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Sample records for acetonitrile-water mobile phase

  1. Enhanced extraction yields and mobile phase separations by solvent mixtures for the analysis of metabolites in Annona muricata L. leaves.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro de Souza, Eloana Benassi; da Silva, Renata Reis; Afonso, Sabrina; Scarminio, Ieda Spacino

    2009-12-01

    The effects of five extraction solvents and their mixtures on the yield of metabolites in crude and fractionated extracts of Annona muricata L. leaves were investigated by direct comparison. Extraction media were prepared using simplex centroid mixtures of ethanol, ethyl acetate, dichloromethane, acetone, and chloroform. The effects of the mobile phase solvent strength and the analysis wavelength on the chromatographic separation were also investigated. Solvent mixtures rather than pure solvents were found to be the most efficient extractors for the different fractions. The results indicated that the mobile phase composed of methanol/acetonitrile/water (26:27:47 v/v/v) was most suitable for the basic fraction analysis at 254 nm, whereas the mobile phase composed of methanol/acetonitrile/water (35:35:30 v/v/v) was the most adequate for the organic fraction analysis at 254 nm. The results indicated that the chromatographic profiles and number of peaks were affected by the mobile phase strength and analysis wavelength. PMID:19882621

  2. Another glimpse over the salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction in acetonitrile/water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Valente, Inês Maria; Gonçalves, Luís Moreira; Rodrigues, José António

    2013-09-20

    The use of the salting-out effect in analytical chemistry is very diverse and can be applied to increase the volatility of the analytes in headspace extractions, to cause the precipitation of proteins in biological samples or to improve the recoveries in liquid-liquid extractions. In the latter, the salting-out process can be used to create a phase separation between water-miscible organic solvents and water. Salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE) is an advantageous sample preparation technique aiming HPLC-UV analysis when developing analytical methodologies. In fact, some new extraction methodologies like QuEChERS include the SALLE concept. This manuscript discusses another point of view over SALLE with particular emphasis over acetonitrile-water mixtures for HPLC-UV analysis; the influence of the salting-out agents, their concentration and the water-acetonitrile volume ratios were the studied parameters. α-dicarbonyl compounds and beer were used as test analytes and test samples, respectively. The influence of the studied parameters was characterized by the obtained phase separation volume ratio and the fraction of α-dicarbonyls extracted to the acetonitrile phase. Results allowed the distribution of salts within three groups according to the phase separation and their extractability: (1) chlorides and acetates, (2) carbonates and sulfates and (3) magnesium sulfate; of all tested salts, sodium chloride had the highest influence on the α-dicarbonyls fraction extracted. PMID:23958692

  3. Effect of HPLC binary mobile phase composition on the analysis of carbonyls.

    PubMed

    Ho, Duy Xuan; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2011-09-01

    The relative performance of the binary mobile phase in the high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of carbonyl compounds (CCs) was tested using the liquid-phase standards containing 15 aldehyde/ketone-DNPH mixture. The Hichrome column was employed for the analysis of CCs at a flow rate of 1.5 mL min( - 1). The binary mobile phases prepared using both acetonitrile/water (AW) and a possible alternative of methanol:water (MW) mixture were examined by their calibration results. The data derived from these two binary phases were then evaluated in terms of three key variables (i.e., resolution, relative sensitivity, and retention time). The relative water content (or the water to organic solvent ratio (W/A) or (W/M)) of the binary phase was found as the key variable for the performance. The results indicate that the optimal resolution of AW combination was attained consistently for most composition, while MW generally suffered from overpressure problem. The changes of water content in the AW mixture led to the changes of all three variables in the quantitative analysis of CCs. The obtained results confirm that the AW mixture should be the optimal elutant for the CC analysis, as other simple binary compositions like MW are limited in many respects. PMID:21107904

  4. Formation of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based liquid chromatography mobile phases as interference ions in liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometric analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Anil K.; Zhang, Rui; Orton, Daniel J.; Zhao, Rui; Clauss, Therese RW; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-05-30

    Two unexpected singly charged ions at m/z 1103 and 944 have been observed in mass spectra obtained from electrospray ionization-mass spectrometric analysis of liquid chromatography effluents with mobile phases containing trifluoroacetic acid. Accurate mass measurement and tandem mass spectrometry studies revealed that these two ions are not due to any contamination from solvents and chemicals used for mobile and stationary phases or from the laboratory atmospheric environment. Instead these ions are clusters of trifluoroacetic acid formed in association with acetonitrile, water and iron from the stainless steel union used to connect the column with the electrospray tip and to apply high voltage; the molecular formulae are Fe+((OH)(H2O)2)9(CF3COOH)5 and Fe+((OH)(H2O)2)6 (CF3COOH)5.

  5. Retention of functional polymers in liquid adsorption chromatography: effect of the end groups in PEGs and their methyl ethers in different mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, V Cuong; Trathnigg, Bernd

    2010-04-01

    It is shown that the end group parameter, which describes the influence of the end group on retention, can be determined in RP chromatography from two chromatograms of a nonfunctional and a monofunctional sample, if a sufficient number of peaks with the same number of repeat units in each sample can be reasonably resolved and identified. The same procedure can also be applied for pairs of di- and monofunctional polymers. End group parameters have been determined in three different mobile phases: acetonitrile-water, acetone-water and methanol-water of different compositions. The temperature dependence of the interaction parameter of the repeat unit and the end group parameter has been found to be different, which allows a fine-tuning of retention. PMID:20187029

  6. 47 CFR 54.1008 - Mobility Fund Phase I disbursements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Mobility Fund § 54.1008 Mobility Fund Phase I disbursements. (a) A winning... compliance with all requirements for receipt of Mobility Fund Phase I support at the time that it...

  7. 47 CFR 54.1008 - Mobility Fund Phase I disbursements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Mobility Fund § 54.1008 Mobility Fund Phase I disbursements. (a) A winning... compliance with all requirements for receipt of Mobility Fund Phase I support at the time that it...

  8. 47 CFR 54.1008 - Mobility Fund Phase I disbursements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mobility Fund Phase I disbursements. 54.1008 Section 54.1008 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Mobility Fund § 54.1008 Mobility Fund Phase I disbursements. (a) A winning bidder for Mobility Fund Phase I...

  9. Carbon-hydrogen vs. carbon-carbon bond cleavage of 1,2-diarylethane radical cations in acetonitrile-water

    SciTech Connect

    Camaioni, D.M.; Franz, J.A.

    1984-05-04

    Radical cations of 1,2-diarylethanes and 1-phenyl-2-arylethanes (Ar = phenyl, p-tolyl, p-anisyl) were generated in acidic 70% acetonitrile-water by Cu/sup 2 +/-catalyzed peroxydisulfate oxidation. The radical cations fragment mainly by loss of benzylic protons (C-H cleavage) rather than by alkyl C-C bond cleavage. The 1,2-diarylethanol products undergo further selective oxidation to aryl aldehydes and arylmethanols via rapid equilibration of diarylethane and diarylethanol radical cations. The radical cation of 2,3-dimethyl-2,3-diphenylbutane fragments efficiently by C-C cleavage, forming cumyl radical and cumyl cation. Oxidations of bibenzyl-bicumyl mixtures show selective oxidation of bicumyl dependent on total substrate concentration, providing evidence of equilibrating radical cations and showing that bicumyl fragments faster than bibenzyl loses protons. The effects of reaction conditions and substrate structure on reactivity are discussed.

  10. Photophysics of Diphenylbutadiynes in Water, Acetonitrile-Water, and Acetonitrile Solvent Systems: Application to Single Component White Light Emission.

    PubMed

    Pati, Avik Kumar; Jana, Rounak; Gharpure, Santosh J; Mishra, Ashok K

    2016-07-28

    Diacetylenes have been the subject of current research because of their interesting optoelectronic properties. Herein, we report that substituted diphenylbutadiynes exhibit locally excited (LE) and excimer emissions in water and multiple emissions from the LE, excimer, and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) states in acetonitrile-water solvent systems. The LE, excimer, and ICT emissions are clearly distinguishable for a diphenylbutadiynyl derivative with push (-NMe2)-pull (-CN) substituents and those are closely overlapped for non-push-pull analogues. In neat acetonitrile, the excimer emission disappears and the LE and ICT emissions predominate. In the case of the push (-NMe2)-pull (-CN) diphenylbutadiyne, the intensity of the ICT emission increases with increasing the fluorophore concentration. This suggests that the ICT emission accompanies with intermolecular CT emission which is of exciplex type. As the LE and exciplex emissions of the push-pull diphenylbutadiyne together cover the visible region (400-700 nm) in acetonitrile, a control of the fluorophore concentration makes the relative intensities of the LE and exciplex emissions such that pure white light emission is achieved. The white light emission is not observed in those diphenylbutadiynyl analogues in which the peripheral substituents of the phenyl rings do not possess strong push-pull character. PMID:27379734

  11. Retention of ionisable compounds on high-performance liquid chromatography. XV. Estimation of the pH variation of aqueous buffers with the change of the acetonitrile fraction of the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Subirats, Xavier; Bosch, Elisabeth; Rosés, Martí

    2004-12-01

    The most commonly used mobile phases in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) are hydro-organic mixtures of an aqueous buffer and an organic modifier. The addition of this organic solvent to buffered aqueous solutions involves a variation of the buffer properties (pH and buffer capacity). In this paper, the pH variation is studied for acetic acid-acetate, phosphoric acid-dihydrogenphosphate-hydrogenphosphate, citric acid-dihydrogencitrate-citrate, and ammonium-ammonia buffers. The proposed equations allow pH estimation of acetonitrile-water buffered mobile phases up to 60% (v/v) of organic modifier and initial aqueous buffer concentrations between 0.001 and 0.1 mol L(-1), from the initial aqueous pH. The estimated pH variation of the mobile phase and the pKa variation of the analytes allow us to predict the degree of ionisation of the analytes and from this and analyte hydrophobicities, to interpret the relative retention and separation of analyte mixtures. PMID:15628122

  12. Capillary electrokinetic separations: Influence of mobile phase composition on performance

    SciTech Connect

    Sepaniak, M.J.; Swaile, D.F.; Powell, A.C.; Cole, R.O.

    1990-01-01

    The composition of the mobile phase employed in capillary zone electrophoresis and the related technique, micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography, is an important factor in determining separation performance. The influences of ionic salt, surfactant, and organic solvent mobile phase additives on separation efficiency, retention, and elution range are discussed and demonstrated. 23 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. MSAT mobile electronically steered phased array antenna development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Fred

    1988-01-01

    The Mobile Satellite Experiment (MSAT-X) breadboard antenna design demonstrates the feasibility of using a phased array in a mobile satellite application. An electronically steerable phased array capable of tracking geosynchronous satellites from anywhere in the Continental United States has been developed. The design is reviewed along with the test data. Cost analysis are presented which indicate that this design can be produced at a cost of $1620 per antenna.

  14. Phase transitions in contagion processes mediated by recurrent mobility patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcan, Duygu; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2011-07-01

    Human mobility and activity patterns mediate contagion on many levels, including the spatial spread of infectious diseases, diffusion of rumours, and emergence of consensus. These patterns however are often dominated by specific locations and recurrent flows and poorly modelled by the random diffusive dynamics generally used to study them. Here we develop a theoretical framework to analyse contagion within a network of locations where individuals recall their geographic origins. We find a phase transition between a regime in which the contagion affects a large fraction of the system and one in which only a small fraction is affected. This transition cannot be uncovered by continuous deterministic models because of the stochastic features of the contagion process and defines an invasion threshold that depends on mobility parameters, providing guidance for controlling contagion spread by constraining mobility processes. We recover the threshold behaviour by analysing diffusion processes mediated by real human commuting data.

  15. 77 FR 15369 - Mobility Fund Phase I Auction GIS Data of Potentially Eligible Census Blocks

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-15

    ... COMMISSION Mobility Fund Phase I Auction GIS Data of Potentially Eligible Census Blocks AGENCY: Federal... information system (GIS) data for the census blocks potentially eligible for Mobility Fund Phase I support to...-0432 (TTY). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This is a summary of the Mobility Fund Phase I Auction GIS...

  16. Absolute negative mobility induced by potential phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandogbessi, Bruno S.; Kenfack, Anatole

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the transport properties of a particle subjected to a deterministic inertial rocking system, under a constant bias, for which the phase of the symmetric spatial potential used is time modulated. We show that this modulated phase, assisted by a periodic driving force, can lead to the occurrence of the so-called absolute negative mobility (ANM), the phenomenon in which the particle surprisingly moves against the bias. Furthermore, we discover that ANM predominantly originates from chaotic-periodic transitions. While a detailed mechanism of ANM remains unclear, we show that one can manipulate the control parameters, i.e., the amplitude and the frequency of the phase, in order to enforce the motion of the particle in a given direction. Finally, for this experimentally realizable system, we devise a two-parameter current plot which may be a good guide for controlling ANM.

  17. Considerations of digital phase modulation for narrowband satellite mobile communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grythe, Knut

    1990-01-01

    The Inmarsat-M system for mobile satellite communication is specified as a frequency division multiple access (FDMA) system, applying Offset Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (QPSK) for transmitting 8 kbit/sec in 10 kHz user channel bandwidth. We consider Digital Phase Modulation (DPM) as an alternative modulation format for INMARSAT-M. DPM is similar to Continuous Phase Modulation (CPM) except that DPM has a finite memory in the premodular filter with a continuous varying modulation index. It is shown that DPM with 64 states in the VA obtains a lower bit error rate (BER). Results for a 5 kHz system, with the same 8 kbit/sec transmitted bitstream, is also presented.

  18. Phased Arrays of Ground and Airborne Mobile Terminals for Satellite Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John

    1996-01-01

    Phased array antenna is beginning to play an important in the arena of mobile/satellite communications. Two examples of mobile terminal phased arrays will be shown. Their technical background, challenges, and cost drivers will be discussed. A possible solution to combat some of the deficiencies of the conventional phased array by exploiting the phased reflectarray technology will be briefly presented.

  19. Methylammonium formate as a mobile phase modifier for reversed-phase liquid chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Shau; Danielson, Neil D.

    2009-01-01

    Although alkylammonium ionic liquids such as ethylammonium nitrate and ethylammonium formate have been used as mobile phase “solvents” for liquid chromatography (LC), we have shown that methylammonium formate (MAF), in part because of its lower viscosity, can be an effective replacement for methanol (MeOH) in reversed-phase LC. Plots of log retention factor versus the fraction of MeOH and MAF in the mobile phase indicate quite comparable solvent strength slope values of 2.50 and 2.05, respectively. Using a polar endcapped C18 column, furazolidone and nitrofurantoin using 20% MAF-80% water could be separated in 22 min but no baseline separation was possible using MeOH as the modifier, even down to 10%. Suppression of silanol peak broadening effects by MAF is important permitting a baseline separation of pyridoxine, thiamine, and nicotinamide using 5% MAF-95% water at 0.7 mL/min. Using 5% MeOH-95% water, severe peak broadening for thiamine is evident. The compatibility of MAF as a mobile phase modifer for LC with mass spectrometry detection of water soluble vitamins is also shown. PMID:18849044

  20. The lipophilicity of artificial and natural sweeteners estimated by reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography and computed by various methods.

    PubMed

    Briciu, Rodica Domnica; Kot-Wasik, Agata; Wasik, Andrzej; Namieśnik, Jacek; Sârbu, Costel

    2010-06-01

    The chromatographic behavior of some artificial and natural sweeteners was established by reverse phase high performance thin-layer chromatography (RP-HPTLC) on RP-18, RP-18W, RP-8, CN and NH(2) stationary phases. The mobile phases were mixtures of acetonitrile-water in different proportions of volume, chosen to create a suitable migration during the chromatographic process. The lipophilicity was described through different chromatographic descriptors such as R(M0), mean of R(M) (mR(M)), and scores of R(M) values corresponding to the first principal component (PC1/R(M)). In addition, scores and loadings resulting from covariance matrix of retention data enable new information about similarity and differences of investigated compounds and between both the stationary and mobile phases. The experimental lipophilicity indices estimated from retention data are directly correlated with the computed values, via computer software and internet module, at a high significant statistical level. PMID:20430396

  1. Adsorption interaction parameter of polyethers in ternary mobile phases: the critical adsorption line.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, V Cuong; Trathnigg, Bernd

    2010-04-01

    It is shown that in LC of polymers, the interaction parameter in ternary mobile phases can be described by a plane, which is determined by the dependencies in binary mobile phases. Instead of a critical adsorption point, critical conditions are observed along a straight line of composition between the two critical points in binary mobile phases. Consequently, a separation of block copolymers under critical conditions for one block by an adsorption mechanism for the other block can be achieved in ternary mobile phases of different compositions, which allows an adjustment of the retention of the adsorbing block. PMID:20222074

  2. High resolution ion mobility measurements for gas phase proteins: correlation between solution phase and gas phase conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudgins, Robert R.; Woenckhaus, Jürgen; Jarrold, Martin F.

    1997-11-01

    Our high resolution ion mobility apparatus has been modified by attaching an electrospray source to perform measurements for biological molecules. While the greater resolving power permits the resolution of more conformations for BPTI and cytochrome c, the resolved features are generally much broader than expected for a single rigid conformation. A major advantage of the new experimental configuration is the much gentler introduction of ions into the drift tube, so that the observed gas phase conformations appear to more closely reflect those present in solution. For example, it is possible to distinguish between the native state of cytochrome c and the methanol-denatured form on the basis of the ion mobility measurements; the mass spectra alone are not sensitive enough to detect this change. Thus this approach may provide a quick and sensitive tool for probing the solution phase conformations of biological molecules.

  3. Polarons and Mobile Impurities Near a Quantum Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadkhoo, Shahriar

    This dissertation aims at improving the current understanding of the physics of mobile impurities in highly correlated liquid-like phases of matter. Impurity problems pose challenging and intricate questions in different realms of many-body physics. For instance, the problem of ''solvation'' of charged solutes in polar solvents, has been the subject of longstanding debates among chemical physicists. The significant role of quantum fluctuations of the solvent, as well as the break down of linear response theory, render the ordinary treatments intractable. Inspired by this complicated problem, we first attempt to understand the role of non-specific quantum fluctuations in the solvation process. To this end, we calculate the dynamic structure factor of a model polar liquid, using the classical Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. We verify the failure of linear response approximation in the vicinity of a hydrated electron, by comparing the outcomes of MD simulations with the predictions of linear response theory. This nonlinear behavior is associated with the pronounced peaks of the structure factor, which reflect the strong fluctuations of the local modes. A cavity picture is constructed based on heuristic arguments, which suggests that the electron, along with the surrounding polarization cloud, behave like a frozen sphere, for which the linear response theory is broken inside and valid outside. The inverse radius of the spherical region serves as a UV momentum cutoff for the linear response approximation to be applicable. The problem of mobile impurities in polar liquids can be also addressed in the framework of the ''polaron'' problem. Polaron is a quasiparticle that typically acquires an extended state at weak couplings, and crossovers to a self-trapped state at strong couplings. Using the analytical fits to the numerically obtained charge-charge structure factor, a phenomenological approach is proposed within the Leggett's influence functional formalism, which

  4. Occurrence and behavior of system peaks in RP HPLC with solely aqueous mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Kalíková, Kveta; Hruska, Vlastimil; Svobodová, Jana; Chudoba, Richard; Gas, Bohuslav; Tesarová, Eva

    2009-09-01

    System peaks are important but often also disturbing phenomena occurring in separation systems. Behavior of system peaks was studied in reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP HPLC) systems consisting of an RP Amide C16 column and aqueous solutions of organic acids with alkaline metal hydroxides as mobile phases. Binary mobile phases, composed of benzoic acid and lithium hydroxide (LiOH) or cesium hydroxide (CsOH), yielded two system peaks. The first peak was stationary and the second one moved with dilution of the mobile phase or with changes of the alkaline metal hydroxide concentration. The latter changes affected dissociation of the benzoic acid present in the mobile phase and thereby its retention. The presumption that the first system peak is not influenced by the type of alkaline metal cation and that it is related to the non-adsorbed component of the mobile phase was confirmed by a cyclic procedure. Three-component mobile phases composed of benzoic acid, tropic acid, and a hydroxide gave rise to three system peaks as expected. The first peak was again stationary and the two others shifted depending on the concentration variation of both acids. Resonance causing a zigzag peak, well described in capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE), was observed if 1-pentanol was injected into a chromatographic system with one-component mobile phase. PMID:19639550

  5. Effect of Mobile Phase on Electrospray Ionization Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liigand, Jaanus; Kruve, Anneli; Leito, Ivo; Girod, Marion; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2014-08-01

    Electrospray (ESI) ionization efficiencies (IE) of a set of 10 compounds differing by chemical nature, extent of ionization in solution (basicity), and by hydrophobicity (tetrapropylammonium and tetraethylammonium ion, triethylamine, 1-naphthylamine, N,N-dimethylaniline, diphenylphthalate, dimethylphtahalate, piperidine, pyrrolidine, pyridine) have been measured in seven mobile phases (three acetonitrile percentages 20%, 50%, and 80%, and three different pH-adjusting additives, 0.1% formic acid, 1 mM ammonia, pH 5.0 buffer combination) using the relative measurement method. MS parameters were optimized separately for each ion. The resulting relative IE data were converted into comparable logIE values by anchoring them to the logIE of tetrapropylammonium ion taking into account the differences of ionization in different solvents and thereby making the logIE values of the compounds comparable across solvents. The following conclusions were made from analysis of the data. The compounds with pK a values in the range of the solution pH values displayed higher IE at lower pH. The sensitivity of IE towards pH depends on hydrophobicity being very strong with pyridine, weaker with N,N-dimethylaniline, and weakest with 1-naphthylamine. IEs of tetraalkylammonium ions and triethylamine were expectedly insensitive towards solution pH. Surprisingly high IEs of phthalate esters were observed. The differences in solutions with different acetonitrile content and similar pH were smaller compared with the pH effects. These results highlight the importance of hydrophobicity in electrospray and demonstrate that high hydrophobicity can sometimes successfully compensate for low basicity.

  6. Polarons and Mobile Impurities Near a Quantum Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadkhoo, Shahriar

    This dissertation aims at improving the current understanding of the physics of mobile impurities in highly correlated liquid-like phases of matter. Impurity problems pose challenging and intricate questions in different realms of many-body physics. For instance, the problem of ''solvation'' of charged solutes in polar solvents, has been the subject of longstanding debates among chemical physicists. The significant role of quantum fluctuations of the solvent, as well as the break down of linear response theory, render the ordinary treatments intractable. Inspired by this complicated problem, we first attempt to understand the role of non-specific quantum fluctuations in the solvation process. To this end, we calculate the dynamic structure factor of a model polar liquid, using the classical Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. We verify the failure of linear response approximation in the vicinity of a hydrated electron, by comparing the outcomes of MD simulations with the predictions of linear response theory. This nonlinear behavior is associated with the pronounced peaks of the structure factor, which reflect the strong fluctuations of the local modes. A cavity picture is constructed based on heuristic arguments, which suggests that the electron, along with the surrounding polarization cloud, behave like a frozen sphere, for which the linear response theory is broken inside and valid outside. The inverse radius of the spherical region serves as a UV momentum cutoff for the linear response approximation to be applicable. The problem of mobile impurities in polar liquids can be also addressed in the framework of the ''polaron'' problem. Polaron is a quasiparticle that typically acquires an extended state at weak couplings, and crossovers to a self-trapped state at strong couplings. Using the analytical fits to the numerically obtained charge-charge structure factor, a phenomenological approach is proposed within the Leggett's influence functional formalism, which

  7. 30 CFR 77.900 - Low- and medium-voltage circuits serving portable or mobile three-phase alternating current...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... portable or mobile three-phase alternating current equipment; circuit breakers. 77.900 Section 77.900... mobile three-phase alternating current equipment; circuit breakers. Low- and medium-voltage circuits supplying power to portable or mobile three-phase alternating current equipment shall be protected...

  8. 77 FR 73586 - Further Inquiry Into Issues Related to Mobility Fund Phase II

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ...The Wireless Telecommunications Bureau and Wireline Competition Bureau (collectively, the Bureaus) seek further comment on specific issues relating to the implementation of Phase II of the Mobility Fund. The Bureaus also seek to develop a more comprehensive record on certain issues relating to the award of ongoing support for advanced mobile...

  9. 77 FR 14012 - Eligible Telecommunications Carrier Designation for Participation in Mobility Fund Phase I

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ...In this document, the Commission's Wireless Telecommunications and Wireline Competition Bureaus describe the process and requirements for applicants seeking Eligible Telecommunications Carrier (ETC) Designation from the Commission for participation in Mobility Fund Phase I Auction...

  10. [Deep eutectic solvent: a new kind of mobile phase modifier for hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Tan, Ting; Qiao, Xin; Wan, Yiqun; Qiu, Hongdeng

    2015-09-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were used as a new kind of mobile phase modifier in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC). In our experiment, a SiO2 column (150 mm x 4.6 mm, 3 µm) was selected to separate several nucleobases and nucleosides by using the mixed solution of acetonitrile and DES (choline chloride-ethylene glycol (1:3, mol/mol) ) as mobile phase. Subsequently, the concentrations of DESs in acetonitrile and the column temperature on the effect of separation were investigated. According to the experimental results, better separation of nucleobases and nucleosides was obtained by using acetonitrile and DESs mixed solution as mobile phase than that using traditional water-based solution. For example, a baseline separation between cytosine and cytidine cannot be achieved by HILIC with water-based mobile phase, however, greater improvement was gained by HILIC with modified DES-acetonitrile mobile phase. Meanwhile, the retention times of nucleobases and nucleosides decreased as the proportion of DESs in acetonitrile increased, the most significant decrease of which was with cytidine. Similar retention behavior took place with the effect of column temperature. Decreased retention times of the analytes were observed as column temperature increased. The experimental results indicated that this new method may solve some separation difficulties in traditional water-based HILIC, which also successfully verify the feasibility of DESs as mobile phase modifiers. PMID:26753279

  11. Effect of temperature in reversed phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Guillarme, D; Heinisch, S; Rocca, J L

    2004-10-15

    The high temperature liquid chromatography (HTLC) reveals interesting chromatographic properties but even now, it misses some theoretical aspects concerning the influence of high temperature on thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of chromatography: such a knowledge is very essential for method development. In this work, the effect of temperature on solute behavior has been studied using various stationary phases which are representative of the available thermally stable materials present on the market. The thermodynamic properties were evaluated by using different mobile phases: acetonitrile-water, methanol-water and pure water. The obtained results were discussed on the basis of both type of mobile phases and type of stationary phases. Type of mobile phase was found to play an important role on the retention of solutes. The kinetic aspect was studied at various temperatures ranging from ambient temperature to high temperature (typically from about 30 to 200 degrees C) by fitting the experimental data with the Knox equation and it was shown that the efficiency is improved significantly when the temperature is increased. In this paper, we also discussed the problem of temperature control for thermostating columns which may represent a significant source of peak broadening: by taking into account the three main parameters such as heat transfer, pressure drop and band broadening resulting from the preheating tube, suitable rules are set up for a judicious choice of the column internal diameter. PMID:15527119

  12. Liquid chromatography at critical conditions in ternary mobile phases: gradient elution along the critical line.

    PubMed

    Trathnigg, Bernd; Malik, Muhammad Imran; Pircher, Nicole; Hayden, Stephan

    2010-07-01

    In ternary mobile phases consisting of acetone, methanol, and water, the retention of PEG on reversed-phase columns is independent on molar mass at certain compositions of the mobile phase. Along this critical adsorption line, the retention of polypropylene glycol varies quite strongly, which can be utilized in the separation of block copolymers. Gradient elution along the critical line allows a baseline separation of all oligomers in polypropylene glycol up to approximately 25 propylene oxide units. The same resolution can be achieved in the separation of ethylene oxide-propylene oxide block copolymers, regardless of the length of the ethylene oxide block. PMID:20535754

  13. Microfabricated refractive index gradient based detector for reversed-phase liquid chromatography with mobile phase gradient elution.

    PubMed

    McBrady, Adam D; Synovec, Robert E

    2006-02-10

    Typical refractive index (RI) detectors for liquid chromatography (LC) are not well suited to application with mobile phase gradient elution, due to the difficulty in correcting for the detected baseline shift during the gradient. We report a sensitive, highly reproducible, microfabricated refractive index gradient (micro-RIG) detector that performs well with mobile phase gradient elution LC. Since the micro-RIG signal remains on-scale throughout the mobile phase gradient, one can apply a baseline correction procedure. We demonstrate that by collecting two mobile phase gradient blanks and subtracting one of them from the other, a reproducible, flat baseline is achieved. Therefore, subtracting a blank from a separation provides a baseline corrected chromatogram with reasonably high signal-to-noise ratio for eluting analytes. The micro-RIG detector uses a collimated diode laser beam to optically probe a RIG formed perpendicular to the laminar flow direction within a microfabricated borosilicate glass chip. The chip-based design of the detector is suitable for either traditional bench-top or LC-on-a-chip technologies. We report reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) separations of proteins and polymers, over mobile phase gradient conditions of 67% A:33% B to 3% A:97% B by volume, where A is 96% methanol:3.9% water:0.1% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), and B is 3.9% methanol:96% water:0.1% TFA. The separations were performed on a Jupiter 5 mu C4 300 A 150 mm x 1.0 mm Phenomenex column at a flow rate of 20 microl/min. Viscosity changes during the mobile phase gradient separation are found to shift the on-chip merge position of the detected concentration gradient (i.e., RIG), in a reproducible fashion. However, this viscosity effect makes detection sensitivity vary throughout the mobile phase gradient, due to moving the optimized position of the probe beam in relation to the analyte concentration gradient being probed. None-the-less, consistent limits

  14. The influence of mobile phase demixion on thin-layer chromatographic enantioseparation of ibuprofen and naproxen.

    PubMed

    Sajewicz, Mieczysław; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Gontarska, Monika; Kiszka, Sylwia; Kowalska, Teresa

    2007-09-01

    In our earlier article we presented the results of tracing the enantioseparation of the two test analytes (ibuprofen and naproxen) by means of video densitometry and scanning densitometry. In that way we demonstrated an excellent performance of this combined approach to the thin-layer chromatographic detection in the area of enantioseparation. In this paper we study an impact of the four different mobile phases on the enantioseparation of the scalemic mixtures of ibuprofen and naproxen on the silica gel layers impregnated with L-arginine as chiral selector. The main component of all the investigated mobile phases is 2-propanol. Mobile phase 1 consists of pure 2-propanol, while mobile phases 2-4 contain, respectively, ca. 0.66, 1.32, and 1.98 g/L of glacial acetic acid in 2-propanol. Acetic acid is used to protonate L-arginine, as the involved retention mechanism consists of the ion pair formation between L-arginine in the cationic form and the chiral 2-arylpropionic acids (2-APAs), ibuprofen and naproxen, in the anionic form. It is shown that in the absence of glacial acetic acid no enantioseparation can be obtained. Then with adding of 0.66 g/L glacial acetic acid partial enantioseparation of the naproxen and ibuprofen antimers is obtained, with a simultaneous effect of the mobile phase demixion. With the amount of acetic acid increasing, the effect of demixion becomes increasingly perceptible. In that case the displacement effect is observed (and mathematically modeled), which results in compressing of the antimer pairs by the second front of mobile phase. The obtained results allow a deeper insight into the mechanism of enantioseparation with the two test 2-APAs. A combined impact of the crystalline chirality of silica gel and the molecular chirality of L-arginine on the vertical and the horizontal enantioseparation of ibuprofen and naproxen is also discussed. PMID:18019559

  15. 77 FR 9655 - Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Updated List of Potentially Eligible Census Blocks

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ..., 77 FR 7152, February 10, 2012, comments are due on or before February 24, 2012. Reply comments are... Public Notice, 77 FR 7152, February 10, 2012, all filings in response to the notice must refer to AU... program requirements in the Auction 901 (Mobility Fund Phase I) Comment Public Notice, 77 FR...

  16. 77 FR 38061 - Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Supplemental Short-Form Instructions and Other Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... Notice, 77 FR 32092, May 31, 2012, the Bureaus provided general instructions for completing FCC Form 180... COMMISSION Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Supplemental Short-Form Instructions and Other Information AGENCY... provide other information regarding Auction 901. DATES: Short-Form applications are due prior to 6 p.m....

  17. Effect of the mobile phase composition on the adsorption behavior of tryptophan in reversed-phase liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Tarab; Guiochon, Georges A

    2006-03-01

    Single-component adsorption isotherm data of l-tryptophan on a C{sub 18}-bonded silica column were acquired by frontal analysis (FA), with aqueous mobile phases containing 2.5, 5, and 7.5% of acetonitrile (ACN) or 7, 10, 15, and 20% of methanol (MeOH). Most of these isotherms have two inflection points and three different parts. The low and the high concentration parts exhibit langmuirian behavior. The intermediate part exhibits anti-langmuirian behavior. The inflection points shift toward higher concentrations with increasing mobile phase concentration in ACN or MeOH, which causes the differences in the isotherm profiles. The nature of the organic modifier and its concentration affect only the isotherm profile and the numerical values of its parameters, not the nature of the best model, which is the bi-Moreau model in all cases. The isotherm profiles depend on the experimental conditions because they affect the intensity of the adsorbate-adsorbate interactions. Overloaded band profiles of tryptophan were recorded with the seven mobile phase compositions. They were used to determine the best values of the isotherm coefficients by the inverse method (IM) of chromatography. There is an excellent agreement between the values of these parameters obtained by FA and by IM. Increasing the concentration of either ACN or MeOH in the mobile phase causes a slight decrease in the saturation capacities of the low and the high energy sites, and in the adsorption constant of the low energy sites. The adsorption constant of the high energy sites increases with increasing concentration of either solvent or is little affected. The adsorbate-adsorbate interaction constants of both low and high energy sites increase for both solvents. Saturation capacities of the high energy sites are higher for ACN than for MeOH.

  18. 78 FR 21355 - Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Scheduled for October 24, 2013; Comment Sought on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ..., 76 FR 73830, November 29, 2011 and 76 FR 81562, December 28, 2011. Auction 902 will award one-time... Mobility Fund Phase I, 77 FR 14012. Petitions for designation as an ETC should be filed in WC Docket No. 09... COMMISSION Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Scheduled for October 24, 2013; Comment Sought on...

  19. Influence of the Modifier Type and its Concentration on Electroosmotic Flow of the Mobile Phase in Pressurized Planar Electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Hałka-Grysińska, Aneta; Płocharz, Paweł W; Torbicz, Andrzej; Skwarek, Ewa; Janusz, Władysław; Dzido, Tadeusz H

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to find a relationship between electroosmotic flow (EOF) velocity of the mobile phase in pressurized planar electrochromatography (PPEC) and physicochemical properties like zeta potential, dielectric constant, and viscosity of the mobile phase as well as its composition. The study included different types of organic modifiers (acetonitrile, methanol, ethanol, acetone, formamide, N-methylformamide and N,N-dimethylformamide) in the full concentration range. In all experiments, chromatographic glass plates HPTLC RP-18 W from Merck (Darmstadt) were used as a stationary phase. During the study we found that there is no linear correlation between EOF velocity of the mobile phase and single variables such as zeta potential or dielectric constant or viscosity. However, there is quite strong linear correlation between EOF velocity of the mobile phase and variable obtained by multiplying zeta potential of the stationary phase-mobile phase interface, by dielectric constant of the mobile phase solution and dividing by viscosity of the mobile phase. Therefore, it could be concluded that the PPEC system fulfilled the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski equation. PMID:25067847

  20. Investigation of retention on bare silica using reversed-phase mobile phases at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Bidlingmeyer, Brian A; Henderson, John

    2004-12-10

    The use of unbonded silica as a stationary phase in reversed-phase HPLC is described as a useful alternative to bonded phase columns for polar, lipophilic amines. Using four lipophilic amines, the role of temperature is shown to favorably impact both efficiency and selectivity, which is not universally seen when using bonded phases. As temperature is raised, retention drops on the silica column. The temperature behavior appears to support the hypothesis that retention is dependant upon electrostatic and adsorptive forces. PMID:15628161

  1. The mobile phase in coals: Its nature and modes of release: Part 2, Efforts to better define the nature and magnitude of the mobile phase: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Given, P.H.

    1987-04-01

    Several liquefaction conditions and many extracting solvents were used in attempts to set up conditions such that, as the conditions became more severe, progressively more hexane-solubles, analyzable by GC/MS, would be released. It was hoped to identify a threshold beyond which trapped mobile phase molecules would become evident. A set of 10 hexane-soluble fractions, all obtained under various conditions from the same coal (a sample of Herrin No. 6 seam, Illinois), were subjected to analysis by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Yields ranged from 0.6 to 16% of the organic matter in the coal. Prominent constituents of all of the fractions were homologous series of alkyl aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols and heterocycles, notably alkylacenaphthenes. Alkyl chains were either unbranched or lightly branched. There was a similarity in the spectra of all of the fractions irrespective of yield. The ease with which a certain homologous series can be released from a coal is highly variable. Thus the data are consistent with the concept of a mobile phase some components of which are trapped in cavities with entrances and exits of restricted size. Release of the various physically held species and the fragments from thermal breakdown of the structure will certainly present a very complex system for kinetic modeling. 30 refs., 10 tabs.

  2. Fundamental studies of gas phase ionic reactions by ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, K.; Knighton, W. B.; Sahlstrom, K. E.; Grimsrud, E. P.

    1995-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) provides a promising approach to the study of gas phase ionic reactions in buffer gases at unusually high pressures. This point is illustrated here by studies of the Sn2 nucleophilic displacement reaction, Cl(-) + CH3Br yields Br + CH3Br, using IMS at atmospheric pressure. The equilibrium clustering reaction, Cl(-)(CHCI3)(n - 1) + CHCI3 yields Cl(-)(CHCI3)(n), where n = 1 and 2, and the effect of clustering on the Sn2 reaction with CH3Br have also been characterized by this IMS-based kinetic method. Present problems and anticipated improvements in the application of ion mobility spectrometry to studies of other gas phase ionic processes are discussed.

  3. 78 FR 45071 - Annual Report for Mobility Fund Phase I Support and Record Retention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    .... 54.1008(d) and (e), 54.1009(a) through (c) and 54.1010, published at 76 FR 73830, November 29, 2011.... 10-208; FCC 11-161, 76 FR 73830 and FCC 12-52, 77 FR 30904, May 24, 2012. If you have any comments on.... 01-92, 96-45; WT Docket No. 10-208; FCC 11-161; FCC 12-52] Annual Report for Mobility Fund Phase...

  4. Mobile phone imaging module with extended depth of focus based on axial irradiance equalization phase coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hsin-Yueh; Chen, Po-Chang; Chang, Chuan-Chung; Chang, Chir-Weei; Yang, Sidney S.; Chang, Horng

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a mobile phone imaging module with extended depth of focus (EDoF) by using axial irradiance equalization (AIE) phase coding. From radiation energy transfer along optical axis with constant irradiance, the focal depth enhancement solution is acquired. We introduce the axial irradiance equalization phase coding to design a two-element 2-megapixel mobile phone lens for trade off focus-like aberrations such as field curvature, astigmatism and longitudinal chromatic defocus. The design results produce modulation transfer functions (MTF) and phase transfer functions (PTF) with substantially similar characteristics at different field and defocus positions within Nyquist pass band. Besides, the measurement results are shown. Simultaneously, the design results and measurement results are compared. Next, for the EDoF mobile phone camera imaging system, we present a digital decoding design method and calculate a minimum mean square error (MMSE) filter. Then, the filter is applied to correct the substantially similar blur image. Last, the blur and de-blur images are demonstrated.

  5. Regularities of Anthocyanins Retention in RP HPLC for “Water–Acetonitrile–Phosphoric Acid” Mobile Phases

    PubMed Central

    Deineka, V. I.; Deineka, L. A.; Saenko, I. I.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of exchange of HCOOH (System 2) by phosphoric acid (System 1) for acidification of the “acetonitrile–water” mobile phases for reversed-phase HPLC of anthocyanins was investigated in the framework of relative retention analysis. The differences and similarities of anthocyanins separation were revealed. It has been shown that some common features of the quantitative relationships may be used for preliminary anthocyanins structure differentiation, according to the number of OH-groups in anthocyanidin backbone as well as to a number of saccharide molecules in glycoside radicals in position 3 of the anthocyanin without MS detection. PMID:25692073

  6. Modulation of phase behaviors and charge carrier mobilities by linkage length in discotic liquid crystal dimers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Fei; Zhang, Chun-Xiu; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Ao; Wang, Jian-Chuang; Zhang, Shuai-Feng; Pu, Jia-Ling

    2015-01-28

    A clear structure-property relationship was revealed in a series of triphenylene-based dimers, which contained two triphenylene nuclei each bearing five β-OC4H9 substituents and are linked through a flexible O(CH2)nO polymethylene chain (n=6-12). Dimers with the linkage close to twice the length of the free side chains (n=8, 9) exhibited a single Colhp phase, while others with the linkage shorter (n=6, 7) or longer (n=10, 11, 12) showed multiphase behaviors with a transition from the Colhp phase to Colh phase; hole mobilities of Colhp phases reached 1.4×10(-2) cm2 V(-1) s(-1) in the dimer for which the linkage is exactly twice the length of the free side chains (n=8), and decreased regularly both with linkage length becoming shorter or longer. This modulation of phase behaviors and charge carrier mobilities was demonstrated to be generated by various steric perturbations introduced by linkages with different lengths, which result in different degrees of lateral fluctuations of discotic moieties in the columns. PMID:25467212

  7. Degenerate mobilities in phase field models are insufficient to capture surface diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Alpha A.; Münch, Andreas; Süli, Endre

    2015-08-01

    Phase field models frequently provide insight into phase transitions and are robust numerical tools to solve free boundary problems corresponding to the motion of interfaces. A body of prior literature suggests that interface motion via surface diffusion is the long-time, sharp interface limit of microscopic phase field models such as the Cahn-Hilliard equation with a degenerate mobility function. Contrary to this conventional wisdom, we show that the long-time behaviour of degenerate Cahn-Hilliard equation with a polynomial free energy undergoes coarsening, reflecting the presence of bulk diffusion, rather than pure surface diffusion. This reveals an important limitation of phase field models that are frequently used to model surface diffusion.

  8. STTR Phase 1 Final Technical Report for Project Entitled "Developing a Mobile Torrefaction Machine"

    SciTech Connect

    James, Joseph J.

    2014-03-11

    The goal of this project, sponsored by Agri-Tech Producers, LLC (ATP), the small business grantee, was to determine if the torrefaction technology, developed by North Carolina State University (NCSU), which ATP has licensed, could be feasibly deployed in a mobile unit. The study adds to the area investigated, by having ATP’s STTR Phase I team give thoughtful consideration to how to use NCSU’s technology in a mobile unit. The findings by ATP’s team were that NCSU’s technology would best perform in units 30’ by 80’ (See Spec Sheet for the Torre-Tech 5.0 Unit in the Appendix) and the technical effectiveness and economic feasibility investigation suggested that such units were not easily, efficiently or safely utilized in a forest or farm setting. (Note rendering of possible mobile system in the Appendix) Therefore, the findings by ATP’s team were that NCSU’s technology could not feasibly be deployed as a mobile unit.

  9. [Separation of bases, phenols and pharmaceuticals on ionic liquid-modified silica stationary phase with pure water as mobile phase].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xusheng; Qiu, Hongdeng; Liu, Xia; Jiang, Shengxiang

    2011-03-01

    N-methylimidazolium ionic liquid (IL) -modified silica was prepared with the reaction of 3-chloropropyl modified silica and N-methylimidazole using toluene as solvent. Based on the multiple interactions between N-methylimidazolium IL-modified silica and analytes such as hydrophobic interaction, electrostatic attraction, repulsion interaction, hydrogen-bonding, etc., the bases (cytosine, thymine, 2-aminopyrimidine and 6-chloroguanine), phenols (m-aminophenol, resorcinol and m-nitrophenol) and three pharmaceuticals (moroxydine hydrochloride, acyclovir and cephalexin hydrate) were separated successfully with only pure water as the mobile phase. These chromatographic separations are environmental friendly, economical and convenient, without any organic solvent or buffer additive. The retention mechanism of these samples on the stationary phase was also investigated. PMID:21657060

  10. Design and application of an expert system for mobile phase optimisation in reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fell, A F; Bridge, T P; Williams, M H

    1988-01-01

    The selection of the optimum composition for the mobile phase in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a complex task; conventional approaches require the expenditure of significant amounts of time by the analyst, particularly for complex mixtures of solutes of biological origin. Some of the existing strategies for the automated optimisation of mobile phase composition (e.g. Simplex), may fail if the elution order of the components changes; or they may require that standards be chromatographed in order to establish the retention behaviour of each component in a mixture (e.g. resolution mapping). These problems may be overcome if the retention behaviour of each individual solute can be established from the chromatogram of the mixture. In this regard, components can be tracked by exploiting the spectral information generated by a rapid scanning photodiode array detector. Unfortunately this information is often insufficiently detailed to allow an unambiguous model of retention behaviour to be constructed. The system developed by the Authors uses these spectral data as a basis for constructing one or more hypothetical retention models, each of which is refined or rejected as further information is obtained during the progress of the experiment. To improve the reliability of the retention models proposed by the system, the spectral data are utilised in a number of tests designed to assess the purity of each chromatographic peak. The information so generated may be used in conjunction with any previously acquired spectral data both to select an appropriate method for extracting spectra for each component from the matrix of (A, lambda, t) data and to establish reliability parameters for the resultant spectra. The development and philosophy of the expert system developed for eluent optimisation in reversed-phase HPLC is discussed. PMID:16867321

  11. The mobility of the amorphous phase in polyethylene as a determining factor for slow crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Y. F.; Rieger, J.; Enderle, H.-F.; Lilge, D.

    2004-12-01

    Polyethylene (PE) pipes generally exhibit a limited lifetime, which is considerably shorter than their chemical degradation period. Slow crack growth failure occurs when pipes are used in long-distance water or gas distribution though being exposed to a pressure lower than the corresponding yield stress. This slow crack growth failure is characterized by localized craze growth and craze fibril rupture. In the literature, the lifetime of PE pipes is often considered as being determined by the density of tie chains connecting adjacent crystalline lamellae. But this consideration cannot explain the excellent durability of the recent bimodal grade PE for pipe application. We show in this paper the importance of the craze fibril length as the determining factor for the pipe lifetime. The conclusions are drawn from stress analysis. It is found that longer craze fibrils sustain lower stress and are deformed to a lesser degree. The mobility of the amorphous phase is found to control the amount of material that can be “sucked” in by the craze fibrils and thus the length of the craze fibrils. The mobility of the amorphous phase can be monitored by dynamic mechanical analysis measurements. Excellent agreement between the mobility thus derived and lifetimes of PE materials as derived from FNCT (full notch creep test) is given, thus providing an effective means to estimate the lifetime of PE pipes by considering well-defined physical properties.

  12. The mobility of the amorphous phase in polyethylene as a determining factor for slow crack growth.

    PubMed

    Men, Y F; Rieger, J; Enderle, H-F; Lilge, D

    2004-12-01

    Polyethylene (PE) pipes generally exhibit a limited lifetime, which is considerably shorter than their chemical degradation period. Slow crack growth failure occurs when pipes are used in long-distance water or gas distribution though being exposed to a pressure lower than the corresponding yield stress. This slow crack growth failure is characterized by localized craze growth and craze fibril rupture. In the literature, the lifetime of PE pipes is often considered as being determined by the density of tie chains connecting adjacent crystalline lamellae. But this consideration cannot explain the excellent durability of the recent bimodal grade PE for pipe application. We show in this paper the importance of the craze fibril length as the determining factor for the pipe lifetime. The conclusions are drawn from stress analysis. It is found that longer craze fibrils sustain lower stress and are deformed to a lesser degree. The mobility of the amorphous phase is found to control the amount of material that can be "sucked" in by the craze fibrils and thus the length of the craze fibrils. The mobility of the amorphous phase can be monitored by dynamic mechanical analysis measurements. Excellent agreement between the mobility thus derived and lifetimes of PE materials as derived from FNCT (full notch creep test) is given, thus providing an effective means to estimate the lifetime of PE pipes by considering well-defined physical properties. PMID:15583973

  13. Mobile terminal equipment design utilising split-loop phase-lock techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenington, P. B.; Mcgeehan, J. P.; Edwards, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    The design and resultant performance of the terminal equipment in a mobile satellite system is vitally important in respect to the overall cost/performance compromise of the whole system. Improvements in system performance which also result in a reduction of the equipment cost are rare. However, this paper details a significant advance in terminal design, utilizing a novel form of 'split-loop' phase locked receiver/downconverter system to enable an accurate, stable and wide coverage terminal to be realized at a reduced cost. The system has the capability of automatically locking onto any carrier within a complete transponder, and can cope with severe amplitude modulation and fading effects.

  14. Trying to detect gas-phase ions? Understanding Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Cumeras, R.; Figueras, E.; Davis, C.E.; Baumbach, J.I.; Gràcia, I.

    2014-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used and ‘well-known’ technique of ion separation in gaseous phase based on the differences of ion mobilities under an electric field. This technique has received increased interest over the last several decades as evidenced by the pace and advances of new IMS devices available. In this review we explore the hyphenated techniques that are used with IMS, especially mass spectrometry as identification approach and multi-capillary column as pre-separation approach. Also, we will pay special attention to the key figures of merit of the ion mobility spectrum and how data is treated, and the influences of the experimental parameters in both a conventional drift time IMS (DTIMS) and a miniaturized IMS also known as high Field Asymmetric IMS (FAIMS) in the planar configuration. The current review article is preceded by a companion review article which details the current instrumentation and to the sections that configures both a conventional DTIMS and FAIMS devices. Those reviews will give the reader an insightful view of the main characteristics and aspects of the IMS technique. PMID:25465248

  15. Multiplicative effects model with internal standard in mobile phase for quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Song, Mi; Chen, Zeng-Ping; Chen, Yao; Jin, Jing-Wen

    2014-07-01

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry assays suffer from signal instability caused by the gradual fouling of the ion source, vacuum instability, aging of the ion multiplier, etc. To address this issue, in this contribution, an internal standard was added into the mobile phase. The internal standard was therefore ionized and detected together with the analytes of interest by the mass spectrometer to ensure that variations in measurement conditions and/or instrument have similar effects on the signal contributions of both the analytes of interest and the internal standard. Subsequently, based on the unique strategy of adding internal standard in mobile phase, a multiplicative effects model was developed for quantitative LC-MS assays and tested on a proof of concept model system: the determination of amino acids in water by LC-MS. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method could efficiently mitigate the detrimental effects of continuous signal variation, and achieved quantitative results with average relative predictive error values in the range of 8.0-15.0%, which were much more accurate than the corresponding results of conventional internal standard method based on the peak height ratio and partial least squares method (their average relative predictive error values were as high as 66.3% and 64.8%, respectively). Therefore, it is expected that the proposed method can be developed and extended in quantitative LC-MS analysis of more complex systems. PMID:24840455

  16. Microchip electrospray: cone-jet stability analysis for water-acetonitrile and water-methanol mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Jung, Stephanie; Effelsberg, Uwe; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2011-03-25

    Changes in mobile phase composition during high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) gradient elution coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) sensitively affect electrospray operation modes. In this work, we identify the influences of dynamic changes in bulk conductivity on the cone-jet stability island for aqueous acetonitrile and aqueous methanol mobile phases commonly used in reversed-phase HPLC. Bulk conductivities of the mobile phases were varied by adding different amounts of formic acid. A commercial microchip-HPLC/ESI-MS configuration was modified to enable in situ electrospray diagnostics by frequency analysis of the microchip emitter current and spray imaging. This approach facilitated the detection of different spray modes together with their onset potentials. The established spray modes are described and the differences in onset potentials and stability regions explained by the physicochemical properties of the electrosprayed liquid. PMID:21333298

  17. Cryogenic Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry: Tracking Ion Structure from Solution to the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Servage, Kelly A; Silveira, Joshua A; Fort, Kyle L; Russell, David H

    2016-07-19

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) combined with ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is adding new dimensions, that is, structure and dynamics, to the field of biological mass spectrometry. There is increasing evidence that gas-phase ions produced by ESI can closely resemble their solution-phase structures, but correlating these structures can be complicated owing to the number of competing effects contributing to structural preferences, including both inter- and intramolecular interactions. Ions encounter unique hydration environments during the transition from solution to the gas phase that will likely affect their structure(s), but many of these structural changes will go undetected because ESI-IM-MS analysis is typically performed on solvent-free ions. Cryogenic ion mobility-mass spectrometry (cryo-IM-MS) takes advantage of the freeze-drying capabilities of ESI and a cryogenically cooled IM drift cell (80 K) to preserve extensively solvated ions of the type [M + xH](x+)(H2O)n, where n can vary from zero to several hundred. This affords an experimental approach for tracking the structural evolution of hydrated biomolecules en route to forming solvent-free gas-phase ions. The studies highlighted in this Account illustrate the varying extent to which dehydration can alter ion structure and the overall impact of cryo-IM-MS on structural studies of hydrated biomolecules. Studies of small ions, including protonated water clusters and alkyl diammonium cations, reveal structural transitions associated with the development of the H-bond network of water molecules surrounding the charge carrier(s). For peptide ions, results show that water networks are highly dependent on the charge-carrying species within the cluster. Specifically, hydrated peptide ions containing lysine display specific hydration behavior around the ammonium ion, that is, magic number clusters with enhanced stability, whereas peptides containing arginine do not display specific hydration around the

  18. Effects of twin boundary mobility on domain microstructure evolution in magnetic shape memory alloys: Phase field simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Yongmei M.

    2009-02-09

    Effects of twin boundary mobility on domain microstructure evolution during magnetic field-induced deformation in magnetic shape memory alloys are studied by phase field micromagnetic microelastic modeling. The simulations show that different twin boundary mobilities lead to drastically different domain microstructures and evolution pathways, yielding very different magnetization and strain responses, even with opposite signs. The study also reveals complex domain phenomena in magnetic shape memory alloys.

  19. Computational study of atomic mobility for the bcc phase of the U-Pu-Zr ternary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weibang; Hu, Rui; Cui, Y.-W.; Zhong, Hong; Chang, Hui; Li, Jinshan; Zhou, Lian

    2010-12-01

    Experimental diffusion data in literature has been evaluated to assess the atomic mobility for the bcc phase in the U-Pu-Zr system by means of the DICTRA-type (Diffusion Controlled TRAnsformation) phenomenological treatment. The developed mobility database has been validated by comprehensive comparisons made between the experimental and calculated diffusion coefficients, as well as other interesting details resulting from interdiffusion, e.g. the concentration profile and the diffusion path of diffusion couples.

  20. Computational studies of coarsening rates for the Cahn-Hilliard equation with phase-dependent diffusion mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shibin; Du, Qiang

    2016-04-01

    We study computationally coarsening rates of the Cahn-Hilliard equation with a smooth double-well potential, and with phase-dependent diffusion mobilities. The latter is a feature of many materials systems and makes accurate numerical simulations challenging. Our numerical simulations confirm earlier theoretical predictions on the coarsening dynamics based on asymptotic analysis. We demonstrate that the numerical solutions are consistent with the physical Gibbs-Thomson effect, even if the mobility is degenerate in one or both phases. For the two-sided degenerate mobility, we report computational results showing that the coarsening rate is on the order of l ∼ ct 1 / 4, independent of the volume fraction of each phase. For the one-sided degenerate mobility, that is non-degenerate in the positive phase but degenerate in the negative phase, we illustrate that the coarsening rate depends on the volume fraction of the positive phase. For large positive volume fractions, the coarsening rate is on the order of l ∼ ct 1 / 3 and for small positive volume fractions, the coarsening rate becomes l ∼ ct 1 / 4.

  1. Vertical Mobilization of a Residual Oil Phase in a Bead Pack Due to Flow of Discrete Gas Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakkala, Konark; Udell, Kent

    2007-11-01

    Mobilization of trapped oil ganglia is of interest in soil and groundwater clean-up and enhanced oil recovery applications. In this work, experiments with glass beads and various oil phase compositions were performed to determine the volumetric fraction of the non-aqueous phase liquid that may be mobilized with rising discrete gas bubbles. Experiments were performed using 6 mm and 2 mm beads. The oil phase liquids included dodecane, perchloroethene, and trichloroethene representing both spreading and non-spreading oil phases. It was found that bubbles were quite effective in mobilizing all three oils including those with densities greater than that of the suspending water. The effectiveness of the mobilization was greater in bead packs with larger beads than in packs comprised of small beads. Volumetric fractional flows of the oil phase were up to 10% of the bubble-droplet volumes, with volumetric fractions decreasing with decreasing oil phase saturations and bead size. The geometry of the oil ganglia/gas bubble combinatory body was also a function of the bead size with smaller beads producing larger, flatter gas bubbles, and the large beads producing bubbles and ganglia of similar size and geometries as the beads themselves.

  2. Determination of opiates and cocaine in urine by high pH mobile phase reversed phase UPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Berg, Thomas; Lundanes, Elsa; Christophersen, Asbjørg S; Strand, Dag Helge

    2009-02-01

    A fast and selective ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method for the determination of opiates (morphine, codeine, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM), pholcodine, oxycodone, ethylmorphine), cocaine and benzoylecgonine in urine has been developed and validated. Sample preparation was performed by solid phase extraction (SPE) on a mixed mode cation exchange (MCX) cartridge. For optimized chromatographic performance with repeatable retention times, narrow and symmetrical peaks, and focusing of all analytes at the column inlet at gradient start, a basic mobile phase consisting of 5mM ammonium bicarbonate, pH 10.2, and methanol (MeOH) was chosen. Positive electrospray ionization (ESI(+)) MS/MS detection was performed with a minimum of two multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions for each analyte. Deuterium labelled-internal standards were used for six of the analytes. Between-assay retention time repeatabilities (n=10 series, 225 injections in total) had relative standard deviation (RSD) values within 0.1-0.6%. Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) values were in the range 0.003-0.05 microM (0.001-0.02 microg/mL) and 0.01-0.16 microM (0.003-0.06 microg/mL), respectively. The RSD values of the between-assay repeatabilities of concentrations were

  3. Studying Gas-Phase Interconversion of Tautomers Using Differential Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J Larry; Yang, Amy Meng-Ci; Melo, Luke R; Hopkins, W Scott

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we report on the use of differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) as a tool for studying tautomeric species, allowing a more in-depth interrogation of these elusive isomers using ion/molecule reactions and tandem mass spectrometry. As an example, we revisit a case study in which gas-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX)-a probe of ion structure in mass spectrometry-actually altered analyte ion structure by tautomerization. For the N- and O-protonated tautomers of 4-aminobenzoic acid, when separated using DMS and subjected to subsequent HDX with trace levels of D2O, the anticipated difference between the exchange rates of the two tautomers is observed. However, when using higher levels of D2O or a more basic reagent, equivalent and almost complete exchange of all labile protons is observed. This second observation is a result of the interconversion of the N-protonated tautomer to the O-protonated form during HDX. We can monitor this transformation experimentally, with support from detailed molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations. In fact, calculations suggest the onset of bulk solution phase properties for 4-aminobenzoic acid upon solvation with eight CH3OH molecules. These findings also underscore the need for choosing HDX reagents and conditions judiciously when separating interconvertible isomers using DMS. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27094827

  4. Studying Gas-Phase Interconversion of Tautomers Using Differential Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. Larry; Yang, Amy Meng-Ci; Melo, Luke R.; Hopkins, W. Scott

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we report on the use of differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) as a tool for studying tautomeric species, allowing a more in-depth interrogation of these elusive isomers using ion/molecule reactions and tandem mass spectrometry. As an example, we revisit a case study in which gas-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX)—a probe of ion structure in mass spectrometry—actually altered analyte ion structure by tautomerization. For the N- and O-protonated tautomers of 4-aminobenzoic acid, when separated using DMS and subjected to subsequent HDX with trace levels of D2O, the anticipated difference between the exchange rates of the two tautomers is observed. However, when using higher levels of D2O or a more basic reagent, equivalent and almost complete exchange of all labile protons is observed. This second observation is a result of the interconversion of the N-protonated tautomer to the O-protonated form during HDX. We can monitor this transformation experimentally, with support from detailed molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations. In fact, calculations suggest the onset of bulk solution phase properties for 4-aminobenzoic acid upon solvation with eight CH3OH molecules. These findings also underscore the need for choosing HDX reagents and conditions judiciously when separating interconvertible isomers using DMS.

  5. Ratchet Effects, Negative Mobility, and Phase Locking for Skyrmions on Periodic Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, Charles; Ray, Dipanjan; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia

    We examine the dynamics of skyrmions interacting with 1D and 2D periodic substrates in the presence of dc and ac drives. We find that the Magnus term strongly affects the skyrmion dynamics and that new kinds of phenomena can occur which are absent for overdamped ac and dc driven particles interacting with similar substrates. We show that it is possible to realize a Magnus induced ratchet for skyrmions interacting with an asymmetric potential, where the application of an ac drive can produce quantized dc motion of the skyrmions even when the ac force is perpendicular to the substrate asymmetry direction. For symmetric substrates it is also possible to achieve a negative mobility effect where the net skyrmion motion runs counter to an applied dc drive. Here, as a function of increasing dc drive, the velocity-force curves show a series of locking phases that have different features from the classic Shapiro steps found in overdamped systems. In the phase locking and ratcheting states, the skyrmions undergo intricate 2D orbits induced by the Magnus term.

  6. Studying Gas-Phase Interconversion of Tautomers Using Differential Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. Larry; Yang, Amy Meng-Ci; Melo, Luke R.; Hopkins, W. Scott

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we report on the use of differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) as a tool for studying tautomeric species, allowing a more in-depth interrogation of these elusive isomers using ion/molecule reactions and tandem mass spectrometry. As an example, we revisit a case study in which gas-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX)—a probe of ion structure in mass spectrometry—actually altered analyte ion structure by tautomerization. For the N- and O-protonated tautomers of 4-aminobenzoic acid, when separated using DMS and subjected to subsequent HDX with trace levels of D2O, the anticipated difference between the exchange rates of the two tautomers is observed. However, when using higher levels of D2O or a more basic reagent, equivalent and almost complete exchange of all labile protons is observed. This second observation is a result of the interconversion of the N-protonated tautomer to the O-protonated form during HDX. We can monitor this transformation experimentally, with support from detailed molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations. In fact, calculations suggest the onset of bulk solution phase properties for 4-aminobenzoic acid upon solvation with eight CH3OH molecules. These findings also underscore the need for choosing HDX reagents and conditions judiciously when separating interconvertible isomers using DMS.

  7. 77 FR 11115 - Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Limited Extension of Deadlines for Comments and Reply Comments on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... released the Auction 901 Comment Public Notice, 77 FR 7152, February 10, 2012, which seeks comment on... Commission in the USF/ICC Transformation Order, 76 FR 73830, November 29, 2011 and 76 FR 81562, December 28... COMMISSION Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Limited Extension of Deadlines for Comments and Reply Comments...

  8. 30 CFR 77.900 - Low- and medium-voltage circuits serving portable or mobile three-phase alternating current...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Low- and medium-voltage circuits serving... Medium-Voltage Alternating Current Circuits § 77.900 Low- and medium-voltage circuits serving portable or mobile three-phase alternating current equipment; circuit breakers. Low- and medium-voltage...

  9. 77 FR 32092 - Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Scheduled for September 27, 2012; Notice and Filing Requirements...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-31

    ... information system (GIS) data for the census blocks eligible for Mobility Fund Phase I support to be offered... through competitive bidding. The USF/ICC Transformation Order, 76 FR 73830, November 29, 2011 and 76 FR... Public Notice, 77 FR 7152, February 10, 2012, which identified a preliminary list of census...

  10. Understanding gas phase modifier interactions in rapid analysis by Differential Mobility-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kafle, Amol; Coy, Stephen L.; Wong, Bryan M.; Fornace, Albert J.; Glick, James J.; Vouros, Paul

    2014-01-01

    A systematic study involving the use and optimization of gas phase modifiers in quantitative differential mobility- mass spectrometry (DMS-MS) analysis is presented using mucleoside-adduct biomarkers of DNA damage as an important reference point for analysis in complex matrices. Commonly used polar protic and polar aprotic modifiers have been screened for use against two deoxyguanosine adducts of DNA: N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4-aminobiphenyl (dG-C8-4-ABP) and N-(deoxyguanosin-8-y1)-2-amino-l-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (dG-C8-PhIP). Particular attention was paid to compensation voltage (CoV) shifts, peak shapes and product ion signal intensities while optimizing the DMS-MS conditions. The optimized parameters were then applied to rapid quantitation of the DNA adducts in calf thymus DNA. After a protein precipitation step, adduct levels corresponding to less than one modification in 106 normal DNA bases were detected using the DMS-MS platform. Based on DMS fundamentals and ab-initio thermochemical results we interpret the complexity of DMS modifier responses in terms of thermal activation and the development of solvent shells. At very high bulk gas temperature, modifier dipole moment may be the most important factor in cluster formation and cluster geometry in mobility differences, but at lower temperatures multi-neutral clusters are important and less predictable. This work provides a useful protocol for targeted DNA adduct quantitation and a basis for future work on DMS modifier effects. PMID:24452298

  11. Utilization of deep eutectic solvents as novel mobile phase additives for improving the separation of bioactive quaternary alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ting; Zhang, Mingliang; Wan, Yiqun; Qiu, Hongdeng

    2016-03-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were used as novel mobile phase additives to improve chromatographic separation of four quaternary alkaloids including coptisine chloride, sanguinarine, berberine chloride and chelerythrine on a C18 column. DESs as a new class of ionic liquids are renewably sourced, environmentally benign, low cost and easy to prepare. Seven DESs were obtained by mixing different hydrogen acceptors and hydrogen-bond donors. The effects of organic solvents, the concentration of DESs, the types of DESs and the pH values of the buffer solution on the separation of the analytes were investigated. The composition of acetonitrile and 1.0% deep eutectic solvents aqueous solution (pH 3.3, adjusted with hydrochloric acid) in a 32:68 (v/v) ratio was used as optimized mobile phase, with which four quaternary alkaloids were well separated. When a small amount of DESs was added in the mobile phase for the separation of alkaloids on the C18 column, noticeable improvements were distinctly observed such as decreasing peak tailing and improving resolution. The separation mechanism mediated by DESs as mobile phase additives can be attributed to combined effect of both hydrogen acceptors and hydrogen-bond donors. For example, choline chloride can effectively cover the residual silanols on silica surface and ethylene glycol can reduce the retention time of analytes. The proposed method has been applied to determine BerbC in Lanqin Chinese herbal oral solution and BerbC tablet. Utilization of DESs in mobile phase can efficiently improve separation and selectivity of analytes from complex samples. PMID:26717817

  12. Investigations of mobile phase contributions to enantioselective anion- and zwitterion-exchange modes on quinine-based zwitterionic chiral stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Christian V; Reischl, Roland; Maier, Norbert M; Lämmerhofer, Michael; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2009-02-13

    Novel chiral stationary phases (CSPs) based on zwitterionic Cinchona alkaloid-type low-molecular mass chiral selectors (SOs), as they have been reported recently, were investigated in HPLC towards effects on their chromatographic behavior by mobile phase composition. Mobile phase characteristics like acid-to-base ratio and type of acidic and basic additives as well as effect of type of bulk solvents in nonaqueous polar organic and aqueous reversed-phase (RP) eluent systems were varied in order to illustrate the variability and applicability of zwitterionic CSPs with regard to mobile phase aspects. Chiral SOs of the five zwitterionic CSPs investigated herein contained weak and strong cation-exchange (WCX, SCX) sites at C9- and C6'-positions of the Cinchona alkaloid scaffold which itself accommodated the weak anion-exchange (WAX) site. The study focused on zwitterion-exchange (ZX) operational mode and chiral amino acids as target analytes. Besides, also the anion-exchange (AX) mode for chiral N-blocked amino acid analytes was considered, because of the intramolecular counterion (IMCI) property available in AX mode. Overall, most general and successful conditions in ZX mode were found to be weakly acidic methanolic mobile phases. In aqueous eluents RP contributions to retention came into play but only at low organic modifier content because of the highly polar character of zwitterionic analytes. At higher acetonitrile content, HILIC-related retention phenomena were observed. When using weakly basic eluent system in AX mode remarkably fast enantiomer separations involving exclusion phenomena were possible with one enantiomer eluting before and the other after void volume. PMID:19144343

  13. Application of the Empore solid-phase extraction membrane to the isolation of drugs from blood. I. Amiodarone and desethylamiodarone.

    PubMed

    Lensmeyer, G L; Wiebe, D A; Doran, T

    1991-05-01

    We describe the use of a new form of solid-phase material, the Empore solid-phase extraction membrane (SPEM), for therapeutic drug monitoring. We evaluated the new extraction procedure with the companion high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method for the antiarrhythmic drug amiodarone and its metabolite, desethylamiodarone, in patients' serum. Acidified serum (250 microliters) was passed through an octyl (C8) SPEM secured in an MF-1 microfilter unit. Serum proteins and potential interferences were removed with an acetonitrile:water wash, and the retained drugs eluted with HPLC mobile phase. This eluate was injected directly onto the analytical column. Both drugs averaged 85% recovery with a linear response from a lower limit of detection at 0.05 mg/L up to 6 mg/L, and between-run precision coefficients of variation ranging from 3.1 to 6.4% over the concentration range of 0.5-3.0 mg/L. We observed significant advantages of the novel SPEM over conventional liquid-liquid or large-particle size solid-phase sorbents packed in cartridges. Minimal amounts of solvents were required, elution volume was smaller, time-consuming evaporating/concentrating steps that can influence drug stability were avoided, and little throw-away material was generated. Only the small membrane was discarded. PMID:1926279

  14. Phases in development of an interactive mobile phone-based system to support self-management of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, Inger; Taft, Charles; Ranerup, Agneta; Bengtsson, Ulrika; Hoffmann, Mikael; Höfer, Stefan; Kasperowski, Dick; Mäkitalo, Asa; Lundin, Mona; Ring, Lena; Rosenqvist, Ulf; Kjellgren, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a significant risk factor for heart disease and stroke worldwide. Effective treatment regimens exist; however, treatment adherence rates are poor (30%-50%). Improving self-management may be a way to increase adherence to treatment. The purpose of this paper is to describe the phases in the development and preliminary evaluation of an interactive mobile phone-based system aimed at supporting patients in self-managing their hypertension. A person-centered and participatory framework emphasizing patient involvement was used. An interdisciplinary group of researchers, patients with hypertension, and health care professionals who were specialized in hypertension care designed and developed a set of questions and motivational messages for use in an interactive mobile phone-based system. Guided by the US Food and Drug Administration framework for the development of patient-reported outcome measures, the development and evaluation process comprised three major development phases (1, defining; 2, adjusting; 3, confirming the conceptual framework and delivery system) and two evaluation and refinement phases (4, collecting, analyzing, interpreting data; 5, evaluating the self-management system in clinical practice). Evaluation of new mobile health systems in a structured manner is important to understand how various factors affect the development process from both a technical and human perspective. Forthcoming analyses will evaluate the effectiveness and utility of the mobile phone-based system in supporting the self-management of hypertension. PMID:24910510

  15. Phases in development of an interactive mobile phone-based system to support self-management of hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hallberg, Inger; Taft, Charles; Ranerup, Agneta; Bengtsson, Ulrika; Hoffmann, Mikael; Höfer, Stefan; Kasperowski, Dick; Mäkitalo, Åsa; Lundin, Mona; Ring, Lena; Rosenqvist, Ulf; Kjellgren, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a significant risk factor for heart disease and stroke worldwide. Effective treatment regimens exist; however, treatment adherence rates are poor (30%–50%). Improving self-management may be a way to increase adherence to treatment. The purpose of this paper is to describe the phases in the development and preliminary evaluation of an interactive mobile phone-based system aimed at supporting patients in self-managing their hypertension. A person-centered and participatory framework emphasizing patient involvement was used. An interdisciplinary group of researchers, patients with hypertension, and health care professionals who were specialized in hypertension care designed and developed a set of questions and motivational messages for use in an interactive mobile phone-based system. Guided by the US Food and Drug Administration framework for the development of patient-reported outcome measures, the development and evaluation process comprised three major development phases (1, defining; 2, adjusting; 3, confirming the conceptual framework and delivery system) and two evaluation and refinement phases (4, collecting, analyzing, interpreting data; 5, evaluating the self-management system in clinical practice). Evaluation of new mobile health systems in a structured manner is important to understand how various factors affect the development process from both a technical and human perspective. Forthcoming analyses will evaluate the effectiveness and utility of the mobile phone-based system in supporting the self-management of hypertension. PMID:24910510

  16. Gas-Phase Dopant-Induced Conformational Changes Monitored with Transversal Modulation Ion Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Nicole Andrea; Root, Katharina; Zenobi, Renato; Vidal-de-Miguel, Guillermo

    2016-02-16

    The potential of a Transversal Modulation Ion Mobility Spectrometry (TMIMS) instrument for protein analysis applications has been evaluated. The Collision Cross Section (CCS) of cytochrome c measured with the TMIMS is in agreement with values reported in the literature. Additionally, it enables tandem IMS-IMS prefiltration in dry gas and in vapor doped gas. The chemical specificity of the different dopants enables interesting studies on the structure of proteins as CCS changed strongly depending on the specific dopant. Hexane produced an unexpectedly high CCS shift, which can be utilized to evaluate the exposure of hydrophobic parts of the protein. Alcohols produced higher shifts with a dual behavior: an increase in CCS due to vapor uptake at specific absorption sites, followed by a linear shift typical for unspecific and unstable vapor uptake. The molten globule +8 shows a very specific transition. Initially, its CCS follows the trend of the compact folded states, and then it rapidly increases to the levels of the unfolded states. This strong variation suggests that the +8 charge state undergoes a dopant-induced conformational change. Interestingly, more sterically demanding alcohols seem to unfold the protein more effectively also in the gas phase. This study shows the capabilities of the TMIMS device for protein analysis and how tandem IMS-IMS with dopants could provide better understanding of the conformational changes of proteins. PMID:26845079

  17. Evaluation of ternary mobile phases for the analysis of carbonyl compound derivatives using high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ho, Duy Xuan; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the feasibility of ternary mobile phases was examined in a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based analysis of carbonyl compounds (CCs). To test the performance of different ternary phases, the liquid phase standards containing a 15 aldehyde/ketone-DNPH(o) mix were analyzed through a series of five-point calibration experiments. For this comparison, three types of ternary mobile phases were prepared initially by mixing water (W) with two of the following three organic solvents: isopropanol (I), methanol (M), and tetrahydrofuran (T). The resulting three types of ternary phases (named as WIM, WTM, and WIT) were tested and evaluated in relation to the water content or in terms of methanol-to-water ratio (M/W). The results derived by the three ternary phases revealed that the optimal resolution was attained near maximum water content, while those of WIT consistently suffered from poor resolution problems. The relative performances of WIM and WTM phases, if assessed by three key operating parameters (sensitivity, retention time, and resolution), were found to be reliable for most selected CCs with the decreasing M/W ratio. PMID:21218260

  18. Quinolones control in milk and eggs samples by liquid chromatography using a surfactant-mediated mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Rambla-Alegre, M; Collado-Sánchez, M A; Esteve-Romero, J; Carda-Broch, S

    2011-05-01

    Four quinolones (danofloxacin, difloxacin, flumequine and marbofloxacin) were determined in milk and egg samples by a simplified high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure using a micellar mobile phase. No extraction was needed to precipitate the proteins from the matrices since they were solubilised in micelles. The only pretreatment steps required were homogenisation, dilution and filtration before injecting the sample into the chromatographic system. An adequate resolution of the quinolones was achieved by a chemometrics approach where retention was modelled as a first step using the retention factors in only five mobile phases. Afterwards, an optimisation criterion was applied to consider the position and shape of the chromatographic peaks. Analytical separation involved a C18 reversed-phase column, a hybrid micellar mobile phase of 0.05 M sodium dodecyl sulphate, 10% (v/v) butanol and 0.5% (v/v) triethylamine buffered at pH 3 and fluorimetric detection. Quinolones were eluted in less than 15 min without the protein band or other endogenous compounds from the food matrices interfering. The calculated relevant validation parameters, e.g., decision limit (CC(α)), detection capability (CC(β)), repeatability, within-laboratory reproducibility, recoveries and robustness, were acceptable and complied with European Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. Finally, the proposed method was successfully employed in quantifying the four quinolones in spiked egg and milk samples. PMID:21085936

  19. Enantioseparation of Citalopram by RP-HPLC, Using Sulfobutyl Ether-β-Cyclodextrin as a Chiral Mobile Phase Additive

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yangfeng; He, Quan Sophia; Cai, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Enantiomeric separation of citalopram (CIT) was developed using a reversed phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) with sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin (SBE-β-CD) as a chiral mobile phase additive. The effects of the pH value of aqueous buffer, concentration of chiral additive, composition of mobile phase, and column temperature on the enantioseparation of CIT were investigated on the Hedera ODS-2 C18 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm × 5.0 um). A satisfactory resolution was achieved at 25°C using a mobile phase consisting of a mixture of aqueous buffer (pH of 2.5, 5 mM sodium dihydrogen phosphate, and 12 mM SBE-β-CD), methanol, and acetonitrile with a volumetric ratio of 21 : 3 : 1 and flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. This analytical method was evaluated by examining the precision (lower than 3.0%), linearity (regression coefficients close to 1), limit of detection (0.070 µg/mL for (R)-CIT and 0.076 µg/mL for (S)-CIT), and limit of quantitation (0.235 µg/mL for (R)-CIT and 0.254 µg/mL for (S)-CIT). PMID:26880921

  20. Enantioseparation of Citalopram by RP-HPLC, Using Sulfobutyl Ether-β-Cyclodextrin as a Chiral Mobile Phase Additive.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yangfeng; He, Quan Sophia; Cai, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Enantiomeric separation of citalopram (CIT) was developed using a reversed phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) with sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin (SBE-β-CD) as a chiral mobile phase additive. The effects of the pH value of aqueous buffer, concentration of chiral additive, composition of mobile phase, and column temperature on the enantioseparation of CIT were investigated on the Hedera ODS-2 C18 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm × 5.0 um). A satisfactory resolution was achieved at 25°C using a mobile phase consisting of a mixture of aqueous buffer (pH of 2.5, 5 mM sodium dihydrogen phosphate, and 12 mM SBE-β-CD), methanol, and acetonitrile with a volumetric ratio of 21 : 3 : 1 and flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. This analytical method was evaluated by examining the precision (lower than 3.0%), linearity (regression coefficients close to 1), limit of detection (0.070 µg/mL for (R)-CIT and 0.076 µg/mL for (S)-CIT), and limit of quantitation (0.235 µg/mL for (R)-CIT and 0.254 µg/mL for (S)-CIT). PMID:26880921

  1. Rapid and sensitive analysis of phthalate metabolites, bisphenol A, and endogenous steroid hormones in human urine by mixed-mode solid-phase extraction, dansylation, and ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, He-xing; Wang, Bin; Zhou, Ying; Jiang, Qing-wu

    2013-05-01

    Steroid hormone levels in human urine are convenient and sensitive indicators for the impact of phthalates and/or bisphenol A (BPA) exposure on the human steroid hormone endocrine system. In this study, a rapid and sensitive method for determination of 14 phthalate metabolites, BPA, and ten endogenous steroid hormones in urine was developed and validated on the basis of ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. The optimized mixed-mode solid phase-extraction separated the weakly acidic or neutral BPA and steroid hormones from acidic phthalate metabolites in urine: the former were determined in positive ion mode with a methanol/water mobile phase containing 10 mM ammonium formate; the latter were determined in negative ion mode with a acetonitrile/water mobile phase containing 0.1 % acetic acid, which significantly alleviated matrix effects for the analysis of BPA and steroid hormones. Dansylation of estrogens and BPA realized simultaneous and sensitive analysis of the endogenous steroid hormones and BPA in a single chromatographic run. The limits of detection were less than 0.84 ng/mL for phthalate metabolites and less than 0.22 ng/mL for endogenous steroid hormones and BPA. This proposed method had satisfactory precision and accuracy, and was successfully applied to the analyses of human urine samples. This method could be valuable when investigating the associations among endocrine-disrupting chemicals, endogenous steroid hormones, and relevant adverse outcomes in epidemiological studies. PMID:23430180

  2. [Determination of residual sulfonamides in meat by high performance liquid chromatography with solid-phase extraction].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Wu, Yinliang

    2005-11-01

    A method was developed for determining residual sulfonamides (SAs) such as sulfamethazine (SM2), sulfamonomethoxine (SMM), sulfamethiazole (SMZ), sulfadimethoxine (SDM) and sulfaquinoxaline (SQ) in pork and chicken using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a photodiode array detector. The samples were extracted with ethyl acetate. An NH2 column was used for clean up. For the HPLC determination, an Intersil ODS-2 column was used with a mixture of methanol-acetonitrile-water-acetic acid (2: 2: 9: 0.2, v/v) as the mobile phase. The detection limits (S/N = 3) were 3 microg/kg for SM2, SMM and SMZ, and 7 microg/kg for SDM and SQ. The quantitation limits (S/N = 10) were 10 microg/kg for SM2, SMM and SMZ, and 25 microg/kg for SDM and SQ. The linear ranges were 30 - 5 000 microg/L for SM2, SMM and SMZ, and 60 - 5 000 microg/L for SDM and SQ. The recoveries were between 73.2% and 97.3% with the relative standard deviations between 2.5% and 11.6% originated from the spiked level of 50 microg/kg. PMID:16498995

  3. [Determination of main degradation products of lignin using reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhijing; Zhu, Junjun; Li, Xin; Lian, Zhina; Yu, Shiyuan; Yong, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    An analytical method using reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) was developed for the separation and quantitative determination of main degradation products of lignin (4-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, vanillin and syringaldehyde) during the steam exploded pretreatment for corn stovers. The separation was carried out on a C18 column with the mobile phase of acetonitrile-water (containing 1.5% acetic acid) at 30 degrees C at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min and the detection wavelengths of 254 and 280 nm. Under the optimized conditions, the correlation coefficients of the 6 compounds were between 0.999 9 and 1.000 0. The recoveries of the 6 compounds were all above 96% and the relative standard deviations (n = 6) were less than 2.5%. This method is suitable for the determination of the main degradation products of lignin during the steam exploded pretreatment of lignocellulosics. PMID:21574401

  4. Use of micellar mobile phases and microbore column switching for the assay of drugs in physiological fluids.

    PubMed

    Koenigbauer, M J; Curtis, M A

    1988-06-01

    The feasibility of directly assaying drugs in physiological fluids using on-line preconcentration and microbore high-performance liquid chromatography has been demonstrated. The untreated sample is injected onto a hydrophobic pre-column, using micellar sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in the case of serum or phosphate buffer in the case of urine, as the load mobile phase. This traps the components of interest which are then backflushed onto a microbore analytical column using a stronger mobile phase. This procedure was then applied to diazepam in serum and phenobarbital in urine. Recovery was linear and quantitative over the range 30-3000 ng/ml for diazepam in serum and 2-200 micrograms/ml for phenobarbital in urine. The diazepam method was specific against caffeine and the three major metabolites of diazepam: oxazepam, temazepam, and nordiazepam. The effects of varying pre-column dimensions, pre-column loading time, and SDS concentration volume were evaluated. PMID:3410911

  5. Isotherm parameters and intraparticle mass transfer kinetics on molecularly imprinted polymers in acetonitrile/buffer mobile phases

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyunjung; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Guiochon, Georges A

    2006-03-01

    The equilibrium isotherm and the intraparticle mass transfer kinetics of the enantiomers of the template were investigated on an Fmoc-L-tryptophan (Fmoc-L-Trp) imprinted polymer at different pHs and water concentrations in acetonitrile/aqueous buffer mobile phases. The equilibrium isotherm data were measured using frontal analysis at 25 {+-} 2 C. The adsorption energy distribution was found to be trimodal, with narrow modes. Consistent with this distribution, the adsorption data were modeled using a tri-Langmuir isotherm equation and the best estimates of the isotherm parameters were determined. The intraparticle mass transfer parameters were derived by comparing the profiles of experimental overloaded bands and the profiles calculated using the isotherm model and the lumped pore diffusion (POR) model of chromatography. These results showed that different adsorption and mass transfer mechanisms exist in mobile phases made of acetonitrile/aqueous buffer and of acetonitrile/acetic acid solutions.

  6. Improved size exclusion chromatography of coal derived materials using N-methyl-2-pyrolidinone as mobile phase

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.R.; Bartle, K.D.; Mitchell, S.C.

    1995-12-31

    A detailed knowledge of the molecular mass distribution (MMD) in coal and its derived products is essential for a fundamental understanding of coal structure, and of the processes occurring during pyrolyis, liquefaction and combustion. In size exclusion chromatography (SEC) tetrahydrofuran (THF) is commonly employed as the mobile phase. However, THF has limited solvating power and consequently a significant proportion of such materials goes undetected. By comparison, N-methyl-2-pyrolidinone is capable of solvating more of the coal sample and therefore gives the opportunity to determine an improved MMD. In this contribution the extended capabilities of NRP as the mobile phase are demonstrated by analysis of the solutions from solvent fractionation of a coal tar pitch, by SEC using UV/V is absorption, fluorescence and differential refractive index detection. Further application to other coal derived materials appears to indicate that separation is by a substantially size-dependent mechanism.

  7. Understanding Gas Phase Modifier Interactions in Rapid Analysis by Differential Mobility-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafle, Amol; Coy, Stephen L.; Wong, Bryan M.; Fornace, Albert J.; Glick, James J.; Vouros, Paul

    2014-07-01

    A systematic study involving the use and optimization of gas-phase modifiers in quantitative differential mobility-mass spectrometry (DMS-MS) analysis is presented using nucleoside-adduct biomarkers of DNA damage as an important reference point for analysis in complex matrices. Commonly used polar protic and polar aprotic modifiers have been screened for use against two deoxyguanosine adducts of DNA: N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4-aminobiphenyl (dG-C8-4-ABP) and N-(deoxyguanosin-8-y1)-2-amino-l-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (dG-C8-PhIP). Particular attention was paid to compensation voltage (CoV) shifts, peak shapes, and product ion signal intensities while optimizing the DMS-MS conditions. The optimized parameters were then applied to rapid quantitation of the DNA adducts in calf thymus DNA. After a protein precipitation step, adduct levels corresponding to less than one modification in 106 normal DNA bases were detected using the DMS-MS platform. Based on DMS fundamentals and ab initio thermochemical results, we interpret the complexity of DMS modifier responses in terms of thermal activation and the development of solvent shells. At very high bulk gas temperature, modifier dipole moment may be the most important factor in cluster formation and cluster geometry, but at lower temperatures, multi-neutral clusters are important and less predictable. This work provides a useful protocol for targeted DNA adduct quantitation and a basis for future work on DMS modifier effects.

  8. The effect of spontaneous gas expansion and mobilization on the aqueous-phase concentrations above a dense non-aqueous phase liquid pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumford, Kevin G.; Smith, James E.; Dickson, Sarah E.

    2010-04-01

    The spontaneous expansion and mobilization of discontinuous gas above dense non-aqueous-phase liquid (DNAPL) pools can affect the aqueous-phase concentrations of the DNAPL constituents above the pool. The results of an intermediate-scale, two-dimensional flow cell experiment showed that the discontinuous gas flow produced by spontaneous expansion, driven by the partitioning of 1,1,1-TCA from the surface of a DNAPL pool, resulted in detectable aqueous-phase concentrations of 1,1,1-TCA well above the pool surface. In comparison to a conventional model for DNAPL pool dissolution in the absence of a discontinuous gas phase, these concentrations were greater than expected, and were present at greater than expected elevations. Additionally, this study showed that the discontinuous gas flow produced transient behavior in the aqueous-phase concentrations, where the elevated concentrations occurred as short-term, pulse-like events. These results suggest that the spontaneous expansion and mobilization of discontinuous gas in DNAPL source zones could lead to the misdiagnosis of source zone architecture using aqueous concentration data, and that the transient nature of the elevated concentrations could further complicate the difficult task of source zone characterization.

  9. Improved size exclusion chromatography of coal derived materials using N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone as mobile phase

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.R.; Bartle, K.D.; Herod, A.A.; Kandiyoti, R.

    1995-12-31

    A detailed knowledge of the molecular mass distribution (MMD) in coal and its derived products is essential for a fundamental understanding of coal structure, and of the processes occurring during pyrolysis, liquefaction and combustion. Indeed with increased economic and environmental pressure to use natural resources more effectively such knowledge can be applied to gaining more from finite coal reserves. Of the methods available for determining MMDs size exclusion chromatography (SEC) is perhaps the most routinely employed. In SEC tetrahydrofuran (THF) is the most commonly employed mobile phase. However THF has limited solvating power for coal derived materials and consequently a significant proportion of such materials goes undetected. In addition the interpretation of chromatograms with reference to calibration of the column with polystyrene standards is flawed. By comparison, N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) is capable of solvating more of the coal sample and therefore gives the opportunity to determine an improved MMD. In this contribution the extended capabilities of NMP as the mobile phase are demonstrated primarily through the analysis of a coal tar pitch. Both NMP and THF are used as mobile phases for SEC using a number of detection techniques, allowing comparison and evaluation of different chromatographic systems to the analysis of coal derived materials.

  10. Influence of mobile phase composition and cross-linking density on the enantiomeric recognition properties of molecularly imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Yu, C; Mosbach, K

    2000-08-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to investigate elements which affect the enantiomeric recognition properties of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) in the HPLC mode. Our results show that the recognition properties of MIPs are greatly influenced by the mobile phase used. For a polymer prepared in acetonitrile, a good enantiomeric separation was observed when acetonitrile-based mobile phase was used, when the mobile phase was changed to chloroform-based, no enantiomeric recognition was observed although the sample molecule was retarded. This indicates that the specific co-operative binding interactions between the functional groups at the imprinted polymer's recognition sites and the sample molecule were considerably disrupted and only non-specific interactions remained. When the mobile phase was changed back to acetonitrile-based, the recognition was regained. In contrast, for polymers prepared in chloroform, chloroform-based mobile phase gave much better separation than acetonitrile-based mobile phase. When other solvents were tested, significant solvent effects were generally observed. Based on these observations, the recognition properties of the methacrylic acid (MAA)-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) polymers were reinvestigated, and the results show that by simply using an optimised mobile phase system, significantly improved recognition over previously reported results was observed. For a polymer made against Cbz-L-Trp, 100 microg of Cbz-D,L-Trp was separated with a separation factor (alpha) of 4.23 and a resolution (Rs) of 3.87, whereas in the previous report, 10 microg of Cbz-D,L-Trp was only separated with alpha = 1.67 and Rs = 0.1. It is generally realised that the imprinted polymer's recognition property is also very much influenced by the nature of the polymer network. It was shown that the recognition decreased with a decrease in the apparent degree of cross-linking (molar percentage of cross-linker in the polymerisation mixture

  11. Electron Transport in a High Mobility Free-Standing GaN Substrate Grown by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, L.; Kurdak, C.; Yun, F.; Morkoc, H.; Rode, D. L.; Tsen, K. T.; Park, S. S.; Lee, K. Y.

    2001-03-01

    We studied electron transport properties in a high quality free-standing GaN grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy. The GaN, with a thickness of more than 200 μm, was lifted off the sapphire substrate and mechanically polished. At room temperature the carrier density is 1.3x10^16cm-3 and the Hall mobility is 1200 cm^2/V-s, which is the highest reported electron mobility for GaN with a wurtzite structure. Transport properties are studied using a van der Pauw geometry in a temperature range of 20 to 300 K and in magnetic fields up to 8 Tesla. Electron mobility is found to increase at lower temperatures with a peak mobility of 7400 cm^2/V-s at 48 K. The carrier density decreases exponentially at temperatures below 80 K with an activation energy of 28 meV. The electron transport measurements were used to examine the contributions of different scattering mechanisms. Numerical solution of the Boltzmann transport equation was carried out, including non-parabolic conduction bands and wavefunction admixture, along with lattice scattering and ionized-impurity scattering. LO and TO phonon energies were determined by Raman spectroscopy.

  12. Description of Gas-Phase Ion/Neutral Interactions in Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry: CV Prediction Using Calibration Runs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, David; Aspenleiter, Julia; Volmer, Dietrich A.

    2014-09-01

    Differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS) coupled to mass spectrometry is increasingly used in both quantitative analyses of biological samples and as a means of removing background interferences for enhanced selectivity and improved quality of mass spectra. However, DMS separation efficiency using dry inert gases often lacks the required selectivity to achieve baseline separation. Polar gas-phase modifiers such as alcohols are therefore frequently employed to improve selectivity via clustering/declustering processes. The choice of an optimal modifier currently relies on trial and error experiments, making method development a tedious activity. It was the goal of this study to establish a means of CV prediction for compounds using a homologous series of alcohols as gas-phase modifiers. This prediction was based on linear regression of compensation voltages of two calibration runs for the alcohols with the lowest and the highest molecular weights and readily available descriptors such as proton affinity and gas phase acidity of the modifier molecules. All experiments were performed on a commercial quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer equipped with a DMS device between electrospray ionization source and entrance quadrupole lens. We evaluated our approach using a homologous series of 4-alkylbenzoic acids and a selection of 23 small molecules of high chemical diversity. Predicted CV values typically deviated from the experimentally determined values by less than 0.5 V. Several test compounds changed their ion mobility behavior for the investigated gas phase modifiers (e.g., from type B to type A) and thus could thus not be evaluated.

  13. Gas phase studies on terpenes by ion mobility spectrometry using different atmospheric pressure chemical ionization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsdorf, H.; Stone, J. A.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2005-11-01

    The ionization pathways and drift behavior were determined for sets of constitutional isomeric and stereoisomeric non-polar hydrocarbons (unsaturated monocyclic terpenes, unsaturated and saturated bicyclic terpenes) using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with different techniques of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) to assess how structural and stereochemical differences influence ion formation. Depending on the structural features, different ions were observed for constitutional isomers using ion mobility spectrometry with photoionization (PI) and corona discharge (CD) ionization. Photoionization provides ion mobility spectra containing one major peak for saturated compounds while at two peaks were observed for unsaturated compounds, which can be assigned to product ions related to monomer and dimer ions. However, differences in relative abundance of product ions were found depending on the position of the double bond. Although IMS using corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of non-polar hydrocarbons, the spectra are complex and differ from those obtained using photoionization. Additional cluster ions and fragment ions were detected. Only small differences in ion mobility spectra were observed for the diastereomers while the enantiomers provide identical spectra. The structure of the product ions formed was checked by investigations using the coupling of ion mobility spectrometry with mass spectrometry (IMS-MS).

  14. ENHANCED MOBILITY OF DENSE NONAQUEOUS-PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPLs) USING DISSOLVED HUMIC ACIDS

    SciTech Connect

    EDWIN S. OLSON; JOHN R. GALLAGHER; MARC D. KURZ

    1998-10-01

    The specific objectives of this subtask are as follows: � Evaluate the suitability of using humic acids to enhance the solubility and mobility of DNAPL contaminants sorbed to soils. � Evaluate the toxicity and bioavailablity of the DNAPLs to biodegrading microorganisms. To meet the first objective, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) evaluated a set of humic acids (two) with different chemical compositions and polarities for the following: � Ability of the humates to mobilize/solubilize selected (three) DNAPLs � Mobilization/solubilization in batch soil�water experiments (one soil) � Removal rate via biotreatment with a well-established active microbial culture. The second objective was met by evaluating the inhibiting effects of a leonardite-derived humic acid on active microbial populations.

  15. Influence of sample and mobile phase composition on peptide retention behaviour and sensitivity in reversed-phase liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Houbart, V; Rozet, E; Matagne, A; Crommen, J; Servais, A-C; Fillet, M

    2013-11-01

    Because the chromatographic behaviour of peptides is totally different from that of small molecules, a good understanding of the mechanisms that occur from injection to detection in reversed-phase LC-MS is strongly recommended to successfully develop not only qualitative but also quantitative methods. In this study, design of experiments was used in order to investigate the influence of the experimental parameters, i.e. sample and mobile phase composition, on a peptide mixture covering a wide range of molecular weights, isoelectric points and hydropathies. First, a screening design was developed to identify the significant factors concerning mobile phase (ion-pairing reagent nature and concentration) and sample composition (organic modifier proportion and ion-pairing reagent nature) on retention and response intensity (sensitivity). Then, after having selected the experimental domain and the significant factors, a full factorial design was used to further investigate the role of the considered factors and their interactions. Interestingly, ion-pairing reagent nature present in the sample had a tremendous effect on retention and response intensity. Optimal conditions leading to good sensitivity and adequate peptide retention without band splitting were selected and could be used as starting point for rapid method development using classical solvents and ion-pairing reagents. PMID:24070623

  16. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography of the stereoisomers of some sweetener peptides with a helical nickel(II) chelate in the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Bazylak, G

    1994-05-13

    The use of a chiral mobile phase additive in the form of the helically distorted, square-planar, chiral nickel(II) chelate dl-[4,4'-(1-methyl-2-propylethane-1,2-diyldiimino)bis(pent-3 -en-2- onato)]nickel(II) was investigated for the resolution of optical isomers of dipeptide-type sweeteners, viz., aspartame, alitame and antiaspartame, and some of their decomposition products, e.g., diketopiperazines. The chiral discrimination mechanism for the solutes was elucidated. The proposed chiral RP-HPLC system was applied to the stereoselective determination of aspartame impurities in samples of its commercial dietetic and pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:8032495

  17. The use of phase sequence image sets to reconstruct the total volume occupied by a mobile lung tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Gagne, Isabelle M.; Robinson, Don M.; Halperin, Ross; Roa, Wilson

    2005-07-15

    The use of phase sequence image (PSI) sets to reveal the total volume occupied by a mobile target is presented. Isocontrast composite clinical target volumes (CCTVs) may be constructed from PSI sets in order to reveal the total volume occupied by a mobile target during the course of its travel. The ability of the CCTV technique to properly account for target motion is demonstrated by comparison to contours of the true total volume occupied (TVO) for a number of experimental phantom geometries. Finally, using real patient data, the clinical utility of the CCTV technique to properly account for internal tumor motion while minimizing the volume of healthy lung tissue irradiated is assessed by comparison to the standard approach of applying safety margins. Results of the phantom study reveal that CCTV cross sections constructed at the 20% isocontrast level yield good agreement with the total cross sections (TXO) of mobile targets. These CCTVs conform well to the TVOs of the moving targets examined whereby the addition of small uniform margins ensures complete circumscription of the TVO with the inclusion of minimal amounts of surrounding external volumes. The CCTV technique is seen to be clearly superior to the common practice of the addition of safety margins to individual CTV contours in order to account for internal target motion. Margins required with the CCTV technique are eight to ten times smaller than those required with individual CTVs.

  18. Trellis coding with Continuous Phase Modulation (CPM) for satellite-based land-mobile communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This volume of the final report summarizes the results of our studies on the satellite-based mobile communications project. It includes: a detailed analysis, design, and simulations of trellis coded, full/partial response CPM signals with/without interleaving over various Rician fading channels; analysis and simulation of computational cutoff rates for coherent, noncoherent, and differential detection of CPM signals; optimization of the complete transmission system; analysis and simulation of power spectrum of the CPM signals; design and development of a class of Doppler frequency shift estimators; design and development of a symbol timing recovery circuit; and breadboard implementation of the transmission system. Studies prove the suitability of the CPM system for mobile communications.

  19. Syntheses, phase behavior, supramolecular chirality, and field-effect carrier mobility of asymmetrically end-capped mesogenic oligothiophenes.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingwei; Sun, Xiao-Hua; Lu, Zhengyu; Xia, Ping-Fang; Shi, Zehua; Chen, Dongzhong; Wong, Man Shing; Wakim, Salem; Lu, Jianping; Baribeau, Jean-Marc; Tao, Ye

    2009-01-01

    phase of the single end-capped oligothiophenes can be utilized to improve field-effect charge mobility. C(10)O-Ar-OT(4)-H showed a hole mobility of 0.07 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) when deposited on octyltrichlorosilane-treated substrates at 140 degrees C and the on/off current ratios reached 5 x 10(5); on the other hand, its mobility was only 8 x 10(-3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) on the same substrate when deposited at room temperature. PMID:19219863

  20. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of ursodeoxycholic acid after solid phase extraction of blood serum and detection-oriented derivatization.

    PubMed

    Nobilis, M; Pour, M; Kunes, J; Kopecký, J; Kvĕtina, J; Svoboda, Z; Sládková, K; Vortel, J

    2001-03-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (3 alpha,7 beta-dihydroxy-5 beta-cholanoic acid, UDCA) is a therapeutically applicable bile acid widely used for the dissolution of cholesterol-rich gallstones and in the treatment of chronic liver diseases associated with cholestasis. UDCA is more hydrophilic and less toxic than another therapeutically valuable bile acid, chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), the 7 alpha-epimer of UDCA. Procedures for sample preparation and HPLC determination of UDCA in blood serum were developed and validated. A higher homologue of UDCA containing an additional methylene group in the side chain was synthetized and used as an internal standard (IS). Serum samples with IS were diluted with a buffer (pH=7). The bile acids and IS were captured using solid phase extraction (C18 cartridges). The carboxylic group of the analytes was derivatized using 2-bromo-2'-acetonaphthone (a detection-oriented derivatization), and reaction mixtures were analyzed (HPLC with UV 245 nm detection; a 125--4 mm column containing Lichrospher 100 C18, 5 microm; mobile phase: acetonitrile--water, 6:4 (v/v)). Following validation, this method was used for pharmacokinetic studies of UDCA in humans. PMID:11248487

  1. Influence of crystallization-induced amorphous phase confinement on α- and β-relaxation molecular mobility in parylene F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaham, S.; Bechara, M.; Locatelli, M.-L.; Lebey, T.

    2011-09-01

    The molecular mobility of cooperative segmental (α-process) and local (β-process) motions in semicrystalline fluorinated parylene (PA-F) films has been studied using broadband dielectric spectroscopy in a wide temperature range. Particularly, the α-relaxation is, for the first time in a semicrystalline polymer, probed well above the glass transition temperature (˜10Tg) based on the PA-F strong difference between Tg and the crystallization temperature (Tc ˜ 16Tg). The influence of the amorphous phase confinement on the chain dynamics, induced by increasing crystallinity, is also explored. Thus, in the range of Tg, the α-relaxation is described by two crossover Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman characteristics, and the high temperature one presents an exacerbated low fragility. The space confinement of the amorphous regions, as characterized by x-ray diffraction, shows an important mobility restriction of both the α- and β-relaxations. The β-process, which has been related to CF2 group local motions, does not present a modification of its activation energy (Ea ˜ 30.8 kJ mol-1) with confinement, showing that it happens in the pure amorphous regions. The dielectric strength analysis of each process, through the Onsager-Kirkwood-Fröhlich (OKF) theory, has demonstrated that a rigid amorphous phase is strongly involved in the very high temperature range well above Tg. In the range around Tg, a peculiar behavior of the low temperature α-relaxation dielectric strength is reported, in agreement with the OKF temperature decreasing dependency that has been related to cooperative rearranging regions in the pure amorphous phase. The disappearance of the α-relaxation with the amorphous phase confinement leads to a transformation from 2D to 3D crystallite arrangements of the PA-F chains in correlation with the formation of spherulitic structures.

  2. Simultaneous derivatization and extraction of primary short-chain aliphatic amines using an ultrasonic-mixed water-ionic liquid two-phase system for liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hailiang; Ying, Liyan; Hao, Yueli; Zhou, Saichun; Shen, Haoyu; Tang, Ying; Bao, Yazhen

    2011-01-01

    Here, we report on a procedure in which ultrasonic waves were used to mix a water-ionic liquid two-phase system to simultaneously derivatize amines with dansyl chloride and extract, and the resulting dansyl amines into an ionic liquid (IL) at room temperature within 15 min. The ILs used were room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), such as 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([C(n)MIM][PF(6)], n = 4, 6, 8), which are insoluble in water, and can extract more than 88% of the total dansyl amines (Dns-amines) present in aqueous solution. The Dns-amines formed were separated by chromatography in 20 µL of RTIL in a mobile-phase gradient of acetonitrile-water flowing through an Agilent Zorbax SB-C18 column. The eluents were analyzed at 333 nm using a UV detector. The optimal analytical conditions were achieved by using the following: RTILs with a 4-carbon alkyl chain; a 7-mL water sample and 1 mL each of 5 mM dansyl chloride in acetone and 20 mM sodium tetraborate buffer for use with a fixed volume (1 mL) of IL; buffer pH of 10.4; duration of 15 min; and an acetonitrile-water ratio of 50:50 from zero time to 3 min, 80:20 from 4 to 10 min, and 50:50 from 11 to 16 min. In comparison to the single-phase hot-water (70°C) derivatization process reported earlier, the simultaneous process developed here showed a higher derivatization efficiency at the tested concentration. The linear range of analysis (0.14-7.14 mg/L) was determined, and the correlation coefficient (R) ranged from 0.9878 to 0.9980. Furthermore, the estimated percentage of recovery from amine-spiked river-water samples ranged from 76 to 108%. The method presented here is simple and fast, and does not involve the use of volatile organic extractants. PMID:21233559

  3. Task 1.16 - Enhanced Mobility of Dense Nonaqueoius-Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) Using Dissolved Humic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Marc D. Kurz

    1997-08-01

    Chlorinated solvent contamination is widespread across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex and other industrial facilities. Because of the physical properties of dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs), current treatment technologies are generally incapable of completely removing contamination from the source area. Incomplete removal means that the residual DNAPL will persist as a long-term source of groundwater contamination. When DNALPs occur in the subsurface, they resist remediation, owing to low water volubility, high viscosity and interracial tension, and microbial recalcitrance. Because of their high density and polarity, they are usually found sorbed to aquifer solids or in pools on impermeable materials. Surfactants have been used with some success to reduce interracial tension between the aqueous and organic phases and improve volubility of DNAPLs. However, surfactants are expensive and toxic and exhibit an oxygen demand. An alternative is the use of dissolved humic acids in improving DNAPL mobilization and solubilization. Humic acids, a. natural form of organic carbon, are abundant, inexpensive, and nontoxic; biodegrade slowly (low oxygen demand); and have excellent mobilization properties. The present work is to establish the feasibility of using humates for enhancing DNAPL remediation.

  4. Task 1.16 - Enhanced Mobility of Dense Nonaqueous-Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) Using Dissolved Humic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin S. Olson; Marc D. Kurz

    1998-02-01

    Chlorinated solvent contamination is widespread across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex and other industrial facilities. Because of the physical properties of dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs), current treatment technologies are generally incapable of completely removing contamination from the source area. Incomplete removal means that the residual DNAPL WN persist as a long-term source of groundwater contamination. When DNALPs occur in the subsurface, they resist remediation, owing to low water volubility, high viscosity and interracial tension, and microbial recalcitrance. Because of their high density and polarity, they are usually found sorbed to aquifer solids or in pools on impermeable materials. Surfactants have been used with some success to reduce interracial tension between the aqueous and organic phases and improve volubility of DNAPLs. However, surfactants are expensive and toxic and exhibit an oxygen demand. An alternative is the use of dissolved humic acids in improving DNAPL mobilization and solubilization. Humic acids, a natural form of organic carbon, are abundant, inexpensive, and nontoxic; biodegrade slowly (low oxygen demand); and have excellent mobilization properties. The present work is to establish the feasibility of using hurnates for enhancing DNAPL remediation.

  5. Phase boundary mobility in naturally deformed, high-grade quartzofeldspathic rocks: evidence for diffusional creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gower, Robert J. W.; Simpson, Carol

    1992-03-01

    Grain shape fabrics and optical microstructures of some quartzofeldspathic rocks deformed under upper amphibolite facies conditions in the southwestern Grenville Province, Ontario, Canada, suggest that quartz and feldspar have accommodated intracrystalline plastic strains by both diffusional and dislocation creep. In these rocks, quartz and feldspar form polycrystalline domains separated by gently curved and locally cuspate phase boundaries whose morphology is similar in certain respects to the phase boundary morphology of rocks annealed experimentally under hydrostatic stress conditions. In the naturally deformed rocks, however, phase boundary cusps consistently point along the foliation and parallel to the mineral fibre lineation (i.e. in directions of inferred finite extension) which implies that phase boundary motion and cusp formation occurred during deformation. Optical microstructures in feldspar and crystallographic preferred orientations in quartz are consistent with the accommodation of some intracrystalline plastic strains by dislocation creep. However, the morphology of quartz-feldspar phase boundaries cannot be explained by either dislocation creep or static annealing alone. We propose that phase boundary motion resulted from a diffusion-assisted process involving dissolution at foliation-parallel quartz-feldspar phase boundaries, mass transfer over length scales of the order of feldspar domain size (≈200 μm or greater) and precipitation at quartz-feldspar phase boundary cusps. This study extends the range of natural deformation conditions under which diffusional creep has been identified in quartzofeldspathic rocks. It also has important implications for the natural rheological behavior of the mid- and lower-continental crust.

  6. Combined effects of potassium chloride and ethanol as mobile phase modulators on hydrophobic interaction and reversed-phase chromatography of three insulin variants.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Karolina; Frederiksen, Søren S; Degerman, Marcus; Breil, Martin P; Mollerup, Jørgen M; Nilsson, Bernt

    2015-02-13

    The two main chromatographic modes based on hydrophobicity, hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) and reversed-phase chromatography (RPC), are widely used for both analytical and preparative chromatography of proteins in the pharmaceutical industry. Despite the extensive application of these separation methods, and the vast amount of studies performed on HIC and RPC over the decades, the underlying phenomena remain elusive. As part of a systematic study of the influence of mobile phase modulators in hydrophobicity-based chromatography, we have investigated the effects of both KCl and ethanol on the retention of three insulin variants on two HIC adsorbents and two RPC adsorbents. The focus was on the linear adsorption range, separating the modulator effects from the capacity effects, but some complementary experiments at higher load were included to further investigate observed phenomena. The results show that the modulators have the same effect on the two RPC adsorbents in the linear range, indicating that the modulator concentration only affects the activity of the solute in the mobile phase, and not that of the solute-ligand complex, or that of the ligand. Unfortunately, the HIC adsorbents did not show the same behavior. However, the insulin variants displayed a strong tendency toward self-association on both HIC adsorbents; on one in particular. Since this causes peak fronting, the retention is affected, and this could probably explain the lack of congruity. This conclusion was supported by the results from the non-linear range experiments which were indicative of double-layer adsorption on the HIC adsorbents, while the RPC adsorbents gave the anticipated increased tailing at higher load. PMID:25595534

  7. Ionic liquid as a mobile phase additive in high-performance liquid chromatography for the simultaneous determination of eleven fluorescent whitening agents in paper materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Chen, Xianbo; Qiu, Bin; Zhou, Liang; Zhang, Hui; Xie, Juan; Luo, Yan; Wang, Bin

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, 11 4,4'-diaminostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid based fluorescent whitening agents with different numbers of sulfonic acid groups were separated by using an ionic liquid as a mobile phase additive in high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. The effects of ionic liquid concentration, pH of mobile phase B, and composition of mobile phase A on the separation of fluorescent whitening agents were systematically investigated. The ionic liquid tetrabutylammonium tetrafluoroborate is superior to tetrabutylammomnium bromide for the separation of the fluorescent whitening agents. The optimal separation conditions were an ionic liquid concentration at 8 mM and the pH of mobile phase B at 8.5 with methanol as mobile phase A. The established method exhibited low limits of detection (0.04-0.07 ng/mL) and wide linearity ranges (0.30-20 ng/mL) with high linear correlation coefficients from 0.9994 to 0.9998. The optimized procedure was applied to analyze target analytes in paper samples with satisfactory results. Eleven target analytes were quantified, and the recoveries of spiked paper samples were in the range of 85-105% with the relative standard deviations from 2.1 to 5.1%. The obtained results indicated that the method was efficient for detection of 11 fluorescent whitening agents. PMID:26843408

  8. Micellar versus hydro-organic mobile phases for retention-hydrophobicity relationship studies with ionizable diuretics and an anionic surfactant.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Angel, M J; Carda-Broch, S; García-Alvarez-Coque, M C; Berthod, A

    2004-03-19

    Logarithm of retention factors (log k) of a group of 14 ionizable diuretics were correlated with the molecular (log P o/w) and apparent (log P(app)) octanol-water partition coefficients. The compounds were chromatographed using aqueous-organic (reversed-phase liquid chromatography, RPLC) and micellar-organic mobile phases (micellar liquid chromatography, MLC) with the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), in the pH range 3-7, and a conventional octadecylsilane column. Acetonitrile was used as the organic modifier in both modes. The quality of the correlations obtained for log P(app) at varying ionization degree confirms that this correction is required in the aqueous-organic mixtures. The correlation is less improved with SDS micellar media because the acid-base equilibriums are shifted towards higher pH values for acidic compounds. In micellar chromatography, an electrostatic interaction with charged solutes is added to hydrophobic forces; consequently, different correlations should be established for neutral and acidic compounds, and for basic compounds. Correlations between log k and the isocratic descriptors log k(w), log k(wm) (extrapolated retention to pure water in the aqueous-organic and micellar-organic systems, respectively), and psi0 (extrapolated mobile phase composition giving a k = 1 retention factor or twice the dead time), and between these descriptors and log P(app) were also satisfactory, although poorer than those between log k and log P(app) due to the extrapolation. The study shows that, in the particular case of the ionizable diuretics studied, classical RPLC gives better results than MLC with SDS in the retention hydrophobicity correlations. PMID:15043280

  9. Peak shapes of acids and bases under overloaded conditions in reversed-phase liquid chromatography, with weakly buffered mobile phases of various pH: A thermodynamic interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2009-01-01

    We measured overloaded band profiles for a series of nine compounds (phenol, caffeine, 3-phenyl 1-propanol, 2-phenylbutyric acid, amphetamine, aniline, benzylamine, p-toluidine, and procainamidium chloride) on columns packed with four different C{sub 18}-bonded packing materials: XTerra-C{sub 18}, Gemini-C{sub 18}, Luna-C{sub 18}(2), and Halo-C{sub 18}, using buffered methanol-water mobile phases. The {sub W}{sup S}pH of the mobile phase was increased from 2.6 to 11.3. The buffer concentration (either phosphate, acetate, or carbonate buffers) was set constant at values below the maximum concentration of the sample in the band. The influence of the surface chemistry of the packing material on the retention and the shape of the peaks was investigated. Adsorbents having a hybrid inorganic/organic structure tend to give peaks exhibiting moderate or little tailing. The retention and the shape of the band profiles can easily be interpreted at {sub W}{sup S}pHs that are well above or well below the {sub W}{sup S}pK{sub a} of the compound studied. In contrast, the peak shapes in the intermediary pH range (i.e., close to the compound {sub W}{sup S}pK{sub a}) have rarely been studied. These shapes reveal the complexity of the competitive adsorption behavior of couples of acido-basic conjugated compounds at {sub W}{sup S}pHs that are close to their {sub W}{sup S}pK{sub a}. They also reveal the role of the buffer capacity on the resulting peak shape. With increasing {sub W}{sup S}pH, the overloaded profiles are first langmuirian (isotherm type I) at low {sub W}{sup S}pHs, they become S-shaped (isotherm type II), then anti-langmuirian (isotherm type III), S-shaped again at intermediate {sub W}{sup S}pHs, and finally return to a langmuirian shape at high {sub W}{sup S}pHs. A new general adsorption isotherm model that takes into account the dissociation equilibrium of conjugated acidic and basic species in the bulk mobile phase accounts for these transient band shapes. An

  10. Towards the Development of a Mobile Phonopneumogram: Automatic Breath-Phase Classification Using Smartphones.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Bersain A; Reljin, Natasa; Kong, Youngsun; Nam, Yunyoung; Ha, Sangho; Chon, Ki H

    2016-09-01

    Correct labeling of breath phases is useful in the automatic analysis of respiratory sounds, where airflow or volume signals are commonly used as temporal reference. However, such signals are not always available. The development of a smartphone-based respiratory sound analysis system has received increased attention. In this study, we propose an optical approach that takes advantage of a smartphone's camera and provides a chest movement signal useful for classification of the breath phases when simultaneously recording tracheal sounds. Spirometer and smartphone-based signals were acquired from N = 13 healthy volunteers breathing at different frequencies, airflow and volume levels. We found that the smartphone-acquired chest movement signal was highly correlated with reference volume (ρ = 0.960 ± 0.025, mean ± SD). A simple linear regression on the chest signal was used to label the breath phases according to the slope between consecutive onsets. 100% accuracy was found for the classification of the analyzed breath phases. We found that the proposed classification scheme can be used to correctly classify breath phases in more challenging breathing patterns, such as those that include non-breath events like swallowing, talking, and coughing, and alternating or irregular breathing. These results show the feasibility of developing a portable and inexpensive phonopneumogram for the analysis of respiratory sounds based on smartphones. PMID:26847825

  11. Changes in mobile phase ion distribution when combining pressurized flow and electric field.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Björn O; Dahl, Magnus; Andersson, Magnus B O; Blomberg, Lars G

    2004-10-01

    The distribution of ions in a capillary with both pressurized flow and an electric field has been studied. We have earlier reported that the overall concentration of ions increase in a capillary with high electric field and a pressurized flow. Now we describe how the ions are distributed in the capillary both along the capillary length and in the radial direction as a result of the parabolic flow profile. We have combined current measurements with finite element techniques in order to get better understanding of the system. We have found that the concentration of the ions that because of the electric mobility moves towards the flow primarily increases at the beginning of the electric field and close to the capillary wall. In view of the results we have proposed an alterative explanation of earlier published results concerning voltage-induced variation in capacity factors. PMID:15472979

  12. [Transfer possibilities of the mobile phases between different liquid chromatographic techniques for the analysis and isolation of compounds of biological matrices].

    PubMed

    Nyiredy, S

    1999-01-01

    After the survey and characterisation of the solid/liquid chromatographic methods, the author summarized the features of overpressure layer chromatography; the disturbing zone and the multi-front effect as well as the elimination of their influence. In light of these effects, the strategy of the mobile phase transfer possibilities is demonstrated between the various analytical and preparative liquid chromatographic methods, with the OPLC playing a central role. The main point of this strategy is that the examination of biological matrices is always begun with unsaturated TLC chamber, in which the compounds to be separated are placed between the Rf values of 0.3 and 0.8. The optimized TLC mobile phase is transferred without changes to the OPLC technique where a prerun is applied. For separation of nonpolar compounds, the prerun can be performed with hexane; for separation of polar substances the prerun can be performed with any component of the mobile phase in which the components are unable to migrate. The selection of this solvent might be considered during optimization of the mobile phase. Using HPTLC chromatoplate and analytical OPLC technique, highly effective separation can be achieved. The scaling-up for the various preparative chromatographic systems can be performed on basis of the applied chromatographic circumstances. The dry-filled preparative (FC, LPLC, MPLC) columns can be equilibrated with the solvent used for the prerun in analytical OPLC, while in case of filling with slurry technique, the slurry has to be prepared using the same solvent as was used for the prerun of OPLC. The air bubbles can be eliminated in both cases by pumping over the appropriate quantity of the solvent used for prerun, afterwards the preparative separation can be started with the optimized unsaturated TLC mobile phase. The author deals separately with the mobile phase transfer possibilities between the different analytical and preparative planar (OPLC and RPC with various

  13. Analytical Enantioseparation of β-Substituted-2-Phenylpropionic Acids by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Hydroxypropyl-β-Cyclodextrin as Chiral Mobile Phase Additive.

    PubMed

    Tong, Shengqiang; Zhang, Hu; Yan, Jizhong

    2016-04-01

    Analytical enantioseparation of five β-substituted-2-phenylpropionic acids by high-performance liquid chromatography with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) as chiral mobile phase additive was established in this paper, and chromatographic retention mechanism was studied. The effects of various factors such as the organic modifier, different ODS C18 columns and concentration of HP-β-CD were investigated. The chiral mobile phase was composed of methanol or acetonitrile and 0.5% triethylamine acetate buffer at pH 3.0 added with 25 mmol L(-1) of HP-β-CD, and baseline separations could be reached for all racemates. As for chromatographic retention mechanism, it was found that there was a negative correlation between the concentration of HP-β-CD in mobile phase and the retention factor under constant pH value and column temperature. PMID:26755500

  14. Adsorption mechanism of acids and bases in reversed-phase liquid chromatography in weak buffered mobile phases designed for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2009-01-01

    The overloaded band profiles of five acido-basic compounds were measured, using weakly buffered mobile phases. Low buffer concentrations were selected to provide a better understanding of the band profiles recorded in LC/MS analyses, which are often carried out at low buffer concentrations. In this work, 10 {micro}L samples of a 50 mM probe solution were injected into C{sub 18}-bonded columns using a series of five buffered mobile phases at {sub W}{sup S}pH between 2 and 12. The retention times and the shapes of the bands were analyzed based on thermodynamic arguments. A new adsorption model that takes into account the simultaneous adsorption of the acidic and the basic species onto the endcapped adsorbent, predicts accurately the complex experimental profiles recorded. The adsorption mechanism of acido-basic compounds onto RPLC phases seems to be consistent with the following microscopic model. No matter whether the acid or the base is the neutral or the basic species, the neutral species adsorbs onto a large number of weak adsorption sites (their saturation capacity is several tens g/L and their equilibrium constant of the order of 0.1 L/g). In contrast, the ionic species adsorbs strongly onto fewer active sites (their saturation capacity is about 1 g/L and their equilibrium constant of the order of a few L/g). From a microscopic point of view and in agreement with the adsorption isotherm of the compound measured by frontal analysis (FA) and with the results of Monte-Carlo calculations performed by Schure et al., the first type of adsorption sites are most likely located in between C{sub 18}-bonded chains and the second type of adsorption sites are located deeper in contact with the silica surface. The injected concentration (50 mM) was too low to probe the weakest adsorption sites (saturation capacity of a few hundreds g/L with an equilibrium constant of one hundredth of L/g) that are located at the very interface between the C{sub 18}-bonded layer and the bulk

  15. The effects of molecular collisions between the mobile phase and the solute in gas-solid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dali; Ke, Jiajun; Lu, Lizhu

    2015-10-01

    In chromatographic processes, molecular collisions between the mobile phase and the solute result in the transfer of kinetic energy. Based on these interactions, the relationship between the gauge pressure of the carrier gas at the column inlet and the partition frequency of the solute is derived; consequently, the relationship between the column temperature and partition frequency can be obtained. These relationships have been experimentally validated. The change in the peak shape described herein has been successfully explained using this relationship: the partition frequency was calculated from the theoretical plate number of a tailing peak. We propose a new mechanism for peak tailing using plate theory, which states that as the number of plates increases, the symmetry of the peak increases. PMID:26227076

  16. Observation of a topological 3D Dirac semimetal phase in high-mobility Cd3As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupane, M.; Xu, S.-Y.; Sankar, R.; Alidoust, N.; Bian, G.; Liu, Chang; Belopolski, I.; Chang, T.-R.; Jeng, H.-T.; Lin, H.; Bansil, A.; Chou, Fangcheng; Hasan, M. Z.

    2014-03-01

    Experimental identification of three-dimensional (3D) Dirac semimetals in solid state systems is critical for realizing exotic topological phenomena and quantum transport. Using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we performed systematic electronic structure studies on well-known compound Cd3As2. For the first time, we observe a highly linear bulk Dirac cone located at the Brillouin zone center projected onto the (001) surface, which is consistent with a 3D Dirac semimetal phase in Cd3As2. Remarkably, an unusually high Dirac Fermion velocity is seen in samples where the mobility far exceeds 20,000 cm2/V.s suggesting that Cd3As2 can be a promising candidate as a hypercone analog of graphene in many device-applications, which can also incorporate topological quantum phenomena in a large gap setting. This work is primarily supported by U.S. DOE and Princeton University.

  17. Chemical systems for improved oil recovery: Phase behavior, oil recovery, and mobility control studies

    SciTech Connect

    Llave, F.; Gall, B.; Gao, H., Scott, L., Cook, I.

    1995-09-01

    Selected surfactant systems containing a series of ethoxylated nonionic surfactants in combination with an anionic surfactant system have been studied to evaluate phase behavior as well as oil recovery potential. These experiments were conducted to evaluate possible improved phase behavior and overall oil recovery potential of mixed surfactant systems over a broad range of conditions. Both polyacrylamide polymers and Xanthan biopolymers were evaluated. Studies were initiated to use a chemical flooding simulation program, UTCHEM, to simulate oil recovery for laboratory and field applications and evaluate its use to simulate oil saturation distributions obtained in CT-monitoring of oil recovery experiments. The phase behavior studies focused on evaluating the effect of anionic-nonionic surfactant proportion on overall phase behavior. Two distinct transition behaviors were observed, depending on the dominant surfactant in the overall system. The first type of transition corresponded to more conventional behavior attributed to nonionic-dominant surfactant systems. This behavior is manifested by an oil-water-surfactant system that inverts from a water-external (highly conducting) microemulsion to an oil-external (nonconducting) one, as a function of temperature. The latter type which inverts in an opposite manner can be attributed to the separation of the anionic-nonionic mixtures into water- and oil-soluble surfactants. Both types of transition behavior can still be used to identify relative proximity to optimal areas. Determining these transition ranges provided more insight on how the behavior of these surfactant mixtures was affected by altering component proportions. Efforts to optimize the chemical system for oil displacement experiments were also undertaken. Phase behavior studies with systems formulated with biopolymer in solution were conducted.

  18. Membrane-based continuous remover of trifluoroacetic acid in mobile phase for LC-ESI-MS analysis of small molecules and proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhigui; Zhang, Jialing; Xing, Jiawei; Bai, Yu; Liao, Yiping; Liu, Huwei

    2012-07-01

    We developed a "continuous" trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) remover based on electrodialysis with bipolar membrane for online coupling of liquid chromatography (LC) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) using TFA containing mobile phase. With the TFA remover as an interface, the TFA anion in the mobile phase was removed based on electrodialysis mechanism, and meanwhile, the anion exchange membrane was self-regenerated by the hydroxide ions produced by the bipolar membrane. So the remover could continuously work without any additional regeneration process. The established LC-TFA remover-MS system has been successfully applied for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of small molecules as well as proteins. PMID:22528206

  19. Membrane-Based Continuous Remover of Trifluoroacetic Acid in Mobile Phase for LC-ESI-MS Analysis of Small Molecules and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhigui; Zhang, Jialing; Xing, Jiawei; Bai, Yu; Liao, Yiping; Liu, Huwei

    2012-07-01

    We developed a "continuous" trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) remover based on electrodialysis with bipolar membrane for online coupling of liquid chromatography (LC) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) using TFA containing mobile phase. With the TFA remover as an interface, the TFA anion in the mobile phase was removed based on electrodialysis mechanism, and meanwhile, the anion exchange membrane was self-regenerated by the hydroxide ions produced by the bipolar membrane. So the remover could continuously work without any additional regeneration process. The established LC-TFA remover-MS system has been successfully applied for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of small molecules as well as proteins.

  20. The Use of Mobile, Electrochemical Sensor Nodes for the Measurement of Personal Exposure to Gas-Phase Air Pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, G.; Popoola, O. A.; Mead, M. I.; McKeating, S. J.; Calleja, M.; Hayes, M.; Baron, R. P.; Saffell, J.; Jones, R.

    2012-12-01

    , and thus also the potential insufficiency at quantifying the risks to health in the surrounding area. Recent campaigns with mobile sensor nodes have included attempts to probe the differences in personal exposure to gas-phase air pollutants at different heights of breathing zone and between different methods of transport.

  1. Gas phase ion chemistry of an ion mobility spectrometry based explosive trace detector elucidated by tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kozole, Joseph; Levine, Lauren A; Tomlinson-Phillips, Jill; Stairs, Jason R

    2015-08-01

    The gas phase ion chemistry for an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) based explosive detector has been elucidated using tandem mass spectrometry. The IMS system, which is operated with hexachloroethane and isobutyramide reagent gases and an ion shutter type gating scheme, is connected to the atmospheric pressure interface of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS/MS). Product ion masses, daughter ion masses, and reduced mobility values for a collection of nitro, nitrate, and peroxide explosives measured with the IMS/MS/MS instrument are reported. The mass and mobility data together with targeted isotopic labeling experiments and information about sample composition and reaction environment are leveraged to propose molecular formulas, structures, and ionization pathways for the various product ions. The major product ions are identified as [DNT-H](-) for DNT, [TNT-H](-) for TNT, [RDX+Cl](-) and [RDX+NO2](-) for RDX, [HMX+Cl](-) and [HMX+NO2](-) for HMX, [NO3](-) for EGDN, [NG+Cl](-) and [NG+NO3](-) for NG, [PETN+Cl](-) and [PETN+NO3](-) for PETN, [HNO3+NO3](-) for NH4NO3, [NO2](-) for DMNB, [HMTD-NC3H6O3+H+Cl](-) and [HMTD+H-CH2O-H2O2](+) for HMTD, and [(CH3)3CO2](+) for TATP. In general, the product ions identified for the IMS system studied here are consistent with the product ions reported previously for an ion trap mobility spectrometer (ITMS) based explosive trace detector, which is operated with dichloromethane and ammonia reagent gases and an ion trap type gating scheme. Differences between the explosive trace detectors include the [NG+Cl](-) and [PETN+Cl](-) product ions being major ions in the IMS system compared to minor ions in the ITMS system as well as the major product ion for TATP being [(CH3)3CO2](+) for the IMS system and [(CH3)2CNH2](+) for the ITMS system. PMID:26048817

  2. Wireless Roadside Inspection Phase II Tennessee Commercial Mobile Radio Services Pilot Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Franzese, Oscar; Lascurain, Mary Beth; Capps, Gary J; Siekmann, Adam

    2011-05-01

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) Wireless Roadside Inspection (WRI) Program is researching the feasibility and value of electronically assessing truck and bus driver and vehicle safety at least 25 times more often than is possible using only roadside physical inspections. The WRI program is evaluating the potential benefits to both the motor carrier industry and to government. These potential benefits include reduction in accidents, fatalities and injuries on our highways and keeping safe and legal drivers and vehicles moving on the highways. WRI Pilot tests were conducted to prototype, test and demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of electronically collecting safety data message sets from in-service commercial vehicles and performing wireless roadside inspections using three different communication methods. This report summarizes the design, conduct and results of the Tennessee CMRS WRI Pilot Test. The purpose of this Pilot test was to demonstrate the implementation of commercial mobile radio services to electronically request and collect safety data message sets from a limited number of commercial vehicles operating in Tennessee. The results of this test have been used in conjunction with the results of the complimentary pilot tests to support an overall assessment of the feasibility and benefits of WRI in enhancing motor carrier safety (reduction in accidents) due to increased compliance (change in motor carrier and driver behavior) caused by conducting frequent safety inspections electronically, at highway speeds, without delay or need to divert into a weigh station

  3. [Determination of zearalanol and related mycotoxins in pork by solid-phase extraction coupled with ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Li, Liping; Fan, Sai; Zhao, Rong; Li, Bing; Liu, Wei; Wu, Guohua

    2013-07-01

    A method was established for the determination of six compounds of zearalanol and related mycotoxins in pork and its products. After hydrolysis of the target compounds in the pork by beta-glucosidase/sulfatase, they were extracted with methanol aqueous solution and further purified by an HLB column. The separation was performed on a BEH C18 column with gradient elution using acetonitrile-water as mobile phases. The analytes were determined by mass spectrometry using electrospray ionization (ESI) in negative scan mode and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. alpha-Zearalenol-D7 and beta-zearalenol-D7 were used as internal standards. The good linearities (r > 0. 999) were achieved for the six compounds over the range of 1. 0 - 100 microg/L based on the internal standard calibration. The detection limits of the method were 0.03 -0.09 microg/kg. The mean recoveries of the six target compounds spiked at three levels from 1. 0 - 10. 0 microg/kg ranged from 76. 7% to 100. 5% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 20%. The proposed method is simple, sensitive, reproducible, and complies with the regulations for the determination of trace contaminant residues in food matrice. PMID:24164042

  4. Environmental mobility of cobalt-Influence of solid phase characteristics and groundwater chemistry.

    PubMed

    Payne, T E; Itakura, T; Comarmond, M J; Harrison, J J

    2009-01-01

    The adsorption of cobalt on samples from a potential waste repository site in an arid region was investigated in batch experiments, as a function of various solution phase parameters including the pH and ionic strength. The samples were characterized using a range of techniques, including BET surface area measurements, total clay content and quantitative X-ray diffraction. The statistical relationships between the measured cobalt distribution coefficients (K(d) values) and the solid and liquid phase characteristics were assessed. The sorption of cobalt increased with the pH of the aqueous phase. In experiments with a fixed pH value, the measured K(d) values were strongly correlated to the BET surface area, but not to the amount of individual clay minerals (illite, kaolinite or smectite). A further set of sorption experiments was undertaken with two samples of distinctive mineralogy and surface area, and consequently different sorption properties. A simple surface complexation model (SCM) that conceptualized the surface sites as having equivalent sorption properties to amorphous Fe-oxide was moderately successful in explaining the pH dependence of the sorption data on these samples. Two different methods of quantifying the input parameters for the SCM were assessed. While a full SCM for cobalt sorption on these complex environmental substrates is not yet possible, the basic applicability and predictive capability of this type of modeling is demonstrated. A principal requirement to further develop the modeling approach is adequate models for cobalt sorption on component mineral phases of complex environmental sorbents. PMID:19299159

  5. Enantioseparation of mandelic acid derivatives by high performance liquid chromatography with substituted β-cyclodextrin as chiral mobile phase additive and evaluation of inclusion complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Shengqiang; Zhang, Hu; Shen, Mangmang

    2014-01-01

    The enantioseparation of ten mandelic acid derivatives was performed by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) or sulfobutyl ether-β-cyclodextrin (SBE-β-CD) as chiral mobile phase additives, in which inclusion complex formations between cyclodextrins and enantiomers were evaluated. The effects of various factors such as the composition of mobile phase, concentration of cyclodextrins and column temperature on retention and enantioselectivity were studied. The peak resolutions and retention time of the enantiomers were strongly affected by the pH, the organic modifier and the type of β-cyclodextrin in the mobile phase, while the concentration of buffer solution and temperature had a relatively low effect on resolutions. Enantioseparations were successfully achieved on a Shimpack CLC-ODS column (150×4.6 mm i.d., 5 μm). The mobile phase was a mixture of acetonitrile and 0.10 mol L-1 of phosphate buffer at pH 2.68 containing 20 mmol L-1 of HP-β-CD or SBE-β-CD. Semi-preparative enantioseparation of about 10 mg of α-cyclohexylmandelic acid and α-cyclopentylmandelic acid were established individually. Cyclodextrin-enantiomer complex stoichiometries as well as binding constants were investigated. Results showed that stoichiomertries for all the inclusion complex of cyclodextrin-enantiomers were 1:1. PMID:24893270

  6. Chiral stationary phase covalently bound with a chiral pseudo-18-crown-6 ether for enantiomer separation of amino compounds using a normal mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Keiji; Yongzhu, Jin; Nakamura, Takashi; Nishioka, Ryota; Ueshige, Tetsuro; Tobe, Yoshito

    2005-03-01

    In order to apply the excellent chiral recognition ability of chiral pseudo-18-crown-6 ethers that we developed to chiral separation, we prepared a chiral stationary phase (CSP) by immobilizing a chiral pseudo-18-crown-6-type host on 3-aminopropyl silica gel. A chiral column was prepared by the slurry-packing method in a stainless steel HPLC column. A liquid chromatography system using this CSP combined with the detection by mass spectrometry was used for enantiomer separation of amino compounds. A normal mobile phase can be used on this CSP as opposed to conventional dynamic coating-type CSPs. Enantiomers of 18 common natural amino acids were efficiently separated. The chiral separation observed for amino acid methyl esters, amino alcohols, and lipophilic amines was fair using this HPLC system. In view of the correlation between the enantiomer selectivity observed in chromatography and the complexion in solution, the chiral recognition in host-guest interactions might contribute to this enantiomer separation. PMID:15704196

  7. Comparison of iso-eluotropic mobile phases at different temperatures for the separation of triacylglycerols in Non-Aqueous Reversed Phase Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hmida, Dorra; Abderrabba, Manef; Tchapla, Alain; Héron, Sylvie; Moussa, Fathi

    2015-05-15

    Triacylglycerols (TAGs) are a large class of neutral lipids that naturally occur in both plant and animal oils and fats. Their analyses in Non-Aqueous Reversed Phase Liquid Chromatography (NARP) require a mixture of weak solvent (mostly acetonitrile) and strong solvent. In the present work, we have established eluotropic solvent strength scale of several binary mobile phases on C18 bonded silica at different temperatures (acetonitrile/methylene chloride, acetonitrile/acetone, acetonitrile/ethyl acetate, acetonitrile/propan-2-ol, and acetonitrile/butan-1-ol at 25°C, 43°C, 63°C and 85°C); it is based on the methylene selectivity and the use of homologous series. We show that this scale is well suited to the TAGs analysis. The analysis of nine seed oils (Aleurites fordii, Calophyllum inophyllum, Glycina max, Olea europea, Orbignya olifeira, Pinus koraiensis, Pistacia lentiscus, Punica granatum and Ribes nigrum) in iso-eluotropic conditions leads to propose unambiguously the couple MeCN/BuOH at 25°C as the best system to separate TAGs. The use of butanol, as strong solvent, provides very good TAGs congeners separations and avoids the use of chlorinated solvents which gave to this day the best separations. PMID:25855317

  8. The stereochemical resolution of the enantiomers of aspartame on an immobilized alpha-chymotrypsin HPLC chiral stationary phase: the effect of mobile-phase composition and enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Jadaud, P; Wainer, I W

    1990-01-01

    The enantioselective and diastereoselective resolutions of the stereoisomers of N alpha-aspartyl-phenylalanine 1-methyl ester (APME) have been accomplished on an HPLC chiral stationary phase based upon alpha-chymotrypsin (the ACHT-CSP) with observed enantioselectivities (alpha 1) for the DL-/LD-enantiomer of as high as 29.17 and for the DD-/LL-enantiomers of as high as 28.97. In addition, the effect on the chromatographic retention of the APME stereoisomers of the activity of the ACHT and the composition of the mobile phase--structure of the anionic component, molarity, and pH--have been studied. The results of this study suggest that the aspartyl moiety and/or the aspartyl-phenylalanine amide linkage play key roles in the observed enantioselectivity; the APME stereoisomers containing L-phenylalanine, i.e., DL- and LL-APME, bind at a different site in the ACHT molecule (the L-Phe site) than the APME stereoisomers containing D-phenylalanine (the D-Phe site); and the observed enantioselectivity is a measure of the difference in the binding affinities at the two sites rather than the consequence of differential affinities at a single site. PMID:2400637

  9. Comparison of the performance of non-ionic and anionic surfactants as mobile phase additives in the RPLC analysis of basic drugs.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ángel, María J; García-Álvarez-Coque, María C

    2011-03-01

    Surfactants added to the mobile phases in reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) give rise to a modified stationary phase, due to the adsorption of surfactant monomers. Depending on the surfactant nature (ionic or non-ionic), the coated stationary phase can exhibit a positive net charge, or just change its polarity remaining neutral. Also, micelles in the mobile phase introduce new sites for solute interaction. This affects the chromatographic behavior, especially in the case of basic compounds. Two surfactants of different nature, the non-ionic Brij-35 and the anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) added to water or aqueous-organic mixtures, are here compared in the separation of basic compounds (β-blockers and tricyclic antidepressants). The reversible/irreversible adsorption of the monomers of both surfactants on the stationary phase was examined. The changes in the nature of the chromatographic system using different columns and chromatographic conditions were followed based on the changes in retention and peak shape. The study revealed that Brij-35 is suitable for analyzing basic compounds of intermediate polarity, using "green chemistry", since the addition of an organic solvent is not needed and Brij-35 is a biodegradable surfactant. In contrast, RPLC with hydro-organic mixtures or mobile phases containing SDS required high concentrations of organic solvents. PMID:21328695

  10. Combined column-mobile phase mixture statistical design optimization of high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of multicomponent systems.

    PubMed

    Breitkreitz, Márcia C; Jardim, Isabel C S F; Bruns, Roy E

    2009-02-27

    A statistical approach for the simultaneous optimization of the mobile and stationary phases used in reversed-phase liquid chromatography is presented. Mixture designs using aqueous mixtures of acetonitrile (ACN), methanol (MeOH) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) organic modifiers were performed simultaneously with column type optimization, according to a split-plot design, to achieve the best separation of compounds in two sample sets: one containing 10 neutral compounds with similar retention factors and another containing 11 pesticides. Combined models were obtained by multiplying a linear model for column type, C8 or C18, by quadratic or special cubic mixture models. Instead of using an objective response function, combined models were built for elementary chromatographic criteria (retention factors, resolution and relative retention) of each solute or pair of solutes and, after their validation, the global separation was accomplished by means of Derringer's desirability functions. For neutral compounds a 37:12:8:43 (v/v/v/v) percentage mixture of ACN:MeOH:THF:H2O with the C18 column and for pesticides a 15:15:70 (v/v/v) ACN:THF:H2O mixture with the C8 column provide excellent resolution of all peaks. PMID:19167715

  11. Chromatographic behavior of small organic compounds in low-temperature high-performance liquid chromatography using liquid carbon dioxide as the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Motono, Tomohiro; Nagai, Takashi; Kitagawa, Shinya; Ohtani, Hajime

    2015-07-01

    Low-temperature high-performance liquid chromatography, in which a loop injector, column, and detection cell were refrigerated at -35ºC, using liquid carbon dioxide as the mobile phase was developed. Small organic compounds (polyaromatic hydrocarbons, alkylbenzenes, and quinones) were separated by low-temperature high-performance liquid chromatography at temperatures from -35 to -5ºC. The combination of liquid carbon dioxide mobile phase with an octadecyl-silica (C18 ) column provided reversed phase mode separation, and a bare silica-gel column resulted in normal phase mode separation. In both the cases, nonlinear behavior at approximately -15ºC was found in the relationship between the temperature and the retention factors of the analytes (van't Hoff plots). In contrast to general trends in high-performance liquid chromatography, the decrease in temperature enhanced the separation efficiency of both the columns. PMID:25917311

  12. Tensor-based classification of an auditory mobile BCI without a subject-specific calibration phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zink, Rob; Hunyadi, Borbála; Van Huffel, Sabine; De Vos, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Objective. One of the major drawbacks in EEG brain-computer interfaces (BCI) is the need for subject-specific training of the classifier. By removing the need for a supervised calibration phase, new users could potentially explore a BCI faster. In this work we aim to remove this subject-specific calibration phase and allow direct classification. Approach. We explore canonical polyadic decompositions and block term decompositions of the EEG. These methods exploit structure in higher dimensional data arrays called tensors. The BCI tensors are constructed by concatenating ERP templates from other subjects to a target and non-target trial and the inherent structure guides a decomposition that allows accurate classification. We illustrate the new method on data from a three-class auditory oddball paradigm. Main results. The presented approach leads to a fast and intuitive classification with accuracies competitive with a supervised and cross-validated LDA approach. Significance. The described methods are a promising new way of classifying BCI data with a forthright link to the original P300 ERP signal over the conventional and widely used supervised approaches.

  13. Ionic liquids as mobile phase additives for the high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of fluoroquinolone antibiotics in water samples.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Herrera, Antonio V; Hernández-Borges, Javier; Rodríguez-Delgado, Miguel Angel

    2008-12-01

    In this work, four ionic liquids differing in the length of the alkyl chain on the imidazolium cation and one ionic liquid containing tetraethylammonium, all with the same counterion, (i.e. 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (EMIm-BF(4)), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIm-BF(4)), 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (HMIm-BF(4)), 1-methyl-3-octylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (MOIm-BF(4)), and tetraethylammonium tetrafluroborate (Et(4)N-BF(4))) were tested as mobile phase additives for HPLC separation of a group of seven basic fluoroquinolone (FQ) antibiotics for human and veterinary use (i.e. fleroxacin, ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin, danofloxacin, enrofloxacin, sarafloxacin, and difloxacin) using a conventional reversed-phase Nova-Pak C(18) column. Fluorescence detection was used. Among the ionic liquids selected, use of BMIm-BF(4) enabled effective separation of these compounds with relatively low analysis time (14 min). The best separation was achieved by isocratic elution at 1 mL min(-1) with 5 mmol L(-1) BMIm-BF(4) and 10 mmol L(-1) ammonium acetate at pH 3.0 with 13% (v/v) acetonitrile. Limits of detection (LODs) for fluorescence detection were in the range 0.5-11 microg L(-1). The method was tested by analyzing several water samples after the optimization of a suitable solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure using Oasis HLB cartridges. Mean recovery values were above 84% for all analytes with LODs in the range 1-29 ng L(-1). PMID:18854988

  14. Use of basic mobile phase to improve chromatography and boost sensitivity for quantifying tetrahydrocurcumin in human plasma by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Tan, Aimin; Wu, Yanxin; Wong, Molly; Licollari, Albert; Bolger, Gordon; Fanaras, John C; Shopp, George; Helson, Lawrence

    2016-08-15

    Tetrahydrocurcumin (THC), a major metabolite of curcumin, is often quantified by LC-MS or LC-MS/MS using acidic mobile phases due to the concern of its instability in a basic medium. However, acidic mobile phases often lead to poor chromatography (e.g. split or double peaks) and reduced detection sensitivity in the commonly used negative ionization mode. To overcome these shortcomings, a basic mobile phase was used for the first time in the LC-MS/MS quantification of THC. In comparison with the acidic mobile phases, a single symmetrical chromatographic peak was obtained and the sensitivity increased by 7-fold or more under the equivalent conditions. The new LC-MS/MS method using the basic mobile phase has been successfully validated for the quantification of THC in human EDTA plasma over the concentration range of 5-2500ng/ml. The within-batch accuracy (% nominal concentration) was between 88.7 and 104.9 and the between-batch accuracy ranged from 96.7 to 108.6. The CVs for within- and between-batch precisions were equal to or less than 5.5% and 9.1%, respectively. No significant matrix interference or matrix effect was observed from normal or lipemic and hemolytic plasma matrices. In addition, the common stabilities with adequate durations were established, including up to 5days of post-preparative stability. Furthermore, when the validated method was applied to a clinical study, the passing rate of ISR samples was 83%, indicating the good reproducibility of the method. The success of the unconventional approach presented in this article demonstrates that a mobile phase could be selected based mainly on its merits to facilitate LC separation and/or MS detection. There is no need for excessive concern about the stability of the compound(s) of interest in the selected mobile phase because the run time of modern LC-MS or LC-MS/MS methods is typically only a few minutes. PMID:27327398

  15. [Preparation and chromatographic performance of a eugenol-bonded silica gel stationary phase for high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Xu, Lili; Zhong, Minghua; Chen, Xiaojing

    2015-05-01

    A eugenol-bonded silica gel stationary phase (EGSP) for high performance liquid chromatography ( HPLC) has been synthesized by the solid-liquid successive reaction method. The preparation process included two steps: firstly, γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxy-silane (KH-560) was covalently attached to the surface of spherical silica gel. Then the bonded silica gel continued to react with eugenol ligand, which was a plant active component, and obtained EGSP. The structure of EGSP was characterized by elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Using naphthalene as a probe, the column efficiency was tested under the mobile phase of acetonitrile-water (35:65, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min. The chromatographic properties and the retention mechanism of EGSP were evaluated by using neutral, basic and acidic analytes as solute probes. Meanwhile, the comparative study with C18 column and phenyl column was also carried out under the same chromatographic conditions. The result showed that the eugenol ligand was successfully bonded to the surface of silica gel with a 0.28 mmol/g of bonded amount, and the theoretical plate number of EGSP column was about 24 707 N/m. The EGSP appeared to be a kind of excellent reversed-phase stationary phase with suitable hydrophobicity and various synergistic sites. The eugenol ligand bonded on silica gel could first provide π-π interaction sites for different analytes because of its benzene ring and alkenyl. In addition, the methoxy groups of eugenol were responsible for dipole-dipole and hydrogen-bonding interactions between the ligand and solutes in the effective separation process. Comparing with traditional C18 column and phenyl column, EGSP has an advantage in the fast separation of polar compounds under simple experimental conditions. PMID:26387202

  16. Applicability of the Remote Mobile Emplacement Package (RMEP) design as a mobility aid for proposed post-84 Mars missions, phase O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The results of study to determine the applicability of the Remote Mobile Emplacement Package (RMEP) design concept as a mobility aid for the proposed post-'84 Mars missions are presented. The RMEP wheel and mobility subsystem parameters: wheel tire size, weight, stowed volume, and environmental effects; obstacle negotiation; reliability and wear; motor and drive train; and electrical power demand were reviewed. Results indicated that: (1) the basic RMEP wheel design would be satisfactory, with additional attention to heating, side loading, tread wear and ultraviolet radiation protection; (2) motor and drive train power requirements on Mars would be less than on Earth; and (3) the mobility electrical power requirements would be small enough to offer the option of operating the Mars mini rover untethered. Payload power required for certain sampling functions would preclude the use of battery power for these missions. Hazard avoidance and reverse direction maneuvers are discussed. Limited examination of vehicle payload integration and thermal design was made, pending establishment of a baseline vehicle/payload design.

  17. Greening pharmaceutical applications of liquid chromatography through using propylene carbonate-ethanol mixtures instead of acetonitrile as organic modifier in the mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Tache, Florentin; Udrescu, Stefan; Albu, Florin; Micăle, Florina; Medvedovici, Andrei

    2013-03-01

    Substitution of acetonitrile (ACN) as organic modifier in mobile phases for liquid chromatography by mixtures of propylene carbonate (PC) and ethanol (EtOH) may be considered a greener approach for pharmaceutical applications. Such a replacement is achievable without any major compromise in terms of elution order, chromatographic retention, efficiency and peak symmetry. This has been equally demonstrated for reverse phase (RP), ion pair formation (IP) and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) separation modes. The impact on the sensitivity induced by the replacement between these organic solvents is discussed for UV-vis and mass spectrometric detection. A comparison between Van Deemter plots obtained under elution conditions based on ACN and PC/EtOH is presented. The alternative elution modes were also compared in terms of thermodynamic parameters, such as standard enthalpy (ΔH⁰) and entropic contributions to the partition between the mobile and the stationary phases, for some model compounds. Van't Hoff plots demonstrated that differences between the thermodynamic parameters are minor when shifting from ACN/water to PC/EtOH/water elution on an octadecyl chemically modified silicagel stationary phase. As long as large volume injection (LVI) of diluents non-miscible with the mobile phase is a recently developed topic having a high potential of greening the sample preparation procedures through elimination of the solvent evaporation stage, this feature was also assessed in the case of ACN replacement by PC/EtOH. PMID:23277155

  18. Influence of the charge distribution on the stationary phases zeta potential.

    PubMed

    Bocian, Szymon; Dziubakiewicz, Ewelina; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2015-08-01

    A set of seven home-made silica based bonded phases with different functional groups was investigated. Their zeta potential data in methanol and acetonitrile as well as in methanol/water and acetonitrile/water solution were obtained by using a Zetasizer. The influence of polar functional groups on a zeta potential was investigated. The results show that the amines incorporated in the structure of chemically bonded phases of reversed-phase materials are protonated during chromatographic analysis, resulting in changes of the zeta potential from negative to positive values. Acetonitrile causes more negative values and methanol provides positive (or less negative) values of the zeta potential. PMID:26011770

  19. On-column nitrosation of amines observed in liquid chromatography impurity separations employing ammonium hydroxide and acetonitrile as mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Myers, David P; Hetrick, Evan M; Liang, Zhongming; Hadden, Chad E; Bandy, Steven; Kemp, Craig A; Harris, Thomas M; Baertschi, Steven W

    2013-12-01

    The availability of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) columns capable of operation at pH values up to 12 has allowed a greater selectivity space to be explored for method development in pharmaceutical analysis. Ammonium hydroxide is of particular value in the mobile phase because it is compatible with direct interfacing to electrospray mass spectrometers. This paper reports an unexpected N-nitrosation reaction that occurs with analytes containing primary and secondary amines when ammonium hydroxide is used to achieve the high pH and acetonitrile is used as the organic modifier. The nitrosation reaction has generality. It has been observed on multiple columns from different vendors and with multiple amine-containing analytes. Ammonia was established to be the source of the nitroso nitrogen. The stainless steel column frit and metal ablated from the frit have been shown to be the sites of the reactions. The process is initiated by removal of the chromium oxide protective film from the stainless steel by acetonitrile. It is hypothesized that the highly active, freshly exposed metals catalyze room temperature oxidation of ammonia to NO but that the actual nitrosating agent is likely N(2)O(3). PMID:24182763

  20. Simultaneous Determination of Diosmin and Hesperidin in Pharmaceuticals by RPLC using Ionic Liquids as Mobile Phase Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Szymański, Marcin; Młynarek, Daria; Szymański, Arkadiusz; Matławska, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Diosmin and hesperidin are natural flavonoid glycosides found in various plant materials, mainly in citrus fruits in different concentrations. Diosmin for pharmaceutical use is obtained mainly semi-synthetically from hesperidin. Hesperidin often accompanies diosmin as a natural impurity in different pharmaceutical formulations; therefore, a simple, fast and precise method for the simultaneous assay of diosmin and hesperidin in pharmaceutical formulations has been developed to control their contents. Chromatographic resolution was performed using a column with C-18 packing and the following mobile phase: methanol/water (45:55, v/v) with 0.025% added didecyldimethylammonium lactate, which significantly affects retention, shortening analysis time and having a positive impact on the symmetry of resulting chromatographic peaks. The method shows linearity between 2.5 and 100 μg/mL, high repeatability (0.39 and 0.42% for diosmin and hesperidin, respectively) and accuracy of 96 to 102% for both the assayed compounds. Intraday and interday precision of the new method were less than RSD% 1, 2. The limit of detection of the assayed compounds is 2.5 and 1.2 μg/mL for diosmin and hesperidin, respectively. The method was tested on several pharmaceutical products available in Poland. PMID:27610154

  1. Simultaneous Determination of Diosmin and Hesperidin in Pharmaceuticals by RPLC using Ionic Liquids as Mobile Phase Modifiers.

    PubMed

    Szymański, Marcin; Młynarek, Daria; Szymański, Arkadiusz; Matławska, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Diosmin and hesperidin are natural flavonoid glycosides found in various plant materials, mainly in citrus fruits in different concentrations. Diosmin for pharmaceutical use is obtained mainly semi-synthetically from hesperidin. Hesperidin often accompanies diosmin as a natural impurity in different pharmaceutical formulations; therefore, a simple, fast and precise method for the simultaneous assay of diosmin and hesperidin in pharmaceutical formulations has been developed to control their contents. Chromatographic resolution was performed using a column with C-18 packing and the following mobile phase: methanol/water (45:55, v/v) with 0.025% added didecyldimethylammonium lactate, which significantly affects retention, shortening analysis time and having a positive impact on the symmetry of resulting chromatographic peaks. The method shows linearity between 2.5 and 100 μg/mL, high repeatability (0.39 and 0.42% for diosmin and hesperidin, respectively) and accuracy of 96 to 102% for both the assayed compounds. Intraday and interday precision of the new method were less than RSD% 1, 2. The limit of detection of the assayed compounds is 2.5 and 1.2 μg/mL for diosmin and hesperidin, respectively. The method was tested on several pharmaceutical products available in Poland. PMID:27610154

  2. Solvent viscosity mismatch between the solute plug and the mobile phase: Considerations in the applications of two-dimensional HPLC

    SciTech Connect

    Shalliker, R. Andrew; Guiochon, Georges A

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the nature of viscosity contrast induced flow instabilities is an important aspect in the design of two-dimensional HPLC separations. When the viscosity contrast between the sample plug and the mobile phase is sufficiently large, the phenomenon known as viscous fingering can be induced. Viscous fingering is a flow instability phenomenon that occurs at the interface between two fluids with different viscosities. In liquid chromatography, viscous fingering results in the solute band undergoing a change in form as it enters into the chromatography column. Moreover, even in the absence of viscous fingering, band shapes change shape at low viscosity contrasts. These changes can result in a noticeable change in separation performance, with the result depending on whether the solvent pushing the solute plug has a higher or lower viscosity than the solute plug. These viscosity induced changes become more important as the solute injection volume increases and hence understanding the process becomes critical in the implementation of multidimensional HPLC techniques, since in these techniques the sample injection plug into the second dimension is an order of magnitude greater than in one-dimensional HPLC. This review article assesses the current understanding of the viscosity contrast induced processes as they relate to liquid chromatographic separation behaviour.

  3. 77 FR 7152 - Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Scheduled for September 27, 2012; Comment Sought on Competitive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... the Commission in the USF/ICC Transformation Order, 76 FR 73830, November 29, 2011 and 76 FR 81562... current- and next-generation mobile networks in areas where these networks are unavailable. This support... current or next generation mobile networks, the USF/ICC Transformation Order provides that the...

  4. Enantiomeric separation of dansyl amino acids using macrocyclic antibiotics as chiral mobile phase additives by narrow-bore high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sharp, V Scott; Letts, Maureen N; Risley, Donald S; Rose, John P

    2004-03-01

    Seven macrocyclic antibiotics were evaluated as chiral selectors for the enantiomeric separation of 11 dansyl amino acids using narrow-bore high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The macrocyclic antibiotics were incorporated as mobile phase additives to determine the enantioselective effects on the chiral analytes. The resolution and capacity factor (k') of each analyte were assessed while varying the structure of macrocyclic antibiotic and the mobile phase buffer pH. The selectivity of the chiral selectors was measured as a function of changes in these parameters. All 11 dansyl amino acids were separated by at least one of the chiral selectors. Three-dimensional computer modeling of the more effective chiral selectors illustrated the importance of macrocyclic antibiotic structure concerning stereospecific analyte interaction. PMID:14770411

  5. Defect-mediated relaxation in the random tiling phase of a binary mixture: Birth, death and mobility of an atomic zipper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tondl, Elisabeth; Ramsay, Malcolm; Harrowell, Peter; Widmer-Cooper, Asaph

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the mechanism of defect-mediated relaxation in a dodecagonal square-triangle random tiling phase exhibited by a simulated binary mixture of soft discs in 2D. We examine the internal transitions within the elementary mobile defect (christened the "zipper") that allow it to move, as well as the mechanisms by which the zipper is created and annihilated. The structural relaxation of the random tiling phase is quantified and we show that this relaxation is well described by a model based on the distribution of waiting times for each atom to be visited by the diffusing zipper. This system, representing one of the few instances where a well defined mobile defect is capable of structural relaxation, can provide a valuable test case for general theories of relaxation in complex and disordered materials.

  6. Defect-mediated relaxation in the random tiling phase of a binary mixture: Birth, death and mobility of an atomic zipper

    SciTech Connect

    Tondl, Elisabeth; Ramsay, Malcolm; Harrowell, Peter; Widmer-Cooper, Asaph

    2014-03-14

    This paper describes the mechanism of defect-mediated relaxation in a dodecagonal square-triangle random tiling phase exhibited by a simulated binary mixture of soft discs in 2D. We examine the internal transitions within the elementary mobile defect (christened the “zipper”) that allow it to move, as well as the mechanisms by which the zipper is created and annihilated. The structural relaxation of the random tiling phase is quantified and we show that this relaxation is well described by a model based on the distribution of waiting times for each atom to be visited by the diffusing zipper. This system, representing one of the few instances where a well defined mobile defect is capable of structural relaxation, can provide a valuable test case for general theories of relaxation in complex and disordered materials.

  7. [The resolution of racemic sec-phenethyl alcohol on cellulose tribenzoate-based CSP: influence of different alcohols in the mobile phase].

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Lü, S; Gao, P; Li, S

    1999-07-01

    Several primary and secondary alcohols (ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol) were used as the mobile phase components separately, to investigate their effects on the capacity factor and stereoselectivity of sec-phenethyl alcohol enantiomers on cellulose tribenzoate-based CSP. The chiral recognition mechanism for the enantiomeric aromatic alcohols studied may involve: (1) the aromatic portion of the solute may insert into a chiral cavity of the CSP through a hydrogen bonding interaction between the solute's alcoholic hydrogen and the ester carbonyl group on the CSP; (2) the mobile phase modifiers (various alcohols) compete with the solutes for chiral, as well as achiral, binding sites on the CSP; (3) the structure of the modifier has some effect on stereoselectivity through an alteration of the steric environment of the chiral cavity. PMID:12552849

  8. Formation of Iron Complexes from Trifluoroacetic Acid Based Liquid Chromatography Mobile Phases as Interference Ions in LC-ESI-MS Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Anil; Zhang, Rui; Orton, Daniel; Zhao, Rui; Clauss, Therese; Moore, Ronald; Smith, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Two unexpected singly charged ions at m/z 1103 and 944 have been observed in mass spectra obtained from electrospray ionization-mass spectrometric analysis of liquid chromatography effluents with mobile phases containing trifluoroacetic acid that severely interfered with sample analysis. Accurate mass measurement and tandem mass spectrometry studies revealed that these two ions are composed of three components; clusters of trifluoroacetic acid, clusters of mass 159 and iron. Formation of these ions is inhibited by removing trifluoroacetic acid from the mobile phases and using formic acid in its place, replacing the stainless steel union with a titanium union or by adding a small blank fused silica capillary column between the chromatography column and the electrospray tip via a stainless steel union without any adverse effects to chromatographic separation, peak broadening or peptide identifications. PMID:21504012

  9. High mobility of flap endonuclease 1 and DNA polymerase eta associated with replication foci in mammalian S-phase nucleus.

    PubMed

    Solovjeva, Lioudmila; Svetlova, Maria; Sasina, Lioudmila; Tanaka, Kyoji; Saijo, Masafumi; Nazarov, Igor; Bradbury, Morton; Tomilin, Nikolai

    2005-05-01

    Originally detected in fixed cells, DNA replication foci (RFi) were later visualized in living cells by using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and DNA ligase I. It was shown using fluorescence redistribution after photobleaching (FRAP) assay that focal GFP-PCNA slowly exchanged, suggesting the existence of a stable replication holocomplex. Here, we used the FRAP assay to study the dynamics of the GFP-tagged PCNA-binding proteins: Flap endonuclease 1 (Fen1) and DNA polymerase eta (Pol eta). We also used the GFP-Cockayne syndrome group A (CSA) protein, which does associate with transcription foci after DNA damage. In normal cells, GFP-Pol eta and GFP-Fen1 are mobile with residence times at RFi (t(m)) approximately 2 and approximately 0.8 s, respectively. GFP-CSA is also mobile but does not concentrate at discrete foci. After methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) damage, the mobile fraction of focal GFP-Fen1 decreased and t(m) increased, but it then recovered. The mobilities of focal GFP-Pol eta and GFP-PCNA did not change after MMS. The mobility of GFP-CSA did not change after UV-irradiation. These data indicate that the normal replication complex contains at least two mobile subunits. The decrease of the mobile fraction of focal GFP-Fen1 after DNA damage suggests that Fen1 exchange depends on the rate of movement of replication forks. PMID:15758026

  10. Simultaneous determination of fangchinoline and tetrandrine in Stephania tetrandra S. Moore by using 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids as the RP-HPLC mobile phase additives.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan; Sun, Ailing; Liu, Renmin; Zhang, Yongqing

    2013-03-12

    A reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method for simultaneous determination of fangchinoline (FAN) and tetrandrine (TET) in Stephania tetrandra S. Moore was established by using 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate as the mobile phase additives in this paper. Four types of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) were used as additives of the mobile phase to separate FAN and TET by RP-HPLC. The effects of the length of the alkyl group on the imidazolium ring and its counterion, the concentrations of IL and the pH of the mobile phase, which influenced the chromatographic behaviors of FAN and TET, were investigated in detail. The linearity, sensitivity, accuracy and repeatability of the proposed method were also investigated. The probable mechanism of the separation with ILs as the mobile phase additives was explored and discussed. PMID:23452799

  11. Efficiency of short, small-diameter columns for reversed-phase liquid chromatography under practical operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Chassy, Alexander W; Miyazaki, Shota; Motokawa, Masanori; Morisato, Kei; Uzu, Hideyuki; Ohira, Masayoshi; Furuno, Masahiro; Nakanishi, Kazuki; Minakuchi, Hiroyoshi; Mriziq, Khaled; Farkas, Tivadar; Fiehn, Oliver; Tanaka, Nobuo

    2015-02-27

    Prototype small-size (1.0mm I.D., 5cm long) columns for reversed-phase HPLC were evaluated in relation to instrument requirements. The performance of three types of columns, monolithic silica and particulate silica (2μm, totally porous and 2.6μm, core-shell particles) was studied in the presence of considerable or minimal extra-column effects, while the detector contribution to band broadening was minimized by employing a small size UV-detector cell (6- or 90nL). A micro-LC instrument having small system volume (<1μL) provided extra-column band variance of only 0.01-0.02μL(2). The three columns generated about 8500 theoretical plates for solutes with retention factor, k>1-3 (depending on the column), in acetonitrile/water mobile phase (65/35=vol/vol) at 0.05mL/min, with the instrument specified above. The column efficiency was lower by up to 30% than that observed with a 2.1mm I.D. commercial column. The small-size columns also provided 8000-8500 theoretical plates for well retained solutes with a commercial ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) instrument when extra-column contributions were minimized. While a significant extra-column effect was observed for early eluting solutes (k<2-4, depending on column) with methanol/water (20/80=vol/vol) as weak-wash solvent, the use of methanol/water=50/50 as wash solvent affected the column efficiency for most analytes. The results suggest that the band compression effect by the weak-wash solvent associated with partial-loop injection may provide a practical means to reducing the extra-column effect for small-size columns, while the use of an instrument with minimum extra-column effect is highly desirable. PMID:25648581

  12. Advantages of the AlGaN spacer in InAlN high-electron-mobility transistors grown using metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Atsushi; Ishiguro, Tetsuro; Kotani, Junji; Tomabechi, Shuichi; Nakamura, Norikazu; Watanabe, Keiji

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate the advantages of an AlGaN spacer layer in an InAlN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT). We investigated the effects of the growth parameters of the spacer layer on electron mobility in InAlN HEMTs grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy, focusing on the surface roughness of the spacer layer and sharpness of the interface with the GaN channel layer. The electron mobility degraded, as evidenced by the formation of a graded AlGaN layer at the top of the GaN channel layer and the surface roughness of the AlN spacer layer. We believe that the short migration length of aluminum atoms is responsible for the observed degradation. An AlGaN spacer layer was employed to suppress the formation of the graded AlGaN layer and improve surface morphology. A high electron mobility of 1550 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 and a low sheet resistance of 211 Ω/sq were achieved for an InAlN HEMT with an AlGaN spacer layer.

  13. Accessing structure and dynamics of mobile phase in organic solids by real-time T1C filter PISEMA NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Chen, Yuzhu; Chen, Tiehong; Sun, Pingchuan; Li, Baohui; Ding, Datong

    2012-01-26

    The structure and dynamic behavior of mobile components play a significant role in determining properties of solid materials. Herein, we propose a novel real-time spectrum-editing method to extract signals of mobile components in organic solids on the basis of the polarization inversion spin exchange at magic angle (PISEMA) pulse sequence and the difference in (13)C T(1) values of rigid and mobile components. From the dipolar splitting spectrum sliced along the heteronuclear dipolar coupling dimension of the 2D spectrum, the structural and dynamic information can be obtained, such as the distances between atoms, the dipolar coupling strength, the order parameter of the polymer backbone chain, and so on. Furthermore, our proposed method can be used to achieve the separation of overlapped NMR signals of mobile and rigid phases in the PISEMA experiment. The high efficacy of this 2D NMR method is demonstrated on organic solids, including crystalline L-alanine, semicrystalline polyamide-6, and the natural abundant silk fibroin. PMID:22185485

  14. Simulation of elution profiles in liquid chromatography-I: Gradient elution conditions, and with mismatched injection and mobile phase solvents.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Lena N; Sajulga, Ray; Forte, Steven G; Stoll, Dwight R; Rutan, Sarah C

    2016-07-29

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) simulators are effective method development tools. The goal of the present work was to design and implement a simple algorithm for simulation of liquid chromatographic separations that allows for characterization of the effect of injection solvent mismatch and injection solvent volume overload. The simulations yield full analyte profiles during solute migration and at elution, which enable a thorough physical understanding of the effects of method variables on chromatographic performance. The Craig counter-current distribution model (the plate model) is used as the basis for simulation, where a local retention factor is assigned for each spatial and temporal element within the simulation. The algorithm, which is an adaptation of an approach originally described by Czok and Guiochon (Ref. [10]), is sufficiently flexible to allow the use of either linear (e.g., Linear Solvent Strength Theory) or non-linear models of solute retention (e.g., Neue-Kuss (Ref. [36])). In this study, both types of models were used, one for simulating separations of a homologous series of alkylbenzenes, and the other for separations of selected amphetamines. The simulation program was validated first by comparison of simulated retention times and peak widths for five amphetamines to predictions obtained using linear solvent strength (LSS) theory, and to results from experimental separations of these compounds. The simulated retention times for the amphetamines agreed within 0.02% and 2.5% compared to theory and experiment, respectively. Secondly, the program was evaluated for simulating the case where there is a compositional mismatch between the mobile phase at the column inlet and the injection solvent (i.e., the sample matrix). This work involved alkylbenzenes, and retention time and peak width predictions from simulations were within 1.5 and 6.0% of experimental values, respectively, even without correction for extra-column dispersion. The

  15. Thermodynamic studies of the solvent effects in chromatography on molecularly imprinted polymers. 3. Nature of the organic mobile phase

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyunjung; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-04-01

    Experimental isotherm data of the Fmoc-tryptophan (Fmoc-Trp) enantiomers were measured by frontal analysis on a Fmoc-L-Trp imprinted polymer, using different organic mobile phases, in a wide concentration range. The nonlinear regression of the data and the independent calculation of the affinity energy distributions of the two enantiomers allowed the selection of the isotherm model and the determination of the isotherm parameters. The organic solvents studied were acetonitrile (MeCN), methylene chloride, chloroform, and tetrahydrofuran (THF), all in the presence of the same concentration of acetic acid, used as an organic modifier. It was found that the highest overall affinity and enantiomeric selectivity were obtained in MeCN, which is also the solvent used in the polymerization. In the other solvents, the overall affinity decreases with increasing hydrogen-bonding ability of the solvents but not the enantiomer selectivity. In MeCN, three types of adsorption sites coexist for the two enantiomers on the MIP. The highest energy sites for Fmoc-L-Trp in MeCN are inactive in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, CHCl{sub 3}, and THF, and only two types of sites were identified in these solvents. Increasing the acetic acid concentration from 0.2 to 0.9 M causes a large decrease in the association constant of the highest energy sites in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, CHCl{sub 3}, and THF but not in MeCN. The overall affinity of Fmoc-L-trp in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, CHCl{sub 3}, and THF is dominated by adsorption on the lowest energy sites, the most abundant ones. In contrast, in MeCN, the overall affinity of Fmoc-L-Trp is dominated by adsorption on the highest energy sites, the least abundant sites. In CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, CHCl{sub 3}, and THF, the number of each type of sites increases with decreasing hydrogen-bonding ability of the solvents while the association constant of the corresponding sites does not change significantly.

  16. Understanding the importance of the viscosity contrast between the sample solvent plug and the mobile phase and its potential consequences in two-dimensional high-performance liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Shalliker, R. Andrew; Guiochon, Georges A

    2009-01-01

    The effect of solvent viscosity mismatch on elution performance in reversed-phase HPLC was studied using moment analysis. Two conditions were tested: (1) the mobile phase viscosity was less than the injection plug viscosity, and (2) the mobile phase viscosity was greater than the injection plug viscosity. Under the first condition, retention time and elution performance decreased as the viscosity contrast between the mobile phase and injection plug increased. The effect on performance was more marked as the injection volume increased. A decrease in performance of 12% for compounds with retention factors up to 2.8 was apparent even when the viscosity contrast was only 0.165 cP. In the second set of conditions, elution performance was actually observed to increase, by as much as 25% for a 40 {micro}L injection, as the viscosity contrast between the mobile phase and the solute plug increased. No change in the retention factor was observed. This behaviour was attributed to the shape of an injection plug as it enters into the column, whereby a low viscosity plug permeates away from the wall when the column contains a higher viscosity mobile phase, and vice a versa for a high viscosity plug entering a low viscosity mobile phase. At no stage was either a band splitting or shoulders observed with viscosity contrasts up to 1.283 cP, as could have been expected.

  17. Liquid phase separation of proteins based on electrophoretic effects in an electrospray setup during sample introduction into a gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analyzer (CE–GEMMA/CE–ES–DMA)

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Victor U.; Kerul, Lukas; Kallinger, Peter; Szymanski, Wladyslaw W.; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle characterization is gaining importance in food technology, biotechnology, medicine, and pharmaceutical industry. An instrument to determine particle electrophoretic mobility (EM) diameters in the single-digit to double-digit nanometer range receiving increased attention is the gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analyzer (GEMMA) separating electrophoretically single charged analytes in the gas-phase at ambient pressure. A fused-silica capillary is used for analyte transfer to the gas-phase by means of a nano electrospray (ES) unit. The potential of this capillary to separate analytes electrophoretically in the liquid phase due to different mobilities is, at measurement conditions recommended by the manufacturer, eliminated due to elevated pressure applied for sample introduction. Measurements are carried out upon constant feeding of analytes to the system. Under these conditions, aggregate formation is observed for samples including high amounts of non-volatile components or complex samples. This makes the EM determination of individual species sometimes difficult, if not impossible. With the current study we demonstrate that liquid phase electrophoretic separation of proteins (as exemplary analytes) occurs in the capillary (capillary zone electrophoresis, CE) of the nano ES unit of the GEMMA. This finding was consecutively applied for on-line desalting allowing EM diameter determination of analytes despite a high salt concentration within samples. The present study is to our knowledge the first report on the use of the GEMMA to determine EM diameters of analytes solubilized in the ES incompatible electrolyte solutions by the intended use of electrophoresis (in the liquid phase) during sample delivery. Results demonstrate the proof of concept of such an approach and additionally illustrate the high potential of a future on-line coupling of a capillary electrophoresis to a GEMMA instrument. PMID:25109866

  18. The hydrophilicity vs. ion interaction selectivity plot revisited: The effect of mobile phase pH and buffer concentration on hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography selectivity behavior.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Chad D; Gu, Xinyun; Lucy, Charles A

    2016-08-01

    This work systematically investigates the selectivity changes on many HILIC phases from w(w)pH 3.7-6.8, at 5 and 25mM buffer concentrations. Hydrophilicity (kcytosine/kuracil) vs. ion interaction (kBTMA/kuracil) selectivity plots developed by Ibrahim et al. (J. Chromatogr. A 1260 (2012) 126-131) are used to investigate the effect of mobile phase changes on the selectivity of 18 HILIC columns from various classes. "Selectivity change plots" focus on the change in hydrophilicity and ion interaction that the columns exhibit upon changing mobile phase conditions. In general, the selectivity behavior of most HILIC columns is dominated by silanol activity. Minimal changes in selectivity are observed upon changing pH between w(w)pH 5 and 6.8. However, a reduction in ionic interaction is observed when the buffer concentration is increased at w(w)pH≥5.0 due to ionic shielding. Reduction of the w(w)pH to<5.0 results in decreasing cation exchange activity due to silanol protonation. Under all eluent conditions, the majority of phases show little change in their hydrophilicity. PMID:27388658

  19. Portable Solid Phase Micro-Extraction Coupled with Ion Mobility Spectrometry System for On-Site Analysis of Chemical Warfare Agents and Simulants in Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Han, Qiang; Cao, Shuya; Yang, Jie; Yang, Junchao; Ding, Mingyu

    2014-01-01

    On-site analysis is an efficient approach to facilitate analysis at the location of the system under investigation as it can result in more accurate, more precise and quickly available analytical data. In our work, a novel self-made thermal desorption based interface was fabricated to couple solid-phase microextraction with ion mobility spectrometry for on-site water analysis. The portable interface can be connected with the front-end of an ion mobility spectrometer directly without other modifications. The analytical performance was evaluated via the extraction of chemical warfare agents and simulants in water samples. Several parameters including ionic strength and extraction time have been investigated in detail. The application of the developed method afforded satisfactory recoveries ranging from 72.9% to 114.4% when applied to the analysis of real water samples. PMID:25384006

  20. Portable solid phase micro-extraction coupled with ion mobility spectrometry system for on-site analysis of chemical warfare agents and simulants in water samples.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Han, Qiang; Cao, Shuya; Yang, Jie; Yang, Junchao; Ding, Mingyu

    2014-01-01

    On-site analysis is an efficient approach to facilitate analysis at the location of the system under investigation as it can result in more accurate, more precise and quickly available analytical data. In our work, a novel self-made thermal desorption based interface was fabricated to couple solid-phase microextraction with ion mobility spectrometry for on-site water analysis. The portable interface can be connected with the front-end of an ion mobility spectrometer directly without other modifications. The analytical performance was evaluated via the extraction of chemical warfare agents and simulants in water samples. Several parameters including ionic strength and extraction time have been investigated in detail. The application of the developed method afforded satisfactory recoveries ranging from 72.9% to 114.4% when applied to the analysis of real water samples. PMID:25384006

  1. Structure of aldehyde cluster ions in the gas phase, according to data from ion mobility spectrometry and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantsuzskaya (Krisilova), E. V.; Krisilov, A. V.; Levina, A. M.

    2015-09-01

    Ion-mobility spectra of a set of aliphatic linear aldehydes with the number of carbon atoms from 3 to 7 are obtained. Values of the mobility corresponding to two most intense peaks, considered to be those of a monomer and dimer, are determined according the spectra. Based on mobility, collision cross sections are calculated using the Mason-Schamp equation. The linear increase in the collision cross sections upon an increase in molecular weight is determined. According to the experimental results, the contribution to the cross section that has no dependence on molecular weight diminishes with the formation of dimers. It is established using quantum chemical calculations that this is associated with a reduction in the dipole moment upon the formation of dimers.

  2. Electronic structure calculations of mercury mobilization from mineral phases and photocatalytic removal from water and the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Da Pieve, Fabiana; Stankowski, Martin; Hogan, Conor

    2014-09-15

    Mercury is a hazardous environmental pollutant mobilized from natural sources, and anthropogenically contaminated and disturbed areas. Current methods to assess mobility and environmental impact are mainly based on field measurements, soil monitoring, and kinetic modelling. In order to understand in detail the extent to which different mineral sources can give rise to mercury release it is necessary to investigate the complexity at the microscopic level and the possible degradation/dissolution processes. In this work, we investigated the potential for mobilization of mercury structurally trapped in three relevant minerals occurring in hot spring environments and mining areas, namely, cinnabar (α-HgS), corderoite (α-Hg3S2Cl2), and mercuric chloride (HgCl2). Quantum chemical methods based on density functional theory as well as more sophisticated approaches are used to assess the possibility of a) direct photoreduction and formation of elemental Hg at the surface of the minerals, providing a path for ready release in the environment; and b) reductive dissolution of the minerals in the presence of solutions containing halogens. Furthermore, we study the use of TiO2 as a potential photocatalyst for decontamination of polluted waters (mainly Hg(2+)-containing species) and air (atmospheric Hg(0)). Our results partially explain the observed pathways of Hg mobilization from relevant minerals and the microscopic mechanisms behind photocatalytic removal of Hg-based pollutants. Possible sources of disagreement with observations are discussed and further improvements to our approach are suggested. PMID:24982025

  3. 78 FR 56875 - Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Rescheduled for December 19, 2013; Notice and Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ... service support through reverse competitive bidding. The USF/ICC Transformation Order, 76 FR 73830, November 29, 2011 and 76 FR 81562, December 28, 2011, established the Mobility Fund as a universal service... program details. On March 29, 2013, the Bureaus released the Auction 902 Comment Public Notice, 78...

  4. Socio-Technical Dimensions of an Outdoor Mobile Learning Environment: A Three-Phase Design-Based Research Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Land, Susan M.; Zimmerman, Heather Toomey

    2015-01-01

    This design-based research project examines three iterations of Tree Investigators, a learning environment designed to support science learning outdoors at an arboretum and nature center using mobile devices (iPads). Researchers coded videorecords and artifacts created by children and parents (n = 53) to understand how both social and…

  5. Semiconducting tin and lead iodide perovskites with organic cations: phase transitions, high mobilities, and near-infrared photoluminescent properties.

    PubMed

    Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Malliakas, Christos D; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2013-08-01

    A broad organic-inorganic series of hybrid metal iodide perovskites with the general formulation AMI3, where A is the methylammonium (CH3NH3(+)) or formamidinium (HC(NH2)2(+)) cation and M is Sn (1 and 2) or Pb (3 and 4) are reported. The compounds have been prepared through a variety of synthetic approaches, and the nature of the resulting materials is discussed in terms of their thermal stability and optical and electronic properties. We find that the chemical and physical properties of these materials strongly depend on the preparation method. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of 1-4 classifies the compounds in the perovskite structural family. Structural phase transitions were observed and investigated by temperature-dependent single crystal X-ray diffraction in the 100-400 K range. The charge transport properties of the materials are discussed in conjunction with diffuse reflectance studies in the mid-IR region that display characteristic absorption features. Temperature-dependent studies show a strong dependence of the resistivity as a function of the crystal structure. Optical absorption measurements indicate that 1-4 behave as direct-gap semiconductors with energy band gaps distributed in the range of 1.25-1.75 eV. The compounds exhibit an intense near-IR photoluminescence (PL) emission in the 700-1000 nm range (1.1-1.7 eV) at room temperature. We show that solid solutions between the Sn and Pb compounds are readily accessible throughout the composition range. The optical properties such as energy band gap, emission intensity, and wavelength can be readily controlled as we show for the isostructural series of solid solutions CH3NH3Sn(1-x)Pb(x)I3 (5). The charge transport type in these materials was characterized by Seebeck coefficient and Hall-effect measurements. The compounds behave as p- or n-type semiconductors depending on the preparation method. The samples with the lowest carrier concentration are prepared from solution and are n-type; p

  6. Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Cross-Linked Intact Multiprotein Complexes: Enhanced Gas-Phase Stabilities and Altered Dissociation Pathways.

    PubMed

    Samulak, Billy M; Niu, Shuai; Andrews, Philip C; Ruotolo, Brandon T

    2016-05-17

    Analysis of protein complexes by ion mobility-mass spectrometry is a valuable method for the rapid assessment of complex composition, binding stoichiometries, and structures. However, capturing labile, unknown protein assemblies directly from cells remains a challenge for the technology. Furthermore, ion mobility-mass spectrometry measurements of complexes, subcomplexes, and subunits are necessary to build complete models of intact assemblies, and such data can be difficult to acquire in a comprehensive fashion. Here, we present the use of novel mass spectrometry cleavable cross-linkers and tags to stabilize intact protein complexes for ion mobility-mass spectrometry. Our data reveal that tags and linkers bearing permanent charges are superior stabilizers relative to neutral cross-linkers, especially in the context of retaining compact forms of the assembly under a wide array of activating conditions. In addition, when cross-linked protein complexes are collisionally activated in the gas phase, a larger proportion of the product ions produced are often more compact and reflect native protein subcomplexes when compared with unmodified complexes activated in the same fashion, greatly enabling applications in structural biology. PMID:27078797

  7. Modelling the transition between fixed and mobile bed conditions in two-phase free-surface flows: The Composite Riemann Problem and its numerical solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosatti, Giorgio; Zugliani, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    In a two-phase free-surface flow, the transition from a mobile-bed condition to a fixed-bed one (and vice versa) occurs at a sharp interface across which the relevant system of partial differential equations changes abruptly. This leads to the possibility of conceiving a new type of Riemann Problem (RP), which we have called Composite Riemann Problem (CRP), where not only the initial constant values of the variables but also the system of equations change from left to right of a discontinuity. In this paper, we present a strategy for solving a CRP by reducing it to a standard RP of a single, composite system of equations. This can be obtained by combining the two original systems by means of a suitable weighting function, namely the erodibility variable, and the introduction of an appropriate differential equation for this quantity. In this way, the CRP problem can be analyzed theoretically with standard methods, and the features of the solutions can be clearly identified. In particular, a stationary contact wave is able to correctly describe the sharp transition between mobile- and fixed-bed conditions. A finite volume scheme based on the Multiple Averages Generalized Roe approach (Rosatti and Begnudelli (2013) [22]) was used to numerically solve the fixed-mobile CRP. Several test cases demonstrate the effectiveness, exact well balanceness and high accuracy of the scheme when applied to problems that fall within the physical range of applicability of the relevant mathematical model.

  8. Atmospheric pressure ionization and gas phase ion mobility studies of isomeric dihalogenated benzenes using different ionization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsdorf, H.; Nazarov, E. G.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2004-03-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) featuring different ionization techniques was used to analyze isomeric ortho-, meta- and para-dihalogenated benzenes in order to assess how structural features affect ion formation and drift behavior. The structure of the product ions formed was investigated by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS) and IMS-MS coupling. Photoionization provided [M]+ ions for chlorinated and fluorinated compounds while bromine was cleaved from isomers of dibromobenzene and bromofluorobenzene. This ionization technique does not permit the different isomers to be distinguished. Comparable ions and additional clustered ions were obtained using 63Ni ionization. Depending on the chemical constitution, different clustered ions were observed in ion mobility spectra for the separate isomers of dichlorobenzene and dibromobenzene. Corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of dihalogenated compounds. Only clustered product ions were obtained. Corona discharge ionization enables the classification of different structural isomers of dichlorobenzene, dibromobenzene and bromofluorobenzene.

  9. Solid phase epitaxial growth of high mobility La:BaSnO3 thin films co-doped with interstitial hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermeier, Christian A.; Rhode, Sneha; Fearn, Sarah; Ide, Keisuke; Moram, Michelle A.; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Hosono, Hideo; Kamiya, Toshio

    2016-04-01

    This work presents the solid phase epitaxial growth of high mobility La:BaSnO3 thin films on SrTiO3 single crystal substrates by crystallization through thermal annealing of nanocrystalline thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition at room temperature. The La:BaSnO3 thin films show high epitaxial quality and Hall mobilities up to 26 ± 1 cm2/Vs. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy is used to determine the La concentration profile in the La:BaSnO3 thin films, and a 9%-16% La doping activation efficiency is obtained. An investigation of H doping to BaSnO3 thin films is presented employing H plasma treatment at room temperature. Carrier concentrations in previously insulating BaSnO3 thin films were increased to 3 × 1019 cm-3 and in La:BaSnO3 thin films from 6 × 1019 cm-3 to 1.5 × 1020 cm-3, supporting a theoretical prediction that interstitial H serves as an excellent n-type dopant. An analysis of the free electron absorption by infrared spectroscopy yields a small (H,La):BaSnO3 electron effective mass of 0.27 ± 0.05 m0 and an optical mobility of 26 ± 7 cm2/Vs. As compared to La:BaSnO3 single crystals, the smaller electron mobility in epitaxial thin films grown on SrTiO3 substrates is ascribed to threading dislocations as observed in high resolution transmission electron micrographs.

  10. Characterizing the gas phase ion chemistry of an ion trap mobility spectrometry based explosive trace detector using a tandem mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Kozole, Joseph; Tomlinson-Phillips, Jill; Stairs, Jason R; Harper, Jason D; Lukow, Stefan R; Lareau, Richard T; Boudries, Hacene; Lai, Hanh; Brauer, Carolyn S

    2012-09-15

    A commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) ion trap mobility spectrometry (ITMS) based explosive trace detector (ETD) has been interfaced to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS/MS) for the purpose of characterizing the gas phase ion chemistry intrinsic to the ITMS instrument. The overall objective of the research is to develop a fundamental understanding of the gas phase ionization processes in the ITMS based ETD to facilitate the advancement of its operational effectiveness as well as guide the development of next generation ETDs. Product ion masses, daughter ion masses, and reduced mobility values measured by the ITMS/MS/MS configuration for a suite of nitro, nitrate, and peroxide containing explosives are reported. Molecular formulas, molecular structures, and ionization pathways for the various product ions are inferred using the mass and mobility data in conjunction with density functional theory. The predominant product ions are identified as follows: [TNT-H](-) for trinitrotoluene (TNT), [RDX+Cl](-) for cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene-2,4,6-trinitramine (RDX), [NO(3)](-) for ethylene glycol dinitrate (EGDN), [NG+NO(3)](-) for nitroglycerine (NG), [PETN+NO(3)](-) for pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), [HNO(3)+NO(3)](-) for ammonium nitrate (NH(4)NO(3)), [HMTD-NC(3)H(6)O(3)+H+Cl](-) for hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD), and [(CH(3))(2)CNH(2)](+) for triacetone triperoxide (TATP). The predominant ionization pathways for the formation of the various product ions are determined to include proton abstraction, ion-molecule attachment, autoionization, first-order and multi-order thermolysis, and nucleophilic substitution. The ion trapping scheme in the reaction region of the ITMS instrument is shown to increase predominant ion intensities relative to the secondary ion intensities when compared to non-ion trap operation. PMID:22967626

  11. Injury Risk Assessment of Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Phase VI and Series 4000 Gloves During Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Hand Manipulation Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilby, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Functional Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs) with high precision gloves are essential for the success of Extravehicular Activity (EVA). Previous research done at NASA has shown that total strength capabilities and performance are reduced when wearing a pressurized EMU. The goal of this project was to characterize the human-space suit glove interaction and assess the risk of injury during common EVA hand manipulation tasks, including pushing, pinching and gripping objects. A custom third generation sensor garment was designed to incorporate a combination of sensors, including force sensitive resistors, strain gauge sensors, and shear force sensors. The combination of sensors was used to measure the forces acting on the finger nails, finger pads, finger tips, as well as the knuckle joints. In addition to measuring the forces, data was collected on the temperature, humidity, skin conductance, and blood perfusion of the hands. Testing compared both the Phase VI and Series 4000 glove against an ungloved condition. The ungloved test was performed wearing the sensor garment only. The project outcomes identified critical landmarks that experienced higher workloads and are more likely to suffer injuries. These critical landmarks varied as a function of space suit glove and task performed. The results showed that less forces were acting on the hands while wearing the Phase VI glove as compared to wearing the Series 4000 glove. Based on our findings, the engineering division can utilize these methods for optimizing the current space suit glove and designing next generation gloves to prevent injuries and optimize hand mobility and comfort.

  12. Ultra high performance supercritical fluid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry for screening of doping agents. I: Investigation of mobile phase and MS conditions.

    PubMed

    Nováková, Lucie; Grand-Guillaume Perrenoud, Alexandre; Nicoli, Raul; Saugy, Martial; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Guillarme, Davy

    2015-01-01

    The conditions for the analysis of selected doping substances by UHPSFC-MS/MS were optimized to ensure suitable peak shapes and maximized MS responses. A representative mixture of 31 acidic and basic doping agents was analyzed, in both ESI+ and ESI- modes. The best compromise for all compounds in terms of MS sensitivity and chromatographic performance was obtained when adding 2% water and 10mM ammonium formate in the CO2/MeOH mobile phase. Beside mobile phase, the nature of the make-up solvent added for interfacing UHPSFC with MS was also evaluated. Ethanol was found to be the best candidate as it was able to compensate for the negative effect of 2% water addition in ESI- mode and provided a suitable MS response for all doping agents. Sensitivity of the optimized UHPSFC-MS/MS method was finally assessed and compared to the results obtained in conventional UHPLC-MS/MS. Sensitivity was improved by 5-100-fold in UHPSFC-MS/MS vs. UHPLC-MS/MS for 56% of compounds, while only one compound (bumetanide) offered a significantly higher MS response (4-fold) under UHPLC-MS/MS conditions. In the second paper of this series, the optimal conditions for UHPSFC-MS/MS analysis will be employed to screen >100 doping agents in urine matrix and results will be compared to those obtained by conventional UHPLC-MS/MS. PMID:25467513

  13. Conformational ordering of biomolecules in the gas phase: nitrogen collision cross sections measured on a prototype high resolution drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    May, Jody C; Goodwin, Cody R; Lareau, Nichole M; Leaptrot, Katrina L; Morris, Caleb B; Kurulugama, Ruwan T; Mordehai, Alex; Klein, Christian; Barry, William; Darland, Ed; Overney, Gregor; Imatani, Kenneth; Stafford, George C; Fjeldsted, John C; McLean, John A

    2014-02-18

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry measurements which describe the gas-phase scaling of molecular size and mass are of both fundamental and pragmatic utility. Fundamentally, such measurements expand our understanding of intrinsic intramolecular folding forces in the absence of solvent. Practically, reproducible transport properties, such as gas-phase collision cross-section (CCS), are analytically useful metrics for identification and characterization purposes. Here, we report 594 CCS values obtained in nitrogen drift gas on an electrostatic drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) instrument. The instrument platform is a newly developed prototype incorporating a uniform-field drift tube bracketed by electrodynamic ion funnels and coupled to a high resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The CCS values reported here are of high experimental precision (±0.5% or better) and represent four chemically distinct classes of molecules (quaternary ammonium salts, lipids, peptides, and carbohydrates), which enables structural comparisons to be made between molecules of different chemical compositions for the rapid "omni-omic" characterization of complex biological samples. Comparisons made between helium and nitrogen-derived CCS measurements demonstrate that nitrogen CCS values are systematically larger than helium values; however, general separation trends between chemical classes are retained regardless of the drift gas. These results underscore that, for the highest CCS accuracy, care must be exercised when utilizing helium-derived CCS values to calibrate measurements obtained in nitrogen, as is the common practice in the field. PMID:24446877

  14. Conformational Ordering of Biomolecules in the Gas Phase: Nitrogen Collision Cross Sections Measured on a Prototype High Resolution Drift Tube Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry measurements which describe the gas-phase scaling of molecular size and mass are of both fundamental and pragmatic utility. Fundamentally, such measurements expand our understanding of intrinsic intramolecular folding forces in the absence of solvent. Practically, reproducible transport properties, such as gas-phase collision cross-section (CCS), are analytically useful metrics for identification and characterization purposes. Here, we report 594 CCS values obtained in nitrogen drift gas on an electrostatic drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) instrument. The instrument platform is a newly developed prototype incorporating a uniform-field drift tube bracketed by electrodynamic ion funnels and coupled to a high resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The CCS values reported here are of high experimental precision (±0.5% or better) and represent four chemically distinct classes of molecules (quaternary ammonium salts, lipids, peptides, and carbohydrates), which enables structural comparisons to be made between molecules of different chemical compositions for the rapid “omni-omic” characterization of complex biological samples. Comparisons made between helium and nitrogen-derived CCS measurements demonstrate that nitrogen CCS values are systematically larger than helium values; however, general separation trends between chemical classes are retained regardless of the drift gas. These results underscore that, for the highest CCS accuracy, care must be exercised when utilizing helium-derived CCS values to calibrate measurements obtained in nitrogen, as is the common practice in the field. PMID:24446877

  15. Health Services Mobility Study. First Progress Report for Phase Four for the Period April 1, 1972 to March 15, 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    City Univ. of New York, NY.

    This report describes the overall work of the project and the first 10 months of its current demonstration phase, Phase IV. It presents an overview of the project's history and objectives, a description of the methodologies involved, the steps taken in applying the methodologies in task analysis and curriculum design, the approach to…

  16. Analysis of a Common Cold Virus and Its Subviral Particles by Gas-Phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analysis and Native Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis (GEMMA) separates nanometer-sized, single-charged particles according to their electrophoretic mobility (EM) diameter after transition to the gas-phase via a nano electrospray process. Electrospraying as a soft desorption/ionization technique preserves noncovalent biospecific interactions. GEMMA is therefore well suited for the analysis of intact viruses and subviral particles targeting questions related to particle size, bioaffinity, and purity of preparations. By correlating the EM diameter to the molecular mass (Mr) of standards, the Mr of analytes can be determined. Here, we demonstrate (i) the use of GEMMA in purity assessment of a preparation of a common cold virus (human rhinovirus serotype 2, HRV-A2) and (ii) the analysis of subviral HRV-A2 particles derived from such a preparation. (iii) Likewise, native mass spectrometry was employed to obtain spectra of intact HRV-A2 virions and empty viral capsids (B-particles). Charge state resolution for the latter allowed its Mr determination. (iv) Cumulatively, the data measured and published earlier were used to establish a correlation between the Mr and EM diameter for a range of globular proteins and the intact virions. Although a good correlation resulted from this analysis, we noticed a discrepancy especially for the empty and subviral particles. This demonstrates the influence of genome encapsulation (preventing analytes from shrinking upon transition into the gas-phase) on the measured analyte EM diameter. To conclude, GEMMA is useful for the determination of the Mr of intact viruses but needs to be employed with caution when subviral particles or even empty viral capsids are targeted. The latter could be analyzed by native MS. PMID:26221912

  17. A novel dispersive micro solid phase extraction using PCX as the sorbent for the determination of melamine and cyromazine in milk and milk powder by UHPLC-HRMS/MS.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dawei; Zhao, Yunfeng; Miao, Hong; Wu, Yongning

    2015-03-01

    A novel dispersive micro solid phase extraction (DMSPE) cleanup method based on the PCX sorbent (a kind of cation exchange polymer material) was applied to the analysis of melamine and cyromazine residues in milk and milk powder, and ultra high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS) was used as instrument detection. Milk powder samples were first extracted with 1% formic acid in acetonitrile/water (1:1 v/v), and milk samples were cleaned up directly without any pre-extraction. Then, melamine and cyromazine in the extracts or milk were adsorbed to the PCX powder. Subsequently, the analytes in PCX sorbent were eluted with ammonium hydroxide/acetonitrile (2.5:97.5 v/v) through a simple unit device equipped with 1 mL syringe and 0.22 μm nylon syringe filter. All the samples were analyzed by UHPLC-HRMS/MS on a Waters Acquity BEH HILIC column with 0.1% formic acid and 4mM ammonium formate in water/acetonitrile as the mobile phase with gradient elution. The matrix effect, recovery, and repeatability, within laboratory reproducibility, CCα and CCβ of the DMSPE cleanup method were investigated. The proposed method provided a significant improvement for the determination of melamine and cyromazine in milk and milk powder in terms of efficient, rapid, economical, and miniaturized sample preparation methods, which yielded fewer matrix effects compared with SPE method. The established cleanup method is expected to be widely applied for the sample preparation of alkaline contaminants at trace levels in the future. PMID:25618651

  18. CsSnI3: Semiconductor or metal? High electrical conductivity and strong near-infrared photoluminescence from a single material. High hole mobility and phase-transitions.

    PubMed

    Chung, In; Song, Jung-Hwan; Im, Jino; Androulakis, John; Malliakas, Christos D; Li, Hao; Freeman, Arthur J; Kenney, John T; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2012-05-23

    CsSnI(3) is an unusual perovskite that undergoes complex displacive and reconstructive phase transitions and exhibits near-infrared emission at room temperature. Experimental and theoretical studies of CsSnI(3) have been limited by the lack of detailed crystal structure characterization and chemical instability. Here we describe the synthesis of pure polymorphic crystals, the preparation of large crack-/bubble-free ingots, the refined single-crystal structures, and temperature-dependent charge transport and optical properties of CsSnI(3), coupled with ab initio first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In situ temperature-dependent single-crystal and synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction studies reveal the origin of polymorphous phase transitions of CsSnI(3). The black orthorhombic form of CsSnI(3) demonstrates one of the largest volumetric thermal expansion coefficients for inorganic solids. Electrical conductivity, Hall effect, and thermopower measurements on it show p-type metallic behavior with low carrier density, despite the optical band gap of 1.3 eV. Hall effect measurements of the black orthorhombic perovskite phase of CsSnI(3) indicate that it is a p-type direct band gap semiconductor with carrier concentration at room temperature of ∼ 10(17) cm(-3) and a hole mobility of ∼585 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). The hole mobility is one of the highest observed among p-type semiconductors with comparable band gaps. Its powders exhibit a strong room-temperature near-IR emission spectrum at 950 nm. Remarkably, the values of the electrical conductivity and photoluminescence intensity increase with heat treatment. The DFT calculations show that the screened-exchange local density approximation-derived band gap agrees well with the experimentally measured band gap. Calculations of the formation energy of defects strongly suggest that the electrical and light emission properties possibly result from Sn defects in the crystal structure, which arise

  19. Analysis of testosterone in human urine using molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction and corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mirmahdieh, Shiva; Mardihallaj, Azam; Hashemian, Zahra; Razavizadeh, Jalal; Ghaziaskar, Hassan; Khayamian, Taghi

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of testosterone was accomplished using corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry. Molecular imprinted polymer was used for the extraction and pre-concentration of testosterone. Analytical parameters including precision, dynamic range and detection limit were obtained. The linear dynamic range was from 10 to 250 ng/mL and the limit of detection was 0.9 ng/mL. The proposed method was used for analysis of testosterone in urine samples. A urine sample from a 3-year-old girl was used as the blank. The RSD was below 10%. The obtained results from the method were also compared with the standard method for analysis of testosterone using SPE-HPLC analysis. The results demonstrate the accuracy of the method. PMID:21171183

  20. On the reactions of perfluoroisobutene with some anions in the gas phase: studies in an ion mobility spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, A. J.; Hayhurst, C. J.; Mayhew, C. A.; Watts, P.

    1994-12-01

    An ion mobility spectrometer (IMS), operating in air in the negative ion mode, has been shown to have potential for detecting and monitoring perfluoroisobutene (PFIB), a toxic perfluorocarbon and potential industrial hazard. Complex spectra with a variety of product ions are observed. Most of these ions result from reactions of PFIB with the negative reactant ions although some important product ions (particularly at high PFIB concentrations) are attributed to reactions with reactive transient species (including electrons) in the ionization region of the IMS system. The ions have been identified using mass spectrometry and a wide variety of isotopic tracers. The results of our parallel studies using a selected ion flow tube have been included where appropriate.

  1. Phase impact factor: a novel parameter for determining optimal CT phase in 4D radiation therapy treatment planning for mobile lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yulin; Huang, Xiaolei; Mueller, Boris; Mychalczak, Borys

    2008-03-01

    Due to respiratory motion, lung tumor can move up to several centimeters. If respiratory motion is not carefully considered during the radiation treatment planning, the highly conformal dose distribution with steep gradients could miss the target. To address this issue, the common strategy is to add a population-derived safety margin to the gross tumor volume (GTV). However, during a free breathing CT simulation, the images could be acquired at any phase of a breathing cycle. With such a generalized uniform margin, the planning target volume (PTV) may either include more normal lung tissue than required or miss the GTV at certain phases of a breathing cycle. Recently, respiration correlated CT (4DCT) has been developed and implemented. With 4DCT, it is now possible to trace the tumor 3D trajectories during a breathing cycle and to define the tumor volume as the union of these 3D trajectories. The tumor volume defined in this way is called the internal target volume (ITV). In this study, we introduced a novel parameter, the phase impact factor (PIF), to determine the optimal CT phase for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning for lung cancer. A minimum PIF yields a minimum probability for the GTV to move out of the ITV during the course of an IMRT treatment, providing a minimum probability of a geometric miss. Once the CT images with the optimal phase were determined, an IMRT plan with three to five co-planner beams was computed and optimized using the inverse treatment planning technique.

  2. Development of an achiral supercritical fluid chromatography method with ultraviolet absorbance and mass spectrometric detection for impurity profiling of drug candidates. Part I: Optimization of mobile phase composition.

    PubMed

    Lemasson, Elise; Bertin, Sophie; Hennig, Philippe; Boiteux, Hélène; Lesellier, Eric; West, Caroline

    2015-08-21

    Supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) is a very useful tool in the purpose of impurity profiling of drug candidates, as an adequate selection of stationary phases can provide orthogonal separations so as to maximize the chances to see all impurities. The purpose of the present work is to develop a method for chemical purity assessment. The first part, presented here, focuses on mobile phase selection to ensure adequate elution and detection of drug-like molecules, while the second part focuses on stationary phase selection for optimal separation and orthogonality. The use of additives in the carbon dioxide - solvent mobile phase in SFC is now commonplace, and enables in particular to increase the number of eluted compounds and to improve peak shapes. The objective of this first part was to test different additives (acids, bases, salts and water) for their chromatographic performance assessed in gradient elution with a diode-array detector, but also for the mass responses obtained with a single-quadrupole mass detector, equipped with an electrospray ionization source (Waters ACQUITY QDa). In this project, we used a selection of one hundred and sixty compounds issued from Servier Research Laboratories to screen a set of columns and additives in SFC with a Waters ACQUITY UPC(2) system. The selected columns were all high-performance columns (1.7-1.8μm with totally porous particles or 2.6-2.7μm with superficially porous particles) with a variety of stationary phase chemistries. Initially, eight additives dissolved in the methanol co-solvent were tested on a UPC(2) ACQUITY UPC(2) HSS C18 SB column. A Derringer desirability function was used to classify the additives according to selected criteria: elution capability, peak shapes, UV baseline drift, and UV and mass responses (signal-to-noise ratios). Following these tests, the two best additives (ammonium acetate and ammonium hydroxide) were tested on a larger number of columns (10) where the two additives appeared

  3. On-site quantitation of arsenic in drinking water by disk solid-phase extraction/mobile X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Kenta; Koike, Yuya; Aizawa, Mamoru; Nakamura, Toshihiro

    2015-11-01

    A rapid and simple method was developed for As determination in drinking water by solid-phase extraction (SPE)/mobile X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry. A 50 mL aqueous sample was adjusted to pH 3 with dilute hydrochloric acid, and then passed through a Ti and Zr-loaded carbon disk (TiZr-CD) to pre-concentrate the As. The SPE disk was adhered to an acrylic plate with cellophane tape, and then examined by mobile XRF spectrometry. The TiZr-CD adsorbed inorganic As (as As(III) and As(V)) and organic As (as methyl, phenyl and aromatic arsenic compounds) from water. The As calibration curve had good linearity over the range of 0.5-5 μg, and the limit of detection was 0.10 μg (2.0 μgL(-1) in As concentration). The concentrations of As in well water samples were determined using the proposed method were similar to results obtained from atomic absorption spectrometry. The proposed method did not require a power supply or a toxic solution and/or gas in any analytical step, therefore it is suitable for the on-site determination of As in drinking water. PMID:26452891

  4. Energetics and structural characterization of isomers using ion mobility and gas-phase H/D exchange: Learning from lasso peptides.

    PubMed

    Hanozin, Emeline; Morsa, Denis; De Pauw, Edwin

    2015-08-01

    State-of-the-art characterization of proteins using MS namely relies on fragmentation methods that allow exploring featured dissociative reaction pathways. These pathways are often initiated by a series of potentially informative mass-constant conformational changes that are nonetheless frequently overlooked by lack of adequate investigation techniques. In the present study, we propose a methodology to readily address both structural and energetic aspects of stereoisomerization reactions using ion mobility coupled with MS. To this end, a commercial spectrometer was used as a reactor comprising an energy resolved collisional activation step intended at promoting controlled conformational changes and a structural assignment step dedicated to the identification of the generated isomers. This identification relies on ion mobility and other on-line coupled techniques, namely an originally designed gas-phase H/D exchange experiment. We here apply this methodology to characterize the isomerization kinetics of capistruin, a 19-residue long lasso-folded peptide. We expect this approach to bring insights into the physical origin of global dissociation thresholds monitored in MS/MS experiments and to set a promising basis for quantitative investigations of the stability of different molecular folds. PMID:25821205

  5. Ion mobility, conductivity, structure, and phase transitions in K0.7M0.3SbF4 compounds with M=Rb, NH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavun, V. Ya.; Gerasimenko, A. V.; Uvarov, N. F.; Polyantsev, M. M.; Zemnukhova, L. A.

    2016-09-01

    Ion mobility, phase transitions, structure, and conductivity in the K0.7M0.3SbF4 (M=Rb, NH4) compounds were studied by NMR spectroscopy, DSC, X-ray, and conductivity measurements. The predominant form in the ion motions resulting from the phase transition of high modification was diffusion of fluoride and ammonium ions above 450 K. The high-temperature phases of K0.7M0.3SbF4 (M=Rb, NH4) are superionic, while their conductivity attains the values of ~10-2-10-4 S/cm at 450-500 K. The structures of α- and β-modifications of the K0.7Rb0.3SbF4 are monoclinic (space group P21/m). The main structural units in them are statistically substituting each other K+ and Rb+ cations and complex ∞1[ SbF4]- anions linked into zigzag-like chains by bridge fluorine atoms. The nearest surrounding of each antimony atom contains five fluorine atoms, so that the antimony coordination polyhedron can be described, taking into account the lone electron pair, as a distorted SbF5E octahedron (ψ-octahedron).

  6. Effects of capillary pressure and use of polymer solutions on dense, non-aqueous-phase liquid retention and mobilization in a rough-walled fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Longino, B.L.; Kueper, B.H. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1999-07-15

    In this laboratory study, perchloroethylene (PCE) was permitted to migrate through a horizontal rough-walled limestone fracture under controlled conditions to assess fracture retention capacity. Retention of immiscible-phase PCE in the absence of an applied wetting-phase hydraulic gradient varied between 11% and 26% of the fracture volume. A portion of this residual could be removed through water flooding; however, even at the maximum applied hydraulic gradient of 1.0, residual PCE remained in the fracture. The observed correlation of reduced residual saturation with capillary number (N[sub c]) demonstrated that this rough-walled fracture exhibited behavior similar to that of a porous medium under water-flooding conditions. For a given hydraulic gradient, polymer-enhanced floods (using xanthan gum) were not as successful as conventional water flooding at removing residual from the fracture. The traditional form of the capillary number became an increasingly poor predictor of mobilization behavior as the viscosity of the displacing phase was increased. Incorporation of ([mu][sub w]/[mu][sub nw])[sup [minus]0.5] into the traditional capillary number provided a more appropriate dimensionless group with which to correlate residual PCE saturation in the fracture as [mu][sub w] increased.

  7. Analysis of Phenacylester Derivatives of Fatty Acids from Human Skin Surface Sebum by Reversed-Phase HPLC: Chromatographic Mobility as a Function of Physico-Chemical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Bodoprost, Juliana; Rosemeyer, Helmut

    2007-01-01

    A set of 13 fatty acids was transformed into their phenacyl esters by reaction with phenacyl bromide in acetonitrile using 18-crown-6 as phase-transfer catalyst. Conditions for the RP-18 HPL chromatographic separation of most of the esters has been worked out. Using this standard the fatty acid spectra from skin surface sebum lipids of 17 test persons was taken after microwave-assisted hydrolysis, neutralization and extraction with n-hexane. Quantitative evaluation of the chromatograms exhibits that oleic acid predominates in the sebum of all test persons. In the second part of the work the chromatographic mobility (RE values) of fatty acid phenacyl esters is correlated with calculated physico-chemical parameters of the corresponding acids. The best linear correlation was found between the RE and the logP values. This is helpful for the structural elucidation of un-identified fatty acids in a chromatogram.

  8. The origin of halide melt phases in layered intrusions, and their significance to platinum-group element mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, J. J.

    2007-12-01

    Fluid and melt inclusions are preserved within pegmatite bodies and cumulus minerals within mafic-ultramafic layered intrusions that host economic concentrations of the platinum-group elements (e.g., Bushveld Complex, South Africa; Stillwater Complex, Montana). The inclusions indicate that the earliest volatile phase to have exsolved from the crystallizing intrusions was a relatively anhydrous carbonic fluid (CO2-dominated). As crystallization proceeded, volatiles became increasingly water-rich and saline, consistent with the relative saturation limits of carbonic and aqueous fluids in mafic silicate liquids, and the partitioning behavior of Cl in fluid-melt systems. Previously unreported, the latest stage volatiles in the layered intrusions were halide melts (slightly hydrous molten salts) of relatively simply composition (NaCl with minor KCl or CaCl2) with salinities in excess of 90 wt% eq. NaCl or CaCl2. These volatiles were trapped at minimum temperatures of 760-800°C, near the eutectic temperature for water-saturated granitic liquid at moderate crustal pressures. Trace element analysis of the salt melt inclusions by laser ablation ICP-MS (ETH Zürich) show that they contain no detectable concentrations of ore and accessory metals. This is in contrast to the earlier, lower salinity volatiles which contain ppm-concentrations of Pt, Pd, As, Bi, Sb as well as abundant S and base metals. Heterogeneous entrapment of late-stage silicate melt and halide melt provides unambiguous evidence for the coexistence of both phases. However, experimental constraints on the nature of exsolved volatiles from mafic or felsic silicate liquids suggest that the halide melt phases cannot represent an exsolved phase from that coexisting silicate liquid, since this would require unrealistically high (initial) Cl:H2O ratios for the parental silicate liquid (> 9 for a granitic residue). Analysis of rhyodacitic silicate melt inclusions that coexist with the halide melt inclusions show

  9. Intelligent mobile sensor system for drum inspection and monitoring: Phase 1. Topical report, October 1, 1992--June 8, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The objective of this project was to develop an operational system for monitoring and inspection activities for waste storage facility operations at several DOE sites. Specifically, the product of this effort is a robotic device with enhanced intelligence and maneuverability capable of conducting routine inspection of stored waste drums. The device is capable of operating in narrow aisles and interpolating the free aisle space between rows of stacked drums. The system has an integrated sensor suite for leak detection, and is interfaced with a site database both for inspection planning and for data correlation, updating, and report generation. The system is capable of departing on an assigned mission, collecting required data, recording which positions of its mission had to be aborted or modified due to environmental constraints, and reporting back when the mission is complete. Successful identification of more than 90% of all drum defects has been demonstrated in a high fidelity waste storage facility mockup. Identified anomalies included rust spots, rust streaks, areas of corrosion, dents, and tilted drums. All drums were positively identified and correlated with the site database. This development effort is separated into three phases of which phase one is now complete. The first phase has demonstrated an integrated system for monitoring and inspection activities for waste storage facility operations. This demonstration system was quickly fielded and evaluated by leveraging technologies developed from previous NASA and DARPA contracts and internal research. The second phase will demonstrate a prototype system appropriate for operational use in an actual storage facility. The prototype provides an integrated design that considers operational requirements, hardware costs, maintenance, safety, and robustness. The final phase will demonstrate commercial viability using the prototype vehicle in a pilot waste operations and inspection project.

  10. Comprehensive size-determination of whole virus vaccine particles using gas-phase electrophoretic mobility macromolecular analyzer, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Havlik, Marlene; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Friedbacher, Gernot; Winkler, Wolfgang; Messner, Paul; Perez-Burgos, Laura; Tauer, Christa; Allmaier, Günter

    2015-09-01

    Biophysical properties including particle size distribution, integrity, and shape of whole virus vaccine particles at different stages in tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccines formulation were analyzed by a new set of methods. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) was used as a conservative sample preparation for vaccine particle fractionation and gas-phase electrophoretic mobility macromolecular analyzer (GEMMA) for analyzing electrophoretic mobility diameters of isolated TBE virions. The derived particle diameter was then correlated with molecular weight. The diameter of the TBE virions determined after SEC by GEMMA instrumentation was 46.8 ± 1.1 nm. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were implemented for comparison purposes and to gain morphological information on the virion particle. Western blotting (Dot Blot) as an immunological method confirmed biological activity of the particles at various stages of the developed analytical strategy. AFM and TEM measurements revealed higher diameters with much higher SD for a limited number of virions, 60.4 ± 8.5 and 53.5 ± 5.3 nm, respectively. GEMMA instrumentation was also used for fractionation of virions with specifically selected diameters in the gas-phase, which were finally collected by means of an electrostatic sampler. At that point (i.e., after particle collection), AFM and TEM showed that the sampled virions were still intact, exhibiting a narrow size distribution (i.e., 59.8 ± 7.8 nm for AFM and 47.5 ± 5.2 nm for TEM images), and most importantly, dot blotting confirmed immunological activity of the collected samples. Furthermore dimers and virion artifacts were detected, too. PMID:26266988

  11. Evaluation of mobile phase composition for enhancing sensitivity of targeted quantification of oligonucleotides using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry: application to phosphorothioate deoxyribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Buyun; Bartlett, Michael G

    2013-05-01

    LC-MS based assays are a promising approach for the bioanalysis of oligonucleotide therapeutics due to their selectivity and structure identification capabilities. However, the lack of sensitivity and complicated sample preparation procedures remain a barrier for application of LC-MS based assays to preclinical and clinical studies. Numerous studies have shown that the mobile phase composition, especially organic solvent type, has a significant impact on the MS sensitivity of oligonucleotides. In this study, we systematically investigated the type of organic solvents and concentration of organic modifiers for their effect on electrospray desorption efficiency, chromatographic separation and LC-MS signal intensity and provide mechanisms for these effects. 25mM HFIP, 15mM DIEA and the use of ethanol as an organic solvent were observed to achieve a two order of magnitude increase in LC-MS signal intensity when compared to the most commonly used LC-MS mobile phase composition. Phenol-chloroform LLE in combination with ethanol precipitation was demonstrated to be effective for quantitative bioanalysis of therapeutic oligonucleotides. Various conditions for ethanol precipitation were evaluated and >75% absolute recovery was achieved using an optimized extraction procedure. No increase in column pressure or deterioration of separation was observed for >500 injections of biological samples. The method run time was 5min and the LOQ was 2.5ng/ml. The accuracy (% error) and precision (%RSD) are <5.09% and <10.56%, respectively, over a dynamic range of 2.5-1000ng/ml. The assay was applied to a proof of concept animal study and similar PK parameters to previous studies were obtained. PMID:23528868

  12. Dependence of negative-mode electrospray ionization response factors on mobile phase composition and molecular structure for newly-authenticated neutral acylsucrose metabolites.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Banibrata; Jones, A Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Authentic standards of known concentrations serve as references for accurate absolute quantification of plant metabolites using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). However, often such standards are not commercially available or not amenable for custom syntheses. Despite the widespread use of electrospray ionization for metabolite analyses, the fundamentals needed for reliable prediction of molecular response factors have yet to be explored in detail for analytes that lack ionized functional groups. In order to lay a foundation for quantifying unknown neutral plant metabolites in absence of authentic standards, sub-milligram quantities of purified homologous acylsucrose metabolites were authenticated by subjecting each to basic hydrolysis and quantifying the sucrose product using stable-isotope dilution ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). Once authenticated, molar response factors of [M + formate](-) ions for the acylsucrose metabolites were determined at different mobile phase compositions ranging from 40%-80% acetonitrile, and demonstrated relationships of response factors with mobile phase composition and metabolite structural features including nonpolar surface areas, the length of the longest acyl chain, and the number of hydroxyl groups. This approach was employed to calculate predicted response factors for three authenticated acylsucroses based on mean values for all isomers with a common number of total acyl carbon atoms. Absolute UHPLC-MS quantification was performed on these three metabolites in an extract from leaves of the wild tomato Solanum habrochaites LA1777, yielding deviations of 26%, 6.7%, and 7.3% from values established using compound-specific response factors. PMID:26331907

  13. Comprehensive Size-Determination of Whole Virus Vaccine Particles Using Gas-Phase Electrophoretic Mobility Macromolecular Analyzer, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Havlik, Marlene; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Friedbacher, Gernot; Winkler, Wolfgang; Messner, Paul; Perez-Burgos, Laura; Tauer, Christa; Allmaier, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Biophysical properties including particle size distribution, integrity, and shape of whole virus vaccine particles at different stages in tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccines formulation were analyzed by a new set of methods. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) was used as a conservative sample preparation for vaccine particle fractionation and gas-phase electrophoretic mobility macromolecular analyzer (GEMMA) for analyzing electrophoretic mobility diameters of isolated TBE virions. The derived particle diameter was then correlated with molecular weight. The diameter of the TBE virions determined after SEC by GEMMA instrumentation was 46.8 ± 1.1 nm. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were implemented for comparison purposes and to gain morphological information on the virion particle. Western blotting (Dot Blot) as an immunological method confirmed biological activity of the particles at various stages of the developed analytical strategy. AFM and TEM measurements revealed higher diameters with much higher SD for a limited number of virions, 60.4 ± 8.5 and 53.5 ± 5.3 nm, respectively. GEMMA instrumentation was also used for fractionation of virions with specifically selected diameters in the gas-phase, which were finally collected by means of an electrostatic sampler. At that point (i.e., after particle collection), AFM and TEM showed that the sampled virions were still intact, exhibiting a narrow size distribution (i.e., 59.8 ± 7.8 nm for AFM and 47.5 ± 5.2 nm for TEM images), and most importantly, dot blotting confirmed immunological activity of the collected samples. Furthermore dimers and virion artifacts were detected, too. PMID:26266988

  14. Improved optimization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) mixtures resolution in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography by using factorial design and response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Eiroa, Auréa; Diévart, Pascal; Dagaut, Philippe

    2010-04-15

    A new procedure for optimizing PAHs separation in very complex mixtures by reverse phase high performance (RPLC) is proposed. It is based on changing gradually the experimental conditions all along the chromatographic procedure as a function of the physical properties of the compounds eluted. The temperature and speed flow gradients allowed obtaining the optimum resolution in large chromatographic determinations where PAHs with very different medium polarizability have to be separated. Whereas optimization procedures of RPLC methodologies had always been accomplished regardless of the physico-chemical properties of the target analytes, we found that resolution is highly dependent on the physico-chemical properties of the target analytes. Based on resolution criterion, optimization process for a 16 EPA PAHs mixture was performed on three sets of difficult-to-separate PAHs pairs: acenaphthene-fluorene (for the optimization procedure in the first part of the chromatogram where light PAHs elute), benzo[g,h,i]perylene-dibenzo[a,h]anthracene and benzo[g,h,i]perylene-indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene (for the optimization procedure of the second part of the chromatogram where the heavier PAHs elute). Two-level full factorial designs were applied to detect interactions among variables to be optimized: speed flow, temperature of column oven and mobile-phase gradient in the two parts of the studied chromatogram. Experimental data were fitted by multivariate nonlinear regression models and optimum values of speed flow and temperature were obtained through mathematical analysis of the constructed models. An HPLC system equipped with a reversed phase 5 microm C18, 250 mm x 4.6mm column (with acetonitrile/water mobile phase), a column oven, a binary pump, a photodiode array detector (PDA), and a fluorimetric detector were used in this work. Optimum resolution was achieved operating at 1.0 mL/min in the first part of the chromatogram (until 45 min) and 0.5 mL/min in the second one (from 45

  15. A radial differential mobility analyzer for the size-classification of gas-phase synthesized nanoparticles at low pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanda, K. K.; Kruis, F. E.

    2014-07-01

    Differential mobility analyzers (DMAs) are commonly used to generate monodisperse nanoparticle aerosols. Commercial DMAs operate at quasi-atmospheric pressures and are therefore not designed to be vacuum-tight. In certain particle synthesis methods, the use of a vacuum-compatible DMA is a requirement as a process step for producing high-purity metallic particles. A vacuum-tight radial DMA (RDMA) has been developed and tested at low pressures. Its performance has been evaluated by using a commercial NANO-DMA as the reference. The performance of this low-pressure RDMA (LP-RDMA) in terms of the width of its transfer function is found to be comparable with that of other NANO-DMAs at atmospheric pressure and is almost independent of the pressure down to 30 mbar. It is shown that LP-RDMA can be used for the classification of nanometer-sized particles (5-20 nm) under low pressure condition (30 mbar) and has been successfully applied to nanoparticles produced by ablating FeNi at low pressures.

  16. Performance of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU): Airlock Coolant Loop Recovery (A/L CLR) Hardware - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John; Rector, tony; Gazda, Daniel; Lewis, John

    2009-01-01

    An EMU water processing kit (Airlock Coolant Loop Recovery A/L CLR) was developed as a corrective action to Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) coolant flow disruptions experienced on the International Space Station (ISS) in May of 2004 and thereafter. Conservative schedules for A/L CLR use and component life were initially developed and implemented based on prior analysis results and analytical modeling. The examination of postflight samples and EMU hardware in November of 2006 indicated that the A/L CLR kits were functioning well and had excess capacity that would allow a relaxation of the initially conservative schedules of use and component life. A relaxed use schedule and list of component lives was implemented thereafter. Since the adoption of the relaxed A/L CLR schedules of use and component lives, several A/L CLR kit components, transport loop water samples and sensitive EMU transport loop components have been examined to gage the impact of the relaxed requirements. The intent of this paper is to summarize the findings of that evaluation, and to outline updated schedules for A/L CLR use and component life.

  17. Mobile satellite service for Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sward, David

    1988-01-01

    The Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system and a special program designed to provide interim mobile satellite services (IMSS) during the construction phase of MSAT are described. A mobile satellite system is a key element in extending voice and and data telecommunications to all Canadians.

  18. Mobile Learning Using Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicente, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The participation in mobile learning programs is conditioned by having/using mobile communication technology. Those who do not have or use such technology cannot participate in mobile learning programs. This study evaluates who are the most likely participants of mobile learning programs by examining the demographic profile and mobile phone usage…

  19. Kinetic behaviour in supercritical fluid chromatography with modified mobile phase for 5 μm particle size and varied flow rates.

    PubMed

    Lesellier, E; Fougere, L; Poe, Donald P

    2011-04-15

    After much development of stationary phase chemistry, in recent years the focus of many studies in HPLC has shifted to increase the efficiency and analysis speed. Ultra high pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) using sub-2 μm particles, and high temperature liquid chromatography (HTLC), using temperatures above 100°C have received much attention. These new approaches allow the use of flow rates higher than those classically used in HPLC, reducing the analysis duration. Due to the low viscosity of supercritical fluids, high velocities, i.e. high flow rates, can be achieved with classical pumping systems typically used in supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). The effects of the flow rate increase with CO(2)/methanol mobile phase was studied on the inlet pressure, t(0), the retention factor of the compounds, and on the efficiency. Simple comparisons of efficiencies obtained at varied temperature between SFC and HPLC, with a packed column containing 5 μm particles, show the greater kinetic performances achieved with the CO(2)/methanol fluid, and underline specific behaviours of SFC, occurring for high flow rates and sub-ambient temperature. Some values (N/t(0)) are also compared to UHPLC data, showing that good performance can be achieved in SFC without applying drastic analytical conditions. Finally, simple kinetic plots (t(0) vs N) at constant column length are used to select combinations of temperature and flow rate necessary to achieve a required theoretical plate number. PMID:21232748

  20. Detection of aqueous phase chemical warfare agent degradation products by negative mode ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry [IM(tof)MS].

    PubMed

    Steiner, Wes E; Harden, Charles S; Hong, Feng; Klopsch, Steve J; Hill, Herbert H; McHugh, Vincent M

    2006-02-01

    The use of negative ion monitoring mode with an atmospheric pressure ion mobility orthogonal reflector time-of-flight mass spectrometer [IM(tof)MS] to detect chemical warfare agent (CWA) degradation products from aqueous phase samples has been determined. Aqueous phase sampling used a traditional electrospray ionization (ESI) source for sample introduction and ionization. Certified reference materials (CRM) of CWA degradation products for the detection of Schedule 1, 2, or 3 toxic chemicals or their precursors as defined by the chemical warfare convention (CWC) treaty verification were used in this study. A mixture of six G-series nerve related CWA degradation products (EMPA, IMPA, EHEP, IHEP, CHMPA, and PMPA) and their related collision induced dissociation (CID) fragment ions (MPA and EPA) were found in each case to be clearly resolved and detected using the IM(tof)MS instrument in negative ion monitoring mode. Corresponding ions, masses, drift times, K(o) values, and signal intensities for each of the CWA degradation products are reported. PMID:16413205

  1. Effects of Select Anions from the Hofmeister Series on the Gas-Phase Conformations of Protein Ions Measured with Traveling-Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Merenbloom, Samuel I.; Flick, Tawnya G.; Daly, Michael P.; Williams, Evan R.

    2011-01-01

    The gas-phase conformations of ubiquitin, cytochrome c, lysozyme, and ↦-lactalbumin ions, formed by electrospray ionization (ESI) from aqueous solutions containing 5 mM ammonium perchlorate, ammonium iodide, ammonium sulfate, ammonium chloride, ammonium thiocyanate, or guanidinium chloride, are examined using traveling-wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS) coupled to time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). For ubiquitin, cytochrome c, and ↦-lactalbumin, adduction of multiple acid molecules results in no significant conformational changes to the highest and lowest charge states formed from aqueous solutions, whereas the intermediate charge states become more compact. The transition to more compact conformers for the intermediate charge states occurs with fewer bound H2SO4 molecules than HClO4 or HI molecules, suggesting ion-ion or salt-bridge interactions are stabilizing more compact forms of the gaseous protein. However, the drift time distributions for protein ions of the same net charge with the highest levels of adduction of each acid are comparable, indicating that these protein ions all adopt similarly compact conformations or families of conformers. No change in conformation is observed upon the adduction of multiple acid molecules to charge states of lysozyme. These results show that the attachment of HClO4, HI, or H2SO4 to multiply protonated proteins can induce compact conformations in the resulting gas-phase protein ions. In contrast, differing Hofmeister effects are observed for the corresponding anions in solution at higher concentrations. PMID:21952780

  2. Evaluation of mobile phase characteristics on three zwitterionic columns in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography mode for liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry based untargeted metabolite profiling of Leishmania parasites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Watson, David G; Wang, Lijie; Westrop, Gareth D; Coombs, Graham H; Zhang, Tong

    2014-10-01

    It has been reported that HILIC column chemistry has a great effect on the number of detected metabolites in LC-HRMS-based untargeted metabolite profiling studies. However, no systematic investigation has been carried out with regard to the optimisation of mobile phase characteristics. In this study using 223 metabolite standards, we explored the retention mechanisms on three zwitterionic columns with varied mobile phase composition, demonstrated the interference from poor chromatographic peak shapes on the output of data extraction, and assessed the quality of chromatographic signals and the separation of isomers under each LC condition. As expected, on the ZIC-cHILIC column the acidic metabolites showed improved chromatographic performance at low pH which can be attributed to the opposite arrangement of the permanently charged groups on this column in comparison with the ZIC-HILIC column. Using extracts from the protozoan parasite Leishmania, we compared the numbers of repeatedly detected LC-HRMS features under different LC conditions with putative identification of metabolites not amongst the standards being based on accurate mass (±3ppm). Besides column chemistry, the pH of the mobile phase plays a key role in not only determining the retention mechanisms of solutes but also the output of the LC-HRMS data processing. Fast evaporation of ammonium carbonate produced less ion suppression in ESI source and consequently improved the detectability of the metabolites in low abundance in comparison with other ammonium salts. Our results show that the combination of a ZIC-pHILIC column with an ammonium carbonate mobile phase, pH 9.2, at 20mM in the aqueous phase or 10mM in both aqueous and organic mobile phase components, provided the most suitable LC conditions for LC-HRMS-based untargeted metabolite profiling of Leishmania parasite extracts. The signal reliability of the mass spectrometer used in this study (Exactive Orbitrap) was also investigated. PMID:25160959

  3. Linear modeling of the soil-water partition coefficient normalized to organic carbon content by reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Andrić, Filip; Šegan, Sandra; Dramićanin, Aleksandra; Majstorović, Helena; Milojković-Opsenica, Dušanka

    2016-08-01

    Soil-water partition coefficient normalized to the organic carbon content (KOC) is one of the crucial properties influencing the fate of organic compounds in the environment. Chromatographic methods are well established alternative for direct sorption techniques used for KOC determination. The present work proposes reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography (RP-TLC) as a simpler, yet equally accurate method as officially recommended HPLC technique. Several TLC systems were studied including octadecyl-(RP18) and cyano-(CN) modified silica layers in combination with methanol-water and acetonitrile-water mixtures as mobile phases. In total 50 compounds of different molecular shape, size, and various ability to establish specific interactions were selected (phenols, beznodiazepines, triazine herbicides, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons). Calibration set of 29 compounds with known logKOC values determined by sorption experiments was used to build simple univariate calibrations, Principal Component Regression (PCR) and Partial Least Squares (PLS) models between logKOC and TLC retention parameters. Models exhibit good statistical performance, indicating that CN-layers contribute better to logKOC modeling than RP18-silica. The most promising TLC methods, officially recommended HPLC method, and four in silico estimation approaches have been compared by non-parametric Sum of Ranking Differences approach (SRD). The best estimations of logKOC values were achieved by simple univariate calibration of TLC retention data involving CN-silica layers and moderate content of methanol (40-50%v/v). They were ranked far well compared to the officially recommended HPLC method which was ranked in the middle. The worst estimates have been obtained from in silico computations based on octanol-water partition coefficient. Linear Solvation Energy Relationship study revealed that increased polarity of CN-layers over RP18 in combination with methanol-water mixtures is the key to better modeling of

  4. Effect of solvent strength and temperature on retention for a polar-endcapped, octadecylsiloxane-bonded silica stationary phase with methanol-water mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Kiridena, Waruna; Poole, Colin F; Koziol, Wladyslaw W

    2004-12-10

    Synergi Hydro-RP is a new type of polar-endcapped, octadecylsiloxane-bonded silica packing for reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Its retention properties as a function of solvent strength and temperature are evaluated from the change in retention factors over the composition range (0-70% v/v methanol) and temperature range (25-65 degrees C) using the solvation parameter model and response surface methodologies. The main factors that affect retention are solute size and hydrogen-bond basicity, with minor contributions from solute hydrogen-bond acidity, dipole-type and electron lone pair interactions. Within the easily accessible range for both temperature and solvent strength, the ability to change selectivity is much greater for solvent strength than temperature. Also, a significant portion of the effect of increasing temperature is to reduce retention without changing selectivity. Response surfaces for the system constants are smooth and non-linear, except for cavity formation and dispersion interactions (v system constant), which is linear. Modeling of the response surfaces suggests that solvent strength and temperature are not independent factors for the b, s and e system constants and for the model intercept (c term). PMID:15628160

  5. Arsenic removal from contaminated brackish sea water by sorption onto Al hydroxides and Fe phases mobilized by land-use.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changxun; Peltola, Pasi; Nystrand, Miriam I; Virtasalo, Joonas J; Österholm, Peter; Ojala, Antti E K; Hogmalm, Johan K; Åström, Mats E

    2016-01-15

    This study examines the spatial and temporal distribution patterns of arsenic (As) in solid and aqueous materials along the mixing zone of an estuary, located in the south-eastern part of the Bothnian Bay and fed by a creek running through an acid sulfate (AS) soil landscape. The concentrations of As in solution form (<1 kDa) increase steadily from the creek mouth to the outer estuary, suggesting that inflowing seawater, rather than AS soil, is the major As source in the estuary. In sediments at the outer estuary, As was accumulated and diagenetically cycled in the surficial layers, as throughout much of the Bothnian Bay. In contrast, in sediments in the inner estuary, As concentrations and accumulation rates showed systematical peaks at greater depths. These peaks were overall consistent with the temporal trend of past As discharges from the Rönnskär smelter and the accompanied As concentrations in past sea-water of the Bothnian Bay, pointing to a connection between the historical smelter activities and the sediment-bound As in the inner estuary. However, the concentrations and accumulation rates of As peaked at depths where the smelter activities had already declined, but a large increase in the deposition of Al hydroxides and Fe phases occurred in response to intensified land-use in the mid 1960's and early 1970's. This correspondence suggests that, apart from the inflowing As-contaminated seawater, capture by Al hydroxides, Fe hydroxides and Fe-organic complexes is another important factor for As deposition in the inner estuary. After accumulating in the sediment, the solid-phase As was partly remobilized, as reflected by increased pore-water As concentrations, a process favored by As(V) reduction and high concentrations of dissolved organic matter. PMID:26558848

  6. Gas-Phase Structure of Amyloid-β (12 - 28) Peptide Investigated by Infrared Spectroscopy, Electron Capture Dissociation and Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Thi Nga; Poully, Jean Christophe; Lecomte, Frédéric; Nieuwjaer, Nicolas; Manil, Bruno; Desfrançois, Charles; Chirot, Fabien; Lemoine, Jerome; Dugourd, Philippe; van der Rest, Guillaume; Grégoire, Gilles

    2013-12-01

    The gas-phase structures of doubly and triply protonated Amyloid-β12-28 peptides have been investigated through the combination of ion mobility (IM), electron capture dissociation (ECD) mass spectrometry, and infrared multi-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy together with theoretical modeling. Replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to explore the conformational space of these protonated peptides, from which several classes of structures were found. Among the low-lying conformers, those with predicted diffusion cross-sections consistent with the ion mobility experiment were further selected and their IR spectra simulated using a hybrid quantum mechanical/semiempirical method at the ONIOM DFT/B3LYP/6-31 g(d)/AM1 level. In ECD mass spectrometry, the c/z product ion abundance (PIA) has been analyzed for the two charge states and revealed drastic differences. For the doubly protonated species, N - Cα bond cleavage occurs only on the N and C terminal parts, while a periodic distribution of PIA is clearly observed for the triply charged peptides. These PIA distributions have been rationalized by comparison with the inverse of the distances from the protonated sites to the carbonyl oxygens for the conformations suggested from IR and IM experiments. Structural assignment for the amyloid peptide is then made possible by the combination of these three experimental techniques that provide complementary information on the possible secondary structure adopted by peptides. Although globular conformations are favored for the doubly protonated peptide, incrementing the charge state leads to a conformational transition towards extended structures with 310- and α-helix motifs.

  7. Toward a Rational Design of Highly Folded Peptide Cation Conformations. 3D Gas-Phase Ion Structures and Ion Mobility Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, Robert; Laszlo, Kenneth J.; Marek, Aleš; Peng, Bo; Bush, Matthew F.; Lavanant, Helène; Afonso, Carlos; Tureček, František

    2016-07-01

    Heptapeptide ions containing combinations of polar Lys, Arg, and Asp residues with non-polar Leu, Pro, Ala, and Gly residues were designed to study polar effects on gas-phase ion conformations. Doubly and triply charged ions were studied by ion mobility mass spectrometry and electron structure theory using correlated ab initio and density functional theory methods and found to exhibit tightly folded 3D structures in the gas phase. Manipulation of the basic residue positions in LKGPADR, LRGPADK, KLGPADR, and RLGPADK resulted in only minor changes in the ion collision cross sections in helium. Replacement of the Pro residue with Leu resulted in only marginally larger collision cross sections for the doubly and triply charged ions. Disruption of zwitterionic interactions in doubly charged ions was performed by converting the C-terminal and Asp carboxyl groups to methyl esters. This resulted in very minor changes in the collision cross sections of doubly charged ions and even slightly diminished collision cross sections in most triply charged ions. The experimental collision cross sections were related to those calculated for structures of lowest free energy ion conformers that were obtained by extensive search of the conformational space and fully optimized by density functional theory calculations. The predominant factors that affected ion structures and collision cross sections were due to attractive hydrogen bonding interactions and internal solvation of the charged groups that overcompensated their Coulomb repulsion. Structure features typically assigned to the Pro residue and zwitterionic COO-charged group interactions were only secondary in affecting the structures and collision cross sections of these gas-phase peptide ions.

  8. Mineralogical and solid phase physical and geochemical controls on U mobility in the sediments from Rifle, CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qafoku, N.; Gartman, B.; Murray, C.; Arey, B.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Resch, C.; Ward, A. L.; Draper, K.; Williams, K.; Long, P.

    2011-12-01

    An understanding of the subsurface mineralogical, physical and solid phase geochemical controls on contaminant U behavior and fate is of primordial importance in designing remediation strategies. Systematic studies using a variety of techniques, such as XRD, μ-XRD, Mössbauer spectroscopy, SEM/EDS, SEM/FIB, TEM/SAED, EMPA, XRF, EXAFS, and XANES were conducted with a variety of subsurface sediments from the Integrated Field Research Challenge site at Rifle, CO, to study U interaction with different subsurface minerals. The cores represented a cross section of sediment conditions that ranged from typical aquifer sediment (minimally reduced) to highly naturally bioreduced sediment from the saturated zone. Some of the subsurface minerals are unique, e.g., the framboidal pyrites of the naturally reduced zone (NRZ) of the Winchester gallery, or the sulfide minerals of different elements and co-contaminants (e.g., ZnS framboids) that were present in the NRZ of the La Quinta experimental plot. All these and other more common minerals, such as Fe oxides and phyllosilicate minerals have a pronounced effect on U fate and behavior in the Rifle subsurface. The solid phase physical and geochemical properties revealed a number of interesting trends. All particle size frequency distributions of the sediments from well CD-08 of the Plot C experimental plot were polymodal, implying complex pore size distribution and water retention functions. Surface area analysis suggests the presence of significant surface area in Rifle IFRC sediment, even on fine-gravel sediment. The wet chemical extractions and microwave digestion analyses showed that substantial amounts of co-contaminants, such as V, Zn, As, Se and Cu (some of them are redox sensitive elements which may compete for the available electrons), were present in the subsurface sediments. NRZs contain elevated concentrations of natural organic matter, Fe(II) and reduced inorganic sulfides. All of these constituents can scavenge

  9. Minimizing ultraviolet noise due to mis-matches between detector flow cell and post column mobile phase temperatures in supercritical fluid chromatography: effect of flow cell design.

    PubMed

    Berger, Terry A

    2014-10-17

    A mis-match between the post-column mobile phase temperature and the UV detector flow cell temperature can cause significant UV noise in supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). Deviations as little as 5 °C can increase noise as much as 5 times, making the detector unsuited for trace analysis. Two approaches were used to minimize this noise. When a flow cell was in direct thermal contact (metal on metal) with the detector optical bench, the mobile phase temperature was actively controlled to the measured flow cell temperature, by using one of the heat exchangers (HX) in the column compartment. However, with some older, but still widely used flow cell designs, this required repeated, hourly monitoring of the flow cell temperature and repeated manual adjustment of the heat exchanger temperature, due to thermal drift. Flow cell design had a strong influence on susceptibility to this thermally induced noise. Thermally insulating the flow cell from the optical bench made some cells much less susceptible to such thermally induced noise. Five different flow cells, some insulated, some un-insulated, were evaluated. Most had a truncated conical flow path, but one had a cylindrical flow path. Using either approach, the ASTM noise, with a 10mm, 13 μL conical flow cell, could be optimized to ≈0.007 mAU at 2.5 Hz, in SFC, which is very near the 0.006 mAU manufacturer's specification for HPLC. The insulated version of this flow cell required far less optimization, compared to the un-insulated version. At 150 bar, an experimental 3mm, 2 μL flow cell, with only one side insulated, yielded noise slightly too high (≈0.16-0.18 mAU) for trace analysis, at 80 Hz. However, at 200 bar, noise at 80 Hz was <0.06 mAU, which should allow quantification of a 1 mAU tall trace component with a signal to noise ratio (S/N) >10. Even partially un-insulated, this flow cell design was much less susceptible to thermally induced noise. Further insulating this flow cell design failed to improve

  10. Fluoroquinolone antibiotic determination in bovine, ovine and caprine milk using solid-phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection with ionic liquids as mobile phase additives.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Herrera, Antonio V; Hernández-Borges, Javier; Rodríguez-Delgado, Miguel Angel

    2009-10-23

    This paper describes the use of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (EMIm-BF(4)) as mobile phase additive for the analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection of a group of seven basic fluoroquinolone antibiotics (i.e. fleroxacin, ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin, danofloxacin, enrofloxacin, sarafloxacin and difloxacin) in different milk samples. EMIm-BF(4) was found superior to 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate for the separation of the analytes from chromatographic interferences of the sample matrix. The optimized method was applied to the analysis of ovine, caprine and bovine milk, in the last case in either skimmed, semi-skimmed and full-cream milk after suitable acidic deproteination followed by a solid-phase extraction procedure. Recovery values between 73% and 113% were obtained for the three types of bovine milk samples, as well as for ovine and caprine milk (RSDs below 16% in all cases), which clearly demonstrates the applicability of the method to the three types of milk irrespective of the fat content of the samples. Limits of detection were in the range of 0.5-8.1 microg/L (approximately 0.5-25.9 microg/kg), well below the maximum residue limits established for these compounds by the current European legislation. A screening study of 24 different milk samples was also developed. In none of the samples, residues of the selected antibiotics were found. PMID:19268960

  11. Soil phosphorus mobility and solid-to-solution phase resupply studied by diffusive gradients in thin films: background soil properties driving their variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes-Blackburn, Daniel; Zhang, Hao; Giles, Courtney; George, Timothy; Shand, Charlie; Lumsdon, David; Cooper, Patricia; Wendler, Renate; Brown, Lawrie; Stutter, Marc; Blackwell, Martin; Darch, Tegan; Wearing, Catherine; Philip, Haygarth

    2015-04-01

    The mobility and resupply of inorganic phosphorus (P) from the solid phase was studied in 32 representative soils from the UK. The objective was to identify the background soil properties driving the variation of soil inorganic P desorption kinetics across different soil types. Diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT), diffusive equilibration in thin films (DET) and the DGT-induced fluxes in sediments model (DIFS) were used as tools for exploring solid-to-solution desorption kinetics. Previously characterized physicochemical properties of the same soils were used for correlation analysis. On average and across soil types, the inorganic P maximum distance of depletion was 0.42±0.10 cm, the equilibration time (Tc) was 3.63 h, the desorption rate constant (k-1) was 0.0046 h-1, and the desorption rate was 4.71 nmol l-1 s-1. The correlation between P in Olsen extractcs (POlsen) with PDGT, PDET and phosphorus effective concentration (PE) was enhanced when similar soils were isolated and used in the comparison, clearly showing that these parameters are affected differently by soil types. The PE was better correlated to Ptot, POlsen, PFeO, and PNaOH/EDTA than PDGT. This may indicate that PE is a better representation of P availability across soil types than PDGT. While the relative DGT-induced inorganic P flux in the first hour is mainly a function of soil wetting properties and % Corg, at longer times it is a function of the resupply capacity (R-Rdiff) of the soil solid phase. In general, resupply of P from the solid phase was less than that for other chemical elements, as shown by high Tc and low k-1 values. Desorption rates and resupply from the solid phase were fundamentally influenced by P saturation status, as reflected by their strong correlation with P concentration in water, FeO strips, Olsen and NaOH-EDTA extracts. Soil pH and particle size distribution had little or no effect on the evaluated parameters. The DGT and DET techniques, along with the DIFS model

  12. Aqueous phase oligomerization of α,β-unsaturated carbonyls and acids investigated using ion mobility spectrometry coupled to mass spectrometry (IMS-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Pascal; Tlili, Sabrine; Ravier, Sylvain; Quivet, Etienne; Monod, Anne

    2016-04-01

    One of the current essential issues to unravel our ability to forecast future climate change and air quality, implies a better understanding of natural processes leading to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, and in particular the formation and fate of oligomers. The difficulty in characterizing macromolecules is to discern between large oxygenated molecules from series of oligomers containing repeated small monomers of diverse structures. In the present study, taking advantage from previously established radical vinyl oligomerization of methyl vinylketone (MVK) in the aqueous phase, where relatively simple oligomers containing up to 14 monomers were observed, we have investigated the same reactivity on several other unsaturated water soluble organic compounds (UWSOCs) and on a few mixtures of these precursor compounds. The technique used to characterize the formed oligomers was a traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry coupled to a hybrid quadrupole - time of flight mass spectrometer (IMS-MS) fitted with an electrospray source and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC). The technique allows for an additional separation, especially for large ions, containing long carbon chains. We have shown the efficiency of the IMS-mass spectrometry technique to detect oligomers derived from MVK photooxidation in the aqueous phase. The results were then compared to other oligomers, derived from ten other individual biogenic UWSOCs. The technique allowed distinguishing between different oligomers arising from different precursors. It also clearly showed that compounds bearing a non-conjugated unsaturation did not provide oligomerization. Finally, it was shown that the IMS-mass spectrometry technique, applied to mixtures of unsaturated conjugated precursors, exhibited the ability of these precursors to co-oligomerize, i.e. forming only one complex oligomer system bearing monomers of different structures. The results are discussed in terms of atmospheric

  13. Carbon nanotubes@silicon dioxide nanohybrids coating for solid-phase microextraction of organophosphorus pesticides followed by gas chromatography-corona discharge ion mobility spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Saraji, Mohammad; Jafari, Mohammad Taghi; Mossaddegh, Mehdi

    2016-01-15

    A high efficiency solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber coated with porous carbon nanotubes-silicon dioxide (CNTs-SiO2) nanohybrids was synthesized and applied for the determination of some organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) in vegetables, fruits and water samples. Gas chromatography-corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry was used as the detection system. Glucose, as a biocompatible compound, was used for connecting CNT and SiO2 during a hydrothermal process. The electrospinning technique was also applied for the fiber preparation. The parameters affecting the efficiency of extraction, including stirring rate, salt effect, extraction temperature, extraction time, desorption temperature and desorption time, were investigated and optimized. The developed CNTs@SiO2 fiber presented better extraction efficiency than the commercial SPME fibers (PA, PDMS, and PDMS-DVB). The intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations were found to be lower than 6.2 and 9.0%, respectively. For water samples, the limits of detection were in the range of 0.005-0.020 μg L(-1) and the limits of quantification were between 0.010 and 0.050 μg L(-1). The results showed a good linearity in the range of 0.01-3.0 μg L(-1) for the analytes. The spiking recoveries ranged from 79 (± 9) to 99 (± 8). The method was successfully applied for the determination of OPPs in real samples. PMID:26709024

  14. High Sensitivity Method to Estimate Distribution of Hyaluronan Molecular Sizes in Small Biological Samples Using Gas-Phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Do, Lan; Dahl, Christen P.; Kerje, Susanne; Hansell, Peter; Mörner, Stellan; Lindqvist, Ulla; Engström-Laurent, Anna; Larsson, Göran; Hellman, Urban

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan is a negatively charged polydisperse polysaccharide where both its size and tissue concentration play an important role in many physiological and pathological processes. The various functions of hyaluronan depend on its molecular size. Up to now, it has been difficult to study the role of hyaluronan in diseases with pathological changes in the extracellular matrix where availability is low or tissue samples are small. Difficulty to obtain large enough biopsies from human diseased tissue or tissue from animal models has also restricted the study of hyaluronan. In this paper, we demonstrate that gas-phase electrophoretic molecular mobility analyzer (GEMMA) can be used to estimate the distribution of hyaluronan molecular sizes in biological samples with a limited amount of hyaluronan. The low detection level of the GEMMA method allows for estimation of hyaluronan molecular sizes from different parts of small organs. Hence, the GEMMA method opens opportunity to attain a profile over the distribution of hyaluronan molecular sizes and estimate changes caused by disease or experimental conditions that has not been possible to obtain before. PMID:26448761

  15. Detection of piperonal emitted from polymer controlled odor mimic permeation systems utilizing Canis familiaris and solid phase microextraction-ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Macias, Michael S; Guerra-Diaz, Patricia; Almirall, José R; Furton, Kenneth G

    2010-02-25

    Currently, in the field of odor detection, there is generally a wider variation in limit of detections (LODs) for canines than instruments. The study presented in this paper introduces an improved protocol for the creation of controlled odor mimic permeation system (COMPS) devices for use as standards in canine training and discusses the canine detection thresholds of piperonal, a starting material for the illicit drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), when exposed to these devices. Additionally, this paper describes the first-ever reported direct comparison of solid phase microextraction-ion mobility spectrometry (SPME-IMS) to canine detection for the MDMA odorant, piperonal. The research presented shows the reliability of COMPS devices as low cost field calibrants providing a wide range of odorant concentrations for biological and instrumental detectors. The canine LOD of piperonal emanating from the 100 ng s(-1) COMPS was found to be 1 ng as compared to the SPME-IMS LOD of piperonal in a static, closed system at 2 ng, with a linear dynamic range from 2 ng to 11 ng. The utilization of the COMPS devices would allow for training that will reduce the detection variability between canines and maintain improved consistency for training purposes. Since both SPME and IMS are field portable technologies, it is expected that this coupled method will be useful as a complement to canine detection for the field detection of MDMA. PMID:20044224

  16. Improved isoelectric focusing chromatography on strong anion exchange media via a new model that custom designs mobile phases using simple buffers.

    PubMed

    Choy, Derek Y C; Creagh, A Louise; Haynes, Charles

    2014-03-01

    Isoelectric chromatofocusing (ICF), a mode of chromatography by which proteins are separated based on changes in their charge state with pH, is widely used at analytical scales and finding increasing interest in biologics manufacturing due to its exceptional resolving power. Here, a method is described for using simple monoprotic and diprotic buffers to create stable mobile phases for sample loading on a strong anion exchange column and for achieving an elution pH gradient of desired shape covering any pH range from pH 10.0 to 3. The buffers used are selected to satisfy cost constraints, and to permit facile detection of eluted biologics by UV spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The method exploits a new model described here that combines multiple-chemical and adsorption-equilibria theory to enable in silico tailoring of elution pH profiles using mixtures of these simple buffers. It is shown to provide a versatile platform for optimizing and conducting ICF of protein mixtures on strong anion exchange media. PMID:24166014

  17. A novel method for the determination of three volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath by solid-phase microextraction-ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Allafchian, Ali Reza; Majidian, Zahra; Ielbeigi, Vahideh; Tabrizchi, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    A method was carried out for the quantitative determination of the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using solid-phase microextraction and ion mobility spectrometry (SPME-IMS). This method was optimized and evaluated. The best results were obtained at sorption temperature 70 °C, desorption temperature 200 °C, and extraction time 15 min. Under the optimized conditions, the linear dynamic range was found to be 0.01-4.0 ppb (R(2) > 0.995), 2.3-400 ppm (R(2) > 0.994), and 2.5-76 ppb (R(2) > 0.998) for acetone, acetaldehyde, and acetonitrile, respectively. The detection limits for acetone, acetaldehyde, and acetonitrile were 0.001 ppb, 0.18 ppm, and 0.22 ppb, respectively. As a practical application, the method was applied for the determination of acetone, acetaldehyde, and acetonitrile in human breath matrix. Therefore, the proposed method was found to be effective and simple enough to be strongly recommended for real sample analysis. PMID:26558761

  18. Polypyrrole nanowire as an excellent solid phase microextraction fiber for bisphenol A analysis in food samples followed by ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kamalabadi, Mahdie; Mohammadi, Abdorreza; Alizadeh, Naader

    2016-08-15

    A polypyrrole nanowire coated fiber was prepared and used in head-space solid phase microextraction coupled with ion mobility spectrometry (HS-SPME-IMS) to the analysis of bisphenol A (BPA) in canned food samples, for the first time. This fiber was synthesized by electrochemical oxidation of the monomer in aqueous solution. The fiber characterization by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the new fiber exhibited two-dimensional structures with a nanowire morphology. The effects of important extraction parameters on the efficiency of HS-SPME were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the linearity of 10-150ngg(-1) and limit of detection (based on S/N=3) of 1ngg(-1) were obtained in BPA analysis. The repeatability (n=5) expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD%) was 5.8%. At the end, the proposed method was successfully applied to determine BPA in various canned food samples (peas, corns, beans). Relative recoveries were obtained 93-96%. Method validation was conducted by comparing our results with those obtained through HPLC with fluorescence detection (FLD). Compatible results indicate that the proposed method can be successfully used in BPA analysis. This method is simple and cheaper than chromatographic methods, with no need of extra organic solvent consumption and derivatization prior to sample introduction. PMID:27260447

  19. Determination of furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural from baby formula using headspace solid phase microextraction based on nanostructured polypyrrole fiber coupled with ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kamalabadi, Mahdie; Ghaemi, Elham; Mohammadi, Abdorreza; Alizadeh, Naader

    2015-08-15

    Furfural (Fu) and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMFu) are extracted using a dodecylbenzenesulfonate-doped polypyrrole coating as a fiber for headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) method in baby formula samples and detected using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Sample pH, salt effect, extraction time and temperature were investigated and optimized as effective parameters in HS-SPME. The calibration curves were linear in the range of 20-300 ng g(-1) (R(2)>0.99). Limits of detection for Fu and HMFu were 6 ng g(-1) and 5 ng g(-1), respectively. The RSD% of Fu and HMFu for five analyses was 4.4 and 4.9, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to determine of Fu and HMFu in the different baby formula samples with satisfactory result. The results were in agreement with those obtained using HPLC analysis. The HS-SPME-IMS is precise, selective and sensitive analytical method for determination of Fu and HMFu in baby formula samples, without any derivatization process. PMID:25794723

  20. Shift of the high-performance liquid chromatographic retention times of metabolites in relation to the original drug on an RP8 column with acidic mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Herre, S; Pragst, F

    1997-04-25

    The effect of the structural change in the metabolization of drugs on the HPLC retention time with an RP8 column with an acetonitrile-phosphate buffer (pH 2.3) as the mobile phase was investigated at model compound pairs of 29 functionalization reactions. A more or less typical region for T(M)=log(k'M/k'D) was found for each of these reactions (with k'M and k'D being the capacity factors of the metabolite and the drug, respectively), which can be explained by an increase or a decrease of the hydrophilic properties caused by the structural change. This effect is superimposed by an essential influence of the unchanged part of the molecule and in some cases by special intramolecular interactions like the hydrogen bond. Despite the more complicated structure of real drugs the results obtained at the model compound pairs were confirmed for most of the 55 metabolite/drug pairs. The practical use of the T(M) values as a support to distinguish between different metabolites in the HPLC-DAD analysis of intoxications is demonstrated with cases of poisoning with diphenhydramine, propafenone and methaqualone. PMID:9187390

  1. HPLC/APCI Mass Spectrometry of Saturated and Unsaturated Hydrocarbons by Using Hydrocarbon Solvents as the APCI Reagent and HPLC Mobile Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jinshan; Owen, Benjamin C.; Borton, David J.; Jin, Zhicheng; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2012-05-01

    Saturated and unsaturated, linear, branched, and cyclic hydrocarbons, as well as polyaromatic and heteroaromatic hydrocarbons, were successfully ionized by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) using small hydrocarbons as reagents in a linear quadrupole ion trap (LQIT) mass spectrometer. Pentane was proved to be the best reagent among the hydrocarbon reagents studied. This ionization method generated different types of abundant ions (i.e., [M + H]+, M+•, [M - H]+ and [M - 2H]+ •), with little or no fragmentation. The radical cations can be differentiated from the even-electron ions by using dimethyl disulfide, thus facilitating molecular weight (MW) determination. While some steroids and lignin monomer model compounds, such as androsterone and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde, also formed abundant M+• and [M + H]+ ions, this was not true for all of them. Analysis of two known mixtures as well as a base oil sample demonstrated that each component of the known mixtures could be observed and that a correct MW distribution was obtained for the base oil. The feasibility of using this ionization method on the chromatographic time scale was demonstrated by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with hexane as the mobile phase (and APCI reagent) to separate an artificial mixture prior to mass spectrometric analysis.

  2. N-MOSFETs Formed on Solid Phase Epitaxially Grown GeSn Film with Passivation by Oxygen Plasma Featuring High Mobility.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yung-Chin; Chen, Kuen-Yi; Hsieh, Ching-Heng; Su, Chang-Chia; Wu, Yung-Hsien

    2015-12-01

    Solid phase epitaxially grown GeSn was employed as the platform to assess the eligibility of direct O2 plasma treatment on GeSn surface for passivation of GeSn N-MOSFETs. It has been confirmed that O2 plasma treatment forms a GeSnO(x) film on the surface and the GeSnO(x) topped by in situ Al2O3 constitutes the gate stack of GeSn MOS devices. The capability of the surface passivation was evidenced by the low interface trap density (D(it)) of 1.62 × 10(11) cm(-2) eV(-1), which is primarily due to the formation of Ge-O and Sn-O bonds at the surface by high density/reactivity oxygen radicals that effectively suppress dangling bonds and decrease gap states. The good D(it) not only makes tiny frequency dispersion in the characterization of GeSn MOS capacitors, but results in GeSn N-MOSFETs with outstanding peak electron mobility as high as 518 cm(2)/(V s) which outperforms other devices reported in the literature due to reduced undesirable carrier scattering. In addition, the GeSn N-MOSFETs also exhibit promising characteristics in terms of acceptable subthreshold swing of 156 mV/dec and relatively large I(ON)/I(OFF) ratio more than 4 orders. Moreover, the robust reliability in terms small V(t) variation against high field stress attests the feasibility of using the O2 plasma-treated passivation to advanced GeSn technology. PMID:26579560

  3. Halloysite nanotubes-titanium dioxide as a solid-phase microextraction coating combined with negative corona discharge-ion mobility spectrometry for the determination of parathion.

    PubMed

    Saraji, Mohammad; Jafari, Mohammad Taghi; Mossaddegh, Mehdi

    2016-07-01

    Halloysite nanotubes-titanium dioxide (HNTs-TiO2) as a biocompatible environmentally friendly solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber coating was prepared. HNTs-TiO2 was chemically coated on the surface of a fused-silica fiber using a sol-gel process. Parathion as an organophosphorus pesticide was selected as a model compound to investigate the extraction efficiency of the fiber. The extracted analyte was detected by negative corona discharge-ion mobility spectrometer (NCD-IMS). The effective parameters on the extraction efficiency, such as salt effect, extraction temperature and extraction time were investigated and optimized. The extraction efficiency of HNTs-TiO2 fiber was compared with bare-silica (sol-gel based coating without HNTs-TiO2), HNTs, carbon nanotubes and commercial SPME fibers (PA, PDMS, and PDMS-DVB). The HNTs-TiO2 fiber showed highest extraction efficiency among the studied fibers. The intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations were found to be 4.3 and 6.3%, respectively. The limit of detection and limit of quantification values were 0.03 and 0.1 μg L(-1), respectively. The dynamic range of the method was in the range of 0.1-25 μg L(-1). The spiking recoveries were between 85 (±9) and 97 (±6). The SPME-HNTs-TiO2 combined with NCD-IMS was successfully applied for the determination of parathion in apple, strawberry, celery and water samples. PMID:27216393

  4. Gas-phase separation of drugs and metabolites using modifier-assisted differential ion mobility spectrometry hyphenated to liquid extraction surface analysis and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Porta, Tiffany; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2013-12-17

    The present work describes an alternative generic approach to LC-MS for the analysis of drugs of abuse as well as their metabolites in post-mortem tissue samples. The platform integrates liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) for analytes tissue extraction followed by differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS) mass spectrometry for analytes gas phase separation. Detection is performed on a triple quadrupole linear ion trap using the selected reaction monitoring mode for quantification as well as product ion scan mode for structural confirmatory analyses. The major advantages of the platform are that neither chromatographic separation nor extensive sample preparation are required. In DMS the combination of a high separation voltage (i.e., up to 4 kV) together with organic modifiers (e.g., alcohols, acetonitrile, acetone) added in the drift gas is required to achieve the separation of isomeric metabolites, such as the ones of cocaine and tramadol. DMS also separates morphine from its glucuronide metabolites, which allows for preventing the overestimation of morphine in case of fragmentation of the glucuronides in the atmospheric-to-vacuum interface of the mass spectrometer. Cocaine, opiates, opioids, amphetamines, benzodiazepines and several of their metabolites could be identified in post-mortem human kidney and muscle tissue based on simultaneous screening and confirmatory analysis in data-dependent acquisition mode using an analyte-dependent compensation voltage to selectively transmit ions through the DMS cell to the mass analyzer. Quantitative performance of the LESA-DMS-MS platform was evaluated for cocaine and two of its metabolites spotted onto a tissue section using deuterated internal standard. Analyte's responses were linear from 2 to 1000 pg on tissue corresponding to a limit of detection in the order of nanograms of analyte per gram of tissue. Accuracy and precision based on QC sample was found to be less than 10%. Replicate analyses of cocaine and

  5. The effects of mobile ATM switches on PNNI peer group operation

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, L.; Sholander, P.; Tolendino, L.

    1997-04-01

    This contribution discusses why, and how, mobile networks and mobile switches might be discussed during Phase 1 of the WATM standards process. Next, it reviews mobile routers within Mobile IP. That IP mobility architecture may not apply to the proposed mobile ATM switches. Finally, it discusses problems with PNNI peer group formation and operation when mobile ATM switches are present.

  6. High-throughput biopolymer desalting by solid-phase extraction prior to mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Gilar, M; Belenky, A; Wang, B H

    2001-06-29

    In the last 10 years mass spectrometry (MS) has become an important method for analysis of peptides, proteins and DNA. It was recently utilized for accurate high-throughput protein identification, sequencing and DNA genotyping. The presence of non-volatile buffers compromises sensitivity and accuracy of MS biopolymer analysis; it is essential to remove sample contaminants prior to analysis. We have developed a fast and efficient method for desalting of DNA oligonucleotides and peptides using 96-well solid-phase extraction plates packed with 5 mg of Waters Oasis HLB sorbent (Waters, Milford, MA, USA). This reversed-phase sorbent retains the biopolymer analytes, while non-retained inorganic ions are washed out with pure deionized water. DNA oligonucleotides or peptides are eluted using a small amount (20-100 microl) of acetonitrile-water (70:30, v/v) solution. The SPE desalting performance meets the requirements for MS applications such as protein digest analysis and DNA genotyping. PMID:11461010

  7. Development and validation of a liquid chromatographic method for the stability study of a pharmaceutical formulation containing voriconazole using cellulose tris(4-chloro-3-methylphenylcarbamate) as chiral selector and polar organic mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Servais, Anne-Catherine; Moldovan, Radu; Farcas, Elena; Crommen, Jacques; Roland, Isabelle; Fillet, Marianne

    2014-10-10

    The ophthalmic solution of voriconazole, i.e. (2R,3S)-2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-3-(5-fluoropyrimidin-4-yl)-1-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)butan-2-ol, made from an injection formulation which also contains sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin sodium salt as an excipient (Vfend), is used for the treatment of fungal keratitis. A liquid chromatographic (LC) method using polar organic mobile phase and cellulose tris(4-chloro-3-methylphenylcarbamate) coated on silica as chiral stationary phase was successfully developed to evaluate the chiral stability of the ophthalmic solution. The percentage of methanol (MeOH) in the mobile phase containing acetonitrile (ACN) as the main solvent significantly influenced the retention and resolution of voriconazole and its enantiomer ((2S,3R)-2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-3-(5-fluoropyrimidin-4-yl)-1-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)butan-2-ol). The optimized mobile phase consisted of ACN/MeOH/diethylamine/trifluoroacetic acid (80/20/0.1/0.1; v/v/v/v). The method was found to be selective not only regarding the enantiomer of voriconazole but also regarding the specified impurities described in the monograph from the European Pharmacopoeia. The LC method was then fully validated applying the strategy based on total measurement error and accuracy profiles. Under the selected conditions, the determination of 0.1% of voriconazole enantiomer could be performed. Finally, a stability study of the ophthalmic solution was conducted using the validated LC method. PMID:25035235

  8. Satellite mobile data service for Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, Glenn R.; Sward, David J.

    1990-01-01

    A commercial mobile satellite system which is to be constructed and operated in Canada is examined. This is done in two phases. First, mobile data services was introduced. Hub equipment and 3000 mobile data terminals were supplied. Over the satellite tests were performed. The mobile data service provides full two way digital messaging automatic vehicle location and fleet management services. The second phase is to construct, launch and make operational the MSAT satellite and associated network control facilities. The implementation is examined of the mobile data service in Canada, including the technical description. Marketing and applications are also examined.

  9. Satellite mobile data service for Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, Glenn R.; Sward, David J.

    A commercial mobile satellite system which is to be constructed and operated in Canada is examined. This is done in two phases. First, mobile data services was introduced. Hub equipment and 3000 mobile data terminals were supplied. Over the satellite tests were performed. The mobile data service provides full two way digital messaging automatic vehicle location and fleet management services. The second phase is to construct, launch and make operational the MSAT satellite and associated network control facilities. The implementation is examined of the mobile data service in Canada, including the technical description. Marketing and applications are also examined.

  10. Trifluoroethanol-containing RP-HPLC mobile phases for the separation of transmembrane peptides human glycophorin-A, integrin alpha-1, and p24: analysis and prevention of potential side reactions due to formic acid.

    PubMed

    Hara, Toshiaki; Huang, Yue; Ito, Akihiro; Kawakami, Toru; Hojo, Hironobu; Murata, Michio

    2015-02-01

    Reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis and purification of three hydrophobic, aggregation-prone peptides, composed mainly of the transmembrane (TM) sequence, were performed using elution systems containing 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE). The addition of 10-16% TFE to a common mobile phase, such as a water/acetonitrile/propanol (PrOH) or a water/PrOH/formic acid system, markedly improved the chromatographic separation of these peptides. The superior performance of TFE-containing systems in separating peptides over water/PrOH/formic acid systems [Bollhagen R. et al., J. Chromatogr. A, 1995; 711: 181-186.] clearly demonstrated that adding TFE to the mobile phase is one of best methods for TM-peptide purification. Characterization of the potential side reactions using MALDI and ESI-LIT/Orbitrap mass spectrometry indicated that prolonged incubation of peptides in a mixture of TFE-formic acid possibly induces O-formylation of the Ser residue and N-formylation of the N-terminus of peptides. The conditions for selective removal of the formyl groups from TM peptides were also screened. We believe that these results will expand our ability to analyze and prepare hydrophobic, aggregation-prone TM peptides and proteins. PMID:25504594

  11. An integrated electrophoretic mobility control device with split design for signal improvement in liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis of aminoglycosides using a heptafluorobutyric acid containing mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Hung, Sih-Hua; Yu, Meng-Ju; Wang, Nan-Hsuan; Hsu, Ren-Yu; Wei, Guor-Jien; Her, Guor-Rong

    2016-08-24

    Electrophoretic mobility control (EMC) was used to alleviate the adverse effect of the ion-pairing agent heptafluorobutyric acid (HFBA) in the liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) analysis of aminoglycosides. Aminoglycosides separated by LC were directed to a connecting column before their detection via ESI. Applying an electric field across the connecting column caused the positively charged aminoglycosides to migrate toward the mass spectrometer whereas the HFBA anions remained in the junction reservoir, thus alleviating the ion suppression caused by HFBA. To accommodate the flow rate of a narrow-bore column, minimize the effect of electrophoretic mobility on separation, and facilitate the operation, an integrated EMC device with a split design was fabricated. With the proposed EMC device, the signals of aminoglycosides were enhanced by a factor of 5-85 without affecting the separation efficiency or elution order. For the analysis of aminoglycosides in bovine milk, the proposed approach demonstrates a sensitivity that is at least 10 times below the maximum residue limits set by most countries. PMID:27497008

  12. High hole mobility tin-doped polycrystalline germanium layers formed on insulating substrates by low-temperature solid-phase crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Wakana; Taoka, Noriyuki; Kurosawa, Masashi; Sakashita, Mitsuo; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Zaima, Shigeaki

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the effects of incorporation of 0%-2% tin (Sn) into amorphous germanium (Ge) on its crystallization behavior and electrical properties. Incorporation of only 0.2% Sn caused the polycrystallization temperature of Ge to lower from 450 to 430 °C, while a polycrystalline Ge1-xSnx layer with high crystallinity compared to that of polycrystalline Ge was formed by incorporation of 2% Sn. A polycrystalline Ge1-xSnx layer with a low Sn content of 2% annealed at 450 °C exhibited a Hall hole mobility as high as 130 cm2/V s at room temperature even though it possessed a small grain size of 20-30 nm. The Hall hole mobility of a poly-Ge1-xSnx layer with an Sn content of 2% was four times higher than that of a polycrystalline Ge layer and comparable to that of single-crystalline silicon.

  13. LC-MS/MS method using unbonded silica column and aqueous/methanol mobile phase for the simultaneous quantification of a drug candidate and co-administered metformin in rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Discenza, Lorell; D'Arienzo, Celia; Olah, Timothy; Jemal, Mohammed

    2010-06-01

    BMS-754807 and metformin were co-administered in drug discovery studies which required the quantitation of both compounds in plasma. Since the two compounds are chemically and structurally dissimilar, developing a single bioanalytical method presented a number of chromatographic challenges including the achievement of appropriate retention times and peak shapes on a single analytical column. To address this chromatographic challenge, we investigated different LC columns under different gradient elution schemes using aqueous/organic mobile phases. Using unbonded silica column and aqueous/methanol mobile phase, we were able to obtain robust and well-resolving chromatographic conditions to support the development and implementation of a single LC-MS/MS bioanalytical method. The use of sub-2 micron particle sizes and a high flow rate, which are attainable with UPLC systems, enhanced the method. The method performance evaluation showed that the method easily met the normally used acceptance criteria for bioanalytical methods, namely a deviation of +/-15% from the nominal concentration except at lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ), where +/-20% is accepted. The reported LLOQ of 7.8 ng/ml, for both BMS-754807 and metformin, was adequate to support the pharmacokinetic studies. PMID:20451474

  14. Investigating changes in the gas-phase conformation of Antithrombin III upon binding of Arixtra using traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuejie; Singh, Arunima; Li, Lingyun; Linhardt, Robert J; Xu, Yongmei; Liu, Jian; Woods, Robert J; Amster, I Jonathan

    2015-10-21

    We validate the utility of ion mobility to measure protein conformational changes induced by the binding of glycosaminoglycan ligands, using the well characterized system of Antithrombin III (ATIII) and Arixtra, a pharmaceutical agent with heparin (Hp) activity. Heparin has been used as a therapeutic anticoagulant drug for several decades through its interaction with ATIII, a serine protease inhibitor that plays a central role in the blood coagulation cascade. This interaction induces conformational changes within ATIII that dramatically enhance the ATIII-mediated inhibition rate. Arixtra is the smallest synthetic Hp containing the specific pentasaccharide sequence required to bind with ATIII. Here we report the first travelling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TWIMS) investigation of the conformational changes in ATIII induced by its interaction with Arixtra. Native electrospray ionization mass spectrometry allowed the gentle transfer of the native topology of ATIII and ATIII-Arixtra complex. IM measurements of ATIII and ATIII-Arixtra complex showed a single structure, with well-defined collisional cross section (CCS) values. An average 3.6% increase in CCS of ATIII occurred as a result of its interaction with Arixtra, which agrees closely with the theoretical estimation of the change in CCS based on protein crystal structures. A comparison of the binding behavior of ATIII under both denaturing and non-denaturing conditions confirmed the significance of a folded tertiary structure of ATIII for its biological activity. A Hp oligosaccharide whose structure is similar to Arixtra but missing the 3-O sulfo group on the central glucosamine residue showed a dramatic decrease in binding affinity towards ATIII, but no change in the mobility behavior of the complex, consistent with prior studies that suggested that 3-O sulfation affects the equilibrium constant for binding to ATIII, but not the mode of interaction. In contrast, nonspecific binding by a Hp

  15. Investigating changes in the gas-phase conformation of Antithrombin III upon binding of Arixtra using traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuejie; Singh, Arunima; Li, Lingyun; Linhardt, Robert J.; Xu, Yongmei; Liu, Jian; Woods, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    We validate the utility of ion mobility to measure protein conformational changes induced by the binding of glycosaminoglycan ligands, using the well characterized system of Antithrombin III (ATIII) and Arixtra, a pharmaceutical agent with heparin (Hp) activity. Heparin has been used as a therapeutic anticoagulant drug for several decades through its interaction with ATIII, a serine protease inhibitor that plays a central role in the blood coagulation cascade. This interaction induces conformational changes within ATIII that dramatically enhance the ATIII-mediated inhibition rate. Arixtra is the smallest synthetic Hp containing the specific pentasaccharide sequence required to bind with ATIII. Here we report the first travelling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TWIMS) investigation of the conformational changes in ATIII induced by its interaction with Arixtra. Native electrospray ionization mass spectrometry allowed the gentle transfer of the native topology of ATIII and ATIII–Arixtra complex. IM measurements of ATIII and ATIII–Arixtra complex showed a single structure, with well-defined collisional cross section (CCS) values. An average 3.6% increase in CCS of ATIII occurred as a result of its interaction with Arixtra, which agrees closely with the theoretical estimation of the change in CCS based on protein crystal structures. A comparison of the binding behavior of ATIII under both denaturing and non-denaturing conditions confirmed the significance of a folded tertiary structure of ATIII for its biological activity. A Hp oligosaccharide whose structure is similar to Arixtra but missing the 3-O sulfo group on the central glucosamine residue showed a dramatic decrease in binding affinity towards ATIII, but no change in the mobility behavior of the complex, consistent with prior studies that suggested that 3-O sulfation affects the equilibrium constant for binding to ATIII, but not the mode of interaction. In contrast, nonspecific binding by a Hp

  16. Social Mobility and Equality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, S. M.

    Social mobility is generally studied in three different ways: stratum mobility, intergenerational social mobility, and intragenerational or career mobility. This paper deals with the first two types of mobility and more with intergenerational mobility than with stratum mobility. The working hypothesis of both discussions is that, in general, a…

  17. Application of a liquid chromatographic procedure for the analysis of penicillin antibiotics in biological fluids and pharmaceutical formulations using sodium dodecyl sulphate/propanol mobile phases and direct injection.

    PubMed

    Rambla-Alegre, Maria; Martí-Centelles, Rosa; Esteve-Romero, Josep; Carda-Broch, Samuel

    2011-07-29

    A direct injection liquid chromatography procedure was developed for the simultaneous determination of four penicillin antibiotics (amoxicillin, ampicillin, cloxacillin and dicloxacillin) in pharmaceutical formulations and physiological fluids (urine) using hybrid micellar mobile phases. These antimicrobials are used to treat gastrointestinal and systemic infections. The four penicillins were analysed using a Zorbax C18 reversed-phase column and detected at 210 nm. These antibiotics were separated by an interpretive optimisation procedure based on the accurate description of the retention and shape of the chromatographic peaks. Antibiotics were eluted in less than 16 min with no interference by the urine protein band or endogenous compounds using the mobile phase 0.11 M sodium dodecyl sulphate-6% propanol-0.01 M NaH(2)PO(4) buffered at pH 3. The method was validated according to the Food and Drug Administration guideline, including analytical parameters such as linearity (R(2)>0.993), intra- and inter-day precisions (RSD, %: 0.1-4.4 and 1.2-5.9, respectively), and robustness for the four compounds. This method is sensitive enough for the routine analysis of penicillins at therapeutic urine levels, with limits of detection in the 1.5-15 ng mL(-1) range and limits of quantification of 50 ng mL(-1). Recoveries in a micellar medium and a spiked urine matrix were in the 92.4-108.2% and 96-110% ranges, respectively. Finally, the method was successfully applied to determine these antibiotics in urine samples and pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:21190691

  18. Simple setup for gas-phase H/D exchange mass spectrometry coupled to electron transfer dissociation and ion mobility for analysis of polypeptide structure on a liquid chromatographic time scale.

    PubMed

    Mistarz, Ulrik H; Brown, Jeffery M; Haselmann, Kim F; Rand, Kasper D

    2014-12-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) is a fast and sensitive, yet unharnessed analytical approach for providing information on the structural properties of biomolecules, in a complementary manner to mass analysis. Here, we describe a simple setup for ND3-mediated millisecond gas-phase HDX inside a mass spectrometer immediately after ESI (gas-phase HDX-MS) and show utility for studying the primary and higher-order structure of peptides and proteins. HDX was achieved by passing N2-gas through a container filled with aqueous deuterated ammonia reagent (ND3/D2O) and admitting the saturated gas immediately upstream or downstream of the primary skimmer cone. The approach was implemented on three commercially available mass spectrometers and required no or minor fully reversible reconfiguration of gas-inlets of the ion source. Results from gas-phase HDX-MS of peptides using the aqueous ND3/D2O as HDX reagent indicate that labeling is facilitated exclusively through gaseous ND3, yielding similar results to the infusion of purified ND3-gas, while circumventing the complications associated with the use of hazardous purified gases. Comparison of the solution-phase- and gas-phase deuterium uptake of Leu-Enkephalin and Glu-Fibrinopeptide B, confirmed that this gas-phase HDX-MS approach allows for labeling of sites (heteroatom-bound non-amide hydrogens located on side-chains, N-terminus and C-terminus) not accessed by classical solution-phase HDX-MS. The simple setup is compatible with liquid chromatography and a chip-based automated nanoESI interface, allowing for online gas-phase HDX-MS analysis of peptides and proteins separated on a liquid chromatographic time scale at increased throughput. Furthermore, online gas-phase HDX-MS could be performed in tandem with ion mobility separation or electron transfer dissociation, thus enabling multiple orthogonal analyses of the structural properties of peptides and proteins in a single automated LC-MS workflow. PMID:25375223

  19. CsSnI[subscript 3]: Semiconductor or Metal? High Electrical Conductivity and Strong Near-Infrared Photoluminescence from a Single Material. High Hole Mobility and Phase-Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, In; Song, Jung-Hwan; Im, Jino; Androulakis, John; Malliakas, Christos D.; Li, Hao; Freeman, Arthur J.; Kenney, John T.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2012-10-29

    CsSnI{sub 3} is an unusual perovskite that undergoes complex displacive and reconstructive phase transitions and exhibits near-infrared emission at room temperature. Experimental and theoretical studies of CsSnI{sub 3} have been limited by the lack of detailed crystal structure characterization and chemical instability. Here we describe the synthesis of pure polymorphic crystals, the preparation of large crack-/bubble-free ingots, the refined single-crystal structures, and temperature-dependent charge transport and optical properties of CsSnI{sub 3}, coupled with ab initio first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In situ temperature-dependent single-crystal and synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction studies reveal the origin of polymorphous phase transitions of CsSnI{sub 3}. The black orthorhombic form of CsSnI{sub 3} demonstrates one of the largest volumetric thermal expansion coefficients for inorganic solids. Electrical conductivity, Hall effect, and thermopower measurements on it show p-type metallic behavior with low carrier density, despite the optical band gap of 1.3 eV. Hall effect measurements of the black orthorhombic perovskite phase of CsSnI{sub 3} indicate that it is a p-type direct band gap semiconductor with carrier concentration at room temperature of {approx} 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} and a hole mobility of {approx} 585 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The hole mobility is one of the highest observed among p-type semiconductors with comparable band gaps. Its powders exhibit a strong room-temperature near-IR emission spectrum at 950 nm. Remarkably, the values of the electrical conductivity and photoluminescence intensity increase with heat treatment. The DFT calculations show that the screened-exchange local density approximation-derived band gap agrees well with the experimentally measured band gap. Calculations of the formation energy of defects strongly suggest that the electrical and light emission properties possibly result from

  20. Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions characterization during the flow-back phase of a hydraulically refractured well in the Uintah Basin, Utah using mobile PTR-MS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, F.; Warneke, C.; Brown, S. S.; De Gouw, J. A.; Dube, W. P.; Edwards, P.; Gilman, J.; Graus, M.; Helleis, F.; Kofler, J.; Lerner, B. M.; Orphal, J.; Petron, G.; Roberts, J. M.; Zahn, A.

    2014-12-01

    Ongoing improvements in advanced technologies for crude oil and natural gas extraction from unconventional reserves, such as directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing, have greatly increased the production of fossil fuels within recent years. The latest forecasts even estimate an enhancement of 56% in total natural gas production due to increased development of shale gas, tight gas and offshore natural gas resources from 2012 to 2040 with the largest contribution from shale formations [US EIA: Annual Energy Outlook 2014]. During the field intensive 'Energy and Environment - Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study (UBWOS)', measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were made using proton-transfer-reactions mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) at the ground site Horse Pool and using a mobile laboratory in the Uintah Basin, Utah, which is a region well known for intense fossil fuel production. A reworked gas well in the Red Wash fields was sampled regularly within two weeks performing mobile laboratory measurements downwind of the well site. The well had been recently hydraulically refractured at that time and waste water was collected into an open flow-back pond. Very high mixing ratios of aromatic hydrocarbons (C6-C13) up to the ppm range were observed coming from condensate and flow-back reservoirs. The measurements are used to determine sources of specific VOC emissions originating from the different parts of the well site and mass spectra are used to classify the air composition in contrast to samples taken at the Horse Pool field site and crude oil samples from South Louisiana. Enhancement ratios and time series of measured peak values for aromatics showed no clear trend, which indicates changes in emissions with operations at the site.

  1. Mobile Customer Relationship Management and Mobile Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanayei, Ali; Mirzaei, Abas

    The purpose of this study is twofold. First, in order to guarantee a coherent discussion about mobile customer relationship management (mCRM), this paper presents a conceptualization of mCRM delineating its unique characteristics because of Among the variety of mobile services, considerable attention has been devoted to mobile marketing and in particular to mobile customer relationship management services. Second, the authors discusses the security risks in mobile computing in different level(user, mobile device, wireless network,...) and finally we focus on enterprise mobile security and it's subgroups with a series of suggestion and solution for improve mobile computing security.

  2. Mobile antennas for COMETS advanced mobile Satcom experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hase, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Masato; Saito, Haruo

    1995-01-01

    Advanced mobile satellite communication experiments in the Ka-band and the mm-wave will be carried out using the COMETS satellite, which is scheduled for launch in 1997. Mobile antennas will play a much more key role in high frequency systems such as COMETS than in conventional L-band mobile systems. This paper describes three types of antennas which are now being developed by the Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) for the COMETS mobile experiments. One is a mechanically steered waveguide slot array antenna, another is an electronically steered active phased array antenna, and the third is a mechanically steered torus reflector antenna. The first two antennas will be used in the Ka-band, while the latter will be used in the mm-wave.

  3. Phase Behavior, Solid Organic Precipitation, and Mobility Characterization Studies in Support of Enhanced Heavy Oil Recovery on the Alaska North Slope

    SciTech Connect

    Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar; Santanu Khataniar

    2008-12-31

    The medium-heavy oil (viscous oil) resources in the Alaska North Slope are estimated at 20 to 25 billion barrels. These oils are viscous, flow sluggishly in the formations, and are difficult to recover. Recovery of this viscous oil requires carefully designed enhanced oil recovery processes. Success of these recovery processes is critically dependent on accurate knowledge of the phase behavior and fluid properties, especially viscosity, of these oils under variety of pressure and temperature conditions. This project focused on predicting phase behavior and viscosity of viscous oils using equations of state and semi-empirical correlations. An experimental study was conducted to quantify the phase behavior and physical properties of viscous oils from the Alaska North Slope oil field. The oil samples were compositionally characterized by the simulated distillation technique. Constant composition expansion and differential liberation tests were conducted on viscous oil samples. Experiment results for phase behavior and reservoir fluid properties were used to tune the Peng-Robinson equation of state and predict the phase behavior accurately. A comprehensive literature search was carried out to compile available compositional viscosity models and their modifications, for application to heavy or viscous oils. With the help of meticulously amassed new medium-heavy oil viscosity data from experiments, a comparative study was conducted to evaluate the potential of various models. The widely used corresponding state viscosity model predictions deteriorate when applied to heavy oil systems. Hence, a semi-empirical approach (the Lindeloff model) was adopted for modeling the viscosity behavior. Based on the analysis, appropriate adjustments have been suggested: the major one is the division of the pressure-viscosity profile into three distinct regions. New modifications have improved the overall fit, including the saturated viscosities at low pressures. However, with the limited

  4. MOBILE BED FLUX FORCE/CONDENSATION SCRUBBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an experimental determination of fine particle collection in mobile bed scrubbers. Particle collection efficiency increased greatly as the gas-phase pressure drop increased. With no water vapor condensation, the performance capability of a mobile bed s...

  5. Carrier recovery techniques on satellite mobile channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vucetic, B.; Du, J.

    1990-01-01

    An analytical method and a stored channel model were used to evaluate error performance of uncoded quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) and M-ary phase shift keying (MPSK) trellis coded modulation (TCM) over shadowed satellite mobile channels in the presence of phase jitter for various carrier recovery techniques.

  6. Modem for the land mobile satellite channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henely, Steven J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a modem which has been developed and implemented using a digital signal processor (DSP) for a land mobile satellite demonstration system. The requirements of this digital modem were determined by the characteristics of the land mobile satellite channel. This paper discusses the algorithms which implement the differentiated phase shift keying (DPSK) demodulator. An algorithm is included which estimates symbol timing independent of carrier phase without the use of a square-law nonlinearity.

  7. A Mobile Internet Service for Self-Management of Physical Activity in People With Rheumatoid Arthritis: Challenges in Advancing the Co-Design Process During the Requirements Specification Phase

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Cathrin; H. Opava, Christina; Brusewitz, Maria; Keller, Christina; Åsenlöf, Pernilla

    2015-01-01

    Background User involvement in the development of health care services is important for the viability, usability, and effectiveness of services. This study reports on the second step of the co-design process. Objective The aim was to explore the significant challenges in advancing the co-design process during the requirements specification phase of a mobile Internet service for the self-management of physical activity (PA) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods A participatory action research design was used to involve lead users and stakeholders as co-designers. Lead users (n=5), a clinical physiotherapist (n=1), researchers (n=2) with knowledge in PA in RA and behavioral learning theories, an eHealth strategist (n=1), and an officer from the patient organization (n=1) collaborated in 4 workshops. Data-collection methods included video recordings and naturalistic observations. Results The inductive qualitative video-based analysis resulted in 1 overarching theme, merging perspectives, and 2 subthemes reflecting different aspects of merging: (1) finding a common starting point and (2) deciding on design solutions. Seven categories illustrated the specific challenges: reaching shared understanding of goals, clarifying and handling the complexity of participants’ roles, clarifying terminology related to system development, establishing the rationale for features, negotiating features, transforming ideas into concrete features, and participants’ alignment with the agreed goal and task. Conclusions Co-designing the system requirements of a mobile Internet service including multiple stakeholders was a complex and extensive collaborative decision-making process. Considering, valuing, counterbalancing, and integrating different perspectives into agreements and solutions (ie, the merging of participants’ perspectives) were crucial for moving the process forward and were considered the core challenges of co-design. Further research is needed to replicate the results

  8. Domestic mobile satellite systems in North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wachira, Muya

    1990-01-01

    Telest Mobile Inc. (TMI) and the American Mobile Satellite Corporation (AMSC) are authorized to provide mobile satellite services (MSS) in Canada and the United States respectively. They are developing compatible systems and are undertaking joint specification and procurement of spacecraft and ground segment with the aim of operational systems by late 1993. Early entry (phase 1) mobile data services are offered in 1990 using space segment capacity leased from Inmarsat. Here, an overview is given of these domestic MSS with an emphasis on the TMI component of the MSAT systen.

  9. Mobile shearography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalms, Michael; Jueptner, Werner

    2005-04-01

    By reason of their sensitivity, accuracy and non-contact as well as non-destructive characteristics, modern optical methods such as digital speckle shearography have found an increasing interest for NDT applications on the factory floor. With new carbon filter technologies and other lightweight constructions in aircraft and automotive manufacturing, adapted examination designs and especially developed testing methods are necessary. Shearography as a coherent optical method has been widely accepted as an useful NDT tool. It is a robust interferometric method to determine locations with maximum stress on various material structures. However, limitations of this technique can be found in the bulky equipment components, the interpretation of the complex sherographic result images and at the work with non-cooperative surfaces (dark absorber, bright shining reflectors). We report a mobile shearography system that was especially designed for investigations at aircraft and automotive constructions.

  10. Cooperating mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Harrington, John J.; Eskridge, Steven E.; Hurtado, John E.; Byrne, Raymond H.

    2004-02-03

    A miniature mobile robot provides a relatively inexpensive mobile robot. A mobile robot for searching an area provides a way for multiple mobile robots in cooperating teams. A robotic system with a team of mobile robots communicating information among each other provides a way to locate a source in cooperation. A mobile robot with a sensor, a communication system, and a processor, provides a way to execute a strategy for searching an area.

  11. Mobile Schools for a Mobile World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Overwhelmingly, independent schools are embracing mobile devices--laptops, iPads or other tablets, and smartphones--to enhance teaching and learning. This article describes the results of the "NAIS 2012 Mobile Learning Survey." Among its findings were that 75 percent of NAIS-member schools currently use mobile learning devices in at…

  12. Design characteristics of the Sludge Mobilization System

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, C.L.

    1990-09-30

    Radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the West Valley Demonstration Project is being processed into low-level waste and solidified in cement. High-level waste also stored underground will be vitrified and solidified into canistered glass logs. To move the waste from where it resides at the Waste Tank Farm to the Vitrification Facility requires equipment to prepare the storage tanks for low-level and high-level waste processing, equipment to mobilize and mix the radioactive sludge into a homogeneous slurry, and equipment to transfer the slurry for vitrification. The design of the Sludge Mobilization System has incorporated the necessary components to effect the preparation and transfer of waste in five operational phases. The first phase of the Sludge Mobilization System, which began in 1987, prepared the waste tanks to process radioactive liquid for delivery to the Cement Solidification System and to support the mobilization equipment. The second phase, beginning in 1991, will wash the sludge that remains after the liquid supernatant is decanted to prepare it for mobilization operations. The third phase will combine the contents of various waste tanks into one tank. The fourth phase will resuspend and mix the contents of the high-level waste tank. The fifth and final phase of the Sludge Mobilization System will entail transferring the waste mixture to the Vitrification Facility for processing into glass logs. Provisions for recycling the waste streams or slurries within the tank farm or for returning process streams to the Waste Tank Farm from the Vitrification Facility are also included in the final phase. This document addresses the Sludge Mobilization System equipment design characteristics in terms of its use in each of the five operational phases listed above.

  13. Polypyrrole/montmorillonite nanocomposite as a new solid phase microextraction fiber combined with gas chromatography-corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of diazinon and fenthion organophosphorus pesticides.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mohammad T; Saraji, Mohammad; Sherafatmand, Hossein

    2014-03-01

    A novel solid phase microextraction (SPME) fiber was prepared and coupled with gas chromatography corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry (GC-CD-IMS) based on polypyrrole/montmorillonite nanocomposites for the simultaneous determination of diazinon and fenthion. The nanocomposite polymer was coated using a three-electrode electrochemical system and directly deposited on a Ni-Cr wire by applying a constant potential. The scanning electron microscopy images revealed that the new fiber exhibited a rather porous and homogenous surface. The thermal stability of the fabricated fiber was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. The effects of different parameters influencing the extraction efficiency such as extraction temperature and time, salt addition, stirring rate, the amount of nanoclay, and desorption temperature were investigated and optimized. The method was exhaustively evaluated in terms of sensitivity, recovery, and reproducibility. The linearity ranges of 0.05-10 and 0.08-10 μg L(-1), and the detection limits of 0.020 and 0.035 μg L(-1) were obtained for diazinon and fenthion, respectively. The relative standard deviation values were calculated to be lower than 5% and 8% for intra-day and inter-day, respectively. Finally, the developed method was applied to determine the diazinon and fenthion (as model compounds) in cucumber, lettuce, apple, tap and river water samples. The satisfactory recoveries revealed the capability of the two-dimensional separation technique (retention time in GC and drift time in IMS) for the analysis of complex matrices extracted by SPME. PMID:24528846

  14. Pilot-Tone System for Mobile Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, F.

    1986-01-01

    In mobile communication system called tone-calibrated technique, pilot tone provides phase- and amplitude-calibration reference to enable coherent demodulation of signal at receiver despite fading. Signal received by or from mobile terminal faded due to motion of terminal and propagation of signal along multiple paths. Fading introduces random amplitude modulation and phase modulation with bandwidth of twice Doppler frequency shift. Degrading effects of multipath fading reduced. Tonecalibrated technique for use with phase-modulated data or telephony systems using Manchester digital pulse-code modulation.

  15. Mobile Bipolaron

    SciTech Connect

    Bonca, J.; Katrasnik, T.; Trugman, S. A.

    2000-04-03

    We explore the properties of the bipolaron in a 1D Holstein-Hubbard model with dynamical quantum phonons. Using a recently developed variational method combined with analytical strong coupling calculations, we compute correlation functions, effective mass, bipolaron isotope effect, and the phase diagram. The two site bipolaron has a significantly reduced mass and isotope effect compared to the on-site bipolaron, and is bound in the strong coupling regime up to twice the Hubbard U naively expected. The model can be described in this regime as an effective t-J-V model with nearest neighbor repulsion. These are the most accurate bipolaron calculations to date. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  16. Rapid purification of fumonisins and their hydrolysis products with solid-phase extraction columns.

    PubMed

    Poling, S M; Plattner, R D

    1999-06-01

    Fumonisins B(3) and B(4) (FB(3) and FB(4)) were recovered from the 50:50 acetonitrile/water extract of corn cultures of a strain of Fusarium moniliforme that does not make FB(1) or FB(2) by stirring the extract with IRA-68, a weak anion-exchange resin. The fumonisins were desorbed with 5% acetic acid in the same solvent. After dilution with water, the desorbed fumonisins were separated into FB(3) (FB(3) and FA(3)) and FB(4) (FB(4), FC(4), and FA(4)) fractions with a tC(18) solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridge. The FB(3) fraction was then separated into FB(3) and FA(3) by using an NH(2) SPE cartridge and eluting with 5% acetic acid and increasing amounts of acetonitrile in water. Finally, FB(1) and FA(3) were hydrolyzed with calcium hydroxide. After recovery from the reaction mixture using a tC(18) cartridge, the hydrolyzed and partially hydrolyzed analogues were separated and the unreacted fumonisins recovered by using an NH(2) cartridge, initially in the normal-phase mode with increasing amounts of water in acetonitrile and then in the reversed-phase mode after the addition of 5% acetic acid to the solvent and eluting in the reverse order. PMID:10794634

  17. Headspace solid-phase microextraction using a dodecylsulfate-doped polypyrrole film coupled to ion mobility spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of atrazine and ametryn in soil and water samples.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Abdorreza; Ameli, Akram; Alizadeh, Naader

    2009-05-15

    A simple and rapid headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) based method is presented for the simultaneous determination of atrazine and ametryn in soil and water samples by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). A dodecylsulfate-doped polypyrrole (PPy-DS), synthesized by electrochemical method, was applied as a laboratory-made fiber for SPME. The HS-SPME system was designed with a cooling device on the upper part of the sample vial and a circulating water bath for adjusting the sample temperature. The extraction properties of the fiber to spiked soil and water samples with atrazine and ametryn were examined, using a HS-SPME device and thermal desorption in injection port of IMS. Parameters affecting the extraction efficiency such as the volume of water added to the soil, pH effect, extraction time, extraction temperature, salt effect, desorption time, and desorption temperature were investigated. The HS-SPME-IMS method with PPy-DS fiber, provided good repeatability (RSDs<10 %), simplicity, good sensitivity and short analysis times for spiked soil (200 ng g(-1)) and water samples (100 and 200 ng mL(-1)). The calibration graphs were linear in the range of 200-4000 ng g(-1) and 50-2800 ng mL(-1) for soil and water respectively (R(2)>0.99). Detection limits for atrazine and ametryn were 37 ng g(-1) (soil) and 23 ng g(-1) (soil) and 15 ng mL(-1) (water) and 10 ng mL(-1) (water), respectively. To evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, atrazine and ametryn in the three kinds of soils and two well water samples were determined. Finally, comparing the HS-SPME results for extraction and determination of selected triazines using PPy-DS fiber with the other methods in literature shows that the proposed method has comparable detection limits and RSDs and good linear ranges. PMID:19269479

  18. Absence of many-body mobility edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Roeck, Wojciech; Huveneers, Francois; Müller, Markus; Schiulaz, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Localization transitions as a function of temperature require a many-body mobility edge in energy, separating localized from ergodic states. We argue that this scenario is inconsistent because local fluctuations into the ergodic phase within the supposedly localized phase can serve as mobile bubbles that induce global delocalization. Such fluctuations inevitably appear with a low but finite density anywhere in any typical state. We conclude that the only possibility for many-body localization to occur is lattice models that are localized at all energies. Building on a close analogy with a model of assisted two-particle hopping, where interactions induce delocalization, we argue why hot bubbles are mobile and do not localize upon diluting their energy. Numerical tests of our scenario show that previously reported mobility edges cannot be distinguished from finite-size effects.

  19. SOFCo mobile planar solid oxide generator

    SciTech Connect

    Khandkar, A.C.; Privette, R.M.

    1995-08-01

    This paper presents results from the first phase of a three phase, four-year program with the objective of designing and demonstrating a 10 kW mobile electric power generator operating on logistic fuel. Objectives of the first phase include: the development of a preliminary system design, an assessment of technologies critical to system performance, and the fabrication of three multi-stack test units.

  20. Mobile Router Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.; Shell, Dan; Leung, Kent

    2002-01-01

    Cisco Systems and NASA have been performing joint research on mobile routing technology under a NASA Space Act Agreement. Cisco developed mobile router technology and provided that technology to NASA for applications to aeronautic and space-based missions. NASA has performed stringent performance testing of the mobile router, including the interaction of routing and transport-level protocols. This paper describes mobile routing, the mobile router, and some key configuration parameters. In addition, the paper describes the mobile routing test network and test results documenting the performance of transport protocols in dynamic routing environments.

  1. Chemical Standards in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Maestre, Roberto; Harden, Charles Steve; Ewing, Robert Gordon; Crawford, Christina Lynn; Hill, Herbert Henderson

    2010-01-01

    In ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), reduced mobility values (K0) are used as a qualitative measure of gas phase ions, and are reported in the literature as absolute values. Unfortunately, these values do not always match those collected in the field. One reason for this discrepancy is that the buffer gas may be contaminated with moisture or other volatile compounds. In this study, the effect of moisture and organic contaminants in the buffer gas on the mobility of IMS standards and analytes was investigated for the first time using IMS directly coupled to mass spectrometry. 2,4-dimethylpyridine, 2,6-di-tert-butyl pyridine (DTBP), and tetrabutylammonium, tetrapropylammonium, tetraethylammonium, and tetramethylammonium chlorides were used as chemical standards. In general, the mobility of IMS standard product ions was not affected by small amounts of contamination while the mobilities of many analytes were affected. In the presence of contaminants in the buffer gas, the mobility of analyte ions is often decreased by forming ion-molecule clusters with the contaminant. To ensure the measurement of accurate reduced mobility values, two IMS standards are required: an instrument and a mobility standard. An instrument standard is not affected by contaminants in the buffer gas, and provides an accurate measurement of the instrumental parameters, such as voltage, drift length, pressure, and temperature. The mobility standard behaves like an analyte ion in that the compound’s mobility is affected by low levels of contamination in the buffer gas. Prudent use of both of these standards can lead to improved measurement of accurate reduced mobility values. PMID:20369157

  2. Chemical standards in ion mobility spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Maestre, Robert; Harden, Charles S.; Ewing, Robert G.; Crawford, Christina L.; Hill, Jr, Herbert H.

    2010-08-01

    In ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), reduced mobility values (K0) are used as a qualitative measure of gas phase ions, and are reported in the literature as absolute values. Unfortunately, these values do not always match with those collected in the field. One reason for this discrepancy is that the buffer gas may be contaminated with moisture or other volatile compounds. In this study, the effect of moisture and organic contaminants in the buffer gas on the mobility of IMS standards and analytes was investigated for the first time using IMS directly coupled to mass spectrometry. 2,4-Dimethylpyridine, 2,6-di- tertbutylpyridine (DTBP), and tetrabutylammonium, tetrapropylammonium, tetraethylammonium, and tetramethylammonium chlorides were used as chemical standards. In general, the mobility of IMS standard product ions was not affected by small amounts of contamination while the mobilities of many analytes were affected. In the presence of contaminants in the buffer gas, the mobility of analyte ions is often decreased by forming ion–molecule clusters with the contaminant. To ensure the measurement of accurate reduced mobility values, two IMS standards are required: an instrument and a mobility standard. An instrument standard is not affected by contaminants in the buffer as, and provides an accurate measurement of the instrumental parameters, such as voltage, drift length, pressure, and temperature. The mobility standard behaves like an analyte ion in that the compound’s mobility is affected by low levels of contamination in the buffer gas. Prudent use of both of these standards can lead to improved measurement of accurate reduced mobility values.

  3. Ion mobility sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  4. Innovative island mobile vet.

    PubMed

    Forster, Dan

    2016-06-11

    One of the UK's first mobile veterinary clinics was recently awarded a Queen's Award for Innovation. Mobile Vet was launched on the Isle of Wight in 2013 by Dan Forster and his wife Kirsty, a veterinary nurse. PMID:27288178

  5. Tandem mobile robot system

    DOEpatents

    Buttz, James H.; Shirey, David L.; Hayward, David R.

    2003-01-01

    A robotic vehicle system for terrain navigation mobility provides a way to climb stairs, cross crevices, and navigate across difficult terrain by coupling two or more mobile robots with a coupling device and controlling the robots cooperatively in tandem.

  6. Mobility and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard van Leer Foundation Newsletter, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue deals with the phenomenon of mobility or transience in India, Kenya, Greece, Ireland, Malaysia, Thailand and Israel. The primary focus is on mobility's effect on young children, specifically their health and education; some of the broader concerns also addressed by the newsletter are the causes of mobility and its…

  7. Mobile Student Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asif, Muhammad; Krogstie, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A mobile student information system (MSIS) based on mobile computing and context-aware application concepts can provide more user-centric information services to students. The purpose of this paper is to describe a system for providing relevant information to students on a mobile platform. Design/methodology/approach: The research…

  8. Ion mobility sensor

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jackson C.; Yu, Conrad M.

    2005-08-23

    An ion mobility sensor which can detect both ion and molecules simultaneously. Thus, one can measure the relative arrival times between various ions and molecules. Different ions have different mobility in air, and the ion sensor enables measurement of ion mobility, from which one can identify the various ions and molecules. The ion mobility sensor which utilizes a pair of glow discharge devices may be designed for coupling with an existing gas chromatograph, where various gas molecules are already separated, but numbers of each kind of molecules are relatively small, and in such cases a conventional ion mobility sensor cannot be utilized.

  9. Mobile Virtual Private Networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkis, Göran; Grahn, Kaj; Mårtens, Mathias; Mattsson, Jonny

    Mobile Virtual Private Networking (VPN) solutions based on the Internet Security Protocol (IPSec), Transport Layer Security/Secure Socket Layer (SSL/TLS), Secure Shell (SSH), 3G/GPRS cellular networks, Mobile IP, and the presently experimental Host Identity Protocol (HIP) are described, compared and evaluated. Mobile VPN solutions based on HIP are recommended for future networking because of superior processing efficiency and network capacity demand features. Mobile VPN implementation issues associated with the IP protocol versions IPv4 and IPv6 are also evaluated. Mobile VPN implementation experiences are presented and discussed.

  10. Modeling vapor uptake induced mobility shifts in peptide ions observed with transversal modulation ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Vivek K; Vidal-de-Miguel, Guillermo; Hogan, Christopher J

    2015-10-21

    Low field ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) techniques exhibit low orthogonality, as inverse mobility often scales with mass to charge ratio. This inadequacy can be mitigated by adding vapor dopants, which may cluster with analyte ions and shift their mobilities by amounts independent of both mass and mobility of the ion. It is therefore important to understand the interactions of vapor dopants with ions, to better quantify the extent of dopant facilitated mobility shifts. Here, we develop predictive models of vapor dopant facilitated mobility shifts, and compare model calculations to measurements of mobility shifts for peptide ions exposed to variable gas phase concentrations of isopropanol. Mobility measurements were made at atmospheric pressure and room temperature using a recently developed transversal modulation ion mobility spectrometer (TMIMS). Results are compared to three separate models, wherein mobility shifts due to vapor dopants are attributed to changes in gas composition and (I) no vapor dopant uptake is assumed, (II) site-specific dopant uptake by the ion is assumed (approximated via a Langmuir adsorption model), and (III) site-unspecific dopant uptake by the ion is assumed (approximated via a classical nucleation model). We find that mobility shifts in peptide ions are in excellent agreement with model II, site-specific binding predictions. Conversely, mobility shifts of tetraalkylammonium ions from previous measurements were compared with these models and best agreement was found with model III predictions, i.e. site-unspecific dopant uptake. PMID:26051323

  11. Mobile healthcare informatics.

    PubMed

    Siau, Keng; Shen, Zixing

    2006-06-01

    Advances in wireless technology give pace to the rapid development of mobile applications. The coming mobile revolution will bring dramatic and fundamental changes to our daily life. It will influence the way we live, the way we do things, and the way we take care of our health. For the healthcare industry, mobile applications provide a new frontier in offering better care and services to patients, and a more flexible and mobile way of communicating with suppliers and patients. Mobile applications will provide important real time data for patients, physicians, insurers, and suppliers. In addition, it will revolutionalize the way information is managed in the healthcare industry and redefine the doctor - patient communication. This paper discusses different aspects of mobile healthcare. Specifically, it presents mobile applications in healthcare, and discusses possible challenges facing the development of mobile applications. Obstacles in developing mobile healthcare applications include mobile device limitations, wireless networking problems, infrastructure constraints, security concerns, and user distrust. Research issues in resolving or alleviating these problems are also discussed in the paper. PMID:16777784

  12. Social mobility and fertility.

    PubMed

    Kasarda, J D; Billy, J O

    1985-01-01

    This review examines 4 possible causal links between social mobility and fertility: 1) fertility affects social mobility; 2) social mobility affects fertility; 3) fertility and social mobility simultaneously affect each other; and 4) social mobility and fertility are unrelated. Due to the lack of systematic theory guiding the research, conceptualizations and measures of social mobility and fertility vary markedly from study to study, leading to inconsistent findings. The review focuses on theoretical perspectives underpinning the research, causal operators proposed to interpret observed associations, and analytical methods used. The selectivity perspective is based on the contention that a family must be small in order to rise on the social scale. This has found little support, however. In fact, studies suggest that children induce slightly higher levels of status achievement and family responsibilities may stimulate the energy and ambition of some so that they achieve more than they would have done without a family. Most studies have concerned the hypothesis that social mobility affects fertility. 4 theoretical perspectives have emerged: status enhancement; relative economic status; social isolation; and stress and disorientation. At any time in a couple's reproductive life cycle the decision or actual experience of either social mobility or fertility may influence the decision or actual experience of the other variable. Mobility-fertility research has defined an individual's or couple's position in terms of income, education, or occupation with occupation used most often as a single index of social class and indexes of social mobility developed by comparing persons' changes in occupational position. A common theme in much of the research literature is that the existence of an effect of social mobility on fertility depends on the societal conditions of a given population. Most studies through the mid-60s used a common measurement method to assess whether a

  13. Modeling Facilitated Contaminant Transport by Mobile Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corapcioglu, M. Yavuz; Kim, Seunghyun

    1995-01-01

    Introduction of exogenous biocolloids such as genetically engineered bacteria in a bioremediation operation can enhance the transport of contaminants in groundwater by reducing the retardation effects. Because of their colloidal size and favorable surface conditions, bacteria are efficient contaminant carriers. In cases where contaminants have a low mobility in porous media because of their high partition with solid matrix, facilitated contaminant transport by mobile bacteria can create high contaminant fluxes. When metabolically active mobile bacteria are present in a subsurface environment, the system can be treated as consisting of three phases: water phase, bacterial phase, and stationary solid matrix phase. In this work a mathematical model based on mass balance equations is developed to describe the facilitated transport and fate of a contaminant and bacteria in a porous medium. Bacterial partition between the bulk solution and the stationary solid matrix and contaminant partition among three phases are represented by expressions in terms of measurable quantities. Solutions were obtained to provide estimates of contaminant and bacterial concentrations. A dimensional analysis of the transport model was utilized to estimate model parameters from the experimental data and to assess the effect of several parameters on model behavior. The model results matched favorably with experimental data of Jenkins and Lion (1993). The presence of mobile bacteria enhances the contaminant transport. However, bacterial consumption of the contaminant, which serves as a bacterial nutrient, can attenuate the contaminant mobility. The work presented in this paper is the first three-phase model to include the effects of substrate metabolism on the fate of groundwater contaminants.

  14. Mobile Bay turbidity plume study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crozier, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    Laboratory and field transmissometer studies on the effect of suspended particulate material upon the appearance of water are reported. Quantitative correlations were developed between remotely sensed image density, optical sea truth data, and actual sediment load. Evaluation of satellite image sea truth data for an offshore plume projects contours of transmissivity for two different tidal phases. Data clearly demonstrate the speed of change and movement of the optical plume for water patterns associated with the mouth of Mobile bay in which relatively clear Gulf of Mexico water enters the bay on the eastern side. Data show that wind stress in excess of 15 knots has a marked impact in producing suspended sediment loads.

  15. ACTS mobile SATCOM experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Frye, Robert E.; Jedrey, Thomas C.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last decade, the demand for reliable mobile satellite communications (satcom) for voice, data, and video applications has increased dramatically. As consumer demand grows, the current spectrum allocation at L-band could become saturated. For this reason, NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are developing the Advanced Communications Technology Satellites (ACTS) mobile terminal (AMT) and are evaluating the feasibility of K/Ka-band (20/30 GHz) mobile satcom to meet these growing needs. U.S. industry and government, acting as co-partners, will evaluate K/Ka-band mobile satcom and develop new technologies by conducting a series of applications-oriented experiments. The ACTS and the AMT testbed will be used to conduct these mobile satcom experiments. The goals of the ACTS Mobile Experiments Program and the individual experiment configurations and objectives are further presented.

  16. Mobile workstation for decontamination and decommissioning operations

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, W.L.; Osborn, J.F.; Thompson, B.R.

    1993-10-01

    This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop effective mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities within the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. These mobile worksystems will be configured to operate within the environmental and logistical constraints of such facilities and to perform a number of work tasks. Our program is designed to produce a mobile worksystem with capabilities and features that are matched to the particular needs of D&D work by evolving the design through a series of technological developments, performance tests and evaluations. The project has three phases. In this the first phase, an existing teleoperated worksystem, the Remote Work Vehicle (developed for use in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building basement), was enhanced for telerobotic performance of several D&D operations. Its ability to perform these operations was then assessed through a series of tests in a mockup facility that contained generic structures and equipment similar to those that D&D work machines will encounter in DOE facilities. Building upon the knowledge gained through those tests and evaluations, a next generation mobile worksystem, the RWV II, and a more advanced controller will be designed, integrated and tested in the second phase, which is scheduled for completion in January 1995. The third phase of the project will involve testing of the RWV II in the real DOE facility.

  17. Mobile learning in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkan Güllüoüǧlu, Sabri

    2013-03-01

    This paper outlines the main infrastructure for implicating mobile learning in medicine and present a sample mobile learning application for medical learning within the framework of mobile learning systems. Mobile technology is developing nowadays. In this case it will be useful to develop different learning environments using these innovations in internet based distance education. M-learning makes the most of being on location, providing immediate access, being connected, and acknowledges learning that occurs beyond formal learning settings, in places such as the workplace, home, and outdoors. Central to m-learning is the principle that it is the learner who is mobile rather than the device used to deliver m learning. The integration of mobile technologies into training has made learning more accessible and portable. Mobile technologies make it possible for a learner to have access to a computer and subsequently learning material and activities; at any time and in any place. Mobile devices can include: mobile phone, personal digital assistants (PDAs), personal digital media players (eg iPods, MP3 players), portable digital media players, portable digital multimedia players. Mobile learning (m-learning) is particularly important in medical education, and the major users of mobile devices are in the field of medicine. The contexts and environment in which learning occurs necessitates m-learning. Medical students are placed in hospital/clinical settings very early in training and require access to course information and to record and reflect on their experiences while on the move. As a result of this paper, this paper strives to compare and contrast mobile learning with normal learning in medicine from various perspectives and give insights and advises into the essential characteristics of both for sustaining medical education.

  18. Mobile computing for radiology.

    PubMed

    Auffermann, William F; Chetlen, Alison L; Sharma, Arjun; Colucci, Andrew T; DeQuesada, Ivan M; Grajo, Joseph R; Kung, Justin W; Loehfelm, Thomas W; Sherry, Steven J

    2013-12-01

    The rapid advances in mobile computing technology have the potential to change the way radiology and medicine as a whole are practiced. Several mobile computing advances have not yet found application to the practice of radiology, while others have already been applied to radiology but are not in widespread clinical use. This review addresses several areas where radiology and medicine in general may benefit from adoption of the latest mobile computing technologies and speculates on potential future applications. PMID:24200475

  19. Exploring the mobility of mobile phone users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csáji, Balázs Cs.; Browet, Arnaud; Traag, V. A.; Delvenne, Jean-Charles; Huens, Etienne; Van Dooren, Paul; Smoreda, Zbigniew; Blondel, Vincent D.

    2013-03-01

    Mobile phone datasets allow for the analysis of human behavior on an unprecedented scale. The social network, temporal dynamics and mobile behavior of mobile phone users have often been analyzed independently from each other using mobile phone datasets. In this article, we explore the connections between various features of human behavior extracted from a large mobile phone dataset. Our observations are based on the analysis of communication data of 100,000 anonymized and randomly chosen individuals in a dataset of communications in Portugal. We show that clustering and principal component analysis allow for a significant dimension reduction with limited loss of information. The most important features are related to geographical location. In particular, we observe that most people spend most of their time at only a few locations. With the help of clustering methods, we then robustly identify home and office locations and compare the results with official census data. Finally, we analyze the geographic spread of users’ frequent locations and show that commuting distances can be reasonably well explained by a gravity model.

  20. Doctors going mobile.

    PubMed

    Romano, Ron; Baum, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Having a Web page and a blog site are the minimum requirements for an Internet presence in the new millennium. However, a Web page that loads on a personal computer or a laptop will be ineffective on a mobile or cellular phone. Today, with more existing and potential patients having access to cellular technology, it is necessary to reconfigure the appearance of your Web site that appears on a mobile phone. This article discusses mobile computing and suggestions for improving the appearance of your Web site on a mobile or cellular phone. PMID:25807610

  1. Enhanced calculation of optimal gradient programs in reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vivó-Truyols, G; Torres-Lapasió, J R; García-Alvarez-Coque, M C

    2003-11-14

    The resolution of a mixture of 16 beta-blockers under gradient elution was optimised using both isocratic and gradient training sets, with a reversed-phase column and acetonitrile-water eluents. Error theory was applied to measure the information extracted from different gradient experimental designs. This allows checking the expected accuracy when gradient predictions exceed the initial solvent concentrations tested in the training set. This work applies the results on modelling found in a previous study [J. Chromatogr. A 1018 (2003) 169] where the performance of several retention models was compared. Enhanced retention predictions were applied to the optimisation of gradient programs involving three factors (gradient slope, initial solvent composition and gradient curvature), using the peak purity criterion as resolution assessment. Peak shape parameters required in peak purity evaluation were modelled by adapting previous developments in isocratic mode. The mixture, which required prohibitive analysis times under isocratic elution, was almost baseline resolved in less than 35 min with linear gradients. Curvilinear gradients did not enhance this result significantly. PMID:14620569

  2. Molecularly imprinted polymer solid-phase extraction for detection of zearalenone in cereal sample extracts.

    PubMed

    Lucci, Paolo; Derrien, Delphine; Alix, Florent; Pérollier, Céline; Bayoudh, Sami

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a method for the clean-up and preconcentration of zearalenone from corn and wheat samples employing molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) as selective sorbent for solid-phase extraction (SPE). Cereal samples were extracted with acetonitrile/water (75:25, v/v) and the extract was diluted with water and applied to an AFFINIMIP ZON MIP-SPE column. The column was then washed to eliminate the interferences and zearalenone was eluted with methanol and quantified using HPLC with fluorescence detection (lambda(exc)=275/lambda(em)=450 nm). The precision and accuracy of the method were satisfactory for both cereals at the different fortification levels tested and it gave recoveries between 82 and 87% (RSDr 2.5-6.2%, n=3) and 86 and 90% (RSDr 0.9-6.8%, n=3) for wheat and maize, respectively. MIP-SPE column capacity was determined to be not less than 6.6 microg of zearalenone and to be at least four times higher than that of immunoaffinity column (IAC). The application of AFFINIMIP ZON molecularly imprinted polymer as a selective sorbent material for detection of zearalenone fulfilled the method performance criteria required by the Commission Regulation (EC) No. 401/2006, demonstrating the suitability of the technique for the control of zearalenone in cereal samples. PMID:20579483

  3. Mobility and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Theresa Z.

    A study examined the effect of geographic mobility on elementary school students' achievement. Although such mobility, which requires students to make multiple moves among schools, can have a negative impact on academic achievement, the hypothesis for the study was that it was not a determining factor in reading achievement test scores. Subjects…

  4. Mobile Marine Museum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, R. D.; Schaadt, M. S.

    1984-01-01

    Calfiornia State University (Long Beach) purchased a motor home and converted it into a mobile marine science display unit, outfitting it with built-in display racks inside and an awning to provide shelter displays suited to outdoor use. School activities and programs using the mobile museum are described. (JN)

  5. Mobile Apps for Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, June L.

    2013-01-01

    In an increasing mobile environment, library and reading-related activities often take place on a phone or tablet device. Not only does this mean that library Web sites must keep mobile navigability in mind, but also develop and utilize apps that allow patrons to interact with information and with libraries. While apps do not serve every purpose,…

  6. Mastering Mobile Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panettieri, Joseph C.

    2007-01-01

    Without proper security, mobile devices are easy targets for worms, viruses, and so-called robot ("bot") networks. Hackers increasingly use bot networks to launch massive attacks against eCommerce websites--potentially targeting one's online tuition payment or fundraising/financial development systems. How can one defend his mobile systems against…

  7. ACTS Mobile Terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Agan, Martin J.; Jedrey, Thomas C.

    1997-01-01

    The development of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Mobile Terminal (AMT) and its follow-on, the Broadband Aeronautical Terminal (BAT), have provided an excellent testbed for the evaluation of K- and Ka-band mobile satellite communications systems. An overview of both of these terminals is presented in this paper.

  8. Mobile Goes Mainstream

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisele-Dyrli, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Mobile learning--the use of mobile devices for educational purposes by students--is rapidly moving from an experimental initiative by a few innovative districts over the last five years to a broadly accepted concept in K12. The latest research and surveys, results of pilot programs, and analysis of trends in both public education and the broader…

  9. Mobile Learning Anytime, Anywhere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hlodan, Oksana

    2010-01-01

    Some educational institutions are taking the leap to mobile learning (m-learning) by giving out free iPods. For example, Abilene Christian University gave iPods or iPhones to freshman students and developed 15 Web applications specifically for the mobile devices. The iPod is not the only ubiquitous m-learning device. Any technology that connects…

  10. Mobility control agent

    SciTech Connect

    Argabright, P.A.; Phillips, B.L.; Rhudy, J.S.

    1983-05-17

    Polymer mobility control agents useful in supplemental oil recovery processes, which give improved reciprocal relative mobilities, are prepared by initiating the polymerization of a monomer containing a vinyl group with a catalyst comprising a persulfate and ferrous ammonium sulfate. The vinyl monomer is an acrylyl, a vinyl cyanide, a styryl and water soluble salts thereof.

  11. Extravehicular mobility unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, M. A.; Rouen, M. N.; Lutz, C. C.; Mcbarron, J. W., II

    1975-01-01

    The Apollo extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) consisted of a highly mobile, anthropomorphic pressure vessel and a portable life support system. The EMU used for the first lunar landing is described along with the changes made in the EMU design during the program to incorporate the results of experience and to provide new capabilities. The performance of the EMU is discussed.

  12. Skylab mobile laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primeaux, G. R.; Larue, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    The Skylab mobile laboratory was designed to provide the capability to obtain necessary data on the Skylab crewmen 30 days before lift-off, within 1 hour after recovery, and until preflight physiological baselines were reattained. The mobile laboratory complex consisted of six laboratories that supported cardiovascular, metabolic, nutrition and endocrinology, operational medicine, blood, and microbiology experiments; a utility package; and two shipping containers. The objectives and equipment requirements of the Skylab mobile laboratory and the data acquisition systems are discussed along with processes such as permanently mounting equipment in the individual laboratories and methods of testing and transporting the units. The operational performance, in terms of amounts of data collected, and the concept of mobile laboratories for medical and scientific experiments are evaluated. The Skylab mobile laboratory succeeded in facilitating the data collection and sample preservation associated with the three Skylab manned flights.

  13. Mobility Modification Alleviates Environmental Influence on Incident Mobility Difficulty among Community-Dwelling Older People: A Two-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Portegijs, Erja; Viljanen, Anne; Iwarsson, Susanne; Rantanen, Taina

    2016-01-01

    Background Environmental barriers increase risk for mobility difficulties in old age. Mobility difficulty is preceded by a phase where people try to postpone a difficulty through mobility modification. We studied whether perceived environmental mobility barriers outdoors correlate with mobility modification and mobility difficulty, predict development of mobility difficulty over a two-year follow-up, and whether mobility modification alleviates the risk for difficulty. Methods At baseline, 848 people aged 75–90 were interviewed face-to-face. Telephone follow-up interviews were conducted one (n = 816) and two years (n = 761) later. Environmental barriers to mobility were self-reported using a15-item structured questionnaire at baseline, summed and divided into tertiles (0, 1 and 2 or more barriers). Mobility difficulty was assessed as self-reported ability to walk 2 km at all assessment points and categorized into ‘no difficulty’, ‘no difficulty but mobility modifications’ (reducing frequency, stopping walking, using an aid, slowing down or resting during the performance) and ‘difficulty’. Results At baseline, 212 participants reported mobility modifications and 356 mobility difficulties. Those reporting one or multiple environmental barriers had twice the odds for mobility modifications and up to five times the odds for mobility difficulty compared to those reporting no environmental barriers. After multiple adjustments for health and functioning, reporting multiple environmental barriers outdoors continued to predict the development of incident mobility difficulty over the two-year follow-up. Mobility modifications attenuated the association. Conclusion For older people who successfully modify their performance, environmental influence on incident mobility difficulty can be diminished. Older people use mobility modification to alleviate environmental press on mobility. PMID:27104750

  14. Gone Mobile? (Mobile Libraries Survey 2010)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2010-01-01

    Librarians, like patrons and researchers, are caught between traditional library service models and the promise of evolving information technologies. In recent years, professional conferences have strategically featured programs and presentations geared toward building a mobile agenda and adapting or adopting services to meet new demands of mobile…

  15. Face identification with frequency domain matched filtering in mobile environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Su; Woo, Yong-Hyun; Yeom, Seokwon; Kim, Shin-Hwan

    2012-06-01

    Face identification at a distance is very challenging since captured images are often degraded by blur and noise. Furthermore, the computational resources and memory are often limited in the mobile environments. Thus, it is very challenging to develop a real-time face identification system on the mobile device. This paper discusses face identification based on frequency domain matched filtering in the mobile environments. Face identification is performed by the linear or phase-only matched filter and sequential verification stages. The candidate window regions are decided by the major peaks of the linear or phase-only matched filtering outputs. The sequential stages comprise a skin-color test and an edge mask filtering test, which verify color and shape information of the candidate regions in order to remove false alarms. All algorithms are built on the mobile device using Android platform. The preliminary results show that face identification of East Asian people can be performed successfully in the mobile environments.

  16. 33 CFR 165.835 - Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... definition covers passenger vessels that must comply with 33 CFR parts 120 and 128. (b) Location. The..., Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. 165.835 Section 165.835 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.835 Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. (a) Definition. As used...

  17. 33 CFR 165.835 - Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... definition covers passenger vessels that must comply with 33 CFR parts 120 and 128. (b) Location. The..., Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. 165.835 Section 165.835 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.835 Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. (a) Definition. As used...

  18. 33 CFR 165.835 - Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... definition covers passenger vessels that must comply with 33 CFR parts 120 and 128. (b) Location. The..., Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. 165.835 Section 165.835 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.835 Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. (a) Definition. As used...

  19. DMSK Receiver For Mobile/Satellite Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz; Simon, Marvin K.; Sumida, Joe T.

    1989-01-01

    Receiver for 2.4-kbit/s differential minimum-shift keying (DMSK) and Gaussian minimum-shift keying(GMSK) suitable for communication between land-mobile stations via geostationary satellites. Operating on phase-shifted signal in 800-MHz band, in presence of fading and Doppler frequency shifts, receiver compact, makes efficient use of frequency spectrum, and wastes little power. Receiver design implemented in very-large-scale-integrated circuits. Basic DMSK receiver design relies on baseband rather than intermediate-frequency processing of in-phase and quadrature signal components because phase errors due to differential delays smaller at baseband.

  20. Characterization of a new mobility separation tool: HRIMS as differential mobility analyzer.

    PubMed

    Bouza, Marcos; López-Vidal, Silvia; Pisonero, Jorge; Bordel, Nerea; Pereiro, Rosario; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2014-12-01

    High resolution ion mobility spectrometer (HRIMS) is a new instrument that uses parallel plate Differential Mobility Analysis as principle of separation. Gas phase analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been performed for the characterization of this new mobility system using an UV-lamp for ionization. Studies of the effect of temperature and the presence of a desiccant are detailed. Identification of the different peaks obtained with an electrometer was successfully carried out for a group of alcohols, aromatic compounds and ketones (ethanol, 1-propanol, isopropanol, 1-butanol, 1-pentanol, 1-heptanol, acetone, 2-butanone, 2-pentanone, 2-octanone, benzene, toluene, xylene and bromobenzene) following a modified Millikan equation. Moreover, the investigation of the discrimination capabilities within the different VOCs families as well as the mobility dependence with molecular mass was successfully achieved. PMID:25159427

  1. Limits of social mobilization.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Alex; Cebrian, Manuel; Dsouza, Sohan; Moro, Esteban; Pentland, Alex; Rahwan, Iyad

    2013-04-16

    The Internet and social media have enabled the mobilization of large crowds to achieve time-critical feats, ranging from mapping crises in real time, to organizing mass rallies, to conducting search-and-rescue operations over large geographies. Despite significant success, selection bias may lead to inflated expectations of the efficacy of social mobilization for these tasks. What are the limits of social mobilization, and how reliable is it in operating at these limits? We build on recent results on the spatiotemporal structure of social and information networks to elucidate the constraints they pose on social mobilization. We use the DARPA Network Challenge as our working scenario, in which social media were used to locate 10 balloons across the United States. We conduct high-resolution simulations for referral-based crowdsourcing and obtain a statistical characterization of the population recruited, geography covered, and time to completion. Our results demonstrate that the outcome is plausible without the presence of mass media but lies at the limit of what time-critical social mobilization can achieve. Success relies critically on highly connected individuals willing to mobilize people in distant locations, overcoming the local trapping of diffusion in highly dense areas. However, even under these highly favorable conditions, the risk of unsuccessful search remains significant. These findings have implications for the design of better incentive schemes for social mobilization. They also call for caution in estimating the reliability of this capability. PMID:23576719

  2. Mobile Lunar Base Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Marc M.

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes three innovative concepts for a mobile lunar base. These concept combine design research for habitat architecture, mobility systems, habitability, radiation protection, human factors, and living and working environments on the lunar surface. The mobile lunar base presents several key advantages over conventional static base notions. These advantages concern landing zone safety, the requirement to move modules over the lunar surface, and the ability to stage mobile reconnaissance with effective systemic redundancy. All of these concerns lead to the consideration of a mobile walking habitat module and base design. The key issues involve landing zone safety, the ability to transport habitat modules across the surface, and providing reliability and redundancy to exploration traverses in pressurized vehicles. With self-ambulating lunar base modules, it will be feasible to have each module separate itself from its retro-rocket thruster unit, and walk five to ten km away from the LZ to a pre-selected site. These mobile modules can operate in an autonomous or teleoperated mode to navigate the lunar surface. At the site of the base, the mobile modules can combine together; make pressure port connections among themselves, to create a multi-module pressurized lunar base.

  3. Mobile sensing systems.

    PubMed

    Macias, Elsa; Suarez, Alvaro; Lloret, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Rich-sensor smart phones have made possible the recent birth of the mobile sensing research area as part of ubiquitous sensing which integrates other areas such as wireless sensor networks and web sensing. There are several types of mobile sensing: individual, participatory, opportunistic, crowd, social, etc. The object of sensing can be people-centered or environment-centered. The sensing domain can be home, urban, vehicular… Currently there are barriers that limit the social acceptance of mobile sensing systems. Examples of social barriers are privacy concerns, restrictive laws in some countries and the absence of economic incentives that might encourage people to participate in a sensing campaign. Several technical barriers are phone energy savings and the variety of sensors and software for their management. Some existing surveys partially tackle the topic of mobile sensing systems. Published papers theoretically or partially solve the above barriers. We complete the above surveys with new works, review the barriers of mobile sensing systems and propose some ideas for efficiently implementing sensing, fusion, learning, security, privacy and energy saving for any type of mobile sensing system, and propose several realistic research challenges. The main objective is to reduce the learning curve in mobile sensing systems where the complexity is very high. PMID:24351637

  4. Mobile Sensing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Elsa; Suarez, Alvaro; Lloret, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Rich-sensor smart phones have made possible the recent birth of the mobile sensing research area as part of ubiquitous sensing which integrates other areas such as wireless sensor networks and web sensing. There are several types of mobile sensing: individual, participatory, opportunistic, crowd, social, etc. The object of sensing can be people-centered or environment-centered. The sensing domain can be home, urban, vehicular… Currently there are barriers that limit the social acceptance of mobile sensing systems. Examples of social barriers are privacy concerns, restrictive laws in some countries and the absence of economic incentives that might encourage people to participate in a sensing campaign. Several technical barriers are phone energy savings and the variety of sensors and software for their management. Some existing surveys partially tackle the topic of mobile sensing systems. Published papers theoretically or partially solve the above barriers. We complete the above surveys with new works, review the barriers of mobile sensing systems and propose some ideas for efficiently implementing sensing, fusion, learning, security, privacy and energy saving for any type of mobile sensing system, and propose several realistic research challenges. The main objective is to reduce the learning curve in mobile sensing systems where the complexity is very high. PMID:24351637

  5. Limits of social mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Alex; Cebrian, Manuel; Dsouza, Sohan; Moro, Esteban; Pentland, Alex; Rahwan, Iyad

    2013-01-01

    The Internet and social media have enabled the mobilization of large crowds to achieve time-critical feats, ranging from mapping crises in real time, to organizing mass rallies, to conducting search-and-rescue operations over large geographies. Despite significant success, selection bias may lead to inflated expectations of the efficacy of social mobilization for these tasks. What are the limits of social mobilization, and how reliable is it in operating at these limits? We build on recent results on the spatiotemporal structure of social and information networks to elucidate the constraints they pose on social mobilization. We use the DARPA Network Challenge as our working scenario, in which social media were used to locate 10 balloons across the United States. We conduct high-resolution simulations for referral-based crowdsourcing and obtain a statistical characterization of the population recruited, geography covered, and time to completion. Our results demonstrate that the outcome is plausible without the presence of mass media but lies at the limit of what time-critical social mobilization can achieve. Success relies critically on highly connected individuals willing to mobilize people in distant locations, overcoming the local trapping of diffusion in highly dense areas. However, even under these highly favorable conditions, the risk of unsuccessful search remains significant. These findings have implications for the design of better incentive schemes for social mobilization. They also call for caution in estimating the reliability of this capability. PMID:23576719

  6. A Lattice-Strained Organic Single-Crystal Nanowire Array Fabricated via Solution-Phase Nanograting-Assisted Pattern Transfer for Use in High-Mobility Organic Field-Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyunghun; Rho, Yecheol; Kim, Yebyeol; Kim, Se Hyun; Hahm, Suk Gyu; Park, Chan Eon

    2016-04-01

    A 50 nm-wide 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene nanowire (NW) array is fabricated on a centimeter-sized substrate via a facile nanograting-assisted pattern-transfer method. NW growth under a nanoconfined space adopts a lattice-strained packing motif of the NWs for strong intermolecular electronic coupling, and thus a NW-based organic field-effect transistor shows high field-effect mobility up to 9.71 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) . PMID:26915597

  7. Nanowires: A Lattice-Strained Organic Single-Crystal Nanowire Array Fabricated via Solution-Phase Nanograting-Assisted Pattern Transfer for Use in High-Mobility Organic Field-Effect Transistors (Adv. Mater. 16/2016).

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyunghun; Rho, Yecheol; Kim, Yebyeol; Kim, Se Hyun; Hahm, Suk Gyu; Park, Chan Eon

    2016-04-01

    S. H. Kim, S. G. Hahm, C. E. Park, and co-workers fabricate a 50 nm-wide organic single-crystalline nanowire array on a centimeter-sized substrate via a facile roll-to-plate process, as described on page 3209. Nanowire growth in a nano-confined space adopts a lattice-strained and single-crystalline packing motif, which can be harnessed for strong intermolecular electronic coupling. Thus, nanowire-based field-effect transistors show extremely high field-effect mobilities up to 9.71 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) . PMID:27105809

  8. Understanding Mobile Apps

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Old Computers Disposing of Your Mobile Device Laptop Security Malware P2P File-Sharing Risks Phishing Securing ... to Help You Shop in Stores Hacked Email Laptop Security Bookmark Shopping Online with Virtual Currencies infographic ...

  9. Understanding Mobile Apps

    MedlinePlus

    ... a device, you’re committed to using the operating system and the type of apps that go with it. The Android, Apple, Microsoft and BlackBerry mobile operating systems have app stores online where you can look ...

  10. AUSSAT mobile satellite services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowland, Wayne L.; Wagg, Michael; Simpson, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    An overview of AUSSAT's planned mobile satellite system is given. The development program which is being undertaken to achieve the 1992 service date is described. Both business and technical aspects of the development program are addressed.

  11. Persuasive Mobile Health Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Wylie, Carlos; Coulton, Paul

    With many industrialized societies bearing the cost of an increasingly sedentary lifestyle on the health of their populations there is a need to find new ways of encouraging physical activity to promote better health and well being. With the increasing power of mobile phones and the recent emergence of personal heart rate monitors, aimed at dedicated amateur runners, there is now a possibility to develop “Persuasive Mobile Health Applications” to promote well being through the use of real-time physiological data and persuade users to adopt a healthier lifestyle. In this paper we present a novel general health monitoring software for mobile phones called Heart Angel. This software is aimed at helping users monitor, record, as well as improve their fitness level through built-in cardio-respiratory tests, a location tracking application for analyzing heart rate exertion over time and location, and a fun mobile-exergame called Health Defender.

  12. REST based mobile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambow, Mark; Preuss, Thomas; Berdux, Jörg; Conrad, Marc

    2008-02-01

    Simplicity is the major advantage of REST based webservices. Whereas SOAP is widespread in complex, security sensitive business-to-business aplications, REST is widely used for mashups and end-user centric applicatons. In that context we give an overview of REST and compare it to SOAP. Furthermore we apply the GeoDrawing application as an example for REST based mobile applications and emphasize on pros and cons for the use of REST in mobile application scenarios.

  13. Mobile multiple access study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Multiple access techniques (FDMA, CDMA, TDMA) for the mobile user and attempts to identify the current best technique are discussed. Traffic loading is considered as well as voice and data modulation and spacecraft and system design. Emphasis is placed on developing mobile terminal cost estimates for the selected design. In addition, design examples are presented for the alternative techniques of multiple access in order to compare with the selected technique.

  14. Mobile Uninterruptible Power Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mears, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed mobile unit provides 20 kVA of uninterruptible power. Used with mobile secondary power-distribution centers to provide power to test equipment with minimal cabling, hazards, and obstacles. Wheeled close to test equipment and system being tested so only short cable connections needed. Quickly moved and set up in new location. Uninterruptible power supply intended for tests which data lost or equipment damaged during even transient power failure.

  15. Mobile antenna development at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.; Jamnejad, V.; Densmore, A.; Tulintseff, A.; Thomas, R.; Woo, K.

    1993-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), under the sponsorship of NASA, has pioneered the development of land vehicle antennas for commercial mobile satellite communications. Several novel antennas have been developed at L-band frequencies for the Mobile Satellite (MSAT) program initiated about a decade ago. Currently, two types of antennas are being developed at K- and Ka-band frequencies for the ACTS (Advanced Communications Technology Satellite) Mobile Terminal (AMT) project. For the future, several hand-held antenna concepts are proposed for the small terminals of the Ka-band Personal Access Satellite System (PASS). For the L-band MSAT program, a number of omni-directional low-gain antennas, such as the crossed drooping-dipoles, the higher-order-mode circular microstrip patch, the quadrifilar helix, and the wrapped-around microstrip 'mast' array, have been developed for lower data rate communications. Several medium-gain satellite tracking antennas, such as the electronically scanned low-profile phased array, the mechanically steered tilted microstrip array, the mechanically steered low-profile microstrip Yagi array, and the hybrid electronically/mechanically steered low-profile array, have been developed for the MSAT's higher data rate and voice communications. To date, for the L-band vehicle application, JPL has developed the world's lowest-profile phased array (1.8 cm height), as well as the lowest-profile mechanically steered antenna (3.7 cm height). For the 20/30 GHz AMT project, a small mechanically steered elliptical reflector antenna with a gain of 23 dBi has recently been developed to transmit horizontal polarization at 30 GHz and receive vertical polarization at 20 GHz. Its hemispherical radome has a height of 10 cm and a base diameter of 23 cm. In addition to the reflector, a mechanically steered printed MMIC active array is currently being developed to achieve the same electrical requirements with a low profile capability. These AMT antenna developments

  16. Power and spectrally efficient M-ARY QAM schemes for future mobile satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sreenath, K.; Feher, K.

    1990-01-01

    An effective method to compensate nonlinear phase distortion caused by the mobile amplifier is proposed. As a first step towards the future use of spectrally efficient modulation schemes for mobile satellite applications, we have investigated effects of nonlinearities and the phase compensation method on 16-QAM. The new method provides about 2 dB savings in power for 16-QAM operation with cost effective amplifiers near saturation and thereby promising use of spectrally efficient linear modulation schemes for future mobile satellite applications.

  17. Mobility. Snapshot Report, Fall 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents information on student mobility for 2011. It offers data on the following: (1) Mobility Rates by Student Enrollment Status; (2) Mobile Student Enrollment at 2-/4-Year Institutions; and (3) Mobile Student Enrollment at Public/Private Institutions.

  18. Libraries and the Mobile Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Cody

    2011-01-01

    In 2011, cell phones and mobile devices are ubiquitous. The vast majority of Americans now own cell phones, and over half of them have mobile access to the Internet through a phone or other mobile device. For libraries to stay relevant, they must be able to offer content and services through the mobile web. In this issue of "Library Technology…

  19. Solid colloids with surface-mobile linkers.

    PubMed

    van der Meulen, Stef A J; Helms, Gesa; Dogterom, Marileen

    2015-06-17

    In this report we review the possibilities of using colloids with surface mobile linkers for the study of colloidal self-assembly processes. A promising route to create systems with mobile linkers is the use of lipid (bi-)layers. These lipid layers can be either used in the form of vesicles or as coatings for hard colloids and emulsion droplets. Inside the lipid bilayers molecules can be inserted via membrane anchors. Due to the fluidity of the lipid bilayer, the anchored molecules remain mobile. The use of different lipid mixtures even allows creating Janus-like particles that exhibit directional bonding if linkers are used which have a preference for a certain lipid phase. In nature mobile linkers can be found e.g. as receptors in cells. Therefore, towards the end of the review, we also briefly address the possibility of using colloids with surface mobile linkers as model systems to mimic cell-cell interactions and cell adhesion processes. PMID:25993272

  20. Fundamentals of Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelmann, Karsten; Silveira, Joshua A.; Ridgeway, Mark E.; Park, Melvin A.

    2015-01-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a relatively new gas-phase separation method that has been coupled to quadrupole orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The TIMS analyzer is a segmented rf ion guide wherein ions are mobility-analyzed using an electric field that holds ions stationary against a moving gas, unlike conventional drift tube ion mobility spectrometry where the gas is stationary. Ions are initially trapped, and subsequently eluted from the TIMS analyzer over time according to their mobility ( K). Though TIMS has achieved a high level of performance ( R > 250) in a small device (<5 cm) using modest operating potentials (<300 V), a proper theory has yet to be produced. Here, we develop a quantitative theory for TIMS via mathematical derivation and simulations. A one-dimensional analytical model, used to predict the transit time and theoretical resolving power, is described. Theoretical trends are in agreement with experimental measurements performed as a function of K, pressure, and the axial electric field scan rate. The linear dependence of the transit time with 1/ K provides a fundamental basis for determination of reduced mobility or collision cross section values by calibration. The quantitative description of TIMS provides an operational understanding of the analyzer, outlines the current performance capabilities, and provides insight into future avenues for improvement.

  1. Mobile medical image retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Samuel; Depeursinge, Adrien; Eggel, Ivan; Müller, Henning

    2011-03-01

    Images are an integral part of medical practice for diagnosis, treatment planning and teaching. Image retrieval has gained in importance mainly as a research domain over the past 20 years. Both textual and visual retrieval of images are essential. In the process of mobile devices becoming reliable and having a functionality equaling that of formerly desktop clients, mobile computing has gained ground and many applications have been explored. This creates a new field of mobile information search & access and in this context images can play an important role as they often allow understanding complex scenarios much quicker and easier than free text. Mobile information retrieval in general has skyrocketed over the past year with many new applications and tools being developed and all sorts of interfaces being adapted to mobile clients. This article describes constraints of an information retrieval system including visual and textual information retrieval from the medical literature of BioMedCentral and of the RSNA journals Radiology and Radiographics. Solutions for mobile data access with an example on an iPhone in a web-based environment are presented as iPhones are frequently used and the operating system is bound to become the most frequent smartphone operating system in 2011. A web-based scenario was chosen to allow for a use by other smart phone platforms such as Android as well. Constraints of small screens and navigation with touch screens are taken into account in the development of the application. A hybrid choice had to be taken to allow for taking pictures with the cell phone camera and upload them for visual similarity search as most producers of smart phones block this functionality to web applications. Mobile information access and in particular access to images can be surprisingly efficient and effective on smaller screens. Images can be read on screen much faster and relevance of documents can be identified quickly through the use of images contained in

  2. The American mobile satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, William B.

    1990-01-01

    During 1989, the American Mobile Satellite Corporation (AMSC) was authorized to construct, launch, and operate satellites to provide mobile satellite services (MSS) to the U.S. and Puerto Rico. The AMSC has undertaken three major development programs to bring a full range of MSS services to the U.S. The first program is the space segment program that will result in the construction and launch of the satellites as well as the construction and installation of the supporting ground telemetry and command system. The second segment will result in the specification, design, development, construction, and installation of the Network Control System necessary for managing communications access to the satellites, and the specification and development of ground equipment for standard circuit switched and packet switched communications services. The third program is the Phase 1 program to provide low speed data services within the U.S. prior to availability of the AMSC satellites and ground segment. Described here are the present status and plans for these three programs as well as an update on related business arrangements and regulatory matters.

  3. Mobile Variable Depth Sampling System Design Study

    SciTech Connect

    BOGER, R.M.

    2000-08-25

    A design study is presented for a mobile, variable depth sampling system (MVDSS) that will support the treatment and immobilization of Hanford LAW and HLW. The sampler can be deployed in a 4-inch tank riser and has a design that is based on requirements identified in the Level 2 Specification (latest revision). The waste feed sequence for the MVDSS is based on Phase 1, Case 3S6 waste feed sequence. Technical information is also presented that supports the design study.

  4. Efficient Mobility Management Signalling in Network Mobility Supported PMIPV6.

    PubMed

    Samuelraj, Ananthi Jebaseeli; Jayapal, Sundararajan

    2015-01-01

    Proxy Mobile IPV6 (PMIPV6) is a network based mobility management protocol which supports node's mobility without the contribution from the respective mobile node. PMIPV6 is initially designed to support individual node mobility and it should be enhanced to support mobile network movement. NEMO-BSP is an existing protocol to support network mobility (NEMO) in PMIPV6 network. Due to the underlying differences in basic protocols, NEMO-BSP cannot be directly applied to PMIPV6 network. Mobility management signaling and data structures used for individual node's mobility should be modified to support group nodes' mobility management efficiently. Though a lot of research work is in progress to implement mobile network movement in PMIPV6, it is not yet standardized and each suffers with different shortcomings. This research work proposes modifications in NEMO-BSP and PMIPV6 to achieve NEMO support in PMIPV6. It mainly concentrates on optimizing the number and size of mobility signaling exchanged while mobile network or mobile network node changes its access point. PMID:26366431

  5. Efficient Mobility Management Signalling in Network Mobility Supported PMIPV6

    PubMed Central

    Jebaseeli Samuelraj, Ananthi; Jayapal, Sundararajan

    2015-01-01

    Proxy Mobile IPV6 (PMIPV6) is a network based mobility management protocol which supports node's mobility without the contribution from the respective mobile node. PMIPV6 is initially designed to support individual node mobility and it should be enhanced to support mobile network movement. NEMO-BSP is an existing protocol to support network mobility (NEMO) in PMIPV6 network. Due to the underlying differences in basic protocols, NEMO-BSP cannot be directly applied to PMIPV6 network. Mobility management signaling and data structures used for individual node's mobility should be modified to support group nodes' mobility management efficiently. Though a lot of research work is in progress to implement mobile network movement in PMIPV6, it is not yet standardized and each suffers with different shortcomings. This research work proposes modifications in NEMO-BSP and PMIPV6 to achieve NEMO support in PMIPV6. It mainly concentrates on optimizing the number and size of mobility signaling exchanged while mobile network or mobile network node changes its access point. PMID:26366431

  6. Mobile propeller dynamometer validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Mason Wade

    With growing interest in UAVs and OSU's interest in propeller performance and manufacturing, evaluating UAV propeller and propulsion system performance has become essential. In attempts to evaluate these propellers a mobile propeller dynamometer has been designed, built, and tested. The mobile dyno has been designed to be cost effective through the ability to load it into the back of a test vehicle to create simulated forward flight characteristics. This allows much larger propellers to be dynamically tested without the use of large and expensive wind tunnels. While evaluating the accuracy of the dyno, several improvements had to be made to get accurate results. The decisions made to design and improve the mobile propeller dyno will be discussed along with attempts to validate the dyno by comparing its results against known sources. Another large part of assuring the accuracy of the mobile dyno is determining if the test vehicle will influence the flow going into the propellers being tested. The flow into the propeller needs to be as smooth and uniform as possible. This is determined by characterizing the boundary layer and accelerated flow over the vehicle. This evaluation was accomplished with extensive vehicle aerodynamic measurements with the use of full-scale tests using a pitot-rake and the actual test vehicle. Additional tests were conducted in Oklahoma State University's low speed wind tunnel with a 1/8-scale model using qualitative flow visualization with smoke. Continuing research on the mobile dyno will be discussed, along with other potential uses for the dyno.

  7. Autonomous mobile communication relays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoa G.; Everett, Hobart R.; Manouk, Narek; Verma, Ambrish

    2002-07-01

    Maintaining a solid radio communication link between a mobile robot entering a building and an external base station is a well-recognized problem. Modern digital radios, while affording high bandwidth and Internet-protocol-based automatic routing capabilities, tend to operate on line-of-sight links. The communication link degrades quickly as a robot penetrates deeper into the interior of a building. This project investigates the use of mobile autonomous communication relay nodes to extend the effective range of a mobile robot exploring a complex interior environment. Each relay node is a small mobile slave robot equipped with sonar, ladar, and 802.11b radio repeater. For demonstration purposes, four Pioneer 2-DX robots are used as autonomous mobile relays, with SSC-San Diego's ROBART III acting as the lead robot. The relay robots follow the lead robot into a building and are automatically deployed at various locations to maintain a networked communication link back to the remote operator. With their on-board external sensors, they also act as rearguards to secure areas already explored by the lead robot. As the lead robot advances and RF shortcuts are detected, relay nodes that become unnecessary will be reclaimed and reused, all transparent to the operator. This project takes advantage of recent research results from several DARPA-funded tasks at various institutions in the areas of robotic simulation, ad hoc wireless networking, route planning, and navigation. This paper describes the progress of the first six months of the project.

  8. Mobile systems capability plan

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This plan was prepared to initiate contracting for and deployment of these mobile system services. 102,000 cubic meters of retrievable, contact-handled TRU waste are stored at many sites around the country. Also, an estimated 38,000 cubic meters of TRU waste will be generated in the course of waste inventory workoff and continuing DOE operations. All the defense TRU waste is destined for disposal in WIPP near Carlsbad NM. To ship TRU waste there, sites must first certify that the waste meets WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The waste must be characterized, and if not acceptable, subjected to additional processing, including repackaging. Most sites plan to use existing fixed facilities or open new ones between FY1997-2006 to perform these functions; small-quantity sites lack this capability. An alternative to fixed facilities is the use of mobile systems mounted in trailers or skids, and transported to sites. Mobile systems will be used for all characterization and certification at small sites; large sites can also use them. The Carlsbad Area Office plans to pursue a strategy of privatization of mobile system services, since this offers a number of advantages. To indicate the possible magnitude of the costs of deploying mobile systems, preliminary estimates of equipment, maintenance, and operating costs over a 10-year period were prepared and options for purchase, lease, and privatization through fixed-price contracts considered.

  9. Enhancement of electron mobility in asymmetric coupled quantum well structures

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Nayak, R. K.; Sahu, T. Panda, A. K.

    2014-02-21

    We study the low temperature multisubband electron mobility in a structurally asymmetric GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As delta doped double quantum well. We calculate the subband energy levels and wave functions through selfconsistent solution of the coupled Schrodinger equation and Poisson's equation. We consider ionized impurity scattering, interface roughness scattering, and alloy disorder scattering to calculate the electron mobility. The screening of the scattering potentials is obtained by using static dielectric response function formalism within the random phase approximation. We analyze, for the first time, the effect of asymmetric structure parameters on the enhancement of multisubband electron mobility through intersubband interactions. We show that the asymmetric variation of well width, doping concentration, and spacer width considerably influences the interplay of scattering mechanisms on mobility. Our results of asymmetry induced enhancement of electron mobility can be utilized for low temperature device applications.

  10. Phases and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitterman, Moshe

    2014-09-01

    In discussing phase transitions, the first thing that we have to do is to define a phase. This is a concept from thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, where a phase is defined as a homogeneous system. As a simple example, let us consider instant coffee. This consists of coffee powder dissolved in water, and after stirring it we have a homogeneous mixture, i.e., a single phase. If we add to a cup of coffee a spoonful of sugar and stir it well, we still have a single phase -- sweet coffee. However, if we add ten spoonfuls of sugar, then the contents of the cup will no longer be homogeneous, but rather a mixture of two homogeneous systems or phases, sweet liquid coffee on top and coffee-flavored wet sugar at the bottom...

  11. Nutritional determinants of mobility

    PubMed Central

    Milaneschi, Yuri; Tanaka, Toshiko; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review In many countries, persons over 65 is one of the fastest growing segment of the population. Mobility disability is one of the major risk factors for morbidity and mortality in this age group. There is increasing evidence that improved nutrition can reduce the risk of developing disability in older age. This review summarizes the recent literature showing the associations between different nutrients and mobility-related outcomes in older adults. Recent findings Recent studies suggested an association between low intake and low serum concentrations of micronutrients, such as antioxidants and vitamins, with measures of physical performance, muscle strength and disability in older adults. Summary The role of low micronutrients as cross-sectional and longitudinal correlates of mobility disability is consistent with a growing number of studies showing that a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, such as the Mediterranean diet, has a beneficial role in healthy aging. PMID:20736822

  12. Mobile Phone Terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In the photo, an employee of a real estate firm is contacting his office by means of HICOM, an advanced central terminal for mobile telephones. Developed by the Orlando Division of Martin Marietta Aerospace, Orlando, Florida, and manufactured by Harris Corporation's RF Division, Rochester, N.Y., HICOM upgrades service to users, provides better system management to telephone companies, and makes more efficient use of available mobile telephone channels through a computerized central control terminal. The real estate man, for example, was able to dial his office and he could also have direct-dialed a long distance number. Mobile phones in most areas not yet served by HICOM require an operator's assistance for both local and long distance calls. HICOM improves system management by automatically recording information on all calls for accurate billing, running continual performance checks on its own operation, and reporting any malfunctions to a central office.

  13. Segway robotic mobility platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoa G.; Morrell, John; Mullens, Katherine D.; Burmeister, Aaron B.; Miles, Susan; Farrington, Nathan; Thomas, Kari M.; Gage, Douglas W.

    2004-12-01

    The Segway Robotic Mobility Platform (RMP) is a new mobile robotic platform based on the self-balancing Segway Human Transporter (HT). The Segway RMP is faster, cheaper, and more agile than existing comparable platforms. It is also rugged, has a small footprint, a zero turning radius, and yet can carry a greater payload. The new geometry of the platform presents researchers with an opportunity to examine novel topics, including people-height sensing and actuation modalities. This paper describes the history and development of the platform, its characteristics, and a summary of current research projects involving the platform at various institutions across the United States.

  14. Autonomous mobile robot teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agah, Arvin; Bekey, George A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes autonomous mobile robot teams performing tasks in unstructured environments. The behavior and the intelligence of the group is distributed, and the system does not include a central command base or leader. The novel concept of the Tropism-Based Cognitive Architecture is introduced, which is used by the robots in order to produce behavior transforming their sensory information to proper action. The results of a number of simulation experiments are presented. These experiments include worlds where the robot teams must locate, decompose, and gather objects, and defend themselves against hostile predators, while navigating around stationary and mobile obstacles.

  15. Correlation ion mobility spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Pfeifer, Kent B.; Rohde, Steven B.

    2008-08-26

    Correlation ion mobility spectrometry (CIMS) uses gating modulation and correlation signal processing to improve IMS instrument performance. Closely spaced ion peaks can be resolved by adding discriminating codes to the gate and matched filtering for the received ion current signal, thereby improving sensitivity and resolution of an ion mobility spectrometer. CIMS can be used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio even for transient chemical samples. CIMS is especially advantageous for small geometry IMS drift tubes that can otherwise have poor resolution due to their small size.

  16. Land mobile communications satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnebianca, C.; Pavesi, B.; Tuozzi, A.

    1986-09-01

    The economic value and salient technical and operational characteristics of a European Land Mobile Communication Satellite (LMCS) to complement and supplement the demand for mobile services of Western European countries in the 1995 to 2005 time frames were assessed. A significant future expansion of demand for LCMS services on the part of the public is anticipated. Important augmentations of current service capabilities could be achieved by a satellite service, improving the overall system performances and/or assisting the PTT's in containing their investments in the required infrastructure. The satellite service itself could represent a profitable revenue producer.

  17. Upward Mobility Program Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This handbook contains the policy and program objectives of the NASA Upward Mobility Program. In addition it gives guidance regarding program planning, implementation, and evaluation and also describes the roles and responsibilities of key personnel responsible for the successful implementation of the program. The Federal Personnel Manual Chapter 720 explains the Federal Government's policy on upward mobility and is available from the installation personnel office upon request. This handbook is applicable to all NASA installations. Unless specifically limited, all responsibilities set forth in this plan for the Installation Personnel Director may be administered wholly or in part by the Personnel Director's designee. This handbook will be revised by page changes.

  18. Mobile transporter path planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baffes, Paul; Wang, Lui

    1990-01-01

    The use of a genetic algorithm (GA) for solving the mobile transporter path planning problem is investigated. The mobile transporter is a traveling robotic vehicle proposed for the space station which must be able to reach any point of the structure autonomously. Elements of the genetic algorithm are explored in both a theoretical and experimental sense. Specifically, double crossover, greedy crossover, and tournament selection techniques are examined. Additionally, the use of local optimization techniques working in concert with the GA are also explored. Recent developments in genetic algorithm theory are shown to be particularly effective in a path planning problem domain, though problem areas can be cited which require more research.

  19. An aeronautical mobile satellite experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrey, T. C.; Dessouky, K. I.; Lay, N. E.

    1990-01-01

    The various activities and findings of a NASA/FAA/COMSAT/INMARSAT collaborative aeronautical mobile satellite experiment are detailed. The primary objective of the experiment was to demonstrate and evaluate an advanced digital mobile satellite terminal developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under the NASA Mobile Satellite Program. The experiment was a significant milestone for NASA/JPL, since it was the first test of the mobile terminal in a true mobile satellite environment. The results were also of interest to the general mobile satellite community because of the advanced nature of the technologies employed in the terminal.

  20. Distributed Mobility Management Scheme for Mobile IPv6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakikawa, Ryuji; Valadon, Guillaume; Shigechika, Noriyuki; Murai, Jun

    Mobile IPv6 and Network Mobility (NEMO) have been standardized as IP extensions. While these technologies are planned to be adopted by several communities, such as the vehicle, aviation, and cellular industries, Mobile IPv6 has serious deployment issues such as scalability, protocol resilience, and redundancy. In these technologies, a special router called a home agent is introduced to support the movement of mobile nodes. This home agent introduces overlapping, inefficient routes, and becomes a single point of failure and a performance bottleneck. In this paper, a new concept for scalable and dependable mobility management scheme is proposed. Multiple home agents serve the same set of mobile nodes. The Home Agent Reliability protocol and Home Agent migration are introduced to achieve this concept. We also propose an overlay network named a Global Mobile eXchange (GMX) that efficiently handles data traffic from and to mobile nodes, and operates home agents as would an Internet eXchange Point (IXP).

  1. ATHLETE: A Mobility and Manipulation System for Mobile Lunar Habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, B. H.

    2008-03-01

    ATHLETE is a mobility and manipulation system considered by recent Lunar Architecture Teams. This presentation will discuss the possible use of ATHLETE-based mobile habitats for global-scale scientific exploration of the moon.

  2. A Mobile Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2011-01-01

    Since 2008, when iStanford stormed onto the college scene as the first campus mobile app, schools from Amarillo College (Texas) to Vanderbilt University (Tennessee) have rushed to create their own offerings. Some have elected to do the work in-house; others have licensed the software from a vendor. Still others hope to bottle the same magic that…

  3. Developing Mobile Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Florence; Pastore, Raymond; Snider, Jean

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an instructional design class's experience developing instruction for the mobile web. The class was taught at a southeastern university in the United States in a master's level computer based instruction course. Two example projects are showcased and student reflections on design issues are highlighted. Additionally,…

  4. Mobile Library Filming Device.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Claud E.

    This report contains details of the study and performance test of the Mobile Filming Library Device which consists of a camera and self contained power source. Because of the cost savings and service improvement characteristics, this technique involving the use of a microfilm intermediate in the preparation of copies of material filed in full size…

  5. Mobile Applications for Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drill, Sabrina L.

    2012-01-01

    Mobile computing devices (smart phones, tablets, etc.) are rapidly becoming the dominant means of communication worldwide and are increasingly being used for scientific investigation. This technology can further our Extension mission by increasing our power for data collection, information dissemination, and informed decision-making. Mobile…

  6. Gridless overtone mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Steven M; Ewing, Michael A; Clemmer, David E

    2013-11-01

    A novel overtone mobility spectrometry (OMS) instrument utilizing a gridless elimination mechanism and cooperative radio frequency confinement is described. The gridless elimination region uses a set of mobility-discriminating radial electric fields that are designed so that the frequency of field application results in selective transmission and elimination of ions. To neutralize ions with mobilities that do not match the field application frequency, active elimination regions radially defocus ions toward the lens walls. Concomitantly, a lens-dependent radio frequency waveform is applied to the transmission regions of the drift tube resulting in radial confinement for mobility-matched ions. Compared with prior techniques, which use many grids for ion elimination, the new gridless configuration substantially reduces indiscriminate ion losses. A description of the apparatus and elimination process, including detailed simulations showing how ions are transmitted and eliminated is presented. A prototype 28 cm long OMS instrument is shown to have a resolving power of 20 and is capable of attomole detection limits of a model peptide (angiotensin I) spiked into a complex mixture (in this case peptides generated from digestion of β-casein with trypsin). PMID:24125033

  7. Mathematics and Mobile Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Tobin; Martin, Lee

    2014-01-01

    This paper argues for an approach to mobile learning that leverages students' informal digital practices as resources for designing mathematics classrooms activities. We briefly describe two exploratory designs along these lines, one featuring the use of photos taken by students outside class and the other centered on their recording and…

  8. ORION mobile unit design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunn, D. L.; Wu, S. C.; Thom, E. H.; Mclaughlin, F. D.; Sweetser, B. M.

    1980-01-01

    An overview of the design of the ORION mobile system is presented. System capability and performance characteristics are outlined. Functional requirements and key performance parameters are stated for each of the nine subsystems. A master design and implementation schedule is given.

  9. Mobile Equipment Expands Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGough, Robert L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes the Mobile Equipment Modules (MEM) system in Duluth, Minnesota. MEM is a way to hold down costs and increase learning opportunities by consolidating purchases of expensive shop equipment within the school district, grouping the equipment in modules, and scheduling and moving it from school to school as needed. (MF)

  10. Mobile automatic metabolic analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bynum, B. G.; Currie, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    Two flexible pipes, attached to face mask, are connected to spirometers in mobile cart. Inhaled air volume is measured as it is drawn from one spirometer, and exhaled air volume is measured as it is breathed into second spirometer. Sensor is used to monitor heartbeat rate.

  11. Gridless Overtone Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, Steven M.; Ewing, Michael A.; Clemmer, David E.

    2013-01-01

    A novel overtone mobility spectrometry (OMS) instrument utilizing a gridless elimination mechanism and cooperative radio frequency confinement is described. The gridless elimination region uses a set of mobility-discriminating radial electric fields that are designed so that the frequency of field application results in selective transmission and elimination of ions. To neutralize ions with mobilities that do not match the field application frequency, active elimination regions radially defocus ions towards the lens walls. Concomitantly, a lens-dependent radio frequency waveform is applied to the transmission regions of the drift tube resulting in radial confinement for mobility-matched ions. Compared with prior techniques, which use many grids for ion elimination, the new gridless configuration substantially reduces indiscriminate ion losses. A description of the apparatus and elimination process, including detailed simulations showing how ions are transmitted and eliminated is presented. A prototype 28 cm long OMS instrument is shown to have a resolving power of 20 and is capable of attomole detection limits of a model peptide (angiotensin I) spiked into a complex mixture (in this case peptides generated from digestion of β-casein with trypsin). PMID:24125033

  12. Visions of Mobile Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    T.H.E. Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    It is almost a foregone conclusion that the mobile device will become an indispensable tool for learning in the future. That's why "T.H.E. Journal" asked a number of educators to let their imaginations go wild and conjure up visions of the future of the device in the classroom. This paper presents the views of educators who conjure up the mobile…

  13. When Mobility Disrupts Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jean Louise M.; Fien, Hank; Paine, Stan C.

    2008-01-01

    Student mobility is a common phenomenon that disproportionately affects students in high-poverty schools. Research shows that students who move repeatedly are likely to fall behind in reading and other academic areas. This article reviews proactive strategies that high-poverty districts and schools are using to reduce the harmful effects of…

  14. Mobile Agents Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Rosane Maria; Chaves, Magali Ribeiro; Pirmez, Luci; Rust da Costa Carmo, Luiz Fernando

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of the need to filter and retrieval relevant information from the Internet focuses on the use of mobile agents, specific software components which are based on distributed artificial intelligence and integrated systems. Surveys agent technology and discusses the agent building package used to develop two applications using IBM's Aglet…

  15. Mobile lighting apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Roe, George Michael; Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rea, Gerald W; Drake, Robert A; Johnson, Terry A; Wingert, Steven John; Damberger, Thomas A; Skradski, Thomas J; Radley, Christopher James; Oros, James M; Schuttinger, Paul G; Grupp, David J; Prey, Stephen Carl

    2013-05-14

    A mobile lighting apparatus includes a portable frame such as a moveable trailer or skid having a light tower thereon. The light tower is moveable from a stowed position to a deployed position. A hydrogen-powered fuel cell is located on the portable frame to provide electrical power to an array of the energy efficient lights located on the light tower.

  16. Mathematics and Mobile Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayed, Fayez

    2015-01-01

    The wide range of Mathematical Apps targeting different mathematical concepts and the various types of mobile devices available present a demanding and challenging problem to the teaching and learning in the field of mathematics. In an attempt to address this issue, a few Apps were selected, implemented and tested in this work. [For complete…

  17. Essays on Teacher Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Jeremy A.

    2012-01-01

    The allocation of quality teachers across schools is of interest because of both the importance and costliness of teachers as inputs in the education production process. Furthermore, because teachers have preferences over their workplace characteristics, this allocation across schools is nonrandom. This research examines teacher mobility within…

  18. Mobile Learning for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bestwick, Angel; Campbell, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Parents and educational professionals are asking the question, "Are schools preparing students for their future lives?" Mobile technologies such as smart phones, iPods, GPS systems, iPads, and a constant stream of information drive much of people's world and work. The use of such technologies increases with each passing day. But how often do…

  19. Global Health Diplomacy, Monitoring & Evaluation, and the Importance of Quality Assurance & Control: Findings from NIMH Project Accept (HPTN 043): A Phase III Randomized Controlled Trial of Community Mobilization, Mobile Testing, Same-Day Results, and Post-Test Support for HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa and Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Kevany, Sebastian; Khumalo-Sakutukwa, Gertrude; Singh, Basant; Chingono, Alfred; Morin, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background Provision and scale-up of high quality, evidence-based services is essential for successful international HIV prevention interventions in order to generate and maintain intervention uptake, study integrity and participant trust, from both health service delivery and diplomatic perspectives. Methods We developed quality assurance (QAC) procedures to evaluate staff fidelity to a cluster-randomized trial of the NIMH Project Accept (HPTN 043) assessing the effectiveness of a community-based voluntary counseling and testing strategy. The intervention was comprised of three components—Mobile Voluntary Counseling and Testing (MVCT), Community Mobilization (CM) and Post-Test Support Services (PTSS). QAC procedures were based on standardized criteria, and were designed to assess both provider skills and adherence to the intervention protocol. Supervisors observed a random sample of 5% to 10% of sessions each month and evaluated staff against multiple criteria on scales of 1–5. A score of 5 indicated 100% adherence, 4 indicated 95% adherence, and 3 indicated 90% adherence. Scores below 3 were considered unsatisfactory, and protocol deviations were discussed with the respective staff. Results During the first year of the intervention, the mean scores of MVCT and CM staff across the 5 study sites were 4 (95% adherence) or greater and continued to improve over time. Mean QAC scores for the PTSS component were lower and displayed greater fluctuations. Challenges to PTSS staff were identified as coping with the wide range of activities in the PTSS component and the novelty of the PTSS process. QAC fluctuations for PTSS were also associated with new staff hires or changes in staff responsibilities. Through constant staff monitoring and support, by Year 2, QAC scores for PTSS activities had reached those of MVCT and CM. Conclusions The implementation of a large-sale, evidence based HIV intervention requires extensive QAC to ensure implementation effectiveness

  20. Mobility platform coupling device and method for coupling mobility platforms

    DOEpatents

    Shirey, David L.; Hayward, David R.; Buttz, James H.

    2002-01-01

    A coupling device for connecting a first mobility platform to a second mobility platform in tandem. An example mobility platform is a robot. The coupling device has a loose link mode for normal steering conditions and a locking position, tight link mode for navigation across difficult terrain and across obstacles, for traversing chasms, and for navigating with a reduced footprint in tight steering conditions.

  1. Weak Solutions for the Cahn-Hilliard Equation with Degenerate Mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shibin; Du, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we study the well-posedness of Cahn-Hilliard equations with degenerate phase-dependent diffusion mobility. We consider a popular form of the equations which has been used in phase field simulations of phase separation and microstructure evolution in binary systems. We define a notion of weak solutions for the nonlinear equation. The existence of such solutions is obtained by considering the limits of Cahn-Hilliard equations with non-degenerate mobilities.

  2. Postcolumn derivatization method for determination of reducing and phosphorylated sugars in chicken by high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Aliani, Michel; Farmer, Linda J

    2002-05-01

    A postcolumn derivatization method is described for determination of reducing sugars and phosphorylated reducing sugars from chicken meat and other foods using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Reducing sugars are extracted with ethanol/water, separated on a Kromasil amine-bonded column by isocratic analysis using acetonitrile/water as the mobile phase, and, after postcolumn reaction with tetrazolium blue, are determined by the resulting absorbance at 550 nm. Phosphorylated sugars are first dephosphorylated using alkaline phosphatase and then determined by the same method. PMID:11982395

  3. Advanced extravehicular mobility unit study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elkins, W.

    1982-01-01

    Components of the advanced extravehicular mobility unit (suit) are described. Design considerations for radiation protection, extravehicular operational pressure, mobility effects, tool/glove/effector, anthropometric definition, lighting, and equipment turnaround are addressed.

  4. Charge carrier mobility in hybrid halide perovskites

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Carlo; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Sanvito, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The charge transport properties of hybrid halide perovskites are investigated with a combination of density functional theory including van der Waals interaction and the Boltzmann theory for diffusive transport in the relaxation time approximation. We find the mobility of electrons to be in the range 5–10 cm2V−1s−1 and that for holes within 1–5 cm2V−1s−1, where the variations depend on the crystal structure investigated and the level of doping. Such results, in good agreement with recent experiments, set the relaxation time to about 1 ps, which is the time-scale for the molecular rotation at room temperature. For the room temperature tetragonal phase we explore two possible orientations of the organic cations and find that the mobility has a significant asymmetry depending on the direction of the current with respect to the molecular axis. This is due mostly to the way the PbI3 octahedral symmetry is broken. Interestingly we find that substituting I with Cl has minor effects on the mobilities. Our analysis suggests that the carrier mobility is probably not a key factor in determining the high solar-harvesting efficiency of this class of materials. PMID:26235910

  5. Mobile Learning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraga, Lucretia M.

    2012-01-01

    This mixed method research study investigated the beliefs of university faculty regarding mobile learning. As well as to determine if providing technology professional development to university faculty supports the increase of mobile learning opportunities in higher education. This study used the Beliefs About Mobile Learning Inventory (BAMLI) to…

  6. Libraries and the Mobile Revolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnan, Yvonne

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of mobile phones--and smartphones in particular--people are slowly moving away from the notion that mobile phones are just for making calls and texting. This coupled with the fact that the uptake of mobile phones hit the 5 billion mark in 2010 has spurred many libraries to offer services that can be used by their patrons on these…

  7. Fade-Free Mobile Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    Scheme for mobile communication reduces multipath fading and interference between adjacent channels. Proposed communication system lends itself to almost completely digital implementation, eliminating costly and bulky crystal filters. Scheme suitable for satellite-aided or terrestrial mobile communication, including cellular mobile telephony, at frequencies in 150-to-900-MHz range.

  8. Travel Tales. A Mobility Storybook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern-Gold, Julia; And Others

    The book is designed to supplement mobility and orientation lessons and explain mobility concepts to visually impaired children from preschool through third grade. Each of the 17 chapters centers on the adventures of Eliot, a young visually impaired child, as he learns the following pre-cane orientation and mobility skills: sighted-guide…

  9. Long range hopping mobility platform.

    SciTech Connect

    Spletzer, Barry Louis; Fischer, Gary John

    2003-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a mesoscale hopping mobility platform (Hopper) to overcome the longstanding problems of mobility and power in small scale unmanned vehicles. The system provides mobility in situations such as negotiating tall obstacles and rough terrain that are prohibitive for other small ground base vehicles. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Administration (DARPA) provided the funding for the hopper project.

  10. Quantitative analysis of olanzapine in rat brain microdialysates by HPLC-MS/MS coupled with column-switching technique.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qiaoling; Wang, Feng; Li, Huande; Xu, Ping; Tang, Huaibo; Li, Lanfang; Cheng, Rihua

    2012-09-15

    A rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method coupled with column-switching technique was developed for the determination of olanzapine in rat brain microdialysates. A C8 guard column was used to desalt the samples before analytical separation on a C18 column and detection with tandem mass spectrometry. The mobile phase consisted of methanol/acetonitrile/water (v/v/v, 22.5/22.2/55) was used for desalting and the mobile phase consisted of methanol/acetonitrile/water (v/v/v, 43/43/14) was for analytical separation, water in both mobile phases contained 0.1% ammonium acetate. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) for olanzapine was 0.085 ng/ml. The method was linear from LLOQ to 34 ng/ml with a coefficient of determination >0.998. Intra- and inter-day accuracy and precision were determined with variability less than 13.24% (R.S.D). This sensitive method was successfully applied to quantify the concentration of olanzapine in rat brain microdialysates. With this study, the effect of the alcohol extract of Schisandra sphenanthera Rehd. et Wils on the concentration of olanzapine in brain was investigated. PMID:22917592

  11. Mobile Multicast in Hierarchical Proxy Mobile IPV6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafizah Mohd Aman, Azana; Hashim, Aisha Hassan A.; Mustafa, Amin; Abdullah, Khaizuran

    2013-12-01

    Mobile Internet Protocol Version 6 (MIPv6) environments have been developing very rapidly. Many challenges arise with the fast progress of MIPv6 technologies and its environment. Therefore the importance of improving the existing architecture and operations increases. One of the many challenges which need to be addressed is the need for performance improvement to support mobile multicast. Numerous approaches have been proposed to improve mobile multicast performance. This includes Context Transfer Protocol (CXTP), Hierarchical Mobile IPv6 (HMIPv6), Fast Mobile IPv6 (FMIPv6) and Proxy Mobile IPv6 (PMIPv6). This document describes multicast context transfer in hierarchical proxy mobile IPv6 (H-PMIPv6) to provide better multicasting performance in PMIPv6 domain.

  12. Surfactant-enhanced spectrofluorimetric determination of total aflatoxins from wheat samples after magnetic solid-phase extraction using modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manafi, Mohammad Hanif; Allahyari, Mehdi; Pourghazi, Kamyar; Amoli-Diva, Mitra; Taherimaslak, Zohreh

    2015-07-01

    The extraction and preconcentration of total aflatoxins (including aflatoxin B1, B2, G1, and G2) using magnetic nanoparticles based solid phase extraction (MSPE) followed by surfactant-enhanced spectrofluorimetric detection was proposed. Ethylene glycol bis-mercaptoacetate modified silica coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles as an efficient antibody-free adsorbent was successfully applied to extract aflatoxins from wheat samples. High surface area and strong magnetization properties of magnetic nanoparticles were utilized to achieve high enrichment factor (97), and satisfactory recoveries (92-105%) using only 100 mg of the adsorbent. Furthermore, the fast separation time (less than 10 min) avoids many time-consuming cartridge loading or column-passing procedures accompany with the conventional SPE. In determination step, signal enhancement was performed by formation of Triton X-100 micelles around the analytes in 15% (v/v) acetonitrile-water which dramatically increase the sensitivity of the method. Main factors affecting the extraction efficiency and signal enhancement of the analytes including pH of sample solution, desorption conditions, extraction time, sample volume, adsorbent amount, surfactant concentration and volume and time of micelle formation were evaluated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, wide linear range of 0.1-50 ng mL-1 with low detection limit of 0.03 ng mL-1 were obtained. The developed method was successfully applied to the extraction and preconcentration of aflatoxins in three commercially available wheat samples and the results were compared with the official AOAC method.

  13. Mobility-Based Mobile Relay Selection in MANETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gilnam; Lee, Hyoungjoo; Lee, Kwang Bok

    The future wireless mobile communication networks are expected to provide seamless wireless access and data exchange to mobile users. In particular, it is expected that the demand for ubiquitous data exchange between mobile users will increase with the widespread use of various wireless applications of the intelligent transportation system (ITS) and intelligent vehicles. Mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) are one of the representative research areas pursuing the technology needed to satisfy the increasing mobile communication requirements. However, most of the works on MANET systems do not take into account the continuous and dynamic changes of nodal mobility to accommodate system design and performance evaluation. The mobility of nodes limits the reliability of communication between the source and the destination node since a link between two continuously moving nodes is established only when one node enters the transmission range of the other. To alleviate this problem, mobile relay has been studied. In particular, it is shown that relay selection is an efficient way to support nodal mobility in MANET systems. In this paper, we propose a mobility-based relay selection algorithm for the MANET environment. Firstly, we define the lifetime as the maximum link duration for which the link between two nodes remains active. Therefore, the lifetime indicates the reliability of the relay link which measures its capability to successfully support relayed communication when requested by the source node. Furthermore, we consider a series of realistic scenarios according to the randomness of nodal mobility. Thus, the proposed algorithm can be easily applied in practical MANET systems by choosing the appropriate node mobility behavior. The numerical results show that the improved reliability of the proposed algorithm's relayed communication is achieved with a proper number of mobile relay nodes rather than with the conventional selection algorithm. Lastly, we show that random

  14. Terrestrial mobile communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogard, R.; Steciw, A.

    1986-11-01

    Current and future mobile communications services in Europe are described, along with the technologies for meeting the market needs. A 450 MHz cellular system began operations in Scandinavian countries in 1981, and two 900 MHz systems entered service in the United Kingdom in 1985. Similar systems are being implemented in most European countries. Coding and access schemes are being studied for a pan-European 900 MHz system. Satellites can complement the system by providing service in coastal waters, regions of economic importance to Europe, and sparsely-populated areas. Improvements in vocodors, receiver gain, and technologies for the less-congested 14/11 or 30/20 GHz voice and data links are necessary. ESA studies with the Marecs satellite, preparatory to launch of a prototype mobile communication link, are summarized.

  15. Mobile Biomass Pelletizing System

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Mason

    2009-04-16

    This grant project examines multiple aspects of the pelletizing process to determine the feasibility of pelletizing biomass using a mobile form factor system. These aspects are: the automatic adjustment of the die height in a rotary-style pellet mill, the construction of the die head to allow the use of ceramic materials for extreme wear, integrating a heat exchanger network into the entire process from drying to cooling, the use of superheated steam for adjusting the moisture content to optimum, the economics of using diesel power to operate the system; a break-even analysis of estimated fixed operating costs vs. tons per hour capacity. Initial development work has created a viable mechanical model. The overall analysis of this model suggests that pelletizing can be economically done using a mobile platform.

  16. Mobile Autonomous Humanoid Assistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diftler, M. A.; Ambrose, R. O.; Tyree, K. S.; Goza, S. M.; Huber, E. L.

    2004-01-01

    A mobile autonomous humanoid robot is assisting human co-workers at the Johnson Space Center with tool handling tasks. This robot combines the upper body of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Robonaut system with a Segway(TradeMark) Robotic Mobility Platform yielding a dexterous, maneuverable humanoid perfect for aiding human co-workers in a range of environments. This system uses stereo vision to locate human team mates and tools and a navigation system that uses laser range and vision data to follow humans while avoiding obstacles. Tactile sensors provide information to grasping algorithms for efficient tool exchanges. The autonomous architecture utilizes these pre-programmed skills to form human assistant behaviors. The initial behavior demonstrates a robust capability to assist a human by acquiring a tool from a remotely located individual and then following the human in a cluttered environment with the tool for future use.

  17. Miniaturized Ion Mobility Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaye, William J. (Inventor); Stimac, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    By utilizing the combination of a unique electronic ion injection control circuit in conjunction with a particularly designed drift cell construction, the instantly disclosed ion mobility spectrometer achieves increased levels of sensitivity, while achieving significant reductions in size and weight. The instant IMS is of a much simpler and easy to manufacture design, rugged and hermetically sealed, capable of operation at high temperatures to at least 250.degree. C., and is uniquely sensitive, particularly to explosive chemicals.

  18. Integrated mobile robot control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amidi, Omead; Thorpe, Charles

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the structure, implementation, and operation of a real-time mobile robot controller which integrates capabilities such as: position estimation, path specification and tracking, human interfaces, fast communication, and multiple client support. The benefits of such high-level capabilities in a low-level controller was shown by its implementation for the Navlab autonomous vehicle. In addition, performance results from positioning and tracking systems are reported and analyzed.

  19. 33 CFR 165.835 - Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... definition covers passenger vessels that must comply with 33 CFR parts 120 and 128. (b) Location. The... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. 165.835 Section 165.835 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST...

  20. Graphene mobility mapping

    PubMed Central

    Buron, Jonas D.; Pizzocchero, Filippo; Jepsen, Peter U.; Petersen, Dirch H.; Caridad, José M.; Jessen, Bjarke S.; Booth, Timothy J.; Bøggild, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carrier mobility and chemical doping level are essential figures of merit for graphene, and large-scale characterization of these properties and their uniformity is a prerequisite for commercialization of graphene for electronics and electrodes. However, existing mapping techniques cannot directly assess these vital parameters in a non-destructive way. By deconvoluting carrier mobility and density from non-contact terahertz spectroscopic measurements of conductance in graphene samples with terahertz-transparent backgates, we are able to present maps of the spatial variation of both quantities over large areas. The demonstrated non-contact approach provides a drastically more efficient alternative to measurements in contacted devices, with potential for aggressive scaling towards wafers/minute. The observed linear relation between conductance and carrier density in chemical vapour deposition graphene indicates dominance by charged scatterers. Unexpectedly, significant variations in mobility rather than doping are the cause of large conductance inhomogeneities, highlighting the importance of statistical approaches when assessing large-area graphene transport properties. PMID:26204815

  1. Graphene mobility mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buron, Jonas D.; Pizzocchero, Filippo; Jepsen, Peter U.; Petersen, Dirch H.; Caridad, José M.; Jessen, Bjarke S.; Booth, Timothy J.; Bøggild, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Carrier mobility and chemical doping level are essential figures of merit for graphene, and large-scale characterization of these properties and their uniformity is a prerequisite for commercialization of graphene for electronics and electrodes. However, existing mapping techniques cannot directly assess these vital parameters in a non-destructive way. By deconvoluting carrier mobility and density from non-contact terahertz spectroscopic measurements of conductance in graphene samples with terahertz-transparent backgates, we are able to present maps of the spatial variation of both quantities over large areas. The demonstrated non-contact approach provides a drastically more efficient alternative to measurements in contacted devices, with potential for aggressive scaling towards wafers/minute. The observed linear relation between conductance and carrier density in chemical vapour deposition graphene indicates dominance by charged scatterers. Unexpectedly, significant variations in mobility rather than doping are the cause of large conductance inhomogeneities, highlighting the importance of statistical approaches when assessing large-area graphene transport properties.

  2. Graphene mobility mapping.

    PubMed

    Buron, Jonas D; Pizzocchero, Filippo; Jepsen, Peter U; Petersen, Dirch H; Caridad, José M; Jessen, Bjarke S; Booth, Timothy J; Bøggild, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carrier mobility and chemical doping level are essential figures of merit for graphene, and large-scale characterization of these properties and their uniformity is a prerequisite for commercialization of graphene for electronics and electrodes. However, existing mapping techniques cannot directly assess these vital parameters in a non-destructive way. By deconvoluting carrier mobility and density from non-contact terahertz spectroscopic measurements of conductance in graphene samples with terahertz-transparent backgates, we are able to present maps of the spatial variation of both quantities over large areas. The demonstrated non-contact approach provides a drastically more efficient alternative to measurements in contacted devices, with potential for aggressive scaling towards wafers/minute. The observed linear relation between conductance and carrier density in chemical vapour deposition graphene indicates dominance by charged scatterers. Unexpectedly, significant variations in mobility rather than doping are the cause of large conductance inhomogeneities, highlighting the importance of statistical approaches when assessing large-area graphene transport properties. PMID:26204815

  3. Mobile shearography in applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalms, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Modern optical methods such as digital shearography have attracted interest not only for laboratory investigations but also for applications on the factory floor because they can be sensitive, accurate, non-tactile and non-destructive. Optical inspection and measurement systems are more and more used in the entire manufacturing process. Shearography as a coherent optical method has been widely accepted as a useful NDT tool. It is a robust interferometric method to determine locations with maximum stress on various material structures. However, limitations of this technique can be found in the bulky equipment components, the interpretation of the complex shearographic result images and a barely solvable challenge at the work with difficult surfaces like dark absorbing or bright reflecting materials. We report a mobile shearography system that was especially designed for investigations at aircraft constructions. The great advantage of this system is the adjusted balance of all single elements to a complete measurement procedure integrated in a handy body. Only with the arrangement of all involved parameters like loading, laser source, sensor unit and software, it is feasible to get optimal measurement results. This paper describes a complete mobile shearographic procedure including loading and image processing facilities for structural testing and flaw recognition on aircrafts. The mobile system was successfully tested, e.g. with the up-to-date EADS multi-role combat aircraft Eurofighter.

  4. High-mobility diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landstrass, Maurice I.

    1994-04-01

    Recent improvements in the CVD diamond deposition process have made possible the fabrication of diamond photoconductive diodes with carrier mobility and lifetime exceeding the values typical of natural gemstones. One of the more surprising recent results is that the best room-temperature carrier properties have been measured on polycrystalline diamond films. The combined electron- hole mobility, as measured by transient photoconductivity at low carrier densities, is 4000 square centimeters per volt per second at electric field of 200 volts per centimeter and is comparable to that of the best single-crystal IIa natural diamonds. Carrier lifetimes measured under the same conditions are 150 picoseconds for the CVD diamond films. The collection distance within the diamond films, at the highest applied fields, is comparable to the average film grain size, indicative of little or no carrier scattering at grain boundaries. A comparison of SIMS measurements with electrical results suggest that impurity incorporation in the near grain boundary regions are responsible for controlling the carrier mobility.

  5. Gradient enhanced-fluidity liquid hydrophilic interaction chromatography of ribonucleic acid nucleosides and nucleotides: A "green" technique.

    PubMed

    Beilke, Michael C; Beres, Martin J; Olesik, Susan V

    2016-03-01

    A "green" hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) technique for separating the components of mixtures with a broad range of polarities is illustrated using enhanced-fluidity liquid mobile phases. Enhanced-fluidity liquid chromatography (EFLC) involves the addition of liquid CO2 to conventional liquid mobile phases. Decreased mobile phase viscosity and increased analyte diffusivity results when a liquefied gas is dissolved in common liquid mobile phases. The impact of CO2 addition to a methanol:water (MeOH:H2O) mobile phase was studied to optimize HILIC gradient conditions. For the first time a fast separation of 16 ribonucleic acid (RNA) nucleosides/nucleotides was achieved (16min) with greater than 1.3 resolution for all analyte pairs. By using a gradient, the analysis time was reduced by over 100% compared to similar separations conducted under isocratic conditions. The optimal separation using MeOH:H2O:CO2 mobile phases was compared to MeOH:H2O and acetonitrile:water (ACN:H2O) mobile phases. Based on chromatographic performance parameters (efficiency, resolution and speed of analysis) and an assessment of the environmental impact of the mobile phase mixtures, MeOH:H2O:CO2 mixtures are preferred over ACN:H2O or MeOH:H2O mobile phases for the separation of mixtures of RNA nucleosides and nucleotides. PMID:26860052

  6. Visualization of surfactant enhanced NAPL mobilization and solubilization in a two-dimensional micromodel

    SciTech Connect

    ZHONG,LIRONG; MAYER,ALEX; GLASS JR.,ROBERT J.

    2000-03-08

    Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation is an emerging technology for aquifers contaminated with nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). A two-dimensional micromodel and image capture system were applied to observe NAPL mobilization and solubilization phenomena. In each experiment, a common residual NAPL field was established, followed by a series of mobilization and solubilization experiments. Mobilization floods included pure water floods with variable flow rates and surfactant floods with variations in surfactant formulations. At relatively low capillary numbers (N{sub ca}<10{sup {minus}3}), the surfactant mobilization floods resulted in higher NAPL saturations than for the pure water flood, for similar N{sub ca}.These differences in macroscopic saturations are explained by differences in micro-scale mobilization processes. Solubilization of the residual NAPL remaining after the mobilization stage was dominated by the formation of dissolution fingers, which produced nonequilibrium NAPL solubilization. A macroemulsion phase also as observed to form spontaneously and persist during the solubilization stage of the experiments.

  7. Studies on deaf mobile application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathan, Shelena Soosay; Hussain, Azham; Hashim, Nor Laily

    2016-08-01

    The deaf normally considered to be disabled that do not need any mobile technology due to the inabilities of hearing and talking. However, many deaf are using mobile phone in their daily life for various purposes such as communication and learning. Many studies have attempted to identify the need of deaf people in mobile application and level of usage of the applications. This study aims in studying the recent research conducted on deaf mobile application to understand the level of importance of mobile technology for this disabled community. This paper enable identification of studies conducted are limited and the need of more research done of this disabled people to ensure their privilege of using mobile technology and its application, which leads to the identification of deaf user requirement for mobile application as future study.

  8. Securing mobile code.

    SciTech Connect

    Link, Hamilton E.; Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Neumann, William Douglas; Campbell, Philip LaRoche; Beaver, Cheryl Lynn; Pierson, Lyndon George; Anderson, William Erik

    2004-10-01

    If software is designed so that the software can issue functions that will move that software from one computing platform to another, then the software is said to be 'mobile'. There are two general areas of security problems associated with mobile code. The 'secure host' problem involves protecting the host from malicious mobile code. The 'secure mobile code' problem, on the other hand, involves protecting the code from malicious hosts. This report focuses on the latter problem. We have found three distinct camps of opinions regarding how to secure mobile code. There are those who believe special distributed hardware is necessary, those who believe special distributed software is necessary, and those who believe neither is necessary. We examine all three camps, with a focus on the third. In the distributed software camp we examine some commonly proposed techniques including Java, D'Agents and Flask. For the specialized hardware camp, we propose a cryptographic technique for 'tamper-proofing' code over a large portion of the software/hardware life cycle by careful modification of current architectures. This method culminates by decrypting/authenticating each instruction within a physically protected CPU, thereby protecting against subversion by malicious code. Our main focus is on the camp that believes that neither specialized software nor hardware is necessary. We concentrate on methods of code obfuscation to render an entire program or a data segment on which a program depends incomprehensible. The hope is to prevent or at least slow down reverse engineering efforts and to prevent goal-oriented attacks on the software and execution. The field of obfuscation is still in a state of development with the central problem being the lack of a basis for evaluating the protection schemes. We give a brief introduction to some of the main ideas in the field, followed by an in depth analysis of a technique called 'white-boxing'. We put forth some new attacks and improvements

  9. Active microrheology in active matter systems: Mobility, intermittency, and avalanches.

    PubMed

    Reichhardt, C; Reichhardt, C J Olson

    2015-03-01

    We examine the mobility and velocity fluctuations of a driven particle moving through an active matter bath of self-mobile disks for varied density or area coverage and varied activity. We show that the driven particle mobility can exhibit nonmonotonic behavior that is correlated with distinct changes in the spatiotemporal structures that arise in the active media. We demonstrate that the probe particle velocity distributions exhibit specific features in the different dynamic regimes and identify an activity-induced uniform crystallization that occurs for moderate activity levels and is distinct from the previously observed higher activity cluster phase. The velocity distribution in the cluster phase has telegraph noise characteristics produced when the probe particle moves alternately through high-mobility areas that are in the gas state and low-mobility areas that are in the dense phase. For higher densities and large activities, the system enters what we characterize as an active jamming regime. Here the probe particle moves in intermittent jumps or avalanches that have power-law-distributed sizes that are similar to the avalanche distributions observed for nonactive disk systems near the jamming transition. PMID:25871116

  10. A robust signalling system for land mobile satellite services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irish, Dale; Shmith, Gary; Hart, Nick; Wines, Marie

    1989-01-01

    Presented here is a signalling system optimized to ensure expedient call set-up for satellite telephony services in a land mobile environment. In a land mobile environment, the satellite to mobile link is subject to impairments from multipath and shadowing phenomena, which result in signal amplitude and phase variations. Multipath, caused by signal scattering and reflections, results in sufficient link margin to compensate for these variations. Direct signal attenuation caused by shadowing due to buildings and vegetation may result in attenuation values in excess of 10 dB and commonly up to 20 dB. It is not practical to provide a link with sufficient margin to enable communication when the signal is blocked. When a moving vehicle passes these obstacles, the link will experience rapid changes in signal strength due to shadowing. Using statistical models of attenuation as a function of distance travelled, a communication strategy has been defined for the land mobile environment.

  11. Analysis of phenolic acids as chloroformate derivatives using solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Citová, Ivana; Sladkovský, Radek; Solich, Petr

    2006-07-28

    In the presented study, a simple and original procedure of phenolic acids derivatization treated by ethyl and methyl chloroformate performed in an aqueous media consisting of acetonitrile, water, methanol/ethanol and pyridine has been modified and optimized. Seven phenolic acid standards-caffeic, ferulic, gallic, p-coumaric, protocatechuic, syringic and vanillic were derivatized into corresponding methyl/ethyl esters and subsequently determined by the means of gas chromatography connected to the flame-ionisation detector (FID). Some selected validation parameters as linearity, detection and quantitation limits and peak area repeatability were valued. The total time of gas chromatography (GC) analysis was 24 min for methyl chloroformate and 30 min for ethyl chloroformate derivatization. The more suitable methyl chloroformate derivatization was used for further experiments on the possibility of multiple pre-concentration by the direct solid phase microextraction technique (SPME). For this purpose, polyacrylate (PA), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane (CAR/PDMS) and polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB) fibres were tested and the extraction conditions concerning time of extraction, temperature and time of desorption were optimized. The most polar PA fibre gave the best results under optimal extraction conditions (50 min extraction time, 25 degrees C extraction temperature and 10 min desorption time). As a result, the total time of SPME-GC analysis was 74 min and an increase in method sensitivity was reached. The limits of quantitation (LOQ) of p-coumaric, ferulic, syringic and vanillic acid esters after SPME pre-concentration were 0.02, 0.17, 0.2 and 0.2 microg mL(-1), respectively, showing approximately 10 times higher sensitivity in comparison with the original GC method. PMID:17723529

  12. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kanu, Abu B; Dwivedi, Prabha; Tam, Maggie; Matz, Laura; Hill, Herbert H

    2008-01-01

    This review article compares and contrasts various types of ion mobility-mass spectrometers available today and describes their advantages for application to a wide range of analytes. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), when coupled with mass spectrometry, offers value-added data not possible from mass spectra alone. Separation of isomers, isobars, and conformers; reduction of chemical noise; and measurement of ion size are possible with the addition of ion mobility cells to mass spectrometers. In addition, structurally similar ions and ions of the same charge state can be separated into families of ions which appear along a unique mass-mobility correlation line. This review describes the four methods of ion mobility separation currently used with mass spectrometry. They are (1) drift-time ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS), (2) aspiration ion mobility spectrometry (AIMS), (3) differential-mobility spectrometry (DMS) which is also called field-asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and (4) traveling-wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS). DTIMS provides the highest IMS resolving power and is the only IMS method which can directly measure collision cross-sections. AIMS is a low resolution mobility separation method but can monitor ions in a continuous manner. DMS and FAIMS offer continuous-ion monitoring capability as well as orthogonal ion mobility separation in which high-separation selectivity can be achieved. TWIMS is a novel method of IMS with a low resolving power but has good sensitivity and is well intergrated into a commercial mass spectrometer. One hundred and sixty references on ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS) are provided. PMID:18200615

  13. Effect of weathering transformations of coal combustion residuals on trace element mobility in view of the environmental safety and sustainability of their disposal and use. I. Hydrogeochemical processes controlling pH and phase stability.

    PubMed

    Stefaniak, Sebastian; Miszczak, Ewa; Szczepańska-Plewa, Jadwiga; Twardowska, Irena

    2015-06-01

    Coal combustion residuals (CCRs) are one of the most abundant high-volume waste materials disposed in impoundments worldwide. Some methods of CCR recycling, e.g. their use as structural fill for low lying areas or as soil amendment, also expose this material to atmospheric conditions. Combustion processes result in concentration of trace elements in CCRs at about an order of magnitude compared to coal. In order to assess an effect of long-term weathering transformations of CCRs on trace element binding/release, a study has been carried out. It is based on the chemical composition of real pore solutions extracted from the most abundant primary alkaline Class F bituminous CCRs, 0 to >40 years old, sampled from the surface layer and vertical profiles at four different impoundments. In this part of the study, results of a hydrogeochemical simulation of the saturation state of real pore solutions with respect to mineral phases of CCRs with use of the PHREEQC program, related to actual pH values reflecting the full cycle of weathering transformations, have been discussed. This study is the first geochemical proof of the general trend towards a progressive acidification up to pH < 4 of primary alkaline CCRs due to release of protons during internal processes of formation of gibbsite and aluminosilicate minerals, buffered by carbonates at the alkaline - near-neutral stages, and followed by parallel dissolution and buffering by aluminosilicates at pH < 7 after carbonate depletion, to the level up to pH∼3.5-4.0. The intrinsic geochemical changes have resulted in the different susceptibility of trace elements to release and associated changes in risk to the environment at consecutive stages of weathering. PMID:25841194

  14. Shuttle-run synchronization in mobile ad hoc networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Sheng-Fei; Bi, Hong-Jie; Zou, Yong; Liu, Zong-Hua; Guan, Shu-Guang

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we study the collective dynamics of phase oscillators in a mobile ad hoc network whose topology changes dynamically. As the network size or the communication radius of individual oscillators increases, the topology of the ad hoc network first undergoes percolation, forming a giant cluster, and then gradually achieves global connectivity. It is shown that oscillator mobility generally enhances the coherence in such networks. Interestingly, we find a new type of phase synchronization/clustering, in which the phases of the oscillators are distributed in a certain narrow range, while the instantaneous frequencies change signs frequently, leading to shuttle-run-like motion of the oscillators in phase space. We conduct a theoretical analysis to explain the mechanism of this synchronization and obtain the critical transition point.

  15. First satellite mobile communication trials using BLQS-CDMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luzdemateo, Maria; Johns, Simon; Dothey, Michel; Vanhimbeeck, Carl; Deman, Ivan; Wery, Bruno

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, technical results obtained in the first MSBN Land mobile technical trial are reported. MSBN (Mobile Satellite Business Network) is a new program undertaken by the European Space Agency (ESA) to promote mobile satellite communication in Europe, in particular voice capability. The first phase of the MSBN system implementation plan is an experimental phase. Its purpose is to evaluate through field experiments the performance of the MSBN system prior to finalization of its specifications. Particularly, the objective is to verify in the field and possibly improve the performance of the novel satellite access technique BLQS-CDMA (Band Limited Quasi-Synchronous-Code Division Multiple Access), which is proposed as baseline for the MSBN.

  16. Mobile Bay turbidity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crozier, G. F.; Schroeder, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    The termination of studies carried on for almost three years in the Mobile Bay area and adjacent continental shelf are reported. The initial results concentrating on the shelf and lower bay were presented in the interim report. The continued scope of work was designed to attempt a refinement of the mathematical model, assess the effectiveness of optical measurement of suspended particulate material and disseminate the acquired information. The optical characteristics of particulate solutions are affected by density gradients within the medium, density of the suspended particles, particle size, particle shape, particle quality, albedo, and the angle of refracted light. Several of these are discussed in detail.

  17. Trauma and Mobile Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Drafke, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    Trauma and Mobile Radiography focuses on the radiography of trauma patients and of patients confined to bed. This book offers students a foundation in the skills they need to produce quality radiograms without causing additional injury or pain to the patient. Features of this new book include: coverage of the basics of radiography and patient care, including monitoring of heavily sedated, immobile, and accident patients. Information on the injuries associated with certain types of accidents, and methods for dealing with these problems. Detailed explanation of the positioning of each anatomical area. A Quick Reference Card with information on evaluating, monitoring and radiographing trauma patients.

  18. Mobile health monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Walker, William; Aroul, A L Praveen; Bhatia, Dinesh

    2009-01-01

    Advancements are being made towards a cheap and effective means for health monitoring. A mobile monitoring system is proposed for monitoring a bicycle rider using light weight, low power wireless sensors. Biometric and environmental information pertaining to the bicycle rider is captured, transmitted to, and stored in a remote database with little user interaction required. Remote users have real time access to the captured information through a web application. Possible applications for this system include the monitoring of a soldier in the battlefield and the monitoring of a patient during an ambulance ride. PMID:19965041

  19. Spacesuit mobility knee joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Pressure suit mobility joints are for use in interconnecting adjacent segments of an hermetically sealed spacesuit in which low torques, low leakage and a high degree of reliability are required. Each of the joints is a special purpose joint characterized by substantially constant volume and low torque characteristics and includes linkages which restrain the joint from longitudinal distension and includes a flexible, substantially impermeable diaphragm of tubular configuration spanning the distance between pivotally supported annuli. The diaphragms of selected joints include rolling convolutions for balancing the joints, while various joints include wedge-shaped sections which enhance the range of motion for the joints.

  20. Lens Antenna For Mobile/Satellite Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodnar, D. G.; Rainer, B. K.

    1988-01-01

    Flat, compact antenna made of stripline elements aimed at fixed elevation angle but steered electronically in azimuth. Design simplified by maintaining fixed elevation and relying on width of beam to cover desired elevation range. Need for phase shifter at each radiating element eliminated by arranging elements in circles and feeding through stripline disks called "R-KR lenses". Used in Mobile/Satellite Service, antenna mounted on top of vehicle on Earth and used to keep transmitted and received antenna beams aimed approximately toward communication satellite.

  1. 1-(2-Methoxybenzylidene)-4-phenylthiosemicarbazide as OFF-ON fluorescent chemodosimeter for detection of Cu 2+ in acetonitrile-water binary solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhao; Lin, Li-Rong; Huang, Rong-Bin; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2008-12-01

    A novel fluorescent chemodosimeter, 1-(2-methoxybenzylidene)-4-phenylthiolsemicarbazide, was studied. In 90:10 (v/v) mixture of CH 3CN and water binary solution, it exhibits high selectivity toward Cu 2+ but very low response toward other competitive cations. The Cu 2+ promoting cyclization of the thiosemicarbazide to 1,2,4-triazole-3(4 H)-thione ring results in observation of the turn-on fluorescence.

  2. Trends in Mobile Application Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, Adrian; Ondrus, Jan

    Major software companies, such as Apple and Google, are disturbing the relatively safe and established actors of the mobile application business. These newcomers have caused significant structural changes by imposing and enforcing their own rules for the future of mobile application development. The implications of these changes do not only concern the mobile network operators and mobile phone manufacturers. This changed environment also brings additional opportunities and constraints for current mobile application developers. Therefore, developers need to assess what their options are and how they can take advantages of these current trends. In this paper, we take a developer’s perspective in order to explore how the structural changes will influence the mobile application development markets. Moreover, we discuss what aspects developers need to take into account in order to position themselves within the current trends.

  3. CHEMICALLY-ENHANCED DISSOLUTION AND MOBILIZATION OF RESIDUAL CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pore-scale micromodels and a computer-controlled imaging system will be used to examine fluid dynamics and phase behavior during chemically-enhanced NAPL dissolution and mobilization. Mechanistic insights gained at this microscopic level will be used to help explain observations...

  4. Mobilization of Pollutant-Degrading Bacteria by Eukaryotic Zoospores.

    PubMed

    Sungthong, Rungroch; van West, Pieter; Heyman, Fredrik; Jensen, Dan Funck; Ortega-Calvo, Jose Julio

    2016-07-19

    The controlled mobilization of pollutant-degrading bacteria has been identified as a promising strategy for improving bioremediation performance. We tested the hypothesis whether the mobilization of bacterial degraders may be achieved by the action of eukaryotic zoospores. We evaluated zoospores that are produced by the soil oomycete Pythium aphanidermatum as a biological vector, and, respectively, the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria Mycobacterium gilvum VM552 and Pseudomonas putida G7, acting as representative nonflagellated and flagellated species. The mobilization assay was performed with a chemical-in-capillary method, in which zoospores mobilized bacterial cells only when they were exposed to a zoospore homing inducer (5% (v/v) ethanol), which caused the tactic response and settlement of zoospores. The mobilization was strongly linked to a lack of bacterial motility, because the nonflagellated cells from strain M. gilvum VM552 and slightly motile, stationary-phase cells from P. putida G7 were mobilized effectively, but the actively motile, exponentially grown cells of P. putida G7 were not mobilized. The computer-assisted analysis of cell motility in mixed suspensions showed that the swimming rate was enhanced by zoospores in stationary, but not in exponentially grown, cells of P. putida G7. It is hypothesized that the directional swimming of zoospores caused bacterial mobilization through the thrust force of their flagellar propulsion. Our results suggest that, by mobilizing pollutant-degrading bacteria, zoospores can act as ecological amplifiers for fungal and oomycete mycelial networks in soils, extending their potential in bioremediation scenarios. PMID:27286642

  5. Creating a Mobile Library Website

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutshall, Tom C.; Blake, Lindsay; Bandy, Sandra L.

    2011-01-01

    The overwhelming results were iPhones and Android devices. Since the library wasn't equipped technologically to develop an in-house application platform and because we wanted the content to work across all mobile platforms, we decided to focus on creating a mobile web-based platform. From the NLM page of mobile sites we chose the basic PubMed/…

  6. Space station mobile transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renshall, James; Marks, Geoff W.; Young, Grant L.

    1988-01-01

    The first quarter of the next century will see an operational space station that will provide a permanently manned base for satellite servicing, multiple strategic scientific and commercial payload deployment, and Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle/Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OMV/OTV) retrieval replenishment and deployment. The space station, as conceived, is constructed in orbit and will be maintained in orbit. The construction, servicing, maintenance and deployment tasks, when coupled with the size of the station, dictate that some form of transportation and manipulation device be conceived. The Transporter described will work in conjunction with the Orbiter and an Assembly Work Platform (AWP) to construct the Work Station. The Transporter will also work in conjunction with the Mobile Remote Servicer to service and install payloads, retrieve, service and deploy satellites, and service and maintain the station itself. The Transporter involved in station construction when mounted on the AWP and later supporting a maintenance or inspection task with the Mobile Remote Servicer and the Flight Telerobotic Servicer is shown.

  7. Mobile access control vestibule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePoy, Jennifer M.

    1998-12-01

    The mobile access control vestibule (MACV) is an adaptation of techniques developed for mobile military command centers. The overall configuration of modules acts as an entry control/screening facility or transportable command center. The system would provide the following capabilities: (1) A key element for force protection, rapid deployment units sent to areas having no prepositioned equipment or where there has been a degradation of that equipment as a result of natural disasters or civil unrest. (2) A rapidly deployable security control center to upgrade the security at nonmilitary sites (e.g., diplomatic or humanitarian organizations). (3) Personnel screening, package screening, badge/identification card production for authorized personnel, centralized monitoring of deployed perimeter sensors, and centralized communications for law enforcement personnel. (4) Self-contained screening and threat detection systems, including explosives detection using the system developed by Sandia National Laboratories for the FAA. When coupled with transportable electric generators, the system is self-sufficient. The communication system for the MACV would be a combination of physically wired and wireless communication units that supports by ad hoc networking.

  8. The Mobile Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharfstein, Gregory; Cox, Russell

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a simulation chamber that represents a shift from the thermal-vacuum chamber stereotype. This innovation, currently in development, combines the capabilities of space simulation chambers, the user-friendliness of modern-day electronics, and the modularity of plug-and-play computing. The Mobile Chamber is a customized test chamber that can be deployed with great ease, and is capable of bringing payloads at temperatures down to 20 K, in high vacuum, and with the desired metrology instruments integrated to the systems control. Flexure plans to lease Mobile Chambers, making them affordable for smaller budgets and available to a larger customer base. A key feature of this design will be an Apple iPad-like user interface that allows someone with minimal training to control the environment inside the chamber, and to simulate the required extreme environments. The feedback of thermal, pressure, and other measurements is delivered in a 3D CAD model of the chamber's payload and support hardware. This GUI will provide the user with a better understanding of the payload than any existing thermal-vacuum system.

  9. INFLUENCE OF VISCOUS AND BUOYANCY FORCES ON THE MOBILIZATION OF RESIDUAL TETRACHLOROETHYLENE DURING SURFACTANT FLUSHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential for nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) mobilization is one of the most important considerations in the development and implementation of surfactant-based remediation technologies. Column experiments were performed to investigate the onset and extent of tetrachloroethyle...

  10. Webizing mobile augmented reality content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sangchul; Ko, Heedong; Yoo, Byounghyun

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a content structure for building mobile augmented reality (AR) applications in HTML5 to achieve a clean separation of the mobile AR content and the application logic for scaling as on the Web. We propose that the content structure contains the physical world as well as virtual assets for mobile AR applications as document object model (DOM) elements and that their behaviour and user interactions are controlled through DOM events by representing objects and places with a uniform resource identifier. Our content structure enables mobile AR applications to be seamlessly developed as normal HTML documents under the current Web eco-system.

  11. Re-thinking residential mobility

    PubMed Central

    van Ham, Maarten; Findlay, Allan M.

    2015-01-01

    While researchers are increasingly re-conceptualizing international migration, far less attention has been devoted to re-thinking short-distance residential mobility and immobility. In this paper we harness the life course approach to propose a new conceptual framework for residential mobility research. We contend that residential mobility and immobility should be re-conceptualized as relational practices that link lives through time and space while connecting people to structural conditions. Re-thinking and re-assessing residential mobility by exploiting new developments in longitudinal analysis will allow geographers to understand, critique and address pressing societal challenges. PMID:27330243

  12. MedlinePlus: Mobility Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... the gap between science and efficacy. Article: Distribution, Determinants, and Prevention of Falls Among the Elderly ... Options for Older Adults (Administration on Aging) - PDF Eldercare at Home: Mobility ...

  13. Nuclear powerplants for mobile applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Mobile nuclear powerplants for applications other than large ships and submarines will require compact, lightweight reactors with especially stringent impact-safety design. This paper examines the technical and economic feasibility that the broadening role of civilian nuclear power, in general, (land-based nuclear electric generating plants and nuclear ships) can extend to lightweight, safe mobile nuclear powerplants. The paper discusses technical experience, identifies potential sources of technology for advanced concepts, cites the results of economic studies of mobile nuclear powerplants, and surveys future technical capabilities needed by examining the current use and projected needs for vehicles, machines, and habitats that could effectively use mobile nuclear reactor powerplants.

  14. Mobile Router Developed and Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center, under a NASA Space Act Agreement with Cisco Systems, has been performing joint networking research to apply Internet-based technologies and protocols to space-based communications. As a result of this research, NASA performed stringent performance testing of the mobile router, including the interaction of routing and the transport-level protocol. In addition, Cisco Systems developed the mobile router for both commercial and Government markets. The code has become part of the Cisco Systems Internetworking Operating System (IOS) as of release 12.2 (4) T--which will make this capability available to the community at large. The mobile router is software code that resides in a network router and enables entire networks to roam while maintaining connectivity to the Internet. This router code is pertinent to a myriad of applications for both Government and commercial sectors, including the "wireless battlefield." NASA and the Department of Defense will utilize this technology for near-planetary observation and sensing spacecraft. It is also a key enabling technology for aviation-based information applications. Mobile routing will make it possible for information such as weather, air traffic control, voice, and video to be transmitted to aircraft using Internet-based protocols. This technology shows great promise in reducing congested airways and mitigating aviation disasters due to bad weather. The mobile router can also be incorporated into emergency vehicles (such as ambulances and life-flight aircraft) to provide real-time connectivity back to the hospital and health-care experts, enabling the timely application of emergency care. Commercial applications include entertainment services, Internet protocol (IP) telephone, and Internet connectivity for cruise ships, commercial shipping, tour buses, aircraft, and eventually cars. A mobile router, which is based on mobile IP, allows hosts (mobile nodes) to seamlessly "roam" among various IP

  15. Crystalline mesophases: Structure, mobility, and pharmaceutical properties.

    PubMed

    Shalaev, Evgenyi; Wu, Ke; Shamblin, Sheri; Krzyzaniak, Joseph F; Descamps, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Crystalline mesophases, which are commonly classified according to their translational, orientational, and conformational order as liquid crystals, plastic crystals, and conformationally disordered crystals, represent a common state of condensed matter. As an intermediate state between crystalline and amorphous materials, crystalline mesophases resemble amorphous materials in relation to their molecular mobility, with the glass transition being their common property, and at the same time possessing a certain degree of translational periodicity (with the exception of nematic phase), with corresponding narrow peaks in X-ray diffraction patterns. For example, plastic crystals, which can be formed both by near-spherical molecules and molecules of lower symmetry, such as planar or chain molecules, can have both extremely sharp X-ray diffraction lines and exhibit glass transition. Fundamentals of structural arrangements in mesophases are compared with several types of disorder in crystalline materials, as well as with short-range ordering in amorphous solids. Main features of the molecular mobility in crystalline mesophases are found to be generally similar to amorphous materials, although some important differences do exist, depending on a particular type of mobility modes involved in relaxation processes. In several case studies reviewed, chemical stability appears to follow the extent of disorder, with the stability of crystalline mesophase found to be intermediate between amorphous (least stable) and crystalline (most stable) materials. Finally, detection of crystalline mesophases during manufacturing of two different types of dosage forms is discussed. PMID:27067607

  16. Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2010-04-20

    In a media of finite viscosity, the Coulomb force of external electric field moves ions with some terminal speed. This dynamics is controlled by “mobility” - a property of the interaction potential between ions and media molecules. This fact has been used to separate and characterize gas-phase ions in various modes of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) developed since 1970. Commercial IMS devices were introduced in 1980-s for field detection of volatile traces such as explosives and chemical warfare agents. Coupling to soft-ionization sources, mass spectrometry (MS), and chromatographic methods in 1990-s had allowed IMS to handle complex samples, enabling new applications in biological and environmental analyses, nanoscience, and other areas. Since 2003, the introduction of commercial systems by major instrument vendors started bringing the IMS/MS capability to broad user community. The other major development of last decade has been the differential IMS or “field asymmetric waveform IMS” (FAIMS) that employs asymmetric time-dependent electric field to sort ions not by mobility itself, but by the difference between its values in strong and weak electric fields. Coupling of FAIMS to conventional IMS and stacking of conventional IMS stages have enabled two-dimensional separations that dramatically expand the power of ion mobility methods.

  17. Development of Hypertension Management Mobile Application based on Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kang, H; Park, H A

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to develop and evaluate a mobile application for hypertension management based on Clinical Practice Guidelines. The application was developed according to Web-Roadmap methodology. In planning phase, we defined the tasks and product of each phase, selected clinical practice guidelines and extracted intervention items for hypertension management. In analysis phase, we analysed intervention items and made data dictionary, rules, use-case diagram, hypertension management ontology and tailored recommendations for the application. In design phase, we developed an entity-relations diagram, algorithm, and user interface and coded them in the implementation phase. In evaluation phase, first, the knowledge-base was evaluated for its accuracy by experts and they proposed three more detailed recommendations, which were added to the application. Second, mobile heuristics were evaluated. The evaluators pointed out 33 usability-related problems on mobile heuristics items. Out of these, three problems were solved by reflecting evaluators' comments. PMID:25991219

  18. Virtual Mobility in Reality: A Study of the Use of ICT in Finnish Leonardo da Vinci Mobility Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valjus, Sonja

    An e-mail survey and interviews collected data on use of information and communications technology (ICT) in Finnish Leonardo da Vinci mobility projects from 2000-02. Findings showed that the most common ICT tools used were e-mail, digital tools, and the World Wide Web; ICT was used during all project phases; the most common problems concerned…

  19. Mobile Learning and Integration of Mobile Technologies in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keengwe, Jared; Bhargava, Malini

    2014-01-01

    Mobile technologies have a huge potential to transform education provided these technologies are designed and implemented in such a way that they are relevant to the social and cultural context of learning. Clearly, the application, implementation, and design of mobile technology in the global educational context pose technological and…

  20. Mobile Perspectives: On Websites. Mobile Matters--Communication Trumps Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Susan T.

    2011-01-01

    Mobile technology is a favorite discussion topic among senior IT leaders and higher education administrators. Mobile is the future for content delivery. Colleges and universities need to establish a strategy now and make the decisions necessary to take advantage of this communication opportunity. In this article, the author recommends making…

  1. Mobile Learning with a Mobile Game: Design and Motivational Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwabe, Gerhard; Goth, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    Mobile technologies offer the opportunity to embed learning in a natural environment. This paper describes the design of the MobileGame prototype, exploring the opportunities to support learning through an orientation game in a university setting. The paper first introduces the scenario and then describes the general architecture of the prototype.…

  2. The Future of Mobile Technology and Mobile Wireless Computing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Jim; Hannan, Mike

    2004-01-01

    It is often stated that mobile wireless computing is going to be the next big technology revolution that will grip the world in the same way mobile telephones did in the 1990s. However, while the technology is rapidly improving, the rate of uptake has been lower than expected. This paper describes some of the reasons for this, and discusses some…

  3. [Biomechanical study on orthodontic tooth movement: changes in biomechanical property of the periodontal tissue in terms of tooth mobility].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Y

    1989-12-01

    The magnitude of tooth mobility has been frequently used for evaluating biomechanical response of the periodontal tissue to applied forces. However, tooth mobility during orthodontic tooth movement has not been measured. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in biomechanical property of the periodontal tissue during canine retraction, in terms of tooth mobility. The upper canines on both sides of ten orthodontic patients were moved in the distal direction for about four weeks with an initial force of 200 gf. An amount of tooth movement and a magnitude of tooth mobility were measured every 3 or 4 days during retraction. A distally directed force up to 500 gf was continuously applied to each canine and tooth mobility was measured with a noncontact type of eddy current displacement sensor. A two-dimensional finite element model was constructed and displacements of the finite element model were calculated with various Young's moduli in loading with a 100 gf force in the distal direction. In comparison with the magnitudes of the tooth mobility, Young's modulus of the periodontal membrane before retraction and the influence of the biomechanical factors on changes in tooth mobility were investigated. The tooth movement curve was divided into three phases; an initial phase, a lag phase and a post-lag phase. The magnitudes of tooth mobility at the initial phase were significantly larger than those before retraction within the range of 250 gf to 500 gf and these magnitudes decreased during the lag phase. The magnitudes of tooth mobility at the post-lag phase significantly increased, within the range of 50 gf to 500 gf, than those before retraction. As a result of curveliniar regression analysis, the tooth mobility curves approximated to delta = AFB, where delta and F denote tooth mobility and force respectively. The coefficients A and B changed according to the phases of tooth movement. An inclination of the tooth mobility curve expressed by a tangent at the

  4. A Mobile IPv6 based Distributed Mobility Management Mechanism of Mobile Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shi; Jiayin, Cheng; Shanzhi, Chen

    A flatter architecture is one of the trends of mobile Internet. Traditional centralized mobility management mechanism faces the challenges such as scalability and UE reachability. A MIPv6 based distributed mobility management mechanism is proposed in this paper. Some important network entities and signaling procedures are defined. UE reachability is also considered in this paper through extension to DNS servers. Simulation results show that the proposed approach can overcome the scalability problem of the centralized scheme.

  5. Need for, and financial feasibility of, satellite-aided land mobile communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castruccio, P. A.; Marantz, C. S.; Freibaum, J.

    Questions regarding the role of a mobile-satellite system in augmenting the terrestrial communications system are considered, and a market assessment study is discussed. Aspects of an investment analysis are examined, taking into account a three phase financial study of four postulated land Mobile Satellite Service (LMSS) systems, project profitability evaluation methods, risk analysis methods, financial projections, potential investor acceptance standards, and a risk analysis. It is concluded that a satellite augmented terrestrial mobile service appears to be economically and technically superior to a service depending exclusively on terrestrial systems. The interest in the Mobile Satellite Service is found to be worldwide, and the ground equipment market is potentially large.

  6. Need for, and financial feasibility of, satellite-aided land mobile communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castruccio, P. A.; Marantz, C. S.; Freibaum, J.

    1982-01-01

    Questions regarding the role of a mobile-satellite system in augmenting the terrestrial communications system are considered, and a market assessment study is discussed. Aspects of an investment analysis are examined, taking into account a three phase financial study of four postulated land Mobile Satellite Service (LMSS) systems, project profitability evaluation methods, risk analysis methods, financial projections, potential investor acceptance standards, and a risk analysis. It is concluded that a satellite augmented terrestrial mobile service appears to be economically and technically superior to a service depending exclusively on terrestrial systems. The interest in the Mobile Satellite Service is found to be worldwide, and the ground equipment market is potentially large.

  7. Modelling an Institutional Mobile Learning Readiness Analyser

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ireri, Bonface Ngari; Omwenga, Elijah I.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the affordability, ease of use and availability of mobile devices, many people in Africa and developing countries have acquired at least a mobile device. The penetration of mobile devices places many learning institution in a position to adopt mobile learning, however there are few tools for measuring mobile learning readiness for an…

  8. [Consideration of Mobile Medical Device Regulation].

    PubMed

    Peng, Liang; Yang, Pengfei; He, Weigang

    2015-07-01

    The regulation of mobile medical devices is one of the hot topics in the industry now. The definition, regulation scope and requirements, potential risks of mobile medical devices were analyzed and discussed based on mobile computing techniques and the FDA guidance of mobile medical applications. The regulation work of mobile medical devices in China needs to adopt the risk-based method. PMID:26665948

  9. ACTS mobile propagation campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, Julius; Vogel, Wolfhard J.; Torrence, Geoffrey W.

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented for three propagation measurement campaigns involving a mobile receiving laboratory and 20 GHz transmissions from the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). Four 1994 campaigns were executed during weekly periods in and around Austin, Texas in February and May, in Central Maryland during March, and in Fairbanks, Alaska and environs in June. Measurements tested the following effects at 20 GHz: (1) attenuation due to roadside trees with and without foliage, (2) multipath effects for scenarios in which line-of-sight paths were unshadowed, (3) fades due to terrain and roadside obstacles, (4) fades due to structures in urban environs, (5) single tree attenuation, and (6) effects of fading at low elevation angles (8 deg in Fairbanks, Alaska) and high elevation angles (55 deg in Austin, Texas). Results presented here cover sampled measurements in Austin, Texas for foliage and non-foliage cases and in Central Maryland for non-foliage runs.

  10. Mobile radio - An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucar, Andy D.

    1991-11-01

    Following a brief prologue and historical overview, such technical issues as the repertoire of systems and services, management of the airwaves, the operating environment, service quality, network issues and cell size, channel coding and modulation, speech coding, diversity, multiplex, and multiple access (FDMA, TDMA, CDMA) are discussed. Also addressed are the potential economic and sociological impacts of mobile radio communications in the wake of the redistribution of airwaves at the World Administrative Radio Conference WARC '92. Performance dependence on multipath delay (related to the cell size and terrain configuration), Doppler frequency (related to the carrier frequency, data rate, and the speed of vehicles), and message length (can dictate the choice of multiple access) is briefly discussed.

  11. Mobile continuous lunar excavation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paterson, John L.

    1992-01-01

    A novel approach to the concept of lunar mining and the use of in situ oxygen, metallics, and ceramics is presented. The EVA time required to set up, relocate, and maintain equipment, as well as the cost per pound of shipping the mining and processing equipment to the moon are considered. The proposed soil fracturing/loading mechanisms are all based loosely on using the Apollo Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) Frame. All use motor driven tracks for mobility in the forward/reverse and left/right direction. All mechanisms employ the concept of rototillers which are attached to a gantry which, through the use of motor-driven lead screws, provide the rototillers with an up/down capability. A self-reactant excavator, a local mass enhanced excavator, and a soil reactant excavator are illustrated.

  12. Mobile electric power

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomfield, V.J.; Bloomfield, D.P.; Johnson, B.Q.

    1992-01-30

    Analytic Power has proven the feasibility of a mobile electric power unit in the form of a hydride fueled ion-exchange membrane (IEM) fuel cell stack. We have over 5 years experience building and testing IEM fuel cells. The power section of a 350 watt fuel cell stack weighs 4.65 pounds based on our five cell sub-stack component weights. The composite stack structure is fabricated from two components; a unitized flow field and catalyzed membrane. The lightweight unitized flow field concept was proven in the first three months of the contract. A single unit flow field weighs 0.155 pounds and can seal to 60 psi. The single cell catalyzed Nafion membrane exceeded our performance goal of 0.6 volts at 100 ASF. Stack performance points were 0.42 volts at 113 ASF and .75 volts at 96 asf.

  13. Intelligent Mobile Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alena, Rick; Gilbaugh, Bruce; Glass, Brian; Swanson, Keith (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Testing involves commercial radio equipment approved for export and use in Canada. Testing was conducted in the Canadian High Arctic, where hilly terrain provided the worst-case testing. SFU and Canadian governmental agencies made significant technical contributions. The only technical data related to radio testing was exchanged with SFU. Test protocols are standard radio tests performed by communication technicians worldwide. The Joint Fields Operations objectives included the following: (1) to provide Internet communications services for field science work and mobile exploration systems; (2) to evaluate the range and throughput of three different medium-range radio link technologies for providing coverage of the crater area; and (3) to demonstrate collaborative software such as NetMeeting with multi-point video for exchange of scientific information between remote node and base-base camp and science centers as part of communications testing.

  14. Phobos Mobility Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielski, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Phobos, the larger of Mars' moons, provides a potential staging location for human exploration of the Martian surface. Its low gravity (about 1/200th of Earth) and lack of atmosphere makes it an attractive destination before a more complex human landing on Mars is attempted. While easier to approach and depart than Mars itself, Phobos provides unique challenges to visiting crews. It is irregularly shaped, so its local gravitational field does not always point straight down with respect to the visible horizon. It is very close to Mars and tidally locked, so the Martian gravity gradient and applied acceleration greatly affect the perceived surface gravity direction and magnitude. This simulation allows the assessment of unique mobility approaches on the surface of Phobos, including hopping in particular.

  15. Simultaneous determination of aflatoxin B(1) and ochratoxin A in licorice roots and fritillary bulbs by solid-phase extraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lizhi; Wang, Zhen; Gao, Weiwei; Chen, Juan; Yang, Meihua; Kuang, Ying; Huang, Linfang; Chen, Shilin

    2013-06-01

    An effective method was developed for screening licorice roots and fritillary bulbs for contamination by aflatoxin B(1) and ochratoxin A using high-performance liquid chromatography connected to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). The samples were pre-concentrated and purified using solid-phase extraction, which provided satisfactory results. The separation was performed on a Waters Xbridge(TM) C18 column with a linear gradient of acetonitrile - water containing 5mM ammonium acetate. The MS spectrum was acquired in positive mode with both single quadrupole (Q1) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The optimised method offered a good linear correlation (r(2)>0.9967), excellent precision (RSD<2.83%) and acceptable recovery (from 92.78 to 105.37%). The limits of detection (LOD) and the limits of quantification (LOQ) were less than 0.024 μg/kg and 0.095 μg/kg, respectively. The validated method was successfully applied to the rapid screening for AFB(1) and OTA in licorice roots and fritillary bulbs. PMID:23411213

  16. Development and validation of a solid-phase extraction method coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet-diode array detection for the determination of sulfonylurea herbicide residues in bovine milk samples.

    PubMed

    Seccia, Serenella; Albrizio, Stefania; Fidente, Paola; Montesano, Domenico

    2011-03-01

    This study proposes a fast, simple and sensitive liquid chromatography diode array detector (LC/UV-DAD)-based method for the simultaneous determination of eight sulfonylurea herbicides (bensulfuron methyl, chlorsulfuron, metsulfuron methyl, primisulfuron methyl, rimsulfuron, thifensulfuron methyl, triasulfuron and tribenuron methyl) in bovine whole milk at concentrations lower than the default limit of 0.01 mg kg(-1) allowed by current legislation (Regulation EC/396/2005 and following Annexes). An effective one-step solid phase extraction (SPE) and clean up procedure was defined with use of Chem Elut cartridges, providing good recoveries for all the analytes tested and with no matrix effects affecting method accuracy. Separation of herbicides was obtained on a C(18) column by acetonitrile- water gradient elution. Method validation has been performed according to European Commission Decision 2002/657/EC criteria, in terms of linearity, recovery, precision, specificity, decision limit (CC(α)) and detection capability (CC(β)). Typical recoveries ranged between 78.4% and 99.7%, at the maximum residue limits (MRLs) levels established by Regulation EC/396/2005, with relative standard deviations (RSD) no larger than 10%. PMID:21277578

  17. The Sutton Trust: Mobility Manifesto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton Trust, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Ahead of the party conference season, the Sutton Trust is urging fairer admissions to comprehensives, grammar schools and independent schools as part of a 10-point Mobility Manifesto setting out ten practical policy steps designed to put social mobility at the heart of the 2015 election campaign. The manifesto urges greater use of ballots (random…

  18. Social Properties of Mobile Video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, April Slayden; O'Hara, Kenton; Vorbau, Alex

    Mobile video is now an everyday possibility with a wide array of commercially available devices, services, and content. These new technologies have created dramatic shifts in the way video-based media can be produced, consumed, and delivered by people beyond the familiar behaviors associated with fixed TV and video technologies. Such technology revolutions change the way users behave and change their expectations in regards to their mobile video experiences. Building upon earlier studies of mobile video, this paper reports on a study using diary techniques and ethnographic interviews to better understand how people are using commercially available mobile video technologies in their everyday lives. Drawing on reported episodes of mobile video behavior, the study identifies the social motivations and values underpinning these behaviors that help characterize mobile video consumption beyond the simplistic notion of viewing video only to kill time. This paper also discusses the significance of user-generated content and the usage of video in social communities through the description of two mobile video technology services that allow users to create and share content. Implications for adoption and design of mobile video technologies and services are discussed as well.

  19. Transformations: Mobile Interaction & Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Fiona; Kop, Rita; Thomas, Nathan; Dunning, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Mobile devices and the interactions that these technologies afford have the potential to change the face and nature of education in our schools. Indeed, mobile technological advances are seen to offer better access to educational material and new interactive ways to learn. However, the question arises, as to whether these new technologies are…

  20. OPACs and the Mobile Revolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liston, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    Since the turn of the century, one of the hottest topics in the IT world has been the coming mobile revolution. While there's been some arguing over the details, the fundamental tenet of the mobile revolution is that lots and lots of people will start accessing web content from handheld portable devices instead of using a traditional laptop or…

  1. Savannah: Mobile Gaming and Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Facer, K.; Joiner, R.; Stanton, D.; Reid, J.; Hull, R.; Kirk, D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports a study that attempts to explore how using mobile technologies in direct physical interaction with space and with other players can be combined with principles of engagement and self-motivation to create a powerful and engaging learning experience. We developed a mobile gaming experience designed to encourage the development of…

  2. Illumination Characteristics of Mobility Lights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wacker, R. T.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This study measured the light distribution patterns and the decay in light output of three mobility lights that visually impaired persons can use for night travel: the Wide-Angle Mobility Lights, the Streamlight, and the Mag-Lite. Implications are discussed in terms of selecting the most efficient visual aid for particular usage. (Author/JDD)

  3. Social Mobility and Educational Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Zefang; Wang, Yanbin; Chen, Wenjiao

    2009-01-01

    There is a close interactive relationship between social mobility and educational selection. On one side, the character, direction, speed, level, methods and trends of social mobility affect the aims, goals, functions, scope, strategy, content and methods of choice in education. On the other side, the goals, basis and means of choosing education…

  4. Why Mobile Is a Must

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaffrey, Mary

    2011-01-01

    There is a need for a new educational model that makes learning personal and motivating, and helps secure students' future in the knowledge economy. Mobile technology opens the door to it. Mobile devices provide the platform and, as importantly, the incentive for students to take personal ownership of the learning experience. The lessons absorbed…

  5. The Orientation and Mobility Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiener, William R.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Implementation of recommendations of a position paper on training Orientation Mobility (OM) assistants is considered with suggestions concerning the roles of the OM specialist and OM assistant, specific skill areas for training, the role of the agency or school, and a preparation program for the mobility assistant leading to certification. (DB)

  6. Mobility. Snapshot™ Report, Spring 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Just over 9% of all students attended more than one institution during the 2012-13 academic year. In each year studied, nearly three-fourths of all mobile students had at least one enrollment at a 2-year public institution. In each of the included years, students in the 20 and under age group had the highest mobility rates, followed by students in…

  7. Mobile Technology and Liberal Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossing, Jonathan P.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author offers reflections on the impact of mobile technology for liberal education. These reflections are based on his own experience of incorporating iPads in his communication courses during the 2010-2011 academic year. As a member of an interdisciplinary faculty learning community on the use of mobile tablets, he explored…

  8. Exploring Mobile Learning Success Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a comparative account and analysis of three mobile Web 2.0 projects instigated within a tertiary learning environment during 2008. Following the successful instigation of a mobile Web 2.0 project in the third year of a Bachelor of Product Design course during semester one, similar projects were initiated in semester two within the…

  9. Education & Mobility. CEE DP 100

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machin, Stephen; Pelkonen, Panu; Salvanes, Kjell G.

    2008-01-01

    Regional labour mobility has long been viewed as a crucial component in the functioning of the labour markets of different countries. Indeed, the study of regional labour mobility has moved towards the top of the research agenda, especially in Europe, where regional unemployment differentials have been persistently larger than in the United…

  10. Carbon phosphide monolayers with superior carrier mobility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaoxue; Pandey, Ravindra; Karna, Shashi P

    2016-04-28

    Two dimensional (2D) materials with a finite band gap and high carrier mobility are sought after materials from both fundamental and technological perspectives. In this paper, we present the results based on the particle swarm optimization method and density functional theory which predict three geometrically different phases of the carbon phosphide (CP) monolayer consisting of sp2 hybridized C atoms and sp3 hybridized P atoms in hexagonal networks. Two of the phases, referred to as α-CP and β-CP with puckered or buckled surfaces are semiconducting with highly anisotropic electronic and mechanical properties. More remarkably, they have the lightest electrons and holes among the known 2D semiconductors, yielding superior carrier mobility. The γ-CP has a distorted hexagonal network and exhibits a semi-metallic behavior with Dirac cones. These theoretical findings suggest that the binary CP monolayer is a yet unexplored 2D material holding great promise for applications in high-performance electronics and optoelectronics. PMID:27067002

  11. Performance measurement of mobile manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostelman, Roger; Hong, Tsai; Marvel, Jeremy

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes a concept for measuring the reproducible performance of mobile manipulators to be used for assembly or other similar tasks. An automatic guided vehicle with an onboard robot arm was programmed to repeatedly move to and stop at a novel, reconfigurable mobile manipulator artifact (RMMA), sense the RMMA, and detect targets on the RMMA. The manipulator moved a laser retroreflective sensor to detect small reflectors that can be reconfigured to measure various manipulator positions and orientations (poses). This paper describes calibration of a multi-camera, motion capture system using a 6 degree-of-freedom metrology bar and then using the camera system as a ground truth measurement device for validation of the reproducible mobile manipulator's experiments and test method. Static performance measurement of a mobile manipulator using the RMMA has proved useful for relatively high tolerance pose estimation and other metrics that support standard test method development for indexed and dynamic mobile manipulator applications.

  12. Joint Transmit Antenna Selection and Power Allocation for ISDF Relaying Mobile-to-Mobile Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lingwei; Zhang, Hao; Gulliver, T. Aaron

    2016-01-01

    The outage probability (OP) performance of multiple-relay incremental-selective decode-and-forward (ISDF) relaying mobile-to-mobile (M2M) sensor networks with transmit antenna selection (TAS) over N-Nakagami fading channels is investigated. Exact closed-form OP expressions for both optimal and suboptimal TAS schemes are derived. The power allocation problem is formulated to determine the optimal division of transmit power between the broadcast and relay phases. The OP performance under different conditions is evaluated via numerical simulation to verify the analysis. These results show that the optimal TAS scheme has better OP performance than the suboptimal scheme. Further, the power allocation parameter has a significant influence on the OP performance. PMID:26907282

  13. Joint Transmit Antenna Selection and Power Allocation for ISDF Relaying Mobile-to-Mobile Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lingwei; Zhang, Hao; Gulliver, T Aaron

    2016-01-01

    The outage probability (OP) performance of multiple-relay incremental-selective decode-and-forward (ISDF) relaying mobile-to-mobile (M2M) sensor networks with transmit antenna selection (TAS) over N-Nakagami fading channels is investigated. Exact closed-form OP expressions for both optimal and suboptimal TAS schemes are derived. The power allocation problem is formulated to determine the optimal division of transmit power between the broadcast and relay phases. The OP performance under different conditions is evaluated via numerical simulation to verify the analysis. These results show that the optimal TAS scheme has better OP performance than the suboptimal scheme. Further, the power allocation parameter has a significant influence on the OP performance. PMID:26907282

  14. iFringe: a fringe analysis application for mobile smart devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Jacob; Teo, Josias Y. S.; Qian, Kemao

    2015-03-01

    This paper introduces iFringe, a mobile application that attempts to incorporate the resource heavy fringe analysis algorithms into the smart mobile devices platform. This first step taken towards mobility in the optical processing field aims to become a catalyst for modernization of various aspects of the field as well as to diversify developments to other applications. Predominantly, the motivation of this work stems from the vastly indifferent human interactive method of mobile devices, which enable images displayed on its touch screen to be manipulated in ways that could enhance the fringe analysis experience. Furthermore, given its hardware compatibility to the conventional fringe projection system, these mobile devices could potentially serve as a much more compact replacement. However, one imperative weakness that mobile devices pose is its limited computing ability. Therefore, to examine the feasibility of incorporating the fringe analysis algorithms into a mobile platform, we have implemented two fundamental fringe analysis techniques, namely the Fourier transform fringe analysis method and the phase-shifting technique. Formulas and processing procedures such as discrete Fourier transform (DFT) and quality-guided phase unwrapping, were included in accordance to their original algorithms to test their performance and usability on a smart mobile device. Details of the implementation and the performance results will also be presented in this paper to demonstrate the practicality of these algorithms on the smart mobile device platform.

  15. The mobile Sousy-Doppler radar: Technical design and first results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czechowsky, P.; Schmidt, G.; Ruster, R.

    1983-01-01

    A mobile VHF Doppler system was developed. The electronic part is installed in a 20 ft container and tested using a special log periodic aerial to illuminate the 300 m dish. The system was extended by designing a mobile phased antenna array with finally 576 Yagi elements. The grouping of the single Yagis, the system of transmission lines, the phase shifters, the power splitters and the T/R switch are described. Results from the first two campaigns and a survey of future programs demonstrating the flexibility of this mobile system are summarized.

  16. Moon Phases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    2010-01-01

    When teaching Moon phases, the focus seems to be on the sequence of Moon phases and, in some grade levels, how Moon phases occur. Either focus can sometimes be a challenge, especially without the use of models and observations of the Moon. In this month's column, the author describes some of the lessons that he uses to teach the phases of the Moon…

  17. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    SciTech Connect

    Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80{degrees}C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either {open_quotes}satisfactory{close_quotes} (2-20 mpy) or {open_quotes}excellent{close_quotes} (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment.

  18. Quantum impurities: from mobile Josephson junctions to depletons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schecter, Michael; Gangardt, Dimitri M.; Kamenev, Alex

    2016-06-01

    We overview the main features of mobile impurities moving in one-dimensional superfluid backgrounds by modeling it as a mobile Josephson junction, which leads naturally to the periodic dispersion of the impurity. The dissipation processes, such as radiative friction and quantum viscosity, are shown to result from the interaction of the collective phase difference with the background phonons. We develop a more realistic depleton model of an impurity-hole bound state that provides a number of exact results interpolating between the semiclassical weakly interacting picture and the strongly interacting Tonks–Girardeau regime. We also discuss the physics of a trapped impurity, relevant to current experiments with ultra cold atoms.

  19. Mobile satellite communications technology - A summary of NASA activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutzi, E. J.; Knouse, G. H.

    1986-01-01

    Studies in recent years indicate that future high-capacity mobile satellite systems are viable only if certain high-risk enabling technologies are developed. Accordingly, NASA has structured an advanced technology development program aimed at efficient utilization of orbit, spectrum, and power. Over the last two years, studies have concentrated on developing concepts and identifying cost drivers and other issues associated with the major technical areas of emphasis: vehicle antennas, speech compression, bandwidth-efficient digital modems, network architecture, mobile satellite channel characterization, and selected space segment technology. The program is now entering the next phase - breadboarding, development, and field experimentation.

  20. Ubiquitous Mobility with Mobile Phones: A Cultural Ecology for Mobile Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, John; Pachler, Norbert; Bachmair, Ben

    2011-01-01

    This article argues that mobile phones should be viewed as new cultural resources that operate within an individualized, mobile and convergent mass communication; such a recognition facilitates the options for a cultural ecology. A particular challenge here is to find adequate curricular functions in school where the inclusion of these new…

  1. Mobilization of intensive care patients: a multidisciplinary practical guide for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Green, Margot; Marzano, Vince; Leditschke, I Anne; Mitchell, Imogen; Bissett, Bernie

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To describe our experience and the practical tools we have developed to facilitate early mobilization in the intensive care unit (ICU) as a multidisciplinary team. Background Despite the evidence supporting early mobilization for improving outcomes for ICU patients, recent international point-prevalence studies reveal that few patients are mobilized in the ICU. Existing guidelines rarely address the practical issues faced by multidisciplinary ICU teams attempting to translate evidence into practice. We present a comprehensive strategy for safe mobilization utilized in our ICU, incorporating the combined skills of medical, nursing, and physiotherapy staff to achieve safe outcomes and establish a culture which prioritizes this intervention. Methods A raft of tools and strategies are described to facilitate mobilization in ICU by the multidisciplinary team. Patients without safe unsupported sitting balance and without ≥3/5 (Oxford scale) strength in the lower limbs commence phase 1 mobilization, including training of sitting balance and use of the tilt table. Phase 2 mobilization involves supported or active weight-bearing, incorporating gait harnesses if necessary. The Plan B mnemonic guides safe multidisciplinary mobilization of invasively ventilated patients and emphasizes the importance of a clearly articulated plan in delivering this valuable treatment as a team. Discussion These tools have been used over the past 5 years in a tertiary ICU with a very low incidence of adverse outcomes (<2%). The tools and strategies described are useful not only to guide practical implementation of early mobilization, but also in the creation of a unit culture where ICU staff prioritize early mobilization and collaborate daily to provide the best possible care. Conclusion These practical tools allow ICU clinicians to safely and effectively implement early mobilization in critically ill patients. A genuinely multidisciplinary approach to safe mobilization in ICU is

  2. Vehicle antenna for the mobile satellite experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Sheng Y.; Chung, H. H.; Leggiere, D.; Foy, W.; Schaffner, G.; Nelson, J.; Pagels, W.; Vayner, M.; Faller, H. L.; Messer, L.

    1988-01-01

    A low profile, low cost, printed circuit, electronically steered, right hand circularly polarized phase array antenna system has been developed for the Mobile Satellite Experiment (MSAT-X) Program. The success of this antenna is based upon the development of a crossed-slot element array and detailed trade-off analyses for both the phased array and pointing system design. The optimized system provides higher gain at low elevation angles (20 degrees above the horizon) and broader frequency coverage (approximately 8 1/2 percent bandwidth) than is possible with a patch array. Detailed analysis showed that optimum performance could be achieved with a 19 element array of a triangular lattice geometry of 3.9 inch element spacing. This configuration has the effect of minimizing grating lobes at large scan angles plus it improves the intersatellite isolation. The array has an aperture 20 inches in diameter and is 0.75 inch thick overall, exclusive of the RF and power connector. The pointing system employs a hybrid approach that operates with both an external rate sensor and an internal error signal as a means of fine tuning the beam acquisition and track. Steering the beam is done electronically via 18, 3-bit diode phase shifters. A nineteenth phase shifter is not required as the center element serves as a reference only. Measured patterns and gain show that the array meets the stipulated performance specifications everywhere except at some low elevation angles.

  3. Physical Activity Helps Seniors Stay Mobile

    MedlinePlus

    ... External link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Physical Activity Helps Seniors Stay Mobile A carefully structured, moderate physical activity program helped vulnerable older people maintain their mobility. ...

  4. Effect of cellular mobility on immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, R. B.; Mannion, R.; Ruskin, H. J.

    2000-08-01

    Mobility of cell types in our HIV immune response model is subject to an intrinsic mobility and an explicit directed mobility, which is governed by Pmob. We investigate how restricting the explicit mobility, while maintaining the innate mobility of a viral-infected cell, affects the model's results. We find that increasing the explicit mobility of the immune system cells leads to viral dominance for certain levels of viral mutation. We conclude that increasing immune system cellular mobility indirectly increases the virus’ inherent mobility.

  5. NASA Computational Mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This blue sky study was conducted in order to study the feasibility and scope of the notion of Computational Mobility to potential NASA applications such as control of multiple robotic platforms. The study was started on July lst, 2003 and concluded on September 30th, 2004. During the course of that period, four meetings were held for the participants to meet and discuss the concept, its viability, and potential applications. The study involved, at various stages, the following personnel: James Allen (IHMC), Albert0 Canas (IHMC), Daniel Cooke (Texas Tech), Kenneth Ford (IHMC - PI), Patrick Hayes (IHMC), Butler Hine (NASA), Robert Morris (NASA), Liam Pedersen (NASA), Jerry Pratt (IHMC), Raul Saavedra (IHMC), Niranjan Suri (IHMC), and Milind Tambe (USC). A white paper describing the notion of a Process Integrated Mechanism (PIM) was generated as a result of this study. The white paper is attached to this report. In addition, a number of presentations were generated during the four meetings, which are included in this report. Finally, an execution platform and a simulation environment were developed, which are available upon request from Niranjan Suri (nsuri@,ihmc.us).

  6. Mobile robot sense net

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konolige, Kurt G.; Gutmann, Steffen; Guzzoni, Didier; Ficklin, Robert W.; Nicewarner, Keith E.

    1999-08-01

    Mobile robot hardware and software is developing to the point where interesting applications for groups of such robots can be contemplated. We envision a set of mobots acting to map and perform surveillance or other task within an indoor environment (the Sense Net). A typical application of the Sense Net would be to detect survivors in buildings damaged by earthquake or other disaster, where human searchers would be put a risk. As a team, the Sense Net could reconnoiter a set of buildings faster, more reliably, and more comprehensibly than an individual mobot. The team, for example, could dynamically form subteams to perform task that cannot be done by individual robots, such as measuring the range to a distant object by forming a long baseline stereo sensor form a pari of mobots. In addition, the team could automatically reconfigure itself to handle contingencies such as disabled mobots. This paper is a report of our current progress in developing the Sense Net, after the first year of a two-year project. In our approach, each mobot has sufficient autonomy to perform several tasks, such as mapping unknown areas, navigating to specific positions, and detecting, tracking, characterizing, and classifying human and vehicular activity. We detail how some of these tasks are accomplished, and how the mobot group is tasked.

  7. Mobile Thread Task Manager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Bradley J.; Estlin, Tara A.; Bornstein, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    The Mobile Thread Task Manager (MTTM) is being applied to parallelizing existing flight software to understand the benefits and to develop new techniques and architectural concepts for adapting software to multicore architectures. It allocates and load-balances tasks for a group of threads that migrate across processors to improve cache performance. In order to balance-load across threads, the MTTM augments a basic map-reduce strategy to draw jobs from a global queue. In a multicore processor, memory may be "homed" to the cache of a specific processor and must be accessed from that processor. The MTTB architecture wraps access to data with thread management to move threads to the home processor for that data so that the computation follows the data in an attempt to avoid L2 cache misses. Cache homing is also handled by a memory manager that translates identifiers to processor IDs where the data will be homed (according to rules defined by the user). The user can also specify the number of threads and processors separately, which is important for tuning performance for different patterns of computation and memory access. MTTM efficiently processes tasks in parallel on a multiprocessor computer. It also provides an interface to make it easier to adapt existing software to a multiprocessor environment.

  8. Mobile Energy Laboratory Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, P.R.; Batishko, C.R.; Dittmer, A.L.; Hadley, D.L.; Stoops, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked to plan and implement a framework for measuring and analyzing the efficiency of on-site energy conversion, distribution, and end-use application on federal facilities as part of its overall technical support to the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) Procedures establish guidelines for specific activities performed by PNL staff. PNL provided sophisticated energy monitoring, auditing, and analysis equipment for on-site evaluation of energy use efficiency. Specially trained engineers and technicians were provided to conduct tests in a safe and efficient manner with the assistance of host facility staff and contractors. Reports were produced to describe test procedures, results, and suggested courses of action. These reports may be used to justify changes in operating procedures, maintenance efforts, system designs, or energy-using equipment. The MEL capabilities can subsequently be used to assess the results of energy conservation projects. These procedures recognize the need for centralized NM administration, test procedure development, operator training, and technical oversight. This need is evidenced by increasing requests fbr MEL use and the economies available by having trained, full-time MEL operators and near continuous MEL operation. DOE will assign new equipment and upgrade existing equipment as new capabilities are developed. The equipment and trained technicians will be made available to federal agencies that provide funding for the direct costs associated with MEL use.

  9. The GalileoMobile Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, P. F.

    2014-10-01

    GalileoMobile is an itinerant science education program that is bringing astronomy closer to young people around the world since 2009 (http://galileo-mobile.org/). GalileoMobile acts in areas where outreach projects are scarce or non-existent. It is a purely non-profit initiative run by 22 volunteers (astronomers, educators and science communicators) from all over the world. The team seeks to promote cultural interaction among people beyond geographical borders and spread the message that we all live under the same sky.

  10. Imaging Mobile Zinc in Biology

    PubMed Central

    Tomat, Elisa; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Trafficking and regulation of mobile zinc pools influence cellular functions and pathological conditions in multiple organs, including brain, pancreas, and prostate. The quest for a dynamic description of zinc distribution and mobilization in live cells fuels the development of increasingly sophisticated probes. Detection systems that respond to zinc binding with changes of their fluorescence emission properties have provided sensitive tools for mobile zinc imaging, and fluorescence microscopy experiments have afforded depictions of zinc distribution within live cells and tissues. Both small-molecule and protein-based fluorescent probes can address complex imaging challenges, such as analyte quantification, site-specific sensor localization, and real-time detection. PMID:20097117

  11. NASA's mobile satellite development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rafferty, William; Dessouky, Khaled; Sue, Miles

    1988-01-01

    A Mobile Satellite System (MSS) will provide data and voice communications over a vast geographical area to a large population of mobile users. A technical overview is given of the extensive research and development studies and development performed under NASA's mobile satellite program (MSAT-X) in support of the introduction of a U.S. MSS. The critical technologies necessary to enable such a system are emphasized: vehicle antennas, modulation and coding, speech coders, networking and propagation characterization. Also proposed is a first, and future generation MSS architecture based upon realized ground segment equipment and advanced space segment studies.

  12. Coherent versus noncoherent signaling for satellite-aided mobile communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, F.; Sumida, J.

    1986-01-01

    The use of coherent versus noncoherent communications is an unresolved issue for the mobile satellite community. Should one select the more robust but less efficient noncoherent strategy for communications over satellite-aided mobile channels, or does the introduction of a space platform in the mobile link improve signal stability (both amplitude and phase) such that conventional coherent schemes become attractive? This publication tries to answer some of the questions by discussing the results from experiments using a coherent QPSK receiver. The issues discussed include items such as the measured performance in Rician fading, the link error floor in a fading environment, etc. The results are compared and contrasted with that of a noncoherent limiter/discriminator FM receiver.

  13. Mobilization plan for the Y-12 9409-5 tank storage facility RCRA closure plan. Final report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1993-11-01

    This mobilization plan identifies the activities and equipment necessary to begin the field sampling for the Oak Ridge Y-12 9409-5 Diked Tank Storage Facility (DTSF) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure. Elements of the plan outline the necessary components of each mobilization task and identify whether SAIC or the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Y-12 Environmental Restoration Division will be responsible for task coordination. Field work will be conducted in two phases: mobilization phase and soil sampling phase. Training and medical monitoring, access, permits and passes, decontamination/staging area, equipment, and management are covered in this document.

  14. High mobility emissive organic semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Hantang; Dong, Huanli; Meng, Lingqiang; Jiang, Longfeng; Jiang, Lang; Wang, Ying; Yu, Junsheng; Sun, Yanming; Hu, Wenping; Heeger, Alan J

    2015-01-01

    The integration of high charge carrier mobility and high luminescence in an organic semiconductor is challenging. However, there is need of such materials for organic light-emitting transistors and organic electrically pumped lasers. Here we show a novel organic semiconductor, 2,6-diphenylanthracene (DPA), which exhibits not only high emission with single crystal absolute florescence quantum yield of 41.2% but also high charge carrier mobility with single crystal mobility of 34 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on DPA give pure blue emission with brightness up to 6,627 cd m(-2) and turn-on voltage of 2.8 V. 2,6-Diphenylanthracene OLED arrays are successfully driven by DPA field-effect transistor arrays, demonstrating that DPA is a high mobility emissive organic semiconductor with potential in organic optoelectronics. PMID:26620323

  15. High mobility emissive organic semiconductor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Hantang; Dong, Huanli; Meng, Lingqiang; Jiang, Longfeng; Jiang, Lang; Wang, Ying; Yu, Junsheng; Sun, Yanming; Hu, Wenping; Heeger, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    The integration of high charge carrier mobility and high luminescence in an organic semiconductor is challenging. However, there is need of such materials for organic light-emitting transistors and organic electrically pumped lasers. Here we show a novel organic semiconductor, 2,6-diphenylanthracene (DPA), which exhibits not only high emission with single crystal absolute florescence quantum yield of 41.2% but also high charge carrier mobility with single crystal mobility of 34 cm2 V−1 s−1. Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on DPA give pure blue emission with brightness up to 6,627 cd m−2 and turn-on voltage of 2.8 V. 2,6-Diphenylanthracene OLED arrays are successfully driven by DPA field-effect transistor arrays, demonstrating that DPA is a high mobility emissive organic semiconductor with potential in organic optoelectronics. PMID:26620323

  16. High mobility emissive organic semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Hantang; Dong, Huanli; Meng, Lingqiang; Jiang, Longfeng; Jiang, Lang; Wang, Ying; Yu, Junsheng; Sun, Yanming; Hu, Wenping; Heeger, Alan J.

    2015-12-01

    The integration of high charge carrier mobility and high luminescence in an organic semiconductor is challenging. However, there is need of such materials for organic light-emitting transistors and organic electrically pumped lasers. Here we show a novel organic semiconductor, 2,6-diphenylanthracene (DPA), which exhibits not only high emission with single crystal absolute florescence quantum yield of 41.2% but also high charge carrier mobility with single crystal mobility of 34 cm2 V-1 s-1. Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on DPA give pure blue emission with brightness up to 6,627 cd m-2 and turn-on voltage of 2.8 V. 2,6-Diphenylanthracene OLED arrays are successfully driven by DPA field-effect transistor arrays, demonstrating that DPA is a high mobility emissive organic semiconductor with potential in organic optoelectronics.

  17. Promoting Function, Independence, and Mobility

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptom management, the use of mobility aids, automobile adaptations and the use of assistance animals. Increasing Accessibility often requires the adaptation of tools and devices at one’s home or ...

  18. Time lapse: Mobile Launcher Moves

    NASA Video Gallery

    The mobile launcher returned from Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida following two weeks of structural and other testing. The 355-foot-tall structure is to be used by the Spac...

  19. Mobile Multi-System Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witoff, Robert J.; Doody, David F.

    2012-01-01

    At the time of this reporting, there are 2,589 rich mobile devices used at JPL, including 1,550 iPhones and 968 Blackberrys. Considering a total JPL population of 5,961 employees, mobile applications have a total addressable market of 43 percent of the employees at JPL, and that number is rising. While it was found that no existing desktop tools can realistically be replaced by a mobile application, there is certainly a need to improve access to these desktop tools. When an alarm occurs and an engineer is away from his desk, a convenient means of accessing relevant data can save an engineer a great deal of time and improve his job efficiency. To identify which data is relevant, an engineer benefits from a succinct overview of the data housed in 13+ tools. This need can be well met by a single, rich, mobile application that provides access to desired data across tools in the ops infrastructure.

  20. Mobile telemedicine: a survey study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Feng

    2012-04-01

    Telemedicine involves the use of advanced and reliable communication techniques to deliver biomedical signals over long distances. In such systems, biomedical information is transmitted using wireline or wireless communication systems. Mobile telemedicine is an improved form of telemedicine, in which advanced wireless communication systems are used to deliver the biomedical signals of patients at any place and any time. Mobile telemedicine employs advanced concepts and techniques from the fields of electrical engineering, computer science, biomedical engineering, and medicine to overcome the restrictions involved in conventional telemedicine and realize an improvement in the quality of service of medicine. In this paper, we study several mobile telemedicine systems, and it is important to gain a good understanding of mobile telemedicine systems because in the further, such systems are expected to become ubiquitous for the delivery of biomedical signals for medicine. PMID:20703699

  1. Human mobility and epidemic invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colizza, Vittoria

    2010-03-01

    The current H1N1 influenza pandemic is just the latest example of how human mobility helps drive infectious diseases. Travel has grown explosively in the last decades, contributing to an emerging complex pattern of traffic flows that unfolds at different scales, shaping the spread of epidemics. Restrictions on people's mobility are thus investigated to design possible containment measures. By considering a theoretical framework in terms of reaction-diffusion processes, it is possible to study the invasion dynamics of epidemics in a metapopulation system with heterogeneous mobility patterns. The system is found to exhibit a global invasion threshold that sets the critical mobility rate below which the epidemic is contained. The results provide a general framework for the understanding of the numerical evidence from detailed data-driven simulations that show the limited benefit provided by travel flows reduction in slowing down or containing an emerging epidemic.

  2. MOBILE EMISSIONS CHARACTERIZATION TEAM (HANDOUT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The handout describes the Mobile Emissions Characterization Team of EPA's Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division. The team conducts research to characterize and evaluate emissions of volatile...

  3. Mobile Launcher Moves for Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    In anticipation of launching NASA’s Space Launch System heavy-lift rocket later in this decade, engineers wanted to check the mobile launcher, or ML, to see how it would behave moving atop a craw...

  4. Deaf mobile application accessibility requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathan, Shelena Soosay; Hussain, Azham; Hashim, Nor Laily

    2016-08-01

    Requirement for deaf mobile applications need to be analysed to ensure the disabilities need are instilled into the mobile applications developed for them. Universal design is understandable to comply every user needs, however specific disability is argued by the authors to have different need and requirements. These differences are among the reasons for these applications being developed to target for a specific group of people, however they are less usable and later abandoned. This study focuses on deriving requirements that are needed by the deaf in their mobile applications that are meant specifically for them. Studies on previous literature was conducted it can be concluded that graphic, text, multimedia and sign language interpreter are among mostly required features to be included in their mobile application to ensure the applications are usable for this community.

  5. Cellular calcium mobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, E.E.

    1984-01-01

    In vascular and other smooth muscles, occurrence of intracellular Ca stores which can be mobilized to support contraction may be a general phenomenon. The Ca stores are characterized by the requirement for release by high concentrations of agonists acting on plasma membrane receptors, by the failure of the released Ca2+ to recycle to the store, by the occurrence of rapid refilling of the store from the extracellular space, and by disappearance of the store when the plasma membrane is made leaky by saponin. In contrast to agonist-released Ca stores, those released by caffeine to support contraction in Ca2+-free solutions are more slowly lost and refilled, are not always emptied when the agonist-related store is emptied, and do not disappear after saponin treatment. Stores released by agonists have been suggested to be in the endoplasmic reticulum near the plasma membrane or at the inner aspect of the plasma membrane related to high affinity, pH-dependent Ca-binding sites. Caffeine-released stores are assumed to be in endoplasmic reticulum. Continued exposure of some tissues to Ca2+-free solutions unmasks what is considered to be a recycling Ca store releasable by agonists. Release of Ca2+ and its reaccumulation in this store appear to be slower than at the nonrecycling store. The contractions which persist for many hours in Ca2+-free solution are inhibited temporarily by Ca2+ restoration. Existence of a recycling store of releasable Ca2+ requires occurrence of mechanisms to abolish Ca2+ extrusion or leak-out of the cell and to ensure recycling to the same store.

  6. ESCAP mobile training scheme.

    PubMed

    Yasas, F M

    1977-01-01

    In response to a United Nations resolution, the Mobile Training Scheme (MTS) was set up to provide training to the trainers of national cadres engaged in frontline and supervisory tasks in social welfare and rural development. The training is innovative in its being based on an analysis of field realities. The MTS team consisted of a leader, an expert on teaching methods and materials, and an expert on action research and evaluation. The country's trainers from different departments were sent to villages to work for a short period and to report their problems in fulfilling their roles. From these grass roots experiences, they made an analysis of the job, determining what knowledge, attitude and skills it required. Analysis of daily incidents and problems were used to produce indigenous teaching materials drawn from actual field practice. How to consider the problems encountered through government structures for policy making and decisions was also learned. Tasks of the students were to identify the skills needed for role performance by job analysis, daily diaries and project histories; to analyze the particular community by village profiles; to produce indigenous teaching materials; and to practice the role skills by actual role performance. The MTS scheme was tried in Nepal in 1974-75; 3 training programs trained 25 trainers and 51 frontline workers; indigenous teaching materials were created; technical papers written; and consultations were provided. In Afghanistan the scheme was used in 1975-76; 45 participants completed the training; seminars were held; and an ongoing Council was created. It is hoped that the training program will be expanded to other countries. PMID:12265562

  7. Mobile infostation network technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajappan, Gowri; Acharya, Joydeep; Liu, Hongbo; Mandayam, Narayan; Seskar, Ivan; Yates, Roy

    2006-05-01

    Inefficient use of network resources on the battlefield is a serious liability: if an asset communicates with the network command for data-a terrain map, for instance-it ties up the end-to-end network resources. When many such assets contend for data simultaneously, traffic is limited by the slowest link along the path from the network command to the asset. A better approach is for a local server, known as an infostation, to download data on an anticipated-need basis when the network load is low. The infostation can then dump data when needed to the assets over a high-speed wireless connection. The infostation serves the local assets over an OFDM-based wireless data link that has MIMO enhancements for high data rate and robustness. We aim for data rate in excess of 100 Mbps, spectral efficiency in excess of 5 bits/sec/Hz, and robustness to poor channel conditions and jammers. We propose an adaptive physical layer that determines power levels, modulation schemes, and the MIMO enhancements to use based on the channel state and the level of interference in the system. We also incorporate the idea of superuser: a user who is allowed preferential use of the high data rate link. We propose a MAC that allows for this priority-based bandwidth allocation scheme. The proposed infostation MAC is integrated tightly with the physical layer through a cross-layer design. We call the proposed infostation PHY, MAC, and network technology, collectively, as the Mobile Infostation Network Technology (MINT).

  8. Mobile satellite systems - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, J. L.; Breithaupt, R. W.

    1986-10-01

    A comprehensive set of technical, economic, and policy studies have been completed in Canada to determine the viability of a mobile service to satisfy Canada's requirements. This paper will present an overall review of these studies, give a rationale as to why narrowband technologies are necessary for the commercial viability of this service, and the approach taken in the development of these technologies. A brief review of activities and proposed mobile satellite systems in other areas besides North America is also given.

  9. Unveiling the Mobile Learning Paradox.

    PubMed

    Mather, Carey; Cummings, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    A mobile learning paradox exists in Australian healthcare settings. Although it is increasingly acknowledged that timely, easy, and convenient access to health information using mobile learning technologies can enhance care and improve patient outcomes, currently there is an inability for nurses to access information at the point of care. Rapid growth in the use of mobile technology has created challenges for learning and teaching in the workplace. Easy access to educational resources via mobile devices challenges traditional strategies of knowledge and skill acquisition. Redesign of learning and teaching in the undergraduate curriculum and the development of policies to support the use of mobile learning at point of care is overdue. This study explored mobile learning opportunities used by clinical supervisors in tertiary and community-based facilities in two Australian States. Individual, organisation and systems level governance were sub-themes of professionalism that emerged as the main theme and impacts on learning and teaching in situ in healthcare environments. It is imperative healthcare work redesign includes learning and teaching that supports professional identity formation of students during work integrated learning. PMID:26262539

  10. Solid-phase extraction-based ultra-sensitive detection of four lipophilic marine biotoxins in bivalves by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lanyun; Yao, Xunping; Wang, Li; Li, Jige

    2015-02-01

    A solid-phase extraction (SPE) method for ultra-sensitive determination of four lipophilic marine biotoxins in bivalve samples by coupling high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS-MS) was developed. Azaspiracid-2 (AZA2), pectenotoxins-2, spirolide (SPX) and gymnodimine were simultaneously determined by HPLC-MS-MS in a positive multiple reaction monitoring mode. Separation was achieved on a reversed-phase C18 column with an acetonitrile-water gradient containing formic acid. During the analysis, solvent effects on the analytes were eliminated by using 1 : 1 water-methanol as dissolving solvent instead of pure methanol. Matrix effects in post-SPE extract and crude extract were seriously evaluated. Increased matrix effects in post-SPE extract countervailed the concentration purpose to some extent. The limits of detection of the SPE-HPLC-MS-MS method were determined to be in the range of 0.013-0.085 µg kg(-1), and the linear range of the method was in the range of 0.128-55.2 ng mL(-1) for the detected toxins. The proposed method was validated in terms of linearity (matrix-matched standard curves), precision, recovery, repeatability and limits of quantification. The recoveries of fortified samples at three different concentration levels were satisfactory, and the intra- and interday precisions were <7 and 10%, respectively.Several bivalve samples were analyzed to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method. Different target toxins were detected in different kind of bivalves. Among them, AZA2 and SPX1 were first detected in Chinese shellfish. The levels of detected toxins were below the current European Union regulatory limits. PMID:24935918

  11. Android Based Mobile Environment for Moodle Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Clunie, Gisela T.; Clunie, Clifton; Castillo, Aris; Rangel, Norman

    2013-01-01

    This paper is about the development of a platform that eases, throughout Android based mobile devices, mobility of users of virtual courses at Technological University of Panama. The platform deploys computational techniques such as "web services," design patterns, ontologies and mobile technologies to allow mobile devices communicate…

  12. Viewing Mobile Learning from a Pedagogical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Matthew; Schuck, Sandra; Burden, Kevin; Aubusson, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Mobile learning is a relatively new phenomenon and the theoretical basis is currently under development. The paper presents a pedagogical perspective of mobile learning which highlights three central features of mobile learning: authenticity, collaboration and personalisation, embedded in the unique timespace contexts of mobile learning. A…

  13. Adaptive Device Context Based Mobile Learning Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pu, Haitao; Lin, Jinjiao; Song, Yanwei; Liu, Fasheng

    2011-01-01

    Mobile learning is e-learning delivered through mobile computing devices, which represents the next stage of computer-aided, multi-media based learning. Therefore, mobile learning is transforming the way of traditional education. However, as most current e-learning systems and their contents are not suitable for mobile devices, an approach for…

  14. Student Mobility. Information Capsule. Volume 0608

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blazer, Christie

    2007-01-01

    Mobility, rather than stability, has become the norm for students in schools across the United States. The student mobility rate is now higher in the United States than in any other industrialized country. This Information Capsule discusses the reasons for student mobility and the characteristics of highly mobile students and families. Research…

  15. 47 CFR 20.7 - Mobile services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mobile services. 20.7 Section 20.7 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES COMMERCIAL MOBILE RADIO SERVICES § 20.7 Mobile services. The following are mobile services within the meaning of sections 3(n)...

  16. 47 CFR 20.7 - Mobile services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mobile services. 20.7 Section 20.7 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES COMMERCIAL MOBILE SERVICES § 20.7 Mobile services. The following are mobile services within the meaning of sections 3(n) and...

  17. Mobility of trace metals in retention pond sediments.

    PubMed

    Durand, C; Ruban, V; Amblès, A

    2004-08-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on trace metal mobility in the sediments of several road and urban infiltration/decantation ponds in France; the trace metal concentrations are indeed high. The potential mobility of trace metals (cadmium, nickel, chromium, copper, lead and zinc) was evaluated by application of the sequential extraction BCR protocol. Results have been compared with those from the IHSS protocol, which allows for the extraction of various forms of organic matter. Cadmium is the most easily exchangeable element in the case of variations in physical-chemical conditions (50% to 60% of Cd is exchangeable and 70% to 80% of Cd remains within the fulvic acid fraction) and is thus easily releasable within an acidic medium. Zinc is also potentially mobile and stays mainly concentrated in fulvic acids, except in the case of the Ronchin sediment (more than 50% in humin). In contrast, nickel and chromium are primarily present in the residual fraction and do not exhibit high mobility. Copper and lead are concentrated in both the humic acid fraction (IHSS protocol) and the organic phase (BCR scheme); consequently, their mobility is limited. PMID:15366555

  18. Enhanced Predictive Handover for Fast Proxy Mobile IPv6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Seil; Kang, Namhi; Kim, Younghan

    Proxy Mobile IPv6 (PMIPv6) has been proposed in order to overcome the limitations of host-based mobility management in IPv6 networks. However, packet losses during doing handover are still a problem. To solve this issue, several schemes have been developed, and can be classified into two approaches: predictive and reactive handover. Both approaches commonly use bi-directional tunnel between mobile access gateways (MAGs). In predictive schemes especially, mobility support for a mobile node (MN) is triggered by simplified link signal strength. Thereafter, the MN sends handover notification to its serving MAG, and is then able to initiate packet forwarding. Therefore, if the MN moves toward an unexpected MAG that does not have any pre-established tunnel with the serving MAG, it may lead to packet losses. In this paper, we define this problem as Early Packet Forwarding (EPF). As a solution, we propose an enhanced PMIPv6 scheme using two-phase tunnel control based on the IEEE 802.21 Media Independent Handover (MIH).

  19. Mobility Spectrometer Studies on Hydrazine and Ammonia Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niu, William; Eiceman, Gary; Szumlas, Andrew; Lewis, John

    2011-01-01

    An airborne vapor analyzer for detecting sub- to low- parts-per-million (ppm) hydrazine in the presence of higher concentration levels of ammonia has been under development for the Orion program. The detector is based on ambient pressure ionization and ion mobility characterization. The detector encompasses: 1) a membrane inlet to exclude particulate and aerosols from the analyzer inlet; 2) a method to separate hydrazine from ammonia which would otherwise lead to loss of calibration and quantitative accuracy for the hydrazine determination; and 3) response and quantitative determinations for both hydrazine and ammonia. Laboratory studies were made to explore some of these features including mobility measurements mindful of power, size, and weight issues. The study recommended the use of a mobility spectrometer of traditional design with a reagent gas and equipped with an inlet transfer line of bonded phase fused silica tube. The inlet transfer line provided gas phase separation of neutrals of ammonia from hydrazine at 50 C simplifying significantly the ionization chemistry that underlies response in a mobility spectrometer. Performance of the analyzer was acceptable between ranges of 30 to 80 C for both the pre-fractionation column and the drift tube. An inlet comprised of a combined membrane with valve-less injector allowed high speed quantitative determination of ammonia and hydrazine without cross reactivity from common metabolites such as alcohols, esters, and aldehydes. Preliminary test results and some of the design features are discussed.

  20. Analysis of Handoff Mechanisms in Mobile IP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraj, Maria Nadine Simonel; Issac, Biju; Haldar, Manas Kumar

    2011-06-01

    One of the most important challenges in mobile Internet Protocol (IP) is to provide service for a mobile node to maintain its connectivity to network when it moves from one domain to another. IP is responsible for routing packets across network. The first major version of IP is the Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4). It is one of the dominant protocols relevant to wireless network. Later a newer version of IP called the IPv6 was proposed. Mobile IPv6 is mainly introduced for the purpose of mobility. Mobility management enables network to locate roaming nodes in order to deliver packets and maintain connections with them when moving into new domains. Handoff occurs when a mobile node moves from one network to another. It is a key factor of mobility because a mobile node can trigger several handoffs during a session. This paper briefly explains on mobile IP and its handoff issues, along with the drawbacks of mobile IP.