Raising the pH of the HEPES-buffered medium to 7.8 or 7.9 reversed inconsistently and then only in part the

  17. PH BUFFERING IN FOREST SOIL ORGANIC HORIZONS: RELEVANCE TO ACID PRECIPITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Samples of organic surface horizons (Oi, Oe, Oa) from New York State forest soils were equilibrated with 0 to 20 cmol HNO3 Kg(-1) soil in the laboratory by a batch technique designed to simulate reactions of acid precipitation with forest floors. Each organic horizon retained a c...

  18. Compiler-Assisted Multiple Instruction Rollback Recovery Using a Read Buffer. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alewine, Neal Jon

    1993-01-01

    Multiple instruction rollback (MIR) is a technique to provide rapid recovery from transient processor failures and was implemented in hardware by researchers and slow in mainframe computers. Hardware-based MIR designs eliminate rollback data hazards by providing data redundancy implemented in hardware. Compiler-based MIR designs were also developed which remove rollback data hazards directly with data flow manipulations, thus eliminating the need for most data redundancy hardware. Compiler-assisted techniques to achieve multiple instruction rollback recovery are addressed. It is observed that data some hazards resulting from instruction rollback can be resolved more efficiently by providing hardware redundancy while others are resolved more efficiently with compiler transformations. A compiler-assisted multiple instruction rollback scheme is developed which combines hardware-implemented data redundancy with compiler-driven hazard removal transformations. Experimental performance evaluations were conducted which indicate improved efficiency over previous hardware-based and compiler-based schemes. Various enhancements to the compiler transformations and to the data redundancy hardware developed for the compiler-assisted MIR scheme are described and evaluated. The final topic deals with the application of compiler-assisted MIR techniques to aid in exception repair and branch repair in a speculative execution architecture.

  19. Thermal inactivation of ileal loop-reactive Clostridium perfringens type A strains in phosphate buffer and beef gravy.

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, J G; Peeler, J T; Twedt, R M

    1977-01-01

    The thermal resistance of spore crops produced from each of two ileal loop-reactive strains of Clostridium perfringens type A was determined in two suspending vehicles consisting of 0.067 M (pH 7.0) phosphate buffer and a commercial beef gravy. D115.6 values obtained in buffer and enumerated after pretreatment with sodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate and recovery in plating medium containing lysozyme were two- to threefold greater than those obtained without this treatment. D115.6 values obtained with beef gravy were less than those obtained in buffer with or without lysozyme; however, the D98.9 and D104.4 values were 1.3 to 2 times greater than those obtained in buffer with lysozyme. The z values were within the ranges reported by previous investigators. PMID:199113

  20. O-buffer: a framework for sample-based graphics.

    PubMed

    Qu, Huamin; Kaufman, Arie E

    2004-01-01

    We present an innovative modeling and rendering primitive, called the O-buffer, as a framework for sample-based graphics. The 2D or 3D O-buffer is, in essence, a conventional image or a volume, respectively, except that samples are not restricted to a regular grid. A sample position in the O-buffer is recorded as an offset to the nearest grid point of a regular base grid (hence the name O-buffer). The O-buffer can greatly improve the expressive power of images and volumes. Image quality can be improved by storing more spatial information with samples and by avoiding multiple resamplings. It can be exploited to represent and render unstructured primitives, such as points, particles, and curvilinear or irregular volumes. The O-buffer is therefore a unified representation for a variety of graphics primitives and supports mixing them in the same scene. It is a semiregular structure which lends itself to efficient construction and rendering. O-buffers may assume a variety of forms including 2D O-buffers, 3D O-buffers, uniform O-buffers, nonuniform O-buffers, adaptive O-buffers, layered-depth O-buffers, and O-buffer trees. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the O--buffer in a variety of applications, such as image-based rendering, point sample rendering, and volume rendering. PMID:18579969

  1. Controlled release of acidic drugs in compendial and physiological hydrogen carbonate buffer from polymer blend-coated oral solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Wulff, R; Rappen, G-M; Koziolek, M; Garbacz, G; Leopold, C S

    2015-09-18

    The objective of this study was to investigate the suitability of "Eudragit® RL/Eudragit® L55" (RL/L55) blend coatings for a pH-independent release of acidic drugs. A coating for ketoprofen and naproxen mini tablets was developed showing constant drug release rate under pharmacopeial two-stage test conditions for at least 300 min. To simulate drug release from the mini tablets coated with RL/L55 blends in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, drug release profiles in Hanks buffer pH 6.8 were recorded and compared with drug release profiles in compendial media. RL/L55 blend coatings showed increased drug permeability in Hanks buffer pH 6.8 compared to phosphate buffer pH 6.8 due to its higher ion concentration. However, drug release rates of acidic drugs were lower in Hanks buffer pH 6.8 because of the lower buffer capacity resulting in reduced drug solubility. Further dissolution tests were performed in Hanks buffer using pH sequences simulating the physiological pH conditions in the GI tract. Drug release from mini tablets coated with an RL/L55 blend (8:1) was insensitive to pH changes of the medium within the pH range of 5.8-7.5. It was concluded that coatings of RL/L55 blends show a high potential for application in coated oral drug delivery systems with a special focus on pH-independent release of acidic drugs. PMID:26093053

  2. Printing without Waiting: Buffers and Spoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Brian

    1989-01-01

    Describes two methods to increase the speed of printing on microcomputers: (1) buffers, which are external storage devices used to temporarily store data bound for the printer; and (2) spoolers, which are software programs used to capture printer output and send it to the computer's memory or to a disk file. (LRW)

  3. Buffer layers on biaxially textured metal substrates

    DOEpatents

    Shoup, Shara S.; Paranthamam, Mariappan; Beach, David B.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Goyal, Amit

    2001-01-01

    A method is disclosed for forming a biaxially textured buffer layer on a biaxially oriented metal substrate by using a sol-gel coating technique followed by pyrolyzing/annealing in a reducing atmosphere. This method is advantageous for providing substrates for depositing electronically active materials thereon.

  4. A Discovery Chemistry Experiment on Buffers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulevich, Suzanne E.; Herrick, Richard S.; Mills, Kenneth V.

    2014-01-01

    The Holy Cross Chemistry Department has designed and implemented an experiment on buffers as part of our Discovery Chemistry curriculum. The pedagogical philosophy of Discovery Chemistry is to make the laboratory the focal point of learning for students in their first two years of undergraduate instruction. We first pose questions in prelaboratory…

  5. Body Buffer Zone and Proxemics in Blocking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockwell, John C.; Bahs, Clarence W.

    This paper investigates the effect of personal body buffer zones on compositional arrangements staged by novice directors. Relationships between directors' concepts of personal space and their projection of its dimensions into staging are studied through the use of a variety of proximity measures--distance, area angles of approach, and physical…

  6. Plastic optical fiber sensor for gastric ph detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, Francesco; Bracci, Susanna; Cosi, Franco

    1994-02-01

    An optical fiber sensor for gastric pH detection is described, making use of plastic fibers as light carriers and a proper electronic system for both source driving and signal processing. The use of a suitable microprocessor and an internal buffer allows the realization of a portable and reliable device, fed by batteries. The indicators, bromophenol blue (BPB) or thymol blue (TB), are immobilized on controlled pore glass (CPG) fixed at the end of plastic optical fibers following a proprietary process. The realized optrode, satisfying clinical requirements, was tested `in vitro.' A precision of pH units and a response time of (

  7. The Role of Ph Fronts in Tissue Electroporation Based Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Maglietti, Felipe; Michinski, Sebastian; Olaiz, Nahuel; Castro, Marcelo; Suárez, Cecilia; Marshall, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Treatments based on electroporation (EP) induce the formation of pores in cell membranes due to the application of pulsed electric fields. We present experimental evidence of the existence of pH fronts emerging from both electrodes during treatments based on tissue EP, for conditions found in many studies, and that these fronts are immediate and substantial. pH fronts are indirectly measured through the evanescence time (ET), defined as the time required for the tissue buffer to neutralize them. The ET was measured through a pH indicator imaged at a series of time intervals using a four-cluster hard fuzzy-c-means algorithm to segment pixels corresponding to the pH indicator at every frame. The ET was calculated as the time during which the number of pixels was 10% of those in the initial frame. While in EP-based treatments such as reversible (ECT) and irreversible electroporation (IRE) the ET is very short (though enough to cause minor injuries) due to electric pulse characteristics and biological buffers present in the tissue, in gene electrotransfer (GET), ET is much longer, enough to denaturate plasmids and produce cell damage. When any of the electric pulse parameters is doubled or tripled the ET grows and, remarkably, when any of the pulse parameters in GET is halved, the ET drops significantly. Reducing pH fronts has relevant implications for GET treatment efficiency, due to a substantial reduction of plasmid damage and cell loss. PMID:24278257

  8. Baroreflex buffering and susceptibility to vasoactive drugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Jens; Tank, Jens; Shannon, John R.; Diedrich, Andre; Lipp, Axel; Schroder, Christoph; Arnold, Guy; Sharma, Arya M.; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, David; Luft, Friedrich C.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The overall effect of vasoactive drugs on blood pressure is determined by a combination of the direct effect on vascular tone and an indirect baroreflex-mediated effect, a baroreflex buffering of blood pressure. Differences in baroreflex function affect the responsiveness to vasoactive medications, particularly baroreflex buffering of blood pressure; however, the magnitude is not known. METHODS AND RESULTS: We characterized baroreflex function and responses to vasoactive drugs in patients with idiopathic orthostatic intolerance, patients with essential hypertension, patients with monogenic hypertension and brachydactyly, patients with multiple system atrophy, and control subjects. We used phenylephrine sensitivity during ganglionic blockade as a measure of baroreflex buffering. Phenylephrine (25 microg) increased systolic blood pressure 6+/-1.6 mm Hg in control subjects, 6+/-1.1 mm Hg in orthostatic intolerance patients, 18+/-3.9 mm Hg in patients with essential hypertension, 31+/-3.4 mm Hg in patients with monogenic hypertension, and 25+/-3.4 mm Hg in patients with multiple system atrophy. Similar differences in sensitivities between groups were observed with nitroprusside. The sensitivity to vasoactive drugs was highly correlated with baroreflex buffering function and to a lesser degree with baroreflex control of heart rate. In control subjects, sensitivities to nitroprusside and phenylephrine infusions were correlated with baroreflex heart rate control and sympathetic nerve traffic. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings are consistent with an important effect of baroreflex blood pressure buffering on the sensitivity to vasoactive drugs. They suggest that even moderate changes in baroreflex function may have a substantial effect on the sensitivity to vasoactive medications.

  9. Plant Habitat (PH)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onate, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will soon have a platform for conducting fundamental research of Large Plants. Plant Habitat (PH) is designed to be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. PH will control light quality, level, and timing, temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing ethylene. Additional capabilities include leaf temperature and root zone moisture and oxygen sensing. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs. There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations.

  10. Dopamine-melanin film deposition depends on the used oxidant and buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Bernsmann, Falk; Ball, Vincent; Addiego, Frédéric; Ponche, Arnaud; Michel, Marc; Gracio, José Joaquin de Almeida; Toniazzo, Valérie; Ruch, David

    2011-03-15

    The deposition of "polydopamine" films, from an aqueous solution containing dopamine or other catecholamines, constitutes a new and versatile way to functionalize solid-liquid interfaces. Indeed such films can be deposited on almost all kinds of materials. Their deposition kinetics does not depend markedly on the surface chemistry of the substrate, and the films can reach thickness of a few tens of nanometers in a single reaction step. Up to now, even if a lot is known about the oxidation mechanism of dopamine in solution, only little information is available to describe the deposition mechanism on surfaces either by oxidation in solution or by electrodeposition. The deposition kinetics of melanin was only investigated from dopamine solutions using oxygen or ammonium persulfate as an oxidant and from a tris(hydroxymethyl) aminomethane (Tris) containing buffer solutions at pH 8.5. Many other oxidants could be used, and the buffer agent containing a primary amine group may influence the deposition process. Herein we show that the deposition kinetics of melanin from dopamine containing buffers at pH 8.5 can be markedly modified using Cu(2+) instead of O2 as an oxidant: the deposition kinetics remains linear up to thicknesses of more than 70 nm, whereas the film growth stops at 45 ± 5 nm in the presence of 02. In addition, the films prepared from Cu(2+) containing solutions display an absorption spectrum with defined peaks at 320 and 370 nm, which are absent in the spectra of films prepared in oxygenated solutions. The replacement of Tris buffer by phosphate buffer also has a marked effect on the melanin deposition kinetics. PMID:21332218

  11. On the Preparation of Buffer Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Bruce M.; Kessick, Michael A.

    1981-01-01

    Presents a method, suitable for use on programmable calculators, which allows calculation of the pH and ionic strength (I) of a mixed solution of salts of an acid or amounts necessary to produce a solution of a particular pH and I. Includes limitations when using the calculations described. (SK)

  12. pH optrode

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Langry, Kevin C.

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for forming a long-lasting, stable, pH-sensitive dye-acrylamide copolymer useful as a pH-sensitive material for use in an optrode or other device sensitive to pH. An optrode may be made by mechanically attaching the copolymer to a sensing device such as an optical fiber.

  13. pH Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunelli, Bruno; Scagnolari, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The exposition of the pervasive concept of pH, of its foundations and implementation as a meaningful quantitative measurement, in nonspecialist university texts is often not easy to follow because too many of its theoretical and operative underpinnings are neglected. To help the inquiring student we provide a concise introduction to the depth just…

  14. Ph.D. shortage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The late 1990s will see a shortage of Ph.D. graduates, according to the Association of American Universities, Washington, D.C. AAU's new comprehensive study, “The Ph.D. Shortage: The Federal Role,” reports that competition for new Ph.D.s is already intense and can only intensify because demand is greater than supply in both academic and nonacademic markets.Doctoral education plays an increasingly important role in U.S. research and development programs. Students have a pivotal part in doing research and enriching it with new ideas. The AAU report says that graduate students are “major determinants of the creativity and productivity of U.S. academic research, the source of more than 50% of the nation's basic research.’ The market for doctoral education extends beyond the university. In 1985, about 43% of all Ph.D.s employed in this country were working outside higher education; the demand for doctorate recipients in nonacademic sectors continues to grow.

  15. Quasi-isoelectric buffers for protein analysis in a fast alternative to conventional capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Antonioli, Paolo; Mendieta, Martha E; Sebastiano, Roberto; Citterio, Attilio; Peltre, Gabriel; Busnel, Jean-Marc; Descroix, Stephanie; Candiano, Giovanni; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2006-03-20

    Two different approaches are here reported for obtaining ultra-narrow pI cuts from 2-pH unit wide carrier ampholyte ranges, as commercially available, for use as quasi-isoelectric buffers in capillary electrophoresis separations of proteins. One of them uses multicompartment electrolyzers endowed with isoelectric membranes (Immobiline technology); the other employs the Rotofor equipment. Although the first approach results in more precise pI cuts, the latter technique is much faster, easier to handle and permits the immediate collection of 20 fractions in a single run. This results in ultra-narrow, ca. 0.1-pH unit intervals, uniformly spaced apart along the original wider gradient utilized for the fractionation. It is here shown that such quasi-isoelectric buffers, especially those in the pH 8-9 interval, have the unique property of coating the silica wall, thus preventing interaction of the proteins with the silica surface, that would otherwise totally disrupt the separation. On the contrary, such a shielding is not obtained in control, non isoelectric buffers (such as phosphate), that give very poor separations in uncoated capillaries. It is hypothesized that such a unique shielding effect is due to the oligo-amino backbone of the carrier ampholytes, typically composed (in the Vesterberg's synthetic approach) of 4-6 nitrogens spaced apart by ethylene moieties. Although such oligoprotic buffers should bear, in the isoelectric state, just one positive and one negative charge, they might be transiently ionized upon contact with the silanols, thus inducing a cooperative binding to the silica wall. PMID:16289957

  16. Phosphate and HEPES buffers potently affect the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of Alzheimer's A{beta} peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, Megan; Tepper, Katharina; Haupt, Caroline; Knuepfer, Uwe; Klement, Karolin; Meinhardt, Jessica; Horn, Uwe; Balbach, Jochen; Faendrich, Marcus

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} Sodium phosphate buffer accelerated A{beta}(1-40) nucleation relative to HEPES. {yields} A{beta}(1-40) fibrils formed in the two buffers show only minor structural differences. {yields} NMR revealed that A{beta}(1-40) histidine residues mediate buffer dependent changes. -- Abstract: The oligomerization of A{beta} peptide into amyloid fibrils is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Due to its biological relevance, phosphate is the most commonly used buffer system for studying the formation of A{beta} and other amyloid fibrils. Investigation into the characteristics and formation of amyloid fibrils frequently relies upon material formed in vitro, predominantly in phosphate buffers. Herein, we examine the effects on the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of A{beta} peptide that occur due solely to the influence of phosphate buffer. We reveal that significant differences in amyloid fibrillation are observed due to fibrillation being initiated in phosphate or HEPES buffer (at physiological pH and temperature). Except for the differing buffer ions, all experimental parameters were kept constant. Fibril formation was assessed using fluorescently monitored kinetic studies, microscopy, X-ray fiber diffraction and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Based on this set up, we herein reveal profound effects on the mechanism and speed of A{beta} fibrillation. The three histidine residues at positions 6, 13 and 14 of A{beta}(1-40) are instrumental in these mechanistic changes. We conclude that buffer plays a more significant role in fibril formation than has been generally acknowledged.

  17. In Vivo Predictive Dissolution: Comparing the Effect of Bicarbonate and Phosphate Buffer on the Dissolution of Weak Acids and Weak Bases.

    PubMed

    Krieg, Brian J; Taghavi, Seyed Mohammad; Amidon, Gordon L; Amidon, Gregory E

    2015-09-01

    Bicarbonate is the main buffer in the small intestine and it is well known that buffer properties such as pKa can affect the dissolution rate of ionizable drugs. However, bicarbonate buffer is complicated to work with experimentally. Finding a suitable substitute for bicarbonate buffer may provide a way to perform more physiologically relevant dissolution tests. The dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs was conducted in bicarbonate and phosphate buffer using rotating disk dissolution methodology. Experimental results were compared with the predicted results using the film model approach of (Mooney K, Mintun M, Himmelstein K, Stella V. 1981. J Pharm Sci 70(1):22-32) based on equilibrium assumptions as well as a model accounting for the slow hydration reaction, CO2 + H2 O → H2 CO3 . Assuming carbonic acid is irreversible in the dehydration direction: CO2 + H2 O ← H2 CO3 , the transport analysis can accurately predict rotating disk dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs in bicarbonate buffer. The predictions show that matching the dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs in phosphate and bicarbonate buffer is possible. The phosphate buffer concentration necessary to match physiologically relevant bicarbonate buffer [e.g., 10.5 mM (HCO3 (-) ), pH = 6.5] is typically in the range of 1-25 mM and is very dependent upon drug solubility and pKa . PMID:25980464

  18. Notes on the Measurement of pH Values

    SciTech Connect

    Carranza, R M; Rebak, R B

    2005-05-05

    The original definition of pH is: pH = -log a{sub H}. Where a{sub H} is the (relative) hydrogen ion activity. However, a single ion activity cannot be measured. Activities of individual ionic species are necessarily conventional. The pH number, of course, has in itself little absolute significance. As the negative of the logarithm of a product of a concentration (c or m) and an activity coefficient (y or {gamma}), it acquires its magnitude from the numerical scale adopted for the latter. Experimental pH measurements are nonetheless widely applied to the determination of thermodynamic equilibrium data such as pK values, on the assumption that they represent -log a{sub H} (or paH). The single ion activity coefficient approaches unity as the ionic strength goes to zero, so that activity becomes m or c and paH becomes pmH or pcH. pH is therefore defined operationally in terms of the operation or method used to measure it, that is, by means of a cell called an operational cell. The cell is standardized by solutions of assigned pH value (Reference Value pH Standard, Primary pH Standards and Operational Standards). Such standard reference solutions are buffer solutions whose pH values are assigned from measurements on cells with or without liquid junction. It must be emphasized that the definition of pH scale is quite different from the measurement of pH with glass-reference electrode-pH meter assemblies, where several standards are used in order to take into account possible deficiencies in the electrode and meter performance.

  19. Spacecraft optical disk recorder memory buffer control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, Robert F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the research completed under the NASA-ASEE summer faculty fellowship program. The project involves development of an Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) to be used as a Memory Buffer Controller (MBC) in the Spacecraft Optical Disk System (SODR). The SODR system has demanding capacity and data rate specifications requiring specialized electronics to meet processing demands. The system is being designed to support Gigabit transfer rates with Terabit storage capability. The complete SODR system is designed to exceed the capability of all existing mass storage systems today. The ASIC development for SODR consist of developing a 144 pin CMOS device to perform format conversion and data buffering. The final simulations of the MBC were completed during this summer's NASA-ASEE fellowship along with design preparations for fabrication to be performed by an ASIC manufacturer.

  20. Buffered explosions in steel pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    The impulse delivered to the walls of a vessel containing an explosion will increase if material is placed between the walls and the charge. If the impulse application time is small in compared with the eigenperiod of the vessel, the wall stress will increase in direct proportion to the impulse. Conversely, if the application period can be extended beyond half the eigenperiod, the peak stress will be proportional to the ratio of the impulse to the delivery period. With powder or granular buffers, it is possible for the delivery period to increase faster than the impulse as the buffer mass is increased. This is the reason why certain powders, or porous materials, can provide stress reduction even below that observed by evacuating the space between the walls and the explosive. If the buffer material is to serve as an effective mitigator, it must collapse on shock loading to a final density that depends only weakly on pressure; the criterion is that the wave speed in the material that impacts the wall must be small comparison with the impact (particle) speed. This behavior apparently occurs with salt, at least for modest values of the charge parameter, but to a lesser extent with snow under the same conditions. The vermiculite data are comparable to the salt in the charge paramete region where the two overlap; with increasing explosive, however, the vermiculite appears to behave like the snow and its effectiveness as a mitigator rapidly diminishes. It is also clear that once the wave speed criterion is seriously violated, the use of a powder buffer will result in a higher wall stress than if only air filled the space between walls and charge. 5 refs.

  1. pH Transients in hydroxyapatite chromatography columns-experimental evidence and phenomenological modeling.

    PubMed

    Bankston, Theresa E; Dattolo, Laura; Carta, Giorgio

    2010-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) columns, widely used for chromatographic separation of proteins and other biomolecules because of their unique selectivity and ability to resolve complex mixtures, exhibit limited stability at acidic conditions requiring careful control of pH. Even with buffered solutions, however, unintended pH transients can occur when the salt concentration varies. For example, the pH temporarily decreases below the feed value when the salt concentration increases and increases above the feed value when the salt concentration is decreased. The intensity and duration of these transients depend on the particular buffer used and the magnitude of the salt concentration step, but in extreme cases the pH can drop by as much as 1.5 pH units creating conditions where the HAP stability is potentially compromised. This work examines the mechanisms leading to pH transients in HAP columns generated by salt steps. The pH excursions are similar to those observed for weak cation exchange columns, but are accompanied by a transient evolution of phosphate which temporarily decreases below the feed value when the salt concentration is increased and increases sharply when the salt concentration is reduced before returning to the feed value. A phenomenological model is developed to describe this behavior by considering the reversible uptake of sodium ions by the P-sites and binding of phosphate ions by the C-sites. The interplay of these two adsorption mechanisms results in complex pH patterns that are consistent with those observed experimentally. In addition to helping understand the underlying mechanisms, the model also provides a useful tool to predict the effects of different buffers and salt concentration and develop corrective measures that can reduce the intensity and duration of the pH transients such as the addition of unretained co-buffers. PMID:20193952

  2. META-ANALYSIS OF NITROGEN REMOVAL IN RIPARIAN BUFFERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian buffer zones, the vegetated region adjacent to streams and wetlands, are thought to be effective at intercepting and controlling nitrogen loads entering water bodies. Riparian buffer width may be positively related to nitrogen removal effectiveness by influencing nitrog...

  3. Mixed metal oxide films as pH sensing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshak, Khalil; Gill, Edric; Korostynska, Olga; Arshak, Arousian

    2007-05-01

    Due to the demand for accurate, reliable and highly sensitive pH sensors, research is being pursued to find novel materials to achieve this goal. Semiconducting metal oxides, such as TiO, SnO and SnO II and insulating oxides such as Nb IIO 5 and Bi IIO 3, and their mixtures in different proportions are being investigated for this purpose. The films of these materials mixtures are used in conjunction with an interdigitated electrode pattern to produce a conductimetric/capacitive pH sensor. The advantages of this approach include straightforward manufacturing, versatility and cost-effectiveness. It was noted that upon contact with a solution, the electrical parameters of the films, such as resistance etc., change. The correlation of these changes with pH values is the basis for the proposed system development. The ultimate goal is to find materials composition, which would have the highest sensitivity towards the pH level of the solutions. It was found that the materials that produced the highest sensitivity either had a long response time or were unstable over a wide pH range. Those exhibiting lower sensitivities were found to be more stable over a wide pH range. All oxide films tested demonstrated a change in electrical parameters upon contact with buffers of known pH value.

  4. pH in physiological salt solutions: direct measurements.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsen, J; Norrie, B; Andersen, P K; Stokke, D B; Nedergaard, O A

    1990-11-01

    Calculations of pH in modified Krebs solutions by inserting PCO2 and total-CO2 in the Henderson-Hasselbalch (H.-H.) equation are obvious as the equation originally served for this purpose. An exact calculation of the relation between pH and PCO2 is complicated as the concentration of bicarbonate, the dissociation constant and the solubility of CO2 change. Furthermore, the dissociation constant in the H.-H. equation is constant only if activities are used in the equation instead of stoichiometric concentrations. We therefore investigated the influence of different carbon dioxide tensions and bicarbonate concentrations on directly measured pH of organ baths aerated with mass-spectrometric analyzed O2-CO2 gases. For reference precision buffers were used. The measured pH values differed distinctly from calculated pH values in the acidic and alkaline parts of the pH interval investigated (6.57-8.15). Measurements of actual pH with proper calibration standards therefore seem mandatory. PMID:2177306

  5. Capillary electrophoresis of alkali and alkaline-earth cations with imidazole or benzylamine buffers

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, P.; Francois, C.; Dreux, M. . Lab. de Chimie Bioorganique et Analytique)

    1994-01-01

    The separation of alkali, alkaline earth, and ammonium cations in several samples of water was achieved by capillary electrophoresis with indirect UV detection. A solution of imidazole (10[sup [minus]2] M, pH 4.5) was used as a buffer to resolve a mixture of six cations (K[sup +], Na[sup +], Ca[sup 2+], Ba[sup 2+], Li[sup +] and Mg[sup 2+]) by capillary electrophoresis at 214 nm in less than 10 min. The addition of potassium cation to the running buffer has an influence on the resolution of Ca[sup 2+]/Na[sup +] and Na[sup +]/Mg[sup 2+] peaks. A linear relationship between the corrected peak area and concentration was obtained in the 1--10 ppm range for these cations using a hydrodynamic injector. This electrophoretic system permitted the separation of these inorganic cations at a 50 ppb-level concentration with a hydrodynamic injection, thus making it possible to quantitatively determine their presence in mineral waters by capillary electrophoresis. At pH 4.5, potassium and ammonium unfortunately have identical ionic mobilities causing them to comigrate in an imidazole buffer. Using an alkaline solution of benzylamine as carrier electrolyte, their separation can be successfully achieved with excellent resolution at 204 nm. The analyses of tap water and several mineral waters have been achieved by capillary electrophoresis.

  6. Specific ion effects: Role of salt and buffer in protonation of cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Boström, M; Williams, D R M; Ninham, B W

    2004-03-01

    Changes in background salt and buffer are known to influence the properties of proteins. The reasons have remained obscure. The challenge posed by many such problems is this. Can physical chemistry contribute any predictive quantitative insights to what is in effect the simplest macromolecular solution behavior? Or must all remain specific? Our thesis is that it can. For definiteness we consider here as an illustrative example: surface pH and protonation equilibria of cytochrome c. We demonstrate an important role for ionic dispersion forces, missing from previous theoretical treatments. Unlike charge interactions these are different for each ionic species, and act between a protein and both salt and buffer ions. The charge of proteins depends not only on pH, ionic charge, and salt concentration. Taking ionic dispersion forces into account goes some way towards explaining the dependence on ionic species. We demonstrate why the addition of buffer can have profound effects, including reversal of the salt dependence of the protein charge. PMID:15103518

  7. Specific ion effects: Role of salt and buffer in protonation of cytochrome c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boström, M.; Williams, D. R. M.; Ninham, B. W.

    2004-03-01

    Changes in background salt and buffer are known to influence the properties of proteins. The reasons have remained obscure. The challenge posed by many such problems is this. Can physical chemistry contribute any predictive quantitative insights to what is in effect the simplest macromolecular solution behavior? Or must all remain specific? Our thesis is that it can. For definiteness we consider here as an illustrative example: surface pH and protonation equilibria of cytochrome c. We demonstrate an important role for ionic dispersion forces, missing from previous theoretical treatments. Unlike charge interactions these are different for each ionic species, and act between a protein and both salt and buffer ions. The charge of proteins depends not only on pH, ionic charge, and salt concentration. Taking ionic dispersion forces into account goes some way towards explaining the dependence on ionic species. We demonstrate why the addition of buffer can have profound effects, including reversal of the salt dependence of the protein charge.

  8. Buffer optimization of thermal melt assays of Plasmodium proteins for detection of small-molecule ligands.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Gregory J; Napuli, Alberto J; Thomas, Andrew P; Chung, Diana J; Kovzun, Kuzma V; Leibly, David J; Castaneda, Lisa J; Bhandari, Janhavi; Damman, Christopher J; Hui, Raymond; Hol, Wim G J; Buckner, Frederick S; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Fan, Erkang; van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2009-07-01

    In the past decade, thermal melt/thermal shift assays have become a common tool for identifying ligands and other factors that stabilize specific proteins. Increased stability is indicated by an increase in the protein's melting temperature (Tm). In optimizing the assays for subsequent screening of compound libraries, it is important to minimize the variability of Tm measurements so as to maximize the assay's ability to detect potential ligands. The authors present an investigation of Tm variability in recombinant proteins from Plasmodium parasites. Ligands of Plasmodium proteins are particularly interesting as potential starting points for drugs for malaria, and new drugs are urgently needed. A single standard buffer (100 mM HEPES [pH 7.5], 150 mM NaCl) permitted estimation of Tm for 58 of 61 Plasmodium proteins tested. However, with several proteins, Tm could not be measured with a consistency suitable for high-throughput screening unless alternative protein-specific buffers were employed. The authors conclude that buffer optimization to minimize variability in Tm measurements increases the success of thermal melt screens involving proteins for which a standard buffer is suboptimal. PMID:19470714

  9. Dissolution properties of co-amorphous drug-amino acid formulations in buffer and biorelevant media.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, A T; DeClerck, L; Löbmann, K; Grohganz, H; Rades, T; Laitinen, R

    2015-07-01

    Co-amorphous formulations, particularly binary drug-amino acid mixtures, have been shown to provide enhanced dissolution for poorly-soluble drugs and improved physical stability of the amorphous state. However, to date the dissolution properties (mainly intrinsic dissolution rate) of the co-amorphous formulations have been tested only in buffers and their supersaturation ability remain unexplored. Consequently, dissolution studies in simulated intestinal fluids need to be conducted in order to better evaluate the potential of these systems in increasing the oral bioavailability of biopharmaceutics classification system class II drugs. In this study, solubility and dissolution properties of the co-amorphous simvastatin-lysine, gibenclamide-serine, glibenclamide-threonine and glibenclamide-serine-threonine were studied in phosphate buffer pH 7.2 and biorelevant media (fasted and fed state simulated intestinal fluids (FaSSIF and FeSSIF, respectively)). The co-amorphous formulations were found to provide a long-lasting supersaturation and improve the dissolution of the drugs compared to the crystalline and amorphous drugs alone in buffer. Similar improvement, but in lesser extent, was observed in biorelevant media suggesting that a dissolution advantage observed in aqueous buffers may overestimate the advantage in vivo. However, the results show that, in addition to stability advantage shown earlier, co-amorphous drug-amino acid formulations provide dissolution advantage over crystalline drugs in both aqueous and biorelevant conditions. PMID:26373205

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces phosphatidyltris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and derivatives when grown in Tris-buffered medium.

    PubMed

    Abbes, Imen; Rihouey, Christophe; Hardouin, Julie; Dé, Emmanuelle; Jouenne, Thierry; Alexandre, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    For optimal growth of a microorganism, the pH of the culture medium should be set at an optimum value. For that reason, growth media require buffering agents. We show in this study that, when grown in a medium supplemented with tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris), Pseudomonas aeruginosa is able to use this organic compound to produce new phospholipids. We thus pointed out that phosphatidyltris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane as well as diphosphatidyltris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane was detected in membrane lipid extracts of bacteria grown in Tris-buffered medium. Moreover, the amounts of lysoglycerophospholipids in the lipidome of P. aeruginosa grown in Tris-buffered medium increased leading to the presence of lysophosphatidylglycerol and lysophosphatidyltris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane as well as other lysophospholipid derivatives. Finally, we investigated the effect of the presence of these exogenous phospholipids on the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to some antibiotics. We observed a decrease of the minimal inhibitory concentrations of different antibiotic families, i.e., fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, ß-lactams and polymyxins, proving the importance of the buffer choice for growth medium and its impact on the lipidome. PMID:27126915

  11. Dialysis buffer with different ionic strength affects the antigenicity of cultured nervous necrosis virus (NNV) suspensions.

    PubMed

    Gye, Hyun Jung; Nishizawa, Toyohiko

    2016-09-01

    Nervous necrosis virus (NNV) belongs to the genus Betanodavirus (Nodaviridae). It is highly pathogenic to various marine fishes. Here, we investigated the antigenicity changes of cultured NNV suspensions during 14days of dialyses using a dialysis tube at 1.4×10(4) molecular weight cut off (MWCO) in three different buffers (Dulbecco's phosphate buffered saline (D-PBS), 15mM Tris-HCl (pH 8.0), and deionized water (DIW)). Total NNV antigen titers of cultured NNV suspension varied depending on different dialysis buffers. For example, total NNV antigen titer during D-PBS dialysis was increased once but then decreased. During Tris-HCl dialysis, it was relatively stable. During dialysis in DIW, total NNV antigen titer was increased gradually. These antigenicity changes in NNV suspension might be due to changes in the aggregation state of NNV particles and/or coat proteins (CPs). ELISA values of NNV suspension changed due to changing aggregates state of NNV antigens. NNV particles in suspension were aggregated at a certain level. These aggregates were progressive after D-PBS dialysis, but regressive after Tris-HCl dialysis. The purified NNV particles self-aggregated after dialysis in D-PBS or in Tris-HCl containing 600mM NaCl, but not after dialysis in Tris-HCl or DIW. Quantitative analysis is merited to determine NNV antigens in the highly purified NNV particles suspended in buffer at low salt condition. PMID:27381060

  12. Quantitative and qualitative optimization of allergen extraction from peanut and selected tree nuts. Part 2. Optimization of buffer and ionic strength using a full factorial experimental design.

    PubMed

    L'Hocine, Lamia; Pitre, Mélanie

    2016-03-01

    A full factorial design was used to assess the single and interactive effects of three non-denaturing aqueous (phosphate, borate, and carbonate) buffers at various ionic strengths (I) on allergen extractability from and immunoglobulin E (IgE) immunoreactivity of peanut, almond, hazelnut, and pistachio. The results indicated that the type and ionic strength of the buffer had different effects on protein recovery from the nuts under study. Substantial differences in protein profiles, abundance, and IgE-binding intensity with different combinations of pH and ionic strength were found. A significant interaction between pH and ionic strength was observed for pistachio and almond. The optimal buffer system conditions, which maximized the IgE-binding efficiency of allergens and provided satisfactory to superior protein recovery yield and profiles, were carbonate buffer at an ionic strength of I=0.075 for peanut, carbonate buffer at I=0.15 for almond, phosphate buffer at I=0.5 for hazelnut, and borate at I=0.15 for pistachio. The buffer type and its ionic strength could be manipulated to achieve the selective solubility of desired allergens. PMID:26471623

  13. The acid-base buffer capacity of podzolic soils and its changes under the impact of treatment with the Mehra-Jackson and Tamm reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimova, Yu. G.; Maryakhina, N. N.; Tolpeshta, I. I.; Sokolova, T. A.

    2010-10-01

    The acid-base buffer capacity before and after the treatment with the Mehra-Jackson and Tamm reagents was assessed by continuous potentiometric titration for the main genetic horizons of two profiles of podzolic soils in the Central Forest State Reserve. The total buffer capacity was calculated in the pH range from the initial titration point (ITP) to 3 for the acid titration and from the ITP to 10 for the base titration, as well as the buffer capacities in the pH intervals of 0.25. It was found that both treatments abruptly decreased the base buffer capacity, which reached 70-90% in the E horizons. The high direct linear correlation of the difference between the total base buffer capacities before and after each treatment with the content of Fe in the Tamm extract was revealed. From the results obtained, a conclusion was drawn that finely dispersed Fe hydroxides were the main solid-phase constituents ensuring the base buffer capacity, and the deprotonation of hydroxyl groups on the surface of Fe hydroxides was the essential buffer reaction during the base titration.

  14. Patterns of sediment and phosphorus accumulation in a riparian buffer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Riparian buffers prevent sediment and phosphorus (P) from reaching streams, but their accumulation in buffers is seldom measured. This study's objectives were to determine accumulations of sediment and P in a multi-species riparian buffer, and characterize spatial-temporal patterns of P in soil wate...

  15. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... EXPLORATION AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  16. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... EXPLORATION AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  17. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones. (a... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  18. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... EXPLORATION AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  19. Enhancement of the absorption of CO{sub 2} in alkaline buffer solutions: Joint action of two enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, G.; Chenlo, F.; Pereira, G.; Vazquez, P.

    1999-05-01

    The authors measured the absorption of CO{sub 2} in alkaline 0.5 M/0.5 M sodium carbonate/bicarbonate buffers containing either saccharose and sodium arsenite or saccharose and formaldehyde. Absorption enhancement increased upon increasing the concentration of either of the catalysts, but the joint action of the two was always less than the sum of their individual effects, the difference being a function of the acidities and concentrations of the catalysts and the pH of the carbonate/bicarbonate buffer solution

  20. 17-4 PH and 15-5 PH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Howard T.

    1995-01-01

    17-4 PH and 15-5 PH are extremely useful and versatile precipitation-hardening stainless steels. Armco 17-4 PH is well suited for the magnetic particle inspection requirements of Aerospace Material Specification. Armco 15-5 PH and 17-4 PH are produced in billet, plate, bar, and wire. Also, 15-5 PH is able to meet the stringent mechanical properties required in the aerospace and nuclear industries. Both products are easy to heat treat and machine, making them very useful in many applications.

  1. Label-Free Carbon-Dots-Based Ratiometric Fluorescence pH Nanoprobes for Intracellular pH Sensing.

    PubMed

    Shangguan, Jingfang; He, Dinggeng; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Xu, Fengzhou; Liu, Jinquan; Tang, Jinlu; Yang, Xue; Huang, Jin

    2016-08-01

    Measuring pH in living cells is of great importance for better understanding cellular functions as well as providing pivotal assistance for early diagnosis of diseases. In this work, we report the first use of a novel kind of label-free carbon dots for intracellular ratiometric fluorescence pH sensing. By simple one-pot hydrothermal treatment of citric acid and basic fuchsin, the carbon dots showing dual emission bands at 475 and 545 nm under single-wavelength excitation were synthesized. It is demonstrated that the fluorescence intensities of the as-synthesized carbon dots at the two emissions are pH-sensitive simultaneously. The intensity ratio (I475 nm/I545 nm) is linear against pH values from 5.2 to 8.8 in buffer solution, affording the capability as ratiometric probes for intracellular pH sensing. It also displays that the carbon dots show excellent reversibility and photostability in pH measurements. With this nanoprobe, quantitative fluorescence imaging using the ratio of two emissions (I475 nm/I545 nm) for the detection of intracellular pH were successfully applied in HeLa cells. In contrast to most of the reported nanomaterials-based ratiometric pH sensors which rely on the attachment of additional dyes, these carbon-dots-based ratiometric probes are low in toxicity, easy to synthesize, and free from labels. PMID:27334762

  2. An electrochemical platform for localized pH control on demand.

    PubMed

    Fomina, N; Johnson, C A; Maruniak, A; Bahrampour, S; Lang, C; Davis, R W; Kavusi, S; Ahmad, H

    2016-06-21

    Solution pH is a powerful tool for regulating many kinds of chemical activity, but is generally treated as a static property defined by a pre-selected buffer. Introducing dynamic control of pH in space, time, and magnitude can enable richer and more efficient chemistries, but is not feasible with traditional methods of titration or buffer exchange. Recent reports have featured electrochemical strategies for modifying bulk pH in constrained volumes, but only demonstrate switching between two preset values and omit spatial control entirely. Here, we use a combination of solution-borne quinones and galvanostatic excitation to enable quantitative control of pH environments that are highly localized to an electrode surface. We demonstrate highly reproducible acidification and alkalinization with up to 0.1 pH s(-1) (±0.002 pH s(-1)) rate of change across the dynamic range of our pH sensor (pH 4.5 to 7.5) in buffered solutions. Using dynamic current control, we generate and sustain 3 distinct pH microenvironments simultaneously to within ±0.04 pH for 13 minutes in a single solution, and we leverage these microenvironments to demonstrate spatially-resolved, pH-driven control of enzymatic activity. In addition to straightforward applications of spatio-temporal pH control (e.g. efficiently studying pH-dependencies of chemical interactions), the technique opens completely new avenues for implementing complex systems through dynamic control of enzyme activation, protein binding affinity, chemical reactivity, chemical release, molecular self-assembly, and many more pH-controlled processes. PMID:27199277

  3. The bimodal pH distribution of volcanic lake waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, Luigi; Vetuschi Zuccolini, Marino; Saldi, Giuseppe

    2003-02-01

    Volcanic lake waters have a bimodal pH distribution with an acidic mode at pH 0.5-1.5 and a near neutral mode at pH 6-6.5, with relatively few samples having pH 3.5-5. To investigate the reasons for this distribution, the irreversible water-rock mass exchanges during the neutralization of acid SO 4-Cl waters with andesite, under both low- and high-temperature conditions, were simulated by means of the EQ3/6 software package, version 7.2. Reaction path modeling under low temperature and atmospheric P CO 2 and f O 2, suggests that several homogeneous and/or heterogeneous pH buffers exist both in the acidic and neutral regions, but no buffer is active in the intermediate, central pH region. Again, the same titration, under high-temperature, hydrothermal-magmatic conditions, is expected to produce comparatively infrequent aqueous solutions with pH values in the 3.5-5 range, upon their cooling below 100°C. Substantially different pH values are obtained depending on the cooling paths, either through boiling or conductive heat losses. These distinct pH values are governed by either HSO 4- and HCl (aq), in poorly neutralized aqueous solutions, or the CO 2(aq)/HCO 3- couple and the P CO 2 value as well, in neutralized aqueous solutions. Finally, mixing of the acid lake water with the aqueous solutions produced through high-temperature titration and cooled below 100°C is unlikely to generate mixtures with pH values higher than 3, unless the fraction of the acidic water originally present in the lake becomes very small, which means its virtually complete substitution. Summing up, the evidence gathered through reaction path modeling of the neutralization of acid lake waters with andesite, both at low and high temperatures, explains the scarcity of volcanic lake waters with measured pH values of 3.5-5.

  4. Shift in pH of biological fluids during storage and processing: effect on bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Fura, Aberra; Harper, Timothy W; Zhang, Hongjian; Fung, Lawrence; Shyu, Wen Chyi

    2003-07-14

    The pH of ex vivo plasma, bile and urine was monitored at different times and temperatures of storage, and following different sample processing methods such as ultrafiltration, centrifugation, precipitation and evaporation. The results showed that the pH of ex vivo plasma, bile and urine increased upon storage, and following sample processing and could lead to significant degradation of pH-labile compounds. Several compounds were used to illustrate the impact of pH shifts on drug stability and interpretation of results obtained from in vivo studies. For example, after 1 h of incubation (37 degrees C) in rat plasma (pH 8.3), about 60%, of I was lost. However, in phosphate buffer, losses were about 12% at pH 7.4 and 40% at pH 8.0. Plasma pH also increased during ultrafiltration, centrifugation and extraction. After methanol precipitation of plasma proteins, and evaporation of the supernatant and redissolution of the residue, the resulting solution had a pH of 9.5. Under these conditions, II was degraded by 60% but was stable when phosphate buffer was used to maintain the pH at 7.4. The shift in plasma pH can yield misleading results from in vivo studies if the pH is not controlled. For example, the major circulating metabolite of II was also formed in plasma ex-vivo. This ex vivo degradation was prevented when blood samples were collected into tubes containing 0.1 volume of phosphate buffer (0.3 M, pH 5). The pH of ex vivo plasma can best be stabilized at physiological conditions using 10% CO2 atmosphere in a CO2 incubator. Changes in pH of ex vivo urine and bile samples can have similar adverse effect on pH-labile samples. Thus, processing of plasma samples under a 10% CO2 atmosphere is a method of choice for stability or protein binding studies in plasma, whereas citrate or phosphate buffers are suitable for stabilizing pH in bile and urine and for plasma samples requiring extensive preparations or long term storage. PMID:14565556

  5. The pH of Enceladus' ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glein, Christopher R.; Baross, John A.; Waite, J. Hunter

    2015-08-01

    Saturn's moon, Enceladus, is a geologically active waterworld. The prevailing paradigm is that there is a subsurface ocean that erupts to the surface, which leads to the formation of a plume of vapor and ice above the south polar region. The chemistry of the ocean is just beginning to be understood, but is of profound geochemical and astrobiological interest. Here, we determine the pH of the ocean using a thermodynamic model of carbonate speciation. Observational data from the Cassini spacecraft are used to make a chemical model of ocean water on Enceladus. The model suggests that Enceladus' ocean is a Na-Cl-CO3 solution with an alkaline pH of ∼11-12. The dominance of aqueous NaCl is a feature that Enceladus' ocean shares with terrestrial seawater, but the ubiquity of dissolved Na2CO3 suggests that soda lakes are more analogous to the Enceladus ocean. The high pH implies that the hydroxide ion should be relatively abundant, while divalent metals should be present at low concentrations owing to buffering by carbonates and phyllosilicates on the ocean floor. Carboxyl groups in dissolved organic species would be negatively charged, while amino groups would exist predominately in the neutral form. Knowledge of the pH improves our understanding of geochemical processes in Enceladus' ocean. The high pH is interpreted to be a key consequence of serpentinization of chondritic rock, as predicted by prior geochemical reaction path models; although degassing of CO2 from the ocean may also play a role depending on the efficiency of mixing processes in the ocean. Serpentinization leads to the generation of H2, a geochemical fuel that can support both abiotic and biological synthesis of organic molecules such as those that have been detected in Enceladus' plume. Serpentinization and H2 generation should have occurred on Enceladus, like on the parent bodies of aqueously altered meteorites; but it is unknown whether these critical processes are still taking place, or if

  6. Buffer for a gamma-insensitive optical sensor with gas and a buffer assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kruger, H.W.

    1994-05-10

    A buffer assembly is disclosed for a gamma-insensitive gas avalanche focal plane array operating in the ultra-violet/visible/infrared energy wavelengths and using a photocathode and an avalanche gas located in a gap between an anode and the photocathode. The buffer assembly functions to eliminate chemical compatibility between the gas composition and the materials of the photocathode. The buffer assembly in the described embodiment is composed of two sections, a first section constructed of glass honeycomb under vacuum and a second section defining a thin barrier film or membrane constructed, for example, of Al and Be, which is attached to and supported by the honeycomb. The honeycomb section, in turn, is supported by and adjacent to the photocathode. 7 figures.

  7. Buffer for a gamma-insensitive optical sensor with gas and a buffer assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kruger, Hans W.

    1994-01-01

    A buffer assembly for a gamma-insensitive gas avalanche focal plane array operating in the ultra-violet/visible/infrared energy wavelengths and using a photocathode and an avalanche gas located in a gap between an anode and the photocathode. The buffer assembly functions to eliminate chemical compatibility between the gas composition and the materials of the photocathode. The buffer assembly in the described embodiment is composed of two sections, a first section constructed of glass honeycomb under vacuum and a second section defining a thin barrier film or membrane constructed, for example, of Al and Be, which is attached to and supported by the honeycomb. The honeycomb section, in turn, is supported by and adjacent to the photocathode.

  8. Modelling inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes by pulsed electric fields in media of different pH.

    PubMed

    Gómez, N; García, D; Alvarez, I; Condón, S; Raso, J

    2005-08-25

    A study of the effect of square-wave pulsed electric fields (PEF) on the inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes in McIlvaine buffer of different pH (3.5-7.0) was conducted. L. monocytoges was more PEF sensitive at higher electric field strengths (E) and in media of low pH. A treatment at 28 kV/cm for 400 mus that inactivated 1.5, 2.3 and 3.0 Log10 cycles at pH 7.0, 6.5 and 5.0 respectively destroyed almost 6.0 Log10 cycles at pH 3.5. The general shape of survival curves of L. monocytogenes PEF treated at different pH was convex/concave upwards. A mathematical model based on the Weibull distribution accurately described these survival curves. At each pH, the shape parameter (n value) did not depend on E. The relationship between n value of the Weibull model and the pH of the treatment medium was described by the Gompertz equation. A multiple linear regression model using three predictor variables (E, E2, pH2) related the Log10 of the scale paramenter (b value) of the Weibull model with E and pH of the treatment medium. A tertiary model developed using McIlvaine buffer as treatment medium predicted satisfactorily the inactivation of L. monocytogenes in apple juice. PMID:16083822

  9. Specific ion and buffer effects on protein-protein interactions of a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D; Keeling, R; Tracka, M; van der Walle, C F; Uddin, S; Warwicker, J; Curtis, R

    2015-01-01

    Better predictive ability of salt and buffer effects on protein-protein interactions requires separating out contributions due to ionic screening, protein charge neutralization by ion binding, and salting-in(out) behavior. We have carried out a systematic study by measuring protein-protein interactions for a monoclonal antibody over an ionic strength range of 25 to 525 mM at 4 pH values (5, 6.5, 8, and 9) in solutions containing sodium chloride, calcium chloride, sodium sulfate, or sodium thiocyante. The salt ions are chosen so as to represent a range of affinities for protein charged and noncharged groups. The results are compared to effects of various buffers including acetate, citrate, phosphate, histidine, succinate, or tris. In low ionic strength solutions, anion binding affinity is reflected by the ability to reduce protein-protein repulsion, which follows the order thiocyanate > sulfate > chloride. The sulfate specific effect is screened at the same ionic strength required to screen the pH dependence of protein-protein interactions indicating sulfate binding only neutralizes protein charged groups. Thiocyanate specific effects occur over a larger ionic strength range reflecting adsorption to charged and noncharged regions of the protein. The latter leads to salting-in behavior and, at low pH, a nonmonotonic interaction profile with respect to sodium thiocyanate concentration. The effects of thiocyanate can not be rationalized in terms of only neutralizing double layer forces indicating the presence of an additional short-ranged protein-protein attraction at moderate ionic strength. Conversely, buffer specific effects can be explained through a charge neutralization mechanism, where buffers with greater valency are more effective at reducing double layer forces at low pH. Citrate binding at pH 6.5 leads to protein charge inversion and the formation of attractive electrostatic interactions. Throughout the report, we highlight similarities in the measured

  10. Germination and inactivation of Bacillus coagulans and Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris spores by high hydrostatic pressure treatment in buffer and tomato sauce.

    PubMed

    Vercammen, Anne; Vivijs, Bram; Lurquin, Ine; Michiels, Chris W

    2012-01-16

    Acidothermophilic bacteria like Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris and Bacillus coagulans can cause spoilage of heat-processed acidic foods because they form spores with very high heat resistance and can grow at low pH. The objective of this work was to study the germination and inactivation of A. acidoterrestris and B. coagulans spores by high hydrostatic pressure (HP) treatment at temperatures up to 60°C and both at low and neutral pH. In a first experiment, spores suspended in buffers at pH 4.0, 5.0 and 7.0 were processed for 10min at different pressures (100-800MPa) at 40°C. None of these treatments caused any significant inactivation, except perhaps at 800MPa in pH 4.0 buffer where close to 1 log inactivation of B. coagulans was observed. Spore germination up to about 2 log was observed for both bacteria but occurred mainly in a low pressure window (100-300MPa) for A. acidoterrestris and only in a high pressure window (600-800MPa) for B. coagulans. In addition, low pH suppressed germination in A. acidoterrestris, but stimulated it in B. coagulans. In a second series of experiments, spores were treated in tomato sauce of pH 4.2 and 5.0 at 100 - 800MPa at 25, 40 and 60°C for 10min. At 40°C, results for B. coagulans were similar as in buffer. For A. acidoterrestris, germination levels in tomato sauce were generally higher than in buffer, and showed little difference at low and high pressure. Remarkably, the pH dependence of A. acidoterrestris spore germination was reversed in tomato sauce, with more germination at the lowest pH. Furthermore, HP treatments in the pH 4.2 sauce caused between 1 and 1.5 log inactivation of A. acidoterrestris. Germination of spores in the high pressure window was strongly temperature dependent, whereas germination of A. acidoterrestris in the low pressure window showed little temperature dependence. When HP treatment was conducted at 60°C, most of the germinated spores were also inactivated. For the pH 4.2 tomato sauce, this

  11. Hybrid Silicon AWG Lasers and Buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurczveil, Geza

    Silicon photonics promises the low cost integration of optical components with CMOS electronics thus enabling optical interconnects in future generation processors. The hybrid silicon platform (HSP) is one approach to make optically active components on silicon. While many optical components on the HSP have been demonstrated, few photonic integrated circuits (PICs), consisting of multiple elements, have been demonstrated. In this dissertation, two Hybrid Silicon PICs and their building blocks will be presented. The first PIC to be presented is a multiwavelength laser based on an AWG. It consists of Fabry-Perot cavities integrated with hybrid silicon amplifiers and an intracavity filter in the form of an AWG with a channel spacing of 360 GHz. Four-channel lasing operation is shown. Single-sided fiber-coupled output powers as high as 35 µW are measured. The SMSR is as high as 35 dB. Various device characteristics are compromised as the AWG was attacked during the III-V process, thus showing the need to properly protect passive components during III-V processing. The second PIC to be presented is a fully integrated optical buffer. The device consists of a hybrid silicon switch, a 1.1 m long silicon waveguide, and cascaded hybrid silicon amplifiers. The passive delay line is protected by dielectric layers to limit passive losses to 0.5 dB/cm. Noise filters in the form of saturable absorbers are integrated in the buffer to allow for a larger number of recirculations in the delay line compared to a delay without filters. Tapers are used to transition the mode from the passive region to the hybrid region with losses as low as 0.22 dB per transition and reflectivities below -35 dB. Error free operation of the hybrid silicon switch is demonstrated in all four paths. The integrated buffer failed due to low yield, showing the current limitations of the HSP.

  12. Analysis of a hybrid, unidirectional buffer strip laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharani, L. R.; Goree, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    A method of analysis capable of predicting accurately the fracture behavior of a unidirectional composite laminate containing symmetrically placed buffer strips is presented. As an example, for a damaged graphite/epoxy laminate, the results demonstrate the manner in which to select the most efficient combination of buffer strip properties necessary to inhibit crack growth. Ultimate failure of the laminate after crack arrest can occur under increasing load either by continued crack extension through the buffer strips or the crack can jump the buffer strips. For some typical hybrid materials it is found that a buffer strip spacing-to-width ratio of about four to one is the most efficient.

  13. Analysis of a hybrid-undirectional buffer strip laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharani, L. R.; Goree, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    A method of analysis capable of predicting accurately the fracture behavior of a unidirectional composite laminate containing symmetrically placed buffer strips is presented. As an example, for a damaged graphite/epoxy laminate, the results demonstrate the manner in which to select the most efficient combination of buffer strip properties necessary to inhibit crack growth. Ultimate failure of the laminate after the arrest can occur under increasing load either by continued crack extension through the buffer strips or the crack can jump the buffer strips. For some typical hybrid materials it is found that a buffer strip spacing to width ratio of about four to one is the most efficient.

  14. Concentrated Flow through a Riparian Buffer: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. B.; Nogues, J. P.; Hutchinson, S. L.

    2005-05-01

    Riparian buffers are often used for in-situ treatment of agricultural runoff. Although the benefits of riparian buffers are well recongized, concentration of flow can restrict the efficiency of contaminant removal. This study evaluates flow concentration at a agricultural site near Manhattan, Kansas. Manual and automated GIS analyses of a high-resolution digital elevation model were used to determine the fraction of runoff contributing to each buffer segment. Subsequent simulation of the system in WEPP (Water Erosion and Prediction Project) demonstrates the extent to which flow concentration affects buffer efficiency. Recommendations are presented for the design of adaptive-width buffers.

  15. k(+)-buffer: An Efficient, Memory-Friendly and Dynamic k-buffer Framework.

    PubMed

    Vasilakis, Andreas-Alexandros; Papaioannou, Georgios; Fudos, Ioannis

    2015-06-01

    Depth-sorted fragment determination is fundamental for a host of image-based techniques which simulates complex rendering effects. It is also a challenging task in terms of time and space required when rasterizing scenes with high depth complexity. When low graphics memory requirements are of utmost importance, k-buffer can objectively be considered as the most preferred framework which advantageously ensures the correct depth order on a subset of all generated fragments. Although various alternatives have been introduced to partially or completely alleviate the noticeable quality artifacts produced by the initial k-buffer algorithm in the expense of memory increase or performance downgrade, appropriate tools to automatically and dynamically compute the most suitable value of k are still missing. To this end, we introduce k(+)-buffer, a fast framework that accurately simulates the behavior of k-buffer in a single rendering pass. Two memory-bounded data structures: (i) the max-array and (ii) the max-heap are developed on the GPU to concurrently maintain the k-foremost fragments per pixel by exploring pixel synchronization and fragment culling. Memory-friendly strategies are further introduced to dynamically (a) lessen the wasteful memory allocation of individual pixels with low depth complexity frequencies, (b) minimize the allocated size of k-buffer according to different application goals and hardware limitations via a straightforward depth histogram analysis and (c) manage local GPU cache with a fixed-memory depth-sorting mechanism. Finally, an extensive experimental evaluation is provided demonstrating the advantages of our work over all prior k-buffer variants in terms of memory usage, performance cost and image quality. PMID:26357252

  16. Generalised expressions for the response of pH to changes in ocean chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagens, Mathilde; Middelburg, Jack J.

    2016-08-01

    The extent to which oceans are capable of buffering chemical changes resulting from the uptake of carbon dioxide (CO2) or other acidifying processes can be quantified using buffer factors. Here, we present general expressions describing the sensitivity of pH and concentrations of CO2 and other acid-base species to a change in ocean chemistry. These expressions can include as many acid-base systems as desirable, making them suitable for application to, e.g., upwelling regions or nutrient-rich coastal waters. We show that these expressions are fully consistent with previously derived expressions for the Revelle factor and other buffer factors, which only included the carbonate and borate acid-base systems, and provide more accurate values. We apply our general expressions to contemporary global ocean surface water and possible changes therein by the end of the 21st century. These results show that most sensitivities describing a change in pH are of greater magnitude in a warmer, high-CO2 ocean, indicating a decreased seawater buffering capacity. This trend is driven by the increase in CO2 and slightly moderated by the warming. Respiration-derived carbon dioxide may amplify or attenuate ocean acidification due to rising atmospheric CO2, depending on their relative importance. Our work highlights that, to gain further insight into current and future pH dynamics, it is crucial to properly quantify the various concurrently acting buffering mechanisms.

  17. Effect of Tris-HCl buffer on DNA adsorption by a variety of soil constituents.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Kazutoshi; Kunito, Takashi; Sakai, Masao

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effect of tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane hydrochloride (Tris-HCl) buffer (pH 7.0) as a bulk solution on the adsorption of DNA by gibbsite, goethite, montmorillonite, kaolinite, synthetic and natural allophanes, two humic acids and two andosols. The natural allophane, gibbsite, kaolinite and an andosol adsorbed significantly more DNA in a 0.1 M Tris-HCl buffer than in a 0.1 M NaCl solution (t-test, P<0.005). In contrast, montmorillonite adsorbed significantly less DNA in the Tris-HCl than NaCl solution (P<0.05). Care should be taken when using Tris-HCl in studies on the adsorption of extracellular DNA molecules by soil particles. PMID:21487209

  18. Branch target buffer design and optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perleberg, Chris H.; Smith, Alan J.

    1993-01-01

    Consideration is given to two major issues in the design of branch target buffers (BTBs), with the goal of achieving maximum performance for a given number of bits allocated to the BTB design. The first issue is BTB management; the second is what information to keep in the BTB. A number of solutions to these problems are reviewed, and various optimizations in the design of BTBs are discussed. Design target miss ratios for BTBs are developed, making it possible to estimate the performance of BTBs for real workloads.

  19. Spacecraft optical disk recorder memory buffer control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, Robert F.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) for use in the control electronics of the Spacecraft Optical Disk Recorder (SODR). Specifically, this project is to design an extendable memory buffer controller ASIC for rate matching between a system Input/Output port and the SODR's device interface. The aforementioned goal can be partitioned into the following sub-goals: (1) completion of ASIC design and simulation (on-going via ASEE fellowship); (2) ASIC Fabrication (at ASIC manufacturer); and (3) ASIC Testing (NASA/LaRC, Christopher Newport University).

  20. Buffer layers and articles for electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Paranthaman, Mariappan P.; Aytug, Tolga; Christen, David K.; Feenstra, Roeland; Goyal, Amit

    2004-07-20

    Materials for depositing buffer layers on biaxially textured and untextured metallic and metal oxide substrates for use in the manufacture of superconducting and other electronic articles comprise RMnO.sub.3, R.sub.1-x A.sub.x MnO.sub.3, and combinations thereof; wherein R includes an element selected from the group consisting of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, and Y, and A includes an element selected from the group consisting of Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, and Ra.

  1. Oxidative phosphorylation and energy buffering in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Nitschmann, W H; Peschek, G A

    1986-01-01

    The onset of respiration in the cyanobacteria Anacystis nidulans and Nostoc sp. strain Mac upon a shift from dark anaerobic to aerobic conditions was accompanied by rapid energization of the adenylate pool (owing to the combined action of ATP synthase and adenylate kinase) and also the guanylate, uridylate, and cytidylate pools (owing to nucleoside diphosphate and nucleoside monophosphate kinases). Rates of the various transphosphorylation reactions were comparable to the rate of oxidative phosphorylation, thus explaining, in part, low approximately P/O ratios which incorporate adenylates only. The increase of ATP, GTP, UTP, and CTP levels (nanomoles per minute per milligram [dry weight]) in oxygen-pulsed cells of A. nidulans and Nostoc species was calculated to be, on average, 2.3, 1.05, 0.8, and 0.57, respectively. Together with aerobic steady-state pool sizes of 1.35, 0.57, 0.5, and 0.4 nmol/mg (dry weight) for these nucleotides, a fairly uniform turnover of 1.3 to 1.5 min-1 was derived. All types of nucleotides, therefore, may be conceived of as being in equilibrium with each other, reflecting the energetic homeostasis or energy buffering of the (respiring) cyanobacterial cell. For the calculation of net efficiencies of oxidative phosphorylation in terms of approximately P/O ratios, this energy buffering was taken into account. Moreover, in A. nidulans an additional 30% of the energy initially conserved in ATP by oxidative phosphorylation was immediately used up by a plasma membrane-bound reversible H+-ATPase for H+ extrusion. Consequently, by allowing for energy buffering and ATPase-linked H+ extrusion, maximum P/O ratios of 2.6 to 3.3 were calculated. By contrast, in Nostoc sp. all the H+ extrusion, appeared to be linked to a plasma membrane-bound respiratory chain, thus bypassing any ATP formation and leading to P/O ratios of only 1.3 to 1.5 despite the correction for energy buffering. PMID:3023299

  2. Are temperate mature forests buffered from invasive lianas?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavlovic, Noel B.; Leicht-Young, Stacey A.

    2011-01-01

    Mature and old-growth forests are often thought to be buffered against invasive species due to low levels of light and infrequent disturbance. Lianas (woody vines) and other climbing plants are also known to exhibit lower densities in older forests. As part of a larger survey of the lianas of the southern Lake Michigan region in mature and old-growth forests, the level of infestation by invasive lianas was evaluated. The only invasive liana detected in these surveys was Celastrus orbiculatus Thunb. (Celastraceae). Although this species had only attached to trees and reached the canopy in a few instances, it was present in 30% of transects surveyed, mostly as a component of the ground layer. Transects with C. orbiculatus had higher levels of soil potassium and higher liana richness than transects without. In contrast, transects with the native C. scandens had higher pH, sand content, and soil magnesium and lower organic matter compared to transects where it was absent. Celastrus orbiculatus appears to be a generalist liana since it often occurs with native lianas. Celastrus orbiculatus poses a substantial threat to mature forests as it will persist in the understory until a canopy gap or other disturbance provides the light and supports necessary for it to ascend to the canopy and damage tree species. As a result, these forests should be monitored by land managers so that C. orbiculatus eradication can occur while invasions are at low densities and restricted to the ground layer.

  3. Control of structurization processes in wood-cement systems at fixed pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbotina, Natalia; Gorlenko, Nikolay; Sarkisov, Yuriy; Naumova, Ludmila; Minakova, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a study of structurization processes in the wood-cement systemmixed with the buffer solutions and the improvement of service properties of products produced therefrom. Infrared spectroscopy, X-ray phase analysis, and pH measurements show that structurization processes in wood-cement systems depend on the acidity of aqueous solution, the behavior of hydration, neutralization, and polycondensation reactions with the formation of polymer products including those with cement grout components and functional groups of wood. It is shown that phosphate buffer solutions used for mixing wood-cement compositions improve their strength properties and reduce water absorption. The optimum acidity of the buffered medium for service properties of the wood-cement systemis pH = 4.8.

  4. Titratable acidity of beverages influences salivary pH recovery.

    PubMed

    Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló; Fernández, Constanza Estefany; Brandão, Ana Carolina Siqueira; Cury, Jaime Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    A low pH and a high titratable acidity of juices and cola-based beverages are relevant factors that contribute to dental erosion, but the relative importance of these properties to maintain salivary pH at demineralizing levels for long periods of time after drinking is unknown. In this crossover study conducted in vivo, orange juice, a cola-based soft drink, and a 10% sucrose solution (negative control) were tested. These drinks differ in terms of their pH (3.5 ± 0.04, 2.5 ± 0.05, and 5.9 ± 0.1, respectively) and titratable acidity (3.17 ± 0.06, 0.57 ± 0.04 and < 0.005 mmols OH- to reach pH 5.5, respectively). Eight volunteers with a normal salivary flow rate and buffering capacity kept 15 mL of each beverage in their mouth for 10 s, expectorated it, and their saliva was collected after 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 s. The salivary pH, determined using a mini pH electrode, returned to the baseline value at 30 s after expectoration of the cola-based soft drink, but only at 90 s after expectoration of the orange juice. The salivary pH increased to greater than 5.5 at 15 s after expectoration of the cola drink and at 30 s after expectoration of the orange juice. These findings suggest that the titratable acidity of a beverage influences salivary pH values after drinking acidic beverages more than the beverage pH. PMID:25715032

  5. Effect of pH and postmortem aging on protein extraction from broiler breast muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of extraction buffer pH and postmortem aging on the extraction of salt-soluble and water-soluble proteins from broiler pectoralis muscle. De-boned broiler breast fillets were collected at 4 h postmortem, packaged, and then stored at 4°C until...

  6. Relationship Between Redox Potential, Disinfectant, and pH in Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work will examine the effects of pH and oxidant type (chlorine [Cl2], oxygen [O2], hydrogen peroxide [H2O2], monochloramine [MCA], and potassium permanganate [KMnO4]) and concentration (mg/L) on the redox potential of buffered test water. Also, the effects of incrementing ir...

  7. EFFECTS OF PH ON DECHLORINATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE BY ZERO-VALENT IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reduction rates of trichloroethylene (TCE) using zero-valent iron (ZVI) and the rates of iron hydrolysis were characterized at pH values of 5 to 10. The reduction of TCE by ZVI was carried out in batch reactors filled with pH-buffered (phosphate based) solutions under anaerob...

  8. Analytical method development and preformulation stability studies of L-665,871 (a beta-agonist) in swine feed.

    PubMed

    DeMontigny, P; Dave, K J

    1993-10-01

    An analytical procedure for the determination of the beta-agonist L-665,871 by LC with fluorescence detection has been developed. The mobile phase consists of acetonitrile-phosphate buffer (pH 3.0) with ion-pairing reagent hexanesulphonic acid sodium salt for the analysis of swine feed samples with 1 and 20 microgram g-1 L-665,871. Storage of feed samples at room temperature, however, indicated that the stability L-665,871 and its analogue L-674,239 were greatly compromised by the presence of moisture in the feed. Acidification with maleic acid and/or freezing the feeds were found to significantly improve drug stability. PMID:7905752

  9. [Bicarbonate instead of lactate buffered substitution solution for continuous hemofiltration in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Olbricht, C J; Huxmann-Nägeli, D; Bischoff, H

    1990-04-01

    The substitution fluids applied in continuous haemofiltration contain 40 mmol/l of lactate. This is unphysiological, since administration of large amounts of lactate lowers the phosphorylation potential and increases catabolism. With bicarbonate-buffered fluid three problems may arise: 1. Precipitation of calcium carbonate and magnesium carbonate; 2. pH is usually 8.4; 3. evaporation of CO2 increases pH. To solve these problems we applied a two-component system consisting of a glass bottle with 160 ml sodium bicarbonate 8.4% and a bag with 4.5 l of acidic solution. Prior to use, the bicarbonate was infused into the bag. The values of Ca++, Mg++, bicarbonate, and pH in this final substitution solution were constant during a 24 hr period after mixing. Precipitation of Ca++ and Mg++ carbonate was prevented by 3 mmol/l of lactic acid in the solution. The pH was 7.37. Evaporation of CO2 was prevented by bags made of special plastic sheeting. The solution was then applied in 7 intensive-care patients suffering from acute renal failure treated by continuous arteriovenous haemofiltration. No side effects of the solution were observed during six days of treatment. The values of Ca++, bicarbonate, pH, and pCO2 remained constant under clinical routine conditions. Hence, bicarbonate-buffered substitution solution is recommended for continuous haemofiltration. Continuous haemofiltration is now also available for patients with impaired liver function and increased lactate levels. PMID:2360710

  10. Urine pH test

    MedlinePlus

    A urine pH test measures the level of acid in urine. ... pH - urine ... meat products, or cheese can decrease your urine pH. ... to check for changes in your urine acid levels. It may be done to ... more effective when urine is acidic or non-acidic (alkaline).

  11. Buffer allocation in an ATM switch with output buffer and speed constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anil K.; Georganas, N. D.

    A synchronous nonblocking N times N switch for asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) networks or high speed packet switching networks transporting fixed length packets called cells is considered. Such a switch with output queuing achieves the optimal performance, however it requires the switch fabric to work at the speed of N. In practice the switch may operate L times faster than the input/output trunk. It is assumed that queues at each output port have a limited buffer space and whenever an output queue is full, the back-pressure is applied and the packets are retained at the head of the input queues. The upper bound on the packet loss probability at the input queues in such a switch are computed. To achieve a given packet loss rate, the switch with L equals 2 requires almost the same amount of input and output buffers as with L equals 4 up to 70 percent input load, but as the load increases beyond 70 percent the switch with L equals 4 would require more output buffers and less input buffers in comparison with a switch operating at L equals 2. The performance of a switch with L equals 3 is very similar to that for L equals 4 and is not considered.

  12. Damage tolerance of woven graphite-epoxy buffer strip panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, John M.

    1990-01-01

    Graphite-epoxy panels with S glass buffer strips were tested in tension and shear to measure their residual strengths with crack-like damage. The buffer strips were regularly spaced narrow strips of continuous S glass. Panels were made with a uniweave graphite cloth where the S glass buffer material was woven directly into the cloth. Panels were made with different width and thickness buffer strips. The panels were loaded to failure while remote strain, strain at the end of the slit, and crack opening displacement were monitoring. The notched region and nearby buffer strips were radiographed periodically to reveal crack growth and damage. Except for panels with short slits, the buffer strips arrested the propagating crack. The strength (or failing strain) of the panels was significantly higher than the strength of all-graphite panels with the same length slit. Panels with wide, thick buffer strips were stronger than panels with thin, narrow buffer strips. A shear-lag model predicted the failing strength of tension panels with wide buffer strips accurately, but over-estimated the strength of the shear panels and the tension panels with narrow buffer strips.

  13. Driving forces and the influence of the buffer composition on the complexation reaction between ibuprofen and HPCD.

    PubMed

    Perlovich, German L; Skar, Merete; Bauer-Brandl, Annette

    2003-10-01

    Cyclodextrins are often used in order to increase the aqueous solubility of drug substances by complexation. In order to investigate the complexation reaction of ibuprofen and hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin, titration calorimetry was used as a direct method. The thermodynamic parameters of the complexation process (stability constant, K(11); complexation enthalpy, deltaH(c) degrees ) were obtained in two different buffer systems (citric acid/sodium-phosphate and phosphoric acid) at various pH values. Based on these data the relative contributions of the enthalpic and entropic terms of the Gibbs energy to the complexation process have been analyzed. In both buffers the enthalpic and entropic terms are of different sign and this case corresponds to a 'nonclassical' model of hydrophobic interaction. In citric buffer, the main driving force of complexation is the entropy, which increases from 60 to 67% while the pH of the solution increases from 3.2 to 8.0. However, for the phosphoric buffer the entropic term decreases from 60 to 45%, while the pH-value of the solution increases from 5.0 to 8.2, and the driving force of the complexation process changes from entropy to enthalpy. The experimental data of the present study are compared to results of other authors and discrepancies discussed in detail. PMID:14550885

  14. Extracellular amylases of starch-fermenting yeast: pH effect on export and residence time in the periplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Calleja, G.B.; Levy-Rick, S.R.; Nasim, A.; Lusena, C.V.

    1987-01-01

    Aerobic cultures of S. alluvius in Wickerham's yeast-nitrogen-base medium with starch as sole carbon source become strongly acidic and contain no detectable extra-cellular amylolytic activity during stationary phase, when the activity in buffered cultures is maximal. The extracellular amylases are irreversibly inactivated at the low pH value (less than 3.5) attained by the cultures. When adequately buffered, the medium yields maximal extracellular amylolytic activity. About 0.2 M phosphate buffer is adequate for substrate concentrations of up to 0.5% starch; higher starch concentrations require more buffer. Unbuffered cultures that are adjusted once with alkali to pH 5.5 also allow maximal extracellular amylolytic activity, provided the adjustment is made prior to the end of exponential growth. Automatic pH control allows use of high starch concentrations of up to 4%. Export is optimal at pH values higher than the optima for enzyme activity and stability and for population growth. The need for pH adjustment prior to the appearance of amylolytic activity in the medium suggests pH dependence of the export process itself and/or acid inactivation of enzymes transiently resident in the periplasm. (Refs. 23).

  15. Surface Treatments of Nb by Buffered Electropolishing

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Andy T.; Rimmer, Robert A.; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Manus, Robert L.; Reece, Charles E.; Williams, J. S.; Eozénou, F.; Jin, S.; Wang, E.

    2009-11-01

    Buffered electropolishing (BEP) is a Nb surface treatment technique developed at Jefferson Lab1. Experimental results obtained from flat Nb samples show2-4 that BEP can produce a surface finish much smoother than that produced by the conventional electropolishing (EP), while Nb removal rate can be as high as 4.67 μm/min. This new technique has been applied to the treatments of Nb SRF single cell cavity employing a vertical polishing system5 constructed at JLab as well as a horizontal polishing system at CEA Saclay. Preliminary results show that the accelerating gradient can reach 32 MV/m for a large grain cavity and 26.7 MV/m for a regular grain cavity. In this presentation, the latest progresses from the international collaboration between Peking University, CEA Saclay, and JLab on BEP will be summarized.

  16. Microscopic optical buffering in a harmonic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumetsky, M.

    2015-12-01

    In the early days of quantum mechanics, Schrödinger noticed that oscillations of a wave packet in a one-dimensional harmonic potential well are periodic and, in contrast to those in anharmonic potential wells, do not experience distortion over time. This original idea did not find applications up to now since an exact one-dimensional harmonic resonator does not exist in nature and has not been created artificially. However, an optical pulse propagating in a bottle microresonator (a dielectric cylinder with a nanoscale-high bump of the effective radius) can exactly imitate a quantum wave packet in the harmonic potential. Here, we propose a tuneable microresonator that can trap an optical pulse completely, hold it as long as the material losses permit, and release it without distortion. This result suggests the solution of the long standing problem of creating a microscopic optical buffer, the key element of the future optical signal processing devices.

  17. Microscopic optical buffering in a harmonic potential

    PubMed Central

    Sumetsky, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the early days of quantum mechanics, Schrödinger noticed that oscillations of a wave packet in a one-dimensional harmonic potential well are periodic and, in contrast to those in anharmonic potential wells, do not experience distortion over time. This original idea did not find applications up to now since an exact one-dimensional harmonic resonator does not exist in nature and has not been created artificially. However, an optical pulse propagating in a bottle microresonator (a dielectric cylinder with a nanoscale-high bump of the effective radius) can exactly imitate a quantum wave packet in the harmonic potential. Here, we propose a tuneable microresonator that can trap an optical pulse completely, hold it as long as the material losses permit, and release it without distortion. This result suggests the solution of the long standing problem of creating a microscopic optical buffer, the key element of the future optical signal processing devices. PMID:26689546

  18. Aerosol buffering of marine boundary layer cloudiness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazil, J.; Feingold, G.; Wang, H.

    2010-12-01

    The role of aerosol particles in maintaining a cloudy boundary layer in the remote marine environment is explored. It has previously been shown that precipitation can result in the transition from a closed- to open-cellular state but that the boundary layer cannot maintain this open-cell state without a resupply of particles. Potential sources include wind-driven production of sea salt particles from the ocean, nucleation from the gas phase, and entrainment from the free troposphere. Here we investigate with model simulations how the interplay of cloud properties, aerosol production, and boundary layer dynamics results in aerosol sources acting as a buffer against processes that destabilize cloudiness and the dynamic state of the marine boundary layer. For example, at nighttime, cloud liquid water increases in the absence of solar heating, resulting in increased precipitation, stronger cloud top cooling, accelerated boundary layer turbulence, and faster surface wind speeds. Faster surface wind speeds drive an enhanced flux of sea salt aerosol, at a time when aerosol particles are scavenged more readily by enhanced precipitation. In contrast, absorption of solar radiation during daytime reduces cloud water, decelerates boundary layer turbulence, reduces surface wind speeds, and therefore slows surface emissions. This is compensated by nucleation of small aerosol particles from the gas phase in response to the nigh complete removal of cloud condensation nuclei in precipitating open cell walls. These newly formed particles need to grow to larger sizes before they can serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), but will likely contribute to the CCN population during the nighttime and, together with ocean emissions, buffer the system against precipitation removal.

  19. Cost of riparian buffer zones: A comparison of hydrologically adapted site-specific riparian buffers with traditional fixed widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, T.; Lundström, J.; Kuglerová, L.; Laudon, H.; Öhman, K.; Ågren, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    Traditional approaches aiming at protecting surface waters from the negative impacts of forestry often focus on retaining fixed width buffer zones around waterways. While this method is relatively simple to design and implement, it has been criticized for ignoring the spatial heterogeneity of biogeochemical processes and biodiversity in the riparian zone. Alternatively, a variable width buffer zone adapted to site-specific hydrological conditions has been suggested to improve the protection of biogeochemical and ecological functions of the riparian zone. However, little is known about the monetary value of maintaining hydrologically adapted buffer zones compared to the traditionally used fixed width ones. In this study, we created a hydrologically adapted buffer zone by identifying wet areas and groundwater discharge hotspots in the riparian zone. The opportunity cost of the hydrologically adapted riparian buffer zones was then compared to that of the fixed width zones in a meso-scale boreal catchment to determine the most economical option of designing riparian buffers. The results show that hydrologically adapted buffer zones were cheaper per hectare than the fixed width ones when comparing the total cost. This was because the hydrologically adapted buffers included more wetlands and low productive forest areas than the fixed widths. As such, the hydrologically adapted buffer zones allows more effective protection of the parts of the riparian zones that are ecologically and biogeochemically important and more sensitive to disturbances without forest landowners incurring any additional cost than fixed width buffers.

  20. Buffer strip design for protecting water quality and fish habitat

    SciTech Connect

    Belt, G.H.; O'Laughlin, J. )

    1994-04-01

    Buffer strips are protective areas adjacent to streams or lakes. Among other functions, they protect water quality and fish habitat. A typical buffer strip is found in western Oregon, where they are called Riparian Management Areas (RMAs). The authors use the term buffer strip to include functional descriptions such as filter, stabilization, or leave strips, and administrative designations such as Idaho's Stream Protection Zone (SPZ), Washington's Riparian Management Zone (RMZ), and the USDA Forest Service's Streamside Management Zone (SMZ). They address water quality and fishery protective functions of buffer strips on forestlands, pointing out improvements in buffer strip design possible through research or administrative changes. Buffer strip design requirements found in some western Forest Practices Act (FPA) regulations are also compared and related to findings in the scientific literature.

  1. The Multimission Image Processing Laboratory's virtual frame buffer interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, T.

    1984-01-01

    Large image processing systems use multiple frame buffers with differing architectures and vendor supplied interfaces. This variety of architectures and interfaces creates software development, maintenance and portability problems for application programs. Several machine-dependent graphics standards such as ANSI Core and GKS are available, but none of them are adequate for image processing. Therefore, the Multimission Image Processing laboratory project has implemented a programmer level virtual frame buffer interface. This interface makes all frame buffers appear as a generic frame buffer with a specified set of characteristics. This document defines the virtual frame uffer interface and provides information such as FORTRAN subroutine definitions, frame buffer characteristics, sample programs, etc. It is intended to be used by application programmers and system programmers who are adding new frame buffers to a system.

  2. The effect of bicarbonate/fluoride dentifrices on human plaque pH.

    PubMed

    Blake-Haskins, J C; Gaffar, A; Volpe, A R; Bánóczy, J; Gintner, Z; Dombi, C

    1997-01-01

    The acidogenic response in dental plaque after rinsing with sodium bicarbonate/fluoride dentifrice slurries was studied using three intra-oral models. In the first model, resting plaque pH was monitored in mesiobuccal plaque on upper molars and premolars in six healthy subjects after abstinence from normal oral hygiene for three days. These measurements were followed by a three-minute rinse with 10% sucrose and, following a two-minute interval, a three-minute rinse with a test dentifrice slurry. After the test dentifrice rinse, pH was monitored at regular intervals up to 60 minutes. Flow rate, pH and buffer capacity of stimulated saliva were also determined. Changes in resting pH, plaque pH minima, and maximum pH drop were calculated. A clear elevation in the resting pH was observed after bicarbonate/fluoride dentifrice rinses, and a significant increase was obtained in the pH minima. The smallest pH drop also was found after treatment with the bicarbonate/fluoride dentifrice rinse treatment (p < 0.02). A second model using telemetric partial dentures with interproximally placed micro-antimony pH electrodes was used to study the effects of rinsing with increasing concentrations of sodium bicarbonate and calcium carbonate solutions, and with a fluoride dentifrice containing sodium bicarbonate. The response to these treatments was found to be rapid, dose-dependent, and was the greatest from the sodium bicarbonate. A third model used 24 subjects to assess the effects of sodium bicarbonate/fluoride dentifrice on plaque pH before and after a glucose challenge. The use of the bicarbonate/fluoride dentifrice resulted in significantly less measurable plaque acid than the fluoride dentifrice treatment. Collectively, these results indicate bicarbonate in dentifrice to be an effective buffering agent for stabilizing the pH and neutralizing plaque acids in dental plaque. PMID:9586535

  3. Striking Effects of Storage Buffers on Apparent Half-Lives of the Activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Arylsulfatase.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuwei; Yang, Xiaolan; Wang, Deqiang; Hu, Xiaolei; Yuan, Mei; Pu, Jun; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Yang, Zhaoyong; Liao, Fei

    2016-08-01

    To obtain the label enzyme for enzyme-linked-immunoabsorbent-assay of two components each time in one well with conventional microplate readers, molecular engineering of Pseudomonas aeruginosa arylsulfatase (PAAS) is needed. To compare thermostability of PAAS/mutants of limited purity, effects of buffers on the half-activity time (t 0.5) at 37 °C were tested. At pH 7.4, PAAS showed non-exponential decreases of activity, with the apparent t 0.5 of ~6.0 days in 50 mM HEPES, but ~42 days in 10 mM sodium borate with >85 % activity after 15 days; protein concentrations in both buffers decreased at slower rates after there were significant decreases of activities. Additionally, the apparent t 0.5 of PAAS was ~14 days in 50 mM Tris-HCl, and ~21 days in 10 mM sodium phosphate. By sodium dodecyl-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the purified PAAS gave single polypeptide; after storage for 14 days at 37 °C, there were many soluble and insoluble fragmented polypeptides in the HEPES buffer, but just one principal insoluble while negligible soluble fragmented polypeptides in the borate buffer. Of tested mutants in the neutral borate buffer, rates for activity decreases and polypeptide degradation were slower than in the HEPES buffer. Hence, dilute neutral borate buffers were favorable for examining thermostability of PAAS/mutants. PMID:27372107

  4. The interpretation of CO2 equilibration data to obtain plaque fluid buffer capacities, and comparison with results obtained by titration.

    PubMed

    Dibdin, G H; Shellis, R P

    1989-09-01

    Titration measurements of pooled plaque fluid buffering capacity (Shellis and Dibdin, 1988), which showed a broadly defined minimum at pH 7, were compared with recent curves published by Carey et al. (1988a), which they obtained by an ultra-micro CO2-equilibration technique and which suggested a quite different profile, peaking sharply at pH 7.1. When analyzed in a different, more conventional way, the raw measurements in the latter study become more consistent with our own results and with earlier findings of Tatevossian (1977). In particular, we conclude that the peak at pH 7.1 is an artifact, and that Carey et al. underestimated buffer capacities below pH 6.4 and above pH 7.4. Rationales for the two modes of analysis are compared, and possible reasons for the remaining differences between the re-analyzed CO2-equilibration results and the titration results are discussed. Suggestions for the improvement of the accuracy of the CO2-equilibration technique are put forward. PMID:2506258

  5. Grass buffers for playas in agricultural landscapes: A literature synthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melcher, Cynthia P.; Skagen, Susan K.

    2005-01-01

    Future research should entail multiple-scale approaches at regional, wetland-complex, and individual watershed scales. Information needs include direct measures of buffer effectiveness in ‘real-world’ systems, refinement and field tests of buffer-effectiveness models, how buffers may affect floral and faunal communities of playas, and basic ecological information on playa function and playa wildlife ecology. Understanding how wildlife communities respond to patch size and habitat fragmentation is crucial for addressing questions regarding habitat quality of grass buffers in playa systems.

  6. An assessment of buffer strips for improving damage tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.; Kennedy, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy panels with buffer strips were tested in tension to measure their residual strength with crack-like damage. Panels were made with 45/0/-45/90(2S) and 45/0/450(2S) layups. The buffer strips were parallel to the loading directions. They were made by replacing narrow strips of the 0 deg graphite plies with strips of either 0 deg S-Glass/epoxy or Kevlar-49/epoxy on either a one for one or a two for one basis. In a third case, O deg graphite/epoxy was used as the buffer material and thin, perforated Mylar strips were placed between the 0 deg piles and the cross-plies to weaken the interfaces and thus to isolate the 0 deg plies. Some panels were made with buffer strips of different widths and spacings. The buffer strips arrested the cracks and increased the residual strengths significantly over those plain laminates without buffer strips. A shear-lag type stress analysis correctly predicted the effects of layups, buffer material, buffer strip width and spacing, and the number of plies of buffer material.

  7. Concentrated Flow through a Riparian Buffer: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. B.; Nogues, J. P.; Hutchinson, S. L.

    2004-05-01

    Riparian buffers are often used for in-situ treatment of agricultural runoff. Although the benefits of riparian buffers are well recongized, concentration of flow can restrict the efficiency of contaminant removal. This study evaluates flow concentration at a agricultural site near Manhattan, Kansas. Manual and automated GIS analyses of a high-resolution digital elevation model were used to determine the fraction of runoff contributing to each buffer segment. Subsequent simulation of the system in WEPP (Water Erosion and Prediction Project) demonstrates the extend to which flow concentration affects buffer efficiency.

  8. Back contact buffer layer for thin-film solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Compaan, Alvin D.; Plotnikov, Victor V.

    2014-09-09

    A photovoltaic cell structure is disclosed that includes a buffer/passivation layer at a CdTe/Back contact interface. The buffer/passivation layer is formed from the same material that forms the n-type semiconductor active layer. In one embodiment, the buffer layer and the n-type semiconductor active layer are formed from cadmium sulfide (CdS). A method of forming a photovoltaic cell includes the step of forming the semiconductor active layers and the buffer/passivation layer within the same deposition chamber and using the same material source.

  9. Interfacial pH during mussel adhesive plaque formation.

    PubMed

    Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Mussel (Mytilus californianus) adhesion to marine surfaces involves an intricate and adaptive synergy of molecules and spatio-temporal processes. Although the molecules, such as mussel foot proteins (mfps), are well characterized, deposition details remain vague and speculative. Developing methods for the precise surveillance of conditions that apply during mfp deposition would aid both in understanding mussel adhesion and translating this adhesion into useful technologies. To probe the interfacial pH at which mussels buffer the local environment during mfp deposition, a lipid bilayer with tethered pH-sensitive fluorochromes was assembled on mica. The interfacial pH during foot contact with modified mica ranged from 2.2 to 3.3, which is well below the seawater pH of ~ 8. The acidic pH serves multiple functions: it limits mfp-Dopa oxidation, thereby enabling the catecholic functionalities to adsorb to surface oxides by H-bonding and metal ion coordination, and provides a solubility switch for mfps, most of which aggregate at pH ≥ 7-8. PMID:25875963

  10. Interfacial pH during mussel adhesive plaque formation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Nadine R. Martinez; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Mussel (Mytilus californianus) adhesion to marine surfaces involves an intricate and adaptive synergy of molecules and spatio-temporal processes. Although the molecules, such as mussel foot proteins (mfps), are well characterized, deposition details remain vague and speculative. Developing methods for the precise surveillance of conditions that apply during mfp deposition would aid both in understanding mussel adhesion and translating this adhesion into useful technologies. To probe the interfacial pH at which mussels buffer the local environment during mfp deposition, a lipid bilayer with tethered pH-sensitive fluorochromes was assembled on mica. The interfacial pH during foot contact with modified mica ranged from 2.2−3.3, which is well below the seawater pH of ~8. The acidic pH serves multiple functions: it limits mfp-Dopa oxidation, thereby enabling the catecholic functionalities to adsorb to surface oxides by H-bonding and metal ion coordination, and provides a solubility switch for mfps, most of which aggregate at pH ≥ 7-8. PMID:25875963

  11. Ocean Acidification: Euphausia Pacifica's Response to Decreasing pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, H. N.; Cooper, H.

    2014-12-01

    The increasing rate of CO2 accumulating in Earth's oceans creates a threat to organisms that can lead to disturbances in their reproduction, survival and growth. Euphausia pacifica is the dominant species of krill in Monterey Bay, CA, and a keystone species in the bay's food web. Previous work on the effects of ocean acidification on the survival, growth and molting of E. pacifica have shown they are fairly tolerant to increased CO2 concentrations. However, less is known about energy costs associated with maintaining their internal pH levels which could affect food consumption, swimming behavior or growth activity. We hypothesized that krill exposed to high CO2 will increase their feeding rate on local species of phytoplankton to account for increased energy costs of pH buffering activity. We exposed experimental E. pacifica to waters of pH 7.6 (the expected pH surface waters in year 2100), and pH 8.0 (control) periods.test for acclimation or longer term stress. Feeding rates were calculated as changes in phytoplankton counts over 24 hours of feeding using Frost's equations (Frost 1972). Understanding the way E. pacifica is affected by ocean acidification is important because of the role they play as the primary food source for a variety of predators necessary to maintain the Pacific's ecology.

  12. Performance of various input-buffered and output-buffered ATM switch design principles under bursty traffic: Simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Soung C.

    1994-02-01

    This paper investigates the packet loss probabilities of several alternative input-buffered and output-buffered switch designs with finite amounts of buffer space. The effects of bursty traffic, modeled by geometrically distributed active and idle periods, are explored. Methods for improving switch performance are classified, and their effectiveness for dealing with bursty traffic discussed. This work indicates that bursty traffic can degrade switch performance significantly and that it is difficult to alleviate the performance degradation by merely restricting the offered traffic load. Unless buffers are shared, or very large buffers provided, strategies that improve throughput under uniform random traffic are not very effective under bursty traffic. For input-buffered switches, our investigation suggests that the specific contention resolution scheme we use is a more important performance factor under bursty traffic than it is under uniform random traffic.

  13. Responses of soil buffering capacity to acid treatment in three typical subtropical forests.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Wang, Ying-Ping; Yu, Mengxiao; Li, Kun; Shao, Yijing; Yan, Junhua

    2016-09-01

    Elevated anthropogenic acid deposition can significantly affect forest ecosystem functioning by changing soil pH, nutrient balance, and chemical leaching and so on. These effects generally differ among different forests, and the dominant mechanisms for those observed responses often vary, depending on climate, soil conditions and vegetation types. Using soil monoliths (0-40cm) from pine forest (pioneer), coniferous and broadleaved mixed forest (transitional) and broadleaved forest (mature) in southern China, we conducted a leaching experiment with acid treatments at different pH levels (control: pH≈4.5; pH=3.5; pH=2.5). We found that pH3.5 treatment significantly reduced dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in leachate from the pioneer forest soil. pH2.5 treatment significantly increased concentrations of NO3(-), SO4(2-), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Al(3+), Fe(3+) and DOC in leachate from the pioneer forest soil, and also concentrations of NO3(-), SO4(2-), Mg(2+), Al(3+), Fe(3+) and DOC in leachate from the transitional forest soil. All acid treatments had no significant effects on concentrations of these chemicals in leachate from the mature forest soil. The responses can be explained by the changes in soil pH, acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and concentrations of Al and Fe. Our results showed that acid buffering capacity of the pioneer or transitional forest soil was lower than that of the mature forest soil. Therefore preserving mature forests in southern China is important for reducing the adverse impacts of high acid deposition on stream water quality at present and into the future. PMID:27185346

  14. Comparison of adhesive properties of water- and phosphate-buffer-washed cottonseed meals with cottonseed protein isolate on bonding maple and poplar veneers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water- and phosphate buffer (35 mM Na2HPO4/NaH2PO4, pH 7.5)-washed cottonseed meals (abbreviated as WCM and BCM, respectively) could be low-cost and environmentally friendly protein-based adhesives as their preparation does not involve corrosive alkali and acid solutions that are needed for cottonse...

  15. An investigation using atomic force microscopy nanoindentation of dental enamel demineralization as a function of undissociated acid concentration and differential buffer capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Michele E.; Shellis, R. Peter

    2007-02-01

    Acidic drinks and foodstuffs can demineralize dental hard tissues, leading to a pathological condition known as dental erosion, which is of increasing clinical concern. The first step in enamel dissolution is a demineralization of the outer few micrometres of tissue, which results in a softening of the structure. The primary determinant of dissolution rate is pH, but the concentration of undissociated acid, which is related to buffer capacity, also appears to be important. In this study, atomic force microscopy nanoindentation was used to measure the first initial demineralization (softening) induced within 1 min by exposure to solutions with a range of undissociated acid concentration and natural pH of 3.3 or with an undissociated acid concentration of 10 mmol l-1 and pH adjusted to 3.3. The results indicate that differential buffering capacity is a better determinant of softening than undissociated acid concentration. Under the conditions of these experiments, a buffer capacity of >3 mmol l-1 pH-1 does not have any further effect on dissolution rate. These results imply that differential buffering capacity should be used for preference over undissociated acid concentration or titratable acidity, which are more commonly employed in the literature.

  16. Cadmium resistance screening in nitrilotriacetate-buffered minimal media. [Rhizobium fredii

    SciTech Connect

    Angle, J.S. ); Chaney, R.L. )

    1989-08-01

    Media used to determine the MICs of heavy metals for bacteria are unreliable because organic components in the media bind or chelate most of the metal being studied. To define specific metal activity in media and to maintain metal activity at a constant level, HEPES-MES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N{prime}-2-ethanesulfonic acid-2-(N-morpholine)ethanesulfonic acid) salts medium with arabinose medium was modified, and the modified medium was used to examine the MIC of cadmium for Rhizobium fredii USDA 201. Arabinose-HEPES-MES was modified by addition of the chelator nitrilotriacetate to buffer the supply of free Cd{sup 2+} ion to maintain a constant Cd activity and by the use of only MES to buffer pH (buffered arabinose-MES medium (BAM)). Ca and Mg were supplied at the normal levels for soil solutions, and other trace elements were supplied at the levels required for normal growth of plants. The concentration of free Cd{sup 2+} ion was calculated by using the computer program GEOCHEM-PC with a corrected data base. The Cd MIC in BAM was 14.0 {mu}M, while that in a tryptone-yeast extract medium was 107 {mu}M. The results indicate that substantial free Cd{sup 2+} is removed from solution in most standard media, resulting in falsely high MICs. The new BAM medium allows for the precise determination of MICs, thus avoiding the uncertainties associated with other media.

  17. Beneficial effects of supplemental buffer and substrate on energy metabolism during small bowel storage.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Payam; Spratlin, Jennifer; Chong, Tze-Feng; Churchill, Thomas A

    2004-06-01

    Successful preservation of small bowel (SB) is closely correlated with the maintenance of cellular energetics. This study was designed to assess the ability of a modified UW solution supplemented with buffer and glucose to facilitate ATP production during cold storage. In part A, rats SB (n = 4) were flushed vascularly as follows: Group 1, UW solution (control); Group 2, HUW solution (UW+90 mM histidine). Inclusion of histidine resulted in a >3-fold increase in buffering capacity over the pH range 7.4-6.8. Positive effects of histidine on ATP and energy charge were apparent after 4-10h storage. Examination of the key regulatory enzyme, Phosphofructokinase (PFK), reflected a sustained activation was over 1-4h in the HUW group only. In part B, groups were vascularly flushed as follows: Group 1, HUW solution (control); Group 2, Group 1+20mM glucose; and Group 3, Group 2+luminal flush. Elevated ATP and total adenylates over 2-10h in Group 3 compared to control were a direct consequence of improved glycolytic activity. This data supports the hypothesis that tissue energetics can be significantly improved during cold storage using a histidine-buffered UW solution supplemented with carbohydrate substrate. PMID:15157773

  18. Effects of intracellular injection of calcium buffers on light adaptation in Limulus ventral photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    The calcium sequestering agent, EGTA, was injected into Limulus ventral photoreceptors. Before injection, the inward membrane current induced by a long stimulus had a large initial transient which declined to a smaller plateau. Iontophoretic injection of EGTA tended to prevent the decline from transient to plateau. Before injection the plateau response was a nonlinear function of light intensity. After EGTA injection the response-intensity curves tended to become linear. Before injection, bright lights lowered the sensitivity as determined with subsequent test flashes. EGTA injection decreased the light-induced changes in sensitivity. Ca-EGTA buffers having different levels of free calcium were pressure-injected into ventral photoreceptors; the higher the level of free calcium, the lower the sensitivity measured after injection. The effects of inotophoretic injection of EGTA were not mimicked by injection or similar amounts of sulfate and the effects of pressure injection of EGTA buffer solutions were not mimicked by injection of similar volumes of pH buffer or mannitol. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that light adaptation is mediated by a rise of the intracellular free calcium concentration. PMID:810540

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of intracellular pH and pH homeostasis in the hog carotid artery

    SciTech Connect

    Grieder, T.A.

    1989-01-01

    Intracellular pH (pH{sub i}) is an important determinant of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) contractility and relaxation. Most NMR measurement of pH have been calculated from the chemical shift of inorganic phosphate (P{sub i}) in {sup 31}P spectra. An alternative approach is to calculate pH from the difference in chemical shifts of signals in the {sup 19}F spectrum of cells loaded with difluoromethylalanine. This technique has higher sensitivity to pH changes and provides better time resolution than other NMR methods. In this study we report simultaneous measurements of pH{sub i} and the contractile state of single, intact hog carotid arterial segments, closed at both ends and superfused with HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-buffered Krebs solution at physiological pressures. At 28{degree}C, resting arteries maintained a pH{sub i} of 7.15 {+-} 0.03 units (n = 16). In a parallel study, helically cut strips studied with {sup 31}P NMR maintained a similar resting pH (7.18 {+-} 0.09).

  20. Hydrolyzed polyacrylamide grafted maize starch based microbeads: application in pH responsive drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Setty, C Mallikarjuna; Deshmukh, Anand S; Badiger, Aravind M

    2014-09-01

    The present study details the synthesis, characterization and pharmaceutical application of hydrolysed polyacrylamide grafted maize starch (HPam-g-MS) as promising polymeric material for the development of pH responsive microbeads. Different grades of graft copolymer were synthesized by changing the net microwave irradiation time, while keeping all other factors constant. Acute oral toxicity study performed in rodents ensured the bio-safety of graft copolymer for clinical application. Various batches of aceclofenac loaded microbeads were prepared by ionic gelation method using synthesized graft copolymers and evaluated for formulation parameters. FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the chemical compatibility between drug and graft copolymer. Results of in vitro release study (USP type-II) carried out in two different pH media (pH 1.2 acid buffer and pH 7.4 phosphate buffer) showed that release rate of drug from developed microbeads was a function of both: (a) surrounding pH and (b) the matrix composition. The drug release was relatively higher at alkaline pH as compared to acidic pH and this feature is desirable from viewpoint of site specific drug delivery. A direct correlation was observed between percentage grafting and microbeads performance and it presents a scope for further research on application and optimization of HPam-g-MS based microbeads as drug delivery carriers. PMID:24971555

  1. Biodesulfurization of vanadium-bearing titanomagnetite concentrates and pH control of bioleaching solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-rong; Jiang, Sheng-cai; Liu, Yan-jun; Li, Hui; Wang, Hua-jun

    2013-10-01

    Vanadium-bearing titanomagnetite concentrates were desulfurized with Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ( A. ferrooxidans). The sulfur content of the concentrates was reduced from 0.69wt% to 0.14wt% after bioleaching for 15 d with a 10% pulp density at 30°C. Maintaining a stable pH value during biodesulfurization was critical because of high acid consumption, resulting from a combination of nonoxidative and oxidative dissolution of pyrrhotite in acid solution. It is discovered that the citric acid-disodium hydrogen phosphate buffer of pH 2.0 can control the solution pH value smoothly in the optimal range of 2.0-3.0 for A. ferrooxidans growth. Using the buffer in the volume fraction range of 5.0%-15.0% stimulates A. ferrooxidans growth and improves the biodesulfurization efficiency. Compared with the buffer-free control case, the maximum increase of biodesulfurization rate is 29.7% using a 10.0vol% buffer. Bioleaching provides an alternative process for desulfurization of vanadium-bearing titanomagnetite ores.

  2. The pH profile for acid-induced elongation of coleoptile and epicotyl sections is consistent with the acid-growth theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleland, R. E.; Buckley, G.; Nowbar, S.; Lew, N. M.; Stinemetz, C.; Evans, M. L.; Rayle, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    The acid-growth theory predicts that a solution with a pH identical to that of the apoplast of auxin-treated tissues (4.5.-5.0) should induce elongation at a rate comparable to that of auxin. Different pH profiles for elongation have been obtained, however, depending on the type of pretreatment between harvest of the sections and the start of the pH-incubations. To determine the acid sensitivity under in vivo conditions, oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptile, maize (Zea mays L.) coleoptile and pea (Pisum sativum L.) epicotyl sections were abraded so that exogenous buffers could penetrate the free space, and placed in buffered solutions of pH 3.5-6.5 without any preincubation. The extension, without auxin, was measured over the first 3 h. Experiments conducted in three laboratories produced similar results. For all three species, sections placed in buffer without pretreatment elongated at least threefold faster at pH 5.0 than at 6.0 or 6.5, and the rate elongation at pH 5.0 was comparable to that induced by auxin. Pretreatment of abraded sections with pH-6.5 buffer or distilled water adjusted to pH 6.5 or above gave similar results. We conclude that the pH present in the apoplast of auxin-treated coleoptile and stems is sufficiently low to account for the initial growth response to auxin.

  3. Student Understanding of pH: "I Don't Know What the Log Actually Is, I Only Know Where the Button Is on My Calculator"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watters, Dianne J.; Watters, James J.

    2006-01-01

    In foundation biochemistry and biological chemistry courses, a major problem area that has been identified is students' lack of understanding of pH, acids, bases, and buffers and their inability to apply their knowledge in solving acid/base problems. The aim of this study was to explore students' conceptions of pH and their ability to solve…

  4. SAMPLING DEVICE FOR pH MEASUREMENT IN PROCESS STREAMS

    DOEpatents

    Michelson, C.E.; Carson, W.N. Jr.

    1958-11-01

    A pH cell is presented for monitoring the hydrogen ion concentration of a fluid in a process stream. The cell is made of glass with a side entry arm just above a reservoir in which the ends of a glass electrode and a reference electrode are situated. The glass electrode contains the usual internal solution which is connected to a lead. The reference electrode is formed of saturated calomel having a salt bridge in its bottom portion fabricated of a porous glass to insure low electrolyte flow. A flush tube leads into the cell through which buffer and flush solutions are introduced. A ground wire twists about both electrode ends to insure constant electrical grounding of the sample. The electrode leads are electrically connected to a pH meter of aay standard type.

  5. Factors affecting intra-oral pH - a review.

    PubMed

    Loke, C; Lee, J; Sander, S; Mei, L; Farella, M

    2016-10-01

    One of the greatest challenges to modern dentistry is the progressive destruction of tooth material due to chemical erosion. Dental erosion is the loss of dental hard tissue, without the action of bacteria, in which demineralisation of enamel and dentine results due to a decrease in intra-oral pH. The aim of this review was to appraise the scientific literature on the factors that can affect intra-oral pH. The review will examine (i) the protective role of human saliva, in terms of its mineral composition, flow rates and buffering systems and (ii) sources of in-mouth acids such as extrinsic acids, which are derived from the diet and environment, as well as intrinsic acids, which are related to disorders of the gastro-oesophageal tract. This review may assist clinicians to identify the risk factors for tooth wear and to recommend adequate preventive measures to patients. PMID:27573678

  6. pH-Sensitive Polymeric Micelle-based pH Probe for Detecting and Imaging Acidic Biological Environments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Ju; Kang, Han Chang; Hu, Jun; Nichols, Joseph W.; Jeon, Yong Sun; Bae, You Han

    2012-01-01

    To overcome the limitations of monomeric pH probes for acidic tumor environments, this study designed a mixed micelle pH probe composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-b- poly(L-histidine) (PHis) and PEG-b-poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA), which is well-known as an effective antitumor drug carrier. Unlike monomeric histidine and PHis derivatives, the mixed micelles can be structurally destabilized by changes in pH, leading to a better pH sensing system in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. The acidic pH-induced transformation of the mixed micelles allowed pH detection and pH mapping of 0.2–0.3 pH unit differences by pH-induced “on/off”-like sensing of NMR and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). The micellar pH probes sensed pH differences in non-biological phosphate buffer and biological buffers such as cell culture medium and rat whole blood. In addition, the pH-sensing ability of the mixed micelles was not compromised by loaded doxorubicin. In conclusion, PHis-based micelles could have potential as a tool to simultaneously treat and map the pH of solid tumors in vivo. PMID:22861824

  7. Saline catholytes as alternatives to phosphate buffers in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yongtae; Logan, Bruce E

    2013-03-01

    Highly saline solutions were examined as alternatives to chemical buffers in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The performance of two-chamber MFCs with different concentrations of saline solutions in the cathode chamber was compared to those with a buffered catholyte (50mM PBS). The use of a NaCl catholyte improved the CE to 43-60% (28% with no membrane) due to a reduction in oxygen transfer into the anolyte. The saline catholyte also reduced the membrane and solution resistance to 23Ω (41Ω without a membrane). The maximum power density of 491mW/m(2) (240mM NaCl) was only 17% less than the MFC with 50mM PBS. The decrease in power output with highest salinity was due to reduced proton transfer due to the ion exchange membrane, and pH changes in the two solutions. These results show that MFC performance can be improved by using a saline catholyte without pH control. PMID:23433978

  8. The Buffering Balance: Modeling Arctic river total-, inorganic-, and organic-alkalinity fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, C. W.; Salisbury, J.; Wollheim, W. M.; Mineau, M.; Stewart, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    River-borne inputs of alkalinity influence the pH and pCO2 of coastal ocean waters, and changes in alkalinity inputs also have implications for responses to climate-driven ocean acidification. Recent work has shown that alkalinity fluxes from rivers are not always dominated by inorganic carbon species, and can instead be composed somewhat or mostly of non-carbonate, presumably organic species. Concentrations and proportions of organic alkalinity (O-Alk) are correlated to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and fluxes, which are predicted to rise as Arctic permafrost thaws and the hydrologic cycle intensifies. We have scaled results from watershed studies to develop a process-based model to simulate and aggregate Arctic river exports of total alkalinity, DOC, and O-Alk to the coastal sea. Total alkalinity, DOC, and O-Alk were loaded to a river network and routed through a 6-minute hydrologic model (FrAMES). We present results contrasting poorly buffered (e.g. the Kolyma river) and highly buffered (e.g. the Yukon river) systems, the impact of O-Alk on river pH and pCO2, and examine the seasonalities of inorganic and organic influences on coastal ocean carbonate chemistry.

  9. Current isolating epitaxial buffer layers for high voltage photodiode array

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Cooper, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    An array of photodiodes in series on a common semi-insulating substrate has a non-conductive buffer layer between the photodiodes and the semi-insulating substrate. The buffer layer reduces current injection leakage between the photodiodes of the array and allows optical energy to be converted to high voltage electrical energy.

  10. Inhibited fragmentation of mAbs in buffered ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Mazid, Romiza R; Vijayaraghavan, R; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Cortez-Jugo, Christina; Cheng, Wenlong

    2015-05-11

    We thoroughly investigated the biological, structural and chemical stability of epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody (EGFR mAb) using choline-based buffered ionic liquids (BILs). The results demonstrated substantially enhanced stabilities in our BILs, indicating their huge promise as real-world green biological buffers for antibody storage and transportation. PMID:25869239

  11. Study on the principle and defense of buffer overflow attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wang

    2013-03-01

    Buffer overflow attacks have been the most common form in the network attacks and become a predominant problem in the system and network security area. With specific programs, this paper describes in detail the type of buffer overflow attacks and technical principles, so we have a good understanding of them, and then gives several common preventive measures.

  12. Atmospheric Delivery of Herbicides to Riparian Buffer Zones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have evaluated the ability of a riparian buffer to intercept herbicides from the air and deliver them directly by rainfall to a receiving stream in the buffer zone. The study was conducted over a four year period at a site in an agricultural watershed in Maryland. The rain collections included ...

  13. Microbial Community Diversity in Agroforestry and Grass Buffer Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agroforesty and grass buffer systems have long been promoted as a soil conservation practice that yields many environmental benefits. Previous research has described the ability of buffer systems to retain nutrients, slow water flow and soil erosion, or mitigate the potentially harmful effects of e...

  14. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers

    DOEpatents

    Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    2014-07-15

    Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

  15. Barrier recovery is impeded at neutral pH, independent of ionic effects: implications for extracellular lipid processing.

    PubMed

    Mauro, T; Holleran, W M; Grayson, S; Gao, W N; Man, M Q; Kriehuber, E; Behne, M; Feingold, K R; Elias, P M

    1998-04-01

    Epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis requires the postsecretory processing of polar lipid precursors into nonpolar lipid products within the stratum corneum (SC) interstices by a family of lipid hydrolases. A specific requirement for beta-glucocerebrosidase (beta-GlcCer'ase), which exhibits a distinct acidic pH optimum, is particularly well documented. Therefore, we sought to determine whether the recovery of the barrier after acute insults requires acidification of the SC. We examined permeability barrier recovery by assessing changes in transepidermal water loss (TEWL), SC membrane ultrastructure utilizing ruthenium tetroxide (RuO4) postfixation, and beta-GlcCer'ase activity by in situ zymography at an acidic vs neutral pH. Barrier recovery proceeded normally when acetone-treated skin was exposed to solutions buffered to an acidic pH. In contrast, the initiation of barrier recovery was slowed when treated skin was exposed to neutral or alkaline pH, regardless of buffer composition. In addition, enhancement of the alkaline buffer-induced delay in barrier recovery occurred with Ca2+ and K+ inclusion in the buffer. Moreover, the pH-dependent alteration in barrier recovery appeared to occur through a mechanism that was independent of Ca(2+)- or K(+)-controlled lamellar body secretion, since both the formation and secretion of lamellar bodies proceeded comparably at pH 5.5 and pH 7.4. In contrast, exposure to pH 7.4 (but not pH 5.5) resulted in both the persistence of immature, extracellular lamellar membrane structures, and a marked decrease in the in situ activity of beta-GlcCer'ase. These results suggest first that an acidic extracellular pH is necessary for the initiation of barrier recovery, and second that the delay in barrier recovery is a consequence of inhibition of postsecretory lipid processing. PMID:9617442

  16. Effect of the Dialysis Fluid Buffer on Peritoneal Membrane Function in Children

    PubMed Central

    Nau, Barbara; Gemulla, Gita; Bonzel, Klaus E.; Hölttä, Tuula; Testa, Sara; Fischbach, Michel; John, Ulrike; Kemper, Markus J.; Sander, Anja; Arbeiter, Klaus; Schaefer, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Double-chamber peritoneal dialysis fluids exert less toxicity by their neutral pH and reduced glucose degradation product content. The role of the buffer compound (lactate and bicarbonate) has not been defined in humans. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A multicenter randomized controlled trial in 37 children on automated peritoneal dialysis was performed. After a 2-month run-in period with conventional peritoneal dialysis fluids, patients were randomized to neutral-pH, low-glucose degradation product peritoneal dialysis fluids with 35 mM lactate or 34 mM bicarbonate content. Clinical and biochemical monitoring was performed monthly, and peritoneal equilibration tests and 24-hour clearance studies were performed at 0, 3, 6, and 10 months. Results No statistically significant difference in capillary blood pH, serum bicarbonate, or oral buffer supplementation emerged during the study. At baseline, peritoneal solute equilibration and clearance rates were similar. During the study, 4-hour dialysis to plasma ratio of creatinine tended to increase, and 24-hour dialytic creatinine and phosphate clearance increased with lactate peritoneal dialysis fluid but not with bicarbonate peritoneal dialysis fluid. Daily net ultrafiltration, which was similar at baseline (lactate fluid=5.4±2.6 ml/g glucose exposure, bicarbonate fluid=4.9±1.9 ml/g glucose exposure), decreased to 4.6±1.0 ml/g glucose exposure in the lactate peritoneal dialysis fluid group, whereas it increased to 5.1±1.7 ml/g glucose exposure in the bicarbonate content peritoneal dialysis fluid group (P=0.006 for interaction). Conclusions When using biocompatible peritoneal dialysis fluids, equally good acidosis control is achieved with lactate and bicarbonate buffers. Improved long-term preservation of peritoneal membrane function may, however, be achieved with bicarbonate-based peritoneal dialysis fluids. PMID:23124784

  17. Properties of a new acid-buffering bioadhesive vaginal formulation (ACIDFORM).

    PubMed

    Garg, S; Anderson, R A; Chany, C J; Waller, D P; Diao, X H; Vermani, K; Zaneveld, L J

    2001-07-01

    Vaginal prophylactic methodology may prevent heterosexual transmission of the HIV and other sexually transmitted disease-causing organisms as well as unplanned pregnancies. A new delivery system (ACIDFORM) was designed with acid-buffering, bioadhesive, and viscosity-retaining properties to (1) maintain the acidic vaginal milieu (the low pH inactivates many pathogens and spermatozoa), (2) form a protective layer over the vaginal/cervical epithelium (minimizing contact with pathogenic organisms), and (3) provide long-term vaginal retention. A Phase I clinical study with ACIDFORM provided initial information about its safety and showed the formation of a layer over the vaginal/cervical epithelium [1; Amaral et al., Contraception 1999;60:361-6]. To study the properties of the gel (without active ingredient) in more detail, ACIDFORM's acid-buffering, bioadhesive, viscosity-retaining, and spermicidal properties were compared in vitro to marketed formulations, and its long-term stability was assessed. ACIDFORM, either when titrated with NaOH or when mixed directly with semen, is highly acid buffering and much more effective than Aci-Jel, a commercial acid-buffering vaginal product. ACIDFORM adheres well to two model membranes (excised sheep vagina and cellophane) and is more bioadhesive than Conceptrol, Advantage S, Replens, Aci-Jel, and K-Y jelly. On dilution, ACIDFORM also retains its viscosity better than these marketed products. ACIDFORM is spermicidal and is stable for at least 2 years. These results suggest that ACIDFORM has advantages over presently marketed vaginal delivery systems. The gel may either be useful by itself as an antimicrobial contraceptive product or as a formulation vehicle for an active ingredient with antimicrobial and/or contraceptive properties. PMID:11535216

  18. Ionised concentrations in calcium and magnesium buffers: Standards and precise measurement are mandatory.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, John A S; Kay, James W; Elder, Hugh Y

    2016-09-01

    In Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) buffer solutions the ionised concentrations ([X(2+)]) are either calculated or measured. Calculated values vary by up to a factor of seven due to the following four problems: 1) There is no agreement amongst the tabulated constants in the literature. These constants have usually to be corrected for ionic strength and temperature. 2) The ionic strength correction entails the calculation of the single ion activity coefficient, which involves non-thermodynamic assumptions; the data for temperature correction is not always available. 3) Measured pH is in terms of activity i.e. pHa. pHa measurements are complicated by the change in the liquid junction potentials at the reference electrode making an accurate conversion from H(+) activity to H(+) concentration uncertain. 4) Ligands such as EGTA bind water and are not 100% pure. Ligand purity has to be measured, even when the [X(2+)] are calculated. The calculated [X(2+)] in buffers are so inconsistent that calculation is not an option. Until standards are available, the [X(2+)] in the buffers must be measured. The Ligand Optimisation Method is an accurate and independently verified method of doing this (McGuigan & Stumpff, Anal. Biochem. 436, 29, 2013). Lack of standards means it is not possible to compare the published [Ca(2+)] in the nmolar range, and the apparent constant (K(/)) values for Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) binding to intracellular ligands amongst different laboratories. Standardisation of Ca(2+)/Mg(2+) buffers is now essential. The parameters to achieve this are proposed. PMID:26975789

  19. pH Control for Effective Anaerobic Bioremediation of Chlorinated Solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, C.; Barry, D.; Gerhard, J. I.; Kouznetsova, I.

    2007-12-01

    SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) is a 4-year collaborative project that aims to evaluate the performance of enhanced anaerobic bioremediation for the treatment of chlorinated solvent DNAPL source areas. The project focuses on a pilot scale demonstration at a trichloroethene (TCE) DNAPL field site, and includes complementary laboratory and modelling studies. Organic acids and hydrogen ions (HCl) typically build up in the treatment zone during anaerobic bioremediation. In aquifer systems with relatively low buffering capacity the generation of these products can cause significant groundwater acidification thereby inhibiting dehalogenating activity. Where the soil buffering capacity is exceeded, addition of buffer may be needed for the effective continuation of TCE degradation. As an aid to the design of remediation schemes, a geochemical model was designed to predict the amount of buffer required to maintain the source zone pH at a suitable level for dechlorinating bacteria (i.e. > 6.5). The model accounts for the amount of TCE to be degraded, site water chemistry, type of organic amendment and soil mineralogy. It assumes complete dechlorination of TCE, and further considers mineral dissolution and precipitation kinetics. The model is applicable to a wide range of sites. For illustration we present results pertinent to the SABRE field site. Model results indicate that, for the extensive dechlorination expected in proximity to the SABRE DNAPL source zone, significant buffer addition may be necessary. Additional simulations are performed to identify buffer requirements over a wider range of field conditions.

  20. Mitigation of substrate defects in reticles using multilayer buffer layers

    DOEpatents

    Mirkarimi, Paul B.; Bajt, Sasa; Stearns, Daniel G.

    2001-01-01

    A multilayer film is used as a buffer layer to minimize the size of defects on a reticle substrate prior to deposition of a reflective coating on the substrate. The multilayer buffer layer deposited intermediate the reticle substrate and the reflective coating produces a smoothing of small particles and other defects on the reticle substrate. The reduction in defect size is controlled by surface relaxation during the buffer layer growth process and by the degree of intermixing and volume contraction of the materials at the multilayer interfaces. The buffer layers are deposited at near-normal incidence via a low particulate ion beam sputtering process. The growth surface of the buffer layer may also be heated by a secondary ion source to increase the degree of intermixing and improve the mitigation of defects.

  1. Replenishing data descriptors in a DMA injection FIFO buffer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Cernohous, Bob R.; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer; Parker, Jeffrey J.

    2011-10-11

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for replenishing data descriptors in a Direct Memory Access (`DMA`) injection first-in-first-out (`FIFO`) buffer that include: determining, by a messaging module on an origin compute node, whether a number of data descriptors in a DMA injection FIFO buffer exceeds a predetermined threshold, each data descriptor specifying an application message for transmission to a target compute node; queuing, by the messaging module, a plurality of new data descriptors in a pending descriptor queue if the number of the data descriptors in the DMA injection FIFO buffer exceeds the predetermined threshold; establishing, by the messaging module, interrupt criteria that specify when to replenish the injection FIFO buffer with the plurality of new data descriptors in the pending descriptor queue; and injecting, by the messaging module, the plurality of new data descriptors into the injection FIFO buffer in dependence upon the interrupt criteria.

  2. The pH Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemecology, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Describes a game that can be used to teach students about the acidity of liquids and substances around their school and enable them to understand what pH levels tell us about the environment. Students collect samples and measure the pH of water, soil, plants, and other natural material. (DDR)

  3. Investigation of interaction studies of cefpirome with ACE-inhibitors in various buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, Muhammad; Arayne, Muhammad Saeed; Sultana, Najma; Abbas, Hira Fatima

    2015-02-01

    This work describes a RP-HPLC method for the determination and interaction studies of cefpirome with ACE-inhibitors (captopril, enalapril and lisinopril) in various buffers. The separation and interaction of cefpirome with ACE-inhibitors was achieved on a Purospher Star, C18 (5 μm, 250 × 4.6 mm) column. Mobile phase consisted of methanol: water (80:20, v/v, pH 3.3); however, for the separation of lisinopril, it was modified to methanol-water (40:60, v/v, pH 3.3) and pumped at a flow rate of 1 mL min-1. In all cases, UV detection was performed at 225 nm. Interactions were carried out in physiological pH i.e., pH 1 (simulated gastric juice), 4 (simulated full stomach), 7.4 (blood pH) and 9 (simulated GI), drug contents were analyzed by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. Method was found linear in the concentration range of 1.0-50.0 μg mL-1 with correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.999. Precision (RSD%) was less than 2.0%, indicating good precision of the method and accuracy was 98.0-100.0%. Furthermore, cefpirome-ACE-inhibitors' complexes were also synthesized and results were elucidated on the basis of FT-IR, and 1H NMR. The interaction results show that these interactions are pH dependent and for the co-administration of cefpirome and ACE-inhibitors, a proper interval should be given.

  4. Improved isoelectric focusing chromatography on strong anion exchange media via a new model that custom designs mobile phases using simple buffers.

    PubMed

    Choy, Derek Y C; Creagh, A Louise; Haynes, Charles

    2014-03-01

    Isoelectric chromatofocusing (ICF), a mode of chromatography by which proteins are separated based on changes in their charge state with pH, is widely used at analytical scales and finding increasing interest in biologics manufacturing due to its exceptional resolving power. Here, a method is described for using simple monoprotic and diprotic buffers to create stable mobile phases for sample loading on a strong anion exchange column and for achieving an elution pH gradient of desired shape covering any pH range from pH 10.0 to 3. The buffers used are selected to satisfy cost constraints, and to permit facile detection of eluted biologics by UV spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The method exploits a new model described here that combines multiple-chemical and adsorption-equilibria theory to enable in silico tailoring of elution pH profiles using mixtures of these simple buffers. It is shown to provide a versatile platform for optimizing and conducting ICF of protein mixtures on strong anion exchange media. PMID:24166014

  5. Development and validation of a hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatographic method for determination of aromatic amines in environmental water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple, precise, and accurate hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatographic (HILIC) method has been developed for the determination of 5 aromatic amines in environmental water samples. Chromatography was carried out on a bare silica column, using a mixture of acetonitrile: phosphate buffer (10 mM...

  6. Streptococcus oligofermentans Inhibits Streptococcus mutans in Biofilms at Both Neutral pH and Cariogenic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xudong; de Soet, Johannes Jacob; Tong, Huichun; Gao, Xuejun; He, Libang; van Loveren, Cor; Deng, Dong Mei

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis of oral microbiota can be maintained through microbial interactions. Previous studies showed that Streptococcus oligofermentans, a non-mutans streptococci frequently isolated from caries-free subjects, inhibited the cariogenic Streptococcus mutans by the production of hydrogen peroxide (HP). Since pH is a critical factor in caries formation, we aimed to study the influence of pH on the competition between S. oligofermentans and S. mutans in biofilms. To this end, S. mutans and S. oligofermentans were inoculated alone or mixed at 1:1 ratio in buffered biofilm medium in a 96-well active attachment model. The single- and dual-species biofilms were grown under either constantly neutral pH or pH-cycling conditions. The latter includes two cycles of 8 h neutral pH and 16 h pH 5.5, used to mimic cariogenic condition. The 48 h biofilms were analysed for the viable cell counts, lactate and HP production. The last two measurements were carried out after incubating the 48 h biofilms in buffers supplemented with 1% glucose (pH 7.0) for 4 h. The results showed that S. oligofermentans inhibited the growth of S. mutans in dual-species biofilms under both tested pH conditions. The lactic acid production of dual-species biofilms was significantly lower than that of single-species S. mutans biofilms. Moreover, dual-species and single-species S. oligofermentans biofilms grown under pH-cycling conditions (with a 16 h low pH period) produced a significantly higher amount of HP than those grown under constantly neutral pH. In conclusion, S. oligofermentans inhibited S. mutans in biofilms not only under neutral pH, but also under pH-cycling conditions, likely through HP production. S. oligofermentans may be a compelling probiotic candidate against caries. PMID:26114758

  7. Streptococcus oligofermentans Inhibits Streptococcus mutans in Biofilms at Both Neutral pH and Cariogenic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xudong; de Soet, Johannes Jacob; Tong, Huichun; Gao, Xuejun; He, Libang; van Loveren, Cor; Deng, Dong Mei

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis of oral microbiota can be maintained through microbial interactions. Previous studies showed that Streptococcus oligofermentans, a non-mutans streptococci frequently isolated from caries-free subjects, inhibited the cariogenic Streptococcus mutans by the production of hydrogen peroxide (HP). Since pH is a critical factor in caries formation, we aimed to study the influence of pH on the competition between S. oligofermentans and S. mutans in biofilms. To this end, S. mutans and S. oligofermentans were inoculated alone or mixed at 1:1 ratio in buffered biofilm medium in a 96-well active attachment model. The single- and dual-species biofilms were grown under either constantly neutral pH or pH-cycling conditions. The latter includes two cycles of 8 h neutral pH and 16 h pH 5.5, used to mimic cariogenic condition. The 48 h biofilms were analysed for the viable cell counts, lactate and HP production. The last two measurements were carried out after incubating the 48 h biofilms in buffers supplemented with 1% glucose (pH 7.0) for 4 h. The results showed that S. oligofermentans inhibited the growth of S. mutans in dual-species biofilms under both tested pH conditions. The lactic acid production of dual-species biofilms was significantly lower than that of single-species S. mutans biofilms. Moreover, dual-species and single-species S. oligofermentans biofilms grown under pH-cycling conditions (with a 16 h low pH period) produced a significantly higher amount of HP than those grown under constantly neutral pH. In conclusion, S. oligofermentans inhibited S. mutans in biofilms not only under neutral pH, but also under pH-cycling conditions, likely through HP production. S. oligofermentans may be a compelling probiotic candidate against caries. PMID:26114758

  8. Multiple cytosolic calcium buffers in posterior pituitary nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Shane M; Chang, Che-Wei; Jackson, Meyer B

    2016-03-01

    Cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers bind to a large fraction of Ca(2+) as it enters a cell, shaping Ca(2+) signals both spatially and temporally. In this way, cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers regulate excitation-secretion coupling and short-term plasticity of release. The posterior pituitary is composed of peptidergic nerve terminals, which release oxytocin and vasopressin in response to Ca(2+) entry. Secretion of these hormones exhibits a complex dependence on the frequency and pattern of electrical activity, and the role of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers in controlling pituitary Ca(2+) signaling is poorly understood. Here, cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers were studied with two-photon imaging in patch-clamped nerve terminals of the rat posterior pituitary. Fluorescence of the Ca(2+) indicator fluo-8 revealed stepwise increases in free Ca(2+) after a series of brief depolarizing pulses in rapid succession. These Ca(2+) increments grew larger as free Ca(2+) rose to saturate the cytosolic buffers and reduce the availability of Ca(2+) binding sites. These titration data revealed two endogenous buffers. All nerve terminals contained a buffer with a Kd of 1.5-4.7 µM, and approximately half contained an additional higher-affinity buffer with a Kd of 340 nM. Western blots identified calretinin and calbindin D28K in the posterior pituitary, and their in vitro binding properties correspond well with our fluorometric analysis. The high-affinity buffer washed out, but at a rate much slower than expected from diffusion; washout of the low-affinity buffer could not be detected. This work has revealed the functional impact of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers in situ in nerve terminals at a new level of detail. The saturation of these cytosolic buffers will amplify Ca(2+) signals and may contribute to use-dependent facilitation of release. A difference in the buffer compositions of oxytocin and vasopressin nerve terminals could contribute to the differences in release plasticity of these two hormones. PMID:26880753

  9. Mu d-directed lacZ fusions regulated by low pH in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Slonczewski, J L; Gonzalez, T N; Bartholomew, F M; Holt, N J

    1987-01-01

    Methods were devised to isolate strains of Escherichia coli containing Mu d (lacZ Kmr) operon fusions regulated by external pH and by internal pH. External acid-inducible fusions (exa) were detected by plating a Mu d fusion pool on Luria broth with 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactoside, buffered at pH 7.4, and then replica plating on the same medium buffered at pH 5.5. Two exa strains showed induction by external acidification, up to 800-fold and 90-fold. Induction of both fusions was maximal at pH 5.6 and minimal over pH 7.0 to 8.3. There was no induction by membrane-permeable weak acids which depress internal pH at constant external pH. Anaerobiosis increased the steady-state level of transcription of exa-1 5-fold and of exa-2 2.5-fold at low external pH. Internal acid-inducible fusions (ina) were detected by plating a Mu d fusion pool on MacConkey medium, pH 6.8, and then replica plating with 15 mM benzoate. Two ina strains showed 10-fold induction by 20 mM benzoate at external pH 7.0. Similar results were obtained with other weak acids; their relative potency (salicylate greater than benzoate greater than dimethoxazoledinedione) was consistent with their relative ability to depress internal pH. In the absence of a weak acid, external pH had almost no effect over the pH range 5.5 to 8.0. Anaerobiosis did not affect ina induction. To our knowledge, this is the first report of E. coli genes induced specifically by internal but not external acidification and the first report of gene fusions induced by external acidification but not by weak acids. PMID:2954947

  10. Using isoelectric point to determine the pH for initial protein crystallization trials

    PubMed Central

    Kirkwood, Jobie; Hargreaves, David; O’Keefe, Simon; Wilson, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: The identification of suitable conditions for crystallization is a rate-limiting step in protein structure determination. The pH of an experiment is an important parameter and has the potential to be used in data-mining studies to help reduce the number of crystallization trials required. However, the pH is usually recorded as that of the buffer solution, which can be highly inaccurate. Results: Here, we show that a better estimate of the true pH can be predicted by considering not only the buffer pH but also any other chemicals in the crystallization solution. We use these more accurate pH values to investigate the disputed relationship between the pI of a protein and the pH at which it crystallizes. Availability and implementation: Data used to generate models are available as Supplementary Material. Contact: julie.wilson@york.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25573921

  11. Stabilization of pH in solid-matrix hydroponic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frick, J.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1993-01-01

    2-[N-morpholino]ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer or Amberlite DP-1 (cation-exchange resin beads) were used to stabilize substrate pH of passive-wicking, solid-matrix hydroponic systems in which small canopies of Brassica napus L. (CrGC 5-2, genome : ACaacc) were grown to maturity. Two concentrations of MES (5 or 10 mM) were included in Hoagland 1 nutrient solution. Alternatively, resin beads were incorporated into the 2 vermiculite : 1 perlite (v/v) growth medium at 6% or 12% of total substrate volume. Both strategies stabilized pH without toxic side effects on plants. Average seed yield rates for all four pH stabilization treatments (13.3 to 16.9 g m-2 day-1) were about double that of the control (8.2 g m-2 day-1), for which there was no attempt to buffer substrate pH. Both the highest canopy seed yield rate (16.9 g m-2 day-1) and the highest shoot harvest index (19.5%) occurred with the 6% resin bead treatment, even though the 10 mM MES and 12% bead treatments maintained pH within the narrowest limits. The pH stabilization methods tested did not significantly affect seed oil and protein contents.

  12. Stabilization of pH in solid-matrix hydroponic systems.

    PubMed

    Frick, J; Mitchell, C A

    1993-10-01

    2-[N-morpholino]ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer or Amberlite DP-1 (cation-exchange resin beads) were used to stabilize substrate pH of passive-wicking, solid-matrix hydroponic systems in which small canopies of Brassica napus L. (CrGC 5-2, genome : ACaacc) were grown to maturity. Two concentrations of MES (5 or 10 mM) were included in Hoagland 1 nutrient solution. Alternatively, resin beads were incorporated into the 2 vermiculite : 1 perlite (v/v) growth medium at 6% or 12% of total substrate volume. Both strategies stabilized pH without toxic side effects on plants. Average seed yield rates for all four pH stabilization treatments (13.3 to 16.9 g m-2 day-1) were about double that of the control (8.2 g m-2 day-1), for which there was no attempt to buffer substrate pH. Both the highest canopy seed yield rate (16.9 g m-2 day-1) and the highest shoot harvest index (19.5%) occurred with the 6% resin bead treatment, even though the 10 mM MES and 12% bead treatments maintained pH within the narrowest limits. The pH stabilization methods tested did not significantly affect seed oil and protein contents. PMID:11537992

  13. Improved ultrastructure of marine invertebrates using non-toxic buffers

    PubMed Central

    Montanaro, Jacqueline; Gruber, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Many marine biology studies depend on field work on ships or remote sampling locations where sophisticated sample preservation techniques (e.g., high-pressure freezing) are often limited or unavailable. Our aim was to optimize the ultrastructural preservation of marine invertebrates, especially when working in the field. To achieve chemically-fixed material of the highest quality, we compared the resulting ultrastructure of gill tissue of the mussel Mytilus edulis when fixed with differently buffered EM fixatives for marine specimens (seawater, cacodylate and phosphate buffer) and a new fixative formulation with the non-toxic PHEM buffer (PIPES, HEPES, EGTA and MgCl2). All buffers were adapted for immersion fixation to form an isotonic fixative in combination with 2.5% glutaraldehyde. We showed that PHEM buffer based fixatives resulted in equal or better ultrastructure preservation when directly compared to routine standard fixatives. These results were also reproducible when extending the PHEM buffered fixative to the fixation of additional different marine invertebrate species, which also displayed excellent ultrastructural detail. We highly recommend the usage of PHEM-buffered fixation for the fixation of marine invertebrates. PMID:27069800

  14. Gilliam County Riparian Buffers; 2003-2004 Annual Reports.

    SciTech Connect

    Coiner, Josh

    2004-06-01

    Interest appears to be at an all-time high for riparian conservation programs in Gilliam County. With the recently added Herbaceous Buffer and the already established CREP program interest is booming. However, more and more people are turning towards the herbaceous buffer because of expense. The riparian forest buffer is becoming too expensive. Even with the excellent cost share and incentives landowners are having trouble with Farm Service Agency's payment limitation. Because of this payment limitation landowners are not receiving their full rental and incentive payments, usually in year one. This has cooled the installation of riparian forest buffers and peaked interest in the CP-29 (Herbaceous Buffer for Wildlife). Either way, riparian lands are being enhanced and water quality is being improved. Year three should be very similar to the accomplishments of year 2. There has already been several projects proposed that may or may not be approved during year 3. I am currently working on three projects that are all over 2.5 miles long on each side and total anywhere from 60 to 250 acres in size. Along with these three projects there at least seven small projects being proposed. Four of those projects are riparian forest buffers and the remaining are herbaceous buffers.

  15. Improved ultrastructure of marine invertebrates using non-toxic buffers.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Jacqueline; Gruber, Daniela; Leisch, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    Many marine biology studies depend on field work on ships or remote sampling locations where sophisticated sample preservation techniques (e.g., high-pressure freezing) are often limited or unavailable. Our aim was to optimize the ultrastructural preservation of marine invertebrates, especially when working in the field. To achieve chemically-fixed material of the highest quality, we compared the resulting ultrastructure of gill tissue of the mussel Mytilus edulis when fixed with differently buffered EM fixatives for marine specimens (seawater, cacodylate and phosphate buffer) and a new fixative formulation with the non-toxic PHEM buffer (PIPES, HEPES, EGTA and MgCl2). All buffers were adapted for immersion fixation to form an isotonic fixative in combination with 2.5% glutaraldehyde. We showed that PHEM buffer based fixatives resulted in equal or better ultrastructure preservation when directly compared to routine standard fixatives. These results were also reproducible when extending the PHEM buffered fixative to the fixation of additional different marine invertebrate species, which also displayed excellent ultrastructural detail. We highly recommend the usage of PHEM-buffered fixation for the fixation of marine invertebrates. PMID:27069800

  16. Social buffering ameliorates conditioned fear responses in female rats.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Akiko; Kiyokawa, Yasushi; Takeuchi, Yukari; Mori, Yuji

    2016-05-01

    The stress experienced by an animal is ameliorated when the animal is exposed to distressing stimuli along with a conspecific animal(s). This is known as social buffering. Previously, we found that the presence of an unfamiliar male rat induced social buffering and ameliorated conditioned fear responses of a male rat subjected to an auditory conditioned stimulus (CS). However, because our knowledge of social buffering is highly biased towards findings in male subjects, analyses using female subjects are crucial for comprehensively understanding the social buffering phenomenon. In the present studies, we assessed social buffering of conditioned fear responses in female rats. We found that the estrus cycle did not affect the intensity of the rats' fear responses to the CS or their degree of vigilance due to the presence of a conspecific animal. Based on these findings, we then assessed whether social buffering ameliorated conditioned fear responses in female rats without taking into account their estrus cycles. When fear conditioned female rats were exposed to the CS without the presence of a conspecific, they exhibited behavioral responses, including freezing, and elevated corticosterone levels. By contrast, the presence of an unfamiliar female rat suppressed these responses. Based on these findings, we conclude that social buffering can ameliorate conditioned fear responses in female rats. PMID:27060333

  17. Buffer Gas Experiments in Mercury (Hg+) Ion Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Sang K.; Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    2004-01-01

    We describe the results of the frequency shifts measured from various buffer gases that might be used as a buffer gas to increase the loading efficiency and cooling of ions trapped in a small mercury ion clock. The small mass, volume and power requirement of space clock precludes the use of turbo pumps. Hence, a hermetically sealed vacuum system, incorporating a suitable getter material with a fixed amount of inert buffer gas may be a practical alternative to the groundbased system. The collision shifts of 40,507,347.996xx Hz clock transition for helium, neon and argon buffer gases were measured in the ambient earth magnetic field. In addition to the above non-getterable inert gases we also measured the frequency shifts due to getterable, molecular hydrogen and nitrogen gases which may be used as buffer gases when incorporated with a miniature ion pump. We also examined the frequency shift due to the low methane gas partial pressure in a fixed higher pressure neon buffer gas environment. Methane gas interacted with mercury ions in a peculiar way as to preserve the ion number but to relax the population difference in the two hyperfine clock states and thereby reducing the clock resonance signal. The same population relaxation was also observed for other molecular buffer gases (N H,) but at much reduced rate.

  18. Monitoring Liverworts to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Hydroriparian Buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Kellina L.; Yasué, Maï

    2014-01-01

    In the coastal temperate rainforest of British Columbia (BC) in western Canada, government policies stipulate that foresters leave unlogged hydroriparian buffer strips up to 25 m on each side of streams to protect wildlife habitat. At present, studies on the effectiveness of these buffers focus on mammals, birds, and amphibians while there is comparably little information on smaller organisms such as liverworts in these hydroriparian buffers. To address this gap of knowledge, we conducted field surveys of liverworts comparing the percent cover and community composition in hydroriparian forested areas ( n = 4 sites, n = 32 plots with nested design) to hydroriparian buffer zones ( n = 4 sites, n = 32 plots). We also examined how substrate type affected the cover of liverworts. Liverwort communities in buffers were similar to those in riparian forest areas and most liverworts were found on downed wood. Thus, hydroriparian buffers of 25-35 m on each side in a coastal temperate rainforest effectively provide habitat for liverworts as long as downed wood is left intact in the landscape. Because liverworts are particularly sensitive to changes in humidity, these results may indicate that hydroriparian buffers are an effective management strategy for bryophytes and possibly for a range of other riparian species that are particularly sensitive to forestry-related changes in microclimate.

  19. Wasco Riparian Buffer Project, Annual Report 2003-2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Ron

    2003-07-01

    This project implements riparian buffer systems in the Mid-Columbia, addressing limiting factors identified in the Deschutes River Sub-basin Summary, March 2, 2001. This project is providing the technical planning support needed to implement at least 20 riparian buffer system contracts on approximately 800 acres covering an estimated 36 miles of anadromous fish streams. During this second year of implementation, 17 buffer contracts were established on 173,462 ft. of stream (25.9 miles). Acreage included in the buffers totaled 891.6 acres. Average buffer width was 112 ft. on each side of the stream. Cumulative totals through the first two project years are 26 buffers on 36.6 stream miles covering 1,283.6 acres. Actual implementation costs, lease payments, and maintenance costs will be borne by existing USDA programs: Conservation Reserve (CRP) and Conservation Reserve Enhancement Programs (CREP). The lease period of each contract may vary from 10 to 15 years. During this year, the average lease period was 14.9 years. The total value of contracts established this year is $1,421,268 compared with $55,504 in BPA contract costs to provide the technical support needed to get the contracts implemented. Cumulative contract value for the first two years is $1,919,451 compared to $103,329 cost to BPA. This project provides technical staffing to conduct assessments and develop conservation plans required for riparian buffer systems to help keep pace with a growing backlog of potential buffer projects. This project meets a critical need in the lower Deschutes and lower John Day River basins and complements the Riparian Buffer project approved for Fifteenmile watershed, Project No. 2001-021-00 begun in fiscal year 2001. This project supports RPA 150 and 153 as required under the Federal Hydropower System biological opinion and benefits the mid-Columbia ESU of steelhead.

  20. Study of retention and peak shape in hydrophilic interaction chromatography over a wide pH range.

    PubMed

    McCalley, David V

    2015-09-11

    Retention factor and column efficiency measurements were made for 14 test compounds comprising acids, bases and neutrals on two pairs of amide and bare silica HILIC columns, each pair obtained from a different manufacturer. The columns were tested with up to 6 different mobile phases with acetonitrile-water containing formic (FA), trifluoroacetic (TFA), heptafluorobutyric acids (HFBA) and ammonium salt buffers at w(w)pH 3, 6 and 9. Measurements of mobile phase pH in water (w(w)pH) and in the aqueous-organic mixture (w(s)pH) were performed, and calculations of ionic strength made, in order to aid interpretation of the chromatographic results. Stronger acids like TFA produced very different selectivity compared with ammonium formate buffers at similar aqueous pH. On a given column using TFA as additive, the retention of strongly acidic solutes was considerably increased relative to that of bases. Some bases even showed exclusion on both amide, and on a hybrid silica column. Conversely, in ammonium formate buffers of similar aqueous pH, bases had increased retention compared with acids, particularly on the bare silica columns. This result can be attributed to the higher pH of the salt buffers when measured in the aqueous-organic phase and interaction with negatively charged silanols. It is possible that the silica surface becomes positively charged at the low pH of TFA, leading to anion exchange properties that become competitive with the cation exchange properties normally attributed to silanol dissociation, although other explanations of these results are possible. Very marked selectivity differences were obtained by use of TFA in the mobile phase. Useful selectivity differences may also be obtained with salt buffers at different pH if the use of TFA is not desired due to its relatively unfavourable properties in mass spectrometry. PMID:26275863

  1. Buffer layers for REBCO films for use in superconducting devices

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Wee, Sung-Hun

    2014-06-10

    A superconducting article includes a substrate having a biaxially textured surface. A biaxially textured buffer layer, which can be a cap layer, is supported by the substrate. The buffer layer includes a double perovskite of the formula A.sub.2B'B''O.sub.6, where A is rare earth or alkaline earth metal and B' and B'' are different transition metal cations. A biaxially textured superconductor layer is deposited so as to be supported by the buffer layer. A method of making a superconducting article is also disclosed.

  2. Enhanced adhesion for LIGA microfabrication by using a buffer layer

    DOEpatents

    Bajikar, Sateesh S.; De Carlo, Francesco; Song, Joshua J.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an improvement on the LIGA microfabrication process wherein a buffer layer is applied to the upper or working surface of a substrate prior to the placement of a resist onto the surface of the substrate. The buffer layer is made from an inert low-Z material (low atomic weight), a material that absorbs secondary X-rays emissions from the substrate that are generated from the substrate upon exposure to a primary X-rays source. Suitable materials for the buffer layer include polyamides and polyimide. The preferred polyimide is synthesized form pyromellitic anhydride and oxydianiline (PMDA-ODA).

  3. An oxygen buffer for some peraluminous granites and metamorphic rocks.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zen, E.

    1985-01-01

    The mineral assemblage biotite-garnet-muscovite-magnetite-quartz and its sub-sets are common in many peraluminous granites, schists and gneisses. If the biotite and garnet are reasonably iron-rich, then the system is a useful buffer for fO2. Available thermochemical data indicate that, in T-fO2 space, the buffer curve is located between the hematite-magnetite curve and the quartz-magnetite-fayalite curve, in a region that previously had no buffer curve applicable to peraluminous rocks. -J.A.Z.

  4. Enhanced adhesion for LIGA microfabrication by using a buffer layer

    SciTech Connect

    Bajikar, Sateesh S.; De Carlo, Francesco; Song, Joshua J.

    2004-01-27

    The present invention is an improvement on the LIGA microfabrication process wherein a buffer layer is applied to the upper or working surface of a substrate prior to the placement of a resist onto the surface of the substrate. The buffer layer is made from an inert low-Z material (low atomic weight), a material that absorbs secondary X-rays emissions from the substrate that are generated from the substrate upon exposure to a primary X-rays source. Suitable materials for the buffer layer include polyamides and polyimide. The preferred polyimide is synthesized form pyromellitic anhydride and oxydianiline (PMDA-ODA).

  5. Capacity and buffer trade-offs in a remanufacturing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksoy, Hasan K.; Gupta, Surendra M.

    2002-02-01

    In this paper, we examine the tradeoffs between increasing the number of buffers and increasing the capacity at the remanufacturing stations under numerous circumstances on such performance measures as expected total cost, average WIP inventory, throughput and average processing (remanufacturing) time when the remanufacturing stations are operating in uncertain environments. We model the remanufacturing system using an open queueing network with finite buffers and unreliable servers. In order to analyze the queueing network, we use the decomposition principle and expansion methodology. Each server in the system is subject to breakdown and has a finite buffer capacity.

  6. Job Shop Scheduling Focusing on Role of Buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, Rei; Kusumi, Tetsuya; Yoo, Jae-Kyu; Shimizu, Yoshiaki

    A scheduling problem is formulated in order to consistently manage each manufacturing resource, including machine tools, assembly robots, AGV, storehouses, material shelves, and so on. The manufacturing resources are classified into three types: producer, location, and mover. This paper focuses especially on the role of the buffer, and the differences among these types are analyzed. A unified scheduling formulation is derived from the analytical results based on the resource’s roles. Scheduling procedures based on dispatching rules are also proposed in order to numerically evaluate job shop-type production having finite buffer capacity. The influences of the capacity of bottle-necked production devices and the buffer on productivity are discussed.

  7. Buffer layer effect on ZnO nanorods growth alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongxu; Andreazza, Caroline; Andreazza, Pascal; Ma, Jiangang; Liu, Yichun; Shen, Dezhen

    2005-06-01

    Vertical aligned ZnO nanorods array was fabricated on Si with introducing a ZnO thin film as a buffer layer. Two different nucleation mechanisms were found in growth process. With using Au catalyst, Zn vapor could diffuse into Au nanoclusters with forming a solid solution. Then the ZnO nucleation site is mainly on the catalyst by oxidation of Au/Zn alloy. Without catalyst, nucleation could occur directly on the surface of buffer layer by homoepitaxy. The density and the size of ZnO nanorods could be governed by morphological character of catalyst and buffer layer. The nanorods growth is followed by vapor-solid mechanism.

  8. Esophageal pH monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    pH monitoring - esophageal; Esophageal acidity test ... esophagitis You may need to have the following tests if your doctor suspects esophagitis : Barium swallow Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (also called upper GI endoscopy)

  9. PhEDEx Data Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Wildish, Tony; Huang, Chih-Hao

    2010-04-01

    The PhEDEx Data Service provides access to information from the central PhEDEx database, as well as certificate-authenticated managerial operations such as requesting the transfer or deletion of data. The Data Service is integrated with the "SiteDB" service for fine-grained access control, providing a safe and secure environment for operations. A plug-in architecture allows server-side modules to be developed rapidly and easily by anyone familiar with the schema, and can automatically return the data in a variety of formats for use by different client technologies. Using HTTP access via the Data Service instead of direct database connections makes it possible to build monitoring web-pages with complex drill-down operations, suitable for debugging or presentation from many aspects. This will form the basis of the new PhEDEx website in the near future, as well as providing access to PhEDEx information and certificate-authenticated services for other CMS dataflow and workflow management tools such as CRAB, WMCore, DBS and the dashboard. A PhEDEx command-line client tool provides one-stop access to all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service interactively, for use in simple scripts that do not access the service directly. The client tool provides certificate-authenticated access to managerial functions, so all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service are available to it. The tool can be expanded by plug-ins which can combine or extend the client-side manipulation of data from the Data Service, providing a powerful environment for manipulating data within PhEDEx.

  10. The stability of water- and fat-soluble vitamin in dentifrices according to pH level and storage type.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Eun; Kim, Ki-Eun; Choi, Yong-Jun; Park, Yong-Duk; Kwon, Ha-Jeong

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the vitamin stabilities in dentifrices by analyzing various vitamins according to the level and storage temperature. The stabilities of water- and fat-soluble vitamins were investigated in buffer solution at different pH values (4, 7, 8, 10 and 11) for 14 days and in dentifrices at different pH (7 and 10) for 5 months at two temperature conditions (room and refrigeration temperature) by analyzing the remaining amounts using HPLC methods. In the buffer solution, the stability of vitamins B1 , B6 and C was increased as the pH values increased. Vitamins E and K showed poor stability at pH 4, and vitamin B3 showed poor stability at pH 11. In dentifrices, the storage temperature highly influenced vitamin stability, especially vitamins C and E, but the stabilities of vitamins B1 and C according to pH values did not correspond to the buffer solution tests. Vitamin B group was relatively stable in dentifrices, but vitamin C completely disappeared after 5 months. Vitamin K showed the least initial preservation rates. Vitamins were not detected in commercial dentifrices for adults and detected amounts were less than the advertised contents in dentifrices for children. PMID:26096721

  11. Protein A chromatography increases monoclonal antibody aggregation rate during subsequent low pH virus inactivation hold

    PubMed Central

    Mazzer, Alice R.; Perraud, Xavier; Halley, Jennifer; O’Hara, John; Bracewell, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Protein A chromatography is a near-ubiquitous method of mAb capture in bioprocesses. The use of low pH buffer for elution from protein A is known to contribute to product aggregation. Yet, a more limited set of evidence suggests that low pH may not be the sole cause of aggregation in protein A chromatography, rather, other facets of the process may contribute significantly. This paper presents a well-defined method for investigating this problem. An IgG4 was incubated in elution buffer after protein A chromatography (typical of the viral inactivation hold) and the quantity of monomer in neutralised samples was determined by size exclusion chromatography; elution buffers of different pH values predetermined to induce aggregation of the IgG4 were used. Rate constants for monomer decay over time were determined by fitting exponential decay functions to the data. Similar experiments were implemented in the absence of a chromatography step, i.e. IgG4 aggregation at low pH. Rate constants for aggregation after protein A chromatography were considerably higher than those from low pH exposure alone; a distinct shift in aggregation rates was apparent across the pH range tested. PMID:26346187

  12. Determination of Henry's constant, the dissociation constant, and the buffer capacity of the bicarbonate system in ruminal fluid.

    PubMed

    Hille, Katharina T; Hetz, Stefan K; Rosendahl, Julia; Braun, Hannah-Sophie; Pieper, Robert; Stumpff, Friederike

    2016-01-01

    Despite the clinical importance of ruminal acidosis, ruminal buffering continues to be poorly understood. In particular, the constants for the dissociation of H2CO3 and the solubility of CO2 (Henry's constant) have never been stringently determined for ruminal fluid. The pH was measured in parallel directly in the rumen and the reticulum in vivo, and in samples obtained via aspiration from 10 fistulated cows on hay- or concentrate-based diets. The equilibrium constants of the bicarbonate system were measured at 38°C both using the Astrup technique and a newly developed method with titration at 2 levels of partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2; 4.75 and 94.98 kPa), yielding mean values of 0.234 ± 0.005 mmol ∙ L(-1) ∙ kPa(-1) and 6.11 ± 0.02 for Henry's constant and the dissociation constant, respectively (n/n = 31/10). Both reticular pH and the pH of samples measured after removal were more alkalic than those measured in vivo in the rumen (by ΔpH = 0.87 ± 0.04 and 0.26 ± 0.04). The amount of acid or base required to shift the pH of ruminal samples to 6.4 or 5.8 (base excess) differed between the 2 feeding groups. Experimental results are compared with the mathematical predictions of an open 2-buffer Henderson-Hasselbalch equilibrium model. Because pCO2 has pronounced effects on ruminal pH and can decrease rapidly in samples removed from the rumen, introduction of a generally accepted protocol for determining the acid-base status of ruminal fluid with standard levels of pCO2 and measurement of base excess in addition to pH should be considered. PMID:26519978

  13. EFFECT OF IONIC STRENGTH AND PH ON THE THERMAL AND RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF SOY PROTEIN-AMYLOPECTIN BLEND

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of amylopectin (AP), moisture content, pH, and buffer molarity on the thermal properties of milled defatted soy flour (MDF) and Soy Protein Isolate (SPI) were studied by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), and the rheological properties of effect of AP on MDF were also investigated. ...

  14. Effect of pH, ionic strength and univalent inorganic ions on the reconstitution of aspartate aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Gianfreda, L; Marino, G; Palescandolo, R; Scardi, V

    1974-02-01

    1. The effect of pH change on the reconstitution of aspartate aminotransferase (EC 2.6.1.1), i.e. the reactivation of the apoenzyme with coenzyme (pyridoxal phosphate and pyridoxamine phosphate), was studied in the pH range 4.2-8.9 by using three buffer systems at concentrations ranging from 0.025 to 0.1m. 2. Although the profile of the reconstitution rate-pH curve in the range pH5.2-6.8 (covered by sodium cacodylate-HCl buffer) reflects the influence of the H(+) concentration on the reconstitution process, the profile of the curve in the pH ranges 4.2-5.6 and 7.2-8.25 (covered respectively by sodium acetate-acetic acid and Tris-HCl buffers) appears to be influenced by the ionic strength of the buffer. 3. The reconstitution is also influenced by univalent inorganic ions such as halide ions and, to a lesser extent, alkali metal ions, which are known to alter the water structure. PMID:4856793

  15. Effect of pH, ionic strength and univalent inorganic ions on the reconstitution of aspartate aminotransferase

    PubMed Central

    Gianfreda, Liliana; Marino, Gennaro; Palescandolo, Rosaria; Scardi, Vincenzo

    1974-01-01

    1. The effect of pH change on the reconstitution of aspartate aminotransferase (EC 2.6.1.1), i.e. the reactivation of the apoenzyme with coenzyme (pyridoxal phosphate and pyridoxamine phosphate), was studied in the pH range 4.2–8.9 by using three buffer systems at concentrations ranging from 0.025 to 0.1m. 2. Although the profile of the reconstitution rate–pH curve in the range pH5.2–6.8 (covered by sodium cacodylate–HCl buffer) reflects the influence of the H+ concentration on the reconstitution process, the profile of the curve in the pH ranges 4.2–5.6 and 7.2–8.25 (covered respectively by sodium acetate–acetic acid and Tris–HCl buffers) appears to be influenced by the ionic strength of the buffer. 3. The reconstitution is also influenced by univalent inorganic ions such as halide ions and, to a lesser extent, alkali metal ions, which are known to alter the water structure. PMID:4856793

  16. Radiation resistance of the natural microbial population in buffer materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stroes-Gascoyne, S.; Lucht, L.M.; Borsa, J.; Delaney, T.L.; Haveman, S.A.; Hamon, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    The radiation sensitivity of naturally occurring microorganisms in buffer materials was investigated as well as the sensitivity of Bacillus subtillis spores and Acinetobacter radioresistens in a buffer matrix. The D{sub 10} values obtained in these radiation experiments varied from 0.34 to 1.68 kGy and it was calculated that the surface of a nuclear fuel waste container would be sterilized in 9 to 33 d after emplacement, depending on the type of container, and the initial bioburden. This suggests that formation of biofilms and microbially influenced corrosion would not be of concern of some time after emplacement. The results also indicated that sterilization throughout a 25 cm thick buffer layer is unlikely and that repopulation of the container surface after some time is a possibility, depending on the mobility of microbes in compacted buffer material.

  17. On buffer layers as non-reflecting computational boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayder, M. Ehtesham; Turkel, Eli L.

    1996-01-01

    We examine an absorbing buffer layer technique for use as a non-reflecting boundary condition in the numerical simulation of flows. One such formulation was by Ta'asan and Nark for the linearized Euler equations. They modified the flow inside the buffer zone to artificially make it supersonic in the layer. We examine how this approach can be extended to the nonlinear Euler equations. We consider both a conservative and a non-conservative form modifying the governing equations in the buffer layer. We compare this with the case that the governing equations in the layer are the same as in the interior domain. We test the effectiveness of these buffer layers by a simulation of an excited axisymmetric jet based on a nonlinear compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  18. Analysis of a unidirectional, symmetric buffer strip laminate with damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharani, L. R.; Goree, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    A method for predicting the fracture behavior of hybrid buffer strip laminates is presented in which the classical shear-lag model is used to represent the shear stress distribution between adjacent fibers. The method is demonstrated by applying it to a notched graphite/epoxy laminate, and the results show clearly the manner in which the most efficient combination of buffer strip properties can be selected in order to arrest the crack. The ultimate failure stress of the laminate is plotted vs the buffer strip width. It is shown that in the case of graphite-epoxy and S-glass epoxy laminates, the optimum buffer strip spacing to width ratio should be about four to one.

  19. Religion a Buffer Against Suicide for Women, Study Suggests

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159630.html Religion a Buffer Against Suicide for Women, Study Suggests ... encouraged as a form of meaningful social participation. Religion and spirituality may be an underappreciated resource that ...

  20. Optimizing the availability of a buffered industrial process

    DOEpatents

    Martz, Jr., Harry F.; Hamada, Michael S.; Koehler, Arthur J.; Berg, Eric C.

    2004-08-24

    A computer-implemented process determines optimum configuration parameters for a buffered industrial process. A population size is initialized by randomly selecting a first set of design and operation values associated with subsystems and buffers of the buffered industrial process to form a set of operating parameters for each member of the population. An availability discrete event simulation (ADES) is performed on each member of the population to determine the product-based availability of each member. A new population is formed having members with a second set of design and operation values related to the first set of design and operation values through a genetic algorithm and the product-based availability determined by the ADES. Subsequent population members are then determined by iterating the genetic algorithm with product-based availability determined by ADES to form improved design and operation values from which the configuration parameters are selected for the buffered industrial process.

  1. RESEARCH SHOWS IMPORTANCE OF RIPARIAN BUFFERS FOR AQUATIC HEALTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Issue: Excess nitrogen from fertilizer, septic tanks, animal feedlots, and runoff from pavement can threaten aquatic ecosystem health. Riparian buffers -- the vegetated region adjacent to streams and wetlands -- are thought to be effective at intercepting and controlling excess ...

  2. Evidence for positive mood buffering among college student drinkers.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Cynthia D; Brannan, Debi; Mohr, Josh; Armeli, Stephen; Tennen, Howard

    2008-09-01

    Positive experiences play an important role in buffering the effects of negative experiences. Although this process can play out in a myriad of contexts, the college context is one of particular importance because of significant concerns about student stress levels and alcohol abuse. Building on evidence that at least some students drink in response to negative experiences, we considered the possibility that positive moods would moderate college student negative mood-drinking relationships. Using a Web-based daily process study of 118 (57% women) undergraduate student drinkers, the authors reveal that positive moods indeed buffer the effects of negative moods on student drinking, depending on the mood and drinking context. Furthermore, the buffering of ashamed mood appears to explain the buffering of other negative moods. Implications of these findings are considered in terms of the relationship between negative self-awareness and drinking to cope. PMID:18550862

  3. 4. EAST FACE. VEGETATIVE SCREENS BUFFER THE BUILDING FROM INDUSTRIAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. EAST FACE. VEGETATIVE SCREENS BUFFER THE BUILDING FROM INDUSTRIAL AREAS TO THE SOUTH OF OARB. - Oakland Army Base, General Purpose Administration Building, Chungking & Algiers Streets, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  4. Religion a Buffer Against Suicide for Women, Study Suggests

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159630.html Religion a Buffer Against Suicide for Women, Study Suggests ... encouraged as a form of meaningful social participation. Religion and spirituality may be an underappreciated resource that ...

  5. Buffer layers for high-Tc thin films on sapphire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, X. D.; Foltyn, S. R.; Muenchausen, R. E.; Cooke, D. W.; Pique, A.; Kalokitis, D.; Pendrick, V.; Belohoubek, E.

    1992-01-01

    Buffer layers of various oxides including CeO2 and yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) have been deposited on R-plane sapphire. The orientation and crystallinity of the layers were optimized to promote epitaxial growth of YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) (YBCO) thin films. An ion beam channeling minimum yield of about 3 percent was obtained in the CeO2 layer on sapphire, indicating excellent crystallinity of the buffer layer. Among the buffer materials used, CeO2 was found to be the best one for YBCO thin films on R-plane sapphire. High Tc and Jc were obtained in YBCO thin films on sapphire with buffer layers. Surface resistances of the YBCO films were about 4 mOmega at 77 K and 25 GHz.

  6. Parasitic infection: a buffer against ocean acidification?

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Colin D; Poulin, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Recently, there has been a concerted research effort by marine scientists to quantify the sensitivity of marine organisms to ocean acidification (OA). Empirical data generated by this research have been used to predict changes to marine ecosystem health, biodiversity and productivity that will be caused by continued acidification. These studies have also found that the effects of OA on marine organisms can be significantly modified by additional abiotic stressors (e.g. temperature or oxygen) and biotic interactions (e.g. competition or predation). To date, however, the effects of parasitic infection on the sensitivity of marine organisms to OA have been largely ignored. We show that parasitic infection significantly altered the response of a marine gastropod to simulated OA conditions by reducing the mortality of infected individuals relative to uninfected conspecifics. Without the inclusion of infection data, our analysis would not have detected the significant effect of pH on host mortality. These results strongly suggest that parasitic infection may be an important confounding factor in OA research and must be taken into consideration when assessing the response of marine species to OA. PMID:27194286

  7. Carbon dioxide in the ocean surface: The homogeneous buffer factor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sundquist, E.T.; Plummer, L.N.; Wigley, T.M.L.

    1979-01-01

    The amount of carbon dioxide that can be dissolved in surface seawater depends at least partially on the homogeneous buffer factor, which is a mathematical function of the chemical equilibrium conditions among the various dissolved inorganic species. Because these equilibria are well known, the homogeneous buffer factor is well known. Natural spatial variations depend very systematically on sea surface temperatures, and do not contribute significantly to uncertainties in the present or future carbon dioxide budget. Copyright ?? 1979 AAAS.

  8. Development of Online Spectroscopic pH Monitoring for Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plants: Weak Acid Schemes.

    PubMed

    Casella, Amanda J; Ahlers, Laura R H; Campbell, Emily L; Levitskaia, Tatiana G; Peterson, James M; Smith, Frances N; Bryan, Samuel A

    2015-05-19

    In nuclear fuel reprocessing, separating trivalent minor actinides and lanthanide fission products is extremely challenging and often necessitates tight pH control in TALSPEAK (Trivalent Actinide-Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorus reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes) separations. In TALSPEAK and similar advanced processes, aqueous pH is one of the most important factors governing the partitioning of lanthanides and actinides between an aqueous phase containing a polyaminopolycarboxylate complexing agent and a weak carboxylic acid buffer and an organic phase containing an acidic organophosphorus extractant. Real-time pH monitoring would significantly increase confidence in the separation performance. Our research is focused on developing a general method for online determination of the pH of aqueous solutions through chemometric analysis of Raman spectra. Spectroscopic process-monitoring capabilities, incorporated in a counter-current centrifugal contactor bank, provide a pathway for online, real-time measurement of solution pH. The spectroscopic techniques are process-friendly and can be easily configured for online applications, whereas classic potentiometric pH measurements require frequent calibration/maintenance and have poor long-term stability in aggressive chemical and radiation environments. Raman spectroscopy discriminates between the protonated and deprotonated forms of the carboxylic acid buffer, and the chemometric processing of the Raman spectral data with PLS (partial least-squares) regression provides a means to quantify their respective abundances and therefore determine the solution pH. Interpretive quantitative models have been developed and validated under a range of chemical composition and pH conditions using a lactic acid/lactate buffer system. The developed model was applied to new spectra obtained from online spectral measurements during a solvent extraction experiment using a counter-current centrifugal contactor bank. The model

  9. Effects of pH and ionic strength on precipitation of phytopathogenic viruses by polyethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Pastorek, J; Marcinka, K

    1989-01-01

    The effects of ionic strength of the solution (changed by varying NaCl concentrations or buffer molarity) on the precipitation with polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000 were studied on phytopathogenic viruses of different morphology: the isometric red clover mottle virus (RCMV), rod-shaped tobacco mosaic virus, flexuous potato virus X (PVX) and bacilliform alfalfa mosaic virus. With increasing NaCl concentration or buffer molarity up to a certain level (0.1 mol/l), the efficiency of PEG precipitation increased. This relationship did not apply to PVX. The effects of pH on PEG precipitation were studied on RCMV. The efficiency of precipitation increased with decreasing difference between pH of the solution and pI of the virus. PMID:2565676

  10. D-buffer: irregular image data storage made practical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipowski, J. K.

    2013-03-01

    Modern hardware accelerated graphics pipelines are designed to operate on data in a so called streaming model. To process the data in this model one needs to impose some restrictions on input and output argument's (most frequently represented by a two-dimensional frame buffer) memory structure. The output data regularity is obvious when we consider rasterizing hardware architecture, which draws 3D polygons using depth buffer to resolve the visible surface problem. But recently the user's needs surpass those restrictions with increasing frequency. In this work we formulate and present new methods of irregular frame buffer storage and ordering. The so called deque buffer (or D-buffer) allows us to decrease the amount of memory used for storage as well as the memory latency cost by using pixel data ordering. Our findings are confirmed by experimental results that measure the processing time, which is up to four times shorter, when compared with previous work by other authors. We also include a detailed description of algorithms used for D-buffer construction on the last three consumer-grade graphics hardware architectures, as a guide for other researchers and a development aid for practitioners. The only theoretical requirement imposed by our method is the use of memory model with linear address space.

  11. DNA and buffers: the hidden danger of complex formation.

    PubMed

    Stellwagen, N C; Gelfi, C; Righetti, P G

    2000-08-01

    The free solution electrophoretic mobility of DNA differs significantly in different buffers, suggesting that DNA-buffer interactions are present in certain buffer systems. Here, capillary and gel electrophoresis data are combined to show that the Tris ions in Tris-acetate-EDTA (TAE) buffers are associated with the DNA helix to approximately the same extent as sodium ions. The borate ions in Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE) buffers interact with DNA to form highly charged DNA-borate complexes, which are stable both in free solution and in polyacrylamide gels. DNA-borate complexes are not observed in agarose gels, because of the competition of the agarose gel fibers for the borate residues. The resulting agarose-borate complexes increase the negative charge of the agarose gel fibers, leading to an increased electroendosmotic flow of the solvent in agarose-TBE gels. The combined results indicate that the buffers in which DNA is studied cannot automatically be assumed to be innocuous. PMID:10861374

  12. Somatic embryogenesis of carrot in hormone-free medium: external pH control over morphogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. L.; Krikorian, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    Cultures of preglobular stage proembryos (PGSPs) were initiated from mechanically wounded mature zygotic embryos of carrot, Daucus carota, on a hormone-free, semisolid medium. These PGSPs have been maintained and multiplied for extended periods without their progression into later embryo stages on the same hormone-free medium containing 1 mM NH4+ as the sole nitrogen source. Sustained maintenance of cultures comprised exclusively of PGSPs was dependent on medium pH throughout the culture period. Best growth and multiplication of PGSP cultures occurred when the pH of unbuffered, hormone-free medium fell from 4.5 to 4 over a 2-week period or when buffered medium was titrated to pH 4. If the hormone-free medium was buffered to sustain a pH at or above 4.5, PGSPs developed into later embryo stages. Maintenance with continuous multiplication of PGSPs occurred equally well on medium containing NH4+ or NH4+ and NO3-, but growth was poor with NO3- alone. Additional observations on the effects of medium components such as various nitrogen sources and levels, sucrose concentration, semisolid supports, type of buffer, borate concentration, activated charcoal, and initial pH that permit optimum maintenance of the PGSPs or foster their continued developmental progression into mature embryos and plantlets are reported. The influence of the pH of the hormone-free medium as a determinant in maintaining cultures as PGSPs or allowing their continued embryonic development are unequivocally demonstrated by gross morphology, scanning electron microscopy, and histological preparations.

  13. A reactive transport model to simulate uranium immobilization through pH manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Luo, Wensui; Watson, David B; Peterson, Mark J; Gu, Baohua; Spalding, Brian Patrick; Jardine, Philip M

    2008-07-01

    Saprolite cores collected from around the former S-3 Ponds waste disposal site on the Oak Ridge Reservation in east Tennessee, USA, exhibit low pH and high concentrations of Al, Ca, Mg, Mn, various trace metals such as Ni and Co, and radionuclides such as U and Tc. Because uranium is one of the major contaminants of concern at the site, its behavior was of particular interest. The mobility of uranium depends highly on pH. Groundwater titration experiments showed that when pH was increased from 3.87 to 5.45 with addition of dissolved sodium hydroxide, concentration of aqueous uranium decreased from 50 ppm to less than 5 ppm. However, base additions to the sediments to increase pH are strongly buffered by various precipitation and sorption reactions. This study was undertaken to investigate the geochemical processes that control contaminant mobility and to develop a practical model to predict uranium immobilization under conditions where pH is manipulated for remediation of geochemically complex sites. The method of Spalding and Spalding was utilized to model soil buffer capacity by treating aquifer solids as a polyprotic acid. Aluminum precipitation and dissolution kinetics was included in HydroGeoChem v5.0 in addition to an equilibrium reaction model that considers aqueous complexation, precipitation, sorption and soil buffering with pH-dependent ion exchange capacity. The HydroGeoChem model was successfully utilized to simulate batch titration experiments and comparison of reactive transport model results with pH manipulation column experiments were in close agreement. The model was also calibrated to simulate acidic groundwater percolating through carbonate gravel at the site.

  14. Verapamil buffering effect on the abrupt elevation in blood pressure, linkage with microcirculatory blood flow.

    PubMed

    Gmitrov, J

    2008-01-01

    1 We studied the effects of verapamil on sudden elevation in blood pressure, microcirculation and arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). 2 Thirty experiments (10 controls and 20 with verapamil) were performed in rabbits sedated using pentobarbital infusion (5 mg kg(-1) h(-1)). 3 BRS, mean femoral artery blood pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and ear lobe skin microcirculatory blood flow, estimated using microphotoelectric plethysmography (MPPG), were simultaneously measured during 30 min of verapamil infusion (20 mug kg(-1) min(-1)). BRS was assessed from HR and MAP responses to intravenous phenylephrine (Ph) and by power spectral analysis using transfer function (TF) from MAP to the HR (BRS(Ph,TF)). 4 Verapamil significantly increased microcirculatory blood flow, and decreased BRS(Ph,TF) and phenylephrine-induced abrupt elevation in MAP (MAP(AE)). 5 A significant inverse correlation was found between verapamil-induced changes in MAP(AE), BRS and in microcirculatory blood flow, measured before phenylephrine blood pressure ramps (DeltaMAP(AE) with DeltaBRS(TF), r = -0.47, P < 0.036; DeltaMAP(AE) with DeltaMPPG, r = -0.49, P < 0.025). 6 These results suggest involvement of the arterial baroreflex and vascular blood pressure-buffering mechanisms, their enhancement by verapamil, and thus a potential benefit of verapamil in cardiovascular conditions where patients present with abrupt high elevations in blood pressure. PMID:18598288

  15. Highly sensitive and selective detection of Al(III) ions in aqueous buffered solution with fluorescent peptide-based sensor.

    PubMed

    In, Byunggyu; Hwang, Gi Won; Lee, Keun-Hyeung

    2016-09-15

    A fluorescent sensor based on a tripeptide (SerGluGlu) with a dansyl fluorophore detected selectively Al(III) among 16 metal ions in aqueous buffered solutions without any organic cosolvent. The peptide-based sensor showed a highly sensitive turn on response to aluminium ion with high binding affinity (1.84×10(4)M(-1)) in aqueous buffered solutions. The detection limit (230nM, 5.98ppb) of the peptide-based sensor was much lower than the maximum allowable level (7.41μM) of aluminium ions in drinking water demanded by EPA. The binding mode of the peptide sensor with aluminium ions was characterized using ESI mass spectrometry, NMR titration, and pH titration experiments. PMID:27503680

  16. Optical measurement of the pH value of intransparent samples under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, M.; Wierschem, A.; Rauh, C.; Delgado, A.

    2015-04-01

    We present a method to optically study the pH value of intransparent media under pressure. To this end, we prepare and use immobilized pH-value indicators. The indicators are brought into contact to the medium and their optical signal is read out in reflection with a spectrometer. The pH value and pressure response of the indicator were calibrated with imidazole buffers. As an example for its applicability to foodstuff, we study the pressure-induced pH-value change of fat and meat pastes.

  17. Theory and practice in the electrometric determination of pH in precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, Carla Jo; Peden, Mark E.

    Basic theory and laboratory investigations have been applied to the electrometric determination of pH in precipitation samples in an effort to improve the reliability of the results obtained from these low ionic strength samples. The theoretical problems inherent in the measurement of pH in rain have been examined using natural precipitation samples with varying ionic strengths and pH values. The importance of electrode design and construction has been stressed. The proper choice of electrode can minimize or eliminate problems arising from residual liquid junction potentials, streaming potentials and temperature differences. Reliable pH measurements can be made in precipitation samples using commercially available calibration buffers providing low ionic strength quality control solutions are routinely used to verify electrode and meter performance.

  18. Good’s buffers as a basis for developing self-buffering and biocompatible ionic liquids for biological research†

    PubMed Central

    Taha, Mohamed; e Silva, Francisca A.; Quental, Maria V.; Ventura, Sónia P. M.; Freire, Mara G.; Coutinho, João A. P.

    2014-01-01

    This work reports a promising approach to the development of novel self-buffering and biocompatible ionic liquids for biological research in which the anions are derived from biological buffers (Good’s buffers, GB). Five Good’s buffers (Tricine, TES, CHES, HEPES, and MES) were neutralized with four suitable hydroxide bases (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium, tetramethylammonium, tetraethylammonium, and tetrabutylammonium) producing 20 Good’s buffer ionic liquids (GB-ILs). The presence of the buffering action of the synthesized GB-ILs was ascertained by measuring their pH-profiles in water. Moreover, a series of mixed GB-ILs with wide buffering ranges were formulated as universal buffers. The impact of GB-ILs on bovine serum albumin (BSA), here used as a model protein, is discussed and compared with more conventional ILs using spectroscopic techniques, such as infrared and dynamic light scattering. They appear to display, in general, a greater stabilizing effect on the protein secondary structure than conventional ILs. A molecular docking study was also carried out to investigate on the binding sites of GB-IL ions to BSA. We further used the QSAR-human serum albumin binding model, log K(HSA), to calculate the binding affinity of some conventional ILs/GB-ILs to HSA. The toxicity of the GB and GB-ILs was additionally evaluated revealing that they are non-toxic against Vitro fischeri. Finally, the GB-ILs were also shown to be able to form aqueous biphasic systems when combined with aqueous solutions of inorganic or organic salts, and we tested their extraction capability for BSA. These systems were able to extract BSA with an outstanding extraction efficiency of 100% in a single step for the GB-IL-rich phase, and, as a result, the use of GB-IL-based ABS for the separation and extraction of other added-value biomolecules is highly encouraging and worthy of further investigation. PMID:25729325

  19. Three dimensional graphene transistor for ultra-sensitive pH sensing directly in biological media.

    PubMed

    Ameri, Shideh Kabiri; Singh, Pramod K; Sonkusale, Sameer R

    2016-08-31

    In this work, pH sensing directly in biological media using three dimensional liquid gated graphene transistors is presented. The sensor is made of suspended network of graphene coated all around with thin layer of hafnium oxide (HfO2), showing high sensitivity and sensing beyond the Debye-screening limit. The performance of the pH sensor is validated by measuring the pH of isotonic buffered, Dulbecco's phosphate buffered saline (DPBS) solution, and of blood serum derived from Sprague-Dawley rat. The pH sensor shows high sensitivity of 71 ± 7 mV/pH even in high ionic strength media with molarities as high as 289 ± 1 mM. High sensitivity of this device is owing to suspension of three dimensional graphene in electrolyte which provides all around liquid gating of graphene, leading to higher electrostatic coupling efficiency of electrolyte to the channel and higher gating control of transistor channel by ions in the electrolyte. Coating graphene with hafnium oxide film (HfO2) provides binding sites for hydrogen ions, which results in higher sensitivity and sensing beyond the Debye-screening limit. The 3D graphene transistor offers the possibility of real-time pH measurement in biological media without the need for desaltation or sample preparation. PMID:27506362

  20. Aggregation and other intermolecular interactions of biological buffers observed by capillary electrophoresis and UV photometry.

    PubMed

    Vespalec, R; Vlcková, M; Horáková, H

    2004-10-01

    Electrophoretic and photometric experiments strongly indicate that monovalent anions, which arise by deprotonation of the nitrogen atom in zwitterionic Good's buffers 3-(cyclohexylamino)-2-hydroxy-1-propanesulfonic acid (CAPSO) and 3-morpholinopropanesulfonic acid (MOPS), spontaneously aggregate. Cationic migration of sanguinarine (SA) and chelerythrine (CHE) in highly alkaline 1,3-bis[tris(hydroxymethyl)methylamino]propane (Bis-Tris-propane), in which the concentration of cations of both alkaloids is negligible, may be explained by the existence of an aggregate, which contains uncharged sanguinarine or chelerythrine and one monovalent cation of Bis-Tris-propane at least. Tendency of tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris), bis (2-hydroxyethyl)iminotris(hydroxymethyl)methane (Bis-Tris) and Bis-Tris-propane cations to ion pairing with synthetic cluster borane anions and with fused silica markedly rises up with the size and charge of these cations. The drop in mobility of cluster borane compounds sometimes exceeds 50% of their mobility found at identical pH and ionic strength in buffers with sodium cation. The electroosmosis drop approached 70% if background electrolyte contained Bis-Tris-propane cations instead of sodium cations. Nitrate, taken as a model inorganic ion, and four randomly chosen organic anions interacted markedly less with Tris, Bis-Tris and Bis-Tris-propane cations than cluster borane anions. 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic (MES) acid anions present in background electrolyte affect the ion pairing of Tris, Bis-Tris and Bis-Tris-propane cations with anionic analytes and, in this way influence also mobilites of these anionic analytes. Limited hydrophilicity at least one of interacting species appears to be the most probable cause of observed intermolecular interactions of biological buffers. PMID:15532558

  1. pH Optrode Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabacco, Mary Beth; Zhou, Quan

    1995-01-01

    pH-sensitive chromophoric reagents immobilized in porous optical fibers. Optoelectronic instrumentation system measures acidity or alkalinity of aqueous nutrient solution. Includes one or more optrodes, which are optical-fiber chemical sensors, in sense, analogous to electrodes but not subject to some of spurious effects distorting readings taken by pH electrodes. Concept of optrodes also described in "Ethylene-Vapor Optrodes" (KSC-11579). pH optrode sensor head, with lead-in and lead-out optical fibers, convenient for monitoring solutions located away from supporting electronic equipment.

  2. Optimization of pH values to formulate the bireagent kit for serum uric acid assay.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya; Chen, Yuanxiang; Yang, Xiaolan; Zhao, Hua; Hu, Xiaolei; Pu, Jun; Liao, Juan; Long, Gaobo; Liao, Fei

    2015-01-01

    A new formulation of the bireagent kit for serum uric acid assay was developed based on the effects of pH on enzyme stability. At 4 °C, half-lives of uricases from Bacillus fastidious and Arthrobacter globiforms were longer than 15 months at pH 9.2, but became shorter at pH below 8.0; half-lives of ascorbate oxidase and peroxidase were comparable at pH 6.5 and 7.0, but became much shorter at pH higher than 7.4. In the new formulation of the bireagent kit, Reagent A contained peroxidase, 4-aminoantipyrine, and ascorbate oxidase in 50 mM phosphate buffer at pH 6.5; Reagent B contained B. fastidious or A. globiforms uricase in 50 mM sodium borate buffer at pH 9.2; Reagents A and B were mixed at 4:1 to produce a final pH from 7.2 to 7.6 for developing a stable color. The new bireagent kit consumed smaller quantities of three enzymes for the same shelf life. With the new bireagent kit, there were linear responses of absorbance at 546 nm to uric acid up to 34 mM in reaction mixtures and a good correlation of uric acid levels in clinical sera with those by a commercial kit, but stronger resistance to ascorbate. Therefore, the new formulation was advantageous. PMID:24673428

  3. The effect of pH on solubility of nano-modified endodontic cements

    PubMed Central

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Godoy, Franklin Garcia; Gutmann, James L; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Asatourian, Armen; Sheibani, Nader; Elyasi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the effect of storage pH on solubility of white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA), bioaggregate (BA), and nano WMTA cements. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight moulds randomly allocated into three groups of pH 4.4 (group A), 7.4 (group B), and 10.4 (group C); and one empty as control in each group. Each group was further divided into three subgroups according to the material studied; WMTA, BA, and nano WMTA. The specimens in subgroup A were soaked in butyric acid buffered with synthetic tissue fluid (STF) (pH 4.4), while the samples in subgroups B (pH 7.4) and C (pH 10.4) buffered in potassium hydroxide for 24 h and then the loss of cement was determined. A two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post-hoc statistical tests were used to detect any statistically significant differences among the groups/subgroups. Results: Statistical analysis has showed the highest solubility in acidic pH for all tested materials. Nano WMTA samples in pH = 10.4 had the lowest and BA samples in pH = 4.4 showed the highest cement loss. Conclusion: The solubility of all tested cements can be jeopardized in acidic environment which might affect on their sealing characteristic in clinical scenario. However, nano WMTA cement due to its small size particles and different additives was capable of producing lower porosity in set material, which resulted in showing more resistance in acidic environment. PMID:24554853

  4. Measurements of spectral responses for developing fiber-optic pH sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Heo, Ji Yeon; Jang, Kyoung Won; Seo, Jeong Ki; Moon, Jin Soo; Park, Jang-Yeon; Park, Byung Gi; Cho, Seunghyun; Lee, Bongsoo

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we have fabricated a fiber-optic pH sensor, which is composed of a light source, a pH-sensing probe, plastic optical fibers and a spectrometer, for determining the degree of infection by Helicobacter pylori in the stomach. As pH indicators, phenol red and m-cresol purple are used, and pH liquid solutions are prepared by mixing phenol red or m-cresol purple solutions and various kinds of pH buffer solutions. The light emitted by a light source is guided by plastic optical fibers to the pH liquid solution, and the optical characteristic of a reflected light is changed according to the color variations of the pH indicator in the pH-sensing probe. Therefore, we have measured the intensities and wavelength shifts of the reflected lights, which change according to the color variations of indicators at different pH values, by using a spectrometer for spectral analysis. Also, the relationships between the pH values of liquid solutions and the optical properties of the modulated lights are obtained on the basis of the changes of the colors of indicators.

  5. Assessing multiregion avian benefits from strategically targeted agricultural buffers.

    PubMed

    Evans, Kristine O; Burger, L Wes; Riffell, Sam; Smith, Mark D

    2014-08-01

    Mounting evidence of wildlife population gains from targeted conservation practices has prompted the need to develop and evaluate practices that are integrated into production agriculture systems and targeted toward specific habitat objectives. However, effectiveness of targeted conservation actions across broader landscapes is poorly understood. We evaluated multiregion, multispecies avian densities on row-crop fields with native grass field margins (i.e., buffers) as part of the first U.S. agricultural conservation practice designed to support habitat and population recovery objectives of a national wildlife conservation initiative. We coordinated breeding season point transect surveys for 6 grassland bird species on 1151 row-crop fields with and without native grass buffers (9-37 m) in 14 U.S. states (10 ecoregions) from 2006 to 2011. In most regions, breeding season densities of 5 of 6 targeted bird species were greater in the 500-m surrounding survey points centered on fields with native grass buffers than in landscapes without buffers. Relative effect sizes were greatest for Northern Bobwhite (Colinus virginianus), Dickcissel (Spiza americana), and Field Sparrow (Spizella pusilla) in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley and Eastern Tallgrass Prairie regions. Other species (e.g., Eastern Meadowlark [Sturnella magna], Grasshopper Sparrow [Ammodramus savannarum]) exhibited inconsistent relative effect sizes. Bird densities on fields with and without buffers were greatest in the Central Mixed-grass Prairie region. Our results suggest that strategic use of conservation buffers in regions with the greatest potential for relative density increases in target species will elicit greater range-wide population response than diffuse, uninformed, and broadly distributed implementation of buffers. We recommend integrating multiple conservation practices in broader agricultural landscapes to maximize conservation effectiveness for a larger suite of species. PMID:24779636

  6. CHEMICAL SOLUTION DEPOSITION BASED OXIDE BUFFERS AND YBCO COATED CONDUCTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans

    2011-01-01

    We have reviewed briefly the growth of buffer and high temperature superconducting oxide thin films using a chemical solution deposition (CSD) method. In the Rolling-Assisted Biaxially Textured Substrates (RABiTS) process, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, utilizes the thermo mechanical processing to obtain the flexible, biaxially oriented copper, nickel or nickel-alloy substrates. Buffers and Rare Earth Barium Copper Oxide (REBCO) superconductors have been deposited epitaxially on the textured nickel alloy substrates. The starting substrate serves as a template for the REBCO layer, which has substantially fewer weak links. Buffer layers play a major role in fabricating the second generation REBCO wire technology. The main purpose of the buffer layers is to provide a smooth, continuous and chemically inert surface for the growth of the REBCO film, while transferring the texture from the substrate to the superconductor layer. To achieve this, the buffer layers need to be epitaxial to the substrate, i.e. they have to nucleate and grow in the same bi-axial texture provided by the textured metal foil. The most commonly used RABiTS multi-layer architectures consist of a starting template of biaxially textured Ni-5 at.% W (Ni-W) substrate with a seed (first) layer of Yttrium Oxide (Y2O3), a barrier (second) layer of Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ), and a Cerium Oxide (CeO2) cap (third) layer. These three buffer layers are generally deposited using physical vapor deposition (PVD) techniques such as reactive sputtering. On top of the PVD template, REBCO film is then grown by a chemical solution deposition. This article reviews in detail about the list of oxide buffers and superconductor REBCO films grown epitaxially on single crystal and/or biaxially textured Ni-W substrates using a CSD method.

  7. The passivity of Type 316L stainless steel in borate buffer solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicic, Igor; Macdonald, Digby D.

    2008-09-01

    The passivity of Type 316 SS in borate buffer solution (pH 8.35), in the steady-state, has been explored using a variety of electrochemical techniques, including potentiostatic polarization, Mott Schottky analysis, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The study shows that the passive film is an n-type semiconductor with a donor density that is essentially independent of voltage across the passive state. The passive current density is also found to be voltage-independent, but the thickness of the barrier layer depends linearly on the applied voltage. These observations are consistent with the predictions of the Point Defect Model, noting that the point defects within the barrier layer of the passive film are metal interstitials or oxygen vacancies, or both. No evidence for p-type behavior was obtained, indicating that cation vacancies do not have a significant population density in the film compared with the two donors (cation interstitials and oxygen vacancies).

  8. Impact of solute concentration on the electrocatalytic conversion of dissolved gases in buffered solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-08-01

    To maintain local pH levels near the electrode during electrochemical reactions, the use of buffer solutions is effective. Nevertheless, the critical effects of the buffer concentration on electrocatalytic performances have not been discussed in detail. In this study, two fundamental electrochemical reactions, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR), on a platinum rotating disk electrode are chosen as model gas-related aqueous electrochemical reactions at various phosphate concentrations. Our detailed investigations revealed that the kinetic and limiting diffusion current densities for both the ORR and HOR logarithmically decrease with increasing solute concentration (log |jORR | = - 0.39 c + 0.92 , log |jHOR | = - 0.35 c + 0.73) . To clarify the physical aspects of this phenomenon, the electrolyte characteristics are addressed: with increasing phosphate concentration, the gas solubility decrease, the kinematic viscosity of the solution increase and the diffusion coefficient of the dissolved gases decrease. The simulated limiting diffusion currents using the aforementioned parameters match the measured ones very well (log |jORR | = - 0.43 c + 0.99 , log |jHOR | = - 0.40 c + 0.54) , accurately describing the consequences of the electrolyte concentration. These alterations of the electrolyte properties associated with the solute concentration are universally applicable to other aqueous gas-related electrochemical reactions because the currents are purely determined by mass transfer of the dissolved gases.

  9. Impact of boron complexation by Tris buffer on the initial dissolution rate of borosilicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Tournié, A; Majérus, O; Lefèvre, G; Rager, M-N; Walmé, S; Caurant, D; Barboux, Ph

    2013-06-15

    Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane is a commonly used buffer for leaching studies on glasses. In this work, we demonstrate that it plays a role on the alteration kinetics of borosilicate glasses. Comparative dissolution experiments on a soda-lime silicate glass and a sodium borosilicate glass, in several solutions with or without Tris at neutral pH, are carried out in order to assess the specific effects of the ionic strength and of the Tris molecules on the initial dissolution kinetics. Tris has no effect on the dissolution of the soda-lime silicate glass, while it significantly enhances the dissolution of the borosilicate glass, by increasing the B, Na, and Si release rates. This specific effect on the borosilicate glass is attributed to the Tris-boron complexation and discussed. The bidentate complexation of boron by Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) with a 1:1 stoichiometry is directly demonstrated by infrared and NMR spectroscopies. Complexation constants are determined for the Tris-borate complex and its protonated form Tris-boric, from the (11)B and (1)H NMR spectra. This complexation should be taken into account when using the Tris/HCl buffer in alteration experiments of borosilicate glasses. PMID:23578519

  10. Message communications of particular message types between compute nodes using DMA shadow buffers

    SciTech Connect

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Parker, Jeffrey J.

    2010-11-16

    Message communications of particular message types between compute nodes using DMA shadow buffers includes: receiving a buffer identifier specifying an application buffer having a message of a particular type for transmission to a target compute node through a network; selecting one of a plurality of shadow buffers for a DMA engine on the compute node for storing the message, each shadow buffer corresponding to a slot of an injection FIFO buffer maintained by the DMA engine; storing the message in the selected shadow buffer; creating a data descriptor for the message stored in the selected shadow buffer; injecting the data descriptor into the slot of the injection FIFO buffer corresponding to the selected shadow buffer; selecting the data descriptor from the injection FIFO buffer; and transmitting the message specified by the selected data descriptor through the data communications network to the target compute node.

  11. Optimizing Buffering Chemistry to Maintain near Neutral pH of Broiler Feed during Pre-enrichment for Salmonella

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella is a human pathogen that can accompany live broilers to the slaughter plant contaminating fully processed carcasses. Feed is one potential source of Salmonella to growing broilers. Monitoring feed for the presence of Salmonella is part of good agricultural practices. The first step in ...

  12. Optimising reef-scale CO2 removal by seaweed to buffer ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mongin, Mathieu; Baird, Mark E.; Hadley, Scott; Lenton, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    The equilibration of rising atmospheric {{CO}}2 with the ocean is lowering {pH} in tropical waters by about 0.01 every decade. Coral reefs and the ecosystems they support are regarded as one of the most vulnerable ecosystems to ocean acidification, threatening their long-term viability. In response to this threat, different strategies for buffering the impact of ocean acidification have been proposed. As the {pH} experienced by individual corals on a natural reef system depends on many processes over different time scales, the efficacy of these buffering strategies remains largely unknown. Here we assess the feasibility and potential efficacy of a reef-scale (a few kilometers) carbon removal strategy, through the addition of seaweed (fleshy multicellular algae) farms within the Great Barrier Reef at the Heron Island reef. First, using diagnostic time-dependent age tracers in a hydrodynamic model, we determine the optimal location and size of the seaweed farm. Secondly, we analytically calculate the optimal density of the seaweed and harvesting strategy, finding, for the seaweed growth parameters used, a biomass of 42 g N m-2 with a harvesting rate of up 3.2 g N m-2 d-1 maximises the carbon sequestration and removal. Numerical experiments show that an optimally located 1.9 km2 farm and optimally harvested seaweed (removing biomass above 42 g N m-2 every 7 d) increased aragonite saturation by 0.1 over 24 km2 of the Heron Island reef. Thus, the most effective seaweed farm can only delay the impacts of global ocean acidification at the reef scale by 7-21 years, depending on future global carbon emissions. Our results highlight that only a kilometer-scale farm can partially mitigate global ocean acidification for a particular reef.

  13. Urine pH test

    MedlinePlus

    ... J. Martin, MD, MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Kidney Stones Urinalysis Browse the Encyclopedia A. ...

  14. Grass buffers for playas in agricultural landscapes: An annotated bibliography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melcher, Cynthia P.; Skagen, Susan K.

    2005-01-01

    References on best management practices (BMPs) for agricultural lands were included because certain BMPs are crucial for informing decisions about buffer design/ effectiveness and overall playa ecology. We also included various papers that increase the spectrum of time over which buffer theories and practices have evolved. An unannotated section lists references that we did not prioritize for annotation and references that may be helpful but were beyond the scope of this document. Finally, we provide notes on conversations we had with scientists, land managers, and other buffer experts whom we consulted, and their contact information. We conclude the bibliography with appendices of common and scientific names of birds and plants and acronyms used in both the bibliography. In the annotations, italicized text signifies our own editorial remarks. Readers should also note that much of the work on buffers has been designed using English units of measure rather than metrics; in most cases, their results have been converted to metrics for publication, explaining the seemingly odd or irregular buffer widths and other parameters reported.

  15. Integrated optical buffers for packet-switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmeister, Emily Frances

    Routers form the backbone of the Internet, directing data to the right locations with huge throughput capacity of terabits/second) and very few errors (1 error allowed in 1012 bits). However, as the Internet continues to grow rapidly, so must the capacity of electronic routers, thereby also growing in footprint and power consumption. The energy bill alone has developers looking for an alternate solution. Today's routers can only operate with electrical signals although Internet data is transmitted optically. This requires the data to be converted from the optical domain to the electrical domain and back again. Optical routers have the potential of saving in power by omitting these conversions, but have been held back in part by the lack of a practical optical memory device. This work presents the first integrated optical buffer for next generation optical packet-switched networks. Buffering is required in a router to move packets of data in order to avoid collisions between packets heading to the same destination at the same time. The device presented here uses an InP-based two-by-two switch with a silica waveguide delay to form a recirculating buffer. Packet storage was shown with 98% packet recovery for 5 circulations. Autonomous contention resolution was demonstrated with two buffered channels to show that the technology is a realistic solution for creating multiple element buffers on multiple router ports. This thesis proposes and demonstrates the first integrated optical random access memory, thereby making a great stride toward high capacity optical routers.

  16. RNA chaperones buffer deleterious mutations in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Rudan, Marina; Schneider, Dominique; Warnecke, Tobias; Krisko, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Both proteins and RNAs can misfold into non-functional conformations. Protein chaperones promote native folding of nascent polypeptides and refolding of misfolded species, thereby buffering mutations that compromise protein structure and function. Here, we show that RNA chaperones can also act as mutation buffers that enhance organismal fitness. Using competition assays, we demonstrate that overexpression of select RNA chaperones, including three DEAD box RNA helicases (DBRHs) (CsdA, SrmB, RhlB) and the cold shock protein CspA, improves fitness of two independently evolved Escherichia coli mutator strains that have accumulated deleterious mutations during short- and long-term laboratory evolution. We identify strain-specific mutations that are deleterious and subject to buffering when introduced individually into the ancestral genotype. For DBRHs, we show that buffering requires helicase activity, implicating RNA structural remodelling in the buffering process. Our results suggest that RNA chaperones might play a fundamental role in RNA evolution and evolvability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04745.001 PMID:25806682

  17. Effect of various commercial buffers on sperm viability and capacitation.

    PubMed

    Andrisani, Alessandra; Donà, Gabriella; Ambrosini, Guido; Bonanni, Guglielmo; Bragadin, Marcantonio; Cosmi, Erich; Clari, Giulio; Armanini, Decio; Bordin, Luciana

    2014-08-01

    A wide variety of sperm preparation protocols are currently available for assisted conception. They include density gradient separation and washing methods. Both aim at isolating and capacitating as much motile sperm as possible for subsequent oocyte fertilization. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of four commercial sperm washing buffers on sperm viability and capacitation. Semen samples from 48 healthy donors (normal values of sperm count, motility, morphology, and volume) were analyzed. After separation (density gradient 40/80%), sperm were incubated in various buffers then analysed for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, viability, tyrosine phosphorylation (Tyr-P), cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) labeling, and the acrosome reaction (AR). The buffers affected ROS generation in various ways resulting either in rapid cell degeneration (when the amount of ROS was too high for cell survival) or the inability of the cells to maintain correct functioning (when ROS were too few). Only when the correct ROS generation curve was maintained, suitable membrane reorganization, evidenced by CTB labeling was achieved, leading to the highest percentages of both Tyr-P- and acrosome-reacted-cells. Distinguishing each particular pathological state of the sperm sample would be helpful to select the preferred buffer treatment since both ROS production and membrane reorganization can be significantly altered by commercial buffers. PMID:24673547

  18. Method of depositing buffer layers on biaxially textured metal substrates

    DOEpatents

    Beach, David B.; Morrell, Jonathan S.; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chirayil, Thomas; Specht, Eliot D.; Goyal, Amit

    2002-08-27

    A laminate article comprises a substrate and a biaxially textured (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer layer over the substrate, wherein 0buffer layer can be deposited using sol-gel or metal-organic decomposition. The laminate article can include a layer of YBCO over the (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer layer. A layer of CeO.sub.2 between the YBCO layer and the (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer can also be include. Further included can be a layer of YSZ between the CeO.sub.2 layer and the (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer layer. The substrate can be a biaxially textured metal, such as nickel. A method of forming the laminate article is also disclosed.

  19. Lot A2 test, THC modelling of the bentonite buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itälä, Aku; Olin, Markus; Lehikoinen, Jarmo

    Finnish spent nuclear fuel is planned to be disposed of deep in the crystalline bedrock of the Olkiluoto island. In such a repository, the role of the bentonite buffer is considered to be central. The initially unsaturated bentonite emplaced around a spent-fuel canister will become fully saturated by the groundwater from the host rock. In order to assess the long-term safety of a deep repository, it is essential to determine how temperature influences the chemical stability of bentonite. The aim of this study was to achieve an improved understanding of the factors governing the thermo-hydro-chemical evolution of the bentonite buffer subject to heat generation from the disposed fuel and in contact with a highly permeable rock fracture intersecting a canister deposition hole. TOUGHREACT was used to model a test known as the long-term test of buffer material adverse-2, which was conducted at the Äspö hard rock laboratory in Sweden. The results on the evolution of cation-exchange equilibria, bentonite porewater chemistry, mineralogy, and saturation of the buffer are presented and discussed. The calculated model results show similarity to the experimental results. In particular, the spatial differences in the saturation and porewater chemistry of the bentonite buffer were clearly visible in the model.

  20. Rare earth zirconium oxide buffer layers on metal substrates

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Robert K.; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chirayil, Thomas G.; Lee, Dominic F.; Goyal, Amit; Feenstra, Roeland

    2001-01-01

    A laminate article comprises a substrate and a biaxially textured (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer over the substrate, wherein 0buffer layer can be deposited using sol-gel or metal-organic decomposition. The laminate article can include a layer of YBCO over the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer. A layer of CeO.sub.2 between the YBCO layer and the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer can also be include. Further included can be a layer of YSZ between the CeO.sub.2 layer and the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer. The substrate can be a biaxially textured metal, such as nickel. A method of forming the laminate article is also disclosed.

  1. Physical-Chemical Treatment of Metals and Radionuclides in the Saturated Zone Using Colloidal Buffers - 12515

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Yenjung; Borden, Robert C.; Alperin, Ed

    2012-07-01

    There are numerous acidic plumes throughout the DOE complex and the nation as a whole. Low aquifer pH is a major concern since many important radionuclides (Pu, Ra, Sr, Tc) and metals (Cd, Co, Cs, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn) strongly sorb to iron hydroxides and aluminosilicates under neutral to alkaline conditions, but are mobile in acidic plumes. To effectively use natural and enhanced attenuation (NEA) for management of these contaminants, we must be able to raise aquifer pH and maintain it at background levels until the external acid loading to the aquifer has dissipated. Geochemical modeling showed that a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) formed by injection of colloidal Mg(OH){sub 2} would last much longer than colloidal Ca(OH){sub 2} due to the much lower solubility of Mg(OH){sub 2}. Assuming a 1,000 meq/L suspension of colloidal Mg(OH)2 could be effectively distributed, the PRB could last over twenty years before rejuvenation was required. Preliminary bench-scale treatability studies were conducted to demonstrate the efficacy of increasing the aquifer pH using a colloidal pH buffer. Laboratory studies demonstrated that three different colloidal Mg(OH){sub 2} suspensions (concentration varied from 1,000 to 1,250 meq/L) could be transported through the columns packed with aquifer sand without significant permeability loss. The time before suspension breakthrough into the column effluent varied with surface treatment, indicating the Mg(OH)2 retention and PRB longevity could be controlled by varying the suspension surface treatment. (authors)

  2. Hydrothermal ore-forming processes in the light of studies in rock- buffered systems: I. Iron-copper-zinc-lead sulfide solubility relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemley, J.J.; Cygan, G.L.; Fein, J.B.; Robinson, G.R.; d'Angelo, W. M.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental studies, using cold-seal and extraction vessel techniques, were conducted on Fe, Pb, Zn, and Cu sulfide solubilities in chloride soultions at temperatures from 300?? to 700??C and pressures from 0.5 to 2 kbars. The solutions were buffered in pH by quartz monzonite and the pure potassium feldspar-muscovite-quartz assemblage and in fS2-fO2 largely by the assemblage pyrite-pyrrhotite-magnetite. Solubilities increase with increasing temperature and total chloride, and decrease with increasing pressure. The effect of increasing chloride concentration on solubility reflects primarily a shift to lower pH via the silicate buffer reactions. Similarity in behaviour with respect to the temperature and pressure of Fe, Zn, and Pb sulfide solubilities points to similarity in chloride speciation, and the neutral species appear to be dominant in the high-temperature region. -from Authors

  3. Acid neutralizing processes in an alpine watershed front range, Colorado, U.S.A.-1: Buffering capacity of dissolved organic carbon in soil solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iggy, Litaor M.; Thurman, E.M.

    1988-01-01

    Soil interstitial waters in the Green Lakes Valley, Front Range, Colorado were studied to evaluate the capacity of the soil system to buffer acid deposition. In order to determine the contribution of humic substances to the buffering capacity of a given soil, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and pH of the soil solutions were measured. The concentration of the organic anion, Ai-, derived from DOC at sample pH and the concentration of organic anion, Ax- at the equivalence point were calculated using carboxyl contents from isolated and purified humic material from soil solutions. Subtracting Ax- from Ai- yields the contribution of humic substances to the buffering capacity (Aequiv.-). Using this method, one can evaluate the relative contribution of inorganic and organic constituents to the acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of the soil solutions. The relative contribution of organic acids to the overall ANC was found to be extremely important in the alpine wetland (52%) and the forest-tundra ecotone (40%), and somewhat less important in the alpine tundra sites (20%). A failure to recognize the importance of organic acids in soil solutions to the ANC will result in erroneous estimates of the buffering capacity in the alpine environment of the Front Range, Colorado. ?? 1988.

  4. Systematic designs of buffers in macropipelines of systolic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Wah, B.W.; Aboelaze, M.; Shang, W.

    1988-02-01

    In a macropipeline of systolic arrays, outputs of one systolic array in a given format have to be fed as inputs to another systolic array in a possibly different format. A common memory becomes a bottleneck and limits the number of systolic arrays that can be connected together. In this paper, they study designs of buffers to convert data from one format to another. The minimum number of buffers is determined by a dynamic-programming algorithm with THETA(n/sup 2/) computational complexity, where n is the problem size. A general-purpose converter to convert data from any distribution to any other in a subset of the possible data distribution is also proposed. Last, buffer designs for a macropipeline to perform feature extraction and pattern classification are used to exemplify the design process.

  5. Redox buffering in shallow aquifers contaminated by leachate

    SciTech Connect

    Heron, G.; Bjerg, P.L.; Christensen, T.H.

    1995-12-31

    The redox conditions in two Danish landfill leachate-polluted aquifers (the Vejen and Grindsted) are discussed in terms of redox buffering. Dominant leachate contributors to reduction capacity (RDC) are dissolved organic matter and ammonium. Aquifer oxidation capacity is dominated by Fe(III) oxides, and the Vejen Landfill case shows that redox buffering by reduction of Fe(III) oxides may be important for plume development. Inorganic precipitates such as pyrite and other Fe(II) minerals may dramatically increase the oxygen demand of the aquifer. In mineral-poor aquifers such as the lower aquifer at Grindsted Landfill, redox buffering by solid electron acceptors is far less important, and smaller quantities of reduced species are formed.

  6. A 20 MHz CMOS reorder buffer for a superscalar microprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenell, John; Wallace, Steve; Bagherzadeh, Nader

    1992-01-01

    Superscalar processors can achieve increased performance by issuing instructions out-of-order from the original sequential instruction stream. Implementing an out-of-order instruction issue policy requires a hardware mechanism to prevent incorrectly executed instructions from updating register values. A reorder buffer can be used to allow a superscalar processor to issue instructions out-of-order and maintain program correctness. This paper describes the design and implementation of a 20MHz CMOS reorder buffer for superscalar processors. The reorder buffer is designed to accept and retire two instructions per cycle. A full-custom layout in 1.2 micron has been implemented, measuring 1.1058 mm by 1.3542 mm.

  7. Optimization of buffer gas pressure for Rb atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chang; Liu, Xiaohu; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong

    2015-08-01

    The optimization of buffer gas pressure is very important to improve the performance of the rubidium (Rb) atomic magnetometer. In this paper we briefly introduce the basic principle and the experimental method of the rubidium magnetometer based on Faraday rotation effect, and describe the factors affecting the magnetometer sensitivity, then analyze and summarize the mechanism of the influence of spin-exchange, spin-destruction collisions, radiation trapping and the spin diffusion on spin relaxation of Rb atoms. Based on this, the relationship between the rubidium magnetometer sensitivity, the spin relaxation rate and the gas chamber conditions (buffer gas pressure, the bubble radius, measuring temperature) is established. Doing calculations by the simulation software, how the magnetometer sensitivity and the relaxation rate vary with the gas chamber conditions can be seen; finally, the optimal values of the buffer gas pressure under certain gas chamber conditions are obtained. The work is significant for the engineering development of rubidium magnetometer.

  8. Buffer-gas effects on dark resonances: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erhard, Michael; Helm, Hanspeter

    2001-04-01

    Dark resonances with widths below 30 Hz have been observed in a rubidium cell filled with neon as buffer gas at room temperature. We compare an approximate analytic solution of a Λ system to our data and show that under our experimental conditions the presence of the buffer gas reduces the power broadening of the dark resonances by two orders of magnitude. We also present numerical calculations that take into account the thermal motion and velocity-changing collisions with the buffer-gas atoms. The resulting dark-resonance features exhibit strong Dicke-type narrowing effects and thereby explain the elimination of Doppler shifts and Doppler broadening, leading to observation of a single ultranarrow dark line.

  9. Chemical chaperones assist intracellular folding to buffer mutational variations

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Anannya; Saxena, Kanika; Kasturia, Neha; Dalal, Vijit; Bhatt, Niraj; Rajkumar, Asher; Maity, Shuvadeep; Sengupta, Shantanu; Chakraborty, Kausik

    2012-01-01

    Hidden genetic variations harbor potential for the evolution of new traits. Molecular chaperones, that assist protein folding, may conceal genetic variations in protein coding regions. Here, we investigate if the chemical milieu of cells has the potential to alleviate intracellular protein folding; potentially implicating a role of osmolytes in concealing genetic variations. Using the model osmolyte TMAO, we uncover that it can buffer mutations that impose kinetic traps in the folding pathways of two model proteins. Using this information, we rationally designed TMAO-dependent mutants in vivo, starting from a TMAO-independent protein. Strikingly, we delineate different osmolytes to have a unique spectrum of buffered-mutations. Consequently, the chemical milieu of cells may alter the folding pathways of unique mutant variants in polymorphic populations and lead to unanticipated spectra of genetic buffering. PMID:22246401

  10. Buffer thermal energy storage for an air Brayton solar engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strumpf, H. J.; Barr, K. P.

    1981-01-01

    The application of latent-heat buffer thermal energy storage to a point-focusing solar receiver equipped with an air Brayton engine was studied. To demonstrate the effect of buffer thermal energy storage on engine operation, a computer program was written which models the recuperator, receiver, and thermal storage device as finite-element thermal masses. Actual operating or predicted performance data are used for all components, including the rotating equipment. Based on insolation input and a specified control scheme, the program predicts the Brayton engine operation, including flows, temperatures, and pressures for the various components, along with the engine output power. An economic parametric study indicates that the economic viability of buffer thermal energy storage is largely a function of the achievable engine life.

  11. Buffer layers on metal alloy substrates for superconducting tapes

    DOEpatents

    Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.; Arendt, Paul N.; Groves, James R.

    2004-10-05

    An article including a substrate, at least one intermediate layer upon the surface of the substrate, a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure upon the at least one intermediate layer, and a layer of a SrRuO.sub.3 buffer material upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer is provided together with additional layers such as a HTS top-layer of YBCO directly upon the layer of a SrRuO.sub.3 buffer material layer. With a HTS top-layer of YBCO upon at least one layer of the SrRuO.sub.3 buffer material in such an article, J.sub.c 's of up to 1.3.times.10.sup.6 A/cm.sup.2 have been demonstrated with projected I.sub.c 's of over 200 Amperes across a sample 1 cm wide.

  12. Precision and accuracy of spectrophotometric pH measurements at environmental conditions in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Karoline; Schneider, Bernd; Kuliński, Karol; Schulz-Bull, Detlef E.

    2014-06-01

    The increasing uptake of anthropogenic CO2 by the oceans has raised an interest in precise and accurate pH measurement in order to assess the impact on the marine CO2-system. Spectrophotometric pH measurements were refined during the last decade yielding a precision and accuracy that cannot be achieved with the conventional potentiometric method. However, until now the method was only tested in oceanic systems with a relative stable and high salinity and a small pH range. This paper describes the first application of such a pH measurement system at conditions in the Baltic Sea which is characterized by a wide salinity and pH range. The performance of the spectrophotometric system at pH values as low as 7.0 (“total” scale) and salinities between 0 and 35 was examined using TRIS-buffer solutions, certified reference materials, and tests of consistency with measurements of other parameters of the marine CO2 system. Using m-cresol purple as indicator dye and a spectrophotometric measurement system designed at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (B. Carter, A. Dickson), a precision better than ±0.001 and an accuracy between ±0.01 and ±0.02 was achieved within the observed pH and salinity ranges in the Baltic Sea. The influence of the indicator dye on the pH of the sample was determined theoretically and is presented as a pH correction term for the different alkalinity regimes in the Baltic Sea. Because of the encouraging tests, the ease of operation and the fact that the measurements refer to the internationally accepted “total” pH scale, it is recommended to use the spectrophotometric method also for pH monitoring and trend detection in the Baltic Sea.

  13. Trona and sodium bicarbonate in beef cattle diets: effects on pH and volatile fatty acid concentrations.

    PubMed

    Boerner, B J; Byers, F M; Schelling, G T; Coppock, C E; Greene, L W

    1987-07-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of NaHCO3 and trona in beef cattle diets. Trace element (n = 28) analysis revealed no toxicological or safety concerns with the use of trona. Trona was more (P less than .05) soluble in ruminal fluid than Na2CO3, and NaHCO3 and had greater (P less than .05) buffering capacity (9.6 meq/g) than NaHCO3 (6.1 meq/g) but less (P less than .05) than Na2CO3 (11.1 meq/g). Calcium carbonate was insoluble and did not buffer ruminal fluid. Six yearling (avg 272 kg) Hereford X Angus steers, each with ruminal, duodenal and ileal cannulas, were fed 50:50 (cracked corn-based concentrate:cottonseed hulls) or 90:10 concentrate diets with no buffer, 1% NaHCO3 or with 1% trona. Intake, across all treatments, averaged 2.4% of body weight. Propionate (mmol/liter) increased (17.6 vs 13.5; P less than .05) and butyrate decreased (3.5 vs 5.2; P less than .05) with trona in the 90:10 diet as compared with no buffer. Propionate (16.8) increased (P less than .05) with NaHCO3 in the 90:10 diet. Average ruminal pH was greater (P less than .05) in 90:10 diets with trona or NaHCO3 than with no buffer (5.61, 5.61 vs 5.55); duodenal pH was greater (P less than .01) with trona than with no buffer (2.66 vs 2.55). Trona reduced ruminal pH-hours (P less than .05) and pH-area (P less than .12; time and area below mean pH of control) below control for both concentrate levels.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3038823

  14. Quantifying the capacity of compost buffers for treating agricultural runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo, S. A.; Beighley, R. E.; Buyuksonmez, F.

    2007-12-01

    Agricultural operations, specifically, avocado and commercial nurseries require frequent and significant fertilizing and irrigating which tends to result in excessive nutrient leaching and off-site runoff. The increased runoff contains high concentrations of nutrients which negatively impacts stream water quality. Researcher has demonstrated that best management practices such as compost buffers can be effective for reducing nutrient and sediment concentrations in agricultural runoff. The objective of this research is to evaluate both the hydraulic capacity and the nutrient removal efficiency of: (a) compost buffers and (b) buffers utilizing a combination of vegetation and compost. A series of experiments will be performed in the environmental hydraulics laboratory at San Diego State University. A tilting flume 12-m long, 27-cm wide and 25-cm deep will be used. Discharge is propelled by an axial flow pump powered by a variable speed motor with a maximum capacity of 30 liters per second. The experiments are designed to measure the ratio compost mass per flow rate per linear width. Two different discharges will be measured: (a) treatment discharge (maximum flow rate such that the buffer decreases the incoming nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations below a maximum allowable limit) and (b) breaking discharge (maximum flow rate the buffer can tolerate without structural failure). Experimental results are presented for the hydraulic analysis, and preliminary results are presented for the removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from runoff. The results from this project will be used to develop guidelines for installing compost buffers along the perimeters of nursery sites and avocado groves in southern California.

  15. Agroforestry buffers for nonpoint source pollution reductions from agricultural watersheds.

    PubMed

    Udawatta, Ranjith P; Garrett, Harold E; Kallenbach, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Despite increased attention and demand for the adoption of agroforestry practices throughout the world, rigorous long-term scientific studies confirming environmental benefits from the use of agroforestry practices are limited. The objective was to examine nonpoint-source pollution (NPSP) reduction as influenced by agroforestry buffers in watersheds under grazing and row crop management. The grazing study consists of six watersheds in the Central Mississippi Valley wooded slopes and the row crop study site consists of three watersheds in a paired watershed design in Central Claypan areas. Runoff water samples were analyzed for sediment, total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) for the 2004 to 2008 period. Results indicate that agroforestry and grass buffers on grazed and row crop management sites significantly reduce runoff, sediment, TN, and TP losses to streams. Buffers in association with grazing and row crop management reduced runoff by 49 and 19%, respectively, during the study period as compared with respective control treatments. Average sediment loss for grazing and row crop management systems was 13.8 and 17.9 kg ha yr, respectively. On average, grass and agroforestry buffers reduced sediment, TN, and TP losses by 32, 42, and 46% compared with the control treatments. Buffers were more effective in the grazing management practice than row crop management practice. These differences could in part be attributed to the differences in soils, management, and landscape features. Results from this study strongly indicate that agroforestry and grass buffers can be designed to improve water quality while minimizing the amount of land taken out of production. PMID:21546665

  16. Fifteenmile Creek Riparian Buffers Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Ron

    2004-02-01

    This project implements riparian buffer systems in the Mid-Columbia, addressing limiting factors identified in the Fifteenmile Subbasin Summary, June 30, 2000. The project is providing the technical planning support needed to implement at least 36 riparian buffer system contracts on approximately 872 acres covering an estimated 40 miles of anadromous fish streams over a three year period. During this second year of the project, 11 buffer contracts were implemented on 10.9 miles of stream. Buffer widths averaged 132 ft. on each side of the stream. Implementation included prescribed plantings, fencing, and related practices. Actual implementation costs, lease payments, and maintenance costs are borne by existing USDA programs: Conservation Reserve and Conservation Reserve Enhancement Programs. The lease period of each contract may vary between 10 to 15 years. During this year the average was 14.6 years. The total value of contracts established this year is $666,121 compared with $71,115 in Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) contract costs to provide the technical support needed to get the contracts implemented. This project provides technical staffing to conduct assessments and develop plans to help keep pace with the growing backlog of potential riparian buffer projects. Word of mouth from satisfied customers has brought in many new sign-ups during the year. In addition, specific outreach efforts targeting the orchard areas of the county began to bear fruit with orchardists sign-ups as the project year ended. Progress this second year of project includes only work accomplished in the Fifteenmile subbasin. A similar but separate effort to implement buffers in the Columbia Plateau Province was initiated during the year under project number 2002-019-00. This project supports RPA 150 and 153 as required under the Federal Hydropower System biological opinion.

  17. Electrodeposited Biaxially Textured Buffer Layers for YBCO Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, R.; Phok, S.; Zhao, W.; Norman, A.

    2009-06-01

    Non-vacuum electrodeposition (ED) was used to prepare simplified Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} and CeO{sub 2}/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} buffer layers on a Ni-W substrate. Post-annealing conditions of electrodeposited precursor films were optimized to obtain high-quality biaxially textured buffer layers. The buffer layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction, optical profiling, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effect of the cap layer thickness on the surface morphology and texture of the buffers was also studied. The microstructure of CeO{sub 2}/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} was analyzed and compared to Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}. The high-resolution TEM shows biaxially textured crystalline elctrodeposited Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CeO{sub 2} cap layers on the electrodeposited Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} layers without any defects. YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}-delta (YBCO) superconductor was deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on the simplified ED-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} and ED-CeO{sub 2}/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} buffers. Transport current density of 3.3 MA/cm{sup 2} at 77 K was obtained for PLD YBCO deposited on ED-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} buffer layers.

  18. Spectroscopy and quantum control of cryogenically buffered polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, David

    2016-05-01

    Cold polyatomic molecules offer rich possibilities for precision measurement, quantum control, and tests of fundamental symmetries. While manipulating, cooling, and detecting atoms and certain diatomic molecules at the single quantum state level is now possible, analogous tools for controlling polyatomic molecules lag far behind. Buffer gas cooling has emerged as a versatile tool for cooling such molecules. We will present recent demonstrations of state-specific and enantiomer-specific preparation of chiral molecules, and novel sensitive and ultra-specific chemical analysis techniques enabled by the combination of modern microwave spectroscopy techniques and the broad applicability of cryogenically buffered molecular samples.

  19. Influence of glyphosate on the copper dissolution in phosphate buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutinho, C. F. B.; Silva, M. O.; Machado, S. A. S.; Mazo, L. H.

    2007-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of copper microelectrode in phosphate buffer in the presence of glyphosate was investigated by electrochemical techniques. It was observed that the additions of glyphosate in the phosphate buffer increased the anodic current of copper microelectrode and the electrochemical dissolution was observed. This phenomenon could be associated with the Cu(II) complexation by glyphosate forming a soluble complex. Physical characterization of the surface showed that, in absence of glyphosate, an insoluble layer covered the copper surface; on the other hand, in presence of glyphosate, it was observed a corroded copper surface with the formation of glyphosate complex in solution.

  20. Separation of abscission zone cells in detached Azolla roots depends on apoplastic pH.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Kazuma; Yamada, Yoshiya; Miyamoto, Kensuke; Ueda, Junichi; Uheda, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    In studies on the mechanism of cell separation during abscission, little attention has been paid to the apoplastic environment. We found that the apoplastic pH surrounding abscission zone cells in detached roots of the water fern Azolla plays a major role in cell separation. Abscission zone cells of detached Azolla roots were separated rapidly in a buffer at neutral pH and slowly in a buffer at pH below 4.0. However, cell separation rarely occurred at pH 5.0-5.5. Light and electron microscopy revealed that cell separation was caused by a degradation of the middle lamella between abscission zone cells at both pH values, neutral and below 4.0. Low temperature and papain treatment inhibited cell separation. Enzyme(s) in the cell wall of the abscission zone cells might be involved in the degradation of the pectin of the middle lamella and the resultant, pH-dependent cell separation. By contrast, in Phaseolus leaf petioles, unlike Azolla roots, cell separation was slow and increased only at acidic pH. The rapid cell separation, as observed in Azolla roots at neutral pH, did not occur. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, using anti-pectin monoclonal antibodies, revealed that the cell wall pectins of the abscission zone cells of Azolla roots and Phaseolus leaf petioles looked similar and changed similarly during cell separation. Thus, the pH-related differences in cell separation mechanisms of Azolla and Phaseolus might not be due to differences in cell wall pectin, but to differences in cell wall-located enzymatic activities responsible for the degradation of pectic substances. A possible enzyme system is discussed. PMID:22940290

  1. Wetland treatment at extremes of pH: a review.

    PubMed

    Mayes, W M; Batty, L C; Younger, P L; Jarvis, A P; Kõiv, M; Vohla, C; Mander, U

    2009-06-15

    Constructed wetlands are an established treatment technology for a diverse range of polluted effluents. There is a long history of using wetlands as a unit process in treating acid mine drainage, while recent research has highlighted the potential for wetlands to buffer highly alkaline (pH>12) drainage. This paper reviews recent evidence on this topic, looking at wetlands treating acidic mine drainage, and highly alkaline leachates associated with drainage from lime-rich industrial by-products or where such residues are used as filter media in constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment. The limiting factors to the success of wetlands treating highly acidic waters are discussed with regard to design practice for the emerging application of wetlands to treat highly alkaline industrial discharges. While empirically derived guidelines (with area-adjusted contaminant removal rates typically quoted at 10 g Fe m(2)/day for influent waters pH>5.5; and 3.5-7 g acidity/m(2)/day for pH>4 to <5.5) for informing sizing of mine drainage treatment wetlands have generally been proved robust (probably due to conservatism), such data exhibit large variability within and between sites. Key areas highlighted for future research efforts include: (1) wider collation of mine drainage wetland performance data in regionalised datasets to improve empirically-derived design guidelines and (2) obtaining an improved understanding of nature of the extremophile microbial communities, microbially-mediated pollutant attenuation and rhizospheral processes in wetlands at extremes of pH. An enhanced knowledge of these (through multi-scale laboratory and field studies), will inform engineering design of treatment wetlands and assist in the move from the empirically-derived conservative sizing estimates that currently prevail to process-based optimal design guidance that could reduce costs and enhance the performance and longevity of wetlands for treating acidic and highly alkaline drainage waters

  2. Measurement and Control of pH in the Aqueous Interior of Reverse Micelles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The encapsulation of proteins and nucleic acids within the nanoscale water core of reverse micelles has been used for over 3 decades as a vehicle for a wide range of investigations including enzymology, the physical chemistry of confined spaces, protein and nucleic acid structural biology, and drug development and delivery. Unfortunately, the static and dynamical aspects of the distribution of water in solutions of reverse micelles complicate the measurement and interpretation of fundamental parameters such as pH. This is a severe disadvantage in the context of (bio)chemical reactions and protein structure and function, which are generally highly sensitive to pH. There is a need to more fully characterize and control the effective pH of the reverse micelle water core. The buffering effect of titratable head groups of the reverse micelle surfactants is found to often be the dominant variable defining the pH of the water core. Methods for measuring the pH of the reverse micelle aqueous interior using one-dimensional 1H and two-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy are described. Strategies for setting the effective pH of the reverse micelle water core are demonstrated. The exquisite sensitivity of encapsulated proteins to the surfactant, water content, and pH of the reverse micelle is also addressed. These results highlight the importance of assessing the structural fidelity of the encapsulated protein using multidimensional NMR before embarking upon a detailed structural and biophysical characterization. PMID:24506449

  3. Analytical modelling of monolayer graphene-based ion-sensitive FET to pH changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiani, Mohammad Javad; Ahmadi, Mohammad Taghi; Karimi Feiz Abadi, Hediyeh; Rahmani, Meisam; Hashim, Amin; Che harun, Fauzan Khairi

    2013-04-01

    Graphene has attracted great interest because of unique properties such as high sensitivity, high mobility, and biocompatibility. It is also known as a superior candidate for pH sensing. Graphene-based ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET) is currently getting much attention as a novel material with organic nature and ionic liquid gate that is intrinsically sensitive to pH changes. pH is an important factor in enzyme stabilities which can affect the enzymatic reaction and broaden the number of enzyme applications. More accurate and consistent results of enzymes must be optimized to realize their full potential as catalysts accordingly. In this paper, a monolayer graphene-based ISFET pH sensor is studied by simulating its electrical measurement of buffer solutions for different pH values. Electrical detection model of each pH value is suggested by conductance modelling of monolayer graphene. Hydrogen ion (H+) concentration as a function of carrier concentration is proposed, and the control parameter ( Ƥ) is defined based on the electro-active ions absorbed by the surface of the graphene with different pH values. Finally, the proposed new analytical model is compared with experimental data and shows good overall agreement.

  4. Local modulation of host pH by Colletotrichum species as a mechanism to increase virulence.

    PubMed

    Prusky, D; McEvoy, J L; Leverentz, B; Conway, W S

    2001-09-01

    The phytopathogenic fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides produces one pectate lyase (PL) that is a key virulence factor in disease development. During growth of C. gloeosporioides, Colletotrichum acutatum, and Colletotrichum coccodes in acidified yeast extract medium, the fungus secreted ammonia and increased the medium pH. Ammonia accumulation and the consequent pH change increased as a function of initial pH and buffer capacity of the medium. PL secretion by C. gloeosporioides correspondingly increased as the pH of the medium increased. The C. gloeosporioides pelB gene-disrupted mutant was able to increase ammonia accumulation and pH of the media similarly to the wild-type isolate. C. gloeosporioides in avocado, C. coccodes in tomato, and C. acutatum in apple showed ammonia accumulation in the infected area where pH increased to 7.5 to 8 and PL activity is optima. In nonhost interactions where C. gloeosporioides was inoculated in apples, the addition of ammonia-releasing compounds significantly enhanced pathogenicity to levels similar to those caused by the compatible C. acutatum-apple interaction. The results therefore suggest the importance of ammonia secretion as a virulence factor, enhancing environmental pH and pathogenicity of the Colletotrichum species. PMID:11551075

  5. Dual excitation ratiometric fluorescent pH sensor for noninvasive bioprocess monitoring: development and application.

    PubMed

    Kermis, Haley R; Kostov, Yordan; Harms, Peter; Rao, Govind

    2002-01-01

    The development and application of a fluorescent excitation-ratiometric, noninvasive pH sensor for continuous on-line fermentation monitoring is presented. The ratiometric approach is robust and insensitive to factors such as source intensity, photobleaching, or orientation of the patch, and since measurements can be made with external instrumentation and without direct contact with the patch, detection is completely noninvasive. The fluorescent dye 8-hydroxy-1,3,6-pyrene trisulfonic acid was immobilized onto Dowex strongly basic anion-exchange resin, which was subsequently entrapped into a proton-permeable hydrogel layer. The sensor layer was polymerized directly onto a white microfiltration membrane backing that provided an optical barrier to the fluorescence and scatter of the fermentation medium. The ratio of emission intensity at 515 nm excited at 468 nm to that excited at 408 nm correlated well with the pH of clear buffers, over the pH range of 6-9. The sensor responded rapidly (<9 min) and reversibly to changes in the solution pH with high precision. The sterilizable HPTS sensor was used for on-line pH monitoring of an E. coli fermentation. The output from the indwelling sensor patch was always in good agreement with the pH recorded off-line with an ISFET probe, with a maximum discrepancy of 0.05 pH units. The sensor is easily adaptable to closed-loop feedback control systems. PMID:12363356

  6. Hydrothermal ore-forming processes in the light of studies in rock- buffered systems: II. Some general geologic applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemley, J.J.; Hunt, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    The experimental metal solubilities for rock-buffered hydrothermal systems provide important insights into the acquisition, transport, and deposition of metals in real hydrothermal systems that produced base metal ore deposits. Water-rock reactions that determine pH, together with total chloride and changes in temperature and fluid pressure, play significant roles in controlling the solubility of metals and determining where metals are fixed to form ore deposits. Deposition of metals in hydrothermal systems occurs where changes such as cooling, pH increase due to rock alteration, boiling, or fluid mixing cause the aqueous metal concentration to exceed saturation. Metal zoning results from deposition occurring at successive saturation surfaces. Zoning is not a reflection simply of relative solubility but of the manner of intersection of transport concentration paths with those surfaces. Saturation surfaces will tend to migrate outward and inward in prograde and retrograde time, respectively, controlled by either temperature or chemical variables. -from Authors

  7. The Methods Behind PH WINS

    PubMed Central

    Leider, Jonathon P.; Bharthapudi, Kiran; Pineau, Vicki; Liu, Lin; Harper, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) has yielded the first-ever nationally representative sample of state health agency central office employees. The survey represents a step forward in rigorous, systematic data collection to inform the public health workforce development agenda in the United States. PH WINS is a Web-based survey and was developed with guidance from a panel of public health workforce experts including practitioners and researchers. It draws heavily from existing and validated items and focuses on 4 main areas: workforce perceptions about training needs, workplace environment and job satisfaction, perceptions about national trends, and demographics. This article outlines the conceptualization, development, and implementation of PH WINS, as well as considerations and limitations. It also describes the creation of 2 new data sets that will be available in public use for public health officials and researchers—a nationally representative data set for permanently employed state health agency central office employees comprising over 10 000 responses, and a pilot data set with approximately 12 000 local and regional health department staff responses. PMID:26422490

  8. The Methods Behind PH WINS.

    PubMed

    Leider, Jonathon P; Bharthapudi, Kiran; Pineau, Vicki; Liu, Lin; Harper, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) has yielded the first-ever nationally representative sample of state health agency central office employees. The survey represents a step forward in rigorous, systematic data collection to inform the public health workforce development agenda in the United States. PH WINS is a Web-based survey and was developed with guidance from a panel of public health workforce experts including practitioners and researchers. It draws heavily from existing and validated items and focuses on 4 main areas: workforce perceptions about training needs, workplace environment and job satisfaction, perceptions about national trends, and demographics. This article outlines the conceptualization, development, and implementation of PH WINS, as well as considerations and limitations. It also describes the creation of 2 new data sets that will be available in public use for public health officials and researchers--a nationally representative data set for permanently employed state health agency central office employees comprising over 10,000 responses, and a pilot data set with approximately 12,000 local and regional health department staff responses. PMID:26422490

  9. Electroporation on microchips: the harmful effects of pH changes and scaling down

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Wu, Mengxi; Zhao, Deyao; Wei, Zewen; Zhong, Wenfeng; Wang, Xiaoxia; Liang, Zicai; Li, Zhihong

    2015-01-01

    Electroporation has been widely used in delivering foreign biomolecules into cells, but there is still much room for improvement, such as cell viability and integrity. In this manuscript, we investigate the distribution and the toxicity of pH changes during electroporation, which significantly decreases cell viability. A localized pH gradient forms between anode and cathode leading to a localized distribution of cell death near the electrodes, especially cathodes. The toxicity of hydroxyl ions is severe and acute due to their effect in the decomposition of phospholipid bilayer membrane. On the other hand, the electric field used for electroporation aggravates the toxicity of hydroxyl because the electropermeabilization of cell membrane makes bilayer structure more loosen and vulnerable. We also investigate the side effects during scaling down the size of electrodes in electroporation microchips. Higher percentage of cells is damaged when the size of electrodes is smaller. At last, we propose an effective strategy to constrain the change of pH by modifying the composition of electroporation buffer. The modified buffer decreases the changes of pH, thus enables high cell viability even when the electric pulse duration exceeds several milliseconds. This ability has potential advantage in some applications that require long-time electric pulse stimulation. PMID:26658168

  10. Surface degradation of dental ceramics as a function of environmental pH.

    PubMed

    Esquivel-Upshaw, J F; Dieng, F Y; Clark, A E; Neal, D; Anusavice, K J

    2013-05-01

    We tested the hypotheses that glass-ceramic veneers and overglazes degrade by ion exchange in an acidic environment, and that they degrade by breakdown of the silica network in a basic environment. Disk specimens of glass-ceramic veneer and glaze were fabricated and immersed in pH 2, 7, or 10 buffer solutions, for 1, 3, 5, 10, 15, and 30 days. Each specimen was placed in a shaker bath containing de-ionized distilled water at 80°C. Concentrations of Al(3+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+), Li(2+), and Si(4+) were analyzed by means of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP/AES). Statistical analyses were performed by factorial ANOVA. Significant differences occurred among leached ion concentrations as a function of material type, solution pH, and exposure time. A substantial release of Si occurred at pH 10 over time, leading to a breakdown of the glass phase. At pH 2, dissolution was controlled by an ionic exchange mechanism. We conclude that ceramic veneers and glazes may be susceptible to considerable degradation in low- and high-pH buffer solutions. PMID:23569159

  11. Surface Degradation of Dental Ceramics as a Function of Environmental pH

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel-Upshaw, J.F.; Dieng, F.Y.; Clark, A.E.; Neal, D.; Anusavice, K.J.

    2013-01-01

    We tested the hypotheses that glass-ceramic veneers and overglazes degrade by ion exchange in an acidic environment, and that they degrade by breakdown of the silica network in a basic environment. Disk specimens of glass-ceramic veneer and glaze were fabricated and immersed in pH 2, 7, or 10 buffer solutions, for 1, 3, 5, 10, 15, and 30 days. Each specimen was placed in a shaker bath containing de-ionized distilled water at 80°C. Concentrations of Al3+, Ca2+, Zn2+, Li2+, and Si4+ were analyzed by means of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP/AES). Statistical analyses were performed by factorial ANOVA. Significant differences occurred among leached ion concentrations as a function of material type, solution pH, and exposure time. A substantial release of Si occurred at pH 10 over time, leading to a breakdown of the glass phase. At pH 2, dissolution was controlled by an ionic exchange mechanism. We conclude that ceramic veneers and glazes may be susceptible to considerable degradation in low- and high-pH buffer solutions. PMID:23569159

  12. Separation of Trivalent Actinides from Lanthanides in an Acetate Buffer Solution Using Cyanex 301

    SciTech Connect

    Jack D. Law; Dean R. Peterman; Terry A. Todd; Richard D. Tillotson

    2006-05-01

    The separation of trivalent actinides from the lanthanides using the active extractant in the Cyanex 301 reagent, bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)dithiophosphinic acid, was studied. Specifically, the extractant was studied for an ammonium acetate/acetic acid buffered feed that would result from a transuranic separation process utilizing an ammonium acetate strip solution. Separation factors of 241Am from 154Eu with this extractant, as a function of total acetate concentration and pH, have been measured. Additionally, the extraction behavior of stable La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, and Eu was measured. Separation factors were typically very high for Am from Eu at a pH ranging from 3.8 to 5.8 and a total acetate concentration ranging from 0.2 M to 1.0 M. However, separation factors across the lanthanide series varied considerably and resulted in separation of the lighter lanthanides from the heavier lanthanides at the higher pH’s.

  13. Heat resistance of Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius in water, various buffers, and orange juice.

    PubMed

    Palop, A; Alvarez, I; Raso, J; Condón, S

    2000-10-01

    The effect of the pH or the composition of the heating medium and of the sporulation temperature on the heat resistance of spores of a thermoacidophilic spore-forming microorganism isolated from a dairy beverage containing orange fruit concentrate was investigated. The species was identified as Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius. The spores showed the same heat resistance in citrate-phosphate buffers of pH 4 and 7, in distilled water, and in orange juice at any of the temperatures tested (D120 degrees C = 0.1 min and z = 7 degrees C). A raise in 20 degrees C in the sporulation temperature (from 45 to 65 degrees C) increased the heat resistance eightfold (from D110 degrees C = 0.48 min when sporulated at 45 degrees C to 3.9 min when sporulated at 65 degrees C). The z-values remained constant for all sporulation temperatures. The spores of this strain of A. acidocaldarius were very heat resistant and could easily survive any heat treatment currently applied to pasteurize fruit juices. PMID:11041137

  14. Improved Stability of a Model IgG3 by DoE-Based Evaluation of Buffer Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Brittany K.; Agarabi, Cyrus D.; Read, Erik K.; Boyne II, Michael T.; Khan, Mansoor A.; Brorson, Kurt A.

    2016-01-01

    Formulating appropriate storage conditions for biopharmaceutical proteins is essential for ensuring their stability and thereby their purity, potency, and safety over their shelf-life. Using a model murine IgG3 produced in a bioreactor system, multiple formulation compositions were systematically explored in a DoE design to optimize the stability of a challenging antibody formulation worst case. The stability of the antibody in each buffer formulation was assessed by UV/VIS absorbance at 280 nm and 410 nm and size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography (SEC) to determine overall solubility, opalescence, and aggregate formation, respectively. Upon preliminary testing, acetate was eliminated as a potential storage buffer due to significant visible precipitate formation. An additional 24 full factorial DoE was performed that combined the stabilizing effect of arginine with the buffering capacity of histidine. From this final DoE, an optimized formulation of 200 mM arginine, 50 mM histidine, and 100 mM NaCl at a pH of 6.5 was identified to substantially improve stability under long-term storage conditions and after multiple freeze/thaw cycles. Thus, our data highlights the power of DoE based formulation screening approaches even for challenging monoclonal antibody molecules. PMID:27042659

  15. Improved Stability of a Model IgG3 by DoE-Based Evaluation of Buffer Formulations.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Brittany K; Agarabi, Cyrus D; Read, Erik K; Boyne, Michael T; Khan, Mansoor A; Brorson, Kurt A

    2016-01-01

    Formulating appropriate storage conditions for biopharmaceutical proteins is essential for ensuring their stability and thereby their purity, potency, and safety over their shelf-life. Using a model murine IgG3 produced in a bioreactor system, multiple formulation compositions were systematically explored in a DoE design to optimize the stability of a challenging antibody formulation worst case. The stability of the antibody in each buffer formulation was assessed by UV/VIS absorbance at 280 nm and 410 nm and size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography (SEC) to determine overall solubility, opalescence, and aggregate formation, respectively. Upon preliminary testing, acetate was eliminated as a potential storage buffer due to significant visible precipitate formation. An additional 2(4) full factorial DoE was performed that combined the stabilizing effect of arginine with the buffering capacity of histidine. From this final DoE, an optimized formulation of 200 mM arginine, 50 mM histidine, and 100 mM NaCl at a pH of 6.5 was identified to substantially improve stability under long-term storage conditions and after multiple freeze/thaw cycles. Thus, our data highlights the power of DoE based formulation screening approaches even for challenging monoclonal antibody molecules. PMID:27042659

  16. The erosion kinetics of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cements in acidic buffer solutions.

    PubMed

    Hazar-Yoruc, Binnaz; Bavbek, Andac Barkin; Özcan, Mutlu

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the erosion kinetics of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cements in acidic buffer solutions as a function of time. Disc shaped specimens were prepared from conventional (Ketac-Cem: KTC) and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (Fuji Plus: FP) and immersed in three acidic buffer solutions (0.01 M) namely, acetic acid/sodium acetate (AA(B)), lactic acid/sodium lactate (LA(B)) and citric acid/sodium citrate (CA(B)) with a constant pH of 4.1 and stored for 1, 8, 24, 48, 80, 120 and 168 h. F concentration was determined using ion-specific electrode. Si, Ca and Al concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Ca, Al, Si and F solubility rates in both FP and KTC were the highest in CA(B) solution. The erosion rates of both FP and KTC in all buffer solutions increased as a function of immersion time. The amount of F eluted from FP was more than that of KTC. The total amount of elements released from FP was less than KTC in all solutions. PMID:23207217

  17. Influence of solid-state acidity on the decomposition of sucrose in amorphous systems II (effect of buffer).

    PubMed

    Alkhamis, Khouloud A

    2009-04-01

    It was of interest to investigate the solid-state acidity using indicator probe molecules and sucrose degradation. Amorphous samples containing lactose, sucrose, buffers (citrate, malate, tartarate, or phosphate) with different pH values, and sodium chloride (to adjust the ionic strength) were prepared by freeze-drying. The lyophiles were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and Karl Fischer titrimetry. The solid-state acidity of all lyophiles was measured using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and suitable indicators (thymol blue or bromophenol blue). Selected lyophiles were subjected to a temperature of 60 degrees C and were analyzed for sucrose degradation using the Trinder kit. The results obtained from this study have shown that good correlation can be obtained between the solid-state acidity and the molar ratio of the salt and the acid in solution. The degradation of sucrose in the lyophiles is extremely sensitive to the solid-state acidity and might be able to provide a better estimate for the acidity than the indicator probe molecules. The Hammett acidity-rate profile for sucrose degradation in the lyophiles (using four different buffers) was also obtained. The profile showed similarity to the pH-rate profile in solution, and no buffer catalysis for sucrose degradation was detected in this study. PMID:19016102

  18. Size Control of (99m)Tc-tin Colloid Using PVP and Buffer Solution for Sentinel Lymph Node Detection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong

    2015-06-01

    Colloidal particle size is an important characteristic that allows mapping sentinel nodes in lymphoscintigraphy. This investigation aimed to introduce different ways of making a (99m)Tc-tin colloid with a size of tens of nanometers. All agents, tin fluoride, sodium fluoride, poloxamer-188, and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), were mixed and labeled with (99m)Tc. Either phosphate or sodium bicarbonate buffers were used to adjust the pH levels. When the buffers were added, the size of the colloids increased. However, as the PVP continued to increase, the size of the colloids was controlled to within tens of nanometers. In all samples, phosphate buffer added PVP (30 mg) stabilized tin colloid ((99m)Tc-PPTC-30) and sodium bicarbonate solution added PVP (50 mg) stabilized tin colloid ((99m)Tc-BPTC-50) were chosen for in vitro and in vivo studies. (99m)Tc-BPTC-50 (<20 nm) was primarily located in bone marrow and was then secreted through the kidneys, and (99m)Tc-PPTC-30 (>100 nm) mainly accumulated in the liver. When a rabbit was given a toe injection, the node uptake of (99m)Tc-PPTC-30 decreased over time, while (99m)Tc-BPTC-50 increased. Therefore, (99m)Tc-BPTC-50 could be a good candidate radiopharmaceutical for sentinel node detection. The significance of this study is that nano-sized tin colloid can be made very easily and quickly by PVP. PMID:26028937

  19. Use of Silicate Minerals for pH Control during Reductive Dechlorination of Chloroethenes in Batch Cultures of Different Microbial Consortia

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Elsa; Brovelli, Alessandro; Barry, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    In chloroethene-contaminated sites undergoing in situ bioremediation, groundwater acidification is a frequent problem in the source zone, and buffering strategies have to be implemented to maintain the pH in the neutral range. An alternative to conventional soluble buffers is silicate mineral particles as a long-term source of alkalinity. In previous studies, the buffering potentials of these minerals have been evaluated based on abiotic dissolution tests and geochemical modeling. In the present study, the buffering potentials of four silicate minerals (andradite, diopside, fayalite, and forsterite) were tested in batch cultures amended with tetrachloroethene (PCE) and inoculated with different organohalide-respiring consortia. Another objective of this study was to determine the influence of pH on the different steps of PCE dechlorination. The consortia showed significant differences in sensitivities toward acidic pH for the different dechlorination steps. Molecular analysis indicated that Dehalococcoides spp. that were present in all consortia were the most pH-sensitive organohalide-respiring guild members compared to Sulfurospirillum spp. and Dehalobacter spp. In batch cultures with silicate mineral particles as pH-buffering agents, all four minerals tested were able to maintain the pH in the appropriate range for reductive dechlorination of chloroethenes. However, complete dechlorination to ethene was observed only with forsterite, diopside, and fayalite. Dissolution of andradite increased the redox potential and did not allow dechlorination. With forsterite, diopside, and fayalite, dechlorination to ethene was observed but at much lower rates for the last two dechlorination steps than with the positive control. This indicated an inhibition effect of silicate minerals and/or their dissolution products on reductive dechlorination of cis-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride. Hence, despite the proven pH-buffering potential of silicate minerals, compatibility with

  20. TRIO: Burst Buffer Based I/O Orchestration

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Teng; Oral, H Sarp; Pritchard, Michael; Wang, Bin; Yu, Weikuan

    2015-01-01

    The growing computing power on leadership HPC systems is often accompanied by ever-escalating failure rates. Checkpointing is a common defensive mechanism used by scientific applications for failure recovery. However, directly writing the large and bursty checkpointing dataset to parallel filesystem can incur significant I/O contention on storage servers. Such contention in turn degrades the raw bandwidth utilization of storage servers and prolongs the average job I/O time of concurrent applications. Recently burst buffer has been proposed as an intermediate layer to absorb the bursty I/O traffic from compute nodes to storage backend. But an I/O orchestration mechanism is still desired to efficiently move checkpointing data from bursty buffers to storage backend. In this paper, we propose a burst buffer based I/O orchestration framework, named TRIO, to intercept and reshape the bursty writes for better sequential write traffic to storage severs. Meanwhile, TRIO coordinates the flushing orders among concurrent burst buffers to alleviate the contention on storage server bandwidth. Our experimental results reveal that TRIO can deliver 30.5% higher bandwidth and reduce the average job I/O time by 37% on average for data-intensive applications in various checkpointing scenarios.

  1. Woven graphite epoxy composite test specimens with glass buffer strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnar, G. R.; Palmer, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Woven unidirectional graphite cloth with bands of fiberglass replacing the graphite in discrete lengthwise locations was impregnated with epoxy resin and used to fabricate a series of composite tensile and shear specimens. The finished panels, with the fiberglass buffer strips, were tested. Details of the fabrication process are reported.

  2. Hypothalamic oxytocin mediates social buffering of the stress response

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Adam S.; Wang, Zuoxin

    2013-01-01

    Background While stressful life events can enhance the risk of mental disorders, positive social interactions can propagate good mental health and normal behavioral routines. Still, the neural systems that promote these benefits are undetermined. Oxytocin is a hormone involved in social behavior and stress; thus, we focus on the impact that social buffering has on the stress response and the governing effects of oxytocin. Methods Female prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) were exposed to 1 hr immobilization stress then recovered alone or with their male partner to characterize the effect of social contact on the behavioral, physiological, and neuroendocrine stress response. In addition, we treated immobilized females recovering alone with oxytocin, or vehicle, and females recovering with their male partner with a selective oxytocin receptor antagonist, or vehicle. Group sizes varied from 6 to 8 voles (n = 98 total). Results We found that 1 hr immobilization increased anxiety-like behaviors and circulating levels of corticosterone, a stress hormone, in females recovering alone, but not the females recovering with their male partner. This social buffering by the male partner on biobehavioral responses to stress was accompanied by increased oxytocin release in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus. Intra-PVN oxytocin injections reduced behavioral and corticosterone responses to immobilization whereas injections of an oxytocin receptor antagonist blocked the effects of the social buffering. Conclusions Together, our data demonstrate that PVN oxytocin mediates the social buffering effects on the stress response, and thus may be a target for treatment of stress-related disorders. PMID:24183103

  3. Odor Mitigation with Tree Buffers: Swine Production Case Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tree buffers are a potential low cost sustainable odor mitigation strategy, but there is little to no data on their effectiveness. Odor transport is thought to occur one of two ways either directly through vapor phase transport or indirectly through sorption onto particles. Consequently, monitoring...

  4. Dominant oceanic bacteria secure phosphate using a large extracellular buffer.

    PubMed

    Zubkov, Mikhail V; Martin, Adrian P; Hartmann, Manuela; Grob, Carolina; Scanlan, David J

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitous SAR11 and Prochlorococcus bacteria manage to maintain a sufficient supply of phosphate in phosphate-poor surface waters of the North Atlantic subtropical gyre. Furthermore, it seems that their phosphate uptake may counter-intuitively be lower in more productive tropical waters, as if their cellular demand for phosphate decreases there. By flow sorting (33)P-phosphate-pulsed (32)P-phosphate-chased cells, we demonstrate that both Prochlorococcus and SAR11 cells exploit an extracellular buffer of labile phosphate up to 5-40 times larger than the amount of phosphate required to replicate their chromosomes. Mathematical modelling is shown to support this conclusion. The fuller the buffer the slower the cellular uptake of phosphate, to the point that in phosphate-replete tropical waters, cells can saturate their buffer and their phosphate uptake becomes marginal. Hence, buffer stocking is a generic, growth-securing adaptation for SAR11 and Prochlorococcus bacteria, which lack internal reserves to reduce their dependency on bioavailable ambient phosphate. PMID:26198420

  5. A model for monitoring of Hsp90-buffered genetic variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozeko, Liudmyla

    Genetic material of terrestrial organisms can be considerably injured by cosmic rays and UV-radiation in the space environment. Organisms onboard are also exposed to the entire complex of negative physical factors which can generate genetic variations and affect morphogenesis. However, species phenotypes must be robust to genetic variation, requiring "buffering" systems to ensure normal development. The molecular chaperone Hsp90 can serve as such "a buffer". It is important in the maturation and conformational regulation of a diverse set of signal transducers. The requirement of many principal regulatory proteins for Hsp90 renders entire metabolic pathways sensitive to impairment of its function. So inhibition of Hsp90 function can open cryptic genetic variations and produce morphological changes. In this paper, we present a model for monitoring of cryptic Hsp90-buffered genetic variations arising during exposure to space and spaceflight factors. This model has been developed with Arabidopsis thaliana seeds gathered in natural habitats with high anthropogenic pressure and wild type (Col-0) seeds subjected to negative influences (UV, heavy metals) experimentally. The phenotypic traits of early seedlings grown under reduction of Hsp90 activity were characterized to estimate Hsp90-buffered genetic variations. Geldanamycin was used as an inhibitor of Hsp90 function.

  6. Evaluating uncertainty in E. coli retention in vegetated buffer strips

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetated buffer strips (VFS) separate fields and pastures from streams and other water bodies and can serve as barriers that prevent sediment and agricultural chemicals from entering waterways and spoiling them. Growing concern about the manure-borne pathogens as water pollutants defines the need t...

  7. Effects of Terrestrial Buffer Zones on Amphibians on Golf Courses

    PubMed Central

    Puglis, Holly J.; Boone, Michelle D.

    2012-01-01

    A major cause of amphibian declines worldwide is habitat destruction or alteration. Public green spaces, such as golf courses and parks, could serve as safe havens to curb the effects of habitat loss if managed in ways to bolster local amphibian communities. We reared larval Blanchard's cricket frogs (Acris blanchardi) and green frogs (Rana clamitans) in golf course ponds with and without 1 m terrestrial buffer zones, and released marked cricket frog metamorphs at the golf course ponds they were reared in. Larval survival of both species was affected by the presence of a buffer zone, with increased survival for cricket frogs and decreased survival for green frogs when reared in ponds with buffer zones. No marked cricket frog juveniles were recovered at any golf course pond in the following year, suggesting that most animals died or migrated. In a separate study, we released cricket frogs in a terrestrial pen and allowed them to choose between mown and unmown grass. Cricket frogs had a greater probability of using unmown versus mown grass. Our results suggest that incorporating buffer zones around ponds can offer suitable habitat for some amphibian species and can improve the quality of the aquatic environment for some sensitive local amphibians. PMID:22761833

  8. A Longitudinal Study of Stress Buffering for Adolescent Problem Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windle, Michael

    1992-01-01

    In a study of middle adolescents, the interrelationships between stressful events, perceived social support, internalization of problems, and externalization of problems were examined. Social support did not act as a buffer of stress. Stressful events and low family support predicted problem behaviors for adolescent girls. (BC)

  9. Dominant oceanic bacteria secure phosphate using a large extracellular buffer

    PubMed Central

    Zubkov, Mikhail V.; Martin, Adrian P.; Hartmann, Manuela; Grob, Carolina; Scanlan, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitous SAR11 and Prochlorococcus bacteria manage to maintain a sufficient supply of phosphate in phosphate-poor surface waters of the North Atlantic subtropical gyre. Furthermore, it seems that their phosphate uptake may counter-intuitively be lower in more productive tropical waters, as if their cellular demand for phosphate decreases there. By flow sorting 33P-phosphate-pulsed 32P-phosphate-chased cells, we demonstrate that both Prochlorococcus and SAR11 cells exploit an extracellular buffer of labile phosphate up to 5–40 times larger than the amount of phosphate required to replicate their chromosomes. Mathematical modelling is shown to support this conclusion. The fuller the buffer the slower the cellular uptake of phosphate, to the point that in phosphate-replete tropical waters, cells can saturate their buffer and their phosphate uptake becomes marginal. Hence, buffer stocking is a generic, growth-securing adaptation for SAR11 and Prochlorococcus bacteria, which lack internal reserves to reduce their dependency on bioavailable ambient phosphate. PMID:26198420

  10. Odor mitigation with vegetative buffers: Swine production case study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetative environmental buffers (VEB) are a potentially low cost sustainable odor mitigation strategy, but there is little to no data supporting their effectiveness. Wind tunnel experiments and field monitoring were used to determine the effect VEB had on wind flow patterns within a swine facility....

  11. NITROUS OXIDE EMISSIONS FROM RIPARIAN BUFFERS AND TREATMENT WETLANDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Riparian buffers and treatment wetlands are used throughout the world for the protection of water bodies from nonpoint source pollution, particularly nitrogen. Yet, relatively few studies of riparian or treatment wetland denitrification consider the production of nitrous oxide. Nitrous oxide emissio...

  12. Diazinon and permethrin mitigation across a grass-wetland buffer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Various management practices have been proposed to help alleviate deleterious effects of pesticides associated with agricultural runoff. Vegetated buffers of different designs are often used as edge-of-field treatment practices. Two experimental systems, a control (no vegetation) and a grass-wetla...

  13. Creating a replicable, valid cross-platform buffering technique: The sausage network buffer for measuring food and physical activity built environments

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Obesity researchers increasingly use geographic information systems to measure exposure and access in neighborhood food and physical activity environments. This paper proposes a network buffering approach, the “sausage” buffer. This method can be consistently and easily replicated across software versions and platforms, avoiding problems with proprietary systems that use different approaches in creating such buffers. Methods In this paper, we describe how the sausage buffering approach was developed to be repeatable across platforms and places. We also examine how the sausage buffer compares with existing alternatives in terms of buffer size and shape, measurements of the food and physical activity environments, and associations between environmental features and health-related behaviors. We test the proposed buffering approach using data from EAT 2010 (Eating and Activity in Teens), a study examining multi-level factors associated with eating, physical activity, and weight status in adolescents (n = 2,724) in the Minneapolis/St. Paul metropolitan area of Minnesota. Results Results show that the sausage buffer is comparable in area to the classic ArcView 3.3 network buffer particularly for larger buffer sizes. It obtains similar results to other buffering techniques when measuring variables associated with the food and physical activity environments and when measuring the correlations between such variables and outcomes such as physical activity and food purchases. Conclusions Findings from various tests in the current study show that researchers can obtain results using sausage buffers that are similar to results they would obtain by using other buffering techniques. However, unlike proprietary buffering techniques, the sausage buffer approach can be replicated across software programs and versions, allowing more independence of research from specific software. PMID:22554353

  14. Improvements in multimedia data buffering using master/slave architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Sheikh, S.; Ganesan, R.

    1996-12-31

    Advances in the networking technology and multimedia technology has necessitated a need for multimedia servers to be robust and reliable. Existing solutions have direct limitations such as I/O bottleneck and reliability of data retrieval. The system can store the stream of incoming data if enough buffer space is available or the mass storage is clearing the buffer data faster than queue input. A single buffer queue is not sufficient to handle the large frames. Queue sizes are normally several megabytes in length and thus in turn will introduce a state of overflow. The system should also keep track of the rewind, fast forwarding, and pause requests, otherwise queue management will become intricate. In this paper, we present a master/slave (server that is designated to monitor the workflow of the complete system. This server holds every other information of slaves by maintaining a dynamic table. It also controls the workload on each of the systems by redistributing request to others or handles the request by itself) approach which will overcome the limitations of today`s storage and also satisfy tomorrow`s storage needs. This approach will maintain the system reliability and yield faster response by using more storage units in parallel. A network of master/slave can handle many requests and synchronize them at all times. Using dedicated CPU and a common pool of queues we explain how queues can be controlled and buffer overflow can be avoided. We propose a layered approach to the buffering problem and provide a read-ahead solution to ensure continuous storage and retrieval of multimedia data.

  15. A pH sensor based on electric properties of nanotubes on a glass substrate.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Seiji; Nakamura, Motonori; Ishii, Atsushi; Subagyo, Agus; Hosoi, Hirotaka; Sueoka, Kazuhisa; Mukasa, Koichi

    2007-01-01

    We fabricated a pH-sensitive device on a glass substrate based on properties of carbon nanotubes. Nanotubes were immobilized specifically on chemically modified areas on a substrate followed by deposition of metallic source and drain electrodes on the area. Some nanotubes connected the source and drain electrodes. A top gate electrode was fabricated on an insulating layer of silane coupling agent on the nanotube. The device showed properties of ann-type field effect transistor when a potential was applied to the nanotube from the top gate electrode. Before fabrication of the insulating layer, the device showed that thep-type field effect transistor and the current through the source and drain electrodes depend on the buffer pH. The current increases with decreasing pH of the CNT solution. This device, which can detect pH, is applicable for use as a biosensor through modification of the CNT surface. PMID:21806848

  16. Enhanced dissolution of silicate minerals by bacteria at near-neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Vandevivere, P; Welch, S A; Ullman, W J; Kirchman, D L

    1994-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that various microorganisms can enhance the dissolution of silicate minerals at low (<5) or high (>8) pH. However, it was not known if they can have an effect at near-neutral pH. Almost half of 17 isolates examined in this study stimulated bytownite dissolution at near-neutral pH while in a resting state in buffered glucose. Most of the isolates found to stimulate dissolution also oxidized glucose to gluconic acid. More detailed analysis with one of these isolates suggested that this partial oxidation was the predominant, if not sole, mechanism of enhanced dissolution. Enhanced dissolution did not require direct contact between the dissolving mineral and the bacteria. Gluconate-promoted dissolution was also observed with other silicate minerals such as albite, quartz, and kaolinite. PMID:24190338

  17. Effect of pH, DIC, orthophosphate and sulfate on drinking water cuprosolvency

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, M.R.; Lytle, D.A.; Clement, J.A.

    1995-06-01

    Field data from various copper monitoring studies and Lead and Copper Rule compliance data are often inappropriate and misleading for reliably determining fundamental chemical relationships behind copper corrosion control. A comprehensive solubility model for copper in drinking water has been developed, that is consistent with available data for copper dissolution and precipitation. The concentration of Cu(I) is dominated by Cu2O(s) or CuOH(s) solid phases, plus soluble aqueous ammonia and chloride complexes. Utilities may choose to add DIC for buffering of pH, raising copper to some degree. Sufficient orthophosphate may reduce cuprosolvency below pH 8. Sulfate may either lower cuprosolvency under some conditions, or interfere with oxide/hydroxide passivation above about pH 8. Dissolved oxygen and chlorine residual influence copper stagnation profiles.

  18. pH profiles in human skin: influence of two in vitro test systems for drug delivery testing.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Heike; Kostka, Karl Heinz; Lehr, Claus Michael; Schaefer, Ulrich F

    2003-01-01

    Investigations to determine pH profiles across human stratum corneum (SC), in vivo as well as in vitro, were carried out using the tape stripping technique and a flat surface pH electrode. This method was extended to the deeper skin layers (=viable epidermis+dermis; DSL) in vitro. Statistically significant changes in the pH values were detected in the SC between in vivo and in vitro investigations and also between male and female skin in vivo. For the DSL, no gender-dependent differences in pH were observed. While the results achieved for the SC are in accordance with data already published in the literature, the values for the DSL were surprising: An alkaline pH, with a steep increase of about two pH units in the first 100 microm of the DSL and a plateau of this level was thereafter detected. Research was also done to examine the influence of different in vitro test systems on the results of pH measurements across the skin. A permeation model (Franz diffusion cell; FD-C) and a penetration model (Saarbruecken penetration model; SB-M) were compared. Experiments were carried out concerning the incubation time as well as the pH of the acceptor solution in the FD-C. Independent of the test system used, no change in the pH profiles could be observed for the SC, but a strong effect of the acceptor medium and its pH on the pH profiles across the DSL could be demonstrated using the FD-C, which showed itself partly after 30 min in statistically significant differences between incubated and formerly frozen skin. The results after the use of buffer solutions with different pH values, the pH across the DSL seemed to come into line with the one of the buffer solution, which was investigated for acidic as well as alkaline pH values. The results obtained with the flat surface pH electrode were confirmed using two different dyes: the pH-dependent fluorescent dye carboxy-SNARF-1 and the pH indicator bromthymolblue. PMID:12551704

  19. In situ XANES study of the passive film formed on iron in borate buffer and in sodium acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Oblonsky, L.J.; Ryan, M.P.; Isaacs, S.

    1996-12-31

    The passive film formed on Fe in pH 8.4 borate buffer (0. 1 36 M) over a broad potential range was characterized by in situ XANES (x-ray absorption near edge structure). On stepping the potential to a value between -0.6 V and +0.4 V (MSE), a passive film forms without detectable dissolution. The edge position indicates that the valence state of Fe in the film is 10 {+-} 5% Fe{sup 2+} and 90 {+-} 5% Fe{sup 3+}. Formation of a passive film at potentials between -0.8 V and -0.65 V is associated with dissolution prior to passivation, and a lower average valence state of 17 {+-} 5% Fe{sup 2+} and 83 {+-} 5% Fe{sup 3+}. At -0.9 V, the Fe did not passivate. The passive film that forms in pH 8.2 sodium acetate (0.1 M) at +0.4 V gives an edge similar to the high potential passive film formed in borate buffer, but dissolution occurs prior to passivation.

  20. Physical and chemical properties and stability of sodium cefazolin in buffered eye drops determined with HPLC method.

    PubMed

    Kodym, Anna; Bilski, Piotr; Domańska, Agata; Hełminiak, Łukasz; Jabłońska, Maria; Jachymska, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the studies was to analyze the stability of 1% and 5% eye drops containing sodium cefazolin, prepared in citrate buffer of pH 6.11-6.27, which were stored at the temperature of 4 degrees C and 20 degrees C with light protection. The drops were prepared under aseptic conditions by dissolving sodium cefazolin (Biofazolin, IBA Bioton), dry injection form of the drug, in citrate buffer. The viscosity of the drops was increased using polyvinyl alcohol. The drops were preserved with phenylmercuric borate of 0.001% concentration mixed with beta-phenylethyl alcohol of 0.4% concentration in the drops. The concentration of cefazolin was determined at every three days using HPLC method. Besides, the measurements of pH, osmotic pressure and viscosity were performed as well as the organoleptic analysis of the drops (clarity, color, odor). The concentration of cefazolin in 1% drops after the 30-day-storage at the temperature of 4 degrees C, depending on their composition, decreased in the range of 2.17-6.02%. In 5% drops the decrease in cefazolin concentration was similar, i.e., after 30-day-storage at the temperature of 4 degrees C it was 1.62-6.76%. In 1% and 5% drops stored at the temperature of 20 degrees C the stability of the drops determined as the 10% degradation time of cefazolin was in the range of 9-15 days. PMID:22574512