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Sample records for acetyl transferases hats

  1. Inhibition of Different Histone Acetyltransferases (HATs) Uncovers Transcription-Dependent and -Independent Acetylation-Mediated Mechanisms in Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merschbaecher, Katja; Hatko, Lucyna; Folz, Jennifer; Mueller, Uli

    2016-01-01

    Acetylation of histones changes the efficiency of the transcription processes and thus contributes to the formation of long-term memory (LTM). In our comparative study, we used two inhibitors to characterize the contribution of different histone acetyl transferases (HATs) to appetitive associative learning in the honeybee. For one we applied…

  2. Crx activates opsin transcription by recruiting HAT-containing co-activators and promoting histone acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Guang-Hua; Chen, Shiming

    2008-01-01

    The homeodomain transcription factor Crx is required for expression of many photoreceptor genes in the mammalian retina. The mechanism by which Crx activates transcription remains to be determined. Using protein–protein interaction assays, Crx was found to interact with three co-activator proteins (complexes): STAGA, Cbp and p300, all of which possess histone acetyl-transferase (HAT) activity. To determine the role of Crx–HAT interactions in target gene chromatin modification and transcriptional activation, quantitative RT–PCR and chromatin immunoprecipitation were performed on Crx target genes, rod and cone opsins, in developing mouse retina. Although cone opsins are transcribed earlier than rhodopsin during development, the transcription of each gene is preceded by the same sequence of events in their promoter and enhancer regions: (i) binding of Crx, followed by (ii) binding of HATs, (iii) the acetylation of histone H3, then (iv) binding of other photoreceptor transcription factors (Nrl and Nr2e3) and RNA polymerase II. In Crx knockout mice (Crx−/−), the association of HATs and AcH3 with target promoter/enhancer regions was significantly decreased, which correlates with aberrant opsin transcription and photoreceptor dysfunction in these mice. Similar changes to the opsin chromatin were seen in Y79 retinoblastoma cells, where opsin genes are barely transcribed. These defects in Y79 cells can be reversed by expressing a recombinant Crx or applying histone deacetylase inhibitors. Altogether, these results suggest that one mechanism for Crx-mediated transcriptional activation is to recruit HATs to photoreceptor gene chromatin for histone acetylation, thereby inducing and maintaining appropriate chromatin configurations for transcription. PMID:17656371

  3. Nucleosome competition reveals processive acetylation by the SAGA HAT module

    PubMed Central

    Ringel, Alison E.; Cieniewicz, Anne M.; Taverna, Sean D.; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    The Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase (SAGA) coactivator complex hyperacetylates histone tails in vivo in a manner that depends upon histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3), a histone mark enriched at promoters of actively transcribed genes. SAGA contains a separable subcomplex known as the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) module that contains the HAT, Gcn5, bound to Sgf29, Ada2, and Ada3. Sgf29 contains a tandem Tudor domain that recognizes H3K4me3-containing peptides and is required for histone hyperacetylation in vivo. However, the mechanism by which H3K4me3 recognition leads to lysine hyperacetylation is unknown, as in vitro studies show no effect of the H3K4me3 modification on histone peptide acetylation by Gcn5. To determine how H3K4me3 binding by Sgf29 leads to histone hyperacetylation by Gcn5, we used differential fluorescent labeling of histones to monitor acetylation of individual subpopulations of methylated and unmodified nucleosomes in a mixture. We find that the SAGA HAT module preferentially acetylates H3K4me3 nucleosomes in a mixture containing excess unmodified nucleosomes and that this effect requires the Tudor domain of Sgf29. The H3K4me3 mark promotes processive, multisite acetylation of histone H3 by Gcn5 that can account for the different acetylation patterns established by SAGA at promoters versus coding regions. Our results establish a model for Sgf29 function at gene promoters and define a mechanism governing crosstalk between histone modifications. PMID:26401015

  4. Characterization and Prediction of Lysine (K)-Acetyl-Transferase Specific Acetylation Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tingting; Du, Yipeng; Wang, Likun; Huang, Lei; Li, Wenlin; Lu, Ming; Zhang, Xuegong; Zhu, Wei-Guo

    2012-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a well-studied post-translational modification on both histone and nonhistone proteins. More than 2000 acetylated proteins and 4000 lysine acetylation sites have been identified by large scale mass spectrometry or traditional experimental methods. Although over 20 lysine (K)-acetyl-transferases (KATs) have been characterized, which KAT is responsible for a given protein or lysine site acetylation is mostly unknown. In this work, we collected KAT-specific acetylation sites manually and analyzed sequence features surrounding the acetylated lysine of substrates from three main KAT families (CBP/p300, GCN5/PCAF, and the MYST family). We found that each of the three KAT families acetylates lysines with different sequence features. Based on these differences, we developed a computer program, Acetylation Set Enrichment Based method to predict which KAT-families are responsible for acetylation of a given protein or lysine site. Finally, we evaluated the efficiency of our method, and experimentally detected four proteins that were predicted to be acetylated by two KAT families when one representative member of the KAT family is over expressed. We conclude that our approach, combined with more traditional experimental methods, may be useful for identifying KAT families responsible for acetylated substrates proteome-wide. PMID:21964354

  5. p300/CBP acetyl transferases interact with and acetylate the nucleotide excision repair factor XPG.

    PubMed

    Tillhon, Micol; Cazzalini, Ornella; Nardo, Tiziana; Necchi, Daniela; Sommatis, Sabrina; Stivala, Lucia A; Scovassi, A Ivana; Prosperi, Ennio

    2012-10-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an important DNA repair mechanism through which cells remove bulky DNA lesions. Following DNA damage, the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) p300 (also referred to as lysine acetyltransferase or KAT) is known to associate with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a master regulator of DNA replication and repair processes. This interaction, which results in HAT inhibition, may be dissociated by the cell cycle inhibitor p21(CDKN1A), thereby restoring p300 activity; however, the role of this protein interplay is still unclear. Here, we report that silencing p300 or its homolog CREB-binding protein (CBP) by RNA interference (RNAi) significantly reduces DNA repair synthesis in human fibroblasts. In addition, we determined whether p300 and CBP may associate with and acetylate specific NER factors such as XPG, the 3'-endonuclease that is involved in the incision/excision step and is known to interact with PCNA. Our results show that p300 and CBP interact with XPG, which has been found to be acetylated in vivo. XPG is acetylated by p300 in vitro, and this reaction is inhibited by PCNA. Knocking down both p300/CBP by RNAi or by chemical inhibition with curcumin greatly reduced XPG acetylation, and a concomitant accumulation of the protein at DNA damage sites was observed. The ability of p21 to bind PCNA was found to regulate the interaction between p300 and XPG, and an abnormal accumulation of XPG at DNA damage sites was also found in p21(-/-) fibroblasts. These results indicate an additional function of p300/CBP in NER through the acetylation of XPG protein in a PCNA-p21 dependent manner.

  6. MOF Acetyl Transferase Regulates Transcription and Respiration in Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Aindrila; Seyfferth, Janine; Lucci, Jacopo; Gilsbach, Ralf; Preissl, Sebastian; Böttinger, Lena; Mårtensson, Christoph U; Panhale, Amol; Stehle, Thomas; Kretz, Oliver; Sahyoun, Abdullah H; Avilov, Sergiy; Eimer, Stefan; Hein, Lutz; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Becker, Thomas; Akhtar, Asifa

    2016-10-20

    A functional crosstalk between epigenetic regulators and metabolic control could provide a mechanism to adapt cellular responses to environmental cues. We report that the well-known nuclear MYST family acetyl transferase MOF and a subset of its non-specific lethal complex partners reside in mitochondria. MOF regulates oxidative phosphorylation by controlling expression of respiratory genes from both nuclear and mtDNA in aerobically respiring cells. MOF binds mtDNA, and this binding is dependent on KANSL3. The mitochondrial pool of MOF, but not a catalytically deficient mutant, rescues respiratory and mtDNA transcriptional defects triggered by the absence of MOF. Mof conditional knockout has catastrophic consequences for tissues with high-energy consumption, triggering hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and cardiac failure in murine hearts; cardiomyocytes show severe mitochondrial degeneration and deregulation of mitochondrial nutrient metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation pathways. Thus, MOF is a dual-transcriptional regulator of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes connecting epigenetics and metabolism.

  7. Dissecting the Molecular Roles of Histone Chaperones in Histone Acetylation by Type B Histone Acetyltransferases (HAT-B).

    PubMed

    Haigney, Allison; Ricketts, M Daniel; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2015-12-18

    The HAT-B enzyme complex is responsible for acetylating newly synthesized histone H4 on lysines K5 and K12. HAT-B is a multisubunit complex composed of the histone acetyltransferase 1 (Hat1) catalytic subunit and the Hat2 (rbap46) histone chaperone. Hat1 is predominantly localized in the nucleus as a member of a trimeric NuB4 complex containing Hat1, Hat2, and a histone H3-H4 specific histone chaperone called Hif1 (NASP). In addition to Hif1 and Hat2, Hat1 interacts with Asf1 (anti-silencing function 1), a histone chaperone that has been reported to be involved in both replication-dependent and -independent chromatin assembly. To elucidate the molecular roles of the Hif1 and Asf1 histone chaperones in HAT-B histone binding and acetyltransferase activity, we have characterized the stoichiometry and binding mode of Hif1 and Asf1 to HAT-B and the effect of this binding on the enzymatic activity of HAT-B. We find that Hif1 and Asf1 bind through different modes and independently to HAT-B, whereby Hif1 binds directly to Hat2, and Asf1 is only capable of interactions with HAT-B through contacts with histones H3-H4. We also demonstrate that HAT-B is significantly more active against an intact H3-H4 heterodimer over a histone H4 peptide, independent of either Hif1 or Asf1 binding. Mutational studies further demonstrate that HAT-B binding to the histone tail regions is not sufficient for this enhanced activity. Based on these data, we propose a model for HAT-B/histone chaperone assembly and acetylation of H3-H4 complexes.

  8. HAT3-mediated acetylation of PCNA precedes PCNA monoubiquitination following exposure to UV radiation in Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Devanand; Saha, Swati

    2015-01-01

    Histone modifications impact various processes. In examining histone acetyltranferase HAT3 of Leishmania donovani, we find elimination of HAT3 causes decreased cell viability due to defects in histone deposition, and aberrant cell cycle progression pattern. HAT3 associates with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), helping load PCNA onto chromatin in proliferating cells. HAT3-nulls show heightened sensitivity to UV radiation. Following UV exposure, PCNA cycles off/on chromatin only in cells expressing HAT3. Inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway prior to UV exposure allows accumulation of chromatin-bound PCNA, and reveals that HAT3-nulls are deficient in PCNA monoubiquitination as well as polyubiquitination. While poor monoubiquitination of PCNA may adversely affect translesion DNA synthesis-based repair processes, polyubiquitination deficiencies may result in continued retention of chromatin-bound PCNA, leading to genomic instability. On suppressing the proteasome pathway we also find that HAT3 mediates PCNA acetylation in response to UV. HAT3-mediated PCNA acetylation may serve as a flag for PCNA ubiquitination, thus aiding DNA repair. While PCNA acetylation has previously been linked to its degradation following UV exposure, this is the first report linking a HAT-mediated PCNA acetylation to PCNA monoubiquitination. These findings add a new dimension to our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating PCNA ubiquitination post-UV exposure in eukaryotes. PMID:25948582

  9. HAT3-mediated acetylation of PCNA precedes PCNA monoubiquitination following exposure to UV radiation in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Devanand; Saha, Swati

    2015-06-23

    Histone modifications impact various processes. In examining histone acetyltranferase HAT3 of Leishmania donovani, we find elimination of HAT3 causes decreased cell viability due to defects in histone deposition, and aberrant cell cycle progression pattern. HAT3 associates with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), helping load PCNA onto chromatin in proliferating cells. HAT3-nulls show heightened sensitivity to UV radiation. Following UV exposure, PCNA cycles off/on chromatin only in cells expressing HAT3. Inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway prior to UV exposure allows accumulation of chromatin-bound PCNA, and reveals that HAT3-nulls are deficient in PCNA monoubiquitination as well as polyubiquitination. While poor monoubiquitination of PCNA may adversely affect translesion DNA synthesis-based repair processes, polyubiquitination deficiencies may result in continued retention of chromatin-bound PCNA, leading to genomic instability. On suppressing the proteasome pathway we also find that HAT3 mediates PCNA acetylation in response to UV. HAT3-mediated PCNA acetylation may serve as a flag for PCNA ubiquitination, thus aiding DNA repair. While PCNA acetylation has previously been linked to its degradation following UV exposure, this is the first report linking a HAT-mediated PCNA acetylation to PCNA monoubiquitination. These findings add a new dimension to our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating PCNA ubiquitination post-UV exposure in eukaryotes.

  10. Hat2p recognizes the histone H3 tail to specify the acetylation of the newly synthesized H3/H4 heterodimer by the Hat1p/Hat2p complex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Li; Liu, Tingting; Chai, Chengliang; Fang, Qianglin; Wu, Han; Agudelo Garcia, Paula A.; Han, Zhifu; Zong, Shuai; Yu, You; Zhang, Xinyue; Parthun, Mark R.; Chai, Jijie; Xu, Rui-Ming; Yang, Maojun

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of histones are significant regulators of replication, transcription, and DNA repair. Particularly, newly synthesized histone H4 in H3/H4 heterodimers becomes acetylated on N-terminal lysine residues prior to its incorporation into chromatin. Previous studies have established that the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complex Hat1p/Hat2p medicates this modification. However, the mechanism of how Hat1p/Hat2p recognizes and facilitates the enzymatic activities on the newly assembled H3/H4 heterodimer remains unknown. Furthermore, Hat2p is a WD40 repeat protein, which is found in many histone modifier complexes. However, how the WD40 repeat proteins facilitate enzymatic activities of histone modification enzymes is unclear. In this study, we first solved the high-resolution crystal structure of a Hat1p/Hat2p/CoA/H4 peptide complex and found that the H4 tail interacts with both Hat1p and Hat2p, by which substrate recruitment is facilitated. We further discovered that H3 N-terminal peptides can bind to the Hat2p WD40 domain and solved the structure of the Hat1p/Hat2p/CoA/H4/H3 peptide complex. Moreover, the interaction with Hat2p requires unmodified Arg2/Lys4 and Lys9 on the H3 tail, suggesting a novel model to specify the activity of Hat1p/Hat2p toward newly synthesized H3/H4 heterodimers. Together, our study demonstrated the substrate recognition mechanism by the Hat1p/Hat2p complex, which is critical for DNA replication and other chromatin remodeling processes. PMID:24835250

  11. Purification and properties of an O-acetyl-transferase from Escherichia coli that can O-acetylate polysialic acid sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Higa, H.; Varki, A.

    1986-05-01

    Certain strains of bacteria synthesize an outer polysialic acid (K1) capsule. Some strains of K1/sup +/ E.coli are also capable of adding O-acetyl-esters to the exocyclic hydroxyl groups of the sialic acid residues. Both the capsule and the O-acetyl modification have been correlated with differences in antigenicity and pathogenicity. The authors have developed an assay for an O-acetyl-transferase in E.coli that transfers O-(/sup 3/H)acetyl groups from (/sup 3/H)acetyl-Coenzyme A to colominic acid (fragments of the polysialic acid capsule). Using this assay, the enzyme was solubilized, and purified approx. 600-fold using a single affinity chromatography step with Procion Red-A Agarose. The enzyme also binds to Coenzyme A Sepharose, and can be eluted with high salt or Coenzyme A. The partially purified enzyme has a pH optimum of 7.0 - 7.5, is unaffected by divalent cations, is inhibited by high salt concentrations, is inhibited by Coenzyme A (50% inhibition at 100 ..mu..M), and shows an apparent Km for colominic acid of 3.7 mM (sialic acid concentration). This enzyme could be involved in the O-acetyl +/- form variation seen in some strains of K1/sup +/ E.coli.

  12. Riboswitch control of induction of aminoglycoside resistance acetyl and adenyl-transferases.

    PubMed

    He, Weizhi; Zhang, Xuhui; Zhang, Jun; Jia, Xu; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Wenxia; Jiang, Hengyi; Chen, Dongrong; Murchie, Alastair I H

    2013-08-01

    The acquisition of antibiotic resistance by human pathogens poses a significant threat to public health. The mechanisms that control the proliferation and expression of antibiotic resistance genes are not yet completely understood. The aminoglycosides are a historically important class of antibiotics that were introduced in the 1940s. Aminoglycoside resistance is conferred most commonly through enzymatic modification of the drug or enzymatic modification of the target rRNA through methylation or through the overexpression of efflux pumps. In our recent paper, we reported that expression of the aminoglycoside resistance genes encoding the aminoglycoside acetyl transferase (AAC) and aminoglycoside adenyl transferase (AAD) enzymes was controlled by an aminoglycoside-sensing riboswitch RNA. This riboswitch is embedded in the leader RNA of the aac/aad genes and is associated with the integron cassette system. The leader RNA can sense and bind specific aminoglycosides such that the binding causes a structural transition in the leader RNA, which leads to the induction of aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance. Specific aminoglycosides induce reporter gene expression mediated by the leader RNA. Aminoglycoside RNA binding was measured directly and, aminoglycoside-induced changes in RNA structure monitored by chemical probing. UV cross-linking and mutational analysis identified potential aminoglycoside binding sites on the RNA.

  13. Role of Carnitine Acetyl Transferase in Regulation of Nitric Oxide Signaling in Pulmonary Arterial Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shruti; Sun, Xutong; Agarwal, Saurabh; Rafikov, Ruslan; Dasarathy, Sridevi; Kumar, Sanjiv; Black, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart defects with increased pulmonary blood flow (PBF) result in pulmonary endothelial dysfunction that is dependent, at least in part, on decreases in nitric oxide (NO) signaling. Utilizing a lamb model with left-to-right shunting of blood and increased PBF that mimics the human disease, we have recently shown that a disruption in carnitine homeostasis, due to a decreased carnitine acetyl transferase (CrAT) activity, correlates with decreased bioavailable NO. Thus, we undertook this study to test the hypothesis that the CrAT enzyme plays a major role in regulating NO signaling through its effect on mitochondrial function. We utilized the siRNA gene knockdown approach to mimic the effect of decreased CrAT activity in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAEC). Our data indicate that silencing the CrAT gene disrupted cellular carnitine homeostasis, reduced the expression of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase-and resulted in an increase in oxidative stress within the mitochondrion. CrAT gene silencing also disrupted mitochondrial bioenergetics resulting in reduced ATP generation and decreased NO signaling secondary to a reduction in eNOS/Hsp90 interactions. Thus, this study links the disruption of carnitine homeostasis to the loss of NO signaling observed in children with CHD. Preserving carnitine homeostasis may have important clinical implications that warrant further investigation. PMID:23344032

  14. Histone acetyl transferase 1 is essential for mammalian development, genome stability, and the processing of newly synthesized histones H3 and H4.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Prabakaran; Ge, Zhongqi; Sirbu, Bianca; Doughty, Cheryl; Agudelo Garcia, Paula A; Schlederer, Michaela; Annunziato, Anthony T; Cortez, David; Kenner, Lukas; Parthun, Mark R

    2013-06-01

    Histone acetyltransferase 1 is an evolutionarily conserved type B histone acetyltransferase that is thought to be responsible for the diacetylation of newly synthesized histone H4 on lysines 5 and 12 during chromatin assembly. To understand the function of this enzyme in a complex organism, we have constructed a conditional mouse knockout model of Hat1. Murine Hat1 is essential for viability, as homozygous deletion of Hat1 results in neonatal lethality. The lungs of embryos and pups genetically deficient in Hat1 were much less mature upon histological evaluation. The neonatal lethality is due to severe defects in lung development that result in less aeration and respiratory distress. Many of the Hat1(-/-) neonates also display significant craniofacial defects with abnormalities in the bones of the skull and jaw. Hat1(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) are defective in cell proliferation and are sensitive to DNA damaging agents. In addition, the Hat1(-/-) MEFs display a marked increase in genome instability. Analysis of histone dynamics at sites of replication-coupled chromatin assembly demonstrates that Hat1 is not only responsible for the acetylation of newly synthesized histone H4 but is also required to maintain the acetylation of histone H3 on lysines 9, 18, and 27 during replication-coupled chromatin assembly.

  15. Histone Acetylation Inhibitors Promote Axon Growth in Adult DRG neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shen; Nazif, Kutaiba; Smith, Alexander; Baas, Peter W; Smith, George M

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsic mechanisms that guide damaged axons to regenerate following spinal cord injury remain poorly understood. Manipulation of posttranslational modifications of key proteins in mature neurons could re-invigorate growth machinery after injury. One such modification is acetylation, a reversible process controlled by two enzyme families acting in opposition, the Histone Deacetylases (HDACs) and the Histone Acetyl Transferases (HATs). While acetylated histones in the nucleus is associated with upregulation of growth promoting genes, de-acetylated tubulin in the axoplasm is associated with more labile microtubules, conducive to axon growth. In this study we investigated the effects of HAT inhibitors and HDAC inhibitors on cultured adult dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. We found that inhibition of HATs, using Anacardic Acid or CPTH2, improved axon outgrowth, while inhibition of HDACs using TSA or Tubacin, inhibited axon growth. Furthermore, Anacardic Acid increased the number of axons able to cross an inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) border. Histone acetylation, but not tubulin acetylation levels, was affected by HAT inhibitors, whereas tubulin acetylation levels were increased in the presence of HDAC inhibitor Tubacin. Although microtubule stabilizing drug taxol did not have an effect on the lengths of DRG axons, nocodazole decreased axon lengths. While the mechanistic basis will require future studies, our data show that inhibitors of HAT can augment axon growth in adult DRG neurons, with the potential of aiding axon growth over inhibitory substrates produced by the glial scar. PMID:25702820

  16. Molecular cloning and heterologous expression of a 10-deacetylbaccatin III-10-O-acetyl transferase cDNA from Taxus x media.

    PubMed

    Guo, Binhui; Kai, Guoyin; Gong, Yifu; Jin, Hongbin; Wang, Yechun; Miao, Zhiqi; Sun, Xiaofen; Tang, Kexuan

    2007-06-01

    A full-length cDNA encoding 10-deacetylbaccatin III-10-O-acetyl transferase (designated as TmDBAT), which catalyzes the acetylation of the C-10 hydroxyl group of the advanced metabolite 10-deacetylbaccatin III (10-DAB) to yield baccatin III, the immediate diterpenoid precursor of Taxol, was isolated from Taxus x media. Heterologous expression of TmDBAT in E. coli demonstrated that TmDBAT was a functional gene. Tissue expression pattern analysis revealed that TmDBAT expressed strongly in leaves, weak in stems and no expression could be detected in fruits, implying that TmDBAT was tissue-specific. Expression profiling analysis of TmDBAT under different elicitor treatments including silver nitrate, ammonium ceric sulphate and methyl jasmonate indicated that TmDBAT was an elicitor-responsive gene. Southern blot analysis suggested that TmDBAT belonged to a small multigene family.

  17. Arylamine N-acetyl Transferase (NAT) in the blue secretion of Telescopium telescopium: xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme as a biomarker for detection of environmental pollution.

    PubMed

    Gorain, Bapi; Chakraborty, Sumon; Pal, Murari Mohan; Sarkar, Ratul; Samanta, Samir Kumar; Karmakar, Sanmoy; Sen, Tuhinadri

    2014-01-01

    Telescopium telescopium, a marine mollusc collected from Sundarban mangrove, belongs to the largest mollusca phylum in the world and exudes a blue secretion when stimulated mechanically. The blue secretion was found to metabolize (preferentially) para-amino benzoic acid, a substrate for N-acetyl transferase (NAT), thereby indicating acetyl transferase like activity of the secretion. Attempts were also made to characterise bioactive fraction of the blue secretion and to further use this as a biomarker for monitoring of marine pollution. NAT like enzyme from marine mollusc is a potential candidate for detoxification of different harmful chemicals. A partially purified extract of blue secretion was obtained by fractional precipitation with (NH4)2SO4. From different fractions obtained by precipitation, the 0-30% fraction (30S) displayed NAT like activity (using para amino benzoic acid as a substrate with para nitrophenyl phosphate or acetyl coenzyme A as acetyl group donors). Maximum NAT like enzyme activity was attained at 25°C and at a pH of 6. The enzyme activity was found to be inhibited by 5 mM phenyl methyl sulfonyl fluoride. The divalent metal ions reduced NAT like activity of 30S. Moreover, Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) (at concentration of 1 mM) completely inhibited NAT activity. The thermal stability and bench-top stability studies were performed and it was found that the enzyme was stable at room temperature for more than 24 hours. Results from the present study further indicate that heavy metal content in blue secretion gradually decreased from pre-monsoon to post-monsoon season, which also corresponded to the change in NAT like activity. Therefore, this article stresses the importance of biomarker research for monitoring pollution.

  18. Crystal Structure of TDP-Fucosamine Acetyl Transferase (WECD) from Escherichia Coli, an Enzyme Required for Enterobacterial Common Antigen Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hung,M.; Rangarajan, E.; Munger, C.; Nadeau, G.; Sulea, T.; Matte, A.

    2006-01-01

    Enterobacterial common antigen (ECA) is a polysaccharide found on the outer membrane of virtually all gram-negative enteric bacteria and consists of three sugars, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetyl-D-mannosaminuronic acid, and 4-acetamido-4,6-dideoxy-D-galactose, organized into trisaccharide repeating units having the sequence {yields}(3)-{alpha}-D-Fuc4NAc-(1{yields}4)-{beta}-D-ManNAcA-(1{yields}4)-{alpha}-D-GlcNAc-(1{yields}). While the precise function of ECA is unknown, it has been linked to the resistance of Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 to organic acids and the resistance of Salmonella enterica to bile salts. The final step in the synthesis of 4-acetamido-4,6-dideoxy-D-galactose, the acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA)-dependent acetylation of the 4-amino group, is carried out by TDP-fucosamine acetyltransferase (WecD). We have determined the crystal structure of WecD in apo form at a 1.95-Angstroms resolution and bound to acetyl-CoA at a 1.66-Angstroms resolution. WecD is a dimeric enzyme, with each monomer adopting the GNAT N-acetyltransferase fold, common to a number of enzymes involved in acetylation of histones, aminoglycoside antibiotics, serotonin, and sugars. The crystal structure of WecD, however, represents the first structure of a GNAT family member that acts on nucleotide sugars. Based on this cocrystal structure, we have used flexible docking to generate a WecD-bound model of the acetyl-CoA-TDP-fucosamine tetrahedral intermediate, representing the structure during acetyl transfer. Our structural data show that WecD does not possess a residue that directly functions as a catalytic base, although Tyr208 is well positioned to function as a general acid by protonating the thiolate anion of coenzyme A.

  19. ATP Synthesis-coupled and -uncoupled Acetate Production from Acetyl-CoA by Mitochondrial Acetate:Succinate CoA-transferase and Acetyl-CoA Thioesterase in Trypanosoma*

    PubMed Central

    Millerioux, Yoann; Morand, Pauline; Biran, Marc; Mazet, Muriel; Moreau, Patrick; Wargnies, Marion; Ebikeme, Charles; Deramchia, Kamel; Gales, Lara; Portais, Jean-Charles; Boshart, Michael; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Bringaud, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Insect stage trypanosomes use an “acetate shuttle” to transfer mitochondrial acetyl-CoA to the cytosol for the essential fatty acid biosynthesis. The mitochondrial acetate sources are acetate:succinate CoA-transferase (ASCT) and an unknown enzymatic activity. We have identified a gene encoding acetyl-CoA thioesterase (ACH) activity, which is shown to be the second acetate source. First, RNAi-mediated repression of ASCT in the ACH null background abolishes acetate production from glucose, as opposed to both single ASCT and ACH mutants. Second, incorporation of radiolabeled glucose into fatty acids is also abolished in this ACH/ASCT double mutant. ASCT is involved in ATP production, whereas ACH is not, because the ASCT null mutant is ∼1000 times more sensitive to oligomycin, a specific inhibitor of the mitochondrial F0/F1-ATP synthase, than wild-type cells or the ACH null mutant. This was confirmed by RNAi repression of the F0/F1-ATP synthase F1β subunit, which is lethal when performed in the ASCT null background but not in the wild-type cells or the ACH null background. We concluded that acetate is produced from both ASCT and ACH; however, only ASCT is responsible, together with the F0/F1-ATP synthase, for ATP production in the mitochondrion. PMID:22474284

  20. Acetylation of retinal histones in diabetes increases inflammatory proteins: effects of minocycline and manipulation of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC).

    PubMed

    Kadiyala, Chandra Sekhar Rao; Zheng, Ling; Du, Yunpeng; Yohannes, Elizabeth; Kao, Hung-Ying; Miyagi, Masaru; Kern, Timothy S

    2012-07-27

    Histone acetylation was significantly increased in retinas from diabetic rats, and this acetylation was inhibited in diabetics treated with minocycline, a drug known to inhibit early diabetic retinopathy in animals. Histone acetylation and expression of inflammatory proteins that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy were increased likewise in cultured retinal Müller glia grown in a diabetes-like concentration of glucose. Both the acetylation and induction of the inflammatory proteins in elevated glucose levels were significantly inhibited by inhibitors of histone acetyltransferase (garcinol and antisense against the histone acetylase, p300) or activators of histone deacetylase (theophylline and resveratrol) and were increased by the histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberolylanilide hydroxamic acid. We conclude that hyperglycemia causes acetylation of retinal histones (and probably other proteins) and that the acetylation contributes to the hyperglycemia-induced up-regulation of proinflammatory proteins and thereby to the development of diabetic retinopathy.

  1. N-acetyl-cysteine prevents age-related hearing loss and the progressive loss of inner hair cells in γ-glutamyl transferase 1 deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dalian; Jiang, Haiyan; Chen, Guang-Di; Longo-Guess, Chantal; Muthaiah, Vijaya Prakash Krishnan; Tian, Cong; Sheppard, Adam; Salvi, Richard; Johnson, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic factors combined with oxidative stress are major determinants of age-related hearing loss (ARHL), one of the most prevalent disorders of the elderly. Dwarf grey mice, Ggt1dwg/dwg, are homozygous for a loss of function mutation of the γ-glutamyl transferase 1 gene, which encodes an important antioxidant enzyme critical for the resynthesis of glutathione (GSH). Since GSH reduces oxidative damage, we hypothesized that Ggt1dwg/dwg mice would be susceptible to ARHL. Surprisingly, otoacoustic emissions and cochlear microphonic potentials, which reflect cochlear outer hair cell (OHC) function, were largely unaffected in mutant mice, whereas auditory brainstem responses and the compound action potential were grossly abnormal. These functional deficits were associated with an unusual and selective loss of inner hair cells (IHC), but retention of OHC and auditory nerve fibers. Remarkably, hearing deficits and IHC loss were completely prevented by N-acetyl-L-cysteine, which induces de novo synthesis of GSH; however, hearing deficits and IHC loss reappeared when treatment was discontinued. Ggt1dwg/dwgmice represent an important new model for investigating ARHL, therapeutic interventions, and understanding the perceptual and electrophysiological consequences of sensory deprivation caused by the loss of sensory input exclusively from IHC. PMID:26977590

  2. N-acetyl-cysteine prevents age-related hearing loss and the progressive loss of inner hair cells in γ-glutamyl transferase 1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dalian; Jiang, Haiyan; Chen, Guang-Di; Longo-Guess, Chantal; Muthaiah, Vijaya Prakash Krishnan; Tian, Cong; Sheppard, Adam; Salvi, Richard; Johnson, Kenneth R

    2016-04-01

    Genetic factors combined with oxidative stress are major determinants of age-related hearing loss (ARHL), one of the most prevalent disorders of the elderly. Dwarf grey mice, Ggt1dwg/dwg, are homozygous for a loss of function mutation of the g-glutamyl transferase 1 gene, which encodes an important antioxidant enzyme critical for the resynthesis of glutathione (GSH). Since GSH reduces oxidative damage, we hypothesized that Ggt1dwg/dwg mice would be susceptible to ARHL. Surprisingly, otoacoustic emissions and cochlear microphonic potentials, which reflect cochlear outer hair cell (OHC) function, were largely unaffected in mutant mice, whereas auditory brainstem responses and the compound action potential were grossly abnormal. These functional deficits were associated with an unusual and selective loss of inner hair cells (IHC), but retention of OHC and auditory nerve fibers. Remarkably, hearing deficits and IHC loss were completely prevented by N-acetyl-L-cysteine, which induces de novo synthesis of GSH; however, hearing deficits and IHC loss reappeared when treatment was discontinued. Ggt1dwg/dwg mice represent an important new model for investigating ARHL, therapeutic interventions, and understanding the perceptual and electrophysiological consequences of sensory deprivation caused by the loss of sensory input exclusively from IHC.

  3. Helper Hats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Special clothing is worn by "community helpers" such as police officers, nurses, firefighters, cafeteria workers, dentists, and waste management workers as they do their jobs. The special clothing allows workers to be safe. Therefore, exploring how hats help community workers do their jobs can be a way to introduce the idea of how the shape or…

  4. Hats Off.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Navy, Washington, DC.

    The materials in this lesson plan introduces students to the U.S. Navy by exploring the hats officers and enlisted personnel wear to work. The lesson is appropriate for students in grades 1-3 and was designed in accordance with local and national social studies standards. The lesson plan cites educational objectives and lists materials provided.…

  5. `Up-regulation of histone acetylation induced by social defeat mediates the conditioned rewarding effects of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Montagud-Romero, S; Montesinos, J; Pascual, M; Aguilar, M A; Roger-Sanchez, C; Guerri, C; Miñarro, J; Rodríguez-Arias, M

    2016-10-03

    Social defeat (SD) induces a long-lasting increase in the rewarding effects of psychostimulants measured using the self-administration and conditioned place procedures (CPP). However, little is known about the epigenetic changes induced by social stress and about their role in the increased response to the rewarding effects of psychostimulants. Considering that histone acetylation regulates transcriptional activity and contributes to drug-induced behavioral changes, we addressed the hypothesis that SD induces transcriptional changes by histone modifications associated with the acquisition of place conditioning. After a fourth defeat, H3(K9) acetylation was decreased in the hippocampus, while there was an increase of HAT and a decrease of HDAC levels in the cortex. Three weeks after the last defeat, mice displayed an increase in histone H4(K12) acetylation and an upregulation of histone acetyl transferase (HAT) activity in the hippocampus. In addition, H3(K4)me3, which is closely associated with transcriptional initiation, was also augmented in the hippocampus three weeks after the last defeat. Inhibition of HAT by curcumin (100mg/kg) before each SD blocked the increase in the conditioned reinforcing effects of 1mg/kg of cocaine, while inhibition of HDAC by valproic acid (500mg/kg) before social stress potentiated cocaine-induced CPP. Preference was reinstated when animals received a priming dose of 0.5mg/kg of cocaine, an effect that was absent in untreated defeated mice. These results suggest that the experience of SD induces chromatin remodeling, alters histone acetylation and methylation, and modifies the effects of cocaine on place conditioning. They also point to epigenetic mechanisms as potential avenues leading to new treatments for the long-term effects of social stress on drug addiction.

  6. Effective Quenchers Are Required to Eliminate the Interference of Substrate: Cofactor Binding in the HAT Scintillation Proximity Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Liza; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) mediate the transfer of an acetyl group from the cofactor, acetyl-CoA, to the side chain amino group of specific lysines in diverse protein substrates, most notably nuclear histones. The deregulation of HATs is connected to a number of disease states. Reliable and rapid biochemical assays for HATs are critical for understanding biological functions of protein acetylation, as well as for screening small-molecule inhibitors of HAT enzymes. In this report, we present a scintillation proximity assay (SPA) for the measurement of HAT enzymatic activities. The acetyl donor was [3H]Ac-CoA, and a biotin-modified histone peptide served as the HAT substrate. After the HAT reaction, streptavidin-coated beads were added to induce proximity of acetylated substrate to the scintillant molecules. However, we observed strong nonspecific binding between the cofactor and the histone peptide substrates, which adversely complicated the SPA performance. To prevent this problem, a set of chemical agents were evaluated to eliminate the cofactor–substrate interaction, thus providing reliable SPA readings. With optimization, the SPA showed consistent and robust performance for HAT activity measurement and HAT inhibitor evaluation. Overall, this mix-and-measure assay does not require any washing procedure, can be utilized in the microplate format, and is well suited for high-throughput screening of HAT chemical modulators. PMID:26065557

  7. Comparison of protein acetyltransferase action of CRTAase with the prototypes of HAT.

    PubMed

    Ponnan, Prija; Kumar, Ajit; Singh, Prabhjot; Gupta, Prachi; Joshi, Rini; Gaspari, Marco; Saso, Luciano; Prasad, Ashok K; Rastogi, Ramesh C; Parmar, Virinder S; Raj, Hanumantharao G

    2014-01-01

    Our laboratory is credited for the discovery of enzymatic acetylation of protein, a phenomenon unknown till we identified an enzyme termed acetoxy drug: protein transacetylase (TAase), catalyzing the transfer of acetyl group from polyphenolic acetates to receptor proteins (RP). Later, TAase was identified as calreticulin (CR), an endoplasmic reticulum luminal protein. CR was termed calreticulin transacetylase (CRTAase). Our persistent study revealed that CR like other families of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) such as p300, Rtt109, PCAF, and ESA1, undergoes autoacetylation. The autoacetylated CR was characterized as a stable intermediate in CRTAase catalyzed protein acetylation, and similar was the case with ESA1. The autoacetylation of CR like that of HATs was found to enhance protein-protein interaction. CR like HAT-1, CBP, and p300 mediated the acylation of RP utilizing acetyl CoA and propionyl CoA as the substrates. The similarities between CRTAase and HATs in mediating protein acylation are highlighted in this review.

  8. Acetylation of Mammalian ADA3 Is Required for Its Functional Roles in Histone Acetylation and Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mohibi, Shakur; Srivastava, Shashank; Bele, Aditya; Mirza, Sameer; Band, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Alteration/deficiency in activation 3 (ADA3) is an essential component of specific histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes. We have previously shown that ADA3 is required for establishing global histone acetylation patterns and for normal cell cycle progression (S. Mohibi et al., J Biol Chem 287:29442–29456, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M112.378901). Here, we report that these functional roles of ADA3 require its acetylation. We show that ADA3 acetylation, which is dynamically regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, reflects a balance of coordinated actions of its associated HATs, GCN5, PCAF, and p300, and a new partner that we define, the deacetylase SIRT1. We use mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis to identify major sites of ADA3 acetylated by GCN5 and p300. Acetylation-defective mutants are capable of interacting with HATs and other components of HAT complexes but are deficient in their ability to restore ADA3-dependent global or locus-specific histone acetylation marks and cell proliferation in Ada3-deleted murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Given the key importance of ADA3-containing HAT complexes in the regulation of various biological processes, including the cell cycle, our study presents a novel mechanism to regulate the function of these complexes through dynamic ADA3 acetylation. PMID:27402865

  9. Acetylation of Mammalian ADA3 Is Required for Its Functional Roles in Histone Acetylation and Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mohibi, Shakur; Srivastava, Shashank; Bele, Aditya; Mirza, Sameer; Band, Hamid; Band, Vimla

    2016-10-01

    Alteration/deficiency in activation 3 (ADA3) is an essential component of specific histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes. We have previously shown that ADA3 is required for establishing global histone acetylation patterns and for normal cell cycle progression (S. Mohibi et al., J Biol Chem 287:29442-29456, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M112.378901). Here, we report that these functional roles of ADA3 require its acetylation. We show that ADA3 acetylation, which is dynamically regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, reflects a balance of coordinated actions of its associated HATs, GCN5, PCAF, and p300, and a new partner that we define, the deacetylase SIRT1. We use mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis to identify major sites of ADA3 acetylated by GCN5 and p300. Acetylation-defective mutants are capable of interacting with HATs and other components of HAT complexes but are deficient in their ability to restore ADA3-dependent global or locus-specific histone acetylation marks and cell proliferation in Ada3-deleted murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Given the key importance of ADA3-containing HAT complexes in the regulation of various biological processes, including the cell cycle, our study presents a novel mechanism to regulate the function of these complexes through dynamic ADA3 acetylation.

  10. Program Transformation in HATS

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, V.L.

    1999-02-24

    HATS is a general purpose syntax derivation tree based transformation system in which transformation sequences are described in special purpose language. A powerful feature of this language is that unification is an explicit operation. By making unification explicit, an elegant framework arises in which to express complex application conditions which in turn enables refined control strategies to be realized. This paper gives an overview of HATS, focusing especially on the framework provided by the transformation language and its potential with respect to control and general purpose transformation.

  11. Acetylation Reader Proteins: Linking Acetylation Signaling to Genome Maintenance and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gong, Fade; Chiu, Li-Ya; Miller, Kyle M

    2016-09-01

    Chromatin-based DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are fundamental for preventing genome and epigenome instability, which are prevalent in cancer. Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the addition and removal of acetyl groups on lysine residues, a post-translational modification important for the DDR. Acetylation can alter chromatin structure as well as function by providing binding signals for reader proteins containing acetyl-lysine recognition domains, including the bromodomain (BRD). Acetylation dynamics occur upon DNA damage in part to regulate chromatin and BRD protein interactions that mediate key DDR activities. In cancer, DDR and acetylation pathways are often mutated or abnormally expressed. DNA damaging agents and drugs targeting epigenetic regulators, including HATs, HDACs, and BRD proteins, are used or are being developed to treat cancer. Here, we discuss how histone acetylation pathways, with a focus on acetylation reader proteins, promote genome stability and the DDR. We analyze how acetylation signaling impacts the DDR in the context of cancer and its treatments. Understanding the relationship between epigenetic regulators, the DDR, and chromatin is integral for obtaining a mechanistic understanding of genome and epigenome maintenance pathways, information that can be leveraged for targeting acetylation signaling, and/or the DDR to treat diseases, including cancer.

  12. Acetylation Reader Proteins: Linking Acetylation Signaling to Genome Maintenance and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kyle M.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin-based DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are fundamental for preventing genome and epigenome instability, which are prevalent in cancer. Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the addition and removal of acetyl groups on lysine residues, a post-translational modification important for the DDR. Acetylation can alter chromatin structure as well as function by providing binding signals for reader proteins containing acetyl-lysine recognition domains, including the bromodomain (BRD). Acetylation dynamics occur upon DNA damage in part to regulate chromatin and BRD protein interactions that mediate key DDR activities. In cancer, DDR and acetylation pathways are often mutated or abnormally expressed. DNA damaging agents and drugs targeting epigenetic regulators, including HATs, HDACs, and BRD proteins, are used or are being developed to treat cancer. Here, we discuss how histone acetylation pathways, with a focus on acetylation reader proteins, promote genome stability and the DDR. We analyze how acetylation signaling impacts the DDR in the context of cancer and its treatments. Understanding the relationship between epigenetic regulators, the DDR, and chromatin is integral for obtaining a mechanistic understanding of genome and epigenome maintenance pathways, information that can be leveraged for targeting acetylation signaling, and/or the DDR to treat diseases, including cancer. PMID:27631103

  13. Glutathione Transferases

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, David P.; Edwards, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The 55 Arabidopsis glutathione transferases (GSTs) are, with one microsomal exception, a monophyletic group of soluble enzymes that can be divided into phi, tau, theta, zeta, lambda, dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) and TCHQD classes. The populous phi and tau classes are often highly stress inducible and regularly crop up in proteomic and transcriptomic studies. Despite much study on their xenobiotic-detoxifying activities their natural roles are unclear, although roles in defence-related secondary metabolism are likely. The smaller DHAR and lambda classes are likely glutathione-dependent reductases, the zeta class functions in tyrosine catabolism and the theta class has a putative role in detoxifying oxidised lipids. This review describes the evidence for the functional roles of GSTs and the potential for these enzymes to perform diverse functions that in many cases are not “glutathione transferase” activities. As well as biochemical data, expression data from proteomic and transcriptomic studies are included, along with subcellular localisation experiments and the results of functional genomic studies. PMID:22303257

  14. Tip60 HAT Action Mediates Environmental Enrichment Induced Cognitive Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Songjun; Panikker, Priyalakshmi; Iqbal, Sahira; Elefant, Felice

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) conditions have beneficial effects for reinstating cognitive ability in neuropathological disorders like Alzheimer’s disease (AD). While EE benefits involve epigenetic gene control mechanisms that comprise histone acetylation, the histone acetyltransferases (HATs) involved remain largely unknown. Here, we examine a role for Tip60 HAT action in mediating activity- dependent beneficial neuroadaptations to EE using the Drosophila CNS mushroom body (MB) as a well-characterized cognition model. We show that flies raised under EE conditions display enhanced MB axonal outgrowth, synaptic marker protein production, histone acetylation induction and transcriptional activation of cognition linked genes when compared to their genotypically identical siblings raised under isolated conditions. Further, these beneficial changes are impaired in both Tip60 HAT mutant flies and APP neurodegenerative flies. While EE conditions provide some beneficial neuroadaptive changes in the APP neurodegenerative fly MB, such positive changes are significantly enhanced by increasing MB Tip60 HAT levels. Our results implicate Tip60 as a critical mediator of EE-induced benefits, and provide broad insights into synergistic behavioral and epigenetic based therapeutic approaches for treatment of cognitive disorder. PMID:27454757

  15. Aerobic production of isoamyl acetate by overexpression of the yeast alcohol acetyl-transferases AFT1 and AFT2 in Escherichia coli and using low-cost fermentation ingredients.

    PubMed

    Singh, R; Vadlani, P V; Harrison, M L; Bennett, G N; San, K-Y

    2008-06-01

    Isoamyl acetate, produced via fermentation, is a natural flavor chemical with applications in the food industry. Two alcohol acetyltransferases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ATF1 and ATF2) can catalyze the esterification of isoamyl alcohol with acetyl coenzyme A. The respective genes were cloned and expressed in an appropriate ack-pta(-) strain of Escherichia coli. The engineered strains produce isoamyl acetate when isoamyl alcohol is added to the culture medium. Aerobic shake flask experiments examined isoamyl acetate production over various growth times, temperatures, and initial optical densities. The strain carrying the pBAD-ATF1 plasmid exhibited a high molar ester yield from glucose (1.13) after 48 h of aerobic growth at 25 degrees C. Low-cost media components, such as fusel oil, sorghum glucose and corn steep liquor, were found to give a high yield of isoamyl acetate. High-cell-density gave an increased isoamyl acetate yield of 0.18 g/g of glucose consumed.

  16. Acetyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 36 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  17. Nonhistone protein acetylation as cancer therapy targets

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brahma N; Zhang, Guanghua; Hwa, Yi L; Li, Jinping; Dowdy, Sean C; Jiang, Shi-Wen

    2012-01-01

    Acetylation and deacetylation are counteracting, post-translational modifications that affect a large number of histone and nonhistone proteins. The significance of histone acetylation in the modification of chromatin structure and dynamics, and thereby gene transcription regulation, has been well recognized. A steadily growing number of nonhistone proteins have been identified as acetylation targets and reversible lysine acetylation in these proteins plays an important role(s) in the regulation of mRNA stability, protein localization and degradation, and protein–protein and protein–DNA interactions. The recruitment of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) to the transcriptional machinery is a key element in the dynamic regulation of genes controlling cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Many nonhistone proteins targeted by acetylation are the products of oncogenes or tumor-suppressor genes and are directly involved in tumorigenesis, tumor progression and metastasis. Aberrant activity of HDACs has been documented in several types of cancers and HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) have been employed for therapeutic purposes. Here we review the published literature in this field and provide updated information on the regulation and function of nonhistone protein acetylation. While concentrating on the molecular mechanism and pathways involved in the addition and removal of the acetyl moiety, therapeutic modalities of HDACi are also discussed. PMID:20553216

  18. Enzymatic Glycosylation by Transferases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blixt, Ola; Razi, Nahid

    Glycosyltransferases are important biological catalysts in cellular systems generating complex cell surface glycans involved in adhesion and signaling processes. Recent advances in glycoscience have increased the demands to access significant amount of glycans representing the glycome. Glycosyltransferases are now playing a key role for in vitro synthesis of oligosaccharides and the bacterial genome are increasingly utilized for cloning and over expression of active transferases in glycosylation reactions. This chapter highlights the recent progress towards preparative synthesis of oligosaccharides representing terminal sequences of glycoproteins and glycolipids using recombinant transferases. Transferases are also being explored in the context of solid-phase synthesis, immobilized on resins and over expression in vivo by engineered bacteria.

  19. Antemortem stress regulates protein acetylation and glycolysis in postmortem muscle.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongwen; Li, Xin; Wang, Zhenyu; Shen, Qingwu W; Zhang, Dequan

    2016-07-01

    Although exhaustive research has established that preslaughter stress is a major factor contributing to pale, soft, exudative (PSE) meat, questions remain regarding the biochemistry of postmortem glycolysis. In this study, the influence of preslaughter stress on protein acetylation in relationship to glycolysis was studied. The data show that antemortem swimming significantly enhanced glycolysis and the total acetylated proteins in postmortem longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle of mice. Inhibition of protein acetylation by histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitors eliminated stress induced increase in glycolysis. Inversely, antemortem injection of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, trichostatin A (TSA) and nicotinamide (NAM), further increased protein acetylation early postmortem and the glycolysis. These data provide new insight into the biochemistry of postmortem glycolysis by showing that protein acetylation regulates glycolysis, which may participate in the regulation of preslaughter stress on glycolysis in postmortem muscle.

  20. 30 CFR 56.15002 - Hard hats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hard hats. 56.15002 Section 56.15002 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15002 Hard hats. All persons shall wear suitable hard hats when in or around a mine or plant where falling...

  1. 30 CFR 57.15002 - Hard hats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hard hats. 57.15002 Section 57.15002 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Underground § 57.15002 Hard hats. All persons shall wear suitable hard hats when in or around a mine or...

  2. Epigenetic Control of Learning and Memory in Drosophila by Tip60 HAT Action

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Songjun; Wilf, Rona; Menon, Trisha; Panikker, Priyalakshmi; Sarthi, Jessica; Elefant, Felice

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of epigenetic gene control mechanisms in the brain causes significant cognitive impairment that is a debilitating hallmark of most neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Histone acetylation is one of the best characterized of these epigenetic mechanisms that is critical for regulating learning- and memory- associated gene expression profiles, yet the specific histone acetyltransferases (HATs) that mediate these effects have yet to be fully characterized. Here, we investigate an epigenetic role for the HAT Tip60 in learning and memory formation using the Drosophila CNS mushroom body (MB) as a well-characterized cognition model. We show that Tip60 is endogenously expressed in the Kenyon cells, the intrinsic neurons of the MB, and in the MB axonal lobes. Targeted loss of Tip60 HAT activity in the MB causes thinner and shorter axonal lobes while increasing Tip60 HAT levels cause no morphological defects. Functional consequences of both loss and gain of Tip60 HAT levels in the MB are evidenced by defects in immediate-recall memory. Our ChIP-Seq analysis reveals that Tip60 target genes are enriched for functions in cognitive processes, and, accordingly, key genes representing these pathways are misregulated in the Tip60 HAT mutant fly brain. Remarkably, we find that both learning and immediate-recall memory deficits that occur under AD-associated, amyloid precursor protein (APP)-induced neurodegenerative conditions can be effectively rescued by increasing Tip60 HAT levels specifically in the MB. Together, our findings uncover an epigenetic transcriptional regulatory role for Tip60 in cognitive function and highlight the potential of HAT activators as a therapeutic option for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25326235

  3. Toll-Like receptor-3 mediates HIV-1 transactivation via NFκB and JNK pathways and histone acetylation, but prolonged activation suppresses Tat and HIV-1 replication

    PubMed Central

    Bhargavan, Biju; Woollard, Shawna M.; Kanmogne, Georgette D.

    2016-01-01

    TLR3 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several viral infections, including SIV- and HIV-1-induced inflammation and AIDS. However the molecular mechanisms of these TLR3-mediated effects are not known, and it is not known whether HIV interacts with cellular TLR3 to affect disease process. Here we investigate the effects of TLR3 ligands on HIV-1 transactivation using both primary human macrophages and cells containing integrated copies of the HIV-1 promoter. We demonstrate that TLR3 activation induced upregulation of transcription factors such as c-Jun, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (CEBPA), signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-1, STAT-2, RELB, and nuclear factor kappa-B1 (NFκB1), most of which are known to regulate the HIV promoter activity. We also demonstrate that TLR3 activation increased HIV-1 transactivation via the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and NFκB pathways. This was associated with epigenetics modifications, including decreased histone deacetylase activity, increased histone acetyl transferase (HAT) activity, and increased acetylation of histones H3 and H4 at lysine residues in the nucleosome-0 and nucleosome-1 of the HIV-1 promoter. However, prolonged TLR3 activation decreased HIV-1 transactivation, decreased HAT activity and Tat transcription, and suppressed viral replication. Overall, data suggests TLR3 can acts as viral sensor to mediate viral transactivation, cellular signaling, innate immune response, and inflammation in HIV-infected humans. Our study provides novel insights into the molecular basis for these TLR3-mediated effects. PMID:26569339

  4. Role of Jade-1 in the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) HBO1 complex.

    PubMed

    Foy, Rebecca L; Song, Ihn Young; Chitalia, Vipul C; Cohen, Herbert T; Saksouk, Nehme; Cayrou, Christelle; Vaziri, Cyrus; Côté, Jacques; Panchenko, Maria V

    2008-10-24

    Regulation of global chromatin acetylation is important for chromatin remodeling. A small family of Jade proteins includes Jade-1L, Jade-2, and Jade-3, each bearing two mid-molecule tandem plant homology domain (PHD) zinc fingers. We previously demonstrated that the short isoform of Jade-1L protein, Jade-1, is associated with endogenous histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity. It has been found that Jade-1L/2/3 proteins co-purify with a novel HAT complex, consisting of HBO1, ING4/5, and Eaf6. We investigated a role for Jade-1/1L in the HBO1 complex. When overexpressed individually, neither Jade-1/1L nor HBO1 affected histone acetylation. However, co-expression of Jade-1/1L and HBO1 increased acetylation of the bulk of endogenous histone H4 in epithelial cells in a synergistic manner, suggesting that Jade1/1L positively regulates HBO1 HAT activity. Conversely, small interfering RNA-mediated depletion of endogenous Jade resulted in reduced levels of H4 acetylation. Moreover, HBO1-mediated H4 acetylation activity was enhanced severalfold by the presence of Jade-1/1L in vitro. The removal of PHD fingers affected neither binding nor mutual Jade-1-HBO1 stabilization but completely abrogated the synergistic Jade-1/1L- and HBO1-mediated histone H4 acetylation in live cells and in vitro with reconstituted oligonucleosome substrates. Therefore, PHDs are necessary for Jade-1/1L-induced acetylation of nucleosomal histones by HBO1. In contrast to Jade-1/1L, the PHD zinc finger protein ING4/5 failed to synergize with HBO1 to promote histone acetylation. The physical interaction of ING4/5 with HBO1 occurred in the presence of Jade-1L or Jade-3 but not with the Jade-1 short isoform. In summary, this study demonstrates that Jade-1/1L are crucial co-factors for HBO1-mediated histone H4 acetylation.

  5. Crystal structure of tabtoxin resistance protein complexed with acetyl coenzyme A reveals the mechanism for {beta}-lactam acetylation.

    SciTech Connect

    He, H.; Ding, Y.; Bartlam, M.; Sun, F.; Le, Y.; Qin, X.; Tang, H.; Zhang, R.; Joachimiak, A.; Liu, J.; Zhao, N.; Rao, Z.; Biosciences Division; Tsinghua Univ.; Chinese Academy of Science

    2003-01-31

    Tabtoxin resistance protein (TTR) is an enzyme that renders tabtoxin-producing pathogens, such as Pseudomonas syringae, tolerant to their own phytotoxins. Here, we report the crystal structure of TTR complexed with its natural cofactor, acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA), to 1.55 {angstrom} resolution. The binary complex forms a characteristic 'V' shape for substrate binding and contains the four motifs conserved in the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily, which also includes the histone acetyltransferases (HATs). A single-step mechanism is proposed to explain the function of three conserved residues, Glu92, Asp130 and Tyr141, in catalyzing the acetyl group transfer to its substrate. We also report that TTR possesses HAT activity and suggest an evolutionary relationship between TTR and other GNAT members.

  6. Distribution of acetylated histones resulting from Gal4-VP16 recruitment of SAGA and NuA4 complexes

    PubMed Central

    Vignali, Marissa; Steger, David J.; Neely, Kristen E.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed the targeting of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes by DNA-binding activators during transcriptional activation and the resulting distribution of acetylated histones. An in vitro competition assay was developed to acetylate and transcribe a nucleosomal array template in the presence of excess non-specific chromatin, which mimics in vivo conditions. Stimulation of transcription from the nucleosomal array template under competitive conditions by the SAGA and NuA4 HAT complexes depended on the presence of the Gal4-VP16 activator, which recognizes sites in the promoter and directly interacts with these HATs. Importantly, the stimulation of transcription by SAGA and NuA4 depended on the presence of Gal4-VP16 during histone acetylation, and Gal4-VP16-bound nucleosomal templates were acetylated preferentially by SAGA and NuA4 relative to the competitor chromatin. While targeting of the SAGA complex led to H3 acetylation of promoter-proximal nucleosomes, targeting of the NuA4 complex led to a broader domain of H4 acetylation of >3 kbp. Thus, either promoter-proximal H3 acetylation by SAGA or broadly distributed acetylation of H4 by NuA4 activated transcription from chromatin templates. PMID:10835360

  7. Protein kinase C coordinates histone H3 phosphorylation and acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Darieva, Zoulfia; Webber, Aaron; Warwood, Stacey; Sharrocks, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    The re-assembly of chromatin following DNA replication is a critical event in the maintenance of genome integrity. Histone H3 acetylation at K56 and phosphorylation at T45 are two important chromatin modifications that accompany chromatin assembly. Here we have identified the protein kinase Pkc1 as a key regulator that coordinates the deposition of these modifications in S. cerevisiae under conditions of replicative stress. Pkc1 phosphorylates the histone acetyl transferase Rtt109 and promotes its ability to acetylate H3K56. Our data also reveal novel cross-talk between two different histone modifications as Pkc1 also enhances H3T45 phosphorylation and this modification is required for H3K56 acetylation. Our data therefore uncover an important role for Pkc1 in coordinating the deposition of two different histone modifications that are important for chromatin assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09886.001 PMID:26468616

  8. Six lysine residues on c-Myc are direct substrates for acetylation by p300.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kangling; Faiola, Francesco; Martinez, Ernest

    2005-10-14

    The c-Myc oncoprotein (Myc) functions as a transcription regulator in association with an obligatory partner, Max, to control cell growth and differentiation. The Myc:Max complex regulates specific genes by recognizing "E-box" DNA sequences and promoter-bound factors such as Miz-1. Myc recruits histone acetyltransferases (HATs) to modify chromatin and is, itself, acetylated in mammalian cells by several of these HATs including p300/CBP, GCN5, and Tip60. The Myc residues that are directly modified by these different HATs remain unknown. Here, we have analyzed the acetylation of recombinant Myc:Max complexes by purified p300 HAT in vitro by using MALDI-TOF and LC-ESI-MS/MS mass spectrometry. These analyses identify six lysine residues in human Myc (K143, K157, K275, K317, K323, and K371) as direct substrates for p300. Our results further indicate that p300 can acetylate DNA-bound Myc:Max complexes and that acetylated Myc:Max heterodimers efficiently interact with Miz-1.

  9. Chaperone-mediated acetylation of histones by Rtt109 identified by quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Abshiru, Nebiyu; Ippersiel, Kevin; Tang, Yong; Yuan, Hua; Marmorstein, Ronen; Verreault, Alain; Thibault, Pierre

    2013-04-09

    Rtt109 is a fungal-specific histone acetyltransferase (HAT) that associates with either Vps75 or Asf1 to acetylate histone H3. Recent biochemical and structural studies suggest that site-specific acetylation of H3 by Rtt109 is dictated by the binding chaperone where Rtt109-Asf1 acetylates K56, while Rtt109-Vps75 acetylates K9 and K27. To gain further insights into the roles of Vps75 and Asf1 in directing site-specific acetylation of H3, we used quantitative proteomics to profile the global and site-specific changes in H3 and H4 during in vitro acetylation assays with Rtt109 and its chaperones. Our analyses showed that Rtt109-Vps75 preferentially acetylates H3 K9 and K23, the former residue being the major acetylation site. At high enzyme-to-substrate ratio, Rtt109 also acetylated K14, K18, K27 and to a lower extent K56 of histone H3. Importantly, this study revealed that in contrast to Rtt109-Vps75, Rtt109-Asf1 displayed a far greater site-specificity, with K56 being the primary site of acetylation. For the first time, we also report the acetylation of histone H4 K12 by Rtt109-Vps75, whereas Rtt109-Asf1 showed no detectable activity toward H4. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: From protein structures to clinical applications.

  10. Chaperone-mediated acetylation of histones by Rtt109 identified by quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Abshiru, Nebiyu; Ippersiel, Kevin; Tang, Yong; Yuan, Hua; Marmorstein, Ronen; Verreault, Alain; Thibault, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Rtt109 is a fungal-specific histone acetyltransferase (HAT) that associates with either Vps75 or Asf1 to acetylate histone H3. Recent biochemical and structural studies suggest that site-specific acetylation of H3 by Rtt109 is dictated by the binding chaperone where Rtt109-Asf1 acetylates K56, while Rtt109-Vps75 acetylates K9 and K27. To gain further insights into the roles of Vps75 and Asf1 in directing site-specific acetylation of H3, we used quantitative proteomics to profile the global and site-specific changes in H3 and H4 during in vitro acetylation assays with Rtt109 and its chaperones. Our analyses showed that Rtt109-Vps75 preferentially acetylates H3 K9 and K23, the former residue being the major acetylation site. At high enzyme to substrate ratio, Rtt109 also acetylated K14, K18, K27 and to a lower extent K56 of histone H3. Importantly, this study revealed that in contrast to Rtt109-Vps75, Rtt109-Asf1 displayed a far greater site-specificity, with K56 being the primary site of acetylation. For the first time, we also report the acetylation of histone H4 K12 by Rtt109-Vps75, whereas Rtt109-Asf1 showed no detectable activity toward H4. PMID:23036725

  11. Hippocampal histone acetylation regulates object recognition and the estradiol-induced enhancement of object recognition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zaorui; Fan, Lu; Fortress, Ashley M; Boulware, Marissa I; Frick, Karyn M

    2012-02-15

    Histone acetylation has recently been implicated in learning and memory processes, yet necessity of histone acetylation for such processes has not been demonstrated using pharmacological inhibitors of histone acetyltransferases (HATs). As such, the present study tested whether garcinol, a potent HAT inhibitor in vitro, could impair hippocampal memory consolidation and block the memory-enhancing effects of the modulatory hormone 17β-estradiol E2. We first showed that bilateral infusion of garcinol (0.1, 1, or 10 μg/side) into the dorsal hippocampus (DH) immediately after training impaired object recognition memory consolidation in ovariectomized female mice. A behaviorally effective dose of garcinol (10 μg/side) also significantly decreased DH HAT activity. We next examined whether DH infusion of a behaviorally subeffective dose of garcinol (1 ng/side) could block the effects of DH E2 infusion on object recognition and epigenetic processes. Immediately after training, ovariectomized female mice received bilateral DH infusions of vehicle, E2 (5 μg/side), garcinol (1 ng/side), or E2 plus garcinol. Forty-eight hours later, garcinol blocked the memory-enhancing effects of E2. Garcinol also reversed the E2-induced increase in DH histone H3 acetylation, HAT activity, and levels of the de novo methyltransferase DNMT3B, as well as the E2-induced decrease in levels of the memory repressor protein histone deacetylase 2. Collectively, these findings suggest that histone acetylation is critical for object recognition memory consolidation and the beneficial effects of E2 on object recognition. Importantly, this work demonstrates that the role of histone acetylation in memory processes can be studied using a HAT inhibitor.

  12. Comparative specificities of Calreticulin Transacetylase to O-acetyl, N-acetyl and S-acetyl derivative of 4-methylcoumarins and their inhibitory effect on AFB1-induced genotoxicity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajit; Ponnan, Prija; Raj, Hanumantharao G; Parmar, Virinder S; Saso, Luciano

    2013-02-01

    We have earlier conclusively established the Calreticulin Transacetylase (CRTAase) catalyzed modifications of functional proteins such as cytochrome-P450-linked mixed function oxidases (Cyt-P450-linked MFOs), NADPH cytochrome c reductase, and glutathione S-transferase by acetoxy derivatives of polyphenols. In this study, we have investigated the comparative specificities of CRTAase to N-acetyl derivative, 7-acetamido-4-methylcoumarin (7-N-AMC), O-acetyl derivative, 7-acetoxy-4-methylcoumarin (7-AMC), S-acetyl derivative, 7-thioacetyl-4-methycoumarin (7-S-AMC) and their parent compounds in the modulation of catalytic activities of aforesaid proteins. Special attention concentrated on the comparative inhibitory effect of aforesaid acetyl moiety on Cyt-P450-linked MFOs such as 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD), pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylase (PROD) and aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1))-induced genotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. The results clearly indicated that N-acetyl and O-acetyl derivatives were better substrates for CRTAase while the S-acetyl was found to be a poorer substrate. Our study involving atomic charge, charge density and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) calculations indicated the pivotal role of electronegativity and charge distribution values of O, N and S atoms of the acetyl group at C-7 position of the 4-methylcoumarins in CRTAase activity. These facts reinforce our hypothesis that the CRTAase catalyzed modifications of the catalytic activities of aforesaid proteins by acetyl derivative of 4-methylcoumarins is probably due to acetylation of these proteins.

  13. Imbalance between HAT and HDAC Activities in the PBMCs of Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis or Rheumatoid Arthritis and Influence of HDAC Inhibitors on TNF Alpha Production

    PubMed Central

    Toussirot, Eric; Abbas, Wasim; Khan, Kashif Aziz; Tissot, Marion; Jeudy, Alicia; Baud, Lucile; Bertolini, Ewa; Wendling, Daniel; Herbein, Georges

    2013-01-01

    Objective Acetylation or deacetylation of histone proteins may modulate cytokine gene transcription such as TNF alpha (TNF). We evaluated the balance between histone deacetytlase (HDAC) and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or ankylosing spondylitis (AS) compared to healthy controls (HC) and determined the influence of HDAC inhibitors (trichostatin A -TSA- or Sirtinol -Sirt-) on these enzymatic activities and on the PBMC production of TNF. Methods 52 patients with RA, 21 with AS and 38 HC were evaluated. HAT and HDAC activities were measured on nuclear extracts from PBMC using colorimetric assays. Enzymatic activities were determined prior to and after ex vivo treatment of PBMC by TSA or Sirt. TNF levels were evaluated in PBMC culture supernatants in the absence or presence of TSA or Sirt. Results HAT and HDAC activities were significantly reduced in AS, while these activities reached similar levels in RA and HC. Ex vivo treatment of PBMC by HDACi tended to decrease HDAC expression in HC, but Sirt significantly reduced HAT in RA. TNF production by PBMC was significantly down-regulated by Sirt in HC and AS patients. Conclusion HAT and HDAC were disturbed in AS while no major changes were found in RA. HDACi may modulate HDAC and HAT PBMC expression, especially Sirt in RA. Sirtinol was able to down regulate TNF production by PBMC in HC and AS. An imbalance between HAT and HDAC activities might provide the rationale for the development of HDACi in the therapeutic approach to inflammatory rheumatic diseases. PMID:24039666

  14. αTAT1 controls longitudinal spreading of acetylation marks from open microtubules extremities

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Nathalie; Elkhatib, Nadia; Bresteau, Enzo; Piétrement, Olivier; Khaled, Mehdi; Magiera, Maria M.; Janke, Carsten; Le Cam, Eric; Rutenberg, Andrew D.; Montagnac, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Acetylation of the lysine 40 of α-tubulin (K40) is a post-translational modification occurring in the lumen of microtubules (MTs) and is controlled by the α-tubulin acetyl-transferase αTAT1. How αTAT1 accesses the lumen and acetylates α-tubulin there has been an open question. Here, we report that acetylation starts at open ends of MTs and progressively spreads longitudinally from there. We observed acetylation marks at the open ends of in vivo MTs re-growing after a Nocodazole block, and acetylated segments growing in length with time. Bias for MTs extremities was even more pronounced when using non-dynamic MTs extracted from HeLa cells. In contrast, K40 acetylation was mostly uniform along the length of MTs reconstituted from purified tubulin in vitro. Quantitative modelling of luminal diffusion of αTAT1 suggested that the uniform acetylation pattern observed in vitro is consistent with defects in the MT lattice providing lateral access to the lumen. Indeed, we observed that in vitro MTs are permeable to macromolecules along their shaft while cellular MTs are not. Our results demonstrate αTAT1 enters the lumen from open extremities and spreads K40 acetylation marks longitudinally along cellular MTs. This mode of tip-directed microtubule acetylation may allow for selective acetylation of subsets of microtubules. PMID:27752143

  15. Plant glutathione transferases

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, David P; Lapthorn, Adrian; Edwards, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The soluble glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are encoded by a large and diverse gene family in plants, which can be divided on the basis of sequence identity into the phi, tau, theta, zeta and lambda classes. The theta and zeta GSTs have counterparts in animals but the other classes are plant-specific and form the focus of this article. The genome of Arabidopsis thaliana contains 48 GST genes, with the tau and phi classes being the most numerous. The GST proteins have evolved by gene duplication to perform a range of functional roles using the tripeptide glutathione (GSH) as a cosubstrate or coenzyme. GSTs are predominantly expressed in the cytosol, where their GSH-dependent catalytic functions include the conjugation and resulting detoxification of herbicides, the reduction of organic hydroperoxides formed during oxidative stress and the isomerization of maleylacetoacetate to fumarylacetoacetate, a key step in the catabolism of tyrosine. GSTs also have non-catalytic roles, binding flavonoid natural products in the cytosol prior to their deposition in the vacuole. Recent studies have also implicated GSTs as components of ultraviolet-inducible cell signaling pathways and as potential regulators of apoptosis. Although sequence diversification has produced GSTs with multiple functions, the structure of these proteins has been highly conserved. The GSTs thus represent an excellent example of how protein families can diversify to fulfill multiple functions while conserving form and structure. PMID:11897031

  16. Molecular Cloning of Adenosinediphosphoribosyl Transferase.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-08

    ACCESSION NO.D,. 03261102F 2312 A~5 11. TITLE (include Securqt Classification) 0 Molecular Cloning of Adenosinediphosphoribosyl Transferase 12. PERSONAL...I’:- AFOSR.Tlt. 8 7 - 0 9 8,2 0IL * pi AFOSR- 85 -0377 PROGRESS REPORT Molecular Cloning of Adenosinediphosphoribosyl Transferase 5." Period of...Pharmacology and the Cardiovascular Research Institute September 8, 1987 .’, 5.’- "’S ". -f, AFOSR - 85 -0377 PROGRESS REPORT Molecular Cloning of

  17. THE EXCHANGE REACTION OF ACETYL FLUORIDE AND ACETYL HEXAFLUOROARSENATE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    From the temperature dependence of the exchange rate of the methyl protons between acetyl fluoride and acetyl hexafluoroarsenate an Arrhenius...the reaction was found to be one-half order in acetyl hexafluoroarsenate and zero order in acetyl fluoride. (Author)

  18. Extrasolar planet search with the HAT network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, G.; Noyes, R. W.; Latham, D. W.; Csák, B.; Gálfi, G.; Pál, A.

    2006-02-01

    We summarize the current status of the HAT Network project. Started up in 2003 with a single telescope, HATNet has grown to an array of six almost identical, fully automated, wide-field telescopes spread in geographical longitude, plus a higher resolution photometry follow-up instrument called TopHAT. The instruments are maintained and controlled from the Center for Astrophysics, and are fully dedicated to planetary transit and variability search. Photometric precision reaches 3mmag for stars at I≈8, and data from separate stations can be readily combined. TopHAT is able to achieve millimag follow-up photometry. As of June 2005, 100000 stars have been thoroughly analyzed (30000 with photometry better than 1%); numerous transit candidates have been found and followed up by spectroscopy or photometry. Most of these turned out to be false positives, with a few cases still pending.

  19. Gli2 Acetylation at Lysine 757 Regulates Hedgehog-Dependent Transcriptional Output by Preventing Its Promoter Occupancy

    PubMed Central

    D'Amico, Davide; Di Magno, Laura; Infante, Paola; De Smaele, Enrico; Giannini, Giuseppe; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Screpanti, Isabella; Gulino, Alberto; Canettieri, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    The morphogenic Hedgehog (Hh) signaling regulates postnatal cerebellar development and its aberrant activation leads to medulloblastoma. The transcription factors Gli1 and Gli2 are the activators of Hh pathway and their function is finely controlled by different covalent modifications, such as phosphorylation and ubiquitination. We show here that Gli2 is endogenously acetylated and that this modification represents a key regulatory step for Hedgehog signaling. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) coactivator p300, but not other HATs, acetylates Gli2 at the conserved lysine K757 thus inhibiting Hh target gene expression. By generating a specific anti acetyl-Gli2(Lys757) antisera we demonstrated that Gli2 acetylation is readily detectable at endogenous levels and is attenuated by Hh agonists. Moreover, Gli2 K757R mutant activity is higher than wild type Gli2 and is no longer enhanced by Hh agonists, indicating that acetylation represents an additional level of control for signal dependent activation. Consistently, in sections of developing mouse cerebella Gli2 acetylation correlates with the activation status of Hedgehog signaling. Mechanistically, acetylation at K757 prevents Gli2 entry into chromatin. Together, these data illustrate a novel mechanism of regulation of the Hh signaling whereby, in concert with Gli1, Gli2 acetylation functions as a key transcriptional checkpoint in the control of morphogen-dependent processes. PMID:23762415

  20. James J. Gallagher: Man in the White Hat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolly, Jennifer L.; Robinson, Ann

    2014-01-01

    In classic Western movies, the good guy could be frequently identified by his trademark white Stetson hat, whereas the bad guy always wore black. James J. Gallagher wore many hats during his career that spanned over six decades; he too would be known as the "man in the white hat,"--trusted to do the right thing. From 1967 to 1970,…

  1. Camello, a novel family of Histone Acetyltransferases that acetylate histone H4 and is essential for zebrafish development

    PubMed Central

    Karmodiya, Krishanpal; Anamika, Krishanpal; Muley, Vijaykumar; Pradhan, Saurabh J.; Bhide, Yoshita; Galande, Sanjeev

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated genome-wide occurrence of Histone Acetyltransferases (HATs) in genomes of Mus musculus and Danio rerio on the basis of presence of HAT domain. Our study identified a group of proteins that lacks characteristic features of known HAT families, relatively smaller in size and has no other associated domains. Most of the proteins in this unclassified group are Camello proteins, which are not yet known and classified as functional HATs. Our in vitro and in vivo analysis revealed that Camello family proteins are active HATs and exhibit specificity towards histone H4. Interestingly, Camello proteins are among the first identified HATs showing perinuclear localization. Moreover, Camello proteins are evolutionarily conserved in all chordates and are observed for the first time in cnidarians in phylogeny. Furthermore, knockdown of Camello protein (CMLO3) in zebrafish embryos exhibited defects in axis elongation and head formation. Thus, our study identified a novel family of active HATs that is specific for histone H4 acetylation, exhibits perinuclear localization and is essential for zebrafish development. PMID:25123547

  2. The RSC Complex Exploits Histone Acetylation to Abrogate the Nucleosomal Barrier to RNA Polymerase II Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Michael; Li, Bing; Workman, Jerry L.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The coordinated action of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes in promoter-dependent transcription initiation represents a paradigm for how epigenetic information regulates gene expression. However, little is known about how such enzymes function during transcription elongation. Here we investigated the role of RSC, a bromodomain-containing ATPase, in nucleosome transcription in vitro. Purified S. cerevisiae RNA polymerase II (pol II) arrests at two primary locations on a positioned mononucleosome. RSC stimulates passage of pol II through these sites. The function of RSC in elongation requires the energy of ATP hydrolysis. Moreover, the SAGA and NuA4 HATs strongly stimulated RSC’s effect on elongation. The stimulation correlates closely with Acetyl-CoA-dependent recruitment of RSC to nucleosomes. Thus, RSC can recognize acetylated nucleosomes and facilitate passage of pol II through them. These data support the view that histone modifications regulate accessibility of the coding region to pol II. PMID:17081996

  3. Glutathione transferases and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Mazzetti, Anna Paola; Fiorile, Maria Carmela; Primavera, Alessandra; Lo Bello, Mario

    2015-03-01

    There is substantial agreement that the unbalance between oxidant and antioxidant species may affect the onset and/or the course of a number of common diseases including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Many studies suggest a crucial role for oxidative stress in the first phase of aging, or in the pathogenesis of various diseases including neurological ones. Particularly, the role exerted by glutathione and glutathione-related enzymes (Glutathione Transferases) in the nervous system appears more relevant, this latter tissue being much more vulnerable to toxins and oxidative stress than other tissues such as liver, kidney or muscle. The present review addresses the question by focusing on the results obtained by specimens from patients or by in vitro studies using cells or animal models related to Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. In general, there is an association between glutathione depletion and Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease. In addition, a significant decrease of glutathione transferase activity in selected areas of brain and in ventricular cerebrospinal fluid was found. For some glutathione transferase genes there is also a correlation between polymorphisms and onset/outcome of neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, there is a general agreement about the protective effect exerted by glutathione and glutathione transferases but no clear answer about the mechanisms underlying this crucial role in the insurgence of neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Histone acetylation in neurodevelopment.

    PubMed

    Contestabile, Antonio; Sintoni, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modification of histones is a primary mechanism through which epigenetic regulation of DNA transcription does occur. Among these modifications, regulation of histone acetylation state is an important tool to influence gene expression. Epigenetic regulation of neurodevelopment contributes to the structural and functional shaping of the brain during neurogenesis and continues to impact on neural plasticity lifelong. Alterations of these mechanisms during neurodevelopment may result in later occurrence of neuropsychatric disorders. The present paper reviews and discusses available data on histone modifications, in particular histone acetylation, in neurogenesis considering results obtained in culture systems of neural progenitors as well as in in vivo studies. Possible teratogenic effects of altered histone acetylation state during development are also considered. The use during pregnancy of drugs such as valproic acid, which acts as a histone deacetylase inhibitor, may result during postnatal development in autistic-like symptoms. The effect of gestational administration of the drug has been, therefore, tested on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in animals showing behavioral impairment as a consequence of the drug administration at a specific stage of pregnancy. These experimental results show that adult neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus is not quantitatively altered by gestational valproic acid administration. Future steps and goals of research on the role and mechanisms of histone acetylation in neurodevelopment are briefly discussed.

  5. Final report on the safety assessment of acetyl triethyl citrate, acetyl tributyl citrate, acetyl trihexyl citrate, and acetyl trioctyl citrate.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Wilbur

    2002-01-01

    Acetyl Triethyl Citrate, Acetyl Tributyl Citrate, Acetyl Trihexyl Citrate, and Acetyl Trioctyl Citrate all function as plasticizers in cosmetics. Additionally, the Trihexyl and Trioctyl forms are described as skin-conditioning agents-emollients, although there are currently no reported uses of Acetyl Trihexyl Citrate or Acetyl Trioctyl Citrate. Acetyl Triethyl Citrate and Acetyl Tributyl Citrate are used in nail products at concentrations up to 7%. Recognizing that there are no reported uses of Acetyl Trihexyl or Trioctyl Citrate, if they were to be used in the future, their concentration of use is expected to be no higher than that reported for Acetyl Triethyl and Tributyl Citrate. These ingredients were sufficiently similar in structure that safety test data on one were considered applicable to all. Approximately 99% of orally administered Acetyl Tributyl Citrate is excreted-intermediate metabolites include acetyl citrate, monobutyl citrate, acetyl monobutyl citrate, dibutyl citrate, and acetyl dibutyl citrate. In acute, short-term, subchronic, and chronic feeding studies, these ingredients were relatively nontoxic. Differences from controls were either not statistically significant or not related to any organ toxicity. Ocular exposures produced moderate reactions that cleared by 48 hours after instillation. Dermal application was not toxic in rabbits. In a guinea pig maximization test, Acetyl Triethyl Citrate was a sensitizer whereas Acetyl Tributyl Citrate was not. Limited clinical testing of Acetyl Triethyl Citrate and Acetyl Tributyl Citrate was negative for both skin irritation and sensitization. These clinical data were considered more relevant than the guinea pig maximization data, suggesting to the Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel that none of these ingredients would be a sensitizer. Physiologic effects noted with intravenous delivery of Acetyl Triethyl Citrate or Acetyl Tributyl Citrate include dose-related decreases in blood pressure and

  6. Protein acetylation sites mediated by Schistosoma mansoni GCN5

    SciTech Connect

    Moraes Maciel, Renata de; Furtado Madeiro da Costa, Rodrigo; Meirelles Bastosde Oliveira, Francisco; Rumjanek, Franklin David; Fantappie, Marcelo Rosado

    2008-05-23

    The transcriptional co-activator GCN5, a histone acetyltransferase (HAT), is part of large multimeric complexes that are required for chromatin remodeling and transcription activation. As in other eukaryotes, the DNA from the parasite Schistosome mansoni is organized into nucleosomes and the genome encodes components of chromatin-remodeling complexes. Using a series of synthetic peptides we determined that Lys-14 of histone H3 was acetylated by the recombinant SmGCN5-HAT domain. SmGCN5 was also able to acetylate schistosome non-histone proteins, such as the nuclear receptors SmRXR1 and SmNR1, and the co-activator SmNCoA-62. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of SmGCN5 protein in the nuclei of vitelline cells. Within the nucleus, SmGCN5 was found to be located in interchromatin granule clusters (IGCs), which are transcriptionally active structures. The data suggest that SmGCN5 is involved in transcription activation.

  7. Long-term surveillance plan for the Mexican Hat disposal site Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Mexican Hat, Utah, disposal site. This LSTP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Mexican Hat disposal site performs as designed and is cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed for custody and long-term care, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires the DOE to submit such a site-specific LTSP.

  8. Histone acetylation is involved in TCDD-induced cleft palate formation in fetal mice

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xingang; Qiu, Lin; Pu, Yalan; Liu, Cuiping; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Chen; Pu, Wei; Fu, Yuexian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present was to evaluate the effects of DNA methylation and histone acetylation on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlo-rodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced cleft palate in fetal mice. Pregnant mice (n=10) were randomly divided into two groups: i) TCDD group, mice were treated with 28 µg/kg TCDD on gestation day (GD) 10 by oral gavage; ii) control group, mice were treated with an equal volume of corn oil. On GD 16.5, the fetal mice were evaluated for the presence of a cleft palate. An additional 36 pregnant mice were divided into the control and TCDD groups, and palate samples were collected on GD 13.5, GD 14.5 and GD 15.5, respectively. Transforming growth factor-β3 (TGF-β3) mRNA expression, TGF-β3 promoter methylation, histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity and histone H3 (H3) acetylation in the palates were evaluated in the two groups. The incidence of a cleft palate in the TCDD group was 93.55%, and no cases of cleft palate were identified in the control group. On GD 13.5 and GD 14.5, TGF-β3 mRNA expression, HAT activity and acetylated H3 levels were significantly increased in the TCDD group compared with the control. Methylated bands were not observed in the TCDD or control groups. In conclusion, at the critical period of palate fusion (GD 13.5–14.5), TCDD significantly increased TGF-β3 gene expression, HAT activity and H3 acetylation. Therefore, histone acetylation may be involved in TCDD-induced cleft palate formation in fetal mice. PMID:27279340

  9. Purification and properties of 4-hydroxybutyrate coenzyme A transferase from Clostridium aminobutyricum.

    PubMed Central

    Scherf, U; Buckel, W

    1991-01-01

    A new coenzyme A (CoA)-transferase from the anaerobe Clostridium aminobutyricum catalyzing the formation of 4-hydroxybutyryl-CoA from 4-hydroxybutyrate and acetyl-CoA is described. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity by standard techniques, including fast protein liquid chromatography under aerobic conditions. Its molecular mass was determined to be 110 kDa, and that of the only subunit was determined to be 54 kDa, indicating a homodimeric structure. Besides acetate and acetyl-CoA, the following substrates were detected (in order of decreasing kcat/Km): 4-hydroxybutyryl-CoA, butyryl-CoA and propionyl-CoA, vinyl-acetyl-CoA (3-butenoyl-CoA), and 5-hydroxyvaleryl-CoA. In an indirect assay the corresponding acids were also found to be substrates; however, DL-lactate, DL-2-hydroxybutyrate, DL-3-hydroxybutyrate, crotonate, and various dicarboxylates were not. PMID:1768145

  10. ASEB: a web server for KAT-specific acetylation site prediction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Likun; Du, Yipeng; Lu, Ming; Li, Tingting

    2012-07-01

    Protein lysine acetylation plays an important role in the normal functioning of cells, including gene expression regulation, protein stability and metabolism regulation. Although large amounts of lysine acetylation sites have been identified via large-scale mass spectrometry or traditional experimental methods, the lysine (K)-acetyl-transferase (KAT) responsible for the acetylation of a given protein or lysine site remains largely unknown due to the experimental limitations of KAT substrate identification. Hence, the in silico prediction of KAT-specific acetylation sites may provide direction for further experiments. In our previous study, we developed the acetylation set enrichment based (ASEB) computer program to predict which KAT-families are responsible for the acetylation of a given protein or lysine site. In this article, we provide KAT-specific acetylation site prediction as a web service. This web server not only provides the online tool and R package for the method in our previous study, but several useful services are also included, such as the integration of protein-protein interaction information to enhance prediction accuracy. This web server can be freely accessed at http://cmbi.bjmu.edu.cn/huac.

  11. MRG15 activates the cdc2 promoter via histone acetylation in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, AndreAna N.; Tominaga, Kaoru; Pereira-Smith, Olivia M.

    2011-07-01

    Chromatin remodeling is required for transcriptional activation and repression. MRG15 (MORF4L1), a chromatin modulator, is a highly conserved protein and is present in complexes containing histone acetyltransferases (HATs) as well as histone deacetylases (HDACs). Loss of expression of MRG15 in mice and Drosophila results in embryonic lethality and fibroblast and neural stem/progenitor cells cultured from Mrg15 null mouse embryos exhibit marked proliferative defects when compared with wild type cells. To determine the role of MRG15 in cell cycle progression we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation with an antibody to MRG15 on normal human fibroblasts as they entered the cell cycle from a quiescent state, and analyzed various cell cycle gene promoters. The results demonstrated a 3-fold increase in MRG15 occupancy at the cdc2 promoter during S phase of the cell cycle and a concomitant increase in acetylated histone H4. H4 lysine 12 was acetylated at 24 h post-serum stimulation while there was no change in acetylation of lysine 16. HDAC1 and 2 were decreased at this promoter during cell cycle progression. Over-expression of MRG15 in HeLa cells activated a cdc2 promoter-reporter construct in a dose-dependent manner, whereas knockdown of MRG15 resulted in decreased promoter activity. In order to implicate HAT activity, we treated cells with the HAT inhibitor anacardic acid and determined that HAT inhibition results in loss of expression of cdc2 mRNA. Further, chromatin immunoprecipitation with Tip60 localizes the protein to the same 110 bp stretch of the cdc2 promoter pulled down by MRG15. Additionally, we determined that cotransfection of MRG15 with the known associated HAT Tip60 had a cooperative effect in activating the cdc2 promoter. These results suggest that MRG15 is acting in a HAT complex involving Tip60 to modify chromatin via acetylation of histone H4 at the cdc2 promoter to activate transcription.

  12. HATS-31b through HATS-35b: Five Transiting Hot Jupiters Discovered By the HATSouth Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Val-Borro, M.; Bakos, G. Á.; Brahm, R.; Hartman, J. D.; Espinoza, N.; Penev, K.; Ciceri, S.; Jordán, A.; Bhatti, W.; Csubry, Z.; Bayliss, D.; Bento, J.; Zhou, G.; Rabus, M.; Mancini, L.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Tan, T. G.; Tinney, C. G.; Wright, D. J.; Kedziora-Chudczer, L.; Bailey, J.; Suc, V.; Durkan, S.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2016-12-01

    We report the discovery of five new transiting hot-Jupiter planets discovered by the HATSouth survey, HATS-31b through HATS-35b. These planets orbit moderately bright stars with V magnitudes within the range of 11.9-14.4 mag while the planets span a range of masses of 0.88-1.22 {M}{{J}} and have somewhat inflated radii between 1.23 and 1.64 {R}{{J}}. These planets can be classified as typical hot Jupiters, with HATS-31b and HATS-35b being moderately inflated gas giant planets with radii of 1.64+/- 0.22 {R}{{J}} and {1.464}-0.044+0.069 {R}{{J}}, respectively, that can be used to constrain inflation mechanisms. All five systems present a higher Bayesian evidence for a fixed-circular-orbit model than for an eccentric orbit. The orbital periods range from 1.8209993+/- 0.0000016 day for HATS-35b) to 3.377960+/- 0.000012 day for HATS-31b. Additionally, HATS-35b orbits a relatively young F star with an age of 2.13+/- 0.51 Gyr. We discuss the analysis to derive the properties of these systems and compare them in the context of the sample of well-characterized transiting hot Jupiters known to date. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. Based in part on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Based in part on observations made with the MPG 2.2 m and Euler1.2 m Telescopes at the ESO Observatory in La Silla. This paper uses observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spectroscopy and photometry for HAT-P-50--HAT-P-53 (Hartman+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, J. D.; Bhatti, W.; Bakos, G. A.; Bieryla, A.; Kovacs, G.; Latham, D. W.; Csubry, Z.; de Val-Borro, M.; Penev, K.; Buchhave, L. A.; Torres, G.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Johnson, J. A.; Isaacson, H.; Sato, B.; Boisse, I.; Falco, E.; Everett, M. E.; Szklenar, T.; Fulton, B. J.; Shporer, A.; Kovacs, T.; Hansen, T.; Beky, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Lazar, J.; Papp, I.; Sari, P.

    2016-04-01

    The HATNet network consists of six identical fully automated instruments, with four at Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory (FLWO) in AZ, and two on the roof of the Submillimeter Array Hangar Building at Mauna Kea Observatory (MKO) in HI. The light-gathering elements of each instrument include an 11cm diameter telephoto lens, a Sloan r filter, and a 4K*4K front-side-illuminated CCD camera. Observations made in 2007 and early 2008 were carried out using a Cousins R filter. The instruments have a field of view of 10.6°*10.6° and a pixel scale of 9"/pixel at the center of an image. Additional time-series photometric measurements were obtained for all four of the systems using Keplercam on the FLWO 1.2m telescope. For HAT-P-50 we also obtained follow-up photometry with the CCD imager on the Byrne Observatory at Sedgwick (BOS) 0.8m telescope, located at Sedgwick Reserve in Santa Ynez Valley, CA, and operated by the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope institute (LCOGT). HAT-P-50 was observed with HAT-10/G316 on 2008 Nov-2009 May, with HAT-5/G364 on 2009 May, with HAT-9/G364 on 2008 Dec-2009 May, with BOS on 2012 Feb 15, on 2012 Feb 21 and on 2012 Apr 08, and with Keplercam on 2012 Feb 18, on 2012 Nov 28, on 2012 Dec 23, on 2013 Jan 14, and on 2013 Jan 17. HAT-P-51 was observed with HAT-6/G164 on 2007 Sep-2008 Feb, with HAT-9/G164 on 2007 Sep-2008 Feb, with HAT-10/G165 on 2010 Sep-2011 Jan, with HAT-5/G165 on 2010 Nov-2011 Feb, with HAT-8/G165 on 2010 Nov-2011 Feb, with HAT-6/G209 on 2010 Nov-2011 Feb, with HAT-9/G209 on 2010 Nov-2011 Feb, with HAT-7/G210 on 2010 Nov-2011 Jan, and with Keplercam on 2011 Oct 21, on 2012 Jan 05, on 2012 Oct 05, on 2012 Oct 26, and on 2012 Nov 12. HAT-P-52 was observed with HAT-5/G212 on 2010 Sep-Nov, with HAT-8/G212 on 2010 Aug-Nov, and with Keplercam on 2010 Dec 23, on 2011 Sep 05, on 2011 Sep 27, on 2011 Nov 21, and on 2012 Jan 07. HAT-P-53 was observed with HAT-6/G164 on 2007 Sep-2008 Feb, with HAT-9/G164 on 2007 Sep-2008 Feb, with

  14. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Mexican Hat Site, Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Mexican Hat site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 2.2 million tons of tailings at the Mexican Hat site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site. Cost estimates for the four options range from about $15,200,000 for stabilization in place, to about $45,500,000 for disposal at a distance of about 16 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Mexican Hat tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $115/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ whether by heap leach or conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Reprocessing the Mexican Hat tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive under present conditions.

  15. Nucleosome acetylation sequencing to study the establishment of chromatin acetylation.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Chitvan; Blacketer, Melissa J; Shogren-Knaak, Michael A

    2014-07-15

    The establishment of posttranslational chromatin modifications is a major mechanism for regulating how genomic DNA is utilized. However, current in vitro chromatin assays do not monitor histone modifications at individual nucleosomes. Here we describe a strategy, nucleosome acetylation sequencing, that allows us to read the amount of modification at each nucleosome. In this approach, a bead-bound trinucleosome substrate is enzymatically acetylated with radiolabeled acetyl CoA by the SAGA complex from Saccharomyces cerevisae. The product is digested by restriction enzymes that cut at unique sites between the nucleosomes and then counted to quantify the extent of acetylation at each nucleosomal site. We find that we can sensitively, specifically, and reproducibly follow enzyme-mediated nucleosome acetylation. Applying this strategy, when acetylation proceeds extensively, its distribution across nucleosomes is relatively uniform. However, when substrates are used that contain nucleosomes mutated at the major sites of SAGA-mediated acetylation, or that are studied under initial rate conditions, changes in the acetylation distribution can be observed. Nucleosome acetylation sequencing should be applicable to analyzing a wide range of modifications. Additionally, because our trinucleosomes synthesis strategy is highly modular and efficient, it can be used to generate nucleosomal systems in which nucleosome composition differs across the array.

  16. Time-resolved luminescence biosensor for continuous activity detection of protein acetylation-related enzymes based on DNA-sensitized terbium(III) probes.

    PubMed

    Han, Yitao; Li, Hao; Hu, Yufang; Li, Pei; Wang, Huixia; Nie, Zhou; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2015-09-15

    Protein acetylation of histone is an essential post-translational modification (PTM) mechanism in epigenetic gene regulation, and its status is reversibly controlled by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). Herein, we have developed a sensitive and label-free time-resolved luminescence (TRL) biosensor for continuous detection of enzymatic activity of HATs and HDACs, respectively, based on acetylation-mediated peptide/DNA interaction and Tb(3+)/DNA luminescent probes. Using guanine (G)-rich DNA-sensitized Tb(3+) luminescence as the output signal, the polycationic substrate peptides interact with DNA with high affinity and subsequently replace Tb(3+), eliminating the luminescent signal. HAT-catalyzed acetylation remarkably reduces the positive charge of the peptides and diminishes the peptide/DNA interaction, resulting in the signal on detection via recovery of DNA-sensitized Tb(3+) luminescence. With this TRL sensor, HAT (p300) can be sensitively detected with a wide linear range from 0.2 to 100 nM and a low detection limit of 0.05 nM. The proposed sensor was further used to continuously monitor the HAT activity in real time. Additionally, the TRL biosensor was successfully applied to evaluating HAT inhibition by two specific inhibitors, anacardic acid and C464, and satisfactory Z'-factors above 0.73 were obtained. Moreover, this sensor is feasible to continuously monitor the HDAC (Sirt1)-catalyzed deacetylation with a linear range from 0.5 to 500 nM and a detection limit of 0.5 nM. The proposed sensor is a convenient, sensitive, and mix-and-read assay, presenting a promising platform for protein acetylation-targeted epigenetic research and drug discovery.

  17. WARM SPITZER PHOTOMETRY OF THREE HOT JUPITERS: HAT-P-3b, HAT-P-4b AND HAT-P-12b

    SciTech Connect

    Todorov, Kamen O.; Deming, Drake; Knutson, Heather A.; Burrows, Adam; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Laughlin, Gregory; Lewis, Nikole K.; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Agol, Eric; Desert, Jean-Michel; Sada, Pedro V.; Charbonneau, David; Langton, Jonathan; Showman, Adam P.

    2013-06-20

    We present Warm Spitzer/IRAC secondary eclipse time series photometry of three short-period transiting exoplanets, HAT-P-3b, HAT-P-4b and HAT-P-12b, in both the available 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bands. HAT-P-3b and HAT-P-4b are Jupiter-mass objects orbiting an early K and an early G dwarf star, respectively. For HAT-P-3b we find eclipse depths of 0.112%+0.015%-0.030% (3.6 micron) and 0.094%+0.016%-0.009% (4.5 {mu}m). The HAT-P-4b values are 0.142%+0.014%-0.016% (3.6 micron) and 0.122%+0.012%-0.014% 4.5 {mu}m). The two planets' photometry is consistent with inefficient heat redistribution from their day to night sides (and low albedos), but it is inconclusive about possible temperature inversions in their atmospheres. HAT-P-12b is a Saturn-mass planet and is one of the coolest planets ever observed during secondary eclipse, along with the hot Neptune GJ 436b and the hot Saturn WASP-29b. We are able to place 3{sigma} upper limits on the secondary eclipse depth of HAT-P-12b in both wavelengths: <0.042% (3.6 {mu}m) and <0.085% (4.5 {mu}m). We discuss these results in the context of the Spitzer secondary eclipse measurements of GJ 436b and WASP-29b. It is possible that we do not detect the eclipses of HAT-P-12b due to high eccentricity, but find that weak planetary emission in these wavelengths is a more likely explanation. We place 3{sigma} upper limits on the |e cos {omega}| quantity (where e is eccentricity and {omega} is the argument of periapsis) for HAT-P-3b (<0.0081) and HAT-P-4b (<0.0042), based on the secondary eclipse timings.

  18. Regulation of Histone Acetylation by Autophagy in Parkinson Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Goonho; Tan, Jieqiong; Garcia, Guillermina; Kang, Yunyi; Salvesen, Guy; Zhang, Zhuohua

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the most common age-dependent neurodegenerative movement disorder. Accumulated evidence indicates both environmental and genetic factors play important roles in PD pathogenesis, but the potential interaction between environment and genetics in PD etiology remains largely elusive. Here, we report that PD-related neurotoxins induce both expression and acetylation of multiple sites of histones in cultured human cells and mouse midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. Consistently, levels of histone acetylation are markedly higher in midbrain DA neurons of PD patients compared to those of their matched control individuals. Further analysis reveals that multiple histone deacetylases (HDACs) are concurrently decreased in 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-treated cells and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-treated mouse brains, as well as midbrain tissues of human PD patients. Finally, inhibition of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) protects, whereas inhibition of HDAC1 and HDAC2 potentiates, MPP+-induced cell death. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy suppresses MPP+-induced HDACs degradation. The study reveals that PD environmental factors induce HDACs degradation and histone acetylation increase in DA neurons via autophagy and identifies an epigenetic mechanism in PD pathogenesis. PMID:26699403

  19. Regulation of Histone Acetylation by Autophagy in Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Goonho; Tan, Jieqiong; Garcia, Guillermina; Kang, Yunyi; Salvesen, Guy; Zhang, Zhuohua

    2016-02-12

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the most common age-dependent neurodegenerative movement disorder. Accumulated evidence indicates both environmental and genetic factors play important roles in PD pathogenesis, but the potential interaction between environment and genetics in PD etiology remains largely elusive. Here, we report that PD-related neurotoxins induce both expression and acetylation of multiple sites of histones in cultured human cells and mouse midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. Consistently, levels of histone acetylation are markedly higher in midbrain DA neurons of PD patients compared to those of their matched control individuals. Further analysis reveals that multiple histone deacetylases (HDACs) are concurrently decreased in 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-treated cells and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-treated mouse brains, as well as midbrain tissues of human PD patients. Finally, inhibition of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) protects, whereas inhibition of HDAC1 and HDAC2 potentiates, MPP(+)-induced cell death. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy suppresses MPP(+)-induced HDACs degradation. The study reveals that PD environmental factors induce HDACs degradation and histone acetylation increase in DA neurons via autophagy and identifies an epigenetic mechanism in PD pathogenesis.

  20. Histone acetylation in insect chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Allfrey, V G; Pogo, B G; Littau, V C; Gershey, E L; Mirsky, A E

    1968-01-19

    Acetylation of histones takes place along the salivary gland chromosomes of Chironomus thummi when RNA synthesis is active. It can be observed but not measured quantitatively by autoradiography of chromosome squashes. The "fixatives" commonly used in preparing squashes of insect chromosomes preferentially extract the highly acetylated "arginine-rich" histone fractions; the use of such fixatives may explain the reported absence of histone acetylation in Drosophila melanogaster.

  1. STAT5 acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Kosan, Christian; Ginter, Torsten; Heinzel, Thorsten; Krämer, Oliver H

    2013-01-01

    The cytokine-inducible transcription factors signal transducer and activator of transcription 5A and 5B (STAT5A and STAT5B) are important for the proper development of multicellular eukaryotes. Disturbed signaling cascades evoking uncontrolled expression of STAT5 target genes are associated with cancer and immunological failure. Here, we summarize how STAT5 acetylation is integrated into posttranslational modification networks within cells. Moreover, we focus on how inhibitors of deacetylases and tyrosine kinases can correct leukemogenic signaling nodes involving STAT5. Such small molecules can be exploited in the fight against neoplastic diseases and immunological disorders. PMID:24416653

  2. Six Thinking Hats: Argumentativeness and Response to Thinking Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carl, Walter John, III

    A study presents a perceptual model of thinking called the "Six Thinking Hats" and argumentativeness as a predictor of response to the model. The "Six Thinking Hats" model creates six artificial contexts for thinking, corresponding to the primary thought modes of objective, subjective, critical, and creative thinking, within a…

  3. Structure and evolution of the hAT transposon superfamily.

    PubMed

    Rubin, E; Lithwick, G; Levy, A A

    2001-07-01

    The maize transposon Activator (Ac) was the first mobile DNA element to be discovered. Since then, other elements were found that share similarity to Ac, suggesting that it belongs to a transposon superfamily named hAT after hobo from Drosophila, Ac from maize, and Tam3 from snapdragon. We addressed the structure and evolution of hAT elements by developing new tools for transposon mining and searching the public sequence databases for the hallmarks of hAT elements, namely the transposase and short terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) flanked by 8-bp host duplications. We found 147 hAT-related sequences in plants, animals, and fungi. Six conserved blocks could be identified in the transposase of most hAT elements. A total of 41 hAT sequences were flanked by TIRs and 8-bp host duplications and, out of these, 34 sequences had TIRs similar to the consensus determined in this work, suggesting that they are active or recently active transposons. Phylogenetic analysis and clustering of hAT sequences suggest that the hAT superfamily is very ancient, probably predating the plant-fungi-animal separation, and that, unlike previously proposed, there is no evidence that horizontal gene transfer was involved in the evolution of hAT elements.

  4. Spin-orbit inclinations of the exoplanetary systems HAT-P-8b, HAT-P-9b, HAT-P-16b, and HAT-P-23b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutou, C.; Díaz, R. F.; Udry, S.; Hébrard, G.; Bouchy, F.; Santerne, A.; Ehrenreich, D.; Arnold, L.; Boisse, I.; Bonfils, X.; Delfosse, X.; Eggenberger, A.; Forveille, T.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Lovis, C.; Martinez, P.; Pepe, F.; Perrier, C.; Queloz, D.; Santos, N. C.; Ségransan, D.; Toublanc, D.; Troncin, J. P.; Vanhuysse, M.; Vidal-Madjar, A.

    2011-09-01

    We report the measurement of the spin-orbit angle of the extra-solar planets HAT-P-8 b, HAT-P-9 b, HAT-P-16 b, and HAT-P-23 b, based on spectroscopic observations performed at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence with the SOPHIE spectrograph on the 1.93-m telescope. Radial velocity measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect show the detection of an apparent prograde, aligned orbit for all systems. The projected spin-orbit angles are found to be λ = -17°+9.2-11.5, -16° ± 8°, -10° ± 16°, and +15° ± 22° for HAT-P-8, HAT-P-9, HAT-P-16, and HAT-P-23, respectively, with corresponding projected rotational velocities of 14.5 ± 0.8, 12.5 ± 1.8, 3.9 ± 0.8, and 7.8 ± 1.6 km s-1. These new results increase to 37 the number of accurately measured spin-orbit angles in transiting extrasolar systems. We conclude by drawing a tentative picture of the global behaviour of orbital alignement, involving the complexity and diversity of possible mechanisms. Based on observations collected with the SOPHIE spectrograph on the 1.93-m telescope at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France, by the SOPHIE Consortium (program 10A.PNP.CONS).

  5. HATS-13b and HATS-14b: two transiting hot Jupiters from the HATSouth survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, L.; Hartman, J. D.; Penev, K.; Bakos, G. Á.; Brahm, R.; Ciceri, S.; Henning, Th.; Csubry, Z.; Bayliss, D.; Zhou, G.; Rabus, M.; de Val-Borro, M.; Espinoza, N.; Jordán, A.; Suc, V.; Bhatti, W.; Schmidt, B.; Sato, B.; Tan, T. G.; Wright, D. J.; Tinney, C. G.; Addison, B. C.; Noyes, R. W.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2015-08-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-13b and HATS-14b, which are two hot-Jupiter transiting planets discovered by the HATSouth survey. The host stars are quite similar to each other (HATS-13: V = 13.9 mag, M⋆ = 0.96 M⊙, R⋆ = 0.89 R⊙, Teff ≈ 5500 K, [Fe/H] = 0.05; HATS-14: V = 13.8 mag, M⋆ = 0.97 M⊙, R⋆ = 0.93 R⊙, Teff ≈ 5350 K, [Fe/H] = 0.33) and both the planets orbit around them with a period of ~3 days and a separation of ~0.04 au. However, even though they are irradiated in a similar way, the physical characteristics of the two planets are very different. HATS-13b, with a mass of Mp = 0.543 ± 0.072 MJ and a radius of Rp = 1.212 ± 0.035 RJ, appears as an inflated planet, while HATS-14b, having a mass of Mp = 1.071 ± 0.070 MJ and a radius of Rp = 1.039 ± 0.032 RJ, is only slightly larger in radius than Jupiter. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (HESS) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. Based in part on observations made with (i) the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; (ii) the MPG 2.2 m and the (iii) Euler 1.2 m Telescopes at the ESO Observatory in La Silla; (iv) the CTIO 0.9 m Telescope at the Observatory of Cerro Tololo.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgFull Table A.1 and RV Tables are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/580/A63

  6. Hibiscus cannabinus feruloyl-coa:monolignol transferase

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkerson, Curtis; Ralph, John; Withers, Saunia; Mansfield, Shawn D.

    2016-11-15

    The invention relates to isolated nucleic acids encoding a feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase and feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase enzymes. The isolated nucleic acids and/or the enzymes enable incorporation of monolignol ferulates into the lignin of plants, where such monolignol ferulates include, for example, p-coumaryl ferulate, coniferyl ferulate, and/or sinapyl ferulate. The invention also includes methods and plants that include nucleic acids encoding a feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase enzyme and/or feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase enzymes.

  7. To learn better, keep the HAT on.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kelsey C; Sun, Yi E

    2004-06-24

    Long-lasting memories are known to require new transcription. Recent studies have highlighted a role for epigenetic alterations, including histone acetylation, in regulating gene expression. In this issue of Neuron, Alarcón et al. and Korzus et al. use two different mouse models of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome to elucidate a role for the histone acetyltransferase activity of CREB binding protein (CBP) in long-term memory and plasticity.

  8. Feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase

    DOEpatents

    Wilkerson, Curtis; Ralph, John; Withers, Saunia; Mansfield, Shawn D.

    2016-09-13

    The invention relates to nucleic acids encoding a feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase and the feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase enzyme that enables incorporation of monolignol ferulates, for example, including p-coumaryl ferulate, coniferyl ferulate, and sinapyl ferulate, into the lignin of plants.

  9. Feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase

    DOEpatents

    Wilkerson, Curtis; Ralph, John; Withers, Saunia; Mansfield, Shawn D.

    2016-11-08

    The invention relates to nucleic acids encoding a feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase and the feruloyl-CoA:monolignol transferase enzyme that enables incorporation of monolignol ferulates, for example, including p-coumaryl ferulate, coniferyl ferulate, and sinapyl ferulate, into the lignin of plants.

  10. HATS-15b and HATS-16b: Two Massive Planets Transiting Old G Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciceri, S.; Mancini, L.; Henning, T.; Bakos, G.; Penev, K.; Brahm, R.; Zhou, G.; Hartman, J. D.; Bayliss, D.; Jordán, A.; Csubry, Z.; de Val-Borro, M.; Bhatti, W.; Rabus, M.; Espinoza, N.; Suc, V.; Schmidt, B.; Noyes, R.; Howard, A. W.; Fulton, B. J.; Isaacson, H.; Marcy, G. W.; Butler, R. P.; Arriagada, P.; Crane, J. D.; Shectman, S.; Thompson, I.; Tan, T. G.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sari, P.

    2016-07-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-15 b and HATS-16 b, two massive transiting extrasolar planets orbiting evolved (∼10 Gyr) main-sequence stars. The planet HATS-15 b, which is hosted by a G9 V star (V=14.8 mag), is a hot Jupiter with mass of 2.17\\quad +/- \\quad 0.15 {M}{{J}} and radius of 1.105\\quad +/- \\quad 0.040 {R}{{J}}, and it completes its orbit in about 1.7 days. HATS-16 b is a very massive hot Jupiter with mass of 3.27\\quad +/- \\quad 0.19 {M}{{J}} and radius of 1.30\\quad +/- \\quad 0.15 {R}{{J}}; it orbits around its G3 V parent star (V=13.8 mag) in ∼2.7 days. HATS-16 is slightly active and shows a periodic photometric modulation, implying a rotational period of 12 days, which is unexpectedly short given its isochronal age. This fast rotation might be the result of the tidal interaction between the star and its planet. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. Based in part on observations performed at the ESO La Silla Observatory in Chile, with the Coralie and FEROS spectrographs mounted on the Euler-Swiss and MPG 2.2 m telescopes, respectively. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. Based in part on data collected at Keck Telescope. Observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope are used in this paper.

  11. Spitzer Secondary Eclipses of HAT-P-13b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Ryan A.; Harrington, J.; Hardin, M. R.; Madhusudhan, N.; Cubillos, P.; Blecic, J.; Bakos, G.; Hartman, J. D.

    2013-10-01

    HAT-P-13 b is a transiting hot Jupiter with a slightly eccentric orbit (e = 0.010) inhabiting a two-planet system. The two-planet arrangement provides an opportunity to probe the interior structure of HAT-P-13b. Under equilibrium-tide theory and confirmation that the apsides of planets b and c are in alignment, a measurement of the planet's eccentricity can be related to the planet's tidal Love number k2, which describes the central condensation of the planet's mass and its deformation under tidal effects. A measurement of k2 could constrain interior models of HAT-P-13b. HAT-P-13b's orbit is configured favorably for refinement of the eccentricity by secondary eclipse timing observations, which provide direct measurements of ecosω. In 2010, Spitzer observed two secondary eclipses of HAT-P-13b in the 3.6- and 4.5-μm IRAC bandpasses. We present secondary eclipse times and depths; joint models of the HAT-P-13 system that incorporate transit photometry and radial velocity data; and constraints on the atmospheric chemistry of HAT-P-13b that suggest solar-abundance composition without a thermal inversion. Spitzer is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with NASA, which provided support for this work. This work was supported in part by NASA Planetary Atmospheres Grant NNX13AF38G.

  12. [Nourseothricin (streptothricin) inactivated by plasmid pIE 636-encoded acetyltransferase: detection of N-acetyl-beta-lysine in the inactivated product].

    PubMed

    Seltmann, G

    1985-12-01

    Nourseothricin (streptothricin) can be inactivated by an acetyl transferase synthesized by E. coli strains containing plasmid pIE 636. Nourseothricin inactivated in the presence of 14C-acetyl-coenzyme A was purified and submitted to partial acidic hydrolysis. By electrophoresis of the hydrolysate a 14C-containing substance moving only slowly towards the cathode could be isolated. This substance after complete hydrolysis yields only unlabelled beta-lysine.

  13. 21 CFR 862.1535 - Ornithine carbamyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... carbamyl transferase (OCT) in serum. Ornithine carbamyl transferase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases, such as infectious hepatitis, acute cholecystitis (inflammation...

  14. Histone acetylation in heterochromatin assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Workman, Jerry L.

    2010-01-01

    Histone acetylation is generally considered a mark involved in activating gene expression by making chromatin structures less compact. In the April 1, 2010, issue of Genes & Development, Xhemalce and Kouzarides (pp. 647–652) demonstrate that the acetylation of histone H3 at Lys 4 (H3K4) plays a role in the formation of repressive heterochromatin in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. H3K4 acetylation mediates a switch of chromodomain proteins associated with methylated H3K9 during heterochromatin assembly. PMID:20395362

  15. Acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Brian T; Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Moustafa, Tarek; Schölz, Christian; Wagner, Sebastian A; Magnes, Christoph; Zechner, Rudolf; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a frequently occurring posttranslational modification; however, little is known about the origin and regulation of most sites. Here we used quantitative mass spectrometry to analyze acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that acetylation accumulated in growth-arrested cells in a manner that depended on acetyl-CoA generation in distinct subcellular compartments. Mitochondrial acetylation levels correlated with acetyl-CoA concentration in vivo and acetyl-CoA acetylated lysine residues nonenzymatically in vitro. We developed a method to estimate acetylation stoichiometry and found that the vast majority of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic acetylation had a very low stoichiometry. However, mitochondrial acetylation occurred at a significantly higher basal level than cytoplasmic acetylation, consistent with the distinct acetylation dynamics and higher acetyl-CoA concentration in mitochondria. High stoichiometry acetylation occurred mostly on histones, proteins present in histone acetyltransferase and deacetylase complexes, and on transcription factors. These data show that a majority of acetylation occurs at very low levels in exponentially growing yeast and is uniformly affected by exposure to acetyl-CoA.

  16. Long-term surveillance plan for the Mexican Hat disposal site Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Mexican Hat, Utah, disposal site. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed regulations for the issuance of a general license for the custody and long-term care of UMTRA Project disposal sites in 10 CFR Part 40. The purpose of this general license is to ensure that the UMTRA Project disposal sites will be cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed, the NRC requires the DOE to submit a site-specific LTSP. The DOE prepared this LTSP to meet this requirement for the Mexican Hat disposal site. The general license becomes effective when the NRC concurs with the DOE`s determination of completion of remedial action for the disposal site and the NRC formally accepts this LTSP. This LTSP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure that the Mexican Hat disposal site performs as designed. The program is based on two distinct types of activities: (1) site inspections to identify potential threats to disposal cell integrity, and (2) monitoring of selected seeps to observe changes in flow rates and water quality. The LTSP is based on the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program guidance and meets the requirements of 10 CFR {section}40.27(b) and 40 CFR {section}192.03. 18 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Bi-Directional Communication: A Critical Component of HAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Known problems with automation include lack of mode awareness, automation brittleness, and risk of miscalibrated trust. Human-Autonomy Teaming (HAT) is essential for improving these problems. This presentation outlines critical components for Human-Autonomy Teaming.

  18. Human borna disease virus infection impacts host proteome and histone lysine acetylation in human oligodendroglia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xia; Zhao, Libo; Yang, Yongtao; Bode, Liv; Huang, Hua; Liu, Chengyu; Huang, Rongzhong; Zhang, Liang; and others

    2014-09-15

    Background: Borna disease virus (BDV) replicates in the nucleus and establishes persistent infections in mammalian hosts. A human BDV strain was used to address the first time, how BDV infection impacts the proteome and histone lysine acetylation (Kac) of human oligodendroglial (OL) cells, thus allowing a better understanding of infection-driven pathophysiology in vitro. Methods: Proteome and histone lysine acetylation were profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Histone acetylation changes were validated by biochemistry assays. Results: Post BDV infection, 4383 quantifiable differential proteins were identified and functionally annotated to metabolism pathways, immune response, DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. Sixteen of the thirty identified Kac sites in core histones presented altered acetylation levels post infection. Conclusions: BDV infection using a human strain impacted the whole proteome and histone lysine acetylation in OL cells. - Highlights: • A human strain of BDV (BDV Hu-H1) was used to infect human oligodendroglial cells (OL cells). • This study is the first to reveal the host proteomic and histone Kac profiles in BDV-infected OL cells. • BDV infection affected the expression of many transcription factors and several HATs and HDACs.

  19. Platelet activating factor-induced expression of p21 is correlated with histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Elisabetta; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Lege, Bree M; Liu, Jingwei; Neelapu, Sattva S; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2017-02-03

    Ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated keratinocytes secrete the lipid mediator of inflammation, platelet-activating factor (PAF). PAF plays an essential role in UV-induced immune suppression and skin cancer induction. Dermal mast cell migration from the skin to the draining lymph nodes plays a prominent role in activating systemic immune suppression. UV-induced PAF activates mast cell migration by up-regulating mast cell CXCR4 surface expression. Recent findings indicate that PAF up-regulates CXCR4 expression via histone acetylation. UV-induced PAF also activates cell cycle arrest and disrupts DNA repair, in part by increasing p21 expression. Do epigenetic alterations play a role in p21 up-regulation? Here we show that PAF increases Acetyl-CREB-binding protein (CBP/p300) histone acetyltransferase expression in a time and dose-dependent fashion. Partial deletion of the HAT domain in the CBP gene, blocked these effects. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that PAF-treatment activated the acetylation of the p21 promoter. PAF-treatment had no effect on other acetylating enzymes (GCN5L2, PCAF) indicating it is not a global activator of histone acetylation. This study provides further evidence that PAF activates epigenetic mechanisms to affect important cellular processes, and we suggest this bioactive lipid can serve as a link between the environment and the epigenome.

  20. Platelet activating factor-induced expression of p21 is correlated with histone acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Damiani, Elisabetta; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Lege, Bree M.; Liu, Jingwei; Neelapu, Sattva S.; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2017-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated keratinocytes secrete the lipid mediator of inflammation, platelet-activating factor (PAF). PAF plays an essential role in UV-induced immune suppression and skin cancer induction. Dermal mast cell migration from the skin to the draining lymph nodes plays a prominent role in activating systemic immune suppression. UV-induced PAF activates mast cell migration by up-regulating mast cell CXCR4 surface expression. Recent findings indicate that PAF up-regulates CXCR4 expression via histone acetylation. UV-induced PAF also activates cell cycle arrest and disrupts DNA repair, in part by increasing p21 expression. Do epigenetic alterations play a role in p21 up-regulation? Here we show that PAF increases Acetyl-CREB-binding protein (CBP/p300) histone acetyltransferase expression in a time and dose-dependent fashion. Partial deletion of the HAT domain in the CBP gene, blocked these effects. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that PAF-treatment activated the acetylation of the p21 promoter. PAF-treatment had no effect on other acetylating enzymes (GCN5L2, PCAF) indicating it is not a global activator of histone acetylation. This study provides further evidence that PAF activates epigenetic mechanisms to affect important cellular processes, and we suggest this bioactive lipid can serve as a link between the environment and the epigenome. PMID:28157211

  1. Urinary mutagenicity and N-acetylation phenotype in textile industry workers exposed to arylamines

    SciTech Connect

    Sinues, B.; Perez, J.; Bernal, M.L.; Saenz, M.A.; Lanuza, J.; Bartolome, M. )

    1992-09-15

    Primary aromatic amines have been identified epidemiologically as human carcinogens. It has been suggested that the target organ affected by aromatic amines is dependent on the rate of metabolic activation. Epidemiological studies have shown an association between low acetyl transferase activity and bladder cancer risk. On this basis, our working hypothesis was that the slow acetylators could follow in a higher extent the metabolic pathway independent of N-acetylation, leading to the excretion of conjugates of electrophyles with glucuronic acid. The instability of these glucuronides could be responsible for the association between arylamine-induced bladder cancer and slow acetylator phenotype. A total of 153 individuals were included in this study: 70 exposed to arylamines (working in textile industry) and 83 nonexposed. The following parameters were determined in urine: mutagenic index in the absence of metabolic activation, S9; mutagenic index in the presence of S9; and the mutagenic index after incubation of the urine with beta-glucuronidase. All individuals were phenotyped according to their capacity of N-acetylation by using isoniazid as drug test. The results show that the mutagenic index after incubation of the urine with beta-glucuronidase is statistically higher in exposed subjects when compared with nonexposed individuals (P less than 0.001), this parameter being statistically higher among exposed subjects who were slow acetylators than among rapid metabolizers, independent of the fact that they were smokers or nonsmokers. There were no significant differences between groups for the mutagenicity in urine not incubated with beta-glucuronidase.

  2. Long-term surveillance plan for the Mexican Hat disposal site, Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This plan describes the long-term surveillance activities for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site at Mexican Hat, Utah. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal site continues to function as designed. This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive material (RRM). This LTSPC documents the land ownership interests and details how the long-term care of the disposal site will be accomplished.

  3. Functional Dissection of the Bipartite Active Site of the Class I Coenzyme A (CoA)-Transferase Succinyl-CoA:Acetate CoA-Transferase

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Jesse R.; Mullins, Elwood A.; Kappock, T. Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme A (CoA)-transferases catalyze the reversible transfer of CoA from acyl-CoA thioesters to free carboxylates. Class I CoA-transferases produce acylglutamyl anhydride intermediates that undergo attack by CoA thiolate on either the internal or external carbonyl carbon atoms, forming distinct tetrahedral intermediates <3 Å apart. In this study, crystal structures of succinyl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase (AarC) from Acetobacter aceti are used to examine how the Asn347 carboxamide stabilizes the internal oxyanion intermediate. A structure of the active mutant AarC-N347A bound to CoA revealed both solvent replacement of the missing contact and displacement of the adjacent Glu294, indicating that Asn347 both polarizes and orients the essential glutamate. AarC was crystallized with the nonhydrolyzable acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) analog dethiaacetyl-CoA (1a) in an attempt to trap a closed enzyme complex containing a stable analog of the external oxyanion intermediate. One active site contained an acetylglutamyl anhydride adduct and truncated 1a, an unexpected result hinting at an unprecedented cleavage of the ketone moiety in 1a. Solution studies confirmed that 1a decomposition is accompanied by production of near-stoichiometric acetate, in a process that seems to depend on microbial contamination but not AarC. A crystal structure of AarC bound to the postulated 1a truncation product (2a) showed complete closure of one active site per dimer but no acetylglutamyl anhydride, even with acetate added. These findings suggest that an activated acetyl donor forms during 1a decomposition; a working hypothesis involving ketone oxidation is offered. The ability of 2a to induce full active site closure furthermore suggests that it subverts a system used to impede inappropriate active site closure on unacylated CoA. PMID:27242998

  4. Functional dissection of the bipartite active site of the class I coenzyme A (CoA)-transferase succinyl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Jesse; Mullins, Elwood; Kappock, T.

    2016-05-01

    Coenzyme A (CoA)-transferases catalyze the reversible transfer of CoA from acyl-CoA thioesters to free carboxylates. Class I CoA-transferases produce acylglutamyl anhydride intermediates that undergo attack by CoA thiolate on either the internal or external carbonyl carbon atoms, forming distinct tetrahedral intermediates less than 3 Å apart. In this study, crystal structures of succinyl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase (AarC) from Acetobacter aceti are used to examine how the Asn347 carboxamide stabilizes the internal oxyanion intermediate. A structure of the active mutant AarC-N347A bound to CoA revealed both solvent replacement of the missing contact and displacement of the adjacent Glu294, indicating that Asn347 both polarizes and orients the essential glutamate. AarC was crystallized with the nonhydrolyzable acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) analogue dethiaacetyl-CoA (1a) in an attempt to trap a closed enzyme complex containing a stable analogue of the external oxyanion intermediate. One active site contained an acetylglutamyl anhydride adduct and truncated 1a, an unexpected result hinting at an unprecedented cleavage of the ketone moiety in 1a. Solution studies confirmed that 1a decomposition is accompanied by production of near-stoichiometric acetate, in a process that seems to depend on microbial contamination but not AarC. A crystal structure of AarC bound to the postulated 1a truncation product (2a) showed complete closure of one active site per dimer but no acetylglutamyl anhydride, even with acetate added. These findings suggest that an activated acetyl donor forms during 1a decomposition; a working hypothesis involving ketone oxidation is offered. The ability of 2a to induce full active site closure furthermore suggests that it subverts a system used to impede inappropriate active site closure on unacylated CoA.

  5. Functional dissection of the bipartite active site of the class I coenzyme A (CoA)-transferase succinyl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase

    DOE PAGES

    Murphy, Jesse R.; Mullins, Elwood A.; Kappock, T. Joseph

    2016-05-23

    Coenzyme A (CoA)-transferases catalyze the reversible transfer of CoA from acyl-CoA thioesters to free carboxylates. Class I CoA-transferases produce acylglutamyl anhydride intermediates that undergo attack by CoA thiolate on either the internal or external carbonyl carbon atoms, forming distinct tetrahedral intermediates <3 Å apart. Here in this study, crystal structures of succinyl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase (AarC) from Acetobacter aceti are used to examine how the Asn347 carboxamide stabilizes the internal oxyanion intermediate. A structure of the active mutant AarC-N347A bound to CoA revealed both solvent replacement of the missing contact and displacement of the adjacent Glu294, indicating that Asn347 both polarizes andmore » orients the essential glutamate. AarC was crystallized with the nonhydrolyzable acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) analog dethiaacetyl-CoA (1a) in an attempt to trap a closed enzyme complex containing a stable analog of the external oxyanion intermediate. One active site contained an acetylglutamyl anhydride adduct and truncated 1a, an unexpected result hinting at an unprecedented cleavage of the ketone moiety in 1a. Solution studies confirmed that 1a decomposition is accompanied by production of near-stoichiometric acetate, in a process that seems to depend on microbial contamination but not AarC. A crystal structure of AarC bound to the postulated 1a truncation product (2a) showed complete closure of one active site per dimer but no acetylglutamyl anhydride, even with acetate added. These findings suggest that an activated acetyl donor forms during 1a decomposition; a working hypothesis involving ketone oxidation is offered. Finally, the ability of 2a to induce full active site closure furthermore suggests that it subverts a system used to impede inappropriate active site closure on unacylated CoA.« less

  6. Functional dissection of the bipartite active site of the class I coenzyme A (CoA)-transferase succinyl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Jesse R.; Mullins, Elwood A.; Kappock, T. Joseph

    2016-05-23

    Coenzyme A (CoA)-transferases catalyze the reversible transfer of CoA from acyl-CoA thioesters to free carboxylates. Class I CoA-transferases produce acylglutamyl anhydride intermediates that undergo attack by CoA thiolate on either the internal or external carbonyl carbon atoms, forming distinct tetrahedral intermediates <3 Å apart. Here in this study, crystal structures of succinyl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase (AarC) from Acetobacter aceti are used to examine how the Asn347 carboxamide stabilizes the internal oxyanion intermediate. A structure of the active mutant AarC-N347A bound to CoA revealed both solvent replacement of the missing contact and displacement of the adjacent Glu294, indicating that Asn347 both polarizes and orients the essential glutamate. AarC was crystallized with the nonhydrolyzable acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) analog dethiaacetyl-CoA (1a) in an attempt to trap a closed enzyme complex containing a stable analog of the external oxyanion intermediate. One active site contained an acetylglutamyl anhydride adduct and truncated 1a, an unexpected result hinting at an unprecedented cleavage of the ketone moiety in 1a. Solution studies confirmed that 1a decomposition is accompanied by production of near-stoichiometric acetate, in a process that seems to depend on microbial contamination but not AarC. A crystal structure of AarC bound to the postulated 1a truncation product (2a) showed complete closure of one active site per dimer but no acetylglutamyl anhydride, even with acetate added. These findings suggest that an activated acetyl donor forms during 1a decomposition; a working hypothesis involving ketone oxidation is offered. Finally, the ability of 2a to induce full active site closure furthermore suggests that it subverts a system used to impede inappropriate active site closure on unacylated CoA.

  7. The Essential Gene wda Encodes a WD40 Repeat Subunit of Drosophila SAGA Required for Histone H3 Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Guelman, Sebastián; Suganuma, Tamaki; Florens, Laurence; Weake, Vikki; Swanson, Selene K.; Washburn, Michael P.; Abmayr, Susan M.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2006-01-01

    Histone acetylation provides a switch between transcriptionally repressive and permissive chromatin. By regulating the chromatin structure at specific promoters, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) carry out important functions during differentiation and development of higher eukaryotes. HAT complexes are present in organisms as diverse as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, humans, and flies. For example, the well-studied yeast SAGA is related to three mammalian complexes. We previously identified Drosophila melanogaster orthologues of yeast SAGA components Ada2, Ada3, Spt3, and Tra1 and demonstrated that they associate with dGcn5 in a high-molecular-weight complex. To better understand the function of Drosophila SAGA (dSAGA), we sought to affinity purify and characterize this complex in more detail. A proteomic approach led to the identification of an orthologue of the yeast protein Ada1 and the novel protein encoded by CG4448, referred to as WDA (will decrease acetylation). Embryos lacking both alleles of the wda gene exhibited reduced levels of histone H3 acetylation and could not develop into adult flies. Our results point to a critical function of dSAGA and histone acetylation during Drosophila development. PMID:16980620

  8. High Hats, Swiss Cheese, and Fluorescent Lighting?

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, Jeffrey J.; Gordon, Kelly L.

    2002-08-30

    For DOE, PNNL is conducting a competitive procurement to promote market introduction of new residential recessed downlights (also known as ''recessed cans'' or ''high hats'') that are airtight, rated for insulated ceilings, and hard-wired for CFLs. This paper discusses the potential energy savings of new high-efficiency downlights, and the results of product testing to date. Recessed downlights are the most popular residential lighting fixtures in the United States, with 21.7 million fixtures sold in 2000. An estimated 350 million are currently installed in American homes. Recessed cans are relatively inexpensive, and provide an unobtrusive, directed source of light for kitchens, hallways, and living rooms. Recessed cans are energy-intensive in three ways. First, virtually all recessed cans currently installed in the residential sector use incandescent light sources, typically reflector-type lamps drawing 65-150 watts. Second, heat from incandescent lamps adds to air-conditioning loads. Third, most installed recessed cans are not airtight, so they allow conditioned air to escape from the living area into unconditioned spaces such as attics. Addressing both lighting energy use and air leakage in recessed cans has proven challenging. Lighting energy efficiency is greatly improved by using CFLs. Air leakage can be addressed by making fixtures airtight. But when CFLs are used in an airtight recessed can, heat generated by the lamp and ballast is trapped within the fixture. Excessive heat causes reduced light output and shorter lifespan of the CFL. The procurement was designed to overcome these technical challenges and make new products available in the marketplace.

  9. Transpositionally active episomal hAT elements

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background hAT elements and V(D)J recombination may have evolved from a common ancestral transposable element system. Extrachromosomal, circular forms of transposable elements (referred to here as episomal forms) have been reported yet their biological significance remains unknown. V(D)J signal joints, which resemble episomal transposable elements, have been considered non-recombinogenic products of V(D)J recombination and a safe way to dispose of excised chromosomal sequences. V(D)J signal joints can, however, participate in recombination reactions and the purpose of this study was to determine if hobo and Hermes episomal elements are also recombinogenic. Results Up to 50% of hobo/Hermes episomes contained two intact, inverted-terminal repeats and 86% of these contained from 1-1000 bp of intercalary DNA. Episomal hobo/Hermes elements were recovered from Musca domestica (a natural host of Hermes), Drosophila melanogaster (a natural host of hobo) and transgenic Drosophila melanogaster and Aedes aegypti (with autonomous Hermes elements). Episomal Hermes elements were recovered from unfertilized eggs of M. domestica and D. melanogaster demonstrating their potential for extrachromosomal, maternal transmission. Reintegration of episomal Hermes elements was observed in vitro and in vivo and the presence of Hermes episomes resulted in lower rates of canonical Hermes transposition in vivo. Conclusion Episomal hobo/Hermes elements are common products of element excision and can be maternally transmitted. Episomal forms of Hermes are capable of integration and also of influencing the transposition of canonical elements suggesting biological roles for these extrachromosomal elements in element transmission and regulation. PMID:20003420

  10. HATS-25b through HATS-30b: A Half-dozen New Inflated Transiting Hot Jupiters from the HATSouth Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza, N.; Bayliss, D.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Jordán, A.; Zhou, G.; Mancini, L.; Brahm, R.; Ciceri, S.; Bhatti, W.; Csubry, Z.; Rabus, M.; Penev, K.; Bento, J.; de Val-Borro, M.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Suc, V.; Wright, D. J.; Tinney, C. G.; Tan, T. G.; Noyes, R.

    2016-10-01

    We report six new inflated hot Jupiters (HATS-25b through HATS-30b) discovered using the HATSouth global network of automated telescopes. The planets orbit stars with V magnitudes in the range of ˜12-14 and have masses in the largely populated 0.5{M}J{--}0.7{M}J region of parameter space but span a wide variety of radii, from 1.17{R}J to 1.75{R}J. HATS-25b, HATS-28b, HATS-29b, and HATS-30b are typical inflated hot Jupiters ({R}p=1.17{--}1.26{R}J) orbiting G-type stars in short period (P = 3.2-4.6 days) orbits. However, HATS-26b ({R}p=1.75{R}J, P=3.3024 days) and HATS-27b ({R}p=1.50{R}J, P=4.6370 days) stand out as highly inflated planets orbiting slightly evolved F stars just after and in the turn-off points, respectively, which are among the least dense hot Jupiters, with densities of 0.153 {{g}} {{cm}}-3 and 0.180 {{g}} {{cm}}-3, respectively. All the presented exoplanets but HATS-27b are good targets for future atmospheric characterization studies, while HATS-27b is a prime target for Rossiter—McLaughlin monitoring in order to determine its spin-orbit alignment given the brightness (V = 12.8) and stellar rotational velocity (v\\sin i≈ 9.3 km s-1) of the host star. These discoveries significantly increase the number of inflated hot Jupiters known, contributing to our understanding of the mechanism(s) responsible for hot Jupiter inflation. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. Based in part on observations made with the MPG 2.2 m Telescope at the ESO Observatory

  11. Androgen Receptor Signalling in Prostate Cancer: The Functional Consequences of Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Lavery, Derek N.; Bevan, Charlotte L.

    2011-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand activated transcription factor and member of the steroid hormone receptor (SHR) subfamily of nuclear receptors. In the early stages of prostate carcinogenesis, tumour growth is dependent on androgens, and AR directly mediates these effects by modulating gene expression. During transcriptional regulation, the AR recruits numerous cofactors with acetylation-modifying enzymatic activity, the best studied include p300/CBP and the p160/SRC family of coactivators. It is known that recruitment of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) is key in fine-tuning responses to androgens and is thus likely to play a role in prostate cancer progression. Further, these proteins can also modify the AR itself. The functional consequences of AR acetylation, the role of modifying enzymes in relation to AR transcriptional response, and prostate cancer will be discussed. PMID:21274273

  12. Properties of Succinyl-Coenzyme A:d-Citramalate Coenzyme A Transferase and Its Role in the Autotrophic 3-Hydroxypropionate Cycle of Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, Silke; Alber, Birgit E.; Fuchs, Georg

    2006-01-01

    The phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus uses the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle for autotrophic CO2 fixation. This cycle starts with acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and produces glyoxylate. Glyoxylate is an unconventional cell carbon precursor that needs special enzymes for assimilation. Glyoxylate is combined with propionyl-CoA to β-methylmalyl-CoA, which is converted to citramalate. Cell extracts catalyzed the succinyl-CoA-dependent conversion of citramalate to acetyl-CoA and pyruvate, the central cell carbon precursor. This reaction is due to the combined action of enzymes that were upregulated during autotrophic growth, a coenzyme A transferase with the use of succinyl-CoA as the CoA donor and a lyase cleaving citramalyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA and pyruvate. Genomic analysis identified a gene coding for a putative coenzyme A transferase. The gene was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to code for succinyl-CoA:d-citramalate coenzyme A transferase. This enzyme, which catalyzes the reaction d-citramalate + succinyl-CoA → d-citramalyl-CoA + succinate, was purified and studied. It belongs to class III of the coenzyme A transferase enzyme family, with an aspartate residue in the active site. The homodimeric enzyme composed of 44-kDa subunits was specific for succinyl-CoA as a CoA donor but also accepted d-malate and itaconate instead of d-citramalate. The CoA transferase gene is part of a cluster of genes which are cotranscribed, including the gene for d-citramalyl-CoA lyase. It is proposed that the CoA transferase and the lyase catalyze the last two steps in the glyoxylate assimilation route. PMID:16952935

  13. Three CoA Transferases Involved in the Production of Short Chain Fatty Acids in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Mitsunari; Yoshida, Yasuo; Nagano, Keiji; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Takebe, Jun; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2016-01-01

    Butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, which produces butyrate and acetyl-CoA from butyryl-CoA and acetate, is responsible for the final step of butyrate production in bacteria. This study demonstrates that in the periodontopathogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis this reaction is not catalyzed by PGN_1171, previously annotated as butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, but by three distinct CoA transferases, PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and spectrophotometric analyses were performed using crude enzyme extracts from deletion mutant strains and purified recombinant proteins. The experiments revealed that, in the presence of acetate, PGN_0725 preferentially utilized butyryl-CoA rather than propionyl-CoA. By contrast, this preference was reversed in PGN_1888. The only butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase activity was observed in PGN_1341. Double reciprocal plots revealed that all the reactions catalyzed by these enzymes follow a ternary-complex mechanism, in contrast to previously characterized CoA transferases. GC-MS analysis to determine the concentrations of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in culture supernatants of P. gingivalis wild type and mutant strains revealed that PGN_0725 and PGN_1888 play a major role in the production of butyrate and propionate, respectively. Interestingly, a triple deletion mutant lacking PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888 produced low levels of SCFAs, suggesting that the microorganism contains CoA transferase(s) in addition to these three enzymes. Growth rates of the mutant strains were mostly slower than that of the wild type, indicating that many carbon compounds produced in the SCFA synthesis appear to be important for the biological activity of this microorganism. PMID:27486457

  14. Long-term surveillance plan for the Mexican Hat Disposal Site, Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    This plan describes the long-term surveillance activities for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site at Mexican Hat, Utah. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal site continues to function as designed. This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive material (RRM). This LTSP (based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program), documents the land ownership interests and details how the long-term care of the disposal site will be accomplished.

  15. HAT-P-39b-HAT-P-41b: Three Highly Inflated Transiting Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Béky, B.; Torres, G.; Latham, D. W.; Csubry, Z.; Penev, K.; Shporer, A.; Fulton, B. J.; Buchhave, L. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Kovács, G.; Noyes, R. W.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Everett, M.; Szklenár, T.; Quinn, S. N.; Bieryla, A.; Knox, R. P.; Hinz, P.; Sasselov, D. D.; Fűrész, G.; Stefanik, R. P.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2012-11-01

    We report the discovery of three new transiting extrasolar planets orbiting moderately bright (V = 11.1, 11.7, and 12.4) F stars. The planets HAT-P-39b through HAT-P-41b have periods of P = 3.5439 days, 4.4572 days, and 2.6940 days, masses of 0.60 M J, 0.62 M J, and 0.80 M J, and radii of 1.57 R J, 1.73 R J, and 1.68 R J, respectively. They orbit stars with masses of 1.40 M ⊙, 1.51 M ⊙, and 1.51 M ⊙, respectively. The three planets are members of an emerging population of highly inflated Jupiters with 0.4 M J < M < 1.5 M J and R > 1.5 R J. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time has been granted by NOAO (A201Hr, A289Hr, and A284Hr), NASA (N049Hr, N018Hr, N167Hr, N029Hr, N108Hr, and N154Hr), and the NOAO Gemini/Keck time-exchange program (G329Hr). Based in part on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. Based in part on observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope. Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona.

  16. HAT-P-20b-HAT-P-23b: Four Massive Transiting Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J.; Torres, G.; Latham, D. W.; Kovács, Géza; Noyes, R. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Marcy, G. W.; Howard, A. W.; Kipping, D.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Shporer, A.; Béky, B.; Buchhave, L. A.; Perumpilly, G.; Everett, M.; Sasselov, D. D.; Stefanik, R. P.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2011-12-01

    We report the discovery of four relatively massive (2-7 M J) transiting extrasolar planets. HAT-P-20b orbits the moderately bright V = 11.339 K3 dwarf star GSC 1910-00239 on a circular orbit, with a period P = 2.875317 ± 0.000004 days, transit epoch Tc = 2455080.92661 ± 0.00021 (BJDUTC), and transit duration 0.0770 ± 0.0008 days. The host star has a mass of 0.76 ± 0.03 M ⊙, radius of 0.69 ± 0.02 R ⊙, effective temperature 4595 ± 80 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.35 ± 0.08. The planetary companion has a mass of 7.246 ± 0.187 M J and a radius of 0.867 ± 0.033 R J yielding a mean density of 13.78 ± 1.50 g cm-3. HAT-P-21b orbits the V = 11.685 G3 dwarf star GSC 3013-01229 on an eccentric (e = 0.228 ± 0.016) orbit, with a period P = 4.124481 ± 0.000007 days, transit epoch Tc = 2454996.41312 ± 0.00069, and transit duration 0.1530 ± 0.0027 days. The host star has a mass of 0.95 ± 0.04 M ⊙, radius of 1.10 ± 0.08 R ⊙, effective temperature 5588 ± 80 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.01 ± 0.08. The planetary companion has a mass of 4.063 ± 0.161 M J and a radius of 1.024 ± 0.092 R J yielding a mean density of 4.68+1.59 - 0.99 g cm-3. HAT-P-21b is a borderline object between the pM and pL class planets, and the transits occur near apastron. HAT-P-22b orbits the bright V = 9.732 G5 dwarf star HD 233731 on a circular orbit, with a period P = 3.212220 ± 0.000009 days, transit epoch Tc = 2454930.22001 ± 0.00025, and transit duration 0.1196 ± 0.0014 days. The host star has a mass of 0.92 ± 0.03 M ⊙, radius of 1.04 ± 0.04 R ⊙, effective temperature 5302 ± 80 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.24 ± 0.08. The planet has a mass of 2.147 ± 0.061 M J and a compact radius of 1.080 ± 0.058 R J yielding a mean density of 2.11+0.40 - 0.29 g cm-3. The host star also harbors an M-dwarf companion at a wide separation. Finally, HAT-P-23b orbits the V = 12.432 G0 dwarf star GSC 1632-01396 on a close to circular orbit, with a period P = 1.212884 ± 0.000002 days

  17. Sirt1 physically interacts with Tip60 and negatively regulates Tip60-mediated acetylation of H2AX

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagata, Kazutsune; Kitabayashi, Issay

    2009-12-25

    Sirt1 appear to be NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase that deacetylates histones and several non-histone proteins. In this study, we identified Sirt1 as a physical interaction partner of Tip60, which is a mammalian MYST-type histone acetyl-transferase that specifically acetylates histones H2A and H4. Although Tip60 also acetylates DNA damage-specific histone H2A variant H2AX in response to DNA damage, which is a process required for appropriate DNA damage response, overexpression of Sirt1 represses Tip60-mediated acetylation of H2AX. Furthermore, Sirt1 depletion by RNAi causes excessive acetylation of H2AX, and enhances accumulation of {gamma}-ray irradiation-induced MDC1, BRCA1, and Rad51 foci in nuclei. These findings suggest that Sirt1 functions as negative regulator of Tip60-mediated acetylation of H2AX. Moreover, Sirt1 deacetylates an acetylated Tip60 in response to DNA damage and stimulates proteasome-dependent Tip60 degradation in vivo, suggesting that Sirt1 negatively regulates the protein level of Tip60 in vivo. Sirt1 may thus repress excessive activation of the DNA damage response and Rad51-homologous recombination repair by suppressing the function of Tip60.

  18. Oxygen-dependent acetylation and dimerization of the corepressor CtBP2 in neural stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Karaca, Esra; Lewicki, Jakub; Hermanson, Ola

    2015-03-01

    The transcriptional corepressor CtBP2 is essential for proper development of the nervous system. The factor exerts its repression by interacting in complexes with chromatin-modifying factors such as histone deacetylases (HDAC) 1/2 and the histone demethylase LSD1/KDM1. Notably, the histone acetyl transferase p300 acetylates CtBP2 and this is an important regulatory event of the activity and subcellular localization of the protein. We recently demonstrated an essential role for CtBPs as sensors of microenvironmental oxygen levels influencing the differentiation potential of neural stem cells (NSCs), but it is not known whether oxygen levels influence the acetylation levels of CtBP factors. Here we show by using proximity ligation assay (PLA) that CtBP2 acetylation levels increased significantly in undifferentiated, proliferating NSCs under hypoxic conditions. CtBP2 interacted with the class III HDAC Sirt1 but this interaction was unaltered in hypoxic conditions, and treatment with the Sirt1 inhibitor Ex527 did not result in any significant change in total CtBP2 acetylation levels. Instead, we revealed a significant decrease in PLA signal representing CtBP2 dimerization in NSCs under hypoxic conditions, negatively correlating with the acetylation levels. Our results suggest that microenvironmental oxygen levels influence the dimerization and acetylation levels, and thereby the activity, of CtBP2 in proliferating NSCs.

  19. The Active Latitudes of HAT-P-11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Brett; Hebb, Leslie; Davenport, James R. A.; Hawley, Suzanne L.

    2017-01-01

    Transiting planets map the brightness of their host stars, as the flux lost during exoplanet transits is proportional to the integrated flux occulted by the planet. We analyze four years of Kepler short-cadence photometry of HAT-P-11 - an active K4 dwarf with a 29 day rotation period, orbited by a hot-Neptune. Due to its highly-misaligned orbit, the planet occults most stellar latitudes during each transit, and the latitude distribution of spots is encoded in the transit light curves. We model each spot occultation in transit to create a spot map of HAT-P-11, which reveals two active latitudes near ±17 degrees. We investigate whether the spot distribution changes in time, and we compare the spot latitude distributions of HAT-P-11 and the Sun throughout the solar activity cycle.

  20. Geodetic VLBI Observations with the Hat Creek Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, D. B.; NASA/Gsfc Geodetic VLBI Group

    1993-05-01

    Geodetic VLBI observations made with the Hat Creek 85' antenna were important contributions to the NASA Crustal Dynamics Program (CDP). Among other things, the CDP studied motions of the Earth's crustal plates and deformation in the vicinity of the San Andreas Fault in California. The 85' antenna was one of the three fundamental anchor points in California east of the San Andreas fault that were used from 1983 to 1991 to determine the motions at various mobile VLBI sites along the San Andreas and to determine the Pacific plate motions at Vandenberg Air Force Base and Ft. Ord (California) and Kauai (Hawaii). The Hat Creek site itself was found to be moving 10.6 +/- 0.4 (one sigma ) mm/yr to the WNW (PA 305deg ) with respect to a ``stable" eastern North America. Hat Creek is located near the western edge of the Northern Basin and Range province. Its motion is thought to be a combination of WNW extension across the Basin and Range, and a small component of NW elastic deformation due to the interaction between the North American and Pacific plates. Geodetic VLBI measurements from Hat Creek to the nearby Quincy and the more distant Ely (Nevada) and Platteville (Colorado) mobile sites were the key measurements in defining the extension rate for the Northern Basin and Range as 8 +/- 2 mm/yr (PA ~ 300deg ). Hat Creek was also the anchor point for measuring a 5 cm northward seismic displacement at the Ft. Ord mobile site due to the Loma Prieta earthquake. We will show the motion of California and Pacific basin sites for which Hat Creek contributed important data.

  1. Social factors in occupational health: a history of hard hats.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Beth; Levenstein, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Personal protective equipment (PPE) is the least desirable way to ensure workplace safety, and it is difficult to use consistently. Hard hats are different; they have cachet and are often worn even when they are not required. We investigated the history of this personal protective equipment to see if there were any lessons that could be applied to other forms of PPE. We learned that what makes hard hats special are social factors that are specific to a certain time and place. The importance of social factors illuminates the requirement that cultural and social norms of workers be included in any kind of worker safety and health training.

  2. Shear buckling analysis of a hat-stiffened panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1994-01-01

    A buckling analysis was performed on a hat-stiffened panel subjected to shear loading. Both local buckling and global buckling were analyzed. The global shear buckling load was found to be several times higher than the local shear buckling load. The classical shear buckling theory for a flat plate was found to be useful in predicting the local shear buckling load of the hat-stiffened panel, and the predicted local shear buckling loads thus obtained compare favorably with the results of finite element analysis.

  3. N-ACETYL GROUPS IN VITELLENIN,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The presence of acetyl groups in vitellenin was confirmed by hydrazinolysis according to the DNP method of Phillips. After hydrazinolysis of 10-30...hydrazinolysis at room temperature for 1 hour, vitellenin contains N- acetyl , but no Oacetyl, groups. (Author)

  4. Acetylated α-Tubulin Regulated by N-Acetyl-Seryl-Aspartyl-Lysyl-Proline(Ac-SDKP) Exerts the Anti-fibrotic Effect in Rat Lung Fibrosis Induced by Silica

    PubMed Central

    Xiaojun, Wang; Yan, Liu; Hong, Xu; Xianghong, Zhang; Shifeng, Li; Dingjie, Xu; Xuemin, Gao; Lijuan, Zhang; Bonan, Zhang; Zhongqiu, Wei; Ruimin, Wang; Brann, Darrell; Fang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Silicosis is the most serious occupational disease in China. The objective of this study was to screen various proteins related to mechanisms of the pathogenesis of silicosis underlying the anti-fibrotic effect of N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline (Ac-SDKP) using proteomic profile analysis. We also aimed to explore a potential mechanism of acetylated α-tubulin (α-Ac-Tub) regulation by Ac-SDKP. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) were used to assess the different protein expression profiles between control and silicosis rats treated with or without Ac-SDKP. Twenty-nine proteins were identified to be potentially involved in the progression of silicosis and the anti-fibrotic effect of Ac-SDKP. Our current study finds that 1) the lost expression of Ac-Tub-α may be a new mechanism in rat silicosis; 2) treatment of silicotic rats with N-acetyl-Seryl-Aspartyl-Lysyl-Proline (Ac-SDKP) inhibits myofibroblast differentiation and collagen deposition accompanied by stabilizing the expression of α-Ac-Tub in vivo and in vitro, which is related with deacetylase family member 6 (HDAC6) and α-tubulin acetyl transferase (α-TAT1). Our data suggest that α-Ac-Tub regulation by Ac-SDKP may potentially be a new anti-fibrosis mechanism. PMID:27577858

  5. ORBITAL ORIENTATIONS OF EXOPLANETS: HAT-P-4b IS PROGRADE AND HAT-P-14b IS RETROGRADE

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, Joshua N.; Albrecht, Simon; Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Johnson, John Asher; Crepp, Justin R.; Morton, Timothy D.; Shporer, Avi; Bakos, Gaspar A.; Hartman, Joel D.; Holman, Matthew J.

    2011-02-15

    We present observations of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for two exoplanetary systems, revealing the orientations of their orbits relative to the rotation axes of their parent stars. HAT-P-4b is prograde, with a sky-projected spin-orbit angle of {lambda} = -4.9 {+-} 11.9 deg. In contrast, HAT-P-14b is retrograde, with {lambda} = 189.1 {+-} 5.1 deg. These results conform with a previously noted pattern among the stellar hosts of close-in giant planets: hotter stars have a wide range of obliquities and cooler stars have low obliquities. This, in turn, suggests that three-body dynamics and tidal dissipation are responsible for the short-period orbits of many exoplanets. In addition, our data revealed a third body in the HAT-P-4 system, which could be a second planet or a companion star.

  6. Roles for glutathione transferases in antioxidant recycling

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, David P; Steel, Patrick G

    2011-01-01

    Uniquely among the plant glutathione transferases, two classes possess a catalytic cysteine capable of performing glutathione-dependent reductions. These are the dehydroascorbate reductases (DHARs) and the lambda-class glutathione transferases (GSTLs). Using immobilized GSTLs probed with crude plant extracts we have identified flavonols as high affinity ligands and subsequently demonstrated a novel glutathione-dependent role for these enzymes in recycling oxidized quercetin. By comparing the activities of DHARs and GSTLs we now propose a unified catalytic mechanism that suggests oxidized anthocyanidins and tocopherols may be alternative polyphenolic substrates of GSTLs. PMID:21778824

  7. Bacterial protein acetylation: new discoveries unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Alan J

    2016-05-01

    Nε-acetylation is emerging as an abundant post-translational modification of bacterial proteins. Two mechanisms have been identified: one is enzymatic, dependent on an acetyltransferase and acetyl-coenzyme A; the other is non-enzymatic and depends on the reactivity of acetyl phosphate. Some, but not most, of those acetylations are reversed by deacetylases. This review will briefly describe the current status of the field and raise questions that need answering.

  8. Protein acetylation in archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Soppa, Jörg

    2010-09-16

    Proteins can be acetylated at the alpha-amino group of the N-terminal amino acid (methionine or the penultimate amino acid after methionine removal) or at the epsilon-amino group of internal lysines. In eukaryotes the majority of proteins are N-terminally acetylated, while this is extremely rare in bacteria. A variety of studies about N-terminal acetylation in archaea have been reported recently, and it was revealed that a considerable fraction of proteins is N-terminally acetylated in haloarchaea and Sulfolobus, while this does not seem to apply for methanogenic archaea. Many eukaryotic proteins are modified by differential internal acetylation, which is important for a variety of processes. Until very recently, only two bacterial proteins were known to be acetylation targets, but now 125 acetylation sites are known for E. coli. Knowledge about internal acetylation in archaea is extremely limited; only two target proteins are known, only one of which--Alba--was used to study differential acetylation. However, indications accumulate that the degree of internal acetylation of archaeal proteins might be underestimated, and differential acetylation has been shown to be essential for the viability of haloarchaea. Focused proteomic approaches are needed to get an overview of the extent of internal protein acetylation in archaea.

  9. RSRM top hat cover simulator lightning test, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The test sequence was to measure electric and magnetic fields induced inside a redesigned solid rocket motor case when a simulated lightning discharge strikes an exposed top hat cover simulator. The test sequence was conducted between 21 June and 17 July 1990. Thirty-six high rate-of-rise Marx generator discharges and eight high current bank discharges were injected onto three different test article configurations. Attach points included three locations on the top hat cover simulator and two locations on the mounting bolts. Top hat cover simulator and mounting bolt damage and grain cover damage was observed. Overall electric field levels were well below 30 kilowatts/meter. Electric field levels ranged from 184.7 to 345.9 volts/meter and magnetic field levels were calculated from 6.921 to 39.73 amperes/meter. It is recommended that the redesigned solid rocket motor top hat cover be used in Configuration 1 or Configuration 2 as an interim lightning protection device until a lightweight cover can be designed.

  10. HATS: A Design Procedure for Routine Business Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William H.

    2001-01-01

    Describes an approach to teaching students a basic design process for routine business documents like memos, letters, and reports. Outlines the design principles of HATS (Headings, Access, Typography, and Spacing), how they apply in before-and-after fashion to various documents, and discusses an assignment in which students redesign an existing…

  11. Degrees of Freedom and Three-Cornered Hats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    differences between the clocks. To our knowledge, there has been no method of determining a confidence interval for such a siability estimate. In this...paper, we present a method for determining the number of degrees of freedom of the estimate, which allows the assignment of a confidence interval to a three-cornered-hat stability estimate.

  12. Compressive buckling analysis of hat-stiffened panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1991-01-01

    Buckling analysis was performed on a hat-stiffened panel subjected to uniaxial compression. Both local buckling and global buckling were analyzed. It was found that the global buckling load was several times higher than the buckling load. The predicted local buckling loads compared favorably with both experimental data and finite-element analysis.

  13. Hats off to Problem-Solving with Couples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Chi-Sing; Lin, Yu-Fen; Nelson, Judy; Eckstein, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how counselors can use de Bono's Six Thinking Hats problem-solving technique in their work with couples. Part 1 of the article focuses on an introduction to the technique, including a theoretical rationale and supporting research. Following a detailed description of the process of using the model as a…

  14. Dr. Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats and Numeracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, Anne

    2006-01-01

    In education, the term "metacognition" describes thinking about thinking. Within mathematics, the term "metacomputation" describes thinking about computational methods and tools. This article shows how Dr. Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats can be used to demonstrate metacognition and metacomputation in the primary classroom. The article suggests…

  15. My Essential Booklist for Museum Educators Wearing Many Hats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schatz, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    Besides being a content expert, it is critical for today's museum educator to be a marketer, a collaborator, and to understand how people learn best in a museum environment. This article provides a list of six books that the author recommends as essential references for today's museum educator who must wear many hats. (Contains 3 notes.)

  16. Farnesyl transferase inhibitors as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Haluska, P; Dy, G K; Adjei, A A

    2002-09-01

    Protein farnesylation catalysed by the enzyme farnesyl protein transferase involves the addition of a 15-carbon farnesyl group to conserved amino acid residues at the carboxyl terminus of certain proteins. Protein substrates of farnesyl transferase include several G-proteins, which are critical intermediates of cell signalling and cytoskeletal organisation such as Ras, Rho, PxF and lamins A and B. Activated Ras proteins trigger a cascade of phosphorylation events through sequential activation of the PI3 kinase/AKT pathway, which is critical for cell survival, and the Raf/Mek/Erk kinase pathway that has been implicated in cell proliferation. Ras mutations which encode for constitutively activated proteins are found in 30% of human cancers. Because farnesylation of Ras is required for its transforming and proliferative activity, the farnesyl protein transferase inhibitors were designed as anticancer agents to abrogate Ras function. However, current evidence suggests that the anticancer activity of the farnesyl transferase inhibitors may not be simply due to Ras inhibition. This review will discuss available clinical data on three of these agents that are currently undergoing clinical trials.

  17. Properties of Succinyl-Coenzyme A:l-Malate Coenzyme A Transferase and Its Role in the Autotrophic 3-Hydroxypropionate Cycle of Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, Silke; Steindorf, Astrid; Alber, Birgit E.; Fuchs, Georg

    2006-01-01

    The 3-hydroxypropionate cycle has been proposed to operate as the autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway in the phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. In this pathway, acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and two bicarbonate molecules are converted to malate. Acetyl-CoA is regenerated from malyl-CoA by l-malyl-CoA lyase. The enzyme forming malyl-CoA, succinyl-CoA:l-malate coenzyme A transferase, was purified. Based on the N-terminal amino acid sequence of its two subunits, the corresponding genes were identified on a gene cluster which also contains the gene for l-malyl-CoA lyase, the subsequent enzyme in the pathway. Both enzymes were severalfold up-regulated under autotrophic conditions, which is in line with their proposed function in CO2 fixation. The two CoA transferase genes were cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzyme was purified and studied. Succinyl-CoA:l-malate CoA transferase forms a large (αβ)n complex consisting of 46- and 44-kDa subunits and catalyzes the reversible reaction succinyl-CoA + l-malate → succinate + l-malyl-CoA. It is specific for succinyl-CoA as the CoA donor but accepts l-citramalate instead of l-malate as the CoA acceptor; the corresponding d-stereoisomers are not accepted. The enzyme is a member of the class III of the CoA transferase family. The demonstration of the missing CoA transferase closes the last gap in the proposed 3-hydroxypropionate cycle. PMID:16547052

  18. Measurements of the UVR protection provided by hats used at school.

    PubMed

    Gies, Peter; Javorniczky, John; Roy, Colin; Henderson, Stuart

    2006-01-01

    The importance of protection against solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) in childhood has lead to SunSmart policies at Australian schools, in particular primary schools, where children are encouraged and in many cases required to wear hats at school. Hat styles change regularly and the UVR protection provided by some of the hat types currently used and recommended for sun protection by the various Australian state cancer councils had not been previously evaluated. The UVR protection of the hats was measured using UVR sensitive polysulphone film badges attached to different facial sites on rotating headforms. The sun protection type hats included in this study were broad-brimmed hats, "bucket hats" and legionnaires hats. Baseball caps, which are very popular, were also included. The broad-brimmed hats and bucket hats provided the most UVR protection for the six different sites about the face and head. Legionnaires hats also provided satisfactory UVR protection, but the caps did not provide UVR protection to many of the facial sites. The highest measured UVR protection factors for facial sites other than the forehead were 8 to 10, indicating that, while some hats can be effective, they need to be used in combination with other forms of UVR protection.

  19. 49. Taken from highline; "McKinley hat" remains on "B" furnace; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. Taken from high-line; "McKinley hat" remains on "B" furnace; no longer used, "McKinley hat was open receptacle with bell below. Hat carried charge to furnace top, dumping it to bell; bell locked onto furnace top, dropping charge into furnace. Looking east - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  20. Exoplanet Transits Registered at the Universidad de Monterrey Observatory. I. HAT-P-12b, HAT-P-13b, HAT-P-16b, HAT-P-23b, and WASP-10b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sada, Pedro V.; Ramón-Fox, Felipe G.

    2016-02-01

    Forty transits of the exoplanets HAT-P-12b, HAT-P-13b, HAT-P-16b, HAT-P-23b, and WASP-10b were recorded with the 0.36 m telescope at the Universidad de Monterrey Observatory. The images were captured with a standard Johnson-Cousins Rc and Ic and Sloan z’ filters and processed to obtain individual light curves of the events. These light curves were successfully combined for each system to obtain a resulting one of higher quality, but with a slightly larger time sampling rate. A reduction by a factor of about four in per-point scatter was typically achieved, resulting in combined light curves with a scatter of ∼1 mmag. The noise characteristics of the combined light curves were verified by comparing Allan variance plots of the residuals. The combined light curves for each system, along with radial velocity measurements from the literature when available, were modeled using a Monte Carlo method to obtain the essential parameters that characterize the systems. Our results for all these systems confirm the derived transit parameters (the planet-to-star radius ratio, {R}{{p}}/{R}*; the scaled semimajor axis, a/{R}*; the orbital inclination, i; in some cases the eccentricity, e; and argument of periastron of the orbit, ω), validating the methodology. This technique can be used by small college observatories equipped with modest-sized telescopes to help characterize known extrasolar planet systems. In some instances, the uncertainties of the essential transit parameters are also reduced. For HAT-P-23b, in particular, we derive a planet size 4.5 ± 1.0% smaller. We also derive improved linear periods for each system, useful for scheduling observations.

  1. White Hats Chasing Black Hats: Careers in IT and the Skills Required to Get There. Advisory from Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulton, Eric; Lawrence, Cameron; Clouse, Shawn

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to illuminate the exciting world in which "white hat crackers" operate and to suggest topics that can help prepare students to enter this high-demand field. While currently there is extraordinary demand for graduates to fill these positions that have relatively high starting salaries, employers find it difficult…

  2. Cloning, expression and properties of porcine trachea UDP-galnac: polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyl transferase.

    PubMed

    Sangadala, Sreedhara; Swain, Ja Baris; McNear, Adrian; Mendicino, Joseph

    2004-11-01

    A UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide N-acetyl-galactosaminyl transferase which catalyses the transfer of GalNAc from UDP-GalNAc to serine and threonine residues in mucin polypeptide chains was purified to homogeneity from swine trachea epithelium (Mendicino J, Sangadala S: Mol Cell Biochem 185: 135-145, 1998). Peptides obtained by proteolysis of the purified enzyme were isolated, sequenced and used to prepare degenerate oligonucleotide primers. Amplified segments of a gene encoding GalNAc transferase were synthesised using the primers and a swine trachea epithelial cDNA library. Selected cDNA fragments were then used to screen the cDNA library, and a clone containing an open reading frame encoding 559 amino acids was isolated. The predicted amino acid sequence contains type II transmembrane region, three potential N-glycosylation sites as well as all of the isolated peptide sequences. The nucleotide sequence and predicted primary protein structure of the transferase were very similar to those of type T-1 GalNAc transferases. The isolated clone was transiently expressed in COS 7 cells and the recombinant enzyme, which contained an N-terminal hexa-histidine tag, was purified to homogeneity and its enzymatic properties were examined. The Vmax of the recombinant enzyme, 2.08 micromol/(min mg), was nearly the same as the native enzyme, 2.12 micromol/(min mg), when assayed with partially deglycosylated mucins as glycosyl acceptors. Both enzymes showed much higher activities when assayed with peptides prepared by limited acid hydrolysis of incompletely deglycosylated Cowper's gland, swine, and human respiratory mucins and tryptic peptides isolated from deglycosylated mucin polypeptide chains. However, as noted earlier (Mendicino J, Sangadala S: Mol Cell Biochem 185: 135-145, 1998), these enzymes showed very little activity with completely deglycosylated mucin polypeptide chains. When completely deglycosylated polypeptide chains were partially glycosylated by incubation with microsome

  3. Spatial memory consolidation is associated with induction of several lysine-acetyltransferase (histone acetyltransferase) expression levels and H2B/H4 acetylation-dependent transcriptional events in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Bousiges, Olivier; Vasconcelos, Anne Pereira de; Neidl, Romain; Cosquer, Brigitte; Herbeaux, Karine; Panteleeva, Irina; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Cassel, Jean-Christophe; Boutillier, Anne-Laurence

    2010-12-01

    Numerous genetic studies have shown that the CREB-binding protein (CBP) is an essential component of long-term memory formation, through its histone acetyltransferase (HAT) function. E1A-binding protein p300 and p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) have also recently been involved in memory formation. By contrast, only a few studies have reported on acetylation modifications during memory formation, and it remains unclear as to how the system is regulated during this dynamic phase. We investigated acetylation-dependent events and the expression profiles of these HATs during a hippocampus-dependent task taxing spatial reference memory in the Morris water maze. We found a specific increase in H2B and H4 acetylation in the rat dorsal hippocampus, while spatial memory was being consolidated. This increase correlated with the degree of specific acetylated histones enrichment on some memory/plasticity-related gene promoters. Overall, a global increase in HAT activity was measured during this memory consolidation phase, together with a global increase of CBP, p300, and PCAF expression. Interestingly, these regulations were altered in a model of hippocampal denervation disrupting spatial memory consolidation, making it impossible for the hippocampus to recruit the CBP pathway (CBP regulation and acetylated-H2B-dependent transcription). CBP has long been thought to be present in limited concentrations in the cells. These results show, for the first time, that CBP, p300, and PCAF are dynamically modulated during the establishment of a spatial memory and are likely to contribute to the induction of a specific epigenetic tagging of the genome for hippocampus-dependent (spatial) memory consolidation. These findings suggest the use of HAT-activating molecules in new therapeutic strategies of pathological aging, Alzheimer's disease, and other neurodegenerative disorders.

  4. Tip60 HAT activity mediates APP induced lethality and apoptotic cell death in the CNS of a Drosophila Alzheimer's disease model.

    PubMed

    Pirooznia, Sheila K; Sarthi, Jessica; Johnson, Ashley A; Toth, Meridith S; Chiu, Kellie; Koduri, Sravanthi; Elefant, Felice

    2012-01-01

    Histone acetylation of chromatin promotes dynamic transcriptional responses in neurons that influence neuroplasticity critical for cognitive ability. It has been demonstrated that Tip60 histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity is involved in the transcriptional regulation of genes enriched for neuronal function as well as the control of synaptic plasticity. Accordingly, Tip60 has been implicated in the neurodegenerative disorder Alzheimer's disease (AD) via transcriptional regulatory complex formation with the AD linked amyloid precursor protein (APP) intracellular domain (AICD). As such, inappropriate complex formation may contribute to AD-linked neurodegeneration by misregulation of target genes involved in neurogenesis; however, a direct and causative epigenetic based role for Tip60 HAT activity in this process during neuronal development in vivo remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that nervous system specific loss of Tip60 HAT activity enhances APP mediated lethality and neuronal apoptotic cell death in the central nervous system (CNS) of a transgenic AD fly model while remarkably, overexpression of Tip60 diminishes these defects. Notably, all of these effects are dependent upon the C-terminus of APP that is required for transcriptional regulatory complex formation with Tip60. Importantly, we show that the expression of certain AD linked Tip60 gene targets critical for regulating apoptotic pathways are modified in the presence of APP. Our results are the first to demonstrate a functional interaction between Tip60 and APP in mediating nervous system development and apoptotic neuronal cell death in the CNS of an AD fly model in vivo, and support a novel neuroprotective role for Tip60 HAT activity in AD neurodegenerative pathology.

  5. Purification and characterization of the Oligosaccharyl transferase

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoor, T.M.

    1990-11-01

    Oligosaccharyl transferase was characterized to be a glycoprotein with at least one saccharide unit that had a D-manno or D- glucopyranose configuration with unmodified hydroxy groups at C-3, C-4 and C-6, using a Concanavalin A affinity column. This afforded a 100 fold increase in the transferase purity in the solubilized microsomal sample and also removed over 90% of the microsomal proteins (the cytosolic ones being removed before solubilization). The detergent, N,N-Dimethyldodecylamine N-oxide (LDAO) was used for solubilization and it yielded a system compatible with the assay and the purification steps. An efficient method for detergent extraction without dilution of sample or protein precipitation was also developed.

  6. Mexican Hat Wavelet Kernel ELM for Multiclass Classification

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Ma, Tian-Lei

    2017-01-01

    Kernel extreme learning machine (KELM) is a novel feedforward neural network, which is widely used in classification problems. To some extent, it solves the existing problems of the invalid nodes and the large computational complexity in ELM. However, the traditional KELM classifier usually has a low test accuracy when it faces multiclass classification problems. In order to solve the above problem, a new classifier, Mexican Hat wavelet KELM classifier, is proposed in this paper. The proposed classifier successfully improves the training accuracy and reduces the training time in the multiclass classification problems. Moreover, the validity of the Mexican Hat wavelet as a kernel function of ELM is rigorously proved. Experimental results on different data sets show that the performance of the proposed classifier is significantly superior to the compared classifiers. PMID:28321249

  7. The Long Duration Flight of the TopHat Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, R.; Aguirre, J.; Bezaire, J.; Cheng, E.; Cordone, S.; Christensen, P. R.; Cottingham, D.; Crawford, T.; Fixsen, D.; Meyer, S. S.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    TopHat is a balloon-borne instrument designed to operate on the top of a balloon. From this location, the experiment could efficiently observe using a clean beam with extremely low sidelobes. The experiment was designed to scan a large portion of the sky directly above it and to map the anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMBR) and thermal emission from galactic dust. The instrument used a one meter class telescope with a five band single pixel radiometer spanning the frequency range from 150-600 GHz. The radiometer used bolometric detectors operating at approx. 250 mK. Here, we will report on the flight of the TopHat experiment over Antarctica in January, 2001 and describe the scientific goals, the operation, and in-flight performance.

  8. Rubber transferase in guayule plants. [Parthenium argentatum

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfield, C.L.; Foster, M.A.; Benedict, C.R.

    1986-04-01

    Rubber transferase catalyzes the transfer of cis-1,4-polyprenyl-PP to isopentenyl-PP (IPP) with the elimination of PP/sub i/. Rubber transferase activity in guayule (Parthenium argentatum Gray) stems was localized in the lipid fraction of the homogenate following centrifugation in buffer and 0.4M Mannitol. Washed rubber particles were obtained by the chromatography of the lipid fraction on Ultrogel columns with an exclusion limit of 750,000 daltons by the procedure of B.G. Audley (private communication). The rubber particles catalyzed the incorporation of /sup 14/C-IPP into cis-polyisoprene. The radioactive cis-polyisoprene was identified by ozonolysis and chromatography of the resulting /sup 14/C-levulinic acid. The synthesis of cis-polyisoprene in the rubber particles required Mg/sup 2 +/ and IPP and was stimulated 2-fold with the addition of DMAPP. Rubber synthesis in guayule plants growing in the Permian Basin of West Texas does not occur during summer months but is induced by the cold night temperatures of the fall and winter. From August to December individual plants (which were transplanted in May) accumulated from 66mg to 11,800mg or rubber. During this period there was a 4-fold increase in rubber transferase activity in stem homogenates induced by the low temperatures.

  9. Analysis of acetylation stoichiometry suggests that SIRT3 repairs nonenzymatic acetylation lesions.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Brian T; Moustafa, Tarek; Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Zechner, Rudolf; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2015-11-03

    Acetylation is frequently detected on mitochondrial enzymes, and the sirtuin deacetylase SIRT3 is thought to regulate metabolism by deacetylating mitochondrial proteins. However, the stoichiometry of acetylation has not been studied and is important for understanding whether SIRT3 regulates or suppresses acetylation. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we measured acetylation stoichiometry in mouse liver tissue and found that SIRT3 suppressed acetylation to a very low stoichiometry at its target sites. By examining acetylation changes in the liver, heart, brain, and brown adipose tissue of fasted mice, we found that SIRT3-targeted sites were mostly unaffected by fasting, a dietary manipulation that is thought to regulate metabolism through SIRT3-dependent deacetylation. Globally increased mitochondrial acetylation in fasted liver tissue, higher stoichiometry at mitochondrial acetylation sites, and greater sensitivity of SIRT3-targeted sites to chemical acetylation in vitro and fasting-induced acetylation in vivo, suggest a nonenzymatic mechanism of acetylation. Our data indicate that most mitochondrial acetylation occurs as a low-level nonenzymatic protein lesion and that SIRT3 functions as a protein repair factor that removes acetylation lesions from lysine residues.

  10. Exoplanet HAT-P-11b Secondary Transit Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Richard K., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    We have conducted secondary eclipse observations of exoplanet HAT--11b, recently discovered by proposal G. Bakos and his colleagues. HAT-P-11b is the smallest transiting extrasolar planet yet found and one of only two known exo-Neptunes. We have observed the system at 3.6 microns for a period of 22 hours centered on the anticipated secondary eclipse time, to detect the eclipse and determine its phase. Once the secondary eclipse is located through analysis of the data, we will make a more focused series of observations in both the 3.6 and 4.5 micron bands to fully characterize it. HAT-P-1lb has a period of 4.8878 days, radius of 0.422 RJ, mass of 0.081 MJ and semi major axis 0.053 AU. Measurements of the secondary eclipse will clarify two key issues; 1) the planetary brightness temperature and the nature of its atmosphere, and 2) the eccentricity of its orbit, with implications for its dynamical evolution. A precise determination of the orbit phase for the secondary eclipse will also be of great utility for Kepler observations of this system at visible wavelengths.

  11. RELATIVE PHOTOMETRY OF HAT-P-1b OCCULTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Beky, Bence; Holman, Matthew J.; Noyes, Robert W.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Bakos, Gaspar A.; Winn, Joshua N.

    2013-06-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph observations of two occultations of the transiting exoplanet HAT-P-1b. By measuring the planet to star flux ratio near opposition, we constrain the geometric albedo of the planet, which is strongly linked to its atmospheric temperature gradient. An advantage of HAT-P-1 as a target is its binary companion ADS 16402 A, which provides an excellent photometric reference, simplifying the usual steps in removing instrumental artifacts from HST time-series photometry. We find that without this reference star, we would need to detrend the lightcurve with the time of the exposures as well as the first three powers of HST orbital phase, and this would introduce a strong bias in the results for the albedo. However, with this reference star, we only need to detrend the data with the time of the exposures to achieve the same per-point scatter, therefore we can avoid most of the bias associated with detrending. Our final result is a 2{sigma} upper limit of 0.64 for the geometric albedo of HAT-P-1b between 577 and 947 nm.

  12. A Method to determine lysine acetylation stoichiometries

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Wu, Si; Sydor, Michael A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Hixson, Kim K.; Kim, Jong Seo; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles

    2014-07-21

    A major bottleneck to fully understanding the functional aspects of lysine acetylation is the lack of stoichiometry information. Here we describe a mass spectrometry method using a combination of isotope labeling and detection of a diagnostic fragment ion to determine the stoichiometry of lysine acetylation on proteins globally. Using this technique, we determined the modification occupancy on hundreds of acetylated peptides from cell lysates and cross-validated the measurements via immunoblotting.

  13. Acetylation of prostaglandin synthase by aspirin.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, G J; Stanford, N; Majerus, P W

    1975-01-01

    When microsomes of sheep or bovine seminal vesicles are incubated with [acetyl-3H]aspirin (acetyl salicylic acid), 200 Ci/mol, we observe acetylation of a single protein, as measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The protein has a molecular weight of 85,000 and corresponds to a similar acetylated protein found in the particulate fraction of aspirin-treated human platelets. The aspirin-mediated acetylation reaction proceeds with the same time course and at the same concentration as does the inhibition of prostaglandin synthase (cyclo-oxygenase) (EC 1.14.99.1; 8,11,14-eicosatrienoate, hydrogen-donor:oxygen oxidoreductase) by the drug. At 100 muM aspirin, 50% inhibition of prostaglandin synthase and 50% of maximal acetylation are observed after 15 min at 37 degrees. Furthermore, the substrate for cyclo-oxygenase, arachidonic acid, inhibits protein acetylation by aspirin at concentrations (50% inhibition at 10-30 muM) which correlate with the Michaelis constant of arachidonic acid as a substrate for cyclooxygenase. Arachidonic acid analogues and indomethacin inhibit the acetylation reaction in proportion to their effectiveness as cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors. The results suggest that aspirin acts as an active-site acetylating agent for the enzyme cyclo-oxygenase. This action of aspirin may account for its anti-inflammatory and anti-platelet action. PMID:810797

  14. Acetylation of woody lignocellulose: significance and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Prashant Mohan-Anupama; Koutaniemi, Sanna; Tenkanen, Maija; Mellerowicz, Ewa J.

    2013-01-01

    Non-cellulosic cell wall polysaccharides constitute approximately one quarter of usable biomass for human exploitation. In contrast to cellulose, these components are usually substituted by O-acetyl groups, which affect their properties and interactions with other polymers, thus affecting their solubility and extractability. However, details of these interactions are still largely obscure. Moreover, polysaccharide hydrolysis to constituent monosaccharides is hampered by the presence of O-acetyl groups, necessitating either enzymatic (esterase) or chemical de-acetylation, increasing the costs and chemical consumption. Reduction of polysaccharide acetyl content in planta is a way to modify lignocellulose toward improved saccharification. In this review we: (1) summarize literature on lignocellulose acetylation in different tree species, (2) present data and current hypotheses concerning the role of O-acetylation in determining woody lignocellulose properties, (3) describe plant proteins involved in lignocellulose O-acetylation, (4) give examples of microbial enzymes capable to de-acetylate lignocellulose, and (5) discuss prospects for exploiting these enzymes in planta to modify xylan acetylation. PMID:23734153

  15. Methamphetamine causes differential alterations in gene expression and patterns of histone acetylation/hypoacetylation in the rat nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Martin, Tracey A; Jayanthi, Subramaniam; McCoy, Michael T; Brannock, Christie; Ladenheim, Bruce; Garrett, Tiffany; Lehrmann, Elin; Becker, Kevin G; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) addiction is associated with several neuropsychiatric symptoms. Little is known about the effects of METH on gene expression and epigenetic modifications in the rat nucleus accumbens (NAC). Our study investigated the effects of a non-toxic METH injection (20 mg/kg) on gene expression, histone acetylation, and the expression of the histone acetyltransferase (HAT), ATF2, and of the histone deacetylases (HDACs), HDAC1 and HDAC2, in that structure. Microarray analyses done at 1, 8, 16 and 24 hrs after the METH injection identified METH-induced changes in the expression of genes previously implicated in the acute and longterm effects of psychostimulants, including immediate early genes and corticotropin-releasing factor (Crf). In contrast, the METH injection caused time-dependent decreases in the expression of other genes including Npas4 and cholecystokinin (Cck). Pathway analyses showed that genes with altered expression participated in behavioral performance, cell-to-cell signaling, and regulation of gene expression. PCR analyses confirmed the changes in the expression of c-fos, fosB, Crf, Cck, and Npas4 transcripts. To determine if the METH injection caused post-translational changes in histone markers, we used western blot analyses and identified METH-mediated decreases in histone H3 acetylated at lysine 9 (H3K9ac) and lysine 18 (H3K18ac) in nuclear sub-fractions. In contrast, the METH injection caused time-dependent increases in acetylated H4K5 and H4K8. The changes in histone acetylation were accompanied by decreased expression of HDAC1 but increased expression of HDAC2 protein levels. The histone acetyltransferase, ATF2, showed significant METH-induced increased in protein expression. These results suggest that METH-induced alterations in global gene expression seen in rat NAC might be related, in part, to METH-induced changes in histone acetylation secondary to changes in HAT and HDAC expression. The causal role that HATs and HDACs might

  16. Bacteria-induced natural product formation in the fungus Aspergillus nidulans requires Saga/Ada-mediated histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Nützmann, Hans-Wilhelm; Reyes-Dominguez, Yazmid; Scherlach, Kirstin; Schroeckh, Volker; Horn, Fabian; Gacek, Agnieszka; Schümann, Julia; Hertweck, Christian; Strauss, Joseph; Brakhage, Axel A

    2011-08-23

    Sequence analyses of fungal genomes have revealed that the potential of fungi to produce secondary metabolites is greatly underestimated. In fact, most gene clusters coding for the biosynthesis of antibiotics, toxins, or pigments are silent under standard laboratory conditions. Hence, it is one of the major challenges in microbiology to uncover the mechanisms required for pathway activation. Recently, we discovered that intimate physical interaction of the important model fungus Aspergillus nidulans with the soil-dwelling bacterium Streptomyces rapamycinicus specifically activated silent fungal secondary metabolism genes, resulting in the production of the archetypal polyketide orsellinic acid and its derivatives. Here, we report that the streptomycete triggers modification of fungal histones. Deletion analysis of 36 of 40 acetyltransferases, including histone acetyltransferases (HATs) of A. nidulans, demonstrated that the Saga/Ada complex containing the HAT GcnE and the AdaB protein is required for induction of the orsellinic acid gene cluster by the bacterium. We also showed that Saga/Ada plays a major role for specific induction of other biosynthesis gene clusters, such as sterigmatocystin, terrequinone, and penicillin. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that the Saga/Ada-dependent increase of histone 3 acetylation at lysine 9 and 14 occurs during interaction of fungus and bacterium. Furthermore, the production of secondary metabolites in A. nidulans is accompanied by a global increase in H3K14 acetylation. Increased H3K9 acetylation, however, was only found within gene clusters. This report provides previously undescribed evidence of Saga/Ada dependent histone acetylation triggered by prokaryotes.

  17. HAT-P-44b, HAT-P-45b, and HAT-P-46b: Three Transiting Hot Jupiters in Possible Multi-planet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Torres, G.; Kovács, G.; Johnson, J. A.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Latham, D. W.; Bieryla, A.; Buchhave, L. A.; Bhatti, W.; Béky, B.; Csubry, Z.; Penev, K.; de Val-Borro, M.; Noyes, R. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Everett, M.; Szklenár, T.; Zhou, G.; Bayliss, D.; Shporer, A.; Fulton, B. J.; Sanchis-Ojeda, R.; Falco, E.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2014-06-01

    We report the discovery by the HATNet survey of three new transiting extrasolar planets orbiting moderately bright (V = 13.2, 12.8, and 11.9) stars. The planets have orbital periods of 4.3012, 3.1290, and 4.4631 days, masses of 0.35, 0.89, and 0.49 M J, and radii of 1.24, 1.43, and 1.28 R J. The stellar hosts have masses of 0.94, 1.26, and 1.28 M ⊙. Each system shows significant systematic variations in its residual radial velocities, indicating the possible presence of additional components. Based on its Bayesian evidence, the preferred model for HAT-P-44 consists of two planets, including the transiting component, with the outer planet having a period of 872 days, eccentricity of 0.494 ± 0.081, and a minimum mass of 4.0 M J. Due to aliasing we cannot rule out alternative solutions for the outer planet having a period of 220 days or 438 days. For HAT-P-45, at present there is not enough data to justify the additional free parameters included in a multi-planet model; in this case a single-planet solution is preferred, but the required jitter of 22.5 ± 6.3 m s-1 is relatively high for a star of this type. For HAT-P-46 the preferred solution includes a second planet having a period of 78 days and a minimum mass of 2.0 M J, however the preference for this model over a single-planet model is not very strong. While substantial uncertainties remain as to the presence and/or properties of the outer planetary companions in these systems, the inner transiting planets are well characterized with measured properties that are fairly robust against changes in the assumed models for the outer planets. Continued radial velocity monitoring is necessary to fully characterize these three planetary systems, the properties of which may have important implications for understanding the formation of hot Jupiters. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck

  18. HAT-P-44b, HAT-P-45b, AND HAT-P-46b: Three transiting hot Jupiters in possible multi-planet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Bhatti, W.; Csubry, Z.; Penev, K.; De Val-Borro, M.; Torres, G.; Latham, D. W.; Bieryla, A.; Béky, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Kovács, G.; Johnson, J. A.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Fischer, D. A.; Everett, M.; Szklenár, T.; and others

    2014-06-01

    We report the discovery by the HATNet survey of three new transiting extrasolar planets orbiting moderately bright (V = 13.2, 12.8, and 11.9) stars. The planets have orbital periods of 4.3012, 3.1290, and 4.4631 days, masses of 0.35, 0.89, and 0.49 M {sub J}, and radii of 1.24, 1.43, and 1.28 R {sub J}. The stellar hosts have masses of 0.94, 1.26, and 1.28 M {sub ☉}. Each system shows significant systematic variations in its residual radial velocities, indicating the possible presence of additional components. Based on its Bayesian evidence, the preferred model for HAT-P-44 consists of two planets, including the transiting component, with the outer planet having a period of 872 days, eccentricity of 0.494 ± 0.081, and a minimum mass of 4.0 M {sub J}. Due to aliasing we cannot rule out alternative solutions for the outer planet having a period of 220 days or 438 days. For HAT-P-45, at present there is not enough data to justify the additional free parameters included in a multi-planet model; in this case a single-planet solution is preferred, but the required jitter of 22.5 ± 6.3 m s{sup –1} is relatively high for a star of this type. For HAT-P-46 the preferred solution includes a second planet having a period of 78 days and a minimum mass of 2.0 M {sub J}, however the preference for this model over a single-planet model is not very strong. While substantial uncertainties remain as to the presence and/or properties of the outer planetary companions in these systems, the inner transiting planets are well characterized with measured properties that are fairly robust against changes in the assumed models for the outer planets. Continued radial velocity monitoring is necessary to fully characterize these three planetary systems, the properties of which may have important implications for understanding the formation of hot Jupiters.

  19. Delphinidin, a specific inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase, suppresses inflammatory signaling via prevention of NF-{kappa}B acetylation in fibroblast-like synoviocyte MH7A cells

    SciTech Connect

    Seong, Ah-Reum; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Choi, KyungChul; Lee, Mee-Hee; Lee, Yoo-Hyun; Lee, Jeongmin; Jun, Woojin; Kim, Sunoh; Yoon, Ho-Geun

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Delphinidin is a novel inhibitor of p300/CBP histone acetyltransferase. {yields} Delphinidin prevents the hyperacetylation of p65 by inhibiting the HAT activity of p300/CBP. {yields} Delphinidin efficiently suppresses the expression of inflammatory cytokines in MH7A cells via hypoacetylation of NF-{kappa}B. {yields} Delphinidin inhibits cytokine release in the Jurkat T lymphocyte cell line. -- Abstract: Histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitors (HATi) isolated from dietary compounds have been shown to suppress inflammatory signaling, which contributes to rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we identified a novel HATi in Punica granatum L. known as delphinidin (DP). DP did not affect the activity of other epigenetic enzymes (histone deacetylase, histone methyltransferase, or sirtuin1). DP specifically inhibited the HAT activities of p300/CBP. It also inhibited p65 acetylation in MH7A cells, a human rheumatoid arthritis synovial cell line. DP-induced hypoacetylation was accompanied by cytosolic accumulation of p65 and nuclear localization of IKB{alpha}. Accordingly, DP treatment inhibited TNF{alpha}-stimulated increases in NF-{kappa}B function and expression of NF-{kappa}B target genes in these cells. Importantly, DP suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in Jurkat T lymphocytes, demonstrating that HATi efficiently suppresses cytokine-mediated immune responses. Together, these results show that the HATi activity of DP counters anti-inflammatory signaling by blocking p65 acetylation and that this compound may be useful in preventing inflammatory arthritis.

  20. A Method to Determine Lysine Acetylation Stoichiometries

    DOE PAGES

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Wu, Si; Sydor, Michael A.; ...

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a common protein posttranslational modification that regulates a variety of biological processes. A major bottleneck to fully understanding the functional aspects of lysine acetylation is the difficulty in measuring the proportion of lysine residues that are acetylated. Here we describe a mass spectrometry method using a combination of isotope labeling and detection of a diagnostic fragment ion to determine the stoichiometry of protein lysine acetylation. Using this technique, we determined the modification occupancy for ~750 acetylated peptides from mammalian cell lysates. Furthermore, the acetylation on N-terminal tail of histone H4 was cross-validated by treating cells with sodiummore » butyrate, a potent deacetylase inhibitor, and comparing changes in stoichiometry levels measured by our method with immunoblotting measurements. Of note we observe that acetylation stoichiometry is high in nuclear proteins, but very low in mitochondrial and cytosolic proteins. In summary, our method opens new opportunities to study in detail the relationship of lysine acetylation levels of proteins with their biological functions.« less

  1. Lysine acetylation and cancer: A proteomics perspective.

    PubMed

    Gil, Jeovanis; Ramírez-Torres, Alberto; Encarnación-Guevara, Sergio

    2017-01-06

    Lysine acetylation is a reversible modification controlled by two groups of enzymes: lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) and lysine deacetylases (KDACs). Acetylated lysine residues are recognized by bromodomains, a family of evolutionarily conserved domains. The use of high-resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomics, in combination with the enrichment of acetylated peptides through immunoprecipitation with anti-acetyl-lysine antibodies, has expanded the number of acetylated proteins from histones and a few nuclear proteins to more than 2000 human proteins. Because acetylation targets almost all cellular processes, this modification has been associated with cancer. Several KATs, KDACs and bromodomain-containing proteins have been linked to cancer development. Many small molecules targeting some of these proteins have been or are being tested as potential cancer therapies. The stoichiometry of lysine acetylation has not been explored in cancer, representing a promising field in which to increase our knowledge of how this modification is affected in cancer. In this review, we will focus on the strategies that can be used to go deeper in the characterization of the protein lysine acetylation emphasizing in cancer research.

  2. Metabolic control of methylation and acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaoyang; Wellen, Kathryn E.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    Methylation and acetylation of DNA and histone proteins are the chemical basis for epigenetics. From bacteria to humans, methylation and acetylation are sensitive to cellular metabolic status. Modification rates depend on the availability of one-carbon and two-carbon substrates (S-adenosylmethionine, acetyl-CoA, and in bacteria also acetyl-phosphate). In addition, they are sensitive to demodification enzyme cofactors (α-ketoglutarate, NAD+) and structural analog metabolites that function as epigenetic enzyme inhibitors (e.g., S-adenosylhomocysteine, 2-hydroxyglutarate). Methylation and acetylation likely initially evolved to tailor protein activities in microbes to their metabolic milieu. While the extracellular environment of mammals is more tightly controlled, the combined impact of nutrient abundance and metabolic enzyme expression impacts epigenetics in mammals sufficiently to drive important biological outcomes such as stem cell fate and cancer. PMID:26629854

  3. SPOTing Acetyl-Lysine Dependent Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Picaud, Sarah; Filippakopoulos, Panagis

    2015-01-01

    Post translational modifications have been recognized as chemical signals that create docking sites for evolutionary conserved effector modules, allowing for signal integration within large networks of interactions. Lysine acetylation in particular has attracted attention as a regulatory modification, affecting chromatin structure and linking to transcriptional activation. Advances in peptide array technologies have facilitated the study of acetyl-lysine-containing linear motifs interacting with the evolutionary conserved bromodomain module, which specifically recognizes and binds to acetylated sequences in histones and other proteins. Here we summarize recent work employing SPOT peptide technology to identify acetyl-lysine dependent interactions and document the protocols adapted in our lab, as well as our efforts to characterize such bromodomain-histone interactions. Our results highlight the versatility of SPOT methods and establish an affordable tool for rapid access to potential protein/modified-peptide interactions involving lysine acetylation. PMID:27600229

  4. Metabolic control of methylation and acetylation.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaoyang; Wellen, Kathryn E; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2016-02-01

    Methylation and acetylation of DNA and histone proteins are the chemical basis for epigenetics. From bacteria to humans, methylation and acetylation are sensitive to cellular metabolic status. Modification rates depend on the availability of one-carbon and two-carbon substrates (S-adenosylmethionine, acetyl-CoA, and in bacteria also acetyl-phosphate). In addition, they are sensitive to demodification enzyme cofactors (α-ketoglutarate, NAD(+)) and structural analog metabolites that function as epigenetic enzyme inhibitors (e.g., S-adenosylhomocysteine, 2-hydroxyglutarate). Methylation and acetylation likely initially evolved to tailor protein activities in microbes to their metabolic milieu. While the extracellular environment of mammals is more tightly controlled, the combined impact of nutrient abundance and metabolic enzyme expression impacts epigenetics in mammals sufficiently to drive important biological outcomes such as stem cell fate and cancer.

  5. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Mexican Hat, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site is a former uranium mill that is undergoing surface remediation in the form of on-site tailings stabilization. Contaminated surface materials from the Monument Valley, Arizona, UMTRA Project site have been transported to the Mexican Hat site and are being consolidated with the Mexican Hat tailings. The scheduled completion of the tailings disposal cell is August 1995. Water is found in two geologic units at the site: the Halgaito Shale Formation and the Honaker Trail Formation. The tailings rest on the Halgaito Shale, and water contained in that unit is a result of milling activities and, to a lesser extent, water released from the tailings from compaction during remedial action construction of the disposal cell. Water in the Halgaito Shale flows through fractures and discharges at seeps along nearby arroyos. Flow from the seeps will diminish as water drains from the unit. Ground water in the lower unit, the Honaker Trail Formation, is protected from contamination by an upward hydraulic gradient. There are no nearby water supply wells because of widespread poor background ground water quality and quantity, and the San Juan River shows no impacts from the site. This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) recommends sampling six seeps and one upgradient monitor well compared in the Honaker Trail Formation. Samples will be taken in April 1994 (representative of high group water levels) and September 1994 (representative of low ground water levels). Analyses will be performed on filtered samples for plume indicator parameters.

  6. Promoter-Targeted Histone Acetylation of Chromatinized Parvoviral Genome Is Essential for the Progress of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mäntylä, Elina; Salokas, Kari; Oittinen, Mikko; Aho, Vesa; Mäntysaari, Pekka; Palmujoki, Lassi; Kalliolinna, Olli; Ihalainen, Teemu O.; Niskanen, Einari A.; Timonen, Jussi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The association of host histones with parvoviral DNA is poorly understood. We analyzed the chromatinization and histone acetylation of canine parvovirus DNA during infection by confocal imaging and in situ proximity ligation assay combined with chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-throughput sequencing. We found that during late infection, parvovirus replication bodies were rich in histones bearing modifications characteristic of transcriptionally active chromatin, i.e., histone H3 lysine 27 acetylation (H3K27ac). H3K27ac, in particular, was located in close proximity to the viral DNA-binding protein NS1. Importantly, our results show for the first time that in the chromatinized parvoviral genome, the two viral promoters in particular were rich in H3K27ac. Histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitors efficiently interfered with the expression of viral proteins and infection progress. Altogether, our data suggest that the acetylation of histones on parvoviral DNA is essential for viral gene expression and the completion of the viral life cycle. IMPORTANCE Viral DNA introduced into cell nuclei is exposed to cellular responses to foreign DNA, including chromatinization and epigenetic silencing, both of which determine the outcome of infection. How the incoming parvovirus resists cellular epigenetic downregulation of its genes is not understood. Here, the critical role of epigenetic modifications in the regulation of parvovirus infection was demonstrated. We showed for the first time that a successful parvovirus infection is characterized by the deposition of nucleosomes with active histone acetylation on the viral promoter areas. The results provide new insights into the regulation of parvoviral gene expression, which is an important aspect of the development of parvovirus-based virotherapy. PMID:26842481

  7. Bivalent interaction of the PZP domain of BRPF1 with the nucleosome impacts chromatin dynamics and acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Brianna J.; Muthurajan, Uma M.; Lalonde, Marie-Eve; Gibson, Matthew D.; Andrews, Forest H.; Hepler, Maggie; Machida, Shinichi; Yan, Kezhi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Poirier, Michael G.; Côté, Jacques; Luger, Karolin; Kutateladze, Tatiana G.

    2016-01-01

    BRPF1 (bromodomain PHD finger 1) is a core subunit of the MOZ histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complex, critical for normal developmental programs and implicated in acute leukemias. BRPF1 contains a unique assembly of zinc fingers, termed a PZP domain, the physiological role of which remains unclear. Here, we elucidate the structure-function relationship of this novel epigenetic reader and detail the biological and mechanistic consequences of its interaction with nucleosomes. PZP has a globular architecture and forms a 2:1 stoichiometry complex with the nucleosome, bivalently interacting with histone H3 and DNA. This binding impacts the nucleosome dynamics, shifting the DNA unwrapping/rewrapping equilibrium toward the unwrapped state and increasing DNA accessibility. We demonstrate that the DNA-binding function of the BRPF1 PZP domain is required for the MOZ-BRPF1-ING5-hEaf6 HAT complex to be recruited to chromatin and to acetylate nucleosomal histones. Our findings reveal a novel link between chromatin dynamics and MOZ-mediated acetylation. PMID:26626149

  8. Application of Human-Autonomy Teaming (HAT) Patterns to Reduce Crew Operations (RCO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, R. Jay; Brandt, Summer L.; Lachter, Joel; Matessa, Mike; Sadler, Garrett; Battiste, Henri

    2011-01-01

    Unmanned aerial systems, advanced cockpits, and air traffic management are all seeing dramatic increases in automation. However, while automation may take on some tasks previously performed by humans, humans will still be required to remain in the system for the foreseeable future. The collaboration between humans and these increasingly autonomous systems will begin to resemble cooperation between teammates, rather than simple task allocation. It is critical to understand this human-autonomy teaming (HAT) to optimize these systems in the future. One methodology to understand HAT is by identifying recurring patterns of HAT that have similar characteristics and solutions. This paper applies a methodology for identifying HAT patterns to an advanced cockpit project.

  9. Preparation of Size-Controlled Hat-Stacked Carbon Nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Y.; Yokoyama, A.; Motomiya, K.; Jeyadevan, B.; Tohji, K.

    2007-03-01

    Hat-stacked carbon nanofibers (H-CNFs) were size-separated using a multi-step microfiltration process employing polycarbonate membrane filters with respective cylindrical pore diameters of 2.0, 1.2 and 0.4 μm after being cut and dispersed in distilled water using sonication in a mixture of concentrated H2SO4 and HNO3. The average length of separated H-CNFs was 2.4 μm, 1.2 μm and 0.6 μm, respectively.

  10. Acetylation modulates the STAT signaling code.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Martin; Ginter, Torsten; Brand, Peter; Heinzel, Thorsten; Krämer, Oliver H

    2012-12-01

    A fascinating question of modern biology is how a limited number of signaling pathways generate biological diversity and crosstalk phenomena in vivo. Well-defined posttranslational modification patterns dictate the functions and interactions of proteins. The signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) are physiologically important cytokine-induced transcription factors. They are targeted by a multitude of posttranslational modifications that control and modulate signaling responses and gene expression. Beyond phosphorylation of serine and tyrosine residues, lysine acetylation has recently emerged as a critical modification regulating STAT functions. Interestingly, acetylation can determine STAT signaling codes by various molecular mechanisms, including the modulation of other posttranslational modifications. Here, we provide an overview on the acetylation of STATs and how this protein modification shapes cellular cytokine responses. We summarize recent advances in understanding the impact of STAT acetylation on cell growth, apoptosis, innate immunity, inflammation, and tumorigenesis. Furthermore, we discuss how STAT acetylation can be targeted by small molecules and we consider the possibility that additional molecules controlling STAT signaling are regulated by acetylation. Our review also summarizes evolutionary aspects and we show similarities between the acetylation-dependent control of STATs and other important molecules. We propose the concept that, similar to the 'histone code', distinct posttranslational modifications and their crosstalk orchestrate the functions and interactions of STAT proteins.

  11. Acetylation of rice straw for thermoplastic applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangzhi; Huang, Kai; Jiang, Xue; Huang, Dan; Yang, Yiqi

    2013-07-01

    An inexpensive and biodegradable thermoplastic was developed through acetylation of rice straw (RS) with acetic anhydride. Acetylation conditions were optimized. The structure and properties of acetylated RS were characterized by fourier transform infrared (FTIR), solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results showed that acetylation of RS has successfully taken place, and comparing with raw RS, the degree of crystallinity decreased and the decomposition rate was slow. The acetylated RS has got thermoplasticity when weight ratio of RS and acetic anhydride was 1:3, using sulphuric acid (9% to RS) as catalyst in glacial acetic acid 35°C for 12h, and the dosage of solvent was 9 times RS, in which weight percent gain (WPG) of the modified RS powder was 35.5% and its percent acetyl content was 36.1%. The acetylated RS could be formed into transparent thin films with different amount of plasticizer diethyl phthalate (DEP) using tape casting technology.

  12. HATS9-b and HATS10-b: Two Compact Hot Jupiters in Field 7 of the K2 Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahm, R.; Jordán, A.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Bayliss, D.; Penev, K.; Zhou, G.; Ciceri, S.; Rabus, M.; Espinoza, N.; Mancini, L.; de Val-Borro, M.; Bhatti, W.; Sato, B.; Tan, T. G.; Csubry, Z.; Buchhave, L.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Suc, V.; Noyes, R. W.; Papp, I.; Lázár, J.; Sári, P.

    2015-07-01

    We report the discovery of two transiting extrasolar planets by the HATSouth survey. HATS-9b orbits an old (10.8 ± 1.5 Gyr) V = 13.3 G dwarf star with a period P≈ 1.9153 days. The host star has a mass of 1.03 {M}⊙ , radius of 1.503 {R}⊙ , and effective temperature 5366 ± 70 K. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.837 {M}{{J}} and radius of 1.065 {R}{{J}}, yielding a mean density of 0.85 {{g}} {{cm}}-3. HATS-10b orbits a V = 13.1 G dwarf star with a period P≈ 3.3128 days. The host star has a mass of 1.1 {M}⊙ , radius of 1.11 {R}⊙ , and effective temperature 5880 ± 120 K. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.53 {M}{{J}} and radius of 0.97 {R}{{J}}, yielding a mean density of 0.7 {{g}} {{cm}}-3. Both planets are compact in comparison with planets receiving similar irradiation from their host stars and lie in the nominal coordinates of Field 7 of K2, but only HATS-9b falls on working silicon. Future characterization of HATS-9b with the exquisite photometric precision of the Kepler telescope may provide measurements of its reflected light signature. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. Based in part on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Based in part on observations made with the MPG 2.2 m Telescope at the ESO Observatory in La Silla. This paper uses observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope. Based on observations obtained with the Apache

  13. Acetyl-phosphate is a critical determinant of lysine acetylation in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Brian T; Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Wagner, Sebastian A; Schölz, Christian; Gummesson, Bertil; Beli, Petra; Nyström, Thomas; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2013-07-25

    Lysine acetylation is a frequently occurring posttranslational modification in bacteria; however, little is known about its origin and regulation. Using the model bacterium Escherichia coli (E. coli), we found that most acetylation occurred at a low level and accumulated in growth-arrested cells in a manner that depended on the formation of acetyl-phosphate (AcP) through glycolysis. Mutant cells unable to produce AcP had significantly reduced acetylation levels, while mutant cells unable to convert AcP to acetate had significantly elevated acetylation levels. We showed that AcP can chemically acetylate lysine residues in vitro and that AcP levels are correlated with acetylation levels in vivo, suggesting that AcP may acetylate proteins nonenzymatically in cells. These results uncover a critical role for AcP in bacterial acetylation and indicate that most acetylation in E. coli occurs at a low level and is dynamically affected by metabolism and cell proliferation in a global, uniform manner.

  14. The History of SETI at the Hat Creek Radio Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarter, J.

    2006-12-01

    Since the first SETI search in 1960, observations have encountered an exponentially growing problem with radio frequency interference (RFI) generated by our own communication, entertainment, and military technologies. The signal processing equipment that is used for SETI has gotten much faster and more capable, yet the fraction of the possible search space that has been explored remains very small. More than 100 searches have been reported in the literature. Tarter (2001) has summarized the various search strategies and the SETI Institute maintains an updated search archive at http://www.seti.org/searcharchive. The Allen Telescope Array (ATA) at Hat Creek Radio Observatory will be the first instrument designed with SETI as a goal, and its speed and flexibility will permit a significant exploration of our local region of the Milky Way Galaxy, targeting ˜1 million stars for weak signals, as well as surveying for stronger signals from ˜40 billion distant stars, located in the direction of the galactic center and the surrounding 20 square degrees. Just as Jack Welch has been responsible for many of the innovations in the ATA and the SETI observations it will soon undertake, he has been the key to enabling SETI at the Hat Creek Radio Observatory for the past three decades.

  15. HAT-P-50b, HAT-P-51b, HAT-P-52b, and HAT-P-53b: Three Transiting Hot Jupiters and a Transiting Hot Saturn From the HATNet Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, J. D.; Bhatti, W.; Bakos, G. Á.; Bieryla, A.; Kovács, G.; Latham, D. W.; Csubry, Z.; de Val-Borro, M.; Penev, K.; Buchhave, L. A.; Torres, G.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Johnson, J. A.; Isaacson, H.; Sato, B.; Boisse, I.; Falco, E.; Everett, M. E.; Szklenar, T.; Fulton, B. J.; Shporer, A.; Kovács, T.; Hansen, T.; Béky, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2015-12-01

    We report the discovery and characterization of four transiting exoplanets by the HATNet survey. The planet HAT-P-50b has a mass of 1.35 {M}{{J}} and radius of 1.29 {R}{{J}}, and orbits a bright (V=11.8 mag) M=1.27 {M}⊙ , R=1.70 {R}⊙ star every P=3.1220 days. The planet HAT-P-51b has a mass of 0.31 {M}{{J}} and radius of 1.29 {R}{{J}}, and orbits a V=13.4 mag, M=0.98 {M}⊙ , R=1.04 {R}⊙ star with a period of P=4.2180 days. The planet HAT-P-52b has a mass of 0.82 {M}{{J}} and radius of 1.01 {R}{{J}}, and orbits a V=14.1 mag, M=0.89 {M}⊙ , R=0.89 {R}⊙ star with a period of P=2.7536 days. The planet HAT-P-53b has a mass of 1.48 {M}{{J}} and radius of 1.32 {R}{{J}}, and orbits a V=13.7 mag, M=1.09 {M}⊙ , R=1.21 {R}⊙ star with a period of P=1.9616 days. All four planets are consistent with having circular orbits and have masses and radii measured to better than 10% precision. The low stellar jitter and favorable {R}p/{R}\\star ratio for HAT-P-51 make it a promising target for measuring the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for a Saturn-mass planet. Based on observations obtained with the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network. Based on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time has been granted by NOAO (A245Hr) and NASA (N154Hr, N130Hr). Based on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. Based on observations obtained with the Tillinghast Reflector 1.5 m telescope and the 1.2 m telescope, both operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in AZ. Based on radial velocities obtained with the

  16. HAT-P-18b AND HAT-P-19b: TWO LOW-DENSITY SATURN-MASS PLANETS TRANSITING METAL-RICH K STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. A.; Torres, G.; Noyes, R. W.; Latham, D. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Fueresz, G.; Perumpilly, G.; Beky, B.; Stefanik, R. P.; Sasselov, D. D.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Everett, M.; Csubry, Z.; Sato, B.; Kovacs, G.; Fischer, D. A.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Johnson, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of two new transiting extrasolar planets. HAT-P-18b orbits the V = 12.759 K2 dwarf star GSC 2594-00646, with a period P = 5.508023 {+-} 0.000006 days, transit epoch T{sub c} = 2454715.02174 {+-} 0.00020 (BJD), and transit duration 0.1131 {+-} 0.0009 days. The host star has a mass of 0.77 {+-} 0.03 M{sub sun}, radius of 0.75 {+-} 0.04 R{sub sun}, effective temperature 4803 {+-} 80 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.10 {+-} 0.08. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.197 {+-} 0.013 M{sub J} and radius of 0.995 {+-} 0.052 R{sub J}, yielding a mean density of 0.25 {+-} 0.04 g cm{sup -3}. HAT-P-19b orbits the V = 12.901 K1 dwarf star GSC 2283-00589, with a period P = 4.008778 {+-} 0.000006 days, transit epoch T{sub c} = 2455091.53417 {+-} 0.00034 (BJD), and transit duration 0.1182 {+-} 0.0014 days. The host star has a mass of 0.84 {+-} 0.04 M{sub sun}, radius of 0.82 {+-} 0.05 R{sub sun}, effective temperature 4990 {+-} 130 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.23 {+-} 0.08. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.292 {+-} 0.018 M{sub J} and radius of 1.132 {+-} 0.072 R{sub J}, yielding a mean density of 0.25 {+-} 0.04 g cm{sup -3}. The radial velocity residuals for HAT-P-19 exhibit a linear trend in time, which indicates the presence of a third body in the system. Comparing these observations with theoretical models, we find that HAT-P-18b and HAT-P-19b are each consistent with a hydrogen-helium-dominated gas giant planet with negligible core mass. HAT-P-18b and HAT-P-19b join HAT-P-12b and WASP-21b in an emerging group of low-density Saturn-mass planets, with negligible inferred core masses. However, unlike HAT-P-12b and WASP-21b, both HAT-P-18b and HAT-P-19b orbit stars with super-solar metallicity. This calls into question the heretofore suggestive correlation between the inferred core mass and host star metallicity for Saturn-mass planets.

  17. Identification of lysine-acetylated mitochondrial proteins and their acetylation sites.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Markus; König, Ann-Christine; Finkemeier, Iris

    2015-01-01

    The (ε)N-acetylation of lysine side chains is a highly conserved posttranslational modification of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins. Lysine acetylation not only occurs on histones in the nucleus but also on many mitochondrial proteins in plants and animals. As the transfer of the acetyl group to lysine eliminates its positive charge, lysine acetylation can affect the biological function of proteins. This chapter describes two methods for the identification of lysine-acetylated proteins in plant mitochondria using an anti-acetyllysine antibody. We describe the Western blot analysis of a two-dimensional blue native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with an anti-acetyllysine antibody as well as the immuno-enrichment of lysine-acetylated peptides followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry data acquisition and analysis.

  18. A Bayesian Atmospheric Retrieval Performed on HAT-P-16b and WASP-11b/HAT-P-10b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Kathleen J.; Harrington, Joseph; Challener, Ryan C.; Hardin, Matthew Ryan; Bowman, Oliver Oliver; Foster, Andrew S. D.; Lenius, Maria; Hartman, Joel D.; Bakos, Gaspar; Blecic, Jasmina; Cubillos, Patricio; Ariston Hardy, Ryan; Cameron, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    HAT-P-16b is a hot (equilibrium temperature 1626 ± 40 K, assuming zero Bond albedo and efficient energy redistribution), 4.19 ± 0.09 Jupiter-mass exoplanet orbiting an F8 star every 2.775960 ± 0.000003 days (Buchhave et al 2010). WASP-11b/HAT-P-10b is a cooler (1020 ± 17 K), 0.487 ± 0.018 Jupiter-mass exoplanet orbiting a K3 star every 3.7224747 ± 0.0000065 days (Bakos et al. 2009, co-discovered by West et al. 2008). We observed secondary eclipses of both planets using the 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm channels of the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Array Camera (program ID 60003). We applied our Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) code to constrain the temperature-pressure profiles and atmospheric molecular abundances of the two planets. Spitzer is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with NASA. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G and NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX13AF38G.

  19. Giant Paperclip Necklaces, Soup-Can Rings and Cherry-Pie Hats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Laurel A.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an art project inspired by the wearable sculpture art created by artist Marjorie Schick. Students used wallpaper paste and newspapers to create papier-mache for a mountain hat, a cherry-pie mask/hat, a "dress" shoe and a Cubistic mask. Cardboard was used in many of these things, in addition to being used as…

  20. Not Just Hats Anymore: Binomial Inversion and the Problem of Multiple Coincidences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathout, Leith

    2007-01-01

    The well-known "hats" problem, in which a number of people enter a restaurant and check their hats, and then receive them back at random, is often used to illustrate the concept of derangements, that is, permutations with no fixed points. In this paper, the problem is extended to multiple items of clothing, and a general solution to the problem of…

  1. Qualitative Differences in the N-Acetyl-D-galactosaminyltransferases Produced by Human A1 and A2 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Schachter, H.; Michaels, M. A.; Tilley, Christine A.; Crookston, Marie C.; Crookston, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    This study describes the kinetic properties of N-acetyl-D-galactosaminyltransferase in serum from subjects with blood groups A1 and A2. When the A1 and A2 enzymes were compared, with lacto-N-fucopentaose I and 2′-fucosyllactose as acceptors, the enzymes differed in their cation requirements, pH optima, and Km values. The two acceptors competed for the same transferase. Mixing experiments showed that the lower activity of the A2 enzyme could not be attributed to a modifier or inhibitor in serum. It was concluded that the A1 and A2 enzymes differ qualitatively. PMID:4509655

  2. WARM SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF THREE HOT EXOPLANETS: XO-4b, HAT-P-6b, AND HAT-P-8b

    SciTech Connect

    Todorov, Kamen O.; Deming, Drake; Knutson, Heather A.; Burrows, Adam; Sada, Pedro V.; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Agol, Eric; Desert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, David; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Laughlin, Gregory; Langton, Jonathan; Showman, Adam P.; Lewis, Nikole K.

    2012-02-10

    We analyze Warm Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera observations of the secondary eclipses of three planets, XO-4b, HAT-P-6b, and HAT-P-8b. We measure secondary eclipse amplitudes at 3.6 {mu}m and 4.5 {mu}m for each target. XO-4b exhibits a stronger eclipse depth at 4.5 {mu}m than at 3.6 {mu}m, which is consistent with the presence of a temperature inversion. HAT-P-8b shows a stronger eclipse amplitude at 3.6 {mu}m and is best described by models without a temperature inversion. The eclipse depths of HAT-P-6b can be fitted with models with a small or no temperature inversion. We consider our results in the context of a postulated relationship between stellar activity and temperature inversion and a relationship between irradiation level and planet dayside temperature, as discussed by Knutson et al. and Cowan and Agol, respectively. Our results are consistent with these hypotheses, but do not significantly strengthen them. To measure accurate secondary eclipse central phases, we require accurate ephemerides. We obtain primary transit observations and supplement them with publicly available observations to update the orbital ephemerides of the three planets. Based on the secondary eclipse timing, we set upper boundaries for ecos ({omega}) for HAT-P-6b, HAT-P-8b, and XO-4b and find that the values are consistent with circular orbits.

  3. p53 Acetylation: Regulation and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Sara M.; Quelle, Dawn E.

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of p53 are critical in modulating its tumor suppressive functions. Ubiquitylation, for example, plays a major role in dictating p53 stability, subcellular localization and transcriptional vs. non-transcriptional activities. Less is known about p53 acetylation. It has been shown to govern p53 transcriptional activity, selection of growth inhibitory vs. apoptotic gene targets, and biological outcomes in response to diverse cellular insults. Yet recent in vivo evidence from mouse models questions the importance of p53 acetylation (at least at certain sites) as well as canonical p53 functions (cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis) to tumor suppression. This review discusses the cumulative findings regarding p53 acetylation, with a focus on the acetyltransferases that modify p53 and the mechanisms regulating their activity. We also evaluate what is known regarding the influence of other post-translational modifications of p53 on its acetylation, and conclude with the current outlook on how p53 acetylation affects tumor suppression. Due to redundancies in p53 control and growing understanding that individual modifications largely fine-tune p53 activity rather than switch it on or off, many questions still remain about the physiological importance of p53 acetylation to its role in preventing cancer. PMID:25545885

  4. Biological activity of acetylated phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Fragopoulou, Elizabeth; Nomikos, Tzortzis; Karantonis, Haralabos C; Apostolakis, Constantinos; Pliakis, Emmanuel; Samiotaki, Martina; Panayotou, George; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi

    2007-01-10

    In recent years an effort has been made to isolate and identify biologically active compounds that are included in the Mediterranean diet. The existence of naturally occurring acetylated phenolics, as well as studies with synthetic ones, provide evidence that acetyl groups could be correlated with their biological activity. Platelet activating factor (PAF) is implicated in atherosclerosis, whereas its inhibitors seem to play a protective role against cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to examine the biological activity of resveratrol and tyrosol and their acetylated derivatives as inhibitors of PAF-induced washed rabbit platelet aggregation. Acetylation of resveratrol and tyrosol was performed, and separation was achieved by HPLC. Acetylated derivatives were identified by negative mass spectrometry. The data showed that tyrosol and its monoacetylated derivatives act as PAF inhibitors, whereas diacetylated derivatives induce platelet aggregation. Resveratrol and its mono- and triacetylated derivatives exert similar inhibitory activity, whereas the diacetylated ones are more potent inhibitors. In conclusion, acetylated phenolics exert the same or even higher antithrombotic activity compared to the biological activity of the initial one.

  5. Restoration of DNA-Binding and Growth-Suppressive Activity of Mutant Forms of p53 Via a PCAF-Mediated Acetylation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    PEREZ, RICARDO E.; KNIGHTS, CHAD D.; SAHU, GEETARAM; CATANIA, JASON; KOLUKULA, VAMSI K.; STOLER, DANIEL; GRAESSMANN, ADOLF; OGRYZKO, VASILY; PISHVAIAN, MICHAEL; ALBANESE, CHRISTOPHER; AVANTAGGIATI, MARIA LAURA

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-derived mutant forms of p53 compromise its DNA binding, transcriptional, and growth regulatory activity in a manner that is dependent upon the cell-type and the type of mutation. Given the high frequency of p53 mutations in human tumors, reactivation of the p53 pathway has been widely proposed as beneficial for cancer therapy. In support of this possibility p53 mutants possess a certain degree of conformational flexibility that allows for re-induction of function by a number of structurally different artificial compounds or by short peptides. This raises the question of whether physiological pathways for p53 mutant reactivation also exist and can be exploited therapeutically. The activity of wild-type p53 is modulated by various acetyl-transferases and deacetylases, but whether acetylation influences signaling by p53 mutant is still unknown. Here, we show that the PCAF acetyl-transferase is down-regulated in tumors harboring p53 mutants, where its re-expression leads to p53 acetylation and to cell death. Furthermore, acetylation restores the DNA-binding ability of p53 mutants in vitro and expression of PCAF, or treatment with deacetylase inhibitors, promotes their binding to p53-regulated promoters and transcriptional activity in vivo. These data suggest that PCAF-mediated acetylation rescues activity of at least a set of p53 mutations. Therefore, we propose that dis-regulation of PCAF activity is a pre-requisite for p53 mutant loss of function and for the oncogenic potential acquired by neoplastic cells expressing these proteins. Our findings offer a new rationale for therapeutic targeting of PCAF activity in tumors harboring oncogenic versions of p53. PMID:20589832

  6. Mechanisms and Dynamics of Protein Acetylation in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Baeza, Josue; Smallegan, Michael J.; Denu, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Reversible protein acetylation is a major regulatory mechanism for controlling protein function. Through genetic manipulations, dietary perturbations, and new proteomic technologies, the diverse functions of protein acetylation are coming into focus. Protein acetylation in mitochondria has taken center stage, revealing that 63% of mitochondrially localized proteins contain lysine acetylation sites. Here we summarize the field, and discuss salient topics that cover spurious versus targeted acetylation, the role of SIRT3 deacetylation, nonenzymatic acetylation, and molecular models for regulatory acetylations that display high and low stoichiometry. PMID:26822488

  7. Supernova 1987 A - The nebular loops and 'Napoleon's Hat'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Wampler, E. J.

    1992-08-01

    We discuss observations of the circumstellar environment of SN 1987A that were obtained between August 1989 and January 1992 at ESO's New Technology Telescope. We find that the angular dimensions of the two nebular loops (Wampler et al., 1990) have not changed during this period. Therefore these loops are confined to a small region. The expansion velocity of the loops is less than about 40 km/s if the loops expanded with a uniform velocity from a common origin. This structure and velocity is hard to reproduce with existing wind interaction models. Our observations further suggest that the Napoleon's Hat nebula does not originate from the general background LMC dust, but from a bow shock dust whose origins are closely related to the stellar winds from the progenitor star of SN 1987A.

  8. One-Loop Calculations with BlackHat

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.F.; Bern, Z.; Dixon, L.J.; Cordero, F.Febres; Forde, D.; Ita, H.; Kosower, D.A.; Maitre, D.

    2008-08-01

    We describe BlackHat, an automated C++ program for calculating one-loop amplitudes, and the techniques used in its construction. These include the unitarity method and on-shell recursion. The other ingredients are compact analytic formulae for tree amplitudes for four-dimensional helicity states. The program computes amplitudes numerically, using analytic formula only for the tree amplitudes, the starting point for the recursion, and the loop integrals. We make use of recently developed on-shell methods for evaluating coefficients of loop integrals, in particular a discrete Fourier projection as a means of improving numerical stability. We illustrate the good numerical stability of this approach by computing six-, seven- and eight-gluon amplitudes in QCD and comparing against known analytic results.

  9. Mapping HI and B at Hat Creek ... and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiles, C.

    2006-12-01

    The Hat Creek 85-foot telescope produced the first complete surveys of HI in the Northern sky--superseded only recently--and initiated measurements of the interstellar magnetic field using Zeeman splitting of the HI line in emission. These endeavors required state-of-the-art electronics and spectrometers. Here I review the role of the Berkeley Radio Astronomy Laboratory and its 85-foot telescope in their initiative roles for these three areas of science and technology and trace their evolution to the present. The present emphasizes the great single dishes of our times, the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) for Zeeman splitting and Arecibo for HI mapping; Fourier-transform spectrometers using FPGA technology; and sustaining the future with the synergy of research and education.

  10. Transit timing analysis in the HAT-P-32 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeliger, M.; Dimitrov, D.; Kjurkchieva, D.; Mallonn, M.; Fernandez, M.; Kitze, M.; Casanova, V.; Maciejewski, G.; Ohlert, J. M.; Schmidt, J. G.; Pannicke, A.; Puchalski, D.; Göğüş, E.; Güver, T.; Bilir, S.; Ak, T.; Hohle, M. M.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Errmann, R.; Jensen, E.; Cohen, D.; Marschall, L.; Saral, G.; Bernt, I.; Derman, E.; Gałan, C.; Neuhäuser, R.

    2014-06-01

    We present the results of 45 transit observations obtained for the transiting exoplanet HAT-P-32b. The transits have been observed using several telescopes mainly throughout the YETI (Young Exoplanet Transit Initiative) network. In 25 cases, complete transit light curves with a timing precision better than 1.4 min have been obtained. These light curves have been used to refine the system properties, namely inclination i, planet-to-star radius ratio Rp/Rs, and the ratio between the semimajor axis and the stellar radius a/Rs. First analyses by Hartman et al. suggests the existence of a second planet in the system, thus we tried to find an additional body using the transit timing variation (TTV) technique. Taking also the literature data points into account, we can explain all mid-transit times by refining the linear ephemeris by 21 ms. Thus, we can exclude TTV amplitudes of more than ˜1.5 min.

  11. Friction pull plug welding: top hat plug design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coletta, Edmond R. (Inventor); Cantrell, Mark A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Friction Pull Plug Welding is a solid state repair process for defects up to one inch in length, only requiring single sided tooling, or outside skin line (OSL), for preferred usage on flight hardware. The most prevalent defect associated with Friction Pull Plug Welding (FPPW) was a top side or inside skin line (ISL) lack of bonding. Bonding was not achieved at this location due to the reduction in both frictional heat and welding pressure between the plug and plate at the end of the weld. Thus, in order to eliminate the weld defects and increase the plug strength at the plug `top` a small `hat` section is added to the pull plug for added frictional heating and pressure.

  12. Friction pull plug welding: top hat plug design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coletta, Edmond R. (Inventor); Cantrell, Mark A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Friction Pull Plug Welding is a solid state repair process for defects up to one inch in length, only requiring single sided tooling, or outside skin line (OSL), for preferred usage on flight hardware. The most prevalent defect associated with Friction Pull Plug Welding (FPPW) was a top side or inside skin line (ISL) lack of bonding. Bonding was not achieved at this location due to the reduction in both frictional heat and welding pressure between the plug and plate at the end of the weld. Thus, in order to eliminate the weld defects and increase the plug strength at the plug `top` a small `hat` section is added to the pull plug for added frictional heating and pressure.

  13. Secondary Eclipses of HAT-P-13b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Ryan A.; Harrington, Joseph; Hardin, Matthew R.; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Loredo, Thomas J.; Challener, Ryan C.; Foster, Andrew S. D.; Cubillos, Patricio E.; Blecic, Jasmina

    2017-02-01

    We present Spitzer secondary-eclipse observations of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-13 b in the 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands. HAT-P-13 b inhabits a two-planet system with a configuration that enables constraints on the planet’s second Love number, {k}2, from precise eccentricity measurements, which in turn constrains models of the planet’s interior structure. We exploit the direct measurements of e\\cos ω from our secondary-eclipse data and combine them with previously published radial velocity data to generate a refined model of the planet’s orbit and thus an improved estimate on the possible interval for {k}2. We report eclipse phases of 0.49154+/- 0.00080 and 0.49711+/- 0.00083 and corresponding e\\cos ω estimates of -0.0136+/- 0.0013 and -0.0048+/- 0.0013. Under the assumptions of previous work, our estimate of {k}2 of 0.81 ± 0.10 is consistent with the lower extremes of possible core masses found by previous models, including models with no solid core. This anomalous result challenges both interior models and the dynamical assumptions that enable them, including the essential assumption of apsidal alignment. We also report eclipse depths of 0.081% ± 0.008% in the 3.6 μm channel and 0.088% ± 0.028% in the 4.5 μm channel. These photometric results are non-uniquely consistent with solar-abundance composition without any thermal inversion.

  14. UMTRA Project Site Observational Work Plan, Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    Surface cleanup activities at the Mexican Hat UMTRA processing site are nearing completion. Ground Water contamination at the Mexican Hat site is a result of uranium milling operations. The extent of residual process water has been identified, and it is limited to the uppermost aquifer in the vicinity of the site. Deeper aquifers are not affected because of an upward hydraulic gradient and the presence of a confining unit (the deeper aquifers are protected by hydrogeologic isolation). The uppermost unit is returning to its pre-milling, mainly unsaturated state. The unit that contains the contaminated water is not a ground water resource because it qualifies as Class III (limited use) based on limited yield. Ground water in the uppermost unit is currently not used and is not anticipated to be used as a ground water resource. The nearby San Juan River and a converted oil exploration well provide all of the water needs for the area. There are no current threats to human health or livestock; and, because the zone of contamination does not represent a ground water resource, none are anticipated in the future. There are, however, seeps where contaminated water is exposed at land surface. The seeps create potential exposure pathways for plants and wildlife. It is not known at this time if there is a risk to the environment. Additional investigations are needed and are described in this document to confirm the presence or absence of potential environmental risks. Additional hydrogeologic investigations are not required. The proposed ground water compliance strategy for the site is no remediation, because the ground water in the uppermost aquifer (which is also the zone of contamination) qualifies for supplemental standards based on Class III, limited yield, and because there are no threats to human health. Domestic and agricultural water is pumped from a deeper aquifer that is isolated from the contaminated zone.

  15. 30 CFR 77.1710-1 - Distinctively colored hard hats or hard caps; identification for newly employed, inexperienced...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Distinctively colored hard hats or hard caps... Distinctively colored hard hats or hard caps; identification for newly employed, inexperienced miners. Hard hats or hard caps distinctively different in color from those worn by experienced miners shall be worn...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1720-1 - Distinctively colored hard hats, or hard caps; identification for newly employed, inexperienced...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Distinctively colored hard hats, or hard caps... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1720-1 Distinctively colored hard hats, or hard caps; identification for newly employed, inexperienced miners. Hard hats or hard caps distinctively different in...

  17. Acetylation of histone H4 lysine 5 and 12 is required for CENP-A deposition into centromeres

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Wei-Hao; Hori, Tetsuya; Westhorpe, Frederick G.; Godek, Kristina M.; Toyoda, Atsushi; Misu, Sadahiko; Monma, Norikazu; Ikeo, Kazuho; Carroll, Christopher W.; Takami, Yasunari; Fujiyama, Asao; Kimura, Hiroshi; Straight, Aaron F.; Fukagawa, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Centromeres are specified epigenetically through the deposition of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A. However, how additional epigenetic features are involved in centromere specification is unknown. Here, we find that histone H4 Lys5 and Lys12 acetylation (H4K5ac and H4K12ac) primarily occur within the pre-nucleosomal CENP-A–H4–HJURP (CENP-A chaperone) complex, before centromere deposition. We show that H4K5ac and H4K12ac are mediated by the RbAp46/48–Hat1 complex and that RbAp48-deficient DT40 cells fail to recruit HJURP to centromeres and do not incorporate new CENP-A at centromeres. However, C-terminally-truncated HJURP, that does not bind CENP-A, does localize to centromeres in RbAp48-deficient cells. Acetylation-dead H4 mutations cause mis-localization of the CENP-A–H4 complex to non-centromeric chromatin. Crucially, CENP-A with acetylation-mimetic H4 was assembled specifically into centromeres even in RbAp48-deficient DT40 cells. We conclude that H4K5ac and H4K12ac, mediated by RbAp46/48, facilitates efficient CENP-A deposition into centromeres. PMID:27811920

  18. The Genetic Architecture of Murine Glutathione Transferases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lu; Pandey, Ashutosh K.; Houseal, M. Trevor; Mulligan, Megan K.

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes play a protective role against oxidative stress and may influence disease risk and drug pharmacokinetics. In this study, massive multiscalar trait profiling across a large population of mice derived from a cross between C57BL/6J (B6) and DBA2/J (D2)—the BXD family—was combined with linkage and bioinformatic analyses to characterize mechanisms controlling GST expression and to identify downstream consequences of this variation. Similar to humans, mice show a wide range in expression of GST family members. Variation in the expression of Gsta4, Gstt2, Gstz1, Gsto1, and Mgst3 is modulated by local expression QTLs (eQTLs) in several tissues. Higher expression of Gsto1 in brain and liver of BXD strains is strongly associated (P < 0.01) with inheritance of the B6 parental allele whereas higher expression of Gsta4 and Mgst3 in brain and liver, and Gstt2 and Gstz1 in brain is strongly associated with inheritance of the D2 parental allele. Allele-specific assays confirmed that expression of Gsto1, Gsta4, and Mgst3 are modulated by sequence variants within or near each gene locus. We exploited this endogenous variation to identify coexpression networks and downstream targets in mouse and human. Through a combined systems genetics approach, we provide new insight into the biological role of naturally occurring variants in GST genes. PMID:26829228

  19. Dialing the Love Number of Hot Jupiter HAT-P-13b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhler, Peter

    2015-05-01

    HAT-P-13b is Jupiter-mass transiting planet in a 0.04 AU orbit around its host star. It has an outer companion, HAT-P-13c, with a minimum mass of 14.7 MJup in a highly eccentric 1.2 AU orbit. These two companions form an isolated dynamical system with their host star [1]. The nature of this system allows the two bodies to settle into a fixed eccentricity state where the eccentricity of HAT-P-13b is directly related to its oblateness as described by the Love number, k2 [2]. In order to constrain the eccentricity, and therefore k2, of HAT-P-13b, we use the Spitzer Space Telescope to measure the timing of its secondary eclipses at 3.6 and 4.5 μm. We then simultaneously fit our secondary eclipse data in conjunction with previously measured radial velocity and transit data. Finally, we apply the fact that, if the orbits of HAT-P-13b and HAT-P-13c are coplanar, then their apsides are aligned [3]. The apsidal orientation of HAT-P-13c is much better constrained because of its high eccentricity, which helps break the degeneracy between the eccentricity and apsidal orientation in interpreting the measured secondary eclipse time. Our analysis allows us to measure the eccentricity of HAT-P-13b’s orbit with a precision approximately ten times better than that of previously published values, in the coplanar case, and allows us to place the first meaningful constraints on the core mass of HAT-P-13b.[1] Becker & Batygin 2013, ApJ 778, 100 [2] Wu & Goldreich 2002, ApJ 564, 1024 [3] Batygin+ 2009, ApJ 704, L49

  20. Acetyl-L-carnitine in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Malaguarnera, Michele

    2013-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a common complication of hepatic cirrhosis. The clinical diagnosis is based on two concurrent types of symptoms: impaired mental status and impaired neuromotor function. Impaired mental status is characterized by deterioration in mental status with psychomotor dysfunction, impaired memory, and increased reaction time, sensory abnormalities, poor concentration, disorientation and coma. Impaired neuromotor function include hyperreflexia, rigidity, myoclonus and asterixis. The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy has not been clearly defined. The general consensus is that elevated levels of ammonia and an inflammatory response work in synergy to cause astrocyte to swell and fluid to accumulate in the brain which is thought to explain the symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy. Acetyl-L-carnitine, the short-chain ester of carnitine is endogenously produced within mitochondria and peroxisomes and is involved in the transport of acetyl-moieties across the membranes of these organelles. Acetyl-L-carnitine administration has shown the recovery of neuropsychological activities related to attention/concentration, visual scanning and tracking, psychomotor speed and mental flexibility, language short-term memory, attention, and computing ability. In fact, Acetyl-L-carnitine induces ureagenesis leading to decreased blood and brain ammonia levels. Acetyl-L-carnitine treatment decreases the severity of mental and physical fatigue, depression cognitive impairment and improves health-related quality of life. The aim of this review was to provide an explanation on the possible toxic effects of ammonia in HE and evaluate the potential clinical benefits of ALC.

  1. HATS-11b AND HATS-12b: Two Transiting Hot Jupiters Orbiting Subsolar Metallicity Stars Selected for the K2 Campaign 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabus, M.; Jordán, A.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Espinoza, N.; Brahm, R.; Penev, K.; Ciceri, S.; Zhou, G.; Bayliss, D.; Mancini, L.; Bhatti, W.; de Val-Borro, M.; Csbury, Z.; Sato, B.; Tan, T.-G.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Bento, J.; Suc, V.; Noyes, R.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2016-10-01

    We report the discovery of two transiting extrasolar planets from the HATSouth survey. HATS-11, a V = 14.1 G0-star shows a periodic 12.9 mmag dip in its light curve every 3.6192 days and a radial velocity variation consistent with a Keplerian orbit. HATS-11 has a mass of 1.000+/- 0.060 {M}⊙ , a radius of 1.444+/- 0.057 {R}⊙ and an effective temperature of 6060+/- 150 K, while its companion is a 0.85+/- 0.12 {M}{{J}}, 1.510+/- 0.078 {R}{{J}} planet in a circular orbit. HATS-12 shows a periodic 5.1 mmag flux decrease every 3.1428 days and Keplerian RV variations around a V = 12.8 F-star. HATS-12 has a mass of 1.489+/- 0.071 {M}⊙ , a radius of 2.21+/- 0.21 {R}⊙ , and an effective temperature of 6408+/- 75 K. For HATS-12b, our measurements indicate that this is a 2.38+/- 0.11 {M}{{J}}, 1.35+/- 0.17 {R}{{J}} planet in a circular orbit. Both host stars show subsolar metallicities of -0.390+/- 0.060 dex and -0.100+/- 0.040 dex, respectively, and are (slightly) evolved stars. In fact, HATS-11 is among the most metal-poor and, HATS-12, with a {log}{g}\\star of 3.923+/- 0.065, is among the most evolved stars hosting a hot-Jupiter planet. Importantly, HATS-11 and HATS-12 have been observed in long cadence by Kepler as part of K2 campaign 7 (EPIC216414930 and EPIC218131080 respectively). The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. Based in part on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Based in part on

  2. Radiant exposure level comparison between Gaussian and top hat beams in various scanning patterns.

    PubMed

    U-Thainual, Paweena; Yang, Yi; Le, Hanh N D; Kim, Do-Hyun

    2014-12-20

    The radiant exposure of optical irradiation beams with different scanning parameters has been theoretically studied. We analyzed the difference in radiant exposure introduced by Gaussian and top hat beams. Various parameters such as scanning pattern, aperture position, beam size and scan spacing were also introduced in this study. We found that Gaussian beams introduce higher calculated radiant exposure to the aperture than top hat beams for certain beam size to aperture size ratios. However, as the scan spacing decreases, the radiant exposure difference calculated from Gaussian and top hat beams diminishes.

  3. Two Independent Regions of Simian Virus 40 T Antigen Increase CBP/p300 Levels, Alter Patterns of Cellular Histone Acetylation, and Immortalize Primary Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sáenz Robles, Maria Teresa; Shivalila, Chikdu; Wano, Jeremy; Sorrells, Shelly; Roos, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (SVT) interferes with normal cell regulation and thus has been used to identify cellular components controlling proliferation and homeostasis. We have previously shown that SVT-mediated transformation requires interaction with the histone acetyltransferases (HATs) CBP/p300 and now report that the ectopic expression of SVT in several cell types in vivo and in vitro results in a significant increase in the steady-state levels of CBP/p300. Furthermore, SVT-expressing cells contain higher levels of acetylated CBP/p300, a modification that has been linked to increased HAT activity. Concomitantly, the acetylation levels of histone residues H3K56 and H4K12 are markedly increased in SVT-expressing cells. Other polyomavirus-encoded large T antigens also increase the levels of CBP/p300 and sustain a rise in the acetylation levels of H3K56 and H4K12. SVT does not affect the transcription of CBP/p300, but rather, alters their overall levels through increasing the loading of CBP/p300 mRNAs onto polysomes. Two distinct regions within SVT, one located in the amino terminus and one in the carboxy terminus, can independently alter both the levels of CBP/p300 and the loading of CBP/p300 transcripts onto polysomes. Within the amino-terminal fragment, a functional J domain is necessary for increasing CBP/p300 and specific histone acetylation levels, as well as for immortalizing primary cells. These studies uncover the action of polyomavirus T antigens on cellular CBP/p300 and suggest that additional mechanisms are used by T antigens to induce cell immortalization and transformation. PMID:24089570

  4. Histone acetyltransferase HAT4 modulates navigation across G2/M and re-entry into G1 in Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Aarti; Chandra, Udita; Saha, Swati

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetyltransferases impact multiple processes. This study investigates the role of histone acetyltransferase HAT4 in Leishmania donovani. Though HAT4 was dispensable for survival, its elimination decreased cell viability and caused cell cycle defects, with HAT4-nulls experiencing an unusually long G2/M. Survival of HAT4-nulls in macrophages was also substantially compromised. DNA microarray analysis revealed that HAT4 modestly regulated the expression of only a select number of genes, thus not being a major modulator of global gene expression. Significantly, cdc20 was among the downregulated genes. To ascertain if decreased expression of cdc20 was responsible for HAT4-null growth and cell cycle defects we expressed LdCdc20 ectopically in HAT4-nulls. We found this to alleviate the aberrant growth and cell cycle progression patterns displayed by HAT4-nulls, with cells navigating G2/M phase and re-entering G1 phase smoothly. HAT4-nulls expressing LdCdc20 ectopically showed survival rates comparable to wild type within macrophages, suggesting that G2/M defects were responsible for poor survival of HAT4-nulls within host cells also. These are the first data analyzing the in vivo functional role of HAT4 in any trypanosomatid. Our results directly demonstrate for the first time a role for Cdc20 in regulating trypanosomatid G2/M events, opening avenues for further research in this area. PMID:27272906

  5. Gamma-glutamyl transferase and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Kastrati, Adnan

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) is an enzyme located on the external surface of cellular membranes. GGT contributes in maintaining the physiological concentrations of cytoplasmic glutathione and cellular defense against oxidative stress via cleavage of extracellular glutathione and increased availability of amino acids for its intracellular synthesis. Increased GGT activity is a marker of antioxidant inadequacy and increased oxidative stress. Ample evidence suggests that elevated GGT activity is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) such as coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, arterial hypertension, heart failure, cardiac arrhythmias and all-cause and CVD-related mortality. The evidence is weaker for an association between elevated GGT activity and acute ischemic events and myocardial infarction. The risk for CVD or CVD-related mortality mediated by GGT may be explained by the close correlation of GGT with conventional CVD risk factors and various comorbidities, particularly non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, alcohol consumption, oxidative stress, metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and systemic inflammation. The finding of GGT activity in atherosclerotic plaques and correlation of intra-plaque GGT activity with histological indexes of plaque instability may suggest a participation of GGT in the pathophysiology of CVD, particularly atherosclerosis. However, whether GGT has a direct role in the pathophysiology of CVD or it is an epiphenomenon of coexisting CVD risk factors or comorbidities remains unknown and Hill’s criteria of causality relationship between GGT and CVD are not fulfilled. The exploration whether GGT provides prognostic information on top of the information provided by known cardiovascular risk factors regarding the CVD or CVD-related outcome and exploration of molecular mechanisms of GGT involvement in the pathophysiology of CVD and eventual use of interventions to reduce circulating GGT activity remain a duty of

  6. Preliminary toxicological study of ferric acetyl acetonate

    SciTech Connect

    London, J.E.; Smith, D.M.

    1983-01-01

    The calculated acute oral LD/sub 50//sup 30/ (lethal does for 50% of the animals occuring with 30 days after compound administration) values for ferric acetyl acetonate were 584 mg/kg in mice and 995 mg/kg in rats. According to classical guidelines, this compound would be considered slightly toxic in both species. Skin application studies in the rabbit demonstrated the compound to be irritating. The eye irritation study disclosed the compound to be a severe irritant causing permanent damage to the cornea (inflammation and scarring resulting in blindness). The sensitization study in the guinea pig did not show ferric acetyl acetonate to be deleterious in this regard.

  7. HAT-P-34b-HAT-P-37b: FOUR TRANSITING PLANETS MORE MASSIVE THAN JUPITER ORBITING MODERATELY BRIGHT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Bakos, G. A.; Hartman, J. D.; Csubry, Z.; Penev, K.; Torres, G.; Beky, B.; Latham, D. W.; Bieryla, A.; Quinn, S.; Szklenar, T.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Noyes, R. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Kovacs, G.; Shporer, A.; Fischer, D. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Sato, B.; and others

    2012-07-15

    We report the discovery of four transiting extrasolar planets (HAT-P-34b-HAT-P-37b) with masses ranging from 1.05 to 3.33 M{sub J} and periods from 1.33 to 5.45 days. These planets orbit relatively bright F and G dwarf stars (from V = 10.16 to V = 13.2). Of particular interest is HAT-P-34b which is moderately massive (3.33 M{sub J}), has a high eccentricity of e = 0.441 {+-} 0.032 at a period of P = 5.452654 {+-} 0.000016 days, and shows hints of an outer component. The other three planets have properties that are typical of hot Jupiters.

  8. Heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) a decade later: a brief update on science and politics.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Benedikt; Oviedo-Joekes, Eugenia; Blanken, Peter; Haasen, Christian; Rehm, Jürgen; Schechter, Martin T; Strang, John; van den Brink, Wim

    2007-07-01

    Since the initial Swiss heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) study conducted in the mid-1990s, several other jurisdictions in Europe and North America have implemented HAT trials. All of these studies embrace the same goal-investigating the utility of medical heroin prescribing for problematic opioid users-yet are distinct in various key details. This paper briefly reviews (initiated or completed) studies and their main parameters, including primary research objectives, design, target populations, outcome measures, current status and-where available-key results. We conclude this overview with some final observations on a decade of intensive HAT research in the jurisdictions examined, including the suggestion that there is a mounting onus on the realm of politics to translate the-largely positive-data from completed HAT science into corresponding policy and programming in order to expand effective treatment options for the high-risk population of illicit opioid users.

  9. Application of Human-Autonomy Teaming (HAT) Patterns to Reduced Crew Operations (RCO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, R. Jay; Brandt, Summer L.; Lachter, Joel; Matessa, Mike; Sadler, Garrett; Battiste, Henri

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Air Force - NASA Bi-Annual Research Council Meeting, slides will be presented on recent Reduced Crew Operations (RCO) work. Unmanned aerial systems, robotics, advanced cockpits, and air traffic management are all examples of domains that are seeing dramatic increases in automation. While automation may take on some tasks previously performed by humans, humans will still be required, for the foreseeable future, to remain in the system. The collaboration with humans and these increasingly autonomous systems will begin to resemble cooperation between teammates, rather than simple task allocation. It is critical to understand this human-autonomy teaming (HAT) to optimize these systems in the future. One methodology to understand HAT is by identifying recurring patterns of HAT that have similar characteristics and solutions. A methodology for identifying HAT patterns to an advanced cockpit project is discussed.

  10. Application of Human-Autonomy Teaming (HAT) Patterns to Reduce Crew Operations (RCO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, R. Jay; Brandt, Summer L.; Lachter, Joel; Matessa, Mike; Sadler, Garrett; Battiste, Henri

    2016-01-01

    Unmanned aerial systems, robotics, advanced cockpits, and air traffic management are all examples of domains that are seeing dramatic increases in automation. While automation may take on some tasks previously performed by humans, humans will still be required, for the foreseeable future, to remain in the system. The collaboration with humans and these increasingly autonomous systems will begin to resemble cooperation between teammates, rather than simple task allocation. It is critical to understand this human-autonomy teaming (HAT) to optimize these systems in the future. One methodology to understand HAT is by identifying recurring patterns of HAT that have similar characteristics and solutions. This paper applies a methodology for identifying HAT patterns to an advanced cockpit project.

  11. FLOYDS Classification of DLT17h/AT 2017ahn as a Type II Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinzadeh, G.; Valenti, S.; Arcavi, I.; Howell, D. A.; McCully, C.; Sand, D.; Tartaglia, L.

    2017-02-01

    We obtained a spectrum of DLT17h/AT 2017ahn (ATel #10058) on 2017 February 8.7 UT with the robotic FLOYDS instrument mounted on the Las Cumbres Observatory 2-meter telescope in Siding Spring, Australia.

  12. Biomechanical study of a hat type cervical intervertebral fusion cage.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yu-Tong; Jia, Lian-Shun; Chen, Tong-Yi

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical effect of a hat type cervical intervertebral fusion cage (HCIFC). In this in vitro biomechanical study, 48 goat cervical spines (C2-5) were tested in flexion, extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending with a nondestructive stiffness method using a nonconstrained testing apparatus, and three-dimensional displacement was measured. Autologous iliac bone and cervical spine intervertebral fusion cage were implanted according to manufacturers' information after complete discectomy (C3-4). Eight spines in each of the following groups were tested: intact, autologous iliac bone graft, Harms cage, SynCage C, carbon cage, and HCIFC. The mean apparent stiffness values were calculated from the corresponding load-displacement curves. Additionally, cage volume and volume-related stiffness were determined. The stiffness of the SynCage C was statistically greatest in all directions. After implantation of the HCIFC, flexion stiffness increased compared with that of the intact motion segment. There was no significant difference in stiffness between the HCIFC and carbon cage. The stiffness of the HCIFC was statistically higher than that of the Harms cage in axial rotation and significantly lower in flexion, extension, and lateral bending. Volume-related stiffness of all cages was higher than that of iliac bone graft. The Harms cage was highest in volume-related stiffness in all directions. The HCIFC can provide enough primary stability for cervical intervertebral fusion.

  13. HAT-P-42b and HAT-P-43b. Two inflated transiting hot Jupiters from the HATNet Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisse, I.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Csubry, Z.; Béky, B.; Latham, D. W.; Bieryla, A.; Torres, G.; Kovács, G.; Buchhave, L. A.; Hansen, T.; Everett, M.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Szklenár, T.; Falco, E.; Shporer, A.; Fulton, B. J.; Noyes, R. W.; Stefanik, R. P.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2013-10-01

    Aims: We announce the discovery of two new transiting planets, and provide their accurate initial characterization. Methods: First identified from the HATNet wide-field photometric survey, these candidate transiting planets were then followed-up with a variety of photometric observations. Determining the planetary nature of the objects and characterizing the parameters of the systems were mainly done with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the 1.93 m telescope at OHP and the TRES spectrograph at the 1.5 m telescope at FLWO. Results: HAT-P-42b and HAT-P-43b are typical hot Jupiters on circular orbits around early-G/late-F main sequence host stars, with periods of 4.641878 ± 0.000032 and 3.332687 ± 0.000015 days, masses of 1.044 ± 0.083 and 0.662 ± 0.060 MJ, and radii of 1.280 ± 0.153 and 1.28+0.062-0.033RJ, respectively. These discoveries increase the sample of planets with measured mean densities, which are needed to constrain theories of planetary interiors and atmospheres. Moreover, their hosts are relatively bright (V < 13.5), which facilitates further follow-up studies. Full Table 2 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/558/A86The photometric/spectroscopic data presented in this paper are based in part on observations carried out by the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network, using telescopes operated at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory (FLWO) of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), and at the Submillimeter Array (SMA) of SAO, by the Tillinghast Reflector 1.5 m telescope and the 1.2 m telescope, both operated by SAO at FLWO, by the SOPHIE spectrograph mounted on the 1.93 m telescope at Observatoire de Haute Provence, France (runs DDT-Dec. 2011), by the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los

  14. Using a Home Automated Telemanagement (HAT) system: experiences and perceptions of patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Castro, Heather K; Cross, Raymond K; Finkelstein, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the experiences and perceptions of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who participated in an interactive, patient-centered computerized disease management program using the Home Automated Telemanagement (HAT) system. We conducted and analyzed qualitative exit interviews with 23 participants who used the system for six months. The HAT system was well accepted, increased patients' awareness about the disease and facilitated greater control of their IBD symptoms.

  15. HAT-P-1: A Direct Glimpse into the Atmosphere of a Hot Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Matthew

    2009-07-01

    The HATNet project has discovered a transiting planet that is an extremely valuable target for reflected light observations {Bakos et al. 2006}. HAT-P-1b, with mass M_p=0.53 +/- 0.04 M_Jup, and radius R_p=1.20 +/- 0.05 R_Jup {Winn et al. 2007}, has a density comparable to that of HD 209458b. However, HAT-P-1b's P=4.46536 day orbital period is longer than that of HD 209458b. It is expected that the cloud composition and particulate size distribution of HAT-P-1b will differ from that of HD 209458b, due to the larger semimajor axis and lower effective temperature of HAT-P-1b. The resulting geometric albedo for HAT-P-1b should be larger than that of HD 209458b. Furthermore, HAT-P-1 orbits one component of a wide binary {ADS 16402A and ADS 16402B are G0V stars with 11.2" at 1.39 pc}, making this an ideal target for ultra-precise differential photometry. Therefore, we propose ACS/HRC slitless grism photometry near times of its secondary eclipse to make the first detection of reflected light from an extrasolar planet.Note: this program was awarded DD time in Cycle 15 but the observations were not executed before the ACS failed.Holman and Bakos are co-PIs on this proposal.

  16. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, P.G.; Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1996-09-24

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives are disclosed which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides. 5 figs.

  17. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  18. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  19. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  20. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  1. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, Paul G.; Ohlrogge, John B.

    1996-01-01

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives thereof which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides.

  2. HAT-P-18b and HAT-P-19b: Two Low-density Saturn-mass Planets Transiting Metal-rich K Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Sato, B.; Torres, G.; Noyes, R. W.; Latham, D. W.; Kovács, G.; Fischer, D. A.; Howard, A. W.; Johnson, J. A.; Marcy, G. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Füresz, G.; Perumpilly, G.; Béky, B.; Stefanik, R. P.; Sasselov, D. D.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Everett, M.; Csubry, Z.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of two new transiting extrasolar planets. HAT-P-18b orbits the V = 12.759 K2 dwarf star GSC 2594-00646, with a period P = 5.508023 ± 0.000006 days, transit epoch Tc = 2454715.02174 ± 0.00020 (BJD), and transit duration 0.1131 ± 0.0009 days. The host star has a mass of 0.77 ± 0.03 M sun, radius of 0.75 ± 0.04 R sun, effective temperature 4803 ± 80 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.10 ± 0.08. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.197 ± 0.013 M J and radius of 0.995 ± 0.052 R J, yielding a mean density of 0.25 ± 0.04 g cm-3. HAT-P-19b orbits the V = 12.901 K1 dwarf star GSC 2283-00589, with a period P = 4.008778 ± 0.000006 days, transit epoch Tc = 2455091.53417 ± 0.00034 (BJD), and transit duration 0.1182 ± 0.0014 days. The host star has a mass of 0.84 ± 0.04 M sun, radius of 0.82 ± 0.05 R sun, effective temperature 4990 ± 130 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.23 ± 0.08. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.292 ± 0.018 M J and radius of 1.132 ± 0.072 R J, yielding a mean density of 0.25 ± 0.04 g cm-3. The radial velocity residuals for HAT-P-19 exhibit a linear trend in time, which indicates the presence of a third body in the system. Comparing these observations with theoretical models, we find that HAT-P-18b and HAT-P-19b are each consistent with a hydrogen-helium-dominated gas giant planet with negligible core mass. HAT-P-18b and HAT-P-19b join HAT-P-12b and WASP-21b in an emerging group of low-density Saturn-mass planets, with negligible inferred core masses. However, unlike HAT-P-12b and WASP-21b, both HAT-P-18b and HAT-P-19b orbit stars with super-solar metallicity. This calls into question the heretofore suggestive correlation between the inferred core mass and host star metallicity for Saturn-mass planets. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time has been granted by NOAO (A146Hr, A201Hr

  3. Acetyl-L-carnitine ameliorates caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Hossam M M; Hemeida, Ramadan A M; Hassan, Mohamed I A; Abdel-Wahab, Mohammed H; Badary, Osama A; Hamada, Farid M A

    2009-07-01

    In the present study, we have addressed the possible protective role of acetyl-L-carnitine in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in male Swiss albino rats. Acute pancreatitis paradigm was developed by challenging animals with a supramaximal dose of caerulein (20 microg/kg, SC) four times at hourly intervals. Caerulein induced acute pancreatitis that was well-characterized morphologically and biochemically. Severe oedema with marked increased relative pancreatic weight, marked atrophy of acini with increased interacinar spaces, vacuolization, and extensive leucocytic infiltration were diagnostic fingerprints of the pancreatitis phenotype. A biochemical test battery that confirmed the model comprised increased plasma amylase and lipase activities, calcium levels as well as increased pancreatic enzymatic myeloperoxidase and glutathione-S-transferase activities, beside increased pancreatic contents of nitric oxide and malondialdehyde and reduced pancreatic glutathione level. Prior administration of acetyl-L-carnitine (200 mg/kg, IP) for seven consecutive days ahead of caerulein challenge alleviated all the histological and biochemical manifestations of acute pancreatitis. These results suggest a possible protective role of the carnitine ester in such a murine acute pancreatitis model probably via regulation of the oxidant/antioxidant balance, beside modulation of the myeloperoxidase and nitric oxide systems, which are involved in the inflammatory cascade that most often associate the disease.

  4. Changes in hepatic lipogenic and oxidative enzymes and glucose homeostasis induced by an acetyl-L-carnitine and nicotinamide treatment in dyslipidaemic insulin-resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Maria R; Camberos, Maria del C; Selenscig, Dante; Martucci, Lucía C; Chicco, Adriana; Lombardo, Yolanda B; Cresto, Juan C

    2013-03-01

    Normal rats fed a sucrose-rich diet (SRD) develop dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance. The present study examined whether administration of the mitochondrial nutrients nicotinamide and acetyl-L-carnitine reversed or improved these metabolic abnormalities. Male Wistar rats were fed an SRD for 90 days. Half the rats then received daily injections of nicotinamide (25 mg/kg, i.p.) and acetyl-L-carnitine (50 mg/kg, i.p.) for a further 90 days. The remaining rats in the SRD-fed group and those in a normal chow-fed control group were injected with an equal volume of saline solution for the same period. The following parameters were determined in all groups: (i) liver activity of fatty acid synthase (FAS), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and carnitine-palmitoyl transferase-1 (CPT-1); (ii) hepatic and skeletal muscle triacylglycerol content, plasma glucose, insulin, free fatty acid (FFA) and triacylglycerol levels and pancreatic insulin content; and (iii) glucose tolerance. Administration of nicotinamide and acetyl-L-carnitine to the SRD-fed rats reduced dyslipidaemia, liver steatosis, muscle triacylglycerol content and hepatic FAS and ACC activities and increased CPT-1 activity. In addition nicotinamide and acetyl-L-carnitine improved the glucose disappearance rate (K(g)), normalized plasma glucose levels and moderately increased insulinaemia without altering pancreatic insulin content. Finally, nicotinamide and acetyl-l-carnitine administration reduced bodyweight gain and visceral adiposity. The results of the present study suggest that altering key hepatic lipogenic and fatty acid oxidative enzymatic activity could improve dyslipidaemia, liver steatosis and visceral adiposity. Indeed, administration of nicotinamide and acetyl-l-carnitine improved glucose intolerance and normalized plasma glucose levels.

  5. Identification and quantification of N alpha-acetylated Y. pestis fusion protein F1-V expressed in Escherichia coli using LCMS E.

    PubMed

    Bariola, Pauline A; Russell, Brett A; Monahan, Steven J; Stroop, Steven D

    2007-05-31

    N-terminal acetylation in E coli is a rare event catalyzed by three known N-acetyl-transferases (NATs), each having a specific ribosomal protein substrate. Multiple, gram-scale lots of recombinant F1-V, a fusion protein constructed from Y. Pestis antigens, were expressed and purified from a single stably transformed E. coli cell bank. A variant form of F1-V with mass increased by 42-43 Da was detected in all purified lots by electrospray orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS). Peptide mapping LCMS localized the increased mass to an N-terminal Lys-C peptide, residues 1-24, and defined it as +42.0308+/-0.0231 Da using a LockSpray exact mass feature and a leucine enkaphalin mass standard. Sequencing of the variant 1-24 peptide by LCMS and high-energy collision induced dissociation (LCMS(E)) further localized the modification to the amino terminal tri-peptide ADL and identified the modification as N(alpha)-acetylation. The average content of N(alpha)-acetylated F1-V in five lots was 24.7+/-2.6% indicating that a stable acetylation activity for F1-V was established in the E. coli expression system. Alignment of the F1-V N-terminal sequence with those of other known N(alpha)-acetylated ectopic proteins expressed in E. coli reveals a substrate motif analogous to the eukaryote NatA' acetylation pathway and distinct from endogenous E. coli NAT substrates.

  6. The Fusarium oxysporum gnt2, encoding a putative N-acetylglucosamine transferase, is involved in cell wall architecture and virulence.

    PubMed

    López-Fernández, Loida; Ruiz-Roldán, Carmen; Pareja-Jaime, Yolanda; Prieto, Alicia; Khraiwesh, Husam; Roncero, M Isabel G

    2013-01-01

    With the aim to decipher the molecular dialogue and cross talk between Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersci and its host during infection and to understand the molecular bases that govern fungal pathogenicity, we analysed genes presumably encoding N-acetylglucosaminyl transferases, involved in glycosylation of glycoproteins, glycolipids, proteoglycans or small molecule acceptors in other microorganisms. In silico analysis revealed the existence of seven putative N-glycosyl transferase encoding genes (named gnt) in F. oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici genome. gnt2 deletion mutants showed a dramatic reduction in virulence on both plant and animal hosts. Δgnt2 mutants had αalterations in cell wall properties related to terminal αor β-linked N-acetyl glucosamine. Mutant conidia and germlings also showed differences in structure and physicochemical surface properties. Conidial and hyphal aggregation differed between the mutant and wild type strains, in a pH independent manner. Transmission electron micrographs of germlings showed strong cell-to-cell adherence and the presence of an extracellular chemical matrix. Δgnt2 cell walls presented a significant reduction in N-linked oligosaccharides, suggesting the involvement of Gnt2 in N-glycosylation of cell wall proteins. Gnt2 was localized in Golgi-like sub-cellular compartments as determined by fluorescence microscopy of GFP::Gnt2 fusion protein after treatment with the antibiotic brefeldin A or by staining with fluorescent sphingolipid BODIPY-TR ceramide. Furthermore, density gradient ultracentrifugation allowed co-localization of GFP::Gnt2 fusion protein and Vps10p in subcellular fractions enriched in Golgi specific enzymatic activities. Our results suggest that N-acetylglucosaminyl transferases are key components for cell wall structure and influence interactions of F. oxysporum with both plant and animal hosts during pathogenicity.

  7. The Transmembrane Serine Protease HAT-like 4 Is Important for Epidermal Barrier Function to Prevent Body Fluid Loss

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Hu, Yae; Yan, Ruhong; Dong, Liang; Jiang, Yizhi; Zhou, Zhichao; Liu, Meng; Zhou, Tiantian; Dong, Ningzheng; Wu, Qingyu

    2017-01-01

    Membrane-bound proteases are essential for epidermal integrity. Human airway trypsin-like protease 4 (HAT-L4) is a type II transmembrane serine protease. Currently, its biochemical property, cellular distribution and physiological function remain unknown. Here we examined HAT-L4 expression and function in vitro and in vivo. In Western analysis, HAT-L4 expressed in transfected CHO cells appeared as a 48-kDa protein. Flow cytometry confirmed HAT-L4 expression on the cell surface with the expected membrane topology. RT-PCR and immunostaining experiments indicated that HAT-L4 was expressed in epithelial cells and exocrine glands in tissues including skin, esophagus, trachea, tongue, eye, bladder, testis and uterus. In the skin, HAT-L4 expression was abundant in keratinocytes and sebaceous glands. We generated HAT-L4 knockout mice by disrupting the Tmprss11f gene encoding HAT-L4. HAT-L4 knockout mice were viable and fertile. No defects were found in HAT-L4 knockout mice in hair growth, wound healing, water repulsion and body temperature regulation. Compared with wild-type controls, HAT-L4-deficient newborn mice had greater body fluid loss and higher mortality in a trans-epidermal body fluid loss test. In metabolic studies, HAT-L4-deficient adult mice drank water more frequently than wild-type controls did. These results indicate that HAT-L4 is important in epidermal barrier function to prevent body fluid loss. PMID:28338078

  8. Phospho-N-Acetyl-Muramyl-Pentapeptide Translocase from Escherichia coli: Catalytic Role of Conserved Aspartic Acid Residues

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Adrian J.; Brandish, Philip E.; Gilbey, Andrea M.; Bugg, Timothy D. H.

    2004-01-01

    Phospho-N-acetyl-muramyl-pentapeptide translocase (translocase 1) catalyzes the first of a sequence of lipid-linked steps that ultimately assemble the peptidoglycan layer of the bacterial cell wall. This essential enzyme is the target of several natural product antibiotics and has recently been the focus of antimicrobial drug discovery programs. The catalytic mechanism of translocase 1 is believed to proceed via a covalent intermediate formed between phospho-N-acetyl-muramyl-pentapeptide and a nucleophilic amino acid residue. Amino acid sequence alignments of the translocase 1 family and members of the related transmembrane phosphosugar transferase superfamily revealed only three conserved residues that possess nucleophilic side chains: the aspartic acid residues D115, D116, and D267. Here we report the expression and partial purification of Escherichia coli translocase 1 as a C-terminal hexahistidine (C-His6) fusion protein. Three enzymes with the site-directed mutations D115N, D116N, and D267N were constructed, expressed, and purified as C-His6 fusions. Enzymatic analysis established that all three mutations eliminated translocase 1 activity, and this finding verified the essential role of these residues. By analogy with the structural environment of the double aspartate motif found in prenyl transferases, we propose a model whereby D115 and D116 chelate a magnesium ion that coordinates with the pyrophosphate bridge of the UDP-N-acetyl-muramyl-pentapeptide substrate and in which D267 therefore fulfills the role of the translocase 1 active-site nucleophile. PMID:14996806

  9. Epigenetic Regulation of Interleukin 6 by Histone Acetylation in Macrophages and Its Role in Paraquat-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lingli; Yu, Yanfang; Huang, Huijie; Fan, Hanting; Hu, Li; Yin, Caiyong; Li, Kai; Fulton, David J. R.; Chen, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Overexpression of interleukin 6 (IL-6) has been proposed to contribute to pulmonary fibrosis and other fibrotic diseases. However, the regulatory mechanisms and the role of IL-6 in fibrosis remain poorly understood. Epigenetics refers to alterations of gene expression without changes in the DNA sequence. Alternation of chromatin accessibility by histone acetylation acts as a critical epigenetic mechanism to regulate various gene transcriptions. The goal of this study was to determine the impact of IL-6 in paraquat (PQ)-induced pulmonary fibrosis and to explore whether the epigenetic regulations may play a role in transcriptional regulation of IL-6. In PQ-treated lungs and macrophages, we found that the mRNA and protein expression of IL-6 was robustly increased in a time-dependent and a dose-dependent manner. Our data demonstrated that PQ-induced IL-6 expression in macrophages plays a central role in pulmonary fibrosis through enhanced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). IL-6 expression and its role to enhance PQ-induced pulmonary fibrosis were increased by histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition and prevented by histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibition. In addition, the ability of CRISPR-ON transcription activation system (CRISPR-ON) to promote transcription of IL-6 was enhanced by HDAC inhibitor and blocked by HAT inhibitor. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that HDAC inhibitor increased histones activation marks H3K4me3 and H3K9ac at IL-6 promoter regions. In conclusion, IL-6 functioning through EMT in PQ-induced pulmonary fibrosis was regulated dynamically by HDAC and HAT both in vitro and in vivo via epigenetically regulating chromatin accessibility. PMID:28194150

  10. Functional analysis of N-linking oligosaccharyl transferase enzymes encoded by deep-sea vent proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Dominic C.; Jervis, Adrian J.; Abouelhadid, Sherif; Yates, Laura E.; Cuccui, Jon; Linton, Dennis; Wren, Brendan W.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial N-linking oligosaccharyl transferases (OTase enzymes) transfer lipid-linked glycans to selected proteins in the periplasm and were first described in the intestinal pathogen Campylobacter jejuni, a member of the ε-proteobacteria-subdivision of bacteria. More recently, orthologues from other ε-proteobacterial Campylobacter and Helicobacter species and a δ-proteobacterium, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, have been described, suggesting that these two subdivisions of bacteria may be a source of further N-linked protein glycosylation systems. Whole-genome sequencing of both ε- and δ-proteobacteria from deep-sea vent habitats, a rich source of species from these subdivisions, revealed putative ORFs encoding OTase enzymes and associated adjacent glycosyltransferases similar to the C. jejuni N-linked glycosylation locus. We expressed putative OTase ORFs from the deep-sea vent species Nitratiruptor tergarcus, Sulfurovum lithotrophicum and Deferribacter desulfuricans in Escherichia coli and showed they were able to functionally complement the C. jejuni OTase, CjPglB . The enzymes were shown to possess relaxed glycan specificity, transferring diverse glycan structures and demonstrated different glycosylation sequon specificities. Additionally a permissive D. desulfuricans acceptor protein was identified, and we provide evidence that the N-linked glycan synthesised by N. tergarcus and S. lithotrophicum contains an acetylated sugar at the reducing end. This work demonstrates that deep-sea vent bacteria encode functional N-glycosylation machineries and are a potential source of biotechnologically important OTase enzymes. PMID:26610891

  11. Functional analysis of N-linking oligosaccharyl transferase enzymes encoded by deep-sea vent proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Mills, Dominic C; Jervis, Adrian J; Abouelhadid, Sherif; Yates, Laura E; Cuccui, Jon; Linton, Dennis; Wren, Brendan W

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial N-linking oligosaccharyl transferases (OTase enzymes) transfer lipid-linked glycans to selected proteins in the periplasm and were first described in the intestinal pathogen Campylobacter jejuni, a member of the ε-proteobacteria-subdivision of bacteria. More recently, orthologues from other ε-proteobacterial Campylobacter and Helicobacter species and a δ-proteobacterium, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, have been described, suggesting that these two subdivisions of bacteria may be a source of further N-linked protein glycosylation systems. Whole-genome sequencing of both ε- and δ-proteobacteria from deep-sea vent habitats, a rich source of species from these subdivisions, revealed putative ORFs encoding OTase enzymes and associated adjacent glycosyltransferases similar to the C. jejuni N-linked glycosylation locus. We expressed putative OTase ORFs from the deep-sea vent species Nitratiruptor tergarcus, Sulfurovum lithotrophicum and Deferribacter desulfuricans in Escherichia coli and showed that they were able to functionally complement the C. jejuni OTase, CjPglB. The enzymes were shown to possess relaxed glycan specificity, transferring diverse glycan structures and demonstrated different glycosylation sequon specificities. Additionally, a permissive D. desulfuricans acceptor protein was identified, and we provide evidence that the N-linked glycan synthesized by N. tergarcus and S. lithotrophicum contains an acetylated sugar at the reducing end. This work demonstrates that deep-sea vent bacteria encode functional N-glycosylation machineries and are a potential source of biotechnologically important OTase enzymes.

  12. 40 CFR 721.10520 - Acetylated fatty acid glycerides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acetylated fatty acid glycerides... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10520 Acetylated fatty acid glycerides (generic). (a) Chemical substance... acetylated fatty acid glycerides (PMN P-11-160) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10520 - Acetylated fatty acid glycerides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acetylated fatty acid glycerides... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10520 Acetylated fatty acid glycerides (generic). (a) Chemical substance... acetylated fatty acid glycerides (PMN P-11-160) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  14. Expression of PCAF, p300 and Gcn5 and more highly acetylated histone H4 in pediatric tumors.

    PubMed

    Armas-Pineda, C; Arenas-Huertero, F; Pérezpeñia-Diazconti, M; Chico-Ponce de León, F; Sosa-Sáinz, G; Lezama, P; Recillas-Targa, F

    2007-06-01

    Any deregulation of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) could affect several processes in tumors. In this paper, the expression of the PCAF, p300 and Gcn5 HATs by RT-PCR in 34 tumor samples was evaluated. Samples of both central nervous system tumors (CNST, 13 cases) and Wilm's tumors (WT, 11 cases) over-expressed PCAF up to 1.6-, and Gcn5 up to 1.3-fold, respectively. In 9 out of 10 samples of benign tumors (BT), PCAF was not expressed. The p300 gene was the least expressed in all tumors. The medians of expression of PCAF (124.0 DU) and Gcn5 (127.0 DU) genes were higher in CNST than in both WT (102.0 and 101.0 DU, respectively) and BT (70.0 and 82.4 DU, respectively). There was a trend to decrease the expression of PCAF and Gcn5 genes in CNST, according to: chemotherapy (110.0 and 96.0 DU, respectively), chemo plus radiotherapy (124.0 and 115.0 DU, respectively) or no treatment (134.0 and 142.0 DU, respectively) in the tumors. A similar trend was observed in WT. Finally, we revealed more highly acetylated forms of histone H4 in CNST and WT. The over-expression of PCAF could represent a new molecular tumor marker in malignant tumors, especially in CNST in pediatric patients.

  15. Remedial Action Plan for the codisposal and stabilization of the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendices C--E. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-02-01

    This document provides appendices C, D, and E this Remedial Action Plan (RAP) which is a revision of the original Mexican Hat Remedial Action Plan and RAP Modification submitted in July 1988 and January 1989, respectively, along with updated design documents. Appendix C provide the Radiological Support Plan, Appendix D provides the Site Characterization, and Appendix E provides the Water Resources Protection Strategy.

  16. Arsenic Trioxide Reduces Global Histone H4 Acetylation at Lysine 16 through Direct Binding to Histone Acetyltransferase hMOF in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Da; Wu, Donglu; Zhao, Linhong; Yang, Yang; Ding, Jian; Dong, Liguo; Hu, Lianghai; Wang, Fei; Zhao, Xiaoming; Cai, Yong; Jin, Jingji

    2015-01-01

    Histone post-translational modification heritably regulates gene expression involved in most cellular biological processes. Experimental studies suggest that alteration of histone modifications affects gene expression by changing chromatin structure, causing various cellular responses to environmental influences. Arsenic (As), a naturally occurring element and environmental pollutant, is an established human carcinogen. Recently, increasing evidence suggests that As-mediated epigenetic mechanisms may be involved in its toxicity and carcinogenicity, but how this occurs is still unclear. Here we present evidence that suggests As-induced global histone H4K16 acetylation (H4K16ac) partly due to the direct physical interaction between As and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) hMOF (human male absent on first) protein, leading to the loss of hMOF HAT activity. Our data show that decreased global H4K16ac and increased deacetyltransferase HDAC4 expression occurred in arsenic trioxide (As2O3)-exposed HeLa or HEK293T cells. However, depletion of HDAC4 did not affect global H4K16ac, and it could not raise H4K16ac in cells exposed to As2O3, suggesting that HDAC4 might not directly be involved in histone H4K16 de-acetylation. Using As-immobilized agarose, we confirmed that As binds directly to hMOF, and that this interaction was competitively inhibited by free As2O3. Also, the direct interaction of As and C2CH zinc finger peptide was verified by MAIDI-TOF mass and UV absorption. In an in vitro HAT assay, As2O3 directly inhibited hMOF activity. hMOF over-expression not only increased resistance to As and caused less toxicity, but also effectively reversed reduced H4K16ac caused by As exposure. These data suggest a theoretical basis for elucidating the mechanism of As toxicity. PMID:26473953

  17. Dynamical Constraints on the Core Mass of Hot Jupiter HAT-P-13b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhler, Peter Benjamin; Knutson, Heather; Batygin, Konstantin; Fulton, Benjamin James; Burrows, Adam Seth; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2016-01-01

    HAT-P-13b is a Jupiter-mass transiting exoplanet that has settled onto a stable, short-period, and mildly eccentric orbit due to the action of tidal dissipation and perturbations from a second, highly eccentric, outer companion. Due to the special orbital configuration of the HAT-P-13 system, the magnitude of HAT-P-13b's eccentricity is in part dictated by its Love number, i.e. the degree of central mass concentration in its interior. We can therefore directly constrain the fraction of HAT-P-13b's mass contained in its core by measuring its orbital eccentricity. This method offers considerable advantages over the standard approach of inferring core size based on mass and radius measurements alone. In this study we derive new constraints on the value of HAT-P-13b's eccentricity by observing two secondary eclipses of HAT-P-13b with the Infrared Array Camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. We fit the measured secondary eclipse times simultaneously with radial velocity measurements and find that the eccentricity of HAT-P-13b is 0.00696 ± 0.00096. We then use octupole-order secular perturbation theory to find that the corresponding Love number is 0.31 (+0.11, -0.05). Applying structural evolution models, we then find, with 68% confidence, that the core mass lies between 0-25 Earth masses, with a most likely value of the core mass of 11 Earth masses. This is the tightest constraint, to date, on the core mass of an exoplanet. We also compare the measured secondary eclipse depths, in the 3.6 and 4.5 micron bands, to the predictions of a suite of atmosphere models and find that the depths are best matched by models with a dayside temperature inversion and relatively efficient day-night circulation.

  18. Dynamic Protein Acetylation in Plant–Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gaoyuan; Walley, Justin W.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen infection triggers complex molecular perturbations within host cells that results in either resistance or susceptibility. Protein acetylation is an emerging biochemical modification that appears to play central roles during host–pathogen interactions. To date, research in this area has focused on two main themes linking protein acetylation to plant immune signaling. Firstly, it has been established that proper gene expression during defense responses requires modulation of histone acetylation within target gene promoter regions. Second, some pathogens can deliver effector molecules that encode acetyltransferases directly within the host cell to modify acetylation of specific host proteins. Collectively these findings suggest that the acetylation level for a range of host proteins may be modulated to alter the outcome of pathogen infection. This review will focus on summarizing our current understanding of the roles of protein acetylation in plant defense and highlight the utility of proteomics approaches to uncover the complete repertoire of acetylation changes triggered by pathogen infection. PMID:27066055

  19. Acetylation and characterization of banana (Musa paradisiaca) starch.

    PubMed

    Bello-Pérez, L A; Contreras-Ramos, S M; Jìmenez-Aparicio, A; Paredes-López, O

    2000-01-01

    Banana native starch was acetylated and some of its functional properties were evaluated and compared to corn starch. In general, acetylated banana starch presented higher values in ash, protein and fat than corn acetylated starch. The modified starches had minor tendency to retrogradation assessed as % transmittance of starch pastes. At high temperature acetylated starches presented a water retention capacity similar to their native counterpart. The acetylation considerably increased the solubility of starches, and a similar behavior was found for swelling power. When freeze-thaw stability was studied, acetyl banana starch drained approximately 60% of water in the first and second cycles, but in the third and fourth cycles the percentage of separated water was low. However, acetyl corn starch showed lower freeze-thaw stability than the untreated sample. The modification increased the viscosity of banana starch pastes.

  20. Locus-specific control of DNA resection and suppression of subtelomeric VSG recombination by HAT3 in the African trypanosome.

    PubMed

    Glover, Lucy; Horn, David

    2014-11-10

    The African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, is a parasitic protozoan that achieves antigenic variation through DNA-repair processes involving Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) gene rearrangements at subtelomeres. Subtelomeric suppression of DNA repair operates in eukaryotes but little is known about these controls in trypanosomes. Here, we identify a trypanosome histone acetyltransferase (HAT3) and a deacetylase (SIR2rp1) required for efficient RAD51-dependent homologous recombination. HAT3 and SIR2rp1 were required for RAD51-focus assembly and disassembly, respectively, at a chromosome-internal locus and a synthetic defect indicated distinct contributions to DNA repair. Although HAT3 promoted chromosome-internal recombination, it suppressed subtelomeric VSG recombination, and these locus-specific effects were mediated through differential production of ssDNA by DNA resection; HAT3 promoted chromosome-internal resection but suppressed subtelomeric resection. Consistent with the resection defect, HAT3 was specifically required for the G2-checkpoint response at a chromosome-internal locus. HAT3 also promoted resection at a second chromosome-internal locus comprising tandem-duplicated genes. We conclude that HAT3 and SIR2rp1 can facilitate temporally distinct steps in DNA repair. HAT3 promotes ssDNA formation and recombination at chromosome-internal sites but has the opposite effect at a subtelomeric VSG. These locus-specific controls reveal compartmentalization of the T. brucei genome in terms of the DNA-damage response and suppression of antigenic variation by HAT3.

  1. Acetylation of prostaglandin synthetase by aspirin. Purification and properties of the acetylated protein from sheep vesicular gland.

    PubMed

    Roth, G J; Stanford, N; Jacobs, J W; Majerus, P W

    1977-09-20

    We previously presented evidence that aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) inhibits prostaglandin synthetase by acetylating and active site of the enzyme. In the current work, we have labeled the enzyme from an aceton-pentane powder of sheep vesicular gland using [acetyl-3H]aspirin and purified the [3H]acetyl-protein to near homogeneity. The final preparation contains protein of a single molecular weight (85 000) and an amino-terminal sequence of Asp-Ala-Gly-Arg-Ala. The [3H]acetyl-protein contained 0.5 mol of acetyl residues per mol of protein based on amino acid composition but only a single sequence was found.

  2. Phylogenetic and Functional Characterization of the hAT Transposon Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Arensburger, Peter; Hice, Robert H.; Zhou, Liqin; Smith, Ryan C.; Tom, Ariane C.; Wright, Jennifer A.; Knapp, Joshua; O'Brochta, David A.; Craig, Nancy L.; Atkinson, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    Transposons are found in virtually all organisms and play fundamental roles in genome evolution. They can also acquire new functions in the host organism and some have been developed as incisive genetic tools for transformation and mutagenesis. The hAT transposon superfamily contains members from the plant and animal kingdoms, some of which are active when introduced into new host organisms. We have identified two new active hAT transposons, AeBuster1, from the mosquito Aedes aegypti and TcBuster from the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum. Activity of both transposons is illustrated by excision and transposition assays performed in Drosophila melanogaster and Ae. aegypti and by in vitro strand transfer assays. These two active insect transposons are more closely related to the Buster sequences identified in humans than they are to the previously identified active hAT transposons, Ac, Tam3, Tol2, hobo, and Hermes. We therefore reexamined the structural and functional relationships of hAT and hAT-like transposase sequences extracted from genome databases and found that the hAT superfamily is divided into at least two families. This division is supported by a difference in target-site selections generated by active transposons of each family. We name these families the Ac and Buster families after the first identified transposon or transposon-like sequence in each. We find that the recently discovered SPIN transposons of mammals are located within the family of Buster elements. PMID:21368277

  3. The neurobiology of acetyl-L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Traina, Giovanna

    2016-06-01

    A large body of evidence points to the positive effects of dietary supplementation of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC). Its use has shown health benefits in neuroinflammation, which is a common denominator in a host of neurodegenerative diseases. ALC is the principal acetyl ester of L-Carnitine (LC), and it plays an essential role in intermediary metabolism, acting as a donor of acetyl groups and facilitating the transfer of fatty acids from cytosol to mitochondria during beta-oxidation. Dietary supplementation of ALC exerts neuroprotective, neurotrophic, antidepressive and analgesic effects in painful neuropathies. ALC also has antioxidant and anti-apoptotic activity. Moreover, ALC exhibits positive effects on mitochondrial metabolism, and shows promise in the treatment of aging and neurodegenerative pathologies by slowing the progression of mental deterioration. In addition, ALC plays neuromodulatory effects on both synaptic morphology and synaptic transmission. These effects are likely due to affects of ALC through modulation of gene expression on several targets in the central nervous system. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on effects of ALC in the nervous system.

  4. Antibodies specific to acetylated histones document the existence of deposition- and transcription-related histone acetylation in Tetrahymena

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    In this study, we have constructed synthetic peptides which are identical to hyperacetylated amino termini of two Tetrahymena core histones (tetra-acetylated H4 and penta-acetylated hv1) and used them to generate polyclonal antibodies specific for acetylated forms (mono-, di-, tri-, etc.) of these histones. Neither of these antisera recognizes histone that is unacetylated. Immunoblotting analyses demonstrate that both transcription-related and deposition-related acetate groups on H4 are recognized by both antisera. In addition, the antiserum raised against penta-acetylated hv1 also recognizes acetylated forms of this variant. Immunofluorescent analyses with both antisera demonstrate that, as expected, histone acetylation is specific to macronuclei (or new macronuclei) at all stages of the life cycle except when micronuclei undergo periods of rapid replication and chromatin assembly. During this time micronuclear staining is also detected. Our results also suggest that transcription-related acetylation begins selectively in new macronuclei immediately after the second postzygotic division. Acetylated histone is not observed in new micronuclei during stages corresponding to anlagen development and, therefore, histone acetylation can be distributed asymmetrically in development. Equally striking is the rapid turnover of acetylated histone in parental macronuclei during the time of their inactivation and elimination from the cell. Taken together, these data lend strong support to the idea that modulation of histone acetylation plays an important role in gene activation and in chromatin assembly. PMID:2654136

  5. Poly-acetylated chromatin signatures are preferred epitopes for site-specific histone H4 acetyl antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rothbart, Scott B; Lin, Shu; Britton, Laura-Mae; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Keogh, Michael-C; Garcia, Benjamin A; Strahl, Brian D

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies specific for histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) have been central to our understanding of chromatin biology. Here, we describe an unexpected and novel property of histone H4 site-specific acetyl antibodies in that they prefer poly-acetylated histone substrates. By all current criteria, these antibodies have passed specificity standards. However, we find these site-specific histone antibodies preferentially recognize chromatin signatures containing two or more adjacent acetylated lysines. Significantly, we find that the poly-acetylated epitopes these antibodies prefer are evolutionarily conserved and are present at levels that compete for these antibodies over the intended individual acetylation sites. This alarming property of acetyl-specific antibodies has far-reaching implications for data interpretation and may present a challenge for the future study of acetylated histone and non-histone proteins.

  6. Biosynthesis and turnover of O-acetyl and N-acetyl groups in the gangliosides of human melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Manzi, A.E.; Sjoberg, E.R.; Diaz, S.; Varki, A.

    1990-08-05

    We and others previously described the melanoma-associated oncofetal glycosphingolipid antigen 9-O-acetyl-GD3, a disialoganglioside O-acetylated at the 9-position of the outer sialic acid residue. We have now developed methods to examine the biosynthesis and turnover of disialogangliosides in cultured melanoma cells and in Golgi-enriched vesicles from these cells. O-Acetylation was selectively expressed on di- and trisialogangliosides, but not on monosialogangliosides, nor on glycoprotein-bound sialic acids. Double-labeling of cells with (3H)acetate and (14C)glucosamine introduced easily detectable labels into each of the components of the ganglioside molecules. Pulse-chase studies of such doubly labeled molecules indicated that the O-acetyl groups turn over faster than the parent molecule. When Golgi-enriched vesicles from these cells were incubated with (acetyl-3H)acetyl-coenzyme A, the major labeled products were disialogangliosides. (Acetyl-3H)O-acetyl groups were found at both the 7- and the 9-positions, indicating that both 7-O-acetyl GD3 and 9-O-acetyl GD3 were synthesized by the action of O-acetyltransferase(s) on endogenous GD3. Analysis of the metabolically labeled molecules confirmed the existence of both 7- and 9-O-acetylated GD3 in the intact cells. Surprisingly, the major 3H-labeled product of the in vitro labeling reaction was not O-acetyl-GD3, but GD3, with the label exclusively in the sialic acid residues. Fragmentation of the labeled sialic acids by enzymatic and chemical methods showed that the 3H-label was exclusively in (3H)N-acetyl groups. Analyses of the double-labeled sialic acids from intact cells also showed that the 3H-label from (3H)acetate was exclusively in the form of (3H)N-acetyl groups, whereas the 14C-label was at the 4-position.

  7. Late onset ornithine carbamoyl transferase deficiency in males.

    PubMed Central

    Drogari, E; Leonard, J V

    1988-01-01

    Six boys with ornithine carbamoyl transferase deficiency presenting in infancy or later childhood are described. There was wide variation in both the time of presentation and the symptoms, which may initially suggest a neurological, behavioural, or gastroenterological problem. Two patients died, as did two male siblings who were probably affected, but with early recognition of the hyperammonaemia the outlook is good. PMID:3202644

  8. Histamine N-methyl transferase: inhibition by drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Pacifici, G M; Donatelli, P; Giuliani, L

    1992-01-01

    1. Histamine N-methyl transferase activity was measured in samples of human liver, brain, kidney, lung and intestinal mucosa. The mean (+/- s.d.) rate (nmol min-1 mg-1 protein) of histamine N-methylation was 1.78 +/- 0.59 (liver, n = 60), 1.15 +/- 0.38 (renal cortex, n = 8), 0.79 +/- 0.14 (renal medulla, n = 8), 0.35 +/- 0.08 (lung, n = 20), 0.47 +/- 0.18 (human intestine, n = 30) and 0.29 +/- 0.14 (brain, n = 13). 2. Inhibition of histamine N-methyl transferase by 15 drugs was investigated in human liver. The IC50 for the various drugs ranged over three orders of magnitude; chloroquine was the most potent inhibitor. 3. The average IC50 values for chloroquine were 12.6, 22.0, 19.0, 21.6 microM in liver, renal cortex, brain and colon, respectively. These values are lower than the Michaelis-Menten constant for histamine N-methyltransferase in liver (43.8 microM) and kidney (45.5 microM). Chloroquine carried a mixed non-competitive inhibition of hepatic histamine N-methyl transferase. Some side-effects of chloroquine may be explained by inhibition of histamine N-methyl transferase. PMID:1457266

  9. Rational design of an organometallic glutathione transferase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, W.H.; Parker, L.J.; De Luca, A.; Juillerat-Jeanneret, L.; Morton, C.J.; LoBello, M.; Parker, M.W.; Dyson, P.J.

    2010-08-17

    A hybrid organic-inorganic (organometallic) inhibitor was designed to target glutathione transferases. The metal center is used to direct protein binding, while the organic moiety acts as the active-site inhibitor. The mechanism of inhibition was studied using a range of biophysical and biochemical methods.

  10. Homogentisate solanesyl transferase (HST) cDNA’s in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize white seedling 3 (w3) has served as a model albino-seedling mutant since its discovery in 1923. We show that the w3 phenotype is caused by disruptions in homogentisate solanesyl transferase (HST), an enzyme that catalyzes the committed step in plastoquinone-9 (PQ9) biosynthesis. This reaction ...

  11. GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE-MEDIATED METABOLISM OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    GLUTATHIONE s-TRANSFERASE-MEDIATED METABOLISM OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE. M K Ross1 and R A Pegram2. 1Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 2Experimental Toxicology Division, NHEERL/ORD, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangl...

  12. The MOF chromobarrel domain controls genome-wide H4K16 acetylation and spreading of the MSL complex.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Thomas; Cavalli, Florence M G; Holz, Herbert; Hallacli, Erinc; Kind, Jop; Ilik, Ibrahim; Vaquerizas, Juan M; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Akhtar, Asifa

    2012-03-13

    The histone H4 lysine 16 (H4K16)-specific acetyltransferase MOF is part of two distinct complexes involved in X chromosome dosage compensation and autosomal transcription regulation. Here we show that the MOF chromobarrel domain is essential for H4K16 acetylation throughout the Drosophila genome and is required for spreading of the male-specific lethal (MSL) complex on the X chromosome. The MOF chromobarrel domain directly interacts with nucleic acids and potentiates MOF's enzymatic activity after chromatin binding, making it a unique example of a chromo-like domain directly controlling acetylation activity in vivo. We also show that the Drosophila-specific N terminus of MOF has evolved to perform sex-specific functions. It modulates nucleosome binding and HAT activity and controls MSL complex assembly, thus regulating MOF function in dosage compensation. We propose that MOF has been especially tailored to achieve tight regulation of its enzymatic activity and enable its dual role on X and autosomes.

  13. Histone H3K56 Acetylation, Rad52, and Non-DNA Repair Factors Control Double-Strand Break Repair Choice with the Sister Chromatid

    PubMed Central

    Rothstein, Rodney; Aguilera, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are harmful lesions that arise mainly during replication. The choice of the sister chromatid as the preferential repair template is critical for genome integrity, but the mechanisms that guarantee this choice are unknown. Here we identify new genes with a specific role in assuring the sister chromatid as the preferred repair template. Physical analyses of sister chromatid recombination (SCR) in 28 selected mutants that increase Rad52 foci and inter-homolog recombination uncovered 8 new genes required for SCR. These include the SUMO/Ub-SUMO protease Wss1, the stress-response proteins Bud27 and Pdr10, the ADA histone acetyl-transferase complex proteins Ahc1 and Ada2, as well as the Hst3 and Hst4 histone deacetylase and the Rtt109 histone acetyl-transferase genes, whose target is histone H3 Lysine 56 (H3K56). Importantly, we use mutations in H3K56 residue to A, R, and Q to reveal that H3K56 acetylation/deacetylation is critical to promote SCR as the major repair mechanism for replication-born DSBs. The same phenotype is observed for a particular class of rad52 alleles, represented by rad52-C180A, with a DSB repair defect but a spontaneous hyper-recombination phenotype. We propose that specific Rad52 residues, as well as the histone H3 acetylation/deacetylation state of chromatin and other specific factors, play an important role in identifying the sister as the choice template for the repair of replication-born DSBs. Our work demonstrates the existence of specific functions to guarantee SCR as the main repair event for replication-born DSBs that can occur by two pathways, one Rad51-dependent and the other Pol32-dependent. A dysfunction can lead to genome instability as manifested by high levels of homolog recombination and DSB accumulation. PMID:23357952

  14. An Analytical Model for Top-Hat Long Transient Mode-Mismatched Thermal Lens Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabaeian, M.; Rezaei, H.

    2016-02-01

    It has been shown that a top-hat excitation beam gives rise to a more sensitive signal for the thermal lens spectroscopy (TLS). Recently, a numerical model has been presented for a top- hat excitation beam in a dual-beam mod-mismatched TLS [Opt. Lett. 33(13), 1464-1466 (2008)]. In this work, we present a full analytical version of this model. Our model was based on a new solution of time-dependent heat equation for a finite radius cylindrical sample exposed to a top-hat excitation laser beam. The Fresnel diffraction integration method was then used to calculate on-axis probe-beam intensity variations due to thermal lensing by taking the aberrant nature of the thermal lens into account. The model was confirmed with experimental data of LSCAS-2 with an excellent agreement.

  15. A Common Proper Motion Stellar Companion to HAT-P-7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Carol A.; McElwain, Michael W.; Narita, Norio; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Hirano, Teruyuki; Suenaga, Takuya

    2012-01-01

    We report that HAT-P-7 has a common proper motion stellar companion. The companion is located at approx. 3.9 arcsec to the east and estimated as an M5.5V dwarf based on its colors. We also confirm the presence of the third companion, which was first reported by Winn et al. (2009), based on long-term radial velocity measurements. We revisit the migration mechanism of HAT-P-7b given the presence of those companions, and propose sequential Kozai migration as a likely scenario in this system. This scenario may explain the reason for an outlier in the discussion of the spin-orbit alignment timescale for HAT-P-7b by Albrecht et al. (2012).

  16. Analysis and test of superplastically formed titanium hat-stiffened panels under compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Randall C.; Royster, Dick M.; Bales, Thomas T.

    1987-01-01

    Four hat-stiffened titanium panels with two different stiffener configurations were fabricated by superplastic forming/weld brazing and tested under a moderately heavy compressive load. The panels had the same overall dimensions but differed in the shape of the hat-stiffener webs; three panels had stiffeners with flat webs and the other panel had stiffeners with beaded webs. Analysis indicated that the local buckling strain of the flat stiffener web was considerably lower than the general panel buckling strain or cap buckling strain. The analysis also showed that beading the webs of the hat stiffeners removed them as the critical element for local buckling and improved the buckling strain of the panels. The analytical extensional stiffness and failure loads compared very well with experimental results.

  17. Radiologic characterization of the Mexican Hat, Utah, uranium mill tailings remedial action site: Addendum D1

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlam, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    This radiologic characterization of the inactive uranium millsite at Mexican Hat, Utah, was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Grand Junctions Project Office in response to and in accord with a Statement of Work prepared by the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Technical Assistance Contractor, Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc. The objective of this project was to determine the horizontal and vertical extent of contamination that exceeds the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards at the Mexican Hat site. The data presented in this report are required for characterization of the areas adjacent to the Mexican Hat tailings piles and for the subsequent design of cleanup activities. Some on- pile sampling was required to determine the depth of the 15-pCi/g Ra- 226 interface in an area where wind and water erosion has taken place.

  18. The design of Top-Hat morphological filter and application to infrared target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ming; Li, Jianxun; Peng, Zhang

    2006-04-01

    Automatic detection and track for infrared target is of great significance in modern world. In this paper, two novel methods which can develop optimizing Top-Hat morphological filtering parameters are presented for spot target detection. One is based on neural network. Its structuring element is a two-layer feed-forward network which is trained by a mass of sample nets. It regards Top-Hat operation as a whole and one layer, and defines the node of the output layer as the maximum gray-scale image vector after Top-Hat operation. The other is based on genetic algorithm. It adopts the interval discretization code and new primary and secondary mood crossover and mutation. Experimental results show that the identified probability of images (SNR is about 2) can reach more than 98% by this method.

  19. Measurement of nonlinear index by a relay-imaged top-hat Z-scan technique

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, T.; Kurnit, N.A.; Sheik-Bahae, M.

    1996-04-01

    Measurements of the nonlinear index of a number of optical materials of interest for the National Ignition Facility have been performed at 1,064 nm and 355 nm by a modified version of the ``top-hat`` technique and the results compared with the more standard gaussian-beam Z-scan technique. The top-hat technique has the advantages of higher sensitivity and smaller uncertainties introduced by beam-quality considerations. The authors have made what they feel to be an additional improvement by placing the defining aperture for the top hat at the front focal plane of the lens that focuses the beam into the sample and then reimaging the input aperture with a second lens onto a ccd camera. Reimaging eliminates diffraction fringes and provides a stationary image even for a wedged sample; recording the entire image permits minimization of spurious effects such as varying interference fringes.

  20. A Common Proper Motion Stellar Companion to HAT-P-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Norio; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Hirano, Teruyuki; Suenaga, Takuya; Kandori, Ryo; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Sato, Bun'ei; Suzuki, Ryuji; Ida, Shigeru; Nagasawa, Makiko; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph; Egner, Sebastian E.; Feldt, Markus; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol A.; Guyon, Olivier; Hashimoto, Jun; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Ishii, Miki; Iye, Masanori; Janson, Markus; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Kwon, Jungmi; Matsuo, Taro; Mayama, Satoshi; McElwain, Michael W.; Miyama, Shoken M.; Morino, Jun-Ichi; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Serabyn, Eugene; Suto, Hiroshi; Takami, Michihiro; Takato, Naruhisa; Terada, Hiroshi; Thalmann, Christian; Tomono, Daigo; Turner, Edwin L.; Watanabe, Makoto; Wisniewski, John P.; Yamada, Toru; Takami, Hideki; Usuda, Tomonori; Tamura, Motohide

    2012-12-01

    We report that HAT-P-7 has a common proper motion stellar companion. The companion is located at ˜3."9 to the east and estimated to be an M5.5V dwarf based on its colors. We also confirm the presence of a third companion, which was first reported by Winn et al. (2009, ApJ, 703, L99), based on long-term radial velocity measurements. We revisit the migration mechanism of HAT-P-7b given to the presence of those companions, and propose the sequential Kozai migration as a likely scenario in this system. This scenario may explain the reason for an outlier in the discussion of the spin-orbit alignment timescale for HAT-P-7b by Albrecht et al. (2012, ApJ, 757, 18).

  1. HATS-1b: THE FIRST TRANSITING PLANET DISCOVERED BY THE HATSouth SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Penev, K.; Bakos, G. A.; Hartman, J. D.; Csubry, Z.; Bayliss, D.; Zhou, G.; Conroy, P.; Jordan, A.; Suc, V.; Rabus, M.; Brahm, R.; Espinoza, N.; Mohler, M.; Mancini, L.; Henning, T.; Nikolov, N.; Csak, B.; Beky, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Buchhave, L.; and others

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-1b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting the moderately bright V = 12.05 G dwarf star GSC 6652-00186, and the first planet discovered by HATSouth, a global network of autonomous wide-field telescopes. HATS-1b has a period of P Almost-Equal-To 3.4465 days, mass of M{sub p} Almost-Equal-To 1.86 M{sub J}, and radius of R{sub p} Almost-Equal-To 1.30 R{sub J}. The host star has a mass of 0.99 M{sub Sun} and radius of 1.04 R{sub Sun }. The discovery light curve of HATS-1b has near-continuous coverage over several multi-day timespans, demonstrating the power of using a global network of telescopes to discover transiting planets.

  2. A Dual Pathogenic Mechanism Links Tau Acetylation to Sporadic Tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Trzeciakiewicz, Hanna; Tseng, Jui-Heng; Wander, Connor M.; Madden, Victoria; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Yuan, Chao-Xing; Cohen, Todd J.

    2017-01-01

    Tau acetylation has recently emerged as a dominant post-translational modification (PTM) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related tauopathies. Mass spectrometry studies indicate that tau acetylation sites cluster within the microtubule (MT)-binding region (MTBR), suggesting acetylation could regulate both normal and pathological tau functions. Here, we combined biochemical and cell-based approaches to uncover a dual pathogenic mechanism mediated by tau acetylation. We show that acetylation specifically at residues K280/K281 impairs tau-mediated MT stabilization, and enhances the formation of fibrillar tau aggregates, highlighting both loss and gain of tau function. Full-length acetylation-mimic tau showed increased propensity to undergo seed-dependent aggregation, revealing a potential role for tau acetylation in the propagation of tau pathology. We also demonstrate that methylene blue, a reported tau aggregation inhibitor, modulates tau acetylation, a novel mechanism of action for this class of compounds. Our study identifies a potential “two-hit” mechanism in which tau acetylation disengages tau from MTs and also promotes tau aggregation. Thus, therapeutic approaches to limit tau K280/K281 acetylation could simultaneously restore MT stability and ameliorate tau pathology in AD and related tauopathies. PMID:28287136

  3. SWI/SNF Displaces SAGA-Acetylated Nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Chandy, Mark; Gutiérrez, José L.; Prochasson, Philippe; Workman, Jerry L.

    2006-01-01

    SWI/SNF is a well-characterized chromatin remodeling complex that remodels chromatin by sliding nucleosomes in cis and/or displacing nucleosomes in trans. The latter mechanism has the potential to remove promoter nucleosomes, allowing access to transcription factors and RNA polymerase. In vivo, histone acetylation often precedes apparent nucleosome loss; therefore, we sought to determine whether nucleosomes containing acetylated histones could be displaced by the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex. We found that SAGA-acetylated histones were lost from an immobilized nucleosome array when treated with the SWI/SNF complex. When the nucleosome array was acetylated by SAGA in the presence of bound transcription activators, it generated a peak of acetylation surrounding the activator binding sites. Subsequent SWI/SNF treatment suppressed this acetylation peak. Immunoblots indicated that SWI/SNF preferentially displaced acetylated histones from the array relative to total histones. Moreover, the Swi2/Snf2 bromodomain, an acetyl-lysine binding domain, played a role in the displacement of acetylated histones. These data indicate that targeted histone acetylation by the SAGA complex predisposes promoter nucleosomes for displacement by the SWI/SNF complex. PMID:17030999

  4. Importance of acetylator phenotype in the identity of Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Zaid, R B; Nargis, M; Neelotpol, S; Sayeed, M A; Banu, A; Shurovi, S; Hassan, K N; Salimullah, M; Ali, L; Azad Khan, A K

    2007-06-01

    The Marma, Tripura, and Chakma are tribal populations of South Asian countries such as Bangladesh. The populations are thought to be immigrants who started moving from their original home in the Far East toward the west and south. We randomly selected 80 Marma, 53 Tripura, and 43 Chakma to determine acetylation capacity and acetylator phenotype. The mean acetylation capacities were 63% in the Marma, 65% in the Tripura, and 70% in the Chakma. The acetylator phenotype was bimodally distributed as fast and slow acetylator. The frequencies of fast acetylator were 83% in the Marma, 89% in the Tripura, and 88% in the Chakma. According to acetylation capacity, the tribes are different from the founder nontribal populations of Bangladesh. They identify themselves as having a separate single population origin. The frequency of fast acetylator predicted served as the acetylator status of the Far East Asian population. The segregation of populations by acetylator phenotype on geographic longitude might be appropriate for geonational identification of Asian populations.

  5. Flexural fatigue life prediction of closed hat-section using materially nonlinear axial fatigue characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razzaq, Zia

    1989-01-01

    Straight or curved hat-section members are often used as structural stiffeners in aircraft. For instance, they are employed as stiffeners for the dorsal skin as well as in the aerial refueling adjacent area structure in F-106 aircraft. The flanges of the hat-section are connected to the aircraft skin. Thus, the portion of the skin closing the hat-section interacts with the section itself when resisting the stresses due to service loads. The flexural fatigue life of such a closed section is estimated using materially nonlinear axial fatigue characteristics. It should be recognized that when a structural shape is subjected to bending, the fatigue life at the neutral axis is infinity since the normal stresses are zero at that location. Conversely, the fatigue life at the extreme fibers where the normal bending stresses are maximum can be expected to be finite. Thus, different fatigue life estimates can be visualized at various distances from the neural axis. The problem becomes compounded further when significant portions away from the neutral axis are stressed into plastic range. A theoretical analysis of the closed hat-section subjected to flexural cyclic loading is first conducted. The axial fatigue characteristics together with the related axial fatigue life formula and its inverted form given by Manson and Muralidharan are adopted for an aluminum alloy used in aircraft construction. A closed-form expression for predicting the flexural fatigue life is then derived for the closed hat-section including materially nonlinear action. A computer program is written to conduct a study of the variables such as the thicknesses of the hat-section and the skin, and the type of alloy used. The study has provided a fundamental understanding of the flexural fatigue life characteristics of a practical structural component used in aircraft when materially nonlinear action is present.

  6. Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization - KVM-based infrastructure services at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Cortijo, D.

    2011-06-14

    Over the past 18 months, BNL has moved a large percentage of its Linux-based servers and services into a Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (RHEV) environment. This presentation will address our approach to virtualization, critical decision points, and a discussion of our implementation. Specific topics will include an overview of hardware and software requirements, networking, and storage; discussion of the decision of Red Hat solution over competing products (VMWare, Xen, etc); details on some of the features of RHEV - both current and on their roadmap; Review of performance and reliability gains since deployment completion; path forward for RHEV at BNL and caveats and potential problems.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Transit of HAT-P-5 (Southworth+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, J.; Mancini, L.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Bruni, I.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Barbieri, M.; Ruocco, N.; Wheatley, P. J.

    2013-01-01

    We observed one full transit of HAT-P-5 on the night of 2010 August 23, using the 2.2-m telescope and BUSCA imager at Calar Alto Astronomical Observatory. BUSCA uses dichroics to split the incoming light into four wavelength intervals, which traverse different arms of the instrument and are incident on to four CCDs. We observed two transits of HAT-P-5 in 2011 May and July, using BFOSC mounted on the 1.52-m G.D. Cassini Telescope at Loiano Observatory, Italy. (2 data files).

  8. The New Photometric Observations for Transiting Exoplanet HAT-P-24b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Bin; Cameron, Andrew Collier; Gu, Sheng-Hong

    2014-04-01

    The transiting exoplanetary system HAT-P-24 was observed by using CCD cameras at Yunnan Observatory and Hokoon Astronomical Centre, China in 2010 and 2012. Three new transit light curves are analyzed by means of MCMC technique, and the new physical parameters of the system are derived, which are compatible with the old ones in the discovery paper. The orbital period of HAT-P-24b is refined and no obvious TTV signal can be found from five transit events during 2010-2012.

  9. [Remedial action plan for the codisposal and stabilization of the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah]. Appendix F, Groundwater hydrology calculations

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This document contains the ground water hydrology calculations for the remedial action plan for the codisposal and stabilization of uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah. Included are calculations for the following: slug test analyses for monitor wells, analyses of packer tests, hydraulic gradients and ground water velocities, volume of released water, aquifer pumping test analysis, slug test analysis to determine hydraulic conductivity, and gradient calculations.

  10. Remedial Action Plan for the codisposal and stabilization of the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    1993-02-01

    This document is a revision of the original Mexiacan Hat Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and RAP Modification submitted in July 1988 and January 1989, respectively, along with updated design documents. This RAP has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents. Section 2.0 presents the EPA standards, including a discussion of their objectives. Section 3. 0 summarizes the present site characteristics and provides a definition of site-specific problems. Section 4.0 is the site design for the proposed action. Section 5.0 presents the water resources protection strategy. Section 6.0 summarizes the plan for ensuring health and safety protection for the surrounding community and the on- site workers. Section 7.0 lists the responsibilities of the project participants. Section 8.0 describes the features of the long-term surveillance and maintenance plan.

  11. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test... Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a) Identification. A galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system is a device intended to measure the...

  12. Global Analysis of Lysine Acetylation Suggests the Involvement of Protein Acetylation in Diverse Biological Processes in Rice (Oryza sativa)

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xiaoxian; Tan, Feng; Mujahid, Hana; Zhang, Jian; Nanduri, Bindu; Peng, Zhaohua

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a reversible, dynamic protein modification regulated by lysine acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Recent advances in high-throughput proteomics have greatly contributed to the success of global analysis of lysine acetylation. A large number of proteins of diverse biological functions have been shown to be acetylated in several reports in human cells, E.coli, and dicot plants. However, the extent of lysine acetylation in non-histone proteins remains largely unknown in monocots, particularly in the cereal crops. Here we report the mass spectrometric examination of lysine acetylation in rice (Oryza sativa). We identified 60 lysine acetylated sites on 44 proteins of diverse biological functions. Immunoblot studies further validated the presence of a large number of acetylated non-histone proteins. Examination of the amino acid composition revealed substantial amino acid bias around the acetylation sites and the amino acid preference is conserved among different organisms. Gene ontology analysis demonstrates that lysine acetylation occurs in diverse cytoplasmic, chloroplast and mitochondrial proteins in addition to the histone modifications. Our results suggest that lysine acetylation might constitute a regulatory mechanism for many proteins, including both histones and non-histone proteins of diverse biological functions. PMID:24586658

  13. WASP-35b, WASP-48b, AND HAT-P-30b/WASP-51b: TWO NEW PLANETS AND AN INDEPENDENT DISCOVERY OF A HAT PLANET

    SciTech Connect

    Enoch, B.; Brown, D. J. A.; Cameron, A. Collier; Anderson, D. R.; Smalley, B.; Barros, S. C. C.; Faedi, F.; Gillon, M.; Hebrard, G.; Bouchy, F.; Lister, T. A.; Street, R. A.; Queloz, D.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Santerne, A.; West, R. G.; Butters, O.; Bento, J.; Fossati, L.; Haswell, C. A.

    2011-09-15

    We report the detection of WASP-35b, a planet transiting a metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -0.15) star in the Southern hemisphere, WASP-48b, an inflated planet which may have spun-up its slightly evolved host star of 1.75 R{sub sun} in the Northern hemisphere, and the independent discovery of HAT-P-30b/WASP-51b, a new planet in the Northern hemisphere. Using WASP, RISE, Faulkes Telescope South, and TRAPPIST photometry, with CORALIE, SOPHIE, and NOT spectroscopy, we determine that WASP-35b has a mass of 0.72 {+-} 0.06 M{sub J} and radius of 1.32 {+-} 0.05R{sub J} , and orbits with a period of 3.16 days, WASP-48b has a mass of 0.98 {+-} 0.09 M{sub J} , radius of 1.67 {+-} 0.10 R{sub J} , and orbits in 2.14 days, while HAT-P-30b/WASP-51b, with an orbital period of 2.81 days, is found to have a mass of 0.76 {+-} 0.05 M{sub J} and radius of 1.42 {+-} 0.03 R{sub J} , agreeing with values of 0.71 {+-} 0.03 M{sub J} and 1.34 {+-} 0.07 R{sub J} reported for HAT-P-30b.

  14. HAT-P-34b-HAT-P-37b: Four Transiting Planets More Massive than Jupiter Orbiting Moderately Bright Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J. D.; Torres, G.; Béky, B.; Latham, D. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Csubry, Z.; Kovács, G.; Bieryla, A.; Quinn, S.; Szklenár, T.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Shporer, A.; Noyes, R. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Sato, B.; Penev, K.; Everett, M.; Sasselov, D. D.; Fűrész, G.; Stefanik, R. P.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2012-07-01

    We report the discovery of four transiting extrasolar planets (HAT-P-34b-HAT-P-37b) with masses ranging from 1.05 to 3.33 M J and periods from 1.33 to 5.45 days. These planets orbit relatively bright F and G dwarf stars (from V = 10.16 to V = 13.2). Of particular interest is HAT-P-34b which is moderately massive (3.33 M J), has a high eccentricity of e = 0.441 ± 0.032 at a period of P = 5.452654 ± 0.000016 days, and shows hints of an outer component. The other three planets have properties that are typical of hot Jupiters. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time has been granted by NOAO (A289Hr) and NASA (N167Hr and N029Hr). Based in part on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Based in part on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias.

  15. Coordination of a transcriptional switch by HMGI(Y) acetylation.

    PubMed

    Munshi, N; Agalioti, T; Lomvardas, S; Merika, M; Chen, G; Thanos, D

    2001-08-10

    Dynamic control of interferon-beta (IFN-beta) gene expression requires the regulated assembly and disassembly of the enhanceosome, a higher-order nucleoprotein complex formed in response to virus infection. The enhanceosome activates transcription by recruiting the histone acetyltransferase proteins CREB binding protein (CBP) and p300/CBP-associated factors (PCAF)/GCN5, which, in addition to modifying histones, acetylate HMGI(Y), the architectural component required for enhanceosome assembly. We show that the accurate execution of the IFN-beta transcriptional switch depends on the ordered acetylation of the high-mobility group I protein HMGI(Y) by PCAF/GCN5 and CBP, which acetylate HMGI(Y) at distinct lysine residues on endogenous promoters. Whereas acetylation of HMGI(Y) by CBP at lysine-65 destabilizes the enhanceosome, acetylation of HMGI(Y) by PCAF/GCN5 at lysine-71 potentiates transcription by stabilizing the enhanceosome and preventing acetylation by CBP.

  16. H3 Lysine 4 Is Acetylated at Active Gene Promoters and Is Regulated by H3 Lysine 4 Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Guillemette, Benoit; Drogaris, Paul; Lin, Hsiu-Hsu Sophia; Armstrong, Harry; Hiragami-Hamada, Kyoko; Imhof, Axel; Bonneil, Éric; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Festenstein, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Methylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me) is an evolutionarily conserved modification whose role in the regulation of gene expression has been extensively studied. In contrast, the function of H3K4 acetylation (H3K4ac) has received little attention because of a lack of tools to separate its function from that of H3K4me. Here we show that, in addition to being methylated, H3K4 is also acetylated in budding yeast. Genetic studies reveal that the histone acetyltransferases (HATs) Gcn5 and Rtt109 contribute to H3K4 acetylation in vivo. Whilst removal of H3K4ac from euchromatin mainly requires the histone deacetylase (HDAC) Hst1, Sir2 is needed for H3K4 deacetylation in heterochomatin. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we show that H3K4ac is enriched at promoters of actively transcribed genes and located just upstream of H3K4 tri-methylation (H3K4me3), a pattern that has been conserved in human cells. We find that the Set1-containing complex (COMPASS), which promotes H3K4me2 and -me3, also serves to limit the abundance of H3K4ac at gene promoters. In addition, we identify a group of genes that have high levels of H3K4ac in their promoters and are inadequately expressed in H3-K4R, but not in set1Δ mutant strains, suggesting that H3K4ac plays a positive role in transcription. Our results reveal a novel regulatory feature of promoter-proximal chromatin, involving mutually exclusive histone modifications of the same histone residue (H3K4ac and H3K4me). PMID:21483810

  17. Survey of the human acetylator polymorphism in spontaneous disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D A

    1984-01-01

    There is ample evidence that the human acetylator phenotypes are associated with drug induced phenomena. It is principally the slow acetylators who exhibit toxic adverse effects because of their relative inability to detoxify the original drug compounds. In rare instances, however, it is the rapid acetylators who are at a disadvantage. In the matter of association of spontaneous disease with either acetylator phenotype, there are two groups of disorders to consider. First, disorders in which carcinogenic amines are known to be an aetiological factor. This is because these amines are substrates for the polymorphic N-acetyltransferase activity and hence there is a possible rational basis for searching for an association. Secondly, other disorders where searches for associations are based more on hunches. In the first group there is a definite statistical association between cancer of the bladder and the slow acetylator phenotype. In prevalence studies the slow phenotype is 39% more associated with bladder cancer than is the rapid phenotype. On the basis of the evidence now available it is not possible to say whether this association is because slow acetylators develop the disease more frequently or whether they survive longer. In the second group the relevant studies show (1) a greatly increased prevalence of slow acetylators in Gilbert's disease; (2) a confirmed association between the rapid acetylator phenotype and diabetes; (3) a possible association between the rapid acetylator phenotype and breast cancer; (4) a possible association between the slow acetylator phenotype and leprosy in Chinese patients; (5) an earlier age of onset of thyrotoxicosis (Graves' disease) in slow acetylators than in rapid acetylators; (6) no evidence of an association between either phenotype and spontaneous systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:6387123

  18. Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of acetylated EGCG and antioxidant properties of the acetylated derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) acetylated derivatives were prepared by lipase catalyzed acylation of EGCG with vinyl acetate to improve its lipophilicity and expand its application in lipophilic media. The immobilized lipase, Lipozyme RM IM, was found to be the optimum catalyst. The optimiz...

  19. Tubulin acetylation protects long-lived microtubules against mechanical ageing.

    PubMed

    Portran, Didier; Schaedel, Laura; Xu, Zhenjie; Théry, Manuel; Nachury, Maxence V

    2017-04-01

    Long-lived microtubules endow the eukaryotic cell with long-range transport abilities. While long-lived microtubules are acetylated on Lys40 of α-tubulin (αK40), acetylation takes place after stabilization and does not protect against depolymerization. Instead, αK40 acetylation has been proposed to mechanically stabilize microtubules. Yet how modification of αK40, a residue exposed to the microtubule lumen and inaccessible to microtubule-associated proteins and motors, could affect microtubule mechanics remains an open question. Here we develop FRET-based assays that report on the lateral interactions between protofilaments and find that αK40 acetylation directly weakens inter-protofilament interactions. Congruently, αK40 acetylation affects two processes largely governed by inter-protofilament interactions, reducing the nucleation frequency and accelerating the shrinkage rate. Most relevant to the biological function of acetylation, microfluidics manipulations demonstrate that αK40 acetylation enhances flexibility and confers resilience against repeated mechanical stresses. Thus, unlike deacetylated microtubules that accumulate damage when subjected to repeated stresses, long-lived microtubules are protected from mechanical ageing through their acquisition of αK40 acetylation. In contrast to other tubulin post-translational modifications that act through microtubule-associated proteins, motors and severing enzymes, intraluminal acetylation directly tunes the compliance and resilience of microtubules.

  20. Interindividual and intraindividual variability in acetylation: characterization with caffeine.

    PubMed

    Hardy, B G; Lemieux, C; Walker, S E; Bartle, W R

    1988-08-01

    The degree of interindividual and intraindividual variability in acetylator activity was investigated with caffeine used as a probe of enzyme activity. Acetylator phenotype and relative N-acetyltransferase activity were estimated in 46 subjects by measuring the urinary ratio of two metabolites, AFMU/1-MX, after a single 300 mg oral dose of caffeine on five separate occasions. Thirty homozygous slow (rr) and 15 heterozygous rapid (Rr) acetylators were identified. The degree of interindividual variability in acetylator activity was observed to be a mean of 32% (range 27% to 36%) and 20% (range 11% to 29%) in the rr and Rr groups, respectively. The mean intraindividual variation on repetitive measurement was 19% (range 6% to 49%) in the rr and 14% (range 7% to 24%) in the Rr acetylator group. Four subjects had apparent changes in acetylator activity with time such that they were unable to be assigned to any one acetylator group. Two of these four subjects exhibited apparent homozygous rapid acetylator activity intermittently during the 5-week trial. This variability may explain, in part, some of the high degree of patient variability observed in the toxicity, efficacy, and drug-related disease associated with acetylated drugs and environmental toxins.

  1. Structure, morphology and functionality of acetylated and oxidised barley starches.

    PubMed

    El Halal, Shanise Lisie Mello; Colussi, Rosana; Pinto, Vânia Zanella; Bartz, Josiane; Radunz, Marjana; Carreño, Neftali Lenin Villarreal; Dias, Alvaro Renato Guerra; Zavareze, Elessandra da Rosa

    2015-02-01

    Acetylation and oxidation are chemical modifications which alter the properties of starch. The degree of modification of acetylated and oxidized starches is dependent on the catalyst and active chlorine concentrations, respectively. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of acetylation and oxidation on the structural, morphological, physical-chemical, thermal and pasting properties of barley starch. Barley starches were acetylated at different catalyst levels (11%, 17%, and 23% of NaOH solution) and oxidized at different sodium hypochlorite concentrations (1.0%, 1.5%, and 2.0% of active chlorine). Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffractograms, thermal, morphological, and pasting properties, swelling power and solubility of starches were evaluated. The degree of substitution (DS) of the acetylated starches increased with the rise in catalyst concentration. The percentage of carbonyl (CO) and carboxyl (COOH) groups in oxidized starches also increased with the rise of active chlorine level. The presence of hydrophobic acetyl groups, carbonyl and carboxyl groups caused a partial disorganization and depolymerization of starch granules. The structural, morphological and functional changes in acetylated and oxidized starches varied according to reaction conditions. Acetylation makes barley starch more hydrophobic by the insertion of acetyl groups. Also the oxidation promotes low retrogradation and viscosity. All these characteristics are important for biodegradable film production.

  2. N-ACETYL-β-GLUCOSAMINIDASE ACTIVITY IN SERUM DURING PREGNANCY

    PubMed Central

    Walker, P. G.; Woollen, Mary E.; Pugh, Doreen

    1960-01-01

    A spectrophotometric method for the estimation of N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase in serum has been devised. Sera from normal adult males and females showed similar levels of activity. The activity in serum rose progressively during pregnancy and fell rapidly after parturition to normal levels. This change resembled closely that which occurs in serum β-glucuronidase. Placenta showed a moderate and chorion a high level of N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase. High N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase activity was demonstrated histochemically in decidual cells. The functions of N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase and β-glucuronidase and factors influencing their activity are discussed. Images PMID:13782743

  3. The Mexican hat effect on the delamination buckling of a compressed thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yin; Liu, Yun

    2014-12-01

    Because of the interaction between film and substrate, the film buckling stress can vary significantly, depending on the delamination geometry, the film and substrate mechanical properties. The Mexican hat effect indicates such interaction. An analytical method is presented, and related dimensional analysis shows that a single dimensionless parameter can effectively evaluate the effect.

  4. Learning to Look, Learning to Read: Dr. Seuss'"The Cat in the Hat."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodmer, George

    1997-01-01

    States that "The Cat in the Hat" (1957), written from a basic 225 word list, explores the level of activity that a child needs to keep secret from the adult world, and is a picture book which is also nominally a "reader" and not a storybook. Includes questions for stimulating student response; encapsulates classic elements in…

  5. Children's Conception of Thermal Conduction--Or the Story of a Woollen Hat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newell, Andrew; Ross, Keith

    1996-01-01

    Reports on discussions with a year 10-group, following their first lesson on heat energy transfer, that revealed they still had not realized that insulation acted as a barrier; instead they saw it as an active warming agent. Describes a teaching method based on a woollen hat that challenges their naive ideas. (Author/JRH)

  6. Six Thinking Hats and Social Workers' Innovative Competence: An Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azeez, Razaq Olugbenga

    2016-01-01

    Employees, no doubt, are the main force in organizations, and their innovative behaviours are vital for outcome efficacy. Innovative organisations, therefore, need creative employees who generate new ideas for product or process of innovation. This study investigated the effect of six thinking hats creativity technique on innovative competence of…

  7. Planet-induced Stellar Pulsations in HAT-P-2's Eccentric System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wit, Julien; Lewis, Nikole K.; Knutson, Heather A.; Fuller, Jim; Antoci, Victoria; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Laughlin, Gregory; Deming, Drake; Shporer, Avi; Batygin, Konstantin; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Agol, Eric; Burrows, Adam S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Langton, Jonathan; Showman, Adam P.

    2017-02-01

    Extrasolar planets on eccentric short-period orbits provide a laboratory in which to study radiative and tidal interactions between a planet and its host star under extreme forcing conditions. Studying such systems probes how the planet’s atmosphere redistributes the time-varying heat flux from its host and how the host star responds to transient tidal distortion. Here, we report the insights into the planet–star interactions in HAT-P-2's eccentric planetary system gained from the analysis of ∼350 hr of 4.5 μm observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The observations show no sign of orbit-to-orbit variability nor of orbital evolution of the eccentric planetary companion, HAT-P-2 b. The extensive coverage allows us to better differentiate instrumental systematics from the transient heating of HAT-P-2 b’s 4.5 μm photosphere and yields the detection of stellar pulsations with an amplitude of approximately 40 ppm. These pulsation modes correspond to exact harmonics of the planet’s orbital frequency, indicative of a tidal origin. Transient tidal effects can excite pulsation modes in the envelope of a star, but, to date, such pulsations had only been detected in highly eccentric stellar binaries. Current stellar models are unable to reproduce HAT-P-2's pulsations, suggesting that our understanding of the interactions at play in this system is incomplete.

  8. Towards top-hat spatial shaping of ultrafast laser beam based on Zernike polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauclair, Cyril; Faure, Nicolas; Houzet, Julien

    2016-04-01

    Femtosecond laser micro machining of surfaces knows a gain of interest as it demonstrates efficient and precise processing with reduced side effects around the irradiated zone, and also because of the remarkable costs reduction and reliability improvements of nowadays commercially available sources. Controlling the intensity distribution spatially can offer a supplementary degree of flexibility and precision in achieving user-defined ablation spatial profile, drilling, cutting of materials or in-volume laser-induced modifications. In this scope, the possibility to generate a top-hat intensity distribution by spatially shaping the beam wavefront is studied in this work. An optimization of Zernike polynomials coefficients is conducted to numerically determine an adequate phase mask that shapes the laser intensity distribution following a targeted top hat distribution in the processing plane, usually at the focal length of a converging lens. The efficiency of the method is numerically investigated in the optimization by evaluation of the root mean square error (RMS) between the top-hat target and the calculated laser distribution in the far field. We numerically verify that acceptable top-hat beam shaping of various size can be achieved with a sufficient number of Zernike polynomials, opening the way to phase mask calculations adapted to the wavefront modulator ability to reproduce Zernike polynomials.

  9. Beyond Pilgrim Hats and Turkey Hands: Using Thanksgiving to Promote Citizenship and Activism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Erica M.; Montgomery, Sarah E.

    2010-01-01

    In many elementary classrooms, Thanksgiving is celebrated by donning homemade Pilgrim hats, grocery bag vests, and colorful construction-paper headdresses, as students join together to reenact the "first" Thanksgiving with a mock feast. Students compose journal entries on the topic, "what I am thankful for." These typical Thanksgiving activities,…

  10. Qualification test report bump protection hat (subassembly of T020/M509 head protective assembly)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    The bump protection hat (BPH) was subjected to impact testing in which it underwent three impacts at 35 foot-pounds of energy. The impacts generated stress cracks, but no penetration. All impacts resulted in deflections of less than one-half inch. It was shown that the BPH is qualified for Skylab and the rescue vehicle.

  11. HATS-5b: A TRANSITING HOT SATURN FROM THE HATSouth SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, G.; Bayliss, D.; Schmidt, B.; Penev, K.; Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J. D.; Csubry, Z.; Jordán, A.; Brahm, R.; Rabus, M.; Suc, V.; Espinoza, N.; Mancini, L.; Mohler, M.; Ciceri, S.; Henning, T.; Buchhave, L.; Béky, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Butler, R. P.; and others

    2014-06-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-5b, a transiting hot Saturn orbiting a G-type star, by the HATSouth survey. HATS-5b has a mass of M{sub p} ≈ 0.24 M {sub J}, radius of R{sub p} ≈ 0.91 R {sub J}, and transits its host star with a period of P ≈ 4.7634 days. The radius of HATS-5b is consistent with both theoretical and empirical models. The host star has a V-band magnitude of 12.6, mass of 0.94 M {sub ☉}, and radius of 0.87 R {sub ☉}. The relatively high scale height of HATS-5b and the bright, photometrically quiet host star make this planet a favorable target for future transmission spectroscopy follow-up observations. We reexamine the correlations in radius, equilibrium temperature, and metallicity of the close-in gas giants and find hot Jupiter-mass planets to exhibit the strongest dependence between radius and equilibrium temperature. We find no significant dependence in radius and metallicity for the close-in gas giant population.

  12. WASP-12b AND HAT-P-8b are members of triple star systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bechter, Eric B.; Crepp, Justin R.; Matthews, Christopher T.; Ngo, Henry; Knutson, Heather A.; Batygin, Konstantin; Johnson, John Asher; Hinkley, Sasha; Muirhead, Philip S.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Morton, Timothy D.; Howard, Andrew W.

    2014-06-10

    We present high spatial resolution images that demonstrate that WASP-12b and HAT-P-8b orbit the primary stars of hierarchical triple star systems. In each case, two distant companions with colors and brightnesses consistent with M dwarfs co-orbit the hot Jupiter planet host as well as one another. Our adaptive optics images spatially resolve the secondary around WASP-12, previously identified by Bergfors et al. and Crossfield et al. into two distinct sources separated by 84.3 ± 0.6 mas (21 ± 3 AU). We find that the secondary to HAT-P-8, also identified by Bergfors et al., is in fact composed of two stars separated by 65.3 ± 0.5 mas (15 ± 1 AU). Our follow-up observations demonstrate physical association through common proper motion. HAT-P-8 C has a particularly low mass, which we estimate to be 0.18 ± 0.02 M {sub ☉} using photometry. Due to their hierarchy, WASP-12 BC and HAT-P-8 BC will enable the first dynamical mass determination for hot Jupiter stellar companions. These previously well studied planet hosts now represent higher-order multi-star systems with potentially complex dynamics, underscoring the importance of diffraction-limited imaging and providing additional context for understanding the migrant population of transiting hot Jupiters.

  13. Automatic Semantic Activation of Embedded Words: Is There a ''Hat'' in ''That''

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, J.S.; Davis, C.J.; Hanley, D.A.

    2005-01-01

    Participants semantically categorized target words that contain subsets (Experiment 1; e.g., target=hatch, subset=hat) or that are parts of supersets (Experiment 2; e.g., target=bee, superset=beer). In both experiments, the targets were categorized in a congruent condition (in which the subset-superset was associated with the same response, e.g.,…

  14. Test and Analysis of Composite Hat Stringer Pull-off Test Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian; OBrien, T. Kevin; Rousseau, Carl Q.

    1996-01-01

    Hat stringer pull-off tests were performed to evaluate the delamination failure mechanisms in the flange region for a rod-reinforced hat stringer section. A special test fixture was used to pull the hat off the stringer while reacting the pull-off load through roller supports at both stringer flanges. Microscopic examinations of the failed specimens revealed that failure occurred at the ply termination in the flange area where the flange of the stiffener is built up by adding 45/-45 tape plies on the top surface. Test results indicated that the as-manufactured microstructure in the flange region has a strong influence on the delamination initiation and the associated pull-off loads. Finite element models were created for each specimen with a detailed mesh based on micrographs of the critical location. A fracture mechanics approach and a mixed mode delamination criterion were used to predict the onset of delamination and the pull-off load. By modeling the critical local details of each specimen from micrographs, the model was able to accurately predict the hat stringer pull-off loads and replicate the variability in the test results.

  15. Photometric Observations and Study of the Transiting Exoplanetary System HAT-P-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, H. B.; Wang, X. B.; Gu, S. H.; Cameron, A. C.

    2013-11-01

    Three transit events of HAT-P-8 are observed by using the 1 m telescope of Yunnan Observatory and 2.4 m telescope of Lijiang Observing Station in 2009 and 2012, respectively. The observational data were reduced with the coarse de-correlation and SysRem algorithms in order to obtain high signal to noise ratio for the transit feature. The MCMC (Markov Chain Monte Carlo) technique is applied to analyze three transit light curves simultaneously, then the new parameters of HAT-P-8 system are derived. The new value of the radius for HAT-P-8b is smaller than the one given by Latham et al., but it is consistent with the value derived by Mancini et al. recently. By linear fitting to the 23 mid-transit times with high precision, the orbital period of HAT-P-8b is refined as P=3.0763461±0.0000021 d. No obvious TTV (Transit Timing Variation) signal can be found from the present (O-C) analysis.

  16. Photometric Observation and Study of the Transiting Exoplanetary System HAT-P-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Hong-Bo; Wang, Xiao-Bin; Gu, Sheng-Hong; Cameron, Andrew Collier

    2014-07-01

    Three transit events of HAT-P-8 were observed by using the 1 m telescope of Yunnan Observatory and the 2.4 m telescope of Lijiang Astronomical Station in 2009 and 2012, respectively. The observational data are reduced with the coarse de-correlation and SysRem algorithms in order to improve the signal to noise ratio of the transit signals. The MCMC (Markov Chain Monte Carlo) technique is applied to analyzing the three transit light curves simultaneously, then the new parameters of the HAT-P-8 system are derived. The new value of the radius of HAT-P-8b is smaller than that given by Latham et al., while it is consistent with the value derived recently by Mancini et al. By linear fitting on the 23 high-precision mid-transit times, the orbital period of HAT-P-8b is refined as P =3.0763461±0.0000021 d, and from the (O - C) analysis no obvious TTV (Transit Timing Variation) signal has been detected.

  17. WASP-12b and HAT-P-8b are Members of Triple Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechter, Eric B.; Crepp, Justin R.; Ngo, Henry; Knutson, Heather A.; Batygin, Konstantin; Hinkley, Sasha; Muirhead, Philip S.; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Matthews, Christopher T.; Morton, Timothy D.

    2014-06-01

    We present high spatial resolution images that demonstrate that WASP-12b and HAT-P-8b orbit the primary stars of hierarchical triple star systems. In each case, two distant companions with colors and brightnesses consistent with M dwarfs co-orbit the hot Jupiter planet host as well as one another. Our adaptive optics images spatially resolve the secondary around WASP-12, previously identified by Bergfors et al. and Crossfield et al. into two distinct sources separated by 84.3 ± 0.6 mas (21 ± 3 AU). We find that the secondary to HAT-P-8, also identified by Bergfors et al., is in fact composed of two stars separated by 65.3 ± 0.5 mas (15 ± 1 AU). Our follow-up observations demonstrate physical association through common proper motion. HAT-P-8 C has a particularly low mass, which we estimate to be 0.18 ± 0.02 M ⊙ using photometry. Due to their hierarchy, WASP-12 BC and HAT-P-8 BC will enable the first dynamical mass determination for hot Jupiter stellar companions. These previously well studied planet hosts now represent higher-order multi-star systems with potentially complex dynamics, underscoring the importance of diffraction-limited imaging and providing additional context for understanding the migrant population of transiting hot Jupiters.

  18. Overexpression of GalNAc-transferase GalNAc-T3 Promotes Pancreatic Cancer Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Taniuchi, Keisuke; Cerny, Ronald L.; Tanouchi, Aki; Kohno, Kimitoshi; Kotani, Norihiro; Honke, Koichi; Saibara, Toshiji; Hollingsworth, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    O-linked glycans of secreted and membrane bound proteins play an important role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer by modulating immune responses, inflammation, and tumorigenesis. A critical aspect of O-glycosylation, the position at which proteins are glycosylated with N-acetyl-galactosamine on serine and threonine residues, is regulated by the substrate specificity of UDP-GalNAc: polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyl-transferases (GalNAc-Ts). Thus, GalNAc-Ts regulate the first committed step in O-glycosylated protein biosynthesis, determine sites of O-glycosylation on proteins, and are important for understanding normal and carcinoma-associated O-glycosylation. We have found that one of these enzymes, GalNAc-T3, is overexpressed in human pancreatic cancer tissues, and suppression of GalNAc-T3 significantly attenuates growth of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, suppression of GalNAc-T3 induces apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells. Our results indicate that GalNAc-T3 is likely to be involved in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Modification of cellular glycosylation occurs in nearly all types of cancer as a result of alterations in the expression levels of glycosyltransferases. We report guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha transducing activity polypeptide 1 (GNAT1) as a possible substrate protein of GalNAc-T3. GalNAc-T3 is associated with O-glycosylation of GNAT1, and affects the subcellular distribution of GNAT1. Knocking down endogenous GNAT1 significantly suppresses the growth/survival of PDAC cells. Our results imply that GalNAc-T3 contributes to the function of O-glycosylated proteins and thereby affects the growth and survival of pancreatic cancer cells. Thus, substrate proteins of GalNAc-T3 should serve as important therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancers. PMID:21625220

  19. Overexpression of GalNAc-transferase GalNAc-T3 promotes pancreatic cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Taniuchi, K; Cerny, R L; Tanouchi, A; Kohno, K; Kotani, N; Honke, K; Saibara, T; Hollingsworth, M A

    2011-12-08

    O-linked glycans of secreted and membrane-bound proteins have an important role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer by modulating immune responses, inflammation and tumorigenesis. A critical aspect of O-glycosylation, the position at which proteins are glycosylated with N-acetyl-galactosamine on serine and threonine residues, is regulated by the substrate specificity of UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyl-transferases (GalNAc-Ts). Thus, GalNAc-Ts regulate the first committed step in O-glycosylated protein biosynthesis, determine sites of O-glycosylation on proteins and are important for understanding normal and carcinoma-associated O-glycosylation. We have found that one of these enzymes, GalNAc-T3, is overexpressed in human pancreatic cancer tissues and suppression of GalNAc-T3 significantly attenuates the growth of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, suppression of GalNAc-T3 induces apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells. Our results indicate that GalNAc-T3 is likely involved in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Modification of cellular glycosylation occurs in nearly all types of cancer as a result of alterations in the expression levels of glycosyltransferases. We report guanine the nucleotide-binding protein, α-transducing activity polypeptide-1 (GNAT1) as a possible substrate protein of GalNAc-T3. GalNAc-T3 is associated with O-glycosylation of GNAT1 and affects the subcellular distribution of GNAT1. Knocking down endogenous GNAT1 significantly suppresses the growth/survival of PDAC cells. Our results imply that GalNAc-T3 contributes to the function of O-glycosylated proteins and thereby affects the growth and survival of pancreatic cancer cells. Thus, substrate proteins of GalNAc-T3 should serve as important therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancers.

  20. Interaction of antimicrobial peptide with mycolyl transferase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Devjani I; Gohil, Tejas P

    2016-03-01

    It is estimated that about 40% of the Indian population are infected with tuberculosis (TB) and that ∼3,000,000 people die as a result of TB annually. TB is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In 2011, the World Health Organization declared India as having the highest TB burden worldwide. An important criteria for pathogenicity is the presence of mycolic acid linked to the protective outer membrane of bacteria. Mycolyl transferase catalyzes the transfer of mycolic acid and promotes cell wall synthesis. This is also considered as a novel target for drug-mediated intervention strategies. Here, we have attempted to understand the interaction between the antimicrobial peptide (AMP), dermcidin, and mycolyl transferase in M. tuberculosis using a computational approach. The present study was undertaken in order to elucidate the capability of AMPs to treat this bacteria, which is less sensitive to available antibiotics, and to design a novel method for new therapies.

  1. [Glutathione S-transferase of alpha class from pike liver].

    PubMed

    Borvinskaia, E V; Smirnov, L P; Nemova, N N

    2013-01-01

    In this study, glutathione S-transferase (GST) was isolated from the liver of pike Esox lucius, which was homogenous according to SDS-PAGE and isoelectrofocusing. It is a homodimer with subunits mass 25235.36 Da (according to HPLC-MS/MS) and pI about 6.4. Substrate specificity, thermostability, some kinetic characteristics and optimum pH were determined. The enzyme was identified as Alpha class GST.

  2. Electronic and thermoelectric properties of Mexican hat bands in van-der-Waals materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramaratne, Darshana; Zahid, Ferdows; Lake, Roger

    2015-03-01

    Mexican hat dispersions are relatively common in few-layer two-dimensional materials. In one to four monolayers of the group-III chalcogenides (GaS, GaSe, InS, InSe) and Bi2Se3 the valence band undergoes a band inversion from a parabolic to an inverted Mexican hat dispersion as the film thickness is reduced from bulk to a single monolayer. The band inversion is robust against changes in stacking order, omission or inclusion of spin-orbit coupling and the choice of functional. The Mexican hat dispersion results in a 1/√{ E} singularity in the two-dimensional density of states and a step-function turn on in the density of modes. The largest radius of the ring of states occurs for a single monolayer of each material. The dispersion with the largest radius coincides with the maximum power factor and ZT for a material at room temperature. Ab-initio electronic structure calculations are used with a Landauer approach to calculate the thermoelectric transport coefficients. Analytical models of the Mexican hat and the parabolic dispersions are used for comparison and analysis. Vertically biased bilayer graphene could serve as an experimental test-bed for measuring this effect since the radius of the Mexican hat band edge increases linearly with vertical electric field. Support by the NSF and SRC-NRI Project 2204.001 (NSF-ECCS-1124733), FAME, one of six centers of STARnet, a SRC program sponsored by MARCO and DARPA and the use of XSEDE NSF Grant # OCI-1053575.

  3. Dynamical Constraints on the Core Mass of Hot Jupiter HAT-P-13b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhler, Peter B.; Knutson, Heather A.; Batygin, Konstantin; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Burrows, Adam; Wong, Ian

    2016-04-01

    HAT-P-13b is a Jupiter-mass transiting exoplanet that has settled onto a stable, short-period, and mildly eccentric orbit as a consequence of the action of tidal dissipation and perturbations from a second, highly eccentric, outer companion. Owing to the special orbital configuration of the HAT-P-13 system, the magnitude of HAT-P-13b's eccentricity (eb) is in part dictated by its Love number ({k}{2b}), which is in turn a proxy for the degree of central mass concentration in its interior. Thus, the measurement of eb constrains {k}{2b} and allows us to place otherwise elusive constraints on the mass of HAT-P-13b's core (Mcore,b). In this study we derive new constraints on the value of eb by observing two secondary eclipses of HAT-P-13b with the Infrared Array Camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. We fit the measured secondary eclipse times simultaneously with radial velocity measurements and find that eb = 0.00700 ± 0.00100. We then use octupole-order secular perturbation theory to find the corresponding {k}{2b}={0.31}-0.05+0.08. Applying structural evolution models, we then find, with 68% confidence, that Mcore,b is less than 25 Earth masses (M⊕). The most likely value is Mcore,b = 11 M⊕, which is similar to the core mass theoretically required for runaway gas accretion. This is the tightest constraint to date on the core mass of a hot Jupiter. Additionally, we find that the measured secondary eclipse depths, which are in the 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands, best match atmospheric model predictions with a dayside temperature inversion and relatively efficient day-night circulation.

  4. An Alternative Strategy for Pan-acetyl-lysine Antibody Generation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Yee; Sim, Choon Kiat; Zhang, Qiongyi; Tang, Hui; Brunmeir, Reinhard; Pan, Hong; Karnani, Neerja; Han, Weiping; Zhang, Kangling; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is an important post-translational modification in cell signaling. In acetylome studies, a high-quality pan-acetyl-lysine antibody is key to successful enrichment of acetylated peptides for subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. Here we show an alternative method to generate polyclonal pan-acetyl-lysine antibodies using a synthesized random library of acetylated peptides as the antigen. Our antibodies are tested to be specific for acetyl-lysine peptides/proteins via ELISA and dot blot. When pooled, five of our antibodies show broad reactivity to acetyl-lysine peptides, complementing a commercial antibody in terms of peptide coverage. The consensus sequence of peptides bound by our antibody cocktail differs slightly from that of the commercial antibody. Lastly, our antibodies are tested in a proof-of-concept to analyze the acetylome of HEK293 cells. In total we identified 1557 acetylated peptides from 416 proteins. We thus demonstrated that our antibodies are well-qualified for acetylome studies and can complement existing commercial antibodies.

  5. Global analysis of lysine acetylation in strawberry leaves

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xianping; Chen, Wenyue; Zhao, Yun; Ruan, Songlin; Zhang, Hengmu; Yan, Chengqi; Jin, Liang; Cao, Lingling; Zhu, Jun; Ma, Huasheng; Cheng, Zhongyi

    2015-01-01

    Protein lysine acetylation is a reversible and dynamic post-translational modification. It plays an important role in regulating diverse cellular processes including chromatin dynamic, metabolic pathways, and transcription in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Although studies of lysine acetylome in plants have been reported, the throughput was not high enough, hindering the deep understanding of lysine acetylation in plant physiology and pathology. In this study, taking advantages of anti-acetyllysine-based enrichment and high-sensitive-mass spectrometer, we applied an integrated proteomic approach to comprehensively investigate lysine acetylome in strawberry. In total, we identified 1392 acetylation sites in 684 proteins, representing the largest dataset of acetylome in plants to date. To reveal the functional impacts of lysine acetylation in strawberry, intensive bioinformatic analysis was performed. The results significantly expanded our current understanding of plant acetylome and demonstrated that lysine acetylation is involved in multiple cellular metabolism and cellular processes. More interestingly, nearly 50% of all acetylated proteins identified in this work were localized in chloroplast and the vital role of lysine acetylation in photosynthesis was also revealed. Taken together, this study not only established the most extensive lysine acetylome in plants to date, but also systematically suggests the significant and unique roles of lysine acetylation in plants. PMID:26442052

  6. Effect of acetaminophen on sulfamethazine acetylation in male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Tahir, I M; Iqbal, T; Saleem, S; Mehboob, H; Akhter, N; Riaz, M

    2016-03-01

    The effect of acetaminophen on sulfamethazine N-acetylation by human N-acetyltrasferase-2 (NAT2) was studied in 19 (n=19) healthy male volunteers in two different phases. In the first phase of the study the volunteers were given an oral dose of sulfamethazine 500 mg alone and blood and urine samples were collected. After the 10-day washout period the same selected volunteers were again administered sulfamethazine 500 mg along with 1000 mg acetaminophen. The acetylation of sulfamethazine by human NAT2 in both phases with and without acetaminophen was determined by HPLC to establish their respective phenotypes. In conclusion obtained statistics of present study revealed that acetaminophen significantly (P<0.0001) decreased sulfamethazine acetylation in plasma of both slow and fast acetylator male volunteers. A highly significant (P<0.0001) decrease in plasma-free and total sulfamethazine concentration was also observed when acetaminophen was co-administered. Urine acetylation status in both phases of the study was found not to be in complete concordance with that of plasma. Acetaminophen significantly (P<0.0001) increased the acetyl, free and total sulfamethazine concentration in urine of both slow and fast acetylators. Urine acetylation analysis has not been found to be a suitable approach for phenotypic studies.

  7. Histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation breaks the genome's silence

    PubMed Central

    Shia, Wei-Jong; Pattenden, Samantha G; Workman, Jerry L

    2006-01-01

    Acetylation at histone H4 lysine 16 is involved in many cellular processes in organisms as diverse as yeast and humans. A recent biochemical study pinpoints this particular acetylation mark as a switch for changing chromatin from a repressive to a transcriptionally active state. PMID:16689998

  8. [Transferase activity of horse blood serum cholinesterase at hydrolysis of 1-methyl-8-acetoxychinolium iodide in the presence of aliphatic alcohols].

    PubMed

    Basova, N E; Kormilitsyn, B N; Perchenok, A Yu; Rozengart, E V; Saakov, V S; Suvorov, A A

    2014-01-01

    To check whether the horse blood serum butyrylcholinesterase expresses transferase activity at the complex ester hydrolysis in the presense of several low-molecular aliphatic alcohols, a study was performed with aid of the chromogenic substrate 1-methyl-8-acetoxychinolium whose phenolic hydrolysis product absorbs intensively at 445 nm, whereas the initial ester in this specter area practically does not absorb. This allowed measuring simultaneously the products of accumulation of both products of enzymatic hydrolysis: of acetic acid by the potentiometric, while of phenol--by the photometric method. Rates of formation of both products of enzymatic hydrolysis are practically equal in experiments with all studied alcohols. This indicates that horse blood serum butyrylcholinesterase under these experimental conditions does not catalize transfer of acetyl residue to the studied aliphatic alcohols, i. e. does not have transefase activity.

  9. Acetylated triterpene saponins from the Thai medicinal plant, Sapindus emarginatus.

    PubMed

    Kanchanapoom, T; Kasai, R; Yamasaki, K

    2001-09-01

    From the pericarps of Sapindus emarginatus (Sapindaceae), three new acetylated triterpene saponins were isolated together with hederagenin and five known triterpene saponins, as well as one known sweet acyclic sesquiterpene glycoside, mukurozioside IIb. The structures of new compounds were elucidated as hederagenin 3-O-(2-O-acetyl-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-(1-->3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside, 23-O-acetyl-hederagenin 3-O-(4-O-acetyl-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-(1-->3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside and oleanolic acid 3-O-(4-O-acetyl-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-(1-->3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside by chemical and spectroscopic data.

  10. How a hat may affect 3-month-olds' recognition of a face: an eye-tracking study.

    PubMed

    Bulf, Hermann; Valenza, Eloisa; Turati, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that infants' face recognition rests on a robust face representation that is resilient to a variety of facial transformations such as rotations in depth, motion, occlusion or deprivation of inner/outer features. Here, we investigated whether 3-month-old infants' ability to represent the invariant aspects of a face is affected by the presence of an external add-on element, i.e. a hat. Using a visual habituation task, three experiments were carried out in which face recognition was investigated by manipulating the presence/absence of a hat during face encoding (i.e. habituation phase) and face recognition (i.e. test phase). An eye-tracker system was used to record the time infants spent looking at face-relevant information compared to the hat. The results showed that infants' face recognition was not affected by the presence of the external element when the type of the hat did not vary between the habituation and test phases, and when both the novel and the familiar face wore the same hat during the test phase (Experiment 1). Infants' ability to recognize the invariant aspects of a face was preserved also when the hat was absent in the habituation phase and the same hat was shown only during the test phase (Experiment 2). Conversely, when the novel face identity competed with a novel hat, the hat triggered the infants' attention, interfering with the recognition process and preventing the infants' preference for the novel face during the test phase (Experiment 3). Findings from the current study shed light on how faces and objects are processed when they are simultaneously presented in the same visual scene, contributing to an understanding of how infants respond to the multiple and composite information available in their surrounding environment.

  11. Acetylated histone H3 increases nucleosome dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Marek; Manohar, Mridula; Ottesen, Jennifer; Poirier, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Chromatin's basic unit structure is the nucleosome, i.e. genomic DNA wrapped around a particular class of proteins -- histones -- which due to their physical hindrance, block vital biological processes, such as DNA repair, DNA replication, and RNA transcription. Histone post-translational modifications, which are known to exist in vivo, are hypothesized to regulate these biological processes by directly altering DNA-histone interactions and thus nucleosome structure and stability. Using magnetic tweezers technique we studied the acetylation of histone H3 in the dyad region, i.e. at K115 and K122, on reconstituted arrays of nucleosomes under constant external force. Based on the measured increase in the probability of dissociation of modified nucleosomes, we infer that this double modification could facilitate histone chaperone mediated nucleosome disassembly in vivo.

  12. Comprehensive profiling of lysine acetylation suggests the widespread function is regulated by protein acetylation in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zuoming; Zhu, Honglin; Zhou, Yong; Wu, Chengcheng; Liu, Yue; Sheng, Qing; Lv, Zhengbing; Zhang, Wenping; Yu, Wei; Jiang, Caiying; Xie, Longfei; Zhang, Yaozhou; Yao, Juming

    2015-09-01

    Lysine acetylation in proteins is a dynamic and reversible PTM and plays an important role in diverse cellular processes. In this study, using lysine-acetylation (Kac) peptide enrichment coupled with nano HPLC/MS/MS, we initially identified the acetylome in the silkworms. Overall, a total of 342 acetylated proteins with 667 Kac sites were identified in silkworm. Sequence motifs analysis around Kac sites revealed an enrichment of Y, F, and H in the +1 position, and F was also enriched in the +2 and -2 positions, indicating the presences of preferred amino acids around Kac sites in the silkworm. Functional analysis showed the acetylated proteins were primarily involved in some specific biological processes. Furthermore, lots of nutrient-storage proteins, such as apolipophorin, vitellogenin, storage proteins, and 30 K proteins, were highly acetylated, indicating lysine acetylation may represent a common regulatory mechanism of nutrient utilization in the silkworm. Interestingly, Ser2 proteins, the coating proteins of larval silk, were found to contain many Kac sites, suggesting lysine acetylation may be involved in the regulation of larval silk synthesis. This study is the first to identify the acetylome in a lepidoptera insect, and expands greatly the catalog of lysine acetylation substrates and sites in insects.

  13. Effects of Carbocysteine and Beclomethasone on Histone Acetylation/Deacetylation Processes in Cigarette Smoke Exposed Bronchial Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Pace, E; Di Vincenzo, S; Ferraro, M; Siena, L; Chiappara, G; Dino, P; Vitulo, P; Bertani, A; Saibene, F; Lanata, L; Gjomarkaj, M

    2016-12-07

    Histone deacetylase expression/activity may control inflammation, cell senescence, and responses to corticosteroids. Cigarette smoke exposure, increasing oxidative stress, may negatively affect deacetylase expression/activity. The effects of cigarette smoke extracts (CSE), carbocysteine, and beclomethasone dipropionate on chromatin remodelling processes in human bronchial epithelial cells are largely unknown. The present study was aimed to assess the effects of cigarette smoke, carbocysteine, and beclomethasone dipropionate on histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) expression/activity, N-CoR (nuclear receptor corepressor) expression, histone acetyltransferases (HAT) (p300/CBP) expression, p-CREB and IL-1 m-RNA expression, neutrophil chemotaxis. Increased p-CREB expression was observed in the bronchial epithelium of smokers. CSE increased p-CREB expression and decreased HDAC3 expression and activity and N-CoR m-RNA and protein expression. At the same time, CSE increased the expression of the HAT, p300/CBP. All these events increased acetylation processes within the cells and were associated to increased IL-1 m-RNA expression and neutrophil chemotaxis. The incubation of CSE exposed cells with carbocysteine and beclomethasone counteracted the effects of cigarette smoke on HDAC3 and N-CoR but not on p300/CBP. The increased deacetylation processes due to carbocysteine and beclomethasone dipropionate incubation is associated to reduced p-CREB, IL-1 m-RNA expression, neutrophil chemotaxis. These findings suggest a new role of combination therapy with carbocysteine and beclomethasone dipropionate in restoring deacetylation processes compromised by cigarette smoke exposure. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. HATS-17b: A Transiting Compact Warm Jupiter in a 16.3 Day Circular Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahm, R.; Jordán, A.; Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Espinoza, N.; Rabus, M.; Hartman, J. D.; Bayliss, D.; Ciceri, S.; Zhou, G.; Mancini, L.; Tan, T. G.; de Val-Borro, M.; Bhatti, W.; Csubry, Z.; Bento, J.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Rojas, F.; Suc, V.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2016-04-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-17b, the first transiting warm Jupiter of the HATSouth network. HATS-17b transits its bright (V = 12.4) G-type ({M}\\star = 1.131+/- 0.030 {M}⊙ , {R}\\star = {1.091}-0.046+0.070 {R}⊙ ) metal-rich ([Fe/H] = +0.3 dex) host star in a circular orbit with a period of P = 16.2546 days. HATS-17b has a very compact radius of 0.777+/- 0.056 {R}{{J}} given its Jupiter-like mass of 1.338+/- 0.065 {M}{{J}}. Up to 50% of the mass of HATS-17b may be composed of heavy elements in order to explain its high density with current models of planetary structure. HATS-17b is the longest period transiting planet discovered to date by a ground-based photometric survey, and is one of the brightest transiting warm Jupiter systems known. The brightness of HATS-17 will allow detailed follow-up observations to characterize the orbital geometry of the system and the atmosphere of the planet. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. This paper includes data gathered with the MPG 2.2 m telescope at the ESO Observatory in La Silla and with the 3.9 m AAT in Siding Spring Observatory. This paper uses observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope. Based on observations taken with the HARPS spectrograph (ESO 3.6 m telescope at La Silla) under programme 097.C-0571.

  15. Replacement of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae acetyl-CoA synthetases by alternative pathways for cytosolic acetyl-CoA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Barbara U; van Rossum, Harmen M; Benjamin, Kirsten R; Wu, Liang; Daran, Jean-Marc G; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2014-01-01

    Cytosolic acetyl-coenzyme A is a precursor for many biotechnologically relevant compounds produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this yeast, cytosolic acetyl-CoA synthesis and growth strictly depend on expression of either the Acs1 or Acs2 isoenzyme of acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS). Since hydrolysis of ATP to AMP and pyrophosphate in the ACS reaction constrains maximum yields of acetyl-CoA-derived products, this study explores replacement of ACS by two ATP-independent pathways for acetyl-CoA synthesis. After evaluating expression of different bacterial genes encoding acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (A-ALD) and pyruvate-formate lyase (PFL), acs1Δ acs2Δ S. cerevisiae strains were constructed in which A-ALD or PFL successfully replaced ACS. In A-ALD-dependent strains, aerobic growth rates of up to 0.27 h(-1) were observed, while anaerobic growth rates of PFL-dependent S. cerevisiae (0.20 h(-1)) were stoichiometrically coupled to formate production. In glucose-limited chemostat cultures, intracellular metabolite analysis did not reveal major differences between A-ALD-dependent and reference strains. However, biomass yields on glucose of A-ALD- and PFL-dependent strains were lower than those of the reference strain. Transcriptome analysis suggested that reduced biomass yields were caused by acetaldehyde and formate in A-ALD- and PFL-dependent strains, respectively. Transcript profiles also indicated that a previously proposed role of Acs2 in histone acetylation is probably linked to cytosolic acetyl-CoA levels rather than to direct involvement of Acs2 in histone acetylation. While demonstrating that yeast ACS can be fully replaced, this study demonstrates that further modifications are needed to achieve optimal in vivo performance of the alternative reactions for supply of cytosolic acetyl-CoA as a product precursor.

  16. Chitosan Molecular Structure as a Function of N-Acetylation

    SciTech Connect

    Franca, Eduardo F.; Freitas, Luiz C.; Lins, Roberto D.

    2011-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to characterize the structure and solubility of chitosan nanoparticle-like structures as a function of the deacetylation level (0, 40, 60, and 100%) and the spatial distribution of the N-acetyl groups in the particles. The polysaccharide chains of highly N-deacetylated particles where the N-acetyl groups are uniformly distributed present a high flexibility and preference for the relaxed two-fold helix and five-fold helix motifs. When these groups are confined to a given region of the particle, the chains adopt preferentially a two-fold helix with f and w values close to crystalline chitin. Nanoparticles with up to 40% acetylation are moderately soluble, forming stable aggregates when the N-acetyl groups are unevenly distributed. Systems with 60% or higher N-acetylation levels are insoluble and present similar degrees of swelling regardless the distribution of their N-acetyl groups. Overall particle solvation is highly affected by electrostatic forces resulting from the degree of acetylation. The water mobility and orientation around the polysaccharide chains affects the stability of the intramolecular O3- HO3(n) ... O5(n+ 1) hydrogen bond, which in turn controls particle aggregation.

  17. Regulation of Autophagy and Mitophagy by Nutrient Availability and Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Bradley R.; Scott, Iain; Traba, Javier; Han, Kim; Sack, Michael N.

    2014-01-01

    Normal cellular function is dependent on a number of highly regulated homeostatic mechanisms, which act in concert to maintain conditions suitable for life. During periods of nutritional deficit, cells initiate a number of recycling programs which break down complex intracellular structures, thus allowing them to utilize the energy stored within. These recycling systems, broadly named “autophagy”, enable the cell to maintain the flow of nutritional substrates until they can be replenished from external sources. Recent research has shown that a number of regulatory components of the autophagy program are controlled by lysine acetylation. Lysine acetylation is a reversible post-translational modification that can alter the activity of enzymes in a number of cellular compartments. Strikingly, the main substrate for this modification is a product of cellular energy metabolism: acetyl-CoA. This suggests a direct and intricate link between fuel metabolites and the systems which regulate nutritional homeostasis. In this review, we examine how acetylation regulates the systems that control cellular autophagy, and how global protein acetylation status may act as a trigger for recycling of cellular components in a nutrient-dependent fashion. In particular, we focus on how acetylation may control the degradation and turnover of mitochondria, the major source of fuel-derived acetyl-CoA. PMID:24525425

  18. High-power Er:YAG laser with quasi-top-hat output beam.

    PubMed

    Kim, J W; Mackenzie, J I; Hayes, J R; Clarkson, W A

    2012-05-01

    A simple method for simultaneously exciting the fundamental (TEM00) transverse mode and first order Laguerre-Gaussian (LG01) donut mode in an end-pumped solid-state laser to yield a quasi-top-hat output beam is reported. This approach has been applied to an Er:YAG laser, in-band pumped by an Er,Yb fiber laser, yielding 9.6 W of continuous-wave output at 1645 nm in a top-hat-like beam with beam propagation factor (M2)<2.1 for 24 W of incident pump power at 1532 nm. The corresponding slope efficiency with respect to incident pump power was 49%. The prospects of further scaling of output power and improved overall efficiency are considered.

  19. Origin of the Napoleon's hat nebula around SN1987A and implications for the progenitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podsiadlowski, Ph.; Fabian, A. C.; Stevens, I. R.

    1991-11-01

    A simple geometrical model for the emission nebula around SN1987A, whose morphology has been likened to Napoleon's hat, is presented. The model consists of a ring and a truncated double cone. When the effects of light travel time are included, the model reproduces the important topological structures of the nebula and makes detailed quantitative predictions for its future appearance. In particular, the hat-shaped northern rim is simply explained as the interaction of the light front with the northern cone. To explain the origin of the double cone, it is argued that the progenitor of SN1987A was in a binary system: its strong wind, colliding with a weaker wind from the companion star, created an asymptotic shock surface that was spread out into the required geometry by the rotation of the binary.

  20. Analytical and experimental study of structurally efficient composite hat-stiffened panels loaded in axial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Mikulus, M. M., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Structural efficiency studies were made to determine the weight saving potential of graphite/epoxy composite structures for compression panel applications. Minimum weight hat-stiffened and open corrugation configurations were synthesized using a nonlinear mathematical programming technique. Selected configurations were built and tested to study local and Euler buckling characteristics. Test results for 23 panels critical in local buckling and six panels critical in Euler buckling are compared with analytical results obtained using the BUCLASP-2 branched plate buckling program. A weight efficiency comparison is made between composite and aluminum compression panels using metal test data generated by the NACA. Theoretical studies indicate that potential weight savings of up to 50% are possible for composite hat-stiffened panels when compared with similar aluminum designs. Weight savings of 32% to 42% were experimentally achieved. Experience suggests that most of the theoretical weight saving potential is available if design deficiencies are eliminated and strict fabrication control is exercised.

  1. Time-resolved thermal mirror technique with top-hat cw laser excitation.

    PubMed

    Astrath, Francine B; Astrath, Nelson G; Shen, Jun; Zhou, Jianqin; Malacarne, Luis C; Pedreira, P R B; Baesso, Mauro L

    2008-08-04

    A theoretical model was developed for time-resolved thermal mirror spectroscopy under top-hat cw laser excitation that induced a nanoscale surface displacement of a low absorption sample. An additional phase shift to the electrical field of a TEM(00) probe beam reflected from the surface displacement was derived, and Fresnel diffraction theory was used to calculate the propagation of the probe beam. With the theory, optical and thermal properties of three glasses were measured, and found to be consistent with literature values. With a top-hat excitation, an experimental apparatus was developed for either a single thermal mirror or a single thermal lens measurement. Furthermore, the apparatus was used for concurrent measurements of thermal mirror and thermal lens. More physical properties could be measured using the concurrent measurements.

  2. Kepler's optical phase curve of the exoplanet HAT-P-7b.

    PubMed

    Borucki, W J; Koch, D; Jenkins, J; Sasselov, D; Gilliland, R; Batalha, N; Latham, D W; Caldwell, D; Basri, G; Brown, T; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Cochran, W D; DeVore, E; Dunham, E; Dupree, A K; Gautier, T; Geary, J; Gould, A; Howell, S; Kjeldsen, H; Lissauer, J; Marcy, G; Meibom, S; Morrison, D; Tarter, J

    2009-08-07

    Ten days of photometric data were obtained during the commissioning phase of the Kepler mission, including data for the previously known giant transiting exoplanet HAT-P-7b. The data for HAT-P-7b show a smooth rise and fall of light from the planet as it orbits its star, punctuated by a drop of 130 +/- 11 parts per million in flux when the planet passes behind its star. We interpret this as the phase variation of the dayside thermal emission plus reflected light from the planet as it orbits its star and is occulted. The depth of the occultation is similar in photometric precision to the detection of a transiting Earth-size planet for which the mission was designed.

  3. HAT-P-7: A Retrograde or Polar Orbit, and a Third Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winn, Joshua N.; Johnson, John Asher; Albrecht, Simon; Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Crossfield, Ian J.; Holman, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    We showed that the exoplanet HAT-P-7b has an extremely tilted orbit, with a true angle of at least 86 degrees with respect to its parent star's equatorial plane, and a strong possibility of retrograde motion. We also report evidence for an additional planet or companion star. The Rossiter-McLaughlin effect was found to be a blueshift during the first half of the transit and a redshift during the second half, an inversion of the usual pattern, implying that the angle between the sky-projected orbital and stellar angular momentum vectors is 182.5 plus or minus 9.4 degrees. The third body is implicated by excess RV variation of the host star over 2 yr. Some possible explanations for the tilted orbit of HAT-P-7b are a close encounter with another planet, the Kozai effect, and resonant capture by an inward-migrating outer planet.

  4. The Red Hat Society: Exploring the role of play, liminality, and communitas in older women's lives.

    PubMed

    Mackay Yarnal, Careen

    2006-01-01

    There is an extensive literature on play. Yet, the role of play in older adults' lives has received limited attention. Strikingly absent is research on play and older women. Missing from the literature is how older women use play as a liminal context for social interaction and communitas. This is odd because by 2030 one in four American women will be over the age of sixty-five. The primary purpose of this study is to explore the roles of play, liminality, and communitas in older women's lives. The focus is the Red Hat Society, a social group for women over age 50 that fosters play and fun. Using qualitative interviews with focus groups and participant observation of a regional Red Hat Society event, the study highlights some of the strengths and weaknesses of current conceptualizations of play, liminality, and communitas.

  5. Serine/threonine acetylation of TGFβ-activated kinase (TAK1) by Yersinia pestis YopJ inhibits innate immune signaling

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Nicholas; Conlon, Joseph; Sweet, Charles; Rus, Florentina; Wilson, Lindsay; Pereira, Andrea; Rosadini, Charles V.; Goutagny, Nadege; Weber, Alexander N. R.; Lane, William S.; Shaffer, Scott A.; Maniatis, Stephanie; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Stuart, Lynda; Silverman, Neal

    2012-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacteria Yersinia pestis, causative agent of plague, is extremely virulent. One mechanism contributing to Y. pestis virulence is the presence of a type-three secretion system, which injects effector proteins, Yops, directly into immune cells of the infected host. One of these Yop proteins, YopJ, is proapoptotic and inhibits mammalian NF-κB and MAP-kinase signal transduction pathways. Although the molecular mechanism remained elusive for some time, recent work has shown that YopJ acts as a serine/threonine acetyl-transferase targeting MAP2 kinases. Using Drosophila as a model system, we find that YopJ inhibits one innate immune NF-κB signaling pathway (IMD) but not the other (Toll). In fact, we show YopJ mediated serine/threonine acetylation and inhibition of dTAK1, the critical MAP3 kinase in the IMD pathway. Acetylation of critical serine/threonine residues in the activation loop of Drosophila TAK1 blocks phosphorylation of the protein and subsequent kinase activation. In addition, studies in mammalian cells show similar modification and inhibition of hTAK1. These data present evidence that TAK1 is a target for YopJ-mediated inhibition. PMID:22802624

  6. Histone Acetylation Facilitates Rapid and Robust Memory CD8 T Cell Response through Differential Expression of Effector Molecules (Eomesodermin and Its Targets: Perforin and Granzyme B)1

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Yasuto; Fann, Monchou; Wersto, Robert; Weng, Nan-ping

    2008-01-01

    To understand the mechanism regulating the effector function of memory CD8 T cells, we examined expression and chromatin state of a key transcription factor (eomesodermin, EOMES) and two of its targets: perforin (PRF1) and granzyme B (GZMB). Accessible chromatin associated histone 3 lysine 9 acetylation (H3K9Ac) was found significantly higher at the proximal promoter and the first exon region of all three genes in memory CD8 T cells than in naive CD8 T cells. Correspondingly, EOMES and PRF1 were constitutively higher expressed in memory CD8 T cells than in naive CD8 T cells at resting and activated states. In contrast, higher expression of GZMB was induced in memory CD8 T cells than in naive CD8 T cells only after activation. Regardless of their constitutive or inducible expression, decreased H3K9Ac levels after treatment with a histone acetyl-transferase inhibitor (Curcumin) led to decreased expression of all three genes in activated memory CD8 T cells. These findings suggest that H3K9Ac associated accessible chromatin state serves as a corner stone for the differentially high expression of these effector genes in memory CD8 T cells. Thus, epigenetic changes mediated via histone acetylation may provide a chromatin “memory” for the rapid and robust transcriptional response of memory CD8 T cells. PMID:18523274

  7. RSRM top hat cover simulator lightning test, volume 2. Appendix A: Resistance measurements. Appendix B: Lightning test data plots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Resistance measurements are given in graphical for when a simulated lightning discharge strikes on an exposed top hat cover simulator. The test sequence was to measure the electric and magnetic fields induced inside a redesigned solid rocket motor case.

  8. The diversification and activity of hAT transposons in Musa genomes.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Gerhard; Heitkam, Tony; Seibt, Kathrin M; Nouroz, Faisal; Müller-Stoermer, Manuela; Heslop-Harrison, John S; Schmidt, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Sequencing of plant genomes often identified the hAT superfamily as the largest group of DNA transposons. Nevertheless, detailed information on the diversity, abundance and chromosomal localization of plant hAT families are rare. By in silico analyses of the reference genome assembly and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) sequences, respectively, we performed the classification and molecular characterization of hAT transposon families in Musa acuminata. Musa hAT transposons are organized in three families designated MuhAT I, MuhAT II and MuhAT III. In total, 70 complete autonomous elements of the MuhAT I and MuhAT II families were detected, while no autonomous MuhAT III transposons were found. Based on the terminal inverted repeat (TIR)-specific sequence information of the autonomous transposons, 1722 MuhAT I- and MuhAT II-specific miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MuhMITEs) were identified. Autonomous MuhAT I and MuhAT II elements are only moderately abundant in the sections of the genus Musa, while the corresponding MITEs exhibit an amplification in Musa genomes. By fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), autonomous MuhAT transposons as well as MuhMITEs were localized in subtelomeric, most likely gene-rich regions of M. acuminata chromosomes. A comparison of homoeologous regions of M. acuminata and Musa balbisiana BACs revealed the species-specific mobility of MuhMITEs. In particular, the activity of MuhMITEs II showing transduplications of genomic sequences might indicate the presence of active MuhAT transposons, thus suggesting a potential role of MuhMITEs as modulators of genome evolution of Musa.

  9. HAT-P-26b: A Neptune-mass Exoplanet with Primordial Solar Heavy Element Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakeford, Hannah; Sing, David; Deming, Drake; Kataria, Tiffany; Lopez, Eric

    2016-10-01

    A trend in giant planet mass and atmospheric heavy elemental abundance was first noted last century from observations of planets in our own solar system. These four data points from Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune have served as a corner stone of planet formation theory. Here we add another point in the mass-metallicity trend from a detailed observational study of the extrasolar planet HAT-P-26b, which inhabits the critical mass regime near Neptune and Uranus. Neptune-sized worlds are among the most common planets in our galaxy and frequently exist in orbital periods very different from that of our own solar system ice giants. Atmospheric studies are the principal window into these worlds, and thereby into their formation and evolution, beyond those of our own solar system. Using the Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer, from the optical to the infrared, we conducted a detailed atmospheric study of the Neptune-mass exoplanet HAT-P-26b over 0.5 to 4.5 μm. We detect prominent H2O absorption at 1.4 μm to 525 ppm in the atmospheric transmission spectrum. We determine that HAT-P-26b's atmosphere is not rich in heavy elements (≈1.8×solar), which goes distinctly against the solar system mass-metallicity trend. This likely indicates that HAT-P-26b's atmosphere is primordial and obtained its gaseous envelope late in its disk lifetime with little contamination from metal-rich planetesimals.

  10. HAT-P-26b: A Neptune-mass Exoplanet with Primordial Solar Heavy Element Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakeford, Hannah R.; Sing, David K.; Kataria, Tiffany; Deming, Drake; Nikolov, Nikolay; Lopez, Eric; Tremblin, Pascal; Skalid Amundsen, David; Lewis, Nikole K.; Mandell, Avi; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Knutson, Heather; Benneke, Björn; Evans, Tom M.

    2017-01-01

    A trend in giant planet mass and atmospheric heavy elemental abundance was first noted last century from observations of planets in our own solar system. These four data points from Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune have served as a corner stone of planet formation theory. Here we add another point in the mass-metallicity trend from a detailed observational study of the extrasolar planet HAT-P-26b, which inhabits the critical mass regime near Neptune and Uranus. Neptune-sized worlds are among the most common planets in our galaxy and frequently exist in orbital periods very different from that of our own solar system ice giants. Atmospheric studies are the principal window into these worlds, and thereby into their formation and evolution, beyond those of our own solar system. Using the Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer, from the optical to the infrared, we conducted a detailed atmospheric study of the Neptune-mass exoplanet HAT-P-26b over 0.5 to 4.5 μm. We detect prominent H2O absorption at 1.4 μm to 525 ppm in the atmospheric transmission spectrum. We determine that HAT-P-26b’s atmosphere is not rich in heavy elements (≈1.8×solar), which goes distinctly against the solar system mass-metallicity trend. This likely indicates that HAT-P-26b’s atmosphere is primordial and obtained its gaseous envelope late in its disk lifetime with little contamination from metal-rich planetesimals.

  11. A lower radius and mass for the transiting extrasolar planet HAT-P-8 b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, L.; Southworth, J.; Ciceri, S.; Fortney, J. J.; Morley, C. V.; Dittmann, J. A.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Bruni, I.; Barbieri, M.; Evans, D. F.; D'Ago, G.; Nikolov, N.; Henning, Th.

    2013-03-01

    Context. The extrasolar planet HAT-P-8 b was thought to be one of the more inflated transiting hot Jupiters. Aims: By using new and existing photometric data, we computed precise estimates of the physical properties of the system. Methods: We present photometric observations comprising eleven light curves covering six transit events, obtained using five medium-class telescopes and telescope-defocussing technique. One transit was simultaneously obtained through four optical filters, and two transits were followed contemporaneously from two observatories. We modelled these and seven published datasets using the jktebop code. The physical parameters of the system were obtained from these results and from published spectroscopic measurements. In addition, we investigated the theoretically-predicted variation of the apparent planetary radius as a function of wavelength, covering the range 330-960 nm. Results: We find that HAT-P-8 b has a significantly lower radius (1.321 ± 0.037 RJup) and mass (1.275 ± 0.053 MJup) compared to previous estimates (1.50-0.06+0.08 R_{Jup} and 1.52-0.16+0.18 M_{Jup} respectively). We also detect a radius variation in the optical bands that, when compared with synthetic spectra of the planet, may indicate the presence of a strong optical absorber, perhaps TiO and VO gases, near the terminator of HAT-P-8 b. Conclusions: These new results imply that HAT-P-8 b is not significantly inflated, and that its position in the planetary mass-radius diagram is congruent with those of many other transiting extrasolar planets. Full Table 2 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/551/A11

  12. HATS-5b: A Transiting Hot Saturn from the HATSouth Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, G.; Bayliss, D.; Penev, K.; Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J. D.; Jordán, A.; Mancini, L.; Mohler, M.; Csubry, Z.; Ciceri, S.; Brahm, R.; Rabus, M.; Buchhave, L.; Henning, T.; Suc, V.; Espinoza, N.; Béky, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Schmidt, B.; Butler, R. P.; Shectman, S.; Thompson, I.; Crane, J.; Sato, B.; Csák, B.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.; Nikolov, N.

    2014-06-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-5b, a transiting hot Saturn orbiting a G-type star, by the HATSouth survey. HATS-5b has a mass of Mp ≈ 0.24 M J, radius of Rp ≈ 0.91 R J, and transits its host star with a period of P ≈ 4.7634 days. The radius of HATS-5b is consistent with both theoretical and empirical models. The host star has a V-band magnitude of 12.6, mass of 0.94 M ⊙, and radius of 0.87 R ⊙. The relatively high scale height of HATS-5b and the bright, photometrically quiet host star make this planet a favorable target for future transmission spectroscopy follow-up observations. We reexamine the correlations in radius, equilibrium temperature, and metallicity of the close-in gas giants and find hot Jupiter-mass planets to exhibit the strongest dependence between radius and equilibrium temperature. We find no significant dependence in radius and metallicity for the close-in gas giant population. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), and the Australian National University (ANU). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with collaborators at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC), the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (HESS) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  13. The discovery of DLT17h/AT 2017ahn with PROMPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglia, L.; Sand, D.; Valenti, S.; Reichart, D. E.; Haislip, J. B.; Kouprianov, V.

    2017-02-01

    We report the discovery of DLT17h/AT 2017ahn. The object was discovered on 2017-02-08.29 UT at R 18.10 mag (absolute magnitude -14.94 mag, assuming a distance modulus of 32.87 mag and a Galactic foreground extinction of 0.17 mag), during the ongoing D20.8 mag) on 2017-02-07.23 UT or in prior imaging of the field.

  14. Erasers of Histone Acetylation: The Histone Deacetylase Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Seto, Edward; Yoshida, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are enzymes that catalyze the removal of acetyl functional groups from the lysine residues of both histone and nonhistone proteins. In humans, there are 18 HDAC enzymes that use either zinc- or NAD+-dependent mechanisms to deacetylate acetyl lysine substrates. Although removal of histone acetyl epigenetic modification by HDACs regulates chromatin structure and transcription, deacetylation of nonhistones controls diverse cellular processes. HDAC inhibitors are already known potential anticancer agents and show promise for the treatment of many diseases. PMID:24691964

  15. Acetylation of cellulose nanowhiskers with vinyl acetate under moderate conditions.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Nihat Sami; Tingaut, Philippe; Ozmen, Nilgül; Henry, Nathan; Harper, David; Dadmun, Mark; Sèbe, Gilles

    2009-10-08

    A novel and straightforward method for the surface acetylation of cellulose nanowhiskers by transesterification of vinyl acetate is proposed. The reaction of vinyl acetate with the hydroxyl groups of cellulose nanowhiskers obtained from cotton linters was examined with potassium carbonate as catalyst. Results indicate that during the first stage of the reaction, only the surface of the nanowhiskers was modified, while their dimensions and crystallinity remained unchanged. With increasing reaction time, diffusion mechanisms controlled the rate, leading to nanowhiskers with higher levels of acetylation, smaller dimensions, and lower crystallinity. In THF, a solvent of low polarity, the suspensions from modified nanowhiskers showed improved stability with increased acetylation.

  16. Structural Basis of Eco1-Mediated Cohesin Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Chao, William C. H.; Wade, Benjamin O.; Bouchoux, Céline; Jones, Andrew W.; Purkiss, Andrew G.; Federico, Stefania; O’Reilly, Nicola; Snijders, Ambrosius P.; Uhlmann, Frank; Singleton, Martin R.

    2017-01-01

    Sister-chromatid cohesion is established by Eco1-mediated acetylation on two conserved tandem lysines in the cohesin Smc3 subunit. However, the molecular basis of Eco1 substrate recognition and acetylation in cohesion is not fully understood. Here, we discover and rationalize the substrate specificity of Eco1 using mass spectrometry coupled with in-vitro acetylation assays and crystallography. Our structures of the X. laevis Eco2 (xEco2) bound to its primary and secondary Smc3 substrates demonstrate the plasticity of the substrate-binding site, which confers substrate specificity by concerted conformational changes of the central β hairpin and the C-terminal extension. PMID:28290497

  17. HAT-South: A Global Network of Southern Hemisphere Automated Telescopes to Detect Transiting Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, G.; Afonso, C.; Henning, T.; Jordán, A.; Holman, M.; Noyes, R. W.; Sackett, P. D.; Sasselov, D.; Kovács, Gábor; Csubry, Z.; Pál, A.

    2009-02-01

    HAT-South is a network of six identical, fully automated wide field telescopes, to be located at three sites (Chile: Las Campanas, Australia: Siding Springs, and Namibia: HESS site) in the Southern hemisphere. The primary purpose of the network is to detect and characterize a large number of extra-solar planets transiting nearby bright stars, and to explore their diversity. Operation of HAT-South is a collaboration among the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA) and the Australian National University (ANU). The network is expected to be ready for initial science operations in 2009. The three sites will permit near round-the-clock monitoring of selected fields, and the continuous data-stream will greatly enhance recovery of transits. HAT-South will be sensitive to planetary transits down to R≈14 across a 128 square-degrees combined field of view, thereby targeting a large number of dwarfs with feasible confirmation-mode follow-up. We anticipate a yearly detection rate of approximately 25 planets transiting bright stars.

  18. Formulating robust linear regression estimation as a one-class LDA criterion: discriminative hat matrix.

    PubMed

    Dufrenois, F; Noyer, J C

    2013-02-01

    Linear discriminant analysis, such as Fisher's criterion, is a statistical learning tool traditionally devoted to separating a training dataset into two or even several classes by the way of linear decision boundaries. In this paper, we show that this tool can formalize the robust linear regression problem as a robust estimator will do. More precisely, we develop a one-class Fischer's criterion in which the maximization provides both the regression parameters and the separation of the data in two classes: typical data and atypical data or outliers. This new criterion is built on the statistical properties of the subspace decomposition of the hat matrix. From this angle, we improve the discriminative properties of the hat matrix which is traditionally used as outlier diagnostic measure in linear regression. Naturally, we call this new approach discriminative hat matrix. The proposed algorithm is fully nonsupervised and needs only the initialization of one parameter. Synthetic and real datasets are used to study the performance both in terms of regression and classification of the proposed approach. We also illustrate its potential application to image recognition and fundamental matrix estimation in computer vision.

  19. The Hat Yai 2000 flood: the worst flood in Thai history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supharatid, Seree

    2006-02-01

    Hat Yai, the largest commercial and tourist city in southern Thailand, is subjected to regular flood events, primarily during the northeast monsoon period. Flooding in this region is recognized as a serious disaster in terms of frequency, rate of risk, and affected areas. The monsoon of 21-25 November 2000 caused extremely heavy rain in the southern part of Thailand, resulting in a great flood occupying Hat Yai. This caused significant damage. Therefore, the use of both structural and non-structural measures is mandatory to reduce the economic losses and the risk for society. This paper investigates two modelling approaches for flood prevention and mitigation of Hat Yai city. First, a hard computing approach by a physically distributed model was applied to study the flood behaviour in a two-dimensional floodplain flow. Second, a soft computing approach using a neuro-genetic algorithm was used to develop a flood-forecasting tool. It was found that the great flood of 2000 can be simulated well by the FLO-2D model. Computed discharges and flood level in the floodplain are close to the observed data. Countermeasures using diversion canals are guaranteed to accelerate the floodwater drainage to Songkla Lake, significantly reducing the flood impact to the people. In addition, the flood forecasting technique developed in this study can give satisfactory results. This would be very useful as a flood-warning tool for the community

  20. On Variable Geometric Factor Systems for Top-Hat Electrostatic Space Plasma Analyzers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kataria, Dhiren O.; Collinson, Glyn A.

    2010-01-01

    Even in the relatively small region of space that is the Earth's magnetosphere, ion and electron fluxes can vary by several orders of magnitude. Top-hat electrostatic analyzers currently do not possess the dynamic range required to sample plasma under all conditions. The purpose of this study was to compare, through computer simulation, three new electrostatic methods that would allow the sensitivity of a sensor to be varied through control of its geometric factor (GF) (much like an aperture on a camera). The methods studied were inner filter plates, split hemispherical analyzer (SHA) and top-cap electrode. This is the first discussion of the filter plate concept and also the first study where all three systems are studied within a common analyzer design, so that their relative merits could be fairly compared. Filter plates were found to have the important advantage that they facilitate the reduction in instrument sensitivity whilst keeping all other instrument parameters constant. However, it was discovered that filter plates have numerous disadvantages that make such a system impracticable for a top-hat electrostatic analyzer. It was found that both the top-cap electrode and SHA are promising variable geometric factor system (VGFS) concepts for implementation into a top-hat electrostatic analyzer, each with distinct advantages over the other.

  1. HATS-4b: A dense hot Jupiter transiting a super metal-rich G star

    SciTech Connect

    Jordán, Andrés; Brahm, Rafael; Rabus, M.; Suc, V.; Espinoza, N.; Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Hartman, J. D.; Csubry, Z.; Bhatti, W.; De Val Borro, M.; Bayliss, D.; Zhou, G.; Mancini, L.; Mohler-Fischer, M.; Ciceri, S.; Csák, B.; Henning, T.; Sato, B.; Buchhave, L.; and others

    2014-08-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth survey of HATS-4b, an extrasolar planet transiting a V = 13.46 mag G star. HATS-4b has a period of P ≈ 2.5167 days, mass of M{sub p} ≈ 1.32 M {sub Jup}, radius of R{sub p} ≈ 1.02 R {sub Jup}, and density of ρ {sub p} = 1.55 ± 0.16 g cm{sup –3} ≈1.24 ρ{sub Jup}. The host star has a mass of 1.00 M {sub ☉}, a radius of 0.92 R {sub ☉}, and a very high metallicity [Fe/H]=0.43 ± 0.08. HATS-4b is among the densest known planets with masses between 1 and 2 M {sub J} and is thus likely to have a significant content of heavy elements of the order of 75 M {sub ⊕}. In this paper we present the data reduction, radial velocity measurements, and stellar classification techniques adopted by the HATSouth survey for the CORALIE spectrograph. We also detail a technique for simultaneously estimating vsin i and macroturbulence using high resolution spectra.

  2. INDEPENDENT DISCOVERY OF THE TRANSITING EXOPLANET HAT-P-14b

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, E. K.; Barros, S. C. C.; Pollacco, D.; Faedi, F.; McCormac, J.; Brown, D. J. A.; Collier Cameron, A.; Enoch, B.; Skillen, I.; Stempels, H. C.; Boisse, I.; Hebrard, G.; Bouchy, F.; Sorensen, P.; Street, R. A.; Anderson, D.; Bento, J.; Butters, O. W.; Haswell, C. A.; Hebb, L.

    2011-05-15

    We present SuperWASP observations of HAT-P-14b, a hot Jupiter discovered by Torres et al. The planet was found independently by the SuperWASP team and named WASP-27b after follow-up observations had secured the discovery, but prior to the publication by Torres et al. Our analysis of HAT-P-14/WASP-27 is in good agreement with the values found by Torres et al. and we provide additional evidence against astronomical false positives. Due to the brightness of the host star, V{sub mag} = 10, HAT-P-14b is an attractive candidate for further characterization observations. The planet has a high impact parameter and the primary transit is close to grazing. This could readily reveal small deviations in the orbital parameters indicating the presence of a third body in the system, which may be causing the small but significant orbital eccentricity. Our results suggest that the planet may undergo a grazing secondary eclipse. However, even a non-detection would tightly constrain the system parameters.

  3. A spin-orbit alignment for the hot Jupiter HATS-3b

    SciTech Connect

    Addison, B. C.; Tinney, C. G.; Wright, D. J.; Bayliss, D.

    2014-09-10

    We have measured the alignment between the orbit of HATS-3b (a recently discovered, slightly inflated Hot Jupiter) and the spin axis of its host star. Data were obtained using the CYCLOPS2 optical-fiber bundle and its simultaneous calibration system feeding the UCLES spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. The sky-projected spin-orbit angle of λ = 3° ± 25° was determined from spectroscopic measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. This is the first exoplanet discovered through the HATSouth transit survey to have its spin-orbit angle measured. Our results indicate that the orbital plane of HATS-3b is consistent with being aligned to the spin axis of its host star. The low obliquity of the HATS-3 system, which has a relatively hot mid F-type host star, agrees with the general trend observed for Hot Jupiter host stars with effective temperatures >6250 K to have randomly distributed spin-orbit angles.

  4. Detection of the Secondary Eclipse of Exoplanet HAT P-11b

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, R. K.; Deming, L. D.; Bakos, G.; Harrington, J.; Madhusudhan, N.; Noyes, R.; Seager, S.

    2010-01-01

    We have successfully conducted secondary eclipse observations of exoplanet HAT-P-11b using the Spitzer Space Telescope. HAT-P-11b was, until very recently, the smallest transiting extrasolar planet yet found and one of only two known exo-Neptunes. We observed the system at 3.6 microns for a period of 22 hours centered on the anticipated secondary eclipse time, to detect the eclipse and determine its phase. Having detected the secondary eclipse, we are at present making a more focused series of observations in both the 3.6 and 4.5 micron bands to fully characterize it. HAT-P-11b has a period of 4.8878 days, radius of 0.422 RJ, mass of 0.081 MJ and semi-major axis 0.053 AU. Measurements of the secondary eclipse will serve to clarify two key issues; 1) the planetary brightness temperature and the nature of its atmosphere, and 2) the eccentricity of its orbit, with implications for its dynamical evolution. A precise determination of the orbit phase for the secondary eclipse will also be of great utility for Kepler observations of this system at visible wavelengths.

  5. Discovery of the secondary eclipse of HAT-P-11 b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, K. F.; Czesla, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2017-01-01

    We report the detection of the secondary eclipse of HAT-P-11 b, a Neptune-sized planet orbiting an active K4 dwarf. Using all available short-cadence data of the Kepler mission, we derive refined planetary ephemeris increasing their precision by more than an order of magnitude. Our simultaneous primary and secondary transit modeling results in improved transit and orbital parameters. In particular, the precise timing of the secondary eclipse allows to pin down the orbital eccentricity to . The secondary eclipse depth of ppm corresponds to a 5.5σ detection and results in a geometric albedo of 0.39 ± 0.07 for HAT-P-11 b, close to Neptune's value, which may indicate further resemblances between these two bodies. Due to the substantial orbital eccentricity, the planetary equilibrium temperature is expected to change significantly with orbital position and ought to vary between 630 K and 950 K, depending on the details of heat redistribution in the atmosphere of HAT-P-11 b.

  6. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase in erythrocytes (red blood cells... hereditary disease galactosemia (disorder of galactose metabolism) in infants. (b) Classification. Class II....

  7. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase in erythrocytes (red blood cells... hereditary disease galactosemia (disorder of galactose metabolism) in infants. (b) Classification. Class II....

  8. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a)...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a)...

  10. 9-O-Acetylation of sialic acids is catalysed by CASD1 via a covalent acetyl-enzyme intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Anna-Maria T.; Bakkers, Mark J. G.; Buettner, Falk F. R.; Hartmann, Maike; Grove, Melanie; Langereis, Martijn A.; de Groot, Raoul J.; Mühlenhoff, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Sialic acids, terminal sugars of glycoproteins and glycolipids, play important roles in development, cellular recognition processes and host–pathogen interactions. A common modification of sialic acids is 9-O-acetylation, which has been implicated in sialoglycan recognition, ganglioside biology, and the survival and drug resistance of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells. Despite many functional implications, the molecular basis of 9-O-acetylation has remained elusive thus far. Following cellular approaches, including selective gene knockout by CRISPR/Cas genome editing, we here show that CASD1—a previously identified human candidate gene—is essential for sialic acid 9-O-acetylation. In vitro assays with the purified N-terminal luminal domain of CASD1 demonstrate transfer of acetyl groups from acetyl-coenzyme A to CMP-activated sialic acid and formation of a covalent acetyl-enzyme intermediate. Our study provides direct evidence that CASD1 is a sialate O-acetyltransferase and serves as key enzyme in the biosynthesis of 9-O-acetylated sialoglycans. PMID:26169044

  11. Spin-orbit alignment for KELT-7b and HAT-P-56b via Doppler tomography with TRES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, George; Latham, David W.; Bieryla, Allyson; Beatty, Thomas G.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael L.

    2016-08-01

    We present Doppler tomographic analyses for the spectroscopic transits of KELT-7b and HAT-P-56b, two hot-Jupiters orbiting rapidly rotating F-dwarf host stars. These include analyses of archival Tillinghast Reflector Echelle Spectrograph (TRES) observations for KELT-7b, and a new TRES transit observation of HAT-P-56b. We report spin-orbit aligned geometries for KELT-7b (2.7° ± 0.6°) and HAT-P-56b (8° ± 2°). The host stars KELT-7 and HAT-P-56 are among some of the most rapidly rotating planet-hosting stars known. We examine the tidal re-alignment model for the evolution of the spin-orbit angle in the context of the spin rates of these stars. We find no evidence that the rotation rates of KELT-7 and HAT-P-56 have been modified by star-planet tidal interactions, suggesting that the spin-orbit angle of systems around these hot stars may represent their primordial configuration. In fact, KELT-7 and HAT-P-56 are two of three systems in supersynchronous, spin-orbit aligned states, where the rotation periods of the host stars are faster than the orbital periods of the planets.

  12. Thermal and Mechanical Buckling Analysis of Hypersonic Aircraft Hat-Stiffened Panels With Varying Face Sheet Geometry and Fiber Orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1996-01-01

    Mechanical and thermal buckling behavior of monolithic and metal-matrix composite hat-stiffened panels were investigated. The panels have three types of face-sheet geometry: Flat face sheet, microdented face sheet, and microbulged face sheet. The metal-matrix composite panels have three types of face-sheet layups, each of which is combined with various types of hat composite layups. Finite-element method was used in the eigenvalue extractions for both mechanical and thermal buckling. The thermal buckling analysis required both eigenvalue and material property iterations. Graphical methods of the dual iterations are shown. The mechanical and thermal buckling strengths of the hat-stiffened panels with different face-sheet geometry are compared. It was found that by just microdenting or microbulging of the face sheet, the axial, shear, and thermal buckling strengths of both types of hat-stiffened panels could be enhanced considerably. This effect is more conspicuous for the monolithic panels. For the metal-matrix composite panels, the effect of fiber orientations on the panel buckling strengths was investigated in great detail, and various composite layup combinations offering, high panel buckling strengths are presented. The axial buckling strength of the metal-matrix panel was sensitive to the change of hat fiber orientation. However, the lateral, shear, and thermal buckling strengths were insensitive to the change of hat fiber orientation.

  13. Nucleotidyl transferase assisted DNA labeling with different click chemistries.

    PubMed

    Winz, Marie-Luise; Linder, Eva Christina; André, Timon; Becker, Juliane; Jäschke, Andres

    2015-09-30

    Here, we present a simple, modular and efficient strategy that allows the 3'-terminal labeling of DNA, regardless of whether it has been chemically or enzymatically synthesized or isolated from natural sources. We first incorporate a range of modified nucleotides at the 3'-terminus, using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase. In the second step, we convert the incorporated nucleotides, using either of four highly efficient click chemistry-type reactions, namely copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition, strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition, Staudinger ligation or Diels-Alder reaction with inverse electron demand. Moreover, we create internal modifications, making use of either ligation or primer extension, after the nucleotidyl transferase step, prior to the click reaction. We further study the influence of linker variants on the reactivity of azides in different click reactions. We find that different click reactions exhibit distinct substrate preferences, a fact that is often overlooked, but should be considered when labeling oligonucleotides or other biomolecules with click chemistry. Finally, our findings allowed us to extend our previously published RNA labeling strategy to the use of a different copper-free click chemistry, namely the Staudinger ligation.

  14. Characterization of glutathione S-transferase of Taenia solium.

    PubMed

    Vibanco-Pérez, N; Jiménez, L; Merchant, M T; Landa, A

    1999-06-01

    A Taenia solium glutathione-S-transferase fraction (SGSTF) was isolated from a metacestode crude extract by affinity chromatography on reduced glutathione (GSH)-sepharose. The purified fraction displayed a specific glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity of 2.8 micromol/min/mg and glutathione peroxidase selenium-independent activity of 0.22 micromol/min/mg. Enzymatic characterization of the fraction suggested that the activity was closer to the mammalian mu-class GSTs. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, gel filtration, and enzyme activity analysis showed that the fraction was composed of a major band of Mr = 26 kd and that the active enzyme was dimeric. Immunohistochemical studies using specific antibodies against the major 26-kd band of the SGSTF indicated that GST protein was present in the tegument, parenchyma, protonephridial, and tegumentary cytons of the T. solium metacestode. Antibodies generated against the SGSTF tested in western blot showed cross-reactivity against GSTs purified from Taenia saginata, T. taeniaeformis, and T. crassiceps, but did not react with GSTs from Schistosoma mansoni, or mice, rabbit, and pig liver tissue. Furthermore, immunization of mice with SGSTF reduced the metacestode burden up to 74.2%. Our findings argue in favor of GST having an important role in the survival of T. solium in its hosts.

  15. Characterization of two Arabidopsis thaliana glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Nutricati, Eliana; Miceli, Antonio; Blando, Federica; De Bellis, Luigi

    2006-09-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GST) are multifunctional proteins encoded by a large gene family, divided on the basis of sequence identity into phi, tau, theta, zeta and lambda classes. The phi and tau classes are present only in plants. GSTs appear to be ubiquitous in plants and are involved in herbicide detoxification and stress response, but little is known about the precise role of GSTs in normal plant physiology and during biotic and abiotic stress response. Two cDNAs representing the two plant classes tau and phi, AtGSTF9 and AtGSTU26, were expressed in vitro and the corresponding proteins were analysed. Both GSTs were able to catalyse a glutathione conjugation to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), but they were inactive as transferases towards p-nitrobenzylchloride (pNBC). AtGSTF9 showed activity towards benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) and an activity as glutathione peroxidase with cumene hydroperoxide (CumHPO). AtGSTU26 was not active as glutathione peroxidase and towards BITC. RT-PCR analysis was used to evaluate the expression of the two genes in response to treatment with herbicides and safeners, chemicals, low and high temperature. Our results reveal that AtGSTU26 is induced by the chloroacetanilide herbicides alachlor and metolachlor and the safener benoxacor, and after exposure to low temperatures. In contrast, AtGSTF9 seems not to be influenced by the treatments employed.

  16. Nucleotidyl transferase assisted DNA labeling with different click chemistries

    PubMed Central

    Winz, Marie-Luise; Linder, Eva Christina; André, Timon; Becker, Juliane; Jäschke, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present a simple, modular and efficient strategy that allows the 3′-terminal labeling of DNA, regardless of whether it has been chemically or enzymatically synthesized or isolated from natural sources. We first incorporate a range of modified nucleotides at the 3′-terminus, using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase. In the second step, we convert the incorporated nucleotides, using either of four highly efficient click chemistry-type reactions, namely copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition, strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition, Staudinger ligation or Diels-Alder reaction with inverse electron demand. Moreover, we create internal modifications, making use of either ligation or primer extension, after the nucleotidyl transferase step, prior to the click reaction. We further study the influence of linker variants on the reactivity of azides in different click reactions. We find that different click reactions exhibit distinct substrate preferences, a fact that is often overlooked, but should be considered when labeling oligonucleotides or other biomolecules with click chemistry. Finally, our findings allowed us to extend our previously published RNA labeling strategy to the use of a different copper-free click chemistry, namely the Staudinger ligation. PMID:26013812

  17. HATS-8b: A Low-density Transiting Super-Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayliss, D.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Zhou, G.; Brahm, R.; Rabus, M.; Jordán, A.; Mancini, L.; de Val-Borro, M.; Bhatti, W.; Espinoza, N.; Csubry, Z.; Howard, A. W.; Fulton, B. J.; Buchhave, L. A.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Ciceri, S.; Noyes, R. W.; Isaacson, H.; Marcy, G. W.; Suc, V.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2015-08-01

    HATS-8b is a low density transiting super-Neptune discovered as part of the HATSouth project. The planet orbits its solar-like G-dwarf host (V = 14.03+/- 0.10, {T}{eff} = 5679+/- 50 K) with a period of 3.5839 days. HATS-8b is the third lowest-mass transiting exoplanet to be discovered from a wide-field ground-based search, and with a mass of 0.138+/- 0.019 {M}{{J}} it is approximately halfway between the masses of Neptune and Saturn. However, HATS-8b has a radius of {0.873}-0.075+0.123 {R}{{J}}, resulting in a bulk density of just 0.259+/- 0.091 {{g}} {{cm}}-3. The metallicity of the host star is super-solar ([{Fe}/{{H}}] = 0.210+/- 0.080), providing evidence against the idea that low-density exoplanets form from metal-poor environments. The low density and large radius of HATS-8b results in an atmospheric scale height of almost 1000 km, and in addition to this there is an excellent reference star of nearly equal magnitude at just 19″ separation in the sky. These factors make HATS-8b an exciting target for future atmospheric characterization studies, particularly for long-slit transmission spectroscopy. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory is operated jointly with ANU. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located in LCO, Chile. The work is based in part on observations made with the MPG 2.2 m Telescope and the ESO 3.6 m Telescope at the ESO Observatory in La Silla. This paper uses observations obtained using the facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope.

  18. Characterization of the atmosphere of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-32Ab and the M-dwarf companion HAT-P-32B

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Ming; Wright, Jason T.; Curtis, Jason; O'Rourke, Joseph G.; Knutson, Heather A.; Ngo, Henry; Burrows, Adam; Fortney, Johnathan; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Hinkley, Sasha; Law, Nicholas M.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Showman, Adam P.; Burruss, Rick

    2014-12-01

    We report secondary eclipse photometry of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-32Ab, taken with Hale/Wide-field Infra-Red Camera (WIRC) in H and K{sub S} bands and with Spitzer/IRAC at 3.6 and 4.5 μm. We carried out adaptive optics imaging of the planet host star HAT-P-32A and its companion HAT-P-32B in the near-IR and the visible. We clearly resolve the two stars from each other and find a separation of 2.''923 ± 0.''004 and a position angle 110.°64 ± 0.°12. We measure the flux ratios of the binary in g'r'i'z' and H and K{sub S} bands, and determine T {sub eff}= 3565 ± 82 K for the companion star, corresponding to an M1.5 dwarf. We use PHOENIX stellar atmosphere models to correct the dilution of the secondary eclipse depths of the hot Jupiter due to the presence of the M1.5 companion. We also improve the secondary eclipse photometry by accounting for the non-classical, flux-dependent nonlinearity of the WIRC IR detector in the H band. We measure planet-to-star flux ratios of 0.090% ± 0.033%, 0.178% ± 0.057%, 0.364% ± 0.016%, and 0.438% ± 0.020% in the H, K{sub S} , 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands, respectively. We compare these with planetary atmospheric models, and find they prefer an atmosphere with a temperature inversion and inefficient heat redistribution. However, we also find that the data are equally well described by a blackbody model for the planet with T {sub p} = 2042 ± 50 K. Finally, we measure a secondary eclipse timing offset of 0.3 ± 1.3 minutes from the predicted mid-eclipse time, which constrains e = 0.0072{sub −0.0064}{sup +0.0700} when combined with radial velocity data and is more consistent with a circular orbit.

  19. Partially Acetylated Sugarcane Bagasse For Wicking Oil From Contaminated Wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sugarcane bagasse was partially acetylated to enhance its oil-wicking ability in saturated environments while holding moisture for hydrocarbon biodegradation. The water sorption capacity of raw bagasse was reduced fourfold after treatment, which indicated considerably increased ...

  20. Data detailing the platelet acetyl-lysine proteome.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Joseph E; David, Larry L; McCarty, Owen J T

    2015-12-01

    Here we detail proteomics data that describe the acetyl-lysine proteome of blood platelets (Aslan et al., 2015 [1]). An affinity purification - mass spectrometry (AP-MS) approach was used to identify proteins modified by Nε-lysine acetylation in quiescent, washed human platelets. The data provide insights into potential regulatory mechanisms of platelet function mediated by protein lysine acetylation. Additionally, as platelets are anucleate and lack histone proteins, they offer a unique and valuable system to study the regulation of cytosolic proteins by lysine acetylation. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (Vizcaino et al., 2014 [2]) via with PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD002332.

  1. Acetylation of C/EBPα inhibits its granulopoietic function

    PubMed Central

    Bararia, Deepak; Kwok, Hui Si; Welner, Robert S.; Numata, Akihiko; Sárosi, Menyhárt B.; Yang, Henry; Wee, Sheena; Tschuri, Sebastian; Ray, Debleena; Weigert, Oliver; Levantini, Elena; Ebralidze, Alexander K.; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Tenen, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) is an essential transcription factor for myeloid lineage commitment. Here we demonstrate that acetylation of C/EBPα at lysine residues K298 and K302, mediated at least in part by general control non-derepressible 5 (GCN5), impairs C/EBPα DNA-binding ability and modulates C/EBPα transcriptional activity. Acetylated C/EBPα is enriched in human myeloid leukaemia cell lines and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) samples, and downregulated upon granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)- mediated granulocytic differentiation of 32Dcl3 cells. C/EBPα mutants that mimic acetylation failed to induce granulocytic differentiation in C/EBPα-dependent assays, in both cell lines and in primary hematopoietic cells. Our data uncover GCN5 as a negative regulator of C/EBPα and demonstrate the importance of C/EBPα acetylation in myeloid differentiation. PMID:27005833

  2. The Histone Demethylase UTX Promotes Brown Adipocyte Thermogenic Program Via Coordinated Regulation of H3K27 Demethylation and Acetylation*

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Lin; Li, Fenfen; Wu, Rui; Artinian, Liana; Rehder, Vincent; Yu, Liqing; Liang, Houjie; Xue, Bingzhong; Shi, Hang

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipocytes function to dissipate energy as heat through adaptive thermogenesis. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the brown fat thermogenic program may provide insights for the development of therapeutic approaches in the treatment of obesity. Most studies investigating the mechanisms underlying brown fat development focus on genetic mechanisms; little is known about the epigenetic mechanisms in this process. We have discovered that ubiquitously transcribed tetratricopeptide repeat on chromosome X (UTX), a histone demethylase for di- or tri-methylated histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27me2/3), plays a potential role in regulating brown adipocyte thermogenic program. We found that UTX is up-regulated during brown adipocyte differentiation and by cold exposure in both brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT) of mice, suggesting a potential role in thermogenesis. Inactivation of UTX down-regulates brown fat specific gene expression, while overexpression of UTX does the opposite. Notably, activation of β adrenergic signaling recruits UTX to the UCP1 and PGC1α promoters, leading to decreased H3K27me3, a histone transcriptional repressive mark. UTX demethylates H3K27me3 and subsequently interacts with the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) protein CBP, resulting in increased H3K27 acetylation (H3K27ac), a histone transcriptional active mark. UTX positively regulate brown adipocyte thermogenic program through coordinated control of demethylating H3K27me3 and acetylating H3K27, switching the transcriptional repressive state to the transcriptional active state at the promoters of UCP1 and PGC1α. We conclude that UTX may play a potential role in regulation of brown adipocyte gene expression and may mediate β adrenergic activation of brown fat function. PMID:26306033

  3. Olig1 Acetylation and Nuclear Export Mediate Oligodendrocyte Development

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jinxiang; Bercury, Kathryn K.; Jin, Weilin

    2015-01-01

    The oligodendrocyte transcription factor Olig1 is critical for both oligodendrocyte development and remyelination in mice. Nuclear to cytoplasmic translocation of Olig1 protein occurs during brain development and in multiple sclerosis, but the detailed molecular mechanism of this translocation remains elusive. Here, we report that Olig1 acetylation and deacetylation drive its active translocation between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in both mouse and rat oligodendrocytes. We identified three functional nuclear export sequences (NES) localized in the basic helix-loop-helix domain and one specific acetylation site at Lys 150 (human Olig1) in NES1. Olig1 acetylation and deacetylation are regulated by the acetyltransferase CREB-binding protein and the histone deacetylases HDAC1, HDAC3, and HDAC10. Acetylation of Olig1 decreased its chromatin association, increased its interaction with inhibitor of DNA binding 2 and facilitated its retention in the cytoplasm of mature oligodendrocytes. These studies establish that acetylation of Olig1 regulates its chromatin dissociation and subsequent translocation to the cytoplasm and is required for its function in oligodendrocyte maturation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The nuclear to cytoplasmic translocation of Olig1 protein has been observed during mouse and human brain development and in multiple sclerosis in several studies, but the detailed molecular mechanism of this translocation remains elusive. Here, we provide insight into the mechanism by which acetylation of Olig1 regulates its unique nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling during oligodendrocyte development and how the acetylation status of Olig1 modulates its distinct function in the nucleus versus the cytoplasm. The current study provides a unique example of a lineage-specific transcription factor that is actively translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm as the cell differentiates. Importantly, we demonstrate that this process is tightly controlled by acetylation at a single

  4. A colorimetric assay for the determination of acetyl xylan esterase or cephalosporin C acetyl esterase activities using 7-amino cephalosporanic acid, cephalosporin C, or acetylated xylan as substrate.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Irene; Montoro-García, Silvia; Lozada-Ramírez, José Daniel; Sánchez-Ferrer, Alvaro; García-Carmona, Francisco

    2007-10-15

    A bromothymol blue-based colorimetric assay has been devised to screen for acetyl xylan esterase or cephalosporin C (CPC) deacetylase activities using 7-amino cephalosporanic acid (7-ACA), CPC, or acetylated xylan as substrate. These enzymes are not screened with their natural substrates because of the tedious procedures available previously. Acetyl xylan esterase from Bacillus pumilus CECT 5072 was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3), and characterized using this assay. Similar K(M) values for 7-ACA and CPC were obtained when compared with those described using HPLC methods. The assay is easy to perform and can be carried out in robotic high-throughput colorimetric devices normally used in directed evolution experiments. The assay allowed us to detect improvements in activity at a minimum of twofold with a very low coefficient of variance in 96-well plates. This method is significantly faster and more convenient to use than are known HPLC and pH-stat procedures.

  5. Regulation of S-Adenosylhomocysteine Hydrolase by Lysine Acetylation*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun; Kavran, Jennifer M.; Chen, Zan; Karukurichi, Kannan R.; Leahy, Daniel J.; Cole, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    S-Adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) is an NAD+-dependent tetrameric enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of S-adenosylhomocysteine to adenosine and homocysteine and is important in cell growth and the regulation of gene expression. Loss of SAHH function can result in global inhibition of cellular methyltransferase enzymes because of high levels of S-adenosylhomocysteine. Prior proteomics studies have identified two SAHH acetylation sites at Lys401 and Lys408 but the impact of these post-translational modifications has not yet been determined. Here we use expressed protein ligation to produce semisynthetic SAHH acetylated at Lys401 and Lys408 and show that modification of either position negatively impacts the catalytic activity of SAHH. X-ray crystal structures of 408-acetylated SAHH and dually acetylated SAHH have been determined and reveal perturbations in the C-terminal hydrogen bonding patterns, a region of the protein important for NAD+ binding. These crystal structures along with mutagenesis data suggest that such hydrogen bond perturbations are responsible for SAHH catalytic inhibition by acetylation. These results suggest how increased acetylation of SAHH may globally influence cellular methylation patterns. PMID:25248746

  6. Acetyl radical generation in cigarette smoke: Quantification and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Na; Green, Sarah A.

    2014-10-01

    Free radicals are present in cigarette smoke and can have a negative effect on human health. However, little is known about their formation mechanisms. Acetyl radicals were quantified in tobacco smoke and mechanisms for their generation were investigated by computer simulations. Acetyl radicals were trapped from the gas phase using 3-amino-2, 2, 5, 5-tetramethyl-proxyl (3AP) on solid support to form stable 3AP adducts for later analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), mass spectrometry/tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Simulations were performed using the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM). A range of 10-150 nmol/cigarette of acetyl radical was measured from gas phase tobacco smoke of both commercial and research cigarettes under several different smoking conditions. More radicals were detected from the puff smoking method compared to continuous flow sampling. Approximately twice as many acetyl radicals were trapped when a glass fiber particle filter (GF/F specifications) was placed before the trapping zone. Simulations showed that NO/NO2 reacts with isoprene, initiating chain reactions to produce hydroxyl radical, which abstracts hydrogen from acetaldehyde to generate acetyl radical. These mechanisms can account for the full amount of acetyl radical detected experimentally from cigarette smoke. Similar mechanisms may generate radicals in second hand smoke.

  7. Kinetic studies on enzymatic acetylation of chloramphenicol in Streptococcus faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Y; Nitahara, Y; Miyamura, S

    1979-01-01

    The kinetics of chloramphenicol (CP) acetylation by CP acetyltransferase from Streptococcus faecalis was studied. CP was shown to be acetylated enzymatically to its 3-O-acetyl derivative (3-AcCP) in the presence of acetyl coenzyme A, after which 3-AcCP was converted nonenzymatically to its 1-O-acetyl isomer, 1-O-acetyl CP (1-AcCP). At equilibrium, the 1-AcCP and 3-AcCP were present in a 1:4 ratio. Subsequently the diacetylated product, 1,3-O-O-diacetyl CP [1,3-(Ac)2CP], was enzymatically produced from 1-AcCP by the same enzyme. Theoretical calculation of rate constants (k1, k2, k3) for each successive reaction is as follows: (Formula: see text). This calculation gave k1 = 0.4 min-1, k2 = 0.002 min-1, and k3 = 0.016 min-1. Experimental results agreed closely with these calculated values. Images PMID:119483

  8. Improved characterisation of exoplanets discovered in wide-field surveys: HAT-P-29b and HAT-P-31b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocchetto, M.; Fossey, S.

    2013-09-01

    In recent years a large population of exoplanets has been discovered thanks to ground-based surveys such as WASP and HATnet. These are typically relatively big planets in close orbits to their parent star that produce transit light curves with depths of up to a few percent which can be well observed using relatively smal-aperture ground-based telescopes. Due to the large number of planets discovered, systematic followup of most of these targets is often lacking. Moreover, in some discovery papers the characterisation of the planet is made with partial-transit follow-up light curves or relies entirely on the wide-field survey photometry, leading to relatively large uncertainties in the derived planetary parameters. We present followup photometry for two such cases, HAT-P-29b and HAT-P-31b, obtained with a 35-cm telescope based at UCL's University of London Observatory between 2011 and 2012. We find that our light curves are able to provide more accurate and/or precise parameters than those published. Follow-up observations are also important to monitor effects such as transit timing variations (TTVs), which can provide evidence for the presence of other planets in the system, and we explore the current limits on TTV detections for the two planets discussed here. The use of small-aperture telescopes provides an efficient and cost-effective way to improve the characterisation of known exoplanets, leading to an improvement in the statistical properties of these samples; and might also lead to the discovery of new exoplanets through TTV monitoring.

  9. Maintenance of Glucose Homeostasis through Acetylation of the Metabolic Transcriptional Coactivator PGC1-alpha

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    highlight that PGC-1α chemical acetylation is directly controlled by two enzymes: GCN5 and SIRT1 ; this strengths the possibility to use small...acetylated through GCN5 acetyltransferase activity, however under low nutrient conditions Sirt1 deacetylase will keep PGC-1α de-acetylated in an active form...acetylated by GCN5, we decided to use R13 because it did not respond to low glucose levels or Sirt1 activators. We think that the additional acetylation

  10. Histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity of p300 modulates human T lymphotropic virus type 1 p30{sup II}-mediated repression of LTR transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Bindhu; Nair, Amrithraj M.; Datta, Antara; Hiraragi, Hajime; Ratner, Lee; Lairmore, Michael D. . E-mail: lairmore.1@osu.edu

    2006-10-25

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is a deltaretrovirus that causes adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma, and is implicated in a variety of lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory disorders. HTLV-1 provirus has regulatory and accessory genes in four pX open reading frames. HTLV-1 pX ORF-II encodes two proteins, p13{sup II} and p30{sup II}, which are incompletely defined in virus replication or pathogenesis. We have demonstrated that pX ORF-II mutations block virus replication in vivo and that ORF-II encoded p30{sup II}, a nuclear-localizing protein that binds with CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300, represses CREB and Tax responsive element (TRE)-mediated transcription. Herein, we have identified p30{sup II} motifs important for p300 binding and in regulating TRE-mediated transcription in the absence and presence of HTLV-1 provirus. Within amino acids 100-179 of p30{sup II}, a region important for repression of LTR-mediated transcription, we identified a single lysine residue at amino acid 106 (K3) that significantly modulates the ability of p30{sup II} to repress TRE-mediated transcription. Exogenous p300, in a dose-responsive manner, reverses p30{sup II}-dependent repression of TRE-mediated transcription, in the absence or presence of the provirus, In contrast to wild type p300, p300 HAT mutants (defective in histone acetyltransferase activity) only partially rescued p30{sup II}-mediated LTR repression. Deacetylation by histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC-1) enhanced p30{sup II}-mediated LTR repression, while inhibition of deacetylation by trichostatin A decreases p30{sup II}-mediated LTR repression. Collectively, our data indicate that HTLV-1 p30{sup II} modulates viral gene expression in a cooperative manner with p300-mediated acetylation.

  11. Glutathione S-transferase class {pi} polymorphism in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Aivaliotis, M.J.; Cantu, T.; Gilligan, R.

    1995-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) comprises a family of isozymes with broad substrate specificities. One or more GST isozymes are present in most animal tissues and function in several detoxification pathways through the conjugation of reduced glutathione with various electrophiles, thereby reducing their potential toxicity. Four soluble GST isozymes encoded by genes on different chromosomes have been identified in humans. The acidic class pi GST, GSTP (previously designated GST-3), is widely distributed in adult tissues and appears to be the only GST isozyme present in leukocytes and placenta. Previously reported electrophoretic analyses of erythrocyte and leukocyte extracts revealed single bands of activity, which differed slightly in mobility between the two cell types, or under other conditions, a two-banded pattern. To our knowledge, no genetically determined polymorphisms have previously been reported in GSTP from any species. We now report a polymorphism of GSTP in baboon leukocytes, and present family data that verifies autosomal codominant inheritance. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions: Part 2. Transferases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Robert N.; Tewari, Yadu B.

    1994-07-01

    Equilibrium constants and enthalpy changes for reactions catalyzed by the transferase class of enzymes have been compiled. For each reaction the following information is given: the reference for the data; the reaction studied; the name of the enzyme used and its Enzyme Commission number; the method of measurement; the conditions of measurement [temperature, pH, ionic strength, and the buffer(s) and cofactor(s) used]; the data and an evaluation of it; and, sometimes, commentary on the data and on any corrections which have been applied to it or any calculations for which the data have been used. The data from 285 references have been examined and evaluated. Chemical Abstract Service registry numbers are given for the substances involved in these various reactions. There is a cross reference between the substances and the Enzyme Commission numbers of the enzymes used to catalyze the reactions in which the substances participate.

  13. Smad4 mediated BMP2 signal is essential for the regulation of GATA4 and Nkx2.5 by affecting the histone H3 acetylation in H9c2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Si, Lina; Shi, Jin; Gao, Wenqun; Zheng, Min; Liu, Lingjuan; Zhu, Jing; Tian, Jie

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • BMP2 can upregulated cardiac related gene GATA4, Nkx2.5, MEF2c and Tbx5. • Inhibition of Smad4 decreased BMP2-induced hyperacetylation of histone H3. • Inhibition of Smad4 diminished BMP2-induced overexpression of GATA4 and Nkx2.5. • Inhibition of Smad4 decreased hyperacetylated H3 in the promoter of GATA4 and Nkx2.5. • Smad4 is essential for BMP2 induced hyperacetylated histone H3. - Abstract: BMP2 signaling pathway plays critical roles during heart development, Smad4 encodes the only common Smad protein in mammals, which is a pivotal nuclear mediator. Our previous studies showed that BMP2 enhanced the expression of cardiac transcription factors in part by increasing histone H3 acetylation. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that Smad4 mediated BMP2 signaling pathway is essential for the expression of cardiac core transcription factors by affecting the histone H3 acetylation. We successfully constructed a lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA interference vector targeting Smad4 (Lv-Smad4) in rat H9c2 embryonic cardiac myocytes (H9c2 cells) and demonstrated that it suppressed the expression of the Smad4 gene. Cultured H9c2 cells were transfected with recombinant adenoviruses expressing human BMP2 (AdBMP2) with or without Lv-Smad4. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that knocking down of Smad4 substantially inhibited both AdBMP2-induced and basal expression levels of cardiac transcription factors GATA4 and Nkx2.5, but not MEF2c and Tbx5. Similarly, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis showed that knocking down of Smad4 inhibited both AdBMP2-induced and basal histone H3 acetylation levels in the promoter regions of GATA4 and Nkx2.5, but not of Tbx5 and MEF2c. In addition, Lv-Smad4 selectively suppressed AdBMP2-induced expression of HAT p300, but not of HAT GCN5 in H9c2 cells. The data indicated that inhibition of Smad4 diminished both AdBMP2 induced and basal histone acetylation levels in the promoter regions of

  14. Smad4 mediated BMP2 signal is essential for the regulation of GATA4 and Nkx2.5 by affecting the histone H3 acetylation in H9c2 cells.

    PubMed

    Si, Lina; Shi, Jin; Gao, Wenqun; Zheng, Min; Liu, Lingjuan; Zhu, Jing; Tian, Jie

    2014-07-18

    BMP2 signaling pathway plays critical roles during heart development, Smad4 encodes the only common Smad protein in mammals, which is a pivotal nuclear mediator. Our previous studies showed that BMP2 enhanced the expression of cardiac transcription factors in part by increasing histone H3 acetylation. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that Smad4 mediated BMP2 signaling pathway is essential for the expression of cardiac core transcription factors by affecting the histone H3 acetylation. We successfully constructed a lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA interference vector targeting Smad4 (Lv-Smad4) in rat H9c2 embryonic cardiac myocytes (H9c2 cells) and demonstrated that it suppressed the expression of the Smad4 gene. Cultured H9c2 cells were transfected with recombinant adenoviruses expressing human BMP2 (AdBMP2) with or without Lv-Smad4. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that knocking down of Smad4 substantially inhibited both AdBMP2-induced and basal expression levels of cardiac transcription factors GATA4 and Nkx2.5, but not MEF2c and Tbx5. Similarly, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis showed that knocking down of Smad4 inhibited both AdBMP2-induced and basal histone H3 acetylation levels in the promoter regions of GATA4 and Nkx2.5, but not of Tbx5 and MEF2c. In addition, Lv-Smad4 selectively suppressed AdBMP2-induced expression of HAT p300, but not of HAT GCN5 in H9c2 cells. The data indicated that inhibition of Smad4 diminished both AdBMP2 induced and basal histone acetylation levels in the promoter regions of GATA4 and Nkx2.5, suggesting that Smad4 mediated BMP2 signaling pathway was essential for the regulation of GATA4 and Nkx2.5 by affecting the histone H3 acetylation in H9c2 cells.

  15. ORBITAL PHASE VARIATIONS OF THE ECCENTRIC GIANT PLANET HAT-P-2b

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Nikole K.; Showman, Adam P.; Knutson, Heather A.; Desert, Jean-Michel; Kao, Melodie; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Laughlin, Gregory; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Burrows, Adam; Bakos, Gaspar A.; Hartman, Joel D.; Deming, Drake; Crepp, Justin R.; Mighell, Kenneth J.; Agol, Eric; Charbonneau, David; Fischer, Debra A.; Hinkley, Sasha; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W.; and others

    2013-04-01

    We present the first secondary eclipse and phase curve observations for the highly eccentric hot Jupiter HAT-P-2b in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m bands of the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m data sets span an entire orbital period of HAT-P-2b (P = 5.6334729 d), making them the longest continuous phase curve observations obtained to date and the first full-orbit observations of a planet with an eccentricity exceeding 0.2. We present an improved non-parametric method for removing the intrapixel sensitivity variations in Spitzer data at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m that robustly maps position-dependent flux variations. We find that the peak in planetary flux occurs at 4.39 {+-} 0.28, 5.84 {+-} 0.39, and 4.68 {+-} 0.37 hr after periapse passage with corresponding maxima in the planet/star flux ratio of 0.1138% {+-} 0.0089%, 0.1162% {+-} 0.0080%, and 0.1888% {+-} 0.0072% in the 3.6, 4.5, and 8.0 {mu}m bands, respectively. Our measured secondary eclipse depths of 0.0996% {+-} 0.0072%, 0.1031% {+-} 0.0061%, 0.071%{sub -0.013%}{sup +0.029,} and 0.1392% {+-} 0.0095% in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m bands, respectively, indicate that the planet cools significantly from its peak temperature before we measure the dayside flux during secondary eclipse. We compare our measured secondary eclipse depths to the predictions from a one-dimensional radiative transfer model, which suggests the possible presence of a transient day side inversion in HAT-P-2b's atmosphere near periapse. We also derive improved estimates for the system parameters, including its mass, radius, and orbital ephemeris. Our simultaneous fit to the transit, secondary eclipse, and radial velocity data allows us to determine the eccentricity (e = 0.50910 {+-} 0.00048) and argument of periapse ({omega} = 188. Degree-Sign 09 {+-} 0. Degree-Sign 39) of HAT-P-2b's orbit with a greater precision than has been achieved for any other eccentric extrasolar planet. We also find evidence for a long-term linear

  16. Orbital Phase Variations of the Eccentric Giant Planet HAT-P-2b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nikole K.; Knutson, Heather A.; Showman, Adam P.; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Laughlin, Gregory; Burrows, Adam; Deming, Drake; Crepp, Justin R.; Mighell, Kenneth J.; Agol, Eric; Bakos, Gáspár Á.; Charbonneau, David; Désert, Jean-Michel; Fischer, Debra A.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Hartman, Joel D.; Hinkley, Sasha; Howard, Andrew W.; Johnson, John Asher; Kao, Melodie; Langton, Jonathan; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    2013-04-01

    We present the first secondary eclipse and phase curve observations for the highly eccentric hot Jupiter HAT-P-2b in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm bands of the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 3.6 and 4.5 μm data sets span an entire orbital period of HAT-P-2b (P = 5.6334729 d), making them the longest continuous phase curve observations obtained to date and the first full-orbit observations of a planet with an eccentricity exceeding 0.2. We present an improved non-parametric method for removing the intrapixel sensitivity variations in Spitzer data at 3.6 and 4.5 μm that robustly maps position-dependent flux variations. We find that the peak in planetary flux occurs at 4.39 ± 0.28, 5.84 ± 0.39, and 4.68 ± 0.37 hr after periapse passage with corresponding maxima in the planet/star flux ratio of 0.1138% ± 0.0089%, 0.1162% ± 0.0080%, and 0.1888% ± 0.0072% in the 3.6, 4.5, and 8.0 μm bands, respectively. Our measured secondary eclipse depths of 0.0996% ± 0.0072%, 0.1031% ± 0.0061%, 0.071%^{+0.029%}_{-0.013%}, and 0.1392% ± 0.0095% in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm bands, respectively, indicate that the planet cools significantly from its peak temperature before we measure the dayside flux during secondary eclipse. We compare our measured secondary eclipse depths to the predictions from a one-dimensional radiative transfer model, which suggests the possible presence of a transient day side inversion in HAT-P-2b's atmosphere near periapse. We also derive improved estimates for the system parameters, including its mass, radius, and orbital ephemeris. Our simultaneous fit to the transit, secondary eclipse, and radial velocity data allows us to determine the eccentricity (e = 0.50910 ± 0.00048) and argument of periapse (ω = 188.°09 ± 0.°39) of HAT-P-2b's orbit with a greater precision than has been achieved for any other eccentric extrasolar planet. We also find evidence for a long-term linear trend in the radial velocity data. This trend suggests the presence

  17. Modification of oil palm wood using acetylation and impregnation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subagiyo, Lambang; Rosamah, Enih; Hesim

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is chemical modification by process of acetylation and impregnation of oil palm wood to improve the dimensional stability. Acetylation process aimed at substituting the hydroxyl groups in a timber with an acetyl group. By increasing the acetyl groups in wood is expected to reduce the ability of wood to absorb water vapor which lead to the dimensions of the wood becomes more stable. Studies conducted on oil palm wood (Elaeis guineensis Jacq) by acetylation and impregnation method. The results showed that acetylated and impregnated wood oil palm (E. guineensis Jacq) were changed in their physical properties. Impregnation with coal ashfly provide the greatest response to changes in weight (in wet conditions) and after conditioning (dry) with the average percentage of weight gain of 198.16% and 66.41% respectively. Changes in volume indicates an increase of volume in the wet condition (imbibition) with the coal ashfly treatment gave highest value of 23.04 %, whereas after conditioning (dry) the highest value obtained in the treatment of gum rosin:ethanol with a volume increase of 13:44%. The highest changes of the density with the coal ashfly impregnation in wet condition (imbibition) in value of 142.32% and after conditioning (dry) of 57.87%. The result of reduction in water absorption (RWA) test showed that in the palm oil wood samples most stable by using of gum rosin : ethanol of 0.97%, whereas the increase in oil palm wood dimensional stability (ASE) is the best of 59.42% after acetylation with Acetic Anhydride: Xylene.

  18. HATS-2b: A transiting extrasolar planet orbiting a K-type star showing starspot activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohler-Fischer, M.; Mancini, L.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Bayliss, D.; Jordán, A.; Csubry, Z.; Zhou, G.; Rabus, M.; Nikolov, N.; Brahm, R.; Espinoza, N.; Buchhave, L. A.; Béky, B.; Suc, V.; Csák, B.; Henning, T.; Wright, D. J.; Tinney, C. G.; Addison, B. C.; Schmidt, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Papp, I.; Lázár, J.; Sári, P.; Conroy, P.

    2013-10-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-2b, the second transiting extrasolar planet detected by the HATSouth survey. HATS-2b is moving on a circular orbit around a V = 13.6 mag, K-type dwarf star (GSC 6665-00236), at a separation of 0.0230 ± 0.0003 AU and with a period of 1.3541 days. The planetary parameters have been robustly determined using a simultaneous fit of the HATSouth, MPG/ESO 2.2 m/GROND, Faulkes Telescope South/Spectral transit photometry, and MPG/ESO 2.2 m/FEROS, Euler 1.2 m/CORALIE, AAT 3.9 m/CYCLOPS radial-velocity measurements. HATS-2b has a mass of 1.37 ± 0.16 MJ, a radius of 1.14 ± 0.03 RJ, and an equilibrium temperature of 1567 ± 30 K. The host star has a mass of 0.88 ± 0.04 M⊙ and a radius of 0.89 ± 0.02 R⊙, and it shows starspot activity. We characterized the stellar activity by analyzing two photometric follow-up transit light curves taken with the GROND instrument, both obtained simultaneously in four optical bands (covering the wavelength range of 3860-9520 Å). The two light curves contain anomalies compatible with starspots on the photosphere of the host star along the same transit chord. Tables of the individual photometric measurements are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/558/A55

  19. HATS-1b: The First Transiting Planet Discovered by the HATSouth Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penev, K.; Bakos, G. Á.; Bayliss, D.; Jordán, A.; Mohler, M.; Zhou, G.; Suc, V.; Rabus, M.; Hartman, J. D.; Mancini, L.; Béky, B.; Csubry, Z.; Buchhave, L.; Henning, T.; Nikolov, N.; Csák, B.; Brahm, R.; Espinoza, N.; Conroy, P.; Noyes, R. W.; Sasselov, D. D.; Schmidt, B.; Wright, D. J.; Tinney, C. G.; Addison, B. C.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-1b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting the moderately bright V = 12.05 G dwarf star GSC 6652-00186, and the first planet discovered by HATSouth, a global network of autonomous wide-field telescopes. HATS-1b has a period of P ≈ 3.4465 days, mass of Mp ≈ 1.86 M J, and radius of Rp ≈ 1.30 R J. The host star has a mass of 0.99 M ⊙ and radius of 1.04 R ⊙. The discovery light curve of HATS-1b has near-continuous coverage over several multi-day timespans, demonstrating the power of using a global network of telescopes to discover transiting planets. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), and the Australian National University (ANU). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute, is operated by PU in conjunction with collaborators at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC), the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (HESS) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. Based in part on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. Based on observations made with the MPG/ESO 2.2 m Telescope at the ESO Observatory in La Silla. FEROS ID programmes: P087.A-9014(A), P088.A-9008(A), P089.A-9008(A), P087.C-0508(A). GROND ID programme: 089.A-9006(A). This paper uses observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope.

  20. HATS-18b: An Extreme Short-period Massive Transiting Planet Spinning Up Its Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penev, K.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Ciceri, S.; Brahm, R.; Bayliss, D.; Bento, J.; Jordán, A.; Csubry, Z.; Bhatti, W.; de Val-Borro, M.; Espinoza, N.; Zhou, G.; Mancini, L.; Rabus, M.; Suc, V.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2016-11-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth network of HATS-18b: a 1.980+/- 0.077 {M}{{J}}, {1.337}-0.049+0.102 {R}{{J}} planet in a 0.8378 day orbit, around a solar analog star (mass 1.037+/- 0.047 {M}⊙ and radius {1.020}-0.031+0.057 {R}⊙ ) with V=14.067+/- 0.040 mag. The high planet mass, combined with its short orbital period, implies strong tidal coupling between the planetary orbit and the star. In fact, given its inferred age, HATS-18 shows evidence of significant tidal spin up, which together with WASP-19 (a very similar system) allows us to constrain the tidal quality factor for Sun-like stars to be in the range of 6.5≲ {{log}}10({Q}* /{k}2)≲ 7 even after allowing for extremely pessimistic model uncertainties. In addition, the HATS-18 system is among the best systems (and often the best system) for testing a multitude of star-planet interactions, be they gravitational, magnetic, or radiative, as well as planet formation and migration theories. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. This paper includes data gathered with the MPG 2.2 m telescope at the ESO Observatory in La Silla. This paper uses observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope.

  1. Refined System Parameters and TTV Study of Transiting Exoplanetary System HAT-P-20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Leilei; Gu, Shenghong; Wang, Xiaobin; Collier Cameron, Andrew; Cao, Dongtao; Wang, Yibo; Xiang, Yue; Hui, Ho-Keung; Kwok, Chi-Tai; Yeung, Bill; Ng, Eric; Grau Horta, Ferran

    2017-01-01

    We report new photometric observations of the transiting exoplanetary system HAT-P-20, obtained using CCD cameras at Yunnan Observatories and Ho Koon Nature Education cum Astronomical Centre, China, from 2010 to 2013, and Observatori Ca l’Ou, Sant Marti Sesgueioles, Spain, from 2013 to 2015. The observed data are corrected for systematic errors according to the coarse de-correlation and SYSREM algorithms, so as to enhance the signal of the transit events. In order to consistently model the star spots and transits of this exoplanetary system, we develop a highly efficient tool STMT based on the analytic models of Mandel & Agol and Montalto et al. The physical parameters of HAT-P-20 are refined by homogeneously analyzing our new data, the radial velocity data, and the earlier photometric data in the literature with the Markov chain Monte Carlo technique. New radii and masses of both host star and planet are larger than those in the discovery paper due to the discrepancy of the radius among K-dwarfs between predicted values by standard stellar models and empirical calibration from observations. Through the analysis of all available mid-transit times calculated with the normal model and spotted model, we conclude that the periodic transit timing variations in these transit events revealed by employing the normal model are probably induced by spot crossing events. From the analysis of the distribution of occulted spots by HAT-P-20b, we constrain the misaligned architecture between the planetary orbit and the spin of the host star.

  2. [The management of aortic root replacement using the Top-Hat/Gelweave composite graft].

    PubMed

    Imada, T; Morishige, N; Nonaka, K; Yamanaka, J

    2000-06-01

    Composite graft replacement of the aortic root has become a routine procedure for annuloaortic ectasia (AAE) and aortic valve insufficiency (AR) with aortic dissection and the results have improved. We treated six cases of aortic root reconstruction using the Carrel patch method in 1998. The Top-Hat/Gelweave Composite graft fit together well and the procedure is technically similar to standard valve replacement. Upon measuring the valve size a Gelweave graft 1 mm larger than the valve size should be selected. There were no incidence of hemorrhage or postoperative hemolysis. Further long-term follow-up is necessary.

  3. Multi-jet Cross Sections at NLO with BlackHat and Sherpa

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.F.; Bern, Z.; Dixon, L.J.; Cordero, F.Febres; Forde, D.; Gleisberg, T.; Ita, H.; Kosower, D.A.; Maitre, D.

    2009-05-20

    In this talk, we report on a recent next-to-leading order QCD calculation of the production of a W boson in association with three jets at hadron colliders. The computation is performed by combining two programs, BlackHat for the computation of the virtual one-loop matrix elements and Sherpa for the real emission part. The addition of NLO corrections greatly reduces the factorization and renormalization scale dependence of the theory prediction for this process. This result demonstrates the applicability of unitarity-based methods for hadron collider physics.

  4. Epigenetic Modulation using Small Molecules - Targeting Histone Acetyltransferases in Disease.

    PubMed

    Richters, André; Koehler, Angela N

    2017-02-23

    Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) are epigenetic drivers that catalyze the acetyl transfer from acetyl-CoA to lysines of both histone and non-histone substrates and thereby induce transcription either by chromatin remodeling or direct transcription factor activation. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) conduct the reverse reaction to counter HAT activity. Physiological processes such as cell cycle progression or apoptosis require a thoroughly balanced equilibrium of the interplay between acetylation and deacetylation processes to maintain or, if required, alter the global acetylome status. Aberrant HAT activity has recently been demonstrated to play a crucial role in the progression of various diseases such as prostate, lung, and colon cancers as well as glioblastomas and neurodegenerative diseases. Recent investigations have aimed for the identification of HAT modulators to further decipher the complexity of acetyl transferase related signaling cascades and discover potential leads for drug design approaches. HDACs have been extensively characterized and targeted by small molecules, including four FDA-approved HDAC inhibitors; in contrast, HATs have not been active targets for therapeutic development. This review will summarize the status of HAT associated diseases and the arsenal of currently known and available HAT inhibitors with respect to their discovery, further improvements, and current applications.

  5. Degradation of aromatics and chloroaromatics by Pseudomonas sp. strain B13: purification and characterization of 3-oxoadipate:succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA) transferase and 3-oxoadipyl-CoA thiolase.

    PubMed

    Kaschabek, Stefan R; Kuhn, Bernd; Müller, Dagmar; Schmidt, Eberhard; Reineke, Walter

    2002-01-01

    The degradation of 3-oxoadipate in Pseudomonas sp. strain B13 was investigated and was shown to proceed through 3-oxoadipyl-coenzyme A (CoA) to give acetyl-CoA and succinyl-CoA. 3-Oxoadipate:succinyl-CoA transferase of strain B13 was purified by heat treatment and chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose, Mono-Q, and Superose 6 gels. Estimation of the native molecular mass gave a value of 115,000 +/- 5,000 Da with a Superose 12 column. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions resulted in two distinct bands of equal intensities. The subunit A and B values were 32,900 and 27,000 Da. Therefore it can be assumed that the enzyme is a heterotetramer of the type A2B2 with a molecular mass of 120,000 Da. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of both subunits are as follows: subunit A, AELLTLREAVERFVNDGTVALEGFTHLIPT; subunit B, SAYSTNEMMTVAAARRLKNGAVVFV. The pH optimum was 8.4. Km values were 0.4 and 0.2 mM for 3-oxoadipate and succinyl-CoA, respectively. Reversibility of the reaction with succinate was shown. The transferase of strain B13 failed to convert 2-chloro- and 2-methyl-3-oxoadipate. Some activity was observed with 4-methyl-3-oxoadipate. Even 2-oxoadipate and 3-oxoglutarate were shown to function as poor substrates of the transferase. 3-oxoadipyl-CoA thiolase was purified by chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose, blue 3GA, and reactive brown-agarose. Estimation of the native molecular mass gave 162,000 +/- 5,000 Da with a Superose 6 column. The molecular mass of the subunit of the denatured protein, as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was 42 kDa. On the basis of these results, 3-oxoadipyl-CoA thiolase should be a tetramer of the type A4. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of 3-oxoadipyl-CoA thiolase was determined to be SREVYI-DAVRTPIGRFG. The pH optimum was 7.8. Km values were 0.15 and 0.01 mM for 3-oxoadipyl-CoA and CoA, respectively. Sequence analysis of the thiolase terminus revealed high percentages of identity

  6. Targeting O-Acetyl-GD2 Ganglioside for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fleurence, Julien; Fougeray, Sophie; Bahri, Meriem; Cochonneau, Denis; Clémenceau, Béatrice; Paris, François; Heczey, Andras; Birklé, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    Target selection is a key feature in cancer immunotherapy, a promising field in cancer research. In this respect, gangliosides, a broad family of structurally related glycolipids, were suggested as potential targets for cancer immunotherapy based on their higher abundance in tumors when compared with the matched normal tissues. GD2 is the first ganglioside proven to be an effective target antigen for cancer immunotherapy with the regulatory approval of dinutuximab, a chimeric anti-GD2 therapeutic antibody. Although the therapeutic efficacy of anti-GD2 monoclonal antibodies is well documented, neuropathic pain may limit its application. O-Acetyl-GD2, the O-acetylated-derivative of GD2, has recently received attention as novel antigen to target GD2-positive cancers. The present paper examines the role of O-acetyl-GD2 in tumor biology as well as the available preclinical data of anti-O-acetyl-GD2 monoclonal antibodies. A discussion on the relevance of O-acetyl-GD2 in chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy development is also included.

  7. Targeting O-Acetyl-GD2 Ganglioside for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fleurence, Julien; Fougeray, Sophie; Bahri, Meriem; Cochonneau, Denis; Clémenceau, Béatrice; Paris, François; Heczey, Andras

    2017-01-01

    Target selection is a key feature in cancer immunotherapy, a promising field in cancer research. In this respect, gangliosides, a broad family of structurally related glycolipids, were suggested as potential targets for cancer immunotherapy based on their higher abundance in tumors when compared with the matched normal tissues. GD2 is the first ganglioside proven to be an effective target antigen for cancer immunotherapy with the regulatory approval of dinutuximab, a chimeric anti-GD2 therapeutic antibody. Although the therapeutic efficacy of anti-GD2 monoclonal antibodies is well documented, neuropathic pain may limit its application. O-Acetyl-GD2, the O-acetylated-derivative of GD2, has recently received attention as novel antigen to target GD2-positive cancers. The present paper examines the role of O-acetyl-GD2 in tumor biology as well as the available preclinical data of anti-O-acetyl-GD2 monoclonal antibodies. A discussion on the relevance of O-acetyl-GD2 in chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy development is also included. PMID:28154831

  8. N-Acetylation of Glucosamine-6-Phosphate in Leuconostoc mesenteroides

    PubMed Central

    DeMoss, R. D.; Moser, K.

    1969-01-01

    A partially purified enzyme (120-fold) from Leuconostoc mesenteroides catalyzed the reversible N-acetylation of d-glucosamine-6-phosphate. Coenzyme A was not required and inhibited the reaction rate. Neither d-glucosamine nor N-acetyl-d-glucosamine served as a substrate for the reversible reaction. The enzyme preparation retained 50% of its original activity after 5 min at 100 C. The Km for acetate was 7.7 × 10−2m in the presence of 2 × 10−2md-glucosamine-6-phosphate. The Km for d-glucosamine-6-phosphate was 5.0 × 10−3m in the presence of 0.64 m acetate. The product of the reaction was characterized by comparison with N-acetyl-d-glucosamine-6-phosphate prepared by enzymatic phosphorylation of N-acetyl-d-glusamine. The characterization tests were: chromatographic migration, acid hydrolysis, enzymatic dephosphorylation, sodium borohydride reduction, and periodate oxidation. The equilibrium constant for the reaction was about 7.5 m for the expression K = (d-glucosamine-6-phosphate)(acetate)/N-acetyl-d-glucosamine-6-phosphate. The standard free energy of the reaction was approximately 1,200 cal per mole. PMID:5781575

  9. Enzymic synthesis of indole-3-acetyl-1-O-beta-d-glucose. I. Partial purification and characterization of the enzyme from Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leznicki, A. J.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    The first enzyme-catalyzed reaction leading from indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to the myo-inositol esters of IAA is the synthesis of indole-3-acetyl-1-O-beta-D-glucose from uridine-5'-diphosphoglucose (UDPG) and IAA. The reaction is catalyzed by the enzyme, UDPG-indol-3-ylacetyl glucosyl transferase (IAA-glucose-synthase). This work reports methods for the assay of the enzyme and for the extraction and partial purification of the enzyme from kernels of Zea mays sweet corn. The enzyme has an apparent molecular weight of 46,500 an isoelectric point of 5.5, and its pH optimum lies between 7.3 and 7.6. The enzyme is stable to storage at zero degrees but loses activity during column chromatographic procedures which can be restored only fractionally by addition of column eluates. The data suggest either multiple unknown cofactors or conformational changes leading to activity loss.

  10. 6-alkylsalicylates are selective Tip60 inhibitors and target the acetyl-CoA binding site

    PubMed Central

    Ghizzoni, Massimo; Wu, Jiang; Gao, Tielong; Haisma, Hidde J.; Dekker, Frank J.; Zheng, Y. George

    2011-01-01

    Histone acetyltransferases are important enzymes that regulate various cellular functions, such as epigenetic control of DNA transcription. Development of HAT inhibitors with high selectivity and potency will provide powerful mechanistic tools for the elucidation of the biological functions of HATs and may also have pharmacological value for potential new therapies. In this work, analogs of the known HAT inhibitor anacardic acid were synthesized and evaluated for inhibition of HAT activity. Biochemical assays revealed novel anacardic acid analogs that inhibited the human recombinant enzyme Tip60 selectively compared to PCAF and p300. Enzyme kinetics studies demonstrated that inhibition of Tip60 by one such novel anacardic acid derive, 20, was essentially competitive with Ac-CoA and noncompetitive with the histone substrate. In addition, these HAT inhibitors effectively inhibited acetyltransferase activity of nuclear extracts on the histone H3 and H4 at micromolar concentrations. PMID:22100137

  11. The Transit Light Curve Project. VII. The Not-So-Bloated Exoplanet HAT-P-1b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winn, Joshua N.; Holman, Matthew J.; Bakos, Gaspar Á.; Pál, András; Johnson, John Asher; Williams, Peter K. G.; Shporer, Avi; Mazeh, Tsevi; Fernandez, José; Latham, David W.; Gillon, Michael

    2007-10-01

    We present photometry of the G0 star HAT-P-1 during six transits of its close-in giant planet, and we refine the estimates of the system parameters. Relative to Jupiter's properties, HAT-P-1b is 1.20 ± 0.05 times larger, and its surface gravity is 2.7 ± 0.2 times weaker. Although it remains the case that HAT-P-1b is among the least dense of the known sample of transiting exoplanets, its properties are in accord with previously published models of strongly irradiated, coreless, solar-composition giant planets. The times of the transits have a typical accuracy of 1 minute and do not depart significantly from a constant period.

  12. Radiologic characterization of the Mexican Hat, Utah, uranium mill tailings remedial action site: Appendix D, Addenda D1--D7

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlam, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    This radiologic characterization of the inactive uranium millsite at Mexican Hat, Utah, was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation foe the US Department of Energy (DOE), Grand Junction Project Office, in response to and in accord with a Statement of Work prepared by the DOE Uranium Mill tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Technical Assistance Contractor, Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc. the objective of this project was to determine the horizontal and vertical extent of contamination that exceeds the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards at the Mexican Hat site. The data presented in this report are required for characterization of the areas adjacent to the Mexican Hat tailings piles and for the subsequent design of cleanup activities. Some on-pile sampling was required to determine the depth of the 15-pCi/g Ra-226 interface in an area where wind and water erosion has taken place.

  13. Characterization of new hAT transposable elements in 12 Drosophila genomes.

    PubMed

    de Freitas Ortiz, Mauro; Loreto, Elgion Lucio Silva

    2009-01-01

    In silico searches for sequences homologous to hAT elements in 12 Drosophila genomes have allowed us to identify 37 new hAT elements (8 in D. ananassae, 11 in D. mojavensis, 2 in D. sechellia, 1 in D. simulans, 2 in D. virilis, 3 in D. yakuba, 3 in D. persimilis, 1 in D. grimshawi, 5 in D. willistoni and 1 in D. pseudobscura). The size of these elements varies from 2,359 to 4,962 bp and the terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) show lengths ranging from 10 to 24 bp. Several elements show intact transposase ORFs, suggesting that they are active. Conserved amino acid motifs were identified that correspond to those important for transposase activity. These elements are highly variable and phylogenetic analysis showed that they can be clustered into four different families. Incongruencies were observed between the phylogenies of the transposable elements and those of their hosts, suggesting that horizontal transfer may have occurred between some of the species.

  14. Synthesis of isothiazol-3-one derivatives as inhibitors of histone acetyltransferases (HATs).

    PubMed

    Gorsuch, Stephen; Bavetsias, Vassilios; Rowlands, Martin G; Aherne, G Wynne; Workman, Paul; Jarman, Michael; McDonald, Edward

    2009-01-15

    High-throughput screening led to the identification of isothiazolones 1 and 2 as inhibitors of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) with IC50s of 3 microM and 5 microM, respectively. Analogues of these hit compounds with variations of the N-phenyl group, and with variety of substituents at C-4, C-5 of the thiazolone ring, were prepared and assayed for inhibition of the HAT enzyme PCAF. Potency is modestly favoured when the N-aryl group is electron deficient (4-pyridyl derivative 10 has IC(50)=1.5 microM); alkyl substitution at C-4 has little effect, whilst similar substitution at C-5 causes a significant drop in potency. The ring-fused compound 38 has activity (IC(50)=6.1 microM) to encourage further exploration of this bicyclic structure. The foregoing SAR is consistent with an inhibitory mechanism involving cleavage of the S-N bond of the isothiazolone ring by a catalytically important thiol residue.

  15. The nature of the Napoleon's Hat nebula of SN 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Dyson, J. E.; Kahn, F. D.

    1993-03-01

    The interstellar and circumstellar environment of SN 1987A is modeled. The geometries of Napoleon's Hat nebula and the dark bay suggest that there is relative motion between the SN progenitor and the surrounding ISM. Most of the dark bay can be identified with the bubble produced by the fast blue supergiant (BSG) wind before the red supergiant (RSG) stage. The relative motion between the star and the ISM is the primary reason for the star being at the edge of this bubble. After the first BSG stage, the star evolves to the RSG stage; the wind velocity is now typically 10 km/s and the mass loss rate is around 10 exp -5 solar mass/yr. The star eventually breaks through the bubble produced in the early BSG stage and starts to interact directly with the ISM outside, thus producing Napoleon's Hat. The success of this model is convincing proof of the BSG-RSG-BSG evolutionary model for the SN 1987A progenitors, and shows that is has moved from the site where it was formed.

  16. The 'chef's hat' appearance of the femoral head in cleidocranial dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Aktas, S; Wheeler, D; Sussman, M D

    2000-04-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is inherited as an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by failure of membranous ossification. The condition is due to a mutation of the cbfa1 gene on chromosome 6 which has a role in the development of osteoblasts from the mesenchymal cells. In their growing years, these patients have an unusual shape of the femoral head reminiscent of a 'chef's hat'. In order to confirm the consistency of this sign, we have reviewed the radiographs of 28 patients with CCD. All except three had this appearance. The sign was also seen in patients with coxa vara associated with a variety of other conditions. The chef's hat sign may occur secondary to the particular mechanical environment created by coxa vara as well as abnormal cellular function in patients with CCD. Although coxa vara has some influence on the shape of the femoral head, it is not entirely responsible for its morphology since it was present in only six of the 28 patients with CCD.

  17. Analytical and experimental study of structurally efficient composite hat-stiffened panels loaded in axial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Mikulas, M. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Structural efficiency studies were made to determine the weight-saving potential of graphite/epoxy composite structures for compression panel applications. Minimum-weight hat-stiffened and open-corrugation configurations were synthesized using a nonlinear mathematical programing technique. Selected configurations were built and tested to study local and Euler buckling characteristics. Test results for 23 panels critical in local buckling and six panels critical in Euler buckling are compared with analytical results obtained using the BUCLASP-2 branched plate buckling program. A weight efficiency comparison is made between composite and aluminum compression panels using metal test data generated by the NACA. Theoretical studies indicate that potential weight savings of up to 50% are possible for composite hat-stiffened panels when compared with similar aluminum designs. Weight savings of 32% to 42% were experimentally achieved. Experience to date suggests that most of the theoretical weight-saving potential is available if design deficiencies are eliminated and strict fabrication control is exercised.

  18. Structural Performance of a Compressively Loaded Foam-Core Hat-Stiffened Textile Composite Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Dexter, Benson H.

    1996-01-01

    A structurally efficient hat-stiffened panel concept that utilizes a structural foam as a stiffener core material has been designed and developed for aircraft primary structural applications. This stiffener concept is fabricated from textile composite material forms with a resin transfer molding process. This foam-filled hat-stiffener concept is structurally more efficient than most other prismatically stiffened panel configurations in a load range that is typical for both fuselage and wing structures. The panel design is based on woven/stitched and braided graphite-fiber textile preforms, an epoxy resin system, and Rohacell foam core. The structural response of this panel design was evaluated for its buckling and postbuckling behavior with and without low-speed impact damage. The results from single-stiffener and multi-stiffener specimen tests suggest that this structural concept responds to loading as anticipated and has excellent damage tolerance characteristics compared to a similar panel design made from preimpregnated graphite-epoxy tape material.

  19. The refined physical properties of transiting exoplanetary system WASP-11/HAT-P-10

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiao-bin; Gu, Sheng-hong; Wang, Yi-bo; Cameron, Andrew Collier; Hui, Ho-Keung; Kwok, Chi-Tai; Yeung, Bill; Leung, Kam-Cheung

    2014-04-01

    The transiting exoplanetary system WASP-11/HAT-P-10 was observed using the CCD camera at Yunnan Observatories, China from 2008 to 2011, and four new transit light curves were obtained. Combined with published radial velocity measurements, the new transit light curves are analyzed along with available photometric data from the literature using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique, and the refined physical parameters of the system are derived, which are compatible with the results of two discovery groups, respectively. The planet mass is M{sub p} = 0.526 ± 0.019 M{sub J} , which is the same as West et al.'s value, and more accurately, the planet radius R{sub p} = 0.999{sub −0.018}{sup +0.029} R{sub J} is identical to the value of Bakos et al. The new result confirms that the planet orbit is circular. By collecting 19 available mid-transit epochs with higher precision, we make an orbital period analysis for WASP-11b/HAT-P-10b, and derive a new value for its orbital period, P = 3.72247669 days. Through an (O – C) study based on these mid-transit epochs, no obvious transit timing variation signal can be found for this system during 2008-2012.

  20. A Bayesian analysis of HAT-P-7b using the EXONEST algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placek, Ben; Knuth, Kevin H.

    2015-01-01

    The study of exoplanets (planets orbiting other stars) is revolutionizing the way we view our universe. High-precision photometric data provided by the Kepler Space Telescope (Kepler) enables not only the detection of such planets, but also their characterization. This presents a unique opportunity to apply Bayesian methods to better characterize the multitude of previously confirmed exoplanets. This paper focuses on applying the EXONEST algorithm to characterize the transiting short-period-hot-Jupiter, HAT-P-7b (also referred to as Kepler-2b). EXONEST evaluates a suite of exoplanet photometric models by applying Bayesian Model Selection, which is implemented with the MultiNest algorithm. These models take into account planetary effects, such as reflected light and thermal emissions, as well as the effect of the planetary motion on the host star, such as Doppler beaming, or boosting, of light from the reflex motion of the host star, and photometric variations due to the planet-induced ellipsoidal shape of the host star. By calculating model evidences, one can determine which model best describes the observed data, thus identifying which effects dominate the planetary system. Presented are parameter estimates and model evidences for HAT-P-7b.

  1. Is lightning a possible source of the radio emission on HAT-P-11b?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodosán, G.; Rimmer, P. B.; Helling, Ch.

    2016-09-01

    Lightning induced radio emission has been observed on Solar system planets. There have been many attempts to observe exoplanets in the radio wavelength, however, no unequivocal detection has been reported. Lecavelier des Etangs et al. carried out radio transit observations of the exoplanet HAT-P-11b, and suggested that a small part of the radio flux can be attributed to the planet. Here, we assume that this signal is real, and study if this radio emission could be caused by lightning with similar energetic properties like in the Solar system. We find that a lightning storm with 3.8 × 106 times larger flash densities than the Earth-storms with the largest lightning activity is needed to produce the observed signal from HAT-P-11b. The optical emission of such thunderstorm would be comparable to that of the host star. We show that HCN produced by lightning chemistry is observable 2-3 yr after the storm, which produces signatures in the L (3.0-4.0 μm) and N (7.5-14.5 μm) infrared bands. We conclude that it is unlikely that the observed radio signal was produced by lightning, however, future, combined radio and infrared observations may lead to lightning detection on planets outside the Solar system.

  2. Free radical scavenger properties of α-mangostin: thermodynamics and kinetics of HAT and RAF mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Ana; Galano, Annia; Vargas, Rubicelia

    2011-11-03

    Mangosteen is a tropical fruit that presents beneficial effects on human health since it is rich in anthocyanins and xanthones, which are considered bioactive compounds that have been described as good free radical scavengers. One of its most active compounds is α-mangostin. In this report, a theoretical study on the free radical scavenger capacity of α-mangostin and its monoanion is analyzed using the density functional theory approximation. Two well-known reaction mechanisms are investigated: the hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and the radical adduct formation (RAF). Two other mechanisms are also considered: sequential electron proton Transfer (SEPT) and proton coupled electron transfer (PCET). According to thermodynamics and kinetics, α-mangostin and its deprotonated form are good free radical scavenger through the HAT mechanism, with the anionic (deprotonated) form being more reactive than the neutral one. Their capacity to scavenge OOH free radical is similar to that of carotenes, higher than that of allicin, much higher than that of melatonin and N-acetylcysteine amide, and about 15 times lower than that of 2-propenesulfenic acid.

  3. FURTHER CONSTRAINTS ON THE OPTICAL TRANSMISSION SPECTRUM OF HAT-P-1b

    SciTech Connect

    Montalto, M.; Santos, N. C.; Martins, J. H. C.; Figueira, P.; Alonso, R.; Iro, N.; Desidera, S.

    2015-09-20

    We report on novel observations of HAT-P-1 aimed at constraining the optical transmission spectrum of the atmosphere of its transiting hot-Jupiter exoplanet. Ground-based differential spectrophotometry was performed over two transit windows using the DOLORES spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. Our measurements imply an average planet to star radius ratio equal to R{sub p}/R{sub *} = (0.1159 ± 0.0005). This result is consistent with the value obtained from recent near-infrared measurements of this object, but differs from previously reported optical measurements, being lower by around 4.4 exoplanet scale heights. Analyzing the data over five different spectral bins of ∼600 Å wide, we observed a single peaked spectrum (3.7 σ level) with a blue cutoff corresponding to the blue edge of the broad absorption wing of sodium and an increased absorption in the region in-between 6180 and 7400 Å. We also infer that the width of the broad absorption wings due to alkali metals is likely narrower than the one implied by solar abundance clear atmospheric models. We interpret the result as evidence that HAT-P-1b has a partially clear atmosphere at optical wavelengths with a more modest contribution from an optical absorber than previously reported.

  4. A Bayesian analysis of HAT-P-7b using the EXONEST algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Placek, Ben; Knuth, Kevin H.

    2015-01-13

    The study of exoplanets (planets orbiting other stars) is revolutionizing the way we view our universe. High-precision photometric data provided by the Kepler Space Telescope (Kepler) enables not only the detection of such planets, but also their characterization. This presents a unique opportunity to apply Bayesian methods to better characterize the multitude of previously confirmed exoplanets. This paper focuses on applying the EXONEST algorithm to characterize the transiting short-period-hot-Jupiter, HAT-P-7b (also referred to as Kepler-2b). EXONEST evaluates a suite of exoplanet photometric models by applying Bayesian Model Selection, which is implemented with the MultiNest algorithm. These models take into account planetary effects, such as reflected light and thermal emissions, as well as the effect of the planetary motion on the host star, such as Doppler beaming, or boosting, of light from the reflex motion of the host star, and photometric variations due to the planet-induced ellipsoidal shape of the host star. By calculating model evidences, one can determine which model best describes the observed data, thus identifying which effects dominate the planetary system. Presented are parameter estimates and model evidences for HAT-P-7b.

  5. HATS-3b: AN INFLATED HOT JUPITER TRANSITING AN F-TYPE STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Bayliss, D.; Zhou, G.; Schmidt, B.; Penev, K.; Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J. D.; Csubry, Z.; Jordán, A.; Suc, V.; Rabus, M.; Brahm, R.; Espinoza, N.; Mancini, L.; Mohler-Fischer, M.; Henning, T.; Nikolov, N.; Csák, B.; Béky, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Buchhave, L.; and others

    2013-11-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth survey of HATS-3b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting a V = 12.4 F dwarf star. HATS-3b has a period of P = 3.5479 days, mass of M{sub p} = 1.07 M {sub J}, and radius of R{sub p} = 1.38 R {sub J}. Given the radius of the planet, the brightness of the host star, and the stellar rotational velocity (vsin i = 9.0 km s{sup –1}), this system will make an interesting target for future observations to measure the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and determine its spin-orbit alignment. We detail the low-/medium-resolution reconnaissance spectroscopy that we are now using to deal with large numbers of transiting planet candidates produced by the HATSouth survey. We show that this important step in discovering planets produces log g and T {sub eff} parameters at a precision suitable for efficient candidate vetting, as well as efficiently identifying stellar mass eclipsing binaries with radial velocity semi-amplitudes as low as 1 km s{sup –1}.

  6. An investigation of higher-order effects in modeling exoplanet HAT-P-7b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, Susan Anne

    In its search for Earth-like planets, NASA's Kepler mission observed over 200,000 stars. Among these systems were the class of planets known as the "hot Jupiters." These are giant gaseous planets with periods less than 10 days. Here I present an analysis of the Kepler observations of the exoplanet HAT-P-7b, a hot Jupiter with an orbital period of 2.2 days, a mass of 1.8 MJ, and a radius of 1.5 RJ. Due to its very close proximity to its host star, the planet has a day-side temperature of 2800 K and a night-side temperature of 1950 K. The tight orbit also causes planetary reflection, as well as higher-order effects in the system such as ellipsoidal variations, Doppler beaming, and gravity darkening. My thesis explores these effects on the Kepler HAT-P-7 light curve using the state of the art Eclipsing Light Curve (ELC) code. The "short cadence" data from Kepler contain 2 million measurements, which I phase folded and binned to get robust uncertainties, resulting in a final data set with 2,704 points. Because of the exquisitely high precision of the data (few ppm level), the physical effects mentioned above need to be accounted for. Including these effects enables me to accurately solve for the system parameters.

  7. Transmission Spectroscopy of HAT-P-32Ab with GTC/OSIRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nortmann, Lisa; Pallé, Enric; Murgas, Felipe; Dreizler, Stefan; Iro, Nicolas; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    I will present one of the latest results of our GTC exoplanet transit spectroscopy survey. Over the last years our group has obtained ground-based optical (538 nm - 918 nm) spectrophotometric transit observations for several hot Jupiters including HAT-P-32Ab using the OSIRIS (Optical System for Imaging and low Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy) instrument at the Spanish 10-meter telescope GTC.I will discuss the source, nature and proper correction of instrument specific systematic noise we found to affect our data. After its correction, we were able to yield high quality results with a precision between 482 and 1703 ppm depending on the wavelength channel. We measure a flat optical transmission spectrum for HAT-P-32Ab, consistent with the results of Gibson et al. (2013, MNRAS, 436, 2974) obtained with GMOS at Gemini-North. This independent reproduction of consistent results re-establishes faith in the reliability of ground-based transmission spectroscopy and emphasizes the high potential of OSIRIS at the GTC as a tool to complement current and future space-based observations.

  8. THE OBLIQUE ORBIT OF THE SUPER-NEPTUNE HAT-P-11b

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, Joshua N.; Albrecht, Simon; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Shporer, Avi; Bakos, Gaspar A.; Hartman, Joel D.

    2010-11-10

    We find the orbit of the Neptune-sized exoplanet HAT-P-11b to be highly inclined relative to the equatorial plane of its host star. This conclusion is based on spectroscopic observations of two transits, which allowed the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect to be detected with an amplitude of 1.5 m s{sup -1}. The sky-projected obliquity is 103{sup +26} {sub -10} deg. This is the smallest exoplanet for which spin-orbit alignment has been measured. The result favors a migration scenario involving few-body interactions followed by tidal dissipation. This finding also conforms with the pattern that the systems with the weakest tidal interactions have the widest spread in obliquities. We predict that the high obliquity of HAT-P-11 will be manifest in transit light curves from the Kepler spacecraft: starspot-crossing anomalies will recur at most once per stellar rotation period, rather than once per orbital period as they would for a well-aligned system.

  9. Implications of the Secondary Eclipse of Exoplanet HAT-P-11b

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Richard K.; Deming, L. D.; Bakos, G.; Harrington, J.; Madhusudhan, N.; Noyes, R.; Seager, S.

    2010-01-01

    We observed exoplanet HAT-P-11b and have successfully detected its secondary eclipse. We conducted observations using the Spitzer Space Telescope in the post-cryo mission at 3.6 microns for a period of 22 hours centered on the anticipated secondary eclipse time, to detect the eclipse and determine its phase. Having detected the secondary eclipse, we are at present making a more focused series of observations in both the 3.6 and 4.5 micron bands to fully characterize it. HAT-P-11b is one of only two known exo-Neptunes and has a period of 4.8878 days, radius of 0.422 RJ, mass of 0.081 MJ and semi-major axis 0.053 AU. Measurements of the secondary eclipse will serve to clarify two key issues; 1) the planetary brightness temperature and the nature of its atmosphere, and 2) the eccentricity of its orbit, with implications for its dynamical evolution. We discuss implications of these observations.

  10. Top hat electrostatic analyzer for far-field electric propulsion plume diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Victor, Allen L.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2006-01-15

    The design, development, and testing of the top hat electric propulsion plume analyzer (TOPAZ) are presented for far-field electric propulsion plume diagnostics. The trend towards high-power thruster development will require plume diagnostic techniques capable of measuring high-energy particles as well as low-energy ions produced from charge-exchange collisions due to elevated facility background pressures. TOPAZ incorporates a 'top hat' design with a geometrical analyzer constant of 100 resulting in a wide energy range and a high-energy resolution. SIMION, an ion trajectory analysis program, was used to predict characteristics of the analyzer. An ion beam accelerator system confirms the computational results. TOPAZ provides an energy resolution of 2.7%, field of view of 112 deg. x 26 deg. (azimuthal by elevation) with an angular resolution in each direction of 2 deg., and a demonstrated energy-per-charge acceptance range of 5-15 keV. An energy profile measurement of the NASA-173Mv1 Hall thruster demonstrates instrument operation in a Hall thruster plume.

  11. Synthetic Biology for Engineering Acetyl Coenzyme A Metabolism in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used cell factory for the production of fuels, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals. The use of this cell factory for cost-efficient production of novel fuels and chemicals requires high yields and low by-product production. Many industrially interesting chemicals are biosynthesized from acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), which serves as a central precursor metabolite in yeast. To ensure high yields in production of these chemicals, it is necessary to engineer the central carbon metabolism so that ethanol production is minimized (or eliminated) and acetyl-CoA can be formed from glucose in high yield. Here the perspective of generating yeast platform strains that have such properties is discussed in the context of a major breakthrough with expression of a functional pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in the cytosol. PMID:25370498

  12. H4K44 Acetylation Facilitates Chromatin Accessibility during Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jialei; Donahue, Greg; Dorsey, Jean; Govin, Jérôme; Yuan, Zuofei; Garcia, Benjamin A; Shah, Parisha P; Berger, Shelley L

    2015-12-01

    Meiotic recombination hotspots are associated with histone post-translational modifications and open chromatin. However, it remains unclear how histone modifications and chromatin structure regulate meiotic recombination. Here, we identify acetylation of histone H4 at Lys44 (H4K44ac) occurring on the nucleosomal lateral surface. We show that H4K44 is acetylated at pre-meiosis and meiosis and displays genome-wide enrichment at recombination hotspots in meiosis. Acetylation at H4K44 is required for normal meiotic recombination, normal levels of double-strand breaks (DSBs) during meiosis, and optimal sporulation. Non-modifiable H4K44R results in increased nucleosomal occupancy around DSB hotspots. Our results indicate that H4K44ac functions to facilitate chromatin accessibility favorable for normal DSB formation and meiotic recombination.

  13. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Globally Enhance H3/H4 Tail Acetylation Without Affecting H3 Lysine 56 Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Drogaris, Paul; Villeneuve, Valérie; Pomiès, Christelle; Lee, Eun-Hye; Bourdeau, Véronique; Bonneil, Éric; Ferbeyre, Gerardo; Verreault, Alain; Thibault, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) represent a promising avenue for cancer therapy. We applied mass spectrometry (MS) to determine the impact of clinically relevant HDACi on global levels of histone acetylation. Intact histone profiling revealed that the HDACi SAHA and MS-275 globally increased histone H3 and H4 acetylation in both normal diploid fibroblasts and transformed human cells. Histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56ac) recently elicited much interest and controversy due to its potential as a diagnostic and prognostic marker for a broad diversity of cancers. Using quantitative MS, we demonstrate that H3K56ac is much less abundant than previously reported in human cells. Unexpectedly, in contrast to H3/H4 N-terminal tail acetylation, H3K56ac did not increase in response to inhibitors of each class of HDACs. In addition, we demonstrate that antibodies raised against H3K56ac peptides cross-react against H3 N-terminal tail acetylation sites that carry sequence similarity to residues flanking H3K56. PMID:22355734

  14. HATS-7b: A Hot Super Neptune Transiting a Quiet K Dwarf Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Bayliss, D.; Hartman, J. D.; Zhou, G.; Brahm, R.; Mancini, L.; de Val-Borro, M.; Bhatti, W.; Jordán, A.; Rabus, M.; Espinoza, N.; Csubry, Z.; Howard, A. W.; Fulton, B. J.; Buchhave, L. A.; Ciceri, S.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Isaacson, H.; Noyes, R. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Suc, V.; Howe, A. R.; Burrows, A. S.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2015-11-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth network of HATS-7b, a transiting Super-Neptune with a mass of 0.120 ± 0.012 {M}{{J}}, a radius of {0.563}-0.034+0.046 {R}{{J}}, and an orbital period of 3.1853 days. The host star is a moderately bright (V=13.340\\+/- 0.010 mag, {K}S=10.976\\+/- 0.026 mag) K dwarf star with a mass of 0.849 ± 0.027 {M}⊙ , a radius of {0.815}-0.035+0.049 {R}⊙ , and a metallicity of [{Fe}/{{H}}] =+0.250\\+/- 0.080. The star is photometrically quiet to within the precision of the HATSouth measurements, has low RV jitter, and shows no evidence for chromospheric activity in its spectrum. HATS-7b is the second smallest radius planet discovered by a wide-field ground-based transit survey, and one of only a handful of Neptune-size planets with mass and radius determined to 10% precision. Theoretical modeling of HATS-7b yields a hydrogen-helium fraction of 18 ± 4% (rock-iron core and H2-He envelope), or 9 ± 4% (ice core and H2-He envelope), i.e., it has a composition broadly similar to that of Uranus and Neptune, and very different from that of Saturn, which has 75% of its mass in H2-He. Based on a sample of transiting exoplanets with accurately (<20%) determined parameters, we establish approximate power-law relations for the envelopes of the mass-density distribution of exoplanets. HATS-7b, which, together with the recently discovered HATS-8b, is one of the first two transiting super-Neptunes discovered in the Southern sky, is a prime target for additional follow-up observations with Southern hemisphere facilities to characterize the atmospheres of Super-Neptunes (which we define as objects with mass greater than that of Neptune, and smaller than halfway between that of Neptune and Saturn, i.e., 0.054 {M}{{J}}\\lt {M}{{p}}\\lt 0.18 {M}{{J}}). The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia

  15. HAT-P-17b,c: A TRANSITING, ECCENTRIC, HOT SATURN AND A LONG-PERIOD, COLD JUPITER

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Bakos, G. A.; Hartman, J.; Torres, G.; Latham, D. W.; Noyes, R. W.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Beky, B.; Sasselov, D. D.; Stefanik, R. P.; Perumpilly, G.; Shporer, A.; Mazeh, T.; Kovacs, Geza; Fischer, D. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Butler, R. P.; Lazar, J.; Papp, I. E-mail: gbakos@cfa.harvard.edu; and others

    2012-04-20

    We report the discovery of HAT-P-17b,c, a multi-planet system with an inner transiting planet in a short-period, eccentric orbit and an outer planet in a 4.4 yr, nearly circular orbit. The inner planet, HAT-P-17b, transits the bright V = 10.54 early K dwarf star GSC 2717-00417, with an orbital period P = 10.338523 {+-} 0.000009 days, orbital eccentricity e = 0.342 {+-} 0.006, transit epoch T{sub c} = 2454801.16943 {+-} 0.00020 (BJD: barycentric Julian dates throughout the paper are calculated from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC)), and transit duration 0.1690 {+-} 0.0009 days. HAT-P-17b has a mass of 0.534 {+-} 0.018 M{sub J} and radius of 1.010 {+-} 0.029 R{sub J} yielding a mean density of 0.64 {+-} 0.05 g cm{sup -3}. This planet has a relatively low equilibrium temperature in the range 780-927 K, making it an attractive target for follow-up spectroscopic studies. The outer planet, HAT-P-17c, has a significantly longer orbital period P{sub 2} = 1610 {+-} 20 days and a minimum mass m{sub 2}sin i{sub 2} = 1.31{sup +0.18}{sub -0.15} M{sub J}. The orbital inclination of HAT-P-17c is unknown as transits have not been observed and may not be present. The host star has a mass of 0.86 {+-} 0.04 M{sub Sun }, radius of 0.84 {+-} 0.02 R{sub Sun }, effective temperature 5246 {+-} 80 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = 0.00 {+-} 0.08. HAT-P-17 is the second multi-planet system detected from ground-based transit surveys.

  16. Toxicology of deoxynivalenol and its acetylated and modified forms.

    PubMed

    Payros, Delphine; Alassane-Kpembi, Imourana; Pierron, Alix; Loiseau, Nicolas; Pinton, Philippe; Oswald, Isabelle P

    2016-12-01

    Mycotoxins are the most frequently occurring natural contaminants in human and animal diet. Among them, deoxynivalenol (DON), produced by Fusarium, is one of the most prevalent and thus represents an important health risk. Recent detection methods revealed new mycotoxins and new molecules derivated from the "native" mycotoxins. The main derivates of DON are the acetylated forms produced by the fungi (3- and 15-acetyl-DON), the biologically "modified" forms produced by the plant (deoxynivalenol-3-β-D-glucopyranoside), or after bacteria transformation (de-epoxy DON, 3-epi-DON and 3-keto-DON) as well as the chemically "modified" forms (norDON A-C and DON-sulfonates). High proportions of acetylated and modified forms of DON co-occur with DON, increasing the exposure and the health risk. DON and its acetylated and modified forms are rapidly absorbed following ingestion. At the molecular level, DON binds to the ribosome, induces a ribotoxic stress leading to the activation of MAP kinases, cellular cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. The toxic effects of DON include emesis and anorexia, alteration of intestinal and immune functions, reduced absorption of the nutrients as well as increased susceptibility to infection and chronic diseases. In contrast to DON, very little information exists concerning the acetylated and modified forms; some can be converted back to DON, their ability to bind to the ribosome and to induce cellular effects varies according to the toxin. Except for the acetylated forms, their toxicity and impact on human and animal health are poorly documented.

  17. Spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry, and eventually of parity, in a σ-model with two Mexican hats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacosa, Francesco

    2010-02-01

    A σ-model with two linked Mexican hats is discussed. This scenario could be realized in low-energy QCD when the ground state and the first excited (pseudo)scalar mesons are included, and where not only in the subspace of the ground states, but also in that of the first excited states, a Mexican hat potential is present. This possibility can change some basic features of a low-energy hadronic theory of QCD. It is also shown that spontaneous breaking of parity can occur in the vacuum for some parameter choice of the model.

  18. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Mexican Hat, Utah -- Monument Valley, Arizona, sites

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The final audit report for remedial action at the Mexican Hat, Utah, Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/audits, quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and QA remedial action close-out inspections performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC); on-site construction reviews (OSCR) performed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); and a surveillance performed by the Navajo Nation. This report refers to remedial action activities performed at the Mexican Hat, Utah--Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites.

  19. Solution of Newly Observed Transit of the Exoplanet Hat-P-24B:No TTV and TDV Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjurkchieva, Diana; Dimitrov, Dinko; Ibryamov, Sunay

    2016-01-01

    We present photometric observations of transit of the exoplanet HAT-P-24b using the Rozhen 2 m telescope. Its solution gives relative stellar radius r_s=0.1304 (a/R_s = 7.669), relative planet radius r_p=0.01304 and orbital inclination of 90°. The calculated planet radius is R_p = 1.316 R_J and corresponds to planet density of ρ_p = 0.37 g cm^{-3}. Our parameter values are between those of the previous two solutions. We did not find evidences of TTV and TDV signals of HAT-P-24b.

  20. MATERNAL SMOKING DURING PREGNANCY, GENETIC VARIATION OF ACETYL-N-TRANSFERASES NAT1 AND NAT2, AND RISK FOR OROFACIAL CLEFTS. (R828292)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  1. Crystal structure of E. coli lipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase.

    PubMed

    Mao, Guotao; Zhao, Yan; Kang, Xusheng; Li, Zhijie; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xianping; Sun, Fei; Sankaran, Krishnan; Zhang, Xuejun C

    2016-01-05

    Lipoprotein biogenesis is essential for bacterial survival. Phosphatidylglycerol:prolipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase (Lgt) is an integral membrane enzyme that catalyses the first reaction of the three-step post-translational lipid modification. Deletion of the lgt gene is lethal to most Gram-negative bacteria. Here we present the crystal structures of Escherichia coli Lgt in complex with phosphatidylglycerol and the inhibitor palmitic acid at 1.9 and 1.6 Å resolution, respectively. The structures reveal the presence of two binding sites and support the previously reported structure-function relationships of Lgt. Complementation results of lgt-knockout cells with different mutant Lgt variants revealed critical residues, including Arg143 and Arg239, that are essential for diacylglyceryl transfer. Using a GFP-based in vitro assay, we correlated the activities of Lgt with structural observations. Together, the structural and biochemical data support a mechanism whereby substrate and product, lipid-modified lipobox-containing peptide, enter and leave the enzyme laterally relative to the lipid bilayer.

  2. Inactivation of Anopheles gambiae Glutathione Transferase ε2 by Epiphyllocoumarin

    PubMed Central

    Marimo, Patience; Hayeshi, Rose; Mukanganyama, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are part of a major family of detoxifying enzymes that can catalyze the reductive dehydrochlorination of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT). The delta and epsilon classes of insect GSTs have been implicated in conferring resistance to this insecticide. In this study, the inactivation of Anopheles gambiae GSTε2 by epiphyllocoumarin (Tral 1) was investigated. Recombinant AgGSTε2 was expressed in Escherichia coli cells containing a pET3a-AGSTε2 plasmid and purified by affinity chromatography. Tral 1 was shown to inactivate GSTε2 both in a time-dependent manner and in a concentration-dependent manner. The half-life of GSTε2 in the presence of 25 μM ethacrynic acid (ETA) was 22 minutes and with Tral 1 was 30 minutes, indicating that Tral 1 was not as efficient as ETA as an inactivator. The inactivation parameters kinact and KI were found to be 0.020 ± 0.001 min−1 and 7.5 ± 2.1 μM, respectively, after 90 minutes of incubation. Inactivation of GSTε2 by Tral 1 implies that Tral 1 covalently binds to this enzyme in vitro and would be expected to exhibit time-dependent effects on the enzyme in vivo. Tral 1, therefore, would produce irreversible effects when used together with dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in malaria control programmes where resistance is mediated by GSTs. PMID:26925266

  3. Glutathione S-transferase polymorphisms in thyroid cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Alba; Céspedes, Walkiria; Xamena, Noel; Surrallés, Jordi; Creus, Amadeu; Galofré, Pere; Marcos, Ricardo

    2003-02-10

    Glutathione S-transferases (GST) are enzymes involved in the metabolism of many carcinogens and mutagens, also acting as important free-radical scavengers. The existence of different genetic polymorphisms in human populations has proven to be a susceptibility factor for different tumours. Nevertheless, as far as we know, for thyroid cancer no study has been conducted until now linking its incidence to genetic susceptibility biomarkers. The present investigation has been conducted to detect the possible association between polymorphism at the GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 genes and thyroid cancer incidence. Thus, 134 thyroid cancer patients and 116 controls, all from the urban district of Barcelona (Spain), have been included in this study. The results indicate that, according to the calculated odds ratio, the frequencies of the different genotypes found in the group of cancer patients do not significantly differ from those values obtained in the controls. This is true for the overall data as well as for the tumour characterization as follicular and papillar types. In addition, none of the possible combinations of mutant genotypes were shown to be risk factors. Finally, when the sex of the patients, the age of tumour onset, and life-style habits were also taken into account, no influence was observed related to the different genotypes. In conclusion, the results obtained in this study clearly suggest that those susceptibility factors related to the different GST polymorphic enzymes are not a predisposing factor in thyroid cancer disease.

  4. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase deficiency with an atypical presentation and ultrastructural mitochondrial abnormalities.

    PubMed Central

    Carey, M P; Poulton, K; Hawkins, C; Murphy, R P

    1987-01-01

    A case of carnitine palmitoyl transferase deficiency presenting in a 72 year old woman with the clinical picture of ophthalmoplegia plus other muscle weakness is reported. Histological and ultrastructural examination showed the features of a mitochondrial myopathy. Images PMID:3655814

  5. Paleomagnetic, geochronologic, and petrologic data discriminate tholeiitic basalts of the northern Hat Creek graben, northeastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muffler, L. J.; Champion, D. E.; Calvert, A. T.; Clynne, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Geologic mapping carried out in 2010-2012 under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the U.S. Geological Survey and Pacific Gas and Electric Company provides the framework for geochronologic, paleomagnetic, and petrologic studies of the widespread low-potassium olivine tholeiite (LKOT) basalts that inundate low topography between higher-elevation remnants of >1 Ma calc-alkaline volcanoes in the northern part of the Hat Creek graben. These tholeiitic basalts are monotonously similar in appearance and cannot be distinguished one from another with any confidence in the field or petrographically. They are, however, distinctive in age, paleomagnetic secular directions, and major-element compositions, allowing us to map three major tholeiitic units: the basalt of Rocky Ledge (40Ar/39Ar determinations on 3 different exposures give 203.2 ± 13.7 ka, 186.8 ± 12.5 ka, and 203.9 ± 15.2 ka; weighted average 197 ± 8 ka), the basalt of Rock Spring (545.7 ± 6.7 ka), and the basalt of Sam Wolfin Spring (647.3 ± 21.7 ka). These tholeiitic units are overlain to the east by the calc-alkaline basalt west of Six Mile Hill (53.5 ± 2.0 ka) and to the south by the calc-alkaline basaltic andesite of Cinder Butte (38 ± 7 ka) and the tholeiitic Hat Creek Basalt (24 ± 6 ka). These latter two ages are from Turrin et al. (2007); all other ages are new 40Ar/39Ar determinations from the USGS geochronology laboratory in Menlo Park, California. Paleomagnetic directions of the tholeiitic basalt of Rocky Ledge (16 sites) cluster tightly at inclination and declination of 63° and 349°, respectively. Inclinations and declinations for the tholeiitic basalt of Rock Spring (3 sites) cluster at 43° and 14°, whereas inclinations and declinations for the tholeiitic basalt of Sam Wolfin Spring (7 sites) cluster at 54° and 5°. On Pearce diagrams of the chemical compositions (e.g., Ti vs. Mg; P/K vs. Ti/K), the three units plot in distinct fields with no overlap

  6. HATS-4b: A Dense Hot Jupiter Transiting a Super Metal-rich G star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordán, Andrés; Brahm, Rafael; Bakos, G. Á.; Bayliss, D.; Penev, K.; Hartman, J. D.; Zhou, G.; Mancini, L.; Mohler-Fischer, M.; Ciceri, S.; Sato, B.; Csubry, Z.; Rabus, M.; Suc, V.; Espinoza, N.; Bhatti, W.; de Val-Borro, M.; Buchhave, L.; Csák, B.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Tan, T. G.; Noyes, R. W.; Béky, B.; Butler, R. P.; Shectman, S.; Crane, J.; Thompson, I.; Williams, A.; Martin, R.; Contreras, C.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2014-08-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth survey of HATS-4b, an extrasolar planet transiting a V = 13.46 mag G star. HATS-4b has a period of P ≈ 2.5167 days, mass of Mp ≈ 1.32 M Jup, radius of Rp ≈ 1.02 R Jup, and density of ρ p = 1.55 ± 0.16 g cm-3 ≈1.24 ρJup. The host star has a mass of 1.00 M ⊙, a radius of 0.92 R ⊙, and a very high metallicity [Fe/H]=0.43 ± 0.08. HATS-4b is among the densest known planets with masses between 1 and 2 M J and is thus likely to have a significant content of heavy elements of the order of 75 M ⊕. In this paper we present the data reduction, radial velocity measurements, and stellar classification techniques adopted by the HATSouth survey for the CORALIE spectrograph. We also detail a technique for simultaneously estimating vsin i and macroturbulence using high resolution spectra. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institut für Astronomie (MPIA), and the Australian National University (ANU). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institution is operated by PU in conjunction with collaborators at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at LCO, Chile. Based in part on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, and on observations made with the MPG/ESO 2.2 m Telescope at the ESO Observatory in La Silla. This paper uses observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope.

  7. Isolation of a mutant Arabidopsis plant that lacks N-aetyl glucosaminyl transferase I and is unable to synthesize Golgi-modified complex N-linked glycans

    SciTech Connect

    Schaewen, A. von; O'Neill, J.; Chrispeels, M.J. ); Sturm, A. )

    1993-08-01

    The complex asparagine-linked glycans of plant glycoproteins, characterized by the presence of [beta]1[yields]2 xylose and [alpha]1[yields]3 fucose residues, are derived from typical mannose[sub 9](N-acetylglucosamine)[sub 2] (Man[sub 9]GlcNAc[sub 2]) N-linked glycans through the activity of a series of glycosidases and glycosyl transferases in the Golgi apparatus. By screening leaf extracts with an antiserum against complex glycans, we isolated a mutant of Arbidopsis thaliana that is blocked in the conversion of high-manne to complex glycans. In callus tissues derived from the mutant plants, all glycans bind to concanavalin A. These glycans can be released by treatment with endoglycosidase H, and the majority has the same size as Man[sub 5]GlcNAc[sub 1] glycans. In the presence of deoxymannojirimycin, an inhibitor of mannosidase I, the mutant cells synthesize Man[sub 9]GlcNAc[sub 2] and Man[sub 8]GlcNAc[sub 2] glycans, suggesting that the biochemical lesion in the mutant is not in the biosynthesis of high-mannose glycans in the endoplasmic reticulum but in their modification in the Golgi. Direct enzyme assays of cell extracts show that the mutant cells lack N-acetyl glucosaminyl transferase I, the first enzyme in the pathway of complex glycan biosynthesis. The mutant plants are able to complete their development normally under several environmental conditions, suggesting that complex glycans are not essential for normal developmental processes. By crossing the complex-glycan-deficient strain of A. thaliana with a transgenic strain that expresses the glycoprotein phytohemagglutinin, a unique strain was obtained that synthesizes phytohemagglutinin with two high-mannose glycans, instead of one high-mannose and one complex glycan. 42 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  8. meso-[{Ru(phen)2}2(mu-HAT)]4+: a high-affinity DNA hairpin probe {HAT = 1,4,5,8,9,12-hexaazatriphenylene; phen = 1,10-phenanthroline}.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jayden A; Morgan, Joy L; Turley, Adam G; Collins, J Grant; Keene, F Richard

    2006-07-14

    1H NMR spectroscopy and fluorescent intercalator displacement (FID) assays have been used to investigate the DNA-binding abilities of two series of dinuclear polypyridyl ruthenium(II) complexes of the form [{Ru(L)2}2(mu-BL)]4+ {L = 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (Me2bpy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), or 4,7-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Me2phen); BL = 2,2'-bipyrimidine (bpm) or 1,4,5,8,9,12-hexaazatriphenylene (HAT)}. Preliminary FID surveys of these metal complexes against a variety of different oligonucleotides revealed that those complexes based upon the HAT bridging ligand induced greater fluorescence decreases in dye-bound DNA than did their bpm-bridged counterparts, suggesting a higher binding affinity by the HAT-bridged species. Furthermore, the greatest fluorescence decreases were typically observed in an oligonucleotide featuring a six-base hairpin loop. The apparent binding affinity of the metal complexes was also found to be a function of the stereochemistry and identity of the terminal ligands of the complex. The meso (DeltaLambda) stereoisomer generally induced greater fluorescence decreases than did either enantiomer (DeltaDelta or LambdaLambda), phen-based terminal ligands performed better than bpy-based terminal ligands, and those terminal ligands with methyl substituents demonstrated stronger apparent binding than did their non-methylated analogues. NMR experiments on meso-[{Ru(phen)2}2(mu-HAT)]4+ and meso-[{Ru(Me2phen)2}2(mu-HAT)]4+ demonstrated that both complexes bound with high affinity to the six-base hairpin oligonucleotide at the stem-loop interface and provided evidence to support stronger binding by the methylated species. meso-[{Ru(phen)2}2(mu-HAT)]4+ was found to bind poorly to duplex DNA and smaller four-base hairpin loops in FID and NMR experiments, whereas FID data suggest that the methylated analogue binds relatively strongly to most oligonucleotide sequences (the four- and six-base hairpins in particular). These

  9. Causal role of histone acetylations in enhancer function

    PubMed Central

    Pradeepa, Madapura M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enhancers control development and cellular function by spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression. Co-occurrence of acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27ac) and mono methylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 (H3K4me1) has been widely used for identification of active enhancers. However, increasing evidence suggests that using this combination of marks alone for enhancer identification gives an incomplete picture of the active enhancer repertoire. We have shown that the H3 globular domain acetylations, H3K64ac and H3K122ac, and an H4 tail acetylation, H4K16ac, are enriched at active enhancers together with H3K27ac, and also at a large number of enhancers without detectable H3K27ac. We propose that acetylations at these lysine residues of histones H3 and H4 might function by directly affecting chromatin structure, nucleosome–nucleosome interactions, nucleosome stability, and transcription factor accessibility. PMID:27792455

  10. 21 CFR 172.372 - N-Acetyl-L-methionine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... amino acid methionine formed by addition of an acetyl group to the alpha-amino group of methionine. It... amino acid) by weight of the total protein of the finished food, including the amount naturally present... of the additive contained therein. (2) The amounts of additive and each amino acid contained in...

  11. 21 CFR 172.372 - N-Acetyl-L-methionine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... amino acid methionine formed by addition of an acetyl group to the alpha-amino group of methionine. It... amino acid) by weight of the total protein of the finished food, including the amount naturally present... of the additive contained therein. (2) The amounts of additive and each amino acid contained in...

  12. 21 CFR 172.372 - N-Acetyl-L-methionine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-Acetyl-L-methionine (Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 65-82-7) is the derivative of the amino acid... provide a total of 3.1 percent L- and DL-methionine (expressed as the free amino acid) by weight of the... contained therein. (2) The amounts of additive and each amino acid contained in any mixture. (3)...

  13. 21 CFR 172.372 - N-Acetyl-L-methionine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... amino acid methionine formed by addition of an acetyl group to the alpha-amino group of methionine. It... amino acid) by weight of the total protein of the finished food, including the amount naturally present... of the additive contained therein. (2) The amounts of additive and each amino acid contained in...

  14. Mechanism for the Inhibition of the Carboxyl-transferase

    SciTech Connect

    L Yu; Y Kim; L Tong

    2011-12-31

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCs) are crucial metabolic enzymes and have been targeted for drug development against obesity, diabetes, and other diseases. The carboxyltransferase (CT) domain of this enzyme is the site of action for three different classes of herbicides, as represented by haloxyfop, tepraloxydim, and pinoxaden. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that haloxyfop and tepraloxydim bind in the CT active site at the interface of its dimer. However, the two compounds probe distinct regions of the dimer interface, sharing primarily only two common anchoring points of interaction with the enzyme. We report here the crystal structure of the CT domain of yeast ACC in complex with pinoxaden at 2.8-{angstrom} resolution. Despite their chemical diversity, pinoxaden has a similar binding mode as tepraloxydim and requires a small conformational change in the dimer interface for binding. Crystal structures of the CT domain in complex with all three classes of herbicides confirm the importance of the two anchoring points for herbicide binding. The structures also provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis of the herbicide resistance mutations and cross resistance among the herbicides, as well as for the design and development of new inhibitors against plant and human ACCs.

  15. Protein-based peptide-bond formation by aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferase.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazunori; Toh, Yukimatsu; Suto, Kyoko; Shimizu, Yoshihiro; Oka, Natsuhisa; Wada, Takeshi; Tomita, Kozo

    2007-10-18

    Eubacterial leucyl/phenylalanyl-tRNA protein transferase (LF-transferase) catalyses peptide-bond formation by using Leu-tRNA(Leu) (or Phe-tRNA(Phe)) and an amino-terminal Arg (or Lys) of a protein, as donor and acceptor substrates, respectively. However, the catalytic mechanism of peptide-bond formation by LF-transferase remained obscure. Here we determine the structures of complexes of LF-transferase and phenylalanyl adenosine, with and without a short peptide bearing an N-terminal Arg. Combining the two separate structures into one structure as well as mutation studies reveal the mechanism for peptide-bond formation by LF-transferase. The electron relay from Asp 186 to Gln 188 helps Gln 188 to attract a proton from the alpha-amino group of the N-terminal Arg of the acceptor peptide. This generates the attacking nucleophile for the carbonyl carbon of the aminoacyl bond of the aminoacyl-tRNA, thus facilitating peptide-bond formation. The protein-based mechanism for peptide-bond formation by LF-transferase is similar to the reverse reaction of the acylation step observed in the peptide hydrolysis reaction by serine proteases.

  16. The determination of tRNALeu recognition nucleotides for Escherichia coli L/F transferase

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Angela Wai Shan; Leung, Charles Chung Yun; Fahlman, Richard Peter

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli leucyl/phenylalanyl-tRNA protein transferase catalyzes the tRNA-dependent post-translational addition of amino acids onto the N-terminus of a protein polypeptide substrate. Based on biochemical and structural studies, the current tRNA recognition model by L/F transferase involves the identity of the 3′ aminoacyl adenosine and the sequence-independent docking of the D-stem of an aminoacyl-tRNA to the positively charged cluster on L/F transferase. However, this model does not explain the isoacceptor preference observed 40 yr ago. Using in vitro-transcribed tRNA and quantitative MALDI-ToF MS enzyme activity assays, we have confirmed that, indeed, there is a strong preference for the most abundant leucyl-tRNA, tRNALeu (anticodon 5′-CAG-3′) isoacceptor for L/F transferase activity. We further investigate the molecular mechanism for this preference using hybrid tRNA constructs. We identified two independent sequence elements in the acceptor stem of tRNALeu (CAG)—a G3:C70 base pair and a set of 4 nt (C72, A4:U69, C68)—that are important for the optimal binding and catalysis by L/F transferase. This maps a more specific, sequence-dependent tRNA recognition model of L/F transferase than previously proposed. PMID:24935875

  17. The Effect of Six Thinking Hats on Student Success in Teaching Subjects Related to Sustainable Development in Geography Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaya, Mehmet Fatih

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of six thinking hats technique in teaching subjects related to sustainable development in geography classes. The study was in both a quantitative and qualitative form. The quantitative part of the study was designed according to pre-test, post-test control group research model, and in the qualitative…

  18. Lumbar disc herniations: the predictive value of the Health Attribution Test (HAT) and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI).

    PubMed

    Herron, L D; Turner, J A; Weiner, P

    1988-01-01

    Ninety-one patients who were treated for lumbar disc herniation with chymopapain chemonucleolysis were evaluated preoperatively by means of the Health Attribution Test (HAT) and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). There were 54 good, 10 fair, and 27 poor results after chemo-nucleolysis. Nineteen patients subsequently underwent lumbar laminectomy and discectomy and the ultimate outcome for the entire series including these laminectomy patients was 66 good, 10 fair, and 15 poor results. The fair/poor chemonucleolysis outcome patients scored significantly lower than did the good outcome patients on the HAT Powerful Others and significantly higher on the Chance scale. Patients with fair or poor outcomes after chemonucleolysis only scored significantly higher on the Hypochondriasis, Hysteria, Psychopathic Deviate, Paranoia, and Hypomania scales in preoperative MMPI testing. Good versus fair/poor ultimate outcome patients differed significantly on preoperative MMPI Hypochondriasis, Hysteria, Psychopathic Deviate, Paranoia, Psychasthenia, Schizophrenia, Hypomania, and Social Introversion scales. These groups also differed significantly on preoperative HAT Internal and Chance scales. Further analyses found the MMPI to be a slightly better predictor of chemonucleolysis outcome and much better predictor of ultimate outcome than the HAT.

  19. Energy level alignment at the interface of NPB/HAT-CN/graphene for flexible organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Eonseok; Park, Soohyung; Jeong, Junkyeong; Kang, Seong Jun; Lee, Hyunbok; Yi, Yeonjin

    2017-01-01

    Graphene is highly promising as an electrode for flexible optoelectronic devices due to its excellent conductivity and transparency. However, it is necessary to tailor its work function with a charge injection layer in order to obtain favorable energy level alignment for efficient charge injection. An adequate charge injection layer can only be chosen with the understanding of the interfacial electronic structure between a charge transport layer and an electrode. In this study, we investigated the energy level alignment of N,N‧-diphenyl-1,1‧-biphenyl-4,4‧-diamine (NPB)/hexaazatriphenylene hexacarbonitrile (HAT-CN)/graphene using in situ ultraviolet and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The effective work function of graphene was significantly increased by 0.94 eV by the HAT-CN hole injection layer (HIL) due to the interface dipole formation. In addition, the charge generation barrier (CGB) between NPB and HAT-CN, which plays a decisive role in charge injection efficiency with a charge generation HIL, was measured to be 0.66 eV. This CGB on graphene is the same as the CGBs on other electrodes, and smaller than that of the widely-used MoO3 HIL. Therefore, HAT-CN could be a promising HIL for efficient flexible organic light-emitting diodes with a graphene anode.

  20. The Six Thinking Hat Model--A Tool for Participation in Community Development, the Experience of an NGO in Cambodia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batchelor, S.

    1996-01-01

    A nongovernmental organization involved in community development in Cambodia adapted De Bono's six thinking hat model to build staff capacity and develop a framework for open-ended conversations. It proved useful for comprehensive analysis of problems and preventing conflicts. (SK)

  1. Survey of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) hAT transposons and MITE-like hATpin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Gerhard; Krebs, Carmen; Diez, Mercedes; Holtgräwe, Daniela; Weisshaar, Bernd; Minoche, André E; Dohm, Juliane C; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Schmidt, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Genome-wide analyses of repetitive DNA suggest a significant impact particularly of transposable elements on genome size and evolution of virtually all eukaryotic organisms. In this study, we analyzed the abundance and diversity of the hAT transposon superfamily of the sugar beet (B. vulgaris) genome, using molecular, bioinformatic and cytogenetic approaches. We identified 81 transposase-coding sequences, three of which are part of structurally intact but nonfunctional hAT transposons (BvhAT), in a B. vulgaris BAC library as well as in whole genome sequencing-derived data sets. Additionally, 116 complete and 497 truncated non-autonomous BvhAT derivatives lacking the transposase gene were in silico-detected. The 116 complete derivatives were subdivided into four BvhATpin groups each characterized by a distinct terminal inverted repeat motif. Both BvhAT and BvhATpin transposons are specific for species of the genus Beta and closely related species, showing a localization on B. vulgaris chromosomes predominantely in euchromatic regions. The lack of any BvhAT transposase function together with the high degree of degeneration observed for the BvhAT and the BvhATpin genomic fraction contrasts with the abundance and activity of autonomous and non-autonomous hAT transposons revealed in other plant species. This indicates a possible genus-specific structural and functional repression of the hAT transposon superfamily during Beta diversification and evolution.

  2. Design and evaluation of a bolted joint for a discrete carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseau, Carl Q.; Baker, Donald J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of prefabricated pultruded carbon-epoxy rods has reduced the manufacturing complexity and costs of stiffened composite panels while increasing the damage tolerance of the panels. However, repairability of these highly efficient discrete stiffeners has been a concern. Design, analysis, and test results are presented in this paper for a bolted-joint repair for the pultruded rod concept that is capable of efficiently transferring axial loads in a hat-section stiffener on the upper skin segment of a heavily loaded aircraft wing component. A tension and a compression joint design were evaluated. The tension joint design achieved approximately 1.0% strain in the carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat-section and failed in a metal fitting at 166% of the design ultimate load. The compression joint design failed in the carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat-section test specimen area at approximately 0.7% strain and at 110% of the design ultimate load. This strain level of 0.7% in compression is similar to the failure strain observed in previously reported carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat-section column tests.

  3. Design and Evaluation of a Bolted Joint for a Discrete Carbon-Epoxy Rod-Reinforced Hat Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.; Rousseau, Carl Q.

    1996-01-01

    The use of pre-fabricated pultruded carbon-epoxy rods has reduced the manufacturing complexity and costs of stiffened composite panels while increasing the damage tolerance of the panels. However, repairability of these highly efficient discrete stiffeners has been a concern. Design, analysis, and test results are presented in this paper for a bolted-joint repair for the pultruded rod concept that is capable of efficiently transferring axial loads in a hat-section stiffener on the upper skin segment of a heavily loaded aircraft wing component. A tension and a compression joint design were evaluated. The tension joint design achieved approximately 1.0 percent strain in the carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat-section and failed in a metal fitting at 166 percent of the design ultimate load. The compression joint design failed in the carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat-section test specimen area at approximately 0.7 percent strain and at 110 percent of the design ultimate load. This strain level of 0.7 percent in compression is similar to the failure strain observed in previously reported carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat-section column tests.

  4. Development of a helmet/helmet-display-unit alignment tool (HAT) for the Apache helmet and display unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, William; Statz, Jonathan; Estes, Victor; Booms, Shawn; Martin, John S.; Harding, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Project Manager (PM) Apache Block III contacted the U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory (USAARL), Fort Rucker, Alabama, requesting assistance to evaluate and find solutions to a government-developed Helmet Display Unit (HDU) device called the Mock HDU for helmet alignment of the Apache Advanced Integrated Helmet (AAIH). The AAIH is a modified Head Gear Unit No. 56 for Personnel (HGU-56/P) to replace the current Integrated Helmet and Sighting System (IHADSS). The current flashlight-based HDU simulator for helmet/HDU alignment was no longer in production or available. Proper helmet/HDU alignment is critical to position the right eye in the small HDU eye box to obtain image alignment and full field of view (FOV). The initial approach of the PM to developing a helmet/HDU fitting device (Mock HDU) was to duplicate the optical characteristics of the current tactical HDU using less complex optics. However, the results produced questionable alignment, FOV, and distortion issues, with cost and development time overruns. After evaluating the Mock HDU, USAARL proposed a cost effective, less complex optical design called the Helmet/HDU Alignment Tool (HAT). This paper will show the development, components, and evaluations of the HAT compared to the current flashlight HDU simulator device. The laboratory evaluations included FOV measurements and alignment accuracies compared to tactical HDUs. The Apache helmet fitter technicians and Apache pilots compared the HAT to the current flashlight based HDU and ranked the HAT superior.

  5. An Overview of HATS: A Language Independent High Assurance Transformation System

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, V.L.

    1998-10-16

    Transformations that are based on syntax directed rewriting systems can have a significant impact on the construction of high assurance systems. However, in order for a transformational approach to be useful to a particular problem domain, a (general) transformation system must be adapted to the notation of that particular domain. A transformation system that can be easily adapted to various domain notations has the potential of having a wide range of applicability. In this paper we dissus why transforrmtion is attractive horn a high assurance perspective, as well as some issues surrounding automated transformation within specific problem domains. We then give an overview of a language independent High Assurance Transformation System (HATS) that is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories.

  6. High-harmonic and terahertz wave spectroscopy (HATS) for aligned molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yindong; Meng, Chao; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Xiaowei; Lü, Zhihui; Zhang, Dongwen; Yuan, Jianmin; Zhao, Zengxiu

    2016-12-01

    We present the experimental and theoretical details of our recent published letter Huang et al (2015 Phys. Rev. Lett. 115 123002) on synchronized high-harmonic and terahertz-wave spectroscopy (HATS) from nonadiabatically aligned nitrogen molecules in dual-color laser fields. By associating alignment-angle dependent terahertz wave generation (TWG) with high harmonic generation (HHG), the angular differential photoionization cross section (PICS) for molecules can be reconstructed. The angles at which the PICS’s minima are located show great convergence between the theoretical predictions and the experimentally deduced results when choosing a suitable internuclear distance. We also show the optimal relative phase between the dual-color laser fields for TWG does not change with the alignment angle at a precision of about 50 attoseconds. This all-optical method provides an alternative for investigating molecular structures and dynamics.

  7. All or nothing... or just a hat? Farmers' sun protection behaviors.

    PubMed

    Silk, Kami J; Parrott, Roxanne L

    2006-04-01

    Farmers have an increased risk for developing skin cancers and thus comprise an important audience for messages that address sun protection practices. This project examines sun protection behaviors of farmers from southeastern Georgia and uses those measured behaviors to conduct a cluster analysis. Farmers (N = 480) were clustered into three groups using six variables that measured their frequency of sun protective and purchasing behaviors. The three groups were characterized as either engaging heavily in sun protective behaviors, engaging in none of the recommended sun protective behaviors, or only wearing hats as a sun protective behavior. Practitioners seeking to develop health message interventions that target farming populations should consider the current behaviors of subgroups of farmers when developing audience segments to tailor messages aimed at increasing sun protective behaviors. Practical recommendations for message content targeted toward the subgroups of farmers are provided.

  8. "It's your badge of inclusion": the Red Hat Society as a gendered subculture of aging.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Anne E; Pai, Manacy; Redmond, Rebecca

    2012-12-01

    Although studies document the health-enhancing effects of social engagement, they reveal little about the underlying mechanisms operating within specific organizational contexts. Limited attention is given to the role of inequality--particularly age and gender--in shaping either the organizations to which we belong or their consequences for our well-being. We address this issue by examining the Red Hat Society, a social organization for middle-aged and older women. Interviews with members (n=52) illustrate how age and gender inequality interact to shape the organization, which can be viewed as a gendered subculture of aging. Drawing on this framework, we discuss four processes through which participation generates benefits for older women involved in age- and gender-segregated organizations: enhancing social networks, countering invisibility, creating positive frames for aging experiences, and promoting youthful identities.

  9. Simulated response of top-hat electrostatic analysers - importance of phase-space resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, Rossana; Bruno, Roberto; D'Amicis, Raffaella; Federica Marcucci, Maria; Servidio, Sergio; Valentini, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    We use a numerical code able to reproduce the angular/energy response of a typical electrostatic analyzer of top-hat type starting from velocity distribution functions (VDFs) generated by numerical imulations.The simulations are based on the Hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell (HVM) numerical algorithm which integrates the Vlasov equation for the ion distribution function in multi-dimensional geometry in phase space, while the electrons are treated as a fluid. Virtual satellites launched through the simulation box measure the particle VDFs. Such VDFs are interpolated into a spacecraft reference frame and moved from the simulation Cartesian grid to energy-angular coordinates to mimic the response of a real electrostatic sensor in the solar wind and in the magnetosheath for different conditions. We discuss the results of this study with respect to the importance of phase-space resolution for a space plasma experiment meant to investigate kinetic plasma regime.

  10. HAT-P-55b: A Hot Jupiter Transiting a Sun-Like Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juncher, D.; Buchhave, L. A.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Bieryla, A.; Kovács, T.; Boisse, I.; Latham, D. W.; Kovács, G.; Bhatti, W.; Csubry, Z.; Penev, K.; de Val-Borro, M.; Falco, E.; Torres, G.; Noyes, R. W.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2015-09-01

    We report the discovery of a new transiting extrasolar planet, HAT-P-55b. The planet orbits a V = 13.207 +/- 0.039 sun-like star with a mass of 1.013 +/- 0.037 solar masses, a radius of 1.011 +/- 0.036 solar radii and a metallicity of -0.03 +/- 0.08. The planet itself is a typical hot Jupiter with a period of 3.5852467 +/- 0.0000064 days, a mass of 0.582 +/- 0.056 Jupiter masses and a radius of 1.182 +/- 0.055 Jupiter radii. This discovery adds to the increasing sample of transiting planets with measured bulk densities, which is needed to put constraints on models of planetary structure and formation theories.

  11. Single-strain-gage force/stiffness buckling prediction techniques on a hat-stiffened panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Larry D.; Thompson, Randolph C.

    1991-01-01

    Predicting the buckling characteristics of a test panel is necessary to ensure panel integrity during a test program. A single-strain-gage buckling prediction method was developed on a hat-stiffened, monolithic titanium buckling panel. The method is an adaptation of the original force/stiffness method which requires back-to-back gages. The single-gage method was developed because the test panel did not have back-to-back gages. The method was used to predict buckling loads and temperatures under various heating and loading conditions. The results correlated well with a finite element buckling analysis. The single-gage force/stiffness method was a valid real-time and post-test buckling prediction technique.

  12. Automatic nuclear bud detection using ellipse fitting, moving sticks or top-hat transformation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Sun, C; Vallotton, P; Fenech, M; Pham, T D

    2013-11-01

    Micronucleus assays are extensively used by biologists to assess genotoxicity and to monitor human exposure to genotoxic materials. As recent studies suggested that nuclear buds can be a new source of micronuclei formed in interphase, the quantification of nuclear buds, which are micronucleus like objects that are attached to the nuclei in interphase, in normal and control group is needed. Three automatic nuclear bud detection algorithms fit for different situations are proposed in this paper. One is based on ellipse fitting, one is based on a stick model and the other is based on the top-hat transform. Comparison of the three methods is also given in this paper. Experimental results showed that the proposed algorithms are all effective and efficient for nuclear bud detection.

  13. Assessment of the radiological impact of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Haywood, F.F.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Ellis, B.S.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Fox, W.F.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1980-03-01

    High surface soil concentrations of /sup 226/Ra and high above-ground measurements of gamma-ray intensity in the vicinity of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Mexican Hat show both wind and water erosion of the tailings. The former mill area, occupied by a trade school at the time of this survey, shows a comparatively high level of contamination, probably from unprocessed ore on the surface of the ore storage area near the location of the former mill buildings. However, the estimated health effect of exposure to gamma rays during a 2000-hr work year in the area represents an increase of 0.1% in the risk of death from cancer. Exposure of less than 600 persons within 1.6 km of the tailings to radon daughters results in an estimated 0.2%/year increase in risk of lung cancer.

  14. THE DISCOVERY OF ELLIPSOIDAL VARIATIONS IN THE KEPLER LIGHT CURVE OF HAT-P-7

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, William F.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Seager, Sara; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Jenkins, Jon; Rowe, Jason F.; Koch, David; Borucki, William J.

    2010-04-20

    We present an analysis of the early Kepler observations of the previously discovered transiting planet HAT-P-7b. The light curve shows the transit of the star, the occultation of the planet, and the orbit phase-dependent light from the planet. In addition, phase-dependent light from the star is present, known as 'ellipsoidal variations'. The very nearby planet (only four stellar radii away) gravitationally distorts the star and results in a flux modulation twice per orbit. The ellipsoidal variations can confuse interpretation of the planetary phase curve if not self-consistently included in the modeling. We fit the light curve using the Roche potential approximation and derive improved planet and orbit parameters.

  15. The 4-flap Jester’s Hat Technique for Nipple Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Economides, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Summary: Macrothelia, or nipple hypertrophy, is a condition that may cause severe psychological distress to those who suffer from it. Although effective in their primary goal of reducing nipple diameter and projection, previously reported techniques in nipple reduction suffer from imperfect aesthetic outcomes with noticeable scarring patterns, anatomically anomalous shape, and a smoothing of the natural ruffles of the nipple. We propose a simple technique to nipple reduction that improves upon previous techniques and creates a more naturally appearing nipple. A 4-flap technique resembling a jester’s hat is described whereby suture lines are concealed within the central nipple to recreate the naturally ruffled appearance of a native nipple. Four patients have undergone this technique at a single institution with 100% patient satisfaction and no postoperative complications. Nipple sensation was maintained in all patients postoperatively. A 4-flap nipple reduction technique is a viable alternative to previously described techniques, which may offer more anatomically congruent results. PMID:28280674

  16. Properties of extrasolar planets and their host stars: A case study of HAT-P-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eylen, V.; Kjeldsen, H.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Aerts, C.

    2012-12-01

    Data from the Kepler satellite (Q0-Q11) are used to study HAT-P-7. The satellite's data are extremely valuable for asteroseismic studies of stars and for observing planetary transits; in this work we do both. An asteroseismic study of the host star improves the accuracy of the stellar parameters derived by Christensen-Dalsgaard et al. (2010), who followed largely the same procedure but based the analysis on only one month of Kepler data. The stellar information is combined with transit observations, phase variations and occultations to derive planetary parameters. In particular, we confirm the presence of ellipsoidal variations as discovered by Welsh et al. (2010), but revise their magnitude, and we revise the occultation depth (Borucki et al. 2009) which leads to different planetary temperature estimates. All other stellar and planetary parameters are now more accurately determined.

  17. Using Edward de Bono's six hats game to aid critical thinking and reflection in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Lesley J

    2003-03-01

    This article describes the use of a creative thinking game to stimulate critical thinking and reflection with qualified health professionals undertaking palliative care education. The importance of reflective practice in nursing is well documented and numerous models are available. However, the author as a nurse teacher has found that many of these models are either too simple or too complex to be valuable in practice. The six hats game, devised by Edward de Bono, is a method that stimulates a variety of types of thinking and when used as a means of reflection helps students to become more critical about their practice. Using this game with a palliative care case study the author demonstrates how thinking more creatively about the patients' perceived needs and problems can assist in developing reflective skills. The article concludes with a discussion on some of the challenges of using this method and suggestions for future practical uses.

  18. A near-infrared transmission spectrum for the warm Saturn HAT-P-12b

    SciTech Connect

    Line, Michael R.; Knutson, Heather; Desert, Jean-Michel; Deming, Drake; Wilkins, Ashlee

    2013-12-01

    We present a Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera-3 (WFC3) transmission spectrum for the transiting exoplanet HAT-P-12b. This warm (1000 K) sub-Saturn-mass planet has a smaller mass and a lower temperature than the hot Jupiters that have been studied so far. We find that the planet's measured transmission spectrum lacks the expected water absorption feature for a hydrogen-dominated atmosphere and is instead best described by a model with high-altitude clouds. Using a frequentist hypothesis testing procedure, we can rule out a hydrogen-dominated cloud-free atmosphere to 4.9σ. When combined with other recent WFC3 studies, our observations suggest that clouds may be common in exoplanetary atmospheres.

  19. HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b: Two Transiting Inflated Hot Jupiters and Observational Evidence for the Reinflation of Close-in Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Bhatti, W.; Penev, K.; Bieryla, A.; Latham, D. W.; Kovács, G.; Torres, G.; Csubry, Z.; de Val-Borro, M.; Buchhave, L.; Kovács, T.; Quinn, S.; Howard, A. W.; Isaacson, H.; Fulton, B. J.; Everett, M. E.; Esquerdo, G.; Béky, B.; Szklenar, T.; Falco, E.; Santerne, A.; Boisse, I.; Hébrard, G.; Burrows, A.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2016-12-01

    We present the discovery of the transiting exoplanets HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b, with orbital periods of 2.6055 and 2.9721 days, masses of 0.527+/- 0.083 {M}{{J}} and 0.783+/- 0.057 {M}{{J}}, and inflated radii of 1.89+/- 0.13 {R}{{J}} and {1.59}-0.10+0.16 {R}{{J}}, respectively. They orbit moderately bright (V=13.145+/- 0.029 and V=12.993+/- 0.052) stars of mass 1.212+/- 0.050 {M}⊙ and {1.255}-0.054+0.107 {M}⊙ . The stars are at the main-sequence turnoff. While it is well known that the radii of close-in giant planets are correlated with their equilibrium temperatures, whether or not the radii of planets increase in time as their hosts evolve and become more luminous is an open question. Looking at the broader sample of well-characterized close-in transiting giant planets, we find that there is a statistically significant correlation between planetary radii and the fractional ages of their host stars, with a false-alarm probability of only 0.0041%. We find that the correlation between the radii of planets and the fractional ages of their hosts is fully explained by the known correlation between planetary radii and their present-day equilibrium temperatures; however, if the zero-age main-sequence equilibrium temperature is used in place of the present-day equilibrium temperature, then a correlation with age must also be included to explain the planetary radii. This suggests that, after contracting during the pre-main-sequence, close-in giant planets are reinflated over time due to the increasing level of irradiation received from their host stars. Prior theoretical work indicates that such a dynamic response to irradiation requires a significant fraction of the incident energy to be deposited deep within the planetary interiors. Based on observations obtained with the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network. Based on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology

  20. Molecular characterization of a glutathione transferase from Pinus tabulaeformis (Pinaceae).

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qing-Yin; Lu, Hai; Wang, Xiao-Ru

    2005-05-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) play important roles in stress tolerance and detoxification metabolism in plants. To date, studies on GSTs in higher plants have focused largely on agricultural plants. In contrast, there is virtually no information on the molecular characteristics of GSTs in gymnosperms. The present study reports for the first time the cloning, expression and characteristics of a GST gene (PtGSTU1) from a pine, Pinus tabulaeformis, which is widely distributed from northern to central China covering cold temperate and drought regions. The PtGSTU1 gene encodes a protein of 228 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 26.37 kDa. Reverse transcription PCR revealed that PtGSTU1 was expressed in different tissues, both above and below ground, of P. tabulaeformis. The over-expressed recombinant PtGSTU1 showed high activity towards the substrates 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD-Cl). Kinetic analysis with respect to CDNB as substrate revealed a Km of 0.47 mM and Vmax of 169.1 micromol/min per mg of protein. The recombinant PtGSTU1 retained more than 60% of its maximum enzymatic activity from 15 degrees C to 45 degrees C with a broad optimum Tm range of 25 degrees C - 35 degrees C. The enzyme had a maximum activity at approximately pH 8.5 - 9.0. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that Ser13 in the N-terminal domain is a critical catalytic residue, responsible for stabilisation of the thiolate anion of enzyme-bound glutathione. Based on comparative analyses of its amino acid sequence, phylogeny and predicted three-dimensional structure, the PtGSTU1 should be classified as a tau class GST.

  1. Phosphonocarboxylates Inhibit the Second Geranylgeranyl Addition by Rab Geranylgeranyl Transferase*

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Rudi A.; Tavaré, Richard; Figueiredo, Ana C.; Błażewska, Katarzyna M.; Kashemirov, Boris A.; McKenna, Charles E.; Ebetino, Frank H.; Taylor, Adam; Rogers, Michael J.; Coxon, Fraser P.; Seabra, Miguel C.

    2009-01-01

    Rab geranylgeranyl transferase (RGGT) catalyzes the post-translational geranylgeranyl (GG) modification of (usually) two C-terminal cysteines in Rab GTPases. Here we studied the mechanism of the Rab geranylgeranylation reaction by bisphosphonate analogs in which one phosphonate group is replaced by a carboxylate (phosphonocarboxylate, PC). The phosphonocarboxylates used were 3-PEHPC, which was previously reported, and 2-hydroxy-3-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-3-yl-2-phosphonopropionic acid ((+)-3-IPEHPC), a >25-fold more potent related compound as measured by both IC50 and Ki.(+)-3-IPEHPC behaves as a mixed-type inhibitor with respect to GG pyrophosphate (GGPP) and an uncompetitive inhibitor with respect to Rab substrates. We propose that phosphonocarboxylates prevent only the second GG transfer onto Rabs based on the following evidence. First, geranylgeranylation of Rab proteins ending with a single cysteine motif such as CAAX, is not affected by the inhibitors, either in vitro or in vivo. Second, the addition of an -AAX sequence onto Rab-CC proteins protects the substrate from inhibition by the inhibitors. Third, we demonstrate directly that in the presence of (+)-3-IPEHPC, Rab-CC and Rab-CXC proteins are modified by only a single GG addition. The presence of (+)-3-IPEHPC resulted in a preference for the Rab N-terminal cysteine to be modified first, suggesting an order of cysteine geranylgeranylation in RGGT catalysis. Our results further suggest that the inhibitor binds to a site distinct from the GGPP-binding site on RGGT. We suggest that phosphonocarboxylate inhibitors bind to a GG-cysteine binding site adjacent to the active site, which is necessary to align the mono-GG-Rab for the second GG addition. These inhibitors may represent a novel therapeutic approach in Rab-mediated diseases. PMID:19074143

  2. Kepler and Ground-Based Transits of the exo-Neptune HAT-P-11b

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deming, Drake; Sada, Pedro V.; Jackson, Brian; Peterson, Steven W.; Agol, Eric; Knutson, Heather A.; Jennings, Donald E.; Haase, Plynn; Bays, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    We analyze 26 archival Kepler transits of the exo-Neptune HAT-P-11b, supplemented by ground-based transits observed in the blue (B band) and near-IR (J band). Both the planet and host star are smaller than previously believed; our analysis yields Rp = 4.31 R xor 0.06 R xor and Rs = 0.683 R solar mass 0.009 R solar mass, both about 3 sigma smaller than the discovery values. Our ground-based transit data at wavelengths bracketing the Kepler bandpass serve to check the wavelength dependence of stellar limb darkening, and the J-band transit provides a precise and independent constraint on the transit duration. Both the limb darkening and transit duration from our ground-based data are consistent with the new Kepler values for the system parameters. Our smaller radius for the planet implies that its gaseous envelope can be less extensive than previously believed, being very similar to the H-He envelope of GJ 436b and Kepler-4b. HAT-P-11 is an active star, and signatures of star spot crossings are ubiquitous in the Kepler transit data. We develop and apply a methodology to correct the planetary radius for the presence of both crossed and uncrossed star spots. Star spot crossings are concentrated at phases 0.002 and +0.006. This is consistent with inferences from Rossiter-McLaughlin measurements that the planet transits nearly perpendicular to the stellar equator. We identify the dominant phases of star spot crossings with active latitudes on the star, and infer that the stellar rotational pole is inclined at about 12 deg 5 deg to the plane of the sky. We point out that precise transit measurements over long durations could in principle allow us to construct a stellar Butterfly diagram to probe the cyclic evolution of magnetic activity on this active K-dwarf star.

  3. Hermitian hat wavelet design for singularity detection in the Paraguay river-level data analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold H.; Hsu, Charles C.; Sa, Leonardo D.; Li, Weigang

    1997-04-01

    The direct differentiation of a noisy signal ds/dt is known to be inaccurate. Differentiation can be improved by employing the Dirac (delta) -function introduced into a convolution product denoted by (direct product) and then integrated by parts: ds/dt equals ds/dt (direct product) (delta) equals - s (direct product) d(delta) /dt. The Schwartz Gaussian representation of the delta function is then explicitly used in the differentiation. It turns out that such a convolution approach to the first and the second derivatives produces a pair of mother wavelets the combination of which is the complex generalization of the Mexican hat called a Hermitian hat wavelet. It is shown that the Hermitian filter is a single oscillation wavelet having much lower frequency bandwidth than the Mortlet or Gabor wavelet. As a result of Nyquist theorem, a fewer number of grid points would be needed for the discrete convolution operation. Therefore, the singularity characteristic will not be overly smeared and the noise can be smoothed away. The phase plot of the Hermitian wavelet transform in terms of the time scale and frequency domains reveal a bifurcation discontinuity of a noisy cusp singularity at the precise location of the singularity as well as the scale nature of the underlying dynamics. This phase plot is defined as (theta) (t/a) equals tan-1 [(ds/dt)/(-d2s/dt2] equals tan-1 [((d(delta) (t/a)dt) (direct product) s)/((d2(delta) (t/a)/dt2) (direct product) s)] applied to a real world data of the Paraguay river levels.

  4. HATS-3b: An Inflated Hot Jupiter Transiting an F-type Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayliss, D.; Zhou, G.; Penev, K.; Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J. D.; Jordán, A.; Mancini, L.; Mohler-Fischer, M.; Suc, V.; Rabus, M.; Béky, B.; Csubry, Z.; Buchhave, L.; Henning, T.; Nikolov, N.; Csák, B.; Brahm, R.; Espinoza, N.; Noyes, R. W.; Schmidt, B.; Conroy, P.; Wright, D. J.; Tinney, C. G.; Addison, B. C.; Sackett, P. D.; Sasselov, D. D.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2013-11-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth survey of HATS-3b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting a V = 12.4 F dwarf star. HATS-3b has a period of P = 3.5479 days, mass of Mp = 1.07 M J, and radius of Rp = 1.38 R J. Given the radius of the planet, the brightness of the host star, and the stellar rotational velocity (vsin i = 9.0 km s-1), this system will make an interesting target for future observations to measure the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and determine its spin-orbit alignment. We detail the low-/medium-resolution reconnaissance spectroscopy that we are now using to deal with large numbers of transiting planet candidates produced by the HATSouth survey. We show that this important step in discovering planets produces log g and T eff parameters at a precision suitable for efficient candidate vetting, as well as efficiently identifying stellar mass eclipsing binaries with radial velocity semi-amplitudes as low as 1 km s-1. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), and the Australian National University (ANU). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with collaborators at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC), the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (HESS) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU.

  5. SPITZER IRAC SECONDARY ECLIPSE PHOTOMETRY OF THE TRANSITING EXTRASOLAR PLANET HAT-P-1b

    SciTech Connect

    Todorov, Kamen; Deming, Drake; Harrington, Jospeph; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Bowman, William C.; Nymeyer, Sarah; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Bakos, Gaspar A.

    2010-01-01

    We report Spitzer/IRAC photometry of the transiting giant exoplanet HAT-P-1b during its secondary eclipse. This planet lies near the postulated boundary between the pM and pL-class of hot Jupiters, and is important as a test of models for temperature inversions in hot Jupiter atmospheres. We derive eclipse depths for HAT-P-1b, in units of the stellar flux, that are: 0.080% +- 0.008% [3.6 mum], 0.135% +- 0.022% [4.5 mum], 0.203% +- 0.031% [5.8 mum], and 0.238% +- 0.040% [8.0 mum]. These values are best fit using an atmosphere with a modest temperature inversion, intermediate between the archetype inverted atmosphere (HD 209458b) and a model without an inversion. The observations also suggest that this planet is radiating a large fraction of the available stellar irradiance on its dayside, with little available for redistribution by circulation. This planet has sometimes been speculated to be inflated by tidal dissipation, based on its large radius in discovery observations, and on a non-zero orbital eccentricity allowed by the radial velocity data. The timing of the secondary eclipse is very sensitive to orbital eccentricity, and we find that the central phase of the eclipse is 0.4999 +- 0.0005. The difference between the expected and observed phase indicates that the orbit is close to circular, with a 3sigma limit of |e cos omega| < 0.002.

  6. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and sulfadimidin acetylation phenotypes in Egyptian oases.

    PubMed

    Hussein, L; Yamamah, G; Saleh, A

    1992-04-01

    Screening of 1315 males from two Egyptian oases for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G-6PD) found an incidence of 5.9%. The rate of acetylation of sulfadimidin was also studied, and a bimodal distribution was found with 73% rapid acetylators. There is a correlation between high frequency of G-6PD deficiency and high frequency of slow acetylation rate.

  7. Acetylation of lysine 40 in alpha-tubulin is not essential in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    In Tetrahymena, at least 17 distinct microtubule structures are assembled from a single primary sequence type of alpha- and beta- tubulin heterodimer, precluding distinctions among microtubular systems based on tubulin primary sequence isotypes. Tetrahymena tubulins also are modified by several types of posttranslational reactions including acetylation of alpha-tubulin at lysine 40, a modification found in most eukaryotes. In Tetrahymena, axonemal alpha-tubulin and numerous other microtubules are acetylated. We completely replaced the single type of alpha-tubulin gene in the macronucleus with a version encoding arginine instead of lysine 40 and therefore cannot be acetylated at this position. No acetylated tubulin was detectable in these transformants using a monoclonal antibody specific for acetylated lysine 40. Surprisingly, mutants lacking detectable acetylated tubulin are indistinguishable from wild-type cells. Thus, acetylation of alpha- tubulin at lysine 40 is non-essential in Tetrahymena. In addition, isoelectric focusing gel analysis of axonemal tubulin from cells unable to acetylate alpha-tubulin leads us to conclude that: (a) most or all ciliary alpha-tubulin is acetylated, (b) other lysines cannot be acetylated to compensate for loss of acetylation at lysine 40, and (c) acetylated alpha-tubulin molecules in wild-type cells contain one or more additional charge-altering modifications. PMID:7775576

  8. The Acetyl Group Buffering Action of Carnitine Acetyltransferase Offsets Macronutrient-induced Lysine Acetylation of Mitochondrial Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Michael N.; Kjalarsdottir, Lilja; Thompson, J. Will; Dubois, Laura G.; Stevens, Robert D.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Brosnan, M. Julia; Rolph, Timothy P.; Grimsrud, Paul A.; Muoio, Deborah M.

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation (AcK), a posttranslational modification wherein a two-carbon acetyl group binds covalently to a lysine residue, occurs prominently on mitochondrial proteins and has been linked to metabolic dysfunction. An emergent theory suggests mitochondrial AcK occurs via mass action rather than targeted catalysis. To test this hypothesis we performed mass spectrometry-based acetylproteomic analyses of quadriceps muscles from mice with skeletal muscle-specific deficiency of carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT), an enzyme that buffers the mitochondrial acetyl-CoA pool by converting short-chain acyl-CoAs to their membrane permeant acylcarnitine counterparts. CrAT deficiency increased tissue acetyl-CoA levels and susceptibility to diet-induced AcK of broad-ranging mitochondrial proteins, coincident with diminished whole body glucose control. Sub-compartment acetylproteome analyses of muscles from obese mice and humans showed remarkable overrepresentation of mitochondrial matrix proteins. These findings reveal roles for CrAT and L-carnitine in modulating the muscle acetylproteome and provide strong experimental evidence favoring the nonenzymatic carbon pressure model of mitochondrial AcK. PMID:26748706

  9. Altered acetylation and succinylation profiles in Corynebacterium glutamicum in response to conditions inducing glutamate overproduction.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yuta; Nagano-Shoji, Megumi; Kubo, Shosei; Kawamura, Yumi; Yoshida, Ayako; Kawasaki, Hisashi; Nishiyama, Makoto; Yoshida, Minoru; Kosono, Saori

    2016-02-01

    The bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum is utilized during industrial fermentation to produce amino acids such as L-glutamate. During L-glutamate fermentation, C. glutamicum changes the flux of central carbon metabolism to favor L-glutamate production, but the molecular mechanisms that explain these flux changes remain largely unknown. Here, we found that the profiles of two major lysine acyl modifications were significantly altered upon glutamate overproduction in C. glutamicum; acetylation decreased, whereas succinylation increased. A label-free semi-quantitative proteomic analysis identified 604 acetylated proteins with 1328 unique acetylation sites and 288 succinylated proteins with 651 unique succinylation sites. Acetylation and succinylation targeted enzymes in central carbon metabolic pathways that are directly related to glutamate production, including the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (ODHC), a key enzyme regulating glutamate overproduction. Structural mapping revealed that several critical lysine residues in the ODHC components were susceptible to acetylation and succinylation. Furthermore, induction of glutamate production was associated with changes in the extent of acetylation and succinylation of lysine, suggesting that these modifications may affect the activity of enzymes involved in glutamate production. Deletion of phosphotransacetylase decreased the extent of protein acetylation in nonproducing condition, suggesting that acetyl phosphate-dependent acetylation is active in C. glutamicum. However, no effect was observed on the profiles of acetylation and succinylation in glutamate-producing condition upon disruption of acetyl phosphate metabolism or deacetylase homologs. It was considered likely that the reduced acetylation in glutamate-producing condition may reflect metabolic states where the flux through acid-producing pathways is very low, and substrates for acetylation do not accumulate in the cell. Succinylation would occur more

  10. Astrocyte Reactivity Following Blast Exposure Involves Aberrant Histone Acetylation.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Zachary S; Grinter, Michael B; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    Blast induced neurotrauma (BINT) is a prevalent injury within military and civilian populations. The injury is characterized by persistent inflammation at the cellular level which manifests as a multitude of cognitive and functional impairments. Epigenetic regulation of transcription offers an important control mechanism for gene expression and cellular function which may underlie chronic inflammation and result in neurodegeneration. We hypothesize that altered histone acetylation patterns may be involved in blast induced inflammation and the chronic activation of glial cells. This study aimed to elucidate changes to histone acetylation occurring following injury and the roles these changes may have within the pathology. Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to either a 10 or 17 psi blast overpressure within an Advanced Blast Simulator (ABS). Sham animals underwent the same procedures without blast exposure. Memory impairments were measured using the Novel Object Recognition (NOR) test at 2 and 7 days post-injury. Tissues were collected at 7 days for Western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis. Sham animals showed intact memory at each time point. The novel object discrimination decreased significantly between two and 7 days for each injury group (p < 0.05). This is indicative of the onset of memory impairment. Western blot analysis showed glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a known marker of activated astrocytes, was elevated in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) following blast exposure for both injury groups. Analysis of histone protein extract showed no changes in the level of any total histone proteins within the PFC. However, acetylation levels of histone H2b, H3, and H4 were decreased in both groups (p < 0.05). Co-localization immunofluorescence was used to further investigate any potential correlation between decreased histone acetylation and astrocyte activation. These experiments showed a similar decrease in H3 acetylation in astrocytes exposed to a 17

  11. Astrocyte Reactivity Following Blast Exposure Involves Aberrant Histone Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Zachary S.; Grinter, Michael B.; VandeVord, Pamela J.

    2016-01-01

    Blast induced neurotrauma (BINT) is a prevalent injury within military and civilian populations. The injury is characterized by persistent inflammation at the cellular level which manifests as a multitude of cognitive and functional impairments. Epigenetic regulation of transcription offers an important control mechanism for gene expression and cellular function which may underlie chronic inflammation and result in neurodegeneration. We hypothesize that altered histone acetylation patterns may be involved in blast induced inflammation and the chronic activation of glial cells. This study aimed to elucidate changes to histone acetylation occurring following injury and the roles these changes may have within the pathology. Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to either a 10 or 17 psi blast overpressure within an Advanced Blast Simulator (ABS). Sham animals underwent the same procedures without blast exposure. Memory impairments were measured using the Novel Object Recognition (NOR) test at 2 and 7 days post-injury. Tissues were collected at 7 days for Western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis. Sham animals showed intact memory at each time point. The novel object discrimination decreased significantly between two and 7 days for each injury group (p < 0.05). This is indicative of the onset of memory impairment. Western blot analysis showed glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a known marker of activated astrocytes, was elevated in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) following blast exposure for both injury groups. Analysis of histone protein extract showed no changes in the level of any total histone proteins within the PFC. However, acetylation levels of histone H2b, H3, and H4 were decreased in both groups (p < 0.05). Co-localization immunofluorescence was used to further investigate any potential correlation between decreased histone acetylation and astrocyte activation. These experiments showed a similar decrease in H3 acetylation in astrocytes exposed to a 17

  12. Induction of Glutathione S-Transferase Isozymes in Sorghum by Herbicide Antidotes 1

    PubMed Central

    Dean, John V.; Gronwald, John W.; Eberlein, Charlotte V.

    1990-01-01

    Certain chemicals referred to as herbicide antidotes protect sorghum from injury by chloroacetanilide herbicides such as metolachlor. The effect of herbicide antidotes on the glutathione S-transferase isozyme complement of etiolated sorghum (Sorghum bicolor [L.] Moench) shoots was examined. Elution profiles of glutathione S-transferase isozymes from untreated and antidote-treated seedlings were generated by fast protein liquid chromatography utilizing an anion exchange (Mono Q) column. In untreated seedlings, there were two glutathione S-transferase isozymes, a major isozyme which exhibited activity toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and a minor isozyme which exhibited activity toward metolachlor. Treating sorghum seedlings with various antidotes (flurazole, oxabetrinil, CGA-133205, naphthalic anhydride, dichlormid) resulted in the appearance of four to five additional glutathione S-transferase isozymes (de-pending on the particular antidote) which exhibited activity toward metolachlor as a substrate and little or no activity with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. Treating etiolated sorghum shoots with metolachlor was also found to induce at least four isozymes which exhibited activity toward the herbicide. An increase in glutathione S-transferase activity, measured with metolachlor as substrate, was detected within 4 h after treatment with 30 micromolar oxabetrinil, but 36 hours were required for maximum expression of activity. Addition of either the transcription inhibitor cordycepin or the translation inhibitor cycloheximide inhibited the appearance of glutathione S-transferase activity measured with metolachlor as substrate. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that antidotes confer protection against metolachlor injury in sorghum by inducing the de novo synthesis of glutathione S-transferase isozymes which catalyze the detoxification of the herbicide. PMID:16667299

  13. Multiple Mass Isotopomer Tracing of Acetyl-CoA Metabolism in Langendorff-perfused Rat Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingling; Deng, Shuang; Ibarra, Rafael A.; Anderson, Vernon E.; Brunengraber, Henri; Zhang, Guo-Fang

    2015-01-01

    We developed an isotopic technique to assess mitochondrial acetyl-CoA turnover (≈citric acid flux) in perfused rat hearts. Hearts are perfused with buffer containing tracer [13C2,2H3]acetate, which forms M5 + M4 + M3 acetyl-CoA. The buffer may also contain one or two labeled substrates, which generate M2 acetyl-CoA (e.g. [13C6]glucose or [1,2-13C2]palmitate) or/and M1 acetyl-CoA (e.g. [1-13C]octanoate). The total acetyl-CoA turnover and the contributions of fuels to acetyl-CoA are calculated from the uptake of the acetate tracer and the mass isotopomer distribution of acetyl-CoA. The method was applied to measurements of acetyl-CoA turnover under different conditions (glucose ± palmitate ± insulin ± dichloroacetate). The data revealed (i) substrate cycling between glycogen and glucose-6-P and between glucose-6-P and triose phosphates, (ii) the release of small excess acetyl groups as acetylcarnitine and ketone bodies, and (iii) the channeling of mitochondrial acetyl-CoA from pyruvate dehydrogenase to carnitine acetyltransferase. Because of this channeling, the labeling of acetylcarnitine and ketone bodies released by the heart are not proxies of the labeling of mitochondrial acetyl-CoA. PMID:25645937

  14. Stoichiometry of site-specific lysine acetylation in an entire proteome.

    PubMed

    Baeza, Josue; Dowell, James A; Smallegan, Michael J; Fan, Jing; Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Khan, Zia; Denu, John M

    2014-08-01

    Acetylation of lysine ϵ-amino groups influences many cellular processes and has been mapped to thousands of sites across many organisms. Stoichiometric information of acetylation is essential to accurately interpret biological significance. Here, we developed and employed a novel method for directly quantifying stoichiometry of site-specific acetylation in the entire proteome of Escherichia coli. By coupling isotopic labeling and a novel pairing algorithm, our approach performs an in silico enrichment of acetyl peptides, circumventing the need for immunoenrichment. We investigated the function of the sole NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase, CobB, on both site-specific and global acetylation. We quantified 2206 peptides from 899 proteins and observed a wide distribution of acetyl stoichiometry, ranging from less than 1% up to 98%. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that metabolic enzymes, which either utilize or generate acetyl-CoA, and proteins involved in transcriptional and translational processes displayed the highest degree of acetylation. Loss of CobB led to increased global acetylation at low stoichiometry sites and induced site-specific changes at high stoichiometry sites, and biochemical analysis revealed altered acetyl-CoA metabolism. Thus, this study demonstrates that sirtuin deacetylase deficiency leads to both site-specific and global changes in protein acetylation stoichiometry, affecting central metabolism.

  15. Histone acetylation dependent energy landscapes in tri-nucleosome revealed by residue-resolved molecular simulations

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Le; Takada, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    Histone tail acetylation is a key epigenetic marker that tends to open chromatin folding and activate transcription. Despite intensive studies, precise roles of individual lysine acetylation in chromatin folding have only been poorly understood. Here, we revealed structural dynamics of tri-nucleosomes with several histone tail acetylation states and analyzed histone tail interactions with DNA by performing molecular simulations at an unprecedentedly high resolution. We found versatile acetylation-dependent landscapes of tri-nucleosome. The H4 and H2A tail acetylation reduced the contact between the first and third nucleosomes mediated by the histone tails. The H3 tail acetylation reduced its interaction with neighboring linker DNAs resulting in increase of the distance between consecutive nucleosomes. Notably, two copies of the same histone in a single nucleosome have markedly asymmetric interactions with DNAs, suggesting specific pattern of nucleosome docking albeit high inherent flexibility. Estimated transcription factor accessibility was significantly high for the H4 tail acetylated structures. PMID:27698366

  16. Metabolic actions of some sympathomimetic amines and their acetyl derivatives in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Marvola, M

    1977-01-01

    To study how acetylation affects the activity of sympathomimetic amines the effects of tyramine, amphetamine, ephedrine, phenylephrine, orciprenaline and salbutamol and of their O- and N-acetyl derivatives on blood glucose and free fatty acid concentrations were studied in the rabbit. Hyperglycemia was induced by all parent compounds except amphetamine which tended to have a weak hypoglycaemic action. Hyperlipaemia in the doses used was induced by ephedrine and orciprenaline but not by the other parent compounds. Usually acetylation decreased the metabolic effects of the compounds but O-acetylation of tyramine and salbutamol caused hyperlipaemia and O-acetylation of ephedrine increased its fatty acid-mobilizing action, perhaps as a consequence of increased lipid solubility of the compounds. The ultimate effects of the O-acetyl derivatives were probably at least partly due to deacetylation at their sites of action. However O-acetylation of sympathomimetics could perhaps be used to induce drug latentiation.

  17. N-Terminal Acetylation Acts as an Avidity Enhancer Within an Interconnected Multiprotein Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Daniel C.; Monda, Julie K.; Bennett, Eric J.; Harper, J. Wade; Schulman, Brenda A.

    2012-10-25

    Although many eukaryotic proteins are amino (N)-terminally acetylated, structural mechanisms by which N-terminal acetylation mediates protein interactions are largely unknown. Here, we found that N-terminal acetylation of the E2 enzyme, Ubc12, dictates distinctive E3-dependent ligation of the ubiquitin-like protein Nedd8 to Cul1. Structural, biochemical, biophysical, and genetic analyses revealed how complete burial of Ubc12's N-acetyl-methionine in a hydrophobic pocket in the E3, Dcn1, promotes cullin neddylation. The results suggest that the N-terminal acetyl both directs Ubc12's interactions with Dcn1 and prevents repulsion of a charged N terminus. Our data provide a link between acetylation and ubiquitin-like protein conjugation and define a mechanism for N-terminal acetylation-dependent recognition.

  18. Infrared and 13C MAS nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of acetylation of cotton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adebajo, Moses O.; Frost, Ray L.

    2004-01-01

    The acetylation of commercial cotton samples with acetic anhydride without solvents in the presence of about 5% 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) catalyst was followed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and 13C MAS NMR spectroscopy. This preliminary investigation was conducted in an effort to develop hydrophobic, biodegradable, cellulosic materials for subsequent application in oil spill cleanup. The FTIR results provide clear evidence for successful acetylation though the NMR results indicate that the level of acetylation is low. Nevertheless, the overall results indicate that cotton fibres are potential candidates suitable for further development via acetylation into hydrophobic sorbent materials for subsequent oil spill cleanup application. The results also indicate that de-acetylation, the reverse of the equilibrium acetylation reaction, occurred when the acetylation reaction was prolonged beyond 3 h.

  19. [Effect of acetylation and oxidation on some properties of breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis) seed starch].

    PubMed

    Rincón, Alicia Mariela; Bou Rached, Lizet; Aragoza, Luis E; Padilla, Fanny

    2007-09-01

    Starch extracted from seeds of Artocarpus altilis (Breadfruit) was chemically modified by acetylation and oxidation, and its functional properties were evaluated and compared with these of native starch. Analysis of the chemical composition showed that moisture content was higher for modified starches. Ash, protein, crude fiber and amylose contents were reduced by the modifications, but did not alter the native starch granules' irregularity, oval shape and smooth surface. Acetylation produced changes in water absorption, swelling power and soluble solids, these values were higher for acetylated starch, while values for native and oxidized starches were similar. Both modifications reduced pasting temperature; oxidation reduced maximum peak viscosity but it was increased by acetylation. Hot paste viscosity was reduced by both modifications, whereas cold paste viscosity was lower in the oxidized starch and higher in the acetylated starch. Breakdown was increased by acetylation and reduced with oxidation. Setback value was reduced after acetylation, indicating it could minimize retrogradation of the starch.

  20. Acetyl-L-carnitine improves aged brain function.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Satoru; Iwamoto, Machiko; Kon, Kazuo; Waki, Hatsue; Ando, Susumu; Tanaka, Yasukazu

    2010-07-01

    The effects of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR), an acetyl derivative of L-carnitine, on memory and learning capacity and on brain synaptic functions of aged rats were examined. Male Fischer 344 rats were given ALCAR (100 mg/kg bodyweight) per os for 3 months and were subjected to the Hebb-Williams tasks and AKON-1 task to assess their learning capacity. Cholinergic activities were determined with synaptosomes isolated from brain cortices of the rats. Choline parameters, the high-affinity choline uptake, acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis and depolarization-evoked ACh release were all enhanced in the ALCAR group. An increment of depolarization-induced calcium ion influx into synaptosomes was also evident in rats given ALCAR. Electrophysiological studies using hippocampus slices indicated that the excitatory postsynaptic potential slope and population spike size were both increased in ALCAR-treated rats. These results indicate that ALCAR increases synaptic neurotransmission in the brain and consequently improves learning capacity in aging rats.

  1. Structures of aminoacylase 3 in complex with acetylated substrates

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Jennifer M.; Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Sawaya, Michael R.; Magilnick, Nathaniel; Abuladze, Natalia; Kurtz, Ira; Abramson, Jeff; Pushkin, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is one of the most widespread environmental contaminants, which is metabolized to N-acetyl-S-1,2-dichlorovinyl-l-cysteine (NA-DCVC) before being excreted in the urine. Alternatively, NA-DCVC can be deacetylated by aminoacylase 3 (AA3), an enzyme that is highly expressed in the kidney, liver, and brain. NA-DCVC deacetylation initiates the transformation into toxic products that ultimately causes acute renal failure. AA3 inhibition is therefore a target of interest to prevent TCE induced nephrotoxicity. Here we report the crystal structure of recombinant mouse AA3 (mAA3) in the presence of its acetate byproduct and two substrates: Nα-acetyl-l-tyrosine and NA-DCVC. These structures, in conjunction with biochemical data, indicated that AA3 mediates substrate specificity through van der Waals interactions providing a dynamic interaction interface, which facilitates a diverse range of substrates. PMID:20921362

  2. Structures of aminoacylase 3 in complex with acetylated substrates.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Jennifer M; Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Sawaya, Michael R; Magilnick, Nathaniel; Abuladze, Natalia; Kurtz, Ira; Abramson, Jeff; Pushkin, Alexander

    2010-10-19

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is one of the most widespread environmental contaminants, which is metabolized to N-acetyl-S-1,2-dichlorovinyl-L-cysteine (NA-DCVC) before being excreted in the urine. Alternatively, NA-DCVC can be deacetylated by aminoacylase 3 (AA3), an enzyme that is highly expressed in the kidney, liver, and brain. NA-DCVC deacetylation initiates the transformation into toxic products that ultimately causes acute renal failure. AA3 inhibition is therefore a target of interest to prevent TCE induced nephrotoxicity. Here we report the crystal structure of recombinant mouse AA3 (mAA3) in the presence of its acetate byproduct and two substrates: N(α)-acetyl-L-tyrosine and NA-DCVC. These structures, in conjunction with biochemical data, indicated that AA3 mediates substrate specificity through van der Waals interactions providing a dynamic interaction interface, which facilitates a diverse range of substrates.

  3. Acetylated tubulin is essential for touch sensation in mice.

    PubMed

    Morley, Shane J; Qi, Yanmei; Iovino, Loredana; Andolfi, Laura; Guo, Da; Kalebic, Nereo; Castaldi, Laura; Tischer, Christian; Portulano, Carla; Bolasco, Giulia; Shirlekar, Kalyanee; Fusco, Claudia M; Asaro, Antonino; Fermani, Federica; Sundukova, Mayya; Matti, Ulf; Reymond, Luc; De Ninno, Adele; Businaro, Luca; Johnsson, Kai; Lazzarino, Marco; Ries, Jonas; Schwab, Yannick; Hu, Jing; Heppenstall, Paul A

    2016-12-13

    At its most fundamental level, touch sensation requires the translation of mechanical energy into mechanosensitive ion channel opening, thereby generating electro-chemical signals. Our understanding of this process, especially how the cytoskeleton influences it, remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that mice lacking the α-tubulin acetyltransferase Atat1 in sensory neurons display profound deficits in their ability to detect mechanical stimuli. We show that all cutaneous afferent subtypes, including nociceptors have strongly reduced mechanosensitivity upon Atat1 deletion, and that consequently, mice are largely insensitive to mechanical touch and pain. We establish that this broad loss of mechanosensitivity is dependent upon the acetyltransferase activity of Atat1, which when absent leads to a decrease in cellular elasticity. By mimicking α-tubulin acetylation genetically, we show both cellular rigidity and mechanosensitivity can be restored in Atat1 deficient sensory neurons. Hence, our results indicate that by influencing cellular stiffness, α-tubulin acetylation sets the force required for touch.

  4. The p53-SET Interplays Reveal A New Mode of Acetylation-dependent Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lasso, Gorka; Jiang, Le; Leng, Wenchuan; Zhu, Wei-Guo; Qin, Jun; Honig, Barry; Gu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Summary Although lysine acetylation is now recognized as a general protein modification for both histones and non-histone proteins1-3, the mechanisms of acetylation mediated actions are not completely understood. Acetylation of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of p53 was the first example for non-histone protein acetylation4. Yet the precise role of the CTD acetylation remains elusive. Lysine acetylation often creates binding sites for bromodomain-containing “reader” proteins5,6; surprisingly, in a proteomic screen, we identified SET as a major cellular factor whose binding with p53 is totally dependent on the CTD acetylation status. SET profoundly inhibits p53 transcriptional activity in unstressed cells but SET-mediated repression is completely abolished by stress-induced p53 CTD acetylation. Moreover, loss of the interaction with SET activates p53, resulting in tumor regression in mouse xenograft models. Notably, the acidic domain of SET acts as a “reader” for unacetylated CTD of p53 and this mechanism of acetylation-dependent regulation is widespread in nature. For example, p53 acetylation also modulates its interactions with similar acidic domains found in other p53 regulators including VPRBP, DAXX and PELP1 (refs. 7-9), and computational analysis of the proteome identified numerous proteins with the potential to serve as the acidic domain readers and lysine-rich ligands. Unlike bromodomain readers, which preferentially bind the acetylated forms of their cognate ligands, the acidic domain readers specifically recognize the unacetylated forms of their ligands. Finally, the acetylation-dependent regulation of p53 was further validated in vivo by using a knockin mouse model expressing an acetylation-mimicking form of p53. These results reveal that the acidic domain-containing factors act as a new class of acetylation-dependent regulators by targeting p53 and potentially, beyond. PMID:27626385

  5. Acetyl-coenzyme A deacylase activity in liver is not an artifact. Subcellular distribution and substrate specificity of acetyl-coenzyme A deacylase activities in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Grigat, Klaus-P.; Koppe, Klaus; Seufert, Claus-D.; Söling, Hans-D

    1979-01-01

    Whole liver and isolated liver mitochondria are able to release free acetate, especially under conditions of increased fatty acid oxidation. In the present paper it is shown that rat liver contains acetyl-CoA deacylase (EC 3.1.2.1) activity (0.72μmol/min per g wet wt. of liver at 30°C and 0.5mm-acetyl-CoA). At 0.5mm-acetyl-CoA 73% of total enzyme activity was found in the mitochondria, 8% in the lysosomal fraction and 19% in the postmicrosomal supernatant. Mitochondrial subfractionation shows that mitochondrial acetyl-CoA deacylase activity is restricted to the matrix space. Mitochondrial acetyl-CoA deacylase showed almost no activity with either butyryl- or hexanoyl-CoA. Acetyl-CoA hydrolase activity from purified rat liver lysosomes exhibited a very low affinity for acetyl-CoA (apparent Km>15mm compared with an apparent Km value of 0.5mm for the mitochondrial enzyme) and reacted at about the same rate with acetyl-, n-butyryl- and hexanoyl-CoA. We could not confirm the findings of Costa & Snoswell [(1975) Biochem. J. 152, 167–172] according to which mitochondrial acetyl-CoA deacylase was considered to be an artifact resulting from the combined actions of acetyl-CoA–l-carnitine acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.7) and acetylcarnitine hydrolase. The results are in line with the concept that free acetate released by the liver under physiological conditions stems from the intramitochondrial deacylation of acetyl-CoA. PMID:34392

  6. N-Acetyl-4-aminophenol (paracetamol), N-acetyl-2-aminophenol and acetanilide in urine samples from the general population, individuals exposed to aniline and paracetamol users.

    PubMed

    Dierkes, Georg; Weiss, Tobias; Modick, Hendrik; Käfferlein, Heiko Udo; Brüning, Thomas; Koch, Holger M

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest associations between the use of N-acetyl-4-aminophenol (paracetamol) during pregnancy and increased risks of reproductive disorders in the male offspring. Previously we have reported a ubiquitous urinary excretion of N-acetyl-4-aminophenol in the general population. Possible sources are (1) direct intake of paracetamol through medication, (2) paracetamol residues in the food chain and (3) environmental exposure to aniline or related substances that are metabolized into N-acetyl-4-aminophenol. In order to elucidate the origins of the excretion of N-acetyl-4-aminophenol in urine and to contribute to the understanding of paracetamol and aniline metabolism in humans we developed a rapid, turbulent-flow HPLC-MS/MS method with isotope dilution for the simultaneous quantification of N-acetyl-4-aminophenol and two other aniline related metabolites, N-acetyl-2-aminophenol and acetanilide. We applied this method to three sets of urine samples: (1) individuals with no known exposure to aniline and also no recent paracetamol medication; (2) individuals after occupational exposure to aniline but no paracetamol medication and (3) paracetamol users. We confirmed the omnipresent excretion of N-acetyl-4-aminophenol. Additionally we revealed an omnipresent excretion of N-acetyl-2-aminophenol. In contrast, acetanilide was only found after occupational exposure to aniline, not in the general population or after paracetamol use. The results lead to four preliminary conclusions: (1) other sources than aniline seem to be responsible for the major part of urinary N-acetyl-4-aminophenol in the general population; (2) acetanilide is a metabolite of aniline in man and a valuable biomarker for aniline in occupational settings; (3) aniline baseline levels in the general population measured after chemical hydrolysis do not seem to originate from acetanilide and hence not from a direct exposure to aniline itself and (4) N-acetyl-2-aminophenol does not seem to be

  7. Tomatidine, a tomato sapogenol, ameliorates hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice by inhibiting acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyl-transferase (ACAT).

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yukio; Kiyota, Naoko; Tsurushima, Keiichiro; Yoshitomi, Makiko; Horlad, Hasita; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Nohara, Toshihiro; Takeya, Motohiro; Nagai, Ryoji

    2012-03-14

    It was previously revealed that esculeoside A, a new glycoalkaloid, and esculeogenin A, a new aglycon of esculeoside A, contained in ripe tomato ameliorate atherosclerosis in apoE-deficent mice. This study examined whether tomatidine, the aglycone of tomatine, which is a major tomato glycoalkaloid, also shows similar inhibitory effects on cholesterol ester (CE) accumulation in human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM) and atherogenesis in apoE-deficient mice. Tomatidine significantly inhibited the CE accumulation induced by acetylated LDL in HMDM in a dose-dependent manner. Tomatidine also inhibited CE formation in Chinese hamster ovary cells overexpressing acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyl-transferase (ACAT)-1 or ACAT-2, suggesting that tomatidine suppresses both ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 activities. Furthermore, the oral administration of tomatidine to apoE-deficient mice significantly reduced levels of serum cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and areas of atherosclerotic lesions. The study provides the first evidence that tomatidine significantly suppresses the activity of ACAT and leads to reduction of atherogenesis.

  8. Glyceryl trinitrate metabolism in the quail embryo by the glutathione S-transferases leads to a perturbation in redox status and embryotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bardai, Ghalib K; Hales, Barbara F; Sunahara, Geoffrey I

    2013-07-01

    Exposure of stage 9 quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) embryos to glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) induces malformations that were associated in previous studies with an increase in protein nitration. Increased nitration suggests metabolism of GTN by the embryo. The goals of this study were to characterize the enzymes and co-factors required for GTN metabolism by quail embryos, and to determine the effects of in ovo treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), a precursor of glutathione (GSH), on GTN embryotoxicity. GTN treatment of quail embryos resulted in an increase in nitrite, a decrease in total GSH, and an increase in the ratio of NADP(+)/NADPH, indicating that redox balance may be compromised in exposed embryos. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs; EC 2.5.1.18) purified from the whole embryo (K(m) 0.84 mM; V(max) 36 μM/min) and the embryonic eye (K(m) 0.20 mM; V(max) 30 μM/min) had GTN-metabolizing activity (1436 and 34 nmol/min/mg, respectively); the addition of ethacrynic acid, an inhibitor of GST activity, decreased GTN metabolism. Peptide sequencing of the GST isozymes indicated that alpha- or mu-type GSTs in the embryo and embryonic eye had GTN metabolizing activity. NAC co-treatment partially protected against the effects of GTN exposure. Thus, GTN denitration by quail embryo GSTs may represent a key initial step in the developmental toxicity of GTN.

  9. DNA demethylation and histone H3K9 acetylation determine the active transcription of the NKG2D gene in human CD8+ T and NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Alba; Baragaño Raneros, Aroa; Carvajal Palao, Reyes; Sanz, Ana B.; Ortiz, Alberto; Ortega, Francisco; Suárez-Álvarez, Beatriz; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The human activating receptor NKG2D is mainly expressed by NK, NKT, γδ T and CD8+ T cells and, under certain conditions, by CD4+ T cells. This receptor recognizes a diverse family of ligands (MICA, MICB and ULBPs 1–6) leading to the activation of effector cells and triggering the lysis of target cells. The NKG2D receptor-ligand system plays an important role in the immune response to infections, tumors, transplanted graft and autoantigens. Elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms of NKG2D is therefore essential for therapeutic purposes. In this study, we speculate whether epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and histone acetylation, participate in NKG2D gene regulation in T lymphocytes and NK cells. DNA methylation in the NKG2D gene was observed in CD4+ T lymphocytes and T cell lines (Jurkat and HUT78), while this gene was unmethylated in NKG2D-positive cells (CD8+ T lymphocytes, NK cells and NKL cell line) and associated with high levels of histone H3 lysine 9 acetylation (H3K9Ac). Treatment with the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitor curcumin reduces H3K9Ac levels in the NKG2D gene, downregulates NKG2D transcription and leads to a marked reduction in the lytic capacity of NKG2D-mediated NKL cells. These findings suggest that differential NKG2D expression in the different cell subsets is regulated by epigenetic mechanisms and that its modulation by epigenetic treatments might provide a new strategy for treating several pathologies. PMID:23235109

  10. Acetylation modification regulates GRP78 secretion in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zongwei; Zhuang, Ming; Zhang, Lichao; Zheng, Xingnan; Yang, Peng; Li, Zhuoyu

    2016-01-01

    High glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) expression contributes to the acquisition of a wide range of phenotypic cancer hallmarks, and the pleiotropic oncogenic functions of GRP78 may result from its diverse subcellular distribution. Interestingly, GRP78 has been reported to be secreted from solid tumour cells, participating in cell-cell communication in the tumour microenvironment. However, the mechanism underlying this secretion remains elusive. Here, we report that GRP78 is secreted from colon cancer cells via exosomes. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors blocked GRP78 release by inducing its aggregation in the ER. Mechanistically, HDAC inhibitor treatment suppressed HDAC6 activity and led to increased GRP78 acetylation; acetylated GRP78 then bound to VPS34, a class III phosphoinositide-3 kinase, consequently preventing the sorting of GRP78 into multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Of note, we found that mimicking GRP78 acetylation by substituting the lysine at residue 633, one of the deacetylated sites of HDAC6, with a glutamine resulted in decreased GRP78 secretion and impaired tumour cell growth in vitro. Our study thus reveals a hitherto-unknown mechanism of GRP78 secretion and may also provide implications for the therapeutic use of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:27460191

  11. Selected properties of acetylated adipate of retrograded starch.

    PubMed

    Zięba, T; Gryszkin, A; Kapelko, M

    2014-01-01

    Native potato starch (NS) and retrograded starch (R - obtained via freezing and defrosting of a starch paste) were used to prepare starch acetates: NS-A and R-A, and then acetylated distarch adipates: NS-ADA and R-ADA. The chemically-modified preparations produced from retrograded starch (R-A; R-ADA) were characterized by a higher degree of esterification compared to the modified preparations produced under the same conditions from native potato starch (NS-A; NS-ADA). Starch resistance to amylolysis was observed to increase (to 30-40 g/100 g) as a result of starch retrogradation and acetylation. Starch cross-linking had a significant impact on the increased viscosity of the paste in the entire course of pasting characteristics and on the increased values of rheological coefficients determined from the equations describing flow curves. The produced preparation of acetylated retrograded starch cross-linked with adipic acid (R-ADA) may be deemed an RS3/4 preparation to be used as a food thickening agent.

  12. Carbon isotope fractionation and the acetyl-CoA pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaser, Martin; Conrad, Ralf

    2010-05-01

    Homoacetogenic bacteria can catalyze the reductive synthesis of acetate from CO2 via the acetyl-CoA pathway. Besides this unifying property homoacetogenic bacteria constitute a metabolically and phylogenetically diverse bacteriological group. Therefore their environmental role is difficult to address. It has been recognized that in methanogenic environments homoacetogenic bacteria contribute to the degradation of organic matter. The natural abundance of 13C may be used to understand the functional impact of homoacetogenic bacteria in the soil environment. To distinguish the acetyl-CoA pathway from other dominant processes, the isotopic composition of acetate and CO2 can be determined and the fractionation factors of the individual processes may be used to discriminate between the dominant pathways. To characterize the fractionation factor associated with the acetyl-CoA pathway the phylogenetic and metabolic diversity needs to be considered. Therefore the fractionation factor of substrate utilization and product formation of different homoacetogens (Acetobacterium woodii, Sporomusa ovata, Thermoanaerobacter kivui, Morella thermoautotrophica) has been studied under pure culture conditions in two defined minimal medium with H2/CO2 as sole source of carbon and energy. It became obvious that the cultivation conditions have a major impact on the obtained fractionation factors.

  13. Getting a Knack for NAC: N-Acetyl-Cysteine.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Randy A; Sansone, Lori A

    2011-01-01

    N-acetyl-cysteine, N-acetylcysteine, N-acetyl cysteine, and N-acetyl-L-cysteine are all designations for the same compound, which is abbreviated as NAC. NAC is a precursor to the amino acid cysteine, which ultimately plays two key metabolic roles. Through its metabolic contribution to glutathione production, cysteine participates in the general antioxidant activities of the body. Through its role as a modulator of the glutamatergic system, cysteine influences the reward-reinforcement pathway. Because of these functions, NAC may exert a therapeutic effect on psychiatric disorders allegedly related to oxidative stress (e.g., schizophrenia, bipolar disorder) as well as psychiatric syndromes characterized by impulsive/compulsive symptoms (e.g., trichotillomania, pathological nail biting, gambling, substance misuse). While the dosages, pharmacological strategies (monotherapy versus augmentation), and long-term risks are not fully evident, NAC appears to be a promising, relatively low-risk intervention. If so, NAC might be an ideal treatment strategy for a variety of psychiatric conditions in both psychiatric and primary care settings.

  14. The GAPS Programme with HARPS-N at TNG. VIII. Observations of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and characterisation of the transiting planetary systems HAT-P-36 and WASP-11/HAT-P-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, L.; Esposito, M.; Covino, E.; Raia, G.; Southworth, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Biazzo, K.; Bonomo, A. S.; Desidera, S.; Lanza, A. F.; Maciejewski, G.; Poretti, E.; Sozzetti, A.; Borsa, F.; Bruni, I.; Ciceri, S.; Claudi, R.; Cosentino, R.; Gratton, R.; Martinez Fiorenzano, A. F.; Lodato, G.; Lorenzi, V.; Marzari, F.; Murabito, S.; Affer, L.; Bignamini, A.; Bedin, L. R.; Boccato, C.; Damasso, M.; Henning, Th.; Maggio, A.; Micela, G.; Molinari, E.; Pagano, I.; Piotto, G.; Rainer, M.; Scandariato, G.; Smareglia, R.; Zanmar Sanchez, R.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Orbital obliquity is thought to be a fundamental parameter in tracing the physical mechanisms that cause the migration of giant planets from the snow line down to roughly 10-2 au from their host stars. We are carrying out a large programme to estimate the spin-orbit alignment of a sample of transiting planetary systems to study what the possible configurations of orbital obliquity are and whether they correlate with other stellar or planetary properties. Aims: We determine the true and the projected obliquity of HAT-P-36 and WASP-11/HAT-P-10 systems, respectively, which are both composed of a relatively cool star (with effective temperature Teff< 6100 K) and a hot-Jupiter planet. Methods: Thanks to the high-resolution spectrograph HARPS-N, we observed the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for both systems by acquiring precise (3-8 m s-1) radial-velocity measurements during planetary transit events. We also present photometric observations comprising six light curves that cover five transit events, which were obtained using three medium-class telescopes. One transit of WASP-11/HAT-P-10 was followed simultaneously from two observatories. The three transit light curves of HAT-P-36 b show anomalies that are attributable to starspot complexes on the surface of the parent star, in agreement with the analysis of its spectra that indicates moderate activity ( log R'HK = -4.65 dex). By analysing the complete HATNet data set of HAT-P-36, we estimated the stellar rotation period by detecting a periodic photometric modulation in the light curve caused by star spots, obtaining Prot = 15.3 ± 0.4 days, which implies that the inclination of the stellar rotational axis with respect to the line of sight is i⋆ = 65° ± 34°. Results: We used the new spectroscopic and photometric data to revise the main physical parameters and measure the sky-projected misalignment angle of the two systems. We found λ = -14° ± 18° for HAT-P-36 and λ = 7° ± 5° for WASP-11/HAT-P-10

  15. KEPLER AND GROUND-BASED TRANSITS OF THE EXO-NEPTUNE HAT-P-11b

    SciTech Connect

    Deming, Drake; Jackson, Brian; Jennings, Donald E.; Sada, Pedro V.; Peterson, Steven W.; Haase, Flynn; Bays, Kevin; Agol, Eric; Knutson, Heather A.

    2011-10-10

    We analyze 26 archival Kepler transits of the exo-Neptune HAT-P-11b, supplemented by ground-based transits observed in the blue (B band) and near-IR (J band). Both the planet and host star are smaller than previously believed; our analysis yields R{sub p} = 4.31 R{sub +} {+-} 0.06 R{sub +} and R{sub s} = 0.683 R{sub sun} {+-} 0.009 R{sub sun}, both about 3{sigma} smaller than the discovery values. Our ground-based transit data at wavelengths bracketing the Kepler bandpass serve to check the wavelength dependence of stellar limb darkening, and the J-band transit provides a precise and independent constraint on the transit duration. Both the limb darkening and transit duration from our ground-based data are consistent with the new Kepler values for the system parameters. Our smaller radius for the planet implies that its gaseous envelope can be less extensive than previously believed, being very similar to the H-He envelope of GJ 436b and Kepler-4b. HAT-P-11 is an active star, and signatures of star spot crossings are ubiquitous in the Kepler transit data. We develop and apply a methodology to correct the planetary radius for the presence of both crossed and uncrossed star spots. Star spot crossings are concentrated at phases -0.002 and +0.006. This is consistent with inferences from Rossiter-McLaughlin measurements that the planet transits nearly perpendicular to the stellar equator. We identify the dominant phases of star spot crossings with active latitudes on the star, and infer that the stellar rotational pole is inclined at about 12{sup 0} {+-} 5{sup 0} to the plane of the sky. We point out that precise transit measurements over long durations could in principle allow us to construct a stellar Butterfly diagram to probe the cyclic evolution of magnetic activity on this active K-dwarf star.

  16. Structure of the Hat Creek graben region: Implications for the structure of the Hat Creek graben and transfer of right-lateral shear from the Walker Lane north of Lassen Peak, northern California, from gravity and magnetic anomalies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, Victoria; Jachens, Robert C.; Clynne, Michael A.; Muffler, L. J. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation of magnetic and new gravity data provides constraints on the geometry of the Hat Creek Fault, the amount of right-lateral offset in the area between Mt. Shasta and Lassen Peak, and confirmation of the influence of pre-existing structure on Quaternary faulting. Neogene volcanic rocks coincide with short-wavelength magnetic anomalies of both normal and reversed polarity, whereas a markedly smoother magnetic field occurs over the Klamath Mountains and its Paleogene cover. Although the magnetic field over the Neogene volcanic rocks is complex, the Hat Creek Fault, which is one of the most prominent normal faults in the region and forms the eastern margin of the Hat Creek Valley, is marked by the eastern edge of a north-trending magnetic and gravity high 20-30 km long. Modeling of these anomalies indicates that the fault is a steeply dipping (~75-85°) structure. The spatial relationship of the fault as modeled by the potential-field data, the youngest strand of the fault, and relocated seismicity suggests that deformation continues to step westward across the valley, consistent with a component of right-lateral slip in an extensional environment. Filtered aeromagnetic data highlight a concealed magnetic body of Mesozoic or older age north of Hat Creek Valley. The body’s northwest margin strikes northeast and is linear over a distance of ~40 km. Within the resolution of the aeromagnetic data (1-2 km), we discern no right-lateral offset of this body. Furthermore, Quaternary faults change strike or appear to end, as if to avoid this concealed magnetic body and to pass along its southeast edge, suggesting that pre-existing crustal structure influenced younger faulting, as previously proposed based on gravity data.

  17. Separation of glutathione transferase subunits from Proteus vulgaris by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Giaming; Chien, Yi-Chih; Chien, Cheng-I

    2003-10-01

    Cytosolic glutathione transferases of Proteus vulgaris were purified by affinity chromatography and characterized by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Four different subunits were identified, and each subunit contained a different molecular mass, ranging from 26.2 kDa to 28.5 kDa; a different pI value, ranging from 8.2 to 9.4; and a different amount of protein fraction, ranging from 10% to 56%. All four subunits existed as basic proteins (pI > 7.0). From these results, we concluded that multiple forms of glutathione transferase enzymes existed in Proteus vulgaris, and four different glutathione transferase subunits were separated by 2-D gel electrophoresis.

  18. Design and evaluation of a foam-filled hat-stiffened panel concept for aircraft primary structural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.

    1995-01-01

    A structurally efficient hat-stiffened panel concept that utilizes a structural foam as stiffener core has been designed for aircraft primary structural applications. This stiffener concept utilizes a manufacturing process that can be adapted readily to grid-stiffened structural configurations which possess inherent damage tolerance characteristics due to their multiplicity of load paths. The foam-filled hat-stiffener concept in a prismatically stiffened panel configuration is more efficient than most other stiffened panel configurations in a load range that is typical for both fuselage and wing structures. The prismatically stiffened panel concept investigated here has been designed using AS4/3502 preimpregnated tape and Rohacell foam core and evaluated for its buckling and postbuckling behavior with and without low-speed impact damage. The results from single-stiffener and multi-stiffener specimens suggest that this structural concept responds to loading as anticipated and has good damage tolerance characteristics.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Transits of HAT-P-16 and WASP-21 (Ciceri+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciceri, S.; Mancini, L.; Southworth, J.; Nikolov, N.; Bozza, V.; Bruni, I.; Calchi Novati, S.; D'Ago, G.; Henning, T.

    2013-07-01

    For both planetary systems, we observed one transit event simultaneously with two telescopes (Figs. 1 and 2). These observations were carried out between September and October 2012 with the 1.52m Cassini telescope from the Loiano observatory and with the 1.23m Calar Alto telescope. An additional transit of HAT-P-16 was observed on October 29th 2010 from Loiano during the PLAN microlensing campaign towards M31 (Calchi Novati et al. 2009ApJ...695..442N, 2010ApJ...717..987C). Another transit of HAT-P-16 was observed in Calar Alto on August 22th 2011. In total we present six new light curves, five of them being from defocussed 1.2-1.5m telescopes (see table 1). File contain the data used to plot the lightcurves in Fig. 3 and 4 in the paper. (7 data files).

  20. A Damage Tolerance Comparison of Composite Hat-Stiffened and Honeycomb Sandwich Structure for Launch Vehicle Interstage Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a direct comparison of the compression-after-impact (CAI) strength of impact-damaged, hat-stiffened and honeycomb sandwich structure for launch vehicle use was made. The specimens used consisted of small substructure designed to carry a line load of approx..3,000 lb/in. Damage was inflicted upon the specimens via drop weight impact. Infrared thermography was used to examine the extent of planar damage in the specimens. The specimens were prepared for compression testing to obtain residual compression strength versus damage severity curves. Results show that when weight of the structure is factored in, both types of structure had about the same CAI strength for a given damage level. The main difference was that the hat-stiffened specimens exhibited a multiphase failure whereas the honeycomb sandwich structure failed catastrophically.