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Sample records for acetonitrile-phosphate buffer ph

  1. Programmable pH buffers

    DOEpatents

    Gough, Dara Van; Huber, Dale L.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Roberts, Mark E.

    2017-01-24

    A programmable pH buffer comprises a copolymer that changes pK.sub.a at a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) in water. The copolymer comprises a thermally programmable polymer that undergoes a hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic phase change at the LCST and an electrolytic polymer that exhibits acid-base properties that are responsive to the phase change. The programmable pH buffer can be used to sequester CO.sub.2 into water.

  2. Thermally programmable pH buffers.

    PubMed

    Van Gough, Dara; Bunker, Bruce C; Roberts, Mark E; Huber, Dale L; Zarick, Holly F; Austin, Mariah J; Wheeler, Jill S; Moore, Diana; Spoerke, Erik D

    2012-11-01

    Many reactions in both chemistry and biology rely on the ability to precisely control and fix the solution concentrations of either protons or hydroxide ions. In this report, we describe the behavior of thermally programmable pH buffer systems based on the copolymerization of varying amounts of acrylic acid (AA) groups into N-isopropylacrylamide polymers. Because the copolymers undergo phase transitions upon heating and cooling, the local environment around the AA groups can be reversibly switched between hydrophobic and hydrophilic states affecting the ionization behavior of the acids. Results show that moderate temperature variations can be used to change the solution pH by two units. However, results also indicate that the nature of the transition and its impact on the pH values are highly dependent on the AA content and the degree of neutralization.

  3. Mapping Soil pH Buffering Capacity of Selected Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, A. R.; Kissel, D. E.; Chen, F.; West, L. T.; Adkins, W.; Rickman, D.; Luvall, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    Soil pH buffering capacity, since it varies spatially within crop production fields, may be used to define sampling zones to assess lime requirement, or for modeling changes in soil pH when acid forming fertilizers or manures are added to a field. Our objective was to develop a procedure to map this soil property. One hundred thirty six soil samples (0 to 15 cm depth) from three Georgia Coastal Plain fields were titrated with calcium hydroxide to characterize differences in pH buffering capacity of the soils. Since the relationship between soil pH and added calcium hydroxide was approximately linear for all samples up to pH 6.5, the slope values of these linear relationships for all soils were regressed on the organic C and clay contents of the 136 soil samples using multiple linear regression. The equation that fit the data best was b (slope of pH vs. lime added) = 0.00029 - 0.00003 * % clay + 0.00135 * % O/C, r(exp 2) = 0.68. This equation was applied within geographic information system (GIS) software to create maps of soil pH buffering capacity for the three fields. When the mapped values of the pH buffering capacity were compared with measured values for a total of 18 locations in the three fields, there was good general agreement. A regression of directly measured pH buffering capacities on mapped pH buffering capacities at the field locations for these samples gave an r(exp 2) of 0.88 with a slope of 1.04 for a group of soils that varied approximately tenfold in their pH buffering capacities.

  4. Improved pH buffering agent for sodium hypochlorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, J. R.; Veeder, L. N.

    1969-01-01

    Sodium citrate/citric acid was found to be an effective buffer for pH control when used with sodium hypochlorite. The mixture does not corrode aluminum. The buffer appears to form a type of conversion coating that may provide corrosion-resistant properties to aluminum in other applications.

  5. Biochar contribution to soil pH buffer capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonutare, Tonu; Krebstein, Kadri; Utso, Maarius; Rodima, Ako; Kolli, Raimo; Shanskiy, Merrit

    2014-05-01

    Biochar as ecologically clean and stable form of carbon has complex of physical and chemical properties which make it a potentially powerful soil amendment (Mutezo, 2013). Therefore during the last decade the biochar application as soil amendment has been a matter for a great number of investigations. For the ecological viewpoint the trend of decreasing of soil organic matter in European agricultural land is a major problem. Society is faced with the task to find possibilities to stabilize or increase soil organic matter content in soil and quality. The availability of different functional groups (e.g. carboxylic, phenolic, acidic, alcoholic, amine, amide) allows soil organic matter to buffer over a wide range of soil pH values (Krull et al. 2004). Therefore the loss of soil organic matter also reduces cation exchange capacity resulting in lower nutrient retention (Kimetu et al. 2008). Biochar can retain elements in soil directly through the negative charge that develops on its surfaces, and this negative charge can buffer acidity in the soil. There are lack of investigations about the effect of biochar to soil pH buffering properties, The aim of our investigation was to investigate the changes in soil pH buffer capacity in a result of addition of carbonizated material to temperate region soils. In the experiment different kind of softwood biochars, activated carbon and different soil types with various organic matter and pH were used. The study soils were Albeluvisols, Leptosols, Cambisols, Regosols and Histosols . In the experiment the series of the soil: biochar mixtures with the biochar content 0 to 100% were used. The times of equiliberation between solid and liquid phase were from 1 to 168 hours. The suspension of soil: biochar mixtures was titrated with HCl solution. The titration curves were established and pH buffer capacities were calculated for the pH interval from 3.0 to 10.0. The results demonstrate the dependence of pH buffer capacity from soil type

  6. A temperature independent pH (TIP) buffer for biomedical biophysical applications at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Sieracki, Nathan A; Hwang, Hee Jung; Lee, Michelle K; Garner, Dewain K; Lu, Yi

    2008-02-21

    A temperature independent pH buffer has been developed from a combination of buffers of opposite-sign temperature coefficients, and utility in low temperature spectroscopy and storage of pH sensitive compounds is demonstrated.

  7. Characterization of discontinuous buffer junctions using pH indicators in capillary electrophoresis for protein preconcentration.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Kristina; Nesbitt, Chandra A; Yeung, Ken K-C

    2006-11-17

    An effective sample preconcentration technique for proteins and peptides was recently developed using capillary electrophoresis (CE) with discontinuous buffers [C.A. Nesbitt, J.T.-M. Lo, K.K.-C. Yeung, J. Chromatogr. A 1073 (2005) 175]. Two buffers of different pH created a junction to trap the sample molecules at their isoelectric points and resulted in over 1000-fold preconcentration for myoglobin within 30 min. To study the formation of pH junctions in CE, a pH indicator, bromothymol blue, is used in this work to reveal the pH changes at the discontinuous buffer boundary. Bromothymol blue (BTB) exhibits a drastic change in its visible absorption spectrum (300-600 nm) going from the acidic to basic pH conditions, and is therefore ideal for visualizing the changes in pH at the junctions created by various buffer combinations. Preconcentration of myoglobin was performed in discontinuous buffers containing BTB. Major differences in the BTB absorption profiles were identified from buffer systems that differ significantly in preconcentration performance, which in turn, allowed for the identification of ideal buffers for sample preconcentration. Up to 2000-fold preconcentrations of myoglobin were achieved in the buffer systems studied in this work. In addition, the role of the electroosmotic flow (EOF) on the preconcentration performance was investigated. A low EOF was found to be desirable, as the pH junction could stay longer in the capillary for accumulation of proteins. The pH junction also displayed characteristics to resist bandbroadening. Potential laminar flow resulted from the mismatched residual EOFs under the two pH conditions within the discontinuous buffers appeared to have minimal effect on the preconcentration. In fact, external applied pressure can be used to control the migration of the pH junction without compromising the protein preconcentration.

  8. Explanation for the enhanced dissolution of silica column packing in high pH phosphate and carbonate buffers.

    PubMed

    Tindall, G W; Perry, R L

    2003-02-28

    It has been reported that at high pH, the rate of bonded phase packing degradation in methanol/water mobile phases is greater for carbonate and phosphate buffers than for amine buffers. This conclusion was based on buffer pH determined in the aqueous buffer before dilution with methanol. Changes in buffer species pKa, and therefore buffer pH, upon methanol dilution are consistent with the observed degradation results. Measurements of pH in the methanol/water solutions confirm that the carbonate and phosphate buffers were considerably more basic than the amine buffer, even though all the buffers were pH 10 before dilution with methanol. These results demonstrate that it can be misleading to extrapolate aqueous pH data to partially aqueous solutions. Measurements of pH in the mixed solvent provide more reliable predictions of column and sample stability.

  9. Systematic generation of buffer systems for pH gradient ion exchange chromatography and their application.

    PubMed

    Kröner, Frieder; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2013-04-12

    pH gradient protein separations are widely used techniques in the field of protein analytics, of which isoelectric focusing is the most well known application. The chromatographic variant, based on the formation of pH gradients in ion exchange columns is only rarely applied due to the difficulties to form controllable, linear pH gradients over a broad pH range. This work describes a method for the systematic generation of buffer compositions with linear titration curves, resulting in well controllable pH gradients. To generate buffer compositions with linear titration curves an in silico method was successfully developed. With this tool, buffer compositions for pH gradient ion exchange chromatography with pH ranges spanning up to 7.5 pH units were established and successfully validated. Subsequently, the buffer systems were used to characterize the elution behavior of 22 different model proteins in cation and anion exchange pH gradient chromatography. The results of both chromatographic modes as well as isoelectric focusing were compared to describe differences in between the methods.

  10. Aluminum elution and precipitation in glass vials: effect of pH and buffer species.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Toru; Miyajima, Makoto; Wakiyama, Naoki; Terada, Katsuhide

    2015-02-01

    Inorganic extractables from glass vials may cause particle formation in the drug solution. In this study, the ability of eluting Al ion from borosilicate glass vials, and tendencies of precipitation containing Al were investigated using various pHs of phosphate, citrate, acetate and histidine buffer. Through heating, all of the buffers showed that Si and Al were eluted from glass vials in ratios almost the same as the composition of borosilicate glass, and the amounts of Al and Si from various buffer solutions at pH 7 were in the following order: citrate > phosphate > acetate > histidine. In addition, during storage after heating, the Al concentration at certain pHs of phosphate and acetate buffer solution decreased, suggesting the formation of particles containing Al. In citrate buffer, Al did not decrease in spite of the high elution amount. Considering that the solubility profile of aluminum oxide and the Al eluting profile of borosilicate glass were different, it is speculated that Al ion may be forced to leach into the buffer solution according to Si elution on the surface of glass vials. When Al ions were added to the buffer solutions, phosphate, acetate and histidine buffer showed a decrease of Al concentration during storage at a neutral range of pHs, indicating the formation of particles containing Al. In conclusion, it is suggested that phosphate buffer solution has higher possibility of forming particles containing Al than other buffer solutions.

  11. Pain reduction in local anesthetic administration through pH buffering.

    PubMed

    Christoph, R A; Buchanan, L; Begalla, K; Schwartz, S

    1988-02-01

    The effects of pH buffering on the pain of administration and efficacy of three local anesthetics (1% lidocaine, 1% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine, and 1% mepivacaine) were investigated in a randomized, prospective, double-blind study of 25 adult volunteers. Plain and buffered solutions of the three local anesthetics were prepared, and a 0.5 intradermal injection of each was administered. Pain of anesthetic infiltration was rated from zero to ten. The area of anesthetized skin surrounding each injection site was measured at time intervals following each injection. Buffering the local anesthetics significantly reduced the mean quantitative pain estimates compared to the nonbuffered controls: 1) 1% lidocaine compared with buffered 1% lidocaine, 4.9 +/- 0.4 versus 1.1 +/- 0.2 (P less than 10(-6)); 2) 1% lidocaine with epinephrine compared with buffered 1% lidocaine with epinephrine, 5.1 +/- 0.4 versus 1.8 +/- 0.4 (P less than 10(-6)); and 3) 1% mepivacaine compared with buffered 1% mepivacaine, 5.1 +/- 0.4 versus 0.9 +/- 0.2 (P less than 10(-6)). Onset, extent, and duration of skin anesthesia were not statistically altered by pH buffering. The pain of local anesthetic administration can be dramatically reduced by buffering the local anesthetic prior to its infiltration. Anesthetic efficacy is not compromised, and patient acceptance may be significantly increased.

  12. The potential effects of pH and buffering capacity on dental erosion.

    PubMed

    Owens, Barry M

    2007-01-01

    Soft drink pH (initial pH) has been shown to be a causative factor--but not necessarily the primary initiating factor--of dental erosion. The titratable acidity or buffering capacity has been acknowledged as playing a significant role in the etiology of these lesions. This in vitro study sought to evaluate five different soft drinks (Coca-Cola Classic, Diet Coke, Gatorade sports drink, Red Bull high-energy drink, Starbucks Frappucino coffee drink) and tap water (control) in terms of initial pH and buffering capacity. Initial pH was measured in triplicate for the six beverages. The buffering capacity of each beverage was assessed by measuring the weight (in grams) of 0.10 M sodium hydroxide necessary for titration to pH levels of 5.0, 6.0, 7.0, and 8.3. Coca-Cola Classic produced the lowest mean pH, while Starbucks Frappucino produced the highest pH of any of the drinks except for tap water. Based on statistical analysis using ANOVA and Fisher's post hoc tests at a P < 0.05 level of significance, Red Bull had the highest mean buffering capacity (indicating the strongest potential for erosion of enamel), followed by Gatorade, Coca-Cola Classic, Diet Coke, and Starbucks Frappucino.

  13. Physiological HEPES buffer proposed as a calibrator for pH measurement in human blood.

    PubMed

    Lang, W; Zander, R

    1999-05-01

    N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-piperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid, known as HEPES buffer, with pK in the physiological range was studied for use as an alternative to conventional phosphate buffer for the calibration of pH in modern clinical analyzers. In different series of aqueous equimolar HEPES buffer, pH was measured at 37 degrees C with a capillary glass electrode standardized previously using phosphate, and variations due to changes in total HEPES buffer concentration (0.025 to 0.320 mol/l), and NaCl (0 to 0.250 mol/l) were monitored. For 0.05 equimolar HEPES buffer without NaCl, the pH of 7.362+/-0.003 (n = 15) obtained coincided well with the reference pH (7.364) from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In particular, in the preferred 0.05 equimolar HEPES buffer/0.110 mol/l NaCl, which is isotonic to human plasma (0.160 mol/l), and termed physiological HEPES buffer (PHB), the pH of 7.346+/-0.003 (n = 84) can be related to the calculated corresponding reference pH from NIST without liquid junction (7.374), and is also compatible with the pH measured in normal arterial blood, pH = 7.403+/-0.003 (n = 20). Hence, in the two-point calibration of clinical analyzers, PHB, which is defined operationally with respect to the glass electrode and to phosphate buffer, may be useful as a calibrator in the range of buffer adjustment control to meet the correct values for pH when measuring in blood. Whereas Na-HEPES salt is hygroscopic and does not meet the declared purity grade (> 99%), pure HEPES acid is non-hygroscopic and conforms to the manufacturer's purity grade (> or = 99%). Therefore, for easy preparation of PHB, HEPES acid is the preferred starting material.

  14. The effect of pH and buffer concentration on anode biofilms of Thermincola ferriacetica.

    PubMed

    Lusk, Bradley G; Parameswaran, Prathap; Popat, Sudeep C; Rittmann, Bruce E; Torres, Cesar I

    2016-12-01

    We assessed the effects of pH and buffer concentration on current production and growth of biofilms of Thermincola ferriacetica - a thermophilic, Gram-positive, anode-respiring bacterium (ARB) - grown on anodes poised at a potential of -0.06V vs. SHE in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) at 60°C. T. ferriacetica generated current in the pH range of 5.2 to 8.3 with acetate as the electron donor and 50mM bicarbonate buffer. Maximum current density was reduced by ~80% at pH5.2 and ~14% at 7.0 compared to pH8.3. Increasing bicarbonate buffer concentrations from 10mM to 100mM resulted in an increase in the current density by 40±6%, from 6.8±1.1 to 11.2±2.7Am(-2), supporting that more buffer alleviated pH depression within T. ferriacetica biofilms. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) images indicated that higher bicarbonate buffer concentrations resulted in larger live biofilm thicknesses: from 68±20μm at 10mM bicarbonate to >150μm at 100mM, supporting that buffer availability was a strong influence on biofilm thickness. In comparison to mesophilic Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms, the faster transport rates at higher temperature and the ability to grow at relatively lower pH allowed T. ferriacetica to produce higher current densities with lower buffer concentrations.

  15. Influences of biochar addition on vegetable soil nitrogen balance and pH buffering capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y.; Odindo, AO; Xue, L.; Yang, L.

    2016-08-01

    Leaching is a major path for chemical nitrogen fertilizer loss from in vegetable soil, which would destroy soil pH buffering capacity soil and result in acidification. It has been a common phenomenon in Tai Lake Region, China. However, few study focused on the change soil pH buffering capacity, especially the effect of soil amendment on pH buffering capacity. In this study, a pot experiment was conducted to research the effects of biochar addition to a vegetable soil on nitrogen leaching and pH buffering capacity with pakchoi (B.chinensis L.) growth as the experimental crop. The results showed that biochar could significantly increase the pakchoi nitrogen utilization efficiency, decrease 48%-65% nitrogen loss from leaching under the urea continuous applied condition. Biochar also could effectively maintain the content of soil organic matter and base cations. Therefore, it rose up soil pH buffering capacity by 9.4%-36.8% and significantly slowed down acidification rate. It was suggested that 1%-2% addition ratio was recommended from this study when used as similar soil condition.

  16. Continuous-flow electrophoresis: Membrane-associated deviations of buffer pH and conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolka, A. J. K.; Mcguire, J. K.

    1978-01-01

    The deviations in buffer pH and conductivity which occur near the electrode membranes in continuous-flow electrophoresis were studied in the Beckman charged particle electrophoresis system and the Hanning FF-5 preparative electrophoresis instrument. The nature of the membranes separating the electrode compartments from the electrophoresis chamber, the electric field strength, and the flow rate of electrophoresis buffer were all found to influence the formation of the pH and conductivity gradients. Variations in electrode buffer flow rate and the time of electrophoresis were less important. The results obtained supported the hypothesis that a combination of Donnan membrane effects and the differing ionic mobilities in the electrophoresis buffer was responsible for the formation of the gradients. The significance of the results for the design and stable operation of continuous-flow electrophoresis apparatus was discussed.

  17. Buffering the aqueous phase pH in water-in-CO{sub 2} microemulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, J.D.; Ziegler, K.J.; Audriani, M.; Lee, C.T. Jr.; Bhargava, P.A.; Johnston, K.P.; Steytler, D.C.

    1999-07-08

    Water-in-oil (w/o) microemulsions have been exploited for use in a wide range of applications, including chemical and enzymatic reactions, protein and metal extraction, and the production of nanoparticles. Microemulsions are attractive systems for studying such applications because they have the ability to function as a universal solvent medium by solubilizing high concentrations of both polar and apolar molecules within their dispersed aqueous and continuous oil phases, respectively. The addition of organic and inorganic buffers to nanometer size water-in-CO{sub 2} microemulsion droplets stabilized by ammonium perfluoropolyether (PFPE-NH{sub 4}) results in an increase in pH from 3 to values of 5--7. The effects of temperature, pressure, buffer type, buffer concentration, ionic strength, and CO{sub 2} solubility on the pH inside water-in-CO{sub 2} microemulsions and on biphasic water-CO{sub 2} systems were measured by the hydrophilic indicator 4-nitrophenyl-2-sulfonate and were predicted accurately with thermodynamic models. In both systems, modest buffer loadings result in a steep pH jump from 2.5 pH units. Further increases in pH require large amounts of base to overcome buffering due to the carbonic acid-bicarbonate equilibrium. A pH approaching neutrality was obtained in w/c microemulsions with approximately 1.5 mol kg{sup {minus}1} NaOH. At high buffer loadings, the effects of temperature and pressure on pH values are negligible.

  18. pH and buffer capacities of apoplastic and cytoplasmic cell compartments in leaves.

    PubMed

    Oja; Savchenko; Jakob; Heber

    1999-08-12

    After opening the stomata in CO(2)-free air, darkened leaves of several plant species were titrated with CO(2) at concentrations between 1 and 16%, in air in order to reversibly decrease cellular pH values and to calculate buffer capacities from pH changes and bicarbonate accumulation using both gas-exchange and fluorescence methods for analysis. After equilibration with CO(2) for times ranging between 4.4 and 300 s, fast CO(2) release from bicarbonate indicated catalysis by highly active carbonic anhydrase. Its time constant was below 2.5 s. Additional CO(2) was released with time constants of about 5, 15 and approximately 300 s. With CO(2) as the acidifying agent, calculated buffer capacities depend on assumptions regarding initial pH in the absence of an acid load. At an initial stroma pH of 7.7, the stromal buffer capacity was about 20 mM pH-unit(-1 )in darkened spinach leaves. At an initial pH of 7.5 it would be only 12 mM pH-unit(-1), i.e. not higher than expected solely on the basis of known stromal concentrations of phosphate and phosphate esters, disregarding the contribution of other solutes. At a concentration of 16%, CO(2) reduced the stromal pH by about 1 pH unit. Buffering of the cytosol was measured by the CO(2)-dependent quenching of the fluorescence of pyranine which was fed to spinach leaves via the petiole. Brief exposures to high CO(2) minimized interference by effective cytosolic pH regulation. Cytosolic buffering appeared to be similar to or only somewhat higher than chloroplast buffering if the initial cytosolic pH was assumed to be 7.25, which is in accord with published cytosolic pH values. The difference from chloroplast pH values indicates the existence of a pH gradient across the chloroplast envelope even in darkened leaves. Apoplastic buffering was weak as measured by the CO(2)-dependent quenching of dextran-conjugated fluorescein isothiocyanate which was infiltrated together with sodium vanadate into potato leaves. In the absence of

  19. Influence of pH on heat resistance of Bacillus licheniformis in buffer and homogenised foods.

    PubMed

    Palop, A; Raso, J; Pagán, R; Condón, S; Sala, F J

    1996-02-01

    The influence of pH of heating menstruum (McIlvaine buffer) on the heat resistance of Bacillus licheniformis was investigated and compared with the heat resistance in homogenised tomato and asparagus at pH 7 and 4 in a wide range of temperatures. Heat resistance was in all mestrua smaller at acid pH. At 99 degrees C and pH 4, heat resistance was 1/20 lower than at pH 7. However, the magnitude of this effect decreased as heat treatment temperatures were increased almost disappearing at 120 degrees C. z values increased from 6.85 at pH 7, to 10.75 at pH 4. At 99 degrees C the effect of pH on heat resistance was constant along the range of pH's tested. The increase of one pH unit increased D99 by 180%. At pH 7 and 4, heat resistance was the same in buffer as in tomato and asparagus homogenates at all temperatures tested. The diminishing influence of the acidification of some foods on the heat resistance of B. licheniformis sterilisation temperatures should be taken into account when a raise in temperature is considered to shorten the duration of heat processes.

  20. Expanding pH screening space using multiple droplets with secondary buffers for protein crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen-Yan; Dong, Chen; Lu, Xiao-Li; Wang, Bei; He, Tian-Yuan; Yang, Rui-Zeng; Lin, Hua-Long; Yang, Xue-Zhou; Yin, Da-Chuan

    2017-04-01

    We have proposed a rational strategy for selecting a suitable pH of protein solution based on protein biochemical properties. However, it is difficult to use this strategy for biochemical properties unknown proteins. In this paper, a simpler and faster pH buffer strategy was proposed. An additional pH-controlling buffer was added to crystallization droplet mixed with protein solution and commercial crystallization reagents to adjust its pH. The results revealed that protein crystallization success rates were enhanced by this strategy due to expansion of the pH screening space, which was closely related with protein solubility. Thus, the possibility of reaching supersaturation was increased by using this strategy.

  1. Oxygen permeability of soft contact lenses in different pH, osmolality and buffering solution

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Se Eun; Kim, So Ra; Park, Mijung

    2015-01-01

    AIM To determine the effect of pH, osmolality, and buffering system on the oxygen permeability (Dk) of soft contact lenses. METHODS Two hydrogel lenses (nelfilcon A and etafilcon A) and 2 silicone hydrogel lenses (lotrafilcon A and balafilcon A) were used in the study. These lenses were incubated in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and borate-buffered saline (BBS) solutions adjusted by 0.8 pH increments to a pH in the range of 5.8-9.0 or in hypotonic (280 mOsmol/kg), isotonic (310 mOsmol/kg) and hypertonic (380 mOsmol/kg) PBS solutions. Polarographic method was used for measuring the Dk and lenses were stacked as 4 layers to correct the boundary effect. RESULTS Dk values of all contact lenses measured in BBS solutions were more stable than those in PBS solutions. Especially the etafilcon A lens showed a relative big change compared with other types of contact lenses at the same conditions. When the osmolality of PBS solution increased from hypotonic to hypertonic, Dk of all contact lenses decreased. Variations in Dk existed depending on lens materials, etafilcon A lens was the most affected and nelfilcon A was the least affected by osmolality. CONCLUSION From the result obtained, it is revealed that Dk of contact lenses is changed by the pH, osmolality, and buffering condition of tear. Thus, Dk of contact lens can be varied by the lens wearers' physiological and/or pathological conditions. PMID:26558223

  2. Matching phosphate and maleate buffer systems for dissolution of weak acids: Equivalence in terms of buffer capacity of bulk solution or surface pH?

    PubMed

    Cristofoletti, Rodrigo; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2016-06-01

    The development of in vitro dissolution tests able to anticipate the in vivo fate of drug products has challenged pharmaceutical scientists over time, especially in the case of ionizable compounds. In the seminal model proposed by Mooney et al. thirty-five years ago, the pH at the solid-liquid interface (pH0) was identified as a key parameter in predicting dissolution rate. In the current work it is demonstrated that the in vitro dissolution of the weak acid ibuprofen in maleate and phosphate buffer systems is a function of the pH0, which in turn is affected by properties of the drug and the medium. The reported pH0 for ibuprofen dissolution in bicarbonate buffer, the predominant buffer species in the human small intestine under fasting conditions, can be achieved by reducing the phosphate buffer concentration to 5.0mM or the maleate buffer concentration to 2.2mM. Using this approach to identify the appropriate buffer/buffer capacity combination for in vitro experiments in FaSSIF-type media, it would be possible to increase the physiological relevance of this important biopharmaceutics tool. However, the necessity of monitoring and adjusting the bulk pH during the experiments carried out in 5.0mM phosphate or 2.2mM maleate buffers must also be taken into consideration.

  3. pH buffers for sea water media based on the total hydrogen ion concentration scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Andrew G.

    1993-01-01

    Published e.m.f. values measured using the cell ? where p° = 101.325 kPa, and BH + and B are the conjugate acid-base pairs of 2-aminopyridine, 2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-propanediol (tris), tetrahydro-1,4-isoxazine (morpholine), and 2-amino-2-methyl-1, 3-propanediol (bis), have been re-evaluated to assign pH values based on the "total" hydrogen ion concentration scale to equimolal ( m =0.04 mol kg -1) buffer solutions based on these compounds. These pH values are consistent with the best available equilibrium constants for acid-base processes in sea water and such pH buffers can be used as pH calibration standards to measure accurate values for oceanic pH on the "total" hydrogen ion pH scale. In addition, the published e.m.f. results for these various amine bases have been used to calculate their respective acidity constants on this pH scale.

  4. Charge-Neutral Constant pH Molecular Dynamics Simulations Using a Parsimonious Proton Buffer.

    PubMed

    Donnini, Serena; Ullmann, R Thomas; Groenhof, Gerrit; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2016-03-08

    In constant pH molecular dynamics simulations, the protonation states of titratable sites can respond to changes of the pH and of their electrostatic environment. Consequently, the number of protons bound to the biomolecule, and therefore the overall charge of the system, fluctuates during the simulation. To avoid artifacts associated with a non-neutral simulation system, we introduce an approach to maintain neutrality of the simulation box in constant pH molecular dynamics simulations, while maintaining an accurate description of all protonation fluctuations. Specifically, we introduce a proton buffer that, like a buffer in experiment, can exchange protons with the biomolecule enabling its charge to fluctuate. To keep the total charge of the system constant, the uptake and release of protons by the buffer are coupled to the titration of the biomolecule with a constraint. We find that, because the fluctuation of the total charge (number of protons) of a typical biomolecule is much smaller than the number of titratable sites of the biomolecule, the number of buffer sites required to maintain overall charge neutrality without compromising the charge fluctuations of the biomolecule, is typically much smaller than the number of titratable sites, implying markedly enhanced simulation and sampling efficiency.

  5. Asparagine deamidation dependence on buffer type, pH, and temperature.

    PubMed

    Pace, Amanda L; Wong, Rita L; Zhang, Yonghua Taylor; Kao, Yung-Hsiang; Wang, Y John

    2013-06-01

    The deamidation of asparagine into aspartate and isoaspartate moieties is a major pathway for the chemical degradation of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). It can affect the shelf life of a therapeutic antibody that is not formulated or stored appropriately. A new approach to detect deamidation using ion exchange chromatography was developed that separates papain-digested mAbs into Fc and Fab fragments. From this, deamidation rates of each fragment can be calculated. To generate kinetic parameters useful in setting shelf life, buffers prepared at room temperature and then placed at the appropriate stability temperatures. Solution pH was not adjusted to the same at different temperatures. Deamidation rate at 40°C was faster in acidic buffers than in basic buffers. However, this trend is reversed at 5°C, attributed to the change in hydroxide ion concentration influenced by buffer and temperature. The apparent activation energy was higher for rates generated in an acidic buffer than in a basic buffer. The rate-pH profile for mAb1 can be deconvoluted to Fc and Fab. The Fc deamidation showed a V-shaped profile: deamidation of PENNY peptide is responsible for the rate at high-pH, whereas deamidation of a new site, Asn323, may be responsible for the rate at low-pH. The profile for Fab is a straight line without curvature.

  6. Zinc(II) complexation by some biologically relevant pH buffers.

    PubMed

    Wyrzykowski, D; Tesmar, A; Jacewicz, D; Pranczk, J; Chmurzyński, L

    2014-12-01

    The isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) technique supported by potentiometric titration data was used to study the interaction of zinc ions with pH buffer substances, namely 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (Mes), piperazine-N,N'-bis(2-ethanesulfonic acid) (Pipes), and dimethylarsenic acid (Caco). The displacement ITC titration method with nitrilotriacetic acid as a strong, competitive ligand was applied to determine conditional-independent thermodynamic parameters for the binding of Zn(II) to Mes, Pipes, and Caco. Furthermore, the relationship between the proposed coordination mode of the buffers and the binding enthalpy has been discussed.

  7. Application of Acetate Buffer in pH Adjustment of Mash and its Influence on Fuel Ethanol Fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 2M sodium acetate buffer at pH 4.2 was used to adjust pH of liquefied mashes in a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) procedure. Although 5 mL of the buffer did not bring the pH values of the mashes (~100 mL) from a sorghum hybrid to 4.2, it kept the system stable (pH from 4.7 to ...

  8. Secular decline of seawater calcium increases seawater buffering and pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hain, M.; Sigman, D. M.; Higgins, J. A.; Haug, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    Reconstructed changes in seawater calcium and magnesium concentration ([Ca2+], [Mg2+]) predictably affect the ocean's acid/base and carbon chemistry. Yet inaccurate formulations of chemical equilibrium "constants" are currently in use to account for these changes. Here we develop an efficient implementation of the MIAMI Ionic Interaction Model (Millero and Pierrot, 1998) to predict all chemical equilibrium constants required for carbon chemistry calculations under variable [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] (Hain et al., 2015). We investigate the impact of [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] on the relationships among the ocean's pH, CO2, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), saturation state of CaCO3 (Ω), and buffer capacity. Increasing [Ca2+] and/or [Mg2+] enhances "ion pairing," which increases seawater buffering by increasing the concentration ratio of total to "free" (uncomplexed) carbonate ion. An increase in [Ca2+], however, also causes a decline in carbonate ion to maintain a given Ω, thereby overwhelming the ion pairing effect and decreasing seawater buffering. Given the reconstructions of Eocene [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] ([Ca2+]~20mM; [Mg2+]~30 mM), Eocene seawater would have required essentially the same DIC as today to simultaneously explain a similar-to-modern Ω and the estimated Eocene atmospheric CO2 of ~1000 ppm. During the Cretaceous, at ~4 times modern [Ca2+], ocean buffering would have been at a minimum. Overall, during times of high seawater [Ca2+], CaCO3 saturation, pH, and atmospheric CO2 were more susceptible to perturbations of the global carbon cycle. For example, given both Eocene and Cretaceous seawater [Ca2+] and [Mg2+], a doubling of atmospheric CO2 would require less carbon addition to the ocean/atmosphere system than under modern seawater composition. Moreover, increase in seawater buffering since the Cretaceous may have been a driver of evolution by raising energetic demands of biologically controlled calcification and CO2 concentration mechanisms that aid photosynthesis.

  9. Key comparison on pH of an unknown phosphate buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastkowski, F.; Spitzer, P.; Sander, B.; Máriássy, M.; Dimitrova, L.; Reyes, A.; Rodríguez, A.; Manzano, V. Lara; Vospelova, A.; Jakobsen, P. T.; Pawlina, M.; Korol, M.; Kozlowski, W.; Delgado, M.; Ticona Canaza, G.; Dias, J. C.; Gonzaga, F. B.; Nagyné Szilágyi, Z.; Jakusovszky, B.; Nongluck, T.; Waters, J.; Pratt, K. W.; Asakai, T.; Maksimov, I.; Hankova, Z.; Uysal, E.; Gavrilkin, V.; Prokunin, S. V.; Ferreira, E.; Fajardo, S.

    2016-01-01

    Results of CCQM-K99 key comparison on unknown phosphate buffer pH ~ 7.5 at 5 °C, 15 °C, 25 °C, 37 °C and 50 °C are reported. Good agreement is found between the majority of participants. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  10. Effect of glycine on pH changes and protein stability during freeze-thawing in phosphate buffer systems.

    PubMed

    Pikal-Cleland, Katherine A; Cleland, Jeffrey L; Anchordoquy, Thomas J; Carpenter, John F

    2002-09-01

    Previous studies have established that the selective precipitation of a less soluble buffer component during freezing can induce a significant pH shift in the freeze concentrate. During freezing of sodium phosphate solutions, crystallization of the disodium salt can produce a pH decrease as great as 3 pH units which can dramatically affect protein stability. The objective of our study was to determine how the presence of glycine (0-500 mM), a commonly used bulking agent in pharmaceutical protein formulations, affects the pH changes normally observed during freezing in sodium phosphate buffer solutions and to determine whether these pH changes contribute to instability of model proteins in glycine/phosphate formulations. During freezing in sodium phosphate buffers, the presence of glycine significantly influenced the pH. Glycine at the lower concentrations (< or = 50 mM) suppressed the pH decrease normally observed during freezing in 10 and 100 mM sodium phosphate buffer, possibly by reducing the nucleation rate of salt and thereby decreasing the extent of buffer salt crystallization. The presence of glycine at higher concentration (> 100 mM) in the sodium phosphate buffer resulted in a more complete crystallization of the disodium salt as indicated by the frozen pH values closer to the equilibrium value (pH 3.6). Although high concentrations of glycine can facilitate more buffer salt crystallization and these pH shifts may prove to be potentially damaging to the protein, glycine, in its amorphous state, can also act to stabilize a protein via the preferential exclusion mechanism.

  11. Evaluation of buffers toxicity in tobacco cells: Homopiperazine-1,4-bis (2-ethanesulfonic acid) is a suitable buffer for plant cells studies at low pH.

    PubMed

    Borgo, Lucélia

    2017-03-19

    Low pH is an important environmental stressor of plant root cells. Understanding the mechanisms of stress and tolerance to acidity is critical; however, there is no widely accepted pH buffer for studies of plant cells at low pH. Such a buffer might also benefit studies of Al toxicity, in which buffering at low pH is also important. The challenge is to find a buffer with minimal cellular effects. We examined the cytotoxicity and possible metabolic disturbances of four buffers that have adequate pKa values and potential use for studies in the pH range of 4.0-5.0. These were homopipes (homopiperazine-1,4-bis (2-ethanesulfonic acid); pKa1 4.4), 3,3-dimethylglutaric acid (pKa1 3.73), β-alanine (pKa1 3.70) and potassium biphthalate (pKa1 2.95; pKa2 5.41). First, tobacco BY-2 cells were grown in a rich medium containing 10 mM of each buffer or MES (2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid) as a control, with the pH initially adjusted to 5.7. β-alanine was clearly toxic and dimethylgluturate and biphthalate were found to be cytostatic, in which no culture growth occurred but cell viability was either unaffected or decreased only after 5 days. Only homopipes allowed normal culture growth and cell viability. Homopipes (10 mM) was then tested in cell cultures with an initial pH of 4.3 ± 0.17 in minimal medium to examine whether its undissociated species (H2A) displayed any cellular effects and no cytotoxic effects were observed. It is possible to conclude that among tested buffers, homopipes is the most suitable for studies at low pH, and may be especially useful for aluminum toxicity experiments.

  12. Removal of sample background buffering ions and myoglobin enrichment via a pH junction created by discontinuous buffers in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Booker, Christina J; Sun, Samuel; Woolsey, Sarah; Mejia, Jose S; Yeung, Ken K-C

    2011-08-19

    Traditional CE sample stacking is ineffective for samples containing a high concentration of salt and/or buffer. We recently reported the use of a discontinuous buffer system for protein enrichment that was applicable to samples containing millimolar concentrations of salt. In this paper, the technique was investigated for samples containing unwanted buffering ions, including TRIS, MES, and phosphate, which are commonly used in biological sample preparation. Using myoglobin as a model protein, the results demonstrated that background buffering ions can be effectively removed or separated from the enriched protein. The key is to use either the acid or the base of the discontinuous buffers to adjust the pH of the sample, such that the net charge of the unwanted buffering ions is near-zero. The successful isolation and enrichment of myoglobin from up to 100 mM TRIS and 50 mM MES was demonstrated. The enrichment factors remained at approximately 200. Removal of phosphate was more challenging because its net charge was anionic in both the acid and the base of the discontinuous buffers. The enrichment was only achievable up to 30 mM of sodium phosphate, the enrichment factors observed were significantly lower, below 50, and the process was delayed due to the higher ionic strength resulted from phosphate. The migration of phosphate during enrichment was studied using a UV-absorbing analogue, phenyl phosphate. In addition, Simul 5.0 was used to simulate the discontinuous buffers in the absence and presence of TRIS and phosphate. The stimulated TRIS and phosphate concentration profiles were generally in agreement with the experimental results. The simulation also provided a better understanding on the effect of phosphate on the formation of the pH junction.

  13. Pain perception with pH buffered peribulbar anaesthesia: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Minasian, M.; Ionides, A.; Fernando, R.; Davey, C.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To determine the relation between pH of anaesthetic solutions and patient perception of pain with peribulbar injection of local anaesthesia.
METHODS—This prospective randomised controlled double blind pilot study involved 60 consecutive patients who received a peribulbar block with either a standard acidic local anaesthetic of 5 ml 2% lignocaine and 5 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine (solution A), or an alkalinised solution composed of the same anaesthetic agents but with a pH of 7.44 (solution B). Before surgery patients were asked to grade the pain of both the preoperative dilating drops and the peribulbar injection using a visual analogue scale.
RESULTS—The mean pain scores were similar in the two treatment groups—slightly higher (4.97) in group B who received the buffered solution, compared with group A (4.84) who received the plain solution. The small difference (−0.13, 95% confidence limits −1.6 and +1.3) was not significant. There was, however, a highly significant association between pain threshold ("drop pain") and injection pain levels (p<0.0001).
CONCLUSION—This study showed no difference in the reduction in the pain experienced by patients undergoing peribulbar anaesthesia with pH buffered local anaesthetic. The study suggests the importance of "pain threshold" as a confounder and also showed the considerable pain felt by some patients on instillation of the preoperative dilating drops.

 PMID:10966962

  14. Extracellular ATP Hydrolysis Inhibits Synaptic Transmission by Increasing pH Buffering in the Synaptic Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Vroman, Rozan; Klaassen, Lauw J.; Howlett, Marcus H.C.; Cenedese, Valentina; Klooster, Jan; Sjoerdsma, Trijntje; Kamermans, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal computations strongly depend on inhibitory interactions. One such example occurs at the first retinal synapse, where horizontal cells inhibit photoreceptors. This interaction generates the center/surround organization of bipolar cell receptive fields and is crucial for contrast enhancement. Despite its essential role in vision, the underlying synaptic mechanism has puzzled the neuroscience community for decades. Two competing hypotheses are currently considered: an ephaptic and a proton-mediated mechanism. Here we show that horizontal cells feed back to photoreceptors via an unexpected synthesis of the two. The first one is a very fast ephaptic mechanism that has no synaptic delay, making it one of the fastest inhibitory synapses known. The second one is a relatively slow (τ≈200 ms), highly intriguing mechanism. It depends on ATP release via Pannexin 1 channels located on horizontal cell dendrites invaginating the cone synaptic terminal. The ecto-ATPase NTPDase1 hydrolyses extracellular ATP to AMP, phosphate groups, and protons. The phosphate groups and protons form a pH buffer with a pKa of 7.2, which keeps the pH in the synaptic cleft relatively acidic. This inhibits the cone Ca2+ channels and consequently reduces the glutamate release by the cones. When horizontal cells hyperpolarize, the pannexin 1 channels decrease their conductance, the ATP release decreases, and the formation of the pH buffer reduces. The resulting alkalization in the synaptic cleft consequently increases cone glutamate release. Surprisingly, the hydrolysis of ATP instead of ATP itself mediates the synaptic modulation. Our results not only solve longstanding issues regarding horizontal cell to photoreceptor feedback, they also demonstrate a new form of synaptic modulation. Because pannexin 1 channels and ecto-ATPases are strongly expressed in the nervous system and pannexin 1 function is implicated in synaptic plasticity, we anticipate that this novel form of synaptic modulation

  15. [Relationship between blood glucose levels and salivary pH and buffering capacity in type II diabetes patients].

    PubMed

    Elkafri, I H; Mashlah, A; Shaqifa, A

    2014-03-13

    This study was evaluated the relationship between blood glucose levels and salivary pH and buffering capacity in type II diabetic patients. The sample comprised 210 participants (age ranged 40-60 years). Based on fasting blood glucose levels the participants were divided into 3 groups: controls with normal blood glucose levels; diabetic patients with levels ≤ 200 mg/dL; and diabetic patients with levels > 200 mg/dL. Salivary pH and buffering capacity were determined in a sample of resting (non-stimulated) saliva taken from each participant. Salivary pH levels in diabetic patients with blood glucose levels > 200 mg/dL were lower than in the controls and diabetic patients with levels ≤ 200 mg/dL. Salivary pH levels were comparable in controls and diabetic patients with blood glucose levels ≤ 200 mg/dL. Salivary buffering capacity in the 3 groups was comparable.

  16. [Soil pH buffer capacity of tea garden with different planting years].

    PubMed

    Su, You-Jian; Wang, Ye-Jun; Zhang, Yong-Li; Luo, Yi; Sun, Li; Song, Li; Liao, Wan-You

    2014-10-01

    In order to investigate the effects of long-term tea planting on soil pH buffer capacity (pHBC), the variation of pHBC and its influence factors were investigated in tea gardens of 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 years in Langxi and Qimen of Anhui Province. The results showed that the acid-base titration method was suitable for the determination of soil pHBC of tea gardens. The amount of acid-base added had approximate linear relationship with soil pH value in specific section (pH 4.0-6.0) of acid-base titration curves, so the soil pHBC could be calculated by linear regression equation. Soil pHBC in the tea gardens from the two regions showed a downward trend with increasing the planting years, which decreased at rates of 0.10 and 0.06 mmol · kg(-1) · a(-1) in Langxi and Qimen tea gardens, respectively. Soil pHBC had significant positive correlation with CEC, soil organic matter, base saturation and physical clay content, and significant negative correlation with exchangeable acid and exchange H+.

  17. Effects of pH and buffer concentration on the thermal stability of etanercept using DSC and DLS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Ah; An, In Bok; Lim, Dae Gon; Lim, Jun Yeul; Lee, Sang Yeol; Shim, Woo Sun; Kang, Nae-Gyu; Jeong, Seong Hoon

    2014-01-01

    The protein size, electrical interaction, and conformational stability of etanercept (marketed as Enbrel®) were examined by thermodynamic and light scattering methods with changing pH and buffer concentration. As pH of etanercept increased from pH 6.6 to 8.6, electrical repulsion in the solution increased, inducing a decrease in protein size. However, the size changed less in high buffer concentration and irreversible aggregation issues were not observed; in contrast, aggregates of about 1000 nm were observed in low buffer concentration at the pH range. Three significant unfolding transitions (Tm) were observed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Unlikely to Tm1, Tm2 and Tm3 were increased as the pH increased. Higher Tm at high buffer concentration was observed, indicating increased conformational stability. The apparent activation energy of unfolding was further investigated since continuous increase of Tm2 and Tm3 was not sufficient to determine optimal conditions. A higher energy barrier was calculated at Tm2 than at Tm3. In addition, the energy barriers were the highest at pH from 7.4 to 7.8 where higher Tm1 was also observed. Therefore, the conformational stability of protein solution significantly changed with pH dependent steric repulsion of neighboring protein molecules. An optimized pH range was obtained that satisfied the stability of all three domains. Electrostatic circumstances and structural interactions resulted in irreversible aggregation at low buffer concentrations and were suppressed by increasing the concentration. Therefore, increased buffer concentration is recommended during protein formulation development, even in the earlier stages of investigation, to avoid protein instability issues.

  18. Decomposition kinetics of peroxynitrite: influence of pH and buffer.

    PubMed

    Molina, Christian; Kissner, Reinhard; Koppenol, Willem H

    2013-07-21

    The decay of ONOOH near neutral pH has been examined as a function of isomerization to H(+) and NO3(-), and decomposition to NO2(-) and O2via O2NOO(-). We find that in phosphate buffer k(isomerization) = 1.11 ± 0.01 s(-1) and k(disproportionation) = (1.3 ± 0.1) × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1) at 25 °C and I = 0.2 M. In the presence of 0.1 M tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris), the decay proceeds more rapidly: k(disproportionation) = 9 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1). The measured first half-life of the absorbance of peroxynitrite correlates with [Tris]0·([ONOO(-)]0 + [ONOOH]0)(2), where the subscript 0 indicates initial concentrations; if this function exceeds 6.3 × 10(-12) M(3), then Tris significantly accelerates the decomposition of peroxynitrite.

  19. Report of the key comparison APMP.QM-K19. APMP comparison on pH measurement of borate buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hioki, Akiharu; Asakai, Toshiaki; Maksimov, Igor; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Miura, Tsutomu; Obromsook, Krairerk; Tangpaisarnkul, Nongluck; Rodruangthum, Patumporn; Wong, Siu-Kay; Lam, Wai-Hing; Zakaria, Osman; Anuar Mohd. Amin, Khirul; Thanh, Ngo Huy; Máriássy, Michal; Vyskocil, Leos; Hankova, Zuzana; Fisicaro, Paola; Stoica, Daniela; Singh, Nahar; Soni, Daya; Ticona Canaza, Galia; Kutovoy, Viatcheslav; Barbieri Gonzaga, Fabiano; Dias, Júlio Cesar; Vospelova, Alena; Bakovets, Nickolay; Zhanasbayeva, Bibinur

    2015-01-01

    The APMP.QM-K19 was organised by TCQM of APMP to test the abilities of the national metrology institutes in the APMP region to measure a pH value of a borate buffer. This APMP comparison on pH measurement was proposed by the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) and the National Institute of Metrology (Thailand) (NIMT) at the APMP-TCQM meeting held 26-27 November 2012. After approval by TCQM, the comparison has been conducted by NMIJ and NIMT. The comparison is a key comparison following CCQM-K19 and CCQM-K19.1. The comparison material was a borate buffer of pH around 9.2 and the measurement temperatures were 15 °C, 25 °C and 37 °C. This is the second APMP key comparison on pH measurement and the fourth APMP comparison on pH measurement following APMP.QM-P06 (two phosphate buffers) in 2004, APMP.QM-P09 (a phthalate buffer) in 2006 and APMP.QM-K9/APMP.QM-P16 (a phosphate buffer) in 2010-2011. The results can be used further by any participant to support its CMC claim at least for a borate buffer. That claim will concern the pH method employed by the participant during this comparison and will cover the used temperature(s) or the full temperature range between 15°C and 37 °C for the participant which measured pH values at the three temperatures. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  20. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence of tris(2,2' bipyridine)ruthenium(II) using common biological buffers as co-reactant, pH buffer and supporting electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Noah; Francis, Paul S; Barbante, Gregory J; Hogan, Conor F

    2015-11-07

    A series of aliphatic tertiary amines (HEPES, POPSO, EPPS and BIS-TRIS) commonly used to buffer the pH in biological experiments, were examined as alternative, non-toxic co-reactants for the electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(ii) ([Ru(bpy)3](2+)). These were found to be very attractive as "multi-tasking" reagents, serving not only as co-reactants, but also fulfiling the roles of pH buffer and supporting electrolyte within an aqueous environment; thus significantly simplifying the overall ECL analysis. Sub-nanomolar detection limits were obtained for [Ru(bpy)3](2+) in the presence of BIS-TRIS, making this species an valuable option for co-reactant ECL-based bioanalytical applications.

  1. Influence of pH on heat resistance of spores of Bacillus coagulans in buffer and homogenized foods.

    PubMed

    Palop, A; Raso, J; Pagán, R; Condón, S; Sala, F J

    1999-02-18

    The influence of pH of heating menstruum (McIlvaine buffer) on the heat resistance of Bacillus coagulans spores has been investigated and compared with the heat resistance in homogenized tomato and asparagus at pH 7 and 4 at a wide range of temperatures. Spores were less heat resistant in all menstrua at acid pH. The magnitude of this effect was greatest at the lowest heating temperatures tested. z values in buffer increased from 8.9 degrees C at pH 7 to 10.5 degrees C at pH 4. pH of menstrua was the main influencing factor, but media composition also influenced heat resistance: at pH 7 heat resistance was similar in all menstrua (D111 degrees C = 1.6 min) but at pH 4 the heat resistance in homogenized foods (D111 degrees C = 0.26 min in tomato and D111 degrees C = 0.28 min in asparagus) was lower than in buffer (D111 degrees C = 0.49 min). The reduced influence of the acidification of media on the heat resistance of B. coagulans at higher temperatures should be taken into account when a rise in the temperature of treatment for canned vegetables is considered to shorten duration of heat processes.

  2. Reaction of nerve agents with phosphate buffer at pH 7.

    PubMed

    Creasy, William R; Fry, Roderick A; McGarvey, David J

    2012-07-12

    Chemical weapon nerve agents, including isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate (GB or Sarin), pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate (GD or Soman), and S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) O-ethyl methylphosphonothioate (VX), are slow to react in aqueous solutions at midrange pH levels. The nerve agent reactivity increases in phosphate buffer at pH 7, relative to distilled water or acetate buffer. Reactions were studied using (31)P NMR. Phosphate causes faster reaction to the corresponding alkyl methylphosphonic acids, and produces a mixed phosphate/phosphonate compound as an intermediate reaction product. GB has the fastest reaction rate, with a bimolecular rate constant of 4.6 × 10(-3) M(-1)s(-1)[PO(4)(3-)]. The molar product branching ratio of GB acid to the pyro product (isopropyl methylphosphonate phosphate anhydride) is 1:1.4, independent of phosphate concentration, and the pyro product continues to react much slower to form GB acid. The pyro product has two doublets in the (31)P NMR spectrum. The rate of reaction for GD is slower than GB, with a rate constant of 1.26 × 10(-3) M(-1)s(-1) [PO(4)(3-)]. The rate for VX is considerably slower, with a rate constant of 1.39 × 10(-5) M(-1)s(-1) [PO(4)(3-)], about 2 orders of magnitude slower than the rate for GD. The rate constant of the reaction of GD with pyrophosphate at pH 8 is 2.04 × 10(-3) min(-1) at a concentration of 0.0145 M. The rate of reaction for diisopropyl fluorophosphate is 2.84 × 10(-3) min(-1) at a concentration of 0.153 M phosphate, a factor of 4 slower than GD and a factor of 15 slower than GB, and there is no detectable pyro product. The half-lives of secondary reaction of the GB pyro product in 0.153 and 0.046 M solution of phosphate are 23.8 and 28.0 h, respectively, which indicates little or no dependence on phosphate.

  3. Application of acetate buffer in pH adjustment of sorghum mash and its influence on fuel ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Renyong; Bean, Scott R; Crozier-Dodson, Beth Ann; Fung, Daniel Y C; Wang, Donghai

    2009-01-01

    A 2 M sodium acetate buffer at pH 4.2 was tried to simplify the step of pH adjustment in a laboratory dry-grind procedure. Ethanol yields or conversion efficiencies of 18 sorghum hybrids improved significantly with 2.0-5.9% (3.9% on average) of relative increases when the method of pH adjustment changed from traditional HCl to the acetate buffer. Ethanol yields obtained using the two methods were highly correlated (R (2) = 0.96, P < 0.0001), indicating that the acetate buffer did not influence resolution of the procedure to differentiate sorghum hybrids varying in fermentation quality. Acetate retarded the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but did not affect the overall fermentation rate. With 41-47 mM of undissociated acetic acid in mash of a sorghum hybrid at pH 4.7, rates of glucose consumption and ethanol production were inhibited during exponential phase but promoted during stationary phase. The maximum growth rate constants (mu(max)) were 0.42 and 0.32 h(-1) for cells grown in mashes with pH adjusted by HCl and the acetate buffer, respectively. Viable cell counts of yeast in mashes with pH adjusted by the acetate buffer were 36% lower than those in mashes adjusted by HCl during stationary phase. Coupled to a 5.3% relative increase in ethanol, a 43.6% relative decrease in glycerol was observed, when the acetate buffer was substituted for HCl. Acetate helped to transfer glucose to ethanol more efficiently. The strain tested did not use acetic acid as carbon source. It was suggested that decreased levels of ATP under acetate stress stimulate glycolysis to ethanol formation, increasing its yield at the expense of biomass and glycerol production.

  4. Optimizing buffering chemistry to maintain near neutral pH of broiler feed during pre-enrichment for Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Berrang, M E; Cosby, D E; Cox, N A; Cason, J A; Richardson, K E

    2015-12-01

    Salmonella is a human pathogen that can accompany live broilers to the slaughter plant, contaminating fully processed carcasses. Feed is one potential source of Salmonella to growing broilers. Monitoring feed for the presence of Salmonella is part of good agricultural practice. The first step in culturing feed for Salmonella (which may be at low numbers and sub-lethally stressed) is to add it to a pre-enrichment broth which is incubated for 24 h. During the course of pre-enrichment, extraneous bacteria metabolize carbohydrates in some feed and excrete acidic byproducts, causing the pH to drop dramatically. An acidic pre-enrichment pH can injure or kill Salmonella resulting in a failure to detect, even if it is present and available to infect chickens. The objective of this study was to test an array of buffering chemistries to prevent formation of an injurious acidic environment during pre-enrichment of feed in peptone water. Five grams of feed were added to 45 mL of peptone water buffered with carbonate, Tris pH 8, and phosphate buffering ingredients individually and in combination. Feed was subjected to a pre-enrichment at 35°C for 24 h; pH was measured at 0, 18, and 24 h. Standard phosphate buffering ingredients at concentrations up to 4 times the normal formulation were unable to fully prevent acidic conditions. Likewise, carbonate and Tris pH 8 were not fully effective. The combination of phosphate, carbonate, and Tris pH 8 was the most effective buffer tested. It is recommended that a highly buffered pre-enrichment broth be used to examine feed for the presence of Salmonella.

  5. The formation of stable pH gradients with weak monovalent buffers for isoelectric focusing in free solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, Richard A.; Thormann, Wolfgang; Graham, Aly; Bier, Milan

    1985-01-01

    Two methods which utilize simple buffers for the generation of stable pH gradients (useful for preparative isoelectric focusing) are compared and contrasted. The first employs preformed gradients comprised of two simple buffers in density-stabilized free solution. The second method utilizes neutral membranes to isolate electrolyte reservoirs of constant composition from the separation column. It is shown by computer simulation that steady-state gradients can be formed at any pH range with any number of components in such a system.

  6. The effects of extracellular pH and buffer concentration on the efflux of lactate from frog sartorius muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mainwood, G. W.; Worsley-Brown, Pauline

    1975-01-01

    1. The rate of efflux of lactate from isolated frog sartorius muscles is measured with a superfusion technique. Efflux curves are followed after raising the internal lactate level of the muscles by repetitive electrical stimulation over a 200 sec period. 2. With an external pH of 7·0 or below the measured efflux rates following stimulation reach 100-150 n-mole/g.min. Increasing the pH of the superfusion fluid to 8·0 results in a two or threefold increase in the peak efflux rate. The effect is independent of the buffer system used and occurs fairly rapidly when the pH of the superfusion fluid is changed. This suggests that the effect of pH on lactate efflux is extracellular. 3. The increase in efflux rate due to an increase in pH is dependent on buffer concentration. This fact together with measurements of surface pH changes in muscles following arrest of superfusion indicates that a pH gradient exists through the muscle thickness during lactate efflux. 4. The low lactate efflux rate seen at a low buffer concentration (1 mM) is reduced to an even lower level by depolarization with potassium sulphate suggesting a membrane potential dependent component. At pH 8·0 with a high buffer concentration (25 mM) potassium sulphate only reduces efflux rate slightly. The observations are interpreted as indicating that a fraction of lactate lost is in the form of undissociated acid and that this fraction increases with increasing external pH. 5. Conditions which favour loss of hydrogen ions and lactate from muscle are also associated with improved recovery of twitch tension. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:16992502

  7. The effect of aminosulfonate buffers on the light responses and intracellular pH of goldfish retinal horizontal cells.

    PubMed

    Trenholm, Stuart; Baldridge, William H

    2010-10-01

    Retinal horizontal cell feedback acts as a gain control at the first synapse in the visual system and generates center-surround receptive fields in the outer retina. One model of feedback proposes that elevation of protons in the photoreceptor synaptic cleft produces feedback. Most evidence supporting the proton model has depended on the effect of proton buffers, in particular aminosulfonates, but these agents could potentially have effects other than external pH regulation. We therefore determined if the effects of aminosulfonates on horizontal cell rollback, an indicator of feedback, were consistent with external proton buffering. Intracellular recording from horizontal cells in isolated goldfish retina revealed that rollback was blocked only by aminosulfonates with an acid dissociation constant suited for buffering at the pH (7.5) of the Ringer's solution. In isolated goldfish horizontal cells, aminosulfonates, even those that did not block rollback, altered intracellular pH. This suggests that the effect of aminosulfonates on rollback is not because of changing intracellular pH. Measures of both intracellular and extracellular pH revealed that treatment with either glutamate or kainate resulted in acidification. As glutamate produced both internal and external acidification, intracellular and extracellular horizontal cell pH would be expected to increase in response to light, a change consistent with the proton model of feedback.

  8. Report of key comparison SIM.QM-K91 pH of phthalate buffer (nominal pH ~4.01 at 25 °C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzaga, F. B.; Dias, J. C.; Pratt, K. W.; Waters, J.; Dimitrova, L.; Delgado, M.; Canaza, G. T.; Cristancho, R. O.; Chavarro, L. A.; Fajardo, S.; Rodruangthum, P.; Tangpaisarnkul, N.; Gavrilkin, V.; Nagibin, S.; Petrenko, A.; Manska, A.

    2015-01-01

    At the SIM meeting in Buenos Aires, from 30 May to 1 June 2012, it was decided a RMO key comparison on pH measurement coordinated by INMETRO would be performed, named SIM.QM-K91, in order to investigate the degrees of equivalence of measurement procedures for the pH determination of a phthalate buffer solution (nominal pH around 4.01 at 25 °C). Phthalate buffer is widely used to calibrate pH electrodes in the acid range. A buffer solution of 0.05 mol kg-1 potassium hydrogen phthalate, KHC8H4O4, is one of the primary pH reference buffer solutions recommended by IUPAC. It was only allowed to participate in this comparison by using a differential cell or a glass electrode, instead of primary cells, if the highest metrological standard in the institute or if the CMCs are based on the type of cell to be used. The results obtained by INMETRO and NIST (who also participated in CCQM-K91 comparison) were used to link the results from the other institutes to the key comparison reference value of CCQM-K91. In this comparison, pH measurements were performed at 25 °C, and optionally also at 15 °C and 37 °C. Nine institutes took part in the comparison and the results are presented in this report. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  9. [Effects of long-term fertilization on pH buffer system of sandy loam calcareous fluvor-aquic soil].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-Dong; Qi, Bing-Jie; Zhang, Yong-Chun; Zhang, Ai-Jun; Ning, Yun-Wang; Xu, Xian-Ju; Zhang, Hui; Ma, Hong-Bo

    2012-04-01

    Soil samples (0-80 cm) were collected from a 30-year fertilization experimental site in Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province of East China to study the variations of the pH, calcium carbonate and active calcium carbonate contents, and pH buffer capacity of sandy loam calcareous fluvor-aquic soil under different fertilization treatments. Thirty-year continuous application of different fertilizers accelerated the acidification of topsoil (0-20 cm), with the soil pH decreased by 0.41-0.70. Under different fertilization, the soil pH buffer capacity (pHBC) varied from 15.82 to 21.96 cmol x kg(-1). As compared with no fertilization, single N fertilization decreased the pHBC significantly, but N fertilization combined with organic fertilization could significantly increase the pHBC. The soil pHBC had significant positive correlations with soil calcium carbonate and active calcium carbonate contents, but less correlation with soil organic matter content and soil cation exchange capacity, suggesting that after a long-term fertilization, the sandy loam calcareous fluvor-aquic soil was still of an elementary calcium carbonate buffer system, and soil organic matter and cation exchange capacity contributed little to the buffer system. The soil calcium carbonate and active calcium carbonate contents were greater in 0-40 cm than in 40-80 cm soil layer. Comparing with soil calcium carbonate, soil active calcium carbonate was more sensitive to reflect the changes of soil physical and chemical properties, suggesting that the calcium carbonate buffer system could be further classified as soil active calcium carbonate buffer system.

  10. The effects of buffers and pH on the thermal stability, unfolding and substrate binding of RecA.

    PubMed

    Metrick, Michael A; Temple, Joshua E; MacDonald, Gina

    2013-12-31

    The Escherichia coli protein RecA is responsible for catalysis of the strand transfer reaction used in DNA repair and recombination. Previous studies in our lab have shown that high concentrations of salts stabilize RecA in a reverse-anionic Hofmeister series. Here we investigate how changes in pH and buffer alter the thermal unfolding and cofactor binding. RecA in 20mM HEPES, MES, Tris and phosphate buffers was studied in the pH range from 6.5 to 8.5 using circular dichroism (CD), infrared (IR) and fluorescence spectroscopies. The results show all of the buffers studied stabilize RecA up to 50°C above the Tris melting temperature and influence RecA's ability to nucleate on double-stranded DNA. Infrared and CD spectra of RecA in the different buffers do not show that secondary structural changes are associated with increased stability or decreased ability to nucleate on dsDNA. These results suggest the differences in stability arise from decreasing positive charge and/or buffer interactions.

  11. Investigating the Degradation Behaviors of a Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibody Associated with pH and Buffer Species.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Songyan; Qiu, Difei; Adams, Monica; Li, Jinjiang; Mantri, Rao V; Gandhi, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed in understanding the degradation behaviors of an IgG 1 subtype therapeutic monoclonal antibody A (mAb-A) associated with pH and buffer species. The information obtained in this study can augment conventional, stability-based screening paradigms by providing the direction necessary for efficient experimental design. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used for studying conformational stability. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) was utilized to generate B 22*, a modified second virial coefficient for the character of protein-protein interaction. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) were employed to separate degradation products. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was used for determining the molecular size and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) were used for identifying the sequence of the separated fragments. The results showed that both pH and buffer species played the roles in controlling the degradation behaviors of mAb-A, but the pH was more significant. In particular, pH 4.5 induced additional thermal transition peaks occurring at a low temperature compared with pH 6.5. A continual temperature-stress study illustrated that the additional thermal transition peaks related to the least stable structure and a greater fragmentation. Although mAb-A showed the comparable conformational structures and an identical amount of aggregates at time zero between the different types of buffer species at pH 6.5, the aggregation formation rate showed a buffer species-dependent discrepancy over a temperature-stress period. It was found that the levels of aggregations associated with the magnitudes of protein-protein interaction forces.

  12. Randomised control trial of pH buffered lignocaine with adrenaline in outpatient operations.

    PubMed

    Masters, J E

    1998-07-01

    Bicarbonate buffering of local anaesthetics is known to significantly decrease the pain of their administration and yet few practising surgeons do so. A double-blind randomised cross-over clinical trial was conducted to confirm the practicality and efficacy of bicarbonate buffering of lignocaine with adrenaline in the setting of a busy local anaesthetic operating theatre. 40 patients received either buffered or control local anaesthetic solutions in equivalent sites on opposite sides of the body. The pain of each injection was rated from 0 (no pain) to 10 (extreme pain). The mean pain score for the buffered solution was significantly lower than the control solution (3.06 vs 4.34, P = 0.002). Bicarbonate buffering of lignocaine with adrenaline is effective, inexpensive and simple; its widespread use should be encouraged.

  13. Macrophyte and pH buffering updates to the Klamath River water-quality model upstream of Keno Dam, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Annett B.; Rounds, Stewart A.; Asbill-Case, Jessica R.; Deas, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    A hydrodynamic, water temperature, and water-quality model of the Link River to Keno Dam reach of the upper Klamath River was updated to account for macrophytes and enhanced pH buffering from dissolved organic matter, ammonia, and orthophosphorus. Macrophytes had been observed in this reach by field personnel, so macrophyte field data were collected in summer and fall (June-October) 2011 to provide a dataset to guide the inclusion of macrophytes in the model. Three types of macrophytes were most common: pondweed (Potamogeton species), coontail (Ceratophyllum demersum), and common waterweed (Elodea canadensis). Pondweed was found throughout the Link River to Keno Dam reach in early summer with densities declining by mid-summer and fall. Coontail and common waterweed were more common in the lower reach near Keno Dam and were at highest density in summer. All species were most dense in shallow water (less than 2 meters deep) near shore. The highest estimated dry weight biomass for any sample during the study was 202 grams per square meter for coontail in August. Guided by field results, three macrophyte groups were incorporated into the CE-QUAL-W2 model for calendar years 2006-09. The CE-QUAL-W2 model code was adjusted to allow the user to initialize macrophyte populations spatially across the model grid. The default CE-QUAL-W2 model includes pH buffering by carbonates, but does not include pH buffering by organic matter, ammonia, or orthophosphorus. These three constituents, especially dissolved organic matter, are present in the upper Klamath River at concentrations that provide substantial pH buffering capacity. In this study, CE-QUAL-W2 was updated to include this enhanced buffering capacity in the simulation of pH. Acid dissociation constants for ammonium and phosphoric acid were taken from the literature. For dissolved organic matter, the number of organic acid groups and each group's acid dissociation constant (Ka) and site density (moles of sites per mole of

  14. The Effect of Crystallizing and Non-crystallizing Cosolutes on Succinate Buffer Crystallization and the Consequent pH Shift in Frozen Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaramurthi, Prakash; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2011-09-06

    To effectively inhibit succinate buffer crystallization and the consequent pH changes in frozen solutions. Using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD), the crystallization behavior of succinate buffer in the presence of either (i) a crystallizing (glycine, mannitol, trehalose) or (ii) a non-crystallizing cosolute (sucrose) was evaluated. Aqueous succinate buffer solutions, 50 or 200 mM, at pH values 4.0 or 6.0 were cooled from room temperature to -25 C at 0.5 C/min. The pH of the solution was measured as a function of temperature using a probe designed to function at low temperatures. The final lyophiles prepared from these solutions were characterized using synchrotron radiation. When the succinic acid solution buffered to pH 4.0, in the absence of a cosolute, was cooled, there was a pronounced shift in the freeze-concentrate pH. Glycine and mannitol, which have a tendency to crystallize in frozen solutions, remained amorphous when the initial pH was 6.0. Under this condition, they also inhibited buffer crystallization and prevented pH change. At pH 4.0 (50 mM initial concentration), glycine and mannitol crystallized and did not prevent pH change in frozen solutions. While sucrose, a non-crystallizing cosolute, did not completely prevent buffer crystallization, the extent of crystallization was reduced. Sucrose decomposition, based on XRD peaks attributable to {beta}-D-glucose, was observed in frozen buffer solutions with an initial pH of 4.0. Trehalose completely inhibited crystallization of the buffer components when the initial pH was 6.0 but not at pH 4.0. At the lower pH, the crystallization of both trehalose dihydrate and buffer components was evident. When retained amorphous, sucrose and trehalose effectively inhibited succinate buffer component crystallization and the consequent pH shift. However, when trehalose crystallized or sucrose degraded to yield a crystalline decomposition product, crystallization of buffer was

  15. Kinetics of an acid-base catalyzed reaction (aspartame degradation) as affected by polyol-induced changes in buffer pH and pK values.

    PubMed

    Chuy, S; Bell, L N

    2009-01-01

    The kinetics of an acid-base catalyzed reaction, aspartame degradation, were examined as affected by the changes in pH and pK(a) values caused by adding polyols (sucrose, glycerol) to phosphate buffer. Sucrose-containing phosphate buffer solutions had a lower pH than that of phosphate buffer alone, which contributed, in part, to reduced aspartame reactivity. A kinetic model was introduced for aspartame degradation that encompassed pH and buffer salt concentrations, both of which change with a shift in the apparent pK(a) value. Aspartame degradation rate constants in sucrose-containing solutions were successfully predicted using this model when corrections (that is, lower pH, lower apparent pK(a) value, buffer dilution from the polyol) were applied. The change in buffer properties (pH, pK(a)) from adding sucrose to phosphate buffer does impact food chemical stability. These effects can be successfully incorporated into predictive kinetic models. Therefore, pH and pK(a) changes from adding polyols to buffer should be considered during food product development.

  16. Effect of Tris-Hydroxymethyl Aminomethane on intracellular pH depends on the extracellular non-bicarbonate buffering capacity.

    PubMed

    Giunti, Carine; Priouzeau, Fabrice; Allemand, Denis; Levraut, Jacques

    2007-12-01

    The effect of Tris-Hydroxymethyl Aminomethane (THAM) on intracellular pH (pHi) is unknown. We previously demonstrated that the effect of sodium bicarbonate on pHi depends on the non-bicarbonate buffering system. First, human hepatocytes from hepatocytes cell culture (HepG2) were perfused with an acidotic artificial medium containing 5-mmol/L (H5) or 30-mmol/L (H30) concentrations of 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethane sulfonic acid (HEPES), a non-bicarbonate buffer. We studied the effect of THAM on the pHi in both conditions. We repeated the same protocol using an acidotic human blood with a 5% or 40% hematocrit. The pHi was measured with the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye bis-carboxyethyl carboxy-fluorescein (BCECF). Gas analysis was performed before and during the alkaline infusion. The results showed that THAM caused an intracellular alkalization that was higher when the non-bicarbonate buffer concentration was low (0.45 +/- 0.21 and 0.22 +/- 0.14 pH units with H5 and H30, respectively). A significant relationship was found between changes in pHi and changes in PCO(2). Similar results were obtained with the human blood. In conclusion, the intracellular alkalizing effect of THAM is caused by the induced decrease of PCO(2) linked to the extracellular non-bicarbonate buffer capacity: The smaller the concentration of extracellular non-bicarbonate buffer, the higher the PCO(2) decrease caused by THAM.

  17. Final report on CCQM-K91: Key comparison on pH of an unknown phthalate buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitzer, P.; Bastkowski, F.; Adel, B.; Dimitrova, L.; Gonzaga, F. B.; Jakobsen, P. T.; Fisicaro, P.; Stoica, D.; Asakai, T.; Maksimov, I.; Szilágyi, Z. N.; Reyes, A.; Monroy, M.; Canaza, G. T.; Kozlowski, W.; Pawlina, M.; Kutovoy, V.; Vyskocil, L.; Mathiasova, A.; Nongluck, T.; Ficicioglu, F.; Gavrilkin, V.; Pratt, K. W.; Waters, J.

    2013-01-01

    Results of the CCQM-K91 key comparison on pH of an unknown phthalate buffer with a nominal pH value of pH ~ 4.01 at 25 °C are reported. Measurements are performed at 15 °C, 25 °C and 37 °C and optional also at 5 °C and 50 °C. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  18. Acidification due to microbial dechlorination near a trichloroethene DNAPL is overcome with pH buffer or formate as electron donor: experimental demonstration in diffusion-cells.

    PubMed

    Philips, Jo; Maes, Nele; Springael, Dirk; Smolders, Erik

    2013-04-01

    Acidification due to microbial dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) can limit the bio-enhanced dissolution of TCE dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL). This study related the dissolution enhancement of a TCE DNAPL to the pH buffer capacity of the medium and the type of electron donor used. In batch systems, dechlorination was optimal at pH7.1-7.5, but was completely inhibited below pH6.2. In addition, dechlorination in batch systems led to a smaller pH decrease at an increasing pH buffer capacity or with the use of formate instead of lactate as electron donor. Subsequently, bio-enhanced TCE DNAPL dissolution was quantified in diffusion-cells with a 5.5 cm central sand layer, separating a TCE DNAPL layer from an aqueous top layer. Three different pH buffer capacities (2.9 mM-17.9 mM MOPS) and lactate or formate as electron donor were applied. In the lactate fed diffusion-cells, the DNAPL dissolution enhancement factor increased from 1.5 to 2.2 with an increase of the pH buffer capacity. In contrast, in the formate fed diffusion-cells, the DNAPL dissolution enhancement factor (2.4±0.3) was unaffected by the pH buffer capacity. Measurement of the pore water pH confirmed that the pH decreased less with an increased pH buffer capacity or with formate instead of lactate as electron donor. These results suggest that the significant impact of acidification on bio-enhanced DNAPL dissolution can be overcome by the amendment of a pH buffer or by applying a non acidifying electron donor like formate.

  19. Multiphasic DNA Adsorption to Silica Surfaces under Varying Buffer, pH, and Ionic Strength Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Vandeventer, Peter E.; Lin, Jessica S.; Zwang, Theodore J.; Nadim, Ali; Johal, Malkiat S.; Niemz, Angelika

    2012-01-01

    Reversible interactions between DNA and silica are utilized in the solid phase extraction and purification of DNA from complex samples. Chaotropic salts commonly drive DNA binding to silica, but inhibit DNA polymerase amplification. We studied DNA adsorption to silica using conditions with or without chaotropic salts through bulk depletion and Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) experiments. While more DNA adsorbed to silica using chaotropic salts, certain buffer conditions without chaotropic salts yielded a similar amount of eluted DNA. QCM results indicate that under stronger adsorbing conditions, the adsorbed DNA layer is initially rigid, but becomes viscoelastic within minutes. These results qualitatively agreed with a mathematical model for a multiphasic adsorption process. Buffer conditions that do not require chaotropic salts can simplify protocols for nucleic acid sample preparation. Understanding how DNA adsorbs to silica can help optimize nucleic acid sample preparation for clinical diagnostic and research applications. PMID:22537288

  20. Dye adsorption onto mesoporous materials: pH influence, kinetics and equilibrium in buffered and saline media.

    PubMed

    Gómez, J M; Galán, J; Rodríguez, A; Walker, G M

    2014-12-15

    Mesoporous materials were used as adsorbents for dye removal in different media: non-ionic, buffered and saline. The mesoporous materials used were commercial (silica gel) as well as as-synthesised materials (SBA-15 and a novel mesoporous carbon). Dye adsorption onto all the materials was very fast and the equilibrium was reached before 1 h. The pH has a significant influence on the adsorption capacity for the siliceous materials since the electrostatic interactions are the driving forces. However, the influence of the pH on the adsorption capacity of the carbonaceous material was lower, since the van der Waals interactions are the driving forces. The ionic strength has a great impact on the siliceous materials adsorption capacity, being their adsorption capacity in a buffered medium six times higher than the corresponding to a non-ionic medium. Nevertheless, ionic strength does not influence on the dye adsorption on the mesoporous carbon. Overall, the as-synthesised carbon material presents a clear potential to treat dye effluents, showing high adsorption capacity (q(e) ≈ 200 mg/g) in all the pH range studied (from 3 to 11); even at low concentrations (C(e) ≈ 10 mg/L) and at short contact times (t(e) < 30 min).

  1. An evaluation of MES (2(N-Morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid) and Amberlite IRC-50 as pH buffers for nutrient solution studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugbee, B. G.; Salisbury, F. B.

    1985-01-01

    All buffering agents used to stabilize pH in hydroponic research have disadvantages. Inorganic buffers are absorbed and may become phytotoxic. Solid carbonate salts temporarily mitigate decreasing pH but provide almost no protection against increasing pH, and they alter nutrient absorption. Exchange resins are more effective, but we find that they remove magnesium and manganese from solution. We have tested 2(N-Morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) as a buffering agent at concentrations of 1 and 10 mol m-3 (1 and 10 mM) with beans, corn, lettuce, tomatoes, and wheat. MES appears to be biologically inert and does not interact significantly with other solution ions. Relative growth rates among controls and MES treatments were nearly identical for each species during the trial period. The pH was stabilized by 1 mol m-3 MES. This buffer warrants further consideration in nutrient research.

  2. An evaluation of MES (2(N-Morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid) and Amberlite IRC-50 as pH buffers for nutrient solution studies.

    PubMed

    Bugbee, B G; Salisbury, F B

    1985-01-01

    All buffering agents used to stabilize pH in hydroponic research have disadvantages. Inorganic buffers are absorbed and may become phytotoxic. Solid carbonate salts temporarily mitigate decreasing pH but provide almost no protection against increasing pH, and they alter nutrient absorption. Exchange resins are more effective, but we find that they remove magnesium and manganese from solution. We have tested 2(N-Morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) as a buffering agent at concentrations of 1 and 10 mol m-3 (1 and 10 mM) with beans, corn, lettuce, tomatoes, and wheat. MES appears to be biologically inert and does not interact significantly with other solution ions. Relative growth rates among controls and MES treatments were nearly identical for each species during the trial period. The pH was stabilized by 1 mol m-3 MES. This buffer warrants further consideration in nutrient research.

  3. Modelling study on buffering pH and retaining U using a simplified uranium mill tailings pile example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Diederik; Simunek, Jirka

    2014-05-01

    The hypothetical problem that is presented here considers the release and migration of uranium from a simplified uranium mill tailings pile towards a river. The modeling exercise with the coupled reactive transport model HP2 illustrates the effect of the geochemical conceptual model for sorption on (i) the buffering of the pH in the soil/aquifer system and (ii) the retention of U in the soil. The HP2 module, which couples the PHREEQC geochemical code with HYDRUS (2D/3D), is a two-dimensional equivalent of the one-dimensional HP1 program that was first released in 2005 (Jacques et al., 2008), and used successfully in many applications. Sorption of U is described using a multi-site cation exchange model (see Jacques et al., 2008). This sorption model also buffers the acid pH due to proton exchange. Two scenarios are considered: a soil with a relatively low (8.1 × 10-3 mol/kg) and relatively high (8.1 × 10-2 mol/kg) sorption capacity. In the third scenario, specific sorption of U and other cations and anions on Fe-oxides is described using a non-electrostatic surface complexation model with a very low capacity (8.1 × 10-4 mol/kg), in addition to low exchange complexation. Proton exchange on the cation exchanger buffers the acidity by replacing calcium with protons on the exchanger; the spatial extent of the pH-perturbed region is smaller in the scenario with the higher exchange capacity. Specific sorption has only a small effect on the pH-perturbed zone, although it is important to note that its capacity is one order of magnitude lower than in the scenario with the low sorption capacity. U reaches the river system within 1000 d in scenarios with low and high exchange capacities. Only in the scenario with specific sorption, U migration within the ground water system is retarded, compared to the other two cases. The results of the three scenarios do not seem to be intuitive, especially the equally fast movement of U in the scenario with a high exchange capacity

  4. Differential effects of buffer pH on Ca2+-induced ROS emission with inhibited mitochondrial complexes I and III

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Daniel P.; Camara, Amadou K. S.; Stowe, David F.; Lubbe, Ryan; Aldakkak, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Excessive mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) emission is a critical component in the etiology of ischemic injury. Complex I and complex III of the electron transport chain are considered the primary sources of ROS emission during cardiac ischemia and reperfusion (IR) injury. Several factors modulate ischemic ROS emission, such as an increase in extra-matrix Ca2+, a decrease in extra-matrix pH, and a change in substrate utilization. Here we examined the combined effects of these factors on ROS emission from respiratory complexes I and III under conditions of simulated IR injury. Guinea pig heart mitochondria were suspended in experimental buffer at a given pH and incubated with or without CaCl2. Mitochondria were then treated with either pyruvate, a complex I substrate, followed by rotenone, a complex I inhibitor, or succinate, a complex II substrate, followed by antimycin A, a complex III inhibitor. H2O2 release rate and matrix volume were compared with and without adding CaCl2 and at pH 7.15, 6.9, or 6.5 with pyruvate + rotenone or succinate + antimycin A to simulate conditions that may occur during in vivo cardiac IR injury. We found a large increase in H2O2 release with high [CaCl2] and pyruvate + rotenone at pH 6.9, but not at pHs 7.15 or 6.5. Large increases in H2O2 release rate also occurred at each pH with high [CaCl2] and succinate + antimycin A, with the highest levels observed at pH 7.15. The increases in H2O2 release were associated with significant mitochondrial swelling, and both H2O2 release and swelling were abolished by cyclosporine A, a desensitizer of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). These results indicate that ROS production by complex I and by complex III is differently affected by buffer pH and Ca2+ loading with mPTP opening. The study suggests that changes in the levels of cytosolic Ca2+ and pH during IR alter the relative amounts of ROS produced at mitochondrial respiratory complex I and complex III. PMID

  5. Contrasting pH buffering patterns in neutral-alkaline soils along a 3600 km transect in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, W.; Nelson, P. N.; Li, M.-H.; Cai, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Shan, Y.; Wang, R.; Han, X.; Jiang, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Soil pH buffering capacity (pHBC) plays a crucial role in predicting acidification rates, yet its large-scale patterns and controls are poorly understood, especially for neutral-alkaline soils. Here, we evaluated the spatial patterns and drivers of pHBC along a 3600 km long transect (1900 km sub-transect with carbonate containing soils and 1700 km sub-transect with non-carbonate containing soils) across northern China. Soil pHBC was greater in the carbonate containing soils than in the non-carbonate containing soils. Acid addition decreased soil pH in the non-carbonate containing soils more markedly than in the carbonate containing soils. Within the carbonate soil sub-transect, soil pHBC was positively correlated with cation exchange capacity (CEC), carbonate content and exchangeable sodium (Na) concentration, but negatively correlated with initial pH and clay content, and not correlated with soil organic carbon (SOC) content. Within the non-carbonate sub-transect, soil pHBC was positively related to initial pH, clay content, CEC and exchangeable Na concentration, but not related to SOC content. Carbonate content was the primary determinant of pHBC in the carbonate containing soils and CEC was the main determinant of buffering capacity in the non-carbonate containing soils. Soil pHBC was positively related to aridity index and carbonate content across the carbonate containing soil sub-transect. Our results indicated that mechanisms controlling pHBC differ among neutral-alkaline soils of northern China, especially between carbonate and non-carbonate containing soils, leading to different rates, risks, and impacts of acidification. This understanding should be incorporated into the acidification risk assessment and landscape management in a changing world.

  6. Contrasting pH buffering patterns in neutral-alkaline soils along a 3600 km transect in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, W. T.; Nelson, P. N.; Li, M.-H.; Cai, J. P.; Zhang, Y. Y.; Zhang, Y. G.; Yang, S.; Wang, R. Z.; Wang, Z. W.; Wu, Y. N.; Han, X. G.; Jiang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Soil pH buffering capacity (pHBC) plays a crucial role in predicting acidification rates, yet its large-scale patterns and controls are poorly understood, especially for neutral-alkaline soils. Here, we evaluated the spatial patterns and drivers of pHBC along a 3600 km long transect (1900 km sub-transect with carbonate-containing soils and 1700 km sub-transect with non-carbonate-containing soils) across northern China. Soil pHBC was greater in the carbonate-containing soils than in the non-carbonate-containing soils. Acid addition decreased soil pH in the non-carbonate-containing soils more markedly than in the carbonate-containing soils. Within the carbonate soil sub-transect, soil pHBC was positively correlated with cation exchange capacity (CEC), carbonate content and exchangeable sodium (Na) concentration, but negatively correlated with initial pH and clay content, and not correlated with soil organic carbon (SOC) content. Within the non-carbonate sub-transect, soil pHBC was positively related to initial pH, clay content, CEC and exchangeable Na concentration, but not related to SOC content. Carbonate content was the primary determinant of pHBC in the carbonate-containing soils and CEC was the main determinant of buffering capacity in the non-carbonate-containing soils. Along the transect, soil pHBC was different in regions with different aridity index. Soil pHBC was positively related to aridity index and carbonate content across the carbonate-containing soil sub-transect. Our results indicated that mechanisms controlling pHBC differ among neutral-alkaline soils of northern China, especially between carbonate- and non-carbonate-containing soils. This understanding should be incorporated into the acidification risk assessment and landscape management in a changing world.

  7. The effect of carbon dioxide on the intracellular pH and buffering power of snail neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, R C

    1976-01-01

    1. Intracellular pH (pHi) was measured using pH-sensitive glass micro-electrodes. The effects on pHi of CO2 applied externally and HCO3-, H+ and NH4+ injected iontophoretically, were investigated. 2. The transport numbers for iontophoretic injection into aqueous micro-droples were found by potentiometric titration to be 0-3 for HCO3- and 0-94 for H+. 3. Exposure to Ringer, pH 7-5, equilibrated with 2-2% CO2 caused a rapid, but only transient, fall in pHi. Within 1 or 2 min pHi began to return exponentially to normal, with a time constant of about 5 min. 4. When external CO2 was removed, pHi rapidly increased, and then slowly returned to normal. The pHi changes with CO2 application or removal gave a calculated intracellular buffer value of about 30 m-equiv H+/pH unit per litre. 5. Injection of HCO3- caused a rise in pHi very similar to that seen on removal of external CO2. 6. The pHi responses to CO2 application, CO2 removal and HCO3- injection were slowed by the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide. 7. H+ injection caused a transient fall in pHi. In CO2 Ringer pHi fell less and recovered faster than in CO2-free Ringer. Calculation of the internal buffer value from the pHi responses to H+ and HCO3- injection gave very similar values. 8. The internal buffer value (measured by H+ injection) was greatly increased by exposure to CO2 Ringer. Acetazolamide reduced this effect of CO2, suggesting that the function of intracellular carbonic anhydrase may be to maximize the internal buffering power in CO2. 9. It was concluded that the internal HCO3- was determined primarily by the CO2 level and pHi, that internal HCO3- made a large contribution to the buffering power, and that after internal acidfication pHi was restored to normal by active transport of H+, OH- or HCO3- across the cell membrane. The active transport was much faster in CO2 than in CO2-free Ringer. PMID:4614

  8. Signs of oral dryness in relation to salivary flow rate, pH, buffering capacity and dry mouth complaints

    PubMed Central

    Farsi, Najat MA

    2007-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the signs of oral dryness in relation to different salivary variables and to correlate subjective complaints of oral dryness with salivary flow rate. Methods 312 unmedicated healthy individuals belonging to three age groups, (6–11, 12–17, and 18–40 years) were examined clinically for signs of oral dryness. Resting and stimulated saliva were collected to determine flow rate, pH and buffering capacity. A questionnaire was used to obtain information on subjective sensation of dry mouth. Results Dry lip and dry mucosa were present in 37.5% and 3.2% of the sample respectively. The proportion of subjects who complained of oral dryness (19%) showed a stimulated salivary flow rate significantly lower than non complainers. Dry lip was significantly related to low resting flow rate but pH and buffering capacity did not show any significant relation to dry lip. Dry mucosa was not related to any of the above mentioned parameters. Conclusion The finding that the stimulated salivary flow rate was reduced in subjects complaining of dry mouth is of great clinical relevance, since the reduction is expected to be reflected in compromising various salivary functions. PMID:17996105

  9. Declines in Soil pH due to Anthropogenic Nitrogen Inputs Alter Buffering and Exchange Reactions in Tropical Forest Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, K. A.

    2003-12-01

    Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) inputs may alter tropical soil buffering and exchange reactions that have important implications for nutrient cycling, forest productivity, and downstream ecosystems. In contrast to relatively young temperate soils that are typically buffered from N inputs by base cation reactions, aluminum reactions may serve to buffer highly weathered tropical soils and result in immediate increases in aluminum mobility and toxicity. Increased nitrate losses due to chronic N inputs may also deplete residual base cations in already weathered base cation-poor soils, further acidify soils, and thereby reduce nitrate mobility through pH-dependent anion exchange reactions. To test these hypotheses, I determined soil pH and cation and anion exchange capacity (CEC and AEC) and measured base cation and aluminum soil solution losses following first-time and long-term experimental N additions from two Hawaiian tropical forest soils, a 300 year old Andisol and a 4.1 million year old Oxisol. I found that elevated base cation losses accompanied increased nitrate losses after first time N additions to the young Andisol whereas immediate and large aluminum losses were associated with increased nitrate losses from the Oxisol. In the long-term, base cation and aluminum losses increased in proportion to nitrate losses. Long-term N additions at both sites resulted in significant declines in soil pH, decreased CEC and increased AEC. These results suggest that even chronic N inputs resulting in small but elevated nitrate losses may deplete residual base cations, increase mobility and toxicity of aluminum, and potentially lead to declines in forest productivity and acidification of downstream ecosystems. These findings also suggest that AEC may provide a long-term mechanism to delay nitrate losses in tropical forests with significant variable charge that are experiencing chronic anthropogenic N inputs.

  10. Comparison of Salivary pH, Buffering Capacity and Alkaline Phosphatase in Smokers and Healthy Non-Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi-Motamayel, Fatemeh; Falsafi, Parisa; Goodarzi, Mohammad T.; Poorolajal, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Saliva contains alkaline phosphatase (ALP)—a key intracellular enzyme related to destructive processes and cellular damage—and has buffering capacity (BC) against acids due to the presence of bicarbonate and phosphate ions. Smoking may have deleterious effects on the oral environment due to pH changes which can affect ALP activity. This study aimed to evaluate the salivary pH, BC and ALP activity of male smokers and healthy non-smokers. Methods: This retrospective cohort study took place between August 2012 and December 2013. A total of 251 healthy male non-smokers and 259 male smokers from Hamadan, Iran, were selected. Unstimulated whole saliva was collected from each participant and pH and BC were determined using a pH meter. Salivary enzymes were measured by spectrophotometric assay. Results: Mean salivary pH (7.42 ± 0.48 and 7.52 ± 0.43, respectively; P = 0.018) and BC (3.41 ± 0.54 and 4.17 ± 0.71; P = 0.001) was significantly lower in smokers compared to non-smokers. Mean ALP levels were 49.58 ± 23.33 IU/L among smokers and 55.11 ± 27.85 IU/L among non-smokers (P = 0.015). Conclusion: Significantly lower pH, BC and ALP levels were observed among smokers in comparison to a healthy control group. These salivary alterations could potentially be utilised as biochemical markers for the evaluation of oral tissue function and side-effects among smokers. Further longitudinal studies are recommended to evaluate the effects of smoking on salivary components. PMID:27606111

  11. Effects of pH Buffering on Horizontal and Ganglion Cell Light Responses in Primate Retina: Evidence for the Proton Hypothesis of Surround Formation

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Christopher M.; Detwiler, Peter B.; Dacey, Dennis M.

    2011-01-01

    Negative feedback from horizontal cells to cone photoreceptors is regarded as the critical pathway for the formation of the antagonistic surround of retinal neurons, yet the mechanism by which horizontal cells accomplish negative feedback has been difficult to determine. Recent evidence suggests that feedback uses a novel, non-GABAergic pathway that directly modulates the calcium current in cones. In non-mammalian vertebrates, enrichment of retinal pH buffering capacity attenuates horizontal cell feedback, supporting one model in which feedback occurs by horizontal cell modulation of the extracellular pH in the cone synaptic cleft. Here we test the effect of exogenous pH buffering on the response dynamics of H1 horizontal cells and the center-surround receptive field structure of parasol ganglion cells in the macaque monkey retina. Enrichment of the extracellular buffering capacity with HEPES selectively attenuates surround antagonism in parasol ganglion cells. The H1 horizontal cell light response includes a slow, depolarizing component that is attributed to negative feedback to cones. This part of the response is attenuated by HEPES and other pH buffers in a dose-dependent manner that is correlated with predicted buffering capacity. The selective effects of pH buffering on the parasol cell surround and H1 cell light response suggests that, in primate retina, horizontal cell feedback to cones is mediated via a pH-dependent mechanism and is a major determinant of the ganglion cell receptive field surround. PMID:18184788

  12. The Effects of pH on the Growth and Aspect Ratio of Chicken Egg White Lysozyme Crystals Prepared in Different Buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, U. J.; Horrell, E. E.; Kou, Y.; Pusey, Marc

    2000-01-01

    We have measured the nucleation and aspect ratio of CEWL crystals grown by vapor diffusion in acetate, butyrate, carbonate, succinate, and phosphate buffers in a range of pH spanning the pK(sub a) of these buffers. The nucleation numbers drop off significantly in the vicinity of pK(sub a) for each of the buffers except the phosphate system, in which we used only the pH range around the second titration point(pK2). There is a concomitant increase in the sizes of the crystals. Some typical nucleation number results are shown. These data support and extend other observations. In addition, we have examined changes in aspect ratio which accompany the suppression of nucleation within each buffer system. The length of the face in the [001] direction was measured, and compared to the width of the (110) face in the [110] type directions. We find that while the aspect ratio of the crystals is affected by pH, it is dominated by a correlation with the size of the crystals. Small crystals are longer in the [0011 direction than crystals that are larger (higher pH within a buffer system). This relationship is found to hold independent of the choice of buffer. These results are consistent with those of Judge et al, who used a batch process which resulted in uniform sizing of crystals at each pH. In these experiments, we specifically avoid agitating the protein/salt buffer mixture when combining the two. This permits the formation of a range of sizes at a given pH. The results for a .05 M acetate 5% NaCl buffer are also shown. We will discuss these results in light of a growth model.

  13. Final report of the key comparison APMP.QM-K91: APMP comparison on pH measurement of phthalate buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hioki, Akiharu; Asakai, Toshiaki; Maksimov, Igor; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Miura, Tsutomu; Ketrin, Rosi; Nuryatini; Thanh, Ngo Huy; Truong Chinh, Nguyen; Vospelova, Alena; Bastkowski, Frank; Sander, Beatrice; Matzke, Jessica; Prokunin, Sergey; Frolov, Dmitry; Aprelev, Alexey; Dobrovolskiy, Vladimir; Uysal, Emrah; Liv, Lokman; Velina Lara-Manzano, Judith; Montero-Ruiz, Jazmin; Ortiz-Aparicio, JosÉ Luis; Ticona Canaza, Galia; Anuar Mohd Amin, Khirul; Abd Kadir, Haslina; Bakovets, Nickolay; Wong, Siu-Kay; Lam, Wai-Hing

    2017-01-01

    The APMP.QM-K91 was organised by TCQM of APMP to test the abilities of the national metrology institutes in the APMP region to measure a pH value of a phthalate buffer. This APMP comparison on pH measurement was proposed by the National Metrology Institute of Japan at the APMP-TCQM meeting held September 22-23, 2014. After approval by TCQM, the comparison has been conducted by NMIJ. The comparison is a key comparison following CCQM-K91. The comparison material was a phthalate buffer of pH around 4.0 and the measurement temperatures were 15 °C, 25 °C and 37 °C. This is the third APMP key comparison on pH measurement and the fifth APMP comparison on pH measurement following APMP.QM-P06 (two phosphate buffers) in 2004, APMP.QM-P09 (a phthalate buffer) in 2006, APMP.QM-K9/APMP.QM-P16 (a phosphate buffer) in 2010-2011 and APMP.QM-K19/APMP.QM-P25 (a borate buffer) in 2013-2014. The results can be used further by any participant to support its CMC claim at least for a phthalate buffer. That claim will concern the pH method employed by the participant during this comparison and will cover the used temperature(s) or the full temperature range between 15°C and 37 °C for the participant which measured pH values at the three temperatures. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  14. Mechanistic information from volume profiles for water exchange and complex-formation reactions of aquated Ni(II). pH, buffer and medium effects.

    PubMed

    Gazzaz, Hanaa Asaad; Ember, Erika; Zahl, Achim; van Eldik, Rudi

    2009-11-21

    Rate and activation parameters for the complex-formation reaction of Ni(2+) with 4-(2-pyridylazo)-N,N-dimethyl aniline (PADA) were studied as a function of pH in different buffers in both aqueous and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelle solutions. In aqueous Tris buffer solution, the forward and backward rate constants increased with increasing pH, while the complex-formation constant decreased due to a larger increase in the backward rate constant. The activation entropy, DeltaS(#), and activation volume, DeltaV(#), changed with increasing pH from positive to negative values, suggesting an apparent changeover from a dissociative to a more associative mechanism. Complex-formation reactions with 2,2'-bipyridine in Tris buffer showed almost no increase in the forward and backward rate constants on increasing the pH, but the DeltaS(#) and DeltaV(#) values became more negative. N-ethylmorpholine buffer showed no pH effect on the rate constants and activation parameters. Water exchange reactions of aquated Ni(2+) were also studied as a function of pH under the same conditions. The reported rate and activation parameters for water exchange in Tris and N-ethylmorpholine buffers are consistent with those found for the complex-formation reactions of Ni(2+) with PADA. The observed pH and buffer effects for both the complex-formation and water exchange reactions of aquated Ni(2+) can be accounted for in terms of the formation of a Ni(2+)-Tris complex in Tris buffer and general base catalysis by the buffer components. In SDS micelle solution, the complex-formation reaction with PADA was much faster than in aqueous solution, but the increase in rate constant with increasing pH was less significant, while DeltaS(#) and DeltaV(#) became more positive, pointing to a more dissociative mechanism. For SDS micelle solutions there was no effect on the water exchange rate constant or activation volume. Mechanistic interpretations are offered for all observed pH, buffer and medium

  15. Effects of high pressure, subzero temperature, and pH on survival of Listeria monocytogenes in buffer and smoked salmon.

    PubMed

    Ritz, M; Jugiau, F; Federighi, M; Chapleau, N; de Lamballerie, M

    2008-08-01

    High pressure processing is a novel food preservation technology, applied for over 15 years in the food industry to inactivate spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms. Many studies have shown the differential resistance of bacterial cells to high pressure. Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterium able to grow at refrigerated temperature and to survive for a long time in minimally processed foods such as raw smoked fish. The freezing process does not cause significant decline of L. monocytogenes. The phase diagram of water under pressure permits a pressure treatment under subzero temperature, without the disadvantages of freezing for food quality. The aim of this study was to estimate if combined effects of pressure and subzero temperature could increase the destruction of L. monocytogenes in buffer and in smoked salmon. We investigated effects of high pressure processing (100, 150, and 200 MPa) combined with subzero temperatures (-10, -14, and -18 degrees C) and pH (7.0 and 4.5). Results showed that the most effective high-pressure treatment to inactivate L. monocytogenes was 200 MPa, -18 degrees C, and pH 4.5. The relevance of pressure holding time and the synergistic effect of pressure coupled with the subzero temperature to inactivate bacteria are highlighted. Modifications of physical properties (color and texture) were a lightening of color and an increase of toughness, which might be accepted by consumers, since safety is increased.

  16. Positively charged and pH self-buffering quantum dots for efficient cellular uptake by charge mediation and monitoring cell membrane permeability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suhua; Song, Haipeng; Ong, Wei Yi; Han, Ming Yong; Huang, Dejian

    2009-10-21

    Positively charged and pH self-buffering quantum dots (Tren-QDs) were achieved by surface functionalization with tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (Tren) derivatives, which are attached to the inorganic cores of QDs through bidentate chelating of dithiocarbamates. The Tren-QDs exhibit pH buffering capability by absorbing or releasing protons due to the surface polyamine groups as the surrounding pH fluctuates. Such self-buffering capability stabilizes the photoluminescence of the Tren-QDs against acid. The Tren-QDs bear positive charges through protonation of the surface polyamine groups under physiological conditions and the surface positive charges improve their cellular uptake efficiency by charge mediation, which has been demonstrated by BV-2 microglia cells. The photoluminescence of Tren-QDs shows a selective Stern-Volmer response to copper ions and this property has been preliminarily evaluated for investigating the BV-2 cell membrane structure by monitoring the photoluminescence of intracellular Tren-QDs.

  17. Positively charged and pH self-buffering quantum dots for efficient cellular uptake by charge mediation and monitoring cell membrane permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Suhua; Song, Haipeng; Ong, Wei Yi; Han, Ming Yong; Huang, Dejian

    2009-10-01

    Positively charged and pH self-buffering quantum dots (Tren-QDs) were achieved by surface functionalization with tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (Tren) derivatives, which are attached to the inorganic cores of QDs through bidentate chelating of dithiocarbamates. The Tren-QDs exhibit pH buffering capability by absorbing or releasing protons due to the surface polyamine groups as the surrounding pH fluctuates. Such self-buffering capability stabilizes the photoluminescence of the Tren-QDs against acid. The Tren-QDs bear positive charges through protonation of the surface polyamine groups under physiological conditions and the surface positive charges improve their cellular uptake efficiency by charge mediation, which has been demonstrated by BV-2 microglia cells. The photoluminescence of Tren-QDs shows a selective Stern-Volmer response to copper ions and this property has been preliminarily evaluated for investigating the BV-2 cell membrane structure by monitoring the photoluminescence of intracellular Tren-QDs.

  18. Final report of the key comparison APMP.QM-K9: APMP comparison on pH measurement of phosphate buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hioki, Akiharu; Ohata, Masaki; Cherdchu, Chainarong; Tangpaisarnkul, Nongluck

    2011-01-01

    The APMP.QM-K9 was organised by TCQM of APMP to test the abilities of the national metrology institutes in the APMP region to measure a pH value of a phosphate buffer. This APMP comparison on pH measurement was proposed by the National Metrology Institute of Japan, NMIJ, and the National Institute of Metrology of Thailand, NIMT, in August 2009. After approval by TCQM, the comparison has been conducted by NMIJ and NIMT. The comparison is a key comparison following CCQM-K9, CCQM-K9.1 and CCQM-K9.2. The comparison material was a phosphate buffer of pH around 6.86 and the measurement temperatures were 15 °C, 25 °C and 37 °C. This is the first APMP key comparison on pH measurement and the third APMP comparison on pH measurement following APMP.QM-P06 (two phosphate buffers) in 2004 and APMP.QM-P09 (a phthalate buffer) in 2006. The results can be used further by any participant to support its CMC claim for a phosphate buffer. That claim will concern the pH method employed by the participant during this comparison and will cover the temperature(s) used or the full temperature range between 15 °C and 37 °C for the participant which measured pH values at the three temperatures. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  19. Preliminary findings on the correlation of saliva pH, buffering capacity, flow rate and consistency in relation to waterpipe tobacco smoking

    PubMed Central

    Khemiss, Mehdi; Ben Khelifa, Mohamed; Ben Saad, Helmi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of the present comparative study was to compare some salivary characteristics between exclusive waterpipe smokers (EWPS) and non-smokers. 72 males (36 EWPS) were recruited. The volume of stimulated saliva was determined and divided by the duration of saliva collection. The pH was measured directly using a pH meter. The buffering capacity was determined using a quantitative method which involved the addition of 10 µl HCl. Up to a total of 160 µL was titrated up to obtain a pH titration curve. At 50 µL of titrated HCl, buffering capacity was ranked into three categories: high, medium and low. EWPS and non-smoker groups had similar flow rates (1.81 ± 0.79 and 1.78 ± 1.14 mL min-1) and similar baseline pH (6.60 ± 0.37 and 6.76 ± 0.39). Statistically significant differences in the two groups’ pH were observed from 30 to 160 µL of titrated up HCl. At 50 µL of titrated up HCl, the EWPS group compared to the non-smoker group had a significantly higher pH (4.79 ± 0.72 vs. 5.32 ± 0.79). To conclude, waterpipe tobacco smoking alters the buffering capacity but does not alter either salivary flow rates or the baseline pH and consistency. PMID:28266252

  20. Monoclonal antibodies requiring coating buffer with low pH for efficient antigen capture in sandwich ELISA: the rarities or practically important phenomena?

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, Alexander D; Tarakanova, Julia N; Yakovleva, Dinora A; Dmitriev, Dmitriy A; Phartooshnaya, Olga V; Kolyaskina, Galina I; Massino, Yulia S; Borisova, Olga V; Segal, Olga L; Smirnova, Maria B; Ulanova, Tatiana I; Lavrov, Viacheslav F

    2013-01-01

    This article reexamines some opinions concerning pH requirements for optimal immobilization of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) by passive adsorption in antigen capture ELISA. It was discovered that substitution of "classical" sodium phosphate (pH 7.5) and carbonate (pH 9.5) coating solutions by acid (pH 2.8) buffers maximized antigen capture 4 out of 10 different tested anti-HBsAg mAbs, resulting in a 1.5-2.5 increase of binding curve coefficients. By measuring both mAbs amounts and functionality, the enhancement effect was attributed to the better preservation of solid phase antibodies activity.

  1. Direct polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from human whole blood and filter-paper-dried blood by using a PCR buffer with a higher pH.

    PubMed

    Bu, Ying; Huang, Huan; Zhou, Guohua

    2008-04-15

    We described a novel approach to directly amplify genomic DNA from whole blood and dried blood spotted on filter paper without any DNA isolation by using the PCR buffer with a higher pH, which was optimized as pH 9.1-9.6. Direct PCR on blood treated with various anticoagulants showed that the buffer worked well with the blood treated by citrate, EDTA, or heparinate. DNA fragments with different lengths could be efficiently amplified directly from various forms of blood samples. By coupling the buffer with tetra-PCR, a "true" single-tube genotyping was realized by using whole blood or paper-dried blood as starting material.

  2. An Efficient Protocol for the Oxidative Hydrolysis of Ketone SAMP Hydrazones Employing SeO2 and H2O2 under Buffered (pH 7) Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Amos B.; Liu, Zhuqing; Simov, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    An effective oxidative protocol for the liberation of ketones from SAMP hydrazones employing peroxyselenous acid under aqueous buffered conditions (pH 7) has been developed. The procedure proceeds without epimerization of adjacent stereocenters or dehydration, respectively, in representative SAMP alkylation and aldol reaction adducts. PMID:20657727

  3. Accelerating the dissolution of enteric coatings in the upper small intestine: evolution of a novel pH 5.6 bicarbonate buffer system to assess drug release.

    PubMed

    Varum, Felipe J O; Merchant, Hamid A; Goyanes, Alvaro; Assi, Pardis; Zboranová, Veronika; Basit, Abdul W

    2014-07-01

    Despite rapid dissolution in compendial phosphate buffers, gastro resistant (enteric coated) products can take up to 2 h to disintegrate in the human small intestine, which clearly highlights the inadequacy of the in vitro test method to predict in vivo behaviour of these formulations. The aim of this study was to establish the utility of a novel pH 5.6 bicarbonate buffer, stabilized by an Auto pH™ System, as a better surrogate of the conditions of the proximal small intestine to investigate the dissolution behaviour of standard and accelerated release enteric double coating formulations. Prednisolone tablets were coated with 3 or 5 mg/cm(2) of partially neutralized EUDRAGIT(®) L 30 D-55, HP-55 or HPMC adjusted to pH 6 or 8. An outer layer of EUDRAGIT(®) L 30 D-55 was applied at 5mg/cm(2). For comparison purposes, a standard single layer of EUDRAGIT(®) L 30 D-55 was applied to the tablets. Dissolution was carried out using USP II apparatus in 0.1 M HCl for 2 h, followed by pH 5.6 bicarbonate buffer. EUDRAGIT(®) L 30 D-55 single-coated tablets showed a slow drug release with a lag time of 75 min in buffer, whereas release from the EUDRAGIT(®) L 30 D-55 double-coated tablets was accelerated. These in vitro lag times closely match the in vivo disintegration times for these coated tablets reported previously. Drug release was further accelerated from modified double coatings, particularly in the case of coatings with a thinner inner layer of HP-55 or HPMC (pH 8 and KH2PO4). This study confirms that the pH 5.6 bicarbonate buffer system offers significant advantages during the development of dosage forms designed to release the drug in the upper small intestine.

  4. Salivary Parameters (Salivary Flow, pH and Buffering Capacity) in Stimulated Saliva of Mexican Elders 60 Years Old and Older

    PubMed Central

    Islas-Granillo, H; Borges-Yañez, SA; Medina-Solís, CE; Galan-Vidal, CA; Navarrete-Hernández, JJ; Escoffié-Ramirez, M; Maupomé, G

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To compare a limited array of chewing-stimulated saliva features (salivary flow, pH and buffer capacity) in a sample of elderly Mexicans with clinical, sociodemographic and socio-economic variables. Subjects and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 139 adults, 60 years old and older, from two retirement homes and a senior day care centre in the city of Pachuca, Mexico. Socio-demographic, socio-economic and behavioural variables were collected through a questionnaire. A trained and standardized examiner obtained the oral clinical variables. Chewing-stimulated saliva (paraffin method) was collected and the salivary flow rate, pH and buffer capacity were measured. The analysis was performed using non-parametric tests in Stata 9.0. Results: Mean age was 79.1 ± 9.8 years. Most of the subjects included were women (69.1%). Mean chewing-stimulated salivary flow was 0.75 ± 0.80 mL/minute, and the pH and buffer capacity were 7.88 ± 0.83 and 4.20 ± 1.24, respectively. Mean chewing-stimulated salivary flow varied (p < 0.05) across type of retirement home, tooth brushing frequency, number of missing teeth and use of dental prostheses. pH varied across the type of retirement home (p < 0.05) and marginally by age (p = 0.087); buffer capacity (p < 0.05) varied across type of retirement home, tobacco consumption and the number of missing teeth. Conclusions: These exploratory data add to the body of knowledge with regard to chewing-stimulated salivary features (salivary flow rate, pH and buffer capacity) and outline the variability of those features across selected sociodemographic, socio-economic and behavioural variables in a group of Mexican elders. PMID:25867562

  5. Contribution of solution pH and buffer capacity to suppress intergranular stress corrosion cracking of sensitized type 304 stainless steel at 95 C

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.; Shibata, T.; Haruna, T. . Dept. of Materials Science and Processing)

    1999-05-01

    Controlling pH of high-temperature water to [approximately]pH 7 at 300 C by adding lithium hydroxide (LiOH) into the coolant system of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) successfully has been mitigating the corrosion of PWR component materials. The effects of solution pH and buffer capacity on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of sensitized type 304 stainless steel ([SS] UNS S30400) was examined at 95 C by slow strain rate technique (SSRT) with an in-situ cracking observation system. It was found that an increase in solution pH or buffer capacity increased crack initiation time and decreased mean crack initiation frequency, but exerted almost no effect on crack propagation. This inhibition effect on IGSCC initiation was explained as resulting from a retarding effect of solution pH and buffer capacity on the decrease in pH at crack nuclei caused by the hydrolysis of metal ions dissolved when the passive film was ruptured by strain in SSRT.

  6. Identification and quantification of redox and pH buffering processes in a heterogeneous, low carbonate aquifer during managed aquifer recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibert, Simone; Atteia, Olivier; Ursula Salmon, S.; Siade, Adam; Douglas, Grant; Prommer, Henning

    2016-05-01

    Managed aquifer recharge of aerobic water into deep aquifers often induces the oxidation of pyrite, which can lead to groundwater acidification and metal mobilization. As circumneutral pH is often maintained by the dissolution of sedimentary calcite or high injectant alkalinity little attention is generally paid to potential alternative pH buffering processes. In contrast, this study analyzed water quality evolution from a 2 year long groundwater replenishment trial in an anaerobic, mostly carbonate free aquifer. While injection of aerobic, very low salinity water triggered pyrite oxidation, the comprehensive field data showed that in many aquifer zones pH was buffered without substantial release of inorganic carbon. A numerical analysis was performed to test and evaluate different conceptual models and suggested that either proton buffering or the dissolution of aluminosilicates, or a combination thereof, can explain the observed, rapid buffering at locations where carbonates were absent. In contrast to many previous managed aquifer recharge [MAR) studies, the oxidation of sedimentary pyrite by nitrate was found to be of minor importance or negligible. The study also highlights that the depositional history of the aquifer, and the associated differences in mineralogy and geochemistry, need to be considered when estimating groundwater quality evolution during the injection of various water types for aquifer replenishment or other management purposes.

  7. Retention of ionisable compounds on high-performance liquid chromatography XIX. pH variation in mobile phases containing formic acid, piperazine and tris as buffering systems and methanol as organic modifier.

    PubMed

    Subirats, Xavier; Bosch, Elisabeth; Rosés, Martí

    2009-07-10

    In previous works a model to estimate the pH of methanol-aqueous buffer mobile phases from the aqueous pH and concentration of the buffer and the fraction of organic modifier was developed. This model was successfully applied and validated for buffers prepared from ammonia, acetic, phosphoric and citric acids. In the present communication this model has been extended to formic acid, piperazine and tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane buffers. Prior to the modelling work, the pK(a) values of the studied buffers at several methanol-water compositions were determined.

  8. Control of groundwater pH during bioremediation: Improvement and validation of a geochemical model to assess the buffering potential of ground silicate minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, Elsa; Brovelli, Alessandro; Holliger, Christof; Barry, D. A.

    2014-05-01

    Accurate control of groundwater pH is of critical importance for in situ biological treatment of chlorinated solvents. The use of ground silicate minerals mixed with groundwater is an appealing buffering strategy as silicate minerals may act as long-term sources of alkalinity. In a previous study, we developed a geochemical model for evaluation of the pH buffering capacity of such minerals. The model included the main microbial processes driving groundwater acidification as well as mineral dissolution. In the present study, abiotic mineral dissolution experiments were conducted with five silicate minerals (andradite, diopside, fayalite, forsterite, nepheline). The goal of the study was to validate the model and to test the buffering capacity of the candidate minerals identified previously. These five minerals increased the pH from acidic to neutral and slightly basic values. The model was revised and improved to represent better the experimental observations. In particular, the experiments revealed the importance of secondary mineral precipitation on the buffering potential of silicates, a process not included in the original formulation. The main secondary phases likely to precipitate were identified through model calibration, as well as the degree of saturation at which they formed. The predictions of the revised geochemical model were in good agreement with the observations, with a correlation coefficient higher than 0.9 in most cases. This study confirmed the potential of silicates to act as pH control agents and showed the reliability of the geochemical model, which can be used as a design tool for field applications.

  9. Influence of biodegradation processes on the duration of CaCO3 as a pH buffer in municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C Annette; Furrer, Gerhard

    2002-01-15

    The long-term leachability of heavy metals from municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash is of concern because of its potential use as a secondary construction material. Calcite is the most important long-term buffer in MSWI bottom ash as it buffers solutions during percolation and is an important factor in the control of heavy-metal mobility. It has been argued that biodegradation of residual organic material in the MSWI is a significant source of acidity. Model calculations have therefore been carried out to determine the influence of biodegradation on the longevity of the calcite buffer. Using the program STEADYQL, which couples thermodynamic equilibrium with kinetically controlled reactions, solution composition was estimated at steady state. The concentration of Ca dissolved from calcite was estimated in the presence and absence of gypsum as a function of the reaction rate of a number of slow reactions: aerobic, ferrogenic, sulfogenic, and methanogenic biodegradation; diffusion of O2 into the system; degassing of CO2 out of the system; and dissolution of Ca silicate. It was found that, independent of the rate, the biodegradation of organic matter had little influence on the longevity of the calcite buffer (between 2,000 and 3,000 yr for a deposit of 1 m in depth), that anaerobic biodegradation may have a slight retarding effect, and that calcite dissolution due to acid input via precipitation was negligible (around 3% of the total at reference conditions for rainwater with a pH value of 4.3).

  10. [Effect of pH of Adsorption Buffers on the Number and Antigen-Binding Activity of Monoclonal Antibodies Immobilized on the Surface of Polystyrene Microplates].

    PubMed

    Tarakanova, Yu N; Dmitriev, A D; Massino, Yu S; Pechelulko, A A; Segal, O L; Skoblov, Yu O; Ulanova, T I; Lavrov, V F; Dmitriev, D A

    2015-01-01

    The change in the concentration and antigen-binding activity of 28 monoclonal antibodies was studied after their adsorption on the surface of polystyrene microplates in buffers with different pH values (1.0, 2.8, 7.5, 9.6, and 11.9). We used 16 clones to the HIV p24 protein and 12 clones to the surface antigen of Hepatitis B Virus. The binding efficiency of adsorbed antibodies to the labeled antigen was evaluated by the slope of the linear region of the binding curve to the concentration axis. It was shown that the antigen-binding activity of six antibodies (21.5%) statistically significantly increased after adsorption at pH 2.8 and 11.9 as compared to pH 7.5 and 9.5. The maximum amount of antibodies was found to be adsorbed on the solid surface at pH 7.5. The analysis of the binding of 125I-HBs-antigen to adsorbed antibodies made it possible to evaluate the concentration of active antibodies on the polystyrene surface. It was shown that the increase in the antigen-binding activity was due to an increase in the proportion of antibodies with retained activity after adsorption at pH 2.8 and 11.9. Under these conditions, about 20% of the antibodies retained their antigen-binding activity, and 6% did so after immobilization at pH 7.5.

  11. A Novel Mechanism of pH Buffering in C. elegans Glia: Bicarbonate Transport via the Voltage-Gated ClC Cl− Channel CLH-1

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Jeff; Matthewman, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    An important function of glia is the maintenance of the ionic composition and pH of the synaptic microenvironment. In terms of pH regulation, HCO3− buffering has been shown to be important in both glia and neurons. Here, we used in vivo fluorescent pH imaging and RNA sequencing of the amphid sheath glia of Caenorhabditis elegans to reveal a novel mechanism of cellular HCO3− uptake. While the classical mechanism of HCO3− uptake involves Na+/HCO3− cotransporters, here we demonstrate that the C. elegans ClC Cl− channel CLH-1 is highly permeable to HCO3− and mediates HCO3− uptake into amphid sheath glia. CLH-1 has homology and electrophysiological properties similar to the mammalian ClC-2 Cl− channel. Our data suggest that, in addition to maintaining synaptic Cl− concentration, these channels may also be involved in maintenance of synaptic pH via HCO3− flux. These findings provide an exciting new facet of study regarding how pH is regulated in the brain. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Maintenance of pH is essential for the physiological function of the nervous system. HCO3− is crucial for pH regulation and is transported into the cell via ion transporters, including ion channels, the molecular identity of which remains unclear. In this manuscript, we describe our discovery that the C. elegans amphid sheath glia regulate intracellular pH via HCO3− flux through the voltage-gated ClC channel CLH-1. This represents a novel function for ClC channels, which has implications for their possible role in mammalian glial pH regulation. This discovery may also provide a novel therapeutic target for pathologic conditions, such as ischemic stroke where acidosis leads to widespread death of glia and subsequently neurons. PMID:26674864

  12. 3-D Surface Visualization of pH Titration "Topos": Equivalence Point Cliffs, Dilution Ramps, and Buffer Plateaus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Garon C.; Hossain, Md Mainul; MacCarthy, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    3-D topographic surfaces ("topos") can be generated to visualize how pH behaves during titration and dilution procedures. The surfaces are constructed by plotting computed pH values above a composition grid with volume of base added in one direction and overall system dilution on the other. What emerge are surface features that…

  13. Fluctuations in surface pH of maturing rat incisor enamel are a result of cycles of H(+)-secretion by ameloblasts and variations in enamel buffer characteristics.

    PubMed

    Damkier, Helle H; Josephsen, Kaj; Takano, Yoshiro; Zahn, Dirk; Fejerskov, Ole; Frische, Sebastian

    2014-03-01

    It is disputed if ameloblasts in the maturation zone of the enamel organ mainly buffer protons released by hydroxyapatite (HA) crystal growth or if they periodically secrete protons to create alternating acidic and alkaline conditions. The latter hypothesis predicts alternating pH regimes in maturing enamel, which would be affected by pharmacological interference with ameloblast H(+)-secretion. This study tests these predictions. Colorimetric pH-indicators and ratiometric fluorometry were used to measure surface pH in maturation zone enamel of rat incisors. Alternating acidic (down to pH6.24±0.06) and alkaline zones (up to pH7.34±0.08) were found along the tooth coinciding with ameloblast morphological cycles. Underlying the cyclic pattern, a gradual decrease in pH towards the incisal edge was seen. Vinblastine or FR167356 (H(+)-ATPase-inhibitor) disturbed ameloblast acid-secretion, especially in the early parts of acidic zones. Enamel surface pH reflects the titration state of surface PO4(3-)-ions. At the pH-values observed, PO4(3-) would be protonated (pKa>12) and HA dissolved. However, by molecular dynamics simulations we estimate the pKa of HPO4(2-) at an ideal HA surface to be 4.3. The acidic pH measured at the enamel surface may thus only dissolve non-perfect domains of HA crystals in which PO4(3-) is less electrostatically shielded. During repeated alkaline/acidic cycles, near-perfect HA-domains may therefore gradually replace less perfect HA-domains resulting in near-perfect HA-crystals. In conclusion, cyclic changes in ameloblast H(+)-secretion and the degree of enamel maturation determine enamel surface pH. This is in accordance with a hypothesis implicating H(+)-ATPase mediated acid-secretion by ameloblasts.

  14. Aerosol pH buffering in the southeastern US: Fine particles remain highly acidic despite large reductions in sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, R. J.; Guo, H.; Russell, A. G.; Nenes, A.

    2015-12-01

    pH is a critical aerosol property that impacts many atmospheric processes, including biogenic secondary organic aerosol formation, gas-particle phase partitioning, and mineral dust or redox metal mobilization. Particle pH has also been linked to adverse health effects. Using a comprehensive data set from the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) as the basis for thermodynamic modeling, we have shown that particles are currently highly acidic in the southeastern US, with pH between 0 and 2. Sulfate and ammonium are the main acid-base components that determine particle pH in this region, however they have different sources and their concentrations are changing. Over 15 years of network data show that sulfur dioxide emission reductions have resulted in a roughly 70 percent decrease in sulfate, whereas ammonia emissions, mainly link to agricultural activities, have been largely steady, as have gas phase ammonia concentrations. This has led to the view that particles are becoming more neutralized. However, sensitivity analysis, based on thermodynamic modeling, to changing sulfate concentrations indicates that particles have remained highly acidic over the past decade, despite the large reductions in sulfate. Furthermore, anticipated continued reductions of sulfate and relatively constant ammonia emissions into the future will not significantly change particle pH until sulfate drops to clean continental background levels. The result reshapes our expectation of future particle pH and implies that atmospheric processes and adverse health effects linked to particle acidity will remain unchanged for some time into the future.

  15. Effects of sodium hypochlorite and high pH buffer solution in electrokinetic soil treatment on soil chromium removal and the functional diversity of soil microbial community.

    PubMed

    Cang, Long; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Alshawabkeh, Akram N; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2007-04-02

    Effects of sodium hypochlorite (NaClO), applied as an oxidant in catholyte, and high pH buffer solution on soil Cr removal and the functional diversity of soil microbial community during enhanced electrokinetic treatments of a chromium (Cr) contaminated red soil are evaluated. Using pH control system to maintain high alkalinity of soil together with the use of NaClO increased the electrical conductivities of soil pore liquid and electroosmotic flux compared with the control (Exp-01). The pH control and NaClO improved the removal of Cr(VI) and total Cr from the soil. The highest removal percentages of soil Cr(VI) and total Cr were 96 and 72%, respectively, in Exp-04 when the pH value of the anolyte was controlled at 10 and NaClO was added in the catholyte. The alkaline soil environment and introduction of NaClO in the soil enhanced the desorption of Cr(VI) from the soil and promoted Cr(III) oxidation to mobile Cr(VI), respectively. However, the elevated pH and introduction of NaClO in the soil, which are necessary for improving the removal efficiency of soil Cr, resulted in a significantly adverse impact on the functional diversity of soil microbial community. It suggests that to assess the negative impact of extreme conditions for enhancing the extraction efficiencies of Cr on the soil properties and function is necessary.

  16. Hydrolytically stable, diaminocarboxylic acid-based membranes buffering in the pH range from 6 to 8.5 for isoelectric trapping separations.

    PubMed

    Fleisher, Helen C; Vigh, Gyula

    2005-06-01

    Diaminocarboxylic acid carrier ampholytes, such as L-histidine, 2,3-diaminopropionic acid, L-ornithine, and L-lysine, were reacted with glycerol-1,3-diglycidyl ether (GDGE) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) in the presence of sodium hydroxide to produce hydrolytically and mechanically stable hydrogels, supported on a PVA substrate, for use as buffering membranes in isoelectric trapping (IET) separations. The pH values of the DACAPVA membranes were determined with the help of small-molecule pI markers and proteins and were found to be in the 6 < pH < 8.5 range. The membranes were successfully used to isoelectrically trap small ampholytes, desalt ampholyte solutions in IET mode, and effect the binary separation of chicken egg white proteins.

  17. Simultaneous measurement of pH and membrane potential in rat dorsal vagal motoneurons during normoxia and hypoxia: a comparison in bicarbonate and HEPES buffers.

    PubMed

    Cowan, A I; Martin, R L

    1995-12-01

    1. The effects of oxygenated and hypoxic bicarbonate/CO2, 10 and 25 mM N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES)-buffered artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) have been studied in a rat brain slice preparation. Double-barreled pH-selective microelectrodes were used to measure intracellular pH (pHi) and membrane potential in dorsal vagal motoneurons (DVMs) and to measure extracellular pH (pHe) in the dorsal vagal motonucleus. 2. In bicarbonate ACSF, pHi averaged 7.24 +/- 0.05 (mean +/- SE, n = 21) and ranged from 6.86 to 7.79 pH units. pHe averaged 7.13 +/- 0.08 (n = 10). 3. On changing from oxygenated bicarbonate ACSF to either 10 or 25 mM HEPES ACSF, pHi decreased by 0.13-0.15 units, and the membrane depolarized by 10-11 mV. pHe also decreased in 10 mM HEPES ACSF (pHe 6.89 +/- 0.02, n = 8) but not in 25 mM HEPES ACSF (pHe 7.15 +/- 0.06, n = 3). In most neurons changes in pHi preceded changes in membrane potential. 4. In bicarbonate ACSF and in 25 mM HEPES ACSF, there was a significant linear relationship between prehypoxic pHi and the direction and amplitude of the hypoxia-induced membrane potential change (either an hyperpolarization or a depolarization). 5. In 10 mM HEPES ACSF, hypoxia always induced a depolarization; there was no correlation between prehypoxic pHi and the membrane potential response. 6. In bicarbonate ACSF and in 10 and 25 mM HEPES ACSF, hypoxia resulted in intracellular and extracellular acidification. However, the extracellular acidification in hypoxic 10 mM HEPES buffer was most pronounced (pH 6.40 +/- 0.11, n = 8), reflecting a preexisting extracellular acidification in oxygenated 10 mM HEPES buffer. 7. Various hypotheses that could give rise to a relationship between changes in membrane potential and pH are discussed; arguments are presented in favor of the concept that modulation of ion channels by either pHi or pHe, or both, is responsible for the observed correlations.

  18. Influence of N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid pH buffer on the biological response of marine algae.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, M Teresa S D; Leal, Maria Fernanda C

    2002-02-01

    The N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) is extensively used as pH buffer in culture media for testing chemicals. However, this study demonstrates that 0.01 M HEPES significantly reduces the rate of Cu, Pb, and Cd binding to Porphyra spp. and Enteromorpha spp. marine macroalgae. The HEPES also decreased the accumulation of Cu, Pb, and Cd but not Hg by these macroalgae. Both the extracellular adsorption and the intracellular uptake of the metals were influenced by HEPES to a similar extent. The HEPES also promoted the release of exudates by the algae, and these exudates form very stable complexes with Cu (and probably with other trace metal ions). The HEPES interference varied with the nature of the metal, the macroalga, and the season. The presence of 0.01 M HEPES in seawater cultures of the Emiliania huxleyi (a microalga) also interfered with E. huxleyi growth, liberation of Cu-complexing organic ligands, and Cu uptake. The HEPES, which displays surface activity, may facilitate the binding of metals to the algae for an initial exposure period. The metal taken up appears to stimulate the liberation of exudates that subsequently control the bioavailability of the metals and therefore metal uptake. Because HEPES can control the uptake of trace metals by algae and the production of organic ligands, the results obtained in cultures containing the HEPES pH buffer can be influenced by this component of the media.

  19. A buffering system to reduce pH drop during pre-enrichment of broiler feeds and feed ingredients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous research has demonstrated that during preenrichment for the detection of Salmonella in feed and feed ingredients the pH decreased from 6.8-7.0 to 3.9-5.6 after 24 hr incubation. These acidic conditions can kill and injure salmonellae which might result in contaminated feed going undetected...

  20. Enhancing hydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cells by in situ hydrogen oxidation for self-buffering pH through periodic polarity reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuli; Qin, Mohan; Yang, Xiaoli; He, Zhen

    2017-04-01

    Successful pH control plays a key role in hydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). Herein, periodic polarity reversal (PPR) is applied to a dual-cathode MEC and achieves the enhanced hydrogen production. The MEC with PPR produces 1.3 ± 0.1 m3 H2 m-3d-1 with 50-mM NaCl as the catholyte, much higher than 0.9 ± 0.1 m3 H2 m-3d-1 from the MEC with dual-working cathodes or 0.8 ± 0.1 m3 H2 m-3d-1 from the MEC with one working cathode. Such enhancement benefits from a slower increase in the catholyte pH, for example, it takes 15.3 h to increase the 10-mM NaCl pH from 7.00 to 12.00 in the MEC with PPR, 1.7-3.6 times that of the MECs without PPR, which is due to the decrease in the catholyte pH of the reversed cathode during PPR. The potential of the reversed electrode is more positive than the anode, suggesting that the reversed electrode acts as a second anode electrode using residue hydrogen gas as an electron source. Thus, a mechanism of in situ oxidation of hydrogen gas for pH buffering is proposed and discussed. These findings have provided a simple but effective pH control strategy for enhancing hydrogen production in MECs.

  1. Effect of HEPES buffer systems upon the pH, growth and survival of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides small colony (MmmSC) vaccine cultures.

    PubMed

    Waite, E R; March, J B

    2001-07-24

    The use of a buffer system based on N-[2-hydroxyethyl]piperazine-N'-[2-ethanesulfonic acid] (HEPES), in conjunction with standard Gourlay's culture medium was investigated for the growth and maintenance of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC vaccine strain T(1)44. When the initial pH of the culture medium was adjusted to 8.0, 0.075 M HEPES-NaOH was found to be sufficient to prevent the pH falling below 7.1 at any stage during the growth cycle, even in the presence of 0.5% glucose. Compared to growth in standard unbuffered Gourlay's medium, the final culture titre was found to be one log(10) higher, at 10(11) colour changing units (CCU) per ml, and considerably extended culture survival was observed at 37 degrees C. The titre remained above 10(10) CCU ml(-1) for 4 days, and above 10(8) CCU ml(-1) in excess of 1 month. After 4 month's storage at 37 degrees C the titre had fallen to 5x10(4) CCU ml(-1). In contrast, no viable bacteria could be detected in standard unbuffered medium 3 days after the onset of stationary phase, at which point the pH had dropped to 5.4. No significant difference in growth rate between the two media was observed. Adoption of a HEPES-NaOH buffer system by African vaccine manufacturers should require minimal changes to current formulations and procedures, and should enhance both the final titre and thermostability of freeze-dried and liquid broth vaccines against contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP).

  2. The effect of buffering dairy cow diets with limestone, calcareous marine algae, or sodium bicarbonate on ruminal pH profiles, production responses, and rumen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cruywagen, C W; Taylor, S; Beya, M M; Calitz, T

    2015-08-01

    Six ruminally cannulated Holstein cows were used to evaluate the effect of 2 dietary buffers on rumen pH, milk production, milk composition, and rumen fermentation parameters. A high concentrate total mixed ration [35.2% forage dry matter (DM)], formulated to be potentially acidotic, was used to construct 3 dietary treatments in which calcareous marine algae (calcified remains of the seaweed Lithothamnium calcareum) was compared with limestone (control) and sodium bicarbonate plus limestone. One basal diet was formulated and the treatment diets contained either 0.4% of dietary DM as Acid Buf, a calcified marine algae product (AB treatment), or 0.8% of dietary DM as sodium bicarbonate and 0.37% as limestone (BC treatment), or 0.35% of dietary DM as limestone [control (CON) treatment]. Cows were randomly allocated to treatments according to a double 3×3 Latin square design, with 3 treatments and 3 periods. The total experimental period was 66 d during which each cow received each treatment for a period of 15 d before the data collection period of 7 d. Rumen fluid was collected to determine volatile fatty acids, lactic acid, and ammonia concentrations. Rumen pH was monitored every 10min for 2 consecutive days using a portable data logging system fitted with in-dwelling electrodes. Milk samples were analyzed for solid and mineral contents. The effect of treatment on acidity was clearly visible, especially from the period from midday to midnight when rumen pH dropped below 5.5 for a longer period of time (13 h) in the CON treatment than in the BC (8.7 h) and AB (4 h) treatments. Daily milk, 4% fat-corrected milk, and energy-corrected milk yields differed among treatments, with AB being the highest, followed by BC and CON. Both buffers increased milk fat content. Treatment had no effect on milk protein content, but protein yield was increased in the AB treatment. Total rumen volatile fatty acids and acetate concentrations were higher and propionate was lower in the AB

  3. Effect of heavy metals on pH buffering capacity and solubility of Ca, Mg, K, and P in non-spiked and heavy metal-spiked soils.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Sarvenaz; Jalali, Mohsen

    2016-06-01

    In many parts of the world, soil acidification and heavy metal contamination has become a serious concern due to the adverse effects on chemical properties of soil and crop yield. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pH (in the range of 1 to 3 units above and below the native pH of soils) on calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), and phosphorus (P) solubility in non-spiked and heavy metal-spiked soil samples. Spiked samples were prepared by cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn) as chloride salts and incubating soils for 40 days. The pH buffering capacity (pHBC) of each sample was determined by plotting the amount of H(+) or OH(-) added (mmol kg(-1)) versus the related pH value. The pHBC of soils ranged from 47.1 to 1302.5 mmol kg(-1) for non-spiked samples and from 45.0 to 1187.4 mmol kg(-1) for spiked soil samples. The pHBC values were higher in soil 2 (non-spiked and spiked) which had higher calcium carbonate content. The results indicated the presence of heavy metals in soils generally decreased the solution pH and pHBC values in spiked samples. In general, solubility of Ca, Mg, and K decreased with increasing equilibrium pH of non-spiked and spiked soil samples. In the case of P, increasing the pH to about 7, decreased the solubility in all soils but further increase of pH from 7, enhanced P solubility. The solubility trends and values for Ca, Mg, and K did not differed significantly in non-spiked and spiked samples. But in the case of P, a reduction in solubility was observed in heavy metal-spiked soils. The information obtained in this study can be useful to make better estimation of the effects of soil pollutants on anion and cation solubility from agricultural and environmental viewpoints.

  4. Retention of ionisable compounds on high-performance liquid chromatography XVIII: pH variation in mobile phases containing formic acid, piperazine, tris, boric acid or carbonate as buffering systems and acetonitrile as organic modifier.

    PubMed

    Subirats, Xavier; Bosch, Elisabeth; Rosés, Martí

    2009-03-20

    In the present work dissociation constants of commonly used buffering species, formic acid, piperazine, tris(hydroxymethyl)-aminomethane, boric acid and carbonate, have been determined for several acetonitrile-water mixtures. From these pK(a) values a previous model has been successfully evaluated to estimate pH values in acetonitrile-aqueous buffer mobile phases from the aqueous pH and concentration of the above mentioned buffers up to 60% of acetonitrile, and aqueous buffer concentrations between 0.005 (0.001 mol L(-1) for formic acid-formate) and 0.1 mol L(-1). The relationships derived for the presently studied buffers, together with those established for previously considered buffering systems, allow a general prediction of the pH variation of the most commonly used HPLC buffers when the composition of the acetonitrile-water mobile phase changes during the chromatographic process, such as in gradient elution. Thus, they are an interesting tool that can be easily implemented in general retention models to predict retention of acid-base analytes and optimize chromatographic separations.

  5. Inhibition of potato polyphenol oxidase by anions and activity in various carboxylate buffers (pH 4.8) at constant ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Malkin, B D; Thickman, K R; Markworth, C J; Wilcox, D E; Kull, F J

    2001-01-01

    The activity of potato polyphenol oxidase (tyrosinase) toward DL-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (K(M) 5.39 mM) was studied using a variety of carboxylate buffers at a common pH and ionic strength. Enzyme activity, greatest in citrate and least in oxalate, correlated with increasing carboxyl concentration and molecular mass. The lower activity in oxalate was attributed to more effective chelation of a copper(II) form of the enzyme by the oxalate dianion. Sodium halide salts inhibited the enzyme. Although there was little difference in inhibition between sodium and potassium salts, the degree and type of inhibition was anion dependent; K(is), values for NaCl and KCl, (competitive inhibitors) were 1.82 and 1.62 mM, whereas Na(2) SO(4) and K(2) SO(4) (mixed inhibitors) had K(is) and K(ii) values in the 250 to 450 mM range.

  6. Kinetic buffers.

    PubMed

    Alibrandi, Giuseppe; Fabbrizzi, Luigi; Licchelli, Maurizio; Puglisi, Antonio

    2015-01-12

    This paper proposes a new type of molecular device that is able to act as an inverse proton sponge to slowly decrease the pH inside a reaction vessel. This makes the automatic monitoring of the concentration of pH-sensitive systems possible. The device is a composite formed of an alkyl chloride, which kinetically produces acidity, and a buffer that thermodynamically modulates the variation in pH value. Profiles of pH versus time (pH-t plots) have been generated under various experimental conditions by computer simulation, and the device has been tested by carrying out automatic spectrophotometric titrations, without using an autoburette. To underline the wide variety of possible applications, this new system has been used to realize and monitor HCl uptake by a di-copper(II) bistren complex in a single run, in a completely automatic experiment.

  7. Estimation of salivary flow rate, pH, buffer capacity, calcium, total protein content and total antioxidant capacity in relation to dental caries severity, age and gender

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Pallavi; Reddy, N. Venugopal; Rao, V. Arun Prasad; Saxena, Aditya; Chaudhary, C. P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate salivary flow rate, pH, buffering capacity, calcium, total protein content and total antioxidant capacity in relation to dental caries, age and gender. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 120 healthy children aged 7–15 years that was further divided into two groups: 7–10 years and 11–15 years. In this 60 children with DMFS/dfs = 0 and 60 children with DMFS/dfs ≥5 were included. The subjects were divided into two groups; Group A: Children with DMFS/dfs = 0 (caries-free) Group B: Children with DMFS/dfs ≥5 (caries active). Unstimulated saliva samples were collected from all groups. Flow rates were determined, and samples analyzed for pH, buffer capacity, calcium, total protein and total antioxidant status. Salivary antioxidant activity is measured with spectrophotometer by an adaptation of 2,2’-azino-di-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonate) assays. Results: The mean difference of the two groups; caries-free and caries active were proved to be statistically significant (P < 0.05) for salivary calcium, total protein and total antioxidant level for both the sexes in the age group 7–10 years and for the age 11–15 years the mean difference of the two groups were proved to be statistically significant (P < 0.05) for salivary calcium level for both the sexes. Salivary total protein and total antioxidant level were proved to be statistically significant for male children only. Conclusions: In general, total protein and total antioxidants in saliva were increased with caries activity. Calcium content of saliva was found to be more in caries-free group and increased with age. PMID:25821379

  8. Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) Sodium Bicarbonate/Carbonate Buffer in an Open Aqueous Carbon Dioxide System and Corollary Electrochemical/Chemical Reactions Relative to System pH Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegman, Thomas W.; Wilson, Mark E.; Glasscock, Brad; Holt, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) experienced a number of chemical changes driven by system absorption of CO2 which altered the coolant’s pH. The natural effects of the decrease in pH from approximately 9.2 to less than 8.4 had immediate consequences on system corrosion rates and corrosion product interactions with specified coolant constituents. The alkalinity of the system was increased through the development and implementation of a carbonate/bicarbonate buffer that would increase coolant pH to 9.0 – 10.0 and maintain pH above 9.0 in the presence of ISS cabin concentrations of CO2 up to twenty times higher than ground concentrations. This paper defines how a carbonate/bicarbonate buffer works in an open carbon dioxide system and summarizes the analyses performed on the buffer for safe and effective application in the on-orbit system. The importance of the relationship between the cabin environment and the IATCS is demonstrated as the dominant factor in understanding the system chemistry and pH trends before and after addition of the carbonate/bicarbonate buffer. The paper also documents the corollary electrochemical and chemical reactions the system has experienced and the rationale for remediation of these effects with the addition of the carbonate/bicarbonate buffer.

  9. New applications of pHluorin--measuring intracellular pH of prototrophic yeasts and determining changes in the buffering capacity of strains with affected potassium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Maresová, Lydie; Hosková, Barbora; Urbánková, Eva; Chaloupka, Roman; Sychrová, Hana

    2010-06-01

    pHluorin is a pH-sensitive variant of green fluorescent protein for measuring intracellular pH (pH(in)) in living cells. We constructed a new pHluorin plasmid with the dominant selection marker KanMX. This plasmid allows pH measurements in cells without auxotrophic mutations and/or grown in chemically indefinite media. We observed differing values of pH(in) for three prototrophic wild-types. The new construct was also used to determine the pH(in) in strains differing in the activity of the plasma membrane Pma1 H(+)-ATPase and the influence of glucose on pH(in). We describe in detail pHluorin measurements performed in a microplate reader, which require much less hands-on time and much lower cell culture volumes compared to standard cuvettes measurements. We also utilized pHluorin in a new method of measuring the buffering capacity of yeast cell cytosol in vivo, shown to be ca. 52 mM/pH for wild-type yeast and moderately decreased in mutants with affected potassium transport.

  10. Equilibrium drug solubility measurements in 96-well plates reveal similar drug solubilities in phosphate buffer pH 6.8 and human intestinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Tiina; Karjalainen, Milja; Ojala, Krista; Partola, Kirsi; Lammert, Frank; Augustijns, Patrick; Urtti, Arto; Yliperttula, Marjo; Peltonen, Leena; Hirvonen, Jouni

    2011-02-28

    This study was conducted to develop a high throughput screening (HTS) method for the assessment of equilibrium solubility of drugs. Solid-state compounds were precipitated from methanol in 96-well plates, in order to eliminate the effect of co-solvent. Solubility of twenty model drugs was analyzed in water and aqueous solutions (pH 1.2 and 6.8) in 96-well plates and in shake-flasks (UV detection). The results obtained with the 96-well plate method correlated well (R(2)=0.93) between the shake-flask and 96-well plates over the wide concentration scale of 0.002-169.2mg/ml. Thereafter, the solubility tests in 96-well plates were performed using fasted state human intestinal fluid (HIF) from duodenum of healthy volunteers. The values of solubility were similar in phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.8) and HIF over the solubility range of 10(2)-10(5)μg/ml. The new 96-well plate method is useful for the screening of equilibrium drug solubility during the drug discovery process and it also allows the use of human intestinal fluid in solubility screening.

  11. Interactions of proteins with other polyelectrolytes in a two-phase system containing phenol and aqueous buffers at various pH values

    PubMed Central

    Pusztai, A.

    1966-01-01

    1. Interactions of proteins with neutral polysaccharides and such polyacids as polygalacturonic acid, chondroitin sulphate, RNA and DNA in a two-phase system composed of phenol and aqueous buffers in the pH range 1·5–10 were studied. 2. Analysis of the products of the interaction was facilitated by the absolute preference of the proteins studied for the phenol-rich phase at all pH values. 3. The polyacids, on the other hand, in the absence of interactions were recovered mainly from the aqueous phases. 4. The interaction, the extent of which was mainly determined by the pH-dependent ionization state of the reacting partners, followed the patterns of antigen–antibody interactions with a well-defined equivalence point (maximum point of precipitation) and with the formation of soluble complexes. 5. The soluble complexes formed below the equivalence point were composed of proteins with small amounts of polyacids attached, and so passed into the phenol-rich phase; those formed above the maximum precipitation point were polyacidic in character and found in the aqueous phases. 6. Glycoproteins, with small amounts of covalently linked sugar residues, passed quantitatively into the phenol-rich phases. 7. The possibilities of developing a method for the analysis of glycoproteins and other applications are discussed. PMID:5965351

  12. Dual role of CO2/HCO3(-) buffer in the regulation of intracellular pH of three-dimensional tumor growths.

    PubMed

    Hulikova, Alzbeta; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D; Swietach, Pawel

    2011-04-22

    Intracellular pH (pH(i)), a major modulator of cell function, is regulated by acid/base transport across membranes. Excess intracellular H(+) ions (e.g. produced by respiration) are extruded by transporters such as Na(+)/H(+) exchange, or neutralized by HCO(3)(-) taken up by carriers such as Na(+)-HCO(3)(-) cotransport. Using fluorescence pH(i) imaging, we show that cancer-derived cell lines (colorectal HCT116 and HT29, breast MDA-MB-468, pancreatic MiaPaca2, and cervical HeLa) extrude acid by H(+) efflux and HCO(3)(-) influx, largely sensitive to dimethylamiloride and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (DIDS), respectively. The magnitude of HCO(3)(-) influx was comparable among the cell lines and may represent a constitutive element of tumor pH(i) regulation. In contrast, H(+) efflux varied considerably (MDA-MB-468 > HCT116 > HT29 > MiaPaca2 > HeLa). When HCO(3)(-) flux was pharmacologically inhibited, acid extrusion in multicellular HT29 and HCT116 spheroids (∼10,000 cells) was highly non-uniform and produced low pH(i) at the core. With depth, acid extrusion became relatively more DIDS-sensitive because the low extracellular pH at the spheroid core inhibits H(+) flux more than HCO(3)(-) flux. HCO(3)(-) flux inhibition also decelerated HCT116 spheroid growth. In the absence of CO(2)/HCO(3)(-), acid extrusion by H(+) flux in HCT116 and MDA-MB-468 spheroids became highly non-uniform and inadequate at the core. This is because H(+) transporters require extracellular mobile pH buffers, such as CO(2)/HCO(3)(-), to overcome low H(+) ion mobility and chaperone H(+) ions away from cells. CO(2)/HCO(3)(-) exerts a dual effect: as substrate for membrane-bound HCO(3)(-) transporters and as a mobile buffer for facilitating extracellular diffusion of H(+) ions extruded from cells. These processes can be augmented by carbonic anhydrase activity. We conclude that CO(2)/HCO(3)(-) is important for maintaining uniformly alkaline pH(i) in small, non-vascularized tumor

  13. Peak shapes of acids and bases under overloaded conditions in reversed-phase liquid chromatography, with weakly buffered mobile phases of various pH: A thermodynamic interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2009-01-01

    We measured overloaded band profiles for a series of nine compounds (phenol, caffeine, 3-phenyl 1-propanol, 2-phenylbutyric acid, amphetamine, aniline, benzylamine, p-toluidine, and procainamidium chloride) on columns packed with four different C{sub 18}-bonded packing materials: XTerra-C{sub 18}, Gemini-C{sub 18}, Luna-C{sub 18}(2), and Halo-C{sub 18}, using buffered methanol-water mobile phases. The {sub W}{sup S}pH of the mobile phase was increased from 2.6 to 11.3. The buffer concentration (either phosphate, acetate, or carbonate buffers) was set constant at values below the maximum concentration of the sample in the band. The influence of the surface chemistry of the packing material on the retention and the shape of the peaks was investigated. Adsorbents having a hybrid inorganic/organic structure tend to give peaks exhibiting moderate or little tailing. The retention and the shape of the band profiles can easily be interpreted at {sub W}{sup S}pHs that are well above or well below the {sub W}{sup S}pK{sub a} of the compound studied. In contrast, the peak shapes in the intermediary pH range (i.e., close to the compound {sub W}{sup S}pK{sub a}) have rarely been studied. These shapes reveal the complexity of the competitive adsorption behavior of couples of acido-basic conjugated compounds at {sub W}{sup S}pHs that are close to their {sub W}{sup S}pK{sub a}. They also reveal the role of the buffer capacity on the resulting peak shape. With increasing {sub W}{sup S}pH, the overloaded profiles are first langmuirian (isotherm type I) at low {sub W}{sup S}pHs, they become S-shaped (isotherm type II), then anti-langmuirian (isotherm type III), S-shaped again at intermediate {sub W}{sup S}pHs, and finally return to a langmuirian shape at high {sub W}{sup S}pHs. A new general adsorption isotherm model that takes into account the dissociation equilibrium of conjugated acidic and basic species in the bulk mobile phase accounts for these transient band shapes. An

  14. Buffer Therapy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Maria de Lourdes C; Silva, Ariosto S.; Bailey, Kate M.; Kumar, Nagi B.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Gatenby, Robert A.; Ibrahim-Hashim, Arig; Gillies, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Oral administration of pH buffers can reduce the development of spontaneous and experimental metastases in mice, and has been proposed in clinical trials. Effectiveness of buffer therapy is likely to be affected by diet, which could contribute or interfere with the therapeutic alkalinizing effect. Little data on food pH buffering capacity was available. This study evaluated the pH and buffering capacity of different foods to guide prospective trials and test the effect of the same buffer (lysine) at two different ionization states. Food groups were derived from the Harvard Food Frequency Questionnaire. Foods were blended and pH titrated with acid from initial pH values until 4.0 to determine “buffering score”, in mmol H+/pH unit. A “buffering score” was derived as the mEq H+ consumed per serving size to lower from initial to a pH 4.0, the postprandial pH of the distal duodenum. To differentiate buffering effect from any metabolic byproduct effects, we compared the effects of oral lysine buffers prepared at either pH 10.0 or 8.4, which contain 2 and 1 free base amines, respectively. The effect of these on experimental metastases formation in mice following tail vein injection of PC-3M prostate cancer cells were monitored with in vivo bioluminescence. Carbohydrates and dairy products’ buffering score varied between 0.5 and 19. Fruits and vegetables showed a low to zero buffering score. The score of meats varied between 6 and 22. Wine and juices had negative scores. Among supplements, sodium bicarbonate and Tums® had the highest buffering capacities, with scores of 11 and 20 per serving size, respectively. The “de-buffered” lysine had a less pronounced effect of prevention of metastases compared to lysine at pH 10. This study has demonstrated the anti-cancer effects of buffer therapy and suggests foods that can contribute to or compete with this approach to manage cancer. PMID:24371544

  15. Relative contribution of ruminal buffering systems to pH regulation in feedlot cattle fed either low- or high-forage diets.

    PubMed

    Chibisa, G E; Beauchemin, K A; Penner, G B

    2016-07-01

    The relative contribution of ruminal short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) absorption and salivary buffering to pH regulation could potentially change under different dietary conditions. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the effects of altering the ruminal supply of rapidly fermentable carbohydrate (CHO) on absorptive function and salivation in beef cattle. Eight heifers (mean BW±SD=410±14 kg) were randomly allocated to two treatments in a crossover design with 37-day periods. Dietary treatments were barley silage at 30% low forage (LF) or 70% high forage (HF) of dietary dry matter (DM), with the remainder of the diet consisting of barley grain (65% or 25% on a DM basis) and a constant level (5%) of supplement. The LF and HF diets contained 45.3% and 30.9% starch, and 4.1% and 14.0% physically effective fiber (DM basis), respectively. Ruminal pH was continuously measured from day 17 to day 23, whereas ruminal fluid was collected on day 23 to determine SCFA concentration. Ruminal liquid passage rate was determined on day 23 using Cr-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Eating or resting salivation was measured by collecting masticate (days 28 and 29) or saliva samples (days 30 and 31) at the cardia, respectively. On days 30 and 31, the temporarily isolated and washed reticulo-rumen technique was used to measure total, and Cl--competitive (an indirect measure of protein-mediated transport) absorption of acetate, propionate and butyrate. As a result of the higher dietary starch content and DM intake, the ruminal supply of rapidly fermentable CHO, total ruminal SCFA concentration (118 v. 95 mM; P<0.001) and osmolality (330 v. 306 mOsm/kg; P=0.018) were greater in cattle fed LF compared with HF. In addition, feeding LF resulted in a longer duration (2.50 v. 0.09 h/day; P=0.02) and a larger area (0.44 v. 0.01 (pH×h)/day; P=0.050) that pH was below 5.5. There was no diet effect on total and Cl--competitive absorption (mmol/h and %/h) of acetate, propionate

  16. Synthesis of UV-absorbing and fluorescent carrier ampholyte mixtures and their application for the determination of the operational pH values of buffering membranes used in isoelectric trapping separations.

    PubMed

    North, Robert; Hwang, Ann; Lalwani, Sanjiv; Shave, Evan; Vigh, Gyula

    2006-10-20

    Success in isoelectric trapping separations critically depends on the knowledge of the accurate operational pH value of the buffering membranes used. Currently, due to a lack of easy, rapid, accurate methods that can be used for the post-synthesis determination of the operational pH value of a buffering membrane, only nominal pH values calculated from the amounts of the reagents used in the synthesis of the membranes and their acid-base dissociation constants are available. To rectify this problem, UV-absorbing and fluorescent carrier ampholyte mixtures were prepared by alkylating pentaethylenehexamine with a chromophore and a fluorophore, followed by Michael addition of acrylic acid and itaconic acid to the resulting oligoamine. Carrier ampholyte mixtures, with evenly distributed absorbance values across the 3buffering membrane to be characterized. The pI value of the most basic UV-absorbing or fluorescent carrier ampholyte collected in the anodic separation compartment, determined by full-column imaging capillary isoelectric focusing analysis, indicates the operational pH value of the separation membrane.

  17. Evaluation of Flow Rate, pH, Buffering Capacity, Calcium, Total Proteins and Total Antioxidant Capacity Levels of Saliva in Caries Free and Caries Active Children: An In Vivo Study.

    PubMed

    Preethi, B P; Reshma, Dodawad; Anand, Pyati

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the physicochemical properties of saliva such as flow rate, pH, buffering capacity, calcium level, total protein and total antioxidant levels in caries free and caries active children. The present study included one hundred and twenty healthy children who were divided into two groups; group I and group II comprising of age groups 7-10 and 11-14 years, respectively. Both the groups were then sub-divided equally according to gender. They were further divided into caries free and caries active with 15 children in each group. Unstimulated saliva was collected by suction method and flow rates were determined. The samples were then analyzed for pH, buffering capacity, total protein, calcium and total antioxidant capacity. The data was statistically analyzed using student t test (unpaired). The results revealed that when all these parameters were compared among the caries free and caries active children, flow rate, pH, buffering capacity were slightly reduced in caries active children, but total protein and total antioxidant capacity of saliva increased significantly in caries active children and the total calcium decreased significantly in caries active children. Within the limitation of this study, we conclude that, the physicochemical properties of saliva play a major role in the development of caries.

  18. Buffer capacity of biologics--from buffer salts to buffering by antibodies.

    PubMed

    Karow, Anne R; Bahrenburg, Sven; Garidel, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Controlling pH is essential for a variety of biopharmaceutical process steps. The chemical stability of biologics such as monoclonal antibodies is pH-dependent and slightly acidic conditions are favorable for stability in a number of cases. Since control of pH is widely provided by added buffer salts, the current study summarizes the buffer characteristics of acetate, citrate, histidine, succinate, and phosphate buffers. Experimentally derived values largely coincide with values calculated from a model that had been proposed in 1922 by van Slyke. As high concentrated protein formulations become more and more prevalent for biologics, the self-buffering potential of proteins becomes of relevance. The current study provides information on buffer characteristics for pH ranges down to 4.0 and up to 8.0 and shows that a monoclonal antibody at 50 mg/mL exhibits similar buffer capacity as 6 mM citrate or 14 mM histidine (pH 5.0-6.0). Buffer capacity of antibody solutions scales linearly with protein concentration up to more than 200 mg/mL. At a protein concentration of 220 mg/mL, the buffer capacity resembles the buffer capacity of 30 mM citrate or 50 mM histidine (pH 5.0-6.0). The buffer capacity of monoclonal antibodies is practically identical at the process relevant temperatures 5, 25, and 40°C. Changes in ionic strength of ΔI=0.15, in contrast, can alter the buffer capacity up to 35%. In conclusion, due to efficient self-buffering by antibodies in the pH range of favored chemical stability, conventional buffer excipients could be dispensable for pH stabilization of high concentrated protein solutions.

  19. Dissolution reaction and surface iron speciation of UICC crocidolite in buffered solution at pH 7.4: A combined ICP-OES, XPS and TEM investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacella, Alessandro; Fantauzzi, Marzia; Turci, Francesco; Cremisini, Carlo; Montereali, Maria Rita; Nardi, Elisa; Atzei, Davide; Rossi, Antonella; Andreozzi, Giovanni B.

    2014-02-01

    The dissolution reaction and the surface modifications of crocidolite asbestos fibres incubated for 0.5, 1, 24, 48, 168 and 1440 h in a phosphate buffered solution at pH 7.4 with and without hydrogen peroxide were investigated. Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) was used to monitor the ion release into solution, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) was performed to unveil the chemistry of the leached surface, and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM) was carried out to monitor the structural modifications of the fibres. No significant differences were observed between dissolution experiments carried out with and without H2O2 with the exception of results after the first hour, from which it may be inferred that the dissolution proceeds faster in the presence of H2O2 but only in its very early steps. Congruent mobilization of Si and Mg from crocidolite was observed, increasing with time especially in the range between 1 and 48 h, while Ca decreased after 48 h and Fe was not detected at any incubation time. In the undersaturated conditions (0-48 h), dissolution rate of UICC crocidolite fibres has been estimated to be d(Si)/dt = 0.079 μmol h-1. The fibre surface modification is continuous with time: XPS results showed a regular depletion of Si and Mg and enrichment of Fe along dissolution. The Fe2p3/2 signal on the surface was fitted with four components at 709.0, 710.5, 711.6 and 712.8 eV binding energy values corresponding to: (i) Fe(II)-O and (ii) Fe(III)-O surrounded by oxygen atoms in the silicate structure, (iii) Fe(III)-OOH as a product of the dissolution process, and (iv) Fe in a phosphate precipitate (Fe-P), respectively. The evolution of Fe speciation on the crocidolite surface was followed by integrating the four photoemission peaks, and results showed that the oxidative environment promotes the formation of Fe(III)-O (up to 37% Fetot) and of Fe-P species (up to 16% Fetot), which are found on the fibre

  20. Free flow cell electrophoresis using zwitterionic buffer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodkey, R. Scott

    1990-01-01

    Studies of a zwitterionic buffer formulated for cell electrophoresis were done using the McDonnell-Douglas Continuous Flow Electrophoresis System. Standard buffers were analyzed for their stability in the electrical field and the results showed that both buffers tested were inherently unstable. Further, titration studies showed that the standards buffers buffered poorly at the pH employed for electrophoresis. The zwitterionic buffer buffered well at its nominal pH and was shown to be stable in the electrical field. Comparative studies of the buffer with standard cell separation buffers using formalin fixed rabbit and goose red blood cells showed that the zwitterionic buffer gave better resolution of the fixed cells. Studies with viable hybridoma cells showed that buffer Q supported cell viability equal to Hank's Balanced Salt Solution and that hybridoma cells in different stages of the growth cycle demonstrated reproducible differences in electrophoretic mobility.

  1. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is reduced to pyrroloquinoline quinol (PQQH2) by vitamin C, and PQQH2 produced is recycled to PQQ by air oxidation in buffer solution at pH 7.4.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Kazuo; Ouchi, Aya; Nagaoka, Shin-ichi; Nakano, Masahiko; Ikemoto, Kazuto

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the reaction of sodium salt of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQNa2) with vitamin C (Vit C) were performed in phosphate-buffered solution (pH 7.4) at 25 °C under nitrogen atmosphere, using UV-vis spectrophotometry. The absorption spectrum of PQQNa2 decreased in intensity due to the reaction with Vit C and was changed to that of pyrroloquinoline quinol (PQQH2, a reduced form of PQQ). One molecule of PQQ was reduced by two molecules of Vit C producing a molecule of PQQH2 in the buffer solution. PQQH2, thus produced, was recycled to PQQ due to air oxidation. PQQ and Vit C coexist in many biological systems, such as vegetables, fruits, as well as in human tissues. The results obtained suggest that PQQ is reduced by Vit C and functions as an antioxidant in biological systems, because it has been reported that PQQH2 shows very high free-radical scavenging and singlet-oxygen quenching activities in buffer solutions.

  2. A semi-empirical mathematical model useful for describing the relationship between carbon dioxide, pH, lactate and base in a bicarbonate-buffered cell-culture process.

    PubMed

    Gramer, Michael J; Ogorzalek, Tad

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a quantitative relationship between the primary factors of state affecting pH control in a bicarbonate-buffered medium. Starting with the Henderson-Hasselbach equation, several assumptions led to the following equation: L = B(T)-s x dCO2 x 10(pH-pK) where L is the lactate concentration (mM), B(T) is the total amount of base added (mM), s is the solubility of CO(2) (mM/%), dCO(2) is the dissolved CO(2) concentration (%) and pK is the acid ionization constant for bicarbonate. This equation appropriately described the relationship of these factors when using bicarbonate, carbonate and HCl (as a lactic acid surrogate) in water. However, the equation required modification to describe the relationship in cell culture medium, due presumably to the presence of other buffers and components; the final form of the equation from an empirical fit in the absence of cells was: L = B(T)-0.88 x dCO2(0.79) x 10(pH-6038) This equation was tested against actual cell culture data, from inoculum preparation in a T-flask through a 10000-litre fed-batch bioreactor, by comparing the lactate concentration calculated from base, pH and dCO(2) data with that actually measured in the bioreactor using a YSI 8500 SELECT Biochemistry Analyzer (YSI Inc., Yellow Springs, OH, U.S.A.). In every case, the calculated and actual lactate concentrations were in good agreement. The equation was useful for isolating the mechanisms leading to varied base addition across 2-, 600- and 10 000-litre-scale bioreactors. This procedure enables a new approach for quantitatively evaluating and understanding factors associated with bioreactor pH control.

  3. Optimizing the culture environment in the IVF laboratory: impact of pH and buffer capacity on gamete and embryo quality.

    PubMed

    Swain, Jason E

    2010-07-01

    Supplying and maintaining appropriate culture conditions is critical to minimize stress imposed upon gametes and embryos and to optimize the in-vitro environment. One parameter that requires close scrutiny in this endeavour is pH. Though embryos have a limited ability to regulate their internal pH (pH(i)), oocytes lack robust mechanisms. Thus, careful attention to external pH (pH(e)) of culture media is imperative in IVF. Ability to withstand deviations in hydrogen ion concentration varies depending on culture conditions, as well as laboratory procedures. Cryopreserved--thaw--thawed embryos, as well as denuded oocytes, are especially susceptible to perturbations in pH(e). Therefore, proper setting, monitoring and stabilizing of pH(e) during IVF laboratory procedures is a crucial component of a rigorous quality control programme. Here, importance of both pH(i) and pH(e) in respect to gamete and embryo quality are discussed. Furthermore, factors influencing selection of pH(e), as well as emerging methods to stabilize pH(e) in the IVF laboratory are detailed.

  4. Buffer Standards for pH Measurement of N-(2-Hydroxyethyl)piperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic Acid (HEPES) for I = 0.16 mol.kg from 5 to 55 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Roy, Rabindra N; Roy, Lakshmi N; Ashkenazi, Shahaf; Wollen, Joshua T; Dunseth, Craig D; Fuge, Michael S; Durden, Jared L; Roy, Chandra N; Hughes, Hannah M; Morris, Brett T; Cline, Kevin L

    2009-04-01

    The values of the second dissociation constant, pK(2) of N-(2-hydroxyethyl) piperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) have been reported at 12 temperatures over the temperature range 5 to 55 degrees C, including 37 degrees C. This paper reports the results for the pa(H) of eight isotonic saline buffer solutions with an I = 0.16 mol*kg(-1) including compositions: (a) HEPES (0.01 mol*kg(-1)) + NaHEPES (0.01 mol*kg(-1)) + NaCl (0.15 mol*kg(-1)); (b) HEPES (0.02 mol*kg(-1)) + NaHEPES (0.02 mol*kg(-1)) + NaCl (0.14 mol*kg(-1)); (c) HEPES (0.03 mol*kg(-1)) + NaHEPES (0.03 mol*kg(-1)) + NaCl (0.13 mol*kg(-1)); (d) HEPES (0.04 mol*kg(-1)) + NaHEPES (0.04 mol*kg(-1)) + NaCl (0.12 mol*kg(-1)); (e) HEPES (0.05 mol*kg(-1)) + NaHEPES (0.05 mol*kg(-1)) + NaCl (0.11 mol*kg(-1)); (f) HEPES (0.06 mol*kg(-1)) + NaHEPES (0.06 mol*kg(-1)) + NaCl (0.10 mol*kg(-1)); (g) HEPES (0.07 mol*kg(-1)) + NaHEPES (0.07 mol*kg(-1)) + NaCl (0.09 mol*kg(-1)); and (h) HEPES (0.08 mol*kg(-1)) + NaHEPES (0.08 mol*kg(-1)) + NaCl (0.08 mol*kg(-1)). Conventional pa(H) values, for all eight buffer solutions from 5 to 55 degrees C have been calculated. The operational pH values with liquid junction corrections, at 25 and 37 degrees C have been determined based on the NBS/NIST standard between the physiological phosphate standard and four buffer solutions. These are recommended as pH standards for physiological fluids in the range of pH 7.3 to 7.5 at I = 0.16 mol*kg(-1).

  5. Prediction of the chromatographic retention of acid-base compounds in pH buffered methanol-water mobile phases in gradient mode by a simplified model.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Axel; Rosés, Martí; Bosch, Elisabeth

    2015-03-13

    Retention of ionizable analytes under gradient elution depends on the pH of the mobile phase, the pKa of the analyte and their evolution along the programmed gradient. In previous work, a model depending on two fitting parameters was recommended because of its very favorable relationship between accuracy and required experimental work. It was developed using acetonitrile as the organic modifier and involves pKa modeling by means of equations that take into account the acidic functional group of the compound (carboxylic acid, protonated amine, etc.). In this work, the two-parameter predicting model is tested and validated using methanol as the organic modifier of the mobile phase and several compounds of higher pharmaceutical relevance and structural complexity as testing analytes. The results have been quite good overall, showing that the predicting model is applicable to a wide variety of acid-base compounds using mobile phases prepared with acetonitrile or methanol.

  6. Buffer Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Kelly

    2000-01-01

    Presents a science experiment in which students test the buffering capacity of household products such as shampoo, hand lotion, fizzies candy, and cola. Lists the standards addressed in this experiment and gives an example of a student lab write-up. (YDS)

  7. Buffer-free therapeutic antibody preparations provide a viable alternative to conventionally buffered solutions: from protein buffer capacity prediction to bioprocess applications.

    PubMed

    Bahrenburg, Sven; Karow, Anne R; Garidel, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Protein therapeutics, including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), have significant buffering capacity, particularly at concentrations>50 mg/mL. This report addresses pH-related issues critical to adoption of self-buffered monoclonal antibody formulations. We evaluated solution conditions with protein concentrations ranging from 50 to 250 mg/mL. Samples were both buffer-free and conventionally buffered with citrate. Samples were non-isotonic or adjusted for isotonicity with NaCl or trehalose. Studies included accelerated temperature stability tests, shaking stability studies, and pH changes in infusion media as protein concentrate is added. We present averaged buffering slopes of capacity that can be applied to any mAb and present a general method for calculating buffering capacity of buffer-free, highly concentrated antibody liquid formulations. In temperature stability tests, neither buffer-free nor conventionally buffered solution conditions showed significant pH changes. Conventionally buffered solutions showed significantly higher opalescence than buffer-free ones. In general, buffer-free solution conditions showed less aggregation than conventionally buffered solutions. Shaking stability tests showed no differences between buffer-free and conventionally buffered solutions. "In-use" preparation experiments showed that pH in infusion bag medium can rapidly approximate that of self-buffered protein concentrate as concentrate is added. In summary, the buffer capacity of proteins can be predicted and buffer-free therapeutic antibody preparations provide a viable alternative to conventionally buffered solutions.

  8. EFFECTS OF CONVERSION TO A BICARBONATE/LACTATE-BUFFERED, NEUTRAL-PH, LOW-GDP PD REGIMEN IN PREVALENT PD: A 2-YEAR RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Karima; Douma, Caroline; Ferrantelli, Evelina; Ter Wee, Pieter M; Beelen, Robert H; van Ittersum, Frans J

    2017-03-27

    ♦ Background: The use of pH-neutral peritoneal dialysis (PD) fluids low in glucose degradation products (GDP) may better preserve the peritoneal membrane and have fewer systemic effects. The effects of conversion from conventional to neutral-pH, low-GDP PD fluids in prevalent patients are unclear. Few studies on the role of neutral-pH, low-GDP PD have studied residual renal function, ultrafiltration, peritonitis incidence and technique failure, transport characteristics, and local and systemic markers of inflammation in prevalent PD patients. ♦ Methods: In a multi-center open-label randomized clinical trial (RCT), we randomly assigned 40 of 78 stable continuous ambulatory PD (CAPD) and automated PD (APD) patients to treatment with bicarbonate/lactate, neutral-pH, low-GDP PD fluid (Physioneal; Baxter Healthcare Corporation, Deerfield, IL, USA) and compared them with 38 patients continuing their current standard lactate-buffered PD fluid (PDF) (Dianeal; Baxter Healthcare Corporation, Deerfield, IL, USA) during 2 years. Primary outcome was residual renal function (RRF) and ultrafiltration (UF) during peritoneal equilibration test (PET); peritonitis incidence was a secondary outcome. Furthermore, clinical parameters as well as several biomarkers in effluents and serum were measured. ♦ Results: During follow-up, RRF did not differ between the groups. In the Physioneal group ultrafiltration (UF) during PET remained more or less stable (-20 mL [confidence interval (CI):-163.5 - 123.5 mL]; p = 0.7 over 24 months), whereas it declined in the Dianeal group (-243 mL [CI: -376.6 to -109.4mL]; p < 0.0001 over 24 months), resulting in a difference of 233.7mL [95% CI 41.0 - 425.5 mL]; p = 0.017 between the groups at 24months. The peritonitis rate was lower in the Physioneal group: adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.38 (0.15 - 0.97) p = 0.043. No differences were observed between the 2 groups in peritoneal adequacy or transport characteristics nor effluent markers of local

  9. Mechanisms of buffer therapy resistance.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Kate M; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Cornnell, Heather H; Ribeiro, Maria C; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Hashim, Arig Ibrahim; Gillies, Robert J

    2014-04-01

    Many studies have shown that the acidity of solid tumors contributes to local invasion and metastasis. Oral pH buffers can specifically neutralize the acidic pH of tumors and reduce the incidence of local invasion and metastatic formation in multiple murine models. However, this effect is not universal as we have previously observed that metastasis is not inhibited by buffers in some tumor models, regardless of buffer used. B16-F10 (murine melanoma), LL/2 (murine lung) and HCT116 (human colon) tumors are resistant to treatment with lysine buffer therapy, whereas metastasis is potently inhibited by lysine buffers in MDA-MB-231 (human breast) and PC3M (human prostate) tumors. In the current work, we confirmed that sensitive cells utilized a pH-dependent mechanism for successful metastasis supported by a highly glycolytic phenotype that acidifies the local tumor microenvironment resulting in morphological changes. In contrast, buffer-resistant cell lines exhibited a pH-independent metastatic mechanism involving constitutive secretion of matrix degrading proteases without elevated glycolysis. These results have identified two distinct mechanisms of experimental metastasis, one of which is pH-dependent (buffer therapy sensitive cells) and one which is pH-independent (buffer therapy resistant cells). Further characterization of these models has potential for therapeutic benefit.

  10. Characterisation of passive films formed on low carbon steel in borate buffer solution (pH 9.2) by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamadou, L.; Kadri, A.; Benbrahim, N.

    2005-12-01

    The comprehension of passivity and its protective character against corrosion is closely connected with the electronic properties of passive films. Passive films formed anodically on carbon steel in borate/boric acid solution, pH 9.2, have been characterised by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Mott-Schottky plots and impedance measurements were made on films formed at different potentials and times. The investigation allowed the determination of the semiconductive properties of the films. The results of the capacitance response indicate that the passive films behave like highly doped n-type semiconductors, showing that the passive film properties are dominated by iron. The value of donors density ( ND) for the passive film is of the order of 10 21 cm -3 and decreases with increasing formation time and potential, indicating that defects decrease with increasing film thickness. Based on the information about the physical phenomena, an equivalent circuit is proposed to fit the experimental data, leading to determination of anodic film capacitance and film resistance.

  11. Electrodialysis operation with buffer solution

    DOEpatents

    Hryn, John N.; Daniels, Edward J.; Krumdick, Greg K.

    2009-12-15

    A new method for improving the efficiency of electrodialysis (ED) cells and stacks, in particular those used in chemical synthesis. The process entails adding a buffer solution to the stack for subsequent depletion in the stack during electrolysis. The buffer solution is regenerated continuously after depletion. This buffer process serves to control the hydrogen ion or hydroxide ion concentration so as to protect the active sites of electrodialysis membranes. The process enables electrodialysis processing options for products that are sensitive to pH changes.

  12. Roles of alkaline phosphatase and labile internal mineral in matrix vesicle-mediated calcification. Effect of selective release of membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase and treatment with isosmotic pH 6 buffer.

    PubMed

    Register, T C; McLean, F M; Low, M G; Wuthier, R E

    1986-07-15

    The roles of alkaline phosphatase and labile internal mineral in matrix vesicle-mediated mineralization have been studied by selectively releasing the enzyme from a wide variety of matrix vesicle preparations using treatment with a bacterial phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C and by demineralization of the vesicles using isosmotic pH 6 buffer. Following depletion of 50-90% of the alkaline phosphatase activity or treatment with citrate buffer, the vesicles were tested for their ability to accumulate 45Ca2+ and 32Pi from a synthetic cartilage lymph. Removal of alkaline phosphatase by phospholipase C treatment caused two principal effects, depending on the matrix vesicle preparation. In rapidly mineralizing vesicle fractions which did not require organic phosphate esters (Po) to accumulate mineral ions, release of alkaline phosphatase had only a minor effect. In slowly mineralizing vesicles preparations or those dependent on Po substrates for mineral ion uptake, release of alkaline phosphatase caused significant loss of mineralizing activity. The activity of rapidly calcifying vesicles was shown to be dependent on the presence of labile internal mineral, as demonstrated by major loss in activity when the vesicles were decalcified by various treatments. Ion uptake by demineralized vesicles or those fractionated on sucrose step gradients required Po and was significantly decreased by alkaline phosphatase depletion. Uptake of Pi, however, was not coupled with hydrolysis of the Po substrate. These findings argue against a direct role for alkaline phosphatase as a porter in matrix vesicle Pi uptake, contrary to previous postulates. The results emphasize the importance of internal labile mineral in rapid uptake of mineral ions by matrix vesicles.

  13. Role of Buffers in Protein Formulations.

    PubMed

    Zbacnik, Teddy J; Holcomb, Ryan E; Katayama, Derrick S; Murphy, Brian M; Payne, Robert W; Coccaro, Richard C; Evans, Gabriel J; Matsuura, James E; Henry, Charles S; Manning, Mark Cornell

    2017-03-01

    Buffers comprise an integral component of protein formulations. Not only do they function to regulate shifts in pH, they also can stabilize proteins by a variety of mechanisms. The ability of buffers to stabilize therapeutic proteins whether in liquid formulations, frozen solutions, or the solid state is highlighted in this review. Addition of buffers can result in increased conformational stability of proteins, whether by ligand binding or by an excluded solute mechanism. In addition, they can alter the colloidal stability of proteins and modulate interfacial damage. Buffers can also lead to destabilization of proteins, and the stability of buffers themselves is presented. Furthermore, the potential safety and toxicity issues of buffers are discussed, with a special emphasis on the influence of buffers on the perceived pain upon injection. Finally, the interaction of buffers with other excipients is examined.

  14. S-Transnitrosation reactions of hydrogen sulfide (H2S/HS(-)/S(2-)) with S-nitrosated cysteinyl thiols in phosphate buffer of pH 7.4: Results and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tsikas, Dimitrios; Böhmer, Anke

    2017-02-06

    Cysteine (CysSH) and its derivatives including N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and glutathione (GSH), and cysteine residues in proteins and enzymes are nitrosated with nitric oxide (NO) reaction products such as N2O3 to form S-nitrosated cysteine thiols (RCysSNO). RCysSNO undergo with cysteine thiols (RCysSH) S-transnitrosation reactions, thereby transferring reversibly their nitrosyl ((+)NO) group to RCysSH to form RCysSNO. (•)NO release from RCysSNO and S-transnitrosation are considered the most important features and signalling pathways of RCysSNO. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S: pKa1, 7; HS(-): pKa2, 12.9) is an endogenous product of cysteine metabolism. We hypothesized that RCysSNO would also undergo S-transnitrosation reaction with H2S/HS(-)/S(2-) to form thionitrite (ONS(-)), the smallest S-nitrosated thiol. This article describes spectrophotometric and mass spectrometric investigations of S-transnitrosation reactions in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) of pH 7.4 between H2S/HS(-)/S(2-) (supplied as Na2S) and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), S-nitroso-l-cysteine (CysSNO), S-nitroso-N-acetyl-l-cysteine (SNAC), and the synthetic S-nitroso-N-acetyl-l-cysteine ethyl ester (SNACET). For comparison, we also investigated the reactions of H2S/HS(-)/S(2-) with NO(+)BF4(-) and NO2(+)BF4(-), direct ON(+) and O2N(+) donors, respectively, and assumed formation of ONS(-) and thionitrate (O2NS(-)), respectively. Addition of Na2S (at 1 mM) to buffered RCysSNO solutions resulted in decreases of the absorbance at 340 nm and concomitant increases in the absorbance at 410 nm depending upon the nature and concentration of RCysSNO (range, 25-1000 μM). The reactivity order of RCysSNO against H2S/HS(-)/S(2-) was: CysSNO > SNACET > GSNO > SNAC. Our spectrophotometric and GC-MS analyses indicate that H2S/HS(-)/S(2-) and RCysSNO undergo multiple reactions. Major final reaction products were found to be nitrite and nitrate. ONS(-) and O2NS(-) were not detected by GC-MS, suggesting rapid and

  15. Effect of pH buffering capacity and sources of dietary sulfur on rumen fermentation, sulfide production, methane production, sulfate reducing bacteria, and total Archaea in in vitro rumen cultures.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Meng, Qingxiang; Yu, Zhongtang

    2015-06-01

    The effects of three types of dietary sulfur on in vitro fermentation characteristics, sulfide production, methane production, and microbial populations at two different buffer capacities were examined using in vitro rumen cultures. Addition of dry distilled grain with soluble (DDGS) generally decreased total gas production, degradation of dry matter and neutral detergent fiber, and concentration of total volatile fatty acids, while increasing ammonia concentration. High buffering capacity alleviated these adverse effects on fermentation. Increased sulfur content resulted in decreased methane emission, but total Archaea population was not changed significantly. The population of sulfate reducing bacteria was increased in a sulfur type-dependent manner. These results suggest that types of dietary sulfur and buffering capacity can affect rumen fermentation and sulfide production. Diet buffering capacity, and probably alkalinity, may be increased to alleviate some of the adverse effects associated with feeding DDGS at high levels.

  16. Evidence of the chemical reaction of (18)O-labelled nitrite with CO2 in aqueous buffer of neutral pH and the formation of (18)OCO by isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsikas, Dimitrios; Böhmer, Anke; Gros, Gerolf; Endeward, Volker

    2016-05-01

    Inorganic nitrite (NO2(-), ON-O(-) ←→ (-)O-NO) is the autoxidation product of nitric oxide (NO). Nitrite can also be formed from inorganic nitrate (ONO2(-)), the major oxidation product of NO in erythrocytes, by the catalytic action of bacterial nitrate reductase in gut and oral microflora. Nitrite can be reduced to NO by certain cellular proteins and enzymes, as well as in the gastric juice under acidic conditions. Hemoglobin, xanthine oxidoreductase and carbonic anhydrase (CA) have been reported to convert nitrite to NO. Renal CA isoforms are involved in the reabsorption of nitrite and may, therefore, play an important role in NO homeostasis. Yet, the mechanisms underlying the action of CA on nitrite are incompletely understood. The nitrate/nitrite system is regarded as a reservoir of NO. We have recently shown that nitrite reacts chemically with carbon dioxide (CO2), the regular substrate of CA. The present communication reports a stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) study on the reaction of NO2(-) and CO2 performed in 50 mM HEPES buffer of pH 7.4 at 37 °C. By using (18)O-labelled nitrite ((18)ON-O(-)/(-18)O-NO) and CO2 we observed formation of (18)O-labelled CO2. This finding is an unequivocal evidence of the chemical reaction of (18)ON-O(-)/(-18)O-NO with CO2. The reaction is rapid and involves nucleophilic attack of the negatively charged nitrite via one of its oxygen atoms on the partially positively charged CO2 molecule to form the putative intermediate (18)ON-O-CO2(-)/(-)O2C-(18)O-NO. The by far largest fraction of this intermediate decomposes back to (18)ON-O(-)/(-18)O-NO and CO2. A very small fraction of the intermediate, however, rearranges and finally decomposes to form (18)OCO and nitrite. This reaction is slower in the presence of an isolated erythrocytic CA isoform II. In summary, NO2(-), CO2 and CA are ubiquitous. The chemical reaction of NO2(-) with CO2 and its modulation by CA isoforms may play important roles in the transport of

  17. PVA-based tunable buffering membranes for isoelectric trapping separations.

    PubMed

    Fleisher-Craver, Helen C; Vigh, Gyula

    2008-11-01

    PVA-based buffering membranes with tunable pH values were prepared on a PVA substrate by reacting PVA, glycerol-1,3-diglycidyl ether, -NH2 group-containing buffers and -NH2 group-containing titrants in the presence of sodium hydroxide. The pH of the buffering membranes could be tuned in the 3<pH<10 range according to the Hendersson-Hasselbach equation while maintaining buffering capacities in excess of 100 mM. Detailed recipes for the preparation of six families of buffering membranes are tabulated and provided as Supporting Information. The buffering membranes were used to trap and desalt ampholyte solutions and separate proteins having a DeltapI as small as 0.1. The membranes were mechanically and hydrolytically stable and could be stored, even in 10<pH sodium hydroxide solutions, in excess of 6 months.

  18. Influence of ignored and well-known zone distortions on the separation performance of proteins in capillary free zone electrophoresis with special reference to analysis in polyacrylamide-coated fused silica capillaries in various buffers. II. Experimental studies at acidic pH with on-line enrichment.

    PubMed

    Mohabbati, Sheila; Hjertén, Stellan; Westerlund, Douglas

    2004-10-22

    The separation of acidic and basic model proteins was studied in capillary free zone electrophoresis in a polyacrylamide-coated, electroosmosis-free capillary at pH below their isoelectric points (pI) using various buffers at pH 2.7-4.8 with UV detection at 200 nm. The separation performance was significantly dependent on the coating quality, which may even differ within the same batch of capillaries. In addition, a washing step with 2 M HCl and the storage of the capillary in distilled water was essential for the performance. For high efficiency and resolution the choice of buffer constituents was extremely important which is discussed in quantitative terms in Part I. The most promising buffers were ammonium acetate and ammonium hydroxyacetate at pH 4 (ionic strengths: 0.12 and 0.15 M, respectively) with plate numbers up to 1,700,000 plates/m, corresponding to a zone width (2sigma) of only 1 mm in a capillary with 40 cm effective length, when the injected samples were dissolved in a 10-fold diluted background electrolyte (BGE), a zone even narrower than those obtained in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the characteristic feature of which is remarkably thin zones. In the experiment giving this plate number, the calculated variance for longitudinal diffusion was larger than all the other calculated variances (those for the width of the starting zone, Joule heating, sedimentation and the curvature of the capillary). Interestingly, the effect of capillary curvature was significant. In addition, the sum of all other imaginable variances (corresponding to various types of slow on/off kinetics and hyper-sharp peaks) was in the most successful experiments only 28-50% of the variance for longitudinal diffusion. One hundred- to two hundred-fold dilution of the BGE improved the detection limits and provided high precision in both migration times and peak areas with ammonium hydroxyacetate and ammonium acetate as background electrolytes. However, that high dilution

  19. Visualization of Buffer Capacity with 3-D "Topo" Surfaces: Buffer Ridges, Equivalence Point Canyons and Dilution Ramps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Garon C.; Hossain, Md Mainul

    2016-01-01

    BufCap TOPOS is free software that generates 3-D topographical surfaces ("topos") for acid-base equilibrium studies. It portrays pH and buffer capacity behavior during titration and dilution procedures. Topo surfaces are created by plotting computed pH and buffer capacity values above a composition grid with volume of NaOH as the x axis…

  20. Buffer Zone Fact Sheets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    New requirements for buffer zones and sign posting contribute to soil fumigant mitigation and protection for workers and bystanders. The buffer provides distance between the pesticide application site and bystanders, reducing exposure risk.

  1. Making pH Tangible.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Elizabeth; Moss, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Presents a laboratory exercise in which students test the pH of different substances, study the effect of a buffer on acidic solutions by comparing the behavior of buffered and unbuffered solutions upon the addition of acid, and compare common over-the-counter antacid remedies. (MKR)

  2. VIRTUAL FRAME BUFFER INTERFACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    Large image processing systems use multiple frame buffers with differing architectures and vendor supplied user interfaces. This variety of architectures and interfaces creates software development, maintenance, and portability problems for application programs. The Virtual Frame Buffer Interface program makes all frame buffers appear as a generic frame buffer with a specified set of characteristics, allowing programmers to write code which will run unmodified on all supported hardware. The Virtual Frame Buffer Interface converts generic commands to actual device commands. The virtual frame buffer consists of a definition of capabilities and FORTRAN subroutines that are called by application programs. The virtual frame buffer routines may be treated as subroutines, logical functions, or integer functions by the application program. Routines are included that allocate and manage hardware resources such as frame buffers, monitors, video switches, trackballs, tablets and joysticks; access image memory planes; and perform alphanumeric font or text generation. The subroutines for the various "real" frame buffers are in separate VAX/VMS shared libraries allowing modification, correction or enhancement of the virtual interface without affecting application programs. The Virtual Frame Buffer Interface program was developed in FORTRAN 77 for a DEC VAX 11/780 or a DEC VAX 11/750 under VMS 4.X. It supports ADAGE IK3000, DEANZA IP8500, Low Resolution RAMTEK 9460, and High Resolution RAMTEK 9460 Frame Buffers. It has a central memory requirement of approximately 150K. This program was developed in 1985.

  3. Buffered local anesthetics and epinephrine degradation.

    PubMed

    Murakami, C S; Odland, P B; Ross, B K

    1994-03-01

    Lidocaine with epinephrine is currently the most common local anesthetic agent used for facial soft tissue surgery. This combination is generally safe and effective in providing complete anesthesia and adequate hemostasis. Because epinephrine is unstable at physiologic pH, the commercial preparation is formulated with a low pH (3.5-5.5). Unfortunately, this acidic pH causes significant pain during infiltration. To reduce pain, clinicians sometimes buffer acidic local anesthetic agents with sodium bicarbonate. However, little is known about the stability of epinephrine when the pH of epinephrine is clinically altered. Using high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), epinephrine levels were measured after the addition of sodium bicarbonate. Our results indicate a significant amount of epinephrine degradation occurs in some of these specimens. Recommendations regarding the use of buffered local anesthetic agents are made.

  4. Organellar calcium buffers.

    PubMed

    Prins, Daniel; Michalak, Marek

    2011-03-01

    Ca(2+) is an important intracellular messenger affecting many diverse processes. In eukaryotic cells, Ca(2+) storage is achieved within specific intracellular organelles, especially the endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum, in which Ca(2+) is buffered by specific proteins known as Ca(2+) buffers. Ca(2+) buffers are a diverse group of proteins, varying in their affinities and capacities for Ca(2+), but they typically also carry out other functions within the cell. The wide range of organelles containing Ca(2+) and the evidence supporting cross-talk between these organelles suggest the existence of a dynamic network of organellar Ca(2+) signaling, mediated by a variety of organellar Ca(2+) buffers.

  5. Common data buffer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, F.

    1981-01-01

    Time-shared interface speeds data processing in distributed computer network. Two-level high-speed scanning approach routes information to buffer, portion of which is reserved for series of "first-in, first-out" memory stacks. Buffer address structure and memory are protected from noise or failed components by error correcting code. System is applicable to any computer or processing language.

  6. Complexation of buffer constituents with neutral complexation agents: part I. Impact on common buffer properties.

    PubMed

    Riesová, Martina; Svobodová, Jana; Tošner, Zdeněk; Beneš, Martin; Tesařová, Eva; Gaš, Bohuslav

    2013-09-17

    The complexation of buffer constituents with the complexation agent present in the solution can very significantly influence the buffer properties, such as pH, ionic strength, or conductivity. These parameters are often crucial for selection of the separation conditions in capillary electrophoresis or high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and can significantly affect results of separation, particularly for capillary electrophoresis as shown in Part II of this paper series (Beneš, M.; Riesová, M.; Svobodová, J.; Tesařová, E.; Dubský, P.; Gaš, B. Anal. Chem. 2013, DOI: 10.1021/ac401381d). In this paper, the impact of complexation of buffer constituents with a neutral complexation agent is demonstrated theoretically as well as experimentally for the model buffer system composed of benzoic acid/LiOH or common buffers (e.g., CHES/LiOH, TAPS/LiOH, Tricine/LiOH, MOPS/LiOH, MES/LiOH, and acetic acid/LiOH). Cyclodextrins as common chiral selectors were used as model complexation agents. We were not only able to demonstrate substantial changes of pH but also to predict the general complexation characteristics of selected compounds. Because of the zwitterion character of the common buffer constituents, their charged forms complex stronger with cyclodextrins than the neutral ones do. This was fully proven by NMR measurements. Additionally complexation constants of both forms of selected compounds were determined by NMR and affinity capillary electrophoresis with a very good agreement of obtained values. These data were advantageously used for the theoretical descriptions of variations in pH, depending on the composition and concentration of the buffer. Theoretical predictions were shown to be a useful tool for deriving some general rules and laws for complexing systems.

  7. The buffer effect in neutral electrolyte supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vindt, Steffen T.; Skou, Eivind M.

    2016-02-01

    The observation that double-layer capacitors based on neutral aqueous electrolytes can have significantly wider usable potential windows than those based on acidic or alkaline electrolytes is studied. This effect is explained by a local pH change taking place at the electrode surfaces, leading to a change in the redox potential of water in opposite directions on the two electrodes, resulting in the wider stability window. The magnitude of this effect is suggested to be dependent on the buffer capacity, rather than the intrinsic pH value of the electrolyte. This is confirmed by studying the impact of addition of a buffer to such systems. It is shown that a 56 % higher dynamic storage capacity may be achieved, simply by controlling the buffer capacity of the electrolyte. The model system used, is based on a well-known commercial activated carbon (NORIT™ A SUPRA) as the electrode material, aqueous potassium nitrate as the electrolyte and potassium phosphates as the buffer system.

  8. Variation of power generation at different buffer types and conductivities in single chamber microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Nam, Joo-Youn; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Lim, Kyeong-Ho; Shin, Hang-Sik; Logan, Bruce E

    2010-01-15

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are operated with solutions containing various chemical species required for the growth of electrochemically active microorganisms including nutrients and vitamins, substrates, and chemical buffers. Many different buffers are used in laboratory media, but the effects of these buffers and their inherent electrolyte conductivities have not been examined relative to current generation in MFCs. We investigated the effect of several common buffers (phosphate, MES, HEPES, and PIPES) on power production in single chambered MFCs compared to a non-buffered control. At the same concentrations the buffers produced different solution conductivities which resulted in different ohmic resistances and power densities. Increasing the solution conductivities to the same values using NaCl produced comparable power densities for all buffers. Very large increases in conductivity resulted in a rapid voltage drop at high current densities. Our results suggest that solution conductivity at a specific pH for each buffer is more important in MFC studies than the buffer itself given relatively constant pH conditions. Based on our analysis of internal resistance and a set neutral pH, phosphate and PIPES are the most useful buffers of those examined here because pH was maintained close to the pK(a) of the buffer, maximizing the ability of the buffer to contribute to increase current generation at high power densities.

  9. Buffers more than buffering agent: introducing a new class of stabilizers for the protein BSA.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Bhupender S; Taha, Mohamed; Lee, Ming-Jer

    2015-01-14

    In this study, we have analyzed the influence of four biological buffers on the thermal stability of bovine serum albumin (BSA) using dynamic light scattering (DLS). The investigated buffers include 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES), 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazine-propanesulfonic acid (EPPS), 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid sodium salt (HEPES-Na), and 4-morpholinepropanesulfonic acid sodium salt (MOPS-Na). These buffers behave as a potential stabilizer for the native structure of BSA against thermal denaturation. The stabilization tendency follows the order of MOPS-Na > HEPES-Na > HEPES ≫ EPPS. To obtain an insight into the role of hydration layers and peptide backbone in the stabilization of BSA by these buffers, we have also explored the phase transition of a thermoresponsive polymer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAM)), a model compound for protein, in aqueous solutions of HEPES, EPPS, HEPES-Na, and MOPS-Na buffers at different concentrations. It was found that the lower critical solution temperatures (LCST) of PNIPAM in the aqueous buffer solutions substantially decrease with increase in buffer concentration. The mechanism of interactions between these buffers and protein BSA was probed by various techniques, including UV-visible, fluorescence, and FTIR. The results of this series of studies reveal that the interactions are mainly governed by the influence of the buffers on the hydration layers surrounding the protein. We have also explored the possible binding sites of BSA with these buffers using a molecular docking technique. Moreover, the activities of an industrially important enzyme α-chymotrypsin (α-CT) in 0.05 M, 0.5 M, and 1.0 M of HEPES, EPPS, HEPES-Na, and MOPS-Na buffer solutions were analyzed at pH = 8.0 and T = 25 °C. Interestingly, the activities of α-CT were found to be enhanced in the aqueous solutions of these investigated buffers. Based upon the Jones-Dole viscosity parameters, the

  10. Is bicarbonate buffer suitable as a dissolution medium?

    PubMed

    Boni, Julia Elisabeth; Brickl, Rolf Stefan; Dressman, Jennifer

    2007-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare two methods for the preparation of bicarbonate buffer, and to compare media prepared with bicarbonate buffer with commonly used biorelevant and pharmacopoeial media in terms of their suitability for dissolution testing. The various media were compared with regard to ease of preparation, robustness and reproducibility of composition. The dissolution of three formulations of a typical Biopharmaceutical Classification System Class II drug (BIXX) was compared in bicarbonate buffer, standard phosphate buffer, a biorelevant buffer (fasted-state simulating intestinal fluid, FaSSIF) and a modified FaSSIF prepared with bicarbonate buffer. The bicarbonate buffer used for dissolution testing was produced by supplying carbon dioxide to a saline solution (0.9% NaCl, to which 12 or 42 mmol NaOH had been added). The bicarbonate buffer had to be prepared in-situ, which proved to be time-consuming, and the pH stability of the bicarbonate buffer could only be maintained under constant CO2 supply. To minimize the mechanical stress caused by inflow and evaporation of gas, the carbon dioxide was supplied above the medium during the dissolution test. Despite taking these measures, use of bicarbonate buffer led to less reproducible dissolution results than the phosphate buffers commonly used to prepare compendial media and FaSSIF, with coefficient of variance values 1.5- to 5-times higher in bicarbonate buffer. It was concluded that although a bicarbonate buffer system would be physiologically relevant for the fasted state in the small intestine, its suitability for dissolution testing is restricted by lack of practicability and poor reproducibility of results.

  11. Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles with Buffer-Dependent Variations of Size and Morphology in Biological Buffers.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Syed Rahin; Oh, Sangjin; Baba, Rina; Zhou, Hongjian; Hwang, Sungu; Lee, Jaebeom; Park, Enoch Y

    2016-12-01

    The demand for biologically compatible and stable noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) has increased in recent years due to their inert nature and unique optical properties. In this article, we present 11 different synthetic methods for obtaining gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) through the use of common biological buffers. The results demonstrate that the sizes, shapes, and monodispersity of the NPs could be varied depending on the type of buffer used, as these buffers acted as both a reducing agent and a stabilizer in each synthesis. Theoretical simulations and electrochemical experiments were performed to understand the buffer-dependent variations of size and morphology exhibited by these Au NPs, which revealed that surface interactions and the electrostatic energy on the (111) surface of Au were the determining factors. The long-term stability of the synthesized NPs in buffer solution was also investigated. Most NPs synthesized using buffers showed a uniquely wide range of pH stability and excellent cell viability without the need for further modifications.

  12. Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles with Buffer-Dependent Variations of Size and Morphology in Biological Buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Syed Rahin; Oh, Sangjin; Baba, Rina; Zhou, Hongjian; Hwang, Sungu; Lee, Jaebeom; Park, Enoch Y.

    2016-02-01

    The demand for biologically compatible and stable noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) has increased in recent years due to their inert nature and unique optical properties. In this article, we present 11 different synthetic methods for obtaining gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) through the use of common biological buffers. The results demonstrate that the sizes, shapes, and monodispersity of the NPs could be varied depending on the type of buffer used, as these buffers acted as both a reducing agent and a stabilizer in each synthesis. Theoretical simulations and electrochemical experiments were performed to understand the buffer-dependent variations of size and morphology exhibited by these Au NPs, which revealed that surface interactions and the electrostatic energy on the (111) surface of Au were the determining factors. The long-term stability of the synthesized NPs in buffer solution was also investigated. Most NPs synthesized using buffers showed a uniquely wide range of pH stability and excellent cell viability without the need for further modifications.

  13. Electrodialytic membrane suppressors for ion chromatography make programmable buffer generators.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongjing; Srinivasan, Kannan; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2012-01-03

    The use of buffer solutions is immensely important in a great variety of disciplines. The generation of continuous pH gradients in flow systems plays an important role in the chromatographic separation of proteins, high-throughput pK(a) determinations, etc. We demonstrate here that electrodialytic membrane suppressors used in ion chromatography can be used to generate buffers. The generated pH, computed from first principles, agrees well with measured values. We demonstrate the generation of phosphate and citrate buffers using a cation-exchange membrane (CEM) -based anion suppressor and Tris and ethylenediamine buffers using an anion-exchange membrane (AEM) -based cation suppressor. Using a mixture of phosphate, citrate, and borate as the buffering ions and using a CEM suppressor, we demonstrate the generation of a highly reproducible (avg RSD 0.20%, n = 3), temporally linear (pH 3.0-11.9, r(2) > 0.9996), electrically controlled pH gradient. With butylamine and a large concentration (0.5 M) of added NaCl, we demonstrate a similar linear pH gradient of large range with a near-constant ionic strength. We believe that this approach will be of value for the generation of eluents in the separation of proteins and other biomolecules and in online process titrations.

  14. New pH-buffering system for media utilized during gamete and embryo manipulations for assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    Swain, Jason E; Pool, Thomas B

    2009-06-01

    Maintenance of stable pH is important for optimizing gamete and embryo culture. One method to stabilize pH entails using zwitterionic buffers in IVF handling media used outside the laboratory incubator. Current handling media utilize single buffers, such as MOPS or HEPES. However, the use of a single buffer limits the ability to adjust the range of buffering capacity. Furthermore, changes in temperature alter buffering of these compounds. Therefore, traditional IVF handling media utilizing a single buffer may not provide ideal pH buffering. This study reports that combining multiple buffers, such as HEPES, MOPS and DIPSO, into a single medium in various ratios gives the ability to shift the effective buffering range to cover a specific pH. Additionally, by combining various buffers, it is possible to expand pH buffering over a range of temperatures, while simultaneously reducing the absolute concentration of individual buffers, thereby reducing or alleviating toxicity concerns. This report verifies that DIPSO, MOPS and HEPES, and their combinations, support embryo development. Therefore, utilization of bi- and tri-buffered media, containing a mixture of HEPES, MOPS or DIPSO, offers advantages compared with media containing HEPES or MOPS alone, and may be used for procedures such as oocyte retrieval, intracytoplasmic sperm injection, embryo transfer and cryopreservation.

  15. Tris buffer modulates polydopamine growth, aggregation, and paramagnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Della Vecchia, Nicola Fyodor; Luchini, Alessandra; Napolitano, Alessandra; D'Errico, Gerardino; Vitiello, Giuseppe; Szekely, Noemi; d'Ischia, Marco; Paduano, Luigi

    2014-08-19

    Despite the growing technological interest of polydopamine (dopamine melanin)-based coatings for a broad variety of applications, the factors governing particle size, shape, and electronic properties of this bioinspired multifunctional material have remained little understood. Herein, we report a detailed characterization of polydopamine growth, particle morphology, and paramagnetic properties as a function of dopamine concentration and nature of the buffer (pH 8.5). Dynamic Light Scattering data revealed an increase in the hydrodynamic radii (Rh) of melanin particles with increasing dopamine concentration in all buffers examined, especially in phosphate buffer. Conversely, a marked inhibition of particle growth was apparent in Tris buffer, with Rh remaining as low as <100 nm during polymerization of 0.5 mM dopamine. Small angle neutron scattering data suggested formation of bidimensional structures in phosphate or bicarbonate buffers, while apparently three-dimensional fractal objects prevailed in Tris buffer. Finally, electron paramagnetic resonance spectra revealed a broader signal amplitude with a peculiar power saturation decay profile for polydopamine samples prepared in Tris buffer, denoting more homogeneous paramagnetic centers with respect to similar samples obtained in phosphate and bicarbonate buffers. Overall, these results disclose Tris buffer as an efficient modulator of polydopamine buildup and properties for the rational control and fine-tuning of melanin aggregate size, morphology, and free radical behavior.

  16. Modulation of the partition coefficient between octanol and buffer at pH 7.4 and pKa to achieve the optimum balance of blood clearance and volume of distribution for a series of tetrahydropyran histamine type 3 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Hay, Tanya; Jones, Rhys; Beaumont, Kevin; Kemp, Mark

    2009-09-01

    The relationship between rat pharmacokinetics and physicochemical parameters [the partition coefficient between octanol and buffer at pH 7.4 (log D((7.4))) and pK(a)] was studied for a series of tetrahydropyran compounds. Sixteen compounds ranging in log D((7.4)) 0.1 to 1.8 were administered intravenously to rats, and the pharmacokinetic parameters were determined from blood concentration time curves. Across the series, a weak correlation was observed between log D((7.4)) and blood clearance, suggesting that log D((7.4)) values less than 0.5 were required to prevent clearance at hepatic blood flow. In terms of the volume of distribution (V(d)), the compounds fell into three distinct subseries characterized by the number of basic centers and differences in ionization of each basic center at physiological pH. These were referred to as the monobasic, weak second base, and strong second base subseries. All the compounds exhibited V(d) greater than body water, as would be expected from their lipophilic and basic nature. For a given clog P, the strong second base subseries showed higher V(d) than the weak second base subseries, which in turn exhibited higher values than the monobasic subseries. In addition, for the weak second base subseries, V(d) could be tuned by modulating the pK(a) of the second basic center. This relationship was rationalized in respect to the interactions of the ionizable centers with phospholipid heads in the cell membrane and/or lysosomal trapping. Compounds in the weak second base subseries showed optimal V(d), and when combined with a log D((7.4)) of 0.1, driving to moderate blood clearance, one compound showed the optimal pharmacokinetic profile.

  17. Thermophysical properties of carboxylic and amino acid buffers at subzero temperatures: relevance to frozen state stabilization.

    PubMed

    Sundaramurthi, Prakash; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2011-06-02

    Macromolecules and other thermolabile biologicals are often buffered and stored in frozen or dried (freeze-dried) state. Crystallization of buffer components in frozen aqueous solutions and the consequent pH shifts were studied in carboxylic (succinic, malic, citric, tartaric acid) and amino acid (glycine, histidine) buffers. Aqueous buffer solutions were cooled from room temperature (RT) to -25 °C and the pH of the solution was measured as a function of temperature. The thermal behavior of frozen solutions was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and the crystallized phases were identified by X-ray diffractometry (XRD). Based on the solubility of the neutral species of each buffer system over a range of temperatures, it was possible to estimate its degree of supersaturation at the subambient temperature of interest. This enabled us to predict its crystallization propensity in frozen systems. The experimental and the predicted rank orderings were in excellent agreement. The malate buffer system was robust with no evidence of buffer component crystallization and hence negligible pH shift. In the citrate and tartrate systems, at initial pH < pK(a)(2), only the most acidic buffer component (neutral form) crystallized on cooling, causing an increase in the freeze-concentrate pH. In glycine buffer solutions, when the initial pH was ∼3 units < isoelectric pH (pI = 5.9), β-glycine crystallization caused a small decrease in pH, while a similar effect but in the opposite direction was observed when the initial pH was ∼3 units > pI. In the histidine buffer system, depending on the initial pH, either histidine or histidine HCl crystallized.

  18. The role of hydroxo-bridged dinuclear species and the influence of "innocent" buffers in the reactivity of cis-[Co(III)(cyclen)(H₂O)₂]³⁺ and [Co(III)(tren)(H₂O)₂]³⁺ complexes with biologically relevant ligands at physiological pH.

    PubMed

    Basallote, Manuel G; Martínez, Manuel; Vázquez, Marta

    2014-07-28

    In view of the relevance of the reactivity of inert tetraamine Co(III) complexes having two substitutionally active cis positions capable of interact with biologically relevant ligands, the study of the reaction of cis-[Co(cyclen)(H2O)2](3+) and [Co(tren)(H2O)2](3+) with chlorides, inorganic phosphate and 5'-CMP (5'-cytidinemonophosphate) has been pursued at physiological pH. The results indicate that, in addition to the actuation of the expected labilising conjugate-base mechanism, the formation of mono and inert bis hydroxo-bridged species is relevant for understanding their speciation and reactivity. The reactivity pattern observed also indicates the key role played by the "innocent" buffers frequently used in most in vitro studies, which can make the results unreliable in many cases. The differences between the reactivity of inorganic and biologically relevant phosphates has also been found to be remarkable, with outer-sphere hydrogen bonding interactions being a dominant factor for the process. While for the inorganic phosphate substitution process the formation of μ-η(2)-OPO2O represents the termination of the reactivity monitored, for 5'-CMP only the formation of η(1)-OPO3 species is observed, which evolve with time to the final dead-end bis hydroxo-bridged complexes. The promoted hydrolysis of the 5'-CMP phosphate has not been observed in any of the processes studied.

  19. Valuation of forested buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basnyat, Prakash

    The research concentrated on two fronts: (1) defining relationships between land use complex and nitrate and sediment concentrations; and (2) developing a method for assessing the extent of potential and water quality improvements available through land management options and their associated costs. In this work, selected basins of the Fish River (Alabama) were delineated, land use/land cover types were classified, and "contributing zones" were delineated using Geographic Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) analytical tools. Water samples collected from these basins were analyzed for their nutrient contents. Based on measured nitrate and sediment concentrations in basin streams, a linkage model was developed. This linkage model relates land use/land cover with the pollution levels in the stream. The linkage model was evaluated at three different scales: (1) the basin scale; (2) the contributing zone scale; and (3) the stream buffer/riparian zone scale. The contributing zone linkage model suggests that forests act as a sink or transformation zone. Residential/urban/built-up areas were identified as the strongest contributors of nitrate in the contributing zones model and active agriculture was identified as the second largest contributor. Regression results for the "land use/land cover diversity" model (stream buffer/riparian zone scale) suggest that areas that are close (adjacent) to the stream and any disturbances in these areas will have major impacts on stream water quality. The economic model suggests the value of retiring lands from agricultural land uses to forested buffers varies from 0 to 3067 per hectare, depending on the types of crops currently grown. Along with conversion costs, this land value forms the basis for estimates of the costs of land management options for improving (or maintaining) water quality throughout the study area. The model also shows the importance of stream-side management zones, which are key to maintenance of stream

  20. Influence of phosphate ions on buffer capacity of soil humic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguta, P.; Sokołowska, Z.

    2012-02-01

    The object of this study was to determine change of natural buffer capacity of humic acids by strong buffering agents, which were phosphate ions. Studies were carried out on the humic acids extracted from peat soils. Additional information was obtained by determination of water holding capacity, density, ash and pH for peats and optical parameter Q4/6 for humic acids. Humic acid suspensions exhibited the highest buffer properties at low pH and reached maximum at pH ~ 4. Phosphates possessed buffer properties in the pH range from 4.5 to 8.0. The maximum of buffering was at pH~6.8 and increased proportionally with an increase in the concentration of phosphate ions. The study indicated that the presence of phosphate ions may strongly change natural buffer capacity of humic acids by shifting buffering maximum toward higher pH values. Significant correlations were found for the degree of the secondary transformation with both the buffer capacity and the titrant volume used during titration.

  1. Buffer Capacity: An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Steven O.; Hanania, George I. H.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a quantitative experiment designed to demonstrate buffer action and the measurement of buffer capacity. Discusses how to make acetate buffers, determine their buffer capacity, plot the capacity/pH curve, and interpret the data obtained. (TW)

  2. Buffer capacity of the coelomic fluid in echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Collard, Marie; Laitat, Kim; Moulin, Laure; Catarino, Ana I; Grosjean, Philippe; Dubois, Philippe

    2013-09-01

    The increase in atmospheric CO2 due to anthropogenic activity results in an acidification of the surface waters of the oceans. The impact of these chemical changes depends on the considered organisms. In particular, it depends on the ability of the organism to control the pH of its inner fluids. Among echinoderms, this ability seems to differ significantly according to species or taxa. In the present paper, we investigated the buffer capacity of the coelomic fluid in different echinoderm taxa as well as factors modifying this capacity. Euechinoidea (sea urchins except Cidaroidea) present a very high buffer capacity of the coelomic fluid (from 0.8 to 1.8mmolkg(-1) SW above that of seawater), while Cidaroidea (other sea urchins), starfish and holothurians have a significantly lower one (from -0.1 to 0.4mmolkg(-1) SW compared to seawater). We hypothesize that this is linked to the more efficient gas exchange structures present in the three last taxa, whereas Euechinoidea evolved specific buffer systems to compensate lower gas exchange abilities. The constituents of the buffer capacity and the factors influencing it were investigated in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and the starfish Asterias rubens. Buffer capacity is primarily due to the bicarbonate buffer system of seawater (representing about 63% for sea urchins and 92% for starfish). It is also partly due to coelomocytes present in the coelomic fluid (around 8% for both) and, in P. lividus only, a compound of an apparent size larger than 3kDa is involved (about 15%). Feeding increased the buffer capacity in P. lividus (to a difference with seawater of about 2.3mmolkg(-1) SW compared to unfed ones who showed a difference of about 0.5mmolkg(-1) SW) but not in A. rubens (difference with seawater of about 0.2 for both conditions). In P. lividus, decreased seawater pH induced an increase of the buffer capacity of individuals maintained at pH7.7 to about twice that of the control individuals and, for those at pH7

  3. Virtual Frame Buffer Interface Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Thomas L.

    1990-01-01

    Virtual Frame Buffer Interface program makes all frame buffers appear as generic frame buffer with specified set of characteristics, allowing programmers to write codes that run unmodified on all supported hardware. Converts generic commands to actual device commands. Consists of definition of capabilities and FORTRAN subroutines called by application programs. Developed in FORTRAN 77 for DEC VAX 11/780 or DEC VAX 11/750 computer under VMS 4.X.

  4. Ring Buffered Network Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the research effort to demonstrate the integration of a data sharing technology, Ring Buffered Network Bus, in development by Dryden Flight Research Center, with an engine simulation application, the Java Gas Turbine Simulator, in development at the University of Toledo under a grant from the Glenn Research Center. The objective of this task was to examine the application of the RBNB technologies as a key component in the data sharing, health monitoring and system wide modeling elements of the NASA Aviation Safety Program (AVSP) [Golding, 1997]. System-wide monitoring and modeling of aircraft and air safety systems will require access to all data sources which are relative factors when monitoring or modeling the national airspace such as radar, weather, aircraft performance, engine performance, schedule and planning, airport configuration, flight operations, etc. The data sharing portion of the overall AVSP program is responsible for providing the hardware and software architecture to access and distribute data, including real-time flight operations data, among all of the AVSP elements. The integration of an engine code capable of numerically "flying" through recorded flight paths and weather data using a software tool that allows for distributed access of data to this engine code demonstrates initial steps toward building a system capable of monitoring and modeling the National Airspace.

  5. Oracle Log Buffer Queueing

    SciTech Connect

    Rivenes, A S

    2004-12-08

    The purpose of this document is to investigate Oracle database log buffer queuing and its affect on the ability to load data using a specialized data loading system. Experiments were carried out on a Linux system using an Oracle 9.2 database. Previous experiments on a Sun 4800 running Solaris had shown that 100,000 entities per minute was an achievable rate. The question was then asked, can we do this on Linux, and where are the bottlenecks? A secondary question was also lurking, how can the loading be further scaled to handle even higher throughput requirements? Testing was conducted using a Dell PowerEdge 6650 server with four CPUs and a Dell PowerVault 220s RAID array with 14 36GB drives and 128 MB of cache. Oracle Enterprise Edition 9.2.0.4 was used for the database and Red Hat Linux Advanced Server 2.1 was used for the operating system. This document will detail the maximum observed throughputs using the same test suite that was used for the Sun tests. A detailed description of the testing performed along with an analysis of bottlenecks encountered will be made. Issues related to Oracle and Linux will also be detailed and some recommendations based on the findings.

  6. Molecular Buffers Permit Sensitivity Tuning and Inversion of Riboswitch Signals.

    PubMed

    Rugbjerg, Peter; Genee, Hans Jasper; Jensen, Kristian; Sarup-Lytzen, Kira; Sommer, Morten Otto Alexander

    2016-07-15

    Predictable integration of foreign biological signals and parts remains a key challenge in the systematic engineering of synthetic cellular actuations, and general methods to improve signal transduction and sensitivity are needed. To address this problem we modeled and built a molecular signal buffer network in Saccharomyces cerevisiae inspired by chemical pH buffer systems. The molecular buffer system context-insulates a riboswitch enabling synthetic control of colony formation and modular signal manipulations. The riboswitch signal is relayed to a transcriptional activation domain of a split transcription factor, while interacting DNA-binding domains mediate the transduction of signal and form an interacting molecular buffer. The molecular buffer system enables modular signal inversion through integration with repressor modules. Further, tuning of input sensitivity was achieved through perturbation of the buffer pair ratio guided by a mathematical model. Such buffered signal tuning networks will be useful for domestication of RNA-based sensors enabling tunable outputs and library-wide selections for drug discovery and metabolic engineering.

  7. Improved dissolution rate of poorly soluble drug by incorporation of buffers.

    PubMed

    Preechagoon, D; Udomprateep, A; Manwiwattanagul, G

    2000-08-01

    This study focused on comparing dissolution rates of indomethacin after co-compressing with three different buffers (calcium carbonate, sodium carbonate, and sodium citrate) at pH 2 and 7. Factors affecting the dissolution rate were also examined, such as type and particle size of buffer and weight-to-weight ratio of drug to buffer. It was found that, at pH 7, the release rates of indomethacin with sodium carbonate (< 74 microns, all proportions) and sodium citrate (< 74 microns, 75% loading) at a 20-min test time were about 10-fold and 6-fold greater, respectively, than that of indomethacin alone. When the drug and buffer were compressed into tablets using a tableting machine, the release rates of indomethacin for the control, sodium carbonate incorporated (25% and 75% buffer loading), and sodium citrate incorporated (75% buffer loading) at a 15-min test time were 50%, 90%, 66%, and 67%, respectively.

  8. Tested Demonstrations: Visualization of Buffer Action and the Acidifying Effect of Carbon Dioxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a buffer demonstration which features visualization of the effects of carbon dioxide on pH. Background information, list of materials needed, procedures used, and a discussion of results obtained are included. (JN)

  9. Nitrification utilizing CaCO3 as the buffering agent.

    PubMed

    Green, M; Ruskol, Y; Tarre, S; Loewenthal, R E

    2002-03-01

    Nitrification utilizing chalk (calcium carbonate) as the buffering agent was investigated. Three different fluidized bed reactor configurations were examined in order to study the effect of reactor layout on nitrification and concomitant chalk dissolution. The first system consisted of two interconnected columns with high recycle rate, one containing zeolite as the carrier for the nitrifying biomass and the other chalk as the buffering agent. The second reactor system consisted of a single column containing both zeolite and chalk particles. In the third system, nitrification was carried out in a single column where chalk particles were used both as the carrier for the biomass and as the buffer. Results showed that only the reactor with chalk acting as both the buffering agent and the biomass carrier could be operated without external buffer (NaHCO3) addition. This system operated at high ammonium removal rates of up to 2.5 g N l(-1) reactor d(-1) even though the bulk solution of the reactor had a low pH of 5.5. The high nitrification efficiency at this low pH was probably mainly a result of a favorable microenvironment surrounding the nitrifying biomass attached to the chalk.

  10. Influence of buffer composition on the distribution of inkjet printed protein molecules and the resulting spot morphology.

    PubMed

    Mujawar, Liyakat Hamid; van Amerongen, Aart; Norde, Willem

    2012-08-30

    Producing high quality protein microarrays on inexpensive substrates like polystyrene is a big challenge in the field of diagnostics. Using a non-contact inkjet printer we have produced microarrays on polystyrene slides for two different biotinylated biomolecules, bovine serum albumin (BSA-biotin) and immunoglobulin-G (IgG-biotin), and studied the influence of buffer (composition and pH) on the spot morphology and signal intensity. Atomic force microscopy revealed the morphological pattern of the (biomolecule) spots printed from phosphate buffer (pH 7.4), phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4) and carbonate buffer (pH 9.6). The spots showed an irregular crust-like appearance when printed in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4), mainly due to the high NaCl content, whereas spots of biomolecules printed in carbonate buffer (pH 9.6) showed a smooth morphology. In addition, the rinsing of these dried spots led to the loss of a considerable fraction of the biomolecules, leaving behind a small fraction that is compatible with the (mono)layer. It was confirmed by confocal laser microscopy that the quality of the spots with respect to the uniformity and distribution of the biomolecules therein was superior when printed in carbonate buffer (pH 9.6) as compared to other buffer systems. Particularly, spotting in PBS yielded spots having a very irregular distribution and morphology.

  11. Buffering capacity and membrane H+ conductance of Halobacterium halobium.

    PubMed

    Rius, N; Lorén, J G

    1996-09-01

    Buffering capacity and membrane H+ conductance were measured in Halobacterium halobium suspensions in the light and in the dark over a wide range of external pH. The values of both variables for this archaeobacterium were significantly higher than those found for eubacteria in other reports. It appears from our results that the special chemical composition of the cell envelope and the movement of ions, mainly protons, may influence the magnitude of the buffering power and the H+ membrane conductance of these cells.

  12. Improved reliability of pH measurements.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Petra; Werner, Barbara

    2002-11-01

    Measurements of pH are performed on a large scale at laboratory level, and in industry. To meet the quality-control requirements and other technical specifications there is a need for traceability in measurement results. The prerequisite for the international acceptance of analytical data is reliability. To measure means to compare. Comparability entails use of recognised references to which the standard buffer solutions used for calibration of pH meter-electrode assemblies can be traced. The new recommendation on the measurement of pH recently published as a provisional document by the International Union on Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) enables traceability for measured pH values to a conventional reference frame which is recognised world-wide. The primary method for pH will be described. If analytical data are to be accepted internationally it is necessary to demonstrate the equivalence of the national traceability structures, including national measurement standards. For the first time key comparisons for pH have been performed by the Consultative Committee for Amount of Substance (CCQM, set up by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures, BIPM) to assess the equivalence of the national measurement procedures used to determine the pH of primary standard buffer solutions. The results of the first key comparison on pH CCQM-K9, and other international initiatives to improve the consistency of the results of measurement for pH, are reported.

  13. Buffer Gas Acquisition and Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F.; Lueck, Dale E.; Jennings, Paul A.; Callahan, Richard A.; Delgado, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The acquisition and storage of buffer gases (primarily argon and nitrogen) from the Mars atmosphere provides a valuable resource for blanketing and pressurizing fuel tanks and as a buffer gas for breathing air for manned missions. During the acquisition of carbon dioxide (CO2), whether by sorption bed or cryo-freezer, the accompanying buffer gases build up in the carbon dioxide acquisition system, reduce the flow of CO2 to the bed, and lower system efficiency. It is this build up of buffer gases that provide a convenient source, which must be removed, for efficient capture Of CO2 Removal of this buffer gas barrier greatly improves the charging rate of the CO2 acquisition bed and, thereby, maintains the fuel production rates required for a successful mission. Consequently, the acquisition, purification, and storage of these buffer gases are important goals of ISRU plans. Purity of the buffer gases is a concern e.g., if the CO, freezer operates at 140 K, the composition of the inert gas would be approximately 21 percent CO2, 50 percent nitrogen, and 29 percent argon. Although there are several approaches that could be used, this effort focused on a hollow-fiber membrane (HFM) separation method. This study measured the permeation rates of CO2, nitrogen (ND, and argon (Ar) through a multiple-membrane system and the individual membranes from room temperature to 193K and 10 kpa to 300 kPa. Concentrations were measured with a gas chromatograph that used a thermoconductivity (TCD) detector with helium (He) as the carrier gas. The general trend as the temperature was lowered was for the membranes to become more selective, In addition, the relative permeation rates between the three gases changed with temperature. The end result was to provide design parameters that could be used to separate CO2 from N2 and Ar.

  14. Buffer gas acquisition and storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrish, Clyde F.; Lueck, Dale E.; Jennings, Paul A.

    2001-02-01

    The acquisition and storage of buffer gases (primarily argon and nitrogen) from the Mars atmosphere provides a valuable resource for blanketing and pressurizing fuel tanks and as a buffer gas for breathing air for manned missions. During the acquisition of carbon dioxide (CO2), whether by sorption bed or cryo-freezer, the accompanying buffer gases build up in the carbon dioxide acquisition system, reduce the flow of CO2 to the bed, and lower system efficiency. It is this build up of buffer gases that provide a convenient source, which must be removed, for efficient capture of CO2. Removal of this buffer gas barrier greatly improves the charging rate of the CO2 acquisition bed and, thereby, maintains the fuel production rates required for a successful mission. Consequently, the acquisition, purification, and storage of these buffer gases are important goals of ISRU plans. Purity of the buffer gases is a concern e.g., if the CO2 freezer operates at 140 K, the composition of the inert gas would be approximately 21 percent CO2, 50 percent nitrogen, and 29 percent argon. Although there are several approaches that could be used, this effort focused on a hollow-fiber membrane (HFM) separation method. This study measured the permeation rates of CO2, nitrogen (N2), and argon (Ar) through a multiple-membrane system and the individual membranes from room temperature to 193 K and 10 kPa to 300 kPa. Concentrations were measured with a gas chromatograph. The end result was data necessary to design a system that could separate CO2, N2, and Ar. .

  15. Buffer Effects in the Solubility, Nucleation and Growth of Chicken Egg White Lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Ursula J.

    1999-01-01

    The growth of protein crystals is important for determination of their three-dimensional structure, which relates to their biochemical functions and to the practical goal of designing pharmaceuticals to modify that function. While many proteins have been successfully crystallized by a variety of methods, there is still limited understanding of the process of nucleation and growth of even the simplest proteins. Chicken egg-white lysozyme (CEWL) is readily crystallized under a variety of conditions, and studies underway at MSFC are designed to elucidate the mechanisms by which the crystals nucleate and grow. We have investigated the effect of buffer choice on the solubility, nucleation and growth of CEWL. CEWL was purified by dialysis against a .05M phosphate buffer and chromatographic separation from contaminants in a sepharose column. Solubility studies were made as a function of buffer concentration for phosphate and formate buffers, and the nucleation and growth of crystals at 10 C was studied as a function of pH for oxalate, succinate, formate, butyrate, carbonate, phosphate and acetate buffer solutions. The solubility data support the conclusion that there is a solubility minimum as a function of buffer concentration for amphiphilic molecules, while no minimum is observed for a phosphate buffer. Nucleation is suppressed at pH greater than pKa for all buffers except phosphate. The aspect ratio of the (110) faces is shown to be a function of crystal size, rather than pH.

  16. Proteins contribute insignificantly to the intrinsic buffering capacity of yeast cytoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Poznanski, Jaroslaw; Szczesny, Pawel; Ruszczynska, Katarzyna; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Paczek, Leszek

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We predicted buffering capacity of yeast proteome from protein abundance data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We measured total buffering capacity of yeast cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed that proteins contribute insignificantly to buffering capacity. -- Abstract: Intracellular pH is maintained by a combination of the passive buffering of cytoplasmic dissociable compounds and several active systems. Over the years, a large portion of and possibly most of the cell's intrinsic (i.e., passive non-bicarbonate) buffering effect was attributed to proteins, both in higher organisms and in yeast. This attribution was not surprising, given that the concentration of proteins with multiple protonable/deprotonable groups in the cell exceeds the concentration of free protons by a few orders of magnitude. Using data from both high-throughput experiments and in vitro laboratory experiments, we tested this concept. We assessed the buffering capacity of the yeast proteome using protein abundance data and compared it to our own titration of yeast cytoplasm. We showed that the protein contribution is less than 1% of the total intracellular buffering capacity. As confirmed with NMR measurements, inorganic phosphates play a crucial role in the process. These findings also shed a new light on the role of proteomes in maintaining intracellular pH. The contribution of proteins to the intrinsic buffering capacity is negligible, and proteins might act only as a recipient of signals for changes in pH.

  17. Density measurements of potassium phosphate buffer from 4 to 45 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Schiel, John E; Hage, David S

    2005-01-30

    Potassium phosphate buffer is often used in methods such as equilibrium dialysis, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) for characterizing the binding of drugs and hormones with proteins or other ligands within the body. In these experiments, the buffer density is often approximated to be that of water and the concentrations of all reagents are assumed to be constant with temperature. However, some difference in density between phosphate buffer and water would be expected, and variations in this density could lead to significant changes in the concentrations of dissolved solutes with temperature. This, in turn, could affect the binding observed for a solute-ligand system in such a buffer. In this study, the densities of potassium phosphate buffers with concentrations up to 0.10M were measured at or near physiological pH for temperatures ranging from 4-45 degrees C. The general change in density versus temperature followed a quadratic equation, while the changes in density with concentration and pH followed a linear response. The results were used to formulate a general equation that could be used to calculate the density of potassium phosphate buffer at any pH, temperature, and concentration within the tested range. This equation and more specialized relationships developed in the temperature, concentration, and pH studies were found to give much greater accuracy in describing the density of these buffers versus a previous relationship developed for solutions containing only potassium dihydrogen phosphate.

  18. Stability of buffer-free freeze-dried formulations: A feasibility study of a monoclonal antibody at high protein concentrations.

    PubMed

    Garidel, Patrick; Pevestorf, Benjamin; Bahrenburg, Sven

    2015-11-01

    We studied the stability of freeze-dried therapeutic protein formulations over a range of initial concentrations (from 40 to 160 mg/mL) and employed a variety of formulation strategies (including buffer-free freeze dried formulations, or BF-FDF). Highly concentrated, buffer-free liquid formulations of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been shown to be a viable alternative to conventionally buffered preparations. We considered whether it is feasible to use the buffer-free strategy in freeze-dried formulations, as an answer to some of the known drawbacks of conventional buffers. We therefore conducted an accelerated stability study (24 weeks at 40 °C) to assess the feasibility of stabilizing freeze-dried formulations without "classical" buffer components. Factors monitored included pH stability, protein integrity, and protein aggregation. Because the protein solutions are inherently self-buffering, and the system's buffer capacity scales with protein concentration, we included highly concentrated buffer-free freeze-dried formulations in the study. The tested formulations ranged from "fully formulated" (containing both conventional buffer and disaccharide stabilizers) to "buffer-free" (including formulations with only disaccharide lyoprotectant stabilizers) to "excipient-free" (with neither added buffers nor stabilizers). We evaluated the impacts of varying concentrations, buffering schemes, pHs, and lyoprotectant additives. At the end of 24 weeks, no change in pH was observed in any of the buffer-free formulations. Unbuffered formulations were found to have shorter reconstitution times and lower opalescence than buffered formulations. Protein stability was assessed by visual inspection, sub-visible particle analysis, protein monomer content, charge variants analysis, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. All of these measures found the stability of buffer-free formulations that included a disaccharide stabilizer comparable to buffer

  19. Use of buffered hypochlorite solution for disinfecting fibrescopes.

    PubMed

    Coates, D; Death, J E

    1982-03-01

    The possible use of sodium hypochlorite solution buffered to pH 7.6 and containing 100 ppm available chlorine (avCl) for disinfecting fibrescopes was investigated. A flexible fibrescope experimentally contaminated with Pseudomonas putida, Mycobacterium fortuitum, or Bacillus subtilis spores was effectively disinfected within 10 m in repeatedly and without any observable adverse effect on the instrument. The corrosive nature of buffered hypochlorite was investigated by immersing various fibrescope components and metal wires in solutions of different strength for long periods and examining them for damage. Stainless steel, platinum, glass, Teflon, polythene and epoxy resin were apparently unaffected whereas polyurethane, rubber and other metals tested were damaged to different extents. Buffered hypochlorite solutions may have many applications pertaining to the disinfection of items which are either thermolabile or require rapid effective disinfection.

  20. A high-throughput colourimetric method for the determination of pH in crystallization screens.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Jobie; Wilson, Julie; O'Keefe, Simon; Hargreaves, David

    2014-09-01

    The crystallization of proteins is dependent on the careful control of numerous parameters, one of these being pH. The pH of crystallization is generally reported as that of the buffer; however, the true pH has been found to be as many as four pH units away. Measurement of pH with a meter is time-consuming and requires the reformatting of the crystallization solution. To overcome this, a high-throughput method for pH determination of buffered solutions has been developed with results comparable to those of a pH meter.

  1. Comparison of three buffer solutions for amino acid derivatization and following analysis by liquid chromatography electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rebane, Riin; Herodes, Koit

    2012-07-06

    For reversed phase separation amino acids are usually derivatized. Several derivatization reactions are carried out at basic pH. In the present work, influence of three basic buffer solutions on liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass-spectrometric (LC-ESI-MS) analysis of amino acid derivatives was studied. Borate buffer--the most common derivatization buffer--was found to influence ESI ionization up to 23 min retention time. For 9-fluorenylmethylmethoxycarbonyl chloride (Fmoc-Cl derivatization) carbonate buffer should be preferred as it provides higher responses. Hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) buffer improves chromatographic peak shapes and responses for diethyl ethoxymethylenemalonate (DEEMM) derivatives.

  2. Peak distortion in the column liquid chromatographic determination of omeprazole dissolved in borax buffer.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, T; Collijn, E; Tivert, A M; Rosén, L

    1991-11-22

    Injection of a sample containing omeprazole dissolved in borax buffer (pH 9.2) into a reversed-phase liquid chromatographic system consisting of a mixture of acetonitrile and phosphate buffer (pH 7.6) as the mobile phase and a C18 surface-modified silica as the solid phase resulted under special conditions in split peaks of omeprazole. The degree of peak split and the retention time of omeprazole varied with the concentration of borax in the sample solution and the ionic strength of the mobile phase buffer as well as with the column used. Borax is eluted from the column in a broad zone starting from the void volume of the column. The retention is probably due to the presence of polyborate ions. The size of the zone varies with the concentration of borax in the sample injected. In the borax zone the pH is increased compared with the pH of the mobile phase, and when omeprazole (a weak acid) is co-eluting in the borax zone its retention is affected. In the front part and in the back part of the borax zone, pH gradients are formed, and these gradients can induce the peak splitting. When the dissolving medium is changed to a phosphate buffer or an ammonium buffer at pH 9 no peak distortion of omeprazole is observed.

  3. Changes in potential difference across the human buccal mucosa with buffered or unbuffered aspirin and salicylate.

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, B J; Makki, K A; O'Grady, J

    1981-01-01

    The potential difference (PD) across the gastric mucosa is an index of mucosal integrity, and is lowered by topical application of irritants such as aspirin. There are basic similarities in the PD across the buccal and gastric mucosae, and we have therefore investigated the actions of various salicylates in buffered or un-buffered solution on buccal PD in human subjects. Aspirin (at pH 2) and soluble aspirin (pH 4.4) applied topically reduced buccal PD, but this fall was abolished by buffering to pH 7. Sodium salicylate likewise reduced buccal PD at pH 4 and pH 6, but not when buffered to pH 7. Two other soluble aspirin mixtures also reduced buccal PD, indicating insufficient buffering capacity to prevent topical irritancy. Ingestion of aspirin (600 mg), avoiding topical contact with the buccal mucosa, did not alter buccal PD. Paracetamol applied topically likewise failed to reduce buccal PD. Measurement of buccal PD may be useful in the preliminary assessment of the gastrointestinal irritation provoked by anti-inflammatory and other compounds. PMID:7297912

  4. Alkaline buffers release EDRF from bovine cultured aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, J. A.; de Nucci, G.; Warner, T. D.; Vane, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    1. Release of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) and prostacyclin (PGI2) from bovine cultured aortic endothelial cells (EC) was measured by bioassay and radioimmunoassay, respectively. 2. Bradykinin (BK, 3-30 pmol), adenosine diphosphate (ADP, 2-6 nmol) or the sodium ionophore monensin (40-100 nmol) injected through a column of EC released EDRF. L-Arginine free base (FB; 10-20 mumol) or D-arginine FB (10-20 mumol) injected through the column of EC released similar amounts of EDRF and also caused an increase in pH of the Krebs solution perfusing the EC from 7.5-8.0 to 8.6-9.5. Sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) an alkaline buffer which caused the same changes in the pH of the Krebs solution also induced the same release of EDRF. The hydrochloride salts of L- or D-arginine did not cause either release of EDRF when injected through the column of EC or increases in the pH of the Krebs solution. 3. Inhibitors of either diacylglycerol lipase (RHC 80267) or kinase (R59022) inhibited the release of EDRF induced by BK or ADP but potentiated the release induced by L-arginine FB, monensin (40-100 nmol) or alkaline buffer (Na2CO3). R59022 and RHC 80267 infused through the EC increased the basal release of EDRF. 4. When calcium chloride was omitted from the Krebs solution the release of EDRF induced by alkaline buffer (Na2CO3; pH 8.6-9.5) or L-arginine FB (10-20 mumol) was selectively inhibited when compared to that induced by BK (3-30 pmol) or ADP (2-6 nmol). This inhibition was reversed when calcium (2.5 mM) was restored. 5. NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (NMMA; 30 microM) inhibited release of EDRF induced by BK (10-30 pmol) or alkaline buffers (Na2CO3 or D-arginine FB; pH 8.6-9.5). This inhibition was partially reversed by L- but not D-arginine FB or HCl (30-100 microM). 6. Prostacyclin was released when BK (10 pmol), ADP (2 nmol) or arachidonic acid (30 nmol) were injected through the column of EC. However, monensin (40 nmol) or alkaline buffers (pH 8.6-9.5) did not release

  5. Buffering in cyclic gene networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyzin, S. D.; Kolesov, A. Yu.; Rozov, N. Kh.

    2016-06-01

    We consider cyclic chains of unidirectionally coupled delay differential-difference equations that are mathematical models of artificial oscillating gene networks. We establish that the buffering phenomenon is realized in these system for an appropriate choice of the parameters: any given finite number of stable periodic motions of a special type, the so-called traveling waves, coexist.

  6. [Influence of buffer solutions on the performance of microbial fuel cell electricity generation].

    PubMed

    Qiang, Lin; Yuan, Lin-jiang; Ding, Qing

    2011-05-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a potential green technology due to its application in wastewater treatment and renewable energy generation. Phosphate buffer solution (PBS) has been commonly used in MFC studies to maintain a suitable pH for electricity generating bacteria and/or to increase the solution conductivity. However, it has some drawbacks using PBS in MFC: One is that the addition of a high concentration of phosphate buffer in MFCs is expensive, especially for the application in wastewater treatment; the other is that phosphates can contribute to the eutrophication conditions of water bodies if the effluents are discharged without the removal of phosphates. By adding PBS buffer as the comparison, the study investigated the effect of borax buffer and in the absence of buffer on the performance of electrical power, coulomb efficiency and effluent pH. 200 mmol/L PBS was the best, conductivity was 1.973 mS/cm,the maximum power density was 36.4 mW/m2 and the maximum coulomb efficiency was 2.92%, effluent pH was almost at (7.00 +/- 0.05). 100 mmol/L borax buffer solution, conductivity was 1.553 mS/cm; the maximum power density was 26.2 mW/m2 coulomb efficiency of 6.26%, which was 2.14 times to PBS and greatly increased the electron recovery efficiency with the effluent pH was (7.35 +/- 0.05). While free buffer solution conductivity was 0.314 mS/cm, maximum power density was 27.64 mW/m2; coulomb efficiency was 2.82% and the effluent pH of approximately 7.43. The electrolyte which in absence of buffer solution conductivity was 1/6 of adding PBS buffer, 1/5 of borax buffer, while its power density lower 8.76 mW/mr2 than adding PBS and higher 1.24 mW/m2 than borax buffer. The results showed that adding the suitable concentration of borax buffer may improve the electron recovery efficiency and under batch conditions, MFC run successfully without adding buffer solution to MFC.

  7. Comparison of Buffer Effect of Different Acids During Sandstone Acidizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umer Shafiq, Mian; Khaled Ben Mahmud, Hisham; Hamid, Mohamed Ali

    2015-04-01

    The most important concern of sandstone matrix acidizing is to increase the formation permeability by removing the silica particles. To accomplish this, the mud acid (HF: HCl) has been utilized successfully for many years to stimulate the sandstone formations, but still it has many complexities. This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations of different acid combinations (HF: HCl, HF: H3PO4 and HF: HCOOH). Hydrofluoric acid and fluoboric acid are used to dissolve clays and feldspar. Phosphoric and formic acids are added as a buffer to maintain the pH of the solution; also it allows the maximum penetration of acid into the core sample. Different tests have been performed on the core samples before and after the acidizing to do the comparative study on the buffer effect of these acids. The analysis consists of permeability, porosity, color change and pH value tests. There is more increase in permeability and porosity while less change in pH when phosphoric and formic acids were used compared to mud acid. From these results it has been found that the buffer effect of phosphoric acid and formic acid is better than hydrochloric acid.

  8. Buffer salt effects in off-line coupling of capillary electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marák, Jozef; Stanová, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    In this work, the impact of buffer salts/matrix effects on the signal in direct injection MS with an electrospray interface (DI-ESI-MS) following pITP fractionation of the sample was studied. A range of buffers frequently used in CE analyses (pH 3-10) was prepared containing 10, 50, and 90% v/v of ACN, respectively. The sets of calibration solutions of cetirizine (an antihistaminic drug with an amphiprotic character) within a 0.05-2.0 mg/L concentration range were prepared in different buffers. The greatest enhancements in the MS signal (in terms of change in the slope of the calibration line) were obtained for the beta-alanine buffer (pH 3.5) in positive ionization and for the borate buffer (pH 9.2) in negative ionization, respectively. The procedure was successfully applied to the analysis of buserelin (a peptidic drug). The slope of the calibration line for solutions containing the beta-alanine buffer with 50% of ACN was 4 times higher than for water or urine, respectively. This study clearly demonstrates that the buffer salt/matrix effects in an offline combination of pITP and DI-ESI-MS can also play a positive role, as they can enhance the signal in MS. A similar influence of the above effects can also be presumed in the CE techniques combined on-line with ESI-MS.

  9. Predicting the crystallization propensity of carboxylic acid buffers in frozen systems--relevance to freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Sundaramurthi, Prakash; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2011-04-01

    Selective crystallization of buffer components in frozen solutions is known to cause pronounced pH shifts. Our objective was to study the crystallization behavior and the consequent pH shift in frozen aqueous carboxylic acid buffers. Aqueous carboxylic acid buffers were cooled to -25°C and the pH of the solution was measured as a function of temperature. The thermal behavior of solutions during freezing and thawing was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. The crystallized phases in frozen solution were identified by X-ray diffractometry. The malate buffer system was robust with no evidence of buffer component crystallization and hence negligible pH shift. In the citrate and tartarate systems, at initial pH buffer component (neutral form) crystallized on cooling, causing an increase in the freeze-concentrate pH. Carboxylic acid buffers were rank ordered based on their propensity to crystallize in frozen solutions. From the aqueous solubility values of these carboxylic acids, which have been reported over a range of temperatures, it was also possible to estimate the degree of supersaturation at the subambient temperature of interest. This enabled us to predict their crystallization propensity in frozen systems. The experimental and the predicted rank orderings were in excellent agreement.

  10. Biophysical stability of hyFc fusion protein with regards to buffers and various excipients.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jun Yeul; Kim, Nam Ah; Lim, Dae Gon; Eun, Chang-yong; Choi, Donghoon; Jeong, Seong Hoon

    2016-05-01

    A novel non-cytolytic hybrid Fc (hyFc) with an intact Ig structure without any mutation in the hyFc region, was developed to construct a long-acting agonistic protein. The stability of interleukin-7 (IL-7) fused with the hyFc (GXN-04) was evaluated to develop early formulations. Various biophysical methods were utilized and three different buffer systems with various pH ranges were investigated including histidine-acetate, sodium citrate, and tris buffers. Various excipients were incorporated into the systems to obtain optimum protein stability. Two evident thermal transitions were observed with the unfolding of IL-7 and hyFc. The Tm and ΔH increased with pH, suggesting increased conformational stability. Increased Z-average size with PDI and decreased zeta potential with pH increase, with the exception of tris buffer, showed aggregation issues. Moreover, tris buffer at higher pH showed aggregation peaks from DLS. Non-ionic surfactants were effective against agitation by outcompeting protein molecules for hydrophobic surfaces. Sucrose and sorbitol accelerated protein aggregation during agitation, but exhibited a protective effect against oxidation, with preferential exclusion favoring the compact states of GXN-04. The stability of GXN-04 was varied by basal buffers and excipients, hence the buffers and excipients need to be evaluated carefully to achieve the maximum stability of proteins.

  11. Investigation of solid-phase buffers for sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Sukalyan; Ergas, Sarina J; Lopez-Luna, Erika

    2007-12-01

    This paper investigates biological denitrification using autotrophic microorganisms that use elemental sulfur as an electron donor. In this process, for each gram of nitrate-nitrogen removed, approximately 4.5 g of alkalinity (as calcium carbonate) are consumed. Because denitrification is severely inhibited below pH 5.5, and alkalinity present in the influent wastewaters is less than the alkalinity consumed, an external buffer was needed to arrest any drop in pH from alkalinity consumption. A packed-bed bioreactor configuration is ideally suited to handle variations in flow and nitrate loading from decentralized wastewater treatment systems, as it is a passive system and thus requires minimal maintenance; therefore, a solid-phase buffer packed with the elemental sulfur in the bioreactor is most suitable. In this research, marble chips, limestone, and crushed oyster shells were tested as solid-phase buffers. Bench- and field-scale studies indicated that crushed oyster shell was the most suitable buffer based on (1) the rate of dissolution of buffer and the buffering agent released (carbonate, bicarbonate, or hydroxide), (2) the ability of the buffer surface to act as host for microbial attachment, (3) turbidity of the solution upon release of the buffering agent, and (4) economics.

  12. Effect of two mouthwashes on salivary ph.

    PubMed

    Belardinelli, Paola A; Morelatto, Rosana A; Benavidez, Tomás E; Baruzzi, Ana M; López de Blanc, Silvia A

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the effect of two mouthwashes on salivary pH and correlate it with age, buffer capacity and saliva flow rate in healthy volunteers, a crossover phase IV clinical study involving three age-based groups was designed. Two commercial mouthwashes (MW), Cool Mint ListerineR (MWa) and Periobacter R (MWb) were used. The unstimulated saliva of each individual was first characterized by measuring flow rate, pH, and buffer capacity. Salivary pH was evaluated before rinsing with a given MW, immediately after rinsing, 5 minutes later, and then every 10 min (at 15, 25, 35 min) until the baseline pH was recovered. Paired t-test, ANOVA with a randomized block design, and Pearson correlation tests were used. Averages were 0.63 mL/min, 7.06, and 0.87 for flow rate, pH, and buffer capacity, respectively. An immediate significant increase in salivary pH was observed after rinsing, reaching average values of 7.24 (MWb) and 7.30 (MWa), which declined to an almost stable value 15 minutes. The great increase in salivary pH, after MW use shows that saliva is a dynamic system, and that the organism is capable of responding to a stimulus with changes in its composition. It is thus evident that pH of the external agent alone is not a good indicator for its erosive potential because biological systems tend to neutralize it. The results of this study enhance the importance of in vivo measurements and reinforce the concept of the protective action of saliva.

  13. New zwitterionic butanesulfonic acids that extend the alkaline range of four families of Good buffers: evaluation for use in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Thiel, T; Liczkowski, L; Bissen, S T

    1998-11-18

    Four new zwitterionic butanesulfonic acid buffers that are structurally related to four families of Good buffers were evaluated for use in biological systems. These buffers, with pKa values from 7.6 to 10.7, were compared with a variety of other buffers from the same family and with unrelated buffers to determine their effect on enzyme activity and on microbial growth. The activity of four enzymes with optimum pH values in the alkaline range were tested: beta-galactosidase, esterase, phosphodiesterase and alkaline phosphatase. In general, all the Good buffers, including the new butanesulfonic acid buffers, gave good activity; however, there was variation in activity of certain enzymes with certain buffers. Tris, glycine, and phosphate buffers typically showed variation in activity compared to the family of Good buffers. beta-Galactosidase, in particular, showed greater activity with Good buffers than with phosphate or Tris buffers. Similarly, growth of seven bacterial strains was consistent, with a few exceptions, for all the Good family of buffers with Tris often inhibiting growth. Quantitation of alkaline phosphatase conjugated to antibodies is an important tool in many applications in molecular biology. Several Good buffers gave good signals when compared with Tris at pH 9.5 for detection of proteins using alkaline phosphatase-conjugated antibodies.

  14. An integrated recirculating optical buffer.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyundai; Mack, John P; Bluementhal, Daniel J; Bowers, John E

    2008-07-21

    This paper reports an integrated optical buffer consisting of a low loss silicon waveguide delay line and a silicon evanescent gate matrix switch. The integrated device demonstrates an error free operation at 40 Gb/s data rate with a packet delay of 1.1 ns. This demonstration also highlights the silicon evanescent device platform to realize new types of photonic integrated devices by combining the low loss silicon passive components with the silicon evanescent photonic active devices.

  15. Laser velocimeter (autocovariance) buffer interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemmons, J. I., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A laser velocimeter (autocovariance) buffer interface (LVABI) was developed to serve as the interface between three laser velocimeter high speed burst counters and a minicomputer. A functional description is presented of the instrument and its unique features which allow the studies of flow velocity vector analysis, turbulence power spectra, and conditional sampling of other phenomena. Typical applications of the laser velocimeter using the LVABI are presented to illustrate its various capabilities.

  16. Cell buffer with built-in test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, William E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A cell buffer with built-in testing mechanism is provided. The cell buffer provides the ability to measure voltage provided by a power cell. The testing mechanism provides the ability to test whether the cell buffer is functioning properly and thus providing an accurate voltage measurement. The testing mechanism includes a test signal-provider to provide a test signal to the cell buffer. During normal operation, the test signal is disabled and the cell buffer operates normally. During testing, the test signal is enabled and changes the output of the cell buffer in a defined way. The change in the cell buffer output can then be monitored to determine if the cell buffer is functioning correctly. Specifically, if the voltage output of the cell buffer changes in a way that corresponds to the provided test signal, then the functioning of the cell buffer is confirmed. If the voltage output of the cell buffer does not change correctly, then the cell buffer is known not to be operating correctly. Thus, the built in testing mechanism provides the ability to quickly and accurately determine if the cell buffer is operating correctly. Furthermore, the testing mechanism provides this functionality without requiring excessive device size and complexity.

  17. Cell wall pH and auxin transport velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Rayle, D.

    1984-01-01

    According to the chemiosmotic polar diffusion hypothesis, auxin pulse velocity and basal secretion should increase with decreasing cell wall pH. Experiments were designed to test this prediction. Avena coleoptile sections were preincubated in either fusicoccin (FC), cycloheximide, pH 4.0, or pH 8.0 buffer and subsequently their polar transport capacities were determined. Relative to controls, FC enhanced auxin (IAA) uptake while CHI and pH 8.0 buffer reduced IAA uptake. Nevertheless, FC reduced IAA pulse velocity while cycloheximide increased velocity. Additional experiments showed that delivery of auxin to receivers is enhanced by increased receiver pH. This phenomenon was overcome by a pretreatment of the tissue with IAA. Our data suggest that while acidic wall pH values facilitate cellular IAA uptake, they do not enhance pulse velocity or basal secretion. These findings are inconsistent with the chemiosmotic hypothesis for auxin transport.

  18. Buffer Zone Requirements for Soil Fumigant Applications

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Updated pesticide product labels require fumigant users to establish a buffer zone around treated fields to reduce risks to bystanders. Useful information includes tarp testing guidance and a buffer zone calculator.

  19. Urban Runoff: Model Ordinances for Aquatic Buffers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Aquatic Buffers serve as natural boundaries between local waterways and existing development. The model and example ordinaces below provide suggested language or technical guidance designed to create the most effective stream buffer zones possible.

  20. 46 CFR 58.25-45 - Buffers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-45 Buffers. For each vessel on an ocean, coastwise, or Great Lakes voyage, steering gear other than hydraulic must be designed with suitable buffering arrangements to relieve...

  1. 46 CFR 58.25-45 - Buffers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-45 Buffers. For each vessel on an ocean, coastwise, or Great Lakes voyage, steering gear other than hydraulic must be designed with suitable buffering arrangements to relieve...

  2. In vitro dissolution of proton-pump inhibitor products intended for paediatric and geriatric use in physiological bicarbonate buffer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Shokrollahi, Honaz

    2015-05-15

    Proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) products based on enteric coated multiparticulates are design to meet the needs of patients who cannot swallow tablets such as children and older adults. Enteric coated PPI preparations exhibit delays in in vivo absorption and onset of antisecretory effects, which is not reflected by the rapid in vitro dissolution in compendial pH 6.8 phosphate buffer commonly used for assessment of these products. A more representative and physiological medium, pH 6.8 mHanks bicarbonate buffer, was used in this study to evaluate the in vitro dissolution of enteric coated multiparticulate-based PPI products. Commercially available omeprazole, lansoprazole and esomeprazole products were subject to dissolution tests using USP-II apparatus in pH 4.5 phosphate buffer saline for 45 min (acid stage) followed by pH 6.8 phosphate buffer or pH 6.8 mHanks bicarbonate buffer. In pH 6.8 phosphate buffer, all nine tested products displayed rapid and comparable dissolution profiles meeting the pharmacopeia requirements for delayed release preparations. In pH 6.8 mHanks buffer, drug release was delayed and failed the pharmacopeia requirements from most enteric coated preparations. Despite that the same enteric polymer, methacrylic acid-ethyl acrylate copolymer (1:1), was applied to all commercial multiparticulate-based products, marked differences were observed between dissolution profiles of these preparations. The use of pH 6.8 physiological bicarbonate (mHanks) buffer can serve as a useful tool to provide realistic and discriminative in vitro release assessment of enteric coated PPI preparations and to assist rational formulation development of these products.

  3. Doped LZO buffer layers for laminated conductors

    DOEpatents

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [Knoxville, TN; Schoop, Urs [Westborough, MA; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Thieme, Cornelis Leo Hans [Westborough, MA; Verebelyi, Darren T [Oxford, MA; Rupich, Martin W [Framingham, MA

    2010-03-23

    A laminated conductor includes a metallic substrate having a surface, a biaxially textured buffer layer supported by the surface of the substrate, the biaxially textured buffer layer comprising LZO and a dopant for mitigating metal diffusion through the LZO, and a biaxially textured conductor layer supported by the biaxially textured buffer layer.

  4. RESEARCH NEEDS IN RIPARIAN BUFFER RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian buffer restorations are used as management tools to produce favorable water quality impacts; moreover, the basis for riparian buffers as an instrument of water quality restoration rests on a relatively firm foundation. However, the extent to which buffers can restore rip...

  5. Determination of fluoxetine in human plasma using reserved phase HPLC.

    PubMed

    Misztal, G; Hopkała, H

    1997-11-01

    A rapid, simple, accurate method for the determination of fluoxetine in human plasma is presented. Liquid-liquid extraction of fluoxetine was carried out using diethyl ether. Chlorprothixene was applied as an internal standard. The samples were chromatographed on a LiChrosorb RP-18 (10 microns) column and the mobile phase was acetonitrile/phosphate buffer pH 2.70 (9:1). The detection was carried at 254 nm. A linear quantitative response curve was generated over a concentration range of 100-600 ng/ml. Overall extraction efficiency of the extraction procedure was found to be 86 to 91% with a correlation coefficient of 0.992.

  6. Carbon Dioxide Addition to Microbial Fuel Cell Cathodes Maintains Sustainable Catholyte pH and Improves Anolyte pH, Alkalinity, and Conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioelectrochemical system (BES) pH imbalances develop due to anodic proton-generating oxidation reactions and cathodic hydroxide-ion-generating reduction reactions. Until now, workers added unsustainable buffers to reduce the pH difference between the anode and cathode because the pH imbalance cont...

  7. Utilization of the buffering capacity of corn steep liquor in bacterial cellulose production by Acetobacter xylinum.

    PubMed

    Noro, N; Sugano, Y; Shoda, M

    2004-04-01

    Acetobacter xylinum BPR2001 produces water-insoluble bacterial cellulose (BC). Using a pH sensor for the accurate control of pH, which is one of the most critical factors for efficient BC production, is difficult especially in a baffled shake-flask and an airlift reactor. The buffering capacity of corn steep liquor (CSL) was estimated by measuring beta (buffering capacity) values in advance and was used to maintain the pH within the optimal range during the production of BC. When CSL was added to either a shake-flask, a stirred-tank reactor or an airlift reactor, BC production was almost the same as that in cultivations where pH was controlled manually or by a pH sensor.

  8. Retention of ionizable compounds on HPLC. 4. Mobile-phase pH measurement in methanol/water

    PubMed

    Canals; Portal; Bosch; Roses

    2000-04-15

    The different procedures used in HPLC to measure the pH of a mobile phase are evaluated in terms of the rigorous IUPAC definition of pH. The three procedures evaluated are as follows: measurement of the pH of the aqueous HPLC buffer before mixing it with the organic modifier, measurement of the pH of the HPLC buffer after mixing it with the organic modifier using a pH electrode system calibrated with aqueous buffers, and measurement of the pH of the HPLC buffer after mixing it with the organic modifier but calibrating the electrode system with reference buffers prepared in the same mixed solvent used as mobile phase. Following IUPAC definitions and recommendations, the three pH values can be related with the pH scales: w(w)pH, s(w)pH, and s(s)pH, respectively. The relationships between these three pH scales are also presented. The retention of several compounds with acid/base behavior in a C-18 and a polymeric column with buffered methanol/water as mobile phase is related to the mobile phase pH value measured in the three pH scales. It is demonstrated that the s(w)pH and s(s)pH scales give better relationships than the w(w)pH scale (pH measured in the aqueous buffer before mixing it with the organic modifier), commonly used on HPLC. The s(w)pH scale is specially recommended because of its simplicity of measurement: the pH is measured after mixing the aqueous buffer with the organic modifier, but the pH calibration is performed with the common aqueous reference buffers.

  9. Dissociation energies of PH and PH+.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, R. R.; Nazeer Ahammed, Y.; Srinivasa Rao, A.; Rao, T. V. R.

    1995-12-01

    Dissociation energies for the ground electronic states of diatomic PH and PH+ are determined by fitting empirical potential functions to the respective RKRV curves using correlation coefficients. The estimated ground state dissociation energies of PH and PH+ are 3.10 and 3.20 eV respectively by the curve fitting procedure using the Lippincott potential function. The computed values are in good agreement with experimental values.

  10. Improving Water Quality With Conservation Buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowrance, R.; Dabney, S.; Schultz, R.

    2003-12-01

    Conservation buffer technologies are new approaches that need wider application. In-field buffer practices work best when used in combination with other buffer types and other conservation practices. Vegetative barriers may be used in combination with edge-of-field buffers to protect and improve their function and longevity by dispersing runoff and encouraging sediment deposition upslope of the buffer. It's important to understand how buffers can be managed to help reduce nutrient transport potential for high loading of nutrients from manure land application sites, A restored riparian wetland buffer retained or removed at least 59 percent of the nitrogen and 66 percent of the phosphorus that entered from an adjacent manure land application site. The Bear Creek National Restoration Demonstration Watershed project in Iowa has been the site of riparian forest buffers and filter strips creation; constructed wetlands to capture tile flow; stream-bank bioengineering; in-stream structures; and controlling livestock grazing. We need field studies that test various widths of buffers of different plant community compositions for their efficacy in trapping surface runoff, reducing nonpoint source pollutants in subsurface waters, and enhancing the aquatic ecosystem. Research is needed to evaluate the impact of different riparian grazing strategies on channel morphology, water quality, and the fate of livestock-associated pathogens and antibiotics. Integrating riparian buffers and other conservation buffers into these models is a key objective in future model development.

  11. Buffered Electrochemical Polishing of Niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Tian, Hui; Corcoran, Sean

    2011-03-01

    The standard preparation of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of pure niobium include the removal of a 'damaged' surface layer, by buffered chemical polishing (BCP) or electropolishing (EP), after the cavities are formed. The performance of the cavities is characterized by a sharp degradation of the quality factor when the surface magnetic field exceeds about 90 mT, a phenomenon referred to as 'Q-drop.' In cavities made of polycrystalline fine grain (ASTM 5) niobium, the Q-drop can be significantly reduced by a low-temperature (? 120 °C) 'in-situ' baking of the cavity if the chemical treatment was EP rather than BCP. As part of the effort to understand this phenomenon, we investigated the effect of introducing a polarization potential during buffered chemical polishing, creating a process which is between the standard BCP and EP. While preliminary results on the application of this process to Nb cavities have been previously reported, in this contribution we focus on the characterization of this novel electrochemical process by measuring polarization curves, etching rates, surface finish, electrochemical impedance and the effects of temperature and electrolyte composition. In particular, it is shown that the anodic potential of Nb during BCP reduces the etching rate and improves the surface finish.

  12. Evaluation of buffering capacity and acid neutralizing-pH time profile of antacids.

    PubMed

    Lin, M S; Sun, P; Yu, H Y

    1998-10-01

    The antacid properties of seven antacids listed in the hospital formulary of a medical center were evaluated with in vitro tests. These included not only the preliminary antacid test and acid-neutralizing capacity test as described in the United States Pharmacopeia (USP XXIII), but also a buffering pH profile test. The preliminary antacid test measured the final pH of a 10-mL solution of 0.5 N HCl 10 minutes after addition of the minimum recommended dose of an antacid, while the neutralizing capacity test measured the amount (mEq) of HCl neutralized by the minimum recommended dose in 15 minutes. The buffering pH profile recorded the pH time course of dynamic simulated gastric fluid neutralization by a dose of an antacid. In the preliminary antacid test, magnesium oxide showed the highest pH (9.52 +/- 0.14, mean +/- standard deviation, n = 3); aluminum phosphate gel yielded a final pH of 2.51 +/- 0.01, thus failing to meet the criteria of an antacid (pH > 3.5). In the acid-neutralizing capacity test, hydrotalcite had the highest neutralizing capacity (28.26 +/- 0.3 mEq), while sodium bicarbonate had the lowest (7.40 +/- 0.12 mEq). In the buffering pH profile test, aluminum-magnesium hydroxide suspensions and hydrotalcite tablets maintained a steady optimum pH (3-5) for around 1.5 hours. One tablet of calcium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate or magnesium oxide could not raise the gastric pH to above 3, but two tablets increased the pH excessively (5.3 to 8.6). The higher dose (two tablets) of aluminum hydroxide hexitol complex could not raise the pH to the optimal level. These findings demonstrate that there is disparity in the antacid effectiveness estimated by the neutralizing capacity test and the buffering pH profile test and suggest that the efficacy of an antacid cannot be accurately predicted from its acid-neutralizing capacity. The dose of antacids greatly influences the neutralizing pH profiles. Aluminum-magnesium compounds appear to provide steadier buffering

  13. Stability of glufosfamide in phosphate buffers and in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuming; Chen, Xiaoyan; Xu, Haiyan; Guan, Zhongmin; Zhong, Dafang

    2006-03-07

    Glufosfamide is a new, potential chemotherapeutic agent currently under investigation. Stability of glufosfamide was investigated in sodium phosphate buffers with different pH and temperature and in biological samples. Glufosfamide and isophosphamide mustard were quantified simultaneously using a liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometric method; precision and accuracy were within 15% for each analyte. Glufosfamide was stable in neutral buffers, but decomposed to form isophosphoramide mustard under acidic and basic conditions, which was pH- and temperature-dependent. The stability of glufosfamide varied in different biological samples. Results indicated that glufosfamide was unstable in some biological samples, such as the small intestine, smooth muscles, pancreas and urine, especially in the small intestine homogenate, with a half-life of 1.1 h. But the pH (<8) and beta-glucosidase of the tissue homogenate was found to have negligible contribution to the degradation of glufosfamide. The enzymatic inhibition experiment with the specific inhibitor, saccharo-1,4-lactone, demonstrated that it was glucuronidase that resulted in the degradation of glufosfamide in small intestine homogenate. Methanol was recommended to be used to homogenize the tissue in an ice water bath, and the container for urine collection should also be maintained in an ice water bath, and all the biological samples collected should be preserved in frozen condition until analysis.

  14. Buffering agents modify the hydration landscape at charged interfaces.

    PubMed

    Trewby, William; Livesey, Duncan; Voïtchovsky, Kislon

    2016-03-07

    Buffering agents are widely used to stabilise the pH of solutions in soft matter and biological sciences. They are typically composed of weak acids and bases mixed in an aqueous solution, and can interact electrostatically with charged surfaces such as biomembranes. Buffers can induce protein aggregation and structural modification of soft interfaces, but a molecular-level picture is still lacking. Here we use high-resolution atomic force microscopy to investigate the effect of five commonly used buffers, namely 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES), 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES), monosodium phosphate, saline sodium citrate (SSC) and tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) on the hydration landscape of Muscovite mica in solution. Mica is an ideal model substrate due to its negative surface charge and identical lattice parameter when compared with gel-phase lipid bilayers. We show that buffer molecules can produce cohesive aggregates spanning over tens of nanometres of the interface. SSC, Tris and monosodium phosphate tend to create an amorphous mesh layer several molecules thick and with no preferential ordering. In contrast, MES and HEPES adopt epitaxial arrangements commensurate with the underlying mica lattice, suggesting that they offer the most suitable solution for high-resolution studies. To confirm that this effect persisted in biologically-relevant interfaces, the experiments were repeated on a silica-supported lipid bilayer. Similar trends were observed for this system using atomic force microscopy as well as ellipsometry. The effect of the buffering agents can be mitigated by the inclusion of salt which helps displace them from the interface.

  15. Enhancement of acid tolerance in Zymomonas mobilis by a proton-buffering peptide.

    PubMed

    Baumler, David J; Hung, Kai F; Bose, Jeffrey L; Vykhodets, Boris M; Cheng, Chorng M; Jeong, Kwang-Cheol; Kaspar, Charles W

    2006-07-01

    A portion of the cbpA gene from Escherichia coli K-12 encoding a 24 amino acid proton-buffering peptide (Pbp) was cloned via the shuttle vector pJB99 into E. coli JM105 and subsequently into Zymomonas mobilis CP4. Expression of Pbp was confirmed in both JM105 and CP4 by HPLC. Z. mobilis CP4 carrying pJB99-2 (Pbp) exhibited increased acid tolerance (p < 0.05) in acidified TSB (HCl [pH 3.0] or acetic acid [pH 3.5]), glycine-HCl buffer (pH 3.0), and sodium acetate-acetic acid buffer (pH 3.5) in comparison to the parent strain (CP4) and CP4 with pJB99 (control plasmid). Although the expression of Pbp influenced survival at a low pH, the minimum growth pH was unaffected. Growth of Z. mobilis in the presence of ampicillin also significantly increased acid tolerance by an unknown mechanism. Results from this study demonstrate that the production of a peptide with a high proportion of basic amino acids can contribute to protection from low pH and weak organic acids such as acetic acid.

  16. Interactions of TRIS [tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane] and related buffers with peptide backbone: thermodynamic characterization.

    PubMed

    Taha, Mohamed; Lee, Ming-Jer

    2010-10-21

    In a situation which is far from ideal, many buffers have been found to be quite reactive, besides maintaining their stable pH values. On the basis of apparent transfer free energies (ΔG(tr)'), through solubility measurements the interactions of zwitterionic glycine peptides: glycine (Gly), diglycine (Gly(2)), triglycine (Gly(3)), and tetraglycine (Gly(4)), with several common neutral pH, amine-based buffers have been studied. The biological buffers studied in this work, including TRIS, TES, TAPS, TAPSO, and TABS are structurally related and all contain TRIS groups. These buffers have pK(a) values ranging from 7.5-9.0, which allow them to be used in biological, biochemical or environmental studies. We observed negative values of ΔG(tr)' for Gly(3) and Gly(4) from water to buffer, indicating that the interactions are favorable. However, the ΔG(tr)' values are positive for Gly and Gly(2), revealing unfavorable interactions, which except for the latter in TRIS buffer are negative. The surprising result in our data is the unexpected extraordinarily high favorable interactions between TRIS buffer and peptides (in comparison with the effect of the most common denaturants, urea and guanidine hydrochloride). The transfer free energies (ΔG(tr)') of the peptide backbone unit (-CH(2)C=O-NH-) contributions have been estimated from ΔG(tr)' values. We have also investigated the interactions of TRIS buffer with Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA), as a globular protein, using dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential, UV-Visible absorption, fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The results indicated that TRIS buffer stabilized the BSA molecules.

  17. Melatonin: Buffering the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Vico, Antonio; Lardone, Patricia J.; Álvarez-Sánchez, Nuria; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Ana; Guerrero, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin modulates a wide range of physiological functions with pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Despite the large number of reports implicating melatonin as an immunomodulatory compound, it still remains unclear how melatonin regulates immunity. While some authors argue that melatonin is an immunostimulant, many studies have also described anti-inflammatory properties. The data reviewed in this paper support the idea of melatonin as an immune buffer, acting as a stimulant under basal or immunosuppressive conditions or as an anti-inflammatory compound in the presence of exacerbated immune responses, such as acute inflammation. The clinical relevance of the multiple functions of melatonin under different immune conditions, such as infection, autoimmunity, vaccination and immunosenescence, is also reviewed. PMID:23609496

  18. Kinetics and hydrolysis of fenamiphos, fipronil, and trifluralin in aqueous buffer solutions.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, A; Balasubramanian, M

    1999-08-01

    Hydrolyses of fenamiphos, fipronil, and trifluralin were studied in aqueous buffer solutions of pH 4.1, 7.1, and 9.1 at different temperatures, 5, 22 +/- 1, 32 +/- 1, and 50 +/- 1 degrees C. Fenamiphos, fipronil, and trifluralin were found to be more stable in acidic and neutral buffer solutions at temperatures of 5 and 22 +/- 1, and dissipation is rapid at 50 +/- 1 degrees C. In basic buffer and at higher temperature, degradation of fenamiphos was found to be very rapid when compared with fipronil and trifluralin. The rate constants calculated at 32 degrees C for fenamiphos were 2349.4 x 10(-)(8) (pH 4.1), 225.2 x 10(-)(8) (pH 7.1), and 30476.0 x 10(-)(8) (pH 9.1); for fipronil 1750.0 x 10(-)(8) (pH 4.1), 3103.0 x 10(-)(8) (pH 7.1), and 3883.0 x 10(-)(8) (pH 9.1); and for trifluralin 2331.0 x 10(-)(8) (pH 4.1), 2360.0 x 10(-)(8) (pH 7.1), and 3188.0 x 10(-)(8) (pH 9.1). On the basis of rate constant values, these pesticides appeared to be more susceptible to hydrolysis than synthetic organophosphorus compounds such as chlorpyriphos, diazinon, malathion, and ronnel. DT(50) values calculated at 32 degrees C were 228 (pH 4.1), 5310.24 (pH 7.1), and 37.68 (pH 9.1) h for fenamiphos; 608.6 (pH 4.1), 373.9 (pH 7.1), and 270.2 (pH 9.1) h for fipronil; and 502.1 (pH 4.1), 496.8 (pH 7.1), and 355.7 (pH 9.1) h for trifluralin.

  19. Selective frame dropping based on hypothetical reference decoder buffer model for initial buffering delay reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Sachin

    2008-02-01

    We propose a method for selective frame dropping based on hypothetical reference decoder buffer model for initial buffering delay reduction. The client side buffering consists of two logical buffers: a de-jitter buffer and a pre-decoder buffer. To playback an encoded bit-stream without underflow the client must do a minimum initial buffering. This minimum initial buffering is a property of the bit-stream. The minimum initial buffering relates to the pre-decoder buffer. In addition the client can do additional initial buffering to handle network jitter and other bandwidth variations. Our proposed approach relates to reducing the minimum initial buffering delay for an already encoded bit-stream. We propose a method for selectively dropping frames to reduce the amount of initial buffering the client needs to do to avoid underflow during the streaming. Our proposed method is especially applicable to pre-stored content. The method is also particularly useful for variable bit-rate (VBR) encoded media. The method can be used by a streaming server. Alternatively the method can be implemented by a trans-rater/ transcoder. In a preferred embodiment our method can be applied in advance on a pre-stored bit-stream to decide which frames to drop to reduce the required minimum initial buffering.

  20. Buffer strips in composites at elevated temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    The composite material 'buffer strip' concept is presently investigated at elevated temperatures for the case of graphite/polyimide buffer strip panels using a (45/0/45/90)2S layup, where the buffer strip material was 0-deg S-glass/polyimide. Each panel was loaded in tension until it failed, and radiographs and crack opening displacements were recorded during the tests to determine fracture onset, fracture arrest, and the extent of damage in the buffer strip after crack arrest. At 177 + or - 3 C, the buffer strips increased the panel strength by at least 40 percent in comparison with panels without buffer strips. Compared to similar panels tested at room temperature, those tested at elevated temperature had lower residual strengths, but higher failure strains.

  1. Signature-based store checking buffer

    DOEpatents

    Sridharan, Vilas; Gurumurthi, Sudhanva

    2015-06-02

    A system and method for optimizing redundant output verification, are provided. A hardware-based store fingerprint buffer receives multiple instances of output from multiple instances of computation. The store fingerprint buffer generates a signature from the content included in the multiple instances of output. When a barrier is reached, the store fingerprint buffer uses the signature to verify the content is error-free.

  2. SODR Memory Control Buffer Control ASIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, Robert F.

    1994-01-01

    The Spacecraft Optical Disk Recorder (SODR) is a state of the art mass storage system for future NASA missions requiring high transmission rates and a large capacity storage system. This report covers the design and development of an SODR memory buffer control applications specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The memory buffer control ASIC has two primary functions: (1) buffering data to prevent loss of data during disk access times, (2) converting data formats from a high performance parallel interface format to a small computer systems interface format. Ten 144 p in, 50 MHz CMOS ASIC's were designed, fabricated and tested to implement the memory buffer control function.

  3. Effects of buffer concentration on voltage-gated H+ currents: does diffusion limit the conductance?

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, T E; Cherny, V V

    1996-01-01

    The single-channel proton conductance of the voltage-gated H(+)-selective channel, like that of the F0 component of the H(+)-ATPase, is nearly constant over a wide range of pH encompassing the physiological range. To examine the possible contributions of buffer diffusion and buffer-channel proton transfer reactions to this phenomenon, the effects of buffer concentration on voltage-activated H+ currents were explored in voltage-clamped rat alveolar epithelial cells. Changes in the external buffer concentration ([B]o), evaluated using the whole-cell configuration, had only small effects on H+ currents (IH). Lowering [B]o from 100 to 1 mM did not alter the voltage-activation curve or reversal potential (Vrev) but reduced IH, typically by 10-30%. Changes in internal buffer concentration ([B]i), examined in inside-out patches, usually altered IH more distinctly and subtly changed the kinetics. Overall, the effects of changing buffer concentration were small and subtle. The maximum attenuation of the single-channel H+ current at 1 mM buffer was estimated to be approximately 20% at either mouth of the H+ channel. Therefore, the rate-determining step in H+ permeation is neither deprotonation of buffer at the inner mouth of the channel nor protonation of buffer at the external surface. Evidently the rate of H+ permeation through the channel is itself small enough that diffusion of buffer in bulk solution does not directly limit the conductance significantly. PMID:8804602

  4. Buffered lidocaine and bupivacaine mixture - the ideal local anesthetic solution?

    PubMed

    Best, Corliss A; Best, Alyssa A; Best, Timothy J; Hamilton, Danielle A

    2015-01-01

    The use of injectable local anesthetic solutions to facilitate pain-free surgery is an integral component of many procedures performed by the plastic surgeon. In many instances, a solution that has both rapid onset and prolonged duration of analgesia is optimal. A combination of lidocaine and bupivacaine, plain or with epinephrine, is readily available in most Canadian health care settings where such procedures are performed, and fulfills these criteria. However, commercially available solutions of both medications are acidic and cause a burning sensation on injection. Buffering to neutral pH with sodium bicarbonate is a practical method to mitigate the burning sensation, and has the added benefit of increasing the fraction of nonionized lipid soluble drug available. The authors report on the proportions of the three drugs to yield a neutral pH, and the results of an initial survey regarding the use of the combined solution with epinephrine in hand surgery.

  5. Reaction of Thymidine with Hypobromous Acid in Phosphate Buffer.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshinori; Kitabatake, Akihiko; Koide, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    When thymidine was treated with hypobromous acid (HOBr) in 100 mM phosphate buffer at pH 7.2, two major product peaks appeared in the HPLC chromatogram. The products in each peak were identified by NMR and MS as two isomers of 5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymidine-6-phosphate (a novel compound) and two isomers of 5,6-dihydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymidine (thymidine glycol) with comparable yields. 5-Hydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymidine-6-phosphate was relatively stable, and decomposed with a half-life of 32 h at pH 7.2 and 37°C generating thymidine glycol. The results suggest that 5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymidine-6-phosphate in addition to thymidine glycol may have importance for mutagenesis by the reaction of HOBr with thymine residues in nucleotides and DNA.

  6. A Reversible Photoacid Functioning in PBS Buffer under Visible Light.

    PubMed

    Abeyrathna, Nawodi; Liao, Yi

    2015-09-09

    A metastable-state photoacid that can reversibly release a proton in PBS buffer (pH = 7.4) under visible light is reported. The design is based on the dual acid-base property and tautomerization of indazole. The quantum yield was as high as 0.73, and moderate light intensity (10(2) μmol·m(2)·s(-1)) is sufficient for the photoreaction. Reversible pH change of 1.7 units was demonstrated using a 0.1 mM aqueous solution. This type of photoacid is promising for control of proton-transfer processes in physiological conditions and may find applications in biomedical areas.

  7. Evaluating the buffering capacity of various soft drinks, fruit juices and tea

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Smita; Jindal, Rahul

    2010-01-01

    Aims and Objective: The purpose of this study is to measure the initial pH of various commonly used beverages and to determine their ability to maintain a low pH by measuring their buffering capacities. Materials and Methods: Twelve commercially available drinks were taken and divided into four groups (preserved fruit juices, tea, mineral water and carbonated drinks. Each group comprised of three drinks. Their initial pH were measured with pH meter and their buffering capacities were measured by adding 1M NaOH in the increments of 0.2 ml into 100 ml of each drink till the pH raised to 5.5 and 7 respectively. Statistical Analysis: The volume of NaOH required to raise the pH to 5.5 and 7 were recorded in all the groups. This data was subjected to statistical analysis using Mann- Whitney tests. Results: Total titratable acidity measurement shows that among all the drinks, there was no significant difference between carbonated drinks and preserved fruit juices while a significant difference was present between carbonated drinks, preserved fruit juices and tea. Conclusion: In this in vitro study, it was found that packaged apple juice had the most buffering capacity with maximum erosive potential whereas green tea had the least. PMID:21116386

  8. Optimization of buffer injection for the effective bioremediation of chlorinated solvents in aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovelli, A.; Robinson, C.; Barry, A.; Kouznetsova, I.; Gerhard, J.

    2008-12-01

    Various techniques have been proposed to enhance biologically-mediated reductive dechlorination of chlorinated solvents in the subsurface, including the addition of fermentable organic substrate for the generation of H2 as an electron donor. One rate-limiting factor for enhanced dechlorination is the pore fluid pH. Organic acids and H+ ions accumulate in dechlorination zones, generating unfavorable conditions for microbial activity (pH < 6.5). The pH variation is a nonlinear function of the amount of reduced chlorinated solvents, and is affected by the organic material fermented, the chemical composition of the pore fluid and the soil's buffering capacity. Consequently, in some cases enhanced remediation schemes rely on buffer injection (e.g., bicarbonate) to alleviate this problem, particularly in the presence of solvent nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source zones. However, the amount of buffer required - particularly in complex, evolving biogeochemical environments - is not well understood. To investigate this question, this work builds upon a geochemical numerical model (Robinson et al., Science of the Total Environment, submitted), which computes the amount of additional buffer required to maintain the pH at a level suitable for bacterial activity for batch systems. The batch model was coupled to a groundwater flow/solute transport/chemical reaction simulator to permit buffer optimization computations within the context of flowing systems exhibiting heterogeneous hydraulic, physical and chemical properties. A suite of simulations was conducted in which buffer optimization was examined within the bounds of the minimum concentration necessary to sustain a pH favorable to microbial activity and the maximum concentration to avoid excessively high pH values (also not suitable to bacterial activity) and mineral precipitation (e.g., calcite, which may lead to pore-clogging). These simulations include an examination of the sensitivity of this buffer concentration range

  9. Computer simulation of two electrophoretic columns coupled for isoelectric focusing in simple buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Amos; Mosher, Richard A.; Bier, Milan

    1986-01-01

    Computer simulation is used to analyze a system of two electrophoretic columns coupled by mixing the anolyte of one with the catholyte of the other. A mathematical model is presented which is used to predict the pH gradients formed by monovalent buffers in this system, when the currents in the columns are unequal. In the column with the higher current a pH gradient is created which increases from anode to cathode and is potentially useful for isoelectric focusing. The breadth of this gradient is dependent upon the ratio of the currents. The function of the second column is the compensation of buffer migration which occurs in the first column, thereby maintaining constant electrolyte composition. The effects of buffer pKs and mobilities are evaluated.

  10. Development of a liquid-junction/low-flow interface for phosphate buffer capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Fu-An; Huang, Ju-Li; Shen, Shang-Yu; Wang, Che-Wei; Her, Guor-Rong

    2009-04-01

    To alleviate ion suppression from phosphate buffer and to preserve separation integrity, a new capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry (CE-MS) interface was developed. The interface consisted of a low-flow interface and a liquid junction. In this design, both the inlet reservoir and the liquid-junction reservoir were filled with phosphate running buffer. Because the phosphate anions in the column migrated toward the inlet reservoir (away from the electrospray ionization (ESI) source) the problem of ion suppression in ESI was avoided. The liquid junction was incorporated to eliminate issues of degraded separation observed when sheath liquid interfaces use different buffers for separation and MS analysis attributed to differences in anion velocity. The utility of the interface was demonstrated by the analysis of antihistamines at pH 3.5 and the analysis of perfluorocarboxylic acid at pH 9.5.

  11. Critical evaluation of buffering solutions for pKa determination by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Fuguet, Elisabet; Reta, Mario; Gibert, Carme; Rosés, Martí; Bosch, Elisabeth; Ràfols, Clara

    2008-07-01

    The performance of the most common and also some other less common CE buffers has been tested for the pKa determination of several types of compounds (pyridine, amines, and phenols). The selected buffers cover a pH ranging from 3.7 to 11.8. Whereas some buffers, like acetic acid/acetate, BisTrisH+/BisTris, TrisH+/Tris, CHES/CHES-, and CAPS/CAPS- can be used with all type of analytes, others like ammonium/ammonia, butylammonium/butylammonia, ethylammonium/ethylammonia, diethylammonium/diethylammonia, and hydrogenphosphate/phosphate are not recommended because they interact with a wide range of compounds. The rest of the tested buffers (dihydrogenphosphate/hydrogenphosphate, MES/MES-, HEPES/HEPES-, and boric acid/borate) can show specific interactions depending on the nature of the analytes, and their use in some applications should be restricted.

  12. Role of amylase, mucin, IgA and albumin on salivary protein buffering capacity: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cheaib, Zeinab; Lussi, Adrian

    2013-06-01

    It has been suggested that proteins serve as major salivary buffers below pH5. It remains unclear, however, which salivary proteins are responsible for these buffering properties. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the correlation between salivary concentration of total protein, amylase, mucin, immunoglobulin A (IgA), albumin and total salivary protein buffering capacity at a pH range of 4-5. In addition, the buffering capacity and the number of carboxylic acid moieties of single proteins were assessed. Stimulated saliva samples were collected at 9:00, 13:00 and 17:00 from 4 healthy volunteers on 3 successive days. The buffering capacities were measured for total salivary protein or for specific proteins. Also, the concentration of total protein, amylase, mucin, IgA and albumin were analysed. Within the limits of the current study, it was found that salivary protein buffering capacity was highly positively correlated with total protein, amylase and IgA concentrations. A weak correlation was observed for both albumin and mucin individually. Furthermore, the results suggest that amylase contributed to 35 percent of the salivary protein buffering capacity in the pH range of 4-5.

  13. High stability buffered phase comparator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. A.; Reinhardt, V. S. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A low noise RF signal phase comparator comprised of two high stability driver buffer amplifiers driving a double balanced mixer which operate to generate a beat frequency between the two RF input signals coupled to the amplifiers from the RF sources is described. The beat frequency output from the mixer is applied to a low noise zero crossing detector which is the phase difference between the two RF inputs. Temperature stability is provided by mounting the amplifiers and mixer on a common circuit board with the active circuit elements located on one side of a circuit board and the passive circuit elements located on the opposite side. A common heat sink is located adjacent the circuit board. The active circuit elements are embedded into the bores of the heat sink which slows the effect of ambient temperature changes and reduces the temperature gradients between the active circuit elements, thus improving the cancellation of temperature effects. The two amplifiers include individual voltage regulators, which increases RF isolation.

  14. Evaluation of a newly developed triple buffered peptone broth for detection of Salmonella in broiler feed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactose broth (LB) and buffered peptone (BP) are used as pre-enrichment media to recover Salmonella from feed. Bacterial utilization of feed carbohydrates results in the production of acidic byproducts causing a drop in the media pH which can injure or kill Salmonella and yield false negative resul...

  15. Statistical evaluation of effects of riparian buffers on nitrate and ground water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spruill, T.B.

    2000-01-01

    A study was conducted to statistically evaluate the effectiveness of riparian buffers for decreasing nitrate concentrations in ground water and for affecting other chemical constituents. Values for pH, specific conductance, alkalinity, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), silica, ammonium, phosphorus, iron, and manganese at 28 sites in the Contentnea Creek Basin were significantly higher (p 20 yr) discharging ground water draining areas with riparian buffers compared with areas without riparian buffers. No differences in chloride, nitrate nitrogen, calcium, sodium, and dssolved oxygen concentrations in old ground water between buffer and nonbuffer areas were detected. Comparison of samples of young (20 yr) discharging ground water draining areas with riparian buffers compared with areas without riparian buffers. No differences in chloride, nitrate nitrogen, calcium, sodium, and dissolved oxygen concentrations in old ground water between buffer and nonbuffer areas were detected. Comparison of samples of young (<20 yr) discharging ground water samples from buffer and nonbuffer areas indicated significantly higher specific conductance, calcium, chloride, and nitrate nitrogen in nonbuffer areas. Riparian buffers along streams can affect the composition of the hyporheic zone by providing a source of organic carbon to the streambed, which creates reducing geochemical conditions that consequently can affect the chemical quality of old ground water discharging through it. Buffer zones between agricultural fields and streams facilitate dilution of conservative chemical constituents in young ground water that originate from fertilizer applications and also allow denitrification in ground water by providing an adequate source of organic carbon generated by vegetation in the buffer zone. Based on the median chloride and nitrate values for young ground water in the Contentnea Creek Basin, nitrate was 95% lower in buffer areas compared with nonbuffer areas, with a 30 to 35% reduction

  16. Buffer Management Simulation in ATM Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaprak, E.; Xiao, Y.; Chronopoulos, A.; Chow, E.; Anneberg, L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a simulation of a new dynamic buffer allocation management scheme in ATM networks. To achieve this objective, an algorithm that detects congestion and updates the dynamic buffer allocation scheme was developed for the OPNET simulation package via the creation of a new ATM module.

  17. FIFO Buffer for Asynchronous Data Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascle, K. P.

    1985-01-01

    Variable-rate, asynchronous data signals from up to four measuring instruments or other sources combined in first-in/first-out (FIFO) buffer for transmission on single channel. Constructed in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) logic, buffer consumes low power (only 125 mW at 5V) and conforms to aerospace standards of reliability and maintainability.

  18. Riparian buffer transpiration and watershed scale impacts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forested riparian buffers are prevalent throughout the Southeastern Coastal Plain Region of the United States (US). Because they make up a significant portion of the regional landscape, transpiration within these riparian buffers is believed to have an important impact on the hydrologic budget of r...

  19. African American College Women's Suicide Buffers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marion, Michelle S.; Range, Lillian M.

    2003-01-01

    To examine the relationships buffers may have with suicide ideation, 300 African American female college students completed measures of suicide ideation and buffers. Three variables accounted for a significant and unique portion of the variance in suicide ideation: family support, a view that suicide is unacceptable, and a collaborative religious…

  20. UNDERSTANDING, DERIVING, AND COMPUTING BUFFER CAPACITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Derivation and systematic calculation of buffer capacity is a topic that seems often to be neglected in chemistry courses and given minimal treatment in most texts. However, buffer capacity is very important in the chemistry of natural waters and potable water. It affects corro...

  1. 46 CFR 58.25-45 - Buffers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Buffers. 58.25-45 Section 58.25-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-45 Buffers. For each vessel on an ocean, coastwise, or Great Lakes...

  2. 46 CFR 58.25-45 - Buffers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Buffers. 58.25-45 Section 58.25-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-45 Buffers. For each vessel on an ocean, coastwise, or Great Lakes...

  3. 46 CFR 58.25-45 - Buffers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Buffers. 58.25-45 Section 58.25-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-45 Buffers. For each vessel on an ocean, coastwise, or Great Lakes...

  4. 21 CFR 520.1696a - Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with... FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696a Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent. (a) Specifications. When reconstituted, each milliliter contains penicillin G procaine...

  5. 21 CFR 520.1696a - Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with... FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696a Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent. (a) Specifications. When reconstituted, each milliliter contains penicillin G procaine...

  6. 21 CFR 520.1696a - Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with... FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696a Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent. (a) Specifications. When reconstituted, each milliliter contains penicillin G procaine...

  7. Extracellular pH modulates GABAergic neurotransmission in rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z L; Huang, R Q

    2014-06-20

    Changes in extracellular pH have a modulatory effect on GABAA receptor function. It has been reported that pH sensitivity of the GABA receptor is dependent on subunit composition and GABA concentration. Most of previous investigations focused on GABA-evoked currents, which only reflect the postsynaptic receptors. The physiological relevance of pH modulation of GABAergic neurotransmission is not fully elucidated. In the present studies, we examined the influence of extracellular pH on the GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission in rat hypothalamic neurons. The inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs), tonic currents, and the GABA-evoked currents were recorded with whole-cell patch techniques on the hypothalamic slices from Sprague-Dawley rats at 15-26 postnatal days. The amplitude and frequency of spontaneous GABA IPSCs were significantly increased while the external pH was changed from 7.3 to 8.4. In the acidic pH (6.4), the spontaneous GABA IPSCs were reduced in amplitude and frequency. The pH induced changes in miniature GABA IPSCs (mIPSCs) similar to that in spontaneous IPSCs. The pH effect on the postsynaptic GABA receptors was assessed with exogenously applied varying concentrations of GABA. The tonic currents and the currents evoked by sub-saturating concentration of GABA ([GABA]) (10 μM) were inhibited by acidic pH and potentiated by alkaline pH. In contrast, the currents evoked by saturating [GABA] (1mM) were not affected by pH changes. We also investigated the influence of pH buffers and buffering capacity on pH sensitivity of GABAA receptors on human recombinant α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors stably expressed in HEK 293 cells. The pH influence on GABAA receptors was similar in HEPES- and MES-buffered media, and not dependent on protonated buffers, suggesting that the observed pH effect on GABA response is a specific consequence of changes in extracellular protons. Our data suggest that the hydrogen ions suppress the GABAergic neurotransmission

  8. Buffer capacity, ecosystem feedbacks, and seawater chemistry under global change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jury, C. P.; Thomas, F. I.; Atkinson, M. J.; Jokiel, P. L.; Onuma, M. A.; Kaku, N.; Toonen, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) results in reduced seawater pH and aragonite saturation state (Ωarag), but also reduced seawater buffer capacity. As buffer capacity decreases, diel variation in seawater chemistry increases. However, a variety of ecosystem feedbacks can modulate changes in both average seawater chemistry and diel seawater chemistry variation. Here we model these effects for a coastal, reef flat ecosystem. We show that an increase in offshore pCO2 and temperature (to 900 μatm and +3°C) can increase diel pH variation by as much as a factor of 2.5 and can increase diel pCO2 variation by a factor of 4.6, depending on ecosystem feedbacks and seawater residence time. Importantly, these effects are different between day and night. With increasing seawater residence time and increasing feedback intensity, daytime seawater chemistry becomes more similar to present-day conditions while nighttime seawater chemistry becomes less similar to present-day conditions. Better constraining ecosystem feedbacks under global change will improve projections of coastal water chemistry, but this study shows the importance of considering changes in both average carbonate chemistry and diel chemistry variation for organisms and ecosystems. Further, we will discuss our recent work examining the effects of diel seawater chemistry variation on coral calcification rates.

  9. Optimization of protein buffer cocktails using Thermofluor.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Linda; Mayerhofer, Hubert; Geerlof, Arie; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen; Weiss, Manfred S

    2013-02-01

    The stability and homogeneity of a protein sample is strongly influenced by the composition of the buffer that the protein is in. A quick and easy approach to identify a buffer composition which increases the stability and possibly the conformational homogeneity of a protein sample is the fluorescence-based thermal-shift assay (Thermofluor). Here, a novel 96-condition screen for Thermofluor experiments is presented which consists of buffer and additive parts. The buffer screen comprises 23 different buffers and the additive screen includes small-molecule additives such as salts and nucleotide analogues. The utilization of small-molecule components which increase the thermal stability of a protein sample frequently results in a protein preparation of higher quality and quantity and ultimately also increases the chances of the protein crystallizing.

  10. [Mechanical buffering characteristics of feline paw pads].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yang, Jialing; Yu, Hui

    2012-12-01

    In the long time of natural evolution, the bodies of some animals, such as feline, that live in the wild and complicate surroundings have evolved to possess outstanding buffering characteristics, which make the animals adapt to the environment perfectly. These animals generally have well-developed paw pads under their soles to play an important role in attenuating the intensity of impact when they land on the ground. Investigating the buffering characteristics of these animals' paw pads could help us to design "bionic" buffering and energy-absorption devices. In this paper, based on observations of animal jumping test, a simple mass-spring-buffer model was proposed to explore the buffering characteristics of the animals' paw pads. By analytically solving the differential equations of this model, the parameters concerned with paw pads functions were discussed and some significant results were obtained.

  11. Formation of monofunctional cisplatin-DNA adducts in carbonate buffer.

    PubMed

    Binter, Alexandra; Goodisman, Jerry; Dabrowiak, James C

    2006-07-01

    Carbonate in its various forms is an important component in blood and the cytosol. Since, under conditions that simulate therapy, carbonate reacts with cisplatin to form carbonato complexes, one of which is taken up and/or modified by the cell [C.R. Centerwall, J. Goodisman, D.J. Kerwood, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 127 (2005) 12768-12769], cisplatin-carbonato complexes may be important in the mechanism of action of cisplatin. In this report we study the binding of cisplatin to pBR322 DNA in two different buffers, using gel electrophoresis. In 23.8mM HEPES, N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-piperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid, 5mM NaCl, pH 7.4 buffer, cisplatin produces aquated species, which react with DNA to unwind supercoiled Form I DNA, increasing its mobility, and reducing the binding of ethidium to DNA. This behavior is consistent with the formation of the well-known intrastrand crosslink on DNA. In 23.8mM carbonate buffer, 5mM NaCl, pH 7.4, cisplatin forms carbonato species that produce DNA-adducts which do not significantly change supercoiling but enhance binding of ethidium to DNA. This behavior is consistent with the formation of a monofunctional cisplatin adduct on DNA. These results show that aquated cisplatin and carbonato complexes of cisplatin produce different types of lesions on DNA and they underscore the importance of carrying out binding studies with cisplatin and DNA using conditions that approximate those found in the cell.

  12. Remarkable effect of mobile phase buffer on the SEC-ICP-AES derived Cu, Fe and Zn-metalloproteome pattern of rabbit blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Jahromi, Elham Zeini; White, Wade; Wu, Qiao; Yamdagni, Raghav; Gailer, Jürgen

    2010-07-01

    The development of an analytical method to quantify the major Cu, Fe and Zn-containing metalloproteins in mammalian plasma has been recently reported. This method is based on the separation of plasma proteins by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) followed by the on-line detection of the metalloproteins by an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES). To assess whether the mobile phase buffer can affect the SEC-ICP-AES-derived metalloproteome pattern, thawed rabbit plasma was analyzed using phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-buffer (0.15 M, pH 7.4), Tris-buffer (0.1 and 0.05 M, pH 7.4), Hepes-buffer (0.1 M, pH 7.4) or Mops-buffer (0.1 M, pH 7.4). In contrast to the Cu-specific chromatograms, the Fe and Zn-specific chromatograms that were obtained with Tris, Hepes and Mops-buffer were considerably different from those attained with PBS-buffer. The Tris, Hepes and Mops-buffer mediated redistribution of ~25% plasma Zn(2+) from <100 kDa to >100-600 kDa plasma proteins and to a smaller extent to a <10 kDa (Tris)(2)Zn(2+)-complex can be rationalized in terms of the abstraction of Zn(2+) from the weak binding site on albumin. In contrast, only Hepes and Mops-buffer redistributed ~20% of plasma Fe(3+) from the <100 kDa to the >600 kDa elution range. Based on these results and considering that the utilization of PBS-buffer has previously resulted in the detection of a number of Cu, Fe and Zn-containing metalloentities in rabbit plasma that was most consistent with literature data, this mobile phase buffer is recommended for metallomic studies regarding mammalian blood plasma.

  13. Are buffers boring? Uniqueness and asymptotical stability of traveling wave fronts in the buffered bistable system.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Je-Chiang; Sneyd, James

    2007-04-01

    Traveling waves of calcium are widely observed under the condition that the free cytosolic calcium is buffered. Thus it is of physiological interest to determine how buffers affect the properties of calcium waves. Here we summarise and extend previous results on the existence, uniqueness and stability of traveling wave solutions of the buffered bistable equation, which is the simplest possible model of the upstroke of a calcium wave. Taken together, the results show that immobile buffers do not change the existence, uniqueness or stability of the traveling wave, while mobile buffers can eliminate a traveling wave. However, if a wave exists in the latter case, it remains unique and stable.

  14. ELECTROENDOSMOSIS THROUGH MAMMALIAN SEROUS MEMBRANES : I. THE HYDROGEN ION REVERSAL POINT WITH BUFFERS CONTAINING POLYVALENT ANIONS.

    PubMed

    Mudd, S

    1925-01-20

    It is shown that when a mammalian serous membrane bathed in dilute buffer is traversed by an electric current, liquid is caused to stream through the membrane toward the cathode when the pH value of the buffer is on the alkaline side of a certain critical hydrogen ion concentration. Streaming is toward the anode on the acid side of the reversal point. Simple means for studying this electroendosmosis quantitatively are described. The mean values of the reversal points in all cases studied with the present buffers lie between pH = 4.3 and 5.3. The membranes studied have been the mesentery of the living and dead animal, and the parietal pericardium and pleura, post mortem. The membranes of dogs, cats, rabbits, and two human pericardia have been studied. All these membranes are essentially sheets of connective tissue, bearing blood vessels, lymphatics, and nerves, and in some instances fat cells, and lined on each surface by a single layer of pavement mesothelial cells. Intercellular fibers form the major bulk of the lean membranes. These are predominantly collagenous except in the pleural region used, in which elastin fibers are present in large proportion. By using buffers alternately more acid or more alkaline than the reversal point, the direction of liquid flow across any given membrane site could be reversed an indefinite number of times. The time interval required is only that taken by the requisite manipulation in changing buffers and making the runs. The mean values of the reversal points for the several membranes when bathed in hypotonic, unbalanced buffer and in isotonic, physiologically balanced buffers showed only small and inconstant differences. The fat and lean pericardia similarly showed small difference in the positions of the mean reversal points. The apparent reversal points for the mesenteries of living animals proved to be lower than those for the mesenteries post mortem. This low value in the animals with functioning circulation is interpreted as

  15. Automated high precision secondary pH measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastkowski, F.; Jakobsen, P. T.; Stefan, F.; Kristensen, H. B.; Jensen, H. D.; Kawiecki, R.; Wied, C. E.; Kauert, A.; Seidl, B.; Spitzer, P.; Eberhardt, R.; Adel, B.

    2013-04-01

    A new setup for high precision, automated secondary pH measurements together with a reference measurement procedure has been developed and tested in interlaboratory comparisons using buffers pH 4.005, pH 7.000, and pH 10.012 at 25 °C and 37 °C. Using primary buffers as standards, a standard uncertainty in pH better than 0.005 can be reached. The central measuring device is a one piece, thermostatted cell of PFA (perfluoroalkoxy) with a built-in Hamilton® Single Pore™ Glass electrode. Due to its flow-through principle this device allows pH measurements with low consumption of measurement solutions. The very hydrophobic and smooth PFA as construction material facilitates complete emptying of the cell. Furthermore, the tempering unit affords very precise temperature control and hence contributes to the low target uncertainty of the produced secondary buffer solutions. Use of a symmetric measurement sequence and the two point calibration was sufficient to reach high precision and accuracy.

  16. Photosynthetic activity buffers ocean acidification in seagrass meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, I. E.; Olsen, Y. S.; Ramajo, L.; Basso, L.; Steckbauer, A.; Moore, T. S.; Howard, J.; Duarte, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophytes growing in shallow coastal zones characterised by intense metabolic activity have the capacity to modify pH within their canopy and beyond. We observed diel pH changes in shallow (5-12 m) seagrass (Posidonia oceanica) meadows spanning 0.06 pH units in September to 0.24 units in June. The carbonate system (pH, DIC, and aragonite saturation state (ΩAr)) and O2 within the meadows displayed strong diel variability driven by primary productivity, and changes in chemistry were related to structural parameters of the meadow, in particular, the leaf surface area available for photosynthesis (LAI). LAI was positively correlated to mean, max and range pHNBS and max and range ΩAr. In June, vertical mixing (as Turbulent Kinetic Energy) influenced max and min ΩAr, while in September there was no effect of hydrodynamics on the carbonate system within the canopy. Max and range ΩAr within the meadow showed a positive trend with the calcium carbonate load of the leaves, pointing to a possible link between structural parameters, ΩAr and carbonate deposition. Calcifying organisms, e.g. epiphytes with carbonate skeletons, may benefit from the modification of the carbonate system by the meadow. There is, however, concern for the ability of seagrasses to provide modifications of similar importance in the future. The predicted decline of seagrass meadows may alter the scope for alteration of pH within a seagrass meadow and in the water column above the meadow, particularly if shoot density and biomass decline, on which LAI is based. Organisms associated with seagrass communities may therefore suffer from the loss of pH buffering capacity in degraded meadows.

  17. Electrophoretic mobilities of erythrocytes in various buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.; Kunze, M. E.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    The calibration of space flight equipment depends on a source of standard test particles, this test particle of choice is the fixed erythrocyte. Erythrocytes from different species have different electrophoretic mobilities. Electrophoretic mobility depends upon zeta potential, which, in turn depends upon ionic strength. Zeta potential decreases with increasing ionic strength, so cells have high electrophoretic mobility in space electrophoresis buffers than in typical physiological buffers. The electrophoretic mobilities of fixed human, rat, and rabbit erythrocytes in 0.145 M salt and buffers of varying ionic strength, temperature, and composition, to assess the effects of some of the unique combinations used in space buffers were characterized. Several effects were assessed: glycerol or DMSO (dimethylsulfoxide) were considered for use as cryoprotectants. The effect of these substances on erythrocyte electrophoretic mobility was examined. The choice of buffer depended upon cell mobility. Primary experiments with kidney cells established the choice of buffer and cryoprotectant. A nonstandard temperature of EPM in the suitable buffer was determined. A loss of ionic strength control occurs in the course of preparing columns for flight, the effects of small increases in ionic strength over the expected low values need to be evaluated.

  18. Social buffering: relief from stress and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kikusui, Takefumi; Winslow, James T; Mori, Yuji

    2006-12-29

    Communication is essential to members of a society not only for the expression of personal information, but also for the protection from environmental threats. Highly social mammals have a distinct characteristic: when conspecific animals are together, they show a better recovery from experiences of distress. This phenomenon, termed 'social buffering', has been found in rodents, birds, non-human primates and also in humans. This paper reviews classical findings on social buffering and focuses, in particular, on social buffering effects in relation to neuroendocrine stress responses. The social cues that transmit social buffering signals, the neural mechanisms of social buffering and a partner's efficacy with respect to social buffering are also detailed. Social contact appears to have a very positive influence on the psychological and the physiological aspects of social animals, including human beings. Research leading towards further understanding of the mechanisms of social buffering could provide alternative medical treatments based on the natural, individual characteristics of social animals, which could improve the quality of life.

  19. Carbon dioxide addition to microbial fuel cell cathodes maintains sustainable catholyte pH and improves anolyte pH, alkalinity, and conductivity.

    PubMed

    Fornero, Jeffrey J; Rosenbaum, Miriam; Cotta, Michael A; Angenent, Largus T

    2010-04-01

    Bioelectrochemical system (BES) pH imbalances develop due to anodic proton-generating oxidation reactions and cathodic hydroxide-ion-generating reduction reactions. Until now, workers added unsustainable buffers to reduce the pH difference between the anode and cathode because the pH imbalance contributes to BES potential losses and, therefore, power losses. Here, we report that adding carbon dioxide (CO(2)) gas to the cathode, which creates a CO(2)/bicarbonate buffered catholyte system, can diminish microbial fuel cell (MFC) pH imbalances in contrast to the CO(2)/carbonate buffered catholyte system by Torres, Lee, and Rittmann [Environ. Sci. Technol. 2008, 42, 8773]. We operated an air-cathode and liquid-cathode MFC side-by-side. For the air-cathode MFC, CO(2) addition resulted in a stable catholyte film pH of 6.61 +/- 0.12 and a 152% increase in steady-state power density. By adding CO(2) to the liquid-cathode system, we sustained a steady catholyte pH (pH = 5.94 +/- 0.02) and a low pH imbalance (DeltapH = 0.65 +/- 0.18) over a 2-week period without external salt buffer addition. By migrating bicarbonate ions from the cathode to the anode (with an anion-exchange membrane), we increased the anolyte pH (DeltapH = 0.39 +/- 0.31), total alkalinity (494 +/- 6 to 582 +/- 6 as mg CaCO(3)/L), and conductivity (1.53 +/- 0.49 to 2.16 +/- 0.03 mS/cm) relative to the feed properties. We also verified with a phosphate-buffered MFC that our reaction rates were limited mainly by the reactor configuration rather than limitations due to the bicarbonate buffer.

  20. A novel structure of optical buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, AiMing; Wu, Chongqing; Gao, Huali; Gong, Yandong; Shum, Ping

    2005-02-01

    Optical buffers are critical for low packet-loss probability in future photonic packet-switched networks. In particular, they would be required to store packets during rate conversion and header processing, and to overcome the receiver's bottleneck. They would be required for queuing packets while transmitters await access to the network. In this paper, we present a novel structure of optical buffer with compact size. This kind of optical buffer is based on a collinear 3x3 fiber coupler in which three fibers are completely in the same plane and weakly coupled. A SOA is used as its nonlinear element as well as an amplifier in it.The experiment result will be also given in the paper. Storage results obtained with this novel structure optical buffer at 100Mb/s will be presented first and then its capacity is extended to higher data rates of 2.5Gb/s, more compatible with present optical networks. Storage has been observed for time up to 1.568ms(more than 32 circulations) in both cases without obvious degration. The novel structure of optical buffer could be a more compact device which makes it possible to be integrated in a chip. SOA in the buffer is used as a nonlinear element as well as an amplifier to compensate loss in the buffer loop. The buffer needs low control power for switch operation. It is easy to control 'write' and 'erase' operation because the same TOAD switch in the buffer can be used for both 'write' and 'erase' operation.

  1. Cheese whey as substrate of batch hydrogen production: effect of temperature and addition of buffer.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Páez, K M; Poggi-Varaldo, H M; García-Mena, J; Ponce-Noyola, M T; Ramos-Valdivia, A C; Barrera-Cortés, J; Robles-González, I V; Ruiz-Ordáz, N; Villa-Tanaca, L; Rinderknecht-Seijas, N

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of buffer addition and process temperature (ambient and 35°C) on H2 production in batch fermentation of cheese whey (CW). When the H2 production reached a plateau, the headspace of the reactors were flushed with N2 and reactors were re-incubated. Afterwards, only the reactors with phosphate buffer showed a second cycle of H2 production and 48% more H2 was obtained. The absence of a second cycle in non-buffered reactors could be related to a lower final pH than in the buffered reactors; the low pH could drive the fermentation to solvents production. Indeed a high solvent production was observed in non-buffered bioreactors as given by low ρ ratios (defined as the ratio between sum of organic acid production and sum of solvents production). Regarding the process temperatures, no significant difference between the H2 production of reactors incubated at ambient temperature and at 35°C was described. After flushing the headspace of bioreactors with N2 at the end of the second cycle, the H2 production did not resume (in all reactors).

  2. Alveolar Subphase pH in the Lungs of Anesthetized Rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, D. W.; Goerke, J.; Clements, J. A.

    1981-11-01

    We measured the pH of the alveolar subphase fluid by puncturing the most superficial alveoli of the exposed lungs of anesthetized rabbits with H+-selective and nonselective KCl microelectrodes. In these experiments, we bathed the lung surface with paraffin oil or buffered Ringer's solutions that had a CO2 tension of 40 Torr (1 Torr = 133.3 Pa) and found an alveolar pH of 6.92± 0.01 (mean ± SEM). When the pH of the surface buffer was below 6.7 or above 7.5, alveolar pH varied with surface buffer pH. With the nonselective electrode, we did not find a significant electrical potential difference between the alveolar fluid and the pleural surface. These results are consistent with active transport of H+ (or HCO3-) across alveolar epithelium.

  3. Effect of Tris-acetate buffer on endotoxin removal from human-like collagen used biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huizhi; Fan, Daidi; Deng, Jianjun; Zhu, Chenghui; Hui, Junfeng; Ma, Xiaoxuan

    2014-09-01

    Protein preparation, which has active ingredients designated for the use of biomaterials and therapeutical protein, is obtained by genetic engineering, but products of genetic engineering are often contaminated by endotoxins. Because endotoxin is a ubiquitous and potent proinflammatory agent, endotoxin removal or depletion from protein is essential for researching any biomaterials. In this study, we have used Tris-acetate (TA) buffer of neutral pH value to evaluate endotoxins absorbed on the Pierce high-capacity endotoxin removal resin. The effects of TA buffer on pH, ionic strength, incubation time as well as human-like collagen (HLC) concentration on eliminating endotoxins are investigated. In the present experiments, we design an optimal method for TA buffer to remove endotoxin from recombinant collagen and use a chromogenic tachypleus amebocyte lysate (TAL) test kit to measure the endotoxin level of HLC. The present results show that, the endotoxins of HLC is dropped to 8.3EU/ml at 25 mM TA buffer (pH7.8) with 150 mM NaCl when setting incubation time at 6h, and HLC recovery is about 96%. Under this experimental condition, it is proved to exhibit high efficiencies of both endotoxin removal and collagen recovery. The structure of treated HLC was explored by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), demonstrating that the property and structure of HLC treated by TA buffer are maintained. Compared to the most widely used endotoxin removal method, Triton X-114 extraction, using TA buffer can obtain the non-toxic HLC without extra treatment for removing the toxic substances in Triton X-114. In addition, the present study aims at establishing a foundation for further work in laboratory animal science and providing a foundation for medical grade biomaterials.

  4. Calculating Buffer Zones: A Guide for Applicators

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Buffer zones provide distance between the application block (i.e., edge of the treated field) and bystanders, in order to control pesticide exposure risk from soil fumigants. Distance requirements may be reduced by credits such as tarps.

  5. Capture effeciency of a vegetative environmental buffer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Particulate matter emitted from tunnel-ventilated animal feeding operations (AFOs) is known to transport malodorous compounds. As a mitigation strategy, vegetative environmental buffers (VEBs) are often installed surrounding AFOs to capture particulates and induce lofting and dispersion. Currently, ...

  6. Buffer layer for thin film structures

    SciTech Connect

    Foltyn, Stephen R.; Jia, Quanxi; Arendt, Paul N.; Wang, Haiyan

    2010-06-15

    A composite structure including a base substrate and a layer of a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate is provided. A superconducting article can include a composite structure including an outermost layer of magnesium oxide, a buffer layer of strontium titanate or a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate and a top-layer of a superconducting material such as YBCO upon the buffer layer.

  7. Buffer layer for thin film structures

    DOEpatents

    Foltyn, Stephen R.; Jia, Quanxi; Arendt, Paul N.; Wang, Haiyan

    2006-10-31

    A composite structure including a base substrate and a layer of a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate is provided. A superconducting article can include a composite structure including an outermost layer of magnesium oxide, a buffer layer of strontium titanate or a mixture of strontium titanate and strontium ruthenate and a top-layer of a superconducting material such as YBCO upon the buffer layer.

  8. Buffered nanoemulsion for nose to brain delivery of ziprasidone hydrochloride: preformulation and pharmacodynamic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bahadur, Shiv; Pathak, Kamla

    2012-11-01

    The study was undertaken to develop buffered nanoemulsion of ziprasidone hydrochloride (fifth generation antipshychotic) and evaluate its potential for efficacious nose to brain delivery drug delivery in animal models. Homogeneous buffered ziprasidone nanoemulsions (BZNE) were prepared by aqueous (phosphate buffer, pH 8.0) titration method using capmul MCM, labrasol and transcutol as oil, surfactant and cosurfactant respectively. The NEs (F1-F7) were characterized for pharmaceutical characteristics (% transmittance, PDI value, Zeta potential, globule size, viscosity and diffusion coefficient) and F6 with mean globule size of 145.24 ± 4.75nm (PDI = 0.186 ± 0.40) and diffusion coefficient of 0.1901± 0.04cm2/min was thermodynamically stable and was developed as buffered mucoadhesive nanoemulsions. The buffered mucoadhesive NE (βmax = 0.57) that contained 0.5% by weight of chitosan (BZMNE) exhibited 1.79 times higher diffusion coefficient (0.3418 ± 0.03) than BZNE. Pharmacodynamic study confirmed the superiority of BZMNE over BZNE in locomotor activity test (p < 0.05) and paw test (p < 0.05). Nasal ciliotoxicity study revealed the optimized BZMNE to be free from acute toxicity. Conclusively, a stable and efficacious buffered mucoadhesive NE of ziprasidone hydrochloride, that can be safely administered by intranasal route was developed.

  9. Phosphate and HEPES buffers potently affect the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of Alzheimer's Aβ peptide.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Megan; Tepper, Katharina; Haupt, Caroline; Knüpfer, Uwe; Klement, Karolin; Meinhardt, Jessica; Horn, Uwe; Balbach, Jochen; Fändrich, Marcus

    2011-06-10

    The oligomerization of Aβ peptide into amyloid fibrils is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Due to its biological relevance, phosphate is the most commonly used buffer system for studying the formation of Aβ and other amyloid fibrils. Investigation into the characteristics and formation of amyloid fibrils frequently relies upon material formed in vitro, predominantly in phosphate buffers. Herein, we examine the effects on the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of Aβ peptide that occur due solely to the influence of phosphate buffer. We reveal that significant differences in amyloid fibrillation are observed due to fibrillation being initiated in phosphate or HEPES buffer (at physiological pH and temperature). Except for the differing buffer ions, all experimental parameters were kept constant. Fibril formation was assessed using fluorescently monitored kinetic studies, microscopy, X-ray fiber diffraction and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Based on this set up, we herein reveal profound effects on the mechanism and speed of Aβ fibrillation. The three histidine residues at positions 6, 13 and 14 of Aβ(1-40) are instrumental in these mechanistic changes. We conclude that buffer plays a more significant role in fibril formation than has been generally acknowledged.

  10. Improving phosphate buffer-free cathode performance of microbial fuel cell based on biological nitrification.

    PubMed

    You, Shi-Jie; Ren, Nan-Qi; Zhao, Qing-Liang; Kiely, Patrick D; Wang, Jing-Yuan; Yang, Feng-Lin; Fu, Lei; Peng, Luo

    2009-08-15

    To reduce the amount of phosphate buffer currently used in Microbial Fuel Cell's (MFC's), we investigated the role of biological nitrification at the cathode in the absence of phosphate buffer. The addition of a nitrifying mixed consortia (NMC) to the cathode compartment and increasing ammonium concentration in the catholyte resulted in an increase of cell voltage from 0.3 V to 0.567 V (external resistance of 100 Omega) and a decrease of catholyte pH from 8.8 to 7.05. A large fraction of ammonium was oxidized to nitrite, as indicated by an increase of nitrate-nitrogen (NO(3)(-)-N). An MFC inoculated with an NMC and supplied with 94.2 mgN/l ammonium to the catholyte could generate a maximum power of 2.1+/-0.14 mW (10.94+/-0.73 W/m(3)). This compared favorably to an MFC supplied with either buffered or non-buffered solution. The buffer-free NMC inoculated cathodic chamber showed the smallest polarization resistance, suggesting that nitrification resulted in improved cathode performance. The improved performances of the phosphate buffer-free cathode and cell are positively related to biological nitrification, in which we suggest additional protons produced from ammonium oxidation facilitated electrochemical reduction of oxygen at cathode.

  11. Solubility and speciation of atmospheric iron in buffer systems simulating cloud conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Nabin; Majestic, Brian J.; Herckes, Pierre

    2011-04-01

    The solubility of iron (Fe) in atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is important to understand its chemistry and potential bioavailability to ocean phytoplankton. However, current studies on Fe solubility and its speciation are highly uncertain partly due to inconsistencies in analytical protocols. In this study, cloud-processing of atmospheric PM was simulated in acetate, formate, and oxalate buffers (pH = 4.30 ± 0.05) at 0.5, 1, 5, and 20 mM. Colorimetric analysis of Fe(II)-ferrozine complex showed that Fe solubility increased by an order of magnitude when acetate and formate concentrations increased from 0.5 mM to 5 mM, with a higher fraction of soluble Fe in acetate than in formate at lower buffer concentration (0.5 mM). Measured pH of sample extracts revealed that weak buffers are unable to maintain pH, presumably due to acidic or alkaline components of PM, requiring an optimum concentration (5 mM in this study) of acetate and formate for Fe solubility measurements. Similar extraction procedures revealed that oxalate buffer inhibits the formation of Fe(II)-ferrozine complex, especially with Fe(III)-containing solutions, rendering it unsuitable for Fe solubility measurements by Ferrozine method. Application of the optimized analytical method to PM samples from different environments showed quite variable Fe solubility, with the lowest (<1%) in dust-impacted samples and the highest (5%) in urban samples. The highest solubility (6.8%) was observed in ambient PM2.5 samples influenced by anthropogenic sources (car emissions) with more than 90% of soluble Fe in the form of Fe(II). Results from this study highlight the importance of the type and strength of buffer at a given pH for Fe solubility and provide further evidence of a higher Fe solubility in urban PM samples compared to desert dust.

  12. Social buffering: relief from stress and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Kikusui, Takefumi; Winslow, James T; Mori, Yuji

    2006-01-01

    Communication is essential to members of a society not only for the expression of personal information, but also for the protection from environmental threats. Highly social mammals have a distinct characteristic: when conspecific animals are together, they show a better recovery from experiences of distress. This phenomenon, termed ‘social buffering’, has been found in rodents, birds, non-human primates and also in humans. This paper reviews classical findings on social buffering and focuses, in particular, on social buffering effects in relation to neuroendocrine stress responses. The social cues that transmit social buffering signals, the neural mechanisms of social buffering and a partner's efficacy with respect to social buffering are also detailed. Social contact appears to have a very positive influence on the psychological and the physiological aspects of social animals, including human beings. Research leading towards further understanding of the mechanisms of social buffering could provide alternative medical treatments based on the natural, individual characteristics of social animals, which could improve the quality of life. PMID:17118934

  13. Buffer regulation of calcium puff sequences.

    PubMed

    Fraiman, Daniel; Dawson, Silvina Ponce

    2014-02-01

    Puffs are localized Ca(2 +) signals that arise in oocytes in response to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). They are the result of the liberation of Ca(2 +) from the endoplasmic reticulum through the coordinated opening of IP3 receptor/channels clustered at a functional release site. The presence of buffers that trap Ca(2 +) provides a mechanism that enriches the spatio-temporal dynamics of cytosolic calcium. The expression of different types of buffers along the cell's life provides a tool with which Ca(2 +) signals and their responses can be modulated. In this paper we extend the stochastic model of a cluster of IP3R-Ca(2 +) channels introduced previously to elucidate the effect of buffers on sequences of puffs at the same release site. We obtain analytically the probability laws of the interpuff time and of the number of channels that participate of the puffs. Furthermore, we show that under typical experimental conditions the effect of buffers can be accounted for in terms of a simple inhibiting function. Hence, by exploring different inhibiting functions we are able to study the effect of a variety of buffers on the puff size and interpuff time distributions. We find the somewhat counter-intuitive result that the addition of a fast Ca(2 +) buffer can increase the average number of channels that participate of a puff.

  14. A dynamic system for the simulation of fasting luminal pH-gradients using hydrogen carbonate buffers for dissolution testing of ionisable compounds.

    PubMed

    Garbacz, Grzegorz; Kołodziej, Bartosz; Koziolek, Mirko; Weitschies, Werner; Klein, Sandra

    2014-01-23

    The hydrogen carbonate buffer is considered as the most biorelevant buffer system for the simulation of intestinal conditions and covers the physiological pH range of the luminal fluids from pH 5.5 to about pH 8.4. The pH value of a hydrogen carbonate buffer is the result of a complex and dynamic interplay of the concentration of hydrogen carbonate ions, carbonic acid, the concentration of dissolved and solvated carbon dioxide and its partial pressure above the solution. The complex equilibrium between the different ions results in a thermodynamic instability of hydrogen carbonate solutions. In order to use hydrogen carbonate buffers with pH gradients in the physiological range and with the dynamics observed in vivo without changing the ionic strength of the solution, we developed a device (pHysio-grad®) that provides both acidification of the dissolution medium by microcomputer controlled carbon dioxide influx and alkalisation by degassing. This enables a continuous pH control and adjustment during dissolution of ionisable compounds. The results of the pH adjustment indicate that the system can compensate even rapid pH changes after addition of a basic or acidic moiety in amounts corresponding up to 90% of the overall buffer capacity. The results of the dissolution tests performed for a model formulation containing ionizable compounds (Nexium 20mg mups) indicate that both the simulated fasting intraluminal pH-profiles and the buffer species can significantly affect the dissolution process by changing the lag time prior to initial drug release and the release rate of the model compound. A prediction of the in vivo release behaviour of this formulation is thus most likely strongly related to the test conditions such as pH and buffer species.

  15. Effects of pH and temperature on the chromatographic performance and stability of immobilized poly(methyloctylsiloxane) stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Borges, Endler M; Collins, Carol H

    2012-03-02

    The effects of mobile phase pH, temperature, buffer type and buffer concentration on the selectivity and stability of four stationary phases, with different PMOS loadings, prepared by the thermal immobilization of poly(methyloctylsiloxane) on to silica (PMOS-SiO₂), were evaluated with both hydrophobic and hydrophilic basic solutes. These solutes show longer retention times at near neutral pH, where both the silanols and the basic solutes are partially ionized, and shorter retention times in more alkaline pH, where the silanols are mostly ionized and the basic solutes are not ionized. Increases in temperature and buffer concentration also result in shorter retention times. These PMOS-SiO₂ stationary phases are quite stable at low pH and are also stable at ambient temperature (23 °C) using pH 7 phosphate. The PMOS-SiO₂ stationary phases are more stable at higher pH using triethylamine (pH 11) and borate (pH 10) buffers than with phosphate and carbonate buffers. Temperature increases stationary phase degradation, while buffer concentration has a minimal effect on stationary phase degradation, indicating that these PMOS-SiO₂ stationary phases have stabilities similar to the equivalent chemically bonded phases.

  16. MES Buffer Affects Arabidopsis Root Apex Zonation and Root Growth by Suppressing Superoxide Generation in Root Apex

    PubMed Central

    Kagenishi, Tomoko; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František

    2016-01-01

    In plants, growth of roots and root hairs is regulated by the fine cellular control of pH and reactive oxygen species (ROS). MES, 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid as one of the Good’s buffers has broadly been used for buffering medium, and it is thought to suit for plant growth with the concentration at 0.1% (w/v) because the buffer capacity of MES ranging pH 5.5–7.0 (for Arabidopsis, pH 5.8). However, many reports have shown that, in nature, roots require different pH values on the surface of specific root apex zones, namely meristem, transition zone, and elongation zone. Despite the fact that roots always grow on a media containing buffer molecule, little is known about impact of MES on root growth. Here, we have checked the effects of different concentrations of MES buffer using growing roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results show that 1% of MES significantly inhibited root growth, the number of root hairs and length of meristem, whereas 0.1% promoted root growth and root apex area (region spanning from the root tip up to the transition zone). Furthermore, superoxide generation in root apex disappeared at 1% of MES. These results suggest that MES disturbs normal root morphogenesis by changing the ROS homeostasis in root apex. PMID:26925066

  17. Basal buffer systems for a newly glycosylated recombinant human interferon-β with biophysical stability and DoE approaches.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Ah; Song, Kyoung; Lim, Dae Gon; Hada, Shavron; Shin, Young Kee; Shin, Sangmun; Jeong, Seong Hoon

    2015-10-12

    The purpose of this study was to develop a basal buffer system for a biobetter version of recombinant human interferon-β 1a (rhIFN-β 1a), termed R27T, to optimize its biophysical stability. The protein was pre-screened in solution as a function of pH (2-11) using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). According to the result, its experimental pI and optimal pH range were 5.8 and 3.6-4.4, respectively. Design of experiment (DoE) approach was developed as a practical tool to aid formulation studies as a function of pH (2.9-5.7), buffer (phosphate, acetate, citrate, and histidine), and buffer concentration (20 mM and 50 mM). This method employed a weight-based procedure to interpret complex data sets and to investigate critical key factors representing protein stability. The factors used were Tm, enthalpy, and relative helix contents which were obtained by DSC and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Although the weights changed by three responses, objective functions from a set of experimental designs based on four buffers were highest in 20 mM acetate buffer at pH 3.6 among all 19 scenarios tested. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) was adopted to investigate accelerated storage stability in order to optimize the pH value with susceptible stability since the low pH was not patient-compliant. Interestingly, relative helix contents and storage stability (monomer remaining) increased with pH and was the highest at pH 4.0. On the other hand, relative helix contents and thermodynamic stability decreased at pH 4.2 and 4.4, suggesting protein aggregation issues. Therefore, the optimized basal buffer system for the novel biobetter was proposed to be 20 mM acetate buffer at pH 3.8±0.2.

  18. Low noise buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators for precise time and frequency measurement and distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichinger, R. A.; Dachel, P.; Miller, W. H.; Ingold, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    Extremely low noise, high performance, wideband buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators were developed. These buffer amplifiers are designed to distribute reference frequencies from 30 KHz to 45 MHz from a hydrogen maser without degrading the hydrogen maser's performance. The buffered phase comparators are designed to intercompare the phase of state of the art hydrogen masers without adding any significant measurement system noise. These devices have a 27 femtosecond phase stability floor and are stable to better than one picosecond for long periods of time. Their temperature coefficient is less than one picosecond per degree C, and they have shown virtually no voltage coefficients.

  19. Temperature buffer test design, instrumentation and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandén, Torbjörn; Goudarzi, Reza; de Combarieu, Michel; Åkesson, Mattias; Hökmark, Harald

    The Temperature Buffer Test, TBT, is a heated full-scale field experiment carried out jointly by ANDRA and SKB at the SKB Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory in Southeast Sweden. An existing 8 m deep, 1.8 m diameter KBS-3-type deposition hole located at -420 m level has been selected for the test. The objectives are to improve the general understanding of Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical, THM, behavior of buffer materials submitted to severe thermal conditions with temperatures well over 100 °C during water uptake of partly saturated bentonite-based buffer materials, and to check, in due time, their properties after water saturation. The test includes two carbon steel heating canisters each 3 m high and 0.6 m diameter, surrounded by 0.6 m of buffer material. There is a 0.2 m thick sand shield between the upper heater and the surrounding bentonite, while the lower heater is surrounded by bentonite only. On top of the stack of bentonite blocks is a confining plug anchored to the rock. In the slot between buffer and rock wall is a sand filter equipped with pipes to control the water pressure at the boundary, which is seldom done with an EBS in situ experiment. Both heater mid-height planes are densely instrumented in order to follow, with direct or indirect methods, buffer THM evolution. Temperature, relative humidity, stress and pore pressure have been monitored since the test start in March 2003. Total water inflow is also monitored. Firstly, the present paper describes the test design, the instrumentation, the plug anchoring system and the system for water boundary pressure control. Second, having described the test, the paper shows different measurements that illustrate evolution of temperature, saturation, suction and swelling pressure in the upper and the lower buffer.

  20. Evaluating the effects of buffer conditions and extremolytes on thermostability of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor using high-throughput screening combined with design of experiments.

    PubMed

    Ablinger, Elisabeth; Hellweger, Monika; Leitgeb, Stefan; Zimmer, Andreas

    2012-10-15

    In this study, we combined a high-throughput screening method, differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF), with design of experiments (DoE) methodology to evaluate the effects of several formulation components on the thermostability of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). First we performed a primary buffer screening where we tested thermal stability of G-CSF in different buffers, pH values and buffer concentrations. The significance of each factor and the two-way interactions between them were studied by multivariable regression analysis. pH was identified as most critical factor regarding thermal stability. The most stabilizing buffer, sodium glutamate, and sodium acetate were determined for further investigations. Second we tested the effect of 6 naturally occurring extremolytes (trehalose, sucrose, ectoine, hydroxyectoine, sorbitol, mannitol) on the thermal stability of G-CSF, using a central composite circumscribed design. At low pH (3.8) and low buffer concentration (5 mM) all extremolytes led to a significant increase in thermal stability except the addition of ectoine which resulted in a strong destabilization of G-CSF. Increasing pH and buffer concentration led to an increase in thermal stability with all investigated extremolytes. The described systematic approach allowed to create a ranking of stabilizing extremolytes at different buffer conditions.

  1. A new strategy to stabilize oxytocin in aqueous solutions: I. The effects of divalent metal ions and citrate buffer.

    PubMed

    Avanti, Christina; Amorij, Jean-Pierre; Setyaningsih, Dewi; Hawe, Andrea; Jiskoot, Wim; Visser, Jan; Kedrov, Alexej; Driessen, Arnold J M; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; Frijlink, Henderik W

    2011-06-01

    In the current study, the effect of metal ions in combination with buffers (citrate, acetate, pH 4.5) on the stability of aqueous solutions of oxytocin was investigated. Both monovalent metal ions (Na(+) and K(+)) and divalent metal ions (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Zn(2+)) were tested all as chloride salts. The effect of combinations of buffers and metal ions on the stability of aqueous oxytocin solutions was determined by RP-HPLC and HP-SEC after 4 weeks of storage at either 4°C or 55°C. Addition of sodium or potassium ions to acetate- or citrate-buffered solutions did not increase stability, nor did the addition of divalent metal ions to acetate buffer. However, the stability of aqueous oxytocin in aqueous formulations was improved in the presence of 5 and 10 mM citrate buffer in combination with at least 2 mM CaCl(2), MgCl(2), or ZnCl(2) and depended on the divalent metal ion concentration. Isothermal titration calorimetric measurements were predictive for the stabilization effects observed during the stability study. Formulations in citrate buffer that had an improved stability displayed a strong interaction between oxytocin and Ca(2+), Mg(2+), or Zn(2+), while formulations in acetate buffer did not. In conclusion, our study shows that divalent metal ions in combination with citrate buffer strongly improved the stability of oxytocin in aqueous solutions.

  2. Round window pH manipulation alters the ototoxicity of systemic cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Fujinobu; Whitworth, Craig A; Rybak, Leonard P

    2004-01-01

    The effect of manipulation of pH on the ototoxicity of systemic cisplatin was studied in Wistar rats. After control auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were performed, the auditory bullae were opened and acidic (pH 6.0), neutral (pH 7.4) or basic (pH 9.0) phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was applied to fill the round window niche (RWN). After 30 min, 13 mg/kg cisplatin solution or saline was administered intraperitoneally. After 3 days, follow-up ABRs were performed and cochleae were processed for morphological analysis. Animals that received basic PBS on the RWN and cisplatin intraperitoneally had significantly smaller ABR threshold shifts compared to rats pretreated with neutral pH buffer (P<0.05). Animals that received acidic PBS on the RWN and systemic cisplatin showed significantly greater ABR threshold shifts compared to those pretreated with neutral pH buffer (P<0.05). No significant threshold changes were observed in animals that received buffer of any pH on the RWN, followed by saline intraperitoneally. Semiquantitative analysis of hair cell survival confirmed a protective effect by basic PBS against cisplatin and a synergistic effect by acidic PBS on cisplatin ototoxicity (P<0.05). It appears that changes in cochlear pH can modulate the ototoxic effects of systemically applied cisplatin.

  3. Influence of pH on yeast immobilization on polystyrene surfaces modified by energetic ion bombardment.

    PubMed

    Tran, Clara T H; Kondyurin, Alexey; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Bilek, Marcela M M; McKenzie, David R

    2013-04-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) treatment is a novel method for immobilizing yeast on polymer surfaces by covalent linkage. This study of the immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in both rehydrated and cultured forms showed that the density of cell attachment on PIII treated polystyrene (PS) was strongly dependent on the pH of the incubation medium and was higher for rehydrated yeast. A study of the surface charge was undertaken to explain this result. A high density of cell attachment occurs in acidic conditions (pH 3-5) and a significantly reduced cell density occurs in neutral and alkaline buffers (pH 6-10) for both types of yeast. Force measurements using atomic force microscopy show that a negative charge is present on polystyrene after PIII treatment. The charge is close to zero at pH 3 to pH 5 and increasingly negative from pH 6 to pH 10. Both rehydrated yeast and cultured yeast have negative electrophoretic mobility in the pH range studied. The repulsive forces are weak in acidic buffers and stronger in neutral and alkaline buffers, in good agreement with the cell densities observed. Rehydrated yeast cells are found to be more hydrophobic than cultured yeasts in the same buffer. The higher hydrophobicity explains the higher attachment of rehydrated yeast compared to cultured yeast.

  4. The Effects of Acetate Buffer Concentration on Lysozyme Solubility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1996-01-01

    The micro-solubility column technique was employed to systematically investigate the effects of buffer concentration on tetragonal lysozyme solubility. While keeping the NaCl concentrations constant at 2%, 3%, 4%, 5% and 7%, and the pH at 4.0, we have studied the solubility of tetragonal lysozyme over an acetate buffer concentration range of 0.01M to 0.5M as a function of temperature. The lysozyme solubility decreased with increasing acetate concentration from 0.01M to 0.1M. This decrease may simply be due to the net increase in solvent ionic strength. Increasing the acetate concentration beyond 0.1M resulted in an increase in the lysozyme solubility, which reached a peak at - 0.3M acetate concentration. This increase was believed to be due to the increased binding of acetate to the anionic binding sites of lysozyme, preventing their occupation by chloride. In keeping with the previously observed reversal of the Hoffmeister series for effectiveness of anions in crystallizing lysozyme, acetate would be a less effective precipitant than chloride. Further increasing the acetate concentration beyond 0.3M resulted in a subsequent gradual decrease in the lysozyme solubility at all NaCl concentrations.

  5. Equilibrium Studies of Dibutyltin(IV)-Zwitterionic Buffer Complexation.

    PubMed

    El-Gahami, M A; Albishri, H M

    2013-01-01

    Equilibrium studies in aqueous solution are reported for dibutyltin(IV) (DBT) complexes of the zwitterionic buffers "Good's buffers" Mes and Mops. Stoichiometric and formation constants of the complexes formed were determined at different temperatures and ionic strength 0.1 mol·L(-1) NaNO3. The results show that the best fit of the titration curves were obtained when the complexes ML, MLH-1, MLH-2 and MLH-3 were considered beside the hydrolysis product of the dibutyltin(IV) cation. The thermodynamic parameters ΔH(o), ΔS(o) and ΔG(o) calculated from the temperature dependence of the formation constant of the dibutyltin(IV) complexes with 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (Mes) and 3-(N-mor-pholino)-propanesulfonic acid (Mops) were investigated. The effect of dioxane as a solvent on the formation constants of DBT-Mes and DBT-Mops complexes decrease linearly with the increase of dioxane proportion in the medium. The concentration distribution of the various complexes species was evaluated as a function of pH.

  6. Performance of a narrow buffer strip in abating agricultural pollutants in the shallow subsurface water flux.

    PubMed

    Borin, Maurizio; Bigon, Elisa; Zanin, Giuseppe; Fava, Luca

    2004-09-01

    The performance of a narrow buffer strip in abating dissolved P, electrical conductivity and herbicides (terbuthylazine, alachlor, nicosulfuron, pendimethalin, linuron) in subsurface water coming from cropland was tested in an experiment carried out on the low plains of the Veneto Region (NE Italy). The experiment lasted from December 1997 to June 1999, monitoring subsurface water quality entering and exiting a buffer composed of a grass strip (5 m wide) and 1 m wide row of trees. Dissolved phosphorus concentrations were reduced by almost 100% passing through the buffer and in most cases exiting water satisfied the limit for avoiding eutrophication. A positive effect was also detected on ECW (reduced by 20%), while pH was not significantly altered. Herbicide concentration abatement varied between 60 and 90%, depending on the chemical and the time elapsed since application.

  7. Photosynthetic activity buffers ocean acidification in seagrass meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, I. E.; Olsen, Y. S.; Ramajo, L.; Basso, L.; Steckbauer, A.; Moore, T. S.; Howard, J.; Duarte, C. M.

    2013-07-01

    Macrophytes growing in shallow coastal zones characterized by intense metabolic activity have the capacity to modify pH within their canopy and beyond. We observed diel pH ranges is in shallow (5-12 m) seagrass (Posidonia oceanica) meadows from 0.06 pH units in September to 0.24 units in June. The carbonate system (pH, DIC, and aragonite saturation state (ΩAr) and O2 within the meadows displayed strong diel variability driven by primary productivity, and changes in chemistry were related to structural parameters of the meadow, in particular, the leaf surface area available for photosynthesis (LAI). LAI was positively correlated to mean and max pHNBS and max ΩAr. Oxygen production positively influenced the range and maximum pHNBS and the range of ΩAr. In June, vertical mixing (as Turbulent Kinetic Energy) influenced ΩAr, while in September there was no effect of hydrodynamics on the carbonate system within the canopy. ΩAr was positively correlated with the calcium carbonate load of the leaves, demonstrating a direct link between structural parameters, ΩAr and carbonate deposition. There was a direct relationship between ΩAr, influenced directly by meadow LAI, and CaCO3 content of the leaves. Therefore, calcifying organisms, e.g. epiphytes with carbonate skeletons, might benefit from the modification of the carbonate system by the meadow. The meadow might be capable of providing refugia for calcifiers by increasing pH and ΩAr through metabolic activity. There is, however, concern for the ability of seagrasses to provide this refugia function in the future. The predicted decline of seagrass meadows may alter the scope for alteration of pH within a seagrass meadow and in the water column above the meadow, particularly if shoot density and biomass decline, both strongly linked to LAI. Organisms associated with seagrass communities may therefore suffer from the loss of pH buffering capacity in degraded meadows.

  8. Undergraduate Chemistry Students' Perceptions of and Misconceptions about Buffers and Buffer Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orgill, MaryKay; Sutherland, Aynsley

    2008-01-01

    Both upper- and lower-level chemistry students struggle with understanding the concept of buffers and with solving corresponding buffer problems. While it might be reasonable to expect general chemistry students to struggle with this abstract concept, it is surprising that upper-level students in analytical chemistry and biochemistry continue to…

  9. Vegetative buffer strips for reducing herbicide transport in runoff: effects of season, vegetation, and buffer width

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effectiveness of vegetative buffer strips (VBS) for reducing herbicide transport in runoff may be affected by season, plant species composition, and buffer width. A plot-scale study was conducted from 2007-2012 on an eroded claypan soil with the objectives of: 1) assessing the effects of season ...

  10. Labview virtual instruments for calcium buffer calculations.

    PubMed

    Reitz, Frederick B; Pollack, Gerald H

    2003-01-01

    Labview VIs based upon the calculator programs of Fabiato and Fabiato (J. Physiol. Paris 75 (1979) 463) are presented. The VIs comprise the necessary computations for the accurate preparation of multiple-metal buffers, for the back-calculation of buffer composition given known free metal concentrations and stability constants used, for the determination of free concentrations from a given buffer composition, and for the determination of apparent stability constants from absolute constants. As implemented, the VIs can concurrently account for up to three divalent metals, two monovalent metals and four ligands thereof, and the modular design of the VIs facilitates further extension of their capacity. As Labview VIs are inherently graphical, these VIs may serve as useful templates for those wishing to adapt this software to other platforms.

  11. Nonlinear spelling in graphemic buffer deficit.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Teresa; Nickels, Lyndsey

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a case of nonlinear spelling and its implications for theories of the graphemic buffer. C.T.J., an individual with an acquired deficit of the graphemic buffer, often wrote the letters of his responses in a nonlinear temporal order when writing to dictation. The spatial ordering of the letters was maintained: Letters in the later positions of the words were written towards the right side of the response, even when written before letters in earlier positions. This unusual phenomenon has been briefly reported in three prior cases but this study provides the most detailed analysis of the phenomenon to date. We specifically contend that the decoupling of the temporal and spatial aspects of spelling is difficult to reconcile with competitive queuing accounts of the graphemic buffer.

  12. Total and Labile Phosphorus Concentrations as Influenced by Riparian Buffer Soil Properties.

    PubMed

    Young, Eric O; Ross, Donald S

    2016-01-01

    Riparian buffers can act as a phosphorus (P) source under active stream bank erosion. Using soil and landscape variables (soil series, drainage class, organic matter, and pH) to index P concentrations could improve P loss risk tools for buffers. The objectives of this study were (i) to determine if soil properties could predict total and labile P concentrations within a 10-ha riparian buffer and (ii) to quantify the degree of spatial dependence of P and related properties. Soil samples were taken in 15-cm increments to a depth of 60 cm using a grid ( = 71) from an established riparian buffer along the Rock River in Vermont. Total soil P (TP), plant-available P determined by Modified Morgan extraction (MM-P), pH, soil organic matter (SOM), soil texture, and select cations were measured. We found that TP (152-1536 mg P kg) and MM-P (0.4-14.6 mg kg) ranged widely, with distinct differences between soil series. Mean TP and MM-P were greater in alluvial and glaciolacustrine soils compared with glacial till. Across all samples, MM-P was weakly related to soil properties; however, total labile P (orthophosphate + organic P measured by ICP) and unreactive labile P (ICP-P - colorimetric-P) could both be predicted by SOM ( = 0.59 and 0.73, respectively). Strong spatial dependence was found for P and related properties as revealed by geospatial analyses. Results show that P availability in the buffer was strongly related to soil genesis and support site-specific approaches for P loss risk evaluation in buffers.

  13. Characterization of filter extractables by proton NMR spectroscopy: studies on intact filters with process buffers.

    PubMed

    Kao, Y H; Bender, J; Hagewiesche, A; Wong, P; Huang, Y; Vanderlaan, M

    2001-01-01

    Studies were conducted to characterize potential extractables from sterilizing grade filters. The focus of this report is the 0.22 micron Durapore (hydrophilic modified PVDF) filter which is used throughout our recovery processes. The objectives of this study are (1) to identify potential filter extractables from the hydrophilic PVDF filters; (2) to show that NMR spectroscopy may be used to detect filter extractables in the presence of product and excipients; and (3) to establish levels of filter extractables obtained by extraction with a variety of buffers. The data show that the primary source of filter extractables is the hydrophilic modification of the PVDF membrane surface. Extractables from the modified hydrophilic PVDF filter include propylene glycol (PG) and soluble oligomers of the hydroxypropyl acrylate and cross-linker. Propylene glycol, arising from the hydrolysis of the hydroxypropyl acrylate, appears to be the primary extractable in buffers above pH 11. Since the 1H-NMR method can easily detect the methyl proton signals of PG, an NMR assay was developed to detect PG in the presence of buffer excipients and final product. Propylene glycol can be used as a marker for the extractables from Durapore hydrophilic PVDF filters. Although numerous buffers were used to generate extractables from the PVDF filter, significant extractables (PG and soluble oligomers) were found only in high pH extraction buffers. As a result of this finding, only a limited number of new buffers or new PVDF filters will require testing for future validation studies. Process validation studies have shown that neither PG nor soluble oligomers are at levels that impact the quality or safety of the product.

  14. Inhibition of enamel demineralization by buffering effect of S-PRG filler-containing dental sealant.

    PubMed

    Kaga, Masayuki; Kakuda, Shinichi; Ida, Yusuke; Toshima, Hirokazu; Hashimoto, Masanori; Endo, Kazuhiko; Sano, Hidehiko

    2014-02-01

    The buffering capacity and inhibitory effects on enamel demineralization of two commercially available dental sealants were evaluated in this study. The effects of filler particles were also examined. Disks of enamel and cured sealant materials of BeautiSealant (silica or S-PRG filler) or Teethmate F-1 were incubated in lactic acid solutions (pH 4.0) for 1-6 d. The pH changes and amounts of ions released in the solutions were assessed, and enamel surfaces were observed using a scanning electron microscope. The pH of the solution with BeautiSealant (S-PRG filler) was neutralized from pH 4.0 to pH 6.1 (after incubation for 1 d) and from pH 4.0 to pH 6.7 (after incubation for 6 d). In addition, no release of calcium ions was detected and the enamel surface was morphologically intact in scanning electron microscopy images. However, the pH of the solution with Teethmate F-1 remained below pH 4.0 during incubation from days 1 to 6. Calcium release was increased in solutions up to and after 6 d of incubation. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that the structures of hydroxyapatite rods were exposed at the specimen surfaces as a result of demineralization. Ions released from S-PRG filler-containing dental sealant rapidly buffered the lactic acid solution and inhibited enamel demineralization.

  15. Defining the buffering process by a triprotic acid without relying on Stewart-electroneutrality considerations.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minhtri K; Kao, Liyo; Kurtz, Ira

    2011-08-17

    Upon the addition of protons to an aqueous solution, a component of the H+ load will be bound i.e. buffered. In an aqueous solution containing a triprotic acid, H+ can be bound to three different states of the acid as well as to OH- ions that are derived from the auto-ionization of H2O. In quantifying the buffering process of a triprotic acid, one must define the partitioning of H+ among the three states of the acid and also the OH- ions in solution in order to predict the equilibrium pH value. However, previous quantitative approaches that model triprotic acid titration behaviour and used to predict the equilibrium pH rely on the mathematical convenience of electroneutrality/charge balance considerations. This fact has caused confusion in the literature, and has led to the assumption that charge balance/electroneutrality is a causal factor in modulating proton buffering (Stewart formulation). However, as we have previously shown, although charge balance can be used mathematically as a convenient tool in deriving various formulae, electroneutrality per se is not a fundamental physicochemical parameter that is mechanistically involved in the underlying buffering and proton transfer reactions. The lack of distinction between a mathematical tool, and a fundamental physicochemical parameter is in part a reason for the current debate regarding the Stewart formulation of acid-base analysis. We therefore posed the following question: Is it possible to generate an equation that defines and predicts the buffering of a triprotic acid that is based only on H+ partitioning without incorporating electroneutrality in the derivation? Towards this goal, we derived our new equation utilizing: 1) partitioning of H+ buffering; 2) conservation of mass; and 3) acid-base equilibria. In validating this model, we compared the predicted equilibrium pH with the measured pH of an aqueous solution consisting of Na2HPO4 to which HCl was added. The measured pH values were in excellent agreement

  16. Recovery of nicotine-free proteins from tobacco leaves using phosphate buffer system under controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Fu, H; Machado, P A; Hahm, T S; Kratochvil, R J; Wei, C I; Lo, Y M

    2010-03-01

    Establishment of an effective, high-throughput processing system to recover protein from tobacco with no nicotine contamination is essential and vital to the development of value-added, alternative applications for tobacco farmers. We have successfully developed a mechanism capable of processing up to 60 kg of tobacco leaves per hour with phosphate buffer (Na(2)HPO(4)-KH(2)PO(4)) simultaneously added to stabilize the protein as the plant was being disintegrated. The optimal processing parameters were identified, including the ratio of buffer to leaf (BLR) at 4.75 (w/w), buffer pH 7.85, and buffer concentration 0.085 mol/L, achieving a maximum yield of soluble protein at 12.85 mg/g fresh leaf. Acetone at -20 degrees C was the most effective among all methods investigated to remove nicotine from protein; however, it also drastically reduced the recovery rate of protein (63.3%). Ultrafiltration was only able to remove about 50% of the residual nicotine, although the protein recovery rate was high (94.7%). The residual nicotine content inherent in the recovered protein was completely removed by rinsing the protein with 85% phosphoric acid at pH 3.5 for three times with a protein recovery of 94.5%. The pilot-scale operation provides a solid foundation for further scale-up to industrial production of nicotine-free tobacco protein that could bring added value to tobacco for nonsmoking applications.

  17. THE KINETICS OF SAPONIFICATION OF IODOACETIC ACID BY SODIUM HYDROXIDE AND BY CERTAIN ALKALINE BUFFER SOLUTIONS.

    PubMed

    Brdicka, R

    1936-07-20

    1. The rate of the saponification of iodoacetic acid in sodium hydroxide and alkaline buffer solutions yielding glycollic acid was measured by means of Heyrovský's polarographic method. 2. From the bimolecular velocity constants, increasing with the ionic strength of the solution, the Brönsted factor, F, which characterizes the primary salt effect, was calculated. 3. In the borate buffer solutions the monomolecular constants of the saponification were determined which, at values above the pH of neutralization of boric acid, show a proportionality to the concentration of hydroxyl anions. Below the pH of neutralization of boric acid, they are proportional to the concentration of borate anions.

  18. Automatic online buffer capacity (alkalinity) measurement of wastewater using an electrochemical cell.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liang; Charles, Wipa; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

    2016-10-01

    The use of an automatic online electrochemical cell (EC) for measuring the buffer capacity of wastewater is presented. pH titration curves of different solutions (NaHCO3, Na2HPO4, real municipal wastewater, and anaerobic digester liquid) were obtained by conventional chemical titration and compared to the online EC measurements. The results show that the pH titration curves from the EC were comparable to that of the conventional chemical titration. The results show a linear relationship between the response of the online EC detection system and the titrimetric partial alkalinity and total alkalinity of all tested samples. This suggests that an EC can be used as a simple online titration device for monitoring the buffer capacity of different industrial processes including wastewater treatment and anaerobic digestion processes.

  19. Biogeochemical processes and buffering capacity concurrently affect acidification in a seasonally hypoxic coastal marine basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagens, M.; Slomp, C. P.; Meysman, F. J. R.; Seitaj, D.; Harlay, J.; Borges, A. V.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2014-11-01

    Coastal areas are impacted by multiple natural and anthropogenic processes and experience stronger pH fluctuations than the open ocean. These variations can weaken or intensify the ocean acidification signal induced by increasing atmospheric pCO2. The development of eutrophication-induced hypoxia intensifies coastal acidification, since the CO2 produced during respiration decreases the buffering capacity of the hypoxic bottom water. To assess the combined ecosystem impacts of acidification and hypoxia, we quantified the seasonal variation in pH and oxygen dynamics in the water column of a seasonally stratified coastal basin (Lake Grevelingen, the Netherlands). Monthly water column chemistry measurements were complemented with estimates of primary production and respiration using O2 light-dark incubations, in addition to sediment-water fluxes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA). The resulting dataset was used to set up a proton budget on a seasonal scale. Temperature-induced seasonal stratification combined with a high community respiration was responsible for the depletion of oxygen in the bottom water in summer. The surface water showed strong seasonal variation in process rates (primary production, CO2 air-sea exchange), but relatively small seasonal pH fluctuations (0.46 units on the total hydrogen ion scale). In contrast, the bottom water showed less seasonality in biogeochemical rates (respiration, sediment-water exchange), but stronger pH fluctuations (0.60 units). This marked difference in pH dynamics could be attributed to a substantial reduction in the acid-base buffering capacity of the hypoxic bottom water in the summer period. Our results highlight the importance of acid-base buffering in the pH dynamics of coastal systems and illustrate the increasing vulnerability of hypoxic, CO2-rich waters to any acidifying process.

  20. Biogeochemical processes and buffering capacity concurrently affect acidification in a seasonally hypoxic coastal marine basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagens, M.; Slomp, C. P.; Meysman, F. J. R.; Seitaj, D.; Harlay, J.; Borges, A. V.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2015-03-01

    Coastal areas are impacted by multiple natural and anthropogenic processes and experience stronger pH fluctuations than the open ocean. These variations can weaken or intensify the ocean acidification signal induced by increasing atmospheric pCO2. The development of eutrophication-induced hypoxia intensifies coastal acidification, since the CO2 produced during respiration decreases the buffering capacity in any hypoxic bottom water. To assess the combined ecosystem impacts of acidification and hypoxia, we quantified the seasonal variation in pH and oxygen dynamics in the water column of a seasonally stratified coastal basin (Lake Grevelingen, the Netherlands). Monthly water-column chemistry measurements were complemented with estimates of primary production and respiration using O2 light-dark incubations, in addition to sediment-water fluxes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA). The resulting data set was used to set up a proton budget on a seasonal scale. Temperature-induced seasonal stratification combined with a high community respiration was responsible for the depletion of oxygen in the bottom water in summer. The surface water showed strong seasonal variation in process rates (primary production, CO2 air-sea exchange), but relatively small seasonal pH fluctuations (0.46 units on the total hydrogen ion scale). In contrast, the bottom water showed less seasonality in biogeochemical rates (respiration, sediment-water exchange), but stronger pH fluctuations (0.60 units). This marked difference in pH dynamics could be attributed to a substantial reduction in the acid-base buffering capacity of the hypoxic bottom water in the summer period. Our results highlight the importance of acid-base buffering in the pH dynamics of coastal systems and illustrate the increasing vulnerability of hypoxic, CO2-rich waters to any acidifying process.

  1. Compiler-Assisted Multiple Instruction Rollback Recovery Using a Read Buffer. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alewine, Neal Jon

    1993-01-01

    Multiple instruction rollback (MIR) is a technique to provide rapid recovery from transient processor failures and was implemented in hardware by researchers and slow in mainframe computers. Hardware-based MIR designs eliminate rollback data hazards by providing data redundancy implemented in hardware. Compiler-based MIR designs were also developed which remove rollback data hazards directly with data flow manipulations, thus eliminating the need for most data redundancy hardware. Compiler-assisted techniques to achieve multiple instruction rollback recovery are addressed. It is observed that data some hazards resulting from instruction rollback can be resolved more efficiently by providing hardware redundancy while others are resolved more efficiently with compiler transformations. A compiler-assisted multiple instruction rollback scheme is developed which combines hardware-implemented data redundancy with compiler-driven hazard removal transformations. Experimental performance evaluations were conducted which indicate improved efficiency over previous hardware-based and compiler-based schemes. Various enhancements to the compiler transformations and to the data redundancy hardware developed for the compiler-assisted MIR scheme are described and evaluated. The final topic deals with the application of compiler-assisted MIR techniques to aid in exception repair and branch repair in a speculative execution architecture.

  2. Recovery of active N-acetyl-D-glucosamine 2-epimerase from inclusion bodies by solubilization with non-denaturing buffers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shih-Chin; Lin, Sung-Chyr

    2012-01-05

    Overexpression of recombinant N-acetyl-D-glucosamine 2-epimerase, one of the key enzymes for the synthesis of N-acetylneuraminic acid, in E. coli led to the formation of protein inclusion bodies. In this study we report the recovery of active epimerase from inclusion bodies by direct solubilization with Tris buffer. At pH 7.0, 25% of the inclusion bodies were solubilized with Tris buffer. The specific activity of the solubilized proteins, 2.08±0.02 U/mg, was similar to that of the native protein, 2.13±0.01 U/mg. The result of circular dichroism spectroscopy analysis indicated that the structure of the solubilized epimerase obtained with pH 7.0 Tris buffer was similar to that of the native epimerase purified from the clarified cell lysate. As expected, the extent of deviation in CD spectra increased with buffer pH. The total enzyme activity recovered by solubilization from inclusion bodies, 170.41±10.06 U/l, was more than 2.5 times higher than that from the clarified cell lysate, 67.32±5.53 U/l. The results reported in this study confirm the hypothesis that the aggregation of proteins into inclusion bodies is reversible and suggest that direct solubilization with non-denaturing buffers is a promising approach for the recovery of active proteins from inclusion bodies, especially for aggregation-prone multisubunit proteins.

  3. Corrosion in low dielectric constant Si-O based thin films: Buffer concentration effects

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, F. W.; Lane, M. W.; Gates, S. M.

    2014-05-15

    Organosilicate glass (OSG) is often used as an interlayer dielectric (ILD) in high performance integrated circuits. OSG is a brittle material and prone to stress-corrosion cracking reminiscent of that observed in bulk glasses. Of particular concern are chemical-mechanical planarization techniques and wet cleans involving solvents commonly encountered in microelectronics fabrication where the organosilicate film is exposed to aqueous environments. Previous work has focused on the effect of pH, surfactant, and peroxide concentration on the subcritical crack growth of these films. However, little or no attention has focused on the effect of the conjugate acid/base concentration in a buffer. Accordingly, this work examines the “strength” of the buffer solution in both acidic and basic environments. The concentration of the buffer components is varied keeping the ratio of acid/base and therefore pH constant. In addition, the pH was varied by altering the acid/base ratio to ascertain any additional effect of pH. Corrosion tests were conducted with double-cantilever beam fracture mechanics specimens and fracture paths were verified with ATR-FTIR. Shifts in the threshold fracture energy, the lowest energy required for bond rupture in the given environment, G{sub TH}, were found to shift to lower values as the concentration of the base in the buffer increased. This effect was found to be much larger than the effect of the hydroxide ion concentration in unbuffered solutions. The results are rationalized in terms of the salient chemical bond breaking process occurring at the crack tip and modeled in terms of the chemical potential of the reactive species.

  4. Corrosion in low dielectric constant Si-O based thin films: Buffer concentration effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, F. W.; Gates, S. M.; Lane, M. W.

    2014-05-01

    Organosilicate glass (OSG) is often used as an interlayer dielectric (ILD) in high performance integrated circuits. OSG is a brittle material and prone to stress-corrosion cracking reminiscent of that observed in bulk glasses. Of particular concern are chemical-mechanical planarization techniques and wet cleans involving solvents commonly encountered in microelectronics fabrication where the organosilicate film is exposed to aqueous environments. Previous work has focused on the effect of pH, surfactant, and peroxide concentration on the subcritical crack growth of these films. However, little or no attention has focused on the effect of the conjugate acid/base concentration in a buffer. Accordingly, this work examines the "strength" of the buffer solution in both acidic and basic environments. The concentration of the buffer components is varied keeping the ratio of acid/base and therefore pH constant. In addition, the pH was varied by altering the acid/base ratio to ascertain any additional effect of pH. Corrosion tests were conducted with double-cantilever beam fracture mechanics specimens and fracture paths were verified with ATR-FTIR. Shifts in the threshold fracture energy, the lowest energy required for bond rupture in the given environment, GTH, were found to shift to lower values as the concentration of the base in the buffer increased. This effect was found to be much larger than the effect of the hydroxide ion concentration in unbuffered solutions. The results are rationalized in terms of the salient chemical bond breaking process occurring at the crack tip and modeled in terms of the chemical potential of the reactive species.

  5. Migration behaviour of discontinuous buffers in capillary electrophoresis during protein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Booker, Christina J; Yeung, Ken K-C

    2012-10-21

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is not only an effective separation technique, but can also serve as a sample preparation tool for enrichment and purification at sub-microliter sample volumes. Our approach is based on the use of a discontinuous buffer system consisting of an acid and a base (acetate and ammonium). Proteins and/or peptides with isoelectric points between the pH values of these two buffers will become stacked at the neutralization reaction boundary (NRB). To understand the mechanism of the NRB formation and the electrophoretic migration of various ions during the enrichment, we performed experiments using myoglobin and mesityl oxide to reveal the ion migration patterns at the buffer junction, and utilized Simul 5 to computer simulate the process. The simulated results closely resembled the experimental data, and together, they effectively revealed the characteristics of the discontinuous buffers. Importantly, the discovery allowed the manipulation of NRB behaviours by controlling the discontinuous buffer composition. To illustrate this, the removal of urea as an unwanted background molecule from the enriched protein sample was achieved based on the acquired information.

  6. Development and evaluation of acid-buffering bioadhesive vaginal tablet for mixed vaginal infections.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohd Aftab; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees; Khan, Zeenat Iqbal; Khar, Roop Krishen; Ali, Mushir

    2007-12-14

    An acid-buffering bioadhesive vaginal tablet was developed for the treatment of genitourinary tract infections. From the bioadhesion experiment and release studies it was found that polycarbophil and sodium carboxymethylcellulose is a good combination for an acid-buffering bioadhesive vaginal tablet. Sodium monocitrate was used as a buffering agent to provide acidic pH (4.4), which is an attribute of a healthy vagina. The effervescent mixture (citric acid and sodium bicarbonate) along with a superdisintegrant (Ac-Di-sol) was used to enhance the swellability of the bioadhesive tablet. The drugs clotrimazole (antifungal) and metronidazole (antiprotozoal as well as an antibacterial) were used in the formulation along with Lactobacillus acidophilus spores to treat mixed vaginal infections. From the ex vivo retention study it was found that the bioadhesive polymers hold the tablet for more than 24 hours inside the vaginal tube. The hardness of the acid-buffering bioadhesive vaginal tablet was optimized, at 4 to 5 kg hardness the swelling was found to be good and the cumulative release profile of the developed tablet was matched with a marketed conventional tablet (Infa-V). The in vitro spreadability of the swelled tablet was comparable to the marketed gel. In the in vitro antimicrobial study it was found that the acid-buffering bioadhesive tablet produces better antimicrobial action than marketed intravaginal drug delivery systems (Infa-V, Candid-V and Canesten 1).

  7. Physiological bicarbonate buffers: stabilisation and use as dissolution media for modified release systems.

    PubMed

    Fadda, Hala M; Merchant, Hamid A; Arafat, Basel T; Basit, Abdul W

    2009-12-01

    Bicarbonate media are reflective of the ionic composition and buffer capacity of small intestinal luminal fluids. Here we investigate methods to stabilise bicarbonate buffers which can be readily applied to USP-II dissolution apparatus. The in vitro drug release behaviour of three enteric coated mesalazine (mesalamine) products is investigated. Asacol 400 mg and Asacol 800 mg (Asacol HD) and the new generation, high dose (1200 mg) delayed and sustained release formulation, Mezavant (Lialda), are compared in pH 7.4 Krebs bicarbonate and phosphate buffers. Bicarbonate stabilisation was achieved by: continuous sparging of the medium with 5% CO(2)(g), application of a layer of liquid paraffin above the medium, or a specially designed in-house seal device that prevents CO(2)(g) loss. Each of the products displayed a delayed onset of drug release in physiological bicarbonate media compared to phosphate buffer. Moreover, Mezavant displayed a zero-order, sustained release profile in phosphate buffer; in bicarbonate media, however, this slow drug release was no longer apparent and a profile similar to that of Asacol 400 mg was observed. These similar release patterns of Asacol 400 mg and Mezavant displayed in bicarbonate media are in agreement with their pharmacokinetic profiles in humans. Bicarbonate media provide a better prediction of the in vivo behaviour of the mesalazine preparations investigated.

  8. Antitumour, antimicrobial and catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles synthesized by different pH propolis extracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatea, Florentina; Teodor, Eugenia Dumitra; Seciu, Ana-Maria; Covaci, Ovidiu Ilie; Mănoiu, Sorin; Lazăr, Veronica; Radu, Gabriel Lucian

    2015-07-01

    The Romanian propolis was extracted in five different media, respectively, in water (pH 6.8), glycine buffer (pH 2.5), acetate buffer (pH 5), phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) and carbonate buffer (pH 9.2). The extracts presented different amounts of flavonoids and phenolic acids, increasing pH leading to higher concentrations of active compounds. Five variants of gold nanoparticles suspensions based on different pH Romanian propolis aqueous extracts were successfully synthesized. The obtained nanoparticles presented dimensions between 20 and 60 nm in dispersion form and around 18 nm in dried form, and different morphologies (spherical, hexagonal, triangular). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy proved the attachment of organic compounds from propolis extracts to the colloidal gold suspensions and X-ray diffraction certified that the suspensions contain metallic gold. The obtained propolis gold nanoparticles do not exhibit any antibacterial or antifungal activity, but presented different catalytic activities and toxicity on tumour cells.

  9. Sustained in vivo activity of recombinant bovine granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rbG-CSF) using HEPES buffer.

    PubMed

    Kasraian, K; Kuzniar, A; Earley, D; Kamicker, B J; Wilson, G; Manion, T; Hong, J; Reiber, C; Canning, P

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a long-acting injectable formulation of bG-CSF for veterinary use. However, in order to achieve sustained in vivo activity it was first necessary to stabilize the protein at the injection site. Preformulation studies, as well as literature, suggest that bG-CSF aggregates at neutral pH ranges (i.e., pH 6-8) and at temperatures of approximately 40 degrees C. Therefore, bG-CSF will not retain its activity for an extended period of time at the injection site. During this study we determined that HEPES buffer has a very significant impact on protein stability as well as on biological performance. Recombinant bovine granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rbG-CSF) was formulated in 1 M HEPES buffer for subcutaneous injection into cows. bG-CSF formulated in 1 M HEPES buffer resulted in sustained in vivo activity of bG-CSF compared to the "control" formulation (control formulation: 5% mannitol, 10 mM acetate buffer, 0.004% tween-80, pH 4). White blood cell (WBC) count was used as a marker to evaluate in vivo activity of the formulation. WBC numbers remained above a threshold value for only 24-30 h for the control formula. However, when bG-CSF was formulated in 1 M HEPES, the WBC remained above threshold for 3 days or 72 h. Formulating bG-CSF in 1 M HEPES at pH 7.5 also resulted in greater solution stability. This was surprising since bG-CSF is intrinsically not stable at neutral pH. The effect of 1 M HEPES on the T(M) (temperature at maximum heat flow on calorimetry scan) of bG-CSF was determined by microcalorimetry. In the absence of 1 M HEPES buffer the T(M) was 48 degrees C (onset approximately 40 degrees C), while bG-CSF formulated in 1 M HEPES buffer has a T(M) of 59 degrees C (onset approximately 50 degrees C). Similar organic buffers, such as MOPS, HEPPS, TES, and tricine, also resulted in improved solution stability as well as in sustained in vivo activity. The dramatic effect of these buffers on stability and biological

  10. Buffer layers on biaxially textured metal substrates

    DOEpatents

    Shoup, Shara S.; Paranthamam, Mariappan; Beach, David B.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Goyal, Amit

    2001-01-01

    A method is disclosed for forming a biaxially textured buffer layer on a biaxially oriented metal substrate by using a sol-gel coating technique followed by pyrolyzing/annealing in a reducing atmosphere. This method is advantageous for providing substrates for depositing electronically active materials thereon.

  11. Body Buffer Zone and Proxemics in Blocking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockwell, John C.; Bahs, Clarence W.

    This paper investigates the effect of personal body buffer zones on compositional arrangements staged by novice directors. Relationships between directors' concepts of personal space and their projection of its dimensions into staging are studied through the use of a variety of proximity measures--distance, area angles of approach, and physical…

  12. Printing without Waiting: Buffers and Spoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Brian

    1989-01-01

    Describes two methods to increase the speed of printing on microcomputers: (1) buffers, which are external storage devices used to temporarily store data bound for the printer; and (2) spoolers, which are software programs used to capture printer output and send it to the computer's memory or to a disk file. (LRW)

  13. Buffer placement improves when topography is considered

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Best Management Practices (BMPs) protect streams by excluding cattle from streambanks and by filtering the run-off flowing from animal heavy use areas like feeding and watering stations. Conservation standards recommend placing buffers and filter strips downslope from heavy use areas, but do not exp...

  14. A Discovery Chemistry Experiment on Buffers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulevich, Suzanne E.; Herrick, Richard S.; Mills, Kenneth V.

    2014-01-01

    The Holy Cross Chemistry Department has designed and implemented an experiment on buffers as part of our Discovery Chemistry curriculum. The pedagogical philosophy of Discovery Chemistry is to make the laboratory the focal point of learning for students in their first two years of undergraduate instruction. We first pose questions in prelaboratory…

  15. Buffering children from marital conflict and dissolution.

    PubMed

    Katz, L F; Gottman, J M

    1997-06-01

    Examined several protective mechanisms that may reduce deleterious correlates of marital conflict and marital dissolution in young children. One set of potential buffers focused on parent-child interaction: parental warmth, parental scaffolding/praise, and inhibition of parental rejection. As a second set of potential buffers, each parent was interviewed about their "meta-emotion philosophy"--that is, their feelings about their own emotions, and their attitudes and responses to their children's anger and sadness. The third set of potential buffers concerned intraindividual characteristics of the child, including the child's intelligence and regulatory physiology (basal vagal tone and vagal suppression). Fifty-six families with a preschool child were studied at two time points: when the children were 5 years old (Time 1) and again when the children were 8 years old (Time 2). At Time 1, naturalistic observations of marital and parent-child interaction were conducted and assessment of child regulatory physiology was obtained through measures of basal vagal tone and suppression of vagal tone. Parents were also interviewed individually about their feelings about their own and their children's emotions, and children's intelligence was assessed. At Time 2, assessment of child outcomes were obtained, including observations of peer interaction, mother ratings of behavior problems and mother and teacher ratings of peer aggression, mother ratings of child physical illness, and measures of achievement. Results indicated that all Time 1 buffering factors protected children in face of marital conflict and dissolution.

  16. Liquid growth hormone: preservatives and buffers.

    PubMed

    Kappelgaard, Anne-Marie; Bojesen, Anders; Skydsgaard, Karsten; Sjögren, Ingrid; Laursen, Torben

    2004-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) treatment is a successful medical therapy for children and adults with GH deficiency as well as for growth retardation due to chronic renal disease, Turner syndrome and in children born small for gestational age. For all of these conditions, treatment is long term and patients receive daily subcutaneous injections of GH for many years. Patient compliance is therefore of critical importance to ensure treatment benefit. One of the major factors influencing compliance is injection pain. Besides the injection device used, pain perception and local tissue reaction following injection are dependent on the preservative used in the formulation and the concentration of GH. Injection pain may also be related to the buffer substance and injection volume. A liquid formulation of GH, Norditropi SimpleXx, has been developed that dispenses with the need for reconstitution before administration. The formulation uses phenol (3 mg/ml) as a preservative (to protect product from microbial degradation or contamination) and histidine as a buffer. Alternative preservatives used in other GH formulations include m-cresol (9 mg/ml) and benzyl alcohol (3-9 mg/ml). Buffering agents include citrate and phosphate. Phenol has been successfully used as a preservative in drug formulations for more than 50 years and is considered a safe and effective agent which complies with strict international requirements for preservatives in drug formulations. In toxicological studies, no or only mild local reactions have been observed following subcutaneous administration of phenol (7.5 mg/ml), m-cresol (3-4 mg/ml) and benzyl alcohol (9 mg/ml). No general toxicity reactions were observed after subcutaneous administration of these agents. Clinical evaluation of the preservatives and buffers used in Norditropin SimpleXx showed that pain perception was similar between formulations containing phenol and benzyl alcohol, whereas m-cresol was associated with more painful injections than benzyl

  17. Iron oxidation in Mops buffer. Effect of EDTA, hydrogen peroxide and FeCl3.

    PubMed

    Tadolini, B

    1987-01-01

    The effect of EDTA and H2O2 on iron autoxidation in Mops buffer depends on the pH of the solution. At acidic pH, EDTA caused the oxidation of a stoichiometric amount of iron. At neutral and alkaline pH, EDTA and H2O2 not only oxidizes a stoichiometric amount of iron but also causes the oxidation of the Fe2+ exceeding the concentration of these compounds. In the presence of EDTA, oxidation of Fe2+ in exceeding the concentration of these compounds has a shorter lag phase and an increased rate compared with that in the absence. The solution develops a yellow colour whose intensity is proportional to the amount of Fe2+ exceeding the concentration of these compounds in solution. When the reaction is conducted in the presence of NBT, formazan formation is greatly reduced compared to the control without EDTA and H2O2. The Fe3+-EDTA complex and Fe3+ affected iron oxidation, development of the yellow colour and NBT reduction in a similar fashion. In all these experimental conditions, iron oxidation is greatly reduced in the presence of mannitol, sorbitol and catalase. In phosphate buffer, EDTA oxidized a stoichiometric amount of iron without affecting free Fe2+ oxidation. Fe3+ has no effect on iron oxidation in this buffer.

  18. Comparison of buffers for extraction of mite allergen der p 1 from dust.

    PubMed

    Prester, Ljerka; Kovačić, Jelena; Macan, Jelena

    2012-09-01

    Der p 1 is the main allergen of house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, which has routinely been detected in residential dust. However, the procedure for extracting Der p 1 from reservoir dust has not been well defined. The aim of this study was to compare Der p 1 mass fractions in dust extracts prepared using the following extraction buffers: phosphate (pH 7.4), borate (pH 8.0), and ammonium bicarbonate (pH 8.0), all with 0.05 % Tween 20. Twenty-eight dust samples were divided into three aliquots and each portion was extracted with one of the three buffers at room temperature. Der p 1 mass fractions were measured in a total of 84 dust extracts using the enzyme immunoassay (range: 0.1 μg g-1 to 7.53 μg g-1). Statistical methods including intraclass correlation showed a high agreement between Der p 1 mass fractions irrespective of the extracting medium. Our results suggest that all three buffers are suitable for the extraction of mite allergens and routine Der p 1 analysis in dust.

  19. Nitrate and Nitrite Determination in Gunshot Residue Samples by Capillary Electrophoresis in Acidic Run Buffer().

    PubMed

    Erol, Özge Ö; Erdoğan, Behice Y; Onar, Atiye N

    2017-03-01

    Simultaneous determination of nitrate and nitrite in gunshot residue has been conducted by capillary electrophoresis using an acidic run buffer (pH 3.5). In previously developed capillary electrophoretic methods, alkaline pH separation buffers were used where nitrite and nitrate possess similar electrophoretic mobility. In this study, the electroosmotic flow has been reversed by using low pH running buffer without any additives. As a result of reversing the electroosmotic flow, very fast analysis has been actualized, well-defined and separated ion peaks emerge in less than 4 min. Besides, the limit of detection was improved by employing large volume sample stacking. Limit of detection values were 6.7 and 4.3 μM for nitrate and nitrite, respectively. In traditional procedure, mechanical agitation is employed for extraction, while in this work the extraction efficiency of ultrasound mixing for 30 min was found sufficient. The proposed method was successfully applied to authentic gunshot residue samples.

  20. Implications of pH manipulation methods for metal toxicity: not all acidic environments are created equal.

    PubMed

    Esbaugh, A J; Mager, E M; Brix, K V; Santore, R; Grosell, M

    2013-04-15

    The toxicity of many metals is impacted by environmental pH, through both competition and complexation by hydroxide and carbonate ions. To establish safe environmental regulation it is important to properly define the relationship between pH and metal toxicity, a process that involves manipulating the pH of test water in the lab. The current study compares the effects of the three most common pH manipulation methods (carbon dioxide, acid-base addition, and chemical buffers) on acute Pb toxicity of a model fish species, Pimephales promelas. Acidification of test water revealed that the Pb and Pb(2+) LC50 values were impacted by the pH manipulation method, with the following order of effects: HClpH was alkalinized using MOPS or NaOH. The different impacts of pH manipulation methods on Pb toxicity are likely due to different physiological stresses resulting from the respective methods; the physiological implications of each method are discussed. The results suggest that when studying the impacts of pH on metal toxicity it is important to properly replicate the ambient conditions of interest as artificial buffering using CO2 environments or organic buffers significantly affects the physiology of the test organisms above and beyond what is expected from pH alone. Thus, using CO2 and organic buffers overestimates the impact of acid pH on Pb toxicity.

  1. Baroreflex buffering and susceptibility to vasoactive drugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Jens; Tank, Jens; Shannon, John R.; Diedrich, Andre; Lipp, Axel; Schroder, Christoph; Arnold, Guy; Sharma, Arya M.; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, David; Luft, Friedrich C.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The overall effect of vasoactive drugs on blood pressure is determined by a combination of the direct effect on vascular tone and an indirect baroreflex-mediated effect, a baroreflex buffering of blood pressure. Differences in baroreflex function affect the responsiveness to vasoactive medications, particularly baroreflex buffering of blood pressure; however, the magnitude is not known. METHODS AND RESULTS: We characterized baroreflex function and responses to vasoactive drugs in patients with idiopathic orthostatic intolerance, patients with essential hypertension, patients with monogenic hypertension and brachydactyly, patients with multiple system atrophy, and control subjects. We used phenylephrine sensitivity during ganglionic blockade as a measure of baroreflex buffering. Phenylephrine (25 microg) increased systolic blood pressure 6+/-1.6 mm Hg in control subjects, 6+/-1.1 mm Hg in orthostatic intolerance patients, 18+/-3.9 mm Hg in patients with essential hypertension, 31+/-3.4 mm Hg in patients with monogenic hypertension, and 25+/-3.4 mm Hg in patients with multiple system atrophy. Similar differences in sensitivities between groups were observed with nitroprusside. The sensitivity to vasoactive drugs was highly correlated with baroreflex buffering function and to a lesser degree with baroreflex control of heart rate. In control subjects, sensitivities to nitroprusside and phenylephrine infusions were correlated with baroreflex heart rate control and sympathetic nerve traffic. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings are consistent with an important effect of baroreflex blood pressure buffering on the sensitivity to vasoactive drugs. They suggest that even moderate changes in baroreflex function may have a substantial effect on the sensitivity to vasoactive medications.

  2. Auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles involves two mechanisms with different pH optima

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleland, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Although rapid auxin-induced growth of coleoptile sections can persist for at least 18 hours, acid-induced growth lasts for a much shorter period of time. Three theories have been proposed to explain this difference in persistence. To distinguish between these theories, the pH dependence for auxin-induced growth of oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptiles has been determined early and late in the elongation process. Coleoptile sections from which the outer epidermis was removed to facilitate buffer entry were incubated, with or without 10 micromolar indoleacetic acid, in 20 millimolar buffers at pH 4.5 to 7.0 to maintain a fixed wall pH. During the first 1 to 2 hours after addition of auxin, elongation occurs by acid-induced extension (i.e. the pH optimum is <5 and the elongation varies inversely with the solution pH). Auxin causes no additional elongation because the buffers prevent further changes in wall pH. After 60 to 90 minutes, a second mechanism of auxin-induced growth, whose pH optimum is 5.5 to 6.0, predominates. It is proposed that rapid growth responses to changes in auxin concentration are mediated by auxin-induced changes in wall pH, whereas the prolonged, steady-state growth rate is controlled by a second, auxin-mediated process whose pH optimum is less acidic.

  3. Regulation of Intracellular pH in Lungs and Other Tissues During Hypercapnia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-03-10

    was observed in terms of "percent pH regula- sumed to equal venous Pco 2. tion." As shown in Fig. 1, the pH of kidney, lung, and Intracellular pH was...buffering. The value, "percent pH 80 Z70regulation" (19), calculated as (Alog HCO3/log Pco 2) - x 100 is also used to quantitate pH regulation. This...42: 2080-2093, 1964. 6. FENN, W. 0. Carbon dioxide and intracellular homeostasis . 19. SCHAEFER, K. E., M. HASSON, AND H. NIEMOELLER. Effect of Ann. NY

  4. Critical evaluation and further development of methods for testing ecotoxicity at multiple pH using Daphnia magna and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata.

    PubMed

    Rendal, Cecilie; Trapp, Stefan; Kusk, Kresten Ole

    2012-08-01

    To meet the requirements of risk assessment legislature regarding the ecotoxicity of ionizing compounds, the present study attempts to establish easy, robust methods for testing ecotoxicity at various pH levels. An overview is given of the buffering methods found in the literature. This is supplemented by a series of experiments where toxicity and ability to stabilize pH of seven common buffering compounds was tested on Daphnia magna and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. We consider a buffer applicable at a given concentration if the pH drift is below 0.2 pH units, and if there are no toxic effects. Twenty-four- and 48-h acute toxicity tests with D. magna were carried on a series of organic buffers with pH monitoring. Based on the experimental results it is possible to give recommendations for buffer concentrations for use in toxicity testing with D. magna at pH levels in the range of pH 6.0-7.8 for 48 h exposure, and pH 6.0-9.5 for 24 h exposure. Forty-eight- and 72-h growth inhibition tests with P. subcapitata were carried out, and recommendations for buffer concentrations at pH 7.5 and 8.0 are made for both 48 and 72 h of exposure.

  5. pH inactivation of phosphofructokinase arrests postmortem glycolysis.

    PubMed

    England, Eric M; Matarneh, Sulaiman K; Scheffler, Tracy L; Wachet, Céline; Gerrard, David E

    2014-12-01

    Fresh meat quality development is influenced by pH decline that results from muscle glycolyzing energy substrates postmortem. The exact reason why glycolysis stops in the presence of residual glycogen remains unclear. We hypothesized that a critical glycolytic enzyme loses activity near the ultimate pH of meat. Porcine longissimus muscle samples were subjected to an in vitro system that mimics postmortem anaerobic metabolism at buffered pH values (7.0, 6.5, 6.0, 5.5 or 5.0). At pH7.0, 6.5, and 6.0, glycogenolysis and glycolysis proceeded normally while pH5.5 stopped lactate formation. Additional experimentation indicated that phosphofructokinase lost activity at pH5.5 while all other glycolytic enzymes remained active. A similar inactivation of phosphofructokinase was observed when using chicken and beef muscle. Elevated temperature hastened pH decline and phosphofructokinase activity loss. Thus, pH inactivates phosphofructokinase and arrests postmortem glycolysis, which may explain the similar ultimate pH across meat of different species.

  6. Cytoplasmic pH and human erythrocyte shape.

    PubMed Central

    Gedde, M M; Davis, D K; Huestis, W H

    1997-01-01

    Altered external pH transforms human erythrocytes from discocytes to stomatocytes (low pH) or echinocytes (high pH). The mechanism of this transformation is unknown. The preceding companion study (Gedde and Huestis) demonstrated that these shape changes are not mediated by changes in membrane potential, as has been reported. The aim of this study was to identify the physiological properties that mediate this shape change. Red cells were placed in a wide range of physiological states by manipulation of buffer pH, chloride concentration, and osmolality. Morphology and four potential predictor properties (cell pH, membrane potential, cell water, and cell chloride concentration) were assayed. Analysis of the data set by stratification and nonlinear multivariate modeling showed that change in neither cell water nor cell chloride altered the morphology of normal pH cells. In contrast, change in cell pH caused shape change in normal-range membrane potential and cell water cells. The results show that change in cytoplasmic pH is both necessary and sufficient for the shape changes of human erythrocytes equilibrated in altered pH environments. PMID:9138569

  7. Lyophilization-induced protein denaturation in phosphate buffer systems: monomeric and tetrameric beta-galactosidase.

    PubMed

    Pikal-Cleland, K A; Carpenter, J F

    2001-09-01

    During freezing in phosphate buffers, selective precipitation of a less soluble buffer component and subsequent pH shifts may induce protein denaturation. Previous reports indicate significantly more inactivation and secondary structural perturbation of monomeric and tetrameric beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) during freeze-thawing in sodium phosphate (NaP) buffer as compared with potassium phosphate (KP) buffer. This observation was attributed to the significant pH shifts (from 7.0 to as low as 3.8) observed during freezing in the NaP buffer (1). In the current study, we investigated the impact of the additional stress of dehydration after freezing on the recovery of active protein on reconstitution and the retention of the native structure in the dried state. Freeze-drying monomeric and tetrameric beta-gal in either NaP or KP buffer resulted in significant secondary structural perturbations, which were greatest for the NaP samples. However, similar recoveries of active monomeric protein were observed after freeze-thawing and freeze-drying, indicating that most dehydration-induced unfolding was reversible on reconstitution of the freeze-dried protein. In contrast, the tetrameric protein was more susceptible to dehydration-induced denaturation as seen by the greater loss in activity after reconstitution of the freeze-dried samples relative to that measured after freeze-thawing. To ensure optimal protein stability during freeze-drying, the protein must be protected from both freezing and dehydration stresses. Although poly(ethylene glycol) and dextran are preferentially excluded solutes and should confer protection during freezing, they were unable to prevent lyophilization-induced denaturation. In addition, Tween did not foster maintenance of native protein during freeze-drying. However, sucrose, which hydrogen bonds to dried protein in the place of lost water, greatly reduced freezing- and drying-induced denaturation, as observed by the high retention of native

  8. Controlled release of acidic drugs in compendial and physiological hydrogen carbonate buffer from polymer blend-coated oral solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Wulff, R; Rappen, G-M; Koziolek, M; Garbacz, G; Leopold, C S

    2015-09-18

    The objective of this study was to investigate the suitability of "Eudragit® RL/Eudragit® L55" (RL/L55) blend coatings for a pH-independent release of acidic drugs. A coating for ketoprofen and naproxen mini tablets was developed showing constant drug release rate under pharmacopeial two-stage test conditions for at least 300 min. To simulate drug release from the mini tablets coated with RL/L55 blends in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, drug release profiles in Hanks buffer pH 6.8 were recorded and compared with drug release profiles in compendial media. RL/L55 blend coatings showed increased drug permeability in Hanks buffer pH 6.8 compared to phosphate buffer pH 6.8 due to its higher ion concentration. However, drug release rates of acidic drugs were lower in Hanks buffer pH 6.8 because of the lower buffer capacity resulting in reduced drug solubility. Further dissolution tests were performed in Hanks buffer using pH sequences simulating the physiological pH conditions in the GI tract. Drug release from mini tablets coated with an RL/L55 blend (8:1) was insensitive to pH changes of the medium within the pH range of 5.8-7.5. It was concluded that coatings of RL/L55 blends show a high potential for application in coated oral drug delivery systems with a special focus on pH-independent release of acidic drugs.

  9. pH transients during salt removal in isoelectric trapping separations: a curse revisited.

    PubMed

    Shave, Evan; Vigh, Gyula

    2007-02-01

    The pH transients that occur during isoelectric trapping separations as a result of the removal of nonampholytic ionic components have been re-examined. Salts containing strong electrolyte anions and cations, both with equal and dissimilar mobilities, have been studied using anodic and cathodic buffering membranes whose pH values were both equidistant and nonequidistant from pH 7. The direction and magnitude of the pH transient (acidic or basic) was found to depend on both the mobilities of the anion and cation (mu(anion)/mu(cation)) and the pH difference between pH 7 and the pH of the buffering membranes (|pH(memb) (anodic) - 7|/|7 - pH(memb) (cathodic)|). When |pH(memb) (anodic) - 7|/|7 - pH(memb) (cathodic)| = 1, mu(anion)/mu(cation)<1 leads to an acidic pH transient, mu(anion)/mu(cation) = 1 eliminates the pH transient and mu(anion)/mu(cation)>1 leads to a basic pH transient. When mu(anion)/mu(cation) = 1, |pH(memb) (anodic) - 7|/|7 - pH(memb) (cathodic)|<1 leads to a basic pH transient, |pH(memb) (anodic) - 7|/|7 - pH(memb) (cathodic)| = 1 eliminates the pH transient and |pH(memb) (anodic) - 7|/|7 - pH(memb) (cathodic)|>1 leads to an acidic pH transient. By selecting appropriate anodic and cathodic buffering membranes to adjust the |pH(memb) (anodic) - 7|/|7 - pH(memb) (cathodic)| value, pH transients caused by dissimilar anion and cation mobilities can be avoided.

  10. Semiautomated pH gradient ion-exchange chromatography of monoclonal antibody charge variants.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Mohammad; Shellie, Robert A; Hilder, Emily F; Lacher, Nathan A; Haddad, Paul R

    2014-10-07

    A new approach using a chromatography system equipped with isocratic pumps and an electrolytic eluent generator (EG) is introduced, replacing external pH gradient delivery using conventional gradient systems, in which bottled buffers with preadjusted pH are mixed using a gradient pump. The EG is capable of generating high purity base or acid required for online preparation of the buffer at the point of use, utilizing deionized water as the only carrier stream. Typically, the buffer was generated from online titration of a reagent composed of low molecular weight amines. The reagent was delivered isocratically into a static mixing tee, where it was titrated to the required pH with electrolytically generated base or acid. The required pH gradient was thus conveniently generated by electrically controlling the concentration of titrant. Also, since the pH was adjusted at the point of use, this approach offered enhanced throughput in terms of eluent preparation time and labor, and with a more reproducible pH profile. The performance of the system was demonstrated by running pH gradients ranging from pH 8.2 to 10.9 on a polymer monolith cation-exchange column for high throughput profiling of charge heterogeneity of intact, basic therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. A high degree of flexibility in modulating the key parameters of the pH gradient, including the buffer concentration, the pH gradient slope and the operating pH range was demonstrated. This enabled fine-tuning of the separation conditions for each individual antibody in order to enhance the chromatographic resolution.

  11. On the Preparation of Buffer Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Bruce M.; Kessick, Michael A.

    1981-01-01

    Presents a method, suitable for use on programmable calculators, which allows calculation of the pH and ionic strength (I) of a mixed solution of salts of an acid or amounts necessary to produce a solution of a particular pH and I. Includes limitations when using the calculations described. (SK)

  12. Interaction of HEPES buffer with glass-ceramic scaffold: Can HEPES replace TRIS in SBF?

    PubMed

    Rohanová, Dana; Horkavcová, Diana; Paidere, Laine; Boccaccini, Aldo Roberto; Bozděchová, Pavlína; Bezdička, Petr

    2016-11-27

    An international standard (ISO: 23317:2014) exists for the in vitro testing of inorganic biomaterials in simulated body fluid (SBF). This standard uses TRIS buffer to maintain neutral pH in SBF, but in our previous paper, we showed that the interaction of a tested glass-ceramic material with TRIS can produce false-positive results. In this study, we evaluated whether the HEPES buffer, which also belongs to the group of Good's buffers, would be more suitable for SBF. We compared its suitability in two media: SBF with HEPES and demineralized water with HEPES. The tested scaffold (45S5 bioactive glass-based) was exposed to the media under a static-dynamic arrangement (solutions were replaced on a daily basis) for 15 days. Leachate samples were collected daily for the analysis of Ca(2+) ions and Si (AAS), (PO4 )(3-) ions (UV-VIS), and to measure pH. The glass-ceramic scaffold was analyzed by SEM/EDS, XRD, and WD-XRF before and after 0.3, 1, 3, 7, 11, and 15 days of exposure. Our results confirmed the rapid selective dissolution of the glass-ceramic crystalline phase (Combeite) containing Ca(2+) ions due to the presence of HEPES, hydroxyapatite supersaturation being reached within 24 h in both solutions. These new results suggest that, like TRIS, HEPES buffer is not suitable for the in vitro testing of highly reactive inorganic biomaterials (glass, glass-ceramics). The ISO standard for such tests requires revision, but HEPES is not a viable alternative to TRIS buffer. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  13. Dopamine-melanin film deposition depends on the used oxidant and buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Bernsmann, Falk; Ball, Vincent; Addiego, Frédéric; Ponche, Arnaud; Michel, Marc; Gracio, José Joaquin de Almeida; Toniazzo, Valérie; Ruch, David

    2011-03-15

    The deposition of "polydopamine" films, from an aqueous solution containing dopamine or other catecholamines, constitutes a new and versatile way to functionalize solid-liquid interfaces. Indeed such films can be deposited on almost all kinds of materials. Their deposition kinetics does not depend markedly on the surface chemistry of the substrate, and the films can reach thickness of a few tens of nanometers in a single reaction step. Up to now, even if a lot is known about the oxidation mechanism of dopamine in solution, only little information is available to describe the deposition mechanism on surfaces either by oxidation in solution or by electrodeposition. The deposition kinetics of melanin was only investigated from dopamine solutions using oxygen or ammonium persulfate as an oxidant and from a tris(hydroxymethyl) aminomethane (Tris) containing buffer solutions at pH 8.5. Many other oxidants could be used, and the buffer agent containing a primary amine group may influence the deposition process. Herein we show that the deposition kinetics of melanin from dopamine containing buffers at pH 8.5 can be markedly modified using Cu(2+) instead of O2 as an oxidant: the deposition kinetics remains linear up to thicknesses of more than 70 nm, whereas the film growth stops at 45 ± 5 nm in the presence of 02. In addition, the films prepared from Cu(2+) containing solutions display an absorption spectrum with defined peaks at 320 and 370 nm, which are absent in the spectra of films prepared in oxygenated solutions. The replacement of Tris buffer by phosphate buffer also has a marked effect on the melanin deposition kinetics.

  14. Colorimetric pH measurement of animal cell culture media.

    PubMed

    Jang, Juno; Moon, Soo-Jin; Hong, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Ik-Hwan

    2010-11-01

    Most animal cell culture media can be buffered using bicarbonate and high pressure CO(2) in a closed system. However, in an open system, the pH of the culture media increases continuously due to the marked difference in CO(2) pressure between the culture media and the atmosphere. Therefore, it is important to measure the exact pH of the culture media in an intact closed system. In this study, a pH measurement method was developed using visible light. The pH was calculated from light absorbance by the cells and by the culture media. This method was successfully applied to both suspension and anchorage-dependent cell cultures.

  15. Spacecraft optical disk recorder memory buffer control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, Robert F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the research completed under the NASA-ASEE summer faculty fellowship program. The project involves development of an Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) to be used as a Memory Buffer Controller (MBC) in the Spacecraft Optical Disk System (SODR). The SODR system has demanding capacity and data rate specifications requiring specialized electronics to meet processing demands. The system is being designed to support Gigabit transfer rates with Terabit storage capability. The complete SODR system is designed to exceed the capability of all existing mass storage systems today. The ASIC development for SODR consist of developing a 144 pin CMOS device to perform format conversion and data buffering. The final simulations of the MBC were completed during this summer's NASA-ASEE fellowship along with design preparations for fabrication to be performed by an ASIC manufacturer.

  16. Simple buffers for 3D STORM microscopy.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Nicolas; Keller, Debora; Rajan, Vinoth Sundar; Gönczy, Pierre; Manley, Suliana

    2013-06-01

    3D STORM is one of the leading methods for super-resolution imaging, with resolution down to 10 nm in the lateral direction, and 30-50 nm in the axial direction. However, there is one important requirement to perform this type of imaging: making dye molecules blink. This usually relies on the utilization of complex buffers, containing different chemicals and sensitive enzymatic systems, limiting the reproducibility of the method. We report here that the commercial mounting medium Vectashield can be used for STORM of Alexa-647, and yields images comparable or superior to those obtained with more complex buffers, especially for 3D imaging. We expect that this advance will promote the versatile utilization of 3D STORM by removing one of its entry barriers, as well as provide a more reproducible way to compare optical setups and data processing algorithms.

  17. Plant Habitat (PH)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onate, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will soon have a platform for conducting fundamental research of Large Plants. Plant Habitat (PH) is designed to be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. PH will control light quality, level, and timing, temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing ethylene. Additional capabilities include leaf temperature and root zone moisture and oxygen sensing. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs. There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations.

  18. Clinical study monitoring the pH on tooth surfaces in patients with and without erosion.

    PubMed

    Lussi, A; von Salis-Marincek, M; Ganss, C; Hellwig, E; Cheaib, Z; Jaeggi, T

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare tooth surface pH after drinking orange juice or water in 39 patients with dental erosion and in 17 controls. The following investigations were carried out: measurement of pH values on selected tooth surfaces after ingestion of orange juice followed by ingestion of water (acid clearance), measurement of salivary flow rate and buffering capacity. Compared with the controls, patients with erosion showed significantly greater decreases in pH after drinking orange juice, and the pH stayed lower for a longer period of time (p < 0.05). Saliva parameters showed no significant differences between the two patient groups except for a lower buffering capacity at pH 5.5 in the erosion group.

  19. Buffered explosions in steel pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    The impulse delivered to the walls of a vessel containing an explosion will increase if material is placed between the walls and the charge. If the impulse application time is small in compared with the eigenperiod of the vessel, the wall stress will increase in direct proportion to the impulse. Conversely, if the application period can be extended beyond half the eigenperiod, the peak stress will be proportional to the ratio of the impulse to the delivery period. With powder or granular buffers, it is possible for the delivery period to increase faster than the impulse as the buffer mass is increased. This is the reason why certain powders, or porous materials, can provide stress reduction even below that observed by evacuating the space between the walls and the explosive. If the buffer material is to serve as an effective mitigator, it must collapse on shock loading to a final density that depends only weakly on pressure; the criterion is that the wave speed in the material that impacts the wall must be small comparison with the impact (particle) speed. This behavior apparently occurs with salt, at least for modest values of the charge parameter, but to a lesser extent with snow under the same conditions. The vermiculite data are comparable to the salt in the charge paramete region where the two overlap; with increasing explosive, however, the vermiculite appears to behave like the snow and its effectiveness as a mitigator rapidly diminishes. It is also clear that once the wave speed criterion is seriously violated, the use of a powder buffer will result in a higher wall stress than if only air filled the space between walls and charge. 5 refs.

  20. Stacking and determination of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid with low pKa in soil via moving reaction boundary formed by alkaline and double acidic buffers in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chong; Yang, Xiao-Di; Fan, Liu-Yin; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Yu-Quan; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2011-04-01

    As shown herein, a normal moving reaction boundary (MRB) formed by an alkaline buffer and a single acidic buffer had poor stacking to the new important plant growth promoter of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) in soil due to the leak induced by its low pK(a). To stack the PCA with low pK(a) efficiently, a novel stacking system of MRB was developed, which was formed by an alkaline buffer and double acidic buffers (viz., acidic sample and blank buffers). With the novel system, the PCA leaking into the blank buffer from the sample buffer could be well stacked by the prolonged MRB formed between the alkaline buffer and blank buffer. The relevant mechanism of stacking was discussed briefly. The stacking system, coupled with sample pretreatment, could achieve a 214-fold increase of PCA sensitivity under the optimal conditions (15 mM (pH 11.5) Gly-NaOH as the alkaline buffer, 15 mM (pH 3.0) Gly-HCl-acetonitrile (20%, v/v) as the acidic sample buffer, 15 mM (pH 3.0) Gly-HCl as the blank buffer, 3 min 13 mbar injection of double acidic buffers, benzoic acid as the internal standard, 75 μm i.d. × 53 cm (44 cm effective length) capillary, 25 kV and 248 nm). The limit of detection of PCA in soil was decreased to 17 ng/g, the intra-day and inter-day precision values (expressed as relative standard deviations) were 3.17-4.24% and 4.17-4.87%, respectively, and the recoveries of PCA at three concentration levels changed from 52.20% to 102.61%. The developed method could be used for the detection of PCA in soil at trace level.

  1. Wintering bird response to fall mowing of herbaceous buffers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blank, P.J.; Parks, J.R.; Dively, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    Herbaceous buffers are strips of herbaceous vegetation planted between working agricultural land and streams or wetlands. Mowing is a common maintenance practice to control woody plants and noxious weeds in herbaceous buffers. Buffers enrolled in Maryland's Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) cannot be mowed during the primary bird nesting season between 15 April and 15 August. Most mowing of buffers in Maryland occurs in late summer or fall, leaving the vegetation short until the following spring. We studied the response of wintering birds to fall mowing of buffers. We mowed one section to 10-15 cm in 13 buffers and kept another section unmowed. Ninety-two percent of birds detected in buffers were grassland or scrub-shrub species, and 98% of all birds detected were in unmowed buffers. Total bird abundance, species richness, and total avian conservation value were significantly greater in unmowed buffers, and Savannah Sparrows (Passerculus sandwichensis), Song Sparrows (Melospiza melodia), and White-throated Sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis) were significantly more abundant in unmowed buffers. Wintering bird use of mowed buffers was less than in unmowed buffers. Leaving herbaceous buffers unmowed through winter will likely provide better habitat for wintering birds. ?? 2011 by the Wilson Ornithological Society.

  2. Phosphate and HEPES buffers potently affect the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of Alzheimer's A{beta} peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, Megan; Tepper, Katharina; Haupt, Caroline; Knuepfer, Uwe; Klement, Karolin; Meinhardt, Jessica; Horn, Uwe; Balbach, Jochen; Faendrich, Marcus

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} Sodium phosphate buffer accelerated A{beta}(1-40) nucleation relative to HEPES. {yields} A{beta}(1-40) fibrils formed in the two buffers show only minor structural differences. {yields} NMR revealed that A{beta}(1-40) histidine residues mediate buffer dependent changes. -- Abstract: The oligomerization of A{beta} peptide into amyloid fibrils is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Due to its biological relevance, phosphate is the most commonly used buffer system for studying the formation of A{beta} and other amyloid fibrils. Investigation into the characteristics and formation of amyloid fibrils frequently relies upon material formed in vitro, predominantly in phosphate buffers. Herein, we examine the effects on the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of A{beta} peptide that occur due solely to the influence of phosphate buffer. We reveal that significant differences in amyloid fibrillation are observed due to fibrillation being initiated in phosphate or HEPES buffer (at physiological pH and temperature). Except for the differing buffer ions, all experimental parameters were kept constant. Fibril formation was assessed using fluorescently monitored kinetic studies, microscopy, X-ray fiber diffraction and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Based on this set up, we herein reveal profound effects on the mechanism and speed of A{beta} fibrillation. The three histidine residues at positions 6, 13 and 14 of A{beta}(1-40) are instrumental in these mechanistic changes. We conclude that buffer plays a more significant role in fibril formation than has been generally acknowledged.

  3. In Vivo Predictive Dissolution: Comparing the Effect of Bicarbonate and Phosphate Buffer on the Dissolution of Weak Acids and Weak Bases.

    PubMed

    Krieg, Brian J; Taghavi, Seyed Mohammad; Amidon, Gordon L; Amidon, Gregory E

    2015-09-01

    Bicarbonate is the main buffer in the small intestine and it is well known that buffer properties such as pKa can affect the dissolution rate of ionizable drugs. However, bicarbonate buffer is complicated to work with experimentally. Finding a suitable substitute for bicarbonate buffer may provide a way to perform more physiologically relevant dissolution tests. The dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs was conducted in bicarbonate and phosphate buffer using rotating disk dissolution methodology. Experimental results were compared with the predicted results using the film model approach of (Mooney K, Mintun M, Himmelstein K, Stella V. 1981. J Pharm Sci 70(1):22-32) based on equilibrium assumptions as well as a model accounting for the slow hydration reaction, CO2 + H2 O → H2 CO3 . Assuming carbonic acid is irreversible in the dehydration direction: CO2 + H2 O ← H2 CO3 , the transport analysis can accurately predict rotating disk dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs in bicarbonate buffer. The predictions show that matching the dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs in phosphate and bicarbonate buffer is possible. The phosphate buffer concentration necessary to match physiologically relevant bicarbonate buffer [e.g., 10.5 mM (HCO3 (-) ), pH = 6.5] is typically in the range of 1-25 mM and is very dependent upon drug solubility and pKa .

  4. pH Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunelli, Bruno; Scagnolari, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The exposition of the pervasive concept of pH, of its foundations and implementation as a meaningful quantitative measurement, in nonspecialist university texts is often not easy to follow because too many of its theoretical and operative underpinnings are neglected. To help the inquiring student we provide a concise introduction to the depth just…

  5. pH optrode

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Langry, Kevin C.

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for forming a long-lasting, stable, pH-sensitive dye-acrylamide copolymer useful as a pH-sensitive material for use in an optrode or other device sensitive to pH. An optrode may be made by mechanically attaching the copolymer to a sensing device such as an optical fiber.

  6. Ph.D. shortage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The late 1990s will see a shortage of Ph.D. graduates, according to the Association of American Universities, Washington, D.C. AAU's new comprehensive study, “The Ph.D. Shortage: The Federal Role,” reports that competition for new Ph.D.s is already intense and can only intensify because demand is greater than supply in both academic and nonacademic markets.Doctoral education plays an increasingly important role in U.S. research and development programs. Students have a pivotal part in doing research and enriching it with new ideas. The AAU report says that graduate students are “major determinants of the creativity and productivity of U.S. academic research, the source of more than 50% of the nation's basic research.’ The market for doctoral education extends beyond the university. In 1985, about 43% of all Ph.D.s employed in this country were working outside higher education; the demand for doctorate recipients in nonacademic sectors continues to grow.

  7. Methyl Bromide Commodity Fumigation Buffer Zone Lookup Tables

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Product labels for methyl bromide used in commodity and structural fumigation include requirements for buffer zones around treated areas. The information on this page will allow you to find the appropriate buffer zone for your planned application.

  8. Monoclonal antibody heterogeneity analysis and deamidation monitoring with high-performance cation-exchange chromatofocusing using simple, two component buffer systems.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xuezhen; Kutzko, Joseph P; Hayes, Michael L; Frey, Douglas D

    2013-03-29

    The use of either a polyampholyte buffer or a simple buffer system for the high-performance cation-exchange chromatofocusing of monoclonal antibodies is demonstrated for the case where the pH gradient is produced entirely inside the column and with no external mixing of buffers. The simple buffer system used was composed of two buffering species, one which becomes adsorbed onto the column packing and one which does not adsorb, together with an adsorbed ion that does not participate in acid-base equilibrium. The method which employs the simple buffer system is capable of producing a gradual pH gradient in the neutral to acidic pH range that can be adjusted by proper selection of the starting and ending pH values for the gradient as well as the buffering species concentration, pKa, and molecular size. By using this approach, variants of representative monoclonal antibodies with isoelectric points of 7.0 or less were separated with high resolution so that the approach can serve as a complementary alternative to isoelectric focusing for characterizing a monoclonal antibody based on differences in the isoelectric points of the variants present. Because the simple buffer system used eliminates the use of polyampholytes, the method is suitable for antibody heterogeneity analysis coupled with mass spectrometry. The method can also be used at the preparative scale to collect highly purified isoelectric variants of an antibody for further study. To illustrate this, a single isoelectric point variant of a monoclonal antibody was collected and used for a stability study under forced deamidation conditions.

  9. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones. (a... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  10. Vegetated buffer management practice to improve surface water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Zhang, X.; Liu, X.

    2007-12-01

    Vegetated buffer best management practices (BMPs) installed in agricultural landscapes have been suggested as promising candidate tactics to reduce erosion and offsite transportation of agrochemicals. A wide range of vegetated buffer management practices have been installed in many areas to reduce agrochemical loss from applied fields, to filter sediments from tailwaters, and to deter their transportation to water bodies. This presentation will focus on reviewing vegetated buffers and their efficacies in reducing agrochemical offsite movements, with a discussion on the major factors influencing BMP efficacy. Percent removal by various BMPs ranged from 16.7 to 100% for sediments, 29 to 98% for nitrogen, 1 to 100% for phosphorus, and 27 to 100% for pesticides, depending on the setting. Preliminary meta-analyses on the data obtained from the literature review showed that vegetated buffers were mostly effective in removing sediment, followed by pesticides and nutrients. BMP efficacy is mainly influenced by buffer width, buffer slope, rainfall and vegetation. As for sediment reduction, the results based on the limited data showed that buffer width and buffer slope are two major factors influencing mitigation efficacy of vegetated buffers. The results also showed that a design with 10-m width and a 9% slope optimizes the sediment trapping capability of vegetated buffers. The meta-analysis results of this study could provide specific recommendations such as buffer width and slope for future vegetated buffer BMP construction to increase soil and water conservation.

  11. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... EXPLORATION AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  12. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... EXPLORATION AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  13. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... EXPLORATION AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  14. The distribution of saliva buffer values in schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Wikner, S; Moum, I

    1986-01-01

    Buffer capacity of stimulated saliva was estimated by Dentobuff in 1596 7-15 years old schoolchildren. 39.7% of the children had a high, 39.9% a low and 20.4% an intermediate buffer capacity. No significant differences between the distributions in different ages were recorded and the mean buffer values did not differ significantly between the age-groups.

  15. Dissolution properties of co-amorphous drug-amino acid formulations in buffer and biorelevant media.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, A T; DeClerck, L; Löbmann, K; Grohganz, H; Rades, T; Laitinen, R

    2015-07-01

    Co-amorphous formulations, particularly binary drug-amino acid mixtures, have been shown to provide enhanced dissolution for poorly-soluble drugs and improved physical stability of the amorphous state. However, to date the dissolution properties (mainly intrinsic dissolution rate) of the co-amorphous formulations have been tested only in buffers and their supersaturation ability remain unexplored. Consequently, dissolution studies in simulated intestinal fluids need to be conducted in order to better evaluate the potential of these systems in increasing the oral bioavailability of biopharmaceutics classification system class II drugs. In this study, solubility and dissolution properties of the co-amorphous simvastatin-lysine, gibenclamide-serine, glibenclamide-threonine and glibenclamide-serine-threonine were studied in phosphate buffer pH 7.2 and biorelevant media (fasted and fed state simulated intestinal fluids (FaSSIF and FeSSIF, respectively)). The co-amorphous formulations were found to provide a long-lasting supersaturation and improve the dissolution of the drugs compared to the crystalline and amorphous drugs alone in buffer. Similar improvement, but in lesser extent, was observed in biorelevant media suggesting that a dissolution advantage observed in aqueous buffers may overestimate the advantage in vivo. However, the results show that, in addition to stability advantage shown earlier, co-amorphous drug-amino acid formulations provide dissolution advantage over crystalline drugs in both aqueous and biorelevant conditions.

  16. Simultaneous determination of phenylethanoid glycosides and aglycones by capillary zone electrophoresis with running buffer modifier.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shuqing; Gao, Ruibin; Yang, Yan; Guo, Mei; Ni, Jingman; Zhao, Liang

    2014-03-15

    Although the separation efficiency of capillary electrophoresis (CE) is much higher than that of other chromatographic methods, it is sometimes difficult to adequately separate the complex ingredients in biological samples. This article describes how one effective and simple way to develop the separation efficiency in CE is to add some modifiers to the running buffer. The suitable running buffer modifier β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) was explored to fast and completely separate four phenylethanoid glycosides and aglycones (homovanillyl alcohol, hydroxytyrosol, 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid, and caffeic acid) in Lamiophlomis rotata (Lr) and Cistanche by capillary zone electrophoresis with ultraviolet (UV) detection. It was found that when β-CD was used as running buffer modifier, a baseline separation of the four analytes could be accomplished in less than 20 min and the detection limits were as low as 10(-3) mg L(-1). Other factors affecting the CE separation, such as working potential, pH value and ionic strength of running buffer, separation voltage, and sample injection time, were investigated extensively. Under the optimal conditions, a successful practical application on the determination of Lr and Cistanche samples confirmed the validity and practicability of this method.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces phosphatidyltris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and derivatives when grown in Tris-buffered medium.

    PubMed

    Abbes, Imen; Rihouey, Christophe; Hardouin, Julie; Dé, Emmanuelle; Jouenne, Thierry; Alexandre, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    For optimal growth of a microorganism, the pH of the culture medium should be set at an optimum value. For that reason, growth media require buffering agents. We show in this study that, when grown in a medium supplemented with tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris), Pseudomonas aeruginosa is able to use this organic compound to produce new phospholipids. We thus pointed out that phosphatidyltris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane as well as diphosphatidyltris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane was detected in membrane lipid extracts of bacteria grown in Tris-buffered medium. Moreover, the amounts of lysoglycerophospholipids in the lipidome of P. aeruginosa grown in Tris-buffered medium increased leading to the presence of lysophosphatidylglycerol and lysophosphatidyltris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane as well as other lysophospholipid derivatives. Finally, we investigated the effect of the presence of these exogenous phospholipids on the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to some antibiotics. We observed a decrease of the minimal inhibitory concentrations of different antibiotic families, i.e., fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, ß-lactams and polymyxins, proving the importance of the buffer choice for growth medium and its impact on the lipidome.

  18. New buffers to improve the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ashraf; Ghasemi, Jahan

    2007-08-01

    Real-time PCR is a potent technique for nucleic acid quantification for research and diagnostic purposes, the wide dynamic range being one of the advantages over other techniques like the microarray. Several additives and enhancers have been studied to expand the PCR dynamic range in order to be more efficient in quantifying low quantities of nucleic acids, increase the yield and improve reaction efficiency. Shown here is that a combination of new buffers with the regularly used Tris buffer makes it possible to expand the real-time PCR dynamic range and to improve the efficiency and correlation coefficient. Mixing HEPES, TEA or MOPS with Tris was more efficient than Tris alone. It was also found that, if the pH value of the Tris buffer was calibrated with phosphoric acid instead of hydrochloric acid, then the dynamic range was significantly improved and low quantities could be detected and quantified more efficiently. Mixing more than one compound with the Tris buffer was also effective for expanding the dynamic range and increasing the efficiency and correlation coefficient in quantitative real-time PCR.

  19. Buffer for a gamma-insensitive optical sensor with gas and a buffer assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kruger, H.W.

    1994-05-10

    A buffer assembly is disclosed for a gamma-insensitive gas avalanche focal plane array operating in the ultra-violet/visible/infrared energy wavelengths and using a photocathode and an avalanche gas located in a gap between an anode and the photocathode. The buffer assembly functions to eliminate chemical compatibility between the gas composition and the materials of the photocathode. The buffer assembly in the described embodiment is composed of two sections, a first section constructed of glass honeycomb under vacuum and a second section defining a thin barrier film or membrane constructed, for example, of Al and Be, which is attached to and supported by the honeycomb. The honeycomb section, in turn, is supported by and adjacent to the photocathode. 7 figures.

  20. Buffer for a gamma-insensitive optical sensor with gas and a buffer assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kruger, Hans W.

    1994-01-01

    A buffer assembly for a gamma-insensitive gas avalanche focal plane array operating in the ultra-violet/visible/infrared energy wavelengths and using a photocathode and an avalanche gas located in a gap between an anode and the photocathode. The buffer assembly functions to eliminate chemical compatibility between the gas composition and the materials of the photocathode. The buffer assembly in the described embodiment is composed of two sections, a first section constructed of glass honeycomb under vacuum and a second section defining a thin barrier film or membrane constructed, for example, of Al and Be, which is attached to and supported by the honeycomb. The honeycomb section, in turn, is supported by and adjacent to the photocathode.

  1. Enhancement of the absorption of CO{sub 2} in alkaline buffer solutions: Joint action of two enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, G.; Chenlo, F.; Pereira, G.; Vazquez, P.

    1999-05-01

    The authors measured the absorption of CO{sub 2} in alkaline 0.5 M/0.5 M sodium carbonate/bicarbonate buffers containing either saccharose and sodium arsenite or saccharose and formaldehyde. Absorption enhancement increased upon increasing the concentration of either of the catalysts, but the joint action of the two was always less than the sum of their individual effects, the difference being a function of the acidities and concentrations of the catalysts and the pH of the carbonate/bicarbonate buffer solution

  2. k(+)-buffer: An Efficient, Memory-Friendly and Dynamic k-buffer Framework.

    PubMed

    Vasilakis, Andreas-Alexandros; Papaioannou, Georgios; Fudos, Ioannis

    2015-06-01

    Depth-sorted fragment determination is fundamental for a host of image-based techniques which simulates complex rendering effects. It is also a challenging task in terms of time and space required when rasterizing scenes with high depth complexity. When low graphics memory requirements are of utmost importance, k-buffer can objectively be considered as the most preferred framework which advantageously ensures the correct depth order on a subset of all generated fragments. Although various alternatives have been introduced to partially or completely alleviate the noticeable quality artifacts produced by the initial k-buffer algorithm in the expense of memory increase or performance downgrade, appropriate tools to automatically and dynamically compute the most suitable value of k are still missing. To this end, we introduce k(+)-buffer, a fast framework that accurately simulates the behavior of k-buffer in a single rendering pass. Two memory-bounded data structures: (i) the max-array and (ii) the max-heap are developed on the GPU to concurrently maintain the k-foremost fragments per pixel by exploring pixel synchronization and fragment culling. Memory-friendly strategies are further introduced to dynamically (a) lessen the wasteful memory allocation of individual pixels with low depth complexity frequencies, (b) minimize the allocated size of k-buffer according to different application goals and hardware limitations via a straightforward depth histogram analysis and (c) manage local GPU cache with a fixed-memory depth-sorting mechanism. Finally, an extensive experimental evaluation is provided demonstrating the advantages of our work over all prior k-buffer variants in terms of memory usage, performance cost and image quality.

  3. Branch target buffer design and optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perleberg, Chris H.; Smith, Alan J.

    1993-01-01

    Consideration is given to two major issues in the design of branch target buffers (BTBs), with the goal of achieving maximum performance for a given number of bits allocated to the BTB design. The first issue is BTB management; the second is what information to keep in the BTB. A number of solutions to these problems are reviewed, and various optimizations in the design of BTBs are discussed. Design target miss ratios for BTBs are developed, making it possible to estimate the performance of BTBs for real workloads.

  4. Spacecraft optical disk recorder memory buffer control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, Robert F.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) for use in the control electronics of the Spacecraft Optical Disk Recorder (SODR). Specifically, this project is to design an extendable memory buffer controller ASIC for rate matching between a system Input/Output port and the SODR's device interface. The aforementioned goal can be partitioned into the following sub-goals: (1) completion of ASIC design and simulation (on-going via ASEE fellowship); (2) ASIC Fabrication (at ASIC manufacturer); and (3) ASIC Testing (NASA/LaRC, Christopher Newport University).

  5. Seasonal buffering of atmospheric pressure on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzurisin, D.; Ingersoll, A. P.

    1975-01-01

    An isothermal reservoir of carbon dioxide in gaseous contact with the Martian atmosphere would reduce the amplitude and advance the phase of global atmospheric pressure fluctuations caused by seasonal growth and decline of polar CO2 frost caps. Adsorbed carbon dioxide in the upper roughly 10 m of Martian regolith is sufficient to buffer the present atmosphere on a seasonal basis. Available observations and related polar cap models do not confirm or refute the operation of such a mechanism. Implications for the amplitude and phase of seasonal pressure fluctuations are subject to direct test by the upcoming Viking mission to Mars.

  6. Lightwave coupler utilizing a tapered buffer layer.

    PubMed

    Kishioka, K

    1988-06-01

    We discuss the performance of a lightwave coupler utilizing a tapered buffer layer. The coupler with a ridge waveguide is fabricated on a glass substrate and high coupling efficiencies of 75% and 50% are measured for the operations of coupling from the waveguide to a light beam and from the laser beam into the waveguide, respectively. Further, experimental results of the rigid connection between the optical fiber and the waveguide are demonstrated. We also describe how the coupler differs from the conventional tapered guiding-layer coupler.

  7. Buffer layers and articles for electronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Paranthaman, Mariappan P.; Aytug, Tolga; Christen, David K.; Feenstra, Roeland; Goyal, Amit

    2004-07-20

    Materials for depositing buffer layers on biaxially textured and untextured metallic and metal oxide substrates for use in the manufacture of superconducting and other electronic articles comprise RMnO.sub.3, R.sub.1-x A.sub.x MnO.sub.3, and combinations thereof; wherein R includes an element selected from the group consisting of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, and Y, and A includes an element selected from the group consisting of Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, and Ra.

  8. Concentrated Flow through a Riparian Buffer: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. B.; Nogues, J. P.; Hutchinson, S. L.

    2005-05-01

    Riparian buffers are often used for in-situ treatment of agricultural runoff. Although the benefits of riparian buffers are well recongized, concentration of flow can restrict the efficiency of contaminant removal. This study evaluates flow concentration at a agricultural site near Manhattan, Kansas. Manual and automated GIS analyses of a high-resolution digital elevation model were used to determine the fraction of runoff contributing to each buffer segment. Subsequent simulation of the system in WEPP (Water Erosion and Prediction Project) demonstrates the extent to which flow concentration affects buffer efficiency. Recommendations are presented for the design of adaptive-width buffers.

  9. Analysis of a hybrid-undirectional buffer strip laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharani, L. R.; Goree, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    A method of analysis capable of predicting accurately the fracture behavior of a unidirectional composite laminate containing symmetrically placed buffer strips is presented. As an example, for a damaged graphite/epoxy laminate, the results demonstrate the manner in which to select the most efficient combination of buffer strip properties necessary to inhibit crack growth. Ultimate failure of the laminate after the arrest can occur under increasing load either by continued crack extension through the buffer strips or the crack can jump the buffer strips. For some typical hybrid materials it is found that a buffer strip spacing to width ratio of about four to one is the most efficient.

  10. Analysis of a hybrid, unidirectional buffer strip laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharani, L. R.; Goree, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    A method of analysis capable of predicting accurately the fracture behavior of a unidirectional composite laminate containing symmetrically placed buffer strips is presented. As an example, for a damaged graphite/epoxy laminate, the results demonstrate the manner in which to select the most efficient combination of buffer strip properties necessary to inhibit crack growth. Ultimate failure of the laminate after crack arrest can occur under increasing load either by continued crack extension through the buffer strips or the crack can jump the buffer strips. For some typical hybrid materials it is found that a buffer strip spacing-to-width ratio of about four to one is the most efficient.

  11. Tuning of the selectivity of fluorescent peptidyl bioprobe using aggregation induced emission for heavy metal ions by buffering agents in 100% aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Lok Nath; Hwang, Gi Won; Lee, Keun-Hyeung

    2017-02-03

    Smart fluorescent probes of which the detection of specific target molecules can be controlled are attracting remarkable interest. A fluorescent peptidyl bioprobe (1) was rationally synthesized by conjugating tetraphenylethylene, an aggregation-induced emission (AIE) fluorophore with a peptide receptor (AspHis) that acted as hard and intermediate bases. The selective detection of 1 for specific metal ion in 100% aqueous solutions was controlled by the buffering agents with the chelate effect without the change of pH. In distilled water and phosphate buffered aqueous solution at neutral pH, 1 exhibited a selective Off-On response to a soft metal ion, Hg(2+) among test metal ions by 100-fold enhancement of the emission at 470nm. 1 showed a selective Off-On response (180-fold enhancement) to a hard metal ion, Al(3+) ions among test metal ions in Tris buffered aqueous solution at neutral pH and Hexamine (hexamethylenetetramine) buffered aqueous solution at acidic pH. The detection limit of 0.46 ppb for Hg(2+) and 2.26 ppb for Al(3+) in each condition was lower than the maximum allowable level of the metal ions in drinking water by EPA. This research helps to understand how buffering agents participate in the complex formation and aggregation of fluorescent probes using an AIE process for the selective detection of specific metal ions in aqueous solutions.

  12. Poly(N-vinylimidazole) gels as insoluble buffers that neutralize acid solutions without dissolving.

    PubMed

    Horta, Arturo; Piérola, Inés F

    2009-04-02

    Typical buffers are solutions containing weak acids or bases. If these groups were anchored to insoluble gels, what would be their behavior? Simple thermodynamics is used to calculate the pH in two-phase systems that contain the weak acid or base fixed to only one of the phases and is absent in the other. The experimental reference of such systems are pH sensitive hydrogels and heterogeneous systems of biological interest. It is predicted that a basic hydrogel immersed in slightly acidic solutions should absorb the acid and leave the external solution exactly neutral (pH 7). This is in accordance with experimental results of cross-linked poly(N-vinylimidazole). The pH 7 cannot be obtained if the system were homogeneous; the confinement of the weak base inside the gel phase is a requisite for this neutral pH in the external solution. The solution inside the gel is regulated to a much higher pH, which has important implications in studies on chemical reactions and physical processes taking place inside a phase insoluble but in contact with a solution.

  13. Specific ion and buffer effects on protein-protein interactions of a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D; Keeling, R; Tracka, M; van der Walle, C F; Uddin, S; Warwicker, J; Curtis, R

    2015-01-05

    Better predictive ability of salt and buffer effects on protein-protein interactions requires separating out contributions due to ionic screening, protein charge neutralization by ion binding, and salting-in(out) behavior. We have carried out a systematic study by measuring protein-protein interactions for a monoclonal antibody over an ionic strength range of 25 to 525 mM at 4 pH values (5, 6.5, 8, and 9) in solutions containing sodium chloride, calcium chloride, sodium sulfate, or sodium thiocyante. The salt ions are chosen so as to represent a range of affinities for protein charged and noncharged groups. The results are compared to effects of various buffers including acetate, citrate, phosphate, histidine, succinate, or tris. In low ionic strength solutions, anion binding affinity is reflected by the ability to reduce protein-protein repulsion, which follows the order thiocyanate > sulfate > chloride. The sulfate specific effect is screened at the same ionic strength required to screen the pH dependence of protein-protein interactions indicating sulfate binding only neutralizes protein charged groups. Thiocyanate specific effects occur over a larger ionic strength range reflecting adsorption to charged and noncharged regions of the protein. The latter leads to salting-in behavior and, at low pH, a nonmonotonic interaction profile with respect to sodium thiocyanate concentration. The effects of thiocyanate can not be rationalized in terms of only neutralizing double layer forces indicating the presence of an additional short-ranged protein-protein attraction at moderate ionic strength. Conversely, buffer specific effects can be explained through a charge neutralization mechanism, where buffers with greater valency are more effective at reducing double layer forces at low pH. Citrate binding at pH 6.5 leads to protein charge inversion and the formation of attractive electrostatic interactions. Throughout the report, we highlight similarities in the measured

  14. A Buffer Management Issue in Designing SSDs for LFSs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaegeuk; Seol, Jinho; Maeng, Seungryoul

    This letter introduces a buffer management issue in designing SSDs for log-structured file systems (LFSs). We implemented a novel trace-driven SSD simulator in SystemC language, and simulated several SSD architectures with the NILFS2 trace. From the results, we give two major considerations related to the buffer management as follows. (1) The write buffer is used as a buffer not a cache, since all write requests are sequential in NILFS2. (2) For better performance, the main architectural factor is the bus bandwidth, but 332MHz is enough. Instead, the read buffer makes a key role in performance improvement while caching data. To enhance SSDs, accordingly, it is an effective way to make efficient read buffer management policies, and one of the examples is tracking the valid data zone in NILFS2, which can increase the data hit ratio in read buffers significantly.

  15. Amelogenin-enamelin association in phosphate buffered saline

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiudong; Fan, Daming; Mattew, Shibi; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2011-01-01

    The structures and interactions among the macromolecules in the enamel extracellular matrix play vital roles in regulating hydroxyapatite crystal nucleation, growth and maturation. We used dynamic light scattering, circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy to investigate association of amelogenin and the 32-kDa enamelin, at physiological pH 7.4, in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Amelogenin (rP148) self-assembly behavior was altered following addition of the 32-kDa enamelin. Dynamic light scattering revealed a trend of decrease in aggregate size in the solution following the addition of enamelin to amelogenin. A blue-shift and intensity increase of the ellipticity minima of rP148 in the circular dichroism spectra, upon the addition of the 32-kDa enamelin, suggest a direct interaction between the two proteins. In the fluorescence spectra, the maximum emission of rP148 was red-shifted from 335 to 341 nm with a marked intensity increase in the presence of enamelin as a result of complexation of the two proteins. In agreement with DLS data, TEM imaging showed that the 32-kDa enamelin dispersed the amelogenin aggregates into oligomeric particles and stabilizing them. Our study provides novel insights into understanding possible cooperation between enamelin and amelogenin in macromolecular co-assembly and in controlling enamel mineral formation. PMID:22243267

  16. Are temperate mature forests buffered from invasive lianas?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavlovic, Noel B.; Leicht-Young, Stacey A.

    2011-01-01

    Mature and old-growth forests are often thought to be buffered against invasive species due to low levels of light and infrequent disturbance. Lianas (woody vines) and other climbing plants are also known to exhibit lower densities in older forests. As part of a larger survey of the lianas of the southern Lake Michigan region in mature and old-growth forests, the level of infestation by invasive lianas was evaluated. The only invasive liana detected in these surveys was Celastrus orbiculatus Thunb. (Celastraceae). Although this species had only attached to trees and reached the canopy in a few instances, it was present in 30% of transects surveyed, mostly as a component of the ground layer. Transects with C. orbiculatus had higher levels of soil potassium and higher liana richness than transects without. In contrast, transects with the native C. scandens had higher pH, sand content, and soil magnesium and lower organic matter compared to transects where it was absent. Celastrus orbiculatus appears to be a generalist liana since it often occurs with native lianas. Celastrus orbiculatus poses a substantial threat to mature forests as it will persist in the understory until a canopy gap or other disturbance provides the light and supports necessary for it to ascend to the canopy and damage tree species. As a result, these forests should be monitored by land managers so that C. orbiculatus eradication can occur while invasions are at low densities and restricted to the ground layer.

  17. 17-4 PH and 15-5 PH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Howard T.

    1995-01-01

    17-4 PH and 15-5 PH are extremely useful and versatile precipitation-hardening stainless steels. Armco 17-4 PH is well suited for the magnetic particle inspection requirements of Aerospace Material Specification. Armco 15-5 PH and 17-4 PH are produced in billet, plate, bar, and wire. Also, 15-5 PH is able to meet the stringent mechanical properties required in the aerospace and nuclear industries. Both products are easy to heat treat and machine, making them very useful in many applications.

  18. Pharmacokinetic study of a new oral buffered acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) formulation in comparison with plain ASA in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Viganò, G; Garagiola, U; Gaspari, F

    1991-01-01

    A single-blind, randomized, crossover pharmacokinetic study was carried out to investigate the bioavailability of a new oral buffered 325 mg acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) formulation (ASPIRINA 03) in comparison with a 325 mg plain tablet. Twelve healthy volunteers of both sexes, aged between 20 and 37 years, received buffered or plain ASA on two separate occasions with a wash-out interval of at least two weeks. ASA and salicylic acid (SA) plasma levels were determined by a chromatographic method. The results showed no difference between the area under concentration time curve (AUC0-infinity) ASA values of both formulations (p = 0.19), and buffered ASA relative bioavailability was 102.49% (= bioequivalence). A significant difference was found between the AUC0-30 min ASA values: 90.5 micrograms. min/ml with buffered and 67.7 micrograms. min/ml with the plain tablet (p less than 0.05). The buffered ASA time of maximum concentration was shorter (28 +/- 8 min) than the plain one (38 +/- 19 min, p less than 0.05). The plasma concentrations and pharmacokinetic parameters of SA were not significantly different after the administration of the two ASA formulations. The plain ASA tablet had a significantly lower (p less than 0.05) dissolution rate than buffered ASA tablet. Moreover, the buffered ASA tablet significantly (p less than 0.01) increased the pH by 0.5 units. In conclusion, the bioavailability of the new oral buffered ASA was equivalent to that of plain ASA, but the plasma concentration peak was reached in a shorter time.

  19. Germination and inactivation of Bacillus coagulans and Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris spores by high hydrostatic pressure treatment in buffer and tomato sauce.

    PubMed

    Vercammen, Anne; Vivijs, Bram; Lurquin, Ine; Michiels, Chris W

    2012-01-16

    Acidothermophilic bacteria like Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris and Bacillus coagulans can cause spoilage of heat-processed acidic foods because they form spores with very high heat resistance and can grow at low pH. The objective of this work was to study the germination and inactivation of A. acidoterrestris and B. coagulans spores by high hydrostatic pressure (HP) treatment at temperatures up to 60°C and both at low and neutral pH. In a first experiment, spores suspended in buffers at pH 4.0, 5.0 and 7.0 were processed for 10min at different pressures (100-800MPa) at 40°C. None of these treatments caused any significant inactivation, except perhaps at 800MPa in pH 4.0 buffer where close to 1 log inactivation of B. coagulans was observed. Spore germination up to about 2 log was observed for both bacteria but occurred mainly in a low pressure window (100-300MPa) for A. acidoterrestris and only in a high pressure window (600-800MPa) for B. coagulans. In addition, low pH suppressed germination in A. acidoterrestris, but stimulated it in B. coagulans. In a second series of experiments, spores were treated in tomato sauce of pH 4.2 and 5.0 at 100 - 800MPa at 25, 40 and 60°C for 10min. At 40°C, results for B. coagulans were similar as in buffer. For A. acidoterrestris, germination levels in tomato sauce were generally higher than in buffer, and showed little difference at low and high pressure. Remarkably, the pH dependence of A. acidoterrestris spore germination was reversed in tomato sauce, with more germination at the lowest pH. Furthermore, HP treatments in the pH 4.2 sauce caused between 1 and 1.5 log inactivation of A. acidoterrestris. Germination of spores in the high pressure window was strongly temperature dependent, whereas germination of A. acidoterrestris in the low pressure window showed little temperature dependence. When HP treatment was conducted at 60°C, most of the germinated spores were also inactivated. For the pH 4.2 tomato sauce, this

  20. Buffering Mechanism of the Atmospheric Oxidation Capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelieveld, J.; Gromov, S.; Pozzer, A.; Taraborrelli, D.

    2015-12-01

    Millions of tons pollutant and greenhouse gases per year are emitted and subsequently removed from the atmosphere through oxidation reactions. The oxidation products are typically more soluble or have a low vapor pressure so that they become subject to deposition processes. The atmospheric oxidation capacity is primarily maintained by hydroxyl (OH) radicals, which initiate reaction chains that can recycle or destroy OH. Key questions are if the oxidation capacity is affected by growing pollution emissions, to what extent it is buffered by OH recycling, and how regions with specific photochemical and pollution characteristics act together through atmospheric transport at a global scale. While previous generations atmospheric chemistry-transport models have discounted OH recycling with schemes that lumped or truncated reaction sequences, we present an approach that does justice to the intricate interactions between reactive carbon, nitrogen and oxygen species. This gives rise to a global buffering mechanism of the oxidation capacity that explains the observed small variability of methane and other gases that are removed by reaction with OH.

  1. Wheat cultivar discrimination by capillary electrophoresis of gliadins in isoelectric buffers.

    PubMed

    Capelli, L; Forlani, F; Perini, F; Guerrieri, N; Cerletti, P; Righetti, P G

    1998-02-01

    A modified method is reported for screening of wheat cultivars: capillary zone electrophoresis of gliadins in isoelectric buffers. Previously published procedures recommended a 100 mM phosphate buffer, supplemented with 0.05% hydroxypropylmethylcellulose and 20% acetonitrile, in uncoated capillaries. Due to the very high conductivity of such a buffer (4.7 mmhos at 25 degrees C) high speed separations (10-12 min analysis time at 800 V/cm) could only be elicited in 20 microm internal diameter (ID) capillaries, at the expense of sensitivity. In the present report, we optimized the background electrolyte as follows: 40 mM aspartic acid (pH=pI=2.77) in the presence of 7 M urea and 0.5% short-chain hydroxyethylcellulose (Mn 27000 Da; apparent pH 3.9 in 7 M urea). As an alternative recipe, the same isoelectric buffer can be supplemented with a mixed organic solvent composed of 4 M urea and 20% acetonitrile (apparent pH 3.66). Due to the much lower conductivity (0.7 mmhos), separations can be carried out at 1000 V/cm in only 10 min, but in larger bore capillaries (50 microm ID), ensuring a five-times higher sensitivity. The gliadin patterns thus obtained are species-specific and allow easy identification of all cultivars tested of both durum and bread wheat. No adsorption of proteins to the silica wall seems to occur and high reproducibility in peak areas and transit times is obtained.

  2. Evaluation of different buffers on plasmid DNA encapsulation into PLGA microparticles.

    PubMed

    Tse, Man Tsuey; Blatchford, Chris; Oya Alpar, H

    2009-03-31

    Double emulsion solvent evaporation is a widely used method to prepare poly(dl-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microparticles encapsulating plasmid DNA. There are inherent problems associated with preparing plasmid DNA in this form, in particular the DNA is liable to degrade during manufacture and the resulting powder has low encapsulation efficiencies. This study compares the use of two buffers, 0.1M NaHCO(3) and 0.07M Na(2)HPO(4) and the effect these have on the encapsulation efficiency and other critical parameters associated with these encapsulated DNA materials. Both buffers preserved the conformation of the original plasmid DNA during the homogenization process, but those made with 0.07M Na(2)HPO(4) had higher encapsulation efficiencies, as well as smaller diameters, compared with those made with 0.1M NaHCO(3) (encapsulation efficiencies of 40.72-45.65%, and mean volume diameters of 2.96-4.45microm). Buffers with a range of pH from 5 to 12 were investigated, and it was demonstrated that pH 9 was the point at which the highest amount of supercoiled DNA was balanced with the highest encapsulation efficiency. To simulate in vitro release, it was shown that microparticles made with 0.07M Na(2)HPO(4) had lower DNA release rates than those made with 0.1M NaHCO(3). These results demonstrate that the use of different buffers can aid in retaining the conformation of plasmid DNA, and can also modulate the amount of DNA encapsulated and the release profiles of microparticles.

  3. The pH of Enceladus' ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glein, Christopher R.; Baross, John A.; Waite, J. Hunter

    2015-08-01

    Saturn's moon, Enceladus, is a geologically active waterworld. The prevailing paradigm is that there is a subsurface ocean that erupts to the surface, which leads to the formation of a plume of vapor and ice above the south polar region. The chemistry of the ocean is just beginning to be understood, but is of profound geochemical and astrobiological interest. Here, we determine the pH of the ocean using a thermodynamic model of carbonate speciation. Observational data from the Cassini spacecraft are used to make a chemical model of ocean water on Enceladus. The model suggests that Enceladus' ocean is a Na-Cl-CO3 solution with an alkaline pH of ∼11-12. The dominance of aqueous NaCl is a feature that Enceladus' ocean shares with terrestrial seawater, but the ubiquity of dissolved Na2CO3 suggests that soda lakes are more analogous to the Enceladus ocean. The high pH implies that the hydroxide ion should be relatively abundant, while divalent metals should be present at low concentrations owing to buffering by carbonates and phyllosilicates on the ocean floor. Carboxyl groups in dissolved organic species would be negatively charged, while amino groups would exist predominately in the neutral form. Knowledge of the pH improves our understanding of geochemical processes in Enceladus' ocean. The high pH is interpreted to be a key consequence of serpentinization of chondritic rock, as predicted by prior geochemical reaction path models; although degassing of CO2 from the ocean may also play a role depending on the efficiency of mixing processes in the ocean. Serpentinization leads to the generation of H2, a geochemical fuel that can support both abiotic and biological synthesis of organic molecules such as those that have been detected in Enceladus' plume. Serpentinization and H2 generation should have occurred on Enceladus, like on the parent bodies of aqueously altered meteorites; but it is unknown whether these critical processes are still taking place, or if

  4. Vegetative buffer strips for reducing herbicide transport in runoff: effects of season, vegetation, and buffer width

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of vegetative buffer strip (VBS) width, vegetation, and season of the year on herbicide transport in runoff has not been well documented for runoff prone soils. A multi-year replicated plot-scale study was conducted on an eroded claypan soil with the following objectives: 1) assess the ef...

  5. Buffer allocation in an ATM switch with output buffer and speed constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anil K.; Georganas, N. D.

    A synchronous nonblocking N times N switch for asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) networks or high speed packet switching networks transporting fixed length packets called cells is considered. Such a switch with output queuing achieves the optimal performance, however it requires the switch fabric to work at the speed of N. In practice the switch may operate L times faster than the input/output trunk. It is assumed that queues at each output port have a limited buffer space and whenever an output queue is full, the back-pressure is applied and the packets are retained at the head of the input queues. The upper bound on the packet loss probability at the input queues in such a switch are computed. To achieve a given packet loss rate, the switch with L equals 2 requires almost the same amount of input and output buffers as with L equals 4 up to 70 percent input load, but as the load increases beyond 70 percent the switch with L equals 4 would require more output buffers and less input buffers in comparison with a switch operating at L equals 2. The performance of a switch with L equals 3 is very similar to that for L equals 4 and is not considered.

  6. In vitro fertilization (IVF) of mouse ova in HEPES-buffered culture media.

    PubMed

    Behr, B R; Stratton, C J; Foote, W D; Knutzen, V; Sher, G

    1990-02-01

    Some major drawbacks of a bicarbonate-buffered culture medium include the requirement of an elaborate incubator system able to maintain a 5% CO2 environment and the inability of the culture medium to maintain a physiological pH range (pH 7.3-7.4) in room air (0.03% CO2). This work resulted in the development of IVF culture media, BB (modified T6) and Hams-HEPES, which use HEPES-buffered systems not requiring the specialized CO2 environment to maintain a physiological pH range in room air. These media generate above-average cleavage rates in in vitro fertilized, superovulated B6CBAF1 mice ova. The effect of heparin and HEPES on cleavage was studied and neither had a significant effect at the concentrations used. Cleavage rates of nonfertilized ova (parthenogenic division) were 9 to 13%. There was no significant difference in parthenogenesis between any of the culture media and it appears to be a function of the strain of mice and the timing between human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) injection and ovum collection. These results emphasize the need to account for parthenogenesis when determining cleavage rates of in vitro fertilized mouse ova. Also, the results suggest that because of individual mouse differences in cleavage rates, it is important to use an adequate number of mice per group to determine an accurate, average cleavage rate.

  7. Acidic pH of the lateral intercellular spaces of MDCK cells cultured on permeable supports.

    PubMed

    Chatton, J Y; Spring, K R

    1994-06-01

    The pH of the lateral intercellular space (LIS) of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell monolayers grown on permeable supports was investigated by microspectrofluorimetry using BCECF (2',7'-bis(carboxyethyl)-5,6-carboxyfluorescein). The permeability of the support was selectively reduced by growing Zn-Al-silicate crystals inside its pores. The diffusion of BCECF across the filter was sufficiently retarded to allow measurements of fluorescence in the LIS. The LIS pH and intracellular pH of the cells surrounding them were determined in HEPES-buffered solutions. When the perfusate pH was 7.4, the LIS pH was more acidic (7.06 +/- 0.02) and equaled the cytoplasmic pH (7.08 +/- 0.05). When perfusate was changed to pH 7.0 or 7.8, the LIS changed linearly by about half the magnitude of the perfusate pH. Intracellular pH followed LIS pH variations between perfusate pH 7.0 and 7.4 but was significantly higher when perfusate pH was 7.8. Tight junctional H+ permeability was undetectably low. The low steady-state pH in the LIS was not altered by inhibitors of acid transport or low temperature. Rapid perturbations of pH in the LIS showed that protons were not immobilized in the LIS. The acidic microenvironment within the LIS may be the result of buffering by the cell surface proteins.

  8. Organic acids make Escherichia coli more resistant to pulsed electric fields at acid pH.

    PubMed

    Somolinos, M; García, D; Mañas, P; Condón, S; Pagán, R

    2010-01-01

    Stationary growth phase cells of Escherichiacoli were more pulsed electric fields (PEF) resistant in citrate-phosphate McIlvaine buffer at pH 4.0 than at pH 7.0. The greater PEF resistance was also confirmed in fruit juices of similar acid pH. In this work we studied whether the higher PEF resistance of E. coli at acid pH was due to the low pH itself or to the interaction of the components of the treatment medium with the cells. The protective effect on E. coli cells was due to the presence of organic acids such as citric, acetic, lactic or malic at pH 4.0. The protective effect of citric acid at pH 4.0 depended on its concentration. A linear relationship was observed between the Log(10) of the citric acid concentration and the degree of inactivation. Organic acids contained in laboratory treatment media (citrate-phosphate buffer) or in fruit juices did not sensitize E. coli cells to PEF but, on the contrary, they induced a protective effect that made E. coli cells more resistant at pH 4.0 than at neutral pH. This work could be useful for improving food preservation by PEF technology and it contributes to the knowledge of the mechanism of microbial inactivation by PEF.

  9. Modelling inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes by pulsed electric fields in media of different pH.

    PubMed

    Gómez, N; García, D; Alvarez, I; Condón, S; Raso, J

    2005-08-25

    A study of the effect of square-wave pulsed electric fields (PEF) on the inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes in McIlvaine buffer of different pH (3.5-7.0) was conducted. L. monocytoges was more PEF sensitive at higher electric field strengths (E) and in media of low pH. A treatment at 28 kV/cm for 400 mus that inactivated 1.5, 2.3 and 3.0 Log10 cycles at pH 7.0, 6.5 and 5.0 respectively destroyed almost 6.0 Log10 cycles at pH 3.5. The general shape of survival curves of L. monocytogenes PEF treated at different pH was convex/concave upwards. A mathematical model based on the Weibull distribution accurately described these survival curves. At each pH, the shape parameter (n value) did not depend on E. The relationship between n value of the Weibull model and the pH of the treatment medium was described by the Gompertz equation. A multiple linear regression model using three predictor variables (E, E2, pH2) related the Log10 of the scale paramenter (b value) of the Weibull model with E and pH of the treatment medium. A tertiary model developed using McIlvaine buffer as treatment medium predicted satisfactorily the inactivation of L. monocytogenes in apple juice.

  10. Treatment of columnaris disease of rainbow trout: low pH and salt as possible tools?

    PubMed

    Suomalainen, L R; Tiirola, M; Valtonen, E T

    2005-06-01

    The impact of salt and low pH on columnaris disease of fish was studied. Survival of Flavobacterium columnare after exposure to either 4% NaCl (pH 7.2) or pH 5.0, pH 4.86 or pH 4.6 for 15 min or 1 h was studied in vitro. All conditions significantly reduced the numbers of viable bacterial cells. The effects of salt (4 and 2%) and acidic baths (pH 4.6) were studied in 2 experiments in vivo with rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss infected with F. columnare. Both salt and acidic baths failed to prevent fish mortality; the overall mortality reached 100% in all groups. However, according to survival analysis, the mortality rate was lower in fish treated with 4% salt baths compared to a control group. The buffering capacity of fish skin mucus against low water pH was also studied. Fish skin mucus was an efficient buffer against decreased water pH and the pH of the skin could be remarkably higher than that of the mucus. This may explain the failure of bath treatments to prevent mortality providing that attached F. columnare are located below the mucus surface. We suggest, however, that salt and acidic bath treatments can be used to disinfect water containing F. columnare cells shed by infected fish and thus prevent the transmission of the disease.

  11. Roles of charge interactions on astringency of whey proteins at low pH.

    PubMed

    Vardhanabhuti, B; Kelly, M A; Luck, P J; Drake, M A; Foegeding, E A

    2010-05-01

    Whey proteins are a major ingredient in sports drink and functional beverages. At low pH, whey proteins are astringent, which may be undesirable in some applications. Understanding the astringency mechanism of whey proteins at low pH could lead to developing ways to minimize the astringency. This study compared the astringency of beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) at low pH with phosphate buffer controls having the same amount of phosphate and at similar pH. Results showed that beta-LG samples were more astringent than phosphate buffers, indicating that astringency was not caused by acid alone and that proteins contribute to astringency. When comparing among various whey protein isolates (WPI) and lactoferrin at pH 3.5, 4.5, and 7.0, lactoferrin was astringent at pH 7.0 where no acid was added. In contrast, astringency of all WPI decreased at pH 7.0. This can be explained by lactoferrin remaining positively charged at pH 7.0 and able to interact with negatively charged saliva proteins, whereas the negatively charged WPI would not interact. Charge interactions were further supported by beta-LG or lactoferrin and salivary proteins precipitating when mixed at conditions where beta-LG, lactoferrin, or saliva themselves did not precipitate. It can be concluded that interactions between positively charged whey proteins and salivary proteins play a role in astringency of proteins at low pH.

  12. The chemistry, physiology and pathology of pH in cancer.

    PubMed

    Swietach, Pawel; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D; Harris, Adrian L; Hulikova, Alzbeta

    2014-03-19

    Cell survival is conditional on the maintenance of a favourable acid-base balance (pH). Owing to intensive respiratory CO2 and lactic acid production, cancer cells are exposed continuously to large acid-base fluxes, which would disturb pH if uncorrected. The large cellular reservoir of H(+)-binding sites can buffer pH changes but, on its own, is inadequate to regulate intracellular pH. To stabilize intracellular pH at a favourable level, cells control trans-membrane traffic of H(+)-ions (or their chemical equivalents, e.g. ) using specialized transporter proteins sensitive to pH. In poorly perfused tumours, additional diffusion-reaction mechanisms, involving carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzymes, fine-tune control extracellular pH. The ability of H(+)-ions to change the ionization state of proteins underlies the exquisite pH sensitivity of cellular behaviour, including key processes in cancer formation and metastasis (proliferation, cell cycle, transformation, migration). Elevated metabolism, weakened cell-to-capillary diffusive coupling, and adaptations involving H(+)/H(+)-equivalent transporters and extracellular-facing CAs give cancer cells the means to manipulate micro-environmental acidity, a cancer hallmark. Through genetic instability, the cellular apparatus for regulating and sensing pH is able to adapt to extracellular acidity, driving disease progression. The therapeutic potential of disturbing this sequence by targeting H(+)/H(+)-equivalent transporters, buffering or CAs is being investigated, using monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule inhibitors.

  13. Generalised expressions for the response of pH to changes in ocean chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagens, Mathilde; Middelburg, Jack J.

    2016-08-01

    The extent to which oceans are capable of buffering chemical changes resulting from the uptake of carbon dioxide (CO2) or other acidifying processes can be quantified using buffer factors. Here, we present general expressions describing the sensitivity of pH and concentrations of CO2 and other acid-base species to a change in ocean chemistry. These expressions can include as many acid-base systems as desirable, making them suitable for application to, e.g., upwelling regions or nutrient-rich coastal waters. We show that these expressions are fully consistent with previously derived expressions for the Revelle factor and other buffer factors, which only included the carbonate and borate acid-base systems, and provide more accurate values. We apply our general expressions to contemporary global ocean surface water and possible changes therein by the end of the 21st century. These results show that most sensitivities describing a change in pH are of greater magnitude in a warmer, high-CO2 ocean, indicating a decreased seawater buffering capacity. This trend is driven by the increase in CO2 and slightly moderated by the warming. Respiration-derived carbon dioxide may amplify or attenuate ocean acidification due to rising atmospheric CO2, depending on their relative importance. Our work highlights that, to gain further insight into current and future pH dynamics, it is crucial to properly quantify the various concurrently acting buffering mechanisms.

  14. Importance of pH homeostasis in metabolic health and diseases: crucial role of membrane proton transport.

    PubMed

    Aoi, Wataru; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Protons dissociated from organic acids in cells are partly buffered. If not, they are transported to the extracellular fluid through the plasma membrane and buffered in circulation or excreted in urine and expiration gas. Several transporters including monocarboxylate transporters and Na(+)/H(+) exchanger play an important role in uptake and output of protons across plasma membranes in cells of metabolic tissues including skeletal muscle and the liver. They also contribute to maintenance of the physiological pH of body fluid. Therefore, impairment of these transporters causes dysfunction of cells, diseases, and a decrease in physical performance associated with abnormal pH. Additionally, it is known that fluid pH in the interstitial space of metabolic tissues is easily changed due to little pH buffering capacitance in interstitial fluids and a reduction in the interstitial fluid pH may mediate the onset of insulin resistance unlike blood containing pH buffers such as Hb (hemoglobin) and albumin. In contrast, habitual exercise and dietary intervention regulate expression/activity of transporters and maintain body fluid pH, which could partly explain the positive effect of healthy lifestyle on disease prognosis.

  15. Damage tolerance of woven graphite-epoxy buffer strip panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, John M.

    1990-01-01

    Graphite-epoxy panels with S glass buffer strips were tested in tension and shear to measure their residual strengths with crack-like damage. The buffer strips were regularly spaced narrow strips of continuous S glass. Panels were made with a uniweave graphite cloth where the S glass buffer material was woven directly into the cloth. Panels were made with different width and thickness buffer strips. The panels were loaded to failure while remote strain, strain at the end of the slit, and crack opening displacement were monitoring. The notched region and nearby buffer strips were radiographed periodically to reveal crack growth and damage. Except for panels with short slits, the buffer strips arrested the propagating crack. The strength (or failing strain) of the panels was significantly higher than the strength of all-graphite panels with the same length slit. Panels with wide, thick buffer strips were stronger than panels with thin, narrow buffer strips. A shear-lag model predicted the failing strength of tension panels with wide buffer strips accurately, but over-estimated the strength of the shear panels and the tension panels with narrow buffer strips.

  16. Multiple cytosolic calcium buffers in posterior pituitary nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Shane M; Chang, Che-Wei; Jackson, Meyer B

    2016-03-01

    Cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers bind to a large fraction of Ca(2+) as it enters a cell, shaping Ca(2+) signals both spatially and temporally. In this way, cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers regulate excitation-secretion coupling and short-term plasticity of release. The posterior pituitary is composed of peptidergic nerve terminals, which release oxytocin and vasopressin in response to Ca(2+) entry. Secretion of these hormones exhibits a complex dependence on the frequency and pattern of electrical activity, and the role of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers in controlling pituitary Ca(2+) signaling is poorly understood. Here, cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers were studied with two-photon imaging in patch-clamped nerve terminals of the rat posterior pituitary. Fluorescence of the Ca(2+) indicator fluo-8 revealed stepwise increases in free Ca(2+) after a series of brief depolarizing pulses in rapid succession. These Ca(2+) increments grew larger as free Ca(2+) rose to saturate the cytosolic buffers and reduce the availability of Ca(2+) binding sites. These titration data revealed two endogenous buffers. All nerve terminals contained a buffer with a Kd of 1.5-4.7 µM, and approximately half contained an additional higher-affinity buffer with a Kd of 340 nM. Western blots identified calretinin and calbindin D28K in the posterior pituitary, and their in vitro binding properties correspond well with our fluorometric analysis. The high-affinity buffer washed out, but at a rate much slower than expected from diffusion; washout of the low-affinity buffer could not be detected. This work has revealed the functional impact of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers in situ in nerve terminals at a new level of detail. The saturation of these cytosolic buffers will amplify Ca(2+) signals and may contribute to use-dependent facilitation of release. A difference in the buffer compositions of oxytocin and vasopressin nerve terminals could contribute to the differences in release plasticity of these two hormones.

  17. Augmentation of bacterial homeostasis by regulating in situ buffer capacity: Significance of total dissolved salts over acidogenic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Venkata Mohan, S; Srikanth, S; Nikhil, G N

    2017-02-01

    During anaerobic fermentation, consequent accumulation of acidic fermented products leads to the failure of pH homeostasis. The present study aimed to comprehend the changes in buffering capacity with addition of sodium salts of hydroxide, bicarbonate and phosphate. The results showed notable augmentation in buffer capacity and cumulative hydrogen production (CHP) compared to control. The influential factor is the amount of undissociated volatile fatty acids released that affected the cell metabolism and consequently biohydrogen generation. It is inferred that among the tested salts, sodium bicarbonate has substantial buffering capacity (β, 0.035± mol) ensuing maximum CHP (468± mL). Besides, bioelectrochemical analysis revealed variations in redox currents that aligned with biohydrogen production. The study provides valuable information on the role of inorganic dissolved salts that would be required to regulate H2 generation and acidogenesis in the aspects of acid-gas phase system.

  18. A continuous-flow method for the determination of the activity of serum alkaline phosphatase in diethanolamine buffer.

    PubMed

    Viitala, A J; Jokela, H A; Penttilä, I M; Nummi, S

    1975-05-01

    A procedure for determination of serum alkaline phosphatase activity (EC 3.1.3.1) in diethanolamine (DEA) buffer with an AutoAnalyzer II apparatus was designed. The buffer used was 1.0 mol/l DEA-HC buffer, pH 9.8 at 37 degree C, containing 0.5 mmol/l of MgCl2 and 10 mmol/l of substrate 4-nitrophenyl-phosphate. The reaction time was about 3 min at 37 degree C. The enzyme activity (U/l) was calculated by determining the amount of 4-nitrophenol formed in reaction. A sampling rate of 70 samples per hour can be used with good linearity up to 1000 U/l. The results obtained by the new continuous-flow system were compared with those measured by the kinetic method according to the Scandinavian recommendation (10). A close correlation between the two methods was observed.

  19. Evaluation of alternatives for human lysozyme purification from transgenic rice: impact of phytic acid and buffer.

    PubMed

    Wilken, Lisa R; Nikolov, Zivko L

    2010-01-01

    Producing economically competitive recombinant human lysozyme from transgenic rice demands an inexpensive purification process for nonpharmaceutical applications. Human lysozyme is a basic protein, and thus, cation exchange chromatography was the selected method for lysozyme purification. Similar to other protein production systems, the identification of critical impurities in the rice extract was important for the development of an efficient purification process. Previous adsorption data indicated that phytic acid was probably responsible for an unacceptably low cation exchange adsorption capacity. In this study, we confirm that reducing phytic acid concentration improves lysozyme binding capacity and investigate alternative process conditions that reduce phytic acid interference. Compared with the previous best process, the adsorption capacity of human lysozyme was increased from 8.6 to 19.7 mg/mL when rice extract was treated with phytase to degrade phytic acid. Using tris buffer to adjust pH 4.5 extract to pH 6 before adsorption reduced phytic acid interference by minimizing phytic acid-lysozyme interactions, eliminated the need for phytase treatment, and increased the binding capacity to 25 mg/mL. Another method of reducing phytic acid concentration was to extract human lysozyme from rice flour at pH 10 with 50 mM NaCl in 50 mM sodium carbonate buffer. A similar binding capacity (25.5 mg/mL) was achieved from pH 10 extract that was clarified by acidic precipitation and adjusted to pH 6 for adsorption. Lysozyme purities ranged from 95 to 98% for all three processing methods. The tris-mediated purification was the most efficient of the alternatives considered.

  20. Microscopic optical buffering in a harmonic potential

    PubMed Central

    Sumetsky, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the early days of quantum mechanics, Schrödinger noticed that oscillations of a wave packet in a one-dimensional harmonic potential well are periodic and, in contrast to those in anharmonic potential wells, do not experience distortion over time. This original idea did not find applications up to now since an exact one-dimensional harmonic resonator does not exist in nature and has not been created artificially. However, an optical pulse propagating in a bottle microresonator (a dielectric cylinder with a nanoscale-high bump of the effective radius) can exactly imitate a quantum wave packet in the harmonic potential. Here, we propose a tuneable microresonator that can trap an optical pulse completely, hold it as long as the material losses permit, and release it without distortion. This result suggests the solution of the long standing problem of creating a microscopic optical buffer, the key element of the future optical signal processing devices. PMID:26689546

  1. Surface Treatments of Nb by Buffered Electropolishing

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Andy T.; Rimmer, Robert A.; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Manus, Robert L.; Reece, Charles E.; Williams, J. S.; Eozénou, F.; Jin, S.; Wang, E.

    2009-11-01

    Buffered electropolishing (BEP) is a Nb surface treatment technique developed at Jefferson Lab1. Experimental results obtained from flat Nb samples show2-4 that BEP can produce a surface finish much smoother than that produced by the conventional electropolishing (EP), while Nb removal rate can be as high as 4.67 μm/min. This new technique has been applied to the treatments of Nb SRF single cell cavity employing a vertical polishing system5 constructed at JLab as well as a horizontal polishing system at CEA Saclay. Preliminary results show that the accelerating gradient can reach 32 MV/m for a large grain cavity and 26.7 MV/m for a regular grain cavity. In this presentation, the latest progresses from the international collaboration between Peking University, CEA Saclay, and JLab on BEP will be summarized.

  2. Biofiltration with bicarbonate as dialysate buffer.

    PubMed

    Rizzelli, S; Alfonso, L; Corlianò, C; Patruno, P; Sozzo, E; Mastrangelo, F

    1986-12-01

    The biofiltration with bicarbonate as dialysate buffer (BiBF) was used in 10 patients on RDT: the patients were treated for 10 months on standard BF and for 10 months on BiBF. The amount of fluid infused varied between 3 and 5 liters and Na-bicarbonate (100 mEq/h) was infused during BF. The dialytic protocol was 3 hours every other day. Cardiovascular stability, waste molecules and acid-base balance were investigated. No differences in vascular stability and no significant changes in the waste-molecules concentrations were found. Both protocols correct the metabolic acidosis; however, in standard BF 50% of patients showed acute hypocapnia at the end of dialysis.

  3. Hydrological heterogeneity in agricultural riparian buffer strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénault-Ethier, Louise; Larocque, Marie; Perron, Rachel; Wiseman, Natalie; Labrecque, Michel

    2017-03-01

    Riparian buffer strips (RBS) may protect surface water and groundwater in agricultural settings, although their effectiveness, observed in field-scale studies, may not extend to a watershed scale. Hydrologically-controlled leaching plots have often shown RBS to be effective at buffering nutrients and pesticides, but uncontrolled field studies have sometimes suggested limited effectiveness. The limited RBS effectiveness may be explained by the spatiotemporal hydrological heterogeneity near non-irrigated fields. This hypothesis was tested in conventional corn and soy fields in the St. Lawrence Lowlands of southern Quebec (Canada), where spring melt brings heavy and rapid runoff, while summer months are hot and dry. One field with a mineral soil (Saint-Roch-de-l'Achigan) and another with an organic-rich soil (Boisbriand) were equipped with passive runoff collectors, suction cup lysimeters, and piezometers placed before and after a 3 m-wide RBS, and monitored from 2011 to 2014. Soil topography of the RBS was mapped to a 1 cm vertical precision and a 50 cm sampling grid. On average, surface runoff intersects the RBS perpendicularly, but is subject to substantial local heterogeneity. Groundwater saturates the root zones, but flows little at the time of snowmelt. Groundwater flow is not consistently perpendicular to the RBS, and may reverse, flowing from stream to field under low water flow regimes with stream-aquifer connectivity, thus affecting RBS effectiveness calculations. Groundwater flow direction can be influenced by stratigraphy, local soil hydraulic properties, and historical modification of the agricultural stream beds. Understanding the spatiotemporal heterogeneity of surface and groundwater flows is essential to correctly assess the effectiveness of RBS in intercepting agro-chemical pollution. The implicit assumption that water flows across vegetated RBS, from the field to the stream, should always be verified.

  4. Natriuretic peptides buffer renin-dependent hypertension.

    PubMed

    Demerath, Theo; Staffel, Janina; Schreiber, Andrea; Valletta, Daniela; Schweda, Frank

    2014-06-15

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and cardiac natriuretic peptides [atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP)] are opposing control mechanisms for arterial blood pressure. Accordingly, an inverse relationship between plasma renin concentration (PRC) and ANP exists in most circumstances. However, PRC and ANP levels are both elevated in renovascular hypertension. Because ANP can directly suppress renin release, we used ANP knockout (ANP(-/-)) mice to investigate whether high ANP levels attenuate the increase in PRC in response to renal hypoperfusion, thus buffering renovascular hypertension. ANP(-/-) mice were hypertensive and had reduced PRC compared with that in wild-type ANP(+/+) mice under control conditions. Unilateral renal artery stenosis (2-kidney, 1-clip) for 1 wk induced similar increases in blood pressure and PRC in both genotypes. Unexpectedly, plasma BNP concentrations in ANP(-/-) mice significantly increased in response to two-kidney, one-clip treatment, potentially compensating for the lack of ANP. In fact, in mice lacking guanylyl cyclase A (GC-A(-/-) mice), which is the common receptor for both ANP and BNP, renovascular hypertension was markedly augmented compared with that in wild-type GC-A(+/+) mice. However, the higher blood pressure in GC-A(-/-) mice was not caused by disinhibition of the renin system because PRC and renal renin synthesis were significantly lower in GC-A(-/-) mice than in GC-A(+/+) mice. Thus, natriuretic peptides buffer renal vascular hypertension via renin-independent effects, such as vasorelaxation. The latter possibility is supported by experiments in isolated perfused mouse kidneys, in which physiological concentrations of ANP and BNP elicited renal vasodilatation and attenuated renal vasoconstriction in response to angiotensin II.

  5. [Rapid determination of serum iron concentration using bathophenanthroline sulfonate in a formate buffered system].

    PubMed

    Pré, J; Benlatrèche, C

    1977-03-01

    A simple accurate and very reproducible procedure for measuring serum iron concentration without precipitating serum proteins is described. In the same time, iron is released from serum transferrin, reduced and determined at 535 mn by incubation in a water bath at 55 degrees for five minutes within a formate buffered system (pH 2,6; i = 0,05) including bathophenanthroline sulfonate. This method yields values very similar to those obtained by that of the International Committee for Standardization in Hematology (ICSH).

  6. Effects of pH and Temperature on the Stability of Fumonisins in Maize Products

    PubMed Central

    Bryła, Marcin; Waśkiewicz, Agnieszka; Szymczyk, Krystyna; Jędrzejczak, Renata

    2017-01-01

    This paper is a study of the stability of fumonisins in dough based on maize flour prepared in a phosphate buffer with a pH of 3.5, 5.5 or 7.5 and baked at a temperature within the range of 100–250 °C. Buffers with various pH values were tested, since it is well-known that pH may significantly influence interactions of fumonisins with other substances. A standard analytical procedure was used to determine the concentration of free fumonisins. Hydrolysis in an alkaline medium was then applied to reveal the hidden forms, while the total fumonisins concentations was determined in another measurement. The total concentration of fumonisins was statistically higher in pH = 3.5 and pH = 5.5 than the concentration of free fumonisins; no similar difference was found at pH = 7.5. The applied phosphate buffer pH 7.5 may enhance solubility of fumonisins, which would increase extraction efficiency of free analytes, thereby decreasing the difference between concentrations of total and free fumonisins. Hydrolysed B1 fumonisin (HFB1) and partially hydrolysed B1 fumonisin (isomers a and b: PHFB1a and PHFB1b, respectively) were the main investigated substances. For baking temperatures below 220 °C, fumonisins were slightly more stable for pH = 5.5 than for pH = 3.5 and pH = 7.5. In both of these latter cases, the concentration of partially hydrolysed fumonisins grew initially (up to 200 °C) with an increase in the baking temperature, and then dropped. Similar behaviour was observed for free HFB1, which may suggest the following fumonisin degradation mechanism: initially, the tricarballylic acid (TCA) groups are removed from the molecules, and next, the HFB1 molecules disintegrate. PMID:28257053

  7. Control of structurization processes in wood-cement systems at fixed pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbotina, Natalia; Gorlenko, Nikolay; Sarkisov, Yuriy; Naumova, Ludmila; Minakova, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a study of structurization processes in the wood-cement systemmixed with the buffer solutions and the improvement of service properties of products produced therefrom. Infrared spectroscopy, X-ray phase analysis, and pH measurements show that structurization processes in wood-cement systems depend on the acidity of aqueous solution, the behavior of hydration, neutralization, and polycondensation reactions with the formation of polymer products including those with cement grout components and functional groups of wood. It is shown that phosphate buffer solutions used for mixing wood-cement compositions improve their strength properties and reduce water absorption. The optimum acidity of the buffered medium for service properties of the wood-cement systemis pH = 4.8.

  8. Priority Based Buffering over Multiple Lossy Links Using TCP Aware Link Layer Buffering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-27

    signed/_________________________ ________ Maj Scott R . Graham, PhD (Chairman) Date _____/signed...Dr. Kenneth M. Hopkinson (Member) Date _____/signed/_________________________ ________ Capt Todd R . Andel, PhD (Member) Date...module to implement. Instead, for this research, a task configuration node is added to the project for manual task configuration. Each task has 11

  9. Cost of riparian buffer zones: A comparison of hydrologically adapted site-specific riparian buffers with traditional fixed widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, T.; Lundström, J.; Kuglerová, L.; Laudon, H.; Öhman, K.; Ågren, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    Traditional approaches aiming at protecting surface waters from the negative impacts of forestry often focus on retaining fixed width buffer zones around waterways. While this method is relatively simple to design and implement, it has been criticized for ignoring the spatial heterogeneity of biogeochemical processes and biodiversity in the riparian zone. Alternatively, a variable width buffer zone adapted to site-specific hydrological conditions has been suggested to improve the protection of biogeochemical and ecological functions of the riparian zone. However, little is known about the monetary value of maintaining hydrologically adapted buffer zones compared to the traditionally used fixed width ones. In this study, we created a hydrologically adapted buffer zone by identifying wet areas and groundwater discharge hotspots in the riparian zone. The opportunity cost of the hydrologically adapted riparian buffer zones was then compared to that of the fixed width zones in a meso-scale boreal catchment to determine the most economical option of designing riparian buffers. The results show that hydrologically adapted buffer zones were cheaper per hectare than the fixed width ones when comparing the total cost. This was because the hydrologically adapted buffers included more wetlands and low productive forest areas than the fixed widths. As such, the hydrologically adapted buffer zones allows more effective protection of the parts of the riparian zones that are ecologically and biogeochemically important and more sensitive to disturbances without forest landowners incurring any additional cost than fixed width buffers.

  10. The Multimission Image Processing Laboratory's virtual frame buffer interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, T.

    1984-01-01

    Large image processing systems use multiple frame buffers with differing architectures and vendor supplied interfaces. This variety of architectures and interfaces creates software development, maintenance and portability problems for application programs. Several machine-dependent graphics standards such as ANSI Core and GKS are available, but none of them are adequate for image processing. Therefore, the Multimission Image Processing laboratory project has implemented a programmer level virtual frame buffer interface. This interface makes all frame buffers appear as a generic frame buffer with a specified set of characteristics. This document defines the virtual frame uffer interface and provides information such as FORTRAN subroutine definitions, frame buffer characteristics, sample programs, etc. It is intended to be used by application programmers and system programmers who are adding new frame buffers to a system.

  11. Relationship Between Redox Potential, Disinfectant, and pH in Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work will examine the effects of pH and oxidant type (chlorine [Cl2], oxygen [O2], hydrogen peroxide [H2O2], monochloramine [MCA], and potassium permanganate [KMnO4]) and concentration (mg/L) on the redox potential of buffered test water. Also, the effects of incrementing ir...

  12. Effects of Zwitterionic buffers on sorption of ferrous iron at goethite and its oxidation by CCl4.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Anke; Laskov, Christine; Haderlein, Stefan B

    2011-04-15

    A major factor which controls sorption and oxidation of Fe(II) at the mineral-water interface is pH, hence buffers are commonly used to control pH in experimental studies. Here, we examined the effects of widely used organic buffers (3-morpholinopropane-1-sulfonic acid (MOPS) and 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES)) on Fe(II) uptake and oxidation by CCl(4) in aqueous suspensions of goethite. Significant sorption of these zwitterionic buffers occurred only at Fe(II)-loaded goethite but not at native goethite. The addition of MOPS and HEPES caused substantial release of Fe(II) from goethite, retarded the oxidation of surface-bound Fe(II) by CCl(4) and changed the reaction pathway as indicated by lower yields of CHCl(3). To explore electrostatic and steric contributions of MOPS and HEPES to the observed phenomena we studied sorption and competitive effects of model sorbates (Ca(2+), sulfonates) which suggest the formation of a complex between surface-bound Fe(II) and MOPS or HEPES. Our study shows for the first time that these frequently used zwitterionic organic buffers may interfere significantly with the surface chemistry and thus with redox reactions of Fe(II) at goethite. Hence, kinetic or mechanistic information obtained in such systems requires careful interpretation.

  13. Hematite Reduction Buffers Acid Generation and Enhances Nutrient Uptake by a Fermentative Iron Reducing Bacterium, Orenia metallireducens Strain Z6.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yiran; Sanford, Robert A; Chang, Yun-Juan; McInerney, Michael J; Fouke, Bruce W

    2017-01-03

    Fermentative iron-reducing organisms have been identified in a variety of environments. Instead of coupling iron reduction to respiration, they have been consistently observed to use ferric iron minerals as an electron sink for fermentation. In the present study, a fermentative iron reducer, Orenia metallireducens strain Z6, was shown to use iron reduction to enhance fermentation not only by consuming electron equivalents, but also by generating alkalinity that effectively buffers the pH. Fermentation of glucose by this organism in the presence of a ferric oxide mineral, hematite (Fe2O3), resulted in enhanced glucose decomposition compared with fermentation in the absence of an iron source. Parallel evidence (i.e., genomic reconstruction, metabolomics, thermodynamic analyses, and calculation of electron transfer) suggested hematite reduction as a proton-consuming reaction effectively consumed acid produced by fermentation. The buffering effect of hematite was further supported by a greater extent of glucose utilization by strain Z6 in media with increasing buffer capacity. Such maintenance of a stable pH through hematite reduction for enhanced glucose fermentation complements the thermodynamic interpretation of interactions between microbial iron reduction and other biogeochemical processes. This newly discovered feature of iron reducer metabolism also has significant implications for groundwater management and contaminant remediation by providing microbially mediated buffering systems for the associated microbial and/or chemical reactions.

  14. Cu(II) complexation by "non-coordinating" N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES buffer).

    PubMed

    Sokołowska, Magdalena; Bal, Wojciech

    2005-08-01

    The combined potentiometric and spectroscopic studies of interactions of N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) with Cu(II) demonstrated that this popular buffer, commonly labelled as "non-coordinating" forms a CuL+ complex, with the logbeta(CuL) value of 3.22. This complex undergoes alkaline hydrolysis above pH 6, resulting in Cu(OH)2 precipitation. However, the presence of HEPES at a typical concentration of 100 mM at pH 7.4 elevates the apparent binding constant, being determined for a complex of another ligand, by a factor of 80. HEPES does not form ternary complexes with aminoacids Ala, Trp, and His, but may do so with other bioligands, such as nucleotides. Therefore, HEPES can still be recommended for Cu(II) studies in place of other common buffers, such as Tris and phosphate, but appropriate corrections and precautions should be applied in quantitative experiments.

  15. Buffer layer optimization for high efficiency CIGS solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severino, N.; Bednar, N.; Adamovic, N.

    2016-10-01

    This work presents a study concerning the numerical optimization of a buffer layer for high efficiency CIGS solar cells. The dependence of the solar cell properties on the buffer layer material, the layer thickness, the type and density of defects within the same layer were numerically investigated and analysed. Promising results were obtained with alternative Cd-free buffer layers (ZnSnO, InS and ZnS) in place of the standard CdS.

  16. Development of buffers for fast semidry transfer of proteins.

    PubMed

    Garić, Dušan; Humbert, Laure; Fils-Aimé, Nadège; Korah, Juliana; Zarfabian, Yasaman; Lebrun, Jean-Jacques; Ali, Suhad

    2013-10-15

    Western blot is an extensively used method for protein detection in cell biology. To optimize this procedure, here we examined a panel of buffers for their ability to efficiently transfer proteins from SDS-polyacrylamide gels onto nitrocellulose membranes in a short 12-min period, designated here as fast semidry transfer. Our results show for the first time that HEPES- and HEPPS/EPPS-based buffers represent the most efficient buffers for fast semidry transfer.

  17. Grass buffers for playas in agricultural landscapes: A literature synthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melcher, Cynthia P.; Skagen, Susan K.

    2005-01-01

    Future research should entail multiple-scale approaches at regional, wetland-complex, and individual watershed scales. Information needs include direct measures of buffer effectiveness in ‘real-world’ systems, refinement and field tests of buffer-effectiveness models, how buffers may affect floral and faunal communities of playas, and basic ecological information on playa function and playa wildlife ecology. Understanding how wildlife communities respond to patch size and habitat fragmentation is crucial for addressing questions regarding habitat quality of grass buffers in playa systems.

  18. An assessment of buffer strips for improving damage tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.; Kennedy, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy panels with buffer strips were tested in tension to measure their residual strength with crack-like damage. Panels were made with 45/0/-45/90(2S) and 45/0/450(2S) layups. The buffer strips were parallel to the loading directions. They were made by replacing narrow strips of the 0 deg graphite plies with strips of either 0 deg S-Glass/epoxy or Kevlar-49/epoxy on either a one for one or a two for one basis. In a third case, O deg graphite/epoxy was used as the buffer material and thin, perforated Mylar strips were placed between the 0 deg piles and the cross-plies to weaken the interfaces and thus to isolate the 0 deg plies. Some panels were made with buffer strips of different widths and spacings. The buffer strips arrested the cracks and increased the residual strengths significantly over those plain laminates without buffer strips. A shear-lag type stress analysis correctly predicted the effects of layups, buffer material, buffer strip width and spacing, and the number of plies of buffer material.

  19. Buffers affect the bending rigidity of model lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Bouvrais, Hélène; Duelund, Lars; Ipsen, John H

    2014-01-14

    In biophysical and biochemical studies of lipid bilayers the influence of the used buffer is often ignored or assumed to be negligible on membrane structure, elasticity, or physical properties. However, we here present experimental evidence, through bending rigidity measurements performed on giant vesicles, of a more complex behavior, where the buffering molecules may considerably affect the bending rigidity of phosphatidylcholine bilayers. Furthermore, a synergistic effect on the bending modulus is observed in the presence of both salt and buffer molecules, which serves as a warning to experimentalists in the data interpretation of their studies, since typical lipid bilayer studies contain buffer and ion molecules.

  20. Solubilization of proteins: the importance of lysis buffer choice.

    PubMed

    Peach, Mandy; Marsh, Noelle; Miskiewicz, Ewa I; MacPhee, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    The efficient extraction of proteins of interest from cells and tissues is not always straightforward. Here we demonstrate the differences in extraction of the focal adhesion protein Kindlin-2 from choriocarcinoma cells using NP-40 and RIPA lysis buffer. Furthermore, we demonstrate the use of a more denaturing urea/thiourea lysis buffer for solubilization, by comparing its effectiveness for solubilization of small heat-shock proteins from smooth muscle with the often utilized RIPA lysis buffer. Overall, the results demonstrate the importance of establishing the optimal lysis buffer for specific protein solubilization within the experimental workflow.

  1. Back contact buffer layer for thin-film solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Compaan, Alvin D.; Plotnikov, Victor V.

    2014-09-09

    A photovoltaic cell structure is disclosed that includes a buffer/passivation layer at a CdTe/Back contact interface. The buffer/passivation layer is formed from the same material that forms the n-type semiconductor active layer. In one embodiment, the buffer layer and the n-type semiconductor active layer are formed from cadmium sulfide (CdS). A method of forming a photovoltaic cell includes the step of forming the semiconductor active layers and the buffer/passivation layer within the same deposition chamber and using the same material source.

  2. Concentrated Flow through a Riparian Buffer: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. B.; Nogues, J. P.; Hutchinson, S. L.

    2004-05-01

    Riparian buffers are often used for in-situ treatment of agricultural runoff. Although the benefits of riparian buffers are well recongized, concentration of flow can restrict the efficiency of contaminant removal. This study evaluates flow concentration at a agricultural site near Manhattan, Kansas. Manual and automated GIS analyses of a high-resolution digital elevation model were used to determine the fraction of runoff contributing to each buffer segment. Subsequent simulation of the system in WEPP (Water Erosion and Prediction Project) demonstrates the extend to which flow concentration affects buffer efficiency.

  3. Effect of phosphate buffer on aggregation kinetics of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles induced by monovalent and divalent electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Afshinnia, K; Baalousha, M

    2017-03-01

    The attachment efficiency (α) is an important parameter that can be used to characterize nanoparticle (NPs) aggregation behavior and has been a topic of discussion of several papers in the past few years. The importance of α is because it is one of the key parameters that can be used to model NP environmental fate and behavior. This study uses UV-vis and laser Doppler electrophoresis to monitor the aggregation behavior of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (cit-AgNPs) induced by Na(+) and Ca(2+) as counter ions in the presence and absence of Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) as a surrogate of natural organic matter and different concentrations of phosphate buffer (0-1mM). Results demonstrate that phosphate buffer, which serves to maintain pH nearly constant over the course of a reaction, is an important determinant of NP aggregation behavior. Increasing phosphate buffer concentration results in a decrease in the critical coagulation concentrations (CCC) of cit-AgNPs to lower counter ion concentration and an increase of α at the same counter ion concentration, both in the absence and presence of SRFA. SRFA stabilizes AgNPs and increases the CCC to higher counter ion concentrations. The outcome of this study can be used to rationalize the variation in α and CCC values reported in the literature for NPs with similar physicochemical properties, where different α and CCC values are reported when different types of buffers and buffer concentrations are used in different studies.

  4. A mathematical model of tumour and blood pHe regulation: The HCO3-/CO2 buffering system.

    PubMed

    Martin, Natasha K; Gaffney, Eamonn A; Gatenby, Robert A; Gillies, Robert J; Robey, Ian F; Maini, Philip K

    2011-03-01

    Malignant tumours are characterised by a low, acidic extracellular pH (pHe) which facilitates invasion and metastasis. Previous research has proposed the potential benefits of manipulating systemic pHe, and recent experiments have highlighted the potential for buffer therapy to raise tumour pHe, prevent metastases, and prolong survival in laboratory mice. To examine the physiological regulation of tumour buffering and investigate how perturbations of the buffering system (via metabolic/respiratory disorders or changes in parameters) can alter tumour and blood pHe, we develop a simple compartmentalised ordinary differential equation model of pHe regulation by the HCO3-/CO2 buffering system. An approximate analytical solution is constructed and used to carry out a sensitivity analysis, where we identify key parameters that regulate tumour pHe in both humans and mice. From this analysis, we suggest promising alternative and combination therapies, and identify specific patient groups which may show an enhanced response to buffer therapy. In addition, numerical simulations are performed, validating the model against well-known metabolic/respiratory disorders and predicting how these disorders could change tumour pHe.

  5. Striking Effects of Storage Buffers on Apparent Half-Lives of the Activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Arylsulfatase.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuwei; Yang, Xiaolan; Wang, Deqiang; Hu, Xiaolei; Yuan, Mei; Pu, Jun; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Yang, Zhaoyong; Liao, Fei

    2016-08-01

    To obtain the label enzyme for enzyme-linked-immunoabsorbent-assay of two components each time in one well with conventional microplate readers, molecular engineering of Pseudomonas aeruginosa arylsulfatase (PAAS) is needed. To compare thermostability of PAAS/mutants of limited purity, effects of buffers on the half-activity time (t 0.5) at 37 °C were tested. At pH 7.4, PAAS showed non-exponential decreases of activity, with the apparent t 0.5 of ~6.0 days in 50 mM HEPES, but ~42 days in 10 mM sodium borate with >85 % activity after 15 days; protein concentrations in both buffers decreased at slower rates after there were significant decreases of activities. Additionally, the apparent t 0.5 of PAAS was ~14 days in 50 mM Tris-HCl, and ~21 days in 10 mM sodium phosphate. By sodium dodecyl-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the purified PAAS gave single polypeptide; after storage for 14 days at 37 °C, there were many soluble and insoluble fragmented polypeptides in the HEPES buffer, but just one principal insoluble while negligible soluble fragmented polypeptides in the borate buffer. Of tested mutants in the neutral borate buffer, rates for activity decreases and polypeptide degradation were slower than in the HEPES buffer. Hence, dilute neutral borate buffers were favorable for examining thermostability of PAAS/mutants.

  6. Effect of pH changes on water release values in hydrophobic interaction chromatographic systems.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fang; Nagrath, Deepak; Cramer, Steven M

    2005-06-24

    The effect on pH on protein binding in HIC systems was investigated. Isocratic experiments were carried out to determine the capacity factors of various proteins as a function of temperature, pH and salt type. This paper presents a framework based on the Maxwell linkage function for estimating the number of released water molecules during the adsorption/desorption process due to a change of buffer pH. This approach also enables one to predict the effect of pH change on the water released values upon binding at any temperature condition. The results indicate that the total number of released water molecules (delta nu) for a pH change increased more on aromatic surfaces (phenyl Sepharose) than on aliphatic resins (butyl Sepharose). The results also indicate that the total number of released water molecules (deltanu) for a pH change increased with salt concentration and when changing from chaotropic to kosmotropic salts. The (deltanu) values also increased as the buffer pH approached the protein's pI, and decreased away from its pI. This work helps to establish a framework for the investigation of pH effects on protein selectivity in HIC systems.

  7. Effect of pH and metal ions on the decomposition rate of S-nitrosocysteine.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jun; Lewis, Randy S

    2007-09-01

    S-nitrosothiols (RSNOs) have many biological functions including platelet deactivation, immunosupression, neurotransmission, and host defense. Most of the functions are attributed to nitric oxide (NO) release during S-nitrosothiol decomposition. As the simplest biologically occurring S-nitrosothiol, S-nitrosocysteine (CySNO) has been widely used as an NO donor and has also been incorporated into biomedical polymers. Knowledge of the CySNO decomposition rate is important for assessing the impact of CySNO on various bioengineering applications or biological systems. In this work, spectrophotometer measurements of CySNO decomposition in the presence of metal ions showed that the decomposition rate is highly susceptible to the pH. The maximum decomposition occurs near physiological pH (near 7.4) while in the acidic (pH < 6) and alkaline (pH > 9) condition CySNO is very stable. This demonstrates that blood provides an optimized environment for the decomposition of CySNO leading to the release of NO. The CySNO decomposition rate can also be affected by buffers with different purity levels in the presence and absence of metal ion chelators-although all buffers show the same pH phenomenon of maximizing near physiological pH. An equilibrium model of metal ions as a function of pH provides a plausible explanation for the pH dependence on the experimental decomposition rate.

  8. Continuous intra-arterial blood pH monitoring by a fiber-optic fluorosensor.

    PubMed

    Jin, Weizhong; Wu, Lingxiang; Song, Yuanlin; Jiang, Jinjun; Zhu, Xiaodan; Yang, Dawei; Bai, Chunxue

    2011-05-01

    Continuous intra-arterial blood pH monitoring is highly desirable in clinical practice. However, devices with appreciable accuracy are still not commercially available to date. In this study, we present a fiber-optic fluorosensor that can be used to continuously and accurately measure blood pH changes. The pH sensor is developed based on a proton-sensitive fluorescence dye, N-allyl-4-(4'-methyl-piperazinyl)-1,8-naphthalimide, which is bonded covalently to an optical fiber through heat polymerization. Fluorescence intensity was recorded after the sensor was exposed to different pH buffer solutions or intra-arterial blood in rabbits. Fluorescence intensity with emission peak at 510 nm decreased immediately as the blood pH increased. Linear and reproducible responses were observed when pH ranges from 6.8 to 8.0 with resolution of 0.03 pH units. The correlation coefficient between the pH sensor and the conventional blood gas analyzer was 0.93 in vivo ( n=75, p<0.001) with a bias and precision of -0.02 ± 0.08 pH units. The pH sensor was stable during measurement for at least 72 h. The pH sensor is not sensitive to fluctuations of various ions' concentrations and plasma osmosis at pathophysiological limits, suggesting that it is useful for the continuous measurement of blood pH at various clinical settings.

  9. Buffered lidocaine and bupivacaine mixture – the ideal local anesthetic solution?

    PubMed Central

    Best, Corliss A; Best, Alyssa A; Best, Timothy J; Hamilton, Danielle A

    2015-01-01

    The use of injectable local anesthetic solutions to facilitate pain-free surgery is an integral component of many procedures performed by the plastic surgeon. In many instances, a solution that has both rapid onset and prolonged duration of analgesia is optimal. A combination of lidocaine and bupivacaine, plain or with epinephrine, is readily available in most Canadian health care settings where such procedures are performed, and fulfills these criteria. However, commercially available solutions of both medications are acidic and cause a burning sensation on injection. Buffering to neutral pH with sodium bicarbonate is a practical method to mitigate the burning sensation, and has the added benefit of increasing the fraction of nonionized lipid soluble drug available. The authors report on the proportions of the three drugs to yield a neutral pH, and the results of an initial survey regarding the use of the combined solution with epinephrine in hand surgery. PMID:26090348

  10. Physiological pH. Effects on posthypoxic proximal tubular injury.

    PubMed

    Zager, R A; Schimpf, B A; Gmur, D J

    1993-04-01

    After O2 deprivation, tissue acidosis rapidly self-corrects. This study assessed the effect of this pH correction on the induction, and pathways, of posthypoxic proximal tubular injury. In addition, ways to prevent the resultant injury were explored. Isolated rat proximal tubular segments (PTSs) were subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation (50/30 or 30/50 minutes) under the following incubation conditions: 1) continuous pH 7.4, 2) continuous pH 6.8, or 3) hypoxia at pH 6.8 and reoxygenation at pH 7.4 (NaHCO3 or Tris base addition). Continuously oxygenated PTSs maintained under these same pH conditions served as controls. Lethal cell injury was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. pH effects on several purported pathways of hypoxia/reoxygenation injury were also assessed (ATP depletion, lipid peroxidation, and membrane deacylation). Acidosis blocked hypoxic LDH release (pH 7.4, 50 +/- 2%; pH 6.8, 6 +/- 1%) without mitigating membrane deacylation or ATP depletion. During reoxygenation, minimal LDH was released (3-5%) if pH was held constant. However, if posthypoxic pH was corrected, immediate (< or = 5 minutes) and marked cell death (e.g., 55 +/- 3% with Tris) occurred. This was dissociated from lipid peroxidation or new deacylation, and it was preceded by a depressed ATP/ADP ratio (suggesting an acidosis-associated defect in hypoxic/posthypoxic cell energetics). Realkalinization injury was not inevitable, since it could be substantially blocked by 1) posthypoxic glycine addition, 2) transient posthypoxic hypothermia, or 3) allowing a 10-minute reoxygenation (cell recovery) period before base addition. Neither mannitol nor graded buffer Ca2+ deletion conferred protection. Acute pH correction caused no injury to continuously oxygenated PTSs. Conclusions are as follows: 1) Posthypoxic "pH shock" causes virtually immediate cell death, not by causing de novo injury but, rather, by removing the cytoprotective effect of acidosis. 2) This injury can be prevented by a

  11. Extracellular amylases of starch-fermenting yeast: pH effect on export and residence time in the periplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Calleja, G.B.; Levy-Rick, S.R.; Nasim, A.; Lusena, C.V.

    1987-01-01

    Aerobic cultures of S. alluvius in Wickerham's yeast-nitrogen-base medium with starch as sole carbon source become strongly acidic and contain no detectable extra-cellular amylolytic activity during stationary phase, when the activity in buffered cultures is maximal. The extracellular amylases are irreversibly inactivated at the low pH value (less than 3.5) attained by the cultures. When adequately buffered, the medium yields maximal extracellular amylolytic activity. About 0.2 M phosphate buffer is adequate for substrate concentrations of up to 0.5% starch; higher starch concentrations require more buffer. Unbuffered cultures that are adjusted once with alkali to pH 5.5 also allow maximal extracellular amylolytic activity, provided the adjustment is made prior to the end of exponential growth. Automatic pH control allows use of high starch concentrations of up to 4%. Export is optimal at pH values higher than the optima for enzyme activity and stability and for population growth. The need for pH adjustment prior to the appearance of amylolytic activity in the medium suggests pH dependence of the export process itself and/or acid inactivation of enzymes transiently resident in the periplasm. (Refs. 23).

  12. Developing Suitable Buffers to Capture Transport Cycling Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Thomas; Schipperijn, Jasper; Christiansen, Lars Breum; Nielsen, Thomas Sick; Troelsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The association between neighborhood built environment and cycling has received considerable attention in health literature over the last two decades, but different neighborhood definitions have been used and it is unclear which one is most appropriate. Administrative or fixed residential spatial units (e.g., home-buffer-based neighborhoods) are not necessarily representative for environmental exposure. An increased understanding of appropriate neighborhoods is needed. GPS cycling tracks from 78 participants for 7 days form the basis for the development and testing of different neighborhood buffers for transport cycling. The percentage of GPS points per square meter was used as indicator of the effectiveness of a series of different buffer types, including home-based network buffers, shortest route to city center buffers, and city center-directed ellipse-shaped buffers. The results show that GPS tracks can help us understand where people go and stay during the day, which can help us link built environment with cycling. Analysis showed that the further people live from the city center, the more elongated are their GPS tracks, and the better an ellipse-shaped directional buffer captured transport cycling behavior. In conclusion, we argue that in order to be able to link built environment factors with different forms of physical activity, we must study the most likely area people use. In this particular study, to capture transport cycling, with its relatively large radius of action, city center-directed ellipse-shaped buffers yielded better results than traditional home-based network buffer types. The ellipse-shaped buffer types could therefore be considered an alternative to more traditional buffers or administrative units in future studies of transport cycling behavior. PMID:24926478

  13. Cadmium resistance screening in nitrilotriacetate-buffered minimal media. [Rhizobium fredii

    SciTech Connect

    Angle, J.S. ); Chaney, R.L. )

    1989-08-01

    Media used to determine the MICs of heavy metals for bacteria are unreliable because organic components in the media bind or chelate most of the metal being studied. To define specific metal activity in media and to maintain metal activity at a constant level, HEPES-MES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N{prime}-2-ethanesulfonic acid-2-(N-morpholine)ethanesulfonic acid) salts medium with arabinose medium was modified, and the modified medium was used to examine the MIC of cadmium for Rhizobium fredii USDA 201. Arabinose-HEPES-MES was modified by addition of the chelator nitrilotriacetate to buffer the supply of free Cd{sup 2+} ion to maintain a constant Cd activity and by the use of only MES to buffer pH (buffered arabinose-MES medium (BAM)). Ca and Mg were supplied at the normal levels for soil solutions, and other trace elements were supplied at the levels required for normal growth of plants. The concentration of free Cd{sup 2+} ion was calculated by using the computer program GEOCHEM-PC with a corrected data base. The Cd MIC in BAM was 14.0 {mu}M, while that in a tryptone-yeast extract medium was 107 {mu}M. The results indicate that substantial free Cd{sup 2+} is removed from solution in most standard media, resulting in falsely high MICs. The new BAM medium allows for the precise determination of MICs, thus avoiding the uncertainties associated with other media.

  14. Extraction and stability of bovine serum albumin (BSA) using cholinium-based Good's buffers ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Taha, Mohamed; Quental, Maria V; Correia, Isabel; Freire, Mara G; Coutinho, João A P

    2015-07-01

    Good's buffers ionic liquids (GB-ILs), composed of cholinium-based cations and Good's buffers anions, display self-buffering characteristics in the biological pH range, and their polarity and hydrophobicity can be easily tuned by a proper manipulation of their ions chemical structures. In this work, the extraction ability for bovine serum albumin (BSA) of aqueous biphasic systems (ABS) formed by polypropylene glycol 400 (PPG 400) and several GB-ILs was evaluated. ABS formed by PPG 400 and cholinium chloride ([Ch]Cl), GBs, and sucrose were also investigated for comparison purposes. It is shown that BSA preferentially migrates for the GB-IL-rich phase, with extraction efficiencies of 100%, achieved in a single-step. Dynamic light scattering, and circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopies were employed to evaluate the effect of the investigated cholinium-based GB-ILs on the BSA stability, and compared with results obtained for the respective GBs precursors, [Ch]Cl and sucrose, a well-known protein stabilizer. Molecular docking studies were also carried out to investigate on the binding sites of GB-IL ions to BSA. The experimental results confirm that BSA has a higher stability in GB-ILs than in any of the other compounds investigated.

  15. Presentation matters: Buffers, packaging, and delivery devices for new, oral enteric vaccines for infants

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Manjari; Jarrahian, Courtney

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral administration of vaccines is simpler and more acceptable than injection via needle and syringe, particularly for infants (Fig. 1) This route is promising for new vaccines in development against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and Shigella that cause childhood diarrhea with devastating consequences in low-resource countries. However, vaccine antigens and adjuvants given orally need buffering against the degradative effects of low stomach pH, and the type and volume of antacid buffer require special attention for infants. In addition, container/closure systems must be compatible with vaccine formulations, protect against water and gas transfer, and have minimal impact on the cold chain. Health care workers in demanding low-resource settings need an administration device that is easy to use, yet will accurately measure and safely deliver the correct vaccine dose. Developers must consider manufacturing capabilities, and immunization program managers want affordable vaccines. As new combination enteric vaccine candidates advance into clinical evaluation, features of the final vaccine presentation—liquid or dry format, diluent, buffer, primary and secondary packaging, and administration device—should be taken into account early in product development to achieve the greatest possible impact for the vaccine. PMID:27819524

  16. A wide bandwidth CCD buffer memory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siemens, K.; Wallace, R. W.; Robinson, C. R.

    1978-01-01

    A prototype system was implemented to demonstrate that CCD's can be applied advantageously to the problem of low power digital storage and particularly to the problem of interfacing widely varying data rates. CCD shift register memories (8K bit) were used to construct a feasibility model 128 K-bit buffer memory system. Serial data that can have rates between 150 kHz and 4.0 MHz can be stored in 4K-bit, randomly-accessible memory blocks. Peak power dissipation during a data transfer is less than 7 W, while idle power is approximately 5.4 W. The system features automatic data input synchronization with the recirculating CCD memory block start address. System expansion to accommodate parallel inputs or a greater number of memory blocks can be performed in a modular fashion. Since the control logic does not increase proportionally to increase in memory capacity, the power requirements per bit of storage can be reduced significantly in a larger system.

  17. Buffered Lidocaine Hydrochloride Solution With and Without Epinephrine: Stability in Polypropylene Syringes

    PubMed Central

    Pascuet, Elena; Donnelly, Ronald F; Garceau, Danielle; Vaillancourt, Régis

    2009-01-01

    Background: Pain associated with infiltrating the skin with lidocaine can be reduced by buffering the solution with sodium bicarbonate. Objectives: To determine the physical compatibility and chemical stability of lidocaine hydrochloride solution buffered with 8.4% sodium bicarbonate, with and without epinephrine, packaged in polypropylene syringes and stored at 5°C with protection from light. Methods: Lidocaine solutions (1% and 2%), with and without epinephrine 1:100 000, were diluted 10:1 with 8.4% sodium bicarbonate, packaged in 3-mL polypropylene syringes, and stored at 5°C (range 3°C to 8°C). On each of days 0, 3, 7, 10, 14, 17, 21, 24, and 28, the contents of 3 syringes for each solution of lidocaine combined with epinephrine were collected separately in glass vials and frozen at −70°C for subsequent analysis. In addition, on days 0, 7, 14, 21, and 28, the contents of 3 syringes for each lidocaine solution without epinephrine were collected separately in glass vials and frozen at −70°C for subsequent analysis. Chemical stability was determined with a validated, stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatography method. Changes in colour, clarity, and pH were used to determine physical compatibility of the solutions. Results: All buffered lidocaine solutions containing epinephrine (1:100 000) retained at least 93.3% of the original concentration of epinephrine and 97.5% of the lidocaine concentration for 7 days when stored at 5°C with protection from light. In contrast, the epinephrine-free solutions retained at least 94.7% of the initial concentration of lidocaine for the duration of the study (28 days). All samples remained clear, colourless, and free of precipitate throughout the study, and there were no significant changes in pH. Conclusion: Extemporaneously prepared buffered lidocaine (1% and 2%) packaged in polypropylene syringes remained stable for up to 28 days when properly refrigerated with protection from light. A 7-day expiry

  18. Comparison of adhesive properties of water- and phosphate-buffer-washed cottonseed meals with cottonseed protein isolate on maple and poplar veneers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water- and phosphate buffer (35 mM Na2HPO4/NaH2PO4, pH 7.5)-washed cottonseed meals (abbreviated as WCM and BCM, respectively) could be low-cost and environmentally friendly protein-based adhesives as their preparation does not involve corrosive alkali and acid solutions that are needed for cottonse...

  19. An investigation using atomic force microscopy nanoindentation of dental enamel demineralization as a function of undissociated acid concentration and differential buffer capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Michele E.; Shellis, R. Peter

    2007-02-01

    Acidic drinks and foodstuffs can demineralize dental hard tissues, leading to a pathological condition known as dental erosion, which is of increasing clinical concern. The first step in enamel dissolution is a demineralization of the outer few micrometres of tissue, which results in a softening of the structure. The primary determinant of dissolution rate is pH, but the concentration of undissociated acid, which is related to buffer capacity, also appears to be important. In this study, atomic force microscopy nanoindentation was used to measure the first initial demineralization (softening) induced within 1 min by exposure to solutions with a range of undissociated acid concentration and natural pH of 3.3 or with an undissociated acid concentration of 10 mmol l-1 and pH adjusted to 3.3. The results indicate that differential buffering capacity is a better determinant of softening than undissociated acid concentration. Under the conditions of these experiments, a buffer capacity of >3 mmol l-1 pH-1 does not have any further effect on dissolution rate. These results imply that differential buffering capacity should be used for preference over undissociated acid concentration or titratable acidity, which are more commonly employed in the literature.

  20. Energy separations for the electronic states of PH -2,PH 2 and PH +2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, K.

    1993-03-01

    All-electron complete-active space multi-configuration self-consistent field (CASSCF) followed by second-order configuration interaction (SOCI) calculations in conjunction with large P(13s10p3d2flg/7s6p3d2flg) and H (10s5p1d/8s5p1d) basis sets are made on the electronic states of PH -2, PH 2 and PH +2. We compute the adiabatic electron affinities of PH 2 and PH. The 3B 1-X 1A 1, 1B 1-X 1A 1 energy separations of PH +2 and the 2A 1-X 2B 1 energy separation of PH 2 are computed.

  1. Effects of pH and magnetic material on immunomagnetic separation of Cryptosporidium oocysts from concentrated water samples.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Ryan C; Rock, Channah M; Oshima, Kevin H

    2002-04-01

    In this study, we examined the effect that magnetic materials and pH have on the recoveries of Cryptosporidium oocysts by immunomagnetic separation (IMS). We determined that particles that were concentrated on a magnet during bead separation have no influence on oocyst recovery; however, removal of these particles did influence pH values. The optimal pH of the IMS was determined to be 7.0. The numbers of oocysts recovered from deionized water at pH 7.0 were 26.3% higher than those recovered from samples that were not at optimal pH. The results indicate that the buffers in the IMS kit did not adequately maintain an optimum pH in some water samples. By adjusting the pH of concentrated environmental water samples to 7.0, recoveries of oocysts increased by 26.4% compared to recoveries from samples where the pH was not adjusted.

  2. Microbial Community Diversity in Agroforestry and Grass Buffer Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agroforesty and grass buffer systems have long been promoted as a soil conservation practice that yields many environmental benefits. Previous research has described the ability of buffer systems to retain nutrients, slow water flow and soil erosion, or mitigate the potentially harmful effects of e...

  3. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers

    DOEpatents

    Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    2014-07-15

    Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

  4. Current isolating epitaxial buffer layers for high voltage photodiode array

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Cooper, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    An array of photodiodes in series on a common semi-insulating substrate has a non-conductive buffer layer between the photodiodes and the semi-insulating substrate. The buffer layer reduces current injection leakage between the photodiodes of the array and allows optical energy to be converted to high voltage electrical energy.

  5. Dynamic Buffer Capacity in Acid-Base Systems.

    PubMed

    Michałowska-Kaczmarczyk, Anna M; Michałowski, Tadeusz

    The generalized concept of 'dynamic' buffer capacity βV is related to electrolytic systems of different complexity where acid-base equilibria are involved. The resulting formulas are presented in a uniform and consistent form. The detailed calculations are related to two Britton-Robinson buffers, taken as examples.

  6. Formation of pyrophosphate-like adducts from nerve agents sarin, soman and cyclosarin in phosphate buffer: implications for analytical and toxicological investigations.

    PubMed

    Gäb, Jürgen; John, Harald; Blum, Marc-Michael

    2011-01-15

    Phosphate buffer is frequently used in biological, biochemical and biomedical applications especially when pH is to be controlled around the physiological value of 7.4. One of the prerequisites of a buffer compound among good buffering capacity and pH stability over time is its non-reactivity with other constituents of the solution. This is especially important for quantitative analytical or toxicological assays. Previous work has identified a number of amino alcohol buffers like TRIS to react with G-type nerve agents sarin, soman and cyclosarin to form stable phosphonic diesters. In case of phosphate buffer we were able to confirm not only the rapid hydrolysis of these agents to the respective alkyl methylphosphonates but also the formation of substantial amounts of pyrophosphate-like adducts (phosphorylated methylphosphonates), which very slowly hydrolyzed following zero-order kinetics. This led to a complex mixture of phosphorus containing species with changing concentrations over time. We identified the molecular structure of these buffer adducts using 1D ¹H-³¹P HSQC NMR and LC-ESI-MS/MS techniques. Reaction rates of adduct formation are fast enough to compete with hydrolysis in aqueous solution and to yield substantial amounts of buffer adduct over the course of just a couple of minutes. Possible reaction mechanisms are discussed with respect to the formation and subsequent hydrolysis of the pyrophosphate-like compounds as well as the increased rate of hydrolysis of the nerve agent to the corresponding alkyl methylphosphonates. In summary, the use of phosphate buffer for the development of new assays with sarin, soman and cyclosarin is discouraged. Already existing protocols should be carefully reexamined on an individual basis.

  7. Interfacial pH during mussel adhesive plaque formation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Nadine R. Martinez; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Mussel (Mytilus californianus) adhesion to marine surfaces involves an intricate and adaptive synergy of molecules and spatio-temporal processes. Although the molecules, such as mussel foot proteins (mfps), are well characterized, deposition details remain vague and speculative. Developing methods for the precise surveillance of conditions that apply during mfp deposition would aid both in understanding mussel adhesion and translating this adhesion into useful technologies. To probe the interfacial pH at which mussels buffer the local environment during mfp deposition, a lipid bilayer with tethered pH-sensitive fluorochromes was assembled on mica. The interfacial pH during foot contact with modified mica ranged from 2.2−3.3, which is well below the seawater pH of ~8. The acidic pH serves multiple functions: it limits mfp-Dopa oxidation, thereby enabling the catecholic functionalities to adsorb to surface oxides by H-bonding and metal ion coordination, and provides a solubility switch for mfps, most of which aggregate at pH ≥ 7-8. PMID:25875963

  8. Ocean Acidification: Euphausia Pacifica's Response to Decreasing pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, H. N.; Cooper, H.

    2014-12-01

    The increasing rate of CO2 accumulating in Earth's oceans creates a threat to organisms that can lead to disturbances in their reproduction, survival and growth. Euphausia pacifica is the dominant species of krill in Monterey Bay, CA, and a keystone species in the bay's food web. Previous work on the effects of ocean acidification on the survival, growth and molting of E. pacifica have shown they are fairly tolerant to increased CO2 concentrations. However, less is known about energy costs associated with maintaining their internal pH levels which could affect food consumption, swimming behavior or growth activity. We hypothesized that krill exposed to high CO2 will increase their feeding rate on local species of phytoplankton to account for increased energy costs of pH buffering activity. We exposed experimental E. pacifica to waters of pH 7.6 (the expected pH surface waters in year 2100), and pH 8.0 (control) periods.test for acclimation or longer term stress. Feeding rates were calculated as changes in phytoplankton counts over 24 hours of feeding using Frost's equations (Frost 1972). Understanding the way E. pacifica is affected by ocean acidification is important because of the role they play as the primary food source for a variety of predators necessary to maintain the Pacific's ecology.

  9. Reduction of dehydroascorbic acid at low pH.

    PubMed

    Wechtersbach, Luka; Cigić, Blaz

    2007-08-01

    Ascorbic acid and dehydroascorbic acid are unstable in aqueous solution in the presence of copper and iron ions, causing problems in the routine analysis of vitamin C. Their stability can be improved by lowering the pH below 2, preferably with metaphosphoric acid. Dehydroascorbic acid, an oxidised form of vitamin C, gives a relatively low response on the majority of chromatographic detectors, and is therefore routinely determined as the increase of ascorbic acid formed after reduction. The reduction step is routinely performed at a pH that is suboptimal for the stability of both forms. In this paper, the reduction of dehydroascorbic acid with tris-[2-carboxyethyl] phosphine (TCEP) at pH below 2 is evaluated. Dehydroascorbic acid is fully reduced with TCEP in metaphosphoric acid in less than 20 min, and yields of ascorbic acid are the same as at higher pH. TCEP and ascorbic acid formed by reduction, are more stable in metaphosphoric acid than in acetate or citrate buffers at pH 5, in the presence of redox active copper ions. The simple experimental procedure and low probability of artefacts are major benefits of this method, over those currently applied in a routine assay of vitamin C, performed on large number of samples.

  10. Interfacial pH during mussel adhesive plaque formation.

    PubMed

    Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Mussel (Mytilus californianus) adhesion to marine surfaces involves an intricate and adaptive synergy of molecules and spatio-temporal processes. Although the molecules, such as mussel foot proteins (mfps), are well characterized, deposition details remain vague and speculative. Developing methods for the precise surveillance of conditions that apply during mfp deposition would aid both in understanding mussel adhesion and translating this adhesion into useful technologies. To probe the interfacial pH at which mussels buffer the local environment during mfp deposition, a lipid bilayer with tethered pH-sensitive fluorochromes was assembled on mica. The interfacial pH during foot contact with modified mica ranged from 2.2 to 3.3, which is well below the seawater pH of ~ 8. The acidic pH serves multiple functions: it limits mfp-Dopa oxidation, thereby enabling the catecholic functionalities to adsorb to surface oxides by H-bonding and metal ion coordination, and provides a solubility switch for mfps, most of which aggregate at pH ≥ 7-8.

  11. Extracellular pH in the isolated retina of the toad in darkness and during illumination.

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, B; Wen, R

    1989-01-01

    1. Extracellular pH (pHo) was measured in the isolated retina preparation of the toad, Bufo marinus, using H(+)-selective microelectrodes. During superfusion with phosphate-buffered solution (pH 7.8), which had a low buffering capacity, pHo in the inner retina was 7.0-7.2 and there was a pHo gradient throughout the distal retina and into the bathing solution. 2. The retinal acidity appears to be due in part to the combined reactions of glycolysis and ATP hydrolysis, since anoxia greatly increased the pHo gradient, while superfusion with either glucose-free pyruvate solution or strophanthidin decreased this gradient. 3. Maintained illumination evoked both an acidification in the proximal retina and an alkalinization in the distal retina. Blocking synaptic transmission to second-order neurones (1.0 mM-aspartate) decreased the acidification but had little effect on the alkalinization, consistent with the notion that the alkalinization is of receptoral origin, while the acidification is of post-receptoral origin. 4. Retinal neurones extrude a significant amount of acid via Na(+)-H+ exchange, since 2.0 mM-amiloride, a blocker of Na(+)-H+ exchange, caused a sustained alkalinization in darkness and decreased the light-evoked changes in pHo, while 1.0 mM-4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2.2'-disulphonic acid (SITS), a blocker of Cl(-)-HCO3- exchange, produced a much smaller alkalinization. 5. Switching to a bicarbonate-buffered solution having a 75 times greater buffering capacity than the phosphate-buffered solution caused retinal pHo to become less acidic and significantly decreased the amplitude of the light-evoked pHo changes. 6. Addition of 2.0 mM-acetazolamide, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, to the bicarbonate-buffered solution increased both the pHo gradient and the light-evoked changes in pHo. These data are consistent with the idea that carbonic anhydrase, which is concentrated in Müller (glial) cells and to a lesser extent in horizontal cells, increases

  12. Electrodynamics of lipid membrane interactions in the presence of zwitterionic buffers.

    PubMed

    Koerner, Megan M; Palacio, Luis A; Wright, Johnnie W; Schweitzer, Kelly S; Ray, Bruce D; Petrache, Horia I

    2011-07-20

    Due to thermal motion and molecular polarizability, electrical interactions in biological systems have a dynamic character. Zwitterions are dipolar molecules that typically are highly polarizable and exhibit both a positive and a negative charge depending on the pH of the solution. We use multilamellar structures of common lipids to identify and quantify the effects of zwitterionic buffers that go beyond the control of pH. We use the fact that the repeat spacing of multilamellar lipid bilayers is a sensitive and accurate indicator of the force balance between membranes. We show that common buffers can in fact charge up neutral membranes. However, this electrostatic effect is not immediately recognized because of the concomitant modification of dispersion (van der Waals) forces. We show that although surface charging can be weak, electrostatic forces are significant even at large distances because of reduced ionic screening and reduced van der Waals attraction. The zwitterionic interactions that we identify are expected to be relevant for interfacial biological processes involving lipid bilayers, and for a wide range of biomaterials, including amino acids, detergents, and pharmaceutical drugs. An appreciation of zwitterionic electrodynamic character can lead to a better understanding of molecular interactions in biological systems and in soft materials in general.

  13. Effect of phosphate buffer on photodegradation reactions of riboflavin in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iqbal; Fasihullah, Q; Vaid, Faiyaz H M

    2005-03-01

    The effect of phosphate buffer on aerobic photodegradation reactions of riboflavin (RF) at pH 7.0 has been studied. The photoproducts of the two major reactions, viz., intramolecular photoreduction and intramolecular photoaddition, have been determined by a specific multicomponent spectrophotometric method. The overall photodegradation of riboflavin in the presence of phosphate buffer involves the participation of both H2PO4-and HPO4(2-) species. The second-order rate constants for the H2PO4(-)-catalysed photodegradation of riboflavin (normal photolysis) to lumichrome (LC) and HPO4(2-)-catalysed photodegradation of riboflavin (photoaddition) to cyclodehydroriboflavin (CDRF) are 0.93 x 10(-4) and 4.0 x 10(-4) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The addition of 0.25-2.00 M phosphate to RF solutions at pH 7.0 gives rise to RF-HPO4(2-) complex and hence the quenching of 4-36% fluorescence, respectively. This results in the suppression of normal photolysis leading to the formation of LC in favour of photoaddition to yield CDRF. The present study shows the involvement of H2PO4- anions in the base-catalysed degradation of riboflavin by normal photolysis vis-a-vis the involvement of HPO42- anions in photoaddition reactions of riboflavin suggested earlier [M. Schuman Jorns, G. Schollnhammer, P. Hemmerich, Intramolecular addition of the riboflavin side chain. Anion-catalysed neutral photochemistry, Eur. J. Biochem. 57 (1975) 35-48].

  14. Saline catholytes as alternatives to phosphate buffers in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yongtae; Logan, Bruce E

    2013-03-01

    Highly saline solutions were examined as alternatives to chemical buffers in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The performance of two-chamber MFCs with different concentrations of saline solutions in the cathode chamber was compared to those with a buffered catholyte (50mM PBS). The use of a NaCl catholyte improved the CE to 43-60% (28% with no membrane) due to a reduction in oxygen transfer into the anolyte. The saline catholyte also reduced the membrane and solution resistance to 23Ω (41Ω without a membrane). The maximum power density of 491mW/m(2) (240mM NaCl) was only 17% less than the MFC with 50mM PBS. The decrease in power output with highest salinity was due to reduced proton transfer due to the ion exchange membrane, and pH changes in the two solutions. These results show that MFC performance can be improved by using a saline catholyte without pH control.

  15. pH measurement and a rational and practical pH control strategy for high throughput cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haiying; Purdie, Jennifer; Wang, Tongtong; Ouyang, Anli

    2010-01-01

    The number of therapeutic proteins produced by cell culture in the pharmaceutical industry continues to increase. During the early stages of manufacturing process development, hundreds of clones and various cell culture conditions are evaluated to develop a robust process to identify and select cell lines with high productivity. It is highly desirable to establish a high throughput system to accelerate process development and reduce cost. Multiwell plates and shake flasks are widely used in the industry as the scale down model for large-scale bioreactors. However, one of the limitations of these two systems is the inability to measure and control pH in a high throughput manner. As pH is an important process parameter for cell culture, this could limit the applications of these scale down model vessels. An economical, rapid, and robust pH measurement method was developed at Eli Lilly and Company by employing SNARF-4F 5-(-and 6)-carboxylic acid. The method demonstrated the ability to measure the pH values of cell culture samples in a high throughput manner. Based upon the chemical equilibrium of CO(2), HCO(3)(-), and the buffer system, i.e., HEPES, we established a mathematical model to regulate pH in multiwell plates and shake flasks. The model calculates the required %CO(2) from the incubator and the amount of sodium bicarbonate to be added to adjust pH to a preset value. The model was validated by experimental data, and pH was accurately regulated by this method. The feasibility of studying the pH effect on cell culture in 96-well plates and shake flasks was also demonstrated in this study. This work shed light on mini-bioreactor scale down model construction and paved the way for cell culture process development to improve productivity or product quality using high throughput systems.

  16. Replenishing data descriptors in a DMA injection FIFO buffer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J [Rochester, MN; Blocksome, Michael A [Rochester, MN; Cernohous, Bob R [Rochester, MN; Heidelberger, Philip [Cortlandt Manor, NY; Kumar, Sameer [White Plains, NY; Parker, Jeffrey J [Rochester, MN

    2011-10-11

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for replenishing data descriptors in a Direct Memory Access (`DMA`) injection first-in-first-out (`FIFO`) buffer that include: determining, by a messaging module on an origin compute node, whether a number of data descriptors in a DMA injection FIFO buffer exceeds a predetermined threshold, each data descriptor specifying an application message for transmission to a target compute node; queuing, by the messaging module, a plurality of new data descriptors in a pending descriptor queue if the number of the data descriptors in the DMA injection FIFO buffer exceeds the predetermined threshold; establishing, by the messaging module, interrupt criteria that specify when to replenish the injection FIFO buffer with the plurality of new data descriptors in the pending descriptor queue; and injecting, by the messaging module, the plurality of new data descriptors into the injection FIFO buffer in dependence upon the interrupt criteria.

  17. Mitigation of substrate defects in reticles using multilayer buffer layers

    DOEpatents

    Mirkarimi, Paul B.; Bajt, Sasa; Stearns, Daniel G.

    2001-01-01

    A multilayer film is used as a buffer layer to minimize the size of defects on a reticle substrate prior to deposition of a reflective coating on the substrate. The multilayer buffer layer deposited intermediate the reticle substrate and the reflective coating produces a smoothing of small particles and other defects on the reticle substrate. The reduction in defect size is controlled by surface relaxation during the buffer layer growth process and by the degree of intermixing and volume contraction of the materials at the multilayer interfaces. The buffer layers are deposited at near-normal incidence via a low particulate ion beam sputtering process. The growth surface of the buffer layer may also be heated by a secondary ion source to increase the degree of intermixing and improve the mitigation of defects.

  18. Thin film photovoltaic devices with a minimally conductive buffer layer

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, Teresa M.; Burst, James

    2016-11-15

    A thin film photovoltaic device (100) with a tunable, minimally conductive buffer (128) layer is provided. The photovoltaic device (100) may include a back contact (150), a transparent front contact stack (120), and an absorber (140) positioned between the front contact stack (120) and the back contact (150). The front contact stack (120) may include a low resistivity transparent conductive oxide (TCO) layer (124) and a buffer layer (128) that is proximate to the absorber layer (140). The photovoltaic device (100) may also include a window layer (130) between the buffer layer (128) and the absorber (140). In some cases, the buffer layer (128) is minimally conductive, with its resistivity being tunable, and the buffer layer (128) may be formed as an alloy from a host oxide and a high-permittivity oxide. The high-permittivity oxide may further be chosen to have a bandgap greater than the host oxide.

  19. Nitrate and dissolved nitrous oxide in groundwater within cropped fields and riparian buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.-G.; Isenhart, T. M.; Parkin, T. B.; Schultz, R. C.; Loynachan, T. E.

    2009-01-01

    Transport and fate of dissolved nitrous oxide (N2O) in groundwater and its significance to nitrogen dynamics within agro-ecosystems are poorly known in spite of significant potential of N2O to global warming and ozone depletion. Increasing denitrification in riparian buffers may trade a reduction in nitrate (NO3-) transport to surface waters for increased N2O emissions resulting from denitrification-produced N2O dissolved in groundwater being emitted into the air when groundwater flows into a stream or a river. This study quantifies the transport and fate of NO3- and dissolved N2O moving from crop fields through riparian buffers, assesses whether groundwater exported from crop fields and riparian buffers is a significant source of dissolved N2O emissions, and evaluates the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) methodology to estimate dissolved N2O emission. We measured concentrations of NO3-; chloride (Cl-); pH; dissolved N2O, dissolved oxygen (DO), and organic carbon (DOC) in groundwater under a multi-species riparian buffer, a cool-season grass filter, and adjacent crop fields located in the Bear Creek watershed in central Iowa, USA. In both the multi-species riparian buffer and the cool-season grass filter, concentrations of dissolved N2O in the groundwater did not change as it passed through the sites, even when the concentrations of groundwater NO3- were decreased by 50% and 59%, respectively, over the same periods. The fraction of N lost to leaching and runoff (0.05) and the modified N2O emission factor, [ratio of dissolved N2O flux to N input (0.00002)] determined for the cropped fields indicate that the current IPCC methodology overestimates dissolved N2O flux in the sites. A low ratio between dissolved N2O flux and soil N2O emission (0.0003) was estimated in the cropped fields. These results suggest that the riparian buffers established adjacent to crop fields for water quality functions (enhanced denitrification) decreased NO3- and were not a

  20. Imaging pH with hyperpolarized 13C.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Ferdia A; Kettunen, Mikko I; Brindle, Kevin M

    2011-10-01

    pH is a fundamental physiological parameter that is tightly controlled by endogenous buffers. The acid-base balance is altered in many disease states, such as inflammation, ischemia and cancer. Despite the importance of pH, there are currently no routine methods for imaging the spatial distribution of pH in humans. The enormous gain in sensitivity afforded by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has provided a novel way in which to image tissue pH using MR, which has the potential to be translated into the clinic. This review explores the advantages and disadvantages of current pH imaging techniques and how they compare with DNP-based approaches for the measurement and imaging of pH with hyperpolarized (13)C. Intravenous injection of hyperpolarized (13)C-labeled bicarbonate results in the rapid production of hyperpolarized (13)CO(2) in the reaction catalyzed by carbonic anhydrase. As this reaction is close to equilibrium in the body and is pH dependent, the ratio of the (13)C signal intensities from H(13)CO(3)(-) and (13)CO(2), measured using MRS, can be used to calculate pH in vivo. The application of this technique to a murine tumor model demonstrated that it measured predominantly extracellular pH and could be mapped in the animal using spectroscopic imaging techniques. A second approach has been to use the production of hyperpolarized (13)CO(2) from hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate to measure predominantly intracellular pH. In tissues with a high aerobic capacity, such as the heart, the hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate undergoes rapid oxidative decarboxylation, catalyzed by intramitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase. Provided that there is sufficient carbonic anhydrase present to catalyze the rapid equilibration of the hyperpolarized (13)C label between CO(2) and bicarbonate, the ratio of their resonance intensities may again be used to estimate pH, which, in this case, is predominantly intracellular. As both pyruvate and bicarbonate are endogenous molecules they

  1. Evidence that pH can drive state transitions in isolated thylakoid membranes from spinach.

    PubMed

    Singh-Rawal, Pooja; Jajoo, Anjana; Mathur, Sonal; Mehta, Pooja; Bharti, Sudhakar

    2010-06-01

    Our observation that the F735/F685 ratio at 77 K increased when the lumenal pH decreased led us to investigate the role of pH in explaining the mechanism of state transitions in spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) thylakoid membranes. As the lumenal pH was changed from pH 7.5 to 5.5, the quantum yield of PS II decreased, while that of PS I increased. In the presence of an uncoupler, NH(4)Cl, which sequesters protons, a reversal of the effects observed at pH 5.5 were noticed. The thylakoid membranes treated with NaF at pH 5.5, when suspended in a buffer of pH 7.5, showed enhanced PS II fluorescence and a decreased PS I fluorescence, suggesting migration of LHC II back to PS II from PS I. The results presented here suggest for the first time that the lumenal pH of thylakoid membranes regulates the migration of antenna, and hence the energy distribution, between the two photosystems, i.e. a low lumenal pH (pH 5.5) favors antenna migration from PS II to PS I. At pH 7.5, the deprotonation of LHC II antenna attached to PS I leads to back migration of LHC II to PS II.

  2. Adsorption behavior of ferritin and buffer components, buffer agents and salts, onto silane-coupled silicon substrate.

    PubMed

    Fukuta, Megumi; Yamashita, Ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Fixation of ferritin using amino-silane modified substrates is effective, but salt and alkali ions of the buffer can contaminate substrates, inhibiting the sensing and fabrication of nano-electronic devices. To avoid adsorption of salts and alkali ions, buffer solutions have been replaced by pure water or alkali-metal-ion-free buffer. However, proteins in such solutions are sometimes denatured. Therefore, we developed a substrate which adsorbs ferritin but does not adsorb contaminants such as salts and alkali metal-ions contained in the buffer. Adsorption of ferritin was achieved by using a buffer with a high ion strength, such as PBS buffer, because the Debye length becomes shorter with increased ion strength due to intermolecular force even when the substrate has no positive charge. The combination of high coverage methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS)-coupled silicon substrate and PBS buffer solution is effective for adsorption of ferritin while not adsorbing buffer components such as contaminants and/or salts on the silicon substrate.

  3. Dehydration and delayed proton equilibria of red blood cells suspended in isosmotic phosphate buffers. Implications for studies of sickled cells.

    PubMed

    Bookchin, R M; Lew, D J; Balazs, T; Ueda, Y; Lew, V L

    1984-12-01

    PO4 buffers isosmotic with plasma or phosphate-buffered saline solution with a substantial proportion of PO4 are often used to wash and suspend red blood cells in studies of respiratory or sickling behavior. Measurements of sequential changes in mean cell hemoglobin concentration, pH, and ion content of red blood cells suspended in 295 mOsm Na-phosphate, pH 7.4, at 23 degrees or 37 degrees C, showed (1) rapid, persistent cell dehydration (mean cell hemoglobin concentration greater than 40 gm/dl) caused initially by Cl- efflux and later by replacement of monovalent Cl- by divalent HPO=4; and (2) temporary reversal of membrane pH gradients with normalization time (30 to 120 minutes) dependent on factors controlling the rate of phosphate-chloride exchange. Sequential equilibration of red blood cells in isosmotic citrate (impermeable) followed by PO4 demonstrated the two stages of the observed shifts in PO4 alone, and red blood cells suspended in 0.15 mol/L 32PO4 at 37 degrees C showed PO4 influx consistent with pH equilibrium kinetics. Sickle trait red blood cells deoxygenated at 37 degrees C, pH 7.4, in plasma or 10 mmol/L HEPES-buffered saline solution showed only 6% to 20% sickling. In isosmotic PO4, mean cell hemoglobin concentration was 40 to 41 gm/dl with approximately 80% sickling. In phosphate-buffered saline solution containing 70 mmol/L PO4, red blood cells showed smaller, similar changes (mean cell hemoglobin concentration approximately 38 gm/dl) with a longer equilibration period and deoxygenated sickle trait cells showed 40% sickling. The altered properties of red blood cells suspended in PO4 or phosphate-buffered saline solution were neither intended nor appropriate for many studies using these media, particularly with hemoglobin S-containing red blood cells, and interpretations of reported results must be reassessed in light of these findings.

  4. Hydrolyzed polyacrylamide grafted maize starch based microbeads: application in pH responsive drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Setty, C Mallikarjuna; Deshmukh, Anand S; Badiger, Aravind M

    2014-09-01

    The present study details the synthesis, characterization and pharmaceutical application of hydrolysed polyacrylamide grafted maize starch (HPam-g-MS) as promising polymeric material for the development of pH responsive microbeads. Different grades of graft copolymer were synthesized by changing the net microwave irradiation time, while keeping all other factors constant. Acute oral toxicity study performed in rodents ensured the bio-safety of graft copolymer for clinical application. Various batches of aceclofenac loaded microbeads were prepared by ionic gelation method using synthesized graft copolymers and evaluated for formulation parameters. FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the chemical compatibility between drug and graft copolymer. Results of in vitro release study (USP type-II) carried out in two different pH media (pH 1.2 acid buffer and pH 7.4 phosphate buffer) showed that release rate of drug from developed microbeads was a function of both: (a) surrounding pH and (b) the matrix composition. The drug release was relatively higher at alkaline pH as compared to acidic pH and this feature is desirable from viewpoint of site specific drug delivery. A direct correlation was observed between percentage grafting and microbeads performance and it presents a scope for further research on application and optimization of HPam-g-MS based microbeads as drug delivery carriers.

  5. Multiple cytosolic calcium buffers in posterior pituitary nerve terminals

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Shane M.; Chang, Che-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic Ca2+ buffers bind to a large fraction of Ca2+ as it enters a cell, shaping Ca2+ signals both spatially and temporally. In this way, cytosolic Ca2+ buffers regulate excitation-secretion coupling and short-term plasticity of release. The posterior pituitary is composed of peptidergic nerve terminals, which release oxytocin and vasopressin in response to Ca2+ entry. Secretion of these hormones exhibits a complex dependence on the frequency and pattern of electrical activity, and the role of cytosolic Ca2+ buffers in controlling pituitary Ca2+ signaling is poorly understood. Here, cytosolic Ca2+ buffers were studied with two-photon imaging in patch-clamped nerve terminals of the rat posterior pituitary. Fluorescence of the Ca2+ indicator fluo-8 revealed stepwise increases in free Ca2+ after a series of brief depolarizing pulses in rapid succession. These Ca2+ increments grew larger as free Ca2+ rose to saturate the cytosolic buffers and reduce the availability of Ca2+ binding sites. These titration data revealed two endogenous buffers. All nerve terminals contained a buffer with a Kd of 1.5–4.7 µM, and approximately half contained an additional higher-affinity buffer with a Kd of 340 nM. Western blots identified calretinin and calbindin D28K in the posterior pituitary, and their in vitro binding properties correspond well with our fluorometric analysis. The high-affinity buffer washed out, but at a rate much slower than expected from diffusion; washout of the low-affinity buffer could not be detected. This work has revealed the functional impact of cytosolic Ca2+ buffers in situ in nerve terminals at a new level of detail. The saturation of these cytosolic buffers will amplify Ca2+ signals and may contribute to use-dependent facilitation of release. A difference in the buffer compositions of oxytocin and vasopressin nerve terminals could contribute to the differences in release plasticity of these two hormones. PMID:26880753

  6. SAMPLING DEVICE FOR pH MEASUREMENT IN PROCESS STREAMS

    DOEpatents

    Michelson, C.E.; Carson, W.N. Jr.

    1958-11-01

    A pH cell is presented for monitoring the hydrogen ion concentration of a fluid in a process stream. The cell is made of glass with a side entry arm just above a reservoir in which the ends of a glass electrode and a reference electrode are situated. The glass electrode contains the usual internal solution which is connected to a lead. The reference electrode is formed of saturated calomel having a salt bridge in its bottom portion fabricated of a porous glass to insure low electrolyte flow. A flush tube leads into the cell through which buffer and flush solutions are introduced. A ground wire twists about both electrode ends to insure constant electrical grounding of the sample. The electrode leads are electrically connected to a pH meter of aay standard type.

  7. The pH profile for acid-induced elongation of coleoptile and epicotyl sections is consistent with the acid-growth theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleland, R. E.; Buckley, G.; Nowbar, S.; Lew, N. M.; Stinemetz, C.; Evans, M. L.; Rayle, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    The acid-growth theory predicts that a solution with a pH identical to that of the apoplast of auxin-treated tissues (4.5.-5.0) should induce elongation at a rate comparable to that of auxin. Different pH profiles for elongation have been obtained, however, depending on the type of pretreatment between harvest of the sections and the start of the pH-incubations. To determine the acid sensitivity under in vivo conditions, oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptile, maize (Zea mays L.) coleoptile and pea (Pisum sativum L.) epicotyl sections were abraded so that exogenous buffers could penetrate the free space, and placed in buffered solutions of pH 3.5-6.5 without any preincubation. The extension, without auxin, was measured over the first 3 h. Experiments conducted in three laboratories produced similar results. For all three species, sections placed in buffer without pretreatment elongated at least threefold faster at pH 5.0 than at 6.0 or 6.5, and the rate elongation at pH 5.0 was comparable to that induced by auxin. Pretreatment of abraded sections with pH-6.5 buffer or distilled water adjusted to pH 6.5 or above gave similar results. We conclude that the pH present in the apoplast of auxin-treated coleoptile and stems is sufficiently low to account for the initial growth response to auxin.

  8. Student Understanding of pH: "I Don't Know What the Log Actually Is, I Only Know Where the Button Is on My Calculator"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watters, Dianne J.; Watters, James J.

    2006-01-01

    In foundation biochemistry and biological chemistry courses, a major problem area that has been identified is students' lack of understanding of pH, acids, bases, and buffers and their inability to apply their knowledge in solving acid/base problems. The aim of this study was to explore students' conceptions of pH and their ability to solve…

  9. Investigation of interaction studies of cefpirome with ACE-inhibitors in various buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, Muhammad; Arayne, Muhammad Saeed; Sultana, Najma; Abbas, Hira Fatima

    2015-02-01

    This work describes a RP-HPLC method for the determination and interaction studies of cefpirome with ACE-inhibitors (captopril, enalapril and lisinopril) in various buffers. The separation and interaction of cefpirome with ACE-inhibitors was achieved on a Purospher Star, C18 (5 μm, 250 × 4.6 mm) column. Mobile phase consisted of methanol: water (80:20, v/v, pH 3.3); however, for the separation of lisinopril, it was modified to methanol-water (40:60, v/v, pH 3.3) and pumped at a flow rate of 1 mL min-1. In all cases, UV detection was performed at 225 nm. Interactions were carried out in physiological pH i.e., pH 1 (simulated gastric juice), 4 (simulated full stomach), 7.4 (blood pH) and 9 (simulated GI), drug contents were analyzed by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. Method was found linear in the concentration range of 1.0-50.0 μg mL-1 with correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.999. Precision (RSD%) was less than 2.0%, indicating good precision of the method and accuracy was 98.0-100.0%. Furthermore, cefpirome-ACE-inhibitors' complexes were also synthesized and results were elucidated on the basis of FT-IR, and 1H NMR. The interaction results show that these interactions are pH dependent and for the co-administration of cefpirome and ACE-inhibitors, a proper interval should be given.

  10. Effect of acetate and carbonate buffers on the photolysis of riboflavin in aqueous solution: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iqbal; Anwar, Zubair; Iqbal, Kefi; Ali, Syed Abid; Mirza, Tania; Khurshid, Adeela; Khurshid, Aqeela; Arsalan, Adeel

    2014-06-01

    The photolysis of riboflavin (RF) in the presence of acetate buffer (pH 3.8-5.6) and carbonate buffer (pH 9.2-10.8) has been studied using a multicomponent spectrophotometric method for the simultaneous assay of RF and its photoproducts. Acetate and carbonate buffers have been found to catalyze the photolysis reaction of RF. The apparent first-order rate constants for the acetate-catalyzed reaction range from 0.20 to 2.86 × 10(-4) s(-1) and for the carbonate-catalyzed reaction from 3.33 to 15.89 × 10(-4) s(-1). The second-order rate constants for the interaction of RF with the acetate and the carbonate ions range from 2.04 to 4.33 × 10(-4) M(-1) s(-1) and from 3.71 to 11.80 × 10(-4) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The k-pH profile for the acetate-catalyzed reaction is bell shaped and for the carbonate-catalyzed reaction a steep curve. Both HCO3(-) and CO3(2-) ions are involved in the catalysis of the photolysis reaction in alkaline solution. The rate constants for the HCO3(-) and CO3(2-) ions catalyzed reactions are 0.72 and 1.38 × 10(-3) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, indicating a major role of CO3(2-) ions in the catalysis reaction. The loss of RF fluorescence in acetate buffer suggests an interaction between RF and acetate ions to promote the photolysis reaction. The optimum stability of RF solutions is observed in the pH range 5-6, which is suitable for pharmaceutical preparations.

  11. Groundwater nitrate following installation of a vegetated riparian buffer.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Toshiro; Logsdon, Sally D; Tomer, Mark D; Burkart, Michael R

    2007-10-15

    Substantial questions remain about the time required for groundwater nitrate to be reduced below 10 mg L(-1) following establishment of vegetated riparian buffers. The objective of this study was to document changes in groundwater nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) concentrations that occurred within a few years of planting a riparian buffer. In 2000 and 2001 a buffer was planted adjacent to a first-order stream in the deep loess region of western Iowa with strips of walnut and cottonwood trees, alfalfa and brome grass, and switch grass. Non-parametric statistics showed significant declines in NO3-N concentrations in shallow groundwater following buffer establishment, especially mid 2003 and later. The dissolved oxygen generally was >5 mg L(-1) beneath the buffer, and neither NO3-N nor DO changed significantly under a non-buffered control area. These short-term changes in groundwater NO3-N provide evidence that vegetated riparian buffers may yield local water-quality benefits within a few years of planting.

  12. Improved ultrastructure of marine invertebrates using non-toxic buffers.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Jacqueline; Gruber, Daniela; Leisch, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    Many marine biology studies depend on field work on ships or remote sampling locations where sophisticated sample preservation techniques (e.g., high-pressure freezing) are often limited or unavailable. Our aim was to optimize the ultrastructural preservation of marine invertebrates, especially when working in the field. To achieve chemically-fixed material of the highest quality, we compared the resulting ultrastructure of gill tissue of the mussel Mytilus edulis when fixed with differently buffered EM fixatives for marine specimens (seawater, cacodylate and phosphate buffer) and a new fixative formulation with the non-toxic PHEM buffer (PIPES, HEPES, EGTA and MgCl2). All buffers were adapted for immersion fixation to form an isotonic fixative in combination with 2.5% glutaraldehyde. We showed that PHEM buffer based fixatives resulted in equal or better ultrastructure preservation when directly compared to routine standard fixatives. These results were also reproducible when extending the PHEM buffered fixative to the fixation of additional different marine invertebrate species, which also displayed excellent ultrastructural detail. We highly recommend the usage of PHEM-buffered fixation for the fixation of marine invertebrates.

  13. Monitoring Liverworts to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Hydroriparian Buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Kellina L.; Yasué, Maï

    2014-01-01

    In the coastal temperate rainforest of British Columbia (BC) in western Canada, government policies stipulate that foresters leave unlogged hydroriparian buffer strips up to 25 m on each side of streams to protect wildlife habitat. At present, studies on the effectiveness of these buffers focus on mammals, birds, and amphibians while there is comparably little information on smaller organisms such as liverworts in these hydroriparian buffers. To address this gap of knowledge, we conducted field surveys of liverworts comparing the percent cover and community composition in hydroriparian forested areas ( n = 4 sites, n = 32 plots with nested design) to hydroriparian buffer zones ( n = 4 sites, n = 32 plots). We also examined how substrate type affected the cover of liverworts. Liverwort communities in buffers were similar to those in riparian forest areas and most liverworts were found on downed wood. Thus, hydroriparian buffers of 25-35 m on each side in a coastal temperate rainforest effectively provide habitat for liverworts as long as downed wood is left intact in the landscape. Because liverworts are particularly sensitive to changes in humidity, these results may indicate that hydroriparian buffers are an effective management strategy for bryophytes and possibly for a range of other riparian species that are particularly sensitive to forestry-related changes in microclimate.

  14. Gilliam County Riparian Buffers; 2003-2004 Annual Reports.

    SciTech Connect

    Coiner, Josh

    2004-06-01

    Interest appears to be at an all-time high for riparian conservation programs in Gilliam County. With the recently added Herbaceous Buffer and the already established CREP program interest is booming. However, more and more people are turning towards the herbaceous buffer because of expense. The riparian forest buffer is becoming too expensive. Even with the excellent cost share and incentives landowners are having trouble with Farm Service Agency's payment limitation. Because of this payment limitation landowners are not receiving their full rental and incentive payments, usually in year one. This has cooled the installation of riparian forest buffers and peaked interest in the CP-29 (Herbaceous Buffer for Wildlife). Either way, riparian lands are being enhanced and water quality is being improved. Year three should be very similar to the accomplishments of year 2. There has already been several projects proposed that may or may not be approved during year 3. I am currently working on three projects that are all over 2.5 miles long on each side and total anywhere from 60 to 250 acres in size. Along with these three projects there at least seven small projects being proposed. Four of those projects are riparian forest buffers and the remaining are herbaceous buffers.

  15. Buffer Gas Experiments in Mercury (Hg+) Ion Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Sang K.; Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    2004-01-01

    We describe the results of the frequency shifts measured from various buffer gases that might be used as a buffer gas to increase the loading efficiency and cooling of ions trapped in a small mercury ion clock. The small mass, volume and power requirement of space clock precludes the use of turbo pumps. Hence, a hermetically sealed vacuum system, incorporating a suitable getter material with a fixed amount of inert buffer gas may be a practical alternative to the groundbased system. The collision shifts of 40,507,347.996xx Hz clock transition for helium, neon and argon buffer gases were measured in the ambient earth magnetic field. In addition to the above non-getterable inert gases we also measured the frequency shifts due to getterable, molecular hydrogen and nitrogen gases which may be used as buffer gases when incorporated with a miniature ion pump. We also examined the frequency shift due to the low methane gas partial pressure in a fixed higher pressure neon buffer gas environment. Methane gas interacted with mercury ions in a peculiar way as to preserve the ion number but to relax the population difference in the two hyperfine clock states and thereby reducing the clock resonance signal. The same population relaxation was also observed for other molecular buffer gases (N H,) but at much reduced rate.

  16. Improved ultrastructure of marine invertebrates using non-toxic buffers

    PubMed Central

    Montanaro, Jacqueline; Gruber, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Many marine biology studies depend on field work on ships or remote sampling locations where sophisticated sample preservation techniques (e.g., high-pressure freezing) are often limited or unavailable. Our aim was to optimize the ultrastructural preservation of marine invertebrates, especially when working in the field. To achieve chemically-fixed material of the highest quality, we compared the resulting ultrastructure of gill tissue of the mussel Mytilus edulis when fixed with differently buffered EM fixatives for marine specimens (seawater, cacodylate and phosphate buffer) and a new fixative formulation with the non-toxic PHEM buffer (PIPES, HEPES, EGTA and MgCl2). All buffers were adapted for immersion fixation to form an isotonic fixative in combination with 2.5% glutaraldehyde. We showed that PHEM buffer based fixatives resulted in equal or better ultrastructure preservation when directly compared to routine standard fixatives. These results were also reproducible when extending the PHEM buffered fixative to the fixation of additional different marine invertebrate species, which also displayed excellent ultrastructural detail. We highly recommend the usage of PHEM-buffered fixation for the fixation of marine invertebrates. PMID:27069800

  17. Monitoring liverworts to evaluate the effectiveness of hydroriparian buffers.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Kellina L; Yasué, Maï

    2014-01-01

    In the coastal temperate rainforest of British Columbia (BC) in western Canada, government policies stipulate that foresters leave unlogged hydroriparian buffer strips up to 25 m on each side of streams to protect wildlife habitat. At present, studies on the effectiveness of these buffers focus on mammals, birds, and amphibians while there is comparably little information on smaller organisms such as liverworts in these hydroriparian buffers. To address this gap of knowledge, we conducted field surveys of liverworts comparing the percent cover and community composition in hydroriparian forested areas (n = 4 sites, n = 32 plots with nested design) to hydroriparian buffer zones (n = 4 sites, n = 32 plots). We also examined how substrate type affected the cover of liverworts. Liverwort communities in buffers were similar to those in riparian forest areas and most liverworts were found on downed wood. Thus, hydroriparian buffers of 25-35 m on each side in a coastal temperate rainforest effectively provide habitat for liverworts as long as downed wood is left intact in the landscape. Because liverworts are particularly sensitive to changes in humidity, these results may indicate that hydroriparian buffers are an effective management strategy for bryophytes and possibly for a range of other riparian species that are particularly sensitive to forestry-related changes in microclimate.

  18. A Tight Upper Bound on Online Buffer Management for Multi-Queue Switches with Bicodal Buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Koji; Miyazaki, Shuichi; Okabe, Yasuo

    The online buffer management problem formulates the problem of queuing policies of network switches supporting QoS (Quality of Service) guarantee. In this paper, we consider one of the most standard models, called multi-queue switches model. In this model, Albers et al. gave a lower bound \\frac{e}{e-1}, and Azar et al. gave an upper bound \\frac{e}{e-1} on the competitive ratio when m, the number of input ports, is large. They are tight, but there still remains a gap for small m. In this paper, we consider the case where m = 2, namely, a switch is equipped with two ports, which is called a bicordal buffer model. We propose an online algorithm called Segmental Greedy Algorithm (SG) and show that its competitive ratio is at most \\frac{16}{13} (\\simeq 1.231), improving the previous upper bound by \\frac{9}{7} (\\simeq 1.286). This matches the lower bound given by Schmidt.

  19. [Photohemolysis sensitized by psoralen: dependence on pH].

    PubMed

    Potapenko, A Ia; Belichenko, I V; Mamedov, I S; Zhuravel', N N; Kiagova, A A; Beijersbergen van Henegouwen, G M J; De Vries, Ch

    2007-01-01

    The effect of pH on the hemolysis of erythrocytes photosensitized (366 nm, 23 Wt/m2) by psoralen has been studied. The dependence of the photohemolysis rate (V) on irradiation dose (D) was described by the equation V = Vo + kD, where Vo is the rate of hemolysis without irradiation (dark), and k is the constant. The index of the power at dose x was approximately equal to 2, and its value did not change as the pH of the erythrocyte suspension was changed. It was found that changes in pH led to a sharp change in the value of coefficient k and correspondingly V. The lowest rate of photohemolysis was observed in the pH range from 8.0 to 8.4. As pH was changed from 3.4 to 9.0 or from 8.0 to 7.4, the V value increased approximately twofold. At pH below 7.4, an abrupt increase (approximately fourfold) in V was observed, with the pK value being equal to 7.3. The psoralen molecule lacks titratable acidic and basic groups; therefore, the effects of pH can hardly be assigned to changes in the photophysical properties of the sensitizer. The increase in V in the alkaline region is prohably related to the acceleration of photooxidation of reduced glutathione, whereas the jump of V at pH of about 7.3 may be due to the titration of the product of psoralen photooxidation. The latter assumption is confirmed by the data of hign performance liquid chromatography. In these experiments, psoralen was oxidized in ethanol and mixed with the phosphate buffer at different pH values followed by a qualitative and quantitative analysis by high performance liquid chromatography of photoproducts. Several photoproducts of psoralen have been identified whose content depended on pH. The curve of titration of one photoproduct was similar in shape to the pH dependence of psoralen-photosensitized hemolysis.

  20. The pH Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemecology, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Describes a game that can be used to teach students about the acidity of liquids and substances around their school and enable them to understand what pH levels tell us about the environment. Students collect samples and measure the pH of water, soil, plants, and other natural material. (DDR)

  1. Wasco Riparian Buffer Project, Annual Report 2003-2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Ron

    2003-07-01

    This project implements riparian buffer systems in the Mid-Columbia, addressing limiting factors identified in the Deschutes River Sub-basin Summary, March 2, 2001. This project is providing the technical planning support needed to implement at least 20 riparian buffer system contracts on approximately 800 acres covering an estimated 36 miles of anadromous fish streams. During this second year of implementation, 17 buffer contracts were established on 173,462 ft. of stream (25.9 miles). Acreage included in the buffers totaled 891.6 acres. Average buffer width was 112 ft. on each side of the stream. Cumulative totals through the first two project years are 26 buffers on 36.6 stream miles covering 1,283.6 acres. Actual implementation costs, lease payments, and maintenance costs will be borne by existing USDA programs: Conservation Reserve (CRP) and Conservation Reserve Enhancement Programs (CREP). The lease period of each contract may vary from 10 to 15 years. During this year, the average lease period was 14.9 years. The total value of contracts established this year is $1,421,268 compared with $55,504 in BPA contract costs to provide the technical support needed to get the contracts implemented. Cumulative contract value for the first two years is $1,919,451 compared to $103,329 cost to BPA. This project provides technical staffing to conduct assessments and develop conservation plans required for riparian buffer systems to help keep pace with a growing backlog of potential buffer projects. This project meets a critical need in the lower Deschutes and lower John Day River basins and complements the Riparian Buffer project approved for Fifteenmile watershed, Project No. 2001-021-00 begun in fiscal year 2001. This project supports RPA 150 and 153 as required under the Federal Hydropower System biological opinion and benefits the mid-Columbia ESU of steelhead.

  2. Buffer layers for REBCO films for use in superconducting devices

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Wee, Sung-Hun

    2014-06-10

    A superconducting article includes a substrate having a biaxially textured surface. A biaxially textured buffer layer, which can be a cap layer, is supported by the substrate. The buffer layer includes a double perovskite of the formula A.sub.2B'B''O.sub.6, where A is rare earth or alkaline earth metal and B' and B'' are different transition metal cations. A biaxially textured superconductor layer is deposited so as to be supported by the buffer layer. A method of making a superconducting article is also disclosed.

  3. Enhanced adhesion for LIGA microfabrication by using a buffer layer

    DOEpatents

    Bajikar, Sateesh S.; De Carlo, Francesco; Song, Joshua J.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an improvement on the LIGA microfabrication process wherein a buffer layer is applied to the upper or working surface of a substrate prior to the placement of a resist onto the surface of the substrate. The buffer layer is made from an inert low-Z material (low atomic weight), a material that absorbs secondary X-rays emissions from the substrate that are generated from the substrate upon exposure to a primary X-rays source. Suitable materials for the buffer layer include polyamides and polyimide. The preferred polyimide is synthesized form pyromellitic anhydride and oxydianiline (PMDA-ODA).

  4. Enhanced adhesion for LIGA microfabrication by using a buffer layer

    DOEpatents

    Bajikar, Sateesh S.; De Carlo, Francesco; Song, Joshua J.

    2004-01-27

    The present invention is an improvement on the LIGA microfabrication process wherein a buffer layer is applied to the upper or working surface of a substrate prior to the placement of a resist onto the surface of the substrate. The buffer layer is made from an inert low-Z material (low atomic weight), a material that absorbs secondary X-rays emissions from the substrate that are generated from the substrate upon exposure to a primary X-rays source. Suitable materials for the buffer layer include polyamides and polyimide. The preferred polyimide is synthesized form pyromellitic anhydride and oxydianiline (PMDA-ODA).

  5. Investigation of active-buffer pulse tube refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shaowei; Kakimi, Yasuhiro; Matsubara, Yoichi

    An active-buffer pulse tube refrigerator, which is a GM type pulse tube refrigerator, is described in this paper. Two or more buffers are connected at the hot end of the pulse tube through on/off valves. The main purpose of this method is to increase the efficiency. A numerical method is introduced to analyse the working process. To understand the basic mechanism, an ideal cycle is also introduced. With a prototype single stage active-buffer pulse tube refrigerator, a cooling capacity of 166 W and a percent Carnot of 13% at 80 K have been obtained.

  6. An evaluation of the effect of methylene blue dye pH on apical leakage.

    PubMed

    Starkey, D L; Anderson, R W; Pashley, D H

    1993-09-01

    The effect of varying the pH of 2% methylene blue dye on apical leakage was evaluated. Eighty-four roots of extracted human teeth were used in this study. The roots were endodontically cleaned and shaped, obturated, apically resected, and amalgam or Temporary Endodontic Restorative Material retro-fillings were placed. The roots were immersed for 7 days in dye solutions of controlled pH of 1, 2, 3, 5 or 7, or in a 2% unbuffered deionized water solution of methylene blue. The results demonstrated significantly less leakage in the pH 1 and 2 amalgam groups. All other amalgam groups and the Temporary Endodontic Restorative Material groups showed no significant differences attributable to pH. Temporary Endodontic Restorative Material retrofilling groups demonstrated statistically significantly less apical leakage at each pH evaluated than the amalgam-retrofilled groups. Additionally, a significant buffering effect of the root structure on the dye solutions was measured.

  7. Streptococcus oligofermentans Inhibits Streptococcus mutans in Biofilms at Both Neutral pH and Cariogenic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xudong; de Soet, Johannes Jacob; Tong, Huichun; Gao, Xuejun; He, Libang; van Loveren, Cor; Deng, Dong Mei

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis of oral microbiota can be maintained through microbial interactions. Previous studies showed that Streptococcus oligofermentans, a non-mutans streptococci frequently isolated from caries-free subjects, inhibited the cariogenic Streptococcus mutans by the production of hydrogen peroxide (HP). Since pH is a critical factor in caries formation, we aimed to study the influence of pH on the competition between S. oligofermentans and S. mutans in biofilms. To this end, S. mutans and S. oligofermentans were inoculated alone or mixed at 1:1 ratio in buffered biofilm medium in a 96-well active attachment model. The single- and dual-species biofilms were grown under either constantly neutral pH or pH-cycling conditions. The latter includes two cycles of 8 h neutral pH and 16 h pH 5.5, used to mimic cariogenic condition. The 48 h biofilms were analysed for the viable cell counts, lactate and HP production. The last two measurements were carried out after incubating the 48 h biofilms in buffers supplemented with 1% glucose (pH 7.0) for 4 h. The results showed that S. oligofermentans inhibited the growth of S. mutans in dual-species biofilms under both tested pH conditions. The lactic acid production of dual-species biofilms was significantly lower than that of single-species S. mutans biofilms. Moreover, dual-species and single-species S. oligofermentans biofilms grown under pH-cycling conditions (with a 16 h low pH period) produced a significantly higher amount of HP than those grown under constantly neutral pH. In conclusion, S. oligofermentans inhibited S. mutans in biofilms not only under neutral pH, but also under pH-cycling conditions, likely through HP production. S. oligofermentans may be a compelling probiotic candidate against caries. PMID:26114758

  8. Longitudinal meta-analysis of NIST pH Standard Reference Materials(®): a complement to pH key comparisons.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Kenneth W

    2015-04-01

    This meta-analysis assesses the long-term (up to 70 years) within-laboratory variation of the NIST pH Standard Reference Material® (SRM) tetroxalate, phthalate, phosphate, borate, and carbonate buffers. Values of ΔpH(S), the difference between the certified pH value, pH(S), of each SRM issue and the mean of all pH(S) values for the given SRM at that Celsius temperature, t, are graphed as a function of the SRM issue and t. In most cases, |ΔpH(S)| < 0.004. Deviations from the nominal base:acid amount (mole) ratio of a buffer yield t-independent, constant shifts in ΔpH(S). The mean ΔpH(S) characterizes such deviations. The corresponding mole fraction of impurity in the conjugate buffer component is generally <0.3 %. Changes in the equipment, personnel, materials, and methodology of the pH(S) measurement yield t-dependent variations. The standard deviation of ΔpH(S) characterizes such changes. Standard deviations of ΔpH(S) are generally 0.0015 or less. The results provide a long-term, single-institution complement to the time-specific, multi-institution results of pH key comparisons administered by the Consultative Committee for Metrology in Chemistry and Biology (CCQM).

  9. Electrochemical remediation of copper contaminated kaolinite by conditioning anolyte and catholyte pH simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dong-Mei; Zorn, Roman; Kurt, Czurda

    2003-05-01

    This report examined electrochemical remediation of copper contaminated kaolinite by controlling electrolytes' pH for both of anolyte and catholyte simultaneously. Results showed that electrokinetic process and remediation efficiency varied obviously when different buffer systems, including citric acid (test 1 ) nitric acid + EDTA (test 2) and nitric acid (test 3), were used to control catholyte pH and Na2CO3 was used at the same time to control all anolyte one. It was found that under such pH condition soil's pH in soil column kept at 3.0-7.0 successfully, and correspondingly no copper precipitation and decrease of soil electroconductivity appeared, which are usually observed in electrokinetic process due to OH- introduction into soil column by electrochemical reaction occurred in cathode. Electroosmosis flow rates were almost equal for these three tests, indicating that these buffers did not affect Zeta-potential of kaolinite within the examined duration. More acid and basic solution was added into electrokinetic cell when nitric acid was used as buffer than when nitric acid + EDTA and then citric acid were used. Due to introduction of large amounts of ions into soil column, significant higher current was observed for test 3 than other two. Analysis of copper speciation and total quantity in kaolinite indicated that 22.5%, 23.74% and 55.65% Cu were removed from kaolinite for test 1, test 2 and test 3 respectively after only 10 days' electrokinetic remediation.

  10. Engineering a pH responsive pore forming protein.

    PubMed

    Kisovec, Matic; Rezelj, Saša; Knap, Primož; Cajnko, Miša Mojca; Caserman, Simon; Flašker, Ajda; Žnidaršič, Nada; Repič, Matej; Mavri, Janez; Ruan, Yi; Scheuring, Simon; Podobnik, Marjetka; Anderluh, Gregor

    2017-02-08

    Listeriolysin O (LLO) is a cytolysin capable of forming pores in cholesterol-rich lipid membranes of host cells. It is conveniently suited for engineering a pH-governed responsiveness, due to a pH sensor identified in its structure that was shown before to affect its stability. Here we introduced a new level of control of its hemolytic activity by making a variant with hemolytic activity that was pH-dependent. Based on detailed structural analysis coupled with molecular dynamics and mutational analysis, we found that the bulky side chain of Tyr406 allosterically affects the pH sensor. Molecular dynamics simulation further suggested which other amino acid residues may also allosterically influence the pH-sensor. LLO was engineered to the point where it can, in a pH-regulated manner, perforate artificial and cellular membranes. The single mutant Tyr406Ala bound to membranes and oligomerized similarly to the wild-type LLO, however, the final membrane insertion step was pH-affected by the introduced mutation. We show that the mutant toxin can be activated at the surface of artificial membranes or living cells by a single wash with slightly acidic pH buffer. Y406A mutant has a high potential in development of novel nanobiotechnological applications such as controlled release of substances or as a sensor of environmental pH.

  11. Biochemical Stabilization of Glucagon at Alkaline pH

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Melanie A.; Castle, Jessica R.; El Youssef, Joseph; Bakhtiani, Parkash A.; Bergstrom, Colin P.; Carroll, Jul