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Sample records for acetyl coa carboxylase

  1. Mitochondrial storage form of acetyl CoA carboxylase in fasted and alloxan diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Roman-Lopez, C.R.; Allred, J.B.

    1986-05-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate-denatured biotinyl proteins will bind (/sup 14/C)methyl avidin which remains bound through polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The method has been used to demonstrate the presence of two high molecular weight subunit forms of acetyl CoA carboxylase in rat liver cytoplasm, both of which are precipitated by antibody to purifed rat liver acetyl CoA carboxylase prepared from sheep serum. Rat liver mitochondria contained five distinct biotinyl protein subunits, the two largest of which have been identified as acetyl CoA carboxylase subunits on the basis of precipitation by anti-acetyl CoA carboxylase antibody. The small quantity of acetyl CoA carboxylase associated with rat liver microsomes could be attributed to cytoplasmic contamination. The binding of radioactive avidin is sufficiently tight to use as a measure of the quantity of acetyl CoA carboxylase. The quantity and activity of the cytoplasmic enzyme was reduced in fasted and in alloxan diabetic rats compared to that in fed controls but the quantity of the enzyme associated with isolated mitochondria was not reduced. The results indicate that there is a mitochondrial storage form of acetyl CoA carboxylase.

  2. Acetyl CoA carboxylase inactivation and meiotic maturation in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Valsangkar, Deepa S; Downs, Stephen M

    2015-09-01

    In mouse oocytes, meiotic induction by pharmacological activation of PRKA (adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase; formerly known as AMPK) or by hormones depends on stimulation of fatty acid oxidation (FAO). PRKA stimulates FAO by phosphorylating and inactivating acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACAC; formerly ACC), leading to decreased malonyl CoA levels and augmenting fatty-acid transport into mitochondria. We investigated a role for ACAC inactivation in meiotic resumption by testing the effect of two ACAC inhibitors, CP-640186 and Soraphen A, on mouse oocytes maintained in meiotic arrest in vitro. These inhibitors significantly stimulated the resumption of meiosis in arrested cumulus cell-enclosed oocytes, denuded oocytes, and follicle-enclosed oocytes. This stimulation was accompanied by an increase in FAO. Etomoxir, a malonyl CoA analogue, prevented meiotic resumption as well as the increase in FAO induced by ACAC inhibition. Citrate, an ACAC activator, and CBM-301106, an inhibitor of malonyl CoA decarboxylase, which converts malonyl CoA to acetyl CoA, suppressed both meiotic induction and FAO induced by follicle-stimulating hormone, presumably by maintaining elevated malonyl CoA levels. Mouse oocyte-cumulus cell complexes contain both isoforms of ACAC (ACACA and ACACB); when wild-type and Acacb(-/-) oocytes characteristics were compared, we found that these single-knockout oocytes showed a significantly higher FAO level and a reduced ability to maintain meiotic arrest, resulting in higher rates of germinal vesicle breakdown. Collectively, these data support the model that ACAC inactivation contributes to the maturation-promoting activity of PRKA through stimulation of FAO.

  3. Prebiotic Fiber Increases Hepatic Acetyl CoA Carboxylase Phosphorylation and Suppresses Glucose-Dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide Secretion More Effectively When Used with Metformin in Obese Rats1,2

    PubMed Central

    Pyra, Kim A.; Saha, Dolan C.; Reimer, Raylene A.

    2013-01-01

    Independently, metformin (MET) and the prebiotic, oligofructose (OFS), have been shown to increase glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) secretion. Our objective was to determine whether using OFS as an adjunct with MET augments GLP-1 secretion in obese rats. Male, diet-induced obese Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to: 1) high-fat/-sucrose diet [HFHS; control (C); 20% fat, 50% sucrose wt:wt]; 2) HFHS+10% OFS (OFS); 3) HFHS + MET [300 mg/kg/d (MET)]; 4) HFHS+10% OFS+MET (OFS +MET). Body composition, glycemia, satiety hormones, and mechanisms related to dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) activity in plasma, hepatic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK; Western blots), and gut microbiota (qPCR) were examined. Direct effects of MET and SCFA were examined in human enteroendocrine cells. The interaction between OFS and MET affected fat mass, hepatic TG, secretion of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and leptin, and AMPKα2 mRNA and phosphorylated acetyl CoA carboxylase (pACC) levels (P < 0.05). Combined, OFS and MET reduced GIP secretion to a greater extent than either treatment alone (P < 0.05). The hepatic pACC level was increased by OFS+MET by at least 50% above all other treatments, which did not differ from each other (P < 0.05). OFS decreased plasma DPP4 activity (P < 0.001). Cecal Bifidobacteria (P < 0.001) were markedly increased and C. leptum decreased (P < 0.001) with OFS consumption. In human enteroendocrine cells, the interaction between MET and SCFA affected GLP-1 secretion (P < 0.04) but was not associated with higher GLP-1 than the highest individual doses. In conclusion, the combined actions of OFS and MET were associated with important interaction effects that have the potential to improve metabolic outcomes associated with obesity. PMID:22223580

  4. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, P.G.; Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1996-09-24

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives are disclosed which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides. 5 figs.

  5. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, Paul G.; Ohlrogge, John B.

    1996-01-01

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives thereof which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides.

  6. Acetyl Coenzyme A Carboxylase Activity in Developing Seedlings and Chloroplasts of Barley and Its Virescens Mutant 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Lawrence W.; Zalik, Saul

    1981-01-01

    Acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase activity of whole tissue homogenates and chloroplast preparations was analyzed as the acetyl-CoA-dependent incorporation of [14C]bicarbonate into an acid-stable product. The absolute requirement for ATP and MgCl2, the complete inhibition with avidin, and end-product analysis were consistent with the presence of acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity. Little difference was found between the mutant and normal tissue homogenates from the 1- to 3-day growth stages, during which period both showed a 3-fold increase. However, by 4 days, the activity of the mutant exceeded that of the normal. Fractionation studies showed that the enzyme was a soluble protein present in the stromal fraction of chloroplasts. The biotin content was also highest in the stroma, although it was found in the lamellar fraction as well. For both the mutant and the normal, the highest acetyl-CoA carboxylase activities were obtained in the stromal preparations from 4-day seedlings (54 and 31 nmoles per milligram protein per minute for the mutant and the normal, respectively) with a progressive decline by 6 and 8 days. The difference between the mutant and the normal was not due to the accumulation of an inhibitor in the normal. PMID:16661731

  7. Piperazine oxadiazole inhibitors of acetyl-CoA carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Bourbeau, Matthew P; Siegmund, Aaron; Allen, John G; Shu, Hong; Fotsch, Christopher; Bartberger, Michael D; Kim, Ki-Won; Komorowski, Renee; Graham, Melissa; Busby, James; Wang, Minghan; Meyer, James; Xu, Yang; Salyers, Kevin; Fielden, Mark; Véniant, Murielle M; Gu, Wei

    2013-12-27

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) is a target of interest for the treatment of metabolic syndrome. Starting from a biphenyloxadiazole screening hit, a series of piperazine oxadiazole ACC inhibitors was developed. Initial pharmacokinetic liabilities of the piperazine oxadiazoles were overcome by blocking predicted sites of metabolism, resulting in compounds with suitable properties for further in vivo studies. Compound 26 was shown to inhibit malonyl-CoA production in an in vivo pharmacodynamic assay and was advanced to a long-term efficacy study. Prolonged dosing with compound 26 resulted in impaired glucose tolerance in diet-induced obese (DIO) C57BL6 mice, an unexpected finding.

  8. The dynamic organization of fungal acetyl-CoA carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Hunkeler, Moritz; Stuttfeld, Edward; Hagmann, Anna; Imseng, Stefan; Maier, Timm

    2016-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCs) catalyse the committed step in fatty-acid biosynthesis: the ATP-dependent carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA. They are important regulatory hubs for metabolic control and relevant drug targets for the treatment of the metabolic syndrome and cancer. Eukaryotic ACCs are single-chain multienzymes characterized by a large, non-catalytic central domain (CD), whose role in ACC regulation remains poorly characterized. Here we report the crystal structure of the yeast ACC CD, revealing a unique four-domain organization. A regulatory loop, which is phosphorylated at the key functional phosphorylation site of fungal ACC, wedges into a crevice between two domains of CD. Combining the yeast CD structure with intermediate and low-resolution data of larger fragments up to intact ACCs provides a comprehensive characterization of the dynamic fungal ACC architecture. In contrast to related carboxylases, large-scale conformational changes are required for substrate turnover, and are mediated by the CD under phosphorylation control. PMID:27073141

  9. The dynamic organization of fungal acetyl-CoA carboxylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunkeler, Moritz; Stuttfeld, Edward; Hagmann, Anna; Imseng, Stefan; Maier, Timm

    2016-04-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCs) catalyse the committed step in fatty-acid biosynthesis: the ATP-dependent carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA. They are important regulatory hubs for metabolic control and relevant drug targets for the treatment of the metabolic syndrome and cancer. Eukaryotic ACCs are single-chain multienzymes characterized by a large, non-catalytic central domain (CD), whose role in ACC regulation remains poorly characterized. Here we report the crystal structure of the yeast ACC CD, revealing a unique four-domain organization. A regulatory loop, which is phosphorylated at the key functional phosphorylation site of fungal ACC, wedges into a crevice between two domains of CD. Combining the yeast CD structure with intermediate and low-resolution data of larger fragments up to intact ACCs provides a comprehensive characterization of the dynamic fungal ACC architecture. In contrast to related carboxylases, large-scale conformational changes are required for substrate turnover, and are mediated by the CD under phosphorylation control.

  10. Structural analysis, plastid localization, and expression of the biotin carboxylase subunit of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase from tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Shorrosh, B S; Roesler, K R; Shintani, D; van de Loo, F J; Ohlrogge, J B

    1995-01-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase, EC 6.4.1.2) catalyzes the synthesis of malonyl-coenzyme A, which is utilized in the plastid for de novo fatty acid synthesis and outside the plastid for a variety of reactions, including the synthesis of very long chain fatty acids and flavonoids. Recent evidence for both multifunctional and multisubunit ACCase isozymes in dicot plants has been obtained. We describe here the isolation of a tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv bright yellow 2 [NT1]) cDNA clone (E3) that encodes a 58.4-kD protein that shares 80% sequence similarity and 65% identity with the Anabaena biotin carboxylase subunit of ACCase. Similar to other biotin carboxylase subunits of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, the E3-encoded protein contains a putative ATP-binding motif but lacks a biotin-binding site (methionine-lysine-methionine or methionine-lysine-leucine). The deduced protein sequence contains a putative transit peptide whose function was confirmed by its ability to direct in vitro chloroplast uptake. The subcellular localization of this biotin carboxylase has also been confirmed to be plastidial by western blot analysis of pea (Pisum sativum), alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), and castor (Ricinus communis L.) plastid preparations. Northern blot analysis indicates that the plastid biotin carboxylase transcripts are expressed at severalfold higher levels in castor seeds than in leaves. PMID:7610168

  11. Resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase-inhibiting herbicides.

    PubMed

    Kaundun, Shiv S

    2014-09-01

    Resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase herbicides is documented in at least 43 grass weeds and is particularly problematic in Lolium, Alopecurus and Avena species. Genetic studies have shown that resistance generally evolves independently and can be conferred by target-site mutations at ACCase codon positions 1781, 1999, 2027, 2041, 2078, 2088 and 2096. The level of resistance depends on the herbicides, recommended field rates, weed species, plant growth stages, specific amino acid changes and the number of gene copies and mutant ACCase alleles. Non-target-site resistance, or in essence metabolic resistance, is prevalent, multigenic and favoured under low-dose selection. Metabolic resistance can be specific but also broad, affecting other modes of action. Some target-site and metabolic-resistant biotypes are characterised by a fitness penalty. However, the significance for resistance regression in the absence of ACCase herbicides is yet to be determined over a practical timeframe. More recently, a fitness benefit has been reported in some populations containing the I1781L mutation in terms of vegetative and reproductive outputs and delayed germination. Several DNA-based methods have been developed to detect known ACCase resistance mutations, unlike metabolic resistance, as the genes remain elusive to date. Therefore, confirmation of resistance is still carried out via whole-plant herbicide bioassays. A growing number of monocotyledonous crops have been engineered to resist ACCase herbicides, thus increasing the options for grass weed control. While the science of ACCase herbicide resistance has progressed significantly over the past 10 years, several avenues provided in the present review remain to be explored for a better understanding of resistance to this important mode of action.

  12. Unequal synthesis and differential degradation of propionyl CoA carboxylase subunits in cells from normal and propionic acidemia patients.

    PubMed Central

    Ohura, T; Kraus, J P; Rosenberg, L E

    1989-01-01

    We have characterized further the molecular basis of human inherited propionyl CoA carboxylase deficiency by measuring steady state levels of the mRNAs coding for the enzyme's two protein subunits (alpha and beta) and by estimating initial synthesis and steady state levels of the protein subunits in skin fibroblasts from controls and affected patients. We studied cell lines from both major complementation groups (pccA and pccBC) corresponding, respectively, to defects in the carboxylase's alpha and beta subunits. Analysis of pccA lines revealed the absence of alpha chain mRNA in three and an abnormally small alpha-mRNA in a fourth. Despite the presence of normal beta-mRNA in each of these pccA lines, there was complete absence of both alpha and beta protein subunits under steady state conditions, even though new synthesis and mitochondrial import of beta precursors was normal. Results in nine pccBC lines revealed normal alpha mRNA in each, while the amounts of beta-mRNA were distinctly reduced in every case. Correspondingly, alpha protein subunits were present in normal amounts at steady-state, but beta subunits were uniformly decreased. In addition, in six of the nine beta deficient cell lines, partially degraded beta-subunits were observed. To help interpret these results, synthesis and stability of carboxylase subunits were studied in intact HeLa cells using a pulse-chase protocol. Whereas alpha chains were stable over the four hour interval studied, beta chains--initially synthesized in large excess over alpha chains--were degraded rapidly reaching equivalence with alpha chains after two hours.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2741949

  13. Dimerization of the Bacterial Biotin Carboxylase Subunit Is Required for Acetyl Coenzyme A Carboxylase Activity In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alexander C.

    2012-01-01

    Acetyl coenzyme A (acteyl-CoA) carboxylase (ACC) is the first committed enzyme of the fatty acid synthesis pathway. Escherichia coli ACC is composed of four different proteins. The first enzymatic activity of the ACC complex, biotin carboxylase (BC), catalyzes the carboxylation of the protein-bound biotin moiety of another subunit with bicarbonate in an ATP-dependent reaction. Although BC is found as a dimer in cell extracts and the carboxylase activities of the two subunits of the dimer are interdependent, mutant BC proteins deficient in dimerization are reported to retain appreciable activity in vitro (Y. Shen, C. Y. Chou, G. G. Chang, and L. Tong, Mol. Cell 22:807–818, 2006). However, in vivo BC must interact with the other proteins of the complex, and thus studies of the isolated BC may not reflect the intracellular function of the enzyme. We have tested the abilities of three BC mutant proteins deficient in dimerization to support growth and report that the two BC proteins most deficient in dimerization fail to support growth unless expressed at high levels. In contrast, the wild-type protein supports growth at low expression levels. We conclude that BC must be dimeric to fulfill its physiological function. PMID:22037404

  14. A unified molecular mechanism for the regulation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase by phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jia; Zhang, Yixiao; Yu, Tai-Yuan; Sadre-Bazzaz, Kianoush; Rudolph, Michael J; Amodeo, Gabriele A; Symington, Lorraine S; Walz, Thomas; Tong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCs) are crucial metabolic enzymes and attractive targets for drug discovery. Eukaryotic acetyl-CoA carboxylases are 250 kDa single-chain, multi-domain enzymes and function as dimers and higher oligomers. Their catalytic activity is tightly regulated by phosphorylation and other means. Here we show that yeast ACC is directly phosphorylated by the protein kinase SNF1 at residue Ser1157, which potently inhibits the enzyme. Crystal structure of three ACC central domains (AC3–AC5) shows that the phosphorylated Ser1157 is recognized by Arg1173, Arg1260, Tyr1113 and Ser1159. The R1173A/R1260A double mutant is insensitive to SNF1, confirming that this binding site is crucial for regulation. Electron microscopic studies reveal dramatic conformational changes in the holoenzyme upon phosphorylation, likely owing to the dissociation of the biotin carboxylase domain dimer. The observations support a unified molecular mechanism for the regulation of ACC by phosphorylation as well as by the natural product soraphen A, a potent inhibitor of eukaryotic ACC. These molecular insights enhance our understanding of acetyl-CoA carboxylase regulation and provide a basis for drug discovery. PMID:27990296

  15. Materials and methods for the alteration of enzyme and acetyl CoA levels in plants

    DOEpatents

    Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve S.; Oliver, David J.; Schnable, Patrick S.; Wen, Tsui-Jung

    2009-04-28

    The present invention provides nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of acetyl CoA synthetase (ACS), plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (pPDH), ATP citrate lyase (ACL), Arabidopsis pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), and Arabidopsis aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), specifically ALDH-2 and ALDH-4. The present invention also provides a recombinant vector comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding one of the aforementioned enzymes, an antisense sequence thereto or a ribozyme therefor, a cell transformed with such a vector, antibodies to the enzymes, a plant cell, a plant tissue, a plant organ or a plant in which the level of an enzyme has been altered, and a method of producing such a plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. Desirably, alteration of the level of enzyme results in an alteration of the level of acetyl CoA in the plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. In addition, the present invention provides a recombinant vector comprising an antisense sequence of a nucleic acid sequence encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), the E1.alpha. subunit of pPDH, the E1.beta. subunit of pPDH, the E2 subunit of pPDH, mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (mtPDH) or aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) or a ribozyme that can cleave an RNA molecule encoding PDC, E1.alpha. pPDH, E1.beta. pPDH, E2 pPDH, mtPDH or ALDH.

  16. Materials and methods for the alteration of enzyme and acetyl CoA levels in plants

    DOEpatents

    Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve S.; Oliver, David J.; Behal, Robert; Schnable, Patrick S.; Ke, Jinshan; Johnson, Jerry L.; Allred, Carolyn C.; Fatland, Beth; Lutziger, Isabelle; Wen, Tsui-Jung

    2005-09-13

    The present invention provides nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of acetyl CoA synthetase (ACS), plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (pPDH), ATP citrate lyase (ACL), Arabidopsis pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), and Arabidopsis aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), specifically ALDH-2 and ALDH-4. The present invention also provides a recombinant vector comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding one of the aforementioned enzymes, an antisense sequence thereto or a ribozyme therefor, a cell transformed with such a vector, antibodies to the enzymes, a plant cell, a plant tissue, a plant organ or a plant in which the level of an enzyme has been altered, and a method of producing such a plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. Desirably, alteration of the level of enzyme results in an alteration of the level of acetyl CoA in the plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. In addition, the present invention provides a recombinant vector comprising an antisense sequence of a nucleic acid sequence encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), the E1.alpha. subunit of pPDH, the E1.beta. subunit of pPDH, the E2 subunit of pPDH, mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (mtPDH) or aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) or a ribozyme that can cleave an RNA molecule encoding PDC, E1.alpha. pPDH, E1.beta. pPDH, E2 pPDH, mtPDH or ALDH.

  17. Materials and methods for the alteration of enzyme and acetyl CoA levels in plants

    DOEpatents

    Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve S.; Oliver, David J.; Behal, Robert; Schnable, Patrick S.; Ke, Jinshan; Johnson, Jerry L.; Allred, Carolyn C.; Fatland, Beth; Lutziger, Isabelle; Wen, Tsui-Jung

    2004-07-20

    The present invention provides nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of acetyl CoA synthetase (ACS), plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (pPDH), ATP citrate lyase (ACL), Arabidopsis pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), and Arabidopsis aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), specifically ALDH-2 and ALDH-4. The present invention also provides a recombinant vector comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding one of the aforementioned enzymes, an antisense sequence thereto or a ribozyme therefor, a cell transformed with such a vector, antibodies to the enzymes, a plant cell, a plant tissue, a plant organ or a plant in which the level of an enzyme has been altered, and a method of producing such a plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. Desirably, alteration of the level of enzyme results in an alteration of the level of acetyl CoA in the plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. In addition, the present invention provides a recombinant vector comprising an antisense sequence of a nucleic acid sequence encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), the E1.sub..alpha. subunit of pPDH, the E1.sub..beta. subunit of pPDH, the E2 subunit of pPDH, mitochondrial pyurvate dehydrogenase (mtPDH) or aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) or a ribozyme that can cleave an RNA molecule encoding PDC, E1.sub..alpha. pPDH, E1.sub..beta. pPDH, E2 pPDH, mtPDH or ALDH.

  18. Inhibition of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase by two classes of grass-selective herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Rendina, A.R.; Craig-Kennard, A.C.; Beaudoin, J.D.; Breen, M.K. )

    1990-05-01

    The selective grass herbicides diclofop, haloxyfop, and trifop (((aryloxy)phenoxy)propionic acids) and alloxydim, sethoxydim, and clethodim (cyclohexanediones) are potent, reversible inhibitors of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) partially purified from barley, corn, and wheat. Although inhibition of the wheat enzyme by clethodim and diclofop is noncompetitive versus each of the substrates adenosine triphosphate (ATP), HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), diclofop and clethodim are nearly competitive versus acetyl-CoA since the level of inhibition is most sensitive to the concentration of acetyl-CoA (K{sub is} < K{sub ii}). To conclusively show whether the herbicides interact at the biotin carboxylation site or the carboxyl transfer site, the inhibition of isotope exchange and partial reactions catalyzed at each site was studied with the wheat enzyme. Only the ({sup 14}C)acetyl-CoA-malonyl-CoA exchange and decarboxylation of ({sup 14}C)malonyl-CoA reactions are strongly inhibited by clethodim and diclofop, suggesting that the herbicides interfere with the carboxyl transfer site rather than the biotin carboxylation site of the enzyme. Double-inhibition studies with diclofop and clethodim suggest that the ((aryloxy)phenoxy)propionic acid and cyclohexanedione herbicides may bind to the same region of the enzyme.

  19. Characterization of lysine acetylation of a phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase involved in glutamate overproduction in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Nagano-Shoji, Megumi; Hamamoto, Yuma; Mizuno, Yuta; Yamada, Ayuka; Kikuchi, Masaki; Shirouzu, Mikako; Umehara, Takashi; Yoshida, Minoru; Nishiyama, Makoto; Kosono, Saori

    2017-03-03

    Protein Nε-acylation is emerging as a ubiquitous post-translational modification. In Corynebacterium glutamicum, which is utilized for industrial production of L-glutamate, the levels of protein acetylation and succinylation change drastically under the conditions that induce glutamate overproduction. Here, we characterized the acylation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), an anaplerotic enzyme that supplies oxaloacetate for glutamate overproduction. We showed that acetylation of PEPC at lysine 653 decreased enzymatic activity, leading to reduced glutamate production. An acetylation-mimic (KQ) mutant of K653 showed severely reduced glutamate production, while the corresponding KR mutant showed normal production levels. Using an acetyllysine-incorporated PEPC protein, we verified that K653-acetylation negatively regulates PEPC activity. In addition, NCgl0616, a sirtuin-type deacetylase, deacetylated K653-acetylated PEPC in vitro. Interestingly, the specific activity of PEPC was increased during glutamate overproduction, which was blocked by the K653R mutation or deletion of sirtuin-type deacetylase homologues. These findings suggested that deacetylation of K653 by NCgl0616 likely plays a role in the activation of PEPC, which maintains carbon flux under glutamate-producing conditions. PEPC deletion increased protein acetylation levels in cells under glutamate-producing conditions, supporting our hypothesis that PEPC is responsible for a large carbon flux change under glutamate-producing conditions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Antitumor/Antifungal Celecoxib Derivative AR-12 is a Non-Nucleoside Inhibitor of the ANL-Family Adenylating Enzyme Acetyl CoA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    AR-12/OSU-03012 is an antitumor celecoxib-derivative that has progressed to Phase I clinical trial as an anticancer agent and has activity against a number of infectious agents including fungi, bacteria and viruses. However, the mechanism of these activities has remained unclear. Based on a chemical-genetic profiling approach in yeast, we have found that AR-12 is an ATP-competitive, time-dependent inhibitor of yeast acetyl coenzyme A synthetase. AR-12-treated fungal cells show phenotypes consistent with the genetic reduction of acetyl CoA synthetase activity, including induction of autophagy, decreased histone acetylation, and loss of cellular integrity. In addition, AR-12 is a weak inhibitor of human acetyl CoA synthetase ACCS2. Acetyl CoA synthetase activity is essential in many fungi and parasites. In contrast, acetyl CoA is primarily synthesized by an alternate enzyme, ATP-citrate lyase, in mammalian cells. Taken together, our results indicate that AR-12 is a non-nucleoside acetyl CoA synthetase inhibitor and that acetyl CoA synthetase may be a feasible antifungal drug target. PMID:27088128

  1. Wheat acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase: cDNA and protein structure.

    PubMed Central

    Gornicki, P; Podkowinski, J; Scappino, L A; DiMaio, J; Ward, E; Haselkorn, R

    1994-01-01

    cDNA fragments encoding part of wheat (Triticum aestivum) acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC; EC 6.4.1.2) were cloned by PCR using primers based on the alignment of several biotin-dependent carboxylases. A set of overlapping clones encoding the entire wheat ACC was then isolated by using these fragments as probes. The cDNA sequence contains a 2257-amino acid reading frame encoding a 251-kDa polypeptide. The amino acid sequence of the most highly conserved domain, corresponding to the biotin carboxylases of prokaryotes, is 52-55% identical to ACC of yeast, rat, and diatom. Identity with the available C-terminal amino acid sequence of maize ACC is 66%. The biotin attachment site has the typical eukaryotic EVMKM sequence. The cDNA does not encode an obvious chloroplast targeting sequence. Various cDNA fragments hybridize in Northern blots to a 7.9-kb mRNA. Southern analysis with cDNA probes revealed multiple hybridizing fragments in hexaploid wheat DNA. Some of the wheat cDNA probes also hybridize with ACC-specific DNA from other plants, indicating significant conservation among plant ACCs. Images PMID:7913745

  2. Correlation of ATP citrate lyase and acetyl CoA levels with trichothecene production in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Naoko; Tsuyuki, Rie; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Usuma, Jermnak; Furukawa, Tomohiro; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2013-11-21

    The correlation of ATP citrate lyase (ACL) and acetyl CoA levels with trichothecene production in Fusarium graminearum was investigated using an inhibitor (precocene II) and an enhancer (cobalt chloride) of trichothecene production by changing carbon sources in liquid medium. When precocene II (30 µM) was added to inhibit trichothecene production in a trichothecene high-production medium containing sucrose, ACL expression was reduced and ACL mRNA level as well as acetyl CoA amount in the fungal cells were reduced to the levels observed in a trichothecene trace-production medium containing glucose or fructose. The ACL mRNA level was greatly increased by addition of cobalt chloride in the trichothecene high-production medium, but not in the trichothecene trace-production medium. Levels were reduced to those level in the trichothecene trace-production medium by addition of precocene II (300 µM) together with cobalt chloride. These results suggest that ACL expression is activated in the presence of sucrose and that acetyl CoA produced by the increased ALC level may be used for trichothecene production in the fungus. These findings also suggest that sucrose is important for the action of cobalt chloride in activating trichothecene production and that precocene II may affect a step down-stream of the target of cobalt chloride.

  3. Expression, purification, and characterization of human acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Won; Yamane, Harvey; Zondlo, James; Busby, James; Wang, Minghan

    2007-05-01

    The full-length human acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) was expressed and purified to homogeneity by two separate groups (Y.G. Gu, M. Weitzberg, R.F. Clark, X. Xu, Q. Li, T. Zhang, T.M. Hansen, G. Liu, Z. Xin, X. Wang, T. McNally, H. Camp, B.A. Beutel, H.I. Sham, Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of N-{3-[2-(4-alkoxyphenoxy)thiazol-5-yl]-1-methylprop-2-ynyl}carboxy derivatives as selective acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2 inhibitors, J. Med. Chem. 49 (2006) 3770-3773; D. Cheng, C.H. Chu, L. Chen, J.N. Feder, G.A. Mintier, Y. Wu, J.W. Cook, M.R. Harpel, G.A. Locke, Y. An, J.K. Tamura, Expression, purification, and characterization of human and rat acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) isozymes, Protein Expr. Purif., in press). However, neither group was successful in expressing the full-length ACC2 due to issues of solubility and expression levels. The two versions of recombinant human ACC2 in these reports are either truncated (lacking 1-148 aa) or have the N-terminal 275 aa replaced with the corresponding ACC1 region (1-133 aa). Despite the fact that ACC activity was observed in both cases, these constructs are not ideal because the N-terminal region of ACC2 could be important for the correct folding of the catalytic domains. Here, we report the high level expression and purification of full-length human ACC2 that lacks only the N-terminal membrane attachment sequence (1-20 and 1-26 aa, respectively) in Trichoplusia ni cells. In addition, we developed a sensitive HPLC assay to analyze the kinetic parameters of the recombinant enzyme. The recombinant enzyme is a soluble protein and has a K(m) value of 2 microM for acetyl-CoA, almost 30-fold lower than that reported for the truncated human ACC2. Our recombinant enzyme also has a lower K(m) value for ATP (K(m)=52 microM). Although this difference could be ascribed to different assay conditions, our data suggest that the longer human ACC2 produced in our system may have higher affinities for the substrates and could

  4. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitors from avocado (Persea americana Mill) fruits.

    PubMed

    Hashimura, H; Ueda, C; Kawabata, J; Kasai, T

    2001-07-01

    A methanol extract of avocado fruits showed potent inhibitory activity against acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a key enzyme in fatty acid biosynthesis. The active principles were isolated and identified as (5E,12Z,15Z)-2-hydroxy-4-oxoheneicosa-5,12,15-trienyl (1), (2R,12Z,15Z)-2-hydroxy-4-oxoheneicosa-12,15-dienyl (2), (2R*,4R*)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-enyl (3) and (2R*,4R*)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-ynyl (4) acetates by instrumental analyses. The IC50 of the compounds were 4.0 x 10(-6), 4.9 x 10(-6), 9.4 x 10(-6), and 5.1 x 10(-6) M, respectively.

  5. Requirement for Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase in Trypanosoma brucei is Dependent Upon the Growth Environment

    PubMed Central

    Vigueira, Patrick A.; Paul, Kimberly S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis, possesses two fatty acid synthesis pathways: a major de novo synthesis pathway in the ER and a mitochondrial pathway. The 2-carbon donor for both pathways is malonyl-CoA, which is synthesized from acetyl-CoA by Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase (ACC). Here, we show that T. brucei ACC shares the same enzyme architecture and moderate ~30% identity with yeast and human ACCs. ACC is cytoplasmic and appears to be distributed throughout the cell in numerous puncta distinct from glycosomes and other organelles. ACC is active in both bloodstream and procyclic forms. Reduction of ACC activity by RNA interference (RNAi) resulted in a stage-specific phenotype. In procyclic forms, ACC RNAi resulted in 50-75% reduction in fatty acid elongation and a 64% reduction in growth in low lipid media. In bloodstream forms, ACC RNAi resulted in a minor 15% decrease in fatty acid elongation and no growth defect in culture, even in low lipid media. However, ACC RNAi did attenuate virulence in a mouse model of infection. Thus the requirement for ACC in T. brucei is dependent upon the growth environment in two different life cycle stages. PMID:21306439

  6. Insulin stimulates the dephosphorylation and activation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase.

    PubMed Central

    Witters, L A; Watts, T D; Daniels, D L; Evans, J L

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the ability of insulin to acutely activate acetyl-CoA carboxylase [acetyl-CoA: carbon-dioxide ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.4.1.2; AcCoA-Case] has been examined in Fao Reuber hepatoma cells. Insulin promotes the rapid activation of AcCoACase, as measured in cell lysates, and this stimulation persists to the same degree after isolation of AcCoACase by avidin-Sepharose chromatography. The insulin-stimulated enzyme, as compared with control enzyme, exhibits an increase in both citrate-independent and -dependent activity and a decrease in the Ka for citrate. Direct examination of the phosphorylation state of isolated 32P-labeled AcCoACase after insulin exposure reveals a marked decrease in total enzyme phosphorylation coincident with activation. The dephosphorylation due to insulin appears to be restricted to the phosphorylation sites previously shown to regulate AcCoACase activity. All of these effects of insulin are mimicked by a low molecular weight autocrine factor, tentatively identified as an oligosaccharide, present in conditioned medium of hepatoma cells. These data suggest that insulin may activate AcCoACase by inhibiting the activity of protein kinase(s) or stimulating the activity of protein phosphatase(s) that control the phosphorylation state of the enzyme. Images PMID:2899891

  7. Discovery of Small Molecule Isozyme Non-specific Inhibitors of Mammalian Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, J.; Freeman-Cook, K; Elliott, R; Vajdos, F; Rajamohan, F; Kohls, D; Marr, E; Harwood Jr., H; Esler, W; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Screening Pfizer's compound library resulted in the identification of weak acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitors, from which were obtained rACC1 CT-domain co-crystal structures. Utilizing HTS hits and structure-based drug discovery, a more rigid inhibitor was designed and led to the discovery of sub-micromolar, spirochromanone non-specific ACC inhibitors. Low nanomolar, non-specific ACC-isozyme inhibitors that exhibited good rat pharmacokinetics were obtained from this chemotype.

  8. Discovery of small molecule isozyme non-specific inhibitors of mammalian acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Jeffrey W; Freeman-Cook, Kevin D; Elliott, Richard; Vajdos, Felix; Rajamohan, Francis; Kohls, Darcy; Marr, Eric; Zhang, Hailong; Tong, Liang; Tu, Meihua; Murdande, Sharad; Doran, Shawn D; Houser, Janet A; Song, Wei; Jones, Christopher J; Coffey, Steven B; Buzon, Leanne; Minich, Martha L; Dirico, Kenneth J; Tapley, Susan; McPherson, R Kirk; Sugarman, Eliot; Harwood, H James; Esler, William

    2010-04-01

    Screening Pfizer's compound library resulted in the identification of weak acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitors, from which were obtained rACC1 CT-domain co-crystal structures. Utilizing HTS hits and structure-based drug discovery, a more rigid inhibitor was designed and led to the discovery of sub-micromolar, spirochromanone non-specific ACC inhibitors. Low nanomolar, non-specific ACC-isozyme inhibitors that exhibited good rat pharmacokinetics were obtained from this chemotype.

  9. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase alpha is essential to breast cancer cell survival.

    PubMed

    Chajès, Véronique; Cambot, Marie; Moreau, Karen; Lenoir, Gilbert M; Joulin, Virginie

    2006-05-15

    Activation of de novo fatty acid synthesis is a characteristic feature of cancer cells. We have recently described an interaction between acetyl-CoA carboxylase alpha (ACCalpha), a key enzyme in fatty acid synthesis, and BRCA1, which indicates a possible connection between lipid synthesis and genetic factors involved in susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancers. For this reason, we explored the role of ACCalpha in breast cancer cell survival using an RNA interference (RNAi) approach. We show that specific silencing of either the ACCalpha or the fatty acid synthase (FAS) genes in cancer cells results in a major decrease in palmitic acid synthesis. Depletion of the cellular pool of palmitic acid is associated with induction of apoptosis concomitant with the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial impairment. Expression of a small interfering RNA (siRNA)-resistant form of ACCalpha mRNA prevented the effect of ACCalpha-RNAi but failed to prevent the effect of FAS gene silencing. Furthermore, supplementation of the culture medium with palmitate or with the antioxidant vitamin E resulted in the complete rescue of cells from both ACCalpha and FAS siRNA-induced apoptosis. Finally, human mammary epithelial cells are resistant to RNAi against either ACCalpha or FAS. These data confirm the importance of lipogenesis in cancer cell survival and indicate that this pathway represents a key target for antineoplastic therapy that, however, might require specific dietary recommendation for full efficacy.

  10. RNAi knockdown of acetyl-CoA carboxylase gene eliminates jinggangmycin-enhanced reproduction and population growth in the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Xin; Ge, Lin-Quan; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Lu, Xiu-Li; Li, Xin; Stanley, David; Song, Qi-Sheng; Wu, Jin-Cai

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in ecology lies in understanding the coexistence of intraguild species, well documented at the organismal level, but not at the molecular level. This study focused on the effects of the antibiotic, jinggangmycin (JGM), a fungicide widely used in Asian rice agroecosystems, on reproduction of insects within the planthopper guild, including the brown planthopper (BPH) Nilaparvata lugens and the white-backed planthopper (WBPH) Sogatella furcifera, both serious resurgence rice pests. JGM exposure significantly increased BPH fecundity and population growth, but suppressed both parameters in laboratory and field WBPH populations. We used digital gene expression and transcriptomic analyses to identify a panel of differentially expressed genes, including a set of up-regulated genes in JGM-treated BPH, which were down-regulated in JGM-treated WBPH. RNAi silencing of Acetyl Co-A carboxylase (ACC), highly expressed in JGM-treated BPH, reduced ACC expression (by > 60%) and eliminated JGM-induced fecundity increases in BPH. These findings support our hypothesis that differences in ACC expression separates intraguild species at the molecular level. PMID:26482193

  11. RNAi knockdown of acetyl-CoA carboxylase gene eliminates jinggangmycin-enhanced reproduction and population growth in the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Xin; Ge, Lin-Quan; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Lu, Xiu-Li; Li, Xin; Stanley, David; Song, Qi-Sheng; Wu, Jin-Cai

    2015-10-20

    A major challenge in ecology lies in understanding the coexistence of intraguild species, well documented at the organismal level, but not at the molecular level. This study focused on the effects of the antibiotic, jinggangmycin (JGM), a fungicide widely used in Asian rice agroecosystems, on reproduction of insects within the planthopper guild, including the brown planthopper (BPH) Nilaparvata lugens and the white-backed planthopper (WBPH) Sogatella furcifera, both serious resurgence rice pests. JGM exposure significantly increased BPH fecundity and population growth, but suppressed both parameters in laboratory and field WBPH populations. We used digital gene expression and transcriptomic analyses to identify a panel of differentially expressed genes, including a set of up-regulated genes in JGM-treated BPH, which were down-regulated in JGM-treated WBPH. RNAi silencing of Acetyl Co-A carboxylase (ACC), highly expressed in JGM-treated BPH, reduced ACC expression (by > 60%) and eliminated JGM-induced fecundity increases in BPH. These findings support our hypothesis that differences in ACC expression separates intraguild species at the molecular level.

  12. Cloning of human acetyl-CoA carboxylase-beta and its unique features.

    PubMed Central

    Ha, J; Lee, J K; Kim, K S; Witters, L A; Kim, K H

    1996-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase, which has a molecular mass of 265 kDa (ACC-alpha), catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of long-chain fatty acids. In this study we report the complete amino acid sequence and unique features of an isoform of ACC with a molecular mass of 275 kDa (ACC-beta), which is primarily expressed in heart and skeletal muscles. In these tissues, ACC-beta may be involved in the regulation of fatty acid oxidation, rather than fatty acid biosynthesis. ACC-beta contains an amino acid sequence at the N terminus which is about 200 amino acids long and may be uniquely related to the role of ACC-beta in controlling carnitine palmitoyltransferase I activity and fatty acid oxidation by mitochondria. If we exclude this unique sequence at the N terminus the two forms of ACC show about 75% amino acid identity. All of the known functional domains of ACC are found in the homologous regions. Human ACC-beta cDNA has an open reading frame of 7,343 bases, encoding a protein of 2,458 amino acids, with a calculated molecular mass of 276,638 Da. The mRNA size of human ACC-beta is approximately 10 kb and is primarily expressed in heart and skeletal muscle tissues, whereas ACC-alpha mRNA is detected in all tissues tested. A fragment of ACC-beta cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli and antibodies against the peptide were generated to establish that the cDNA sequence that we cloned is that for ACC-beta. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8876158

  13. Glucose and fat metabolism in adipose tissue of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Oh, WonKeun; Abu-Elheiga, Lutfi; Kordari, Parichher; Gu, Zeiwei; Shaikenov, Tattym; Chirala, Subrahmanyam S.; Wakil, Salih J.

    2005-01-01

    Acc2-/- mutant mice, when fed a high-fat/high-carbohydrate (HF/HC) diet, were protected against diet-induced obesity and diabetes. To investigate the role of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) in the regulation of energy metabolism in adipose tissues, we studied fatty acid and glucose oxidation in primary cultures of adipocytes isolated from wild-type and Acc2-/- mutant mice fed either normal chow or a HF/HC diet. When fed normal chow, oxidation of [14C]palmitate in adipocytes of Acc2-/- mutant mice was ≈80% higher than in adipocytes of WT mice, and it remained significantly higher in the presence of insulin. Interestingly, in addition to increased fatty acid oxidation, we also observed increased glucose oxidation in adipocytes of Acc2-/- mutant mice compared with that of WT mice. When fed a HF/HC diet for 4-5 months, adipocytes of Acc2-/- mutant mice maintained a 25% higher palmitate oxidation and a 2-fold higher glucose oxidation than WT mice. The mRNA level of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) decreased several fold in the adipose tissue of WT mice fed a HF/HC diet; however, in the adipose tissue of Acc2-/- mutant mice, it was 7-fold higher. Moreover, lipolysis activity was higher in adipocytes of Acc2-/- mutant mice compared with that in WT mice. These findings suggest that continuous fatty acid oxidation in the adipocytes of Acc2-/- mutant mice, combined with a higher level of glucose oxidation and a higher rate of lipolysis, are major factors leading to efficient maintenance of insulin sensitivity and leaner Acc2-/- mutant mice. PMID:15677334

  14. Isolated poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) granules are complex bacterial organelles catalyzing formation of PHB from acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) and degradation of PHB to acetyl-CoA.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Keiichi; Saito, Terumi; Gebauer, Birgit; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2007-11-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) granules isolated in native form (nPHB granules) from Ralstonia eutropha catalyzed formation of PHB from (14)C-labeled acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) in the presence of NADPH and concomitantly released CoA, revealing that PHB biosynthetic proteins (acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase, acetoacetyl-CoA reductase, and PHB synthase) are present and active in isolated nPHB granules in vitro. nPHB granules also catalyzed thiolytic cleavage of PHB in the presence of added CoA, resulting in synthesis of 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA (3HB-CoA) from PHB. Synthesis of 3HB-CoA was also shown by incubation of artificial (protein-free) PHB with CoA and PhaZa1, confirming that PhaZa1 is a PHB depolymerase catalyzing the thiolysis reaction. Acetyl-CoA was the major product detectable after incubation of nPHB granules in the presence of NAD(+), indicating that downstream mobilizing enzyme activities were also present and active in isolated nPHB granules. We propose that intracellular concentrations of key metabolites (CoA, acetyl-CoA, 3HB-CoA, NAD(+)/NADH) determine whether a cell accumulates or degrades PHB. Since the degradation product of PHB is 3HB-CoA, the cells do not waste energy by synthesis and degradation of PHB. Thus, our results explain the frequent finding of simultaneous synthesis and breakdown of PHB.

  15. Genetic inhibition of hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity increases liver fat and alters global protein acetylationa

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Jenny D.Y.; Lawrence, Robert T.; Healy, Marin E.; Dominy, John E.; Liao, Jason A.; Breen, David S.; Byrne, Frances L.; Kenwood, Brandon M.; Lackner, Carolin; Okutsu, Saeko; Mas, Valeria R.; Caldwell, Stephen H.; Tomsig, Jose L.; Cooney, Gregory J.; Puigserver, Pere B.; Turner, Nigel; James, David E.; Villén, Judit; Hoehn, Kyle L.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid deposition in the liver is associated with metabolic disorders including fatty liver disease, type II diabetes, and hepatocellular cancer. The enzymes acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) and ACC2 are powerful regulators of hepatic fat storage; therefore, their inhibition is expected to prevent the development of fatty liver. In this study we generated liver-specific ACC1 and ACC2 double knockout (LDKO) mice to determine how the loss of ACC activity affects liver fat metabolism and whole-body physiology. Characterization of LDKO mice revealed unexpected phenotypes of increased hepatic triglyceride and decreased fat oxidation. We also observed that chronic ACC inhibition led to hyper-acetylation of proteins in the extra-mitochondrial space. In sum, these data reveal the existence of a compensatory pathway that protects hepatic fat stores when ACC enzymes are inhibited. Furthermore, we identified an important role for ACC enzymes in the regulation of protein acetylation in the extra-mitochondrial space. PMID:24944901

  16. Underlying Resistance Mechanisms in the Cynosurus echinatus Biotype to Acetyl CoA Carboxylase-Inhibiting Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Pablo; Alcántara-de la Cruz, Ricardo; Cruz-Hipólito, Hugo; Osuna, María D.; De Prado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog dogtail (Cynosurus echinatus) is an annual grass, native to Europe, but also widely distributed in North and South America, South Africa, and Australia. Two hedgehog dogtail biotypes, one diclofop-methyl (DM)-resistant and one DM-susceptible were studied in detail for experimental dose-response resistance mechanisms. Herbicide rates that inhibited shoot growth by 50% (GR50) were determined for DM, being the resistance factor (GR50R/GR50S) of 43.81. When amitrole (Cyt. P450 inhibitor) was applied before treatment with DM, the R biotype growth was significantly inhibited (GR50 of 1019.9 g ai ha-1) compared with the GR50 (1484.6 g ai ha-1) found for the R biotype without pretreatment with amitrole. However, GR50 values for S biotype do not vary with or without amitrole pretreatment. Dose-response experiments carried out to evaluate cross-resistance, showed resistance to aryloxyphenoxypropionate (APP), cyclohexanedione (CHD) and phenylpyrazoline (PPZ) inhibiting herbicides. Both R and S biotypes had a similar 14C-DM uptake and translocation. The herbicide was poorly distributed among leaves, the rest of the shoot and roots with unappreciable acropetal and/or basipetal DM translocation at 96 h after treatment (HAT). The metabolism of 14C-DM, D-acid and D-conjugate metabolites were identified by thin-layer chromatography. The results showed that DM resistance in C. echinatus is likely due to enhanced herbicide metabolism, involving Cyt. P450 as was demonstrated by indirect assays (amitrole pretreatment). The ACCase in vitro assays showed that the target site was very sensitive to APP, CHD and PPZ herbicides in the C. echinatus S biotype, while the R biotype was insensitive to the previously mentioned herbicides. DNA sequencing studies confirmed that C. echinatus cross-resistance to ACCase inhibitors has been conferred by specific ACCase double point mutations Ile-2041-Asn and Cys-2088-Arg. PMID:27148285

  17. Synthesis of 7-oxo-dihydrospiro[indazole-5,4'-piperidine] acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bagley, Scott W; Southers, James A; Cabral, Shawn; Rose, Colin R; Bernhardson, David J; Edmonds, David J; Polivkova, Jana; Yang, Xiaojing; Kung, Daniel W; Griffith, David A; Bader, Scott J

    2012-02-03

    Synthesis of oxo-dihydrospiroindazole-based acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) inhibitors is reported. The dihydrospiroindazoles were assembled in a regioselective manner in six steps from substituted hydrazines and protected 4-formylpiperidine. Enhanced regioselectivity in the condensation between a keto enamine and substituted hydrazines was observed when using toluene as the solvent, leading to selective formation of 1-substituted spiroindazoles. The 2-substituted spiroindazoles were formed selectively from alkyl hydrazones by ring closure with Vilsmeier reagent. The key step in the elaboration to the final products is the conversion of an intermediate olefin to the desired ketone through elimination of HBr from an O-methyl bromohydrin. This methodology enabled the synthesis of each desired regioisomer on 50-75 g scale with minimal purification. Acylation of the resultant spirocyclic amines provided potent ACC inhibitors.

  18. Expression and characterization of recombinant fungal acetyl-CoA carboxylase and isolation of a soraphen-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Weatherly, Stephanie C; Volrath, Sandra L; Elich, Tedd D

    2004-05-15

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) catalyses the first step in fatty-acid biosynthesis. Owing to its role in primary metabolism, ACC has been exploited as a commercial herbicide target and identified as a chemically validated fungicide target. In animals, ACC is also a key regulator of fat metabolism. This function has made ACC a prime target for the development of anti-obesity and anti-Type II diabetes therapeutics. Despite its economic importance, there is a lack of published information on recombinant expression of ACC. We report here the expression of enzymically active fungal (Ustilago maydis ) ACC in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzyme exhibited Km values of 0.14+/-0.013 mM and 0.19+/-0.041 mM for acetyl-CoA and ATP respectively, which are comparable with those reported for the endogenous enzyme. The polyketide natural product soraphen is a potent inhibitor of the BC (biotin carboxylase) domain of endogenous fungal ACC. Similarly, recombinant ACC activity was inhibited by soraphen with a K(i) of 2.1+/-0.9 nM. A truncated BC domain that included amino acids 2-560 of the full-length protein was also expressed in E. coli. The isolated BC domain was expressed to higher levels, and was more stable than full-length ACC. Although incapable of enzymic turnover, the BC domain exhibited high-affinity soraphen binding (Kd 1.1+/-0.3 nM), demonstrating a native conformation. Additional BC domains from the phytopathogenic fungi Magnaporthe grisea and Phytophthora infestans were also cloned and expressed, and were shown to exhibit high-affinity soraphen binding. Together, these reagents will be useful for structural studies and assay development.

  19. Genes encoding the biotin carboxylase subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase from Brassica napus and parental species: cloning, expression patterns, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Guo; Yin, Wei-Bo; Song, Li-Ying; Chen, Yu-Hong; Guan, Rong-Zhan; Wang, Jing-Qiao; Wang, Richard R-C; Hu, Zan-Min

    2011-03-01

    Comparative genomics is a useful tool to investigate gene and genome evolution. Biotin carboxylase (BC), an important subunit of heteromeric acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) that is a rate-limiting enzyme in fatty acid biosynthesis in dicots, catalyzes ATP, biotin carboxyl carrier protein, and CO2 to form carboxybiotin carboxyl carrier protein. In this study, we cloned four genes encoding BC from Brassica napus L. (namely BnaC.BC.a, BnaC.BC.b, BnaA.BC.a, and BnaA.BC.b), and two were cloned from each of the two parental species Brassica rapa L. (BraA.BC.a and BraA.BC.b) and Brassica oleracea L. (BolC.BC.a and BolC.BC.b). Sequence analyses revealed that in B. napus the genes BnaC.BC.a and BnaC.BC.b were from the C genome of B. oleracea, whereas BnaA.BC.a and BnaA.BC.b were from the A genome of B. rapa. Comparative and cluster analysis indicated that these genes were divided into two major groups, BnaC.BC.a, BnaA.BC.a, BraA.BC.a, and BolC.BC.a in group-1 and BnaC.BC.b, BnaA.BC.b, BraA.BC.b, and BolC.BC.b in group-2. The divergence of group-1 and group-2 genes occurred in their common ancestor 13-17 million years ago (MYA), soon after the divergence of Arabidopsis and Brassica (15-20 MYA). This time of divergence is identical to the previously reported triplicated time of paralogous subgenomes of diploid Brassica species and the divergence date of group-1 and group-2 genes of α-carboxyltransferase, another subunit of heteromeric ACCase, in Brassica. Reverse transcription PCR revealed that the expression level of group-1 and group-2 genes varied in different organs, and the expression patterns of the two groups of genes were similar in different organs, except in flower. However, two paralogs of group-2 BC genes from B. napus could express differently in mature plants tested by generating BnaA.BC.b and BnaC.BC.b promoter-β-glucuronidase (GUS) fusions. The amino acid sequences of proteins encoded by these genes were highly conserved, except the sequence encoding

  20. AMPK activation represses the human gene promoter of the cardiac isoform of acetyl-CoA carboxylase: Role of nuclear respiratory factor-1

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, Tasneem; Opie, Lionel H.; Essop, M. Faadiel

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} AMPK inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta gene promoter activity. {yields} Nuclear respiratory factor-1 inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta promoter activity. {yields} AMPK regulates acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta at transcriptional level. -- Abstract: The cardiac-enriched isoform of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC{beta}) produces malonyl-CoA, a potent inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1. AMPK inhibits ACC{beta} activity, lowering malonyl-CoA levels and promoting mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation. Previously, AMPK increased promoter binding of nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), a pivotal transcriptional modulator controlling gene expression of mitochondrial proteins. We therefore hypothesized that NRF-1 inhibits myocardial ACC{beta} promoter activity via AMPK activation. A human ACC{beta} promoter-luciferase construct was transiently transfected into neonatal cardiomyocytes {+-} a NRF-1 expression construct. NRF-1 overexpression decreased ACC{beta} gene promoter activity by 71 {+-} 4.6% (p < 0.001 vs. control). Transfections with 5'-end serial promoter deletions revealed that NRF-1-mediated repression of ACC{beta} was abolished with a pPII{beta}-18/+65-Luc deletion construct. AMPK activation dose-dependently reduced ACC{beta} promoter activity, while NRF-1 addition did not further decrease it. We also investigated NRF-1 inhibition in the presence of upstream stimulatory factor 1 (USF1), a known transactivator of the human ACC{beta} gene promoter. Here NRF-1 blunted USF1-dependent induction of ACC{beta} promoter activity by 58 {+-} 7.5% (p < 0.001 vs. control), reversed with a dominant negative NRF-1 construct. NRF-1 also suppressed endogenous USF1 transcriptional activity by 55 {+-} 6.2% (p < 0.001 vs. control). This study demonstrates that NRF-1 is a novel transcriptional inhibitor of the human ACC{beta} gene promoter in the mammalian heart. Our data extends AMPK regulation of ACC{beta} to the transcriptional level.

  1. Graminicide insensitivity correlates with herbicide-binding co-operativity on acetyl-CoA carboxylase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Price, Lindsey J; Herbert, Derek; Moss, Stephen R; Cole, David J; Harwood, John L

    2003-10-15

    The sensitivity of grass species to important classes of graminicide herbicides inhibiting ACCase (acetyl-CoA carboxylase) is associated with a specific inhibition of the multifunctional ACCase located in the plastids of grasses. In contrast, the multisubunit form of ACCase found in the chloroplasts of dicotyledonous plants is insensitive and the minor cytosolic multifunctional isoforms of the enzyme in both types of plants are also less sensitive to inhibition. We have isolated, separated and characterized the multifunctional ACCase isoforms found in exceptional examples of grasses that are either inherently insensitive to these graminicides, or from biotypes showing acquired resistance to their use. Major and minor multifunctional enzymes were isolated from cell suspension cultures of Festuca rubra and the 'Notts A1'-resistant biotype of Alopecurus myosuroides, and their properties compared with those isolated from cells of wild-type sensitive A. myosuroides or from sensitive maize. Purifications of up to 300-fold were necessary to separate the two isoforms. The molecular masses (200-230 kDa) and K(m) values for all three substrates (ATP, bicarbonate and acetyl-CoA) were similar for the different ACCases, irrespective of their graminicide sensitivity. Moreover, we found no correlation between the ability of isoforms to carboxylate propionyl-CoA and their sensitivity to graminicides. However, insensitive purified forms of ACCase were characterized by herbicide-binding co-operativity, whereas, in contrast, sensitive forms of the enzymes were not. Our studies on isolated individual isoforms of ACCase from grasses support and extend previous indications that herbicide binding co-operativity is the only kinetic property that differentiates naturally or selected insensitive enzymes from the typical sensitive forms usually found in grasses.

  2. Identification of dual Acetyl-CoA carboxylases 1 and 2 inhibitors by pharmacophore based virtual screening and molecular docking approach.

    PubMed

    Bhadauriya, Anuseema; Dhoke, Gaurao V; Gangwal, Rahul P; Damre, Mangesh V; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2013-02-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) is a crucial metabolic enzyme that plays a vital role in obesity-induced type 2 diabetes and fatty acid metabolism. To identify dual inhibitors of Acetyl-CoA carboxylase1 and Acetyl-CoA carboxylase2, a pharmacophore modelling approach has been employed. The best HypoGen pharmacophore model for ACC2 inhibitors (Hypo1_ACC2) consists of one hydrogen bond acceptor, one hydrophobic aliphatic and one hydrophobic aromatic feature, whereas the best pharmacophore (Hypo1_ACC1) for ACC1 consists of one additional hydrogen-bond donor (HBD) features. The best pharmacophore hypotheses were validated by various methods such as test set, decoy set and Cat-Scramble methodology. The validated pharmacophore models were used to screen several small-molecule databases, including Specs, NCI, ChemDiv and Natural product databases to identify the potential dual ACC inhibitors. The virtual hits were then subjected to several filters such as estimated [Formula: see text] value, quantitative estimation of drug-likeness and molecular docking analysis. Finally, three novel compounds with diverse scaffolds were selected as potential starting points for the design of novel dual ACC inhibitors.

  3. An 'in situ' perfusion system suitable for investigating mammary-tissue metabolism in the lactating rat. Hormonal regulation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase.

    PubMed Central

    Clegg, R A; Calvert, D T

    1988-01-01

    A technique is described for the non-recirculating perfusion of inguinal/abdominal mammary tissue in situ in anaesthetized lactating rats. Tissue viability was maintained, without resort to infusion of vasoactive chemicals which may also be effectors of cellular metabolism, for at least 90 min. Total tissue adenine nucleotides (per mg of DNA) were somewhat decreased in perfused relative to non-perfused mammary tissue. DNA content (per g wet wt. of tissue) was diminished after 90 min of perfusion to approx. 65% of its value in control tissue. Adenylate energy-charge ratios were lower in perfused tissue in the absence of hormones than in control tissue. They were increased to control values by the presence of either insulin or isoprenaline in the perfusate. No changes occurred in flow rate of the perfusate that might account for these increases. In mammary tissue perfused without addition of hormones, acetyl-CoA carboxylase activities were similar to those measured in control tissue samples, although activity-ratio measurements implied some increase in the phosphorylation of this enzyme. Insulin or isoprenaline increased the activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, especially when this was measured at low concentrations of citrate. Confirming conclusions from previous experiments with mammary acini and explant preparations, insulin activated acetyl-CoA carboxylase in mammary tissue, but inhibition of its activity was not mediated by cyclic AMP. PMID:2895636

  4. Resistance to herbicides caused by single amino acid mutations in acetyl-CoA carboxylase in resistant populations of grassy weeds.

    PubMed

    Jang, SoRi; Marjanovic, Jasmina; Gornicki, Piotr

    2013-03-01

    Eleven spontaneous mutations of acetyl-CoA carboxylase have been identified in many herbicide-resistant populations of 42 species of grassy weeds, hampering application of aryloxyphenoxypropionate, cyclohexadione and phenylpyrazoline herbicides in agriculture. IC(50) shifts (resistance indices) caused by herbicide-resistant mutations were determined using a recombinant yeast system that allows comparison of the effects of single amino acid mutations in the same biochemical background, avoiding the complexity inherent in the in planta experiments. The effect of six mutations on the sensitivity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase to nine herbicides representing the three chemical classes was studied. A combination of partially overlapping binding sites of the three classes of herbicides and the structure of their variable parts explains cross-resistance among and between the three classes of inhibitors, as well as differences in their specificity. Some degree of resistance was detected for 51 of 54 herbicide/mutation combinations. Introduction of new herbicides targeting acetyl-CoA carboxylase will depend on their ability to overcome the high degree of cross-resistance already existing in weed populations.

  5. Dominant mutations causing alterations in acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase confer tolerance to cyclohexanedione and aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides in maize.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, W B; Marshall, L C; Burton, J D; Somers, D A; Wyse, D L; Gronwald, J W; Gengenbach, B G

    1990-01-01

    A partially dominant mutation exhibiting increased tolerance to cyclohexanedione and aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides was isolated by exposing susceptible maize (Zea mays) tissue cultures to increasingly inhibitory concentrations of sethoxydim (a cyclohexanedione). The selected tissue culture (S2) was greater than 40-fold more tolerant to sethoxydim and 20-fold more tolerant to haloxyfop (an aryloxyphenoxypropionate) than the nonselected wild-type tissue culture. Regenerated S2 plants were heterozygous for the mutant allele and exhibited a high-level, but not complete, tolerance to both herbicides. Homozygous mutant families derived by self-pollinating the regenerated S2 plants exhibited no injury after treatment with 0.8 kg of sethoxydim per ha, which was greater than 16-fold the rate lethal to wild-type plants. Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase; EC 6.4.1.2) is the target enzyme of cyclohexanedione and aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides. ACCase activities of the nonselected wild-type and homozygous mutant seedlings were similar in the absence of herbicide. ACCase activity from homozygous tolerant plants required greater than 100-fold more sethoxydim and 16-fold more haloxyfop for 50% inhibition than ACCase from wild-type plants. These results indicate that tolerance to sethoxydim and haloxyfop is controlled by a partially dominant nuclear mutation encoding a herbicide-insensitive alteration in maize ACCase. Images PMID:1976254

  6. Molecular basis for the inhibition of the carboxyltransferase domain of acetyl-coenzyme-A carboxylase by haloxyfop and diclofop

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hailong; Tweel, Benjamin; Tong, Liang

    2004-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCs) are crucial for the metabolism of fatty acids, making these enzymes important targets for the development of therapeutics against obesity, diabetes, and other diseases. The carboxyltransferase (CT) domain of ACC is the site of action of commercial herbicides, such as haloxyfop, diclofop, and sethoxydim. We have determined the crystal structures at up to 2.5-Å resolution of the CT domain of yeast ACC in complex with the herbicide haloxyfop or diclofop. The inhibitors are bound in the active site, at the interface of the dimer of the CT domain. Unexpectedly, inhibitor binding requires large conformational changes for several residues in this interface, which create a highly conserved hydrophobic pocket that extends deeply into the core of the dimer. Two residues that affect herbicide sensitivity are located in this binding site, and mutation of these residues disrupts the structure of the domain. Other residues in the binding site are strictly conserved among the CT domains. PMID:15079078

  7. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibition by ND-630 reduces hepatic steatosis, improves insulin sensitivity, and modulates dyslipidemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Harriman, Geraldine; Greenwood, Jeremy; Bhat, Sathesh; Huang, Xinyi; Wang, Ruiying; Paul, Debamita; Tong, Liang; Saha, Asish K.; Westlin, William F.; Kapeller, Rosana; Harwood, H. James

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous inhibition of the acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) isozymes ACC1 and ACC2 results in concomitant inhibition of fatty acid synthesis and stimulation of fatty acid oxidation and may favorably affect the morbidity and mortality associated with obesity, diabetes, and fatty liver disease. Using structure-based drug design, we have identified a series of potent allosteric protein–protein interaction inhibitors, exemplified by ND-630, that interact within the ACC phosphopeptide acceptor and dimerization site to prevent dimerization and inhibit the enzymatic activity of both ACC isozymes, reduce fatty acid synthesis and stimulate fatty acid oxidation in cultured cells and in animals, and exhibit favorable drug-like properties. When administered chronically to rats with diet-induced obesity, ND-630 reduces hepatic steatosis, improves insulin sensitivity, reduces weight gain without affecting food intake, and favorably affects dyslipidemia. When administered chronically to Zucker diabetic fatty rats, ND-630 reduces hepatic steatosis, improves glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, and reduces hemoglobin A1c (0.9% reduction). Together, these data suggest that ACC inhibition by representatives of this series may be useful in treating a variety of metabolic disorders, including metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and fatty liver disease. PMID:26976583

  8. Mechanism of metamifop inhibition of the carboxyltransferase domain of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase in Echinochloa crus-galli

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xiangdong; Tang, Wenjie; He, Shun; Kang, Jing; Ma, Hongju; Li, Jianhong

    2016-01-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) plays crucial roles in fatty acid metabolism and is an attractive target for herbicide discovery. Metamifop is a novel ACCase-inhibiting herbicide that can be applied to control sensitive weeds in paddy fields. In this study, the effects of metamifop on the chloroplasts, ACCase activity and carboxyltransferase (CT) domain gene expression in Echinochloa crus-galli were investigated. The results showed that metamifop interacted with the CT domain of ACCase in E. crus-galli. The three-dimensional structure of the CT domain of E. crus-galli ACCase in complex with metamifop was examined by homology modelling, molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Metamifop has a different mechanism of inhibiting the CT domain compared with other ACCase inhibitors as it interacted with a different region in the active site of the CT domain. The protonation of nitrogen in the oxazole ring of metamifop plays a crucial role in the interaction between metamifop and the CT domain. The binding mode of metamifop provides a foundation for elucidating the molecular mechanism of target resistance and cross-resistance among ACCase herbicides, and for designing and optimizing ACCase inhibitors. PMID:27666674

  9. DNA inhibits catalysis by the carboxyltransferase subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase: implications for active site communication.

    PubMed

    Benson, Brian K; Meades, Glen; Grove, Anne; Waldrop, Grover L

    2008-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) catalyzes the first committed step in the synthesis of long-chain fatty acids. The crystal structure of the Escherichia coli carboxyltransferase component of ACC revealed an alpha(2)beta(2) subunit composition with two active sites and, most importantly, a unique zinc domain in each alphabeta pair that is absent in the eukaryotic enzyme. We show here that carboxyltransferase binds DNA. Half-maximal saturation of different single-stranded or double-stranded DNA constructs is seen at 0.5-1.0 muM, and binding is cooperative and nonspecific. The substrates (malonyl-CoA and biocytin) inhibit DNA:carboxyltransferase complex formation. More significantly, single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA, and heparin inhibit the reaction catalyzed by carboxyltransferase, with single-stranded DNA and heparin acting as competitive inhibitors. However, double-inhibition experiments revealed that both DNA and heparin can bind the enzyme in the presence of a bisubstrate analog (BiSA), and the binding of BiSA has a very weak synergistic effect on the binding of the second inhibitor (DNA or heparin) and vice versa. In contrast, DNA and heparin can also bind to the enzyme simultaneously, but the binding of either molecule has a strong synergistic effect on binding of the other. An important mechanistic implication of these observations is that the dual active sites of ACC are functionally connected.

  10. Mechanism of metamifop inhibition of the carboxyltransferase domain of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase in Echinochloa crus-galli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xiangdong; Tang, Wenjie; He, Shun; Kang, Jing; Ma, Hongju; Li, Jianhong

    2016-09-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) plays crucial roles in fatty acid metabolism and is an attractive target for herbicide discovery. Metamifop is a novel ACCase-inhibiting herbicide that can be applied to control sensitive weeds in paddy fields. In this study, the effects of metamifop on the chloroplasts, ACCase activity and carboxyltransferase (CT) domain gene expression in Echinochloa crus-galli were investigated. The results showed that metamifop interacted with the CT domain of ACCase in E. crus-galli. The three-dimensional structure of the CT domain of E. crus-galli ACCase in complex with metamifop was examined by homology modelling, molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Metamifop has a different mechanism of inhibiting the CT domain compared with other ACCase inhibitors as it interacted with a different region in the active site of the CT domain. The protonation of nitrogen in the oxazole ring of metamifop plays a crucial role in the interaction between metamifop and the CT domain. The binding mode of metamifop provides a foundation for elucidating the molecular mechanism of target resistance and cross-resistance among ACCase herbicides, and for designing and optimizing ACCase inhibitors.

  11. A Different Mechanism for the Inhibition of the Carboxyltransferase Domain of Acetyl-coenzyme A Carboxylase by Tepraloxydim

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, S.; Callaghan, M; Watson, K; Tong, L

    2009-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCs) are crucial metabolic enzymes and are attractive targets for drug discovery. Haloxyfop and tepraloxydim belong to two distinct classes of commercial herbicides and kill sensitive plants by inhibiting the carboxyltransferase (CT) activity of ACC. Our earlier structural studies showed that haloxyfop is bound near the active site of the CT domain, at the interface of its dimer, and a large conformational change in the dimer interface is required for haloxyfop binding. We report here the crystal structure at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution of the CT domain of yeast ACC in complex with tepraloxydim. The compound has a different mechanism of inhibiting the CT activity compared to haloxyfop, as well as the mammalian ACC inhibitor CP-640186. Tepraloxydim probes a different region of the dimer interface and requires only small but important conformational changes in the enzyme, in contrast to haloxyfop. The binding mode of tepraloxydim explains the structure-activity relationship of these inhibitors, and provides a molecular basis for their distinct sensitivity to some of the resistance mutations, as compared to haloxyfop. Despite the chemical diversity between haloxyfop and tepraloxydim, the compounds do share two binding interactions to the enzyme, which may be important anchoring points for the development of ACC inhibitors

  12. Genes encoding biotin carboxylase subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase from Brassica napus and parental species: cloning, expression patterns, and evolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative genomics is a useful tool to investigate gene and genome evolution. Biotin carboxylase (BC), an important subunit of heteromeric ACCase that is a rate-limiting enzyme in fatty acid biosynthesis in dicots, catalyzes ATP, biotin-carboxyl-carrier protein and CO2 to form carboxybiotin-carbo...

  13. Drosophila melanogaster Acetyl-CoA-carboxylase sustains a fatty acid-dependent remote signal to waterproof the respiratory system.

    PubMed

    Parvy, Jean-Philippe; Napal, Laura; Rubin, Thomas; Poidevin, Mickael; Perrin, Laurent; Wicker-Thomas, Claude; Montagne, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acid (FA) metabolism plays a central role in body homeostasis and related diseases. Thus, FA metabolic enzymes are attractive targets for drug therapy. Mouse studies on Acetyl-coenzymeA-carboxylase (ACC), the rate-limiting enzyme for FA synthesis, have highlighted its homeostatic role in liver and adipose tissue. We took advantage of the powerful genetics of Drosophila melanogaster to investigate the role of the unique Drosophila ACC homologue in the fat body and the oenocytes. The fat body accomplishes hepatic and storage functions, whereas the oenocytes are proposed to produce the cuticular lipids and to contribute to the hepatic function. RNA-interfering disruption of ACC in the fat body does not affect viability but does result in a dramatic reduction in triglyceride storage and a concurrent increase in glycogen accumulation. These metabolic perturbations further highlight the role of triglyceride and glycogen storage in controlling circulatory sugar levels, thereby validating Drosophila as a relevant model to explore the tissue-specific function of FA metabolic enzymes. In contrast, ACC disruption in the oenocytes through RNA-interference or tissue-targeted mutation induces lethality, as does oenocyte ablation. Surprisingly, this lethality is associated with a failure in the watertightness of the spiracles-the organs controlling the entry of air into the trachea. At the cellular level, we have observed that, in defective spiracles, lipids fail to transfer from the spiracular gland to the point of air entry. This phenotype is caused by disrupted synthesis of a putative very-long-chain-FA (VLCFA) within the oenocytes, which ultimately results in a lethal anoxic issue. Preventing liquid entry into respiratory systems is a universal issue for air-breathing animals. Here, we have shown that, in Drosophila, this process is controlled by a putative VLCFA produced within the oenocytes.

  14. A Chemogenomic Screen Reveals Novel Snf1p/AMPK Independent Regulators of Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Bozaquel-Morais, Bruno L; Madeira, Juliana B; Venâncio, Thiago M; Pacheco-Rosa, Thiago; Masuda, Claudio A; Montero-Lomeli, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (Acc1p) is a key enzyme in fatty acid biosynthesis and is essential for cell viability. To discover new regulators of its activity, we screened a Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion library for increased sensitivity to soraphen A, a potent Acc1p inhibitor. The hits identified in the screen (118 hits) were filtered using a chemical-phenotype map to exclude those associated with pleiotropic drug resistance. This enabled the identification of 82 ORFs that are genetic interactors of Acc1p. The main functional clusters represented by these hits were "transcriptional regulation", "protein post-translational modifications" and "lipid metabolism". Further investigation of the "transcriptional regulation" cluster revealed that soraphen A sensitivity is poorly correlated with ACC1 transcript levels. We also studied the three top unknown ORFs that affected soraphen A sensitivity: SOR1 (YDL129W), SOR2 (YIL092W) and SOR3 (YJR039W). Since the C18/C16 ratio of lipid acyl lengths reflects Acc1p activity levels, we evaluated this ratio in the three mutants. Deletion of SOR2 and SOR3 led to reduced acyl lengths, suggesting that Acc1p is indeed down-regulated in these strains. Also, these mutants showed no differences in Snf1p/AMPK activation status and deletion of SNF1 in these backgrounds did not revert soraphen A sensitivity completely. Furthermore, plasmid maintenance was reduced in sor2Δ strain and this trait was shared with 18 other soraphen A sensitive hits. In summary, our screen uncovered novel Acc1p Snf1p/AMPK-independent regulators.

  15. A Chemogenomic Screen Reveals Novel Snf1p/AMPK Independent Regulators of Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Bozaquel-Morais, Bruno L.; Madeira, Juliana B.; Venâncio, Thiago M.; Pacheco-Rosa, Thiago; Masuda, Claudio A.; Montero-Lomeli, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (Acc1p) is a key enzyme in fatty acid biosynthesis and is essential for cell viability. To discover new regulators of its activity, we screened a Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion library for increased sensitivity to soraphen A, a potent Acc1p inhibitor. The hits identified in the screen (118 hits) were filtered using a chemical-phenotype map to exclude those associated with pleiotropic drug resistance. This enabled the identification of 82 ORFs that are genetic interactors of Acc1p. The main functional clusters represented by these hits were “transcriptional regulation”, “protein post-translational modifications” and “lipid metabolism”. Further investigation of the “transcriptional regulation” cluster revealed that soraphen A sensitivity is poorly correlated with ACC1 transcript levels. We also studied the three top unknown ORFs that affected soraphen A sensitivity: SOR1 (YDL129W), SOR2 (YIL092W) and SOR3 (YJR039W). Since the C18/C16 ratio of lipid acyl lengths reflects Acc1p activity levels, we evaluated this ratio in the three mutants. Deletion of SOR2 and SOR3 led to reduced acyl lengths, suggesting that Acc1p is indeed down-regulated in these strains. Also, these mutants showed no differences in Snf1p/AMPK activation status and deletion of SNF1 in these backgrounds did not revert soraphen A sensitivity completely. Furthermore, plasmid maintenance was reduced in sor2Δ strain and this trait was shared with 18 other soraphen A sensitive hits. In summary, our screen uncovered novel Acc1p Snf1p/AMPK-independent regulators. PMID:28076367

  16. Susceptibilities of Different Test Systems from Maize (Zea mays), Poa annua, and Festuca rubra to Herbicides That Inhibit the Enzyme Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase

    PubMed

    Herbert; Cole; Pallett; Harwood

    1996-06-01

    The susceptibilities of maize (Zea mays cv. Champ) and two graminicide-resistant grass species, Poa annua (annual meadow grass) and Festuca rubra (red fescue), to two aryloxyphenoxypropionates (quizalofop and fluazifop) and a cyclohexanedione (sethoxydim) graminicide were evaluated in leaf blades and isolated chloroplasts, and by assaying acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) in desalted leaf homogenates. The graminicide resistance of P. annua and F. rubra appeared to be at the level of ACCase. Festuca rubra ACCase was highly insensitive and P. annua ACCase was partially insensitive to the graminicides that were tested. Fatty acid synthesis in isolated maize chloroplasts was more susceptible to inhibition than was ACCase activity from whole leaves. There was a smaller difference in graminicide sensitivity between these two test systems in P. annua. The developmental pattern of ACCase specific activity and its inhibition by quizalofop was measured in maize and P. annua leaf blades. There was an age-dependent increase in the sensitivity of maize leaf ACCase activity to inhibition by quizalofop. Together with the greater susceptibility of chloroplasts compared with leaf homogenates this could imply that a graminicide-insensitive (extrachloroplastic) ACCase isoform is less highly expressed in older leaves. Poa annua ACCase did not significantly alter in sensitivity as leaves aged, consistent with the smaller difference in the level of inhibition between chloroplasts and leaf homogenates in this species. A small pyruvate carboxylase activity was detected in maize leaves after 9 days. By 38 days, when leaves were senescing, pyruvate carboxylase activity predominated over ACCase.

  17. Accumulation fatty acids of in Chlorella vulgaris under heterotrophic conditions in relation to activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, temperature, and co-immobilization with Azospirillum brasilense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyva, Luis A.; Bashan, Yoav; Mendoza, Alberto; de-Bashan, Luz E.

    2014-10-01

    The relation between fatty acid accumulation, activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), and consequently lipid accumulation was studied in the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris co-immobilized with the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense under dark heterotrophic conditions with Na acetate as a carbon source. In C. vulgaris immobilized alone, cultivation experiments for 6 days showed that ACC activity is directly related to fatty acid accumulation, especially in the last 3 days. In co-immobilization experiments, A. brasilense exerted a significant positive effect over ACC activity, increased the quantity in all nine main fatty acids, increased total lipid accumulation in C. vulgaris, and mitigated negative effects of nonoptimal temperature for growth. No correlation between ACC activity and lipid accumulation in the cells was established for three different temperatures. This study demonstrated that the interaction between A. brasilense and C. vulgaris has a significant effect on fatty acid and lipid accumulation in the microalgae.

  18. Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase α gene variations may be associated with the direct effects of some antipsychotics on triglyceride levels

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Francisco J.; Meary, Alexander; Arranz, Maria J.; Ruaño, Gualberto; Windemuth, Andreas; de Leon, Jose

    2009-01-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase α (ACACA) single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (rs2229416) was significantly associated with hypertriglyceridemia, during exploration of antipsychotic direct effects on lipids. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene (rs1468271) and ACACB gene (rs2241220) SNPs were significantly associated with severe hypercholesterolemia. In the same sample (173 patients on olanzapine, quetiapine, chlorpromazine or mirtazapine [increasing the risk of hyperlipidemia] and 184 controls taking other antipsychotics), three (rs1266175, rs12453407 and rs9906543) of eight additional ACACA SNPs were significantly associated with hypertriglyceridemia in those taking drugs of interest, but not in controls. Five other ACACA SNPs, three additional NPY SNPs, or seven additional ACACB SNPs were not significant. PMID:19846279

  19. Genes encoding the alpha-carboxyltransferase subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase from Brassica napus and parental species: cloning, expression patterns, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Guo; Yin, Wei-Bo; Guo, Huan; Song, Li-Ying; Chen, Yu-Hong; Guan, Rong-Zhan; Wang, Jing-Qiao; Wang, Richard R-C; Hu, Zan-Min

    2010-05-01

    Heteromeric acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase), a rate-limiting enzyme in fatty acid biosynthesis in dicots, is a multi-enzyme complex consisting of biotin carboxylase, biotin carboxyl carrier protein, and carboxyltransferase (alpha-CT and beta-CT). In the present study, four genes encoding alpha-CT were cloned from Brassica napus, and two were cloned from each of the two parental species, B. rapa and B. oleracea. Comparative and cluster analyses indicated that these genes were divided into two major groups. The major divergence between group-1 and group-2 occurred in the second intron. Group-2 alpha-CT genes represented the ancestral form in the genus Brassica. The divergence of group-1 and group-2 genes occurred in their common ancestor 12.96-17.78 million years ago (MYA), soon after the divergence of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica (15-20 MYA). This time of divergence is identical to that reported for the paralogous subgenomes of diploid Brassica species (13-17 MYA). Real-time reverse transcription PCR revealed that the expression patterns of the two groups of genes were similar in different organs, except in leaves. To better understand the regulation and evolution of alpha-CT genes, promoter regions from two sets of orthologous gene copies from B. napus, B. rapa, and B. oleracea were cloned and compared. The function of the promoter of gene Bnalpha-CT-1-1 in group-1 and gene Bnalpha-CT-2-1 in group-2 was examined by assaying beta-glucuronidase activity in transgenic A. thaliana. Our results will be helpful in elucidating the evolution and regulation of ACCase in oilseed rape.

  20. Susceptibility of podocytes to palmitic acid is regulated by fatty acid oxidation and inversely depends on acetyl-CoA carboxylases 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Kampe, Kapil; Sieber, Jonas; Orellana, Jana Marina; Mundel, Peter; Jehle, Andreas Werner

    2014-02-15

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by dyslipidemia with elevated free fatty acids (FFAs). Loss of podocytes is a hallmark of diabetic nephropathy, and podocytes are susceptible to saturated FFAs, which induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and podocyte death. Genome-wide association studies indicate that expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) 2, a key enzyme of fatty acid oxidation (FAO), is associated with proteinuria in type 2 diabetes. Here, we show that stimulation of FAO by aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1β-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR) or by adiponectin, activators of the low-energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), protects from palmitic acid-induced podocyte death. Conversely, inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT-1), the rate-limiting enzyme of FAO and downstream target of AMPK, augments palmitic acid toxicity and impedes the protective AICAR effect. Etomoxir blocked the AICAR-induced FAO measured with tritium-labeled palmitic acid. The beneficial effect of AICAR was associated with a reduction of ER stress, and it was markedly reduced in ACC-1/-2 double-silenced podocytes. In conclusion, the stimulation of FAO by modulating the AMPK-ACC-CPT-1 pathway may be part of a protective mechanism against saturated FFAs that drive podocyte death. Further studies are needed to investigate the potentially novel therapeutic implications of these findings.

  1. Decreasing the Rate of Metabolic Ketone Reduction in the Discovery of a Clinical Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Inhibitor for the Treatment of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) inhibitors offer significant potential for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hepatic steatosis, and cancer. However, the identification of tool compounds suitable to test the hypothesis in human trials has been challenging. An advanced series of spirocyclic ketone-containing ACC inhibitors recently reported by Pfizer were metabolized in vivo by ketone reduction, which complicated human pharmacology projections. We disclose that this metabolic reduction can be greatly attenuated through introduction of steric hindrance adjacent to the ketone carbonyl. Incorporation of weakly basic functionality improved solubility and led to the identification of 9 as a clinical candidate for the treatment of T2DM. Phase I clinical studies demonstrated dose-proportional increases in exposure, single-dose inhibition of de novo lipogenesis (DNL), and changes in indirect calorimetry consistent with increased whole-body fatty acid oxidation. This demonstration of target engagement validates the use of compound 9 to evaluate the role of DNL in human disease. PMID:25423286

  2. Inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase suppresses fatty acid synthesis and tumor growth of non-small cell lung cancer in preclinical models

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Robert U.; Parker, Seth J.; Eichner, Lillian J.; Kolar, Matthew J.; Wallace, Martina; Brun, Sonja N.; Lombardo, Portia S.; Van Nostrand, Jeanine L.; Hutchins, Amanda; Vera, Lilliana; Gerken, Laurie; Greenwood, Jeremy; Bhat, Sathesh; Harriman, Geraldine; Westlin, William F.; Harwood, H. James; Saghatelian, Alan; Kapeller, Rosana; Metallo, Christian M.; Shaw, Reuben J.

    2016-01-01

    Continuous de novo fatty acid synthesis is a common feature of cancer required to meet the biosynthetic demands of a growing tumor. This process is controlled by the rate-limiting enzyme acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), an attractive but traditionally intractable drug target. Here, we provide genetic and pharmacological evidence that in preclinical models ACC is required to maintain de novo fatty acid synthesis needed for growth and viability of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We describe the ability of ND-646—an allosteric inhibitor of the ACC enzymes ACC1 and ACC2 that prevents ACC subunit dimerization—to suppress fatty acid synthesis in vitro and in vivo. Chronic ND-646 treatment of xenograft and genetically engineered mouse models of NSCLC inhibited tumor growth. When administered as a single agent or in combination with the standard-of-care drug carboplatin, ND-646 markedly suppressed lung tumor growth in the Kras;Trp53−/− (also known as KRAS p53) and Kras;Stk11−/− (also known as KRAS Lkb1) mouse models of NSCLC. These findings demonstrate that ACC mediates a metabolic liability of NSCLC and that ACC inhibition by ND-646 is detrimental to NSCLC growth, supporting further examination of the use of ACC inhibitors in oncology. PMID:27643638

  3. The glossyhead1 Allele of ACC1 Reveals a Principal Role for Multidomain Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase in the Biosynthesis of Cuticular Waxes by Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.; Xu, C.; Zhao, H.; Parsons, E. P.; Kosma, D. K.; Xu, X.; Chao, D.; Lohrey, G.; Bangarusamy, D. K.; Wang, G.; Bressan, R. A.; Jenks, M. A.

    2011-11-01

    A novel mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), having highly glossy inflorescence stems, postgenital fusion in floral organs, and reduced fertility, was isolated from an ethyl methanesulfonate-mutagenized population and designated glossyhead1 (gsd1). The gsd1 locus was mapped to chromosome 1, and the causal gene was identified as a new allele of Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase1 (ACC1), a gene encoding the main enzyme in cytosolic malonyl-coenzyme A synthesis. This, to our knowledge, is the first mutant allele of ACC1 that does not cause lethality at the seed or early germination stage, allowing for the first time a detailed analysis of ACC1 function in mature tissues. Broad lipid profiling of mature gsd1 organs revealed a primary role for ACC1 in the biosynthesis of the very-long-chain fatty acids (C{sub 20:0} or longer) associated with cuticular waxes and triacylglycerols. Unexpectedly, transcriptome analysis revealed that gsd1 has limited impact on any lipid metabolic networks but instead has a large effect on environmental stress-responsive pathways, especially senescence and ethylene synthesis determinants, indicating a possible role for the cytosolic malonyl-coenzyme A-derived lipids in stress response signaling.

  4. Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Conflict in Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Is Associated with Nuclear and Plastidic Candidate Genes Encoding Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanova, Vera S.; Zaytseva, Olga O.; Mglinets, Anatoliy V.; Shatskaya, Natalia V.; Kosterin, Oleg E.; Vasiliev, Gennadiy V.

    2015-01-01

    In crosses of wild and cultivated peas (Pisum sativum L.), nuclear-cytoplasmic incompatibility frequently occurs manifested as decreased pollen fertility, male gametophyte lethality, sporophyte lethality. High-throughput sequencing of plastid genomes of one cultivated and four wild pea accessions differing in cross-compatibility was performed. Candidate genes for involvement in the nuclear-plastid conflict were searched in the reconstructed plastid genomes. In the annotated Medicago truncatula genome, nuclear candidate genes were searched in the portion syntenic to the pea chromosome region known to harbor a locus involved in the conflict. In the plastid genomes, a substantial variability of the accD locus represented by nucleotide substitutions and indels was found to correspond to the pattern of cross-compatibility among the accessions analyzed. Amino acid substitutions in the polypeptides encoded by the alleles of a nuclear locus, designated as Bccp3, with a complementary function to accD, fitted the compatibility pattern. The accD locus in the plastid genome encoding beta subunit of the carboxyltransferase of acetyl-coA carboxylase and the nuclear locus Bccp3 encoding biotin carboxyl carrier protein of the same multi-subunit enzyme were nominated as candidate genes for main contribution to nuclear-cytoplasmic incompatibility in peas. Existence of another nuclear locus involved in the accD-mediated conflict is hypothesized. PMID:25789472

  5. Decreasing the Rate of Metabolic Ketone Reduction in the Discovery of a Clinical Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Inhibitor for the Treatment of Diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, David A.; Kung, Daniel W.; Esler, William P.; Amor, Paul A.; Bagley, Scott W.; Beysen, Carine; Carvajal-Gonzalez, Santos; Doran, Shawn D.; Limberakis, Chris; Mathiowetz, Alan M.; McPherson, Kirk; Price, David A.; Ravussin, Eric; Sonnenberg, Gabriele E.; Southers, James A.; Sweet, Laurel J.; Turner, Scott M.; Vajdos, Felix F.

    2014-12-26

    We found that Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) inhibitors offer significant potential for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hepatic steatosis, and cancer. However, the identification of tool compounds suitable to test the hypothesis in human trials has been challenging. An advanced series of spirocyclic ketone-containing ACC inhibitors recently reported by Pfizer were metabolized in vivo by ketone reduction, which complicated human pharmacology projections. Here, we disclose that this metabolic reduction can be greatly attenuated through introduction of steric hindrance adjacent to the ketone carbonyl. Incorporation of weakly basic functionality improved solubility and led to the identification of 9 as a clinical candidate for the treatment of T2DM. Phase I clinical studies demonstrated dose-proportional increases in exposure, single-dose inhibition of de novo lipogenesis (DNL), and changes in indirect calorimetry consistent with increased whole-body fatty acid oxidation. This demonstration of target engagement validates the use of compound 9 to evaluate the role of DNL in human disease.

  6. Inhibition of Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase 1 (ACC1) and 2 (ACC2) Reduces Proliferation and De Novo Lipogenesis of EGFRvIII Human Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jessica E. C.; Esler, William P.; Patel, Rushi; Lanba, Adhiraj; Vera, Nicholas B.; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A.; Vernochet, Cecile

    2017-01-01

    Tumor cell proliferation and migration processes are regulated by multiple metabolic pathways including glycolysis and de novo lipogenesis. Since acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) is at the junction of lipids synthesis and oxidative metabolic pathways, we investigated whether use of a dual ACC inhibitor would provide a potential therapy against certain lipogenic cancers. The impact of dual ACC1/ACC2 inhibition was investigated using a dual ACC1/ACC2 inhibitor as well as dual siRNA knock down on the cellular viability and metabolism of two glioblastoma multiform cancer cell lines, U87 and a more aggressive form, U87 EGFRvIII. We first demonstrated that while ACCi inhibited DNL in both cell lines, ACCi preferentially blunted the U87 EGFRvIII cellular proliferation capacity. Metabolically, chronic treatment with ACCi significantly upregulated U87 EGFRvIII cellular respiration and extracellular acidification rate, a marker of glycolytic activity, but impaired mitochondrial health by reducing maximal respiration and decreasing mitochondrial ATP production efficiency. Moreover, ACCi treatment altered the cellular lipids content and increased apoptotic caspase activity in U87 EGFRvIII cells. Collectively these data indicate that ACC inhibition, by reducing DNL and increasing cellular metabolic rate, may have therapeutic utility for the suppression of lipogenic tumor growth and warrants further investigation. PMID:28081256

  7. Genes encoding plastid acetyl-CoA carboxylase and 3-phosphoglycerate kinase of the Triticum/Aegilops complex and the evolutionary history of polyploid wheat

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shaoxing; Sirikhachornkit, Anchalee; Su, Xiujuan; Faris, Justin; Gill, Bikram; Haselkorn, Robert; Gornicki, Piotr

    2002-01-01

    The classic wheat evolutionary history is one of adaptive radiation of the diploid Triticum/Aegilops species (A, S, D), genome convergence and divergence of the tetraploid (Triticum turgidum AABB, and Triticum timopheevii AAGG) and hexaploid (Triticum aestivum, AABBDD) species. We analyzed Acc-1 (plastid acetyl-CoA carboxylase) and Pgk-1 (plastid 3-phosphoglycerate kinase) genes to determine phylogenetic relationships among Triticum and Aegilops species of the wheat lineage and to establish the timeline of wheat evolution based on gene sequence comparisons. Triticum urartu was confirmed as the A genome donor of tetraploid and hexaploid wheat. The A genome of polyploid wheat diverged from T. urartu less than half a million years ago (MYA), indicating a relatively recent origin of polyploid wheat. The D genome sequences of T. aestivum and Aegilops tauschii are identical, confirming that T. aestivum arose from hybridization of T. turgidum and Ae. tauschii only 8,000 years ago. The diploid Triticum and Aegilops progenitors of the A, B, D, G, and S genomes all radiated 2.5–4.5 MYA. Our data suggest that the Acc-1 and Pgk-1 loci have different histories in different lineages, indicating genome mosaicity and significant intraspecific differentiation. Some loci of the S genome of Aegilops speltoides and the G genome of T. timophevii are closely related, suggesting the same origin of some parts of their genomes. None of the Aegilops genomes analyzed is a close relative of the B genome, so the diploid progenitor of the B genome remains unknown. PMID:12060759

  8. A Symmetrical Tetramer for S. aureus Pyruvate Carboxylase in Complex with Coenzyme A

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.; Xiang, S; Lasso, G; Gil, D; Valle, M; Tong, L

    2009-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) is a conserved metabolic enzyme with important cellular functions. We report crystallographic and cryo-electron microscopy (EM) studies of Staphylococcus aureus PC (SaPC) in complex with acetyl-CoA, an allosteric activator, and mutagenesis, biochemical, and structural studies of the biotin binding site of its carboxyltransferase (CT) domain. The disease-causing A610T mutation abolishes catalytic activity by blocking biotin binding to the CT active site, and Thr908 might play a catalytic role in the CT reaction. The crystal structure of SaPC in complex with CoA reveals a symmetrical tetramer, with one CoA molecule bound to each monomer, and cryo-EM studies confirm the symmetrical nature of the tetramer. These observations are in sharp contrast to the highly asymmetrical tetramer of Rhizobium etli PC in complex with ethyl-CoA. Our structural information suggests that acetyl-CoA promotes a conformation for the dimer of the biotin carboxylase domain of PC that might be catalytically more competent.

  9. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of N-{3-[2-(4-alkoxyphenoxy)thiazol-5-yl]-1- methylprop-2-ynyl}carboxy derivatives as selective acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yu Gui; Weitzberg, Moshe; Clark, Richard F; Xu, Xiangdong; Li, Qun; Zhang, Tianyuan; Hansen, T Matthew; Liu, Gang; Xin, Zhili; Wang, Xiaojun; Wang, Rongqi; McNally, Teresa; Zinker, Bradley A; Frevert, Ernst U; Camp, Heidi S; Camp, Heidi; Beutel, Bruce A; Sham, Hing L

    2006-06-29

    A structurally novel acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) inhibitor is identified from high-throughput screening. A preliminary structure-activity relationship study led to the discovery of potent dual ACC1/ACC2 and ACC2 selective inhibitors against human recombinant ACC1 and ACC2. Selective ACC2 inhibitors exhibited IC50<20 nM and >1000-fold selectivity against ACC1. (S)-Enantiomer 9p exhibited high ACC2 activity and lowered muscle malonyl-CoA dose-dependently in acute rodent studies, whereas (R)-enantiomer 9o was weak and had no effect on the malonyl-CoA level.

  10. MEDICA 16 inhibits hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase and reduces plasma triacylglycerol levels in insulin-resistant JCR: LA-cp rats.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Laura L; Kelly, Sandra E; Russell, James C; Bar-Tana, Jacob; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2002-05-01

    Intracellular triacylglycerol (TG) content of liver and skeletal muscle contributes to insulin resistance, and a significant correlation exists between TG content and the development of insulin resistance. Because acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) is the rate-limiting enzyme for liver fatty acid biosynthesis and a key regulator of muscle fatty acid oxidation, we examined whether ACC plays a role in the accumulation of intracellular TG. We also determined the potential role of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in this process, since it can phosphorylate and inhibit ACC activity in both liver and muscle. TG content, ACC, and AMPK were examined in the liver and skeletal muscle of insulin-resistant JCR:LA-cp rats during the time frame when insulin resistance develops. At 12 weeks of age, there was a threefold elevation in liver TG content and a sevenfold elevation in skeletal muscle TG content. Hepatic ACC activity was significantly elevated in 12-week-old JCR:LA-cp rats compared with lean age-matched controls (8.75 +/- 0.53 vs. 3.30 +/- 0.18 nmol. min(-1). mg(-1), respectively), even though AMPK activity was also increased. The observed increase in hepatic ACC activity was accompanied by a 300% increase in ACC protein expression. There were no significant differences in ACC activity, ACC protein expression, or AMPK activity in the skeletal muscle of the 12-week JCR:LA-cp rats. Treatment of 12-week JCR:LA-cp rats with MEDICA 16 (an ATP-citrate lyase inhibitor) resulted in a decrease in hepatic ACC and AMPK activities, but had no effect on skeletal muscle ACC and AMPK. Our data suggest that alterations in ACC or AMPK activity in muscle do not contribute to the development of insulin resistance. However, increased liver ACC activity in the JCR:LA-cp rat appears to contribute to the development of lipid abnormalities, although this increase does not appear to occur secondary to a decrease in AMPK activity.

  11. COAs: Behind the Masks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birke, Szifra

    1993-01-01

    Provides information on alcoholism and codependency to help teachers identify and respond to children of alcoholics (COAs). Discusses characteristics of alcoholic homes and problems encountered by children and adult COAs. Examines survival "masks" of COAs, including hero, rebel, adjustor, clown, and caretaker. Lists organizational,…

  12. Potential Functional Replacement of the Plastidic Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Subunit (accD) Gene by Recent Transfers to the Nucleus in Some Angiosperm Lineages1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau-Gueutin, Mathieu; Huang, Xun; Higginson, Emily; Ayliffe, Michael; Day, Anil; Timmis, Jeremy N.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells originated when an ancestor of the nucleated cell engulfed bacterial endosymbionts that gradually evolved into the mitochondrion and the chloroplast. Soon after these endosymbiotic events, thousands of ancestral prokaryotic genes were functionally transferred from the endosymbionts to the nucleus. This process of functional gene relocation, now rare in eukaryotes, continues in angiosperms. In this article, we show that the chloroplastic acetyl-CoA carboxylase subunit (accD) gene that is present in the plastome of most angiosperms has been functionally relocated to the nucleus in the Campanulaceae. Surprisingly, the nucleus-encoded accD transcript is considerably smaller than the plastidic version, consisting of little more than the carboxylase domain of the plastidic accD gene fused to a coding region encoding a plastid targeting peptide. We verified experimentally the presence of a chloroplastic transit peptide by showing that the product of the nuclear accD fused to green fluorescent protein was imported in the chloroplasts. The nuclear gene regulatory elements that enabled the erstwhile plastidic gene to become functional in the nuclear genome were identified, and the evolution of the intronic and exonic sequences in the nucleus is described. Relocation and truncation of the accD gene is a remarkable example of the processes underpinning endosymbiotic evolution. PMID:23435694

  13. Fungal ammonia fermentation, a novel metabolic mechanism that couples the dissimilatory and assimilatory pathways of both nitrate and ethanol. Role of acetyl CoA synthetase in anaerobic ATP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Takasaki, Kazuto; Shoun, Hirofumi; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takeo, Kanji; Nakamura, Akira; Hoshino, Takayuki; Takaya, Naoki

    2004-03-26

    Fungal ammonia fermentation is a novel dissimilatory metabolic mechanism that supplies energy under anoxic conditions. The fungus Fusarium oxysporum reduces nitrate to ammonium and simultaneously oxidizes ethanol to acetate to generate ATP (Zhou, Z., Takaya, N., Nakamura, A., Yamaguchi, M., Takeo, K., and Shoun, H. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 1892-1896). We identified the Aspergillus nidulans genes involved in ammonia fermentation by analyzing fungal mutants. The results showed that assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases (the gene products of niaD and niiA) were essential for reducing nitrate and for anaerobic cell growth during ammonia fermentation. We also found that ethanol oxidation is coupled with nitrate reduction and catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase, coenzyme A (CoA)-acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase, and acetyl-CoA synthetase (Acs). This is similar to the mechanism suggested in F. oxysporum except A. nidulans uses Acs to produce ATP instead of the ADP-dependent acetate kinase of F. oxysporum. The production of Acs requires a functional facA gene that encodes Acs and that is involved in ethanol assimilation and other metabolic processes. We purified the gene product of facA (FacA) from the fungus to show that the fungus acetylates FacA on its lysine residue(s) specifically under conditions of ammonia fermentation to regulate its substrate affinity. Acetylated FacA had higher affinity for acetyl-CoA than for acetate, whereas non-acetylated FacA had more affinity for acetate. Thus, the acetylated variant of the FacA protein is responsible for ATP synthesis during fungal ammonia fermentation. These results showed that the fungus ferments ammonium via coupled dissimilatory and assimilatory mechanisms.

  14. Structure and function of biotin-dependent carboxylases

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Liang

    2012-01-01

    Biotin-dependent carboxylases include acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC), 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (MCC), geranyl-CoA carboxylase (GCC), pyruvate carboxylase (PC), and urea carboxylase (UC). They contain biotin carboxylase (BC), carboxyltransferase (CT) and biotin-carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) components. These enzymes are widely distributed in nature and have important functions in fatty acid metabolism, amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, polyketide biosynthesis, urea utilization, and other cellular processes. ACCs are also attractive targets for drug discovery against type 2 diabetes, obesity, cancer, microbial infections, and other diseases, and the plastid ACC of grasses is the target of action of three classes of commercial herbicides. Deficiencies in the activities of PCC, MCC or PC are linked to serious diseases in humans. Our understanding of these enzymes has been greatly enhanced over the past few years by the crystal structures of the holoenzymes of PCC, MCC, PC, and UC. The structures reveal unanticipated features in the architectures of the holoenzymes, including the presence of previously unrecognized domains, and provide a molecular basis for understanding their catalytic mechanism as well as the large collection of disease-causing mutations in PCC, MCC and PC. This review will summarize the recent advances in our knowledge on the structure and function of these important metabolic enzymes. PMID:22869039

  15. Inhibitors of Pyruvate Carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Zeczycki, Tonya N.; Maurice, Martin St.; Attwood, Paul V.

    2010-01-01

    This review aims to discuss the varied types of inhibitors of biotin-dependent carboxylases, with an emphasis on the inhibitors of pyruvate carboxylase. Some of these inhibitors are physiologically relevant, in that they provide ways of regulating the cellular activities of the enzymes e.g. aspartate and prohibitin inhibition of pyruvate carboxylase. Most of the inhibitors that will be discussed have been used to probe various aspects of the structure and function of these enzymes. They target particular parts of the structure e.g. avidin – biotin, FTP – ATP binding site, oxamate – pyruvate binding site, phosphonoacetate – binding site of the putative carboxyphosphate intermediate. PMID:22180764

  16. Identification of a novel CoA synthase isoform, which is primarily expressed in Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Nemazanyy, Ivan . E-mail: nemazanyy@imbg.org.ua; Panasyuk, Ganna; Breus, Oksana; Zhyvoloup, Alexander; Filonenko, Valeriy; Gout, Ivan T. . E-mail: i.gout@ucl.ac.uk

    2006-03-24

    CoA and its derivatives Acetyl-CoA and Acyl-CoA are important players in cellular metabolism and signal transduction. CoA synthase is a bifunctional enzyme which mediates the final stages of CoA biosynthesis. In previous studies, we have reported molecular cloning, biochemical characterization, and subcellular localization of CoA synthase (CoASy). Here, we describe the existence of a novel CoA synthase isoform, which is the product of alternative splicing and possesses a 29aa extension at the N-terminus. We termed it CoASy {beta} and originally identified CoA synthase, CoASy {alpha}. The transcript specific for CoASy {beta} was identified by electronic screening and by RT-PCR analysis of various rat tissues. The existence of this novel isoform was further confirmed by immunoblot analysis with antibodies directed to the N-terminal peptide of CoASy {beta}. In contrast to CoASy {alpha}, which shows ubiquitous expression, CoASy {beta} is primarily expressed in Brain. Using confocal microscopy, we demonstrated that both isoforms are localized on mitochondria. The N-terminal extension does not affect the activity of CoA synthase, but possesses a proline-rich sequence which can bring the enzyme into complexes with signalling proteins containing SH3 or WW domains. The role of this novel isoform in CoA biosynthesis, especially in Brain, requires further elucidation.

  17. Nucleosome acetylation sequencing to study the establishment of chromatin acetylation.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Chitvan; Blacketer, Melissa J; Shogren-Knaak, Michael A

    2014-07-15

    The establishment of posttranslational chromatin modifications is a major mechanism for regulating how genomic DNA is utilized. However, current in vitro chromatin assays do not monitor histone modifications at individual nucleosomes. Here we describe a strategy, nucleosome acetylation sequencing, that allows us to read the amount of modification at each nucleosome. In this approach, a bead-bound trinucleosome substrate is enzymatically acetylated with radiolabeled acetyl CoA by the SAGA complex from Saccharomyces cerevisae. The product is digested by restriction enzymes that cut at unique sites between the nucleosomes and then counted to quantify the extent of acetylation at each nucleosomal site. We find that we can sensitively, specifically, and reproducibly follow enzyme-mediated nucleosome acetylation. Applying this strategy, when acetylation proceeds extensively, its distribution across nucleosomes is relatively uniform. However, when substrates are used that contain nucleosomes mutated at the major sites of SAGA-mediated acetylation, or that are studied under initial rate conditions, changes in the acetylation distribution can be observed. Nucleosome acetylation sequencing should be applicable to analyzing a wide range of modifications. Additionally, because our trinucleosomes synthesis strategy is highly modular and efficient, it can be used to generate nucleosomal systems in which nucleosome composition differs across the array.

  18. Structural Analysis of Substrate, Reaction Intermediate, and Product Binding in Haemophilus influenzae Biotin Carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Tyler C; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Neau, David B; Bonnot, Ross; Waldrop, Grover L

    2015-06-23

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the first and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three proteins: biotin carboxylase, a biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase. The reaction mechanism involves two half-reactions with biotin carboxylase catalyzing the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin-BCCP in the first reaction. In the second reaction, carboxyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of the carboxyl group from biotin-BCCP to acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA. In this report, high-resolution crystal structures of biotin carboxylase from Haemophilus influenzae were determined with bicarbonate, the ATP analogue AMPPCP; the carboxyphosphate intermediate analogues, phosphonoacetamide and phosphonoformate; the products ADP and phosphate; and the carboxybiotin analogue N1'-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester. The structures have a common theme in that bicarbonate, phosphate, and the methyl ester of the carboxyl group of N1'-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester all bound in the same pocket in the active site of biotin carboxylase and as such utilize the same set of amino acids for binding. This finding suggests a catalytic mechanism for biotin carboxylase in which the binding pocket that binds tetrahedral phosphate also accommodates and stabilizes a tetrahedral dianionic transition state resulting from direct transfer of CO₂ from the carboxyphosphate intermediate to biotin.

  19. Enhanced acetyl-CoA production is associated with increased triglyceride accumulation in the green alga Chlorella desiccata.

    PubMed

    Avidan, Omri; Brandis, Alexander; Rogachev, Ilana; Pick, Uri

    2015-07-01

    Triglycerides (TAGs) from microalgae can be utilized as food supplements and for biodiesel production, but little is known about the regulation of their biosynthesis. This work aimed to test the relationship between acetyl-CoA (Ac-CoA) levels and TAG biosynthesis in green algae under nitrogen deprivation. A novel, highly sensitive liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) technique enabled us to determine the levels of Ac-CoA, malonyl-CoA, and unacetylated (free) CoA in green microalgae. A comparative study of three algal species that differ in TAG accumulation levels shows that during N starvation, Ac-CoA levels rapidly rise, preceding TAG accumulation in all tested species. The levels of Ac-CoA in the high TAG accumulator Chlorella desiccata exceed the levels in the moderate TAG accumulators Dunaliella tertiolecta and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Similarly, malonyl-CoA and free CoA levels also increase, but to lower extents. Calculated cellular concentrations of Ac-CoA are far lower than reported K mAc-CoA values of plastidic Ac-CoA carboxylase (ptACCase) in plants. Transcript level analysis of plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (ptPDH), the major chloroplastic Ac-CoA producer, revealed rapid induction in parallel with Ac-CoA accumulation in C. desiccata, but not in D. tertiolecta or C. reinhardtii. It is proposed that the capacity to accumulate high TAG levels in green algae critically depends on their ability to divert carbon flow towards Ac-CoA. This requires elevation of the chloroplastic CoA pool level and enhancement of Ac-CoA biosynthesis. These conclusions may have important implications for future genetic manipulation to enhance TAG biosynthesis in green algae.

  20. Functional reconstitution of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis long-chain acyl-CoA carboxylase from multiple acyl-CoA subunits.

    PubMed

    Bazet Lyonnet, Bernardo; Diacovich, Lautaro; Gago, Gabriela; Spina, Lucie; Bardou, Fabienne; Lemassu, Anne; Quémard, Annaïk; Gramajo, Hugo

    2017-02-21

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis produces a large number of structurally diverse lipids that have been implicated in the pathogenicity, persistence and antibiotic resistance of this organism. Most building blocks involved in the biosynthesis of all these lipids are generated by acyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCase) whose subunit composition and physiological roles have not yet been clearly established. A rather controversial data in the literature refers to the exact protein composition and substrate specificity of the enzyme complex that produces the long-chain α-carboxy-acyl-CoAs; one of the substrates involved in the last step of condensation mediated by the polyketide synthase Pks13 to synthesize mature mycolic acids. Here we have successfully reconstituted the so called long-chain acyl-CoA carboxylase complex (LCC) from its purified components: the α-subunit AccA3, the ε-subunit AccE5 and the two β-subunits AccD4 and AccD5, and demonstrated that the four subunits are essential for its LCC activity. Furthermore, we also showed by substrate competition experiments and the use of a specific inhibitor of the AccD5 subunit, that its role in the carboxylation of the long acyl-CoAs, as part of the LCC complex, was structural rather than catalytic. Moreover, AccD5 was also able to carboxylate its natural substrates, acetyl-CoA and propionyl-CoA, in the context of the LCC enzyme complex. Thus, the supercomplex formed by these four subunits has the potential to generate the main substrates, malonyl-CoA, methylmalonyl-CoA and α-carboxy-C24-26 -CoA, used as condensing units for the biosynthesis of all the lipids present in this pathogen. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of Pyruvate Carboxylase Overexpression on the Physiology of Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Koffas, Mattheos A. G.; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Aon, Juan C.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2002-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase was recently sequenced in Corynebacterium glutamicum and shown to play an important role of anaplerosis in the central carbon metabolism and amino acid synthesis of these bacteria. In this study we investigate the effect of the overexpression of the gene for pyruvate carboxylase (pyc) on the physiology of C. glutamicum ATCC 21253 and ATCC 21799 grown on defined media with two different carbon sources, glucose and lactate. In general, the physiological effects of pyc overexpression in Corynebacteria depend on the genetic background of the particular strain studied and are determined to a large extent by the interplay between pyruvate carboxylase and aspartate kinase activities. If the pyruvate carboxylase activity is not properly matched by the aspartate kinase activity, pyc overexpression results in growth enhancement instead of greater lysine production, despite its central role in anaplerosis and aspartic acid biosynthesis. Aspartate kinase regulation by lysine and threonine, pyruvate carboxylase inhibition by aspartate (shown in this study using permeabilized cells), as well as well-established activation of pyruvate carboxylase by lactate and acetyl coenzyme A are the key factors in determining the effect of pyc overexpression on Corynebacteria physiology. PMID:12406733

  2. SIRT4 coordinates the balance between lipid synthesis and catabolism by repressing malonyl CoA decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Gaëlle; German, Natalie J.; Saha, Asish K.; de Boer, Vincent C. J.; Davies, Michael; Koves, Timothy R.; Dephoure, Noah; Fischer, Frank; Boanca, Gina; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Lovitch, Scott B.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Kurland, Irwin J.; Steegborn, Clemens; Gygi, Steven P.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Ruderman, Neil B.; Haigis, Marcia C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Lipid metabolism is tightly controlled by the nutritional state of the organism. Nutrient-rich conditions increase lipogenesis whereas nutrient deprivation promotes fat oxidation. In this study, we identify the mitochondrial sirtuin, SIRT4, as a novel regulator of lipid homeostasis. SIRT4 is active in nutrient-replete conditions to repress fatty acid oxidation while promoting lipid anabolism. SIRT4 deacetylates and inhibits malonyl CoA decarboxylase (MCD), an enzyme that produces acetyl CoA from malonyl CoA. Malonyl CoA provides the carbon skeleton for lipogenesis and also inhibits fat oxidation. Mice lacking SIRT4 display elevated MCD activity and decreased malonyl CoA in skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue. Consequently, SIRT4 KO mice display deregulated lipid metabolism leading to increased exercise tolerance and protection against diet-induced obesity. In sum, this work elucidates SIRT4 as an important regulator of lipid homeostasis, identifies MCD as a novel SIRT4 target, and deepens our understanding of the malonyl CoA regulatory axis. PMID:23746352

  3. Molecular Characterization of a Heteromeric ATP-Citrate Lyase That Generates Cytosolic Acetyl-Coenzyme A in Arabidopsis1[w

    PubMed Central

    Fatland, Beth L.; Ke, Jinshan; Anderson, Marc D.; Mentzen, Wieslawa I.; Cui, Li Wei; Allred, C. Christy; Johnston, Jerry L.; Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    2002-01-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) is used in the cytosol of plant cells for the synthesis of a diverse set of phytochemicals including waxes, isoprenoids, stilbenes, and flavonoids. The source of cytosolic acetyl-CoA is unclear. We identified two Arabidopsis cDNAs that encode proteins similar to the amino and carboxy portions of human ATP-citrate lyase (ACL). Coexpression of these cDNAs in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) confers ACL activity, indicating that both the Arabidopsis genes are required for ACL activity. Arabidopsis ACL is a heteromeric enzyme composed of two distinct subunits, ACLA (45 kD) and ACLB (65 kD). The holoprotein has a molecular mass of 500 kD, which corresponds to a heterooctomer with an A4B4 configuration. ACL activity and the ACLA and ACLB polypeptides are located in the cytosol, consistent with the lack of targeting peptides in the ACLA and ACLB sequences. In the Arabidopsis genome, three genes encode for the ACLA subunit (ACLA-1, At1g10670; ACLA-2, At1g60810; and ACLA-3, At1g09430), and two genes encode the ACLB subunit (ACLB-1, At3g06650 and ACLB-2, At5g49460). The ACLA and ACLB mRNAs accumulate in coordinated spatial and temporal patterns during plant development. This complex accumulation pattern is consistent with the predicted physiological needs for cytosolic acetyl-CoA, and is closely coordinated with the accumulation pattern of cytosolic acetyl-CoA carboxylase, an enzyme using cytosolic acetyl-CoA as a substrate. Taken together, these results indicate that ACL, encoded by the ACLA and ACLB genes of Arabidopsis, generates cytosolic acetyl-CoA. The heteromeric organization of this enzyme is common to green plants (including Chlorophyceae, Marchantimorpha, Bryopsida, Pinaceae, monocotyledons, and eudicots), species of fungi, Glaucophytes, Chlamydomonas, and prokaryotes. In contrast, all known animal ACL enzymes have a homomeric structure, indicating that a evolutionary fusion of the ACLA and ACLB genes probably occurred early in the

  4. Three CoA Transferases Involved in the Production of Short Chain Fatty Acids in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Mitsunari; Yoshida, Yasuo; Nagano, Keiji; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Takebe, Jun; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2016-01-01

    Butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, which produces butyrate and acetyl-CoA from butyryl-CoA and acetate, is responsible for the final step of butyrate production in bacteria. This study demonstrates that in the periodontopathogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis this reaction is not catalyzed by PGN_1171, previously annotated as butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, but by three distinct CoA transferases, PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and spectrophotometric analyses were performed using crude enzyme extracts from deletion mutant strains and purified recombinant proteins. The experiments revealed that, in the presence of acetate, PGN_0725 preferentially utilized butyryl-CoA rather than propionyl-CoA. By contrast, this preference was reversed in PGN_1888. The only butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase activity was observed in PGN_1341. Double reciprocal plots revealed that all the reactions catalyzed by these enzymes follow a ternary-complex mechanism, in contrast to previously characterized CoA transferases. GC-MS analysis to determine the concentrations of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in culture supernatants of P. gingivalis wild type and mutant strains revealed that PGN_0725 and PGN_1888 play a major role in the production of butyrate and propionate, respectively. Interestingly, a triple deletion mutant lacking PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888 produced low levels of SCFAs, suggesting that the microorganism contains CoA transferase(s) in addition to these three enzymes. Growth rates of the mutant strains were mostly slower than that of the wild type, indicating that many carbon compounds produced in the SCFA synthesis appear to be important for the biological activity of this microorganism. PMID:27486457

  5. Acetyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 36 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  6. Assay of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, C.; Berry, J.

    1987-04-01

    Assays of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase (rubisco) can be used to illustrate many properties of photosynthetic systems. Many different leaves have been assayed with this standard procedure. The tissue is ground with a mortar and pestle in extraction buffer. The supernatant after centrifugation is used as the source of enzyme. Buffer, RuBP, (/sup 14/C)-NaHCO/sub 3/, and enzyme are combined in a scintillation vial; the reaction is run for 1 min at 30/sup 0/. The acid-stable products are counted. Reproducibility in student experiments has been excellent. The assay data can be combined with analyses of leaf properties such as fresh and dry weight, chlorophyll and protein content, etc. Students have done projects such as the response of enzyme to temperature and to various inhibitors. They also report on the use of a transition state analog, carboxyarabinitol bisphosphate, to titrate the molar concentration of rubisco molecules (active sites) in an enzyme sample. Thus, using crude extracts the catalytic activity of a sample can be compared to the absolute quantity of enzyme or to the turnover number.

  7. Is Dimerization Required for the Catalytic Activity of Bacterial Biotin Carboxylase?

    SciTech Connect

    Shen,Y.; Chou, C.; Chang, G.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylases (ACCs) have crucial roles in fatty acid metabolism. The biotin carboxylase (BC) subunit of Escherichia coli ACC is believed to be active only as a dimer, although the crystal structure shows that the active site of each monomer is 25 Angstroms from the dimer interface. We report here biochemical, biophysical, and structural characterizations of BC carrying single-site mutations in the dimer interface. Our studies demonstrate that two of the mutants, R19E and E23R, are monomeric in solution but have only a 3-fold loss in catalytic activity. The crystal structures of the E23R and F363A mutants show that they can still form the correct dimer at high concentrations. Our data suggest that dimerization is not an absolute requirement for the catalytic activity of the E. coli BC subunit, and we propose a new model for the molecular mechanism of action for BC in multisubunit and multidomain ACCs.

  8. Crystal Structure of the alpha6beta6 Holoenzyme of propionyl-coenzyme A Carboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.; Sadre-Bazzaz, K; Shen, Y; Deng, B; Zhou, Z; Tong, L

    2010-01-01

    Propionyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (PCC), a mitochondrial biotin-dependent enzyme, is essential for the catabolism of the amino acids Thr, Val, Ile and Met, cholesterol and fatty acids with an odd number of carbon atoms. Deficiencies in PCC activity in humans are linked to the disease propionic acidaemia, an autosomal recessive disorder that can be fatal in infants. The holoenzyme of PCC is an {alpha}{sub 6}{beta}{sub 6} dodecamer, with a molecular mass of 750 kDa. The {alpha}-subunit contains the biotin carboxylase (BC) and biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) domains, whereas the {beta}-subunit supplies the carboxyltransferase (CT) activity. Here we report the crystal structure at 3.2-{angstrom} resolution of a bacterial PCC {alpha}{sub 6}{beta}{sub 6} holoenzyme as well as cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstruction at 15-{angstrom} resolution demonstrating a similar structure for human PCC. The structure defines the overall architecture of PCC and reveals unexpectedly that the {alpha}-subunits are arranged as monomers in the holoenzyme, decorating a central {beta}{sub 6} hexamer. A hitherto unrecognized domain in the {alpha}-subunit, formed by residues between the BC and BCCP domains, is crucial for interactions with the {beta}-subunit. We have named it the BT domain. The structure reveals for the first time the relative positions of the BC and CT active sites in the holoenzyme. They are separated by approximately 55 {angstrom}, indicating that the entire BCCP domain must translocate during catalysis. The BCCP domain is located in the active site of the {beta}-subunit in the current structure, providing insight for its involvement in the CT reaction. The structural information establishes a molecular basis for understanding the large collection of disease-causing mutations in PCC and is relevant for the holoenzymes of other biotin-dependent carboxylases, including 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (MCC) and eukaryotic acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC).

  9. Structural evidence for substrate-induced synergism and half-sites reactivity in biotin carboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Mochalkin, Igor; Miller, J. Richard; Evdokimov, Artem; Lightle, Sandra; Yan, Chunhong; Stover, Charles Ken; Waldrop, Grover L.

    2008-10-24

    Bacterial acetyl-CoA carboxylase is a multifunctional biotin-dependent enzyme that consists of three separate proteins: biotin carboxylase (BC), biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase (CT). Acetyl-CoA carboxylase is a potentially attractive target for novel antibiotics because it catalyzes the first committed step in fatty acid biosynthesis. In the first half-reaction, BC catalyzes the ATP-dependent carboxylation of BCCP. In the second half-reaction, the carboxyl group is transferred from carboxybiotinylated BCCP to acetyl-CoA to produce malonyl-CoA. A series of structures of BC from several bacteria crystallized in the presence of various ATP analogs is described that addresses three major questions concerning the catalytic mechanism. The structure of BC bound to AMPPNP and the two catalytically essential magnesium ions resolves inconsistencies between the kinetics of active-site BC mutants and previously reported BC structures. Another structure of AMPPNP bound to BC shows the polyphosphate chain folded back on itself, and not in the correct (i.e., extended) conformation for catalysis. This provides the first structural evidence for the hypothesis of substrate-induced synergism, which posits that ATP binds nonproductively to BC in the absence of biotin. The BC homodimer has been proposed to exhibit half-sites reactivity where the active sites alternate or 'flip-flop' their catalytic cycles. A crystal structure of BC showed the ATP analog AMPPCF{sub 2}P bound to one subunit while the other subunit was unliganded. The liganded subunit was in the closed or catalytic conformation while the unliganded subunit was in the open conformation. This provides the first structural evidence for half-sites reactivity in BC.

  10. Structural evidence for substrate-induced synergism and half-sites reactivity in biotin carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Mochalkin, Igor; Miller, J. Richard; Evdokimov, Artem; Lightle, Sandra; Yan, Chunhong; Stover, Charles Ken; Waldrop, Grover L.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial acetyl-CoA carboxylase is a multifunctional biotin-dependent enzyme that consists of three separate proteins: biotin carboxylase (BC), biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase (CT). Acetyl-CoA carboxylase is a potentially attractive target for novel antibiotics because it catalyzes the first committed step in fatty acid biosynthesis. In the first half-reaction, BC catalyzes the ATP-dependent carboxylation of BCCP. In the second half-reaction, the carboxyl group is transferred from carboxybiotinylated BCCP to acetyl-CoA to produce malonyl-CoA. A series of structures of BC from several bacteria crystallized in the presence of various ATP analogs is described that addresses three major questions concerning the catalytic mechanism. The structure of BC bound to AMPPNP and the two catalytically essential magnesium ions resolves inconsistencies between the kinetics of active-site BC mutants and previously reported BC structures. Another structure of AMPPNP bound to BC shows the polyphosphate chain folded back on itself, and not in the correct (i.e., extended) conformation for catalysis. This provides the first structural evidence for the hypothesis of substrate-induced synergism, which posits that ATP binds nonproductively to BC in the absence of biotin. The BC homodimer has been proposed to exhibit half-sites reactivity where the active sites alternate or “flip-flop” their catalytic cycles. A crystal structure of BC showed the ATP analog AMPPCF2P bound to one subunit while the other subunit was unliganded. The liganded subunit was in the closed or catalytic conformation while the unliganded subunit was in the open conformation. This provides the first structural evidence for half-sites reactivity in BC. PMID:18725455

  11. Computational redesign of bacterial biotin carboxylase inhibitors using structure-based virtual screening of combinatorial libraries.

    PubMed

    Brylinski, Michal; Waldrop, Grover L

    2014-04-02

    As the spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria steadily increases, there is an urgent need for new antibacterial agents. Because fatty acid synthesis is only used for membrane biogenesis in bacteria, the enzymes in this pathway are attractive targets for antibacterial agent development. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the committed and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three distinct protein components: biotin carboxylase, biotin carboxyl carrier protein, and carboxyltransferase. Fragment-based screening revealed that amino-oxazole inhibits biotin carboxylase activity and also exhibits antibacterial activity against Gram-negative organisms. In this report, we redesigned previously identified lead inhibitors to expand the spectrum of bacteria sensitive to the amino-oxazole derivatives by including Gram-positive species. Using 9,411 small organic building blocks, we constructed a diverse combinatorial library of 1.2×10⁸ amino-oxazole derivatives. A subset of 9×10⁶ of these compounds were subjected to structure-based virtual screening against seven biotin carboxylase isoforms using similarity-based docking by eSimDock. Potentially broad-spectrum antibiotic candidates were selected based on the consensus ranking by several scoring functions including non-linear statistical models implemented in eSimDock and traditional molecular mechanics force fields. The analysis of binding poses of the top-ranked compounds docked to biotin carboxylase isoforms suggests that: (1) binding of the amino-oxazole anchor is stabilized by a network of hydrogen bonds to residues 201, 202 and 204; (2) halogenated aromatic moieties attached to the amino-oxazole scaffold enhance interactions with a hydrophobic pocket formed by residues 157, 169, 171 and 203; and (3) larger substituents reach deeper into the binding pocket to form additional hydrogen bonds with the side chains of residues 209 and 233. These structural insights into drug

  12. Post-translational modifications in the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Houtz, R L; Stults, J T; Mulligan, R M; Tolbert, N E

    1989-03-01

    Two adjacent N-terminal tryptic peptides of the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase [3-phospho-D-glycerate carboxy-lyase (dimerizing), EC 4.1.1.39] from spinach, wheat, tobacco, and muskmelon were removed by limited tryptic proteolysis. Characterization by peptide sequencing, amino acid composition, and tandem mass spectrometry revealed that the N-terminal residue from the large subunit of the enzyme from each plant species was acetylated proline. The sequence of the penultimate N-terminal tryptic peptide from the large subunit of the spinach and wheat enzyme was consistent with previous primary structure determinations. However, the penultimate N-terminal peptide from the large subunit of both the tobacco and muskmelon enzymes, while identical, differed from the corresponding peptide from spinach and wheat by containing a trimethyllysyl residue at position 14. Thus, tryptic proteolysis occurred at lysine-18 rather than lysine-14 as with the spinach and wheat enzymes. A comparison of the DNA sequences for the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase indicates that the N terminus has been post-translationally processed by removal of methionine-1 and serine-2 followed by acetylation of proline-3. In addition, for the enzyme from tobacco and muskmelon a third post-translational modification occurs at lysine-14 in the form of N epsilon-trimethylation.

  13. Evolutionary history and biotechnological future of carboxylases.

    PubMed

    Schada von Borzyskowski, Lennart; Rosenthal, Raoul G; Erb, Tobias J

    2013-11-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a potent greenhouse gas whose presence in the atmosphere is a critical factor for global warming. At the same time atmospheric CO2 is also a cheap and readily available carbon source that can in principle be used to synthesize value-added products. However, as uncatalyzed chemical CO2-fixation reactions usually require quite harsh conditions to functionalize the CO2 molecule, not many processes have been developed that make use of CO2. In contrast to synthetical chemistry, Nature provides a multitude of different carboxylating enzymes whose carboxylating principle(s) might be exploited in biotechnology. This review focuses on the biochemical features of carboxylases, highlights possible evolutionary scenarios for the emergence of their reactivity, and discusses current, as well as potential future applications of carboxylases in organic synthesis, biotechnology and synthetic biology.

  14. Studies of vitamin K-dependent carboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, G.M.

    1986-01-01

    Carboxylase was studied in detergent solubilized rat liver microsomes, using the peptide substrate Phe-Leu-(..gamma..-/sup 3/H)-Glu-Glu-Leu. Cleavage of the ..gamma..-C-H bond in Glu was measured as the release of /sup 3/H from this peptide to water, carboxylation was measured as the incorporation of H/sup 14/CO/sub 3/-into the peptide, and KO formation was measured by an HPLC assay. All three products could be measured simultaneously, and this system was used to examine the effects of cyanide, manganese, tetrachloropyridinol, and Boc-SerP-SerP-Leu-OMe on the separate steps of the carboxylase reaction. Vitamin K-epoxide formation was studied separately from the other reactions, and it was found that in the absence of a Glu-containing substrate, carboxylase catalyzed the uncoupled formation of KO from KH/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/. The stoichiometry of product formation (GLa, KO, and ..gamma..-protons) was measured, and the results obtained were all in agreement with the values predicted from the proposed mechanism. When all of the substrates were saturating, the stoichiometry of ..gamma..-C-H bond cleavage, carboxylation, and KO formation was 1:1:1.

  15. Global Hawk Pacific (GloPac) COA and Mission Coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, Mark; Hall, Philip

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the science objectives of the Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) in the Pacific region, shows examp le flight tracks, the satellite under-flight requirement, the flight planning, and the agencies coordination of the airspace required for the Certificate of Authorization (COA).

  16. Novel Insights into the Biotin Carboxylase Domain Reactions of Pyruvate Carboxylase from Rhizobium etli†

    PubMed Central

    Zeczycki, Tonya N.; Menefee, Ann L.; Adina-Zada, Abdussalam; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut; Surinya, Kathy H.; Wallace, John C.; Attwood, Paul V.; St. Maurice, Martin; Cleland, W. Wallace

    2011-01-01

    The catalytic mechanism of the MgATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin in the biotin carboxylase domain of pyruvate carboxylase from R. etli (RePC) is common to the biotin-dependent carboxylases. The current site-directed mutagenesis study has clarified the catalytic functions of several residues proposed to be pivotal in MgATP-binding and cleavage (Glu218 and Lys245), HCO3− deprotonation (Glu305 and Arg301) and biotin enolization (Arg353). The E218A mutant was inactive for any reaction involving the BC domain and the E218Q mutant exhibited a 75-fold decrease in kcat for both pyruvate carboxylation and the full reverse reaction. The E305A mutant also showed a 75- and 80-fold decrease in kcat for both pyruvate carboxylation and the full reverse reaction, respectively. While Glu305 appears to be the active site base which deprotonates HCO3−, Lys245, Glu218 and Arg301 are proposed to contribute to catalysis through substrate binding interactions. The reactions of the biotin carboxylase and carboxyl transferase domains were uncoupled in the R353M-catalyzed reactions, indicating that Arg353 may not only facilitate the formation of the biotin enolate, but also assist in coordinating catalysis between the two spatially distinct active sites. The 2.5 and 4-fold increase in kcat for the full reverse reaction with the R353K and R353M mutants, respectively, suggests that mutation of Arg353 allows carboxybiotin increased access to the biotin carboxylase domain active site. The proposed chemical mechanism is initiated by the deprotonation of HCO3− by Glu305 and concurrent nucleophilic attack on the γ-phosphate of MgATP. The trianionic carboxyphosphate intermediate formed reversibly decomposes in the active site to CO2 and PO43−. PO43− then acts as the base to deprotonate the tethered biotin at the N1-position. Stabilized by interactions between the ureido oxygen and Arg353, the biotin-enolate reacts with CO2 to give carboxybiotin. The formation of a distinct salt

  17. Synthesis and magnetic properties of superparamagnetic CoAs nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, P.; Ashokaan, N.; Masud, J.; Pariti, A.; Nath, M.

    2015-03-01

    This article provides a comprehensive guide on the synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic CoAs nanoparticles and elongated nanostructures with high blocking temperature, (TB), via hot-injection precipitation and solvothermal methods. Cobalt arsenides constitute an important family of magnetically active solids that find a variety of applications ranging from magnetic semiconductors to biomedical imaging. While the higher temperature hot-injection precipitation technique (300 °C) yields pure CoAs nanostructures, the lower temperature solvothermal method (200 °C) yields a mixture of CoAs nanoparticles along with other Co-based impurity phases. The synthesis in all these cases involved usage of triphenylarsine ((C6H5)3As) as the As precursor which reacts with solid Co2(CO)8 by ligand displacement to yield a single source precursor. The surfactant, hexadecylamine (HDA) further assists in controlling the morphology of the nanostructures. HDA also provides a basic medium and molten flux-like conditions for the redox chemistry to occur between Co and As at elevated temperatures. The influence of the length of reaction time was investigated by studying the evolution of product morphology over time. It was observed that while spontaneous nucleation at higher temperature followed by controlled growth led to the predominant formation of short nanorods, with longer reaction time, the nanorods were further converted to nanoparticles. The size of the nanoparticles obtained, was mostly in the range of 10-15 nm. The key finding of this work is exceptionally high coercivity in CoAs nanostructures for the first time. Coercivity observed was as high as 0.1 T (1000 Oe) at 2 K. These kinds of magnetic nanostructures find multiple applications in spintronics, whereas the superparamagnetic nanoparticles are viable for use in magnetic storage, ferrofluids and as contrast enhancing agents in MRI.

  18. Molecular evolution of urea amidolyase and urea carboxylase in fungi

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Urea amidolyase breaks down urea into ammonia and carbon dioxide in a two-step process, while another enzyme, urease, does this in a one step-process. Urea amidolyase has been found only in some fungal species among eukaryotes. It contains two major domains: the amidase and urea carboxylase domains. A shorter form of urea amidolyase is known as urea carboxylase and has no amidase domain. Eukaryotic urea carboxylase has been found only in several fungal species and green algae. In order to elucidate the evolutionary origin of urea amidolyase and urea carboxylase, we studied the distribution of urea amidolyase, urea carboxylase, as well as other proteins including urease, across kingdoms. Results Among the 64 fungal species we examined, only those in two Ascomycota classes (Sordariomycetes and Saccharomycetes) had the urea amidolyase sequences. Urea carboxylase was found in many but not all of the species in the phylum Basidiomycota and in the subphylum Pezizomycotina (phylum Ascomycota). It was completely absent from the class Saccharomycetes (phylum Ascomycota; subphylum Saccharomycotina). Four Sordariomycetes species we examined had both the urea carboxylase and the urea amidolyase sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these two enzymes appeared to have gone through independent evolution since their bacterial origin. The amidase domain and the urea carboxylase domain sequences from fungal urea amidolyases clustered strongly together with the amidase and urea carboxylase sequences, respectively, from a small number of beta- and gammaproteobacteria. On the other hand, fungal urea carboxylase proteins clustered together with another copy of urea carboxylases distributed broadly among bacteria. The urease proteins were found in all the fungal species examined except for those of the subphylum Saccharomycotina. Conclusions We conclude that the urea amidolyase genes currently found only in fungi are the results of a horizontal gene transfer event from

  19. Xenograft Studies of Fatty Acid Synthesis Inhibition as Novel Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-08-01

    Research. 56: 1189-1193, 1996. 19. Witters, L . and Kemp, B. Insulin activation of acetyl -CoA carboxylase accompanied by inhibition of the 5’-AMP...substrate for FAS, malonyl-CoA acts at the outer mitochondrial membrane to regulate fatty acid oxidation by inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1...compared to the xenograft, it has about 10 fold higher levels of acetyl -CoA, and higher levels of other CoA derivatives. These data indicate significant

  20. Effect of (L-Carnitine) on acetyl-L-carnitine production by heart mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Bieber, L.L.; Lilly, K.; Lysiak, W.

    1986-05-01

    The authors recently reported a large efflux of acetyl-L-carnitine from rat heart mitochondria during state 3 respiration with pyruvate as substrate both in the presence and absence of malate. In this series of experiments, the effect of the concentration of L-carnitine on the efflux of acetyl-L-carnitine and on the production of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from 2-/sup 14/C-pyruvate was determined. Maximum acetylcarnitine production (approximately 25 n moles/min/mg protein) was obtained at 3-5 mM L-carnitine in the absence of added malate. /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production decreased as the concentration of L-carnitine increased; it plateaued at 3-5 mM L-carnitine. These data indicate carnitine can stimulate flux of pyruvate through pyruvate dehydrogenase and can reduce flux of acetyl CoA through the Krebs cycle by acting as an acceptor of the acetyl moieties of acetyl CoA generated by pyruvate dehydrogenase.

  1. Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase and phosphoribulokinase in Prochloron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berhow, M. A.; Mcfadden, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase and phosphoribulokinase, enzymes in the reductive pentose-phosphate cycle, were measured in cell-free extracts of Prochloran didemni. The partial purification and characterization of RuBP carboxylase were described. Prochloron RuBP carboxylase, when purified by isopycnic centrifugation in reoriented linear 0.2 to 0.8 M sucrose gradients, sedimented to a position which corresponded to that of the 520,000-dalton spinach enzyme. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that the Prochloron enzyme was composed of large and small subunits (MW = 57,500 and 18,800). Though results established that the enzymes RuBP carboxylase and phosphoribulokinase were present in levels comparable to other CO2-fixing microorganisms, it was suggested that other enzymes in the Calvin cycle limit growth or that additional enzymic insufficiencies exist.

  2. Reverse genetic characterization of two paralogous acetoacetyl CoA thiolase genes in Arabidopsis reveals their importance in plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Jin, Huanan; Song, Zhihong; Nikolau, Basil J

    2012-06-01

    Acetoacetyl CoA thiolase (AACT, EC 2.3.1.9) catalyzes the condensation of two acetyl CoA molecules to form acetoacetyl CoA. Two AACT-encoding genes, At5g47720 (AACT1) and At5g48230 (AACT2), were functionally identified in the Arabidopsis genome by direct enzymological assays and functional expression in yeast. Promoter::GUS fusion experiments indicated that AACT1 is primarily expressed in the vascular system and AACT2 is highly expressed in root tips, young leaves, top stems and anthers. Characterization of T-DNA insertion mutant alleles at each AACT locus established that AACT2 function is required for embryogenesis and for normal male gamete transmission. In contrast, plants lacking AACT1 function are completely viable and show no apparent growth phenotypes, indicating that AACT1 is functionally redundant with respect to AACT2 function. RNAi lines that express reduced levels of AACT2 show pleiotropic phenotypes, including reduced apical dominance, elongated life span and flowering duration, sterility, dwarfing, reduced seed yield and shorter root length. Microscopic analysis reveals that the reduced stature is caused by a reduction in cell size and fewer cells, and male sterility is caused by loss of the pollen coat and premature degeneration of the tapetal cells. Biochemical analyses established that the roots of AACT2 RNAi plants show quantitative and qualitative alterations in phytosterol profiles. These phenotypes and biochemical alterations are reversed when AACT2 RNAi plants are grown in the presence of mevalonate, which is consistent with the role of AACT2 in generating the bulk of the acetoacetyl CoA precursor required for the cytosol-localized, mevalonate-derived isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway.

  3. THE EXCHANGE REACTION OF ACETYL FLUORIDE AND ACETYL HEXAFLUOROARSENATE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    From the temperature dependence of the exchange rate of the methyl protons between acetyl fluoride and acetyl hexafluoroarsenate an Arrhenius...the reaction was found to be one-half order in acetyl hexafluoroarsenate and zero order in acetyl fluoride. (Author)

  4. Biochemical characterization of a Rhizobium etli monovalent cation-stimulated acyl-coenzyme A carboxylase with a high substrate specificity constant for propionyl-coenzyme A.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Michael F; Araíza, Gisela; Mora, Jaime

    2004-02-01

    Biotin has a profound effect on the metabolism of rhizobia. It is reported here that the activities of the biotin-dependent enzymes acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC; EC 6.4.1.2) and propionyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (PCC; EC 6.4.1.3) are present in all species of the five genera comprising the Rhizobiaceae which were examined. Evidence is presented that the ACC and PCC activities detectable in Rhizobium etli extracts are catalysed by a single acyl-coenzyme A carboxylase. The enzyme from R. etli strain 12-53 was purified 478-fold and displayed its highest activity with propionyl-CoA as substrate, with apparent K(m) and V(max) values of 0.064 mM and 2885 nmol min(-1) (mg protein)(-1), respectively. The enzyme carboxylated acetyl-CoA and butyryl-CoA with apparent K(m) values of 0.392 and 0.144 mM, respectively, and V(max) values of 423 and 268 nmol min(-1) (mg protein)(-1), respectively. K(+), or Cs(+) markedly activated the enzyme, which was essentially inactive in their absence. Electrophoretic analysis indicated that the acyl-CoA carboxylase was composed of a 74 kDa biotin-containing alpha subunit and a 45 kDa biotin-free beta subunit, and gel chromatography indicated a total molecular mass of 620 000 Da. The strong kinetic preference of the enzyme for propionyl-CoA is consistent with its participation in an anaplerotic pathway utilizing this substrate.

  5. Characterization of ribulose diphosphate carboxylase and phosphoribulokinase from Thiobacillus thioparus and Thiobacillus neapolitanus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. J.; Johnson, M. K.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1968-01-01

    Ribulose diphosphate carboxylase and phosphoribulokinase activity in chemosynthetic autotrophs Thiobacillus thioparus and Thiobacillus neapolitanus, noting sedimentation and gel filtration characteristics

  6. Kinetics of CO Insertion and Acetyl Group Transfer Steps, and a Model of the Acetyl-CoA Synthase Catalytic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiangshi; Surovtsev, Ivan V.; Lindahl, Paul A.

    2008-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA synthase/carbon monoxide dehydrogenase is a Ni-Fe-S-containing enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of acetyl-CoA from CO, CoA and a methyl group. The methyl group is transferred onto the enzyme from a corrinoid-iron-sulfur protein (CoFeSP). The kinetics of two steps within the catalytic mechanism were studied using the stopped-flow method, including the insertion of CO into a putative Ni2+-CH3 bond and the transfer of the resulting acetyl group to CoA. Neither step had been studied previously. Reactions were monitored indirectly, starting with the methylated intermediate form of the enzyme. Resulting traces were analyzed by constructing a simple kinetic model describing the catalytic mechanism under reducing conditions. Besides methyl group transfer, CO insertion, and acetyl group transfer, fitting to experimental traces required the inclusion of an inhibitory step in which CO reversibly bound to the form of the enzyme obtained immediately after product release. Global simulation of the reported datasets afforded a consistent set of kinetic parameters. The equilibrium constant for the overall synthesis of acetyl-CoA was estimated and compared to the product of the individual equilibrium constants. Simulations obtained with the model recapitulated the essential behavior of the enzyme, in terms of the variation of activity with [CO], and the time-dependent decay of the NiFeC EPR signal upon reaction with CoFeSP. Under standard assay conditions, the model suggests that the vast majority of active enzyme molecules in a population should be in the methylated form, suggesting that the subsequent catalytic step, namely CO insertion, is rate limiting. This conclusion is further supported by a sensitivity analysis showing that the rate is most sensitively affected by a change in the rate-coefficient associated with the CO insertion step. PMID:16967985

  7. Histone acetylation in neurodevelopment.

    PubMed

    Contestabile, Antonio; Sintoni, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modification of histones is a primary mechanism through which epigenetic regulation of DNA transcription does occur. Among these modifications, regulation of histone acetylation state is an important tool to influence gene expression. Epigenetic regulation of neurodevelopment contributes to the structural and functional shaping of the brain during neurogenesis and continues to impact on neural plasticity lifelong. Alterations of these mechanisms during neurodevelopment may result in later occurrence of neuropsychatric disorders. The present paper reviews and discusses available data on histone modifications, in particular histone acetylation, in neurogenesis considering results obtained in culture systems of neural progenitors as well as in in vivo studies. Possible teratogenic effects of altered histone acetylation state during development are also considered. The use during pregnancy of drugs such as valproic acid, which acts as a histone deacetylase inhibitor, may result during postnatal development in autistic-like symptoms. The effect of gestational administration of the drug has been, therefore, tested on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in animals showing behavioral impairment as a consequence of the drug administration at a specific stage of pregnancy. These experimental results show that adult neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus is not quantitatively altered by gestational valproic acid administration. Future steps and goals of research on the role and mechanisms of histone acetylation in neurodevelopment are briefly discussed.

  8. Final report on the safety assessment of acetyl triethyl citrate, acetyl tributyl citrate, acetyl trihexyl citrate, and acetyl trioctyl citrate.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Wilbur

    2002-01-01

    Acetyl Triethyl Citrate, Acetyl Tributyl Citrate, Acetyl Trihexyl Citrate, and Acetyl Trioctyl Citrate all function as plasticizers in cosmetics. Additionally, the Trihexyl and Trioctyl forms are described as skin-conditioning agents-emollients, although there are currently no reported uses of Acetyl Trihexyl Citrate or Acetyl Trioctyl Citrate. Acetyl Triethyl Citrate and Acetyl Tributyl Citrate are used in nail products at concentrations up to 7%. Recognizing that there are no reported uses of Acetyl Trihexyl or Trioctyl Citrate, if they were to be used in the future, their concentration of use is expected to be no higher than that reported for Acetyl Triethyl and Tributyl Citrate. These ingredients were sufficiently similar in structure that safety test data on one were considered applicable to all. Approximately 99% of orally administered Acetyl Tributyl Citrate is excreted-intermediate metabolites include acetyl citrate, monobutyl citrate, acetyl monobutyl citrate, dibutyl citrate, and acetyl dibutyl citrate. In acute, short-term, subchronic, and chronic feeding studies, these ingredients were relatively nontoxic. Differences from controls were either not statistically significant or not related to any organ toxicity. Ocular exposures produced moderate reactions that cleared by 48 hours after instillation. Dermal application was not toxic in rabbits. In a guinea pig maximization test, Acetyl Triethyl Citrate was a sensitizer whereas Acetyl Tributyl Citrate was not. Limited clinical testing of Acetyl Triethyl Citrate and Acetyl Tributyl Citrate was negative for both skin irritation and sensitization. These clinical data were considered more relevant than the guinea pig maximization data, suggesting to the Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel that none of these ingredients would be a sensitizer. Physiologic effects noted with intravenous delivery of Acetyl Triethyl Citrate or Acetyl Tributyl Citrate include dose-related decreases in blood pressure and

  9. Covalent dimerization of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase subunits by UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, R M; Franco, E; Teixeira, A R

    1996-08-15

    The effect of UV radiation (UV-A, UV-B and UV-C) on ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from a variety of plant species was examined. The exposition of plant leaves or the pure enzyme to UV radiation produced a UV-dependent accumulation of a +5 kDa polypeptide (P65). Different approaches were utilized to elucidate the origin and structure of P65: electrophoretic and fluorographic analyses of 35S-labelled ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase exposed to UV radiation and immunological experiments using antibodies specific for P65, for the large and small subunits of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase and for high-molecular-mass aggregates of the enzyme. These studies revealed that P65 is a dimer, formed by the covalent, non-disulphide linkage of one small subunit with one large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. For short periods of time (< 1 h), the amount of P65 formed increased with the duration of the exposure to the UV radiation and with the energy of the radiation applied. Prolonged exposure to UV radiation (1-6 h) resulted in the formation of high-molecular-mass aggregates of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. Formation of P65 was shown to depend on the native state of the protein, was stimulated by inhibitors of enzyme activity, and was inhibited by activators of enzyme activity. A UV-independent accumulation of P65 was also achieved by the in vitro incubation of plant crude extracts. However, the UV-dependent and the UV-independent formation of P65 seemed to occur by distinct molecular mechanisms. The UV-dependent accumulation of P65 was immunologically detected in all species examined, including Lemna minor, Arum italicum, Brassica oleracea, Triticum aestivum, Zea mays, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris, suggesting that it may constitute a universal response to UV radiation, common to all photo-synthetic tissues.

  10. Mercury Methylation Independent of the Acetyl-Coenzyme A Pathway in Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ekstrom, Eileen B.; Morel, François M. M.; Benoit, Janina M.

    2003-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in anoxic waters and sediments are the major producers of methylmercury in aquatic systems. Although a considerable amount of work has addressed the environmental factors that control methylmercury formation and the conditions that control bioavailability of inorganic mercury to SRB, little work has been undertaken analyzing the biochemical mechanism of methylmercury production. The acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) pathway has been implicated as being key to mercury methylation in one SRB strain, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans LS, but this result has not been extended to other SRB species. To probe whether the acetyl-CoA pathway is the controlling biochemical process for methylmercury production in SRB, five incomplete-oxidizing SRB strains and two Desulfobacter strains that do not use the acetyl-CoA pathway for major carbon metabolism were assayed for methylmercury formation and acetyl-CoA pathway enzyme activities. Three of the SRB strains were also incubated with chloroform to inhibit the acetyl-CoA pathway. So far, all species that have been found to have acetyl-CoA activity are complete oxidizers that require the acetyl-CoA pathway for basic metabolism, as well as methylate mercury. Chloroform inhibits Hg methylation in these species either by blocking the methylating enzyme or by indirect effects on metabolism and growth. However, we have identified four incomplete-oxidizing strains that clearly do not utilize the acetyl-CoA pathway either for metabolism or mercury methylation (as confirmed by the absence of chloroform inhibition). Hg methylation is thus independent of the acetyl-CoA pathway and may not require vitamin B12 in some and perhaps many incomplete-oxidizing SRB strains. PMID:12957930

  11. A Delphi-based consensus clinical practice protocol for the diagnosis and management of 3-methylcrotonyl CoA carboxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Georgianne L; Koeberl, Dwight D; Matern, Dietrich; Barshop, Bruce; Braverman, Nancy; Burton, Barbara; Cederbaum, Stephen; Fiegenbaum, Annette; Garganta, Cheryl; Gibson, James; Goodman, Stephen I; Harding, Cary; Kahler, Stephen; Kronn, David; Longo, Nicola

    2008-04-01

    3-MCC deficiency is among the most common inborn errors of metabolism identified on expanded newborn screening (1:36,000 births). However, evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis and management of this disorder are lacking. Using the traditional Delphi method, a panel of 15 experts in inborn errors of metabolism was convened to develop consensus-based clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of 3-MCC screen-positive infants and their mothers. The Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine system was used to grade the literature review and create recommendations graded from A (evidence level of randomized clinical trials) to D (expert opinion). Panelists reviewed the initial evaluation of the screen-positive infant-mother dyad, diagnostic guidelines, and management of diagnosed patients. Grade D consensus recommendations were made in each of these three areas. The panel did not reach consensus on all issues. This consensus protocol is intended to assist clinicians in the diagnosis and management of screen-positive newborns for 3-MCC deficiency and to encourage the development of evidence-based guidelines.

  12. Pyruvate carboxylase from Rhizobium etli: mutant characterization, nucleotide sequence, and physiological role.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, M F; Encarnación, S; Araíza, G; Vargas, M C; Dávalos, A; Peralta, H; Mora, Y; Mora, J

    1996-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PYC), a biotin-dependent enzyme which catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, was hypothesized to play an important anaplerotic role in the growth of Rhizobium etli during serial subcultivation in minimal media containing succinate (S. Encarnación, M. Dunn, K. Willms, and J. Mora, J. Bacteriol. 177:3058-3066, 1995). R. etli and R. tropici pyc::Tn5-mob mutants were selected for their inability to grow in minimal medium with pyruvate as a sole carbon source. During serial subcultivation in minimal medium containing 30 mM succinate, the R. etli parent and pyc mutant strains exhibited similar decreases in growth rate with each subculture. Supplementation of the medium with biotin prevented the growth decrease of the parent but not the mutant strain, indicating that PYC was necessary for the growth of R. etli under these conditions. The R. tropici pyc mutant grew normally in subcultures regardless of biotin supplementation. The symbiotic phenotypes of the pyc mutants from both species were similar to those of the parent strains. The R. etli pyc was cloned, sequenced, and found to encode a 126-kDa protein of 1,154 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence is highly homologous to other PYC sequences, and the catalytic domains involved in carboxylation, pyruvate binding, and biotinylation are conserved. The sequence and biochemical data show that the R. etli PYC is a member of the alpha4, homotetrameric, acetyl coenzyme A-activated class of PYCs. PMID:8830693

  13. Cloning and characterization of the pyruvate carboxylase from Sinorhizobium meliloti Rm1021.

    PubMed

    Dunn, M F; Araíza, G; Finan, T M

    2001-11-01

    The gene encoding pyruvate carboxylase (pyc) was isolated from a Sinorhizobium meliloti Rm1021 cosmid bank by complementation of a Rhizobium tropici pyc mutant. PYC-negative mutants of S. meliloti Rm1021 were isolated by transposon mutagenesis and were unable to grow with glucose or pyruvate as sole carbon sources, but were symbiotically competent in combination with alfalfa plants. PYC activity assays, pyc::lacZ gene fusion studies and an in vivo biotinylation assay showed that PYC activity in S. meliloti was dependent mainly on biotin availability and not on changes in gene transcription. The subunit and holo-enzyme molecular masses of the S. meliloti PYC indicated that the enzyme was an alpha4 homotetramer. The S. meliloti PYC had a high apparent Ka (0.23 mM) for the allosteric activator acetyl-CoA and was product-inhibited by sub-millimolar concentrations of oxaloacetate. In contrast to other bacterial alpha4-PYCs which have been characterized, the S. meliloti enzyme was not strongly inhibited by L-aspartate.

  14. Adenosine 5'-tetraphosphate and adenosine 5'-pentaphosphate are synthesized by yeast acetyl coenzyme A synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Guranowski, A; Günther Sillero, M A; Sillero, A

    1994-01-01

    Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase (EC 6.2.1.1) catalyzes the synthesis of adenosine 5'-tetraphosphate (P4A) and adenosine 5'-pentaphosphate (p5A) from ATP and tri- or tetrapolyphosphate (P3 or P4), with relative velocities of 7:1, respectively. Of 12 nucleotides tested as potential donors of nucleotidyl moiety, only ATP, adenosine-5'-O-[3-thiotriphosphate], and acetyl-AMP were substrates, with relative velocities of 100, 62, and 80, respectively. The Km values for ATP, P3, and acetyl-AMP were 0.16, 4.7, and 1.8 mM, respectively. The synthesis of p4A could proceed in the absence of exogenous acetate but was stimulated twofold by acetate, with an apparent Km value of 0.065 mM. CoA did not participate in the synthesis of p4A (p5A) and inhibited the reaction (50% inhibitory concentration of 0.015 mM). At pH 6.3, which was optimum for formation of p4A (p5A), the rate of acetyl-CoA synthesis (1.84 mumol mg-1 min-1) was 245 times faster than the rate of synthesis of p4A measured in the presence of acetate. The known formation of p4A (p5A) in yeast sporulation and the role of acetate may therefore be related to acetyl-CoA synthetase. Images PMID:7910605

  15. Mitochondrial disease genes COA6, COX6B and SCO2 have overlapping roles in COX2 biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Alok; Pratt, Anthony T.; Soma, Shivatheja; Theriault, Sarah G.; Griffin, Aaron T.; Trivedi, Prachi P.; Gohil, Vishal M.

    2016-01-01

    Biogenesis of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is a complex process facilitated by several assembly factors. Pathogenic mutations were recently reported in one such assembly factor, COA6, and our previous work linked Coa6 function to mitochondrial copper metabolism and expression of Cox2, a copper-containing subunit of CcO. However, the precise role of Coa6 in Cox2 biogenesis remained unknown. Here we show that yeast Coa6 is an orthologue of human COA6, and like Cox2, is regulated by copper availability, further implicating it in copper delivery to Cox2. In order to place Coa6 in the Cox2 copper delivery pathway, we performed a comprehensive genetic epistasis analysis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and found that simultaneous deletion of Coa6 and Sco2, a mitochondrial copper metallochaperone, or Coa6 and Cox12/COX6B, a structural subunit of CcO, completely abrogates Cox2 biogenesis. Unlike Coa6 deficient cells, copper supplementation fails to rescue Cox2 levels of these double mutants. Overexpression of Cox12 or Sco proteins partially rescues the coa6Δ phenotype, suggesting their overlapping but non-redundant roles in copper delivery to Cox2. These genetic data are strongly corroborated by biochemical studies demonstrating physical interactions between Coa6, Cox2, Cox12 and Sco proteins. Furthermore, we show that patient mutations in Coa6 disrupt Coa6–Cox2 interaction, providing the biochemical basis for disease pathogenesis. Taken together, these results place COA6 in the copper delivery pathway to CcO and, surprisingly, link it to a previously unidentified function of CcO subunit Cox12 in Cox2 biogenesis. PMID:26669719

  16. ACBP and cholesterol differentially alter fatty acyl CoA utilization by microsomal ACAT.

    PubMed

    Chao, Hsu; Zhou, Minglong; McIntosh, Avery; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Kier, Ann B

    2003-01-01

    Microsomal acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) is stimulated in vitro and/or in intact cells by proteins that bind and transfer both substrates, cholesterol, and fatty acyl CoA. To resolve the role of fatty acyl CoA binding independent of cholesterol binding/transfer, a protein that exclusively binds fatty acyl CoA (acyl CoA binding protein, ACBP) was compared. ACBP contains an endoplasmic reticulum retention motif and significantly colocalized with acyl-CoA cholesteryl acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2) and endoplasmic reticulum markers in L-cell fibroblasts and hepatoma cells, respectively. In the presence of exogenous cholesterol, ACAT was stimulated in the order: ACBP > sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2) > liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP). Stimulation was in the same order as the relative affinities of the proteins for fatty acyl CoA. In contrast, in the absence of exogenous cholesterol, these proteins inhibited microsomal ACAT, but in the same order: ACBP > SCP-2 > L-FABP. The extracellular protein BSA stimulated microsomal ACAT regardless of the presence or absence of exogenous cholesterol. Thus, ACBP was the most potent intracellular fatty acyl CoA binding protein in differentially modulating the activity of microsomal ACAT to form cholesteryl esters independent of cholesterol binding/transfer ability.

  17. Mutations in COA6 cause cytochrome c oxidase deficiency and neonatal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Baertling, Fabian; A M van den Brand, Mariel; Hertecant, Jozef L; Al-Shamsi, Aisha; P van den Heuvel, Lambert; Distelmaier, Felix; Mayatepek, Ertan; Smeitink, Jan A; Nijtmans, Leo G J; Rodenburg, Richard J T

    2015-01-01

    COA6/C1ORF31 is involved in cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) biogenesis. We present a new pathogenic COA6 variant detected in a patient with neonatal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and isolated complex IV deficiency. For the first time, clinical details about a COA6-deficient patient are given and patient fibroblasts are functionally characterized: COA6 protein is undetectable and steady-state levels of complex IV and several of its subunits are reduced. The monomeric COX1 assembly intermediate accumulates. Using pulse-chase experiments, we demonstrate an increased turnover of mitochondrial encoded complex IV subunits. Although monomeric complex IV is decreased in patient fibroblasts, the CI/CIII2 /CIVn -supercomplexes remain unaffected. Copper supplementation shows a partial rescue of complex IV deficiency in patient fibroblasts. We conclude that COA6 is required for complex IV subunit stability. Furthermore, the proposed role in the copper delivery pathway to complex IV subunits is substantiated and a therapeutic lead for COA6-deficient patients is provided.

  18. Mechanistic insight with HBCH2CoA as a probe to polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Shrestha, Ruben; Buckley, Rachael M; Jewell, Jamie; Bossmann, Stefan H; Stubbe, JoAnne; Li, Ping

    2014-08-15

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthases catalyze the polymerization of 3-(R)-hydroxybutyrate coenzyme A (HBCoA) to produce polyoxoesters of 1-2 MDa. A substrate analogue HBCH2CoA, in which the S in HBCoA is replaced with a CH2 group, was synthesized in 13 steps using a chemoenzymatic approach in a 7.5% overall yield. Kinetic studies reveal it is a competitive inhibitor of a class I and a class III PHB synthases, with Kis of 40 and 14 μM, respectively. To probe the elongation steps of the polymerization, HBCH2CoA was incubated with a synthase acylated with a [(3)H]-saturated trimer-CoA ([(3)H]-sTCoA). The products of the reaction were shown to be the methylene analogue of [(3)H]-sTCoA ([(3)H]-sT-CH2-CoA), saturated dimer-([(3)H]-sD-CO2H), and trimer-acid ([(3)H]-sT-CO2H), distinct from the expected methylene analogue of [(3)H]-saturated tetramer-CoA ([(3)H]-sTet-CH2-CoA). Detection of [(3)H]-sT-CH2-CoA and its slow rate of formation suggest that HBCH2CoA may be reporting on the termination and repriming process of the synthases, rather than elongation.

  19. Properties of ribulose diphosphate carboxylase immobilized on porous glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapira, J.; Hanson, C. L.; Lyding, J. M.; Reilly, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-diphosphate carboxylase from spinach has been bound to arylamine porous glass with a diazo linkage and to alklamine porous glass with glutaraldehyde. Stability at elevated temperatures and responses to changes of pH and ribulose-1,5-diphosphate, Mg(2+), and dithiothreitol concentrations were not significantly different from the soluble enzyme, though stability at 4 C was somewhat improved.

  20. N-Acetylaspartate reductions in brain injury: impact on post-injury neuroenergetics, lipid synthesis, and protein acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Moffett, John R.; Arun, Peethambaran; Ariyannur, Prasanth S.; Namboodiri, Aryan M. A.

    2013-01-01

    N-Acetylaspartate (NAA) is employed as a non-invasive marker for neuronal health using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). This utility is afforded by the fact that NAA is one of the most concentrated brain metabolites and that it produces the largest peak in MRS scans of the healthy human brain. NAA levels in the brain are reduced proportionately to the degree of tissue damage after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the reductions parallel the reductions in ATP levels. Because NAA is the most concentrated acetylated metabolite in the brain, we have hypothesized that NAA acts in part as an extensive reservoir of acetate for acetyl coenzyme A synthesis. Therefore, the loss of NAA after TBI impairs acetyl coenzyme A dependent functions including energy derivation, lipid synthesis, and protein acetylation reactions in distinct ways in different cell populations. The enzymes involved in synthesizing and metabolizing NAA are predominantly expressed in neurons and oligodendrocytes, respectively, and therefore some proportion of NAA must be transferred between cell types before the acetate can be liberated, converted to acetyl coenzyme A and utilized. Studies have indicated that glucose metabolism in neurons is reduced, but that acetate metabolism in astrocytes is increased following TBI, possibly reflecting an increased role for non-glucose energy sources in response to injury. NAA can provide additional acetate for intercellular metabolite trafficking to maintain acetyl CoA levels after injury. Here we explore changes in NAA, acetate, and acetyl coenzyme A metabolism in response to brain injury. PMID:24421768

  1. Ribulose diphosphate carboxylase of the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis

    SciTech Connect

    Terekhova, I.V.; Chernyad'ev, I.I.; Doman, N.G.

    1986-11-20

    The ribulose diphosphate (RDP) carboxylase activity of the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis is represented by two peaks when a cell homogenate is centrifuged in a sucrose density gradient. In the case of differential centrifugation (40,000 g, 1 h), the activity of the enzyme was distributed between the supernatant liquid (soluble form) and the precipitate (carboxysomal form). From the soluble fraction, in which 80-95% of the total activity of the enzyme is concentrated, electrophoretically homogeneous RDP carboxylase was isolated by precipitation with ammonium sulfate and centrifugation in a sucrose density gradient. The purified enzyme possessed greater electrophoretic mobility in comparison with the RDP carboxylase of beans Vicia faba. The molecular weight of the enzyme, determined by gel filtration, was 450,000. The enzyme consists of monotypic subunits with a molecular weight of 53,000. The small subunits were not detected in electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel in the presence of SDS after fixation and staining of the gels by various methods.

  2. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL): Mouse and human HL gene (HMGCL) cloning and detection of large gene deletions in two unrelated HL-deficient patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.P.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A.

    1996-04-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL, EC 4.1.3.4) catalyzes the cleavage of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA to acetoacetic acid and acetyl CoA, the final reaction of both ketogenesis and leucine catabolism. Autosomal-recessive HL deficiency in humans results in episodes of hypoketotic hypoglycemia and coma. Using a mouse HL cDNA as a probe, we isolated a clone containing the full-length mouse HL gene that spans about 15 kb of mouse chromosome 4 and contains nine exons. The promoter region of the mouse HL gene contains elements characteristic of a housekeeping gene: a CpG island containing multiple Sp1 binding sites surrounds exon 1, and neither a TATA nor a CAAT box are present. We identified multiple transcription start sites in the mouse HL gene, 35 to 9 bases upstream of the translation start codon. We also isolated two human HL genomic clones that include HL exons 2 to 9 within 18 kb. The mouse and human HL genes (HGMW-approved symbol HMGCL) are highly homologous, with identical locations of intron-exon junctions. By genomic Southern blot analysis and exonic PCR, was found 2 of 33 HL-deficient probands to be homozygous for large deletions in the HL gene. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Histone acetylation in insect chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Allfrey, V G; Pogo, B G; Littau, V C; Gershey, E L; Mirsky, A E

    1968-01-19

    Acetylation of histones takes place along the salivary gland chromosomes of Chironomus thummi when RNA synthesis is active. It can be observed but not measured quantitatively by autoradiography of chromosome squashes. The "fixatives" commonly used in preparing squashes of insect chromosomes preferentially extract the highly acetylated "arginine-rich" histone fractions; the use of such fixatives may explain the reported absence of histone acetylation in Drosophila melanogaster.

  4. STAT5 acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Kosan, Christian; Ginter, Torsten; Heinzel, Thorsten; Krämer, Oliver H

    2013-01-01

    The cytokine-inducible transcription factors signal transducer and activator of transcription 5A and 5B (STAT5A and STAT5B) are important for the proper development of multicellular eukaryotes. Disturbed signaling cascades evoking uncontrolled expression of STAT5 target genes are associated with cancer and immunological failure. Here, we summarize how STAT5 acetylation is integrated into posttranslational modification networks within cells. Moreover, we focus on how inhibitors of deacetylases and tyrosine kinases can correct leukemogenic signaling nodes involving STAT5. Such small molecules can be exploited in the fight against neoplastic diseases and immunological disorders. PMID:24416653

  5. Simultaneous high-performance liquid chromatography determination of coenzyme A, dephospho-coenzyme A, and acetyl-coenzyme A in normal and pantothenic acid-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Katsumi; Nakai, Takumi; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu

    2012-11-15

    We describe here a simultaneous high-performance liquid chromatography method for practical and rapid determination of coenzyme A (CoA), dephospho-CoA, and acetyl-CoA in tissues. These coenzymes are biosynthesized from the vitamin pantothenic acid (PaA), which is involved in the metabolism of fatty acids, amino acid catabolism, and several other nutrients. The method employed a Tosoh TSK-GEL ODS-100 V column (250×4.6mm i.d., particle size 5μm) eluted with 100mmol/L NaH(2)PO(4) and 75mmol/L CH(3)COONa (pH was adjusted to 4.6 by the addition of concentrated H(3)PO(4))-acetonitrile (94:6, v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0ml/min. The ultraviolet detector was set at 259nm. The limits of detection for CoA, dephospho-CoA, and acetyl-CoA all were 10pmol. The method was applied to the analysis of several tissues of rats fed normal and PaA-free diets. The results clearly showed that the method was suitable for the simultaneous determination of CoA, dephospho-CoA, and acetyl-CoA in the liver, heart, kidney, spleen, testis, large colon, and muscle, but not for the small intestine, of rats.

  6. Pyrophosphate-Dependent ATP Formation from Acetyl Coenzyme A in Syntrophus aciditrophicus , a New Twist on ATP Formation

    DOE PAGES

    James, Kimberly L.; Ríos-Hernández, Luis A.; Wofford, Neil Q.; ...

    2016-08-16

    Syntrophus aciditrophicusis a model syntrophic bacterium that degrades key intermediates in anaerobic decomposition, such as benzoate, cyclohexane-1-carboxylate, and certain fatty acids, to acetate when grown with hydrogen-/formate-consuming microorganisms. ATP formation coupled to acetate production is the main source for energy conservation byS. aciditrophicus. However, the absence of homologs for phosphate acetyltransferase and acetate kinase in the genome ofS. aciditrophicusleaves it unclear as to how ATP is formed, as most fermentative bacteria rely on these two enzymes to synthesize ATP from acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) and phosphate. Here, we combine transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolite, and enzymatic approaches to show thatS. aciditrophicususes AMP-forming, acetyl-CoA synthetase (Acs1)more » for ATP synthesis from acetyl-CoA.acs1mRNA and Acs1 were abundant in transcriptomes and proteomes, respectively, ofS. aciditrophicusgrown in pure culture and coculture. Cell extracts ofS. aciditrophicushad low or undetectable acetate kinase and phosphate acetyltransferase activities but had high acetyl-CoA synthetase activity under all growth conditions tested. Both Acs1 purified fromS. aciditrophicusand recombinantly produced Acs1 catalyzed ATP and acetate formation from acetyl-CoA, AMP, and pyrophosphate. High pyrophosphate levels and a high AMP-to-ATP ratio (5.9 ± 1.4) inS. aciditrophicuscells support the operation of Acs1 in the acetate-forming direction. Thus,S. aciditrophicushas a unique approach to conserve energy involving pyrophosphate, AMP, acetyl-CoA, and an AMP-forming, acetyl-CoA synthetase. We find bacteria use two enzymes, phosphate acetyltransferase and acetate kinase, to make ATP from acetyl-CoA, while acetate-forming archaea use a single enzyme, an ADP-forming, acetyl-CoA synthetase, to synthesize ATP and acetate from acetyl-CoA.Syntrophus aciditrophicusapparently relies on a different approach to conserve energy during acetyl-CoA metabolism, as

  7. Structural and docking studies of Leucaena leucocephala Cinnamoyl CoA reductase.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Nirmal K; Vindal, Vaibhav; Kumar, Vikash; Kabra, Ashish; Phogat, Navneet; Kumar, Manoj

    2011-03-01

    Lignin, a major constituent of plant call wall, is a phenolic heteropolymer. It plays a major role in the development of plants and their defense mechanism against pathogens. Therefore Lignin biosynthesis is one of the critical metabolic pathways. In lignin biosynthesis, the Cinnamoyl CoA reductase is a key enzyme which catalyzes the first step in the pathway. Cinnamoyl CoA reductase provides the substrates which represent the main transitional molecules of lignin biosynthesis pathway, exhibits a high in vitro kinetic preference for feruloyl CoA. In present study, the three-dimensional model of cinnamoyl CoA reductase was constructed based on the crystal structure of Grape Dihydroflavonol 4-Reductase. Furthermore, the docking studies were performed to understand the substrate interactions to the active site of CCR. It showed that residues ARG51, ASN52, ASP54 and ASN58 were involved in substrate binding. We also suggest that residue ARG51 in CCR is the determinant residue in competitive inhibition of other substrates. This structural and docking information have prospective implications to understand the mechanism of CCR enzymatic reaction with feruloyl CoA, however the approach will be applicable in prediction of substrates and engineering 3D structures of other enzymes as well.

  8. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Coordinate expression of hydrogenase and ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase in Rhizobium japonicum Hupc mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Merberg, D; Maier, R J

    1984-01-01

    In contrast to the wild type, H2 uptake-constitutive mutants of Rhizobium japonicum expressed both hydrogenase and ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activities when grown heterotrophically. However, as bacteroids from soybean root nodules, the H2 uptake-constitutive mutants, like the wild type, did not express ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity. PMID:6384199

  10. A distinct holoenzyme organization for two-subunit pyruvate carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Philip H.; Jo, Jeanyoung; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Min-Han; Chou, Chi-Yuan; Dietrich, Lars E. P.; Tong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) has important roles in metabolism and is crucial for virulence for some pathogenic bacteria. PC contains biotin carboxylase (BC), carboxyltransferase (CT) and biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) components. It is a single-chain enzyme in eukaryotes and most bacteria, and functions as a 500 kD homo-tetramer. In contrast, PC is a two-subunit enzyme in a collection of Gram-negative bacteria, with the α subunit containing the BC and the β subunit the CT and BCCP domains, and it is believed that the holoenzyme has α4β4 stoichiometry. We report here the crystal structures of a two-subunit PC from Methylobacillus flagellatus. Surprisingly, our structures reveal an α2β4 stoichiometry, and the overall architecture of the holoenzyme is strikingly different from that of the homo-tetrameric PCs. Biochemical and mutagenesis studies confirm the stoichiometry and other structural observations. Our functional studies in Pseudomonas aeruginosa show that its two-subunit PC is important for colony morphogenesis. PMID:27708276

  11. Molecular Basis of Substrate Specific Acetylation by N-Terminal Acetyltransferase NatB.

    PubMed

    Hong, Haiyan; Cai, Yongfei; Zhang, Shijun; Ding, Hongyan; Wang, Haitao; Han, Aidong

    2017-04-04

    The NatB N-terminal acetyltransferase specifically acetylates the N-terminal group of substrate protein peptides starting with Met-Asp/Glu/Asn/Gln. How NatB recognizes and acetylates these substrates remains unknown. Here, we report crystal structures of a NatB holoenzyme from Candida albicans in the presence of its co-factor CoA and substrate peptides. The auxiliary subunit Naa25 of NatB forms a horseshoe-like deck to hold specifically its catalytic subunit Naa20. The first two amino acids Met and Asp of a substrate peptide mediate the major interactions with the active site in the Naa20 subunit. The hydrogen bonds between the substrate Asp and pocket residues of Naa20 are essential to determine the NatB substrate specificity. Moreover, a hydrogen bond between the amino group of the substrate Met and a carbonyl group in the Naa20 active site directly anchors the substrate toward acetyl-CoA. Together, these structures define a unique molecular mechanism of specific N-terminal acetylation acted by NatB.

  12. Histone acetylation in heterochromatin assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Workman, Jerry L.

    2010-01-01

    Histone acetylation is generally considered a mark involved in activating gene expression by making chromatin structures less compact. In the April 1, 2010, issue of Genes & Development, Xhemalce and Kouzarides (pp. 647–652) demonstrate that the acetylation of histone H3 at Lys 4 (H3K4) plays a role in the formation of repressive heterochromatin in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. H3K4 acetylation mediates a switch of chromodomain proteins associated with methylated H3K9 during heterochromatin assembly. PMID:20395362

  13. Acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Brian T; Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Moustafa, Tarek; Schölz, Christian; Wagner, Sebastian A; Magnes, Christoph; Zechner, Rudolf; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a frequently occurring posttranslational modification; however, little is known about the origin and regulation of most sites. Here we used quantitative mass spectrometry to analyze acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that acetylation accumulated in growth-arrested cells in a manner that depended on acetyl-CoA generation in distinct subcellular compartments. Mitochondrial acetylation levels correlated with acetyl-CoA concentration in vivo and acetyl-CoA acetylated lysine residues nonenzymatically in vitro. We developed a method to estimate acetylation stoichiometry and found that the vast majority of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic acetylation had a very low stoichiometry. However, mitochondrial acetylation occurred at a significantly higher basal level than cytoplasmic acetylation, consistent with the distinct acetylation dynamics and higher acetyl-CoA concentration in mitochondria. High stoichiometry acetylation occurred mostly on histones, proteins present in histone acetyltransferase and deacetylase complexes, and on transcription factors. These data show that a majority of acetylation occurs at very low levels in exponentially growing yeast and is uniformly affected by exposure to acetyl-CoA.

  14. Biochemical and kinetic characterization of the recombinant ADP-forming acetyl coenzyme A synthetase from the amitochondriate protozoan Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cheryl P; Ingram-Smith, Cheryl

    2014-12-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, an amitochondriate protozoan parasite that relies on glycolysis as a key pathway for ATP generation, has developed a unique extended PPi-dependent glycolytic pathway in which ADP-forming acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase (ACD; acetate:CoA ligase [ADP-forming]; EC 6.2.1.13) converts acetyl-CoA to acetate to produce additional ATP and recycle CoA. We characterized the recombinant E. histolytica ACD and found that the enzyme is bidirectional, allowing it to potentially play a role in ATP production or in utilization of acetate. In the acetate-forming direction, acetyl-CoA was the preferred substrate and propionyl-CoA was used with lower efficiency. In the acetyl-CoA-forming direction, acetate was the preferred substrate, with a lower efficiency observed with propionate. The enzyme can utilize both ADP/ATP and GDP/GTP in the respective directions of the reaction. ATP and PPi were found to inhibit the acetate-forming direction of the reaction, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of 0.81 ± 0.17 mM (mean ± standard deviation) and 0.75 ± 0.20 mM, respectively, which are both in the range of their physiological concentrations. ATP and PPi displayed mixed inhibition versus each of the three substrates, acetyl-CoA, ADP, and phosphate. This is the first example of regulation of ACD enzymatic activity, and possible roles for this regulation are discussed.

  15. Structure of the acetophenone carboxylase core complex: prototype of a new class of ATP-dependent carboxylases/hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Weidenweber, Sina; Schühle, Karola; Demmer, Ulrike; Warkentin, Eberhard; Ermler, Ulrich; Heider, Johann

    2017-01-01

    Degradation of the aromatic ketone acetophenone is initiated by its carboxylation to benzoylacetate catalyzed by acetophenone carboxylase (Apc) in a reaction dependent on the hydrolysis of two ATP to ADP and Pi. Apc is a large protein complex which dissociates during purification into a heterooctameric Apc(αα′βγ)2 core complex of 482 kDa and Apcε of 34 kDa. In this report, we present the X-ray structure of the Apc(αα′βγ)2 core complex from Aromatoleum aromaticum at ca. 3 Å resolution which reveals a unique modular architecture and serves as model of a new enzyme family. Apcβ contains a novel domain fold composed of two β-sheets in a barrel-like arrangement running into a bundle of eight short polyproline (type II)-like helical segments. Apcα and Apcα′ possess ATP binding modules of the ASKHA superfamily integrated into their multidomain structures and presumably operate as ATP-dependent kinases for acetophenone and bicarbonate, respectively. Mechanistic aspects of the novel carboxylation reaction requiring massive structural rearrangements are discussed and criteria for specifically annotating the family members Apc, acetone carboxylase and hydantoinase are defined. PMID:28054554

  16. Generation of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate from acetate in higher plants: Detection of acetoacetyl CoA reductase- and PHB synthase- activities in rice.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Hirohisa; Shiraki, Mari; Inoue, Eri; Saito, Terumi

    2016-08-20

    It has been reported that Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) is generated from acetate in the rice root. However, no information is available about the biosynthetic pathway of PHB from acetate in plant cells. In the bacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16 (R. eutropha), PHB is synthesized from acetyl CoA by the consecutive reaction of three enzymes: β-ketothiolase (EC: 2.3.1.9), acetoacetyl CoA reductase (EC: 1.1.1.36) and PHB synthase (EC: 2.3.1.-). Thus, in this study, we examined whether the above three enzymatic activities were also detected in rice seedlings. The results clearly showed that the activities of the above three enzymes were all detected in rice. In particular, the PHB synthase activity was detected specifically in the sonicated particulate fractions (2000g 10min precipitate (ppt) and the 8000g 30min ppt) of rice roots and leaves. In addition to these enzyme activities, several new experimental results were obtained on PHB synthesis in higher plants: (a) (14)C-PHB generated from 2-(14)C-acetate was mainly localized in the 2000g 10min ppt and the 8000g 30min ppt of rice root. (b) Addition of acetate (0.1-10mM) to culture medium of rice seedlings did not increase the content of PHB in the rice root or leaf. (c) In addition to C3 plants, PHB was generated from acetate in a C4 plant (corn) and in a CAM plant (Bryophyllum pinnatum). d) Washing with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) strongly suggested that the PHB synthesized from acetate was of plant origin and was not bacterial contamination.

  17. Measurement of acylcarnitine substrate to product ratios specific to biotin-dependent carboxylases offers a combination of indicators of biotin status in humans.

    PubMed

    Bogusiewicz, Anna; Horvath, Thomas D; Stratton, Shawna L; Mock, Donald M; Boysen, Gunnar

    2012-09-01

    This work describes a novel liquid chromatography tandem MS (LC-MS/MS) method for the determination of ratios of acylcarnitines arising from acyl-CoA substrates and products that reflect metabolic disturbances caused by marginal biotin deficiency. The urinary ratios reflecting reduced activities of biotin-dependent enzymes include the following: 1) the ratio of 3-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine : 3-methylglutarylcarnitine (3HIAc : MGc) for methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase; 2) the ratio of propionylcarnitine:methylmalonylcarnitine (Pc : MMc) for propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC); and 3) the ratio of acetylcarnitine : malonylcarnitine (Ac : Mc) for acetyl-CoA carboxylase. To demonstrate the suitability of the LC-MS/MS method for biomonitoring, we measured the 3 ratios for 7 healthy adults at various time points (d 0, 14, and 28) during the induction of marginal biotin through the consumption of egg white. The mean change in the Pc : MMc ratio relative to d 0 was 5.3-fold by d 14 (P = 0.0049) and 8.5-fold by d 28 (P = 0.0042). The mean change in the 3HIAc : MGc ratio was 2.8-fold by d 14 (P = 0.0022) and 3.8-fold by d 28 (P = 0.0001). The mean change in the Ac : Mc ratio was 2.9-fold by d 14 (P = 0.03) and 4.7-fold by d 28 (P = 0.02). The results suggest that simultaneous assessment of ratios of multiple biotin-dependent pathways offers insight into the complex metabolic disturbances caused by marginal biotin deficiency. We hypothesize that one or a combination of the ratios might be more sensitive or robust with respect to other nutrient deficiencies or confounding metabolic processes.

  18. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017coa as a Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Danfeng; Rui, Liming; Wang, Xiaofeng; Tan, Hanjie; Li, Wenxiong; Zhang, Tianmeng; Xu, Zhijian; Yang, Zesheng; Song, Hao; Mo, Jun; Wang, Yuanhao; Zhou, Ziheng; Meng, Xianmin; Qian, Shenban; Jia, Junjun; Zhou, Xu; Zhang, Jujia

    2017-04-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 360-840 nm) of SN 2017coa,discovered by Tsinghua-NAOC Transient Survey (TNTS), on UT Mar.31.49 2017 with the 2.16-m telescope (+BFOSC) at Xinglong Station of National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC).

  19. Chemical inhibition of acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase as a strategy to increase polyhydroxybutyrate yields in transgenic sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Petrasovits, Lars A; McQualter, Richard B; Gebbie, Leigh K; Blackman, Deborah M; Nielsen, Lars K; Brumbley, Stevens M

    2013-12-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a naturally occurring bacterial polymer that can be used as a biodegradable replacement for some petrochemical-derived plastics. Polyhydroxybutyrate is produced commercially by fermentation, but to reduce production costs, efforts are underway to produce it in engineered plants, including sugarcane. However, PHB levels in this high-biomass crop are not yet commercially viable. Chemical ripening with herbicides is a strategy used to enhance sucrose production in sugarcane and was investigated here as a tool to increase PHB production. Class A herbicides inhibit ACCase activity and thus reduce fatty acid biosynthesis, with which PHB production competes directly for substrate. Treatment of PHB-producing transgenic sugarcane plants with 100 μM of the class A herbicide fluazifop resulted in a fourfold increase in PHB content in the leaves, which peaked ten days post-treatment. The minimum effective concentration of herbicide required to maximize PHB production was 30 μM for fluazifop and 70 μM for butroxydim when applied to saturation. Application of a range of class A herbicides from the DIM and FOP groups consistently resulted in increased PHB yields, particularly in immature leaf tissue. Butroxydim or fluazifop treatment of mature transgenic sugarcane grown under glasshouse conditions increased the total leaf biomass yield of PHB by 50%-60%. Application of an ACCase inhibitor in the form of a class A herbicide to mature sugarcane plants prior to harvest is a promising strategy for improving overall PHB yield. Further testing is required on field-grown transgenic sugarcane to more precisely determine the effectiveness of this strategy.

  20. Mechanism of action of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Lane, M D; Miziorko, H M

    1978-01-01

    RuBP carboxylase-oxygenase appears to catalyze carboxylation and oxygenation by homologous mechanisms. A common binding site exists on the enzyme for the acceptor substrate, RuBP. A mechanism is proposed whereby RuBP is isomerized, and a carbanion is generated at C2. Then, either CO2 or O2 is added as an electrophile at C2 to form the corresponding 3-keto-2-carboxy-RBP or 3-keto-2-hydroperoxy-RBP adduct. Hydrolytic cleavage at the C2-C3 bonds of these intermediates by the enzyme is envisioned to produce 2 molecules of 3-phosphoglycerate in the carboxylation sequence and 1 molecule of phosphoglycolate and 1 molecule of 3-phosphoglycerate in the oxygenation sequence. Further work will be necessary to establish the validity of the proposed mechanism.

  1. Ribulose diphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. III. Isolation and properties.

    PubMed

    Ryan, F J; Tolbert, N E

    1975-06-10

    Similarities in properties of ribulose diphosphate carboxylase and oxygenase activities further substantiate the hypothesis that the same protein catalyzes both reactions. The Km (ribulose diphosphate) is 0.33 mM for the ribulose diphosphate oxygenase, when assayed in air with an oxygen electrode. Maximum activity is obtained with 10 to 35 mM MgCl2. Higher MgCl2 concentrations are inhibitory, but they shift the pH optimum from 9.3 or 9.4 to 8.7 or 9.0. MnCl2 is an effective cofactor of the oxygenase and some activity is obtained with CoCl2. Both the ribulose diphosphate carboxylase and oxygenase activity of the purified protein from spinach leaves are slowly inactivated by storage at 0 degrees and reactivated in 10 min at 50 degrees, provided both 25 mM MgCl2 and 1 mM dithiothreitol are present. The sulfhydryl groups of the enzyme which react rapidly with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) are approximately 4 at pH 7.8 and 11 at pH 9.4. At both pH values ribulose diphosphate prevents two of these sulfhydryl groups from reacting with this reagent. About 50% inhibition of the oxygenase activity at pH 9.0 occurs with 50 mM bicarbonate in the presence of 3 mM ribulose diphosphate, and from variations in these parameters the inhibition is attributed to the CO2 species. The purified enzyme of acrylamide gels prevented the reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium in the presence of the superoxide radical, but the enzyme in solution did not react as a superoxide dismutase.

  2. Acetyl-L-carnitine: from a biological curiosity to a drug for the peripheral nervous system and beyond.

    PubMed

    Onofrj, Marco; Ciccocioppo, Fausta; Varanese, Sara; di Muzio, Antonio; Calvani, Menotti; Chiechio, Santina; Osio, Maurizio; Thomas, Astrid

    2013-08-01

    Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) is a molecule derived from acetylation of carnitine in the mitochondria. Carnitine acetylation enables the function of CoA and facilitates elimination of oxidative products. Beyond this metabolic activity, ALC provides acetyl groups for acetylcholine synthesis, exerts a cholinergic effect and optimizes the balance of energy processes. Acetylcarnitine supplementation induces neuroprotective, neurotrophic and analgesic effects in the peripheral nervous system. In the recent studies, ALC, by acting as a donor of acetyl groups to NF-kb p65/RelA, enhanced the transcription of the GRM2 gene encoding the mGLU2 receptors, inducing long-term upregulation of the mGluR2, evidencing therefore that its long-term analgesic effects are dependent on epigenetic modifications. Several studies, including double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group studies and few open studies showed the effect of ALC in diseases characterized by neuropathies and neuropathic pain: the studies included diabetic neuropathy, HIV and antiretroviral therapy-induced neuropathies, neuropathies due to compression and chemotherapeutic agents. Double-blinded studies involved 1773 patients. Statistical evaluations evidenced reduction of pain, improvements of nerve function and trophism. In conclusion, ALC represents a consistent therapeutic option for peripheral neuropathies, and its complex effects, neurotrophic and analgesic, based on epigenetic mechanism, open new pathways in the study of peripheral nerve disease management.

  3. Crystallographic trapping of the glutamyl-CoA thioester intermediate of family I CoA transferases

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan,E.; Li, Y.; Ajamian, E.; Iannuzzi, P.; Kernaghan, S.; Fraser, M.; Cygler, M.; Matte, A.

    2005-01-01

    Coenzyme A transferases are involved in a broad range of biochemical processes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and exhibit a diverse range of substrate specificities. The YdiF protein from Escherichia coli O157:H7 is an acyl-CoA transferase of unknown physiological function, and belongs to a large sequence family of CoA transferases, present in bacteria to humans, which utilize oxoacids as acceptors. In vitro measurements showed that YdiF displays enzymatic activity with short-chain acyl-CoAs. The crystal structures of YdiF and its complex with CoA, the first co-crystal structure for any Family I CoA transferase, have been determined and refined at 1.9 and 2.0 Angstrom resolution, respectively. YdiF is organized into tetramers, with each monomer having an open {alpha}/{beta} structure characteristic of Family I CoA transferases. Co-crystallization of YdiF with a variety of CoA thioesters in the absence of acceptor carboxylic acid resulted in trapping a covalent {gamma}-glutamyl-CoA thioester intermediate. The CoA binds within a well defined pocket at the N- and C-terminal domain interface, but makes contact only with the C-terminal domain. The structure of the YdiF complex provides a basis for understanding the different catalytic steps in the reaction of Family I CoA transferases.

  4. Pyrophosphate-Dependent ATP Formation from Acetyl Coenzyme A in Syntrophus aciditrophicus , a New Twist on ATP Formation

    SciTech Connect

    James, Kimberly L.; Ríos-Hernández, Luis A.; Wofford, Neil Q.; Mouttaki, Housna; Sieber, Jessica R.; Sheik, Cody S.; Nguyen, Hong H.; Yang, Yanan; Xie, Yongming; Erde, Jonathan; Rohlin, Lars; Karr, Elizabeth A.; Loo, Joseph A.; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Gunsalus, Robert P.; Szweda, Luke I.; McInerney, Michael J.

    2016-08-16

    Syntrophus aciditrophicusis a model syntrophic bacterium that degrades key intermediates in anaerobic decomposition, such as benzoate, cyclohexane-1-carboxylate, and certain fatty acids, to acetate when grown with hydrogen-/formate-consuming microorganisms. ATP formation coupled to acetate production is the main source for energy conservation byS. aciditrophicus. However, the absence of homologs for phosphate acetyltransferase and acetate kinase in the genome ofS. aciditrophicusleaves it unclear as to how ATP is formed, as most fermentative bacteria rely on these two enzymes to synthesize ATP from acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) and phosphate. Here, we combine transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolite, and enzymatic approaches to show thatS. aciditrophicususes AMP-forming, acetyl-CoA synthetase (Acs1) for ATP synthesis from acetyl-CoA.acs1mRNA and Acs1 were abundant in transcriptomes and proteomes, respectively, ofS. aciditrophicusgrown in pure culture and coculture. Cell extracts ofS. aciditrophicushad low or undetectable acetate kinase and phosphate acetyltransferase activities but had high acetyl-CoA synthetase activity under all growth conditions tested. Both Acs1 purified fromS. aciditrophicusand recombinantly produced Acs1 catalyzed ATP and acetate formation from acetyl-CoA, AMP, and pyrophosphate. High pyrophosphate levels and a high AMP-to-ATP ratio (5.9 ± 1.4) inS. aciditrophicuscells support the operation of Acs1 in the acetate-forming direction. Thus,S. aciditrophicushas a unique approach to conserve energy involving pyrophosphate, AMP, acetyl-CoA, and an AMP-forming, acetyl-CoA synthetase. We find bacteria use two enzymes, phosphate acetyltransferase and acetate kinase, to make ATP from acetyl-CoA, while acetate-forming archaea use a single enzyme, an ADP-forming, acetyl-CoA synthetase, to

  5. Aminoacyl-coenzyme A synthesis catalyzed by a CoA ligase from Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Koetsier, Martijn J; Jekel, Peter A; Wijma, Hein J; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Janssen, Dick B

    2011-03-23

    Coenzyme A ligases play an important role in metabolism by catalyzing the activation of carboxylic acids. In this study we describe the synthesis of aminoacyl-coenzyme As (CoAs) catalyzed by a CoA ligase from Penicillium chrysogenum. The enzyme accepted medium-chain length fatty acids as the best substrates, but the proteinogenic amino acids L-phenylalanine and L-tyrosine, as well as the non-proteinogenic amino acids D-phenylalanine, D-tyrosine and (R)- and (S)-β-phenylalanine were also accepted. Of these amino acids, the highest activity was found for (R)-β-phenylalanine, forming (R)-β-phenylalanyl-CoA. Homology modeling suggested that alanine 312 is part of the active site cavity, and mutagenesis (A312G) yielded a variant that has an enhanced catalytic efficiency with β-phenylalanines and D-α-phenylalanine.

  6. Pyrophosphate-Dependent ATP Formation from Acetyl Coenzyme A in Syntrophus aciditrophicus, a New Twist on ATP Formation

    PubMed Central

    James, Kimberly L.; Ríos-Hernández, Luis A.; Wofford, Neil Q.; Mouttaki, Housna; Sieber, Jessica R.; Sheik, Cody S.; Nguyen, Hong H.; Yang, Yanan; Xie, Yongming; Erde, Jonathan; Rohlin, Lars; Karr, Elizabeth A.; Loo, Joseph A.; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Gunsalus, Robert P.; Szweda, Luke I.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Syntrophus aciditrophicus is a model syntrophic bacterium that degrades key intermediates in anaerobic decomposition, such as benzoate, cyclohexane-1-carboxylate, and certain fatty acids, to acetate when grown with hydrogen-/formate-consuming microorganisms. ATP formation coupled to acetate production is the main source for energy conservation by S. aciditrophicus. However, the absence of homologs for phosphate acetyltransferase and acetate kinase in the genome of S. aciditrophicus leaves it unclear as to how ATP is formed, as most fermentative bacteria rely on these two enzymes to synthesize ATP from acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) and phosphate. Here, we combine transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolite, and enzymatic approaches to show that S. aciditrophicus uses AMP-forming, acetyl-CoA synthetase (Acs1) for ATP synthesis from acetyl-CoA. acs1 mRNA and Acs1 were abundant in transcriptomes and proteomes, respectively, of S. aciditrophicus grown in pure culture and coculture. Cell extracts of S. aciditrophicus had low or undetectable acetate kinase and phosphate acetyltransferase activities but had high acetyl-CoA synthetase activity under all growth conditions tested. Both Acs1 purified from S. aciditrophicus and recombinantly produced Acs1 catalyzed ATP and acetate formation from acetyl-CoA, AMP, and pyrophosphate. High pyrophosphate levels and a high AMP-to-ATP ratio (5.9 ± 1.4) in S. aciditrophicus cells support the operation of Acs1 in the acetate-forming direction. Thus, S. aciditrophicus has a unique approach to conserve energy involving pyrophosphate, AMP, acetyl-CoA, and an AMP-forming, acetyl-CoA synthetase. PMID:27531911

  7. Acetylation control of cardiac fatty acid β-oxidation and energy metabolism in obesity, diabetes, and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Arata; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2016-12-01

    Alterations in cardiac energy metabolism are an important contributor to the cardiac pathology associated with obesity, diabetes, and heart failure. High rates of fatty acid β-oxidation with cardiac insulin resistance represent a cardiac metabolic hallmark of diabetes and obesity, while a marginal decrease in fatty acid oxidation and a prominent decrease in insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation are commonly seen in the early stages of heart failure. Alterations in post-translational control of energy metabolic processes have recently been identified as an important contributor to these metabolic changes. In particular, lysine acetylation of non-histone proteins, which controls a diverse family of mitochondrial metabolic pathways, contributes to the cardiac energy derangements seen in obesity, diabetes, and heart failure. Lysine acetylation is controlled both via acetyltransferases and deacetylases (sirtuins), as well as by non-enzymatic lysine acetylation due to increased acetyl CoA pool size or dysregulated nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) metabolism (which stimulates sirtuin activity). One of the important mitochondrial acetylation targets are the fatty acid β-oxidation enzymes, which contributes to alterations in cardiac substrate preference during the course of obesity, diabetes, and heart failure, and can ultimately lead to cardiac dysfunction in these disease states. This review will summarize the role of lysine acetylation and its regulatory control in the context of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation. The functional contribution of cardiac protein lysine acetylation to the shift in cardiac energy substrate preference that occurs in obesity, diabetes, and especially in the early stages of heart failure will also be reviewed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The role of post-translational protein modifications on heart and vascular metabolism edited by Jason R.B. Dyck & Jan F.C. Glatz.

  8. Chemical and Physical Characterization of the Activation of Ribulosebiphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Donnelly, M. I.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Hartman, F. C.

    1983-08-01

    Molecular structure of ribulosebiphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase isolated from Rhodospirillium was compared with the enzyme isolated from Alcaligens eutrophus. Peptides derived from the active center of the bacterial enzyme were highly homologous with those isolated from spinach. Molecular shapes of the carboxylases were estimated using neutron scattering data. These studies suggested that the enzyme as isolated from R. rubrum is a solid prolate ellipsoid or cylinder, while the spinach enzyme resembles a hollow sphere.

  9. Crystallization and structure of a recombinant ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Gunter; Lindqvist, Ylva; Brändén, Carl-Ivar; Lorimer, George

    1988-07-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase is the key enzyme in photosynthetic carbon dioxide fixation and photorespiration. The dimeric carboxylase from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum has been cloned and expressed in E. coli. The recombinant enzyme has been crystallized in a number of different crystal forms. The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme has been determined by X-ray crystallographic methods to 2.9Åresolution.

  10. Variations in Km(CO2) of Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase among Grasses

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, Hock-Hin; Badger, Murray R.; Watson, Leslie

    1980-01-01

    A survey of the Km(CO2) values of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase from 60 grass species shows that enzyme from C3 grasses consistently exhibits lower Km(CO2) than does that from C4 grasses. Systematically ordered variation in Km(CO2) of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylases from C3 and C4 grasses is also apparent and, among C4 grasses, this shows some correlation with C4 types. PMID:16661586

  11. Chemical and physical characterization of the activation of ribulosebiphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, M.I.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Hartman, F.C.

    1983-01-01

    Molecular structure of ribulosebiphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase isolated from Rhodospirillium was compared with the enzyme isolated from Alcaligens eutrophus. Peptides derived from the active center of the bacterial enzyme were highly homologous with those isolated from spinach. Molecular shapes of the carboxylases were estimated using neutron scattering data. These studies suggested that the enzyme as isolated from R. rubrum is a solid prolate ellipsoid or cylinder, while the spinach enzyme resembles a hollow sphere. 1 drawing.

  12. Mosaic Conservation Opportunity Areas - Liberal Model (ECO_RES.COA_MOSAIC33)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The COA_Mosaic33 layer designates areas with potential for forest/grassland mosaic conservation. These are areas of natural or semi-natural forest/grassland mosaic land cover patches that are at least 75 meters away from roads and away from patch edges. OAs were modeled by creating distance grids using the National Land Cover Database and the Census Bureau's TIGER roads files

  13. Mosaic Conservation Opportunity Areas - Conservativel Model (ECO_RES.COA_MOSAIC66)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The COA_Mosaic66 layer designates areas with potential for forest/grassland mosaic conservation. These are areas of natural or semi-natural forest/grassland land cover patches that area at least 395 meters away from roads and away from patch edges. OAs were modeled by creating distance grids using the National Land Cover Database and the Census Bureau's TIGER road files.

  14. Regulation of schistosome egg production by HMG CoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    VandeWaa, E.A.; Bennett, J.L.

    1986-03-05

    Hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG CoA reductase) catalyzes the conversion of HMG CoA to mevalonate in the synthesis of steroids, isoprenoids and terpenes. Mevinolin, an inhibitor of this enzyme, decreased egg production in Schistosoma mansoni during in vitro incubations. This was associated with a reduction in the incorporation of /sup 14/C-acetate into polyisoprenoids and a reduction in the formation of a lipid-linked oligosaccharide. In vivo, mevinolin in daily doses of 50 mg/kg (p.o., from days 30-48 post-infection) caused no change in gross liver pathology in S. mansoni infected mice. However, when parasites exposed to mevinolin or its vehicle in vivo were cultured in vitro, worms from mevinolin-treated mice produced six times more eggs than control parasites. When infected mice were dosed with 250 mg/kg mevinolin daily (p.o., from days 35-45 post-infection), liver pathology was reduced in comparison to control mice. Thus, during in vivo exposure to a high dose of the drug egg production is decreased, while at a lower dose it appears unaffected until the parasites are cultured in a drug-free in vitro system wherein egg production is stimulated to extraordinarily high levels. It may be that at low doses mevinolin, by inhibiting the enzyme, is blocking the formation of a product (such as an isoprenoid) which normally acts to down-regulate enzyme synthesis, resulting in enzyme induction. Induction of HMG CoA reductase is then expressed as increased egg production when the worms are removed from the drug. These data suggest that HMG CoA reductase plays a role in schistosome egg production.

  15. N-ACETYL GROUPS IN VITELLENIN,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The presence of acetyl groups in vitellenin was confirmed by hydrazinolysis according to the DNP method of Phillips. After hydrazinolysis of 10-30...hydrazinolysis at room temperature for 1 hour, vitellenin contains N- acetyl , but no Oacetyl, groups. (Author)

  16. Germline deletion of pantothenate kinases 1 and 2 reveals the key roles for CoA in postnatal metabolism.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Matthew; Leonardi, Roberta; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Rehg, Jerold E; Jackowski, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase (PanK) phosphorylates pantothenic acid (vitamin B(5)) and controls the overall rate of coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis. Pank1 gene deletion in mice results in a metabolic phenotype where fatty acid oxidation and gluconeogenesis are impaired in the fasted state, leading to mild hypoglycemia. Inactivating mutations in the human PANK2 gene lead to childhood neurodegeneration, but Pank2 gene inactivation in mice does not elicit a phenotype indicative of the neuromuscular symptoms or brain iron accumulation that accompany the human disease. Pank1/Pank2 double knockout (dKO) mice were derived to determine if the mild phenotypes of the single knockout mice are due to the ability of the two isoforms to compensate for each other in CoA biosynthesis. Postnatal development was severely affected in the dKO mice. The dKO pups developed progressively severe hypoglycemia and hyperketonemia by postnatal day 10 leading to death by day 17. Hyperketonemia arose from impaired whole-body ketone utilization illustrating the requirement for CoA in energy generation from ketones. dKO pups had reduced CoA and decreased fatty acid oxidation coupled with triglyceride accumulation in liver. dKO hepatocytes could not maintain the NADH levels compared to wild-type hepatocytes. These results revealed an important link between CoA and NADH levels, which was reflected by deficiencies in hepatic oleate synthesis and gluconeogenesis. The data indicate that PanK1 and PanK2 can compensate for each other to supply tissue CoA, but PanK1 is more important to CoA levels in liver whereas PanK2 contributes more to CoA synthesis in the brain.

  17. Copper supplementation restores cytochrome c oxidase assembly defect in a mitochondrial disease model of COA6 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Alok; Trivedi, Prachi P.; Timbalia, Shrishiv A.; Griffin, Aaron T.; Rahn, Jennifer J.; Chan, Sherine S. L.; Gohil, Vishal M.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain biogenesis is orchestrated by hundreds of assembly factors, many of which are yet to be discovered. Using an integrative approach based on clues from evolutionary history, protein localization and human genetics, we have identified a conserved mitochondrial protein, C1orf31/COA6, and shown its requirement for respiratory complex IV biogenesis in yeast, zebrafish and human cells. A recent next-generation sequencing study reported potential pathogenic mutations within the evolutionarily conserved Cx9CxnCx10C motif of COA6, implicating it in mitochondrial disease biology. Using yeast coa6Δ cells, we show that conserved residues in the motif, including the residue mutated in a patient with mitochondrial disease, are essential for COA6 function, thus confirming the pathogenicity of the patient mutation. Furthermore, we show that zebrafish embryos with zfcoa6 knockdown display reduced heart rate and cardiac developmental defects, recapitulating the observed pathology in the human mitochondrial disease patient who died of neonatal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The specific requirement of Coa6 for respiratory complex IV biogenesis, its intramitochondrial localization and the presence of the Cx9CxnCx10C motif suggested a role in mitochondrial copper metabolism. In support of this, we show that exogenous copper supplementation completely rescues respiratory and complex IV assembly defects in yeast coa6Δ cells. Taken together, our results establish an evolutionarily conserved role of Coa6 in complex IV assembly and support a causal role of the COA6 mutation in the human mitochondrial disease patient. PMID:24549041

  18. Bacterial protein acetylation: new discoveries unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Alan J

    2016-05-01

    Nε-acetylation is emerging as an abundant post-translational modification of bacterial proteins. Two mechanisms have been identified: one is enzymatic, dependent on an acetyltransferase and acetyl-coenzyme A; the other is non-enzymatic and depends on the reactivity of acetyl phosphate. Some, but not most, of those acetylations are reversed by deacetylases. This review will briefly describe the current status of the field and raise questions that need answering.

  19. Protein acetylation in archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Soppa, Jörg

    2010-09-16

    Proteins can be acetylated at the alpha-amino group of the N-terminal amino acid (methionine or the penultimate amino acid after methionine removal) or at the epsilon-amino group of internal lysines. In eukaryotes the majority of proteins are N-terminally acetylated, while this is extremely rare in bacteria. A variety of studies about N-terminal acetylation in archaea have been reported recently, and it was revealed that a considerable fraction of proteins is N-terminally acetylated in haloarchaea and Sulfolobus, while this does not seem to apply for methanogenic archaea. Many eukaryotic proteins are modified by differential internal acetylation, which is important for a variety of processes. Until very recently, only two bacterial proteins were known to be acetylation targets, but now 125 acetylation sites are known for E. coli. Knowledge about internal acetylation in archaea is extremely limited; only two target proteins are known, only one of which--Alba--was used to study differential acetylation. However, indications accumulate that the degree of internal acetylation of archaeal proteins might be underestimated, and differential acetylation has been shown to be essential for the viability of haloarchaea. Focused proteomic approaches are needed to get an overview of the extent of internal protein acetylation in archaea.

  20. Cooperation between COA6 and SCO2 in COX2 maturation during cytochrome c oxidase assembly links two mitochondrial cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Pacheu-Grau, David; Bareth, Bettina; Dudek, Jan; Juris, Lisa; Vögtle, F-Nora; Wissel, Mirjam; Leary, Scot C; Dennerlein, Sven; Rehling, Peter; Deckers, Markus

    2015-06-02

    Three mitochondria-encoded subunits form the catalytic core of cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain. COX1 and COX2 contain heme and copper redox centers, which are integrated during assembly of the enzyme. Defects in this process lead to an enzyme deficiency and manifest as mitochondrial disorders in humans. Here we demonstrate that COA6 is specifically required for COX2 biogenesis. Absence of COA6 leads to fast turnover of newly synthesized COX2 and a concomitant reduction in cytochrome c oxidase levels. COA6 interacts transiently with the copper-containing catalytic domain of newly synthesized COX2. Interestingly, similar to the copper metallochaperone SCO2, loss of COA6 causes cardiomyopathy in humans. We show that COA6 and SCO2 interact and that corresponding pathogenic mutations in each protein affect complex formation. Our analyses define COA6 as a constituent of the mitochondrial copper relay system, linking defects in COX2 metallation to cardiac cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

  1. Validation of CoaBC as a Bactericidal Target in the Coenzyme A Pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis relies on its own ability to biosynthesize coenzyme A to meet the needs of the myriad enzymatic reactions that depend on this cofactor for activity. As such, the essential pantothenate and coenzyme A biosynthesis pathways have attracted attention as targets for tuberculosis drug development. To identify the optimal step for coenzyme A pathway disruption in M. tuberculosis, we constructed and characterized a panel of conditional knockdown mutants in coenzyme A pathway genes. Here, we report that silencing of coaBC was bactericidal in vitro, whereas silencing of panB, panC, or coaE was bacteriostatic over the same time course. Silencing of coaBC was likewise bactericidal in vivo, whether initiated at infection or during either the acute or chronic stages of infection, confirming that CoaBC is required for M. tuberculosis to grow and persist in mice and arguing against significant CoaBC bypass via transport and assimilation of host-derived pantetheine in this animal model. These results provide convincing genetic validation of CoaBC as a new bactericidal drug target. PMID:27676316

  2. Lysine acetyltransferase NuA4 and acetyl-CoA regulate glucose-deprived stress granule formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Huard, Sylvain; Morettin, Alan; Fullerton, Morgan D.; Côté, Jocelyn

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells form stress granules under a variety of stresses, however the signaling pathways regulating their formation remain largely unknown. We have determined that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae lysine acetyltransferase complex NuA4 is required for stress granule formation upon glucose deprivation but not heat stress. Further, the Tip60 complex, the human homolog of the NuA4 complex, is required for stress granule formation in cancer cell lines. Surprisingly, the impact of NuA4 on glucose-deprived stress granule formation is partially mediated through regulation of acetyl-CoA levels, which are elevated in NuA4 mutants. While elevated acetyl-CoA levels suppress the formation of glucose-deprived stress granules, decreased acetyl-CoA levels enhance stress granule formation upon glucose deprivation. Further our work suggests that NuA4 regulates acetyl-CoA levels through the Acetyl-CoA carboxylase Acc1. Altogether this work establishes both NuA4 and the metabolite acetyl-CoA as critical signaling pathways regulating the formation of glucose-deprived stress granules. PMID:28231279

  3. Structures and energetics of models for the active site of acetyl-coenzyme a synthase: role of distal and proximal metals in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Webster, Charles Edwin; Darensbourg, Marcetta Y; Lindahl, Paul A; Hall, Michael B

    2004-03-24

    Acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthase/carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (ACS/CODH) is a bifunctional enzyme that generates CO from carbon dioxide in the C-cluster of the beta subunit and synthesizes acetyl-CoA from carbon monoxide (CO), CoA, and CH3+ at the active site of the A-cluster in the alpha subunit. On the basis of density functional calculations, we predict that methylation of Nip occurs first, and CO then adds to the NipII-CH3 species to form the intermediate, NipII(CO)(CH3), in which Nip deligates one of its SNid bonds. The CO-insertion/CH3-migration occurs on one metal, the proximal Ni, forming the trigonal planar NipII-acetyl intermediate. The thiolate can bind to NipII and reductively eliminate the thioester. Our calculations disfavor the unprecedented bimetallic CO-insertion/CH3-migration. Ni in the proximal site produces a better catalyst than does Cu.

  4. Light Modulation of Maize Leaf Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase 1

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Steven C.; Sugiyama, Tatsuo; Akazawa, Takashi

    1986-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) was extracted from maize (Zea mays L. cv Golden Cross Bantam T51) leaves harvested in the dark or light and was partially purified by (NH4)2SO4 fractionation and gel filtration to yield preparations that were 80% homogeneous. Malate sensitivity, PEPC activity, and PEPC protein (measured immunochemically) were monitored during purification. As reported previously, PEPC from dark leaves was more sensitive to malate inhibition compared to enzyme extracted from light leaves. Extraction and purification in the presence of malate stabilized the characteristics of the two forms. During gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300, all of the PEPC activity and PEPC protein emerged in a single high molecular weight peak, indicating that no inactive dissociated forms (dimers, monomers) were present. However, there was a slight difference between the light and dark enzymes in elution volume during gel filtration. In addition, specific activity (units at pH 7/milligram PEPC protein) decreased through the peak for both enzyme samples; because the dark enzyme emerged at a slightly higher elution volume, it contained enzyme with a relatively lower specific activity. The variation in specific activity of the dark enzyme corresponded with changes in malate sensitivity. Immunoblotting of samples with different specific activity and malate sensitivity, obtained from gel filtration, revealed only a single polypeptide with a relative molecular mass of 100,000. When the enzyme was extracted and purified in the absence of malate, characteristic differences of the light and dark enzymes were lost, the enzymes eluted at the same volume during gel filtration, and specific activity was constant through the peak. We conclude that maize leaf PEPC exists in situ as a tetramer of a single polypeptide and that subtle conformation changes can affect both enzymic activity and sensitivity to malate inhibition. Images Fig. 6 PMID:16665065

  5. COA7 (C1orf163/RESA1) mutations associated with mitochondrial leukoencephalopathy and cytochrome c oxidase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Martinez Lyons, Anabel; Ardissone, Anna; Reyes, Aurelio; Robinson, Alan J; Moroni, Isabella; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Zeviani, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Background Assembly of cytochrome c oxidase (COX, complex IV, cIV), the terminal component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is assisted by several factors, most of which are conserved from yeast to humans. However, some of them, including COA7, are found in humans but not in yeast. COA7 is a 231aa-long mitochondrial protein present in animals, containing five Sel1-like tetratricopeptide repeat sequences, which are likely to interact with partner proteins. Methods Whole exome sequencing was carried out on a 19 year old woman, affected by early onset, progressive severe ataxia and peripheral neuropathy, mild cognitive impairment and a cavitating leukodystrophy of the brain with spinal cord hypotrophy. Biochemical analysis of the mitochondrial respiratory chain revealed the presence of isolated deficiency of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity in skin fibroblasts and skeletal muscle. Mitochondrial localization studies were carried out in isolated mitochondria and mitoplasts from immortalized control human fibroblasts. Results We found compound heterozygous mutations in COA7: a paternal c.410A>G, p.Y137C, and a maternal c.287+1G>T variants. Lentiviral-mediated expression of recombinant wild-type COA7 cDNA in the patient fibroblasts led to the recovery of the defect in COX activity and restoration of normal COX amount. In mitochondrial localization experiments, COA7 behaved as the soluble matrix protein Citrate Synthase. Conclusions We report here the first patient carrying pathogenic mutations of COA7, causative of isolated COX deficiency and progressive neurological impairment. We also show that COA7 is a soluble protein localized to the matrix, rather than in the intermembrane space as previously suggested. PMID:27683825

  6. A Chemo-Enzymatic Road Map to the Synthesis of CoA Esters.

    PubMed

    Peter, Dominik M; Vögeli, Bastian; Cortina, Niña Socorro; Erb, Tobias J

    2016-04-20

    Coenzyme A (CoA) is a ubiquitous cofactor present in every known organism. The thioesters of CoA are core intermediates in many metabolic processes, such as the citric acid cycle, fatty acid biosynthesis and secondary metabolism, including polyketide biosynthesis. Synthesis of CoA-thioesters is vital for the study of CoA-dependent enzymes and pathways, but also as standards for metabolomics studies. In this work we systematically tested five chemo-enzymatic methods for the synthesis of the three most abundant acyl-CoA thioester classes in biology; saturated acyl-CoAs, α,β-unsaturated acyl-CoAs (i.e., enoyl-CoA derivatives), and α-carboxylated acyl-CoAs (i.e., malonyl-CoA derivatives). Additionally we report on the substrate promiscuity of three newly described acyl-CoA dehydrogenases that allow the simple conversion of acyl-CoAs into enoyl-CoAs. With these five methods, we synthesized 26 different CoA-thioesters with a yield of 40% or higher. The CoA esters produced range from short- to long-chain, include branched and α,β-unsaturated representatives as well as other functional groups. Based on our results we provide a general guideline to the optimal synthesis method of a given CoA-thioester in respect to its functional group(s) and the commercial availability of the precursor molecule. The proposed synthetic routes can be performed in small scale and do not require special chemical equipment, making them convenient also for biological laboratories.

  7. The Role of Coa2 in Hemylation of Yeast Cox1 Revealed by Its Genetic Interaction with Cox10 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Bestwick, Megan; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Pierrel, Fabien; Winge, Dennis R.

    2010-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking the cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) assembly factor Coa2 are impaired in Cox1 maturation and exhibit a rapid degradation of newly synthesized Cox1. The respiratory deficiency of coa2Δ cells is suppressed either by the presence of a mutant allele of the Cox10 farnesyl transferase involved in heme a biosynthesis or through impaired proteolysis by the disruption of the mitochondrial Oma1 protease. Cox10 with an N196K substitution functions as a robust gain-of-function suppressor of the respiratory deficiency of coa2Δ cells but lacks suppressor activity for two other CcO assembly mutant strains, the coa1Δ and shy1Δ mutants. The suppressor activity of N196K mutant Cox10 is dependent on its catalytic function and the presence of Cox15, the second enzyme involved in heme a biosynthesis. Varying the substitution at Asn196 reveals a correlation between the suppressor activity and the stabilization of the high-mass homo-oligomeric Cox10 complex. We postulate that the mutant Cox10 complex has enhanced efficiency in the addition of heme a to Cox1. Coa2 appears to impart stability to the oligomeric wild-type Cox10 complex involved in Cox1 hemylation. PMID:19841065

  8. Crystallization and characterization of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from eight plant species.

    PubMed

    Johal, S; Bourque, D P; Smith, W W; Suh, S W; Eisenberg, D

    1980-09-25

    Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase was isolated and crystallized from eight plant species. Crystals grew from either of two similar sets of crystallizing conditions: crystals of the enzyme from alfalfa, corn, cotton, potato, spinach, tobacco, and tomato grew from solutions containing phosphate and polyethylene glycol 6000 as a precipitant, and those from potato, tobacco (both Nicotiana sylvestris and Nicotiana tabacum), and tomato grew from a mixture of ammonium sulfate and phosphate. Crystals of the enzyme from potato and both species of tobacco were large enough to characterize by x-ray diffraction and were found to have the Form III structure, previously reported for crystals of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from N. tabacum. For crystalline material from several species, both carboxylase and oxygenase activites have been assayed and copper and iron contents have been determined. The possible significance of the observed general conditions of crystallization of this enzyme is discussed.

  9. Changing ribulose diphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activity in ripening tomato fruit.

    PubMed

    Bravdo, B A; Palgi, A; Lurie, S

    1977-08-01

    Tomato fruit (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill) from green, pink, and red stages were assayed for changes in the activity of ribulose diphosphate carboxylase and oxygenase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, changes in the levels of glycolate and respiratory gas exchange. The ribulose diphosphate carboxylase activity decreased as the fruit ripened. By comparison, the ribulose diphosphate oxygenase activity increased during the transition from the green to the pink stage, and declined afterward. The changes in the endogenous glycolate levels and the respiratory gas exchange, as observed at different stages of ripening, resembled the changes in the ribulose diphosphate oxygenase activity. The utilization of glycolate in further metabolic activity may result in the formation of peroxidases required for the onset of ripening.

  10. Analysis of acetylation stoichiometry suggests that SIRT3 repairs nonenzymatic acetylation lesions.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Brian T; Moustafa, Tarek; Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Zechner, Rudolf; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2015-11-03

    Acetylation is frequently detected on mitochondrial enzymes, and the sirtuin deacetylase SIRT3 is thought to regulate metabolism by deacetylating mitochondrial proteins. However, the stoichiometry of acetylation has not been studied and is important for understanding whether SIRT3 regulates or suppresses acetylation. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we measured acetylation stoichiometry in mouse liver tissue and found that SIRT3 suppressed acetylation to a very low stoichiometry at its target sites. By examining acetylation changes in the liver, heart, brain, and brown adipose tissue of fasted mice, we found that SIRT3-targeted sites were mostly unaffected by fasting, a dietary manipulation that is thought to regulate metabolism through SIRT3-dependent deacetylation. Globally increased mitochondrial acetylation in fasted liver tissue, higher stoichiometry at mitochondrial acetylation sites, and greater sensitivity of SIRT3-targeted sites to chemical acetylation in vitro and fasting-induced acetylation in vivo, suggest a nonenzymatic mechanism of acetylation. Our data indicate that most mitochondrial acetylation occurs as a low-level nonenzymatic protein lesion and that SIRT3 functions as a protein repair factor that removes acetylation lesions from lysine residues.

  11. Insulin Signaling Regulates Fatty Acid Catabolism at the Level of CoA Activation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojun; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Ruskeepää, Anna-Liisa; Aye, Cho Cho; Carson, Brian P.; Mora, Silvia; Orešič, Matej; Teleman, Aurelio A.

    2012-01-01

    The insulin/IGF signaling pathway is a highly conserved regulator of metabolism in flies and mammals, regulating multiple physiological functions including lipid metabolism. Although insulin signaling is known to regulate the activity of a number of enzymes in metabolic pathways, a comprehensive understanding of how the insulin signaling pathway regulates metabolic pathways is still lacking. Accepted knowledge suggests the key regulated step in triglyceride (TAG) catabolism is the release of fatty acids from TAG via the action of lipases. We show here that an additional, important regulated step is the activation of fatty acids for beta-oxidation via Acyl Co-A synthetases (ACS). We identify pudgy as an ACS that is transcriptionally regulated by direct FOXO action in Drosophila. Increasing or reducing pudgy expression in vivo causes a decrease or increase in organismal TAG levels respectively, indicating that pudgy expression levels are important for proper lipid homeostasis. We show that multiple ACSs are also transcriptionally regulated by insulin signaling in mammalian cells. In sum, we identify fatty acid activation onto CoA as an important, regulated step in triglyceride catabolism, and we identify a mechanistic link through which insulin regulates lipid homeostasis. PMID:22275878

  12. Determination of methylmalonyl coenzyme A by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for measuring propionyl coenzyme A carboxylase activity in patients with propionic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Kana; Nakajima, Yoko; Tajima, Go; Watanabe, Yoriko; Hotta, Yuji; Kataoka, Tomoya; Kawade, Yoshihiro; Sugiyama, Naruji; Ito, Tetsuya; Kimura, Kazunori; Maeda, Yasuhiro

    2017-03-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is an inherited metabolic disease caused by low activity of propionyl coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase (PCC), which metabolizes propionyl-CoA into methylmalonyl-CoA. Although many patients with PA have been identified by tandem mass spectrometry since the test was first included in neonatal mass screening in the 1990s, the disease severity varies. Thus, determining the specific level of PCC activity is considered to be helpful to grasp the severity of PA. We developed a new PCC assay method by the determination of methylmalonyl-CoA, which is formed by an enzyme reaction using peripheral lymphocytes, based on ultra high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). With methylmalonyl-CoA concentrations of 0.05, 0.5, and 5μmol/L, the intra-assay coefficients of variation (CVs) were 8.2%, 8.7%, and 5.1%, respectively, and the inter-assay CVs were 13.6%, 10.5%, and 5.9%, respectively. The PCC activities of 20 healthy individuals and 6 PA patients were investigated with this assay. Methylmalonyl-CoA was not detected in one PA patient with a severe form of the disease, but the remaining PA patients with mild disease showed residual activities (3.3-7.8%). These results demonstrate that determination of PCC activity with this assay would be useful to distinguish between mild and severe cases of PA to help choose an appropriate treatment plan.

  13. NP-40 reduces contamination by endogenous biotinylated carboxylases during purification of biotin tagged nuclear proteins.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Dimitris N; Demmers, Jeroen; Strouboulis, John

    2013-05-01

    We describe here a simple procedure for greatly reducing contamination of nuclear extracts by naturally biotinylated cytoplasmic carboxylases, which represent a major source of non-specific background when employing BirA-mediated biotinylation tagging for the purification and characterization of nuclear protein complexes by mass spectrometry. We show that the use of 0.5% of the non-ionic detergent Nonidet-40 (NP-40) during cell lysis and nuclei isolation is sufficient to practically eliminate contamination of nuclear extracts by carboxylases and to greatly reduce background signals in downstream mass spectrometric analyses.

  14. A Method to determine lysine acetylation stoichiometries

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Wu, Si; Sydor, Michael A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Hixson, Kim K.; Kim, Jong Seo; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles

    2014-07-21

    A major bottleneck to fully understanding the functional aspects of lysine acetylation is the lack of stoichiometry information. Here we describe a mass spectrometry method using a combination of isotope labeling and detection of a diagnostic fragment ion to determine the stoichiometry of lysine acetylation on proteins globally. Using this technique, we determined the modification occupancy on hundreds of acetylated peptides from cell lysates and cross-validated the measurements via immunoblotting.

  15. Acetylation of prostaglandin synthase by aspirin.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, G J; Stanford, N; Majerus, P W

    1975-01-01

    When microsomes of sheep or bovine seminal vesicles are incubated with [acetyl-3H]aspirin (acetyl salicylic acid), 200 Ci/mol, we observe acetylation of a single protein, as measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The protein has a molecular weight of 85,000 and corresponds to a similar acetylated protein found in the particulate fraction of aspirin-treated human platelets. The aspirin-mediated acetylation reaction proceeds with the same time course and at the same concentration as does the inhibition of prostaglandin synthase (cyclo-oxygenase) (EC 1.14.99.1; 8,11,14-eicosatrienoate, hydrogen-donor:oxygen oxidoreductase) by the drug. At 100 muM aspirin, 50% inhibition of prostaglandin synthase and 50% of maximal acetylation are observed after 15 min at 37 degrees. Furthermore, the substrate for cyclo-oxygenase, arachidonic acid, inhibits protein acetylation by aspirin at concentrations (50% inhibition at 10-30 muM) which correlate with the Michaelis constant of arachidonic acid as a substrate for cyclooxygenase. Arachidonic acid analogues and indomethacin inhibit the acetylation reaction in proportion to their effectiveness as cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors. The results suggest that aspirin acts as an active-site acetylating agent for the enzyme cyclo-oxygenase. This action of aspirin may account for its anti-inflammatory and anti-platelet action. PMID:810797

  16. Acetylation of woody lignocellulose: significance and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Prashant Mohan-Anupama; Koutaniemi, Sanna; Tenkanen, Maija; Mellerowicz, Ewa J.

    2013-01-01

    Non-cellulosic cell wall polysaccharides constitute approximately one quarter of usable biomass for human exploitation. In contrast to cellulose, these components are usually substituted by O-acetyl groups, which affect their properties and interactions with other polymers, thus affecting their solubility and extractability. However, details of these interactions are still largely obscure. Moreover, polysaccharide hydrolysis to constituent monosaccharides is hampered by the presence of O-acetyl groups, necessitating either enzymatic (esterase) or chemical de-acetylation, increasing the costs and chemical consumption. Reduction of polysaccharide acetyl content in planta is a way to modify lignocellulose toward improved saccharification. In this review we: (1) summarize literature on lignocellulose acetylation in different tree species, (2) present data and current hypotheses concerning the role of O-acetylation in determining woody lignocellulose properties, (3) describe plant proteins involved in lignocellulose O-acetylation, (4) give examples of microbial enzymes capable to de-acetylate lignocellulose, and (5) discuss prospects for exploiting these enzymes in planta to modify xylan acetylation. PMID:23734153

  17. ACSS2-mediated acetyl-CoA synthesis from acetate is necessary for human cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Vysochan, Anna; Sengupta, Arjun; Weljie, Aalim M; Alwine, James C; Yu, Yongjun

    2017-02-21

    Recent studies have shown that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can induce a robust increase in lipid synthesis which is critical for the success of infection. In mammalian cells the central precursor for lipid biosynthesis, cytosolic acetyl CoA (Ac-CoA), is produced by ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY) from mitochondria-derived citrate or by acetyl-CoA synthetase short-chain family member 2 (ACSS2) from acetate. It has been reported that ACLY is the primary enzyme involved in making cytosolic Ac-CoA in cells with abundant nutrients. However, using CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we have shown that ACLY is not essential for HCMV growth and virally induced lipogenesis. Instead, we found that in HCMV-infected cells glucose carbon can be used for lipid synthesis by both ACLY and ACSS2 reactions. Further, the ACSS2 reaction can compensate for the loss of ACLY. However, in ACSS2-KO human fibroblasts both HCMV-induced lipogenesis from glucose and viral growth were sharply reduced. This reduction suggests that glucose-derived acetate is being used to synthesize cytosolic Ac-CoA by ACSS2. Previous studies have not established a mechanism for the production of acetate directly from glucose metabolism. Here we show that HCMV-infected cells produce more glucose-derived pyruvate, which can be converted to acetate through a nonenzymatic mechanism.

  18. A key role of PGC-1α transcriptional coactivator in production of VEGF by a novel angiogenic agent COA-Cl in cultured human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Junsuke; Okamoto, Ryuji; Yamashita, Tetsuo; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Karita, Sakiko; Nakai, Kozo; Kubota, Yasuo; Takata, Maki; Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Tokuda, Masaaki; Sakakibara, Norikazu; Tsukamoto, Ikuko; Konishi, Ryoji; Hirano, Katsuya

    2016-03-01

    We previously demonstrated a potent angiogenic effect of a newly developed adenosine-like agent namedCOA-Cl.COA-Cl exerted tube forming activity in human umbilical vein endothelial cells in the presence of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF). We therefore explored whether and howCOA-Cl modulates gene expression and protein secretion ofVEGF, a master regulator of angiogenesis, inNHDFRT-PCRandELISArevealed thatCOA-Cl upregulatedVEGF mRNAexpression and protein secretion inNHDFHIF1α(hypoxia-inducible factor 1α), a transcription factor, andPGC-1α(peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γcoactivator-1α), a transcriptional coactivator, are known to positively regulate theVEGFgene. Immunoblot andRT-PCRanalyses revealed thatCOA-Cl markedly upregulated the expression ofPGC-1αprotein andmRNACOA-Cl had no effect on the expression ofHIF1αprotein andmRNAin both hypoxia and normoxia. SilencingPGC-1αgene, but notHIF1αgene, by small interferingRNAattenuated the ability ofCOA-Cl to promoteVEGFsecretion. When an N-terminal fragment ofPGC-1αwas cotransfected with its partner transcription factorERRα(estrogen-related receptor-α) inCOS-7 cells,COA-Cl upregulated the expression of the endogenousVEGF mRNA However,COA-Cl had no effect on the expression ofVEGF, whenHIF1αwas transfected.COA-Cl inducesVEGFgene expression and protein secretion in fibroblasts. The transcriptional coactivatorPGC-1α, in concert withERRα, plays a key role in theCOA-Cl-inducedVEGFproduction.COA-Cl-induced activation ofPGC-1α-ERRα-VEGFpathway has a potential as a novel means for therapeutic angiogenesis.

  19. Characterization and Prediction of Lysine (K)-Acetyl-Transferase Specific Acetylation Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tingting; Du, Yipeng; Wang, Likun; Huang, Lei; Li, Wenlin; Lu, Ming; Zhang, Xuegong; Zhu, Wei-Guo

    2012-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a well-studied post-translational modification on both histone and nonhistone proteins. More than 2000 acetylated proteins and 4000 lysine acetylation sites have been identified by large scale mass spectrometry or traditional experimental methods. Although over 20 lysine (K)-acetyl-transferases (KATs) have been characterized, which KAT is responsible for a given protein or lysine site acetylation is mostly unknown. In this work, we collected KAT-specific acetylation sites manually and analyzed sequence features surrounding the acetylated lysine of substrates from three main KAT families (CBP/p300, GCN5/PCAF, and the MYST family). We found that each of the three KAT families acetylates lysines with different sequence features. Based on these differences, we developed a computer program, Acetylation Set Enrichment Based method to predict which KAT-families are responsible for acetylation of a given protein or lysine site. Finally, we evaluated the efficiency of our method, and experimentally detected four proteins that were predicted to be acetylated by two KAT families when one representative member of the KAT family is over expressed. We conclude that our approach, combined with more traditional experimental methods, may be useful for identifying KAT families responsible for acetylated substrates proteome-wide. PMID:21964354

  20. Isolation of Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase from Leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is a multi-functional enzyme that catalyzes the fixation of CO2 and O2 in photosynthesis and photorespiration, respectively. As the rate-limiting step in photosynthesis, improving the catalytic properties of Rubisco has long been viewed as a...

  1. Age-associated mitochondrial oxidative decay: Improvement of carnitine acetyltransferase substrate-binding affinity and activity in brain by feeding old rats acetyl-l- carnitine and/or R-α-lipoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiankang; Killilea, David W.; Ames, Bruce N.

    2002-01-01

    We test whether the dysfunction with age of carnitine acetyltransferase (CAT), a key mitochondrial enzyme for fuel utilization, is due to decreased binding affinity for substrate and whether this substrate, fed to old rats, restores CAT activity. The kinetics of CAT were analyzed by using the brains of young and old rats and of old rats supplemented for 7 weeks with the CAT substrate acetyl-l-carnitine (ALCAR) and/or the mitochondrial antioxidant precursor R-α-lipoic acid (LA). Old rats, compared with young rats, showed a decrease in CAT activity and in CAT-binding affinity for both substrates, ALCAR and CoA. Feeding ALCAR or ALCAR plus LA to old rats significantly restored CAT-binding affinity for ALCAR and CoA, and CAT activity. To explore the underlying mechanism, lipid peroxidation and total iron and copper levels were assayed; all increased in old rats. Feeding old rats LA or LA plus ALCAR inhibited lipid peroxidation but did not decrease iron and copper levels. Ex vivo oxidation of young-rat brain with Fe(II) caused loss of CAT activity and binding affinity. In vitro oxidation of purified CAT with Fe(II) inactivated the enzyme but did not alter binding affinity. However, in vitro treatment of CAT with the lipid peroxidation products malondialdehyde or 4-hydroxy-nonenal caused a decrease in CAT-binding affinity and activity, thus mimicking age-related change. Preincubation of CAT with ALCAR or CoA prevented malondialdehyde-induced dysfunction. Thus, feeding old rats high levels of key mitochondrial metabolites can ameliorate oxidative damage, enzyme activity, substrate-binding affinity, and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:11854488

  2. A Method to Determine Lysine Acetylation Stoichiometries

    DOE PAGES

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Wu, Si; Sydor, Michael A.; ...

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a common protein posttranslational modification that regulates a variety of biological processes. A major bottleneck to fully understanding the functional aspects of lysine acetylation is the difficulty in measuring the proportion of lysine residues that are acetylated. Here we describe a mass spectrometry method using a combination of isotope labeling and detection of a diagnostic fragment ion to determine the stoichiometry of protein lysine acetylation. Using this technique, we determined the modification occupancy for ~750 acetylated peptides from mammalian cell lysates. Furthermore, the acetylation on N-terminal tail of histone H4 was cross-validated by treating cells with sodiummore » butyrate, a potent deacetylase inhibitor, and comparing changes in stoichiometry levels measured by our method with immunoblotting measurements. Of note we observe that acetylation stoichiometry is high in nuclear proteins, but very low in mitochondrial and cytosolic proteins. In summary, our method opens new opportunities to study in detail the relationship of lysine acetylation levels of proteins with their biological functions.« less

  3. Lysine acetylation and cancer: A proteomics perspective.

    PubMed

    Gil, Jeovanis; Ramírez-Torres, Alberto; Encarnación-Guevara, Sergio

    2017-01-06

    Lysine acetylation is a reversible modification controlled by two groups of enzymes: lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) and lysine deacetylases (KDACs). Acetylated lysine residues are recognized by bromodomains, a family of evolutionarily conserved domains. The use of high-resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomics, in combination with the enrichment of acetylated peptides through immunoprecipitation with anti-acetyl-lysine antibodies, has expanded the number of acetylated proteins from histones and a few nuclear proteins to more than 2000 human proteins. Because acetylation targets almost all cellular processes, this modification has been associated with cancer. Several KATs, KDACs and bromodomain-containing proteins have been linked to cancer development. Many small molecules targeting some of these proteins have been or are being tested as potential cancer therapies. The stoichiometry of lysine acetylation has not been explored in cancer, representing a promising field in which to increase our knowledge of how this modification is affected in cancer. In this review, we will focus on the strategies that can be used to go deeper in the characterization of the protein lysine acetylation emphasizing in cancer research.

  4. Succinyl CoA: 3-oxoacid CoA transferase (SCOT): human cDNA cloning, human chromosomal mapping to 5p13, and mutation detection in a SCOT-deficient patient.

    PubMed Central

    Kassovska-Bratinova, S.; Fukao, T.; Song, X. Q.; Duncan, A. M.; Chen, H. S.; Robert, M. F.; Pérez-Cerdá, C.; Ugarte, M.; Chartrand, C.; Vobecky, S.; Kondo, N.; Mitchell, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    Succinyl CoA: 3-oxoacid CoA transferase (SCOT; E.C.2.8.3.5) mediates the rate-determining step of ketolysis in extrahepatic tissues, the esterification of acetoacetate to CoA for use in energy production. Hereditary SCOT deficiency in humans causes episodes of severe ketoacidosis. We obtained human-heart SCOT cDNA clones spanning the entire 1,560-nt coding sequence. Sequence alignment of the human SCOT peptides with other known CoA transferases revealed several conserved regions of potential functional importance. A single approximately 3.2-kb SCOT mRNA is present in human tissues (heart > leukocytes >> fibroblasts), but no signal is detectable in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. We mapped the human SCOT locus (OXCT) to the cytogenetic band 5p13 by in situ hybridization. From fibroblasts of a patient with hereditary SCOT deficiency, we amplified and cloned cDNA fragments containing the entire SCOT coding sequence. We found a homozygous C-to-G transversion at nt 848, which changes the Ser 283 codon to a stop codon. This mutation (S283X) is incompatible with normal enzyme function and represents the first documentation of a pathogenic mutation in SCOT deficiency. Images Figure 2 Figure 6 PMID:8751852

  5. Role of pyruvate carboxylase in facilitation of synthesis of glutamate and glutamine in cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gamberino, W C; Berkich, D A; Lynch, C J; Xu, B; LaNoue, K F

    1997-12-01

    CO2 fixation was measured in cultured astrocytes isolated from neonatal rat brain to test the hypothesis that the activity of pyruvate carboxylase influences the rate of de novo glutamate and glutamine synthesis in astrocytes. Astrocytes were incubated with 14CO2 and the incorporation of 14C into medium or cell extract products was determined. After chromatographic separation of 14C-labelled products, the fractions of 14C cycled back to pyruvate, incorporated into citric acid cycle intermediates, and converted to the amino acids glutamate and glutamine were determined as a function of increasing pyruvate carboxylase flux. The consequences of increasing pyruvate, bicarbonate, and ammonia were investigated. Increasing extracellular pyruvate from 0 to 5 mM increased pyruvate carboxylase flux as observed by increases in the 14C incorporated into pyruvate and citric acid cycle intermediates, but incorporation into glutamate and glutamine, although relatively high at low pyruvate levels, did not increase as pyruvate carboxylase flux increased. Increasing added bicarbonate from 15 to 25 mM almost doubled CO2 fixation. When 25 mM bicarbonate plus 0.5 mM pyruvate increased pyruvate carboxylase flux to approximately the same extent as 15 mM bicarbonate plus 5 mM pyruvate, the rate of appearance of [14C] glutamate and glutamine was higher with the lower level of pyruvate. The conclusion was drawn that, in addition to stimulating pyruvate carboxylase, added pyruvate (but not added bicarbonate) increases alanine aminotransferase flux in the direction of glutamate utilization, thereby decreasing glutamate as pyruvate + glutamate --> alpha-ketoglutarate + alanine. In contrast to previous in vivo studies, the addition of ammonia (0.1 and 5 mM) had no effect on net 14CO2 fixation, but did alter the distribution of 14C-labelled products by decreasing glutamate and increasing glutamine. Rather unexpectedly, ammonia did not increase the sum of glutamate plus glutamine (mass amounts or

  6. Metabolic control of methylation and acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaoyang; Wellen, Kathryn E.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    Methylation and acetylation of DNA and histone proteins are the chemical basis for epigenetics. From bacteria to humans, methylation and acetylation are sensitive to cellular metabolic status. Modification rates depend on the availability of one-carbon and two-carbon substrates (S-adenosylmethionine, acetyl-CoA, and in bacteria also acetyl-phosphate). In addition, they are sensitive to demodification enzyme cofactors (α-ketoglutarate, NAD+) and structural analog metabolites that function as epigenetic enzyme inhibitors (e.g., S-adenosylhomocysteine, 2-hydroxyglutarate). Methylation and acetylation likely initially evolved to tailor protein activities in microbes to their metabolic milieu. While the extracellular environment of mammals is more tightly controlled, the combined impact of nutrient abundance and metabolic enzyme expression impacts epigenetics in mammals sufficiently to drive important biological outcomes such as stem cell fate and cancer. PMID:26629854

  7. SPOTing Acetyl-Lysine Dependent Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Picaud, Sarah; Filippakopoulos, Panagis

    2015-01-01

    Post translational modifications have been recognized as chemical signals that create docking sites for evolutionary conserved effector modules, allowing for signal integration within large networks of interactions. Lysine acetylation in particular has attracted attention as a regulatory modification, affecting chromatin structure and linking to transcriptional activation. Advances in peptide array technologies have facilitated the study of acetyl-lysine-containing linear motifs interacting with the evolutionary conserved bromodomain module, which specifically recognizes and binds to acetylated sequences in histones and other proteins. Here we summarize recent work employing SPOT peptide technology to identify acetyl-lysine dependent interactions and document the protocols adapted in our lab, as well as our efforts to characterize such bromodomain-histone interactions. Our results highlight the versatility of SPOT methods and establish an affordable tool for rapid access to potential protein/modified-peptide interactions involving lysine acetylation. PMID:27600229

  8. Metabolic control of methylation and acetylation.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaoyang; Wellen, Kathryn E; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2016-02-01

    Methylation and acetylation of DNA and histone proteins are the chemical basis for epigenetics. From bacteria to humans, methylation and acetylation are sensitive to cellular metabolic status. Modification rates depend on the availability of one-carbon and two-carbon substrates (S-adenosylmethionine, acetyl-CoA, and in bacteria also acetyl-phosphate). In addition, they are sensitive to demodification enzyme cofactors (α-ketoglutarate, NAD(+)) and structural analog metabolites that function as epigenetic enzyme inhibitors (e.g., S-adenosylhomocysteine, 2-hydroxyglutarate). Methylation and acetylation likely initially evolved to tailor protein activities in microbes to their metabolic milieu. While the extracellular environment of mammals is more tightly controlled, the combined impact of nutrient abundance and metabolic enzyme expression impacts epigenetics in mammals sufficiently to drive important biological outcomes such as stem cell fate and cancer.

  9. Changes in hepatic lipogenic and oxidative enzymes and glucose homeostasis induced by an acetyl-L-carnitine and nicotinamide treatment in dyslipidaemic insulin-resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Maria R; Camberos, Maria del C; Selenscig, Dante; Martucci, Lucía C; Chicco, Adriana; Lombardo, Yolanda B; Cresto, Juan C

    2013-03-01

    Normal rats fed a sucrose-rich diet (SRD) develop dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance. The present study examined whether administration of the mitochondrial nutrients nicotinamide and acetyl-L-carnitine reversed or improved these metabolic abnormalities. Male Wistar rats were fed an SRD for 90 days. Half the rats then received daily injections of nicotinamide (25 mg/kg, i.p.) and acetyl-L-carnitine (50 mg/kg, i.p.) for a further 90 days. The remaining rats in the SRD-fed group and those in a normal chow-fed control group were injected with an equal volume of saline solution for the same period. The following parameters were determined in all groups: (i) liver activity of fatty acid synthase (FAS), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and carnitine-palmitoyl transferase-1 (CPT-1); (ii) hepatic and skeletal muscle triacylglycerol content, plasma glucose, insulin, free fatty acid (FFA) and triacylglycerol levels and pancreatic insulin content; and (iii) glucose tolerance. Administration of nicotinamide and acetyl-L-carnitine to the SRD-fed rats reduced dyslipidaemia, liver steatosis, muscle triacylglycerol content and hepatic FAS and ACC activities and increased CPT-1 activity. In addition nicotinamide and acetyl-L-carnitine improved the glucose disappearance rate (K(g)), normalized plasma glucose levels and moderately increased insulinaemia without altering pancreatic insulin content. Finally, nicotinamide and acetyl-l-carnitine administration reduced bodyweight gain and visceral adiposity. The results of the present study suggest that altering key hepatic lipogenic and fatty acid oxidative enzymatic activity could improve dyslipidaemia, liver steatosis and visceral adiposity. Indeed, administration of nicotinamide and acetyl-l-carnitine improved glucose intolerance and normalized plasma glucose levels.

  10. Discovery of Tumor-Specific Irreversible Inhibitors of Stearoyl CoA Desaturase

    PubMed Central

    Theodoropoulos, Panayotis C.; Gonzales, Stephen S.; Winterton, Sarah E.; Rodriguez-Navas, Carlos; McKnight, John S.; Morlock, Lorraine K.; Hanson, Jordan M.; Cross, Bethany; Owen, Amy E.; Duan, Yingli; Moreno, Jose R.; Lemoff, Andrew; Mirzaei, Hamid; Posner, Bruce A.; Williams, Noelle S.

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of targeted cancer therapies is selective toxicity among cancer cell lines. We evaluated results from a viability screen of over 200,000 small molecules to identify two chemical series, oxalamides and benzothiazoles, that were selectively toxic to the same four of 12 human lung cancer cell lines at low nanomolar concentrations. Sensitive cell lines expressed cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4F11, which metabolized the compounds into irreversible stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD) inhibitors. SCD is recognized as a promising biological target in cancer and metabolic disease. However, SCD is essential to sebocytes, and accordingly SCD inhibitors cause skin toxicity. Mouse sebocytes were unable to activate the benzothiazoles or oxalamides into SCD inhibitors, providing a therapeutic window for inhibiting SCD in vivo. We thus offer a strategy to target SCD in cancer by taking advantage of high CYP expression in a subset of tumors. PMID:26829472

  11. Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase in complex with the feedback inhibitor CoA reveals only one active-site conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Wubben, T.; Mesecar, A.D.

    2014-10-02

    Phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase (PPAT) catalyzes the penultimate step in the coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway, reversibly transferring an adenylyl group from ATP to 4'-phosphopantetheine to form dephosphocoenzyme A (dPCoA). To complement recent biochemical and structural studies on Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPAT (MtPPAT) and to provide further insight into the feedback regulation of MtPPAT by CoA, the X-ray crystal structure of the MtPPAT enzyme in complex with CoA was determined to 2.11 {angstrom} resolution. Unlike previous X-ray crystal structures of PPAT-CoA complexes from other bacteria, which showed two distinct CoA conformations bound to the active site, only one conformation of CoA is observed in the MtPPAT-CoA complex.

  12. Isolation, identification, and synthesis of 2-carboxyarabinitol 1-phosphate, a diurnal regulator of ribulase-bisphosphate carboxylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, J.A.; Lorimer, G.H.; Pierce, J.; Seemann, J.R.; Meek, J.; Freas, S.

    1987-02-01

    The diurnal change in activity of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (Rbu-1,5-P/sub 2/) carboxylase (3-phospho-D-glycerate carboxy-lyase (dimerizing); EC 4.1.1.39) of leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris is regulated (in part) by mechanisms that control the level of an endogenous inhibitor that binds tightly to the activated (carbamoylated) form of Rbu-1,5-P/sub 2/ carboxylase. This inhibitor was extracted from leaves and copurified with the Rbu-1,5-P/sub 2/ carboxylase of the leaves. Further purification by ion-exchange chromatography, adsorption to purified Rbu-1,5-P/sub 2/ carboxylase, barium precipitation, and HPLC separation yielded a phosphorylated compound that was a strong inhibitor of Rbu-1,5-P/sub 2/ carboxylase. The compound was analyzed by GC/MS, /sup 13/C NMR, and /sup 1/H NMR and shown to be 2-carboxyarabinitol 1-phosphate ((2-C-phosphohydroxymethyl)-D-ribonic acid). The structure of the isolated compound differs from the Rbu-1,5-P/sub 2/ carboxylase transition-state analogue 2-carboxyarabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate only by the lack of the C-5 phosphate group. This difference results in a higher binding constant for the monophosphate compared with the bisphosphate. The less tightly bound compound acts in a light-dependent, reversible regulation of Rbu-1,5-P/sub 2/ carboxylase activity in vivo.

  13. Spectroscopic Classification of ASASSN-16fn/AT2016coa and MASTER J202606.27-200732.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falco, E.; Calkins, M.; Challis, P.; Kirshner, R.; Prieto, J. L.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2016-06-01

    Optical spectra (range 350-760nm) of the supernova candidates ASASSN-16fn/AT2016coa (ATel #9081) and MASTER J202606.27-200732.6 (ATel #9056) were obtained on UT 2016 June 3 with the F. L. Whipple Observatory 1.5-m telescope (+ FAST).

  14. Geranylgeraniol suppresses the viability of human DU145 prostate carcinoma cells and the level of HMG CoA reductase

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Nicolle V.; Yeganehjoo, Hoda; Katuru, Rajasekhar; DeBose-Boyd, Russell A.; Morris, Lindsey L.; Michon, Renee; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Mo, Huanbiao

    2014-01-01

    The rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase, provides essential intermediates for the prenylation of nuclear lamins and Ras and dolichol-mediated glycosylation of growth factor receptors. The diterpene geranylgeraniol downregulates the level of HMG CoA reductase and suppresses the growth of human liver, lung, ovary, pancreas, colon, stomach, and blood tumors. We evaluated the growth-suppressive activity of geranylgeraniol in human prostate carcinoma cells. Geranylgeraniol induced dose-dependent suppression of the viability of human DU145 prostate carcinoma cells (IC50 = 80 ±18 μmol/L, n =5) following 72-h incubations in 96-well plates. Cell cycle was arrested at the G1 phase with a concomitant decrease in cyclin D1 protein. Geranylgeraniol-induced apoptosis was detected by flow cytometric analysis, fluorescence microscopy following acridine orange and ethidium bromide dual staining, and caspase-3 activation. Geranylgeraniol-induced viability suppression was accompanied by concentration-dependent decrease in the level of HMG CoA reductase protein. As a nonsterol molecule that downregulates HMG CoA reductase in the presence of sterols, geranylgeraniol may have potential in the chemoprevention and/or therapy of human prostate cancer. PMID:24006306

  15. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase activity in Morris Hepatoma 7777 mitochondria and its sensitivity to malonyl CoA inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Woldegiorgis, G.; Shrago, E.

    1986-05-01

    Earlier reports in the literature have indicated no detectable Carnitine Palymitoyl Transferase (CPT) activity in homogenates prepared from Morris Hepatoma 7777. In its study CPT activity in isolated mitochondria (mito) was measured by butanol extraction of the (/sup 3/H)palmitoyl carnitine formed as outlined by Bremer et al. Contrary to the earlier work where no appreciable activity of CPT was observed the authors find significant levels of CPT (2.6 nMol/min/mg protein) in isolated mito from Morris Hepatoma 7777 (MH 7777). The level of CPT activity observed in MH 7777 mito was, however, 36% lower compared to the host liver CPT activity (4.1 nMol/min/mg protein). The enzyme in MH 7777 mito showed 83% inhibition in the presence of 10 ..mu..M malonyl CoA, in agreement with the degree of sensitivity observed with the host liver isolated mito. On freeze thawing host mito, total CPT activity increased and the sensitivity of the enzyme to malonyl CoA decreased. Frozen thawed MH 7777 mito showed a similar response to malonyl CoA but no change in the total CPT level was observed. The authors results establish for the first time the presence of a malonyl CoA sensitive CPT in MH 7777 mito, which may have slightly different properties from normal due to the membrane environment of the enzyme.

  16. OUTCROP-BASED HIGH RESOLUTION GAMMA-RAY CHARACTERIZATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA). CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The COA supplies drinking water to a number of municipalities in central Oklahoma. Two major stratigraphic units in the COA, the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formation, contain naturally occurring arsenic that exceeds government mandated drinking-water standards (EPA, 2001). ...

  17. Unraveling Cholesterol Catabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: ChsE4-ChsE5 α2β2 Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Initiates β-Oxidation of 3-Oxo-cholest-4-en-26-oyl CoA

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The metabolism of host cholesterol by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is an important factor for both its virulence and pathogenesis, although how and why cholesterol metabolism is required is not fully understood. Mtb uses a unique set of catabolic enzymes that are homologous to those required for classical β-oxidation of fatty acids but are specific for steroid-derived substrates. Here, we identify and assign the substrate specificities of two of these enzymes, ChsE4-ChsE5 (Rv3504-Rv3505) and ChsE3 (Rv3573c), that carry out cholesterol side chain oxidation in Mtb. Steady-state assays demonstrate that ChsE4-ChsE5 preferentially catalyzes the oxidation of 3-oxo-cholest-4-en-26-oyl CoA in the first cycle of cholesterol side chain β-oxidation that ultimately yields propionyl-CoA, whereas ChsE3 specifically catalyzes the oxidation of 3-oxo-chol-4-en-24-oyl CoA in the second cycle of β-oxidation that generates acetyl-CoA. However, ChsE4-ChsE5 can catalyze the oxidation of 3-oxo-chol-4-en-24-oyl CoA as well as 3-oxo-4-pregnene-20-carboxyl-CoA. The functional redundancy of ChsE4-ChsE5 explains the in vivo phenotype of the igr knockout strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis; the loss of ChsE1-ChsE2 can be compensated for by ChsE4-ChsE5 during the chronic phase of infection. The X-ray crystallographic structure of ChsE4-ChsE5 was determined to a resolution of 2.0 Å and represents the first high-resolution structure of a heterotetrameric acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD). Unlike typical homotetrameric ACADs that bind four flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactors, ChsE4-ChsE5 binds one FAD at each dimer interface, resulting in only two substrate-binding sites rather than the classical four active sites. A comparison of the ChsE4-ChsE5 substrate-binding site to those of known mammalian ACADs reveals an enlarged binding cavity that accommodates steroid substrates and highlights novel prospects for designing inhibitors against the committed β-oxidation step in the first

  18. Acetylation modulates the STAT signaling code.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Martin; Ginter, Torsten; Brand, Peter; Heinzel, Thorsten; Krämer, Oliver H

    2012-12-01

    A fascinating question of modern biology is how a limited number of signaling pathways generate biological diversity and crosstalk phenomena in vivo. Well-defined posttranslational modification patterns dictate the functions and interactions of proteins. The signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) are physiologically important cytokine-induced transcription factors. They are targeted by a multitude of posttranslational modifications that control and modulate signaling responses and gene expression. Beyond phosphorylation of serine and tyrosine residues, lysine acetylation has recently emerged as a critical modification regulating STAT functions. Interestingly, acetylation can determine STAT signaling codes by various molecular mechanisms, including the modulation of other posttranslational modifications. Here, we provide an overview on the acetylation of STATs and how this protein modification shapes cellular cytokine responses. We summarize recent advances in understanding the impact of STAT acetylation on cell growth, apoptosis, innate immunity, inflammation, and tumorigenesis. Furthermore, we discuss how STAT acetylation can be targeted by small molecules and we consider the possibility that additional molecules controlling STAT signaling are regulated by acetylation. Our review also summarizes evolutionary aspects and we show similarities between the acetylation-dependent control of STATs and other important molecules. We propose the concept that, similar to the 'histone code', distinct posttranslational modifications and their crosstalk orchestrate the functions and interactions of STAT proteins.

  19. Acetylation of rice straw for thermoplastic applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangzhi; Huang, Kai; Jiang, Xue; Huang, Dan; Yang, Yiqi

    2013-07-01

    An inexpensive and biodegradable thermoplastic was developed through acetylation of rice straw (RS) with acetic anhydride. Acetylation conditions were optimized. The structure and properties of acetylated RS were characterized by fourier transform infrared (FTIR), solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results showed that acetylation of RS has successfully taken place, and comparing with raw RS, the degree of crystallinity decreased and the decomposition rate was slow. The acetylated RS has got thermoplasticity when weight ratio of RS and acetic anhydride was 1:3, using sulphuric acid (9% to RS) as catalyst in glacial acetic acid 35°C for 12h, and the dosage of solvent was 9 times RS, in which weight percent gain (WPG) of the modified RS powder was 35.5% and its percent acetyl content was 36.1%. The acetylated RS could be formed into transparent thin films with different amount of plasticizer diethyl phthalate (DEP) using tape casting technology.

  20. Nonhistone protein acetylation as cancer therapy targets

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brahma N; Zhang, Guanghua; Hwa, Yi L; Li, Jinping; Dowdy, Sean C; Jiang, Shi-Wen

    2012-01-01

    Acetylation and deacetylation are counteracting, post-translational modifications that affect a large number of histone and nonhistone proteins. The significance of histone acetylation in the modification of chromatin structure and dynamics, and thereby gene transcription regulation, has been well recognized. A steadily growing number of nonhistone proteins have been identified as acetylation targets and reversible lysine acetylation in these proteins plays an important role(s) in the regulation of mRNA stability, protein localization and degradation, and protein–protein and protein–DNA interactions. The recruitment of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) to the transcriptional machinery is a key element in the dynamic regulation of genes controlling cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Many nonhistone proteins targeted by acetylation are the products of oncogenes or tumor-suppressor genes and are directly involved in tumorigenesis, tumor progression and metastasis. Aberrant activity of HDACs has been documented in several types of cancers and HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) have been employed for therapeutic purposes. Here we review the published literature in this field and provide updated information on the regulation and function of nonhistone protein acetylation. While concentrating on the molecular mechanism and pathways involved in the addition and removal of the acetyl moiety, therapeutic modalities of HDACi are also discussed. PMID:20553216

  1. Acetyl-phosphate is a critical determinant of lysine acetylation in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Brian T; Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Wagner, Sebastian A; Schölz, Christian; Gummesson, Bertil; Beli, Petra; Nyström, Thomas; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2013-07-25

    Lysine acetylation is a frequently occurring posttranslational modification in bacteria; however, little is known about its origin and regulation. Using the model bacterium Escherichia coli (E. coli), we found that most acetylation occurred at a low level and accumulated in growth-arrested cells in a manner that depended on the formation of acetyl-phosphate (AcP) through glycolysis. Mutant cells unable to produce AcP had significantly reduced acetylation levels, while mutant cells unable to convert AcP to acetate had significantly elevated acetylation levels. We showed that AcP can chemically acetylate lysine residues in vitro and that AcP levels are correlated with acetylation levels in vivo, suggesting that AcP may acetylate proteins nonenzymatically in cells. These results uncover a critical role for AcP in bacterial acetylation and indicate that most acetylation in E. coli occurs at a low level and is dynamically affected by metabolism and cell proliferation in a global, uniform manner.

  2. Application of acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase (AtoAD) in Escherichia coli to increase 3-hydroxyvalerate fraction in poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate).

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong-Min; Kim, Hyun-Joong; Bhatia, Shashi Kant; Sung, Changmin; Seo, Hyung-Min; Kim, Jung-Ho; Park, Hyung-Yeon; Lee, Dahye; Brigham, Christopher J; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2017-02-16

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) is a family of biodegradable polymers, and incorporation of different monomers can alter its physical properties. To produce the copolymer poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (P(3HB-co-3HV)) containing a high level of 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV) by altering acetyl-CoA pool levels, we overexpressed an acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase (atoAD) in an engineered E. coli strain, YH090, carrying PHA synthetic genes bktB, phaB, and phaC. It was found that, with introduction of atoAD and with propionate as a co-substrate, 3HV fraction in PHA was increased up to 7.3-fold higher than a strain without atoAD expressed in trans (67.9 mol%). By the analysis of CoA pool concentrations in vivo and in vitro using HPLC and LC-MS, overexpression of AtoAD was shown to decrease the amount of acetyl-CoA and increase the propionyl-CoA/acetyl-CoA ratio, ultimately resulting in an increased 3HV fraction in PHA. Finally, synthesis of P(3HB-co-3HV) containing 57.9 mol% of 3HV was achieved by fed-batch fermentation of YJ101 with propionate.

  3. Model simulations of cooking organic aerosol (COA) over the UK using estimates of emissions based on measurements at two sites in London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ots, Riinu; Vieno, Massimo; Allan, James D.; Reis, Stefan; Nemitz, Eiko; Young, Dominique E.; Coe, Hugh; Di Marco, Chiara; Detournay, Anais; Mackenzie, Ian A.; Green, David C.; Heal, Mathew R.

    2016-11-01

    Cooking organic aerosol (COA) is currently not included in European emission inventories. However, recent positive matrix factorization (PMF) analyses of aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements have suggested important contributions of COA in several European cities. In this study, emissions of COA were estimated for the UK, based on hourly AMS measurements of COA made at two sites in London (a kerbside site in central London and an urban background site in a residential area close to central London) for the full calendar year of 2012 during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) campaign. Iteration of COA emissions estimates and subsequent evaluation and sensitivity experiments were conducted with the EMEP4UK atmospheric chemistry transport modelling system with a horizontal resolution of 5 km × 5 km. The spatial distribution of these emissions was based on workday population density derived from the 2011 census data. The estimated UK annual COA emission was 7.4 Gg per year, which is an almost 10 % addition to the officially reported UK national total anthropogenic emissions of PM2.5 (82 Gg in 2012), corresponding to 320 mg person-1 day-1 on average. Weekday and weekend diurnal variation in COA emissions were also based on the AMS measurements. Modelled concentrations of COA were then independently evaluated against AMS-derived COA measurements from another city and time period (Manchester, January-February 2007), as well as with COA estimated by a chemical mass balance model of measurements for a 2-week period at the Harwell rural site (˜ 80 km west of central London). The modelled annual average contribution of COA to ambient particulate matter (PM) in central London was between 1 and 2 µg m-3 (˜ 20 % of total measured OA1) and between 0.5 and 0.7 µg m-3 in other major cities in England (Manchester, Birmingham, Leeds). It was also shown that cities smaller than London can have a central hotspot of population density of smaller

  4. Identification of lysine-acetylated mitochondrial proteins and their acetylation sites.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Markus; König, Ann-Christine; Finkemeier, Iris

    2015-01-01

    The (ε)N-acetylation of lysine side chains is a highly conserved posttranslational modification of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins. Lysine acetylation not only occurs on histones in the nucleus but also on many mitochondrial proteins in plants and animals. As the transfer of the acetyl group to lysine eliminates its positive charge, lysine acetylation can affect the biological function of proteins. This chapter describes two methods for the identification of lysine-acetylated proteins in plant mitochondria using an anti-acetyllysine antibody. We describe the Western blot analysis of a two-dimensional blue native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with an anti-acetyllysine antibody as well as the immuno-enrichment of lysine-acetylated peptides followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry data acquisition and analysis.

  5. Structural and biochemical characterisation of Archaeoglobus fulgidus esterase reveals a bound CoA molecule in the vicinity of the active site

    PubMed Central

    Sayer, Christopher; Finnigan, William; Isupov, Michail N.; Levisson, Mark; Kengen, Servé W. M.; van der Oost, John; Harmer, Nicholas J.; Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    A new carboxyl esterase, AF-Est2, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus has been cloned, over-expressed in Escherichia coli and biochemically and structurally characterized. The enzyme has high activity towards short- to medium-chain p-nitrophenyl carboxylic esters with optimal activity towards the valerate ester. The AF-Est2 has good solvent and pH stability and is very thermostable, showing no loss of activity after incubation for 30 min at 80 °C. The 1.4 Å resolution crystal structure of AF-Est2 reveals Coenzyme A (CoA) bound in the vicinity of the active site. Despite the presence of CoA bound to the AF-Est2 this enzyme has no CoA thioesterase activity. The pantetheine group of CoA partially obstructs the active site alcohol pocket suggesting that this ligand has a role in regulation of the enzyme activity. A comparison with closely related α/β hydrolase fold enzyme structures shows that the AF-Est2 has unique structural features that allow CoA binding. A comparison of the structure of AF-Est2 with the human carboxyl esterase 1, which has CoA thioesterase activity, reveals that CoA is bound to different parts of the core domain in these two enzymes and approaches the active site from opposite directions. PMID:27160974

  6. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus.

    PubMed

    Gubernator, Beata; Bartoszewski, Rafal; Kroliczewski, Jaroslaw; Wildner, Guenter; Szczepaniak, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco) can be divided into two branches: the "red-like type" of marine algae and the "green-like type" of cyanobacteria, green algae, and higher plants. We found that the "green-like type" rubisco from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus has an almost 2-fold higher specificity factor compared with rubiscos of mesophilic cyanobacteria, reaching the values of higher plants, and simultaneously revealing an improvement in enzyme thermostability. The difference in the activation energies at the transition stages between the oxygenase and carboxylase reactions for Thermosynechococcus elongatus rubisco is very close to that of Galdieria partita and significantly higher than that of spinach. This is the first characterization of a "green-like type" rubisco from thermophilic organism.

  7. Nonstructural 5A Protein of Hepatitis C Virus Interacts with Pyruvate Carboxylase and Modulates Viral Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Wook; Hwang, Soon B.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is highly dependent on cellular factors for its own propagation. By employing tandem affinity purification method, we identified pyruvate carboxylase (PC) as a cellular partner for NS5A protein. NS5A interacted with PC through the N-terminal region of NS5A and the biotin carboxylase domain of PC. PC expression was decreased in cells expressing NS5A and HCV-infected cells. Promoter activity of PC was also decreased by NS5A protein. However, FAS expression was increased in cells expressing NS5A and cell culture grown HCV (HCVcc)-infected cells. Silencing of PC promoted fatty acid synthase (FAS) expression level. These data suggest HCV may modulate PC via NS5A protein for its own propagation. PMID:23861867

  8. Crystal Structures of Human and Staphylococcus aureus Pyruvate Carboxylase and Molecular Insights into the Carboxyltransfer Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang,S.; Tong, L.

    2008-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) catalyzes the biotin-dependent production of oxaloacetate and has important roles in gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, insulin secretion and other cellular processes. PC contains the biotin carboxylase (BC), carboxyltransferase (CT) and biotin-carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) domains. We report here the crystal structures at 2.8-Angstroms resolution of full-length PC from Staphylococcus aureus and the C-terminal region (missing only the BC domain) of human PC. A conserved tetrameric association is observed for both enzymes, and our structural and mutagenesis studies reveal a previously uncharacterized domain, the PC tetramerization (PT) domain, which is important for oligomerization. A BCCP domain is located in the active site of the CT domain, providing the first molecular insights into how biotin participates in the carboxyltransfer reaction. There are dramatic differences in domain positions in the monomer and the organization of the tetramer between these enzymes and the PC from Rhizobium etli.

  9. Acetylation Reader Proteins: Linking Acetylation Signaling to Genome Maintenance and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gong, Fade; Chiu, Li-Ya; Miller, Kyle M

    2016-09-01

    Chromatin-based DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are fundamental for preventing genome and epigenome instability, which are prevalent in cancer. Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the addition and removal of acetyl groups on lysine residues, a post-translational modification important for the DDR. Acetylation can alter chromatin structure as well as function by providing binding signals for reader proteins containing acetyl-lysine recognition domains, including the bromodomain (BRD). Acetylation dynamics occur upon DNA damage in part to regulate chromatin and BRD protein interactions that mediate key DDR activities. In cancer, DDR and acetylation pathways are often mutated or abnormally expressed. DNA damaging agents and drugs targeting epigenetic regulators, including HATs, HDACs, and BRD proteins, are used or are being developed to treat cancer. Here, we discuss how histone acetylation pathways, with a focus on acetylation reader proteins, promote genome stability and the DDR. We analyze how acetylation signaling impacts the DDR in the context of cancer and its treatments. Understanding the relationship between epigenetic regulators, the DDR, and chromatin is integral for obtaining a mechanistic understanding of genome and epigenome maintenance pathways, information that can be leveraged for targeting acetylation signaling, and/or the DDR to treat diseases, including cancer.

  10. Acetylation Reader Proteins: Linking Acetylation Signaling to Genome Maintenance and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kyle M.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin-based DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are fundamental for preventing genome and epigenome instability, which are prevalent in cancer. Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the addition and removal of acetyl groups on lysine residues, a post-translational modification important for the DDR. Acetylation can alter chromatin structure as well as function by providing binding signals for reader proteins containing acetyl-lysine recognition domains, including the bromodomain (BRD). Acetylation dynamics occur upon DNA damage in part to regulate chromatin and BRD protein interactions that mediate key DDR activities. In cancer, DDR and acetylation pathways are often mutated or abnormally expressed. DNA damaging agents and drugs targeting epigenetic regulators, including HATs, HDACs, and BRD proteins, are used or are being developed to treat cancer. Here, we discuss how histone acetylation pathways, with a focus on acetylation reader proteins, promote genome stability and the DDR. We analyze how acetylation signaling impacts the DDR in the context of cancer and its treatments. Understanding the relationship between epigenetic regulators, the DDR, and chromatin is integral for obtaining a mechanistic understanding of genome and epigenome maintenance pathways, information that can be leveraged for targeting acetylation signaling, and/or the DDR to treat diseases, including cancer. PMID:27631103

  11. Simultaneous Kinetic Analysis of Ribulose 1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Activities 1

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Samuel S.; Young, Joseph D.

    1980-01-01

    An assay was developed for simultaneous kinetic analysis of the activities of the bifunctional plant enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase [EC 4.1.1.39]. [1-14C,5-3H]Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) was used as the labeled substrate. Tritium enrichment of the doubly labeled 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PGA) product, common to both enzyme activities, may be used to calculate Vc/Vo ratios from the expression A/(B-A) where A and B represent the 3H/14C isotope ratios of doubly labeled RuBP and 3-PGA, and Vc and Vo represent the activities of carboxylase and oxygenase, respectively. Doubly labeled substrate was synthesized from [2-14C]glucose and [6-3H]glucose using the enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway coupled with phosphoribulokinase. The kinetic properties of a commercial preparation of fully activated spinach carboxylase were studied under approximated physiological conditions of 20% O2 (252 micromolar), 295 μl/l CO2 (10 micromolar), 25 C, and pH 8.19. The Vc/Vo ratio was, within experimental error, constant at 30 seconds and 1 minute. This double label assay method may be used to calculate Vc/Vo ratios for the Laing-Ogren-Hageman equation, Vc/Vo = (VcKo/VoKc) ([CO2]/[O2]) where Vc and Vo represent Vmax, and Kc and Ko represent Michaelis constants for the carboxylase and oxygenase activities, respectively. PMID:16661214

  12. p53 Acetylation: Regulation and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Sara M.; Quelle, Dawn E.

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of p53 are critical in modulating its tumor suppressive functions. Ubiquitylation, for example, plays a major role in dictating p53 stability, subcellular localization and transcriptional vs. non-transcriptional activities. Less is known about p53 acetylation. It has been shown to govern p53 transcriptional activity, selection of growth inhibitory vs. apoptotic gene targets, and biological outcomes in response to diverse cellular insults. Yet recent in vivo evidence from mouse models questions the importance of p53 acetylation (at least at certain sites) as well as canonical p53 functions (cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis) to tumor suppression. This review discusses the cumulative findings regarding p53 acetylation, with a focus on the acetyltransferases that modify p53 and the mechanisms regulating their activity. We also evaluate what is known regarding the influence of other post-translational modifications of p53 on its acetylation, and conclude with the current outlook on how p53 acetylation affects tumor suppression. Due to redundancies in p53 control and growing understanding that individual modifications largely fine-tune p53 activity rather than switch it on or off, many questions still remain about the physiological importance of p53 acetylation to its role in preventing cancer. PMID:25545885

  13. Biological activity of acetylated phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Fragopoulou, Elizabeth; Nomikos, Tzortzis; Karantonis, Haralabos C; Apostolakis, Constantinos; Pliakis, Emmanuel; Samiotaki, Martina; Panayotou, George; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi

    2007-01-10

    In recent years an effort has been made to isolate and identify biologically active compounds that are included in the Mediterranean diet. The existence of naturally occurring acetylated phenolics, as well as studies with synthetic ones, provide evidence that acetyl groups could be correlated with their biological activity. Platelet activating factor (PAF) is implicated in atherosclerosis, whereas its inhibitors seem to play a protective role against cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to examine the biological activity of resveratrol and tyrosol and their acetylated derivatives as inhibitors of PAF-induced washed rabbit platelet aggregation. Acetylation of resveratrol and tyrosol was performed, and separation was achieved by HPLC. Acetylated derivatives were identified by negative mass spectrometry. The data showed that tyrosol and its monoacetylated derivatives act as PAF inhibitors, whereas diacetylated derivatives induce platelet aggregation. Resveratrol and its mono- and triacetylated derivatives exert similar inhibitory activity, whereas the diacetylated ones are more potent inhibitors. In conclusion, acetylated phenolics exert the same or even higher antithrombotic activity compared to the biological activity of the initial one.

  14. Mechanisms and Dynamics of Protein Acetylation in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Baeza, Josue; Smallegan, Michael J.; Denu, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Reversible protein acetylation is a major regulatory mechanism for controlling protein function. Through genetic manipulations, dietary perturbations, and new proteomic technologies, the diverse functions of protein acetylation are coming into focus. Protein acetylation in mitochondria has taken center stage, revealing that 63% of mitochondrially localized proteins contain lysine acetylation sites. Here we summarize the field, and discuss salient topics that cover spurious versus targeted acetylation, the role of SIRT3 deacetylation, nonenzymatic acetylation, and molecular models for regulatory acetylations that display high and low stoichiometry. PMID:26822488

  15. Characterization of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Euglena gracilis Z.

    PubMed

    Yokota, A; Harada, A; Kitaoka, S

    1989-03-01

    An improved method was devised to purify ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) with high specific activity (2.1 mumol of CO2 fixed/mg protein/min) from Euglena gracilis Z. The purified enzyme stored at -80 degrees C required treatment with dithiothreitol for full activity. The dithiothreitol-treated RuBisCO was activated by 12 mM NaHCO3 and 20 mM MgCl2, and the activated state was stable at least for 60 min in the presence of 4 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetate. The form of inorganic carbon fixed by the Euglena enzyme was CO2, as for the plant enzymes. The carboxylase reaction proceeded linearly with time for at least 8 min. The optimum pH for this reaction was 7.8 to 8.0. The carboxylase activity increased with increasing temperature up to 50 degrees C. The activation energy for the carboxylation reaction was 10.0 kcal/mol. The Michaelis constants of Euglena RuBisCO were 30.9 microM for CO2, 560 microM for O2, and 10.5 microM for ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. Mathematical comparison between the photosynthesis rate predicted from these enzymatic properties and the observed rate suggested that there is no CO2-concentrating mechanism in E. gracilis.

  16. Isolation, characterization, and crystallization of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase from autotrophically grown Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed

    Schloss, J V; Phares, E F; Long, M V; Norton, I L; Stringer, C D; Hartman, F C

    1979-01-01

    Serial culture of Rhodospirillum rubrum with 2% CO2 in H2 as the exclusive carbon source resulted in a rather large fraction of the soluble protein (greater than 40%) being comprised of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase (about sixfold higher than the highest value previously reported). Isolation of the enzyme from these cells revealed that it has physical and kinetic properties similar to those previously described for the enzyme derived from cells grown on butyrate. Notably, the small subunit (which is a constituent of the carboxylase from eucaryotes and most procaryotes) was absent in the enzyme from autotrophically grown R. rubrum. Edman degradation of the purified enzyme revealed that the NH2 terminus is free (in contrast to the catalytic subunit of the carboxylase from eucaryotes) and that the NH2-terminal sequence is Met-Asp-Gln-Ser-Ser-Arg-Tyr-Val-Asn-Leu-Ala-Leu-Lys-Glu-Glu-Asp-Leu-Ile-Ala-Gly-Gly-Glx-His-Val-Leu-. Crystals of the enzyme were readily obtained by dialysis against distilled water.

  17. A substrate-induced biotin binding pocket in the carboxyltransferase domain of pyruvate carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Lietzan, Adam D; St Maurice, Martin

    2013-07-05

    Biotin-dependent enzymes catalyze carboxyl transfer reactions by efficiently coordinating multiple reactions between spatially distinct active sites. Pyruvate carboxylase (PC), a multifunctional biotin-dependent enzyme, catalyzes the bicarbonate- and MgATP-dependent carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, an important anaplerotic reaction in mammalian tissues. To complete the overall reaction, the tethered biotin prosthetic group must first gain access to the biotin carboxylase domain and become carboxylated and then translocate to the carboxyltransferase domain, where the carboxyl group is transferred from biotin to pyruvate. Here, we report structural and kinetic evidence for the formation of a substrate-induced biotin binding pocket in the carboxyltransferase domain of PC from Rhizobium etli. Structures of the carboxyltransferase domain reveal that R. etli PC occupies a symmetrical conformation in the absence of the biotin carboxylase domain and that the carboxyltransferase domain active site is conformationally rearranged upon pyruvate binding. This conformational change is stabilized by the interaction of the conserved residues Asp(590) and Tyr(628) and results in the formation of the biotin binding pocket. Site-directed mutations at these residues reduce the rate of biotin-dependent reactions but have no effect on the rate of biotin-independent oxaloacetate decarboxylation. Given the conservation with carboxyltransferase domains in oxaloacetate decarboxylase and transcarboxylase, the structure-based mechanism described for PC may be applicable to the larger family of biotin-dependent enzymes.

  18. Characterisation and purification of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase from heterotrophically grown halophilic archaebacterium, Haloferax mediterranei.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, R; Altekar, W

    1994-04-15

    The CO2-fixing enzyme of Calvin cycle ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase has been isolated from a halophilic bacterium, Haloferax mediterranei grown heterotrophically. A homogeneous preparation was obtained from sonicated extract of the cells by three steps, resulting in a specific activity of 52 nmol.min-1.mg protein-1. The physicochemical and catalytic properties of the enzyme were studied. The halobacterial ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase is an oligomer of 54-kDa and 14-kDa subunits as detected by SDS/PAGE. By sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation, the molecular mass of the enzyme was estimated as approximately 500 kDa indicating a hexadecameric nature. No evidence for an additional form of the enzyme devoid of small subunits was obtained. The enzyme required Mg2+ for activity, KCl for activity and stability, and an optimal pH of 7.8. In contrast to many halophilic proteins, ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase from H. mediterranei is not an acidic protein. From the comparison of amino acid composition of halobacterial enzyme with its counterparts from a few eukaryotic and eubacterial sources, the S delta Q values showed that these proteins share some compositional similarities.

  19. 3-Methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency: phenotypic variability in a family.

    PubMed

    Eminoglu, F Tuba; Ozcelik, Aysima A; Okur, Ilyas; Tumer, Leyla; Biberoglu, Gursel; Demir, Ercan; Hasanoglu, Alev; Baumgartner, Matthias R

    2009-04-01

    A family with 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency with different clinical features is described. A 15-month-old boy, who was the index patient, was admitted to the hospital with atonic seizure. His brother had delayed language development and their uncle had been followed with diagnosis of epilepsy for the last 5 years. Urinary organic acid analysis displayed elevated 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid and 3-methylcrotonylglycine, analysis of acylcarnitines showed elevated 3-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine and decreased free carnitine levels in both the patients and their uncle. Methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase activity in cultured fibroblasts displayed a low residual activity of 2.2% of the median control value while propionyl-CoA carboxylase activity was normal in the index patient. Mutation analysis revealed a large homozygous deletion of 2264 bp (c.873+4524_6787de12264) in the MCCA gene, which has not been described to date. Adult-onset afebrile seizures have not been reported in the literature. Our cases are an example of this wide phenotypic variability within a single family.

  20. Variations in Kinetic Properties of Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylases among Plants

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, Hock-Hin; Badger, Murray R.; Watson, Leslie

    1981-01-01

    Studies of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase from taxonomically diverse plants show that the enzyme from C3 and crassulacean acid metabolism pathway species exhibits lower Km(CO2) values (12-25 micromolar) than does that from C4 species (28-34 micromolar). RuBP carboxylase from aquatic angiosperms, an aquatic bryophyte, fresh water and marine algae has yielded consistently high Km(CO2) values (30-70 micromolar), similar in range to that of the enzyme from C4 terrestrial plants. This variation in Km(CO2) is discussed in relation to the correlation between the existence of CO2-concentrating mechanisms for photosynthesis and the affinity of the enzyme for CO2. The Km(RuBP) of the enzyme from various sources ranges from 10 to 136 micromolar; mean ± sd = 36 ± 20 micromolar. This variation in Km(RuBP) does not correlate with different photosynthetic pathways, but shows taxonomic patterns. Among the dicotyledons, the enzyme from crassinucellate species exhibits lower Km(RuBP) (18 ± 4 micromolar) than does that from tenuinucellate species (25 ± 7 micromolar). Among the Poaceae, RuBP carboxylase from Triticeae, chloridoids, andropogonoids, Microlaena, and Tetrarrhena has yielded lower Km(RuBP) values (29 ± 11 micromolar) than has that from other members of the grass family (46 ± 10 micromolar). PMID:16661826

  1. Conformational transitions of cinnamoyl CoA reductase 1 from Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant D; Khan, Bashir M; Gaikwad, Sushama M

    2014-03-01

    Conformational transitions of cinnamoyl CoA reductase, a key regulatory enzyme in lignin biosynthesis, from Leucaena leucocephala (Ll-CCRH1) were studied using fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The native protein possesses four trp residues exposed on the surface and 66% of helical structure, undergoes rapid structural transitions at and above 45 °C and starts forming aggregates at 55 °C. Ll-CCRH1 was transformed into acid induced (pH 2.0) molten globule like structure, exhibiting altered secondary structure, diminished tertiary structure and exposed hydrophobic residues. The molten globule like structure was examined for the thermal and chemical stability. The altered secondary structure of L1-CCRH1 at pH 2.0 was stable up to 90 °C. Also, in presence of 0.25 M guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl), it got transformed into different structure which was stable in the vicinity of 2M GdnHCl (as compared to drastic loss of native structure in 2M GdnHCl) as seen in far UV-CD spectra. The structural transition of Ll-CCRH1 at pH 2.0 followed another transition after readjusting the pH to 8.0, forming a structure with hardly any similarity to that of native protein.

  2. Acyl CoA Binding Proteins are Required for Cuticle Formation and Plant Responses to Microbes.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ye; Yu, Keshun; Gao, Qing-Ming; Wilson, Ella V; Navarre, Duroy; Kachroo, Pradeep; Kachroo, Aardra

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acids (FA) and lipids are well known regulators of plant defense. Our previous studies have shown that components of prokaryotic (plastidal) FA biosynthesis pathway regulate various aspects of plant defense. Here, we investigated the defense related roles of the soluble acyl CoA binding proteins (ACBPs), which are thought to facilitate the intracellular transport of FA/lipids. We show that ACBP3 and 4 are required for maintaining normal lipid levels and that ACBP3 contributes to the lipid flux between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathways. We also show that loss of ACBP3, 4, or 6 impair normal development of the cuticle and affect both basal and resistance protein-mediated defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Loss of ACBP3, 4, or 6 also inhibits the induction of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) due to the plants inability to generate SAR inducing signal(s). Together, these data show that ACBP3, ACBP4, and ACBP6 are required for cuticle development as well as defense against microbial pathogens.

  3. Real-Time Decision Support for Course of Action/Enemy Course of Action (COA/ECOA) Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    used. 3. A domain ontology must be given. Based on these assumptions, we propose the CAFSIN solution, standing for COA Analysis based on Fuzzified...the Pentagon” and “DoD” are wired together as the same word and are represented as a single node). 2. Polysemy : words with different meanings in the...Given an ontology with these requirements satisfied, a standard hashing function may be used to directly identify a specific node in the ontology

  4. Biochemical characterization of recombinant cinnamoyl CoA reductase 1 (Ll-CCRH1) from Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant; Vishwakarma, Rishi Kishore; Khan, Bashir M

    2013-07-01

    Recombinant cinnamoyl CoA reductase 1 (Ll-CCRH1) protein from Leucaena leucocephala was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) strain and purified to apparent homogeneity. Optimum pH for forward and reverse reaction was found to be 6.5 and 7.8 respectively. The enzyme was most stable around pH 6.5 at 25°C for 90 min. The enzyme showed Kcat/Km for feruloyl, caffeoyl, sinapoyl, coumaroyl CoA, coniferaldehyde and sinapaldehyde as 4.6, 2.4, 2.3, 1.7, 1.9 and 1.2 (×10(6) M(-1) s(-1)), respectively, indicating affinity of enzyme for feruloyl CoA over other substrates and preference of reduction reaction over oxidation. Activation energy, Ea for various substrates was found to be in the range of 20-50 kJ/mol. Involvement of probable carboxylate ion, histidine, lysine or tyrosine at the active site of enzyme was predicted by pH activity profile. SAXS studies of protein showed radius 3.04 nm and volume 49.25 nm(3) with oblate ellipsoid shape. Finally, metal ion inhibition studies revealed that Ll-CCRH1 is a metal independent enzyme.

  5. SUBSURFACE WELL-LOG CORRELATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA), CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fluvial Garber Sandstone and the underlying Wellington Formation are important sources of drinking water in central Oklahoma. These formations, which make up much of the COA, consist of amalgamated sandstones with some interbedded mudstones, siltstones, and local mudstone- a...

  6. Transmembrane domain interactions and residue proline 378 are essential for proper structure, especially disulfide bond formation, in the human vitamin K-dependent gamma-glutamyl carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Tie, Jian-Ke; Zheng, Mei-Yan; Hsiao, Kuang-Ling N; Perera, Lalith; Stafford, Darrel W; Straight, David L

    2008-06-17

    We used recombinant techniques to create a two-chain form (residues 1-345 and residues 346-758) of the vitamin K-dependent gamma-glutamyl carboxylase, a glycoprotein located in the endoplasmic reticulum containing five transmembrane domains. The two-chain carboxylase had carboxylase and epoxidase activities similar to those of one-chain carboxylase. In addition, it had normal affinity for the propeptide of factor IX. We employed this molecule to investigate formation of the one disulfide bond in carboxylase, the transmembrane structure of carboxylase, and the potential interactions among the carboxylase's transmembrane domains. Our results indicate that the two peptides of the two-chain carboxylase are joined by a disulfide bond. Proline 378 is important for the structure necessary for disulfide formation. Results with the P378L carboxylase indicate that noncovalent bonds maintain the two-chain structure even when the disulfide bond is disrupted. As we had previously proposed, the fifth transmembrane domain of carboxylase is the last and only transmembrane domain in the C-terminal peptide of the two-chain carboxylase. We show that the noncovalent association between the two chains of carboxylase involves an interaction between the fifth transmembrane domain and the second transmembrane domain. Results of a homology model of transmembrane domains 2 and 5 suggest that not only do these two domains associate but that transmembrane domain 2 may interact with another transmembrane domain. This latter interaction may be mediated at least in part by a motif of glycine residues in the second transmembrane domain.

  7. Acetyl-L-carnitine in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Malaguarnera, Michele

    2013-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a common complication of hepatic cirrhosis. The clinical diagnosis is based on two concurrent types of symptoms: impaired mental status and impaired neuromotor function. Impaired mental status is characterized by deterioration in mental status with psychomotor dysfunction, impaired memory, and increased reaction time, sensory abnormalities, poor concentration, disorientation and coma. Impaired neuromotor function include hyperreflexia, rigidity, myoclonus and asterixis. The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy has not been clearly defined. The general consensus is that elevated levels of ammonia and an inflammatory response work in synergy to cause astrocyte to swell and fluid to accumulate in the brain which is thought to explain the symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy. Acetyl-L-carnitine, the short-chain ester of carnitine is endogenously produced within mitochondria and peroxisomes and is involved in the transport of acetyl-moieties across the membranes of these organelles. Acetyl-L-carnitine administration has shown the recovery of neuropsychological activities related to attention/concentration, visual scanning and tracking, psychomotor speed and mental flexibility, language short-term memory, attention, and computing ability. In fact, Acetyl-L-carnitine induces ureagenesis leading to decreased blood and brain ammonia levels. Acetyl-L-carnitine treatment decreases the severity of mental and physical fatigue, depression cognitive impairment and improves health-related quality of life. The aim of this review was to provide an explanation on the possible toxic effects of ammonia in HE and evaluate the potential clinical benefits of ALC.

  8. Peroxisomal Delta(3),Delta(2)-enoyl CoA isomerases and evolution of cytosolic paralogues in embryophytes.

    PubMed

    Goepfert, Simon; Vidoudez, Charles; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Delessert, Syndie; Hiltunen, J Kalervo; Poirier, Yves

    2008-12-01

    Delta(3),Delta(2)-enoyl CoA isomerase (ECI) is an enzyme that participates in the degradation of unsaturated fatty acids through the beta-oxidation cycle. Three genes encoding Delta(3),Delta(2)-enoyl CoA isomerases and named AtECI1, AtECI2 and AtECI3 have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. When expressed heterologously in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, all three ECI proteins were targeted to the peroxisomes and enabled the yeast Deltaeci1 mutant to degrade 10Z-heptadecenoic acid, demonstrating Delta(3),Delta(2)-enoyl CoA isomerase activity in vivo. Fusion proteins between yellow fluorescent protein and AtECI1 or AtECI2 were targeted to the peroxisomes in onion epidermal cells and Arabidopsis root cells, but a similar fusion protein with AtECI3 remained in the cytosol for both tissues. AtECI3 targeting to peroxisomes in S. cerevisiae was dependent on yeast PEX5, while expression of Arabidopsis PEX5 in yeast failed to target AtECI3 to peroxisomes. AtECI2 and AtECI3 are tandem duplicated genes and show a high level of amino acid conservation, except at the C-terminus; AtECI2 ends with the well conserved peroxisome targeting signal 1 (PTS1) terminal tripeptide PKL, while AtECI3 possesses a divergent HNL terminal tripeptide. Evolutionary analysis of ECI genes in plants revealed several independent duplication events, with duplications occurring in rice and Medicago truncatula, generating homologues with divergent C-termini and no recognizable PTS1. All plant ECI genes analyzed, including AtECI3, are under negative purifying selection, implying functionality of the cytosolic AtECI3. Analysis of the mammalian and fungal genomes failed to identify cytosolic variants of the Delta(3),Delta(2)-enoyl CoA isomerase, indicating that evolution of cytosolic Delta(3),Delta(2)-enoyl CoA isomerases is restricted to the plant kingdom.

  9. Phosphoenol Pyruvate Carboxylase in Parasitic Plants: Further Characterization in Various Species and Localization at the Level of Cells and Tissues in Lathraea clandestina L.

    PubMed

    Renaudin, S; Thalouarn, P; Rey, L; Vidal, J; Larher, F

    1984-11-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEP carboxylase, EC 4.1.1.31) activity was demonstrated in a range of holo and hemiparasitic phanerogams. Lathraea clandestina was used as a model for a more detailed study. Enzyme activity levels were determined in the various plant parts. Great changes in enzyme capacity were observed in the shoots according to the time of measurement during a 24 hr cycle. PEP carboxylase characterized at the cellular level by using an indirect immunofluorescence method was found to be mainly located in the cytosol. The possible functions of PEP carboxylase in parasitic plants are discussed.

  10. Distribution of fallover in the carboxylase reaction and fallover-inducible sites among ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenases of photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Uemura, K; Tokai, H; Higuchi, T; Murayama, H; Yamamoto, H; Enomoto, Y; Fujiwara, S; Hamada, J; Yokota, A

    1998-02-01

    The biphasic reaction course, fallover, of carboxylation catalysed by ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) has been known as a characteristic of the enzyme from higher land plants. Fallover consists of hysteresis in the reaction seen during the initial several minutes and a very slow suicide inhibition by inhibitors formed from the substrate ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP). This study examined the relationship between occurrence of fallover and non-catalytic RuBP-binding sites, and the putative hysteresis-inducible sites (Lys-21 and Lys-305 of the large subunit in spinach RuBisCO) amongst RuBisCOs of a wide variety of photosynthetic organisms. Fallover could be detected by following the course of the carboxylase reaction at 1 mM RuBP and the non-catalytic binding sites by alleviation of fallover at 5 mM RuBP. RuBisCO from Euglena gracilis showed the same linear reaction course at both RuBP concentrations, indicating an association between an absence of fallover and an absence of the non-catalytic binding sites. This was supported by the results of an equilibrium binding assay for this enzyme with a transition state analogue. Green macroalgae and non-green algae contained the plant-type, fallover enzyme. RuBisCOs from Conjugatae, Closterium ehrenbergii, Gonatozygon monotaenium and Netrium digitus, showed a much smaller decrease in activity at 1 mM RuBP than the spinach enzyme and the reaction courses of these enzymes at 5 mM RuBP were almost linear. RuBisCO of a primitive type Conjugatae, Mesotaenium caldariorum, showed the same linear course at both RuBP concentrations. Sequencing of rbcL of these organisms indicated that Lys-305 was changed into arginine with Lys-21 conserved.

  11. 4-coumarate: CoA ligase partitions metabolites for eugenol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Shubhra; Kumar, Ritesh; Chanotiya, Chandan S; Shanker, Karuna; Gupta, Madan M; Nagegowda, Dinesh A; Shasany, Ajit K

    2013-08-01

    Biosynthesis of eugenol shares its initial steps with that of lignin, involving conversion of hydroxycinnamic acids to their corresponding coenzyme A (CoA) esters by 4-coumarate:CoA ligases (4CLs). In this investigation, a 4CL (OS4CL) was identified from glandular trichome-rich tissue of Ocimum sanctum with high sequence similarity to an isoform (OB4CL_ctg4) from Ocimum basilicum. The levels of OS4CL and OB4CL_ctg4-like transcripts were highest in O. sanctum trichome, followed by leaf, stem and root. The eugenol content in leaf essential oil was positively correlated with the expression of OS4CL in the leaf at different developmental stages. Recombinant OS4CL showed the highest activity with p-coumaric acid, followed by ferulic, caffeic and trans-cinnamic acids. Transient RNA interference (RNAi) suppression of OS4CL in O. sanctum leaves caused a reduction in leaf eugenol content and trichome transcript level, with a considerable increase in endogenous p-coumaric, ferulic, trans-cinnamic and caffeic acids. A significant reduction in the expression levels was observed for OB4CL_ctg4-related transcripts in suppressed trichome compared with transcripts similar to the other four isoforms (OB4CL_ctg1, 2, 3 and 5). Sinapic acid and lignin content were also unaffected in RNAi suppressed leaf samples. Transient expression of OS4CL-green fluorescent protein fusion protein in Arabidopsis protoplasts was associated with the cytosol. These results indicate metabolite channeling of intermediates towards eugenol by a specific 4CL and is the first report demonstrating the involvement of 4CL in creation of virtual compartments through substrate utilization and committing metabolites for eugenol biosynthesis at an early stage of the pathway.

  12. Beating the acetyl coenzyme A-pathway to the origin of life

    PubMed Central

    Nitschke, Wolfgang; Russell, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Attempts to draft plausible scenarios for the origin of life have in the past mainly built upon palaeogeochemical boundary conditions while, as detailed in a companion article in this issue, frequently neglecting to comply with fundamental thermodynamic laws. Even if demands from both palaeogeochemistry and thermodynamics are respected, then a plethora of strongly differing models are still conceivable. Although we have no guarantee that life at its origin necessarily resembled biology in extant organisms, we consider that the only empirical way to deduce how life may have emerged is by taking the stance of assuming continuity of biology from its inception to the present day. Building upon this conviction, we have assessed extant types of energy and carbon metabolism for their appropriateness to conditions probably pertaining in those settings of the Hadean planet that fulfil the thermodynamic requirements for life to come into being. Wood–Ljungdahl (WL) pathways leading to acetyl CoA formation are excellent candidates for such primordial metabolism. Based on a review of our present understanding of the biochemistry and biophysics of acetogenic, methanogenic and methanotrophic pathways and on a phylogenetic analysis of involved enzymes, we propose that a variant of modern methanotrophy is more likely than traditional WL systems to date back to the origin of life. The proposed model furthermore better fits basic thermodynamic demands and palaeogeochemical conditions suggested by recent results from extant alkaline hydrothermal seeps. PMID:23754811

  13. Beating the acetyl coenzyme A-pathway to the origin of life.

    PubMed

    Nitschke, Wolfgang; Russell, Michael J

    2013-07-19

    Attempts to draft plausible scenarios for the origin of life have in the past mainly built upon palaeogeochemical boundary conditions while, as detailed in a companion article in this issue, frequently neglecting to comply with fundamental thermodynamic laws. Even if demands from both palaeogeochemistry and thermodynamics are respected, then a plethora of strongly differing models are still conceivable. Although we have no guarantee that life at its origin necessarily resembled biology in extant organisms, we consider that the only empirical way to deduce how life may have emerged is by taking the stance of assuming continuity of biology from its inception to the present day. Building upon this conviction, we have assessed extant types of energy and carbon metabolism for their appropriateness to conditions probably pertaining in those settings of the Hadean planet that fulfil the thermodynamic requirements for life to come into being. Wood-Ljungdahl (WL) pathways leading to acetyl CoA formation are excellent candidates for such primordial metabolism. Based on a review of our present understanding of the biochemistry and biophysics of acetogenic, methanogenic and methanotrophic pathways and on a phylogenetic analysis of involved enzymes, we propose that a variant of modern methanotrophy is more likely than traditional WL systems to date back to the origin of life. The proposed model furthermore better fits basic thermodynamic demands and palaeogeochemical conditions suggested by recent results from extant alkaline hydrothermal seeps.

  14. Preliminary toxicological study of ferric acetyl acetonate

    SciTech Connect

    London, J.E.; Smith, D.M.

    1983-01-01

    The calculated acute oral LD/sub 50//sup 30/ (lethal does for 50% of the animals occuring with 30 days after compound administration) values for ferric acetyl acetonate were 584 mg/kg in mice and 995 mg/kg in rats. According to classical guidelines, this compound would be considered slightly toxic in both species. Skin application studies in the rabbit demonstrated the compound to be irritating. The eye irritation study disclosed the compound to be a severe irritant causing permanent damage to the cornea (inflammation and scarring resulting in blindness). The sensitization study in the guinea pig did not show ferric acetyl acetonate to be deleterious in this regard.

  15. Isolation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from leaves.

    PubMed

    Carmo-Silva, A Elizabete; Barta, Csengele; Salvucci, Michael E

    2011-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is a multifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the fixation of CO2 and O2 in photosynthesis and photorespiration, respectively. As the rate-limiting step in photosynthesis, improving the catalytic properties of Rubisco has long been viewed as a viable strategy for increasing plant productivity. Advances in biotechnology have made this goal more attainable by making it possible to modify Rubisco in planta. To properly evaluate the properties of Rubisco, it is necessary to isolate the enzyme in pure form. This chapter describes procedures for rapid and efficient purification of Rubisco from leaves of several species.

  16. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  17. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  18. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  19. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  20. Coimmunopurification of phosphorylated bacterial- and plant-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases with the plastidial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from developing castor oil seeds.

    PubMed

    Uhrig, R Glen; O'Leary, Brendan; Spang, H Elizabeth; MacDonald, Justin A; She, Yi-Min; Plaxton, William C

    2008-03-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) interactome of developing castor oil seed (COS; Ricinus communis) endosperm was assessed using coimmunopurification (co-IP) followed by proteomic analysis. Earlier studies suggested that immunologically unrelated 107-kD plant-type PEPCs (p107/PTPC) and 118-kD bacterial-type PEPCs (p118/BTPC) are subunits of an unusual 910-kD hetero-octameric class 2 PEPC complex of developing COS. The current results confirm that a tight physical interaction occurs between p118 and p107 because p118 quantitatively coimmunopurified with p107 following elution of COS extracts through an anti-p107-IgG immunoaffinity column. No PEPC activity or immunoreactive PEPC polypeptides were detected in the corresponding flow-through fractions. Although BTPCs lack the N-terminal phosphorylation motif characteristic of PTPCs, Pro-Q Diamond phosphoprotein staining, immunoblotting with phospho-serine (Ser)/threonine Akt substrate IgG, and phosphate-affinity PAGE established that coimmunopurified p118 was multiphosphorylated at unique Ser and/or threonine residues. Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of an endoproteinase Lys-C p118 peptide digest demonstrated that Ser-425 is subject to in vivo proline-directed phosphorylation. The co-IP of p118 with p107 did not appear to be influenced by their phosphorylation status. Because p118 phosphorylation was unchanged 48 h following elimination of photosynthate supply due to COS depodding, the signaling mechanisms responsible for photosynthate-dependent p107 phosphorylation differ from those controlling p118's in vivo phosphorylation. A 110-kD PTPC coimmunopurified with p118 and p107 when depodded COS was used. The plastidial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC(pl)) was identified as a novel PEPC interactor. Thus, a putative metabolon involving PEPC and PDC(pl) could function to channel carbon from phosphoenolpyruvate to acetyl-coenzyme A and/or to recycle CO(2) from PDC(pl) to PEPC.

  1. Degradation of aromatics and chloroaromatics by Pseudomonas sp. strain B13: purification and characterization of 3-oxoadipate:succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA) transferase and 3-oxoadipyl-CoA thiolase.

    PubMed

    Kaschabek, Stefan R; Kuhn, Bernd; Müller, Dagmar; Schmidt, Eberhard; Reineke, Walter

    2002-01-01

    The degradation of 3-oxoadipate in Pseudomonas sp. strain B13 was investigated and was shown to proceed through 3-oxoadipyl-coenzyme A (CoA) to give acetyl-CoA and succinyl-CoA. 3-Oxoadipate:succinyl-CoA transferase of strain B13 was purified by heat treatment and chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose, Mono-Q, and Superose 6 gels. Estimation of the native molecular mass gave a value of 115,000 +/- 5,000 Da with a Superose 12 column. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions resulted in two distinct bands of equal intensities. The subunit A and B values were 32,900 and 27,000 Da. Therefore it can be assumed that the enzyme is a heterotetramer of the type A2B2 with a molecular mass of 120,000 Da. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of both subunits are as follows: subunit A, AELLTLREAVERFVNDGTVALEGFTHLIPT; subunit B, SAYSTNEMMTVAAARRLKNGAVVFV. The pH optimum was 8.4. Km values were 0.4 and 0.2 mM for 3-oxoadipate and succinyl-CoA, respectively. Reversibility of the reaction with succinate was shown. The transferase of strain B13 failed to convert 2-chloro- and 2-methyl-3-oxoadipate. Some activity was observed with 4-methyl-3-oxoadipate. Even 2-oxoadipate and 3-oxoglutarate were shown to function as poor substrates of the transferase. 3-oxoadipyl-CoA thiolase was purified by chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose, blue 3GA, and reactive brown-agarose. Estimation of the native molecular mass gave 162,000 +/- 5,000 Da with a Superose 6 column. The molecular mass of the subunit of the denatured protein, as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was 42 kDa. On the basis of these results, 3-oxoadipyl-CoA thiolase should be a tetramer of the type A4. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of 3-oxoadipyl-CoA thiolase was determined to be SREVYI-DAVRTPIGRFG. The pH optimum was 7.8. Km values were 0.15 and 0.01 mM for 3-oxoadipyl-CoA and CoA, respectively. Sequence analysis of the thiolase terminus revealed high percentages of identity

  2. Discovery of tumor-specific irreversible inhibitors of stearoyl CoA desaturase | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    A hallmark of targeted cancer therapies is selective toxicity among cancer cell lines. We evaluated results from a viability screen of over 200,000 small molecules to identify two chemical series, oxalamides and benzothiazoles, that were selectively toxic at low nanomolar concentrations to the same 4 of 12 human lung cancer cell lines. Sensitive cell lines expressed cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4F11, which metabolized the compounds into irreversible inhibitors of stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD). SCD is recognized as a promising biological target in cancer and metabolic disease.

  3. 40 CFR 721.10520 - Acetylated fatty acid glycerides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acetylated fatty acid glycerides... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10520 Acetylated fatty acid glycerides (generic). (a) Chemical substance... acetylated fatty acid glycerides (PMN P-11-160) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10520 - Acetylated fatty acid glycerides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acetylated fatty acid glycerides... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10520 Acetylated fatty acid glycerides (generic). (a) Chemical substance... acetylated fatty acid glycerides (PMN P-11-160) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  5. Purification and characterization of the thermostable ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from the thermophilic purple bacterium Chromatium tepidum.

    PubMed

    Heda, G D; Madigan, M T

    1989-09-15

    The Calvin cycle enzyme ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase has been purified and characterized from the thermophilic and obligately anaerobic purple sulfur bacterium, Chromatium tepidum. The enzyme is an L8S8 carboxylase with a molecular mass near 550 kDa. No evidence for a second form of the enzyme lacking small subunits was obtained. C. tepidum ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase was stable to heating to temperatures of 60 degrees C and could be readily purified in an active form at room temperature. Both carboxylase and oxygenase activities of this enzyme were Mg2+-dependent and carboxylase activity was sensitive to the effector 6-phosphogluconic acid. The Km for ribulose bisphosphate for the carboxylase activity of the C. tepidum enzyme was substantially higher than that observed in mesophilic Calvin cycle autotrophs. Amino acid composition and immunological analyses of C. tepidum and Chromatium vinosum ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylases showed the enzymes to be highly related despite significant differences in heat stability. It is hypothesized that thermal stability of C. tepidum ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase is due to differences in primary structure affecting folding patterns in both the large and small subunits and is clearly not the result of any unique quaternary structure of the thermostable enzyme.

  6. Dark/Light Modulation of Ribulose Bisphosphate Carboxylase Activity in Plants from Different Photosynthetic Categories 1

    PubMed Central

    Vu, J. Cu V.; Allen, Leon H.; Bowes, George

    1984-01-01

    Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBPCase) from several plants had substantially greater activity in extracts from lightexposed leaves than dark leaves, even when the extracts were incubated in vitro with saturating HCO3− and Mg2+ concentrations. This occurred in Glycine max, Lycopersicon esculentum, Nicotiana tabacum, Panicum bisulcatum, and P. hylaeicum (C3); P. maximum (C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase); P. milioides (C3/C4); and Bromelia pinguin and Ananas comosus (Crassulacean acid metabolism). Little or no difference between light and dark leaf extracts of RuBPCase was observed in Triticum aestivum (C3); P. miliaceum (C4 NAD malic enzyme); Zea mays and Sorghum bicolor (C4 NADP malic enzyme); Moricandia arvensis (C3/C4); and Hydrilla verticillata (submersed aquatic macrophyte). It is concluded that, in many plants, especially Crassulacean acid metabolism and C3 species, a large fraction of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in the dark is in an inactivatable state that cannot respond to CO2 and Mg2+ activation, but which can be converted to an activatable state upon exposure of the leaf to light. PMID:16663937

  7. Dark/Light modulation of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity in plants from different photosynthetic categories.

    PubMed

    Vu, J C; Allen, L H; Bowes, G

    1984-11-01

    Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBPCase) from several plants had substantially greater activity in extracts from lightexposed leaves than dark leaves, even when the extracts were incubated in vitro with saturating HCO(3) (-) and Mg(2+) concentrations. This occurred in Glycine max, Lycopersicon esculentum, Nicotiana tabacum, Panicum bisulcatum, and P. hylaeicum (C(3)); P. maximum (C(4) phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase); P. milioides (C(3)/C(4)); and Bromelia pinguin and Ananas comosus (Crassulacean acid metabolism). Little or no difference between light and dark leaf extracts of RuBPCase was observed in Triticum aestivum (C(3)); P. miliaceum (C(4) NAD malic enzyme); Zea mays and Sorghum bicolor (C(4) NADP malic enzyme); Moricandia arvensis (C(3)/C(4)); and Hydrilla verticillata (submersed aquatic macrophyte). It is concluded that, in many plants, especially Crassulacean acid metabolism and C(3) species, a large fraction of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in the dark is in an inactivatable state that cannot respond to CO(2) and Mg(2+) activation, but which can be converted to an activatable state upon exposure of the leaf to light.

  8. Insight into the carboxyl transferase domain mechanism of pyruvate carboxylase from Rhizobium etli†

    PubMed Central

    Zeczycki, Tonya N.; Maurice, Martin St.; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut; Wallace, John C.; Attwood, Paul V.; Cleland, W. Wallace

    2009-01-01

    The effects of mutations in the active site of the carboxyl transferase domain of R. etli pyruvate carboxylase have been determined for the forward reaction to form oxaloacetate, the reverse reaction to form MgATP, the oxamate-induced decarboxylation of oxaloacetate, the phosphorylation of MgADP by carbamoyl phosphate and the bicarbonate-dependent ATPase reaction. Additional studies with these mutants examined the effect of pyruvate and oxamate on the reactions of the biotin carboxylase domain. From these mutagenic studies, putative roles for catalytically relevant active site residues were assigned and a more accurate description of the mechanism of the carboxyl transferase domain is presented. The T882A mutant showed no catalytic activity for reactions involving the carboxyl transferase domain, but surprisingly showed a 7- and 3.5-fold increase in activity, as compared to the wild-type enzyme, for the ADP phosphorylation and bicarbonate-dependent ATPase reactions, respectively. Furthermore, the partial inhibition of the T882A catalyzed BC domain reactions by oxamate and pyruvate further supports the critical role of Thr882 in the proton transfer between biotin and pyruvate in the carboxyl transferase domain. The catalytic mechanism appears to involve the decarboxylation of carboxybiotin and proton removal from Thr882 by the resulting biotin enolate with either a concerted or subsequent transfer of a proton from pyruvate to Thr882. The resulting enolpyruvate then reacts with CO2 to form oxaloacetate and complete the reaction. PMID:19341298

  9. The role of biotin and oxamate in the carboxyltransferase reaction of pyruvate carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Lietzan, Adam D; Lin, Yi; St Maurice, Martin

    2014-11-15

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) is a biotin-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the MgATP-dependent carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, an important anaplerotic reaction in central metabolism. During catalysis, carboxybiotin is translocated to the carboxyltransferase domain where the carboxyl group is transferred to the acceptor substrate, pyruvate. Many studies on the carboxyltransferase domain of PC have demonstrated an enhanced oxaloacetate decarboxylation activity in the presence of oxamate and it has been shown that oxamate accepts a carboxyl group from carboxybiotin during oxaloacetate decarboxylation. The X-ray crystal structure of the carboxyltransferase domain from Rhizobium etli PC reveals that oxamate is positioned in the active site in an identical manner to the substrate, pyruvate, and kinetic data are consistent with the oxamate-stimulated decarboxylation of oxaloacetate proceeding through a simple ping-pong bi bi mechanism in the absence of the biotin carboxylase domain. Additionally, analysis of truncated PC enzymes indicates that the BCCP domain devoid of biotin does not contribute directly to the enzymatic reaction and conclusively demonstrates a biotin-independent oxaloacetate decarboxylation activity in PC. These findings advance the description of catalysis in PC and can be extended to the study of related biotin-dependent enzymes.

  10. Interaction of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase with 2-carboxyhexitol 1,6-bisphosphates.

    PubMed

    Roach, D J; Gollnick, P D; McFadden, B A

    1983-04-01

    2-C-Carboxy-D-glucitol 1,6-bisphosphate (CGBP) and 2-C-carboxy-D-mannitol 1,6-bisphosphate (CMBP) have been synthesized, isolated, and the structures of these compounds and the derived lactones elucidated by NMR spectroscopy and periodate oxidation. Both carboxyhexitol bisphosphates, which are homologs of the transition state analog 2-C-carboxy-D-arabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate, exhibit competitive inhibiton of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (EC 4.1.1.9) isolated from spinach (Spinacia oleracea), with respect to ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. CMBP was a more potent inhibitor (100-fold) displaying an inhibition constant (Ki at pH 8.0 and 30 degrees C) of 1-2 microM with enzymes from spinach, barley (Hordeum vulgare), and Chromatium vinosum. In contrast the Rhodospirillum rubrum enzyme was inhibited about 40-fold more weakly (Ki = 53 microM at pH 8.0 and 30 degrees C). Both CGBP and CMBP potentiated activation of RuBP carboxylase from spinach and R. rubrum.

  11. Dark/light modulation of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity in plants from different photosynthetic categories

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, J.C.V.; Allen, L.H. Jr.; Bowes, G.

    1984-11-01

    Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBPCase) from several plants had substantially greater activity in extracts from light-exposed leaves than dark leaves, even when the extracts were incubated in vitro with saturating HCO/sub 3//sup -/ and Mg/sup 2 +/ concentrations. This occurred in Glycine max, Lycopersicon esculentum, Nicotiana tabacum, Panicum bisulcatum, and P. hylaeicum (C/sub 3/); P. maximum (C/sub 4/ phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase); P. milioides (C/sub 3//C/sub 4/); and Bromelia pinguin and Ananas comosus (Crassulacean acid metabolism). Little or no difference between light and dark leaf extracts of RuBPCase was observed in Triticum aestivum (C/sub 3/); P. miliaceum (C/sub 4/ NAD malic enzyme); Zea mays and Sorghum bicolor (C/sub 4/ NADP malic enzyme); Moricandia arvensis (C/sub 3//C/sub 4/); and Hydrilla verticillata (submersed aquatic macrophyte). It is concluded that, in many plants, especially Crassulacean acid metabolism and C/sub 3/ species, a large fraction of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in the dark is in an inactivatable state that cannot respond to CO/sub 2/ and Mg/sup 2 +/ activation, but which can be converted to an activatable state upon exposure of the leaf to light. 16 references, 2 tables.

  12. Discovery of Antibacterial Biotin Carboxylase Inhibitors by Virtual Screening and Fragment-Based Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Mochalkin, Igor; Miller, J. Richard; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; Thanabal, Venkataraman; Erdman, Paul; Cox, Philip B.; Prasad, J.V.N. Vara; Lightle, Sandra; Huband, Michael D.; Stover, C. Kendall; Pfizer

    2009-07-24

    As part of our effort to inhibit bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis through the recently validated target biotin carboxylase, we employed a unique combination of two emergent lead discovery strategies. We used both de novo fragment-based drug discovery and virtual screening, which employs 3D shape and electrostatic property similarity searching. We screened a collection of unbiased low-molecular-weight molecules and identified a structurally diverse collection of weak-binding but ligand-efficient fragments as potential building blocks for biotin carboxylase ATP-competitive inhibitors. Through iterative cycles of structure-based drug design relying on successive fragment costructures, we improved the potency of the initial hits by up to 3000-fold while maintaining their ligand-efficiency and desirable physicochemical properties. In one example, hit-expansion efforts resulted in a series of amino-oxazoles with antibacterial activity. These results successfully demonstrate that virtual screening approaches can substantially augment fragment-based screening approaches to identify novel antibacterial agents.

  13. Translational regulation of light-induced ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase gene expression in amaranth.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, J O; Nikolau, B J; Carr, J P; Klessig, D F

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of the genes encoding the large and small subunits of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase was examined in amaranth cotyledons in response to changes in illumination. When dark-grown cotyledons were transferred into light, synthesis of the large- and small-subunit polypeptides was initiated very rapidly, before any increase in the levels of their corresponding mRNAs. Similarly, when light-grown cotyledons were transferred to total darkness, synthesis of the large- and small-subunit proteins was rapidly depressed without changes in mRNA levels for either subunit. In vitro translation or in vivo pulse-chase experiments indicated that these apparent changes in protein synthesis were not due to alterations in the functionality of the mRNAs or to protein turnover, respectively. These results, in combination with our previous studies, suggest that the expression of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase genes can be adjusted rapidly at the translational level and over a longer period through changes in mRNA accumulation. Images PMID:3785198

  14. Light-mediated control of translational initiation of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase in amaranth cotyledons.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, J O; Breiding, D E; Klessig, D F

    1990-01-01

    In cotyledons of 6-day-old amaranth seedlings, the large subunit (LSU) and the small subunit (SSU) polypeptides of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase are not synthesized in the absence of light. When dark-grown seedlings were transferred into light, synthesis of both polypeptides was induced within the first 3 to 5 hr of illumination without any significant changes in levels of their mRNAs. In cotyledons of light-grown seedlings and of dark-grown seedlings transferred into light for 5 hr (where ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase synthesis was readily detected in vivo), the LSU and SSU mRNAs were associated with polysomes. In cotyledons of dark-grown seedlings, these two mRNAs were not found on polysomes. In contrast to the SSU message, mRNAs encoding the nonlight-regulated, nuclear-encoded proteins actin and ubiquitin were associated with polysomes regardless of the light conditions. Similarly, mRNA from at least one chloroplast-encoded gene (rpl2) was found on polysomes in the dark as well as in the light. These results indicate an absence of translational initiation in cotyledons of dark-grown seedlings which is specific to a subset of nuclear- and chloroplast-encoded genes including the SSU and LSU, respectively. Upon illumination, synthesis of both polypeptides, and possibly other proteins involved in light-mediated chloroplast development, was induced at the level of translational initiation. PMID:2152128

  15. Active site histidine in spinach ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase modified by diethyl pyrocarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Y.; McFadden, B.A.; el-Gul, T.

    1985-07-16

    (TH) Diethyl pyrocarbonate was synthesized from (TH) ethanol prepared by the reduction of acetaldehyde by NaB3H4. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) from spinach was inactivated with this reagent at pH 7.0 the presence of 20 mM MgS , and tryptic peptides that contained modified histidine residues were isolated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Labeling of the enzyme was conducted in the presence and absence of the competitive inhibitor sedoheptulose 1,7-bisphosphate. The amount of one peptide that was heavily labeled in the absence of this compound was reduced 10-fold in its presence. The labeled residue was histidine-298. This result, in combination with earlier experiments, suggests that His-298 in spinach RuBisCO is located in the active site domain and is essential to enzyme activity. This region of the primary structure is strongly conserved in seven other ribulosebisphosphate carboxylases from divergent sources.

  16. Pathway of assembly of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Anabaena 7210 expressed in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevitz, M.; Somerville, C.R.; McIntosh, L.

    1985-10-01

    The authors have placed the genes encoding ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from the Anabaena 7120 operon under transcriptional control of the lac promoter carried on the Escherichia coli plasmid pUC19. The genes encoding both the large and small subunit polypeptides (rbcL and rbcS) are transcribed and translated so that approx. = 0.6% of the soluble protein in E. coli extracts is a fully functional holoenzyme with a sedimentation coefficient of approximately 18S, which contains stoichiometric amounts of the two subunits. However, expression of the large subunit polypeptide vastly exceeds that of the small subunit because the majority of transcripts terminate in the intergenic region between the rbcL and rbcS genes. As a result, excess large subunit is synthesized and accumulates in E. coli as an insoluble and catalytically inactive form. Because small subunit is found only in the high molecular weight soluble form of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, the authors propose that the small subunit promotes assembly of the hexadecameric form of the enzyme via heterodimers of large and small subunits.

  17. The Crystal Structure of N-Acetyl-L-glutamate Synthase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae Provides Insights into Mechanisms of Catalysis and Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Dashuang; Sagar, Vatsala; Jin, Zhongmin; Yu, Xiaolin; Caldovic, Ljubica; Morizono, Hiroki; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel

    2010-01-07

    The crystal structures of N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) in the arginine biosynthetic pathway of Neisseria gonorrhoeae complexed with acetyl-CoA and with CoA plus N-acetylglutamate have been determined at 2.5- and 2.6-A resolution, respectively. The monomer consists of two separately folded domains, an amino acid kinase (AAK) domain and an N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain connected through a 10-A linker. The monomers assemble into a hexameric ring that consists of a trimer of dimers with 32-point symmetry, inner and outer ring diameters of 20 and 100A, respectively, and a height of 110A(.) Each AAK domain interacts with the cognate domains of two adjacent monomers across two 2-fold symmetry axes and with the NAT domain from a second monomer of the adjacent dimer in the ring. The catalytic sites are located within the NAT domains. Three active site residues, Arg316, Arg425, and Ser427, anchor N-acetylglutamate in a position at the active site to form hydrogen bond interactions to the main chain nitrogen atoms of Cys356 and Leu314, and hydrophobic interactions to the side chains of Leu313 and Leu314. The mode of binding of acetyl-CoA and CoA is similar to other NAT family proteins. The AAK domain, although catalytically inactive, appears to bind arginine. This is the first reported crystal structure of any NAGS, and it provides insights into the catalytic function and arginine regulation of NAGS enzymes.

  18. Screening, identification, and characterization of mechanistically diverse inhibitors of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enzyme, pantothenate kinase (CoaA).

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Janani; Bhat, Jyothi; Solapure, Suresh M; Sandesh, Jatheendranath; Sarkar, Debasmita; Aishwarya, Sundaram; Mukherjee, Kakoli; Datta, Santanu; Malolanarasimhan, Krishnan; Bandodkar, Balachandra; Das, Kaveri S

    2012-03-01

    The authors describe the discovery of anti-mycobacterial compounds through identifying mechanistically diverse inhibitors of the essential Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) enzyme, pantothenate kinase (CoaA). Target-driven drug discovery technologies often work with purified enzymes, and inhibitors thus discovered may not optimally inhibit the form of the target enzyme predominant in the bacterial cell or may not be available at the desired concentration. Therefore, in addition to addressing entry or efflux issues, inhibitors with diverse mechanisms of inhibition (MoI) could be prioritized before hit-to-lead optimization. The authors describe a high-throughput assay based on protein thermal melting to screen large numbers of compounds for hits with diverse MoI. Following high-throughput screening for Mtb CoaA enzyme inhibitors, a concentration-dependent increase in protein thermal stability was used to identify true binders, and the degree of enhancement or reduction in thermal stability in the presence of substrate was used to classify inhibitors as competitive or non/uncompetitive. The thermal shift-based MoI assay could be adapted to screen hundreds of compounds in a single experiment as compared to traditional biochemical approaches for MoI determination. This MoI was confirmed through mechanistic studies that estimated K(ie) and K(ies) for representative compounds and through nuclear magnetic resonance-based ligand displacement assays.

  19. Interaction of the Nitrogen Regulatory Protein GlnB (PII) with Biotin Carboxyl Carrier Protein (BCCP) Controls Acetyl-CoA Levels in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Hauf, Waldemar; Schmid, Katharina; Gerhardt, Edileusa C. M.; Huergo, Luciano F.; Forchhammer, Karl

    2016-01-01

    The family of PII signal transduction proteins (members GlnB, GlnK, NifI) plays key roles in various cellular processes related to nitrogen metabolism at different functional levels. Recent studies implied that PII proteins may also be involved in the regulation of fatty acid metabolism, since GlnB proteins from Proteobacteria and from Arabidopsis thaliana were shown to interact with biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). In case of Escherichia coli ACCase, this interaction reduces the kcat of acetyl-CoA carboxylation, which should have a marked impact on the acetyl-CoA metabolism. In this study we show that the PII protein of a unicellular cyanobacterium inhibits the biosynthetic activity of E. coli ACC and also interacts with cyanobacterial BCCP in an ATP and 2-oxoglutarate dependent manner. In a PII mutant strain of Synechocystis strain PCC 6803, the lacking control leads to reduced acetyl-CoA levels, slightly increased levels of fatty acids and formation of lipid bodies as well as an altered fatty acid composition. PMID:27833596

  20. Dynamic Protein Acetylation in Plant–Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gaoyuan; Walley, Justin W.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen infection triggers complex molecular perturbations within host cells that results in either resistance or susceptibility. Protein acetylation is an emerging biochemical modification that appears to play central roles during host–pathogen interactions. To date, research in this area has focused on two main themes linking protein acetylation to plant immune signaling. Firstly, it has been established that proper gene expression during defense responses requires modulation of histone acetylation within target gene promoter regions. Second, some pathogens can deliver effector molecules that encode acetyltransferases directly within the host cell to modify acetylation of specific host proteins. Collectively these findings suggest that the acetylation level for a range of host proteins may be modulated to alter the outcome of pathogen infection. This review will focus on summarizing our current understanding of the roles of protein acetylation in plant defense and highlight the utility of proteomics approaches to uncover the complete repertoire of acetylation changes triggered by pathogen infection. PMID:27066055

  1. Acetylation and characterization of banana (Musa paradisiaca) starch.

    PubMed

    Bello-Pérez, L A; Contreras-Ramos, S M; Jìmenez-Aparicio, A; Paredes-López, O

    2000-01-01

    Banana native starch was acetylated and some of its functional properties were evaluated and compared to corn starch. In general, acetylated banana starch presented higher values in ash, protein and fat than corn acetylated starch. The modified starches had minor tendency to retrogradation assessed as % transmittance of starch pastes. At high temperature acetylated starches presented a water retention capacity similar to their native counterpart. The acetylation considerably increased the solubility of starches, and a similar behavior was found for swelling power. When freeze-thaw stability was studied, acetyl banana starch drained approximately 60% of water in the first and second cycles, but in the third and fourth cycles the percentage of separated water was low. However, acetyl corn starch showed lower freeze-thaw stability than the untreated sample. The modification increased the viscosity of banana starch pastes.

  2. C75 is converted to C75-CoA in the hypothalamus, where it inhibits carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 and decreases food intake and body weight.

    PubMed

    Mera, Paula; Bentebibel, Assia; López-Viñas, Eduardo; Cordente, Antonio G; Gurunathan, Chandrashekaran; Sebastián, David; Vázquez, Irene; Herrero, Laura; Ariza, Xavier; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Asins, Guillermina; Serra, Dolors; García, Jordi; Hegardt, Fausto G

    2009-03-15

    Central nervous system administration of C75 produces hypophagia and weight loss in rodents identifying C75 as a potential drug against obesity and type 2 diabetes. However, the mechanism underlying this effect is unknown. Here we show that C75-CoA is generated chemically, in vitro and in vivo from C75 and that it is a potent inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltranferase 1 (CPT1), the rate-limiting step of fatty-acid oxidation. Three-D docking and kinetic analysis support the inhibitory effect of C75-CoA on CPT1. Central nervous system administration of C75 in rats led to C75-CoA production, inhibition of CPT1 and lower body weight and food intake. Our results suggest that inhibition of CPT1, and thus increased availability of fatty acids in the hypothalamus, contribute to the pharmacological mechanism of C75 to decrease food intake.

  3. Acetylation of prostaglandin synthetase by aspirin. Purification and properties of the acetylated protein from sheep vesicular gland.

    PubMed

    Roth, G J; Stanford, N; Jacobs, J W; Majerus, P W

    1977-09-20

    We previously presented evidence that aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) inhibits prostaglandin synthetase by acetylating and active site of the enzyme. In the current work, we have labeled the enzyme from an aceton-pentane powder of sheep vesicular gland using [acetyl-3H]aspirin and purified the [3H]acetyl-protein to near homogeneity. The final preparation contains protein of a single molecular weight (85 000) and an amino-terminal sequence of Asp-Ala-Gly-Arg-Ala. The [3H]acetyl-protein contained 0.5 mol of acetyl residues per mol of protein based on amino acid composition but only a single sequence was found.

  4. Isolation and preliminary characterization of two forms of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase from Rhodopseudomonas capsulata.

    PubMed

    Gibson, J L; Tabita, F R

    1977-12-01

    The presence of two distinct forms of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase has been demonstrated in extracts of Rhodopseudomonas capsulata, similar to the form I (peak I) and form II (peak II) carboxylases previously described from R. sphaeroides (J. Gibson and F. R. Tabita, J. Biol. Chem 252:943-949, 1977). The two activities, separated by diethylaminoethyl-cellulose chromatography, were shown to be of different molecular size after assay on polyacrylamide gels. The higher-molecular-weight carboxylase from R. capsulata was designated form I-C, whereas the smaller enzyme was designated form II-C. Catalytic studies revealed significant differences between the two enzymes in response to pH and the effector 6-phosphogluconate. Immunological studies with antisera directed against the carboxylases from R. sphaeroides demonstrated antigenic differences between the two R. capsulata enzymes; cross-reactivity was observed only between R. sphaeroides anti-form II serum and the corresponding R. capsulata enzyme, form II-C.

  5. The neurobiology of acetyl-L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Traina, Giovanna

    2016-06-01

    A large body of evidence points to the positive effects of dietary supplementation of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC). Its use has shown health benefits in neuroinflammation, which is a common denominator in a host of neurodegenerative diseases. ALC is the principal acetyl ester of L-Carnitine (LC), and it plays an essential role in intermediary metabolism, acting as a donor of acetyl groups and facilitating the transfer of fatty acids from cytosol to mitochondria during beta-oxidation. Dietary supplementation of ALC exerts neuroprotective, neurotrophic, antidepressive and analgesic effects in painful neuropathies. ALC also has antioxidant and anti-apoptotic activity. Moreover, ALC exhibits positive effects on mitochondrial metabolism, and shows promise in the treatment of aging and neurodegenerative pathologies by slowing the progression of mental deterioration. In addition, ALC plays neuromodulatory effects on both synaptic morphology and synaptic transmission. These effects are likely due to affects of ALC through modulation of gene expression on several targets in the central nervous system. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on effects of ALC in the nervous system.

  6. CoaTx-II, a new dimeric Lys49 phospholipase A2 from Crotalus oreganus abyssus snake venom with bactericidal potential: Insights into its structure and biological roles.

    PubMed

    Almeida, J R; Lancellotti, M; Soares, A M; Calderon, L A; Ramírez, D; González, W; Marangoni, S; Da Silva, S L

    2016-09-15

    Snake venoms are rich and intriguing sources of biologically-active molecules that act on target cells, modulating a diversity of physiological functions and presenting promising pharmacological applications. Lys49 phospholipase A2 is one of the multifunctional proteins present in these complex secretions and, although catalytically inactive, has a variety of biological activities, including cytotoxic, antibacterial, inflammatory, antifungal activities. Herein, a Lys49 phospholipase A2, denominated CoaTx-II from Crotalus oreganus abyssus, was purified and structurally and pharmacologically characterized. CoaTx-II was isolated with a high degree of purity by a combination of two chromatographic steps; molecular exclusion and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. This toxin is dimeric with a mass of 13868.2 Da (monomeric form), as determined by mass spectrometry. CoaTx-II is rich in Arg and Lys residues and displays high identity with other Lys49 PLA2 homologues, which have high isoelectric points. The structural model of dimeric CoaTx-II shows that the toxin is non-covalently stabilized. Despite its enzymatic inactivity, in vivo CoaTx-II caused local muscular damage, characterized by increased plasma creatine kinase and confirmed by histological alterations, in addition to an inflammatory activity, as demonstrated by mice paw edema induction and pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 elevation. CoaTx-II also presents antibacterial activity against gram negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa 31NM, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922) and positive (Staphyloccocus aureus BEC9393 and Rib1) bacteria. Therefore, data show that this newly purified toxin plays a central role in mediating the degenerative events associated with envenomation, in addition to demonstrating antibacterial properties, with potential for use in the development of strategies for antivenom therapy and combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  7. Aspergillus oryzae CsyB Catalyzes the Condensation of Two β-Ketoacyl-CoAs to Form 3-Acetyl-4-hydroxy-6-alkyl-α-pyrone*

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Makoto; Koen, Tsukasa; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Suda, Chihiro; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko; Fujii, Isao

    2014-01-01

    The type III polyketide synthases from fungi produce a variety of secondary metabolites including pyrones, resorcinols, and resorcylic acids. We previously reported that CsyB from Aspergillus oryzae forms α-pyrone csypyrone B compounds when expressed in A. oryzae. Feeding experiments of labeled acetates indicated that a fatty acyl starter is involved in the reaction catalyzed by CsyB. Here we report the in vivo and in vitro reconstitution analysis of CsyB. When CsyB was expressed in Escherichia coli, we observed the production of 3-acetyl-4-hydroxy-α-pyrones with saturated or unsaturated straight aliphatic chains of C9–C17 in length at the 6 position. Subsequent in vitro analysis using recombinant CsyB revealed that CsyB could accept butyryl-CoA as a starter substrate and malonyl-CoA and acetoacetyl-CoA as extender substrates to form 3-acetyl-4-hydroxy-6-propyl-α-pyrone. CsyB also afforded dehydroacetic acid from two molecules of acetoacetyl-CoA. Furthermore, synthetic N-acetylcysteamine thioester of β-ketohexanoic acid was converted to 3-butanoyl-4-hydroxy-6-propyl-α-pyrone by CsyB. These results therefore confirmed that CsyB catalyzed the synthesis of β-ketoacyl-CoA from the reaction of the starter fatty acyl CoA thioesters with malonyl-CoA as the extender through decarboxylative condensation and further coupling with acetoacetyl-CoA to form 3-acetyl-4-hydroxy-6-alkyl-α-pyrone. CsyB is the first type III polyketide synthase that synthesizes 3-acetyl-4-hydroxy-6-alkyl-α-pyrone by catalyzed the coupling of two β-ketoacyl-CoAs. PMID:24895122

  8. Antibodies specific to acetylated histones document the existence of deposition- and transcription-related histone acetylation in Tetrahymena

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    In this study, we have constructed synthetic peptides which are identical to hyperacetylated amino termini of two Tetrahymena core histones (tetra-acetylated H4 and penta-acetylated hv1) and used them to generate polyclonal antibodies specific for acetylated forms (mono-, di-, tri-, etc.) of these histones. Neither of these antisera recognizes histone that is unacetylated. Immunoblotting analyses demonstrate that both transcription-related and deposition-related acetate groups on H4 are recognized by both antisera. In addition, the antiserum raised against penta-acetylated hv1 also recognizes acetylated forms of this variant. Immunofluorescent analyses with both antisera demonstrate that, as expected, histone acetylation is specific to macronuclei (or new macronuclei) at all stages of the life cycle except when micronuclei undergo periods of rapid replication and chromatin assembly. During this time micronuclear staining is also detected. Our results also suggest that transcription-related acetylation begins selectively in new macronuclei immediately after the second postzygotic division. Acetylated histone is not observed in new micronuclei during stages corresponding to anlagen development and, therefore, histone acetylation can be distributed asymmetrically in development. Equally striking is the rapid turnover of acetylated histone in parental macronuclei during the time of their inactivation and elimination from the cell. Taken together, these data lend strong support to the idea that modulation of histone acetylation plays an important role in gene activation and in chromatin assembly. PMID:2654136

  9. Poly-acetylated chromatin signatures are preferred epitopes for site-specific histone H4 acetyl antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rothbart, Scott B; Lin, Shu; Britton, Laura-Mae; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Keogh, Michael-C; Garcia, Benjamin A; Strahl, Brian D

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies specific for histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) have been central to our understanding of chromatin biology. Here, we describe an unexpected and novel property of histone H4 site-specific acetyl antibodies in that they prefer poly-acetylated histone substrates. By all current criteria, these antibodies have passed specificity standards. However, we find these site-specific histone antibodies preferentially recognize chromatin signatures containing two or more adjacent acetylated lysines. Significantly, we find that the poly-acetylated epitopes these antibodies prefer are evolutionarily conserved and are present at levels that compete for these antibodies over the intended individual acetylation sites. This alarming property of acetyl-specific antibodies has far-reaching implications for data interpretation and may present a challenge for the future study of acetylated histone and non-histone proteins.

  10. Cross sections for production of the CO(A 1 Pi)-(X 1 Sigma) fourth positive band system and O(3 S) by photodissociation of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentieu, E. P.; Mentall, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    The CO(A 1 Pi) cross sections reported here, along with previously determined electron impact results, establish the basis for calculating CO fourth positive system volume emission rates in the Martian dayglow. Calculated volume emission rates in turn determine relative distribution of photon vs. electron impact as mechanisms for producing CO(A 1 Pi) in the Mars atmosphere. The smallness of the O(1304) cross section confirms previous indirect evidence that photodissociative excitation of CO2 is not an important source of O(3 S) in the upper atmosphere of Mars.

  11. Species Variation in the Predawn Inhibition of Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase 1

    PubMed Central

    Servaites, Jerome C.; Parry, Martin A. J.; Gutteridge, Steven; Keys, Alfred J.

    1986-01-01

    The activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase was measured in extracts of leaves collected before dawn (predawn activity, pa) and at midday (midday activity, ma). Twenty-three of the 37 species examined showed a pa/ma ratio (≤0.75, while only Capsicum frutescens, Cucumis sativa, Glycine max, Nicotiana tabacum, Vigna unguiculata, and 3 Solanum species showed a pa/ma ratio ≤0.5. Phaseolus vulgaris consistently showed a pa/ma ratio of ≤0.1. Activities and pa/ma ratios of the same species grown in the United States and the United Kingdom were very similar. Gel filtration of extracts before assay had no effect on the observed activities and the pa/ma ratios. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that in a number of species the enzyme is partially inhibited following the night period by the presence of a tight-binding inhibitor. PMID:16665155

  12. Purification and characterization of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase from triticale.

    PubMed

    Khan, M A; Dixit, A; Upadhyaya, K C

    1994-04-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase has been isolated from a synthetic cereal triticale and purified using a newly developed rapid procedure involving precipitation with ammonium sulphate (35-55% saturation), DEAE-cellulose (DE-52) chromatography and filtration through Sepharose CL-68. Molecular weights of the enzyme subunits are 15.5 and 52 kDa which corresponds to 540 kDa for the hexadecameric holoenzyme. Isoelectric focussing showed that the enzyme has a pI of 4.2. Various kinetic constants determined under aerobic conditions are: Km (CO2), 118 microM; Km (RuBP), 220 microM (at 20 mM NaHCO3) and Vmax, 690 nmole CO2 fixed/mg enzyme/min.

  13. Cloning and characterization of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase gene of a carboxydobacterium, hydrogenophagea pseudoflava DSM 1084.

    PubMed

    Lee, S N; Kim, Y M

    1998-10-31

    The ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase rbcL and rbcS genes of a carbon monoxide-oxidizing bacterium, Hydrogenophaga pseudoflava DSM 1084, were cloned and sequenced. The cloned rbcL and rbcS genes had open reading frames of 1422 and 351 nucleotides encoding RbcL and RbcS with calculated molecular masses of 52,689 and 13,541, respectively. The known active site residues in other RbcL proteins were conserved in the H. pseudoflava proteins. The H. pseudoflava RbcS protein lacked the 12-residue internal sequence found in the plant enzymes. The 2 genes were separated by a 134 bp intergenic region and cotranscribed as a 2.0 kb rbcLS mRNA. Novel two perfect 9 bp direct repeats overlapping with two dyad symmetries were found in the rbcLS promoter region.

  14. Postimport methylation of the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase in chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Grimm, R; Grimm, M; Eckerskorn, C; Pohlmeyer, K; Röhl, T; Soll, J

    1997-05-26

    Electron impact mass spectronomy analysis of the amino-terminal amino acid of the small subunit (SSU) of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) showed that the amino-terminal methionine residue is post-translationally modified to N-methyl-methionine. Modification of the amino-terminal methionine residue was found in mature SSU proteins from the dicotyledonous plants pea and spinach as well as the monocotyledonous plants barley and corn. SSU methyltransferase is a soluble protein in the chloroplast stroma and accepts heterologously expressed non-methylated SSU as a substrate using S-adenosylmethionine as methyl-group donor. We show that this modification occurs after post-translational uptake of the precursor form of SSU into chloroplasts and processing to its mature size. This reaction represents a new step in the import and assembly pathway of Rubisco holoenzyme.

  15. Maternal 3-methylcrotonyl-coenzyme A carboxylase deficiency with elevated 3-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine in breast milk

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyung Lae; Kim, Yeo Jin; Yang, Song Hyun; Kim, Gu-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    We report here a case of maternal 3-methylcrotonyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (3-MCC) deficiency in a Korean woman. Her 2 infants had elevated 3-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine (C5-OH) on a neonatal screening test by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), but normal results were found on urine organic acid analysis. The patient was subjected to serial testing and we confirmed a maternal 3-MCC deficiency by blood spot and breast milk spot test by LC-MS/MS, serum amino acid analysis, urine organic acid and molecular genetic analysis that found c.838G>T (p.Asp280Tyr) homozygous mutation within exon 9 of the MCCB gene. Especially, we confirmed marked higher levels of C5-OH on breast milk spot by LC-MS/MS, in the case of maternal 3-MCC deficiency vs. controls. PMID:28018443

  16. [Functions of plant phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and its applications for genetic engineering].

    PubMed

    Wei, Shaowei; Li, Yin

    2011-12-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) is an important ubiquitous cytosol enzyme that fixes HCO3 together with phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and yields oxaloacetate that can be converted to intermediates of the citric acid cycle. In plant cells, PEPC participates in CO2 assimilation and other important metabolic pathways, and it has broad functions in different plant tissues. PEPC is also involved in the regulation of storage product synthesis and metabolism in seeds, such as affecting the metabolic fluxes from sugars/starch towards the synthesis of fatty acids or amino acids and proteins. In this review, we introduced the progress in classification, structure and regulation of PEPC in plant tissues. We discussed the potential applications of plant PEPCs in genetic engineering. The researches in functions and regulation mechanism of plant PEPCs will provide beneficial approaches to applications of plant PEPCs in high-yield crops breeding, energy crop and microbe genetic engineering.

  17. Biosynthesis and turnover of O-acetyl and N-acetyl groups in the gangliosides of human melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Manzi, A.E.; Sjoberg, E.R.; Diaz, S.; Varki, A.

    1990-08-05

    We and others previously described the melanoma-associated oncofetal glycosphingolipid antigen 9-O-acetyl-GD3, a disialoganglioside O-acetylated at the 9-position of the outer sialic acid residue. We have now developed methods to examine the biosynthesis and turnover of disialogangliosides in cultured melanoma cells and in Golgi-enriched vesicles from these cells. O-Acetylation was selectively expressed on di- and trisialogangliosides, but not on monosialogangliosides, nor on glycoprotein-bound sialic acids. Double-labeling of cells with (3H)acetate and (14C)glucosamine introduced easily detectable labels into each of the components of the ganglioside molecules. Pulse-chase studies of such doubly labeled molecules indicated that the O-acetyl groups turn over faster than the parent molecule. When Golgi-enriched vesicles from these cells were incubated with (acetyl-3H)acetyl-coenzyme A, the major labeled products were disialogangliosides. (Acetyl-3H)O-acetyl groups were found at both the 7- and the 9-positions, indicating that both 7-O-acetyl GD3 and 9-O-acetyl GD3 were synthesized by the action of O-acetyltransferase(s) on endogenous GD3. Analysis of the metabolically labeled molecules confirmed the existence of both 7- and 9-O-acetylated GD3 in the intact cells. Surprisingly, the major 3H-labeled product of the in vitro labeling reaction was not O-acetyl-GD3, but GD3, with the label exclusively in the sialic acid residues. Fragmentation of the labeled sialic acids by enzymatic and chemical methods showed that the 3H-label was exclusively in (3H)N-acetyl groups. Analyses of the double-labeled sialic acids from intact cells also showed that the 3H-label from (3H)acetate was exclusively in the form of (3H)N-acetyl groups, whereas the 14C-label was at the 4-position.

  18. Structural and Biochemical Studies on the Regulation of Biotin Carboxylase by Substrate Inhibition and Dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Chi-Yuan; Tong, Liang

    2012-06-19

    Biotin carboxylase (BC) activity is shared among biotin-dependent carboxylases and catalyzes the Mg-ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin using bicarbonate as the CO{sub 2} donor. BC has been studied extensively over the years by structural, kinetic, and mutagenesis analyses. Here we report three new crystal structures of Escherichia coli BC at up to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution, complexed with different ligands. Two structures are wild-type BC in complex with two ADP molecules and two Ca{sup 2+} ions or two ADP molecules and one Mg{sup 2+} ion. One ADP molecule is in the position normally taken by the ATP substrate, whereas the other ADP molecule occupies the binding sites of bicarbonate and biotin. One Ca{sup 2+} ion and the Mg{sup 2+} ion are associated with the ADP molecule in the active site, and the other Ca{sup 2+} ion is coordinated by Glu-87, Glu-288, and Asn-290. Our kinetic studies confirm that ATP shows substrate inhibition and that this inhibition is competitive against bicarbonate. The third structure is on the R16E mutant in complex with bicarbonate and Mg-ADP. Arg-16 is located near the dimer interface. The R16E mutant has only a 2-fold loss in catalytic activity compared with the wild-type enzyme. Analytical ultracentrifugation experiments showed that the mutation significantly destabilized the dimer, although the presence of substrates can induce dimer formation. The binding modes of bicarbonate and Mg-ADP are essentially the same as those to the wild-type enzyme. However, the mutation greatly disrupted the dimer interface and caused a large re-organization of the dimer. The structures of these new complexes have implications for the catalysis by BC.

  19. Structural and Biochemical Studies on the Regulation of Biotin Carboxylase by Substrate Inhibition and Dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    C Chou; L Tong

    2011-12-31

    Biotin carboxylase (BC) activity is shared among biotin-dependent carboxylases and catalyzes the Mg-ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin using bicarbonate as the CO{sub 2} donor. BC has been studied extensively over the years by structural, kinetic, and mutagenesis analyses. Here we report three new crystal structures of Escherichia coli BC at up to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution, complexed with different ligands. Two structures are wild-type BC in complex with two ADP molecules and two Ca{sup 2+} ions or two ADP molecules and one Mg{sup 2+} ion. One ADP molecule is in the position normally taken by the ATP substrate, whereas the other ADP molecule occupies the binding sites of bicarbonate and biotin. One Ca{sup 2+} ion and the Mg{sup 2+} ion are associated with the ADP molecule in the active site, and the other Ca{sup 2+} ion is coordinated by Glu-87, Glu-288, and Asn-290. Our kinetic studies confirm that ATP shows substrate inhibition and that this inhibition is competitive against bicarbonate. The third structure is on the R16E mutant in complex with bicarbonate and Mg-ADP. Arg-16 is located near the dimer interface. The R16E mutant has only a 2-fold loss in catalytic activity compared with the wild-type enzyme. Analytical ultracentrifugation experiments showed that the mutation significantly destabilized the dimer, although the presence of substrates can induce dimer formation. The binding modes of bicarbonate and Mg-ADP are essentially the same as those to the wild-type enzyme. However, the mutation greatly disrupted the dimer interface and caused a large re-organization of the dimer. The structures of these new complexes have implications for the catalysis by BC.

  20. Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase from the halophilic cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica.

    PubMed

    Asami, S; Takabe, T; Akazawa, T; Codd, G A

    1983-09-01

    Various structural and functional properties of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) isolated from the halophilic cyanobacterium (blue-green alga) Aphanothece halophytica were reexamined. The ready dissociation of this algal RuBisCO during sedimentation in a linear sucrose density gradient was observed. Low NaCl concentrations promote the dissociation of small subunit (B) from the original native enzyme molecule as evidenced by the sucrose density gradient centrifugation and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. It is thus possible that the intracellular osmoticum of A. halophytica might influence the structural integrity and activity of RuBisCO. The low residual carboxylase activity ascribed to the catalytic core, an oligomer form of the large subunit (A) apparently deficient in small subunit (B), was found to be markedly stimulated by a protein component which appears identical to subunit B. The purification and structural characterization of the catalytic core and subunit B were attempted by step-wise column chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, Utrogel AcA 34, Sephadex G-75, and hydroxylapatite, and at the final stage each component was purified to near homogeneity, although the catalytic core is still associated with a small quantity of subunit B. The addition of subunit B to the catalytic core does not alter the Km (HCO-3, RuBP) values, but Vmax values are markedly enhanced. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation gave a value of 16 S for the catalytic core. The molecular weights of the monomeric forms of the catalytic core (subunit A) and subunit B were 5.0 X 10(4) and 1.4 X 10(4), respectively.

  1. Crystal Structure of Biotin Carboxylase in Complex with Substrates and Implications for Its Catalytic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C.; Yu, L; Tong, L

    2009-01-01

    Biotin-dependent carboxylases are widely distributed in nature and have important functions in many cellular processes. These enzymes share a conserved biotin carboxylase (BC) component, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin using bicarbonate as the donor. Despite the availability of a large amount of biochemical and structural information on BC, the molecular basis for its catalysis is currently still poorly understood. We report here the crystal structure at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution of wild-type Escherichia coli BC in complex with its substrates biotin, bicarbonate, and Mg-ADP. The structure suggests that Glu{sup 296} is the general base that extracts the proton from bicarbonate, and Arg{sup 338} is the residue that stabilizes the enolate biotin intermediate in the carboxylation reaction. The B domain of BC is positioned closer to the active site, leading to a 2-{angstrom} shift in the bound position of the adenine nucleotide and bringing it near the bicarbonate for catalysis. One of the oxygen atoms of bicarbonate is located in the correct position to initiate the nucleophilic attack on ATP to form the carboxyphosphate intermediate. This oxygen is also located close to the N1' atom of biotin, providing strong evidence that the phosphate group, derived from decomposition of carboxyphosphate, is the general base that extracts the proton on this N1' atom. The structural observations are supported by mutagenesis and kinetic studies. Overall, this first structure of BC in complex with substrates offers unprecedented insights into the molecular mechanism for the catalysis by this family of enzymes.

  2. Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Pseudomonas oxalacticus.

    PubMed Central

    Lawlis, V B; Gordon, G L; McFadden, B A

    1979-01-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase was purified by a rapid, facile procedure from formate-grown Pseudomonas oxalaticus. The electrophoretically homogeneous enzyme had specific activities of 1.9 mumol of CO2 fixed per min per mg of protein and 0.15 mumol of O2 consumed per min per mg of protein. The amino acid composition was similar to that of other bacterial sources of the enzyme. The molecular weights determined by sedimentation equilibrium and by gel filtration were 421,000 and 450,000, respectively. Upon sodium dodecyl sulfate electrophoresis of enzyme purified under conditions which would limit proteolysis, two types of large (L) subunits and two types of small (S) subunits were observed with apparent molecular weights of 57,000, 55,000, 17,000 and 15,000. By densitometric scans at two different protein concentrations the stoichiometry of the total large to total small subunits was 1:1, implying an L6S6 structure. Electron micrographs of the enzyme revealed an unusual structure that was inconsistent with a cubical structure. The enzyme had an unusually high Km for ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (220 microM) and was strongly inhibited by 6-phosphogluconate in the ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase assay (Ki = 270 microM). One, 5, and 12 days after purification the enzyme was half-maximally activated at 0.13 microM, 0.23 mM, and 0.70 mM CO2, respectively, at saturating Mg2+. At saturating CO2, enzyme 1 day afer purification responded sigmoidally to Mg2+ and was half-maximally activated by 0.85 mM Mg2+ in the absence of 6-phosphogluconate (Hill coefficient, h = 2.0) and by 0.19 mM Mg2+ in the presence of mM 6-phosphogluconate (h = 1.7). Images PMID:457602

  3. Nitric oxide regulation of leaf phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase-kinase activity: implication in sorghum responses to salinity.

    PubMed

    Monreal, José A; Arias-Baldrich, Cirenia; Tossi, Vanesa; Feria, Ana B; Rubio-Casal, Alfredo; García-Mata, Carlos; Lamattina, Lorenzo; García-Mauriño, Sofía

    2013-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling molecule that mediates many plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses, including salt stress. Interestingly, salinity increases NO production selectively in mesophyll cells of sorghum leaves, where photosynthetic C₄ phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (C₄ PEPCase) is located. PEPCase is regulated by a phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase-kinase (PEPCase-k), which levels are greatly enhanced by salinity in sorghum. This work investigated whether NO is involved in this effect. NO donors (SNP, SNAP), the inhibitor of NO synthesis NNA, and the NO scavenger cPTIO were used for long- and short-term treatments. Long-term treatments had multifaceted consequences on both PPCK gene expression and PEPCase-k activity, and they also decreased photosynthetic gas-exchange parameters and plant growth. Nonetheless, it could be observed that SNP increased PEPCase-k activity, resembling salinity effect. Short-term treatments with NO donors, which did not change photosynthetic gas-exchange parameters and PPCK gene expression, increased PEPCase-k activity both in illuminated leaves and in leaves kept at dark. At least in part, these effects were independent on protein synthesis. PEPCase-k activity was not decreased by short-term treatment with cycloheximide in NaCl-treated plants; on the contrary, it was decreased by cPTIO. In summary, NO donors mimicked salt effect on PEPCase-k activity, and scavenging of NO abolished it. Collectively, these results indicate that NO is involved in the complex control of PEPCase-k activity, and it may mediate some of the plant responses to salinity.

  4. Methylation of γ-carboxylated Glu (Gla) allows detection by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and the identification of Gla residues in the γ-glutamyl carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Hallgren, K W; Zhang, D; Kinter, M; Willard, B; Berkner, K L

    2013-06-07

    γ-Carboxylated Glu (Gla) is a post-translational modification required for the activity of vitamin K-dependent (VKD) proteins that has been difficult to study by mass spectrometry due to the properties of this negatively charged residue. Gla is generated by a single enzyme, the γ-glutamyl carboxylase, which has broad biological impact because VKD proteins have diverse functions that include hemostasis, apoptosis, and growth control. The carboxylase also contains Glas, of unknown function, and is an integral membrane protein with poor sequence coverage. To locate these Glas, we first established methods that resulted in high coverage (92%) of uncarboxylated carboxylase. Subsequent analysis of carboxylated carboxylase identified a Gla peptide (729-758) and a missing region (625-647) that was detected in uncarboxylated carboxylase. We therefore developed an approach to methylate Gla, which efficiently neutralized Gla and improved mass spectrometric analysis. Methylation eliminated CO2 loss from Gla, increased the ionization of Gla-containing peptide, and appeared to facilitate trypsin digestion. Methylation of a carboxylated carboxylase tryptic digest identified Glas in the 625-647 peptide. These studies provide valuable information for testing the function of carboxylase carboxylation. The methylation approach for studying Gla by mass spectrometry is an important advance that will be broadly applicable to analyzing other VKD proteins.

  5. Methylation of gamma-carboxylated Glu (Gla) allows detection by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and the identification of Gla residues in the gamma-glutamyl carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Hallgren, K. W.; Zhang, D.; Kinter, M.; Willard, B.; Berkner, K. L.

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-carboxylated Glu (Gla) is a post-translational modification required for the activity of vitamin K-dependent (VKD) proteins that has been difficult to study by mass spectrometry due to the properties of this negatively-charged residue. Gla is generated by a single enzyme, the gamma-glutamyl carboxylase, which has broad biological impact because VKD proteins have diverse functions that include hemostasis, apoptosis, and growth control. The carboxylase also contains Glas, of unknown function, and is an integral membrane protein with poor sequence coverage. To locate these Glas, we first established methods that resulted in high coverage (92%) of uncarboxylated carboxylase. Subsequent analysis of carboxylated carboxylase identified a Gla-peptide (729-758) and a missing region (625-647) that was detected in uncarboxylated carboxylase. We therefore developed an approach to methylate Gla, which efficiently neutralized Gla and improved mass spectrometric analysis. Methylation eliminated CO2 loss from Gla, increased the ionization of Gla-containing peptide, and appeared to facilitate trypsin digestion. Methylation of a carboxylated carboxylase tryptic digest identified Glas in the 625-647 peptide. These studies provide valuable information for testing the function of carboxylase carboxylation. The methylation approach for studying Gla by mass spectrometry is an important advance that will be broadly applicable to analyzing other VKD proteins. PMID:22536908

  6. A Dual Pathogenic Mechanism Links Tau Acetylation to Sporadic Tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Trzeciakiewicz, Hanna; Tseng, Jui-Heng; Wander, Connor M.; Madden, Victoria; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Yuan, Chao-Xing; Cohen, Todd J.

    2017-01-01

    Tau acetylation has recently emerged as a dominant post-translational modification (PTM) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related tauopathies. Mass spectrometry studies indicate that tau acetylation sites cluster within the microtubule (MT)-binding region (MTBR), suggesting acetylation could regulate both normal and pathological tau functions. Here, we combined biochemical and cell-based approaches to uncover a dual pathogenic mechanism mediated by tau acetylation. We show that acetylation specifically at residues K280/K281 impairs tau-mediated MT stabilization, and enhances the formation of fibrillar tau aggregates, highlighting both loss and gain of tau function. Full-length acetylation-mimic tau showed increased propensity to undergo seed-dependent aggregation, revealing a potential role for tau acetylation in the propagation of tau pathology. We also demonstrate that methylene blue, a reported tau aggregation inhibitor, modulates tau acetylation, a novel mechanism of action for this class of compounds. Our study identifies a potential “two-hit” mechanism in which tau acetylation disengages tau from MTs and also promotes tau aggregation. Thus, therapeutic approaches to limit tau K280/K281 acetylation could simultaneously restore MT stability and ameliorate tau pathology in AD and related tauopathies. PMID:28287136

  7. SWI/SNF Displaces SAGA-Acetylated Nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Chandy, Mark; Gutiérrez, José L.; Prochasson, Philippe; Workman, Jerry L.

    2006-01-01

    SWI/SNF is a well-characterized chromatin remodeling complex that remodels chromatin by sliding nucleosomes in cis and/or displacing nucleosomes in trans. The latter mechanism has the potential to remove promoter nucleosomes, allowing access to transcription factors and RNA polymerase. In vivo, histone acetylation often precedes apparent nucleosome loss; therefore, we sought to determine whether nucleosomes containing acetylated histones could be displaced by the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex. We found that SAGA-acetylated histones were lost from an immobilized nucleosome array when treated with the SWI/SNF complex. When the nucleosome array was acetylated by SAGA in the presence of bound transcription activators, it generated a peak of acetylation surrounding the activator binding sites. Subsequent SWI/SNF treatment suppressed this acetylation peak. Immunoblots indicated that SWI/SNF preferentially displaced acetylated histones from the array relative to total histones. Moreover, the Swi2/Snf2 bromodomain, an acetyl-lysine binding domain, played a role in the displacement of acetylated histones. These data indicate that targeted histone acetylation by the SAGA complex predisposes promoter nucleosomes for displacement by the SWI/SNF complex. PMID:17030999

  8. Importance of acetylator phenotype in the identity of Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Zaid, R B; Nargis, M; Neelotpol, S; Sayeed, M A; Banu, A; Shurovi, S; Hassan, K N; Salimullah, M; Ali, L; Azad Khan, A K

    2007-06-01

    The Marma, Tripura, and Chakma are tribal populations of South Asian countries such as Bangladesh. The populations are thought to be immigrants who started moving from their original home in the Far East toward the west and south. We randomly selected 80 Marma, 53 Tripura, and 43 Chakma to determine acetylation capacity and acetylator phenotype. The mean acetylation capacities were 63% in the Marma, 65% in the Tripura, and 70% in the Chakma. The acetylator phenotype was bimodally distributed as fast and slow acetylator. The frequencies of fast acetylator were 83% in the Marma, 89% in the Tripura, and 88% in the Chakma. According to acetylation capacity, the tribes are different from the founder nontribal populations of Bangladesh. They identify themselves as having a separate single population origin. The frequency of fast acetylator predicted served as the acetylator status of the Far East Asian population. The segregation of populations by acetylator phenotype on geographic longitude might be appropriate for geonational identification of Asian populations.

  9. Global Analysis of Lysine Acetylation Suggests the Involvement of Protein Acetylation in Diverse Biological Processes in Rice (Oryza sativa)

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xiaoxian; Tan, Feng; Mujahid, Hana; Zhang, Jian; Nanduri, Bindu; Peng, Zhaohua

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a reversible, dynamic protein modification regulated by lysine acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Recent advances in high-throughput proteomics have greatly contributed to the success of global analysis of lysine acetylation. A large number of proteins of diverse biological functions have been shown to be acetylated in several reports in human cells, E.coli, and dicot plants. However, the extent of lysine acetylation in non-histone proteins remains largely unknown in monocots, particularly in the cereal crops. Here we report the mass spectrometric examination of lysine acetylation in rice (Oryza sativa). We identified 60 lysine acetylated sites on 44 proteins of diverse biological functions. Immunoblot studies further validated the presence of a large number of acetylated non-histone proteins. Examination of the amino acid composition revealed substantial amino acid bias around the acetylation sites and the amino acid preference is conserved among different organisms. Gene ontology analysis demonstrates that lysine acetylation occurs in diverse cytoplasmic, chloroplast and mitochondrial proteins in addition to the histone modifications. Our results suggest that lysine acetylation might constitute a regulatory mechanism for many proteins, including both histones and non-histone proteins of diverse biological functions. PMID:24586658

  10. Characterization of the JWST Pathfinder mirror dynamics using the center of curvature optical assembly (CoCOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Conrad; Hadaway, James B.; Olczak, Gene; Cosentino, Joseph; Johnston, John D.; Whitman, Tony; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Knight, J. Scott; Telfer, Randal

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) consists of a 6.6 m clear aperture, 18 segment primary mirror, all-reflective, three-mirror anastigmat operating at cryogenic temperatures. To verify performance of the primary mirror, a full aperture center of curvature optical null test is performed under cryogenic conditions in Chamber A at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) using an instantaneous phase measuring interferometer. After phasing the mirrors during the JWST Pathfinder testing, the interferometer is utilized to characterize the mirror relative piston and tilt dynamics under different facility configurations. The correlation between the motions seen on detectors at the focal plane and the interferometer validates the use of the interferometer for dynamic investigations. The success of planned test hardware improvements will be characterized by the multi-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) at the Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA).

  11. Characterization of the JWST Pathfinder Mirror Dynamics Using the Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Conrad; Hadaway, James B.; Olczak, Gene; Cosentino, Joseph; Johnston, John D.; Whitman, Tony; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Knight, J. Scott; Telfer, Randal

    2016-01-01

    The JWST (James Webb Space Telescope) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) consists of a 6.6 meter clear aperture, 18-segment primary mirror, all-reflective, three-mirror anastigmat operating at cryogenic temperatures. To verify performance of the primary mirror, a full aperture center of curvature optical null test is performed under cryogenic conditions in Chamber A at NASA Johnson Space Center using an instantaneous phase measuring interferometer. After phasing the mirrors during the JWST Pathfinder testing, the interferometer is utilized to characterize the mirror relative piston and tilt dynamics under different facility configurations. The correlation between the motions seen on detectors at the focal plane and the interferometer validates the use of the interferometer for dynamic investigations. The success of planned test hardware improvements will be characterized by the multi-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) at the Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA).

  12. Coordination of a transcriptional switch by HMGI(Y) acetylation.

    PubMed

    Munshi, N; Agalioti, T; Lomvardas, S; Merika, M; Chen, G; Thanos, D

    2001-08-10

    Dynamic control of interferon-beta (IFN-beta) gene expression requires the regulated assembly and disassembly of the enhanceosome, a higher-order nucleoprotein complex formed in response to virus infection. The enhanceosome activates transcription by recruiting the histone acetyltransferase proteins CREB binding protein (CBP) and p300/CBP-associated factors (PCAF)/GCN5, which, in addition to modifying histones, acetylate HMGI(Y), the architectural component required for enhanceosome assembly. We show that the accurate execution of the IFN-beta transcriptional switch depends on the ordered acetylation of the high-mobility group I protein HMGI(Y) by PCAF/GCN5 and CBP, which acetylate HMGI(Y) at distinct lysine residues on endogenous promoters. Whereas acetylation of HMGI(Y) by CBP at lysine-65 destabilizes the enhanceosome, acetylation of HMGI(Y) by PCAF/GCN5 at lysine-71 potentiates transcription by stabilizing the enhanceosome and preventing acetylation by CBP.

  13. Oxaloacetate synthesis in the methanarchaeon Methanosarcina barkeri: pyruvate carboxylase genes and a putative Escherichia coli-type bifunctional biotin protein ligase gene (bpl/birA) exhibit a unique organization.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, B; Purwantini, E; Kreder, C L; Wolfe, R S

    2001-06-01

    Evidence is presented that, in Methanosarcina barkeri oxaloacetate synthesis, an essential and major CO(2) fixation reaction is catalyzed by an apparent alpha(4)beta(4)-type acetyl coenzyme A-independent pyruvate carboxylase (PYC), composed of 64.2-kDa biotinylated and 52.9-kDa ATP-binding subunits. The purified enzyme was most active at 70 degrees C, insensitive to aspartate and glutamate, mildly inhibited by alpha-ketoglutarate, and severely inhibited by ATP, ADP, and excess Mg(2+). It showed negative cooperativity towards bicarbonate at 70 degrees C but not at 37 degrees C. The organism expressed holo-PYC without an external supply of biotin and, thus, synthesized biotin. pycA, pycB, and a putative bpl gene formed a novel operon-like arrangement. Unlike other archaeal homologs, the putative biotin protein ligases (BPLs) of M. barkeri and the closely related euryarchaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus appeared to be of the Escherichia coli-type (bifunctional, with two activities: BirA or a repressor of the biotin operon and BPL). We found the element Tyr(Phe)ProX(5)Phe(Tyr) to be fully conserved in biotin-dependent enzymes; it might function as the hinge for their "swinging arms."

  14. Survey of the human acetylator polymorphism in spontaneous disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D A

    1984-01-01

    There is ample evidence that the human acetylator phenotypes are associated with drug induced phenomena. It is principally the slow acetylators who exhibit toxic adverse effects because of their relative inability to detoxify the original drug compounds. In rare instances, however, it is the rapid acetylators who are at a disadvantage. In the matter of association of spontaneous disease with either acetylator phenotype, there are two groups of disorders to consider. First, disorders in which carcinogenic amines are known to be an aetiological factor. This is because these amines are substrates for the polymorphic N-acetyltransferase activity and hence there is a possible rational basis for searching for an association. Secondly, other disorders where searches for associations are based more on hunches. In the first group there is a definite statistical association between cancer of the bladder and the slow acetylator phenotype. In prevalence studies the slow phenotype is 39% more associated with bladder cancer than is the rapid phenotype. On the basis of the evidence now available it is not possible to say whether this association is because slow acetylators develop the disease more frequently or whether they survive longer. In the second group the relevant studies show (1) a greatly increased prevalence of slow acetylators in Gilbert's disease; (2) a confirmed association between the rapid acetylator phenotype and diabetes; (3) a possible association between the rapid acetylator phenotype and breast cancer; (4) a possible association between the slow acetylator phenotype and leprosy in Chinese patients; (5) an earlier age of onset of thyrotoxicosis (Graves' disease) in slow acetylators than in rapid acetylators; (6) no evidence of an association between either phenotype and spontaneous systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:6387123

  15. Biochemical and Crystallographic Analysis of Substrate Binding and Conformational Changes in Acetyl-CoA Synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Reger,A.; Carney, J.; Gulick, A.

    2007-01-01

    The adenylate-forming enzymes, including acyl-CoA synthetases, the adenylation domains of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS), and firefly luciferase, perform two half-reactions in a ping-pong mechanism. We have proposed a domain alternation mechanism for these enzymes whereby, upon completion of the initial adenylation reaction, the C-terminal domain of these enzymes undergoes a 140{sup o} rotation to perform the second thioester-forming half-reaction. Structural and kinetic data of mutant enzymes support this hypothesis. We present here mutations to Salmonella enterica acetyl-CoA synthetase (Acs) and test the ability of the enzymes to catalyze the complete reaction and the adenylation half-reaction. Substitution of Lys609 with alanine results in an enzyme that is unable to catalyze the adenylate reaction, while the Gly524 to leucine substitution is unable to catalyze the complete reaction yet catalyzes the adenylation half-reaction with activity comparable to the wild-type enzyme. The positions of these two residues, which are located on the mobile C-terminal domain, strongly support the domain alternation hypothesis. We also present steady-state kinetic data of putative substrate-binding residues and demonstrate that no single residue plays a dominant role in dictating CoA binding. We have also created two mutations in the active site to alter the acyl substrate specificity. Finally, the crystallographic structures of wild-type Acs and mutants R194A, R584A, R584E, K609A, and V386A are presented to support the biochemical analysis.

  16. Linear magnetoelectric effect as a signature of long-range collinear antiferromagnetic ordering in the frustrated spinel CoA l2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghara, Somnath; Ter-Oganessian, N. V.; Sundaresan, A.

    2017-03-01

    The ground state of the frustrated A -site magnetic spinel CoA l2O4 has been a controversial issue whether it is a collinear antiferromagnetic ordering or a spiral spin-liquid state, as the ratio of the two competing interactions J2/J1 lies close to the boundary between these two ground states. Here we address the magnetic ground state in CoA l2O4 with different amounts of C o2 +/A l3 + site disorder from the study of magnetoelectric effect and Monte Carlo simulations. CoA l2O4 with low site disorder exhibits a linear magnetoelectric effect below the magnetic ordering temperature. With increasing disorder, the magnetoelectric effect is suppressed and the sample with 14 % disorder exhibits a spin glass behavior without the magnetoelectric effect. Monte Carlo simulations support the experimental findings and suggest that the site disorder suppresses long-range antiferromagnetic order and induces a spin glass state. Since the linear magnetoelectric effect requires a long-range magnetic ordering, we suggest that the ground state of CoA l2O4 with low site disorder is a collinear antiferromagnet.

  17. Acyl CoA synthetase 5 (ACSL5) ablation in mice increases energy expenditure and insulin sensitivity and delays fat absorption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: The family of acyl-CoA synthetase enzymes (ACSL) activates fatty acids within cells to generate long chain fatty acyl CoA (FACoA). The differing metabolic fates of FACoAs such as incorporation into neutral lipids, phospholipids, and oxidation pathways are differentially regulated by the ...

  18. Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of acetylated EGCG and antioxidant properties of the acetylated derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) acetylated derivatives were prepared by lipase catalyzed acylation of EGCG with vinyl acetate to improve its lipophilicity and expand its application in lipophilic media. The immobilized lipase, Lipozyme RM IM, was found to be the optimum catalyst. The optimiz...

  19. Tubulin acetylation protects long-lived microtubules against mechanical ageing.

    PubMed

    Portran, Didier; Schaedel, Laura; Xu, Zhenjie; Théry, Manuel; Nachury, Maxence V

    2017-04-01

    Long-lived microtubules endow the eukaryotic cell with long-range transport abilities. While long-lived microtubules are acetylated on Lys40 of α-tubulin (αK40), acetylation takes place after stabilization and does not protect against depolymerization. Instead, αK40 acetylation has been proposed to mechanically stabilize microtubules. Yet how modification of αK40, a residue exposed to the microtubule lumen and inaccessible to microtubule-associated proteins and motors, could affect microtubule mechanics remains an open question. Here we develop FRET-based assays that report on the lateral interactions between protofilaments and find that αK40 acetylation directly weakens inter-protofilament interactions. Congruently, αK40 acetylation affects two processes largely governed by inter-protofilament interactions, reducing the nucleation frequency and accelerating the shrinkage rate. Most relevant to the biological function of acetylation, microfluidics manipulations demonstrate that αK40 acetylation enhances flexibility and confers resilience against repeated mechanical stresses. Thus, unlike deacetylated microtubules that accumulate damage when subjected to repeated stresses, long-lived microtubules are protected from mechanical ageing through their acquisition of αK40 acetylation. In contrast to other tubulin post-translational modifications that act through microtubule-associated proteins, motors and severing enzymes, intraluminal acetylation directly tunes the compliance and resilience of microtubules.

  20. Interindividual and intraindividual variability in acetylation: characterization with caffeine.

    PubMed

    Hardy, B G; Lemieux, C; Walker, S E; Bartle, W R

    1988-08-01

    The degree of interindividual and intraindividual variability in acetylator activity was investigated with caffeine used as a probe of enzyme activity. Acetylator phenotype and relative N-acetyltransferase activity were estimated in 46 subjects by measuring the urinary ratio of two metabolites, AFMU/1-MX, after a single 300 mg oral dose of caffeine on five separate occasions. Thirty homozygous slow (rr) and 15 heterozygous rapid (Rr) acetylators were identified. The degree of interindividual variability in acetylator activity was observed to be a mean of 32% (range 27% to 36%) and 20% (range 11% to 29%) in the rr and Rr groups, respectively. The mean intraindividual variation on repetitive measurement was 19% (range 6% to 49%) in the rr and 14% (range 7% to 24%) in the Rr acetylator group. Four subjects had apparent changes in acetylator activity with time such that they were unable to be assigned to any one acetylator group. Two of these four subjects exhibited apparent homozygous rapid acetylator activity intermittently during the 5-week trial. This variability may explain, in part, some of the high degree of patient variability observed in the toxicity, efficacy, and drug-related disease associated with acetylated drugs and environmental toxins.

  1. Structure, morphology and functionality of acetylated and oxidised barley starches.

    PubMed

    El Halal, Shanise Lisie Mello; Colussi, Rosana; Pinto, Vânia Zanella; Bartz, Josiane; Radunz, Marjana; Carreño, Neftali Lenin Villarreal; Dias, Alvaro Renato Guerra; Zavareze, Elessandra da Rosa

    2015-02-01

    Acetylation and oxidation are chemical modifications which alter the properties of starch. The degree of modification of acetylated and oxidized starches is dependent on the catalyst and active chlorine concentrations, respectively. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of acetylation and oxidation on the structural, morphological, physical-chemical, thermal and pasting properties of barley starch. Barley starches were acetylated at different catalyst levels (11%, 17%, and 23% of NaOH solution) and oxidized at different sodium hypochlorite concentrations (1.0%, 1.5%, and 2.0% of active chlorine). Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffractograms, thermal, morphological, and pasting properties, swelling power and solubility of starches were evaluated. The degree of substitution (DS) of the acetylated starches increased with the rise in catalyst concentration. The percentage of carbonyl (CO) and carboxyl (COOH) groups in oxidized starches also increased with the rise of active chlorine level. The presence of hydrophobic acetyl groups, carbonyl and carboxyl groups caused a partial disorganization and depolymerization of starch granules. The structural, morphological and functional changes in acetylated and oxidized starches varied according to reaction conditions. Acetylation makes barley starch more hydrophobic by the insertion of acetyl groups. Also the oxidation promotes low retrogradation and viscosity. All these characteristics are important for biodegradable film production.

  2. N-ACETYL-β-GLUCOSAMINIDASE ACTIVITY IN SERUM DURING PREGNANCY

    PubMed Central

    Walker, P. G.; Woollen, Mary E.; Pugh, Doreen

    1960-01-01

    A spectrophotometric method for the estimation of N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase in serum has been devised. Sera from normal adult males and females showed similar levels of activity. The activity in serum rose progressively during pregnancy and fell rapidly after parturition to normal levels. This change resembled closely that which occurs in serum β-glucuronidase. Placenta showed a moderate and chorion a high level of N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase. High N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase activity was demonstrated histochemically in decidual cells. The functions of N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase and β-glucuronidase and factors influencing their activity are discussed. Images PMID:13782743

  3. Ligand binding at the A-cluster in full-length or truncated acetyl-CoA synthase studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schrapers, Peer; Ilina, Julia; Gregg, Christina M.; Mebs, Stefan; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Dau, Holger; Dobbek, Holger; Haumann, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria integrate CO2 reduction and acetyl coenzyme-A (CoA) synthesis in the Wood-Ljungdal pathway. The acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) active site is a [4Fe4S]-[NiNi] complex (A-cluster). The dinickel site structure (with proximal, p, and distal, d, ions) was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy in ACS variants comprising all three protein domains or only the C-terminal domain with the A-cluster. Both variants showed two square-planar Ni(II) sites and an OH- bound at Ni(II)p in oxidized enzyme and a H2O at Ni(I)p in reduced enzyme; a Ni(I)p-CO species was induced by CO incubation and a Ni(II)-CH3- species with an additional water ligand by a methyl group donor. These findings render a direct effect of the N-terminal and middle domains on the A-cluster structure unlikely. PMID:28178309

  4. Crystal Structure of the Golgi-Associated Human Nα-Acetyltransferase 60 Reveals the Molecular Determinants for Substrate-Specific Acetylation.

    PubMed

    Støve, Svein Isungset; Magin, Robert S; Foyn, Håvard; Haug, Bengt Erik; Marmorstein, Ronen; Arnesen, Thomas

    2016-07-06

    N-Terminal acetylation is a common and important protein modification catalyzed by N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs). Six human NATs (NatA-NatF) contain one catalytic subunit each, Naa10 to Naa60, respectively. In contrast to the ribosome-associated NatA to NatE, NatF/Naa60 specifically associates with Golgi membranes and acetylates transmembrane proteins. To gain insight into the molecular basis for the function of Naa60, we developed an Naa60 bisubstrate CoA-peptide conjugate inhibitor, determined its X-ray structure when bound to CoA and inhibitor, and carried out biochemical experiments. We show that Naa60 adapts an overall fold similar to that of the catalytic subunits of ribosome-associated NATs, but with the addition of two novel elongated loops that play important roles in substrate-specific binding. One of these loops mediates a dimer to monomer transition upon substrate-specific binding. Naa60 employs a catalytic mechanism most similar to Naa50. Collectively, these data reveal the molecular basis for Naa60-specific acetyltransferase activity with implications for its Golgi-specific functions.

  5. Ligand binding at the A-cluster in full-length or truncated acetyl-CoA synthase studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schrapers, Peer; Ilina, Julia; Gregg, Christina M; Mebs, Stefan; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Dau, Holger; Dobbek, Holger; Haumann, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria integrate CO2 reduction and acetyl coenzyme-A (CoA) synthesis in the Wood-Ljungdal pathway. The acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) active site is a [4Fe4S]-[NiNi] complex (A-cluster). The dinickel site structure (with proximal, p, and distal, d, ions) was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy in ACS variants comprising all three protein domains or only the C-terminal domain with the A-cluster. Both variants showed two square-planar Ni(II) sites and an OH- bound at Ni(II)p in oxidized enzyme and a H2O at Ni(I)p in reduced enzyme; a Ni(I)p-CO species was induced by CO incubation and a Ni(II)-CH3- species with an additional water ligand by a methyl group donor. These findings render a direct effect of the N-terminal and middle domains on the A-cluster structure unlikely.

  6. Novel domain arrangement in the crystal structure of a truncated acetyl-CoA synthase fromMoorella thermoacetica†‡

    PubMed Central

    Volbeda, Anne; Darnault, Claudine; Tan, Xiangshi; Lindahl, Paul A.; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C.

    2009-01-01

    Ni-dependent Acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) and CO dehydrogenase (CODH) constitute the central enzyme complex of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway of acetyl-CoA formation. The crystal structure of a recombinant bacterial ACS lacking the N-terminal domain that interacts with CODH shows a large reorganization of the remaining two globular domains, producing a narrow cleft of suitable size, shape and nature to bind CoA. Sequence comparisons with homologous archaeal enzymes that naturally lack the N-terminal domain show that many amino acids lining this cleft are conserved. Besides the typical [4Fe-4S] center, the A-cluster contains only one proximal metal ion that, according to anomalous scattering data, is most likely Cu or Zn. Incorporation of a functional Ni2Fe4S4 A-cluster would require only minor structural rearrangements. Using available structures, a plausible model of the interaction between CODH and the smaller ACS in archaeal multi-enzyme complexes is presented, along with a discussion of evolutionary relationships of the archaeal and bacterial enzymes. PMID:19650626

  7. p300/CBP acetyl transferases interact with and acetylate the nucleotide excision repair factor XPG.

    PubMed

    Tillhon, Micol; Cazzalini, Ornella; Nardo, Tiziana; Necchi, Daniela; Sommatis, Sabrina; Stivala, Lucia A; Scovassi, A Ivana; Prosperi, Ennio

    2012-10-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an important DNA repair mechanism through which cells remove bulky DNA lesions. Following DNA damage, the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) p300 (also referred to as lysine acetyltransferase or KAT) is known to associate with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a master regulator of DNA replication and repair processes. This interaction, which results in HAT inhibition, may be dissociated by the cell cycle inhibitor p21(CDKN1A), thereby restoring p300 activity; however, the role of this protein interplay is still unclear. Here, we report that silencing p300 or its homolog CREB-binding protein (CBP) by RNA interference (RNAi) significantly reduces DNA repair synthesis in human fibroblasts. In addition, we determined whether p300 and CBP may associate with and acetylate specific NER factors such as XPG, the 3'-endonuclease that is involved in the incision/excision step and is known to interact with PCNA. Our results show that p300 and CBP interact with XPG, which has been found to be acetylated in vivo. XPG is acetylated by p300 in vitro, and this reaction is inhibited by PCNA. Knocking down both p300/CBP by RNAi or by chemical inhibition with curcumin greatly reduced XPG acetylation, and a concomitant accumulation of the protein at DNA damage sites was observed. The ability of p21 to bind PCNA was found to regulate the interaction between p300 and XPG, and an abnormal accumulation of XPG at DNA damage sites was also found in p21(-/-) fibroblasts. These results indicate an additional function of p300/CBP in NER through the acetylation of XPG protein in a PCNA-p21 dependent manner.

  8. Effects of heterologous expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase on organic acid production in Aspergillus carbonarius.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Lübeck, Mette; Lübeck, Peter S

    2015-11-01

    Aspergillus carbonarius has a potential as a cell factory for production of various organic acids. In this study, the organic acid profile of A. carbonarius was investigated under different cultivation conditions. Moreover, two heterologous genes, pepck and ppc, which encode phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in Actinobacillus succinogenes and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in Escherichia coli, were inserted individually and in combination in A. carbonarius to enhance the carbon flux toward the reductive TCA branch. Results of transcription analysis and measurement of enzyme activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the corresponding single and double transformants demonstrated that the two heterologous genes were successfully expressed in A. carbonarius. The production of citric acid increased in all the transformants in both glucose- and xylose-based media at pH higher than 3 but did not increase in the pH non-buffered cultivation compared with the wild type.

  9. Nitrate-Dependent Degradation of Acetone by Alicycliphilus and Paracoccus Strains and Comparison of Acetone Carboxylase Enzymes ▿

    PubMed Central

    Dullius, Carlos Henrique; Chen, Ching-Yuan; Schink, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    A novel acetone-degrading, nitrate-reducing bacterium, strain KN Bun08, was isolated from an enrichment culture with butanone and nitrate as the sole sources of carbon and energy. The cells were motile short rods, 0.5 to 1 by 1 to 2 μm in size, which gave Gram-positive staining results in the exponential growth phase and Gram-negative staining results in the stationary-growth phase. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolate was assigned to the genus Alicycliphilus. Besides butanone and acetone, the strain used numerous fatty acids as substrates. An ATP-dependent acetone-carboxylating enzyme was enriched from cell extracts of this bacterium and of Alicycliphilus denitrificans K601T by two subsequent DEAE Sepharose column procedures. For comparison, acetone carboxylases were enriched from two additional nitrate-reducing bacterial species, Paracoccus denitrificans and P. pantotrophus. The products of the carboxylase reaction were acetoacetate and AMP rather than ADP. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of cell extracts and of the various enzyme preparations revealed bands corresponding to molecular masses of 85, 78, and 20 kDa, suggesting similarities to the acetone carboxylase enzymes described in detail for the aerobic bacterium Xanthobacter autotrophicus strain Py2 (85.3, 78.3, and 19.6 kDa) and the phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus. Protein bands were excised and compared by mass spectrometry with those of acetone carboxylases of aerobic bacteria. The results document the finding that the nitrate-reducing bacteria studied here use acetone-carboxylating enzymes similar to those of aerobic and phototrophic bacteria. PMID:21841031

  10. GroE heat shock protein is required for in vivo assembly of recombinant Anabaena ribulose bisphosphate (Ru-P sub 2 ) carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Larimer, F.W.; Soper, T.S. )

    1991-03-11

    As a prerequisite for site-directed mutagenesis of a L{sub 8}S{sub 8} form of Ru-P{sub 2} carboxylase, the rbc operon from Anabaena 7120 was placed under control of the tac promoter (tac-rbcLrbcS, bla, ori(pMB1), from pFL260) in E. coli MV1190 (recA). Substantial amounts of insoluble large subunit were produced, but not active enzyme, suggesting that the carboxylase was not being correctly assembled in vivo. Coexpression of rbcLrbcS and the operon encoding the GroESL (HSP10, HSP60) complex from a compatible plasmid (tac-groESgroEL, cat, ori(p15A), from pFL261) resulted in high levels of active, soluble enzyme. Supplementation of rich medium with potassium ions, required for GroE complex function in vitro enhanced recovery of active enzyme. Under optimal expression conditions, active Ru-P{sub 2} carboxylase comprised 7-10% of soluble protein. The recombinant carboxylase, purified to homogeneity, was similar to the enzyme purified from the authentic cyanobacterium. Chaperonins are required for assembly of many complex proteins. The stringent requirement of Anabaena carboxylase for elevated levels of E. coli GroE chaperonin for proper assembly suggests that the GroE complex differs from the Anabaena chaperonin complex that is normally involved in the assembly of this L{sub 8}S{sub 8} carboxylase.

  11. The opportunity for and significance of alteration of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activities in crop production.

    PubMed

    Hardy, R W; Havelka, U D; Quebedeaux, B

    1978-01-01

    Increased population and the dietary changes accompanying increased affluence are creating a need for a suggested doubling of world cereal grain production (a 3% per year compounding rate) and quadrupling of grain legume production (a 6% per year compounding rate) during this quarter century (1). CO2 enrichment of field-grown crops has demonstrated the possibility of enhancing RuBP carboxylase activity to achieve improved crop production; it increases the production of grain legumes by 50 to 100% and that of cereal grains, for which the studies are less complete, by perhaps 10 to 50%. Results of O2 alteration of growth-room legumes and cereal grains are consistent with the results of CO2 enrichment except for a second role of O2 in assimilate partitioning. It may be necessary to include other components of the system, e.g., additional soil fertility, especially for non-N2-fixing plants, to enable an improved RuBP carboxylase to increase production. No practical method--chemical, genetic, or physical--of improving RuBP carboxylase activity has been reported.

  12. Isolation and partial characterization of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides mutants defective in the regulation of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Weaver, K E; Tabita, F R

    1983-11-01

    Several mutants of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides defective in the derepression of the enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase have been isolated by using the unstable Tn5 vectors pJB4JI and pRK340. Transpositional insertion mutants obtained with pJB4JI were demonstrated to be incapable of increasing ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase levels when grown on butyrate-bicarbonate medium or under conditions of carbon starvation, whereas the wild-type strain increased activity four- to eightfold. When the wild-type strain was starved for carbon in the presence of chloramphenicol, no derepression was observed. Crude extracts from mutant and wild-type strains had distinct and consistent differences in protein content as observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Chromatographic evidence indicated that mutants were defective in the regulation of only one of the two forms of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase synthesized by R. sphaeroides.

  13. An Alternative Strategy for Pan-acetyl-lysine Antibody Generation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Yee; Sim, Choon Kiat; Zhang, Qiongyi; Tang, Hui; Brunmeir, Reinhard; Pan, Hong; Karnani, Neerja; Han, Weiping; Zhang, Kangling; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is an important post-translational modification in cell signaling. In acetylome studies, a high-quality pan-acetyl-lysine antibody is key to successful enrichment of acetylated peptides for subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. Here we show an alternative method to generate polyclonal pan-acetyl-lysine antibodies using a synthesized random library of acetylated peptides as the antigen. Our antibodies are tested to be specific for acetyl-lysine peptides/proteins via ELISA and dot blot. When pooled, five of our antibodies show broad reactivity to acetyl-lysine peptides, complementing a commercial antibody in terms of peptide coverage. The consensus sequence of peptides bound by our antibody cocktail differs slightly from that of the commercial antibody. Lastly, our antibodies are tested in a proof-of-concept to analyze the acetylome of HEK293 cells. In total we identified 1557 acetylated peptides from 416 proteins. We thus demonstrated that our antibodies are well-qualified for acetylome studies and can complement existing commercial antibodies.

  14. Global analysis of lysine acetylation in strawberry leaves

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xianping; Chen, Wenyue; Zhao, Yun; Ruan, Songlin; Zhang, Hengmu; Yan, Chengqi; Jin, Liang; Cao, Lingling; Zhu, Jun; Ma, Huasheng; Cheng, Zhongyi

    2015-01-01

    Protein lysine acetylation is a reversible and dynamic post-translational modification. It plays an important role in regulating diverse cellular processes including chromatin dynamic, metabolic pathways, and transcription in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Although studies of lysine acetylome in plants have been reported, the throughput was not high enough, hindering the deep understanding of lysine acetylation in plant physiology and pathology. In this study, taking advantages of anti-acetyllysine-based enrichment and high-sensitive-mass spectrometer, we applied an integrated proteomic approach to comprehensively investigate lysine acetylome in strawberry. In total, we identified 1392 acetylation sites in 684 proteins, representing the largest dataset of acetylome in plants to date. To reveal the functional impacts of lysine acetylation in strawberry, intensive bioinformatic analysis was performed. The results significantly expanded our current understanding of plant acetylome and demonstrated that lysine acetylation is involved in multiple cellular metabolism and cellular processes. More interestingly, nearly 50% of all acetylated proteins identified in this work were localized in chloroplast and the vital role of lysine acetylation in photosynthesis was also revealed. Taken together, this study not only established the most extensive lysine acetylome in plants to date, but also systematically suggests the significant and unique roles of lysine acetylation in plants. PMID:26442052

  15. Effect of acetaminophen on sulfamethazine acetylation in male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Tahir, I M; Iqbal, T; Saleem, S; Mehboob, H; Akhter, N; Riaz, M

    2016-03-01

    The effect of acetaminophen on sulfamethazine N-acetylation by human N-acetyltrasferase-2 (NAT2) was studied in 19 (n=19) healthy male volunteers in two different phases. In the first phase of the study the volunteers were given an oral dose of sulfamethazine 500 mg alone and blood and urine samples were collected. After the 10-day washout period the same selected volunteers were again administered sulfamethazine 500 mg along with 1000 mg acetaminophen. The acetylation of sulfamethazine by human NAT2 in both phases with and without acetaminophen was determined by HPLC to establish their respective phenotypes. In conclusion obtained statistics of present study revealed that acetaminophen significantly (P<0.0001) decreased sulfamethazine acetylation in plasma of both slow and fast acetylator male volunteers. A highly significant (P<0.0001) decrease in plasma-free and total sulfamethazine concentration was also observed when acetaminophen was co-administered. Urine acetylation status in both phases of the study was found not to be in complete concordance with that of plasma. Acetaminophen significantly (P<0.0001) increased the acetyl, free and total sulfamethazine concentration in urine of both slow and fast acetylators. Urine acetylation analysis has not been found to be a suitable approach for phenotypic studies.

  16. Histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation breaks the genome's silence

    PubMed Central

    Shia, Wei-Jong; Pattenden, Samantha G; Workman, Jerry L

    2006-01-01

    Acetylation at histone H4 lysine 16 is involved in many cellular processes in organisms as diverse as yeast and humans. A recent biochemical study pinpoints this particular acetylation mark as a switch for changing chromatin from a repressive to a transcriptionally active state. PMID:16689998

  17. Evaluation of 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency detected by tandem mass spectrometry newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, D D; Millington, D S; Smith, W E; Weavil, S D; Muenzer, J; McCandless, S E; Kishnani, P S; McDonald, M T; Chaing, S; Boney, A; Moore, E; Frazier, D M

    2003-01-01

    Since the addition of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to the North Carolina Newborn Screening Program, 20 infants with two consecutive elevated 3-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine (C5OH) levels have been evaluated for evidence of inborn errors of metabolism associated with this metabolite. Ten of these 20 infants had significant concentrations of both 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid and 3-methylcrotonylglycine in their urine, suggestive of 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (3-MCC) deficiency. Four of these 10 were infants whose abnormal metabolites were found to be of maternal origin. Of 8 patients with probable 3-MCC deficiency, 7 have been tested and found to have the enzyme deficiency confirmed in lymphoblasts or cultured fibroblasts; one of these 7 infants had only marginally decreased 3-MCC activity in lymphocytes but deficient 3-MCC in fibroblasts. We estimate the incidence of 3-MCC deficiency at 1:64000 live births in North Carolina. We conclude that MS/MS newborn screening will detect additional inborn errors of metabolism, such as 3-MCC deficiency, not traditionally associated with newborn screening. The evaluation of newborns with two abnormally elevated C5OH levels on MS/MS newborn screening should include, at least, urine organic acid analysis by capillary GC-MS and a plasma acylcarnitine profile by MS/MS. Long-term follow-up is needed to determine the outcome of presymptomatically diagnosed patients with 3-MCC deficiency by MS/MS newborn screening.

  18. Activating Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase and Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase in Combination for Improvement of Succinate Production

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zaigao; Zhu, Xinna; Chen, Jing; Li, Qingyan

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylation is an important step in the production of succinate by Escherichia coli. Two enzymes, PEP carboxylase (PPC) and PEP carboxykinase (PCK), are responsible for PEP carboxylation. PPC has high substrate affinity and catalytic velocity but wastes the high energy of PEP. PCK has low substrate affinity and catalytic velocity but can conserve the high energy of PEP for ATP formation. In this work, the expression of both the ppc and pck genes was modulated, with multiple regulatory parts of different strengths, in order to investigate the relationship between PPC or PCK activity and succinate production. There was a positive correlation between PCK activity and succinate production. In contrast, there was a positive correlation between PPC activity and succinate production only when PPC activity was within a certain range; excessive PPC activity decreased the rates of both cell growth and succinate formation. These two enzymes were also activated in combination in order to recruit the advantages of each for the improvement of succinate production. It was demonstrated that PPC and PCK had a synergistic effect in improving succinate production. PMID:23747698

  19. Soybean ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit: Mechanisms and determinants of RNA turnover. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, R.B.

    1993-12-31

    An in vitro degradation system has been developed from petunia and soybean polysomes in order to investigate the mechanisms and determinants controlling RNA turnover in higher plants. This system faithfully degrades soybean ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit (rbcS) mRNA into the same products observed in total RNA preparations. In previous years it was shown that the most stable products represent a nested constellation of fragments, which are shortened from their 3{prime} ends, and have intact 5{prime} ends. Exogenous rbcS RNA tagged with novel 5{prime} sequence 15 or 56 bp long were synthesized in vitro as Sp6 and T7 runoff transcripts, respectively. When added to the system they were degraded faithfully into constellation of products which were 15 or 56 bp longer than the endogenous products, respectively. Detailed kinetics on the appearance of these exogenous products confirmed degradation proceeds in an overall 3{prime} to 5{prime} direction but suggested that there are multiple pathways through which the RNA may be degraded. To further demonstrate a precursor product relationships, in vitro synthesized transcripts truncated at their 3{prime} ends were shown to degrade into the expected smaller fragments previously mapped in the 5{prime} portion of the rbcS RNA.

  20. Slow inactivation of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase during catalysis is not due to decarbamylation of the catalytic site

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, D.L.; Badger, M.R.; Andrews, T.J. )

    1990-08-01

    An investigation was made of the proposal that the slow inactivation of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) activity, which occurs during in vitro assays, is due to decarbamylation of the enzyme. The level of carbamylation was compared with catalytic activity during assay conditions in which activity was both increasing and decreasing. A dual isotope procedure was used in which ({sup 3}H)carboxyarabinitol-P{sub 2} measured total active sites and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} reported the level of carbamylation. The efficacy of the procedure was verified both in the presence and in the absence of the substrate D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (ribulose-P{sub 2}). These measurements showed that changes in activity during assays were not correlated with carbamylation status. Inactivation during assays initiated with both fully and partially carbamylated enzyme was not associated with any change in carbamylation level. This implies that the loss of activity during assays is not due to ribulose-P{sub 2} binding and sequestering the E form of the enzyme. Ribulose-P{sub 2} did not appear to alter the equilibrium between carbamylated and uncarbamylated enzyme, but it did slow the rate at which enzyme was both decarbamylated and carbamylated. The most likely explanation for the loss of activity during assays appears to be the sequestration of carbamylated, Mg{sup 2+}-bound active sites by an inhibitor.

  1. Crystalline ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of high integrity and catalytic activity from Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Servaites, J C

    1985-04-01

    Crystalline tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (EC 4.1.1.39) was prepared using a procedure which protected the enzyme from hydrolysis by endogenous proteases. Leaves were extracted in a buffered medium containing casein, leupeptin, and high concentrations of MgSO4 and NaHCO3. After filtration through ion-exchange resin to remove contaminants, the enzyme was concentrated by precipitation with polyethylene glycol and crystal formation was induced by low-salt dialysis. The crystalline enzyme had a measured specific activity of 1.7 mumol CO2 mg protein-1 min-1, and about 93% of the enzyme could be activated with Mg2+ and CO2. Crystalline enzyme prepared in the absence of casein exhibited an activity which was only one-third of this rate and only about 70% of the enzyme could be activated with Mg2+ and CO2. Casein-extracted enzyme was resolved into distinct bands corresponding to the large (55,000) and small (14,000) subunits by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The large subunit of enzyme prepared according to the latter procedure was found to be composed of five different polypeptides of slightly decreasing molecular weight. Only about one-third of the large subunits were of the 55,000 molecular weight type. No differences between the two preparations were observed in the Km (CO2) and apparent Km (ribulose bisphosphate).

  2. [Efficacy of thiamine pyrophosphate or carboxylase in the salvage of diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Carmona-Cervantes, J

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic foot represents one of the most common complications in patients with a long standing disease. The etiology is neuropathy, infections and ischemia that together contribute to the sequence of tissue necrosis, ulceration and gangrene. Since treatment is very difficult, we must look for several options to solve these problems caused by chronic hyperglycemia. Thiamine pyrophosphate or carboxylase perform multiple metabolic and non-metabolic activities that are considered important in the resolution of diabetic impairments, therefore, this work shows the results when using it in patients with diabetic foot. 29 patients with diabetic foot were treated between January 1998 and July 2012: 19 Wagner type III and 12 Wagner type IV. Management was the administration of antibiotics, partial surgical procedures and thiamine pyrophosphate. The infectious process was controlled, the appearance of granulation tissue and scarring of the lesion in a period of 2 to 6 months depending on the severity of the problem. Given the clinical data and evolution of the patients, we conclude that the administration of thiamine pyrophosphate was able to control metabolic and non-metabolic dysfunctions that lead to complications in diabetic patients, therefore we must consider it a tool in the treatment of diabetic patients in general and for diabetic foot salvage in particular.

  3. Catalytic by-product formation and ligand binding by ribulose bisphosphate carboxylases from different phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Pearce, F Grant

    2006-11-01

    During catalysis, all Rubisco (D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) enzymes produce traces of several by-products. Some of these by-products are released slowly from the active site of Rubisco from higher plants, thus progressively inhibiting turnover. Prompted by observations that Form I Rubisco enzymes from cyanobacteria and red algae, and the Form II Rubisco enzyme from bacteria, do not show inhibition over time, the production and binding of catalytic by-products was measured to ascertain the underlying differences. In the present study we show that the Form IB Rubisco from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC6301, the Form ID enzyme from the red alga Galdieria sulfuraria and the low-specificity Form II type from the bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum all catalyse formation of by-products to varying degrees; however, the by-products are not inhibitory under substrate-saturated conditions. Study of the binding and release of phosphorylated analogues of the substrate or reaction intermediates revealed diverse strategies for avoiding inhibition. Rubisco from Synechococcus and R. rubrum have an increased rate of inhibitor release. G. sulfuraria Rubisco releases inhibitors very slowly, but has an increased binding constant and maintains the enzyme in an activated state. These strategies may provide information about enzyme dynamics, and the degree of enzyme flexibility. Our observations also illustrate the phylogenetic diversity of mechanisms for regulating Rubisco and raise questions about whether an activase-like mechanism should be expected outside the green-algal/higher-plant lineage.

  4. 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency: Clinical, biochemical, enzymatic and molecular studies in 88 individuals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Isolated 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (MCC) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of leucine metabolism caused by mutations in MCCC1 or MCCC2 encoding the α and β subunit of MCC, respectively. The phenotype is highly variable ranging from acute neonatal onset with fatal outcome to asymptomatic adults. Methods We report clinical, biochemical, enzymatic and mutation data of 88 MCC deficient individuals, 53 identified by newborn screening, 26 diagnosed due to clinical symptoms or positive family history and 9 mothers, identified following the positive newborn screening result of their baby. Results Fifty-seven percent of patients were asymptomatic while 43% showed clinical symptoms, many of which were probably not related to MCC deficiency but due to ascertainment bias. However, 12 patients (5 of 53 identified by newborn screening) presented with acute metabolic decompensations. We identified 15 novel MCCC1 and 16 novel MCCC2 mutant alleles. Additionally, we report expression studies on 3 MCCC1 and 8 MCCC2 mutations and show an overview of all 132 MCCC1 and MCCC2 variants known to date. Conclusions Our data confirm that MCC deficiency, despite low penetrance, may lead to a severe clinical phenotype resembling classical organic acidurias. However, neither the genotype nor the biochemical phenotype is helpful in predicting the clinical course. PMID:22642865

  5. Improvement of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity of Phaeodactylum tricornutum PEPCase 1 through protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kwang Suk; Jeon, Hancheol; Seo, Seungbeom; Lee, Yew; Jin, EonSeon

    2014-06-10

    In order to mitigate CO2 accumulation and decrease the rate of global warming and climate change, we previously presented a strategy for the development of an efficient CO2 capture and utilization system. The system employs two recombinant enzymes, carbonic anhydrase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, which were originated from microalgae. Although utilization of this integrated system would require a large quantity of high quality PEPCase protein, such quantities could be produced by increasing the solubility of the Phaeodactylum tricornutum PEPCase 1 (PtPEPCase 1) protein in the Escherichia coli heterologous expression system. We first expressed the putative mitochondria targeting peptide- and chloroplast transit peptide-truncated proteins of PtPEPCase 1, mPtPEPCase 1 and cPtPEPCase 1, respectively, in E. coli. After affinity chromatography, the amount of purified PEPCase protein from 500mL of E. coli culture was greatest for cPtPEPCase 1 (1.99mg), followed by mPtPEPCase 1 (0.82mg) and PtPEPCase 1 (0.61mg). Furthermore, the enzymatic activity of mPtPEPCase 1 and cPtPEPCase 1 showed approximately 1.6-fold (32.19 units/mg) and 3-fold (59.48 units/mg) increases, respectively. Therefore, cPtPEPCase 1 purified using the E. coli heterogeneous expression system could be a strong candidate for a platform technology to capture CO2 and produce value-added four-carbon platform chemicals.

  6. Allosteric Inhibition of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylases is Determined by a Single Amino Acid Residue in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Takeya, Masahiro; Hirai, Masami Yokota; Osanai, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is an important enzyme for CO2 fixation and primary metabolism in photosynthetic organisms including cyanobacteria. The kinetics and allosteric regulation of PEPCs have been studied in many organisms, but the biochemical properties of PEPC in the unicellular, non-nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 have not been clarified. In this study, biochemical analysis revealed that the optimum pH and temperature of Synechocystis 6803 PEPC proteins were 7.3 and 30 °C, respectively. Synechocystis 6803 PEPC was found to be tolerant to allosteric inhibition by several metabolic effectors such as malate, aspartate, and fumarate compared with other cyanobacterial PEPCs. Comparative sequence and biochemical analysis showed that substitution of the glutamate residue at position 954 with lysine altered the enzyme so that it was inhibited by malate, aspartate, and fumarate. PEPC of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was purified, and its activity was inhibited in the presence of malate. Substitution of the lysine at position 946 (equivalent to position 954 in Synechocystis 6803) with glutamate made Anabaena 7120 PEPC tolerant to malate. These results demonstrate that the allosteric regulation of PEPC in cyanobacteria is determined by a single amino acid residue, a characteristic that is conserved in different orders. PMID:28117365

  7. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in mistletoe leaves: Regulation of gene expression, protein content, and covalent modification.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuemei; Wanek, Wolfgang; Nehls, U.; Popp, Marianne; Hampp, Rüdiger; Rennenberg, Heinz; Einig, Werner

    2001-07-01

    Seasonal changes in the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase, EC 4.1.1.31), a key enzyme in the interaction of carbohydrate and nitrogen metabolism, were studied in leaves of the C3 semiparasitic mistletoe, Viscum album, growing on different host trees. Maximum extractable PEPCase activities were higher in leaves of mistletoes growing on Betula pendula and Alnus glutinosa hosts compared with those on the conifers, Abies alba and Larix decidua. Independent of host, maximum extractable PEPCase activities were high in spring and autumn while low in summer. Samples with higher PEPCase activities showed higher amounts of PEPCase protein and higher PEPCase mRNA levels. A curvilinear correlation between leaf total nitrogen content and the maximum extractable PEPCase activity as well as PEPCase mRNA level suggested that nitrogen might affect the activity of PEPCase of mistletoe by up-regulating gene expression. In addition to extractable activity, seasonal changes of the PEPCase activation state, the ratio of activities resulting from limited:non-limited assays, were found, which was correlated to the variation of malate content in leaves of mistletoe. ATP-dependent activation of PEPCase was characterized by an increase in I0.5(L-malate), indicating that PEPCase of leaves of mistletoes is probably regulated via phosphorylation.

  8. Antemortem stress regulates protein acetylation and glycolysis in postmortem muscle.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongwen; Li, Xin; Wang, Zhenyu; Shen, Qingwu W; Zhang, Dequan

    2016-07-01

    Although exhaustive research has established that preslaughter stress is a major factor contributing to pale, soft, exudative (PSE) meat, questions remain regarding the biochemistry of postmortem glycolysis. In this study, the influence of preslaughter stress on protein acetylation in relationship to glycolysis was studied. The data show that antemortem swimming significantly enhanced glycolysis and the total acetylated proteins in postmortem longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle of mice. Inhibition of protein acetylation by histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitors eliminated stress induced increase in glycolysis. Inversely, antemortem injection of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, trichostatin A (TSA) and nicotinamide (NAM), further increased protein acetylation early postmortem and the glycolysis. These data provide new insight into the biochemistry of postmortem glycolysis by showing that protein acetylation regulates glycolysis, which may participate in the regulation of preslaughter stress on glycolysis in postmortem muscle.

  9. Acetylated triterpene saponins from the Thai medicinal plant, Sapindus emarginatus.

    PubMed

    Kanchanapoom, T; Kasai, R; Yamasaki, K

    2001-09-01

    From the pericarps of Sapindus emarginatus (Sapindaceae), three new acetylated triterpene saponins were isolated together with hederagenin and five known triterpene saponins, as well as one known sweet acyclic sesquiterpene glycoside, mukurozioside IIb. The structures of new compounds were elucidated as hederagenin 3-O-(2-O-acetyl-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-(1-->3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside, 23-O-acetyl-hederagenin 3-O-(4-O-acetyl-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-(1-->3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside and oleanolic acid 3-O-(4-O-acetyl-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-(1-->3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside by chemical and spectroscopic data.

  10. Acetylated histone H3 increases nucleosome dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Marek; Manohar, Mridula; Ottesen, Jennifer; Poirier, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Chromatin's basic unit structure is the nucleosome, i.e. genomic DNA wrapped around a particular class of proteins -- histones -- which due to their physical hindrance, block vital biological processes, such as DNA repair, DNA replication, and RNA transcription. Histone post-translational modifications, which are known to exist in vivo, are hypothesized to regulate these biological processes by directly altering DNA-histone interactions and thus nucleosome structure and stability. Using magnetic tweezers technique we studied the acetylation of histone H3 in the dyad region, i.e. at K115 and K122, on reconstituted arrays of nucleosomes under constant external force. Based on the measured increase in the probability of dissociation of modified nucleosomes, we infer that this double modification could facilitate histone chaperone mediated nucleosome disassembly in vivo.

  11. Comprehensive profiling of lysine acetylation suggests the widespread function is regulated by protein acetylation in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zuoming; Zhu, Honglin; Zhou, Yong; Wu, Chengcheng; Liu, Yue; Sheng, Qing; Lv, Zhengbing; Zhang, Wenping; Yu, Wei; Jiang, Caiying; Xie, Longfei; Zhang, Yaozhou; Yao, Juming

    2015-09-01

    Lysine acetylation in proteins is a dynamic and reversible PTM and plays an important role in diverse cellular processes. In this study, using lysine-acetylation (Kac) peptide enrichment coupled with nano HPLC/MS/MS, we initially identified the acetylome in the silkworms. Overall, a total of 342 acetylated proteins with 667 Kac sites were identified in silkworm. Sequence motifs analysis around Kac sites revealed an enrichment of Y, F, and H in the +1 position, and F was also enriched in the +2 and -2 positions, indicating the presences of preferred amino acids around Kac sites in the silkworm. Functional analysis showed the acetylated proteins were primarily involved in some specific biological processes. Furthermore, lots of nutrient-storage proteins, such as apolipophorin, vitellogenin, storage proteins, and 30 K proteins, were highly acetylated, indicating lysine acetylation may represent a common regulatory mechanism of nutrient utilization in the silkworm. Interestingly, Ser2 proteins, the coating proteins of larval silk, were found to contain many Kac sites, suggesting lysine acetylation may be involved in the regulation of larval silk synthesis. This study is the first to identify the acetylome in a lepidoptera insect, and expands greatly the catalog of lysine acetylation substrates and sites in insects.

  12. Replacement of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae acetyl-CoA synthetases by alternative pathways for cytosolic acetyl-CoA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Barbara U; van Rossum, Harmen M; Benjamin, Kirsten R; Wu, Liang; Daran, Jean-Marc G; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2014-01-01

    Cytosolic acetyl-coenzyme A is a precursor for many biotechnologically relevant compounds produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this yeast, cytosolic acetyl-CoA synthesis and growth strictly depend on expression of either the Acs1 or Acs2 isoenzyme of acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS). Since hydrolysis of ATP to AMP and pyrophosphate in the ACS reaction constrains maximum yields of acetyl-CoA-derived products, this study explores replacement of ACS by two ATP-independent pathways for acetyl-CoA synthesis. After evaluating expression of different bacterial genes encoding acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (A-ALD) and pyruvate-formate lyase (PFL), acs1Δ acs2Δ S. cerevisiae strains were constructed in which A-ALD or PFL successfully replaced ACS. In A-ALD-dependent strains, aerobic growth rates of up to 0.27 h(-1) were observed, while anaerobic growth rates of PFL-dependent S. cerevisiae (0.20 h(-1)) were stoichiometrically coupled to formate production. In glucose-limited chemostat cultures, intracellular metabolite analysis did not reveal major differences between A-ALD-dependent and reference strains. However, biomass yields on glucose of A-ALD- and PFL-dependent strains were lower than those of the reference strain. Transcriptome analysis suggested that reduced biomass yields were caused by acetaldehyde and formate in A-ALD- and PFL-dependent strains, respectively. Transcript profiles also indicated that a previously proposed role of Acs2 in histone acetylation is probably linked to cytosolic acetyl-CoA levels rather than to direct involvement of Acs2 in histone acetylation. While demonstrating that yeast ACS can be fully replaced, this study demonstrates that further modifications are needed to achieve optimal in vivo performance of the alternative reactions for supply of cytosolic acetyl-CoA as a product precursor.

  13. Probing the active site of cinnamoyl CoA reductase 1 (Ll-CCRH1) from Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant; Patel, Krunal; Vishwakarma, Rishi Kishore; Srivastava, Sameer; Singh, Somesh; Gaikwad, Sushama; Khan, Bashir M

    2013-09-01

    Lack of three dimensional crystal structure of cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) limits its detailed active site characterization studies. Putative active site residues involved in the substrate/NADPH binding and catalysis for Leucaena leucocephala CCR (Ll-CCRH1; GenBank: DQ986907) were identified by amino acid sequence alignment and homology modeling. Putative active site residues and proximal H215 were subjected for site directed mutagenesis, and mutated enzymes were expressed, purified and assayed to confirm their functional roles. Mutagenesis of S136, Y170 and K174 showed complete loss of activity, indicating their pivotal roles in catalysis. Mutant S212G exhibited the catalytic efficiencies less than 10% of wild type, showing its indirect involvement in substrate binding or catalysis. R51G, D77G, F30V and I31N double mutants showed significant changes in Km values, specifying their roles in substrate binding. Finally, chemical modification and substrate protection studies corroborated the presence Ser, Tyr, Lys, Arg and carboxylate group at the active site of Ll-CCRH1.

  14. Downregulation of Caffeic Acid 3-O-Methyltransferase and Caffeoyl CoA 3-O-Methyltransferase in Transgenic Alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dianjing; Chen, Fang; Inoue, Kentaro; Blount, Jack W.; Dixon, Richard A.

    2001-01-01

    Transgenic alfalfa plants were generated harboring caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and caffeoyl CoA 3-O-methyltransferase (CCOMT) cDNA sequences under control of the bean phenylalanine ammonia-lyase PAL2 promoter. Strong downregulation of COMT resulted in decreased lignin content, a reduction in total guaiacyl (G) lignin units, a near total loss of syringyl (S) units in monomeric and dimeric lignin degradation products, and appearance of low levels of 5-hydroxy guaiacyl units and a novel dimer. No soluble monolignol precursors accumulated. In contrast, strong downregulation of CCOMT led to reduced lignin levels, a reduction in G units without reduction in S units, and increases in β-5 linked dimers of G units. Accumulation of soluble caffeic acid β-d-glucoside occurred only in CCOMT downregulated plants. The results suggest that CCOMT does not significantly contribute to the 3-O-methylation step in S lignin biosynthesis in alfalfa and that there is redundancy with respect to the 3-O-methylation reaction of G lignin biosynthesis. COMT is unlikely to catalyze the in vivo methylation of caffeic acid during lignin biosynthesis. PMID:11158530

  15. Impact of single-dose nandrolone decanoate on gonadotropins, blood lipids and HMG CoA reductase in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Gårevik, N; Börjesson, A; Choong, E; Ekström, L; Lehtihet, M

    2016-06-01

    The aim was to study the effect and time profile of a single dose of nandrolone decanoate (ND) on gonadotropins, blood lipids and HMG CoA reductase [3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR)] in healthy men. Eleven healthy male participants aged 29-46 years were given a single dose of 150 mg ND as an intramuscular dose of Deca Durabol®, Organon. Blood samples for sex hormones, lipids and HMGCR mRNA analysis were collected prior to ND administration day 0, 4 and 14. A significant suppression of luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) was seen after 4 days. Total testosterone and bioavailable testosterone level decreased significantly throughout the observed study period. A small but significant decrease in sexual hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) was seen after 4 days but not after 14 days. Total serum (S)-cholesterol and plasma (P)-apolipoprotein B (ApoB) increased significantly after 14 days. In 80% of the individuals, the HMGCR mRNA level was increased 4 days after the ND administration. Our results show that a single dose of 150 mg ND increases (1) HMGCR mRNA expression, (2) total S-cholesterol and (3) P-ApoB level. The long-term consequences on cardiovascular risk that may appear in users remain to be elucidated.

  16. Histone Acetylation Inhibitors Promote Axon Growth in Adult DRG neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shen; Nazif, Kutaiba; Smith, Alexander; Baas, Peter W; Smith, George M

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsic mechanisms that guide damaged axons to regenerate following spinal cord injury remain poorly understood. Manipulation of posttranslational modifications of key proteins in mature neurons could re-invigorate growth machinery after injury. One such modification is acetylation, a reversible process controlled by two enzyme families acting in opposition, the Histone Deacetylases (HDACs) and the Histone Acetyl Transferases (HATs). While acetylated histones in the nucleus is associated with upregulation of growth promoting genes, de-acetylated tubulin in the axoplasm is associated with more labile microtubules, conducive to axon growth. In this study we investigated the effects of HAT inhibitors and HDAC inhibitors on cultured adult dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. We found that inhibition of HATs, using Anacardic Acid or CPTH2, improved axon outgrowth, while inhibition of HDACs using TSA or Tubacin, inhibited axon growth. Furthermore, Anacardic Acid increased the number of axons able to cross an inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) border. Histone acetylation, but not tubulin acetylation levels, was affected by HAT inhibitors, whereas tubulin acetylation levels were increased in the presence of HDAC inhibitor Tubacin. Although microtubule stabilizing drug taxol did not have an effect on the lengths of DRG axons, nocodazole decreased axon lengths. While the mechanistic basis will require future studies, our data show that inhibitors of HAT can augment axon growth in adult DRG neurons, with the potential of aiding axon growth over inhibitory substrates produced by the glial scar. PMID:25702820

  17. Chitosan Molecular Structure as a Function of N-Acetylation

    SciTech Connect

    Franca, Eduardo F.; Freitas, Luiz C.; Lins, Roberto D.

    2011-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to characterize the structure and solubility of chitosan nanoparticle-like structures as a function of the deacetylation level (0, 40, 60, and 100%) and the spatial distribution of the N-acetyl groups in the particles. The polysaccharide chains of highly N-deacetylated particles where the N-acetyl groups are uniformly distributed present a high flexibility and preference for the relaxed two-fold helix and five-fold helix motifs. When these groups are confined to a given region of the particle, the chains adopt preferentially a two-fold helix with f and w values close to crystalline chitin. Nanoparticles with up to 40% acetylation are moderately soluble, forming stable aggregates when the N-acetyl groups are unevenly distributed. Systems with 60% or higher N-acetylation levels are insoluble and present similar degrees of swelling regardless the distribution of their N-acetyl groups. Overall particle solvation is highly affected by electrostatic forces resulting from the degree of acetylation. The water mobility and orientation around the polysaccharide chains affects the stability of the intramolecular O3- HO3(n) ... O5(n+ 1) hydrogen bond, which in turn controls particle aggregation.

  18. Regulation of Autophagy and Mitophagy by Nutrient Availability and Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Bradley R.; Scott, Iain; Traba, Javier; Han, Kim; Sack, Michael N.

    2014-01-01

    Normal cellular function is dependent on a number of highly regulated homeostatic mechanisms, which act in concert to maintain conditions suitable for life. During periods of nutritional deficit, cells initiate a number of recycling programs which break down complex intracellular structures, thus allowing them to utilize the energy stored within. These recycling systems, broadly named “autophagy”, enable the cell to maintain the flow of nutritional substrates until they can be replenished from external sources. Recent research has shown that a number of regulatory components of the autophagy program are controlled by lysine acetylation. Lysine acetylation is a reversible post-translational modification that can alter the activity of enzymes in a number of cellular compartments. Strikingly, the main substrate for this modification is a product of cellular energy metabolism: acetyl-CoA. This suggests a direct and intricate link between fuel metabolites and the systems which regulate nutritional homeostasis. In this review, we examine how acetylation regulates the systems that control cellular autophagy, and how global protein acetylation status may act as a trigger for recycling of cellular components in a nutrient-dependent fashion. In particular, we focus on how acetylation may control the degradation and turnover of mitochondria, the major source of fuel-derived acetyl-CoA. PMID:24525425

  19. Studies of Human 2,4-Dienoyl CoA Reductase Shed New Light on Peroxisomal β-Oxidation of Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Tian; Wu, Dong; Ding, Wei; Wang, Jiangyun; Shaw, Neil; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2012-10-15

    Peroxisomes play an essential role in maintaining fatty acid homeostasis. Although mitochondria are also known to participate in the catabolism of fatty acids via β-oxidation, differences exist between the peroxisomal and mitochondrial β-oxidation. Only peroxisomes, but not mitochondrion, can shorten very long chain fatty acids. Here, we describe the crystal structure of a ternary complex of peroxisomal 2,4-dienoyl CoA reductases (pDCR) with hexadienoyl CoA and NADP, as a prototype for comparison with the mitochondrial 2,4-dienoyl CoA reductase (mDCR) to shed light on the differences between the enzymes from the two organelles at the molecular level. Unexpectedly, the structure of pDCR refined to 1.84 Å resolution reveals the absence of the tyrosine-serine pair seen in the active site of mDCR, which together with a lysine and an asparagine have been deemed a hallmark of the SDR family of enzymes. Instead, aspartate hydrogen-bonded to the Cα hydroxyl via a water molecule seems to perturb the water molecule for protonation of the substrate. Our studies provide the first structural evidence for participation of water in the DCR-catalyzed reactions. Biochemical studies and structural analysis suggest that pDCRs can catalyze the shortening of six-carbon-long substrates in vitro. However, the Km values of pDCR for short chain acyl CoAs are at least 6-fold higher than those for substrates with 10 or more aliphatic carbons. Unlike mDCR, hinge movements permit pDCR to process very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  20. Epigenetic regulation of pyruvate carboxylase gene expression in the postpartum liver.

    PubMed

    Walker, C G; Crookenden, M A; Henty, K M; Handley, R R; Kuhn-Sherlock, B; White, H M; Donkin, S S; Snell, R G; Meier, S; Heiser, A; Loor, J J; Mitchell, M D; Roche, J R

    2016-07-01

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is essential for maintenance of whole body glucose homeostasis and glucose supply for mammary lactose synthesis in the dairy cow. Upregulation of the gluconeogenic enzyme pyruvate carboxylase (PC) during the transition period is vital in the adaptation to the greater glucose demands associated with peripartum lactogenesis. The objective of this study was to determine if PC transcription in hepatocytes is regulated by DNA methylation and if treatment with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) alters methylation of an upstream DNA sequence defined as promoter 1. Dairy cows were left untreated (n=20), or treated with a NSAID during the first 5 d postcalving (n=20). Liver was biopsied at d 7 precalving and d 7, 14, and 28 postcalving. Total PC and transcript specific gene expression was quantified using quantitative PCR and DNA methylation of promoter 1 was quantified using bisulfite Sanger sequencing. Expression of PC changed over the transition period, with increased expression postcalving occurring concurrently with increased circulating concentration of nonesterified fatty acids. The DNA methylation percentage was variable at all sites quantified and ranged from 21 to 54% across the 15 CpG dinucleotides within promoter 1. The DNA methylation at wk 1 postcalving, however, was not correlated with gene expression of promoter 1-regulated transcripts and we did not detect an effect of NSAID treatment on DNA methylation or PC gene expression. Our results do not support a role for DNA methylation in regulating promoter 1-driven gene expression of PC at wk 1 postcalving. Further research is required to determine the mechanisms regulating increased PC expression over the transition period.

  1. Unusual ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of anoxic Archaea.

    PubMed

    Watson, G M; Yu, J P; Tabita, F R

    1999-03-01

    The predominant pool of organic matter on earth is derived from the biological reduction and assimilation of carbon dioxide gas, catalyzed primarily by the enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO). By virtue of its capacity to use molecular oxygen as an alternative and competing gaseous substrate, the catalytic efficiency of RubisCO and the enzyme's ability to assimilate CO2 may be severely limited, with consequent environmental and agricultural effects. Recent genomic sequencing projects, however, have identified putative RubisCO genes from anoxic Archaea. In the present study, these potential RubisCO sequences, from Methanococcus jannaschii and Archaeoglobus fulgidus, were analyzed in order to ascertain whether such sequences might encode functional proteins. We also report the isolation and properties of recombinant RubisCO using sequences obtained from the obligately anaerobic hyperthermophilic methanogen M. jannaschii. This is the first description of an archaeal RubisCO sequence; this study also represents the initial characterization of a RubisCO molecule that has evolved in the absence of molecular oxygen. The enzyme was shown to be a homodimer whose deduced sequence, along with other recently obtained archaeal RubisCO sequences, differs substantially from those of known RubisCO molecules. The recombinant M. jannaschii enzyme has a somewhat low, but reasonable kcat, however, unlike previously isolated RubisCO molecules, this enzyme is very oxygen sensitive yet it is stable to hyperthermal temperatures and catalyzes the formation of the expected carboxylation product. Despite inhibition by oxygen, this unusual RubisCO still catalyzes a weak yet demonstrable oxygenase activity, with perhaps the lowest capacity for CO2/O2 discrimination ever encountered for any RubisCO.

  2. Effects of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase desensitization on glutamic acid production in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masaru; Sawada, Kazunori; Ogura, Kotaro; Shimono, Yuta; Hagiwara, Takuya; Sugimoto, Masakazu; Onuki, Akiko; Yokota, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032, a glutamic-acid producing actinobacterium, is subject to feedback inhibition by metabolic intermediates such as aspartic acid and 2-oxoglutaric acid, which implies the importance of PEPC in replenishing oxaloacetic acid into the TCA cycle. Here, we investigated the effects of feedback-insensitive PEPC on glutamic acid production. A single amino-acid substitution in PEPC, D299N, was found to relieve the feedback control by aspartic acid, but not by 2-oxoglutaric acid. A simple mutant, strain R1, having the D299N substitution in PEPC was constructed from ATCC 13032 using the double-crossover chromosome replacement technique. Strain R1 produced glutamic acid at a concentration of 31.0 g/L from 100 g/L glucose in a jar fermentor culture under biotin-limited conditions, which was significantly higher than that of the parent, 26.0 g/L (1.19-fold), indicative of the positive effect of desensitized PEPC on glutamic acid production. Another mutant, strain DR1, having both desensitized PEPC and PYK-gene deleted mutations, was constructed in a similar manner using strain D1 with a PYK-gene deleted mutation as the parent. This mutation had been shown to enhance glutamic acid production in our previous study. Although marginal, strain D1 produced higher glutamic acid, 28.8 g/L, than ATCC13032 (1.11-fold). In contrast, glutamic acid production by strain DR-1 was elevated up to 36.9 g/L, which was 1.42-fold higher than ATCC13032 and significantly higher than the other three strains. The results showed a synergistic effect of these two mutations on glutamic acid production in C. glutamicum.

  3. Synthesis of catalytically active form III ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in archaea.

    PubMed

    Finn, Michael W; Tabita, F Robert

    2003-05-01

    Ribulose 1,5 bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) catalyzes the biological reduction and assimilation of carbon dioxide gas to organic carbon; it is the key enzyme responsible for the bulk of organic matter found on earth. Until recently it was believed that there are only two forms of RubisCO, form I and form II. However, the recent completion of several genome-sequencing projects uncovered open reading frames resembling RubisCO in the third domain of life, the archaea. Previous work and homology comparisons suggest that these enzymes represent a third form of RubisCO, form III. While earlier work indicated that two structurally distinct recombinant archaeal RubisCO proteins catalyzed bona fide RubisCO reactions, it was not established that the rbcL genes of anaerobic archaea can be transcribed and translated to an active enzyme in the native organisms. In this report, it is shown not only that Methanococcus jannaschii, Archaeoglobus fulgidus, Methanosarcina acetivorans, and Methanosarcina barkeri possess open reading frames with the residues required for catalysis but also that the RubisCO protein from these archaea accumulates in an active form under normal growth conditions. In addition, the form III RubisCO gene (rbcL) from M. acetivorans was shown to complement RubisCO deletion strains of Rhodobacter capsulatus and Rhodobacter sphaeroides under both photoheterotrophic and photoautotrophic growth conditions. These studies thus indicate for the first time that archaeal form III RubisCO functions in a physiologically significant fashion to fix CO(2). Furthermore, recombinant M. jannaschii, M. acetivorans, and A. fulgidus RubisCO possess unique properties with respect to quaternary structure, temperature optima, and activity in the presence of molecular oxygen compared to the previously described Thermococcus kodakaraensis and halophile proteins.

  4. In vivo monoubiquitination of anaplerotic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase occurs at Lys624 in germinating sorghum seeds

    PubMed Central

    Echevarría, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) is an important cytosolic regulatory enzyme that plays a pivotal role in numerous physiological processes in plants, including seed development and germination. Previous studies demonstrated the occurrence of immunoreactive PEPC polypeptides of ~110kDa and 107kDa (p110 and p107, respectively) on immunoblots of clarified extracts of germinating sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) seeds. In order to establish the biochemical basis for this observation, a 460kDa PEPC heterotetramer composed of an equivalent ratio of p110 and p107 subunits was purified to near homogeneity from the germinated seeds. Mass spectrometry established that p110 and p107 are both encoded by the same plant-type PEPC gene (CP21), but that p107 was in vivo monoubiquitinated at Lys624 to form p110. This residue is absolutely conserved in vascular plant PEPCs and is proximal to a PEP-binding/catalytic domain. Anti-ubiquitin IgG immunodetected p110 but not p107, whereas incubation with a deubiquitinating enzyme (USP-2 core) efficiently converted p110 into p107, while relieving the enzyme’s feedback inhibition by l-malate. Partial PEPC monoubiquitination was also detected during sorghum seed development. It is apparent that monoubiquitination at Lys624 is opposed to phosphorylation at Ser7 in terms of regulating the catalytic activity of sorghum seed PEPC. PEPC monoubiquitination is hypothesized to fine-tune anaplerotic carbon flux according to the cell’s immediate physiological requirements for tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates needed in support of biosynthesis and carbon–nitrogen interactions. PMID:24288181

  5. Multiple Inter-Kingdom Horizontal Gene Transfers in the Evolution of the Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Su, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Pepcase is a gene encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase that exists in bacteria, archaea and plants,playing an important role in plant metabolism and development. Most plants have two or more pepcase genes belonging to two gene sub-families, while only one gene exists in other organisms. Previous research categorized one plant pepcase gene as plant-type pepcase (PTPC) while the other as bacteria-type pepcase (BTPC) because of its similarity with the pepcase gene found in bacteria. Phylogenetic reconstruction showed that PTPC is the ancestral lineage of plant pepcase, and that all bacteria, protistpepcase and BTPC in plants are derived from a lineage of pepcase closely related with PTPC in algae. However, their phylogeny contradicts the species tree and traditional chronology of organism evolution. Because the diversification of bacteria occurred much earlier than the origin of plants, presumably all bacterialpepcase derived from the ancestral PTPC of algal plants after divergingfrom the ancestor of vascular plant PTPC. To solve this contradiction, we reconstructed the phylogeny of pepcase gene family. Our result showed that both PTPC and BTPC are derived from an ancestral lineage of gamma-proteobacteriapepcases, possibly via an ancient inter-kingdom horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from bacteria to the eukaryotic common ancestor of plants, protists and cellular slime mold. Our phylogenetic analysis also found 48other pepcase genes originated from inter-kingdom HGTs. These results imply that inter-kingdom HGTs played important roles in the evolution of the pepcase gene family and furthermore that HGTsare a more frequent evolutionary event than previouslythought. PMID:23251445

  6. Identification of Interactions between Abscisic Acid and Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Galka, Marek M.; Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Buhrow, Leann M.; Nelson, Ken M.; Switala, Jacek; Cutler, Adrian J.; Palmer, David R. J.; Loewen, Peter C.; Abrams, Suzanne R.; Loewen, Michele C.

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid ((+)-ABA) is a phytohormone involved in the modulation of developmental processes and stress responses in plants. A chemical proteomics approach using an ABA mimetic probe was combined with in vitro assays, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), x-ray crystallography and in silico modelling to identify putative (+)-ABA binding-proteins in crude extracts of Arabidopsis thaliana. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) was identified as a putative ABA-binding protein. Radiolabelled-binding assays yielded a Kd of 47 nM for (+)-ABA binding to spinach Rubisco, which was validated by ITC, and found to be similar to reported and experimentally derived values for the native ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) substrate. Functionally, (+)-ABA caused only weak inhibition of Rubisco catalytic activity (Ki of 2.1 mM), but more potent inhibition of Rubisco activation (Ki of ~ 130 μM). Comparative structural analysis of Rubisco in the presence of (+)-ABA with RuBP in the active site revealed only a putative low occupancy (+)-ABA binding site on the surface of the large subunit at a location distal from the active site. However, subtle distortions in electron density in the binding pocket and in silico docking support the possibility of a higher affinity (+)-ABA binding site in the RuBP binding pocket. Overall we conclude that (+)-ABA interacts with Rubisco. While the low occupancy (+)-ABA binding site and weak non-competitive inhibition of catalysis may not be relevant, the high affinity site may allow ABA to act as a negative effector of Rubisco activation. PMID:26197050

  7. Towards efficient photosynthesis: overexpression of Zea mays phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kandoi, Deepika; Mohanty, Sasmita; Govindjee; Tripathy, Baishnab C

    2016-12-01

    Plants with C4 photosynthesis are efficient in carbon assimilation and have an advantage over C3 photosynthesis. In C4 photosynthesis, the primary CO2 fixation is catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). Here, we show that overexpression of Zea mays PEPC cDNA, under the control of (35)S promoter, in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in ~7-10 fold higher protein abundance and ~7-10 fold increase in PEPC activity in the transgenic lines than that in the vector control. We suggest that overexpression of PEPC played an anaplerotic role to increase the supply of 4-carbon carboxylic acids, which provided carbon skeletons for increased amino acid and protein synthesis. Higher protein content must have been responsible for increased metabolic processes including chlorophyll biosynthesis, photosynthesis, and respiration. Consequently, the PEPC-overexpressed transgenic plants had higher chlorophyll content, enhanced electron transport rate (ETR), lower non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll a fluorescence, and a higher performance index (PI) than the vector control. Consistent with these observations, the rate of CO2 assimilation, the starch content, and the dry weight of PEPC-overexpressed plants increased by 14-18 %, 10-18 %, and 6.5-16 %, respectively. Significantly, transgenics were tolerant to salt stress as they had increased ability to synthesize amino acids, including the osmolyte proline. NaCl (150 mM)-treated transgenic plants had higher variable to maximum Chl a fluorescence (F v/F m) ratio, higher PI, higher ETR, and lower NPQ than the salt-treated vector controls. These results suggest that expression of C4 photosynthesis enzyme(s) in a C3 plant can improve its photosynthetic capacity with enhanced tolerance to salinity stress.

  8. Coordinating Role of His216 in MgATP Binding and Cleavage in Pyruvate Carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    His216 is a well-conserved residue in pyruvate carboxylases and, on the basis of structures of the enzyme, appears to have a role in the binding of MgATP, forming an interaction with the 3′-hydroxyl group of the ribose ring. Mutation of this residue to asparagine results in a 9-fold increase in the Km for MgATP in its steady-state cleavage in the absence of pyruvate and a 3-fold increase in the Km for MgADP in its steady-state phosphorylation by carbamoyl phosphate. However, from single-turnover experiments of MgATP cleavage, the Kd of the enzyme·MgATP complex is essentially the same in the wild-type enzyme and H216N. Direct stopped-flow measurements of nucleotide binding and release using the fluorescent analogue FTP support these observations. However, the first-order rate constant for MgATP cleavage in the single-turnover experiments in H216N is only 0.75% of that for the wild-type enzyme, and thus, the MgATP cleavage step is rate-limiting in the steady state for H216N but not for the wild-type enzyme. Close examination of the structure of the enzyme suggested that His216 may also interact with Glu218, which in turn interacts with Glu305 to form a proton relay system involved in the deprotonation of bicarbonate. Single-turnover MgATP cleavage experiments with mutations of these two residues resulted in kinetic parameters similar to those observed in H216N. We suggest that the primary role of His216 is to coordinate the binding of MgATP and the deprotonation of bicarbonate in the reaction to form the putative carboxyphosphate intermediate by participation in a proton relay system involving Glu218 and Glu305. PMID:24460480

  9. Molecular Evolution of the Small Subunit of Ribulose Bisphosphate Carboxylase: Nucleotide Substitution and Gene Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Meagher, R. B.; Berry-Lowe, S.; Rice, K.

    1989-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences encoding the mature portion of 31 ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit (SSU) genes from 17 genera of plants, green algae and cyanobacteria were examined. Among the 465 pairwise sequence comparisons, SSU multigene family members within the same species were more similar to each other in nonsynonymous or replacement nucleotide substitutions (RNS) than they were to SSU sequences in any other organism. The concerted evolution of independent SSU gene lineages within closely related plant species suggests that homogenization of RNS positions has occurred at least once in the life of each genus. The rate of expected RNS among mature SSU sequences was calculated to be 1.25 X 10(-9)/site/yr for the first 70 million years (MY) of divergence with a significant slowing to 0.13 X 10(-9)/site/yr for the next 1,400 MY. The data suggest that mature SSU sequences do not accumulate more than 20% differences in the RNS positions without compensatory changes in other components of this enzyme system. During the first 70 MY of divergence between species, the rate of expected synonymous or silent nucleotide substitutions (SNS) is ~6.6 X 10(-9)/site/yr. This is five times the RNS rate and is similar to the silent rate observed in animals. In striking contrast, SNS and RNS do not show this correlation among SSU gene family members within a species. A mechanism involving gene conversion within the exons followed by selection for biased gene conversion products with conservation of RNS positions and divergence of SNS positions is discussed. A SSU gene tree based on corrected RNS for 31 SSU sequences is presented and agrees well with a species tree based on morphological and cytogenetic traits for the 17 genera examined. SSU gene comparisons may be useful in predicting phylogenetic relationships and in some cases divergence times of various plant, algal and cyanobacterial species. PMID:2515110

  10. Erasers of Histone Acetylation: The Histone Deacetylase Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Seto, Edward; Yoshida, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are enzymes that catalyze the removal of acetyl functional groups from the lysine residues of both histone and nonhistone proteins. In humans, there are 18 HDAC enzymes that use either zinc- or NAD+-dependent mechanisms to deacetylate acetyl lysine substrates. Although removal of histone acetyl epigenetic modification by HDACs regulates chromatin structure and transcription, deacetylation of nonhistones controls diverse cellular processes. HDAC inhibitors are already known potential anticancer agents and show promise for the treatment of many diseases. PMID:24691964

  11. Acetylation of cellulose nanowhiskers with vinyl acetate under moderate conditions.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Nihat Sami; Tingaut, Philippe; Ozmen, Nilgül; Henry, Nathan; Harper, David; Dadmun, Mark; Sèbe, Gilles

    2009-10-08

    A novel and straightforward method for the surface acetylation of cellulose nanowhiskers by transesterification of vinyl acetate is proposed. The reaction of vinyl acetate with the hydroxyl groups of cellulose nanowhiskers obtained from cotton linters was examined with potassium carbonate as catalyst. Results indicate that during the first stage of the reaction, only the surface of the nanowhiskers was modified, while their dimensions and crystallinity remained unchanged. With increasing reaction time, diffusion mechanisms controlled the rate, leading to nanowhiskers with higher levels of acetylation, smaller dimensions, and lower crystallinity. In THF, a solvent of low polarity, the suspensions from modified nanowhiskers showed improved stability with increased acetylation.

  12. Structural Basis of Eco1-Mediated Cohesin Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Chao, William C. H.; Wade, Benjamin O.; Bouchoux, Céline; Jones, Andrew W.; Purkiss, Andrew G.; Federico, Stefania; O’Reilly, Nicola; Snijders, Ambrosius P.; Uhlmann, Frank; Singleton, Martin R.

    2017-01-01

    Sister-chromatid cohesion is established by Eco1-mediated acetylation on two conserved tandem lysines in the cohesin Smc3 subunit. However, the molecular basis of Eco1 substrate recognition and acetylation in cohesion is not fully understood. Here, we discover and rationalize the substrate specificity of Eco1 using mass spectrometry coupled with in-vitro acetylation assays and crystallography. Our structures of the X. laevis Eco2 (xEco2) bound to its primary and secondary Smc3 substrates demonstrate the plasticity of the substrate-binding site, which confers substrate specificity by concerted conformational changes of the central β hairpin and the C-terminal extension. PMID:28290497

  13. 9-O-Acetylation of sialic acids is catalysed by CASD1 via a covalent acetyl-enzyme intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Anna-Maria T.; Bakkers, Mark J. G.; Buettner, Falk F. R.; Hartmann, Maike; Grove, Melanie; Langereis, Martijn A.; de Groot, Raoul J.; Mühlenhoff, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Sialic acids, terminal sugars of glycoproteins and glycolipids, play important roles in development, cellular recognition processes and host–pathogen interactions. A common modification of sialic acids is 9-O-acetylation, which has been implicated in sialoglycan recognition, ganglioside biology, and the survival and drug resistance of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells. Despite many functional implications, the molecular basis of 9-O-acetylation has remained elusive thus far. Following cellular approaches, including selective gene knockout by CRISPR/Cas genome editing, we here show that CASD1—a previously identified human candidate gene—is essential for sialic acid 9-O-acetylation. In vitro assays with the purified N-terminal luminal domain of CASD1 demonstrate transfer of acetyl groups from acetyl-coenzyme A to CMP-activated sialic acid and formation of a covalent acetyl-enzyme intermediate. Our study provides direct evidence that CASD1 is a sialate O-acetyltransferase and serves as key enzyme in the biosynthesis of 9-O-acetylated sialoglycans. PMID:26169044

  14. Acetylation of Mammalian ADA3 Is Required for Its Functional Roles in Histone Acetylation and Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mohibi, Shakur; Srivastava, Shashank; Bele, Aditya; Mirza, Sameer; Band, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Alteration/deficiency in activation 3 (ADA3) is an essential component of specific histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes. We have previously shown that ADA3 is required for establishing global histone acetylation patterns and for normal cell cycle progression (S. Mohibi et al., J Biol Chem 287:29442–29456, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M112.378901). Here, we report that these functional roles of ADA3 require its acetylation. We show that ADA3 acetylation, which is dynamically regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, reflects a balance of coordinated actions of its associated HATs, GCN5, PCAF, and p300, and a new partner that we define, the deacetylase SIRT1. We use mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis to identify major sites of ADA3 acetylated by GCN5 and p300. Acetylation-defective mutants are capable of interacting with HATs and other components of HAT complexes but are deficient in their ability to restore ADA3-dependent global or locus-specific histone acetylation marks and cell proliferation in Ada3-deleted murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Given the key importance of ADA3-containing HAT complexes in the regulation of various biological processes, including the cell cycle, our study presents a novel mechanism to regulate the function of these complexes through dynamic ADA3 acetylation. PMID:27402865

  15. Acetylation of Mammalian ADA3 Is Required for Its Functional Roles in Histone Acetylation and Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mohibi, Shakur; Srivastava, Shashank; Bele, Aditya; Mirza, Sameer; Band, Hamid; Band, Vimla

    2016-10-01

    Alteration/deficiency in activation 3 (ADA3) is an essential component of specific histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes. We have previously shown that ADA3 is required for establishing global histone acetylation patterns and for normal cell cycle progression (S. Mohibi et al., J Biol Chem 287:29442-29456, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M112.378901). Here, we report that these functional roles of ADA3 require its acetylation. We show that ADA3 acetylation, which is dynamically regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, reflects a balance of coordinated actions of its associated HATs, GCN5, PCAF, and p300, and a new partner that we define, the deacetylase SIRT1. We use mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis to identify major sites of ADA3 acetylated by GCN5 and p300. Acetylation-defective mutants are capable of interacting with HATs and other components of HAT complexes but are deficient in their ability to restore ADA3-dependent global or locus-specific histone acetylation marks and cell proliferation in Ada3-deleted murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Given the key importance of ADA3-containing HAT complexes in the regulation of various biological processes, including the cell cycle, our study presents a novel mechanism to regulate the function of these complexes through dynamic ADA3 acetylation.

  16. Isolated spinach ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit .sup..epsilon. N-methyltransferase and method of inactivating ribulose-1,5-bisphosphatase carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit .sup..epsilon. N-methyltransferase activity

    DOEpatents

    Houtz, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS) .sup..epsilon. N-methyltransferase (protein methylase III or Rubisco LSMT) from a plant which has a des(methyl) lysyl residue in the LS is disclosed. In addition, the full-length cDNA clones for Rubisco LSMT are disclosed. Transgenic plants and methods of producing same which have the Rubisco LSMT gene inserted into the DNA are also provided. Further, methods of inactivating the enzymatic activity of Rubisco LSMT are also disclosed.

  17. Leucine 332 influences the CO2/O2 specificity factor of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Anacystis nidulans.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, G. J.; McDonald, K. A.; McFadden, B. A.

    1993-01-01

    The role of Leu 332 in ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans was investigated by site-directed mutagenesis. Substitutions of this residue with Met, Ile, Val, Thr, or Ala decreased the CO2/O2 specificity factor by as much as 67% and 96% for the Ile mutant in the presence of Mg2+ and Mn2+, respectively. For the Met, Ile, and Ala mutants in the presence of Mg2+, no loss of oxygenase activity was observed despite the loss of greater than 65% of the carboxylase activity relative to the wild-type enzyme. In the presence of Mn2+, carboxylase activities for mutant enzymes were reduced to approximately the same degree as was observed in the presence of Mg2+, although oxygenase activities were also reduced to similar extents as carboxylase activities. Only minor changes in Km(RuBP) were observed for all mutants in the presence of Mg2+ relative to the wild-type enzyme, indicating that Leu 332 does not function in RuBP binding. These results suggest that in the presence of Mg2+, Leu 332 contributes to the stabilization of the transition state for the carboxylase reaction, and demonstrate that it is possible to affect only one of the activities of this bifunctional enzyme. PMID:8358297

  18. Substrate specificity of THCA-CoA oxidases from rat liver light mitochondrial fractions on dehydrogenation of 3 alpha,7 alpha,12 alpha-trihydroxy-5 beta-cholestanoic acid CoA thioester.

    PubMed

    Ikegawa, S; Goto, T; Mano, N; Goto, J

    1998-11-01

    The substrate specificity of rat liver peroxisomal 3 alpha,7 alpha,12 alpha-trihydroxy-5 beta-cholestanoyl-CoA (THCA-CoA) oxidases, which catalyze the dehydrogenation of 3 alpha,7 alpha,12 alpha-trihydroxy-5 beta-cholestanoic acid (THCA) CoA thioester, having an asymmetric center at C-25, to form (24E)-3 alpha,7 alpha,12 alpha-trihydroxy-5 beta-cholest-24-enoic acid (delta 24-THCA) CoA thioester, was studied. The stable isotope labeled substrates, [3,7,12-18O3]-(25R)- and (25S)-THCA CoA thioesters were synthesized by an exchange reaction of carbonyl oxygens on a steroid nucleus of 3,7,12-trioxo-5 beta-cholestanoic acid, followed by metal hydride reduction and condensation reaction with CoA. After incubation of a mixture of unlabeled (25R)- and 18O-labeled (25S)-THCA CoA thioester, or vice versa, with hepatic peroxisomal THCA-CoA oxidases, biotransformed delta 24-THCA was determined by liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry. The delta 24-THCA was derived only from (25S)-THCA CoA thioester, indicating that the 25S epimer of THCA is a preferential substrate on dehydrogenation by THCA-CoA oxidases.

  19. Partially Acetylated Sugarcane Bagasse For Wicking Oil From Contaminated Wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sugarcane bagasse was partially acetylated to enhance its oil-wicking ability in saturated environments while holding moisture for hydrocarbon biodegradation. The water sorption capacity of raw bagasse was reduced fourfold after treatment, which indicated considerably increased ...

  20. Data detailing the platelet acetyl-lysine proteome.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Joseph E; David, Larry L; McCarty, Owen J T

    2015-12-01

    Here we detail proteomics data that describe the acetyl-lysine proteome of blood platelets (Aslan et al., 2015 [1]). An affinity purification - mass spectrometry (AP-MS) approach was used to identify proteins modified by Nε-lysine acetylation in quiescent, washed human platelets. The data provide insights into potential regulatory mechanisms of platelet function mediated by protein lysine acetylation. Additionally, as platelets are anucleate and lack histone proteins, they offer a unique and valuable system to study the regulation of cytosolic proteins by lysine acetylation. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (Vizcaino et al., 2014 [2]) via with PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD002332.

  1. Protein kinase C coordinates histone H3 phosphorylation and acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Darieva, Zoulfia; Webber, Aaron; Warwood, Stacey; Sharrocks, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    The re-assembly of chromatin following DNA replication is a critical event in the maintenance of genome integrity. Histone H3 acetylation at K56 and phosphorylation at T45 are two important chromatin modifications that accompany chromatin assembly. Here we have identified the protein kinase Pkc1 as a key regulator that coordinates the deposition of these modifications in S. cerevisiae under conditions of replicative stress. Pkc1 phosphorylates the histone acetyl transferase Rtt109 and promotes its ability to acetylate H3K56. Our data also reveal novel cross-talk between two different histone modifications as Pkc1 also enhances H3T45 phosphorylation and this modification is required for H3K56 acetylation. Our data therefore uncover an important role for Pkc1 in coordinating the deposition of two different histone modifications that are important for chromatin assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09886.001 PMID:26468616

  2. Acetylation of C/EBPα inhibits its granulopoietic function

    PubMed Central

    Bararia, Deepak; Kwok, Hui Si; Welner, Robert S.; Numata, Akihiko; Sárosi, Menyhárt B.; Yang, Henry; Wee, Sheena; Tschuri, Sebastian; Ray, Debleena; Weigert, Oliver; Levantini, Elena; Ebralidze, Alexander K.; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Tenen, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) is an essential transcription factor for myeloid lineage commitment. Here we demonstrate that acetylation of C/EBPα at lysine residues K298 and K302, mediated at least in part by general control non-derepressible 5 (GCN5), impairs C/EBPα DNA-binding ability and modulates C/EBPα transcriptional activity. Acetylated C/EBPα is enriched in human myeloid leukaemia cell lines and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) samples, and downregulated upon granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)- mediated granulocytic differentiation of 32Dcl3 cells. C/EBPα mutants that mimic acetylation failed to induce granulocytic differentiation in C/EBPα-dependent assays, in both cell lines and in primary hematopoietic cells. Our data uncover GCN5 as a negative regulator of C/EBPα and demonstrate the importance of C/EBPα acetylation in myeloid differentiation. PMID:27005833

  3. Immobilization of D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase: a step toward carbon dioxide fixation bioprocess.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Subhra; Bhattacharya, Sumana; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K

    2003-03-20

    Immobilization of D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) from spinach leaves is described. This enzyme enables the fixation of carbon dioxide on a five-carbon sugar D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP). Two different immobilization methods were employed: dicyclohexylcarbodiimide coupling on nylon membrane matrix and dimethylpimelimidate immobilization on protein A agarose. The reusability of immobilized enzymes, coupling efficiency, and temperature-activity relationship of soluble and immobilized Rubisco are presented. The immobilization imparted greater thermal and storage stability. The thermal deactivation rates of the immobilized enzymes were considerably lower than those of the soluble enzyme.

  4. Olig1 Acetylation and Nuclear Export Mediate Oligodendrocyte Development

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jinxiang; Bercury, Kathryn K.; Jin, Weilin

    2015-01-01

    The oligodendrocyte transcription factor Olig1 is critical for both oligodendrocyte development and remyelination in mice. Nuclear to cytoplasmic translocation of Olig1 protein occurs during brain development and in multiple sclerosis, but the detailed molecular mechanism of this translocation remains elusive. Here, we report that Olig1 acetylation and deacetylation drive its active translocation between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in both mouse and rat oligodendrocytes. We identified three functional nuclear export sequences (NES) localized in the basic helix-loop-helix domain and one specific acetylation site at Lys 150 (human Olig1) in NES1. Olig1 acetylation and deacetylation are regulated by the acetyltransferase CREB-binding protein and the histone deacetylases HDAC1, HDAC3, and HDAC10. Acetylation of Olig1 decreased its chromatin association, increased its interaction with inhibitor of DNA binding 2 and facilitated its retention in the cytoplasm of mature oligodendrocytes. These studies establish that acetylation of Olig1 regulates its chromatin dissociation and subsequent translocation to the cytoplasm and is required for its function in oligodendrocyte maturation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The nuclear to cytoplasmic translocation of Olig1 protein has been observed during mouse and human brain development and in multiple sclerosis in several studies, but the detailed molecular mechanism of this translocation remains elusive. Here, we provide insight into the mechanism by which acetylation of Olig1 regulates its unique nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling during oligodendrocyte development and how the acetylation status of Olig1 modulates its distinct function in the nucleus versus the cytoplasm. The current study provides a unique example of a lineage-specific transcription factor that is actively translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm as the cell differentiates. Importantly, we demonstrate that this process is tightly controlled by acetylation at a single

  5. A colorimetric assay for the determination of acetyl xylan esterase or cephalosporin C acetyl esterase activities using 7-amino cephalosporanic acid, cephalosporin C, or acetylated xylan as substrate.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Irene; Montoro-García, Silvia; Lozada-Ramírez, José Daniel; Sánchez-Ferrer, Alvaro; García-Carmona, Francisco

    2007-10-15

    A bromothymol blue-based colorimetric assay has been devised to screen for acetyl xylan esterase or cephalosporin C (CPC) deacetylase activities using 7-amino cephalosporanic acid (7-ACA), CPC, or acetylated xylan as substrate. These enzymes are not screened with their natural substrates because of the tedious procedures available previously. Acetyl xylan esterase from Bacillus pumilus CECT 5072 was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3), and characterized using this assay. Similar K(M) values for 7-ACA and CPC were obtained when compared with those described using HPLC methods. The assay is easy to perform and can be carried out in robotic high-throughput colorimetric devices normally used in directed evolution experiments. The assay allowed us to detect improvements in activity at a minimum of twofold with a very low coefficient of variance in 96-well plates. This method is significantly faster and more convenient to use than are known HPLC and pH-stat procedures.

  6. Regulation of S-Adenosylhomocysteine Hydrolase by Lysine Acetylation*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun; Kavran, Jennifer M.; Chen, Zan; Karukurichi, Kannan R.; Leahy, Daniel J.; Cole, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    S-Adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) is an NAD+-dependent tetrameric enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of S-adenosylhomocysteine to adenosine and homocysteine and is important in cell growth and the regulation of gene expression. Loss of SAHH function can result in global inhibition of cellular methyltransferase enzymes because of high levels of S-adenosylhomocysteine. Prior proteomics studies have identified two SAHH acetylation sites at Lys401 and Lys408 but the impact of these post-translational modifications has not yet been determined. Here we use expressed protein ligation to produce semisynthetic SAHH acetylated at Lys401 and Lys408 and show that modification of either position negatively impacts the catalytic activity of SAHH. X-ray crystal structures of 408-acetylated SAHH and dually acetylated SAHH have been determined and reveal perturbations in the C-terminal hydrogen bonding patterns, a region of the protein important for NAD+ binding. These crystal structures along with mutagenesis data suggest that such hydrogen bond perturbations are responsible for SAHH catalytic inhibition by acetylation. These results suggest how increased acetylation of SAHH may globally influence cellular methylation patterns. PMID:25248746

  7. Acetyl radical generation in cigarette smoke: Quantification and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Na; Green, Sarah A.

    2014-10-01

    Free radicals are present in cigarette smoke and can have a negative effect on human health. However, little is known about their formation mechanisms. Acetyl radicals were quantified in tobacco smoke and mechanisms for their generation were investigated by computer simulations. Acetyl radicals were trapped from the gas phase using 3-amino-2, 2, 5, 5-tetramethyl-proxyl (3AP) on solid support to form stable 3AP adducts for later analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), mass spectrometry/tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Simulations were performed using the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM). A range of 10-150 nmol/cigarette of acetyl radical was measured from gas phase tobacco smoke of both commercial and research cigarettes under several different smoking conditions. More radicals were detected from the puff smoking method compared to continuous flow sampling. Approximately twice as many acetyl radicals were trapped when a glass fiber particle filter (GF/F specifications) was placed before the trapping zone. Simulations showed that NO/NO2 reacts with isoprene, initiating chain reactions to produce hydroxyl radical, which abstracts hydrogen from acetaldehyde to generate acetyl radical. These mechanisms can account for the full amount of acetyl radical detected experimentally from cigarette smoke. Similar mechanisms may generate radicals in second hand smoke.

  8. Kinetic studies on enzymatic acetylation of chloramphenicol in Streptococcus faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Y; Nitahara, Y; Miyamura, S

    1979-01-01

    The kinetics of chloramphenicol (CP) acetylation by CP acetyltransferase from Streptococcus faecalis was studied. CP was shown to be acetylated enzymatically to its 3-O-acetyl derivative (3-AcCP) in the presence of acetyl coenzyme A, after which 3-AcCP was converted nonenzymatically to its 1-O-acetyl isomer, 1-O-acetyl CP (1-AcCP). At equilibrium, the 1-AcCP and 3-AcCP were present in a 1:4 ratio. Subsequently the diacetylated product, 1,3-O-O-diacetyl CP [1,3-(Ac)2CP], was enzymatically produced from 1-AcCP by the same enzyme. Theoretical calculation of rate constants (k1, k2, k3) for each successive reaction is as follows: (Formula: see text). This calculation gave k1 = 0.4 min-1, k2 = 0.002 min-1, and k3 = 0.016 min-1. Experimental results agreed closely with these calculated values. Images PMID:119483

  9. Inactivation of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Rhodospirillum rubrum and spinach with the new affinity label 2-bromo-1,5-dihydroxy-3-pentanone 1,5-bisphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, M.I.; Hartman, F.C.

    1981-11-16

    In an attempt to identify the active-site base believed to initiate catalysis by ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase, we have synthesized 2-bromo-1, 5-dihydroxy-3-pentanone 1,5-bisphosphate, a reactive analogue of a postulated intermediate of carboxylation. Although highly unstable, this compound can be shown to inactivate the carboxylases from both Rhodospirillum rubrum and spinach rapidly and irreversibly. Inactivation follows pseudo first-order kinetics, shows rate saturation and is greatly reduced by saturating amounts of the competitive inhibitor, 2-carboxyribitol 1,5-bisphosphate. The incorporation of reagent, quantified by reducing the modified carboxylases with (/sup 3/H)NaBH/sub 4/, shows that inactivation results from the modification of approximately one residue per catalytic subunit of the Rhodospirillum rubrum enzyme and less than one residue per protomeric unit of the spinach enzyme.

  10. Effect of Light and NO3− on Wheat Leaf Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Le Van Quy; Foyer, Christine; Champigny, Marie-Louise

    1991-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPcase) activity was studied in excised leaves of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the dark and in the light, in presence of either N-free (low-NO3− leaves) or 40 millimolar KNO3 (high-NO3− leaves) nutrient solutions. PEPcase activity increased to 2.7-fold higher than that measured in dark-adapted tissue (control) during the first 60 minutes and continued to increase more slowly to 3.8-fold that of the control. This level was reached after 200 minutes exposure of the leaves to light and high NO3−. In contrast, the lower rate of increase recorded for low-NO3− leaves ceased after 60 minutes of exposure to light at 2.3-fold the control level. The short-term NO3− effect increased linearly with the level of NO3− uptake. In immunoprecipitation experiments, the antibody concentration for PEPcase precipitation increased with the protein extracts from the different treatments in the order: control, illuminated low-NO3− leaves, illuminated high-NO3− leaves. This order also applied with regard to a decreasing sensitivity to malate and an increasing stimulation by okadaic acid (an inhibitor of P-protein phosphatases). Following these studies, 32P labeling experiments were carried out in vivo. These showed that the light-induced change in the properties of the PEPcase was due to an alteration in the phosphorylation state of the protein and that this effect was enhanced in high-NO3− conditions. Based on the responses of PEPcase and sucrose phosphate synthase in wheat leaves to light and NO3−, an interpretation of the role of NO3− as either an inhibitor of P-protein phosphatase(s) or activator of protein kinase(s) is inferred. In the presence of NO3−, the phosphorylation state of both PEPcase and sucrose phosphate synthase is increased. This causes activation of the former enzyme and inhibition of the latter. We suggest that NO3− modulates the relative protein kinase/protein phosphatase ratio to favor increased

  11. Regulation of bovine pyruvate carboxylase mRNA and promoter expression by thermal stress.

    PubMed

    White, H M; Koser, S L; Donkin, S S

    2012-09-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in gluconeogenesis from lactate and is a determinant of tricarboxylic acid cycle carbon flux. Bovine PC 5' untranslated region (UTR) mRNA variants are the products of a single PC gene containing 3 promoter regions (P3, P2, and P1, 5' to 3') that are responsive to physiological and nutritional stressors. The objective of this study was to determine the direct effects of thermal stress on PC mRNA and gene expression in bovine hepatocyte monolayer cultures, rat hepatoma (H4IIE) cells, and Madin-Darby bovine kidney epithelial (MDBK) cells. Hepatocytes were isolated from 3 Holstein bull calves and used to prepare monolayer cultures. Rat hepatoma cells and MDBK cells were obtained from American Type Culture Collection, Manassas, VA. Beginning 24 h after initial seeding, cells were subjected to either 37°C (control) or 42°C (thermal stress) for 24 h. Treatments were applied in triplicate in a minimum of 3 independent cell preparations. For bovine primary hepatocytes, endogenous expression of bovine PC mRNA increased (P < 0.1) with 24 h of thermal stress (1.31 vs. 2.79 ± 0.49, arbitrary units, control vs. thermal stress, respectively), but there was no change (P ≥ 0.1) in cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) mRNA expression. Similarly, exposure of MDBK cells to thermal stress increased (P < 0.1) expression of bovine PC mRNA without altering (P ≥ 0.1) PEPCK-C mRNA expression. Conversely, there was no effect (P ≥ 0.1) of thermal stress on endogenous rat PC (0.47 vs. 0.30 ± 0.08, control vs. thermal stress) or PEPCK-C (1.61 vs. 1.20 ± 0.48, arbitrary units, control vs. thermal stress, respectively) mRNA expressions in H4IIE cells. To further investigate the regulation of PC, H4IIE cells were transiently transfected with bovine promoter-luciferase constructs containing either P1, P2, or P3, and exposed to thermal stress for 23 h. Activity of P1 was suppressed (P < 0.1) 5-fold, activity of P2

  12. Brønsted analysis reveals Lys218 as the carboxylase active site base that deprotonates vitamin K hydroquinone to initiate vitamin K-dependent protein carboxylation.

    PubMed

    Rishavy, Mark A; Hallgren, Kevin W; Yakubenko, Anna V; Shtofman, Rebecca L; Runge, Kurt W; Berkner, Kathleen L

    2006-11-07

    The vitamin K-dependent (VKD) carboxylase converts Glu's to carboxylated Glu's in VKD proteins to render them functional in a broad range of physiologies. The carboxylase uses vitamin K hydroquinone (KH(2)) epoxidation to drive Glu carboxylation, and one of its critical roles is to provide a catalytic base that deprotonates KH(2) to allow epoxidation. A long-standing model invoked Cys as the catalytic base but was ruled out by activity retention in a mutant where every Cys is substituted by Ala. Inhibitor analysis of the cysteine-less mutant suggested that the base is an activated amine [Rishavy et al. (2004) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 101, 13732-13737], and in the present study, we used an evolutionary approach to identify candidate amines, which revealed His160, His287, His381, and Lys218. When mutational analysis was performed using an expression system lacking endogenous carboxylase, the His to Ala mutants all showed full epoxidase activity but K218A activity was not detectable. The addition of exogenous amines restored K218A activity while having little effect on wild type carboxylase, and pH studies indicated that rescue was dependent upon the basic form of the amine. Importantly, Brønsted analysis that measured the effect of amines with different pK(a) values showed that K218A activity rescue depended upon the basicity of the amine. The combined results provide strong evidence that Lys218 is the essential base that deprotonates KH(2) to initiate the reaction. The identification of this base is an important advance in defining the carboxylase active site and has implications regarding carboxylase membrane topology and the feedback mechanism by which the Glu substrate regulates KH(2) oxygenation.

  13. Maintenance of Glucose Homeostasis through Acetylation of the Metabolic Transcriptional Coactivator PGC1-alpha

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    highlight that PGC-1α chemical acetylation is directly controlled by two enzymes: GCN5 and SIRT1 ; this strengths the possibility to use small...acetylated through GCN5 acetyltransferase activity, however under low nutrient conditions Sirt1 deacetylase will keep PGC-1α de-acetylated in an active form...acetylated by GCN5, we decided to use R13 because it did not respond to low glucose levels or Sirt1 activators. We think that the additional acetylation

  14. Involvement of S1P1 receptor pathway in angiogenic effects of a novel adenosine-like nucleic acid analog COA-Cl in cultured human vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Junsuke; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Kubota, Yasuo; Shoji, Kazuyo; Maruyama, Tokumi; Sakakibara, Norikazu; Takuwa, Yoh; Ujihara, Yoshihiro; Katanosaka, Yuki; Mohri, Satoshi; Naruse, Keiji; Yamashita, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Ryuji; Hirano, Katsuya; Kosaka, Hiroaki; Takata, Maki; Konishi, Ryoji; Tsukamoto, Ikuko

    2014-01-01

    COA-Cl (2Cl-C.OXT-A) is a recently developed adenosine-like nucleic acid analog that promotes angiogenesis via the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases ERK1/2. Endothelial S1P1 receptor plays indispensable roles in developmental angiogenesis. In this study, we examined the functions of S1P1 in COA-Cl-induced angiogenic responses. Antagonists for S1P1, W146, and VPC23019, substantially but still partly inhibited the effects of COA-Cl with regard to ERK1/2 activation and tube formation in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Antagonists for adenosine A1 receptor and purinergic P2Y1 receptor were without effect. Genetic knockdown of S1P1 with siRNA, but not that of S1P3, attenuated COA-Cl-elicited ERK1/2 responses. The signaling properties of COA-Cl showed significant similarities to those of sphingosine 1-phosphate, an endogenous S1P1 ligand, in that both induced responses sensitive to pertussis toxin (Gα i/o inhibitor), 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis (acetoxymethyl ester) (BAPTA-AM), (calcium chelator), and PP2 (c-Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor). COA-Cl elevated intracellular Ca2+ concentration and induced tyrosine phosphorylation of p130Cas, a substrate of c-Src, in HUVEC. COA-Cl displaced [3H]S1P in a radioligand-binding competition assay in chem-1 cells overexpressing S1P1. However, COA-Cl activated ERK1/2 in CHO-K1 cells that lack functional S1P1 receptor, suggesting the presence of additional yet-to-be-defined COA-Cl target in these cells. The results thus suggest the major contribution of S1P1 in the angiogenic effects of COA-Cl. However, other mechanism such as that seen in CHO-K1 cells may also be partly involved. Collectively, these findings may lead to refinement of the design of this nucleic acid analog and ultimately to development of small molecule-based therapeutic angiogenesis. PMID:25505610

  15. Purification and properties of an O-acetyl-transferase from Escherichia coli that can O-acetylate polysialic acid sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Higa, H.; Varki, A.

    1986-05-01

    Certain strains of bacteria synthesize an outer polysialic acid (K1) capsule. Some strains of K1/sup +/ E.coli are also capable of adding O-acetyl-esters to the exocyclic hydroxyl groups of the sialic acid residues. Both the capsule and the O-acetyl modification have been correlated with differences in antigenicity and pathogenicity. The authors have developed an assay for an O-acetyl-transferase in E.coli that transfers O-(/sup 3/H)acetyl groups from (/sup 3/H)acetyl-Coenzyme A to colominic acid (fragments of the polysialic acid capsule). Using this assay, the enzyme was solubilized, and purified approx. 600-fold using a single affinity chromatography step with Procion Red-A Agarose. The enzyme also binds to Coenzyme A Sepharose, and can be eluted with high salt or Coenzyme A. The partially purified enzyme has a pH optimum of 7.0 - 7.5, is unaffected by divalent cations, is inhibited by high salt concentrations, is inhibited by Coenzyme A (50% inhibition at 100 ..mu..M), and shows an apparent Km for colominic acid of 3.7 mM (sialic acid concentration). This enzyme could be involved in the O-acetyl +/- form variation seen in some strains of K1/sup +/ E.coli.

  16. Kinetic Variance of Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Isolated from Diverse Taxonomic Sources 1

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Samuel Sherrill; Tomany, Michael John

    1984-01-01

    Two dual label methods were used to investigate kinetic variability of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/oxygenase (EC 4.1.1.39). In addition to using [1-14C,5-3H]RuBP (method 1), we describe here the detailed assay with 14CO2 and [5-3H]RuBP (method 2), which generates [3H,14C]3-phosphoglyceric acid and unlabeled (noncontaminating) phosphoglycolate; the carboxylase/oxygenase activity ratio (vc/vo) is calculated from 3H/14C ratios of substrates and products. vc/vo was found to be a linear function of [CO2]/[O2], constant over a 4-minute assay interval, and invariant of the degree of enzyme activity. Accurately measurable vc/vo ratios range from approximately 0.3 to 6. The Km and Vmax of both enzymes may be determined as a composite constant, VcKo/VoKc. By method 2, the directly compared, relative values at 40 micromolar CO2 and 1240 micromolar O2 were: Spinacia oleracea (74), Chlorella pyrenoidosa (31), Plectonema boryanum (32), and Rhodospirillum rubrum (8). With method 1, the values for S. oleracea and R. rubrum were 75, and 9, respectively. Under tight experimental controls, the absolute value for S. oleracea was 69 ± 3. PMID:16663680

  17. Varying Photoperiod, Ribulose 1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase and CO2 Uptake in Thalassiosira fluviatilis (Bacillariophyceae) 1

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, Louis A.; Morris, W. James.; Guest, Kathryn P.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to test the hypothesis that acclimation of the unicellular marine alga, Thalassiosira fluviatilis Hustedt, to short photoperiods results in decreased cellular concentrations of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and decreased rates of light-saturated CO2 uptake. Cells were acclimated to photoperiods of 6:18, 12:12, and 18:6 h:h light:dark, and concentrations of the large subunit of the enzyme and responses of CO2 uptake to varying irradiance were measured. Concentrations of the large subunit, which weighed approximately 50 kilodaltons, were conserved while rates of CO2 uptake under light saturation and limitation, and cellular contents of chlorophyll a increased as photoperiod decreased. Apparently, these cells acclimate to short photoperiods by increasing rates of CO2 uptake under saturating irradiances by increasing in vivo activation of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Also, chlorophyll-specific concentrations and specific activities of the enzyme appear to be lower and higher, respectively, in diatomaceous algae than in higher plants. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16664500

  18. Genetic Construction of Truncated and Chimeric Metalloproteins Derived from the Alpha Subunit of Acetyl-CoA Synthase from Clostridium thermoaceticum

    SciTech Connect

    Huay-Keng Loke; Xiangshi Tan; Paul A. Lindahl

    2002-06-28

    In this study, a genetics-based method is used to truncate acetyl-coenzyme A synthase from Clostridium thermoaceticum (ACS), an alpha2beta2 tetrameric 310 kda bifunctional enzyme. ACS catalyzes the reversible reduction of CO2 to CO and the synthesis of acetyl-CoA from CO (or CO2 in the presence of low-potential reductants), CoA, and a methyl group bound to a corrinoid-iron sulfur protein (CoFeSP). ACS contains 7 metal-sulfur clusters of 4 different types called A, B, C, and D. The B, C, and D clusters are located in the 72 kda beta subunit while the A-cluster, a Ni-X-Fe4S4 cluster that serves as the active site for acetyl-CoA synthase activity, is located in the 82 kda alpha subunit. The extent to which the essential properties of the cluster, including catalytic, redox, spectroscopic, and substrate-binding properties, were retained as ACS was progressively truncated was determined. Acetyl-CoA synthase catalytic activity remained when the entire alpha subunit was removed, as long as CO, rather than CO2 and a low-potential reductant, was used as a substrate. Truncating an {approx} 30 kda region from the N-terminus of the alpha subunit yielded a 49 kda protein that lacked catalytic activity but exhibited A-cluster-like spectroscopic, redox, and CO binding properties. Further truncation afforded a 23 kda protein that lacked recognizable A-cluster properties except for UV-vis spectra typical of [Fe4S4]2+ clusters. Two chimeric proteins were constructed by fusing the gene encoding a ferredoxin from Chromatium vinosum to genes encoding the 49 kda and 82 kda fragments of the alpha subunit. The chimeric proteins exhibited EPR signals that were not the simple sum of the signals from the separate proteins, suggesting magnetic interactions between clusters. This study highlights the potential for using genetics to simplify the study of complex multi-centered metalloenzymes and to generate new complex metalloenzymes with interesting properties.

  19. Modification of oil palm wood using acetylation and impregnation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subagiyo, Lambang; Rosamah, Enih; Hesim

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is chemical modification by process of acetylation and impregnation of oil palm wood to improve the dimensional stability. Acetylation process aimed at substituting the hydroxyl groups in a timber with an acetyl group. By increasing the acetyl groups in wood is expected to reduce the ability of wood to absorb water vapor which lead to the dimensions of the wood becomes more stable. Studies conducted on oil palm wood (Elaeis guineensis Jacq) by acetylation and impregnation method. The results showed that acetylated and impregnated wood oil palm (E. guineensis Jacq) were changed in their physical properties. Impregnation with coal ashfly provide the greatest response to changes in weight (in wet conditions) and after conditioning (dry) with the average percentage of weight gain of 198.16% and 66.41% respectively. Changes in volume indicates an increase of volume in the wet condition (imbibition) with the coal ashfly treatment gave highest value of 23.04 %, whereas after conditioning (dry) the highest value obtained in the treatment of gum rosin:ethanol with a volume increase of 13:44%. The highest changes of the density with the coal ashfly impregnation in wet condition (imbibition) in value of 142.32% and after conditioning (dry) of 57.87%. The result of reduction in water absorption (RWA) test showed that in the palm oil wood samples most stable by using of gum rosin : ethanol of 0.97%, whereas the increase in oil palm wood dimensional stability (ASE) is the best of 59.42% after acetylation with Acetic Anhydride: Xylene.

  20. COA User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, B.; Pautz, J.; Sellers, C.

    1999-01-28

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has one of the largest and most complete collections of information on crude oil composition that is available to the public. The computer program that manages this database of crude oil analyses has recently been rewritten to allow easier access to this information. This report describes how the new system can be accessed and how the information contained in the Crude Oil Analysis Data Bank can be obtained.

  1. VimA-Dependent Modulation of Acetyl Coenzyme A Levels and Lipid A Biosynthesis Can Alter Virulence in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Aruni, A. Wilson; Lee, J.; Osbourne, D.; Dou, Y.; Roy, F.; Muthiah, A.; Boskovic, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    The Porphyromonas gingivalis VimA protein has multifunctional properties that can modulate several of its major virulence factors. To further characterize VimA, P. gingivalis FLL406 carrying an additional vimA gene and a vimA-defective mutant in a different P. gingivalis genetic background were evaluated. The vimA-defective mutant (FLL451) in the P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 genetic background showed a phenotype similar to that of the vimA-defective mutant (FLL92) in the P. gingivalis W83 genetic background. In contrast to the wild type, gingipain activity was increased in P. gingivalis FLL406, a vimA chimeric strain. P. gingivalis FLL451 had a five times higher biofilm-forming capacity than the parent strain. HeLa cells incubated with P. gingivalis FLL92 showed a decrease in invasion, in contrast to P. gingivalis FLL451 and FLL406, which showed increases of 30 and 40%, respectively. VimA mediated coenzyme A (CoA) transfer to isoleucine and reduced branched-chain amino acid metabolism. The lipid A content and associated proteins were altered in the vimA-defective mutants. The VimA chimera interacted with several proteins which were found to have an LXXTG motif, similar to the sorting motif of Gram-positive organisms. All the proteins had an N-terminal signal sequence with a putative sorting signal of L(P/T/S)X(T/N/D)G and two unique signatures of EXGXTX and HISXXGXG, in addition to a polar tail. Taken together, these observations further confirm the multifunctional role of VimA in modulating virulence possibly through its involvement in acetyl-CoA transfer and lipid A synthesis and possibly by protein sorting. PMID:22144476

  2. Steady state fluorescence studies of wild type recombinant cinnamoyl CoA reductase (Ll-CCRH1) and its active site mutants.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant; Vishwakarma, Rishi Kishore; Singh, Somesh; Gaikwad, Sushama; Khan, Bashir M

    2014-05-01

    Fluorescence quenching and time resolved fluorescence studies of wild type recombinant cinnamoyl CoA reductase (Ll-CCRH1), a multitryptophan protein from Leucaena leucocephala and 10 different active site mutants were carried out to investigate tryptophan environment. The enzyme showed highest affinity for feruloyl CoA (K(a)  = 3.72 × 10(5) M(-1)) over other CoA esters and cinnamaldehydes, as determined by fluorescence spectroscopy. Quenching of the fluorescence by acrylamide for wild type and active site mutants was collisional with almost 100% of the tryptophan fluorescence accessible under native condition and remained same after denaturation of protein with 6 M GdnHCl. In wild type Ll-CCRH1, the extent of quenching achieved with iodide (f(a) = 1.0) was significantly higher than cesium ions (f(a) = 0.33) suggesting more density of positive charge around surface of trp conformers under native conditions. Denaturation of wild type protein with 6 M GdnHCl led to significant increase in the quenching with cesium (f(a) = 0.54), whereas quenching with iodide ion was decreased (f(a) = 0.78), indicating reorientation of charge density around trp from positive to negative and heterogeneity in trp environment. The Stern-Volmer plots for wild type and mutants Ll-CCRH1 under native and denatured conditions, with cesium ion yielded biphasic quenching profiles. The extent of quenching for cesium and iodide ions under native and denatured conditions observed in active site mutants was significantly different from wild type Ll-CCRH1 under the same conditions. Thus, single substitution type mutations of active site residues showed heterogeneity in tryptophan microenvironment and differential degree of conformation of protein under native or denatured conditions.

  3. Effect of Genistein and L-Carnitine and Their Combination on Gene Expression of Hepatocyte HMG-COA Reductase and LDL Receptor in Experimental Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    YOUSEFINEJAD, Abbas; SIASSI, Fereydoon; MIRSHAFIEY, Abbas; ESHRAGHIAN, Mohammad-Reza; KOOHDANI, Fariba; JAVANBAKHT, Mohammad Hassan; SEDAGHAT, Reza; RAMEZANI, Atena; ZAREI, Mahnaz; DJALALI, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nephrotic syndrome is a disorder that leads to hyperlipidemia. L-carnitine and genistein can effect on lipid metabolism and the syndrome. In the present study, we have delved into the separate and the twin-effects of L-carnitine and genistein on the gene expressions of HMG-COA reductase and LDL receptor in experimental nephrotic syndrome. Methods: In this controlled experimental study, 50 male Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups: NC (normal-control), PC (patient-control), LC (L-carnitine), G (genistein), LCG (L-carnitine-genistein). Adriamycin was used for inducing nephrotic syndrome and the spot urine samples and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio were measured. Hepatocytic RNA was extracted and real-time PCR was used for HMG-COA Reductase and LDL receptor gene Expression measurement. Results: The final weight of the patients groups were lower than the NC group (P=0.001), and weight gain of the NC group was higher than the other groups (P<0.001). The proteinuria and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio showed significant differences between PC group and LC, G and LCG groups at week 7 (P<0.001). The expression of HMGCOA Reductase mRNA down regulated in LC, G and LCG groups in comparison with PC group (P<0.001). ΔCT of LDLr mRNA showed significant differences between the PC group and the other patient groups (P<0.001). Conclusion: This study shows a significant decreasing (P<0.001) and non-significant increasing trend in HMG-COA Reductase and LDLr gene expression, respectively, and synergistic effect of L-carnitine and genistein on these genes in experimental nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26576346

  4. RNAi inhibition of feruloyl CoA 6'-hydroxylase reduces scopoletin biosynthesis and post-harvest physiological deterioration in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) storage roots.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shi; Zainuddin, Ima M; Vanderschuren, Herve; Doughty, James; Beeching, John R

    2017-03-18

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is a major world crop, whose storage roots provide food for over 800 million throughout the humid tropics. Despite many advantages as a crop, the development of cassava is seriously constrained by the rapid post-harvest physiological deterioration (PPD) of its roots that occurs within 24-72 h of harvest, rendering the roots unpalatable and unmarketable. PPD limits cassava's marketing possibilities in countries that are undergoing increased development and urbanisation due to growing distances between farms and consumers. The inevitable wounding of the roots caused by harvesting triggers an oxidative burst that spreads throughout the cassava root, together with the accumulation of secondary metabolites including phenolic compounds, of which the coumarin scopoletin (7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one) is the most abundant. Scopoletin oxidation yields a blue-black colour, which suggests its involvement in the discoloration observed during PPD. Feruloyl CoA 6'-hydroxylase is a controlling enzyme in the biosynthesis of scopoletin. The cassava genome contains a seven membered family of feruloyl CoA 6'-hydroxylase genes, four of which are expressed in the storage root and, of these, three were capable of functionally complementing Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutants in this gene. A RNA interference construct, designed to a highly conserved region of these genes, was used to transform cassava, where it significantly reduced feruloyl CoA 6'-hydroxylase gene expression, scopoletin accumulation and PPD symptom development. Collectively, our results provide evidence that scopoletin plays a major functional role in the development of PPD symptoms, rather than merely paralleling symptom development in the cassava storage root.

  5. Targeting O-Acetyl-GD2 Ganglioside for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fleurence, Julien; Fougeray, Sophie; Bahri, Meriem; Cochonneau, Denis; Clémenceau, Béatrice; Paris, François; Heczey, Andras; Birklé, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    Target selection is a key feature in cancer immunotherapy, a promising field in cancer research. In this respect, gangliosides, a broad family of structurally related glycolipids, were suggested as potential targets for cancer immunotherapy based on their higher abundance in tumors when compared with the matched normal tissues. GD2 is the first ganglioside proven to be an effective target antigen for cancer immunotherapy with the regulatory approval of dinutuximab, a chimeric anti-GD2 therapeutic antibody. Although the therapeutic efficacy of anti-GD2 monoclonal antibodies is well documented, neuropathic pain may limit its application. O-Acetyl-GD2, the O-acetylated-derivative of GD2, has recently received attention as novel antigen to target GD2-positive cancers. The present paper examines the role of O-acetyl-GD2 in tumor biology as well as the available preclinical data of anti-O-acetyl-GD2 monoclonal antibodies. A discussion on the relevance of O-acetyl-GD2 in chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy development is also included.

  6. Targeting O-Acetyl-GD2 Ganglioside for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fleurence, Julien; Fougeray, Sophie; Bahri, Meriem; Cochonneau, Denis; Clémenceau, Béatrice; Paris, François; Heczey, Andras

    2017-01-01

    Target selection is a key feature in cancer immunotherapy, a promising field in cancer research. In this respect, gangliosides, a broad family of structurally related glycolipids, were suggested as potential targets for cancer immunotherapy based on their higher abundance in tumors when compared with the matched normal tissues. GD2 is the first ganglioside proven to be an effective target antigen for cancer immunotherapy with the regulatory approval of dinutuximab, a chimeric anti-GD2 therapeutic antibody. Although the therapeutic efficacy of anti-GD2 monoclonal antibodies is well documented, neuropathic pain may limit its application. O-Acetyl-GD2, the O-acetylated-derivative of GD2, has recently received attention as novel antigen to target GD2-positive cancers. The present paper examines the role of O-acetyl-GD2 in tumor biology as well as the available preclinical data of anti-O-acetyl-GD2 monoclonal antibodies. A discussion on the relevance of O-acetyl-GD2 in chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy development is also included. PMID:28154831

  7. N-Acetylation of Glucosamine-6-Phosphate in Leuconostoc mesenteroides

    PubMed Central

    DeMoss, R. D.; Moser, K.

    1969-01-01

    A partially purified enzyme (120-fold) from Leuconostoc mesenteroides catalyzed the reversible N-acetylation of d-glucosamine-6-phosphate. Coenzyme A was not required and inhibited the reaction rate. Neither d-glucosamine nor N-acetyl-d-glucosamine served as a substrate for the reversible reaction. The enzyme preparation retained 50% of its original activity after 5 min at 100 C. The Km for acetate was 7.7 × 10−2m in the presence of 2 × 10−2md-glucosamine-6-phosphate. The Km for d-glucosamine-6-phosphate was 5.0 × 10−3m in the presence of 0.64 m acetate. The product of the reaction was characterized by comparison with N-acetyl-d-glucosamine-6-phosphate prepared by enzymatic phosphorylation of N-acetyl-d-glusamine. The characterization tests were: chromatographic migration, acid hydrolysis, enzymatic dephosphorylation, sodium borohydride reduction, and periodate oxidation. The equilibrium constant for the reaction was about 7.5 m for the expression K = (d-glucosamine-6-phosphate)(acetate)/N-acetyl-d-glucosamine-6-phosphate. The standard free energy of the reaction was approximately 1,200 cal per mole. PMID:5781575

  8. 248-nm laser photolysis of CHBr3/O-atom mixtures: kinetic evidence for UV CO(A) chemiluminescence in the reaction of methylidyne radicals with atomic oxygen.

    PubMed

    Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L

    2005-03-17

    The 4th positive and Cameron band emissions from electronically excited CO have been observed for the first time in 248-nm pulsed laser photolysis of a trace amount of CHBr(3) vapor in an excess of O atoms. O atoms were produced by dissociation of N(2)O (or O(2)) in a cw-microwave discharge cavity in 2.0 Torr of He at 298 K. The CO emission intensity in these bands showed a quadratic dependence on the laser fluence employed. Temporal profiles of the CO(A) and other excited-state products that formed in the photoproduced precursor + O-atom reactions were measured by recording their time-resolved chemiluminescence in discrete vibronic bands. The CO 4th positive transition (A(1)Pi, v' = 0 --> X(1)Sigma(+), v' ' = 2) near 165.7 nm was monitored in this work to deduce the pseudo-first-order decay kinetics of the CO(A) chemiluminescence in the presence of various added substrates (CH(4), NO, N(2)O, H(2), and O(2)). From this, the second-order rate coefficient values were determined for reactions of these substrates with the photoproduced precursors. The measured reactivity trends suggest that the prominent precursors responsible for the CO(A) chemiluminescence are the methylidyne radicals, CH(X(2)Pi) and CH(a(4)Sigma(-)), whose production requires the absorption of at least 2 laser photons by the photolysis mixture. The O-atom reactions with brominated precursors (CBr, CHBr, and CBr(2)), which also form in the photolysis, are shown to play a minor role in the production of the CO(A or a) chemiluminescence. However, the CBr(2) + O-atom reaction was identified as a significant source for the 289.9-nm Br(2) chemiluminescence that was also observed in this work. The 282.2-nm OH and the 336.2-nm NH chemiluminescences were also monitored to deduce the kinetics of CH(X(2)Pi) and CH(a(4)Sigma(-)) reactions when excess O(2) and NO were present.

  9. Synthetic Biology for Engineering Acetyl Coenzyme A Metabolism in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used cell factory for the production of fuels, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals. The use of this cell factory for cost-efficient production of novel fuels and chemicals requires high yields and low by-product production. Many industrially interesting chemicals are biosynthesized from acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), which serves as a central precursor metabolite in yeast. To ensure high yields in production of these chemicals, it is necessary to engineer the central carbon metabolism so that ethanol production is minimized (or eliminated) and acetyl-CoA can be formed from glucose in high yield. Here the perspective of generating yeast platform strains that have such properties is discussed in the context of a major breakthrough with expression of a functional pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in the cytosol. PMID:25370498

  10. H4K44 Acetylation Facilitates Chromatin Accessibility during Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jialei; Donahue, Greg; Dorsey, Jean; Govin, Jérôme; Yuan, Zuofei; Garcia, Benjamin A; Shah, Parisha P; Berger, Shelley L

    2015-12-01

    Meiotic recombination hotspots are associated with histone post-translational modifications and open chromatin. However, it remains unclear how histone modifications and chromatin structure regulate meiotic recombination. Here, we identify acetylation of histone H4 at Lys44 (H4K44ac) occurring on the nucleosomal lateral surface. We show that H4K44 is acetylated at pre-meiosis and meiosis and displays genome-wide enrichment at recombination hotspots in meiosis. Acetylation at H4K44 is required for normal meiotic recombination, normal levels of double-strand breaks (DSBs) during meiosis, and optimal sporulation. Non-modifiable H4K44R results in increased nucleosomal occupancy around DSB hotspots. Our results indicate that H4K44ac functions to facilitate chromatin accessibility favorable for normal DSB formation and meiotic recombination.

  11. Enzymic and physicochemical characterization of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from diploid and tetraploid cultivars of perennial ryegrass

    SciTech Connect

    Rejda, J.M.; Johal, S.; Chollet, R.

    1981-09-01

    Homogeneous preparations of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase were isolated from several diploid and tetraploid cultivars of perennial ryegrass by three different purification protocols. The apparent K/sub m/ values for substrate CO/sub 2/ were essentially identical for the fully CO/sub 2//Mg/sup 2 +/-activated diploid and tetraploid enzymes, as were the kinetics for deactivation and activation of the CO/sub 2//Mg/sup 2 +/-activated and -depleted carboxylases, respectively. Similarly, virtually indistinguishable electrophoretic properties were observed for both the native and dissociated diploid and tetraploid ryegrass proteins, including native and subunit molecular weights and the isoelectric points of the native proteins and the large and small subunit component polypeptides. The quantity of carboxylase protein or total soluble leaf protein did not differ significantly between the diploid and tetraploid cultivars. Contrary to a previous report, these results indicate that increased ploidy level has had essentially no effect on the quantity or enzymic and physicochemical properties of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in perennial ryegrass.

  12. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Globally Enhance H3/H4 Tail Acetylation Without Affecting H3 Lysine 56 Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Drogaris, Paul; Villeneuve, Valérie; Pomiès, Christelle; Lee, Eun-Hye; Bourdeau, Véronique; Bonneil, Éric; Ferbeyre, Gerardo; Verreault, Alain; Thibault, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) represent a promising avenue for cancer therapy. We applied mass spectrometry (MS) to determine the impact of clinically relevant HDACi on global levels of histone acetylation. Intact histone profiling revealed that the HDACi SAHA and MS-275 globally increased histone H3 and H4 acetylation in both normal diploid fibroblasts and transformed human cells. Histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56ac) recently elicited much interest and controversy due to its potential as a diagnostic and prognostic marker for a broad diversity of cancers. Using quantitative MS, we demonstrate that H3K56ac is much less abundant than previously reported in human cells. Unexpectedly, in contrast to H3/H4 N-terminal tail acetylation, H3K56ac did not increase in response to inhibitors of each class of HDACs. In addition, we demonstrate that antibodies raised against H3K56ac peptides cross-react against H3 N-terminal tail acetylation sites that carry sequence similarity to residues flanking H3K56. PMID:22355734

  13. Toxicology of deoxynivalenol and its acetylated and modified forms.

    PubMed

    Payros, Delphine; Alassane-Kpembi, Imourana; Pierron, Alix; Loiseau, Nicolas; Pinton, Philippe; Oswald, Isabelle P

    2016-12-01

    Mycotoxins are the most frequently occurring natural contaminants in human and animal diet. Among them, deoxynivalenol (DON), produced by Fusarium, is one of the most prevalent and thus represents an important health risk. Recent detection methods revealed new mycotoxins and new molecules derivated from the "native" mycotoxins. The main derivates of DON are the acetylated forms produced by the fungi (3- and 15-acetyl-DON), the biologically "modified" forms produced by the plant (deoxynivalenol-3-β-D-glucopyranoside), or after bacteria transformation (de-epoxy DON, 3-epi-DON and 3-keto-DON) as well as the chemically "modified" forms (norDON A-C and DON-sulfonates). High proportions of acetylated and modified forms of DON co-occur with DON, increasing the exposure and the health risk. DON and its acetylated and modified forms are rapidly absorbed following ingestion. At the molecular level, DON binds to the ribosome, induces a ribotoxic stress leading to the activation of MAP kinases, cellular cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. The toxic effects of DON include emesis and anorexia, alteration of intestinal and immune functions, reduced absorption of the nutrients as well as increased susceptibility to infection and chronic diseases. In contrast to DON, very little information exists concerning the acetylated and modified forms; some can be converted back to DON, their ability to bind to the ribosome and to induce cellular effects varies according to the toxin. Except for the acetylated forms, their toxicity and impact on human and animal health are poorly documented.

  14. Comparative specificities of Calreticulin Transacetylase to O-acetyl, N-acetyl and S-acetyl derivative of 4-methylcoumarins and their inhibitory effect on AFB1-induced genotoxicity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajit; Ponnan, Prija; Raj, Hanumantharao G; Parmar, Virinder S; Saso, Luciano

    2013-02-01

    We have earlier conclusively established the Calreticulin Transacetylase (CRTAase) catalyzed modifications of functional proteins such as cytochrome-P450-linked mixed function oxidases (Cyt-P450-linked MFOs), NADPH cytochrome c reductase, and glutathione S-transferase by acetoxy derivatives of polyphenols. In this study, we have investigated the comparative specificities of CRTAase to N-acetyl derivative, 7-acetamido-4-methylcoumarin (7-N-AMC), O-acetyl derivative, 7-acetoxy-4-methylcoumarin (7-AMC), S-acetyl derivative, 7-thioacetyl-4-methycoumarin (7-S-AMC) and their parent compounds in the modulation of catalytic activities of aforesaid proteins. Special attention concentrated on the comparative inhibitory effect of aforesaid acetyl moiety on Cyt-P450-linked MFOs such as 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD), pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylase (PROD) and aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1))-induced genotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. The results clearly indicated that N-acetyl and O-acetyl derivatives were better substrates for CRTAase while the S-acetyl was found to be a poorer substrate. Our study involving atomic charge, charge density and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) calculations indicated the pivotal role of electronegativity and charge distribution values of O, N and S atoms of the acetyl group at C-7 position of the 4-methylcoumarins in CRTAase activity. These facts reinforce our hypothesis that the CRTAase catalyzed modifications of the catalytic activities of aforesaid proteins by acetyl derivative of 4-methylcoumarins is probably due to acetylation of these proteins.

  15. Control of light saturated photosynthesis: Concentration and activity of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. Final report, September 1, 1993--February 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Geider, R.J. |

    1997-05-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is one of the most abundant enzymes on the planet and is responsible for catalysing the net fixation of CO{sub 2} into organic matter. It is central, therefore, to primary productivity in marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Rubisco is a large enzyme with low substrate affinity and low catalytic efficiency and is considered to limit the rate of light-saturated photosynthesis. This report summarizes research into the molecular basis of the regulation of phytoplankton photosynthesis. It describes experimental and theoretical studies of the role of Rubisco in regulating the photosynthetic rate of phytoplankton. It also describes the integration of a mechanistically based phytoplankton growth model into a description of primary productivity in the sea. This work was conducted as part of the Ocean Margins Program.

  16. Isolation of the catalytically competent small subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from spinach under an extremely alkaline condition.

    PubMed

    Incharoensakdi, A; Takabe, T; Takabe, T; Akazawa, T

    1986-07-16

    A method for isolating the small subunit (B) of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) from spinach leaf using an alkaline buffer (pH 11.2) in combination with sucrose gradient centrifugation is described. Although the yield of isolated subunit B (ca. 20%) was comparable to that previously described (ca. 25%) using the acid precipitation method [Andrews, T.J. and Lorimer, G.H. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260: 4632-4636], the isolated subunit B in this report suffered less denaturation (ca. 30%) as estimated from kinetic analysis of its reassembly with large subunit (A) derived from Aphanothece halophytica. Studies on the kinetic properties of the reassembled enzyme molecules suggested that spinach subunit B does not influence the affinity of the enzyme for substrate CO2. The catalytic core (A8) of spinach RuBisCO could not be isolated in the native form.

  17. The nature of L8 and L8S8 forms of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Chromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Torres-Ruiz, J; McFadden, B A

    1987-04-01

    L8 and L8S8 forms of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) have been prepared from Chromatium vinosum by the extremely mild method of centrifugal fractionation. Only the L8S8 form is detectable in crude extracts of this organism. Both forms show immunological identify in double diffusion studies using antibody to L subunits of the L8S8 form. L subunits from both L8 and L8S8 enzymes are identical by the criteria of peptides observed after limited proteolysis and N-terminal sequence analysis. In addition, these subunits show regions of homology with L subunits from Rhodospirillum rubrum, Anacystis nidulans, and spinach. S subunits of the C. vinosum enzyme are completely homologous to those from A. nidulans and higher plants from the 18th through 25th residue, a stretch preceded in all cases by two basic amino acids.

  18. Phosphorylation of chloroplast ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit by an envelope-bound protein kinase in situ.

    PubMed

    Soll, J; Buchanan, B B

    1983-06-10

    A new protein kinase of the cAMP independent type was found to be bound to the outer envelope membrane of spinach chloroplasts. While stimulated by Mg2+ and inhibited by ADP, the enzyme showed no response to conventional protein substrates and was essentially independent of pH in the physiological (pH 7 to 8) range. The new protein kinase phosphorylated the mature form of the small subunit of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and, to a lesser extent, an unidentified 24-kDa polypeptide, both of which were bound to the outer envelope membrane. The results suggest that phosphorylation of cytoplasmically synthesized protein constituents of chloroplasts is involved in their transport through the chloroplast envelope membrane barrier.

  19. Activity ratios of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase accurately reflect carbamylation ratios. [Phaseolus vulgaris, Spinacla oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Butz, N.D.; Sharkey, T.D. )

    1989-03-01

    Activity ratios and carbamylation ratios of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPCase) were determined for leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris and Spinacia oleracea exposed to a variety of partial pressures of CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} and photon flux densities (PFD). It was found that activity ratios accurately predicted carbamylation ratios except in extracts from leaves held in low PFD. In particular, it was confirmed that the loss of FuBPCase activity in low partial pressure of O{sub 2} and high PFD results from reduced carbamylation. Activity ratios of RuBPCase were lower than carbamylation ratios for Phaseolus leaves sampled in low PFD, presumably because of the presence of 2-carboxyarabinitol 1-phosphate. Spinacia leaves sampled in darkness also exhibited lower activity ratios than carbamylation ratios indicating that this species may also have an RuBPCase inhibitor even though carboxyarabinitol 1-phosphate has not been detected in this species in the past.

  20. In vitro reassembly of tobacco ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from fully denatured subunits.

    PubMed

    Yong, Zhen-Hua; Chen, Gen-Yun; Shi, Jiao-Nai; Xu, Da-Quan

    2006-10-01

    It has been generally proved impossible to reassemble ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) from fully denatured subunits in vitro in higher plant, because large subunit of fully denatured Rubisco is liable to precipitate when the denaturant is removed by common methods of direct dilution and one-step dialysis. In our experiment, the problem of precipitation was resolved by an improved gradual dialysis method, which gradually decreased the concentration of denaturant. However, fully denatured Rubisco subunits still could not be reassembled into holoenzyme using gradual dialysis unless chaperonin 60 was added. The restored activity of reassembled Rubisco was approximately 8% of natural enzyme. The quantity of reassembled Rubisco increased greatly when heat shock protein 70 was present in the reassembly process. ATP and Mg2+ were unnecessary for in vitro reassembly of Rubisco, and Mg2+ inhibited the reassembly process. The reassembly was weakened when ATP, Mg2+ and K+ existed together in the reassembly process.

  1. Cloning and developmental expression of pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit epsilon N-methyltransferase

    DOEpatents

    Houtz, R.L.

    1999-02-02

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS){sup {epsilon}}N-methyltransferase (protein methylase III or Rubisco LSMT) is disclosed. This enzyme catalyzes methylation of the {epsilon}-amine of lysine-14 in the large subunit of Rubisco. In addition, a full-length cDNA clone for Rubisco LSMT is disclosed. Transgenic plants and methods of producing same which (1) have the Rubisco LSMT gene inserted into the DNA, and (2) have the Rubisco LSMT gene product or the action of the gene product deleted from the DNA are also provided. Further, methods of using the gene to selectively deliver desired agents to a plant are also disclosed. 8 figs.

  2. Cloning and developmental expression of pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit N-methyltransferase

    DOEpatents

    Houtz, R.L.

    1998-03-03

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS) {epsilon}N-methyltransferase (protein methylase III or Rubisco LSMT) is disclosed. This enzyme catalyzes methylation of the {epsilon}-amine of lysine-14 in the large subunit of Rubisco. In addition, a full-length cDNA clone for Rubisco LSMT is disclosed. Transgenic plants and methods of producing same which (1) have the Rubisco LSMT gene inserted into the DNA, and (2) have the Rubisco LSMT gene product or the action of the gene product deleted from the DNA are also provided. Further, methods of using the gene to selectively deliver desired agents to a plant are also disclosed. 5 figs.

  3. Cloning and developmental expression of pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit epsilon N-methyltransferase

    DOEpatents

    Houtz, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS) .sup..epsilon. N-methyltransferase (protein methylase III or Rubisco LSMT) is disclosed. This enzyme catalyzes methylation of the .epsilon.-amine of lysine-14 in the large subunit of Rubisco. In addition, a full-length cDNA clone for Rubisco LSMT is disclosed. Transgenic plants and methods of producing same which (1) have the Rubisco LSMT gene inserted into the DNA, and (2) have the Rubisco LSMT gene product or the action of the gene product deleted from the DNA are also provided. Further, methods of using the gene to selectively deliver desired agents to a plant are also disclosed.

  4. Cloning and developmental expression of pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit N-methyltransferase

    DOEpatents

    Houtz, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS) .epsilon.N-methyltransferase (protein methylase III or Rubisco LSMT) is disclosed. This enzyme catalyzes methylation of the .epsilon.-amine of lysine-14 in the large subunit of Rubisco. In addition, a full-length cDNA clone for Rubisco LSMT is disclosed. Transgenic plants and methods of producing same which (1) have the Rubisco LSMT gene inserted into the DNA, and (2) have the Rubisco LSMT gene product or the action of the gene product deleted from the DNA are also provided. Further, methods of using the gene to selectively deliver desired agents to a plant are also disclosed.

  5. Can HMG Co-A reductase inhibitors (“statins”) slow the progression of age-related macular degeneration? The Age-Related Maculopathy Statin Study (ARMSS)

    PubMed Central

    Guymer, Robyn H; Dimitrov, Peter N; Varsamidis, Mary; Lim, Lyndell L; Baird, Paul N; Vingrys, Algis J; Robman, Luba

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is responsible for the majority of visual impairment in the Western world. The role of cholesterol-lowering medications, HMG Co-A reductase inhibitors or statins, in reducing the risk of AMD or of delaying its progression has not been fully investigated. A 3-year prospective randomized controlled trial of 40 mg simvastatin per day compared to placebo in subjects at high risk of AMD progression is described. This paper outlines the primary aims of the Age-Related Maculopathy Statin Study (ARMSS), and the methodology involved. Standardized clinical grading of macular photographs and comparison of serial macular digital photographs, using the International grading scheme, form the basis for assessment of primary study outcomes. In addition, macular function is assessed at each visit with detailed psychophysical measurements of rod and cone function. Information collected in this study will assist in the assessment of the potential value of HMG Co-A reductase inhibitors (statins) in reducing the risk of AMD progression. PMID:18982929

  6. Rubisco and PEP carboxylase responses to changing irradiance in a Brazilian Cerrado tree species, Qualea grandiflora Mart. (Vochysiaceae).

    PubMed

    Paulilo, M T; Besford, R T; Wilkins, D

    1994-02-01

    The activities of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase, Rubisco (E.C. 4.1.1.39) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, PEPc (E.C. 4.1.1.31), and concentrations of protein and chlorophyll were measured in extracts from cotyledons and first leaves of Qualea grandiflora Mart. (Vochysiaceae) seedlings after transfer from high-light (20 days at 320 micro mol m(-2) s(-1), PAR) to low-light (35 days at 120 micro mol m(-2) s(-1), PAR) conditions. When Tween 20 and glycerol were added to the extraction medium, Rubisco activities obtained for Qualea grandiflora were comparable to published values for several coniferous species and the broad-leaved species, Prunus avium L. Stella, grown in a similar light environment. Rubisco activity in cotyledons of Q. grandiflora grown in high light for 20 days and then transferred to low light for a further 35 days was similar to the activity in cotyledons of plants grown continuously in high light. However, the first leaf above the cotyledons showed a greater response to the change in irradiance; in high light, Rubisco activity of the first leaf was 1.8 times higher on a fresh weight basis and 2.7 times higher on an area basis than that of leaves transferred from high to low light. Fresh weight and chlorophyll concentration expressed on a unit leaf area basis were also higher in the high-light treatment. These responses to irradiance are indicative of a species adapted to growth in an unshaded habitat. The PEPc activity in leaves was 15% of Rubisco activity, which is typical of species with a C(3) photosynthetic pathway. The relatively slow growth rate of Q. grandiflora observed in these experiments could not be attributed to a low carboxylation capacity per unit leaf area.

  7. Evolution of the Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Protein Kinase Family in C3 and C4 Flaveria spp.1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Aldous, Sophia H.; Weise, Sean E.; Sharkey, Thomas D.; Waldera-Lupa, Daniel M.; Stühler, Kai; Mallmann, Julia; Groth, Georg; Gowik, Udo; Westhoff, Peter; Arsova, Borjana

    2014-01-01

    The key enzyme for C4 photosynthesis, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase (PEPC), evolved from nonphotosynthetic PEPC found in C3 ancestors. In all plants, PEPC is phosphorylated by Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Protein Kinase (PPCK). However, differences in the phosphorylation pattern exist among plants with these photosynthetic types, and it is still not clear if they are due to interspecies differences or depend on photosynthetic type. The genus Flaveria contains closely related C3, C3-C4 intermediate, and C4 species, which are evolutionarily young and thus well suited for comparative analysis. To characterize the evolutionary differences in PPCK between plants with C3 and C4 photosynthesis, transcriptome libraries from nine Flaveria spp. were used, and a two-member PPCK family (PPCKA and PPCKB) was identified. Sequence analysis identified a number of C3- and C4-specific residues with various occurrences in the intermediates. Quantitative analysis of transcriptome data revealed that PPCKA and PPCKB exhibit inverse diel expression patterns and that C3 and C4 Flaveria spp. differ in the expression levels of these genes. PPCKA has maximal expression levels during the day, whereas PPCKB has maximal expression during the night. Phosphorylation patterns of PEPC varied among C3 and C4 Flaveria spp. too, with PEPC from the C4 species being predominantly phosphorylated throughout the day, while in the C3 species the phosphorylation level was maintained during the entire 24 h. Since C4 Flaveria spp. evolved from C3 ancestors, this work links the evolutionary changes in sequence, PPCK expression, and phosphorylation pattern to an evolutionary phase shift of kinase activity from a C3 to a C4 mode. PMID:24850859

  8. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase regulation in C4-PEPC-expressing transgenic rice during early responses to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaolong; Li, Xia; Zhang, Chen; Dai, Chuanchao; Zhou, Jiayu; Ren, Chenggang; Zhang, Jinfei

    2017-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) has important functions in C4 photosynthesis and biosynthesis of intermediate metabolites. In this study, the drought resistance of C4-PEPC-expressing transgenic rice (Oryza sativa, line PC) plants was assessed using simulated drought conditions [i.e. polyethylene glycol (PEG)-6000 treatment]. The dry weight of PC plants was higher than that of wild-type (WT) plants following treatment with 15% PEG-6000 for 16 days. Furthermore, the water use efficiency, relative water content and proline content in PC plants were higher than those of WT plants, as were C4-PEPC activity and transcript levels following treatment with 5% PEG-6000 for 2 h. The protein kinase activities and transcript levels of sucrose non-fermenting-1-related protein kinases (SnRKs) genes, such as SnRK1a, OsK24 and OsK35 were also higher in PC plants than in WT plants following treatment with 5% PEG-6000 for 2 h. Additionally, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase kinase (PPCK, EC 4.1.1.32) activities and transcript levels (e.g. PPCK1 and PPCK2) increased following drought treatment. These changes were regulated by signaling molecules, such as calcium, nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, the -1095 to -416 region of the C4-PEPC promoter in PC plants was demethylated following exposure to drought conditions for 1 h. The demethylation coincided with an increase in C4-PEPC expression. Our data suggest that the demethylation of the C4-PEPC promoter and the phosphorylation catalyzed by PPCK have key roles in conferring drought tolerance to the transgenic rice plants.

  9. Cloning and characterization of pyruvate carboxylase gene responsible for calcium malate overproduction in Penicillium viticola 152 and its expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ibrar; Qayyum, Sadia; Ahmed, Shehzad; Maqbool, Farhana; Tauseef, Isfahan; Haleem, Kashif Syed; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2017-03-20

    In this study, a pyruvate carboxylase gene (PYC) from a marine fungus Penicillium viticola 152 isolated from marine algae was cloned and characterized by using Genome Walking method. An open reading frame (ORF) of The PYC gene (accession number: KM593097) had 3582bp encoding 1193 amino acid protein (isoelectric point: 5.01) with a calculated molecular weight of 131.2757kDa. A putative promoter (intronless) of the gene was located at -666bp and contained a TATA box, several CAAT boxes, the 5'-SYGGRG-3' and a 5'-HGATAR-3' sequences. A consensus polyadenylation site (AATAAA) was also observed at +10bp downstream of the ORF. The protein deduced from the PYC gene had no signal peptide, was a homotetramer (4), and had the four functional domains. Furthermore, PYC protein also had three potential N-linked glycosylation sites, among them, -N-S-T-I- at 36 amino acid, -N-G-T-V- at 237 amino acid, and -N-G-S-S- at 517 amino acid were the most possible N-glycosylation sites. After expression of the PYC gene of P. viticola 152 in medium supplemented with CSL and biotin, it was found that the specific pyruvate carboxylase activity in MA production medium supplemented with CSL was much higher (0.5U/mg) than in MA medium supplemented with biotin (0.3U/mg), suggesting that optimal concentration of CSL is required for increased expression of the PYC gene, which is responsible for high level production of malic acid in P. viticola 152 strain.

  10. Demonstration of a functional requirement for the carbamate nitrogen of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase by chemical rescue

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.B.; Hartman, F.C. )

    1991-05-28

    Ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase is reversibly activated by the reaction of Co{sub 2} with a specific lysyl residue to form a carbamate that coordinates an essential Mg{sup 2+} cation. Surprisingly, the Lys191{yields}Cys mutant protein, in the presence of Co{sub 2} and Mg{sup 2+} exhibits tight binding of the reaction intermediate analogue 2-carboxyarabinitol bisphosphate a property normally equated with effective coordination of the Mg{sup 2+} by the carbamate. Catalytic ineptness of the Cys191 mutant protein, despite its ability to coordinate Mg{sup 2+} properly, might be due to the absence of the carbamate nitrogen. To investigate this possibility, the authors have evaluated the ability of exogenous amines to restore catalytic activity to the mutant protein. Significantly, the Cys191 protein manifests ribulose bisphosphate dependent fixation of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} when incubated with aminomethanewsulfonate but not ethanesulfonate. This novel activity reflects a K{sub m} value for ribulose bisphosphate which is not markedly perturbed relative to wild-type enzyme, a K{sub m} for Mg{sup 2+} which is in fact decreased 10-fold, and rate saturation with respect to aminomethanesulfonate. Chromatographic and spectrophotometric analyses reveal the product of CO{sub 2} fixation to be D-3-phosphoglycerate while turnover of (1-{sup 3}H)ribulose bisphosphate into ({sup 3}H)phosphoglycolate confirms oxygenase activity. The authors conclude that aminomethanesulfonate restored ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activities to the Cys191 mutant protein by providing a nitrogenous function which satisfies a catalytic demand normally met by the carbamate nitrogen of Lys191.

  11. Development of a new transformant selection system for Penicillium chrysogenum: isolation and characterization of the P. chrysogenum acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase gene (facA) and its use as a homologous selection marker.

    PubMed

    Gouka, R J; van Hartingsveldt, W; Bovenberg, R A; van Zeijl, C M; van den Hondel, C A; van Gorcom, R F

    1993-01-01

    A new transformation system for the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum is described, based on the use of the homologous acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase (facA) gene as a selection marker. Acetate-non-utilizing (Fac-) strains of P. chrysogenum were obtained by positive selection for spontaneous resistance to fluoroacetate. Among these fac mutants putative facA strains were selected for a loss of acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase activity. The facA gene, coding for the enzyme acetyl-CoA synthetase, was isolated from a P. chrysogenum genomic library using synthetic oligonucleotides derived from conserved regions from the corresponding genes of Aspergillus nidulans and Neurospora crassa. Vector pPC2-3, comprising a genomic 6.5 kb PstI fragment, was able to complement P. chrysogenum facA strains with frequencies up to 27 transformants.micrograms-1 DNA. Direct selection of transformants was accomplished using acetate and low amounts (0.001%) of glucose as carbon sources. About 50% of the transformants arose by integration of pPC2-3 DNA at the homologous facA locus and 50% by integration elsewhere in the genome. Determination of the nucleotide sequence of part of the cloned fragment showed the presence of an open reading frame of 2007 nucleotides, interrupted by five putative introns. Comparison of the nucleotide and the amino acid sequence of the facA gene of P. chrysogenum with the facA gene of A. nidulans reveals similarities of 80% and 89%, respectively. The putative introns present in the P. chrysogenum facA gene appear at identical positions as those in the A. nidulans facA gene, but show no significant sequence similarity.

  12. Causal role of histone acetylations in enhancer function

    PubMed Central

    Pradeepa, Madapura M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enhancers control development and cellular function by spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression. Co-occurrence of acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27ac) and mono methylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 (H3K4me1) has been widely used for identification of active enhancers. However, increasing evidence suggests that using this combination of marks alone for enhancer identification gives an incomplete picture of the active enhancer repertoire. We have shown that the H3 globular domain acetylations, H3K64ac and H3K122ac, and an H4 tail acetylation, H4K16ac, are enriched at active enhancers together with H3K27ac, and also at a large number of enhancers without detectable H3K27ac. We propose that acetylations at these lysine residues of histones H3 and H4 might function by directly affecting chromatin structure, nucleosome–nucleosome interactions, nucleosome stability, and transcription factor accessibility. PMID:27792455

  13. 21 CFR 172.372 - N-Acetyl-L-methionine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... amino acid methionine formed by addition of an acetyl group to the alpha-amino group of methionine. It... amino acid) by weight of the total protein of the finished food, including the amount naturally present... of the additive contained therein. (2) The amounts of additive and each amino acid contained in...

  14. 21 CFR 172.372 - N-Acetyl-L-methionine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... amino acid methionine formed by addition of an acetyl group to the alpha-amino group of methionine. It... amino acid) by weight of the total protein of the finished food, including the amount naturally present... of the additive contained therein. (2) The amounts of additive and each amino acid contained in...

  15. 21 CFR 172.372 - N-Acetyl-L-methionine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-Acetyl-L-methionine (Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 65-82-7) is the derivative of the amino acid... provide a total of 3.1 percent L- and DL-methionine (expressed as the free amino acid) by weight of the... contained therein. (2) The amounts of additive and each amino acid contained in any mixture. (3)...

  16. 21 CFR 172.372 - N-Acetyl-L-methionine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... amino acid methionine formed by addition of an acetyl group to the alpha-amino group of methionine. It... amino acid) by weight of the total protein of the finished food, including the amount naturally present... of the additive contained therein. (2) The amounts of additive and each amino acid contained in...

  17. Nucleosome competition reveals processive acetylation by the SAGA HAT module

    PubMed Central

    Ringel, Alison E.; Cieniewicz, Anne M.; Taverna, Sean D.; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    The Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase (SAGA) coactivator complex hyperacetylates histone tails in vivo in a manner that depends upon histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3), a histone mark enriched at promoters of actively transcribed genes. SAGA contains a separable subcomplex known as the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) module that contains the HAT, Gcn5, bound to Sgf29, Ada2, and Ada3. Sgf29 contains a tandem Tudor domain that recognizes H3K4me3-containing peptides and is required for histone hyperacetylation in vivo. However, the mechanism by which H3K4me3 recognition leads to lysine hyperacetylation is unknown, as in vitro studies show no effect of the H3K4me3 modification on histone peptide acetylation by Gcn5. To determine how H3K4me3 binding by Sgf29 leads to histone hyperacetylation by Gcn5, we used differential fluorescent labeling of histones to monitor acetylation of individual subpopulations of methylated and unmodified nucleosomes in a mixture. We find that the SAGA HAT module preferentially acetylates H3K4me3 nucleosomes in a mixture containing excess unmodified nucleosomes and that this effect requires the Tudor domain of Sgf29. The H3K4me3 mark promotes processive, multisite acetylation of histone H3 by Gcn5 that can account for the different acetylation patterns established by SAGA at promoters versus coding regions. Our results establish a model for Sgf29 function at gene promoters and define a mechanism governing crosstalk between histone modifications. PMID:26401015

  18. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and sulfadimidin acetylation phenotypes in Egyptian oases.

    PubMed

    Hussein, L; Yamamah, G; Saleh, A

    1992-04-01

    Screening of 1315 males from two Egyptian oases for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G-6PD) found an incidence of 5.9%. The rate of acetylation of sulfadimidin was also studied, and a bimodal distribution was found with 73% rapid acetylators. There is a correlation between high frequency of G-6PD deficiency and high frequency of slow acetylation rate.

  19. Acetylation of lysine 40 in alpha-tubulin is not essential in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    In Tetrahymena, at least 17 distinct microtubule structures are assembled from a single primary sequence type of alpha- and beta- tubulin heterodimer, precluding distinctions among microtubular systems based on tubulin primary sequence isotypes. Tetrahymena tubulins also are modified by several types of posttranslational reactions including acetylation of alpha-tubulin at lysine 40, a modification found in most eukaryotes. In Tetrahymena, axonemal alpha-tubulin and numerous other microtubules are acetylated. We completely replaced the single type of alpha-tubulin gene in the macronucleus with a version encoding arginine instead of lysine 40 and therefore cannot be acetylated at this position. No acetylated tubulin was detectable in these transformants using a monoclonal antibody specific for acetylated lysine 40. Surprisingly, mutants lacking detectable acetylated tubulin are indistinguishable from wild-type cells. Thus, acetylation of alpha- tubulin at lysine 40 is non-essential in Tetrahymena. In addition, isoelectric focusing gel analysis of axonemal tubulin from cells unable to acetylate alpha-tubulin leads us to conclude that: (a) most or all ciliary alpha-tubulin is acetylated, (b) other lysines cannot be acetylated to compensate for loss of acetylation at lysine 40, and (c) acetylated alpha-tubulin molecules in wild-type cells contain one or more additional charge-altering modifications. PMID:7775576

  20. The Acetyl Group Buffering Action of Carnitine Acetyltransferase Offsets Macronutrient-induced Lysine Acetylation of Mitochondrial Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Michael N.; Kjalarsdottir, Lilja; Thompson, J. Will; Dubois, Laura G.; Stevens, Robert D.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Brosnan, M. Julia; Rolph, Timothy P.; Grimsrud, Paul A.; Muoio, Deborah M.

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation (AcK), a posttranslational modification wherein a two-carbon acetyl group binds covalently to a lysine residue, occurs prominently on mitochondrial proteins and has been linked to metabolic dysfunction. An emergent theory suggests mitochondrial AcK occurs via mass action rather than targeted catalysis. To test this hypothesis we performed mass spectrometry-based acetylproteomic analyses of quadriceps muscles from mice with skeletal muscle-specific deficiency of carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT), an enzyme that buffers the mitochondrial acetyl-CoA pool by converting short-chain acyl-CoAs to their membrane permeant acylcarnitine counterparts. CrAT deficiency increased tissue acetyl-CoA levels and susceptibility to diet-induced AcK of broad-ranging mitochondrial proteins, coincident with diminished whole body glucose control. Sub-compartment acetylproteome analyses of muscles from obese mice and humans showed remarkable overrepresentation of mitochondrial matrix proteins. These findings reveal roles for CrAT and L-carnitine in modulating the muscle acetylproteome and provide strong experimental evidence favoring the nonenzymatic carbon pressure model of mitochondrial AcK. PMID:26748706

  1. Altered acetylation and succinylation profiles in Corynebacterium glutamicum in response to conditions inducing glutamate overproduction.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yuta; Nagano-Shoji, Megumi; Kubo, Shosei; Kawamura, Yumi; Yoshida, Ayako; Kawasaki, Hisashi; Nishiyama, Makoto; Yoshida, Minoru; Kosono, Saori

    2016-02-01

    The bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum is utilized during industrial fermentation to produce amino acids such as L-glutamate. During L-glutamate fermentation, C. glutamicum changes the flux of central carbon metabolism to favor L-glutamate production, but the molecular mechanisms that explain these flux changes remain largely unknown. Here, we found that the profiles of two major lysine acyl modifications were significantly altered upon glutamate overproduction in C. glutamicum; acetylation decreased, whereas succinylation increased. A label-free semi-quantitative proteomic analysis identified 604 acetylated proteins with 1328 unique acetylation sites and 288 succinylated proteins with 651 unique succinylation sites. Acetylation and succinylation targeted enzymes in central carbon metabolic pathways that are directly related to glutamate production, including the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (ODHC), a key enzyme regulating glutamate overproduction. Structural mapping revealed that several critical lysine residues in the ODHC components were susceptible to acetylation and succinylation. Furthermore, induction of glutamate production was associated with changes in the extent of acetylation and succinylation of lysine, suggesting that these modifications may affect the activity of enzymes involved in glutamate production. Deletion of phosphotransacetylase decreased the extent of protein acetylation in nonproducing condition, suggesting that acetyl phosphate-dependent acetylation is active in C. glutamicum. However, no effect was observed on the profiles of acetylation and succinylation in glutamate-producing condition upon disruption of acetyl phosphate metabolism or deacetylase homologs. It was considered likely that the reduced acetylation in glutamate-producing condition may reflect metabolic states where the flux through acid-producing pathways is very low, and substrates for acetylation do not accumulate in the cell. Succinylation would occur more

  2. Astrocyte Reactivity Following Blast Exposure Involves Aberrant Histone Acetylation.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Zachary S; Grinter, Michael B; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    Blast induced neurotrauma (BINT) is a prevalent injury within military and civilian populations. The injury is characterized by persistent inflammation at the cellular level which manifests as a multitude of cognitive and functional impairments. Epigenetic regulation of transcription offers an important control mechanism for gene expression and cellular function which may underlie chronic inflammation and result in neurodegeneration. We hypothesize that altered histone acetylation patterns may be involved in blast induced inflammation and the chronic activation of glial cells. This study aimed to elucidate changes to histone acetylation occurring following injury and the roles these changes may have within the pathology. Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to either a 10 or 17 psi blast overpressure within an Advanced Blast Simulator (ABS). Sham animals underwent the same procedures without blast exposure. Memory impairments were measured using the Novel Object Recognition (NOR) test at 2 and 7 days post-injury. Tissues were collected at 7 days for Western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis. Sham animals showed intact memory at each time point. The novel object discrimination decreased significantly between two and 7 days for each injury group (p < 0.05). This is indicative of the onset of memory impairment. Western blot analysis showed glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a known marker of activated astrocytes, was elevated in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) following blast exposure for both injury groups. Analysis of histone protein extract showed no changes in the level of any total histone proteins within the PFC. However, acetylation levels of histone H2b, H3, and H4 were decreased in both groups (p < 0.05). Co-localization immunofluorescence was used to further investigate any potential correlation between decreased histone acetylation and astrocyte activation. These experiments showed a similar decrease in H3 acetylation in astrocytes exposed to a 17

  3. Astrocyte Reactivity Following Blast Exposure Involves Aberrant Histone Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Zachary S.; Grinter, Michael B.; VandeVord, Pamela J.

    2016-01-01

    Blast induced neurotrauma (BINT) is a prevalent injury within military and civilian populations. The injury is characterized by persistent inflammation at the cellular level which manifests as a multitude of cognitive and functional impairments. Epigenetic regulation of transcription offers an important control mechanism for gene expression and cellular function which may underlie chronic inflammation and result in neurodegeneration. We hypothesize that altered histone acetylation patterns may be involved in blast induced inflammation and the chronic activation of glial cells. This study aimed to elucidate changes to histone acetylation occurring following injury and the roles these changes may have within the pathology. Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to either a 10 or 17 psi blast overpressure within an Advanced Blast Simulator (ABS). Sham animals underwent the same procedures without blast exposure. Memory impairments were measured using the Novel Object Recognition (NOR) test at 2 and 7 days post-injury. Tissues were collected at 7 days for Western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis. Sham animals showed intact memory at each time point. The novel object discrimination decreased significantly between two and 7 days for each injury group (p < 0.05). This is indicative of the onset of memory impairment. Western blot analysis showed glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a known marker of activated astrocytes, was elevated in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) following blast exposure for both injury groups. Analysis of histone protein extract showed no changes in the level of any total histone proteins within the PFC. However, acetylation levels of histone H2b, H3, and H4 were decreased in both groups (p < 0.05). Co-localization immunofluorescence was used to further investigate any potential correlation between decreased histone acetylation and astrocyte activation. These experiments showed a similar decrease in H3 acetylation in astrocytes exposed to a 17

  4. Enhancement of cardenolide and phytosterol levels by expression of an N-terminally truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase in Transgenic digitalis minor.

    PubMed

    Sales, Ester; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Arrillaga, Isabel; Segura, Juan

    2007-06-01

    Pathway engineering in medicinal plants attains a special significance in Digitalis species, the main industrial source of cardiac glycosides, steroidal metabolites derived from mevalonic acid via the triterpenoid pathway. In this work, the Arabidopsis thaliana HMG1 cDNA, coding the catalytic domain of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR1S), a key enzyme of the MVA pathway, was expressed in the cardenolide-producing plant Digitalis minor. Transgenic plants were morphologically indistinguishable from control wild plants and displayed the same developmental pattern. Constitutive expression of HMG1 resulted in an increased sterol and cardenolide production in both in vitro- and greenhouse-grown plants. This work demonstrates that transgenic D. minor plants are a valuable system to study and achieve metabolic engineering of the cardenolide pathway and in consequence for the genetic improvement of Digitalis species.

  5. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA coding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutary CoA reductase involved in glycyrrhizic acid biosynthesis in Glycyrrhiza uralensis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Xu, Qiao-Xian; Xi, Pei-Yu; Chen, Hong-Hao; Liu, Chun-Sheng

    2013-05-01

    The roots of Glycyrrhiza uralensis are widely used in Chinese medicine for their action of clearing heat, detoxicating, relieving cough, dispelling sputum and tonifying spleen and stomach. The reason why Glycyrrhiza uralensis has potent and significant actions is that it contains various active secondary metabolites, especially glycyrrhizic acid. In the present study, we cloned the cDNA coding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutary CoA reductase (HMGR) involved in glycyrrhizic acid biosynthesis in Glycyrrhiza uralensis. The corresponding cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli as fusion proteins. Recombinant HMGR exhibited catalysis activity in reduction of HMG-CoA to mevalonic acid (MVA) just as HMGR isolated from other species. Because HMGR gene is very important in the biosynthesis of glycyrrhizic acid in Glycyrrhiza uralensis, this work is significant for further studies concerned with strengthening the efficacy of Glycyrrhiza uralensis by means of increasing glycyrrhizic acid content and exploring the biosynthesis of glycyrrhizic acid in vitro.

  6. Mycobacteria Encode Active and Inactive Classes of TesB Fatty-Acyl CoA Thioesterases Revealed through Structural and Functional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Swarbrick, Crystall M D; Bythrow, Glennon V; Aragao, David; Germain, Gabrielle A; Quadri, Luis E N; Forwood, Jade K

    2017-03-14

    Mycobacteria contain a large number of highly divergent species and exhibit unusual lipid metabolism profiles, believed to play important roles in immune invasion. Thioesterases modulate lipid metabolism through the hydrolysis of activated fatty-acyl CoAs; multiple copies are present in mycobacteria, yet many remain uncharacterized. Here, we undertake a comprehensive structural and functional analysis of a TesB thioesterase from Mycobacterium avium (MaTesB). Structural superposition with other TesB thioesterases reveals that the Asp active site residue, highly conserved across a wide range of TesB thioesterases, is mutated to Ala. Consistent with these structural data, the wild-type enzyme failed to hydrolyze an extensive range of acyl-CoA substrates. Mutation of this residue to an active Asp residue restored activity against a range of medium-chain length fatty-acyl CoA substrates. Interestingly, this Ala mutation is highly conserved across a wide range of Mycobacterium species but not found in any other bacteria or organism. Our structural homology analysis revealed that at least one other TesB acyl-CoA thioesterase also contains an Ala residue at the active site, while two other Mycobacterium TesB thioesterases harbor an Asp residue at the active site. The inactive TesBs display a common quaternary structure that is distinct from that of the active TesB thioesterases. Investigation of the effect of expression of either the catalytically active or inactive MaTesB in Mycobacterium smegmatis exposed, to the best of our knowledge, the first genotype-phenotype association implicating a mycobacterial tesB gene. This is the first report that mycobacteria encode active and inactive forms of thioesterases, the latter of which appear to be unique to mycobacteria.

  7. Multiple Mass Isotopomer Tracing of Acetyl-CoA Metabolism in Langendorff-perfused Rat Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingling; Deng, Shuang; Ibarra, Rafael A.; Anderson, Vernon E.; Brunengraber, Henri; Zhang, Guo-Fang

    2015-01-01

    We developed an isotopic technique to assess mitochondrial acetyl-CoA turnover (≈citric acid flux) in perfused rat hearts. Hearts are perfused with buffer containing tracer [13C2,2H3]acetate, which forms M5 + M4 + M3 acetyl-CoA. The buffer may also contain one or two labeled substrates, which generate M2 acetyl-CoA (e.g. [13C6]glucose or [1,2-13C2]palmitate) or/and M1 acetyl-CoA (e.g. [1-13C]octanoate). The total acetyl-CoA turnover and the contributions of fuels to acetyl-CoA are calculated from the uptake of the acetate tracer and the mass isotopomer distribution of acetyl-CoA. The method was applied to measurements of acetyl-CoA turnover under different conditions (glucose ± palmitate ± insulin ± dichloroacetate). The data revealed (i) substrate cycling between glycogen and glucose-6-P and between glucose-6-P and triose phosphates, (ii) the release of small excess acetyl groups as acetylcarnitine and ketone bodies, and (iii) the channeling of mitochondrial acetyl-CoA from pyruvate dehydrogenase to carnitine acetyltransferase. Because of this channeling, the labeling of acetylcarnitine and ketone bodies released by the heart are not proxies of the labeling of mitochondrial acetyl-CoA. PMID:25645937

  8. αTAT1 controls longitudinal spreading of acetylation marks from open microtubules extremities

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Nathalie; Elkhatib, Nadia; Bresteau, Enzo; Piétrement, Olivier; Khaled, Mehdi; Magiera, Maria M.; Janke, Carsten; Le Cam, Eric; Rutenberg, Andrew D.; Montagnac, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Acetylation of the lysine 40 of α-tubulin (K40) is a post-translational modification occurring in the lumen of microtubules (MTs) and is controlled by the α-tubulin acetyl-transferase αTAT1. How αTAT1 accesses the lumen and acetylates α-tubulin there has been an open question. Here, we report that acetylation starts at open ends of MTs and progressively spreads longitudinally from there. We observed acetylation marks at the open ends of in vivo MTs re-growing after a Nocodazole block, and acetylated segments growing in length with time. Bias for MTs extremities was even more pronounced when using non-dynamic MTs extracted from HeLa cells. In contrast, K40 acetylation was mostly uniform along the length of MTs reconstituted from purified tubulin in vitro. Quantitative modelling of luminal diffusion of αTAT1 suggested that the uniform acetylation pattern observed in vitro is consistent with defects in the MT lattice providing lateral access to the lumen. Indeed, we observed that in vitro MTs are permeable to macromolecules along their shaft while cellular MTs are not. Our results demonstrate αTAT1 enters the lumen from open extremities and spreads K40 acetylation marks longitudinally along cellular MTs. This mode of tip-directed microtubule acetylation may allow for selective acetylation of subsets of microtubules. PMID:27752143

  9. Chaperone-mediated acetylation of histones by Rtt109 identified by quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Abshiru, Nebiyu; Ippersiel, Kevin; Tang, Yong; Yuan, Hua; Marmorstein, Ronen; Verreault, Alain; Thibault, Pierre

    2013-04-09

    Rtt109 is a fungal-specific histone acetyltransferase (HAT) that associates with either Vps75 or Asf1 to acetylate histone H3. Recent biochemical and structural studies suggest that site-specific acetylation of H3 by Rtt109 is dictated by the binding chaperone where Rtt109-Asf1 acetylates K56, while Rtt109-Vps75 acetylates K9 and K27. To gain further insights into the roles of Vps75 and Asf1 in directing site-specific acetylation of H3, we used quantitative proteomics to profile the global and site-specific changes in H3 and H4 during in vitro acetylation assays with Rtt109 and its chaperones. Our analyses showed that Rtt109-Vps75 preferentially acetylates H3 K9 and K23, the former residue being the major acetylation site. At high enzyme-to-substrate ratio, Rtt109 also acetylated K14, K18, K27 and to a lower extent K56 of histone H3. Importantly, this study revealed that in contrast to Rtt109-Vps75, Rtt109-Asf1 displayed a far greater site-specificity, with K56 being the primary site of acetylation. For the first time, we also report the acetylation of histone H4 K12 by Rtt109-Vps75, whereas Rtt109-Asf1 showed no detectable activity toward H4. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: From protein structures to clinical applications.

  10. Chaperone-mediated acetylation of histones by Rtt109 identified by quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Abshiru, Nebiyu; Ippersiel, Kevin; Tang, Yong; Yuan, Hua; Marmorstein, Ronen; Verreault, Alain; Thibault, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Rtt109 is a fungal-specific histone acetyltransferase (HAT) that associates with either Vps75 or Asf1 to acetylate histone H3. Recent biochemical and structural studies suggest that site-specific acetylation of H3 by Rtt109 is dictated by the binding chaperone where Rtt109-Asf1 acetylates K56, while Rtt109-Vps75 acetylates K9 and K27. To gain further insights into the roles of Vps75 and Asf1 in directing site-specific acetylation of H3, we used quantitative proteomics to profile the global and site-specific changes in H3 and H4 during in vitro acetylation assays with Rtt109 and its chaperones. Our analyses showed that Rtt109-Vps75 preferentially acetylates H3 K9 and K23, the former residue being the major acetylation site. At high enzyme to substrate ratio, Rtt109 also acetylated K14, K18, K27 and to a lower extent K56 of histone H3. Importantly, this study revealed that in contrast to Rtt109-Vps75, Rtt109-Asf1 displayed a far greater site-specificity, with K56 being the primary site of acetylation. For the first time, we also report the acetylation of histone H4 K12 by Rtt109-Vps75, whereas Rtt109-Asf1 showed no detectable activity toward H4. PMID:23036725

  11. Stoichiometry of site-specific lysine acetylation in an entire proteome.

    PubMed

    Baeza, Josue; Dowell, James A; Smallegan, Michael J; Fan, Jing; Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Khan, Zia; Denu, John M

    2014-08-01

    Acetylation of lysine ϵ-amino groups influences many cellular processes and has been mapped to thousands of sites across many organisms. Stoichiometric information of acetylation is essential to accurately interpret biological significance. Here, we developed and employed a novel method for directly quantifying stoichiometry of site-specific acetylation in the entire proteome of Escherichia coli. By coupling isotopic labeling and a novel pairing algorithm, our approach performs an in silico enrichment of acetyl peptides, circumventing the need for immunoenrichment. We investigated the function of the sole NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase, CobB, on both site-specific and global acetylation. We quantified 2206 peptides from 899 proteins and observed a wide distribution of acetyl stoichiometry, ranging from less than 1% up to 98%. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that metabolic enzymes, which either utilize or generate acetyl-CoA, and proteins involved in transcriptional and translational processes displayed the highest degree of acetylation. Loss of CobB led to increased global acetylation at low stoichiometry sites and induced site-specific changes at high stoichiometry sites, and biochemical analysis revealed altered acetyl-CoA metabolism. Thus, this study demonstrates that sirtuin deacetylase deficiency leads to both site-specific and global changes in protein acetylation stoichiometry, affecting central metabolism.

  12. Histone acetylation dependent energy landscapes in tri-nucleosome revealed by residue-resolved molecular simulations

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Le; Takada, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    Histone tail acetylation is a key epigenetic marker that tends to open chromatin folding and activate transcription. Despite intensive studies, precise roles of individual lysine acetylation in chromatin folding have only been poorly understood. Here, we revealed structural dynamics of tri-nucleosomes with several histone tail acetylation states and analyzed histone tail interactions with DNA by performing molecular simulations at an unprecedentedly high resolution. We found versatile acetylation-dependent landscapes of tri-nucleosome. The H4 and H2A tail acetylation reduced the contact between the first and third nucleosomes mediated by the histone tails. The H3 tail acetylation reduced its interaction with neighboring linker DNAs resulting in increase of the distance between consecutive nucleosomes. Notably, two copies of the same histone in a single nucleosome have markedly asymmetric interactions with DNAs, suggesting specific pattern of nucleosome docking albeit high inherent flexibility. Estimated transcription factor accessibility was significantly high for the H4 tail acetylated structures. PMID:27698366

  13. Metabolic actions of some sympathomimetic amines and their acetyl derivatives in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Marvola, M

    1977-01-01

    To study how acetylation affects the activity of sympathomimetic amines the effects of tyramine, amphetamine, ephedrine, phenylephrine, orciprenaline and salbutamol and of their O- and N-acetyl derivatives on blood glucose and free fatty acid concentrations were studied in the rabbit. Hyperglycemia was induced by all parent compounds except amphetamine which tended to have a weak hypoglycaemic action. Hyperlipaemia in the doses used was induced by ephedrine and orciprenaline but not by the other parent compounds. Usually acetylation decreased the metabolic effects of the compounds but O-acetylation of tyramine and salbutamol caused hyperlipaemia and O-acetylation of ephedrine increased its fatty acid-mobilizing action, perhaps as a consequence of increased lipid solubility of the compounds. The ultimate effects of the O-acetyl derivatives were probably at least partly due to deacetylation at their sites of action. However O-acetylation of sympathomimetics could perhaps be used to induce drug latentiation.

  14. N-Terminal Acetylation Acts as an Avidity Enhancer Within an Interconnected Multiprotein Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Daniel C.; Monda, Julie K.; Bennett, Eric J.; Harper, J. Wade; Schulman, Brenda A.

    2012-10-25

    Although many eukaryotic proteins are amino (N)-terminally acetylated, structural mechanisms by which N-terminal acetylation mediates protein interactions are largely unknown. Here, we found that N-terminal acetylation of the E2 enzyme, Ubc12, dictates distinctive E3-dependent ligation of the ubiquitin-like protein Nedd8 to Cul1. Structural, biochemical, biophysical, and genetic analyses revealed how complete burial of Ubc12's N-acetyl-methionine in a hydrophobic pocket in the E3, Dcn1, promotes cullin neddylation. The results suggest that the N-terminal acetyl both directs Ubc12's interactions with Dcn1 and prevents repulsion of a charged N terminus. Our data provide a link between acetylation and ubiquitin-like protein conjugation and define a mechanism for N-terminal acetylation-dependent recognition.

  15. Infrared and 13C MAS nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of acetylation of cotton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adebajo, Moses O.; Frost, Ray L.

    2004-01-01

    The acetylation of commercial cotton samples with acetic anhydride without solvents in the presence of about 5% 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) catalyst was followed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and 13C MAS NMR spectroscopy. This preliminary investigation was conducted in an effort to develop hydrophobic, biodegradable, cellulosic materials for subsequent application in oil spill cleanup. The FTIR results provide clear evidence for successful acetylation though the NMR results indicate that the level of acetylation is low. Nevertheless, the overall results indicate that cotton fibres are potential candidates suitable for further development via acetylation into hydrophobic sorbent materials for subsequent oil spill cleanup application. The results also indicate that de-acetylation, the reverse of the equilibrium acetylation reaction, occurred when the acetylation reaction was prolonged beyond 3 h.

  16. [Effect of acetylation and oxidation on some properties of breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis) seed starch].

    PubMed

    Rincón, Alicia Mariela; Bou Rached, Lizet; Aragoza, Luis E; Padilla, Fanny

    2007-09-01

    Starch extracted from seeds of Artocarpus altilis (Breadfruit) was chemically modified by acetylation and oxidation, and its functional properties were evaluated and compared with these of native starch. Analysis of the chemical composition showed that moisture content was higher for modified starches. Ash, protein, crude fiber and amylose contents were reduced by the modifications, but did not alter the native starch granules' irregularity, oval shape and smooth surface. Acetylation produced changes in water absorption, swelling power and soluble solids, these values were higher for acetylated starch, while values for native and oxidized starches were similar. Both modifications reduced pasting temperature; oxidation reduced maximum peak viscosity but it was increased by acetylation. Hot paste viscosity was reduced by both modifications, whereas cold paste viscosity was lower in the oxidized starch and higher in the acetylated starch. Breakdown was increased by acetylation and reduced with oxidation. Setback value was reduced after acetylation, indicating it could minimize retrogradation of the starch.

  17. Acetyl-L-carnitine improves aged brain function.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Satoru; Iwamoto, Machiko; Kon, Kazuo; Waki, Hatsue; Ando, Susumu; Tanaka, Yasukazu

    2010-07-01

    The effects of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR), an acetyl derivative of L-carnitine, on memory and learning capacity and on brain synaptic functions of aged rats were examined. Male Fischer 344 rats were given ALCAR (100 mg/kg bodyweight) per os for 3 months and were subjected to the Hebb-Williams tasks and AKON-1 task to assess their learning capacity. Cholinergic activities were determined with synaptosomes isolated from brain cortices of the rats. Choline parameters, the high-affinity choline uptake, acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis and depolarization-evoked ACh release were all enhanced in the ALCAR group. An increment of depolarization-induced calcium ion influx into synaptosomes was also evident in rats given ALCAR. Electrophysiological studies using hippocampus slices indicated that the excitatory postsynaptic potential slope and population spike size were both increased in ALCAR-treated rats. These results indicate that ALCAR increases synaptic neurotransmission in the brain and consequently improves learning capacity in aging rats.

  18. Structures of aminoacylase 3 in complex with acetylated substrates

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Jennifer M.; Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Sawaya, Michael R.; Magilnick, Nathaniel; Abuladze, Natalia; Kurtz, Ira; Abramson, Jeff; Pushkin, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is one of the most widespread environmental contaminants, which is metabolized to N-acetyl-S-1,2-dichlorovinyl-l-cysteine (NA-DCVC) before being excreted in the urine. Alternatively, NA-DCVC can be deacetylated by aminoacylase 3 (AA3), an enzyme that is highly expressed in the kidney, liver, and brain. NA-DCVC deacetylation initiates the transformation into toxic products that ultimately causes acute renal failure. AA3 inhibition is therefore a target of interest to prevent TCE induced nephrotoxicity. Here we report the crystal structure of recombinant mouse AA3 (mAA3) in the presence of its acetate byproduct and two substrates: Nα-acetyl-l-tyrosine and NA-DCVC. These structures, in conjunction with biochemical data, indicated that AA3 mediates substrate specificity through van der Waals interactions providing a dynamic interaction interface, which facilitates a diverse range of substrates. PMID:20921362

  19. Structures of aminoacylase 3 in complex with acetylated substrates.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Jennifer M; Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Sawaya, Michael R; Magilnick, Nathaniel; Abuladze, Natalia; Kurtz, Ira; Abramson, Jeff; Pushkin, Alexander

    2010-10-19

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is one of the most widespread environmental contaminants, which is metabolized to N-acetyl-S-1,2-dichlorovinyl-L-cysteine (NA-DCVC) before being excreted in the urine. Alternatively, NA-DCVC can be deacetylated by aminoacylase 3 (AA3), an enzyme that is highly expressed in the kidney, liver, and brain. NA-DCVC deacetylation initiates the transformation into toxic products that ultimately causes acute renal failure. AA3 inhibition is therefore a target of interest to prevent TCE induced nephrotoxicity. Here we report the crystal structure of recombinant mouse AA3 (mAA3) in the presence of its acetate byproduct and two substrates: N(α)-acetyl-L-tyrosine and NA-DCVC. These structures, in conjunction with biochemical data, indicated that AA3 mediates substrate specificity through van der Waals interactions providing a dynamic interaction interface, which facilitates a diverse range of substrates.

  20. Acetylated tubulin is essential for touch sensation in mice.

    PubMed

    Morley, Shane J; Qi, Yanmei; Iovino, Loredana; Andolfi, Laura; Guo, Da; Kalebic, Nereo; Castaldi, Laura; Tischer, Christian; Portulano, Carla; Bolasco, Giulia; Shirlekar, Kalyanee; Fusco, Claudia M; Asaro, Antonino; Fermani, Federica; Sundukova, Mayya; Matti, Ulf; Reymond, Luc; De Ninno, Adele; Businaro, Luca; Johnsson, Kai; Lazzarino, Marco; Ries, Jonas; Schwab, Yannick; Hu, Jing; Heppenstall, Paul A

    2016-12-13

    At its most fundamental level, touch sensation requires the translation of mechanical energy into mechanosensitive ion channel opening, thereby generating electro-chemical signals. Our understanding of this process, especially how the cytoskeleton influences it, remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that mice lacking the α-tubulin acetyltransferase Atat1 in sensory neurons display profound deficits in their ability to detect mechanical stimuli. We show that all cutaneous afferent subtypes, including nociceptors have strongly reduced mechanosensitivity upon Atat1 deletion, and that consequently, mice are largely insensitive to mechanical touch and pain. We establish that this broad loss of mechanosensitivity is dependent upon the acetyltransferase activity of Atat1, which when absent leads to a decrease in cellular elasticity. By mimicking α-tubulin acetylation genetically, we show both cellular rigidity and mechanosensitivity can be restored in Atat1 deficient sensory neurons. Hence, our results indicate that by influencing cellular stiffness, α-tubulin acetylation sets the force required for touch.

  1. High substrate specificity factor ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from eukaryotic marine algae and properties of recombinant cyanobacterial RubiSCO containing "algal" residue modifications.

    PubMed

    Read, B A; Tabita, F R

    1994-07-01

    Marine algae play an important role in removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. In this investigation, we have determined the substrate specificity factor of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from several marine chromophytic and rhodophytic algae. The enzymes were purified to homogeneity and all possessed significantly higher substrate specificity factors than the enzymes from terrestrial plants, green algae, or bacteria. There are substantial differences in the sequence in a helix 6 of the large subunit of these enzymes, which is intriguing since residues of this region had been previously shown to influence the ability of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase to discriminate between CO2 and O2, presumably by influencing the adjacent flexible loop 6 region. Sequence divergence at this and other key regions might contribute to the substantial differences in the substrate specificity factor of the chromophyte/rhodophyte enzyme. Initial studies on probing the basis for the high substrate specificity factor employed single amino acid substitutions in the recombinant cyanobacterial ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. Residues in the vicinity of loop 6 were changed to reflect the corresponding residues in the chromophyte/rhodophyte large subunit. Some changes in the substrate specificity factor were noted, as were alterations in other important kinetic parameters. Since marine algae show little evidence of photorespiratory metabolism, the high substrate specificity of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase is consistent with the physiology of these organisms. The results of this study provide further evidence that the properties of this enzyme may evolve or change according to the environment in which the host organism is found.

  2. Lactate administration and fatty liver and kidney syndrome development in biotin-deficient chicks.

    PubMed

    Balnave, D; Pearce, J

    1979-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out to determine whether administration of lactate to biotin-deficient chicks induced fatty liver and kidney syndrome (FLKS). 2. The results suggest that increased serum lactate concentrations are a consequence of the syndrome rather than a contributory factor in its incidence. 3. The increase in liver lipids of birds affected by FLKS was not associated with an increase in the specific activity of the hepatic lipogenic enzyme acetyl CoA carboxylase accept when birds developed FLKS spontaneously in experiment 2. 4. Some biotin-deficient chicks did not show physical symptoms of deficiency although mean liver biotin concentrations were low (0.31 microgram/g liver).

  3. The p53-SET Interplays Reveal A New Mode of Acetylation-dependent Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lasso, Gorka; Jiang, Le; Leng, Wenchuan; Zhu, Wei-Guo; Qin, Jun; Honig, Barry; Gu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Summary Although lysine acetylation is now recognized as a general protein modification for both histones and non-histone proteins1-3, the mechanisms of acetylation mediated actions are not completely understood. Acetylation of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of p53 was the first example for non-histone protein acetylation4. Yet the precise role of the CTD acetylation remains elusive. Lysine acetylation often creates binding sites for bromodomain-containing “reader” proteins5,6; surprisingly, in a proteomic screen, we identified SET as a major cellular factor whose binding with p53 is totally dependent on the CTD acetylation status. SET profoundly inhibits p53 transcriptional activity in unstressed cells but SET-mediated repression is completely abolished by stress-induced p53 CTD acetylation. Moreover, loss of the interaction with SET activates p53, resulting in tumor regression in mouse xenograft models. Notably, the acidic domain of SET acts as a “reader” for unacetylated CTD of p53 and this mechanism of acetylation-dependent regulation is widespread in nature. For example, p53 acetylation also modulates its interactions with similar acidic domains found in other p53 regulators including VPRBP, DAXX and PELP1 (refs. 7-9), and computational analysis of the proteome identified numerous proteins with the potential to serve as the acidic domain readers and lysine-rich ligands. Unlike bromodomain readers, which preferentially bind the acetylated forms of their cognate ligands, the acidic domain readers specifically recognize the unacetylated forms of their ligands. Finally, the acetylation-dependent regulation of p53 was further validated in vivo by using a knockin mouse model expressing an acetylation-mimicking form of p53. These results reveal that the acidic domain-containing factors act as a new class of acetylation-dependent regulators by targeting p53 and potentially, beyond. PMID:27626385

  4. Acetyl-coenzyme A deacylase activity in liver is not an artifact. Subcellular distribution and substrate specificity of acetyl-coenzyme A deacylase activities in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Grigat, Klaus-P.; Koppe, Klaus; Seufert, Claus-D.; Söling, Hans-D

    1979-01-01

    Whole liver and isolated liver mitochondria are able to release free acetate, especially under conditions of increased fatty acid oxidation. In the present paper it is shown that rat liver contains acetyl-CoA deacylase (EC 3.1.2.1) activity (0.72μmol/min per g wet wt. of liver at 30°C and 0.5mm-acetyl-CoA). At 0.5mm-acetyl-CoA 73% of total enzyme activity was found in the mitochondria, 8% in the lysosomal fraction and 19% in the postmicrosomal supernatant. Mitochondrial subfractionation shows that mitochondrial acetyl-CoA deacylase activity is restricted to the matrix space. Mitochondrial acetyl-CoA deacylase showed almost no activity with either butyryl- or hexanoyl-CoA. Acetyl-CoA hydrolase activity from purified rat liver lysosomes exhibited a very low affinity for acetyl-CoA (apparent Km>15mm compared with an apparent Km value of 0.5mm for the mitochondrial enzyme) and reacted at about the same rate with acetyl-, n-butyryl- and hexanoyl-CoA. We could not confirm the findings of Costa & Snoswell [(1975) Biochem. J. 152, 167–172] according to which mitochondrial acetyl-CoA deacylase was considered to be an artifact resulting from the combined actions of acetyl-CoA–l-carnitine acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.7) and acetylcarnitine hydrolase. The results are in line with the concept that free acetate released by the liver under physiological conditions stems from the intramitochondrial deacylation of acetyl-CoA. PMID:34392

  5. N-Acetyl-4-aminophenol (paracetamol), N-acetyl-2-aminophenol and acetanilide in urine samples from the general population, individuals exposed to aniline and paracetamol users.

    PubMed

    Dierkes, Georg; Weiss, Tobias; Modick, Hendrik; Käfferlein, Heiko Udo; Brüning, Thomas; Koch, Holger M

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest associations between the use of N-acetyl-4-aminophenol (paracetamol) during pregnancy and increased risks of reproductive disorders in the male offspring. Previously we have reported a ubiquitous urinary excretion of N-acetyl-4-aminophenol in the general population. Possible sources are (1) direct intake of paracetamol through medication, (2) paracetamol residues in the food chain and (3) environmental exposure to aniline or related substances that are metabolized into N-acetyl-4-aminophenol. In order to elucidate the origins of the excretion of N-acetyl-4-aminophenol in urine and to contribute to the understanding of paracetamol and aniline metabolism in humans we developed a rapid, turbulent-flow HPLC-MS/MS method with isotope dilution for the simultaneous quantification of N-acetyl-4-aminophenol and two other aniline related metabolites, N-acetyl-2-aminophenol and acetanilide. We applied this method to three sets of urine samples: (1) individuals with no known exposure to aniline and also no recent paracetamol medication; (2) individuals after occupational exposure to aniline but no paracetamol medication and (3) paracetamol users. We confirmed the omnipresent excretion of N-acetyl-4-aminophenol. Additionally we revealed an omnipresent excretion of N-acetyl-2-aminophenol. In contrast, acetanilide was only found after occupational exposure to aniline, not in the general population or after paracetamol use. The results lead to four preliminary conclusions: (1) other sources than aniline seem to be responsible for the major part of urinary N-acetyl-4-aminophenol in the general population; (2) acetanilide is a metabolite of aniline in man and a valuable biomarker for aniline in occupational settings; (3) aniline baseline levels in the general population measured after chemical hydrolysis do not seem to originate from acetanilide and hence not from a direct exposure to aniline itself and (4) N-acetyl-2-aminophenol does not seem to be

  6. Site-specific mutations in a loop region of the C-terminal domain of the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase that influence substrate partitioning.

    PubMed

    Gutteridge, S; Rhoades, D F; Herrmann, C

    1993-04-15

    Amino acids composing a flexible loop (loop 6) of the eight-stranded barrel domain of the L-subunit of Synechococcus ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (EC 4.1.1.39) involved in reaction intermediate stabilization have been modified by site-specific mutagenesis. Changes at positions both distant and within the active site affect overall catalysis and substrate partitioning. Most significantly, replacement of the active site Lys (Lys-334) with Arg at the apex of the loop almost completely suppressed the carboxylase activity of the enzyme relative to oxygenation, with only a modest reduction in overall catalysis. Val-331 and Thr-342, more distant from the active site but with interacting side chains, were changed to larger and smaller residues with differential effects on both turnover and substrate partitioning. Substitution of the loop with the sequence found in more efficient carboxylases only increased partitioning marginally when accompanied by alterations in the C-terminal tail of the L-subunit that interacts with the loop. Generally, modifications to the loop composition also affected enediol formation, the first step of catalysis, suggesting that the geometry and hence flexibility of this segment affect more than just stabilization of the intermediates immediately following reaction with CO2 or O2.

  7. Regulation of Histone Acetylation by Autophagy in Parkinson Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Goonho; Tan, Jieqiong; Garcia, Guillermina; Kang, Yunyi; Salvesen, Guy; Zhang, Zhuohua

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the most common age-dependent neurodegenerative movement disorder. Accumulated evidence indicates both environmental and genetic factors play important roles in PD pathogenesis, but the potential interaction between environment and genetics in PD etiology remains largely elusive. Here, we report that PD-related neurotoxins induce both expression and acetylation of multiple sites of histones in cultured human cells and mouse midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. Consistently, levels of histone acetylation are markedly higher in midbrain DA neurons of PD patients compared to those of their matched control individuals. Further analysis reveals that multiple histone deacetylases (HDACs) are concurrently decreased in 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-treated cells and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-treated mouse brains, as well as midbrain tissues of human PD patients. Finally, inhibition of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) protects, whereas inhibition of HDAC1 and HDAC2 potentiates, MPP+-induced cell death. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy suppresses MPP+-induced HDACs degradation. The study reveals that PD environmental factors induce HDACs degradation and histone acetylation increase in DA neurons via autophagy and identifies an epigenetic mechanism in PD pathogenesis. PMID:26699403

  8. Acetylation modification regulates GRP78 secretion in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zongwei; Zhuang, Ming; Zhang, Lichao; Zheng, Xingnan; Yang, Peng; Li, Zhuoyu

    2016-01-01

    High glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) expression contributes to the acquisition of a wide range of phenotypic cancer hallmarks, and the pleiotropic oncogenic functions of GRP78 may result from its diverse subcellular distribution. Interestingly, GRP78 has been reported to be secreted from solid tumour cells, participating in cell-cell communication in the tumour microenvironment. However, the mechanism underlying this secretion remains elusive. Here, we report that GRP78 is secreted from colon cancer cells via exosomes. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors blocked GRP78 release by inducing its aggregation in the ER. Mechanistically, HDAC inhibitor treatment suppressed HDAC6 activity and led to increased GRP78 acetylation; acetylated GRP78 then bound to VPS34, a class III phosphoinositide-3 kinase, consequently preventing the sorting of GRP78 into multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Of note, we found that mimicking GRP78 acetylation by substituting the lysine at residue 633, one of the deacetylated sites of HDAC6, with a glutamine resulted in decreased GRP78 secretion and impaired tumour cell growth in vitro. Our study thus reveals a hitherto-unknown mechanism of GRP78 secretion and may also provide implications for the therapeutic use of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:27460191

  9. Selected properties of acetylated adipate of retrograded starch.

    PubMed

    Zięba, T; Gryszkin, A; Kapelko, M

    2014-01-01

    Native potato starch (NS) and retrograded starch (R - obtained via freezing and defrosting of a starch paste) were used to prepare starch acetates: NS-A and R-A, and then acetylated distarch adipates: NS-ADA and R-ADA. The chemically-modified preparations produced from retrograded starch (R-A; R-ADA) were characterized by a higher degree of esterification compared to the modified preparations produced under the same conditions from native potato starch (NS-A; NS-ADA). Starch resistance to amylolysis was observed to increase (to 30-40 g/100 g) as a result of starch retrogradation and acetylation. Starch cross-linking had a significant impact on the increased viscosity of the paste in the entire course of pasting characteristics and on the increased values of rheological coefficients determined from the equations describing flow curves. The produced preparation of acetylated retrograded starch cross-linked with adipic acid (R-ADA) may be deemed an RS3/4 preparation to be used as a food thickening agent.

  10. Regulation of Histone Acetylation by Autophagy in Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Goonho; Tan, Jieqiong; Garcia, Guillermina; Kang, Yunyi; Salvesen, Guy; Zhang, Zhuohua

    2016-02-12

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the most common age-dependent neurodegenerative movement disorder. Accumulated evidence indicates both environmental and genetic factors play important roles in PD pathogenesis, but the potential interaction between environment and genetics in PD etiology remains largely elusive. Here, we report that PD-related neurotoxins induce both expression and acetylation of multiple sites of histones in cultured human cells and mouse midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. Consistently, levels of histone acetylation are markedly higher in midbrain DA neurons of PD patients compared to those of their matched control individuals. Further analysis reveals that multiple histone deacetylases (HDACs) are concurrently decreased in 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-treated cells and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-treated mouse brains, as well as midbrain tissues of human PD patients. Finally, inhibition of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) protects, whereas inhibition of HDAC1 and HDAC2 potentiates, MPP(+)-induced cell death. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy suppresses MPP(+)-induced HDACs degradation. The study reveals that PD environmental factors induce HDACs degradation and histone acetylation increase in DA neurons via autophagy and identifies an epigenetic mechanism in PD pathogenesis.

  11. Carbon isotope fractionation and the acetyl-CoA pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaser, Martin; Conrad, Ralf

    2010-05-01

    Homoacetogenic bacteria can catalyze the reductive synthesis of acetate from CO2 via the acetyl-CoA pathway. Besides this unifying property homoacetogenic bacteria constitute a metabolically and phylogenetically diverse bacteriological group. Therefore their environmental role is difficult to address. It has been recognized that in methanogenic environments homoacetogenic bacteria contribute to the degradation of organic matter. The natural abundance of 13C may be used to understand the functional impact of homoacetogenic bacteria in the soil environment. To distinguish the acetyl-CoA pathway from other dominant processes, the isotopic composition of acetate and CO2 can be determined and the fractionation factors of the individual processes may be used to discriminate between the dominant pathways. To characterize the fractionation factor associated with the acetyl-CoA pathway the phylogenetic and metabolic diversity needs to be considered. Therefore the fractionation factor of substrate utilization and product formation of different homoacetogens (Acetobacterium woodii, Sporomusa ovata, Thermoanaerobacter kivui, Morella thermoautotrophica) has been studied under pure culture conditions in two defined minimal medium with H2/CO2 as sole source of carbon and energy. It became obvious that the cultivation conditions have a major impact on the obtained fractionation factors.

  12. Getting a Knack for NAC: N-Acetyl-Cysteine.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Randy A; Sansone, Lori A

    2011-01-01

    N-acetyl-cysteine, N-acetylcysteine, N-acetyl cysteine, and N-acetyl-L-cysteine are all designations for the same compound, which is abbreviated as NAC. NAC is a precursor to the amino acid cysteine, which ultimately plays two key metabolic roles. Through its metabolic contribution to glutathione production, cysteine participates in the general antioxidant activities of the body. Through its role as a modulator of the glutamatergic system, cysteine influences the reward-reinforcement pathway. Because of these functions, NAC may exert a therapeutic effect on psychiatric disorders allegedly related to oxidative stress (e.g., schizophrenia, bipolar disorder) as well as psychiatric syndromes characterized by impulsive/compulsive symptoms (e.g., trichotillomania, pathological nail biting, gambling, substance misuse). While the dosages, pharmacological strategies (monotherapy versus augmentation), and long-term risks are not fully evident, NAC appears to be a promising, relatively low-risk intervention. If so, NAC might be an ideal treatment strategy for a variety of psychiatric conditions in both psychiatric and primary care settings.

  13. The glossyhead1 Allele of ACC1 Reveals a Principal Role for multidomain acetyl-coenzyme a carboxylase in the biosynthesis of cuticular waxes by arabidopsis[c][w][oa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana having highly glossy inflorescence stems, post-genital fusion in floral organs, and reduced fertility, was isolated from an EMS-mutagenized population and designated glossyhead1 (gsd1). The gsd1 locus was mapped to chromosome 1, and the causal gene identified a...

  14. Multiple isoforms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the Orchidaceae (subtribe Oncidiinae): implications for the evolution of crassulacean acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Silvera, Katia; Winter, Klaus; Rodriguez, B Leticia; Albion, Rebecca L; Cushman, John C

    2014-07-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) catalyses the initial fixation of atmospheric CO2 into oxaloacetate and subsequently malate. Nocturnal accumulation of malic acid within the vacuole of photosynthetic cells is a typical feature of plants that perform crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). PEPC is a ubiquitous plant enzyme encoded by a small gene family, and each member encodes an isoform with specialized function. CAM-specific PEPC isoforms probably evolved from ancestral non-photosynthetic isoforms by gene duplication events and subsequent acquisition of transcriptional control elements that mediate increased leaf-specific or photosynthetic-tissue-specific mRNA expression. To understand the patterns of functional diversification related to the expression of CAM, ppc gene families and photosynthetic patterns were characterized in 11 closely related orchid species from the subtribe Oncidiinae with a range of photosynthetic pathways from C3 photosynthesis (Oncidium cheirophorum, Oncidium maduroi, Rossioglossum krameri, and Oncidium sotoanum) to weak CAM (Oncidium panamense, Oncidium sphacelatum, Gomesa flexuosa and Rossioglossum insleayi) and strong CAM (Rossioglossum ampliatum, Trichocentrum nanum, and Trichocentrum carthagenense). Phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of two main ppc lineages in flowering plants, two main ppc lineages within the eudicots, and three ppc lineages within the Orchidaceae. Our results indicate that ppc gene family expansion within the Orchidaceae is likely to be the result of gene duplication events followed by adaptive sequence divergence. CAM-associated PEPC isoforms in the Orchidaceae probably evolved from several independent origins.

  15. Temperature Responses of C4 Photosynthesis: Biochemical Analysis of Rubisco, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase, and Carbonic Anhydrase in Setaria viridis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Ryan A.; Gandin, Anthony; Cousins, Asaph B.

    2015-01-01

    The photosynthetic assimilation of CO2 in C4 plants is potentially limited by the enzymatic rates of Rubisco, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc), and carbonic anhydrase (CA). Therefore, the activity and kinetic properties of these enzymes are needed to accurately parameterize C4 biochemical models of leaf CO2 exchange in response to changes in CO2 availability and temperature. There are currently no published temperature responses of both Rubisco carboxylation and oxygenation kinetics from a C4 plant, nor are there known measurements of the temperature dependency of the PEPc Michaelis-Menten constant for its substrate HCO3−, and there is little information on the temperature response of plant CA activity. Here, we used membrane inlet mass spectrometry to measure the temperature responses of Rubisco carboxylation and oxygenation kinetics, PEPc carboxylation kinetics, and the activity and first-order rate constant for the CA hydration reaction from 10°C to 40°C using crude leaf extracts from the C4 plant Setaria viridis. The temperature dependencies of Rubisco, PEPc, and CA kinetic parameters are provided. These findings describe a new method for the investigation of PEPc kinetics, suggest an HCO3− limitation imposed by CA, and show similarities between the Rubisco temperature responses of previously measured C3 species and the C4 plant S. viridis. PMID:26373659

  16. Reversible inactivation and characterization of purified inactivated form I ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Tabita, F R

    1992-06-01

    Form I ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is inactivated upon the addition of organic acids to photolithoautotrophically grown cultures. Activity recovers after the dissipation of the organic acid from the culture. The inactivation process depends on both the concentration of the organic compound and the nitrogen status of the cells. The inactivated RubisCO has been purified and was shown to exhibit mobility on both nondenaturing and sodium dodecyl sulfate gels different from that of the active enzyme prepared from cells not treated with organic acids. However, the Michaelis constants for ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate and CO2 or O2 were not dramatically altered. Purified inactivated RubisCO could be activated in vitro by increasing the temperature or the levels of Mg(II), and this activation was accompanied by changes in the electrophoretic mobility of the protein. When foreign bacterial RubisCO genes were expressed in an R. sphaeroides host strain lacking the ability to synthesize endogenous RubisCO, only slight inactivation of RubisCO activity was attained.

  17. Closely related form I ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase molecules that possess different CO2/O2 substrate specificities.

    PubMed

    Horken, K M; Tabita, F R

    1999-01-15

    The deduced primary sequence (cbbL and cbbS) of form I ribulose 1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco) from Bradyrhizobium japonicum places this enzyme within the Type IC subgroup of red-like rubisco enzymes. In addition, B. japonicum appears to organize most of the structural genes of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) pathway in at least one major operon. Functional expression and characterization of the B. japonicum and Xanthobacter flavus enzymes from this group revealed that these molecules exhibit diverse kinetic properties despite their relatively high degree of sequence relatedness. Of prime importance was the fact that these closely related enzymes exhibited CO2 and O2 substrate specificities that varied from relatively low values [tau = (VcKo)/(VoKc) = 45] to values that approximated those obtained for higher plants (tau = 75). These results, combined with the metabolic and genetic versatility of the organisms from which these enzymes were derived, suggest a potential rich resource for future biological selection and structure-function studies aimed at elucidating structural features that govern key enzymological properties of rubisco.

  18. Effect of mutation of lysine-128 of the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Anacystis nidulans.

    PubMed

    Bainbridge, G; Anralojc, P J; Madgwick, P J; Pitts, J E; Parry, M A

    1998-12-01

    The contribution of lysine-128 within the active site of Anacystis nidulans d-ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco; EC 4.1.1.39) was investigated by the characterization of mutants in which lysine-128 was replaced with arginine, glycine, glutamine, histidine or aspartic acid. Mutated genes encoding the Rubisco large subunit were expressed in Escherichia coli and the resultant polypeptides assembled into active complexes. All of the mutant enzymes had a lower affinity for ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) and lower rates of carboxylation. Substitution of lysine-128 with glutamine, histidine or aspartic acid decreased the specificity factor and led to the production of an additional monophosphate reaction product. We show that this product results from the loss of the phosphate from C-1 of RuBP, most probably by beta-elimination from the 2,3-enediolate derivative of RuBP. The results confirm that lysine-128 is important in determining the position of the essential epsilon-amino group of lysine-334 within the active site and in loop dynamics. This further demonstrates that residues remote from the active site can be manipulated to modify catalytic function.

  19. Constitutive and dark-induced expression of Solanum tuberosum phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase enhances stomatal opening and photosynthetic performance of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kebeish, Rashad; Niessen, Markus; Oksaksin, Mehtap; Blume, Christian; Peterhaensel, Christoph

    2012-02-01

    The effect of constitutive and dark-induced expression of Solanum tuberosum phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) on the opening state of stomata and photosynthetic performance in Arabidopsis thaliana plants was studied. Transcript accumulation analyses of the A. thaliana dark-induced (Din10 and Din6) and the Pisum sativum asparagine synthetase 2 promoters (Asn2) in transiently transformed tobacco leaves showed that Din10 promoter induced more DsRed accumulation in the dark compared to the other din genes. Overexpression of PEPC under the control of the constitutive enhanced CaMV 35S (p35SS) and dark-induced Din10 promoter in stably transformed A. thaliana plants increased the number of opened stomata in dark adapted leaves. Gas exchange measurements using A. thaliana plants transgenic for p35SS-PEPC and Din10-PEPC revealed a marked increase in stomatal conductance, transpiration, and dark respiration rates measured in the dark compared to wild-type plants. Moreover, measurement of CO(2) assimilation rates at different external CO(2) concentrations (C(a) ) and different light intensities shows an increase in the CO(2) assimilation rates in transgenic Arabidopsis lines compared to wild-type plants. This is considered as first step towards transferring the aspects of Crassulacean acid metabolism-like photosynthetic mechanism into C3 plants.

  20. Pyruvate Carboxylase Activates the RIG-I-like Receptor-Mediated Antiviral Immune Response by Targeting the MAVS signalosome

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhongying; Zhou, Yaqin; Zhu, Shengli; Feng, Jian; Chen, Xueyuan; Liu, Shi; Peng, Nanfang; Yang, Xiaodan; Xu, Gang; Zhu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    When retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 protein (RIG-I)-like receptors sense viral dsRNA in the cytosol, RIG-I and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) are recruited to the mitochondria to interact with mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) and initiate antiviral immune responses. In this study, we demonstrate that the biotin-containing enzyme pyruvate carboxylase (PC) plays an essential role in the virus-triggered activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling mediated by MAVS. PC contributes to the enhanced production of type I interferons (IFNs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and PC knockdown inhibits the virus-triggered innate immune response. In addition, PC shows extensive antiviral activity against RNA viruses, including influenza A virus (IAV), human enterovirus 71 (EV71), and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Furthermore, PC mediates antiviral action by targeting the MAVS signalosome and induces IFNs and pro-inflammatory cytokines by promoting phosphorylation of NF-κB inhibitor-α (IκBα) and the IκB kinase (IKK) complex, as well as NF-κB nuclear translocation, which leads to activation of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), including double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and myxovirus resistance protein 1 (Mx1). Our findings suggest that PC is an important player in host antiviral signaling. PMID:26906558

  1. Diversity of the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase form I gene (rbcL) in natural phytoplankton communities.

    PubMed Central

    Pichard, S L; Campbell, L; Paul, J H

    1997-01-01

    The phytoplankton of the world's oceans play an integral part in global carbon cycling and food webs by conversion of carbon dioxide into organic carbon. They accomplish this task through the action of the Calvin cycle enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). Here we have investigated the phylogenetic diversity in the form I rbcL locus in natural phytoplankton communities of the open ocean and representative clones of marine autotrophic picoplankton by mRNA or DNA amplification and sequencing of a 480 to 483 bp internal fragment of this gene. Five gene sequences were recovered from nucleic acids of natural phytoplankton communities of the Gulf of Mexico. The rbcL genes of two Prochlorococcus isolates and one Synechococcus strain (WH8007) were also sequenced. Sequences were aligned with the database of rbcL genes and subjected to both neighbor-joining and parsimony analyses. The five sequences from the natural phytoplankton community spanned nearly the entire diversity of characterized form I rbcL genes, with some sequences closely related to isolates such as Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus (forms IA and I) and prymnesiophyte algae (form ID), while other sequences were deeply rooted. Unexpectedly, the deep euphotic zone contained an organism that possesses a transcriptionally active rbcL gene closely related to that of a recently characterized manganese-oxidizing bacterium, suggesting that such chemoautotrophs may contribute to the diversity of carbon-fixing organisms in the marine euphotic zone. PMID:9293012

  2. Photosynthetic and Other Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Isoforms in the Single-Cell, Facultative C4 System of Hydrilla verticillata1

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Srinath K.; Magnin, Noël C.; Reiskind, Julia B.; Bowes, George

    2002-01-01

    The submersed monocot Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle is a facultative C4 plant. It typically exhibits C3 photosynthetic characteristics, but exposure to low [CO2] induces a C4 system in which the C4 and Calvin cycles co-exist in the same cell and the initial fixation in the light is catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). Three full-length cDNAs encoding PEPC were isolated from H. verticillata, two from leaves and one from root. The sequences were 95% to 99% identical and shared a 75% to 85% similarity with other plant PEPCs. Transcript studies revealed that one isoform, Hvpepc4, was exclusively expressed in leaves during C4 induction. This and enzyme kinetic data were consistent with it being the C4 photosynthesis isoform. However, the C4 signature serine of terrestrial plant C4 isoforms was absent in this and the other H. verticillata sequences. Instead, alanine, typical of C3 sequences, was present. Western analyses of C3 and C4 leaf extracts after anion-exchange chromatography showed similar dominant PEPC-specific bands at 110 kD. In phylogenetic analyses, the sequences grouped with C3, non-graminaceous C4, and Crassulacean acid metabolism PEPCs but not with the graminaceous C4, and formed a clade with a gymnosperm, which is consistent with H. verticillata PEPC predating that of other C4 angiosperms. PMID:12376652

  3. The source and characteristics of chemiluminescence associated with the oxygenase reaction catalyzed by Mn(2+)-ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Lilley, R M; Riesen, H; Andrews, T J

    1993-07-05

    We confirm the observation of Mogel and McFadden (Mogel, S.N., and McFadden, B. A. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 8333-8337) that ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco) exhibits chemiluminescence while catalyzing its oxygenase reaction in the presence of Mn2+. However, our results with the spinach and Rhodospirillum rubrum enzymes differ markedly in the following respects. 1) Chemiluminescence intensity was directly proportional to enzyme concentration and behaved as if representing the rate of oxygenase catalysis. 2) The wavelength spectrum peaked at about 770 nm and extended beyond 810 nm. This seems inconsistent with chemiluminescence generated by simultaneous decay of pairs of singlet O2 molecules. It is consistent with manganese(II) luminescence and we discuss its possible sources. The time course of chemiluminescence (resolution, 0.25 s) was distinctively different for spinach and R. rubrum enzymes during the initial 5 s of catalysis, with the bacterial enzyme exhibiting a pronounced initial "burst." Chemiluminescence by the spinach enzyme responded to substrate concentrations in a manner consistent with known oxygenase properties, exhibiting Michaelis-Menten kinetics with ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (Km 400 nM). Chemiluminescence required carbamylated enzyme with Mn2+ bound at the active site (activation energy, -57.1 KJ.mol-1). As an indicator of oxygenase activity, chemiluminescence represents an improvement over oxygen electrode measurements in response time and sensitivity by factors of at least 100.

  4. Promotion of photosynthesis in transgenic rice over-expressing of maize C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene by nitric oxide donors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pingbo; Li, Xia; Huo, Kai; Wei, Xiaodong; Dai, Chuanchao; Lv, Chuangen

    2014-03-15

    We determined the effects of exogenous nitric oxide on photosynthesis and gene expression in transgenic rice plants (PC) over-expressing the maize C4pepc gene, which encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). Seedlings were subjected to treatments with NO donors, an NO scavenger, phospholipase inhibitors, a Ca(2+) chelator, a Ca(2+) channel inhibitor, and a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhibitor, individually and in various combinations. The NO donors significantly increased the net photosynthetic rate (PN) of PC and wild-type (WT), especially that of PC. Treatment with an NO scavenger did inhibit the PN of rice plants. The treatments with phospholipase inhibitors and a Ca(2+) chelator decreased the PN of WT and PC, and photosynthesis was more strongly inhibited in WT than in PC. Further analyses showed that the NO donors increased endogenous levels of NO and PLD activity, but decreased endogenous levels of Ca(2+) both WT and PC. However, there was a greater increase in NO in WT and a greater increase in PLD activity and Ca(2+) level in PC. The NO donors also increased both PEPC activity and pepc gene expression in PC. PEPC activity can be increased by SNP alone. But the expression of its encoding gene in PC might be regulated by SNP, together with PA and Ca(2+).

  5. Genome-wide Analysis of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Gene Family and Their Response to Abiotic Stresses in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Zhong, Xiujuan; Cong, Yahui; Wang, Tingting; Yang, Songnan; Li, Yan; Gai, Junyi

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) plays an important role in assimilating atmospheric CO2 during C4 and crassulacean acid metabolism photosynthesis, and also participates in various non-photosynthetic processes, including fruit ripening, stomatal opening, supporting carbon–nitrogen interactions, seed formation and germination, and regulation of plant tolerance to stresses. However, a comprehensive analysis of PEPC family in Glycine max has not been reported. Here, a total of ten PEPC genes were identified in soybean and denominated as GmPEPC1-GmPEPC10. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of the PEPC proteins from 13 higher plant species including soybean, PEPC family could be classified into two subfamilies, which was further supported by analyses of their conserved motifs and gene structures. Nineteen cis-regulatory elements related to phytohormones, abiotic and biotic stresses were identified in the promoter regions of GmPEPC genes, indicating their roles in soybean development and stress responses. GmPEPC genes were expressed in various soybean tissues and most of them responded to the exogenously applied phytohormones. GmPEPC6, GmPEPC8 and GmPEPC9 were significantly induced by aluminum toxicity, cold, osmotic and salt stresses. In addition, the enzyme activities of soybean PEPCs were also up-regulated by these treatments, suggesting their potential roles in soybean response to abiotic stresses. PMID:27924923

  6. ppc, the gene for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from an extremely thermophilic bacterium, Rhodothermus obamensis: cloning, sequencing and overexpression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Takai, K; Sako, Y; Uchida, A

    1998-05-01

    The ppc gene, which encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) of an extremely thermophilic bacterium, Rhodothermus obamensis, was directly sequenced by the thermal asymmetric interlaced (TAIL) PCR method. An ORF for a 937 amino acid polypeptide was found in the gene. The ppc gene had a high G+C content (66.2 mol%) and the third position of the codon exhibited strong preference for G or C usage (85.0 mol%). The calculated molecular mass was 107,848 Da, which was consistent with the molecular mass of the enzyme as determined by SDS-PAGE (100 kDa). The amino acid sequence of R. obamensis PEPC was closely related to that of PEPC from another thermophile, a Thermus sp., and from a mesophile, Corynebacterium glutamicum, exhibiting 45.3% or 37.7% identity and 61.5% or 56.5% similarity, respectively. By Southern analysis, the ppc gene was found to be present in a single copy in the genomic DNA of this organism. The cloned gene was expressed in Escherichia coli using a pET expression vector system and a thermostable recombinant PEPC was obtained. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of the thermophilic and mesophilic PEPCs revealed distinct or common preferences for specific amino acid composition and substitutions in the two thermophilic enzymes.

  7. Algal evolution in relation to atmospheric CO2: carboxylases, carbon-concentrating mechanisms and carbon oxidation cycles

    PubMed Central

    Raven, John A.; Giordano, Mario; Beardall, John; Maberly, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis evolved at least 2.4 Ga; all oxygenic organisms use the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco)–photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle (PCRC) rather than one of the five other known pathways of autotrophic CO2 assimilation. The high CO2 and (initially) O2-free conditions permitted the use of a Rubisco with a high maximum specific reaction rate. As CO2 decreased and O2 increased, Rubisco oxygenase activity increased and 2-phosphoglycolate was produced, with the evolution of pathways recycling this inhibitory product to sugar phosphates. Changed atmospheric composition also selected for Rubiscos with higher CO2 affinity and CO2/O2 selectivity correlated with decreased CO2-saturated catalytic capacity and/or for CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). These changes increase the energy, nitrogen, phosphorus, iron, zinc and manganese cost of producing and operating Rubisco–PCRC, while biosphere oxygenation decreased the availability of nitrogen, phosphorus and iron. The majority of algae today have CCMs; the timing of their origins is unclear. If CCMs evolved in a low-CO2 episode followed by one or more lengthy high-CO2 episodes, CCM retention could involve a combination of environmental factors known to favour CCM retention in extant organisms that also occur in a warmer high-CO2 ocean. More investigations, including studies of genetic adaptation, are needed. PMID:22232762

  8. Interaction between potyvirus P3 and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) of host plants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Luo, Zhaopeng; Yan, Fei; Lu, Yuwen; Zheng, Hongying; Chen, Jianping

    2011-08-01

    The P3 protein encoded by Shallot yellow stripe virus onion isolate (SYSV-O) interacted in the Yeast Two-hybrid (Y2H) system and in co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assays with the large subunit of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) protein that is encoded by the rbcL gene of its onion host. Dissection analysis by Y2H showed that the main part of SYSV P3 (amino acids 1-390) and onion RbcL (amino acids 1-137) were responsible for the interaction. The P3 proteins encoded by Onion yellow dwarf virus (OYDV), Soybean mosaic virus Pinellia isolate (SMV-P), and Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) also interacted with RbcL, suggesting that a P3/RbcL interaction might exist generally for potyviruses. An interaction between P3 of these potyviruses and the small subunit of RubisCO (RbcS) was also demonstrated. Moreover, the P3N-PIPO protein encoded by a newly identified open reading frame embedded within the P3 cistron also interacted with both RbcL and RbcS. It is possible that the potyvirus P3 protein affects the normal functions of RubisCO which thus contributes to symptom development.

  9. Multiple isoforms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the Orchidaceae (subtribe Oncidiinae): implications for the evolution of crassulacean acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Silvera, Katia; Winter, Klaus; Rodriguez, B. Leticia; Albion, Rebecca L.; Cushman, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) catalyses the initial fixation of atmospheric CO2 into oxaloacetate and subsequently malate. Nocturnal accumulation of malic acid within the vacuole of photosynthetic cells is a typical feature of plants that perform crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). PEPC is a ubiquitous plant enzyme encoded by a small gene family, and each member encodes an isoform with specialized function. CAM-specific PEPC isoforms probably evolved from ancestral non-photosynthetic isoforms by gene duplication events and subsequent acquisition of transcriptional control elements that mediate increased leaf-specific or photosynthetic-tissue-specific mRNA expression. To understand the patterns of functional diversification related to the expression of CAM, ppc gene families and photosynthetic patterns were characterized in 11 closely related orchid species from the subtribe Oncidiinae with a range of photosynthetic pathways from C3 photosynthesis (Oncidium cheirophorum, Oncidium maduroi, Rossioglossum krameri, and Oncidium sotoanum) to weak CAM (Oncidium panamense, Oncidium sphacelatum, Gomesa flexuosa and Rossioglossum insleayi) and strong CAM (Rossioglossum ampliatum, Trichocentrum nanum, and Trichocentrum carthagenense). Phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of two main ppc lineages in flowering plants, two main ppc lineages within the eudicots, and three ppc lineages within the Orchidaceae. Our results indicate that ppc gene family expansion within the Orchidaceae is likely to be the result of gene duplication events followed by adaptive sequence divergence. CAM-associated PEPC isoforms in the Orchidaceae probably evolved from several independent origins. PMID:24913627

  10. Crystal structure of tabtoxin resistance protein complexed with acetyl coenzyme A reveals the mechanism for {beta}-lactam acetylation.

    SciTech Connect

    He, H.; Ding, Y.; Bartlam, M.; Sun, F.; Le, Y.; Qin, X.; Tang, H.; Zhang, R.; Joachimiak, A.; Liu, J.; Zhao, N.; Rao, Z.; Biosciences Division; Tsinghua Univ.; Chinese Academy of Science

    2003-01-31

    Tabtoxin resistance protein (TTR) is an enzyme that renders tabtoxin-producing pathogens, such as Pseudomonas syringae, tolerant to their own phytotoxins. Here, we report the crystal structure of TTR complexed with its natural cofactor, acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA), to 1.55 {angstrom} resolution. The binary complex forms a characteristic 'V' shape for substrate binding and contains the four motifs conserved in the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily, which also includes the histone acetyltransferases (HATs). A single-step mechanism is proposed to explain the function of three conserved residues, Glu92, Asp130 and Tyr141, in catalyzing the acetyl group transfer to its substrate. We also report that TTR possesses HAT activity and suggest an evolutionary relationship between TTR and other GNAT members.

  11. Acetylation of Werner syndrome protein (WRN): relationships with DNA damage, DNA replication and DNA metabolic activities

    PubMed Central

    Lozada, Enerlyn; Yi, Jingjie; Luo, Jianyuan; Orren, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of WRN function causes Werner Syndrome, characterized by increased genomic instability, elevated cancer susceptibility and premature aging. Although WRN is subject to acetylation, phosphorylation and sumoylation, the impact of these modifications on WRN’s DNA metabolic function remains unclear. Here, we examined in further depth the relationship between WRN acetylation and its role in DNA metabolism, particularly in response to induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that endogenous WRN is acetylated somewhat under unperturbed conditions. However, levels of acetylated WRN significantly increase after treatment with certain DNA damaging agents or the replication inhibitor hydroxyurea. Use of DNA repair-deficient cells or repair pathway inhibitors further increase levels of acetylated WRN, indicating that induced DNA lesions and their persistence are at least partly responsible for increased acetylation. Notably, acetylation of WRN correlates with inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that replication blockage might underlie this effect. Moreover, WRN acetylation modulates its affinity for and activity on certain DNA structures, in a manner that may enhance its relative specificity for physiological substrates. Our results also show that acetylation and deacetylation of endogenous WRN is a dynamic process, with sirtuins and other histone deacetylases contributing to WRN deacetylation. These findings advance our understanding of the dynamics of WRN acetylation under unperturbed conditions and following DNA damage induction, linking this modification not only to DNA damage persistence but also potentially to replication stalling caused by specific DNA lesions. Our results are consistent with proposed metabolic roles for WRN and genomic instability phenotypes associated with WRN deficiency. PMID:24965941

  12. Cell differentiation along multiple pathways accompanied by changes in histone acetylation status.

    PubMed

    Legartová, Soňa; Kozubek, Stanislav; Franek, Michal; Zdráhal, Zbyněk; Lochmanová, Gabriela; Martinet, Nadine; Bártová, Eva

    2014-04-01

    Post-translational modification of histones is fundamental to the regulation of basic nuclear processes and subsequent cellular events, including differentiation. In this study, we analyzed acetylated forms of histones H2A, H2B, and H4 during induced differentiation in mouse (mESCs) and human (hESCs) embryonic stem cells and during induced enterocytic differentiation of colon cancer cells in vitro. Endoderm-like differentiation of mESCs induced by retinoic acid and enterocytic differentiation induced by histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate were accompanied by increased mono-, di-, and tri-acetylation of histone H2B and a pronounced increase in di- and tri-acetylation of histone H4. In enterocytes, mono-acetylation of histone H2A also increased and tetra-acetylation of histone H4 appeared only after induction of this differentiation pathway. During differentiation of hESCs, we observed increased mono-acetylation and decreased tri-acetylation of H2B. Mono-, di-, and tri-acetylation of H4 were reduced, manifested by a significant increase in nonacetylated H4 histones. Levels of acetylated histones increased during induced differentiation in mESCs and during histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor-induced enterocytic differentiation, whereas differentiation of human ESCs was associated with reduced acetylation of histones H2B and H4.

  13. Acetylation mimic of lysine 280 exacerbates human Tau neurotoxicity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gorsky, Marianna Karina; Burnouf, Sylvie; Dols, Jacqueline; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction and accumulation of the microtubule-associated human Tau (hTau) protein into intraneuronal aggregates is observed in many neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Reversible lysine acetylation has recently emerged as a post-translational modification that may play an important role in the modulation of hTau pathology. Acetylated hTau species have been observed within hTau aggregates in human AD brains and multi-acetylation of hTau in vitro regulates its propensity to aggregate. However, whether lysine acetylation at position 280 (K280) modulates hTau-induced toxicity in vivo is unknown. We generated new Drosophila transgenic models of hTau pathology to evaluate the contribution of K280 acetylation to hTau toxicity, by analysing the respective toxicity of pseudo-acetylated (K280Q) and pseudo-de-acetylated (K280R) mutant forms of hTau. We observed that mis-expression of pseudo-acetylated K280Q-hTau in the adult fly nervous system potently exacerbated fly locomotion defects and photoreceptor neurodegeneration. In addition, modulation of K280 influenced total hTau levels and phosphorylation without changing hTau solubility. Altogether, our results indicate that pseudo-acetylation of the single K280 residue is sufficient to exacerbate hTau neurotoxicity in vivo, suggesting that acetylated K280-hTau species contribute to the pathological events leading to neurodegeneration in AD. PMID:26940749

  14. In silico analysis of protein Lys-N𝜀-acetylation in plants

    PubMed Central

    Rao, R. Shyama Prasad; Thelen, Jay J.; Miernyk, Ján A.

    2014-01-01

    Among post-translational modifications, there are some conceptual similarities between Lys-N𝜀-acetylation and Ser/Thr/Tyr O-phosphorylation. Herein we present a bioinformatics-based overview of reversible protein Lys-acetylation, including some comparisons with reversible protein phosphorylation. The study of Lys-acetylation of plant proteins has lagged behind studies of mammalian and microbial cells; 1000s of acetylation sites have been identified in mammalian proteins compared with only hundreds of sites in plant proteins. While most previous emphasis was focused on post-translational modifications of histones, more recent studies have addressed metabolic regulation. Being directly coupled with cellular CoA/acetyl-CoA and NAD/NADH, reversible Lys-N𝜀-acetylation has the potential to control, or contribute to control, of primary metabolism, signaling, and growth and development. PMID:25136347

  15. Purification and characterization of large and small subunits of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase expressed separately in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Smrcka, A V; Ramage, R T; Bohnert, H J; Jensen, R G

    1991-04-01

    Procedures were developed for 95 and 80% purification to homogeneity of the large subunit (L) and small subunit (S) of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (L8S8) from Synechococcus PCC 6301, each expressed separately in Escherichia coli. Purified L had a low specific activity in the absence of S (0.075 mumol CO2 fixed/mg holoenzyme/min). Following elution on a Pharmacia Superose 6 or 12 gel filtration column, 50% of the purified L appeared as the octamer, L8. The rest was in equilibrium with lower polymeric species and/or was retained on the column. Large and small subunits assembled rapidly into the L8S8 holoenzyme that had high specific activities, 6.2 and 3.1 mumol CO2 fixed/mg holoenzyme/min for the homologous Synechococcus L8S8 and the hybrid Synechococcus L-pea S L8S8, respectively. The CO2 dependence for carbamylation of L8 was compared to that of L8S8 as a function of pH and CO2 concentration. The pH dependence indicated an apparent pKa for L8 of 8.28 and for L8S8 of 8.15, suggesting that S may influence the pKa of the lysine involved in carbamylation. The Kact for CO2 at pH 8.4 were similar for L8 (13.5 microM) and L8S8 (15.5 microM). L8 bound 2-[14C]carboxy-D-arabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate (CABP) tightly so that most of the bound [14C]CABP survived gel filtration. A major amount of the L8-[14C]CABP complex appeared as larger polymeric aggregates when eluted in the presence of E. coli protein.

  16. Characterization of the duplicate ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase genes and cbb promoters of Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed

    Kusian, B; Bednarski, R; Husemann, M; Bowien, B

    1995-08-01

    Autotrophic CO2 fixation via the Calvin carbon reduction cycle in Alcaligenes eutrophus H16 is genetically determined by two highly homologous cbb operons, one of which is located on the chromosome and the other on megaplasmid pHG1 of the organism. An activator gene, cbbR, lies in divergent orientation only 167 bp upstream of the chromosomal operon and controls the expression of both cbb operons. The two 5'-terminal genes of the operons, cbbLS, coding for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, were sequenced. Mapping of the 5' termini of the 2.1-kb cbbLS transcripts by primer extension and by nuclease S1 treatment revealed a single transcriptional start point at the same relative position for the chromosomal and plasmid-borne cbb operons. The derived cbb operon promoter showed similarity to sigma 70-dependent promoters of Escherichia coli. For the 1.4-kb transcripts of cbbR, the transcriptional start points were different in autotrophic and heterotrophic cells. The two corresponding cbbR promoters overlapped the cbb operon promoter and also displayed similarities to sigma 70-dependent promoters. The deficient cbbR gene located on pHG1 was transcribed as well. A newly constructed double operon fusion vector was used to determine the activities of the cbb promoters. Fusions with fragments carrying the cbb intergenic control regions demonstrated that the cbb operon promoters were strongly regulated in response to autotrophic versus heterotrophic growth conditions. In contrast, the cbbR promoters displayed low constitutive activities. The data suggest that the chromosomal and plasmid-borne cbb promoters of A. eutrophus H16 are functionally equivalent despite minor structural differences.

  17. Covalent modification of a highly reactive and essential lysine residue of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activase.

    PubMed

    Salvucci, M E

    1993-10-01

    Chemical modification of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activase with water-soluble N-hydroxysuccinimide esters was used to identify a reactive lysyl residue that is essential for activity. Incubation of Rubisco activase with sulfosuccinimidyl-7-amino-4-methylcoumarin-3-acetate (AMCA-sulfo-NHS) or sulfosuccinimidyl-acetate (sulfo-NHS-acetate) caused progressive inactivation of ATPase activity and concomitant loss of the ability to activate Rubisco. AMCA-sulfo-NHS was the more potent inactivator of Rubisco activase, exhibiting a second-order rate constant for inactivation of 239 M-1 s-1 compared to 21 M-1 s-1 for sulfo-NHS-acetate. Inactivation of enzyme activity by AMCA-sulfo-NHS correlated with the incorporation of 1.9 mol of AMCA per mol of 42-kD Rubisco activase monomer. ADP, a competitive inhibitor of Rubisco activase, afforded considerable protection against inactivation of Rubisco activase and decreased the amount of AMCA incorporated into the Rubisco activase monomer. Sequence analysis of the major labeled peptide from AMCA-sulfo-NHS-modified enzyme showed that the primary site of modification was lysine-247 (K247) in the tetrapeptide methionine-glutamic acid-lysine-phenylalanine. Upon complete inactivation of ATPase activity, modification of K247 accounted for 1 mol of AMCA incorporated per mol of Rubisco activase monomer. Photoaffinity labeling of AMCA-sulfo-NHS- and sulfo-NHS-acetate-modified Rubisco activase with ATP analogs derivatized on either the adenine base or on the gamma-phosphate showed that K247 is not essential for the binding of adenine nucleotides per se. Instead, the data indicated that the essentiality of K247 is probably due to an involvement of this highly reactive, species-invariant residue in an obligatory interaction that occurs between the protein and the nucleotide phosphate during catalysis.

  18. Changes in the net charge and subunit properties of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase--oxygenase during cold hardening of Puma rye.

    PubMed

    Huner, N P; Macdowall, F D

    1979-02-01

    Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase--oxygenase (RUBPCase) from leaves of cold-hardened and unhardened Puma rye was purified by gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography. The specific activity of the hardened form was twice that of the unhardened form. A difference in charge between the two forms of this enzyme was proved by gel electrofocussing. The estimated isoelectric point (pI) values were 6.4 and 6.3 for the enzyme from the hardened and unhardened source respectively. The large subunit (55,000 molecular weight) of the enzyme from only the unhardened source formed at apparent dimer during sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel electrophoresis. At pH 6,8 it was also the source of an anomalous polypeptide with an apparent molecular weight of 47,000. This anomalous polypeptide appeared in both hardened and unhardened preparations after irreversible inactivation of RUBPCase activity by NaCl. It also appeared after preparation of the purified enzymes for SDS--PAGE in the absence of beta-mercaptoethanol, but this was reversible. The enzyme from the hardened source was less affected in the absence of reducing agent. Structural evidence was obtained for the previously reported cold hardening of the enzyme against freeze inactivation. A freeze-thaw cycle applied to the enzyme in vitro caused some polymerization of the large subunit and its anomalous polypeptide, in the absence of reducing agent, especially in the unhardened case. This increased with repeated cycles until the fifth cycle when the large subunit monomer and its satellite were abolished only in preparations from the unhardened source. These data indicate that the large subunit is a probable site of change that occurred in this enzyme during cold hardening.

  19. Altered intersubunit interactions in crystal structures of catalytically compromised ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Karkehabadi, Saeid; Taylor, Thomas C; Spreitzer, Robert J; Andersson, Inger

    2005-01-11

    Substitution of Leu290 by Phe (L290F) in the large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii causes a 13% decrease in CO(2)/O(2) specificity and reduced thermal stability. Genetic selection for restored photosynthesis at the restrictive temperature identified an Ala222 to Thr (A222T) substitution that suppresses the deleterious effects of the original mutant substitution to produce a revertant enzyme with improved thermal stability and kinetic properties virtually indistinguishable from that of the wild-type enzyme. Because the mutated residues are situated approximately 19 A away from the active site, they must affect the relative rates of carboxylation and oxygenation in an indirect way. As a means for elucidating the role of such distant interactions in Rubisco catalysis and stability, we have determined the crystal structures of the L290F mutant and L290F/A222T revertant enzymes to 2.30 and 2.05 A resolution, respectively. Inspection of the structures reveals that the mutant residues interact via van der Waals contacts within the same large subunit (intrasubunit path, 15.2 A Calpha-Calpha) and also via a path involving a neighboring small subunit (intersubunit path, 18.7 A Calpha-Calpha). Structural analysis of the mutant enzymes identified regions (residues 50-72 of the small subunit and residues 161-164 and 259-264 of the large subunit) that show significant and systematically increased atomic temperature factors in the L290F mutant enzyme compared to wild type. These regions coincide with residues on the interaction paths between the L290F mutant and A222T suppressor sites and could explain the temperature-conditional phenotype of the L290F mutant strain. This suggests that alterations in subunit interactions will influence protein dynamics and, thereby, affect catalysis.

  20. Presence of a structurally novel type ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus kodakaraensis KOD1.

    PubMed

    Ezaki, S; Maeda, N; Kishimoto, T; Atomi, H; Imanaka, T

    1999-02-19

    We have characterized the gene encoding ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) of the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus kodakaraensis KOD1. The gene encoded a protein consisting of 444 amino acid residues, corresponding in size to the large subunit of previously reported Rubiscos. Rubisco of P. kodakaraensis KOD1 (Pk-Rubisco) showed only 51.4% similarity with the large subunit of type I Rubisco from spinach and 47.3% with that of type II Rubisco from Rhodospirillum rubrum, suggesting that the enzyme was not a member of either type. Active site residues identified from type I and type II Rubiscos were conserved. We expressed the gene in Escherichia coli, and we obtained a soluble protein with the expected molecular mass and N-terminal amino acid sequence. Purification of the recombinant protein revealed that Pk-Rubisco was an L8 type homo-octamer. Pk-Rubisco showed highest specific activity of 19.8 x 10(3) nmol of CO2 fixed per min/mg, and a tau value of 310 at 90 degreesC, both higher than any previously characterized Rubisco. The optimum pH was 8.3, and the enzyme possessed extreme thermostability, with a half-life of 15 h at 80 degreesC. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the gene was transcribed in P. kodakaraensis KOD1. Furthermore, Western blot analysis with cell-free extract of P. kodakaraensis KOD1 clearly indicated the presence of Pk-Rubisco in the native host cells.

  1. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase gene expression and diversity of Lake Erie planktonic microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H.H.; Tabita, F.R.

    1996-06-01

    Carbon dioxide fixation is carried out primarily through the Calvin-Benson-Bassham reductive pentose phosphate cycle, in which rubulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) is the key enzyme. The primary structure of the large subunit of form I RubisCO is well conserved; however, four distinct types, A, B, C, and D, may be distinguished. To better understand the environmental regulation of RubisCO in Lake Erie phytoplanktonic microorganisms, we have isolated total RNA and DNA from four Lake Erie sampling sites. Probes prepared from RubisCO large-subunit genes (rbcL) of the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC6301 (representative of type IB) and the diatom Cylindrotheca sp. strain N1 (representative of type ID) was determined. It appeared that type ID (diatom) rbcL gene expression per gene dose decreased as the sampling sites shifted toward open water. By contrast, a similar trend was not observed for cyanobacterial (type IB) rbcL gene expression per gene dose. Thus far, a total of 21 clones of rbcL genes derived from mRNA have been obtained and completely sequenced from the Ballast Island site. For surface water samples, deduced amino acid sequences of five of six clones appeared to be representative of green algae. In contrast, six of nine sequenced rbcL clones from 10-m-deep samples were a chromophytic and rhodophytic lineages. At 5 m deep, the active CO{sub 2}-fixing planktonic organisms represented a diverse group, including organisms related to Chlorella ellipsoidea, Cylindrotheca sp. strain N1, and Olisthodiscus luteus. Although many more samplings at diverse sites must be accomplished, the discovery of distinctly different sequences of rbcL mRNA at different water depths suggests that there is a stratification of active CO{sub 2}-fixing organisms in western Lake Erie. 54 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Positive selection of Kranz and non-Kranz C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase amino acids in Suaedoideae (Chenopodiaceae).

    PubMed

    Rosnow, Josh J; Edwards, Gerald E; Roalson, Eric H

    2014-07-01

    In subfamily Suaedoideae, four independent gains of C4 photosynthesis are proposed, which includes two parallel origins of Kranz anatomy (sections Salsina and Schoberia) and two independent origins of single-cell C4 anatomy (Bienertia and Suaeda aralocaspica). Additional phylogenetic support for this hypothesis was generated from sequence data of the C-terminal portion of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) gene used in C4 photosynthesis (ppc-1) in combination with previous sequence data. ppc-1 sequence was generated for 20 species in Suaedoideae and two outgroup Salsola species that included all types of C4 anatomies as well as two types of C3 anatomies. A branch-site test for positively selected codons was performed using the software package PAML. From labelling of the four branches where C4 is hypothesized to have developed (foreground branches), residue 733 (maize numbering) was identified to be under positive selection with a posterior probability >0.99 and residue 868 at the >0.95 interval using Bayes empirical Bayes (BEB). When labelling all the branches within C4 clades, the branch-site test identified 13 codons to be under selection with a posterior probability >0.95 by BEB; this is discussed considering current information on functional residues. The signature C4 substitution of an alanine for a serine at position 780 in the C-terminal end (which is considered a major determinant of affinity for PEP) was only found in four of the C4 species sampled, while eight of the C4 species and all the C3 species have an alanine residue; indicating that this substitution is not a requirement for C4 function.

  3. Coordinate, Organ-Specific and Developmental Regulation of Ribulose 1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase Gene Expression in Amaranthus hypochondriacus1

    PubMed Central

    Nikolau, Basil J.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    1987-01-01

    The expression of the genes